Science.gov

Sample records for fuel benefits challenges

  1. Used Nuclear Fuel: From Liability to Benefit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orbach, Raymond L.

    2011-03-01

    Nuclear power has proven safe and reliable, with operating efficiencies in the U.S. exceeding 90%. It provides a carbon-free source of electricity (with about a 10% penalty arising from CO2 released from construction and the fuel cycle). However, used fuel from nuclear reactors is highly toxic and presents a challenge for permanent disposal -- both from technical and policy perspectives. The half-life of the ``bad actors'' is relatively short (of the order of decades) while the very long lived isotopes are relatively benign. At present, spent fuel is stored on-site in cooling ponds. Once the used fuel pools are full, the fuel is moved to dry cask storage on-site. Though the local storage is capable of handling used fuel safely and securely for many decades, the law requires DOE to assume responsibility for the used fuel and remove it from reactor sites. The nuclear industry pays a tithe to support sequestration of used fuel (but not research). However, there is currently no national policy in place to deal with the permanent disposal of nuclear fuel. This administration is opposed to underground storage at Yucca Mountain. There is no national policy for interim storage---removal of spent fuel from reactor sites and storage at a central location. And there is no national policy for liberating the energy contained in used fuel through recycling (separating out the fissionable components for subsequent use as nuclear fuel). A ``Blue Ribbon Commission'' has been formed to consider alternatives, but will not report until 2012. This paper will examine alternatives for used fuel disposition, their drawbacks (e.g. proliferation issues arising from recycling), and their benefits. For recycle options to emerge as a viable technology, research is required to develop cost effective methods for treating used nuclear fuel, with attention to policy as well as technical issues.

  2. Carbon benefits from fuel treatments

    Treesearch

    Jim Cathcart; Alan A. Ager; Andrew McMahan; Mark Finney; Brian Watt

    2010-01-01

    Landscape simulation modeling is used to examine whether fuel treatments result in a carbon offset from avoided wildfire emissions. The study landscape was a 169,200-acre watershed located in south-central Oregon. Burn probability modeling was employed under extreme weather and fuel moisture conditions. Expected carbon stocks post-treatment, post-wildfire were...

  3. Whole grains: benefits and challenges.

    PubMed

    Jones, Julie Miller; Engleson, Jodi

    2010-01-01

    Inclusion of whole grains (WG) in the diet is recommended in dietary guidance around the world because of their associations with increased health and reduced risk of chronic disease. WGs are linked to reduced risk of obesity or weight gain; reduced risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), including coronary heart disease (CHD), hypertension, and stroke; improved gut health and decreased risk of cancers of the upper gut; perhaps reduced risk of colorectal cancer; and lower mortality rate. The 2005 United States Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee has recommended that consumers make "half their grains whole." Yet, whole grains are puzzling both consumers and scientists. Scientists are trying to determine whether their health benefits are due to the synergy of WG components, individual WG components, or the fact that WG eaters make many of the recommended diet and lifestyle choices. Consumers need to understand the WG benefits and how to identify WG foods to have incentive to purchase and use such foods. Industry needs to develop great-tasting, clearly-labeled products. With both these factors working together, it will be possible to change WG consumption habits among consumers.

  4. Physics challenges for advanced fuel cycle assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Giuseppe Palmiotti; Massimo Salvatores; Gerardo Aliberti

    2014-06-01

    Advanced fuel cycles and associated optimized reactor designs will require substantial improvements in key research area to meet new and more challenging requirements. The present paper reviews challenges and issues in the field of reactor and fuel cycle physics. Typical examples are discussed with, in some cases, original results.

  5. Sustainable Facility Development: Perceived Benefits and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinnett, Brad; Gibson, Fred

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to assess the perceived benefits and challenges of implementing sustainable initiatives in collegiate recreational sports facilities. Additionally, this paper intends to contribute to the evolving field of facility sustainability in higher education. Design/methodology/approach The design included qualitative…

  6. Sustainable Facility Development: Perceived Benefits and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinnett, Brad; Gibson, Fred

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to assess the perceived benefits and challenges of implementing sustainable initiatives in collegiate recreational sports facilities. Additionally, this paper intends to contribute to the evolving field of facility sustainability in higher education. Design/methodology/approach The design included qualitative…

  7. Orff Ensembles: Benefits, Challenges, and Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Donald M.

    2012-01-01

    Playing Orff instruments provides students with a wide variety of opportunities to explore creative musicianship. This article examines the benefits of classroom instrument study, common challenges encountered, and viable teaching strategies to promote student success. The ability to remove notes from barred instruments makes note accuracy more…

  8. Orff Ensembles: Benefits, Challenges, and Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Donald M.

    2012-01-01

    Playing Orff instruments provides students with a wide variety of opportunities to explore creative musicianship. This article examines the benefits of classroom instrument study, common challenges encountered, and viable teaching strategies to promote student success. The ability to remove notes from barred instruments makes note accuracy more…

  9. Online Credit Recovery: Benefits and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettyjohn, Teri; LaFrance, Jason

    2014-01-01

    School leaders are faced with selecting programs to support at-risk students in high schools across the United States. Increasingly, supplemental online learning is being selected as an innovative way to assist these students. The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand stakeholders' perceptions of the benefits and challenges of high…

  10. Developing a PPO: challenges and benefits.

    PubMed

    Range, R P

    1984-12-01

    When deciding upon which kind of alternative delivery system to develop, Saint Vincent Charity Hospital and Health Center, Cleveland, selected the preferred provider organization (PPO) mode because of four basic advantages: (1) the health care consumer's freedom to choose providers; (2) effective cost containment; (3) coordination of services among allied providers; and (4) health promotion programs. More specifically, the Ohio Health Choice Plan (OHCP) benefits hospitals by assisting to maintain or increase market share, facilitating prompt claims payments, and improving financial mix. Physicians benefit not only because they receive prompt payment and are not a risk but also because the fee-for-service system is retained and their market shares can also be preserved or enhanced. Employers' advantages include savings through controlled utilization, positive employee relations, and improved management information. Employees' benefits include lower out-of-pocket costs and freedom of choice. As a full-service PPO, the organization provides benefits plans designed to meet each employer's needs as well as actuary services, claims screening and processing, benefits coordination, utilization control, management reporting, health promotion activities, and networking capabilities. Four major challenges do confront PPOs: 1. Start-up and operating costs can be significant; 2. The administrative skills required are different from those used in traditional health care systems; 3. The commitment in implementing and operating a PPO; and 4. All participating providers must genuinely accept the PPO. A PPO's success also can be measured in three ways: the development of a strong network; size of enrollment; and effectiveness in utilization control.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. The challenges and benefits of lunar exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Aaron

    1992-01-01

    Three decades into the Space Age, the United States is experiencing a fundamental shift in space policy with the adoption of a broad national goal to expand human presence and activity beyond Earth orbit and out into the Solar System. These plans mark a turning point in American space exploration, for they entail a shift away from singular forays to a long-term, evolutionary program of exploration and utilization of space. No longer limited to the technical and operational specifics of any one vehicle or any one mission plan, this new approach will involve a fleet of spacecraft and a stable of off-planet research laboratories, industrial facilities, and exploration programs. The challenges inherent in this program are immense, but so too are the benefits. Central to this new space architecture is the concept of using a lunar base for in-situ resource utilization, and for the development of planetary surface exploration systems, applicable to the Moon, Mars, and other planetary bodies in the Solar System. This paper discusses the technical, economic, and political challenges involved in this new approach, and details the latest thinking on the benefits that could come from bold new endeavors on the final frontier.

  12. The challenges and benefits of lunar exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Aaron

    1992-02-01

    Three decades into the Space Age, the United States is experiencing a fundamental shift in space policy with the adoption of a broad national goal to expand human presence and activity beyond Earth orbit and out into the Solar System. These plans mark a turning point in American space exploration, for they entail a shift away from singular forays to a long-term, evolutionary program of exploration and utilization of space. No longer limited to the technical and operational specifics of any one vehicle or any one mission plan, this new approach will involve a fleet of spacecraft and a stable of off-planet research laboratories, industrial facilities, and exploration programs. The challenges inherent in this program are immense, but so too are the benefits. Central to this new space architecture is the concept of using a lunar base for in-situ resource utilization, and for the development of planetary surface exploration systems, applicable to the Moon, Mars, and other planetary bodies in the Solar System. This paper discusses the technical, economic, and political challenges involved in this new approach, and details the latest thinking on the benefits that could come from bold new endeavors on the final frontier.

  13. Doing clinical research: the challenges and benefits.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Isabel; Parker, Vicki; Keatinge, Diana; Giles, Michelle; Winskill, Rhonda; Guest, Eileen; Kepreotes, Elizabeth; Phelan, Caroline

    2010-06-01

    The need for research in practice is well documented within nursing and other health care disciplines. This acceptance is predicated on the belief that clinically applied research will inform and improve practice and health service delivery resulting in better outcomes for consumers and their families. Nurses, however, find doing clinical research challenging. This paper describes nurses' experiences of doing clinical research. The main challenges of doing clinical research arise from a culture that prioritises practice where nursing work is core business and there is the need to address immediate and short term goals. There are also problems associated with the use of research language amongst clinical nurses and ambiguity in relation to research role expectations. Lack of support and resources for doing research along with keeping up the momentum for a research project also pose significant challenges. The benefits of doing clinical nursing research include experiential learning that has the potential to lead to practice change and improved patient outcomes that are evidence based.

  14. Undergraduate Research: Opportunities, Challenges, and Benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, J.

    2001-05-01

    Undergraduate research is one of the best ways students can experience investigative learning. Undergraduates involved in research often cite the experience as the highlight of their education. Because many geoscience departments now recognize the benefits of undergraduate research, they are creating more opportunities for students and are expecting their faculty to provide research mentoring. The Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR) is a national organization of individual and institutional members representing nearly 900 public and private colleges and universities. CUR generates awareness and support for undergraduate research and offers a variety of faculty development opportunities and services. CUR also conducts workshops where teams of faculty develop a campus plan for institutionalizing undergraduate research. A new online registry facilitates matchmaking between undergraduates with research experience and a desire to pursue an advanced degree, and graduate schools seeking high quality students who are well prepared for research. This presentation will describe the role of CUR in supporting undergraduate research, give examples of successful undergraduate research programs, and highlight some of the challenges and benefits of undergraduate research.

  15. The all electric airplane-benefits and challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitzer, C. R.; Hood, R. V.

    1982-01-01

    The all electric aircraft considered in the present investigation is an aircraft which has digital flight crucial controls, electromechanical actuators, and electrical secondary power. There are no hydraulic or pneumatic systems. The characteristics of an all electric aircraft are related to reduced acquisition cost, reduced weight, reduced fuel consumption, increased reliability, reduced support equipment, simpler maintenance, an expanded flight envelope, and improved survivability. An additional benefit is the dramatically increased design flexibility and mission adaptability. However, the implementation of the all electric aircraft concept requires the resolution of a number of major technology issues. Issues in the digital flight controls area are related to achieving the required levels of safety and reliability in a cost effective manner. Other challenges which have to be met are concerned with electromechanical actuators, environmental control and ice protection systems, and engine technology.

  16. Environmental benefits of transport and stationary fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, David; Hörmandinger, Günter

    The potential environmental benefits of using fuel cells in cars, buses and stationary combined heat and power (CHP) plants of different sizes have not been well-researched. This environmental analysis was conducted for the UK on a `full fuel cycle' basis, encompassing all greenhouse gas and regulated pollutant emissions for the supply chain and end-use technology under consideration. Solid polymer fuel cells (SPFCs) with methanol or natural gas reformers were analysed for cars, SPFCs and phosphoric acid fuel cells (PAFCs) with on-board hydrogen for buses. CHP plants were PAFCs or solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Each option was compared with one or more conventional technologies. In all cases fuel cell technologies have substantially reduced emissions in comparison with conventional technologies. Regulated emissions are lowest, by up to two orders of magnitude, and those that do occur are primarily in the fuel supply chain. The fuel cell technologies are more efficient in all cases, and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions are reduced broadly in line with energy savings. Methane emissions increase due to fuel switching, e.g. from petrol to natural gas powered buses, but from a very low base. The study pinpoints some areas in which alternative approaches could be made - the methods for generating and transporting hydrogen have a significant bearing on energy consumption and emissions. However, it is clear that from an overall emissions perspective the use of fuel cells in transport and power generation is highly beneficial.

  17. A methodology for assessing the market benefits of alternative motor fuels: The Alternative Fuels Trade Model

    SciTech Connect

    Leiby, P.N.

    1993-09-01

    This report describes a modeling methodology for examining the prospective economic benefits of displacing motor gasoline use by alternative fuels. The approach is based on the Alternative Fuels Trade Model (AFTM). AFTM development was undertaken by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of a longer term study of alternative fuels issues. The AFTM is intended to assist with evaluating how alternative fuels may be promoted effectively, and what the consequences of substantial alternative fuels use might be. Such an evaluation of policies and consequences of an alternative fuels program is being undertaken by DOE as required by Section 502(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Interest in alternative fuels is based on the prospective economic, environmental and energy security benefits from the substitution of these fuels for conventional transportation fuels. The transportation sector is heavily dependent on oil. Increased oil use implies increased petroleum imports, with much of the increase coming from OPEC countries. Conversely, displacement of gasoline has the potential to reduce US petroleum imports, thereby reducing reliance on OPEC oil and possibly weakening OPEC`s ability to extract monopoly profits. The magnitude of US petroleum import reduction, the attendant fuel price changes, and the resulting US benefits, depend upon the nature of oil-gas substitution and the supply and demand behavior of other world regions. The methodology applies an integrated model of fuel market interactions to characterize these effects.

  18. [Biomass energy utilization in microbial fuel cells: potentials and challenges].

    PubMed

    Huang, Liping; Cheng, Shaoan

    2010-07-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) that can harvest biomass energy from organic wastes through microbial catalysis have garnered more and more attention within the past decade due to its potential benefits to ecological environment. In this article, the updated progress in MFCs is reviewed, with a focus on frontier technologies such as chamber configurations, feedstock varieties and the integration of MFCs with microbial electrolysis cells for hydrogen production. And on the other hand, the challenges like development of cost-effective electrode materials, improvement of biomass energy recovery and power output, design and optimization of commercial MFC devices are presented.

  19. Miniaturized biological and electrochemical fuel cells: challenges and applications.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Ghobadian, Sasan; Goodrich, Payton J; Montazami, Reza; Hashemi, Nastaran

    2013-09-14

    This paper discusses the fundamentals and developments of miniaturized fuel cells, both biological and electrochemical. An overview of microfluidic fuel cells, miniaturized microbial fuel cells, enzymatic biofuel cells, and implanted biofuel cells in an attempt to provide green energy and to power implanted microdevices is provided. Also, the challenges and applications of each type of fuel cell are discussed in detail. Most recent developments in fuel cell technologies such as novel catalysts, compact designs, and fabrication methods are reviewed.

  20. Reassessing retiree benefits: the new challenge.

    PubMed

    Kann, R H; Turner, D E

    1993-03-01

    For most employers, uncertainty about the future shape of the U.S. health care system, rising health care costs and FAS 106 accounting rules mean it is important to manage retiree medical costs. Survey data shows many employers are taking steps to manage their future retiree health care costs. These steps include reducing benefit levels, introducing service-related contributions and introducing managed care elements to retiree medical plans.

  1. Organisational Blogs: Benefits and Challenges of Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, Gavin J.; Connolly, Thomas M.; Stansfield, Mark H.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify the theoretical link between blogs and organisational learning. It aims to provide a set of practical guidelines on how to overcome the challenges of implementing an organisational blog. Design/methodology/approach: A literature review will be used to examine blogs and their association towards…

  2. Organisational Blogs: Benefits and Challenges of Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, Gavin J.; Connolly, Thomas M.; Stansfield, Mark H.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify the theoretical link between blogs and organisational learning. It aims to provide a set of practical guidelines on how to overcome the challenges of implementing an organisational blog. Design/methodology/approach: A literature review will be used to examine blogs and their association towards…

  3. Campus Challenge - Part 2: Benefits and Challenges of BACnet

    DOE PAGES

    Masica, Ken

    2016-01-15

    Additional challenges of implementing a BACnet network in a large campus environment are explored in this article: providing BACnet campus connectivity, protecting BACnet network traffic, and controlling the resulting broadcast traffic. An example of BACnet implementation is also presented, unifying concepts presented in this and Part One of the article.

  4. Campus Challenge - Part 2: Benefits and Challenges of BACnet

    SciTech Connect

    Masica, Ken

    2016-01-15

    Additional challenges of implementing a BACnet network in a large campus environment are explored in this article: providing BACnet campus connectivity, protecting BACnet network traffic, and controlling the resulting broadcast traffic. An example of BACnet implementation is also presented, unifying concepts presented in this and Part One of the article.

  5. Riparian fuel treatments in the western USA: Challenges and considerations

    Treesearch

    Kathleen A. Dwire; Kristen E. Meyer; Gregg Riegel; Timothy Burton

    2016-01-01

    Fuel reduction treatments are being conducted throughout watersheds of the western United States to reduce hazardous fuels in efforts to decrease the risk of high-severity fire. The number of fuel reduction projects that include near-stream environments is increasing, bringing new challenges to riparian management. Riparian areas are protected by administrative...

  6. Risk-benefit perception: The research challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Peelle, E.

    1987-01-01

    Factors predisposing to perception of repositories as risky include the nuclear track record of secrecy and ineptitude, the overconfidence of some pro-nukes and the premature commercialization of an immature technology. Then, in parallel, we have the AEC-DOE track record including a bureaucratic approach involving premature policy decisions and continual changes in nuclear waste policy as demanded by Congress. The confusion of nuclear power with nuclear weapons is encouraged by those whose goal is to get rid of nuclear power. Media coverge feeds on controversy and a crisis, is a major factor in public perception of N-power and repositories as risky. Beyond their actual physical effects, there is the signal value of accidents such as Browns Ferry, Chernobyl, the Hanford tank leaks, Challenger, and TMI. These accidents have signaled that either the managers and operators don't understand the technology well enough to manage it, or worse yet, that the technology itself may not be manageable. With wodefully inadequate science and technology eduation, US citizens are unprepared to make decisions about management and uses of technology or to conduct their own risk evaluations. All of the above is occurring against the backdrop of the widespread and pervasive decline of trust in government and institutions in the past 25 years. And finally, there is Murphy's Law - everyone has some personal knowledge that whatever can go wrong will go wrong some day. In this social context, the tilt is toward perception of repositories as risky.

  7. Nuclear fuel performance: Trends, remedies and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusch, C. A.

    2008-12-01

    It is unacceptable to have nuclear power plants unavailable or power restricted due to fuel reliability issues. 'Fuel reliability' has a much broader definition than just maintaining mechanical integrity and being leaker free - fuel must fully meet the specifications, impose no adverse impacts on plant operation and safety, and maintain quantifiable margins within design and operational envelopes. The fuel performance trends over the last decade are discussed and the significant contributors to reduced reliability experienced with commercial PWR and BWR designs are identified and discussed including grid-to-rod fretting and debris fretting in PWR designs and accelerated corrosion, debris fretting and pellet-cladding interaction in BWR designs. In many of these cases, the impacts have included not only fuel failures but also plant operating restrictions, forced shutdowns, and/or enhanced licensing authority oversight. Design and operational remedies are noted. The more demanding operating regimes and the constant quest to improve fuel performance require enhancements to current designs and/or new design features. Fuel users must continue to and enhance interaction with fuel suppliers in such areas as oversight of supplier design functions, lead test assembly irradiation programs and quality assurance oversight and surveillance. With the implementation of new designs and/or features, such fuel user initiatives can help to minimize the potential for performance problems.

  8. Use of Demonstration Gardens in Extension: Challenges and Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glen, Charlotte D.; Moore, Gary E.; Jayaratne, K. S. U.; Bradley, Lucy K.

    2014-01-01

    Extension agents' use of demonstration gardens was studied to determine how gardens are employed in horticultural programming, perceived benefits and challenges of using gardens for Extension programming, and desired competencies. Gardens are primarily used to enhance educational efforts by providing hands-on learning experiences. Greatest…

  9. Reflection in a Workplace Qualification: Challenges and Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hegarty, Pauline M.; Kelly, Henry A.; Walsh, Anita

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss the challenges and benefits that arose from the implementation of an innovative example of employer responsive provision, i.e. of a postgraduate programme that is work-based and designed specifically to meet the needs of the organisation. Design/methodology/approach: The approach is to outline the…

  10. Faculty Perception on International Students in Turkey: Benefits and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acar, Erkan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study is to examine faculty perceptions on international students with respect to benefits and challenges of having them in a liberal arts university located in Istanbul, Turkey. The research data were collected through evaluation of pertinent documents of the school and interviews with sixteen faculty members…

  11. Use of Demonstration Gardens in Extension: Challenges and Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glen, Charlotte D.; Moore, Gary E.; Jayaratne, K. S. U.; Bradley, Lucy K.

    2014-01-01

    Extension agents' use of demonstration gardens was studied to determine how gardens are employed in horticultural programming, perceived benefits and challenges of using gardens for Extension programming, and desired competencies. Gardens are primarily used to enhance educational efforts by providing hands-on learning experiences. Greatest…

  12. Reflection in a Workplace Qualification: Challenges and Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hegarty, Pauline M.; Kelly, Henry A.; Walsh, Anita

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss the challenges and benefits that arose from the implementation of an innovative example of employer responsive provision, i.e. of a postgraduate programme that is work-based and designed specifically to meet the needs of the organisation. Design/methodology/approach: The approach is to outline the…

  13. Electronic Payment System in Nigeria: Its Economic Benefits and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okifo, Joseph; Igbunu, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The crux of this study is on the adoption of E-payment system in Nigeria: Its economic benefits and challenges. The arrival of the internet has taken electronic payments and transactions to an exponential growth level. Consumers could purchase goods and services from the internet and send unencrypted credit card numbers across the network, which…

  14. Immobilization of enzymes on porous silicas--benefits and challenges.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Martin; Kostrov, Xenia

    2013-08-07

    Porous silica materials have extensively been used for the immobilization of enzymes aiming at their use as biocatalysts or biosensors. This tutorial review will discuss the benefits and challenges of different immobilization techniques and will provide references to recent papers for further reading. Moreover, novel trends and unsolved problems will be introduced.

  15. Santini memorial lecture: Space Challenges and Opportunities for Human Benefit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarymovych, Michael I.

    2012-06-01

    Since the beginning of the Space Age the public was fascinated by the great challenges that needed to be overcome, but also inspired by the potential benefits that might arise from the utilization of space systems. This lecture examines the major technological breakthroughs that were necessary for many of the key space programs to succeed, and postulates the immediate and future benefits to humanity that became evident as a result of these advances. A dozen programs ranging from Sputnik and Apollo to the Global Navigation Satellite System are reviewed in view of the technical challenges in elements such as propulsion, power, structures, computing, guidance and control, spectrum management and payloads. Challenges in the cost of space launch, large structures, debris mitigation, humans in space and commercial promise are discussed and opportunities for improvements in the future are postulated.

  16. A Vulnerability-Benefit Analysis of Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delman, E. M.; Stephenson, S. R.; Davis, S. J.; Diffenbaugh, N. S.

    2015-12-01

    Although we can anticipate continued improvements in our understanding of future climate impacts, the central challenge of climate change is not scientific, but rather political and economic. In particular, international climate negotiations center on how to share the burden of uncertain mitigation and adaptation costs. We expose the relative economic interests of different countries by assessing and comparing their vulnerability to climate impacts and the economic benefits they derive from the fossil fuel-based energy system. Vulnerability refers to the propensity of humans and their assets to suffer when impacted by hazards, and we draw upon the results from a number of prior studies that have quantified vulnerability using multivariate indices. As a proxy for benefit, we average CO2 related to each country's extraction of fossil fuels, production of CO2 emissions, and consumption of goods and services (Davis et al., 2011), which should reflect benefits accrued in proportion to national economic dependence on fossil fuels. We define a nondimensional vulnerability-benefit ratio for each nation and find a large range across countries. In general, we confirm that developed and emerging economies such as the U.S., Western Europe, and China rely heavily on fossil fuels and have substantial resources to respond to the impacts of climate change, while smaller, less-developed economies such as Sierra Leone and Vanuatu benefit little from current CO2 emissions and are much more vulnerable to adverse climate impacts. In addition, we identify some countries with a high vulnerability and benefit, such as Iraq and Nigeria; conversely, some nations exhibit both a low vulnerability and benefit, such as New Zealand. In most cases, the ratios reflect the nature of energy-climate policies in each country, although certain nations - such as the United Kingdom and France - assume a level of responsibility incongruous with their ratio and commit to mitigation policy despite

  17. Social media and physicians: Exploring the benefits and challenges.

    PubMed

    Panahi, Sirous; Watson, Jason; Partridge, Helen

    2016-06-01

    Healthcare professionals' use of social media platforms, such as blogs, wikis, and social networking web sites has grown considerably in recent years. However, few studies have explored the perspectives and experiences of physicians in adopting social media in healthcare. This article aims to identify the potential benefits and challenges of adopting social media by physicians and demonstrates this by presenting findings from a survey conducted with physicians. A qualitative survey design was employed to achieve the research goal. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 24 physicians from around the world who were active users of social media. The data were analyzed using the thematic analysis approach. The study revealed six main reasons and six major challenges for physicians adopting social media. The main reasons to join social media were as follows: staying connected with colleagues, reaching out and networking with the wider community, sharing knowledge, engaging in continued medical education, benchmarking, and branding. The main challenges of adopting social media by physicians were also as follows: maintaining confidentiality, lack of active participation, finding time, lack of trust, workplace acceptance and support, and information anarchy. By revealing the main benefits as well as the challenges of adopting social media by physicians, the study provides an opportunity for healthcare professionals to better understand the scope and impact of social media in healthcare, and assists them to adopt and harness social media effectively, and maximize the benefits for the specific needs of the clinical community. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Multidimensional Challenges and Benefits of the CASSIOPE Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yau, A.; James, G.; Enno, G.; Hum, R.; Duggan, P.; Senez, M.; Ali, Z.; Brassard, G.; Desjardins, B.; Dubé, L.; Guroux, R.; Beattie, D.; Walkty, I.

    2008-08-01

    We discuss both the synergistic benefits and the challenges of the multi-purpose Canadian CASSIOPE small satellite mission, in which we merge a science mission (e-POP), a technology demonstration mission (CASCADE), and the Canadian Small Satellite Bus Development Program into a single mission. The scientific objectives of the mission concentrate on understanding the central role of the polar ionosphere in moderating the exchange of energy and mass among the ionosphere, thermosphere and magnetosphere. The cross- disciplinary merger posed a number of technical and programmatic challenges on both payloads and the spacecraft bus, including a stringent level of electro- magnetic cleanliness and surface electrical conductivity for plasma and high-sensitivity electric and magnetic field measurements on e-POP; differences in development philosophies, mission reliability requirements, and product assurance-cost tradeoff between the two payloads and between mission subsystems, and cost- effective management of technical and programmatic interfaces between subsystems and between development teams. As well, the mission exemplifies the significant benefits that can be achieved with efficient and pragmatic cooperation between development teams and practical, "outside-the-box" problem solving in addressing these challenges.

  19. Costs and benefits of automotive fuel economy improvement: A partial analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, D.L. ); Duleep, K.G. )

    1992-03-01

    This paper is an exercise in estimating the costs and benefits of technology-based fuel economy improvements for automobiles and light trucks. Benefits quantified include vehicle cots, fuel savings, consumer's surplus effects, the effect of reduced weight on vehicle safety, impacts on emissions of CO{sub 2} and criteria pollutants, world oil market and energy security benefits, and the transfer of wealth from US consumes to oil producers. A vehicle stock model is used to capture sales, scrappage, and vehicle use effects under three fuel price scenarios. Three alternative fuel economy levels for 2001 are considered, ranging from 32.9 to 36.5 MPG for cars and 24.2 to 27.5 MPG for light trucks. Fuel economy improvements of this size are probably cost-effective. The size of the benefit, and whether there is a benefit, strongly depends on the financial costs of fuel economy improvement and judgments about the values of energy security, emissions, safety, etc. Three sets of values for eight parameters are used to define the sensitivity of costs and benefits to key assumptions. The net present social value (1989$) of costs and benefits ranges from a cost of $11 billion to a benefit of $286 billion. The critical parameters being the discount rate (10% vs. 3%) and the values attached to externalities. The two largest components are always the direct vehicle costs and fuel savings, but these tend to counterbalance each other for the fuel economy levels examined here. Other components are the wealth transfer, oil cost savings, CO{sub 2} emissions reductions, and energy security benefits. Safety impacts, emissions of criteria pollutants, and consumer's surplus effects are relatively minor components. The critical issues for automotive fuel economy are therefore: (1) the value of present versus future costs and benefits, (2) the values of external costs and benefits, and (3) the financially cost-effective level of MPG achievable by available technology. 53 refs.

  20. Costs and benefits of automotive fuel economy improvement: A partial analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, D.L.; Duleep, K.G.

    1992-03-01

    This paper is an exercise in estimating the costs and benefits of technology-based fuel economy improvements for automobiles and light trucks. Benefits quantified include vehicle cots, fuel savings, consumer`s surplus effects, the effect of reduced weight on vehicle safety, impacts on emissions of CO{sub 2} and criteria pollutants, world oil market and energy security benefits, and the transfer of wealth from US consumes to oil producers. A vehicle stock model is used to capture sales, scrappage, and vehicle use effects under three fuel price scenarios. Three alternative fuel economy levels for 2001 are considered, ranging from 32.9 to 36.5 MPG for cars and 24.2 to 27.5 MPG for light trucks. Fuel economy improvements of this size are probably cost-effective. The size of the benefit, and whether there is a benefit, strongly depends on the financial costs of fuel economy improvement and judgments about the values of energy security, emissions, safety, etc. Three sets of values for eight parameters are used to define the sensitivity of costs and benefits to key assumptions. The net present social value (1989$) of costs and benefits ranges from a cost of $11 billion to a benefit of $286 billion. The critical parameters being the discount rate (10% vs. 3%) and the values attached to externalities. The two largest components are always the direct vehicle costs and fuel savings, but these tend to counterbalance each other for the fuel economy levels examined here. Other components are the wealth transfer, oil cost savings, CO{sub 2} emissions reductions, and energy security benefits. Safety impacts, emissions of criteria pollutants, and consumer`s surplus effects are relatively minor components. The critical issues for automotive fuel economy are therefore: (1) the value of present versus future costs and benefits, (2) the values of external costs and benefits, and (3) the financially cost-effective level of MPG achievable by available technology. 53 refs.

  1. Landing on empty: estimating the benefits from reducing fuel uplift in US Civil Aviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryerson, Megan S.; Hansen, Mark; Hao, Lu; Seelhorst, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Airlines and Air Navigation Service Providers are united in their goal to reduce fuel consumption. While changes to flight operations and technology investments are the focus of a number of studies, our study is among the first to investigate an untapped source of aviation fuel consumption: excess contingency fuel loading. Given the downside risk of fuel exhaustion of diverting to an alternate airport, airline dispatchers may load excess fuel onto an aircraft. Such conservatism comes at a cost of consuming excess fuel, as fuel consumed is a function of, among other factors, aircraft weight. The aim of this paper is to quantify, on a per-flight basis, the fuel burned due to carrying fuel beyond what is needed for foreseeable contingencies, and thereby motivate research, federal guidance, and investments that allow airline dispatchers to reduce fuel uplift while maintaining near zero risks of fuel exhaustion. We merge large publicly available aviation and weather databases with a detailed dataset from a major US airline. Upon estimating factors that capture the quantity fuel consumed due to carrying a pound of weight for a range of aircraft types, we calculate the cost and greenhouse gas emissions from carrying unused fuel on arrival and additional contingency fuel above a conservative buffer for foreseeable contingencies. We establish that the major US carrier does indeed load fuel conservatively. We find that 4.48% of the fuel consumed by an average flight is due to carrying unused fuel and 1.04% of the fuel consumed by an average flight is due to carrying additional contingency fuel above a reasonable buffer. We find that simple changes in flight dispatching that maintain a statistically minimal risk of fuel exhaustion could result in yearly savings of 338 million lbs of CO2, the equivalent to the fuel consumed from 4760 flights on midsized commercial aircraft. Moreover, policy changes regarding maximum fuel loads or investments that reduce uncertainty or increase

  2. Empowering patients through social media: the benefits and challenges.

    PubMed

    Househ, Mowafa; Borycki, Elizabeth; Kushniruk, Andre

    2014-03-01

    This article explores the range of social media platforms used by patients and examines the benefits and challenges of using these tools from a patient perspective. A literature review was performed to investigate the use of social media technology by patients. The MEDLINE database was searched using the terms "social media" and "patient." The search was conducted in September 2012 and yielded 765 abstracts. Initially, 63 abstracts were selected. All articles dating from 2004 through 2012 were included. Only 12 articles were found to be relevant for the purposes of the review. The results of this research found that there appears to be an increase in the use of social media by patients across the healthcare spectrum. The research indicates a promising future for the use of social media by patients; however, evidence related to the efficacy and effectiveness of social media is currently limited. Various challenges have also been identified relating to privacy and security concerns, usability, the manipulation of identity, and misinformation. The use of social media technology is an emerging trend for patients who are seeking health information. Conclusions are that such technology holds promise for improving patient engagement and empowerment and community building. Social media has a future in healthcare, especially with regard to patient engagement and empowerment; however, there are several challenges to overcome before the technology can achieve its potential.

  3. Fuel reformulation has benefits, but may not reduce NOx emissions

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-19

    A new report by the International Energy Agency (IEA) details the results of a comprehensive survey of European automotive fuels. Current fuel reformulation trends lead to reduced emissions of carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, and benzene from automobiles. Results for NO{sub x} emissions, however, are contradictory and inconclusive. Part 1 of the two-volume report focuses on raw materials and conversion. Part 2 looks at distribution and use. According to IEA, the report presents an overview of important aspects of raw materials and their conversion to automotive fuels. In addition to traditional fuels, the report includes sections on alternative fuels such as natural gas, hydrogen, ethers, and fuels derived from biological sources. The books also contain a detailed analysis of refinery and automotive emissions. Refinery emissions depend on the refinery processing scheme. Cat cracking refineries, for example, emit significantly greater quantities of sulfur than hydroskimming or thermal cracking refineries. In addition, the report includes data from tests of the effects of fuel reformulation on automobile emissions. This paper summarizes these results.

  4. Hydrogen as a transportation fuel: Costs and benefits

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, G.D.

    1996-03-01

    Hydrogen fuel and vehicles are assessed and compared to other alternative fuels and vehicles. The cost, efficiency, and emissions of hydrogen storage, delivery, and use in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs) are estimated. Hydrogen made thermochemically from natural gas and electrolytically from a range of electricity mixes is examined. Hydrogen produced at central plants and delivered by truck is compared to hydrogen produced on-site at filling stations, fleet refueling centers, and residences. The impacts of hydrogen HEVs, fueled using these pathways, are compared to ultra-low emissions gasoline internal-combustion-engine vehicles (ICEVs), advanced battery-powered electric vehicles (BPEVs), and HEVs using gasoline or natural gas.

  5. Measuring the benefits of RCM challenges and results

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, R.W.

    1996-08-01

    Dofasco`s application of Reliability-centered Maintenance started in September of 1993. This paper describes a sample of the benefits realized by the effort. It also presents a framework for the successful application and implementation of RCM. Twenty (20) steps are identified that address areas which can circumvent success. Recommendations are made along with suggested roles and responsibilities to address each of the potential challenges areas. Dofasco is a fully integrated steel company located in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. The company produces a broad range of flat rolled coiled steel products for a wide variety of industries. Their primary markets are the automotive, construction, pipe and tube, consumer packaging, distribution centres and manufacturing industries. In 1994, 3.1 million tons were shipped with total sales of $2.26 billion. Dofasco currently employs approximately 7000 employees.

  6. Advance care planning for people with dementia: benefits and challenges.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, Debbie

    2013-05-01

    Advance care planning (ACP) is a process being championed within health and social care, particularly since the publication of the UK Department of Health's 2008 End of Life Care Strategy. However, its implementation in dementia care is yet to be fully realised and can pose significant ethical and legal dilemmas for the generic and specialist workforce, the patient themselves, and their family or loved ones. Challenges may be attributable to inadequate communication, capacity issues, missed opportunities, and the perception that dementia is not a life-limiting illness. The aim of this paper is to highlight the benefits of ACP for individuals with dementia while appraising the recognised barriers to assist in developing some realistic recommendations for future practice.

  7. Searching for grey literature for systematic reviews: challenges and benefits.

    PubMed

    Mahood, Quenby; Van Eerd, Dwayne; Irvin, Emma

    2014-09-01

    There is ongoing interest in including grey literature in systematic reviews. Including grey literature can broaden the scope to more relevant studies, thereby providing a more complete view of available evidence. Searching for grey literature can be challenging despite greater access through the Internet, search engines and online bibliographic databases. There are a number of publications that list sources for finding grey literature in systematic reviews. However, there is scant information about how searches for grey literature are executed and how it is included in the review process. This level of detail is important to ensure that reviews follow explicit methodology to be systematic, transparent and reproducible. The purpose of this paper is to provide a detailed account of one systematic review team's experience in searching for grey literature and including it throughout the review. We provide a brief overview of grey literature before describing our search and review approach. We also discuss the benefits and challenges of including grey literature in our systematic review, as well as the strengths and limitations to our approach. Detailed information about incorporating grey literature in reviews is important in advancing methodology as review teams adapt and build upon the approaches described.

  8. Benefits of an Integrated Fuel Cycle on Repository Effective Capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, D.; Hunter, I.; Vinoche, R.; Clement, G.; Louvet, T.; Bruyere, J.

    2006-07-01

    Today, the Yucca Mountain repository is limited by legislation to a maximum capacity of 70,000 metric tons of initial heavy metal (MTiHM), of which 63,000 MTiHM is reserved for civilian nuclear used fuel. Various sources have estimated the 'real' or 'technical' capacity of Yucca Mountain could be around 125,000 MTiHM. Whatever the actual number is, it will be significantly less than the anticipated total volume of used fuel expected to be generated in the US by 2100. This paper briefly reviews the design constraints of the Yucca Mountain repository and shows the potential gains in capacity by early recycling of used fuel from US commercial reactors using an evolutionary COEX process (co-extraction of uranium and plutonium) design. To optimize the Yucca Mountain loading, two important constraints need to be addressed: heat load and physical volume. For heat load there is a long-term issue with actinides (primarily plutonium and americium) and a short-term issue with fission products (primarily cesium and strontium). We present a new way to increase the capacity of Yucca Mountain by increasing the unit loading of the repository - early recycling approach. For the once-through option and the early recycling solution, drift loading factors are calculated, looking at both volume and heat. The resulting densification factor (ratio of drift loading factor of treatment high level waste residues to used fuel) is 4 using COEX technology. In simple terms, the total length of Yucca Mountain tunnels needed to dispose of 63,000 MTiHM of used fuel (legal limit) could be used to dispose of the residues from the treatment of 252,000 MTiHM of used fuel. (authors)

  9. Animal models of protein allergenicity: potential benefits, pitfalls and challenges.

    PubMed

    Dearman, R J; Kimber, I

    2009-04-01

    Food allergy is an important health issue. With an increasing interest in novel foods derived from transgenic crop plants, there is a growing need for the development of approaches suitable for the characterization of the allergenic potential of proteins. There are methods available currently (such as homology searches and serological testing) that are very effective at identifying proteins that are likely to cross-react with known allergens. However, animal models may play a role in the identification of truly novel proteins, such as bacterial or fungal proteins, that have not been experienced previously in the diet. We consider here the potential benefits, pitfalls and challenges of the selection of various animal models, including the mouse, the rat, the dog and the neonatal swine. The advantages and disadvantages of various experimental end-points are discussed, including the measurement of specific IgE by ELISA, Western blotting or functional tests such as the passive cutaneous anaphylaxis assay, and the assessment of challenge-induced clinical symptoms in previously sensitized animals. The experimental variables of route of exposure to test proteins and the incorporation of adjuvant to increase the sensitivity of the responses are considered also. It is important to emphasize that currently none of these approaches has been validated for the purposes of hazard identification in the context of a safety assessment. However, the available evidence suggests that the judicious use of an accurate and robust animal model could provide important additional data that would contribute significantly to the assessment of the potential allergenicity of novel proteins.

  10. Modeled forest inventory data suggest climate benefits from fuels management

    Treesearch

    Jeremy S. Fried; Theresa B. Jain; Jonathan. Sandquist

    2013-01-01

    As part of a recent synthesis addressing fuel management in dry, mixed-conifer forests we analyzed more than 5,000 Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) plots, a probability sample that represents 33 million acres of these forests throughout Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Utah, and extreme northern California. We relied on the BioSum analysis framework that...

  11. Intradermal delivery of vaccines: potential benefits and current challenges

    PubMed Central

    Hickling, JK; Jones, KR; Friede, M; Chen, D; Kristensen, D

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Delivery of vaccine antigens to the dermis and/or epidermis of human skin (i.e. intradermal delivery) might be more efficient than injection into the muscle or subcutaneous tissue, thereby reducing the volumes of antigen. This is known as dose-sparing and has been demonstrated in clinical trials with some, but not all, vaccines. Dose-sparing could be beneficial to immunization programmes by potentially reducing the costs of purchase, distribution and storage of vaccines; increasing vaccine availability and effectiveness. The data obtained with intradermal delivery of some vaccines are encouraging and warrant further study and development; however significant gaps in knowledge and operational challenges such as reformulation, optimizing vaccine presentation and development of novel devices to aid intradermal vaccine delivery need to be addressed. Modelling of the costs and potential savings resulting from intradermal delivery should be done to provide realistic expectations of the potential benefits and to support cases for investment. Implementation and uptake of intradermal vaccine delivery requires further research and development, which depends upon collaboration between multiple stakeholders in the field of vaccination. PMID:21379418

  12. Intradermal delivery of vaccines: potential benefits and current challenges.

    PubMed

    Hickling, J K; Jones, K R; Friede, M; Zehrung, D; Chen, D; Kristensen, D

    2011-03-01

    Delivery of vaccine antigens to the dermis and/or epidermis of human skin (i.e. intradermal delivery) might be more efficient than injection into the muscle or subcutaneous tissue, thereby reducing the volumes of antigen. This is known as dose-sparing and has been demonstrated in clinical trials with some, but not all, vaccines. Dose-sparing could be beneficial to immunization programmes by potentially reducing the costs of purchase, distribution and storage of vaccines; increasing vaccine availability and effectiveness. The data obtained with intradermal delivery of some vaccines are encouraging and warrant further study and development; however significant gaps in knowledge and operational challenges such as reformulation, optimizing vaccine presentation and development of novel devices to aid intradermal vaccine delivery need to be addressed. Modelling of the costs and potential savings resulting from intradermal delivery should be done to provide realistic expectations of the potential benefits and to support cases for investment. Implementation and uptake of intradermal vaccine delivery requires further research and development, which depends upon collaboration between multiple stakeholders in the field of vaccination.

  13. Being empathetic: benefits and challenges for the clinician and client.

    PubMed

    Abbott Moore, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the meaning of empathy and how it influences clinicians in their personal and professional lives. Empathy may benefit client and clinician by improving patient satisfaction and pain management, reducing medical errors, and helping to keep clinicians grounded in the priorities of patient care. The cultural and developmental origins and neural basis of empathy are reviewed to provide insight into how a clinician's and client's emotions can interact and influence each other. Methods for cultivating and communicating empathetic responses in the clinical setting are provided, including ways of identifying and dealing with difficult clients. Concepts such as attunement, emotional labor, and parallel emotions are explained. The limitations to empathy and potential challenges or difficulties for the clinician are also explored, along with possible solutions. Narratives from the author's personal and professional life are included to illustrate how a clinician's emotions can play a significant part in interactions with clients. This discussion shows that clinicians must combine both evidenced-based practice and empathy in their interactions with clients to achieve the professional goal of high-quality care.

  14. EHRs in primary care practices: benefits, challenges, and successful strategies.

    PubMed

    Goetz Goldberg, Debora; Kuzel, Anton J; Feng, Lisa Bo; DeShazo, Jonathan P; Love, Linda E

    2012-02-01

    To understand the current use of electronic health records (EHRs) in small primary care practices and to explore experiences and perceptions of physicians and staff toward the benefits, challenges, and successful strategies for implementation and meaningful use of advanced EHR functions. Qualitative case study of 6 primary care practices in Virginia. We performed surveys and in-depth interviews with clinicians and administrative staff (N = 38) and observed interpersonal relations and use of EHR functions over a 16-month period. Practices with an established EHR were selected based on a maximum variation of quality activities, location, and ownership. Physicians and staff report increased efficiency in retrieving medical records, storing patient information, coordination of care, and office operations. Costs, lack of knowledge of EHR functions, and problems transforming office operations were barriers reported for meaningful use of EHRs. Major disruption to patient care during upgrades and difficulty utilizing performance tracking and quality functions were also reported. Facilitators for adopting and using advanced EHR functions include team-based care, adequate technical support, communication and training for employees and physicians, alternative strategies for patient care during transition, and development of new processes and work flow procedures. Small practices experience difficulty with implementation and utilization of advanced EHR functions. Federal and state policies should continue to support practices by providing technical assistance and financial incentives, grants, and/or loans. Small practices should consider using regional extension center services and reaching out to colleagues and other healthcare organizations with similar EHR systems for advice and guidance.

  15. Implementing root cause analysis in Iranian hospitals: challenges and benefits.

    PubMed

    Abdi, Zhaleh; Ravaghi, Hamid

    2017-04-01

    Root cause analysis (RCA) has been widely used for retrospective investigations of patient safety incidents. To increase patient safety competencies, RCA has recently been introduced in Iranian hospitals. The aims of the current study were to explore team members' experiences and perceptions of RCA and to identify the challenges and benefits of using it in Iranian hospitals from their perspective. A qualitative study was conducted consisting of 32 semi-structured interviews with health professionals who participated in the national training programme and were involved in RCA investigations. Data were analysed using the thematic analysis method. The participants encountered a range of obstacles while conducting RCA, including time constraints, a lack of resources, the blame culture and unsupportive colleagues. They stressed the need for further leadership support and cultural change within the Iranian healthcare system to facilitate the application of RCA. RCA was perceived as a beneficial analytical tool that improved patient care, fostered teamwork and communication among staff and promoted safety culture. This study concluded that applying RCA in the Iranian healthcare setting has had a significant impact on improving commitment to safety. However, the general adoption of this method is hindered by the lack of workplace and system supports. To maximize profits from RCA, clinical leaders must assign a high priority to RCA investigations and support RCA team efforts. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Benefits of modern refinery information systems for manufacturing cleaner fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Latour, P.R.

    1995-12-31

    Revolutionary changes in quality specifications (number, complexity, uncertainty, economic sensitivity) for reformulated gasolines (RFG) and low-sulfur diesels (LSD) are being addressed by powerful, new, computer integrated manufacturing technology for Refinery Information Systems and Advanced Process Control (RIS/APC). This paper shows how the five active RIS/APC functions -- performance measurement, optimization, scheduling, control and integration -- are used to manufacture new, clean fuels competitively. With current industry spending for this field averaging 2 to 3 cents/bbl crude, many refineries can capture 50 to 100 cents/bbl if the technology is properly employed and sustained throughout refining operations, organizations, and businesses.

  17. NUCLEAR FUEL LEASING – AN ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC AND NONPROLIFERATION BENEFITS

    SciTech Connect

    Short, Steven M.; Weimar, Mark R.; Kreyling, Sean J.; Gastelum, Zoe N.; Phillips, Jon R.; Wood, Thomas W.

    2009-06-11

    To enable the expansion of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes while discouraging the spread of enrichment and reprocessing technology to additional countries, existing front- and back-end supplier States are considering a variety of approaches to encourage the establishment of Reliable Fuel Service & Supply (RFS&S) arrangements for providing fresh fuel and taking back of spent fuel. Important aspects of such a trade regime are the economic basis, the product offerings, and alternative business models for RFS&S arrangements. This paper provides an assessment of the potential economic and nonproliferation benefits of one type of RFS&S trade regime currently under active consideration: full-service nuclear fuel leasing arrangements. Several different fuel leasing implementation models are evaluated to develop an understanding of the range of potential economic benefit to the lessee and, conversely, the economic liability to the lessor. Results suggest that while economic benefits are potentially substantial, these benefits also vary substantially depending on how a fuel leasing arrangement is implemented.

  18. Bioconversion of natural gas to liquid fuel: Opportunities and challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Fei, Q; Guarnieri, MT; Tao, L; Laurens, LML; Dowe, N; Pienkos, PT

    2014-05-01

    Natural gas is a mixture of low molecular weight hydrocarbon gases that can be generated from either fossil or anthropogenic resources. Although natural gas is used as a transportation fuel, constraints in storage, relatively low energy content (MJ/L), and delivery have limited widespread adoption. Advanced utilization of natural gas has been explored for biofuel production by microorganisms. In recent years, the aerobic bioconversion of natural gas (or primarily the methane content of natural gas) into liquid fuels (Bio-GTL) by biocatalysts (methanotrophs) has gained increasing attention as a promising alternative for drop-in biofuel production. Methanotrophic bacteria are capable of converting methane into microbial lipids, which can in turn be converted into renewable diesel via a hydrotreating process. In this paper, biodiversity, catalytic properties and key enzymes and pathways of these microbes are summarized. Bioprocess technologies are discussed based upon existing literature, including cultivation conditions, fermentation modes, bioreactor design, and lipid extraction and upgrading. This review also outlines the potential of Bio-GTL using methane as an alternative carbon source as well as the major challenges and future research needs of microbial lipid accumulation derived from methane, key performance index, and techno-economic analysis. An analysis of raw material costs suggests that methane-derived diesel fuel has the potential to be competitive with petroleum-derived diesel. (C) 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Bioconversion of Natural Gas to Liquid Fuel. Opportunities and Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Fei, Qiang; Guarnieri, Michael T.; Tao, Ling; Laurens, Lieve M. L.; Dowe, Nancy; Pienkos, Philip T.

    2014-05-01

    Natural gas is a mixture of low molecular weight hydrocarbon gases that can be generated from either fossil or anthropogenic resources. Although natural gas is used as a transportation fuel, constraints in storage, relatively low energy content (MJ/L), and delivery have limited widespread adoption. Advanced utilization of natural gas has been explored for biofuel production by microorganisms. In recent years, the aerobic bioconversion of natural gas (or primarily the methane content of natural gas) into liquid fuels (Bio-GTL) by biocatalysts (methanotrophs) has gained increasing attention as a promising alternative for drop-in biofuel production. Moreover, methanotrophic bacteria are capable of converting methane into microbial lipids, which can in turn be converted into renewable diesel via a hydrotreating process. In this paper, biodiversity, catalytic properties and key enzymes and pathways of these microbes are summarized. Bioprocess technologies are discussed based upon existing literature, including cultivation conditions, fermentation modes, bioreactor design, and lipid extraction and upgrading. Our review also outlines the potential of Bio-GTL using methane as an alternative carbon source as well as the major challenges and future research needs of microbial lipid accumulation derived from methane, key performance index, and techno-economic analysis. An analysis of raw material costs suggests that methane-derived diesel fuel has the potential to be competitive with petroleum-derived diesel.

  20. Bioconversion of natural gas to liquid fuel: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Fei, Qiang; Guarnieri, Michael T; Tao, Ling; Laurens, Lieve M L; Dowe, Nancy; Pienkos, Philip T

    2014-01-01

    Natural gas is a mixture of low molecular weight hydrocarbon gases that can be generated from either fossil or anthropogenic resources. Although natural gas is used as a transportation fuel, constraints in storage, relatively low energy content (MJ/L), and delivery have limited widespread adoption. Advanced utilization of natural gas has been explored for biofuel production by microorganisms. In recent years, the aerobic bioconversion of natural gas (or primarily the methane content of natural gas) into liquid fuels (Bio-GTL) by biocatalysts (methanotrophs) has gained increasing attention as a promising alternative for drop-in biofuel production. Methanotrophic bacteria are capable of converting methane into microbial lipids, which can in turn be converted into renewable diesel via a hydrotreating process. In this paper, biodiversity, catalytic properties and key enzymes and pathways of these microbes are summarized. Bioprocess technologies are discussed based upon existing literature, including cultivation conditions, fermentation modes, bioreactor design, and lipid extraction and upgrading. This review also outlines the potential of Bio-GTL using methane as an alternative carbon source as well as the major challenges and future research needs of microbial lipid accumulation derived from methane, key performance index, and techno-economic analysis. An analysis of raw material costs suggests that methane-derived diesel fuel has the potential to be competitive with petroleum-derived diesel. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Top Benefits Challenges Facing School Business Decision Makers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohling, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    What's the main factor coloring employee satisfaction? Many organizations' leaders think the answer is salary, yet in reality, employee benefits packages are one of the biggest incentives an employer can offer. Educational institutions have done well in providing benefits to employees. However, with an unpredictable economic climate and a complex…

  2. Top Benefits Challenges Facing School Business Decision Makers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohling, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    What's the main factor coloring employee satisfaction? Many organizations' leaders think the answer is salary, yet in reality, employee benefits packages are one of the biggest incentives an employer can offer. Educational institutions have done well in providing benefits to employees. However, with an unpredictable economic climate and a complex…

  3. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2015 Specific Environmental Benefit: Climate Change Award

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2015 award winner, Algenol, blue-green algae to produce ethanol and other fuels, uses CO2 from air or industrial emitters, reduces the carbon footprint, costs and water usage, no reliance on food crops

  4. Fuel switching from wood to LPG can benefit the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Nautiyal, Sunil Kaechele, Harald

    2008-11-15

    The Himalaya in India is one of the world's biodiversity hotspots. Various scientific studies have reported and proven that many factors are responsible for the tremendous decline of the Himalayan forests. Extraction of wood biomass from the forests for fuel is one of the factors, as rural households rely entirely on this for their domestic energy. Efforts continue for both conservation and development of the Himalayan forests and landscape. It has been reported that people are still looking for more viable solutions that could help them to improve their lifestyle as well as facilitate ecosystem conservation and preservation of existing biodiversity. In this direction, we have documented the potential of the introduction of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), which is one of the solutions that have been offered to the local people as a substitute for woodfuel to help meet their domestic energy demand. The results of the current study found dramatic change in per capita woodfuel consumption in the last two decades in the villages where people are using LPG. The outcome showed that woodfuel consumption had been about 475 kg per capita per year in the region, but after introduction of LPG, this was reduced to 285 kg per capita per year in 1990-1995, and was further reduced to 46 kg per capita per year in 2000-2005. Besides improving the living conditions of the local people, this transformation has had great environmental consequences. Empirical evidence shows that this new paradigm shift is having positive external effects on the surrounding forests. Consequently, we have observed a high density of tree saplings and seedlings in adjacent forests, which serves as an assessment indicator of forest health. With the help of the current study, we propose that when thinking about a top-down approach to conservation, better solutions, which are often ignored, should be offered to local people.

