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Sample records for fuca ridge northeast

  1. On subinertial oscillations trapped by the Juan de Fuca Ridge, northeast Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavelle, J. W.; Cannon, G. A.

    2001-12-01

    Spectra of currents measured along the 2100 m deep Juan de Fuca Ridge in the northeast Pacific have prominent tidal, inertial, and weather-band (3-7 day period) spectral peaks. The weather-band peak, in particular, has a number of interesting features. It is strongest in close lateral proximity to the ridge and strongest near ridge depth; intensification near the ridge is characteristic of trapped motion. Spectral peak intensities vary seasonally, with largest amplitudes occurring in autumn and winter; seasonal variation suggests that surface weather is forcing flow at depth. Together, trapping and seasonality indicate opportunistic amplification of oscillatory motion at the ridge. At all frequencies, forcing, topography, and stratification together shape current and hydrographic distributions near the ridge. Effects of those interactions for subinertial motion are quantified here using a primitive equation numerical model. Forcing period (1-10 days) and friction are the principal dependencies examined. Results show that flow over the Juan de Fuca Ridge can be amplified by factors of 3-4 for diurnal and up to a factor of 7 for weather-band frequencies. Amplification is ridge trapped, with effects extending many hundreds of meters upward and extending 5-10 km laterally for 5-day-period flow; the strength and area of amplification increase with increasing period over the 1- to 10-day-period band. Oscillatory weather-band flow leads to vertical velocities on the order of 0.3 cm s-1 on ridge flanks, which in turn cause periodic temperature (T) and salinity (S) variations with amplitudes of as much as 0.05°C and 0.01 practical salinity units, respectively. The vertical motion and consequent vertical displacement (>100 m) lead to isotherms that plunge below the crest alternately each side of the ridge, a distribution observed in conductivity-temperature-depth transect data. Near the ridge crest, cross-ridge baroclinic pressure gradients caused by cyclically plunging

  2. Hydrothermal fluid effects on sediment column in Middle Valley, Juan de Fuca Ridge (northeast Pacific)

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Aasm, I.S.; Blaise, B.

    1987-05-01

    Core PAR 85-34, located near a high heat flow area in Middle Valley, northern Juan de Fuca Ridge, contains carbonate nodules of various sizes (less than or equal to 1-5 cm in length). Sedimentological, geochemical, and isotopic results allow us to understand the origin of these concretions and the effects of hydrothermal activity from nearby sulfide vents on the sediment column. The mineralogy of the olive-gray surface sediment (0-15 cm) is identical to unaffected hemipelagic sediments in the region except for a concentration of barite crystals (up to 1 cm) at the water-sediment interface. In the clay, mud fraction, and bulk sediment, the FeO, S, Ba, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn and As are more enriched than in normal hemipelagic sediment in the area due to hydrothermal activity. Petrographic and SEM analysis of the nodules reveal iron calcite and barite minerals in cracks and on the outside part of the nodules with mineralogical and textural variations downcore. Stable isotope curves of these nodules appear to demonstrate the effects of both bacterial sulfate reduction and microbiological methane generation, with consequent extreme /sup 13/C-depletion in the precipitated carbonate. The curves also demonstrate that the hydrothermal fluid entering the system may have caused the negative shift in oxygen isotopes downcore, although this effect may have been of cyclic or episodic nature.

  3. Mixing of magmas from enriched and depleted mantle sources in the northeast Pacific: West Valley segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousens, Brian L.; Allan, James F.; Leybourne, Matthew I.; Chase, R. L.; van Wagoner, Nancy

    1995-07-01

    The 50 km-long West Valley segment of the northern Juan de Fuca Ridge is a young, extension-dominated spreading centre, with volcanic activity concentrated in its southern half. A suite of basalts dredged from the West Valley floor, the adjacent Heck Seamount chain, and a small near-axis cone here named Southwest Seamount, includes a spectrum of geochemical compositions ranging from highly depleted normal (N-) MORB to enriched (E-) MORB. Heck Seamount lavas have chondrite-normalized La/Smcn˜0.3, 87Sr/86Sr = 0.70235 0.70242, and 206Pb/204Pb = 18.22 18.44, requiring a source which is highly depleted in trace elements both at the time of melt generation and over geologic time. The E-MORB from Southwest Seamount have La/Smcn˜1.8, 87Sr/86Sr = 0.70245 0.70260, and 206Pb/204Pb = 18.73 19.15, indicating a more enriched source. Basalts from the West Valley floor have chemical compositions intermediate between these two end-members. As a group, West Valley basalts from a two-component mixing array in element-element and element-isotope plots which is best explained by magma mixing. Evidence for crustal-level magma mixing in some basalts includes mineral-melt chemical and isotopic disequilibrium, but mixing of melts at depth (within the mantle) may also occur. The mantle beneath the northern Juan de Fuca Ridge is modelled as a plum-pudding, with “plums” of enriched, amphibole-bearing peridotite floating in a depleted matrix (DM). Low degrees of melting preferentially melt the “plums”, initially removing only the amphibole component and producing alkaline to transitional E-MORB. Higher degrees of melting tap both the “plums” and the depleted matrix to yield N-MORB. The subtly different isotopic compositions of the E-MORBs compared to the N-MORBs require that any enriched component in the upper mantle was derived from a depleted source. If the enriched component crystallized from fluids with a DM source, the “plums” could evolve to their more evolved isotopic

  4. Fin whale tracks recorded by a seismic network on the Juan de Fuca Ridge, Northeast Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Soule, Dax C; Wilcock, William S D

    2013-03-01

    Fin whale calls recorded from 2003 to 2004 by a seafloor seismic network on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge were analyzed to determine tracks and calling patterns. Over 150 tracks were obtained with a total duration of ~800 h and swimming speeds from 1 to 12 km/h. The dominant inter-pulse interval (IPI) is 24 s and the IPI patterns define 4 categories: a 25 s single IPI and 24/30 s dual IPI produced by single calling whales, a 24/13 s dual IPI interpreted as two calling whales, and an irregular IPI interpreted as groups of calling whales. There are also tracks in which the IPI switches between categories. Call rates vary seasonally with all the tracks between August and April. From August to October tracks are dominated by the irregular IPI and are predominantly headed to the northwest, suggesting that a portion of the fin whale population does not migrate south in the fall. The other IPI categories occur primarily from November to March. These tracks have slower swimming speeds, tend to meander, and are predominantly to the south. The distribution of fin whales around the network is non-random with more calls near the network and to the east and north.

  5. Characteristics of hydrothermal plumes from two vent fields on the Juan de Fuca Ridge, northeast Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Edward T.; Massoth, Gary J.

    1987-09-01

    Deep CTD/transmissometer tows and water bottle sampling were used during 1985 to map the regional distribution of the neutrally-buoyant plumes emanating from each of two major vent fields on the Southern Symmetrical Segment (SSS) and Endeavour Segment (ES) of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. At both vent fields, emissions from point and diffuse hydrothermal sources coalesced into a single 200-m-thick plume elongated in the direction of current flow and with characteristic temperature anomalies of 0.02-0.05°C and light-attenuation anomalies of 0.01-0.08 m -1 (10-80 μg/l above background). Temperature anomalies in the core of each plume were uniform as far downcurrent as the plumes were mapped (10-15 km). Downcurrent light-attenuation trends were non-uniform and differed between plumes, apparently because different vent fluid chemistries at each field cause significant differences in the settling characteristics of the hydrothermal precipitates. Vent fluids from the SSS are metal-dominated and mostly precipitate very fine-grained hydrous Fe-oxides that remain suspended in the plume. Vent fluids from the ES are sulfur-dominated and precipitate a high proportion of coarser-grained Fe-sulfides that rapidly settle from the plume. The integrated flux of each vent field was estimated from measurements of the advective transport of each plume. Heat flux was 1700 ± 1100 MW from the ES and 580 ± 351 MW from the SSS. Particle flux varied from 546 ± 312 g/s to 204 ± 116 g/s at the ES depending on distance from the vent field, and was 92 ± 48 g/s from the SSS.

  6. Pb, Sr, and Nd isotopes in seamount basalts from the Juan de Fuca Ridge and Kodiak-Bowie seamount chain, northeast Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hegner, E.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1989-01-01

    Pb, Sr, and Nd isotopic ratios and their parent/daughter element concentrations for 28 basalts from 10 hotspot and nonhotspot seamounts are reported. Nd and Sr isotopic compositions (143Nd/144Nd = 0.51325-0.51304; 87Sr/86Sr = 0.70237-0.70275) plot in the envelope for Juan de Fuca-Gorda ridge basalts with tholeiitic basalts showing more depleted sources and a better negative correlation than transitional to alkalic basalts. Pb isotopic ratios in tholeiitic and alkalic basalts overlap (206Pb/204Pb = 18.29-19.44) and display a trend toward more radiogenic Pb in alkalic basalts. The isotopic data for hotspot and nonhotspot basalts are indistinguishable and correlate broadly with rock composition, implying that they are controlled by partial melting. The isotopic variation in the seamount basalts is about 60% (Nd-Sr) to 100% (Pb) of that in East Pacific Rise basalts and is interpreted as a lower limit for the magnitude of mantle heterogeneity in the northeast Pacific. The data indicate absence of a chemically distinct plume component in the linear seamount chains and strongly suggest an origin from mid-ocean ridge basalt-like east Pacific mantle. -Authors

  7. Ultrastructure and potential sub-seafloor evidence of bacteriogenic iron oxides from Axial Volcano, Juan de Fuca Ridge, north-east Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, C B; Scott, S D; Ferris, F G

    2003-03-01

    Iron oxides from the caldera of Axial Volcano, a site of hydrothermal vent activity along the Juan de Fuca Ridge, were found to consist predominantly of microbial structures in hydrated whole mounts examined using an environmental scanning electron microscope. Novel observations were made of the iron oxides revealing the spatial relationships of the bacteria within to be more consistent with microbial mats than mineral precipitates. The bacterial structures are attributed to the sheaths of Leptothrix ochracea, the stalks of Gallionella ferruginea, and the filaments of a novel iron oxidizing PV-1 strain, based on the distinctive morphological characteristics of these three bacteria. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed the presence and distribution of Fe, Si, and Cl on the bacterial sheaths, stalks and filaments. The iron oxides were identified by X-ray diffraction to be two-line ferrihydrite, a poorly ordered iron oxyhydroxide. Adsorption of Si in particular to two-line ferrihydrite likely contributes to its stability on the seafloor, and might also be a preservation mechanism creating microfossils of the bacterial structures encrusted with ferrihydrite. Presumptive evidence of the sub-seafloor presence of L. ochracea, G. ferruginea and PV-1 at Axial Volcano was obtained from the presence of these bacteria on a trap that had been placed within an active vent, and also in a vent fluid sample. If indeed these bacteria are present in the sub-seafloor, it may be an indication that the surface expression of iron oxide deposits at Axial Volcano is minimal in comparison to what exists beneath the seafloor.

  8. Water column hydrothermal plumes on the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Lupton, J.E. )

    1990-08-10

    Hydrographic surveys on the Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdFR) carried out from 1980 to 1987 show a complex pattern of {sup 3}He and Mn-rich water column plumes produced by venting from several submarine hot spring areas. In the vicinity of Axial Volcano at latitude 46{degree}N, distinct plumes were detected in 1980, 1982, and 1983 with {sup 3}He signatures up to {delta}({sup 3}He) = 64% at {approximately} 1,500 m depth at distances of {approximately} 10 km from the seamount summit. However, the same plumes had no detectable thermal signature, a paradox which is attributed to the high {sup 3}He/heat ratios and low salinities of the fluids venting within the caldera of Axial Volcano. Profiles directly over the seamount show hydrothermal {sup 3}He in the water column up to 300 m above the caldera floor, with the {sup 3}He signal increasing with depth to very high and uniform ratios of {delta}({sup 3}He) = 108-150% below the {approximately} 1,500-m caldera sill depth. Another apparent locus of hydrothermal input is Helium Basin, a depression on the northeast flank of Axial Volcano which had {delta}({sup 3}He) = 51% when first sampled in 1980. However, subsequent hydrocasts into Helium Basin in 1982 and 1983 yielded lower helium enrichments, suggesting either a decrease in hydrothermal input or flushing of the basin via a mixing event. To the south of Axial Volcano, high {delta}({sup 3}He) values of {approximately} 40% observed over the ridge axis at 45{degree}18{prime}N and 45{degree}39{prime}N indicate venting on this previously unexplored section of the ridge. The water column plumes over the US Geological Survey vent site at {approximately} 44{degree}40{prime}N on the southern JdFR have very high Mn/{sup 3}He ratios of 4,600 mol/cm{sup 3}, an apparently unique characteristic which can be used to distinguish these plumes from those originating at other JdFR vent fields.

  9. Divergent Ridge Features on the Juan de Fuca and Gorda Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, M. E.; Sautter, L.; Steele, M.

    2014-12-01

    Multibeam data collected using a Kongsberg EM122 sonar system on the NOAA ship R/V Marcus G. Langseth led by chief scientist Douglas Toomey (University of Oregon) in 2009 and with a Simrad EM302 sonar system on two NOAA ship Okeanos Explorer cruises led by chief scientists James Gardner (University of New Hampshire) and Catalina Martinez (University of Rhode Island) in 2009 show the morphology of the Juan de Fuca and Gorda Ridges, as well as the Blanco and Mendocino Fracture Zones. These ridges and fracture zones comprise the divergent plate boundary of the eastern edge of the Pacific Plate and the western edges of the Juan de Fuca and Gorda Plates. Both plates are being subducted beneath the western edge of the North American Plate. CARIS HIPS 8.1 software was used to process the multibeam data and create bathymetric images. The ridge axes, located off the coast of Washington and Oregon (USA) adjacent to the Cascadia Basin, indicate obvious signs of spreading, due to the series of faults and rocky ridges aligned parallel to the plate boundaries. Fault and ridge orientations are used to compare the direction of seafloor spreading, and indicate that both the Juan de Fuca Plate and Gorda Plate are spreading in a southeastern direction. Younger ridges from the Gorda Ridge system mapped in the study run parallel to the boundary, however older ridges do not show the same orientation, indicating a change in spreading direction. The presence of hydrothermal vents along the Juan de Fuca Ridge is also evidence of the active boundary, as the vent chimneys are composed of minerals and metals precipitated from the hot water heated by magma from beneath the spreading seafloor. In this study, the data are used to compare and contrast earthquake seismicity and ridge morphologies at a depth range of approximately 762 to 2134 meters. The diverging Pacific, Juan de Fuca, and Gorda Plates along with the San Andreas Fault have potential to increase seismic and volcanic activity around

  10. Microbial diversity in subseafloor fluids from Explorer Ridge, Northeast Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolton, S.; Huber, J. A.; Embley, R.; Butterfield, D. A.; Baross, J. A.

    2003-12-01

    The Gorda, Juan de Fuca and Explorer Ridges are first order spreading centers located in the northeast Pacific. While the Gorda and Juan de Fuca Ridges have been extensively sampled for chemical and microbiological analyses, what little is known about the Explorer Ridge is from preliminary observations made in the mid-1980's. A cruise in 2002 revisited the area and discovered vigorous hydrothermal activity at Magic Mountain, a site located outside the primary rift valley. Explorer Ridge is an important site to compare with other well-described vent sites on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Our research has focused on describing the phylogenetic and physiological diversity of bacteria and archaea in low temperature hydrothermal fluids in an effort to identify subseafloor indicator organisms and to use the physiological characteristics of these organisms to help constrain subseafloor habitat characteristics. We have previously established that there are microbial taxa that are unique to subseafloor habitats associated with diffuse flow fluids at Axial Seamount and at Endeavour both located on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. These included cultured anaerobic, thermophilic and hyperthermophilic heterotrophs, methanogens and sulfur metabolizers. Moreover, results from molecular phylogeny analyses using the 16S rRNA sequences identified a phylogenetically diverse group of bacteria belonging to the epsilon-proteobacteria. While anaerobic hyperthermophiles were cultured from some diffuse-flow vent sites at Explorer, they were less abundant than at Axial Volcano and Endeavour, and curiously, no methanogens were cultured or detected in 16S rRNA clonal libraries. Like Axial, a diverse group of epsilon-proteobacterial clones were found with many similar to those identified from Axial Seamount and other hydrothermal vent sites, although there appears to be some unique species. The overall bacterial diversity at Explorer appears different than at Axial, possibly linked to temperature or chemical

  11. Hydrothermal circulation within the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, H. Paul; Tivey, Maurice A.; Bjorklund, Tor A.; Salmi, Marie S.

    2010-05-01

    Areas of the seafloor at mid-ocean ridges where hydrothermal vents discharge are easily recognized by the dramatic biological, physical, and chemical processes that characterize such sites. Locations where seawater flows into the seafloor to recharge hydrothermal cells within the crustal reservoir are by contrast almost invisible but can be indirectly identified by a systematic grid of conductive heat flow measurements. An array of conductive heat flow stations in the Endeavour axial valley of the Juan de Fuca Ridge has identified recharge zones that appear to represent a nested system of fluid circulation paths. At the scale of an axial rift valley, conductive heat flow data indicate a general cross-valley fluid flow, where seawater enters the shallow subsurface crustal reservoir at the eastern wall of the Endeavour axial valley and undergoes a kilometer of horizontal transit beneath the valley floor, finally exiting as warm hydrothermal fluid discharge on the western valley bounding wall. Recharge zones also have been identified as located within an annular ring of very cold seafloor around the large Main Endeavour Hydrothermal Field, with seawater inflow occurring within faults that surround the fluid discharge sites. These conductive heat flow data are consistent with previous models where high-temperature fluid circulation cells beneath large hydrothermal vent fields may be composed of narrow vertical cylinders. Subsurface fluid circulation on the Endeavour Segment occurs at various crustal depths in three distinct modes: (1) general east to west flow across the entire valley floor, (2) in narrow cylinders that penetrate deeply to high-temperature heat sources, and (3) supplying low-temperature diffuse vents where seawater is entrained into the shallow uppermost crust by the adjacent high-temperature cylindrical systems. The systematic array of conductive heat flow measurements over the axial valley floor averaged ˜150 mW/m2, suggesting that only about 3% of

  12. Hydrothermal sulfide accumulation along the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, J. W.; Clague, D. A.; Hannington, M. D.

    2014-06-01

    Hydrothermal sulfide deposits that form on the seafloor are often located by the detection of hydrothermal plumes in the water column, followed by exploration with deep-towed cameras, side-scan sonar imaging, and finally by visual surveys using remotely-operated vehicle or occupied submersible. Hydrothermal plume detection, however, is ineffective for finding hydrothermally-inactive sulfide deposits, which may represent a significant amount of the total sulfide accumulation on the seafloor, even in hydrothermally active settings. Here, we present results from recent high-resolution, autonomous underwater vehicle-based mapping of the hydrothermally-active Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, in the Northeast Pacific Ocean. Analysis of the ridge bathymetry resulted in the location of 581 individual sulfide deposits along 24 km of ridge length. Hydrothermal deposits were distinguished from volcanic and tectonic features based on the characteristics of their surface morphology, such as shape and slope angles. Volume calculations for each deposit results in a total volume of 372,500 m3 of hydrothermal sulfide-sulfate-silica material, for an equivalent mass of ∼1.2 Mt of hydrothermal material on the seafloor within the ridge's axial valley, assuming a density of 3.1 g/cm3. Much of this total volume is from previously undocumented inactive deposits outside the main active vent fields. Based on minimum ages of sulfide deposition, the deposits accumulated at a maximum rate of ∼400 t/yr, with a depositional efficiency (proportion of hydrothermal material that accumulates on the seafloor to the total amount hydrothermally mobilized and transported to the seafloor) of ∼5%. The calculated sulfide tonnage represents a four-fold increase over previous sulfide estimates for the Endeavour Segment that were based largely on accumulations from within the active fields. These results suggest that recent global seafloor sulfide resource estimates, which were based mostly

  13. Hydrothermal venting on the Juan de Fuca Ridge over the last 600,000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, K.; McManus, J. F.; Winckler, G.; Huybers, P. J.; Langmuir, C. H.; Giosan, L.; Middleton, J. L.; Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2015-12-01

    Mid-ocean ridges provide a unique chemical, physical, and biological environment on the seafloor. They are a significant source of dissolved Fe, a critical micronutrient in the ocean, and they are a primary source of CO2 from the mantle, Earth's largest carbon reservoir. Although more than a hundred modern hydrothermal systems have been discovered, few records of their variation through geological time have been obtained. Sediments near ocean ridges hold the potential to provide such records, and here we investigate sediments near the Juan de Fuca Ridge through continuous XRF scans coupled with oxygen isotope temporal constraints to explore hydrothermal activity over the past 600,000 years. These are the first records over multiple glacial-interglacial cycles and permit investigation of potential feedbacks between glacial-interglacial climate change and hydrothermal activity. Today, hydrothermal activity on the Juan de Fuca Ridge is characterized by hydrothermal particles with high concentrations of Fe, Cu, and Zn (Feely et. al., 1987). Over longer time scales, Fe concentrations are positively correlated with Ti (r2≥0.75), so that the dominant variability in Fe is due to the input of lithogenic material. Additional Fe inputs from hydrothermal activity increase the Fe/Ti ratio above the lithogenic value of 11.7 wt%/wt%. Intense hydrothermal activity (Fe/Ti > 25 wt%/wt%) is observed on the Juan de Fuca Ridge from ~375-430ka, and less intense but still elevated hydrothermal activity (Fe/Ti > 17 wt%/wt%) recurs at near 100kyr cyclicity, from 80-120ka, 180-220ka, 290-330ka, and 470-520ka. These time periods correspond to times of sea level fall owing to expanding ice volume, supporting a link between sea level changes and ridge crest activity

  14. Earthquake-induced changes in a hydrothermal system on the Juan de Fuca mid-ocean ridge

    PubMed

    Johnson; Hutnak; Dziak; Fox; Urcuyo; Cowen; Nabelek; Fisher

    2000-09-14

    Hydrothermal vents on mid-ocean ridges of the northeast Pacific Ocean are known to respond to seismic disturbances, with observed changes in vent temperature. But these disturbances resulted from submarine volcanic activity; until now, there have been no observations of the response of a vent system to non-magmatic, tectonic events. Here we report measurements of hydrothermal vent temperature from several vents on the Juan de Fuca ridge in June 1999, before, during and after an earthquake swarm of apparent tectonic origin. Vent fluid temperatures began to rise 4-11 days after the first earthquake. Following this initial increase, the vent temperatures oscillated for about a month before settling down to higher values. We also observed a tenfold increase in fluid output from the hydrothermal system over a period of at least 80 days, extending along the entire ridge segment. Such a large, segment-wide thermal response to relatively modest tectonic activity is surprising, and raises questions about the sources of excess heat and fluid, and the possible effect on vent biological communities.

  15. Mantle flow geometry from ridge to trench beneath the Gorda-Juan de Fuca plate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Short, Robert; Allen, Richard M.; Bastow, Ian D.; Totten, Eoghan; Richards, Mark A.

    2015-12-01

    Tectonic plates are underlain by a low-viscosity mantle layer, the asthenosphere. Asthenospheric flow may be induced by the overriding plate or by deeper mantle convection. Shear strain due to this flow can be inferred using the directional dependence of seismic wave speeds--seismic anisotropy. However, isolation of asthenospheric signals is challenging; most seismometers are located on continents, whose complex structure influences the seismic waves en route to the surface. The Cascadia Initiative, an offshore seismometer deployment in the US Pacific Northwest, offers the opportunity to analyse seismic data recorded on simpler oceanic lithosphere. Here we use measurements of seismic anisotropy across the Juan de Fuca and Gorda plates to reconstruct patterns of asthenospheric mantle shear flow from the Juan de Fuca mid-ocean ridge to the Cascadia subduction zone trench. We find that the direction of fastest seismic wave motion rotates with increasing distance from the mid-ocean ridge to become aligned with the direction of motion of the Juan de Fuca Plate, implying that this plate influences mantle flow. In contrast, asthenospheric mantle flow beneath the Gorda Plate does not align with Gorda Plate motion and instead aligns with the neighbouring Pacific Plate motion. These results show that asthenospheric flow beneath the small, slow-moving Gorda Plate is controlled largely by advection due to the much larger, faster-moving Pacific Plate.

  16. No spreading across the southern Juan de Fuca ridge axial cleft during 1994-1996

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chadwell, C.D.; Hildebrand, J.A.; Spiess, Fred N.; Morton, J.L.; Normark, W.R.; Reiss, C.A.

    1999-01-01

    Direct-path acoustic measurements between seafloor transponders observed no significant extension (-10 ?? 14 mm/yr) from August 1994 to September 1996 at the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge (44??40' N and 130??20' W). The acoustic path for the measurement is a 691-m baseline straddling the axial cleft, which bounds the Pacific and Juan de Fuca plates. Given an expected full-spreading rate of 56 mm/yr, these data suggest that extension across this plate boundary occurs episodically within the narrow (~1 km) region of the axial valley floor, and that active deformation is occurring between the axial cleft and the plate interior. A cleft-parallel 714-m baseline located 300 m to the west of the cleft on the Pacific plate monitored system performance and, as expected, observed no motion (+5??7 mm/yr) between the 1994 and 1996 surveys.Direct-path acoustic measurements between seafloor transponders observed no significant extension (-10 ?? 14 mm/yr) from August 1994 to September 1996 at the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge (44??40 minutes N and 130??20 minutes W). The acoustic path for the measurement is a 691-m baseline straddling the axial cleft, which bounds the Pacific and Juan de Fuca plates. Given an expected full-spreading rate of 56 mm/yr, these data suggest that extension across this plate boundary occurs episodically within the narrow (approx. 1 km) region of the axial valley floor, and that active deformation is occurring between the axial cleft and the plate interior. A cleft-parallel 714-m baseline located 300 m to the west of the cleft on the Pacific plate monitored system performance and, as expected, observed no motion (+5 ?? 7 mm/yr) between the 1994 and 1996 surveys.

  17. Pb, Sr, and Nd isotopes in basalts and sulfides from the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Hegner, E.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1987-10-10

    Pb, Sr, Nd isotopes of seven basalt glasses collected by the submersible Alvin from the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge (SJFR) are almost identical (/sup 206/Pb//sup 204/Pbapprox.18.45, /sup 207/Pb//sup 204/Pbapprox.15.47, /sup 208/Pb//sup 204/Pbapprox.37.81, /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Srapprox.0.70249, /sup 143/Nd//sup 144/Ndapprox.0.51315). Whereas all basalts appear cogenetic, four of the samples have uniform abundances of U, Th, Rb, Nd, Sm, Pb, and Sr, indicating that they are also comagmatic. Two basalt glasses dredged previously at the SJFR have similar isotopic compositions but higher concentrations of U, Th, and Pb. The /sup 206/Pb//sup 204/Pb ratios are intermediate between generally less radiogenic ridge basalts from south of the Juan de Fuca Ridge (JFR) and often more radiogenic basalts from the northern JFR and NE Pacific seamounts. Sr and Nd isotopic compositions closely resemble data of other ridge basalts from the northernmost East Pacific Rise and are intermediate between isotopically more diverse seamount basalts produced nearby.

  18. Melt anomalies and propagating ridge offsets: Insights from the East Pacific Rise and Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbotte, S. M.; Marjanovic, M.; Nedimovic, M. R.; Canales, J.

    2010-12-01

    Recent observations of crustal structure associated with propagating ridge offsets at both the Endeavour and East Pacific Rise (EPR) ISS indicate local crustal thickness anomalies are associated with propagating ridge tips and renew the question of the role of melt anomalies in driving ridge propagation. Seismic and gravity data from the flanks of the Endeavour and adjoining segments of the Juan de Fuca Ridge reveal a 10-20 km wide zone of thicker and possibly denser crust on the young crust side of pseudofaults left by former propagating offsets. A sequence of bright ridge-ward dipping sub-Moho seismic reflections underlie the region of thicker crust and are interpreted as frozen magma sills at the base of the crust emplaced behind the propagating ridge tips [Nedimovic et al., 2005]. Crust within the pseudofault zones is denser and the presence of iron-enriched compositions is inferred, with the sub-crust magma sills the presumed source magma bodies for these denser, iron-enriched crustal rocks. Comparisons with the well-studied overlapping spreading center discontinuity at the EPR 9°03’N reveals a similar suite of crustal anomalies. On the flanks of this southward propagating discontinuity, an ~20 km wide band of crust that is both thicker and denser is located behind the V-shaped discordant zone of the OSC [Canales et al., 2002; Toomey and Hooft, 2008]. A broad swath of higher crustal magnetizations encompasses the region of thicker and denser crust as well as the adjoining discordant zone of relict OSC ridge tips and overlap basins [Carbotte and Macdonald, 1992]. At the southern edge of the band of thick crust, Singh et al. [2008] find evidence for a large melt anomaly in the lower crust and anomalously thick crust at the propagating eastern ridge of the OSC. The presence of local melt accumulations inferred from these bands of thicker crust behind propagating ridge offsets at both EPR and Juan de Fuca, presumably contributes to the forces driving ridge

  19. Seafloor Geodetic Evidence of Episodic Spreading 25 km East of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwell, C. D.; Spiess, F. N.; Hildebrand, J. A.; Dragert, H.

    2002-12-01

    The Juan de Fuca plate is a small oceanic plate, with no exposed landmass, encompassed by the larger Pacific and North America plates. Over geologic time, the Pacific and Juan de Fuca (JdF) plates continuously diverge along the Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdFR). GPS combined with acoustic ranging (GPS-A) provides a method to observe present-day seafloor positions with centimeter resolution. From 1994-1999, using an acoustic ranging system that straddled the JdFR Cleft Segment, we observed no spreading across a 700-m wide zone spanning the central cleft. However, seaward of the northern Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ), a GPS-A array was observed to move continuously between 1994 to 1996 at about the average geologic rate. These contrasting results suggest that a transition zone must exist between episodic spreading occurring at the JdFR and the continuous motion nearer the CSZ. In this zone the motion would be expected to lag behind that of the bulk of the JdF plate while the ridge crest is locked and then, subsequent to a spreading event at the ridge crest, the velocity in the transition zone would be greater than the plate average to compensate for the loss. To investigate the transition zone, we established a GPS-Acoustic reference site 25 km off-axis from the Cleft array on the east flank of the JdFR. Preliminary results from analyses of the GPS-A data collected in 2000 and 2002, while still characterized by large errors, show that this site may be lagging behind the bulk of the JdF plate. Analysis of additional data, and a scheduled 2003 return to the area, should refine these results. At this time they clearly suggest that the flank region is currently in the portion of the cycle preceding a spreading event. The work was supported by NSF-OCE-9907247.

  20. Propagation as a mechanism of reorientation of the Juan de Fuca ridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. S.; Hey, R. N.; Nishimura, C.

    1984-01-01

    A revised model is presented of the tectonic evolution of the Juan de Fuca ridge by propagating rifting. The new model has three different relative rotation poles, covering the time intervals 17.0-8.5 Ma, 8.5-5.0 Ma, and 5.0 Ma to the present. The rotation pole shifts at 8.5 and 5.0 Ma imply clockwise shifts in the direction of relative motion of 10 deg to 15 deg. At each of these shifts, the pattern of propagation reorganizes, and the new ridges formed by propagation are at an orientation closer to orthogonal to the new direction of motion than the orientation of the preexisting ridges. The model, containing a total of seven propagation sequences, shows excellent agreement with the isochrons inferred from the magnetic anomaly data, except in areas complicated by the separate Explorer and Gorda plates. The agreement between model and data near the Explorer plate breaks down abruptly at an age of about 5 Ma, indicating that the probable cause of the rotation pole shift at that time was the separation of the Explorer plate from the Juan de Fuca plate.

  1. Biogenic iron oxyhydroxide formation at mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal vents: Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toner, Brandy M.; Santelli, Cara M.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Wirth, Richard; Chan, Clara S.; McCollom, Thomas; Bach, Wolfgang; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2009-01-01

    Here we examine Fe speciation within Fe-encrusted biofilms formed during 2-month seafloor incubations of sulfide mineral assemblages at the Main Endeavor Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The biofilms were distributed heterogeneously across the surface of the incubated sulfide and composed primarily of particles with a twisted stalk morphology resembling those produced by some aerobic Fe-oxidizing microorganisms. Our objectives were to determine the form of biofilm-associated Fe, and identify the sulfide minerals associated with microbial growth. We used micro-focused synchrotron-radiation X-ray fluorescence mapping (μXRF), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (μΕXAFS), and X-ray diffraction (μXRD) in conjunction with focused ion beam (FIB) sectioning, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The chemical and mineralogical composition of an Fe-encrusted biofilm was queried at different spatial scales, and the spatial relationship between primary sulfide and secondary oxyhydroxide minerals was resolved. The Fe-encrusted biofilms formed preferentially at pyrrhotite-rich (Fe 1-xS, 0 ⩽ x ⩽ 0.2) regions of the incubated chimney sulfide. At the nanometer spatial scale, particles within the biofilm exhibiting lattice fringing and diffraction patterns consistent with 2-line ferrihydrite were identified infrequently. At the micron spatial scale, Fe μEXAFS spectroscopy and μXRD measurements indicate that the dominant form of biofilm Fe is a short-range ordered Fe oxyhydroxide characterized by pervasive edge-sharing Fe-O 6 octahedral linkages. Double corner-sharing Fe-O 6 linkages, which are common to Fe oxyhydroxide mineral structures of 2-line ferrihydrite, 6-line ferrihydrite, and goethite, were not detected in the biogenic iron oxyhydroxide (BIO). The suspended development of the BIO mineral structure is consistent with Fe(III) hydrolysis and polymerization in the presence of high concentrations of Fe-complexing ligands. We hypothesize that

  2. Biogenic iron oxyhydroxide formation at mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal vents: Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Toner, Brandy M.; Santelli, Cara M.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Wirth, Richard; Chan, Clara S.; McCollom, Thomas; Bach, Wolfgang; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2008-05-22

    Here we examine Fe speciation within Fe-encrusted biofilms formed during 2-month seafloor incubations of sulfide mineral assemblages at the Main Endeavor Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The biofilms were distributed heterogeneously across the surface of the incubated sulfide and composed primarily of particles with a twisted stalk morphology resembling those produced by some aerobic Fe-oxidizing microorganisms. Our objectives were to determine the form of biofilm-associated Fe, and identify the sulfide minerals associated with microbial growth. We used micro-focused synchrotron-radiation X-ray fluorescence mapping (mu XRF), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (mu EXAFS), and X-ray diffraction (mu XRD) in conjunction with focused ion beam (FIB) sectioning, and highresolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The chemical and mineralogical composition of an Fe-encrusted biofilm was queried at different spatial scales, and the spatial relationship between primary sulfide and secondary oxyhydroxide minerals was resolved. The Fe-encrusted biofilms formed preferentially at pyrrhotite-rich (Fe1-xS, 0<_ x<_ 0.2) regions of the incubated chimney sulfide. At the nanometer spatial scale, particles within the biofilm exhibiting lattice fringing and diffraction patterns consistent with 2-line ferrihydrite were identified infrequently. At the micron spatial scale, Fe mu EXAFS spectroscopy and mu XRD measurements indicate that the dominant form of biofilm Fe is a short-range ordered Fe oxyhydroxide characterized by pervasive edge-sharing Fe-O6 octahedral linkages. Double corner-sharing Fe-O6 linkages, which are common to Fe oxyhydroxide mineral structures of 2-line ferrihydrite, 6-line ferrihydrite, and goethite, were not detected in the biogenic iron oxyhydroxide (BIO). The suspended development of the BIO mineral structure is consistent with Fe(III) hydrolysis and polymerization in the presence of high concentrations of Fe-complexing ligands. We hypothesize that

  3. Submersible observations along the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge: 1984 Alvin program.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Normark, W.R.; Morton, J.L.; Ross, S.L.

    1987-01-01

    In September 1984, the research submersible Alvin provided direct observations of three major hydrothermal vent areas along the southernmost segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge (JFR). The submersible operations focuses on specific volcanologic, structural, and hydrothermal problems that had been identified during the preceding 4 years of photographic, dredging, acoustic imaging, and geophysical studies along a 12 km long section of the ridge. A continuously maintained (from 1981 to the present) net of seafloor-anchored acoustic transponders allowed the observations from Alvin to be directly tied to all previous USGS data sets and NOAA water column surveys from 1984 to the present. We review the dive program and present a brief synthesis of the geology of the vent sites together with sample and track line compilations.-from Authors

  4. U, Th, and Pb isotopes in hot springs on the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. H.

    1987-01-01

    Concentrations and isotopic compositions of U, Th, and Pb in three hydrothermal fluids from the Juan de Fuca Ridge were determined from samples obtained by the Alvin submersible. The samples were enriched in Pb and Th relative to deep-sea water, and were deficient in U. No clear relationship with Mg was found, suggesting nonideal mixing between the hot hydrothermal fluids and the cold ambient seawater. Values for U-234/U-238 have a seawater signature, and show a U-234 enrichment relative to the equilibrium value. The Pb isotopic composition has a uniform midocean ridge basalt signature, and it is suggested that Pb in these fluids may represent the best average value of the local oceanic crust.

  5. Pb, Sr, and Nd isotopes in basalts and sulfides from the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegner, E.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1987-01-01

    Isotopic Pb, Sr, and Nd data were collected by the Alvin submersible from seven basalt glasses in the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge (JFR), giving similar ratios for Pb-206/Pb-204 of about 18.45, for Pb-207/Pb-204 of about 15.47, for Pb-208/Pb-204 of about 37.81, for Sr-87/Sr-86 of about 0.70249, and for Nd-143/Nd-144 of about 0.51315. Data suggest that the basalts are all cogenetic, and that four of the samples are also comagmatic. It is concluded that isotopic data for the JFR and seamount basalts provide additional support for the mantle blob cluster model (Allegre et al., 1984), suggesting the involvement of multiple components in the genesis of ridge basalts, and including an unusual end-member that has nonradiogenic Sr and variable Pb-206/Pb-204 isotopic compositions.

  6. Variability of low temperature hydrothermal alteration in upper ocean crust: Juan de Fuca Ridge and North Pond, Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutter, J.; Harris, M.; Coggon, R. M.; Alt, J.; Teagle, D. A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Over 2/3 of the global hydrothermal heat flux occurs at low temperatures (< 150°) on the ridge flanks carried by fluid volumes comparable to riverine discharge. Understanding ridge flank hydrothermal exchange is important to quantify global geochemical cycles. Hydrothermal chemical pathways are complex and the effects of water-rock reactions remain poorly constrained. Factors controlling fluid flow include volcanic structure, sediment thickness, and basement topography. This study compares the effects of low temperature alteration in two locations with contrasting hydrogeological regimes. The intermediate spreading Juan de Fuca ridge flank (JdF) in the northeast Pacific sports a thick sediment blanket. Rare basement outcrops are sites of fluid recharge and discharge. The average alteration extent (~10% secondary minerals), oxidation ratio (Fe3+/FeTOT=34%), and alteration character (orange, green, grey halos) of basement is constant with crustal age and depth along a 0.97-3.6 m.yr transect of ODP basement holes. However, vesicle fills record an increasingly complex history of successive alteration with age. In contrast, North Pond, a ~8 m.yr-old sediment-filled basin at 22N on the slow spreading Mid Atlantic Ridge, hosts rapid, relatively cool SE to NW basinal fluid flow. Average alteration extent (~10%) and oxidation ratio (33%) of Hole 395A basalts are similar to JdF. However, 395A cores are dominated by orange alteration halos, lack celadonite, but have abundant zeolite. Vesicle fill combinations are highly variable, but the most common fill progression is from oxidising to less oxidising secondary assemblages. The comparable extent of alteration between these two sites and the absence of an age relationship on the JdF suggests that the alteration extent of the upper crust is uniform and mostly established by 1 Myr. However, the variable alteration character reflects the influence of regional hydrology on hydrothermal alteration.

  7. Seismic and Acoustic Studies from a Seafloor Array on the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Mark Armstrong

    This dissertation consists of two related but separate studies, one a refraction seismic study of the oceanic crust and the other an acoustic study of whale behavior in the presence of noise, both using seafloor array data. The goal of the first study was to measure the lateral thickness variability in the extrusive volcanic layer on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The Juan de Fuca Ridge is a medium rate (6 cm per year full rate), active spreading center, separating the Juan de Fuca and Pacific plates. It is a site of volcanic eruptions, associated with creation of new oceanic crust, and hydrothermal vents which are important in the chemical balance of the oceans. To better understand the mechanisms controlling hydrothermal venting and the creation of new crust, a seismic refraction survey was conducted over a 20 km by 30 km area of the ridge. This survey, conducted in August of 1990, used airguns as energy sources and ocean bottom seismometers as recorders. A 3-dimensional traveltime inversion was used to interpret extrusive volcanic layer thickness changes of 300 m, occurring over less than several kilometers laterally. These thickness changes are interpreted as lava accumulations on the low side of listric faults in an episodic spreading system. The traveltime inversion also reveals a large horizontal seismic velocity anisotropy which is confined to the upper 500 m of crust. Compressional velocities are 3.35 km/s in the ridge strike direction and 2.25 km/s across strike. This anisotropy is believed to be caused by oriented fractures within the extrusive layer. The second study involved the tracking and analysis of whale vocalizations which were recorded on the array 10 percent of the time. The goal was to determine if noises such as generated by the airguns, shipping or earthquakes affected the behavior of these fin and blue whales. The vocalization patterns allow analysis of swimming speed, direction, respiration cycle and call interaction. While no clear noise

  8. U, Th, and Pb isotopes in hot springs on the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.H.

    1987-10-10

    The concentrations and isotopic compositions of U, Th, and Pb in three hydrothermal fluids from the Juan de Fuca Ridge were determined. The samples consisted of 10.2--57.6% of the pure hydrothermal end-members based on Mg contents. The Pb contents of the samples ranged from 34 to 87 ng/g, U from 1.3 to 3.0 ng/g, and Th from 0.2 to 7.7 pg/g. These samples showed large enrichments of Pb and Th relative to deep-sea water and some depletion of U. They did not show coherent relationships with Mg, however, indicating nonideal mixings between the hot hydrothermal fluids and cold ambient seawater. Particles filtered from these hydrothermal fluids contained significant amounts of Th and Pb which may effectively increase the concentration of these elements in the fluids when acidified. The /sup 234/U//sup 238/U values in all samples show a /sup 234/U enrichment relative to the equilibrium value and have a seawater signature. The Pb isotopic composition of the Juan de Fuca hydrothermal fluids resembles that of 21 /sup 0/N East Pacific Rise and has a uniform mid-ocean ridge basalt signature. The hydrothermal systems at oceanic spreading ridges have circulated through a large volume of basalts. Therefore Pb in these fluids may represent the best average value of the local oceanic crust. From the effects of U deposition from seawater to the crust and Pb extraction from rock to the ocean, the U/Pb ratio in the hydrothermally altered oceanic crust may be increased significantly. copyright American Geophysical Union 1987

  9. Geochemistry of Axial seamount lavas: Magmatic relationship between the Cobb hotspot and the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, J.M.; Morgan, C.; Lilas, R.A. )

    1990-08-10

    Axial seamount, located along the central portion of the Juan de Fuca Ridge axis and at the eastern end of the Cobb-Eickelberg seamount chain, is the current center of the Cobb hotspot. Lava chemistry and bathymetry indicate that Axial seamount is a discrete volcanic unit, with a more productive shallow magmatic plumbing system separate from the adjacent ridge segments. Despite this classic association of spreading center and hotspot volcanic activity, there is no evidence in the lavas for geochemical or isotopic enrichment typical of hotspot or mantle plume activity. The differences in composition between the Axial seamount lavas and the Juan de Fuca Ridge lavas are attributed to melting processes rather than to any fundamental differences in their mantle source compositions. The higher magma production rates, higher Sr, and lower silica saturation in the seamount lavas relative to the ridge lavas are thought to be a consequence of melt initiation at greater depths. The melting column producing the seamount lavas is thought to be initiated in the stability field of spinel peridotite, whereas the ridge lavas are produced from a melting column initiated at shallower levels, possibly within or close to the stability field of plagioclase peridotite. Implicit in this interpretation is the conclusion that the Juan de Fuca Ridge lavas, and by analogy most MORB, are generated at shallow mantle levels, mostly within the stability field of plagioclase peridotite. This interpretation also requires that for the upwelling mantle to intersect the solidus at different depths, the mantle supplying Axial seamount must be hotter than the rest of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Axial seamount, therefore, reflects a thermal anomaly in the mantle, rather than a geochemically enriched ocean island basalt type mantle plume.

  10. Magmatic effects of the Cobb hot spot on the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chadwick, J.; Perfit, M.; Ridley, I.; Jonasson, I.; Kamenov, G.; Chadwick, W.; Embley, R.; le, Roux P.; Smith, M.

    2005-01-01

    The interaction of the Juan de Fuca Ridge with the Cobb hot spot has had a considerable influence on the magmatism of the Axial Segment of the ridge, the second-order segment that overlies the hot spot. In addition to the construction of the large volcanic edifice of Axial Seamount, the Axial Segment has shallow bathymetry and a prevalence of constructional volcanic features along its 100-km length, suggesting that hot spot-derived magmas supplement and oversupply the ridge. Lavas are generally more primitive at Axial Seamount and more evolved in the Axial Segment rift zones, suggesting that fractional crystallization is enhanced with increasing distance from the hot spot because of a reduced magma supply and more rapid cooling. Although the Cobb hot spot is not an isotopically enriched plume, it produces lavas with some distinct geochemical characteristics relative to normal mid-ocean ridge basalt, such as enrichments in alkalis and highly incompatible trace elements, that can be used as tracers to identify the presence and prevalence of the hot spot influence along the ridge. These characteristics are most prominent at Axial Seamount and decline in gradients along the Axial Segment. The physical model that can best explain the geochemical observations is a scenario in which hot spot and mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) magmas mix to varying degrees, with the proportions controlled by the depth to the MORB source. Modeling of two-component mixing suggests that MORB is the dominant component in most Axial Segment basalts. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Near-axis crustal structure and thickness of the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soule, Dax; Wilcock, William S. D.; Toomey, Douglas R.; Hooft, Emilie E. E.; Weekly, Robert T.

    2016-06-01

    A model of crustal thickness and lower crustal velocities is obtained for crustal ages of 0.1-1.2 Ma on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge by inverting travel times of crustal paths and non-ridge-crossing wide-angle Moho reflections obtained from a three-dimensional tomographic experiment. The crust is thicker by 0.5-1 km beneath a 200 m high plateau that extends across the segment center. This feature is consistent with the influence of the proposed Heckle melt anomaly on the spreading center. The history of ridge propagation on the Cobb overlapping spreading center may also have influenced the formation of the plateau. The sharp boundaries of the plateau and crustal thickness anomaly suggest that melt transport is predominantly upward in the crust. Lower crustal velocities are lower at the ends of the segment, likely due to increased hydrothermal alteration in regions influenced by overlapping spreading centers, and possibly increased magmatic differentiation.

  12. Hydrological response to a seafloor spreading episode on the Juan de Fuca ridge.

    PubMed

    Davis, Earl; Becker, Keir; Dziak, Robert; Cassidy, John; Wang, Kelin; Lilley, Marvin

    2004-07-15

    Seafloor hydrothermal systems are known to respond to seismic and magmatic activity along mid-ocean ridges, often resulting in locally positive changes in hydrothermal discharge rate, temperature and microbial activity, and shifts in composition occurring at the time of earthquake swarms and axial crustal dike injections. Corresponding regional effects have also been observed. Here we present observations of a hydrological response to seafloor spreading activity, which resulted in a negative formation-fluid pressure transient during and after an earthquake swarm in the sediment-sealed igneous crust of the Middle Valley rift of the northernmost Juan de Fuca ridge. The observations were made with a borehole seal and hydrologic observatory originally established in 1991 to study the steady-state pressure and temperature conditions in this hydrothermally active area. The magnitude of the co-seismic response is consistent with the elastic strain that would be expected from the associated earthquakes, but the prolonged negative pressure transient after the swarm is surprising and suggests net co-seismic dilatation of the upper, permeable igneous crust. The rift valley was visited four weeks after the onset of the seismic activity, but no signature of increased hydrothermal activity was detected in the water column. It appears that water, not magma, filled the void left by this spreading episode.

  13. Geochemistry of some gases in hydrothermal fluids from the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, William C.; White, L.D.; Rapp, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    Five samples of hydrothermal fluids from two vent areas on the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge were analyzed for dissolved gases. Concentrations in the end-member hydrothermal fluid of H2 (270-527 ??mol/kg), CH4 (82-118 ??mol/kg), and CO2 (3920-4460 ??mol/kg) are well above values in ambient seawater and are similar to concentrations reported for other ridge crest hydrothermal systems. The carbon isotopic ratios of the CH4(??13C=-17.8 to -20.8) and CO2(??13C=-3.6 to -4.7) suggest that at least some of the CH4 and CO2 in the fluids is basalt-derived. The range of ??13C values for the basalt-derived CO2 is -6.8 to -9.7, calculated by assuming conservation of recharge ??CO2 during hydrothermal circulation. Apparent temperatures of equilibration between the CH4 and the basalt-derived CO2 range from 640??C to 750??C. Small amounts of ethane (C2H6/CH4??? 0.9 ?? 10-3-2.2 ?? 10-3), propane, and butane detected in the samples may also have formed in the basalt. One sample of almost pure (95.5%) hydrothermal fluid contained a significant fraction, up to 63% and 74%, respectively, of the recharge Ar and N2. This suggests that the fluid has not undergone extensive vapor-liquid phase separation. -Authors

  14. Heat Flux From the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, W. J.; McDuff, R. E.; Stahr, F. R.; Yoerger, D. R.; Jakuba, M.

    2005-12-01

    The very essence of a hydrothermal system is transfer of heat by a convecting fluid, yet the flux of heat remains a poorly known quantity. Past studies of heat flux consisted primarily of point measurements of temperature and fluid flow at individual vent sites and inventories of the neutrally buoyant plume above the field. In 2000 the Flow Mow project used the Autonomous Benthic Explorer (ABE) to determine heat flux from Main Endeavour Field (MEF) on the Juan de Fuca Ridge by intersecting the stems of rising buoyant plumes. ABE carries instruments to measure conductivity, temperature and depth, and a MAVS current meter to determine the vertical velocity of the fluid, after correcting for vehicle motion. Complementary work on horizontal fluxes suggests that the vertical flux measured by ABE includes both the primary high buoyancy focused "smoker" sources and also entrained diffuse flow. In 2004, ABE was again used to determine heat flux not only from MEF, but also from the other four fields in the Endeavour Segment RIDGE 2000 Integrated Study Site. In this four year interval the flux of heat from MEF has declined by approximately a factor of two. The High Rise vent field has the greatest heat flux, followed by MEF, then Mothra, Salty Dawg and Sasquatch (of order 500, 300, 100, 50 MW respectively; heat flux at Sasquatch was below detection).

  15. Hydrological response to a seafloor spreading episode on the Juan de Fuca ridge.

    PubMed

    Davis, Earl; Becker, Keir; Dziak, Robert; Cassidy, John; Wang, Kelin; Lilley, Marvin

    2004-07-15

    Seafloor hydrothermal systems are known to respond to seismic and magmatic activity along mid-ocean ridges, often resulting in locally positive changes in hydrothermal discharge rate, temperature and microbial activity, and shifts in composition occurring at the time of earthquake swarms and axial crustal dike injections. Corresponding regional effects have also been observed. Here we present observations of a hydrological response to seafloor spreading activity, which resulted in a negative formation-fluid pressure transient during and after an earthquake swarm in the sediment-sealed igneous crust of the Middle Valley rift of the northernmost Juan de Fuca ridge. The observations were made with a borehole seal and hydrologic observatory originally established in 1991 to study the steady-state pressure and temperature conditions in this hydrothermally active area. The magnitude of the co-seismic response is consistent with the elastic strain that would be expected from the associated earthquakes, but the prolonged negative pressure transient after the swarm is surprising and suggests net co-seismic dilatation of the upper, permeable igneous crust. The rift valley was visited four weeks after the onset of the seismic activity, but no signature of increased hydrothermal activity was detected in the water column. It appears that water, not magma, filled the void left by this spreading episode. PMID:15254534

  16. Sound field near hydrothermal vents on Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Little, S.A.; Stolzenbach, K.D.; Purdy, G.M.

    1990-08-10

    High-quality acoustic noise measurements were obtained by two hydrophones located 3 m and 40 m from an active hydrothermal vent on Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge, in an effort to determine the feasibility of monitoring hydrothermal vent activity through flow noise generation. Most of the measured noise field could be attributed to ambient ocean noise sources of microseisms, distant shipping, and weather, punctuated by local ships and biological sources. Long-period, low-velocity, water/rock interface waves were detected with high amplitudes which rapidly decayed with distance from the seafloor. Detection of vent signals was hampered by unexpected spatial nonstationarity due to the shadowing effects of the calders wall. No continuous vent signals were deemed significant based on a criterion of 90% probability of detection and 5% probability of false alarm. However, a small signal near 40 Hz, with a power level of 0.0001 Pa sq/Hz was noticed on two records taken within 3 m of the Inferno black smoker. The frequency of this signal is consistent with predictions, and the power level suggests the occurrence of jet noise amplification due to convected density inhomogeneities. Keywords: Seamounts; Flow noise; Underwater acoustics; Acoustic measurement; Geothermy/noise; Ocean ridges; Underwater sound signals; Reprints; North Pacific Ocean. (EDC).

  17. Tidal Triggering and Statistical Patterns of Microseismicity at Axial Volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Dziak, R. P.; Caplan-Auerbach, J.; Haxel, J. H.; Mann, M. E.; Pennington, C.; Weis, J.; Womack, N.; Levy, S.

    2015-12-01

    Tidal stress changes are known to modulate the timing of microearthquakes within many mid-ocean ridge volcanic systems. At Axial Volcano, located on the Juan de Fuca Ridge, earthquakes occur preferentially when volumetric extension peaks near times of low ocean tide. Autonomous ocean-bottom hydrophone (OBH, 2007-2011) and cabled ocean bottom seismometer (OBS, Nov. 2014-) data are used to quantify the strength of tidal triggering in time periods before the April 2011 and April 2015 eruptions at Axial Volcano. The mean percent excess at times of low ocean-tide is ~14% (16% std) in the four years prior to the 2011 eruption and ~18% (17% std) in the five months prior to the 2015 eruption. The sensitivity of earthquakes to tidal stress does not evolve systematically prior to either eruption; however, this pattern is disturbed by much larger stress changes associated with the onset of dike intrusion. Following dike injection and eruption, seismicity rates drop sharply. As seismicity rates continue to rise in the months following the 2015 eruption, real-time data available from the cabled OBS network will be used quantify temporal patterns in microearthquake activity as dike induced stresses are relaxed and the magma chamber inflates.

  18. Denitrification in diffuse hydrothermal vent fluids of Axial Volcano and the Endeavour Segment on the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourbonnais, A.; Lehmann, M. F.; Butterfield, D. A.; Devol, A.; Chang, B. X.; Juniper, K.

    2009-12-01

    Denitrification is a major and well-investigated sink of bio-available nitrogen (N) in the ocean. However, little is known about the removal of N in diffuse hydrothermal vents. Hydrothermal vent fluids are known to harbor diverse bacterial populations, and the use of nitrate as an electron acceptor for the microbially mediated oxidation of hydrogen sulphide has previously been documented in these extreme environments, but no direct measurements of denitrification rates have been reported. We present the first denitrification rate estimates (i.e. the conversion of nitrate to nitrogen gas) derived from 15N-label incubations at 7 diffuse hydrothermal vent sites along the Juan de Fuca Ridge (North-East Pacific). Incubation samples (in-situ temperatures between 6.8 and 40.8οC) were collected during research cruises in June and August 2008. We also measured the isotopic composition of nitrate and ammonium from low-T sites collected during several cruises from 2006 to 2009. Mixing between ambient seawater and sub-seafloor hydrothermal reservoirs is the dominant process that modulates DIN concentration and isotope dynamics. However, clear signs of isotope fractionation of the N (and O of nitrate) isotopes at some sites suggests the presence of nitrate consuming processes, likely denitrification and/or the assimilation by vent microorganisms. 15N incubation-based denitrification rates ranged from 0 to 0.6 μM N/day, with no consistent relationship with the in-situ temperature of the vent fluids. With only one exception, detectable denitrification rates were determined at all sites, suggesting that denitrification is an important N-elimination process in diffuse vent fluids. Ongoing work that aims at studying the environmental factors that potentially control rates of denitrification (e.g. temperature, flow rate, fluid chemistry), as well as other possible N removal pathways (e.g. anammox and DNRA coupled to anammox), will also be discussed.

  19. Lead Isotopic Compositions of the Endeavour Sulfides, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labonte, F.; Hannington, M. D.; Cousens, B. L.; Blenkinsop, J.; Gill, J. B.; Kelley, D. S.; Lilley, M. D.; Delaney, J. R.

    2006-12-01

    32 sulfide samples from the main structures of the Endeavour vent field, Juan de Fuca Ridge, were analyzed for their Pb isotope composition. The samples were collected from 6 main vent fields between 1985 and 2005 and encompass a strike length of more than 15 km along the ridge crest. The sulfides are typical of black smoker deposits on sediment-starved mid-ocean ridges. Pb isotope compositions of the massive sulfides within the six hydrothermal fields vary within narrow ranges, with 206Pb/204Pb = 18.58 18.75, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.45 15.53 and 208Pb/204Pb = 37.84 38.10. A geographic trend is observed, with the lower Pb ratios restricted mostly to the northern part of the segment (Salty Dawg, Sasquatch and High Rise fields), and the higher Pb ratios restricted mostly to the southern part of the segment (Main Endeavour, Clam Bed and Mothra fields). Variations within individual fields are much smaller than those between fields, and variation within individual sulfide structures is within the uncertainty of the measurements. Therefore, it is unlikely that the ranges of Pb isotope compositions along the length of the segment reflect remobilization, replacement, and recrystallization of sulfides, as suggested for the observed Pb isotope variability in some large seafloor sulfide deposits. Instead, the differences in isotopic compositions from north to south are interpreted to reflect differences in the source rocks exposed to hydrothermal circulation of fluids below the seafloor. Possible sources of the somewhat more radiogenic Pb may be small amounts of buried sediment, either from turbidites or from hemipelagic sediment. This possibility is supported by high concentrations of CH4 and NHC4 found in the high-temperature vent fluids at the Main Endeavour Field, which are interpreted to reflect subseafloor interaction between hydrothermal fluids and organic material in buried sediments. However, the majority of the samples fall below and are approximately parallel to the

  20. In situ observations of dissolved iron and manganese in hydrothermal vent plumes, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Carol S.; Coale, Kenneth H.; Elrod, Virginia A.; Johnson, Kenneth S.; Massoth, Gary J.; Baker, Edward T.

    1994-03-01

    In situ mesaurements of dissolved manganese and total dissolved iron were conducted in hydrothermal plumes over the Juan de Fuca Ridge using a submersible chemical analyzer (Scanner). The Scanner was deployed as part of a conductivity, temperature, depth (CTD)/transmissometer rosette instrument package on both tow-yos and vertical casts during the VENTS Leg I cruise in 1989. Dissolved manganese and total dissolved iron concentrations, along with temperature and light attenuation anomalies, were determined over the ridge crest every 5 s. Discrete samples for laboratory analyses of dissolved iron II, total dissolved iron II+III and manganese were also collected. Metal to heat ratios (Me:Q) measured in situ were extremely variable in one steady state plume, while an event plume had constant Me:Q. Uniform values of Mn:Q in the event plume demonstrate that Mn behaves conservatively in the near-field plume. Variability in the Mn:Q ratios in a steady state plume indicated the presence of at least two hydrothermal sources with distinct Me:Q values. A simple mixing model shows that the contribution of Mn from high Me:Q sources, with a composition characteristic of black smoker vents, varies between 1% and 99% within the core of the steady state plume with an average value of 55%. On average, over 50% of the excess heat within the plume originates from low Me:Q ratio sources, with a composition characteristic of low-temperature, diffuse flow vent fluids. Less than 4% of the volume of hydrothermal fluids in the plume originates from black smokers. The Fe II concentrations were used to provide an estimate of plume age on a transect across the ridge axis. Plume ages were about 2.5 days on axis and greater than 12 days off axis. These plume ages were modeled to provide estimates of plume transport and horizontal diffusion and show excellent agreement with ages determined using Rn-222.

  1. Composition and dissolution of black smoker particulates from active vents on the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feely, Richard A.; Lewison, Maureen; Massoth, Gary J.; Robert-Baldo, Gillian; Lavelle, J. William; Byrne, Robert H.; Von Damm, Karen L.; Curl, Herbert C., Jr.

    1987-10-01

    During two Atlantis II/Alvin cruises to the Juan de Fuca Ridge in 1984 active high temperature (140°-284°C) vents were sampled for black smoker particulates using the Grassle Pump. Individual mineral phases were identified using standard X ray diffraction and petrographic procedures. In addition, elemental compositions and particle morphologies were determined by X ray energy spectrometry and scanning electron microscope/X ray energy spectrometry techniques. The vent particulates from the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge vent sites were highly enriched in S, Si, Fe, Zn, and Cu and were primarily composed of sphalerite, wurtzite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, barite, chalcopyrite, cubanite, hydrous iron oxides, and elemental sulfur. Two additional unidentified phases which were prevalent in the samples included an Fe-Si phase and a Ca-Si phase. The grain sizes of the individual particle phases ranged from < 2 μm for the sphalerite and Fe oxide particles to > 100 μm for the Fe-Si particles. Grain size and current meter data were used in a deposition model of individual phase dispersal. For many of the larger sulfide and sulfate particles, the model predicts dispersal to occur over length scales of only several hundreds of meters. The high-temperature black smokers from the more northerly Endeavour Segment vents were highly enriched in Fe, S, Ca, Cu, and Zn and were primarily composed of anhydrite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite, barite, sulfur, pyrite, and other less abundant metal sulfide minerals. The grain sizes of the individual particles ranged from < 10 μm to slightly larger than 500 μm. The composition and size distributions of the mineral phases are highly suggestive of high-temperature mixing between vent fluids and seawater. A series of field and laboratory studies were conducted to determine the rates of dissolution of several sulfate and sulfide minerals. The dissolution rates ranged over more than 3 orders of magnitude, from 3.2 × 10-8 cm s-1 for anhydrite to 1.2

  2. Seismic Structure of the Shallow Mantle Beneath the Endeavor Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanderBeek, B. P.; Toomey, D. R.; Hooft, E. E.; Wilcock, W. S.; Weekly, R. T.; Soule, D. C.

    2013-12-01

    We present tomographic images of the seismic structure of the shallow mantle beneath the intermediate-spreading Endeavor segment of the Juan de Fuca ridge. Our results provide insight into the relationship between magma supply from the mantle and overlying ridge crest processes. We use seismic energy refracted below the Moho (Pn), as recorded by the Endeavor tomography (ETOMO) experiment, to image the anisotropic and isotropic P wave velocity structure. The ETOMO experiment was an active source seismic study conducted in August 2009 as part of the RIDGE2000 science program. The experimental area extends 100 km along- and 60 km across-axis and encompasses active hydrothermal vent fields near the segment center, the eastern end of the Heck seamount chain, and two overlapping spreading centers (OSCs) at either end of the segment. Previous tomographic analyses of seismic arrivals refracted through the crust (Pg), and reflected off the Moho (PmP), constrain a three-dimensional starting model of crustal velocity and thickness. These Pg and PmP arrivals are incorporated in our inversion of Pn travel-time data to further constrain the isotropic and anisotropic mantle velocity structure. Preliminary results reveal three distinct mantle low-velocity zones, inferred as regions of mantle melt delivery to the base of the crust, that are located: (i) off-axis near the segment center, (ii) beneath the Endeavor-West Valley OSC, and (iii) beneath the Cobb OSC near Split Seamount. The mantle anomalies are located at intervals of ~30 to 40 km along-axis and the low velocity anomalies beneath the OSCs are comparable in magnitude to the one located near the segment center. The direction of shallow mantle flow is inferred from azimuthal variations in Pn travel-time residuals relative to a homogeneous isotropic mantle. Continuing analysis will focus on constraining spatial variations in the orientation of azimuthal anisotropy. On the basis of our results, we will discuss the transport of

  3. Biogeochemical Fluxes Across the Juan de Fuca Ridge-Flank: Minor and Trace Element Systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulme, S. M.; Wheat, C. G.; Jannasch, H. W.

    2006-12-01

    Crustal ridge-flank hydrothermal convection of seawater profoundly affects; global geochemical fluxes and cycles, plate tectonics through crustal cooling, and the deep biosphere. Comprehensive assessment of chemical fluxes from this type of hydrothermal circulation has been obscured by sampling artifacts during sample retrieval and extraction from drilling and the lack of uncontaminated in situ samples. With the development of sealed borehole observatories (CORKs) it is now possible to obtainable uncontaminated crustal formation fluids. The Endeavor Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge presented an ideal region for addressing the effects of ridge flank hydrothermal circulation on global processes because of direct access to basement fluids through six CORKs and the known composition of nearby spring fluids. We present data from fluids collected via osmotically-pumped continuous fluid samplers (OsmoSamplers) from within sealed boreholes. Methods using high-resolution ICP-MS were developed to allow analysis of trace elements (V, Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Y, Mo, Cd, Cs, Ba, and U) and the entire suite of rare-earth elements in 5ml of sample. Fluids from OsmoSamplers deployed at 3 drill sites (1024, 1026, and 1027) were analyzed along with borehole fluids collected at two additional sites (1025 and 1026). Pore fluids from multiple drilling legs were also compared for sampling artifacts associated with differing sediment core collection techniques. The results of this study determined which trace elements can be accurately determined from ocean drilling and pore water extraction from sediments and borehole sampling by comparison with the time-integrated samples obtained from within the sealed boreholes. Once the accurate composition of basement fluids was determined, it was possible to examine regional trends of the hydrothermal aquifer system both along and across strike of the ridge axis. These data of crustal fluids can then be compared to pore fluids collected during

  4. Mineralogy and chemistry of massive sulfide deposits from the Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koski, R.A.; Clague, D.A.; Oudin, E.

    1984-01-01

    Two types of massive sulphide were dredged from one of the six vent sites located in the axial valley of the southern Juan de Fuca ridge. Type A samples are angular slabs of dark grey Zn-rich sulphide with interlayers and a thin, partly-oxidized crust of Fe-sulphide. These layered sulphide aggregates appear to be fragments of a sulphide wall enclosing an active hydrothermal vent. The outer sulphide wall is composed of colloform Fe sulphide and Fe-poor sphalerite deposited under low-T conditions when sea-water and hydrothermal fluid mix above the discharge point. Inside the wall the intensifying hydrothermal sytem deposits a higher-T assemblage of granular Fe-rich sphalerite, wurtzite, pyrite and minor Cu-Fe sulphide. Type B sulphide samples are sub-rounded, spongy-textured fragments composed almost entirely of dendritic aggregates of pale Fe-poor colloform sphalerite and opaline silica. This type of sulphide is deposited in settings peripheral to sites of focused discharge and in open spaces by moderate- to low-T fluid discharging at a slow but variable rate; the fluid becomes increasingly oxidizing, resulting in late-stage deposits of hematite, baryte and sulphur.-L.di H.

  5. Acoustic mapping of diffuse flow at a seafloor hydrothermal site: Monolith Vent, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rona, P. A.; Jackson, D. R.; Wen, T.; Jones, C.; Mitsuzawa, K.; Bemis, K. G.; Dworski, J. G.

    Diffuse flow of hydrothermal solutions commonly occurs in patchy areas up to tens of meters in diameter in seafloor hydrothermal fields. It is recognized as a quantitatively significant component of thermal and chemical fluxes, yet is elusive to map. We report a new acoustic method to detect and map areas of diffuse flow using phase-coherent correlation techniques. The sonar system was modified to record phase information and mounted on DSV SEA CLIFF. The submersible occupied a stationary position on the seafloor and the transducer scanned the seafloor surrounding Monolith Vent, a sulfide edifice venting black smokers, at a nominal range of 17 m at a depth of 2249 m on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Patchy areas of uncorrelated returns clearly stood out from a background of returns that exhibited ping-to-ping correlation. The areas of uncorrelated returns coincided with areas of diffuse flow as mapped by a video survey with the Navy's Advanced Tethered Vehicle (ATV). Correlated returns were backscattered from invariant seafloor. Uncorrelated returns were distorted by index of refraction inhomogeneities as they passed through diffuse flow between the seafloor and the transducer. The acoustic method presented can synoptically map areas of diffuse flow. When combined with standard in situ measurement and sampling methods the acoustic mapping will facilitate accurate determination of diffuse thermal and chemical fluxes in seafloor hydrothermal fields.

  6. Numerical modeling of phase separation at Main Endeavour Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Shreya; Lowell, Robert P.; Lewis, Kayla C.

    2013-10-01

    Before being disrupted by a magmatic event in 1999, the vent temperatures and salinities along the axis of the Main Endeavour Field on the Juan de Fuca Ridge exhibited a quasi-steady spatial gradient in which the southern vent fluids were hotter and less saline than the northern vent fluids. We present 2-D numerical models of two phase flow in a NaCl-H2O system to understand these gradients. We consider homogenous permeability models with a range of bottom boundary temperature distributions and heterogeneous permeability models by imposing layer 2A extrusives with a constant bottom boundary temperature distribution. The aim is to understand the impact of both bottom boundary temperature and layer 2A permeability on hydrothermal fluids and to determine what combination of these controlling factors could cause the observed trend. We find that variations in bottom boundary temperature alone cannot explain the span of surface temperatures and salinities measured at the Main Endeavour Field. Heterogeneous permeability within layer 2A that has higher overall permeability in the northern part of the vent field than the southern part can reproduce the observed north to south temperature gradient, but such a permeability distribution cannot reproduce the observed salinity gradient. We conclude that both deep-seated heterogeneous permeability, perhaps localized by a fault zone, and a heterogeneous layer 2A are required to produce the trend of temperatures and salinities in vent fluids at the Main Endeavour Field prior to the 1999 event.

  7. A hydrographic transient above the Salty Dawg hydrothermal field, Endeavour segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellogg, J. P.; McDuff, R. E.

    2010-12-01

    During systematic repeat hydrography cruises to the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the summers of 2004, 2005, and 2006, we encountered a transient increase in the water column heat content above the Salty Dawg hydrothermal field. First observed in July 2005 and mapped in greater detail in August 2005, this feature was not a typical event or megaplume since potential temperature anomalies were continuously elevated from the plume top to the seafloor. During the summer of 2005, the heat content in the waters above Salty Dawg was elevated ˜30 TJ, and the plume top was over 150 m higher in the water column than the other years measured. Based on scaling analyses, an order of magnitude increase in the volume flux from Salty Dawg would be required to generate a neutrally buoyant plume of this size. This observation was unexpected because no substantial earthquakes were detected in the time frame of this increased heat flux. The duration of the transient suggests possible forcing mechanisms: advancement of a cracking front, a small-scale dike intrusion, aseismic crustal movement, fracture of a flow constriction to a previously unaccessible reservoir, an increase of heat in an underlying magma chamber, or movement of melt within the axial magma chamber. The transient disappeared before returning in August 2006, likely due to thermal expansion of shallow host rock, decreasing the permeability. Should such increases in seafloor heat flux prove to be common, the rate of hydrothermal cooling could be faster than previously thought.

  8. Microbial community structure across fluid gradients in the Juan de Fuca Ridge hydrothermal system.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Rika E; Beltrán, Mónica Torres; Hallam, Steven J; Baross, John A

    2013-02-01

    Physical and chemical gradients are dominant factors in shaping hydrothermal vent microbial ecology, where archaeal and bacterial habitats encompass a range between hot, reduced hydrothermal fluid and cold, oxidized seawater. To determine the impact of these fluid gradients on microbial communities inhabiting these systems, we surveyed bacterial and archaeal community structure among and between hydrothermal plumes, diffuse flow fluids, and background seawater in several hydrothermal vent sites on the Juan de Fuca Ridge using 16S rRNA gene diversity screening (clone libraries and terminal restriction length polymorphisms) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction methods. Community structure was similar between hydrothermal plumes and background seawater, where a number of taxa usually associated with low-oxygen zones were observed, whereas high-temperature diffuse fluids exhibited a distinct phylogenetic profile. SUP05 and Arctic96BD-19 sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were prevalent in all three mixing regimes where they exhibited overlapping but not identical abundance patterns. Taken together, these results indicate conserved patterns of redox-driven niche partitioning between hydrothermal mixing regimes and microbial communities associated with sinking particles and oxygen-deficient waters. Moreover, the prevalence of SUP05 and Arctic96BD-19 in plume and diffuse flow fluids indicates a more cosmopolitan role for these groups in the ecology and biogeochemistry of the dark ocean.

  9. Chemistry of hydrothermal solutions from the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Von Damm, K.L.; Bischoff, J.L.

    1987-10-10

    Fluids from three vent fields on the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge were sampled in September 1984 using the DSRV Alvin. The fluids are uniquely high in both chloride, which ranges up to twice the seawater value, and in metal content. Simple vapor-liquid phase separation could not have produced both the high chlorinity and gas concentrations observed in these fluids. The cause of the elevated chlorinity can not be uniquely identified but may be the result of either or a combination of two processes: (1) subsurface formation of a degassed brine and subsequent mixing of a small amount of this brine with a hydrothermal seawater which has not undergone a phase separation and (2) dissolution of a chloride-rich phase combined with a possible small loss of gas during sampling procedures. Although measured temperatures were all less than 300 /sup 0/C, quartz geothermometry suggests that the fluids have equilibrated at greater than 340 /sup 0/C. Quartz geobarometry is also in agreement with geophysical estimates of depth to the local magma chamber. copyright American Geophysical Union 1987

  10. Metals and isotopes in Juan de Fuca Ridge hydrothermal fluids and their associated solid materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkley, T.K.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1987-10-10

    The /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratio of the hydrothermal solution (HTS) (0.7034) is larger than that of basalt (0.7025) at the southern vent field of the Juan de Fuca Ridge (SJFR). Both the Sr isotopic ratio for HTS and the water/rock interaction ratio lie between those at two sites farther south on the East Pacific Rise, 13 /sup 0/N and 21 /sup 0/N. These parameters may be closely related to subsurface temperatures and rates of magma ascent and to extent of faulting and surface areas of the frameworks of the hydrothermal systems. For these three Pacific Ocean sites there is no steady geographical progression of these measured parameters, nor of reported spreading rate, with increasing latitude northward. Pb and Nd isotopic measurements are uniform for all samples from the SJFR, ranging only from 18.43 to 18.58 for /sup 206/Pb//sup 204/Pb (fluids and associated solids) and centering near 0.5131 for /sup 143/Nd//sup 144/Nd (only fluids measured). Values for basalts and sulfides from the site have similar values. Relatively high /sup 206/Pb//sup 204/Pb values at the SJFR suggest the potential for the existence of an anomalous radiogenic heat source in the underlying mantle material.

  11. Microbiological characterization of post-eruption "snowblower" vents at Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Julie L; Akerman, Nancy H; Proskurowski, Giora; Huber, Julie A

    2013-01-01

    Microbial processes within the subseafloor can be examined during the ephemeral and uncommonly observed phenomena known as snowblower venting. Snowblowers are characterized by the large quantity of white floc that is expelled from the seafloor following mid-ocean ridge eruptions. During these eruptions, rapidly cooling lava entrains seawater and hydrothermal fluids enriched in geochemical reactants, creating a natural bioreactor that supports a subseafloor microbial "bloom." Previous studies hypothesized that the eruption-associated floc was made by sulfide-oxidizing bacteria; however, the microbes involved were never identified. Here we present the first molecular analysis combined with microscopy of microbial communities in snowblower vents from samples collected shortly after the 2011 eruption at Axial Seamount, an active volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. We obtained fluid samples and white flocculent material from active snowblower vents as well as orange flocculent material found on top of newly formed lava flows. Both flocculent types revealed diverse cell types and particulates when examined by phase contrast and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Distinct archaeal and bacterial communities were detected in each sample type through Illumina tag sequencing of 16S rRNA genes and through sequencing of the sulfide oxidation gene, soxB. In fluids and white floc, the dominant bacteria were sulfur-oxidizing Epsilonproteobacteria and the dominant archaea were thermophilic Methanococcales. In contrast, the dominant organisms in the orange floc were Gammaproteobacteria and Thaumarchaeota Marine Group I. In all samples, bacteria greatly outnumbered archaea. The presence of anaerobic methanogens and microaerobic Epsilonproteobacteria in snowblower communities provides evidence that these blooms are seeded by subseafloor microbes, rather than from microbes in bottom seawater. These eruptive events thus provide a unique opportunity to observe subseafloor microbial

  12. Surficial permeability of the axial valley seafloor: Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearn, Casey K.; Homola, Kira L.; Johnson, H. Paul

    2013-09-01

    Hydrothermal systems at mid-ocean spreading centers play a fundamental role in Earth's geothermal budget. One underexamined facet of marine hydrothermal systems is the role that permeability of the uppermost seafloor veneer plays in the distribution of hydrothermal fluid. As both the initial and final vertical gateway for subsurface fluid circulation, uppermost seafloor permeability may influence the local spatial distribution of hydrothermal flow. A method of deriving a photomosaic from seafloor video was developed and utilized to estimate relative surface permeability in an active hydrothermal area on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The mosaic resolves seafloor geology of the axial valley seafloor at submeter resolution over an area greater than 1 km2. Results indicate that the valley walls and basal talus slope are topographically rugged and unsedimented, providing minimal resistance to fluid transmission. Elsewhere, the axial valley floor is capped by an unbroken blanket of low-permeability sediment, resisting fluid exchange with the subsurface reservoir. Active fluid emission sites were restricted to the high-permeability zone at the base of the western wall. A series of inactive fossil hydrothermal structures form a linear trend along the western bounding wall, oriented orthogonal to the spreading axis. High-temperature vent locations appear to have migrated over 100 m along-ridge-strike over the decade between surveys. While initially an expression of subsurface faulting, this spatial pattern suggests that increases in seafloor permeability from sedimentation may be at least a secondary contributing factor in regulating fluid flow across the seafloor interface.

