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Sample records for fuel fabrication phase

  1. Solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) fuel cell technology program, phase 1/1A. [design and fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A solid polymer electrolyte fuel cell was studied for the purpose of improving the characteristics of the technology. Several facets were evaluated, namely: (1) reduced fuel cell costs; (2) reduced fuel cell weight; (3) improved fuel cell efficiency; and (4) increased systems compatibility. Demonstrated advances were incorporated into a full scale hardware design. A single cell unit was fabricated. A substantial degree of success was demonstrated.

  2. Update On Monolithic Fuel Fabrication Development

    SciTech Connect

    C. R Clark; J. M. Wight; G. C. Knighton; G. A. Moore; J. F. Jue

    2005-11-01

    Efforts to develop a viable monolithic research reactor fuel plate have continued at Idaho National Laboratory. These efforts have concentrated on both fabrication process refinement and scale-up to produce full sized fuel plates. Advancements have been made in the production of U-Mo foil including full sized foils. Progress has also been made in the friction stir welding and transient liquid phase bonding fabrication processes resulting in better bonding, more stable processes and the ability to fabricate larger fuel plates.

  3. Automated breeder fuel fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Goldmann, L.H.; Frederickson, J.R.

    1983-09-01

    The objective of the Secure Automated Fabrication (SAF) Project is to develop remotely operated equipment for the processing and manufacturing of breeder reactor fuel pins. The SAF line will be installed in the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF). The FMEF is presently under construction at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford site near Richland, Washington, and is operated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The fabrication and support systems of the SAF line are designed for computer-controlled operation from a centralized control room. Remote and automated fuel fabriction operations will result in: reduced radiation exposure to workers; enhanced safeguards; improved product quality; near real-time accountability, and increased productivity. The present schedule calls for installation of SAF line equipment in the FMEF beginning in 1984, with qualifying runs starting in 1986 and production commencing in 1987. 5 figures.

  4. Neutronic fuel element fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Korton, George

    2004-02-24

    This disclosure describes a method for metallurgically bonding a complete leak-tight enclosure to a matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant channels. Coolant tubes containing solid filler pins are disposed in the coolant channels. A leak-tight metal enclosure is then formed about the entire assembly of fuel matrix, coolant tubes and pins. The completely enclosed and sealed assembly is exposed to a high temperature and pressure gas environment to effect a metallurgical bond between all contacting surfaces therein. The ends of the assembly are then machined away to expose the pin ends which are chemically leached from the coolant tubes to leave the coolant tubes with internal coolant passageways. The invention described herein was made in the course of, or under, a contract with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. It relates generally to fuel elements for neutronic reactors and more particularly to a method for providing a leak-tight metal enclosure for a high-performance matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant tubes. The planned utilization of nuclear energy in high-performance, compact-propulsion and mobile power-generation systems has necessitated the development of fuel elements capable of operating at high power densities. High power densities in turn require fuel elements having high thermal conductivities and good fuel retention capabilities at high temperatures. A metal clad fuel element containing a ceramic phase of fuel intimately mixed with and bonded to a continuous refractory metal matrix has been found to satisfy the above requirements. Metal coolant tubes penetrate the matrix to afford internal cooling to the fuel element while providing positive fuel retention and containment of fission products generated within the fuel matrix. Metal header plates are bonded to the coolant tubes at each end of the fuel element and a metal cladding or can completes the fuel-matrix enclosure

  5. Fabrication and characterization of anode-supported micro-tubular solide oxide fuel cell by phase inversion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Cong

    Nowadays, the micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cells (MT-SOFCs), especially the anode supported MT-SOFCs have been extensively developed to be applied for SOFC stacks designation, which can be potentially used for portable power sources and vehicle power supply. To prepare MT-SOFCs with high electrochemical performance, one of the main strategies is to optimize the microstructure of the anode support. Recently, a novel phase inversion method has been applied to prepare the anode support with a unique asymmetrical microstructure, which can improve the electrochemical performance of the MT-SOFCs. Since several process parameters of the phase inversion method can influence the pore formation mechanism and final microstructure, it is essential and necessary to systematically investigate the relationship between phase inversion process parameters and final microstructure of the anode supports. The objective of this study is aiming at correlating the process parameters and microstructure and further preparing MT-SOFCs with enhanced electrochemical performance. Non-solvent, which is used to trigger the phase separation process, can significantly influence the microstructure of the anode support fabricated by phase inversion method. To investigate the mechanism of non-solvent affecting the microstructure, water and ethanol/water mixture were selected for the NiO-YSZ anode supports fabrication. The presence of ethanol in non-solvent can inhibit the growth of the finger-like pores in the tubes. With the increasing of the ethanol concentration in the non-solvent, a relatively dense layer can be observed both in the outside and inside of the tubes. The mechanism of pores growth and morphology obtained by using non-solvent with high concentration ethanol was explained based on the inter-diffusivity between solvent and non-solvent. Solvent and non-solvent pair with larger Dm value is benefit for the growth of finger-like pores. Three cells with different anode geometries was

  6. Fabrication of thorium bearing carbide fuels

    DOEpatents

    Gutierrez, R.L.; Herbst, R.J.; Johnson, K.W.R.

    Thorium-uranium carbide and thorium-plutonium carbide fuel pellets have been fabricated by the carbothermic reduction process. Temperatures of 1750/sup 0/C and 2000/sup 0/C were used during the reduction cycle. Sintering temperatures of 1800/sup 0/C and 2000/sup 0/C were used to prepare fuel pellet densities of 87% and > 94% of theoretical, respectively. The process allows the fabrication of kilogram quantities of fuel with good reproductibility of chemical and phase composition.

  7. Fabrication and characterization of anode-supported micro-tubular solide oxide fuel cell by phase inversion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Cong

    Nowadays, the micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cells (MT-SOFCs), especially the anode supported MT-SOFCs have been extensively developed to be applied for SOFC stacks designation, which can be potentially used for portable power sources and vehicle power supply. To prepare MT-SOFCs with high electrochemical performance, one of the main strategies is to optimize the microstructure of the anode support. Recently, a novel phase inversion method has been applied to prepare the anode support with a unique asymmetrical microstructure, which can improve the electrochemical performance of the MT-SOFCs. Since several process parameters of the phase inversion method can influence the pore formation mechanism and final microstructure, it is essential and necessary to systematically investigate the relationship between phase inversion process parameters and final microstructure of the anode supports. The objective of this study is aiming at correlating the process parameters and microstructure and further preparing MT-SOFCs with enhanced electrochemical performance. Non-solvent, which is used to trigger the phase separation process, can significantly influence the microstructure of the anode support fabricated by phase inversion method. To investigate the mechanism of non-solvent affecting the microstructure, water and ethanol/water mixture were selected for the NiO-YSZ anode supports fabrication. The presence of ethanol in non-solvent can inhibit the growth of the finger-like pores in the tubes. With the increasing of the ethanol concentration in the non-solvent, a relatively dense layer can be observed both in the outside and inside of the tubes. The mechanism of pores growth and morphology obtained by using non-solvent with high concentration ethanol was explained based on the inter-diffusivity between solvent and non-solvent. Solvent and non-solvent pair with larger Dm value is benefit for the growth of finger-like pores. Three cells with different anode geometries was

  8. Fabrication of thorium bearing carbide fuels

    DOEpatents

    Gutierrez, Rueben L.; Herbst, Richard J.; Johnson, Karl W. R.

    1981-01-01

    Thorium-uranium carbide and thorium-plutonium carbide fuel pellets have been fabricated by the carbothermic reduction process. Temperatures of 1750.degree. C. and 2000.degree. C. were used during the reduction cycle. Sintering temperatures of 1800.degree. C. and 2000.degree. C. were used to prepare fuel pellet densities of 87% and >94% of theoretical, respectively. The process allows the fabrication of kilogram quantities of fuel with good reproducibility of chemicals and phase composition. Methods employing liquid techniques that form carbide microspheres or alloying-techniques which form alloys of thorium-uranium or thorium-plutonium suffer from limitation on the quantities processed of because of criticality concerns and lack of precise control of process conditions, respectively.

  9. Integrated Recycling Test Fuel Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    R.S. Fielding; K.H. Kim; B. Grover; J. Smith; J. King; K. Wendt; D. Chapman; L. Zirker

    2013-03-01

    The Integrated Recycling Test is a collaborative irradiation test that will electrochemically recycle used light water reactor fuel into metallic fuel feedstock. The feedstock will be fabricated into a metallic fast reactor type fuel that will be irradiation tested in a drop in capsule test in the Advanced Test Reactor on the Idaho National Laboratory site. This paper will summarize the fuel fabrication activities and design efforts. Casting development will include developing a casting process and system. The closure welding system will be based on the gas tungsten arc burst welding process. The settler/bonder system has been designed to be a simple system which provides heating and controllable impact energy to ensure wetting between the fuel and cladding. The final major pieces of equipment to be designed are the weld and sodium bond inspection system. Both x-radiography and ultrasonic inspection techniques have been examine experimentally and found to be feasible, however the final remote system has not been designed. Conceptual designs for radiography and an ultrasonic system have been made.

  10. Fuel Fabrication Capability Research and Development Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Senor, David J.; Burkes, Douglas

    2013-06-28

    The purpose of this document is to provide a comprehensive review of the mission of the Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC) within the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Convert Program, along with research and development (R&D) needs that have been identified as necessary to ensuring mission success. The design and fabrication of successful nuclear fuels must be closely linked endeavors.

  11. UPDATE ON MONOLITHIC FUEL FABRICATION METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    C. R. Clark; J. F. Jue; G. A. Moore; N. P. Hallinan; B. H. Park; D. E. Burkes

    2006-10-01

    Efforts to develop a viable monolithic research reactor fuel plate have continued at Idaho National Laboratory. These efforts have concentrated on both fabrication process refinement and scale-up to produce full sized fuel plates. Progress at INL has led to fabrication of hot isostatic pressed uranium-molybdenum bearing monolithic fuel plates. These miniplates are part of the RERTR-8 miniplate irradiation test. Further progress has also been made on friction stir weld processing which has been used to fabricate full size fuel plates which will be irradiated in the ATR and OSIRIS reactors.

  12. Design, Fabrication, and Operation of Innovative Microalgae Culture Experiments for the Purpose of Producing Fuels: Final Report, Phase I

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    A conceptual design was developed for a 1000-acre (water surface) algae culture facility for the production of fuels. The system is modeled after the shallow raceway system with mixing foils that is now being operated at the University of Hawaii. A computer economic model was created to calculate the discounted breakeven price of algae or fuels produced by the culture facility. A sensitivity analysis was done to estimate the impact of changes in important biological, engineering, and financial parameters on product price.

  13. Electric Fuel Rod Simulator Fabrication at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, Larry J.; McCulloch, Reg

    2004-02-04

    Commercial vendors could not supply the high-quality, highly instrumented electric fuel rod simulators (FRS) required for large thermal-hydraulic safety-oriented experiments at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the 1970s and early 1980s. Staff at ORNL designed, developed, and manufactured the simulators utilized in these safety experiments. Important FRS design requirements include (1) materials of construction, (2) test power requirements and availability, (3) experimental test objectives, (4) supporting thermal analyses, and (5) extensive quality control throughout all phases of FRS fabrication. This paper will present an overview of these requirements (design, analytics, and quality control) as practiced at ORNL to produce a durable high-quality FRS.

  14. Fabrication of FFTF fuel pin wire wrap

    SciTech Connect

    Epperson, E.M.

    1980-06-01

    Lateral spacing between FFTF fuel pins is required to provide a passageway for the sodium coolant to flow over each pin to remove heat generated by the fission process. This spacing is provided by wrapping each fuel pin with type 316 stainless steel wire. This wire has a 1.435mm (0.0565 in.) to 1.448mm (0.0570 in.) diameter, contains 17 +- 2% cold work and was fabricated and tested to exacting RDT Standards. About 500 kg (1100 lbs) or 39 Km (24 miles) of fuel pin wrap wire is used in each core loading. Fabrication procedures and quality assurance tests are described.

  15. Cermet fuel for fast reactor - Fabrication and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Sudhir; Kutty, P. S.; Kutty, T. R. G.; Das, Shantanu; Dey, G. K.; Kumar, Arun

    2013-11-01

    (U, Pu)O2 ceramic fuel is the well-established fuel for the fast reactors and (U, Pu, Zr) metallic fuel is the future fuel. Both the fuels have their own merits and demerits. Optimal solution may lie in opting for a fuel which combines the favorable features of both fuel systems. The choice may be the use of cermet fuel which can be either (U, PuO2) or (Enriched U, UO2). In the present study, attempt has been made to fabricate (Natural U, UO2) cermet fuel by powder metallurgy route. Characterization of the fuel has been carried out using dilatometer, differential thermal analyzer, X-ray diffractometer, and Scanning Electron Microscope. The results show a high solidus temperature, high thermal expansion, presence of porosities, etc. in the fuel. The thermal conductivity of the fuel has also been measured. X-ray diffraction study on the fuel compact reveals presence of α U and UO2 phases in the matrix of the fuel.

  16. Method to fabricate high performance tubular solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Fanglin; Yang, Chenghao; Jin, Chao

    2013-06-18

    In accordance with the present disclosure, a method for fabricating a solid oxide fuel cell is described. The method includes forming an asymmetric porous ceramic tube by using a phase inversion process. The method further includes forming an asymmetric porous ceramic layer on a surface of the asymmetric porous ceramic tube by using a phase inversion process. The tube is co-sintered to form a structure having a first porous layer, a second porous layer, and a dense layer positioned therebetween.

  17. Fabrication of capsule assemblies, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keeton, A. R.; Stemann, L. G.

    1973-01-01

    Thirteen capsule assemblies were fabricated for evaluation of fuel pin design concepts for a fast spectrum lithium cooled compact space power reactor. These instrumented assemblies were designed for real time test of prototype fuel pins. Uranium mononitride fuel pins were encased in AISI 304L stainless steel capsules. Fabrication procedures were fully qualified by process development and assembly qualification tests. Instrumentation reliability was achieved utilizing specially processed and closely controlled thermocouple hot zone fabrication and by thermal screening tests. Overall capsule reliability was achieved with an all electron beam welded assembly.

  18. Secure automated fabrication: remote fabrication of breeder-reactor fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, E.W.; Rice, L.H.; Horgos, R.M.; Nagamoto, T.T.; Graham, R.A.

    1981-05-01

    The Secure Automated Fabrication (SAF) Program was initiated at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) to develop and demonstrate an advanced manufacturing line (SAF line) for plutonium oxide breeder reactor fuel pins. The SAF line is to be installed in the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) at Hanford and will utilize technology that focuses on improved safety features for plant operating personnel, the public, and the environment. Equipment and process improvements incorporated by the SAF line will yield significant gains in nuclear materials safeguards, product quality and productivity.

  19. Fuel Fabrication Capability Research and Development Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Senor, David J.; Burkes, Douglas

    2014-04-17

    The purpose of this document is to provide a comprehensive review of the mission of the Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC) within the Global Threat Reduction Initiative Convert Program, along with research and development (R&D) needs that have been identified as necessary to ensuring mission success. The design and fabrication of successful nuclear fuels must be closely linked endeavors. Therefore, the overriding motivation behind the FFC R&D program described in this plan is to foster closer integration between fuel design and fabrication to reduce programmatic risk. These motivating factors are all interrelated, and progress addressing one will aid understanding of the others. The FFC R&D needs fall into two principal categories, 1) baseline process optimization, to refine the existing fabrication technologies, and 2) manufacturing process alternatives, to evaluate new fabrication technologies that could provide improvements in quality, repeatability, material utilization, or cost. The FFC R&D Plan examines efforts currently under way in regard to coupon, foil, plate, and fuel element manufacturing, and provides recommendations for a number of R&D topics that are of high priority but not currently funded (i.e., knowledge gaps). The plan ties all FFC R&D efforts into a unified vision that supports the overall Convert Program schedule in general, and the fabrication schedule leading up to the MP-1 and FSP-1 irradiation experiments specifically. The fabrication technology decision gates and down-selection logic and schedules are tied to the schedule for fabricating the MP-1 fuel plates, which will provide the necessary data to make a final fuel fabrication process down-selection. Because of the short turnaround between MP-1 and the follow-on FSP-1 and MP-2 experiments, the suite of specimen types that will be available for MP-1 will be the same as those available for FSP-1 and MP-2. Therefore, the only opportunity to explore parameter space and alternative processing

  20. Update on US High Density Fuel Fabrication Development

    SciTech Connect

    C.R. Clark; G.A. Moore; J.F. Jue; B.H. Park; N.P. Hallinan; D.M. Wachs; D.E. Burkes

    2007-03-01

    Second generation uranium molybdenum fuel has shown excellent in-reactor irradiation performance. This metallic fuel type is capable of being fabricated at much higher loadings than any presently used research reactor fuel. Due to the broad range of fuel types this alloy system encompasses—fuel powder to monolithic foil and binary fuel systems to multiple element additions—significant amounts of research and development have been conducted on the fabrication of these fuels. This paper presents an update of the US RERTR effort to develop fabrication techniques and the fabrication methods used for the RERTR-9A miniplate test.

  1. Phase Change Fabrics Control Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Originally featured in Spinoff in 1997, Outlast Technologies Inc. (formerly Gateway Technologies Inc.) has built its entire product line on microencapsulated phase change materials, developed in Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts with Johnson Space Center after initial development for the U.S. Air Force. The Boulder, Colorado-based company acquired the exclusive patent rights and now integrates these materials into textiles or onto finished apparel, providing temperature regulation in bedding materials and a full line of apparel for both ordinary and extreme conditions.

  2. MONOLITHIC FUEL FABRICATION PROCESS DEVELOPMENT AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn A. Moore; Francine J. Rice; Nicolas E. Woolstenhulme; W. David SwanK; DeLon C. Haggard; Jan-Fong Jue; Blair H. Park; Steven E. Steffler; N. Pat Hallinan; Michael D. Chapple; Douglas E. Burkes

    2008-10-01

    Within the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program directed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), UMo fuel-foils are being developed in an effort to realize high density monolithic fuel plates for use in high-flux research and test reactors. Namely, targeted are reactors that are not amenable to Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel conversion via utilization of high density dispersion-based fuels, i.e. 8-9 gU/cc. LEU conversion of reactors having a need for >8-9 gU/cc fuel density will only be possible by way of monolithic fuel forms. The UMo fuel foils under development afford fuel meat density of ~16 gU/cc and thus have the potential to facilitate LEU conversions without any significant reactor-performance penalty. Two primary challenges have been established with respect to UMo monolithic fuel development; namely, fuel element fabrication and in-reactor fuel element performance. Both issues are being addressed concurrently at the Idaho National Laboratory. An overview is provided of the ongoing monolithic UMo fuel development effort at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL); including development of complex/graded fuel foils. Fabrication processes to be discussed include: UMo alloying and casting, foil fabrication via hot rolling, fuel-clad interlayer application via co-rolling and thermal spray processes, clad bonding via Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) and Friction Bonding (FB), and fuel plate finishing.

  3. Status of high-density fuel plates fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Wiencek, T.C.; Domagala, R.F.; Thresh, H.R.

    1989-09-01

    Progress has continued on the fabrication of fuel plates with fuel zone loadings approaching 9gU/cm{sup 3}. Using Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIPping) successful diffusion bonds have been made with 110 Al and 6061 Al alloys. These bonds demonstrated the most critical processing step for proof-of-concept hardware. Two types of prototype highly-loaded fuel plates have been fabricated. First, a fuel plate in which 0.030 in. (0.76 mm) uranium compound wires are bonded within an aluminum cladding and second, a dispersion fuel plate with uniform cladding and fuel zone thickness. The successful fabrication of these fuel plates derives from the unique ability of the HIPping process to produce diffusion bonds with minimal deformation. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Advanced Safeguards Approaches for New TRU Fuel Fabrication Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Durst, Philip C.; Ehinger, Michael H.; Boyer, Brian; Therios, Ike; Bean, Robert; Dougan, A.; Tolk, K.

    2007-12-15

    This second report in a series of three reviews possible safeguards approaches for the new transuranic (TRU) fuel fabrication processes to be deployed at AFCF – specifically, the ceramic TRU (MOX) fuel fabrication line and the metallic (pyroprocessing) line. The most common TRU fuel has been fuel composed of mixed plutonium and uranium dioxide, referred to as “MOX”. However, under the Advanced Fuel Cycle projects custom-made fuels with higher contents of neptunium, americium, and curium may also be produced to evaluate if these “minor actinides” can be effectively burned and transmuted through irradiation in the ABR. A third and final report in this series will evaluate and review the advanced safeguards approach options for the ABR. In reviewing and developing the advanced safeguards approach for the new TRU fuel fabrication processes envisioned for AFCF, the existing international (IAEA) safeguards approach at the Plutonium Fuel Production Facility (PFPF) and the conceptual approach planned for the new J-MOX facility in Japan have been considered as a starting point of reference. The pyro-metallurgical reprocessing and fuel fabrication process at EBR-II near Idaho Falls also provided insight for safeguarding the additional metallic pyroprocessing fuel fabrication line planned for AFCF.

  5. Fabrication Phase of the Ignitor Program*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantovani, S.; Frosi, P.; Ramogida, G.; Coppi, B.

    2011-10-01

    The fabrication phase of the complete Ignitor machine has started by identifying at first the main industrial groups that have the capabilities to construct the main components of the machine. The ``translation'' of the drawings of the detailed design into fabrication drawings has been undertaken reconsidering the results of the structural analysis that has been carried out for all the machine elements. A special attention is being devoted to the robotic systems that have to be able to perform different functions during the final assembly of the machine and for its operation. The management structure necessary to carry out the entire fabrication effort has been established. The Italian Space Agency (A.S.I.) has been charged with the task of administrating the funds allocated for the construction of the core of the machine by the Italian government. * Sponsored in part by the U.S. DOE.

  6. Fabrication of non-fertile and evolutionary mixed oxide fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, K.B.; Chidester, D.M.

    1996-10-01

    Non-fertile and evolutionary mixed oxide (EMOX) fuels for light water reactors have been fabricated using the solid-state reaction method. Specifically, the non-fertile fuel form fabricated for this study was a PuO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2}-CaO-Er{sub 2}O{sub 3}composition. Weapons-grade plutonium served as the source of PuO{sub 2}. The non-fertile fuel offers the key advantage of the {open_quotes}deep burn{close_quotes} capability for a once-through cycle. The non-fertile fuel achieves this performance through the absence of uranium, which breeds plutonium, in the fuel composition. An EMOX fuel form with a composition of PuO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2}-CaO was also fabricated using weapons-grade plutonium and depleted uranium. The EMOX fuel concept allows for greater plutonium destruction as compared to standard MOX fuel and provides a licensing path forward towards eventual implementation of non-fertile fuels in light water reactors. This paper summarizes the ongoing activities and past accomplishments for the fabrication of non-fertile and EMOX fuel pellets. 2 figs.

  7. MONOLITHIC FUEL FABRICATION PROCESS DEVELOPMENT AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY_

    SciTech Connect

    G. A. Moore; F. J. Rice; N. E. Woolstenhulme; J-F. Jue; B. H. Park; S. E. Steffler; N. P. Hallinan; M. D. Chapple; M. C. Marshall; B. L. Mackowiak; C. R. Clark; B. H. Rabin

    2009-11-01

    Full-size/prototypic U10Mo monolithic fuel-foils and aluminum clad fuel plates are being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC). These efforts are focused on realizing Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) high density monolithic fuel plates for use in High Performance Research and Test Reactors. The U10Mo fuel foils under development afford a fuel meat density of ~16 gU/cc and thus have the potential to facilitate LEU conversions without any significant reactor-performance penalty. An overview is provided of the ongoing monolithic UMo fuel development effort, including application of a zirconium barrier layer on fuel foils, fabrication scale-up efforts, and development of complex/graded fuel foils. Fuel plate clad bonding processes to be discussed include: Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) and Friction Bonding (FB).

  8. SEM and TEM Characterization of As-Fabricated U-7Mo Disperson Fuel Plates

    SciTech Connect

    D. D. Keiser, Jr.; B. Yao; E. Perez; Y. H. Sohn

    2009-11-01

    The starting microstructure of a dispersion fuel plate can have a dramatic impact on the overall performance of the plate during irradiation. To improve the understanding of the as-fabricated microstructures of dispersion fuel plates, SEM and TEM analysis have been performed on RERTR-9A archive fuel plates, which went through an additional hot isostatic procsssing (HIP) step during fabrication. The fuel plates had depleted U-7Mo fuel particles dispersed in either Al-2Si or 4043 Al alloy matrix. For the characterized samples, it was observed that a large fraction of the ?-phase U-7Mo alloy particles had decomposed during fabrication, and in areas near the fuel/matrix interface where the transformation products were present significant fuel/matrix interaction had occurred. Relatively thin Si-rich interaction layers were also observed around the U-7Mo particles. In the thick interaction layers, (U)(Al,Si)3 and U6Mo4Al43 were identified, and in the thin interaction layers U(Al,Si)3, U3Si3Al2, U3Si5, and USi1.88-type phases were observed. The U3Si3Al2 phase contained some Mo. Based on the results of this work, exposure of dispersion fuel plates to relatively high temperatures during fabrication impacts the overall microstructure, particularly the nature of the interaction layers around the fuel particles. The time and temperature of fabrication should be carefully controlled in order to produce the most uniform Si-rich layers around the U-7Mo particles.

  9. Fabrication and Characterization of Surrogate Fuel Particles Using the Spark Erosion Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Kathryn E.

    In light of the disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant, the Department of Energy's Advanced Fuels Program has shifted its interest from enhanced performance fuels to enhanced accident tolerance fuels. Dispersion fuels possess higher thermal conductivities than traditional light water reactor fuel and as a result, offer improved safety margins. The benefits of a dispersion fuel are due to the presence of the secondary non-fissile phase (matrix), which serves as a barrier to fission products and improves the overall thermal performance of the fuel. However, the presence of a matrix material reduces the fuel volume, which lowers the fissile content of dispersion. This issue can be remedied through the development of higher density fuel phases or through an optimization of fuel particle size and volume loading. The latter requirement necessitates the development of fabrication methods to produce small, micron-order fuel particles. This research examines the capabilities of the spark erosion process to fabricate particles on the order of 10 μm. A custom-built spark erosion device by CT Electromechanica was used to produce stainless steel surrogate fuel particles in a deionized water dielectric. Three arc intensities were evaluated to determine the effect on particle size. Particles were filtered from the dielectric using a polycarbonate membrane filter and vacuum filtration system. Fabricated particles were characterized via field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), laser light particle size analysis, energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), and gas pycnometry. FESEM images reveal that the spark erosion process produces highly spherical particles on the order of 10 microns. These findings are substantiated by the results of particle size analysis. Additionally, EDS and XRD results indicate the presence of oxide phases, which suggests the dielectric reacted with the molten debris during particle formation.

  10. Fabrication and Characterization of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Terrani, Kurt A; Kiggans, Jim; Katoh, Yutai; Shimoda, Kazuya; Montgomery, Fred C; Armstrong, Beth L; Parish, Chad M; Hinoki, Tatsuya; Hunn, John D; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2012-01-01

    The current generation of fully ceramic microencapsulated fuels, consisting of Tristructural Isotropic fuel particles embedded in a silicon carbide matrix, is fabricated by hot pressing. Matrix powder feedstock is comprised of alumina - yttria additives thoroughly mixed with silicon carbide nanopowder using polyethyleneimine as a dispersing agent. Fuel compacts are fabricated by hot pressing the powder - fuel particle mixture at a temperature of 1800-1900 C using compaction pressures of 10-20 MPa. Detailed microstructural characterization of the final fuel compacts shows that oxide additives are limited in extent and are distributed uniformly at silicon carbide grain boundaries, at triple joints between silicon carbide grains, and at the fuel particle-matrix interface.

  11. Coated U(Mo) Fuel: As-Fabricated Microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Emmanuel Perez; Dennis D. Keiser, Jr.; Ann Leenaers; Sven Van den Berghe; Tom Wiencek

    2014-04-01

    As part of the development of low-enriched uranium fuels, fuel plates have recently been tested in the BR-2 reactor as part of the SELENIUM experiment. These fuel plates contained fuel particles with either Si or ZrN thin film coating (up to 1 µm thickness) around the U-7Mo fuel particles. In order to best understand irradiation performance, it is important to determine the starting microstructure that can be observed in as-fabricated fuel plates. To this end, detailed microstructural characterization was performed on ZrN and Si-coated U-7Mo powder in samples taken from AA6061-clad fuel plates fabricated at 500°C. Of interest was the condition of the thin film coatings after fabrication at a relatively high temperature. Both scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were employed. The ZrN thin film coating was observed to consist of columns comprised of very fine ZrN grains. Relatively large amounts of porosity could be found in some areas of the thin film, along with an enrichment of oxygen around each of the the ZrN columns. In the case of the pure Si thin film coating sample, a (U,Mo,Al,Si) interaction layer was observed around the U-7Mo particles. Apparently, the Si reacted with the U-7Mo and Al matrix during fuel plate fabrication at 500°C to form this layer. The microstructure of the formed layer is very similar to those that form in U-7Mo versus Al-Si alloy diffusion couples annealed at higher temperatures and as-fabricated U-7Mo dispersion fuel plates with Al-Si alloy matrix fabricated at 500°C.

  12. Fabrication of Monolithic RERTR Fuels by Hot Isostatic Pressing

    SciTech Connect

    Jan-Fong Jue; Blair H. Park; Curtis R. Clark; Glenn A. Moore; Dennis D. Keiser, Jr.

    2010-11-01

    The RERTR (Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors) Program is developing advanced nuclear fuels for high-power test reactors. Monolithic fuel design provides higher uranium loading than that of the traditional dispersion fuel design. Hot isostatic pressing is a promising process for low-cost batch fabrication of monolithic RERTR fuel plates for these high-power reactors. Bonding U Mo fuel foil and 6061 Al cladding by hot isostatic press bonding was successfully developed at Idaho National Laboratory. Due to the relatively high processing temperature, the interaction between fuel meat and aluminum cladding is a concern. Two different methods were employed to mitigate this effect: (1) a diffusion barrier and (2) a doping addition to the interface. Both types of fuel plates have been fabricated by hot isostatic press bonding. Preliminary results show that the direct fuel/cladding interaction during the bonding process was eliminated by introducing a thin zirconium diffusion barrier layer between the fuel and the cladding. Fuel plates were also produced and characterized with a silicon-rich interlayer between fuel and cladding. This paper reports the recent progress of this developmental effort and identifies the areas that need further attention.

  13. Fabrication of advanced oxide fuels containing minor actinide for use in fast reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Miwa, Shuhei; Osaka, Masahiko; Tanaka, Kosuke; Ishi, Yohei; Yoshimochi, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Kenya

    2007-07-01

    R and D of advanced fuel containing minor actinide for use in fast reactors is described related to the composite fuel with MgO matrix. Fabrication tests of MgO composite fuels containing Am were done by a practical process that could be adapted to the presently used commercial manufacturing technology. Am-containing MgO composite fuels having good characteristics, i.e., having no defects, a high density, a homogeneous dispersion of host phase, were obtained. As related technology, burn-up characteristics of a fast reactor core loaded with the present MgO composite fuel were also analyzed, mainly in terms of core criticality. Furthermore, phase relations of MA oxide which was assumed to be contained in MgO matrix fuel were experimentally investigated. (authors)

  14. Fabrication and Preliminary Evaluation of Metal Matrix Microencapsulated Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Terrani, Kurt A; Kiggans, Jim; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2012-01-01

    The metal matrix microencapsulated (M3) fuel concept for light water reactors (LWRs), consisting of coated fuel particles dispersed in a zirconium metal matrix, is introduced. Fabrication of M3 fuels by hot pressing, hot isostatic pressing, or extrusion methodologies has been demonstrated over the temperature range 800-1050 C. Various types of coated fuel particles with outermost layers of pyrocarbon, SiC, ZrC, and TiN have been incorporated into the zirconium metal matrix. Mechanical particle-particle and chemical particle-matrix interactions have been observed during the preliminary characterization of as-fabricated M3 specimens. Irradiation of three M3 rodlets with surrogate coated fuel particles was carried out at mean rod temperature of 400 C to 4.6 dpa in the zirconium metal matrix. Due to absence of texture in the metal matrix no irradiation growth strain (<0.09%) was detected during the post-irradiation examination.

  15. Redundancy of Supply in the International Nuclear Fuel Fabrication Market: Are Fabrication Services Assured?

    SciTech Connect

    Seward, Amy M.; Toomey, Christopher; Ford, Benjamin E.; Wood, Thomas W.; Perkins, Casey J.

    2011-11-14

    For several years, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been assessing the reliability of nuclear fuel supply in support of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration. Three international low enriched uranium reserves, which are intended back up the existing and well-functioning nuclear fuel market, are currently moving toward implementation. These backup reserves are intended to provide countries credible assurance that of the uninterrupted supply of nuclear fuel to operate their nuclear power reactors in the event that their primary fuel supply is disrupted, whether for political or other reasons. The efficacy of these backup reserves, however, may be constrained without redundant fabrication services. This report presents the findings of a recent PNNL study that simulated outages of varying durations at specific nuclear fuel fabrication plants. The modeling specifically enabled prediction and visualization of the reactors affected and the degree of fuel delivery delay. The results thus provide insight on the extent of vulnerability to nuclear fuel supply disruption at the level of individual fabrication plants, reactors, and countries. The simulation studies demonstrate that, when a reasonable set of qualification criteria are applied, existing fabrication plants are technically qualified to provide backup fabrication services to the majority of the world's power reactors. The report concludes with an assessment of the redundancy of fuel supply in the nuclear fuel market, and a description of potential extra-market mechanisms to enhance the security of fuel supply in cases where it may be warranted. This report is an assessment of the ability of the existing market to respond to supply disruptions that occur for technical reasons. A forthcoming report will address political disruption scenarios.

  16. Dispersion type zirconium matrix fuels fabricated by capillary impregnation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savchenko, A.; Konovalov, I.; Vatulin, A.; Morozov, A.; Orlov, V.; Uferov, O.; Ershov, S.; Laushkin, A.; Kulakov, G.; Maranchak, S.; Petrova, Z.

    2007-05-01

    Several novel dispersion fuel compositions with a high uranium content fuel (U9Mo, U5Zr5Nb, U3Si) and a zirconium alloy matrix with low melting point (1063-1133 K) have been developed at A.A. Bochvar Institute using a capillary impregnation fabrication method. The capillary impregnation method introduces fuel granules and granules of a zirconium alloy into a fuel element followed by a short-term anneal at a temperature above the melting temperature of alloy. The alloy melts down and under capillary forces moves into the joints between the fuel element components to form metallurgical bonds. The volume ratios between the components are: 55-65% fuel, 10-20% matrix, and 15-30% pores. Fuel elements produced by capillary impregnation method have a high uranium content (9-10 g cm-3) and a high thermal conductivity (18-22 W m-1 K-1), which, when used as PWR or BWR fuels allow the fuel temperature to be lowered to 723-773 K. They also feature porosity to accommodate swelling. The metallurgical fuel-cladding bond makes the fuel elements serviceable in power transients. The primary advantages for PWR, BWR and CANDU use of these fuels elements, would be the high uranium content, low fuel temperature and serviceability under transient conditions. Consideration is given to their applicability in Floating Nuclear Power Plants (FNPP) as well as for the feasibility of burning civil and weapon grade plutonium.

  17. Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, C.M.

    1990-12-31

    Hawaii has abundant natural energy resources, especially biomass, that could be used to produce alternative fuels for ground transportation and electricity. This report summarizes activities performed during 1988 to June 1991 in the first phase of the Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program. The Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program was funded initially by the Energy Division of the State of Hawaii`s Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism, and then by the US Department of Energy. This program was intended to support the transition to an altemative transportation fuel, methanol, by demonstrating the use of methanol fuel and methanol-fueled vehicles, and solving the problems associated with that fuel. Specific objectives include surveying renewable energy resources and ground transportation in Hawaii; installing a model methanol fueling station; demonstrating a methanol-fueled fleet of (spark-ignition engine) vehicles; evaluating modification strategies for methanol-fueled diesel engines and fuel additives; and investigating the transition to methanol fueling. All major objectives of Phase I were met (survey of local renewable resources and ground transportation, installation of methanol refueling station, fleet demonstration, diesel engine modification and additive evaluation, and dissemination of information on alternative fueling), and some specific problems (e.g., relating to methanol fuel contamination during handling and refueling) were identified and solved. Several key issues emerging from Phase I (e.g., methanol corrosion, flame luminosity, and methanol-transition technoeconomics) were recommended as topics for follow-on research in subsequent phases of this program.