  5. Benefits and Challenges of Achieving a Mainstream Market for Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Ungar, Edward; Mueller, Howard; Smith, Brett

    2010-08-01

    The Plug-in Hybrid electric Vehicle (PHEV) Market Introduction Study Final Report identified a range of policies, incentives and regulations designed to enhance the probability of success in commercializing PHEVs as they enter the automotive marketplace starting in 2010. The objective of the comprehensive PHEV Value Proposition study, which encompasses the PHEV Market Introduction Study, is to better understand the value proposition that PHEVs (as well as other plug-in electric vehicle platforms - PEVs) provide to the auto companies themselves, to the consumer and to the public at large as represented by the government and its public policies. In this report we use the more inclusive term PEVs, to include PHEVs, BEVs (battery electric vehicles that operate only on battery) and EREVs (extended range electric vehicles that combine battery electric vehicles with an internal combustion engine that charges the battery as needed). The objective of Taratec's contribution to Phase 2 of the PHEV Value Proposition Study is to develop a clear understanding of the benefits of PEVs to three stakeholders - auto original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), utilities, and the government - and of the technical and commercial challenges and risks to be overcome in order to achieve commercial success for these vehicles. The goal is to understand the technical and commercial challenges in moving from the 'early adopters' at the point of market introduction of these vehicles to a 'sustainable' mainstream market in which PEVs and other PEVs represent a normal, commercially available and attractive vehicle to the mainstream consumer. For the purpose of this study, that sustainable market is assumed to be in place in the 2030 timeframe. The principal focus of the study is to better understand the technical and commercial challenges in the transition from early adopters to a sustainable mainstream consumer market. Effectively, that translates to understanding the challenges to be overcome

  6. Future nuclear fuel cycles: Prospect and challenges for actinide recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warin, Dominique

    2010-03-01

    The global energy context pleads in favour of a sustainable development of nuclear energy since the demand for energy will likely increase, whereas resources will tend to get scarcer and the prospect of global warming will drive down the consumption of fossil fuel. In this context, nuclear power has the worldwide potential to curtail the dependence on fossil fuels and thereby to reduce the amount of greenhouse gas emissions while promoting energy independence. How we deal with nuclear radioactive waste is crucial in this context. In France, the public's concern regarding the long-term waste management made the French Governments to prepare and pass the 1991 and 2006 Acts, requesting in particular the study of applicable solutions for still minimizing the quantity and the hazardousness of final waste. This necessitates High Active Long Life element (such as the Minor Actinides MA) recycling, since the results of fuel cycle R&D could significantly change the challenges for the storage of nuclear waste. HALL recycling can reduce the heat load and the half-life of most of the waste to be buried to a couple of hundred years, overcoming the concerns of the public related to the long-life of the waste and thus aiding the "burying approach" in securing a "broadly agreed political consensus" of waste disposal in a geological repository. This paper presents an overview of the recent R and D results obtained at the CEA Atalante facility on innovative actinide partitioning hydrometallurgical processes. For americium and curium partitioning, these results concern improvements and possible simplifications of the Diamex-Sanex process, whose technical feasibility was already demonstrated in 2005. Results on the first tests of the Ganex process (grouped actinide separation for homogeneous recycling) are also discussed. In the coming years, next steps will involve both better in-depth understanding of the basis of these actinide partitioning processes and, for the new promising

  7. Vehicle Technologies and Fuel Cell Technologies Program: Prospective Benefits Assessment Report for Fiscal Year 2016

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, T. S.; Taylor, C. H.; Moore, J. S.; Ward, J.

    2016-02-23

    Under a diverse set of programs, the Vehicle Technologies and Fuel Cell Technologies offices of DOE’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy invest in research, development, demonstration, and deployment of advanced vehicle, hydrogen production, delivery and storage, and fuel cell technologies. This report estimates the benefits of successfully developing and deploying these technologies (a “Program Success” case) relative to a base case (the “No Program” case). The Program Success case represents the future with completely successful deployment of Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) and Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) technologies. The No Program case represents a future in which there is no contribution after FY 2016 by the VTO or FCTO to these technologies. The benefits of advanced vehicle, hydrogen production, delivery and storage, and fuel cell technologies were estimated on the basis of differences in fuel use, primary energy use, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from light-, medium- and heavy-duty vehicles, including energy and emissions from fuel production, between the base case and the Program Success case. Improvements in fuel economy of various vehicle types, growth in the stock of fuel cell vehicles and other advanced technology vehicles, and decreased GHG intensity of hydrogen production and delivery in the Program Success case over the No Program case were projected to result in savings in petroleum use and GHG emissions. Benefits were disaggregated by individual program technology areas, which included the FCTO program and the VTO subprograms of batteries and electric drives; advanced combustion engines; fuels and lubricants; materials (for reduction in vehicle mass, or “lightweighting”); and, for medium- and heavy-duty vehicles, reduction in rolling and aerodynamic resistance. Projections for the Program Success case indicate that by 2035, the average fuel economy of on-road, light-duty vehicle stock could be 47% to 76

  8. Benefits of two mitigation strategies for container vessels: cleaner engines and cleaner fuels.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Yusuf; Giordano, Michael; Gutierrez, James; Welch, William A; Asa-Awuku, A; Miller, J Wayne; Cocker, David R

    2012-05-01

    Emissions from ocean-going vessels (OGVs) are a significant health concern for people near port communities. This paper reports the emission benefits for two mitigation strategies, cleaner engines and cleaner fuels, for a 2010 container vessel. In-use emissions were measured following International Organization for Standardization (ISO) protocols. The overall in-use nitrogen oxide (NO(x)) emission factor was 16.1 ± 0.1 gkW(-1) h(-1), lower than the Tier 1 certification (17 gkW(-1) h(-1)) and significantly lower than the benchmark value of 18.7 gkW(-1) h(-1) commonly used for estimating emission inventories. The in-use particulate matter (PM(2.5)) emission was 1.42 ± 0.04 gkW(-1) h(-1) for heavy fuel oil (HFO) containing 2.51 wt % sulfur. Unimodal (∼30 nm) and bimodal (∼35 nm; ∼75 nm) particle number size distributions (NSDs) were observed when the vessel operated on marine gas oil (MGO) and HFO, respectively. First-time emission measurements during fuel switching (required 24 nautical miles from coastline) showed that concentrations of sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) and particle NSD took ∼55 min to reach steady-state when switching from MGO to HFO and ∼84 min in the opposite direction. Therefore, if OGVs commence fuel change at the regulated boundary, then vessels can travel up to 90% of the distance to the port before steady-state values are re-established. The transient behavior follows a classic, nonlinear mixing function driven by the amount of fuel in day tank and the fuel consumption rate. Hence, to achieve the maximum benefits from a fuel change regulation, fuel switch boundary should be further increased to provide the intended benefits for the people living near the ports.

  9. Doing Qualitative Comparative Research on Teaching: Challenges and Benefits of Working with Grounded Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rupp, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    The last decades have seen the completion of an increasing number of qualitative comparative research projects on teaching. Challenges and benefits which might arise from a qualitative international comparative research design have been considered. However, very little has been published on challenges and benefits which may arise from using…

  10. Doing Qualitative Comparative Research on Teaching: Challenges and Benefits of Working with Grounded Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rupp, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    The last decades have seen the completion of an increasing number of qualitative comparative research projects on teaching. Challenges and benefits which might arise from a qualitative international comparative research design have been considered. However, very little has been published on challenges and benefits which may arise from using…

  11. Online Distance Learning and Music Training: Benefits, Drawbacks and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koutsoupidou, Theano

    2014-01-01

    This study examines online distance learning (ODL) as applied in music and music education programmes at different educational levels with a special focus on the digital tools employed in such programmes. It aims to provide an up-to-date snapshot of the current online courses focusing on the potential benefits and drawbacks of ODL from the…

  12. Benefits and Challenges of School-Based Crisis Response Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kline, Marsha; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Offers a rationale for the importance of school-based intervention in crisis and emergency situations, outlining a model for crisis response policies and procedures. Discusses benefits to schools of developing a team to implement the model, obstacles that can impede full implementation, and strategies for minimizing identified obstacles. (SM)

  13. Personal and Professional Challenges and Benefits of Studying Abroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milian, Madeline; Birnbaum, Matthew; Cardona, Betty; Nicholson, Bonnie

    2015-01-01

    Completing studies abroad is a global trend that has placed the United States in the enviable position of being the most desirable destination for those considering post secondary education. Institutions of higher education are increasingly devoting efforts to attract international students as they bring both financial and cultural benefits to the…

  14. Online Distance Learning and Music Training: Benefits, Drawbacks and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koutsoupidou, Theano

    2014-01-01

    This study examines online distance learning (ODL) as applied in music and music education programmes at different educational levels with a special focus on the digital tools employed in such programmes. It aims to provide an up-to-date snapshot of the current online courses focusing on the potential benefits and drawbacks of ODL from the…

  15. Searching for Grey Literature for Systematic Reviews: Challenges and Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahood, Quenby; Van Eerd, Dwayne; Irvin, Emma

    2014-01-01

    There is ongoing interest in including grey literature in systematic reviews. Including grey literature can broaden the scope to more relevant studies, thereby providing a more complete view of available evidence. Searching for grey literature can be challenging despite greater access through the Internet, search engines and online bibliographic…

  16. Wireless Intra-Spacecraft Communication: The Benefits and the Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Will H.; Armstrong, John T.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a systematic study of how intra-spacecraft wireless communication can be adopted to various subsystems of the spacecraft including C&DH (Command & Data Handling), Telecom, Power, Propulsion, and Payloads, and the interconnects between them. We discuss the advantages of intra-spacecraft wireless communication and the disadvantages and challenges and a proposal to address them.

  17. Borderland Spaces for Learning Partnership: Opportunities, Benefits and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Jennifer; Thomas, Greg; Diaz, Anita; Simm, David

    2016-01-01

    This paper uses case studies and secondary literature to critically examine how learning spaces inhabited by geographers might be used productively as borderland spaces for learning partnership. Borderland spaces are novel, challenging, permissive and liminal, destabilizing traditional power hierarchies. In these spaces, students gain confidence…

  18. Wireless Intra-Spacecraft Communication: The Benefits and the Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Will H.; Armstrong, John T.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a systematic study of how intra-spacecraft wireless communication can be adopted to various subsystems of the spacecraft including C&DH (Command & Data Handling), Telecom, Power, Propulsion, and Payloads, and the interconnects between them. We discuss the advantages of intra-spacecraft wireless communication and the disadvantages and challenges and a proposal to address them.

  19. Searching for Grey Literature for Systematic Reviews: Challenges and Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahood, Quenby; Van Eerd, Dwayne; Irvin, Emma

    2014-01-01

    There is ongoing interest in including grey literature in systematic reviews. Including grey literature can broaden the scope to more relevant studies, thereby providing a more complete view of available evidence. Searching for grey literature can be challenging despite greater access through the Internet, search engines and online bibliographic…

  20. Borderland Spaces for Learning Partnership: Opportunities, Benefits and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Jennifer; Thomas, Greg; Diaz, Anita; Simm, David

    2016-01-01

    This paper uses case studies and secondary literature to critically examine how learning spaces inhabited by geographers might be used productively as borderland spaces for learning partnership. Borderland spaces are novel, challenging, permissive and liminal, destabilizing traditional power hierarchies. In these spaces, students gain confidence…

  1. Program Benefits Guidance: Analysis of Benefits Associated with Projects and Technologies Supported by the Alternative and Renewable Fuel and Vehicle Technology Program

    SciTech Connect

    Melaina, Marc; Warner, Ethan; Sun, Yongling; Newes, Emily; Ragatz, Adam

    2014-06-01

    The Alternative and Renewable Fuel and Vehicle Technologies Program (ARFVTP) supports a wide range of alternative, low-carbon fuel and vehicle projects in California. This report focuses on two types of ARFVTP benefits. Expected benefits reflect successful deployment of vehicles and fuels supported through program projects. Market transformation benefits represent benefits resulting from project influences on future market conditions to accelerated technology adoption rates. Data collected directly from ARFVTP projects funded from 2009 to first quarter 2014 are used as inputs to the benefits analysis, where possible. Expected benefit estimation methods rely primarily upon project-level data and result in year single-point estimates within the 2011 to 2025 analysis period. Results suggest that the 178 projects evaluated for expected benefits, representing an investment of $351.3 million in ARFVTP funds, could result in a reduction in petroleum fuel use by 236 million gallons per year and greenhouse gases (GHGs) by 1.7 million metric tonnes carbon dioxide equivalent (MMTCO2e) per year by 2025. Market transformation benefits are described as accruing in addition to expected benefits. They are inherently more uncertain and theoretical than expected benefits, and are therefore reported as high and low ranges, with results suggesting reductions of 1.1 MMTCO2e to 2.5 MMTCO2e per year in GHG reductions and 102 million to 330 million gallons per year in petroleum fuel reductions by 2025. Taking both benefit types into account, results suggest that ARFVTP projects have the potential to make substantial progress toward meeting California's long-term GHG and petroleum fuel use reduction goals. As additional project data become available and market success with alternative and renewable fuels and vehicles grows, the analytic framework relied upon to develop these estimates will become more rigorous and will have a greater capacity to inform future ARFVTP activities.

  2. Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajbabaei, Maryam

    There is a global effort to expand the use of alternative fuels due to their several benefits such as improving air quality with reducing some criteria emissions, reducing dependency on fossil fuels, and reducing greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide. This dissertation is focused on investigating the impact of two popular alternative fuels, biodiesel and natural gas (NG), on emissions from heavy-duty engines. Biodiesel is one of the most popular renewable fuels with diesel applications. Although biodiesel blends are reported to reduce particulate matter, carbon monoxide, and total hydrocarbon emissions; there is uncertainty on their impact on nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions. This dissertation evaluated the effect of biodiesel feedstock, biodiesel blend level, engine technology, and driving conditions on NOx emissions. The results showed that NOx emissions increase with 20% and higher biodiesel blends. Also, in this study some strategies were proposed and some fuel formulations were found for mitigating NOx emissions increases with biodiesel. The impact of 5% biodiesel on criteria emissions specifically NOx was also fully studied in this thesis. As a part of the results of this study, 5% animal-based biodiesel was certified for use in California based on California Air Resources Board emissions equivalent procedure. NG is one of the most prominent alternative fuels with larger reserves compared to crude oil. However, the quality of NG depends on both its source and the degree to which it is processed. The current study explored the impact of various NG fuels, ranging from low methane/high energy gases to high methane/low energy gases, on criteria and toxic emissions from NG engines with different combustion and aftertreatment technologies. The results showed stronger fuel effects for the lean-burn technology bus. Finally, this thesis investigated the impact of changing diesel fuel composition on the criteria emissions from a variety of heavy-duty engine

  3. Energy and emission benefits of alternative transportation liquid fuels derived from switchgrass: a fuel life cycle assessment.

    PubMed

    Wu, May; Wu, Ye; Wang, Michael

    2006-01-01

    We conducted a mobility chains, or well-to-wheels (WTW), analysis to assess the energy and emission benefits of cellulosic biomass for the U.S. transportation sector in the years 2015-2030. We estimated the life-cycle energy consumption and emissions associated with biofuel production and use in light-duty vehicle (LDV) technologies by using the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model. Analysis of biofuel production was based on ASPEN Plus model simulation of an advanced fermentation process to produce fuel ethanol/protein, a thermochemical process to produce Fischer-Tropsch diesel (FTD) and dimethyl ether (DME), and a combined heat and power plant to co-produce steam and electricity. Our study revealed that cellulosic biofuels as E85 (mixture of 85% ethanol and 15% gasoline by volume), FTD, and DME offer substantial savings in petroleum (66-93%) and fossil energy (65-88%) consumption on a per-mile basis. Decreased fossil fuel use translates to 82-87% reductions in greenhouse gas emissions across all unblended cellulosic biofuels. In urban areas, our study shows net reductions for almost all criteria pollutants, with the exception of carbon monoxide (unchanged), for each of the biofuel production option examined. Conventional and hybrid electric vehicles, when fueled with E85, could reduce total sulfur oxide (SO(x)) emissions to 39-43% of those generated by vehicles fueled with gasoline. By using bio-FTD and bio-DME in place of diesel, SO(x) emissions are reduced to 46-58% of those generated by diesel-fueled vehicles. Six different fuel production options were compared. This study strongly suggests that integrated heat and power co-generation by means of gas turbine combined cycle is a crucial factor in the energy savings and emission reductions.

  4. Nitrogen fertilization challenges the climate benefit of cellulosic biofuels

    DOE PAGES

    Ruan, Leilei; Bhardwaj, Ajay K.; Hamilton, Stephen K.; ...

    2016-06-01

    Cellulosic biofuels are intended to improve future energy and climate security. Nitrogen (N) fertilizer is commonly recommended to stimulate yields but can increase losses of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) and other forms of reactive N, including nitrate. We measured soil N2O emissions and nitrate leaching along a switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) high resolution N-fertilizer gradient for three years post-establishment. Results revealed an exponential increase in annual N2O emissions that each year became stronger (R2 > 0.9, P < 0.001) and deviated further from the fixed percentage assumed for IPCC Tier 1 emission factors. Concomitantly, switchgrass yields became less responsivemore » each year to N fertilizer. Nitrate leaching (and calculated indirect N2O emissions) also increased exponentially in response to N inputs, but neither methane (CH4) uptake nor soil organic carbon changed detectably. Overall, N fertilizer inputs at rates greater than crop need curtailed the climate benefit of ethanol production almost two-fold, from a maximum mitigation capacity of–5.71 ± 0.22 Mg CO2e ha–1 yr–1 in switchgrass fertilized at 56 kgNha–1 to only –2.97 ± 0.18 MgCO2e ha–1 yr–1 in switchgrass fertilized at 196 kgNha–1. In conclusion, minimizing N fertilizer use will be an important strategy for fully realizing the climate benefits of cellulosic biofuel production.« less

  5. Nitrogen fertilization challenges the climate benefit of cellulosic biofuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Leilei; Bhardwaj, Ajay K.; Hamilton, Stephen K.; Robertson, G. Philip

    2016-06-01

    Cellulosic biofuels are intended to improve future energy and climate security. Nitrogen (N) fertilizer is commonly recommended to stimulate yields but can increase losses of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) and other forms of reactive N, including nitrate. We measured soil N2O emissions and nitrate leaching along a switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) high resolution N-fertilizer gradient for three years post-establishment. Results revealed an exponential increase in annual N2O emissions that each year became stronger (R 2 > 0.9, P < 0.001) and deviated further from the fixed percentage assumed for IPCC Tier 1 emission factors. Concomitantly, switchgrass yields became less responsive each year to N fertilizer. Nitrate leaching (and calculated indirect N2O emissions) also increased exponentially in response to N inputs, but neither methane (CH4) uptake nor soil organic carbon changed detectably. Overall, N fertilizer inputs at rates greater than crop need curtailed the climate benefit of ethanol production almost two-fold, from a maximum mitigation capacity of -5.71 ± 0.22 Mg CO2e ha-1 yr-1 in switchgrass fertilized at 56 kg N ha-1 to only -2.97 ± 0.18 Mg CO2e ha-1 yr-1 in switchgrass fertilized at 196 kg N ha-1. Minimizing N fertilizer use will be an important strategy for fully realizing the climate benefits of cellulosic biofuel production.

  6. The Challenge Facing Efforts to Encourage Military Use of Biodiesel as a Drop-In Fuel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    kerosene. These energy products (Coal Oil & Kerosene) became the first alternative fuels to Whale oil . Coal oil and Kerosene were cheaper alternatives , but...addiction to oil has intensified the research and development into new forms of alternative fuels. The challenges today are numerous and multi-layered...interrupt the flow of oil . Any alternative fuel that requires a new set of pipeline construction adds a higher premium to the use of that fuel, and that

  7. Polarized Heliospheric Imaging: Lessons, Benefits, Challenges, and Status (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeForest, C. E.; Howard, T. A.

    2013-12-01

    STEREO has delivered on the promise of continuous, photometric imaging of coronal and heliospheric transients from Sun to Earth. It is time to explore polarized heliospheric imaging. Applications include 3-D location of individual features and improved separation of signal from background. These scientific applications have different advantages and challenges in the heliosphere than the corona. We present analytical and numerical results on 3-D location of features both large and small with polarized heliospheric imaging; describe advantages to polarimetry for both in-ecliptic and out-of-ecliptic missions; and discuss some of the design considerations for PHI-C, our proposed mission to prototype this technology from LEO.

  8. Life cycle benefits, challenges, and the potential of recycled aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Martchek, K.J.

    1997-12-31

    Recently, a number of prominent articles have appeared in the national press questioning the environmental benefits and economic rationale of post consumer materials recycling. This paper reviews the evolution of aluminum recycling and then examines its role in the life cycle of aluminum products based on the most recent industry studies conducted in Europe and North America. The environmental and economic viability of today`s recovery and reuse of aluminum products is explored based on these life cycle assessments and current market conditions. This paper then summarizes technology and issues associated with aluminum recycling including the current state of automotive aluminum dismantling, shredding, recycle and reuse. Afterwards, the paper highlights opportunities for recovering the full environmental and economic potential of aluminum recycling based on emerging technologies, ``producer responsibility`` legislation, voluntary initiatives, and product design considerations.

  9. Nitrogen fertilization challenges the climate benefit of cellulosic biofuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ruan, Leilei; Bhardwaj, Ajay K.; Hamilton, Stephen K.; Robertson, G. Philip

    2016-06-01

    Cellulosic biofuels are intended to improve future energy and climate security. Nitrogen (N) fertilizer is commonly recommended to stimulate yields but can increase losses of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) and other forms of reactive N, including nitrate. We measured soil N2O emissions and nitrate leaching along a switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) high resolution N-fertilizer gradient for three years post-establishment. Results revealed an exponential increase in annual N2O emissions that each year became stronger (R2 > 0.9, P < 0.001) and deviated further from the fixed percentage assumed for IPCC Tier 1 emission factors. Concomitantly, switchgrass yields became less responsive each year to N fertilizer. Nitrate leaching (and calculated indirect N2O emissions) also increased exponentially in response to N inputs, but neither methane (CH4) uptake nor soil organic carbon changed detectably. Overall, N fertilizer inputs at rates greater than crop need curtailed the climate benefit of ethanol production almost two-fold, from a maximum mitigation capacity of–5.71 ± 0.22 Mg CO2e ha–1 yr–1 in switchgrass fertilized at 56 kgNha–1 to only –2.97 ± 0.18 MgCO2e ha–1 yr–1 in switchgrass fertilized at 196 kgNha–1. In conclusion, minimizing N fertilizer use will be an important strategy for fully realizing the climate benefits of cellulosic biofuel production.

  10. Capacity building in emerging space nations: Experiences, challenges and benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jason, Susan; da Silva Curiel, Alex; Liddle, Doug; Chizea, Francis; Leloglu, Ugur Murat; Helvaci, Mustafa; Bekhti, Mohammed; Benachir, Djouad; Boland, Lee; Gomes, Luis; Sweeting, Martin

    2010-09-01

    This paper focuses on ways in which space is being used to build capacity in science and technology in order to: Offer increasing support for national and global solutions to current and emerging problems including: how to improve food security; resource management; understanding the impacts of climate change and how to deal with them; improving disaster mitigation, management and response. Support sustainable economic development. We present some of the experiences, lessons learned and benefits gained in capacity building projects undertaken by Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd. and our partners from developing and mature space nations. We focus on the Turkish, Algerian and Nigerian know-how and technology transfer programmes which form part of the first Disaster Monitoring Constellation (DMC) in orbit. From the lessons learned on Surrey's know-how and technology transfer partnership programmes, it is clear that space technology needs to be implemented responsibly as part of a long-term capacity building plan to be a sustainable one. It needs to be supported with appropriate policy and legal frameworks, institutional development, including community participation, human resources development and strengthening of managerial systems. In taking this on board, DMC has resulted in a strong international partnership combining national objectives, humanitarian aid and commerce. The benefits include: Ownership of space-based and supporting ground assets with low capital expenditure that is in line with national budgets of developing nations. Ownership of data and control over data acquisition. More for the money via collaborative consortium. Space related capacity building in organisations and nations with the goal of sustainable development. Opportunities for international collaboration, including disaster management and relief.

  11. Benefits and Challenges of Conducting Psychotherapy by Telephone

    PubMed Central

    Brenes, Gretchen A.; Ingram, Cobi W.; Danhauer, Suzanne C.

    2011-01-01

    Telephone-delivered psychotherapy has increased utility as a method of service delivery in the current world, where a number of barriers, including economic hardships and limited access to care, may prevent people from receiving the treatment they need. This method of service provision is practical and has the potential to reach large numbers of underserved people in a cost-effective manner. The aim of this paper is to review the state-of-the-art of telephone-delivered psychotherapy and to identify improvements and possible solutions to challenges. Results of randomized controlled trials indicate high client acceptance and positive outcomes with this method of delivering psychotherapy. Nonetheless, psychotherapists wishing to deliver psychotherapy by telephone face a number of challenges, including a lack of control over the environment, potential compromises of privacy and confidentiality, developing therapeutic alliance without face-to-face contact, ethical and legal issues in providing psychotherapy by telephone, handling crisis situations at a distance, and psychotherapist adjustment to conducting psychotherapy in an alternative manner. There remains a need for further research, including direct comparisons of face-to-face psychotherapy with telephone-delivered psychotherapy and feasibility of telephone delivery of psychotherapies other than cognitive behavioral therapy. PMID:22247588

  12. Bayesian networks for maritime traffic accident prevention: benefits and challenges.

    PubMed

    Hänninen, Maria

    2014-12-01

    Bayesian networks are quantitative modeling tools whose applications to the maritime traffic safety context are becoming more popular. This paper discusses the utilization of Bayesian networks in maritime safety modeling. Based on literature and the author's own experiences, the paper studies what Bayesian networks can offer to maritime accident prevention and safety modeling and discusses a few challenges in their application to this context. It is argued that the capability of representing rather complex, not necessarily causal but uncertain relationships makes Bayesian networks an attractive modeling tool for the maritime safety and accidents. Furthermore, as the maritime accident and safety data is still rather scarce and has some quality problems, the possibility to combine data with expert knowledge and the easy way of updating the model after acquiring more evidence further enhance their feasibility. However, eliciting the probabilities from the maritime experts might be challenging and the model validation can be tricky. It is concluded that with the utilization of several data sources, Bayesian updating, dynamic modeling, and hidden nodes for latent variables, Bayesian networks are rather well-suited tools for the maritime safety management and decision-making. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Benefits and challenges of electronic surveillance in nursing home research.

    PubMed

    Sifford, K Susan; Bharucha, Ashok

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive impairment and frailty associated with dementia renders residents of long-term care (LTC) facilities particularly vulnerable to physical and emotional harm. Resident-to-resident violence affects not only the target of the aggression, but also the aggressor, as well as the formal and informal caregivers who must intervene. To date, little research has been conducted on resident-to-resident violence despite preliminary but emerging evidence that it is a common (and likely growing) problem in LTC settings. Exploration of this phenomenon presents multiple pragmatic and ethical challenges. This article presents a rationale for implementing newer technological methods to collect data in investigations of resident-to-resident violence associated with dementia. The advantages and disadvantages of electronic surveillance in LTC research and the ethical principles involved are discussed, and an argument is developed for using electronic surveillance in both the shared, as well as private, spaces of the facility. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Haptics in Robot-Assisted Surgery: Challenges and Benefits.

    PubMed

    Enayati, Nima; De Momi, Elena; Ferrigno, Giancarlo

    2016-01-01

    Robotic surgery is transforming the current surgical practice, not only by improving the conventional surgical methods but also by introducing innovative robot-enhanced approaches that broaden the capabilities of clinicians. Being mainly of man-machine collaborative type, surgical robots are seen as media that transfer pre- and intraoperative information to the operator and reproduce his/her motion, with appropriate filtering, scaling, or limitation, to physically interact with the patient. The field, however, is far from maturity and, more critically, is still a subject of controversy in medical communities. Limited or absent haptic feedback is reputed to be among reasons that impede further spread of surgical robots. In this paper, objectives and challenges of deploying haptic technologies in surgical robotics are discussed, and a systematic review is performed on works that have studied the effects of providing haptic information to the users in major branches of robotic surgery. It attempts to encompass both classical works and the state-of-the-art approaches, aiming at delivering a comprehensive and balanced survey both for researchers starting their work in this field and for the experts.

  15. Providing Undergraduate Science Partners for Elementary Teachers: Benefits and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Goebel, Camille A.; Umoja, Aminata

    2009-01-01

    Undergraduate college “science partners” provided content knowledge and a supportive atmosphere for K–5 teachers in a university–school professional development partnership program in science instruction. The Elementary Science Education Partners program, a Local Systemic Change initiative supported by the National Science Foundation, was composed of four major elements: 1) a cadre of mentor teachers trained to provide district-wide teacher professional development; 2) a recruitment and training effort to place college students in classrooms as science partners in semester-long partnerships with teachers; 3) a teacher empowerment effort termed “participatory reform”; and 4) an inquiry-based curriculum with a kit distribution and refurbishment center. The main goals of the program were to provide college science students with an intensive teaching experience and to enhance teachers' skills in inquiry-based science instruction. Here, we describe some of the program's successes and challenges, focusing primarily on the impact on the classroom teachers and their science partners. Qualitative analyses of data collected from participants indicate that 1) teachers expressed greater self-confidence about teaching science than before the program and they spent more class time on the subject; and 2) the college students modified deficit-model negative assumptions about the children's science learning abilities to express more mature, positive views. PMID:19723818

  16. Costs and benefits of influenza vaccination: more evidence, same challenges.

    PubMed

    Ciancio, Bruno Christian; Rezza, Giovanni

    2014-08-08

    Seasonal influenza vaccination coverage in most EU/EEA remains suboptimal. Providers' and users' confidence in influenza vaccines is undermined by reports of moderate to low vaccine effectiveness and by the lack of solid evidence on disease burden. A study from Preaud and co. indicates that even with current levels of vaccine effectiveness, increasing vaccination coverage would significantly reduce disease burden and health cost. The results of the study should be interpreted cautiously because some of the assumptions are not generalizable or are imprecise, especially those on vaccine coverage, disease burden and health cost. Increasing vaccination coverage in EU/EEA countries is very challenging. Multifaceted approaches and country specific strategies are needed to address vaccine hesitancy in health care workers and in the population, and to manage organisational and financial obstacles. One key element for increasing vaccination coverage is the development of better influenza vaccines, e.g. vaccines that are more effective, provide longer lasting immunity and do not require annual administration. Vaccine producers should consider this as the highest research priority in the field of influenza vaccine development.

  17. Toward a second generation fuel efficient supersonic cruise aircraft performance characteristics and benefits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vachal, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    The need for greatly improved fuel efficiency and off-design subsonic characteristics is discussed. Engine-airframe matching studies are presented which show the benefits of a configuration designed for much lower supersonic drag levels (blended wing-fuselage) and how well this airframe matches with the new advanced variable-cycle engines. The benefits of advanced takeoff procedures and systems together with the co-annular noise effect in achieving low noise levels with a small cruise-sized engine are discussed. It is concluded that the technology advances when carefully integrated through detailed engine-airframe matching studies on a validated baseline airplane lead to a much improved supersonic cruise aircraft, i.e., more range, less fuel consumption, noise flexibility and satisfactory off-design characteristics.

  18. Costs and benefits of low-sulphur fuel standard for Baltic Sea shipping.

    PubMed

    Antturi, Jim; Hänninen, Otto; Jalkanen, Jukka-Pekka; Johansson, Lasse; Prank, Marje; Sofiev, Mikhail; Ollikainen, Markku

    2016-12-15

    The maximum allowable fuel sulphur content for shipping in the Baltic Sea dropped from 1%S to 0.1%S in 1 January 2015. We provide a cost-benefit analysis of the sulphur reduction policy in the Baltic Sea Sulphur Emission Control Area (SECA). We calculated the abatement costs based on shipowners' optimal decision-making in choosing between low-sulphur fuel and a sulphur scrubber, and the benefits were modelled through a high-resolution impact pathway analysis, which took into account the formation and dispersion of the emissions, and considered the positive health impacts resulting from lowered ambient PM2.5 concentrations. Our basic result indicates that for the Baltic Sea only, the latest sulphur regulation is not cost-effective. The expected annual cost is roughly €465 M and benefit 2200 saved Disability Adjusted Life-Years (DALYs) or monetized €105 M. Based on our sensitivity analysis, the benefits yet have a potential to exceed the costs. The analysis neither takes into account the acidifying impact of sulphur nor the impact North Sea shipping has on the cost-benefit ratio. Lastly, a similar approach is found highly recommendable to study the implications of the upcoming Tier III NOx standard for shipping. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Materials and Manufacturing Challenges of Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-27

    conditions. The oxygen reduction reaction is a common process for both DMFCs and proton exchange membrane fuel cells ( PEMFCs ) operating with hydrogen fuel...However, the much slower oxidation of methanol in DMFCs, compared to that of hydrogen in PEMFCs , together with a poisoning of the cathode Pt...electrocatalyst† results in a low operating voltage for a DMFC compared to that of a PEMFC . Although Pt is used for the oxidation of hydrogen fuel in a PEMFC

  20. California experiment continues: Challenges to alternative motor fuels growth

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-26

    The U.S. Energy Information Administration is predicting that by 2010, alternative fueled vehicles will comprise more than 11% of total U.S. new light vehicle sales, up from a predicted 2.3% in 1995. While the current U.S. administration enthusiastically supports alternative fuels, field experience suggests that nascent alternative fuel engine technologies have some way to go before they can achieve widespread acceptance.

  1. Challenges for fuel cells as stationary power resource in the evolving energy enterprise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastler, Dan

    The primary market challenges for fuel cells as stationary power resources in evolving energy markets are reviewed. Fuel cell power systems have significant barriers to overcome in their anticipated role as decentralized energy power systems. Market segments for fuel cells include combined heat and power; low-cost energy, premium power; peak shaving; and load management and grid support. Understanding the role and fit of fuel cell systems in evolving energy markets and the highest value applications are a major challenge for developers and government funding organizations. The most likely adopters of fuel cell systems and the challenges facing each adopter in the target market segment are reviewed. Adopters include generation companies, utility distribution companies, retail energy service providers and end-users. Key challenges include: overcoming technology risk; achieving retail competitiveness; understanding high value markets and end-user needs; distribution and service channels; regulatory policy issues; and the integration of these decentralized resources within the electrical distribution system.

  2. Advanced nuclear fuel cycles - Main challenges and strategic choices

    SciTech Connect

    Le Biez, V.; Machiels, A.; Sowder, A.

    2013-07-01

    A graphical conceptual model of the uranium fuel cycles has been developed to capture the present, anticipated, and potential (future) nuclear fuel cycle elements. The once-through cycle and plutonium recycle in fast reactors represent two basic approaches that bound classical options for nuclear fuel cycles. Chief among these other options are mono-recycling of plutonium in thermal reactors and recycling of minor actinides in fast reactors. Mono-recycling of plutonium in thermal reactors offers modest savings in natural uranium, provides an alternative approach for present-day interim management of used fuel, and offers a potential bridging technology to development and deployment of future fuel cycles. In addition to breeder reactors' obvious fuel sustainability advantages, recycling of minor actinides in fast reactors offers an attractive concept for long-term management of the wastes, but its ultimate value is uncertain in view of the added complexity in doing so,. Ultimately, there are no simple choices for nuclear fuel cycle options, as the selection of a fuel cycle option must reflect strategic criteria and priorities that vary with national policy and market perspectives. For example, fuel cycle decision-making driven primarily by national strategic interests will likely favor energy security or proliferation resistance issues, whereas decisions driven primarily by commercial or market influences will focus on economic competitiveness.

  3. Realistic Challenges to Optimize the Closed Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Shigeo Nomura; Hisao Ojima; Hirohisa Ishikawa

    2002-07-01

    The first generation nuclear fuel cycle system will be closed in Japan by 2010 with the successful combination of LWR-MOX, industrial operation of reprocessing and MOX fuel fabrication plants, interim storage of spent fuel, and plans for the location of final disposal of radioactive wastes. To tailor nuclear power as the globally sustainable and environmentally benign energy source for future society, however, an advanced fuel cycle option is needed that is well suited to the fast reactor. It should recycle fissile materials of plutonium and uranium whilst transmuting minor actinides and generating minimum waste. (authors)

  4. The doubtful environmental benefit of reduced maximum sulfur limit in international shipping fuel.

    PubMed

    Mestl, Thomas; Løvoll, Grunde; Stensrud, Erik; Le Breton, Arnaud

    2013-06-18

    On January 1st, 2012, the maximum limit for sulfur concentration in marine fuels on the high seas was lowered from 4.50% to 3.50% by the International Maritime Organization (IMO). It was one of a series of planned steps toward reducing the negative environmental and health impacts of international shipping. This study investigates the effectiveness of the IMO regulation in reducing global sulfur emissions. We found a reduction in global average sulfur concentration of only 0.07% points from 2011 to 2012. On the positive side, we also found that only 2.3% of the bunkerings were noncompliant in 2012, that is, exceeded the new 3.50% sulfur concentration cap. The analysis furthermore suggests that compliance with the new regulation is achieved by blending high sulfur fuel with lower sulfur fuel, rather than by removing high sulfur fuel from the market or removing the excess sulfur. The main conclusion is that the regulation has been effective in reducing the maximum sulfur concentration but has not been very effective in reducing the average sulfur concentration. Thus, the regulation may have resulted in local environmental benefits but has not resulted in global benefits with respect to global sulfur emissions from international shipping.

  5. Investigating the Benefits and Challenges of Using Laptop Computers in Higher Education Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Robin Holding; Lauricella, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the benefits and challenges using laptop computers (hereafter referred to as laptops) inside and outside higher education classrooms. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected from 156 university students (54 males, 102 females) enrolled in either education or communication studies. Benefits of…

  6. The Benefits and Challenges Hospitality Management Students Experience by Working in Conjunction with Completing Their Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoffstall, Donald G.

    2013-01-01

    Previous researchers have suggested that in order to be successful in the hospitality industry, students need to obtain work experience in addition to completing their degrees. Although the benefit of gaining such experience from the industry viewpoint has been well documented, few studies have assessed the benefits and challenges faced by…

  7. The Benefits and Challenges Hospitality Management Students Experience by Working in Conjunction with Completing Their Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoffstall, Donald G.

    2013-01-01

    Previous researchers have suggested that in order to be successful in the hospitality industry, students need to obtain work experience in addition to completing their degrees. Although the benefit of gaining such experience from the industry viewpoint has been well documented, few studies have assessed the benefits and challenges faced by…

  8. Benefits and challenges of molecular diagnostics for childhood tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Cristina

    2016-12-01

    Expanding tuberculosis (TB)-diagnostic services, including access to rapid tests, is a World Health Organization (WHO) strategy to accelerate progress toward ending TB. Faster and more sensitive molecular tests capable of diagnosing TB and drug-resistant TB have the technical capacity to address limitations associated with smears and cultures by increasing accuracy and shortening turnaround times as compared with those of these conventional laboratory methods. Nucleic acid amplification assays used to detect and analyze Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB)-complex nucleic acids can be used directly on specimens from patients suspected of having TB. Recently, several commercial molecular tests were developed to detect MTB and determine the drug resistance (DR) based on detection of specific genetic mutations conferring resistance. The first to be endorsed by the WHO was molecular line-probe assay technology. This test uses polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse-hybridization methods to rapidly identify MTB and DR-related mutations simultaneously. More recently, the WHO endorsed Xpert MTB/RIF, Cepheid Inc, CA, USA, a fully automated assay used for TB diagnosis that relies upon PCR techniques for detection of TB and rifampicin resistance-related mutations. Other promising molecular TB assays for simplifying PCR-based testing protocols and increasing their accuracy are under development and evaluation. Although we lack a practical gold standard for the diagnosis of childhood TB, its bacteriological confirmation is always recommended to be sought whenever possible prior to a diagnostic decision being made. Conventional diagnostic laboratory TB tests are less efficient for children as compared with adults, because sufficient sputum samples are more difficult to collect from infants and young children, and their disease is often paucibacillary, resulting in smear-negative disease. These inherent challenges associated with childhood TB are due to immunological- and

  9. Getting People Involved: The Benefit of Intellectual Capital Management for Addressing HR Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pook, Katja

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore the benefits of intellectual capital assessment for facing current challenges of human resources work and organizational development. Design/methodology/approach: The paper takes findings of studies on challenges in HR work and maps them with features of intellectual capital assessment methods. It is thus a…

  10. Getting People Involved: The Benefit of Intellectual Capital Management for Addressing HR Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pook, Katja

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore the benefits of intellectual capital assessment for facing current challenges of human resources work and organizational development. Design/methodology/approach: The paper takes findings of studies on challenges in HR work and maps them with features of intellectual capital assessment methods. It is thus a…

  11. The Benefits and Challenges of Multiple Health Behavior Change in Research and in Practice

    PubMed Central

    Prochaska, Judith J.; Nigg, Claudio R.; Spring, Bonnie; Velicer, Wayne F.; Prochaska, James O.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The major chronic diseases are caused by multiple risks, yet the science of multiple health behavior change (MHBC) is at an early stage, and factors that facilitate or impede scientists’ involvement in MHBC research are unknown. Benefits and challenges of MHBC interventions were investigated to strengthen researchers’ commitment and prepare them for challenges. Method An online anonymous survey was emailed to listservs of the Society of Behavioral Medicine between May 2006 and 2007. Respondents (N = 69) were 83% female; 94% held a doctoral degree; 64% were psychologists, 24% were in public health; 83% targeted MHBC in their work. Results A sample majority rated 23 of the 24 benefits, but only 1 of 31 challenge items, as very-to-extremely important. Those engaged in MHBC rated the total benefits significantly higher than respondents focused on single behaviors, F(1,69) = 4.21, p<.05, and rated the benefits significantly higher than the challenges: paired t(57) = 7.50, p<.001. The two groups did not differ in ratings of challenges. Conclusion It appears individuals focused solely on single behaviors do not fully appreciate the benefits that impress MHBC researchers; it is not that substantial barriers are holding them back. Benefits of MHBC interventions need emphasizing more broadly to advance this research area. PMID:19948184

  12. Fuel Cells: Status and Challenges in Materials and Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z Gary

    2006-08-01

    Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that directly convert the chemical energy in incoming fuel (hydrogen or a hydrogen rich reformate) into electrical energy via ionic conducting electrolyte membranes. Depending on the electrolyte used, fuel cells can be classified into a number of types. Two major types of fuel cells, polymeric-electrolyte-membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) and solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC), have attracted the most recent attention and are the subject of extensive R&D efforts worldwide. PEMFCs are typically based on a proton conductive sulphonated fluoropolymer membrane such as Nafion? and operate in the 60-80 C temperature range. On the other hand, SOFCs are constructed from an oxygen ion conductive membrane, such as YSZ (yttria stabilized zirconia), and operate in the range of 600-1,000 C. To build up a useful voltage, a series of cells, comprised of an anode and a cathode in addition to the electrolyte, are electrically connected and integrated into a stack via interconnects or bi-polar plates. For designs such as the planar one, seals are required in the stack to prevent leakage and to separate the fuel at the anode side from the oxygen or air at the cathode side.

  13. Spent Fuel Transportation Package Performance Study - Experimental Design Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, A. M.; Murphy, A. J.; Sprung, J. L.; Ammerman, D. J.; Lopez, C.

    2003-02-25

    Numerous studies of spent nuclear fuel transportation accident risks have been performed since the late seventies that considered shipping container design and performance. Based in part on these studies, NRC has concluded that the level of protection provided by spent nuclear fuel transportation package designs under accident conditions is adequate. [1] Furthermore, actual spent nuclear fuel transport experience showcase a safety record that is exceptional and unparalleled when compared to other hazardous materials transportation shipments. There has never been a known or suspected release of the radioactive contents from an NRC-certified spent nuclear fuel cask as a result of a transportation accident. In 1999 the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated a study, the Package Performance Study, to demonstrate the performance of spent fuel and spent fuel packages during severe transportation accidents. NRC is not studying or testing its current regulations, a s the rigorous regulatory accident conditions specified in 10 CFR Part 71 are adequate to ensure safe packaging and use. As part of this study, NRC currently plans on using detailed modeling followed by experimental testing to increase public confidence in the safety of spent nuclear fuel shipments. One of the aspects of this confirmatory research study is the commitment to solicit and consider public comment during the scoping phase and experimental design planning phase of this research.

  14. CONVERTING PYROLYSIS OILS TO RENEWABLE TRANSPORT FUELS: PROCESSING CHALLENGES & OPPORTUNITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Holmgren, Jennifer; Nair, Prabhakar N.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Bain, Richard; Marinangelli, Richard

    2008-03-11

    To enable a sustained supply of biomass-based transportation fuels, the capability to process feedstocks outside the food chain must be developed. Significant industry efforts are underway to develop these new technologies, such as converting cellulosic wastes to ethanol. UOP, in partnership with U.S. Government labs, NREL and PNNL, is developing an alternate route using cellulosic feedstocks. The waste biomass is first subjected to a fast pyrolysis operation to generate pyrolysis oil (pyoil for short). Current efforts are focused on developing a thermochemical platform to convert pyoils to renewable gasoline, diesel and jet fuel. The fuels produced will be indistinguishable from their fossil fuel counterparts and, therefore, will be compatible with existing transport and distribution infrastructure.

  15. Molten-salt fuel cells-Technical and economic challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selman, J. Robert

    This paper presents a personal view of the status and research needs of the MCFC and other molten-salt fuel cells. After an overview of current MCFC performance, compared with performance and cost of other fuel cells, improvements in power density and lifetime as well as cost reduction are identified as key priorities to accelerate the commercialization of the MCFC. In spite of its unfavorable public image (compared to, in particular, PEMFC and planar SOFC) MCFC technology has progressed steadily and cost reduction has been significant. Large-scale commercialization, especially in the distributed generation and cogeneration market, remains a possibility but its chances are highly dependent on a forceful and consistent energy policy, for example taking into account the externalities associated with various modes of electric power production from fossil fuels. In spite of steady improvements in performance, important defects in fundamental knowledge remain about wetting properties, oxygen reduction kinetics, corrosion paths and control mechanisms. These must be addressed to stimulate further simplification of design and find solutions to lifetime issues. Recently, alternative concepts of molten-salt fuel cells have been capturing attention. The direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC), reviving an old concept, has caught the attention of energy system analysts and some important advances have been made in this technology. Direct CO and CH 4 oxidation have also been a focus of study. Finally, the potential of nanotechnology for high-temperature fuel cells should not be a priori excluded.

  16. Recent progress and continuing challenges in bio-fuel cells. Part II: Microbial.

    PubMed

    Osman, M H; Shah, A A; Walsh, F C

    2010-11-15

    Recent key developments in microbial fuel cell technology are reviewed. Fuel sources, electron transfer mechanisms, anode materials and enhanced O(2) reduction are discussed in detail. A summary of recently developed microbial fuel cell systems, including performance measurements, is conveniently provided in tabular form. The current challenges involved in developing practical bio-fuel cell systems are described, with particular emphasis on a fundamental understanding of the reaction environment, the performance and stability requirements, modularity and scalability. This review is the second part of a review of bio-fuel cells. In Part 1 a general introduction to bio-fuel cells, including their operating principles and applications, was provided and enzymatic fuel cell technology was reviewed.

  17. Biogas from waste materials as transportation fuel-benefits from an environmental point of view.

    PubMed

    Börjesson, P

    2008-01-01

    In this paper various biogas systems based on waste materials have been analysed from an environmental point of view. The analyses are based on Swedish conditions using a systems analysis approach from an energy and life cycle perspective. The biogas produced is used as a transportation fuel replacing petrol in light-duty vehicles. The overall aims are to quantify the potential environmental effects when current waste handling and transportation fuel systems are replaced. A general conclusion is that the indirect environmental benefits (e.g. reduced emissions of ammonia and methane, and nitrogen leaching) from altered handling of organic waste materials and land-use may often significantly exceed the direct environmental benefits achieved when biogas replaces petrol (e.g. reduced emissions of carbon dioxide and air pollutants). Such indirect benefits are seldom considered when biogas is evaluated from an environmental point of view. However, the environmental impact from different biogas systems can vary significantly due to factors such as the waste materials utilised, different reference systems being replaced, and local conditions.

  18. Fuel cells for transportation: Status, opportunities and challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, A.C.; Leonard, J.H.

    1996-12-31

    Environmental issues will become important drivers influencing technology in the years ahead. For example, air quality legislation and regulation - locally, regionally, and globally - will continue to play an increasing role in influencing decisions made in choosing a particular energy source. Health concerns related to ambient fine particles and the ongoing debate on global climate change and the need to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions are two examples of the nexus between energy and the environment. Additionally, as conventional sources of energy and petroleum become depleted and as political issues remain, desires for energy diversity and energy security will require a menu of technologies and fuels. It is recognized that many of the renewable and environmentally benign fuels and energy sources are expensive and that economics will play a key role in dictating which of these is going to be most successful. For example, generating hydrogen from wind or solar is expensive compared to conventional technologies and price competition is likely to be more intense in the area of electricity de-regulation. However, the cost of conventional fuels are also increasing because of a desire to clean them up or a desire to change their chemical and physical properties through partial oxidation or steam reforming. These additional treatments lead to increased costs so that the gap between the {open_quotes}clean{close_quotes} fuels and cleaning up conventional fuels becomes much narrower.

  19. Challenges and benefits of conducting environmental justice research in a school setting.

    PubMed

    Guidry, Virginia T; Lowman, Amy; Hall, Devon; Baron, Dothula; Wing, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Environmental justice (EJ) research requires attention to consequences for research participants beyond those typically considered by institutional review boards. The imbalance of power between impacted communities and those who create and regulate pollution creates challenges for participation, yet research can also benefit those involved. Our community-academic partnership designed the Rural Air Pollutants and Children's Health (RAPCH) study to provide positive impacts while measuring health effects at three low-resource public middle schools near concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) in North Carolina. We evaluated perceived benefits and challenges of study involvement by interviewing school staff and community liaisons who facilitated data collection. Reported benefits included enhancement of students' academic environment and increased community environmental awareness; challenges were associated mainly with some participants' immaturity. Leadership from a strong community-based organization was crucial to recruitment, yet our approach entailed minimal focus on EJ, which may have limited opportunities for community education or organizing for environmental health.

  20. CHALLENGES AND BENEFITS OF CONDUCTING ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE RESEARCH IN A SCHOOL SETTING

    PubMed Central

    GUIDRY, VIRGINIA T.; LOWMAN, AMY; HALL, DEVON; BARON, DOTHULA; WING, STEVE

    2015-01-01

    Environmental justice (EJ) research requires attention to consequences for research participants beyond those typically considered by institutional review boards. The imbalance of power between impacted communities and those who create and regulate pollution creates challenges for participation, yet research can also benefit those involved. Our community-academic partnership designed the Rural Air Pollutants and Children's Health (RAPCH) study to provide positive impacts while measuring health effects at three low-resource public middle schools near concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) in North Carolina. We evaluated perceived benefits and challenges of study involvement by interviewing school staff and community liaisons who facilitated data collection. Reported benefits included enhancement of students’ academic environment and increased community environmental awareness; challenges were associated mainly with some participants’ immaturity. Leadership from a strong community-based organization was crucial to recruitment, yet our approach entailed minimal focus on EJ, which may have limited opportunities for community education or organizing for environmental health. PMID:25085828

  1. Electrocatalyst approaches and challenges for automotive fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Debe, Mark K

    2012-06-06

    Fuel cells powered by hydrogen from secure and renewable sources are the ideal solution for non-polluting vehicles, and extensive research and development on all aspects of this technology over the past fifteen years has delivered prototype cars with impressive performances. But taking the step towards successful commercialization requires oxygen reduction electrocatalysts--crucial components at the heart of fuel cells--that meet exacting performance targets. In addition, these catalyst systems will need to be highly durable, fault-tolerant and amenable to high-volume production with high yields and exceptional quality. Not all the catalyst approaches currently being pursued will meet those demands.

  2. Assessment of the environmental benefits of transport and stationary fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauen, A.; Hart, D.