  13. Microbiological characterization of post-eruption "snowblower" vents at Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Julie L; Akerman, Nancy H; Proskurowski, Giora; Huber, Julie A

    2013-01-01

    Microbial processes within the subseafloor can be examined during the ephemeral and uncommonly observed phenomena known as snowblower venting. Snowblowers are characterized by the large quantity of white floc that is expelled from the seafloor following mid-ocean ridge eruptions. During these eruptions, rapidly cooling lava entrains seawater and hydrothermal fluids enriched in geochemical reactants, creating a natural bioreactor that supports a subseafloor microbial "bloom." Previous studies hypothesized that the eruption-associated floc was made by sulfide-oxidizing bacteria; however, the microbes involved were never identified. Here we present the first molecular analysis combined with microscopy of microbial communities in snowblower vents from samples collected shortly after the 2011 eruption at Axial Seamount, an active volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. We obtained fluid samples and white flocculent material from active snowblower vents as well as orange flocculent material found on top of newly formed lava flows. Both flocculent types revealed diverse cell types and particulates when examined by phase contrast and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Distinct archaeal and bacterial communities were detected in each sample type through Illumina tag sequencing of 16S rRNA genes and through sequencing of the sulfide oxidation gene, soxB. In fluids and white floc, the dominant bacteria were sulfur-oxidizing Epsilonproteobacteria and the dominant archaea were thermophilic Methanococcales. In contrast, the dominant organisms in the orange floc were Gammaproteobacteria and Thaumarchaeota Marine Group I. In all samples, bacteria greatly outnumbered archaea. The presence of anaerobic methanogens and microaerobic Epsilonproteobacteria in snowblower communities provides evidence that these blooms are seeded by subseafloor microbes, rather than from microbes in bottom seawater. These eruptive events thus provide a unique opportunity to observe subseafloor microbial

  14. Geology of a vigorous hydrothermal system on the Endeavour segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Delaney, J.R.; Robigou, V.; McDuff, R.E. ); Tivey, M.K. )

    1992-12-10

    A high-precision, high-resolution geologic map explicitly documents relationships between tectonic features and large steep-sided, sulfide-sulfate-silica deposits in the vigorously venting Endeavour hydrothermal field near the northern end of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Location of the most massive sulfide structures appears to be controlled by intersections of ridge-parallel normal faults and other fracture-fissure sets that trend oblique to, and perpendicular to the overall structural fabric of the axial valley. As presently mapped, the field is about 200 by 400 m on a side and contains at least 15 large (> 1,000 m[sup 3]) sulfide edifices and many tens of smaller, commonly inactive, sulfide structures. The larger sulfide structures are also the most vigorously venting features in the field; they are commonly more than 30 m in diameter and up to 20 m in height. Maximum venting temperatures of 375[degrees]C are associated with the smaller structures in the northern portion of the field are consistently 20[degrees]-30[degrees]C lower. Hydrothermal output from individual active sulfide features varies from no flow in the lower third of the edifice to vigorous output from fracture-controlled black smoker activity near the top of the structures. Two types of diffuse venting in the Endeavour field include a lower temperature 8[degrees]-15[degrees]C output through colonies of large tubeworms and 25[degrees]-50[degrees]C vent fluid that seems to percolate through the tops of overhanging flanges. The large size and steep-walled nature of these structures evidently results from sustained venting in a mature hydrothermal system, coupled with dual mineral depositional mechanisms involving vertical growth by accumulation of chimney sulfide debris and lateral growth by means of flange development.

  15. Pressures of Partial Crystallization of Magmas from the Juan de Fuca Ridge: Implications for Crustal Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, J. L.; Barton, M.

    2010-12-01

    Plate spreading at the mid-ocean ridges is accompanied by intrusion of dikes and eruption of lava along the ridge axis. It has been suggested that the depth of magma chambers that feed the flows and dikes is related to the rate of spreading. As part of a larger effort to examine this hypothesis, we determined the depths of magma chambers beneath the intermediate spreading Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdF) which extends from the Blanco fracture zone at about 44.5 degrees North to the Triple junction of the JdF, Nootka Fault, and the Socanco fracture zone at 48.7 degrees North. Pressures of partial crystallization were determined by comparing the compositions of natural liquids (glasses) with those of experimental liquids in equilibrium with olivine, plagioclase, and clinopyroxene at different pressures and temperatures using the method described by Kelley and Barton (2008). Chemical analyses mid-ocean ridge basalts glasses sampled from along the JdF were used as liquid compositions. Samples with anomalous chemical compositions and samples that yielded pressures associated with unrealistically large uncertainties were filtered out of the database. The calculated pressures for the remaining 533 samples were used to calculate the depths of partial crystallization and to identify the likely location of magma chambers. Preliminary results indicate that the pressure of partial crystallization decreases from 2 to 1±0.5 kbars from the Blanco fracture zone to the north along the Cleft segment of the ridge. Calculated pressures remain approximately constant at 0.87±0.53 kbars along ridge segments to the north of the Cleft. These low pressures for the remaining segments of the ridge are interpreted to indicate magma chambers at depths of 1.3-4.9 km and agree reasonably well with the depths of seismically imaged tops of axial magma chambers (2-3 km) (Canales et al 2009). The higher pressures obtained for lavas erupted along the Cleft segment of the JdF agree very well with recent

  16. Microbial diversity within Juan de Fuca ridge basement fluids sampled from oceanic borehole observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungbluth, S.; Bowers, R.; Lin, H.; Hsieh, C.; Cowen, J. P.; Rappé, M.

    2012-12-01

    Three generations of sampling and instrumentation platforms known as Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kit (CORK) observatories affixed to Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) boreholes are providing unrivaled access to fluids originating from 1.2-3.5 million-years (Myr) old basaltic crust of the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca ridge. Borehole fluid samples obtained via a custom seafloor fluid pumping and sampling system coupled to CORK continuous fluid delivery lines are yielding critical insights into the biogeochemistry and nature of microbial life inhabiting the sediment-covered basement environment. Direct microscopic enumeration revealed microbial cell abundances that are 2-41% of overlying bottom seawater. Snapshots of basement fluid microbial diversity and community structure have been obtained through small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene cloning and sequencing from five boreholes that access a range of basement ages and temperatures at the sediment-basement interface. SSU rRNA gene clones were derived from four different CORK installations (1026B, 1301A, 1362A, and 1362B) accessing relatively warmer (65°C) and older (3.5 Myr) ridge flank, and one location (1025C) accessing relatively cooler (39°C) and younger (1.2 Myr) ridge flank, revealing that warmer basement fluids had higher microbial diversity. A sampling time-series collected from borehole 1301A has revealed a microbial community that is temporally variable, with the dominant lineages changing between years. Each of the five boreholes sampled contained a unique microbial assemblage, however, common members are found from both cultivated and uncultivated lineages within the archaeal and bacterial domains, including meso- and thermophilic microbial lineages involved with sulfur cycling (e.g Thiomicrospira, Sulfurimonas, Desulfocapsa, Desulfobulbus). In addition, borehole fluid environmental gene clones were also closely related to uncultivated lineages

  17. The Occurrence and Origin of Andesites and Dacites From the Southern Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotsonika, L. A.; Perfit, M. R.; Stakes, D.; Ridley, W. I.

    2005-05-01

    We have studied the geology of the Cleft segment of the Southern Juan de Fuca Ridge and the ridge-transform intersection (RTI) during three cruises of MBARI's R/V Western Flyer beginning in 2000. A total of 53 rock cores and 276 precisely located rock or glass samples were collected during sixteen dives with the ROV Tiburon. These ROV dive samples and observations along with regional (EM300) and local-scale (side scan and video imaging) mapping, allow us to test models regarding the magmatic evolution of this segment and the relationships between specific tectonic and morphologic features and magmatic processes. An extremely wide range of N-type lavas were recovered which are, on average, more evolved (lower MgO) off-axis, away from the present neovolcanic zone (the cleft), and towards the RTI. During the fall of 2004, a ROV dive was specifically planned to investigate a region of unfaulted, curved volcanic ridges that overshoot the Blanco Transform. During the dive 39 samples were recovered that range from ferrobasalt to andesite and dacite (SiO2 = 50.3 to 66.4 wt.% ; Mg# = 41 to 7). The highly evolved lavas were recovered from two large constructional domes comprised of unusually large pillow flows, and extremely blocky, vesicular flows, similar to some terrestrial silicic domes. Some of the andesite-dacite hand samples are extremely vesicular with elongate vesicles (1-10 cm) in a glassy matrix. The andesitic and dacitic lavas also have elevated Cl- levels that range from 4000-6000 ppm. Mineral assemblages are dominated by microphenocrysts of ferroaugite and ferropigeonite, with lesser amounts of sodic plagioclase and FeTi oxides, and rare fayalite and zircon. A few of the more magnesian phenocrysts (xenocrysts?) exhibit normal zoning whereas more Fe-rich crystals are reversely zoned. In addition, there appear to be inclusions of quenched basaltic material within some of the evolved lavas. These samples represent an extensive and unique set of some of the most

  18. Upper Crustal Seismic Velocity Structure of the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weekly, R. T.; Wilcock, W. S.; Toomey, D. R.; Hooft, E. E.; Wells, A. E.

    2010-12-01

    We report preliminary results from an active-source seismic tomography experiment that was conducted along the intermediate-spreading Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge in 2009. The overarching objective of the experiment is to test competing hypotheses for what governs the scale and intensity of magmatic and hydrothermal processes at mid-ocean ridges. Previous models of crustal accretion inferred that ridge-basin topography observed at the Endeavour results from alternating periods of enhanced or reduced magma supply from the mantle. Alternatively, a recent seismic reflection study has imaged a crustal magma chamber underlying the central portion of the Endeavour, which may indicate that variations in seafloor topography instead result from dike-induced faulting that occurs within the upper crust, adjacent to the axial magma chamber. The first model predicts a thicker high-porosity eruptive layer and lower velocities beneath topographic highs, while the second model is compatible with a uniform pattern of volcanic accretion. The experiment used 68 four-component ocean-bottom seismometers (OBSs) at 64 sites to record 5,567 airgun shots from the 6600 in3 airgun array of the R/V Marcus G. Langseth. Three nested shooting grids were collected to image the three-dimensional crustal and upper mantle velocity structure of the segment at multiple spatial scales. We use first-arriving crustal phases (Pg) recorded by the two grids with the densest shot-receiver spacing, the 24 x 8 km2 vent field grid and the 60 x 20 km2 crustal grid, to image the fine-scale (< 1 km) three-dimensional velocity structure of the upper few kilometers of crust at the segment scale. We employ a non-linear tomographic method that utilizes a shortest-path ray-tracing algorithm with columns of nodes sheared vertically to include effects of seafloor topography. To date, we have manually picked 13,000 Pg phases located within 10 km of 17 OBSs. The full analysis will include ~40,000 Pg travel

  19. Microbial diversity within basement fluids of the sediment-buried Juan de Fuca Ridge flank.

    PubMed

    Jungbluth, Sean P; Grote, Jana; Lin, Huei-Ting; Cowen, James P; Rappé, Michael S

    2013-01-01

    Despite its immense size, logistical and methodological constraints have largely limited microbiological investigations of the subseafloor basement biosphere. In this study, a unique sampling system was used to collect fluids from the subseafloor basaltic crust via a Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kit (CORK) observatory at Integrated Ocean Drilling Program borehole 1301A, located at a depth of 2667 m in the Pacific Ocean on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Here, a fluid delivery line directly accesses a 3.5 million years old basalt-hosted basement aquifer, overlaid by 262 m of sediment, which serves as a barrier to direct exchange with bottom seawater. At an average of 1.2 × 10(4) cells ml(-1), microorganisms in borehole fluids were nearly an order of magnitude less abundant than in surrounding bottom seawater. Ribosomal RNA genes were characterized from basement fluids, providing the first snapshots of microbial community structure using a high-integrity fluid delivery line. Interestingly, microbial communities retrieved from different CORKs (1026B and 1301A) nearly a decade apart shared major community members, consistent with hydrogeological connectivity. However, over three sampling years, the dominant gene clone lineage changed from relatives of Candidatus Desulforudis audaxviator within the bacterial phylum Firmicutes in 2008 to the Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotic Group in 2009 and a lineage within the JTB35 group of Gammaproteobacteria in 2010, and statistically significant variation in microbial community structure was observed. The enumeration of different phylogenetic groups of cells within borehole 1301A fluids supported our observation that the deep subsurface microbial community was temporally dynamic.

  20. Temperature and Redox Effect on Mineral Colonization in Juan de Fuca Ridge Flank Subsurface Crustal Fluids.

    PubMed

    Baquiran, Jean-Paul M; Ramírez, Gustavo A; Haddad, Amanda G; Toner, Brandy M; Hulme, Samuel; Wheat, Charles G; Edwards, Katrina J; Orcutt, Beth N

    2016-01-01

    To examine microbe-mineral interactions in subsurface oceanic crust, we evaluated microbial colonization on crustal minerals that were incubated in borehole fluids for 1 year at the seafloor wellhead of a crustal borehole observatory (IODP Hole U1301A, Juan de Fuca Ridge flank) as compared to an experiment that was not exposed to subsurface crustal fluids (at nearby IODP Hole U1301B). In comparison to previous studies at these same sites, this approach allowed assessment of the effects of temperature, fluid chemistry, and/or mineralogy on colonization patterns of different mineral substrates, and an opportunity to verify the approach of deploying colonization experiments at an observatory wellhead at the seafloor instead of within the borehole. The Hole U1301B deployment did not have biofilm growth, based on microscopy and DNA extraction, thereby confirming the integrity of the colonization design against bottom seawater intrusion. In contrast, the Hole U1301A deployment supported biofilms dominated by Epsilonproteobacteria (43.5% of 370 16S rRNA gene clone sequences) and Gammaproteobacteria (29.3%). Sequence analysis revealed overlap in microbial communities between different minerals incubated at the Hole U1301A wellhead, indicating that mineralogy did not separate biofilm structure within the 1-year colonization experiment. Differences in the Hole U1301A wellhead biofilm community composition relative to previous studies from within the borehole using similar mineral substrates suggest that temperature and the diffusion of dissolved oxygen through plastic components influenced the mineral colonization experiments positioned at the wellhead. This highlights the capacity of low abundance crustal fluid taxa to rapidly establish communities on diverse mineral substrates under changing environmental conditions such as from temperature and oxygen. PMID:27064928

  1. Temperature and Redox Effect on Mineral Colonization in Juan de Fuca Ridge Flank Subsurface Crustal Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Baquiran, Jean-Paul M.; Ramírez, Gustavo A.; Haddad, Amanda G.; Toner, Brandy M.; Hulme, Samuel; Wheat, Charles G.; Edwards, Katrina J.; Orcutt, Beth N.

    2016-01-01

    To examine microbe-mineral interactions in subsurface oceanic crust, we evaluated microbial colonization on crustal minerals that were incubated in borehole fluids for 1 year at the seafloor wellhead of a crustal borehole observatory (IODP Hole U1301A, Juan de Fuca Ridge flank) as compared to an experiment that was not exposed to subsurface crustal fluids (at nearby IODP Hole U1301B). In comparison to previous studies at these same sites, this approach allowed assessment of the effects of temperature, fluid chemistry, and/or mineralogy on colonization patterns of different mineral substrates, and an opportunity to verify the approach of deploying colonization experiments at an observatory wellhead at the seafloor instead of within the borehole. The Hole U1301B deployment did not have biofilm growth, based on microscopy and DNA extraction, thereby confirming the integrity of the colonization design against bottom seawater intrusion. In contrast, the Hole U1301A deployment supported biofilms dominated by Epsilonproteobacteria (43.5% of 370 16S rRNA gene clone sequences) and Gammaproteobacteria (29.3%). Sequence analysis revealed overlap in microbial communities between different minerals incubated at the Hole U1301A wellhead, indicating that mineralogy did not separate biofilm structure within the 1-year colonization experiment. Differences in the Hole U1301A wellhead biofilm community composition relative to previous studies from within the borehole using similar mineral substrates suggest that temperature and the diffusion of dissolved oxygen through plastic components influenced the mineral colonization experiments positioned at the wellhead. This highlights the capacity of low abundance crustal fluid taxa to rapidly establish communities on diverse mineral substrates under changing environmental conditions such as from temperature and oxygen. PMID:27064928

  2. Sulfide geochronology along the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, John W.; Hannington, Mark D.; Clague, David A.; Kelley, Deborah S.; Delaney, John R.; Holden, James F.; Tivey, Margaret K.; Kimpe, Linda E.

    2013-07-01

    Forty-nine hydrothermal sulfide-sulfate rock samples from the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, northeastern Pacific Ocean, were dated by measuring the decay of 226Ra (half-life of 1600 years) in hydrothermal barite to provide a history of hydrothermal venting at the site over the past 6000 years. This dating method is effective for samples ranging in age from ˜200 to 20,000 years old and effectively bridges an age gap between shorter- and longer-lived U-series dating techniques for hydrothermal deposits. Results show that hydrothermal venting at the active High Rise, Sasquatch, and Main Endeavour fields began at least 850, 1450, and 2300 years ago, respectively. Barite ages of other inactive deposits on the axial valley floor are between ˜1200 and ˜2200 years old, indicating past widespread hydrothermal venting outside of the currently active vent fields. Samples from the half-graben on the eastern slope of the axial valley range in age from ˜1700 to ˜2925 years, and a single sample from outside the axial valley, near the westernmost valley fault scarp is ˜5850 ± 205 years old. The spatial relationship between hydrothermal venting and normal faulting suggests a temporal relationship, with progressive younging of sulfide deposits from the edges of the axial valley toward the center of the rift. These relationships are consistent with the inward migration of normal faulting toward the center of the valley over time and a minimum age of onset of hydrothermal activity in this region of 5850 years.

  3. Geology and hydrothermal evolution of the Mothra Hydrothermal Field, Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glickson, Deborah A.; Kelley, Deborah S.; Delaney, John R.

    2007-06-01

    Detailed characterization of the Mothra Hydrothermal Field, the most southern and spatially extensive field on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, provides new insights into its geologic and hydrothermal development. Meter-scale bathymetry, side-scan sonar imagery, and direct dive observations show that Mothra is composed of six actively venting sulfide clusters spaced 40-200 m apart. Chimneys within each cluster have similar morphology and venting characteristics, and all clusters host a combination of active and extinct sulfide structures. Black smoker chimneys venting fluids above 300°C are rare, while more common lower-temperature, diffusely venting chimneys support dense colonies of macrofauna and bacterial mat. Hydrothermal sediment and extinct sulfide debris cover 10-15 m of the seafloor surrounding each vent cluster, obscuring the underlying basaltic substrate of light to moderately sedimented pillow, lobate, sheet, and chaotic flows, basalt talus, and collapse terrain. Extinct sulfide chimneys and debris between the clusters indicate that hydrothermal flow was once more widespread and that it has shifted spatially over time. The most prominent structural features in the axial valley at Mothra are regional (020°) trending faults and fissures and north-south trending collapse basins. The location of actively venting clusters within the field is controlled by (1) localization of fluid upflow along the western boundary fault zone, and diversion of these fluids by antithetic faults to feed vent clusters near the western valley wall, and (2) tapping of residual magmatic heat in the central part of the axial valley, which drives flow beneath vent clusters directly adjacent to the collapse basins 70-90 m east of the western valley wall. These processes form the basis for a model of axial valley and hydrothermal system development at Mothra, in which the field is initiated by an eruptive-diking episode and sustained through intense microseismicity

  4. Microbial diversity within basement fluids of the sediment-buried Juan de Fuca Ridge flank

    PubMed Central

    Jungbluth, Sean P; Grote, Jana; Lin, Huei-Ting; Cowen, James P; Rappé, Michael S

    2013-01-01

    Despite its immense size, logistical and methodological constraints have largely limited microbiological investigations of the subseafloor basement biosphere. In this study, a unique sampling system was used to collect fluids from the subseafloor basaltic crust via a Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kit (CORK) observatory at Integrated Ocean Drilling Program borehole 1301A, located at a depth of 2667 m in the Pacific Ocean on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Here, a fluid delivery line directly accesses a 3.5 million years old basalt-hosted basement aquifer, overlaid by 262 m of sediment, which serves as a barrier to direct exchange with bottom seawater. At an average of 1.2 × 104 cells ml−1, microorganisms in borehole fluids were nearly an order of magnitude less abundant than in surrounding bottom seawater. Ribosomal RNA genes were characterized from basement fluids, providing the first snapshots of microbial community structure using a high-integrity fluid delivery line. Interestingly, microbial communities retrieved from different CORKs (1026B and 1301A) nearly a decade apart shared major community members, consistent with hydrogeological connectivity. However, over three sampling years, the dominant gene clone lineage changed from relatives of Candidatus Desulforudis audaxviator within the bacterial phylum Firmicutes in 2008 to the Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotic Group in 2009 and a lineage within the JTB35 group of Gammaproteobacteria in 2010, and statistically significant variation in microbial community structure was observed. The enumeration of different phylogenetic groups of cells within borehole 1301A fluids supported our observation that the deep subsurface microbial community was temporally dynamic. PMID:22791235

  5. Hydrothermal fluid composition at Middle Valley, Northern Juan de Fuca Ridge: Temporal and spatial variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruse, Anna M.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; Saccocia, Peter J.; Zierenberg, Robert

    Hydrothermal fluids were collected in July 2000 from the Dead Dog and Ore Drilling Program (ODP) Mound vent fields at Middle Valley, a sediment-covered spreading center on the northern Juan de Fuca Ridge. Measured fluid temperatures varied from 187° to 281°C in focused flow vents and 40°C in ODP Hole 1035F. Cl concentrations indicate that ODP Mound fluids undergo phase separation in the subsurface, whereas Dead Dog fluids do not. The lack of phase separation at Dead Dog is consistent with other geochemical indicators of lower subsurface temperatures. Cooling and equilibration with quartz after phase separation at the ODP Mound results in exit temperatures and silica concentrations that are indistinguishable from those at Dead Dog. The sulfur isotopic composition of aqueous ΣH2S indicates extensive reduction of seawater SO4 and leaching of basaltic sulfur at both areas. A new area of venting, which resulted from drilling operations during ODP Leg 169, was discovered on the eastern side of the ODP Mound. The fluids in the new area have compositions that are similar to those of Hole 1035H and Shiner Bock, except for lower H2 and higher H2S concentrations. These differences reflect the conversion of pyrite to pyrrhotite in the ODP Mound as fluids react with sulfide minerals during upflow. Fluid temperatures and compositions have remained constant between 1990 and 2000 indicating that subsurface reaction zone conditions did not change over this period. Near constant concentrations of sediment-derived mobile trace elements suggest that the residence time of fluids in a high-temperature reservoir exceeds 10 years.

  6. Microbial Primary Productivity in Hydrothermal Vent Chimneys at Middle Valley, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olins, H. C.; Rogers, D.; Frank, K. L.; Girguis, P. R.; Vidoudez, C.

    2012-12-01

    Chemosynthetic primary productivity supports hydrothermal vent ecosystems, but the extent of that productivity has not been well measured. To examine the role that environmental temperature plays in controlling carbon fixation rates, and to assess the degree to which microbial community composition, in situ geochemistry, and mineralogy influence carbon fixation, we conducted a series of shipboard incubations across a range of temperatures (4, 25, 50 and 90°C) and at environmentally relevant geochemical conditions using material recovered from three hydrothermal vent chimneys in the Middle Valley hydrothermal vent field (Juan de Fuca Ridge). Net rates of carbon fixation (CFX) were greatest at lower temperatures, and were similar among structures. Rates did not correlate with the mineralogy or the geochemical composition of the high temperature fluids at each chimney. No obvious patterns of association were observed between carbon fixation rates and microbial community composition. Abundance of selected functional genes related to different carbon fixation pathway exhibited striking differences among the three study sites, but did not correlate with rates. Natural carbon isotope ratios implicate the Calvin Benson Bassham Cycle as the dominant mechanism of primary production in these systems, despite the abundance of genes related to other pathways (and presumably some degree of activity). Together these data reveal that primary productivity by endolithic communities does not exhibit much variation among these chimneys, and further reveal that microbial activity cannot easily be related to mineralogical and geochemical assessments that are made at a coarser scale. Indeed, the relationships between carbon fixation rates and community composition/functional gene abundance were also likely obfuscated by differences in scale at which these measurements were made. Regardless, these data reveal the degree to which endolithic, anaerobic carbon fixation contributes to

  7. Preliminary Analysis of Multibeam, Subbottom, and Water Column Data Collected from the Juan de Fuca Plate and Gorda Ridge Earthquake Swarm Sites, March-April 2008.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merle, S. G.; Dziak, R. P.; Embley, R. W.; Lupton, J. E.; Greene, R. R.; Chadwick, W. W.; Lilley, M.; Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Braunmiller, J.; Fowler, M.; Resing, J.

    2008-12-01

    Two oceanographic expeditions were undertaken in the northeast Pacific during April and September of 2008 to collect a variety of scientific data at the sites of intense earthquake swarms that occurred from 30 March to 9 April 2008. The earthquake swarms were detected by the NOAA/PMEL and US Navy SOSUS hydrophone system in the northeast Pacific. The first swarm occurred within the central Juan de Fuca Plate, ~280 km west of the Oregon coast and ~70 km north of the Blanco Transform Fault Zone (BTFZ). Time history of the events indicate this swarm was not a typical mainshock-aftershock sequence, and was the largest SOSUS detected swarm within the intraplate. This intraplate swarm activity was followed by three distinct clusters of earthquakes located along the BTFZ. Two of the clusters, which began on 10 and 12 April, were initiated by MW 5+ earthquakes suggesting these were mainshock-aftershock sequences, and the number of earthquakes on the BTFZ were small relative to the intraplate swarm. On 22 April, another intense earthquake swarm began on the northern Gorda Ridge segment adjacent to the BTFZ. The Gorda swarm produced >1000 SOSUS detected earthquakes over a five-day duration, with activity distributed between the mid-segment high and the ridge-transform intersection. This swarm was of special interest because of previous magmatic activity near its location in 1996. Overall, the March-April earthquake activity showed an interesting spatio-temporal progression, beginning at the intraplate, to the transform, then to a spreading event at the ridge. This pattern once again demonstrates the Juan de Fuca plate is continually moving and converging with North America at the Cascadia Subduction Zone. As the initial swarm was not focused on the ridge crest, it was not interpreted as a significant eruptive event, and we did not advocate a large-scale Ridge2000 response effort. The earthquake activity, however, did have an unusual character and therefore a short (four

  8. Precipitation and growth of barite within hydrothermal vent deposits from the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, John William; Hannington, Mark D.; Tivey, Margaret K.; Hansteen, Thor; Williamson, Nicole M.-B.; Stewart, Margaret; Fietzke, Jan; Butterfield, David; Frische, Matthias; Allen, Leigh; Cousens, Brian; Langer, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Hydrothermal vent deposits form on the seafloor as a result of cooling and mixing of hot hydrothermal fluids with cold seawater. Amongst the major sulfide and sulfate minerals that are preserved at vent sites, barite (BaSO4) is unique because it requires the direct mixing of Ba-rich hydrothermal fluid with sulfate-rich seawater in order for precipitation to occur. Because of its extremely low solubility, barite crystals preserve geochemical fingerprints associated with conditions of formation. Here, we present data from petrographic and geochemical analyses of hydrothermal barite from the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, northeast Pacific Ocean, in order to determine the physical and chemical conditions under which barite precipitates within seafloor hydrothermal vent systems. Petrographic analyses of 22 barite-rich samples show a range of barite crystal morphologies: dendritic and acicular barite forms near the exterior vent walls, whereas larger bladed and tabular crystals occur within the interior of chimneys. A two component mixing model based on Sr concentrations and 87Sr/86Sr of both seawater and hydrothermal fluid, combined with 87Sr/86Sr data from whole rock and laser-ablation ICP-MS analyses of barite crystals indicate that barite precipitates from mixtures containing as low as 17% and as high as 88% hydrothermal fluid component, relative to seawater. Geochemical modelling of the relationship between aqueous species concentrations and degree of fluid mixing indicates that Ba2+ availability is the dominant control on mineral saturation. Observations combined with model results support that dendritic barite forms from fluids of less than 40% hydrothermal component and with a saturation index greater than ∼0.6, whereas more euhedral crystals form at lower levels of supersaturation associated with greater contributions of hydrothermal fluid. Fluid inclusions within barite indicate formation temperatures of between ∼120 °C and 240 °C during

  9. Monitoring Change on Hydrothermal Edifices by Photogrammetric Time Series: Case Studies from the Endeavour Segment (Juan de Fuca Ridge)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heesemann, M.; Kwasnitschka, T.; Kelley, D. S.; Mihaly, S. F.

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution photogrammetric surveys derived from ROV or AUV imagery yield seafloor geometry at centimeter resolution with full color texture while modeling overhangs and crevasses, generating vastly more detailed terrain models compared to most acoustic methods. The models furthermore serve as geographic reference frames for localized studies. Repetitive surveys consequently facilitate the precise, quantitative study of edifice buildup and erosion as well as the development of the biological habitat. We compare data gathered by the Ocean Networks Canada maintenance cruises with earlier surveys at two sites (Mothra, Main Endeavour Field) along the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge.

  10. Uniformity and diversity in the composition of mineralizing fluids from hydrothermal vents on the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Philpotts, J.A.; Aruscavage, P. J.; Von Damm, K. L.

    1987-01-01

    Abundances of Li, Na, K, Rb, Ca, Sr, Ba, Mn, Fe, Zn, and Si have been determined in fluid samples from 7 vents located in three areas on the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge. The hydrothermal component estimated from the Mg contents of the samples ranges from 7% to 76%. Concentrations of Fe and Si, among other elements, in acid-stabilized solutions appear to be generally representative of the parental hydrothermal fluids, but some Zn determinations and most Ba values appear to be too low.-from Authors

  11. High-Resolution Imaging of Axial Volcano, Juan de Fuca ridge.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnulf, A. F.; Harding, A. J.; Kent, G. M.

    2014-12-01

    To date, seismic experiments have been key in our understanding of the internal structure of volcanic systems. However, most experiments, especially subaerial-based, are often restricted to refraction geometries with limited numbers of sources and receivers, and employ smoothing constraints required by tomographic inversions that produce smoothed and blurry images with spatial resolutions well below the length scale of important features that define these magmatic systems. Taking advantage of the high density of sources and receivers from multichannel seismic (MCS) data should, in principle, allow detailed images of velocity and reflectivity to be recovered. Unfortunately, the depth of mid-ocean ridges has the detrimental effect of concealing critical velocity information behind the seafloor reflection, preventing first arrival travel-time tomographic approaches from imaging the shallowest and most heterogeneous part of the crust. To overcome the limitations of the acquisition geometry, here we are using an innovative multistep approach. We combine a synthetic ocean bottom experiment (SOBE), 3-D traveltime tomography, 2D elastic full waveform and a reverse time migration (RTM) formalism, and present one of the most detailed imagery to date of a massive and complex magmatic system beneath Axial seamount, an active submarine volcano that lies at the intersection of the Juan de Fuca ridge and the Cobb-Eickelberg seamount chain. We present high-resolution images along 12 seismic lines that span the volcano. We refine the extent/volume of the main crustal magma reservoir that lies beneath the central caldera. We investigate the extent, volume and physical state of a secondary magma body present to the southwest and study its connections with the main magma reservoir. Additionally, we present a 3D tomographic model of the entire volcano that reveals a subsiding caldera floor that provides a near perfect trap for the ponding of lava flows, supporting a "trapdoor

  12. Low-Temperature Weathering of Hydrothermal Sulfide Minerals at Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toner, B. M.; Santelli, C. M.; Rogers, D. R.; Edwards, K. J.

    2005-12-01

    Phylogenetically and metabolically diverse microbial communities have been identified in several deep ocean settings, including the seafloor at mid-ocean ridge flanks. The microorganisms present in these environments appear to participate in geochemical processes, such as mineral dissolution and mineral precipitation, over geological time scales. The purpose of our study was to characterize the initial alteration products and geochemical signatures of hydrothermal sulfide minerals exposed at the seafloor near hydrothermal venting at the Juan de Fuca Ridge, and to identify those weathering products specific to microbial metabolism. Biominerals are notoriously difficult to characterize, often possessing structural defects and small particle size, and are commonly only one of many constituents within natural particles and biofilms. Given these challenges, focused beam X-ray absorption spectroscopic (XAS) techniques provide important capabilities for identifying microbial weathering products by (1) effectively simplifying the chemistry of the sample through examination of chemically discrete areas, (2) identifying co-occurring elements of interest, (3) providing complementary structural information from co-occurring elements, and (4) examining samples at the natural micro- to millimeter spatial scale of mineralogical heterogeneity. We collected 2-dimensional X-ray fluorescence (XRF) elemental maps of experimentally weathered sulfide minerals in cross section. For these experiments, fresh, unweathered sulfide minerals were incubated at low temperatures for a two month period and then collected for mineralogical and microbiological analysis. Previous work on these samples showed that abundant Fe oxide minerals (principally 2-line ferrihydrite) accumulated during weathering, and correlated with dense cell aggregates at the mineral surface. Additionally, a diverse collection of Fe oxidizing bacteria were cultured from these and other similar samples incubated or collected

  13. Porosity estimates of the upper crust in the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, E.; Toomey, D. R.; Hooft, E. E. E.; Wilcock, W. S. D.; Weekly, R. T.; Lee, S. M.; Kim, Y.

    2015-12-01

    We estimate upper crustal porosity variations using the differential effective medium (DEM) theory to interpret the observed seismic velocity variations for the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, an intermediate spreading center [Weekly et al., 2014]. We use six P-wave vertical velocity profiles averaged within 5 km × 10 km areas to estimate the porosity at depths from 0.4 km to 2 km. The profile regions cover on-axis, east and west flanks of the central Endeavour segment and three regions of the segment ends including the Endeavour-West Valley (E-WV) and the Cobb overlapping spreading centers (OSCs) and the relict Middle Valley. At the segment center, our calculated porosities on-axis and on the east and west flanks agree well with the apparent bulk porosities measured in Hole 504B at intermediate-spreading Costa Rica Rift [Becker, 1990] and decrease from 5-15% to 2-7% from 0.5 km to 1 km depth and seal by 2 km depth. At all depths, our calculated porosities on the east and west flanks are lower than those on-axis by ~1.3-3%. This indicates the infilling of cracks by mineral precipitation associated with near-axis hydrothermal circulation [Newman et al., 2011]. At the segment ends, upper crustal velocities are lower than those in the segment center at depths < 2 km. These lower velocities are attributed to higher porosities (10-20% at 0.4 km decreasing to 3-6% at 2 km depth). This may indicate that fracturing in the OSCs strongly affects porosity at shallow depths. Between 0.7 km and 1 km, porosities estimated in all regions using pore aspect ratios of 0.05, 0.1 and 0.2 are higher than those from Hole 504B indicating that the aspect ratio of cracks may be smaller than 0.05. There also appears to be a spreading rate dependence to upper crustal porosity structure. On-axis at the Endeavour segment, the calculated porosities from 0.4 km to 2 km are higher than those at the Lucky Strike segment, a slow spreading center [Seher et al., 2010]. Specifically at 2

  14. Southern Juan De Fuca Ridge and Escanaba Trough, Gorda Ridge: Comparison of hydrothermal deposits in sediment-free and sediment-covered ridge settings

    SciTech Connect

    Benninger, L.M.; Randolph, M.; Koski, A.; Zierenberg, R.A. )

    1990-06-01

    Southern Juan De Fuca Ridge (SJDF) is a low-relief, sediment-starved ridge axis that has a total opening rate of 6 cm/year and is characterized by lobate and brecciated sheet flows and pillows of MORB composition. Sulfide deposits form at {approximately}2,200 m water depth and are concentrated within a narrow graben centered within the ridge axial valley. Solitary and coalesced chimneys (0.25 to 12 m high) rise directly from the basalt basement and are composed predominantly of Zn sulfide accompanied by Fe and Cu-Fe sulfide and traces of Pb sulfide. Anhydrite occurs as a minor phase in some chimneys. Sulfide chimneys were formed by rapid-venting of high temperature ({approximately}285{degree}C) fluids. These acidic fluids (pH {approximately}3.5) are enriched in Cl, Na, and Ca and are depleted in Cu and Zn. In contrast to SJDF, Escanaba Trough (ET) is spreading at {approximately}2.3 cm/year and has the high relief and axial graben morphology typical of the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The floor of the axial valley is buried by up to 500 m of clay and terrigenous silt. Rare basement exposures reveal unbrecciated sheet flows and pillow basalts of MORB composition. Large chimney-topped sulfide mounds up to 20 m high and hundreds of meters in extent occur at {approximately}3,250 m water depth at the base of sediment hills; sulfide veins, small chimneys, and clastic deposits occur on, and within, the sediment between hills. Two distinct sulfide types occur at ET. Pyrrhotite-rich sulfide is enriched in Fe, Cu, and As and is associated with low-velocity venting of warm (<220{degree} C) alkaline (pH {approximately}5.4) fluids that are currently depositing anhydrite and barite sinter deposits on top of the sulfide mounds.

  15. Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge, Integrated Studies Site (ISS) Update and Opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterfield, D.; Ridge Community

    2003-12-01

    The Ridge 2000 (R2K) Integrated Studies bull's eye on the Juan de Fuca Ridge is focused on the Main Endeavour hydrothermal field, located on the central portion of the Endeavour Segment. This vent field is one of the most vigorously venting systems along the global mid-ocean ridge spreading network, hosting at least 18 large sulfide structures that contains more than100 smokers. Prior to a magmatic event in 2000 some of the edifices had been venting 380C, volatile-rich fluids with extremely low chlorinities for a decade. In addition to the Main Endeavour Field there are four other known high temperature vent fields spaced approximately 2 kilometers apart along the segment (with hints of more) and abundant areas of diffuse flow, both nearby and distal to the high temperature venting. Diffuse flow from the structures and from a variety of basaltic-hosted sites provides rich habitats abundant with microbial and macrofaunal communities. There are well-developed gradients in volatile concentrations along axis that may reflect influence from a sedimentary source to the north, and high chlorinity fluids vent from the most southern (Mothra) and northern fields (Sasquatch). Twenty years of research have laid a firm base for the 5-year plans of R2K at this site, which include examining the response of this segment to perturbations induced by tectonic and magmatic events, identification of the reservoirs, fluxes, and feedbacks of mass and energy at this site, and predictive modeling coupled with field observations. Since designation as an IS site, high-resolution bathymetric mapping (EM300) and an extensive multi-channel seismic survey have been conducted along the entire segment. Smaller focused areas have also been mapped at meter resolution by SM2000 sonar. Intense field programs in 2003 established the first in-situ seismic array along a mid-ocean ridge, which includes installation of a buried broadband seismometer and 7 short-period seismometers emplaced within basaltic

  16. Vent Field Distribution and Evolution Along the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, D. S.; Delaney, J. R.; Lilley, M. D.; Butterfield, D. A.

    2001-12-01

    Five major vent fields have now been discovered along the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. From the north to the south they include Sasquatch, Salty Dawg, High Rise, Main Endeavour, and Mothra. Spacing between the distinct, high-temperature fields increases from the north to the south. For example Sasquatch is located 1.6 km north of Salty Dawg and Mothra is 2.7 km south of the Main Endeavour Field. In addition to changes in spacing of the vent fields along axis there are also dramatic changes in the style, intensity, and thermal-chemical characteristics of venting. The newly discovered Sasquatch field extends for >200 m in length, and venting is limited to a few isolated, small structures that reach 284° C. Active venting is confined to the northern portion of the field. In contrast, extinct, massive sulfide edifices and oxidized sulfide talus can be followed continuously for over 200 m along a 25-30 m wide, 020 trending ridge indicating that this field was very active in the past. In contrast to the delicate active structures, older extinct structures reach at least 25 m in height and the aspect ratios are similar to active pillars in the Mothra Field 7.5 km, to the south. It is unclear if venting at this site represents rejuvenation of the field, or whether it is in a waning stage. Within Salty Dawg, vent fluid temperatures reach 296° C and vigorous venting is constrained to a few, multi-flanged edifices that reach 25 m in height and 25 m in length. The field hosts over 25 structures, oxidized sulfide is abundant, and diffuse flow is dominant. Fluid compositions and temperatures are consistent with Salty Dawg being in a waning stage of evolution. Venting intensity and incidence of venting increase dramatically at High Rise where numerous multi-flanged structures are active; temperatures reach 343° C. The most intense and active of the fields is the Main Endeavour, with at least 21 actively venting, multi-flanged edifices that contain at least 100

  17. Estimating Heat Transfer from Grotto Mound, NEPTUNE Canada Cabled Observatory, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rona, P. A.; Bemis, K. G.; Xu, G.

    2012-12-01

    Heat flux is a fundamental property of a seafloor hydrothermal system that relates to magnitude of sub-seafloor heat source and biosphere conditions, to distribution and style of seafloor venting and benthic biota, to chemical flux, plume formation, and dispersal of biological matter in the water column. We are working to estimate heat flux from Grotto mound, the site of the NEPTUNE Canada Cabled Observatory in the Main Endeavour Field on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The mound is formed of two sulfide edifices that lie between ~2190 and 2180 m isobaths: 1) an elliptical edifice with major NE-SW-trending axis ~30 m long and minor axis ~ 14 m wide (area ~ 330 m2); 2) a columnar edifice ~ 10 m in diameter and 10 m high (area ~80 m2) named the North Tower, situated across a narrow (~5 m wide) saddle (area ~40 m2) at the W end of the elliptical edifice. Several black smokers discharge relatively small plumes at the E end of the elliptical edifice. A cluster of vigorous black smokers discharge from the top of North Tower and merge to form a large plume. Patchy diffuse flow occurs in areas around all of the black smokers and in the saddle between the two edifices. We are in process of measuring heat flux from components of hydrothermal discharge on Grotto mound, as follows: 1) for smokers on the North Tower an integrated heat flux of 28-55 MW is calculated based on temperature measurements in the initial 20 m rise of the plume assuming that the highest temperatures measured are closest to those of the plume centerline ; 2) for smokers on the E end of the elliptical edifice based on measurements of flow rate from video and acoustic Doppler phase shift, video of vent diameters, and in situ temperature measurements; 3) for discharge from flanges on some chimneys based on video of flow and in situ temperature measurements; 4) for diffuse flow based on area measured by Acoustic Scintillation Thermography and direct measurements of temperature and flow rate. We are evaluating

  18. Geochemical and Morphological Characteristics of Metalliferous Deposits at the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrischeva, E.; Scott, S.

    2005-12-01

    Metalliferous sediments of the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge originating from fallout of particles from a hydrothermal plume and wasting of sulfide chimneys and their oxidation products, as well as deposits of primary Fe-Si-rich oxyhydroxides, were collected during Keck supported expeditions in 2003 and 2004. The analysis of sediment deposited within 35 m of an actively venting high-temperature chimney at the Main Endeavour Field and containing hydrothermal material derived from a plume fallout indicates that Fe, Cu and Zn settled as sulfides, constituting about 3% of the sediment, and as amorphous phases. The amorphous material is represented by Fe-Si-S phases and black aggregates of variable Fe-Mn-Si-S-P-Ca-Mg-Cu-Zn composition. The association of the amorphous material with biogenic debris and bacteria suggests that microorganisms have enhanced the scavenging of the metals and their settlement near the vents. Fine-grained sulfides, barite and other mineral particles may have been deposited near the vents as zooplankton fecal pellets. Barite and Fe-Mn oxyhydroxides are the hydrothermal phases in the sediments along 1.8 km of the axial valley. The sediments also contain Fe-rich montmorillonite of authigenic origin, illite, chlorite, quartz, feldspar and calcite. The study of a mound of old oxidized sulfides at the Main Endeavour Field shows that patchy accumulations of Fe oxyhydroxides are associated with increased concentrations of Si. It is suggested that the oxidation of sulfides was accompanied by precipitation of primary Fe-Si oxyhydroxides from diffuse low-temperature sources. At the Mothra Field, low-temperature solutions have deposited amorphous Fe-Si-Mn oxyhydroxides containing minor Ca, P, Mg, S, Zn and Cu as well as amorphous material of Fe-Mn-Si-S-P-Zn-Pb composition that are found as an external crust on the wall of an extinct chimney. In the oxyhydroxide deposits, the amorphous material is associated with a variety of mineralized

  19. Direct Measurements of Hydrothermal Heat Output at Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germanovich, L. N.; di Iorio, D.; Genc, G.; Hurt, R. S.; Lowell, R. P.; Holden, J. F.; Butterfield, D. A.; Olson, E. J.

    2009-12-01

    Heat output and fluid flow are key parameters for characterizing seafloor hydrothermal systems at oceanic spreading centers. In particular, they are essential for examining partition of heat and geochemical fluxes between discrete and diffuse flow components. Hydrothermal heat output also constrains permeability of young oceanic crust and thickness of the conductive boundary layer separating hydrothermal circulation from the underlying magmatic heat source. Over the past several years, we have deployed a number of relatively simple devices to make direct measurements of focused and diffuse flow. Most recently, we have used cup anemometer and turbine flow meters to measure fluid flow and heat flux at individual high-temperature vents and diffuse flow sites. The turbine flow meter (Figure 1) includes a titanium rotor assembly housed within a stainless steel tube and supported by sapphire bearings. The device can be used at different seafloor settings for measurements of both diffuse and focused flow. The spin of the rotor blades is videotaped to acquire the angular velocity, which is a function of the flow rate determined through calibration. We report data obtained during four cruises to the Main Endeavor and High Rise vent fields, Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdFR), between 2007 and 2009. Overall more than 50 successful measurements of heat flow have been made on a variety of high-, medium-, and low-temperature hydrothermal sites on the Endeavor, Mothra, and High Rise structures. For example, the velocity of diffuse flow at Endeavor ranged from ~1 to ~10 cm/sec. The flow velocity from black smokers varied from ~10 cm/sec to ~1 m/sec, which appears to be similar to EPR 9°N. Typical measurements of heat flux obtained at JdFR ranged from ~1 kW for diffuse flow to ~1 MW for black smokers. Although it is difficult to extrapolate the data and obtain the integrated heat output for a vent field on JdFR, the data are used to characterize the heat fluxes from individual vent

  20. Growth of large sulfide structures on the endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tivey, Margaret K.; Delaney, John R.

    1986-04-01

    Mapping and sampling with DSRV "Alvin" has established that sulfide blocks 0.5 m across, dredged from the axial valley of the Endeavour Segment at 47°57'N, are samples of unusually large sulfide structures. The steep-sided structures, up to 30 m in length, 20 m in height, and 10-15 m across, are localized by venting along normal faults at the base of the western axial valley wall, and are distributed for about 200 m along strike paralleling the 020 trend of the ridge crest. High-temperature fluids (350 to more than 400°C) pass through the massive sulfide structures and enter seawater through small, concentric "nozzle-like" features projecting from the top or the sides of the larger vent structures. Diffuse, low-temperature flow is pervasive in the vicinity of the active sulfide structures, exiting from basalt and sulfide surfaces alike. Evidence of recent volcanic activity is sparse. The two largest samples taken with the dredge would not have been recoverable using the submersible. These samples represent massive, complex portions of the sulfide structures which were not closely associated with rapid high-temperature fluid flow at the time of sampling; they contain textural evidence of sealed hydrothermal fluid exit channels. Mineralogy is dominated by Fe sulfides nnd amorphous silica. Pyrite, marcasite, wurtzite, chalcopyrite, and iss are the most common sulfide phases. Pyrrhotite, galena, and sphalerite are present in trace amounts. Barite, amorphous silica, and chalcedony are the only non-sulfide phases; anhydrite is not observed in any of the dredge samples, although it is common in the chimney-like samples recovered by "Alvin". Specific mineralogical-textural zones within the dredge samples are anaoogous to individual layers in East Pacific Rise at 21°N and southern Juan de Fuca Ridge samples, with two exceptions: a coarse-grained, highly porous Fe sulfide-rich interior containing sulfidized tubeworm casts, and a 2-5 cm thick zone near the outer margin of

  1. Free-living bacterial communities associated with tubeworm (Ridgeia piscesae) aggregations in contrasting diffuse flow hydrothermal vent habitats at the Main Endeavour Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    PubMed

    Forget, Nathalie L; Kim Juniper, S

    2013-04-01

    We systematically studied free-living bacterial diversity within aggregations of the vestimentiferan tubeworm Ridgeia piscesae sampled from two contrasting flow regimes (High Flow and Low Flow) in the Endeavour Hydrothermal Vents Marine Protected Area (MPA) on the Juan de Fuca Ridge (Northeast Pacific). Eight samples of particulate detritus were recovered from paired tubeworm grabs from four vent sites. Most sequences (454 tag and Sanger methods) were affiliated to the Epsilonproteobacteria, and the sulfur-oxidizing genus Sulfurovum was dominant in all samples. Gammaproteobacteria were also detected, mainly in Low Flow sequence libraries, and were affiliated with known methanotrophs and decomposers. The cooccurrence of sulfur reducers from the Deltaproteobacteria and the Epsilonproteobacteria suggests internal sulfur cycling within these habitats. Other phyla detected included Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Chloroflexi, Firmicutes, Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, and Deinococcus-Thermus. Statistically significant relationships between sequence library composition and habitat type suggest a predictable pattern for High Flow and Low Flow environments. Most sequences significantly more represented in High Flow libraries were related to sulfur and hydrogen oxidizers, while mainly heterotrophic groups were more represented in Low Flow libraries. Differences in temperature, available energy for metabolism, and stability between High Flow and Low Flow habitats potentially explain their distinct bacterial communities.

  2. Free-living bacterial communities associated with tubeworm (Ridgeia piscesae) aggregations in contrasting diffuse flow hydrothermal vent habitats at the Main Endeavour Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    PubMed

    Forget, Nathalie L; Kim Juniper, S

    2013-04-01

    We systematically studied free-living bacterial diversity within aggregations of the vestimentiferan tubeworm Ridgeia piscesae sampled from two contrasting flow regimes (High Flow and Low Flow) in the Endeavour Hydrothermal Vents Marine Protected Area (MPA) on the Juan de Fuca Ridge (Northeast Pacific). Eight samples of particulate detritus were recovered from paired tubeworm grabs from four vent sites. Most sequences (454 tag and Sanger methods) were affiliated to the Epsilonproteobacteria, and the sulfur-oxidizing genus Sulfurovum was dominant in all samples. Gammaproteobacteria were also detected, mainly in Low Flow sequence libraries, and were affiliated with known methanotrophs and decomposers. The cooccurrence of sulfur reducers from the Deltaproteobacteria and the Epsilonproteobacteria suggests internal sulfur cycling within these habitats. Other phyla detected included Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Chloroflexi, Firmicutes, Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, and Deinococcus-Thermus. Statistically significant relationships between sequence library composition and habitat type suggest a predictable pattern for High Flow and Low Flow environments. Most sequences significantly more represented in High Flow libraries were related to sulfur and hydrogen oxidizers, while mainly heterotrophic groups were more represented in Low Flow libraries. Differences in temperature, available energy for metabolism, and stability between High Flow and Low Flow habitats potentially explain their distinct bacterial communities. PMID:23401293

  3. Free-living bacterial communities associated with tubeworm (Ridgeia piscesae) aggregations in contrasting diffuse flow hydrothermal vent habitats at the Main Endeavour Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    PubMed Central

    Forget, Nathalie L; Kim Juniper, S

    2013-01-01

    We systematically studied free-living bacterial diversity within aggregations of the vestimentiferan tubeworm Ridgeia piscesae sampled from two contrasting flow regimes (High Flow and Low Flow) in the Endeavour Hydrothermal Vents Marine Protected Area (MPA) on the Juan de Fuca Ridge (Northeast Pacific). Eight samples of particulate detritus were recovered from paired tubeworm grabs from four vent sites. Most sequences (454 tag and Sanger methods) were affiliated to the Epsilonproteobacteria, and the sulfur-oxidizing genus Sulfurovum was dominant in all samples. Gammaproteobacteria were also detected, mainly in Low Flow sequence libraries, and were affiliated with known methanotrophs and decomposers. The cooccurrence of sulfur reducers from the Deltaproteobacteria and the Epsilonproteobacteria suggests internal sulfur cycling within these habitats. Other phyla detected included Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Chloroflexi, Firmicutes, Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, and Deinococcus–Thermus. Statistically significant relationships between sequence library composition and habitat type suggest a predictable pattern for High Flow and Low Flow environments. Most sequences significantly more represented in High Flow libraries were related to sulfur and hydrogen oxidizers, while mainly heterotrophic groups were more represented in Low Flow libraries. Differences in temperature, available energy for metabolism, and stability between High Flow and Low Flow habitats potentially explain their distinct bacterial communities. PMID:23401293

  4. Hot spot-ridge crest convergence in the northeast Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Karsten, J.L.; Delaney, J.R. )

    1989-01-10

    Evolution of the Juan de Fuca Ridge during the past 7 m.y. has been reconstructed taking into account both the propagating rift history and migration of the spreading center in the 'absolute' (fixed hot spot) reference frame. Northwestward migration of the spreading center (at a rate of 30 km/m.y.) has resulted in progressive encroachment of the ridge axis on the Cobb Hot Spot and westward jumping of the central third of the ridge axis more recently than 0.5 Ma. Seamounts in the Cobb-Eickelberg chain are predicted to display systematic variations in morphology and petrology, and a reduction in the age contrast between the edifice and underlying crust, as a result of the ridge axis approach. Relative seamount volumes also indicate that magmatic output of the hot spot varied during this interval, with a reduction in activity between 2.5 and 4.5 Ma, compared with relatively more robust activity before and after this period. Spatial relationships determined in this reconstruction allow hypotheses relating hot spot activity and rift propagation to be evaluated. In most cases, rift propagation has been directed away from the hot spot during the time period considered. Individual propagators show some reduction in propagation rate as separation between the propagating rift tip and hot spot increases, but cross comparison of multiple propagators does not uniformly display the same relationship. No obvious correlation exists between propagation rate and increasing proximity of the hot spot to the ridge axis or increasing hot spot output. Taken together, these observations do not offer compelling support for the concept of hot spot driven rift propagation. However, short-term reversals in propagation direction at the Cobb Offset coincide with activity of the Heckle melting anomaly, suggesting that local propagation effects may be related to excess magma supply at the ridge axis.

  5. Gravity and seismic study of crustal structure along the Juan de Fuca Ridge axis and across pseudofaults on the ridge flanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marjanović, Milena; Carbotte, Suzanne M.; Nedimović, Mladen R.; Canales, Juan Pablo

    2011-05-01

    Variations in topography and seismic structure are observed along the Juan de Fuca (JdF) Ridge axis and in the vicinity of pseudofaults on the ridge flanks left by former episodes of ridge propagation. Here we analyze gravity data coregistered with multichannel seismic data from the JdF Ridge and flanks in order to better understand the origin of crustal structure variations in this area. The data were collected along the ridge axis and along three ridge-perpendicular transects at the Endeavor, Northern Symmetric, and Cleft segments. Negative Mantle Bouguer anomalies of -21 to -28 mGal are observed at the axis of the three segments. Thicker crust at the Endeavor and Cleft segments is inferred from seismic data and can account for the small differences in axial gravity anomalies (3-7 mGal). Additional low densities/elevated temperatures within and/or below the axial crust are required to explain the remaining axial MBA low at all segments. Gravity models indicate that the region of low densities is wider beneath the Cleft segment. Gravity models for pseudofaults crossed along the three transects support the presence of thinner and denser crust within the pseudofault zones that we attribute to iron-enriched crust. On the young crust side of the pseudofaults, a 10-20 km wide zone of thicker crust is found. Reflection events interpreted as subcrustal sills underlie the zones of thicker crust and are the presumed source for the iron enrichment.

  6. The concentration and isotopic composition of carbon in basaltic glasses from the Juan de Fuca Ridge, Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Blank, J G; Delaney, J R; Des Marais, D J

    1993-02-01

    The abundance and 13C/12C ratios of carbon were analyzed in basaltic glass from twenty locations along the Juan de Fuca Ridge using a 3-step combustion/extraction technique. Carbon released during the first two combustion steps at 400-500 degrees C and 600-650 degrees C is interpreted to be secondary, and only the carbon recovered during a final combustion step at approximately 1200 degrees C is thought to be indigenous to the samples. For carbon released at approximately 1200 degrees C, glasses analyzed as 1-2 mm chips contained 23-146 ppm C with delta 13C values of -4.8 to -9.3%, whereas samples crushed to 38-63 microns or 63-90 microns yielded 56-103 ppm C with delta 13C values of -6.1 to -9.2%. The concentrations and isotopic compositions of the primary carbon dissolved in the glasses and present in the vesicles are similar to those previously reported for other ocean-ridge basalts. The Juan de Fuca basaltic magmas were not in equilibrium with respect to carbon when they erupted and quenched on the sea floor. Evidence of disequilibrium includes (1) a large range of carbon contents among glasses collected at similar depths, (2) a highly variable calculated carbon isotopic fractionation between melt and vapor determined by comparing crushed and uncrushed splits of the same sample, and (3) a lack of correlation between vesicle abundance, carbon concentration, and depth of eruption. Variations in carbon concentration and delta 13C ratios along the ridge do not correlate with major element chemistry. The observed relationship between carbon concentrations and delta 13C values may be explained by late-stage, variable degrees of open-system (Rayleigh-like) degassing.

  7. The concentration and isotopic composition of carbon in basaltic glasses from the Juan de Fuca Ridge, Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blank, Jennifer G.; Delaney, John R.; Des Marais, David J.

    1993-01-01

    The abundance and C-13/C-12 ratios of carbon were analyzed in basaltic glass from twenty locations along the Juan de Fuca Ridge using a 3-step combustion/extraction technique. Carbon released during the first two combustion steps at 400-500 C and 600-650 C is interpreted to be secondary, and only the carbon recovered during a final combustion step at about 1200 C is thought to be indigenous to the samples. For carbon released at about 1200 C, glasses analyzed as 1-2 mm chips contained 23-146 ppm C with delta C-13 values of -4.8 to -9.3 per mil, whereas samples crushed to 38-63 microns or 63-90 microns yielded 56-103 ppm C with delta C-13 values of -6.1 to -9.2 per mil. The concentrations and isotopic compositions of the primary carbon dissolved in the glasses and present in the vesicles are similar to those previously reported for other ocean-ridge basalts. The Juan de Fuca basaltic magmas were not in equilibrium with respect to carbon when they erupted and quenched on the sea floor. Evidence of disequilibrium includes (1) a large range of carbon contents among glasses collected at similar depths, (2) a highly variable calculated carbon isotopic fractionation between melt and vapor determined by comparing crushed and uncrushed splits of the same sample, and (3) a lack of correlation between vesicle abundance, carbon concentration, and depth of eruption. Variations in carbon concentration and delta C-13 ratios along the ridge do not correlate with major element chemistry. The observed relationship between carbon concentrations and delta C-13 values may be explained by late-stage, variable degrees of open-system (Rayleigh-like) degassing.

  8. Stable isotope studies of vent fluids and chimney minerals, southern Juan de Fuca Ridge: Sodium metasomatism and seawater sulfate reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Shanks W.C. III; Seyfried W.E. Jr.

    1987-10-10

    Sulfur isotope values (delta/sup 34/S) or H/sub 2/S in vent fluids from the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge hydrothermal sites range from 4.0 to 7.4% and are variably /sup 34/S-enriched with respect to coexisting inner wall chimney sulfides. Chimney sulfides range from 1.6 to 5.7%. The chimneys consist of Fe-sphalerite zoned to inner zinc sulfide and chalcopyrite ( +- isocubanite)-pyrrhotite lining channels. Sulfide from inner walls of type A chimneys have the lightest delta/sup 34/S values. Type B chimneys (porous, unzoned, low-Fe-sphalerite) have the isotopically heaviest chimney sulfides and occur at vent sites distal to the along-axis shallow point of the ridge crest, hence distal to the magma chamber. These variations are largely ascribed to sulfate reduction by ferrous iron in the hydrothermal fluid in chimneys of substrate mounds, probably due to transitory entrainment of ambient sulfate-bearing seawater. The delta/sup 18/O values of end-member hydrothermal fluids range from 0.6 to 0.8%, significantly lower than the delta/sup 18/O values at 21 /sup 0/N vent fluids. The deltaD values of the fluid samples range from -2.5 to 0.5%. Isotopic differences from the 21 /sup 0/N fluids may be due to slightly higher water/rock ratios, approximately 1.0, in the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge hydrothermal system. Admixture of a small amount of residual brine from an earlier phase separation even may have contributed water with low deltaD values.

  9. Uniformity and diversity in the composition of mineralizing fluids from hydrothermal vents on the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Philpotts, J.A.; Aruscavage, P.J.; Von Damm, K.L.

    1987-10-10

    Abundances of Li, Ni, K, Rb, Ca, Sr, Ba, Mn, Fe, Zn, and Si have been determined in fluid samples from seven vents located in three areas on the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge. The hydrothermal component estimated from the Mg contents of the samples ranges from 7% to 76%. Concentrations of Fe and Si, among the other elements, in acid-stabilized solutions appear to be generally representative of the parental hydrothermal fluids, but some Zn determinations and most Ba values appear to be too low. Thermodynamic calculations indicate that the acidified samples remain supersaturated with respect to silica, barite, and pyrite; unacidified samples are supersaturated, in addition with respect to ZnS, FeS, and many silicate phases. Within the constraints of limited sampling there appear to be differences in fluid compositions both within and between the three vent areas. Some uniform differences in the elemental abundances predicted for hydrothermal end-member fluids might be due to inmixing of fresh seawater at depth in the hydrothermal system. The Juan de Fuca hydrothermal fluids contain more Fe but otherwise have relative elemental abundances fairly similar to those in 13 /sup 0/N (East Pacific Rise) fluids, albeit at higher levels. In contrast, fluids from 21 /sup 0/N (East Pacific Rise) and Galapagos have lower K/Rb and much lower Sr and Na abundances; these compositional features probably result from interaction of these fluids with a different mineral assemblage, possibly more mature greenstone. copyright American Geophysical Union 1987

  10. Understanding Plume Bending at Grotto Vent on the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemis, K. G.; Xu, G.; Rabinowitz, J.; Rona, P. A.; Jackson, D. R.; Jones, C. D.

    2011-12-01

    Our improved understanding of black smoker plume bending derives from acoustic imaging of the plume at Grotto, a 30 m diameter vent cluster in the Main Endeavour Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge. In July 2000, the VIP2000 cruise collected 15 acoustic images over 24 hours. In September 2010, the Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar (COVIS) was connected to the NEPTUNE Canada Endeavour Observatory and acquired a 29 day time series capturing plume bending in 479 independent images. Inclination and declination are extracted for one or more plumes from the acoustic images using 2D Gaussian fitting. The bending of the large plume above the northwest end of Grotto is consistent with a dominant tidal sloshing and secondary rift valley inflow based a spectral analysis of the COVIS time series compared with a spectral analysis of current data from 2.9 km north of Grotto. The smaller plume above the eastern end of Grotto behaves in a more complicated fashion as it sometimes bends towards the larger plume. The overall shape of the larger plume is highly variable: sometimes the plume just leans in the direction of the presumed ambient current; other times, the plume bends-over and, in a few cases, the plume bends in two or more directions (forming a sinusoidal shape). Several factors influence bending direction, magnitude and shape. First, for a fluctuating plume, the instantaneous plume centerline wiggles around within the time-averaged plume boundaries; this will certainly produce a "sinusoidal" shape and may be the best explanation for the small scale multi-directional bending observed in individual acoustic images. Second, the transition from jet to plume could produce a change in bending magnitude (but not direction); however, this is unlikely to be visible on the acoustic images as the transition from jet to plume is anticipated to occur within the first 1 m of rise. Third, the ratio of rise velocity W to cross-flow velocity U controls the magnitude and direction of bending

  11. Mineralogical studies of sulfide samples and volatile concentrations of basalt glasses from the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brett, Robin; Evans, Howard T., Jr.; Wandless, M. V.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Hedenquist, Jeffrey W.

    1987-01-01

    Sulfide samples obtained from Alvin dives on the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge were examined, showing the presence of two previously undiscovered minerals, both formed at low temperatures. The first detection of lizardite, starkeyite, and anatase in such an environment is also reported. Sulfide geothermometry involving the Cu-Fe-S system shows a vent temperature of less than 328 C for one sample. Ice-melting temperatures on inclusions from this sample are about -2.8 C, and fluid inclusion studies on crystals near this sample show pressure-corrected homogenization temperatures of 268 and 285 C. Volatile concentrations from vesicle-free basalt glass from the vent field are found to be about 0.0013 wt pct CO2 and 0.16 wt pct H2O.

  12. Regional patterns of hydrothermal alteration of sediments as interpreted from seafloor reflection coefficients, Middle Valley, Juan De Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohr, Kristin M. M.; Schmidt, Ulrike; Groschel-Becker, Henrike

    1993-09-01

    Reflection coefficients of the seafloor have been calculated from three multi-channel seismic reflection profiles across Middle Valley of the Juan de Fuca ridge. Seafloor reflection coefficients in this sedimented rift valley are high over an active hydrothermal vent and adjacent to major offset faults. Comparison of our measurements to drilling results from Leg 139 shows that high reflection coefficients over an active vent mound are produced by cemented sediments. Large reflection coefficients adjacent to major faults may have a similar origin and indicate that ongoing faulting creates pathways for hydrothermal fluids which alter the sediments and result in higher densities and velocities. Since 30 Hz seismic energy responds to the top 50 m of sediments, we are looking at the integrated response of hydrothermal alteration over tens of thousands of years. This is the first time seafloor reflection coefficients have been used to identify highly altered sediments in a region of deep-water hydrothermal activity.

  13. Geochemistry and petrology of andesites from the north rift zone of Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithka, I. N.; Perfit, M. R.; Clague, D. A.; Wanless, V. D.

    2014-12-01

    In 2013, the ROV Doc Ricketts onboard R/V Western Flyer explored ~4 km of an elongate pillow ridge up to ~300 m high along the eastern edge of the north rift zone of Axial Seamount. The steep-sided volcanic ridge is constructed of large pillow lavas up to 2-3 m in diameter and smaller elongated pillow tubes. Of the 27 samples collected during dive D526, all but one are andesites making it one of the largest confirmed high-silica exposures along a mid-ocean ridge (MOR). Based on radiocarbon ages of sediment on top of flows, the mounds are at least ~1390 years old. This minimum age is much younger than the 56 Ka age calculated based on distance from the rift axis, indicating eruption off-axis through older, colder crust and supporting the hypothesis and model calculations that extensive fractional crystallization (>85%) caused the high silica content. The andesitic lavas are primarily glassy, highly vesicular, crusty, and sparsely phyric with small (~1 mm) plagioclase crystals and olivine, clinopyroxene, and Fe-Ti oxide microphenocrysts. Microprobe analyses of glasses are similar to wax-core samples previously collected from this area but are more compositionally variable. Excluding one basalt (7.7 wt% MgO) sampled between mounds, the lavas are basaltic andesites and andesites (53-59 wt% SiO2) with <3 wt% MgO and 12.8-15.7 wt% FeO concentrations. Incompatible trace element abundances are ~4-6 times more enriched than in Axial Seamount T-MORB. Primitive mantle-normalized patterns are similar to those of high-silica lavas from other MORs (southern Juan de Fuca Ridge, 9N East Pacific Rise) with significant positive U anomalies, large negative Sr anomalies, small negative Eu anomalies, and slight positive Zr-Hf anomalies. The andesites are more enriched in light rare earth elements than basalts from Axial Seamount ((La/Yb)N 1.35-1.4 vs. 0.7-1.27) and N-MORB from the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge. The andesites also have high Cl (~0.3-0.6 wt%) and H2O (~1.60-1.71 wt

  14. Crustal Thickness and Lower Crustal Velocity Structure Beneath the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, R.; Soule, D. C.; Wilcock, W. S. D.; Toomey, D. R.; Hooft, E. E. E.; Weekly, R. T.

    2014-12-01

    In 2009, a multi-scale seismic tomography experiment was conducted on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge aboard the R/V Marcus G. Langseth. Ocean bottom seismometers were deployed at 64 sites and recorded 5567 shots of a 36-element, 6600 in.3 airgun array. The experiment extended 100 km along-axis and 60 km cross-axis. Two crustal tomographic analyses have previously been completed using data from the experiment. First, 93,000 manually picked crustal refraction arrivals (Pg) were used to develop a three-dimensional model of crustal velocity and thickness in the upper crust (Weekly et al. 2014). Second, this model was used as the starting model in an analysis that incorporated ~19,000 Moho reflection arrivals (PmP) for non-ridge crossing paths to image lower crustal velocity structure and crustal thickness off-axis. A key feature of this model is a ~0.5-1 km increase in crustal thickness beneath a bathymetric plateau that extends to either side of the central portion of the Endeavour segment. We present a tomographic inversions that incorporates ridge-crossing paths to examine spatial variations in lower crustal velocity and crustal thickness beneath the ridge axis. The preliminary results from an inversion that incorporates ~8700 manually picked ridge-crossing PmP arrival times reveals a ~10-km-wide low velocity zone extending throughout the lower crust with a velocity anomaly of -0.3 to -0.5 km/s at ≥4 km depth. This low velocity zone extends both to the north and south of the axial magma chamber reflector imaged previously beneath the central Endeavour. The inversion also shows significant variations in apparent crustal thickness along axis but additional analysis is required to understand whether these variations are well resolved.

  15. Upper crustal seismic structure of the Endeavour segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge from traveltime tomography: Implications for oceanic crustal accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weekly, Robert T.; Wilcock, William S. D.; Toomey, Douglas R.; Hooft, Emilie E. E.; Kim, Eunyoung

    2014-04-01

    isotropic and anisotropic P wave velocity structure of the upper oceanic crust on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge is studied using refracted traveltime data collected by an active-source, three-dimensional tomography experiment. The isotropic velocity structure is characterized by low crustal velocities in the overlapping spreading centers (OSCs) at the segment ends. These low velocities are indicative of pervasive tectonic fracturing and persist off axis, recording the history of ridge propagation. Near the segment center, velocities within the upper 1 km show ridge-parallel bands with low velocities on the outer flanks of topographic highs. These features are consistent with localized thickening of the volcanic extrusive layer from eruptions extending outside of the axial valley that flow down the fault-tilted blocks that form the abyssal hill topography. On-axis velocities are generally relatively high beneath the hydrothermal vent fields likely due to the infilling of porosity by mineral precipitation. Lower velocities are observed beneath the most vigorous vent fields in a seismically active region above the axial magma chamber and may reflect increased fracturing and higher temperatures. Seismic anisotropy is high on-axis but decreases substantially off axis over 5-10 km (0.2-0.4 Ma). This decrease coincides with an increase in seismic velocities resolved at depths ≥1 km and is attributed to the infilling of cracks by mineral precipitation associated with near-axis hydrothermal circulation. The orientation of the fast-axis of anisotropy is ridge-parallel near the segment center but curves near the segment ends reflecting the tectonic fabric within the OSCs.

  16. Amino acid abundances and stereochemistry in hydrothermally altered sediments from the Juan de Fuca Ridge, northeastern Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Andersson, E; Simoneit, B R; Holm, N G

    2000-09-01

    The Juan de Fuca Ridge is a hydrothermally active, sediment covered, spreading ridge situated a few hundred kilometres off the west coast of North America in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. Sediments from seven sites drilled during the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Legs 139 and 168 were analyzed for total hydrolyzable amino acids (THAA), individual amino acid distributions, total organic C (TOC) and total N (TN) contents. The aim was to evaluate the effects of hydrothermal stress on the decomposition and transformation of sedimentary amino acids. Hydrolyzable amino acids account for up to 3.3% of the total organic C content and up to 12% of the total N content of the upper sediments. The total amounts of amino acids decrease significantly with depth in all drilled holes. This trend is particularly pronounced in holes with a thermal gradient of around 0.6 degrees C/m or higher. The most abundant amino acids in shallow sediments are glycine, alanine, lysine, glutamic acid, valine and histidine. The changes in amino acid distributions in low temperature holes are characterized by increased relative abundances of non-protein beta-alanine and gamma-aminobutyric acid. In high temperature holes the amino acid compositions are characterized by high abundances of glycine, alanine, serine, ornithine and histidine at depth. D/L ratios of samples with amino acid distributions similar to those found in acid hydrolysates of kerogen, indicate that racemization rates of amino acids bound by condensation reactions may be diminished.

  17. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudoalteromonas telluritireducens DSM 16098 and P. spiralis DSM 16099 Isolated from the Hydrothermal Vents of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Wang, Mengqiang; Wang, Hao; Gao, Qiang; Hou, Zhanhui; Zhou, Zhi; Gao, Dahai

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the draft genome sequences of two strains, Pseudoalteromonas telluritireducens DSM 16098 and P. spiralis DSM 16099, which were isolated from hydrothermal vents of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The reads generated by an Ion Torrent PGM were assembled into contigs with total sizes of 4.4 Mb and 4.1 Mb for DSM 16098 and DSM 16099, respectively. PMID:27563045

  18. Fluid rare earth element anlayses from geothermal wells located on the Reykjanes Peninsula, Iceland and Middle Valley seafloor hydrothermal system on the Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    DOE Data Explorer

    Andrew Fowler

    2015-05-01

    Results for fluid rare earth element analyses from four Reykjanes peninsula high-temperature geothermal fields. Data for fluids from hydrothermal vents located 2400 m below sea level from Middle Valley on the Juan de Fuca Ridge are also included. Data have been corrected for flashing. Samples preconcentrated using a chelating resin with IDA functional group (InertSep ME-1). Analyzed using an Element magnetic sector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS).

  19. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudoalteromonas telluritireducens DSM 16098 and P. spiralis DSM 16099 Isolated from the Hydrothermal Vents of the Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huan; Liu, Rui; Wang, Mengqiang; Wang, Hao; Gao, Qiang; Hou, Zhanhui; Zhou, Zhi; Gao, Dahai; Wang, Lingling

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the draft genome sequences of two strains, Pseudoalteromonas telluritireducens DSM 16098 and P. spiralis DSM 16099, which were isolated from hydrothermal vents of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The reads generated by an Ion Torrent PGM were assembled into contigs with total sizes of 4.4 Mb and 4.1 Mb for DSM 16098 and DSM 16099, respectively. PMID:27563045

  20. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudoalteromonas telluritireducens DSM 16098 and P. spiralis DSM 16099 Isolated from the Hydrothermal Vents of the Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huan; Liu, Rui; Wang, Mengqiang; Wang, Hao; Gao, Qiang; Hou, Zhanhui; Zhou, Zhi; Gao, Dahai; Wang, Lingling

    2016-08-25

    This report describes the draft genome sequences of two strains, Pseudoalteromonas telluritireducens DSM 16098 and P. spiralis DSM 16099, which were isolated from hydrothermal vents of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The reads generated by an Ion Torrent PGM were assembled into contigs with total sizes of 4.4 Mb and 4.1 Mb for DSM 16098 and DSM 16099, respectively.

  1. Dissolved Carbon Species in Diffuse and Focused Flow Hydrothermal Vents at the Main Endeavour Field, Northern Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foustoukos, D. I.; Seyfried, W. E.; Ding, K.; Pester, N. J.