  18. Impact of fuel fabrication and fuel management technologies on uranium utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Arnsberger, P.L.; Stucker, D.L.

    1994-12-31

    Uranium utilization in commercial pressurized water reactors is a complex function of original NSSS design, utility energy requirements, fuel assembly design, fuel fabrication materials and fuel management optimization. Fuel design and fabrication technologies have reacted to the resulting market forcing functions with a combination of design and material changes. The technologies employed have included ever-increasing fuel discharge burnup, non-parasitic structural materials, burnable absorbers, and fissile material core zoning schemes (both in the axial and radial direction). The result of these technological advances has improved uranium utilization by roughly sixty percent from the infancy days of nuclear power to present fuel management. Fuel management optimization technologies have also been developed in recent years which provide fuel utilization improvements due to core loading pattern optimization. This paper describes the development and impact of technology advances upon uranium utilization in modem pressurized water reactors.

  19. Greenfield Alternative Study LEU-Mo Fuel Fabrication Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Washington Division of URS

    2008-07-01

    This report provides the initial “first look” of the design of the Greenfield Alternative of the Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC); a facility to be built at a Greenfield DOE National Laboratory site. The FFC is designed to fabricate LEU-Mo monolithic fuel for the 5 US High Performance Research Reactors (HPRRs). This report provides a pre-conceptual design of the site, facility, process and equipment systems of the FFC; along with a preliminary hazards evaluation, risk assessment as well as the ROM cost and schedule estimate.

  20. Uranium nitride fuel fabrication for SP-100 reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Richard E.; Chidester, Kenneth M.; Hoth, Carl W.; Matthews, Bruce R.

    1987-01-01

    Fuel pins of uranium mononitride clad in Nb-1 percent Zr were fabricated for irradiation tests in EBR-II. Laboratory scale process parameters to synthesize UN powders and fabricate UN pellets were developed. Uranium mononitride was prepared by converting UO2 to UN. Fuel pellets were prepared by communition of UN briquettes, uniaxial pressing, and high temperature sintering. Techniques for machining, cleaning, and welding Nb-1 percent Zr cladding components were developed. End caps were electron beam welded to the tubing. Helium back-fill holes were sealed with a laser weld.

  1. FABRICATION OF TUBE TYPE FUEL ELEMENT FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Loeb, E.; Nicklas, J.H.

    1959-02-01

    A method of fabricating a nuclear reactor fuel element is given. It consists essentially of fixing two tubes in concentric relationship with respect to one another to provide an annulus therebetween, filling the annulus with a fissionablematerial-containing powder, compacting the powder material within the annulus and closing the ends thereof. The powder material is further compacted by swaging the inner surface of the inner tube to increase its diameter while maintaining the original size of the outer tube. This process results in reduced fabrication costs of powdered fissionable material type fuel elements and a substantial reduction in the peak core temperatures while materially enhancing the heat removal characteristics.

  2. A hybrid sequential deposition fabrication technique for micro fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, Kevin G.; Czyzewska, Eva K.; Vanderhoek, Tom P. K.; Fan, Lilian L. Y.; Abel, Keith A.; Wu, Q. M. Jonathan; Parameswaran, M. Ash

    2005-10-01

    Micro fuel cell systems have elicited significant interest due to their promise for instantly rechargeable, longer duration and portable power. Most micro fuel cell systems are either built as miniaturized plate-and-frame or silicon-based microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Plate-and-frame systems are difficult to fabricate smaller than 20 cm3. Existing micro fuel cell designs cannot meet the cost, scale and power requirements of some portable power markets. Traditional MEMS scaling advantages do not apply to fuel cells because the minimum area for the fuel cell is fixed by the catalyst area required for a given power output, and minimum volume set by mass transport limitations. We have developed a new hybrid technique that borrows from both micro and macro machining techniques to create fuel cells in the 1-20 cm3 range, suitable for cell phones, PDAs and smaller devices.

  3. Summary report on fuel development and miniplate fabrication for the RERTR Program, 1978 to 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Wiencek, T.C.

    1995-08-01

    This report summarizes the efforts of the Fabrication Technology Section at Argonne National Laboratory in the program of Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactors (RERTR). The main objective of this program was to reduce the amount of high enriched ({approx}93% {sup 235}U) uranium (HEU) used in nonpower reactors. Conversion from low-density (0.8--1.6 g U/cm{sup 3}) HEU fuel elements to highly loaded (up to 7 g U/cm{sup 3}) low-enrichment (<20% {sup 235}U) uranium (LEU) fuel elements allows the same reactor power levels, core designs and sizes to be retained while greatly reducing the possibility of illicit diversion of HEU nuclear fuel. This document is intended as an overview of the period 1978--1990, during which the Section supported this project by fabricating mainly powder metallurgy uranium-silicide dispersion fuel plates. Most of the subjects covered in detail are fabrication-related studies of uranium silicide fuels and fuel plate properties. Some data are included for out-of-pile experiments such as corrosion and compatibility tests. Also briefly covered are most other aspects of the RERTR program such as irradiation tests, full-core demonstrations, and technology transfer. References included are for further information on most aspects of the entire program. A significant portion of the report is devoted to data that were never published in their entirety. The appendices contain a list of previous RERTR reports, ANL fabrication procedures, calculations for phases present in two-phase fuels, chemical analysis of fuels, miniplate characteristics, and a summary of bonding runs made by hot isostatic pressing.

  4. Remote fabrication and irradiation test of recycled nuclear fuel prepared by the oxidation and reduction of spent oxide fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin Ryu, Ho; Chan Song, Kee; Il Park, Geun; Won Lee, Jung; Seung Yang, Myung

    2005-02-01

    A direct dry recycling process was developed in order to reuse spent pressurized light water reactor (LWR) nuclear fuel in CANDU reactors without the separation of sensitive nuclear materials such as plutonium. The benefits of the dry recycling process are the saving of uranium resources and the reduction of spent fuel accumulation as well as a higher proliferation resistance. In the process of direct dry recycling, fuel pellets separated from spent LWR fuel rods are oxidized from UO2 to U3O8 at 500 °C in an air atmosphere and reduced into UO2 at 700 °C in a hydrogen atmosphere, which is called OREOX (oxidation and reduction of oxide fuel). The pellets are pulverized during the oxidation and reduction processes due to the phase transformation between cubic UO2 and orthorhombic U3O8. Using the oxide powder prepared from the OREOX process, the compaction and sintering processes are performed in a remote manner in a shielded hot cell due to the high radioactivity of the spent fuel. Most of the fission gas and volatile fission products are removed during the OREOX and sintering processes. The mini-elements fabricated by the direct dry recycling process are irradiated in the HANARO research reactor for the performance evaluation of the recycled fuel pellets. Post-irradiation examination of the irradiated fuel showed that microstructural evolution and fission gas release behavior of the dry-recycled fuel were similar to high burnup UO2 fuel.

  5. Fabrication of Uranium Oxycarbide Kernels for HTR Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Barnes; CLay Richardson; Scott Nagley; John Hunn; Eric Shaber

    2010-10-01

    Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) has been producing high quality uranium oxycarbide (UCO) kernels for Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) fuel tests at the Idaho National Laboratory. In 2005, 350-µm, 19.7% 235U-enriched UCO kernels were produced for the AGR-1 test fuel. Following coating of these kernels and forming the coated-particles into compacts, this fuel was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) from December 2006 until November 2009. B&W produced 425-µm, 14% enriched UCO kernels in 2008, and these kernels were used to produce fuel for the AGR-2 experiment that was inserted in ATR in 2010. B&W also produced 500-µm, 9.6% enriched UO2 kernels for the AGR-2 experiments. Kernels of the same size and enrichment as AGR-1 were also produced for the AGR-3/4 experiment. In addition to fabricating enriched UCO and UO2 kernels, B&W has produced more than 100 kg of natural uranium UCO kernels which are being used in coating development tests. Successive lots of kernels have demonstrated consistent high quality and also allowed for fabrication process improvements. Improvements in kernel forming were made subsequent to AGR-1 kernel production. Following fabrication of AGR-2 kernels, incremental increases in sintering furnace charge size have been demonstrated. Recently small scale sintering tests using a small development furnace equipped with a residual gas analyzer (RGA) has increased understanding of how kernel sintering parameters affect sintered kernel properties. The steps taken to increase throughput and process knowledge have reduced kernel production costs. Studies have been performed of additional modifications toward the goal of increasing capacity of the current fabrication line to use for production of first core fuel for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) and providing a basis for the design of a full scale fuel fabrication facility.

  6. Fuel Fabrication for Surrogate Sphere-Pac Rodlet

    SciTech Connect

    Del Cul, G.D.

    2005-07-19

    Sphere-pac fuel consists of a blend of spheres of two or three different size fractions contained in a fuel rod. The smear density of the sphere-pac fuel column can be adjusted to the values obtained for light-water reactor (LWR) pellets (91-95%) by using three size fractions, and to values typical of the fast-reactor oxide fuel column ({approx}85%) by using two size fractions. For optimum binary packing, the diameters of the two sphere fractions must differ by at least a factor of 7 (ref. 3). Blending of spheres with smaller-diameter ratios results in difficult blending, nonuniform loading, and lower packing fractions. A mixture of about 70 vol% coarse spheres and 30 vol% fine spheres is needed to obtain high packing fractions. The limiting smear density for binary packing is 86%, with about 82% achieved in practice. Ternary packing provides greater smear densities, with theoretical values ranging from 93 to 95%. Sphere-pac technology was developed in the 1960-1990 period for thermal and fast spectrum reactors of nearly all types (U-Th and U-Pu fuel cycles, oxide and carbide fuels), but development of this technology was most strongly motivated by the need for remote fabrication in the thorium fuel cycle. The application to LWR fuels as part of the DOE Fuel Performance Improvement Program did not result in commercial deployment for a number of reasons, but the relatively low production cost of existing UO{sub 2} pellet fuel is probably the most important factor. In the case of transmutation fuels, however, sphere-pac technology has the potential to be a lower-cost alternative while also offering great flexibility in tailoring the fuel elements to match the exact requirements of any particular reactor core at any given time in the cycle. In fact, the blend of spheres can be adjusted to offer a different composition for each fuel pin or group of pins in a given fuel element. Moreover, it can even provide a vertical gradient of composition in a single fuel pin. For

  7. Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage Fuel Design and Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickman, Robert; Broadway, Jeramie; Mireles, Omar; Webb, Jon; Qualls, Lou

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) is a game changing technology for space exploration. Goal of assessing the affordability and viability of an NCPS includes thses overall tasks: (1) Pre-conceptual design of the NCPS and architecture integration (2) NCPS Fuel Design and Testing (3) Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) (4) Affordable NCPS Development and Qualification Strategy (5) Second Generation NCPS Concepts. There is a critical need for fuels development. Fuel task objectives are to demonstrate capabilities and critical technologies using full scale element fabrication and testing.

  8. Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage Fuel Design and Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickman, Robert; Broadway, Jeramie; Mireles, Omar; Webb, Jon; Qualls, Lou

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) is a game changing technology for space exploration. Goal of assessing the affordability and viability of an NCPS includes these overall tasks: (1) Pre-conceptual design of the NCPS and architecture integration (2) NCPS Fuel Design and Testing (3) Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) (4) Affordable NCPS Development and Qualification Strategy (5) Second Generation NCPS Concepts. There is a critical need for fuels development. Fuel task objectives are to demonstrate capabilities and critical technologies using full scale element fabrication and testing.

  9. Estimation and control in HTGR fuel rod fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, D J; Bailey, M J

    1980-01-01

    A control algorithm has been derived for a HTGR Fuel Rod Fabrication Process utilizing the method of Box and Jenkins. The estimator is a Kalman filter and is compared with a Least Square estimator and a standard control chart. The effects of system delays are presented.

  10. Design and fabrication of high density uranium dispersion fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Trybus, C.L.; Meyer, M.K.; Clark, C.R.; Wlencek, T.C.; McGann, D.J.

    1997-11-01

    Twelve different uranium alloys and compounds with uranium densities greater than 13.8 g/cc were fabricated into fuel plates. Sixty-four experimental fuel plates, referred to as microplates, with overall dimensions of 76.2 mm x 22.2 mm x 1.3 mm and elliptical fuel zone of nominal dimensions of 51 mm x 9.5 mm, began irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor on August 23, 1997. The fuel test matrix consists of machined or comminuted (compositions are in weight %) U-10Mo, U-8Mo, U-6Mo, U-4Mo, U-9Nb-3Zr, U-6Nb-4Zr, U-5Nb-3Zr, U-6Mo-1Pt, U6Mo-0.6 Ru, U-10Mo-0.05Sn, U{sub 2}Mo and U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} (as a control). The low enriched ({sup 235}U < 20%) fuel materials were cast, powdered, mixed with aluminum dispersant at a volume ratio of 1:3, compacted and hot rolled to form the microplates. Spherical atomized powders of two fuels, U-10Mo and U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}, were utilized to make microplates and included in the irradiation test as well. The experimental design and fabrication steps employed in the selection and production of the fueled microplates is discussed.

  11. Composite nuclear fuel fabrication methodology for gas fast reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevamurthy, Gokul

    An advanced fuel form for use in Gas Fast Reactors (GFR) was investigated. Criteria for the fuel includes operation at high temperature (˜1400°C) and high burnup (˜150 MWD/MTHM) with effective retention of fission products even during transient temperatures exceeding 1600°C. The GFR fuel is expected to contain up to 20% transuranics for a closed fuel cycle. Earlier evaluations of reference fuels for the GFR have included ceramic-ceramic (cercer) dispersion type composite fuels of mixed carbide or nitride microspheres coated with SiC in a SiC matrix. Studies have indicated that ZrC is a potential replacement for SiC on account of its higher melting point, increased fission product corrosion resistance and better chemical stability. The present work investigated natural uranium carbide microspheres in a ZrC matrix instead of SiC. Known issues of minor actinide volatility during traditional fabrication procedures necessitated the investigation of still high temperature but more rapid fabrication techniques to minimize these anticipated losses. In this regard, fabrication of ZrC matrix by combustion synthesis from zirconium and graphite powders was studied. Criteria were established to obtain sufficient matrix density with UC microsphere volume fractions up to 30%. Tests involving production of microspheres by spark erosion method (similar to electrodischarge machining) showed the inability of the method to produce UC microspheres in the desired range of 300 to 1200 mum. A rotating electrode device was developed using a minimum current of 80A and rotating at speeds up to 1500 rpm to fabricate microspheres between 355 and 1200 mum. Using the ZrC process knowledge, UC electrodes were fabricated and studied for use in the rotating electrode device to produce UC microspheres. Fabrication of the cercer composite form was studied using microsphere volume fractions of 10%, 20%, and 30%. The macrostructure of the composite and individual components at various stages were

  12. FABRICATION OF URANIUM OXYCARBIDE KERNELS AND COMPACTS FOR HTR FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Jeffrey A. Phillips; Eric L. Shaber; Scott G. Nagley

    2012-10-01

    As part of the program to demonstrate tristructural isotropic (TRISO)-coated fuel for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) fuel is being irradiation tested in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). This testing has led to improved kernel fabrication techniques, the formation of TRISO fuel particles, and upgrades to the overcoating, compaction, and heat treatment processes. Combined, these improvements provide a fuel manufacturing process that meets the stringent requirements associated with testing in the AGR experimentation program. Researchers at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) are working in conjunction with a team from Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to (a) improve the quality of uranium oxycarbide (UCO) fuel kernels, (b) deposit TRISO layers to produce a fuel that meets or exceeds the standard developed by German researches in the 1980s, and (c) develop a process to overcoat TRISO particles with the same matrix material, but applies it with water using equipment previously and successfully employed in the pharmaceutical industry. A primary goal of this work is to simplify the process, making it more robust and repeatable while relying less on operator technique than prior overcoating efforts. A secondary goal is to improve first-pass yields to greater than 95% through the use of established technology and equipment. In the first test, called “AGR-1,” graphite compacts containing approximately 300,000 coated particles were irradiated from December 2006 to November 2009. The AGR-1 fuel was designed to closely replicate many of the properties of German TRISO-coated particles, thought to be important for good fuel performance. No release of gaseous fission product, indicative of particle coating failure, was detected in the nearly 3-year irradiation to a peak burn up of 19.6% at a time-average temperature of 1038–1121°C. Before fabricating AGR-2 fuel, each

  13. Fabrication of high exposure nuclear fuel pellets

    DOEpatents

    Frederickson, James R.

    1987-01-01

    A method is disclosed for making a fuel pellet for a nuclear reactor. A mixture is prepared of PuO.sub.2 and UO.sub.2 powders, where the mixture contains at least about 30% PuO.sub.2, and where at least about 12% of the Pu is the Pu.sup.240 isotope. To this mixture is added about 0.3 to about 5% of a binder having a melting point of at least about 250.degree. F. The mixture is pressed to form a slug and the slug is granulated. Up to about 4.7% of a lubricant having a melting point of at least about 330.degree. F. is added to the granulated slug. Both the binder and the lubricant are selected from a group consisting of polyvinyl carboxylate, polyvinyl alcohol, naturally occurring high molecular weight cellulosic polymers, chemically modified high molecular weight cellulosic polymers, and mixtures thereof. The mixture is pressed to form a pellet and the pellet is sintered.

  14. Development of advanced fuel cell system, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handley, L. M.; Meyer, A. P.; Bell, W. F.

    1973-01-01

    A multiple task research and development program was performed to improve the weight, life, and performance characteristics of hydrogen-oxygen alkaline fuel cells for advanced power systems. Development and characterization of a very stable gold alloy catalyst was continued from Phase I of the program. A polymer material for fabrication of cell structural components was identified and its long term compatibility with the fuel cell environment was demonstrated in cell tests. Full scale partial cell stacks, with advanced design closed cycle evaporative coolers, were tested. The characteristics demonstrated in these tests verified the feasibility of developing the engineering model system concept into an advanced lightweight long life powerplant.

  15. Radiological health aspects of commercial uranium conversion, enrichment, and fuel fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Stoetzel, G.A.; Hoenes, G.R.; Cummings, F.M.; McCormack, W.D.

    1982-11-01

    Detailed information concerning occupational exposures, health physics practices, and regulatory procedures at commercial conversion, enrichment and fuel fabrication facilities is given. Sites visits were the primary source of information, which is divided into four sections. The first section discusses health physics practices that are common to the conversion, enrichment, and fuel fabrication phases of the commercial uranium industry. The next three sections review process descriptions, radiological health practices, and regulatory procedures for the three phases. Nonradiological exposures are considered only as they influence the interpretation of the health effects of radiological exposures. The review of regulatory procedures indicates the types of exposure evaluation records being kept on uranium workers and the responsibility for maintaining the records.

  16. Fabrication of small-orifice fuel injectors for diesel engines.

    SciTech Connect

    Woodford, J. B.; Fenske, G. R.

    2005-04-08

    Diesel fuel injector nozzles with spray hole diameters of 50-75 {micro}m have been fabricated via electroless nickel plating of conventionally made nozzles. Thick layers of nickel are deposited onto the orifice interior surfaces, reducing the diameter from {approx}200 {micro}m to the target diameter. The nickel plate is hard, smooth, and adherent, and covers the orifice interior surfaces uniformly.

  17. FULL SIZE U-10MO MONOLITHIC FUEL FOIL AND FUEL PLATE FABRICATION-TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    G. A. Moore; J-F Jue; B. H. Rabin; M. J. Nilles

    2010-03-01

    Full-size U10Mo foils are being developed for use in high density LEU monolithic fuel plates. The application of a zirconium barrier layer too the foil is applied using a hot co-rolling process. Aluminum clad fuel plates are fabricated using Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) or a Friction Bonding (FB) process. An overview is provided of ongoing technology development activities, including: the co-rolling process, foil shearing/slitting and polishing, cladding bonding processes, plate forming, plate-assembly swaging, and fuel plate characterization. Characterization techniques being employed include, Ultrasonic Testing (UT), radiography, and microscopy.

  18. Fuel cell collector plate and method of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Braun, James C.; Zabriskie, Jr., John E.; Neutzler, Jay K.; Fuchs, Michel; Gustafson, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    An improved molding composition is provided for compression molding or injection molding a current collector plate for a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell. The molding composition is comprised of a polymer resin combined with a low surface area, highly-conductive carbon and/or graphite powder filler. The low viscosity of the thermoplastic resin combined with the reduced filler particle surface area provide a moldable composition which can be fabricated into a current collector plate having improved current collecting capacity vis-a-vis comparable fluoropolymer molding compositions.

  19. An innovative miniature microbial fuel cell fabricated using photolithography.

    PubMed

    Chen, You-Peng; Zhao, Yue; Qiu, Ke-Qiang; Chu, Jian; Lu, Rui; Sun, Min; Liu, Xian-Wei; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Yu, Han-Qing; Chen, Jie; Li, Wen-Jie; Liu, Gang; Tian, Yang-Chao; Xiong, Ying

    2011-02-15

    Recently microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have attracted increasing interests in both environmental and energy fields. Among the various MFC configurations, miniature microbial fuel cell (mini-MFC) has a great potential for the application in medical, communication and other areas because of its miniature volume and high output power density. In this work, a 25-μL single-chamber mini-MFC was fabricated using the photolithography technique. The plate-shaped gold anodic electrode in the mini-MFC showed a higher electrochemical activity than the stripe-shaped one. A biofilm of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was formed on the surface of gold electrode in this micro-liter-scale MFCs. As a result, a maximum power density of 29 mW/m(2) and a maximum current density of 2148 mA/m(2) were achieved by this single-chamber mini-MFC.

  20. A color phase shift profilometry for the fabric defect detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Li-mei; Li, Zong-yan; Chang, Yu-lan; Xing, Guang-xin; Wang, Peng-qiang; Xi, Jiang-tao; Zhu, Teng-da

    2014-07-01

    For fabric defect identification in the textile industry, a three-dimensional (3D) color phase shift profilometry (CPSP) method is proposed. The detecting system is mainly composed of one CCD camera and one digital-light-processing (DLP) projector. Before detection, the system should be calibrated to make sure the camera parameters. The CPSP color grating is projected to the measured fabric by DLP projector, and then it is collected by CCD camera to obtain the grating phase. The 3D measurement can be completed by the grating phase difference. In image acquisition, only invariable grating is projected to the object. In order to eliminate the interference from background light during the image acquisition, the brightness correction method is researched for improving the detection accuracy. The experimental results show that the false rate of detecting the fabric defects is 5.78%, the correct rates of detecting the fabric defects of hole and qualified fabric are both 100%, and the correct rates of detecting the fabric defect of scratch and fold are 98% and 96%, respectively. The experiment proves that the proposed method can accurately identify fabric defects.

  1. Fabrication Characteristics of Large Grain DUPIC Fuel Using SIMFUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Geun IL; Lee, Jung Won; Lee, Jae Won; Yang, Myung Seung; Song, Kee Chan

    2007-07-01

    Fabrication characteristics to improve the density and grain size of DUPIC fuel with relation to its fuel performance were experimentally evaluated using SIMFUEL as a surrogate for an actual spent PWR fuel due to the high radioactivity of a spent fuel. Hence, SIMFUELs with a burn-up of 35,000 MWd/tU and 60,000 MWd/tU were used to investigate the influence of fission products contents as an impurity on the fuel powder properties and on the density and grain size of a simulated DUPIC pellet. In order to improve the densification and grain growth of the simulated DUPIC fuel, the effect of the addition of sintering aids was investigated. The specific surface area of the OREOX powders was increased with an increase of the impurities by the dissolved oxides in UO{sub 2} among the impurity groups. The specific surface area of the powders milled after the OXREOX treatment was slightly higher than the UO{sub 2} powder used for a nuclear power plant, thus resulting in sintered pellets with a higher than 95% T.D. (theoretical density). The grain size of the sintered pellets was significantly decreased with increasing amount of the metallic and oxide precipitates. However, on adding the sintering aids such as TiO{sub 2} and Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}, the grain size of the sintering aids-doped pellets was greatly improved by up to around 3 times that of the raw pellets and their sintered density was also increased by up to 2%. (authors)

  2. Multi-fuel reformers for fuel cells used in transportation. Phase 1: Multi-fuel reformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-05-01

    DOE has established the goal, through the Fuel Cells in Transportation Program, of fostering the rapid development and commercialization of fuel cells as economic competitors for the internal combustion engine. Central to this goal is a safe feasible means of supplying hydrogen of the required purity to the vehicular fuel cell system. Two basic strategies are being considered: (1) on-board fuel processing whereby alternative fuels such as methanol, ethanol or natural gas stored on the vehicle undergo reformation and subsequent processing to produce hydrogen, and (2) on-board storage of pure hydrogen provided by stationary fuel processing plants. This report analyzes fuel processor technologies, types of fuel and fuel cell options for on-board reformation. As the Phase 1 of a multi-phased program to develop a prototype multi-fuel reformer system for a fuel cell powered vehicle, the objective of this program was to evaluate the feasibility of a multi-fuel reformer concept and to select a reforming technology for further development in the Phase 2 program, with the ultimate goal of integration with a DOE-designated fuel cell and vehicle configuration. The basic reformer processes examined in this study included catalytic steam reforming (SR), non-catalytic partial oxidation (POX) and catalytic partial oxidation (also known as Autothermal Reforming, or ATR). Fuels under consideration in this study included methanol, ethanol, and natural gas. A systematic evaluation of reforming technologies, fuels, and transportation fuel cell applications was conducted for the purpose of selecting a suitable multi-fuel processor for further development and demonstration in a transportation application.

  3. Binary phase digital reflection holograms - Fabrication and potential applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, N. C., Jr.; Angus, J. C.; Coffield, F. E.; Edwards, R. V.; Mann, J. A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A novel technique for the fabrication of binary-phase computer-generated reflection holograms is described. By use of integrated circuit technology, the holographic pattern is etched into a silicon wafer and then aluminum coated to make a reflection hologram. Because these holograms reflect virtually all the incident radiation, they may find application in machining with high-power lasers. A number of possible modifications of the hologram fabrication procedure are discussed.

  4. Epitaxial solar-cell fabrication, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daiello, R. V.; Robinson, P. H.; Kressel, H.

    1977-01-01

    Dichlorosilane (SiH2Cl2) was used as the silicon source material in all of the epitaxial growths. Both n/p/p(+) and p/n/n(+) structures were studied. Correlations were made between the measured profiles and the solar cell parameters, especially cell open-circuit voltage. It was found that in order to obtain consistently high open-circuit voltage, the epitaxial techniques used to grow the surface layer must be altered to obtain very abrupt doping profiles in the vicinity of the junction. With these techniques, it was possible to grow reproducibly both p/n/n(+) and n/p/p(+) solar cell structures having open-circuit voltages in the 610- to 630-mV range, with fill-factors in excess of 0.80 and AM-1 efficiencies of about 13%. Combinations and comparisons of epitaxial and diffused surface layers were also made. Using such surface layers, we found that the blue response of epitaxial cells could be improved, resulting in AM-1 short-circuit current densities of about 30 mA/cm sq. The best cells fabricated in this manner had AM-1 efficiency of 14.1%.

  5. Fabrication and Characterization of Dual Phase Magnesia-Zirconia Ceramics Doped with Plutonia

    SciTech Connect

    P. G. Medvedev; J. F. Jue; S. M. Frank; M.K. Meyer

    2005-05-01

    Dual phase magnesia-zirconia ceramics doped with plutonia are being studied as an inert matrix fuel (IMF) for light water reactors. The motivation of this work is to develop an IMF with a thermal conductivity superior to that of the fuels based on yttria stabilized zirconia. The concept uses the MgO phase as an efficient heat conductor to increase thermal conductivity of the composite. In this paper ceramic fabrication and characterization by scanning electron microscopy, energy and wavelength dispersive xray spectroscopy is discussed. Characterization shows that the ceramics consist of the two-phase matrix and PuO2-rich inclusions. The matrix is comprised of pure MgO phase and MgO-ZrO2-PuO2 solid solution. The PuO2-rich inclusion contained dissolved MgO and ZrO2.

  6. Fabrication and characterization of dual phase magnesia zirconia ceramics doped with plutonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, P. G.; Jue, J. F.; Frank, S. M.; Meyer, M. K.

    2006-06-01

    Dual phase magnesia-zirconia ceramics doped with plutonia are being studied as an inert matrix fuel (IMF) for light water reactors. The motivation of this work is to develop an IMF with a thermal conductivity superior to that of the fuels based on yttria stabilized zirconia. The concept uses the MgO phase as an efficient heat conductor to increase thermal conductivity of the composite. In this paper ceramic fabrication and characterization by scanning electron microscopy, energy and wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy is discussed. Characterization shows that the ceramics consist of the two-phase matrix and PuO2-rich inclusions. The matrix is comprised of pure MgO phase and MgO-ZrO2-PuO2 solid solution. The PuO2-rich inclusion contained dissolved MgO and ZrO2.

  7. Electron Microscopy Characterization of an As-Fabricated Research Reactor Fuel Plate Comprised of U-7Mo Particles Dispersed in an Al-2Si Alloy Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis D. Keiser, Jr.; J. Gan; J. F. Jue; B. D. Miller

    2010-11-01

    To understand the microstructural development of nuclear fuel plates during irradiation, it is imperative to know the microstructure of a fuel plate after all the fabrication steps have been completed and before it is inserted into the reactor. To this end, a U–7 wt.% Mo alloy research reactor dispersion fuel plate with Al–2 wt.% Si matrix was destructively examined using scanning and transmission electron microscopy to characterize the developed microstructure after fabrication. Of particular interest for this study was how the Si that was added to the fuel matrix partitioned between the various fuel plate phases during fabrication. Si was added to the matrix so that the microstructure that developed during fuel fabrication would exhibit good irradiation behavior. SEM analysis was used to identify the representative microstructure, the compositions of the various phases, and the partitioning behavior of the fuel and matrix constituents. TEM analysis was employed to definitively identify the phases in the U–7Mo alloy and the phases that formed due to diffusional interactions between the fuel particles and matrix during fuel plate fabrication. The TEM results are the first reported for an as-fabricated U–7 wt.% Mo dispersion fuel plate with an Al alloy matrix. SEM results showed that a significant portion of the original ?-(U–Mo) fuel particles had transformed to a lamellar microstructure, comprised of a-U and either ? or ?' phases, and the fuel/matrix interaction layers were enriched in Si. TEM analysis identified an ordered fcc (U–Mo)(Al–Si)3 type of phase, which formed at the decomposed U–7Mo/matrix interface and extended into the lamellar microstructure. Some regions of the U–7Mo particles retained the single-phase ?-(U–Mo). Small precipitate phases were observed in the fuel meat matrix that contained Fe, Al, and Si. The Si that is added to the matrix of a U–Mo dispersion fuel plate to improve irradiation performance appears to result in

  8. Environmental assessment for radioisotope heat source fuel processing and fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) for radioisotope heat source fuel processing and fabrication involving existing facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) near Los Alamos, New Mexico. The proposed action is needed to provide Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) to support the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) CRAF and Cassini Missions. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. 30 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Fabrication of solid oxide fuel cell by electrochemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Brian; Szreders, Bernard E.

    1988-04-01

    In a high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), the deposition of an impervious high density thin layer of electrically conductive interconnector material, such as magnesium doped lanthanum chromite, and of an electrolyte material, such as yttria stabilized zirconia, onto a porous support/air electrode substrate surface is carried out at high temperatures (approx. 1100 to 1300 C) by a process of electrochemical vapor deposition. In this process, the mixed chlorides of the specific metals involved react in the gaseous state with water vapor resulting in the deposit of an impervious thin oxide layer on the support tube/air electrode substrate of between 20 and 50 microns in thickness. An internal heater, such as a heat pipe, is placed within the support tube/air electrode substrate and induces a uniform temperature profile therein so as to afford precise and uniform oxide deposition kinetics in an arrangement which is particularly adapted for large scale, commercial fabrication of SOFCs.

  10. Fabrication of solid oxide fuel cell by electrochemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Brian, Riley; Szreders, Bernard E.

    1989-01-01

    In a high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), the deposition of an impervious high density thin layer of electrically conductive interconnector material, such as magnesium doped lanthanum chromite, and of an electrolyte material, such as yttria stabilized zirconia, onto a porous support/air electrode substrate surface is carried out at high temperatures (approximately 1100.degree.-1300.degree. C.) by a process of electrochemical vapor deposition. In this process, the mixed chlorides of the specific metals involved react in the gaseous state with water vapor resulting in the deposit of an impervious thin oxide layer on the support tube/air electrode substrate of between 20-50 microns in thickness. An internal heater, such as a heat pipe, is placed within the support tube/air electrode substrate and induces a uniform temperature profile therein so as to afford precise and uniform oxide deposition kinetics in an arrangement which is particularly adapted for large scale, commercial fabrication of SOFCs.

  11. Fabrication of solid oxide fuel cell by electrochemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Riley, B.; Szreders, B.E.

    1988-04-26

    In a high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), the deposition of an impervious high density thin layer of electrically conductive interconnector material, such as magnesium doped lanthanum chromite, and of an electrolyte material, such as yttria stabilized zirconia, onto a porous support/air electrode substrate surface is carried out at high temperatures (/approximately/1100/degree/ /minus/ 1300/degree/C) by a process of electrochemical vapor deposition. In this process, the mixed chlorides of the specific metals involved react in the gaseous state with water vapor resulting in the deposit of an impervious thin oxide layer on the support tube/air electrode substrate of between 20--50 microns in thickness. An internal heater, such as a heat pipe, is placed within the support tube/air electrode substrate and induces a uniform temperature profile therein so as to afford precise and uniform oxide deposition kinetics in an arrangement which is particularly adapted for large scale, commercial fabrication of SOFCs.

  12. 76 FR 65544 - Standard Format and Content of License Applications for Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facilities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-21

    ... issuance of the guide (74 FR 36780). The comment period closed on September 21, 2009. The staff's responses... COMMISSION Standard Format and Content of License Applications for Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facilities... Format and Content of License Applications for Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facilities.'' This...

  13. SSME fuel preburner phase 1/phase 2+ comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, R.J.; Liang, P.Y.; Pinkowski, S.M.

    1985-01-01

    An analytical comparison of the predicted combustion flowfields for the Phase 1 and Phase 2+ fuel preburner configurations using an advanced CFD combustion code is currently underway at Rocketdyne. The Phase 2+ injector has a modified element design. The redesigned element provides for improved atomization through a shift in the injector element/face bleed flow split while maintaining an acceptable pressure drop. Cold-flow tests of the new design have been encouraging. As a complement to those tests, the Advanced Rocket Injector Combustor Code (ARICC) was selected to conduct a detailed combustion flowfield simulation. ARICC models two-dimensional (or axisymmetric), transient, turbulent, two-phase mixing and combustion flowfields. It is derived from a member of the Los Alamos ICEd-ALE family of codes. Unique features of ARICC include explicit representation of the coaxial LOX jet and hydrogen gas flows, distributed atomization processes, droplet breakup, and supercritical vaporation processes. Predictions of temperature and OH concentration profiles for the Phase 1 and Phase 2+ injector flowfields indicate a trend toward more uniform temperature distributions and shorter flame lengths with the Phase 2+ design.

  14. Fabrication procedures for manufacturing High Flux Isotope Reactor fuel elements - 2

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, R.W.; Morin, R.A.

    1999-12-01

    The original fabrication procedures written in 1968 delineated the manufacturing procedures at that time. Since 1968, there have been a number of procedural changes. This rewrite of the fabrication procedures incorporates these changes. The entire fuel core of this reactor is made up of two fuel elements. Each element consists of one annular array of fuel plates. These annuli are identified as the inner and outer fuel elements, since one fits inside the other. The inner element consists of 171 identical fuel plates, and the outer element contains 369 identical fuel plates differing slightly from those in the inner element. Both sets of fuel plates contain U{sub 3}O{sub 8} powder as the fuel, dispersed in an aluminum powder matrix and clad with aluminum. Procedures for manufacturing and inspection of the fuel elements are described and illustrated.