    Fuel cells (FCs) offer significant environmental benefits over competing technologies and hence the environment is a strong driving force behind the development of FC systems for transport and stationary applications. This paper provides a comprehensive comparison of FC and competing systems, and points out strengths and weaknesses of the different FC systems, suggesting areas for improvement. The results presented build on earlier work [D. Hart, G. Hörmandinger, Initial assessment of the environmental characteristics of fuel cells and competing technologies, ETSU F/02/00111/REP/1, ETSU, Harwell, UK, 1997.] and provide a detailed analysis of a wider range of systems. The analysis takes the form of a model, which compares system emissions (global, regional and local pollutants) and energy consumption on a full fuel cycle basis. It considers a variety of primary energy sources, intermediate fuel supply steps and FC systems for transport and stationary end-uses. These are compared with alternative systems for transport and stationary applications. Energy and pollutant emission reductions of FC systems compared to alternative vehicle technology vary considerably, though all FC technologies show reductions in energy use and CO 2 emissions of at least 20%; as well as reductions of several orders of magnitude in regulated pollutants compared to the base-case vehicle. The location of emissions is also of importance, with most emissions in the case of FC vehicles occurring in the fuel supply stage. The energy, CO 2 and regulated emissions advantages of FC systems for distributed and baseload electricity are more consistent than for transport applications, with reductions in regulated pollutants generally larger than one order of magnitude compared to competing technologies. For CHP applications, the advantages of FC systems with regard to regulated pollutants remain large. However, energy and CO 2 emission advantages are reduced, depending largely on the assumptions made

  3. Anesthesia information management systems in the ambulatory setting: benefits and challenges.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Ori

    2014-06-01

    Adopting an anesthesia information management system (AIMS) is a challenge for anesthesia departments. The transition requires a physician champion and the support of members in every section. This change can be facilitated by visiting similar institutions that are already using AIMS, shadow charting for a sufficient period of time, and understanding that optimization continues after the go-live date. Once implemented, the benefits outweigh the challenges, but understanding where the potential obstacles lie is critical to removing them efficiently and effectively. As different AIMS continue to spread throughout the medical world, so will their benefits. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A COMPARISON OF CHALLENGES ASSOCIATED WITH SLUDGE REMOVAL & TREATMENT & DISPOSAL AT SEVERAL SPENT FUEL STORAGE LOCATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    PERES, M.W.

    2007-01-09

    Challenges associated with the materials that remain in spent fuel storage pools are emerging as countries deal with issues related to storing and cleaning up nuclear fuel left over from weapons production. The K Basins at the Department of Energy's site at Hanford in southeastern Washington State are an example. Years of corrosion products and piles of discarded debris are intermingled in the bottom of these two pools that stored more 2,100 metric tons (2,300 tons) of spent fuel. Difficult, costly projects are underway to remove radioactive material from the K Basins. Similar challenges exist at other locations around the globe. This paper compares the challenges of handling and treating radioactive sludge at several locations storing spent nuclear fuel.

  5. Estimating the climate and air quality benefits of aviation fuel and emissions reductions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorbian, Christopher S.; Wolfe, Philip J.; Waitz, Ian A.

    2011-05-01

    In this study we consider the implications of our current understanding of aviation climate impacts as it relates to the ratio of non-CO 2 to CO 2 effects from aviation. We take as inputs recent estimates from the literature of the magnitude of the component aviation impacts and associated uncertainties. We then employ a simplified probabilistic impulse response function model for the climate and a range of damage functions to estimate the ratio of non-CO 2 to CO 2 impacts of aviation for a range of different metrics, scientific assumptions, future background emissions scenarios, economic growth scenarios, and discount rates. We take cost-benefit analysis as our primary context and thus focus on integral metrics that can be related to damages: the global warming potential, the time-integrated change in surface temperature, and the net present value of damages. We also present results based on an endpoint metric, the global temperature change potential. These latter results would be more appropriate for use in a cost-effectiveness framework (e.g., with a well-defined policy target for the anthropogenic change in surface temperature at a specified time in the future). We find that the parameter that most influences the ratio of non-CO 2 to CO 2 impacts of aviation is the discount rate, or analogously the time window used for physical metrics; both are expressions of the relative importance of long-lived versus short-lived impacts. Second to this is the influence of the radiative forcing values that are assumed for aviation-induced cloudiness effects. Given the large uncertainties in short-lived effects from aviation, and the dominating influence of discounting or time-windowing, we find that the choice of metric is relatively less influential. We express the ratios of non-CO 2 to CO 2 impacts on a per unit fuel burn basis so that they can be multiplied by a social cost of carbon to estimate the additional benefits of fuel burn reductions from aviation beyond those

  6. Challenges in microbial fuel cell development and operation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung Hong; Chang, In Seop; Gadd, Geoffrey M

    2007-09-01

    A microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a device that converts chemical energy into electricity through the catalytic activities of microorganisms. Although there is great potential of MFCs as an alternative energy source, novel wastewater treatment process, and biosensor for oxygen and pollutants, extensive optimization is required to exploit the maximum microbial potential. In this article, the main limiting factors of MFC operation are identified and suggestions are made to improve performance.

  7. Implementing Portfolio-Based Language Assessment in LINC Programs: Benefits and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ripley, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Although earlier research has examined the potential of portfolios as assessment tools, research on the use of portfolios in the context of second-language education in Canada has been limited. The goal of this study was to explore the benefits and challenges of implementing a portfolio-based language assessment (PBLA) model in Language…

  8. Benefits and Challenges of a Teacher Cluster in South Africa: The Case of Sizabantwana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Carol; Jonker, David

    2013-01-01

    This article explores teacher clusters as possible mechanisms for teacher development in dealing with a number of the difficulties facing education in the South African context. It describes the benefits and challenges experienced by primary school teachers who are involved in a self-sustaining teacher cluster (development and support group). This…

  9. University and Corporate Partnerships: Benefits and Challenges of Offering College Degrees in Collaboration with Private Corporations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown-Welty, Sharon; Patterson, Teresa

    2002-01-01

    Examines the relationship between universities and private corporations in providing college-level educational programs to better understand the central issues in collaboration, including the benefits and challenges of these partnerships. Also explores why some corporations choose not to partner with universities, but offer their own programs…

  10. Benefits, Challenges, and Perceptions of the Multiple Article Dissertation Format in Instructional Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Rebecca Arlene; West, Richard E.; Rich, Peter

    2016-01-01

    This study used survey data to investigate the benefits, challenges, perceptions, and current practices of the multiple article dissertation format in instructional technology. Online surveys were sent to current students, alumni, faculty, and department representatives of instructional technology programs, and data were analysed using qualitative…

  11. The Twenty-First Century Multiple Generation Workforce: Overlaps and Differences but Also Challenges and Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helyer, Ruth; Lee, Dionne

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the issues around a multiple generational workforce and more specifically, the challenges and benefits for education providers and employers. Design/methodology/approach: Reviewing research papers, analysing academic texts, interrogating market intelligence and contextualising case studies, the…

  12. How Benefits and Challenges of Personal Response System Impact Students' Continuance Intention? A Taiwanese Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeh, C. Rosa; Tao, Yu-Hui

    2013-01-01

    To address four issues observed from the latest Personal Response System (PRS) review by Kay and LeSage (2009), this paper investigates, through a systematic research, how the derived benefits and challenges of PRS affect the satisfaction and continuance intention of college students in Taiwan. The empirical study samples representative college…

  13. University and Corporate Partnerships: Benefits and Challenges of Offering College Degrees in Collaboration with Private Corporations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown-Welty, Sharon; Patterson, Teresa

    2002-01-01

    Examines the relationship between universities and private corporations in providing college-level educational programs to better understand the central issues in collaboration, including the benefits and challenges of these partnerships. Also explores why some corporations choose not to partner with universities, but offer their own programs…

  14. Scheduling Recess before Lunch: Exploring the Benefits and Challenges in Montana Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bark, Katie; Stenberg, Molly; Sutherland, Shelly; Hayes, Dayle

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of the "Montana Recess Before Lunch Survey" was to explore benefits, challenges, and factors associated with successful implementation of Recess Before Lunch (RBL), from the perspective of school principals. Methods: An online written questionnaire was distributed to all (N = 661) Montana elementary and…

  15. Military Veterans Face Challenges in Accessing Educational Benefits at Florida Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiro, Rivka; Hill, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Florida's community colleges are seeing an influx of students who face unique challenges. They are the men and women who served in the military after the attacks of September 11, 2001, and who are now attending college on the new Post-9/11 GI Bill, with its greatly enhanced educational benefits, and on the expanded, old Montgomery GI Bill, which…

  16. Benefits, Challenges, and Perceptions of the Multiple Article Dissertation Format in Instructional Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Rebecca Arlene; West, Richard E.; Rich, Peter

    2016-01-01

    This study used survey data to investigate the benefits, challenges, perceptions, and current practices of the multiple article dissertation format in instructional technology. Online surveys were sent to current students, alumni, faculty, and department representatives of instructional technology programs, and data were analysed using qualitative…

  17. How Benefits and Challenges of Personal Response System Impact Students' Continuance Intention? A Taiwanese Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeh, C. Rosa; Tao, Yu-Hui

    2013-01-01

    To address four issues observed from the latest Personal Response System (PRS) review by Kay and LeSage (2009), this paper investigates, through a systematic research, how the derived benefits and challenges of PRS affect the satisfaction and continuance intention of college students in Taiwan. The empirical study samples representative college…

  18. Military Veterans Face Challenges in Accessing Educational Benefits at Florida Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiro, Rivka; Hill, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Florida's community colleges are seeing an influx of students who face unique challenges. They are the men and women who served in the military after the attacks of September 11, 2001, and who are now attending college on the new Post-9/11 GI Bill, with its greatly enhanced educational benefits, and on the expanded, old Montgomery GI Bill, which…

  19. Integrating Quantitative and Qualitative Data in Mixed Methods Research--Challenges and Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almalki, Sami

    2016-01-01

    This paper is concerned with investigating the integration of quantitative and qualitative data in mixed methods research and whether, in spite of its challenges, it can be of positive benefit to many investigative studies. The paper introduces the topic, defines the terms with which this subject deals and undertakes a literature review to outline…

  20. The Twenty-First Century Multiple Generation Workforce: Overlaps and Differences but Also Challenges and Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helyer, Ruth; Lee, Dionne

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the issues around a multiple generational workforce and more specifically, the challenges and benefits for education providers and employers. Design/methodology/approach: Reviewing research papers, analysing academic texts, interrogating market intelligence and contextualising case studies, the…

  1. Scheduling Recess before Lunch: Exploring the Benefits and Challenges in Montana Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bark, Katie; Stenberg, Molly; Sutherland, Shelly; Hayes, Dayle

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of the "Montana Recess Before Lunch Survey" was to explore benefits, challenges, and factors associated with successful implementation of Recess Before Lunch (RBL), from the perspective of school principals. Methods: An online written questionnaire was distributed to all (N = 661) Montana elementary and…

  2. Cochlear Implantation among Deaf Children with Additional Disabilities: Parental Perceptions of Benefits, Challenges, and Service Provision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaidman-Zait, Anat; Curle, Deirdre; Jamieson, Janet R.; Chia, Ruth; Kozak, Frederick K.

    2015-01-01

    Although increasing numbers of children with additional disabilities are receiving cochlear implants (CIs), little is known about family perspectives of the benefits and the challenges of cochlear implantation in this pediatric population. This study examines perceptions among parents of deaf children with additional disabilities regarding…

  3. The Benefits and Challenges of Culturally Responsive EFL Critical Literature Circles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredricks, Lori

    2012-01-01

    Though some research has shown what applying a culturally relevant framework entails in an American context, and occasionally in an EFL setting, there is still too little research on how students respond to critical, culturally responsive pedagogy. More insight is needed into the specific challenges and benefits of critical approaches in diverse…

  4. Cochlear Implantation among Deaf Children with Additional Disabilities: Parental Perceptions of Benefits, Challenges, and Service Provision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaidman-Zait, Anat; Curle, Deirdre; Jamieson, Janet R.; Chia, Ruth; Kozak, Frederick K.

    2015-01-01

    Although increasing numbers of children with additional disabilities are receiving cochlear implants (CIs), little is known about family perspectives of the benefits and the challenges of cochlear implantation in this pediatric population. This study examines perceptions among parents of deaf children with additional disabilities regarding…

  5. Challenges to obtaining high efficiency in solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hartvigsen, J.; Milliken, C.; Elangovan, S.; Khandkar, A.

    1996-12-31

    Efficient conversion of hydrocarbon fuels to electricity is the main motivation for development of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), for applications in both military and commercial markets. A requirement for high efficiency is that the fuel cell be operated at as high a cell voltage as possible while still producing a practical current density. This implies that the open circuit voltage (OCV) must be near theoretical in order to achieve high operating potential. A commonly stated problem with the planar SOFC design is the difficulty in sealing adjoining cells to the bipolar interconnects. However, experimental evidence indicates that because the OCV is strongly affected by a non-uniform or {open_quotes}mixed{close_quotes} potential due to cell edge leaks, estimates of leakage from OCV are much greater than actual leakage. A second phenomenon that affects the OCV of a SOFC stack is the mixed conduction exhibited by the interconnect material. The effects of these mechanisms on SOFC operational performance and efficiency are discussed.

  6. System-Agnostic Clinical Decision Support Services: Benefits and Challenges for Scalable Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, Kensaku; Del Fiol, Guilherme; Orton, Charles; Lobach, David F

    2010-01-01

    System-agnostic clinical decision support (CDS) services provide patient evaluation capabilities that are independent of specific CDS systems and system implementation contexts. While such system-agnostic CDS services hold great potential for facilitating the widespread implementation of CDS systems, little has been described regarding the benefits and challenges of their use. In this manuscript, the authors address this need by describing potential benefits and challenges of using a system-agnostic CDS service. This analysis is based on the authors’ formal assessments of, and practical experiences with, various approaches to developing, implementing, and maintaining CDS capabilities. In particular, the analysis draws on the authors’ experience developing and leveraging a system-agnostic CDS Web service known as SEBASTIAN. A primary potential benefit of using a system-agnostic CDS service is the relative ease and flexibility with which the service can be leveraged to implement CDS capabilities across applications and care settings. Other important potential benefits include facilitation of centralized knowledge management and knowledge sharing; the potential to support multiple underlying knowledge representations and knowledge resources through a common service interface; improved simplicity and componentization; easier testing and validation; and the enabling of distributed CDS system development. Conversely, important potential challenges include the increased effort required to develop knowledge resources capable of being used in many contexts and the critical need to standardize the service interface. Despite these challenges, our experiences to date indicate that the benefits of using a system-agnostic CDS service generally outweigh the challenges of using this approach to implementing and maintaining CDS systems. PMID:21603281

  7. System-agnostic clinical decision support services: benefits and challenges for scalable decision support.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Kensaku; Del Fiol, Guilherme; Orton, Charles; Lobach, David F

    2010-01-01

    System-agnostic clinical decision support (CDS) services provide patient evaluation capabilities that are independent of specific CDS systems and system implementation contexts. While such system-agnostic CDS services hold great potential for facilitating the widespread implementation of CDS systems, little has been described regarding the benefits and challenges of their use. In this manuscript, the authors address this need by describing potential benefits and challenges of using a system-agnostic CDS service. This analysis is based on the authors' formal assessments of, and practical experiences with, various approaches to developing, implementing, and maintaining CDS capabilities. In particular, the analysis draws on the authors' experience developing and leveraging a system-agnostic CDS Web service known as SEBASTIAN. A primary potential benefit of using a system-agnostic CDS service is the relative ease and flexibility with which the service can be leveraged to implement CDS capabilities across applications and care settings. Other important potential benefits include facilitation of centralized knowledge management and knowledge sharing; the potential to support multiple underlying knowledge representations and knowledge resources through a common service interface; improved simplicity and componentization; easier testing and validation; and the enabling of distributed CDS system development. Conversely, important potential challenges include the increased effort required to develop knowledge resources capable of being used in many contexts and the critical need to standardize the service interface. Despite these challenges, our experiences to date indicate that the benefits of using a system-agnostic CDS service generally outweigh the challenges of using this approach to implementing and maintaining CDS systems.

  8. Outlook for benefits of sediment microbial fuel cells with two bio‐electrodes

    PubMed Central

    De Schamphelaire, Liesje; Rabaey, Korneel; Boeckx, Pascal; Boon, Nico; Verstraete, Willy

    2008-01-01

    Summary The benefits of sediment microbial fuel cells (SMFCs) go beyond energy generation for low‐power applications. Aside from producing electrical energy, SMFCs can enhance the oxidation of reduced compounds at the anode, thus bringing about the removal of excessive or unwanted reducing equivalents from submerged soils. Moreover, an SMFC could be applied to control redox‐dependent processes in sediment layers. Several cathodic reactions that may drive these sediment oxidation reactions are examined. Special attention is given to two biologically mediated cathodic reactions, respectively employing an oxygen reduction and a manganese cycle. Both reactions imply a low cost and a high electrode potential and are of interest for reactor‐type MFCs as well as for SMFCs. PMID:21261866

  9. The Benefits and Challenges of Preconsent in a Multisite, Pediatric Sickle Cell Intervention Trial.

    PubMed

    Nimmer, Mark; Czachor, Jason; Turner, Laura; Thomas, Bobbe; Woodford, Ashley L; Carpenter, Karli; Gonzalez, Victor; Liem, Robert I; Ellison, Angela; Casper, T Charles; Brousseau, David C

    2016-09-01

    Enrollment of patients in sickle cell intervention trials has been challenging due to difficulty in obtaining consent from a legal guardian and lack of collaboration between emergency medicine and hematology. We utilized education and preconsent in a pediatric multisite sickle cell intervention trial to overcome these challenges. Overall, 48 patients were enrolled after being preconsented. Variable Institutional Review Board policies related to preconsent validity and its allowable duration decreased the advantages of preconsent at some sites. The utility of preconsent for future intervention trials largely depends on local Institutional Review Board policies. Preeducation may also benefit the consent process, regardless of site differences.

  10. Examination of the costs, benefits and enery conservation aspects of the NASA aircraft fuel conservation technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The costs and benefits of the NASA Aircraft Fuel Conservation Technology Program are discussed. Consideration is given to a present worth analysis of the planned program expenditures, an examination of the fuel savings to be obtained by the year 2005 and the worth of this fuel savings relative to the investment required, a comparison of the program funding with that planned by other Federal agencies for energy conservation, an examination of the private industry aeronautical research and technology financial posture for the period FY 76 - FY 85, and an assessment of the potential impacts on air and noise pollution. To aid in this analysis, a computerized fleet mix forecasting model was developed. This model enables the estimation of fuel consumption and present worth of fuel expenditures for selected commerical aircraft fleet mix scenarios.

  11. Incorporating Systems Science Principles into the Development of Obesity Prevention Interventions: Principles, Benefits, and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Gittelsohn, Joel; Mui, Yeeli; Adam, Atif; Lin, Sen; Kharmats, Anna; Igusa, Takeru; Lee, Bruce Y

    2015-06-01

    Systems modeling represents an innovative approach for addressing the obesity epidemic at the community level. We developed an agent-based model of the Baltimore City food environment that permits us to assess the relative impact of different programs and policies, alone and in combination, and potential unexpected consequences. Based on this experience, and a review of literature, we have identified a set of principles, potential benefits, and challenges. Some of the key principles include the importance of early and multilevel engagement with the community prior to initiating model development and continued engagement and testing with community stakeholders. Important benefits include improving community stakeholder understanding of the system, testing of interventions before implementation, and identification of unexpected consequences. Challenges in these models include deciding on the most important, yet parsimonious factors to consider, how to model food source and food selection behavior in a realistic yet transferable manner, and identifying the appropriate outcomes and limitations of the model.

  12. A transition strategy for becoming a baby-friendly hospital: exploring the costs, benefits, and challenges.

    PubMed

    DelliFraine, Jami; Langabeer, James; Delgado, Rigoberto; Williams, Janet F; Gong, Alice

    2013-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to provide an economic assessment as well as a calculated projection of the costs that typical U.S. tertiary-care hospitals would incur through policy reconfiguration and implementation to achieve the UNICEF/World Health Organization Baby-Friendly® Hospital designation and to examine the associated challenges and benefits of becoming a Baby-Friendly Hospital. We analyzed hospital resource utilization, focusing on formula use and staffing profiles at one U.S. urban tertiary-care teaching hospital, as well as conducted an online survey and telephone interviews with a selection of Baby-Friendly Hospitals to obtain their perspective on costs, challenges, and benefits. Findings indicate that added costs for a new Baby-Friendly Hospital will approximate $148 per birth, but these costs sharply decrease over time as breastfeeding rates increase in a Baby-Friendly environment.

  13. Cost-Benefit Analysis of Flexibility Retrofits for Coal and Gas-Fueled Power Plants: August 2012 - December 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Venkataraman, S.; Jordan, G.; O'Connor, M.; Kumar, N.; Lefton, S.; Lew, D.; Brinkman, G.; Palchak, D.; Cochran, J.

    2013-12-01

    High penetrations of wind and solar power plants can induce on/off cycling and ramping of fossil-fueled generators. This can lead to wear-and-tear costs and changes in emissions for fossil-fueled generators. Phase 2 of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS-2) determined these costs and emissions and simulated grid operations to investigate the full impact of wind and solar on the fossil-fueled fleet. This report studies the costs and benefits of retrofitting existing units for improved operational flexibility (i.e., capability to turndown lower, start and stop faster, and ramp faster between load set-points).

  14. Blood Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs): Benefits, Challenges and the Road Ahead

    PubMed Central

    El Hokayem, Jimmy; Dykxhoorn, Derek M

    2016-01-01

    Since the creation of induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs) ten years ago, hundreds of publications have demonstrated their considerable impact on disease modeling and therapy. In this commentary, we will summarize key milestones, benefits and challenges in the iPSC field. Furthermore, we will highlight blood as an effective and easily accessible source for patient-specific iPSCs derivation in the context of work done in our laboratory and others. PMID:27882265

  15. Dogs in the Workplace: A Review of the Benefits and Potential Challenges.

    PubMed

    Foreman, Anne M; Glenn, Margaret K; Meade, B Jean; Wirth, Oliver

    2017-05-08

    Pet dogs, therapy dogs, and service dogs can be seen in workplaces with increasing frequency. Although dogs may provide many benefits to employees and employers, their presence may introduce additional hazards and concerns to the work environment. Therefore, decisions to accept dogs in the workplace may include many considerations including the health, safety, and well-being of employees, legal and cultural sensitivities, and animal welfare. The present paper serves to introduce the issue of dogs in the workplace and outline the potential benefits and challenges to their presence. The legal accommodations afforded to certain types of dogs in workplace settings are discussed, and the research findings pertaining to the potential benefits of dogs on human health and well-being are summarized. The paper concludes with considerations for human resource management personnel in the areas of diversity, employee relations, ethics and corporate responsibility, organizational and employee development, safety and security, and legal considerations, as well as suggested topics for future research.

  16. A Glimpse of Challenges and Benefits Associated with Collaborative Postgraduate Programmes in Sub-Saharan African Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mundia, Lisho C.

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents empirical findings on the potential benefits and challenges associated with collaborative postgraduate programs between African universities. It reflects the empirical benefits and challenges towards a collaborative master in the fields of Earth Observation, Geographical Information Science (GIS) and Remote Sensing. The research…

  17. Higher education experiences of students with autism spectrum disorder: challenges, benefits and support needs.

    PubMed

    Van Hees, Valérie; Moyson, Tinneke; Roeyers, Herbert

    2015-06-01

    The transition into higher education constitutes a precarious life stage for students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Research on how students with ASD navigate college life is needed for the development of adequate support. This study investigated the challenges and support needs of 23 students with ASD in higher education through semi-structured interviews. Data were analyzed following the principles of Grounded Theory. Students faced difficulties with new situations and unexpected changes, social relationships, problems with information processing and time management and had doubts about disclosure. Facing these challenges simultaneously in the domains of education, student life and daily (independent) living, had a major impact on students' well being. Besides these challenges, students also reported benefits that contributed to success in the three domains. They pointed out to a set of recommendations for support. These findings are linked with previous research and implications for higher education institutions are extrapolated on the basis of these findings.

  18. Nanomaterials for Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells; Materials Challenges Facing Electrical Energy Storate

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal Rao, MRS Web-Editor; Yury Gogotsi, Drexel University; Karen Swider-Lyons, Naval Research Laboratory

    2010-08-05

    Symposium T: Nanomaterials for Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells are under intense investigation worldwide for applications ranging from transportation to portable power. The purpose of this seminar is to focus on the nanomaterials and nanostructures inherent to polymer fuel cells. Symposium topics will range from high-activity cathode and anode catalysts, to theory and new analytical methods. Symposium U: Materials Challenges Facing Electrical Energy Storage Electricity, which can be generated in a variety of ways, offers a great potential for meeting future energy demands as a clean and efficient energy source. However, the use of electricity generated from renewable sources, such as wind or sunlight, requires efficient electrical energy storage. This symposium will cover the latest material developments for batteries, advanced capacitors, and related technologies, with a focus on new or emerging materials science challenges.

  19. Small group learning: graduate health students' views of challenges and benefits.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Debra; Hickman, Louise D; Power, Tamara; Disler, Rebecca; Potgieter, Ingrid; Deek, Hiba; Davidson, Patricia M

    2014-07-19

    Abstract Background: For health care professionals, particularly nurses, the need to work productively and efficiently in small groups is a crucial skill required to meet the challenges of the contemporary health-care environment. Small group work is an educational technique that is used extensively in nurse education. The advantage of group work includes facilitation of deep, active and collaborative learning. However, small group work can be problematic and present challenges for students. Many of the challenges occur because group work necessitates the coming together of collections of individuals, each with their own personalities and sets of experiences. Aim: This study aimed to identify challenges and benefits associated with small group work and to explore options for retaining the positive aspects of group work while reducing or eliminating the aspects the students experienced as negative. Method: Online survey; thematic analysis. Results: Over all, students experienced a range of challenges that necessitated the development of problem-solving strategies. However, they were able to elucidate some enjoyable and positive aspects of group work. Implications for teaching and learning are drawn from this study. Conclusion: The ability to work effectively in small groups and teams is essential for all health care workers in the contemporary health environment. Findings of this study highlight the need for educators to explore novel and effective ways in which to engage nurses in group work.

  20. An assessment of the benefits of the use of NASA developed fuel conservative technology in the US commercial aircraft fleet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Cost and benefits of a fuel conservative aircraft technology program proposed by NASA are estimated. NASA defined six separate technology elements for the proposed program: (a) engine component improvement (b) composite structures (c) turboprops (d) laminar flow control (e) fuel conservative engine and (f) fuel conservative transport. There were two levels postulated: The baseline program was estimated to cost $490 million over 10 years with peak funding in 1980. The level two program was estimated to cost an additional $180 million also over 10 years. Discussions with NASA and with representatives of the major commercial airframe manufacturers were held to estimate the combinations of the technology elements most likely to be implemented, the potential fuel savings from each combination, and reasonable dates for incorporation of these new aircraft into the fleet.

  1. Hybrid-Electric Passenger Car Carbon Dioxide and Fuel Consumption Benefits Based on Real-World Driving.

    PubMed

    Holmén, Britt A; Sentoff, Karen M

    2015-08-18

    Hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs) have lower fuel consumption and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions than conventional vehicles (CVs), on average, based on laboratory tests, but there is a paucity of real-world, on-road HEV emissions and performance data needed to assess energy use and emissions associated with real-world driving, including the effects of road grade. This need is especially great as the electrification of the passenger vehicle fleet (from HEVs to PHEVs to BEVs) increases in response to climate and energy concerns. We compared tailpipe CO2 emissions and fuel consumption of an HEV passenger car to a CV of the same make and model during real-world, on-the-road network driving to quantify the in-use benefit of one popular full HEV technology. Using vehicle specific power (VSP) assignments that account for measured road grade, the mean CV/HEV ratios of CO2 tailpipe emissions or fuel consumption defined the corresponding HEV "benefit" factor for each VSP class (1 kW/ton resolution). Averaging over all VSP classes for driving in all seasons, including temperatures from -13 to +35 °C in relatively steep (-13.2 to +11.5% grade), hilly terrain, mean (±SD) CO2 emission benefit factors were 4.5 ± 3.6, 2.5 ± 1.7, and 1.4 ± 0.5 for city, exurban/suburban arterial and highway driving, respectively. Benefit factor magnitude corresponded to the frequency of electric-drive-only (EDO) operation, which was modeled as a logarithmic function of VSP. A combined model explained 95% of the variance in HEV benefit for city, 75% for arterial and 57% for highway driving. Benefit factors consistently exceeded 2 for VSP classes with greater than 50% EDO (i.e., only city and arterial driving). The reported HEV benefits account for real-world road grade that is often neglected in regulatory emissions and fuel economy tests. Fuel use HEV benefit factors were 1.3 and 2 for the regulatory highway (HWFET) and city (FTP) cycles, respectively, 18% and 31% higher than the EPA adjusted

  2. Early access programs: Benefits, challenges, and key considerations for successful implementation

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Sanjaykumar

    2016-01-01

    Early access programs, (EAPs) are adopted by an increasing number of pharma companies due to several benefits offered by these programs. EAPs offer ethical, compliant, and controlled mechanisms of access to investigational drugs outside of the clinical trial space and before the commercial launch of the drug, to patients with life-threatening diseases having no treatment options available. In addition to the development of positive relationships with key opinion leaders (KOL), patients, advocacy groups and regulators, the data captured from the implementation of EAPs supports in the formulation of global commercialization strategies. This white paper outlines various circumstances to be considered for the implementation of EAPs named patient programs, the regulatory landscape, the benefits and challenges associated with implementing these programs and the key considerations for their successful implementation. PMID:26955570

  3. The challenges and opportunities for integration of solar syngas production with liquid fuel synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkley, James T.; McNaughton, Robbie K.; Pye, John; Saw, Woei; Stechel, Ellen B.

    2016-05-01

    Reforming of methane is practiced on a vast scale globally for the production of syngas as a precursor for the production of many commodities, including hydrogen, ammonia and synthetic liquid fuels. Solar reforming can reduce the greenhouse gas intensity of syngas production by up to about 40% by using solar thermal energy to provide the endothermic heat of reaction, traditionally supplied by combustion of some of the feed. This has the potential to enable the production of solar derived synthetic fuels as drop in replacements for conventional fuels with significantly lower CO2 intensity than conventional gas to liquids (GTL) processes. However, the intermittent nature of the solar resource - both diurnal and seasonal - poses significant challenges for such a concept, which relies on synthesis processes that typically run continuously on very stable feed compositions. We find that the integration of solar syngas production to a GTL process is a non-trivial exercise, with the ability to turn down the capacity of the GTL synthesis section, and indeed to suspend operations for short periods without significant detriment to product quality or process operability, likely to be a key driver for the commercial implementation of solar liquid fuels. Projected costs for liquid fuel synthesis suggest that solar reforming and small scale gas to liquid synthesis can potentially compete with conventional oil derived transport fuels in the short to medium term.

  4. The public health benefits of reducing fine particulate matter through conversion to cleaner heating fuels in New York City.

    PubMed

    Kheirbek, Iyad; Haney, Jay; Douglas, Sharon; Ito, Kazuhiko; Caputo, Steven; Matte, Thomas

    2014-12-02

    In recent years, both New York State and City issued regulations to reduce emissions from burning heating oil. To assess the benefits of these programs in New York City, where the density of emissions and vulnerable populations vary greatly, we simulated the air quality benefits of scenarios reflecting no action, partial, and complete phase-out of high-sulfur heating fuels using the Community MultiScale Air Quality (CMAQ) model conducted at a high spatial resolution (1 km). We evaluated the premature mortality and morbidity benefits of the scenarios within 42 city neighborhoods and computed benefits by neighborhood poverty status. The complete phase-out scenario reduces annual average fine particulate matter (PM2.5) by an estimated 0.71 μg/m(3) city-wide (average of 1 km estimates, 10-90th percentile: 0.1-1.6 μg/m(3)), avoiding an estimated 290 premature deaths, 180 hospital admissions for respiratory and cardiovascular disease, and 550 emergency department visits for asthma each year. The largest improvements were seen in areas of highest building and population density and the majority of benefits have occurred through the partial phase out of high-sulfur heating fuel already achieved. While emissions reductions were greatest in low-poverty neighborhoods, health benefits are estimated to be greatest in high-poverty neighborhoods due to higher baseline morbidity and mortality rates.

  5. Benefits, Challenges, and Potential Utility of a Gait Database for Diabetes Patients.

    PubMed

    Brown, Steven; Boulton, Andrew; Bowling, Frank; Reeves, Neil

    2016-09-01

    Gait analysis is a useful tool in understanding movement impairments, which impact on patient well-being. The use of gait analysis in patients with diabetes has led to improvements in health care including the treatment and prevention of ulceration and development of targeted exercise interventions. The current convention when analyzing gait is to address specific complications of diabetes, controlling for potential influencing conditions within a study sample to understand the effects of the few specific complications chosen for analysis. Databases allow for the storage of data in a structured format, allowing easy access to large quantities of data in a consistent, comparable manner. A database of gait analyses of patients with diabetes has the potential to include far greater sample sizes for statistical analyses, allowing multiple influencing factors to be assessed simultaneously, and relationships identified between multiple influencing factors. However, a database of this type would encounter ethical and methodological challenges in its implementation, which are discussed. This article introduces some of the potential benefits, challenges, and utility of a gait database for diabetes patients. We highlight that, whereas the creation of a database within this clinical population would be a complex process both ethically and practically, huge potential benefits could be gained, overcoming some of the limitations faced by traditional isolated gait analysis studies. © 2016 Diabetes Technology Society.

  6. Benefits, Challenges, and Potential Utility of a Gait Database for Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Steven; Boulton, Andrew; Bowling, Frank; Reeves, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Gait analysis is a useful tool in understanding movement impairments, which impact on patient well-being. The use of gait analysis in patients with diabetes has led to improvements in health care including the treatment and prevention of ulceration and development of targeted exercise interventions. The current convention when analyzing gait is to address specific complications of diabetes, controlling for potential influencing conditions within a study sample to understand the effects of the few specific complications chosen for analysis. Databases allow for the storage of data in a structured format, allowing easy access to large quantities of data in a consistent, comparable manner. A database of gait analyses of patients with diabetes has the potential to include far greater sample sizes for statistical analyses, allowing multiple influencing factors to be assessed simultaneously, and relationships identified between multiple influencing factors. However, a database of this type would encounter ethical and methodological challenges in its implementation, which are discussed. This article introduces some of the potential benefits, challenges, and utility of a gait database for diabetes patients. We highlight that, whereas the creation of a database within this clinical population would be a complex process both ethically and practically, huge potential benefits could be gained, overcoming some of the limitations faced by traditional isolated gait analysis studies. PMID:27022098

  7. Dogs in the Workplace: A Review of the Benefits and Potential Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Foreman, Anne M.; Glenn, Margaret K.; Meade, B. Jean; Wirth, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Pet dogs, therapy dogs, and service dogs can be seen in workplaces with increasing frequency. Although dogs may provide many benefits to employees and employers, their presence may introduce additional hazards and concerns to the work environment. Therefore, decisions to accept dogs in the workplace may include many considerations including the health, safety, and well-being of employees, legal and cultural sensitivities, and animal welfare. The present paper serves to introduce the issue of dogs in the workplace and outline the potential benefits and challenges to their presence. The legal accommodations afforded to certain types of dogs in workplace settings are discussed, and the research findings pertaining to the potential benefits of dogs on human health and well-being are summarized. The paper concludes with considerations for human resource management personnel in the areas of diversity, employee relations, ethics and corporate responsibility, organizational and employee development, safety and security, and legal considerations, as well as suggested topics for future research. PMID:28481317

  8. Timely Diagnosis for Alzheimer’s Disease: A Literature Review on Benefits and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Dubois, Bruno; Padovani, Alessandro; Scheltens, Philip; Rossi, Andrea; Dell’Agnello, Grazia

    2015-01-01

    Background: Timely diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) refers to a diagnosis at the stage when patients come to the attention of clinicians because of concerns about changes in cognition, behavior, or functioning and can be still free of dementia and functionally independent. Objectives: To comprehensively review existing scientific evidence on the benefits and potential challenges of making a timely diagnosis of AD. Methods: Relevant studies were identified by searching electronic databases (Medline, Embase) and bibliographies for studies published in English between 1 January 2000 and 2 June 2014 on the consequences of a timely diagnosis of AD. Results: Nine studies were identified that investigated the consequences of diagnosing AD at the initial stages; none were specifically focused on prodromal AD. A timely diagnosis potentially offers the opportunities of early intervention, implementation of coordinated care plans, better management of symptoms, patient safety, cost savings, and postponement of institutionalization. Barriers to making a timely diagnosis include stigma, suicide risk, lack of training, diagnostic uncertainty, shortage of specialized diagnostic services, and the reluctance of healthcare providers to make a diagnosis when no effective disease-modifying options are available. Conclusions: Despite its potential benefits, few published studies have explored the advantages or risks of a timely diagnosis of AD. In light of the cultural shift toward diagnosis at the initial stage of the disease continuum, when the patient does not yet have dementia, more investigations are needed to evaluate the benefits and address the barriers that may impede making a timely AD diagnosis. PMID:26484931

  9. Early Child Development and Nutrition: A Review of the Benefits and Challenges of Implementing Integrated Interventions.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Kristen M; Yousafzai, Aisha K; Lopez-Boo, Florencia

    2016-03-01

    Poor nutrition (substandard diet quantity and/or quality resulting in under- or overnutrition) and the lack of early learning opportunities contribute to the loss of developmental potential and life-long health and economic disparities among millions of children aged <5 y. Single-sector interventions representing either early child development (ECD) or nutrition have been linked to positive child development and/or nutritional status, and recommendations currently advocate for the development and testing of integrated interventions. We reviewed the theoretical and practical benefits and challenges of implementing integrated nutrition and ECD interventions along with the evidence for best practice and benefit-cost and concluded that the strong theoretical rationale for integration is more nuanced than the questions that the published empirical evidence have addressed. For example, further research is needed to 1) answer questions related to how integrated messaging influences caregiver characteristics such as well-being, knowledge, and behavior and how these influence early child nutrition and development outcomes; 2) understand population and nutritional contexts in which integrated interventions are beneficial; and 3) explore how varying implementation processes influence the efficacy, uptake, and cost-benefit of integrated nutrition and ECD interventions. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  10. Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    The DOE is conducting a comprehensive technical analysis of a flexible-fuel transportation system in the United States -- that is, a system that could easily switch between petroleum and another fuel, depending on price and availability. The DOE Alternative Fuels Assessment is aimed directly at questions of energy security and fuel availability, but covers a wide range of issues. This report examines environmental, health, and safety concerns associated with a switch to alternative- and flexible-fuel vehicles. Three potential alternatives to oil-based fuels in the transportation sector are considered: methanol, compressed natural gas (CNG), and electricity. The objective is to describe and discuss qualitatively potential environmental, health, and safety issues that would accompany widespread use of these three fuels. This report presents the results of exhaustive literature reviews; discussions with specialists in the vehicular and fuel-production industries and with Federal, State, and local officials; and recent information from in-use fleet tests. Each chapter deals with the end-use and process emissions of air pollutants, presenting an overview of the potential air pollution contribution of the fuel --relative to that of gasoline and diesel fuel -- in various applications. Carbon monoxide, particulate matter, ozone precursors, and carbon dioxide are emphasized. 67 refs., 6 figs. , 8 tabs.

  11. Acceptance, Benefits, and Challenges of Public Health-Oriented Pet Business Regulations in King County, Washington.

    PubMed

    Wierenga, Janelle; Thiede, Hanne; Helms, Leah; Hopkins, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    New regulations were implemented in King County, Washington, in 2010 requiring pet businesses to obtain a permit from Public Health-Seattle & King County (Public Health) and undergo annual inspections to provide education and ensure compliance with regulatory standards. The regulations were developed as a tool for zoonotic disease control and prevention education for businesses and their customers, as well as for environmental protection. To assess the acceptance, benefits, and challenges of the new regulations and identify ways for Public Health to improve educational efforts and assist businesses with compliance. Cross-sectional survey. King County, Washington. Pet businesses with Public Health permits in 2013. Self-administered survey responses. The response rate was 40.5%. The majority of respondents provided grooming, pet day care, and kennel/boarding services from small, independent businesses. Sixty-one percent reported Public Health inspections as beneficial, especially concerning disinfection procedures and using an infection control plan. Almost three-fourths of respondents used the Public Health template to develop the infection control plan. Forty-four percent reported using the educational materials provided by Public Health, and 62% used educational materials from other sources. Most respondents reported that they gained benefits from the pet business permit, although fewer agreed that they obtained a good value from the permit and fee. The most common benefits reported were protection of animal and human health and establishing the credibility of the pet business. Major challenges with the implementation of the pet business regulations were not generally reported by respondents. Most respondents reported a collaborative relationship between Public Health and the pet businesses. Improvements in infection control practices and positive responses to the inspections were reported by pet businesses. Survey results were used to improve infection control

  12. Multinational medical support to operations: challenges, benefits and recommendations for the future.

    PubMed

    Cordell, R F

    2012-03-01

    This paper considers the strategic aspects of medical support to military operations as delivered through multi-national collaboration. The military medical services are in essence a people organisation; the purpose of the organisation is primarily to support the people engaged in military operations, and also the people providing healthcare to them. Increasingly, supporting the latter also includes preparation for the ethical dilemmas that they will face. Providing health advice and healthcare on operations is now usually undertaken on a multinational basis, in order to generate sufficient medical capacity to meet the requirement with assets of the appropriate (and NATO mandated) capability. This will be an enduring feature, particularly in light of increasing costs of providing high quality healthcare and the operational and logistic challenges of delivering this capability in adverse environments, and in the context of medical personnel being a limited resource. The key to overcoming the challenges, often the result of the "people issues" such as cultural differences, is to recognise the value that the inherent diversity of multinational healthcare provision brings. The benefit is realised through sharing best practice, and the lessons from challenges met, as well as through burden sharing, and to understand that challenges are most commonly the result of misunderstandings, such as those inherent in language differences. The advice for those bringing a multinational team together includes considering the implications of culture (noting differences in national and military perspectives, and in medical processes such as clinical governance), to ensure effective communication, and to utilise feedback to confirm understanding. It is important not to prejudge or denigrate others. Share information and knowledge, provide positive reinforcement when things go well, and recognise that there will inevitably be challenges and use these as an opportunity to learn. Above

  13. Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    In 1988 the Department of Energy (DOE) undertook a comprehensive technical analysis of a flexible-fuel transportation system in the United States. During the next two decades, alternative fuels such as alcohol (methanol or ethanol), compressed natural gas (CNG), and electricity could become practical alternatives to oil-based fuels in the US transportation sector. The DOE Alternative Fuels Assessment is aimed directly at questions of energy security and fuel availability. To keep interested parties informed about the progress of the DOE Alternative Fuels Assessment, the Department periodically publishes reports dealing with particular aspects of this complex study. This report provides an analysis of the expected costs to produce methanol from biomass feedstock.

  14. Emerging Fuel Cell Technology Being Developed: Offers Many Benefits to Air Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James F.; Civinskas, Kestutis C.

    2004-01-01

    Fuel cells, which have recently received considerable attention for terrestrial applications ranging from automobiles to stationary power generation, may enable new aerospace missions as well as offer fuel savings, quiet operations, and reduced emissions for current and future aircraft. NASA has extensive experience with fuel cells, having used them on manned space flight systems over four decades. Consequently, the NASA Glenn Research Center has initiated an effort to investigate and develop fuel cell technologies for multiple aerospace applications. Two promising fuel cell types are the proton exchange membrane (PEM) and solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). PEM technology, first used on the Gemini spacecraft in the sixties, remained unutilized thereafter until the automotive industry recently recognized the potential. PEM fuel cells are low-temperature devices offering quick startup time but requiring relatively pure hydrogen fuel. In contrast, SOFCs operate at high temperatures and tolerate higher levels of impurities. This flexibility allows SOFCs to use hydrocarbon fuels, which is an important factor considering our current liquid petroleum infrastructure. However, depending on the specific application, either PEM or SOFC can be attractive. As only NASA can, the Agency is pursuing fuel cell technology for civil uninhabited aerial vehicles (UAVs) because it offers enhanced scientific capabilities, including enabling highaltitude, long-endurance missions. The NASA Helios aircraft demonstrated altitudes approaching 100,000 ft using solar power in 2001, and future plans include the development of a regenerative PEM fuel cell to provide nighttime power. Unique to NASA's mission, the high-altitude aircraft application requires the PEM fuel cell to operate on pure oxygen, instead of the air typical of terrestrial applications.

  15. Increasing Diversity in the Sciences: a Partial Solution to the Challenge and the Benefits it Produces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Givan, A. V.

    2009-12-01

    Science is supposed to be about talent devoid of the bias’ and judgments generated by background, gender, ethnicity or any culturally determined discriminators. The scientific, academic, corporate and government communities have a vested interest in developing models, practices and policies that significantly increase the number of U.S. graduates in scientific disciplines. Additionally, it is crucial that these graduates possess the essential competencies and creative problem solving skills to compete in the current global economy. The stakeholders (corporations, researchers, educational practitioners, policymakers and funders) who have the common goal of producing highly qualified scientists must commit to collaborate in developing innovative strategies and solutions to this complex challenge. Volumes of research data from a variety of sources such the social and cognitive sciences, educational psychology, National Science Foundation and non-profit groups have been and are available for use enabling us to rise to the challenge we have been charged with, and are responsible for the outcome. A proposed solution to part of the challenge and discussion of the impacts of increasing diversity in science will be discussed in this paper. The paper will address one element of the issue - strategies for the recruitment and retention of under-represented groups in science focusing on the historical and current culture, climate and barriers encountered by minorities as they progress through the educational system and career pathways. The paper will examine the benefits of diversity to the individual and society as a whole.

  16. The Challenges Associated with High Burnup and High Temperature for UO2 TRISO-Coated Particle Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    David Petti; John Maki

    2005-02-01

    The fuel service conditions for the DOE Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be challenging. All major fuel related design parameters (burnup, temperature, fast neutron fluence, power density, particle packing fraction) exceed the values that were qualified in the successful German UO2 TRISO-coated particle fuel development program in the 1980s. While TRISO-coated particle fuel has been irradiated at NGNP relevant levels for two or three of the design parameters, no data exist for TRISO-coated particle fuel for all five parameters simultaneously. Of particular concern are the high burnup and high temperatures expected in the NGNP. In this paper, where possible, we evaluate the challenges associated with high burnup and high temperature quantitatively by examining the performance of the fuel in terms of different known failure mechanisms. Potential design solutions to ameliorate the negative effects of high burnup and high temperature are also discussed.

  17. Photovoltaics (PV) as an Eligible Measure in Residential PACE Programs: Benefits and Challenges (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlin, J.

    2010-06-01

    Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing is one of several new financial models broadening access to clean energy by addressing the barrier of initial capital cost. The majority of the PACE programs in the market today include PV as an eligible measure. PV appeals to homeowners as a way to reduce utility bills, self-generate sustainable power, increase energy independence and demonstrate a commitment to the environment. If substantial state incentives for PV exist, PV projects can be economic under PACE, especially when partnered with good net metering policies. At the same time, PV is expensive relative to other eligible measures with a return on investment horizon that might exceed program targets. This fact sheet reviews the benefits and potential challenges of including PV in PACE programs.

  18. Ask the experts: the challenges and benefits of flow chemistry to optimize drug development.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Neal; Gernaey, Krist V; Jamison, Timothy F; Kircher, Manfred; Wiles, Charlotte; Leadbeater, Nicholas E; Sandford, Graham; Richardson, Paul

    2012-09-01

    Against a backdrop of a struggling economic and regulatory climate, pharmaceutical companies have recently been forced to develop new ways to provide more efficient technology to meet the demands of a competitive drug industry. This issue, coupled with an increase in patent legislation and a rising generics market, makes these themes common issues in the growth of drug development. As a consequence, the importance of process chemistry and scale-up has never been more under the spotlight. Future Medicinal Chemistry wishes to share the thoughts and opinions of a variety of experts from this field, discussing issues concerning the use of flow chemistry to optimize drug development, the potential regulatory and environmental challenges faced with this, and whether the academic and industrial sectors could benefit from a more harmonized system relevant to process chemistry.

  19. Dynamic Human Reliability Analysis: Benefits and Challenges of Simulating Human Performance

    SciTech Connect

    R. L. Boring

    2007-06-01

    To date, there has been considerable work on dynamic event trees and other areas related to dynamic probabilistic safety assessment (PSA). The counterpart to these efforts in human reliability analysis (HRA) has centered on the development of specific methods to account for the dynamic nature of human performance. In this paper, the author posits that the key to dynamic HRA is not in the development of specific methods but in the utilization of cognitive modeling and simulation to produce a framework of data that may be used in quantifying the likelihood of human error. This paper provides an overview of simulation approaches to HRA; reviews differences between first, second, and dynamic generation HRA; and outlines potential benefits and challenges of this approach.

  20. Patient-Centered Participatory Research in Three Health Clinics: Benefits, Challenges, and Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Fava, Nicole M; Munro-Kramer, Michelle L; Felicetti, Irene L; Darling-Fisher, Cynthia S; Pardee, Michelle; Helman, Abigail; Trucco, Elisa M; Martyn, Kristy K

    2016-06-23

    Research informed by individuals' lived experiences is a critical component of participatory research and nursing interventions for health promotion. Yet, few examples of participatory research in primary care settings with adolescents and young adults exist, especially with respect to their sexual health and health-risk behaviors. Therefore, we implemented a validated patient-centered clinical assessment tool to improve the quality of communication between youth patients and providers, sexual risk assessment, and youths' health-risk perception to promote sexual health and reduce health-risk behaviors among adolescents and young adults in three community health clinic settings, consistent with national recommendations as best practices in adolescent health care. We describe guiding principles, benefits, challenges, and lessons learned from our experience. Improving clinical translation of participatory research requires consideration of the needs and desires of key stakeholders (e.g., providers, patients, and researchers) while retaining flexibility to successfully navigate imperfect, real-world conditions.

  1. Student leadership in interprofessional education: benefits, challenges and implications for educators, researchers and policymakers.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Steven J; Rosenfield, Daniel; Gilbert, John H V; Oandasan, Ivy F

    2008-07-01

    Context Interprofessional collaboration is gaining increasing prominence as a team-based approach to health care delivery that synergistically maximises the strengths of each health professional to enhance patient care, decrease medical errors and optimise efficiency. The often neglected role that student leaders have in preparing their peers, as the health professionals of the future, for collaboration in health care should not be overlooked. Objective This paper offers the foundational arguments supporting the integral role that student leadership in interprofessional education (IPE) can play and its comparative advantages. Methods Evidence from previous literature and the National Health Science Students' Association in Canada was reviewed and a questionnaire on student-initiated IPE was administered among Canada's top student leaders in this area. Results Student leadership is essential to the success of IPE because it enhances students' willingness to collaborate and facilitates the longterm sustainability of IPE efforts. Student-initiated IPE, a subset of student leadership, is particularly important to achieving the aforementioned goals and offers a number of benefits, comparative advantages and associated challenges. Conclusions Successful student leadership in IPE will yield significant benefits for everyone in the years to come. However, it requires the support of educators, researchers and policymakers in fostering an enabling environment that will facilitate the efforts and contributions of student leaders.

  2. Air Quality Benefits of Ship Fuel Regulations in the San Francisco Bay Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, L.; Harley, R. A.; Fairley, D.; Martien, P. T.

    2012-12-01

    Ocean-going vessels burning high-sulfur heavy fuel oil are an important emission source of air pollutants such as sulfur dioxide and particulate matter. Beginning July 1, 2009, an emission control area was put into effect at ports and along the California coastline, requiring use of low-sulfur marine fuels in place of heavy fuel oil in main engines of ships. To assess impacts of the fuel changes on air quality at the Port of Oakland and in the surrounding San Francisco Bay area, we analyzed speciated fine particle composition data from 4 urban sites and 2 more remote sites (Point Reyes and Pinnacles) from the IMPROVE network. Measured changes in concentrations of vanadium, a useful and specific tracer for heavy fuel oil combustion, are related to overall changes in primary aerosol emissions from ships. The results indicate a substantial reduction in vanadium concentrations after the fuel change, and a 13 to 38% decrease in SO2 concentration, with the SO2 decrease varying depending on proximity to shipping lanes. We inferred from emission factors documented in the literature that marine vessel contributions to primary fine particulate matter mass in the Bay Area, prior to the fuel change, were on the order of 1 to 5%.

  3. Appendix B: Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program inputs for FY 2008 benefits estimates

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    Document summarizes the results of the benefits analysis of EERE’s programs, as described in the FY 2008 Budget Request. EERE estimates benefits for its overall portfolio and nine Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment (RD3) programs.

  4. Social Media in the Dental School Environment, Part A: Benefits, Challenges, and Recommendations for Use.

    PubMed

    Spallek, Heiko; Turner, Sharon P; Donate-Bartfield, Evelyn; Chambers, David; McAndrew, Maureen; Zarkowski, Pamela; Karimbux, Nadeem

    2015-10-01

    Social media consist of powerful tools that impact not only communication but relationships among people, thus posing an inherent challenge to the traditional standards of who we are as dental educators and what we can expect of each other. This article examines how the world of social media has changed dental education. Its goal is to outline the complex issues that social media use presents for academic dental institutions and to examine these issues from personal, professional, and legal perspectives. After providing an update on social media, the article considers the advantages and risks associated with the use of social media at the interpersonal, professional, and institutional levels. Policies and legal issues of which academic dental institutions need to be aware from a compliance perspective are examined, along with considerations and resources needed to develop effective social media policies. The challenge facing dental educators is how to capitalize on the benefits that social media offer, while minimizing risks and complying with the various forms of legal constraint.

  5. Benefits and Challenges of Antivirulence Antimicrobials at the Dawn of the Post-Antibiotic Era

    PubMed Central

    Totsika, Makrina

    2016-01-01

    In April 2014, the World Health Organization announced the beginning of a post-antibiotic era and declared antimicrobial resistance (AMR) a public health priority demanding global action. If no action is taken, by 2050 AMR will kill more people each year than cancer, with 10 million estimated annual deaths at a cost of $100 trillion to the global economy. New therapies to tackle multidrug resistant bacterial pathogens are urgently needed. Unlike traditional antibiotics, antivirulence drugs inhibit bacterial virulence instead of growth promising to offer a new class of superior therapeutics that will be ‘evolution-proof’ and ‘tailored-spectrum’. This mini-review discusses the latest emerging evidence on the promised benefits of antivirulence drugs over conventional antibiotics, also highlighting the challenges in evaluating these properties for each of the diverse virulence targets that are currently under investigation. The author argues that overcoming such challenges early in the development process constitutes an important step towards successfully progressing each of the expanding number of antivirulence strategies into next-generation therapies for common human and animal infections that are becoming increasingly refractory to all available antibiotics.