    2006-12-01

    The magmatic and tectonic event of 1999 had a significant impact on the chemical composition of vent fluids issuing from the Main Endeavour Field (MEF), Juan de Fuca Ridge. Here, we report dissolved concentrations of H2, CO2, CO and C1-C3 alkanes measured in low and high-temperature hydrothermal fluids collected in August 2005 during an RV Atlantis/DSV Alvin expedition at MEF. In comparison with time series data, temperatures of the 2005 vent fluids were slightly lower than those recorded in the aftermaths of the tectonic event of 1999. The possible cooling of the hydrothermal subseafloor reaction zone is consistent with the observed increase in dissolved Cl to pre-1999 values. Converging compositional trends to pre-1999 conditions are also suggested for dissolved CO2 concentrations (~20 mmol/kg) in Puffer, Sully, Bastille and S&M vent fluids. In these focused flow and high-temperature vent fluids, dissolved CO2 is in thermodynamic equilibrium with CO(aq). The systematics of organic species in diffuse flow fluids, however, appears to be closely related to processes occurring within the near-seafloor environment. For example, excess CO(aq) observed in the diffuse flow fluids at Easter Island is attributed to sluggish CO- CO2(aq) equilibria at low temperatures, suggesting hydrothermal circulation of short-residence times. Short-lived hydrothermal circulation is further supported by the nearly identical C1/(C2+C3) ratios between focused and diffuse flow fluids. Furthermore, alkane distribution in the MEF diffuse flow fluids suggests direct mixing between seawater and hydrothermal fluid with minimal biological inputs, in contrast with the greater effect of microbial methanogenesis proposed in other ridge-crest hydrothermal environments. Thus, the coupling of CO2(aq)-CO(aq) redox equilibrium with dissolved carbon species in low- temperature vent fluids could provide a better understanding of the effect of subsurface microbial communities upon the composition of mid

  2. Compressional and Shear Wave Structure of the Upper Crust Beneath the Endeavour Segment, Juan De Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, E.; Toomey, D. R.; Hooft, E. E. E.; Wilcock, W. S. D.; Weekly, R. T.; Lee, S. M.; Kim, Y.

    2014-12-01

    We present tomographic images of the compressional (Vp) and shear (Vs) wave velocity structure of the upper crust beneath the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. This ridge segment is bounded by the Endeavour and Cobb overlapping spreading centers (OSCs) to the north and south, respectively. Near the segment center an axial magma chamber (AMC) reflector underlies 5 hydrothermal vent fields. Our analysis uses data from the Endeavour tomography (ETOMO) experiment. A prior study of the Vp structure indicates that the shallow crust of the Endeavour segment is strongly heterogeneous [Weekly et al., 2014]. Beneath the OSCs Vp is anomalously low, indicating tectonic fracturing. Near the segment center, upper crustal Vp is relatively high beneath the hydrothermal vent fields, likely due to infilling of porosity by mineral precipitation. Lower velocities are observed immediately above the AMC, reflecting increased fracturing or higher temperatures. Anisotropic tomography reveals large amplitude ridge-parallel seismic anisotropy on-axis (>10%), but decreases in the off-axis direction over 5-10 km. Here we use crustal S-wave phases (Sg) — generated by P-to-S conversions near the seafloor — to better constrain crustal properties. Over half the OBSs in the ETOMO experiment recorded horizontal data on two channels that are of sufficiently high quality that we can orient the geophones using the polarizations of water waves from shots within 12 km. For these OBSs, crustal Sg phases are commonly visible out to ranges of ~20-25 km. We invert the Sg data separately for Vs structure, and also jointly invert Pg and Sg data to constrain the Vp/Vs ratio. Preliminary inversions indicate that Vs and Vp/Vs varies both laterally and vertically. These results imply strong lateral variations in both the physical (e.g., crack density and aspect ratio) and chemical (e.g., hydration) properties of oceanic crust.

  3. Activity and abundance of denitrifying bacteria in the subsurface biosphere of diffuse hydrothermal vents of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourbonnais, A.; Juniper, S. K.; Butterfield, D. A.; Devol, A. H.; Kuypers, M. M. M.; Lavik, G.; Hallam, S. J.; Wenk, C. B.; Chang, B. X.; Murdock, S. A.; Lehmann, M. F.

    2012-11-01

    Little is known about fixed nitrogen (N) transformation and elimination at diffuse hydrothermal vents where anoxic fluids are mixed with oxygenated crustal seawater prior to discharge. Oceanic N sinks that remove bio-available N ultimately affect chemosynthetic primary productivity in these ecosystems. Using 15N paired isotope techniques, we determined potential rates of fixed N loss pathways (denitrification, anammox) and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) in sulfidic hydrothermal vent fluids discharging from the subsurface at several sites at Axial Volcano and the Endeavour Segment on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. We also measured physico-chemical parameters (i.e., temperature, pH, nutrients, H2S and N2O concentrations) as well as the biodiversity and abundance of chemolithoautotrophic nitrate-reducing, sulfur-oxidizing γ-proteobacteria (SUP05 cluster) using sequence analysis of amplified small subunit ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) genes in combination with taxon-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays. Denitrification was the dominant N loss pathway in the subsurface biosphere of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, with rates of up to ~1000 nmol N l-1 day-1. In comparison, anammox rates were always < 5 nmol N l-1 day-1 and below the detection limit at most of the sites. DNRA rates were up to ~150 nmol N l-1 day-1. These results suggest that bacterial denitrification out-competes anammox in sulfidic hydrothermal vent waters. Taxon-specific qPCR revealed that γ-proteobacteria of the SUP05 cluster sometimes dominated the microbial community (SUP05/total bacteria up to 38%). Significant correlations were found between fixed N loss (i.e., denitrification, anammox) rates and in situ nitrate and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) deficits in the fluids, indicating that DIN availability may ultimately regulate N loss in the subsurface. Based on our rate measurements, and on published data on hydrothermal fluid fluxes and residence times, we estimated

  4. Activity and abundance of denitrifying bacteria in the subsurface biosphere of diffuse hydrothermal vents of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourbonnais, A.; Juniper, S. K.; Butterfield, D. A.; Devol, A. H.; Kuypers, M. M. M.; Lavik, G.; Hallam, S. J.; Wenk, C. B.; Chang, B. X.; Murdock, S. A.; Lehmann, M. F.

    2012-04-01

    Little is known about nitrogen (N) transformations in general, and the elimination of N in particular, at diffuse vents where anoxic hydrothermal fluids have mixed with oxygenated crustal seawater prior to discharge. Oceanic N sinks that remove bio-available N ultimately affect chemosynthetic primary productivity in these ecosystems. Using 15N paired isotope techniques, we determined potential rates of fixed N-loss pathways (denitrification, anammox) and dissimilative nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) in sulfidic hydrothermal vent fluids discharging from the subsurface at several sites at Axial Volcano and the Endeavour Segment on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. We also measured physico-chemical parameters (i.e. temperature, pH, nutrients, H2S and N2O concentrations) as well as the biodiversity and abundance of chemolithotrophic nitrate-reducing, sulfur-oxidizing γ-proteobacteria (SUP05 cluster) using sequence analysis of amplified small subunit ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) genes in combination with taxon-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays. Denitrification was the dominant N-loss pathway in the subsurface biosphere of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, with rates of up to ~1000 nmol N l-1 day-1. In comparison, anammox rates were always <5 nmol N l-1 day-1 and below the detection limit at most of the sites. DNRA rates were up to 152 nmol N l-1 day-1. These results suggest that bacterial denitrification out-competes anammox in sulfidic hydrothermal vent waters. Taxon-specific qPCR revealed that γ-proteobacteria of the SUP05 cluster sometimes dominated the microbial community (SUP05/total bacteria up to 38%). Significant correlation existed between fixed N-loss (i.e., denitrification, anammox) rates and in-situ nitrate and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) deficits in the fluids, indicating that DIN availability may ultimately regulate N-loss in the subsurface. Based on our rate measurements, and on published data on hydrothermal fluid fluxes and residence

  5. Quantitative estimate of heat flow from a mid-ocean ridge axial valley, Raven field, Juan de Fuca Ridge: Observations and inferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmi, Marie S.; Johnson, H. Paul; Tivey, Maurice A.; Hutnak, Michael

    2014-09-01

    A systematic heat flow survey using thermal blankets within the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge axial valley provides quantitative estimates of the magnitude and distribution of conductive heat flow at a mid-ocean ridge, with the goal of testing current models of hydrothermal circulation present within newly formed oceanic crust. Thermal blankets were deployed covering an area of 700 by 450 m in the Raven Hydrothermal vent field area located 400 m north of the Main Endeavour hydrothermal field. A total of 176 successful blanket deployment sites measured heat flow values that ranged from 0 to 31 W m-2. Approximately 53% of the sites recorded values lower than 100 mW m-2, suggesting large areas of seawater recharge and advective extraction of lithospheric heat. High heat flow values were concentrated around relatively small "hot spots." Integration of heat flow values over the Raven survey area gives an estimate of conductive heat output of 0.3 MW, an average of 0.95 W m-2, over the survey area. Fluid circulation cell dimensions and scaling equations allow calculation of a Rayleigh number of approximately 700 in Layer 2A. The close proximity of high and low heat flow areas, coupled with previous estimates of surficial seafloor permeability, argues for the presence of small-scale hydrothermal fluid circulation cells within the high-porosity uppermost crustal layer of the axial seafloor.

  6. A Long-Term Seismic Array on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGill, P. R.; Wilcock, W. S.; Stakes, D. S.; Barclay, A. H.; Ramirez, T. M.; Toomey, D. R.

    2003-12-01

    The Keck Foundation with additional support from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute and the University of Washington has funded a five-year, five-million dollar program for archetypic experiments on the northern Juan de Fuca Plate. The goal of this program is to constrain the linkages between deformation (earthquakes), fluid flow and chemistry, and microbial response across the northern Juan de Fuca Plate in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. A key component of these studies is an array of ocean-bottom seismometers to record the temporal and spatial distribution of seismic activity in the region. The current network, deployed in August of 2003, is comprised of eight autonomous instruments: one broadband seismometer and seven short-period seismometers. The instruments are distributed within and around the axial valley at the center of the Endeavour segment and spaced about 4 km apart, composing an array about 7 km wide and 9 km long. The short-period instruments, sensitive over a frequency range of 1 to 32 Hz, utilize an MBARI/GEOSense BH1 three-axis corehole geophone connected to an MBARI/GEOSense LP1 data logger. For five of these instruments the corehole sensor is inserted into a 7 cm diameter hole drilled into the basaltic basement rock, thus providing excellent coupling. For the other two instruments where suitable drilling sites were not available, the sensors are inserted into 55 kg concrete blocks placed on the sediment. The broadband instrument is a Guralp CMG-1T three-axis seismometer, sensitive over a frequency range of 2.8 mHz (360 sec) to 50 Hz. The sensor is completely buried in sediment inside a 60 cm deep by 60 cm diameter caisson, thus reducing the effects of water currents on the recorded data. A 20 m cable connects the sensor to an LP1 data logger and a 30 kW-hr battery sitting on the sediment. A complete data set will be recovered from the array when the instruments are revisited during the summer of 2004. However, data from two events, an

  7. Fine-scale heat flow, shallow heat sources, and decoupled circulation systems at two sea-floor hydrothermal sites, Middle Valley, northern Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, J.S.; Fisher, A.T.; Langseth, M.; Jin, W.; Iturrino, G.; Davis, E.

    1998-12-01

    Fine-scale heat-flow patterns at two areas of active venting in Middle Valley, a sedimented rift on the northern Juan de Fuca Ridge, provide thermal evidence of shallow hydrothermal reservoirs beneath the vent fields. The extreme variability of heat flow is explained by conductive heating immediately adjacent to vents and shallow circulation within sediments above the reservoir. This secondary circulation is hydrologically separated from the deeper system feeding the vents by a shallow conductive lid within the sediments. A similar separation of shallow and deep circulation may also occur at sediment-free ridge-crest hydrothermal environments.

  8. Vertical distribution and characterization of aerobic phototrophic bacteria at the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Rathgeber, Christopher; Lince, Michael T; Alric, Jean; Lang, Andrew S; Humphrey, Elaine; Blankenship, Robert E; Verméglio, André; Plumley, F Gerald; Van Dover, Cindy L; Beatty, J Thomas; Yurkov, Vladimir

    2008-09-01

    The vertical distribution of culturable anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria was investigated at five sites at or near the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the Pacific Ocean. Twelve similar strains of obligately aerobic phototrophic bacteria were isolated in pure culture, from depths ranging from 500 to 2,379 m below the surface. These strains appear morphologically, physiologically, biochemically, and phylogenetically similar to Citromicrobium bathyomarinum strain JF-1, a bacterium previously isolated from hydrothermal vent plume waters. Only one aerobic phototrophic strain was isolated from surface waters. This strain is morphologically and physiologically distinct from the strains isolated at deeper sampling locations, and phylogenetic analysis indicates that it is most closely related to the genus Erythrobacter. Phototrophs were cultivated from three water casts taken above vents but not from two casts taken away from active vent sites. No culturable anaerobic anoxygenic phototrophs were detected. The photosynthetic apparatus was investigated in strain JF-1 and contains light-harvesting I and reaction center complexes, which are functional under aerobic conditions.

  9. Microbial diversity of a sulfide black smoker in main endeavour hydrothermal vent field, Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huaiyang; Li, Jiangtao; Peng, Xiaotong; Meng, Jun; Wang, Fengping; Ai, Yuncan

    2009-06-01

    Submarine hydrothermal vents are among the least-understood habitats on Earth but have been the intense focus of research in the past 30 years. An active hydrothermal sulfide chimney collected from the Dudley site in the Main Endeavour vent Field (MEF) of Juan de Fuca Ridge was investigated using mineralogical and molecular approaches. Mineral analysis indicated that the chimney was composed mainly of Fe-, Zn-and Cu-rich sulfides. According to phylogenetic analysis, within the Crenarchaeota, clones of the order Desulfurococcales predominated, comprising nearly 50% of archaeal clones. Euryarchaeota were composed mainly of clones belonging to Thermococcales and deep-sea hydrothermal vent Euryarchaeota (DHVE), each of which accounted for about 20% of all clones. Thermophilic or hyperthermophilic physiologies were common to the predominant archaeal groups. More than half of bacterial clones belonged to epsilon-Proteobacteria, which confirmed their prevalence in hydrothermal vent environments. Clones of Proteobacteria (gamma-, delta-, beta-), Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides (CFB) and Deinococcus-Thermus occurred as well. It was remarkable that methanogens and methanotrophs were not detected in our 16S rRNA gene library. Our results indicated that sulfur-related metabolism, which included sulfur-reducing activity carried out by thermophilic archaea and sulfur-oxidizing by mesophilic bacteria, was common and crucial to the vent ecosystem in Dudley hydrothermal site. PMID:19557339

  10. Time-series measurement of hydrothermal heat flux at the Grotto mound, Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guangyu; Jackson, Darrell R.; Bemis, Karen G.; Rona, Peter A.

    2014-10-01

    Continuous time-series observations are key to understanding the temporal evolution of a seafloor hydrothermal system and its interplay with thermal and chemical processes in the ocean and Earth interior. In this paper, we present a 26-month time series of the heat flux driving a hydrothermal plume on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge obtained using the Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar (COVIS). Since 2010, COVIS has been connected to the North East Pacific Time-series Underwater Networked Experiment (NEPTUNE) observatory that provides power and real-time data transmission. The heat flux time series has a mean value of 18.10 MW and a standard deviation of 6.44 MW. The time series has no significant global trend, suggesting the hydrothermal heat source remained steady during the observation period. The steadiness of the hydrothermal heat source coincides with reduced seismic activity at Endeavour observed in the seismic data recorded by an ocean bottom seismometer from 2011 to 2013. Furthermore, first-order estimation of heat flux based on the temperature measurements made by the Benthic and Resistivity Sensors (BARS) at a neighboring vent also supports the steadiness of the hydrothermal heat source.

  11. Spatial patterns of zooplankton and nekton in a hydrothermally active axial valley on Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skebo, Kristina; Tunnicliffe, Verena; Garcia Berdeal, Irene; Johnson, H. Paul

    2006-06-01

    Zooplankton and nekton at 2000 m depth in the axial valley of Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge, show marked variability in abundances in a plane at 20 m above bottom. A remotely operated vehicle flew a gridded rectangle 3.2×0.5 km that included two large high-temperature and two small low-temperature vent fields. Numbers of zooplankton, jellyfish, shrimp and fish were recorded with a video camera, and the abundance patterns were examined with the program SADIE ©. Each organism group displayed a distinctive distribution pattern. Abundance gaps over the high-temperature fields were significant and, for the more abundant copepods, were related to the locations of individual smokers. Pelagic shrimp and macrourid fish abundances were correlated and concentrated around the northern high temperature field. Distinct aggregations of zooplankton and nekton were correlated with the fluid indicators from both the low temperature diffuse effluent and the focused high temperature vents. Patterns were likely established by organism choice that forms aggregations and gaps, and by physical processes that entrain passive particles near vigorous smoker plumes. While enhanced plankton and nekton numbers were not observed over the vent fields, overall abundances in the axial valley may be sustained by production transported from the vent fields on the seafloor.

  12. Submarine fissure eruptions and hydrothermal vents on the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge: preliminary observations from the submersible Alvin.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Normark, W.R.

    1986-01-01

    The submersible Alvin was used to investigate 3 active hydrothermal discharge sites along the S Juan de Fuca Ridge in September 1984. The hydrothermal zones occur within a 10-30m-deep, 30-50m-wide cleft marking the center of the axial valley. This cleft is the eruptive locus for the axial valley. The hydrothermal vents coincide with the main eruptive vents along the cleft. Each hydrothermal zone has multiple discharge sites extending as much as 500m along the cleft. Sulfide deposits occur as clusters (15-100m2 area) of small chimneys (= or <2m high) and as individual and clustered fields of large, branched chimneys (= or <10m high). Recovered sulfide samples are predominantly the tops of chimneys and spires and typically contain more than 80% sphalerite and wurtzite with minor pyrrhotite, pyrite, marcasite, isocubanite, chalcopyrite, anhydrite, anhydrite, and amorphous silica. The associated hydrothermal fluids have the highest chlorinity of any reported to date.-Authors

  13. Distribution and composition of hydrothermal plume particles from the ASHES Vent Field at Axial Volcano, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feely, R. A.; Geiselman, T. L.; Baker, E. T.; Massoth, G. J.; Hammond, S. R.

    1990-08-01

    In 1986 and 1987, buoyant and neutrally buoyant hydrothermal plume particles from the ASHES vent field within Axial Volcano were sampled to study their variations in composition with height above the seafloor. Individual mineral phases were identified using standard X ray diffraction procedures. Elemental composition and particle morphologies were determined by X ray fluorescence spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy/X ray energy spectrometry techniques. The vent particles were primarily composed of sphalerite, anhydrite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, barite, hydrous iron oxides, and amorphous silica. Grain size analyses of buoyant plume particles showed rapid particle growth in the first few centimeters above the vent orifice, followed by differential sedimentation of the larger sulfide and sulfate minerals out of the buoyant plume. The neutrally buoyant plume consisted of a lower plume, which was highly enriched in Fe, S, Zn, and Cu, and an upper plume, which was highly enriched in Fe and Mn. The upper plume was enriched in Fe and Mn oxyhydroxide particles, and the lower plume was enriched in suspended sulfide particles in addition to the Fe and Mn oxyhydroxide particles. The chemical data for the water column particles indicate that chemical scavenging and differential sedimentation processes are major factors controlling the composition of the dispersing hydrothermal particles. Short-term sediment trap experiments indicate that the fallout from the ASHES vent field is not as large as some of the other vent fields on the Juan de Fuca Ridge.

  14. Window into Sediment-Buried Basement Biosphere: Fluid Sampling from CORK Observatory Seafloor Platforms, Juan de Fuca Ridge Flanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowen, J. P.; Lin, H.; Rappe, M.; Jungbluth, S.; Glazer, B. T.; Matzinger, M.; Amend, J. P.; Boettger, J.

    2010-12-01

    Studies of the deep basement biosphere are technologically challenging, requiring complementary approaches to provide sufficient access to allow precision analyses and experimentation. Our NSF-funded ‘Microbial Observatory’ has focused on IODP Circulation Obviating Retrofit Kit (CORK) observatories to obtain pristine samples of fluids from sediment-buried basement environments. We have developed instruments and samplers to interface with CORK fluid delivery lines, including a ROV/HOV-borne Mobile Pumping System and autonomous (e.g., GeoMICROBE) instrument sensor/sampler systems. These systems are providing high quality (e.g., depleted Mg++, <6 mM) samples of basement fluids from 3.5 mA old upper basement, on the flanks of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, for geochemical and microbial studies. Relative to bottom seawater, these fluids are also depleted in O2, SO42-, PO43-, NO3- and NO2-, while enriched in NH4+, H2S, Mn and Fe. In situ voltammetric analyses obtained during sample collection, revealed the presence of micromolar levels of sulfide (0.5 µm) in the fluids. Dissolved organic carbon in basement fluids is about half that of local bottom seawater, low molecular weight organic acids are below detection limits, while total amino acids are also low in concentration, but the relative abundance of specific amino acids varies from that of bottom seawater. Overall, the sediment-buried basement environments appears to be organic-carbon depleted and low energy, yet still dynamic. The microbial communities from CORK 1301A (47deg 45N, 127deg 45W) in consecutive years are heterogeneous, but share common groups. Different CORKs sampled a decade apart share major lineages, consistent with hydrogeologic connectivity. Samples collected from a new CORK installation at borehole 1026B contain a subset of members found a decade previously from an older style CORK at the same site. Communities retrieved from the CORK at 1025C (47deg 53N, 128deg 39W), in 1.4 My ridge flank basement

  15. Microbiological characterization of post-eruption “snowblower” vents at Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Julie L.; Akerman, Nancy H.; Proskurowski, Giora; Huber, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial processes within the subseafloor can be examined during the ephemeral and uncommonly observed phenomena known as snowblower venting. Snowblowers are characterized by the large quantity of white floc that is expelled from the seafloor following mid-ocean ridge eruptions. During these eruptions, rapidly cooling lava entrains seawater and hydrothermal fluids enriched in geochemical reactants, creating a natural bioreactor that supports a subseafloor microbial “bloom.” Previous studies hypothesized that the eruption-associated floc was made by sulfide-oxidizing bacteria; however, the microbes involved were never identified. Here we present the first molecular analysis combined with microscopy of microbial communities in snowblower vents from samples collected shortly after the 2011 eruption at Axial Seamount, an active volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. We obtained fluid samples and white flocculent material from active snowblower vents as well as orange flocculent material found on top of newly formed lava flows. Both flocculent types revealed diverse cell types and particulates when examined by phase contrast and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Distinct archaeal and bacterial communities were detected in each sample type through Illumina tag sequencing of 16S rRNA genes and through sequencing of the sulfide oxidation gene, soxB. In fluids and white floc, the dominant bacteria were sulfur-oxidizing Epsilonproteobacteria and the dominant archaea were thermophilic Methanococcales. In contrast, the dominant organisms in the orange floc were Gammaproteobacteria and Thaumarchaeota Marine Group I. In all samples, bacteria greatly outnumbered archaea. The presence of anaerobic methanogens and microaerobic Epsilonproteobacteria in snowblower communities provides evidence that these blooms are seeded by subseafloor microbes, rather than from microbes in bottom seawater. These eruptive events thus provide a unique opportunity to observe subseafloor microbial

  16. Seismic reflection images of a near-axis melt sill within the lower crust at the Juan de Fuca ridge.

    PubMed

    Canales, J Pablo; Nedimović, Mladen R; Kent, Graham M; Carbotte, Suzanne M; Detrick, Robert S

    2009-07-01

    The oceanic crust extends over two-thirds of the Earth's solid surface, and is generated along mid-ocean ridges from melts derived from the upwelling mantle. The upper and middle crust are constructed by dyking and sea-floor eruptions originating from magma accumulated in mid-crustal lenses at the spreading axis, but the style of accretion of the lower oceanic crust is actively debated. Models based on geological and petrological data from ophiolites propose that the lower oceanic crust is accreted from melt sills intruded at multiple levels between the Moho transition zone (MTZ) and the mid-crustal lens, consistent with geophysical studies that suggest the presence of melt within the lower crust. However, seismic images of molten sills within the lower crust have been elusive. Until now, only seismic reflections from mid-crustal melt lenses and sills within the MTZ have been described, suggesting that melt is efficiently transported through the lower crust. Here we report deep crustal seismic reflections off the southern Juan de Fuca ridge that we interpret as originating from a molten sill at present accreting the lower oceanic crust. The sill sits 5-6 km beneath the sea floor and 850-900 m above the MTZ, and is located 1.4-3.2 km off the spreading axis. Our results provide evidence for the existence of low-permeability barriers to melt migration within the lower section of modern oceanic crust forming at intermediate-to-fast spreading rates, as inferred from ophiolite studies.

  17. Evolution of seismic layer 2B across the Juan de Fuca Ridge from hydrophone streamer 2-D traveltime tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Kori R.; Nedimović, Mladen R.; Canales, J. Pablo; Carbotte, Suzanne M.

    2011-05-01

    How oceanic crust evolves has important implications for understanding both subduction earthquake hazards and energy and mass exchange between the Earth's interior and the oceans. Although considerable work has been done characterizing the evolution of seismic layer 2A, there has been little analysis of the processes that affect layer 2B after formation. Here we present high-resolution 2-D tomographic models of seismic layer 2B along ˜300 km long multichannel seismic transects crossing the Endeavour, Northern Symmetric, and Cleft segments of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. These models show that seismic layer 2B evolves rapidly following a different course than layer 2A. The upper layer 2B velocities increase on average by 0.8 km/s and reach a generally constant velocity of 5.2 ± 0.3 km/s within the first 0.5 Myr after crustal formation. This suggests that the strongest impact on layer 2B evolution may be that of mineral precipitation due to "active" hydrothermal circulation centered about the ridge crest and driven by the heat from the axial magma chamber. Variations in upper layer 2B velocity with age at time scales ≥0.5 Ma show correlation about the ridge axis indicating that in the long term, crustal accretion processes affect both sides of the ridge axis in a similar way. Below the 0.5 Ma threshold, differences in 2B velocity are likely imprinted during crustal formation or early crustal evolution. Layer 2B velocities at propagator wakes (5.0 ± 0.2 km/s), where enhanced faulting and cracking are expected, and at areas that coincide with extensional or transtensional faulting are on average slightly slower than in normal mature upper layer 2B. Analysis of the layer 2B velocities from areas where the hydrothermal patterns are known shows that the locations of current and paleohydrothermal discharge and recharge zones are marked by reduced and increased upper layer 2B velocities, respectively. Additionally, the distance between present up-flow and down-flow zones is

  18. Geochronology and petrogenesis of MORB from the Juan de Fuca and Gorda ridges by 238U230Th disequilibrium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldstein, S.J.; Murrell, M.T.; Janecky, D.R.; Delaney, J.R.; Clague, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    A highly precise mass spectrometric method of analysis was used to determine 238U234U230Th232Th in axial and off-axis basalt glasses from Juan de Fuca (JDF) and Gorda ridges. Initial 230Th activity excesses in the axial samples range from 3 to 38%, but generally lie within a narrow range of 12 to 15%. Secondary alteration effects were evaluated using ??234U and appear to be negligible; hence the 230Th excesses are magmatic in origin. Direct dating of MORB was accomplished by measuring the decrease in excess 230Th in off-axis samples. 238U230Th ages progressively increase with distance from axis. Uncertainties in age range from 10 to 25 ka for UTh ages of 50 to 200 ka. The full spreading rate based on UTh ages for Endeavour segment of JDF is 5.9 ?? 1/2 cm/yr, with asymmetry in spreading between the Pacific (4.0 ?? 0.6 cm/yr) and JDF (1.9 ?? 0.6 cm/yr) plates. For northern Gorda ridge, the half spreading rate for the JDF plate is found to be 3.0 ?? 0.4 cm/yr. These rates are in agreement with paleomagnetic spreading rates and topographic constraints. This suggests that assumptions used to determine ages, including constancy of initial 230Th 232Th ratio over time, are generally valid for the areas studied. Samples located near the axis of spreading are typically younger than predicted by these spreading rates, which most likely reflects recent volcanism within a 1-3 km wide zone of crustal accretion. Initial 230Th/232Th ratios and 230Th activity were also used to examine the recent Th/U evolution and extent of melting of mantle sources beneath these ridges. A negative anomaly in 230Th 232Th for Axial seamount lavas provides the first geochemical evidence of a mantle plume source for Axial seamount and the Cobb-Eickelberg seamount chain and indicates recent depletion of other JDF segment sources. Large 230Th activity excesses for lavas from northern Gorda ridge and Endeavour segment indicate formation from a lower degree of partial melting than other segments. An

  19. Aqueous volatiles in hydrothermal fluids from the Main Endeavour Field, northern Juan de Fuca Ridge: temporal variability following earthquake activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seewald, Jeffrey; Cruse, Anna; Saccocia, Peter

    2003-12-01

    The Main Endeavour Field, northern Juan de Fuca Ridge, experienced intense seismic activity in June 1999. Hydrothermal vent fluids were collected from sulfide structures in September 1999 and July 2000 and analyzed for the abundance of H2, H2S, CH4, CO2, NH3, Mg and Cl to document temporal and spatial changes following the earthquakes. Dissolved concentrations of CO2, H2, and H2S increased dramatically in the September 1999 samples relative to pre-earthquake abundances, and subsequently decreased during the following year. In contrast, dissolved NH3 and CH4 concentrations in 1999 and 2000 were similar to or less than pre-earthquake values. Aqueous Cl abundances showed large decreases immediately following the earthquakes followed by increases to near pre-earthquake values. The abundances of volatile species at the Main Endeavour Field were characterized by strong inverse correlations with chlorinity. Phase separation can account for 20-50% enrichments of CO2, CH4, and NH3 in low-chlorinity fluids, while temperature- and pressure-dependent fluid-mineral equilibria at near-critical conditions are responsible for order of magnitude greater enrichments in dissolved H2S and H2. The systematic variation of dissolved gas concentrations with chlorinity likely reflects mixing of a low-chlorinity volatile-enriched vapor generated by supercritical phase separation with a cooler gas-poor hydrothermal fluid of seawater chlorinity. Decreased abundances of sediment-derived NH3 and CH4 in 1999 indicate an earthquake-induced change in subsurface hydrology. Elevated CO2 abundances in vent fluids collected in September 1999 provide evidence that supports a magmatic origin for the earthquakes. Temperature-salinity relationships are consistent with intrusion of a shallow dike and suggest that the earthquakes were associated with movement of magma beneath the ridge crest. These data demonstrate the large and rapid response of chemical fluxes at mid-ocean ridges to magmatic activity and

  20. Elastic Full Waveform Inversion reveals the fine-scale structure of Axial Volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnulf, A. F.; Harding, A. J.; Kent, G.

    2012-12-01

    Axial volcano (sometimes referred to as "Axial seamount" or "Axial") is located at 46N, 130W at the intersection of the Juan de Fuca Ridge and the Cobb-Eickelberg seamount chain. It is the most recent eruptive center of the Cobb hotspot, which last erupted in 2011. The volcano rises ~700 m above the adjacent ridge axis and its summit features a U-shaped caldera open to the southeast, which hosts an active hydrothermal field and very young lava flows. Located at the junction of a mid-ocean ridge and a volcanic hotspot, Axial volcano is atypical and its internal structure remains poorly understood. Here, we present results from an elastic full waveform inversion (FWI) along multiple seismic lines that span the whole volcano. We have used a multi-stage FWI, inverting successively wide-angle reflections and refractions arrivals from downward extrapolated streamer data, then windowed short offset reflections from the underlying magma chamber. Our final models show fine scale velocity structures with spatial resolutions of tens of meters. Our results indicate that Layer 2A thickness is extremely heterogeneous (350-900 m) within the volcano with abrupt vertical throws of >300 m beneath the caldera walls that suggests the tectonic thinning of a geologically defined Layer 2A. Interestingly, Layer 2A appears to be extremely thin beneath the active hydrothermal field and the most recent lava flows, on the southeast end of the caldera, where sheeted dikes might lay <100 m beneath the seafloor. On the other hand, the nearby caldera center is filled by successive lava sequences (~450 m thick) that further appear to be micro faulted, suggesting a constant interplay between magmatic and tectonic processes. Surface velocities show limited variation over the whole volcano and may suggest relative recent formation, considering the rapid increase in layer 2A velocity with age. Finally, our velocity structures image a wide and complex magma chamber system beneath the volcano at depth

  1. Evidence of active ground deformation on the mid-ocean ridge: Axial seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge, April-June 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, C.G. )

    1990-08-10

    Since September 1987 a precision bottom pressure recorder (BPR) has been deployed within the summit caldera of Axial seamount. The instrument is capable of measuring pressure of 1 mbar resolution and recording these measurements at 64 samples per hour for up to 15 months. Any significant change in the pressure record should indicate a change of depth associated with vertical ground movement, commonly indicative of active inflation or deflation of underlying magma bodies. Results from the first 9 months of the BPR deployment revealed a significant change in pressure, which is interpreted to represent a 15-cm subsidence of the caldera floor during two 2- to 3-week periods in April-June 1988. Also during these periods, an anomalous decline in temperature at the site was recorded that is correlated with an apparent increase in current velocity at the Axial Seamount Hydrothermal Emissions Study (ASHES) vent field, suggesting vigorous advection of cold water into the caldera. Concurrent oceanographic data from Geosat and from current meter arrays do not indicate any large-scale oceanographic phenomena capable of generating these simultaneous events. One mechanism to explain simultaneous ground subsidence and temperature decline at the caldera center and increased bottom current at the caldera margin is the generation of a buoyant parcel of heated water in response to the intrusion or the eruption of magma associated with volcanic deflation. Similar volcanic events also may have generated large midwater plumes that have been described previously along the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge.

  2. Lead isotope relations in oceanic Ridge basalts from the Juan de Fuca-Gorda Ridge area N.E. Pacific Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, S.E.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1975-01-01

    Lead isotopic analyses of a suite of basaltic rocks from the Juan de Fuca-Gorda Ridge and nearby seamounts confirm an isotopically heterogeneous mantle known since 1966. The process of mixing during partial melting of a heterogeneous mantle necessarily produces linear data arrays that can be interpreted as secondary isochrons. Moreover, the position of the entire lead isotope array, with respect to the geochron, requires that U/Pb and Th/Pb values are progressively increased over the age of the earth. Partial melting theory also dictates analogous behavior for the other incompatible trace elements. This process explains not only the LIL element character of MOR basalts, but also duplicates the spread of radiogenic lead data collected from alkali-rich oceanic basalts. This dynamic, open-system model of lead isotopic and chemical evolution of the mantle is believed to be the direct result of tectonic flow and convective overturn within the mantle and is compatible with geophysical models of a dynamic earth. ?? 1975 Springer-Verlag.

  3. Linkages between mineralogy, fluid chemistry, and microbial communities within hydrothermal chimneys from the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, T. J.; Ver Eecke, H. C.; Breves, E. A.; Dyar, M. D.; Jamieson, J. W.; Hannington, M. D.; Dahle, H.; Bishop, J. L.; Lane, M. D.; Butterfield, D. A.; Kelley, D. S.; Lilley, M. D.; Baross, J. A.; Holden, J. F.

    2016-02-01

    Rock and fluid samples were collected from three hydrothermal chimneys at the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge to evaluate linkages among mineralogy, fluid chemistry, and microbial community composition within the chimneys. Mössbauer, midinfrared thermal emission, and visible-near infrared spectroscopies were utilized for the first time to characterize vent mineralogy, in addition to thin-section petrography, X-ray diffraction, and elemental analyses. A 282°C venting chimney from the Bastille edifice was composed primarily of sulfide minerals such as chalcopyrite, marcasite, and sphalerite. In contrast, samples from a 300°C venting chimney from the Dante edifice and a 321°C venting chimney from the Hot Harold edifice contained a high abundance of the sulfate mineral anhydrite. Geochemical modeling of mixed vent fluids suggested the oxic-anoxic transition zone was above 100°C at all three vents, and that the thermodynamic energy available for autotrophic microbial redox reactions favored aerobic sulfide and methane oxidation. As predicted, microbes within the Dante and Hot Harold chimneys were most closely related to mesophilic and thermophilic aerobes of the Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria and sulfide-oxidizing autotrophic Epsilonproteobacteria. However, most of the microbes within the Bastille chimney were most closely related to mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobes of the Deltaproteobacteria, especially sulfate reducers, and anaerobic hyperthermophilic archaea. The predominance of anaerobes in the Bastille chimney indicated that other environmental factors promote anoxic conditions. Possibilities include the maturity or fluid flow characteristics of the chimney, abiotic Fe2+ and S2- oxidation in the vent fluids, or O2 depletion by aerobic respiration on the chimney outer wall.

  4. Heat flux measured acoustically at Grotto Vent, a hydrothermal vent cluster on the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, G.; Jackson, D. R.; Bemis, K. G.; Rona, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    Over the past several decades, quantifying the heat output has been a unanimous focus of studies at hydrothermal vent fields discovered around the global ocean. Despite their importance, direct measurements of hydrothermal heat flux are very limited due to the remoteness of most vent sites and the complexity of hydrothermal venting. Moreover, almost all the heat flux measurements made to date are snapshots and provide little information on the temporal variation that is expected from the dynamic nature of a hydrothermal system. The Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar (COVIS, https://sites.google.com/a/uw.edu/covis/) is currently connected to the Endeavour node of the NEPTUNE Canada observatory network (http://www.neptunecanada.ca) to monitor the hydrothermal plumes issuing from a vent cluster (Grotto) on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. COVIS is acquiring a long-term (20-months to date) time series of the vertical flow rate and volume flux of the hydrothermal plume above Grotto through the Doppler analysis of the acoustic backscatter data (Xu et al., 2013). We then estimate the plume heat flux from vertical flow rate and volume flux using our newly developed inverse method. In this presentation, we will briefly summarize the derivation of the inverse method and present the heat-flux time series obtained consequently with uncertainty quantification. In addition, we compare our heat-flux estimates with the one estimated from the plume in-situ temperatures measured using a Remotely Operative Vehicle (ROV) in 2012. Such comparison sheds light on the uncertainty of our heat flux estimation. Xu, G., Jackson, D., Bemis, K., and Rona, P., 2013, Observations of the volume flux of a seafloor hydrothermal plume using an acoustic imaging sonar, Geochemistry, Geophysics Geosystems, 2013 (in press).

  5. High-resolution near-bottom vector magnetic anomalies over Raven Hydrothermal Field, Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tivey, Maurice A.; Johnson, H. Paul; Salmi, Marie S.; Hutnak, Michael

    2014-10-01

    High-resolution, near-bottom vector magnetic data were collected by remotely operated vehicle Jason over the Raven hydrothermal vent field (47°57.3'N 129°5.75'W) located north of Main Endeavour vent field on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The survey was part of a comprehensive heat flow study of the Raven site using innovative thermal blanket technology to map the heat flux and crustal fluid pathways around a solitary hydrothermal vent field. Raven hydrothermal activity is presently located along the western axial valley wall, while additional inactive hydrothermal deposits are found to the NW on the upper rift valley wall. Magnetic inversion results show discrete areas of reduced magnetization associated with both active and inactive hydrothermal vent deposits that also show high conductive heat flow. Higher spatial variability in the heat flow patterns compared to the magnetization is consistent with the heat flow reflecting the currently active but ephemeral thermal environment of fluid flow, while crustal magnetization is representative of the static time-averaged effect of hydrothermal alteration. A general NW to SE trend in reduced magnetization across the Raven area correlates closely with the distribution of hydrothermal deposits and heat flux patterns and suggests that the fluid circulation system at depth is likely controlled by local crustal structure and magma chamber geometry. Magnetic gradient tensor components computed from vector magnetic data improve the resolution of the magnetic anomaly source and indicate that the hydrothermally altered zone directly beneath the Raven site is approximately 15 × 106 m3 in volume.

  6. Mineralogical studies of sulfide samples and volatile concentrations of basalt glasses from the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    PubMed

    Brett, R; Evans, H T; Gibson, E K; Hedenquist, J W; Wandless, M V; Sommer, M A

    1987-10-10

    Sulfide samples obtained from the U.S. Geological Survey's DSRV Alvin dives on the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge closely resemble those from the same area described by Koski et al. (1984). Major minerals include sphalerite, wurtzite, pyrite, marcasite, isocubanite, anhydrite, and chalcopyrite. Equilibrium, if attained at all, during deposition of most sulfides was a transient event over a few tens of micrometers at most and was perturbed by rapid temperature and compositional changes of the circulating fluid. Two new minerals were found: one, a hydrated Zn, Fe hydroxy-chlorosulfate, and the other, a (Mn, Mg, Fe) hydroxide or hydroxy-hydrate. Both were formed at relatively low temperatures. Lizardite, starkeyite, and anatase were found for the first time in such an environment. Sulfide geothermometry involving the system Cu-Fe-S indicates a vent temperature of <328 degrees C for one sample. Fluid inclusion studies on crystals from the same vicinity of the same sample give pressure-corrected homogenization temperatures of 268 degrees and 285 degrees C. Ice-melting temperatures on inclusions from the same sample are about -2.8 degrees C, indicating that the equivalent salinity of the trapped fluid is about 50% greater than that of seawater. Volatile concentrations from vesicle-free basalt glass from the vent field are about 0.013 wt% CO2 and 0.16 wt% H2O, CO2 contents in these samples yield an entrapment depth of 2200 m of seawater, which is the depth from which the samples were collected.

  7. GeoChip-based analysis of metabolic diversity of microbial communities at the Juan de Fuca Ridge hydrothermal vent

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fengping; Zhou, Huaiyang; Meng, Jun; Peng, Xiaotong; Jiang, Lijing; Sun, Ping; Zhang, Chuanlun; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Wu, Liyou; Zhou, Jizhong; Xiao, Xiang

    2009-01-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents are one of the most unique and fascinating ecosystems on Earth. Although phylogenetic diversity of vent communities has been extensively examined, their physiological diversity is poorly understood. In this study, a GeoChip-based, high-throughput metagenomics technology revealed dramatic differences in microbial metabolic functions in a newly grown protochimney (inner section, Proto-I; outer section, Proto-O) and the outer section of a mature chimney (4143-1) at the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Very limited numbers of functional genes were detected in Proto-I (113 genes), whereas much higher numbers of genes were detected in Proto-O (504 genes) and 4143-1 (5,414 genes). Microbial functional genes/populations in Proto-O and Proto-I were substantially different (around 1% common genes), suggesting a rapid change in the microbial community composition during the growth of the chimney. Previously retrieved cbbL and cbbM genes involved in the Calvin Benson Bassham (CBB) cycle from deep-sea hydrothermal vents were predominant in Proto-O and 4143-1, whereas photosynthetic green-like cbbL genes were the major components in Proto-I. In addition, genes involved in methanogenesis, aerobic and anaerobic methane oxidation (e.g., ANME1 and ANME2), nitrification, denitrification, sulfate reduction, degradation of complex carbon substrates, and metal resistance were also detected. Clone libraries supported the GeoChip results but were less effective than the microarray in delineating microbial populations of low biomass. Overall, these results suggest that the hydrothermal microbial communities are metabolically and physiologically highly diverse, and the communities appear to be undergoing rapid dynamic succession and adaptation in response to the steep temperature and chemical gradients across the chimney. PMID:19273854

  8. Space-time relations of hydrothermal sulfide-sulfate-silica deposits at the northern Cleft Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Koski, R.A.; Smith, V.K. ); Embley, R.W. ); Jonasson, I.R. ); Kadko, D.C. . Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science)

    1993-04-01

    Submersible investigations along the northern Cleft Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge indicate that a newly erupted sheet flow and two recent megaplume events are spatially related to a NNE-trending fissure system that is now the locus for active hydrothermal venting and deposition of massive sulfide mounds and chimneys. Samples from active high-temperature vent sites located east and north of the sheet flow terrain include zoned Cu-sulfide-rich chimneys (Type 1), bulbous anhydrite-rich chimneys (Type 2), and columnar Zn-sulfide-rich chimneys (Type 3). Type 1 chimneys with large open channelways result from the focused discharge of fluid at temperatures between 310 and 328 C from the Monolith sulfide mound. Type 2 chimneys are constructed on the Monolith and Fountain mounds where discharge of fluid at temperatures between 293 and 315 C is diffuse and sluggish. Type 3 chimneys, characterized by twisting narrow channelways, are deposited from focused and relatively low-temperature fluid discharging directly from basalt substrate. Inactive sulfide chimneys (Type 4) located within 100 m of the fissure system have bulk compositions, mineral assemblages, colloform and bacteroidal textures, and oxygen isotope characteristics consistent with low-temperature (< 250 C ) deposition from less robust vents. Field relations and [sup 210]Pb ages (> 100 years) indicate that the Type 4 chimneys formed prior to the sheet flow eruption. The sulfide mounds and Type 1 and Type 2 chimneys at the Monolith and Fountain vents, however, are an expression of the same magmatic event that caused the sheet flow eruption and megaplume events.

  9. Chemical Speciation and Oxidation Kinetics of Iron and Sulfur in Subseafloor Basement Fluids on the Juan de Fuca Ridge Flanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazer, B. T.; Matzinger, M.; Cowen, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    Redox reactive chemical species circulate throughout the upper oceanic crust, and are involved in a variety of abiotic and microbially-mediated reactions. Through exchange with bottom seawater, fluids circulating in the upper basement have the potential to influence scales ranging from global-scale biogeochemical cycling to micro-scale microbe-mineral interactions. Understanding fundamental chemical speciation, distribution, bioavailability, and rates of transformations for key chemical redox species is crucial to understanding processes in the subsurface. In-situ electrochemical analyses were conducted in real-time at CORK (Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kit) observatories affixed to Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) boreholes in Cascadia Basin on the Juan de Fuca Ridge Flanks. Voltammetric electrodes were mounted into a flow cell to allow for simultaneous detection of redox species (O2, H_{2}O2, HS^{-}, S(0), Sx^{2-}, S2O_{3}2-, S_{4}O6^{2-}, Fe(II), Fe(III), FeS$_{(aq)}) concurrent to sample filtering or fluid collection. During real-time voltammetric scanning, qualitative assessment of the integrity of fluids delivered through the Fluid Delivery Lines could be made, allowing for comparisons between CORK sites and various sampling strategies. Newly installed CORKs at IODP sites 1362A and 1362B are producing the highest-integrity basement fluids collected to date, deplete in oxygen (<3uM) and enriched in iron (>1uM). Here, we report results of in situ electrochemical measurements at multiple borehole observatories, including the newly installed 1362A & 1362B sites, and present results of speciation analyses and kinetics of oxidation for iron and sulfur in discrete samples.

  10. Subsurface fluids from basement basalt of the Juan de Fuca Ridge possess microbial communities that are distinct from overlying sediments and surrounding seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungbluth, S.; Bowers, R. M.; Lin, H.; Hsieh, C.; Cowen, J. P.; Rappe, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrothermal circulation of fluids through the porous and permeable ocean basement fuels a deep subsurface microbial community that remains poorly characterized due to the logistical and methodological constraints associated with sampling the sediment-covered seafloor. Ocean Drilling Program and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program holes penetrating 1.2-3.5 million-years old sediment-covered basaltic crust of the Juan de Fuca Ridge flank fitted with Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kit (CORK) borehole observatories have enabled sampling of chemically-reducing basement fluids over the course of multiple years (2008-2013). Consistent and reliable access to pristine fluids from the ocean crust is due to improvements to CORK observatories, through incorporation of microbiologically-friendly materials, and fluid sampling techniques and equipment. By analyzing ~1.7 million reads of the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene by next-generation Illumina sequencing from marine sediment, deep seawater, and 24 crustal fluid samples spanning multiple years and boreholes (1025C, U1301A, U1362A, and U1362), a distinct subseafloor biosphere dominated by the domain Bacteria was uncovered. Fluids from borehole U1301A sampled annually over the course of three years each had distinct microbial community structure and were dominated by the Proteobacteria. In contrast, fluids from boreholes 1362A and 1362B, located ~500 meters to the northeast, contained lineages phylogenetically related to the phylum Nitrospirae in highest abundance. The domain Archaea was was dominated by either the phylum Crenarchaeota (borehole U1301A) or the Euryarchaeota (boreholes 1025C, U1362A and U1362B). SSU rRNA genes phylogenetically affiliated with known lineages of methane producing Euryarchaeota (e.g. Methanobacteria) were the most abundant archaeal group detected in fluids from Holes U1362A and U1362B, predominantly within samples originating from the deepest subsurface sampling horizon (~200 meters sub

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus sp. Strain ST04, Isolated from a Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Sulfide Chimney on the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Ju-Hoon; Holden, James F.; Seo, Dong-Ho; Shin, Hakdong; Kim, Hae-Yeong; Kim, Wooki; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2012-01-01

    Pyrococcus sp. strain ST04 is a hyperthermophilic, anaerobic, and heterotrophic archaeon isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal sulfide chimney on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. To further understand the distinct characteristics of this archaeon at the genome level (polysaccharide utilization at high temperature and ATP generation by a Na+ gradient), the genome of strain ST04 was completely sequenced and analyzed. Here, we present the complete genome sequence analysis results of Pyrococcus sp. ST04 and report the major findings from the genome annotation, with a focus on its saccharolytic and metabolite production potential. PMID:22843576

  12. Complete genome sequence of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus sp. strain ST04, isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal sulfide chimney on the Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Ju-Hoon; Holden, James F; Seo, Dong-Ho; Shin, Hakdong; Kim, Hae-Yeong; Kim, Wooki; Ryu, Sangryeol; Park, Cheon-Seok

    2012-08-01

    Pyrococcus sp. strain ST04 is a hyperthermophilic, anaerobic, and heterotrophic archaeon isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal sulfide chimney on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. To further understand the distinct characteristics of this archaeon at the genome level (polysaccharide utilization at high temperature and ATP generation by a Na(+) gradient), the genome of strain ST04 was completely sequenced and analyzed. Here, we present the complete genome sequence analysis results of Pyrococcus sp. ST04 and report the major findings from the genome annotation, with a focus on its saccharolytic and metabolite production potential.

  13. Complete genome sequence of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus sp. strain ST04, isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal sulfide chimney on the Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Ju-Hoon; Holden, James F; Seo, Dong-Ho; Shin, Hakdong; Kim, Hae-Yeong; Kim, Wooki; Ryu, Sangryeol; Park, Cheon-Seok

    2012-08-01

    Pyrococcus sp. strain ST04 is a hyperthermophilic, anaerobic, and heterotrophic archaeon isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal sulfide chimney on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. To further understand the distinct characteristics of this archaeon at the genome level (polysaccharide utilization at high temperature and ATP generation by a Na(+) gradient), the genome of strain ST04 was completely sequenced and analyzed. Here, we present the complete genome sequence analysis results of Pyrococcus sp. ST04 and report the major findings from the genome annotation, with a focus on its saccharolytic and metabolite production potential. PMID:22843576

  14. Linking Microearthquakes and Seismic Tomography on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge: Implications for Hydrothermal Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcock, W. S.; Weekly, R. T.; Hooft, E. E.; Toomey, D. R.; Kim, E.

    2013-12-01

    We report on a remarkable correlation between the patterns of microearthquakes and three-dimensional upper crustal velocity anomalies on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Microearthquakes were monitored from 2003-2006 by a small seismic network deployed on the central part of the segment. The velocity model was obtained from a tomography experiment comprising over 5500 shots from a large airgun array that were recorded by ocean bottom seismometers deployed at 64 sites along the Endeavour segment and the adjacent overlapping spreading centers (OSCs). On the segment scale, upper crustal velocities are low in the OSCs indicating that the crust is highly fractured. These low velocities persist off-axis and record the history of ridge propagation. In 2005, two swarm sequences that were interpreted in terms of magmatic intrusions on the limbs of the Endeavour-West Valley OSC were accompanied by extensive seismicity within the overlap basin. Throughout the microearthquake experiment earthquakes were concentrated in a region surrounding the southern tip of the West Valley propagator that coincides closely with the southern limit of the low velocities imaged around the OSC. Beneath the hydrothermal vent fields in the center of the Endeavour segment, the earthquakes were mostly located in a 500-m-thick band immediately above the axial magma chamber. There was a close correlation between the rates of seismicity beneath each vent field and their thermal output. The highest rates of seismicity were observed beneath the High Rise and Main Endeavour fields that each have power outputs of several hundred megawatts. Seismic velocities are generally high beneath the vent fields relative to velocities along the ridge axis immediately to the north and south. However, the High Rise and Main Endeavour fields are underlain by a low velocity region at 2 km depth that coincides with the seismically active region. This is consistent with a region of increased fracturing and

  15. Geologic setting of massive sulfide deposits and hydrothermal vents along the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Normark, W.R.; Morton, J.L.; Delaney, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    This report incorporates data from two cruises of the USGS vessel SP LEE: (1) L12-80-WF from 29 October to 13 November 1980, and (2) L11-81-WF from 4 to 15 September 1981. The 1980 cruise occurred long after the optimum weather window for this region. The natural results was that no photographic or sample stations could be attempted during nearly continuous gale- and storm-force winds, which twice forced the vessel to depart the work area for safety. A detailed bathymetric survey of a 35-km segment of the ridge axial zone was completed nonetheless, and the bathymetric map compiled from this survey was used as the base for our second cruise in 1981. The second visit to the area was blessed with fair weather, and most of the cruise effort was devoted to photography and sampling, including dredging and hydrocasts in the axial valley segment, which is the central part of the area surveyed in 1980.

  16. Modeling mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal response to earthquakes, tides, and ocean currents: a case study at the Grotto mound, Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, G.; Bemis, K. G.

    2014-12-01

    Seafloor hydrothermal systems feature intricate interconnections among oceanic, geological, hydrothermal, and biological processes. The advent of the NEPTUNE observatory operated by Ocean Networks Canada at the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge enables scientists to study these interconnections through multidisciplinary, continuous, real-time observations. The multidisciplinary observatory instruments deployed at the Grotto Mound, a major study site of the NEPTUNE observatory, makes it a perfect place to study the response of a seafloor hydrothermal system to geological and oceanic processes. In this study, we use the multidisciplinary datasets recorded by the NEPTUNE Observatory instruments as observational tools to demonstrate two different aspects of the response of hydrothermal activity at the Grotto Mound to geological and oceanic processes. First, we investigate a recent increase in venting temperature and heat flux at Grotto observed by the Benthic and Resistivity Sensors (BARS) and the Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar (COVIS) respectively. This event started in Mar 2014 and is still evolving by the time of writing this abstract. An initial interpretation in light of the seismic data recorded by a neighboring ocean bottom seismometer on the NEPTUNE observatory suggests the temperature and heat flux increase is probably triggered by local seismic activities. Comparison of the observations with the results of a 1-D mathematical model simulation of hydrothermal sub-seafloor circulation elucidates the potential mechanisms underlying hydrothermal response to local earthquakes. Second, we observe significant tidal oscillations in the venting temperature time series recorded by BARS and the acoustic imaging of hydrothermal plumes by COVIS, which is evidence for hydrothermal response to ocean tides and currents. We interpret the tidal oscillations of venting temperature as a result of tidal loading on a poroelastic medium. We then invoke poroelastic

  17. Temporal Changes in the Strength of Tidal Triggering Linked to Volcanic Swarms on the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcock, W. S.; Weekly, R. T.; Hooft, E. E.; Toomey, D. R.

    2010-12-01

    A number of studies on mid-ocean ridges have documented a clear tidal triggering signal for volcanic/hydrothermal microearthquakes with earthquake rates increasing during intervals when the volumetric tidal stresses are least compressive. Tidal triggering has been demonstrated for the Endeavour segment in 1995, Axial Volcano in 1994, and the East Pacific Rise near 9°50’N in 2003-4. The results from the East Pacific Rise show a particularly strong tidal triggering signal that was interpreted as indicating that the crust was critically stressed in the lead up to a volcanic eruption in 2005-6. Observations in several subduction zones also show an increasing tidal triggering signal prior to large earthquakes and no clear evidence for triggering immediately afterwards. We present results from a tidal triggering study on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca ridge using a three-year catalog of seismicity for a local network deployed around the vent fields from 2003-2006. The catalog spans two complex regional swarms in January and February 2005 that we interpret as non-eruptive volcanic events on the southern extension of the West Valley propagating ridge and the northern Endeavour segment, respectively. These swarms were followed by a substantial drop in seismicity rates along the entire Endeavour segment and by a drop in b-values in the areas of the swarms. The swarms appear to mark the end of a 6-year spreading event that began with a swarm in 1999 and cumulatively ruptured the whole Endeavour segment. We analyze both the tidal phase and height at the times of earthquakes for triggering. Preliminary results show that prior to the swarms there is a strong triggering signal. For example, for earthquakes near the vent fields the rates of seismicity during times when the tidal phase is closer to low tide than high tide is 50% higher than when the phase is closer to high tide. The rate of earthquakes is 130% higher when tide heights are in the lowest tenth

  18. Chlorine stable isotopic composition of basement fluids of the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge (ODP Leg 168)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacie, Magali; Monnin, Christophe; Jendrzejewski, Nathalie; Agrinier, Pierre; Javoy, Marc

    2007-08-01

    This paper presents chlorine stable isotope compositions (δ 37Cl) of sediment pore waters collected by squeezing sediment cores from the sediment-basement interface along an East-West transect through the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge (ODP Leg 168). These "near basement fluids" (NBF) are generally thought to be representative of low-temperature fluids circulating in the off-axis basaltic crust. The δ 37Cl value of the fluid directly sampled from a flow at the base of Site 1026 (WSTP1026) is also reported. NBF display δ 37Cl values between - 2.09‰ and - 0.12‰ relative to the Standard Mean Ocean Chloride (SMOC defined as 0‰) and small variations in chlorinity (˜ 4%). These data contrast with the homogeneity of δ 37Cl values associated with highly variable chlorinities observed in high-temperature on-axis fluids [M. Bonifacie, J.L. Charlou, N. Jendrzejewski, P. Agrinier, J.P. Donval, Chlorine isotopic compositions of ridge axis high temperature hydrothermal vent fluids, Chem. Geol. 221(2005) 279-288.]. The NBF δ 37Cl values show a general decreasing trend with distance from the ridge-axis except for two fluids. When plotted against δ 18O values, the δ 37Cl of the NBF show two different trends. This paper discusses the possible contributions on NBF δ 37Cl values of fluid-mixing, water-rock interactions and transport processes (diffusion, ion membrane filtration) that can occur in the igneous basement. However, as none of these processes can fully explain the observed δ 37Cl variations, the potential effect of the sediment cover is also investigated. At site 1026, the interstitial pore fluid displays a δ 37Cl signature significantly lower than that of the fluid discharge sample (- 1.90‰ and - 0.28‰, respectively). This difference, demonstrated here cannot be an artifact of the sampling method, rather indicates the influence of the sediment cover on NBF δ 37Cl values. The potential contributions of physical processes associated with

  19. A Comparative Study of the 2011 and 2015 Eruptions of Axial Volcano, Juan de Fuca Ridge, From Seafloor Hydrophones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplan-Auerbach, J.; Dziak, R. P.; Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Chadwick, W.; Lau, T. K. A.

    2015-12-01

    Axial volcano, on the Juan de Fuca ridge, erupted in April 2011, and again in April 2015. Both eruptions were captured on ocean bottom hydrophones (OBHs). The 2011 eruption was recorded by three OBHs deployed near or within the caldera, although one instrument was overrun by lava and its data could not be recovered. The 2015 eruption was captured in real time by a network of ocean bottom seismometers and hydrophones deployed as part of the Ocean Observatories Initiative Cabled Array. Intense seismicity preceded and accompanied both eruptions. Earthquakes are recognizable in the hydroacoustic record by the timing of surface reflections: secondary and tertiary pulses are consistent with arrivals coming from below the hydrophone and reflecting off of the sea surface. The 2015 eruption also produced signals that initiate in the water column, interpreted as water-lava interactions. Surface reflections for these water column events are consistent with a more distant source, and the relative polarity of arrivals on the co-located OBH and OBSs are consistent with a signal traveling through the water rather than the subsurface. Comparisons of arrivals on the hydroacoustic and seismic channels show that there is little energy on the EW seismic channel, consistent with an impulsive signal arriving from the north. These water column events are absent from the 2011 eruption, despite the fact that preliminary estimates suggest that the eruptions were of comparable volume. Also observed during the 2015 event were a number of a diffuse broadband (10-100 Hz) signals that last from several minutes to over an hour. These events appear similar to hydroacoustic signals recorded in association with explosive degassing at other submarine volcanoes including NW Rota-1 (Marianas) and West Mata (Lau Basin). A comparison of hydroacoustic data recorded in the two events indicates that the 2015 eruption was more vigorous than the 2011 event and resulted in more explosive lava

  20. Geochemistry of low-molecular weight hydrocarbons in hydrothermal fluids from Middle Valley, northern Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruse, Anna M.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.

    2006-04-01

    Hydrothermal vent fluids from Middle Valley, a sediment-covered vent field located on the northern Juan de Fuca Ridge, were sampled in July, 2000. Eight different vents with exit temperatures of 186-281 °C were sampled from two areas of venting: the Dead Dog and ODP Mound fields. Fluids from the Dead Dog field are characterized by higher concentrations of ΣNH 3 and organic compounds (C 1-C 4 alkanes, ethene, propene, benzene and toluene) compared with fluids from the ODP Mound field. The ODP Mound fluids, however, are characterized by higher C 1/(C 2 + C 3) and benzene:toluene ratios than those from the Dead Dog field. The aqueous organic compounds in these fluids have been derived from both bacterial processes (methanogenesis in low temperature regions during recharge) as well as from thermogenic processes in higher temperature portions of the subsurface reaction zone. As the sediments undergo hydrothermal alteration, carbon dioxide and hydrocarbons are released to solution as organic matter degrades via a stepwise oxidation process. Compositional and isotopic differences in the aqueous hydrocarbons indicate that maximum subsurface temperatures at the ODP Mound are greater than those at the Dead Dog field. Maximum subsurface temperatures were calculated assuming that thermodynamic equilibrium is attained between alkenes and alkanes, benzene and toluene, and carbon dioxide and methane. The calculated temperatures for alkene-alkane equilibrium are consistent with differences in the dissolved Cl concentrations in fluids from the two fields, and confirm that subsurface temperatures at the ODP Mound are hotter than those at the Dead Dog field. Temperatures calculated assuming benzene-toluene equilibrium and carbon dioxide-methane equilibrium are similar to observed exit temperatures, and do not record the hottest subsurface conditions. The difference in subsurface temperatures estimated using organic geochemical thermometers reflects subsurface cooling processes via

  1. Microbially-Mediated Sulfur Oxidation in Diffuse Hydrothermal Vent Fluids at Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akerman, N. H.; Butterfield, D. A.; Huber, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    Diffusely venting hydrothermal fluids can act as a window to the subseafloor microbial environment, where chemically-reduced hydrothermal fluids mixing with oxygenated seawater in the shallow crust creates chemical disequilibria that chemotrophic microorganisms can exploit for energy gain. At Axial Seamount, an active deep-sea volcano located on the Juan de Fuca Ridge, sulfide concentrations have been measured as high as 5770 μM, and sulfide oxidation is quantitatively the most important chemical energy source for microbial metabolism. In addition, studies of microbial population structure indicate that diffuse fluids at Axial are dominated by putative sulfur- and sulfide-oxidizing bacteria belonging to the Epsilonproteobacteria. To further study this important microbial process, we surveyed diffuse vent samples from Axial over a range of temperature, pH, and sulfide concentrations for the presence and expression of sulfide-oxidizing bacteria using a functional gene approach. Dissolved oxygen concentrations decrease exponentially above 40°C and lower the potential for sulfide oxidation, so we identified six sites of different temperatures, two each in the low (< 30°C), medium (~30°C), and high temperature (30 - 50°C) range. The low temperature sites had sulfide-to-temperature ratios of 1 - 26, the medium from 15 - 29, and the high from 26 - 36. PCR primers were designed to target the sulfur oxidation gene soxB specifically from Epsilonproteobacteria and five of the six sites were positive for soxB in the DNA fraction. Bulk RNA was also extracted from the same sites to examine in situ expression of soxB. Data from these analyses, along with quantification of the soxB gene abundance and expression using quantitative PCR, are currently being carried out. Together, this data set of soxB gene diversity, expression, and abundance along with geochemical data will allow us to quantitatively determine the functional dynamics of sulfide oxidation in the subseafloor at

  2. Evolution of the Mothra Hydrothermal Field, Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glickson, D.; Kelley, D. S.; Delaney, J.

    2005-12-01

    The Mothra Hydrothermal Field (MHF) is a 600 m long, high-temperature hydrothermal field. It is located 2.7 km south of the Main Endeavour Field at the southern end of the central Endeavour Segment. Mothra is the most areally extensive field along the Endeavour Segment, composed of six active sulfide clusters that are 40-200 m apart. Each cluster contains rare black smokers (venting up to 319°C), numerous diffusely venting chimneys, and abundant extinct chimneys and sulfide talus. From north to south, these clusters include Cauldron, Twin Peaks, Faulty Towers, Crab Basin, Cuchalainn, and Stonehenge. As part of the Endeavour Integrated Study Site (ISS), the MHF is a site of intensive interdisciplinary studies focused on linkages among geology, geochemistry, fluid chemistry, seismology, and microbiology. Axial valley geology at MHF is structurally complex, consisting of lightly fissured flows that abut the walls and surround a core of extensively fissured, collapsed terrain. Fissure abundance and distribution indicates that tectonism has been the dominant process controlling growth of the axial graben. Past magmatic activity is shown by the 200 m long chain of collapse basins between Crab Basin and Stonehenge, which may have held at least ~7500 m3 of lava. Assuming a flow thickness of 0.5 m, this amount of lava could cover over half the valley floor during a single volcanic event. At a local scale, MHF clusters vary in size, activity, and underlying geology. They range in size from 400-1600 m2 and consist of isolated chimneys and/or coalesced cockscomb arrays atop ramps of sulfide talus. In the northern part of the field, Cauldron, Twin Peaks, Faulty Towers, and Crab Basin are located near the western valley wall, bounded by basalt talus and a combination of collapsed sheet flows, intermixed lobate and sulfide, disrupted terrain, and isolated pillow ridges. The southern clusters, Cuchalainn and Stonehenge, are associated with collapse basins in the central valley

  3. In-situ Chemistry of Hydrothermal Fluids from Black Smokers in Main Endeavour Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, K.; Seyfried, W. E.; Zhang, Z.; Foustoukos, D.; Pester, N. J.

    2005-12-01

    After an off-axis earthquake swarm in 1999, dramatic changes were observed in vent fluids of Main Endeavour Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Three month latter, we also recorded this sudden variation using a high temperature in-situ chemical sensor. The results at that time indicated some of the vent temperatures as high as 374°C. This change was also characterized by relatively high in-situ pH, high dissolved H2, and H2S concentrations in the fluids that were in excess of 5, 0.7 mmol/kg and 20 mmol/kg respectively. In order to further track time dependent changes over the past 6 years, we revisited Main Endeavour Field during the recent AT 11-31 cruise in Aug.~Sept. 2005. The high temperature chemical sensor was again used on selected dives with DSV Alvin to conduct in-situ measurements of pH, dissolved H2 and H2S concentrations along with temperatures. The data were obtained in a real time mode of 3 seconds per-reading from a series of measurements at high temperature conditions in the depth of 2200 m. Conventional gas-tight samples were also collected for verification and further study. In this study, Puffer, Sully and Bastille black smoker vent sites were specifically investigated owing to the high fluid temperatures that characterize these vents in comparison with other vents in the area. The measured temperatures for these vents were 362°C, 358°C, and 361°C respectively, which were generally about 20~30°C higher than the others currently in the area, but approximately 10°C lower than the highest temperatures measured in the aftermath of the 1999 seismic-magmatic event. Although the drops in vent temperatures were not substantial, the measured in-situ chemistry showed large departures from previous reported data. The in-situ pH values in these vents ranged from 4.43 to 4.89, in comparison with values above 5 in 1999. This difference may be linked directly to the decrease in temperature. The measured in-situ dissolved H2 and H2S concentrations were 0

  4. Geological and hydrothermal controls on the distribution of megafauna in Ashes Vent Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arquit, Anne M.

    1990-08-01

    A computerized data base was constructed to aid in the interpretation of biological and geological observations recorded from 7662 photographs taken of Ashes vent field (located along the SW wall of the summit caldera of Axial Volcano, Juan de Fuca Ridge) during 1985-1986 using the Pisces IV submersible and a towed camera system. The transition region between the locus of high-temperature vents in Ashes vent field (i.e., Inferno, 326°C; Hell, 301°C; and Virgin Mound, 298°C) and more typical environmental conditions for the summit caldera of Axial Volcano as a whole is zoned spatially with respect to sediment type and organism assemblage. Three general ecological zones are identified within the vent field: (1) the central vent zone (within 100 m of a high-temperature vent), dominated by vent-associated organisms (vestimentiferan tube worms, clams, bacterial mats) and sedimentation (high-temperature, plume-derived and low-temperature, in situ deposits); (2) the distal vent zone (100-725 m from any high-temperature vent), characterized by extensive fields of iron oxide, iron silicate and silica chimneys and sediment (nontronite assemblage material), as well as maximum densities of most nonvent fauna; and (3) the nonvent impact zone (725-1300 m), indicated by elevated densities of nonvent organisms relative to regional (i.e., caldera-wide) values and maximum Bathydorus sp. sponge densities. The distribution of vestimentiferan tube worms is limited to within 90 m of known high-temperature venting (central vent zone); and anemones were observed only between 30 and 40 m from hot vents. Clams and microbial mats are concentrated in the central vent zone, as well, but occur sporadically up to 1250 m from the hot vents in association with hydrothermal nontronite that is probably precipitating in situ from <60°C vent fluid; thus megafaunal distributions are a useful indicator of poorly defined, often diffuse low-temperature hydrothermal activity on the seafloor. Maximum

  5. Crustal magnetization and the subseafloor structure of the ASHES vent field, Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge: Implications for the investigation of hydrothermal sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caratori Tontini, Fabio; Crone, Timothy J.; Ronde, Cornel E. J.; Fornari, Daniel J.; Kinsey, James C.; Mittelstaedt, Eric; Tivey, Maurice

    2016-06-01

    High-resolution geophysical data have been collected using the Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) Sentry over the ASHES (Axial Seamount Hydrothermal Emission Study) high-temperature (~348°C) vent field at Axial Seamount, on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Multiple surveys were performed on a 3-D grid at different altitudes above the seafloor, providing an unprecedented view of magnetic data resolution as a function of altitude above the seafloor. Magnetic data derived near the seafloor show that the ASHES field is characterized by a zone of low magnetization, which can be explained by hydrothermal alteration of the host volcanic rocks. Surface manifestations of hydrothermal activity at the ASHES vent field are likely controlled by a combination of local faults and fractures and different lava morphologies near the seafloor. Three-dimensional inversion of the magnetic data provides evidence of a vertical, pipe-like upflow zone of the hydrothermal fluids with a vertical extent of ~100 m.

  6. Preliminary Results from Downhole Osmotic Samplers in a Gas Tracer Injection Experiment in the Upper Oceanic Crust on the Eastern Flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, M. T.; Clark, J. F.; Neira, N. M.; Fisher, A. T.; Wheat, C. G.

    2015-12-01

    We present results from a gas tracer injection experiment in the ocean crust on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, in an area of hydrothermal circulation. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer was injected in Hole 1362B in 2010, during IODP Expedition 327. Fluid samples were subsequently collected from a borehole observatory (CORK) installed in this hole and similar CORKs in three additional holes (1026B, 1362A, and 1301A), located 300 to 500 m away. This array of holes is located on 3.5 My old seafloor, as an array oriented subparallel to the Endeavor Segment of Juan de Fuca Ridge. Borehole fluid samples were collected in copper coils using osmotic pumps. In addition to pumps at seafloor wellheads, downhole sampling pumps were installed in the perforated casing in the upper ocean crust. These downhole samplers were intended to produce a high-resolution continuous record of tracer concentrations, including records from the first year after tracer injection in Holes 1362A and 1362B. In contrast, wellhead samplers were not installed on these CORKs holes until 2011, and wellhead records from all CORKs have a record gap of up to one year, because of a delayed expedition in 2012. The downhole samples were recovered with the submersible Alvin in August 2014. SF6 concentrations in downhole samples recovered in 2014 are generally consistent with data obtained from wellhead samples. Of particular interest are the results from Hole 1362B, where a seafloor valve was opened and closed during various recovery expeditions. High resolution tracer curves produced from the 1362B downhole samples confirm that these operations produced an SF6 breakthrough curve corresponding to a classic push-pull test used to evaluate contaminant field locations in terrestrial setting. Complete analyses of downhole samples from these CORKs are expected to produce high-resolution breakthrough curves that will allow more precise analysis and modeling of hydrothermal flow in the study area.

  7. Chemistry of hydrothermal vent fluids from the Main Endeavour Field, northern Juan de Fuca Ridge: Geochemical controls in the aftermath of June 1999 seismic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyfried, W. E.; Seewald, J. S.; Berndt, M. E.; Ding, Kang; Foustoukos, D. I.

    2003-09-01

    In June 1999, an intense swarm of earthquakes occurred on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge influencing hydrothermal activity in and around the Main Endeavour Field (MEF). Here we report the dissolved concentrations of 31 species from five high-temperature vents sampled 3 months after the seismic event. The spatial variability of vent fluid chemistry is extreme. Vapor-dominated vent fluids at Cantilever and Sully sites have high measured temperatures (375°-379°C), high dissolved gas and boron concentrations, but low SiO2. Modeling results indicate that these fluids can be accounted for by supercritical phase separation and brine condensation. Other vent fluids have moderate temperatures (340°-366°C) and chloride concentrations (208-426 mmol/kg), and may result from mixing of supercritical, vapor-rich fluids with evolved seawater. Phase equilibria calculations indicate that in addition to chloride, redox, temperature, and especially pressure play key roles in accounting for compositional variability of vent fluids at MEF. In comparison with earlier (1988) data, the 1999 data set reveals significantly lower chloride concentrations and higher boron, whereas alkali and alkaline earth cations are lower by 10-20% in keeping with chloride decrease. That dissolved chloride, boron, and other elements returned to preevent levels when again sampled in 2000 provide additional data documenting the inherently dynamic nature of hydrothermal systems at mid-ocean ridges.

  8. Geology, mineralogy, and chemistry of sediment-hosted clastic massive sulfides in shallow cores, Middle Valley, northern Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Goodfellow, W.D.; Franklin, J.M. )

    1993-12-01

    Middle Valley is a sediment-covered rift near the northern end of Juan de Fuca Ridge. Hydrothermal fluids are presently being discharged at two vent fields about 3 km apart, Bent Hill and the area of active venting. The hydrothermally active chimneys at both Bent Hill and the area of active venting consist of anhydrite and Mg-rich silicates with minor pyrite, Cu-Fe sulfide, sphalerite, and galena. Hydrothermal discharge in these areas appears to be focused along extensional faults. At the Bent Hill massive sulfide deposit, clastic sulfide layers are interbedded with hydrothermally altered and unaltered hemipelagic and turbiditic sediment along the flanks of the sulfide mound. Sulfide textures and mineralogy suggest that the Bent Hill sulfide mound formed by the build-up and collapse of sulfide chimneys, the resedimentation of sulfide debris and the formation of clastic sulfide layers, and the infilling and replacement of clastic sulfides by hydrothermal fluids near vents. Sulfur isotope values that are consistently more positive than basaltic sulfur support the addition of seawater sulfur. Pb isotope values for the Bent Hill deposit that are transitional between midocean ridge basalt (MORB) and Middle Valley sediments indicate that the sulfides probably formed from fluids which originated in the oceanic crust but which have been modified by reaction with lower temperature (<274 C) fluids generated in the sedimentary pile, similar to those now venting in Middle Valley.

  9. Insights on the Biology of the Eastern Lau Spreading Center from Studies on the East Pacific Rise and Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, C. R.; Sen, A.; Becker, E.