  15. Photoelectrochemical fabrication of spectroscopic diffraction gratings, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauh, R. David; Carrabba, Michael M.; Li, Jianguo; Cartland, Robert F.; Hachey, John P.; Mathew, Sam

    1990-01-01

    This program was directed toward the production of Echelle diffraction gratings by a light-driven, electrochemical etching technique (photoelectrochemical etching). Etching is carried out in single crystal materials, and the differential rate of etching of the different crystallographic planes used to define the groove profiles. Etching of V-groove profiles was first discovered by us during the first phase of this project, which was initially conceived as a general exploration of photoelectrochemical etching techniques for grating fabrication. This highly controllable V-groove etching process was considered to be of high significance for producing low pitch Echelles, and provided the basis for a more extensive Phase 2 investigation.

  16. An Overview of Current and Past W-UO[2] CERMET Fuel Fabrication Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas E. Burkes; Daniel M. Wachs; James E. Werner; Steven D. Howe

    2007-06-01

    Studies dating back to the late 1940s performed by a number of different organizations and laboratories have established the major advantages of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) systems, particularly for manned missions. A number of NTP projects have been initiated since this time; none have had any sustained fuel development work that appreciably contributed to fuel fabrication or performance data from this era. As interest in these missions returns and previous space nuclear power researchers begin to retire, fuel fabrication technologies must be revisited, so that established technologies can be transferred to young researchers seamlessly and updated, more advanced processes can be employed to develop successful NTP fuels. CERMET fuels, specifically W-UO2, are of particular interest to the next generation NTP plans since these fuels have shown significant advantages over other fuel types, such as relatively high burnup, no significant failures under severe transient conditions, capability of accommodating a large fission product inventory during irradiation and compatibility with flowing hot hydrogen. Examples of previous fabrication routes involved with CERMET fuels include hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) and press and sinter, whereas newer technologies, such as spark plasma sintering, combustion synthesis and microsphere fabrication might be well suited to produce high quality, effective fuel elements. These advanced technologies may address common issues with CERMET fuels, such as grain growth, ductile to brittle transition temperature and UO2 stoichiometry, more effectively than the commonly accepted ‘traditional’ fabrication routes. Bonding of fuel elements, especially if the fabrication process demands production of smaller element segments, must be investigated. Advanced brazing techniques and compounds are now available that could produce a higher quality bond segment with increased ease in joining. This paper will briefly address the history of

  17. Development of Core Cladding Fabrication Techniques for Phase I Fission Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salvail, Patrick G.; Reid, Robert S.; Ring, Peter J.; Gentz, Steven J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Phase I fission propulsion systems focus on safety, timely development, and affordability. Prototype and flight units can be tested at full thrust, using resistance heaters to closely simulate heat from a fission reaction. In Phase I ground testing, one goal is to establish a reliable and affordable manufacturing technique for fabricating a flight-like core. A refractory metal (Mo) has been suggested for the core substrate, primarily due to the existence of a significant database for Mo/LJ02 fuel. The core can be fabricated by bundling Mo tubes with a bonding system that meets preliminary test goals. These criteria include materials compatibility, ability to maintain thermal and structural integrity during 10,000 hours of operation, and fabrication with existing facilities. This paper describes an effort to investigate several fabrication techniques in a cost-effective manner. First, inexpensive materials were tested at low temperatures to determine the relative effectiveness of such techniques as welding, brazing, plating, and vacuum plasma spraying (VPSing). Promising techniques were chosen for further evaluation, including thermal and structural studies, using ceramic tubing at intermediate temperatures. The most desirable technique will be tested on actual Mo tubing at anticipated operating temperatures. This work is being performed by the National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA) at George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Advanced Methods & Materials (AMM), Inc.

  18. Development of core cladding fabrication techniques for phase I fission propulsion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvail, Patrick G.; Reid, Robert S.; Ring, Peter J.

    2001-02-01

    Phase I fission propulsion systems focus on safety, timely development, and affordability. Prototype and flight units can be tested at full thrust, using resistance heaters to closely simulate heat from a fission reaction. In Phase I ground testing, one goal is to establish a reliable and affordable manufacturing technique for fabricating a flight-like core. A refractory metal (Mo) has been suggested for the core substrate, primarily due to the existence of a significant database for Mo/UO2 fuel. The core can be fabricated by bundling Mo tubes with a bonding system that meets preliminary test goals. These criteria include materials compatibility, ability to maintain thermal and structural integrity during 10,000 hours of operation, and fabrication with existing facilities. This paper describes an effort to investigate several fabrication techniques in a cost-effective manner. First, inexpensive materials were tested at low temperatures to determine the relative effectiveness of such techniques as welding, brazing, plating, and vacuum plasma spraying (VPSing). Promising techniques were chosen for further evaluation, including thermal and structural studies, using ceramic tubing at intermediate temperatures. The most desirable technique will be tested on actual Mo tubing at anticipated operating temperatures. This work is being performed by the National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA) at George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Advanced Methods & Materials (AMM), Inc. .

  19. Fabrication and Testing of Full-Length Single-Cell Externally Fueled Converters for Thermionic Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, Alfred

    1995-08-01

    Paper presented at the 29th IECEC in Monterey, CA in August 1994. The present paper describes the fabrication and testing of full-length prototypcial converters, both unfueled and fueled, and presents parametric results of electrically heated tests.

  20. Prediction of dose and field mapping around a shielded plutonium fuel fabrication glovebox

    SciTech Connect

    Strode, J.N.; Soldat, K.L.; Brackenbush, L.W.

    1984-04-25

    Westinghouse Hanford Company, as the Department of Energy's (DOE) prime contractor for the operation of the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL), is responsible for the development of the Secure Automated Fabrication (SAF) Line which is to be installed in the recently constructed Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF). The SAF Line will fabricate mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel pins for the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) at an annual throughput rate of six (6) metric tons (MT) of MOX. The SAF Line will also demonstrate the automated manufacture of fuel pins on a production-scale. This paper describes some of the techniques used to reduce personnel exposure on the SAF Line, as well as the prediction and field mapping of doses from a shielded fuel fabrication glovebox. Tables are also presented from which exposure rate estimates can be made for plutonium recovered from fuels having different isotopic compositions as a result of varied burnup.

  1. 10 CFR 72.236 - Specific requirements for spent fuel storage cask approval and fabrication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Specific requirements for spent fuel storage cask approval and fabrication. 72.236 Section 72.236 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INDEPENDENT STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE, AND...

  2. 10 CFR 72.236 - Specific requirements for spent fuel storage cask approval and fabrication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Specific requirements for spent fuel storage cask approval and fabrication. 72.236 Section 72.236 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INDEPENDENT STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE, AND...

  3. 10 CFR 72.236 - Specific requirements for spent fuel storage cask approval and fabrication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Specific requirements for spent fuel storage cask approval and fabrication. 72.236 Section 72.236 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INDEPENDENT STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE, AND...

  4. 10 CFR 72.236 - Specific requirements for spent fuel storage cask approval and fabrication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Specific requirements for spent fuel storage cask approval and fabrication. 72.236 Section 72.236 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INDEPENDENT STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE, AND...

  5. Operation of N Reactor and Fuels Fabrication Facilities, Hanford Reservation, Richland, Benton County, Washington: Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    Environmental data, calculations and analyses show no significant adverse radiological or nonradiological impacts from current or projected future operations resulting from N Reactor, Fuels Fabrication and Spent Fuel Storage Facilities. Nonoccupational radiation exposures resulting from 1978 N Reactor operations are summarized and compared to allowable exposure limits.

  6. Design of high density gamma-phase uranium alloys for LEU dispersion fuel applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Hofman, G. L.

    1998-10-19

    Uranium alloys are candidates for the fuel phase in aluminum matrix dispersion fuels requiring high uranium loading. Certain uranium alloys have been shown to have good irradiation performance at intermediate burnup. Previous studies have shown that acceptable fission gas swelling behavior and fuel-aluminum interaction is possible only if the fuel alloy can be maintained in the high temperature body-centered-cubic {gamma}-phase during fabrication and irradiation, i.e., at temperatures at which {alpha}-U is the equilibrium phase. Transition metals in Groups V through VIII are known to allow metastable retention of the gamma phase below the equilibrium isotherm. These metals have varying degrees of effectiveness in stabilizing the gamma phase. Certain alloys are metastable for very long times at the relatively low fuel temperatures seen in research reactor operation. In this paper, the existing data on the gamma stability of binary and ternary uranium alloys is analyzed. The mechanism and kinetics of decomposition of the gamma phase are assessed with the help of metal alloy theory. Alloys with the highest possible uranium content, good gamma-phase stability, and good neutronic performance are identified for further metallurgical studies and irradiation tests. Results from theory will be compared with experimentally generated data.

  7. Foil fabrication and barrier layer application for monolithic fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Glenn A. Clark, Curtis R.; Jue, J.-F.; Swank, W. David; Haggard, D.C.; Chapple, Michael D.; Burkes, Douglas E.

    2008-07-15

    This presentation provides details of recent UMo fuel developments efforts at the Idaho National Laboratory. Processing of monolithic fuel foil, the friction bonding process, and hot isostatic press (HIP) sample preparation will be presented. Details of the hot rolling, foil annealing, zirconium barrier-layer application to U10Mo fuel foils via the hot-rolling process and application of silicon rich aluminum interfacial-layers via a thermal spray process will be presented. (author)

  8. Interpenetrating phase ceramic/polymer composite coatings: Fabrication and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Bradley Dene

    The goals of this thesis research were to fabricate interpenetrating phase composite (IPC) ceramic/polymer coatings and to investigate the effect of the interconnected microstructure on the physical and wear properties of the coatings. IPC coatings with an interpenetrating phase microstructure were successfully fabricated by first forming a porous ceramic with an interconnected microstructure using a chemical bonding route (mainly reacting alpha-alumina (0.3 mum) with orthophosphoric acid to form a phosphate bond). Porosity within these ceramic coatings was easily controlled between 20 and 50 vol. % by phosphoric acid addition, and was measured by a new porosity measurement technique (thermogravimetric volatilization of liquids, or TVL) which was developed. The resulting ceramic preforms were infiltrated with a UV and thermally curable cycloaliphatic epoxide resin and cured. This fabrication route resulted in composite coatings with thicknesses ranging from ˜1mum to 100 mum with complete filling of open pore space. The physical properties of the composite coatings, including microhardness, flexural modulus and wear resistance, were evaluated as a function of processing variables, including orthophosphoric acid content and ceramic phase firing temperature, which affected the microstructure and interparticulate bonding between particles in the coatings. For example, microhardness increased from ˜30 on the Vicker's scale to well over 200 as interparticulate bonding was increased in the ceramic phase. Additionally, Taber wear resistance in the best TPC coatings was found to approach that of fully-densified alumina under certain conditions. Several factors were found to influence the wear mechanism in the IPC coating materials. Forming strong connections between ceramic particles led to up to an order of magnitude increase in the wear resistance. Additionally, coating microhardness and ceramic/polymer interfacial strength were studied and found to be important in

  9. Fabrication of (U, Zr) C-fueled/tungsten-clad specimens for irradiation in the Plum Brook Reactor Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Fuel samples, 90UC - 10 ZrC, and chemically vapor deposited tungsten fuel cups were fabricated for the study of the long term dimensional stability and compatibility of the carbide-tungsten fuel-cladding systems under irradiation. These fuel samples and fuel cups were assembled into the fuel pins of two capsules, designated as V-2E and V-2F, for irradiation in NASA Plum Brook Reactor Facility at a fission power density of 172 watts/c.c. and a miximum cladding temperature of 1823 K. Fabrication methods and characteristics of the fuel samples and fuel cups prepared are described.

  10. Fabrication of polycaprolactone nanofibrous scaffolds by facile phase separation approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuqiong; He, Zhihang; Xu, Guojie; Xiao, Xiufeng

    2014-11-01

    Three-dimensional polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds with spherulite and nanofibrous structures were fabricated for the first time by thermally induced phase separation from a ternary PCL/dioxane/water system. Moreover, the effects of polymer concentration, aging temperature and the ratio of dioxane to water on the morphology of nanofibrous scaffolds were investigated. The result revealed that gelation, aging temperature, and ratio of solvents significantly influenced the formation of the unique spherulite and nanofibrous structures. The apatite-formation ability test showed relatively rapid growth of carbonate hydroxyapatite in the nanofibrous PCL scaffold with macropore compared to the other two scaffolds with smooth structure and nanofibrous structure without macropore, respectively, indicating good apatite-formation ability of the macroporous and nanofibrous PCL scaffolds.

  11. The Role of Friction Stir Welding in Nuclear Fuel Plate Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    D Burkes; P Medvedev; M Chapple; A Amritkar; P Wells; I Charit

    2009-02-01

    The friction bonding process combines desirable attributes of both friction stir welding and friction stir processing. The development of the process is spurred on by the need to fabricate thin, high density, reduced enrichment fuel plates for nuclear research reactors. The work seeks to convert research and test reactors currently operating on highly enriched uranium fuel to operate on low enriched uranium fuel without significant loss in reactor performance, safety characteristics, or significant increase in cost. In doing so, the threat of global nuclear material proliferation will be reduced. Feasibility studies performed on the process show that this is a viable option for mass production of plate-type nuclear fuel. Adapting the friction stir weld process for nuclear fuel fabrication has resulted in the development of several unique ideas and observations. Preliminary results of this adaptation and process model development are discussed.

  12. Characterization of candidate DOE sites for fabricating MOX fuel for lead assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Holdaway, R.F.; Miller, J.W.; Sease, J.D.; Moses, R.J.; O`Connor, D.G.; Carrell, R.D.; Jaeger, C.D.; Thompson, M.L.; Strasser, A.A.

    1998-03-01

    The Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD) of the Department of Energy (DOE) is directing the program to disposition US surplus weapons-usable plutonium. For the reactor option for disposition of this surplus plutonium, MD is seeking to contract with a consortium, which would include a mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabricator and a commercial US reactor operator, to fabricate and burn MOX fuel in existing commercial nuclear reactors. This option would entail establishing a MOX fuel fabrication facility under the direction of the consortium on an existing DOE site. Because of the lead time required to establish a MOX fuel fabrication facility and the need to qualify the MOX fuel for use in a commercial reactor, MD is considering the early fabrication of lead assemblies (LAs) in existing DOE facilities under the technical direction of the consortium. The LA facility would be expected to produce a minimum of 1 metric ton heavy metal per year and must be operational by June 2003. DOE operations offices were asked to identify candidate sites and facilities to be evaluated for suitability to fabricate MOX fuel LAs. Savannah River Site, Argonne National Laboratory-West, Hanford, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory were identified as final candidates to host the LA project. A Site Evaluation Team (SET) worked with each site to develop viable plans for the LA project. SET then characterized the suitability of each of the five plans for fabricating MOX LAs using 28 attributes and documented the characterization to aid DOE and the consortium in selecting the site for the LA project. SET concluded that each option has relative advantages and disadvantages in comparison with other options; however, each could meet the requirements of the LA project as outlined by MD and SET.

  13. Fabrication and testing of U-7Mo monolithic plate fuel with Zircaloy cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasqualini, E. E.; Robinson, A. B.; Porter, D. L.; Wachs, D. M.; Finlay, M. R.

    2016-10-01

    Nuclear fuel designs are being developed to replace highly enriched fuel used in research and test reactors with fuels of low enrichment. In the most challenging cases, U-(7-10 wt%)Mo monolithic plate fuels are proposed. One of the considered designs includes aluminum-alloy cladding, which provides some challenges in fabrication and fuel/cladding interaction during service. Zircaloy cladding, specifically Zry-4, was investigated as an alternative cladding, and development of a fabrication method was performed by researchers with the Comisión Nacionalde Energia Atómica (CNEA) in Argentina, resulting in test fuel plates (Zry-4 clad U-7Mo) which were subsequently tested in the Advanced Test Reactor in Idaho. Because Zry-4 and U-(7-10)Mo have similar high-temperature mechanical properties, fabrication was simplified in that the fuel foil and cladding could be co-rolled and bonded. The challenge was to prevent a thermal-expansion mismatch, which could destroy the fuel/cladding bond before complete bonding was achieved; the solution was to prevent the composites from cooling significantly during or between roll passes. The final product performed very well in-reactor, showing good bonding, very little fuel/cladding interaction-either from fabrication or in-reactor testing-and little swelling, especially no detectable heterogeneous bubble formation at the fuel/cladding interface tested to a fission density of up to 2.7E+21 (average) fissions/cm3, 3.8E+21 (peak).

  14. Hawaii alternative fuels utilization program. Phase 3, final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, C.M.; Staackmann, M.

    1996-08-01

    The Hawaii Alternative Fuels Utilization Program originated as a five-year grant awarded by the US Department of Energy (USDOE) to the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. The overall program included research and demonstration efforts aimed at encouraging and sustaining the use of alternative (i.e., substitutes for gasoline and diesel) ground transportation fuels in Hawaii. Originally, research aimed at overcoming technical impediments to the widespread adoption of alternative fuels was an important facet of this program. Demonstration activities centered on the use of methanol-based fuels in alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs). In the present phase, operations were expanded to include flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs) which can operate on M85 or regular unleaded gasoline or any combination of these two fuels. Additional demonstration work was accomplished in attempting to involve other elements of Hawaii in the promotion and use of alcohol fuels for ground transportation in Hawaii.

  15. SP-100 coated-particle fuel development. Phase I. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-03-01

    This document is the final report of Phase I of the SP-100 Coated-Particle Fuel Development Program conducted by GA Technologies Inc. for the US Department of Energy under contract DE-AT03-82SF11690. The general objective of the study conducted between September and December 1982 was to evaluate coated-particle type fuel as an alternate or backup fuel to the UO/sub 2/ tile-and-fin arrangement currently incorporated into the reference design of the SP-100 reactor core. This report presents and discusses the following topics in the order listed: the need for an alternative fuel for the SP-100 nuclear reactor; an abbreviated description of the reference and coated-particle fuel module concepts; the bases and results of the study and analysis leading to the preliminary design of a coated particle suitable for the SP-100 space power reactor; incorporation of the fuel particles into compacts and heat-pipe-cooled modules; initial efforts and plans to fabricate coated-particle fuel and fuel compacts; the design and performance of the proposed alternative core relative that of the reference fuel; and a summary of critical issues and conclusions consistent with the level of effort and duration of the study.

  16. Fabrication and Testing of CERMET Fuel Materials for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickman, Robert; Broadway, Jeramie; Mireles, Omar

    2012-01-01

    A first generation Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) based on Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is currently being developed for Advanced Space Exploration Systems. The overall goal of the project is to address critical NTP technology challenges and programmatic issues to establish confidence in the affordability and viability of NTP systems. The current technology roadmap for NTP identifies the development of a robust fuel form as a critical near term need. The lack of a qualified nuclear fuel is a significant technical risk that will require a considerable fraction of program resources to mitigate. Due to these risks and the cost for qualification, the development and selection of a primary fuel must begin prior to Authority to Proceed (ATP) for a specific mission. The fuel development is a progressive approach to incrementally reduce risk, converge the fuel materials, and mature the design and fabrication process of the fuel element. A key objective of the current project is to advance the maturity of CERMET fuels. The work includes fuel processing development and characterization, fuel specimen hot hydrogen screening, and prototypic fuel element testing. Early fuel materials development is critical to help validate requirements and fuel performance. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview and status of the work at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  17. Broad specification fuels technology program, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohmann, R. P.; Jeroszko, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental evaluation was conducted to assess the impact of the use of broadened properties fuels on combustor design concepts. Emphasis was placed on establishing the viability of design modifications to current combustor concepts and the use of advanced technology concepts to facilitate operation on Experimental Referee Broad Specification (ERBS) fuel while meeting exhaust emissions and performance specifications and maintaining acceptable durability. Three different combustor concepts, representative of progressively more aggressive technology levels, were evaluated. When operated on ERBS rather than Jet A fuel, a single stage combustor typical of that in the most recent versions of the JT9D-7 engine was found to produce excess carbon monoxide emissions at idle and elevated liner temperatures at high power levels that were projected to reduced liner life by 13 percent. The introduction of improved component technology, such as refined fuel injectors and advanced liner cooling concepts were shown to have the potential of enhancing the fuel flexibility of the single stage combustor.

  18. Microstructural Examination to Aid in Understanding Friction Bonding Fabrication Technique for Monolithic Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Karen L. Shropshire

    2008-04-01

    Monolithic nuclear fuel is currently being developed for use in research reactors, and friction bonding (FB) is a technique being developed to help in this fuel’s fabrication. Since both FB and monolithic fuel are new concepts, research is needed to understand the impact of varying FB fabrication parameters on fuel plate characteristics. This thesis research provides insight into the FB process and its application to the monolithic fuel design by recognizing and understanding the microstructural effects of varying fabrication parameters (a) FB tool load, and (b) FB tool face alloy. These two fabrication parameters help drive material temperature during fabrication, and thus the material properties, bond strength, and possible formation of interface reaction layers. This study analyzed temperatures and tool loads measured during those FB processes and examined microstructural characteristics of materials and bonds in samples taken from the resulting fuel plates. This study shows that higher tool load increases aluminum plasticization and forging during FB, and that the tool face alloy helps determine the tool’s heat extraction efficacy. The study concludes that successful aluminum bonds can be attained in fuel plates using a wide range of FB tool loads. The range of tool loads yielding successful uranium-aluminum bonding was not established, but it was demonstrated that such bonding can be attained with FB tool load of 48,900 N (11,000 lbf) when using a FB tool faced with a tungsten alloy. This tool successfully performed FB, and with better results than tools faced with other materials. Results of this study correlate well with results reported for similar aluminum bonding techniques. This study’s results also provide support and validation for other nuclear fuel development studies and conclusions. Recommendations are offered for further research.

  19. Method of fabricating a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Minh, N.Q.; Horne, C.R.

    1994-03-01

    In a two-step densifying process of making a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell, a limited number of anode-electrolyte-cathode cells separated by an interconnect layer are formed and partially densified. Subsequently, the partially densified cells are stacked and further densified to form a monolithic array. 10 figures.

  20. Method of fabricating a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Minh, Nguyen Q.; Horne, Craig R.

    1994-01-01

    In a two-step densifying process of making a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell, a limited number of anode-electrolyte-cathode cells separated by an interconnect layer are formed and partially densified. Subsequently, the partially densified cells are stacked and further densified to form a monolithic array.

  1. External fuel vaporization study, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szetela, E. J.; Chiappetta, L.

    1981-01-01

    An analytical study was conducted to evaluate the effect of variations in fuel properties on the design of an external fuel vaporizaton system. The fuel properties that were considered included thermal stability, critical temperature, enthalpy a critical conditions, volatility, and viscosity. The design parameters that were evaluated included vaporizer weight and the impact on engine requirement such as maintenance, transient response, performance, and altitude relight. The baseline fuel properties were those of Jet A. The variation in thermal stability was taken as the thermal stability variation for Experimental Referee Broad Specification (ERBS) fuel. The results of the analysis indicate that a change in thermal stability equivalent to that of ERBS would increase the vaporization system weight by 20 percent, decrease oprating time between cleaning by 40 percent and make altitude relight more difficult. An increase in fuel critical temperature of 39 K would require a 40 percent increase in vaporization system weight. The assumed increase in enthalpy and volatility would also increase vaporizer weight by 40 percent and make altitude relight extremely difficult. The variation in fuel viscosity would have a negligible effect on the design parameters.

  2. Design and fabrication of specific ceramic?metallic fuels and targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, A.; Konings, R. J. M.; Somers, J.

    2003-06-01

    The fabrication of ceramic-metallic (cermet) composite fuel, containing (Y,An,Zr)O 2- x spheres, by dust free processes has been studied. The influence of several process parameters, such as, ceramic volume fraction, compaction pressure and sintering temperature, on the microstructure of the final composite have been investigated and optimised using cerium as a stand for americium and two metal matrices namely molybdenum and stainless steel. In addition, a cermet fuel with (near) spherical (Y,Pu,Zr)O 2- x particles, dispersed in stainless steel matrix, has been successfully fabricated and characterized.

  3. Multi-fuel reformers for fuel cells used in transportation. Multi-fuel reformers: Phase 1 -- Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    DOE has established the goal, through the Fuel Cells in Transportation Program, of fostering the rapid development and commercialization of fuel cells as economic competitors for the internal combustion engine. Central to this goal is a safe feasible means of supplying hydrogen of the required purity to the vehicular fuel cell system. Two basic strategies are being considered: (1) on-board fuel processing whereby alternative fuels such as methanol, ethanol or natural gas stored on the vehicle undergo reformation and subsequent processing to produce hydrogen, and (2) on-board storage of pure hydrogen provided by stationary fuel processing plants. This report analyzes fuel processor technologies, types of fuel and fuel cell options for on-board reformation. As the Phase 1 of a multi-phased program to develop a prototype multi-fuel reformer system for a fuel cell powered vehicle, the objective of this program was to evaluate the feasibility of a multi-fuel reformer concept and to select a reforming technology for further development in the Phase 2 program, with the ultimate goal of integration with a DOE-designated fuel cell and vehicle configuration. The basic reformer processes examined in this study included catalytic steam reforming (SR), non-catalytic partial oxidation (POX) and catalytic partial oxidation (also known as Autothermal Reforming, or ATR). Fuels under consideration in this study included methanol, ethanol, and natural gas. A systematic evaluation of reforming technologies, fuels, and transportation fuel cell applications was conducted for the purpose of selecting a suitable multi-fuel processor for further development and demonstration in a transportation application.

  4. Dual phase magnesia-zirconia ceramics for light water reactor inert matrix fuel.

    SciTech Connect

    Medvedev, P.; Meyer, M. K.; Nuclear Technology

    2005-01-01

    To address the low thermal conductivity of the ZrO{sub 2}-based inert matrix fuel and the instability in water of the MgO-based inert matrix fuel, the dual-phase MgO-ZrO{sub 2} ceramics are proposed as a matrix for light water reactor fuel for actinide transmutation and Pu burning. It is envisioned that in a dual-phase system MgO will act as efficient heat conductor while ZrO{sub 2} will provide protection from the coolant attack. This paper describes results of fabrication, characterization and hydration testing of MgO-ZrO{sub 2} ceramics containing 30-70 wt% of MgO.

  5. Dual phase MgO-ZrO 2 ceramics for use in LWR inert matrix fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, P. G.; Frank, S. M.; O'Holleran, T. P.; Meyer, M. K.

    2005-06-01

    To address the low thermal conductivity of the ZrO 2-based inert matrix fuel and the instability in water of the MgO-based inert matrix fuel, the dual-phase MgO-ZrO 2 ceramics are proposed as a matrix for light water reactor fuel for actinide transmutation and Pu burning. It is envisioned that in a dual-phase system MgO will act as efficient heat conductor while ZrO 2 will provide protection from the coolant attack. This paper describes results of fabrication, characterization and hydration testing of MgO-ZrO 2 ceramics containing 30-70 wt% of MgO.

  6. Recent progress on minor-actinide-bearing oxide fuel fabrication at CEA Marcoule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebreton, Florent; Prieur, Damien; Horlait, Denis; Delahaye, Thibaud; Jankowiak, Aurélien; Léorier, Caroline; Jorion, Frédéric; Gavilan, Elisabeth; Desmoulière, François

    2013-07-01

    Partitioning and transmutation (P&T) of minor actinides (MA: americium, neptunium and curium) in fast neutron reactors or accelerator-driven systems is a route envisaged to reduce nuclear waste inventory. Over the years, several modes of P&T were proposed, each being based on the use of dedicated fuels such as inert-matrix fuels, MA-bearing MOX or MA-bearing blankets. In this context, progress on the manufacturing of such fuels is a key-challenge in order to render P&T viable at the industrial scale. Here, MA-bearing oxide fuel fabrication and characterization conducted in the CEA Marcoule Atalante facility is reviewed. A particular attention is also given to the research conducted on uranium-americium mixed-oxides fuels, which are now considered the reference fuels for MA transmutation in France.

  7. Design Evolutuion of Hot Isotatic Press Cans for NTP Cermet Fuel Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mireles, O. R.; Broadway, J.; Hickman, R.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is under consideration for potential use in deep space exploration missions due to desirable performance properties such as a high specific impulse (> 850 seconds). Tungsten (W)-60vol%UO2 cermet fuel elements are under development, with efforts emphasizing fabrication, performance testing and process optimization to meet NTP service life requirements [1]. Fuel elements incorporate design features that provide redundant protection from crack initiation, crack propagation potentially resulting in hot hydrogen (H2) reduction of UO2 kernels. Fuel erosion and fission product retention barriers include W coated UO2 fuel kernels, W clad internal flow channels and fuel element external W clad resulting in a fully encapsulated fuel element design as shown.

  8. Literature on fabrication of tungsten for application in pyrochemical processing of spent nuclear fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Edstrom, C.M.; Phillips, A.G.; Johnson, L.D.; Corle, R.R.

    1980-10-11

    The pyrochemical processing of nuclear fuels requires crucibles, stirrers, and transfer tubing that will withstand the temperature and the chemical attack from molten salts and metals used in the process. This report summarizes the literature that pertains to fabrication (joining, chemical vapor deposition, plasma spraying, forming, and spinning) is the main theme. This report also summarizes a sampling of literature on molbdenum and the work previously performed at Argonne National Laboratory on other container materials used for pyrochemical processing of spent nuclear fuels.

  9. Simulated physical inventory verification exercise at a mixed-oxide fuel fabrication facility

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, D.; Augustson, R.

    1985-01-01

    A physical inventory verification (PIV) was simulated at a mixed-oxide fuel fabrication facility. Safeguards inspectors from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) conducted the PIV exercise to test inspection procedures under ''realistic but relaxed'' conditions. Nondestructive assay instrumentation was used to verify the plutonium content of samples covering the range of material types from input powders to final fuel assemblies. This paper describes the activities included in the exercise and discusses the results obtained. 5 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  10. Evaluation of LANL Capabilities for Fabrication of TREAT Conversion Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Luther, Erik Paul; Leckie, Rafael M.; Dombrowski, David E.

    2014-03-06

    This report estimates costs and schedule associated with scale up and fabrication of a low-enriched uranium (LEU) core for the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) reactor. This study considers facilities available at Los Alamos National Laboratory, facility upgrades, equipment, installation and staffing costs. Not included are costs associated with raw materials and off-site shipping. These estimates are considered a rough of magnitude. At this time, no specifications for the LEU core have been made and the final schedule needed by the national program. The estimate range (+/-100%) reflects this large uncertainty and is subject to change as the project scope becomes more defined.

  11. Application of Self-Propagating High Temperature Synthesis to the Fabrication of Actinide Bearing Nitride and Other Ceramic Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, John J.; Reigel, Marissa M.; Donohoue, Collin D.

    2009-04-30

    The project uses an exothermic combustion synthesis reaction, termed self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS), to produce high quality, reproducible nitride fuels and other ceramic type nuclear fuels (cercers and cermets, etc.) in conjunction with the fabrication of transmutation fuels. The major research objective of the project is determining the fundamental SHS processing parameters by first using manganese as a surrogate for americium to produce dense Zr-Mn-N ceramic compounds. These fundamental principles will then be transferred to the production of dense Zr-Am-N ceramic materials. A further research objective in the research program is generating fundamental SHS processing data to the synthesis of (i) Pu-Am-Zr-N and (ii) U-Pu-Am-N ceramic fuels. In this case, Ce will be used as the surrogate for Pu, Mn as the surrogate for Am, and depleted uranium as the surrogate for U. Once sufficient fundamental data has been determined for these surrogate systems, the information will be transferred to Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for synthesis of Zr-Am-N, Pu-Am-Zr-N and U-Pu-Am-N ceramic fuels. The high vapor pressures of americium (Am) and americium nitride (AmN) are cause for concern in producing nitride ceramic nuclear fuel that contains Am. Along with the problem of Am retention during the sintering phases of current processing methods, are additional concerns of producing a consistent product of desirable homogeneity, density and porosity. Similar difficulties have been experienced during the laboratory scale process development stage of producing metal alloys containing Am wherein compact powder sintering methods had to be abandoned. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop a low-temperature or low–heat fuel fabrication process for the synthesis of Am-containing ceramic fuels. Self-propagating high temperature synthesis (SHS), also called combustion synthesis, offers such an alternative process for the synthesis of Am nitride fuels. Although SHS

  12. Development of Hot Pressing as a Low Cost Processing Technique for Fuel Cell Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Sarin, V

    2003-01-14

    Dependable, plentiful, and economical energy has been the driving force for financial, industrial, and political growth in the US since the mid 19th century. For a country whose progress is so deeply rooted in abundant energy and whose current political agenda involves stabilizing world fossil fuel prices, the development of a reliable, efficient and environmentally friendly power generating source seems compulsory. The maturing of high technology fuel cells may be the panacea the country will find indispensable to free itself from foreign dependence. Fuel cells offer an efficient, combustion-less, virtually pollution-free power source, capable of being sited in downtown urban areas or in remote regions. Fuel cells have few moving parts and run almost silently. Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that convert the chemical energy of a fuel directly to electrical energy. Unlike batteries, which store a finite amount of energy, fuel cells will generate electricity continuously, as long as fuel and oxidant are available to the electrodes. Additionally, fuel cells offer clean, efficient, and reliable power and they can be operated using a variety of fuels. Hence, the fuel cell is an extremely promising technology. Over the course of this research, the fundamental knowledge related to ceramic processing, sintering, and hot pressing to successfully hot press a single operational SOFC in one step has been developed. Ceramic powder processing for each of the components of an SOFC has bene tailored towards this goal. Processing parameter for the electrolyte and cathode have been studied and developed until they converted. Several anode fabrication techniques have been developed. Additionally, a novel anode structured has been developed and refined. These individual processes have been cultivated until a single cell SOFC has been fabricated in one step.

  13. PRELIMINARY DATA CALL REPORT ADVANCED BURNER REACTOR START UP FUEL FABRICATION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    S. T. Khericha

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide data for preparation of a NEPA Environmental Impact Statement in support the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). One of the GNEP objectives is to reduce the inventory of long lived actinide from the light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. The LWR spent fuel contains Plutonium (Pu) -239 and other transuranics (TRU) such as Americium-241. One of the options is to transmute or burn these actinides in fast neutron spectra as well as generate the electricity. A sodium-cooled Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) concept has been proposed to achieve this goal. However, fuel with relatively high TRU content has not been used in the fast reactor. To demonstrate the utilization of TRU fuel in a fast reactor, an Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) prototype of ARR is proposed, which would necessarily be started up using weapons grade (WG) Pu fuel. The WG Pu is distinguished by relatively highest proportions of Pu-239 and lesser amount of other actinides. The WG Pu will be used as the startup fuel along with TRU fuel in lead test assemblies. Because such fuel is not currently being produced in the US, a new facility (or new capability in an existing facility) is being considered for fabrication of WG Pu fuel for the ABR. This report is provided in response to ‘Data Call’ for the construction of startup fuel fabrication facility. It is anticipated that the facility will provide the startup fuel for 10-15 years and will take to 3 to 5 years to construct.

  14. External fuel vaporization study, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szetela, E. J.; Chiappetta, L.

    1980-01-01

    A conceptual design study was conducted to devise and evaluate techniques for the external vaporization of fuel for use in an aircraft gas turbine with characteristics similar to the Energy Efficient Engine (E(3)). Three vaporizer concepts were selected and they were analyzed from the standpoint of fuel thermal stability, integration of the vaporizer system into the aircraft engine, engine and vaporizer dynamic response, startup and altitude restart, engine performance, control requirements, safety, and maintenance. One of the concepts was found to improve the performance of the baseline E(3) engine without seriously compromising engine startup and power change response. Increased maintenance is required because of the need for frequent pyrolytic cleaning of the surfaces in contact with hot fuel.

  15. 30 CFR 250.917 - What are the CVA's primary duties during the fabrication phase?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are the CVA's primary duties during the fabrication phase? 250.917 Section 250.917 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION... duties during the fabrication phase? (a) The CVA must use good engineering judgement and practices...

  16. Fabrication of catalytic electrodes for molten carbonate fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Smith, James L.

    1988-01-01

    A porous layer of catalyst material suitable for use as an electrode in a molten carbonate fuel cell includes elongated pores substantially extending across the layer thickness. The catalyst layer is prepared by depositing particulate catalyst material into polymeric flocking on a substrate surface by a procedure such as tape casting. The loaded substrate is heated in a series of steps with rising temperatures to set the tape, thermally decompose the substrate with flocking and sinter bond the catalyst particles into a porous catalytic layer with elongated pores across its thickness. Employed as an electrode, the elongated pores provide distribution of reactant gas into contact with catalyst particles wetted by molten electrolyte.

  17. Automated catalyst processing for cloud electrode fabrication for fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Goller, Glen J.; Breault, Richard D.