  6. Challenges and benefits on long-term eddy covariance measurements over lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesala, Timo; Golub, Malgorzata; Desai, Ankur; Heiskanen, Jouni; Provenzale, Maria; Rantakari, Miitta; Ojala, Anne; Mammarella, Ivan

    2017-04-01

    Eddy Covariance (EC) data on carbon dioxide fluxes is presently available on about 30 lakes but the time series are mostly short, order of one year. Longer EC series together with chamber measurements and appropriate auxiliary data on water column allow for more accurate estimates of the aquatic component in terrestrial carbon balance and analysis of the environmental controls. We discuss on challenges for long-term EC measurements over freshwater ecosystems and demonstrate the benefits of EC data for carbon cycle studies via examples from long-term sites EC sites in Finland. We discuss on the auxiliary measurements needed and the general design of the whole measurement set-up to get representative information. We discuss on challenges related to the CO2 flux partitioning for freshwater ecosystems and introduce a new method to estimate the net primary productivity (NPP) on EC data, which is superior to more traditional methods (bottle incubations, 14C technique) with a poor temporal resolution. Finally, we collected and analyzed CO2 fluxes from 19 globally distributed lakes and reservoirs representing six climate zones. The mean flux was c. 0.3 micro mole / m2 s. We applied a simple upscaling to the direct observations and ended up to the estimate which is about half of the current emission estimate for lentic systems.

  7. Long-term hand tele-rehabilitation on the PlayStation 3: benefits and challenges.

    PubMed

    Burdea, Grigore C; Jain, Abhishek; Rabin, Bryan; Pellosie, Richard; Golomb, Meredith

    2011-01-01

    Rehabilitation interventions for the hand have shown benefits for children with Hemiplegia due to cerebral palsy or traumatic brain injury. Longer interventions are facilitated if training is provided in the patient's home, due to easier access to care and reduced impact on school or work activities. Providing remote rehabilitation over lengthy periods of time has however its own challenges. This paper presents two pediatric patients with hemiplegia, who practiced virtual hand rehabilitation games using a modified PlayStation 3 and 5DT sensing gloves. Despite severe initial hand spasticity, and occasional technology shortcomings, the subjects practiced for about 14 months, and 6 months, respectively. Game performance data for the second patient is presented. Follow-up evaluations 14 months from the removal of the PlayStation 3 from the home of the child with cerebral palsy showed that the patient had good retention in terms of grasp strength, hand function and bone health. Challenges of long-term home tele-rehabilitation are also discussed.

  8. Learning in Later Life: Benefits and Challenges for Volunteers and Agencies.

    PubMed

    Findsen, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Older adults in most societies are keen volunteers in a myriad of contexts for the betterment of individuals and for the agencies in which they volunteer. This article discusses how volunteerism among older adults may enhance their learning and the kinds of benefits and challenges they encounter in their work for employing authorities. It also considers how agencies can be better attuned to the lifelong learning aspirations of older volunteers. Research related to older adults, lifelong learning and the character of volunteerism is reviewed with examples provided from New Zealand and Australia of older adults' participation in volunteerism and consequential impact. While volunteerism is normally viewed as a "win-win" situation for the volunteers and the organisations in which knowledge is further developed for varied purposes (economic sufficiency; personal development; active citizenship; social inclusion), there are nevertheless challenges for both parties. The article explores salient factors which function as enhancers or limitations for older volunteers in their work and learning. It is important that the motives of volunteers for participation are fully transparent and understood by the older adults themselves and by the relevant agencies. Organisations can provide considerable opportunities for older people to engage in continuing learning/ education but they need to be aware of effective recruitment and retention strategies; older people can provide a much needed labour resource where their previous life experiences can be drawn upon and they should be fully cognisant of the organisation's mission and how they can help to enhance it.

  9. Harmonisation of food labelling regulations in Southeast Asia: benefits, challenges and implications.

    PubMed

    Kasapila, William; Shaarani, Sharifudin Md

    2011-01-01

    In the globalised world of the 21st century, issues of food and nutrition labelling are of pre-eminent importance. Several international bodies, including the World Health Organisation and World Trade Organisation, are encouraging countries to harmonise their food and nutrition regulations with international standards, guidelines and recommendations such as those for Codex Alimentarius. Through harmonisation, these organisations envisage fewer barriers to trade and freer movement of food products between countries, which would open doors to new markets and opportunities for the food industry. In turn, increased food trade would enhance economic development and allow consumers a greater choice of products. Inevitably, however, embracing harmonisation brings along cost implications and challenges that have to be overcome. Moreover, the harmonisation process is complex and sporadic in light of the tasks that countries have to undertake; for example, updating legislation, strengthening administrative capabilities and establishing analytical laboratories. This review discusses the legislation and regulations that govern food and nutrition labelling in Southeast Asia, and highlights the discrepancies that exist in this regard, their origin and consequences. It also gives an account of the current status of harmonising labelling of pre-packaged foodstuffs in the region and explains the subsequent benefits, challenges and implications for governments, the food industry and consumers.

  10. The introduction of graduate entry medical programmes: potential benefits and likely challenges.

    PubMed

    Cullen, W; Power, D; Bury, G

    2007-06-01

    There have been moves to introduce graduate entry programmes at medical schools both internationally and nationally. This, paper aims to review the recent literature on this policy issue and to discuss its implications in the context of the proposed introduction of graduate entry programmes at medical schools in Ireland. A number of potential advantages to this policy have been described, including: better educational outcomes, increased student motivation, benefits to student wellbeing, increased diversity of the student body, improved student learning strategies and improved professional outcomes. An equal number of challenges associated with this policy have also been described, including: increased stress levels for students, increased difficulties establishing an equitable admissions process, challenges to the curriculum to accommodate students with different educational backgrounds and other organisational issues. These issues must be considered in the transition to graduate entry programmes at medical schools in Ireland. The introduction of graduate entry programmes at medical schools in Ireland represents an important opportunity to inform the international debate on this subject.

  11. Xylose fermentation as a challenge for commercialization of lignocellulosic fuels and chemicals.

    PubMed

    Sànchez Nogué, Violeta; Karhumaa, Kaisa

    2015-04-01

    Fuel ethanol production from lignocellulosic materials is at a level where commercial biofuel production is becoming a reality. The solubilization of the hemicellulose fraction in lignocellulosic-based feedstocks results in a large variety of sugar mixtures including xylose. However, allowing xylose fermentation in yeast that normally is used for fuel ethanol production requires genetic engineering. Moreover, the efficiency of lignocellulosic pretreatment, together with the release and generation of inhibitory compounds in this step, are some of the new challenges faced during second generation ethanol production. Successful advances in all these aspects will improve ethanol yield, productivity and titer, which will reduce the impact on capital and operating costs, leading to the consolidation of the fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass as an economically feasible option for the production of renewable fuels. Therefore the development of yeast strains capable of fermenting a wide variety of sugars in a highly inhibitory environment, while maintaining a high ethanol yield and production rate, is required. This review provides an overview of the current status in the use of xylose-engineered yeast strains and describes the remaining challenges to achieve an efficient deployment of lignocellulosic-based ethanol production.

  12. The benefits and costs of new fuels and engines for light-duty vehicles in the United States.

    PubMed

    Keefe, Ryan; Griffin, James P; Graham, John D

    2008-10-01

    Rising oil prices and concerns about energy security and climate change are spurring reconsideration of both automobile propulsion systems and the fuels that supply energy to them. In addition to the gasoline internal combustion engine, recent years have seen alternatives develop in the automotive marketplace. Currently, hybrid-electric vehicles, advanced diesels, and flex-fuel vehicles running on a high percentage mixture of ethanol and gasoline (E85) are appearing at auto shows and in driveways. We conduct a rigorous benefit-cost analysis from both the private and societal perspective of the marginal benefits and costs of each technology--using the conventional gasoline engine as a baseline. The private perspective considers only those factors that influence the decisions of individual consumers, while the societal perspective accounts for environmental, energy, and congestion externalities as well. Our analysis illustrates that both hybrids and diesels show promise for particular light-duty applications (sport utility vehicles and pickup trucks), but that vehicles running continuously on E85 consistently have greater costs than benefits. The results for diesels were particularly robust over a wide range of sensitivity analyses. The results from the societal analysis are qualitatively similar to the private analysis, demonstrating that the most relevant factors to the benefit-cost calculations are the factors that drive the individual consumer's decision. We conclude with a brief discussion of marketplace and public policy trends that will both illustrate and influence the relative adoption of these alternative technologies in the United States in the coming decade.

  13. Certification challenges in the development of an innovative high payload capacity spent fuel transportation cask

    SciTech Connect

    Mair, B.R.; Severson, M.J.; Ciez, A.P. )

    1990-01-01

    The design approach and certification strategy used in the development of an innovative transportation cask for legal weight truck shipments of spent nuclear fuel is presented. The proposed approach represents a significant departure from conventional cask designs in that it uses titanium alloy, a material with a high strength-to-weight ratio which has no precedent in transportation cask certification. The significant increase in payload obtainable with the proposed approach, and the associated benefits such as reduced life cycle costs, lower personnel exposure, and lower transportation accident risks are discussed. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Key challenges and recent progress in batteries, fuel cells, and hydrogen storage for clean energy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalk, Steven G.; Miller, James F.

    Reducing or eliminating the dependency on petroleum of transportation systems is a major element of US energy research activities. Batteries are a key enabling technology for the development of clean, fuel-efficient vehicles and are key to making today's hybrid electric vehicles a success. Fuel cells are the key enabling technology for a future hydrogen economy and have the potential to revolutionize the way we power our nations, offering cleaner, more efficient alternatives to today's technology. Additionally fuel cells are significantly more energy efficient than combustion-based power generation technologies. Fuel cells are projected to have energy efficiency twice that of internal combustion engines. However before fuel cells can realize their potential, significant challenges remain. The two most important are cost and durability for both automotive and stationary applications. Recent electrocatalyst developments have shown that Pt alloy catalysts have increased activity and greater durability than Pt catalysts. The durability of conventional fluorocarbon membranes is improving, and hydrocarbon-based membranes have also shown promise of equaling the performance of fluorocarbon membranes at lower cost. Recent announcements have also provided indications that fuel cells can start from freezing conditions without significant deterioration. Hydrogen storage systems for vehicles are inadequate to meet customer driving range expectations (>300 miles or 500 km) without intrusion into vehicle cargo or passenger space. The United States Department of Energy has established three centers of Excellence for hydrogen storage materials development. The centers are focused on complex metal hydrides that can be regenerated onboard a vehicle, chemical hydrides that require off-board reprocessing, and carbon-based storage materials. Recent developments have shown progress toward the 2010 DOE targets. In addition DOE has established an independent storage material testing center

  15. Cost-benefit analysis of using sewage sludge as alternative fuel in a cement plant: a case study.

    PubMed

    Nadal, Martí; Schuhmacher, Marta; Domingo, José L

    2009-05-01

    To enforce the implementation of the Kyoto Protocol targets, a number of governmental/international institutions have launched emission trade schemes as an approach to specify CO(2) caps and to regulate the emission trade in recent years. These schemes have been basically applied for large industrial sectors, including energy producers and energy-intensive users. Among them, cement plants are included among the big greenhouse gas (GHG) emitters. The use of waste as secondary fuel in clinker kilns is currently an intensive practice worldwide. However, people living in the vicinity of cement plants, where alternative fuels are being used, are frequently concerned about the potential increase in health risks. In the present study, a cost-benefit analysis was applied after substituting classical fuel for sewage sludge as an alternative fuel in a clinker kiln in Catalonia, Spain. The economical benefits resulting in the reduction of CO(2) emissions were compared with the changes in human health risks due to exposure to polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) and carcinogenic metals (As, Cd, Co, and Cr) before and after using sewage sludge to generate 20% of the thermal energy needed for pyro-processing. The exposure to PCDD/Fs and metals through air inhalation, soil ingestion and dermal absorption was calculated according to the environmental levels in soil. The carcinogenic risks were assessed, and the associated cost for the population was estimated by considering the DG Environment's recommended value for preventing a statistical fatality (VPF). In turn, the amount of CO(2) emitted was calculated, and the economical saving, according to the market prices, was evaluated. The use of sewage sludge as a substitute of conventional energy meant a probability cancer decrease of 4.60 for metals and a cancer risk increase of 0.04 for PCDD/Fs. Overall, a net reduction of 4.56 cancers for one million people can be estimated. The associated economical

  16. Benefits and challenges of linking green infrastructure and highway planning in the United States.

    PubMed

    Marcucci, Daniel J; Jordan, Lauren M

    2013-01-01

    Landscape-level green infrastructure creates a network of natural and semi-natural areas that protects and enhances ecosystem services, regenerative capacities, and ecological dynamism over long timeframes. It can also enhance quality of life and certain economic activity. Highways create a network for moving goods and services efficiently, enabling commerce, and improving mobility. A fundamentally profound conflict exists between transportation planning and green infrastructure planning because they both seek to create connected, functioning networks across the same landscapes and regions, but transportation networks, especially in the form of highways, fragment and disconnect green infrastructure networks. A key opportunity has emerged in the United States during the last ten years with the promotion of measures to link transportation and environmental concerns. In this article we examined the potential benefits and challenges of linking landscape-level green infrastructure planning and implementation with integrated transportation planning and highway project development in the United States policy context. This was done by establishing a conceptual model that identified logical flow lines from planning to implementation as well as the potential interconnectors between green infrastructure and highway infrastructure. We analyzed the relationship of these activities through literature review, policy analysis, and a case study of a suburban Maryland, USA landscape. We found that regionally developed and adopted green infrastructure plans can be instrumental in creating more responsive regional transportation plans and streamlining the project environmental review process while enabling better outcomes by enabling more targeted mitigation. In order for benefits to occur, however, landscape-scale green infrastructure assessments and plans must be in place before integrated transportation planning and highway project development occurs. It is in the transportation

  17. Benefits and Challenges of Linking Green Infrastructure and Highway Planning in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcucci, Daniel J.; Jordan, Lauren M.

    2013-01-01

    Landscape-level green infrastructure creates a network of natural and semi-natural areas that protects and enhances ecosystem services, regenerative capacities, and ecological dynamism over long timeframes. It can also enhance quality of life and certain economic activity. Highways create a network for moving goods and services efficiently, enabling commerce, and improving mobility. A fundamentally profound conflict exists between transportation planning and green infrastructure planning because they both seek to create connected, functioning networks across the same landscapes and regions, but transportation networks, especially in the form of highways, fragment and disconnect green infrastructure networks. A key opportunity has emerged in the United States during the last ten years with the promotion of measures to link transportation and environmental concerns. In this article we examined the potential benefits and challenges of linking landscape-level green infrastructure planning and implementation with integrated transportation planning and highway project development in the United States policy context. This was done by establishing a conceptual model that identified logical flow lines from planning to implementation as well as the potential interconnectors between green infrastructure and highway infrastructure. We analyzed the relationship of these activities through literature review, policy analysis, and a case study of a suburban Maryland, USA landscape. We found that regionally developed and adopted green infrastructure plans can be instrumental in creating more responsive regional transportation plans and streamlining the project environmental review process while enabling better outcomes by enabling more targeted mitigation. In order for benefits to occur, however, landscape-scale green infrastructure assessments and plans must be in place before integrated transportation planning and highway project development occurs. It is in the transportation

  18. PEM fuel cells: status and challenges for commercial stationary power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Bin; Guo, Qunhui; Pollard, Richard; Rodriguez, Daniel; Smith, Christopher; Elter, John

    2006-08-01

    The past decade has seen tremendous advances in proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology: However, there remain many challenges to bring commercially viable stationary PEMFC products to the market. This review, from a manufacturer's perspective, focuses on system reliability and materials compatibility and their strong impact on stack life and overall system durability. Statistical analysis is based on field data from more than 600 stationary PEMFC systems for both continuous and back-up power applications. Sealing materials and coolants are used to illustrate the approaches taken to evaluate materials compatibility studies.

  19. Potential Benefits from the Use of JP-8 Fuel in Military Ground Equipment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-02-01

    08990 ByU A.F. Montemayor L.L. Stavizba V LY S.J. Lestz Belvoir Fuels and Lubricants Research Facility (SwRI) Southwest Research Institute San Antonio...ZPERSONALAUTHOR(S) Montemayor , Alan F., and Stavinoha, Leo L., and Lestz, Sidney J.., and LePera, Maurice E. (Belvoir RDE Center) 13*. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME...San Antonio, TX, January 1988. 18. Montemayor , A.F., et al., "Fuel Property Effects on the Cold Startability of Navy High-Speed Diesel Engines

  20. Investigating Epigenetic Effects of Prenatal Exposure to Toxic Metals in Newborns: Challenges and Benefits.

    PubMed

    Nye, Monica D; Fry, Rebecca C; Hoyo, Cathrine; Murphy, Susan K

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggest that epigenetic alterations can greatly impact human health, and that epigenetic mechanisms (DNA methylation, histone modifications, and microRNAs) may be particularly relevant in responding to environmental toxicant exposure early in life. The epigenome plays a vital role in embryonic development, tissue differentiation and disease development by controlling gene expression. In this review we discuss what is currently known about epigenetic alterations in response to prenatal exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) and lead (Pb), focusing specifically on their effects on DNA methylation. We then describe how epigenetic alterations are being studied in newborns as potential biomarkers of in utero environmental toxicant exposure, and the benefits and challenges of this approach. In summary, the studies highlighted herein indicate how epigenetic mechanisms are impacted by early life exposure to iAs and Pb, and the research that is being done to move towards understanding the relationships between toxicant-induced epigenetic alterations and disease development. Although much remains unknown, several groups are working to understand the correlative and causal effects of early life toxic metal exposure on epigenetic changes and how these changes may result in later development of disease.

  1. Promoting neurological recovery in the post-acute stroke phase: benefits and challenges.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Dirk M; Chopp, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Profound cellular and biochemical remodeling processes occur in the brain following an ischemic stroke, raising the possibility that we may be able to promote neurological recovery by harnessing the brain's endogenous recovery processes with pharmacological or cell-based therapies. There is a compelling body of evidence that cerebral plasticity and neurological recovery can be stimulated in the post-acute ischemic brain in this manner. This overview of neurorestorative therapies highlights the main challenges in their development, and summarizes the implications of these findings to stroke patients. Key Message: Neurorestorative therapies are a highly promising avenue of treatment for the restitution of neuronal networks damaged by stroke. The key supporting data have so far been obtained using in vivo models in animals, underscoring the need to validate these findings in humans. For human studies, several potentially confounding variables should be kept in mind, including age, and the presence of risk factors and comorbidities (such as hyperlipidemia and diabetes). Stroke patients vary considerably in age and genetic background, as well as in the etiology, localization and size of brain infarcts. The choice of patient population is a critical factor in the success of clinical trials, as patient heterogeneity could mask any potential therapeutic benefits. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Exploring the benefits and challenges of establishing a DRI-like process for bioactives.

    PubMed

    Lupton, Joanne R; Atkinson, Stephanie A; Chang, Namsoo; Fraga, Cesar G; Levy, Joseph; Messina, Mark; Richardson, David P; van Ommen, Ben; Yang, Yuexin; Griffiths, James C; Hathcock, John

    2014-04-01

    Bioactives can be defined as: "Constituents in foods or dietary supplements, other than those needed to meet basic human nutritional needs, which are responsible for changes in health status" (Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office of Public Health and Science, Department of Health and Human Services in Fed Reg 69:55821-55822, 2004). Although traditional nutrients, such as vitamins, minerals, protein, essential fatty acids and essential amino acids, have dietary reference intake (DRI) values, there is no such evaluative process for bioactives. For certain classes of bioactives, substantial scientific evidence exists to validate a relationship between their intake and enhanced health conditions or reduced risk of disease. In addition, the study of bioactives and their relationship to disease risk is a growing area of research supported by government, academic institutions, and food and supplement manufacturers. Importantly, consumers are purchasing foods containing bioactives, yet there is no evaluative process in place to let the public know how strong the science is behind the benefits or the quantitative amounts needed to achieve these beneficial health effects. This conference, Bioactives: Qualitative Nutrient Reference Values for Life-stage Groups?, explored why it is important to have a DRI-like process for bioactives and challenges for establishing such a process.

  3. IED Cleanup: A Cooperative Classroom Robotics Challenge--The Benefits and Execution of a Cooperative Classroom Robotics Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piotrowski, Mark; Kressly, Rich

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a cooperative classroom robotics challenge named "IED Cleanup". This classroom challenge was created to incorporate a humanitarian project with the use of a robotics design system in order to remove simulated IEDs (Improvised Explosive Devices) to a detonation zone within a specified amount of time. Throughout the activity,…

  4. IED Cleanup: A Cooperative Classroom Robotics Challenge--The Benefits and Execution of a Cooperative Classroom Robotics Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piotrowski, Mark; Kressly, Rich

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a cooperative classroom robotics challenge named "IED Cleanup". This classroom challenge was created to incorporate a humanitarian project with the use of a robotics design system in order to remove simulated IEDs (Improvised Explosive Devices) to a detonation zone within a specified amount of time. Throughout the activity,…

  5. The benefits of an advanced fast reactor fuel cycle for plutonium management

    SciTech Connect

    Hannum, W.H.; McFarlane, H.F.; Wade, D.C.; Hill, R.N.

    1996-12-31

    The United States has no program to investigate advanced nuclear fuel cycles for the large-scale consumption of plutonium from military and civilian sources. The official U.S. position has been to focus on means to bury spent nuclear fuel from civilian reactors and to achieve the spent fuel standard for excess separated plutonium, which is considered by policy makers to be an urgent international priority. Recently, the National Research Council published a long awaited report on its study of potential separation and transmutation technologies (STATS), which concluded that in the nuclear energy phase-out scenario that they evaluated, transmutation of plutonium and long-lived radioisotopes would not be worth the cost. However, at the American Nuclear Society Annual Meeting in June, 1996, the STATS panelists endorsed further study of partitioning to achieve superior waste forms for burial, and suggested that any further consideration of transmutation should be in the context of energy production, not of waste management. 2048 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has an active program for the short-term disposition of excess fissile material and a `focus area` for safe, secure stabilization, storage and disposition of plutonium, but has no current programs for fast reactor development. Nevertheless, sufficient data exist to identify the potential advantages of an advanced fast reactor metallic fuel cycle for the long-term management of plutonium. Advantages are discussed.

  6. An analytical framework for quantifying wildland fire risk and fuel treatment benefit

    Treesearch

    Joe H. Scott

    2006-01-01

    Federal wildland fire management programs have readily embraced the practice of fuel treatment. Wildland fire risk is quantified as expected annual loss ($ yr –1 or $ yr –1 ac –1). Fire risk at a point on the landscape is a function of the probability of burning at that point, the relative frequency...

  7. Funding fuels management in the national park service: costs and benefits

    Treesearch

    Stephen J. Botti

    1995-01-01

    Despite a quarter of a century of prescribed burning by the National Park Service (NPS) in California, there is reason to believe that the fuels situation is getting worse rather than better. The area burned in the past 10 years has declined by 42 percent compared to the previous 10 years. The total area burned per year from wildfire and prescribed fire is...

  8. Benefits of utilizing CellProfiler as a characterization tool for U-10Mo nuclear fuel

    DOE PAGES

    Collette, R.; Douglas, J.; Patterson, L.; ...

    2015-05-01

    Automated image processing techniques have the potential to aid in the performance evaluation of nuclear fuels by eliminating judgment calls that may vary from person-to-person or sample-to-sample. Analysis of in-core fuel performance is required for design and safety evaluations related to almost every aspect of the nuclear fuel cycle. This study presents a methodology for assessing the quality of uranium-molybdenum fuel images and describes image analysis routines designed for the characterization of several important microstructural properties. The analyses are performed in CellProfiler, an open-source program designed to enable biologists without training in computer vision or programming to automatically extract cellularmore » measurements from large image sets. The quality metric scores an image based on three parameters: the illumination gradient across the image, the overall focus of the image, and the fraction of the image that contains scratches. The metric presents the user with the ability to ‘pass’ or ‘fail’ an image based on a reproducible quality score. Passable images may then be characterized through a separate CellProfiler pipeline, which enlists a variety of common image analysis techniques. The results demonstrate the ability to reliably pass or fail images based on the illumination, focus, and scratch fraction of the image, followed by automatic extraction of morphological data with respect to fission gas voids, interaction layers, and grain boundaries.« less

  9. Benefits of utilizing CellProfiler as a characterization tool for U-10Mo nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Collette, R.; Douglas, J.; Patterson, L.; Bahun, G.; King, J.; Keiser, D.; Schulthess, J.

    2015-05-01

    Automated image processing techniques have the potential to aid in the performance evaluation of nuclear fuels by eliminating judgment calls that may vary from person-to-person or sample-to-sample. Analysis of in-core fuel performance is required for design and safety evaluations related to almost every aspect of the nuclear fuel cycle. This study presents a methodology for assessing the quality of uranium-molybdenum fuel images and describes image analysis routines designed for the characterization of several important microstructural properties. The analyses are performed in CellProfiler, an open-source program designed to enable biologists without training in computer vision or programming to automatically extract cellular measurements from large image sets. The quality metric scores an image based on three parameters: the illumination gradient across the image, the overall focus of the image, and the fraction of the image that contains scratches. The metric presents the user with the ability to ‘pass’ or ‘fail’ an image based on a reproducible quality score. Passable images may then be characterized through a separate CellProfiler pipeline, which enlists a variety of common image analysis techniques. The results demonstrate the ability to reliably pass or fail images based on the illumination, focus, and scratch fraction of the image, followed by automatic extraction of morphological data with respect to fission gas voids, interaction layers, and grain boundaries.

  10. Using fire to increase the scale, benefits and future maintenance of fuels treatments

    Treesearch

    Malcolm P. North; Brandon M. Collins; Scott L Stephens

    2012-01-01

    The Forest Service is implementing a new planning rule and starting to revise forest plans for many of the 155 National Forests. In forests that historically had frequent fire regimes, the scale of current fuels reduction treatments has often been too limited to affect fire severity and the Forest Service has predominantly focused on suppression. In addition to...

  11. E-health: potential benefits and challenges in providing and accessing sexual health services

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background E-health has become a burgeoning field in which health professionals and health consumers create and seek information. E-health refers to internet-based health care and information delivery and seeks to improve health service locally, regionally and worldwide. E-sexual health presents new opportunities to provide online sexual health services irrespective of gender, age, sexual orientation and location. Discussion The paper used the dimensions of the RE-AIM model (reach, efficacy, adoption, implementation and maintenance) as a guiding principle to discuss potentials of E-health in providing and accessing sexual health services. There are important issues in relation to utilising and providing online sexual health services. For healthcare providers, e-health can act as an opportunity to enhance their clients’ sexual health care by facilitating communication with full privacy and confidentiality, reducing administrative costs and improving efficiency and flexibility as well as market sexual health services and products. Sexual health is one of the common health topics which both younger and older people explore on the internet and they increasingly prefer sexual health education to be interactive, non-discriminate and anonymous. This commentary presents and discusses the benefits of e-sexual health and provides recommendations towards addressing some of the emerging challenges. Future directions The provision of sexual health services can be enhanced through E-health technology. Doing this can empower consumers to engage with information technology to enhance their sexual health knowledge and quality of life and address some of the stigma associated with diversity in sexualities and sexual health experiences. In addition, e-sexual health may better support and enhance the relationship between consumers and their health care providers across different locations. However, a systematic and focused approach to research and the application of findings in

  12. Vermont Yankee's benefits and concerns operating with Axially zoned GE9 fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Woehlke, R.A. )

    1993-01-01

    Vermont Yankee (VY) is a 368-assembly, D-lattice, boiling water reactor (BWR)/4. The current cycle 16 contains 252 GE9 assemblies with axial zoning of gadolinium and enrichment, 112 GE8 assemblies with axially zoned gadolinium, and 4 Siemens 9 x 9-IX lead qualification assemblies. In this paper, the performance of the GE9-dominated core is evaluated against previous cores containing less sophisticated fuel designs.

  13. Benefits of utilizing CellProfiler as a characterization tool for U–10Mo nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Collette, R.; Douglas, J.; Patterson, L.; Bahun, G.; King, J.; Keiser, D.; Schulthess, J.

    2015-07-15

    Automated image processing techniques have the potential to aid in the performance evaluation of nuclear fuels by eliminating judgment calls that may vary from person-to-person or sample-to-sample. Analysis of in-core fuel performance is required for design and safety evaluations related to almost every aspect of the nuclear fuel cycle. This study presents a methodology for assessing the quality of uranium–molybdenum fuel images and describes image analysis routines designed for the characterization of several important microstructural properties. The analyses are performed in CellProfiler, an open-source program designed to enable biologists without training in computer vision or programming to automatically extract cellular measurements from large image sets. The quality metric scores an image based on three parameters: the illumination gradient across the image, the overall focus of the image, and the fraction of the image that contains scratches. The metric presents the user with the ability to ‘pass’ or ‘fail’ an image based on a reproducible quality score. Passable images may then be characterized through a separate CellProfiler pipeline, which enlists a variety of common image analysis techniques. The results demonstrate the ability to reliably pass or fail images based on the illumination, focus, and scratch fraction of the image, followed by automatic extraction of morphological data with respect to fission gas voids, interaction layers, and grain boundaries. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • A technique is developed to score U–10Mo FIB-SEM image quality using CellProfiler. • The pass/fail metric is based on image illumination, focus, and area scratched. • Automated image analysis is performed in pipeline fashion to characterize images. • Fission gas void, interaction layer, and grain boundary coverage data is extracted. • Preliminary characterization results demonstrate consistency of the algorithm.

  14. Short- and long-term effects on fuels, forest structure, and wildfire potential from prescribed fire and resource benefit fire in southwestern forests, USA

    Treesearch

    Molly E. Hunter; Jose M. Iniguez; Leigh B. Lentile

    2011-01-01

    Prescribed and resource benefit fires are used to manage fuels in fire-prone landscapes in the Southwest. These practices, however, typically occur under different conditions, potentially leading to differences in fire behavior and effects. The objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of recent prescribed fires, resource benefit fires, and repeated...

  15. IEEE 802.16J-Relay Fortified Aeromacs Networks; Benefits and Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamali, Behnam; Apaza, Rafael D.

    2014-01-01

    Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS) is an IEEE 802.16 standard-based (WiMAX) broadband aviation transmission technology, developed to provide safety critical communications coverage for airport surface in support of fixed and mobile ground to ground applications and services. We have previously demonstrated that IEEE 802.16j-amendment-based WiMAX is most feasible for AeroMACS applications. The principal argument in favor of application of IEEE 802.16j technology is the flexible and cost effective extension of radio coverage that is afforded by relay fortified WiMAX networks, with virtually no increase in the power requirements. In this article, following introductory remarks on airport surface communications, WiMAX and AeroMACS; the IEEE 802.16j-based WiMAX technology and multihop relay systems are briefly described. The two modes of relay operation supported by IEEE 802.16j amendment; i.e., transparent (TRS) and non-transparent (NTRS) modes, are discussed in some detail. Advantages and disadvantages of using TRS and NTRS in AeroMACS networks are summarized in a table. Practical issues vis--vis the inclusion of relays in AeroMACS networks are addressed. It is argued that the selection of relay type may affect a number of network parameters. A discussion on specific benefits and challenges of inclusion of relays in AeroMACS networks is provided. The article concludes that in case it is desired or necessary to exclusively employ one type of relay mode for all applications throughout an AeroMACS network, the proper selection would be the non-transparent mode.

  16. The Challenges and Benefits of Using Computer Technology for Communication and Teaching in the Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairley, J. P.; Hinds, J. J.

    2003-12-01

    The advent of the World Wide Web in the early 1990s not only revolutionized the exchange of ideas and information within the scientific community, but also provided educators with a new array of teaching, informational, and promotional tools. Use of computer graphics and animation to explain concepts and processes can stimulate classroom participation and student interest in the geosciences, which has historically attracted students with strong spatial and visualization skills. In today's job market, graduates are expected to have knowledge of computers and the ability to use them for acquiring, processing, and visually analyzing data. Furthermore, in addition to promoting visibility and communication within the scientific community, computer graphics and the Internet can be informative and educational for the general public. Although computer skills are crucial for earth science students and educators, many pitfalls exist in implementing computer technology and web-based resources into research and classroom activities. Learning to use these new tools effectively requires a significant time commitment and careful attention to the source and reliability of the data presented. Furthermore, educators have a responsibility to ensure that students and the public understand the assumptions and limitations of the materials presented, rather than allowing them to be overwhelmed by "gee-whiz" aspects of the technology. We present three examples of computer technology in the earth sciences classroom: 1) a computer animation of water table response to well pumping, 2) a 3-D fly-through animation of a fault controlled valley, and 3) a virtual field trip for an introductory geology class. These examples demonstrate some of the challenges and benefits of these new tools, and encourage educators to expand the responsible use of computer technology for teaching and communicating scientific results to the general public.

  17. Business Education Students' Evaluation of the Benefits and Challenges Confronting Student Industrial Works Experience Scheme in Edo and Delta States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olumese, H. A.; Ediagbonya, Kennedy

    2016-01-01

    This research paper specifically investigated Business Education students' evaluation of the benefits and challenges confronting Student Industrial Works Experience Scheme (SIWES) in Edo and Delta States. Two research questions were raised to guide the study and were answered descriptively. The descriptive survey research design was adopted for…

  18. Benefits and Challenges of Technology in High Schools: A Voice from Educational Leaders with a Freire Echo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston, Jane P.; Wiebe, Sean; Gabriel, Martha; McAuley, Alexander; Campbell, Barbara; MacDonald, Ron

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to document the perceptions of school leaders pertaining to the benefits and challenges of technology in high schools located on Prince Edward Island (PEI) (Canada). For this qualitative study, we interviewed 11 educational leaders representing the PEI Department of Education, principals, vice-principals, and…

  19. The Interactive Whiteboard: Uses, Benefits, and Challenges. A Survey of 11,683 Students and 1,131 Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karsenti, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Over the past five years, the interactive whiteboard (IWB) has been massively introduced into schools across the province of Quebec, Canada. This study explores how the IWB is being used, and the associated benefits and challenges. Data on 11,683 students (from 4th year elementary to grade 12) and 1,131 teachers were collected with five…

  20. Insights of Public High School Teachers and Administrators Regarding the Benefits and Challenges of Co-Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dagna, Jeanne M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the benefits and challenges of co-teaching, as self-reported by high school general education teachers, special education teachers, and administrators and determine if they shared common beliefs regarding supporting students with special needs within the general education curriculum. Participants included…

  1. Benefits and Challenges of Technology in High Schools: A Voice from Educational Leaders with a Freire Echo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston, Jane P.; Wiebe, Sean; Gabriel, Martha; McAuley, Alexander; Campbell, Barbara; MacDonald, Ron

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to document the perceptions of school leaders pertaining to the benefits and challenges of technology in high schools located on Prince Edward Island (PEI) (Canada). For this qualitative study, we interviewed 11 educational leaders representing the PEI Department of Education, principals, vice-principals, and…

  2. An Overview of the Use of Phase Change Materials for the Thermal Management of Transient Portable Electronics: Benefits and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischer, Amy S.

    This paper provides an overview of the implementation of phase change materials to absorb thermal energy in transient electronics. A thorough review of existing literature is included with an emphasis on the evolution of the technology, its potential benefits and the remaining challenges to its implementation.

  3. PBL in the Era of Reform Standards: Challenges and Benefits Perceived by Teachers in One Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nariman, Nahid; Chrispeels, Janet

    2016-01-01

    We explore teachers' efforts to implement problem-based learning (PBL) in an elementary school serving predominantly English learners. Teachers had an opportunity to implement the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) using PBL in a summer school setting with no test-pressures. To understand the challenges and benefits of PBL implementation, a…

  4. What Challenges and Benefits Can Non-Formal Law and Language Integrated Learning Bring to University Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atabekova, Atabekova; Gorbatenko, Rimma; Belousov, Aleksandr; Grebnev, Ruslan; Sheremetieva, Olga

    2016-01-01

    The paper explores the ways in which non-formal content and language integrated learning within university studies can affect students' academic progress. The research has included theoretical and empirical studies. The article focuses on the observation of students' learning process, draws attention to challenges and benefits students experienced…

  5. Benefits and Challenges of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) Integration in Québec English Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabah, Jihan

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigated teachers' and educational consultants' perceptions of ICT integration in Québec English Schools, specifically with regards to the benefits and challenges of ICT integration therein. 23 teachers and educational consultants from seven different school boards participated in the focus group sessions. Results revealed higher…

  6. PBL in the Era of Reform Standards: Challenges and Benefits Perceived by Teachers in One Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nariman, Nahid; Chrispeels, Janet

    2016-01-01

    We explore teachers' efforts to implement problem-based learning (PBL) in an elementary school serving predominantly English learners. Teachers had an opportunity to implement the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) using PBL in a summer school setting with no test-pressures. To understand the challenges and benefits of PBL implementation, a…

  7. Potential benefits of solar reflective car shells: cooler cabins, fuel savings and emission reductions

    SciTech Connect

    Levinson, Ronnen; Pan, Heng; Ban-Weiss, George; Rosado, Pablo; Paolini, Riccardo; Akbari, Hashem

    2011-05-11

    Abstract: Vehicle thermal loads and air conditioning ancillary loads are strongly influenced by the absorption of solar energy. The adoption of solar reflective coatings for opaque surfaces of the vehicle shell can decrease the ?soak? temperature of the air in the cabin of a vehicle parked in the sun, potentially reducing the vehicle?s ancillary load and improving its fuel economy by permitting the use of a smaller air conditioner. An experimental comparison of otherwise identical black and silver compact sedans indicated that increasing the solar reflectance (?) of the car?s shell by about 0.5 lowered the soak temperature of breath-level air by about 5?6?C. Thermal analysis predicts that the air conditioning capacity required to cool the cabin air in the silver car to 25?C within 30min is 13percent less than that required in the black car. Assuming that potential reductions in AC capacity and engine ancillary load scale linearly with increase in shell solar reflectance, ADVISOR simulations of the SC03 driving cycle indicate that substituting a typical cool-colored shell (?=0.35) for a black shell (?=0.05) would reduce fuel consumption by 0.12L per 100km (1.1percent), increasing fuel economy by 0.10kmL?1 [0.24mpg] (1.1percent). It would also decrease carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by 2.7gkm?1 (1.1percent), nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions by 5.4mgkm?1 (0.44percent), carbon monoxide (CO) emissions by 17mgkm?1 (0.43percent), and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions by 4.1mgkm?1 (0.37percent). Selecting a typical white or silver shell (?=0.60) instead of a black shell would lower fuel consumption by 0.21L per 100km (1.9percent), raising fuel economy by 0.19kmL?1 [0.44mpg] (2.0percent). It would also decrease CO2 emissions by 4.9gkm?1 (1.9percent), NOx emissions by 9.9mgkm?1 (0.80percent), CO emissions by 31mgkm?1 (0.79percent), and HC emissions by 7.4mgkm?1 (0.67percent). Our simulations may underestimate emission reductions because emissions in standardized driving cycles are

  8. Challenges faced when using radiocarbon measurements to estimate fossil fuel emissions in the UK.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenger, A.; O'Doherty, S.; Rigby, M. L.; Ganesan, A.; Manning, A.; Allen, G.

    2015-12-01

    Estimating the anthropogenic component of carbon dioxide emissions from direct atmospheric measurements is difficult, due to the large natural carbon dioxide fluxes. One way of determining the fossil fuel component of atmospheric carbon dioxide is the use of radiocarbon measurements. Whilst carbon reservoirs with a reasonably fast carbon exchange rate all have a similar radiocarbon content, fossil fuels are completely devoid of radiocarbon due to their age. Previous studies have 14CO2 (UK) this approach is compromised by the high density of 14CO2 emitting nuclear power plants. Of the 16 nuclear reactors in the UK, 14 are advanced gas cooled reactors, which have one of the highest 14CO2 emission rates of all reactor types. These radiocarbon emissions not only lead to a serious underestimation of the recently added fossil fuel CO2, by masking the depletion of 14C in CO2, but can in fact overshadow the depletion by a factor of 2 or more. While a correction for this enhancement can be applied, the emissions from the nuclear power plants are highly variable, and an accurate correction is therefore not straightforward. We present the first attempt to quantify UK fossil fuel CO2 emissions through the use of 14CO2. We employ a sampling strategy that makes use of a Lagrangian particle dispersion model, in combination with nuclear industry emission estimates, to forecast "good" sampling times, in an attempt to minimize the correction due to emissions from the nuclear industry. As part of the Greenhouse gAs Uk and Global Emissions (GAUGE) project, 14CO2measurements are performed at two measurement sites in the UK and Ireland, as well as during science flights around the UK. The measurement locations have been chosen with a focus on high emitting regions such as London and the Midlands. We discuss the unique challenges that face the determination of fossil fuel emissions through radiocarbon measurements in the UK and our sampling strategy to deal with them. In addition we

  9. Benefits analysis for the production of fuels and chemicals using solar thermal energy. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1982-05-01

    Numerous possibilities exist for using high temperature solar thermal energy in the production of various chemicals and fuels (Sun Fuels). Research and development activities have focused on the use of feedstocks such as coal and biomass to provide synthesis gas, hydrogen, and a variety of other end-products. A Decision Analysis technique geared to the analysis of Sun Fuels options was developed. Conventional scoring methods were combined with multi-attribute utility analysis in a new approach called the Multi-Attribute Preference Scoring (MAPS) system. MAPS calls for the designation of major categories of attributes which describe critical elements of concern for the processes being examined. The six major categories include: Process Demonstration; Full-Scale Process, Feedstock; End-Product Market; National/Social Considerations; and Economics. MAPS calls for each attribute to be weighted on a simple scale for all of the candidate processes. Next, a weight is assigned to each attribute, thus creating a multiplier to be used with each individual value to derive a comparative weighting. Last, each of the categories of attributes themselves are weighted, thus creating another multiplier, for use in developing an overall score. With sufficient information and industry input, each process can be ultimately compared using a single figure of merit. After careful examination of available information, it was decided that only six of the 20 candidate processes were adequately described to allow a complete MAPS analysis which would allow direct comparisons for illustrative purposes. These six processes include three synthesis gas processes, two hydrogen and one ammonia. The remaining fourteen processes were subjected to only a partial MAPS assessment.

  10. Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    The Alternative Motor Fuels Act of 1988 (Public Law 100-494), Section 400EE, states that the Secretary of Energy ...shall study methanol plants, including the costs and practicability of such plants that are (A) capable of utilizing current domestic supplies of unutilized natural gas; (B) relocatable; or (C) suitable for natural gas to methanol conversion by natural gas distribution companies...'' The purpose of this report is to characterize unutilized gas within the lower 48 states and to perform an economic analysis of methanol plants required by the act. The approach with regard to unutilized lower 48 gas is to (1) compare the costs of converting such gas to methanol against the expected price of gasoline over the next 20 years, and (2) compare the economics of converting such gas to methanol against the economics of using the gas as a pipeline-transported fuel. This study concludes that remote gas and low-Btu gas generally cannot be converted to methanol at costs near the expected competitive value of gasoline because of the poor economies of scale of small methanol plants.

  11. Benefits of a Graduate Business Degree: Students' Perspectives and Universities' Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Marion Stanton; Allen, Lida Cherie

    1995-01-01

    A survey of 1,499 graduate business students at 7 colleges and universities investigated perceptions of potential benefits of an advanced degree, and their relationships with degree type, school size/type, and student characteristics. Five perceived benefits included research and analytical skills, competitive advantage, monetary reward, career…

  12. Video observation in HIT development: lessons learned on benefits and challenges.

    PubMed

    Høstgaard, Anna Marie; Bertelsen, Pernille

    2012-08-22

    Experience shows that the precondition for the development of successful health information technologies is a thorough insight into clinical work practice. In contemporary clinical work practice, clinical work and health information technology are integrated, and part of the practice is tacit. When work practice becomes routine, it slips to the background of the conscious awareness and becomes difficult to recognize without the context to support recall. This means that it is difficult to capture with traditional ethnographic research methods or in usability laboratories or clinical set ups. Observation by the use of the video technique within healthcare settings has proven to be capable of providing a thorough insight into the complex clinical work practice and its context - including parts of the tacit practice. The objective of this paper is 1) to argue for the video observation technique to inform and improve health-information-technology development and 2) to share insights and lessons learned on benefits and challenges when using the video observation technique within healthcare settings. A multiple case study including nine case studies conducted by DaCHI researchers 2004-2011 using audio-visual, non-participant video observation for data collection within different healthcare settings. In HIT development, video observation is beneficial for 1) informing and improving system design 2) studying changes in work practice 3) identifying new potentials and 4) documenting current work practices. The video observation technique used within healthcare settings is superior to other ethnographic research methods when it comes to disclosing the complexity in clinical work practice. The insights gained are far more realistic compared to traditional ethnographic studies or usability studies and studies in clinical set ups. Besides, the data generated through video recordings provide a solid basis for dialog between the health care professionals involved. The most

  13. Video observation in HIT development: lessons learned on benefits and challenges

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Experience shows that the precondition for the development of successful health information technologies is a thorough insight into clinical work practice. In contemporary clinical work practice, clinical work and health information technology are integrated, and part of the practice is tacit. When work practice becomes routine, it slips to the background of the conscious awareness and becomes difficult to recognize without the context to support recall. This means that it is difficult to capture with traditional ethnographic research methods or in usability laboratories or clinical set ups. Observation by the use of the video technique within healthcare settings has proven to be capable of providing a thorough insight into the complex clinical work practice and its context - including parts of the tacit practice. The objective of this paper is 1) to argue for the video observation technique to inform and improve health-information-technology development and 2) to share insights and lessons learned on benefits and challenges when using the video observation technique within healthcare settings. Methods A multiple case study including nine case studies conducted by DaCHI researchers 2004–2011 using audio-visual, non-participant video observation for data collection within different healthcare settings. Results In HIT development, video observation is beneficial for 1) informing and improving system design 2) studying changes in work practice 3) identifying new potentials and 4) documenting current work practices. Conclusions The video observation technique used within healthcare settings is superior to other ethnographic research methods when it comes to disclosing the complexity in clinical work practice. The insights gained are far more realistic compared to traditional ethnographic studies or usability studies and studies in clinical set ups. Besides, the data generated through video recordings provide a solid basis for dialog between the health care

  14. Noise control at fossil fuel power plants: an industrywide assessment of costs and benefits. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, R.M.

    1983-12-01

    This report presents the results of a study on the costs and perceived benefits of noise control measures currently installed at fossil power plants. Information for this study was sought from the entire fossil power plant industry in this country through a questionnaire survey and through discussions with utility personnel. A total of 84 power companies responded with information on plants. In addition, five power plants with extensive noise control measures were selected for detailed study. For these plants, case histories were prepared following plant visits and discussions with utility personnel regarding the specific noise control measures. Based on these case histories and the results of the questionnaire survey, noise control costs and perceived benefits are presented for major power plant equipment categories including draft fans, boiler feed pumps, turbine-generator systems, valves, and transformers. 12 references, 14 figures, 7 tables.

  15. Benefits and challenges of multi-level learner rural general practices--an interview study with learners, staff and patients.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Tracy; Brown, James; Bryant, Melanie; Nestel, Debra

    2014-10-24

    General practices vary in the provision of training and education. Some practices have training as a major focus with the presence of multi-level learners and others host single learner groups or none at all. This study investigates the educational benefits and challenges associated with 'multi-level learner' practices. This paper comprised three case studies of rural general practices with multiple levels of learners. Qualitative data were collected from 29 interviews with learners (n = 12), staff (n = 12) and patients (n = 5). Interviews were initially analyzed using open and axial coding and thematic analysis. Thematic analysis showed 'multi-level learning' in general practices has benefits and challenges to learners and the practice. Learner benefits included knowledge exchange, the opportunity for vertical peer learning, a positive learning environment and the development of a supportive network. The presence of multi-level learners promoted sharing of knowledge with all staff, a sense of community, an increase in patient services and enthused supervisors. Challenges for learners included perception of decreased access to supervisors, anxiety with peer observation, reduced access to patient presentations and patient reluctance to be seen by a learner. Practice challenges were administration requirements, high learner turnover, infrastructure requirements and the requirement for supervisors to cater to a range of learner level needs. The presence of medical students, interns and registrars in general practice has educational benefits to the learners extending to the other stakeholders (staff and patients). Multi-level learners present challenges to the learners and the practice by increasing pressures on resources, staff (administrative and supervisors) and infrastructure.

  16. Microbial fuel cells and osmotic membrane bioreactors have mutual benefits for wastewater treatment and energy production.

    PubMed

    Hou, Dianxun; Lu, Lu; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2016-07-01

    This study demonstrates that microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and osmotic membrane bioreactors (OMBRs) can be mutually beneficial when integrated together for wastewater treatment. When connecting MFCs with OMBRs, the solute buildup increased conductivity and buffer capacity, which greatly increased MFC power density from 3 W/m(3) up to 11.5 W/m(3). In turn, the MFCs conditioned and reduced sludge production and therefore reduced forward osmosis (FO) membrane fouling. The MFC-OMBR equipped with new thin-film composite (TFC) membrane showed excellent organic (>95%) and phosphorus removal (>99%) and therefore maintained effluent sCOD below 20 mg/L. However, the nitrogen removal was limited due to the negative surface charge of the thin-film composite membrane and solution chemistry, which led to higher flux of ammonium toward the OMBR draw solution. Further studies are needed to improve nitrogen removal, reduce fouling, and optimize system integration.

  17. Parent-Infant Skin-to-Skin Contact Following Birth: History, Benefits, and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Jessie Marie; Gattman, Kindsey Rae

    2017-03-01

    It is a practice with strong roots in nature and has a significant influence on health outcomes, particularly for at-risk newborns in low-resource settings. In this comprehensive review, benefits of SSC for newborns, mothers, and fathers after vaginal and cesarean births are discussed as well as the benefits of SSC observed for infants in the NICU. Barriers to SSC practice implementation are discussed, and proposed solutions and recommendations are offered. By understanding the many benefits of SSC and strategies for implementation, health care providers can best support and promote this high-quality, evidence-based practice with mothers, newborns, and their families.

  18. Developing IT Infrastructure for Rural Hospitals: A Case Study of Benefits and Challenges of Hospital-to-Hospital Partnerships

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Madhu C.; Purao, Sandeep; Kelly, Mary

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a study identifying benefits and challenges of a novel hospital-to-hospital information technology (IT) outsourcing partnership (HHP). The partnership is an innovative response to the problem that many smaller, rural hospitals face: to modernize their IT infrastructure in spite of a severe shortage of resources. The investigators studied three rural hospitals that outsourced their IT infrastructure, through an HHP, to a larger, more technologically advanced hospital in the region. The study design was based on purposive sampling and interviews of senior managers from the four hospitals. The results highlight the HHP's benefits and challenges from both the rural hospitals' and vendor hospital's perspectives. The HHP was considered a success: a key outcome was that it has improved the rural hospitals' IT infrastructure at an affordable cost. The investigators discuss key elements for creating a successful HHP and offer preliminary answers to the question of what it takes for an HHP to be successful. PMID:18436901

  19. An overview of current practice in external beam radiation oncology with consideration to potential benefits and challenges for nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    King, Raymond B; McMahon, Stephen J; Hyland, Wendy B; Jain, Suneil; Butterworth, Karl T; Prise, Kevin M; Hounsell, Alan R; McGarry, Conor K

    2017-01-01

    Over the past two decades, there has been a significant evolution in the technologies and techniques employed within the radiation oncology environment. Over the same period, extensive research into the use of nanotechnology in medicine has highlighted a range of potential benefits to its incorporation into clinical radiation oncology. This short communication describes key tools and techniques that have recently been introduced into specific stages of a patient's radiotherapy pathway, including diagnosis, external beam treatment and subsequent follow-up. At each pathway stage, consideration is given towards how nanotechnology may be combined with clinical developments to further enhance their benefit, with some potential opportunities for future research also highlighted. Prospective challenges that may influence the introduction of nanotechnology into clinical radiotherapy are also discussed, indicating the need for close collaboration between academic and clinical staff to realise the full clinical benefit of this exciting technology.

  20. Actinide ion extraction using room temperature ionic liquids: opportunities and challenges for nuclear fuel cycle applications.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Prasanta Kumar

    2017-02-14

    Studies on the extraction of actinide ions from radioactive feeds have great relevance in nuclear fuel cycle activities, mainly in the back end processes focused on reprocessing and waste management. Room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) based diluents are becoming increasingly popular due to factors such as more efficient extraction vis-à-vis molecular diluents, higher metal loading, higher radiation resistance, etc. The fascinating chemistry of the actinide ions in RTIL based solvent systems due to complex extraction mechanisms makes it a challenging area of research. By the suitable tuning of the cationic and anionic parts of the ionic liquids, their physical properties such as density, dielectric constant and viscosity can be changed which are considered key parameters in metal ion extraction. Aqueous solubility of the RTILs, which can lead to significant loss in the solvent inventory, can be avoided by appending the extractant moieties onto the ionic liquid. While the low vapour pressure and non-flammability of the ionic liquids make them appear as 'green' diluents, their aqueous solubility raises concerns of environmental hazards. The present article gives a summary of studies carried out on actinide ion extraction and presents perspectives of its applications in the nuclear fuel cycle. The article discusses various extractants used for actinide ion extraction and at many places, comparison is made vis-à-vis molecular diluents which includes the nature of the extracted species and the mechanism of extraction. Results of studies on rare earth elements are also included in view of their similarities with the trivalent minor actinides.

  1. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2016 Designing Greener Chemicals and Specific Environmental Benefit: Climate Change Awards

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2016 award winner, Newlight Technologies, developed a net carbon negative plastic made from methane-based GHG. It is cheaper than petroleum-based plastic; used to make cell phone cases, furniture, and other products.