    2011-12-01

    A primary goal of the Ridge 2000 program was to conduct comparable interdisciplinary studies at a few fundamentally different sites that would facilitate comparisons among sites and development of concepts with broad application across deep ocean ridge spreading centers. Although the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) was the least known of the three Integrated Study Sites, we were able to make amazingly fast progress on understanding this system because we could draw on technology and experience developed during the RIDGE program to plan and conduct the work, and now interpret our findings in the context of the rich literature and Ridge 2000 studies on East Pacific Rise (EPR) , Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdFR), and Mid Atlantic Ridge communities. The ELSC communities not only house different species than those of the other regions, but unlike the often tubeworm dominated E. Pacific vents, they are structured by symbiont reliant species that are mobile; snails and mussels. Although there is some variation with lava type on the ELSC, the 4 species of large, symbiont-containing snails largely occupy the niches filled by tubeworms and mussels on the EPR, while the niche of the mussel in the W. Pacific vents is quite different from that of its EPR cousin. Although we have not observed any significant tectonic or magmatic events during our studies of the ELSC, 4 years of study considered in the context of what we have learned on the EPR and JdFR allow us to formulate and begin testing hypotheses about temporal change and succession in these very different and much less visited ecosystems. Furthermore, athough Paralvinella fijiensis are only found in limited areas on some chimneys and flanges, unlike the situation on the EPR and JdFR ,the ELSC chimney communities are largely composed of the same species as are found in diffuse flow on the lavas. The ELSC chimney communities are also remarkably stable, hosting some of the largest and apparently oldest individuals found on the

  10. Major- and minor-metal composition of three distinct solid material fractions associated with Juan de Fuca hydrothermal fluids (northeast Pacific), and calculation of dilution fluid samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinkley, T.K.; Seeley, J.L.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1988-01-01

    Three distinct types of solid material are associated with each sample of the hydrothermal fluid that was collected from the vents of the Southern Juan de Fuca Ridge. The solid materials appear to be representative of deposits on ocean floors near mid-ocean ridges, and interpretation of the chemistry of the hydrothermal solutions requires understanding of them. Sr isotopic evidence indicates that at least two and probably all three of these solid materials were removed from the solution with which they are associated, by precipitation or adsorption. This occurred after the "pure" hydrothermal fluid was diluted and thoroughly mixed with ambient seawater. The three types of solid materials, are, respectively, a coarse Zn- and Fe-rich material with small amounts of Na and Ca; a finer material also rich in Zn and Fe, but with alkali and alkaline-earth metals; and a scum composed of Ba or Zn, with either considerable Fe or Si, and Sr. Mineral identification is uncertain because of uncertain anion composition. Only in the cases of Ba and Zn were metal masses greater in solid materials than in the associated fluids. For all other metals measured, masses in fluids dwarf those in solids. The fluids themselves contain greater concentrations of all metals measured, except Mg, than seawater. We discuss in detail the relative merits of two methods of determining the mixing proportions of "pure" hydrothermal solution and seawater in the fluids, one based on Sr isotopes, and another previously used method based on Mg concentrations. Comparison of solute concentrations in the several samples shows that degree of dilution of "pure" hydrothermal solutions by seawater, and amounts of original solutes that were removed from it as solid materials, are not related. There is no clear evidence that appreciable amounts of solid materials were not conserved (lost) either during or prior to sample collection. ?? 1988.

  11. Contrasting two-dimensional and three-dimensional models of outcrop-to-outcrop hydrothermal circulation on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, A. T.; Winslow, D. M.; Stauffer, P. H.; Gable, C. W.; Zyvoloski, G.

    2015-12-01

    We present results from two-dimensional and three-dimensional coupled (fluid and heat flow) simulations of ridge-flank hydrothermal circulation on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Field studies in this region demonstrate the existence of an active hydrothermal siphon operating between two seamounts separated by ~50 km, and provide quantitative constraints that help to determine which simulations are successful in replicating known properties and processes. Constraints from field observations include (a) the flow rate between the outcrops, (b) the presence of secondary convection within the basement aquifer, leading to simultaneous recharge and discharge through a single outcrop (in additional to siphon flow between outcrops), (c) direct measurements of crustal permeability in basement boreholes, and (d) the lack of a regional seafloor heat flux anomaly as a consequence of outcrop-to-outcrop circulation. New simulations include an assessment of crustal permeability and thickness, outcrop permeability, and a comparison of simulation results using different geometries. Three-dimensional simulations are more consistent with field observations than their two-dimensional counterparts and indicate a crustal aquifer of ≤300 m thick having a bulk permeability between 3×10-13 and 2×10-12 m2, values consistent with borehole measurements. In addition, we find fluid flow rates and crustal cooling efficiencies that are an order of magnitude greater in three-dimensional simulations than inferred from two-dimensional simulations using equivalent properties. These results show that three-dimensional simulations of outcrop-to-outcrop hydrothermal circulation on a ridge flank improves the geological and geometric accuracy of results, in comparison to models run in two dimensions.

  12. Preliminary Results from a Gas Tracer Injection Experiment in the Upper Oceanic Crust on the Eastern Flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neira, N. M.; Clark, J. F.; Fisher, A. T.; Wheat, C. G.

    2013-12-01

    We present the first results from a gas tracer injection experiment in the ocean crust on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, in an area of vigorous hydrothermal circulation. A mixture of tracers was injected in Hole 1362B in 2010, during IODP Expedition 327, as part of a 24-hour pumping experiment. Fluid samples were subsequently collected from this hole and three additional holes (1026B, 1362A, and 1301A), located 300 to 500 m away. The array of holes is located on 3.5 M.y. old seafloor, and oriented N20°E, subparallel to the Endeavor Segment of Juan de Fuca Ridge, 100 km to the west. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) was injected at a concentration of 0.0192 mol/min, with fluid pumping rate of 6.7 L/s for 20.2 h, resulting in a mean concentration of 47.6 μM and 23.3 mol of SF6 being added to crustal fluids. Borehole fluid samples were collected in copper coils using osmotic pumps attached to the wellheads of several long-term, subseafloor observatories (CORKs). These samples were recovered from the seafloor using a remotely-operated vehicle in 2011 and 2013. Analyses of SF6 concentrations in samples recovered in 2011 indicate the first arrival of SF6 in Hole 1301A, 550 m south of the injection Hole 1362B, ~265 days after injection. This suggests that the most rapid lateral transport of gas (at the leading edge of the plume) occurred at ~2 m/day. Samples recovered in 2013 should provide a more complete breakthrough curve, allowing assessment of the mean lateral transport rate. Additional insights will come from analysis of metal salts and particle tracers injected contemporaneously with the SF6, the cross-hole pressure response to injection and a two-year fluid discharge experiment. Additional wellhead samples will be collected in Summer 2014, as will downhole osmosamplers deployed in perforated casing within the upper ocean crust in Holes 1362A and 1362B.

  13. Neogene magmatism northeast of the Aegir and Kolbeinsey ridges, NE Atlantic: Spreading ridge-mantle plume interaction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breivik, AsbjøRn Johan; Faleide, Jan Inge; Mjelde, Rolf

    2008-02-01

    According to mantle plume theory the Earth's interior cools partly by localized large vertical mass transport, causing extensive decompression melting. The Iceland melt anomaly is regarded as a typical example of a mantle plume. However, there are centers of Miocene to recent magmatism in the Norwegian-Greenland Sea not easily explained by the plume theory. Here we present new data to document diffuse late Miocene magmatic underplating of older oceanic crust located mostly north of the Aegir Ridge, an extinct seafloor spreading axis in the Norway Basin. There is also a region with similar magmatism northeast of the presently spreading Kolbeinsey Ridge north of Iceland. Intraplate magmatism in these locations is not easily explained by local plume models, edge-driven convection, or by asthenosphere flow-lithosphere thickness interaction. On the basis of correlation between the magmatism and the active or extinct spreading ridges, we propose the mid-ocean ridge basalt-capture model, in which this magmatism can be understood through plume-spreading ridge interaction: The asthenosphere flow out from Iceland captures deeper, low-degree partially molten asthenospheric regions from underneath the spreading ridges and carry these across the terminating fracture zones, to subsequently underplate oceanic crust or to intrude and build seamounts. This model is similar to lithospheric cracking models for intraplate magmatism in requiring that low-degree partial melt can be retained in the asthenosphere over time but differ in that the magma is extracted by internal magma movement processes and not by external tectonic forces.

  14. A Diverse Community of Metal(loid) Oxide Respiring Bacteria Is Associated with Tube Worms in the Vicinity of the Juan de Fuca Ridge Black Smoker Field.

    PubMed

    Maltman, Chris; Walter, Graham; Yurkov, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Epibiotic bacteria associated with tube worms living in the vicinity of deep sea hydrothermal vents of the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the Pacific Ocean were investigated for the ability to respire anaerobically on tellurite, tellurate, selenite, selenate, metavanadate and orthovanadate as terminal electron acceptors. Out of 107 isolates tested, 106 were capable of respiration on one or more of these oxides, indicating that metal(loid) oxide based respiration is not only much more prevalent in nature than is generally believed, but also is an important mode of energy generation in the habitat. Partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed the bacterial community to be rich and highly diverse, containing many potentially new species. Furthermore, it appears that the worms not only possess a close symbiotic relationship with chemolithotrophic sulfide-oxidizing bacteria, but also with the metal(loid) oxide transformers. Possibly they protect the worms through reduction of the toxic compounds that would otherwise be harmful to the host.

  15. Origin of minor and trace element compositional diversity in anorthitic feldspar phenocrysts and melt inclusions from the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, David T.; Nielsen, Roger L.; Kent, Adam J.R.; Tepley, Frank J.

    2011-01-01

    Melt inclusions trapped in phenocryst phases are important primarily due to their potential of preserving a significant proportion of the diversity of magma composition prior to modification of the parent magma array during transport through the crust. The goal of this investigation was to evaluate the impact of formational and post-entrapment processes on the composition of melt inclusions hosted in high anorthite plagioclase in MORB. Our observations from three plagioclase ultra-phyric lavas from the Endeavor Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge document a narrow range of major elements and a dramatically greater range of minor and trace elements within most host plagioclase crystals. Observed host/inclusion partition coefficients for Ti are consistent with experimental determinations. In addition, observed values of DTi are independent of inclusion size and inclusion TiO2 content of the melt inclusion. These observations preclude significant effects from the re-homogenization process, entrapment of incompatible element boundary layers or dissolution/precipitation. The observed wide range of TiO2 contents in the host feldspar, and between bands of melt inclusions within individual crystals rule out modification of TiO contents by diffusion, either pre-eruption or due to re-homogenization. However, we do observe comparatively small ranges for values of K2O and Sr compared to P2O5 and TiO2 in both inclusions and crystals that can be attributed to diffusive processes that occurred prior to eruption.

  16. Distribution and composition of hydrothermal plume particles from the ASHES vent field at Axial Volcano, Juan de Fuca Ridge. [Axial Seamount Hydrothermal Emission Study

    SciTech Connect

    Feely, R.A.; Geiselman, T.L.; Baker, E.T.; Massoth, G.J. ); Hammond, S.R. )

    1990-08-10

    In 1986 and 1987, buoyant and neutrally buoyant hydrothermal plume particles from the ASHES vent field within Axial Volcano were sampled to study their variations in composition with height above the seafloor. Individual mineral phases were identified using standard X ray diffraction procedures. Elemental composition and particle morphologies were determined by X ray fluorescence spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy/X ray energy spectrometry techniques. The vent particles were primarily composed of sphalerite, anhydrite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, barite, hydrous iron oxides, and amorphous silica. Grain size analyses of buoyant plume particles showed rapid particle growth in the first few centimeters above the vent orifice, followed by differential sedimentation of the larger sulfide and sulfate minerals out of the buoyant plume. The neutrally buoyant plume consisted of a lower plume, which was highly enriched in Fe, S, Zn, and Cu, and an upper plume, which was highly enriched in Fe and Mn. The upper plume was enriched in Fe and Mn oxyhydroxide particles, and the lower plume was enriched in suspended sulfide particles in addition to the Fe and Mn oxyhydroxide particles. The chemical data for the water column particles indicate that chemical scavenging and differential sedimentation processes are major factors controlling the composition of the dispersing hydrothermal particles. Short-term sediment trap experiments indicate that the fallout from the ASHES vent field is not as large as some of the other vent fields on the Juan de Fuca Ridge.

  17. Phylogenetic diversity of microorganisms in subseafloor crustal fluids from Holes 1025C and 1026B along the Juan de Fuca Ridge flank

    PubMed Central

    Jungbluth, Sean P.; Lin, Huei-Ting; Cowen, James P.; Glazer, Brian T.; Rappé, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    To expand investigations into the phylogenetic diversity of microorganisms inhabiting the subseafloor biosphere, basalt-hosted crustal fluids were sampled from Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kits (CORKs) affixed to Holes 1025C and 1026B along the Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdFR) flank using a clean fluid pumping system. These boreholes penetrate the crustal aquifer of young ocean crust (1.24 and 3.51 million years old, respectively), but differ with respect to borehole depth and temperature at the sediment-basement interface (147 m and 39°C vs. 295 m and 64°C, respectively). Cloning and sequencing of PCR-amplified small subunit ribosomal RNA genes revealed that fluids retrieved from Hole 1025C were dominated by relatives of the genus Desulfobulbus of the Deltaproteobacteria (56% of clones) and Candidatus Desulforudis of the Firmicutes (17%). Fluids sampled from Hole 1026B also contained plausible deep subseafloor inhabitants amongst the most abundant clone lineages; however, both geochemical analysis and microbial community structure reveal the borehole to be compromised by bottom seawater intrusion. Regardless, this study provides independent support for previous observations seeking to identify phylogenetic groups of microorganisms common to the deep ocean crustal biosphere, and extends previous observations by identifying additional lineages that may be prevalent in this unique environment. PMID:24723917

  18. A Diverse Community of Metal(loid) Oxide Respiring Bacteria Is Associated with Tube Worms in the Vicinity of the Juan de Fuca Ridge Black Smoker Field

    PubMed Central

    Maltman, Chris; Walter, Graham; Yurkov, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Epibiotic bacteria associated with tube worms living in the vicinity of deep sea hydrothermal vents of the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the Pacific Ocean were investigated for the ability to respire anaerobically on tellurite, tellurate, selenite, selenate, metavanadate and orthovanadate as terminal electron acceptors. Out of 107 isolates tested, 106 were capable of respiration on one or more of these oxides, indicating that metal(loid) oxide based respiration is not only much more prevalent in nature than is generally believed, but also is an important mode of energy generation in the habitat. Partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed the bacterial community to be rich and highly diverse, containing many potentially new species. Furthermore, it appears that the worms not only possess a close symbiotic relationship with chemolithotrophic sulfide-oxidizing bacteria, but also with the metal(loid) oxide transformers. Possibly they protect the worms through reduction of the toxic compounds that would otherwise be harmful to the host. PMID:26914590

  19. A Diverse Community of Metal(loid) Oxide Respiring Bacteria Is Associated with Tube Worms in the Vicinity of the Juan de Fuca Ridge Black Smoker Field.

    PubMed

    Maltman, Chris; Walter, Graham; Yurkov, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Epibiotic bacteria associated with tube worms living in the vicinity of deep sea hydrothermal vents of the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the Pacific Ocean were investigated for the ability to respire anaerobically on tellurite, tellurate, selenite, selenate, metavanadate and orthovanadate as terminal electron acceptors. Out of 107 isolates tested, 106 were capable of respiration on one or more of these oxides, indicating that metal(loid) oxide based respiration is not only much more prevalent in nature than is generally believed, but also is an important mode of energy generation in the habitat. Partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed the bacterial community to be rich and highly diverse, containing many potentially new species. Furthermore, it appears that the worms not only possess a close symbiotic relationship with chemolithotrophic sulfide-oxidizing bacteria, but also with the metal(loid) oxide transformers. Possibly they protect the worms through reduction of the toxic compounds that would otherwise be harmful to the host. PMID:26914590

  20. Eruptive and tectonic history of the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge, based on AUV mapping data and lava flow ages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, David A.; Dreyer, Brian M; Paduan, Jennifer B; Martin, Julie F; Caress, David W; Gillespie, James B.; Kelley, Deborah S; Thomas, Hans; Portner, Ryan A; Delaney, John R; Guilderson, Thomas P.; McGann, Mary L.

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution bathymetric surveys from autonomous underwater vehicles ABE and D. Allan B. were merged to create a coregistered map of 71.7 km2 of the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Radiocarbon dating of foraminifera in cores from three dives of remotely operated vehicle Doc Ricketts provide minimum eruption ages for 40 lava flows that are combined with the bathymetric data to outline the eruptive and tectonic history. The ages range from Modern to 10,700 marine-calibrated years before present (yr BP). During a robust magmatic phase from >10,700 yr BP to ~4300 yr BP, flows erupted from an axial high and many flowed >5 km down the flanks; some partly buried adjacent valleys. Axial magma chambers (AMCs) may have been wider than today to supply dike intrusions over a 2 km wide axial zone. Summit Seamount formed by ~4770 yr BP and was subsequently dismembered during a period of extension with little volcanism starting ~4300 yr BP. This tectonic phase with only rare volcanic eruptions lasted until ~2300 yr BP and may have resulted in near-solidification of the AMCs. The axial graben formed by crustal extension during this period of low magmatic activity. Infrequent eruptions occurred on the flanks between 2620–1760 yr BP and within the axial graben since ~1750 yr BP. This most recent phase of limited volcanic and intense hydrothermal activity that began ~2300 yr BP defines a hydrothermal phase of ridge development that coincides with the present-day 1 km wide AMCs and overlying hydrothermal vent fields.

  1. Eruptive and tectonic history of the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge, based on AUV mapping data and lava flow ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clague, David. A.; Dreyer, Brian M.; Paduan, Jennifer B.; Martin, Julie F.; Caress, David W.; Gill, James B.; Kelley, Deborah S.; Thomas, Hans; Portner, Ryan A.; Delaney, John R.; Guilderson, Thomas P.; McGann, Mary L.

    2014-08-01

    bathymetric surveys from autonomous underwater vehicles ABE and D. Allan B. were merged to create a coregistered map of 71.7 km2 of the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Radiocarbon dating of foraminifera in cores from three dives of remotely operated vehicle Doc Ricketts provide minimum eruption ages for 40 lava flows that are combined with the bathymetric data to outline the eruptive and tectonic history. The ages range from Modern to 10,700 marine-calibrated years before present (yr BP). During a robust magmatic phase from >10,700 yr BP to ˜4300 yr BP, flows erupted from an axial high and many flowed >5 km down the flanks; some partly buried adjacent valleys. Axial magma chambers (AMCs) may have been wider than today to supply dike intrusions over a 2 km wide axial zone. Summit Seamount formed by ˜4770 yr BP and was subsequently dismembered during a period of extension with little volcanism starting ˜4300 yr BP. This tectonic phase with only rare volcanic eruptions lasted until ˜2300 yr BP and may have resulted in near-solidification of the AMCs. The axial graben formed by crustal extension during this period of low magmatic activity. Infrequent eruptions occurred on the flanks between 2620-1760 yr BP and within the axial graben since ˜1750 yr BP. This most recent phase of limited volcanic and intense hydrothermal activity that began ˜2300 yr BP defines a hydrothermal phase of ridge development that coincides with the present-day 1 km wide AMCs and overlying hydrothermal vent fields.

  2. Seismic Structure of the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge: Correlations of Crustal Magma Chamber Properties With Seismicity, Faulting, and Hydrothermal Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ark, E. M.; Detrick, R. S.; Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Diebold, J. B.; Harding, A.; Kent, G.; Nedimovic, M. R.; Wilcock, W. S.

    2003-12-01

    Multichannel seismic reflection data collected in July 2002 at the RIDGE2000 Integrated Studies Site at the Endeavour segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge show a high-amplitude, mid-crustal reflector underlying all of the known hydrothermal vent fields at this segment. This reflector, which has been identified with a crustal magma body [Detrick et al., 2002], is found at a two-way travel time of 0.85-1.5 s (1.9-4.0 km) below the seafloor and extends approximately 25 km along axis although it is only 1-2 km wide on the cross-axis lines. The reflector is shallowest (2.5 km depth on the along-axis line) beneath the central, elevated part of the Endeavour segment and deepens toward the segment ends, with a maximum depth of 4 km. The cross axis lines show the mid-crustal reflector dipping from 9 to 50? to the east with the shallowest depths under the ridge axis and greater depths under the eastern flank of the ridge. The amplitude-offset behavior of this mid-crustal axial reflector is consistent with a negative impedance contrast, indicating the presence of melt or a crystallizing mush. We have constructed partial offset stacks at 2-3 km offset to examine the variation of melt-mush content of the axial magma chamber along axis. We see a decrease in P-wave amplitudes with increasing offset for the mid-crustal reflector beneath the Mothra and Main Endeavour vent fields and between the Salty Dawg and Sasquatch vent fields, indicating the presence of a melt-rich body. Beneath the High Rise, Salty Dawg, and Sasquatch vent fields P-wave amplitudes vary little with offset suggesting the presence of a more mush-rich magma chamber. Hypocenters of well-located microseismicity in this region [Wilcock et al., 2002] have been projected onto the along-axis and cross-axis seismic lines, revealing that most axial earthquakes are concentrated in a depth range of 1.5 - 2.7 km, just above the axial magma chamber. In general, seismicity is distributed diffusely within this zone indicating thermal

  3. Crustal structure of Axial Volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge, from seafloor depths to the bottom of the magma chamber, using Elastic Full Waveform Inversion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnulf, Adrien; Harding, Alistair; Kent, Graham

    2013-04-01

    Axial volcano is located at 46˚N, 130˚W at the intersection of the Juan de Fuca Ridge and the Cobb-Eickelberg seamount chain. It is the most recent eruptive center of the Cobb hotspot, which last erupted in 2011. The volcano rises ~700 m above the adjacent ridge axis and its summit features a 8-km-long, U-shaped caldera with an opening to the southeast where there is an active hydrothermal field and very young lava flows. Located at the junction of a mid-ocean ridge and a volcanic hotspot, Axial volcano is atypical and its internal structure remains poorly understood. Here, we present results from an elastic full waveform inversion (FWI) along multiple seismic lines that span the whole volcano. We have used a multi-stage FWI, inverting successively wide-angle reflections and refractions arrivals from downward extrapolated streamer data, then windowed short offset reflections from the underlying magma chamber. Our final models show fine scale velocity structures with spatial resolutions of tens of meters. Our results indicate that Layer 2A thickness is extremely heterogeneous (350-900 m) within the volcano with abrupt vertical offsets of >300 m at the caldera walls, consistent with faulting of a geologically defined Layer 2A. Interestingly, Layer 2A appears to be extremely thin beneath the active hydrothermal field, where sheeted dikes might lay <100 m beneath the seafloor. On the other hand, the ever-dropping floor of the caldera appears to be a perfect trap for the ponding of lava flows: the thickness of the lava flows increase gradually to the northwest reaching ~450 m at end of the caldera. Surface velocities are low and exhibit limited variation over the whole volcano suggesting relative recent formation, as layer 2A velocity increases rapidly with age at slightly greater depths. Crustal aging (increase in layer 2A velocity with age) appears to be controlled by pipe-like pattern of focused hydrothermal mineralization. Finally, RTM images reveal a large melt

  4. Evolution and hydration of the Juan de Fuca crust and uppermost mantle: a plate-scale seismic investigation from ridge to trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbotte, S. M.; Canales, J.; Carton, H. D.; Nedimovic, M. R.; Han, S.; Marjanovic, M.; Gibson, J. C.; Janiszewski, H. A.; Horning, G.; Delescluse, M.; Watremez, L.; Farkas, A.; Biescas Gorriz, B.; Bornstein, G.; Childress, L. B.; Parker, B.

    2012-12-01

    The evolution of oceanic lithosphere involves incorporation of water into the physical and chemical structure of the crust and shallow mantle through fluid circulation, which initiates at the mid-ocean ridge and continues on the ridge flanks long after crustal formation. At subduction zones, water stored and transported with the descending plate is gradually released at depth, strongly influencing subduction zone processes. Cascadia is a young-lithosphere end member of the global subduction system where relatively little hydration of the downgoing Juan de Fuca (JdF) plate is expected due to its young age and presumed warm thermal state. However, numerous observations support the abundant presence of water within the subduction zone, suggesting that the JdF plate is significantly hydrated prior to subduction. Knowledge of the state of hydration of the JdF plate is limited, with few constraints on crustal and upper mantle structure. During the Cascadia Ridge-to-Trench experiment conducted in June-July 2012 over 4000 km of active source seismic data were acquired as part of a study of the evolution and state of hydration of the crust and shallow mantle of the JdF plate prior to subduction at the Cascadia margin. Coincident long-streamer (8 km) multi-channel seismic (MCS) and wide-angle ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) data were acquired in a two-ship program with the R/V Langseth (MGL1211), and R/V Oceanus (OC1206A). Our survey included two ridge-perpendicular transects across the full width of the JdF plate, a long trench-parallel line ~10 km seaward of the Cascadia deformation front, as well as three fan lines to study mantle anisotropy. The plate transects were chosen to provide reference sections of JdF plate evolution over the maximum range of JdF plate ages (8-9 Ma), offshore two contrasting regions of the Cascadia Subduction zone, and provide the first continuous ridge-to-trench images acquired at any oceanic plate. The trench-parallel line was designed to

  5. Metalloid reducing bacteria isolated from deep ocean hydrothermal vents of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, Pseudoalteromonas telluritireducens sp. nov. and Pseudoalteromonas spiralis sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Rathgeber, Christopher; Yurkova, Natalia; Stackebrandt, Erko; Schumann, Peter; Humphrey, Elaine; Beatty, J Thomas; Yurkov, Vladimir

    2006-11-01

    Five strains of Gram-negative, rod, curved rod and spiral-shaped bacteria were isolated from the vicinity of deep ocean hydrothermal vents along the Main Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the Pacific Ocean. All strains showed remarkable resistance to high levels of toxic metalloid oxyanions, and were capable of reducing the oxyanions tellurite and selenite to their less toxic elemental forms. Phylogenetic analysis of four strains identified these isolates as close relatives of the genus Pseudoalteromonas within the class Gammaproteobacteria. Pseudoalteromonas agarivorans was the closest relative of strains Te-1-1 and Se-1-2-redT, with, respectively, 99.5 and 99.8% 16S rDNA sequence similarity. Strain Te-2-2T was most closely related to Pseudoalteromonas paragorgicola, with 99.8% 16S rDNA sequence similarity. The DNA G+C base composition was 39.6 to 41.8 mol%, in agreement with other members of the genus Pseudoalteromonas. However, the isolates showed important morphological and physiological differences from previously described species of this genus, with one group forming rod-shaped bacteria typical of Pseudoalteromonas and the other forming vibrioid- to spiral-shaped cells. Based on these differences, and on phylogenetic data, we propose the creation of the new species Pseudoalteromonas telluritireducens sp. nov., with strain Se-1-2-redT (DSMZ = 16098T = VKM B-2382T) as the type strain, and Pseudoalteromonas spiralis sp. nov., with strain Te-2-2T (DSMZ = 16099T = VKM B-2383T) as the type strain. PMID:17066332

  6. Compositions, growth mechanisms, and temporal realtions of hydrothermal sulfide-sulfate-silica chimneys at the northern Cleft segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koski, Randolph A.; Jonasson, Ian R.; Kadko, David C.; Smith, Virginia K.; Wong, Florence L.

    1994-03-01

    Three active hydrothermal vents forming sulfide mounds and chimneys (Monolith, Fountain, and Pipe Organ) and more widely distributed inactive chimneys are spatially related to a system of discontinuous fissures and young sheet flow lavas at the northern Cleft segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge. The formation of zoned tubular Curich chimneys (type I) on the Monolith sulfide mound is related to focused flow of high-temperature (to 328 C) fluid. Bulbous chimneys (type II or 'beehives') at the Monolith and Fountain vents are products of diffuse high-temperature (to 315 C) discharge. A broader zone of vigorous mixing between the hydrothermal fluid and seawater results in quench crystallization of anhydrite-rich shells. Columnar Zn-sulfide-rich chimneys with narrow channelways (type III) are constructed where focused and relatively low-temperature (261 C) fluid vents directly from the basalt substrate. The bulk chemistry (low Cu; high Pb, Ag, and SiO2 contents), mineralogy (pyrite-marcasite-wurtzite-amorphous silica-anglesite), colloform and filamentous textures, and oxygen isotope characteristics of inactive (type IV) chimneys indicate a low-temperature (less than 250 C) origin involving diffuse and sluggish flow patterns and conductive cooling. Seafloor observations and Pb-210 data indicate that (1) type IV chimneys are products of an earlier period of hydrothermal activity that ended no more than 60 years ago but prior to the sheet flow eruption; (2) the high-temperature Monolith and Fountain vents are manifestations of the same heating event (shallow emplacement of magma) that led to the sheet flow eruption and recent megaplumes; and (3) the Pipe Organ Vent is in a very youthful stage of development, and chimney deposition postdates the sheet flow eruption.

  7. Constraining Seasonal and Vertical Distributions of Planktonic Foraminifera for Paleoclimate Reconstruction Since MIS3 at the Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. L.; Ravelo, A. C.; Clague, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The California Current is an upwelling region with dynamic interactions between circulation, biological productivity and ecology. A 77 cm piston push core was taken from the Juan de Fuca Ridge Axial Seamount using a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) (2213m, 45.55º N, 130.08º W), an active submarine volcano ~480 km off Oregon's coast. Five radiocarbon dates indicate that the sediment ranges from 42.6 ka at 77 cm to 17.6 ka at 15 cm, with an average sediment accumulation rate of 2.47 cm/ka from 77-15 cm, and an average rate of 0.85 cm/ka during the postglacial period (<17.6 ka). Multiple species of planktic foraminifera from the core representing subtropical, subartic, and arctic fauna have been used to constrain changes in vertical and seasonal temperature since Marine Isotope Stage 3 (MIS3). Measurements of δ18O of the upwelling species Globigerina bulloides, the thermocline dwelling species Neogloboquadrina dutertrei, and the warm mixed-layer species Orbulina universa are offset from each other, reflecting vertical and seasonal variation among the planktonic foraminifera. Of the three species, G. bulloides shows the least variation in δ18O, possibly indicating that marked changes in temperature are masking changes in the δ18O of seawater due to global ice volume changes. G. bulloides and O. universa δ18O values are similar in MIS 3 and diverge with time, indicating the development of strong seasonal succession of species, since the last glacial maximum. Bulk nitrogen isotopes and nitrogen flux provide additional constraints on upwelling strength and insight into local biological productivity and nutrient dynamics. Obtaining Mg/Ca data will clarify the δ 18O interpretation except deep in the core where metal-bearing authigenic precipitates affect Mg concentrations. These climatic proxies together provide insight into how global climate change and local seamount volcanism impacts regional productivity in the California Current.

  8. Numerical Modeling of Two-Phase Flow at the Main Endeavour Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge: Quasi-Steady State and Thermal Decline of the Vent Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S.; Lowell, R. P.; Lewis, K. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Main Endeavour Field (MEF) on the Juan de Fuca Ridge consists of a large number of chimney structures occupying an area approximately 400 m x 150 m along the ridge axis. For nearly a decade, the MEF exhibited quasi-steady north-south trending spatial gradients of both temperature and salinity. We have constructed 2-D across-axis numerical models of two-phase flow using the code FISHES to investigate possible causes for this variation. We considered the effect of bottom boundary temperature and both a homogeneous permeability structure and a geometry incorporating a more-permeable layer 2A. From these model results we argue that such a trend is more likely to be the result of heterogeneous permeability structure of the shallow oceanic crust than a result of bottom boundary temperature variations. After a magmatic event in 1999, this trend was disrupted; and thermal data using the Autonomous Benthic Explorer (ABE) indicates that there has been a significant decline in the heat output from a value of approximately 450 MW in 2000 to approximately 300 MW in 2004. In the southern part of the vent field, vent salinities have also increased from values well below those of seawater to values close to seawater. We therefore extend our investigation to include the effect of a temporally-decaying basal heat flow, which may result from cooling, crystallizing magma chamber, on the system. Our aim is to determine whether such a phenomenon could cause the observed rapid decline of heat flow and changes in vent salinity at the MEF. We find that the thermal inertia in the system is such that changes in basal heat flow would be difficult to detect in the given time frame, if magma replenishment ceased following the 1999 magmatic event. The time delay between changes in bottom conditions and the observed decay in observed heat output suggests that the 1999 event represented a small replenishment event and that the AMC may have begun cooling some time before that. Moreover, because

  9. Microearthquakes beneath the Hydrothermal Vent Fields on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge: Results from the Keck Seismic/Hydrothermal Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, D.; Parker, J.; Wilcock, W.; Hooft, E.; Barclay, A.; Toomey, D.; McGill, P.; Stakes, D.; Schmidt, C.; Patel, H.

    2005-12-01

    The W.M. Keck Foundation is supporting the operation of a small seismic network in the vicinity of the hydrothermal vent fields on the central portion of the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. This is part of a program to conduct prototype seafloor observatory experiments to monitor the relationships between episodic deformation, fluid venting and microbial productivity at oceanic plate boundaries. The Endeavour seismic network was installed in the summer of 2003 and comprises seven GEOSense three-component short-period corehole seismometers and one buried Guralp CMG-1T broadband seismometer. A preliminary analysis of the first year of data was undertaken as part of an undergraduate research apprenticeship class taught at the University of Washington's Friday Harbor Laboratories and additional analysis has since been completed by two of the apprentices and by two IRIS undergraduate interns. Over 12,000 earthquakes were located along the ridge-axis of the Endeavour, of which ~3,000 occur within or near the network and appear to be associated with the hydrothermal systems. The levels of seismicity are strongly correlated with the intensity of venting with particularly high rates of seismicity beneath the Main and High Rise Fields and substantially lower rates to the north beneath the relatively inactive Salty Dawg and Sasquatch fields. We have used both HYPOINVERSE and a grid search algorithm to investigate the distribution of focal depths assuming a variety of one-dimensional velocity models. The preliminary results show that the majority of earthquakes occur within a narrow depth range and may represent an intense zone of seismicity within a reaction overlying the axial magma chamber at ~2.5 km depth. However, the mean focal depth is strongly dependent on the relative weights assigned to the S arrivals. We infer from the inspection of residuals that no combination of the P- and S-wave velocity models we have so far investigated are fully consistent with

  10. Special collection on the June 1993 volcanic eruption on the CoAxial segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Christopher G.

    1995-01-01

    The mid-ocean ridge system is the primary site of oceanic crustal accretion and a major source of chemical/thermal flux from the Earth's interior to the hydrosphere. Although geological mapping, geophysical exploration, and hydrographie/chemical surveys have provided important insights into accretionary processes, until recently there has been no method of monitoring the dynamics of these systems over long periods and large areas. Insights into spreading center dynamics have depended on serendipitous discoveries of evidence of activity based on water column anomalies [Baker et al., 1987], bathymetric differences [Fox et al., 1992], or direct field observations [Haymon et al., 1993]. In situ instrumentation has been used to monitor dynamics at a few selected sites for long periods, but these instruments are generally unable to telemeter data in real time.

  11. Submarine geology of Hana Ridge and Haleakala Volcano's northeast flank, Maui

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eakins, Barry W.; Robinson, Joel E.

    2006-01-01

    We present a morphostructural analysis of the submarine portions of Haleakala Volcano and environs, based upon a 4-year program of geophysical surveys and submersible explorations of the underwater flanks of Hawaiian volcanoes that was conducted by numerous academic and governmental research organizations in Japan and the U.S. and funded primarily by the Japan Agency for Marine–Earth Science and Technology. A resulting reconnaissance geologic map features the 135-km-long Hana Ridge, the 3000 km2 Hana slump on the volcano's northeast flank, and island-surrounding terraces that are the submerged parts of volcanic shields. Hana Ridge below 2000 m water depth exhibits the lobate morphology typical of the subaqueously erupted parts of Hawaiian rift zones, with some important distinctions: namely, subparallel crestlines, which we propose result from the down-rift migration of offsets in the dike intrusion zone, and an amphitheater at its distal toe, where a submarine landslide has embayed the ridge tip. Deformation of Haleakala's northeast flank is limited to that part identified as the Hana slump, which lies downslope from the volcano's submerged shield, indicating that flank mobility is also limited in plan, inconsistent with hypothesized volcanic spreading driven by rift-zone dilation. The leading edge of the slump has transverse basins and ridges that resemble the thrust ramps of accretionary prisms, and we present a model to describe the slump's development that emphasizes the role of coastally generated fragmental basalt on gravitational instability of Haleakala's northeast flank and that may be broadly applicable to other ocean-island slumps.

  12. Age, Episodicity and Migration of Hydrothermal Activity within the Axial Valley, Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, J. W.; Hannington, M. D.; Kelley, D. S.; Clague, D. A.; Holden, J. F.; Tivey, M. K.; Delaney, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrothermal sulfide deposits record the history of high-temperature venting along the Endeavour Segment. Active venting is currently located within five discreet vent fields, with minor diffuse venting occurring between the fields. However, inactive and/or extinct sulfide structures are found throughout the entire axial valley of the ridge segment, suggesting that hydrothermal activity has been more vigorous in the past or focused venting has migrated with time. Here, we present age constraints from U-series dating of 44 sulfide samples collected by manned submersible from between the Mothra Field in the south to Sasquatch in the north. Samples are dated using 226Ra/Ba ratios from hydrothermal barite that precipitates along with the sulfide minerals. Most samples have been collected from within or near the active vent fields. Fifteen samples from the Main Endeavour Field (MEF) show a spectrum of ages from present to 2,430 years old, indicating that this field has been continuously active for at least ~2,400 years. MEF appears to be oldest currently active field. This minimum value for the age of hydrothermal activity also provides a minimum age of the axial valley itself. Ages from thirteen samples from the High-Rise Field indicate continuous venting for at least the past ~1,250 years. These age data are used in conjunction with age constraints of the volcanic flows to develop an integrated volcanic, hydrothermal and tectonic history of the Endeavour Segment. The total volume of hydrothermal sulfide within the axial valley, determined from high-resolution bathymetry, is used in conjunction with the age constraints of the sulfide material to determine the mass accumulation rates of sulfide along the Endeavour Segment. These data can be used to calibrate the efficiency of sulfide deposition from the hydrothermal vents, and provide a time-integrated history of heat, fluid and chemical fluxes at the ridge-segment scale. The comparison of time-integrated rates with

  13. Characterization of Active Hydrothermal Fluid Discharge and Recharge Zones in the Endeavour Axial Valley, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmi, M.; Hutnak, M.; Hearn, C.; Tivey, M.; Bjorklund, T.; Johnson, H. P.

    2012-12-01

    Sites where warm hydrothermal fluid vents at mid-ocean spreading centers are important for understanding a wide range of critical oceanic processes, but discharge zones represent a very limited portion of crustal fluid circulation pathways. Mapping the distribution of both fluid recharge and discharge sites within the axial valley provides wider insight into the larger scale features of hydrothermal circulation. Our 2011 survey consisted of 180 conductive heat flow stations within the Endeavour axial valley in roughly a 400 m by 1000 m grid, extending across the entire axial valley from the outer flank of the western boundary ridge to the eastern wall. Data acquisition used thermal blankets which measured conductive heat flow without requiring substantial sediment cover. A surprising result from this survey was zones of high heat flow extending across-strike, from the summit of the west valley wall across the entire axial valley floor. This trend was correlated with anomalously low seafloor magnetization from a near-bottom survey with the ROV JASON. Unexpectedly, over half of the axial valley floor was anomalously low at <50 mW m-2, while a small portion of the sites within the 'warm zone' had heat flow values >1 W m-2. The areas of extremely low heat flow values are interpreted as being directly influenced by recharge zones. Based on MCS estimates of partial melt depth below the axial valley and the assumption of no fluid advection, the purely conductive heat flow for this region should be on the order of 1 W m-2.The observation that conductive heat flux is suppressed over large portions of the axial valley floor suggests that heat transfer within the crustal sub-surface fluid reservoir is widespread, and impacts a large portion of our survey area. The largely bi-modal distribution of high and low conductive heat flow, coupled with geophysical and video observations, suggest current Endeavour axial valley crustal fluid circulation models need to be re-evaluated.

  14. Seismicity Along the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge: Automated Event Locations for an Ocean-Bottom Seismometer Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weekly, R. T.; Wilcock, W. S.; Hooft, E. E.; Toomey, D. R.; McGill, P. R.

    2007-12-01

    From 2003-2006, the W.M. Keck Foundation supported the operation of a network of eight ocean-bottom seismometers (OBSs) that were deployed with a remotely operated vehicle along the central portion of the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca mid-ocean ridge as part of a multidisciplinary prototype NEPTUNE experiment. Data from 2003-2004 were initially analyzed during a research apprenticeship class at the University of Washington's Friday Harbor Laboratories. Eight student analysts located ~13,000 earthquakes along the Endeavour Segment. Analysis of data from 2004-2005 has to date been limited to locating ~6,000 earthquakes associated with a swarm in February-March 2005 near the northern end of the Endeavour Segment. The remaining data includes several significant swarms and it is anticipated that tens of thousands of earthquakes still need to be located. In order to efficiently obtain a complete catalog of high-quality locations for the 3-year experiment, we are developing an automatic method for earthquake location. We first apply a 5-Hz high-pass filter and identify triggers when the ratio of the root-mean square (RMS) amplitudes in short- and long- term windows exceeds a specified threshold. We search for events that are characterized by triggers within a short time interval on the majority of stations and use the signal spectra to eliminate events that are the result of 20-Hz Fin and Blue whale vocalizations. An autoregressive technique is applied to a short time window centered on the trigger time to pick P-wave times on each station's vertical channel. We locate the earthquake with these picks and either attempt to repick or eliminate arrivals with unacceptable residuals. Preliminary S-wave picks are then made on the horizontal channels by applying a 5-12 Hz bandpass filter, identifying the peak RMS amplitude for a short running window, and making a pick at the time the RMS amplitude rises above 50% of this value. The picks are refined using the

  15. Seismicity Along the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge: Automated Event Locations for an Ocean-Bottom Seismometer Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weekly, R. T.; Wilcock, W. S.; Hooft, E. E.; Toomey, D. R.; McGill, P. R.

    2004-12-01

    From 2003-2006, the W.M. Keck Foundation supported the operation of a network of eight ocean-bottom seismometers (OBSs) that were deployed with a remotely operated vehicle along the central portion of the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca mid-ocean ridge as part of a multidisciplinary prototype NEPTUNE experiment. Data from 2003-2004 were initially analyzed during a research apprenticeship class at the University of Washington's Friday Harbor Laboratories. Eight student analysts located ~13,000 earthquakes along the Endeavour Segment. Analysis of data from 2004-2005 has to date been limited to locating ~6,000 earthquakes associated with a swarm in February-March 2005 near the northern end of the Endeavour Segment. The remaining data includes several significant swarms and it is anticipated that tens of thousands of earthquakes still need to be located. In order to efficiently obtain a complete catalog of high-quality locations for the 3-year experiment, we are developing an automatic method for earthquake location. We first apply a 5-Hz high-pass filter and identify triggers when the ratio of the root-mean square (RMS) amplitudes in short- and long- term windows exceeds a specified threshold. We search for events that are characterized by triggers within a short time interval on the majority of stations and use the signal spectra to eliminate events that are the result of 20-Hz Fin and Blue whale vocalizations. An autoregressive technique is applied to a short time window centered on the trigger time to pick P-wave times on each station's vertical channel. We locate the earthquake with these picks and either attempt to repick or eliminate arrivals with unacceptable residuals. Preliminary S-wave picks are then made on the horizontal channels by applying a 5-12 Hz bandpass filter, identifying the peak RMS amplitude for a short running window, and making a pick at the time the RMS amplitude rises above 50% of this value. The picks are refined using the

  16. Competing styles of deep-marine explosive eruptions revealed from Axial seamount and Juan De Fuca ridge push core records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portner, R. A.; Clague, D. A.; Paduan, J. B.; Martin, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    extremely fine-grained, angular-sliver shaped and locally concentrated into reverse graded laminae. Fluidal shards are rare. Plagioclase fragments are locally abundant up to 15%. A significant component of hydrothermal grains also occurs and consists of pale greenish-blue clay aggregates, reddish-orange botryoidal grains, anyhydrite, barite or zeolite, and pyrite. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates that the muddy host contains minor nontronite or saponite, and chlorite. This mineral association is in stark contrast to quartz-illite bearing sediment samples from adjacent ridge segments, and supports the interpretation that the ashy mud deposits on Axial seamount preserve hydrothermal activity. Analogous to a phreatomagmatic eruption on land, we envisage shallow circulation of hydrothermal fluids below the vent and hydrovolcanic fragmentation during ascent through the conduit. Lamination and grading criteria suggest that beds were deposited via dilute turbidity flows and reworked by ocean bottom currents. Associations of the two pyroclastic lithofacies with interbedded fossiliferous-bioturbated mud, indicates relatively quiescent periods between separate magmatic or phreatomagmatic eruptions. These eruptive modes extend our knowledge about the range in deep-marine explosive activity.

  17. Microbial and Mineral Descriptions of the Interior Habitable Zones of Active Hydrothermal Chimneys from the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, J. F.; Lin, T.; Ver Eecke, H. C.; Breves, E.; Dyar, M. D.; Jamieson, J. W.; Hannington, M. D.; Butterfield, D. A.; Bishop, J. L.; Lane, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    Actively venting hydrothermal chimneys and their associated hydrothermal fluids were collected from the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge to determine the mineralogy, chemistry and microbial community composition of their interiors. To characterize the mineralogy, Mössbauer, FTIR, VNIR and thermal emission spectroscopies were used for the first time on this type of sample in addition to thin-section petrography, x-ray diffraction and elemental analyses. A chimney from the Bastille edifice was Fe-sulfide rich and composed primarily of chalcopyrite, marcasite-sphalerite, and pyrrhotite while chimneys from the Dante and Hot Harold edifices were Fe-sulfide poor and composed primarily of anhydrite. The bulk emissivity and reflectance spectroscopies corroborated well with the petrography and XRD analyses. The microbial community in the interior of Bastille was most closely related to mesophilic-to-thermophilic anaerobes of the deltaproteobacteria and hyperthermophilic archaea while those in the interiors of Dante and Hot Harold were most closely related to mesophilic-to-thermophilic aerobes of the beta-, gamma- and epsilonproteobacteria. The fluid temperatures (282-321°C) and chemistries of the three chimneys were very similar suggesting that differences in mineralogy and microbial community compositions were more dependent on fluid flow characteristics and paragenesis within the chimney. Thin-section petrography of the interior of another hydrothermal chimney collected from the Dante edifice (emitting 336°C fluid) shows a thin coat of Fe3+ oxide associated with amorphous silica on the exposed outer surfaces of pyrrhotite, sphalerite and chalcopyrite in pore spaces, along with anhydrite precipitation in the pores that is indicative of seawater ingress. The Fe-sulfide minerals were likely oxidized to ferrihydrite with increasing pH and Eh due to cooling and seawater exposure, providing reactants for bioreduction. Culture-based most-probable-number estimates of

  18. A long-term record of magma compositions at the Juan de Fuca ridge from analysis of sediment hosted volcanic glass: tests of the effects of sea level on melt production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, D.; Li, Y.; Langmuir, C. H.; Costa, K.; McManus, J. F.; Huybers, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    It is hypothesized that the pressure changes caused by sea level variations during glacial cycles can influence long-term rates of magmatism in ocean basins. This proposed coupling between oceanic magmatism and climate has important implications for temporal trends in rates of mid-ocean ridge (MOR) volcanism, the structure of the oceanic crust and the composition of oceanic magmas, including the flux of volatile elements from the mantle. Testing the extent to which climate cycles may or may not modulate the compositions of oceanic magmas is difficult, as it requires compositional records that stretch over timescales comparable to those of glacial cycles (i.e. 10s of kyrs), which do not currently exist. In this study we use fragments of volcanic glass found in sediment cores to construct compositional time-series for lavas erupted at the Juan de Fuca ridge, NW Pacific. These provide continuous records of magmatism over several 10s kyrs, with a temporal resolution of a few kyrs. The longest record in our current dataset spans ~80 kyrs and records two significant step-wise changes in the average compositions of the erupted magmas, linked to both variations in the extent of crustal fractionation (i.e. MgO) and also the composition of primary mantle melts (i.e. K2O/TiO2). These changes occur rapidly and are decoupled in time, with the MgO shift happening around ~20 kyrs before the change in K2O/TiO2. Compositional variations such as these, and the temporal offset between them, are generally consistent with models of the effect of sea-level variation on magma chemistry, which can modulate the melt flux to the ridge and the extent of mantle melting. To place our results in a chronological and climatic context we will compare our data to oxygen-isotope records collected from the same sediment horizons and chemical analysis of the host sediments. Our study demonstrates the potential of this method for investigating the magmatic behaviour of ridges over long timescales.

  19. The Cobb-Eickelberg seamount chain: Hotspot volcanism with mid-ocean ridge basalt affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Desonie, D.L.; Duncan, R.A. )

    1990-08-10

    Cobb hotspot, currently located beneath Axial seamount on the Juan de Fuca ridge, has the temporal but not the isotopic characteristics usually attributed to a mantle plume. The earlier volcanic products of the hotspot, form eight volcanoes in the Cobb-Eickelberg seamount (CES) chain, show a westward age progression away from the hotspot and a westward increase in the age difference between the seamounts and the crust on which they formed. These results are consistent with movement of the Pacific plate over a fixed Cobb hotspot and eventual encroachment by the westwardly migrating Juan de Fuca ridge. CES lavas are slightly enriched in alkalies and incompatible elements relative to those of the Juan de Fuca ridge but they have Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic compositions virtually identical to those found along the ridge. Therefore, Cobb hotspot is a stationary, upper mantle melting anomaly whose volcanic products show strong mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) affinity. These observations can be explained by low degrees of partial melting of entrained heterogeneous upper mantle MORB source material within a thermally driven lower mantle diapir or by an intrinsic MORB-like composition of the deeper mantle source region from which northeast Pacific plumes rise.

  20. Tectonic evolution of Gorda Ridge inferred from sidescan sonar images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masson, D.G.; Cacchione, D.A.; Drake, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    Gorda Ridge is the southern segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge complex, in the north-east Pacific. Along-strike spreading-rate variation on Gorda Ridge and deformation of Gorda Plate are evidence for compression between the Pacific and Gorda Plates. GLORIA sidescan sonographs allow the spreading fabric associated with Gorda Ridge to be mapped in detail. Between 5 and 2 Ma, a pair of propagating rifts re-orientated the northern segment of Gorda Ridge by about 10?? clockwise, accommodating a clockwise shift in Pacific-Juan de Fuca plate motion that occurred around 5 Ma. Deformation of Gorda Plate, associated with southward decreasing spreading rates along southern Gorda Ridge, is accommodated by a combination of clockwise rotation of Gorda Plate crust, coupled with left-lateral motion on the original normal faults of the ocean crust. Segments of Gorda Plate which have rotated by different amounts are separated by narrow deformation zones across which sharp changes in ocean fabric trend are seen. Although minor lateral movement may occur on these NW to WNW structures, no major right-lateral movement, as predicted by previous models, is observed. ?? 1988 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  1. Anatomy of sand beach ridges: Evidence from severe Tropical Cyclone Yasi and its predecessors, northeast Queensland, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nott, Jonathan; Chague-Goff, Catherine; Goff, James; Sloss, Craig; Riggs, Naomi

    2013-09-01

    Four well-identified tropical cyclones over the past century have been responsible for depositing distinct units of predominantly quartzose sand and gravel to form the most seaward beach ridge at several locations along the wet tropical coast of northeast Queensland, Australia. These units deposited by tropical cyclones display a key sedimentary signature characterized by a sharp basal erosional contact, a coarser grain size than the underlying facies and a coarse-skewed trend toward the base. Coarse-skewed distributions with minimal change in mean grain size also characterize the upper levels of the high-energy deposited units at locations within the zone of maximum onshore winds during the tropical cyclone. These same coarse skew distributions are not apparent in sediments deposited at locations where predominantly offshore winds occurred during the cyclone, which in the case of northeast Australia is north of the eye-crossing location. These sedimentary signatures, along with the geochemical indicators and the degraded nature of the microfossil assemblages, have proven to be useful proxies to identify storm-deposited units within the study site and can also provide useful proxies in older beach ridges where advanced pedogenesis has obscured visual stratigraphic markers. As a consequence, more detailed long-term histories of storms and tropical cyclones can now be developed.

  2. An estimate of hydrothermal fluid residence times and vent chimney growth rates based on 210Pb Pb ratios and mineralogic studies of sulfides dredged from the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kadko, D.; Koski, R.; Tatsumoto, M.; Bouse, R.

    1985-01-01

    The 210Pb Pb ratios across two sulfide samples dredged from the Juan de Fuca Ridge are used to estimate the growth rate of the sulfide material and the residence time of the hydrothermal fluid within the oceanic crust from the onset of basalt alteration. 210Pb is added to the hydrothermal fluid by two processes: (1) high-temperature alteration of basalt and (2) if the residence time of the fluid is on the order of the 22.3-year half-life of 210Pb, by in-situ growth from 222Rn (Krishnaswami and Turekian, 1982). Stable lead is derived only from the alteration of basalt. The 210Pb Pb ratio across one sample was ??? 0.5 dpm/10-6 g Pb, and across the other it was ??? 0.4 dpm/10-6 g Pb. These values are quite close to the 238U Pb ratios of basalts from the area, suggesting that the residence time of the hydrothermal fluid from the onset of basalt alteration is appreciably less than the mean life of 210Pb, i.e., the time required for ingrowth from the radon. An apparent growth rate of 1.2 cm/yr is derived from the slope of the 210Pb Pb curve for one of the samples. This is consistent with its mineralogy and texture which suggest an accretionary pattern of development. There is no obvious sequential growth pattern, and virtually no gradient in 210Pb Pb across the second sample. This is consistent with alteration of the original 210Pb Pb distribution by extensive remobilization reactions which are inferred from the mineralogic and textural relationships of the sample. ?? 1985.

  3. Phylogenetic and Physiological Diversity of Subseafloor Microbial Communities at Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge: Summary of Results From the New Millenium Observatory (NeMO), 1998-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baross, J. A.; Huber, J. A.; Mehta, M. P.; Opatkiewicz, A.; Bolton, S. A.; Butterfield, D. A.; Sogin, M. L.; Embley, R. W.

    2005-12-01

    Axial Seamount (45 ° 58' N; 130 ° 00' W) is an active submarine volcano located on the Juan de Fuca Ridge, approximately 300 miles off the coast of Oregon. Lying at the intersection of a seamount chain and a spreading axis, Axial is a unique study site from both the geological and biological perspective. In January of 1998, Axial experienced a week-long series of earthquakes, and subsequent water column and seafloor observations on the southeast portion of the caldera found temperature and chemical anomalies, extensive new seafloor lava flows, large "snow blower" type vents, and other characteristics commonly associated with diking-eruptive events. Due to its high activity and close proximity to shore, Axial was chosen as a site for a multi-year observatory (New Millenium Observatory, NeMO) to document changes and interactions between geology, chemistry, and biology on the mid-ocean ridge system. From 1998 through 2004, we extensively sampled diffuse vents at Axial Seamount to determine the physiological and phylogenetic diversity of subseafloor microbial communities and their relationship to the geochemical environment. Here we present a summary of those studies, including molecular-based phylogenetic surveys of bacteria, archaea, and potential nitrogen-fixing organisms, culturing results of thermophiles and hyperthermophiles from over 20 sites, and the distribution of one particular group of hyperthermophiles at diffuse vents throughout the caldera and how that distribution may be linked to the geochemical habitat. Results indicate that Axial supports a diverse subseafloor microbial community, including hydrogen and sulfur oxidizers, hyperthermophilic methane producers and heterotrophs, and many organisms with the potential to fix nitrogen. In addition, we find that the species composition of the microbial community changes in response to changes in the physical and chemical conditions at each vent site. The extent of seawater mixing with hydrothermal fluids

  4. Inorganic chemistry, gas compositions and dissolved organic carbon in fluids from sedimented young basaltic crust on the Juan de Fuca Ridge flanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Huei-Ting; Cowen, James P.; Olson, Eric J.; Amend, Jan P.; Lilley, Marvin D.

    2012-05-01

    The permeable upper oceanic basement serves as a plausible habitat for a variety of microbial communities. There is growing evidence suggesting a substantial subseafloor biosphere. Here new time series data are presented on key inorganic species, methane, hydrogen and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in ridge flank fluids obtained from subseafloor observatory CORKs (Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kits) at Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) boreholes 1301A and 1026B. These data show that the new sampling methods (Cowen et al., 2012) employed at 1301A result in lower contamination than earlier studies. Furthermore, sample collection methods permitted most chemical analyses to be performed from aliquots of single large volume samples, thereby allowing more direct comparison of the data. The low phosphate concentrations (0.06-0.2 μM) suggest that relative to carbon and nitrogen, phosphorus could be a limiting nutrient in the basement biosphere. Coexisting sulfate (17-18 mM), hydrogen sulfide (˜0.1 μM), hydrogen (0.3-0.7 μM) and methane (1.5-2 μM) indicates that the basement aquifer at 1301A either draws fluids from multiple flow paths with different redox histories or is a complex environment that is not thermodynamically controlled and may allow co-occurring metabolic pathways including sulfate reduction and methanogenesis. The low DOC concentrations (11-18 μM) confirm that ridge flank basement is a net DOC sink and ultimately a net carbon sink. Based on the net amounts of DOC, oxygen, nitrate and sulfate removed (˜30 μM, ˜80 μM, ˜40 μM and ˜10 mM, respectively) from entrained bottom seawater, organic carbon may be aerobically or anaerobically oxidized in biotic and/or abiotic processes.

  5. Phylogenetic Diversity of Nitrogenase (nifH) Genes in Deep-Sea and Hydrothermal Vent Environments of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Mausmi P.; Butterfield, David A.; Baross, John A.

    2003-01-01

    The subseafloor microbial habitat associated with typical unsedimented mid-ocean-ridge hydrothermal vent ecosystems may be limited by the availability of fixed nitrogen, inferred by the low ammonium and nitrate concentrations measured in diffuse hydrothermal fluid. Dissolved N2 gas, the largest reservoir of nitrogen in the ocean, is abundant in deep-sea and hydrothermal vent fluid. In order to test the hypothesis that biological nitrogen fixation plays an important role in nitrogen cycling in the subseafloor associated with unsedimented hydrothermal vents, degenerate PCR primers were designed to amplify the nitrogenase iron protein gene nifH from hydrothermal vent fluid. A total of 120 nifH sequences were obtained from four samples: a nitrogen-poor diffuse vent named marker 33 on Axial Volcano, sampled twice over a period of 1 year as its temperature decreased; a nitrogen-rich diffuse vent near Puffer on Endeavour Segment; and deep seawater with no detectable hydrothermal plume signal. Subseafloor nifH genes from marker 33 and Puffer are related to anaerobic clostridia and sulfate reducers. Other nifH genes unique to the vent samples include proteobacteria and divergent Archaea. All of the nifH genes from the deep-seawater sample are most closely related to the thermophilic, anaerobic archaeon Methanococcus thermolithotrophicus (77 to 83% amino acid similarity). These results provide the first genetic evidence of potential nitrogen fixers in hydrothermal vent environments and indicate that at least two sources contribute to the diverse assemblage of nifH genes detected in hydrothermal vent fluid: nifH genes from an anaerobic, hot subseafloor and nifH genes from cold, oxygenated deep seawater. PMID:12571018

  6. Phylogenetic diversity of nitrogenase (nifH) genes in deep-sea and hydrothermal vent environments of the Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Mausmi P; Butterfield, David A; Baross, John A

    2003-02-01

    The subseafloor microbial habitat associated with typical unsedimented mid-ocean-ridge hydrothermal vent ecosystems may be limited by the availability of fixed nitrogen, inferred by the low ammonium and nitrate concentrations measured in diffuse hydrothermal fluid. Dissolved N2 gas, the largest reservoir of nitrogen in the ocean, is abundant in deep-sea and hydrothermal vent fluid. In order to test the hypothesis that biological nitrogen fixation plays an important role in nitrogen cycling in the subseafloor associated with unsedimented hydrothermal vents, degenerate PCR primers were designed to amplify the nitrogenase iron protein gene nifH from hydrothermal vent fluid. A total of 120 nifH sequences were obtained from four samples: a nitrogen-poor diffuse vent named marker 33 on Axial Volcano, sampled twice over a period of 1 year as its temperature decreased; a nitrogen-rich diffuse vent near Puffer on Endeavour Segment; and deep seawater with no detectable hydrothermal plume signal. Subseafloor nifH genes from marker 33 and Puffer are related to anaerobic clostridia and sulfate reducers. Other nifH genes unique to the vent samples include proteobacteria and divergent Archaea. All of the nifH genes from the deep-seawater sample are most closely related to the thermophilic, anaerobic archaeon Methanococcus thermolithotrophicus (77 to 83% amino acid similarity). These results provide the first genetic evidence of potential nitrogen fixers in hydrothermal vent environments and indicate that at least two sources contribute to the diverse assemblage of nifH genes detected in hydrothermal vent fluid: nifH genes from an anaerobic, hot subseafloor and nifH genes from cold, oxygenated deep seawater. PMID:12571018

  7. Continuing evolution of the Pacific-Juan de Fuca-North America slab window system-A trench-ridge-transform example from the Pacific Rim

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCrory, P.A.; Wilson, D.S.; Stanley, R.G.

    2009-01-01

    Many subduction margins that rim the Pacific Ocean contain complex records of Cenozoic slab-window volcanism combined with tectonic disruption of the continental margin. The series of slab windows that opened beneath California and Mexico starting about 28.5 Ma resulted from the death of a series of spreading ridge segments and led to piecewise destruction of a subduction regime. The timing and areal extent of the resultant slab-window volcanism provide constraints on models that depict the subsequent fragmentation and dispersal of the overlying continental margin. The initial Pioneer slab window thermally weakened the overlying western Transverse Ranges and California Borderlands region starting about 28.5 Ma. A second thermal pulse occurred in the same region starting about 19 Ma during growth of the Monterey slab window. This additional heating, combined with the capture of a partially subducted Monterey plate fragment by the Cocos plate, initiated the pulling apart and rotation of the adjacent continental margin. Similarly, the capture of Guadalupe and Magdalena plate fragments by the Pacific plate and initiation of the Guadalupe-Magdalena slab window about 12.5 Ma are coeval with Baja California pulling away from the Mexico continental margin, with the break along the Comondú arc, in crust already thermally weakened by about 10 My of volcanism. In coastal California, distributed crustal extension and subsidence accompanied the new transform plate boundary, and continued until the slab windows cooled and plate motion coalesced along a through-going system of strike-slip faults. The transform boundary continues to evolve, and forward modeling predicts an instability with the current configuration as a result of convergence between the Sierra Nevada and Peninsular Ranges batholiths, starting about 2 My in the future. The instability may be resolved by a shift in the locus of transform motion from the San Andreas fault to the eastern California shear zone, or by

  8. Time-series geochemical and tracer injection recovery data from the deep (basaltic) crustal fluids from IODP Holes 1301A/1362B on the eastern flank of Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowen, J. P.; Hsieh, C.; Guss, J.; Fisher, A. T.; Lin, H.; Clark, J. F.; Wheat, C. G.

    2012-12-01

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program borehole CORK (Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kit) observatories provide invaluable opportunities to study the deep biosphere. In order to draw large volumes of fluids from crustal aquifers to seafloor, we developed an autonomous sensor and fluid sampling system, GeoMICROBE (Cowen et al., 2012). GeoMICROBE's Major components include a positive displacement primary pump, a primary valve manifold system, sensors (e.g., fluid flow rate, temperature, dissolved O2, electrochemistry-voltammrtry analyzer), 24-48 port in situ filtration and fluid collection system, computerized controller, six 24V-40A batteries and wet-mateable (ODI) communications with submersibles. This sampling system has been successfully deployed at IODP Hole 1301A in 2010 on the eastern flank of Juan de Fuca Ridge. The GeoMICROBE was successfully recovered in the summer of 2011. However, due to the narrow inner diameter of the fluid delivery line (1/4''), the batteries were exhausted and only half of the preprogrammed sampling procedures were accomplished. After quick turn-around the GeoMICROBE was redeployed at nearby CORK 1362B for Summer, 2012 recovery. CORKs 1301A and 1362B are only ~800 m apart and both penetrate to ~40-50m into the basement. Unlike CORK 1301A, the fluid deliver line installed on CORK 1362B has 1/2'' inner diameter. The much lower resistance allows us to pump the fluids up with reduced power consumption. A conservative power consumption model was made to ensure that enough battery power would be available to complete the twelve monthly samplings. Monthly, following extensive flushing ~3 L of fluid was passed through a 0.2 μm polycarbonate filter. The filter holder was pre-charged with 6% glutaraldehyde. Also, monthly whole fluid samples were collected and stored in an acid-washed 500mL Tedlar bag. The whole fluid will be used for analysis of colloidal (Microspheres) and dissolved tracers injected into the upper crust in August 2010 as well as

  9. Rare earth element geochemistry in cold-seep pore waters of Hydrate Ridge, northeast Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himmler, Tobias; Haley, Brian A.; Torres, Marta E.; Klinkhammer, Gary P.; Bohrmann, Gerhard; Peckmann, Jörn

    2013-07-01

    The concentrations of rare earth elements (REEs), sulphate, hydrogen sulphide, total alkalinity, calcium, magnesium and phosphate were measured in shallow (<12 cm below seafloor) pore waters from cold-seep sediments on the northern and southern summits of Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon. Downward-decreasing sulphate and coevally increasing sulphide concentrations reveal sulphate reduction as dominant early diagenetic process from ~2 cm depth downwards. A strong increase of total dissolved REE (∑REE) concentrations is evident immediately below the sediment-water interface, which can be related to early diagenetic release of REEs into pore water resulting from the re-mineralization of particulate organic matter. The highest pore water ∑REE concentrations were measured close to the sediment-water interface at ~2 cm depth. Distinct shale-normalized REE patterns point to particulate organic matter and iron oxides as main REE sources in the upper ~2-cm depth interval. In general, the pore waters have shale-normalized patterns reflecting heavy REE (HREE) enrichment, which suggests preferential complexation of HREEs with carbonate ions. Below ~2 cm depth, a downward decrease in ∑REE correlates with a decrease in pore water calcium concentrations. At this depth, the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulphate reduction increases carbonate alkalinity through the production of bicarbonate, which results in the precipitation of carbonate minerals. It seems therefore likely that the REEs and calcium are consumed during vast AOM-induced precipitation of carbonate in shallow Hydrate Ridge sediments. The analysis of pore waters from Hydrate Ridge shed new light on early diagenetic processes at cold seeps, corroborating the great potential of REEs to identify geochemical processes and to constrain environmental conditions.

  10. Complex Pull-apart Structure Evolving at Northern Explorer Ridge, Northeast Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Embley, R.

    2008-12-01

    The Explorer Spreading Center (ESC) bounding the western edge of the Explorer microplate has undergone substantial reorganization over the past few million years as the microplate has rotated in response to increasing resistance to the subduction of its young crust. The northern Explorer ridge (NER) has evolved into a complex compound structure consisting of several rift basins bounded by half-graben and arcuate shaped faults with a superimposed pattern of rhombohedral grabens and horsts. This pattern is similar to structures on rift zones and pull-apart basins formed along major continental transforms and rift zones and contrasts with the ridge-parallel faults formed at seafloor spreading centers. However, initiation of faulting in the NER appears to have occurred along inactive off-axis faults generated by seafloor spreading. The NER region appears to be evolving into a larger pull-apart-like structure. As extension continues, individual basins have widened with some of the larger arcuate boundary faults linking up to form accommodation zones between adjacent depressions. If diffuse rifting continues in the NER the nascent pull- apart structure will grow longer as it accommodates the changing regional strain field induced by the diminishment of the Explorer plate. Alternatively, a strike-slip fault could propagate through the area and join the two master faults. Although there's no well-defined though-going fault with the strike of the Pacific-North American vector (about 340°), there is some indication from that such a structure is beginning to break through.

  11. Regional characteristics of land use in Northeast and Southern Blue Ridge Province: Associations with acid rain effects on surface-water chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liegel, Leon; Cassell, David; Stevens, Donald; Shaffer, Paul; Church, Robbins

    1991-03-01

    The Direct/Delayed Response Project (DDRP) is one of several studies being conducted by the United States Environmental Protection Agency to assess risk to surface waters from acidic deposition in the eastern United States. In one phase of DDRP, land use, wetland, and forest cover data were collected for statistical samples of 145 Northeast lake and 35 Southern Blue Ridge Province stream watersheds in the United States. Land-use and other data then were extrapolated from individual to target watershed populations. Project statistical design allows summarization of results for various subsets of the target population. This article discusses results and implications of the land-use and land-cover characterization for both regions. Forest cover was the primary land use in both regions. In the Northeast, developed (agriculture and urban) land was positively associated with surface-water chemistry values for acid neutralizing capacity, Ca plus Mg, pH, and sulfate in the Pocono/Catskill subregion. Extensive wetlands and beaver activity occur in parts of the Northeast region, whereas topography limits wetland and riparian development in the Southern Blue Ridge Province. Northeast soils have low sulfate adsorption capacity, most watersheds are near sulfur steady state, and lake sulfate concentrations are controlled principally by levels of sulfur deposition. Net annual sulfur retention in Northeast watersheds is positively correlated with occurrence of wetlands and beaver impoundments. In contrast, most Southern Blue Ridge Province soils have high sulfate adsorption capacities, resulting in high net watershed sulfur retention. At the present time, stream sulfate concentrations and percent sulfur retention are controlled principally by soil chemical properties related to adsorption rather than atmospheric deposition and land use.

  12. Biogeochemistry of dissolved methane and hydrogen in basement fluids of the sediment-buried Juan de Fuca Ridge flank at Boreholes (CORKs) 1301A, 1362A and 1362B: methane isotopic compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, H.; Cowen, J. P.; Olson, E. J.; Lilley, M. D.; Jungbluth, S.; Rappe, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    The ocean crust is the largest aquifer system on Earth. Within the sediment-buried 3.5 Myr basaltic crust of the eastern Juan de Fuca Ridge (JFR) flank, the circulating basement fluids have moderate temperature (~65°C) and potentially harbor a substantial subseafloor biosphere. With dissolved oxygen and nitrate exhausted, sulfate may serve as the major electron acceptor in this environment. This study aims to evaluate the availability and the biogeochemistry of two important electron donors, methane and hydrogen, for the subseafloor biosphere. Basement fluids were collected via stainless steel and ethylene-tetrafluoroethylene fluoropolymer (ETFE) fluid delivery lines associated with Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kits (CORKs) that extend from basement depths to outlet ports at the seafloor. Three CORKs were visited; 1301A, 1362A and 1362B lie within 200 to 500 m of each other, and their fluid intakes lie at ~30, ~60, and ~50 m below the sediment-basement interface (mbs), respectively. In addition, CORK 1362A contains a second intake at a deep (~200 mbs) horizon. The basement fluids from the three CORKs contained significantly higher concentrations of methane (1.5-13μM) and hydrogen (0.05-1.1 μM) than in bottom seawater (0.002 and 0.0004, respectively), indicating that prevalence and availability of both methane and hydrogen as electron donors for the subseafloor biosphere. Thermodynamic calculations show that sulfate reduction coupled with either methane or hydrogen oxidation is energy yielding in the oceanic basement. The δ13C values of methane ranged from -43×1‰ to -58×0.3‰; the δ2H values of methane in CORKs 1301A, 1362A and 1362B fluids were 57×5‰, -262×2‰, -209×2‰, respectively. The isotopic compositions suggest that methane in the basement fluid is of biogenic origin. Interestingly, the δ2H value of methane in the CORK 1301A fluids is far more positive than that in other marine environments

  13. Microbial life in ridge flank crustal fluids.

    PubMed

    Huber, Julie A; Johnson, H Paul; Butterfield, David A; Baross, John A

    2006-01-01

    To determine the microbial community diversity within old oceanic crust, a novel sampling strategy was used to collect crustal fluids at Baby Bare Seamount, a 3.5 Ma old outcrop located in the north-east Pacific Ocean on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Stainless steel probes were driven directly into the igneous ocean crust to obtain samples of ridge flank crustal fluids. Genetic signatures and enrichment cultures of microorganisms demonstrate that these crustal fluids host a microbial community composed of species indigenous to the subseafloor, including anaerobic thermophiles, and species from other deep-sea habitats, such as seawater and sediments. Evidence using molecular techniques indicates the presence of a relatively small but active microbial population, dominated by bacteria. The microbial community diversity found in the crustal fluids may indicate habitat variability in old oceanic crust, with inputs of nutrients from seawater, sediment pore-water fluids and possibly hydrothermal sources. This report further supports the presence of an indigenous microbial community in ridge flank crustal fluids and advances our understanding of the potential physiological and phylogenetic diversity of this community.

  14. Sea level Variability and Juan de Fuca Bathymetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huybers, P. J.; Boulahanis, B.; Proistosescu, C.; Langmuir, C. H.; Carbotte, S. M.; Katz, R. F.

    2015-12-01

    That deglaciation influences mid-ocean ridge volcanism is well established for Iceland, where depressurization associated with melting a ~2 km ice cap led to order of magnitude increases in volcanism during the last deglaciation. The case was also made that the more subtle ~100 m changes in sea level that accompany glacial cycles have identifiable implications for undersea mid-ocean ridge systems using both models and data from the Australian-Antarctic Ridge (Crowley et al., 2015). Sea level rising at ~1 cm/year during deglaciation leads to an expectation of ~10% decreases in melt production at ridges, given mantle upwelling rates of ˜3 cm/yr at intermediate spreading ridges and mantle density being ~3 times that of seawater. The implications of variations in melt production for bathymetry, however, involve numerous considerations, including whether melt signals are cancelled within the melt column, appreciably alter accretionary or fault processes, and have identifiable surface expressions. Further empirical assessment of bathymetry is thus useful for purposes of confirming patterns and constraining processes. Here we report on spectral analyses of bathymetry recently acquired from the Juan de Fuca ridge between 44°30'N and 45°15'N during the SeaVOICE expedition. Multibeam swath sonar data were acquired with an EM122 sonar insonfiying seafloor to crustal ages of ˜2 ma with 35 m spatial resolution. We examine (1.) the statistical significance of concentrations of bathymetric variability at the 100 ky, 41 ky, and 23 ky periods characteristic of late-Pleistocene sea level variability; (2.) whether sea level responses are primarily at 41 ky periods in crust accreted during the early Pleistocene, when global sea level variations were primarily at this period; and (3.) if sea level responses are superimposed on bathymetry variations or, instead, align with fault features. We also note that Juan de Fuca's proximity to the Cordilleran Ice Sheet implies that regional

  15. Magnetic Anomalies over the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near 27{degrees}N.

    PubMed

    Phillips, J D

    1967-08-25

    Ten magnetic profiles across the mid-Atlantic ridge near 27 degrees N show trends that are parallel to the ridge axis and symmetrical about the ridge axis. The configuration of magnetic bodies that could account for the pattern supports the Vine and Matthews hypothesis for the origin of magnetic anomalies over oceanic ridges. A polarity-reversal time scale inferred from models for sea-floor spreading in the Pacific-Antarctic ridge and radiometrically dated reversals of the geomagnetic field indicates a spreading rate of 1.25 centimeters per year during the last 6 million years and a rate of 1.65 centimeters per year between 6 and 10 million years ago. A similar analysis of more limited data over the mid-Atlantic ridge near 22 degrees N also indicates a change in the spreading rate. Here a rate of 1.4 centimeters per year appears to have been in effect during the last 5 million years; between 5 and 9 million years ago, an increased rate of 1.7 centimeters per year is indicated. The time of occurrence and relative magnitude of these changes in the spreading rate, about 5 to 6 million years ago and 18 to 27 percent, respectively, accords with the spreading rate change implied for the Juan de Fuca ridge in the northeast Pacific.

  16. Magnetic Anomalies over the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near 27{degrees}N.

    PubMed

    Phillips, J D

    1967-08-25

    Ten magnetic profiles across the mid-Atlantic ridge near 27 degrees N show trends that are parallel to the ridge axis and symmetrical about the ridge axis. The configuration of magnetic bodies that could account for the pattern supports the Vine and Matthews hypothesis for the origin of magnetic anomalies over oceanic ridges. A polarity-reversal time scale inferred from models for sea-floor spreading in the Pacific-Antarctic ridge and radiometrically dated reversals of the geomagnetic field indicates a spreading rate of 1.25 centimeters per year during the last 6 million years and a rate of 1.65 centimeters per year between 6 and 10 million years ago. A similar analysis of more limited data over the mid-Atlantic ridge near 22 degrees N also indicates a change in the spreading rate. Here a rate of 1.4 centimeters per year appears to have been in effect during the last 5 million years; between 5 and 9 million years ago, an increased rate of 1.7 centimeters per year is indicated. The time of occurrence and relative magnitude of these changes in the spreading rate, about 5 to 6 million years ago and 18 to 27 percent, respectively, accords with the spreading rate change implied for the Juan de Fuca ridge in the northeast Pacific. PMID:17792827

  17. Late Quaternary chronology of major dune ridge development in the northeast Rub' al-Khali, United Arab Emirates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, Oliver A. C.; Thomas, David S. G.; Goudie, Andrew S.; Bailey, Richard M.