    1980-01-01

    A process for making dry carbon/polytetrafluoroethylene floc material, particularly useful in the manufacture of fuel cell electrodes, comprises of the steps of floccing a co-suspension of carbon particles and polytetrafluoroethylene particles, filtering excess liquids from the co-suspension, molding pellet shapes from the remaining wet floc solids without using significant pressure during the molding, drying the wet floc pellet shapes within the mold at temperatures no greater than about 150.degree. F., and removing the dry pellets from the mold.

  18. Conductivity fuel cell collector plate and method of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Braun, James C.

    2002-01-01

    An improved method of manufacturing a PEM fuel cell collector plate is disclosed. During molding a highly conductive polymer composite is formed having a relatively high polymer concentration along its external surfaces. After molding the polymer rich layer is removed from the land areas by machining, grinding or similar process. This layer removal results in increased overall conductivity of the molded collector plate. The polymer rich surface remains in the collector plate channels, providing increased mechanical strength and other benefits to the channels. The improved method also permits greater mold cavity thickness providing a number of advantages during the molding process.

  19. Extremely thin bilayer electrolyte for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) fabricated by chemical solution deposition (CSD).

    PubMed

    Oh, Eun-Ok; Whang, Chin-Myung; Lee, Yu-Ri; Park, Sun-Young; Prasad, Dasari Hari; Yoon, Kyung Joong; Son, Ji-Won; Lee, Jong-Ho; Lee, Hae-Weon

    2012-07-01

    An extremely thin bilayer electrolyte consisting of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC) is successfully fabricated on a sintered NiO-YSZ substrate. Major processing flaws are effectively eliminated by applying local constraints to YSZ nanoparticles, and excellent open circuit voltage and cell performance are demonstrated in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) at intermediate operating temperatures.

  20. Process Developed for Fabricating Engineered Pore Structures for High- Fuel-Utilization Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sofie, Stephen W.; Cable, Thomas L.; Salamone, Sam M.

    2005-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have tremendous commercial potential because of their high efficiency, high energy density, and flexible fuel capability (ability to use fossil fuels). The drive for high-power-utilizing, ultrathin electrolytes (less than 10 microns), has placed an increased demand on the anode to provide structural support, yet allow sufficient fuel entry for sustained power generation. Concentration polarization, a condition where the fuel demand exceeds the supply, is evident in all commercial-based anode-supported cells, and it presents a significant roadblock to SOFC commercialization.

  1. Fabrication and characterization of high power dual chamber E. coli microbial fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalitha Priya, R.; Ramachandran, T.; Suneesh, P. V.

    2016-09-01

    This work reports the fabrication of a dual chamber microbial fuel cell with E. coli modified graphite as the anode and lead dioxide cathode. At the optimized operating conditions, the cell provided 778 mV open circuit potential, 3.47 mA m-2 of current density and 1660 mW m-2 power density. Morphology of the of E. coli biofilm on the electrode was analysed using AFM and the electrochemical characterization of the fuel cell was carried out using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and polarization curves. The composition of the anode and the time duration for E. coli biofilm formation were varied to obtain maximum power density. The MFC fabricated in this study was found to have improved power density in comparison with other reported fuel cells.

  2. Fabrication of simulated plate fuel elements: Defining role of out-of-plane residual shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakesh, R.; Kohli, D.; Sinha, V. P.; Prasad, G. J.; Samajdar, I.

    2014-02-01

    Bond strength and microstructural developments were investigated during fabrication of simulated plate fuel elements. The study involved roll bonding of aluminum-aluminum (case A) and aluminum-aluminum + yttria (Y2O3) dispersion (case B). Case B approximated aluminum-uranium silicide (U3Si2) 'fuel-meat' in an actual plate fuel. Samples after different stages of fabrication, hot and cold rolling, were investigated through peel and pull tests, micro-hardness, residual stresses, electron and micro-focus X-ray diffraction. Measurements revealed a clear drop in bond strength during cold rolling: an observation unique to case B. This was related to significant increase in 'out-of-plane' residual shear stresses near the clad/dispersion interface, and not from visible signatures of microstructural heterogeneities.

  3. Airborne ultrasonic phased arrays using ferroelectrets: a new fabrication approach.

    PubMed

    Ealo, Joao L; Camacho, Jorge J; Fritsch, Carlos

    2009-04-01

    In this work, a novel procedure that considerably simplifies the fabrication process of ferroelectret-based multielement array transducers is proposed and evaluated. Also, the potential of ferroelectrets being used as active material for air-coupled ultrasonic transducer design is demonstrated. The new construction method of multi-element transducers introduces 2 distinctive improvements. First, active ferroelectret material is not discretized into elements, and second, the need of structuring upper and/or lower electrodes in advance of the permanent polarization of the film is removed. The aperture discretization and the mechanical connection are achieved in one step using a through-thickness conductive tape. To validate the procedure, 2 linear array prototypes of 32 elements, with a pitch of 3.43 mm and a wide usable frequency range from 30 to 300 kHz, were built and evaluated using a commercial phased-array system. A low crosstalk among elements, below -30 dB, was measured by interferometry. Likewise, a homogeneous response of the array elements, with a maximum deviation of +/-1.8 dB, was obtained. Acoustic beam steering measurements were accomplished at different deflection angles using a calibrated microphone. The ultrasonic beam parameters, namely, lateral resolution, side lobe level, grating lobes, and focus depth, were congruent with theory. Acoustic images of a single reflector were obtained using one of the array elements as the receiver. Resulting images are also in accordance with numerical simulation, demonstrating the feasibility of using these arrays in pulse-echo mode. The proposed procedure simplifies the manufacturing of multidimensional arrays with arbitrary shape elements and not uniformly distributed. Furthermore, this concept can be extended to nonflat arrays as long as the transducer substrate conforms to a developable surface. PMID:19406714

  4. Fabrication of fuel cell electrodes and other catalytic structures

    DOEpatents

    Smith, J.L.

    1987-02-11

    A porous layer of catalyst material suitable for use as an electrode in a molten carbonate fuel cell includes elongated pores substantially extending across the layer thickness. The catalyst layer is prepared by depositing particulate catalyst material into polymeric flocking on a substrate surface by a procedure such as tape casting. The loaded substrate is heated in a series of steps with rising temperatures to set the tape, thermally decompose the substrate with flocking and sinter bond the catalyst particles into a porous catalytic layer with elongated pores across its thickness. Employed as an electrode, the elongated pores provide distribution of reactant gas into contact with catalyst particles wetted by molten electrolyte. 1 fig.

  5. Thoria-based cermet nuclear fuel : sintered microsphere fabrication by spray drying.

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, A.A.; McDeavitt, S.M.; Chandrmouli, V.; Anthonysamy, S.; Kuchibhotla, S.; Downar, T.J.

    2002-01-09

    Cermet nuclear fuels have been demonstrated to have significant potential to enhance fuel performance because of low internal fuel temperatures and low stored energy. The combination of these benefits with the inherent proliferation resistance, high burnup capability, and favorable neutronic properties of the thorium fuel cycle produces intriguing options for advanced nuclear fuel cycles. This paper describes aspects of a Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) project with two primary goals: (1) Evaluate the feasibility of implementing the thorium fuel cycle in existing or advanced reactors using a zirconium-matrix cermet fuel, and (2) Develop enabling technologies required for the economic application of this new fuel form. Spray drying is a physical process of granulating fine powders that is used widely in the chemical, pharmaceutical, ceramic, and food industries. It is generally used to produce flowable fine powders. Occasionally it is used to fabricate sintered bodies like cemented carbides, but it has not, heretofore, been used to produce sintered microspheres. As a physical process, it can be adapted to many powder types and mixtures and thus, has appeal for nuclear fuels and waste forms of various compositions. It also permits easy recycling of process ''wastes'' and minimal chemical waste streams that can arise in chemical sol/gel processing. On the other hand, for radioactive powders, it presents safety challenges for processing these materials in powder form and in achieving microspheres of high density and perfection.

  6. Improved Phase-Mask Fabrication of Fiber Bragg Gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Joseph; Wang, Ying; Sharma, Anup

    2004-01-01

    An improved method of fabrication of Bragg gratings in optical fibers combines the best features of two prior methods: one that involves the use of a phase mask and one that involves interference between the two coherent laser beams. The improved method affords flexibility for tailoring Bragg wavelengths and bandwidths over wide ranges. A Bragg grating in an optical fiber is a periodic longitudinal variation in the index of refraction of the fiber core. The spatial period (Bragg wavelength) is chosen to obtain enhanced reflection of light of a given wavelength that would otherwise propagate relatively unimpeded along the core. Optionally, the spatial period of the index modulation can be made to vary gradually along the grating (such a grating is said to be chirped ) in order to obtain enhanced reflection across a wavelength band, the width of which is determined by the difference between the maximum and minimum Bragg wavelengths. In the present method as in both prior methods, a Bragg grating is formed by exposing an optical fiber to an ultraviolet-light interference field. The Bragg grating coincides with the pattern of exposure of the fiber core to ultraviolet light; in other words, the Bragg grating coincides with the interference fringes. Hence, the problem of tailoring the Bragg wavelength and bandwidth is largely one of tailoring the interference pattern and the placement of the fiber in the interference pattern. In the prior two-beam interferometric method, a single laser beam is split into two beams, which are subsequently recombined to produce an interference pattern at the location of an optical fiber. In the prior phase-mask method, a phase mask is used to diffract a laser beam mainly into two first orders, the interference between which creates the pattern to which an optical fiber is exposed. The prior two-beam interferometric method offers the advantage that the period of the interference pattern can be adjusted to produce gratings over a wide range

  7. Binder Jetting: A Novel Solid Oxide Fuel-Cell Fabrication Process and Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manogharan, Guha; Kioko, Meshack; Linkous, Clovis

    2015-03-01

    With an ever-growing concern to find a more efficient and less polluting means of producing electricity, fuel cells have constantly been of great interest. Fuel cells electrochemically convert chemical energy directly into electricity and heat without resorting to combustion/mechanical cycling. This article studies the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), which is a high-temperature (100°C to 1000°C) ceramic cell made from all solid-state components and can operate under a wide range of fuel sources such as hydrogen, methanol, gasoline, diesel, and gasified coal. Traditionally, SOFCs are fabricated using processes such as tape casting, calendaring, extrusion, and warm pressing for substrate support, followed by screen printing, slurry coating, spray techniques, vapor deposition, and sputter techniques, which have limited control in substrate microstructure. In this article, the feasibility of engineering the porosity and configuration of an SOFC via an additive manufacturing (AM) method known as binder jet printing was explored. The anode, cathode and oxygen ion-conducting electrolyte layers were fabricated through AM sequentially as a complete fuel cell unit. The cell performance was measured in two modes: (I) as an electrolytic oxygen pump and (II) as a galvanic electricity generator using hydrogen gas as the fuel. An analysis on influence of porosity was performed through SEM studies and permeability testing. An additional study on fuel cell material composition was conducted to verify the effects of binder jetting through SEM-EDS. Electrical discharge of the AM fabricated SOFC and nonlinearity of permeability tests show that, with additional work, the porosity of the cell can be modified for optimal performance at operating flow and temperature conditions.

  8. Fabrication of large aperture kinoform phase plates in fused silica for smoothing focal plane intensity profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Rushford, M.; Dixit, S.; Thomas, I.; Perry, M.

    1996-04-26

    We have fabricated large aperture (40-cm) kinoform phase plates for producing super-Gaussian focal plane intensity profiles. The continuous phase screen, designed using a new iterative procedure, was fabricated in fused silica as a 16-level, one-wave deep rewrapped phase profile using a lithographic process and wet etching in buffered hydrofluoric acid. The observed far-field contains 94% of the incident energy inside the desired spot.

  9. Research, development and demonstration of a fuel cell/battery powered bus system. Phase 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1990-02-28

    Purpose of the Phase I effort was to demonstrate feasibility of the fuel cell/battery system for powering a small bus (under 30 ft or 9 m) on an urban bus route. A brassboard powerplant was specified, designed, fabricated, and tested to demonstrate feasibility in the laboratory. The proof-of-concept bus, with a powerplant scaled up from the brassboard, will be demonstrated under Phase II.

  10. ECAS Phase I fuel cell results. [Energy Conservation Alternatives Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warshay, M.

    1978-01-01

    This paper summarizes and discusses the fuel cell system results of Phase I of the Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS). Ten advanced electric powerplant systems for central-station baseload generation using coal were studied by NASA in ECAS. Three types of low-temperature fuel cells (solid polymer electrolyte, SPE, aqueous alkaline, and phosphoric acid) and two types of high-temperature fuel cells (molten carbonate, MC, and zirconia solid electrolyte, SE) were studied. The results indicate that (1) overall efficiency increases with fuel cell temperature, and (2) scale-up in powerplant size can produce a significant reduction in cost of electricity (COE) only when it is accompanied by utilization of waste fuel cell heat through a steam bottoming cycle and/or integration with a gasifier. For low-temperature fuel cell systems, the use of hydrogen results in the highest efficiency and lowest COE. In spite of higher efficiencies, because of higher fuel cell replacement costs integrated SE systems have higher projected COEs than do integrated MC systems. Present data indicate that life can be projected to over 30,000 hr for MC fuel cells, but data are not yet sufficient for similarly projecting SE fuel cell life expectancy.

  11. Actinide partitioning-transmutation program final report. IV. Miscellaneous aspects. [Transport; fuel fabrication; decay; policy; economics

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, C.W.; Croff, A.G.

    1980-09-01

    This report discusses seven aspects of actinide partitioning-transmutation (P-T) which are important in any complete evaluation of this waste treatment option but which do not fall within other major topical areas concerning P-T. The so-called miscellaneous aspects considered are (1) the conceptual design of a shipping cask for highly neutron-active fresh and spent P-T fuels, (2) the possible impacts of P-T on mixed-oxide fuel fabrication, (3) alternatives for handling the existing and to-be-produced spent fuel and/or wastes until implementation of P-T, (4) the decay and dose characteristics of P-T and standard reactor fuels, (5) the implications of P-T on currently existing nuclear policy in the United States, (6) the summary costs of P-T, and (7) methods for comparing the risks, costs, and benefits of P-T.

  12. A Blueprint for GNEP Advanced Burner Reactor Startup Fuel Fabrication Facility

    SciTech Connect

    S. Khericha

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to identify the requirements and issues associated with design of GNEP Advanced Burner Reactor Fuel Facility. The report was prepared in support of providing data for preparation of a NEPA Environmental Impact Statement in support the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). One of the GNEP objectives was to reduce the inventory of long lived actinide from the light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. The LWR spent fuel contains Plutonium (Pu) -239 and other transuranics (TRU) such as Americium-241. One of the options is to transmute or burn these actinides in fast neutron spectra as well as generate the electricity. A sodium-cooled Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) concept was proposed to achieve this goal. However, fuel with relatively high TRU content has not been used in the fast reactor. To demonstrate the utilization of TRU fuel in a fast reactor, an Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) prototype of ARR was proposed, which would necessarily be started up using weapons grade (WG) Pu fuel. The WG Pu is distinguished by relatively highest proportions of Pu-239 and lesser amount of other actinides. The WG Pu was assumed to be used as the startup fuel along with TRU fuel in lead test assemblies. Because such fuel is not currently being produced in the US, a new facility (or new capability in an existing facility) was being considered for fabrication of WG Pu fuel for the ABR. It was estimated that the facility will provide the startup fuel for 10-15 years and would take 3 to 5 years to construct.

  13. LOW COST MULTI-LAYER FABRICATION METHOD FOR SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS (SOFC)

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Christopher E. Milliken; Dr. Robert C. Ruhl

    2001-05-16

    Under this program, Technology Management, Inc, is evaluating the economic advantages of a multi-pass printing process on the costs of fabricating planar solid oxide fuel cell stacks. The technique, still unproven technically, uses a ''green-field'' or build-up approach. Other more mature processes were considered to obtain some baseline assumptions. Based on this analysis, TMI has shown that multi-pass printing can offer substantial economic advantages over many existing fabrication processes and can reduce costs. By impacting overall production costs, the time is compressed to penetrate early low volume niche markets and more mature high-volume market applications.

  14. Oxidation Protection of Uranium Nitride Fuel using Liquid Phase Sintering

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Paul A. Lessing

    2012-03-01

    Two methods are proposed to increase the oxidation resistance of uranium nitride (UN) nuclear fuel. These paths are: (1) Addition of USi{sub x} (e.g. U3Si2) to UN nitride powder, followed by liquid phase sintering, and (2) 'alloying' UN nitride with various compounds (followed by densification via Spark Plasma Sintering or Liquid Phase Sintering) that will greatly increase oxidation resistance. The advantages (high thermal conductivity, very high melting point, and high density) of nitride fuel have long been recognized. The sodium cooled BR-10 reactor in Russia operated for 18 years on uranium nitride fuel (UN was used as the driver fuel for two core loads). However, the potential advantages (large power up-grade, increased cycle lengths, possible high burn-ups) as a Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel are offset by uranium nitride's extremely low oxidation resistance (UN powders oxidize in air and UN pellets decompose in hot water). Innovative research is proposed to solve this problem and thereby provide an accident tolerant LWR fuel that would resist water leaks and high temperature steam oxidation/spalling during an accident. It is proposed that we investigate two methods to increase the oxidation resistance of UN: (1) Addition of USi{sub x} (e.g. U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) to UN nitride powder, followed by liquid phase sintering, and (2) 'alloying' UN nitride with compounds (followed by densification via Spark Plasma Sintering) that will greatly increase oxidation resistance.

  15. Design and Fabrication of the First Commercial-Scale Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH) Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-21

    The Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOHT) process uses a slurry bubble column reactor to convert synthesis gas (syngas), primarily a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, to methanol. Because of its superior heat management the process can utilize directly the carbon monoxide (CO)-rich syngas characteristic of the gasification of coal, petroleum coke, residual oil, wastes, or other hydrocarbon feedstocks. The LPMEOHM Demonstration Project at Kingsport, Tennessee, is a $213.7 million cooperative agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Air Products Liquid Phase Conversion Company, L.P., a partnership between Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. and Eastman Chemical Company, to produce methanol from coal-derived syngas. Construction of the LPMEOH~ Process Demonstration Plant at Eastman's chemicals-from-coal complex in Kingsport was completed in January 1997. Following commissioning and shakedown activities, the fwst production of methanol from the facility occurred on April 2, 1997. Nameplate capacity of 260 short tons per day (TPD) was achieved on April 6, 1997, and production rates have exceeded 300 TPD of methanol at times. This report describes the design, fabrication, and installation of the Kingsport LPMEOEFM reactor, which is the first commercial-scale LPMEOEPM reaetor ever built. The vessel is 7.5 feet in diameter and 70 feet tall with design conditions of 1000 psig at 600 `F. These dimensions represent a significant scale-up from prior experience at the DOE-owned Alternative Fuels Development Unit in LaPorte, Texas, where 18-inch and 22-inch diameter reactors have been tested successfidly over thousands of hours. The biggest obstacles discovered during the scale- up, however, were encountered during fabrication of the vessel. The lessons learned during this process must be considered in tailoring the design for future sites, where the reactor dimensions may grow by yet another factor of two.

  16. Low NO/sub x/ Heavy Fuel Combustor Concept Program. Phase I. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cutrone, M B

    1981-10-01

    Six combustor concepts were designed, fabricated, and underwent a series of combustion tests with the objective of evaluating and developing a combustor capable of meeting US New Source Performance Standards (NSPS), dry, for high-nitrogen liquid fuels. Three rich/lean and three lean/lean two-stage combustors were tested with ERBS distillate, petroleum residual, and SRC-II coal derived liquid (CDL) fuels with fuel-bound nitrogen contents of 0.0054, 0.23, and 0.87 weight percent, respectively. A lean/lean concept was demonstrated with ultralow NO/sub x/ emissions, dry, of 5 gm NO/sub x/kg fuel on ERBS, and NO/sub x/ emissions meeting the NSPS NO/sub x/ standard on residual fuel. This combustor concept met operational goals for pressure drop, smoke, exhaust pattern factor, and combustion efficiency. A rich/lean concept was identified and developed which demonstrated NO/sub x/ emissions approaching the NSPS standards, dry, for all liquid fuels including the 0.87 weight percent nitrogen SRC-II coal-derived liquid. Exhaust pattern factor and pressure drop met or approached goals. Smoke emissions were higher than the program goal. However, a significant improvement was made with only a minor modification of the fuel injector/air swirler system, and further development should result in meeting smoke goals for all fuels. Liner metal temperatures were higher than allowable for commercial application. Conceptual designs for further development of these two rich/lean and lean/lean concepts have been completed which address smoke and metal temperature concerns, and are available for the next phase of this NASA-sponsored, DOE-funded program. Tests of a rich/lean concept, and a catalytic combustor concept using low- and intermediate-Btu simulated coal-derived gases will be completed during the ongoing Phase IA extension of this program.

  17. Fabrication of U-10 wt.%Zr Metallic Fuel Rodlets for Irradiation Test in BOR-60 Fast Reactor

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kim, Ki-Hwan; Kim, Jong-Hwan; Oh, Seok-Jin; Lee, Jung-Won; Lee, Ho-Jin; Lee, Chan-Bock

    2016-01-01

    The fabrication technology for metallic fuel has been developed to produce the driver fuel in a PGSFR in Korea since 2007. In order to evaluate the irradiation integrity and validate the in-reactor of the starting metallic fuel with FMS cladding for the loading of the metallic fuel, U-10 wt.%Zr fuel rodlets were fabricated and evaluated for a verification of the starting driver fuel through an irradiation test in the BOR-60 fast reactor. The injection casting method was applied to U-10 wt.%Zr fuel slugs with a diameter of 5.5 mm. Consequently, fuel slugs per melting batch without casting defects were fabricated through the developmentmore » of advanced casting technology and evaluation tests. The optimal GTAW welding conditions were also established through a number of experiments. In addition, a qualification test was carried out to prove the weld quality of the end plug welding of the metallic fuel rodlets. The wire wrapping of metallic fuel rodlets was successfully accomplished for the irradiation test. Thus, PGSFR fuel rodlets have been soundly fabricated for the irradiation test in a BOR-60 fast reactor.« less

  18. High Accuracy Fuel Flowmeter, Phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, C.; Rose, L.; Chan, A.; Chin, B.; Gregory, W.

    1983-01-01

    Technology related to aircraft fuel mass - flowmeters was reviewed to determine what flowmeter types could provide 0.25%-of-point accuracy over a 50 to one range in flowrates. Three types were selected and were further analyzed to determine what problem areas prevented them from meeting the high accuracy requirement, and what the further development needs were for each. A dual-turbine volumetric flowmeter with densi-viscometer and microprocessor compensation was selected for its relative simplicity and fast response time. An angular momentum type with a motor-driven, spring-restrained turbine and viscosity shroud was selected for its direct mass-flow output. This concept also employed a turbine for fast response and a microcomputer for accurate viscosity compensation. The third concept employed a vortex precession volumetric flowmeter and was selected for its unobtrusive design. Like the turbine flowmeter, it uses a densi-viscometer and microprocessor for density correction and accurate viscosity compensation.

  19. Metallic fast reactor fuel fabrication for the global nuclear energy partnership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Fielding, Randall S.; Porter, Douglas L.

    2009-07-01

    Fast reactors are once again being considered for nuclear power generation, in addition to transmutation of long-lived fission products resident in spent nuclear fuels. This re-consideration follows with intense developmental programs for both fuel and reactor design. One of the two leading candidates for next generation fast reactor fuel is metal alloys, resulting primarily from the successes achieved in the 1960s to early 1990s with both the experimental breeding reactor-II and the fast flux test facility. The goal of the current program is to develop and qualify a nuclear fuel system that performs all of the functions of a conventional, fast-spectrum nuclear fuel while destroying recycled actinides, thereby closing the nuclear fuel cycle. In order to meet this goal, the program must develop efficient and safe fuel fabrication processes designed for remote operation. This paper provides an overview of advanced casting processes investigated in the past, and the development of a gaseous diffusion calculation that demonstrates how straightforward process parameter modification can mitigate the loss of volatile minor actinides in the metal alloy melt.

  20. Calculation of parameters for inspection planning and evaluation: mixed-oxide fuel fabrication facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Reardon, P.T.; Mullen, M.F.

    1982-08-01

    As part of Task C.35 (Calculation of Parameters for Inspection Planning and Evaluation) of the US Program of Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards, Pacific Northwest Laboratory has performed some quantitative analyses of IAEA inspection activities for mixed-oxide fuel fabrication facilities. There were four distinct efforts involved in this task. These were as follows: show the effect on a material balance verification of using two variables measurement methods in some strata; perform additional calculations for the reference facility described in STR-89; modify the INSPECT computer programs to be used as an after-inspection analysis tool, as well as a preinspection planning tool; provide written comments and explantations of text and graphs of the first draft of STR-89, Safeguards Considerations for Mixed-Oxide Fuel Element Fabrication Facilities, by W. Bahm, T. Shea, and D. Tolchenkov, System Studies Section, IAEA.

  1. Fabrication of metallic bipolar plate for proton exchange membrane fuel cells by rubber pad forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanxiong; Hua, Lin

    In this paper, the rubber pad forming process is used to fabricate the metallic bipolar plate for a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell, which has multi-array micro-scale flow channels on its surface. The rubber pad forming process has the following advantages: high surface quality and dimensional accuracy of the formed parts, low cost of the die because only one rigid die is required, and high efficiency. The process control parameters (rubber hardness, internal and outer radii, draft angle) of the rubber pad forming are analyzed by the finite element method using the commercial software Abaqus. After that, the rubber pad forming process is used to manufacture a metallic bipolar plate of SS304 stainless steel with perfect flow micro-channels. The results of this effort indicated that the rubber pad forming process is a feasible technique for fabricating the bipolar plates of PEM fuel cells.

  2. Hazard analysis for 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facilty

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.J.; Brehm, J.R.

    1994-01-25

    This hazard analysis (HA) has been prepared for the 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facility (Facility), in compliance with the requirements of Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) controlled manual WHC-CM-4-46, Nonreactor Facility Safety Analysis Manual, and to the direction of WHC-IP-0690, Safety Analysis and Regulation Desk Instructions, (WHC 1992). An HA identifies potentially hazardous conditions in a facility and the associated potential accident scenarios. Unlike the Facility hazard classification documented in WHC-SD-NR-HC-004, Hazard Classification for 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facility, (Huang 1993), which is based on unmitigated consequences, credit is taken in an HA for administrative controls or engineered safety features planned or in place. The HA is the foundation for the accident analysis. The significant event scenarios identified by this HA will be further evaluated in a subsequent accident analysis.

  3. Calculation of parameters for inspection planning and evaluation: low enriched uranium conversion and fuel fabrication facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Reardon, P.T.; Mullen, M.F.; Harms, N.L.

    1981-02-01

    As part of Task C.35 (Calculation of Parameters for Inspection Planning and Evaluation) of the US Program of Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards, Pacific Northwest Laboratory has performed some quantitative analyses of IAEA inspection activities at low-enriched uranium (LEU) conversion and fuel fabrication facilities. This report presents the results and conclusions of those analyses. Implementation of IAEA safeguards at LEU conversion and fuel fabrication facilities must take into account a variety of practical problems and constraints. One of the key concerns is the problem of flow verification, especially product verification. The objective of this report is to help put the problem of flow verification in perspective by presenting the results of some specific calculations of inspection effort and probability of detection for various product measurement strategies. In order to provide quantitative information about the advantages and disadvantages of the various strategies, eight specific cases were examined.

  4. Fabrication of simulated plate fuel elements: Defining role of stress relief annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohli, D.; Rakesh, R.; Sinha, V. P.; Prasad, G. J.; Samajdar, I.

    2014-04-01

    This study involved fabrication of simulated plate fuel elements. Uranium silicide of actual fuel elements was replaced with yttria. The fabrication stages were otherwise identical. The final cold rolled and/or straightened plates, without stress relief, showed an inverse relationship between bond strength and out of plane residual shear stress (τ13). Stress relief of τ13 was conducted over a range of temperatures/times (200-500 °C and 15-240 min) and led to corresponding improvements in bond strength. Fastest τ13 relief was obtained through 300 °C annealing. Elimination of microscopic shear bands, through recovery and partial recrystallization, was clearly the most effective mechanism of relieving τ13.

  5. Fabrication of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell MEAs utilizing inkjet print technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Towne, Silas; Viswanathan, Vish; Holbery, James; Rieke, Peter

    Utilizing drop-on-demand technology, we have successfully fabricated hydrogen-air polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), demonstrated some of the processing advantages of this technology and have demonstrated that the performance is comparable to conventionally fabricated membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs). Commercial desktop inkjet printers were used to deposit the active catalyst electrode layer directly from print cartridges onto Nafion ® polymer membranes in the hydrogen form. The layers were well-adhered and withstood simple tape peel, bending and abrasion tests and did so without any post-deposition hot press step. The elimination of this processing step suggests that inkjet-based fabrication or similar processing technologies may provide a route to less expensive large-scale fabrication of PEMFCs. When tested in our experimental apparatus, open circuit voltages up to 0.87 V and power densities of up to 155 mW cm -2 were obtained with a catalyst loading of 0.20 mg Pt cm -2. A commercially available membrane under identical, albeit not optimized test conditions, showed about 7% greater power density. The objective of this work was to demonstrate some of the processing advantages of drop-on-demand technology for fabrication of MEAs. It remains to be determined if inkjet fabrication offers performance advantages or leads to more efficient utilization of expensive catalyst materials.

  6. Fabrication and Comparison of Fuels for Advanced Gas Reactor Irradiation Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Phillips; Charles Barnes; John Hunn

    2010-10-01

    As part of the program to demonstrate TRISO-coated fuel for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, a series of irradiation tests of Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) fuel are being performed in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory. In the first test, called “AGR-1,” graphite compacts containing approximately 300,000 coated particles were irradiated from December 2006 until November 2009. Development of AGR-1 fuel sought to replicate the properties of German TRISO-coated particles. No particle failures were seen in the nearly 3-year irradiation to a burn up of 19%. The AGR-1 particles were coated in a two-inch diameter coater. Following fabrication of AGR-1 fuel, process improvements and changes were made in each of the fabrication processes. Changes in the kernel fabrication process included replacing the carbon black powder feed with a surface-modified carbon slurry and shortening the sintering schedule. AGR-2 TRISO particles were produced in a six-inch diameter coater using a change size about twenty-one times that of the two-inch diameter coater used to coat AGR-1 particles. Changes were also made in the compacting process, including increasing the temperature and pressure of pressing and using a different type of press. Irradiation of AGR-2 fuel began in late spring 2010. Properties of AGR-2 fuel compare favorably with AGR-1 and historic German fuel. Kernels are more homogeneous in shape, chemistry and density. TRISO-particle sphericity, layer thickness standard deviations, and defect fractions are also comparable. In a sample of 317,000 particles from deconsolidated AGR-2 compacts, 3 exposed kernels were found in a leach test. No SiC defects were found in a sample of 250,000 deconsolidated particles, and no IPyC defects in a sample of 64,000 particles. The primary difference in properties between AGR-1 and AGR-2 compacts is that AGR-2 compacts have a higher matrix density, 1.6 g/cm3 compared to about 1.3 g/cm3 for AGR-1 compacts. Based on

  7. Paper-based membraneless hydrogen peroxide fuel cell prepared by micro-fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi Ehteshami, Seyyed Mohsen; Asadnia, Mohsen; Tan, Swee Ngin; Chan, Siew Hwa

    2016-01-01

    A paper-based membraneless single-compartment hydrogen peroxide power source prepared by micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology is reported. The cell utilizes hydrogen peroxide as both fuel and oxidant in a low volume cell fabricated on paper. The fabrication method used is a simple method where precise, small-sized patterns are produced which include the hydrophilic paper bounded by hydrophobic resin. Open circuit potentials of 0.61 V and 0.32 V are achieved for the cells fabricated with Prussian Blue as the cathode and aluminium/nickel as the anode materials, respectively. The power produced by the cells is 0.81 mW cm-2 at 0.26 V and 0.38 mW cm-2 at 0.14 V, respectively, even after the cell is bent or distorted. Such a fuel cell provides an easily fabricated, environmentally friendly, flexible and cost saving power source. The cell may be integrated within a self-sustained diagnostic system to provide the on-demand power for future bio-sensing applications.

  8. Geometry-controlled triple phase boundary study for low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells reaction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Beom

    2013-12-01

    In this work, the triple phase boundary (TPB) characteristics of the platinum (Pt)/yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) interface in low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (LT-SOFCs) was examined through the development of a novel nano electrode fabrication method utilizing nanosphere lithography and Langmuir-Blodgett methods. Dense Pt cathode structures with close-packed circular openings about 300 to 600 nm in diameter were successfully fabricated on 300 microm-thick single crystalline YSZ substrates, through which the underlying YSZ surface was exposed to the gas phase. Fuel cell current-voltage behavior and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements were carried out in the temperature range of 300-450 degrees C. The fuel cell performance, as evaluated by the peak power density, confirmed that the TPB is the actual electrochemical reaction site, as a proportional relationship was observed between the peak power density and an increase in the TPB density. In addition, electrochemical studies on the cathode interface resistance with different TPB geometries enabled a qualitative estimation of the electrochemically active region or the TPB width for the fuel cell charge transfer reaction. The fabrication and experiment methods employed in this work provide an opportunity to investigate electrode/electrolyte interface characteristics under real fuel cell operating conditions.

  9. Broad Specification Fuels Combustion Technology Program, Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohmann, R. P.; Jeroszko, R. A.; Kennedy, J. B.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental evaluation of two advanced technology combustor concepts was conducted to evolve and assess their capability for operation on broadened properties fuels. The concepts were based on the results of Phase 1 of the Broad Specification Fuel Combustor Technology Program which indicated that combustors with variable geometry or staged combustion zones had a flexibility of operation that could facilitate operation on these fuels. Emphasis in defining these concepts included the use of single pipe as opposed to duplex or staged fuels systems to avoid the risk of coking associated with the reduction in thermal stability expected in broadened properties fuels. The first concept was a variable geometry combustor in which the airflow into the primary zone could be altered through valves on the front while the second was an outgrowth of the staged Vorbix combustor, evolved under the NASA/P&W ECCP and EEE programs incorporating simplified fuel and air introduction. The results of the investigation, which involved the use of Experimental Referee Broad Specification (ERBS) fuel, indicated that in the form initially conceived, both of these combustor concepts were deficient in performance relative to many of the program goals for performance emissions. However, variations of both combustors were evaluated that incorporated features to simulate conceptual enhancement to demonstrate the long range potential of the combustor. In both cases, significant improvements relative to the program goals were observed.

  10. Design, fabrication, and test of lightweight shell structure, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A cylindrical shell skirt structure 4.57 m (180 in.) in diameter and 3.66 m (144 in.) high was subjected to a design and analysis study using a wide variety of structural materials and concepts. The design loading of 1225.8 N/cm (700 lb/in.) axial compression and 245.2 N/cm (140 lb/in.) torsion is representative of that expected on a typical space tug skirt section. Structural concepts evaluated included honeycomb sandwich, truss, isogrid, and skin/stringer/frame. The materials considered included a wide variety of structural metals as well as glass, graphite, and boron-reinforced composites. The most unique characteristic of the candidate designs is that they involve the use of very thin-gage material. Fabrication and structural test of small panels and components representative of many of the candidate designs served to demonstrate proposed fabrication techniques and to verify design and analysis methods.

  11. Multilayer Phase-Only Diffraction Gratings: Fabrication andApplication to EUV Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Salmassi, Farhad; Gullikson, Eric M.; Anderson, Erik H.; Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2007-05-01

    The use of phase-only diffractive devices has long played an important role in advanced optical systems in varying fields. Such devices include gratings, diffractive and holographic optical elements, diffractive lenses, and phase-shift masks for advanced lithography. Extending such devices to the increasingly important regime of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths, however, is not trivial. Here, we present an effective fabrication and etch process enabling high-resolution patterning of Mo/Si multilayers for use in EUV phase devices, providing another method for fabrication of high numerical aperture diffractive devices or high-resolution EUV phase shift masks.