  2. Medical education in the electronic medical record (EMR) era: benefits, challenges, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Michael J; Pageler, Natalie M; Kahana, Madelyn; Pantaleoni, Julie L; Longhurst, Christopher A

    2013-06-01

    In the last decade, electronic medical record (EMR) use in academic medical centers has increased. Although many have lauded the clinical and operational benefits of EMRs, few have considered the effect these systems have on medical education. The authors review what has been documented about the effect of EMR use on medical learners through the lens of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's six core competencies for medical education. They examine acknowledged benefits and educational risks to use of EMRs, consider factors that promote their successful use when implemented in academic environments, and identify areas of future research and optimization of EMRs' role in medical education.

  3. [Challenges for clinical trials in oncology within the scope of early benefit assessment of drugs].

    PubMed

    Lange, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Until May 31, 2015 the German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) conducted 108 assessments for various diseases on the basis of 103 dossiers within the scope of the early benefit assessment of drugs pursuant to the Act on the Reform of the Market for Medicinal Products (AMNOG). 29 of these assessments (28 dossiers) referred to advanced stages of oncologic (including neoplastic-hematologic) diseases. In 21 of these 29 assessments (72%), IQWiG found an added benefit for at least one subpopulation or subgroup, compared to 33% with non-oncologic diseases. For oncologic diseases, the extent of benefit was classified as "major" in six assessments (21%), compared to 5% for non-oncologic disorders. In contrast, the conclusions of the oncologic studies were less certain: only one assessment provided proof (of an added benefit); for non-oncologic diseases, this was the case in eight assessments. A distinctive methodological feature of the available oncologic studies is that, as a rule, treatment switching was planned in the event of progression (normally on the basis of imaging or laboratory findings) and that shortly afterwards the follow-up of important endpoints (adverse events and patient-reported outcomes) was normally discontinued. In particular, the pre-specified option in the study protocol allowing the control group to switch treatment to the experimental intervention after progression ("protocol-permitted treatment switches") makes it extremely difficult to interpret the results beyond the outcome "progression" (or progression-free survival). This treatment switching is mostly justified by reference to ethical necessity. This, however, alleges that the experimental intervention (i. e., the new drug) is superior to the control intervention, which means that circular reasoning is unavoidable. But despite this, oncologic studies are better than their reputation. Hence, so far the results of the early benefit assessment of new drugs (regarding

  4. The benefits and challenges of the Family Health Strategy in Brazilian Primary Health care: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Arantes, Luciano José; Shimizu, Helena Eri; Merchán-Hamann, Edgar

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze what contributions the Family Health Strategy has made towards the development of primary healthcare in Brazil, and what challenges it faces. A literature review was conducted and articles were analyzed from three dimensions: political/institutional, organizational, and technical/healthcare. In the first dimension, the Family Health Strategy was found to have helped expand primary healthcare, the institutionalization of evaluations, and the promotion of equity. The main challenges identified were funding, the training, education, and management of personnel, and cross-sectoral action. In terms of organization, the benefits include a broader supply of services, access to health services through organized initiatives for specific diseases or age groups, and more comprehensive healthcare. The challenges involve access, the entry point, integration with the healthcare network, planning, and social participation. As for technical/healthcare considerations, the main benefits identified were the fostering of multidisciplinary working practices, family focus, reception, rapport, humanization, community orientation, production of care, and performance. The challenges for its improvement are associated with complex factors and require greater political/institutional effort.

  5. Service-Learning in Supply Chain Management: Benefits, Challenges and Best Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenherr, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Service-learning (SL) is a pedagogical approach in which students are assigned a course-related project in a not-for-profit organization, and are tasked to apply course content to execute the project. While the benefits are multifarious, only recently have supply chain management (SCM) courses adapted this innovative teaching methodology. The…

  6. Service-Learning in Supply Chain Management: Benefits, Challenges and Best Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenherr, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Service-learning (SL) is a pedagogical approach in which students are assigned a course-related project in a not-for-profit organization, and are tasked to apply course content to execute the project. While the benefits are multifarious, only recently have supply chain management (SCM) courses adapted this innovative teaching methodology. The…

  7. Analyzing the Extensive Reading Approach: Benefits and Challenges in the Mexican Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varona Archer, Aurora

    2012-01-01

    Some scholars have highlighted the benefits of using extensive reading as a way to motivate students to learn a second language (L2). This article is derived from a study that aimed at implementing extensive reading in an action research project in a public University in Mexico. Therefore, the following article examines some arguments of different…

  8. Religious Challenges to School Voucher and Tax Benefit/Scholarship Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Martha

    2016-01-01

    A key component of current school reform efforts focuses on increasing parental choice through voucher systems and programs that provide tax benefits for contributions to scholarship programs for private school tuition. Indeed, proposals to adopt such programs have been or currently are being considered in four-fifths of the states, and about half…

  9. Religious Challenges to School Voucher and Tax Benefit/Scholarship Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Martha

    2016-01-01

    A key component of current school reform efforts focuses on increasing parental choice through voucher systems and programs that provide tax benefits for contributions to scholarship programs for private school tuition. Indeed, proposals to adopt such programs have been or currently are being considered in four-fifths of the states, and about half…

  10. Implementing Structured English Immersion in Arizona: Benefits, Costs, Challenges, and Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rios-Aguilar, Cecilia; Gonzalez-Canche, Manuel; Moll, Luis C.

    2010-01-01

    This study conducted telephone interviews with 26 randomly selected English Language Coordinators from 26 Arizona school districts with enrollment patterns that were representative of the state as whole. Three primary questions were posed to the respondents: (a) How is the 4-hour ELD block being implemented?; (b) What are the benefits of the…

  11. Challenges in evaluating influenza vaccine effectiveness and the mortality benefits controversy.

    PubMed

    Nichol, Kristin L

    2009-10-23

    Randomized, controlled trials are the gold standard study design. However, ethical constraints and practical considerations may necessitate other types of studies for evaluating influenza vaccine effectiveness in the elderly--a high priority group for annual vaccination in many countries. Observational studies therefore comprise the bulk of the vaccine effectiveness evidence in older persons, but these types of studies can be susceptible to selection bias and residual confounding. All observational studies should utilize strategies to minimize the impact of bias and confounding. Recent studies questioning the plausibility of reported mortality benefits among vaccinated elderly persons may themselves be based on assumptions that are susceptible to important limitations and multiple biases. Future studies that incorporate prospectively collected information on functional status, life expectancy, and other types of data may provide additional insights into these concerns. At present, even after taking into account the potential for residual bias and confounding, most studies confirm the benefits of vaccination among the elderly for reducing hospitalization and death.

  12. Addressing the challenges of solar thermal fuels via atomic-scale computational design and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolpak, Alexie; Kucharski, Timothy; Grossman, Jeffrey

    2012-02-01

    By reversibly storing solar energy in the conformations of photo-isomers, solar thermal fuels (STFs) provide a mechanism for emissions-free, renewable energy storage and conversion in a single system. Development of STFs as a large-scale energy technology has been hampered by technical challenges that beset the photo-isomers of interest: low energy density, storage lifetime, and quantum yield; UV absorption; and irreversible degradation upon repeated cycling. In this talk, we discuss our efforts to design new STFs that overcome these hurdles. We present computational results on various STFs based on our recently proposed photo-isomer/template STF concept [Kolpak and Grossman, Nano Letters 11, 3156 (2011)], as well as new experimental results on azobenzene-functionalized carbon nanotube STFs. Our approach yields significant improvements with respect to STFs studied in the past, with energy densities similar to Li-ion batteries, storage lifetimes > 1 year, and increased quantum yield and absorption efficiency. Our strategy also suggests mechanisms for inhibiting photo-isomer degradation. With a large phase space yet to be explored, there remain numerous possibilites for property enhancement, suggesting that STFs could become a competitive renewable energy technology.

  13. Biodiesel biorefinery: opportunities and challenges for microbial production of fuels and chemicals from glycerol waste.

    PubMed

    Almeida, João R M; Fávaro, Léia C L; Quirino, Betania F

    2012-07-18

    The considerable increase in biodiesel production worldwide in the last 5 years resulted in a stoichiometric increased coproduction of crude glycerol. As an excess of crude glycerol has been produced, its value on market was reduced and it is becoming a "waste-stream" instead of a valuable "coproduct". The development of biorefineries, i.e. production of chemicals and power integrated with conversion processes of biomass into biofuels, has been singled out as a way to achieve economically viable production chains, valorize residues and coproducts, and reduce industrial waste disposal. In this sense, several alternatives aimed at the use of crude glycerol to produce fuels and chemicals by microbial fermentation have been evaluated. This review summarizes different strategies employed to produce biofuels and chemicals (1,3-propanediol, 2,3-butanediol, ethanol, n-butanol, organic acids, polyols and others) by microbial fermentation of glycerol. Initially, the industrial use of each chemical is briefly presented; then we systematically summarize and discuss the different strategies to produce each chemical, including selection and genetic engineering of producers, and optimization of process conditions to improve yield and productivity. Finally, the impact of the developments obtained until now are placed in perspective and opportunities and challenges for using crude glycerol to the development of biodiesel-based biorefineries are considered. In conclusion, the microbial fermentation of glycerol represents a remarkable alternative to add value to the biodiesel production chain helping the development of biorefineries, which will allow this biofuel to be more competitive.

  14. Higher Education Experiences of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Challenges, Benefits and Support Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hees, Valérie; Moyson, Tinneke; Roeyers, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    The transition into higher education constitutes a precarious life stage for students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Research on how students with ASD navigate college life is needed for the development of adequate support. This study investigated the challenges and support needs of 23 students with ASD in higher education through…

  15. Materials Development in the Colombian Context: Some Considerations about Its Benefits and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramos Holguín, Bertha; Aguirre Morales, Jahir

    2014-01-01

    Materials development is a field of study which has recently acquired significant importance in the Colombian context due to the fact that teachers, as materials developers, consider materials development as an area of knowledge that helps them to improve their teaching practices. However, the rationale, the gains as well as the challenges that…

  16. A Cost-Benefit Analysis of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program. Technical Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez-Arce, Francisco; Constant, Louay; Loughran, David S.; Karoly, Lynn A.

    2012-01-01

    Decades of research show that high school dropouts are more likely than graduates to commit crimes, abuse drugs and alcohol, have children out of wedlock, earn low wages, be unemployed, and suffer from poor health. The ChalleNGe program, currently operating in 27 states, is a residential program coupled with post-residential mentoring that seeks…

  17. The Benefits and Challenges of Becoming Cross-Culturally Competent Counseling Psychologists. Presidential Address

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heppner, P. Paul

    2006-01-01

    The central thesis of this article is that focusing on cross-cultural competence will enhance both the science and the practice of counseling psychology. Developing cross-cultural competence is a lifelong journey, replete with many joys and challenges, that will (a) increase the sophistication of our research, (b) expand the utility and…

  18. Developing and using expert systems and neural networks in medicine: a review on benefits and challenges.

    PubMed

    Sheikhtaheri, Abbas; Sadoughi, Farahnaz; Hashemi Dehaghi, Zahra

    2014-09-01

    Complicacy of clinical decisions justifies utilization of information systems such as artificial intelligence (e.g. expert systems and neural networks) to achieve better decisions, however, application of these systems in the medical domain faces some challenges. We aimed at to review the applications of these systems in the medical domain and discuss about such challenges. Following a brief introduction of expert systems and neural networks by representing few examples, the challenges of these systems in the medical domain are discussed. We found that the applications of expert systems and artificial neural networks have been increased in the medical domain. These systems have shown many advantages such as utilization of experts' knowledge, gaining rare knowledge, more time for assessment of the decision, more consistent decisions, and shorter decision-making process. In spite of all these advantages, there are challenges ahead of developing and using such systems including maintenance, required experts, inputting patients' data into the system, problems for knowledge acquisition, problems in modeling medical knowledge, evaluation and validation of system performance, wrong recommendations and responsibility, limited domains of such systems and necessity of integrating such systems into the routine work flows. We concluded that expert systems and neural networks can be successfully used in medicine; however, there are many concerns and questions to be answered through future studies and discussions.

  19. Benefits and Challenges of the Passport Broadcast Intervention in Long-Term Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Oliver, Debra Parker; Demiris, George; Shaunfield, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Creative activities are a challenge for long-term care facilities. The Passport intervention uses web-based video technology to provide long-term care residents with a virtual travel experience. Passport broadcasts were conducted and staff and residents were interviewed about the experience. A thematic analysis of interviews was used to discern…

  20. Activity-Based Management System Implementation in Higher Education Institution: Benefits and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ismail, Noor Azizi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss how activity-based costing (ABC) technique can be applied in the context of higher education institutions. It also discusses the obstacles and challenges to the successful implementation of activity-based management (ABM) in the higher education environment. Design/methodology/approach: This paper…

  1. Activity-Based Management System Implementation in Higher Education Institution: Benefits and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ismail, Noor Azizi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss how activity-based costing (ABC) technique can be applied in the context of higher education institutions. It also discusses the obstacles and challenges to the successful implementation of activity-based management (ABM) in the higher education environment. Design/methodology/approach: This paper…

  2. A Cost-Benefit Analysis of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program. Technical Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez-Arce, Francisco; Constant, Louay; Loughran, David S.; Karoly, Lynn A.

    2012-01-01

    Decades of research show that high school dropouts are more likely than graduates to commit crimes, abuse drugs and alcohol, have children out of wedlock, earn low wages, be unemployed, and suffer from poor health. The ChalleNGe program, currently operating in 27 states, is a residential program coupled with post-residential mentoring that seeks…

  3. Learning from Learning Journals: The Benefits and Challenges of Using Learning Journal Assignments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varner, Donna; Peck, Sharon R.

    2003-01-01

    Describes a learning journal assignment in an organizational behavior course that is designed to provide practice in management skills, facilitate comprehension and retention, and provide an assessment tool. Discusses challenges in evaluating journals, including differences in style and culture. An appendix gives details on the assignment and…

  4. Benefits and Challenges of the Passport Broadcast Intervention in Long-Term Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Oliver, Debra Parker; Demiris, George; Shaunfield, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Creative activities are a challenge for long-term care facilities. The Passport intervention uses web-based video technology to provide long-term care residents with a virtual travel experience. Passport broadcasts were conducted and staff and residents were interviewed about the experience. A thematic analysis of interviews was used to discern…

  5. The Benefits and Challenges of Special Education Positions in Rural Settings: Listening to the Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Ann B.; Gravelle, Maggie

    2013-01-01

    Special education teachers, through a national survey conducted in 55 rural districts, provided information on the positive and negative aspects of teaching in rural schools. The 203 special educators were asked what they liked best about their position and what they found challenging. Some of the themes identified in the analysis centered on…

  6. Higher Education Experiences of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Challenges, Benefits and Support Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hees, Valérie; Moyson, Tinneke; Roeyers, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    The transition into higher education constitutes a precarious life stage for students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Research on how students with ASD navigate college life is needed for the development of adequate support. This study investigated the challenges and support needs of 23 students with ASD in higher education through…

  7. The benefits and challenges of research centers and institutes in academic medicine: findings from six universities and their medical schools.

    PubMed

    Mallon, William T

    2006-06-01

    To understand the benefits and challenges of using centers and institutes in the academic research enterprise, and to explore institutional strategies that capitalize on the strengths and ameliorate the weaknesses of the center/institute structure. Using a qualitative research design, the author and associates interviewed over 150 faculty members and administrators at six medical schools and their parent universities in 2004. Interview data were transcribed, coded, and analyzed using a grounded theory approach. This methodology generated rich descriptions and explanations of the six institutions, which can produce extrapolations to, but not necessarily findings that are generalizable to, other institutions and settings. Centers and institutes offer a number of benefits to academic institutions. Centers can aid in faculty recruitment and retention, facilitate collaboration in research, secure research resources, offer a sense of community and promote continued learning, afford organizational flexibility, and focus on societal problems and raise funds. Despite their many benefits, centers can also create tensions and present management challenges to institutional leaders. Centers can compete with departments over resources, complicate faculty recruitment, contribute to a fragmented mission, resist effective evaluation, pose governance problems, and impede junior faculty development. Institutional leaders might capitalize on the strengths of centers through three strategies: (1) reward leaders who embrace a collaborative point of view and develop a culture that frowns upon empire building; (2) distinguish among the many entities that share the "center" or "institute" labels; and (3) acknowledge that departments must maintain their place in the organizational milieu.

  8. Post graduate clinical placements: evaluating benefits and challenges with a mixed methods cross sectional design.

    PubMed

    Yiend, Jenny; Tracy, Derek K; Sreenan, Brian; Cardi, Valentina; Foulkes, Tina; Koutsantoni, Katerina; Kravariti, Eugenia; Tchanturia, Kate; Willmott, Lucy; Shergill, Sukhi; Reedy, Gabriel

    2016-02-16

    Systematic evaluations of clinical placements are rare, especially when offered alongside academic postgraduate courses. An evidence-based approach is important to allow pedagogically-driven provision, rather than that solely governed by opinion or market demand. Our evaluation assessed a voluntary clinical placement scheme allied to a mental health course. Data were collected over academic years 2010/11- 2013/14, from participating students (n = 20 to 58) and clinician supervisors (n = 10-12), using a mixed-methods cross-sectional design. Quantitative evaluation captured information on uptake, dropout, resource use, attitudes and experience, using standardized (the Placement Evaluation Questionnaire; the Scale To Assess the Therapeutic Relationship - Clinical version and the University of Toronto Placement Supervisor Evaluation) and bespoke questionnaires and audit data. Qualitative evaluation comprised two focus groups (5 clinicians, 5 students), to investigate attitudes, experience, perceived benefits, disadvantages and desired future developments. Data were analysed using framework analysis to identify a priori and emergent themes. High uptake (around 70 placements per annum), low dropout (2-3 students per annum; 5 %) and positive focus group comments suggested placements successfully provided added value and catered sufficiently to student demand. Students' responses confirmed that placements met expectations and the perception of benefit remained after completion with 70 % (n = 14) reporting an overall positive experience, 75 % (n = 15) reporting a pleasant learning experience, 60 % (n = 12) feeling that their clinical skills were enhanced and 85 % (n = 17) believing that it would benefit other students. Placements contributed the equivalent of seven full time unskilled posts per annum to local health care services. While qualitative data revealed perceived 'mutual benefit' for both students and clinicians, this was qualified by

  9. Coast Guard: Deployable Operations Group Achieving Organizational Benefits, but Challenges Remain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-07

    Forces under Command of the DOG With a total of approximately 3,000 personnel, the Coast Guard’s deployable specialized forces ( DSF ) consist of five...trained and that the DSF community is prepared to meet its broad range of responsibilities. • In particular, DSF units face human resource challenges...did not have a standardized process to manage DSFs and, as a result, independently allocated resources and prioritized operations. • The DOG now

  10. Culinary herbs and spices: their bioactive properties, the contribution of polyphenols and the challenges in deducing their true health benefits.

    PubMed

    Opara, Elizabeth I; Chohan, Magali

    2014-10-22

    Herbs and spices have been used for both culinary and medicinal purposes for centuries. Over the last decade, research into their role as contributors of dietary polyphenols, known to possess a number of properties associated with reducing the risk of developing chronic non-communicable diseases, has increased. However, bearing in mind how these foods are consumed, normally in small quantities and in combination with other foods, it is unclear what their true benefit is from a health perspective. The aim of this review is to use the literature to discuss how preparative and digestive processes, bioavailability and interactions between foods may influence the bioactive properties of these foods, and whether or not polyphenols are responsible for these properties. Furthermore, this review aims to highlight the challenges that need to be addressed so as to determine the true benefits of these foods and the mechanisms of action that underpin their purported efficacy.

  11. Culinary Herbs and Spices: Their Bioactive Properties, the Contribution of Polyphenols and the Challenges in Deducing Their True Health Benefits

    PubMed Central

    Opara, Elizabeth I.; Chohan, Magali

    2014-01-01

    Herbs and spices have been used for both culinary and medicinal purposes for centuries. Over the last decade, research into their role as contributors of dietary polyphenols, known to possess a number of properties associated with reducing the risk of developing chronic non-communicable diseases, has increased. However, bearing in mind how these foods are consumed, normally in small quantities and in combination with other foods, it is unclear what their true benefit is from a health perspective. The aim of this review is to use the literature to discuss how preparative and digestive processes, bioavailability and interactions between foods may influence the bioactive properties of these foods, and whether or not polyphenols are responsible for these properties. Furthermore, this review aims to highlight the challenges that need to be addressed so as to determine the true benefits of these foods and the mechanisms of action that underpin their purported efficacy. PMID:25340982

  12. Enamel protection from acid challenge--benefits of marketed fluoride dentifrices.

    PubMed

    Faller, R V; Eversole, S L

    2013-01-01

    To determine the ability of various marketed dentifrices containing stabilized stannous fluoride (SnF2), sodium fluoride (NaF), or sodium monofluorophosphate (SMFP) to protect enamel against the earliest stages of erosive dietary acid damage using an in vitro enamel protection model. Acid-challenged, extracted human teeth were treated with a 1:3 dilution of dentifrice, rinsed, and then challenged in a controlled series of tests using four dietary acids considered potentially erosive to teeth. Each acid was collected and analyzed to determine the level of mineral (phosphorous) removed from the teeth during the challenge. Post-treatment results were compared to baseline values for each acid. Results for the four acids were averaged and reported as an average percent protection value for each of the dentifrices tested, with higher values representing greater acid protection. The study included six dentifrices formulated with (A) sodium fluoride (NaF), (B) stabilized stannous fluoride (SnF2), (C,D) NaF plus 5% potassium nitrate (KNO3), (E) sodium monofluorophosphate (SMFP), or (F) SMFP plus 8% arginine bicarbonate. The stabilized SnF2 dentifrice demonstrated an average protection score of 39.3%, while products formulated with NaF resulted in protection scores between 11 and 13%. The SMFP dentifrice was rated at -3.5%, and the SMFP + arginine bicarbonate dentifrice resulted in a net average score of -5.0%. Results of this test were statistically significant (p < 0.05, ANOVA: B > A = C = D > E = F), in favor of the stabilized SnF2 dentifrice. These results suggest the stabilized SnF2 dentifrice has the potential to provide significantly better overall acid protection versus any of the other dentifrices included in the study.

  13. Cost, time, and benefit measures for personal use fuel-wood collection in Colorado. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Betters, D.R.; Markstrom, D.C.; Aukerman, R.

    1990-01-01

    The average fuel-wood collector is willing to pay, beyond current perceived costs, an additional $21 to $29 per cord in order to continue collecting fuel-wood. The difference between willingness-to-pay estimates for fuel-wood collection and for wood purchased from a commercial vendor is assumed to present recreational value of fuel-wood collection. On that basis, the recreation values for the average collection is estimated to be between $6 and $12 per cord.

  14. Challenges to the census: international trends and a need to consider public health benefits.

    PubMed

    Wilson, R T; Hasanali, S H; Sheikh, M; Cramer, S; Weinberg, G; Firth, A; Weiss, S H; Soskolne, C L

    2017-10-01

    The Canadian government decision to cancel the mandatory long-form census in 2010 (subsequently restored in 2015), along with similar discussions in the United Kingdom (UK) and the United States of America (USA), have brought the purpose and use of census data into focus for epidemiologists and public health professionals. Policy decision-makers should be well-versed in the public health importance of accurate and reliable census data for emergency preparedness planning, controlling disease outbreaks, and for addressing health concerns among vulnerable populations including the elderly, low-income, racial/ethnic minorities, and special residential groups (e.g., nursing homes). Valid census information is critical to ensure that policy makers and public health practitioners have the evidence needed to: (1) establish incidence rates, mortality rates, and prevalence for the full characterization of emerging health issues; (2) address disparities in health care, prevention strategies and health outcomes among vulnerable populations; and (3) plan and effectively respond in times of disaster and emergency. At a time when budget and sample size cuts have been implemented in the UK, a voluntary census is being debated in the US. In Canada, elimination of the mandatory long-form census in 2011 resulted in unreliable population enumeration, as well as a substantial waste of money and resources for taxpayers, businesses and communities. The purpose of this article is to provide a brief overview of recent international trends and to review the foundational role of the census in public health management and planning using historical and current examples of environmental contamination, cancer clusters and emerging infections. Citing a general absence of public health applications of the census in cost-benefit analyses, we call on policy makers to consider its application to emergency preparedness, outbreak response, and chronic disease prevention efforts. At the same time, we

  15. The Controversy, Challenges, and Potential Benefits of Putative Female Germline Stem Cells Research in Mammals.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zezheng; Sun, Mengli; Liang, Xia; Li, Jia; Zhou, Fangyue; Zhong, Zhisheng; Zheng, Yuehui

    2016-01-01

    The conventional view is that female mammals lose their ability to generate new germ cells after birth. However, in recent years, researchers have successfully isolated and cultured a type of germ cell from postnatal ovaries in a variety of mammalian species that have the abilities of self-proliferation and differentiation into oocytes, and this finding indicates that putative germline stem cells maybe exist in the postnatal mammalian ovaries. Herein, we review the research history and discovery of putative female germline stem cells, the concept that putative germline stem cells exist in the postnatal mammalian ovary, and the research progress, challenge, and application of putative germline stem cells in recent years.

  16. The Controversy, Challenges, and Potential Benefits of Putative Female Germline Stem Cells Research in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Zezheng; Sun, Mengli; Liang, Xia; Li, Jia; Zhou, Fangyue; Zhong, Zhisheng; Zheng, Yuehui

    2016-01-01

    The conventional view is that female mammals lose their ability to generate new germ cells after birth. However, in recent years, researchers have successfully isolated and cultured a type of germ cell from postnatal ovaries in a variety of mammalian species that have the abilities of self-proliferation and differentiation into oocytes, and this finding indicates that putative germline stem cells maybe exist in the postnatal mammalian ovaries. Herein, we review the research history and discovery of putative female germline stem cells, the concept that putative germline stem cells exist in the postnatal mammalian ovary, and the research progress, challenge, and application of putative germline stem cells in recent years. PMID:26788065

  17. Moving Toward Space Internetworking via DTN: Its Operational Challenges, Benefits, and Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkley, Erik; Burleigh, Scott; Gladden, Roy; Malhotra, Shan; Shames, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The international space community has begun to recognize that the established model for management of communications with spacecraft - commanded data transmission over individual pair-wise contacts - is operationally unwieldy and will not scale in support of increasingly complex and sophisticated missions such as NASA's Constellation project. Accordingly, the international Inter-Agency Operations Advisory Group (IOAG) ichartered a Space Internetworking Strategy Group (SISG), which released its initial recommendations in a November 2008 report. The report includes a recommendation that the space flight community adopt Delay-Tolerant Networking (DTN) to address the problem of interoperability and communication scaling, especially in mission environments where there are multiple spacecraft operating in concert. This paper explores some of the issues that must be addressed in implementing, deploying, and operating DTN as part of a multi-mission, multi-agency space internetwork as well as benefits and future operational scenarios afforded by DTN-based space internetworking.

  18. Moving Toward Space Internetworking via DTN: Its Operational Challenges, Benefits, and Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkley, Erik; Burleigh, Scott; Gladden, Roy; Malhotra, Shan; Shames, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The international space community has begun to recognize that the established model for management of communications with spacecraft - commanded data transmission over individual pair-wise contacts - is operationally unwieldy and will not scale in support of increasingly complex and sophisticated missions such as NASA's Constellation project. Accordingly, the international Inter-Agency Operations Advisory Group (IOAG) ichartered a Space Internetworking Strategy Group (SISG), which released its initial recommendations in a November 2008 report. The report includes a recommendation that the space flight community adopt Delay-Tolerant Networking (DTN) to address the problem of interoperability and communication scaling, especially in mission environments where there are multiple spacecraft operating in concert. This paper explores some of the issues that must be addressed in implementing, deploying, and operating DTN as part of a multi-mission, multi-agency space internetwork as well as benefits and future operational scenarios afforded by DTN-based space internetworking.

  19. Minimally invasive surgery in gastrointestinal cancer: benefits, challenges, and solutions for underutilization.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Osama H; Gusani, Niraj J; Kimchi, Eric T; Kavic, Stephen M

    2014-01-01

    After the widespread application of minimally invasive surgery for benign diseases and given its proven safety and efficacy, minimally invasive surgery for gastrointestinal cancer has gained substantial attention in the past several years. Despite the large number of publications on the topic and level I evidence to support its use in colon cancer, minimally invasive surgery for most gastrointestinal malignancies is still underused. We explore some of the challenges that face the fusion of minimally invasive surgery technology in the management of gastrointestinal malignancies and propose solutions that may help increase the utilization in the future. These solutions are based on extensive literature review, observation of current trends and practices in this field, and discussion made with experts in the field. We propose 4 different solutions to increase the use of minimally invasive surgery in the treatment of gastrointestinal malignancies: collaboration between surgical oncologists/hepatopancreatobiliary surgeons and minimally invasive surgeons at the same institution; a single surgeon performing 2 fellowships in surgical oncology/hepatopancreatobiliary surgery and minimally invasive surgery; establishing centers of excellence in minimally invasive gastrointestinal cancer management; and finally, using robotic technology to help with complex laparoscopic skills. Multiple studies have confirmed the utility of minimally invasive surgery techniques in dealing with patients with gastrointestinal malignancies. However, training continues to be the most important challenge that faces the use of minimally invasive surgery in the management of gastrointestinal malignancy; implementation of our proposed solutions may help increase the rate of adoption in the future.

  20. Biodiesel biorefinery: opportunities and challenges for microbial production of fuels and chemicals from glycerol waste

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The considerable increase in biodiesel production worldwide in the last 5 years resulted in a stoichiometric increased coproduction of crude glycerol. As an excess of crude glycerol has been produced, its value on market was reduced and it is becoming a “waste-stream” instead of a valuable “coproduct”. The development of biorefineries, i.e. production of chemicals and power integrated with conversion processes of biomass into biofuels, has been singled out as a way to achieve economically viable production chains, valorize residues and coproducts, and reduce industrial waste disposal. In this sense, several alternatives aimed at the use of crude glycerol to produce fuels and chemicals by microbial fermentation have been evaluated. This review summarizes different strategies employed to produce biofuels and chemicals (1,3-propanediol, 2,3-butanediol, ethanol, n-butanol, organic acids, polyols and others) by microbial fermentation of glycerol. Initially, the industrial use of each chemical is briefly presented; then we systematically summarize and discuss the different strategies to produce each chemical, including selection and genetic engineering of producers, and optimization of process conditions to improve yield and productivity. Finally, the impact of the developments obtained until now are placed in perspective and opportunities and challenges for using crude glycerol to the development of biodiesel-based biorefineries are considered. In conclusion, the microbial fermentation of glycerol represents a remarkable alternative to add value to the biodiesel production chain helping the development of biorefineries, which will allow this biofuel to be more competitive. PMID:22809320

  1. Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell Status and Remaining Challenges for Manned Space-Flight Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reaves, Will F.; Hoberecht, Mark A.

    2003-01-01

    The Fuel Cell has been used for manned space flight since the Gemini program. Its power output and water production capability over long durations for the mass and volume are critical for manned space-flight requirements. The alkaline fuel cell used on the Shuttle, while very reliable and capable for it s application, has operational sensitivities, limited life, and an expensive recycle cost. The PEM fuel cell offers many potential improvements in those areas. NASA Glenn Research Center is currently leading a PEM fuel cell development and test program intended to move the technology closer to the point required for manned space-flight consideration. This paper will address the advantages of PEM fuel cell technology and its potential for future space flight as compared to existing alkaline fuel cells. It will also cover the technical hurdles that must be overcome. In addition, a description of the NASA PEM fuel cell development program will be presented, and the current status of this effort discussed. The effort is a combination of stack and ancillary component hardware development, culminating in breadboard and engineering model unit assembly and test. Finally, a detailed roadmap for proceeding fiom engineering model hardware to qualification and flight hardware will be proposed. Innovative test engineering and potential payload manifesting may be required to actually validate/certify a PEM fuel cell for manned space flight.

  2. Opportunities and challenges for developing an oilseed to renewable jet fuel industry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Military and commercial aviation have expressed interest in using renewable aviation biofuels, with an initial goal of 1 billion gallons of drop-in aviation biofuels by 2018. While these fuels could come from many sources, hydrotreated renewable jet fuel (HRJ) from vegetable oils have been demonstra...

  3. Challenges and approaches in planning fuel treatments across fire-excluded forested landscapes

    Treesearch

    B.M. Collins; S.L. Stephens; J.J. Moghaddas; J. Battles

    2010-01-01

    Placing fuel reduction treatments across entire landscapes such that impacts associated with high-intensity fire are lessened is a difficult goal to achieve, largely because of the immense area needing treatment. As such, fire scientists and managers have conceptually developed and are refining methodologies for strategic placement of fuel treatments that...

  4. Meaningful use of health information technology: evidence suggests benefits and challenges lie ahead.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Michael F; Poon, Eric

    2011-12-01

    Less than 3 years into the passage of the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) provisions of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, measurable results are emerging. For example, in the first 11 months during which healthcare providers ("eligible professionals") and acute care hospitals ("eligible hospitals") had the opportunity to demonstrate stage 1 "Meaningful Use" of Healthcare Information Technology (HIT), more than 20,000 "eligible professionals" and 750 "eligible hospitals" have done so. In the current issue of The American Journal of Managed Care, we showcase examples of HITECH's potential impact, as well as illustrate the opportunities and challenges ahead. Two studies in this issue illustrate how HIT can improve the capacity of our healthcare system to manage chronic illnesses. The study by Vollmer et al describes how an interactive voice recognition system can improve adherence to inhaled corticosteroids among individuals with asthma in a large health maintenance organization. Shelley's study shows that the combination of electronic medical records, clinical decision support, and performance feedback can improve the rate of blood pressure control in patients with hypertension who receive care in community health centers. Together, these studies provide hope that the nation's investment in HIT could one day yield clinical dividends. Three other studies in this issue suggest that success for HIT will require attention to both technological and sociological factors. The study by Millery et al attributes the success of an HIT-based intervention to a multi-faceted approach that involves a combination of decision support tools, systematic provider feedback, implementation support, and leadership. Results from Abramson's study suggest that the full error-reduction potential of e-prescribing may only be reached with the combination of on-line clinical decision support and support for clinicians. The study by

  5. Viewing Health Care Delivery as Science: Challenges, Benefits, and Policy Implications

    PubMed Central

    Pronovost, Peter J; Goeschel, Christine A

    2010-01-01

    The need for health services research is likely to rise rapidly as the population ages, health care costs soar, and therapeutic and diagnostic choices proliferate. Building an effective and efficient health care delivery system is a national priority. Yet the national health care quality report concludes that we lack the ability to monitor progress toward even basic quality and patient safety goals effectively. The gap between the need to improve and our ability to do so exists in part because we fail to view the delivery of health care as science, we lack national improvement priorities, and we lack a national infrastructure to achieve our stated goals. We discuss key challenges implicit in correcting these failures and recommend actions to expedite progress. PMID:21054369

  6. Benefits and challenges of starting a new therapeutic apheresis service in a resource-constrained setting.

    PubMed

    Arogundade, Fatiu A; Sanusi, Abubakr A; Oguntola, Stephen O; Omotoso, Bolanle A; Abdel-Rahman, Emaad M; Akinsola, Adewale; Balogun, Rasheed A

    2014-08-01

    Therapeutic apheresis (TA) refers to a group of extracorporeal blood treatment modalities with clinical indications for which the clinicians' knowledge, availability and applicability vary widely worldwide. Therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE), the most common TA technique, is neither readily available nor affordable in many parts of Africa. This article focuses on the challenges of starting a TPE program in a resource-constrained economy and the result of a survey of Nigerian nephrology professionals on TPE. A critical appraisal of published manuscripts from Nigeria on TA was undertaken to assess uses, methods, and challenges encountered followed by a survey of the perceptions of Nigerian nephrology professionals on TPE. Survey results: 56.7% of respondents had very little or no knowledge of TPE; 40.5% moderate and only 2.7% admitting to having a good knowledge. Only 18.9% of respondents have ever participated or observed a TPE procedure with the remaining 81.1% not having any exposure to the procedure. A vast majority of the respondents 97.3% felt they needed better exposure and training in TPE and its applications. Among consultants, 56% had little knowledge, 88% had never participated or observed the TPE procedure, and 94% felt they needed better exposure and training. There is significant limitation in accessibility, availability, and use of TPE in Nigeria; knowledge of TPE and its applications is minimal among nephrology professionals. Efforts should be concentrated on improving the knowledge and availability of TPE in resource-constrained economy like Nigeria. Centers that would be able to manage cases requiring TA should be developed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Feasibility, benefits and challenges of using telemonitoring for the aging with Developmental Disabilities (DD): An exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    Nambisan, Priya; Lamkin, Donna; DeLong, Carrie

    2014-01-01

    Telemonitoring is being increasingly used to provide services to patients with developmental disabilities in residential community settings. The objective of this study is to assess the feasibility, benefits and challenges of using telemonitoring for aging patients with developmental disabilities. We also assess the benefits and challenges of telemonitoring for the caregivers of these patients. Focus groups and questionnaire-based surveys were used to collect data from patients and caregivers. The study found that telemonitoring was feasible and beneficial for the aging with developmental disabilities, albeit for those who are moderate to high functioning. It was not beneficial or feasible for those with very low functional capabilities. The study found that telemonitoring was beneficial towards providing more independence, more self-confidence in carrying out daily activities, and more knowledge regarding their disease. The study also found that telemonitoring was useful for caregivers to better understand their patients and their needs, better coordinate the services delivered, and to enhance the satisfaction of caregiving. The discussions include limitations of using quantitative methods in this type of setting. PMID:25422722

  8. Periconception pre-exposure prophylaxis to prevent HIV transmission: benefits, risks, and challenges to implementation

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Lynn T; Baeten, Jared M; Celum, Connie; Bangsberg, David R

    2013-01-01

    HIV-serodiscordant couples face complicated choices between fulfilling reproductive desire and risking HIV transmission to their partners and children. Sexual HIV transmission can be dramatically reduced through artificial insemination and sperm washing, however most couples cannot access these resources. We propose that periconception pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) could offer an important, complementary therapy to harm reduction counseling programs that aim to decrease HIV transmission for couples who choose to conceive. In this paper we describe the potential benefits of periconception PrEP and define critical points of clarification prior to implementation of PrEP as part of a reproductive health program. We consider sexual transmission risk, current risk reduction options, PrEP efficacy, cost, adherence, resistance, fetal toxicity, and impact of PrEP counseling on entry into health services. We address PrEP in the context of other periconception HIV prevention strategies, including antiretroviral treatment of the HIV-infected partner. We conclude that, should PrEP prove safe and efficacious in ongoing trials, periconception PrEP may offer a useful approach to minimize risk of HIV transmission for individuals of reproductive age in HIV-endemic countries. PMID:20679759

  9. Teaching Outside the Box: Challenging Gifted Students with Polar Sciences Without Benefit of a Science Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dooley, J.

    2013-12-01

    In the high-stakes-testing world of one-size-fits-most educational practices, it is often the needs of the most able students that are unmet, yet these high ability learners can benefit greatly from exploration in the area of polar science. With school schedules and budgets already stretched to the breaking point and Common Core (CCSS) subjects are the focus, very few resources remain for topics considered by some as unimportant. Polar and climate science are prime examples. Here, a council member of Polar Educators International and Gifted Education Teacher, shares resources and ideas to engage this unique group of students and others. She draws from experiences and knowledge gained through ANDRILL's Arise Educator program, IPY Oslo and Montreal PolarEDUCATOR workshops, and Consortium for Ocean Leadership's Deep Earth Academy. Topics include School-wide Enrichment through use of ANDRILL's Flexhibit material and participation in Antarctica Day, afterschool Deep Freeze clubs that presented in public outreach venues for polar science events at the Maryland Science Center in Baltimore and NYC's Museum of Natural History, group project work using IODP core data from Antarctica, interaction with polar scientists via Skype, and other projects.

  10. Information technology in pharmacovigilance: Benefits, challenges, and future directions from industry perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhengwu

    2009-01-01

    Risk assessment during clinical product development needs to be conducted in a thorough and rigorous manner. However, it is impossible to identify all safety concerns during controlled clinical trials. Once a product is marketed, there is generally a large increase in the number of patients exposed, including those with comorbid conditions and those being treated with concomitant medications. Therefore, postmarketing safety data collection and clinical risk assessment based on observational data are critical for evaluating and characterizing a product’s risk profile and for making informed decisions on risk minimization. Information science promises to deliver effective e-clinical or e-health solutions to realize several core benefits: time savings, high quality, cost reductions, and increased efficiencies with safer and more efficacious medicines. The development and use of standard-based pharmacovigilance system with integration connection to electronic medical records, electronic health records, and clinical data management system holds promise as a tool for enabling early drug safety detections, data mining, results interpretation, assisting in safety decision making, and clinical collaborations among clinical partners or different functional groups. The availability of a publicly accessible global safety database updated on a frequent basis would further enhance detection and communication about safety issues. Due to recent high-profile drug safety problems, the pharmaceutical industry is faced with greater regulatory enforcement and increased accountability demands for the protection and welfare of patients. This changing climate requires biopharmaceutical companies to take a more proactive approach in dealing with drug safety and pharmacovigilance. PMID:21701609

  11. Early Child Development and Nutrition: A Review of the Benefits and Challenges of Implementing Integrated Interventions1234

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Kristen M; Yousafzai, Aisha K; Lopez-Boo, Florencia

    2016-01-01

    Poor nutrition (substandard diet quantity and/or quality resulting in under- or overnutrition) and the lack of early learning opportunities contribute to the loss of developmental potential and life-long health and economic disparities among millions of children aged <5 y. Single-sector interventions representing either early child development (ECD) or nutrition have been linked to positive child development and/or nutritional status, and recommendations currently advocate for the development and testing of integrated interventions. We reviewed the theoretical and practical benefits and challenges of implementing integrated nutrition and ECD interventions along with the evidence for best practice and benefit-cost and concluded that the strong theoretical rationale for integration is more nuanced than the questions that the published empirical evidence have addressed. For example, further research is needed to 1) answer questions related to how integrated messaging influences caregiver characteristics such as well-being, knowledge, and behavior and how these influence early child nutrition and development outcomes; 2) understand population and nutritional contexts in which integrated interventions are beneficial; and 3) explore how varying implementation processes influence the efficacy, uptake, and cost-benefit of integrated nutrition and ECD interventions. PMID:26980819

  12. Space Shuttle main engine. NASA has not evaluated the alternate fuel turbopump costs and benefits. Report to the Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-10-01

    NASA's plans to develop an alternate high pressure fuel turbopump for the Space Shuttle's main engines were assessed by the General Accounting Office as a part of the evaluation of the Space Shuttle Safety and Obsolescence Upgrade program. The objective was to determine whether NASA has adequately analyzed cost, performance, and benefits that are expected to result from this program in comparison to other alternatives before resuming development of the alternate pump, which was suspended in 1992. The alternate fuel pump is one of five improvements being developed or planned to significantly enhance safety margins of the engines.

  13. Screening of living organ donors for endemic infections: Understanding the challenges and benefits of enhanced screening.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Amanda; Ison, Michael G

    2016-11-14

    Living organ donor candidates are screened for medical and psychosocial contraindications to donation. One important goal of this process is to prevent donor-derived infectious diseases transmissions. These transmissions are exceptionally rare, but have the potential to cause significant morbidity and mortality. The Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network now requires each recovery hospital to develop a protocol for evaluating living donors for tuberculosis and other geographically-defined endemic pathogens, including Trypanosoma cruzi (the causative pathogen of Chagas' disease), Strongyloides stercoralis, and West Nile Virus (WNV), in addition to universal screening for blood-borne pathogens. Enhanced screening requirements were developed in response to the changing epidemiology and endemicity of these diseases, as well as recent case reports of donor-derived disease transmission. Living organ donor disease screening presents a number of unique challenges to clinicians and policy-makers, including deciding which donors to test, which testing modality to use, when to test, and appropriate interpretation of results. This review will analyze the epidemiology of T. cruzi, S. stercoralis, and WNV, the assays available for screening for these diseases, and the subsequent impact on the living organ donor process . This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Challenge to promote change: both young and older adults benefit from contextual interference

    PubMed Central

    Pauwels, Lisa; Vancleef, Kathleen; Swinnen, Stephan P.; Beets, Iseult A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Current society has to deal with major challenges related to our constantly increasing population of older adults. Since, motor performance generally deteriorates at older age, research investigating the effects of different types of training on motor improvement is particularly important. Here, we tested the effects of contextual interference (CI) while learning a bimanual coordination task in both young and older subjects. Both age groups acquired a low and high complexity task variant following either a blocked or random practice schedule. Typical CI effects, i.e., better overall performance during acquisition but detrimental effects during retention for the blocked compared with the random groups, were found for the low complexity task variant in both age groups. With respect to the high complexity task variant, no retention differences between both practice schedules were found. However, following random practice, better skill persistence (i.e., from end of acquisition to retention) over a 1 week time interval was observed for both task complexity variants and in both age groups. The current study provides clear evidence that the effects of different practice schedules on learning a complex bimanual task are not modulated by age. PMID:26321950

  15. Applying quantitative benefit-risk analysis to aid regulatory decision making in diagnostic imaging: methods, challenges, and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Agapova, Maria; Devine, Emily Beth; Bresnahan, Brian W; Higashi, Mitchell K; Garrison, Louis P

    2014-09-01

    Health agencies making regulatory marketing-authorization decisions use qualitative and quantitative approaches to assess expected benefits and expected risks associated with medical interventions. There is, however, no universal standard approach that regulatory agencies consistently use to conduct benefit-risk assessment (BRA) for pharmaceuticals or medical devices, including for imaging technologies. Economics, health services research, and health outcomes research use quantitative approaches to elicit preferences of stakeholders, identify priorities, and model health conditions and health intervention effects. Challenges to BRA in medical devices are outlined, highlighting additional barriers in radiology. Three quantitative methods--multi-criteria decision analysis, health outcomes modeling and stated-choice survey--are assessed using criteria that are important in balancing benefits and risks of medical devices and imaging technologies. To be useful in regulatory BRA, quantitative methods need to: aggregate multiple benefits and risks, incorporate qualitative considerations, account for uncertainty, and make clear whose preferences/priorities are being used. Each quantitative method performs differently across these criteria and little is known about how BRA estimates and conclusions vary by approach. While no specific quantitative method is likely to be the strongest in all of the important areas, quantitative methods may have a place in BRA of medical devices and radiology. Quantitative BRA approaches have been more widely applied in medicines, with fewer BRAs in devices. Despite substantial differences in characteristics of pharmaceuticals and devices, BRA methods may be as applicable to medical devices and imaging technologies as they are to pharmaceuticals. Further research to guide the development and selection of quantitative BRA methods for medical devices and imaging technologies is needed. Copyright © 2014 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  16. Use of online clinical videos for clinical skills training for medical students: benefits and challenges

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Multimedia learning has been shown effective in clinical skills training. Yet, use of technology presents both opportunities and challenges to learners. The present study investigated student use and perceptions of online clinical videos for learning clinical skills and in preparing for OSCE (Objective Structured Clinical Examination). This study aims to inform us how to make more effective us of these resources. Methods A mixed-methods study was conducted for this study. A 30-items questionnaire was administered to investigate student use and perceptions of OSCE videos. Year 3 and 4 students from 34 Korean medical schools who had access to OSCE videos participated in the online survey. Additionally, a semi-structured interview of a group of Year 3 medical students was conducted for an in-depth understanding of student experience with OSCE videos. Results 411 students from 31 medical schools returned the questionnaires; a majority of them found OSCE videos effective for their learning of clinical skills and in preparing for OSCE. The number of OSCE videos that the students viewed was moderately associated with their self-efficacy and preparedness for OSCE (p < 0.05). One-thirds of those surveyed accessed the video clips using mobile devices; they agreed more with the statement that it was convenient to access the video clips than their peers who accessed the videos using computers (p < 0.05). Still, students reported lack of integration into the curriculum and lack of interaction as barriers to more effective use of OSCE videos. Conclusions The present study confirms the overall positive impact of OSCE videos on student learning of clinical skills. Having faculty integrate these learning resources into their teaching, integrating interactive tools into this e-learning environment to foster interactions, and using mobile devices for convenient access are recommended to help students make more effective use of these resources. PMID:24650290

  17. The Health Benefits and Challenges of Exercise Training in Persons Living with Schizophrenia: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Bredin, Shannon S. D.; Warburton, Darren E. R.; Lang, Donna J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In addition to the hallmark cognitive and functional impairments mounting evidence indicates that schizophrenia is also associated with an increased risk for the development of secondary complications, in particular cardio-metabolic disease. This is thought to be the result of various factors including physical inactivity and the metabolic side effects of psychotropic medications. Therefore, non-pharmacological approaches to improving brain health, physical health, and overall well-being have been promoted increasingly. Methods: We report on the health-related physical fitness (body composition, blood pressure, heart rate, and aerobic fitness) and lipid profile of persons living with schizophrenia and effective means to address the challenges of exercise training in this population. Results: There was a markedly increased risk for cardio-metabolic disease in 13 persons living with schizophrenia (Age = 31 ± 7 years) including low aerobic fitness (76% ± 34% of predicted), reduced HDL (60% of cohort), elevated resting heart rate (80% of cohort), hypertension (40% of cohort), overweight and obesity (69% of cohort), and abdominal obesity (54% of cohort). Individualized exercise prescription (3 times/week) was well tolerated, with no incidence of adverse exercise-related events. The exercise adherence rate was 81% ± 21% (Range 48%–100%), and 69% of the participants were able to complete the entire exercise training program. Exercise training resulted in clinically important changes in physical activity, aerobic fitness, exercise tolerance, blood pressure, and body composition. Conclusion: Persons living with schizophrenia appear to be at an increased risk for cardio-metabolic disease. An individualized exercise program has shown early promise for the treatment of schizophrenia and the various cognitive, functional, and physiological impairments that ultimately affect health and well-being. PMID:24961427

  18. Use of online clinical videos for clinical skills training for medical students: benefits and challenges.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hye Won; Kim, Kyong-Jee

    2014-03-21

    Multimedia learning has been shown effective in clinical skills training. Yet, use of technology presents both opportunities and challenges to learners. The present study investigated student use and perceptions of online clinical videos for learning clinical skills and in preparing for OSCE (Objective Structured Clinical Examination). This study aims to inform us how to make more effective us of these resources. A mixed-methods study was conducted for this study. A 30-items questionnaire was administered to investigate student use and perceptions of OSCE videos. Year 3 and 4 students from 34 Korean medical schools who had access to OSCE videos participated in the online survey. Additionally, a semi-structured interview of a group of Year 3 medical students was conducted for an in-depth understanding of student experience with OSCE videos. 411 students from 31 medical schools returned the questionnaires; a majority of them found OSCE videos effective for their learning of clinical skills and in preparing for OSCE. The number of OSCE videos that the students viewed was moderately associated with their self-efficacy and preparedness for OSCE (p < 0.05). One-thirds of those surveyed accessed the video clips using mobile devices; they agreed more with the statement that it was convenient to access the video clips than their peers who accessed the videos using computers (p < 0.05). Still, students reported lack of integration into the curriculum and lack of interaction as barriers to more effective use of OSCE videos. The present study confirms the overall positive impact of OSCE videos on student learning of clinical skills. Having faculty integrate these learning resources into their teaching, integrating interactive tools into this e-learning environment to foster interactions, and using mobile devices for convenient access are recommended to help students make more effective use of these resources.

  19. Multi-GNSS ionospheric modeling and differential code bias estimation: Benefits and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Weiliang; Li, Xingxing; Ren, Xiaodong; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2017-04-01

    It is well known that the ionosphere model and differential code bias (DCB) are of great significance for GNSS based precise positioning. The rapid development of GNSS and the IGS Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) provide great opportunities and challenges for global ionospheric modeling and DCB estimation. In this contribution, we develop a global ionosphere model based on GPS+GLONASS+BeiDou+Galileo observations. The ionospheric modeling with GPS only, GPS+GLONASS, GPS+BeiDou, and GPS+GLONASS+Galileo observations are also performed to evaluate the contribution of each system for current global ionospheric modeling. The obtained global ionospheric maps (GIMs) are compared with the GIM products of Ionospheric Associate Analysis Centers (IAACs) to validate their accuracy and reliability. Our GIM results show excellent agreement with the IAACs products. The DCBs of GPS, GLONASS, BeiDou and Galileo are also estimated based on the observations collected by the MGEX stations. The computed DCB results are validated with the products from German Aerospace Center (DLR) and Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics (IGG). Especially, the effect of GLONASS inter-frequency bias on the differential code bias estimation and ionospheric modeling is also investigated. The results show that the effect of GLONASS inter-frequency bias on DCB estimation can reach several nanoseconds, but it has little effect on current ionospheric modeling. Furthermore, some studies on the ray-tracing mapping function and high precision fitting function are also carried out for improving the precision of ionospheric modeling. Keywords: ionospheric modeling; differential code bias; GPS, GLONASS, Galileo and BDS; Multi-GNSS fusion

  20. PEM Fuel Cells for Transport Applications: State of the Art and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bruijn, Frank A.

    2009-09-01

    In order to offer a true alternative to the internal combustion engine, whether fuelled with today's fossil fuels or with first and second generation biofuels, the fuel cell technology needs to mature to such a level that it meets consumer expectations with respect to vehicle performance, driving range and refueling time, while at the same time vehicle efficiency and well to tank emissions are such that overall emissions can be diminished drastically. The present paper addresses the present state of the art of fuel cell technology (PEMFC—proton exchange membrane fuel cells) for transportation, and the materials issues for both the short term and the long term that need to be addressed to fulfill the expectations.

  1. A Methodology to Assess the Benefit of Operational or Tactic Adjustments to Reduce Marine Corps Fuel Consumption

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    release; distribution is unlimited 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) The United States Marine Corps is too dependent on fossil fuel...Department iv THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK v ABSTRACT The United States Marine Corps is too dependent on fossil fuel, which leaves...problem is that the Marine Corps is too dependent on fossil fuel and that a change in the overall energy strategy is required in order for the

  2. Challenge to Aviation: Hatching a Leaner Pterosauer. [Improving Commercial Aircraft Design for Greater Fuel Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, F. E.