    The northeastern sector of the Rub' al-Khali desert in the eastern United Arab Emirates (UAE) is dominated by large NE-SW trending dune ridges orientated perpendicular to the currently prevailing northwesterly wind regime. In this study, extensive use has been made of artificially exposed sections through these major dune ridges that reveal internal sedimentary structures and allow an intensive, high-resolution sampling programme to be carried out. Here, we present the optical dating results for samples from 7 sections. The results indicate that dune activity and preservation occurred within the periods 7-3 ka, 16-10 ka and 22-20 ka with evidence of earlier preservation during marine oxygen isotope stages MIS 3 and 5, with net accumulation rates in the range 2.2-25 m.ka - 1 . In several instances, hiatuses in the preserved record of dune accumulation coincide with stratigraphic bounding surfaces visible in the exposed section profiles with associated truncation of internal sedimentary structures. Caution must be exercised when interpreting such gaps in the recorded accumulation chronologies of these dunes since these may simply constitute phases of low preservation potential rather than phases of low aeolian activity. Other factors such as sediment supply and availability in relation to sea-level dynamics may be significant and are also considered.

  18. 33 CFR 80.1385 - Strait of Juan de Fuca.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Strait of Juan de Fuca. 80.1385... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1385 Strait of Juan de Fuca. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of the Strait of Juan de Fuca....

  19. Time-Critical Studies: Rapid response to Transient Dynamic Mid-Ocean Ridge Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowen, J. P.; Baker, E. T.; Dziak, R. P.; Lilley, M. M.

    2003-12-01

    The Time-Critical Studies (TCS) Theme of Ridge 2000 focuses on observations of the immediate geochemical and geobiological consequences of magmatic and tectonic events along the global mid-ocean ridge system. To date funding has centered on the Juan de Fuca and Gorda Ridges which are within the range of the U.S. Navy's Northeast Pacific Sound Surveillance System (SOSUS). NOAA's T-Phase Monitoring Program has accessed SOSUS in real-time since 1993, providing the TCS community with detection of seismicity associated with eruptive or tectonic activity along these two ridges. This remote detection of earthquake swarms along the N.E. Pacific mid-ocean ridge coupled to NSF funding for pre-event staging equipment and supplies has allowed directed and increasingly well-organized field responses to the event site. Major rapid and follow-up response cruises have been successfully mounted to 1993 CoAxial, 1996 and 2001 Gorda Ridge, the 1998 Axial Volcano, and 2001 Middle Valley magmatic episodes. The logistical approach required to study these events has been greatly facilitated by the RIDGE/Ridge 2000 programs and collaboration between university, NOAA and Canadian investigators. Not only have our studies of these events significantly impacted our ideas on the nature of crustal accretion, but they also have led to the discovery and preliminary documentation of a previously unrecognized biomass reservoir that lives below the seafloor and is swept out during these cataclysmic events, and to increased appreciation of the formation and thermal, chemical and biogeochemical implications of the 'Event Plumes' commonly associated with sea floor magmatic events. Rapid shore-to-event site response is an important aspect of TCS. Proposals to enhance the event detection and response effort are welcome at any Ridge 2000 target date. The Ridge 2000 program recognizes that even the most rapid ship response will miss the earliest subsurface and water column expressions of magmatic events

  20. Vacuolate-attached filaments: highly productive Ridgeia piscesae epibionts at the Juan de Fuca hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Kalanetra, Karen M; Nelson, Douglas C

    2010-01-01

    Vacuolate sulfur bacteria with high morphological similarity to vacuolate-attached filaments previously described from shallow hydrothermal vents (White Point, CA) were found at deep-sea hydrothermal vents. These filamentous bacteria grow in dense mats that cover surfaces and potentially provide a significant source of organic carbon where they occur. Vacuolate-attached filaments were collected near vents at the Clam Bed site of the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge and from the sediment surface at Escanaba Trough on the Gorda Ridge. A phylogenetic analysis comparing their 16S rRNA gene sequences to those collected from the shallow White Point site showed that all vacuolate-attached filament sequences form a monophyletic group within the vacuolate sulfur-oxidizing bacteria clade in the gamma proteobacteria. Abundance of the attached filaments was quantified over the length of the exterior surface of the tubes of Ridgeia piscesae worms collected from the Clam Bed site at Juan de Fuca yielding a per worm average of 0.070 ± 0.018 cm(3) (n = 4). In agreement with previous results for White Point filaments, anion measurements by ion chromatography showed no detectable internal nitrate concentrations above ambient seawater (n = 9). For one R. piscesae tube worm "bush" at the Easter Island vent site, potential gross epibiont productivity is estimated to be 15 to 45× the net productivity of the worms. PMID:24391244

  1. Directional dispersal between mid-ocean ridges: deep-ocean circulation and gene flow in Ridgeia piscesae.

    PubMed

    Young, C R; Fujio, S; Vrijenhoek, R C

    2008-04-01

    This study examined relationships between bathymetrically induced deep-ocean currents and the dispersal of the hydrothermal vent tubeworm Ridgeia piscesae along the northeast Pacific ridge system. A robust diagnostic model of deep-ocean circulation in this region predicted strong southeasterly currents following contours of the Blanco Transform Fault, a 450-km lateral offset that separates the Gorda and Juan de Fuca ridge systems. Such currents should facilitate the southward dispersal of R. piscesae larvae. Immigration rates for populations north and south of the Blanco Transform Fault were estimated from molecular population genetic data. Mitochondrial DNA evidence revealed population subdivision across the Blanco Transform Fault, and a strong directional bias in gene flow that was consistent with predictions of the circulation model. The distribution of mitochondrial diversity between the northern and southern populations of R. piscesae suggests that the Gorda Ridge tubeworms have maintained larger effective population sizes than the northern populations, a pattern that also exists in co-occurring limpets. Together, these data suggest that the northern vent fields may experience a higher frequency of habitat turnover and consequently more rapid losses of genetic diversity.

  2. Juan de Fuca subducting plate geometry and intraslab seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medema, Guy Frederick

    The geometry of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate beneath the Olympic Peninsula of Western Washington is modeled using wide-angle P mP reflections off the slab Moho. Active-source reflection data collected from the 1998 WET SHIPS project were augmented with earthquake-source reflections to increase the spatial distribution of reflection points over the Juan de Fuca arch structure. Approximately 1100 WET SHIPS and 500 earthquake-source reflections were used in our inversion. PmP travel-times from active sources and PmP--P differential times from earthquakes sources were simultaneously inverted for slab-Moho depth, using a combination of finite-difference and 3-D ray-tracing methods. Results show a tighter arch structure than in previous models with the shallowest dipping portion (˜ 10° dip) concentrated directly beneath the Olympic Mountains. Comparison of our slab model to intraslab earthquake hypocenters reveals a southwest-northeast trending lineament of seismicity situated just beneath the subducted Moho in the slab mantle. We interpret this seismicity as the manifestation of a subducting pseudofault along which high levels of upper mantle hydration occurred prior to subduction. Most of the remaining intraslab seismicity is concentrated on the northern and southern flanks of the arch and is likely due to increased strain rates in these regions from the combined effect of slab arch and subsequent steepening of slab dip. Earthquakes in the northern region appear to occur above the slab Moho in the crust of the oceanic plate, while uncertainties in earthquake locations and 3-D velocities in the southern region prevent an unambiguous interpretation at this time. The southern patch is especially important as it contains 3 large (magnitude 6.5 to 7.1) earthquakes during that past 60 years, including the 2001, Mw 6.8, Nisqually earthquake. Earthquakes occurring between 45 and 65 km depth in these two regions also systematically produce an anomalous low

  3. Tracking fin whales in the northeast Pacific Ocean with a seafloor seismic network.

    PubMed

    Wilcock, William S D

    2012-10-01

    Ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) networks represent a tool of opportunity to study fin and blue whales. A small OBS network on the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the northeast Pacific Ocean in ~2.3 km of water recorded an extensive data set of 20-Hz fin whale calls. An automated method has been developed to identify arrival times based on instantaneous frequency and amplitude and to locate calls using a grid search even in the presence of a few bad arrival times. When only one whale is calling near the network, tracks can generally be obtained up to distances of ~15 km from the network. When the calls from multiple whales overlap, user supervision is required to identify tracks. The absolute and relative amplitudes of arrivals and their three-component particle motions provide additional constraints on call location but are not useful for extending the distance to which calls can be located. The double-difference method inverts for changes in relative call locations using differences in residuals for pairs of nearby calls recorded on a common station. The method significantly reduces the unsystematic component of the location error, especially when inconsistencies in arrival time observations are minimized by cross-correlation. PMID:23039436

  4. Tracking fin whales in the northeast Pacific Ocean with a seafloor seismic network.

    PubMed

    Wilcock, William S D

    2012-10-01

    Ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) networks represent a tool of opportunity to study fin and blue whales. A small OBS network on the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the northeast Pacific Ocean in ~2.3 km of water recorded an extensive data set of 20-Hz fin whale calls. An automated method has been developed to identify arrival times based on instantaneous frequency and amplitude and to locate calls using a grid search even in the presence of a few bad arrival times. When only one whale is calling near the network, tracks can generally be obtained up to distances of ~15 km from the network. When the calls from multiple whales overlap, user supervision is required to identify tracks. The absolute and relative amplitudes of arrivals and their three-component particle motions provide additional constraints on call location but are not useful for extending the distance to which calls can be located. The double-difference method inverts for changes in relative call locations using differences in residuals for pairs of nearby calls recorded on a common station. The method significantly reduces the unsystematic component of the location error, especially when inconsistencies in arrival time observations are minimized by cross-correlation.

  5. Miocene ridge impingement and the spawning of secondary ridges off Oregon, Washington and British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrar, Edward; Dixon, John M.

    1980-11-01

    The East Pacific Rise is the only extant portion of the South Pacific Spreading Center, which began to impinge on the North American plate margin ~30 Ma ago. The North Pacific Spreading Center, offset ~1500 km to the west on the Mendocino transform fault, remained active until ~9 Ma ago when it, too, impinged on the trench off the Oregon—Washington margin. The zones of mantle upwelling associated with the spreading centers have since migrated inland to their present sites beneath the Cascade and Garibaldi volcanic chains and the Rio Grande Rift, maintaining the ~1500 km offset that they have had since the Early Tertiary. Impingement of the North Pacific Spreading Center on the trench at anomaly 5 time juxtaposed the Pacific and American plates and the continuing relative motion between these plates across the north—south boundary has been accommodated by secondary spreading at the Gorda—Juan de Fuca—Explorer ridge system. These obliquely spreading ridges, fed by lateral mantle flow originating at the zone of mantle upwelling beneath the Cascade belt, are migrating away from the North American coast at half the Pacific—America velocity, and no subduction is occurring along the continental margin, the Juan de Fuca sea floor being an integral part of the American plate. This scenario is consistent with the fact that the sea floor along the continental margin has the same age as that which bears the last north—south anomaly on the Pacific plate (anomaly 5) preceding initiation of spreading at the Juan de Fuca and Explorer ridges (a fortuitous coincidence in models involving continued subduction of the Juan de Fuca sea floor). This model implies that the rate of motion between the Pacific and American plates is 8 cm/a. The Blanco fracture zone formed as a transform fault at the south end of the Juan de Fuca ridge and was initially collinear with the North American margin south of Cape Mendocino. The North Pacific Spreading Center impinged on this portion of

  6. Hydrothermal plumes over spreading ridges and related deposits in the northeast Pacific Ocean: The East Pacific Rise near 11 degrees north and 21 degrees north, Explorer Ridge and J. Tuzo Wilson Seamounts

    SciTech Connect

    McConachy, T.F.

    1988-01-01

    Hydrothermal plumes emanating from hot springs over spreading ridges in the north east Pacific Ocean have been mapped and sampled using the submersible ALVIN and equipment deployed from surface ships. The geologic setting and polymetallic sulfides of the vent field producing the hydrothermal plume at 11{degree}N have also been examined. At 11{degree}N, two distinct metalliferous components are delivered to the intermediate to far-field from high temperature black smoker discharge as a result of the physical and chemical processes that occur in the lower 32 m of the plume. About 60 volume % of this material is estimated to settle within a 6-km-radius of the vent field, based on the results of SEM-IPS grain-size analyses and their application to a published particle settling model. The second component delivered to the far-field consists of the remaining 40 volume % of fine-grained sulfides and non-sulfides, 10% of dissolved Fe which will eventually precipitate as oxyhydroxides, and {>=} 80% of the hydrothermally injected Mn, Si, and probably Ba. At 21{degree} N by contrast, only 20 volume % of the smoke particles is conservatively estimated to settle within a 8-km-radius of the NGS vent due to their finer grain size and a higher terminal height of the buoyant hydrothermal plume.

  7. Seismic velocity structure of the Juan de Fuca and Gorda plates revealed by a joint inversion of ambient noise and regional earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Haiying

    2016-05-01

    The crust and upper mantle seismic structure, spanning from the Juan de Fuca and Gorda spreading centers to the Cascade back arc, is imaged with full-wave propagation simulation and a joint inversion of ambient noise and regional earthquake recordings. The spreading centers have anomalously low shear wave velocity beneath the oceanic lithosphere. Around the Cobb axial seamount, we observe a low-velocity anomaly underlying a relatively thin oceanic lithosphere, indicating its influence on the Juan de Fuca ridge. The oceanic Moho is clearly defined by a P velocity increase from 6.3 km/s to 7.5 km/s at about 6 km depth beneath the seafloor. The thickness of the oceanic plates is less than 40 km prior to subduction, and the structure of the oceanic lithosphere varies both along strike and along dip. Farther landward, very low velocity anomalies are observed above the plate interface along the Cascade fore arc, indicative of subducted sediments.

  8. A magnetotelluric sounding across Vancouver Island detects the subducting Juan de Fuca plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtz, R. D.; Delaurier, J. M.; Gupta, J. C.

    1986-06-01

    Magnetotelluric1 (MT) and geomagnetic2 depth-sounding measurements have been made at 18 sites (7 with remote reference3) across Vancouver Island (Fig. 1), beneath which the Juan de Fuca plate is underthrusting4,5. Vancouver Island is part of the old accretionary Wrangellia terrane6 and is located in the central portion of a 350-km forearc region that extends from the sediment-filled trench7 to the Garibaldi volcanic belt8. Gravity9 and seismic refraction studies10 suggest that the descending plate has a shallow northeasterly dip of 8°-16° with perhaps higher dips beneath northeastern Vancouver Island. A high-resolution seismic reflection survey11 along lines 1 and 3 (Fig. 1) located a zone of strong acoustic reflections (the E-horizon11) near the top of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate at depths of 23-34 km. Our model of the broad-band MT data defines a sloping, highly conducting zone also near the top of the subducting plate at the same depths as the seismic E-horizon. The high electrical conductivity in this zone (the E-conductor) is the result of saline fluid within the pore spaces of sedimentary and mafic materials of the upper oceanic crust that have been subducted to those depths beneath Vancouver Island. These are the first data which clearly define a dipping conductive layer associated with the boundary region between converging plates; they have significant implications for thrust earthquakes and metamorphic reactions that occur in subduction zones.

  9. Offshore finfish mariculture in the Strait of Juan de Fuca

    SciTech Connect

    Rensel, Jack; Kiefer, Dale; Forster, John R.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Evans, Nathan R.

    2007-10-07

    Finfish mariculture has existed in the U.S. Pacific Northwest for over thirty years, but for the past 15 years most effort has focused on culture of Atlantic salmon in protected, inshore cage sites. The Strait of Juan de Fuca (the "Strait") is a large area with relatively sparce shoreline development and several apparent advantages for mariculture using offshore technology.

  10. The importance of hydrothermal venting to water-column secondary production in the northeast Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burd, Brenda J.; Thomson, Richard E.

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to show that seafloor hydrothermal venting in the open northeast Pacific Ocean has a marked impact on secondary biomass and production within the overlying water column. Specifically, we use net tows and concurrently measured acoustic backscatter data collected over six summers to examine the effects of hydrothermal venting from the Endeavour Segment of Juan de Fuca Ridge on macro-zooplankton biomass and production throughout the entire 2000 m depth range. Previous research shows that ontogenetic diapausing migrators and their predators from the upper ocean aggregate above the neutrally buoyant plumes in summer and resume feeding on plume and bottom upwelled particles, resulting in increased zooplankton reproductive output to the upper ocean. Within the limitations of our sampling methodology, net tows reveal a statistically significant exponential decline in total water-column biomass with increasing lateral distance from the vent fields. The acoustic backscatter data show a similar decline, but only below 800 m depth. Near-surface biomass was highly variable throughout the region, but values near vents consistently ranged higher than summer values found elsewhere in the offshore northeast Pacific. Water-column biomass was similar in magnitude above and below 800 m depth throughout the region. Because epiplume biomass can be advected a considerable distance from vent fields, biomass enhancement of the water column from hydrothermal venting may extend considerable distances to the west and northwest of the vent sites, in the prevailing directions of the subsurface flow. Based on the extensive acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) data collected, and the strong correlation between zooplankton production derived from net sample biomass and acoustic backscatter intensity, we estimate that daily macro-zooplankton production in the upper 400 m of the water column within 10 km of the vent fields averages approximately 16% of photosynthetic

  11. Volcanic episodicity and a non-steady state rift valley along northeast Pacific Spreading Centers: Evidence from Sea MARCI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    appel, Ellen S.; Ryan, William B. F.

    1986-12-01

    Sea MARCI side-looking sonar images and Sea Beam bathymetry along a 400-km stretch of the Juan de Fuca Ridge crest provide evidence that excessive extrusive volcanism periodically builds a crestal ridge along the axis of seafloor spreading. An elongate summit depression (ESD), or rift valley, is commonly observed in the spine of this crestal ridge. The crestal ridge volcanic landform has a distinctive shape that is recognized in bathymetric contours both along the spreading axis and at least up to 30 km away from the axis. The landform has a plan-form shape that resembles a side view of an archer's bow with the long dimension of the bow form parallel to the strike of the ridge. In cross section, the bow form is flat on top and has steep flanks. These bow-form shapes can be explained by magma that rises into the crust at a discrete center and flows laterally into belts of ridge-parallel diskes, similar to Icelandic fissure eruptions. Both the variable dimensions of the ESD along axis of the Juan de Fuca Ridge and the relationship among volcanic flow morphologies within and beyond the ESD suggest the four different segments of the Juan de Fuca Ridge presented in detail here display different stages in a cycle of oceanic crust accretion. This cycle includes episodes in which there is (1) extrusive volcanic construction which widen the crestal ridge prior to the collapse of the summit depression, (2) collapse within the summit region of the crestal ridge to form an ESD during a phase of volcanic inactivity, and (3) renewed magmatism in the ESD as its floor widens by extension and brittle fracture of the upper crust. This episodic model implies that the width of the young seafloor affected by volcanic extrusion or dominated by tectonic stretching varies through time.

  12. Volcanic Episodicity and a Non-Steady State Rift Valley Along Northeast Pacific Spreading Centers: Evidence From Sea MARC I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappel, Ellen S.; Ryan, William B. F.

    1986-12-01

    Sea MARC I side-looking sonar images and Sea Beam bathymetry along a 400-km stretch of the Juan de Fuca Ridge crest provide evidence that excessive extrusive volcanism periodically builds a crestal ridge along the axis of seafloor spreading. An elongate summit depression (ESD), or rift valley, is commonly observed in the spine of this crestal ridge. The crestal ridge volcanic landform has a distinctive shape that is recognized in bathymetric contours both along the spreading axis and at least up to 30 km away from the axis. The landform has a plan-form shape that resembles a side view of an archer's bow with the long dimension of the bow form parallel to the strike of the ridge. In cross section, the bow form is flat on top and has steep flanks. These bow-form shapes can be explained by magma that rises into the crust at a discrete center and flows laterally into belts of ridge-parallel dikes, similar to Icelandic fissure eruptions. Both the variable dimensions of the ESD along axis of the Juan de Fuca Ridge and the relationship among volcanic flow morphologies within and beyond the ESD suggest the four different segments of the Juan de Fuca Ridge presented in detail here display different stages in a cycle of oceanic crust accretion. This cycle includes episodes in which there is (1) extrusive volcanic construction which widen the crestal ridge prior to the collapse of the summit depression, (2) collapse within the summit region of the crestal ridge to form an ESD during a phase of volcanic inactivity, and (3) renewed magmatism in the ESD as its floor widens by extension and brittle fracture of the upper crust. This episodic model implies that the width of the young seafloor affected by volcanic extrusion or dominated by tectonic stretching varies through time.

  13. 33 CFR 110.229 - Straits of Juan de Fuca, Wash.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Straits of Juan de Fuca, Wash. 110.229 Section 110.229 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.229 Straits of Juan de Fuca, Wash. (a)...

  14. The Fate of the Juan de Fuca Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, M.; Allen, R. M.

    2006-12-01

    The Juan de Fuca plate is subducting beneath the northwestern United States and southwestern Canada. Although the slab has been imaged to depths of at least ~{400} km beneath Washington and at least ~{200} to 300 km beneath northern Oregon with a dip of ~60° to the east, there is little evidence for a slab east of High Cascades deeper than ~150 km beneath central and ~200 km beneath southern Oregon. To image the slab beneath Oregon, we apply tomography technique using a dataset consisting of our own OATS deployment and all other available data. For the Vs inversion, a total of 95 events with clear S and SKS phases were recorded at 45 stations and a total number of 2148 rays were used. For the Vp inversion, a total of 74 events with clear direct P phase were recorded at 46 stations, and a total number of 2043 rays were used. Our tomographic images clearly show that the Juan de Fuca plate dives into the mantle beneath Oregon and continues east of the High Cascades with a dip of ~50° reaching a depth of ~400 km. The slab does not dip more vertically than its counterparts to north and south, which have a dip of ~60° and ~65° respectively. Resolution tests suggest there is little or no velocity anomaly associated with a slab below ~400 km.

  15. 247. Axial Parkway alignment along ridge top. Note the open ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    247. Axial Parkway alignment along ridge top. Note the open vistas to either side of the roadway. These are maintained through vegetation management. The wood guide rail is a primary safety feature. View is to the northeast. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  16. Cabled-observatory Regional Circulation Moorings on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihaly, S. F.

    2011-12-01

    In September of 2010, one of four moorings was deployed on the Endeavour node of the NEPTUNE Canada cabled-observatory network. The installation included the laying of a 7km cable from the node to the mooring site in the axial valley about 3km north of the Main Endeavour Vent Field over extraordinary bathymetry. This September, three more cables and secondary junction boxes will be deployed to support the three additional moorings that complete the regional circulation array. The cable-laying is facilitated by the Canadian Scientific Submersible Facility's ROV ROPOS and a remotely operated cable-laying system, whereas the actual deployment of the moorings is a two ship operation. The CCGS John P. Tully lowers the mooring anchor first, while the RV Thomas G. Thompson supports the ROV operations which navigate the mooring to underwater mateable cable end. Precise navigation is needed because there are few areas suitable for placement of the junction boxes. Scientifically, the moorings are designed and located to best constrain the hydrothermally driven circulation within the rift valley, the regional circulation can then be used as a proxy measurement for hydrothermal fluxes. Each mooring carries a current meter/ ctd pair at 4, 50, 125, and 200m, with an upward looking ADCP at 250m. The northern moorings are located between the Hi-Rise and Salty Dawg fields about 700m apart in the ~1km wide rift valley and the southern moorings are located south of the Mothra vent field. Here we present initial results from the four mooring array.

  17. Geologic history of the summit of Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, David A.; Dreyer, Brian M; Paduan, Jennifer B; Martin, Julie F; Chadwick, William W Jr; Caress, David W; Portner, Ryan A; Guilderson, Thomas P.; McGann, Mary; Thomas, Hans; Butterfield, David A; Embley, Robert W

    2013-01-01

    Multibeam (1 m resolution) and side scan data collected from an autonomous underwater vehicle, and lava samples, radiocarbon-dated sediment cores, and observations of flow contacts collected by remotely operated vehicle were combined to reconstruct the geologic history and flow emplacement processes on Axial Seamount's summit and upper rift zones. The maps show 52 post-410 CE lava flows and 20 precaldera lava flows as old as 31.2 kyr, the inferred age of the caldera. Clastic deposits 1–2 m thick accumulated on the rims postcaldera. Between 31 ka and 410 CE, there are no known lava flows near the summit. The oldest postcaldera lava (410 CE) is a pillow cone SE of the caldera. Two flows erupted on the W rim between ∼800 and 1000 CE. From 1220 to 1300 CE, generally small eruptions of plagioclase phyric, depleted, mafic lava occurred in the central caldera and on the east rim. Larger post-1400 CE eruptions produced inflated lobate flows of aphyric, less-depleted, and less mafic lava on the upper rift zones and in the N and S caldera. All caldera floor lava flows, and most uppermost rift zone flows, postdate 1220 CE. Activity shifted from the central caldera to the upper S rift outside the caldera, to the N rift and caldera floor, and then to the S caldera and uppermost S rift, where two historical eruptions occurred in 1998 and 2011. The average recurrence interval deduced from the flows erupted over the last 800 years is statistically identical to the 13 year interval between historical eruptions.

  18. Juan de Fuca plate: Aseismic subduction at 1. 8 cm/yr

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, H.

    1981-11-01

    Volcanic activity in the Cascades in historic times suggests that the Juan de Fuca plate is underthrusting aseismically at about 1.8 cm/yr. This rate of underthrusting is identical to the rate computed from sediment studies.

  19. Nature and extent of electrogenic microbial communities recovered from Juan de Fuca hydrothermal sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girguis, P. R.; Nielsen, M. E.

    2011-12-01

    Microbes have evolved a variety of metabolic strategies to survive in anaerobic environments, including extracellular electron transfer (EET). Here we present laboratory and in situ experiments revealing that hydrothermal vent microbes employ and depend upon EET to access spatially remote oxidants via semi-conductive pyrite. To simulate the physical and electrochemical conditions in vent sulfides, we constructed a two-chamber flow-through bioelectrochemical reactor in which a pyrite electrode was enclosed in one chamber and subject to simulated hydrothermal conditions. Electroactive biofilms formed solely on pyrite in electrical continuity with oxygenated water. Phylogenetic and metagenomic analyses revealed a diversity of autotrophic and heterotrophic archaea and bacteria, markedly different in composition from the control (pyrite without electrical continuity). To further characterize this phenomenon, we deployed a bioelectrochemical experiment in situ at the hydrothermal vent sulfide "Roane" (2200 m water depth, at the Mothra hydrothermal field, Juan de Fuca ridge). A graphite anode was inserted into a borehole drilled into the base of a hydrothermal sulfide, and connected through a potentiostat to a carbon-fiber cathode on the outside of the vent structure. The in situ experiment produced sustained current and enriched for a distinct microbial community likely associated with EET. The data presented herein reveal the nature and extent of microbial communities that use conductive minerals such as pyrite, though fully reduced, to facilitate the reduction of spatially remote oxidants while maintaining chemical discontinuity. Thus EET, by enabling sustained access to terminal electron acceptors while maintaining the functioning of strictly anaerobic metabolisms, may alleviate the limitations commonly associated with anaerobic environs, namely the depletion of oxidants.

  20. p53 directly regulates the glycosidase FUCA1 to promote chemotherapy-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Baudot, Alice D; Crighton, Diane; O'Prey, Jim; Somers, Joanna; Sierra Gonzalez, Pablo; Ryan, Kevin M

    2016-09-01

    p53 is a central factor in tumor suppression as exemplified by its frequent loss in human cancer. p53 exerts its tumor suppressive effects in multiple ways, but the ability to invoke the eradication of damaged cells by programmed cell death is considered a key factor. The ways in which p53 promotes cell death can involve direct activation or engagement of the cell death machinery, or can be via indirect mechanisms, for example though regulation of ER stress and autophagy. We present here another level of control in p53-mediated tumor suppression by showing that p53 activates the glycosidase, FUCA1, a modulator of N-linked glycosylation. We show that p53 transcriptionally activates FUCA1 and that p53 modulates fucosidase activity via FUCA1 up-regulation. Importantly, we also report that chemotherapeutic drugs induce FUCA1 and fucosidase activity in a p53-dependent manner. In this context, while we found that over-expression of FUCA1 does not induce cell death, RNAi-mediated knockdown of endogenous FUCA1 significantly attenuates p53-dependent, chemotherapy-induced apoptotic death. In summary, these findings add an additional component to p53s tumor suppressive response and highlight another mechanism by which the tumor suppressor controls programmed cell death that could potentially be exploited for cancer therapy. PMID:27315169

  1. p53 directly regulates the glycosidase FUCA1 to promote chemotherapy-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Baudot, Alice D; Crighton, Diane; O'Prey, Jim; Somers, Joanna; Sierra Gonzalez, Pablo; Ryan, Kevin M

    2016-09-01

    p53 is a central factor in tumor suppression as exemplified by its frequent loss in human cancer. p53 exerts its tumor suppressive effects in multiple ways, but the ability to invoke the eradication of damaged cells by programmed cell death is considered a key factor. The ways in which p53 promotes cell death can involve direct activation or engagement of the cell death machinery, or can be via indirect mechanisms, for example though regulation of ER stress and autophagy. We present here another level of control in p53-mediated tumor suppression by showing that p53 activates the glycosidase, FUCA1, a modulator of N-linked glycosylation. We show that p53 transcriptionally activates FUCA1 and that p53 modulates fucosidase activity via FUCA1 up-regulation. Importantly, we also report that chemotherapeutic drugs induce FUCA1 and fucosidase activity in a p53-dependent manner. In this context, while we found that over-expression of FUCA1 does not induce cell death, RNAi-mediated knockdown of endogenous FUCA1 significantly attenuates p53-dependent, chemotherapy-induced apoptotic death. In summary, these findings add an additional component to p53s tumor suppressive response and highlight another mechanism by which the tumor suppressor controls programmed cell death that could potentially be exploited for cancer therapy.

  2. p53 directly regulates the glycosidase FUCA1 to promote chemotherapy-induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    Baudot, Alice D.; Crighton, Diane; O'Prey, Jim; Somers, Joanna; Sierra Gonzalez, Pablo; Ryan, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT p53 is a central factor in tumor suppression as exemplified by its frequent loss in human cancer. p53 exerts its tumor suppressive effects in multiple ways, but the ability to invoke the eradication of damaged cells by programmed cell death is considered a key factor. The ways in which p53 promotes cell death can involve direct activation or engagement of the cell death machinery, or can be via indirect mechanisms, for example though regulation of ER stress and autophagy. We present here another level of control in p53-mediated tumor suppression by showing that p53 activates the glycosidase, FUCA1, a modulator of N-linked glycosylation. We show that p53 transcriptionally activates FUCA1 and that p53 modulates fucosidase activity via FUCA1 up-regulation. Importantly, we also report that chemotherapeutic drugs induce FUCA1 and fucosidase activity in a p53-dependent manner. In this context, while we found that over-expression of FUCA1 does not induce cell death, RNAi-mediated knockdown of endogenous FUCA1 significantly attenuates p53-dependent, chemotherapy-induced apoptotic death. In summary, these findings add an additional component to p53s tumor suppressive response and highlight another mechanism by which the tumor suppressor controls programmed cell death that could potentially be exploited for cancer therapy. PMID:27315169

  3. Metopic ridge

    MedlinePlus

    ... infant is made up of bony plates. The gaps between the plates allow for growth of the skull. The places where these plates connect are called sutures or suture lines. They do not fully close until the 2nd or 3rd year of life. A metopic ridge occurs when the ...

  4. Multi-mode conversion imaging of the subducted Gorda and Juan de Fuca plates below the North American continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauzin, Benoit; Bodin, Thomas; Debayle, Eric; Perrillat, Jean-Philippe; Reynard, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    Receiver function analysis and seismic tomography show tectonic structures dipping eastward in the mantle below the Cascadia volcanic arc (western US) that have been related to the subduction of the Gorda and Juan de Fuca oceanic micro-plates. Inconsistencies in the dip angle and depth extent of the slab between the two methods undermine the interpretation of the structure and processes at work. Receiver function imaging is biased by multiple reflection phases that interfere with converted phases, and produce spurious discontinuities in images. Here, we correct the interference using a multiple mode conversion imaging technique that efficiently removes artifacts under dipping structures. The method has the advantage of being applicable to large aperture arrays, and can image large-scale structures down to the transition zone. With this approach, the interfaces between the subducting and overriding plates and the oceanic Moho are imaged at shallow depths (<120 km) with a dip angle of ∼20°, consistently with former studies. In addition, several important features are imaged with the present method. Faint converters located between 100 and 400 km depth in the mantle wedge, and strong sub-horizontal seismic scatterers near 160 km depth, may highlight dehydration and metasomatism processes in the Cascadia subduction zone. A discontinuity located at ∼15 km depth in the lithospheric mantle of the subducted plates and associated with a negative impedance contrast is interpreted as the fossil fabric of the plates acquired at the spreading ridges.

  5. 33 CFR 334.1180 - Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. 334.1180 Section 334.1180 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1180 Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. (a)...

  6. 33 CFR 334.1180 - Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. 334.1180 Section 334.1180 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1180 Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. (a)...

  7. 33 CFR 334.1180 - Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. 334.1180 Section 334.1180 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1180 Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. (a)...

  8. 33 CFR 334.1180 - Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. 334.1180 Section 334.1180 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1180 Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. (a)...

  9. 46 CFR 7.145 - Strait of Juan de Fuca, Haro Strait and Strait of Georgia WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Strait of Juan de Fuca, Haro Strait and Strait of Georgia WA. 7.145 Section 7.145 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC BOUNDARY LINES Pacific Coast § 7.145 Strait of Juan de Fuca, Haro Strait and...

  10. 33 CFR 334.1180 - Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. 334.1180 Section 334.1180 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1180 Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. (a)...

  11. Polar Ridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03662 Polar Ridges

    This ridge system is located in the south polar region.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -81.7N, Longitude 296.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  12. Estuarine versus transient flow regimes in Juan de Fuca Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Richard E.; MiháLy, Steven F.; Kulikov, Evgueni A.

    2007-09-01

    Residual currents in Juan de Fuca Strait are observed to switch between two fundamental states: estuarine and transient. The estuarine regime, which prevails roughly 90% of the time in summer and 55% of the time in winter, has a fortnightly modulated, three-layer structure characterized by strong (˜50 cm s-1) outflow above 60 ± 15 m depth, moderate (˜25 cm s-1) inflow between 60 and 125 m depth, and weak (˜10 cm s-1) inflow below 125 ± 10 m depth. Rotation increases the upper layer depth by 40 m on the northern side of the channel and upwelling-favorable coastal winds augment inflow in the bottom layer by as much as 5 cm s-1. Rotation, combined with modulation of the estuarine currents by tidal mixing in the eastern strait, leads to fortnightly variability in the along-channel velocity and cross-channel positioning of the core flow regions. Transient flows, which occur roughly 10% of the time in summer and 45% of the time in winter, are rapidly evolving, horizontally and vertically sheared "reversals" in the estuarine circulation generated during poleward wind events along the outer coast. Major events can persist for several weeks, force a net inward transport, and give rise to an O(10) km wide, surface-intensified, O(100) cm s-1 inflow along the southern (Olympic Peninsula) boundary of the strait. This "Olympic Peninsula Countercurrent" is typically accompanied by an abrupt decrease in salinity, indicating that it is a buoyancy flow originating with low-density water on the northern Washington shelf.

  13. Detail of the ridge framing of the clerestory roof, note ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of the ridge framing of the clerestory roof, note the alternating wood and steel beams, view facing northeast - U.S. Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Warehouse 250, Aviation Storehouse, C Street between Fifth & Sixth Streets, Kaneohe, Honolulu County, HI

  14. A 2-D tomographic model of the Juan de Fuca plate from accretion at axial seamount to subduction at the Cascadia margin from an active source ocean bottom seismometer survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horning, G.; Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Han, S.; Carton, H.; Nedimović, M. R.; Keken, P. E.

    2016-08-01

    We report results from a wide-angle controlled source seismic experiment across the Juan de Fuca plate designed to investigate the evolution of the plate from accretion at the Juan de Fuca ridge to subduction at the Cascadia margin. A two-dimensional velocity model of the crust and upper mantle is derived from a joint reflection-refraction traveltime inversion. To interpret our tomography results, we first generate a plausible baseline velocity model, assuming a plate cooling model and realistic oceanic lithologies. We then use an effective medium theory to infer from our tomography results the extent of porosity, alteration, and water content that would be required to explain the departure from the baseline model. In crust of ages >1 Ma and away from propagator wakes and regions of faulting due to plate bending, we obtain estimates of upper crustal hydration of 0.5-2.1 wt % and find mostly dry lower crust and upper mantle. In sections of the crust affected by propagator wakes we find upper estimates of upper crustal, lower crustal, and upper mantle hydration of 3.1, 0.8, and 1.8 wt %, respectively. At the Cascadia deformation front, we find that the amount of water stored at uppermost mantle levels in the downgoing JdF plate is very limited (<0.3 wt %), with most of the water carried into the subduction zone being stored in the oceanic crust.

  15. Geophysical Investigation of Australian-Antarctic Ridge Using High-Resolution Gravity and Bathymetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. S.; Lin, J.; Park, S. H.; Choi, H.

    2015-12-01

    Much of the Australian-Antarctic Ridge (AAR) has been remained uncharted until 2011 because of its remoteness and harsh weather conditions. From 2011, the multidisciplinary ridge program initiated by the Korea Polar Research Institute (KOPRI) surveyed the little-explored eastern ends of the AAR to characterize the tectonics, geochemistry, and hydrothermal activity of this intermediate spreading system. In this study, we present a detailed analysis of a 300-km-long supersegment of the AAR to quantify the spatial variations in ridge morphology and axial and off-axis volcanisms as constrained by high-resolution shipboard bathymetry and gravity. The ridge axis morphology alternates between rift valleys and axial highs within relatively short ridge segments. To obtain a geological proxy for regional variations in magma supply, we calculated residual mantle Bouguer gravity anomalies (RMBA), gravity-derived crustal thickness, and residual topography for neighboring seven sub-segments. The results of the analyses revealed that the southern flank of the AAR is associated with shallower seafloor, more negative RMBA, thicker crust, and/or less dense mantle in comparison to the conjugate northern flank. Furthermore, this north-south asymmetry becomes more prominent toward the KR1 supersegment of the AAR. The axial topography of the KR1 supersegment exhibits a sharp transition from axial highs at the western end to rift valleys at the eastern end, with regions of axial highs being associated with more robust magma supply as indicated by more negative RMBA. We also compare and contrast the characteristics of the AAR supersegment with that of other ridges of intermediate spreading rates, including the Juan de Fuca Ridge, Galápagos Spreading Center, and Southeast Indian Ridge west of the Australian-Antarctic Discordance, to investigate the influence of ridge-hotspot interaction on ridge magma supply and tectonics.

  16. Precise relative locations for earthquakes in the northeast Pacific region

    SciTech Connect

    Cleveland, K. Michael; VanDeMark, Thomas F.; Ammon, Charles J.

    2015-10-09

    We report that double-difference methods applied to cross-correlation measured Rayleigh wave time shifts are an effective tool to improve epicentroid locations and relative origin time shifts in remote regions. We apply these methods to seismicity offshore of southwestern Canada and the U.S. Pacific Northwest, occurring along the boundaries of the Pacific and Juan de Fuca (including the Explorer Plate and Gorda Block) Plates. The Blanco, Mendocino, Revere-Dellwood, Nootka, and Sovanco fracture zones host the majority of this seismicity, largely consisting of strike-slip earthquakes. The Explorer, Juan de Fuca, and Gorda spreading ridges join these fracture zones and host normal faulting earthquakes. Our results show that at least the moderate-magnitude activity clusters along fault strike, supporting suggestions of large variations in seismic coupling along oceanic transform faults. Our improved relative locations corroborate earlier interpretations of the internal deformation in the Explorer and Gorda Plates. North of the Explorer Plate, improved locations support models that propose northern extension of the Revere-Dellwood fault. Relocations also support interpretations that favor multiple parallel active faults along the Blanco Transform Fault Zone. Seismicity of the western half of the Blanco appears more scattered and less collinear than the eastern half, possibly related to fault maturity. We use azimuthal variations in the Rayleigh wave cross-correlation amplitude to detect and model rupture directivity for a moderate size earthquake along the eastern Blanco Fault. Lastly, the observations constrain the seismogenic zone geometry and suggest a relatively narrow seismogenic zone width of 2 to 4 km.

  17. Precise relative locations for earthquakes in the northeast Pacific region

    DOE PAGES

    Cleveland, K. Michael; VanDeMark, Thomas F.; Ammon, Charles J.

    2015-10-09

    We report that double-difference methods applied to cross-correlation measured Rayleigh wave time shifts are an effective tool to improve epicentroid locations and relative origin time shifts in remote regions. We apply these methods to seismicity offshore of southwestern Canada and the U.S. Pacific Northwest, occurring along the boundaries of the Pacific and Juan de Fuca (including the Explorer Plate and Gorda Block) Plates. The Blanco, Mendocino, Revere-Dellwood, Nootka, and Sovanco fracture zones host the majority of this seismicity, largely consisting of strike-slip earthquakes. The Explorer, Juan de Fuca, and Gorda spreading ridges join these fracture zones and host normal faultingmore » earthquakes. Our results show that at least the moderate-magnitude activity clusters along fault strike, supporting suggestions of large variations in seismic coupling along oceanic transform faults. Our improved relative locations corroborate earlier interpretations of the internal deformation in the Explorer and Gorda Plates. North of the Explorer Plate, improved locations support models that propose northern extension of the Revere-Dellwood fault. Relocations also support interpretations that favor multiple parallel active faults along the Blanco Transform Fault Zone. Seismicity of the western half of the Blanco appears more scattered and less collinear than the eastern half, possibly related to fault maturity. We use azimuthal variations in the Rayleigh wave cross-correlation amplitude to detect and model rupture directivity for a moderate size earthquake along the eastern Blanco Fault. Lastly, the observations constrain the seismogenic zone geometry and suggest a relatively narrow seismogenic zone width of 2 to 4 km.« less

  18. Grafts for Ridge Preservation

    PubMed Central

    Jamjoom, Amal; Cohen, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Alveolar ridge bone resorption is a biologic phenomenon that occurs following tooth extraction and cannot be prevented. This paper reviews the vertical and horizontal ridge dimensional changes that are associated with tooth extraction. It also provides an overview of the advantages of ridge preservation as well as grafting materials. A Medline search among English language papers was performed in March 2015 using alveolar ridge preservation, ridge augmentation, and various graft types as search terms. Additional papers were considered following the preliminary review of the initial search that were relevant to alveolar ridge preservation. The literature suggests that ridge preservation methods and augmentation techniques are available to minimize and restore available bone. Numerous grafting materials, such as autografts, allografts, xenografts, and alloplasts, currently are used for ridge preservation. Other materials, such as growth factors, also can be used to enhance biologic outcome. PMID:26262646

  19. Transform push, oblique subduction resistance, and intraplate stress of the Juan de Fuca plate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, K.; He, J.; Davis, E.E.

    1997-01-01

    The Juan de Fuca plate is a small oceanic plate between the Pacific and North America plates. In the southernmost region, referred to as the Gorda deformation zone, the maximum compressive stress a, constrained by earthquake focal mechanisms is N-S. Off Oregon, and possibly off Washington, NW trending left-lateral faults cutting the Juan de Fuca plate indicate a a, in a NE-SW to E-W direction. The magnitude of differential stress increases from north to south; this is inferred from the plastic yielding and distribution of earthquakes throughout the Gorda deformation zone. To understand how tectonic forces determine the stress field of the Juan de Fuca plate, we have modeled the intraplate stress using both elastic and elastic-perfectly plastic plane-stress finite element models. We conclude that the right-lateral shear motion of the Pacific and North America plates is primarily responsible for the stress pattern of the Juan de Fuca plate. The most important roles are played by a compressional force normal to the Mendocino transform fault, a result of the northward push by the Pacific plate and a horizontal resistance operating against the northward, or margin-parallel, component of oblique subduction. Margin-parallel subduction resistance results in large N-S compression in the Gorda deformation zone because the force is integrated over the full length of the Cascadia subduction zone. The Mendocino transform fault serves as a strong buttress that is very weak in shear but capable of transmitting large strike-normal compressive stresses. Internal failure of the Gorda deformation zone potentially places limits on the magnitude of the fault-normal stresses being transmitted and correspondingly on the magnitude of strike-parallel subduction resistance. Transform faults and oblique subduction zones in other parts of the world can be expected to transmit and create stresses in the same manner. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. Juan de Fuca slab geometry and its relation to Wadati-Benioff zone seismicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCrory, Patricia A.; Blair, J. Luke; Waldhause, Felix; Oppenheimer, David H.

    2012-01-01

    A new model of the subducted Juan de Fuca plate beneath western North America allows first-order correlations between the occurrence of Wadati-Benioff zone earthquakes and slab geometry, temperature, and hydration state. The geo-referenced 3D model, constructed from weighted control points, integrates depth information from earthquake locations and regional seismic velocity studies. We use the model to separate earthquakes that occur in the Cascadia forearc from those that occur within the underlying Juan de Fuca plate and thereby reveal previously obscured details regarding the spatial distribution of earthquakes. Seismicity within the slab is most prevalent where the slab is warped beneath northwestern California and western Washington suggesting that slab flexure, in addition to expected metamorphic dehydration processes, promotes earthquake occurrence within the subducted oceanic plate. Earthquake patterns beneath western Vancouver Island are consistent with slab dehydration processes. Conversely, the lack of slab earthquakes beneath western Oregon is consistent with an anhydrous slab. Double-differenced relocated seismicity resolves a double seismic zone within the slab beneath northwestern California that strongly constrains the location of the plate interface and delineates a cluster of seismicity 10 km above the surface that includes the 1992 M7.1 Mendocino earthquake. We infer that this earthquake ruptured a surface within the Cascadia accretionary margin above the Juan de Fuca plate. We further speculate that this earthquake is associated with a detached fragment of former Farallon plate. Other subsurface tectonic elements within the forearc may have the potential to generate similar damaging earthquakes.

  1. Evidence for microbial carbon and sulfur cycling in deeply buried ridge flank basalt.

    PubMed

    Lever, Mark A; Rouxel, Olivier; Alt, Jeffrey C; Shimizu, Nobumichi; Ono, Shuhei; Coggon, Rosalind M; Shanks, Wayne C; Lapham, Laura; Elvert, Marcus; Prieto-Mollar, Xavier; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Inagaki, Fumio; Teske, Andreas

    2013-03-15

    Sediment-covered basalt on the flanks of mid-ocean ridges constitutes most of Earth's oceanic crust, but the composition and metabolic function of its microbial ecosystem are largely unknown. By drilling into 3.5-million-year-old subseafloor basalt, we demonstrated the presence of methane- and sulfur-cycling microbes on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Depth horizons with functional genes indicative of methane-cycling and sulfate-reducing microorganisms are enriched in solid-phase sulfur and total organic carbon, host δ(13)C- and δ(34)S-isotopic values with a biological imprint, and show clear signs of microbial activity when incubated in the laboratory. Downcore changes in carbon and sulfur cycling show discrete geochemical intervals with chemoautotrophic δ(13)C signatures locally attenuated by heterotrophic metabolism.

  2. Beryllium 10 in hydrothermal vent deposits from the East Pacific Ridges: Role of sediments in the hydrothermal processes

    SciTech Connect

    Valette-Silver, J.N.; Tera, F.; Klein, J.; Middleton, R.

    1987-10-10

    Beryllium 10 concentrations were determined for 31 handpicked hydrothermal sulfides, six oxyhydroxides, seven basalts, and five sediments collected from the hydrothermally active areas of the East Pacific ridges. The samples includes specimens from the East Pacific Rise (EPR) at 21 /sup 0/N and 13 /sup 0/N, the Galapagos Rift, the Guaymas Basin, and the Gorda and the Juan de Fuca ridges. Additional samples from massive sulfides associated with the Oman ophiolites were studied. In all samples, we obtained values ranging from 0.04 x 10/sup 6/ atoms/g to 125 x 10/sup 6/ atoms/g, with the lowest values being very close to our blank (0.015 x 10/sup 6/ atoms/g). The data show systematic variations with sample location and type. The /sup 10/Be concentrations measured for the mid-ocean basalts are of the order of 0.3 x 10/sup 6/ atoms/g and reach 3800 x 10/sup 6/ atoms/g for the pelagic deep-sea sediments collected near the EPR 21 /sup 0/N. Based on their /sup 10/Be concentrations, we can clearly distinguish two categories of sulfides: sulfides containing low /sup 10/Be concentration (<10 /sup 6/ atoms/g) sitting directly on the mid-ocean basalt (EPR of Juan de Fuca), and sulfides with high /sup 10/Be concentration (>10/sup 6/ atoms/g) located atop of a thick pile of young sediments (Guaymas Basin or Gorda Ridge).

  3. 7. View looking southeast, showing northeast approach and northeast sidewalk. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. View looking southeast, showing northeast approach and northeast sidewalk. - Water Street Bridge, Spanning Boston & Maine Railroad tracks at Water Street (U.S. Route 3), Concord, Merrimack County, NH

  4. 52. Ground floor, northeast corner, looking northeast at former delivery ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. Ground floor, northeast corner, looking northeast at former delivery entries (archways have since been filled in) - Sheffield Farms Milk Plant, 1075 Webster Avenue (southwest corner of 166th Street), Bronx, Bronx County, NY

  5. OBLIQUE VIEW OF THE NORTHEAST SIDE AND NORTHEAST BACK OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF THE NORTHEAST SIDE AND NORTHEAST BACK OF BUILDING 13, FACING SOUTH. - Southern Branch of the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Building 13, Harris Avenue at its intersection of Black Avenue and Woodfin Street, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  6. 5. INTERIOR OF NORTHEAST ROOM AND MEZZANINE, NORTHEAST VIEW OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. INTERIOR OF NORTHEAST ROOM AND MEZZANINE, NORTHEAST VIEW OF (HOISTS IN CENTER). - Vanadium Corporation of America (VCA) Naturita Mill, Sampling Building & Ore Receiving Platform, 3 miles Northwest of Naturita, between Highway 141 & San Miguel River, Naturita, Montrose County, CO

  7. Microearthquake patterns following the 1998 eruption of Axial Volcano, Juan de Fuca Ridge: Mechanical relaxation and thermal strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Robert A.; Barclay, Andrew H.; Webb, Spahr C.

    2004-01-01

    Ocean bottom seismic networks deployed following the 1998 eruption of Axial seamount reveal an evolving pattern of microearthquake activity associated with subsurface magmatism and thermal strain. Seismicity rates decay steadily over 15 months of observation (February 8, 1998, to April 30, 1999), consistent with a trend toward thermal and mechanical equilibrium in the shallow crust after the magmatic event. Immediately after the eruption, seismicity rates were high for about 60 days in the southeast corner of the caldera where lava flows from the 1998 eruption were mapped. A small burst of seismic activity was observed on the southeast shoulder of the volcano from 100 to 150 days after the eruption. These events, which are characterized by slip on nearly vertical faults in the shallow crust, extend about 6 km from the southeast corner of the caldera and overlie a mid-crustal low-velocity zone. After this episode, seismicity rates remain low until the end of the observation period, 455 days after the eruption. Shallow (˜0.7 km depth) events, consistent with thermal contraction and volume changes of ˜2 × 10-3 m3 in ˜5 m3 sources, are observed in individual clusters beneath hydrothermal vents within the 1998 lava flow at the southeast edge of the caldera. Microearthquakes observed during the last 70 days of observation are distributed around the central caldera, most likely representing small amounts of subsidence on caldera faults during the final stages of equilibration following melt withdrawal associated with the 1998 eruption.

  8. Magnetite formation from ferrihydrite by hyperthermophilic archaea from Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge hydrothermal vent chimneys.

    PubMed

    Lin, T Jennifer; Breves, E A; Dyar, M D; Ver Eecke, H C; Jamieson, J W; Holden, J F

    2014-05-01

    Hyperthermophilic iron reducers are common in hydrothermal chimneys found along the Endeavour Segment in the northeastern Pacific Ocean based on culture-dependent estimates. However, information on the availability of Fe(III) (oxyhydr) oxides within these chimneys, the types of Fe(III) (oxyhydr) oxides utilized by the organisms, rates and environmental constraints of hyperthermophilic iron reduction, and mineral end products is needed to determine their biogeochemical significance and are addressed in this study. Thin-section petrography on the interior of a hydrothermal chimney from the Dante edifice at Endeavour showed a thin coat of Fe(III) (oxyhydr) oxide associated with amorphous silica on the exposed outer surfaces of pyrrhotite, sphalerite, and chalcopyrite in pore spaces, along with anhydrite precipitation in the pores that is indicative of seawater ingress. The iron sulfide minerals were likely oxidized to Fe(III) (oxyhydr) oxide with increasing pH and Eh due to cooling and seawater exposure, providing reactants for bioreduction. Culture-dependent estimates of hyperthermophilic iron reducer abundances in this sample were 1740 and 10 cells per gram (dry weight) of material from the outer surface and the marcasite-sphalerite-rich interior, respectively. Two hyperthermophilic iron reducers, Hyperthermus sp. Ro04 and Pyrodictium sp. Su06, were isolated from other active hydrothermal chimneys on the Endeavour Segment. Strain Ro04 is a neutrophilic (pH opt 7-8) heterotroph, while strain Su06 is a mildly acidophilic (pH opt 5), hydrogenotrophic autotroph, both with optimal growth temperatures of 90-92 °C. Mössbauer spectroscopy of the iron oxides before and after growth demonstrated that both organisms form nanophase (<12 nm) magnetite [Fe3 O4 ] from laboratory-synthesized ferrihydrite [Fe10 O14 (OH)2 ] with no detectable mineral intermediates. They produced up to 40 mm Fe(2+) in a growth-dependent manner, while all abiotic and biotic controls produced <3 mm Fe(2+) . Hyperthermophilic iron reducers may have a growth advantage over other hyperthermophiles in hydrothermal systems that are mildly acidic where mineral weathering at increased temperatures occurs. PMID:24612368

  9. Viral Genomics and Evolution in Subseafloor Diffuse Flow Viral Communities in the Main Endeavour Hydrothermal Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. E.; Baross, J. A.

    2010-04-01

    In the dynamic environment of hydrothermal vents, transduction may play a crucial role in microbial evolution. Metagenomic analysis of diffuse flow viral communities may elucidate the nature and extent of transduction in these ancient ecosystems.

  10. Mineralogical studies of sulfide samples and volatile concentrations of basalt glasses from the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brett, R.; Evans, H.T.; Gibson, E.K.; Hedenquist, J.W.; Wandless, M.-V.; Sommer, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    Specifically considers unusual minerals and geothermometric relations not previously covered. Equilibrium, if attained at all, during deposition of most sulfides was a transient event over a few tens of micrometers at most and was perturbed by rapid temperature and compositional changes of the circulating fluid. Two new minerals were found: one, a hydrated Zn, Fe hydroxy-chlorosulfate, and the other, a (Mn, Mg, Fe) hydroxide or hydroxy-hydrate. Both were formed at relatively low temperatures. Lizardite, starkeyite, and anatase were found for the first time in such an environment.-from Authors

  11. Heat and chemical flux variability within the Main Endeavour Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge, from 2000, 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellogg, J. P.; McDuff, R. E.; Hautala, S. L.; Stahr, F.

    2010-12-01

    The Main Endeavour Field (MEF) has had a split personality since it was discovered. The southern half of the field is regularly observed to be hotter and fresher than the northern half. Differences lessened after the 1999 earthquake event, but the thermal and chemical gradient remains. We examine CTD and MAVS current meter data collected during surveys, designed to intersect the rising hydrothermal plume, conducted with the Autonomous Benthic Explorer (ABE) in 2000 and 2004. By taking subsets of the data over known clusters of structures within the field, we attribute fractional contributions to the whole field heat and salt fluxes. Preliminary findings indicate that North MEF contributes ~90% and ~100% of the heat from MEF in 2000 and 2004 respectively. It is clear from this that the majority of the MEF buoyancy flux is from North MEF even though the source fluids from South MEF are estimated to be initially more buoyant than those from North MEF. Within North MEF, ~2/3 of the heat comes from the Grotto, Dante, Lobo sulfide cluster and ~1/4 from the Hulk and Crypto cluster. These data, for the intra-field spatial scales of heat and salt flux, may allow us to infer mechanisms capable of altering the porous network of the hydrothermal system.

  12. Low-molecular weight hydrocarbons in vent fluids from the Main Endeavour Field, northern Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruse, Anna M.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.

    2010-11-01

    Despite its location on sediment-free basalt, vent fluids from the Main Endeavour Field (MEF) contain chemical species that indicate fluids have interacted with sediments during circulation. We report on the distribution and isotopic abundances of organic compounds ( C1- C3 alkanes and alkenes, benzene and toluene) in fluids collected from the Main Endeavour Field (MEF) in July, 2000, to understand the processes that regulate their abundances and characterize fluid sources. Aqueous organic compounds are derived from the thermal alteration of sedimentary organic matter and subsequently undergo further oxidation reactions during fluid flow. Fluid:sediment mass ratios calculated using ΣNH 4 concentrations indicate that the sediments are distal to the MEF, resulting in a common reservoir of fluids for all of the vents. Following the generation from sediment alteration, aqueous organic compounds undergo secondary alteration reactions via a stepwise oxidation reaction mechanism. Alkane distributions and isotopic compositions indicate that organic compounds in MEF fluids have undergone a greater extent of alteration as compared to Middle Valley fluids, either due to differences in subsurface redox conditions or the residence time of fluids at subsurface conditions. The distributions of the aromatic compounds benzene and toluene are qualitatively consistent with the subsurface conditions indicated by equilibration of aqueous alkanes and alkanes. However, benzene and toluene do not achieve chemical equilibrium in the subsurface. Methane and CO 2 also do not equilibrate chemically or isotopically at reaction zone temperatures, a likely result of an insufficient reaction time after addition of CO 2 from magmatic sources during upflow. The organic geochemistry supports the assumption that the sediments with which MEF fluids interact has the same composition as sediments present in Middle Valley itself, and highlight differences in subsurface reaction zone conditions and fluid flow pathways at these two sites.

  13. Magnetite formation from ferrihydrite by hyperthermophilic archaea from Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge hydrothermal vent chimneys.

    PubMed

    Lin, T Jennifer; Breves, E A; Dyar, M D; Ver Eecke, H C; Jamieson, J W; Holden, J F

    2014-05-01

    Hyperthermophilic iron reducers are common in hydrothermal chimneys found along the Endeavour Segment in the northeastern Pacific Ocean based on culture-dependent estimates. However, information on the availability of Fe(III) (oxyhydr) oxides within these chimneys, the types of Fe(III) (oxyhydr) oxides utilized by the organisms, rates and environmental constraints of hyperthermophilic iron reduction, and mineral end products is needed to determine their biogeochemical significance and are addressed in this study. Thin-section petrography on the interior of a hydrothermal chimney from the Dante edifice at Endeavour showed a thin coat of Fe(III) (oxyhydr) oxide associated with amorphous silica on the exposed outer surfaces of pyrrhotite, sphalerite, and chalcopyrite in pore spaces, along with anhydrite precipitation in the pores that is indicative of seawater ingress. The iron sulfide minerals were likely oxidized to Fe(III) (oxyhydr) oxide with increasing pH and Eh due to cooling and seawater exposure, providing reactants for bioreduction. Culture-dependent estimates of hyperthermophilic iron reducer abundances in this sample were 1740 and 10 cells per gram (dry weight) of material from the outer surface and the marcasite-sphalerite-rich interior, respectively. Two hyperthermophilic iron reducers, Hyperthermus sp. Ro04 and Pyrodictium sp. Su06, were isolated from other active hydrothermal chimneys on the Endeavour Segment. Strain Ro04 is a neutrophilic (pH opt 7-8) heterotroph, while strain Su06 is a mildly acidophilic (pH opt 5), hydrogenotrophic autotroph, both with optimal growth temperatures of 90-92 °C. Mössbauer spectroscopy of the iron oxides before and after growth demonstrated that both organisms form nanophase (<12 nm) magnetite [Fe3 O4 ] from laboratory-synthesized ferrihydrite [Fe10 O14 (OH)2 ] with no detectable mineral intermediates. They produced up to 40 mm Fe(2+) in a growth-dependent manner, while all abiotic and biotic controls produced <3 mm Fe(2+) . Hyperthermophilic iron reducers may have a growth advantage over other hyperthermophiles in hydrothermal systems that are mildly acidic where mineral weathering at increased temperatures occurs.

  14. Northeast Hellas Landscape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-446, 8 August 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image of pitted terrain northeast of Hellas Basin shows light-toned outcrops of layered, sedimentary rock, and a valley floor covered by large, dark ripples or small dunes. Similar light-toned sedimentary materials are found throughout the region immediately northeast of Hellas, and in the crater, Terby. The area shown is 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and located near 27.5oS, 281.7oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  15. Segmentation of mid-ocean ridges attributed to oblique mantle divergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderbeek, Brandon P.; Toomey, Douglas R.; Hooft, Emilie E. E.; Wilcock, William S. D.

    2016-08-01

    The origin of mid-ocean ridge segmentation--the systematic along-axis variation in tectonic and magmatic processes--remains controversial. It is commonly assumed that mantle flow is a passive response to plate divergence and that between transform faults magma supply controls segmentation. Using seismic tomography, we constrain the geometry of mantle flow and the distribution of mantle melt beneath the intermediate-spreading Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Our results, in combination with prior studies, establish a systematic skew between the mantle-divergence and plate-spreading directions. In all three cases studied, mantle divergence is advanced with respect to recent changes in the plate-spreading direction and the extent to which the flow field is advanced increases with decreasing spreading rate. Furthermore, seismic images show that large-offset, non-transform discontinuities are regions of enhanced mantle melt retention. We propose that oblique mantle flow beneath mid-ocean ridges is a driving force for the reorientation of spreading segments and the formation of ridge-axis discontinuities. The resulting tectonic discontinuities decrease the efficiency of upward melt transport, thus defining segment-scale variations in magmatic processes. We predict that across spreading rates mid-ocean ridge segmentation is controlled by evolving patterns in asthenospheric flow and the dynamics of lithospheric rifting.

  16. Massive sulfide deposition and trace element remobilization in the Middle Valley sediment-hosted hydrothermal system, northern Juan de Fuca Rdge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houghton, J.L.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Seyfried, W.E.

    2004-01-01

    The Bent Hill massive sulfide deposit and ODP Mound deposit in Middle Valley at the northernmost end of the Juan de Fuca Ridge are two of the largest modern seafloor hydrothermal deposits yet explored. Trace metal concentrations of sulfide minerals, determined by laser-ablation ICP-MS, were used in conjunction with mineral paragenetic studies and thermodynamic calculations to deduce the history of fluid-mineral reactions during sulfide deposition. Detailed analyses of the distribution of metals in sulfides indicate significant shifts in the physical and chemical conditions responsible for the trace element variability observed in these sulfide deposits. Trace elements (Mn, Co, Ni, As, Se, Ag, Cd, Sb, Pb, and Bi) analyzed in a representative suite of 10 thin sections from these deposits suggest differences in conditions and processes of hydrothermal alteration resulting in mass transfer of metals from the center of the deposits to the margins. Enrichments of some trace metals (Pb, Sb, Cd, Ag) in sphalerite at the margins of the deposits are best explained by dissolution/reprecipitation processes consistent with secondary remineralization. Results of reaction-path models clarify mechanisms of mass transfer during remineralization of sulfide deposits due to mixing of hydrothermal fluids with seawater. Model results are consistent with patterns of observed mineral paragenesis and help to identify conditions (pH, redox, temperature) that may be responsible for variations in trace metal concentrations in primary and secondary minerals. Differences in trace metal distributions throughout a single deposit and between nearby deposits at Middle Valley can be linked to the history of metal mobilization within this active hydrothermal system that may have broad implications for sulfide ore formation in other sedimented and unsedimented ridge systems. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Marine bird populations of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Strait of Georgia and adjacent waters in 1978 and 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, T.R.; Speich, S.M.; Manuwal, D.A.; Hirsch, K.V.; Miller, C.

    1981-10-01

    The threat of oil pollution in the Strait of Juan de Fuca has prompted this study of marine birds in Washington State. The study was conducted from 1 January 1978 to 31 December 1979 in the Strait of Juan de Fuca north to the San Juan Islands and Point Roberts and west to Sidney, British Columbia. Major objectives were to determine the time of occurrence, distribution, abundance, and locations of important concentrations of marine birds. Data were obtained on breeding marine birds on 99 geographic units in American waters.

  18. The fate of the Juan de Fuca plate: Implications for a Yellowstone plume head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Mei; Allen, Richard M.

    2007-12-01

    Beneath the Pacific Northwest the Juan de Fuca plate, a remnant of the Farallon plate, continues subducting beneath the North American continent. To the east of the Cascadia subduction zone lies the Yellowstone Hotspot Track. The origins of this track can be traced back to the voluminous basaltic outpourings in the Columbia Plateau around 17 Ma. If these basalts are the result of a large melting anomaly rising through the mantle to the base of the North American continent, such as a mantle plume head, the anomaly would need to punch through the subducting Juan de Fuca slab. Here, we use teleseismic body-wave travel-time tomography to investigate the fate of the subducted slab and its possible interaction with a plume head. Our dataset is derived from the Oregon Array for Teleseismic Study (OATS) deployment in Oregon and all other available seismic data in this region during the same period. In our JdF07 models, we image the subducted Juan de Fuca plate in the mantle east of the Cascades beneath Oregon, where the slab has not been imaged before, to a depth of 400 km but no deeper. The slab dips ˜ 50°E and has a thickness of ˜ 75 km. Immediately beneath the slab, we image a low velocity layer with a similar geometry to the slab and extending down to at least ˜ 575 km depth in the V s model. The total length of the high velocity slab is ˜ 660 km, about 180 km longer than the estimated length of slab subducted since 17 Ma. Assuming similar slab geometry to today, this 180 km length of slab would reach ˜ 60 km depth, comparable to the thickness of continental lithosphere. We propose that the absence of the slab below 400 km today is due to the arrival of the Yellowstone plume head ˜ 17 Ma, which destroyed the Juan de Fuca slab at depths greater than the thickness of the continental lithosphere. Given this scenario, the low velocity anomaly beneath the slab is likely the remnant plume head material which has been pulled down by traction with the subducting plate

  19. Northeast Regional Biomass Program

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, R.A.

    1991-11-01

    The management structure and program objectives for the Northeast Regional Biomass Program (NRBP) remain unchanged from previous years. Additional funding was provided by the Bonneville Power Administration Regional Biomass Program to continue the publication of articles in the Biologue. The Western Area Power Administration and the Council of Great Lakes Governors funded the project Characterization of Emissions from Burning Woodwaste''. A grant for the ninth year was received from DOE. The Northeast Regional Biomass Steering Committee selected the following four projects for funding for the next fiscal year. (1) Wood Waste Utilization Conference, (2) Performance Evaluation of Wood Systems in Commercial Facilities, (3) Wood Energy Market Utilization Training, (4) Update of the Facility Directory.

  20. Northeast Regional Biomass Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lusk, P.D.

    1992-12-01

    The Northeast Regional Biomass Program has been in operation for a period of nine years. During this time, state managed programs and technical programs have been conducted covering a wide range of activities primarily aim at the use and applications of wood as a fuel. These activities include: assessments of available biomass resources; surveys to determine what industries, businesses, institutions, and utility companies use wood and wood waste for fuel; and workshops, seminars, and demonstrations to provide technical assistance. In the Northeast, an estimated 6.2 million tons of wood are used in the commercial and industrial sector, where 12.5 million cords are used for residential heating annually. Of this useage, 1504.7 mw of power has been generated from biomass. The use of wood energy products has had substantial employment and income benefits in the region. Although wood and woodwaste have received primary emphasis in the regional program, the use of municipal solid waste has received increased emphasis as an energy source. The energy contribution of biomass will increase as potentia users become more familiar with existing feedstocks, technologies, and applications. The Northeast Regional Biomass Program is designed to support region-specific to overcome near-term barriers to biomass energy use.

  1. A Geo-referenced 3D model of the Juan de Fuca Slab and associated seismicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blair, J.L.; McCrory, P.A.; Oppenheimer, D.H.; Waldhauser, F.

    2011-01-01

    We present a Geographic Information System (GIS) of a new 3-dimensional (3D) model of the subducted Juan de Fuca Plate beneath western North America and associated seismicity of the Cascadia subduction system. The geo-referenced 3D model was constructed from weighted control points that integrate depth information from hypocenter locations and regional seismic velocity studies. We used the 3D model to differentiate earthquakes that occur above the Juan de Fuca Plate surface from earthquakes that occur below the plate surface. This GIS project of the Cascadia subduction system supersedes the one previously published by McCrory and others (2006). Our new slab model updates the model with new constraints. The most significant updates to the model include: (1) weighted control points to incorporate spatial uncertainty, (2) an additional gridded slab surface based on the Generic Mapping Tools (GMT) Surface program which constructs surfaces based on splines in tension (see expanded description below), (3) double-differenced hypocenter locations in northern California to better constrain slab location there, and (4) revised slab shape based on new hypocenter profiles that incorporate routine depth uncertainties as well as data from new seismic-reflection and seismic-refraction studies. We also provide a 3D fly-through animation of the model for use as a visualization tool.

  2. Sub-Seafloor Carbon Dioxide Storage Potential on the Juan de Fuca Plate, Western North America

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry Fairley; Robert Podgorney

    2012-11-01

    The Juan de Fuca plate, off the western coast of North America, has been suggested as a site for geological sequestration of waste carbon dioxide because of its many attractive characteristics (high permeability, large storage capacity, reactive rock types). Here we model CO2 injection into fractured basalts comprising the upper several hundred meters of the sub-seafloor basalt reservoir, overlain with low-permeability sediments and a large saline water column, to examine the feasibility of this reservoir for CO2 storage. Our simulations indicate that the sub-seafloor basalts of the Juan de Fuca plate may be an excellent CO2 storage candidate, as multiple trapping mechanisms (hydrodynamic, density inversions, and mineralization) act to keep the CO2 isolated from terrestrial environments. Questions remain about the lateral extent and connectivity of the high permeability basalts; however, the lack of wells or boreholes and thick sediment cover maximize storage potential while minimizing potential leakage pathways. Although promising, more study is needed to determine the economic viability of this option.

  3. Tomographic imaging of the Cascadia subduction zone: Constraints on the Juan de Fuca slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chuanxu; Zhao, Dapeng; Wu, Shiguo

    2015-04-01

    We used 40,343 P-wave arrival times from 1883 local earthquakes and 105,455 P-wave arrivals from 6361 teleseismic events to study the detailed structure of the Cascadia subduction zone. We conducted tomographic inversions using a starting velocity model which includes the high-velocity subducting Juan de Fuca slab as a priori information. A number of such slab-constrained inversions are conducted by changing the slab thickness and the velocity contrast between the slab and the surrounding mantle. Our optimal 3-D velocity model fits the data much better than that determined by an inversion with a 1-D homogeneous starting model. Our results show that the subducting Juan de Fuca slab has a thickness of 30-50 km and a P-wave velocity of 1-3% higher than that of the surrounding mantle. Beneath the northern and southern parts of the Cascadia, P-wave velocity is lower in the slab and along the slab interface, which may reflect a more hydrated slab and more active slab dehydration there. The lateral velocity variations may indicate different degrees of slab dehydration and forearc mantle serpentinization. The segmentation in episodic tremor and slip (ETS) is also spatially coincident with the velocity heterogeneities, indicating that the ETS occurrence and recurrence interval are controlled by fluid activity in and around the mantle wedge corner.

  4. Interaction of a mantle plume and a segmented mid-ocean ridge: Results from numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgen, Jennifer E.

    2014-04-01

    Previous investigations have proposed that changes in lithospheric thickness across a transform fault, due to the juxtaposition of seafloor of different ages, can impede lateral dispersion of an on-ridge mantle plume. The application of this “transform damming” mechanism has been considered for several plume-ridge systems, including the Reunion hotspot and the Central Indian Ridge, the Amsterdam-St. Paul hotspot and the Southeast Indian Ridge, the Cobb hotspot and the Juan de Fuca Ridge, the Iceland hotspot and the Kolbeinsey Ridge, the Afar plume and the ridges of the Gulf of Aden, and the Marion/Crozet hotspot and the Southwest Indian Ridge. This study explores the geodynamics of the transform damming mechanism using a three-dimensional finite element numerical model. The model solves the coupled steady-state equations for conservation of mass, momentum, and energy, including thermal buoyancy and viscosity that is dependent on pressure and temperature. The plume is introduced as a circular thermal anomaly on the bottom boundary of the numerical domain. The center of the plume conduit is located directly beneath a spreading segment, at a distance of 200 km (measured in the along-axis direction) from a transform offset with length 100 km. Half-spreading rate is 0.5 cm/yr. In a series of numerical experiments, the buoyancy flux of the modeled plume is progressively increased to investigate the effects on the temperature and velocity structure of the upper mantle in the vicinity of the transform. Unlike earlier studies, which suggest that a transform always acts to decrease the along-axis extent of plume signature, these models imply that the effect of a transform on plume dispersion may be complex. Under certain ranges of plume flux modeled in this study, the region of the upper mantle undergoing along-axis flow directed away from the plume could be enhanced by the three-dimensional velocity and temperature structure associated with ridge-transform-ridge

  5. Fluid-sediment Interaction and Formation of Mn oxi-hydroxide related to a Ridge Flank Hydrothermal System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buatier, M. D.; Bodei, S.; Steinmann, M.; Manceau, A.; Karpoff, A.; Guillaume, D.; Wheat, C. G.

    2005-12-01

    Fluid-sediment interaction at ridge flank permits the formation of metalliferous deposits that play a role in the scavenging of Fe, Mn and other trace elements. Several sites of active hydrothermal flow have been found on the eastern flank of Juan de Fuca Ridge (Retroflux) and along the Costa Rica margin (Ticoflux). These sites are typically located along edges of basaltic outcrops and seamounts where the sediment layers are thin. Mn and Fe oxides can be formed at such interfaces. These oxides form soft micro-concretions or slightly indurated black crusts. Detailed investigations combining geochemical (major, trace elements and REEY) and mineralogical (SEM, TEM, EELS EXAFS) analyses of these Mn and Fe-oxides allow formation mechanisms to be proposed. On the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge above the 3.5 Ma-old seafloor, amorphous and poorly crystallized Mn-oxides are dispersed in altered sediments whereas pure birnessite is observed as crust layers. Hydrothermal birnessite and well-crystallized todorokite are found in sediments from the Costa Rica margin, on an 18-24 Ma seafloor. Our data suggest that the formation of hydrothermal Mn concretions occurs in several steps. The initial step is the adsorption or precipitation of Mn, Si and Fe around siliceous remains of fossils and around cell wall of bacteria and extracellular polymers. These poorly crystallized phyllomanganates give rise to the formation of better crystallized birnessite and todorokite, which progressively increase in size and crystallinity. This study shows that biogenic and amorphous components of sediments provide reactive sites for precipitation of metallic elements and the formation of hydrothermal oxi-hydroxides in ridge flank environments. These minerals, which are good scavengers of metallic elements, must be taken into account when considering the water-rocks reactions controlling oceanic chemical budgets.

  6. Ridge Regression Signal Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhl, Mark R.

    1990-01-01

    The introduction of the Global Positioning System (GPS) into the National Airspace System (NAS) necessitates the development of Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (RAIM) techniques. In order to guarantee a certain level of integrity, a thorough understanding of modern estimation techniques applied to navigational problems is required. The extended Kalman filter (EKF) is derived and analyzed under poor geometry conditions. It was found that the performance of the EKF is difficult to predict, since the EKF is designed for a Gaussian environment. A novel approach is implemented which incorporates ridge regression to explain the behavior of an EKF in the presence of dynamics under poor geometry conditions. The basic principles of ridge regression theory are presented, followed by the derivation of a linearized recursive ridge estimator. Computer simulations are performed to confirm the underlying theory and to provide a comparative analysis of the EKF and the recursive ridge estimator.