  12. Method and device for fabricating dispersion fuel comprising fission product collection spaces

    DOEpatents

    Shaber, Eric L; Fielding, Randall S

    2015-05-05

    A method of fabricating a nuclear fuel comprising a fissile material, one or more hollow microballoons, a phenolic resin, and metal matrix. The fissile material, phenolic resin and the one or more hollow microballoons are combined. The combined fissile material, phenolic resin and the hollow microballoons are heated sufficiently to form at least some fissile material carbides creating a nuclear fuel particle. The resulting nuclear fuel particle comprises one or more fission product collection spaces. In a preferred embodiment, the fissile material, phenolic resin and the one or more hollow microballoons are combined by forming the fissile material into microspheres. The fissile material microspheres are then overcoated with the phenolic resin and microballoon. In another preferred embodiment, the fissile material, phenolic resin and the one or more hollow microballoons are combined by overcoating the microballoon with the fissile material, and phenolic resin.

  13. Accident safety analysis for 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.J.; Brehm, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the accident safety analysis is to identify and analyze a range of credible events, their cause and consequences, and to provide technical justification for the conclusion that uranium billets, fuel assemblies, uranium scrap, and chips and fines drums can be safely stored in the 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facility, the contaminated equipment, High-Efficiency Air Particulate filters, ductwork, stacks, sewers and sumps can be cleaned (decontaminated) and/or removed, the new concretion process in the 304 Building will be able to operate, without undue risk to the public, employees, or the environment, and limited fuel handling and packaging associated with removal of stored uranium is acceptable.

  14. Fuel Fabrication Capability WBS 01.02.01.05 - HIP Bonding Experiments Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dickerson, Patricia O'Donnell; Summa, Deborah Ann; Liu, Cheng; Tucker, Laura Arias; Chen, Ching-Fong; Aikin, Beverly; Aragon, Daniel Adrian; Beard, Timothy Vance; Montalvo, Joel Dwayne; Pena, Maria Isela; Dombrowski, David E.

    2015-06-10

    The goals of this project were to demonstrate reliable, reproducible solid state bonding of aluminum 6061 alloy plates together to encapsulate DU-10 wt% Mo surrogate fuel foils. This was done as part of the CONVERT Fuel Fabrication Capability effort in Process Baseline Development . Bonding was done using Hot Isotatic Pressing (HIP) of evacuated stainless steel cans (a.k.a HIP cans) containing fuel plate components and strongbacks. Gross macroscopic measurements of HIP cans prior to HIP and after HIP were used as part of this demonstration, and were used to determine the accuracy of a finitie element model of the HIP bonding process. The quality of the bonding was measured by controlled miniature bulge testing for Al-Al, Al-Zr, and Zr-DU bonds. A special objective was to determine if the HIP process consistently produces good quality bonding and to determine the best characterization techniques for technology transfer.

  15. A study of the effect of fabrication variables on the void content and quality of fuel plates

    SciTech Connect

    Wiencek, T.C.

    1986-10-01

    The control of void content and quality of dispersion type fuel plates fabricated for research and test reactors are issues of concern to plate fabricators. These two variables were studied by examining the data for various geometries of fuel plates fabricated at ANL. It was found that the porosity of a fuel plate can be increased by: (1) decreasing the fuel particle size, (2) increasing the fuel particle surface roughness, (3) increasing the matrix strength, (4) decreasing the rolling temperature, (5) decreasing the final fuel zone thickness, and (6) increasing the volume percentage of the fuel. Porosity formation is controlled by bulk movement and deformation and/or fracture of particles. The most important factor is the flow stress of the matrix material. Lowering the flow stress will decrease the plate porosity. The percentage of plates with fuel-out-of-zone is a function of the fuel material and the loading. The highest percentage of plates with fuel-out-of-zone were those with U3Si2 which is at this time the most commonly used silicide fuel.

  16. Metal supported tubular solid oxide fuel cells fabricated by suspension plasma spray and suspension high velocity oxy-fuel spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Yeong; Wang, Youliang; Deng, Xiaohua; Singh, Devinder; Legoux, Jean-Gabriel

    2012-10-01

    Low temperature (LT) metal supported solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have many advantages in comparison to conventional electrode or electrolyte supported type SOFCs. NRC has demonstrated high performance LT metal supported planar SOFCs fabricated by either wet colloidal spray/sintering or suspension thermal spray. The combination of tubular configuration and metal supported SOFCs may produce more unique and very attractive advantages such as easy and inexpensive sealing method and materials, high specific and volumetric power density, cost-effective fabrication, enhanced robustness, rapid start up, red-ox cycle tolerance and potential use for a pressurized integrated system. In this paper, thin film solid electrolyte of Sm0.2Ce0.8O1.90 (SDC) and NiO-SDC composite anode on sintered porous tubular metal supports were deposited by suspension HVOF spray and suspension plasma spray, respectively on sintered porous tubular metal support. La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ (LSCF) cathode on the SDC electrolyte was formed by wet colloidal spray and subsequent sintering process as the final fabrication step. The detailed investigation of suspension and process-related parameters for suspension thermal spray was performed in order to produce thin and crack-free SDC thin film coatings. The electrochemical performance of single cells was demonstrated.

  17. Fabrication and Testing of Full-Length Single-Cell Externally Fueled Converters for Thermionic Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, Alfred

    1994-06-01

    The preceding paper described designs and analyses of thermionic reactors employing full-core-length single-cell converters with their heated emitters located on the outside of their internally cooled collectors, and it presented results of detailed parametric analyses which illustrate the benefits of this unconventional design. The present paper describes the fabrication and testing of full-length prototypical converters, both unfueled and fueled, and presents parametric results of electrically heated tests. The unfueled converter tests demonstrated the practicality of operating such long converters without shorting across a 0.3-mm interelectrode gap. They produced a measured peak output of 751 watts(e) from a single diode and a peak efficiency of 15.4%. The fueled converter tests measured the parametric performance of prototypic UO(subscript 2)-fueled converters designed for subsequent in-pile testing. They employed revolver-shaped tungsten elements with a central emitter hole surrounded by six fuel chambers. The full-length converters were heated by a water-cooled RF-induction coil inside an ion-pumped vacuum chamber. This required development of high-vacuum coaxial RF feedthroughs. In-pile test rules required multiple containment of the UO (subscript 2)-fuel, which complicated the fabrication of the test article and required successful development of techniques for welding tungsten and other refractory components. The test measured a peak power output of 530 watts(e) or 7.1 watts/cm (superscript 2) at an efficiency of 11.5%. There are three copies in the file. Cross-Reference a copy FSC-ESD-217-94-529 in the ESD files with a CID #8574.

  18. Design and fabrication of miniaturized PEM fuel cell combined microreactor with self-regulated hydrogen mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, A.; Frei, M.; Kerzenmacher, S.; Reinecke, H.; Mueller, C.

    2015-12-01

    In this work we present the design and fabrication of the miniaturized PEM fuel cell combined microreactor system with hydrogen regulation mechanism and testing of prototype microreactor. The system consists of two components (i) fuel cell component and (ii) microreactor component. The fuel cell component represents the miniaturized PEM fuel cell system (combination of screen printed fuel cell assembly and an on-board hydrogen storage medium). Hydrogen production based on catalytic hydrolysis of chemical hydride takes place in the microreactor component. The self-regulated hydrogen mechanism based on the gaseous hydrogen produced from the catalytic hydrolysis of sodium borohydride (NaBH4) gets accumulated as bubbles at the vicinity of the hydrophobic coated hydrogen exhaust holes. When the built up hydrogen bubbles pressure exceeds the burst pressure at the hydrogen exhaust holes the bubble collapses. This collapse causes a surge of fresh NaBH4 solution onto the catalyst surface leading to the removal of the reaction by-products formed at the active sites of the catalyst. The catalyst used in the system is platinum deposited on a base substrate. Nickel foam, carbon porous medium (CPM) and ceramic plate were selected as candidates for base substrate for developing a robust catalyst surface. For the first time the platinum layer fabricated by pulsed electrodeposition and dealloying (EPDD) technique is used for hydrolysis of NaBH4. The major advantages of such platinum catalyst layers are its high surface area and their mechanical stability. Prototype microreactor system with self-regulated hydrogen mechanism is demonstrated.

  19. The reasons for the high power density of fuel cells fabricated with directly deposited membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vierrath, Severin; Breitwieser, Matthias; Klingele, Matthias; Britton, Benjamin; Holdcroft, Steven; Zengerle, Roland; Thiele, Simon

    2016-09-01

    In a previous study, we reported that polymer electrolyte fuel cells prepared by direct membrane deposition (DMD) produced power densities in excess of 4 W/cm2. In this study, the underlying origins that give rise to these high power densities are investigated and reported. The membranes of high power, DMD-fabricated fuel cells are relatively thin (12 μm) compared to typical benchmark, commercially available membranes. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, at high current densities (2.2 A/cm2) reveals that mass transport resistance was half that of reference, catalyst-coated-membranes (CCM). This is attributed to an improved oxygen supply in the cathode catalyst layer by way of a reduced propensity of flooding, and which is facilitated by an enhancement in the back diffusion of water from cathode to anode through the thin directly deposited membrane. DMD-fabricated membrane-electrode-assemblies possess 50% reduction in ionic resistance (15 mΩcm2) compared to conventional CCMs, with contributions of 9 mΩcm2 for the membrane resistance and 6 mΩcm2 for the contact resistance of the membrane and catalyst layer ionomer. The improved mass transport is responsible for 90% of the increase in power density of the DMD fuel cell, while the reduced ionic resistance accounts for a 10% of the improvement.

  20. Chirped fiber gratings fabricated on curved fibers using uniform phase mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Liu, Yan; Tan, Zhongwei; Xu, Ou; Lu, Shaohua; Jian, Shuisheng

    2006-09-01

    We fabricated linearly chirped fiber gratings by using uniform phase mask instead of chirped mask. The chirp of the grating is realized by precisely setting the distance between the fiber and the phase mask at every point of the fiber. In experiments we derived linearly chirped fiber grating which has dispersion -1102ps/nm, time delay ripple is 17ps. And also the asymmetry high order apodization method is used successfully to reduce the time delay ripple. The experiment results consistent with the simulation results. We can fabricate gratings with different chirp extent use one uniform phase mask conveniently by only changing the curve function of the fiber.

  1. Key Differences in the Fabrication, Irradiation, and Safety Testing of U.S. and German TRISO-coated Particle Fuel and Their Implications on Fuel Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Petti, David Andrew; Maki, John Thomas; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Hobbins, Richard Redfield

    2002-06-01

    High temperature gas reactor technology is achieving a renaissance around the world. This technology relies on high quality production and performance of coated particle fuel. Historically, the irradiation performance of TRISO-coated gas reactor particle fuel in Germany has been superior to that in the United States. German fuel generally displayed in-pile gas release values that were three orders of magnitude lower than U.S. fuel. Thus, we have critically examined the TRISO-coated fuel fabrication processes in the U.S. and Germany and the associated irradiation database with a goal of understanding why the German fuel behaves acceptably, why the U.S. fuel has not faired as well, and what process/ production parameters impart the reliable performance to this fuel form. The postirradiation examination results are also reviewed to identify failure mechanisms that may be the cause of the poorer U.S. irradiation performance. This comparison will help determine the roles that particle fuel process/product attributes and irradiation conditions (burnup, fast neutron fluence, temperature, and degree of acceleration) have on the behavior of the fuel during irradiation and provide a more quantitative linkage between acceptable processing parameters, as-fabricated fuel properties and subsequent in-reactor performance.

  2. Microstructural characterization of a thin film ZrN diffusion barrier in an As-fabricated U-7Mo/Al matrix dispersion fuel plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiser, Dennis D.; Perez, Emmanuel; Wiencek, Tom; Leenaers, Ann; Van den Berghe, Sven

    2015-03-01

    The United States High Performance Research Reactor Fuel Development program is developing low enriched uranium fuels for application in research and test reactors. One concept utilizes U-7 wt.% Mo (U-7Mo) fuel particles dispersed in Al matrix, where the fuel particles are coated with a 1 μm-thick ZrN coating. The ZrN serves as a diffusion barrier to eliminate a deleterious reaction that can occur between U-7Mo and Al when a dispersion fuel is irradiated under aggressive reactor conditions. To investigate the final microstructure of a physically-vapor-deposited ZrN coating in a dispersion fuel plate after it was fabricated using a rolling process, characterization samples were taken from a fuel plate that was fabricated at 500 °C using ZrN-coated U-7Mo particles, Al matrix and AA6061 cladding. Scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy analysis were performed. Data from these analyses will be used to support future microstructural examinations of irradiated fuel plates, in terms of understanding the effects of irradiation on the ZrN microstructure, and to determine the role of diffusion barrier microstructure in eliminating fuel/matrix interactions during irradiation. The as-fabricated coating was determined to be cubic-ZrN (cF8) phase. It exhibited a columnar microstructure comprised of nanometer-sized grains and a region of relatively high porosity, mainly near the Al matrix. Small impurity-containing phases were observed at the U-7Mo/ZrN interface, and no interaction zone was observed at the ZrN/Al interface. The bonding between the U-7Mo and ZrN appeared to be mechanical in nature. A relatively high level of oxygen was observed in the ZrN coating, extending from the Al matrix in the ZrN coating in decreasing concentration. The above microstructural characteristics are discussed in terms of what may be most optimal for a diffusion barrier in a dispersion fuel plate application.

  3. Microstructural characterization of a thin film ZrN diffusion barrier in an As-fabricated U–7Mo/Al matrix dispersion fuel plate

    SciTech Connect

    Keiser, Dennis D.; Perez, Emmanuel; Wiencek, Tom; Leenaers, Ann; Van den Berghe, Sven

    2015-03-01

    The United States High Performance Research Reactor Fuel Development program is developing low enriched uranium fuels for application in research and test reactors. One concept utilizes U–7 wt.% Mo (U–7Mo) fuel particles dispersed in Al matrix, where the fuel particles are coated with a 1 μm-thick ZrN coating. The ZrN serves as a diffusion barrier to eliminate a deleterious reaction that can occur between U–7Mo and Al when a dispersion fuel is irradiated under aggressive reactor conditions. To investigate the final microstructure of a physically-vapor-deposited ZrN coating in a dispersion fuel plate after it was fabricated using a rolling process, characterization samples were taken from a fuel plate that was fabricated at 500 °C using ZrN-coated U–7Mo particles, Al matrix and AA6061 cladding. Scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy analysis were performed. Data from these analyses will be used to support future microstructural examinations of irradiated fuel plates, in terms of understanding the effects of irradiation on the ZrN microstructure, and to determine the role of diffusion barrier microstructure in eliminating fuel/matrix interactions during irradiation. The as-fabricated coating was determined to be cubic-ZrN (cF8) phase. It exhibited a columnar microstructure comprised of nanometer-sized grains and a region of relatively high porosity, mainly near the Al matrix. Small impurity-containing phases were observed at the U–7Mo/ZrN interface, and no interaction zone was observed at the ZrN/Al interface. The bonding between the U–7Mo and ZrN appeared to be mechanical in nature. A relatively high level of oxygen was observed in the ZrN coating, extending from the Al matrix in the ZrN coating in decreasing concentration. The above microstructural characteristics are discussed in terms of what may be most optimal for a diffusion barrier in a dispersion fuel plate application.

  4. Novel approaches for fabrication of thin film layers for solid oxide electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murugesamoorthi, K. A.; Srinivasan, S.; Cocke, D. L.; Appleby, A. J.

    1990-01-01

    The main objectives of the SOFC (solid oxide fuel cell) project are to (1) identify viable and cost-effective techniques to prepare cell components for stable MSOFCs (monolithic SOFCs); (2) fabricate half and single cells; and (3) evaluate their performances. The approach used to fabricate stable MSOFCs is as follows: (1) the electrolyte layer is prepared in the form of a honeycomb structure by alloy oxidation and other cell components are deposited on it; (2) the electrolyte and anode layers are deposited on the cathode layer, which has a porous, honeycomb structure; and (3) the electrolyte and cathode layers are deposited on the anode layer. The current status of the project is reported.

  5. Fabrication and microstructure characterization of inert matrix fuel based on yttria stabilized zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellwig, Ch.; Pouchon, M.; Restani, R.; Ingold, F.; Bart, G.

    2005-04-01

    The deployment of a suitable, Pu-bearing inert matrix fuel (IMF) could offer an attractive option as a single-recycling LWR strategy aimed at reducing the currently growing plutonium stockpiles. A development programme focusing on yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ)-based IMF is conducted at PSI. YSZ-based IMF has so far been irradiated in two test reactors. The fabrication routes as well as the characterization of the irradiated material by ceramography, electronprobe microanalysis, and X-ray diffraction are presented. IMF fabrication by attrition milling of the oxide constituents is possible, but high sintering temperatures are required to achieve homogeneity. X-ray diffraction is a suitable tool to monitor the homogeneity. Extra efforts are needed to increase the density.

  6. Fabrication and characterization of americium, neptunium and curium bearing MOX fuels obtained by powder metallurgy process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebreton, Florent; Prieur, Damien; Jankowiak, Aurélien; Tribet, Magaly; Leorier, Caroline; Delahaye, Thibaud; Donnet, Louis; Dehaudt, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    MOX fuel pellets containing up to 1.4 wt% of Minor Actinides (MA), i.e. Am, Np and Cm, were fabricated to demonstrate the technical feasibility of powder metallurgy process involving, pelletizing and sintering in controlled atmosphere. The compounds were then characterized using XRD, SEM and EDX/EPMA. Dense pellets were obtained which closed porosity mean size is equal to 7 μm. The results indicate the formation of (U, Pu)O 2 solid solution. However, microstructure contains some isolated UO 2 grains. The distribution of Am and Cm appears to be homogeneous whereas Np was found to be clustered at some locations.

  7. Application of Phase Field Simulations to Fuel Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; Gorti, Sarma B; Clarno, Kevin T

    2015-01-01

    The application of the phase filed method to simulate the formation and the stress induced re-orientation of zirconium hydride during dry storage of the spent fuel and clad assembly is discussed. The phase field technique is able to capture qualitatively the effect of external stress on the hydride orientation in Zr-H system. However, the modeling effort to-date is far from adequate and several issues remain to be addressed before the simulations can be used as a predictive tool for the behavior of the clad during long time dry storage.

  8. Operational comparison of TLD albedo dosemeters and solid state nuclear tracks detectors in fuel fabrication facilities.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, N; Takada, C; Yoshida, T; Momose, T

    2007-01-01

    The authors carried out an operational study that compared the use of TLD albedo dosemeters and solid state nuclear tracks detector in plutonium environments of Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, Tokai Works. A selected group of workers engaged in the fabrication process of MOX (Plutonium-Uranium mixed oxide) fuel wore both TLD albedo dosemeters and solid state nuclear tracks detectors. The TL readings were generally proportional to the counted etch-pits, and thus the dose equivalent results obtained from TLD albedo dosemeter agreed with those from solid state nuclear tracks detector within a factor of 1.5. This result indicates that, in the workplaces of the MOX fuel plants, the neutron spectrum remained almost constant in terms of time and space, and the appropriate range of field-specific correction with spectrum variations was small in albedo dosimetry. PMID:17337735

  9. The FUTURIX-FTA experiment in Phenix: status of oxides fuels fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Jorion, F.; Donnet, L.

    2007-07-01

    Eliminating long-lived radionuclides by transmuting them into nonradioactive or short-lived nuclei is a reference approach in nuclear waste management. FUTURIX/FTA (FUels for Transmutation of transuranium elements in Phenix / Fortes Teneurs en Actinides [high actinide content]) is an international program intended to demonstrate the technical feasibility, primarily with regard to fuel behavior, of transmuting minor actinides in fast neutron reactors. This research is carried out in collaboration with the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), the Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU) in Germany, and the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) in France. In this context, the CEA investigated four ceramic/ceramic (cercer) compositions ((Pu{sub 0.5}Am{sub 0.5})O{sub 2-x} + 80 vol% MgO), (Pu{sub 0.5}Am{sub 0.5})O{sub 2-x} + 70 vol% MgO), (Pu{sub 0.2}Am{sub 0.8})O{sub 2-x} + 75 vol% MgO), (Pu{sub 0.2}Am{sub 0.8})O{sub 2-x} + 65 vol% MgO) and fabricated two fuel pins. The mixed actinide oxides were synthesized by oxalate co-conversion and incorporated into a magnesia matrix by classical powder metallurgy. The resulting fuel pellets were subjected to chemical, dimensional, structural and microstructural characterization. The results for each composition were interpreted and compared. (authors)

  10. Fabrication of optical multilayer for two-color phase plate in super-resolution microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Iketaki, Yoshinori; Kitagawa, Katsuichi; Hidaka, Kohjiro; Kato, Naoki; Hirabayashi, Akira; Bokor, Nandor

    2014-07-15

    In super-resolution microscopy based on fluorescence depletion, the two-color phase plate (TPP) is an indispensable optical element, which can independently control the phase shifts for two beams of different color, i.e., the pump and erase beams. By controlling a phase shift of the erase beam through the TPP, the erase beam can be modulated into a doughnut shape, while the pump beam maintains the initial Gaussian shape. To obtain a reliable optical multiplayer (ML) for the TPP, we designed a ML with only two optical layers by performing numerical optimization. The measured phase shifts generated by the fabricated ML using interferometry correspond to the design values. The beam profiles in the focal plane are also consistent with theoretical results. Although the fabricated ML consists of only two optical layers, the ML can provide a suitable phase modulation function for the TPP in a practical super-resolution microscope.

  11. Fabrication of optical multilayer for two-color phase plate in super-resolution microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iketaki, Yoshinori; Kitagawa, Katsuichi; Hidaka, Kohjiro; Kato, Naoki; Hirabayashi, Akira; Bokor, Nandor

    2014-07-01

    In super-resolution microscopy based on fluorescence depletion, the two-color phase plate (TPP) is an indispensable optical element, which can independently control the phase shifts for two beams of different color, i.e., the pump and erase beams. By controlling a phase shift of the erase beam through the TPP, the erase beam can be modulated into a doughnut shape, while the pump beam maintains the initial Gaussian shape. To obtain a reliable optical multiplayer (ML) for the TPP, we designed a ML with only two optical layers by performing numerical optimization. The measured phase shifts generated by the fabricated ML using interferometry correspond to the design values. The beam profiles in the focal plane are also consistent with theoretical results. Although the fabricated ML consists of only two optical layers, the ML can provide a suitable phase modulation function for the TPP in a practical super-resolution microscope.

  12. Design, Fabrication and Prototype testing of a Chip Integrated Micro PEM Fuel Cell Accumulator combined On-Board Range Extender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, A.; Mueller, C.; Reinecke, H.

    2014-11-01

    In this work we present the design, fabrication and prototype testing of Chip Integrated Micro PEM Fuel Cell Accumulator (CIμ-PFCA) combined On-Board Range Extender (O-BRE). CIμ-PFCA is silicon based micro-PEM fuel cell system with an integrated hydrogen storage feature (palladium metal hydride), the run time of CIμ-PFCA is dependent on the stored hydrogen, and in order to extend its run time an O-BRE is realized (catalytic hydrolysis of chemical hydride, NaBH4. Combining the CIμ-PFCA and O-BRE on a system level have few important design requirements to be considered; hydrogen regulation, gas -liquid separator between the CIμ-PFCA and the O-RE. The usage of traditional techniques to regulate hydrogen (tubes), gas-liquid phase membranes (porous membrane separators) are less desirable in the micro domain, due to its space constraint. Our approach is to use a passive hydrogen regulation and gas-liquid phase separation concept; to use palladium membrane. Palladium regulates hydrogen by concentration diffusion, and its property to selectively adsorb only hydrogen is used as a passive gas-liquid phase separator. Proof of concept is shown by realizing a prototype system. The system is an assembly of CIμ-PFCA, palladium membrane and the O-BRE. The CIμ-PFCA consist of 2 individually processed silicon chips, copper supported palladium membrane realized by electroplating followed by high temperature annealing process under inter atmosphere and the O-BRE is realized out of a polymer substrate by micromilling process with platinum coated structures, which functions as a catalyst for the hydrolysis of NaBH4. The functionality of the assembled prototype system is demonstrated by the measuring a unit cell (area 1 mm2) when driven by the catalytic hydrolysis of chemical hydride (NaBH4 and the prototype system shows run time more than 15 hours.

  13. EUV Binary Phase Gratings: Fabrication and Application toDiffractive Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Salmassi, F.; Naulleau, P.P.; Gullikson, E.M.; Olynick, D.L.; Liddle, J.A.

    2005-02-01

    Diffractive optics play an important role in a variety of fields such as astronomy, microscopy, and lithography. For the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) region of the spectrum they have been difficult to make due to the extremely precise control required of their surface structure. We have developed a robust fabrication technique that achieves the required topographic control through the deposition of a thin film of Si on a Cr etch stop. We have fabricated binary phase gratings using this approach that have an efficiency of 80% of the theoretical maximum. The technique is applicable to any type of binary phase optical element.

  14. Submicrometer photonic structure fabrication by phase spatial-light-modulator-based interference lithography.

    PubMed

    Behera, Saraswati; Kumar, Manish; Joseph, Joby

    2016-04-15

    We present a large-area and single-step fabrication approach based on phase spatial light modulator (SLM)-assisted interference lithography for the realization of submicrometer photonic structures on photoresist. A multimirror beam steering unit is used to reflect the SLM-generated phase-engineered beams leading to a large angle between interfering beams while also preserving the large area of the interfering plane beams. Both translational and rotational periodic submicrometer structures are experimentally realized. This approach increases the flexibility of interference lithography to fabricate more complex submicrometer photonic structures and photonic metamaterial structures for future applications. PMID:27082372

  15. Cost update: Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning a reference uranium fuel fabrication plant

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, T.L.; Liu, Y.

    1994-06-01

    The cost estimates originally developed in NUREG/CR-1266 for commissioning a reference low-enrichment uranium fuel fabrication plant are updated from 1978 to early 1993 dollars. During this time, the costs for labor and materials increased approximately at the rate of inflation, the cost of energy increased more slowly than the rate of inflation, and the cost of low-level radioactive waste disposal increased much more rapidly than the rate of inflation. The results of the analysis indicate that the estimated costs for the immediate dismantlement and decontamination for unrestricted facility release (DECON) of the reference plant have increased from the mid-1978 value of $3.57 million to $8.08 million in 1993 with in-compact low-level radioactive waste disposal at the US Ecoloay facility near Richland, Washington. The cost estimate rises to $19.62 million with out-of-compact radioactive waste disposal at the Chem-Nuclear facility near Barnwell, South Carolina. A methodology and a formula are presented for estimating the cost of decommissioning the reference uranium fuel fabrication plant at some future time, based on these early 1993 cost estimates. The formula contains essentially the same elements as the formula given in 10 CFR 50.75 for escalating the decommissioning costs for nuclear power reactors to some future time.

  16. Supplemental information for a notice of construction for the Fueled Clad Fabrication System, the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility, and the Fuel Assembly Area

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-08-01

    This ''Notice of Construction'' has been submitted by the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (P.O. Box 550, Richland, Washington 99352), pursuant to WAC 402-80-070, for three new sources of radionuclide emissions at the Hanford Site in Washington State (Figure 1). The three new sources, the Fueled Clad Fabrication System (FCFS) the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) and the Fuel Assembly Area (FAA) will be located in one facility, the Fuels and materials Examination Facility (FMEF) of the 400 Area. The FMEF was originally designed to provide for post- irradiation examination and fabrication of breeder reactor fuels. These FMEF missions were cancelled before the introduction of any fuel materials or any irradiated material. The current plans are to use the facility to fabricate power supplies to be used in space applications and to produce Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) fuel and target assemblies. The FCFS and the RPSF will produce materials and assemblies for application in space. The FAA project will produce FFTF fuel and target assemblies. The FCFS and the RPSF will share the same building, stack, and, in certain cases, the same floor space. Given this relationship, to the extent possible, these systems will be dealt with separately. The FAA is a comparatively independent operation though it will share the FMEF complex.

  17. Prevention of significant deterioration permit application for the Fueled Clad Fabrication System, the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility, and the Fuel Assembly Area

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-08-01

    This New Source Review'' has been submitted by the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (PO Box 550, Richland, Washington 99352), pursuant to WAC 173-403-050 and in compliance with the Department of Ecology Guide to Processing A Prevention Of Significant Deterioration (PSD) Permit'' for three new sources of radionuclide emissions at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The three new sources, the Fueled Clad Fabrication System (FCFS), the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF), and the Fuel Assembly Area (FAA), will be located in one facility, the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) of the 400 Area. The FMEF was originally designed to provide for post-irradiation examination and fabrication of breeder reactor fuels. These FMEF missions were cancelled before the introduction of any fuel materials or any irradiated material. The current plans are to use the facility to fabricate power supplies for use in space applications and to produce Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) fuel and target assemblies. The FCFS and the RPSF will produce materials and assemblies for application in space. The FAA project will produce FFTF fuel and target assemblies. The FCFS and the RPSF will share the same building, stack, and, in certain cases, the same floor space. Given this relationship, these systems will be dealt with separately to the extent possible. The FAA is a comparatively independent operation though it will share the FMEF complex.

  18. Fabrication and characterization of the source grating for visibility improvement of neutron phase imaging with gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongyul; Lee, Kye Hong; Lim, Chang Hwy; Kim, Taejoo; Ahn, Chi Won; Cho, Gyuseong; Lee, Seung Wook

    2013-06-01

    The fabrication of gratings including metal deposition processes for highly neutron absorbing lines is a critical issue to achieve a good visibility of the grating-based phase imaging system. The source grating for a neutron Talbot-Lau interferometer is an array of Gadolinium (Gd) structures that are generally made by sputtering, photo-lithography, and chemical wet etching. However, it is very challenging to fabricate a Gd structure with sufficient neutron attenuation of approximately more than 20 μm using a conventional metal deposition method because of the slow Gd deposition rate, film stress, high material cost, and so on. In this article, we fabricated the source gratings for neutron Talbot-Lau interferometers by filling the silicon structure with Gadox particles. The new fabrication method allowed us a very stable and efficient way to achieve a much higher Gadox filled structure than a Gd film structure, and is even more suitable for thermal polychromatic neutrons, which are more difficult to stop than cold neutrons. The newly fabricated source gratings were tested at the polychromatic thermal neutron grating interferometer system of HANARO at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, and the visibilities and images from the neutron phase imaging system with the new source gratings were compared with those fabricated by a Gd deposition method.

  19. Fabrication and characterization of the source grating for visibility improvement of neutron phase imaging with gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jongyul; Lee, Kye Hong; Lim, Chang Hwy; Kim, Taejoo; Ahn, Chi Won; Cho, Gyuseong; Lee, Seung Wook

    2013-06-15

    The fabrication of gratings including metal deposition processes for highly neutron absorbing lines is a critical issue to achieve a good visibility of the grating-based phase imaging system. The source grating for a neutron Talbot-Lau interferometer is an array of Gadolinium (Gd) structures that are generally made by sputtering, photo-lithography, and chemical wet etching. However, it is very challenging to fabricate a Gd structure with sufficient neutron attenuation of approximately more than 20 {mu}m using a conventional metal deposition method because of the slow Gd deposition rate, film stress, high material cost, and so on. In this article, we fabricated the source gratings for neutron Talbot-Lau interferometers by filling the silicon structure with Gadox particles. The new fabrication method allowed us a very stable and efficient way to achieve a much higher Gadox filled structure than a Gd film structure, and is even more suitable for thermal polychromatic neutrons, which are more difficult to stop than cold neutrons. The newly fabricated source gratings were tested at the polychromatic thermal neutron grating interferometer system of HANARO at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, and the visibilities and images from the neutron phase imaging system with the new source gratings were compared with those fabricated by a Gd deposition method.

  20. Structural-phase state and creep of mixed nitride fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, I. I.; Tarasov, B. A.; Glagovsky, E. M.

    2016-04-01

    By the analysis of thermal creep data in conjunction with structural-phase state the most likely mechanisms of UN creep are considered. An equation relating the thermal and radiation creep of nitride fuel with such important parameters as plutonium content, porosity, grain size, the content of impurities of transition metals and oxygen, the carbon content has been suggested. At stationary operating parameters in reactor the creep of nitride fuel with technical purity is defined by the thermal component at mechanism of intergranular slip and by the radiation component, which plays a significant role at temperatures below 1100°C. Both types of creep in a first approximation have a linear dependence on the stress.

  1. Granulation and infiltration processes for the fabrication of minor actinide fuels, targets and conditioning matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nästren, C.; Fernandez, A.; Haas, D.; Somers, J.; Walter, M.

    2007-05-01

    The impact of Pu and Am, two elements that potentially pose a long term hazard for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel, can be abated by their reintroduction into the fuel cycle for transmutation. Such transmutation targets can be fabricated by a sol gel method for the production of porous inactive beads, which are then infiltrated by Am solutions. Following calcination, compaction into pellets and sintering, the product is obtained. At its heart, the sol gel process relies on an ammonia precipitation, so that it is not universally applicable. Therefore, an alternative is sought not just to overcome this chemical limitation, but also to simplify the process and reduce waste streams. The new concept utilises powder metallurgy routes (compaction, crushing and sieving) to produce porous, almost, dust free granules, which are infiltrated with the actinide nitrate. The method has been developed using yttria stabilised zirconia and alumina, and has been demonstrated for the production of Al2O3-AmO2 targets for neutron capture investigations. The results are very promising and meet light water reactor fuel specifications. In addition, the process is ideally suited for the production of ceramic matrices for conditioning actinides for geological disposal.

  2. Decommissioning of a mixed oxide fuel fabrication plant at Winfrith Technolgy Centre

    SciTech Connect

    Pengelly, M.G.A.

    1994-01-01

    The Alpha Materials Laboratory (Building A52) at Winfrith contained a mixed oxide fuel fabrication plant which had a capability of producing 10 te/yr of pelleted/compacted fuel and was in operation from 1962 until 1980, when the requirement for this type of fuel in the UK diminished, and the plant became surplus to requirements. A program to develop decommissioning techniques for plutonium plants was started in 1983, addressing the following aspects of alpha plant decommissioning: (1) Re-usable containment systems, (2) Strippable coating technology, (3) Mobile air filtration plant, (4) Size reduction primarily using cold cutting, (5) techniques, (6) Waste packing, and (7) Alpha plant decommissioning methodology. The technology developed has been used to safely and efficiently decommission radioactive plant and equipment including Pu contaminated glove boxes. (63 glove boxes to date) The technology has been widely adopted in the United Kingdom and elsewhere. This paper outlines the general strategies adopted and techniques used for glove box decommissioning in building A52.