    1975-01-01

    Modifications in commercial aircraft design, particularly the development of lighter aircraft, are discussed as effective means of reducing aviation fuel consumption. The modifications outlined include: (1) use of the supercritical wing; (2) generation of the winglet; (3) production and flight testing of composite materials; and, (4) implementation of fly-by-wire control systems. Attention is also given to engineering laminar air flow control, improving cargo payloads, and adapting hydrogen fuels for aircraft use.

  3. Fuel cell commercialization issues for light-duty vehicle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borroni-Bird, Christopher E.

    The major challenges facing fuel cells in light-duty vehicle applications relate to the high cost of the fuel cell stack components (membrane, electro-catalyst and bipolar plate) which dictate that new manufacturing processes and materials must be developed. Initially, the best fuel for a mass market light-duty vehicle will probably not be the best fuel for the fuel cell (hydrogen); refueling infrastructure and energy density concerns may demand the use of an on-board fuel processor for petroleum-based fuels since this will increase customer acceptance. The use of fuel processors does, however, reduce the fuel cell system's efficiency. Moreover, if such fuels are used then the emissions benefit associated with fuel cells may come with a significant penalty in terms of added complexity, weight, size and cost. However, ultimately, fuel cells powered by hydrogen do promise to be the most efficient and cleanest of automotive powertrains.

  4. NIOZ high-resolution moored temperature observations: benefits and new challenges.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimatoribus, Andrea; Gostiaux, Louis; Cyr, Frederic; van Haren, Hans

    2016-04-01

    spectrum, modulation by submesoscale and mesoscale activity and seasonal variations. These features have been exploited for characterising the internal wave spectrum in the open ocean, for evaluating turbulence parameters above seamounts, and to characterise the statistics of temperature fluctuations. Main results include the observational demonstration of extreme inhomogeneity in space and intermittency in time of turbulence, and evidence of the importance of convective activity within strong geophysical turbulence. The data collected challenges the classical methods of turbulence parameters estimation in the ocean. Classical "Thorpe scale" methods have been adapted to the particular characteristics of the data, and efforts have been made to adapt other methods, providing higher detail on the vertical and temporal modulation of turbulence. The large datasets have also enabled the application on observational data of analysis methods previously used on laboratory data alone.

  5. A means of improving public health in low- and middle-income countries? Benefits and challenges of international public-private partnerships.

    PubMed

    Kostyak, L; Shaw, D M; Elger, B; Annaheim, B

    2017-08-01

    In the last two decades international public-private partnerships have become increasingly important to improving public health in low- and middle-income countries. Governments realize that involving the private sector in projects for financing, innovation, development, and distribution can make a valuable contribution to overcoming major health challenges. Private-public partnerships for health can generate numerous benefits but may also raise some concerns. To guide best practice for public-private partnerships for health to maximize benefits and minimize risks, the first step is to identify potential benefits, challenges, and motives. We define motives as the reasons why private partners enter partnerships with a public partner. We conducted a systematic review of the literature using the PRISMA guidelines. We reviewed the literature on the benefits and challenges of public-private partnerships for health in low- and middle-income countries provided by international pharmaceutical companies and other health-related companies. We provide a description of these benefits, challenges, as well as of motives of private partners to join partnerships. An approach of systematic categorization was used to conduct this research. We identified six potential benefits, seven challenges, and three motives. Our main finding was a significant gap in the available academic literature on this subject. Further empirical research using both qualitative and quantitative approaches is required. From the limited information that is readily available, we conclude that public-private partnerships for health imply several benefits but with some noticeable and crucial limitations. In this article, we provide a description of these benefits and challenges, discuss key themes, and conclude that empirical research is required to determine the full extent of the challenges addressed in the literature. Copyright © 2017 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  6. Hybrid modeling for quality by design and PAT-benefits and challenges of applications in biopharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    von Stosch, Moritz; Davy, Steven; Francois, Kjell; Galvanauskas, Vytautas; Hamelink, Jan-Martijn; Luebbert, Andreas; Mayer, Martin; Oliveira, Rui; O'Kennedy, Ronan; Rice, Paul; Glassey, Jarka

    2014-06-01

    This report highlights the drivers, challenges, and enablers of the hybrid modeling applications in biopharmaceutical industry. It is a summary of an expert panel discussion of European academics and industrialists with relevant scientific and engineering backgrounds. Hybrid modeling is viewed in its broader sense, namely as the integration of different knowledge sources in form of parametric and nonparametric models into a hybrid semi-parametric model, for instance the integration of fundamental and data-driven models. A brief description of the current state-of-the-art and industrial uptake of the methodology is provided. The report concludes with a number of recommendations to facilitate further developments and a wider industrial application of this modeling approach. These recommendations are limited to further exploiting the benefits of this methodology within process analytical technology (PAT) applications in biopharmaceutical industry.

  7. The iPad and mobile technology revolution: benefits and challenges for individuals who require augmentative and alternative communication.

    PubMed

    McNaughton, David; Light, Janice

    2013-06-01

    The iPad and other mobile technologies provide powerful new tools to potentially enhance communication for individuals with developmental disabilities, acquired neurogenic disorders, and degenerative neurological conditions. These mobile technologies offer a number of potential benefits, including: (a) increased awareness and social acceptance of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), (b) greater consumer empowerment in accessing AAC solutions, (c) increased adoption of AAC technologies, (d) greater functionality and interconnectivity, and (e) greater diffusion of AAC research and development. However, there remain a number of significant challenges that must be addressed if these benefits are to be fully realized: (a) to ensure the focus is on communication, not just technology, (b) to develop innovative models of AAC service delivery to ensure successful outcomes, (c) to ensure ease of access for all individuals who require AAC, and, (d) to maximize AAC solutions to support a wide variety of communication functions. There is an urgent need for effective collaboration among key stakeholders to support research and development activities, and to ensure the successful implementation of mobile technologies to enhance communication outcomes for individuals who require AAC and their families.

  8. The Euratom Fast Collar (EFC): A Safeguards Instrument Design to Address Future Fuel Measurement Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Louise; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Menlove, Howard O.; Browne, Michael C.

    2012-08-13

    Summary of this presentation: (1) EFC instrument design for {sup 235}U verification measurements issued to EURATOM to issue a call for commercial tender; (2) Achieved a fast (Cd mode) measurement with less than 2% relative uncertainty in the doubles neutron counting rate in 10 minutes using a standard source strength; (3) Assay time in fast mode consistent with the needs of an inspector; (4) Extended to realistic calibration range for modern fuel designs - Relatively insensitive to gadolinia content for fuel designs with up to 32 burnable poison rods and 15 wt % gadolinia concentration, which is a realistic maximum for modern PWR fuel; (5) Improved performance over the standard thermal neutron collar with greater than twice the efficiency of the original design; (6) Novel tube pattern to reduce the impact of accidental pile-up; and (7) Joint test of prototype unit - EURATOM-LANL.

  9. Materials challenges toward proton-conducting oxide fuel cells: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Emiliana; Pergolesi, Daniele; Traversa, Enrico

    2010-11-01

    The increasing world population and the need to improve quality of life for a large percentage of human beings are the driving forces for the search for sustainable energy production systems, alternative to fossil fuel combustion. Among the various types of alternative energy production technologies, solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) operating at intermediate temperatures (400-700 °C) show the advantage of possible use both for stationary and mobile energy production. To reach the goal of reducing the SOFC operating temperature, proton-conducting oxides are gaining wide interest as electrolyte materials. This critical review provides a broad overview of the most recent progresses obtained tailoring the properties of proton-conducting oxides for fuel cell applications, analyzing and comparing the different strategies proposed to match high-proton conductivity with good chemical stability (170 references).

  10. Fuel ethanol production from lignocellulose: a challenge for metabolic engineering and process integration.

    PubMed

    Zaldivar, J; Nielsen, J; Olsson, L

    2001-07-01

    With industrial development growing rapidly, there is a need for environmentally sustainable energy sources. Bioethanol (ethanol from biomass) is an attractive, sustainable energy source to fuel transportation. Based on the premise that fuel bioethanol can contribute to a cleaner environment and with the implementation of environmental protection laws in many countries, demand for this fuel is increasing. Efficient ethanol production processes and cheap substrates are needed. Current ethanol production processes using crops such as sugar cane and corn are well-established; however, utilization of a cheaper substrate such as lignocellulose could make bioethanol more competitive with fossil fuel. The processing and utilization of this substrate is complex, differing in many aspects from crop-based ethanol production. One important requirement is an efficient microorganism able to ferment a variety of sugars (pentoses, and hexoses) as well as to tolerate stress conditions. Through metabolic engineering, bacterial and yeast strains have been constructed which feature traits that are advantageous for ethanol production using lignocellulose sugars. After several rounds of modification/evaluation/modification, three main microbial platforms, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Zymomonas mobilis, and Escherichia coli, have emerged and they have performed well in pilot studies. While there are ongoing efforts to further enhance their properties, improvement of the fermentation process is just one of several factors-that needs to be fully optimized and integrated to generate a competitive lignocellulose ethanol plant.

  11. Automotive Fuel Processor Development and Demonstration with Fuel Cell Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nuvera Fuel Cells

    2005-04-15

    The potential for fuel cell systems to improve energy efficiency and reduce emissions over conventional power systems has generated significant interest in fuel cell technologies. While fuel cells are being investigated for use in many applications such as stationary power generation and small portable devices, transportation applications present some unique challenges for fuel cell technology. Due to their lower operating temperature and non-brittle materials, most transportation work is focusing on fuel cells using proton exchange membrane (PEM) technology. Since PEM fuel cells are fueled by hydrogen, major obstacles to their widespread use are the lack of an available hydrogen fueling infrastructure and hydrogen's relatively low energy storage density, which leads to a much lower driving range than conventional vehicles. One potential solution to the hydrogen infrastructure and storage density issues is to convert a conventional fuel such as gasoline into hydrogen onboard the vehicle using a fuel processor. Figure 2 shows that gasoline stores roughly 7 times more energy per volume than pressurized hydrogen gas at 700 bar and 4 times more than liquid hydrogen. If integrated properly, the fuel processor/fuel cell system would also be more efficient than traditional engines and would give a fuel economy benefit while hydrogen storage and distribution issues are being investigated. Widespread implementation of fuel processor/fuel cell systems requires improvements in several aspects of the technology, including size, startup time, transient response time, and cost. In addition, the ability to operate on a number of hydrocarbon fuels that are available through the existing infrastructure is a key enabler for commercializing these systems. In this program, Nuvera Fuel Cells collaborated with the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop efficient, low-emission, multi-fuel processors for transportation applications. Nuvera's focus was on (1) developing fuel processor

  12. On the benefits and challenges of a coordinated Validation and Quality Assessment of the GMES Service Element for Atmosphere (PROMOTE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosalia Delgado Blanco, Maria; Lambert, Jean-Christopher; Skarlas, Pauline

    PROtocol MOniToring for the GMES Service Element for Atmosphere (PROMOTE) is an ESA- funded project delivering sustainable geo-spatial information services related to atmospheric ozone, surface UV exposure, air quality, climate change, and volcanic hazards to aviation. Services are based on ground-, airand satellite-based Earth observation data and on numerical models and assimilation systems. As a major step in the building of Global Monitoring of Environment and Security (GMES), a European contribution to the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), PROMOTE Services are to support informed decisions relevant to the nine Societal Benefit Areas addressed by GEOSS. GEOSS objectives of interoperability, sustainability, traceability and dedication to users are particular challenges that are addressed, among others, by the PROMOTE Validation Office. The first goal of this cross-cutting body is to ensure appropriate, user-driven quality assessment and validation of all PROMOTE services. Going beyond the classical validation of individual data products from a satellite or a model, the Validation Office verifies not only the "fitness for purpose" of all PROMOTE Products and Services against service specifications and user requirements, but also the "fitness for purpose" of the validation itself against user requirements, and generally coordinates validation activities at project level. A driving task under the responsibility of the Validation Office is to establish the PROMOTE Service Validation Protocol which sets the top-level definition of applicable standards and validation approaches for all constituents of the PROMOTE Service Portfolio. It is through the development and implementation of such a Validation Protocol, that the fitness for purpose of every product and service and of their validation can be assessed and sustained. At the same time, their compliance with high-level recommendations (e.g. GEO-CEOS Best Practices for Cal/Val) and regulations

  13. Efficiency maximization in solar-thermochemical fuel production: challenging the concept of isothermal water splitting.

    PubMed

    Ermanoski, I; Miller, J E; Allendorf, M D

    2014-05-14

    Widespread adoption of solar-thermochemical fuel production depends on its economic viability, largely driven by the efficiency of use of the available solar resource. Herein, we analyze the efficiency of two-step cycles for thermochemical hydrogen production, with emphasis on efficiency. Owing to water thermodynamics, isothermal H2 production is shown to be impractical and inefficient, irrespective of reactor design or reactive oxide properties, but an optimal temperature difference between cycle steps, for which efficiency is the highest, can be determined for a wide range of other operating parameters. A combination of well-targeted pressure and temperature swing, rather than either individually, emerges as the most efficient mode of operation of a two-step thermochemical cycle for solar fuel production.

  14. Quantification of uncertainty associated with United States high resolution fossil fuel CO2 emissions: updates, challenges and future plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurney, K. R.; Chandrasekaran, V.; Mendoza, D. L.; Geethakumar, S.

    2010-12-01

    The Vulcan Project has estimated United States fossil fuel CO2 emissions at the hourly time scale and at spatial scales below the county level for the year 2002. Vulcan is built from a wide variety of observational data streams including regulated air pollutant emissions reporting, traffic monitoring, energy statistics, and US census data. In addition to these data sets, Vulcan relies on a series of modeling assumptions and constructs to interpolate in space, time and transform non-CO2 reporting into an estimate of CO2 combustion emissions. The recent version 2.0 of the Vulcan inventory has produced advances in a number of categories with particular emphasis on improved temporal structure. Onroad transportation emissions now avail of roughly 5000 automated traffic count monitors allowing for much improved diurnal and weekly time structure in our onroad transportation emissions. Though the inventory shows excellent agreement with independent national-level CO2 emissions estimates, uncertainty quantification has been a challenging task given the large number of data sources and numerous modeling assumptions. However, we have now accomplished a complete uncertainty estimate across all the Vulcan economic sectors and will present uncertainty estimates as a function of space, time, sector and fuel. We find that, like the underlying distribution of CO2 emissions themselves, the uncertainty is also strongly lognormal with high uncertainty associated with a relatively small number of locations. These locations typically are locations reliant upon coal combustion as the dominant CO2 source. We will also compare and contrast Vulcan fossil fuel CO2 emissions estimates against estimates built from DOE fuel-based surveys at the state level. We conclude that much of the difference between the Vulcan inventory and DOE statistics are not due to biased estimation but mechanistic differences in supply versus demand and combustion in space/time.

  15. Maximizing Societal Benefits Associated With Alternative Fuel Subsidies: The Case of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazir, Samir M.

    Government seeks to improve the welfare of its citizenry and intervenes in marketplaces to maximize benefits when externalities are not captured. By analyzing how welfare changes from area to area across the country in response to the same intervention informs where government should act. This thesis analyzes the case of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). PHEVs have many societal benefits, including improving national security, economic, environmental, and health advantages. The magnitude and distribution of these benefits depends on where PHEVs are deployed. This thesis develops and applies a methodology to determine if the benefits from PHEV deployment vary across the country and for ranking regions where positive PHEV consequences are likely to be maximized. The metrics in this method are proxies of key variables which predict the level of benefits in a county from the deployment of a PHEV there; they include population, health benefits from reduced ozone concentration, vehicle miles traveled per capita, existence of non-federal policies, and CO 2 intensity of electricity. By shedding light on how benefits from PHEV deployment vary across counties, this thesis seeks to better inform where to enact government interventions to maximize the benefits of this technology.

  16. Manufacturing Challenges and Benefits when Scaling the HIAD Stacked-Torus Aeroshell to a 15m Class System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheatwood, F. McNeil; Swanson, Gregory T.; Johnson, R. Keith; Hughes, Stephen; Calomino, Anthony; Gilles, Brian; Anderson, Paul; Bond, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    stitching of F-TPS gores. Additionally, new approaches and hardware will be required for handling and ground testing of both individual tori and the fully assembled HIADs. There are also noteworthy benefits of scaling up the HIAD aeroshell to 15m-class system. Two complications in working with handmade textiles structures are the non-linearity of the materials and the role of human accuracy during fabrication. Larger, more capable, HIAD structures should see much larger operational loads, potentially bringing the structural response of the materials out of the non-linear regime and into the preferred linear response range. Also, making the reasonable assumption that the magnitude of fabrication accuracy remains constant as the structures grow, the relative effect of fabrication errors should decrease as a percentage of the textile component size. Combined, these two effects improve the predictive capability and the uniformity of the structural response for a 12-15m class HIAD. In this paper, the challenges and associated mitigation plans related to scaling up the HIAD stacked-torus aeroshell to a 15m class system will be discussed. In addition, the benefits of enlarging the structure will be further explored.

  17. World Biofuels Production Potential Understanding the Challenges to Meeting the U.S. Renewable Fuel Standard

    SciTech Connect

    Sastri, B.; Lee, A.

    2008-09-15

    This study by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates the worldwide potential to produce biofuels including biofuels for export. It was undertaken to improve our understanding of the potential for imported biofuels to satisfy the requirements of Title II of the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) in the coming decades. Many other countries biofuels production and policies are expanding as rapidly as ours. Therefore, we modeled a detailed and up-to-date representation of the amount of biofuel feedstocks that are being and can be grown, current and future biofuels production capacity, and other factors relevant to the economic competitiveness of worldwide biofuels production, use, and trade. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) identified and prepared feedstock data for countries that were likely to be significant exporters of biofuels to the U.S. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) calculated conversion costs by conducting material flow analyses and technology assessments on biofuels technologies. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) integrated the country specific feedstock estimates and conversion costs into the global Energy Technology Perspectives (ETP) MARKAL (MARKet ALlocation) model. The model uses least-cost optimization to project the future state of the global energy system in five year increments. World biofuels production was assessed over the 2010 to 2030 timeframe using scenarios covering a range U.S. policies (tax credits, tariffs, and regulations), as well as oil prices, feedstock availability, and a global CO{sub 2} price. All scenarios include the full implementation of existing U.S. and selected other countries biofuels policies (Table 4). For the U.S., the most important policy is the EISA Title II Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS). It progressively increases the required volumes of renewable fuel used in motor vehicles (Appendix B). The RFS requires 36 billion (B) gallons (gal) per year of renewable fuels by 2022

  18. Challenges and constraints of using oxygen cathodes in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feng; Harnisch, Falk; Schröder, Uwe; Scholz, Fritz; Bogdanoff, Peter; Herrmann, Iris

    2006-09-01

    The performance of oxygen reduction catalysts (platinum, pyrolyzed iron(ll) phthalocyanine (pyr-FePc) and cobalt tetramethoxyphenylporphyrin (pyr-CoTMPP)) is discussed in light of their application in microbial fuel cells. It is demonstrated that the physical and chemical environment in microbial fuel cells severely affects the thermodynamics and the kinetics of the electrocatalytic oxygen reduction. The neutral pH in combination with low buffer capacities and low ionic concentrations strongly affect the cathode performance and limit the fuel cell power output. Thus, the limiting current density in galvanodyanamic polarization experiments decreases from 1.5 mA cm(-2) to 0.6 mA cm(-2) (pH 3.3, E(cathode) = 0 V) when the buffer concentration is decreased from 500 to 50 mM. The cathode limitations are superposed by the increasing internal resistance of the MFC that substantially contributes to the decrease of power output. For example, the maximum power output of a model MFC decreased by 35%, from 2.3 to 1.5 mW, whereas the difference between the electrode potentials (deltaE = E(anode) - E(cathode)) decreased only by 10%. The increase of the catalyst load of pyr-FePc from 0.25 to 2 mg cm(-2) increased the cathodic current density from 0.4 to 0.97 mA cm(-2) (pH 7, 50 mM phosphate buffer). The increase of the load of such inexpensive catalyst thus represents a suitable means to improve the cathode performance in microbial fuel cells. Due to the low concentration of protons in MFCs in comparison to relatively high alkali cation levels (ratio C(Na+,K+)/C(H+) = 5 x E5 in pH 7, 50 mM phosphate buffer) the transfer of alkali ions through the proton exchange membrane plays a major role in the charge-balancing ion flux from the anodic into the cathodic compartment. This leads to the formation of pH gradients between the anode and the cathode compartment.

  19. Development and Qualification of a Specialized Gas Turbine Test Stand to Research the Potential Benefits of Nanocatalyst Fuel Additives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    71 ix LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1. Activation Energy Affect on Residence Time (from Davis...altered on a molecular level in order to achieve higher catalytic energies or increase operating ranges. The use of nanocatalysts as a means of...stored fuel. Anti- oxidants can also act to inhibit the formation of peroxide compounds. 3. Static dissipater additives reduce the effects of static

  20. Sputtered cathodes for polymer electrolyte fuel cells: insights into potentials, challenges and limitations.

    PubMed

    Schwanitz, Bernhard; Rabis, Annett; Horisberger, Michael; Scherer, Günther G; Schmidt, Thomas J

    2012-01-01

    The level of Pt loadings in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC) is still one of the main hindrances for implementation of PEFCs into the market. Therefore, new catalyst and electrode preparation methods such as sputtering are of current interest, because they allow thin film production and have many cost saving advantages for electrode preparation. This paper summarises some of the most important studies done for sputtered PEFCs, including non carbon supported electrodes. Furthermore, it will be shown that an understanding of the main morphological differences between sputtered and ink-based electrodes is crucial for a better understanding of the resulting fuel cell performance. Especially, the electrochemical surface area (ECSA) plays a key role for a further increase in PEFC performance of sputtered electrodes. The higher surface specific activities i(k,spec) of sputtered compared to ink-based electrodes will be discussed as advantage of the thin film formation. The so- called particle size effect, known in literature for several years, will be discussed as reason for the higher i(k,spec) of sputtered electrodes. Therefore, a model system on a rotating disc electrode (RDE) was studied. For sputtered PEFC cathodes Pt loadings were lowered to 100 μg(Pt)/cm(2), yet with severe performance losses compared to ink-based electrodes. Still, for Pt sputtered electrodes on a carbon support structure remarkably high current densities of 0.46 A/cm(2) at 0.6 V could be achieved.

  1. Trends and challenges in the microbial production of lignocellulosic bioalcohol fuels.

    PubMed

    Weber, Christian; Farwick, Alexander; Benisch, Feline; Brat, Dawid; Dietz, Heiko; Subtil, Thorsten; Boles, Eckhard

    2010-07-01

    Bioalcohols produced by microorganisms from renewable materials are promising substitutes for traditional fuels derived from fossil sources. For several years already ethanol is produced in large amounts from feedstocks such as cereals or sugar cane and used as a blend for gasoline or even as a pure biofuel. However, alcohols with longer carbon chains like butanol have even more suitable properties and would better fit with the current fuel distribution infrastructure. Moreover, ethical concerns contradict the use of food and feed products as a biofuel source. Lignocellulosic biomass, especially when considered as a waste material offers an attractive alternative. However, the recalcitrance of these materials and the inability of microorganisms to efficiently ferment lignocellulosic hydrolysates still prevent the production of bioalcohols from these plentiful sources. Obviously, no known organism exist which combines all the properties necessary to be a sustainable bioalcohol producer. Therefore, breeding technologies, genetic engineering and the search for undiscovered species are promising means to provide a microorganism exhibiting high alcohol productivities and yields, converting all lignocellulosic sugars or are even able to use carbon dioxide or monoxide, and thereby being highly resistant to inhibitors and fermentation products, and easy to cultivate in huge bioreactors. In this review, we compare the properties of various microorganisms, bacteria and yeasts, as well as current research efforts to develop a reliable lignocellulosic bioalcohol producing organism.

  2. Introducing peer worker roles into UK mental health service teams: a qualitative analysis of the organisational benefits and challenges

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The provision of peer support as a component of mental health care, including the employment of Peer Workers (consumer-providers) by mental health service organisations, is increasingly common internationally. Peer support is strongly advocated as a strategy in a number of UK health and social care policies. Approaches to employing Peer Workers are proliferating. There is evidence to suggest that Peer Worker-based interventions reduce psychiatric inpatient admission and increase service user (consumer) empowerment. In this paper we seek to address a gap in the empirical literature in understanding the organisational challenges and benefits of introducing Peer Worker roles into mental health service teams. Methods We report the secondary analysis of qualitative interview data from service users, Peer Workers, non-peer staff and managers of three innovative interventions in a study about mental health self-care. Relevant data was extracted from interviews with 41 participants and subjected to analysis using Grounded Theory techniques. Organisational research literature on role adoption framed the analysis. Results Peer Workers were highly valued by mental health teams and service users. Non-peer team members and managers worked hard to introduce Peer Workers into teams. Our cases were projects in development and there was learning from the evolutionary process: in the absence of formal recruitment processes for Peer Workers, differences in expectations of the Peer Worker role can emerge at the selection stage; flexible working arrangements for Peer Workers can have the unintended effect of perpetuating hierarchies within teams; the maintenance of protective practice boundaries through supervision and training can militate against the emergence of a distinctive body of peer practice; lack of consensus around what constitutes peer practice can result in feelings for Peer Workers of inequality, disempowerment, uncertainty about identity and of being under

  3. Manufacturing Challenges and Benefits When Scaling the HIAD Stacked-Torus Aeroshell to a 15 Meter Class System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, G. T.; Cheatwood, F. M.; Johnson, R. K.; Hughes, S. J.; Calomino, A. M.

    2016-01-01

    structural webbing, initial inflation of tori, and stitching of F-TPS gores. Additionally, new approaches and hardware will be required for handling and ground testing of both individual tori and the fully assembled HIADs. There are also noteworthy benefits of scaling up the HIAD aeroshell to a 15m-class system. Two complications in working with handmade textile structures are the non-linearity of the material components and the role of human accuracy during fabrication. Larger, more capable, HIAD structures should see much larger operational loads, potentially bringing the structural response of the material components out of the non-linear regime and into the preferred linear response range. Also, making the reasonable assumption that the magnitude of fabrication accuracy remains constant as the structures grow, the relative effect of fabrication errors should decrease as a percentage of the textile component size. Combined, these two effects improve the predictive capability and the uniformity of the structural response for a 12-15-meter HIAD. In this presentation, a handful of the challenges and associated mitigation plans will be discussed, as well as an update on current manufacturing and testing that addressing these challenges.

  4. Manufacturing Challenges and Benefits when Scaling the HIAD Stacked-Torus Aeroshell to a 15m-Class System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Gregory; Cheatwood, Neil; Johnson, Keith; Calomino, Anthony; Gilles, Brian; Anderson, Paul; Bond, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    , and stitching of F-TPS gores. Additionally, new approaches and hardware will be required for handling and ground testing of both individual tori and the fully assembled HIADs.There are also noteworthy benefits of scaling up the HIAD aeroshell to a 15m-class system. Two complications in working with handmade textile structures are the non-linearity of the material components and the role of human accuracy during fabrication. Larger, more capable, HIAD structures should see much larger operational loads, potentially bringing the structural response of the material components out of the non-linear regime and into the preferred linear response range. Also, making the reasonable assumption that the magnitude of fabrication accuracy remains constant as the structures grow, the relative effect of fabrication errors should decrease as a percentage of the textile component size. Combined, these two effects improve the predictive capability and the uniformity of the structural response for a 12-15m HIAD.In this presentation, a handful of the challenges and associated mitigation plans will be discussed, as well as an update on current 12m aeroshell manufacturing and testing that is addressing these challenges

  5. Successes and Challenges in the Resale of Alternative Fuel Vehicles: July 2001 - March 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2002-05-01

    This report provides the outcome of Dorfman & O'Neal's effort to examine the resale market for automobiles as it relates to the resale of late-model, original equipment manufacture (OEM), alternative fuel vehicles. Auctions provide an exceptionally rapid, effective, and efficient market for the transfer of property between buyers and sellers at reasonable prices. The first automobile auction in the United States was successful because used cars were in reasonably constant supply, were uniformly packaged, and were easily graded for quality. Also, the auction had sufficient volume to significantly lower the handling and transaction costs for wholesalers and dealers. To this day, the automobile auction industry conducts business primarily with registered wholesalers and dealers. Except for the U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) auctions and some consignment auctions, nearly all automobile auctions are closed to the public. The auction system represents a near-perfect market, validated by the lack of statistical price differences in value of specific model cars between various regions of the country. However, specialty cars may be subject to arbitrage. The buyer purchases the vehicle believing that it can be sold immediately at a profit in another region. A variety of vehicle pricing services are available to serve the consumer and the wholesale automobile industry. Each has a different philosophy for collecting, analyzing, and reporting data. ''The Automobile Lease Guide'' (ALG) is clearly the authority on vehicle residual values. Auction companies continue to apply automated technologies to lower transaction costs. Automated technologies are the only way to track the increasing number of transactions in the growing industry. Nevertheless, people-to-people relationships remain critical to the success of all auction companies. Our assessment is that everyone in the secondary automobile market is aware of alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) and is interested to

  6. Challenges in Measuring Benefit of Clinical Research Training Programs--the ASH Clinical Research Training Institute Example.

    PubMed

    Sung, Lillian; Crowther, Mark; Byrd, John; Gitlin, Scott D; Basso, Joe; Burns, Linda

    2015-12-01

    The American Society of Hematology developed the Clinical Research Training Institute (CRTI) to address the lack of training in patient-oriented research among hematologists. As the program continues, we need to consider metrics for measuring the benefits of such a training program. This article addresses the benefits of clinical research training programs. The fundamental and key components are education and mentorship. However, there are several other benefits including promotion of collaboration, job and advancement opportunities, and promotion of work-life balance. The benefits of clinical research training programs need to be measured so that funders and society can judge if they are worth the investment in time and resources. Identification of elements that are important to program benefit is essential to measuring the benefit of the program as well as program planning. Future work should focus on the constructs which contribute to benefits of clinical research training programs such as CRTI.

  7. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; social issues fact sheet 11: Challenges to collaboration

    Treesearch

    Christine Esposito

    2006-01-01

    Bringing the right people into a collaborative process can be difficult. Potential collaborators must all feel they have something to gain to justify investing resources, sharing knowledge, and perhaps compromising on goals and actions. This fact sheet discusses some of the common challenges that individuals, communities, and institutions face in collaboration.

  8. Researcher and institutional review board perspectives on the benefits and challenges of reporting back biomonitoring and environmental exposure results.

    PubMed

    Ohayon, Jennifer Liss; Cousins, Elicia; Brown, Phil; Morello-Frosch, Rachel; Brody, Julia Green

    2017-02-01

    As the number of personal exposure studies expands and trends favor greater openness and transparency in the health sciences, ethical issues arise around reporting back individual results for contaminants without clear health guidelines. Past research demonstrates that research participants want their results even when the health implications are not known. The experiences of researchers and institutional review boards (IRBs) in studies that have reported personal chemical exposures can provide insights about ethical and practical approaches while also revealing areas of continued uncertainty. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 17 researchers and nine IRB members from seven personal exposure studies across the United States to investigate their experiences and attitudes about the report-back process. Researchers reported multiple benefits of report-back, including increasing retention and recruitment, advancing environmental health literacy, empowering study participants to take actions to reduce exposures, encouraging shifts in government and industry practices, and helping researchers discover sources of exposure through participant consultation. Researchers also reported challenges, including maintaining ongoing contact with participants, adopting protocols for notification of high exposures to chemicals without health guidelines, developing meaningful report-back materials, and resource limitations. IRB members reported concern for potential harm to participants, such as anxiety about personal results and counterproductive behavior changes. In contrast, researchers who have conducted personal report-back in their studies said that participants did not appear overly alarmed and noted that worry can be a positive outcome to motivate action to reduce harmful exposures. While key concerns raised during the early days of report-back have been substantially resolved for scientists with report-back experience, areas of uncertainty remain. These include

  9. TOPICAL REVIEW: Electrode materials: a challenge for the exploitation of protonic solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbri, Emiliana; Pergolesi, Daniele; Traversa, Enrico

    2010-08-01

    High temperature proton conductor (HTPC) oxides are attracting extensive attention as electrolyte materials alternative to oxygen-ion conductors for use in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) operating at intermediate temperatures (400-700 °C). The need to lower the operating temperature is dictated by cost reduction for SOFC pervasive use. The major stake for the deployment of this technology is the availability of electrodes able to limit polarization losses at the reduced operation temperature. This review aims to comprehensively describe the state-of-the-art anode and cathode materials that have so far been tested with HTPC oxide electrolytes, offering guidelines and possible strategies to speed up the development of protonic SOFCs.

  10. Electrode materials: a challenge for the exploitation of protonic solid oxide fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    Fabbri, Emiliana; Pergolesi, Daniele; Traversa, Enrico

    2010-01-01

    High temperature proton conductor (HTPC) oxides are attracting extensive attention as electrolyte materials alternative to oxygen-ion conductors for use in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) operating at intermediate temperatures (400–700 °C). The need to lower the operating temperature is dictated by cost reduction for SOFC pervasive use. The major stake for the deployment of this technology is the availability of electrodes able to limit polarization losses at the reduced operation temperature. This review aims to comprehensively describe the state-of-the-art anode and cathode materials that have so far been tested with HTPC oxide electrolytes, offering guidelines and possible strategies to speed up the development of protonic SOFCs. PMID:27877342

  11. What Do Students Think about Group Work in Business Education? An Investigation into the Benefits, Challenges, and Student-Suggested Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Seung Hwan Mark; Smith, Donna; Sergueeva, Ksenia

    2016-01-01

    The authors sought to gain insight on how students view group learning and development as part of their business education experience. Specifically, the authors categorize benefits and challenges using S. A. Wheelan's (2005) integrated model of group development. Additionally, they investigate (from the students' perspective) best practices that…

  12. Benefits, Challenges, Characteristics and Instructional Approaches in an El Sistema Inspired After-School String Program Developed as a University-School Partnership in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Michael; Provenzano, Anthony M.; Spencer, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the benefits, challenges, program characteristics and instructional approaches of an El Sistema inspired (ESI) after-school string program developed as a university-school partnership. Case study methodology was used to examine the program. Fifth-grade students received 75 minutes of after-school…

  13. The Challenges and Benefits of Employing a Mobile Research Fellow to Facilitate Team Work on a Large, Interdisciplinary, Multi-Sited Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugden, Fraser; Punch, Samantha

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few years research funding has increasingly moved in favour of large, multi-partner, interdisciplinary and multi-site research projects. This article explores the benefits and challenges of employing a full-time research fellow to work across multiple field sites, with all the local research teams, on an international,…

  14. The Challenges and Benefits of Employing a Mobile Research Fellow to Facilitate Team Work on a Large, Interdisciplinary, Multi-Sited Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugden, Fraser; Punch, Samantha

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few years research funding has increasingly moved in favour of large, multi-partner, interdisciplinary and multi-site research projects. This article explores the benefits and challenges of employing a full-time research fellow to work across multiple field sites, with all the local research teams, on an international,…

  15. Radioactive waste partitioning and transmutation within advanced fuel cycles: Achievements and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvatores, M.; Palmiotti, G.

    2011-01-01

    If nuclear power becomes a sustainable source of energy, a safe, robust, and acceptable solution must be pursued for existing and projected inventories of high-activity, long-lived radioactive waste. Remarkable progress in the field of geological disposal has been made in the last two decades. Some countries have reached important milestones, and geological disposal (of spent fuel) is expected to start in 2020 in Finland and in 2022 in Sweden. In fact, the licensing of the geological repositories in both countries is now entering into its final phase. In France, disposal of intermediate-level waste (ILW) and vitrified high-level waste (HLW) is expected to start around 2025, according to the roadmap defined by an Act of Parliament in 2006. In this context, transmutation of part of the waste through use of advanced fuel cycles, probably feasible in the coming decades, can reduce the burden on the geological repository. This article presents the physical principle of transmutation and reviews several strategies of partitioning and transmutation (P&T). Many recent studies have demonstrated that the impact of P&T on geological disposal concepts is not overwhelmingly high. However, by reducing waste heat production, a more efficient utilization of repository space is likely. Moreover, even if radionuclide release from the waste to the environment and related calculated doses to the population are only partially reduced by P&T, it is important to point out that a clear reduction of the actinide inventory in the HLW definitely reduces risks arising from less probable evolutions of a repository (i.e., an increase of actinide mobility in certain geochemical situations and radiological impact by human intrusion).

  16. Preparing undergraduates for the future of scientific collaboration: Benefits, challenges and technological solutions in Distributed REU Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubenthal, M.; Anagnos, T.

    2012-12-01

    As research problems increasingly require multi-disciplinary approaches they naturally foster scientific collaborations between geographically distributed colleagues. This increasing trend in scientific research, the rapid evolution of communication technology, cognitive research into distance education, and the current generation of undergraduate students' eagerness to embrace and use technology, increases the relevance of distributed REU sites. Like traditional REU sites that host a cohort of students in one geographic location, distributed REU sites also seek to attract, nurture, and retain students in a STEM career pipeline. Distributed REU sites are unique in that some or all of the interns are geographically distributed during the research period. This arrangement allows the REU site to capitalize on distributed scientific resources such as field sites, research facilities, or human capital. At their core, distributed REU sites are fundamentally constructed of elements that have proven to be effective components of any undergraduate research experience. They also strive to develop and employ specialized programming that leverages collaboration tools through a cyberinfrastructure to enable interns to develop meaningful social and academic relationships with one another. Since 2006 the IRIS Consortium and NEES have facilitated separate, NSF funded, distributed REU Sites. Implementation and evaluations of these programs have revealed a number of successes and benefits. Longitudinal tracking indicates that distributed REU Sites are at least as successful as traditional sites in attracting, nurturing, and retaining students in a STEM career pipeline. A distributed arrangement also offers benefits over a traditional REU site, such as the flexibility to place interns at a variety of institutions with mentors making only an annual commitment to participate. This ensures that all mentors are eager to participate and are concerned with their intern's growth. It also

  17. Analysis of the FeCrAl Accident Tolerant Fuel Concept Benefits during BWR Station Blackout Accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Robb, Kevin R

    2015-01-01

    Iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys are being considered for fuel concepts with enhanced accident tolerance. FeCrAl alloys have very slow oxidation kinetics and good strength at high temperatures. FeCrAl could be used for fuel cladding in light water reactors and/or as channel box material in boiling water reactors (BWRs). To estimate the potential safety gains afforded by the FeCrAl concept, the MELCOR code was used to analyze a range of postulated station blackout severe accident scenarios in a BWR/4 reactor employing FeCrAl. The simulations utilize the most recently known thermophysical properties and oxidation kinetics for FeCrAl. Overall, when compared to the traditional Zircaloy-based cladding and channel box, the FeCrAl concept provides a few extra hours of time for operators to take mitigating actions and/or for evacuations to take place. A coolable core geometry is retained longer, enhancing the ability to stabilize an accident. Finally, due to the slower oxidation kinetics, substantially less hydrogen is generated, and the generation is delayed in time. This decreases the amount of non-condensable gases in containment and the potential for deflagrations to inhibit the accident response.

  18. Challenger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allday, Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    The events that led to the spectacular destruction of the Space Shuttle "Challenger" in 1986 are detailed here. They show how NASA should have heeded engineers' worries over materials problems resulting from a launch in cold weather. Suggestions are made of how pupils could also learn from this tragedy. (Contains 4 figures and 2 footnotes.)

  19. Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Thomas R.

    1975-01-01

    Domestic and international challenges facing the National Society for the Prevention of Blindness are discussed; and U.S. and Russian programs in testing and correcting children's vision, developing eye safety programs in agriculture and industry, and disseminating information concerning the detection and treatment of cataracts are compared. (SB)

  20. Challenger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allday, Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    The events that led to the spectacular destruction of the Space Shuttle "Challenger" in 1986 are detailed here. They show how NASA should have heeded engineers' worries over materials problems resulting from a launch in cold weather. Suggestions are made of how pupils could also learn from this tragedy. (Contains 4 figures and 2 footnotes.)

  1. Border Security: Observations on Costs, Benefits, and Challenges of a Department of Defense Role in Helping to Secure the Southwest Land Border

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-17

    BORDER SECURITY Observations on Costs, Benefits, and Challenges of a Department of Defense Role in Helping to Secure...Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person shall be subject to a penalty for failing to comply with a collection of...information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 17 APR 2012 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2012

  2. The balance sheet of benefits and harms of breast cancer population-based screening in Europe: outcome research, practice and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Broeders, Mireille; Paci, Eugenio

    2015-11-01

    Breast cancer screening programs are still object of harsh debate. In 2012, the Independent UK Panel reviewed the benefits and harms of mammography screening based on randomized trials and the EUROSCREEN Working Group reviewed European observational outcome studies. The conclusion was that screening programs should continue, while acknowledging that harms, such as the occurrence of false-positive results and overdiagnosis, can have a negative impact on a woman's life. Information on the balance sheet of the benefits and harms of breast cancer screening should help women and their physicians to make an informed choice. The future challenge for breast screening programs is to assess the feasibility, acceptability, effectiveness and impact of risk-based screening in order to maximize benefit-to-harm ratios.

  3. Photocatalytic conversion of CO(2) into renewable hydrocarbon fuels: state-of-the-art accomplishment, challenges, and prospects.

    PubMed

    Tu, Wenguang; Zhou, Yong; Zou, Zhigang

    2014-07-16

    Photocatalytic reduction of CO2 into hydrocarbon fuels, an artificial photosynthesis, is based on the simulation of natural photosynthesis in green plants, whereby O2 and carbohydrates are produced from H2 O and CO2 using sunlight as an energy source. It couples the reductive half-reaction of CO2 fixation with a matched oxidative half-reaction such as water oxidation, to achieve a carbon neutral cycle, which is like killing two birds with one stone in terms of saving the environment and supplying future energy. The present review provides an overview and highlights recent state-of-the-art accomplishments of overcoming the drawback of low photoconversion efficiency and selectivity through the design of highly active photocatalysts from the point of adsorption of reactants, charge separation and transport, light harvesting, and CO2 activation. It specifically includes: i) band-structure engineering, ii) nanostructuralization, iii) surface oxygen vacancy engineering, iv) macro-/meso-/microporous structuralization, v) exposed facet engineering, vi) co-catalysts, vii) the development of a Z-scheme system. The challenges and prospects for future development of this field are also present. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. A collaborative effort to apply the evidence-based review process to the field of nutrition: challenges, benefits, and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Balk, Ethan M; Horsley, Tanya A; Newberry, Sydne J; Lichtenstein, Alice H; Yetley, Elizabeth A; Schachter, Howard M; Moher, David; MacLean, Catherine H; Lau, Joseph

    2007-06-01

    Evidence-based systematic reviews evaluating dietary intake and nutritional interventions are becoming common but are relatively few compared with other applications. Concerns remain that systematic reviews of nutrition topics pose several unique challenges. We present a successful collaboration to systematically review the health effects of a common nutrient, n-3 (or omega-3) fatty acids, across a wide range of clinical conditions. More generally, we discuss the challenges faced and the lessons learned during the review, the benefits of systematic review of nutritional topics, and recommendations for conducting and reviewing nutrition-related studies. Through a structured but flexible process, 3 Evidence-based Practice Centers in the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality program produced 11 reports on a wide range of n-3 fatty acid-related topics. An important resource has been created, through which nutrition and dietetics researchers, clinical dietitians and nutritionists, clinicians, and the general public can understand the state of the science. The process identified challenges and problems in evaluating the health effects of n-3 fatty acid consumption, highlighted challenges to reviewing the human nutrition literature, and yielded recommendations for future research. The goals of these systematic reviews, the processes that were used, the benefits and limitations of the collaboration, and the conclusions of the reviews, including recommendations for future research, are summarized here.

  5. Teaching Science with Case Studies: A National Survey of Faculty Perceptions of the Benefits and Challenges of Using Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yadav, Aman; Lundeberg, Mary; DeSchryver, Michael; Dirkin, Kathryn; Schiller, Nancy A.; Maier, Kimberly; Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    2007-01-01

    To understand more about faculty perceptions of the instructional benefits of and barriers to using case studies, the authors surveyed 101 science faculty at universities and colleges in the United States and Canada. The results provided evidence that, overall, faculty think cases have a positive impact on student learning, critical thinking, and…

  6. Teachers' Views on Digital Educational Tools in English Language Learning: Benefits and Challenges in the Turkish Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çelik, Servet; Aytin, Kübra

    2014-01-01

    Despite the clear benefits provided by digital educational tools, Turkish teachers of English as a foreign language (EFL) are often seen as failing to take advantage of computing technologies in the classroom. Deficiencies in terms of teachers' digital literacies are often faulted for this omission. The majority of studies concerning Turkish EFL…

  7. Benefits and Challenges of Scaling Up Expansion of Marine Protected Area Networks in the Verde Island Passage, Central Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Horigue, Vera; Pressey, Robert L.; Mills, Morena; Brotánková, Jana; Cabral, Reniel; Andréfouët, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Locally-established marine protected areas (MPAs) have been proven to achieve local-scale fisheries and conservation objectives. However, since many of these MPAs were not designed to form ecologically-connected networks, their contributions to broader-scale goals such as complementarity and connectivity can be limited. In contrast, integrated networks of MPAs designed with systematic conservation planning are assumed to be more effective—ecologically, socially, and economically—than collections of locally-established MPAs. There is, however, little empirical evidence that clearly demonstrates the supposed advantages of systematic MPA networks. A key reason is the poor record of implementation of systematic plans attributable to lack of local buy-in. An intermediate scenario for the expansion of MPAs is scaling up of local decisions, whereby locally-driven MPA initiatives are coordinated through collaborative partnerships among local governments and their communities. Coordination has the potential to extend the benefits of individual MPAs and perhaps to approach the potential benefits offered by systematic MPA networks. We evaluated the benefits of scaling up local MPAs to form networks by simulating seven expansion scenarios for MPAs in the Verde Island Passage, central Philippines. The scenarios were: uncoordinated community-based establishment of MPAs; two scenarios reflecting different levels of coordinated MPA expansion through collaborative partnerships; and four scenarios guided by systematic conservation planning with different contexts for governance. For each scenario, we measured benefits through time in terms of achievement of objectives for representation of marine habitats. We found that: in any governance context, systematic networks were more efficient than non-systematic ones; systematic networks were more efficient in broader governance contexts; and, contrary to expectations but with caveats, the uncoordinated scenario was slightly more

  8. Teachers' Perceptions of the Benefits and Challenges of Three-Dimensional Virtual Worlds for Social Skills Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nussli, Natalie; Oh, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    This case study describes how a systematic 7-Step Virtual Worlds Teacher Training Workshop guided the enculturation of 18 special education teachers into three-dimensional virtual worlds. The main purpose was to enable these teachers to make informed decisions about the usability of virtual worlds for students with social skills challenges, such…

  9. Teachers' Perceptions of the Benefits and Challenges of Three-Dimensional Virtual Worlds for Social Skills Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nussli, Natalie; Oh, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    This case study describes how a systematic 7-Step Virtual Worlds Teacher Training Workshop guided the enculturation of 18 special education teachers into three-dimensional virtual worlds. The main purpose was to enable these teachers to make informed decisions about the usability of virtual worlds for students with social skills challenges, such…

  10. Benefits, Challenges, and Dynamism of Positionalities Associated with Mixed Methods Research in Developing Countries: Evidence from Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teye, Joseph Kofi

    2012-01-01

    Although mixed methods designs have gained visibility in recent years, most of the publications on this methodological strategy have been written by scholars in the developed world. Consequently, the practical challenges associated with mixed methods research in developing countries have not been adequately discussed in the literature. Relying on…

  11. Personal Reflection: Reflections on SoTL by a Casual Lecturer--Personal Benefits, Long-Term Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbins, Kerry

    2011-01-01

    I have just completed my second year as a casual lecturer and have enjoyed engaging in the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL). However, my casual status has brought a number of challenges to ensuring my SoTL work has both long term and institutional impact. As the trend for casualisation in higher education continues across the world, I…

  12. Benefits, Challenges, and Dynamism of Positionalities Associated with Mixed Methods Research in Developing Countries: Evidence from Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teye, Joseph Kofi

    2012-01-01

    Although mixed methods designs have gained visibility in recent years, most of the publications on this methodological strategy have been written by scholars in the developed world. Consequently, the practical challenges associated with mixed methods research in developing countries have not been adequately discussed in the literature. Relying on…

  13. Research Stakeholders’ Views on Benefits and Challenges for Public Health Research Data Sharing in Kenya: The Importance of Trust and Social Relations

    PubMed Central

    Jao, Irene; Kombe, Francis; Mwalukore, Salim; Bull, Susan; Parker, Michael; Kamuya, Dorcas; Molyneux, Sassy; Marsh, Vicki

    2015-01-01

    Background There is increasing recognition of the importance of sharing research data within the international scientific community, but also of the ethical and social challenges this presents, particularly in the context of structural inequities and varied capacity in international research. Public involvement is essential to building locally responsive research policies, including on data sharing, but little research has involved stakeholders from low-to-middle income countries. Methods Between January and June 2014, a qualitative study was conducted in Kenya involving sixty stakeholders with varying experiences of research in a deliberative process to explore views on benefits and challenges in research data sharing. In-depth interviews and extended small group discussions based on information sharing and facilitated debate were used to collect data. Data were analysed using Framework Analysis, and charting flow and dynamics in debates. Findings The findings highlight both the opportunities and challenges of communicating about this complex and relatively novel topic for many stakeholders. For more and less research-experienced stakeholders, ethical research data sharing is likely to rest on the development and implementation of appropriate trust-building processes, linked to local perceptions of benefits and challenges. The central nature of trust is underpinned by uncertainties around who might request what data, for what purpose and when. Key benefits perceived in this consultation were concerned with the promotion of public health through science, with legitimate beneficiaries defined differently by different groups. Important challenges were risks to the interests of study participants, communities and originating researchers through stigmatisation, loss of privacy, impacting autonomy and unfair competition, including through forms of intentional and unintentional 'misuse' of data. Risks were also seen for science. Discussion Given background structural

  14. Research Stakeholders' Views on Benefits and Challenges for Public Health Research Data Sharing in Kenya: The Importance of Trust and Social Relations.

    PubMed

    Jao, Irene; Kombe, Francis; Mwalukore, Salim; Bull, Susan; Parker, Michael; Kamuya, Dorcas; Molyneux, Sassy; Marsh, Vicki

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing recognition of the importance of sharing research data within the international scientific community, but also of the ethical and social challenges this presents, particularly in the context of structural inequities and varied capacity in international research. Public involvement is essential to building locally responsive research policies, including on data sharing, but little research has involved stakeholders from low-to-middle income countries. Between January and June 2014, a qualitative study was conducted in Kenya involving sixty stakeholders with varying experiences of research in a deliberative process to explore views on benefits and challenges in research data sharing. In-depth interviews and extended small group discussions based on information sharing and facilitated debate were used to collect data. Data were analysed using Framework Analysis, and charting flow and dynamics in debates. The findings highlight both the opportunities and challenges of communicating about this complex and relatively novel topic for many stakeholders. For more and less research-experienced stakeholders, ethical research data sharing is likely to rest on the development and implementation of appropriate trust-building processes, linked to local perceptions of benefits and challenges. The central nature of trust is underpinned by uncertainties around who might request what data, for what purpose and when. Key benefits perceived in this consultation were concerned with the promotion of public health through science, with legitimate beneficiaries defined differently by different groups. Important challenges were risks to the interests of study participants, communities and originating researchers through stigmatisation, loss of privacy, impacting autonomy and unfair competition, including through forms of intentional and unintentional 'misuse' of data. Risks were also seen for science. Given background structural inequities in much international research

  15. The challenges and benefits of a genuine partnership between Music Therapy and Neuroscience: a dialog between scientist and therapist

    PubMed Central

    Magee, Wendy L.; Stewart, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Collaborations between neuroscience and music therapy promise many mutual benefits given the different knowledge bases, experiences and specialist skills possessed by each discipline. Primarily, music therapists deliver music-based interventions on a daily basis with numerous populations; neuroscientists measure clinical changes in ways that provide an evidence base for progressing clinical care. Although recent developments suggest that partnerships between the two can produce positive outcomes for both fields, these collaborations are not considered mainstream. The following dialog between an experienced professional from each discipline explores the potential for collaboration, as well as the misconceptions that may be preventing further synergies from developing. PMID:25983683

  16. The challenges and benefits of a genuine partnership between Music Therapy and Neuroscience: a dialog between scientist and therapist.

    PubMed

    Magee, Wendy L; Stewart, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Collaborations between neuroscience and music therapy promise many mutual benefits given the different knowledge bases, experiences and specialist skills possessed by each discipline. Primarily, music therapists deliver music-based interventions on a daily basis with numerous populations; neuroscientists measure clinical changes in ways that provide an evidence base for progressing clinical care. Although recent developments suggest that partnerships between the two can produce positive outcomes for both fields, these collaborations are not considered mainstream. The following dialog between an experienced professional from each discipline explores the potential for collaboration, as well as the misconceptions that may be preventing further synergies from developing.

  17. Nutritional, Health, and Technological Functionality of Lupin Flour Addition to Bread and Other Baked Products: Benefits and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Villarino, C B J; Jayasena, V; Coorey, R; Chakrabarti-Bell, S; Johnson, S K

    2016-01-01

    Lupin is an undervalued legume despite its high protein and dietary fiber content and potential health benefits. This review focuses on the nutritional value, health benefits, and technological effects of incorporating lupin flour into wheat-based bread. Results of clinical studies suggest that consuming lupin compared to wheat bread and other baked products reduce chronic disease risk markers; possibly due to increased protein and dietary fiber and bioactive compounds. However, lupin protein allergy has also been recorded. Bread quality has been improved when 10% lupin flour is substituted for refined wheat flour; possibly due to lupin-wheat protein cross-linking assisting bread volume and the high water-binding capacity (WBC) of lupin fiber delaying staling. Above 10% substitution appears to reduce bread quality due to lupin proteins low elasticity and the high WBC of its dietary fiber interrupting gluten network development. Gaps in understanding of the role of lupin flour in bread quality include the optimal formulation and processing conditions to maximize lupin incorporation, role of protein cross-linking, antistaling functionality, and bioactivity of its γ-conglutin protein.