  7. 30. NORTHEAST TO BLACKSMITH SHOP AREA IN NORTHEAST CORNER OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. NORTHEAST TO BLACKSMITH SHOP AREA IN NORTHEAST CORNER OF FACTORY. A BENCH VICE STANDS IN LEFT FOREGROUND IN FRONT OF THE HOODED FORGE. MOUNTED ON THE WORK BENCH IS THE MAIN CASTING FROM AN ELI WINDMILL, USED AS A JIG TO SUPPORT PARTS DURING THE BABBITT BEARING POURING OPERATION. - Kregel Windmill Company Factory, 1416 Central Avenue, Nebraska City, Otoe County, NE

  8. 2. SOUTHWEST VIEW OF NORTH SIDE (NORTHEAST CORNER).. THE NORTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. SOUTHWEST VIEW OF NORTH SIDE (NORTHEAST CORNER).. THE NORTHEAST SIDE OF THE MINE OFFICE IS IN THE BACKGROUND. - Juniata Mill Complex, Mill Camp Shed, 22.5 miles Southwest of Hawthorne, between Aurora Crater & Aurora Peak, Hawthorne, Mineral County, NV

  9. Topographic Analysis of Europa's Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, C. E.; Kattenhorn, S. A.; Schenk, P. M.

    2008-12-01

    Ridges are the most ubiquitous surface feature on Europa. Here we examine double ridges that have two parallel, raised flanks with a continuous axial trough (referred to as a ridge pair). Characterizing ridge edifices may help us better understand the processes that drive ridge formation and evolution. Because there is no global elevation map for Europa, topography was derived from high resolution (18 to 181 m/pixel) combined stereographic and photoclinometric images to create 265 topographic profiles across 24 features of interest. Ridge topography was examined across 22 ridge pairs (12 with apparent lateral offsets) and 2 ridge complexes, in the Bright Plains, Conamara Chaos, Cilix, Argadnel Regio, Rhadamanthys Linea, and the E17DISSTR01 (northwest of Katreus Linea) areas. Topographic profiles are oriented perpendicular to the strike of each ridge pair to capture height and width variations as well as to highlight asymmetry between adjacent ridges. We characterize ridges using ridge height and width (vertical and horizontal distance from the base of the ridge flank to the ridge peak), average ridge height (average of the individual peaks in a ridge pair), total ridge width (distance between the ridge's outer flanks), and peak-to-peak (PTP) width (distance between peaks in a ridge pair). Height-to-width ratios of 44 individual ridges fall within a wide range that never exceeds 0.53, implying a maximum outer slope of 28 degrees, slightly less than the suggested angle of repose of loose granular ice (~34 degrees). Most slopes are much gentler, between 10 and 20 degrees, which are significantly smaller than those presented in a prior study undertaken early in the Galileo imaging mission. In fact, we have found that ridges can be very wide and low with outer slopes of only a few degrees, implying that very few ridge morphologies are likely to be controlled by granular flow processes down their outer slopes. The ratio of average ridge height to total ridge width has a

  10. [sup 226]Ra-[sup 230]Th disequilibrium in axial and off-axis mid-ocean ridge basalts

    SciTech Connect

    Volpe, A.M.; Goldstein, S.J. Los Alamos National Lab., NM )

    1993-03-01

    The authors describe [sup 226]Ra-[sup 230]Th disequilibrium in mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) glasses from the Juan de Fuca, Gorda, and East Pacific ridges. These first mass spectrometric measurements of [sup 226]Ra in MORB glasses at sub-picogram abundance levels confirm the large excesses over [sup 230]Th determined by radon-emanation techniques and alpha spectrometry. All off-axis MORB glasses have [sup 226]Ra-[sup 230]Th and [sup 234]U-[sup 238]U in secular equilibrium. This suggests that magmatic processes, not secondary post-eruption alteration, generate [sup 238]U-series disequilibrium in these MORB. Least evolved, N-MORB from axial valleys have ([sup 226]Ra/[sup 230]Th) between 2.2-2.3. Differentiated and enriched E-type MORB have consistently low ([sup 226]Ra/[sup 230]Th) ratios compared with N-MORB from the same ridge sections. Ra-Th fractionation may be less pronounced, or magma residence-transit periods may be long for differentiated MORB. Also, E-MORB may be generated by different melt extraction volumes and rates. Estimated [sup 226]Ra-[sup 230]Th ages for N-MORB agree with location on and off ridge segments, and with Th-U model ages. These preliminary results show that [sup 226]Ra-[sup 230]Th disequilibrium could be used to quantify volcanic episodicity at ocean ridges. 39 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Tomography reveals buoyant asthenosphere accumulating beneath the Juan de Fuca plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawley, William B.; Allen, Richard M.; Richards, Mark A.

    2016-09-01

    The boundary between Earth’s strong lithospheric plates and the underlying mantle asthenosphere corresponds to an abrupt seismic velocity decrease and electrical conductivity increase with depth, perhaps indicating a thin, weak layer that may strongly influence plate motion dynamics. The behavior of such a layer at subduction zones remains unexplored. We present a tomographic model, derived from on- and offshore seismic experiments, that reveals a strong low-velocity feature beneath the subducting Juan de Fuca slab along the entire Cascadia subduction zone. Through simple geodynamic arguments, we propose that this low-velocity feature is the accumulation of material from a thin, weak, buoyant layer present beneath the entire oceanic lithosphere. The presence of this feature could have major implications for our understanding of the asthenosphere and subduction zone dynamics.

  12. Dissolved organic carbon in ridge-axis and ridge-flank hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Susan Q.; Butterfield, David A.; Lilley, Marvin D.; Paul Johnson, H.; Hedges, John I.

    2006-08-01

    The circulation of hydrothermal fluid through the upper oceanic crustal reservoir has a large impact on the chemistry of seawater, yet the impact on dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the ocean has received almost no attention. To determine whether hydrothermal circulation is a source or a sink for DOC in the oceans, we measured DOC concentrations in hydrothermal fluids from several environments. Hydrothermal fluids were collected from high-temperature vents and diffuse, low-temperature vents on the basalt-hosted Juan de Fuca Ridge axis and also from low-temperature vents on the sedimented eastern flanks. High-temperature fluids from Main Endeavour Field (MEF) and Axial Volcano (AV) contain very low DOC concentrations (average = 15 and 17 μM, respectively) compared to background seawater (36 μM). At MEF and AV, average DOC concentrations in diffuse fluids (47 and 48 μM, respectively) were elevated over background seawater, and high DOC is correlated with high microbial cell counts in diffuse fluids. Fluids from off-axis hydrothermal systems located on 3.5-Ma-old crust at Baby Bare Seamount and Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Hole 1026B had average DOC concentrations of 11 and 13 μM, respectively, and lowered DOC was correlated with low cell counts. The relative importance of heterotrophic uptake, abiotic sorption to mineral surfaces, thermal decomposition, and microbial production in fixing the DOC concentration in vent fluids remains uncertain. We calculated the potential effect of hydrothermal circulation on the deep-sea DOC cycle using our concentration data and published water flux estimates. Maximum calculated fluxes of DOC are minor compared to most oceanic DOC source and sink terms.

  13. Formation of volcanic edifices in response to changes in magma budget at intermediate spreading rate ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, J.; White, S. M.; Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Bizimis, M.

    2010-12-01

    The spatial and abundance distributions of volcanic edifices along mid-ocean ridges have a well known correlation with spreading rate. Along slow spreading centers, volcanic edifices are normally distributed about the segment center. Volcanic edifices along fast spreading centers have the opposing trend, i.e. edifices form primarily at the ends of segments. However, in ridges affected by plumes and at back arc basins, the spatial and abundance distributions of volcanic edifices differ from that observed at normal ridges of the same spreading rate. This suggests that magma supply rate may control the spatial and abundance distribution of volcanic edifices. Recent geophysical and geochemical studies along the Galapagos Spreading Centers (GSC), Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdFR), Southeast Indian Ridge (SEIR) and the Valu Fa (VF) and Eastern Lau Spreading Centers (ELSC) put tight constraints on crustal thickness, making it possible investigate the effect of magma budget and axial morphology on the formation of volcanic edifices. Volcanic edifices are described according to their volume, shape (their height to basal radius ratio) and their location relative to the end or center of a segment (abundance distribution). For the GSC, the shape and distribution of volcanic edifices correlate with changes in crustal thickness and axial morphology, consistent with a magma supply control on their formation in this region. This relationship is not apparent along the SEIR or JdFR, where edifices show little variation with changes in axial morphology at relatively constant spreading rates. Results for VF and ELSC are what we expect for changes in spreading rate, not axial morphology. Our study suggests that the formation of volcanic edifices at intermediate spreading rate ridges are influenced by magma budget but only when it is above a certain threshold.

  14. FOSSIL RIDGE WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeWitt, Ed; Kluender, Steven E.

    1984-01-01

    The Fossil Ridge Wilderness Study Area, approximately 20 mi northeast of Gunnison in central Colorado, was studied and its mineral-resource potential assessed. Portions of the study area have substantiated resource potential for gold, silver, copper, lead, zinc, molybdenum, uranium, thorium, rare-earth elements, and high-calcium limestone. Much of the area has a probable resource potential for the preceeding commodities as well as for tin. Various other elements are found in anomalous concentrations within the study area, but there is likelihood for their occurrence in amounts sufficient to constitute resources. Exploration, especially for molybdenum, gold, and uranium, has been active in the past and is expected to continue in the future. No potential for fossil fuel resources was identified in this study.

  15. Fingermark ridge drift.

    PubMed

    De Alcaraz-Fossoul, Josep; Roberts, Katherine A; Feixat, Carme Barrot; Hogrebe, Gregory G; Badia, Manel Gené

    2016-01-01

    Distortions of the fingermark topography are usually considered when comparing latent and exemplar fingerprints. These alterations are characterized as caused by an extrinsic action, which affects entire areas of the deposition and alters the overall flow of a series of contiguous ridges. Here we introduce a novel visual phenomenon that does not follow these principles, named fingermark ridge drift. An experiment was designed that included variables such as type of secretion (eccrine and sebaceous), substrate (glass and polystyrene), and degrees of exposure to natural light (darkness, shade, and direct light) indoors. Fingermarks were sequentially visualized with titanium dioxide powder, photographed and analyzed. The comparison between fresh and aged depositions revealed that under certain environmental conditions an individual ridge could randomly change its original position regardless of its unaltered adjacent ridges. The causes of the drift phenomenon are not well understood. We believe it is exclusively associated with intrinsic natural aging processes of latent fingermarks. This discovery will help explain the detection of certain dissimilarities at the minutiae/ridge level; determine more accurate "hits"; identify potentially erroneous corresponding points; and rethink identification protocols, especially the criteria of "no single minutiae discrepancy" for a positive identification.

  16. Fingermark ridge drift.

    PubMed

    De Alcaraz-Fossoul, Josep; Roberts, Katherine A; Feixat, Carme Barrot; Hogrebe, Gregory G; Badia, Manel Gené

    2016-01-01

    Distortions of the fingermark topography are usually considered when comparing latent and exemplar fingerprints. These alterations are characterized as caused by an extrinsic action, which affects entire areas of the deposition and alters the overall flow of a series of contiguous ridges. Here we introduce a novel visual phenomenon that does not follow these principles, named fingermark ridge drift. An experiment was designed that included variables such as type of secretion (eccrine and sebaceous), substrate (glass and polystyrene), and degrees of exposure to natural light (darkness, shade, and direct light) indoors. Fingermarks were sequentially visualized with titanium dioxide powder, photographed and analyzed. The comparison between fresh and aged depositions revealed that under certain environmental conditions an individual ridge could randomly change its original position regardless of its unaltered adjacent ridges. The causes of the drift phenomenon are not well understood. We believe it is exclusively associated with intrinsic natural aging processes of latent fingermarks. This discovery will help explain the detection of certain dissimilarities at the minutiae/ridge level; determine more accurate "hits"; identify potentially erroneous corresponding points; and rethink identification protocols, especially the criteria of "no single minutiae discrepancy" for a positive identification. PMID:26646735

  17. Northeast Pacific flatfish management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trumble, Robert J.

    1998-03-01

    Exploitation of northeast Pacific flatfish effectively began in the late 1800s with the fishery for Pacific halibut. Harvest of other flatfish occurred on a limited, local basis until foreign fishing fleets came to the area in the late 1950s. When US and Canadian fishermen replaced the foreign fleets in the 1970s and 1980s, a conservation-based management system designed to control foreign fishing was applied to the domestic fleet. Flatfish stock assessment is based on scientific surveys, both trawl and longline, and on catch-age models. In Alaskan waters since 1989 and since 1996 in Canadian waters, mandatory observers collect data on species composition, discards of flatfish and other groundfish, and catch and discards of prohibited species. Fishermen pay observer costs. Most biomass and harvest occurs in the Bering Sea-Aleutian Islands area. Many northeast Pacific flatfish are near record-high abundance, an order of magnitude higher than 20 years ago. Exploitation rates based on F35% or F0.1 generate acceptable biological catch of more than 1 million mt, but annual harvest reaches only 300,000 mt. Total groundfish harvest is limited by an optimum yield limit of 2 million mt in the Bering Sea-Aleutian Islands, where the acceptable biological catch is 3 million mt, and by limits on amounts of Pacific halibut and other prohibited species bycatch. Most flatfish are relatively low-value species, and fishermen chose to fish for more valuable species. A large, powerful fleet which developed under open access in the US saw fishing time decline and economic problems increase as catching capacity grew, while Canada stabilized its fleet with limited entry and catch restrictions for individual vessels.

  18. Ridge Subduction Beneath the Americas: Synthesis and New Research on Anomalous Tectonism and Magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorkelson, D. J.; Madsen, J. K.; Breitsprecher, K.; Groome, W. G.; Sluggett, C.

    2006-12-01

    The west coast of the Americas has been repeatedly affected by ridge-trench interactions from Mesozoic to Recent time. Beneath North America, subduction of the Kula-Farallon, Kula-Resurrection and Farallon- Resurrection spreading ridges resulted in anomalous and time-transgressive forearc to backarc magmatism and related tectonism from the Late Cretaceous to the Eocene. Following consumption and redistribution of the Kula and Resurrection plates, the Neogene Farallon-Pacific ridge system intersected the North American trench in two locations - western Canada and northwestern Mexico / southwestern United States - causing pronounced magmatic and tectonic effects that continue to the present. Beneath Central America, divergent subduction of the Nazca and Cocos plates led to development of a slab window, with a present location beneath Panama and a probable pre-Pliocene position beneath Columbia or Ecuador. Patagonia has been the site of localized ridge subduction from the Eocene to the Recent, with the Phoenix-Farallon ridge subducting from the Eocene to the early Miocene, and the Nazca-Antarctic ridge from the Miocene to the present. Antarctica experienced diverging Antarctic-Phoenix plate subduction from the Eocene to the Pliocene. In all cases, normal arc magmatism was interrupted or eliminated by anomalous igneous activity ranging in signature from adakitic to intraplate. Our current research involves geochemical, tectonic, and thermal modeling of slab window environments. A new geochemical analysis on the effects of Miocene to Recent subduction of the northern segment of the Farallon (Juan de Fuca)-Pacific ridge is underway. A symmetrical arc-intraplate-arc geochemical pattern is evident in a transect from the northern Cascade Arc, through the volcanic fields of British Columbia, Yukon and eastern Alaska, and into the Aleutian Arc. This pattern can be explained by Neogene displacement of the arc-metasomatized mantle wedge caused by upwelling oceanic

  19. The Sagatu Ridge dike swarm, Ethiopian rift margin. [tectonic evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohr, P. A.; Potter, E. C.

    1976-01-01

    A swarm of dikes forms the core of the Sagatu Ridge, a 70-km-long topographic feature elevated to more than 4000 m above sea level and 1500 m above the level of the Eastern (Somalian) plateau. The ridge trends NNE and lies about 50 km east of the northeasterly trending rift-valley margin. Intrusion of the dikes and buildup of the flood-lava pile, largely hawaiitic but with trachyte preponderant in the final stages, occurred during the late Pliocene-early Pleistocene and may have been contemporaneous with downwarping of the protorift trough to the west. The ensuing faulting that formed the present rift margin, however, bypassed the ridge. The peculiar situation and orientation of the Sagatu Ridge, and its temporary existence as a line of crustal extension and voluminous magmatism, are considered related to a powerful structural control by a major line of Precambrian crustal weakness, well exposed further south. Transverse rift structures of unknown type appear to have limited the development of the ridge to the north and south.

  20. Pb isotopes in sulfides from mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal sites

    SciTech Connect

    LeHuray, A.P.; Church, S.E.; Koski, R.A.; Bouse, R.M.

    1988-04-01

    The authors report Pb isotope ratios of sulfides deposited at seven recently active mid-ocean ridge (MOR) hydrothermal vents. Sulfides from three sediment-starved sites on the Juan de Fuca Ridge contain Pb with isotope ratios identical to their local basaltic sources. Lead in two deposits from the sediment-covered Escanaba Trough, Gorda Ridge, is derived from the sediments and does not appear to contain any basaltic component. There is a range of isotope ratios in a Guaymas Basin deposit, consistent with a mixture of sediment and MOR basalt Pb. Lead in a Galapagos deposit differs slightly from known Galapagos basalt Pb isotope values. The faithful record of Pb isotope signatures of local sources in MOR sulfides indicates that isotope ratios from ancient analogues ca be used as accurate reflections of ancient oceanic crustal values in ophiolite-hosted deposits and continental crustal averages in sediment-hosted deposits. The preservation of primary ophiolitic or continental crustal Pb isotope signatures in ancient MOR sulfides provides a powerful tool for investigation of crustal evolution and for fingerprinting ancient terranes.

  1. Depth to the Juan De Fuca slab beneath the Cascadia subduction margin - a 3-D model for sorting earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCrory, Patricia A.; Blair, J. Luke; Oppenheimer, David H.; Walter, Stephen R.

    2004-01-01

    We present an updated model of the Juan de Fuca slab beneath southern British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, and northern California, and use this model to separate earthquakes occurring above and below the slab surface. The model is based on depth contours previously published by Fluck and others (1997). Our model attempts to rectify a number of shortcomings in the original model and update it with new work. The most significant improvements include (1) a gridded slab surface in geo-referenced (ArcGIS) format, (2) continuation of the slab surface to its full northern and southern edges, (3) extension of the slab surface from 50-km depth down to 110-km beneath the Cascade arc volcanoes, and (4) revision of the slab shape based on new seismic-reflection and seismic-refraction studies. We have used this surface to sort earthquakes and present some general observations and interpretations of seismicity patterns revealed by our analysis. For example, deep earthquakes within the Juan de Fuca Plate beneath western Washington define a linear trend that may mark a tear within the subducting plate Also earthquakes associated with the northern stands of the San Andreas Fault abruptly terminate at the inferred southern boundary of the Juan de Fuca slab. In addition, we provide files of earthquakes above and below the slab surface and a 3-D animation or fly-through showing a shaded-relief map with plate boundaries, the slab surface, and hypocenters for use as a visualization tool.

  2. Slab stagnation and detachment under northeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Satoru

    2016-03-01

    Results of tomography models around the Japanese Islands show the existence of a gap between the horizontally lying (stagnant) slab extending under northeastern China and the fast seismic velocity anomaly in the lower mantle. A simple conversion from the fast velocity anomaly to the low-temperature anomaly shows a similar feature. This feature appears to be inconsistent with the results of numerical simulations on the interaction between the slab and phase transitions with temperature-dependent viscosity. Such numerical models predict a continuous slab throughout the mantle. I extend previous analyses of the tomography model and model calculations to infer the origins of the gap beneath northeastern China. Results of numerical simulations that take the geologic history of the subduction zone into account suggest two possible origins for the gap: (1) the opening of the Japan Sea led to a breaking off of the otherwise continuous subducting slab, or (2) the western edge of the stagnant slab is the previous subducted ridge, which was the plate boundary between the extinct Izanagi and the Pacific plates. Origin (2) suggesting the present horizontally lying slab has accumulated since the ridge subduction, is preferable for explaining the present length of the horizontally lying slab in the upper mantle. Numerical models of origin (1) predict a stagnant slab in the upper mantle that is too short, and a narrow or non-existent gap. Preferred models require rather stronger flow resistance of the 660-km phase change than expected from current estimates of the phase transition property. Future detailed estimates of the amount of the subducted Izanagi plate and the present stagnant slab would be useful to constrain models. A systematic along-arc variation of the slab morphology from the northeast Japan to Kurile arcs is also recognized, and its understanding may constrain the 3D mantle flow there.

  3. Rapid cooling rates at an active mid-ocean ridge from zircon thermochronology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmitt, Axel K.; Perfit, Michael R.; Rubin, Kenneth H.; Stockli, Daniel F.; Smith, Matthew C.; Cotsonika, Laurie A.; Zellmer, Georg F.; Ridley, W. Ian

    2011-01-01

    Oceanic spreading ridges are Earth's most productive crust generating environment, but mechanisms and rates of crustal accretion and heat loss are debated. Existing observations on cooling rates are ambiguous regarding the prevalence of conductive vs. convective cooling of lower oceanic crust. Here, we report the discovery and dating of zircon in mid-ocean ridge dacite lavas that constrain magmatic differentiation and cooling rates at an active spreading center. Dacitic lavas erupted on the southern Cleft segment of the Juan de Fuca ridge, an intermediate-rate spreading center, near the intersection with the Blanco transform fault. Their U–Th zircon crystallization ages (29.3-4.6+4.8 ka; 1δ standard error s.e.) overlap with the (U–Th)/He zircon eruption age (32.7 ± 1.6 ka) within uncertainty. Based on similar 238U-230Th disequilibria between southern Cleft dacite glass separates and young mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) erupted nearby, differentiation must have occurred rapidly, within ~ 10–20 ka at most. Ti-in-zircon thermometry indicates crystallization at 850–900 °C and pressures > 70–150 MPa are calculated from H2O solubility models. These time-temperature constraints translate into a magma cooling rate of ~ 2 × 10-2 °C/a. This rate is at least one order-of-magnitude faster than those calculated for zircon-bearing plutonic rocks from slow spreading ridges. Such short intervals for differentiation and cooling can only be resolved through uranium-series (238U–230Th) decay in young lavas, and are best explained by dissipating heat convectively at high crustal permeability.

  4. Rapid cooling rates at an active mid-ocean ridge from zircon thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Axel K.; Perfit, Michael R.; Rubin, Kenneth H.; Stockli, Daniel F.; Smith, Matthew C.; Cotsonika, Laurie A.; Zellmer, Georg F.; Ridley, W. Ian; Lovera, Oscar M.

    2011-02-01

    Oceanic spreading ridges are Earth's most productive crust generating environment, but mechanisms and rates of crustal accretion and heat loss are debated. Existing observations on cooling rates are ambiguous regarding the prevalence of conductive vs. convective cooling of lower oceanic crust. Here, we report the discovery and dating of zircon in mid-ocean ridge dacite lavas that constrain magmatic differentiation and cooling rates at an active spreading center. Dacitic lavas erupted on the southern Cleft segment of the Juan de Fuca ridge, an intermediate-rate spreading center, near the intersection with the Blanco transform fault. Their U-Th zircon crystallization ages (29.3 - 4.6 + 4.8 ka; 1σ standard error s.e.) overlap with the (U-Th)/He zircon eruption age (32.7 ± 1.6 ka) within uncertainty. Based on similar 238U- 230Th disequilibria between southern Cleft dacite glass separates and young mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) erupted nearby, differentiation must have occurred rapidly, within ~ 10-20 ka at most. Ti-in-zircon thermometry indicates crystallization at 850-900 °C and pressures > 70-150 MPa are calculated from H 2O solubility models. These time-temperature constraints translate into a magma cooling rate of ~ 2 × 10 - 2 °C/a. This rate is at least one order-of-magnitude faster than those calculated for zircon-bearing plutonic rocks from slow spreading ridges. Such short intervals for differentiation and cooling can only be resolved through uranium-series ( 238U- 230Th) decay in young lavas, and are best explained by dissipating heat convectively at high crustal permeability.

  5. Advanced Seismic Studies of the Endeavour Ridge: Understanding the Interplay among Magmatic, Hydrothermal, and Tectonic Processes at Mid-Ocean Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnoux, G. M.; VanderBeek, B. P.; Morgan, J. V.; Hooft, E. E. E.; Toomey, D. R.; Wilcock, W. S. D.; Warner, M.

    2014-12-01

    At mid-ocean ridges magmatic, hydrothermal, and tectonic processes are linked. Understanding their interactions requires mapping magmatic systems and tectonic structures, as well as their relationship to hydrothermal circulation. Three-dimensional seismic images of the crust can be used to infer the size, shape, and location of magma reservoirs, in addition to the structure of the thermal boundary layer that connects magmatic and hydrothermal processes. Travel time tomography has often been used to study these processes, however, the spatial resolution of travel time tomography is limited. Three-dimensional full waveform inversion (FWI) is a state-of-the art seismic method developed for use in the oil industry to obtain high-resolution models of the velocity structure. The primary advantage of FWI is that it has the potential to resolve subsurface structures on the order of half the seismic wavelength—a significant improvement on conventional travel time tomography. Here, we apply anisotropic FWI to data collected on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Starting models for anisotropic P-wave velocity were obtained by travel time tomography [Weekly et al., 2014]. During FWI, the isotropic velocity model is updated and anisotropy is held constant. We have recovered low-velocity zones approximately 2-3 km beneath the ridge axis that likely correspond to a segmented magma-rich body and are in concert with those previously resolved using multi-channel seismic reflection methods. The segmented crustal magma body underlies all five known high-temperature hydrothermal vent fields along the Endeavour segment. A high-velocity zone, shallower than the observed low-velocity zones, underlies the southernmost hydrothermal vent field. This may be indicative of waning hydrothermal activity in which minerals are crystallizing beneath the vent field. Our FWI study of the Endeavour Ridge will provide the most detailed three-dimensional images of the crustal structure to

  6. Spatial and temporal distribution of the seismicity along two mid-oceanic ridges with contrasted spreading rates in the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang-Hin-Sun, E.; Perrot, J.; Royer, J. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The seismicity of the ultra-slow spreading Southwest (14 mm/y) and intermediate spreading Southeast (60 mm/y) Indian ridges was monitored from February 2012 to March 2013 by the OHASISBIO array of 7 autonomous hydrophones. A total of 1471 events were located with 4 instruments or more, inside the array, with a median location uncertainty < 5 km and a completeness magnitude of mb = 3. Both ridges display similar average rates of seismicity, suggesting that there is no systematic relationship between seismicity and spreading rates. Accretion modes do differ, however, by the along-axis distribution of the seismic events. Along the ultra-slow Southwest Indian Ridge, events are sparse but regularly spaced and scattered up to 50 km off-axis. Along the fast Southeast Indian Ridge, events are irregularly distributed, focusing in narrow regions near the ridge axis at segment ends and along transform faults, whereas ridge-segment centers generally appear as seismic gaps (at the level of completeness of the array). Only two clusters, 6 months apart, are identified in a segment-center at 29°S. From the temporal distribution of the clustered events and comparisons with observations in similar mid-oceanic ridge setting, both clusters seem to have a volcanic origin and to be related to a dike emplacement or a possible eruption on the seafloor. Their onset time and migration rate are comparable to volcanic swarms recorded along the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Overall, the rate of seismicity along the two Indian spreading ridges correlates with the large-scale variations in the bathymetry and shear-wave velocity anomaly in the upper mantle, suggesting that the distribution of the low-magnitude seismicity is mainly controlled by along-axis variations in the lithosphere rheology and temperature.

  7. Helium as a tracer for fluids released from Juan de Fuca lithosphere beneath the Cascadia forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCrory, P. A.; Constantz, J. E.; Hunt, A. G.; Blair, J. L.

    2016-06-01

    Helium isotopic ratios (3He/4He) observed in 25 mineral springs and wells above the Cascadia forearc provide a marker for fluids derived from Juan de Fuca lithosphere. This exploratory study documents a significant component of mantle-derived helium within forearc springs and wells, and in turn, documents variability in helium enrichment across the Cascadia forearc. Sample sites arcward of the forearc mantle corner generally yield significantly higher ratios (˜1.2-4.0 RA) than those seaward of the corner (˜0.03-0.7 RA). 3He detected above the inner forearc mantle wedge may represent a mixture of both oceanic lithosphere and forearc mantle sources, whereas 3He detected seaward of the forearc mantle corner likely has only an oceanic source. The highest ratios in the Cascadia forearc coincide with slab depths (˜40-45 km) where metamorphic dehydration of young oceanic lithosphere is expected to release significant fluid and where tectonic tremor occurs, whereas little fluid is expected to be released from the slab depths (˜25-30 km) beneath sites seaward of the corner. These observations provide independent evidence that tremor is associated with deep fluids, and further suggest that high pore pressures associated with tremor may serve to keep fractures open for 3He migration through the ductile upper mantle and lower crust.

  8. Dacite petrogenesis on mid-ocean ridges: Evidence for oceanic crustal melting and assimilation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wanless, V.D.; Perfit, M.R.; Ridley, W.I.; Klein, E.

    2010-01-01

    Whereas the majority of eruptions at oceanic spreading centers produce lavas with relatively homogeneous mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) compositions, the formation of tholeiitic andesites and dacites at mid-ocean ridges (MORs) is a petrological enigma. Eruptions of MOR high-silica lavas are typically associated with ridge discontinuities and have produced regionally significant volumes of lava. Andesites and dacites have been observed and sampled at several locations along the global MOR system; these include propagating ridge tips at ridge-transform intersections on the Juan de Fuca Ridge and eastern Gal??pagos spreading center, and at the 9??N overlapping spreading center on the East Pacific Rise. Despite the formation of these lavas at various ridges, MOR dacites show remarkably similar major element trends and incompatible trace element enrichments, suggesting that similar processes are controlling their chemistry. Although most geochemical variability in MOR basalts is consistent with low-pressure fractional crystallization of various mantle-derived parental melts, our geochemical data for MOR dacitic glasses suggest that contamination from a seawater-altered component is important in their petrogenesis. MOR dacites are characterized by elevated U, Th, Zr, and Hf, low Nb and Ta concentrations relative to rare earth elements (REE), and Al2O3, K2O, and Cl concentrations that are higher than expected from low-pressure fractional crystallization alone. Petrological modeling of MOR dacites suggests that partial melting and assimilation are both integral to their petrogenesis. Extensive fractional crystallization of a MORB parent combined with partial melting and assimilation of amphibole-bearing altered crust produces a magma with a geochemical signature similar to a MOR dacite. This supports the hypothesis that crustal assimilation is an important process in the formation of highly evolved MOR lavas and may be significant in the generation of evolved MORB in

  9. Petrogenesis of Near-Ridge Seamounts: AN Investigation of Mantle Source Heterogeneity and Melting Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, N. L.; Perfit, M. R.; Lundstrom, C.; Clague, D. A.

    2010-12-01

    Near-ridge (NR) seamounts offer an important opportunity to study lavas that have similar sources to ridge basalts but have been less affected by fractionation and homogenization that takes place at adjacent spreading ridge axes. By studying lavas erupted at these off-axis sites, we have the potential to better understand source heterogeneity and melting and transport processes that can be applied to the ridge system as a whole. One purpose of our study is to investigate the role of dunite conduits in the formation of near-ridge seamount chains. We believe that near-ridge seamounts could form due to focusing of melts in dunite channels located slightly off-axis and that such conduits may be important in the formation and transport of melt both on- and off-axis (Lundstrom et al., 2000). New trace element and isotopic analyses of glasses from Rogue, Hacksaw, and T461 seamounts near the Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdFR), the Lamont Seamounts adjacent to the East Pacific Rise (EPR) ~ 10°N, and the Vance Seamounts next to the JdFR ~45°N provide a better understanding of the petrogenesis of NR seamounts. Our data indicate that lavas from these seamounts have diverse incompatible trace element compositions that range from highly depleted to slightly enriched in comparison to associated ridge basalts. Vance A lavas (the oldest in the Vance chain) have the most enriched signatures and lavas from Rogue seamount on the JdFR plate have the most depleted signatures. Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic ratios indicate that NR seamount lava compositions vary within the chains as well as within individual seamounts, and that there is some mixing between heterogeneous, small-scale mantle sources. Using the program PRIMELT2.XLS (Herzberg and Asimow, 2008), we calculated mantle potential temperatures (Tp) for some of the most primitive basalts erupted at these seamounts. Our data indicate that NR seamount lavas have Tp values that are only slightly higher than that of average ambient mantle. Variations in

  10. Mantle plume capture, anchoring, and outflow during Galápagos plume-ridge interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, S. A.; Geist, D. J.; Richards, M. A.

    2015-05-01

    Compositions of basalts erupted between the main zone of Galápagos plume upwelling and adjacent Galápagos Spreading Center (GSC) provide important constraints on dynamic processes involved in transfer of deep-mantle-sourced material to mid-ocean ridges. We examine recent basalts from central and northeast Galápagos including some that have less radiogenic Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic compositions than plume-influenced basalts (E-MORB) from the nearby ridge. We show that the location of E-MORB, greatest crustal thickness, and elevated topography on the GSC correlates with a confined zone of low-velocity, high-temperature mantle connecting the plume stem and ridge at depths of ˜100 km. At this site on the ridge, plume-driven upwelling involving deep melting of partially dehydrated, recycled ancient oceanic crust, plus plate-limited shallow melting of anhydrous peridotite, generate E-MORB and larger amounts of melt than elsewhere on the GSC. The first-order control on plume stem to ridge flow is rheological rather than gravitational, and strongly influenced by flow regimes initiated when the plume was on axis (>5 Ma). During subsequent northeast ridge migration material upwelling in the plume stem appears to have remained "anchored" to a contact point on the GSC. This deep, confined NE plume stem-to-ridge flow occurs via a network of melt channels, embedded within the normal spreading and advection of plume material beneath the Nazca plate, and coincides with locations of historic volcanism. Our observations require a more dynamically complex model than proposed by most studies, which rely on radial solid-state outflow of heterogeneous plume material to the ridge.

  11. Remedial investigation work plan for Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 4 (Rogers Quarry/Lower McCoy Branch) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant includes - 800 acres near the northeast comer of the reservation and adjacent to the city of Oak Ridge (Fig. 1-1). The plant is a manufacturing and developmental engineering facility that produced components for various nuclear weapons systems and provides engineering support to other Energy Systems facilities. More than 200 contaminated sites have been identified at the Y-12 Plant that resulted from past waste management practices. Many of the sites have operable units (OUs) based on priority and on investigative and remediation requirements. This Remedial Investigation RI work plan specifically addresses Chestnut Ridge OU 4. Chestnut Ridge OU 4 consists of Rogers Quarry and Lower McCoy Branch (MCB). Rogers Quarry, which is also known as Old Rogers Quarry or Bethel Valley Quarry was used for quarrying from the late 1940s or early 1950s until about 1960. Since that time, the quarry has been used for disposal of coal ash and materials from Y-12 production operations, including classified materials. Disposal of coal ash ended in July 1993. An RI is being conducted at this site in response to CERCLA regulations. The overall objectives of the RI are to collect data necessary to evaluate the nature and extent of contaminants of concern, support an Ecological Risk Assessment and a Human Health Risk Assessment, support the evaluation of remedial alternatives, and ultimately develop a Record of Decision for the site. The purpose of this work plan is to outline RI activities necessary to define the nature and extent of suspected contaminants at Chestnut Ridge OU 4. Potential migration pathways also will be investigated. Data collected during the RI will be used to evaluate the risk posed to human health and the environment by OU 4.

  12. Sub-km HIMU-type Enriched Mantle at a Mid-ocean Ridge Far From a Plume: Endeavour, JdFR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, J. B.; Michael, P. J.; Dreyer, B. M.; Clague, D. A.; Ramos, F. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge is characterized by abundant enriched (E) MORB since the currently inflated axial ridge formed <105 years ago, and by the full range of depleted (D) to E-MORB during the last 2300 years in the km-wide axial graben. Two different styles of enrichment of moderately incompatible elements are present. The first characterized basalts across the ~5 km-wide ridge from >10,000 to ~4000 years ago, whereas the second characterizes more recent basalts erupted in the axial graben. We attribute the first to a higher proportion of pyroxenite to enriched peridotite in the mantle source during ridge inflation. The more recent style reflects the reduced role of pyroxenite after the axial graben formed. The enriched component for both styles is a HIMU-type because it has low 87Sr/86Sr and 176Hf/177Hf relative to 143Nd/144Nd, lower 3He/4He (~8.1 RA) than in the more depleted basalts, shallow slopes on Pb isotope diagrams, and high Nb/LREE ratios. It is regionally widespread and shared with the West Valley and Explorer segments to the north. At least 14 different samplings of mantle components occurred within <1 km of ridge length and width during a time when <1 km of upwelling occurred, indicating that the scale of mantle heterogeneity is <1 km in this setting that is far from a plume.

  13. Geodynamics map of northeast Asia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parfenov, Leonid M.; Khanchuk, Alexander I.; Badarch, Gombosuren; Miller, Robert J.; Naumova, Vera V.; Nokleberg, Warren J.; Ogasawara, Masatsugu; Prokopiev, Andrei V.; Yan, Hongquan

    2013-01-01

    This map portrays the geodynamics of Northeast Asia at a scale of 1:5,000,000 using the concepts of plate tectonics and analysis of terranes and overlap assemblages. The map is the result of a detailed compilation and synthesis at 5 million scale and is part of a major international collaborative study of the mineral resources, metallogenesis, and tectonics of northeast Asia conducted from 1997 through 2002 by geologists from earth science agencies and universities in Russia, Mongolia, northeastern China, South Korea, Japan, and the USA.

  14. Late Neogene geohistory analysis of the Humboldt basin and its relationship to convergence of the Juan de Fuca plate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCrory, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    Geohistory analysis of Neogene Humboldt basin strata provides important constraints for hypotheses of the tectonic evolution of the southern Cascadia subduction margin, leading up to the arrival of the Mendocino triple junction. This analysis suggests that the tectonic evolution of the Humboldt basin area was dominated by coupling between the downgoing Juan de Fuca plate and the continental margin. This coupling is reflected in the timing of major hiatuses within the basin sedimentary sequence and margin uplift and subsidence which occur during periods of tectonic plate adjustment. -from Author

  15. High-resolution mapping of ice-marginal landforms in the Barnim region, northeast Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardt, Jacob; Hebenstreit, Robert; Lüthgens, Christopher; Böse, Margot

    2015-12-01

    Despite more than a 100-year-long research history, timing and position of the last glacial ice margins in the northeast German lowland are still up for debate. The Barnim region, a till plain in the northeast German young morainic landscape, is traversed by the contradictorily discussed Frankfurt ice marginal position. It is located in a key position to reassess the current state of research with help of a geographic information system (GIS) and field methods. A qualitative geomorphological analysis of a high resolution LiDAR digital elevation model (DEM) in the Barnim area uncovers a variety of landforms that were previously not described. The most prominent discovery is a set of about 10 lobe-shaped ridges in the middle Barnim area. Fieldwork and geophysical measurements were carried out to investigate the structure of the ridges. The ridges are 1000-1500 m in length and their widths vary from 10 to 15 km. They are raised some 6-10 m from their surroundings. The Frankfurt ice marginal position can only partially be traced in the DEM. Sedimentological and geophysical investigations indicate that the ridges are composed of glacial till that was deposited on glaciofluvial sediments. Their formation most probably took place during the ice retreat of the Brandenburg phase (W1B) and hence represents the W1F phase in the region.

  16. Microbial community in black rust exposed to hot ridge flank crustal fluids.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Satoshi; Inagaki, Fumio; Suzuki, Yohey; Steinsbu, Bjørn Olav; Lever, Mark Alexander; Takai, Ken; Engelen, Bert; Sako, Yoshihiko; Wheat, Charles Geoffrey; Horikoshi, Koki

    2006-10-01

    During Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 301, we obtained a sample of black rust from a circulation obviation retrofit kit (CORK) observatory at a borehole on the eastern flank of Juan de Fuca Ridge. Due to overpressure, the CORK had failed to seal the borehole. Hot fluids from oceanic crust had discharged to the overlying bottom seawater and resulted in the formation of black rust analogous to a hydrothermal chimney deposit. Both culture-dependent and culture-independent analyses indicated that the black-rust-associated community differed from communities reported from other microbial habitats, including hydrothermal vents at seafloor spreading centers, while it shared phylotypes with communities previously detected in crustal fluids from the same borehole. The most frequently retrieved sequences of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes were related to the genera Ammonifex and Methanothermococcus, respectively. Most phylotypes, including phylotypes previously detected in crustal fluids, were isolated in pure culture, and their metabolic traits were determined. Quantification of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsrAB) genes, together with stable sulfur isotopic and electron microscopic analyses, strongly suggested the prevalence of sulfate reduction, potentially by the Ammonifex group of bacteria. Stable carbon isotopic analyses suggested that the bulk of the microbial community was trophically reliant upon photosynthesis-derived organic matter. This report provides important insights into the phylogenetic, physiological, and trophic characteristics of subseafloor microbial ecosystems in warm ridge flank crusts.

  17. Microbial community in black rust exposed to hot ridge flank crustal fluids.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Satoshi; Inagaki, Fumio; Suzuki, Yohey; Steinsbu, Bjørn Olav; Lever, Mark Alexander; Takai, Ken; Engelen, Bert; Sako, Yoshihiko; Wheat, Charles Geoffrey; Horikoshi, Koki

    2006-10-01

    During Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 301, we obtained a sample of black rust from a circulation obviation retrofit kit (CORK) observatory at a borehole on the eastern flank of Juan de Fuca Ridge. Due to overpressure, the CORK had failed to seal the borehole. Hot fluids from oceanic crust had discharged to the overlying bottom seawater and resulted in the formation of black rust analogous to a hydrothermal chimney deposit. Both culture-dependent and culture-independent analyses indicated that the black-rust-associated community differed from communities reported from other microbial habitats, including hydrothermal vents at seafloor spreading centers, while it shared phylotypes with communities previously detected in crustal fluids from the same borehole. The most frequently retrieved sequences of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes were related to the genera Ammonifex and Methanothermococcus, respectively. Most phylotypes, including phylotypes previously detected in crustal fluids, were isolated in pure culture, and their metabolic traits were determined. Quantification of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsrAB) genes, together with stable sulfur isotopic and electron microscopic analyses, strongly suggested the prevalence of sulfate reduction, potentially by the Ammonifex group of bacteria. Stable carbon isotopic analyses suggested that the bulk of the microbial community was trophically reliant upon photosynthesis-derived organic matter. This report provides important insights into the phylogenetic, physiological, and trophic characteristics of subseafloor microbial ecosystems in warm ridge flank crusts. PMID:17021232

  18. Hydrothermal recharge and discharge across 50 km guided by seamounts on a young ridge flank.

    PubMed

    Fisher, A T; Davis, E E; Hutnak, M; Spiess, V; Zühlsdorff, L; Cherkaoui, A; Christiansen, L; Edwards, K; Macdonald, R; Villinger, H; Mottl, M J; Wheat, C G; Becker, K

    2003-02-01

    Hydrothermal circulation within the sea floor, through lithosphere older than one million years (Myr), is responsible for 30% of the energy released from plate cooling, and for 70% of the global heat flow anomaly (the difference between observed thermal output and that predicted by conductive cooling models). Hydrothermal fluids remove significant amounts of heat from the oceanic lithosphere for plates typically up to about 65 Myr old. But in view of the relatively impermeable sediments that cover most ridge flanks, it has been difficult to explain how these fluids transport heat from the crust to the ocean. Here we present results of swath mapping, heat flow, geochemistry and seismic surveys from the young eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca ridge, which show that isolated basement outcrops penetrating through thick sediments guide hydrothermal discharge and recharge between sites separated by more than 50 km. Our analyses reveal distinct thermal patterns at the sea floor adjacent to recharging and discharging outcrops. We find that such a circulation through basement outcrops can be sustained in a setting of pressure differences and crustal properties as reported in independent observations and modelling studies.

  19. SeaVOICE: Sea-going Experiments to Test Potential Linkages among Sea Level Change, Ocean Ridge Volcanism, and Hydrothermal Activity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langmuir, C. H.; Carbotte, S. M.; Huybers, P. J.; McManus, J. F.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Winckler, G.; Boulahanis, B.; Costa, K.; Ferguson, D.; Katz, R. F.; Li, Y.; Middleton, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Changes in sea level influence the pressure of the solid Earth over entire ocean basins. While the absolute changes in sea level caused by glacial cycles are small relative to ocean depths, the temporal variations in sea level can lead to pressure changes of similar order to mantle upwelling rates, with the potential to significantly perturb short term rates of melt production at ocean ridges (Huybers and Langmuir, EPSL, 2009). Such changes could then lead to fluctuations in crustal thickness, magma composition and hydrothermal activity. To investigate possible relationships between glacial cycles and ocean ridge processes, we carried out an 18 day cruise of mapping and sediment coring to the Cleft Segment of the Juan de Fuca ridge. High resolution bathymetry was obtained on the west side of the ridge axis to beyond 1Ma to test whether abyssal hill fabric shows periodicities consistent with glacial cycles. Nine successful piston cores up to 7.6m in length provide a sedimentary record back to more than 600kyr to test for spatial and temporal variations in hydrothermal activity. Oxygen isotope stratigraphy on these cores is systematic and provides good age constraints. Short cores near the ridge axis provide a record of the current trace of hydrothermal activity in youngest sediments. Several of the cores impacted basement and recovered a basement sample. Above basement, basaltic glass shards were recovered in the bottom meter of sediment, raising the possibility of temporal records of basalt chemical compositions using the age constraints the sediments provide. The glass samples provide a unique and new perspective on ridge volcanism, since previous off-axis samples were restricted to dredging old fault scarps. Cores can be taken anywhere, raising the potential for global time series studies of ridge volcanism. The coupled bathymetry, sediment geochemistry and magmatic glass compositions hold the promise of a definitive advance in our understanding of the

  20. Triassic/Jurassic faulting patterns of Conecuh Ridge, southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Hutley, J.K.

    1985-02-01

    Two major fault systems influenced Jurassic structure and deposition on the Conecuh Ridge, southwest Alabama. Identification and dating of these fault systems are based on seismic-stratigraphic interpretation of a 7-township grid in Monroe and Conecuh Counties. Relative time of faulting is determined by fault geometry and by formation isopachs and isochrons. Smackover and Norphlet Formations, both Late Jurassic in age, are mappable seismic reflectors and are thus reliable for seismicstratigraphic dating. The earlier of the 2 fault systems is a series of horsts and grabens that trends northeast-southwest and is Late Triassic to Early Jurassic in age. The system formed in response to tensional stress associated with the opening of the Atlantic Ocean. The resulting topography was a series of northeast-southwest-trending ridges. Upper Triassic Eagle Mills and Jurassic Werner Formations were deposited in the grabens. The later fault system is also a series of horsts and grabens trending perpendicular to the first. This system was caused by tensional stress related to a pulse in the opening of the Gulf of Mexico. Faulting began in Early Jurassic and continued into Late Jurassic, becoming progressively younger basinward. At the basin margin, faulting produced a very irregular shoreline. Submerged horst blocks became centers for shoaling or carbonate buildups. Today, these blocks are exploration targets in southwest Alabama.

  1. Contextual view of Point Bonita Ridge, showing Bonita Ridge access ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Contextual view of Point Bonita Ridge, showing Bonita Ridge access road retaining wall and location of Signal Corps Radar (S.C.R.) 296 Station 5 Transmitter Building foundation (see stake at center left), camera facing north - Fort Barry, Signal Corps Radar 296, Station 5, Transmitter Building Foundation, Point Bonita, Marin Headlands, Sausalito, Marin County, CA

  2. Near-ridge seamount chains in the northeastern Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clague, David A.; Reynolds, Jennifer R.; Davis, Alicé S.

    2000-07-01

    High-resolution bathymetry and side-scan data of the Vance, President Jackson, and Taney near-ridge seamount chains in the northeast Pacific were collected with a hull-mounted 30-kHz sonar. The central volcanoes in each chain consist of truncated cone-shaped volcanoes with steep sides and nearly flat tops. Several areas are characterized by frequent small eruptions that result in disorganized volcanic regions with numerous small cones and volcanic ridges but no organized truncated conical structure. Several volcanoes are crosscut by ridge-parallel faults, showing that they formed within 30-40 km of the ridge axis where ridge-parallel faulting is still active. Magmas that built the volcanoes were probably transported through the crust along active ridge-parallel faults. The volcanoes range in volume from 11 to 187 km3, and most have one or more multiple craters and calderas that modify their summits and flanks. The craters (<1 km diameter) and calderas (>1 km diameter) range from small pit craters to calderas as large as 6.5×8.5 km, although most are 2-4 km across. Crosscutting relationships commonly show a sequence of calderas stepping toward the ridge axis. The calderas overlie crustal magma chambers at least as large as those that underlie Kilauea and Mauna Loa Volcanoes in Hawaii, perhaps 4-5 km in diameter and ˜1-3 km below the surface. The nearly flat tops of many of the volcanoes have remnants of centrally located summit shields, suggesting that their flat tops did not form from eruptions along circumferential ring faults but instead form by filling and overflowing of earlier large calderas. The lavas retain their primitive character by residing in such chambers for only short time periods prior to eruption. Stored magmas are withdrawn, probably as dikes intruded into the adjacent ocean crust along active ridge-parallel faults, triggering caldera collapse, or solidified before the next batch of magma is intruded into the volcano, probably 1000-10,000 years

  3. Height ridges of oriented medialness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furst, Jacob David

    Shape analysis of objects is an important aspect of medical image processing. Information gained from shape analysis can be used for object segmentation, object- based registration and object visualization. One shape analysis tool is the core, defined to be a height ridge of a medial strength measure made on an image. In this dissertation I present 3D cores, defined here to be optimal scale-orientation height ridges of oriented medial strength measurements. This dissertation covers (1)a medial strength measurement, Blum- like medialness, that is robust, efficient, and insensitive to intrafigural interference, (2)a new definition for a ridge, the optimal parameter height ridge, and its properties, and (3)an algorithm, Marching Ridges, for extracting cores. The medial strength measurement uses Gaussian derivatives, so is insensitive to noise, and responds to object boundaries at points rather than on entire spheres, so is faster to calculate and less sensitive to boundaries of other image figures. The Marching Ridges algorithm uses the grid structure of the image domain to identify ridge points as zero-crossings of first derivatives and to track ridges through the image domain. I include results of this algorithm on medical images of cerebral vasculature, a skull, kidneys, and brain ventricles.

  4. Late Neogene geohistory analysis of the Humboldt Basin and its relationship to convergence of the Juan de Fuca Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCrory, Patricia A.

    1989-03-01

    Geohistory analysis of Neogene Humboldt basin strata provides important constraints for hypotheses of the tectonic evolution of the southern Cascadia subduction margin, leading up to the arrival of the Mendocino triple junction. This analysis suggests that the tectonic evolution of the Humboldt basin area was dominated by coupling between the downgoing Juan de Fuca plate and the continental margin. This coupling is reflected in the timing of major hiatuses within the basin sedimentary sequence and margin uplift and subsidence which occur during periods of tectonic plate adjustment. Stratigraphic evidence indicates that Humboldt basin originated at the base of the continental slope in early Miocene time. Syndepositional uplift of basin strata began in the late Pliocene and was both thermal isostatic and tectonic in origin. Isostatic uplift was a function of an increasingly more buoyant slab being subducted, whereas tectonic uplift was due to imbricated thrusting of the accretionary complex and underplating of offscraped sediment during subduction. A component of margin uplift is postulated to have been caused by a change in the rate of convergence between the Juan de Fuca and North American plates. Coeval with late Pliocene uplift documented onshore was a sharp decrease in covergence rate ˜3 Ma. A reduction in rate of tectonic uplift, observed in the Eel River section, in early Pleistocene time was coeval with a marked increase in relative motion parallel to the continental margin. This localized subsidence may have been caused by syndepositional folding.

  5. Polygonal Ridge Networks on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerber, Laura; Dickson, James; Grosfils, Eric; Head, James W.

    2016-10-01

    Polygonal ridge networks, also known as boxwork or reticulate ridges, are found in numerous locations and geological contexts across Mars. While networks formed from mineralized fractures hint at hot, possibly life-sustaining circulating ground waters, networks formed by impact-driven clasting diking, magmatic dikes, gas escape, or lava flows do not have the same astrobiological implications. Distinguishing the morphologies and geological context of the ridge networks sheds light on their potential as astrobiological and mineral resource sites of interest. The most widespread type of ridge morphology is characteristic of the Nili Fossae and Nilosyrtis region and consists of thin, criss-crossing ridges with a variety of heights, widths, and intersection angles. They are found in ancient Noachian terrains at a variety of altitudes and geographic locations and may be a mixture of clastic dikes, brecciated dikes, and mineral veins. They occur in the same general areas as valley networks and ancient lake basins, but they are not more numerous where these features are concentrated, and can appear in places where they morphologies are absent. Similarly, some of the ridge networks are associated with hydrated mineral detections, but some occur in locations without detections. Smaller, light-toned ridges of variable widths have been found in Gale Crater and other rover sites and are interpreted to be smaller version of the Nili-like ridges, in this case formed by the mineralization of fractures. This type of ridge is likely to be found in many other places on Mars as more high-resolution data becomes available. Hellas Basin is host to a third type of ridge morphology consisting of large, thick, light-toned ridges forming regular polygons at several superimposed scales. While still enigmatic, these are most likely to be the result of sediment-filled fractures. The Eastern Medusae Fossae Formation contains large swaths of a fourth, previously undocumented, ridge network type

  6. Remedial Investigation Report on Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 2 (Filled Coal Ash Pond/Upper McCoy Branch) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1. Main Text

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This document is a report on the remedial investigation (RI) of Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit (OU) 2 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Chestnut Ridge OU 2 consists of Upper McCoy Branch (UMB), the Filled Coal Ash Pond (FCAP), and the area surrounding the Sluice Channel formerly associated with coal ash disposal in the FCAP. Chestnut Ridge OU 2 is located within the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation in Anderson County, Tennessee, approximately 24 miles west of Knoxville. The pond is an 8.5-acre area on the southern slope of Chestnut Ridge, 0.5 mile south of the main Y-12 Plant and geographically separated from the Y-12 Plant by Chestnut Ridge. The elevation of the FCAP is {approximately} 950 ft above mean sea level (msl), and it is relatively flat and largely vegetated. Two small ponds are usually present at the northeast and northwest comers of the FCAP. The Sluice Channel Area extends {approximately}1000 ft from the northern margin of the FCAP to the crest of Chestnut Ridge, which has an elevation of {approximately}1100 ft above msl. The Sluice Channel Area is largely vegetated also. McCoy Branch runs from the top of Chestnut Ridge across the FCAP into Rogers Quarry and out of the quarry where it runs a short distance into Milton Hill Lake at McCoy Embayment, termed UMB. The portion south of Rogers Quarry, within Chestnut Ridge OU 4, is termed Lower McCoy Branch. The DOE Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant disposed of coal ash from its steam plant operations as a slurry that was discharged into an ash retention impoundment; this impoundment is the FCAP. The FCAP was built in 1955 to serve as a settling basin after coal ash slurried over Chestnut Ridge from the Y-12 Plant. The FCAP was constructed by building an earthen dam across the northern tributary of McCoy Branch. The dam was designed to hold 20 years of Y-12 steam plant ash. By July 1967, ash had filled up the impoundment storage behind the dam to within 4 ft of the top.

  7. Pre-breakup age of East Greenland Ridge strata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Tove; Bjerager, Morten; Lindström, Sofie; Nøhr-Hansen, Henrik; Lander Rasmussen, Tine

    2014-05-01

    The East Greenland Ridge (EGR) is a submarine elevation that juts out from the Northeast Greenland shelf, separating the modern Boreas Basin in north from the Greenland Basin in south. The EGR strikes roughly northwest-southeast and lies almost perpendicular to the Mohns Spreading Ridge and sub-parallel to the Knipovich Spreading Ridge. The EGR is about 320 km long and includes several en-echelon elongated crests. The flanks on either side of the EGR are generally high and steep, with escarpments exposing outcropping sub-strata. The EGR has been characterized as a continental sliver. However, this is based on analysis of seismic data only, while no direct evidence has hitherto been published to strengthen this interpretation. In 2012, two up-slope transects on the northeastern lower flank of the EGR were dredged by GEUS and UiT in order to obtain in-situ samples of the outcropping strata. Subsequent work by GEUS on the dredged samples was concentrated on lithological description and age determination of selected rock samples. The selected samples were either fresh and angular, or too soft to have survived long transport, and therefore interpreted to be in-situ or near in-situ (local and limited transported) and representative for the geology of the EGR. Some rock samples of greenish grey, slightly sandy mudstones were dated by palynological analysis to be of Late Triassic (Carnian) age, i.e. to pre-date the onset of seafloor spreading in this part of the Northeast Atlantic Ocean by more than 150 ma years. Notably, no basalts were dredged, which further supports the interpretation that the strata overlying the basement of the EGR is composed of pre-breakup sediments, and thus strengthen the characterization of the EGR as a continental sliver.

  8. Effect of ridge-ridge interactions in crumpled thin sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, Shiuan-Fan; Lo, Chun-Chao; Chou, Ming-Han; Hsiao, Pai-Yi; Hong, Tzay-Ming

    2014-02-01

    We study whether and how the energy scaling based on the single-ridge approximation is revised in an actual crumpled sheet, namely, in the presence of ridge-ridge interactions. Molecular dynamics simulation is employed for this purpose. In order to improve the data quality, modifications are introduced to the common protocol. As crumpling proceeds, we find that the average storing energy changes from being proportional to one-third of the ridge length to a linear relation, while the ratio of bending and stretching energies decreases from 5 to 2. The discrepancy between previous simulations and experiments on the material-dependence for the power-law exponent is resolved. We further determine the average ridge length to scale as 1/D1/3, the ridge number as D2/3, and the average storing energy per unit ridge length as D0.881 where D denotes the volume density of the crumpled ball. These results are accompanied by experimental proofs and are consistent with mean-field predictions. Finally, we extend the existent simulations to the high-pressure region and verify the existence of a scaling relation that is more general than the familiar power law at covering the whole density range.

  9. 33 CFR 334.1200 - Strait of Juan de Fuca, eastern end; off the westerly shore of Whidbey Island; naval restricted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... end; off the westerly shore of Whidbey Island; naval restricted areas. 334.1200 Section 334.1200... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1200 Strait of Juan de Fuca, eastern end; off the westerly shore...°40′26″ W.; and thence along the shore line to the point of beginning. (b) Area No. 2. Bounded by...

  10. Oak Ridge fault, Ventura fold belt, and the Sisar decollement, Ventura basin, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeats, Robert S.; Huftile, Gary J.; Grigsby, F. Bryan

    1988-12-01

    The rootless Ventura Avenue, San Miguelito, and Rincon anti-clines (Ventura fold belt) in Pliocene-Pleistocene turbidites are fault-propagation folds related to south-dipping reverse faults rising from a decollement in Miocene shale. To the east, the Sulphur Mountain anti-clinorium overlies and is cut by the Sisar, Big Canyon, and Lion south-dipping thrusts that merge downward into the Sisar decollement in lower Miocene shale. Shortening of the Miocene and younger sequence is ˜3 km greater than that of underlying competent Paleogene strata in the Ventura fold belt and ˜7 km greater farther east at Sulphur Mountain. Cross-section balancing requires that this difference be taken up by the Paleogene sequence at the Oak Ridge fault to the south. Convergence is northeast to north-northeast on the basis of earthquake focal mechanisms, borehole breakouts, and piercing-point offset of the South Mountain seaknoll by the Oak Ridge fault. A northeast-trending line connecting the west end of Oak Ridge and the east end of the Sisar fault separates an eastern domain where late Quaternary displacement is taken up entirely on the Oak Ridge fault and a western domain where displacement is transferred to the Sisar decollement and its overlying rootless folds. This implies that (1) the Oak Ridge fault near the coast presents as much seismic risk as it does farther east, despite negligible near-surface late Quaternary movement; (2) ground-rupture hazard is high for the Sisar fault set in the upper Ojai Valley; and (3) the decollement itself could produce an earthquake analogous to the 1987 Whittier Narrows event in Los Angeles.

  11. Oak Ridge fault, Ventura fold belt, and the Sisar decollement, Ventura basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Yeats, R.S.; Huftile, G.J.; Grigsby, F.B. )

    1988-12-01

    The rootless Ventura Avenue, San Miguelito, and Rincon anticlines (Ventura fold belt) in Pliocene -Pleistocene turbidites are fault-propagation folds related to south-dipping reverse faults rising from a decollement in Miocene shale. To the east, the Sulfur Mountain anticlinorium overlies and is cut by the Sisar, Big Canyon, and Lion south-dipping thrusts that merge downward into the Sisar decollement in lower Miocene shale. Shortening of the Miocene and younger sequence is {approximately} 3 km greater than that of underlying competent Paleogens strata in the Ventura fold belt and {approximately} 7 km greater farther east at Sulfur Mountain. Cross-section balancing requires that this difference be taken up by the Paleogene sequence at the Oak Ridge fault to the south. Convergence is northeast to north-northeast on the base of earthquake focal mechanisms, borehole breakouts, and piercing-point offest of the South Mountain seaknoll by the Oak Ridge fault. A northeast-trending line connecting the west end of Oak Ridge and the east end of Sisar fault separates an eastern domain where late Quaternary displacement is taken up entirely on the Oak Ridge fault and a western domain where displacement is transferred to the Sisar decollement and its overlying rootless folds. This implies that (1) the Oak Ridge fault near the coast presents as much seismic risk as it does farther east, despite negligible near-surface late Quaternary movement; (2) ground-rupture hazard is high for the Sisar fault set in the upper Ojai Valley; and (3) the decollement itself could produce an earthquake analogous to the 1987 Whittier Narrows event in Low Angeles.

  12. Geochemical heterogeneity within mid-ocean ridge lava flows: insights into eruption, emplacement and global variations in magma generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, K. H.; Smith, M. C.; Bergmanis, E. C.; Perfit, M. R.; Sinton, J. M.; Batiza, R.

    2001-06-01

    Compositional heterogeneity in mid-ocean ridge (MOR) lava flows is a powerful yet presently under-utilized volcanological and petrological tracer. Here, it is demonstrated that variations in pre- and syn-eruptive magmatic conditions throughout the global ridge system can be constrained with intra-flow compositional heterogeneity among 10 discrete MOR flows. Geographical distribution of chemical heterogeneity within flows is also used along with mapped physical features to help decipher the range of conditions that apply to seafloor eruptions (i.e. inferred vent locations and whether there were single or multiple eruptive episodes). Although low-pressure equilibrium fractional crystallization can account for much of the observed intra-flow compositional heterogeneity, some cases require multiple parent magmas and/or more complex crystallization conditions. Globally, the extent of within-flow compositional heterogeneity is well correlated (positively) with estimated erupted volume for flows from the northern East Pacific Rise (EPR), and the Mid Atlantic, Juan de Fuca and Gorda Ridges; however, some lavas from the superfast spreading southern EPR fall below this trend. Compositional heterogeneity is also inversely correlated with spreading rate. The more homogeneous compositions of lavas from faster spreading ridges likely reflect the relative thermal stability and longevity of sub-ridge crustal magma bodies, and possibly higher eruption frequencies. By contrast, greater compositional heterogeneity in lavas at slower spreading rates probably results from low thermal stability of the crust (due to diminished magma supply and greater hydrothermal cooling). Finally, the within-flow compositional variations observed here imply that caution must be exercised when interpreting MOR basalt data on samples where individual flows have not been mapped because chemical variations between lava samples may not necessarily record the history of spatially and temporally distinct

  13. Crustal structure and evolution of the southern Juan de Fuca plate from wide-angle seismic data: Insights into the hydration state of the incoming plate off Cascadia subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horning, G.; Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Nedimovic, M. R.; Carton, H. D.

    2014-12-01

    A multi-channel seismic reflection and wide-angle refraction seismic experiment was conducted on the Juan de Fuca (JdF) plate to investigate the evolution of the plate from accretion to its subduction at the Cascadia margin. Hydration of the upper crust (UC) of the JdF Plate is well documented, but the state of hydration of the lower crust (LC) and upper mantle (UM] remains to be investigated. A 2D P-wave velocity model of the plate is derived from a joint reflection-refraction travel-time inversion of wide-angle seismic data. Stacked MCS reflection images together with modeled sedimentary velocities define an increasing thickness of sedimentary cover of up to 2.7km. Evidence for bending-related faulting is identified in coincident MCS images both indirectly as faulting in the sedimentary layer [Gibson, et al., this meeting] and directly as dipping crustal reflectors [Han et al., this meeting]. Three first order features are evident in the patterns of crustal velocity variations along the profile. 1: Crustal velocities at 150-250 km landward of the spreading ridge (~5 Ma age) show reduced velocities up to -0.20 km/s in comparison to velocities in younger crust (~3 Ma) 100-150 km from the ridge. This decrease in velocities is coincident with a propagator wake. 2: Upper crustal velocities begin to increase at 170km from the deformation front (DF), which coincides with the first evidence of faulting from sedimentary offsets. Crustal velocities start a decreasing trend at 80km from the DF where fault throws are seen to begin increasing trend landward. 3: UC velocities in the region of directly imaged crustal faulting (40km from trench) increase ~0.5km/s at the DF, while LC velocities decrease ~0.3km/s. The contrasting behavior in the upper and lower crust may indicate that bending promotes hydrothermal circulation in the outer rise. Circulation may be vigorous enough within the sediments/UC so that any residual shallow porosity is clogged with alteration products

  14. Zinc, copper, and lead in mid-ocean ridge basalts and the source rock control on Zn/Pb in ocean-ridge hydrothermal deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doe, B.R.

    1994-01-01

    The contents of Zn, Cu, and Pb in mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) and the MORB source-rock control on Zn/Pb in ocean-ridge hydrothermal deposits are examined. The values of Zn, Cu, and Pb for submarine mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) are, respectively (in ppm): average MORB-75, 75, and 0.7; West Valley, Juan de Fuca Ridge (JFR)-87, 64, and 0.5; southern JFR-120 and 0.5; and 21??N, East Pacific Rise (EPR)-73, 78, and 0.5. Values of Zn/Pb range from about 100-240 and Cu/ Pb from 100-156. In this study, Zn is found to correlate positively with TiO2 + FeO (mean square of weighted deviates, MSWD, of 1.6 for JFR basalt), and inversely with Mg number (MSWD of 3.5). Therefore, contrary to statements in the literature that Zn should be compatible in MORB, Zn is a mildly incompatible element and must be enriched in the glass phase relative to olivine as Zn does not fit into the other major phenocryst phase, plagioclase. In the source of MORB, Zn likely is most enriched in oxides: spinel, magnetite, and titanomagnetite. Copper generally does not correlate well with other elements in most MORB data examined. When differentiation is dominated by olivine, Cu has a tendency to behave incompatibly (e.g., at Mg numbers > 70), but, overall, Cu shows some tendency towards being a compatible element, particularly along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, a behavior presumably due to separation of sulfides in which Cu (but not Zn) is markedly enriched. Copper thus may be in dispersed sulfides in the source of MORB. Ocean ridges provide important data on source-rock controls for sulfide deposits because, in sediment-starved ridges, much is known about the possible source rocks and mineralization is presently occurring. In contrast to Zn/Pb ~5 in continental hot Cl-rich brines, Zn/Pb in the hottest sediment-starved ridge black smoker hydrothermal fluids at 21 ??N, EPR is about 110, similar to local MORB (145), but Cu/Pb is closer to 30, possibly due to subsurface deposition of Cu. At the JFR, the best

  15. Northeast Regional Biomass Energy Program

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, R.A.

    1992-04-01

    The Northeast Regional Biomass Program (NRBP) is entering its ninth year of operation. The management and the objectives have virtually remained unchanged and are stated as follows. The program conducted by NRBP has three basic features: (1) a state grant component that provides funds (with a 50 percent matching requirement) to each of the states in the region to strengthen and integrate the work of state agencies involved in biomass energy; (2) a series of technical reports and studies in areas that have been identified as being of critical importance to the development of biomass energy in the region; and (3) a continuous long range planning component with heavy private sector involvement that helps to identify activities necessary to spur greater development and use of biomass energy in the Northeast.

  16. The Northeast Climate Science Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnaswamy, M. J.; Palmer, R. N.; Morelli, T.; Staudinger, M.; Holland, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    The Department of Interior Northeast Climate Science Center (NE CSC) is part of a federal network of eight Climate Science Centers created to provide scientific information, tools, and techniques that managers and other parties interested in land, water, wildlife and cultural resources can use to anticipate, monitor, and adapt to climate change. Recognizing the critical threats, unique climate challenges, and expansive and diverse nature of the northeast region, the University of Massachusetts Amherst, College of Menominee Nation, Columbia University, Marine Biological Laboratory, University of Minnesota, University of Missouri Columbia, and University of Wisconsin-Madison have formed a consortium to host the NE CSC. This partnership with the U.S. Geological Survey climate science center network provides wide-reaching expertise, resources, and established professional collaborations in both climate science and natural and cultural resources management. This interdisciplinary approach is needed for successfully meeting the regional needs for climate impact assessment, adaptive management, education, and stakeholder outreach throughout the northeast region. Thus, the NE CSC conducts research, both through its general funds and its annual competitive award process, that responds to the needs of natural resource management partners that exist, in part or whole, within the NE CSC bounds. This domain includes the North Atlantic, Upper Midwest and Great Lakes, Eastern Tallgrass and Big Rivers, and Appalachian Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs), among other management stakeholders. For example, researchers are developing techniques to monitor tree range dynamics as affected by natural disturbances which can enable adaptation of projected climate impacts; conducting a Designing Sustainable Landscapes project to assess the capability of current and potential future landscapes in the Northeast to provide integral ecosystems and suitable habitat for a suite of

  17. Imaging the Juan de Fuca subduction plate using 3D Kirchoff Prestack Depth Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, C.; Bodin, T.; Allen, R. M.; Tauzin, B.

    2014-12-01

    We propose a new Receiver Function migration method to image the subducting plate in the western US that utilizes the US array and regional network data. While the well-developed CCP (common conversion point) poststack migration is commonly used for such imaging; our method applies a 3D prestack depth migration approach. The traditional CCP and post-stack depth mapping approaches implement the ray tracing and moveout correction for the incoming teleseismic plane wave based on a 1D earth reference model and the assumption of horizontal discontinuities. Although this works well in mapping the reflection position of relatively flat discontinuities (such as the Moho or the LAB), CCP is known to give poor results in the presence of lateral volumetric velocity variations and dipping layers. Instead of making the flat layer assumption and 1D moveout correction, seismic rays are traced in a 3D tomographic model with the Fast Marching Method. With travel time information stored, our Kirchoff migration is done where the amplitude of the receiver function at a given time is distributed over all possible conversion points (i.e. along a semi-elipse) on the output migrated depth section. The migrated reflectors will appear where the semicircles constructively interfere, whereas destructive interference will cancel out noise. Synthetic tests show that in the case of a horizontal discontinuity, the prestack Kirchoff migration gives similar results to CCP, but without spurious multiples as this energy is stacked destructively and cancels out. For 45 degree and 60 degree dipping discontinuities, it also performs better in terms of imaging at the right boundary and dip angle. This is especially useful in the Western US case, beneath which the Juan de Fuca plate subducted to ~450km with a dipping angle that may exceed 50 degree. While the traditional CCP method will underestimate the dipping angle, our proposed imaging method will provide an accurate 3D subducting plate image without

  18. Helium as a Tracer for Fluids Released from Juan de Fuca Lithosphere Beneath the Cascadia Forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCrory, P. A.; Constantz, J. E.; Hunt, A. G.; Blair, J. L. L.

    2015-12-01

    Helium isotopic ratios (3He/4He) observed in mineral springs above the Cascadia forearc provide a marker for fluids derived from Juan de Fuca lithosphere. Sample sites arcward of the forearc mantle corner generally yield significantly higher ratios (~1.5-4.0 R/RA) than those seaward of the corner (~0.3-0.6 R/RA). 3He detected above the inner forearc mantle wedge may represent a mixture of both oceanic lithosphere and forearc mantle sources, whereas 3He detected seaward of the forearc mantle corner likely has only an oceanic source. The highest ratios in the forearc coincide with slab depths (~40-45 km) where metamorphic dehydration of young, warm oceanic lithosphere is expected to release significant fluid and where tectonic tremor occurs, whereas little fluid is expected to be released from the slab (~ 25-30 km depth) beneath sites seaward of the corner.High helium ratios are also observed in springs and wells in the Nankai and Hikurangi forearcs above the region where tremor and slow slip events are detected. This correlation provides independent evidence that tremor and slow slip are associated with deep fluids, and further suggests that high pore pressures associated with tremor may also serve to keep fractures open for 3He migration through the crust.Even though our preliminary results document mantle-derived helium in surface waters of the Cascadia forearc, these results are based on sparse data from sample locations that are not optimally distributed. We have recently identified additional sample sites to investigate whether specific crustal structures in the Cascadia forearc might serve as conduits to speed the ascent of mantle-derived helium. Finally, the possibility of a 3He source related to westward flow of arc-derived fluids through the forearc mantle cannot be ruled out for some of the sites, nonetheless, the highest ratio (4.0 R/RA) is found >130 km from the nearest Cascade Arc volcano making a magmatic source unlikely.

  19. Central ridge of Newfoundland: Little explored, potential large

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, N.R. De )

    1993-10-25

    The Central ridge on the northeastern Grand Banks off Newfoundland represents a large area with known hydrocarbon accumulations and the potential for giant fields. It covers some 17,000 sq km with water less than 400 m deep. The first major hydrocarbon discovery on the Newfoundland Grand Banks is giant Hibernia field in the Jeanne d'Arc basin. Hibernia field, discovered in 1979, has reserves of 666 million bbl and is due onstream in 1997. Since Hibernia, 14 other discoveries have been made on the Grand Banks, with three on the Central ridge. Oil was first discovered on Central Ridge in 1980 with the Mobil et al. South Tempest G-88 well. In 1982 gas was discovered with the Mobil et al. North Dana I-43 well 30 km northeast of the earlier discovery. In 1983 gas and condensate were discovered with the Husky-Bow Valley et al. Trave E-87 well 20 km south of the South Tempest well. These discoveries are held under significant discovery licenses and an additional 2,400 sq km are held under exploration licenses. The paper discusses the history of the basin, the reservoir source traps, and the basin potential.

  20. Learning experiences at Oak Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.K.

    1990-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) of DOE has organized an Environmental Restoration Program to handle environmental cleanup activitis for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) following General Watkins' reorganization at DOE Headquarters. Based on the major facilities and locations of contamination sites, the Environmental Restoration Program is divided into five subprograms: Oak Ridge, National Laboatory (ORNL) sites, y-12 Plant sites, Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) sites, Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) sites and off-site areas. The Office of Risk Analysis at ORNL was established under the auspices of the Environmental Restoration Program to implement Superfun legislation in the five subprograms of DOE-ORO. Risk assessment must examine protetial human health and ecological impacts from contaminant sources that range from highly radioactive materials to toxic chemicals and mixed wastes. The remedial alternatives we are evaluating need to reach acceptable levels of risk effectively while also being cost-efficient. The purpose of this paper is to highlight areas of particular interest and concern at Oak Ridge and to discuss, where possible, solutions implemented by the Oak Ridge Environmental Restoation Program.