  3. Fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angel, Roger; Helms, Richard; Bilbro, Jim; Brown, Norman; Eng, Sverre; Hinman, Steve; Hull-Allen, Greg; Jacobs, Stephen; Keim, Robert; Ulmer, Melville

    1992-08-01

    What aspects of optical fabrication technology need to be developed so as to facilitate existing planned missions, or enable new ones? Throughout the submillimeter to UV wavelengths, the common goal is to push technology to the limits to make the largest possible apertures that are diffraction limited. At any one wavelength, the accuracy of the surface must be better than lambda/30 (rms error). The wavelength range is huge, covering four orders of magnitude from 1 mm to 100 nm. At the longer wavelengths, diffraction limited surfaces can be shaped with relatively crude techniques. The challenge in their fabrication is to make as large as possible a reflector, given the weight and volume constraints of the launch vehicle. The limited cargo diameter of the shuttle has led in the past to emphasis on deployable or erectable concepts such as the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR), which was studied by NASA for a submillimeter astrophysics mission. Replication techniques that can be used to produce light, low-cost reflecting panels are of great interest for this class of mission. At shorter wavelengths, in the optical and ultraviolet, optical fabrication will tax to the limit the most refined polishing methods. Methods of mechanical and thermal stabilization of the substrate will be severely stressed. In the thermal infrared, the need for large aperture is tempered by the even stronger need to control the telescope's thermal emission by cooled or cryogenic operation. Thus, the SIRTF mirror at 1 meter is not large and does not require unusually high accuracy, but the fabrication process must produce a mirror that is the right shape at a temperature of 4 K. Future large cooled mirrors will present more severe problems, especially if they must also be accurate enough to work at optical wavelengths. At the very shortest wavelengths accessible to reflecting optics, in the x-ray domain, the very low count fluxes of high energy photons place a premium on the collecting area. It is

  4. Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angel, Roger; Helms, Richard; Bilbro, Jim; Brown, Norman; Eng, Sverre; Hinman, Steve; Hull-Allen, Greg; Jacobs, Stephen; Keim, Robert; Ulmer, Melville

    1992-01-01

    What aspects of optical fabrication technology need to be developed so as to facilitate existing planned missions, or enable new ones? Throughout the submillimeter to UV wavelengths, the common goal is to push technology to the limits to make the largest possible apertures that are diffraction limited. At any one wavelength, the accuracy of the surface must be better than lambda/30 (rms error). The wavelength range is huge, covering four orders of magnitude from 1 mm to 100 nm. At the longer wavelengths, diffraction limited surfaces can be shaped with relatively crude techniques. The challenge in their fabrication is to make as large as possible a reflector, given the weight and volume constraints of the launch vehicle. The limited cargo diameter of the shuttle has led in the past to emphasis on deployable or erectable concepts such as the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR), which was studied by NASA for a submillimeter astrophysics mission. Replication techniques that can be used to produce light, low-cost reflecting panels are of great interest for this class of mission. At shorter wavelengths, in the optical and ultraviolet, optical fabrication will tax to the limit the most refined polishing methods. Methods of mechanical and thermal stabilization of the substrate will be severely stressed. In the thermal infrared, the need for large aperture is tempered by the even stronger need to control the telescope's thermal emission by cooled or cryogenic operation. Thus, the SIRTF mirror at 1 meter is not large and does not require unusually high accuracy, but the fabrication process must produce a mirror that is the right shape at a temperature of 4 K. Future large cooled mirrors will present more severe problems, especially if they must also be accurate enough to work at optical wavelengths. At the very shortest wavelengths accessible to reflecting optics, in the x-ray domain, the very low count fluxes of high energy photons place a premium on the collecting area. It is

  5. Fabric phase sorptive extraction: Two practical sample pretreatment techniques for brominated flame retardants in water.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guiqi; Dong, Sheying; Zhang, Mengfei; Zhang, Haihan; Huang, Tinglin

    2016-09-15

    Sample pretreatment is the critical section for residue monitoring of hazardous pollutants. In this paper, using the cellulose fabric as host matrix, three extraction sorbents such as poly (tetrahydrofuran) (PTHF), poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly (dimethyldiphenylsiloxane) (PDMDPS), were prepared on the surface of the cellulose fabric. Two practical extraction techniques including stir bar fabric phase sorptive extraction (stir bar-FPSE) and magnetic stir fabric phase sorptive extraction (magnetic stir-FPSE) have been designed, which allow stirring of fabric phase sorbent during the whole extraction process. In the meantime, three brominated flame retardants (BFRs) [tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), tetrabromobisphenol A bisallylether (TBBPA-BAE), tetrabromobisphenol A bis(2,3-dibromopropyl)ether (TBBPA-BDBPE)] in the water sample were selected as model analytes for the practical evaluation of the proposed two techniques using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Moreover, various experimental conditions affecting extraction process such as the type of fabric phase, extraction time, the amount of salt and elution conditions were also investigated. Due to the large sorbent loading capacity and unique stirring performance, both techniques possessed high extraction capability and fast extraction equilibrium. Under the optimized conditions, high recoveries (90-99%) and low limits of detection (LODs) (0.01-0.05 μg L(-1)) were achieved. In addition, the reproducibility was obtained by evaluating the intraday and interday precisions with relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 5.1% and 6.8%, respectively. The results indicated that two pretreatment techniques were promising and practical for monitoring of hazardous pollutants in the water sample. Due to low solvent consumption and high repeated use performance, proposed techniques also could meet green analytical criteria.

  6. Fabric phase sorptive extraction: Two practical sample pretreatment techniques for brominated flame retardants in water.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guiqi; Dong, Sheying; Zhang, Mengfei; Zhang, Haihan; Huang, Tinglin

    2016-09-15

    Sample pretreatment is the critical section for residue monitoring of hazardous pollutants. In this paper, using the cellulose fabric as host matrix, three extraction sorbents such as poly (tetrahydrofuran) (PTHF), poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly (dimethyldiphenylsiloxane) (PDMDPS), were prepared on the surface of the cellulose fabric. Two practical extraction techniques including stir bar fabric phase sorptive extraction (stir bar-FPSE) and magnetic stir fabric phase sorptive extraction (magnetic stir-FPSE) have been designed, which allow stirring of fabric phase sorbent during the whole extraction process. In the meantime, three brominated flame retardants (BFRs) [tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), tetrabromobisphenol A bisallylether (TBBPA-BAE), tetrabromobisphenol A bis(2,3-dibromopropyl)ether (TBBPA-BDBPE)] in the water sample were selected as model analytes for the practical evaluation of the proposed two techniques using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Moreover, various experimental conditions affecting extraction process such as the type of fabric phase, extraction time, the amount of salt and elution conditions were also investigated. Due to the large sorbent loading capacity and unique stirring performance, both techniques possessed high extraction capability and fast extraction equilibrium. Under the optimized conditions, high recoveries (90-99%) and low limits of detection (LODs) (0.01-0.05 μg L(-1)) were achieved. In addition, the reproducibility was obtained by evaluating the intraday and interday precisions with relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 5.1% and 6.8%, respectively. The results indicated that two pretreatment techniques were promising and practical for monitoring of hazardous pollutants in the water sample. Due to low solvent consumption and high repeated use performance, proposed techniques also could meet green analytical criteria. PMID:27300591

  7. Vapor-phase fabrication of β-iron oxide nanopyramids for lithium-ion battery anodes.

    PubMed

    Carraro, Giorgio; Barreca, Davide; Cruz-Yusta, Manuel; Gasparotto, Alberto; Maccato, Chiara; Morales, Julián; Sada, Cinzia; Sánchez, Luis

    2012-12-01

    The other polymorph: A vapor-phase route for the fabrication of β-Fe(2)O(3) nanomaterials on Ti substrates at 400-500 °C is reported. For the first time, the β polymorph is tested as anode for lithium batteries, exhibiting promising performances in terms of Li storage and rate capability.

  8. 30 CFR 250.917 - What are the CVA's primary duties during the fabrication phase?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the fabrication phase? (a) The CVA must use good engineering judgment and practices in conducting an...; (vi) Structural tolerances specified and adherence to those tolerances; (vii) The nondestructive...-zone protection; (xi) Erection procedures to ensure that overstressing of structural members does...

  9. 30 CFR 250.917 - What are the CVA's primary duties during the fabrication phase?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the fabrication phase? (a) The CVA must use good engineering judgment and practices in conducting an...; (vi) Structural tolerances specified and adherence to those tolerances; (vii) The nondestructive...-zone protection; (xi) Erection procedures to ensure that overstressing of structural members does...

  10. 30 CFR 250.917 - What are the CVA's primary duties during the fabrication phase?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the fabrication phase? (a) The CVA must use good engineering judgment and practices in conducting an...; (vi) Structural tolerances specified and adherence to those tolerances; (vii) The nondestructive...-zone protection; (xi) Erection procedures to ensure that overstressing of structural members does...

  11. High-temperature Chemical Compatibility of As-fabricated TRIGA Fuel and Type 304 Stainless Steel Cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis D. Keiser, Jr.; Jan-Fong Jue; Eric Woolstenhulme; Kurt Terrani; Glenn A. Moore

    2012-09-01

    Chemical interaction between TRIGA fuel and Type-304 stainless steel cladding at relatively high temperatures is of interest from the point of view of understanding fuel behavior during different TRIGA reactor transient scenarios. Since TRIGA fuel comes into close contact with the cladding during irradiation, there is an opportunity for interdiffusion between the U in the fuel and the Fe in the cladding to form an interaction zone that contains U-Fe phases. Based on the equilibrium U-Fe phase diagram, a eutectic can develop at a composition between the U6Fe and UFe2 phases. This eutectic composition can become a liquid at around 725°C. From the standpoint of safe operation of TRIGA fuel, it is of interest to develop better understanding of how a phase with this composition may develop in irradiated TRIGA fuel at relatively high temperatures. One technique for investigating the development of a eutectic phase at the fuel/cladding interface is to perform out-of-pile diffusion-couple experiments at relatively high temperatures. This information is most relevant for lightly irradiated fuel that just starts to touch the cladding due to fuel swelling. Similar testing using fuel irradiated to different fission densities should be tested in a similar fashion to generate data more relevant to more heavily irradiated fuel. This report describes the results for TRIGA fuel/Type-304 stainless steel diffusion couples that were annealed for one hour at 730 and 800°C. Scanning electron microscopy with energy- and wavelength-dispersive spectroscopy was employed to characterize the fuel/cladding interface for each diffusion couple to look for evidence of any chemical interaction. Overall, negligible fuel/cladding interaction was observed for each diffusion couple.

  12. Multi-fuel reformers for fuel cells used in transportation: Assessment of hydrogen storage technologies. Phase 2: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    During Phase 1 of this program, the authors evaluated all known hydrogen storage technologies (including those that are now practiced and those that are development) in the context of fuel cell vehicles. They determined that among the development technologies, carbon sorbents could most benefit from closer scrutiny. During Phase 2 of this program, they tested ten different carbon sorbents at various practical temperatures and pressures, and developed the concept of the usable Capacity Ratio, which is the ratio of the mass of hydrogen that can be released from a carbon-filled tank to the mass of hydrogen that can be released from an empty tank. The authors also commissioned the design, fabrication, and NGV2 (Natural Gas Vehicle) testing of an aluminum-lined, carbon-composite, full-wrapped pressure vessel to store hydrogen at 78 K and 3,000 psi. They constructed a facility to pressure cycle the tank at 78 K and to temperature cycle the tank at 3,000 psi, tested one such tank, and submitted it for a burst test. Finally, they devised a means by which cryogenic compressed hydrogen gas tanks can be filled and discharged using standard hardware--that is, without using filters, valves, or pressure regulators that must operate at both low temperature and high pressure. This report describes test methods and test results of carbon sorbents and the design of tanks for cold storage. 7 refs., 91 figs., 10 tabs.

  13. Evaluation of existing United States` facilities for use as a mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility for plutonium disposition

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, C.A.; Buksa, J.J.; Chidester, K.; Eaton, S.L.; Motley, F.E.; Siebe, D.A.

    1995-12-31

    A number of existing US facilities were evaluated for use as a mixed-oxide fuel fabrication facility for plutonium disposition. These facilities include the Fuels Material Examination Facility (FMEF) at Hanford, the Washington Power Supply Unit 1 (WNP-1) facility at Hanford, the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant (BNFP) at Barnwell, SC, the Fuel Processing Facility (FPF) at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and the P-reactor at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The study consisted of evaluating each facility in terms of available process space, available building support systems (i.e., HVAC, security systems, existing process equipment, etc.), available regional infrastructure (i.e., emergency response teams, protective force teams, available transportation routes, etc.), and ability to integrate the MOX fabrication process into the facility in an operationally-sound manner that requires a minimum amount of structural modifications.

  14. An integrated optical CO2 sensor. Phase 0: Design and fabrication of critical elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Michael C.; Kelly, Kevin W.; Li, B. Q.; Ma, EN; Wang, Wanjun; Vladimirsky, Yuli; Vladimirsky, Olga

    1994-01-01

    Significant progress has been made toward all of the goals for the first phase of the project short of actual fabrication of a light path. Two alternative approaches to fabricating gold mirrors using the basic LIGA process were developed, one using electroplated solid gold mirrors and the second using gold plated over a nickel base. A new method of fabrication, the transfer mask process, was developed and demonstrated. Analysis of the projected surface roughness and beam divergence effects was completed. With gold surface with low surface roughness scattering losses are expected to be insignificant. Beam divergence due to diffraction will require a modification of the original design, but should be eliminated by fabricating mirrors 1000 mu m in height by 1000 mu m in width and using a source with an initial beam radius greater than 300 mu m. This may eliminate any need for focusing optics. Since the modified design does not affect the mask layout, ordering of the mask and fabrication of the test structures can begin immediately at the start of Phase 1.

  15. High-transparency, self-standable gel-SLIPS fabricated by a facile nanoscale phase separation.

    PubMed

    Okada, Issei; Shiratori, Seimei

    2014-02-12

    Slippery liquid-infused porous surfaces (SLIPSs) that were both highly transparent and free-standing (self-standability) were fabricated by an extremely simple process using non-solvent-induced phase separation (NIPS) of a poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-HFP)/di-n-butyl phthalate solution. We call these "Gel-SLIPS" because the porous PVDF-HFP film fabricated using the NIPS process has been used as a gel electrolyte in a lithium-ion battery. In previous reports, SLIPS fabrication required complex processes, high annealing temperatures, and drying. Gel-SLIPS can be fabricated from the adjusted solution and the lubricant at room temperature and pressure in 5 min by squeegee, cast, or dip methods. NIPS is based on a quick phase separation process in situ, and reduction of the surface energy is not required because of the considerable fluorine in PVDF-HFP. Moreover, because of the flexible nanonetwork structure of PVDF-HFP, Gel-SLIPS exhibited self-standability and high transmittance (>87% at 600 nm). Gel-SLIPS is thus highly versatile in terms of the fabrication process and film characteristics. PMID:24377307

  16. Blue-phase templated fabrication of three-dimensional nanostructures for photonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castles, F.; Day, F. V.; Morris, S. M.; Ko, D.-H.; Gardiner, D. J.; Qasim, M. M.; Nosheen, S.; Hands, P. J. W.; Choi, S. S.; Friend, R. H.; Coles, H. J.

    2012-07-01

    A promising approach to the fabrication of materials with nanoscale features is the transfer of liquid-crystalline structure to polymers. However, this has not been achieved in systems with full three-dimensional periodicity. Here we demonstrate the fabrication of self-assembled three-dimensional nanostructures by polymer templating blue phase I, a chiral liquid crystal with cubic symmetry. Blue phase I was photopolymerized and the remaining liquid crystal removed to create a porous free-standing cast, which retains the chiral three-dimensional structure of the blue phase, yet contains no chiral additive molecules. The cast may in turn be used as a hard template for the fabrication of new materials. By refilling the cast with an achiral nematic liquid crystal, we created templated blue phases that have unprecedented thermal stability in the range -125 to 125 °C, and that act as both mirrorless lasers and switchable electro-optic devices. Blue-phase templated materials will facilitate advances in device architectures for photonics applications in particular.

  17. Manipulating mammalian cell by phase transformed titanium surface fabricated through ultra-short pulsed laser synthesis.

    PubMed

    Chinnakkannu Vijayakumar, Sivaprasad; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2016-01-15

    Developing cell sensitive indicators on interacting substrates that allows specific cell manipulation by a combination of physical, chemical or mechanical cues is a challenge for current biomaterials. Hence, various fabrication approaches have been created on a variety of substrates to mimic or create cell specific cues. However, to achieve cell specific cues a multistep process or a post-chemical treatment is often necessitated. So, a simple approach without any chemical or biological treatment would go a long way in developing bio-functionalized substrates to effectively modulate cell adhesion and interaction. The present investigation is aimed to study the manipulative activity induced by phase transformed titanium surface. An ultra-short laser is used to fabricate the phase transformed titanium surface where a polymorphic titanium oxide phases with titanium monoxide (TiO), tri-titanium oxide (Ti3O) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) have been synthesized on commercially pure titanium. Control over oxide phase transformed area was demonstrated via a combination of laser scanning time (laser pulse interaction time) and laser pulse widths (laser pulse to pulse separation time). The interaction of phase transformed titanium surface with NIH3T3 fibroblasts and MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells developed a new bio-functionalized platforms on titanium based biomaterials to modulate cell migration and adhesion. The synthesized phase transformed titanium surface on the whole appeared to induce directional cues for cell migration with unique preferential cell adhesion unseen by other fabrication approaches. The precise bio-functionalization controllability exhibited during fabrication offers perceptible edge for developing a variety of smart bio-medical devices, implants and cardiovascular stents where the need in supressing specific cell adhesion and proliferation is of great demand.

  18. Manipulating mammalian cell by phase transformed titanium surface fabricated through ultra-short pulsed laser synthesis.

    PubMed

    Chinnakkannu Vijayakumar, Sivaprasad; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2016-01-15

    Developing cell sensitive indicators on interacting substrates that allows specific cell manipulation by a combination of physical, chemical or mechanical cues is a challenge for current biomaterials. Hence, various fabrication approaches have been created on a variety of substrates to mimic or create cell specific cues. However, to achieve cell specific cues a multistep process or a post-chemical treatment is often necessitated. So, a simple approach without any chemical or biological treatment would go a long way in developing bio-functionalized substrates to effectively modulate cell adhesion and interaction. The present investigation is aimed to study the manipulative activity induced by phase transformed titanium surface. An ultra-short laser is used to fabricate the phase transformed titanium surface where a polymorphic titanium oxide phases with titanium monoxide (TiO), tri-titanium oxide (Ti3O) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) have been synthesized on commercially pure titanium. Control over oxide phase transformed area was demonstrated via a combination of laser scanning time (laser pulse interaction time) and laser pulse widths (laser pulse to pulse separation time). The interaction of phase transformed titanium surface with NIH3T3 fibroblasts and MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells developed a new bio-functionalized platforms on titanium based biomaterials to modulate cell migration and adhesion. The synthesized phase transformed titanium surface on the whole appeared to induce directional cues for cell migration with unique preferential cell adhesion unseen by other fabrication approaches. The precise bio-functionalization controllability exhibited during fabrication offers perceptible edge for developing a variety of smart bio-medical devices, implants and cardiovascular stents where the need in supressing specific cell adhesion and proliferation is of great demand. PMID:26546983

  19. Fabrication of stainless steel mesh gas diffusion electrode for power generation in microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    You, Shi-Jie; Wang, Xiu-Heng; Zhang, Jin-Na; Wang, Jing-Yuan; Ren, Nan-Qi; Gong, Xiao-Bo

    2011-01-15

    This study reports the fabrication of a new membrane electrode assembly by using stainless steel mesh (SSM) as raw material and its effectiveness as gas diffusion electrode (GDE) for electrochemical oxygen reduction in microbial fuel cell (MFC). Based on feeding glucose (0.5 g L(-1)) substrate to a single-chambered MFC, power generation using SSM-based GDE was increased with the decrease of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) content applied during fabrication, reaching the optimum power density of 951.6 mW m(-2) at 20% PTFE. Repeatable cell voltage of 0.51 V (external resistance of 400 Ω) and maximum power density of 951.6 mW m(-2) produced for the MFC with SSM-based GDE are comparable to that of 0.52 V and 972.6 mW m(-2), respectively obtained for the MFC containing typical carbon cloth (CC)-made GDE. Besides, Coulombic efficiency (CE) is found higher for GDE (SSM or CC) with membrane assembly than without, which results preliminarily from the mitigation of Coulombic loss being associated with oxygen diffusion and substrate crossover. This study demonstrates that with its good electrical conductivity and much lower cost, the SSM-made GDE suggests a promising alternative as efficient and more economically viable material to conventional typical carbon for power production from biomass in MFC.

  20. Cast and 3D printed ion exchange membranes for monolithic microbial fuel cell fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philamore, Hemma; Rossiter, Jonathan; Walters, Peter; Winfield, Jonathan; Ieropoulos, Ioannis

    2015-09-01

    We present novel solutions to a key challenge in microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology; greater power density through increased relative surface area of the ion exchange membrane that separates the anode and cathode electrodes. The first use of a 3D printed polymer and a cast latex membrane are compared to a conventionally used cation exchange membrane. These new techniques significantly expand the geometric versatility available to ion exchange membranes in MFCs, which may be instrumental in answering challenges in the design of MFCs including miniaturisation, cost and ease of fabrication. Under electrical load conditions selected for optimal power transfer, peak power production (mean 10 batch feeds) was 11.39 μW (CEM), 10.51 μW (latex) and 0.92 μW (Tangoplus). Change in conductivity and pH of anolyte were correlated with MFC power production. Digital and environmental scanning electron microscopy show structural changes to and biological precipitation on membrane materials following long term use in an MFC. The cost of the novel membranes was lower than the conventional CEM. The efficacy of two novel membranes for ion exchange indicates that further characterisation of these materials and their fabrication techniques, shows great potential to significantly increase the range and type of MFCs that can be produced.

  1. Water transport in two-phase fuel cell microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eon Soo

    Many fuel cells contain small rectangular channels in which three of the channel walls are smooth, impermeable metal and the fourth wall is a porous gas-diffusion layer. The main function of the channels is to supply reactant gases through the porous layer to the reaction surface, but also to remove water formed by the electro-chemical reactions. Analysis of the two-phase flow through these channels is complicated by the fact that both gas and liquid can move through either the channel or the porous layer. This study presents the flow regime maps for the two-phase flow and a 1-D two-phase flow model for the frictional characteristics of the porous wall bounded channel flow. Experiments were performed on a straight 200 by 500 micron by 150 mm long rectangular channel. Three walls of the channel were machined into a solid piece of acrylic. One of the 500 micron wide walls was a commercial Toray carbon paper gas-diffusion layer (GDL) material held in place by a flat sheet of acrylic. Water was forced through the GDL layer from four evenly spaced holes in the flat acrylic piece. Two-phase flow regime maps were constructed from flow visualization in terms of a superficial gas velocity, JG and the superficial liquid velocity, JL at the channel exit between 0 < JG < 20 m/s and 0 < JL < 10 mm/s. Flow regimes were observed to change from plug flow to stratified flow through an intermediate flow regime as superficial gas velocities increased. The transition from plug flow generally occurs at a constant superficial gas velocity and a two-phase Weber number is proposed as an appropriate dimensionless parameter to characterize this transition. A one-dimensional, two-phase flow model was developed which included the effect of air and water flows in both the channel and GDL. The analysis from experimental measurements showed that the product of the friction factor and the gas flow Reynolds number was very nearly a constant, indicating that the model captures the critical physical

  2. Design, fabrication and performance analysis of a 200 W PEM fuel cell short stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Fang-Bor; Jou, Bo-Shian; Su, Ay; Chan, Shih Hung; Chi, Pei-Hung

    A PEM fuel cell short stack of 200 W capacity, with an active area of 100 cm 2 has been designed and fabricated in-house. The status of unit cell performance was 0.55 W cm -2. Based on the unit cell technology, a short stack has been developed. The proper design of uniform flow distribution, cooling plate and compressed end plate were important to achieve the best performance of the short stack. The performance of four cells stack was analyzed in static and dynamic modes. In the static mode of polarization curve, the stack has peak power density of 0.55 W cm -2 (220 W) at 0.5 V per cell, when the voltage was scanning from low to high voltage (1.5-3.5 V), and resulted in minimum water flooding inside the stack. In this study a series of dynamic loadings were tested to simulate the vehicle acceleration. The fuel cell performances respond to dynamic loading influenced by the hydrogen/air stoichiometric, back pressure, and dynamic-loading time. It was needed high hydrogen stoichiometric and back pressure to maintain high dynamic performance. In the long-time stable power testing, the stack was difficult to maintain at high performance, due to the water flooding at high output power. An adjusting cathode back-pressure method for purging water was proposed to prevent the water flooding at flow channels and maintain the stable output power at 170 W (0.42 W cm -2).

  3. Options for converting excess plutonium to feed for the MOX fuel fabrication facility

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, Joe A; Smith, Paul H; Psaras, John D; Jarvinen, Gordon D; Costa, David A; Joyce, Jr., Edward L

    2009-01-01

    The storage and safekeeping of excess plutonium in the United States represents a multibillion-dollar lifecycle cost to the taxpayers and poses challenges to National Security and Nuclear Non-Proliferation. Los Alamos National Laboratory is considering options for converting some portion of the 13 metric tons of excess plutonium that was previously destined for long-term waste disposition into feed for the MOX Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). This approach could reduce storage costs and security ri sks, and produce fuel for nuclear energy at the same time. Over the course of 30 years of weapons related plutonium production, Los Alamos has developed a number of flow sheets aimed at separation and purification of plutonium. Flow sheets for converting metal to oxide and for removing chloride and fluoride from plutonium residues have been developed and withstood the test oftime. This presentation will address some potential options for utilizing processes and infrastructure developed by Defense Programs to transform a large variety of highly impure plutonium into feedstock for the MFFF.

  4. Infrared Frequency Selective Surfaces Fabricated using Optical Lithography and Phase-Shift Masks

    SciTech Connect

    S.J. Spector; D.K. Astolfi; S.P. Doran; T.M. Lyszczarz; J.E. Raynolds

    2001-06-15

    A frequency selective surface (FSS) structure has been fabricated for use in a thermophotovoltaic system. The FSS provides a means for reflecting the unusable light below the bandgap of the thermophotovoltaic cell while transmitting the usable light above the bandgap. This behavior is relatively independent of the light's incident angle. The fabrication of the FSS was done using optical lithography and a phase-shift mask. The FSS cell consisted of circular slits spaced by 1100 nm. The diameters and widths of the circular slits were 870 nm and 120 nm, respectively. The FSS was predicted to pass wavelengths near 7 {micro}m and reflect wavelengths outside of this pass-band. The FSSs fabricated performed as expected with a pass-band centered near 5 {micro}m.

  5. Vapor-phase proton-exchange in lithium tantalate for high-quality waveguides fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramponi, Roberta; Osellame, Roberto; Marangoni, Marco; Russo, Vera

    2001-05-01

    Vapor-phase proton-exchange has been applied to lithium tantalate for the first time, as a waveguide fabrication technique. This technique provides alpha-phase waveguides without the need for annealing. A sealed ampoule set-up has been used employing pure benzoic acid as the vapor source. Various waveguides have been realized and optically characterized by means of standard m-lines spectroscopy. The profile shape is a step plus an exponential tail toward the substrate, as that found for vapor-phase proton-exchange waveguides in lithium niobate. The total depth of the refractive index profile increases with the exchange time, following a linear diffusion model. The ordinary index change has been determined by an interferometric method, giving values that confirmed the alpha-crystallographic phase of the fabricated waveguides. The propagation losses have been measured with a new method using an isosceles coupling prism and an out-coupling objective. The values found for the different modes of the various waveguides ranged from 0.5 to 0.8 dB/cm. An aging phenomenon in the fabricate waveguides has been observed during the first month after the exchange process. The extraordinary index change decreased of 5 percent, while the optical depth increased of 2 percent. Application of this technology to periodically poled substrates for QPM devices seems feasible.

  6. 77 FR 70193 - Shaw Areva MOX Services (Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility); Notice of Atomic Safety and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-23

    ... COMMISSION Shaw Areva MOX Services (Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility); Notice of Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Reconstitution Pursuant to 10 CFR 2.313(c) and 2.321(b), the Atomic Safety and Licensing... Administrative Judge, Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel. BILLING CODE 7590-01-P...

  7. Plan offered to revive nukes. [US DOE would fabricate fuel from weapons for WNP-1 and 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-20

    This article discusses a new plan that would allow work to resume on two uncompleted nuclear power units in Washington state at a cost of $3.3 billion under an agreement with the federal government. If approved, the Department of Energy would fabricate plutonium from US and former Soviet Union weapons into fuel.

  8. 10 CFR 140.13a - Amount of financial protection required for plutonium processing and fuel fabrication plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Amount of financial protection required for plutonium... of financial protection required for plutonium processing and fuel fabrication plants. (a) Each holder of a license issued pursuant to part 70 of this chapter to possess and use plutonium at...

  9. 10 CFR 140.13a - Amount of financial protection required for plutonium processing and fuel fabrication plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Amount of financial protection required for plutonium... of financial protection required for plutonium processing and fuel fabrication plants. (a) Each holder of a license issued pursuant to part 70 of this chapter to possess and use plutonium at...

  10. 10 CFR 140.13a - Amount of financial protection required for plutonium processing and fuel fabrication plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Amount of financial protection required for plutonium... of financial protection required for plutonium processing and fuel fabrication plants. (a) Each holder of a license issued pursuant to part 70 of this chapter to possess and use plutonium at...

  11. 10 CFR 140.13a - Amount of financial protection required for plutonium processing and fuel fabrication plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Amount of financial protection required for plutonium... of financial protection required for plutonium processing and fuel fabrication plants. (a) Each holder of a license issued pursuant to part 70 of this chapter to possess and use plutonium at...

  12. 10 CFR 140.13a - Amount of financial protection required for plutonium processing and fuel fabrication plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Amount of financial protection required for plutonium... of financial protection required for plutonium processing and fuel fabrication plants. (a) Each holder of a license issued pursuant to part 70 of this chapter to possess and use plutonium at...

  13. 10 CFR Appendix O to Part 110 - Illustrative List of Fuel Element Fabrication Plant Equipment and Components Under NRC's Export...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Illustrative List of Fuel Element Fabrication Plant Equipment and Components Under NRC's Export Licensing Authority O Appendix O to Part 110 Energy NUCLEAR... and equipment to extremely high standards is necessary in order to ensure predictable and safe...

  14. 10 CFR Appendix O to Part 110 - Illustrative List of Fuel Element Fabrication Plant Equipment and Components Under NRC's Export...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Illustrative List of Fuel Element Fabrication Plant Equipment and Components Under NRC's Export Licensing Authority O Appendix O to Part 110 Energy NUCLEAR... and equipment to extremely high standards is necessary in order to ensure predictable and safe...

  15. 10 CFR Appendix O to Part 110 - Illustrative List of Fuel Element Fabrication Plant Equipment and Components Under NRC's Export...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Illustrative List of Fuel Element Fabrication Plant Equipment and Components Under NRC's Export Licensing Authority O Appendix O to Part 110 Energy NUCLEAR... and equipment to extremely high standards is necessary in order to ensure predictable and safe...

  16. 10 CFR Appendix O to Part 110 - Illustrative List of Fuel Element Fabrication Plant Equipment and Components Under NRC's Export...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Illustrative List of Fuel Element Fabrication Plant Equipment and Components Under NRC's Export Licensing Authority O Appendix O to Part 110 Energy NUCLEAR... and equipment to extremely high standards is necessary in order to ensure predictable and safe...

  17. Development of advanced fuel cell system, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handley, L. M.; Meyer, A. P.; Bell, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    A multiple task research and development program was performed to improve the weight, life, and performance characteristics of hydrogen-oxygen alkaline fuel cells for advanced power systems. Gradual wetting of the anode structure and subsequent long-term performance loss was determined to be caused by deposition of a silicon-containing material on the anode. This deposit was attributed to degradation of the asbestos matrix, and attention was therefore placed on development of a substitute matrix of potassium titanate. An 80 percent gold 20 percent platinum catalyst cathode was developed which has the same performance and stability as the standard 90 percent gold - 10 percent platinum cathode but at half the loading. A hybrid polysulfone/epoxy-glass fiber frame was developed which combines the resistance to the cell environment of pure polysulfone with the fabricating ease of epoxy-glass fiber laminate. These cell components were evaluated in various configurations of full-size cells. The ways in which the baseline engineering model system would be modified to accommodate the requirements of the space tug application are identified.

  18. Fabrication of Dual Phase Magnesia-Zirconia Ceramics Doped with Plutonia and Erbia

    SciTech Connect

    Paul A. Lessing; Timothy A. Hyde

    2006-06-01

    Dual phase magnesia-zirconia ceramics doped with plutonia and erbia are being evaluated as an inert matrix fuel (IMF) for light water reactors (LWR). The motivation for this work is to develop an IMF with a thermal conductivity superior to that of the fuels based on single-phase yttria stabilized zirconia. The innovative fuel developed at INL is comprised of two major phases: pure MgO and quaternary solid solution consisting of MgO, ZrO{sub 2}, Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} and PuO{sub 2}. Pure MgO phase acts as an efficient heat conductor. It has been shown [1] that dual phase MgO-ZrO{sub 2} ceramics have the thermal conductivity superior to that of UO{sub 2} and have notable chemical resistance to water at the temperature of 573 K and pressure 8.6 MPa, which makes them attractive for use as an IMF matrix in LWRs.

  19. Fabrication of dual phase magnesia-zirconia ceramics doped with plutonia and erbia

    SciTech Connect

    P. G. Medvedev; J. F. Jue; S. M. Frank

    2006-06-01

    Dual phase magnesia-zirconia ceramics doped with plutonia and erbia are being evaluated as an inert matrix fuel (IMF) for light water reactors (LWR). The motivation for this work is to develop an IMF with a thermal conductivity superior to that of the fuels based on single-phase yttria stabilized zirconia. The innovative fuel developed at INL is comprised of two major phases: pure MgO and quaternary solid solution consisting of MgO, ZrO{sub 2}, Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} and PuO{sub 2}. Pure MgO phase acts as an efficient heat conductor. It has been shown [1] that dual phase MgO-ZrO{sub 2} ceramics have the thermal conductivity superior to that of UO{sub 2} and have notable chemical resistance to water at the temperature of 573 K and pressure 8.6 MPa, which makes them attractive for use as an IMF matrix in LWRs.

  20. Development of Advanced Fuel Cell System (Phase 4)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, A. P.; Bell, W. F.

    1976-01-01

    A multiple-task research and development program was performed to improve the weight, life, and performance characteristics of hydrogen-oxygen alkaline fuel cells for advanced power systems. During Phase 4, the lowest stabilized degradation rate observed in all the testing completed during four phases of the program, 1 microvolt/hour, was demonstrated. This test continues after 5,000 hours of operation. The cell incorporates a PPf anode, a 90Au/10Pt cathode, a hybrid frame, and a Fybex matrix. These elements were developed under this program to extend cell life. The result demonstrated that the 80Au/20Pt cathode is as stable as a 90Au/10Pt cathode of twice the precious metal loading, was confirmed in full-scale cells. A hybrid frame two-cell plaque with dedicated flow fields and manifolds for all fluids was demonstrated to prevent the cell-to cell electrolyte transfer that limited the endurance of multicell plaques. At the conclusion of Phase 4, more than 90,900 hours of testing had been completed and twelve different cell designs had been evaluated. A technology base has been established which is ready for evaluation at the powerplant level.

  1. Cellulosic fabrics printing with multifunctional encapsulated phthalocyanine pigment blue using phase separation method.

    PubMed

    Haroun, Ahmed A; Diab, H A; Hakeim, O A

    2016-08-01

    Aqueous dispersions of citric-acrylate (CAC) oligomer encapsulating C.I. Pigment Blue 15:3 (PB15:3) in the presence of glutaraldhyde were formulated using the phase separation method. FT-IR spectroscopy and centrifuge sedimentation are performed to confirm the encapsulation of pigment into CAC oligomer. The prepared capsules were characterized using thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The results revealed that the encapsulated pigment had a profound multifunctional impact and minimized the driving force of pigment printing on the cellulosic fabrics. Besides, the encapsulated pigment accelerated the pigment fixation on cellulosic fabrics without drying in one step and reduced the required amount of the binder, compared with the control sample. Furthermore, the printed fabrics exhibited good antibacterial performance against both Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). The presence of the crosslinker could be stabilized the encapsulated pigment on the cellulosic fabrics. Moreover, the light and washing fastness for the printed fabrics using encapsulated pigment are higher than that in case of using control samples.

  2. Atomic layer deposition on phase-shift lithography generated photoresist patterns for 1D nanochannel fabrication.

    PubMed

    Güder, Firat; Yang, Yang; Krüger, Michael; Stevens, Gregory B; Zacharias, Margit

    2010-12-01

    A versatile, low-cost, and flexible approach is presented for the fabrication of millimeter-long, sub-100 nm wide 1D nanochannels with tunable wall properties (wall thickness and material) over wafer-scale areas on glass, alumina, and silicon surfaces. This approach includes three fabrication steps. First, sub-100 nm photoresist line patterns were generated by near-field contact phase-shift lithography (NFC-PSL) using an inexpensive homemade borosilicate mask (NFC-PSM). Second, various metal oxides were directly coated on the resist patterns with low-temperature atomic layer deposition (ALD). Finally, the remaining photoresist was removed via an acetone dip, and then planar nanochannel arrays were formed on the substrate. In contrast to all the previous fabrication routes, the sub-100 nm photoresist line patterns produced by NFC-PSL are directly employed as a sacrificial layer for the creation of nanochannels. Because both the NFC-PSL and the ALD deposition are highly reproducible processes, the strategy proposed here can be regarded as a general route for nanochannel fabrication in a simplified and reliable manner. In addition, the fabricated nanochannels were used as templates to synthesize various organic and inorganic 1D nanostructures on the substrate surface. PMID:21047101

  3. Atomic layer deposition on phase-shift lithography generated photoresist patterns for 1D nanochannel fabrication.

    PubMed

    Güder, Firat; Yang, Yang; Krüger, Michael; Stevens, Gregory B; Zacharias, Margit

    2010-12-01

    A versatile, low-cost, and flexible approach is presented for the fabrication of millimeter-long, sub-100 nm wide 1D nanochannels with tunable wall properties (wall thickness and material) over wafer-scale areas on glass, alumina, and silicon surfaces. This approach includes three fabrication steps. First, sub-100 nm photoresist line patterns were generated by near-field contact phase-shift lithography (NFC-PSL) using an inexpensive homemade borosilicate mask (NFC-PSM). Second, various metal oxides were directly coated on the resist patterns with low-temperature atomic layer deposition (ALD). Finally, the remaining photoresist was removed via an acetone dip, and then planar nanochannel arrays were formed on the substrate. In contrast to all the previous fabrication routes, the sub-100 nm photoresist line patterns produced by NFC-PSL are directly employed as a sacrificial layer for the creation of nanochannels. Because both the NFC-PSL and the ALD deposition are highly reproducible processes, the strategy proposed here can be regarded as a general route for nanochannel fabrication in a simplified and reliable manner. In addition, the fabricated nanochannels were used as templates to synthesize various organic and inorganic 1D nanostructures on the substrate surface.