  18. Evaluating risks and benefits of wildland fire at landscape scales

    Treesearch

    Carol Miller; Peter B. Landres; Paul B. Alaback

    2000-01-01

    Fire suppression has resulted in severe management challenges, especially in the wildland-urban interface zone. Fire managers seek to reduce fuels and risks in the interface zone, while striving to return the natural role of fire to wildland ecosystems. Managers must balance the benefits of wildland fire on ecosystem health against the values that need to be protected...

  19. The health benefits of nature-based solutions to urbanization challenges for children and the elderly - A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kabisch, Nadja; van den Bosch, Matilda; Lafortezza, Raffaele

    2017-11-01

    Urban green and blue spaces promote health by offering areas for physical activity, stress relief, and social interaction, which may be considered as cultural ecosystem services. They also provide a number of regulating ecosystem services that can be regarded as nature-based solutions to mitigate impacts from urbanization-induced challenges. Urban trees and other vegetation provide cooling through shade and evapotranspiration, which reduce the impact of the urban heat island on hot summer days. Urban vegetation may improve air quality by removing air pollutants. Open areas in cities, such as parks, gardens, playgrounds and cemeteries, are unsealed spaces that also improve infiltration during extreme precipitation events providing water regulating functions. All these services have the potential to improve the health of urban residents, particularly of specific vulnerable groups such as children and the elderly. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the current state of evidence on the relationship between the health of children and the elderly and urban green and blue spaces that can account as nature-based solutions to urbanization-induced challenges. We discuss potential confounding factors and refer to the different green space metrics used to identify associations to health. From the results, we cannot conclude on a universal protective health effect of urban green and blue spaces for children and the elderly. While the association trend is positive, the results remain inconclusive, context dependent and are partly overridden by socioeconomic confounders. However, the research area is consistently increasing, and we advance important prospects for future research on urban green and blue spaces in the face of global challenges such as urbanization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A qualitative study of physicians' experiences with online learning in a masters degree program: benefits, challenges, and proposed solutions.

    PubMed

    Dyrbye, Liselotte; Cumyn, Annabelle; Day, Hollis; Heflin, Mitchell

    2009-02-01

    In response to challenges to faculty development (e.g. time away from clinical, teaching, and other responsibilities; lack of mentors; and limited resources) online learning has become an important venue to provide education for physicians in curriculum development, instruction, assessment, evaluation, educational leadership, and education scholarship. Online learning however has its own unique challenges. Little is known about clinician-educators' experiences while participating in online programs and few studies have focused on their approaches to facilitate online learning. To explore the experiences of physicians pursuing a degree in higher education with online learning, including motivations for choosing this format, barriers encountered, and ideas for facilitating learning in the online environment. All students (n = 71) enrolled in online courses in the University of Illinois at Chicago Masters of Health Profession Education Program were surveyed in the spring of 2006. Responses were analysed using a qualitative approach. Of the 48 students who completed the survey (response rate 68%) 45 (94%) were physicians. The online format is convenient, flexible, and may be beneficial for learning. Students' responses raise issues inherent to online learning that must be addressed to optimize student-centered learning. These issues relate to: clarity of communication; difficulties in negotiating team work and in building relationships; technical demands; learning style preferences, and time commitment. Students provided recommendations for strategies to address these issues such as how to communicate clearly, facilitate teamwork, and optimize time management. Member checking supported the analysis. Online education programs meet the needs of physicians but have associated challenges. Further research is needed to explore the potential value of student suggested ways to optimize the online learning experience.

  1. Challenges in the quality assurance of elemental and isotopic analyses in the nuclear domain benefitting from high resolution ICP-OES and sector field ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Krachler, Michael; Alvarez-Sarandes, Rafael; Van Winckel, Stefaan

    Accurate analytical data reinforces fundamentally the meaningfulness of nuclear fuel performance assessments and nuclear waste characterization. Regularly lacking matrix-matched certified reference materials, quality assurance of elemental and isotopic analysis of nuclear materials remains a challenging endeavour. In this context, this review highlights various dedicated experimental approaches envisaged at the European Commission-Joint Research Centre-Institute for Transuranium Elements to overcome this limitation, mainly focussing on the use of high resolution-inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (HR-ICP-OES) and sector field-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (SF-ICP-MS). However, also α- and γ-spectrometry are included here to help characterise extensively the investigated actinide solutions for their actual concentration, potential impurities and isotopic purity.

  2. A National Laboratory and University Branch Campus Library Partnership: Shared Benefits and Challenges from Combined Reference Services

    SciTech Connect

    Buxton, Karen A.; Gover, Harvey R.

    2003-12-31

    The Hanford Technical Library of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Max E. Benitz Memorial Library of the Washington State University Tri-Cities Branch Campus have functioned both separately and in combination since moving into the same space within the Consolidated Information Center in 1997. The libraries have successfully partnered to serve different clientele at a combined reference desk since June 1997. Although having separate staffs, catalogs, and collections, the libraries share a single reference/information desk. The reference staffs work together to serve a very diverse clientele including students, faculty, engineers, scientists, contractors, regulators, and the public. The combined libraries offer significant benefits to both library staffs and their users. The libraries have expanded access to collections and information expertise, enhanced staff training opportunities, and provided additional hours of reference service to patrons while at the same time maintaining the individual identities of the two libraries.

  3. Management of Legacy Spent Nuclear Fuel Wastes at the Chalk River Laboratories: The Challenges and Innovative Solutions Implemented - 13301

    SciTech Connect

    Schruder, Kristan; Goodwin, Derek

    2013-07-01

    AECL's Fuel Packaging and Storage (FPS) Project was initiated in 2004 to retrieve, transfer, and stabilize an identified inventory of degraded research reactor fuel that had been emplaced within in-ground 'Tile Hole' structures in Chalk River Laboratories' Waste Management Area in the 1950's and 60's. Ongoing monitoring of the legacy fuel storage conditions had identified that moisture present in the storage structures had contributed to corrosion of both the fuel and the storage containers. This prompted the initiation of the FPS Project which has as its objective to design, construct, and commission equipment and systems that would allow for the ongoing safe storage of this fuel until a final long-term management, or disposition, pathway was available. The FPS Project provides systems and technologies to retrieve and transfer the fuel from the Waste Management Area to a new facility that will repackage, dry, safely store and monitor the fuel for a period of 50 years. All equipment and the new storage facility are designed and constructed to meet the requirements for Class 1 Nuclear Facilities in Canada. (authors)

  4. The Benefits and Challenges of Having AN Open and Free Basis Satellite Data Sharing Platform in Turkey: GEZGİN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seda Deveci, Hüsne; Koru, Aziz; Sakarya, Ufuk; Tevrizoğlu, İsmail; Teke, Mustafa; Küpçü, Ramazan; Avenoğlu, Bülent; Demirkesen, Can; Zübeyde Gürbüz, Sevgi; Feray Öztoprak, A.; Açıkgöz, İbrahim Serdar; Hakkı Demirhan, İsmail; Ömer Kozal, Ali; Efendioğlu, Mehmet; Berke, Erdinç; Fehmi Şimşek, F.; Atıl, İlkay; Kaya, Derya; Uçmak, Pınar; Ersöz, Eda; Özen, Hilal

    2016-06-01

    Turkey is a county that experiences rapid socioeconomic development, which, in turn, leads to high urbanization rates due to migration of people from rural to urban areas, many large-scale development projects (e.g. highways, dams, housing and infrastructure), and environmental problems that adversely affect agriculture, such as soil erosion and deforestation. Furthermore, Turkey lies in a region prone to natural disasters, especially earthquakes, landslides, flooding and forest fires. Successfully overcoming these challenges requires continuous monitoring to enable rapid response as well as the development of effective socioeconomic policies. In this regard, space-based earth observation (EO) systems play a critical role in the rapid acquisiton and extraction of crucial information. The first launch of the first Turkish-designed satellite, RASAT, in 2011 led to the wide-spread exploitation of space-based resources by Turkish institutions through the dissemination of EO data on an open and free basis via the GEZGIN internet portal (http://www.gezgin.gov.tr). The push for data sharing was further instigated by the nationally funded project GEOPORTAL ("Satellite Image Processing and Geoportal Development Project") and European Union FP7 project EOPOWER ("Earth Observation for Economic Empowerment"), which strove to create conditions for sustainable economic development through the increased use of Earth observation products and services for environmental applications. In this work, the technical challenges involving processing and preparing raw satellite data for dissemination as well as software design of the GEZGIN Portal will be presented.

  5. Fuel cell status, 1994

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschenhofer, John H.

    1994-11-01

    Fuel cells are increasingly being used for commercial purposes in various countries worldwide because of their high efficiency environmental benefits. Among the nations which are pioneering the use of fuel cells are Australia, the United States, England, Japan, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium and Canada. These countries use fuel cells to augment the capacity of and improve the reliability of power plants fueled by natural gas.

  6. Maintaining a Sense of Control in the Context of Cognitive Challenge: Greater Stability in Control Beliefs Benefits Working Memory

    PubMed Central

    Agrigoroaei, Stefan; Neupert, Shevaun D.; Lachman, Margie E.

    2013-01-01

    We considered the functional role of control beliefs for cognitive performance by focusing on patterns of stability across multiple trials increasing in level of difficulty. We assessed 56 adults aged 18-88 on working memory tasks. We examined stability vs. lability (intraindividual variability, IIV) in control beliefs and the relationships with anxiety, distraction, and performance. Age was positively associated with IIV in control and performance, and IIV increased with task difficulty. Those maintaining stable control beliefs had better performance, and showed less anxiety and distraction. Those with lower stability and less control showed steeper declines in performance and increases in distraction. The findings suggest that stability of control beliefs may serve a protective function in the context of cognitively challenging tasks. PMID:23745114

  7. Benefits and Challenges with Applying Unique Molecular Identifiers in Next Generation Sequencing to Detect Low Frequency Mutations.

    PubMed

    Kou, Ruqin; Lam, Ham; Duan, Hairong; Ye, Li; Jongkam, Narisra; Chen, Weizhi; Zhang, Shifang; Li, Shihong

    2016-01-01

    Indexing individual template molecules with a unique identifier (UID) before PCR and deep sequencing is promising for detecting low frequency mutations, as true mutations could be distinguished from PCR errors or sequencing errors based on consensus among reads sharing same index. In an effort to develop a robust assay to detect from urine low-abundant bladder cancer cells carrying well-documented mutations, we have tested the idea first on a set of mock templates, with wild type and known mutants mixed at defined ratios. We have measured the combined error rate for PCR and Illumina sequencing at each nucleotide position of three exons, and demonstrated the power of a UID in distinguishing and correcting errors. In addition, we have demonstrated that PCR sampling bias, rather than PCR errors, challenges the UID-deep sequencing method in faithfully detecting low frequency mutation.

  8. Benefits and Challenges with Applying Unique Molecular Identifiers in Next Generation Sequencing to Detect Low Frequency Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Ruqin; Lam, Ham; Duan, Hairong; Ye, Li; Jongkam, Narisra; Chen, Weizhi; Zhang, Shifang; Li, Shihong

    2016-01-01

    Indexing individual template molecules with a unique identifier (UID) before PCR and deep sequencing is promising for detecting low frequency mutations, as true mutations could be distinguished from PCR errors or sequencing errors based on consensus among reads sharing same index. In an effort to develop a robust assay to detect from urine low-abundant bladder cancer cells carrying well-documented mutations, we have tested the idea first on a set of mock templates, with wild type and known mutants mixed at defined ratios. We have measured the combined error rate for PCR and Illumina sequencing at each nucleotide position of three exons, and demonstrated the power of a UID in distinguishing and correcting errors. In addition, we have demonstrated that PCR sampling bias, rather than PCR errors, challenges the UID-deep sequencing method in faithfully detecting low frequency mutation. PMID:26752634

  9. Exploiting Nutritional Value of Staple Foods in the World's Semi-Arid Areas: Risks, Benefits, Challenges and Opportunities of Sorghum.

    PubMed

    Proietti, Ilaria; Frazzoli, Chiara; Mantovani, Alberto

    2015-03-30

    Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) is a drought-resistant crop and an important food resource in terms of nutritional as well as social-economic values, especially in semi-arid environments. Cultivar selection and processing methods have been observed to impact on composition and functional and nutritional value of sorghum. Amino acid imbalance, cyanogenic glycosides, endogenous anti-nutrients, mycotoxins and toxic elements are among factors impairing its nutritional value. This paper reviews possible approaches (varieties selection, production practices, cooking processes) to improve the benefits-to-risks balance of sorghum meal, to mitigate the risk of deficiencies and/or imbalances and to improve effects on human nutrition. Opportunity for avoiding dietary diversification in high sorghum consumers is also discussed, e.g., tryptophan and niacin deficits potentially related to pellagra, or unavailability of proteins and divalent cations (e.g., Fe, Zn) due to the antinutrient activity of phytic acid and tannins. As potential candidate for production investments, the role of sorghum in preserving biological diversity is also considered.

  10. Family meals: perceptions of benefits and challenges among parents of 8- to 10-year-old children.

    PubMed

    Fulkerson, Jayne A; Story, Mary; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Rydell, Sarah

    2008-04-01

    The study purpose was to examine parental perceptions of the mealtime environment in families with school-aged children and identify strategies to improve the dietary quality of meals. Cross-sectional surveys were completed by a convenience sample of 107 parents (86% mothers, 14% fathers) of 8- to 10-year-old children who were recruited from afterschool child care programs/elementary schools. SAS (version 9.1) was used to produce descriptive frequencies of parental reports of positive and negative perceptions of mealtime. Parents reported frequent family meals; however, they indicated that family dinners were eaten at full-service restaurants, purchased from fast-food establishments, or picked up as takeout foods at least weekly (47.0%, 28.3%, and 23.8%, respectively). Conflicts about food were problematic for some families (40.2% on at least some days), and appeared to be related to children's food pickiness. Parents reported many benefits of family meals, including time for conversation, feelings of togetherness, shared nutrition, and ceremony. Areas where parents desired change included assistance with meal planning, food preparation, and clean-up; spending more time at meals; assistance with children's food pickiness; new recipes and meal ideas; and decreasing conflict at mealtimes. Findings suggest that interventions to increase family meal frequency and promote healthful foods at mealtimes should address promoting food acceptance among children, sharing responsibilities among parents and children for meal planning and preparation, decreasing conflict at meals, and eating out healthfully.

  11. Functional foods: benefits, concerns and challenges-a position paper from the american council on science and health.

    PubMed

    Hasler, Clare M

    2002-12-01

    Functional foods can be considered to be those whole, fortified, enriched or enhanced foods that provide health benefits beyond the provision of essential nutrients (e.g., vitamins and minerals), when they are consumed at efficacious levels as part of a varied diet on a regular basis. Linking the consumption of functional foods or food ingredients with health claims should be based on sound scientific evidence, with the "gold standard" being replicated, randomized, placebo-controlled, intervention trials in human subjects. However, not all foods on the market today that are claimed to be functional foods are supported by enough solid data to merit such claims. This review categorizes a variety of functional foods according to the type of evidence supporting their functionality, the strength of that evidence and the recommended intakes. Functional foods represent one of the most intensively investigated and widely promoted areas in the food and nutrition sciences today. However, it must be emphasized that these foods and ingredients are not magic bullets or panaceas for poor health habits. Diet is only one aspect of a comprehensive approach to good health.

  12. The Benefits and Challenges of Managing Asthma in Hispanic Families in South Texas: A Mixed-Methods Study.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Genny; Perez-Patron, Maria J; Lucio, Rose L; Cabrera, Lucia; Trevino, Alyssa; Xu, Xiaohui; Mier, Nelda

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the experience of Hispanic parents of children diagnosed with asthma can be useful in the delivery of effective and meaningful asthma education. In order to assess the needs of Hispanic families with asthmatic children in South Texas, investigators utilized a combination of qualitative and quantitative research methods. This study aimed (1) to assess the impact of asthma in the quality of life of Hispanic children and their families and (2) to identify barriers and challenges to asthma management as perceived by parents of children diagnosed with asthma. A mixed-methods study included a quality-of-life survey and focus group discussions. The Children's Health Survey for Asthma (CHSA) was completed by 90 parents of children with asthma. Three focus groups were conducted with 15 low-income, Hispanic parents of asthmatic children to assess their needs and experience in managing the disease. Results from the CHSA showed that asthma significantly affects the quality of life of children with asthma and their families, particularly the emotional dimensions and the child's physical health. Fifty-three percent of the children had visited the emergency room, and 51% had been hospitalized due to asthma. One out of five parents had missed work, and 27% of children had missed school in the past 2 weeks due to the child's asthma. In the focus group discussions, the key themes emerging included lack of asthma knowledge, the burden of disease for asthmatic children and their families, and the importance of asthma education and self-management behaviors for asthma control. One of the main challenges faced by Hispanic families with asthmatic children is the lack of asthma-related knowledge to help understand and control their children's disease. Lack of knowledge and self-management skills lead to significant stress and anxiety among children with asthma and their parents. Results highlight that while asthma has an effect on the quality of life of children and their

  13. A case study of the implementation of an ergonomics improvement committee in a Brazilian hospital--Challenges and benefits.

    PubMed

    Bolis, Ivan; Sznelwar, Laerte I

    2016-03-01

    This article discusses the creation of an improvement committee (IC) to implement policies aimed at improving working conditions in a public health institution in the city of São Paulo. Suggestions were proposed for future implementations of this organizational mechanism, pursuant to the presentation of the process of its formation and the main results achieved. The findings led to the conclusion that good outcomes require autonomy and support from management, and the adoption of effective measures to improve and legitimize the improvement committee's existence. Another important issue is facilitating worker involvement and creating a locus for dialog among people with different visions within the organization. Thus, two approaches converge: a top-down approach in which policies are defined and improvement actions are actually implemented based on a general outlook of the production and work system, and a bottom-up approach specific to employees who are also engaged in improvement policies and in putting them into practice. It is also possible to point out problems and opportunities arising from actual work situations to the higher levels of management. This kind of approach fits with macroergonomics, because it integrates strategy, organization and work issues. It is possible to discuss the benefits of this approach for companies and provide conditions for workers to engage effectively in these processes. In conclusion, these proposals can be considered from an emancipatory perspective, given that different actors should be able to codetermine working conditions and work content, thus directly influencing their individual and collective experiences. The support and commitment of upper management are essential elements of success in maximizing the effectiveness of this organizational approach.

  14. Integral Healthcare: The Benefits and Challenges of Integrating Complementary and Alternative Medicine with a Conventional Healthcare Practice

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Christina L.

    2009-01-01

    Today’s medicine is in the midst of an undeniable crisis. Calls to reform healthcare are in the forefront of economic and political discussions worldwide. Economic pressures reduce the amount of time physicians can spend with patients contributing to burnout among medical staff and endangering the patient iatrogenically. Politicians are getting involved as the public is calling for more affordable healthcare. A new paradigm must be embraced in order to address all aspects of this dilemma. It is clear that science and technology have resulted in vastly improved understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of disease, but the emphasis on science and technology to the exclusion of other elements of healing has also served to limit the development of a model that humanizes healthcare. The healing of a patient must include more than the biology and chemistry of their physical body; by necessity, it must include the mental, emotional and spiritual aspects. Because of these challenges, the development of an integral healthcare system that is rooted in appropriate regulation and supported by rigorous scientific evidence is the direction that many models of integrative healthcare are moving towards in the 21st century. PMID:21614160

  15. Coming Out in Class: Challenges and Benefits of Active Learning in a Biology Classroom for LGBTQIA Students.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Katelyn M; Brownell, Sara E

    As we transition our undergraduate biology classrooms from traditional lectures to active learning, the dynamics among students become more important. These dynamics can be influenced by student social identities. One social identity that has been unexamined in the context of undergraduate biology is the spectrum of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, and asexual (LGBTQIA) identities. In this exploratory interview study, we probed the experiences and perceptions of seven students who identify as part of the LGBTQIA community. We found that students do not always experience the undergraduate biology classroom to be a welcoming or accepting place for their identities. In contrast to traditional lectures, active-learning classes increase the relevance of their LGBTQIA identities due to the increased interactions among students during group work. Finally, working with other students in active-learning classrooms can present challenges and opportunities for students considering their LGBTQIA identity. These findings indicate that these students' LGBTQIA identities are affecting their experience in the classroom and that there may be specific instructional practices that can mitigate some of the possible obstacles. We hope that this work can stimulate discussions about how to broadly make our active-learning biology classes more inclusive of this specific population of students.

  16. Coming Out in Class: Challenges and Benefits of Active Learning in a Biology Classroom for LGBTQIA Students

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Katelyn M.; Brownell, Sara E.

    2016-01-01

    As we transition our undergraduate biology classrooms from traditional lectures to active learning, the dynamics among students become more important. These dynamics can be influenced by student social identities. One social identity that has been unexamined in the context of undergraduate biology is the spectrum of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, and asexual (LGBTQIA) identities. In this exploratory interview study, we probed the experiences and perceptions of seven students who identify as part of the LGBTQIA community. We found that students do not always experience the undergraduate biology classroom to be a welcoming or accepting place for their identities. In contrast to traditional lectures, active-learning classes increase the relevance of their LGBTQIA identities due to the increased interactions among students during group work. Finally, working with other students in active-learning classrooms can present challenges and opportunities for students considering their LGBTQIA identity. These findings indicate that these students’ LGBTQIA identities are affecting their experience in the classroom and that there may be specific instructional practices that can mitigate some of the possible obstacles. We hope that this work can stimulate discussions about how to broadly make our active-learning biology classes more inclusive of this specific population of students. PMID:27543636

  17. Knowledge representation and management: benefits and challenges of the semantic web for the fields of KRM and NLP.

    PubMed

    Rassinoux, A-M

    2011-01-01

    To summarize excellent current research in the field of knowledge representation and management (KRM). A synopsis of the articles selected for the IMIA Yearbook 2011 is provided and an attempt to highlight the current trends in the field is sketched. This last decade, with the extension of the text-based web towards a semantic-structured web, NLP techniques have experienced a renewed interest in knowledge extraction. This trend is corroborated through the five papers selected for the KRM section of the Yearbook 2011. They all depict outstanding studies that exploit NLP technologies whenever possible in order to accurately extract meaningful information from various biomedical textual sources. Bringing semantic structure to the meaningful content of textual web pages affords the user with cooperative sharing and intelligent finding of electronic data. As exemplified by the best paper selection, more and more advanced biomedical applications aim at exploiting the meaningful richness of free-text documents in order to generate semantic metadata and recently to learn and populate domain ontologies. These later are becoming a key piece as they allow portraying the semantics of the Semantic Web content. Maintaining their consistency with documents and semantic annotations that refer to them is a crucial challenge of the Semantic Web for the coming years.

  18. The Benefits and Challenges of an Interfaced Electronic Health Record and Laboratory Information System: Effects on Laboratory Processes.

    PubMed

    Petrides, Athena K; Bixho, Ida; Goonan, Ellen M; Bates, David W; Shaykevich, Shimon; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Landman, Adam B; Tanasijevic, Milenko J; Melanson, Stacy E F

    2017-03-01

    - A recent government regulation incentivizes implementation of an electronic health record (EHR) with computerized order entry and structured results display. Many institutions have also chosen to interface their EHR with their laboratory information system (LIS). - To determine the impact of an interfaced EHR-LIS on laboratory processes. - We analyzed several different processes before and after implementation of an interfaced EHR-LIS: the turnaround time, the number of stat specimens received, venipunctures per patient per day, preanalytic errors in phlebotomy, the number of add-on tests using a new electronic process, and the number of wrong test codes ordered. Data were gathered through the LIS and/or EHR. - The turnaround time for potassium and hematocrit decreased significantly (P = .047 and P = .004, respectively). The number of stat orders also decreased significantly, from 40% to 7% for potassium and hematocrit, respectively (P < .001 for both). Even though the average number of inpatient venipunctures per day increased from 1.38 to 1.62 (P < .001), the average number of preanalytic errors per month decreased from 2.24 to 0.16 per 1000 specimens (P < .001). Overall there was a 16% increase in add-on tests. The number of wrong test codes ordered was high and it was challenging for providers to correctly order some common tests. - An interfaced EHR-LIS significantly improved within-laboratory turnaround time and decreased stat requests and preanalytic phlebotomy errors. Despite increasing the number of add-on requests, an electronic add-on process increased efficiency and improved provider satisfaction. Laboratories implementing an interfaced EHR-LIS should be cautious of its effects on test ordering and patient venipunctures per day.

  19. Schools of the Pacific Rainfall Climate Experiment: The Benefits and Challenges of Student Participation in Scientific Research Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrissey, M. L.; Postawko, S.

    2005-12-01

    The Schools of the Pacific Rainfall Climate Experiment (SPaRCE) is a cooperative field project involving elementary, middle school, high school, college and trade school students, along with personnel from Pacific Island meteorological services, in expanding and enhancing the climate observation network across the Pacific Basin. The goals of the program are to: 1. foster interest and increase awareness among students, teachers, and local island meteorologists as to the importance of cooperation between nations in investigating potential climate change, 2. to educate students and teachers as to the importance of rainfall (particularly in the Pacific region) to climate studies, 3. to increase the observations of climate variable across the Pacific, and to incorporate the collected observations into a comprehensive Pacific database to be used for climate research purposes 4. to make a major contribution to the global climate research effort by collecting and analyzing Pacific climate data, 5. and to encourage scientific and cultural exchange. The SPaRCE program has been working with students, teachers, and meteorological service personnel on various Pacific islands and atolls since 1991. Much of the data collected has been incorporated into the Comprehensive Pacific Rainfall Database and has been used as verification data for several satellite rainfall studies. In addition, several students who got involved in the SPaRCE program at their school have gone on to work at their local meteorological service upon graduation. Significant advances in the technological capabilities in most of the Pacific island countries have taken place over the years. These advances have been both a help and a hindrance in getting schools involved in making accurate, reliable, long-term climate observations and getting students excited about analyzing these data. One challenge that has remained fairly constant over the years is that of teacher turn-over in these developing island nations.

  20. Modeling and managing urban water demand through smart meters: Benefits and challenges from current research and emerging trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cominola, A.; Giuliani, M.; Castelletti, A.; Piga, D.; Rizzoli, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    Urban population growth, climate and land use change are expected to boost residential water demand in urban contexts in the next decades. In such a context, developing suitable demand-side management strategies is essential to meet future water demands, pursue water savings, and reduce the costs for water utilities. Yet, the effectiveness of water demand management strategies (WDMS) relies on our understanding of water consumers' behavior, their consumption habits, and the water use drivers. While low spatial and temporal resolution water consumption data, as traditionally gathered for billing purposes, hardly support this understanding, the advent of high-resolution, smart metering technologies allowed for quasi real-time monitoring water consumption at the single household level. This, in turn, is advancing our ability in characterizing consumers' behavior, modeling, and designing user-oriented residential water demand management strategies. Several water smart metering programs have been rolled-out in the last two decades worldwide, addressing one or more of the following water demand management phases: (i) data gathering, (ii) water end-uses characterization, (iii) user modeling, (iv) design and implementation of personalized WDMS. Moreover, the number of research studies in this domain is quickly increasing and big economic investments are currently being devoted worldwide to smart metering programs. With this work, we contribute the first comprehensive review of more than 100 experiences in the field of residential water demand modeling and management, and we propose a general framework for their classification. We revise consolidated practices, identify emerging trends and highlight the challenges and opportunities for future developments given by the use of smart meters advancing residential water demand management. Our analysis of the status quo of smart urban water demand management research and market constitutes a structured collection of information

  1. The electrolyte challenge for a direct methanol-air polymer electrolyte fuel cell operating at temperatures up to 200 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savinell, Robert; Yeager, Ernest; Tryk, Donald; Landau, Uziel; Wainright, Jesse; Gervasio, Dominic; Cahan, Boris; Litt, Morton; Rogers, Charles; Scherson, Daniel

    1993-01-01

    Novel polymer electrolytes are being evaluated for use in a direct methanol-air fuel cell operating at temperatures in excess of 100 C. The evaluation includes tests of thermal stability, ionic conductivity, and vapor transport characteristics. The preliminary results obtained to date indicate that a high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell is feasible. For example, Nafion 117 when equilibrated with phosphoric acid has a conductivity of at least 0.4 Omega(exp -1)cm(exp -1) at temperatures up to 200 C in the presence of 400 torr of water vapor and methanol vapor cross over equivalent to 1 mA/cm(exp 2) under a one atmosphere methanol pressure differential at 135 C. Novel polymers are also showing similar encouraging results. The flexibility to modify and optimize the properties by custom synthesis of these novel polymers presents an exciting opportunity to develop an efficient and compact methanol fuel cell.

  2. Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the U.S. transportation sector. Technical report fourteen: Market potential and impacts of alternative fuel use in light-duty vehicles -- A 2000/2010 analysis

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    In this report, estimates are provided of the potential, by 2010, to displace conventional light-duty vehicle motor fuels with alternative fuels--compressed natural gas (CNG), liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), methanol from natural gas, ethanol from grain and from cellulosic feedstocks, and electricity--and with replacement fuels such as oxygenates added to gasoline. The 2010 estimates include the motor fuel displacement resulting both from government programs (including the Clean Air Act and EPACT) and from potential market forces. This report also provides an estimate of motor fuel displacement by replacement and alterative fuels in the year 2000. However, in contrast to the 2010 estimates, the year 2000 estimate is restricted to an accounting of the effects of existing programs and regulations. 27 figs., 108 tabs.

  3. Ebola Preparedness Resources for Acute-Care Hospitals in the United States: A Cross-Sectional Study of Costs, Benefits, and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Smit, Michael A; Rasinski, Kenneth A; Braun, Barbara I; Kusek, Linda L; Milstone, Aaron M; Morgan, Daniel J; Mermel, Leonard A

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess resource allocation and costs associated with US hospitals preparing for the possible spread of the 2014-2015 Ebola virus disease (EVD) epidemic in the United States. METHODS A survey was sent to a stratified national probability sample (n=750) of US general medical/surgical hospitals selected from the American Hospital Association (AHA) list of hospitals. The survey was also sent to all children's general hospitals listed by the AHA (n=60). The survey assessed EVD preparation supply costs and overtime staff hours. The average national wage was multiplied by labor hours to calculate overtime labor costs. Additional information collected included challenges, benefits, and perceived value of EVD preparedness activities. RESULTS The average amount spent by hospitals on combined supply and overtime labor costs was $80,461 (n=133; 95% confidence interval [CI], $56,502-$104,419). Multivariate analysis indicated that small hospitals (mean, $76,167) spent more on staff overtime costs per 100 beds than large hospitals (mean, $15,737; P<.0001). The overall cost for acute-care hospitals in the United States to prepare for possible EVD cases was estimated to be $361,108,968. The leading challenge was difficulty obtaining supplies from vendors due to shortages (83%; 95% CI, 78%-88%) and the greatest benefit was improved knowledge about personal protective equipment (89%; 95% CI, 85%-93%). CONCLUSIONS The financial impact of EVD preparedness activities was substantial. Overtime cost in smaller hospitals was >3 times that in larger hospitals. Planning for emerging infectious disease identification, triage, and management should be conducted at regional and national levels in the United States to facilitate efficient and appropriate allocation of resources in acute-care facilities. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:405-410.

  4. Perceived benefits and challenges for low-income mothers of having family meals with preschool-aged children: childhood memories matter.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Khushi; Herman, Allison N; Wright, Gretchen; Bruton, Yasmeen; Fisher, Jennifer O; Whitaker, Robert C

    2013-11-01

    Eating regular family meals is associated with a lower risk of obesity among preschool-aged children. Children in lower-income households are at higher risk for obesity, but there is little information about their mothers' perceptions of family meals, and such information could improve nutrition counseling. To identify the perceived benefits and challenges of having family meals, four focus groups were conducted with 20 mothers of preschool-aged children living in low-income households in Philadelphia, PA. Three authors independently analyzed verbatim transcripts using an inductive method of open coding, and themes were established by consensus among all authors. Of the 20 mothers, 18 were black, 11 had education beyond high school, and 12 were living with an adult partner or husband. Mothers' strong childhood memories of mealtimes, both negative and positive, motivated them to have family meals because of the opportunities afforded by mealtimes to build strong relationships with their children. However, mothers also described needing help, especially from other household adults, in preparing meals and establishing calm and order with their children during mealtimes. To identify what motivates the mothers of low-income, preschool-aged children to have family meals, registered dietitians can benefit from asking about the mothers' own childhood experiences of family meals. Studies are needed to examine whether such an approach to identifying maternal motivations, when combined with practical advice about overcoming challenges with meal preparation and managing children's mealtime behavior, could lead to more frequent and nutritious family meals in this population. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The challenge of documenting water quality benefits of conservation practices: a review of USDA-ARS's conservation effects assessment project watershed studies.

    PubMed

    Tomer, M D; Locke, M A

    2011-01-01

    The Conservation Effects Assessment Project was established to quantify water quality benefits of conservation practices supported by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). In 2004, watershed assessment studies were begun in fourteen agricultural watersheds with varying cropping systems, landscapes, climate, and water quality concerns. This paper reviews USDA Agricultural Research Service 'Benchmark' watershed studies and the challenge of identifying water quality benefits in watersheds. Study goals included modeling and field research to assess practices, and evaluation of practice placement in watersheds. Not all goals were met within five years but important lessons were learned. While practices improved water quality, problems persisted in larger watersheds. This dissociation between practice-focused and watershed-scale assessments occurred because: (1) Conservation practices were not targeted at critical sources/pathways of contaminants; (2) Sediment in streams originated more from channel and bank erosion than from soil erosion; (3) Timing lags, historical legacies, and shifting climate combined to mask effects of practice implementation; and (4) Water quality management strategies addressed single contaminants with little regard for trade-offs among contaminants. These lessons could help improve conservation strategies and set water quality goals with realistic timelines. Continued research on agricultural water quality could better integrate modeling and monitoring capabilities, and address ecosystem services.

  6. Benefits of a health impact assessment in relation to fuel poverty: assessing Luton's Affordable Warmth Strategy and the need for a national mandatory strategy.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Jill; Habgood, Veronica

    2008-05-01

    The links between fuel poverty and poor health are well documented, yet there is no statutory requirement on local authorities to develop fuel poverty strategies, which tend to be patchy nationally and differ substantially in quality. Fuel poverty starts from the perspective of income, even though interventions can improve health. The current public health agenda calls for more partnership-based, cost-effective strategies based on sound evidence. Fuel poverty represents a key area where there is currently little local evidence quantifying and qualifying health gain arising from strategic interventions. As a result, this initial study sought to apply the principles of a health impact assessment to Luton's Affordable Warmth Strategy, exploring the potential to identify health impact arising--as a baseline for future research--in the context of the public health agenda. A national strategy would help ensure the promotion of targeted fuel poverty strategies.

  7. Conductive Education: Benefits and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratliffe, Katherine T.; Sanekane, Cindy

    2009-01-01

    Conductive education (CE) is an intensive, holistic approach to the education of people with physical disabilities that recognizes that teaching and learning are related to the emotional, cognitive, and physical aspects of individuals. Despite its popularity in the United States and throughout the world, research has not demonstrated a clear…

  8. Conductive Education: Benefits and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratliffe, Katherine T.; Sanekane, Cindy

    2009-01-01

    Conductive education (CE) is an intensive, holistic approach to the education of people with physical disabilities that recognizes that teaching and learning are related to the emotional, cognitive, and physical aspects of individuals. Despite its popularity in the United States and throughout the world, research has not demonstrated a clear…

  9. An external peer review of the U.S. Department of Energy`s assessment of ``damages and benefits of the fuel cycles: Estimation methods, impacts, and values``. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-09

    The need for better assessments of the ``external`` benefits and costs of environmental effects of various fuel cycles was identified during the development of the National Energy Strategy. The growing importance of this issue was emphasized by US Department of Energy (DOE) management because over half of the states were already pursuing some form of social costing in electricity regulation and a well-established technical basis for such decisions was lacking. This issue was identified as a major area of controversy--both scientifically and politically--in developing energy policies at the state and national level. In 1989, the DOE`s Office of Domestic and International Energy Policy commissioned a study of the external environmental damages and benefits of the major fuel cycles involved in electric power generation. Over the next 3-year period, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Resources for the Future conducted the study and produced a series of documents (fuel cycle documents) evaluating the costs of environmental damages of the coal, oil, natural gas, biomass, hydroelectric, and nuclear fuel cycles, as well as the Background Document on methodological issues. These documents described work that took almost 3 years and $2.5 million to complete and whose implications could be far reaching. In 1992, the Secretary of Energy sought advice on the overall concepts underlying the studies and the means employed to estimate environmental externalities. He asked the Secretary of Energy`s Advisory Board to undertake a peer review of the fuel cycle studies and encouraged the Board to turn to outside expertise, as needed.

  10. Fuel flexible fuel injector

    DOEpatents

    Tuthill, Richard S; Davis, Dustin W; Dai, Zhongtao

    2015-02-03

    A disclosed fuel injector provides mixing of fuel with airflow by surrounding a swirled fuel flow with first and second swirled airflows that ensures mixing prior to or upon entering the combustion chamber. Fuel tubes produce a central fuel flow along with a central airflow through a plurality of openings to generate the high velocity fuel/air mixture along the axis of the fuel injector in addition to the swirled fuel/air mixture.

  11. Recent advances and challenges in the anode architecture and their modifications for the applications of microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    kumar, G Gnana; Sarathi, V G Sathiya; Nahm, Kee Suk

    2013-05-15

    Microbial fuel cells (MFC), the ergonomic technology connects the liaison of fuel cell architecture and biological resources. Many viable applications like wastewater treatment, biosensors and bioremediation can be made possible with the help of MFCs. This technology is still at its toddler stage and immense works are still in progress to increase the volumetric energy density of MFCs. The overall performance of MFC depends on the cardinal part of the system; anode. A number of anode materials are currently in research to adjudge the better one in terms of the startup time, power output and durability. A wide range of possibilities are now currently available in the fabrication and modification of anode materials to substantially increase the power performances. This review adumbrates the significant requirements of anodes that are essential to be fulfilled, encompasses the aspiring research efforts which have been devoted so far in the anode modification and fabrication strategies to increase the power output, durability and compatibility of the anode interface with the inoculated microorganisms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The Priority and Challenge of High-Power Performance of Low-Platinum Proton-Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Kongkanand, Anusorn; Mathias, Mark F

    2016-04-07

    Substantial progress has been made in reducing proton-exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) cathode platinum loadings from 0.4-0.8 mgPt/cm(2) to about 0.1 mgPt/cm(2). However, at this level of cathode Pt loading, large performance loss is observed at high-current density (>1 A/cm(2)), preventing a reduction in the overall stack cost. This next developmental step is being limited by the presence of a resistance term exhibited at these lower Pt loadings and apparently due to a phenomenon at or near the catalyst surface. This issue can be addressed through the design of catalysts with high and stable Pt dispersion as well as through development and implementation of ionomers designed to interact with Pt in a way that does not constrain oxygen reduction reaction rates. Extrapolating from progress made in past decades, we are optimistic that the concerted efforts of materials and electrode designers can resolve this issue, thus enabling a large step toward fuel cell vehicles that are affordable for the mass market.

  13. Integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) demonstration test

    SciTech Connect

    Steinfeld, G.; Ghezel-Ayagh, H.; Sanderson, R.; Abens, S.

    2000-07-01

    As concern about the environment generates interest in ultra-clean energy plants, fuel cell power plants can respond to the challenge. Fuel cells convert hydrocarbon fuels to electricity at efficiencies exceeding conventional heat engine technologies while generating extremely low emissions. Emissions of SOx and NOx are expected to be well below current and anticipated future standards. Nitrogen oxides, a product of combustion, will be extremely low in this power plant because power is produced electrochemically rather than by combustion. Due to its higher efficiencies, a fuel cell power plant also produces less carbon dioxide. Fuel cells in combination with coal gasification, are an efficient and environmentally acceptable means to utilize the abundant coal reserves both in the US and around the world. To demonstrate this technology, FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE), is planning to build and test a 2-MW Fuel Cell Power Plant for operation on coal derived gas. This power plant is based on Direct Fuel Cell (DFC{trademark}) technology and will be part of a Clean Coal V IGCC project supported by the US DOE. A British Gas Lurgi (BGL) slagging fixed-bed gasification system with cold gas clean up is planned as part of a 400 MW IGCC power plant to provide a fuel gas slip stream to the fuel cell. The IGFC power plant will be built by Kentucky Pioneer Energy, A subsidiary of Global Energy, in Clark County, KY. This demonstration will result in the world's largest fuel cell power plant operating on coal derived gas. The objective of this test is to demonstrate fuel cell operation on coal derived gas at a commercial scale and to verify the efficiency and environmental benefits.

  14. Benefits and challenges in practice-oriented psychotherapy research in Germany: the TK and the QS-PSY-BAY projects of quality assurance in outpatient psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Bernhard Michael; Lutz, Wolfgang; Steffanowski, Andres; Wittmann, Werner W; Boehnke, Jan R; Rubel, Julian; Scheidt, Carl E; Caspar, Franz; Vogel, Heiner; Altmann, Uwe; Steyer, Rolf; Zimmermann, Anna; Bruckmayer, Ellen; von Heymann, Friedrich; Kramer, Dietmar; Kirchmann, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Two patient-focused long-term research projects performed in the German outpatient psychotherapy system are focused on in this article. The TK (Techniker Krankenkasse) project is the first study to evaluate a quality assurance and feedback system with regard to its practical feasibility in German routine care. The other study ("Quality Assurance in Outpatient Psychotherapy in Bavaria"; QS-PSY-BAY) was designed to test a new approach for quality assurance in outpatient psychotherapy using electronic documentation of patient characteristics and outcome parameters. In addition this project provides the opportunity to analyze data on health-related costs for the patients undergoing outpatient psychotherapy. Both projects and their results indicating high effect sizes are briefly described. From the perspectives of the research teams, advisory boards and other stakeholders, the experiences with these projects are discussed focusing on obstacles, challenges, difficulties, and benefits in developing and implementing the studies. The triangle collaboration of therapists, researchers, and health insurance companies/health service institutions turned out to be fruitful in both studies. Despite some controversies between the partners the experiences indicate the importance of practiced-research collaborations to provide relevant information about the delivery of outpatient psychotherapy in the health system.

  15. Sharing the tracks to good tucker: identifying the benefits and challenges of implementing community food programs for Aboriginal communities in Victoria.

    PubMed

    Murray, Margaret; Bonnell, Emily; Thorpe, Sharon; Browne, Jennifer; Barbour, Liza; MacDonald, Catherine; Palermo, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Food insecurity is a significant issue in the Victorian Aboriginal population, contributing to the health disparity and reduced life expectancy. Community food programs are a strategy used to minimise individual level food insecurity, with little evidence regarding their effectiveness for Aboriginal populations. The aim of this study was to explore the role of community food programs operating for Aboriginal people in Victoria and their perceived influence on food access and nutrition. Semistructured interviews were conducted with staff (n=23) from a purposive sample of 18 community food programs across Victoria. Interviews explored the programs' operation, key benefits to the community, challenges and recommendations for setting up a successful community food program. Results were analysed using a qualitative thematic approach and revealed three main themes regarding key factors for the success of community food programs: (1) community food programs for Aboriginal people should support access to safe, affordable, nutritious food in a socially and culturally acceptable environment; (2) a community development approach is essential for program sustainability; and (3) there is a need to build the capacity of community food programs as part of a strategy to ensure sustainability. Community food programs may be an effective initiative for reducing food insecurity in the Victorian Aboriginal population.

  16. Misrepresentation of vital status follow-up: challenging the integrity of the PLATO trial and the claimed mortality benefit of ticagrelor versus clopidogrel.

    PubMed

    DiNicolantonio, James J; Tomek, Ales

    2013-10-30

    Ticagrelor, a novel, reversible, and oral P2Y12 receptor antagonist, was claimed to reduce all-cause mortality compared to clopidogrel in the PLATO trial. We sought to ascertain vital status follow-up for clopidogrel and ticagrelor to determine if any discrepancy existed by reviewing data from the FDA Complete Response Review. The FDA Complete Response Review indicated misrepresentation of vital status follow-up by the sponsor's presenter at the Cardiovascular and Renal Drugs Advisory Committee. Instead of five patients with missing vital status follow-up, the FDA primary efficacy reviewer indicated that there was a minimum of 106 patients. Additionally and more concerning was the fact that significantly more patients on ticagrelor (3.1%, n = 289 patients) had incomplete vital status follow-up versus clopidogrel (2.6%, n = 242 patients, p = 0.04 for the difference). The Advisory Committee that voted in favor to approve ticagrelor was given misrepresented data, which may have affected the approval of ticagrelor. The fact that significantly more patients on ticagrelor had incomplete vital status follow-up versus clopidogrel challenges the claimed mortality benefit of ticagrelor and the approval of the PLATO trial. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A scoping review of the literature on benefits and challenges of participating in patient education programs aimed at promoting self-management for people living with chronic illness.

    PubMed

    Stenberg, Una; Haaland-Øverby, Mette; Fredriksen, Kari; Westermann, Karl Fredrik; Kvisvik, Toril

    2016-11-01

    To give a comprehensive overview of benefits and challenges from participating in group based patient education programs that are carried out by health care professionals and lay participants, aimed at promoting self-management for people living with chronic illness. We searched 8 literature databases. Full text articles meeting the inclusion criteria were retrieved and reviewed. Arksey and O'Malley's framework for scoping studies guided the review process and thematic analysis was undertaken to synthesize extracted data. Of the 5935 titles identified, 47 articles were included in this review. The participants experienced the programs as beneficial according to less symptom distress and greater awareness of their own health, improved self-management strategies, peer support, learning and hope. A substantial evidence base supports the conclusion that group based self-management patient education programs in different ways have been experienced as beneficial, but more research is needed. The insights gained from this review can enable researchers, health care professionals, and participants to understand the complexity in evaluating self-management patient education programs, and constitute a basis for a more standardized and systematic evaluation. The results may also encourage health care professionals in planning and carrying out programs in cooperation with lay participants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Review of Biojet Fuel Conversion Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei-Cheng; Tao, Ling; Markham, Jennifer; Zhang, Yanan; Tan, Eric; Batan, Liaw; Warner, Ethan; Biddy, Mary

    2016-07-01

    Biomass-derived jet (biojet) fuel has become a key element in the aviation industry’s strategy to reduce operating costs and environmental impacts. Researchers from the oil-refining industry, the aviation industry, government, biofuel companies, agricultural organizations, and academia are working toward developing commercially viable and sustainable processes that produce long-lasting renewable jet fuels with low production costs and low greenhouse gas emissions. Additionally, jet fuels must meet ASTM International specifications and potentially be a 100% drop-in replacement for the current petroleum jet fuel. The combustion characteristics and engine tests demonstrate the benefits of running the aviation gas turbine with biojet fuels. In this study, the current technologies for producing renewable jet fuels, categorized by alcohols-to-jet, oil-to-jet, syngas-to-jet, and sugar-to-jet pathways, are reviewed. The main challenges for each technology pathway, including feedstock availability, conceptual process design, process economics, life-cycle assessment of greenhouse gas emissions, and commercial readiness, are discussed. Although the feedstock price and availability and energy intensity of the process are significant barriers, biomass-derived jet fuel has the potential to replace a significant portion of conventional jet fuel required to meet commercial and military demand.

  19. Energy Storage Fuel Cell Vehicle Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A; Markel, T; Zolot, M; Sprik, S; Tataria, H; Duong, T

    2005-08-01

    In recent years, hydrogen fuel cell (FC) vehicle technology has received considerable attention as a strategy to decrease oil consumption and reduce harmful emissions. However, the cost, transient response, and cold performance of FC systems may present significant challenges to widespread adoption of the technology for transportation in the next 15 years. The objectives of this effort were to perform energy storage modeling with fuel cell vehicle simulations to quantify the benefits of hybridization and to identify a process for setting the requirements of ES for hydrogen-powered FC vehicles for U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Storage Program.

  20. Critical assessment of power trains with fuel-cell systems and different fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höhlein, B.; von Andrian, S.; Grube, Th; Menzer, R.

    Legal regulations (USA, EU) are a major driving force for intensifying technological developments with respect to the global automobile market. In the future, highly efficient vehicles with very low emission levels will include low-temperature fuel-cell systems (PEFC) as units of electric power trains. With alcohols, ether or hydrocarbons used as fuels for these new electric power trains, hydrogen as PEFC fuel has to be produced on board. These concepts including the direct use of methanol in fuel-cell systems, differ considerably in terms of both their development prospects and the results achieved so far. Based on process engineering analyses for net electricity generation in PEFC-powered power trains, as well as on assumptions for electric power trains and vehicle configurations, different fuel-cell performances and fuel processing units for octane, diesel, methanol, ethanol, propane and dimethylether have been evaluated as fuels. The possible benefits and key challenges for different solutions of power trains with fuel-cell systems/on-board hydrogen production and with direct methanol fuel-cell (DMFC) systems have been assessed. Locally, fuel-cell power trains are almost emission-free and, unlike battery-powered vehicles, their range is comparable to conventional vehicles. Therefore, they have application advantages cases of particularly stringent emission standards requiring zero emission. In comparison to internal combustion engines, using fuel-cell power trains can lead to clear reductions in primary energy demand and global, climate-relevant emissions providing the advantage of the efficiency of the hydrogen/air reaction in the fuel cell is not too drastically reduced by additional conversion steps of on-board hydrogen production, or by losses due to fuel supply provision.

  1. Fuel cells feasibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonfeld, D.; Charng, T.

    1981-01-01

    The technical and economic status of fuel cells is assessed with emphasis on their potential benefits to the Deep Space Network. The fuel cell, what it is, how it operates, and what its outputs are, is reviewed. Major technical problems of the fuel cell and its components are highlighted. Due to these problems and economic considerations it is concluded that fuel cells will not become commercially viable until the early 1990s.

  2. The Stability Challenge on the Pathway to Low and Ultra-Low Platinum Loading for Oxygen Reduction in Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Keeley, Gareth P; Cherevko, Serhiy; Mayrhofer, Karl J J

    2016-01-01

    We report the influence of catalyst loading on rates of platinum degradation in acidic electrolyte at room temperature. A piezoelectric printer is used to deposit spotted arrays of a commercially available catalyst comprised of Pt nanoparticles on a porous carbon support. The kinetically controlled oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity at different loadings is measured using an electrochemical scanning flow cell (SFC), and found to be quite stable over the range of loadings studied. This behaviour, however, contrasts sharply with rates of both transient and quasi-steady-state platinum dissolution. These are shown using downstream inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analytics, to increase as loading becomes lower. This dichotomy between activity and stability has direct implications for the development of improved catalyst materials, as well as for the achievement of current targets for reduced loadings of noble metals for fuel cells and other energy storage devices.

  3. The Stability Challenge on the Pathway to Low and Ultra‐Low Platinum Loading for Oxygen Reduction in Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cherevko, Serhiy

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We report the influence of catalyst loading on rates of platinum degradation in acidic electrolyte at room temperature. A piezoelectric printer is used to deposit spotted arrays of a commercially available catalyst comprised of Pt nanoparticles on a porous carbon support. The kinetically controlled oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity at different loadings is measured using an electrochemical scanning flow cell (SFC), and found to be quite stable over the range of loadings studied. This behaviour, however, contrasts sharply with rates of both transient and quasi‐steady‐state platinum dissolution. These are shown using downstream inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP‐MS) analytics, to increase as loading becomes lower. This dichotomy between activity and stability has direct implications for the development of improved catalyst materials, as well as for the achievement of current targets for reduced loadings of noble metals for fuel cells and other energy storage devices. PMID:27525211

  4. Capital requirements and fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts of potential PNGV fuels.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.; Mintz, M.; Singh, M.; Stork, K.; Vyas, A.; Wang, M.

    1999-03-11

    Our study reveals that supplying gasoline-equivalent demand for the low-market-share scenario requires a capital investment of less than $40 billion for all fuels except H{sub 2}, which will require a total cumulative investment of $150 billion. By contrast, cumulative capital investments under the high-market-share scenario are $50 billion for LNG, $90 billion for ethanol, $100 billion for methanol, $160 billion for CNG and DME, and $560 billion for H{sub 2}. Although these substantial capital requirements are spread over many years, their magnitude could pose a challenge to the widespread introduction of 3X vehicles. Fossil fuel use by US light-duty vehicles declines significantly with introduction of 3X vehicles because of fuel-efficiency improvements for 3X vehicles and because of fuel substitution (which applies to the nonpetroleum-fueled alternatives). Petroleum use for light-duty vehicles in 2030 is reduced by as much as 45% relative to the reference scenario. GHG emissions follow a similar pattern. Total GHG emissions decline by 25-30% with most of the propulsion system/fuel alternatives. For those using renewable fuels (i.e., ethanol and H{sub 2} from solar energy), GHG emissions drop by 33% (H{sub 2}) and 45% (ethanol). Among urban air pollutants, urban NOX emissions decline slightly for 3X vehicles using CIDI and SIDI engines and drop substantially for fuel-cell vehicles. Urban CO emissions decline for CIDI and FCV alternatives, while VOC emissions drop significantly for all alternatives except RFG-, methanol-, and ethanol-fueled SIDI engines. With the exception of CIDI engines fueled by RFD, FT50, or B20 (which increase urban PM{sub 10} emissions by over 30%), all propulsion system/fuel alternatives reduce urban PM{sub 10} emissions. Reductions are approximately 15-20% for fuel cells and for methanol-, ethanol-, CNG-, or LPG-fueled SIDI engines. Table 3 qualitatively summarizes impacts of the 13 alternatives on capital requirements and on energy use and

  5. Flexible Fuel Vehicles: Providing a Renewable Fuel Choice

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2007-05-01

    This Clean Cities Program fact sheet describes aspects of flexible fuel vehicles such as use of E85, special features, benefits of use, costs, and fueling locations. It discusses performance and lists additional resources.

  6. Genetic Evaluation and Use of Chromosome Microarray in Patients with Isolated Heart Defects: Benefits and Challenges of a New Model in Cardiovascular Care

    PubMed Central

    Helm, Benjamin M.; Freeze, Samantha L.