  1. Data Sharing Report Characterization of Isotope Row Facilities Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge TN

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, Phyllis C

    2013-12-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (EM-OR) requested that Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), working under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, provide technical and independent waste management planning support using funds provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Specifically, DOE EM-OR requested ORAU to plan and implement a survey approach, focused on characterizing the Isotope Row Facilities located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for future determination of an appropriate disposition pathway for building debris and systems, should the buildings be demolished. The characterization effort was designed to identify and quantify radiological and chemical contamination associated with building structures and process systems. The Isotope Row Facilities discussed in this report include Bldgs. 3030, 3031, 3032, 3033, 3033A, 3034, 3036, 3093, and 3118, and are located in the northeast quadrant of the main ORNL campus area, between Hillside and Central Avenues. Construction of the isotope production facilities was initiated in the late 1940s, with the exception of Bldgs. 3033A and 3118, which were enclosed in the early 1960s. The Isotope Row facilities were intended for the purpose of light industrial use for the processing, assemblage, and storage of radionuclides used for a variety of applications (ORNL 1952 and ORAU 2013). The Isotope Row Facilities provided laboratory and support services as part of the Isotopes Production and Distribution Program until 1989 when DOE mandated their shutdown (ORNL 1990). These facilities performed diverse research and developmental experiments in support of isotopes production. As a result of the many years of operations, various projects, and final cessation of operations, production was followed by inclusion into the surveillance and maintenance (S&M) project for eventual decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). The

  2. Preliminary northeast Asia geodynamics map

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parfenov, Leonid M.; Khanchuk, Alexander I.; Badarch, Gombosuren; Miller, Robert J.; Naumova, Vera V.; Nokleberg, Warren J.; Ogasawara, Masatsugu; Prokopiev, Andrei V.; Yan, Hongquan

    2003-01-01

    This map portrays the geodynamics of Northeast Asia at a scale of 1:5,000,000 using the concepts of plate tectonics and analysis of terranes and overlap assemblages. The map is the result of a detailed compilation and synthesis at 5 million scale and is part of a major international collaborative study of the Mineral Resources, Metallogenesis, and Tectonics of Northeast Asia conducted from 1997 through 2002 by geologists from earth science agencies and universities in Russia, Mongolia, Northeastern China, South Korea, Japan, and the USA. This map is the result of extensive geologic mapping and associated tectonic studies in Northeast Asia in the last few decades and is the first collaborative compilation of the geology of the region at a scale of 1:5,000,000 by geologists from Russia, Mongolia, Northeastern China, South Korea, Japan, and the USA. The map was compiled by a large group of international geologists using the below concepts and definitions during collaborative workshops over a six-year period. The map is a major new compilation and re-interpretation of pre-existing geologic maps of the region. The map is designed to be used for several purposes, including regional tectonic analyses, mineral resource and metallogenic analysis, petroleum resource analysis, neotectonic analysis, and analysis of seismic hazards and volcanic hazards. The map consists of two sheets. Sheet 1 displays the map at a scale of 1:5,000,000, explanation. Sheet 2 displays the introduction, list of map units, and source references. Detailed descriptions of map units and stratigraphic columns are being published separately. This map is one of a series of publications on the mineral resources, metallogenesis, and geodynamics,of Northeast Asia. Companion studies and other articles and maps , and various detailed reports are: (1) a compilation of major mineral deposit models (Rodionov and Nokleberg, 2000; Rodionov and others, 2000; Obolenskiy and others, in press a); (2) a series of

  3. Ridge 2000 Data Management System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwillie, A. M.; Carbotte, S. M.; Arko, R. A.; Haxby, W. F.; Ryan, W. B.; Chayes, D. N.; Lehnert, K. A.; Shank, T. M.

    2005-12-01

    Hosted at Lamont by the marine geoscience Data Management group, mgDMS, the NSF-funded Ridge 2000 electronic database, http://www.marine-geo.org/ridge2000/, is a key component of the Ridge 2000 multi-disciplinary program. The database covers each of the three Ridge 2000 Integrated Study Sites: Endeavour Segment, Lau Basin, and 8-11N Segment. It promotes the sharing of information to the broader community, facilitates integration of the suite of information collected at each study site, and enables comparisons between sites. The Ridge 2000 data system provides easy web access to a relational database that is built around a catalogue of cruise metadata. Any web browser can be used to perform a versatile text-based search which returns basic cruise and submersible dive information, sample and data inventories, navigation, and other relevant metadata such as shipboard personnel and links to NSF program awards. In addition, non-proprietary data files, images, and derived products which are hosted locally or in national repositories, as well as science and technical reports, can be freely downloaded. On the Ridge 2000 database page, our Data Link allows users to search the database using a broad range of parameters including data type, cruise ID, chief scientist, geographical location. The first Ridge 2000 field programs sailed in 2004 and, in addition to numerous data sets collected prior to the Ridge 2000 program, the database currently contains information on fifteen Ridge 2000-funded cruises and almost sixty Alvin dives. Track lines can be viewed using a recently- implemented Web Map Service button labelled Map View. The Ridge 2000 database is fully integrated with databases hosted by the mgDMS group for MARGINS and the Antarctic multibeam and seismic reflection data initiatives. Links are provided to partner databases including PetDB, SIOExplorer, and the ODP Janus system. Improved inter-operability with existing and new partner repositories continues to be

  4. Isolation of tellurite- and selenite-resistant bacteria from hydrothermal vents of the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Rathgeber, Christopher; Yurkova, Natalia; Stackebrandt, Erko; Beatty, J Thomas; Yurkov, Vladimir

    2002-09-01

    Deep-ocean hydrothermal-vent environments are rich in heavy metals and metalloids and present excellent sites for the isolation of metal-resistant microorganisms. Both metalloid-oxide-resistant and metalloid-oxide-reducing bacteria were found. Tellurite- and selenite-reducing strains were isolated in high numbers from ocean water near hydrothermal vents, bacterial films, and sulfide-rich rocks. Growth of these isolates in media containing K(2)TeO(3) or Na(2)SeO(3) resulted in the accumulation of metallic tellurium or selenium. The MIC of K(2)TeO(3) ranged from 1,500 to greater than 2,500 micro g/ml, and the MIC of Na(2)SeO(3) ranged from 6,000 to greater than 7,000 micro g/ml for 10 strains. Phylogenetic analysis of 4 of these 10 strains revealed that they form a branch closely related to members of the genus Pseudoalteromonas, within the gamma-3 subclass of the Proteobacteria. All 10 strains were found to be salt tolerant, pH tolerant, and thermotolerant. The metalloid resistance and morphological, physiological, and phylogenetic characteristics of newly isolated strains are described.

  5. Isolation of aerobic anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria from black smoker plume waters of the juan de fuca ridge in the pacific ocean.

    PubMed

    Yurkov, V; Beatty, J T

    1998-01-01

    A strain of the aerobic anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria was isolated from a deep-ocean hydrothermal vent plume environment. The in vivo absorption spectra of cells indicate the presence of bacteriochlorophyll a incorporated into light-harvesting complex I and a reaction center. The general morphological and physiological characteristics of this new isolate are described.

  6. Active Submarine Volcanoes and Electro-Optical Sensor Networks: The Potential of Capturing and Quantifying an Entire Eruptive Sequence at Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaney, J. R.; Kelley, D. S.; Proskurowski, G.; Fundis, A. T.; Kawka, O.

    2011-12-01

    The NE Pacific Regional Scale Nodes (RSN) component of the NSF Ocean Observatories Initiative is designed to provide unprecedented electrical power and bandwidth to the base and summit of Axial Seamount. The scientific community is engaged in identifying a host of existing and innovative observation and measurement techniques that utilize the high-power and bandwidth infrastructure and its real-time transmission capabilities. The cable, mooring, and sensor arrays will enable the first quantitative documentation of myriad processes leading up to, during, and following a submarine volcanic event. Currently planned RSN instrument arrays will provide important and concurrent spatial and temporal constraints on earthquake activity, melt migration, hydrothermal venting behavior and chemistry, ambient currents, microbial community structure, high-definition (HD) still images and HD video streaming from the vents, and water-column chemistry in the overlying ocean. Anticipated, but not yet funded, additions will include AUVs and gliders that continually document the spatial-temporal variations in the water column above the volcano and the distal zones. When an eruption appears imminent the frequency of sampling will be increased remotely, and the potential of repurposing the tracking capabilities of the mobile sensing platforms will be adapted to the spatial indicators of likely eruption activity. As the eruption begins mobile platforms will fully define the geometry, temperature, and chemical-microbial character of the volcanic plume as it rises into the thoroughly documented control volume above the volcano. Via the Internet the scientific community will be able to witness and direct adaptive sampling in response to changing conditions of plume formation. A major goal will be to document the eruptive volume and link the eruption duration to the volume of erupted magma. For the first time, it will be possible to begin to quantify the time-integrated output of an underwater volcanic eruption linked to the heat, chemical, and biological fluxes. In the late stages of the event, the dissipation of the "event plume" into the surrounding water column and the plume's migration patterns in the ambient regional flow will be tracked using specifically designed mobile sensor-platforms. The presence of these assets opens the potential for more immediate, coordinated, and thorough event responses than the community has previously been able to mount. Given the relative abundance of information on many variables in a verifiable and archived spatial and temporal context, and the rapidly evolving ability to conduct real-time genomic analyses, our community may be able to secure entirely novel organisms that are released into the overlying ocean only under well-characterized eruptive conditions.

  7. Isolation of Aerobic Anoxygenic Photosynthetic Bacteria from Black Smoker Plume Waters of the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the Pacific Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Yurkov, Vladimir; Beatty, J. Thomas

    1998-01-01

    A strain of the aerobic anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria was isolated from a deep-ocean hydrothermal vent plume environment. The in vivo absorption spectra of cells indicate the presence of bacteriochlorophyll a incorporated into light-harvesting complex I and a reaction center. The general morphological and physiological characteristics of this new isolate are described. PMID:16349490

  8. Partitioning Between Plume and Diffuse Flow at the Grotto Vent Cluster, Main Endeavour Vent Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge: Past and Present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rona, P. A.; Bemis, K. G.; Jones, C.; Jackson, D. R.; Mitsuzawa, K.; Palmer, D. R.

    2010-12-01

    Seafloor hydrothermal systems discharge as plumes from discrete vents and as diffuse flow from surrounding areas that transfer heat and chemicals from the lithosphere into the ocean in quantitatively significant amounts. Our VIP (Vent Imaging Pacific) July 2000 experiment was designed to acoustically image and quantify these flows at vent clusters in the Main Endeavour field using a sonar system (Simrad SM 2000) mounted on ROV Jason from fixed positions on the seafloor using three methods that we developed. Buoyant plumes are reconstructed applying visualization techniques to volume backscatter from suspended particulates and density discontinuities in plumes. A Doppler algorithm is used to measure mean vertical velocity through plume cross sections and to calculate volume flux at different altitudes in a plume. Acoustic Scintillation Thermography (AST) is used to image irregular areas of diffuse flow. Results from a sulfide edifice (north tower of Grotto Vent cluster; height 12 m; diameter 10 m; sonar range 12 m) supplemented by additional AST measurements and in situ measurements of flow rate and temperature are tabulatd below: The higher diffuse than plume heat flux is consistent with prior studies at other sites. However, the ratio of diffuse to plume heat flux (range 23-353) is exceptionally large suggesting an overestimation of diffuse flow area at the high end and/or underestimation of plume flux. We are scheduled this fall to connect our next generation sonar system (COVIS=Cable Operated Vent Imaging Sonar) to the NEPTUNE Canada cabled observatory at the Grotto vent cluster. COVIS is designed to image plume and diffuse flow in space and in time, which will contribute to interpreting our past observations and to provide new insights on how partitioning may vary with time.

  9. Impact of the Colonization by Paralvinella sulfincola on the Microbial Diversity Associated with a Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent Sulfide Chimney (Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, A.; Juniper, K.; Olagnon, M.; Alain, K.; Desrosiers, G.; Querellou, J.; Cambon-Bonavita, M.

    2002-12-01

    In the early stages of high temperature deep-sea hydrothermal vent chimneys growth, the walls remain porous and allow the escape of hydrothermal fluids as well as an inflow of seawater. This gradual mixing creates sharp thermal and geochemical gradients and provides potential habitats for physiologically diverse microorganisms. The annelid polychaete Paralvinella sulfincola colonizes the external surfaces of these structures, covering them with layered mucous tubes that locally alter the mixing of discharged hydrothermal fluids and surrounding seawater. Modifications of the physical and chemical conditions combined with an accumulation of elemental sulfur (S0) in P. sulfincola mucous tube are thought to be responsible for the deposition of a thin marcassite (FeS2) crust on outer surfaces of anhydrite chimneys (Juniper et al. 1992). This marcassite deposition could partly be induced by a shift in the composition of microbial communities that would to be locally associated with the presence of P. sulfincola. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated the impact of the colonization by P. sulfincola on the microbial communities present at the surface of an active sulfide chimney. Bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes were amplified from DNA extracted from a P. sulfincola tube and from a chimney mineral sample. Using the statistical analysis demonstrated by Singleton et al. (2001), both clone libraries from the chimney sample have been shown to be significantly different from those of the P. sulfincola tube sample, even though the major phylogenetic groups of these libraries were similar. As it has been observed at other deep-sea hydrothermal vent sites, the Epsilon-Proteobacteria and the Deep-sea Hydrothermal Vent Euryarchaeotic Group 1 were the dominant components of both bacterial and archaeal clone libraries. These results seem to indicate that P. sulfincola affect the microbial community composition on high temperature chimneys.

  10. Isolation of Tellurite- and Selenite-Resistant Bacteria from Hydrothermal Vents of the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the Pacific Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Rathgeber, Christopher; Yurkova, Natalia; Stackebrandt, Erko; Beatty, J. Thomas; Yurkov, Vladimir

    2002-01-01

    Deep-ocean hydrothermal-vent environments are rich in heavy metals and metalloids and present excellent sites for the isolation of metal-resistant microorganisms. Both metalloid-oxide-resistant and metalloid-oxide-reducing bacteria were found. Tellurite- and selenite-reducing strains were isolated in high numbers from ocean water near hydrothermal vents, bacterial films, and sulfide-rich rocks. Growth of these isolates in media containing K2TeO3 or Na2SeO3 resulted in the accumulation of metallic tellurium or selenium. The MIC of K2TeO3 ranged from 1,500 to greater than 2,500 μg/ml, and the MIC of Na2SeO3 ranged from 6,000 to greater than 7,000 μg/ml for 10 strains. Phylogenetic analysis of 4 of these 10 strains revealed that they form a branch closely related to members of the genus Pseudoalteromonas, within the γ-3 subclass of the Proteobacteria. All 10 strains were found to be salt tolerant, pH tolerant, and thermotolerant. The metalloid resistance and morphological, physiological, and phylogenetic characteristics of newly isolated strains are described. PMID:12200320

  11. Lower Tertiary laterite on the Iceland-Faeroe Ridge and the Thulean land bridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nilsen, T.H.

    1978-01-01

    CORES of a lower Tertiary lateritic palaeosol resting on basalt were recovered1 from Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 336 (Leg 38) on the north-east flank of the Iceland-Faeroe Ridge (Fig. 1), a major aseismic oceanic ridge that, together with Iceland, forms the Icelandic transverse ridge 2. The transverse ridge extends from the West European continental margin to the East Greenland continental margin, forming the geographic boundary and a partial barrier to flow of water between the Norwegian-Greenland Sea to the north and the northern North Atlantic Ocean to the south. The palaeosol indicates that at least part of the Iceland-Faeroe Ridge was above sea level during early Tertiary time3. Palaeogeographic and palaeooceanographic reconstructions suggest that it formed the main part of the Thulean land bridge that connected South-east Greenland and the Faeroe islands during the early Tertiary4. This report summarises the subsidence history of the Iceland-Faeroe Ridge relative to early Tertiary seafloor spreading, basaltic volcanism, and the development of the proposed Thulean land bridge. ?? 1978 Nature Publishing Group.

  12. Sea-floor drainage features of Cascadia Basin and the adjacent continental slope, northeast Pacific Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hampton, M.A.; Karl, Herman A.; Kenyon, Neil H.

    1989-01-01

    Sea-floor drainage features of Cascadia Basin and the adjacent continental slope include canyons, primary fan valleys, deep-sea valleys, and remnant valley segments. Long-range sidescan sonographs and associated seismic-reflection profiles indicate that the canyons may originate along a mid-slope escarpment and grow upslope by mass wasting and downslope by valley erosion or aggradation. Most canyons are partly filled with sediment, and Quillayute Canyon is almost completely filled. Under normal growth conditions, the larger canyons connect with primary fan valleys or deep-sea valleys in Cascadia Basin, but development of accretionary ridges blocks or re-routes most canyons, forcing abandonment of the associated valleys in the basin. Astoria Fan has a primary fan valley that connects with Astoria Canyon at the fan apex. The fan valley is bordered by parallel levees on the upper fan but becomes obscure on the lower fan, where a few valley segments appear on the sonographs. Apparently, Nitinat Fan does not presently have a primary fan valley; none of the numerous valleys on the fan connect with a canyon. The Willapa-Cascadia-Vancouver-Juan de Fuca deep-sea valley system bypasses the submarine fans and includes deeply incised valleys to broad shallow swales, as well as within-valley terraces and hanging-valley confluences. ?? 1989.

  13. Directionality of Ambient Noise on the Juan de Fuca Plate: Implications for Source Locations of the Primary and Secondary Microseism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y.; Ritzwoller, M. H.

    2014-12-01

    Based on cross-correlations computed from 61 ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) within the Juan de Fuca plate from the Cascadia Initiative experiment and 42 continental stations near the western US coast, we investigate the generation locations of the primary (11-20 sec period) and secondary (5-10 sec period) microseisms in the northern Pacific Ocean by analyzing the directionality of the microseism signals received in this region. (1) Ambient noise observed across the array is much different in the primary and secondary microseism bands, both in its azimuthal content and seasonal variation, indicating different source generation locations. (2) The principal secondary microseism signals propagate toward the east, consistent with source generation in deep water of the North Pacific, perhaps coincident with the region of body wave excitation observed by Gerstoft et al. [2008] and Landès et al. [2010]. (3) Local primary microseism sources within and near the Juan de Fuca plate are implied by observations of the azimuthal dependence of the fundamental mode Rayleigh wave amplitudes as well as observations of precursory arrivals in cross-correlations of ambient noise. The strongest local generation region is observed northwest of the Juan de Fuca plate near the coast of British Columbia perhaps near Graham Island. Weaker local sources appear to be oceanward of Vancouver Island and southern Oregon. (4) High quality Green's functions are derived from cross-correlations between deep water OBSs and continental stations proving that deep water generated signals can efficiently propagate onto the continent and are well recorded by continental seismic stations, at least at periods longer than about 5 sec.In conclusion, the primary and secondary microseisms are generated at different locations, with the secondary microseism dominantly coming from deep-water sources and the source of primary microseism having a significant component in the shallow waters of the eastern Pacific

  14. Ridges on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This is the highest resolution picture ever taken of the Jupiter moon, Europa. The area shown is about 5.9 by 9.9 miles (9.6 by 16 kilometers) and the smallest visible feature is about the size of a football field. In this view, the ice-rich surface has been broken into a complex pattern by cross-cutting ridges and grooves resulting from tectonic processes. Sinuous rille-like features and knobby terrain could result from surface modifications of unknown origins. Small craters of possible impact origin range in size from less than 330 feet (100 meters) to about 1300 feet (400 meters) across are visible.

    This image was taken by the solid state imaging television camera aboard the Galileo during its fourth orbit around Jupiter, at a distance of 2060 miles (3340 kilometers). The picture is centered at 325 degrees West, 5.83 degrees North. North is toward the top of this image, with the sun shining from the right.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the Galileo mission home page on the World Wide Web at http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  15. The Mid-Ocean Ridge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macdonald, Kenneth C.; Fox, Paul J.

    1990-01-01

    Described are concepts involved with the formation and actions of the Mid-Ocean Ridge. Sea-floor spreading, the magma supply model, discontinuities, off-axis structures, overlaps and deviation, and aquatic life are discussed. (CW)

  16. Growth of a tectonic ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, R.W.; Messerich, J.A.; Johnson, A.M.

    1997-12-31

    The 28 June 1992 Landers, California, earthquake of M 7.6 created an impressive record of surface rupture and ground deformation. Fractures extend over a length of more than 80 km including zones of right-lateral shift, steps in the fault zones, fault intersections and vertical changes. Among the vertical changes was the growth of a tectonic ridge described here. In this paper the authors describe the Emerson fault zone and the Tortoise Hill ridge including the relations between the fault zone and the ridge. They present data on the horizontal deformation at several scales associated with activity within the ridge and belt of shear zones and show the differential vertical uplifts. And, they conclude with a discussion of potential models for the observed deformation.

  17. Testing Models of Magmatic and Hydrothermal Segmentation: A Three-Dimensional Seismic Tomography Experiment at the Endeavour Ridge (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcock, W. S.; Toomey, D. R.; Hooft, E. E.; Weekly, R. T.; Wells, A. E.

    2010-12-01

    Competing models for what controls the segmentation and intensity of ridge crest processes are at odds on the scale of mantle and crustal magmatic segmentation, the distribution of hydrothermal venting with respect to a volcanic segment and the properties of the thermal boundary layer that transports energy between the magmatic and hydrothermal systems. The presence of an axial magma chamber (AMC) reflector beneath the central portion of the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca ridge, as well as systematic along axis changes in seafloor depth, ridge crest morphology and hydrothermal venting provide an ideal target for testing conflicting hypotheses. In late summer 2009, we conducted an active source seismic experiment on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. A total of 5,567 airgun shots from the 36-gun, 6,600 in3 airgun array of the R/V Marcus G. Langseth were recorded by 68 short-period ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) deployed at 64 sites. The experimental geometry utilized 3 nested scales and was designed to image (1) crustal thickness variations within 25 km of the axial high (0 to 900 kyr); (2) the map view heterogeneity and anisotropy of the topmost mantle beneath the spreading axis; (3) the three-dimensional structure of the crustal magmatic system and (4) the detailed three-dimensional, shallow crustal thermal structure beneath the Endeavour vent fields. At the segment scale, six 100-km-long ridge-parallel shot lines were obtained at distances of 16, 23 and 30 km to both sides of the ridge axis with OBSs on all but the outer lines. At the along-axis scale of the AMC reflector, shot lines are spaced 1 km apart and OBSs 8 km apart within a 60 x 20 km2 region. At the vent field scale, shots were obtained on a 500 x 500 m2 grid and OBSs spaced 5 km apart within a 20 x 10 km2 region. All the shooting lines were collected with a 9 m source depth to obtain impulsive arrivals at shorter ranges but the outer lines were also shot with a 15 m source depth

  18. Noble metals in mid-ocean ridge volcanism: A significant fractionation of gold with respect to platinum group metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crocket, James H.

    1988-01-01

    Hydrothermal precipitates, black smoker particulate, and massive sulphide dredge samples from the Explorer Ridge on the Juan de Fuca Plate and the TAG hydrothermal area on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge were analyzed for selected noble metals including Au, Ir and Pd by radiochemical neutron activation analysis. The preliminary results indicate that gold contents may reach the ppm range although values in the neighborhood of 100 to 200 ppb are more typical. The platinum group elements (PGE) represented by Ir and Pd are typically less than 0.02 ppb and less than 2 ppb respectively. These abundances represent a significant enrichment of gold relative to the PGE in comparison with average noble metal abundances in mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB). A partial explanation of this distinctive fractionation can be found in the concepts of sulfur-saturation of basic magma in mid-ocean ridge (MOR) settings, and the origin of MOR hydrothermal fluids. Experimental and petrological data suggest that MORBs are sulfur-saturated at the time of magma generation and that an immiscible sulfide component remains in the mantle residue. Hence, MORBs are noble metal-poor, particularly with respect to PGE. Consequently, black smoker fluids can be expected to reflect the low Ir and Pd contents of the rock column. The average Au content of MORB is 1.3 ppb, and so the rock column is not significantly enriched in Au. The generation of fluids which precipitate solids with 200 ppb Au is apparently dependent on highly efficient fluid chemistry to mobilize Au from the rock column, high Au solubility in seawater hydrothermal fluids and efficient precipitation mechanisms to coprecipitate Au on Fe, Zn and Cu sulfides. Significant differences in these parameters appear to be the ultimate cause of the strong Au-PGE fractionation in the MOR setting. It does not appear from the current data base that MOR hydrothermal fluids are significant contributors to the Ir enrichment seen in Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary

  19. A reduced crustal magnetization zone near the first observed active hydrothermal vent field on the Southwest Indian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jian; Lin, Jian; Chen, Yongshun J.; Tao, Chunhui; German, Christopher R.; Yoerger, Dana R.; Tivey, Maurice A.

    2010-09-01

    Inversion of near-bottom magnetic data reveals a well-defined low crustal magnetization zone (LMZ) near a local topographic high (37°47‧S, 49°39‧E) on the ultraslow-spreading Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR). The magnetic data were collected by the autonomous underwater vehicle ABE on board R/V DaYangYiHao in February-March 2007. The first active hydrothermal vent field observed on the SWIR is located in Area A within and adjacent to the LMZ at the local topographic high, implying that this LMZ may be the result of hydrothermal alteration of magnetic minerals. The maximum reduction in crustal magnetization is 3 A/M. The spatial extent of the LMZ is estimated to be at least 6.7 × 104 m2, which is larger than that of the LMZs at the TAG vent field on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR), as well as the Relict Field, Bastille, Dante-Grotto, and New Field vent-sites on the Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdF). The calculated magnetic moment, i.e., the product of the spatial extent and amplitude of crustal magnetization reduction is at least -3 × 107 Am2 for the LMZ on the SWIR, while that for the TAG field on the MAR is -8 × 107 Am2 and that for the four individual vent fields on the JdF range from -5 × 107 to -3 × 107 Am2. Together these results indicate that crustal demagnetization is a common feature of basalt-hosted hydrothermal vent fields at mid-ocean ridges of all spreading rates. Furthermore, the crustal demagnetization of the Area A on the ultraslow-spreading SWIR is comparable in strength to that of the TAG area on the slow-spreading MAR.

  20. Carpenter Ridge Tuff, CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Olivier; Deering, Chad D.; Lipman, Peter W.; Plummer, Charles

    2014-06-01

    The ~1,000 km3 Carpenter Ridge Tuff (CRT), erupted at 27.55 Ma during the mid-tertiary ignimbrite flare-up in the western USA, is among the largest known strongly zoned ash-flow tuffs. It consists primarily of densely welded crystal-poor rhyolite with a pronounced, highly evolved chemical signature (high Rb/Sr, low Ba, Zr, Eu), but thickly ponded intracaldera CRT is capped by a more crystal-rich, less silicic facies. In the outflow ignimbrite, this upper zone is defined mainly by densely welded crystal-rich juvenile clasts of trachydacite composition, with higher Fe-Ti oxide temperatures, and is characterized by extremely high Ba (to 7,500 ppm), Zr, Sr, and positive Eu anomalies. Rare mafic clasts (51-53 wt% SiO2) with Ba contents to 4,000-5,000 ppm and positive Eu anomalies are also present. Much of the major and trace-element variations in the CRT juvenile clasts can be reproduced via in situ differentiation by interstitial melt extraction from a crystal-rich, upper-crustal mush zone, with the trachydacite, crystal-rich clasts representing the remobilized crystal cumulate left behind by the melt extraction process. Late recharge events, represented by the rare mafic clasts and high-Al amphiboles in some samples, mixed in with parts of the crystal cumulate and generated additional scatter in the whole-rock data. Recharge was important in thermally remobilizing the silicic crystal cumulate by partially melting the near-solidus phases, as supported by: (1) ubiquitous wormy/sieve textures and reverse zoning patterns in feldspars and biotites, (2) absence of quartz in this very silicic unit stored at depths of >4-5 km, and (3) heterogeneous melt compositions in the trachydacite fiamme and mafic clasts, particularly in Ba, indicating local enrichment of this element due mostly to sanidine and biotite melting. The injection of hot, juvenile magma into the upper-crustal cumulate also imparted the observed thermal gradient to the deposits and the mixing overprint that

  1. Flow rate perturbations in a black smoker hydrothermal vent in response to a mid-ocean ridge earthquake swarm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crone, Timothy J.; Wilcock, William S. D.; McDuff, Russell E.

    2010-03-01

    Although there is indirect evidence for strong connections between tectonic processes and mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal flow, there are no direct observations of these links, primarily because measuring flow in these systems is difficult. Here we use an optical analysis technique to obtain a 44 day record of flow rate changes in a black smoker vent in the Main Endeavour field of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. We show that variations in the flow rate coincide with an earthquake swarm observed using an ocean bottom seismometer array. These observations indicate that connections between tectonics and flow are indeed strong, that hydraulic connections within this hydrothermal system are long ranging, and that enhanced tidal pumping of fluids may be initiated by earthquake activity. Because the effects of the swarm cross over an intervening vent field, we infer that the upflow zones feeding this field are narrow. Using the time lag between the swarm onset and the flow rate changes we estimate that the bulk permeability of the crust on the Endeavour segment ranges from 3.0 × 10-13 m2 to 6.0 × 10-12 m2.

  2. Global and regional ridge patterns on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chicarro, A. F.; Schultz, P. H.; Masson, P.

    1985-01-01

    A systematic study of Martian wrinkle ridges was performed to synthesize a theory of the planetary interior forces which produced such surface features. The survey was carried out using Mariner-9 and Viking orbiter imagery. Attention was given to the global distributions of ridge types in terms of geologic and tectonic surrounds, and to the orientation of ridges relative to impact basins. High/low relief ridges, ridge wings and rectilinear ridges were examined. Ridge orientation and distribution were found to be controlled by the forces of formation and modification of impact basins. Several other conclusions were reached regarding basin-concentric ridge patterns, regional stress patterns, regions of the most numerous ridges, and the location of a major compressive zone.

  3. PROPAGATION AND LINKAGE OF OCEANIC RIDGE SEGMENTS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollard, David D.; Aydin, Atilla

    1984-01-01

    An investigation was made of spreading ridges and the development of structures that link ridge segments using an analogy between ridges and cracks in elastic plates. The ridge-propagation force and a path factor that controls propagation direction were calculated for echelon ridge segments propagating toward each other. The ridge-propagation force increases as ridge ends approach but then declines sharply as the ends pass, so ridge segments may overlap somewhat. The sign of the path factor changes as ridge ends approach and pass, so the overlapping ridge ends may diverge and then converge following a hook-shaped path. The magnitudes of shear stresses in the plane of the plate and orientations of maximum shear planes between adjacent ridge segments were calculated to study transform faulting. For different loading conditions simulating ridge push, plate pull, and ridge suction, a zone of intense mechanical interaction between adjacent ridge ends in which stresses are concentrated was identified. The magnitudes of mean stresses in the plane of the plate and orientations of principal stress planes were also calculated.

  4. A new species of Duttaphrynus (Anura:Bufonidae) from Northeast India.

    PubMed

    Das, Abhijit; Chetia, Mitali; Dutta, Sushil Kumar; Sengupta, Saibal

    2013-01-01

    A new species of montane toad Duttaphrynus is described from Nagaland state of Northeast India. The new species is diagnosable based on following combination of characters: absence of preorbital, postorbital and orbitotympanic ridges, elongated and broad parotid gland, first finger longer than second and presence of a mid-dorsal line. The tympanum is hidden under a skin fold (in male) or absent (in female). The species is compared with its congers from India and Indo-China. We propose to consider Duttaphrynus wokhaensis as junior synonym of Duttaphrynus melanostictus.

  5. Methane-generated( ) pockmarks on young, thickly sedimented oceanic crust in the Arctic. Vestnesa ridge, Fram strait

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, P.R.; Crane, K. ); Sundvor, E. ); Max, M.D. ); Pfirman, S.L. )

    1994-03-01

    Acoustic backscatter imagery in the Farm strait (between Greenland and Spitzbergen) reveals a 1-3-km-wide, 50-km-long belt of -50 pointlike backscatter objects decorating the -1300-m-deep crest of Vestnesa Ridge, a 1 [minus]> 2 km thick sediment drift possibly underlain by a transform-parallel oceanic basement ridge (crustal ages approximately 3-14 Ma). A 3.5 kHz seismic-reflection profile indicates that at least some objects are pockmarks approximately 100-200 m in diameter and 10-20 m deep. The pockmarks (possibly also mud dipairs) may have been formed by evolution of methane generated by the decomposition of marine organic matter in the Vestnesa ridge sediment drift. The ridge may be underlain by an anticlinical carapace of methane-hydrate calculated to be 200-300 m thick, comparable to the hydrate thickness measured just to the south. The rising methane would collect in the ridge-crest trap, intermittently escaping to the sea floor. This hypothesis is supported by multichannel evidence for bright spots and bottom-simulating reflectors in the area. The pockmark belt may also be located above a transcurrent fault. Sediment slumps on the flanks of Vestnesa ridge and northeast of Molloy ridge may have been triggered by plate-boundary earthquakes and facilitated by methane hydrates. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Conductive heat loss in recent eruptions at mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Paul; Hutnak, Michael

    A new technique for measuring conductive heat flow from unsedimented volcanic rocks on the sea floor has been tested on two new eruption sites in the NE Pacific. This technique consists of isolating the surficial rocks from sea water using water-saturated urethane foam as an insulating thermal blanket. The thermal gradient transferred from the outcrop to the thermal blanket is a quantitative measurement of the conductive heat flow that takes place in unsedimented volcanic areas. We deployed two thermal blankets at 13 sites on the 1993 and 1996 Juan de Fuca/Gorda Ridge flows and found (1) a factor of 10 decrease in heat flow over a period of 12 months on the 1993 CoAxial flow, (2) a value of 6950 mW/m² on the 8 month old Gorda flow, and (3) measurements of heat flow versus age-since-eruption indicate that newly extruded volcanic units are quite permeable to fluid circulation and cool rapidly by convection in only a few years. These new heat flux data confirm that the extrusive volcanic layer is not the primary heat source for long-lived, high temperature hydrothermal systems, which must instead rely on a more isolated thermal reservoir within the lower crustal rocks.

  7. Novel microbial assemblages inhabiting crustal fluids within mid-ocean ridge flank subsurface basalt.

    PubMed

    Jungbluth, Sean P; Bowers, Robert M; Lin, Huei-Ting; Cowen, James P; Rappé, Michael S

    2016-08-01

    Although little is known regarding microbial life within our planet's rock-hosted deep subseafloor biosphere, boreholes drilled through deep ocean sediment and into the underlying basaltic crust provide invaluable windows of access that have been used previously to document the presence of microorganisms within fluids percolating through the deep ocean crust. In this study, the analysis of 1.7 million small subunit ribosomal RNA genes amplified and sequenced from marine sediment, bottom seawater and basalt-hosted deep subseafloor fluids that span multiple years and locations on the Juan de Fuca Ridge flank was used to quantitatively delineate a subseafloor microbiome comprised of distinct bacteria and archaea. Hot, anoxic crustal fluids tapped by newly installed seafloor sampling observatories at boreholes U1362A and U1362B contained abundant bacterial lineages of phylogenetically unique Nitrospirae, Aminicenantes, Calescamantes and Chloroflexi. Although less abundant, the domain Archaea was dominated by unique, uncultivated lineages of marine benthic group E, the Terrestrial Hot Spring Crenarchaeotic Group, the Bathyarchaeota and relatives of cultivated, sulfate-reducing Archaeoglobi. Consistent with recent geochemical measurements and bioenergetic predictions, the potential importance of methane cycling and sulfate reduction were imprinted within the basalt-hosted deep subseafloor crustal fluid microbial community. This unique window of access to the deep ocean subsurface basement reveals a microbial landscape that exhibits previously undetected spatial heterogeneity. PMID:26872042

  8. Novel microbial assemblages inhabiting crustal fluids within mid-ocean ridge flank subsurface basalt

    PubMed Central

    Jungbluth, Sean P; Bowers, Robert M; Lin, Huei-Ting; Cowen, James P; Rappé, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Although little is known regarding microbial life within our planet's rock-hosted deep subseafloor biosphere, boreholes drilled through deep ocean sediment and into the underlying basaltic crust provide invaluable windows of access that have been used previously to document the presence of microorganisms within fluids percolating through the deep ocean crust. In this study, the analysis of 1.7 million small subunit ribosomal RNA genes amplified and sequenced from marine sediment, bottom seawater and basalt-hosted deep subseafloor fluids that span multiple years and locations on the Juan de Fuca Ridge flank was used to quantitatively delineate a subseafloor microbiome comprised of distinct bacteria and archaea. Hot, anoxic crustal fluids tapped by newly installed seafloor sampling observatories at boreholes U1362A and U1362B contained abundant bacterial lineages of phylogenetically unique Nitrospirae, Aminicenantes, Calescamantes and Chloroflexi. Although less abundant, the domain Archaea was dominated by unique, uncultivated lineages of marine benthic group E, the Terrestrial Hot Spring Crenarchaeotic Group, the Bathyarchaeota and relatives of cultivated, sulfate-reducing Archaeoglobi. Consistent with recent geochemical measurements and bioenergetic predictions, the potential importance of methane cycling and sulfate reduction were imprinted within the basalt-hosted deep subseafloor crustal fluid microbial community. This unique window of access to the deep ocean subsurface basement reveals a microbial landscape that exhibits previously undetected spatial heterogeneity. PMID:26872042

  9. Novel microbial assemblages inhabiting crustal fluids within mid-ocean ridge flank subsurface basalt.

    PubMed

    Jungbluth, Sean P; Bowers, Robert M; Lin, Huei-Ting; Cowen, James P; Rappé, Michael S

    2016-08-01

    Although little is known regarding microbial life within our planet's rock-hosted deep subseafloor biosphere, boreholes drilled through deep ocean sediment and into the underlying basaltic crust provide invaluable windows of access that have been used previously to document the presence of microorganisms within fluids percolating through the deep ocean crust. In this study, the analysis of 1.7 million small subunit ribosomal RNA genes amplified and sequenced from marine sediment, bottom seawater and basalt-hosted deep subseafloor fluids that span multiple years and locations on the Juan de Fuca Ridge flank was used to quantitatively delineate a subseafloor microbiome comprised of distinct bacteria and archaea. Hot, anoxic crustal fluids tapped by newly installed seafloor sampling observatories at boreholes U1362A and U1362B contained abundant bacterial lineages of phylogenetically unique Nitrospirae, Aminicenantes, Calescamantes and Chloroflexi. Although less abundant, the domain Archaea was dominated by unique, uncultivated lineages of marine benthic group E, the Terrestrial Hot Spring Crenarchaeotic Group, the Bathyarchaeota and relatives of cultivated, sulfate-reducing Archaeoglobi. Consistent with recent geochemical measurements and bioenergetic predictions, the potential importance of methane cycling and sulfate reduction were imprinted within the basalt-hosted deep subseafloor crustal fluid microbial community. This unique window of access to the deep ocean subsurface basement reveals a microbial landscape that exhibits previously undetected spatial heterogeneity.

  10. Active tectonics of the Devils Mountain Fault and related structures, northern Puget Lowland and eastern Strait of Juan de Fuca region, Pacific Northwest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Mosher, David C.; Blakely, Richard J.; Childs, Jonathan R.

    2001-01-01

    Information from marine high-resolution and conventional seismic-reflection surveys, aeromagnetic mapping, coastal exposures of Pleistocene strata, and lithologic logs of water wells is used to assess the active tectonics of the northern Puget Lowland and eastern Strait of Juan de Fuca region of the Pacific Northwest. These data indicate that the Devils Mountain Fault and the newly recognized Strawberry Point and Utsalady Point faults are active structures and represent potential earthquake sources.

  11. Comparison of Ridges on Triton and Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prockter, L. M.; Pappalardo, R. .

    2003-01-01

    Triton and Europa each display a variety of ridges and associated troughs. The resemblance of double ridges on these two satellites has been previously noted [R. Kirk, pers. comm.], but as yet, the similarities and differences between these feature types have not been examined in any detail. Triton s ridges, and Europa s, exhibit an evolutionary sequence ranging from isolated troughs, through doublet ridges, to complex ridge swaths [1, 2]. Comparison of ridges on Europa to those on Triton may provide insight into their formation on both satellites, and thereby have implications for the satellites' histories.

  12. Genome-Wide Analysis Identifies IL-18 and FUCA2 as Novel Genes Associated with Diastolic Function in African Americans with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sysol, Justin R.; Abbasi, Taimur; Patel, Amit R.; Lang, Roberto M.; Gupta, Akash; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Gordeuk, Victor R.; Machado, Roberto F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Diastolic dysfunction is common in sickle cell disease (SCD), and is associated with an increased risk of mortality. However, the molecular pathogenesis underlying this development is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to identify a gene expression profile that is associated with diastolic function in SCD, potentially elucidating molecular mechanisms behind diastolic dysfunction development. Methods Diastolic function was measured via echocardiography in 65 patients with SCD from two independent study populations. Gene expression microarray data was compared with diastolic function in both study cohorts. Candidate genes that associated in both analyses were tested for validation in a murine SCD model. Lastly, genotyping array data from the replication cohort was used to derive cis-expression quantitative trait loci (cis-eQTLs) and genetic associations within the candidate gene regions. Results Transcriptome data from both patient cohorts implicated 7 genes associated with diastolic function, and mouse SCD myocardial expression validated 3 of these genes. Genetic associations and eQTLs were detected in 2 of the 3 genes, FUCA2 and IL18. Conclusions FUCA2 and IL18 are associated with diastolic function in SCD patients, and may be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Genetic polymorphisms within the FUCA2 and IL18 gene regions are also associated with diastolic function in SCD, likely by affecting expression levels of the genes. PMID:27636371

  13. Northeast Regional Planetary Data Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Peter H.; Saunders, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    In 1980, the Northeast Planetary Data Center (NEPDC) was established with Tim Mutch as its Director. The Center was originally located in the Sciences Library due to space limitations but moved to the Lincoln Field Building in 1983 where it could serve the Planetary Group and outside visitors more effectively. In 1984 Dr. Peter Schultz moved to Brown University and became its Director after serving in a similar capacity at the Lunar and Planetary Institute since 1976. Debbie Glavin has served as the Data Center Coordinator since 1982. Initially the NEPDC was build around Tim Mutch's research collection of Lunar Orbiter and Mariner 9 images with only partial sets of Apollo and Viking materials. Its collection was broadened and deepened as the Director (PHS) searched for materials to fill in gaps. Two important acquisitions included the transfer of a Viking collection from a previous PI in Tucson and the donation of surplused lunar materials (Apollo) from the USGS/Menlo Park prior to its building being torn down. Later additions included the pipeline of distributed materials such as the Viking photomosaic series and certain Magellan products. Not all materials sent to Brown, however, found their way to the Data Center, e.g., Voyager prints and negatives. In addition to the NEPDC, the planetary research collection is separately maintained in conjunction with past and ongoing mission activities. These materials (e.g., Viking, Magellan, Galileo, MGS mission products) are housed elsewhere and maintained independently from the NEPDC. They are unavailable to other researchers, educators, and general public. Consequently, the NEPDC represents the only generally accessible reference collection for use by researchers, students, faculty, educators, and general public in the Northeast corridor.

  14. A novel microbial habitat in the mid-ocean ridge subseafloor

    PubMed Central

    Summit, Melanie; Baross, John A.

    2001-01-01

    The subseafloor at the mid-ocean ridge is predicted to be an excellent microbial habitat, because there is abundant space, fluid flow, and geochemical energy in the porous, hydrothermally influenced oceanic crust. These characteristics also make it a good analog for potential subsurface extraterrestrial habitats. Subseafloor environments created by the mixing of hot hydrothermal fluids and seawater are predicted to be particularly energy-rich, and hyperthermophilic microorganisms that broadly reflect such predictions are ejected from these systems in low-temperature (≈15°C), basalt-hosted diffuse effluents. Seven hyperthermophilic heterotrophs isolated from low-temperature diffuse fluids exiting the basaltic crust in and near two hydrothermal vent fields on the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge, were compared phylogenetically and physiologically to six similarly enriched hyperthermophiles from samples associated with seafloor metal sulfide structures. The 13 organisms fell into four distinct groups: one group of two organisms corresponding to the genus Pyrococcus and three groups corresponding to the genus Thermococcus. Of these three groups, one was composed solely of sulfide-derived organisms, and the other two related groups were composed of subseafloor organisms. There was no evidence of restricted exchange of organisms between sulfide and subseafloor habitats, and therefore this phylogenetic distinction indicates a selective force operating between the two habitats. Hypotheses regarding the habitat differences were generated through comparison of the physiology of the two groups of hyperthermophiles; some potential differences between these habitats include fluid flow stability, metal ion concentrations, and sources of complex organic matter. PMID:11226209

  15. Inner-shelf circulation and sediment dynamics on a series of shoreface connected ridges offshore of Fire Island, NY

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warner, John C.; List, Jeffrey H.; Schwab, William C.; Voulgaris, George; Armstrong, Brandy N.; Marshall, N

    2014-01-01

    Locations along the inner-continental shelf offshore of Fire Island, NY, are characterized by a series of shoreface connected ridges (SFCRs). These sand ridges have approximate dimensions of 10 km in length, 3 km spacing, up to ~8 m ridge to trough relief, and are oriented obliquely at approximately 30 degrees clockwise from the coastline. Stability analysis from previous studies explains how sand ridges such as these could be formed and maintained by storm-driven flows directed alongshore with a key maintenance mechanism of offshore deflected flows over ridge crests and onshore in the troughs. We examine these processes both with a limited set of idealized numerical simulations and analysis of observational data. Model results confirm that along-shore flows over the SFCRs exhibit offshore veering of currents over the ridge crests and onshore-directed flows in the troughs, and demonstrate the opposite circulation pattern for a reverse wind. To further investigate these maintenance processes, oceanographic instruments were deployed at seven sites on the SFCRs offshore of Fire Island to measure water levels, ocean currents, waves, suspended-sediment concentrations, and bottom stresses from January to April 2012. Data analysis reveals that during storms with winds from the northeast the processes of offshore deflection of currents over ridge crests and onshore in the troughs were observed, and during storm events with winds from the southwest a reverse flow pattern over the ridges occurred. Computations of suspended-sediment fluxes identify periods that are consistent with SFCR maintenance mechanisms. Alongshore winds from the northeast drove fluxes offshore on the ridge crest and onshore in the trough that would tend to promote ridge maintenance. However, alongshore winds from the southwest drove opposite circulations. The wind fields are related to different storm types that occur in the region (low pressure systems, cold fronts, and warm fronts). From the limited

  16. The Ridge, the Glasma and Flow

    SciTech Connect

    McLerran,L.

    2008-09-15

    I discuss the ridge phenomena observed in heavy ion collisions at RHIC. I argue that the ridge may be due to flux tubes formed from the Color Glass Condensate in the early Glasma phase of matter produced in such collisions.

  17. Oak Ridge callibration recall program

    SciTech Connect

    Falter, K.G.; Wright, W.E.; Pritchard, E.W.

    1996-12-31

    A development effort was initiated within the Oak Ridge metrology community to address the need for a more versatile and user friendly tracking database that could be used across the Oak Ridge complex. This database, which became known as the Oak Ridge Calibration Recall Program (ORCRP), needed to be diverse enough for use by all three Oak Ridge facilities, as well as the seven calibration organizations that support them. Various practical functions drove the initial design of the program: (1) accessible by any user at any site through a multi-user interface, (2) real-time database that was able to automatically generate e-mail notices of due and overdue measuring and test equipment, (3) large memory storage capacity, and (4) extremely fast data access times. In addition, the program needed to generate reports on items such as instrument turnaround time, workload projections, and laboratory efficiency. Finally, the program should allow the calibration intervals to be modified, based on historical data. The developed program meets all of the stated requirements and is accessible over a network of computers running Microsoft Windows software.

  18. Ridge Regression for Interactive Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tate, Richard L.

    1988-01-01

    An exploratory study of the value of ridge regression for interactive models is reported. Assuming that the linear terms in a simple interactive model are centered to eliminate non-essential multicollinearity, a variety of common models, representing both ordinal and disordinal interactions, are shown to have "orientations" that are favorable to…

  19. The seismicity of the equatorial Mid-Atlantic Ridge and its long-offset transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. K.; Dziak, R. P.; Palmiotto, C.; Parnell-Turner, R. E.; Zheleznov, A.

    2012-12-01

    An array of eight hydrophones is monitoring seismicity of the equatorial Atlantic between 20N and 10S. The array is obtaining a two-year, continuous record of seismicity, which will provide an important new view of the spatial and temporal patterns of seismicity at the slow-spreading equatorial Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) and its long-offset transforms. The hydroacoustically-recorded seismicity, which will be in hand in 2014, can be used to address several key questions concerning the modes of spreading along the strongly offset equatorial MAR, the short-term earthquake predictability on some of the longest transform faults in the oceans, and the dynamics of the NA-SA-AF triple junction whose exact location is not known. In addition, seismic patterns of the entire South Atlantic will be obtained (at reduced location accuracy), and will aid in understanding the dynamics of the southern MAR, Walvis Ridge, Rio Grande Rise, and other prominent seafloor features. The hydroacoustic data will also allow characterization of cetacean populations in the region as well as an assessment of the ambient noise levels due to shipping and oil exploration. To provide additional information on the short-term earthquake predictability (retrospective) on oceanic transform faults, we are identifying all magnitude mb >5 earthquakes in our existing hydroacoustic databases and searching for systematic foreshock activity associated with these events. We have multi-year earthquake databases accumulated from past hydrophone experiments along the Central, Southwest and Southeast Indian Ridges, the Juan de Fuca Ridge system, and the northern MAR. Preliminary results are very promising, and there appear to be several examples of clear foreshocks preceding mainshocks by several hours. Also as part of this project, we are compiling a bathymetric map of the equatorial MAR and its transforms between 20N and 10S. There have been several international mapping efforts in this region and the integration of

  20. Lava Cones and Shields on Intermediate-Rate Mid-Ocean Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clague, D. A.; Paduan, J. B.; Caress, D. W.

    2014-12-01

    Most eruptions of basalt along mid-ocean ridges produce either sheet flows or pillow mounds and ridges. Rare eruptions on the Juan de Fuca and Gorda Ridges and on the Alarcon Rise (northern East Pacific Rise) produce volcanic cones or shields from point sources. Bathymetric maps at 1-m resolution from an autonomous underwater vehicle enabled classification of these ~circular features. The most common are 290-510m across and <50m tall cones with craters or tumulus-like inflated flows on their summits. There are 8 of these on the upper south rift, caldera floor, and southwest caldera rim on Axial Seamount; one on North Cleft segment near the 1986 pillow mounds; and one in the axial graben on northern Endeavour Segment. Hundreds of smaller pillow mounds lack craters or tumulus-like inflated flows at their summits. Three 660-1300m across circular cones have either a crater or an inflated tumulus-like structure at their flat to slightly domed summits. One in the axial graben on the northern Endeavour Segment is dissected by extensional faulting. Cage Seamount on the Coaxial Segment south of the 1993 pillow ridge is the most voluminous at 1100m across and >200m tall. Two flat-topped cones are located near the center of Alarcon Rise. A low-relief shield volcano on the northern Alarcon Rise is ~1700m across and only ~45m tall, and is cut by numerous faults and fissures. Two other shields, 860m and 1700m across and 50-70m tall, occur south of the 1996 North Gorda pillow mounds. These shields are decorated with small pillow mounds. Five 100-250m across and 15-30m deep pits collapsed on the northern shield. These constructional cones and shields form during eruptions where the initial fissure consolidated to a point, indicative of long duration activity. They are constructed during uncommon eruptions with flux larger than produces pillow mounds and smaller than produces sheet flows. They are a submarine equivalent of subaerial shield-building eruptions.

  1. Northeast Clean Energy Application Center

    SciTech Connect

    Bourgeois, Tom

    2013-09-30

    From October 1, 2009 through September 30, 2013 (“contract period”), the Northeast Clean Energy Application Center (“NE-CEAC”) worked in New York and New England (Connecticut, Rhode Island, Vermont, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Maine) to create a more robust market for the deployment of clean energy technologies (CETs) including combined heat and power (CHP), district energy systems (DES), and waste heat recovery (WHR) systems through the provision of technical assistance, education and outreach, and strategic market analysis and support for decision-makers. CHP, DES, and WHR can help reduce greenhouse gas emissions, reduce electrical and thermal energy costs, and provide more reliable energy for users throughout the United States. The NE-CEAC’s efforts in the provision of technical assistance, education and outreach, and strategic market analysis and support for decision-makers helped advance the market for CETs in the Northeast thereby helping the region move towards the following outcomes: • Reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and criteria pollutants • Improvements in energy efficiency resulting in lower costs of doing business • Productivity gains in industry and efficiency gains in buildings • Lower regional energy costs • Strengthened energy security • Enhanced consumer choice • Reduced price risks for end-users • Economic development effects keeping more jobs and more income in our regional economy Over the contract period, NE-CEAC provided technical assistance to approximately 56 different potential end-users that were interested in CHP and other CETs for their facility or facilities. Of these 56 potential end-users, five new CHP projects totaling over 60 MW of install capacity became operational during the contract period. The NE-CEAC helped host numerous target market workshops, trainings, and webinars; and NE-CEAC staff delivered presentations at many other workshops and conferences. In total, over 60 different workshops

  2. Pliocene northeast African vegetation change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liddy, H.; Sieracki, A.; Feakins, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    Plant leaf wax molecular fossils have yielded key insights into forest-grassland transitions in northeast Africa. The stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of sedimentary leaf waxes (including n-alkanoic acids) records variations in the proportions of plants using the C3 (Calvin-Benson) pathway including trees, most shrubs and cool-season grasses versus the C4 (Hatch-Slack) pathway including warm-season grasses and sedges. Here we apply this technique to marine sediments from the Gulf of Aden to characterize northeast African environmental variability during the Pliocene. We sample DSDP Site 231 integrating 3kyr intervals to generate a high-resolution reconstruction spanning 3.7-5.3Ma. The δ13C compositions of downcore C30 n-alkanoic acid analyses average -27.5‰ (σ=1.2, n=177), ranging between -30.2 to -24.3‰ with repeated oscillations in the proportions of C4 biomass, presumably corresponding to the eccentricity and precessional modulation of insolation acting on monsoonal precipitation. Although δ13C values cannot be uniquely translated to C4 biomass given the spread in the C3 'endmember', we find complimentary evidence for proportions of C4 biomass from the isotopic spread of the n-alkanoic homologues (n-C28 to n-C32). Comparison to pollen data indicates that at times of low δ13C values, complete forest cover remains unlikely given the presence of grass pollen - taken together these records indicate the presence of C3 grasses. By evaluating our longer record from this site, as well as the terrestrial soil carbonate record, we find the Pliocene has low C4 proportions in comparison to higher proportions in Pleistocene and even late Miocene times. Intriguingly this drop in C4 plant biomass may correspond to a period of elevated atmospheric pCO2. Our ongoing reconstructions are of interest both for constraining environments of hominin evolution and tropical climate variability prior to the onset of Northern Hemisphere Glaciation, in particular during

  3. Electrical properties of the mantle upwelling zone beneath a mid-ocean ridge: An application of vertical gradient sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jegen, Marion Dorothea

    On mid-ocean ridges, as adjacent plates move apart, the mantle material rises to fill the void created. During its ascent the solidus of the material is crossed and melting occurs. The melt itself is eventually emplaced at the ridge axis producing new oceanic crust. The understanding of the flow of the solid and molten material is hampered by the lack of knowledge of vital model parameters such as the connectivity of the partial melt. Connectivity is related to the permeability in the upwelling region. It therefore controls the migration pattern of the buoyant melt, the flow of the solid phase material, and the mantle upwelling mechanism. Changes in the geometry of the distribution of melt in the solid material have a large impact on the electrical conductivity. I have measured the conductivity of the upwelling region to constrain possible partial melt geometries. I present results of vertical gradient sounding (VGS) experiments on the Endeavour and Explorer ridge, which are part of the Juan de Fuca and its northern extension, the Explorer ridge, respectively. The VGS method is a natural source EM method based entirely on measurements of the magnetic fields. Electrical responses of the 1D layered normal seafloor combined with a 2D region representing the mantle upwelling zone and proposed upwelling mechanisms are derived. A comparison of the synthetic response of a range of models with data measured on the Endeavour segment shows that the conductivity in the upwelling region is very high (in the order of 1 to 5 ohm m depending on the shape of the upwelling region). The results of this experiment suggest that the pore space containing the conductive melt is well connected. The melt must be able to move freely through the upwelling region. The experiments support so called melt migration models. The data measured on the Explorer segment yielded a different conductivity model. The data do not require the presence of a pronounced 2D conductivity anomaly at depth and

  4. Composition of pore and spring waters from Baby Bare: global implications of geochemical fluxes from a ridge flank hydrothermal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheat, C. Geoffrey; Mottl, Michael J.

    2000-02-01

    Warm hydrothermal springs were discovered on Baby Bare, which is an isolated basement outcrop on 3.5 Ma-old crust on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. We have sampled these spring waters from a manned submersible, along with associated sediment pore waters from 48 gravity and piston cores. Systematic variations in the chemical composition of these waters indicate that hydrothermal reactions in basement at moderate temperatures (63°C in uppermost basement at this site) remove Na, K, Li, Rb, Mg, TCO 2, alkalinity, and phosphate from the circulating seawater and leach Ca, Sr, Si, B, and Mn from the oceanic crust; and that reactions with the turbidite sediment surrounding Baby Bare remove Na, Li, Mg, Ca, Sr, and sulfate from the pore water while producing ammonium and Si and both producing and consuming phosphate, nitrate, alkalinity, Mn, and Fe. K, Rb, and B are relatively unreactive in the sediment column. These data confirm the earlier inference that sediment pore waters from areas of upwelling can be used to estimate the composition of altered seawater in the underlying basement, even for those elements that are reactive in the sediment column or are affected by sampling artifacts. The composition of altered seawater in basement at Baby Bare is similar to the inferred composition of 58°C formation water from crust nearly twice as old (5.9 Ma) on the southern flank of the Costa Rica Rift. The Baby Bare fluids also exhibit the same directions of net elemental transfer between basalt and seawater as solutions produced in laboratory experiments at a similar temperature, and complement compositional changes from seawater observed in seafloor basalts altered at cool to moderate temperatures. The common parameter among the two ridge flanks and experiments is temperature, suggesting that the residence time of seawater in basement at the two ridge-flank sites is sufficiently long for the solutions to equilibrate with altered basalt. This conclusion is supported

  5. Antimalarial plants of northeast India: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Rama; Deb, Sourabh; Sharma, B K

    2012-01-01

    The need for an alternative drug for malaria initiated intensive efforts for developing new antimalarials from indigenous plants. The information from different tribal communities of northeast India along with research papers, including books, journals and documents of different universities and institutes of northeast India was collected for information on botanical therapies and plant species used for malaria. Sixty-eight plant species belonging to 33 families are used by the people of northeast India for the treatment of malaria. Six plant species, namely, Alstonia scholaris, Coptis teeta, Crotolaria occulta, Ocimum sanctum, Polygala persicariaefolia, Vitex peduncularis, have been reported by more than one worker from different parts of northeast India. The species reported to be used for the treatment of malaria were either found around the vicinity of their habitation or in the forest area of northeast India. The most frequently used plant parts were leaves (33%), roots (31%), and bark and whole plant (12%). The present study has compiled and enlisted the antimalarial plants of northeast India, which would help future workers to find out the suitable antimalarial plants by thorough study. PMID:22529674

  6. Northeast View From Pathfinder Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This panorama of the region to the northeast of the lander was constructed to support the Sojourner Rover Team's plans to conduct an 'autonomous traverse' to explore the terrain away from the lander after science objectives in the lander vicinity had been met. The large, relatively bright surface in the foreground, about 10 meters (33 feet) from the spacecraft, in this scene is 'Baker's Bench.' The large, elongated rock left of center in the middle distance is 'Zaphod.'

    This view was produced by combining 8 individual 'Superpan' scenes from the left and right eyes of the IMP camera. Each frame consists of 8 individual frames (left eye) and 7 frames (right eye) taken with different color filters that were enlarged by 500% and then co-added using Adobe Photoshop to produce, in effect, a super-resolution panchromatic frame that is sharper than an individual frame would be.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The IMP was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  7. The Northeast Stream Quality Assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Metre, Peter C.; Riva-Murray, Karen; Coles, James F.

    2016-04-22

    In 2016, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) is assessing stream quality in the northeastern United States. The goal of the Northeast Stream Quality Assessment (NESQA) is to assess the quality of streams in the region by characterizing multiple water-quality factors that are stressors to aquatic life and evaluating the relation between these stressors and biological communities. The focus of NESQA in 2016 will be on the effects of urbanization and agriculture on stream quality in all or parts of eight states: Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Vermont.Findings will provide the public and policymakers with information about the most critical factors affecting stream quality, thus providing insights about possible approaches to protect the health of streams in the region. The NESQA study will be the fourth regional study conducted as part of NAWQA and will be of similar design and scope to the first three, in the Midwest in 2013, the Southeast in 2014, and the Pacific Northwest in 2015 (http://txpub.usgs.gov/RSQA/).

  8. Structural processes at slow-spreading ridges.

    PubMed

    Mutter, J C; Karson, J A

    1992-07-31

    Slow-spreading (<35 millimeters per year) mid-ocean ridges are dominated by segmented, asymmetric, rifted depressions like continental rifts. Fast-spreading ridges display symmetric, elevated volcanic edifices that vary in shape and size along axis. Deep earthquakes, major normal faults, and exposures of lower crustal rocks are common only along slow-spreading ridges. These contrasting features suggest that mechanical deformation is far more important in crustal formation at slow-spreading ridges than at fast-spreading ridges. New seismic images suggest that the nature and scale of segmentation of slow-spreading ridges is integral to the deformational process and not to magmatic processes that may control segmentation on fast-spreading ridges.

  9. The East Greenland Ridge - a continental sliver along the Greenland Fracture Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlings, Joanna; Funck, Thomas; Castro, Carlos F.; Hopper, John R.

    2014-05-01

    The East Greenland Ridge (EGR), situated along the Greenland Fracture Zone in the northern part of the Greenland-Norwegian Sea, is a NW-SE trending 250-km-long and up to 50-km-wide bathymetric high that separates the Greenland Basin in the south from the Boreas Basin in the north. Previous seismic work established that the EGR is primarily continental in nature. Detailed swath bathymetric data revealed a complex internal structure of the ridge with two main overstepping ridge segments. These segments were not adequately covered by the GEUS2002NEG seismic survey as the detailed structure was not known at that time. The crustal affinity of the northwestern, landward-most ridge segment, and how it is attached to the Northeast Greenland continental shelf, remained unclear. The GEUS-EAGER2011 survey was designed to address these issues and to provide further constraints on the structural development of the EGR. During the GEUS-EAGER2011 survey, additional seismic refraction and reflection data were acquired on the EGR and the Northeast Greenland shelf. The data set consists of two strike lines covering the seaward-most part of the Northeast Greenland shelf and the landward-most part of the EGR, and one cross line extending from the Boreas Basin, across the ridge and into the Greenland Basin. A total of 15 ocean bottom seismometers and 46 sonobuoys were deployed along the three seismic refraction lines. P-wave velocity models for the crust and upper mantle were derived by forward and inverse modelling of the travel times of the observed seismic phases using the raytracing algorithm RAYINVR. Seismic reflection data, coinciding with the seismic refraction data were used to guide the modelling of the sedimentary layers down to basement. The velocity models confirm that the crust has a continental nature along both ridge segments with a velocity structure that significantly differs from that of normal oceanic crust. The models also show that the crust of the EGR is linked to

  10. Microwave ridged waveguide beam pickups

    SciTech Connect

    Suddeth, D.

    1985-01-01

    Sensitive broad-band beam pickups are a prerequisite for improved stochastic beam cooling. The 2-4 GHz and the 4-8 GHz bands have been of particular interest for stochastic cooling applications. This report summarizes the striking results of an investigation of ridged waveguide pickups at Argonne. An upper-to-lower frequency ratio of 2.4:1 is readily obtained with a ridged waveguide as compared to 1.5:1 with a standard waveguide. Wire measurements and tests at the Argonne beam test facility indicate an approximate 20% increase in gain per unit over a stripline with comparable longitudinal spacing. Another advantage of waveguide pickups is construction simplicity. The output is easily coupled to a transmission line. Descriptions of the design, construction, and results are included in this report.

  11. Status of Blue Ridge Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This is one in a series of reports prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overview of Blue Ridge Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most current reports and data available, as well as interview with water resource professionals in various federal, state, and local agencies. Blue Ridge Reservoir is a single-purpose hydropower generating project. When consistent with this primary objective, the reservoir is also operated to benefit secondary objectives including water quality, recreation, fish and aquatic habitat, development of shoreline, aesthetic quality, and other public and private uses that support overall regional economic growth and development. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Review

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, C.; Pearce, J.; Zucker, A.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents brief descriptions of the following programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory: The effects of pollution and climate change on forests; automation to improve the safety and efficiency of rearming battle tanks; new technologies for DNA sequencing; ORNL probes the human genome; ORNL as a supercomputer research center; paving the way to superconcrete made with polystyrene; a new look at supercritical water used in waste treatment; and small mammals as environmental monitors.

  13. A Subnational Perspective for Comparative Research: Education and Development in Northeast Brazil and Northeast Thailand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fry, Gerald; Kempner, Ken

    1996-01-01

    Case studies of northeast Brazil and northeast Thailand highlight the importance of a subnational approach to comparative research. Compares geographic and economic conditions, regional culture, ethnicity and gender issues, migration patterns, religion, literacy, and educational underdevelopment. Points out that neglect of a region and its people…

  14. Oral Mucosal Lesions in Indians From Northeast Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Cury, Patricia Ramos; Porto, Lia Pontes Arruda; dos Santos, Jean Nunes; e Ribeiro, Livia Silva Figueiredo; de Aquino Xavier, Flavia Caló; Figueiredo, Andreia Leal; Ramalho, Luciana Maria Pedreira

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the prevalence of oral mucosal lesions, and their risk indicators in adult Kiriri Indians from Northeast Brazil. Clinical oral examination was performed on a representative sample of 223 Indians (age ≥19 years). A systematic evaluation of lips, labial mucosa and sulcus, commissures, buccal mucosa and sulcus, gingiva and alveolar ridge, tongue, floor of the mouth, and soft and hard palate was performed. Bivariate analysis was conducted to assess associations between mucosal conditions and age, gender, income, educational level, diabetic status, and smoking status. Mucosal lesions were found in 50 participants (22.4%). The most prevalent lesions were fistulae (6.2%) and traumatic ulcers (4.48%). Oral mucosal was associated with higher age (≥35 years; odds ratio [OR] = 1.99, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05–3.76, P = 0.03) and lower education level (<9 years; OR = 2.13, 95% CI: 0.96–4.71, P = 0.06). Mucosal conditions are prevalent in Kiriri Indians and the presence of mucosal lesions is associated with advanced age and lower education. A public health program aimed at preventing and treating mucosal lesions and targeted toward the high-risk group is vital to improve the oral health status of this population. PMID:25501053

  15. Structural and stratigraphic controls on cave development in the Oak Ridge area, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, P A; Lemiszki, P J

    1992-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) is located in the northwestern part of the Valley and Ridge province in east Tennessee. The Valley and Ridge province is the topographic expression of the southern Appalachian foreland fold-thrust belt, which formed during the late Paleozoic Alleghanian orogeny. In the Oak Ridge area, three major northwest verging thrust faults (Kingston, Whiteoak Mountain, and Copper Creek) imbricate and juxtapose carbonate and clastic stratigraphic units that range in age from the lower Cambrian to the lower Mississippian. The carbonate stratigraphic units range in thickness from 1278 to 1748 m and include the Maynardville Limestone in the Conasauga Group (hereby included as part of the Knox Group), the Knox Group, and the Chickamauga Group. Stratigraphic relationships and repetition of units by thrust faulting has produced three northeast striking and southeast dipping carbonate bands bounded to the northwest and southeast by noncarbonate units. Preliminary results indicate that within two of these carbonate bands, formations composed of mudstone and argillaceous limestone appear to further subdivide groundwater basins. Our efforts have focused on relating the stratigraphic and structural characteristics of these rock units with cave development in the region.

  16. Changing characteristics of arctic pressure ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadhams, Peter; Toberg, Nick

    2012-04-01

    The advent of multibeam sonar permits us to obtain full three-dimensional maps of the underside of sea ice. In particular this enables us to distinguish the morphological characteristics of first-year (FY) and multi-year (MY) pressure ridges in a statistically valid way, whereas in the past only a small number of ridges could be mapped laboriously by drilling. In this study pressure ridge distributions from two parts of the Arctic Ocean are compared, in both the cases using mainly data collected by the submarine “Tireless” in March 2007 during two specific grid surveys, in the Beaufort Sea at about 75° N, 140° W (N of Prudhoe Bay), and north of Ellesmere Island at about 83° 20‧ N, 64° W. In the Beaufort Sea the ice was mainly FY, and later melted or broke up as this area became ice-free during the subsequent summer. N of Ellesmere Island the ice was mainly MY. Ridge depth and spacing distributions were derived for each region using the boat's upward looking sonar, combined with distributions of shapes of the ridges encountered, using the Kongsberg EM3002 multibeam sonar. The differing shapes of FY and MY ridges are consistent with two later high-resolution multibeam studies of specific ridges by AUV. FY ridges are found to fit the normal triangular shape template in cross-section (with a range of slope angles averaging 27°) with a relatively constant along-crest depth, and often a structure of small ice blocks can be distinguished. MY ridges, however, are often split into a number of independent solid, smooth blocks of large size, giving an irregular ridge profile which may be seemingly without linearity. Our hypothesis for this difference is that during its long lifetime an MY ridge is subjected to several episodes of crack opening; new cracks in the Arctic pack often run in straight lines across the ridges and undeformed ice alike. Such a crack will open somewhat before refreezing, interpolating a stretch of thin ice into the structure, and breaking up

  17. Accretion and Subduction of Oceanic Lithosphere: 2D and 3D Seismic Studies of Off-Axis Magma Lenses at East Pacific Rise 9°37-40'N Area and Downgoing Juan de Fuca Plate at Cascadia Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Shuoshuo

    Two thirds of the Earth's lithosphere is covered by the ocean. The oceanic lithosphere is formed at mid-ocean ridges, evolves and interacts with the overlying ocean for millions of years, and is eventually consumed at subduction zones. In this thesis, I use 2D and 3D multichannel seismic (MCS) data to investigate the accretionary and hydrothermal process on the ridge flank of the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise (EPR) at 9°37-40'N and the structure of the downgoing Juan de Fuca plate at the Cascadia subduction zone offshore Oregon and Washington. Using 3D multichannel seismic (MCS) data, I image a series of off-axis magma lenses (OAML) in the middle or lower crust, 2-10 km from the ridge axis at EPR 9°37-40'N. The large OAMLs are associated with Moho travel time anomalies and local volcanic edifices above them, indicating off-axis magmatism contributes to crustal accretion though both intrusion and eruption (Chapter 1). To assess the effect of OAMLs on the upper crustal structure, I conduct 2-D travel time tomography on downward continued MCS data along two across-axis lines above a prominent OAML in our study area. I find higher upper crustal velocity in a region ~ 2 km wide above this OAML compared with the surrounding crust. I attribute these local anomalies to enhanced precipitation of alteration minerals in the pore space of upper crust associated with high-temperature off-axis hydrothermal circulation driven by the OAML (Chapter 2). At Cascadia, a young and hot end-member of the global subduction system, the state of hydration of the downgoing Juan de Fuca (JdF) plate is important to a number of subduction processes, yet is poorly known. As local zones of higher porosity and permeability, faults constitute primary conduits for seawater to enter the crust and potentially uppermost mantle. From pre-stack time migrated MCS images, I observe pervasive faulting in the sediment section up to 200 km from the deformation front. Yet faults with large throw and

  18. Trace elements in ocean ridge basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kay, R. W.; Hubbard, N. J.

    1978-01-01

    A study is made of the trace elements found in ocean ridge basalts. General assumptions regarding melting behavior, trace element fractionation, and alteration effects are presented. Data on the trace elements are grouped according to refractory lithophile elements, refractory siderophile elements, and volatile metals. Variations in ocean ridge basalt chemistry are noted both for regional and temporal characteristics. Ocean ridge basalts are compared to other terrestrial basalts, such as those having La/Yb ratios greater than those of chondrites, and those having La/Yb ratios less than those of chondrites. It is found that (1) as compared to solar or chondrite ratios, ocean ridge basalts have low ratios of large, highly-charged elements to smaller less highly-charged elements, (2) ocean ridge basalts exhibit low ratios of volatile to nonvolatile elements, and (3) the transition metals Cr through Zn in ocean ridge basalts are not fractionated more than a factor of 2 or 3 from the chondritic abundance ratios.

  19. Directionality of ambient noise on the Juan de Fuca plate: implications for source locations of the primary and secondary microseisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ye; Ritzwoller, Michael H.

    2015-04-01

    Based on cross-correlations of ambient seismic noise computed using 61 ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) within the Juan de Fuca (JdF) plate from the Cascadia Initiative experiment and 42 continental stations near the coast of the western United States, we investigate the locations of generation of the primary (11-20 s period) and secondary (5-10 s period) microseisms in the northern Pacific Ocean by analysing the directionality and seasonality of the microseism (Rayleigh wave) signals received in this region. We conclude that (1) the ambient noise observed across the array is much different in the primary and secondary microseism bands, both in its azimuthal content and seasonal variation. (2) The principal secondary microseism signals propagate towards the east, consistent with their generation in deep waters of the North Pacific, perhaps coincident both with the region of observed body wave excitation and the predicted wave-wave interaction region from recent studies. (3) The primary microseism, as indicated by observations of the azimuthal dependence of the fundamental mode Rayleigh wave as well as observations of precursory arrivals, derives significantly from the shallow waters of the eastern Pacific near to the JdF plate but also has a component generated at greater distance of unknown origin. (4) These observations suggest different physical mechanisms for generating the two microseisms: the secondary microseisms are likely to be generated by non-linear wave-wave interaction over the deep Pacific Ocean, while the primary microseism may couple directly into the solid earth locally in shallow waters from ocean gravity waves. (5) Above 5 s period, high quality empirical Green's functions are observed from cross-correlations between deep water OBSs and continental stations, which illustrates that microseisms propagate efficiently from either deep or shallow water source regions onto the continent and are well recorded by continental seismic stations.

  20. P-wave tomography of the western United States: Insight into the Yellowstone hotspot and the Juan de Fuca slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, You; Zhao, Dapeng

    2012-06-01

    We used 190,947 high-quality P-wave arrival times from 8421 local earthquakes and 1,098,022 precise travel-time residuals from 6470 teleseismic events recorded by the EarthScope/USArray transportable array to determine a detailed three-dimensional P-wave velocity model of the crust and mantle down to 1000 km depth under the western United States (US). Our tomography revealed strong heterogeneities in the crust and upper mantle under the western US. Prominent high-velocity anomalies are imaged beneath Idaho Batholith, central Colorado Plateau, Cascadian subduction zone, stable North American Craton, Transverse Ranges, and Southern Sierra Nevada. Prominent low-velocity anomalies are imaged at depths of 0-200 km beneath Snake River Plain, which may represent a small-scale convection beneath the western US. The low-velocity structure deviates variably from a narrow vertical plume conduit extending down to ˜1000 km depth, suggesting that the Yellowstone hotspot may have a lower-mantle origin. The Juan de Fuca slab is imaged as a dipping high-velocity anomaly under the western US. The slab geometry and its subducted depth vary in the north-south direction. In the southern parts the slab may have subducted down to >600 km depth. A "slab hole" is revealed beneath Oregon, which shows up as a low-velocity anomaly at depths of ˜100 to 300 km. The formation of the slab hole may be related to the Newberry magmatism. The removal of flat subducted Farallon slab may have triggered the vigorous magmatism in the Basin and Range and southern part of Rocky Mountains and also resulted in the uplift of the Colorado Plateau and Rocky Mountains.

  1. The Mid-Ocean Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, K.C. ); Fox, P.J. )

    1990-06-01

    The Mid-Ocean Ridge girdles the earth like the seam of a baseball. For more than 75,000 kilometers, this submerged range of razorback mountains--many higher than the greatest peaks on land--marks the restless boundary between continental plates. An analysis of this huge structure reveals a fascinating picture of how it is created by magma welling up as the plates pull apart. The paper discusses sea-floor spreading, the magma supply model, types of discontinuities, off-axis structures, small overlaps and DEVALs (slight DEViations in Axial Linearity), and aquatic life.

  2. Ridge effect and alignment phenomenon

    SciTech Connect

    Lokhtin, I. P. Managadze, A. K. Snigirev, A. M.

    2013-05-15

    It is assumed that the ridge effect observed by the CMS Collaboration in proton-proton collisions at the LHC and the phenomenon observed by the Pamir Collaboration in emulsion experiments with cosmic rays and characterized by the alignment of spots on a film is a manifestation of the same as-yet-unknown mechanism of the emergence of a coplanar structure of events. A large coplanar effect at the LHC in the region of forward rapidities is predicted on the basis of this hypothesis and an analysis of experimental data.

  3. Climate change in the Brazilian northeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Regina R.; Haarsma, Reindert J.; Hoelzemann, Judith J.

    2012-10-01

    Climate Change, Impacts and Vulnerabilities in Brazil: Preparing the Brazilian Northeast for the Future; Natal, Brazil, 27 May to 01 June 2012 The variability of the semiarid climate of the Brazilian northeast has enormous environmental and social implications. Because most of the population in this area depends on subsistence agriculture, periods of severe drought in the past have caused extreme poverty and subsequent migration to urban centers. From the ecological point of view, frequent and prolonged droughts can lead to the desertification of large areas. Understanding the causes of rainfall variability, in particular periods of severe drought, is crucial for accurate forecasting, mitigation, and adaptation in this important region of Brazil.