  4. Cellulosic fabrics printing with multifunctional encapsulated phthalocyanine pigment blue using phase separation method.

    PubMed

    Haroun, Ahmed A; Diab, H A; Hakeim, O A

    2016-08-01

    Aqueous dispersions of citric-acrylate (CAC) oligomer encapsulating C.I. Pigment Blue 15:3 (PB15:3) in the presence of glutaraldhyde were formulated using the phase separation method. FT-IR spectroscopy and centrifuge sedimentation are performed to confirm the encapsulation of pigment into CAC oligomer. The prepared capsules were characterized using thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The results revealed that the encapsulated pigment had a profound multifunctional impact and minimized the driving force of pigment printing on the cellulosic fabrics. Besides, the encapsulated pigment accelerated the pigment fixation on cellulosic fabrics without drying in one step and reduced the required amount of the binder, compared with the control sample. Furthermore, the printed fabrics exhibited good antibacterial performance against both Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). The presence of the crosslinker could be stabilized the encapsulated pigment on the cellulosic fabrics. Moreover, the light and washing fastness for the printed fabrics using encapsulated pigment are higher than that in case of using control samples. PMID:27112855

  5. Fabrication of low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells with a nanothin protective layer by atomic layer deposition

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Anode aluminum oxide-supported thin-film fuel cells having a sub-500-nm-thick bilayered electrolyte comprising a gadolinium-doped ceria (GDC) layer and an yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) layer were fabricated and electrochemically characterized in order to investigate the effect of the YSZ protective layer. The highly dense and thin YSZ layer acted as a blockage against electron and oxygen permeation between the anode and GDC electrolyte. Dense GDC and YSZ thin films were fabricated using radio frequency sputtering and atomic layer deposition techniques, respectively. The resulting bilayered thin-film fuel cell generated a significantly higher open circuit voltage of approximately 1.07 V compared with a thin-film fuel cell with a single-layered GDC electrolyte (approximately 0.3 V). PMID:23342963

  6. Effect of PEG additive on anode microstructure and cell performance of anode-supported MT-SOFCs fabricated by phase inversion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Cong; Liu, Tong; Maturavongsadit, Panita; Luckanagul, Jittima Amie; Chen, Fanglin

    2015-04-01

    Anode-supported micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cells (MT-SOFCs) have been fabricated by phase inversion method. For the anode support preparation, N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP), polyethersulfone (PESf) and poly ethylene glycol (PEG) were applied as solvent, polymer binder and additive, respectively. The effect of molecular weight and amount of PEG additive on the thermodynamics of the casting solutions was characterized by measuring the coagulation value. Viscosity of the casting slurries was also measured and the influence of PEG additive on viscosity was studied and discussed. The presence of PEG in the casting slurry can significantly influence the final anode support microstructure. Based on the microstructure result and the measured gas permeation value, two anode supports were selected for cell fabrication. For cell with the anode support fabricated using slurry with PEG additive, a maximum cell power density of 704 mW cm-2 is obtained at 750 °C with humidified hydrogen as fuel and ambient air as oxidant; cell fabricated without any PEG additive shows the peak cell power density of 331 mW cm-2. The relationship between anode microstructure and cell performance was discussed.

  7. Fossil fuel derivatives with reduced carbon. Phase I final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kennel, E.B.; Zondlo, J.W.; Cessna, T.J.

    1999-06-30

    This project involves the simultaneous production of clean fossil fuel derivatives with reduced carbon and sulfur, along with value-added carbon nanofibers. This can be accomplished because the nanofiber production process removes carbon via a catalyzed pyrolysis reaction, which also has the effect of removing 99.9% of the sulfur, which is trapped in the nanofibers. The reaction is mildly endothermic, meaning that net energy production with real reductions in greenhouse emissions are possible. In Phase I research, the feasibility of generating clean fossil fuel derivatives with reduced carbon was demonstrated by the successful design, construction and operation of a facility capable of utilizing coal as well as natural gas as an inlet feedstock. In the case of coal, for example, reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions can be as much as 70% (normalized according to kilowatts produced), with the majority of carbon safely sequestered in the form of carbon nanofibers or coke. Both of these products are value-added commodities, indicating that low-emission coal fuel can be done at a profit rather than a loss as is the case with most clean-up schemes. The main results of this project were as follows: (1) It was shown that the nanofiber production process produces hydrogen as a byproduct. (2) The hydrogen, or hydrogen-rich hydrocarbon mixture can be consumed with net release of enthalpy. (3) The greenhouse gas emissions from both coal and natural gas are significantly reduced. Because coal consumption also creates coke, the carbon emission can be reduced by 75% per kilowatt-hour of power produced.

  8. Phase Change Nanodot Arrays Fabricated Using a Self-Assembly Diblock Copolymer Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang,Y.; Wong, H.; Raoux, S.; Cha, J.; Rettner, C.; Krupp, L.; Topuria, T.; Milliron, D.; Rice, P.; Jordan-Sweet, J.

    2007-01-01

    Self-assembling diblock copolymer, polystyrene-b-poly-4-vinylpyridine (PS-b-P4VP), was used as the template for fabricating phase change nanostructures. The high density GeSb nanodots were formed by etching into an amorphous GeSb thin film using silica hard mask which was patterned on top of polymer. The nanodot arrays are 15 nm in diameter with 30 nm spacing. This is smaller than most structures obtained by e-beam lithography. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction studies showed that the phase transition occurred at 235 {sup o}C, which is 5 {sup o}C lower than blanket GeSb film but higher than that of Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} (150 {sup o}C). GeSb showed good temperature stability for fabrication of small memory devices.

  9. Tunable tissue scaffolds fabricated by in situ crosslink in phase separation system

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xifeng; Chen, Wenjian; Gustafson, Carl T.; Miller, A. Lee; Waletzki, Brian E.; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Lu, Lichun

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) scaffolds with intrinsic porous structures are desirable in various tissue regeneration applications. In this study, a unique method that combines thermally induced phase separation with a photocrosslinking process was developed for the fabrication of 3-D crosslinked polymer scaffolds with densely interconnected porous structures. Biodegradable poly(propylene fumarate)-co-poly(L-lactic acid) with crosslinkable fumarate bonds were used as the structural polymer material and a dioxane/water binary system was applied for the phase separation. By altering the polymer composition (9, 5 and 3 wt%), different types of scaffolds with distinct morphology, mechanical strength, degradation rate, cell growth and morphology, and extracellular matrix production were fabricated. These crosslinked 3-D porous scaffolds with tunable strength and biological responses show promise for potential applications in regenerative therapies, including bone and neural tissue engineering. PMID:26989479

  10. Uranium silicide pellet fabrication by powder metallurgy for accident tolerant fuel evaluation and irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harp, Jason M.; Lessing, Paul A.; Hoggan, Rita E.

    2015-11-01

    In collaboration with industry, Idaho National Laboratory is investigating uranium silicide for use in future light water reactor fuels as a more accident resistant alternative to uranium oxide base fuels. Specifically this project was focused on producing uranium silicide (U3Si2) pellets by conventional powder metallurgy with a density greater than 94% of the theoretical density. This work has produced a process to consistently produce pellets with the desired density through careful optimization of the process. Milling of the U3Si2 has been optimized and high phase purity U3Si2 has been successfully produced. Results are presented from sintering studies and microstructural examinations that illustrate the need for a finely ground reproducible particle size distribution in the source powder. The optimized process was used to produce pellets for the Accident Tolerant Fuel-1 irradiation experiment. The average density of these pellets was 11.54 ± 0.06 g/cm3. Additional characterization of the pellets by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction has also been performed. Pellets produced in this work have been encapsulated for irradiation, and irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor is expected soon.

  11. Uranium silicide pellet fabrication by powder metallurgy for accident tolerant fuel evaluation and irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Harp, Jason Michael; Lessing, Paul Alan; Hoggan, Rita Elaine

    2015-06-21

    In collaboration with industry, Idaho National Laboratory is investigating uranium silicide for use in future light water reactor fuels as a more accident resistant alternative to uranium oxide base fuels. Specifically this project was focused on producing uranium silicide (U3Si2) pellets by conventional powder metallurgy with a density greater than 94% of the theoretical density. This work has produced a process to consistently produce pellets with the desired density through careful optimization of the process. Milling of the U3Si2 has been optimized and high phase purity U3Si2 has been successfully produced. Results are presented from sintering studies and microstructural examinations that illustrate the need for a finely ground reproducible particle size distribution in the source powder. The optimized process was used to produce pellets for the Accident Tolerant Fuel-1 irradiation experiment. The average density of these pellets was 11.54 ±0.06 g/cm3. Additional characterization of the pellets by scaning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction has also been performed. As a result, pellets produced in this work have been encapsulated for irradiation, and irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor is expected soon.

  12. Uranium silicide pellet fabrication by powder metallurgy for accident tolerant fuel evaluation and irradiation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Harp, Jason Michael; Lessing, Paul Alan; Hoggan, Rita Elaine

    2015-06-21

    In collaboration with industry, Idaho National Laboratory is investigating uranium silicide for use in future light water reactor fuels as a more accident resistant alternative to uranium oxide base fuels. Specifically this project was focused on producing uranium silicide (U3Si2) pellets by conventional powder metallurgy with a density greater than 94% of the theoretical density. This work has produced a process to consistently produce pellets with the desired density through careful optimization of the process. Milling of the U3Si2 has been optimized and high phase purity U3Si2 has been successfully produced. Results are presented from sintering studies and microstructural examinationsmore » that illustrate the need for a finely ground reproducible particle size distribution in the source powder. The optimized process was used to produce pellets for the Accident Tolerant Fuel-1 irradiation experiment. The average density of these pellets was 11.54 ±0.06 g/cm3. Additional characterization of the pellets by scaning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction has also been performed. As a result, pellets produced in this work have been encapsulated for irradiation, and irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor is expected soon.« less

  13. Phase-shifted distributed feedback laser with linearly chirped grating fabricated by reconstruction equivalent chirp technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lianyan; Lu, Linlin; Li, Simin; Guo, Renjia; Shi, Yuechun; Chen, Xiangfei

    2014-09-01

    The phase-shifted distributed feedback (DFB) semiconductor laser with linearly chirped grating based on reconstruction equivalent chirp (REC) technique is theoretically analyzed and experimentally demonstrated for the first time. The asymmetric property of the lasing spectrum is analyzed according to the normalized threshold gain, and the different spectra from each facet of the laser are compared. Due to the low cost and fabrication flexibility, REC technique provides a promising way for the future practical applications of DFB lasers with chirped gratings.

  14. Design and fabrication of a high temperature leading edge heating array, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Progress during a Phase 1 program to design a high temperature heating array is reported for environmentally testing full-scale shuttle leading edges (30 inch span, 6 to 15 inch radius) at flight heating rates and pressures. Heat transfer analyses of the heating array, individual modules, and the shuttle leading edge were performed, which influenced the array design, and the design, fabrication, and testing of a prototype heater module.

  15. Gas phase carbonyl compounds in ship emissions: Differences between diesel fuel and heavy fuel oil operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reda, Ahmed A.; Schnelle-Kreis, J.; Orasche, J.; Abbaszade, G.; Lintelmann, J.; Arteaga-Salas, J. M.; Stengel, B.; Rabe, R.; Harndorf, H.; Sippula, O.; Streibel, T.; Zimmermann, R.

    2014-09-01

    Gas phase emission samples of carbonyl compounds (CCs) were collected from a research ship diesel engine at Rostock University, Germany. The ship engine was operated using two different types of fuels, heavy fuel oil (HFO) and diesel fuel (DF). Sampling of CCs was performed from diluted exhaust using cartridges and impingers. Both sampling methods involved the derivatization of CCs with 2,4-Dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH). The CCs-hydrazone derivatives were analyzed by two analytical techniques: High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Diode Array Detector (HPLC-DAD) and Gas Chromatography-Selective Ion Monitoring-Mass Spectrometry (GC-SIM-MS). Analysis of DNPH cartridges by GC-SIM-MS method has resulted in the identification of 19 CCs in both fuel operations. These CCs include ten aliphatic aldehydes (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, propanal, isobutanal, butanal, isopentanal, pentanal, hexanal, octanal, nonanal), three unsaturated aldehydes (acrolein, methacrolein, crotonaldehyde), three aromatic aldehyde (benzaldehyde, p-tolualdehyde, m,o-molualdehyde), two ketones (acetone, butanone) and one heterocyclic aldehyde (furfural). In general, all CCs under investigation were detected with higher emission factors in HFO than DF. The total carbonyl emission factor was determined and found to be 6050 and 2300 μg MJ-1 for the operation with HFO and DF respectively. Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were found to be the dominant carbonyls in the gas phase of ship engine emission. Formaldehyde emissions factor varied from 3500 μg MJ-1 in HFO operation to 1540 μg MJ-1 in DF operation, which is 4-30 times higher than those of other carbonyls. Emission profile contribution of CCs showed also a different pattern between HFO and DF operation. The contribution of formaldehyde was found to be 58% of the emission profile of HFO and about 67% of the emission profile of DF. Acetaldehyde showed opposite behavior with higher contribution of 16% in HFO compared to 11% for DF. Heavier carbonyls

  16. Fabrication of 200 nm Period Hard X-ray Phase Gratings

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Far field X-ray grating interferometry achieves extraordinary phase sensitivity in imaging weakly absorbing samples, provided that the grating period is within the transverse coherence length of the X-ray source. Here we describe a cost-efficient process to fabricate large area, 100 nm half-pitch hard X-ray phase gratings with an aspect ratio of 32. The nanometric gratings are suitable for ordinary compact X-ray sources having low spatial coherence, as demonstrated by X-ray diffraction experiments. PMID:24845537

  17. Fabrication of submicron metallic grids with interference and phase-mask holography

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Joong-Mok; Kim, Tae-Geun; Constant, Kristen; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2011-01-25

    Complex, submicron Cu metallic mesh nanostructures are made by electrochemical deposition using polymer templates made from photoresist. The polymer templates are fabricated with photoresist using two-beam interference holography and phase mask holography with three diffracted beams. Freestanding metallic mesh structures are made in two separate electrodepositions with perpendicular photoresist grating templates. Cu mesh square nanostructures having large (52.6%) open areas are also made by single electrodeposition with a photoresist template made with a phase mask. These structures have potential as electrodes in photonic devices.

  18. Magnesium-solution phase catholyte semi-fuel cell for undersea vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medeiros, Maria G.; Bessette, Russell R.; Deschenes, Craig M.; Patrissi, Charles J.; Carreiro, Louis G.; Tucker, Steven P.; Atwater, Delmas W.

    A magnesium-solution phase catholyte semi-fuel cell (SFC) is under development at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center (NUWC) as an energetic electrochemical system for low rate, long endurance undersea vehicle applications. This electrochemical system consists of a magnesium anode, a sodium chloride anolyte, a conductive membrane, a catalyzed carbon current collector, and a catholyte of sodium chloride, sulfuric acid and hydrogen peroxide. Bipolar electrode fabrication to minimize cell stack volume, long duration testing, and scale-up of electrodes from 77 to 1000 cm 2 have been the objectives of this project. Single cell and multi-cell testing at the 77 cm 2 configuration have been utilized to optimize all testing parameters including start-up conditions, flow rates, temperatures, and electrolyte concentrations while maintaining high voltages and efficiencies. The fabrication and testing of bipolar electrodes and operating parameter optimization for large electrode area cells will be presented. Designs for 1000 cm 2 electrodes, electrolyte flow patterns and current/voltage distribution across these large area cells will also be discussed.

  19. Uranium-233 purification and conversion to stabilized ceramic grade urania for LWBR fuel fabrication (LWBR Development Program)

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, R.

    1980-10-01

    High purity ceramic grade urania (/sup 233/UO/sub 2/) used in manufacturing the fuel for the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core was made from uranium-233 that was obtained by irradiating thoria under special conditions to result in not more than 10 ppM of uranium-232 in the recovered uranium-233 product. A developmental study established the operating parameters of the conversion process for transforming the uranium-233 into urania powder with the appropriate chemical and physical attributes for use in fabricating the LWBR core fuel. This developmental study included the following: (a) design of an ion exchange purification process for removing the gamma-emitting alpha-decay daughters of uranium-232, to reduce the gamma-radiation field of the uranium-233 during LWBR fuel manufacture; (b) definition of the parameters for precipitating the uranium-233 as ammonium uranate (ADU) and for reducing the ADU with hydrogen to yield a urania conversion product of the proper particle size, surface area and sinterability for use in manufacturing the LWBR fuel; (c) establishment of parameters and design of equipment for stabilizing the urania conversion product to prevent it from undergoing excessive oxidation on exposure to the air during LWBR fuel manufacturing operations; and (d) development of a procedure and a facility to reprocess the unirradiated thoria-urania fuel scrap from the LWBR core manufacturing operations to recover the uranium-233 and convert it into high purity ceramic grade urania for LWBR core fabrication.

  20. Rapid fabrication of microfluidic polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell in PDMS by surface patterning of perfluorinated ion-exchange resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yong-Ak; Batista, Candy; Sarpeshkar, Rahul; Han, Jongyoon

    In this paper we demonstrate a simple and rapid fabrication method for a microfluidic polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), which has become the de facto standard material in BioMEMS. Instead of integrating a Nafion sheet film between two layers of a PDMS device in a traditional "sandwich format," we pattern a perfluorinated ion-exchange resin such as a Nafion resin on a glass substrate using a reversibly bonded PDMS microchannel to generate an ion-selective membrane between the fuel-cell electrodes. After this patterning step, the assembly of the microfluidic fuel cell is accomplished by simple oxygen plasma bonding between the PDMS chip and the glass substrate. In an example implementation, the planar PEM microfluidic fuel cell generates an open circuit voltage of 600-800 mV and delivers a maximum current output of nearly 4 μA. To enhance the power output of the fuel cell we utilize self-assembled colloidal arrays as a support matrix for the Nafion resin. Such arrays allow us to increase the thickness of the ion-selective membrane to 20 μm and increase the current output by 166%. Our novel fabrication method enables rapid prototyping of microfluidic fuel cells to study various ion-exchange resins for the polymer electrolyte membrane. Our work will facilitate the development of miniature, implantable, on-chip power sources for biomedical applications.

  1. Fabrication of single-phase titanium carbide layers from MWCNTs using high DC pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woo Sik; Moon, Sook Young; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Bang, Sin Young; Choi, Bong Geun; Ham, Heon; Sekino, Tohru; Shim, Kwang Bo

    2010-02-01

    Single-phase layered titanium carbide (TiC) was successfully synthesized by reacting carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) under a high direct current (DC) pulse. Single-phase TiC layer fabrication is confirmed as the transformation of multi-layered graphene from MWCNTs. Therefore its thickness and width is almost identical to those of transformed graphene layers. This is the first report on the formation of single-phase layered nano-TiC. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) were used for the characteristic analysis of single-phase layered TiC structures.

  2. Fabrication of single-phase titanium carbide layers from MWCNTs using high DC pulse.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woo Sik; Moon, Sook Young; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Bang, Sin Young; Choi, Bong Geun; Ham, Heon; Sekino, Tohru; Shim, Kwang Bo

    2010-02-01

    Single-phase layered titanium carbide (TiC) was successfully synthesized by reacting carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) under a high direct current (DC) pulse. Single-phase TiC layer fabrication is confirmed as the transformation of multi-layered graphene from MWCNTs. Therefore its thickness and width is almost identical to those of transformed graphene layers. This is the first report on the formation of single-phase layered nano-TiC. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) were used for the characteristic analysis of single-phase layered TiC structures. PMID:20051612

  3. Application of high velocity oxygen fuel flame (HVOF) spraying to fabrication of La0.8Sr0.2Ga0.8Mg0.2O3 electrolyte for solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shan-Lin; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu; Yang, Guan-Jun; Liu, Meilin

    2016-01-01

    La0.8Sr0.2Ga0.8Mg0.2O3 (LSGM) is considered a promising electrolyte for intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs) due to its high ionic conductivity and stability under fuel cell operating conditions. Here we report our findings in investigating the feasibility of using a high velocity oxygen fuel flame (HVOF) spraying process for cost-effective fabrication of dense LSGM electrolyte membranes. The flame and in-flight particle behavior were simulated numerically to optimize the microstructure and phase compositions of the LSGM deposits. The measured gas leakage rate of an LSGM deposit is ∼7 × 10-7 cm4gf-1 s-1. The single cell assembled with 50-55 μm HVOF-sprayed LSGM electrolyte shows open circuit voltage (OCV) of 1.08 V at 800 °C, suggesting that the as-sprayed LSGM deposit is dense enough for direct application as SOFC electrolyte. At 800 °C, the ionic conductivity of the sprayed LSGM deposit is ∼0.04 S cm-1, indicating that the HVOF spraying is a promising process for low-temperature fabrication of dense LSGM electrolyte membranes for IT-SOFCs.

  4. Development of new fabrication methods for solid oxide fuel cell electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Suk-Won

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) have gained a great deal of attention in recent years since they have the potential to be high efficiency devices for the generation of electricity. The ability to use hydrocarbon fuels however requires the development of alternatives to conventional Ni/YSZ anodes that are prone to coking when exposed to hydrocarbons. The optimization of electrode microstructure and composition is also needed in order to maximize the electrode catalytic activity and thermal stability. In this thesis these issues were addressed through the development of new methods for anode fabrication that allowed for the incorporation of a wide range of materials and better control of electrode microstructure. The specific methods that were studied include (1) Impregnation with urea and (2) Electrochemical Deposition. First, how impregnation using Cu(NO3)2 and urea affect the microstructure of the Cu component in Cu/CeO2/YSZ (yittria-stabilized zirconia) composite anodes and how this influences anode performance were examined. This method produced a more homogeneous distribution of Cu throughout the anode than impregnation with only Cu(NO3)2. Second, Cu electrodeposition into 0.12 cm thick, highly porous Ni/YSZ cermets was investigated for the initial study to evaluate electrodeposition for the electrode fabrication method. An electrochemical cell in which the electrolyte solution was allowed to flow through the porous Ni/YSZ substrate was constructed in order to eliminate mass transfer limitations and determine conditions for which the potential drop in the electrolyte solution was minimized for the deposition of uniform Cu layer in the cermet. Finally it was demonstrated how the anodes for SOFCs could be prepared by electrodeposition. After the addition of CeO2, a 60 mum thin porous layer of YSZ was made conductive by the deposition of a conductive carbon layer with exposing the porous layer to C4H10 at 1123 K and either Ni or Co was then electrodeposited on the

  5. Highly stable phase change material emulsions fabricated by interfacial assembly of amphiphilic block copolymers during phase inversion.

    PubMed

    Park, Hanhee; Han, Dong Wan; Kim, Jin Woong

    2015-03-10

    This study introduced a robust and promising approach to fabricate highly stable phase change material (PCM) emulsions consisting of n-tetradecane as a dispersed phase and a mixture of meso-2,3-butanediol (m-BDO) and water as a continuous phase. We showed that amphiphilic poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(ε-caprolactone) block copolymers assembled to form a flexible but tough polymer membrane at the interface during phase inversion from water-in-oil emulsion to oil-in-water emulsion, thus remarkably improving the emulsion stability. Although the incorporation of m-BDO into the emulsion lowered the phase changing enthalpy, it provided a useful means to elevate the melting temperature of the emulsions near to 15 °C. Interestingly, supercooling was commonly observed in our PCM emulsions. We attributed this to the fact that the PCM molecules confined in submicron-scale droplets could not effectively nucleate to grow molecular crystals. Moreover, the presence of m-BDO in the continuous phase rather dominated the heat emission of the emulsion system during freezing, which made the supercooling more favorable. PMID:25674921

  6. Report on Development of Concepts for the Advanced Casting System in Support of the Deployment of a Remotely Operable Research Scale Fuel Fabrication Facility for Metal Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Marsden

    2007-03-01

    Demonstration of recycle processes with low transuranic losses is key to the successful implementation of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership strategy to manage spent fuel. It is probable that these recycle processes will include remote fuel fabrication. This report outlines the strategy to develop and implement a remote metal fuel casting process with minimal transuranic losses. The approach includes a bench-scale casting system to develop materials, methods, and perform tests with transuranics, and an engineering-scale casting system to demonstrate scalability and remote operability. These systems will be built as flexible test beds allowing exploration of multiple fuel casting approaches. The final component of the remote fuel fabrication demonstration culminates in the installation of an advanced casting system in a hot cell to provide integrated remote operation experience with low transuranic loss. Design efforts and technology planning have begun for the bench-scale casting system, and this will become operational in fiscal year 2008, assuming appropriate funding. Installation of the engineering-scale system will follow in late fiscal year 2008, and utilize materials and process knowledge gained in the bench-scale system. Assuming appropriate funding, the advanced casting system will be installed in a remote hot cell at the end of fiscal year 2009.

  7. Single-step approach for fabrication of vancomycin-bonded silica monolith as chiral stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ming-Lung; Chau, Lai-Kwan; Hon, Yung-Son

    2014-09-01

    A vancomycin-bonded silica monolithic column for capillary electrochromatography (CEC) was prepared by a single-step in situ sol-gel approach. This sol-gel process incorporates a synthetic sol-gel precursor which contains a macrocyclic antibiotic, vancomycin, to form a porous silica network inside a fused-silica capillary. To avoid degradation of vancomycin during the column fabrication, a mild step was adopted into the sol-gel process. The performance of the vancomycin chiral stationary phase was investigated by CEC in both the reversed-phase mode and the normal-phase mode. The vancomycin chiral stationary phase was optimized with respect to vancomycin loading in the reversed-phase mode for chiral separation of thalidomide enantiomers. The best efficiency and resolution values of 94600plates/m and 5.79, respectively, were achieved. The optimized column was further applied to chiral separation of alprenolol enantiomers. A plate height of less than 7μm for the first eluted enantiomer of alprenolol was obtained in an aqueous mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.74mm/s. Using enantiomers of seven β-blockers and some other basic enantiomers as test analytes, separation efficiencies of up to 148100plates/m in the reversed-phase mode and up to 138100plates/m in the normal-phase mode were achieved.

  8. Rapid fabrication of graphene on dielectric substrates via solid-phase processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, W.; Zhou, Y. S.; Hou, W. J.; Lu, Y. F.

    2015-03-01

    To unleash the full potential of graphene in functional devices, high-quality graphene sheets and patterns are frequently required to be deposited on dielectric substrates. However, it generally calls for post-growth catalyst etching and graphene transfer steps in currently existing approaches, which are very time consuming and costly for fabricating functional graphene devices. We developed a rapid and cost-effective growth method to achieve the graphene formation directly on various kinds of dielectric substrates via a novel solid-phase transformation mechanism based on Ni/C thin films. High-quality graphene was obtained uniformly on whole surface of wafers with a controlled number of graphene layers. The monolayer graphene, as obtained, exhibits a low sheet resistance of about 50 Ω/sq and a high optical transmittance of 95.8% at 550 nm. Graphene patterns were successfully fabricated simply by either conventional photolithography or laser direct writing techniques. Various graphene patterns, including texts, spirals, line arrays, and even large-scale integrated circuit patterns, with a feature line width of 800 nm and a low sheet resistance of 205 ohm/sq, were achieved. The developed method provides a facile and cost-effective way to fabricate complex and high-quality graphene patterns directly on target substrates, which opens a door for fabricating various advanced optoelectronic devices.

  9. Advanced process with magnetically enhanced RIE for phase-shifting mask fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Satoshi; Kusunose, Haruhiko; Hanazaki, Minoru; Yoshioka, Nobuyuki; Watakabe, Yaichiro; Hayashi, Atsushi; Isao, Akihiko; Tokoro, Yasuo

    1993-08-01

    Phase-shifting needs the critical dimension (CD) accuracy to be less than 0.05 micrometers for the metal and shifter pattern on a phase-shifting mask. Thus we have investigated a new etching process using magnetically enhanced reactive ion etching (MERIE). A magnetic field was provided by two pairs of solenoid coils outside the chamber. By using this MERIE system, the etching characteristics of chromium (Cr) and spin on glass (SOG) were evaluated. A Cl2 and O2 gas mixture was used for Cr etching. The etching selectivity had a maximum when the concentration of O2 was 20%. The etching selectivity increased with an increase in the magnetic field and gas pressure as well as with a decrease in the rf power. High etching selectivity and anisotropic etching features were obtained when the magnetic field was 100 G, the gas pressure 10 - 30 Pa, and the rf power density 0.18 - 0.22 W/cm2. Phase-shifting masks fabricated with this system show a CD accuracy of better than 0.05 micrometers , so 64 MB DRAM phase-shifting masks can be successfully fabricated with this MERIE system.

  10. Test Operation of Oxygen-Enriched Incinerator for Wastes From Nuclear Fuel Fabrication Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.-G.; Yang, H.cC.; Park, G.-I.; Kim, I.-T.; Kim, J.-K.

    2002-02-26

    The oxygen-enriched combustion concept, which can minimize off-gas production, has been applied to the incineration of combustible uranium-containing wastes from a nuclear fuel fabrication facility. A simulation for oxygen combustion shows the off-gas production can be reduced by a factor of 6.7 theoretically, compared with conventional air combustion. The laboratory-scale oxygen enriched incineration (OEI) process with a thermal capacity of 350 MJ/h is composed of an oxygen feeding and control system, a combustion chamber, a quencher, a ceramic filter, an induced draft fan, a condenser, a stack, an off-gas recycle path, and a measurement and control system. Test burning with cleaning paper and office paper in this OEI process shows that the thermal capacity is about 320 MJ/h, 90 % of design value and the off-gas reduces by a factor of 3.5, compared with air combustion. The CO concentration for oxygen combustion is lower than that of air combustion, while the O2 concentration in off-gas is kept above 25 vol % for a simple incineration process without any grate. The NOx concentration in an off-gas stream does not reduce significantly due to air incoming by leakage, and the volume and weight reduction factors are not changed significantly, which suggests a need for an improvement in sealing.

  11. DISMANTLING OF GLOVEBOXES FOR MOX FUEL FABRICATION BY A GLOVEBOX DISMANTLING FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Uematsu, S.; Kashiro, K.; Tobita, N.

    2002-02-25

    The Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) installed a glovebox dismantling facility (GBDF) in the Plutonium Fuel Production Facility (PFPF) of the Tokai works. The purpose of GBDF is to dismantle after-service gloveboxes for the MOX pellet fabrication process in PFPF (GBMPs) for safely storing and recovering the hold-up MOX powder from GBMPs. GBDF has a function of a glovebox for preventing scattering radioactive nuclides and is used for dismantling after-service gloveboxes repeatedly for decreasing the quantity of secondary wastes. Remote-controlled devices such as an arm-type robot, and plasma arc cutting systems are installed in it for the purposes of decreasing irradiation dose and increasing work efficiency respectively. Following items are considered as merits for the application of remote-controlled devices to the dismantling works in comparison with the ordinary dismantling method: improving working conditions, no capability of injury and inhalation contamination area; decreasing irradiation dose of workers; decreasing generation of secondary wastes; and decreasing personal cost.

  12. Fabrication and Characterization of Functionally Graded Cathodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonet, J.; Kapelski, G.; Bouvard, D.

    2008-02-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells are multi-layered designed. The most prevalent structure is an anode supported cell with a thick porous layer of nickel oxide NiO and yttrium stabilized zirconia (YSZ) composite acting as an anode, a thin dense layer of YSZ as an electrolyte, a composite thin porous layer of lanthanum strontium manganate LSM and YSZ and a current collector layer of porous LSM. Regular operating temperature is 1000 °C. The industrial development requires designing cathodes with acceptable electrochemical and mechanical properties at a lower temperature, typically between 700 and 800 °C. A solution consists in designing composite bulk cathodes with more numerous electro-chemical reaction sites. This requirement could be met by grading the composition of the cathode in increasing the YSZ volume fraction near the electrolyte and the LSM volume fraction near the current collector layer so that the repartition of reaction sites and the interfacial adhesion between the cathode and electrolyte layers are optimal. The fabrication of graded composite cathode has been investigated using a sedimentation process that consists of preparing a suspension containing the powder mixture and allowing the particles to fall by gravity upon a substrate. Different composite cathodes with continuous composition gradient have been obtained by sedimentation of LSM and YSZ powder mixture upon a dense YSZ substrate and subsequent firing. Their compositions and microstructures have been analysed with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Electron Dispersive Spectrometry (EDS).

  13. Advanced Fabrication Technique and Thermal Performance Prediction of U-Mo/Zr-alloy Dispersion Fuel Pin for High Burnup PWR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwardi

    2010-06-01

    In recent years, a novel class of zirconium alloys having the melting temperature of 990-1160 K has been developed. Based on novel zirconium matrix alloys, high uranium content fuel pin with U-9Mo has been developed according to capillary impregnation technique. The pin shows it is thermal conductivity ranging from 18 to 22 w/m/K that is comparably higher than UO2 pellet pin. The paper presents the met-met fabrication and thermal performance analysis of the fuel in typical PWR. The fabrication consists of mixing UO2 powder or granules and a novel Zr-alloy powder having low melting point, filling the mixture in a cladding tube that one of its end has been plugged, heating the pin to above melting temperature of Zr-alloy for an hour, natural cooling and heat treating at 300 K for 1/2 hr. The thermal analysis takes into account the pore and temperature distribution and high burn up effect to pellet conductivity. The thermal diffusivity ratio of novel to conventional fuel has been used as correction factor for the novel fuel conductivity. The results show a significant lowering pellet temperature along the radius until 1000 K at the hottest position. The analysis underestimates since the gap conductivity has been treated as decreased by 2% fission gas released that is not real since the use of lower temperature, and also decreasing thermal conductivity by porosity formation will much lower. The analysis shows that the novel fuel has very good thermal properties which able to pass the barrier of 65 MWD/kg-U, the limit to day commercial fuel. The burn-up extension means fewer fresh fuel is needed to produce electricity, preserve natural uranium resource, easier fuel handling operational per energy produced

  14. Comparative Study of Laboratory-Scale and Prototypic Production-Scale Fuel Fabrication Processes and Product Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas W. Marshall

    2014-10-01

    An objective of the High Temperature Gas Reactor fuel development and qualification program for the United States Department of Energy has been to qualify fuel fabricated in prototypic production-scale equipment. The quality and characteristics of the tristructural isotropic coatings on fuel kernels are influenced by the equipment scale and processing parameters. Some characteristics affecting product quality were suppressed while others have become more significant in the larger equipment. Changes to the composition and method of producing resinated graphite matrix material has eliminated the use of hazardous, flammable liquids and enabled it to be procured as a vendor-supplied feed stock. A new method of overcoating TRISO particles with the resinated graphite matrix eliminates the use of hazardous, flammable liquids, produces highly spherical particles with a narrow size distribution, and attains product yields in excess of 99%. Compact fabrication processes have been scaled-up and automated with relatively minor changes to compact quality to manual laboratory-scale processes. The impact on statistical variability of the processes and the products as equipment was scaled are discussed. The prototypic production-scale processes produce test fuels that meet fuel quality specifications.

  15. Fabrication of ORNL Fuel Irradiated in the Peach Bottom Reactor and Postirradiation Examination of Recycle Test Elements 7 and 4

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Jr. E.L.