    2016-01-01

    . We also provide perspective regarding the benefits and challenges that lie ahead for this model in the clinical setting. PMID:27379245

  7. Technologies for Enhancement of Bioactive Components and Potential Health Benefits of Cereal and Cereal-Based Foods: Research Advances and Application Challenges.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Ahmed S M; Wang, Peng; Wang, Na; Yang, Shu; Xiao, Zhigang

    2017-08-28

    Cereal grains are a major source of human food and their production has steadily been increased during the last several decades to meet the demand of our increasing world population. The modernized society and the expansion of the cereal food industry created a need for highly efficient processing technologies, especially flour production. Earlier scientific research efforts have led to the invention of the modern steel roller mill, and the refined flour of wheat has become a basic component in most of cereal-based foods such as breads and pastries because of the unique functionality of wheat protein. On the other hand, epidemiological studies have found that consumption of whole cereal grains was health beneficial. The health benefit of whole cereal grain is attributed to the combined effects of micronutrients, phytochemicals, and dietary fibre, which are mainly located in the outer bran layer and the germ. However, the removal of bran and germ from cereal grains during polishing and milling results in refined flour and food products with lower bioactive compounds and dietary fibre contents than those from whole grain. Also, the level of bioactive compounds in cereal food is influenced by other food preparation procedures such as baking, cooking, extrusion, and puffing. Therefore, food scientists and nutritionists are searching for strategies and processing technologies to enhance the content and bioavailability of nutrients, bioactive compounds, and dietary fibre of cereal foods. The objective of this article was to review the research advances on technologies for the enhancement of bioactive compounds and dietary fibre contents of cereal and cereal-based foods. Bioactivities or biological effects of enhanced cereal and cereal-based foods are presented. Challenges facing the application of the proposed technologies in the food industry are also discussed.

  8. Genetic Evaluation and Use of Chromosome Microarray in Patients with Isolated Heart Defects: Benefits and Challenges of a New Model in Cardiovascular Care.

    PubMed

    Helm, Benjamin M; Freeze, Samantha L

    2016-01-01

    also provide perspective regarding the benefits and challenges that lie ahead for this model in the clinical setting.

  9. Balancing benefits and costs in a 4°C world: the need for and challenges of natural-social science dialogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, R. E.

    2012-12-01

    Making wise policy decisions regarding mitigation, adaptation and geoengineering requires fair assessments of the risks of both action and inaction. Such assessments necessitate dialogue between natural and social scientists. Recent attempts by the U.S. government to estimate the social cost of carbon (SCC) for use in balancing the benefits and costs of proposed mitigatory regulations highlight some of the challenges involved. Among them: (1) Scale: The costs and benefits of adaptation decisions generally take place locally, while the benefits of mitigation accrue globally. Most studies to inform adaptation decision have, quite reasonably, taken place at the local scale, but this has left globally aggregate estimates of climate risk in a fairly tenuous state, engaging only a handful of economists. More accurate assessments, needed for making critical policy decisions as we approach a 4°C world, will require both better top-down analyses and a better framework for integrating bottom-up analyses. (2) Historical validation: Integrated assessment models have not been subject to validation studies, such as the historical runs used to test physical climate models. Conducting such studies for impact analyses will require the integration and further development of statistical analyses of the human impact of past and ongoing climate change. If models don't work for a 0.8°C world, there's no reason to think they'll work for a 4°C world. (3) Looking beyond a 4°C world: A world that reaches 4°C in this century may exceed it in the next century; and even if temperature is stabilized, understanding the economic impacts of 4°C warming will require more than the current approach of extrapolating from 2°C impacts. Natural scientists and social scientists need to work together to estimate damage calibration points for considerably warmer conditions. Recent work on the loss of physiologically habitable regions in a >8°C warmer world is a rare step in this direction (Sherwood

  10. Fuel removal, transport, and storage

    SciTech Connect

    Reno, H.W.

    1986-01-01

    The March 1979 accident at Unit 2 of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station (TMI-2) which damaged the core of the reactor resulted in numerous scientific and technical challenges. Some of those challenges involve removing the core debris from the reactor, packaging it into canisters, loading canisters into a rail cask, and transporting the debris to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for storage, examination, and preparation for final disposal. This paper highlights how some challenges were resolved, including lessons learned and benefits derived therefrom. Key to some success at TMI was designing, testing, fabricating, and licensing two rail casks, which each provide double containment of the damaged fuel. 10 refs., 12 figs.

  11. Vision for the development of an international nuclear fuel recycling program

    SciTech Connect

    Kok, Kenneth D.

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of the development of an international nuclear fuel recycle program is to: - Demonstrate advanced recycling by working to prove the technologies needed to close the fuel cycle, minimize waste, and obtain more energy benefit for each unit of fuel. - Build a global vision by enlisting partners to limit the spread of sensitive nuclear technologies in a way that enables nuclear power to meet global challenges. The program will begin with the establishment of a smaller scale secure fuel cycle facility that would serve as a model for international nuclear fuel reprocessing centers that would eventually be built in several countries world wide. The operating process plants will provide the secure and safe guarded environment for the recycle of spent fuel from nuclear power stations around the world. The demonstration site will provide for developing and testing processes that would lead to the more complete use of the energy available in nuclear fuels and the minimization of long lived nuclear waste. (author)

  12. Thin film battery/fuel cell power generation system. Topical report covering Task 5: the design, cost and benefit of an industrial cogeneration system, using a high-temperature solid-oxide-electrolyte (HTSOE) fuel-cell generator

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-02-25

    A literature search and review of the studies analyzing the relationship between thermal and electrical energy demand for various industries and applications resulted in several applications affording reasonable correlation to the thermal and electrical output of the HTSOE fuel cell. One of the best matches was in the aluminum industry, specifically, the Reynolds Aluminum Production Complex near Corpus Christi, Texas. Therefore, a preliminary design of three variations of a cogeneration system for this plant was effected. The designs were not optimized, nor were alternate methods of providing energy compared with the HTSOE cogeneration systems. The designs were developed to the extent necessary to determine technical practicality and economic viability, when compared with alternate conventional fuel (gas and electric) prices in the year 1990.

  13. RDF (Refuse-Derived Fuel) Co-Firing Cost/Benefit Analysis Using the NCEL RDF Cost Model. Volume 2. Appendixes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-01

    scrubber and a baghouse (Puget Sound). The erroneous algorithm added the individual efficiencies when two devices were present, yielding an efficiency of...PRESENT IS BARE TUBE" 73 73 "Boiler has a history of slagging" 74 74 "ADEQUATE BACKUP CAPABILI TY EXISTS" 75 75 "BOILER IS EQUIPPED WITH .-. A BAGHOUSE ...102 "DESIGN FUEL SPECIFIC HEA T" 103 103 "TEMPERATURE OF DCF AT BO ILER BOUNDARY" 104 104 "HYDROGEN MASS FRACTION 0 F AS-RCVD CFD " 105 105 "RADIATION

  14. RDF (Refuse-Derived Fuel) Co-Firing Cost/Benefit Analysis Using the NCEL RDF Cost Model. Volume 1. Project Results.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-01

    2-1 2.2 Initial Data Collection . ................ 2-2 3.0 Case Study Cost/Benefit Analysis ..... .............. ... 3-1 3.1 Introduction...RDFCostModl. VlumeII* ..,,.. continstherefrencd apenic . Tese ppedics cntai prgra ,-’-’ litigs mdfiatondtals cmlee rorm utut oreah civty vi"i-.... and ativiy...considerable effort in the study of the RDF technology. This has included the determination of optimum heat recovery incinerator (HRI) design, the systemization

  15. Coal and biomass to fuels and power.

    PubMed

    Williams, Robert H; Liu, Guangjian; Kreutz, Thomas G; Larson, Eric D

    2011-01-01

    Systems with CO(2) capture and storage (CCS) that coproduce transportation fuels and electricity from coal plus biomass can address simultaneously challenges of climate change from fossil energy and dependence on imported oil. Under a strong carbon policy, such systems can provide competitively clean low-carbon energy from secure domestic feedstocks by exploiting the negative emissions benefit of underground storage of biomass-derived CO(2), the low cost of coal, the scale economies of coal energy conversion, the inherently low cost of CO(2) capture, the thermodynamic advantages of coproduction, and expected high oil prices. Such systems require much less biomass to make low-carbon fuels than do biofuels processes. The economics are especially attractive when these coproduction systems are deployed as alternatives to CCS for stand-alone fossil fuel power plants. If CCS proves to be viable as a major carbon mitigation option, the main obstacles to deployment of coproduction systems as power generators would be institutional.

  16. Gut-training: the impact of two weeks repetitive gut-challenge during exercise on gastrointestinal status, glucose availability, fuel kinetics, and running performance.

    PubMed

    Costa, Ricardo J S; Miall, Atlanta; Khoo, Anthony; Rauch, Christopher; Snipe, Rhiannon; Camões-Costa, Vera; Gibson, Peter

    2017-05-01

    Due to gastrointestinal tract adaptability, the study aimed to determine the impact of gut-training protocol over 2 weeks on gastrointestinal status, blood glucose availability, fuel kinetics, and running performance. Endurance runners (n = 25) performed a gut-challenge trial (GC1), consisting of 2 h running exercise at 60% V̇O2max whilst consuming gel-discs containing 30 g carbohydrates (2:1 glucose/fructose, 10% w/v) every 20 min and a 1 h distance test. Participants were then randomly assigned to a carbohydrate gel-disc (CHO-S), carbohydrate food (CHO-F), or placebo (PLA) gut-training group for 2 weeks of repetitive gut-challenge intervention. Participants then repeated a second gut-challenge trial (GC2). Gastrointestinal symptoms reduced in GC2 on CHO-S (60%; p = 0.008) and CHO-F (63%; p = 0.046); reductions were greater than PLA (p < 0.05). H2 peak was lower in GC2 on CHO-S (mean (CI): 6 (4-8) ppm) compared with CHO-F (9 (6-12) ppm) and PLA (12 (2-21) ppm) (trial × time: p < 0.001). Blood glucose concentration was higher in GC2 on CHO-S (7.2 (6.3-8.1) mmol·L(-1)) compared with CHO-F (6.1 (5.7-6.5) mmol·L(-1)) and PLA (6.2 (4.9-7.5) mmol·L(-1)) (trial × time: p = 0.015). No difference in oxidation rates, plasma I-FABP, and cortisol concentrations were observed between groups and trials. Distance test improved on CHO-S (5.2%) and CHO-F (4.3%) in GC2, but not on PLA (-2.1%) (trial × time: p = 0.009). Two weeks of gut-training with CHO-S and CHO-F improved gastrointestinal symptoms and running performance compared with PLA. CHO-S also reduced malabsorption and increased blood glucose availability during endurance running compared with PLA.

  17. Fueling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gorker, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    This report deals with concepts of the Tiber II tokamak reactor fueling systems. Contained in this report are the fuel injection requirement data, startup fueling requirements, intermediate range fueling requirements, power range fueling requirements and research and development considerations. (LSR)

  18. Alcohol fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    Ethanol is an alcohol made from grain that can be blended with gasoline to extend petroleum supplies and to increase gasoline octane levels. Congressional proposals to encourage greater use of alternative fuels could increase the demand for ethanol. This report evaluates the growth potential of the ethanol industry to meet future demand increases and the impacts increased production would have on American agriculture and the federal budget. It is found that ethanol production could double or triple in the next eight years, and that American farmers could provide the corn for this production increase. While corn growers would benefit, other agricultural segments would not; soybean producers, for example could suffer for increased corn oil production (an ethanol byproduct) and cattle ranchers would be faced with higher feed costs because of higher corn prices. Poultry farmers might benefit from lower priced feed. Overall, net farm cash income should increase, and consumers would see slightly higher food prices. Federal budget impacts would include a reduction in federal farm program outlays by an annual average of between $930 million (for double current production of ethanol) to $1.421 billion (for triple production) during the eight-year growth period. However, due to an partial tax exemption for ethanol blended fuels, federal fuel tax revenues could decrease by between $442 million and $813 million.

  19. Micro scale electrochemistry: Application to fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hayre, Ryan

    technique provides perhaps the most direct measurement yet of ORR kinetics at nanometer length scales. While the techniques in this thesis are employed to study fuel cells, characterizing and understanding nanostructures is a challenge extending beyond the fuel cell realm. Many other devices, such as solar cells, sensors, and thermoelectric converters also benefit from nanostructured materials. The parallels between these systems and fuel cells make them amenable to the same type of nano-scale visualization and measurement techniques, offering rich opportunities for further research.

  20. Challenges of Implementing New Technologies for Sustainable Energy. Opening address at the Sixth Grove Fuel Cell Symposium, London, 13-16 September 1999

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jørgen Koch, Hans

    To meet the commitments made in Kyoto, energy-related CO 2 emissions would have to fall to almost 30% below the level projected for a "Business-As-Usual" scenario. Meeting this goal will require a large-scale shift toward climate-friendly technologies such as fuel cells, which have a large long-term potential for both stationary generation and transportation. The deployment of a technology is the last major stage in the process of technological shift. Climate-friendly technologies are not being deployed at a sufficient rate or in sufficient amount to allow IEA countries to meet their targets. Hence, if technology is to play an important roll in reducing emissions within the Kyoto time frame (2008-2012) and beyond, immediate and sustained action to accelerate technology deployment will be required. Obstacles in the way of the deployment of technologies that are ready or near-ready for normal use have come to be referred to as market barriers. The simplest yet most significant form of market barrier to a new technology is the out-of-pocket cost to the user relative to the cost of technologies currently in use. Some market barriers also involve market failure, where the market fails to take account of all the costs and benefits involved, such as omitting external environmental costs, and therefore retard the deployment of more environmentally sustainable technologies. Other barriers include poor information dissemination, excessive and costly regulations, slow capital turnover rates, and inadequate financing. Efforts by governments to alleviate market barriers play an important role to complement private-sector activities, and there are many policies and measures each government could take. In addition, international technology collaboration can help promote the best use of available R&D resources and can contribute to more effective deployment of the result of research and development by sharing costs, pooling information and avoiding duplication of efforts.

  1. Benefits/fringes under better control

    SciTech Connect

    Mantho, M.

    1995-07-01

    Fringe benefits, e.g., health insurance for employees in the fuel oil industry are discussed. It was concluded that only 12% of the companies had cut benefits but that these benefits were costing less. This would seem to indicate that the cost of these benefits was being controlled better perhaps by more sharing of these costs.

  2. The challenge of documenting water quality benefits of conservation practices: A review of USDA-ARS's Conservation Effects Assessment Project watershed studies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) was established to quantify water quality benefits of voluntary agricultural conservation practices supported through U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) financial incentives. In 2004, a set of watershed assessment studies were begun in large, rai...

  3. Vegetable oil fuels: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Karaosmanoglu, F.

    1999-04-01

    Using vegetable oils as fuel alternatives has economic, environmental, and energy benefits for Turkey. The present work provides insight to the status of vegetable oil fuels in Turkey. A brief historical background of the issue, as well as an up to date review of the research carried out on vegetable oil fuels, is given and the future of their production and application is discussed.

  4. Liquid fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Soloveichik, Grigorii L

    2014-01-01

    The advantages of liquid fuel cells (LFCs) over conventional hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells include a higher theoretical energy density and efficiency, a more convenient handling of the streams, and enhanced safety. This review focuses on the use of different types of organic fuels as an anode material for LFCs. An overview of the current state of the art and recent trends in the development of LFC and the challenges of their practical implementation are presented.

  5. Liquid fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary The advantages of liquid fuel cells (LFCs) over conventional hydrogen–oxygen fuel cells include a higher theoretical energy density and efficiency, a more convenient handling of the streams, and enhanced safety. This review focuses on the use of different types of organic fuels as an anode material for LFCs. An overview of the current state of the art and recent trends in the development of LFC and the challenges of their practical implementation are presented. PMID:25247123

  6. Energy Switching Threshold for Climatic Benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Cao, L.; Caldeira, K.

    2013-12-01

    Climate change is one of the great challenges facing humanity currently and in the future. Its most severe impacts may still be avoided if efforts are made to transform current energy systems (1). A transition from the global system of high Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emission electricity generation to low GHG emission energy technologies is required to mitigate climate change (2). Natural gas is increasingly seen as a choice for transitions to renewable sources. However, recent researches in energy and climate puzzled about the climate implications of relying more energy on natural gas. On one hand, a shift to natural gas is promoted as climate mitigation because it has lower carbon per unit energy than coal (3). On the other hand, the effect of switching to natural gas on nuclear-power and other renewable energies development may offset benefits from fuel-switching (4). Cheap natural gas is causing both coal plants and nuclear plants to close in the US. The objective of this study is to measure and evaluate the threshold of energy switching for climatic benefits. We hypothesized that the threshold ratio of energy switching for climatic benefits is related to GHGs emission factors of energy technologies, but the relation is not linear. A model was developed to study the fuel switching threshold for greenhouse gas emission reduction, and transition from coal and nuclear electricity generation to natural gas electricity generation was analyzed as a case study. The results showed that: (i) the threshold ratio of multi-energy switching for climatic benefits changes with GHGs emission factors of energy technologies. (ii)The mathematical relation between the threshold ratio of energy switching and GHGs emission factors of energies is a curved surface function. (iii) The analysis of energy switching threshold for climatic benefits can be used for energy and climate policy decision support.

  7. Thorium fueled reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipaun, S.

    2017-01-01

    Current development in thorium fueled reactors shows that they can be designed to operate in the fast or thermal spectrum. The thorium/uranium fuel cycle converts fertile thorium-232 into fissile uranium-233, which fissions and releases energy. This paper analyses the characteristics of thorium fueled reactors and discusses the thermal reactor option. It is found that thorium fuel can be utilized in molten salt reactors through many configurations and designs. A balanced assessment on the feasibility of adopting one reactor technology versus another could lead to optimized benefits of having thorium resource.

  8. Flexible Fuel Vehicles: Providing a Renewable Fuel Choice (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-03-01

    Flexible Fuel vehicles are able to operate using more than one type of fuel. FFVs can be fueled with unleaded gasoline, E85, or any combination of the two. Today more than 7 million vehicles on U.S. highways are flexible fuel vehicles. The fact sheet discusses how E85 affects vehicle performance, the costs and benefits of using E85, and how to find E85 station locations.

  9. Fuel Cell Activities at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohout, Lisa L.; Lyons, Valerie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Fuel cells have a long history in space applications and may have potential application in aeronautics as well. A fuel cell is an electrochemical energy conversion device that directly transforms the chemical energy of a fuel and oxidant into electrical energy. Alkaline fuel cells have been the mainstay of the U.S. space program, providing power for the Apollo missions and the Space Shuttle. However, Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells offer potential benefits over alkaline systems and are currently under development for the next generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV). Furthermore, primary and regenerative systems utilizing PEM technology are also being considered for future space applications such as surface power and planetary aircraft. In addition to these applications, the NASA Glenn Research Center is currently studying the feasibility of the use of both PEM and solid oxide fuel cells for low- or zero-emission electric aircraft propulsion. These types of systems have potential applications for high altitude environmental aircraft, general aviation and commercial aircraft, and high attitude airships. NASA Glenn has a unique set of capabilities and expertise essential to the successful development of advanced fuel cell power systems for space and aeronautics applications. NASA Glenn's role in past fuel cell development programs as well as current activities to meet these new challenges will be presented

  10. Cost Benefit Analysis: Closed-Cell Polyurethane Foam Use in DOD Forward-Deployed Structures and As An Alternative Building Material to Reduce Operational Fuel Demand and Associated Costs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    DOD’s dependence on fossil fuels ” (GAO, 2008a, p. 8). The group examined technological options to reduce dependence on fossil fuels or increase...consequences related to fossil fuel dependence and provided recommendations and areas of focus for DOD improvement. Major conclusions were: • Fuel ...deployed locations. The U.S. military will continue to use fossil fuels , specifically JP-8, in generator sets because of its universal use to power

  11. Analysis of fuel cycle strategies and U.S. transition scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Wigeland, Roald; Taiwo, Temitope A.

    2016-10-17

    The nuclear fuel cycle Evaluation and Screening (E&S) study that was completed in October 2014 [1] enabled the identification of four fuel cycle groups that are considered most promising based on a set of nine evaluation criteria: (a) six benefit criteria of Nuclear Waste Management, Proliferation Risk, Nuclear Material Security Risk, Safety, Environmental Impact, Resource Utilization, and (b) three challenge criteria of Development and Deployment Risk, Institutional Issues, Financial Risk and Economics. The E&S study was conducted at a level of analysis that is "technology- neutral," that is, without consideration of specific technologies, but using the fundamental physics characteristics of each part of the fuel cycle. The study focused on the fuel cycle performance benefits at the fuel cycle equilibrium state, with only limited consideration of transition and deployment impacts. Common characteristics of the four most promising fuel cycle options include continuous recycle of all U/Pu or U/TRU, the use of fast-spectrum reactors, and no use of uranium enrichment once fuel cycle equilibrium has been established. The high-level wastes are mainly from processing of irradiated fuel, and there would be no disposal of any spent fuel. Building on the findings of the E&S study, additional studies have been conducted in the last two years following the information exchange meeting, the 13th IEMPT, which was held in Seoul, the Republic of Korea in 2014. Insights are presented from the recent studies on the benefits and challenges of recycling minor actinides, and transition considerations to some of the most promising fuel cycle options.

  12. Production of fuels and chemicals from waste by microbiomes.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Christopher W; LaBelle, Edward V; May, Harold D

    2013-06-01

    The demand for chemicals and fuels will continue to grow simultaneously with the costly requirement to treat solid waste, wastewater, and regarding climate change, carbon dioxide. A dual benefit is at hand if waste could be converted to valuable chemicals. The application of stable chemical producing microbiomes adapted to these waste streams may turn this challenge into an opportunity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Wheelchair donation in a low-resources setting: Utilization, challenges and benefits of wheelchairs provided through a specialized seating programme in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Sumner, Emma; O'Connell, Colleen; MacAlpine, Brenda

    2017-01-31

    To describe a 6-month follow-up of a specialized paediatric wheelchair and seating programme in Haiti. Descriptive design using a structured survey and open-ended questions. Concurrent with a seating and wheelchair programme conducted in northern Haiti, beneficiaries and their families were introduced to the study, and 86 of 91 consented to future contact. A survey was developed with input from international and local partners, and administered by face-to-face or telephone interviews. Donated wheelchairs were assessed in 5 categories: wheelchair utilization, maintenance, fit, environmental access, and perceived benefits of wheelchair use. A total of 57 beneficiaries (age range <  2-31 years) were located 6 months after receiving their custom-fit wheelchair and consented to the survey. All respondents still had the wheelchair, 70.2% were using it a minimum of 3-5 days/week, 17.5% were using it < 3 days/week and 12.3% were not using it at all. Primary reasons for not using the wheelchair were that it was broken, uncomfortable, or difficult to transport. The commonly reported benefits were improved mobility, independence, participation and social interaction. The majority of people who received customized wheelchairs continued to use their equipment 6 months later, with predominantly beneficial outcomes. In future seating initiatives in low-resource settings, efforts to optimize equipment durability and training of local technicians should be supported and evaluated.

  14. Fossil fuels -- future fuels

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    Fossil fuels -- coal, oil, and natural gas -- built America`s historic economic strength. Today, coal supplies more than 55% of the electricity, oil more than 97% of the transportation needs, and natural gas 24% of the primary energy used in the US. Even taking into account increased use of renewable fuels and vastly improved powerplant efficiencies, 90% of national energy needs will still be met by fossil fuels in 2020. If advanced technologies that boost efficiency and environmental performance can be successfully developed and deployed, the US can continue to depend upon its rich resources of fossil fuels.

  15. Synthetic fuels handbook: properties, process and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Speight, J.

    2008-07-01

    The handbook is a comprehensive guide to the benefits and trade-offs of numerous alternative fuels, presenting expert analyses of the different properties, processes, and performance characteristics of each fuel. It discusses the concept systems and technology involved in the production of fuels on both industrial and individual scales. Chapters 5 and 7 are of special interest to the coal industry. Contents: Chapter 1. Fuel Sources - Conventional and Non-conventional; Chapter 2. Natural Gas; Chapter 3. Fuels From Petroleum and Heavy Oil; Chapter 4. Fuels From Tar Sand Bitumen; Chapter 5. Fuels From Coal; Chapter 6. Fuels From Oil Shale; Chapter 7. Fuels From Synthesis Gas; Chapter 8. Fuels From Biomass; Chapter 9. Fuels From Crops; Chapter 10. Fuels From Wood; Chapter 11. Fuels From Domestic and Industrial Waste; Chapter 12. Landfill Gas. 3 apps.

  16. Current Challenges in Commercially Producing Biofuels from Lignocellulosic Biomass

    PubMed Central

    Balan, Venkatesh

    2014-01-01

    Biofuels that are produced from biobased materials are a good alternative to petroleum based fuels. They offer several benefits to society and the environment. Producing second generation biofuels is even more challenging than producing first generation biofuels due the complexity of the biomass and issues related to producing, harvesting, and transporting less dense biomass to centralized biorefineries. In addition to this logistic challenge, other challenges with respect to processing steps in converting biomass to liquid transportation fuel like pretreatment, hydrolysis, microbial fermentation, and fuel separation still exist and are discussed in this review. The possible coproducts that could be produced in the biorefinery and their importance to reduce the processing cost of biofuel are discussed. About $1 billion was spent in the year 2012 by the government agencies in US to meet the mandate to replace 30% existing liquid transportation fuels by 2022 which is 36 billion gallons/year. Other countries in the world have set their own targets to replace petroleum fuel by biofuels. Because of the challenges listed in this review and lack of government policies to create the demand for biofuels, it may take more time for the lignocellulosic biofuels to hit the market place than previously projected. PMID:25937989

  17. Current Challenges in Commercially Producing Biofuels from Lignocellulosic Biomass

    DOE PAGES

    Balan, Venkatesh

    2014-01-01

    Biofuels that are produced from biobased materials are a good alternative to petroleum based fuels. They offer several benefits to society and the environment. Producing second generation biofuels is even more challenging than producing first generation biofuels due the complexity of the biomass and issues related to producing, harvesting, and transporting less dense biomass to centralized biorefineries. In addition to this logistic challenge, other challenges with respect to processing steps in converting biomass to liquid transportation fuel like pretreatment, hydrolysis, microbial fermentation, and fuel separation still exist and are discussed in this review. The possible coproducts that could be producedmore » in the biorefinery and their importance to reduce the processing cost of biofuel are discussed. About $1 billion was spent in the year 2012 by the government agencies in US to meet the mandate to replace 30% existing liquid transportation fuels by 2022 which is 36 billion gallons/year. Other countries in the world have set their own targets to replace petroleum fuel by biofuels. Because of the challenges listed in this review and lack of government policies to create the demand for biofuels, it may take more time for the lignocellulosic biofuels to hit the market place than previously projected.« less

  18. System design of a large fuel cell hybrid locomotive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, A. R.; Hess, K. S.; Barnes, D. L.; Erickson, T. L.

    Fuel cell power for locomotives combines the environmental benefits of a catenary-electric locomotive with the higher overall energy efficiency and lower infrastructure costs of a diesel-electric. A North American consortium, a public-private partnership, is developing a prototype hydrogen-fueled fuel cell-battery hybrid switcher locomotive for urban and military-base rail applications. Switcher locomotives are used in rail yards for assembling and disassembling trains and moving trains from one point to another. At 127 tonnes (280,000 lb), continuous power of 250 kW from its (proton exchange membrane) PEM fuel cell prime mover, and transient power well in excess of 1 MW, the hybrid locomotive will be the heaviest and most powerful fuel cell land vehicle yet. This fast-paced project calls for completion of the vehicle itself near the end of 2007. Several technical challenges not found in the development of smaller vehicles arise when designing and developing such a large fuel cell vehicle. Weight, center of gravity, packaging, and safety were design factors leading to, among other features, the roof location of the lightweight 350 bar compressed hydrogen storage system. Harsh operating conditions, especially shock loads during coupling to railcars, require component mounting systems capable of absorbing high energy. Vehicle scale-up by increasing mass, density, or power presents new challenges primarily related to issues of system layout, hydrogen storage, heat transfer, and shock loads.

  19. Nanofluidic fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jin Wook; Kjeang, Erik

    2013-11-01

    Fuel cells are gaining momentum as a critical component in the renewable energy mix for stationary, transportation, and portable power applications. State-of-the-art fuel cell technology benefits greatly from nanotechnology applied to nanostructured membranes, catalysts, and electrodes. However, the potential of utilizing nanofluidics for fuel cells has not yet been explored, despite the significant opportunity of harnessing rapid nanoscale reactant transport in close proximity to the reactive sites. In the present article, a nanofluidic fuel cell that utilizes fluid flow through nanoporous media is conceptualized and demonstrated for the first time. This transformative concept captures the advantages of recently developed membraneless and catalyst-free fuel cell architectures paired with the enhanced interfacial contact area enabled by nanofluidics. When compared to previously reported microfluidic fuel cells, the prototype nanofluidic fuel cell demonstrates increased surface area, reduced activation overpotential, superior kinetic characteristics, and moderately enhanced fuel cell performance in the high cell voltage regime with up to 14% higher power density. However, the expected mass transport benefits in the high current density regime were constrained by high ohmic cell resistance, which could likely be resolved through future optimization studies.

  20. Promising Fuel Cycle Options for R&D – Results, Insights, and Future Directions

    SciTech Connect

    Wigeland, Roald Arnold

    2015-05-01

    The Fuel Cycle Options (FCO) campaign in the U.S. DOE Fuel Cycle Research & Development Program conducted a detailed evaluation and screening of nuclear fuel cycles. The process for this study was described at the 2014 ICAPP meeting. This paper reports on detailed insights and questions from the results of the study. The comprehensive study identified continuous recycle in fast reactors as the most promising option, using either U/Pu or U/TRU recycle, and potentially in combination with thermal reactors, as reported at the ICAPP 2014 meeting. This paper describes the examination of the results in detail that indicated that there was essentially no difference in benefit between U/Pu and U/TRU recycle, prompting questions about the desirability of pursuing the more complex U/TRU approach given that the estimated greater challenges for development and deployment. The results will be reported from the current effort that further explores what, if any, benefits of TRU recycle (minor actinides in addition to plutonium recycle) may be in order to inform decisions on future R&D directions. The study also identified continuous recycle using thorium-based fuel cycles as potentially promising, in either fast or thermal systems, but with lesser benefit. Detailed examination of these results indicated that the lesser benefit was confined to only a few of the evaluation metrics, identifying the conditions under which thorium-based fuel cycles would be promising to pursue. For the most promising fuel cycles, the FCO is also conducting analyses on the potential transition to such fuel cycles to identify the issues, challenges, and the timing for critical decisions that would need to be made to avoid unnecessary delay in deployment, including investigation of issues such as the effects of a temporary lack of plutonium fuel resources or supporting infrastructure. These studies are placed in the context of an overall analysis approach designed to provide comprehensive information to

  1. Opportunities and challenges to capturing the multiple potential benefits of REDD+ in a traditional transnational savanna-woodland region in West Africa.

    PubMed

    Olsson, E Gunilla A; Ouattara, Syna

    2013-04-01

    The REDD+ scheme of the United Nations intends to offer developing countries financial incentives to reduce the rates of deforestation and forest degradation for reducing global CO2 emissions. This is combined with building carbon stocks in existing wooded ecosystems and fostering other soil, biodiversity and water conservation objectives. Successful application of REDD+ to the Xylophone Triangle of West Africa faces substantial challenges and risks to both meeting REDD+ objectives and to the local people's rights and livelihoods. The transnationality of the culturally coherent area requires collaboration of three national governments. The opportunities, however, are great to capitalize on the region's biodiversity, the well-developed traditional ecological knowledge and the use of local medicinal plants as an integral part of the agro-ecosystem. Possibilities open to, not only sequester carbon, but also to increase the resilience of the ecosystem and of independent rural livelihoods in the face of climate change and globalization.

  2. Preservation of the inferior mesenteric artery via laparoscopic sigmoid colectomy performed for diverticular disease: real benefit or technical challenge: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Masoni, Luigi; Mari, Francesco Saverio; Nigri, Giuseppe; Favi, Francesco; Gasparrini, Marcello; Dall'Oglio, Anna; Pindozzi, Fioralba; Pancaldi, Alessandra; Brescia, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Defecatory disorders are very common complications after left hemicolectomy and anterior rectal resection. These disorders seem related primarily to colonic denervation after the resection. To evaluate the real benefits of inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) preservation via laparoscopic left hemicolectomy performed for diverticular disease in terms of reduced colonic denervation and improved postoperative intestinal functions, a randomized, single-blinded (patients) controlled clinical trial was conducted. From January 2004 to January 2010, patients with symptomatic diverticular disease and a surgical indication were enrolled in the study and randomly assigned to two treatment groups. The first group underwent laparoscopic left hemicolectomy, which preserved the IMA by sectioning the sigmoid arteries one by one near the colonic wall, In the second group, the IMA was sectioned immediately below the origin of left colic artery. Defecation disorders were assessed by anorectal manometry and by three questionnaires to evaluate constipation, incontinence, and quality of life 6 months after the intervention. A total of 107 patients were included in the study. The 54 patients with preserved IMA showed a statistically lower incidence of defecation disorders such as fragmented evacuations, alternating bowel function, constipation, and minor incontinence, as well as less lifestyle alteration than the 53 patients with the IMA sectioned just below the left colic artery. This study confirmed that preservation of the IMA should be recommended to reduce the incidence of defecatory disorders after left hemicolectomy for benign disease.

  3. Exploiting Nutritional Value of Staple Foods in the World’s Semi-Arid Areas: Risks, Benefits, Challenges and Opportunities of Sorghum

    PubMed Central

    Proietti, Ilaria; Frazzoli, Chiara; Mantovani, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) is a drought-resistant crop and an important food resource in terms of nutritional as well as social-economic values, especially in semi-arid environments. Cultivar selection and processing methods have been observed to impact on composition and functional and nutritional value of sorghum. Amino acid imbalance, cyanogenic glycosides, endogenous anti-nutrients, mycotoxins and toxic elements are among factors impairing its nutritional value. This paper reviews possible approaches (varieties selection, production practices, cooking processes) to improve the benefits-to-risks balance of sorghum meal, to mitigate the risk of deficiencies and/or imbalances and to improve effects on human nutrition. Opportunity for avoiding dietary diversification in high sorghum consumers is also discussed, e.g., tryptophan and niacin deficits potentially related to pellagra, or unavailability of proteins and divalent cations (e.g., Fe, Zn) due to the antinutrient activity of phytic acid and tannins. As potential candidate for production investments, the role of sorghum in preserving biological diversity is also considered. PMID:27417755

  4. Physiological Benefits of Being Small in a Changing World: Responses of Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) to an Acute Thermal Challenge and a Simulated Capture Event

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Timothy D.; Donaldson, Michael R.; Pieperhoff, Sebastian; Drenner, S. Matthew; Lotto, Andrew; Cooke, Steven J.; Hinch, Scott G.; Patterson, David A.; Farrell, Anthony P.

    2012-01-01

    Evidence is building to suggest that both chronic and acute warm temperature exposure, as well as other anthropogenic perturbations, may select for small adult fish within a species. To shed light on this phenomenon, we investigated physiological and anatomical attributes associated with size-specific responses to an acute thermal challenge and a fisheries capture simulation (exercise+air exposure) in maturing male coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). Full-size females were included for a sex-specific comparison. A size-specific response in haematology to an acute thermal challenge (from 7 to 20°C at 3°C h−1) was apparent only for plasma potassium, whereby full-size males exhibited a significant increase in comparison with smaller males (‘jacks’). Full-size females exhibited an elevated blood stress response in comparison with full-size males. Metabolic recovery following exhaustive exercise at 7°C was size-specific, with jacks regaining resting levels of metabolism at 9.3±0.5 h post-exercise in comparison with 12.3±0.4 h for full-size fish of both sexes. Excess post-exercise oxygen consumption scaled with body mass in male fish with an exponent of b = 1.20±0.08. Jacks appeared to regain osmoregulatory homeostasis faster than full-size males, and they had higher ventilation rates at 1 h post-exercise. Peak metabolic rate during post-exercise recovery scaled with body mass with an exponent of b∼1, suggesting that the slower metabolic recovery in large fish was not due to limitations in diffusive or convective oxygen transport, but that large fish simply accumulated a greater ‘oxygen debt’ that took longer to pay back at the size-independent peak metabolic rate of ∼6 mg min−1 kg−1. Post-exercise recovery of plasma testosterone was faster in jacks compared with full-size males, suggesting less impairment of the maturation trajectory of smaller fish. Supporting previous studies, these findings suggest that environmental change and non

  5. Extending the benefits of NASA Earth-Sun System Science Data Products and Modeled Forecasts to Decision Support Tools: Successes and Future Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, E.; Birk, R. J.

    2005-12-01

    In Earth-Sun system science, NASA affiliated researchers view the Earth as a whole system and take a contextual approach to scientific inquiry. Through observations-based science data products and computational models of the Earth system, NASA and its partners are establishing predictive capabilities for future projections of natural and human perturbations on the planet. Researchers worldwide assimilate science data products resulting from NASA research into computer models to generate predictions that can be used in decision support tools for policy makers and resource managers. Plans and actions are underway to transition research results to operational tools that can result in societal and economic benefits based on research results, including advancements in data-handling systems employing international standards for interoperability to enable effective distribution of our Earth system science data and products. Examples of the successful transition of research results that contribute to operational decision support tools include Wildfire Management with the U.S Forest Service, Air-Quality Forecasting with the U.S Environmental Protection Agency, and the Forecast of Volcanic Ash and Icing Hazards to Aviation with the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. These examples will be discussed in terms of bridging the gaps between the science data sets, the computer modelers, and decision makers. NASA's Applied Sciences Program is taking a systems engineering approach to facilitate rapid prototyping of potential uses of research capabilities into decision support tools and to contribute to future operational observation and modeling systems. Input on engineering and scientific tools and techniques associated with improved data acquisition, product generation, archiving and accessibility, and application are assimilated from the community-of-practice that utilizes observations and predictions resulting from NASA.

  6. New developments in RTR fuel recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Lelievre, F.; Brueziere, J.; Domingo, X.; Valery, J.F.; Leroy, J.F.; Tribout-Maurizi, A.

    2013-07-01

    As most utilities in the world, Research and Test Reactors (RTR) operators are currently facing two challenges regarding the fuel, in order to comply with local safety and waste management requirements as well as global non-proliferation obligation: - How to manage used fuel today, and - How fuel design changes that are currently under development will influence used fuel management. AREVA-La-Hague plant has a large experience in used fuel recycling, including traditional RTR fuel (UAl). Based on that experience and deep knowledge of RTR fuel manufacturing, AREVA is currently examining possible options to cope with both challenges. This paper describes the current experience of AREVA-La-Hague in UAl used fuels recycling and its plan to propose recycling for various types of fuels such as U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} fuel or UMo fuel on an industrial scale. (authors)

  7. Green Flight Challenge Highlights

    NASA Image and Video Library

    On Monday, October 3, 2011, NASA's Centennial Challenges program awarded the largest prize in aviation history, created to inspire the development of more fuel-efficient aircraft and spark the star...

  8. Solving Aviation Challenges

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This video highlights the challenges NASA aeronautics researchers are tackling to reduce aircraft noise, emissions, fuel consumption, and the innovative ways they're helping to debut NextGen, a rev...

  9. Uncertain translation, uncertain benefit and uncertain risk: ethical challenges facing first-in-human trials of induced pluripotent stem (ips) cells.

    PubMed

    Fung, Ronald K F; Kerridge, Ian H

    2013-02-01

    The discovery of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells in 2006 was heralded as a major breakthrough in stem cell research. Since then, progress in iPS cell technology has paved the way towards clinical application, particularly cell replacement therapy, which has refueled debate on the ethics of stem cell research. However, much of the discourse has focused on questions of moral status and potentiality, overlooking the ethical issues which are introduced by the clinical testing of iPS cell replacement therapy. First-in-human trials, in particular, raise a number of ethical concerns including informed consent, subject recruitment and harm minimisation as well as the inherent uncertainty and risks which are involved in testing medical procedures on humans for the first time. These issues, while a feature of any human research, become more complex in the case of iPS cell therapy, given the seriousness of the potential risks, the unreliability of available animal models, the vulnerability of the target patient group, and the high stakes of such an intensely public area of science. Our paper will present a detailed case study of iPS cell replacement therapy for Parkinson's disease to highlight these broader ethical and epistemological concerns. If we accept that iPS cell technology is fraught with challenges which go far beyond merely refuting the potentiality of the stem cell line, we conclude that iPS cell research should not replace, but proceed alongside embryonic and adult somatic stem cell research to promote cross-fertilisation of knowledge and better clinical outcomes. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Benefit from NASA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-01-01

    The same rocket fuel that helps power the Space Shuttle as it thunders into orbit will now be taking on a new role, with the potential to benefit millions of people worldwide. Leftover rocket fuel from NASA is being used to make a flare that destroys land mines where they were buried, without using explosives. The flare is safe to handle and easy to use. People working to deactivate the mines simply place the flare next to the uncovered land mine and ignite it from a safe distance using a battery-triggered electric match. The flare burns a hole in the land mine's case and ignites its explosive contents. The explosive burns away, disabling the mine and rendering it harmless. Using leftover rocket fuel to help destroy land mines incurs no additional costs to taxpayers. To ensure enough propellant is available for each Shuttle mission, NASA allows for a small percentage of extra propellant in each batch. Once mixed, surplus fuel solidifies and carnot be saved for use in another launch. In its solid form, it is an ideal ingredient for the new flare. The flare was developed by Thiokol Propulsion in Brigham City, Utah, the NASA contractor that designs and builds rocket motors for the Solid Rocket Booster Space Shuttle. An estimated 80 million or more active land mines are scattered around the world in at least 70 countries, and kill or maim 26,000 people a year. Worldwide, there is one casualty every 22 minutes

  11. EXTENDING SODIUM FAST REACTOR DRIVER FUEL USE TO HIGHER TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas L. Porter

    2011-02-01

    Calculations of potential sodium-cooled fast reactor fuel temperatures were performed to estimate the effects of increasing the outlet temperature of a given fast reactor design by increasing pin power, decreasing assembly flow, or increasing inlet temperature. Based upon experience in the U.S., both metal and mixed oxide (MOX) fuel types are discussed in terms of potential performance effects created by the increased operating temperatures. Assembly outlet temperatures of 600, 650 and 700 °C were used as goal temperatures. Fuel/cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) and fuel melting, as well as challenges to the mechanical integrity of the cladding material, were identified as the limiting phenomena. For example, starting with a recent 1000 MWth fast reactor design, raising the outlet temperature to 650 °C through pin power increase increased the MOX centerline temperature to more than 3300 °C and the metal fuel peak cladding temperature to more than 700 °C. These exceeded limitations to fuel performance; fuel melting was limiting for MOX and FCCI for metal fuel. Both could be alleviated by design ‘fixes’, such as using a barrier inside the cladding to minimize FCCI in the metal fuel, or using annular fuel in the case of MOX. Both would also require an advanced cladding material with improved stress rupture properties. While some of these are costly, the benefits of having a high-temperature reactor which can support hydrogen production, or other missions requiring high process heat may make the extra costs justified.

  12. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-28

    A hot air balloon passes over the campus of the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  13. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-28

    A hot air balloons pass over the campus of the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  14. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-25

    Sid Siddiqi, seated, and other support personnel prepare noise level measuring equipment for the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Monday, Sept. 26, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  15. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-25

    Support personnel prepare noise level measuring equipment along the runway for the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Monday, Sept. 26, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-25

    The PhoEnix aircraft takes off during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Monday, Sept. 26, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  17. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-25

    The e-Genius aircraft crew wait as their aircraft is inspected during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Monday, Sept. 26, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  18. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-25

    The Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, EcoEagle aircraft takes off during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Monday, Sept. 26, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  19. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-28

    e-Genius Aircraft Pilot Eric Raymond poses for a photograph during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, held at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  20. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-28

    CAFE Foundation Hanger Boss Mike Fenn directs the EcoEagle aircraft to the start of the speed competition during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  1. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-28

    e-Genius Aircraft Pilot Klaus Ohlmann poses for a photograph during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, held at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  2. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-28

    Various team members applaud as aircraft return from the speed competition during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, held at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  3. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-28

    CAFE Foundation Hanger Boss Mike Fenn waves the speed competition start flag for the EcoEagle aircraft during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  4. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-27

    The PhoEnix aircraft prepares to takeoff for the miles per gallon (MPG) flight during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  5. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-28

    PhoEnix Aircraft Co-Pilot Jeff Shingleton poses for a photograph during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, held at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  6. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-25

    The e-Genius aircraft takes off during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Monday, Sept. 26, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  7. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-28

    Pipistrel-USA Taurus G4 Aircraft Pilot David Morss poses for a photograph during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, held at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  8. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-28

    CAFE Foundation Hanger Boss Mike Fenn waves the speed competition checkered flag for the e-Genius aircraft during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  9. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-27

    The e-Genius aircraft is pulled out to the runway for the miles per gallon (MPG) flight during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-28

    The PhoEnix aircraft takes off for the start of the speed competition during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  11. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-27

    Media and ground crew look at aircraft as they participate in the miles per gallon (MPG) flight during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-27

    The campus of the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, is seen in this aerial view at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  13. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-25

    Team members of the e-Genius aircraft prepare their plane prior to competition as part of the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Monday, Sept. 26, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  14. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-28

    CAFE Foundation Hanger Boss Mike Fenn waves the speed competition checkered flag for the Taurus G4 aircraft during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  15. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-25

    The Pipistrel-USA, Taurus G4 aircraft takes off during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Monday, Sept. 26, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-27

    The e-Genius aircraft prepares to takeoff for the miles per gallon (MPG) flight during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  17. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-28

    CAFE Foundation Hanger Boss Mike Fenn waves the speed competition checkered flag for the EcoEagle aircraft during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  18. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-27

    The Pipistrel-USA, Taurus G4 aircraft prepares to takeoff for the miles per gallon (MPG) flight during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  19. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-28

    CAFE Foundation Hanger Boss Mike Fenn waves the speed competition checkered flag for the PhoEnix aircraft during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  20. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-28

    CAFE Foundation Hanger Boss Mike Fenn directs the e-Genius aircraft to the start of the speed competition during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  1. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-28

    Pipistrel-USA Taurus G4 Aircraft Pilot Robin Reid poses for a photograph during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, held at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  2. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-27

    The EcoEagle, left, and the PhoEnix aircraft are seen on the campus of the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  3. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-25

    A Pipistrel-USA team member wipes down the Taurus G4 aircraft prior to competition as part of the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Monday, Sept. 26, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  4. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-28

    PhoEnix Aircraft Pilot Jim Lee poses for a photograph during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, held at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  5. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-28

    EcoEagle Aircraft Pilot Mikhael Ponso poses for a photograph during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, held at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  6. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-28

    The e-Genius aircraft takes off for the start of the speed competition during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  7. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-27

    The Pipistrel-USA team look up at aircraft as they participate in the miles per gallon (MPG) flight during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  8. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-10-03

    Pipistrel-USA Team Lead Jack Langelaan talks after his team won the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, on Monday, Oct. 3, 2011 at the NASA Ames Research Center, Mountain View, Calif. The all electric Taurus G4 aircraft achieved the equivalency of more than 400 miles per gallon. NASA and CAFE Foundation held the challenge to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  9. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-25

    The Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, EcoEagle is seen as it passes a Grumman Albatross during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Monday, Sept. 26, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. Green Flight Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-27

    The e-Genius aircraft is pulled pulled out to the runway for the miles per gallon (MPG) flight during the 2011 Green Flight Challenge, sponsored by Google, at the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2011. NASA and the Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Foundation are having the challenge with the goal to advance technologies in fuel efficiency and reduced emissions with cleaner renewable fuels and electric aircraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  11. Traditional Birth Attendance (TBA) in a health system: what are the roles, benefits and challenges: A case study of incorporated TBA in Timor-Leste.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro Sarmento, Decio

    2014-01-01

    One current strategy to overcome the issue of shortage of qualified health workers has focused on the use of community health workers in the developing countries to deliver health care services specifically to the most vulnerable communities in the rural areas. Timor-Leste is the one of the world's newest developing countries that has incorporated the traditional birth attendance in its health system through a family health promoter initiative in response to reproductive and child health, hence to improve primary health care delivery and increase number of healthcare workforce. The study utilized a non-systematic review of the literature using key words such as community health workers, traditional birth attendants, reproductive health, child health and health outcomes. A case study from Timor-Leste was also used. Traditional birth attendants have performed wide variety of tasks including outreach and case finding, health and patient education, referrals, home visits and care management. Evidence indicated that there were, to varying degrees, positive associations between traditional birth attendance training and maternity care. Traditional birth attendance training was found to be associated with significant increases in attributes such as knowledge, attitude, behavior, advice for antenatal care, and pregnancy outcomes. However, some challenges faced by traditional birth attendants' role in encouraging women to go to health center for preventive services would be the compliance and refusal of the referral. The implementation case study from Timor-Leste shows that integrating traditional birth attendance into a national healthcare system through Family Health Promoter program has been programmatic effective. It is recommended that the implementation should consider regular communication between health staff and community leaders in recruiting members of family health promoters, and the use of supportive supervision tools to identify weaknesses in the management of

  12. Alternative Fuels

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Alternative fuels include gaseous fuels such as hydrogen, natural gas, and propane; alcohols such as ethanol, methanol, and butanol; vegetable and waste-derived oils; and electricity. Overview of alternative fuels is here.

  13. Energy: Analysing fossil-fuel displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgenson, Andrew K.

    2012-06-01

    It is commonly assumed that fossil fuels can be replaced by alternative forms of energy. Now research challenges this assumption, and highlights the role of non-technological solutions to reduce fossil-fuel consumption.

  14. FY2015 ceramic fuels development annual highlights

    SciTech Connect

    Mcclellan, Kenneth James

    2015-09-22

    Key challenges for the Advanced Fuels Campaign are the development of fuel technologies to enable major increases in fuel performance (safety, reliability, power and burnup) beyond current technologies, and development of characterization methods and predictive fuel performance models to enable more efficient development and licensing of advanced fuels. Ceramic fuel development activities for fiscal year 2015 fell within the areas of 1) National and International Technical Integration, 2) Advanced Accident Tolerant Ceramic Fuel Development, 3) Advanced Techniques and Reference Materials Development, and 4) Fabrication of Enriched Ceramic Fuels. High uranium density fuels were the focus of the ceramic fuels efforts. Accomplishments for FY15 primarily reflect the prioritization of identification and assessment of new ceramic fuels for light water reactors which have enhanced accident tolerance while also maintaining or improving normal operation performance, and exploration of advanced post irradiation examination techniques which will support more efficient testing and qualification of new fuel systems.

  15. Fuel pin

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Karnesky, Richard A.; Leggett, Robert D.; Baker, Ronald B.

    1989-10-03

    A fuel pin for a liquid metal nuclear reactor is provided. The fuel pin includes a generally cylindrical cladding member with metallic fuel material disposed therein. At least a portion of the fuel material extends radially outwardly to the inner diameter of the cladding member to promote efficient transfer of heat to the reactor coolant system. The fuel material defines at least one void space therein to facilitate swelling of the fuel material during fission.

  16. Fuel pin

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Karnesky, Richard A.; Leggett, Robert D.; Baker, Ronald B.

    1989-01-01

    A fuel pin for a liquid metal nuclear reactor is provided. The fuel pin includes a generally cylindrical cladding member with metallic fuel material disposed therein. At least a portion of the fuel material extends radially outwardly to the inner diameter of the cladding member to promote efficient transfer of heat to the reactor coolant system. The fuel material defines at least one void space therein to facilitate swelling of the fuel material during fission.

  17. Fuel pin

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, D.W.; Karnesky, R.A.; Leggett, R.D.; Baker, R.B.

    1987-11-24

    A fuel pin for a liquid metal nuclear reactor is provided. The fuel pin includes a generally cylindrical cladding member with metallic fuel material disposed therein. At least a portion of the fuel material extends radially outwardly to the inner diameter of the cladding member to promote efficient transfer of heat to the reactor coolant system. The fuel material defines at least one void space therein to facilitate swelling of the fuel material during fission.

  18. Fuel pin

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, D.W.; Karnesky, R.A.; Leggett, R.D.; Baker, R.B.

    1987-11-24

    A fuel pin for a liquid metal nuclear reactor is provided. The fuel pin includes a generally cylindrical cladding member with metallic fuel material disposed therein. At least a portion of the fuel material extends radially outwardly to the inner diameter of the cladding member to promote efficient transfer of heat to the reactor coolant system. The fuel material defines at least one void space therein to facilitate swelling of the fuel material during fission.

  19. Flexible Fuel Vehicles: Providing a Renewable Fuel Choice (Revised)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2008-06-01

    Clean Cities fact sheet describing aspects of flexible fuel vehicles such as use of E85, special features, benefits of use, costs, and fueling locations. It includes discussion on performance and how to identify these vehicles as well as listing additional resources.

  20. Manufacturing the Gas Diffusion Layer for PEM Fuel Cell Using a Novel 3D Printing Technique and Critical Assessment of the Challenges Encountered

    PubMed Central

    Singamneni, Sarat; Ramos, Maximiano; Al-Jumaily, Ahmed M

    2017-01-01

    The conventional gas diffusion layer (GDL) of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells incorporates a carbon-based substrate, which suffers from electrochemical oxidation as well as mechanical degradation, resulting in reduced durability and performance. In addition, it involves a complex manufacturing process to produce it. The proposed technique aims to resolve both these issues by an advanced 3D printing technique, namely selective laser sintering (SLS). In the proposed work, polyamide (PA) is used as the base powder and titanium metal powder is added at an optimised level to enhance the electrical conductivity, thermal, and mechanical properties. The application of selective laser sintering to fabricate a robust gas diffusion substrate for PEM fuel cell applications is quite novel and is attempted here for the first time. PMID:28773156