  4. Horizontal Ridge Augmentation with Piezoelectric Hinge-Assisted Ridge Split Technique in the Atrophic Posterior Mandible

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Min-Sang; Lee, Ji-Hye; Lee, Sang-Woon; Cho, Lee-Ra; Huh, Yoon-Hyuk; Lee, You-Sun

    2014-01-01

    Onlay bone grafting, guided bone regeneration, and alveolar ridge split technique are considered reliable bone augmentation methods on the horizontally atrophic alveolar ridge. Among these techniques, alveolar ridge split procedures are technique-sensitive and difficult to perform in the posterior mandible. This case report describes successful implant placement with the use of piezoelectric hinge-assisted ridge split technique in an atrophic posterior mandible. PMID:27489822

  5. Geo-Morphological Analyses of the Gakkel Ridge and the Southwest Indian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorschel, B.; Schlindwein, V. S. N.; Eagles, G.

    2014-12-01

    The Gakkel Ridge in the Arctic Ocean and the Southwest Indian Ridge in the Southwest Indian Ocean between Africa and Antarctica are ultraslow-spreading (<20 mm yr-1) mid ocean ridges. This type of mid ocean ridge has distinct geo-morphologies that are influenced by the slow rate of plate divergence and by mantle potential temperature, which control the processes (peridotite diapirism and intersticial melt migration) by which material rises to fill the space vacated by plate divergence. These ridges are characterised by non-orthogonal spreading. Transform faults, typical of faster spreading mid ocean ridges, are far less common at ultraslow spreading mid ocean ridges. Thus in return, detailed geo-statistical analyses of the geo-morphology of ultraslow-spreading mid ocean ridges can provide valuable information towards a better understanding of these slowest of spreading ridges. We have generated high resolution bathymetric grids for the Gakkel and Southwest Indian ridges based on high resolution multibeam echosounder data from various expeditions with RV Polarstern. On the basis of these grids, geo-statistical analyses allow for an assessment of the geo-morphological elements of the ridges on various scales. The results of these analyses show that, approximately 200 km long medium-scale sections of the ridges can be characterised by the lengths and orientations of the short-scale (hundreds of meters to tens of kilometres) ridges and troughs. The geomorphologies of short-scale ridges and troughs situated at the junctions between medium scale sections often exhibit a mixture of the geomorphological elements seen in the neighbouring sections. These geo-morphological patterns provide insights into the overall spreading-geometry along the Gakkel Ridge and the Southwest Indian Ridge.

  6. 20. DETAIL OF OFFICE FURNITURE IN NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECRETARIES' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. DETAIL OF OFFICE FURNITURE IN NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECRETARIES' OFFICE ALONG NORTH SIDE OF FIRST FLOOR. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Boise Project, Boise Project Office, 214 Broadway, Boise, Ada County, ID

  7. 2. Light tower and keeper's house, view southwest, north northeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Light tower and keeper's house, view southwest, north northeast side of tower, northeast and northwest sides of keeper's house - Wood Island Light Station, East end of Wood Island, at mouth of Soo River, Biddeford Pool, York County, ME

  8. 1. BUILDING 522, SOUTH SIDE, OBLIQUE VIEW, FROM NORTHEAST CORNER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. BUILDING 522, SOUTH SIDE, OBLIQUE VIEW, FROM NORTHEAST CORNER OF BUILDING 431, LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Oakland Naval Supply Center, Aeronautical Materials Storehouses, Between E & G Streets, between Fourth & Sixth Streets, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  9. 53. INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING NORTH NORTHEAST SHOWING THE REMAINS OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING NORTH NORTHEAST SHOWING THE REMAINS OF A WOODEN SETTLING BOX IN THE BACKGROUND RIGHT. AMALGAMATING PANS IN THE FOREGROUND. - Standard Gold Mill, East of Bodie Creek, Northeast of Bodie, Bodie, Mono County, CA

  10. 11. DETAIL SHOWING ROLLING ENGINE DECK AND NORTHEAST TRUSS OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. DETAIL SHOWING ROLLING ENGINE DECK AND NORTHEAST TRUSS OF SUPERSTRUCTURE. Looking northeast. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  11. 19. INTERIOR OF NORTHEAST REAR BEDROOM SHOWING ALUMINUMFRAME SLIDING GLASS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. INTERIOR OF NORTHEAST REAR BEDROOM SHOWING ALUMINUM-FRAME SLIDING GLASS WINDOWS. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 4, Worker Cottage, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  12. 39. FOURTH FLOOR: DETAIL OF STEAM HEATING PIPES ON NORTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. FOURTH FLOOR: DETAIL OF STEAM HEATING PIPES ON NORTHEAST WALL OF DINING AND SOCIAL HALL ON NORTHWEST END OF BUILDING LOOKING NORTHEAST - Masonic Temple, 1111-1119 Eleventh Street, Altoona, Blair County, PA

  13. Interior view of northeast unit master bedroom, looking into sleeping ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of northeast unit master bedroom, looking into sleeping porch, facing northeast - MacDill Air Force Base, Double Non-Commissioned Officers' Quarters, 7418 Hanger Loop Drive, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

  14. 7. Oil house, view northeast, west and south sides ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Oil house, view northeast, west and south sides - Great Duck Island Light Station, At southern tip of Great Duck Island southeast of Bass Harbor & northeast of Frenchboro, Frenchboro, Hancock County, ME

  15. 5. GENERAL VIEW OF FARM, VIEW OF OUTBUILDINGS TO NORTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. GENERAL VIEW OF FARM, VIEW OF OUTBUILDINGS TO NORTHEAST - (from left) CHICKEN COOP, WORKSHOP, PUMP HOUSE - John & Mary Felderman Farm, Northeast Corner of County Roads 56 & T, Clarkville, Yuma County, CO

  16. 2. THREESTALL GARAGE. NORTHEAST SIDE. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. Rainbow ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. THREE-STALL GARAGE. NORTHEAST SIDE. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Rainbow Hydroelectric Facility, Three Stall Garage, On north bank of Missouri River 2 miles Northeast of Great Falls, & end of Rainbow Dam Road, Great Falls, Cascade County, MT

  17. 1. THREESTALL GARAGE. SOUTHEAST AND NORTHEAST SIDES. VIEW TO WEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. THREE-STALL GARAGE. SOUTHEAST AND NORTHEAST SIDES. VIEW TO WEST. - Rainbow Hydroelectric Facility, Three Stall Garage, On north bank of Missouri River 2 miles Northeast of Great Falls, & end of Rainbow Dam Road, Great Falls, Cascade County, MT

  18. 3. CLUBHOUSE. FRONT (SOUTHEAST) FACADE AND NORTHEAST SIDE. VIEW TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. CLUBHOUSE. FRONT (SOUTHEAST) FACADE AND NORTHEAST SIDE. VIEW TO WEST. - Rainbow Hydroelectric Facility, Clubhouse, On north bank of Missouri River 2 miles Northeast of Great Falls, & end of Rainbow Dam Road, Great Falls, Cascade County, MT

  19. 2. TOOL HOUSE. NORTHEAST AND SOUTHEAST SIDES. VIEW TO WEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. TOOL HOUSE. NORTHEAST AND SOUTHEAST SIDES. VIEW TO WEST. - Rainbow Hydroelectric Facility, Tool House, On north bank of Missouri River 2 miles Northeast of Great Falls, & end of Rainbow Dam Road, Great Falls, Cascade County, MT

  20. 4. CLUBHOUSE. NORTHEAST SIDE. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. Rainbow Hydroelectric ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. CLUBHOUSE. NORTHEAST SIDE. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Rainbow Hydroelectric Facility, Clubhouse, On north bank of Missouri River 2 miles Northeast of Great Falls, & end of Rainbow Dam Road, Great Falls, Cascade County, MT

  1. 6. CLUBHOUSE. SOUTHWEST SIDE. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. Rainbow Hydroelectric ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. CLUBHOUSE. SOUTHWEST SIDE. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Rainbow Hydroelectric Facility, Clubhouse, On north bank of Missouri River 2 miles Northeast of Great Falls, & end of Rainbow Dam Road, Great Falls, Cascade County, MT

  2. 1. TWOSTALL GARAGE. FRONT (SOUTHWEST) SIDE. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. TWO-STALL GARAGE. FRONT (SOUTHWEST) SIDE. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Rainbow Hydroelectric Facility, Two Stall Garage, On north bank of Missouri River 2 miles Northeast of Great Falls, & end of Rainbow Dam Road, Great Falls, Cascade County, MT

  3. 1. TOOL HOUSE. NORTHEAST AND NORTHWEST SIDES. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. TOOL HOUSE. NORTHEAST AND NORTHWEST SIDES. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Rainbow Hydroelectric Facility, Tool House, On north bank of Missouri River 2 miles Northeast of Great Falls, & end of Rainbow Dam Road, Great Falls, Cascade County, MT

  4. 4. HOUSE No. 16. NORTHEAST SIDE. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. HOUSE No. 16. NORTHEAST SIDE. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Rainbow Hydroelectric Facility, House No. 16, On north bank of Missouri River 2 miles Northeast of Great Falls, & end of Rainbow Dam Road, Great Falls, Cascade County, MT

  5. 4. FOREMAN'S HOUSE. NORTHEAST SIDE. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. Rainbow ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. FOREMAN'S HOUSE. NORTHEAST SIDE. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Rainbow Hydroelectric Facility, Foreman's House, On north bank of Missouri River 2 miles Northeast of Great Falls, & end of Rainbow Dam Road, Great Falls, Cascade County, MT

  6. 3. TWOSTALL GARAGE SOUTHEAST AND NORTHEAST SIDES. VIEW TO WEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. TWO-STALL GARAGE SOUTHEAST AND NORTHEAST SIDES. VIEW TO WEST. - Rainbow Hydroelectric Facility, Two Stall Garage, On north bank of Missouri River 2 miles Northeast of Great Falls, & end of Rainbow Dam Road, Great Falls, Cascade County, MT

  7. 2. FOREMAN'S HOUSE. SOUTHWEST SIDE. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. Rainbow ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. FOREMAN'S HOUSE. SOUTHWEST SIDE. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Rainbow Hydroelectric Facility, Foreman's House, On north bank of Missouri River 2 miles Northeast of Great Falls, & end of Rainbow Dam Road, Great Falls, Cascade County, MT

  8. 55. VIEW TO NORTHEAST OF MOTOR AND REDUCTION GEAR NO. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    55. VIEW TO NORTHEAST OF MOTOR AND REDUCTION GEAR NO. 1: View towards the northeast of Motor and Reduction Gear No. 1, installed in 1957. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  9. 10. Lighthouse boathouse and granite wharf, view north northeast, southwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Lighthouse boathouse and granite wharf, view north northeast, southwest and southeast sides of boathouse, west and south sides of dock - Whitehead Light Station, Whitehead Island, East northeast of Tenants Harbor, Spruce Head, Knox County, ME

  10. Detail of door and gable treatment, looking northeast at intersection ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of door and gable treatment, looking northeast at intersection of East Wing (Wing 1) and central core - Hospital for Sick Children, 1731 Bunker Hill Road, Northeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  11. Steam sand dryer in northeast part of sand tower. View ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Steam sand dryer in northeast part of sand tower. View to northeast - Duluth & Iron Range Rail Road Company Shops, Sand Tower, Southwest of downtown Two Harbors, northwest of Agate Bay, Two Harbors, Lake County, MN

  12. 3. Light tower and fog signal house, view northeast, west ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Light tower and fog signal house, view northeast, west and south sides - Great Duck Island Light Station, At southern tip of Great Duck Island southeast of Bass Harbor & northeast of Frenchboro, Frenchboro, Hancock County, ME

  13. OVERALL VIEW OF QUARRY, FACING NORTHEAST, SHOWING SOUTHERN SECTION OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERALL VIEW OF QUARRY, FACING NORTHEAST, SHOWING SOUTHERN SECTION OF QUARRY - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 2, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  14. Latest Developments in the Installation Planning for Stage 1, NEPTUNE Regional Cabled Observatory, Northeast Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, C. R.

    2004-12-01

    NEPTUNE is a proposed innovative network of over 30 sub-sea observatories linked by over 3300 km of powered, fiber-optic cables covering the Juan de Fuca Plate (200,000 sq km), Northeast Pacific. Each observatory will host and power many scientific instruments on the surrounding seafloor, in boreholes in the seafloor, and buoyed up into the water column. Remotely operated and autonomous vehicles will reside at depth, recharge at observatories, and respond to distant labs. Continuous near-real-time multidisciplinary measurement series will extend over 30 years. Shore stations will be located in Port Alberni, BC and Nedonna Beach, OR. Major research themes include: the structure and seismic behavior of the ocean crust; the dynamics of hot and cold fluids and gas hydrates in the upper ocean crust and overlying sediments; ocean climate change and its effect on the ocean biota at all depths; and the barely known ecosystem dynamics and biodiversity of the deep-sea. All involve interacting processes, long term changes, and non-linear, chaotic, episodic events that are hard to study with traditional means. VENUS, MARS, and NEPTUNE will use many of the same cable and engineering systems with the former two acting as test-beds for the latter. NEPTUNE is an US/Canada (70/30) partnership with the total facility cost of about 250M. Over 40M has already been funded for NEPTUNE design and development and for VENUS and MARS. Funding for NEPTUNE Canada's installation contribution (CAN$62.4M) was announced in October 2003. With US NSF/MREFC funding not anticipated before FY 2006, the Northern Loop (Stage 1) of the Project will be installed by NEPTUNE Canada, which comprises a consortium of 12 Canadian universities, lead by the University of Victoria. Housed in new quarters at UVic, NEPTUNE Canada has hired a dozen staff members, with more of be appointed, and has purchased the former Teleglobe TPC4 Shore Station at Port Alberni. Current activities include: a) issuing an RFQu and RFP

  15. Probable Causes of the Abnormal Ridge Accompanying the 2013-2014 California Drought: ENSO Precursor and Anthropogenic Warming Footprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S-Y; Hipps, Lawrence; Gillies, Robert R.; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2014-05-16

    The 2013-14 California drought was accompanied by an anomalous high-amplitude ridge system. The anomalous ridge was investigated using reanalysis data and the Community Earth System Model (CESM). It was found that the ridge emerged from continual sources of Rossby wave energy in the western North Pacific starting in late summer, and subsequently intensified into winter. The ridge generated a surge of wave energy downwind and deepened further the trough over the northeast U.S., forming a dipole. The dipole and associated circulation pattern is not linked directly with either ENSO or Pacific Decadal Oscillation; instead it is correlated with a type of ENSO precursor. The connection between the dipole and ENSO precursor has become stronger since the 1970s, and this is attributed to increased GHG loading as simulated by the CESM. Therefore, there is a traceable anthropogenic warming footprint in the enormous intensity of the anomalous ridge during winter 2013-14, the associated drought and its intensity.

  16. NORTHEAST VIEW OF FOUNDRY FROM TOP OF GREY IRON CUPOLA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTHEAST VIEW OF FOUNDRY FROM TOP OF GREY IRON CUPOLA SHOWING CORE ROOM ROOF DIRECTLY NORTHEAST, GREY IRON FOUNDRY TO THE RIGHT, MALLEABLE IRON CUPOLAS AND FOUNDRY NORTHEAST OF GREY IRON FOUNDRY WITH THE BRASS FOUNDRY IN THE REAR. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  17. Emergency preparedness at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Skipper, M.N.

    1990-03-01

    Emergency preparedness for industry was commonly believed to be an essential responsibility on the part of management. Therefore, this study was conducted to research and accumulate information and data on emergency preparedness at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The objective of this study was to conduct a thorough evaluation of emergency preparedness knowledge among employees to determine if they were properly informed or if they needed more training. Also, this study was conducted to provide insight to management as to what their responsibility was concerning this training. To assess employee emergency preparedness knowledge, a questionnaire was developed and administered to 100 employees at ORNL. The data was analyzed using frequencies and percentages of response and was displayed through the use of graphs within the report. 22 refs., 22 figs.

  18. A 14-year-long Measurement of the Convergence Rate of the Juan de Fuca and North America Plates Offshore Central Oregon using GPS-Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwell, C. D.; Webb, S. C.; Nooner, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    The motion of the sea floor was measured at a 3000-m-deep site approximately 120 km offshore Central Oregon using the GPS-Acoustic technique in 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003 and 2014. The GPS-Acoustic derived motion relative to the interior of North America agrees with the geomagnetically-derived value within their measurement uncertainties. The time series from the early 2000's was resurrected using two new innovations. The first innovation, a permanent benchmark that has locating channels and mating pins, allows reoccupation of an established benchmark at any later date using an ROV to replace the transponder on the benchmark. The second innovation: an autonomous platform based on a Waveglider that carries a GPS navigated acoustic transponder interrogation system that is wave and solar powered. This enables measurements to be obtained over a GPSA site without requiring a large ship, greatly reducing the cost of a GPSA measurement. Combining data at this site with data from two other GPS-Acoustic seafloor sites on the Juan de Fuca plate, makes it possible to determine a present-day Euler Pole for the Juan de Fuca - North America plates using GPS-Acoustics seafloor geodesy.

  19. President's Report. Northeast Missouri State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClain, Charles J.

    A report by the president of Northeast Missouri State University (NMSU) is presented. After discussing academic standards, five challenges that face higher education are considered: adjusting institutional goals to meet social change, renewing the emphasis on quality, helping students fulfill their potential, expanding the financial support for…

  20. Northeast Regional Exchange, Annual Report, January 1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1982

    The activities of Northeast Regional Exchange, Inc. (NEREX) during its first year of operation are delineated in this report. The newest member of the national network of Research and Development Exchanges (RDx), this service agency was established to promote educational improvement in the seven northeastern states: Connecticut, Maine,…

  1. 27 CFR 9.182 - Ribbon Ridge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Approved Maps. The appropriate maps used to determine the boundaries of the Ribbon Ridge viticultural area are the following two United States Geological Survey (USGS), 1:24,000 scale, topographical maps (7.5..., Oregon, 1956, revised 1993. (c) Boundary. The Ribbon Ridge viticultural area is located in...

  2. Cedar Ridge Camp: Using the Local Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Grayson

    2007-01-01

    In 2007 Cedar Ridge Camp opened for its first season as a traditional co-ed summer camp and year-round outdoor education and recreation centre. The mission would centre on creating a program that would encourage personal development and growth through a shared outdoor experience. Cedar Ridge's main goals were to promote the formation of close…

  3. Ridges and tidal stress on Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bart, G.D.; Turtle, E.P.; Jaeger, W.L.; Keszthelyi, L.P.; Greenberg, R.

    2004-01-01

    Sets of ridges of uncertain origin are seen in twenty-nine high-resolution Galileo images, which sample seven locales on Io. These ridges are on the order of a few kilometers in length with a spacing of about a kilometer. Within each locale, the ridges have a consistent orientation, but the orientations vary from place to place. We investigate whether these ridges could be a result of tidal flexing of Io by comparing their orientations with the peak tidal stress orientations at the same locations. We find that ridges grouped near the equator are aligned either north-south or east-west, as are the predicted principal stress orientations there. It is not clear why particular groups run north-south and others east-west. The one set of ridges observed far from the equator (52?? S) has an oblique azimuth, as do the tidal stresses at those latitudes. Therefore, all observed ridges have similar orientations to the tidal stress in their region. This correlation is consistent with the hypothesis that tidal flexing of Io plays an important role in ridge formation. ?? 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Transverse dune trailing ridges and vegetation succession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesp, Patrick A.; ‘Marisa' Martinez, M. L.

    2008-07-01

    We describe the evolution of, and vegetation succession on, a previously undescribed landform: transverse dune trailing ridges at El Farallón transgressive dunefield in the state of Veracruz, Mexico. Three-dimensional clinometer/compass and tape topographic surveys were conducted in conjunction with 1 m 2 contiguous percent cover and presence/absence vegetation survey transects at eight locations across two adjacent trailing ridges. At the study site, and elsewhere, the transverse dune trailing ridges are formed by vegetation colonization of the lateral margins of active transverse, barchanoidal transverse, and aklé or network dunes. For simplicity, all trailing ridges formed from these dune types are referred to as transverse dune trailing ridges. Because there are several transverse dunes in the dunefield, multiple trailing ridges can be formed at one time. Two adjacent trailing ridges were examined. The shortest length ridge was 70 m long, and evolving from a 2.5 m-high transverse dune, while the longer ridge was 140 m long, and evolving from an 8 m-high dune. Trailing ridge length is a proxy measure of ridge age, since the longer the ridge, the greater the length of time since initial formation. With increasing age or distance upwind, species diversity increased, as well as species horizontal extent and percent cover. In turn, the degree of bare sand decreased. Overall, the data indicate a successional trend in the vegetation presence and cover with increasing age upwind. Those species most tolerant to burial ( Croton and Palafoxia) begin the process of trailing ridge formation. Ipomoea and Canavalia are less tolerant to burial and also are typically the next colonizing species. Trachypogon does not tolerate sand burial or deposition very well and only appears after significant stabilization has taken place. The ridges display a moderately defined successional sequence in plant colonization and percentage cover with time (and upwind distance). They are

  5. Hydroforming Applications at Oak Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    bird, e.l.; ludtka, g.m.

    1999-03-10

    Hydroforming technology is a robust forming process that produces components with high precision and complexity. The goal of this paper is to present a brief description of the sheet hydroforming process with respect to the authors' experience and capabilities. Following the authors' discussion of the sheet-metal forming application, the tubular hydroforming process is described in the context of one of our technology development programs with an automotive industrial partner. After that is a summary of the tubular hydroforming advisor (expert system) development activity, which was a significant part of this overall program based on previous experience in developing a design and manufacturing support hydroforming advisor for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant's weapons-component manufacturing needs. Therefore, this paper is divided into three sections: (1) Hydroforming of Stainless Steel Parts, (2) Tubular Hydroforming, and (3) Components of a Tubular Hydroforming Advisor.

  6. Manastash Ridge Observatory Autoguider Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozo, Jason; Huehnerhoff, Joseph; Armstrong, John; Davila, Adrian; Johnson, Courtney; McMaster, Alex; Olinger, Kyle

    2016-06-01

    The Astronomy Undergraduate Engineering Group (AUEG) at the University of Washington has designed and manufactured a novel autoguider system for the 0.8-meter telescope at the Manastash Ridge Observatory in Ellensburg, Washington. The system uses a pickoff mirror placed in the unused optical path, directing the outer field to the guide camera via a system of axi-symmetrically rotating relay mirrors (periscope). This allows the guider to sample nearly 7 times the area that would be possible with the same fixed detector. This system adds closed loop optical feedback to the tracking capabilities of the telescope. When tuned the telescope will be capable of acheiving 0.5 arcsecond tracking or better. Dynamic focusing of the primary optical path will also be an included feature of this system. This unique guider will be a much needed upgrade to the telescope allowing for increased scientific capability.

  7. Crustal structures of the Boreas Basin and the Knipovich Ridge, North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, Tobias; Jokat, Wilfried

    2013-06-01

    The Boreas Basin is located in the Norwegian-Greenland Sea between Northeast Greenland and Svalbard. Towards the east, it is bounded by the ultraslow mid-ocean Knipovich Ridge. Here, we present a 340-km-long seismic refraction line acquired during the expedition ARK-XXIV/3 of research vessel Polarstern in 2009, using 18 ocean bottom seismometers. It crosses the central Boreas Basin from the Knipovich Ridge to the Northeast Greenland margin. Thus, the line provides the first reliable crustal structure information of this basin. In addition, the gravity data acquired parallel to the seismic refraction line are used to calculate a 2.5-D gravity model. The P-wave velocity model shows an unusual ˜3-km-thin oceanic crust with seismic velocities less than 6.3 km s-1, indicating the absence of a significant oceanic layer 3. Mantle velocities vary between 7.5 km s-1 in the uppermost mantle and 8.0 km s-1 at approximately 15 km depth. The low velocities within the upper mantle may be explained by 13 per cent serpentinisation, which is negligible at about 15 km depth. Furthermore, the S-wave velocity model shows low Vp/Vs ratios in the mantle, indicating a highly serpentinised mantle at shallow depths. The gravity model has crustal densities between 2.3 and 2.9 g cm-3, which also point towards the absence of a significant thick oceanic layer 3. The results of our seismic refraction line and other geophysical data indicate that the entire Boreas Basin opened at ultraslow spreading rates since at least ˜28 Ma. No evidence for an extinct spreading ridge in the centre of the Boreas Basin was found.

  8. The Modern Gorda-Juan de Fuca Subduction System and the Inherited Stratification of the Transition Zone below Western US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauzin, B.; van der Hilst, R. D.; Wittlinger, G.; Ricard, Y. R.

    2012-12-01

    We provide insights on the deep geodynamic processes that have shaped western North America (NA) during the past 100 Myr. We use data of P-to-S converted waves recorded at seismic stations of the US Transportable Array to image main discontinuities in shear-wave velocity within the transition zone (TZ). We measure the topography and the reflectance (i.e. the amplitude of conversion) of the `410' and `660' interfaces. We image also minor seismic discontinuities around 350, 590 and 630 km depths. Idaho is the location of strong structural anomalies with a sharp topography of the `660', a thick TZ, a reduced reflectance of the `410' and a positive interface at 630 km depth. The thick TZ and the `630' discontinuity suggest low temperatures and a possible garnet to ilmenite transition. Water could also reduce locally the `410' Vs contrast. A remnant of the Farallon plate, anchored 55 Myr ago in the mantle below Idaho [Schmandt and Humphreys, 2011] and providing cool temperatures and water to the TZ, is a possible explanation. At the same location, a layer with 4% shear-wave speed reduction (the `350') and 70 km thickness is present atop the `410' discontinuity. In addition, an almost continuous interface, marking shear wave velocity reductions, spreads at 590 km depth roughly from southern Idaho to southeastern western US. Dehydration induced partial melting [Bercovici and Karato, 2003] can explain a melt layer atop the `410'. However, it does not explain a widespread negative `590' discontinuity within the TZ. It is possible that eclogitic material has progressively accumulated at the base of the TZ due to crustal delamination from the subducted Farallon oceanic lithosphere. With low Vs, the top of a garnetite layer could produce sharp negative velocity gradients around 590 km depth. The geometry of the Gorda-Juan de Fuca subduction system is also subject to debate. Tomography has shown the plate to subduct in the mantle along the whole western margin of NA except

  9. Composition of pore and spring waters from Baby Bare: Global implications of geochemical fluxes from a ridge flank hydrothermal system

    SciTech Connect

    Wheat, C.G.; Mottl, M.J.

    2000-02-01

    Warm hydrothermal springs were discovered on Baby Bare, which is an isolated basement outcrop on 3.5 Ma-old crust on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The authors have sampled these spring waters from a manned submersible, along with associated sediment pore waters from 48 gravity and piston cores. Systematic variations in the chemical composition of these waters indicate that hydrothermal reactions in basement at moderate temperatures remove Na, K, Li, Rb, Mg, TCO{sub 2}, alkalinity, and phosphate from the circulating seawater and leach Ca, Sr, Si, B, and Mn from the oceanic crust; and that reactions with the turbidite sediment surrounding Baby Bare remove Na, Li, Mg, Ca, Sr, and sulfate from the pore water while producing ammonium and Si and both producing and consuming phosphate, nitrate, alkalinity, Mn, and Fe. K, Rb, and B are relatively unreactive in the sediment column. The composition of altered seawater in basement at Baby Bare is similar to the inferred composition of 58 C formation water from crust nearly twice as old (5.9 Ma) on the southern flank of the Costa Rica Rift. The Baby Bare fluids also exhibit the same directions of net elemental transfer between basalt and seawater as solutions produced in laboratory experiments at a similar temperature, and complement compositional changes form seawater observed in seafloor basalts altered at cool to moderate temperatures. The common parameter among the two ridge flanks and experiments is temperature, suggesting that the residence time of seawater in the two ridge-flank sites is sufficiently long for the solutions to equilibrate with altered basalt. The authors use the Baby Bare spring water to estimate upper limits on the global fluxes of 14 elements at warm ridge-flank sites such as Baby Bare. Maximum calculated fluxes of Mg, Ca, sulfate, B, and K may equal or exceed 25% of the riverine flux, and such sites may represent the missing, high K/Rb sink required for the K budget.

  10. Mid-Ocean Ridge Magma Supply and Glacial Cycles: Long Time Series Studies of Crustal Thickness and Seafloor Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulahanis, B.; Carbotte, S. M.; Huybers, P. J.; Langmuir, C. H.; Han, S.; Aghaei, O.; Canales, J. P.; Nedimovic, M. R.; Menke, W. H.

    2015-12-01

    Glacial loading has been shown to modulate volcanic melt generation in subaerial systems, and recent studies suggest that eustatic sea level fluctuations induced by glacial cycles may influence mantle-melting regimes at mid-ocean ridges. Models predict temporal variation in crustal thickness, and seafloor topography, linked to sea level change. Recent studies of bathymetry as a proxy for crustal thickness show significant spectral energy at periodicities linked to Milankovitch cycles of 23, 41, and 100ka (Crowley et al., 2015; Tolstoy, M., 2015). In this study we investigate climate driven periodicity in mid-ocean ridge magma supply utilizing basement topography and crustal thickness data. We use multichannel seismic reflection (MCS) data from two prior studies of the flanks of the Juan de Fuca (JdF) ridge, and 3D MCS data from the Northern East Pacific Rise (EPR) 9°37-57'N. The JdF datasets extend to crustal ages up to 8.78 Ma, and EPR data to ~180 ka. By performing spectral analysis on these data along with dO18 climate records from Lisiecki and Raymo (2005) for the last 5.32ma and Zachos et al. (2001) for earlier times we investigate intervals of similar periodicities in order to identify potential links between climate and magma supply to mid-ocean ridges. Further analysis is undertaken to determine whether depth to basement and crustal thickness are correlated within and across datasets, and whether significant spectral peaks occur in basement and crustal thickness data outside of known climate cycles. Initial results show significant spectral energy in basement depth at the 100ky cycle in the 0-1Ma time series, when eccentricity is understood to have the most impact. Long-term temporal variability is apparent in JdF data, with low relief abyssal hills (~70m on average) present 1-3.2Ma and 6-8.78Ma, but higher relief bathymetry (~200m) from 3.2-6Ma. These subsets align well with previously identified climatic subgroups (Zachos et al., 2001), correlating both

  11. Petrology and Geochemistry of the Northeast Seamounts of the Galapagos Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinton, C. W.; Harpp, K. S.; Christie, D. M.

    2010-12-01

    One of the best locations to study hotspot-ridge interactions is the Northern Galápagos Province (NGP), the region that lies between the Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC) and the central portion of the Galapagos Archipelago. The Galapagos hotspot is currently located off-axis from the GSC but still has a profound influence on the ridge in terms of axial lava composition and ridge bathymetry. The NGP is characterized by an array of volcanic lineaments that are composed of seamounts and five small islands. The eastern edge of the NGP is defined by a group of at least five seamounts (the Northeast Seamounts), three of which were mapped and dredged in 1990 during Leg 2 of the PLUME expedition of the R/V Thomas Washington. We report petrological and geochemical data from the basalts recovered at six dredge sites. All basalts are tholeiitic with a general MORB-like composition, but with considerable variation within some individual dredge hauls and between seamounts. Previously published isotopic data are limited but 3He/4He ratios (Graham et al. 1993) and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic data (Harpp and White 2000) are consistent with a depleted mantle source for all three seamounts. Based on geochemistry and petrological observations, the basalts can be divided into at least thirteen distinct groups. The bulk of the analyzed glass samples have compositions more than MORB with MgO content of 8-10% wt., although two of the groups are in the 6-7% range. In addition, the primitive lavas have high CaO and Al2O3 . The mineralogy ranges from aphyric for the more evolved lavas to olivine + plagioclase-phyric or plagioclase ultraphyric for the more primitive basalts. The plagioclase appear to be very calcic (up to An91) xenocrysts that are often hosting aluminous spinel (Al2O3 46-48% wt.) and primitive melt inclusions (Sinton et al., 1993). Initial trace element data show light rare earth (LREE)-depleted signatures, although several samples are slightly enriched in the LREE. Taken together

  12. The "pressures" of being a ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleeman, K.; Scott, J. L.; Barton, M.

    2015-12-01

    As part of a larger project aimed at understanding the magma plumbing systems and magmatic processes responsible for crust formation at divergent plate margins, we have begun a study of the Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC), an intermediate spreading ridge off the west coast of South America and connected to the East Pacific Rise. This ridge is of interest because it passes close to the Galapagos Islands, allowing the effects of a mantle plume on sub-ridge processes and magma plumbing systems to be examined. In addition, the effects of ridge-ridge intersection, ridge propagation, and ridge offsets by transform faults on magma evolution can be examined. Published compositional data for glasses collected along the ridge were used to calculate pressures of partial crystallization and to examine variations in magma chemistry along the ridge. To aid interpretation of the results, the ridge was divided into 12 segments based on sample distribution and the occurrence of ridge offsets. Calculated pressures for most segments range from 100 and 300 MPa, and indicate depths of partial crystallization of ~3-9 km. This suggests that accretion occurs mostly near the base of the crust. However, the range of pressures for some segments is relatively large with maximum calculated values of 500-750 MPa. For example, near the major transform fault at ~85OW, the calculated maximum pressure is 741 MPa and the average pressure is ~ 300 MPa. We consider it unlikely that the calculated high pressures represent the true pressure of partial crystallization, and suggest that the compositions of some magmas result from processes other than simple crystallization. Correlations between Pressure and MgO, between Na2O and MgO, P2O5 and K2O, and between Na8 and longitude suggest that the processes operating beneath this ridge are complex. Near the transform fault for example, MgO vs Pressure shows a negative correlation with an R2 value of 0.546. Such trends are inconsistent with magma evolution

  13. Classification of the alveolar ridge width: implant-driven treatment considerations for the horizontally deficient alveolar ridges.

    PubMed

    Tolstunov, Len

    2014-07-01

    Among many techniques advocated for the horizontally deficient alveolar ridges, ridge-split has many advantages. Here, treatment management strategies of the horizontally collapsed ridges, especially the ridge-split approach, are discussed and a clinically relevant implant-driven classification of the alveolar ridge width is proposed, with the goal to assist an operator in choosing the proper bone augmentation technique. Comparison and advantages of two commonly used techniques, ridge-split and block bone graft, are presented.

  14. Influence of ancient thrust faults on the hydrogeology of the Blue Ridge Province.

    PubMed

    Seaton, William J; Burbey, Thomas J

    2005-01-01

    The Blue Ridge Province contains ubiquitous northeast-southwest-trending thrust faults or smaller thrust "slivers" that greatly impact the nature and character of ground water flow in this region. Detailed investigations at a field site in Floyd County, Virginia, indicate that high-permeability zones occur in the brittle crystalline rocks above these thrust faults. Surface and borehole geophysics, aquifer tests, and chlorofluorocarbon and geochemical data reveal that the shallow saprolite aquifer is separated from the deeper fault-zone aquifer by a low-fracture permeability bedrock confining unit, the hydraulic conductivity of which has been estimated to be six orders of magnitude less than the conductivity of the fault zones at the test site. Within the Blue Ridge Province, these fault zones can occur at depths of 300 m or more, can contain a significant amount of storage, and yield significant quantities of water to wells. Furthermore, it is expected that these faults may compartmentalize the deep aquifer system. Recharge to and discharge from the deep aquifer occurs by slow leakage through the confining unit or through localized breach zones that occur where quartz accumulated in high concentrations during metamorphism and later became extensively fractured during episodes of deformation. The results of this investigation stress the importance of thrust faults in this region and suggest that hydrogeologic models for the Blue Ridge Province include these ancient structural features. Faults in crystalline-rock environments may not only influence the hydrology, they may dominate the flow characteristics of a region. PMID:15882322

  15. Metal mobility in sediment-covered ridge-crest hydrothermal systems: experimental and theoretical constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruse, Anna M.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.

    2001-10-01

    The presence of sedimentary organic matter blanketing midocean ridge crests has a potentially strong impact on metal transport in hydrothermal vent fluids. To constrain the role of organic matter in metal mobility during hydrothermal sediment alteration, we reacted organic-rich diatomaceous ooze from Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California, and organic-poor hemipelagic mud from Middle Valley, northern Juan de Fuca Ridge, with seawater and a Na-Ca-K-Cl fluid of seawater chlorinity, at 275° to 400°C, 350 to 500 bars, and initial fluid: sediment mass ratios ranging from 1.6 to 9.8. Reaction of these fluids with both sediment types released CO 2 and high concentrations of ore-forming metals (Fe, Mn, Zn, Pb) to solution. Relatively low concentrations of Cu were observed in solution and likely reflect the reducing conditions that resulted from the presence of sedimentary organic matter. Both the concentrations of CO 2 and dissolved metals were lower in fluids reacted with Middle Valley sediment compared with aqueous concentrations in fluids reacted with Guaymas Basin sediment. During alteration of both sediment types, metal concentrations varied strongly as a function of temperature, increasing by up to an order of magnitude over the 75°C range of each experiment. Major element fluid chemistry and observed alteration assemblages suggest that during hydrothermal alteration of organic-lean sediment from Middle Valley a feldspar-quartz-illite mineral assemblage buffered in situ pH. In contrast, data from the experimental alteration of organic-rich Guaymas Basin sediment suggest that a calcite-plagioclase-quartz assemblage regulated in situ pH. Fluid speciation calculations suggest that in situ pH during Guaymas Basin sediment alteration was lower than during alteration of Middle Valley sediment and accounts for the substantially greater metal mobility at a given temperature and pressure during the former experiment. Comparison of our results with the results of basalt

  16. SRTM Anaglyph: Wheeler Ridge, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Wheeler Ridge and vicinity, California, is a site of major tectonic activity, both historically and over recent geologic time. The epicenter of the 7.5 magnitude Kern County earthquake occurred here on July 21,1952, and numerous geologic and topographic features indicate rapid geologic processes. The ridge itself (upper-right center) is a geologic fold that is growing out of the southern San Joaquin Valley. A prominent 'wind gap,' now used for passage of the California aquaduct (with the aid of a pumping station), is evidence that the ridge grew faster than tranversing streams could erode down. Nearby abrupt and/or landslid mountain fronts similarly indicate a vigorous tectonic setting here, just north of the San Andreas fault. The Interstate 5 freeway can be seen crossing agricultural fields on the right and entering the very rugged and steep Grapevine Canyon toward the bottom.

    This anaglyph was generated by first draping a Landsat satellite image over a preliminary topographic map from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), then generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter. Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30 meter resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyses of the large and growing Landsat image archive.

    The elevation data used in this image was acquired by SRTM aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect

  17. Dynamic plumbing systems along the 100 km long Arctic Vestnesa Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaza-Faverola, Andreia; Buenz, Stefan; Vadakkepuliyambatta, Sunil; Mienert, Jurgen; Chand, Shyam; Johnson, Joel; Greinert, Jens

    2014-05-01

    Vestnesa is a ridge-like contour-current controlled sediment succession that lies above young oceanic crust created during the tectonic opening of Fram Strait. It is surrounded by the Molloy transform fault to the southwest, the Molloy deep to the north-west, the Knipovich oceanic ridge to the south-east, and the continental margin of Svalbard to the northeast. Although interrupted in places, a mostly continuous bottom simulating reflector (BSR), the seismic indicator for the base of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), extends for tens of kilometers from the crest of the ridge towards its northern and southern flanks. High-resolution P-Cable 2D seismic data show vertical fluid migration pathways, distributed in clusters along the 100 km long ridge, connecting the free gas system beneath the GHSZ through a 160-180 m thick hydrate stability zone to seabed pockmarks at the crest of the ridge. Among these clusters only those lying towards the easternmost end of the ridge have been documented to be periodically active in terms of present-day seafloor gas seepage. The methane release activity shows particularly well on 18 kHz echosounder data over a time period from 2008 to 2013. Gas hydrates have been recovered in shallow sediment cores (<6 mbsf) at the active seafloor seepage site. Gas analyses show heavier gases in addition to methane, as a hydrate-forming gas. Within the framework of CAGE - Center for Arctic Gas Hydrate, Environment and Climate, we are investigating the development of the plumbing systems of the Arctic Vestnesa Ridge in space and time domains. We compare the modeled base of the GHSZ for different gas compositions against the depth of the BSR in the region and discuss the elements of fluid migration systems that could explain observed lateral changes in BSR depths and the switching between active and inactive plumbing systems. The Centre of Excellence is funded by the Norwegian Research Council (grant No. 223259) over a period of ten years.

  18. The structure of mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, Sean C.; Toomey, Douglas R.

    1992-01-01

    Recent research results on the structure of midocean ridges are reviewed. The new view of ridge-axis crustal structure obtained from high-resolution seismology is reviewed, emphasizing the variation of that structure with spreading rate and along-axis at a given spreading rate. Recent results on upper mantle structure beneath ridges are examined, including variations with seafloor age, indications from anisotropy for directions of mantle flow, and long-wavelength along-axis variations in structure and their implications for lateral heterogeneity in mantle temperature and composition.

  19. Hurricane Bonnie, Northeast of Bermuda, Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Hurricane Bonnie was over the North Atlantic Ocean about 500 miles northeast of Bermuda (39.0N, 56.5W) when this photo was taken. Compare this view with Hurricane Iniki, also photographed on this mission (STS-47-77-058). Bonnie is small but in her prime, having a well defined eye, a tight spiral gyre indicating high wind speeds and numerous thunderheads. Iniki, on the other hand, was decaying when photographed and no longer presented a threat.

  20. Two new species of Munidopsis (Crustacea: Anomura: Munidopsidae) from the Kermadec and Louisville ridge systems off New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Schnabel, Kareen E; Ahyong, Shane T

    2015-08-05

    Two new species of Munidopsis are described from the wider New Zealand region. Munidopsis bamberi sp. nov. is described from the Havre Trough adjacent to the Kermadec Volcanic Arc north-east of the New Zealand continental shelf, and is named in honour of Roger Bamber for his contributions to arthropod taxonomy and systematics. The second species is M. sculpo sp. nov. from Forde Seamount on the Louisville Ridge east of New Zealand. This brings the number of Munidopsis species known in New Zealand waters to 17 and a key to the New Zealand species is provided.

  1. Two new species of Munidopsis (Crustacea: Anomura: Munidopsidae) from the Kermadec and Louisville ridge systems off New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Schnabel, Kareen E; Ahyong, Shane T

    2015-01-01

    Two new species of Munidopsis are described from the wider New Zealand region. Munidopsis bamberi sp. nov. is described from the Havre Trough adjacent to the Kermadec Volcanic Arc north-east of the New Zealand continental shelf, and is named in honour of Roger Bamber for his contributions to arthropod taxonomy and systematics. The second species is M. sculpo sp. nov. from Forde Seamount on the Louisville Ridge east of New Zealand. This brings the number of Munidopsis species known in New Zealand waters to 17 and a key to the New Zealand species is provided. PMID:26250316

  2. Controls on melting at spreading ridges from correlated abyssal peridotite - mid-ocean ridge basalt compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regelous, Marcel; Weinzierl, Christoph G.; Haase, Karsten M.

    2016-09-01

    Variations in the volume and major element composition of basalt erupted along the global mid-ocean ridge system have been attributed to differences in mantle potential temperature, mantle composition, or plate spreading rate and lithosphere thickness. Abyssal peridotites, the residues of mantle melting beneath mid-ocean ridges, provide additional information on the melting process, which could be used to test these hypotheses. We compiled a global database of abyssal peridotite compositions averaged over the same ridge segments defined by Gale et al. (2013). In addition, we calculated the distance of each ridge segment to the nearest hotspots. We show that Cr# in spinel in abyssal peridotites is negatively correlated with Na90 in basalts from the same ridge segments on a global scale. Ridge segments that erupt basalts apparently produced by larger degrees of mantle melting are thus underlain by peridotites from which large amounts of melt have been extracted. We find that near-ridge hotspots have a more widespread influence on mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) composition and ridge depth than previously thought. However, when these hotspot-influenced ridge segments are excluded, the remaining segments show clear relationships between MORB composition, peridotite composition, and ridge depth with spreading rate. Very slow-spreading ridges (<20 mm/yr) are deeper, erupt basalts with higher Na90, Al90, K90/Ti90, and lower Fe90, Ca90/Al90, and expose peridotites with lower Cr# than intermediate and fast-spreading ridges. We show that away from hotspots, the spreading-rate dependence of the maximum degree of mantle melting inferred from Cr# in peridotites (FM) and the bulk degree of melting inferred from Na90 in basalts (FB) from the same ridge segments is unlikely to be due to variations in mantle composition. Nor can the effects of dynamic mantle upwelling or incomplete melt extraction at low spreading rates satisfactorily explain the observed compositions of abyssal

  3. Paratuberculosis in buffaloes in Northeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Farias Brito, Marilene; Dos Santos Belo-Reis, Alessandra; Barbosa, José Diomedes; Ubiali, Daniel Guimarães; de Castro Pires, Ana Paula; de Medeiros, Elizabeth Sampaio; de Melo, Renata Pimentel Bandeira; de Albuquerque, Pedro Paulo Feitosa; Yamasaki, Elise; Mota, Rinaldo Aparecido

    2016-10-01

    Several farms in the Northeast of Brazil were investigated for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in order to identify the occurrence of paratuberculosis in buffaloes. Samples were obtained from 17 farms, two slaughter houses, and a quarantine area in the Northeast. About 15,000 buffaloes of the Murrah, Mediterranean, and Jafarabadi breed as well as their crossbreeds were evaluated for meat, dairy, and mixed farms with semi-intensive or extensive breeding practices. For diagnostic purposes, postmortem and histopathological examination, including Ziehl-Neelsen test of fecal smears and scraped intestinal mucosa were performed. PCR was applied for fecal samples, mesenteric lymph nodes, and intestines. Six Johne's disease-positive farms, which together with those previously identified, indicate that the disease is spread through the Brazilian Northeast, similar to what occurs in cattle herds in other regions of the country. The increase in prevalence of paratuberculosis is a consequence of introduction of animals from other regions without adequate veterinary assistance and due to the little official attention paid to this initially silent and chronic disease.

  4. Paratuberculosis in buffaloes in Northeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Farias Brito, Marilene; Dos Santos Belo-Reis, Alessandra; Barbosa, José Diomedes; Ubiali, Daniel Guimarães; de Castro Pires, Ana Paula; de Medeiros, Elizabeth Sampaio; de Melo, Renata Pimentel Bandeira; de Albuquerque, Pedro Paulo Feitosa; Yamasaki, Elise; Mota, Rinaldo Aparecido

    2016-10-01

    Several farms in the Northeast of Brazil were investigated for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in order to identify the occurrence of paratuberculosis in buffaloes. Samples were obtained from 17 farms, two slaughter houses, and a quarantine area in the Northeast. About 15,000 buffaloes of the Murrah, Mediterranean, and Jafarabadi breed as well as their crossbreeds were evaluated for meat, dairy, and mixed farms with semi-intensive or extensive breeding practices. For diagnostic purposes, postmortem and histopathological examination, including Ziehl-Neelsen test of fecal smears and scraped intestinal mucosa were performed. PCR was applied for fecal samples, mesenteric lymph nodes, and intestines. Six Johne's disease-positive farms, which together with those previously identified, indicate that the disease is spread through the Brazilian Northeast, similar to what occurs in cattle herds in other regions of the country. The increase in prevalence of paratuberculosis is a consequence of introduction of animals from other regions without adequate veterinary assistance and due to the little official attention paid to this initially silent and chronic disease. PMID:27334632

  5. Periodic bedrock ridges on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, David R.; Bandfield, Joshua L.; Becker, Scott K.

    2012-03-01

    Evidence for sediment transport and erosion by wind is widespread over the surface of Mars today and was likely a major geomorphic process for much of its geological past. Although Martian surface features resembling aeolian dunes and ripples have been recognized since the Mariner and Viking missions, such features have been interpreted previously as active, indurated, or exhumed sedimentary forms. Here we report evidence based on High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment images that show some megaripple forms are eroded into cohesive substrate rather than being composed of loose granular material or fossilized dunes. Exposure of stratigraphic continuity within layered, cohesive material extending crest to trough through features with mean wavelengths of 18 to 51 m demonstrates the primarily erosional formation of what we term periodic bedrock ridges (PBRs). Hence some surfaces on Mars previously considered to be covered by wind-deposited material are actually wind-carved exposures that offer windows into Martian history. PBRs lack the distinctive streamlining associated with wind-parallel yardangs and comparison of PBR orientation to yardangs, megayardangs, and active sedimentary dunes in the same vicinity confirm that these PBRs formed transverse to prevailing winds. Observed wavelengths of PBRs are comparable to those predicted by a simple model for erosional wavelengths of periodic transverse bed forms owing to the spacing of flow separations within the flow. Recognition of these transverse aeolian erosional forms brings up the question of how widespread Martian PBRs are and how many have been misinterpreted as active or indurated (fossilized) sedimentary dunes.

  6. Carlsberg Ridge and Mid-Atlantic Ridge: Comparison of slow spreading centre analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murton, Bramley J.; Rona, Peter A.

    2015-11-01

    Eighty per cent of all mid-ocean spreading centres are slow. Using a mixture of global bathymetry data and ship-board multibeam echosounder data, we explore the morphology of global mid-ocean ridges and compare two slow spreading analogues: the Carlsberg Ridge in the north-west Indian Ocean between 57°E and 60°E, and the Kane to Atlantis super-segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge between 21°N and 31°N. At a global scale, mid-ocean spreading centres show an inverse correlation between segment length and spreading rate with segmentation frequency. Within this context, both the Mid-Atlantic Ridge super-segment and Carlsberg Ridge are similar: spreading at 22 and 26 mm/yr full rates respectively, being devoid of major transform faults, and being segmented by dextral, non-transform, second-order discontinuities. For these and other slow spreading ridges, we show that segmentation frequency varies inversely with flank height and ridge axis depth. Segments on both the Mid-Atlantic Ridge super-segment and Carlsberg Ridge range in aspect ratio (ridge flank height/axis width), depth and symmetry. Segments with high aspect ratios and deeper axial floors often have asymmetric rift flanks and are associated with indicators of lower degrees of melt flux. Segments with low aspect ratios have shallower axial floors, symmetric rift flanks, and evidence of robust melt supply. The relationship between segmentation, spreading rate, ridge depth and morphology, at both a global and local scale, is evidence that rates of melting of the underlying mantle and melt delivery to the crust play a significant role in determining the structure and morphology of slow spreading mid-ocean ridges.

  7. 27 CFR 9.182 - Ribbon Ridge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., Oregon, 1956, revised 1993. (c) Boundary. The Ribbon Ridge viticultural area is located in northern... Quadrangle map at the intersection of a light-duty road known locally as Albertson Road and Dopp Road...

  8. 27 CFR 9.182 - Ribbon Ridge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., Oregon, 1956, revised 1993. (c) Boundary. The Ribbon Ridge viticultural area is located in northern... Quadrangle map at the intersection of a light-duty road known locally as Albertson Road and Dopp Road...

  9. 27 CFR 9.182 - Ribbon Ridge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., Oregon, 1956, revised 1993. (c) Boundary. The Ribbon Ridge viticultural area is located in northern... Quadrangle map at the intersection of a light-duty road known locally as Albertson Road and Dopp Road...

  10. 27 CFR 9.182 - Ribbon Ridge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., Oregon, 1956, revised 1993. (c) Boundary. The Ribbon Ridge viticultural area is located in northern... Quadrangle map at the intersection of a light-duty road known locally as Albertson Road and Dopp Road...

  11. Stratigraphic evolution of Blake Outer Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Markl, R.G.; Bryan, G.M.

    1983-04-01

    Multichannel seismic data from a reconnaissance survey of the Blake Outer Ridge reveal the seismic stratigraphy down to oceanic basement, as well as intracrustal and mantle reflections. The depositional history of the outer ridge can now be subdivided into four principal phases, based on seismic stratigraphic style: (1) Jurassic-Early Cretaceous sedimentation which filled in basement irregularities and leveled the sea floor by horizon ..beta.. (Barremian) time, (2) Early Cretaceous-Late Cretaceous deposition of a seaward-thinning wedge typical of Atlantic-type margins; its deeply eroded surface is probably equivalent to the Late Cretaceous-Miocene hiatus reflected by horizon A'', (3) earlies Miocene current-controlled deposits preferentially deposited along the axis of the incipient Blake Outer Ridge; these prograding strata, which thin and dip downridge and laterally away from the ridge axis, are attributed to the interaction of the Florida Current and Western Boundary Undercurrent, and (4) continuing early Miocene preferential deposition on the ridge axis and sculpting by the Western Boundary Undercurrent; this phase is characterized by strata thinning and dipping upridge and toward the ridge axis. The reversal of dip is explained to a first approximation by a steady-state contour-current model in which the current position is progressively shifted by the deposition. Five angular unconformities and associated bathymetric terraces west of the ridge crest are mapped using all Lamont-Doherty seismic data and interpreted as having formed penecontemporaneously during phase four. The areal extent of the gas hydrate (clathrate) horizon is also delineated; it is continuous across the northern Blake Outer Ridge, and the multichannel seismic data presented here show it to extend onto the shallow Blake Plateau as well.

  12. Dark and Bright Ridges on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This high-resolution image of Jupiter's moon Europa, taken by NASA's Galileo spacecraft camera, shows dark, relatively smooth region at the lower right hand corner of the image which may be a place where warm ice has welled up from below. The region is approximately 30 square kilometers in area. An isolated bright hill stands within it. The image also shows two prominent ridges which have different characteristics; youngest ridge runs from left to top right and is about 5 kilometers in width (about 3.1 miles). The ridge has two bright, raised rims and a central valley. The rims of the ridge are rough in texture. The inner and outer walls show bright and dark debris streaming downslope, some of it forming broad fans. This ridge overlies and therefore must be younger than a second ridge running from top to bottom on the left side of the image. This dark 2 km wide ridge is relatively flat, and has smaller-scale ridges and troughs along its length.

    North is to the top of the picture, and the sun illuminates the surface from the upper left. This image, centered at approximately 14 degrees south latitude and 194 degrees west longitude, covers an area approximately 15 kilometers by 20 kilometers (9 miles by 12 miles). The resolution is 26 meters (85 feet) per picture element. This image was taken on December 16, 1997 at a range of 1300 kilometers (800 miles) by Galileo's solid state imaging system.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ galileo.

  13. Realization of Ridge Regression in MATLAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrov, S.; Kovacheva, S.; Prodanova, K.

    2008-10-01

    The least square estimator (LSE) of the coefficients in the classical linear regression models is unbiased. In the case of multicollinearity of the vectors of design matrix, LSE has very big variance, i.e., the estimator is unstable. A more stable estimator (but biased) can be constructed using ridge-estimator (RE). In this paper the basic methods of obtaining of Ridge-estimators and numerical procedures of its realization in MATLAB are considered. An application to Pharmacokinetics problem is considered.

  14. Assessing the clarity of friction ridge impressions.

    PubMed

    Hicklin, R Austin; Buscaglia, JoAnn; Roberts, Maria Antonia

    2013-03-10

    The ability of friction ridge examiners to correctly discern and make use of the ridges and associated features in finger or palm impressions is limited by clarity. The clarity of an impression relates to the examiner's confidence that the presence, absence, and attributes of features can be correctly discerned. Despite the importance of clarity in the examination process, there have not previously been standard methods for assessing clarity in friction ridge impressions. We introduce a process for annotation, analysis, and interchange of friction ridge clarity information that can be applied to latent or exemplar impressions. This paper: (1) describes a method for evaluating the clarity of friction ridge impressions by using color-coded annotations that can be used by examiners or automated systems; (2) discusses algorithms for overall clarity metrics based on manual or automated clarity annotation; and (3) defines a method of quantifying the correspondence of clarity when comparing a pair of friction ridge images, based on clarity annotation and resulting metrics. Different uses of this approach include examiner interchange of data, quality assurance, metrics, and as an aid in automated fingerprint matching. PMID:23313600

  15. Oak Ridge Reservation environmental report for 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, V.A.; Wilson, A.R.

    1990-10-01

    This two-volume report, the Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental Report for 1989, is the nineteenth in an annual series that began in 1971. It reports the results of a comprehensive, year-round program to monitor the impact of operations at the three major US Department of Energy (DOE) production and research installations in Oak Ridge on the immediate areas' and surrounding region's groundwater and surface waters, soil, air quality, vegetation and wildlife, and through these multiple and varied pathways, the resident human population. Information is presented for the environmental monitoring Quality Assurance (QA) Program, audits and reviews, waste management activities, land special environmental studies. Data are included for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP). Volume 1 presents narratives, summaries, and conclusions based on environmental monitoring at the three DOE installations and in the surrounding environs during calendar year (CY) 1989. Volume 1 is intended to be a stand-alone'' report about the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) for the reader who does not want an in-depth review of 1989 data. Volume 2 presents the detailed data from which these conclusions have been drawn and should be used in conjunction with Volume 1.

  16. Lava Flow Ages and Geologic Mapping on Mid-ocean Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clague, D. A.; Paduan, J. B.; Dreyer, B. M.; Caress, D. W.

    2010-12-01

    Geologic mapping of mid-ocean ridges has been hindered by a lack of high-resolution bathymetry and age data. Autonomous underwater vehicles (AUV) with multibeam sonars now produce maps with 1-m resolution. MBARI has collected data since 2006 along the Juan de Fuca and Gorda Ridges, including the 1998 eruptions in summit caldera and upper south rift zone on Axial Seamount, the 1993 and 1982-1991 eruptions on the CoAxial segment, the 1986 pillow mounds and “young sheet flow” on the north Cleft segment, the 1996 eruption on the North Gorda segment, and part of the Endeavour Ridge. The 1-m data allows identification of flow internal structure, boundaries, and emplacement sequences using superposition and abundance of fissures. Geologic maps of young volcanoes on land are constructed using the same principles, constrained by observations of flow contacts and 14C age dates on charcoal from beneath flow margins. In the deep sea, we collect sediment on top of the flows that contains planktic and benthic foraminifera that can be dated using AMS 14C dating. We sampled sediment on flows from the Axial, CoAxial, and North Cleft areas using 30-cm long pushcores deployed from remotely operated vehicles (ROVs). The coring is done with collection of flow samples for chemistry and video observations to confirm contact locations and flow superposition. Cores are inserted until they hit the underlying lava and can be recovered between pillow lobes when the sediment is >~10 cm thick. We recover the basal 1 cm of sediment, sieve to recover foraminifera, and hand-pick for 14C dating. The North Gorda neovolcanic zone at ~3150 m lacks carbonate sediment and therefore ages. Ages of planktic foraminifera are marine calibrated in years before present (aBP). Benthic foraminifera are calibrated against planktic foraminifera from 5 samples. 14C ages obtained from basal sediment from over 40 sites represent minimum ages as there is probably a small amount of unrecovered basal sediment. Ages

  17. Seismic structure and crustal accretion along an intermediate-rate mid-ocean ridge segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weekly, Robert Todd

    Epicenters and magnitudes for 36,523 earthquakes recorded along the Endeavour segment between August 2003 and October 2006 are automatically determined using a local ocean-bottom seismometer (OBS) network. The catalog is dominated by two swarm sequences in January and February 2005 in the vicinity of the Endeavour overlapping spreading center, which included earthquakes in West Valley, the northern portion of the Endeavour segment, southwest Endeavour Valley and the Endeavour vent fields. These swarms are attributed to volcanism including a dike intrusion on the northern Endeavour in February 2005 and smaller diking events on the propagating tip of the West Valley segment in both swarms. The dike on the northern Endeavour propagated to the south, which is inconsistent with magma sourced from the axial magma chamber beneath the elevated central portion of the segment. Following the swarms, seismic activity on the Endeavour segment decreased on average to ˜15% of pre-swarm values and almost ceased at the segment ends. I infer that a six-year non-eruptive event that started with a swarm in 1999 and finished with the 2005 swarms ruptured the entire segment and relieved plate-spreading stresses. The inferred coupling between the 1999 and 2005 events, the observation of extensive precursory activity prior to the 2005 swarms, and the interaction between seismically active regions during the swarms is consistent with static triggering with delays influenced by viscoelastic relaxation, hydraulic diffusion and magma withdrawal and replenishment. The isotropic and anisotropic P-wave velocity structure of the upper oceanic crust on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge is studied using refracted travel time data collected by an active-source, three-dimensional tomography experiment. The isotropic velocity structure is characterized by low crustal velocities in the overlapping spreading centers (OSCs) at the ends of the segment. These low velocities are indicative of

  18. Results from a 14-month hydroacoustic monitoring of the three mid-oceanic ridges in the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, J.-Y.; Dziak, R. P.; Delatre, M.; Chateau, R.; Brachet, C.; Haxel, J. H.; Matsumoto, H.; Goslin, J.; Brandon, V.; Bohnenstielh, D. R.

    2009-04-01

    From October 2006 to January 2008, an hydroacoustic experiment in the Indian Ocean was carried out by the CNRS/University of Brest and NOAA/Oregon State University to monitor the low-level seismic activity associated with the three contrasting spreading ridges and deforming zones in the Indian Ocean. Three autonomous hydrophones were moored in the SOFAR channel by R/V Marion Dufresne for 14 months in the Madagascar Basin, and northeast and southwest of Amsterdam Island, complementing the two permanent hydroacoustic stations of the Comprehensive nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) located near Diego Garcia Island and off Cape Leeuwin. The three instruments successfully collected 14 month of continuous acoustic records. Combined with the records from the permanent stations, the array detected 1780 acoustic events consisting mostly of earthquake generated T-waves, but also of iceberg tremors from Wilkes Land, Antarctica. Within the triangle defined by the temporary array, the three ridges exhibit contrasting seismicity patterns. Along the Southeast Indian ridge (SEIR), the 272 acoustic events (vs 24 events in the NEIC catalog) occur predominantly along the transform faults ; only one ridge segment (76˚E) displays a continuous activity for 10 months. Along the Central Indian Ridge (CIR), seismicity is distributed along fracture zones and ridge segments (269 events vs 45 NEIC events), with two clusters of events near the triple junction (24-25S) and south of Marie-Celeste FZ (18.5S). Along the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR), the 222 events (vs 31 NEIC events) are distributed along the ridge segments with a larger number of events west of Melville FZ and a cluster at 58E. The immediate vicinity of the Rodrigues triple junction shows periods of quiescence and of intense activity. Some large earthquakes (Mb>5) near the triple junction (SEIR and CIR) seem to be preceded by several acoustic events that may be precursors. Finally, off-ridge seismicity is mostly

  19. Perspective view from northeast of convalescent pavilion ("A"). National ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective view from northeast of convalescent pavilion ("A"). - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Northwestern Branch, Hospital, 5000 West National Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, WI

  20. Looking Northeast Along Hallway between Pellet Plant and Oxide Building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking Northeast Along Hallway between Pellet Plant and Oxide Building, including Virgin Hopper Bins - Hematite Fuel Fabrication Facility, Pellet Plant, 3300 State Road P, Festus, Jefferson County, MO

  1. View of exterior circumferential path at northeast side of building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of exterior circumferential path at northeast side of building beneath trellis, looking southeast - National Zoological Park, Bird House, 3001 Connecticut Avenue NW, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  2. Underside from northeast. Waterville Bridge, Spanning Swatara Creek at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Underside from northeast. - Waterville Bridge, Spanning Swatara Creek at Appalachian Trail (moved from Little Pine Creek at State Route 44, Waterville, Lycoming County), Green Point, Lebanon County, PA

  3. VIEW OF WEST ELEVATION: CAMERA FACING NORTHEAST Mare Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF WEST ELEVATION: CAMERA FACING NORTHEAST - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Transportation Building & Gas Station, Third Street, south side between Walnut Avenue & Cedar Avenue, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  4. Elevation of grove looking northeast toward Washington Monument 1910 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevation of grove looking northeast toward Washington Monument - 1910 Japanese Flowering Cherry Trees , East Potomac Golf Course, East Potomac Park, Hains Point vicinity, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  5. OVERHILLS GOLF COURSE LOOKING NORTHEAST FROM SPECTATOR SHELTER BACK UP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERHILLS GOLF COURSE LOOKING NORTHEAST FROM SPECTATOR SHELTER BACK UP FAIRWAY #1 - Overhills, Fort Bragg Military Reservation, Approximately 15 miles NW of Fayetteville, Overhills, Harnett County, NC

  6. 2. View northeast. South elevation Westminster span, link span, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View northeast. South elevation - Westminster span, link span, Walpole span. - Walpole-Westminster Bridge, Spanning Connecticut River between Walpole, NH & Westminster, VT, Walpole, Cheshire County, NH

  7. 5. VIEW, LOOKING NORTHEAST, SHOWING BRIDGE COUNTERWEIGHT New York, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW, LOOKING NORTHEAST, SHOWING BRIDGE COUNTERWEIGHT - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Niantic Bridge, Spanning Niantic River between East Lyme & Waterford, Old Lyme, New London County, CT

  8. 1. Aerial view, looking northeast up Newark Bay, showing entire ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Aerial view, looking northeast up Newark Bay, showing entire island Charles Wisniewski, photographer, January 1985 - Shooters Island, Ships Graveyard, Newark Bay, Staten Island (subdivision), Richmond County, NY

  9. 2. VIEW SOUTH SHOWING NORTHEAST ELEVATION; BRICK CORBELLING, BUTTRESSES AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW SOUTH SHOWING NORTHEAST ELEVATION; BRICK CORBELLING, BUTTRESSES AND ART DECO STAINED GLASS - Poletown Historic District, St. Michael's Greek Catholic Church, 2390 East Grand Boulevard, Detroit, MI

  10. View of main facade (southwest side), camera facing northeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of main facade (southwest side), camera facing northeast - Golden Gate International Exposition, Hall of Transportation, 440 California Avenue, Treasure Island, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  11. Northeast and northwest elevations. View to south Flint Creek ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Northeast and northwest elevations. View to south - Flint Creek Hydroelectric Project, Powerhouse, Approximately 3 miles southeast of Porters Corner on Powerhouse Road, Philipsburg, Granite County, MT

  12. Detail of towers at southwest corner; camera facing northeast. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of towers at southwest corner; camera facing northeast. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Hospital Wards, Cedar Avenue, eat side between Fourteenth Avenue & Cossey Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  13. 3. MAGAZINE P STAIRWAY ENCLOSURE, LOOKING NORTHEAST. NIKE Missile ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. MAGAZINE P STAIRWAY ENCLOSURE, LOOKING NORTHEAST. - NIKE Missile Base C-84, Underground Storage Magazines & Launcher-Loader Assemblies, Easternmost portion of launch area, Barrington, Cook County, IL

  14. 11. VIEW NORTHEAST, DETAIL OF BRIDGE BEARING AT SOUTHEAST CORNER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. VIEW NORTHEAST, DETAIL OF BRIDGE BEARING AT SOUTHEAST CORNER, SHOWING WELDED REINFORCEMENT - Perkins Corner Bridge, Spanning Willimantic River at Flanders & Cider Mill Roads, Coventry, Tolland County, CT

  15. VIEW OF CENTRAL INTERIOR SPACE, FACING NORTHEAST. Douglas Aircraft ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF CENTRAL INTERIOR SPACE, FACING NORTHEAST. - Douglas Aircraft Company Long Beach Plant, Aircraft Parts Shipping & Receiving Building, 3855 Lakewood Boulevard, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. DETAIL VIEW OF SOUTH FRONT DOORS, FACING NORTHEAST. Douglas ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF SOUTH FRONT DOORS, FACING NORTHEAST. - Douglas Aircraft Company Long Beach Plant, Aircraft Wing & Fuselage Assembly Building, 3855 Lakewood Boulevard, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. Interior, bedroom at northeast corner of east unit Fitzsimons ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior, bedroom at northeast corner of east unit - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Noncomissioned Officers' Quarters, West Loosley Avenue & North Hickey Street, Southeast Corner, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  18. Perspective view of second floor landing from northeast National ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective view of second floor landing from northeast - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Danville Branch, Directors' House, 1900 and 2000 East Main Street , Danville, Vermilion County, IL

  19. Perspective view of east entrance from northeast National Home ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective view of east entrance from northeast - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Pacific Branch, Mental Health Building, 11301 Wilshire Boulevard, West Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  20. Distribution of mega fauna on sulfide edifices on the Eastern Lau Spreading Center and Valu Fa Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Arunima; Becker, Erin L.; Podowski, Elizabeth L.; Wickes, Leslie N.; Ma, Shufen; Mullaugh, Katherine M.; Hourdez, Stéphane; Luther, George W.; Fisher, Charles R.

    2013-02-01

    Hydrothermal vent sulfide edifices contain some of the most extreme thermal and chemical conditions in which animals are able to live. As a result, sulfide edifices in the East Pacific Rise, Juan de Fuca Ridge, and Mid Atlantic Ridge vent systems often contain distinct faunal assemblages. In this study, we used high-resolution imagery and in-situ physico-chemical measurements within the context of a Geographic Information System (GIS) to examine community structure and niche differentiation of dominant fauna on sulfide edifices in the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) and Valu Fa Ridge (VFR) in the Western Pacific Ocean. Our results show that ELSC and VFR sulfide edifices host two distinct types of communities. One type, that covers the majority of sulfide edifice faces, is overall very similar to nearby lava communities and biomass is dominated by the same chemoautotrophic symbiont-containing molluscs that dominate lava communities, namely the provannid gastropods Alviniconcha spp. and Ifremeria nautilei and the mytilid bivalve Bathymodiolus brevior. The spatial distribution of the dominant molluscs is often a variation of the pattern of concentric rings observed on lavas, with Alviniconcha spp. at the tops of edifices where exposure to vent flow is the highest, and I. nautilei and B. brevior below. Our physico-chemical measurements indicate that because of rapid dispersion of vent fluid, habitable area for symbiont-containing fauna is quite limited on sulfide edifices, and the realized niches of the mollusc groups are narrower on sulfide edifices than on lavas. We suggest that competition plays an important role in determining the realized distributions of the mollusc groups on edifices. The other habitat, present in small patches of presumably hot, new anhydrite, is avoided by the dominant symbiont-containing molluscs and inhabited by crabs, shrimp and polynoids that are likely more heat tolerant. The ratio of sulfide concentration to temperature anomaly of

  1. Potential for Large Transpressional Earthquakes along the Santa Cruz-Catalina Ridge, California Continental Borderland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legg, M.; Kohler, M. D.; Weeraratne, D. S.; Castillo, C. M.

    2015-12-01

    Transpressional fault systems comprise networks of high-angle strike-slip and more gently-dipping oblique-slip faults. Large oblique-slip earthquakes may involve complex ruptures of multiple faults with both strike-slip and dip-slip. Geophysical data including high-resolution multibeam bathymetry maps, multichannel seismic reflection (MCS) profiles, and relocated seismicity catalogs enable detailed mapping of the 3-D structure of seismogenic fault systems offshore in the California Continental Borderland. Seafloor morphology along the San Clemente fault system displays numerous features associated with active strike-slip faulting including scarps, linear ridges and valleys, and offset channels. Detailed maps of the seafloor faulting have been produced along more than 400 km of the fault zone. Interpretation of fault geometry has been extended to shallow crustal depths using 2-D MCS profiles and to seismogenic depths using catalogs of relocated southern California seismicity. We examine the 3-D fault character along the transpressional Santa Cruz-Catalina Ridge (SCCR) section of the fault system to investigate the potential for large earthquakes involving multi-fault ruptures. The 1981 Santa Barbara Island (M6.0) earthquake was a right-slip event on a vertical fault zone along the northeast flank of the SCCR. Aftershock hypocenters define at least three sub-parallel high-angle fault surfaces that lie beneath a hillside valley. Mainshock rupture for this moderate earthquake appears to have been bilateral, initiating at a small discontinuity in the fault geometry (~5-km pressure ridge) near Kidney Bank. The rupture terminated to the southeast at a significant releasing step-over or bend and to the northeast within a small (~10-km) restraining bend. An aftershock cluster occurred beyond the southeast asperity along the East San Clemente fault. Active transpression is manifest by reverse-slip earthquakes located in the region adjacent to the principal displacement zone

  2. The cretaceous opening of the Northeast Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanisch, J.

    1984-01-01

    A continuous rift system from the Rockall Trough through the Faeroe-Shetland Channel, and the Møre and Vøring basins up to the Tromsø and Bear Island basins is inferred to have developed during the Cretaceous. Oceanic crust was generated in its southern part but its width presumably decreases toward the northeast and probably ends in the Møre Basin. This rift/spreading system requires a clockwise rotation of Greenland and the Rockall Plateau during the Cretaceous around a rotation pole at its northern end at about 74°N 21°E. North of the pole of rotation crustal shortening must have occurred. This compression is interpreted to have taken place on West Spitsbergen. The orogeny there is reinterpreted as (1) a Cretaceous folding phase, (2) a phase of overthrusting at the Paleocene-Eocene boundary, and (3) an extensional faulting phase during the Oligocene. This plate-tectonic model can resolve a series of problems in the Northeast Atlantic region: the connection of the Caledonian fronts of Scotland and Greenland can be easily established. The northern ends of the West Shetland Basin and the North Sea graben; the unusual depth of the Møre and Vøring basins; the marked obliqueness of structural trends between the Northeast Greenland shelf and the Norwegian shelf; the fact that the western Hammerfest Basin was intersected by a younger north-south trending graben which formed the deep Tromsø Basin—all these enigmatic observations can be explained by the Cretaceous rift system.

  3. Formation and stability of ridge-ridge-ridge triple junctions in rheologically realistic lithosphere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerya, Taras; Burov, Evgueni

    2015-04-01

    -branch junction formation and evolution by using high-resolution 3D numerical mechanical experiments that take into account realistic thermo-rheological structure and rheology of the lithosphere. We find that two major types of quadruple and triple junctions are formed under bi-directional or multidirectional far-field stress field: (i) plate rifting junctions are formed by the initial plate fragmentation and can be subsequently re-arranged into (ii) oceanic spreading junctions controlled by the new oceanic crust accretion. In particular, we document initial formation and destabilization of quadruple R-R-R-R junctions as initial plate rifting structures under bi-directional extension. In most cases, quadruple plate rifting junctions rapidly (typically within 1-2 Myr) evolve towards formation of two diverging triple oceanic spreading junctions connected by a linear spreading center lengthening with time. This configuration remains stable over long time scales. However, under certain conditions, quadruple junctions may also remain relatively stable. Asymmetric stretching results in various configurations, for example formation of "T-junctions" with trans-extensional components and combination of fast and slow spreading ridges. Combined with plume impingement, this scenario evolves in realistic patterns closely resembling observed plate dynamics. In particular, opening of the Red Sea and of the Afar rift system find a logical explanation within a single model. Numerical experiments also suggest that several existing oceanic spreading junctions form as the result of plate motions rearrangements after which only one of two plates spreading along the ridge become subjected to bi-directional spreading.

  4. Magmatic and tectonic extension at the Chile Ridge: Evidence for mantle controls on ridge segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Samuel M.; Ito, Garrett; Behn, Mark D.; Martinez, Fernando; Olive, Jean-Arthur; Escartín, Javier

    2016-06-01

    We use data from an extensive multibeam bathymetry survey of the Chile Ridge to study tectonomagmatic processes at the ridge axis. Specifically, we investigate how abyssal hills evolve from axial faults, how variations in magmatic extension influence morphology and faulting along the spreading axis, and how these variations correlate with ridge segmentation. The bathymetry data are used to estimate the fraction of plate separation accommodated by normal faulting, and the remaining fraction of extension, M, is attributed primarily to magmatic accretion. Results show that M ranges from 0.85 to 0.96, systematically increasing from first-order and second-order ridge segment offsets toward segment centers as the depth of ridge axis shoals relative to the flanking highs of the axial valley. Fault spacing, however, does not correlate with ridge geometry, morphology, or M along the Chile Ridge, which suggests the observed increase in tectonic strain toward segment ends is achieved through increased slip on approximately equally spaced faults. Variations in M along the segments follow variations in petrologic indicators of mantle melt fraction, both showing a preferred length scale of 50 ± 20 km that persists even along much longer ridge segments. In comparison, mean M and axial relief fail to show significant correlations with distance offsetting the segments. These two findings suggest a form of magmatic segmentation that is partially decoupled from the geometry of the plate boundary. We hypothesize this magmatic segmentation arises from cells of buoyantly upwelling mantle that influence tectonic segmentation from the mantle, up.

  5. Molecular characterization of bromeliads from northeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    Vieira, S D; Rabbani, A R C; Santos, F; Silva-Mann, R; Arrigoni-Blank, M F; Prata, A P N; Resende, L V; Pasqual, M; Blank, A F

    2014-01-01

    Bromeliaceae is an important botany family that includes many species with economic value; demand for members of this family is increasing. However, illegal collection frequently occurs, drastically reducing the species populations; thus, it is necessary to collect and store Bromeliaceae genetic material. In this study, we identified and quantified genetic variability of the Bromeliad family using domi