    2001-10-25

    Seven full-sized Peach Bottom Reactor. fuel elements were fabricated in a cooperative effort by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Gulf General Atomic (GGA) as part of the National HTGR Fuel Recycle Development Program. These elements contain bonded fuel rods and loose beds of particles made from several combinations of fertile and fissile particles of interest for present and future use in the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR). The portion of the fuel prepared for these elements by ORNL is described in detail in this report, and it is in conjunction with the GGA report (GA-10109) a complete fabrication description of the test. In addition, this report describes the results obtained to date from postirradiation examination of the first two elements removed from the Peach Bottom Reactor, RTE-7 and -4. The fuel examined had relatively low exposure, up to about 1.5 x 10{sup 21} neutrons/cm* fast (>0.18 MeV) fluence, compared with the peak anticipated HTGR fluence of 8.0 x 10{sup 21}, but it has performed well at this exposure. Dimensional data indicate greater irradiation shrinkage than expected from accelerated test data to higher exposures. This suggests that either the method of extrapolation of the higher exposure data back to low exposure is faulty, or the behavior of the coated particles in the neutron spectrum characteristic of the accelerated tests does not adequately represent the behavior in an HTGR spectrum.

  16. Fabrication of a phase transmission holographic optical element in polycarbonate and its characterization.

    PubMed

    Vadivelan, V; Chandar Shekar, B

    2016-08-10

    The phase transmission holographic optical element in silver halide holographic emulsion, especially for holographic collimator sights, is fabricated and the desired diffraction efficiency is obtained with very high transmission. One of the main drawbacks of these holograms are that they become dark by being exposed under sunlight, and this darkness drastically reduces the visible transmission and diffraction efficiency of a holographic optical element, hence it is not suitable for weapon sight application. To overcome this problem, we transferred a holographic optical element with a reticle image from silver halide into polycarbonate by using copying, electroforming, and recombination techniques. The holographic optical element in polycarbonate has many advantages; the detailed method of fabrication, transfer, and its characterization are presented. The very interesting result of diffraction efficiency variation with angle obtained in polycarbonate is discussed. PMID:27534494

  17. Fabrication of a phase transmission holographic optical element in polycarbonate and its characterization.

    PubMed

    Vadivelan, V; Chandar Shekar, B

    2016-08-10

    The phase transmission holographic optical element in silver halide holographic emulsion, especially for holographic collimator sights, is fabricated and the desired diffraction efficiency is obtained with very high transmission. One of the main drawbacks of these holograms are that they become dark by being exposed under sunlight, and this darkness drastically reduces the visible transmission and diffraction efficiency of a holographic optical element, hence it is not suitable for weapon sight application. To overcome this problem, we transferred a holographic optical element with a reticle image from silver halide into polycarbonate by using copying, electroforming, and recombination techniques. The holographic optical element in polycarbonate has many advantages; the detailed method of fabrication, transfer, and its characterization are presented. The very interesting result of diffraction efficiency variation with angle obtained in polycarbonate is discussed.

  18. 10 CFR 72.236 - Specific requirements for spent fuel storage cask approval and fabrication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INDEPENDENT STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE, AND REACTOR... spent fuel (i.e., intact assembly or consolidated fuel rods), the inerting atmosphere requirements. (b... removal of the stored spent fuel from a reactor site, transportation, and ultimate disposition by...

  19. Fabrication of large-scale multilevel phase-type Fresnel zone plate arrays by femtosecond laser direct writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yan-Hao; Tian, Zhen-Nan; Jiang, Tong; Niu, Li-Gang; Gao, Bing-Rong

    2016-03-01

    We report on the fabrication of large-scale eight-level phase-type Fresnel zone plate arrays (FZPAs) by femtosecond-laser direct writing technology. A high-speed galvanometer scanning system was used to fabricate each Fresnel zone plate to realize high fabrication efficiency. To overcome the limited fabrication scale in the case of galvanometer scanning, inter-plate movements were controlled by multi-axis air-bearing precise positioning stages. With the system, FZPAs whose fill-factor was designed to be 100% realized a diffraction efficiency of 89%. The focusing and imaging properties of the FZPAs were also evaluated, and the FZPAs showed high fidelity.

  20. Affordable Fabrication and Properties of Silicon Carbide-Based Interpenetrating Phase Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Mrityunjay

    1998-01-01

    An affordable processing technique for the fabrication of silicon carbide-based interpenetrating phase composites (IPCs) is presented. This process consists of the production of microporous carbon preforms and subsequent infiltration with liquid silicon or silicon-refractory metal alloys. The microporous preforms are made by the pyrolysis of a polymerized resin mixture for which methods to control pore volume and pore size have been established. The process gives good control of microstructure and morphology of silicon carbide-based composite materials. Room and high temperature mechanical properties (flexural strength, compressive strength, and flexural creep) of low and high silicon-silicon carbide composites will be discussed.

  1. Fabrication of triple layered vascular scaffolds by combining electrospinning, braiding, and thermally induced phase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, Hao-Yang; Jing, Xin; Yu, Emily; McNulty, Jason; Turng, Lih-Sheng

    2015-12-01

    Triple layered small diameter vascular scaffolds, which consisted of thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) and silk, were fabricated in this study for the first time by combining electrospinning, braiding, and thermally induced phase separation methods. These novel vascular scaffolds, which possess three layers of different structures (nanofibrous inner layer, woven silk filament middle layer, and porous outer layer) have a desired toe region in the tensile test and sufficient suture retention and burst pressure for vascular graft applications. The endothelia cell culture tests showed that a cell layer could form on the inner surface of a scaffold with high cell viability. Furthermore, the cells showed favorable morphology on the scaffold.

  2. Zinc oxide nanowires and nanorods fabricated by vapour-phase transport at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C. X.; Sun, X. W.; Dong, Z. L.; Yu, M. B.; My, T. D.; Zhang, X. H.; Chua, S. J.; White, T. J.

    2004-07-01

    Using zinc chloride as source material, zinc oxide nanowires and nanorods were fabricated by a vapour-phase transport method at low temperature. The nanowires grown on gold-coated silicon showed a uniform diameter of about 40 nm, and the nanorods on copper-coated silicon grew upwards to form flower-like arrays. The x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy analyses demonstrated that the nanostructural zinc oxide grew along the [0001] direction. The growth process was attributed to a vapour-liquid-solid mechanism. Distinct photoluminescent behaviours were observed for zinc oxide nanostructures grown on gold-coated and copper-coated silicon wafers.

  3. Wafer scale fabrication of submicron chessboard gratings using phase masks in proximity lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuerzebecher, Lorenz; Harzendorf, Torsten; Fuchs, Frank; Zeitner, Uwe D.

    2012-03-01

    One and two dimensional grating structures with submicron period have a huge number of applications in optics and photonics. Such structures are conventionally fabricated using interference or e-beam lithography. However, both technologies have significant drawbacks. Interference lithography is limited to rather simple geometries and the sequential writing scheme of e-beam lithography leads to time consuming exposures for each grating. We present a novel fabrication technique for this class of microstructures which is based on proximity lithography in a mask aligner. The technology is capable to pattern a complete wafer within less than one minute of exposure time and offers thereby high lateral resolution and a reliable process. Our advancements compared to standard mask aligner lithography are twofold: First of all, we are using periodic binary phase masks instead of chromium masks to generate an aerial image of high resolution and exceptional light efficiency at certain distances behind the mask. Second, a special mask aligner illumination set-up is employed which allows to precisely control the incidence angles of the exposure light. This degree of freedom allows both, to shape the aerial image (e. g. transformation of a periodic spot pattern into a chessboard pattern) and to increase its depth of focus considerably. That way, our technology enables the fabrication of high quality gratings with arbitrary geometry in a fast and stable wafer scale process.

  4. Analytical fuel property effects: Small combustors, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, T. G.; Monty, J. D.; Morton, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of non-standard aviation fuels on a typical small gas turbine combustor were studied and the effectiveness of design changes intended to counter the effects of these fuels was evaluated. The T700/CT7 turboprop engine family was chosen as being representative of the class of aircraft power plants desired for this study. Fuel properties, as specified by NASA, are characterized by low hydrogen content and high aromatics levels. No. 2 diesel fuel was also evaluated in this program. Results demonstrated the anticipated higher than normal smoke output and flame radiation intensity with resulting increased metal temperatures on the baseline T700 combustor. Three new designs were evaluated using the non standard fuels. The three designs incorporated enhanced cooling features and smoke reduction features. All three designs, when burning the broad specification fuels, exhibited metal temperatures at or below the baseline combustor temperatures on JP-5. Smoke levels were acceptable but higher than predicted.

  5. Transmutation, Burn-Up and Fuel Fabrication Trade-Offs in Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor Thorium Fuel Cycles - 13502

    SciTech Connect

    Lindley, Benjamin A.; Parks, Geoffrey T.; Franceschini, Fausto

    2013-07-01

    Multiple recycle of long-lived actinides has the potential to greatly reduce the required storage time for spent nuclear fuel or high level nuclear waste. This is generally thought to require fast reactors as most transuranic (TRU) isotopes have low fission probabilities in thermal reactors. Reduced-moderation LWRs are a potential alternative to fast reactors with reduced time to deployment as they are based on commercially mature LWR technology. Thorium (Th) fuel is neutronically advantageous for TRU multiple recycle in LWRs due to a large improvement in the void coefficient. If Th fuel is used in reduced-moderation LWRs, it appears neutronically feasible to achieve full actinide recycle while burning an external supply of TRU, with related potential improvements in waste management and fuel utilization. In this paper, the fuel cycle of TRU-bearing Th fuel is analysed for reduced-moderation PWRs and BWRs (RMPWRs and RBWRs). RMPWRs have the advantage of relatively rapid implementation and intrinsically low conversion ratios. However, it is challenging to simultaneously satisfy operational and fuel cycle constraints. An RBWR may potentially take longer to implement than an RMPWR due to more extensive changes from current BWR technology. However, the harder neutron spectrum can lead to favourable fuel cycle performance. A two-stage fuel cycle, where the first pass is Th-Pu MOX, is a technically reasonable implementation of either concept. The first stage of the fuel cycle can therefore be implemented at relatively low cost as a Pu disposal option, with a further policy option of full recycle in the medium term. (authors)

  6. Past research and fabrication conducted at SCK•CEN on ferritic ODS alloys used as cladding for FBR's fuel pins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bremaecker, Anne

    2012-09-01

    In the 1960s in the frame of the sodium-cooled fast breeders, SCK•CEN decided to develop claddings made with ferritic stainless materials because of their specific properties, namely a higher thermal conductivity, a lower thermal expansion, a lower tendency to He-embrittlement, and a lower swelling than the austenitic stainless steels. To enhance their lower creep resistance at 650-700 °C arose the idea to strengthen the microstructure by oxide dispersions. This was the starting point of an ambitious programme where both the matrix and the dispersions were optimized. A purely ferritic 13 wt% Cr matrix was selected and its mechanical strength was improved through addition of ferritizing elements. Results of tensile and stress-rupture tests showed that Ti and Mo were the most beneficial elements, partly because of the chi-phase precipitation. In 1973 the optimized matrix composition was Fe-13Cr-3.5Ti-2Mo. To reach creep properties similar to those of AISI 316, different dispersions and methods were tested: internal oxidation (that was not conclusive), and the direct mixing of metallic and oxide powders (Al2O3, MgO, ZrO2, TiO2, ZrSiO4) followed by pressing, sintering, and extrusion. The compression and extrusion parameters were determined: extrusion as hollow at 1050 °C, solution annealing at 1050 °C/15 min, cleaning, cold drawing to the final dimensions with intermediate annealings at 1050 °C, final annealing at 1050 °C, straightening and final aging at 800 °C. The choice of titania and yttria powders and their concentrations were finalized on the basis of their out-of-pile and in-pile creep and tensile strength. As soon as a resistance butt welding machine was developed and installed in a glove-box, fuel segments with PuO2 were loaded in the Belgian MTR BR2. The fabrication parameters were continuously optimized: milling and beating, lubrication, cold drawing (partial and final reduction rates, temperature, duration, atmosphere and furnace). Specific non

  7. Hydrothermal interactions of cesium and strontium phases from spent unreprocessed fuel with basalt phases and basalts

    SciTech Connect

    Komarneni, S.; Scheetz, B.E.; McCarthy, G.J.; Coons, W.E.

    1980-03-01

    This investigation is a segment of an extensive research program aimed at investigating the feasibility of long-term, subsurface storage of commercial nuclear waste. Specifically, it is anticipated that the waste will be housed in a repository mined from the basalt formations which lie beneath the Hanford Site. The elements monitored during the present experiments were Cs and Sr. These two elements represent significant biohazards if released from a repository and are the major heat producing radionuclides present in commercial radioactive waste. Several Cs phases and/or solutions were reacted with either isolated basalt phases or bulk-rock basalt, and the resulting solids and solutions were analyzed. The hydrothermal reactivity of SrZrO/sub 3/, which is believed to be a probable host for Sr in SFE was investigated. While so far no evidence exists which indicates that Sr is present in a water soluble phase in spent fuel elements (SFE), detailed investigation of a potential hazard is warranted. This investigation has determined that some Cs compounds likely to be stable components of spent fuel (i.e., CsOH, Cs/sub 2/MoO/sub 4/, Cs/sub 2/U/sub 2/O/sub 7/) have significant hydrothermal solubilities. These solubilities are greatly decreased in the presence of basalt and/or basalt minerals. The decrease in the amount of Cs in solution results from reactions which form pollucite and/or CsAlSiO/sub 4/, with the production of pollucite exceeding that of CsAlSiO/sub 4/. Dissolution of ..beta..-Cs/sub 2/U/sub 2/O/sub 7/ implies solubilizing a uranium species to an undetermined extent. The production of schoepite (UO/sub 3/.3H/sub 2/O) during some experiments containing basalt phases, indicates a tendency to oxidize U/sup 4 +/ to U/sup 6 +/. When diopside (nominally CaMgSi/sub 2/O/sub 6/) and ..beta..-Cs/sub 2/U/sub 2/O/sub 7/ were hydrothermally reacted, at 300/sup 0/C both UO/sub 2/ and UO/sub 3/.3H/sub 2/O were produced. Results of experiments on SrZrO/sub 3/ show it to be

  8. Homeotropically aligning phase separated columnar structures for fabrication of flexible electrooptical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Bharat R.; Choi, Hyunchul; Srinivasarao, Mohan; Kumar, Satyendra

    2011-11-01

    A method of achieving homeotropic alignment of liquid crystals (LCs) by ultraviolet light induced phase separation of LC from its mixture with photo-curable pre-polymer is reported. Vertical polymer columns and micro-fibrils developed during the phase separation promote homeotropic alignment of the LC director (i.e., alignment perpendicular to the LC-substrate interface), suitable for devices based on LCs possessing negative dielectric anisotropy. These vertical structures extend between two substrates and permit the fabrication of highly flexible electro-optical devices with high contrast coupled with fast response times. This simple single-step technique eliminates the need for the traditional polymer alignment layer pre-deposited on substrates.

  9. Sensitivity analysis and optimization method for the fabrication of one-dimensional beam-splitting phase gratings

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Shaun; Brand, Jonathan F.; Zaverton, Melissa; Milster, Tom; Liang, Rongguang

    2015-01-01

    A method to design one-dimensional beam-spitting phase gratings with low sensitivity to fabrication errors is described. The method optimizes the phase function of a grating by minimizing the integrated variance of the energy of each output beam over a range of fabrication errors. Numerical results for three 1x9 beam splitting phase gratings are given. Two optimized gratings with low sensitivity to fabrication errors were compared with a grating designed for optimal efficiency. These three gratings were fabricated using gray-scale photolithography. The standard deviation of the 9 outgoing beam energies in the optimized gratings were 2.3 and 3.4 times lower than the optimal efficiency grating. PMID:25969268

  10. Alternative fuels for medium-speed diesel engines (AFFMSED) project: slurries, emulsions and blended-fuel extenders; cylinder wear measurements, staged injection. Third research phase final report

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Q.A. Jr.; Wakenell, J.F.; Ariga, S.

    1983-08-01

    The third year of research activity on an ongoing research, development and demonstration effort to investigate the use of alternative fuels for medium-speed engines is described. Tests were performed using laboratory medium-speed diesel engines to define the ability of these engines to operate on alternative fuels, the fuel property limits that the engines can tolerate, the problems associated with alternative fuels use, and methods to improve fuel tolerance and to overcome the problems identified. The fuels studied during the Phase III program were alcohol-in-diesel fuel emulsions, water-in-diesel fuel emulsions, sunflower oil/diesel fuel blends, No. 6 fuel oil/diesel fuel blends, and a carbon black/diesel fuel slurry. Also studied were methods to measure cylinder liner and piston ring wear rates in a short period of engine operation. Finally, staged injection was investigated as a means to improve engine performance on low cetane number fuels.

  11. SPS Fabrication of Tungsten-Rhenium Alloys in Support of NTR Fuels Development

    SciTech Connect

    Jonathan A. Webb; Indrajit Charit; Cory Sparks; Darryl P. Butt; Megan Frary; Mark Carroll

    2011-02-01

    Abstract. Tungsten metal slugs were fabricated via Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) of powdered metals at temperatures ranging from 1575 K to 1975 K and hold times of 5 minutes to 30 minutes, using powders with an average diameter of 7.8 ?m. Sintered tungsten specimens were found to have relative densities ranging from 83 % to 94 % of the theoretical density for tungsten. Consolidated specimens were also tested for their Vickers Hardness Number (VHN), which was fitted as a function of relative density; the fully consolidated VHN was extrapolated to be 381.45 kg/mm2. Concurrently, tungsten and rhenium powders with average respective diameters of 0.5 ?m and 13.3 ?m were pre-processed either by High-Energy-Ball-Milling (HEBM) or by homogeneous mixing to yield W-25at.%Re mixtures. The powder batches were sintered at temperatures of 1975 K and 2175 K for hold times ranging from 0 minutes to 60 minutes yielding relative densities ranging from 94% to 97%. The combination of HEBM and sintering showed a significant decrease in the inter-metallic phases compared to that of the homogenous mixing and sintering.

  12. Low NOx heavy fuel combustor concept program, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutrone, M. B.

    1981-01-01

    Combustion tests were completed with seven concepts, including three rich/lean concepts, three lean/lean concepts, and one catalytic combustor concept. Testing was conducted with ERBS petroleum distillate, petroleum residual, and SRC-II coal-derived liquid fuels over a range of operating conditions for the 12:1 pressure ratio General Electric MS7001E heavy-duty turbine. Blends of ERBS and SRC-II fuels were used to vary fuel properties over a wide range. In addition, pyridine was added to the ERBS and residual fuels to vary nitrogen level while holding other fuel properties constant. Test results indicate that low levels of NOx and fuel-bound nitrogen conversion can be achieved with the rich/lean combustor concepts for fuels with nitrogen contents up to 1.0% by weight. Multinozzle rich/lean Concept 2 demonstrated dry low Nox emissions within 10-15% of the EPA New Source Performance Standards goals for SRC-II fuel, with yields of approximately 15%, while meeting program goals for combustion efficiency, pressure drop, and exhaust gas temperature profile. Similar, if not superior, potential was demonstrated by Concept 3, which is a promising rich/lean combustor design.

  13. Low NOx heavy fuel combustor concept program, phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutrone, M. B.

    1981-10-01

    Combustion tests were completed with seven concepts, including three rich/lean concepts, three lean/lean concepts, and one catalytic combustor concept. Testing was conducted with ERBS petroleum distillate, petroleum residual, and SRC-II coal-derived liquid fuels over a range of operating conditions for the 12:1 pressure ratio General Electric MS7001E heavy-duty turbine. Blends of ERBS and SRC-II fuels were used to vary fuel properties over a wide range. In addition, pyridine was added to the ERBS and residual fuels to vary nitrogen level while holding other fuel properties constant. Test results indicate that low levels of NOx and fuel-bound nitrogen conversion can be achieved with the rich/lean combustor concepts for fuels with nitrogen contents up to 1.0% by weight. Multinozzle rich/lean Concept 2 demonstrated dry low Nox emissions within 10-15% of the EPA New Source Performance Standards goals for SRC-II fuel, with yields of approximately 15%, while meeting program goals for combustion efficiency, pressure drop, and exhaust gas temperature profile. Similar, if not superior, potential was demonstrated by Concept 3, which is a promising rich/lean combustor design.

  14. Experimental clean combustor program, alternate fuels addendum, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleason, C. C.; Bahr, D. W.

    1976-01-01

    The characteristics of current and advanced low-emissions combustors when operated with special test fuels simulating broader range combustion properties of petroleum or coal derived fuels were studied. Five fuels were evaluated; conventional JP-5, conventional No. 2 Diesel, two different blends of Jet A and commercial aromatic mixtures - zylene bottoms and haphthalene charge stock, and a fuel derived from shale oil crude which was refined to Jet A specifications. Three CF6-50 engine size combustor types were evaluated; the standard production combustor, a radial/axial staged combustor, and a double annular combustor. Performance and pollutant emissons characteristics at idle and simulated takeoff conditions were evaluated in a full annular combustor rig. Altitude relight characteristics were evaluated in a 60 degree sector combustor rig. Carboning and flashback characteristics at simulated takeoff conditions were evaluated in a 12 degree sector combustor rig. For the five fuels tested, effects were moderate, but well defined.

  15. Determination of alternative fuels combustion products: Phase 3 report

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, K.A.

    1997-12-01

    This report describes the laboratory efforts to characterize particulate and gaseous exhaust emissions from a passenger vehicle operating on alternative fuels. Tests were conducted at room temperature (nominally 72 F) and 20 F utilizing the chassis dynamometer portion of the FTP for light-duty vehicles. Fuels evaluated include Federal RFG, LPG meeting HD-5 specifications, a national average blend of CNG, E85, and M85. Exhaust particulate generated at room temperature was further characterized to determine polynuclear aromatic content, trace element content, and trace organic constituents. For all fuels except M85, the room temperature particulate emission rate from this vehicle was about 2 to 3 mg/mile. On M85, the particulate emission rate was more than 6 mg/mile. In addition, elemental analysis of particulate revealed an order of magnitude more sulfur and calcium from M85 than any other fuel. The sulfur and calcium indicate that these higher emissions might be due to engine lubricating oil in the exhaust. For RFG, particulate emissions at 20 F were more than six times higher than at room temperature. For alcohol fuels, particulate emissions at 20 F were two to three times higher than at room temperature. For CNG and LPG, particulate emissions were virtually the same at 72 F and 20 F. However, PAH emissions from CNG and LPG were higher than expected. Both gaseous fuels had larger amounts of pyrene, 1-nitropyrene, and benzo(g,h,i)perylene in their emissions than the other fuels.

  16. Technology development for phosphoric acid fuel cell powerplant (phase 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christner, L.

    1979-01-01

    The status of technology for the manufacturing and testing of 1200 sq. cm cell materials, components, and stacks for on-site integrated energy systems is assessed. Topics covered include: (1) preparation of thin layers of silicon carbide; (2) definition and control schemes for volume changes in phosphoric acid fuel cells; (3) preparation of low resin content graphite phenolic resin composites; (4) chemical corrosion of graphite-phenolic resin composites in hot phosphoric acid; (5) analysis of electrical resistance of composite materials for fuel cells; and (6) fuel cell performance and testing.

  17. Fuel cell power systems for remote applications. Phase 1 final report and business plan

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    The goal of the Fuel Cell Power Systems for Remote Applications project is to commercialize a 0.1--5 kW integrated fuel cell power system (FCPS). The project targets high value niche markets, including natural gas and oil pipelines, off-grid homes, yachts, telecommunication stations and recreational vehicles. Phase 1 includes the market research, technical and financial analysis of the fuel cell power system, technical and financial requirements to establish manufacturing capability, the business plan, and teaming arrangements. Phase 1 also includes project planning, scope of work, and budgets for Phases 2--4. The project is a cooperative effort of Teledyne Brown Engineering--Energy Systems, Schatz Energy Research Center, Hydrogen Burner Technology, and the City of Palm Desert. Phases 2 through 4 are designed to utilize the results of Phase 1, to further the commercial potential of the fuel cell power system. Phase 2 focuses on research and development of the reformer and fuel cell and is divided into three related, but potentially separate tasks. Budgets and timelines for Phase 2 can be found in section 4 of this report. Phase 2 includes: Task A--Develop a reformate tolerant fuel cell stack and 5 kW reformer; Task B--Assemble and deliver a fuel cell that operates on pure hydrogen to the University of Alaska or another site in Alaska; Task C--Provide support and training to the University of Alaska in the setting up and operating a fuel cell test lab. The Phase 1 research examined the market for power systems for off-grid homes, yachts, telecommunication stations and recreational vehicles. Also included in this report are summaries of the previously conducted market reports that examined power needs for remote locations along natural gas and oil pipelines. A list of highlights from the research can be found in the executive summary of the business plan.

  18. Material synthesis and fabrication method development for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hanping

    of 0.1 Ω cm2, improved power density of 1535 mW cm-2 at 650 °C in hydrogen and good thermal-cycle stability. Furthermore, this novel nano-scale platinum current collector can be extensively applied to other cathode materials and cell structures while showing the capability of being scaled up for mass productions due to the easily operated spraying process. The SOFCs with metal oxide as anodes are usually electrolyte-supported design. This design requires relatively thick electrolyte of 300˜500 mum to support the entire cell, leading to significant ohmic resistance. Accordingly, high temperatures (800-900 °C) are needed to reduce the ohmic loss for high power outputs. Anode-supported designs may effectively reduce the ohmic loss with thin electrolyte membrane while lowering the operating temperatures. However, the anode-supported designs with metal oxides as anode materials are difficult to fabricate. In general, high sintering temperature is needed to co-fire the anode substrate/electrolyte assembly to densify the thin electrolyte, which in turn may induce the densification of the porous anode substrate, resulting in anode porosity loss. In this work, a ceramic anode supported SOFC based on perovksite oxide of La0.75Sr0.25Cr 0.5Mn0.5O3-delta (LSCM) has been prepared to evaluate the superiority of this new cell design. The cell exhibits the power density of 596 mW cm-2 and 381 mW cm-2 at 700 °C with wet hydrogen and methane as the fuel respectively, the highest performance up to date for the cells with metal oxide anodes at this temperature.

  19. A review of composite and metallic bipolar plates in proton exchange membrane fuel cell: Materials, fabrication, and material selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taherian, Reza

    2014-11-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells offer exceptional potential for a clean, efficient, and reliable power source. The bipolar plate (BP) is a key component in this device, as it connects each cell electrically, supplies reactant gases to both anode and cathode, and removes reaction products from the cell. BPs have primarily been fabricated from high-density graphite, but in recent years, much attention has been paid to develop the cost-effective and feasible alternative materials. Recently, two different classes of materials have been attracted attention: metals and composite materials. This paper offers a comprehensive review of the current researches being carried out on the metallic and composite BPs, covering materials and fabrication methods. In this research, the phenomenon of ionic contamination due to the release of the corrosion products of metallic BP and relative impact on the durability as well as performance of PEM fuel cells is extensively investigated. Furthermore, in this paper, upon several effective parameters on commercialization of PEM fuel cells, such as stack cost, weight, volume, durability, strength, ohmic resistance, and ionic contamination, a material selection is performed among the most common BPs currently being used. This material selection is conducted by using Simple Additive Weighting Method (SAWM).

  20. Results from a Field Trial of the Radio Frequency Based Cylinder Accountability and Tracking System at the Global Nuclear Fuel Americas Fuel Fabrication Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, Peter; Laughter, Mark D; Martyn, Rose; Pickett, Chris A; Rowe, Nathan C; Younkin, James R; Shephard, Adam M

    2010-01-01

    The Cylinder Accountability and Tracking System (CATS) is a tool designed for use by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to improve overall inspector efficiency through real-time unattended monitoring of cylinder movements, site specific rules-based event detection, and the capability to integrate many types of monitoring technologies. The system is based on the tracking of cylinder movements using (radio frequency) RF tags, and the collection of data, such as accountability weights, that can be associated with the cylinders. This presentation will cover the installation and evaluation of the CATS at the Global Nuclear Fuels (GNF) fuel fabrication facility in Wilmington, NC. This system was installed to evaluate its safeguards applicability, operational durability under operating conditions, and overall performance. An overview of the system design and elements specific to the GNF deployment will be presented along with lessons learned from the installation process and results from the field trial.

  1. XeF2 vapor phase silicon etch used in the fabrication of movable SOI structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Wiwi, M.; Sanchez, Carlos Anthony; Plut, Thomas Alvin; Salazar, M.; Stevens, Jeffrey; Bauer, Todd M.; Ford, C.; Shul, Randy John; Grossetete, Grant David

    2010-10-01

    Vapor phase XeF{sub 2} has been used in the fabrication of various types of devices including MEMS, resonators, RF switches, and micro-fluidics, and for wafer level packaging. In this presentation we demonstrate the use of XeF{sub 2} Si etch in conjunction with deep reactive ion etch (DRIE) to release single crystal Si structures on Silicon On Insulator (SOI) wafers. XeF{sub 2} vapor phase etching is conducive to the release of movable SOI structures due to the isotropy of the etch, the high etch selectivity to silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) and fluorocarbon (FC) polymer etch masks, and the ability to undercut large structures at high rates. Also, since XeF{sub 2} etching is a vapor phase process, stiction problems often associated with wet chemical release processes are avoided. Monolithic single crystal Si features were fabricated by etching continuous trenches in the device layer of an SOI wafer using a DRIE process optimized to stop on the buried SiO{sub 2}. The buried SiO{sub 2} was then etched to handle Si using an anisotropic plasma etch process. The sidewalls of the device Si features were then protected with a conformal passivation layer of either FC polymer or SiO{sub 2}. FC polymer was deposited from C4F8 gas precursor in an inductively coupled plasma reactor, and SiO{sub 2} was deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). A relatively high ion energy, directional reactive ion etch (RIE) plasma was used to remove the passivation film on surfaces normal to the direction of the ions while leaving the sidewall passivation intact. After the bottom of the trench was cleared to the underlying Si handle wafer, XeF{sub 2} was used to isotropically etch the handle Si, thus undercutting and releasing the features patterned in the device Si layer. The released device Si structures were not etched by the XeF{sub 2} due to protection from the top SiO{sub 2} mask, sidewall passivation, and the buried SiO{sub 2} layer. Optimization of the XeF{sub 2

  2. CFD prediction of flow and phase distribution in fuel assemblies with spacers

    SciTech Connect

    Anglart, H.; Nylund, O.; Kurul, N.

    1995-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the modeling and computation of multi-dimensional two-phase flows in BWR fuel assemblies. The modeling principles are presented based on using a two-fluid model in which lateral interfacial effects are accounted for. This model has been used to evaluate the velocity fields of both vapor and liquid phases, as well as phase distribution, between fuel elements in geometries similar to BWR fuel bundles. Furthermore, this model has been used to predict, in a detailed mechanistic manner, the effects of spacers on flow and phase distribution between, and pressure drop along, fuel elements. The related numerical simulations have been performed using a CFD computer code, CFDS-FLOW3D.

  3. Large-scale controlled fabrication of highly roughened flower-like silver nanostructures in liquid crystalline phase

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chengliang; Xiang, Xiangjun; Zhang, Ying; Peng, Zenghui; Cao, Zhaoliang; Wang, Junlin; Xuan, Li

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale controllable fabrication of highly roughened flower-like silver nanostructures is demonstrated experimentally via electrodeposition in the liquid crystalline phase. Different sizes of silver flowers are fabricated by adjusting the deposition time and the concentration of the silver nitrate solution. The density of the silver flowers in the sample is also controllable in this work. The flower-like silver nanostructures can serve as effective surface-enhanced Raman scattering and surface-enhanced fluorescence substrates because of their local surface plasmon resonance, and they may have applications in photoluminescence and catalysis. This liquid crystalline phase is used as a soft template for fabricating flower-like silver nanostructures for the first time, and this approach is suitable for large-scale uniform fabrication up to several centimetres. PMID:26216669

  4. Fabrication of wafer-scale nanopatterned sapphire substrate through phase separation lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xu; Ni, Mengyang; Zhuang, Zhe; Dai, Jiangping; Wu, Feixiang; Cui, Yushuang; Yuan, Changsheng; Ge, Haixiong; Chen, Yanfeng

    2016-04-01

    A phase separation lithography (PSL) based on polymer blend provides an extremely simple, low-cost, and high-throughput way to fabricate wafer-scale disordered nanopatterns. This method was introduced to fabricate nanopatterned sapphire substrates (NPSSs) for GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The PSL process only involved in spin-coating of polystyrene (PS)/polyethylene glycol (PEG) polymer blend on sapphire substrate and followed by a development with deionized water to remove PEG moiety. The PS nanoporous network was facilely obtained, and the structural parameters could be effectively tuned by controlling the PS/PEG weight ratio of the spin-coating solution. 2-in. wafer-scale NPSSs were conveniently achieved through the PS nanoporous network in combination with traditional nanofabrication methods, such as O2 reactive ion etching (RIE), e-beam evaporation deposition, liftoff, and chlorine-based RIE. In order to investigate the performance of such NPSSs, typical blue LEDs with emission wavelengths of ~450 nm were grown on the NPSS and a flat sapphire substrate (FSS) by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition, respectively. The integral photoluminescence (PL) intensity of the NPSS LED was enhanced by 32.3 % compared to that of the FSS-LED. The low relative standard deviation of 4.7 % for PL mappings of NPSS LED indicated the high uniformity of PL data across the whole 2-in. wafer. Extremely simple, low cost, and high throughput of the process and the ability to fabricate at the wafer scale make PSL a potential method for production of nanopatterned sapphire substrates.

  5. Fabrication of high-density In3Sb1Te2 phase change nanoarray on glass-fabric reinforced flexible substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jong Moon; Shin, Dong Ok; Yin, You; Seo, Hyeon Kook; Kim, Daewoon; In Kim, Yong; Jin, Jung Ho; Kim, Yong Tae; Bae, Byeong-Soo; Ouk Kim, Sang; Lee, Jeong Yong

    2012-06-01

    Mushroom-shaped phase change memory (PCM) consisting of a Cr/In3Sb1Te2 (IST)/TiN (bottom electrode) nanoarray was fabricated via block copolymer lithography and single-step dry etching with a gas mixture of Ar/Cl2. The process was performed on a high performance transparent glass-fabric reinforced composite film (GFR Hybrimer) suitable for use as a novel substrate for flexible devices. The use of GFR Hybrimer with low thermal expansion and flat surfaces enabled successful nanoscale patterning of functional phase change materials on flexible substrates. Block copolymer lithography employing asymmetrical block copolymer blends with hexagonal cylindrical self-assembled morphologies resulted in the creation of hexagonal nanoscale PCM cell arrays with an areal density of approximately 176 Gb/in2.

  6. Co-Rolled U10Mo/Zirconium-Barrier-Layer Monolithic Fuel Foil Fabrication Process

    SciTech Connect

    G. A. Moore; M. C. Marshall

    2010-01-01

    Integral to the current UMo fuel foil processing scheme being developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is the incorporation of a zirconium barrier layer for the purpose of controlling UMo-Al interdiffusion at the fuel-meat/cladding interface. A hot “co-rolling” process is employed to establish a ~25-µm-thick zirconium barrier layer on each face of the ~0.3-mm-thick U10Mo fuel foil.

  7. Development of carbon slurry fuels for transportation (hybrid fuels, phase 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, T. W., III; Dodge, L. G.

    1984-01-01

    Slurry fuels of various forms of solids in diesel fuel are developed and evaluated for their relative potential as fuel for diesel engines. Thirteen test fuels with different solids concentrations are formulated using eight different materials. A variety of properties are examined including ash content, sulfur content, particle size distribution, and rheological properties. Attempts are made to determine the effects of these variations on these fuel properties on injection, atomization, and combustion processes. The slurries are also tested in a single cylinder CLR engine in both direct injection and prechamber configurations. The data includes the normal performance parameters as well as heat release rates and emissions. The slurries perform very much like the baseline fuel. The combustion data indicate that a large fraction (90 percent or more) of the solids are burning in the engine. It appears that the prechamber engine configuration is more tolerant of the slurries than the direct injection configuration.

  8. A Novel Approach to Fabricating Fuel Compacts for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)

    SciTech Connect

    Pappano, Peter J; Burchell, Timothy D; Trammell, Michael P; Hunn, John D

    2008-01-01

    The next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) is a combined complex of a very high temperature reactor (VHTR) and hydrogen production facility. The VHTR can have a prismatic or pebble bed design and is powered by TRISO fuel in the form of a fuel compact (prismatic) or pebble (pebble bed). The US is scheduled to build a demonstration VHTR at the Idaho National Laboratory site by 2020. The first step toward building of this facility is development and qualification of the fuel for the reactor. This paper summarizes the research and development efforts performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) toward development of a qualified fuel compact for a VHTR.

  9. A novel approach to fabricating fuel compacts for the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappano, P. J.; Burchell, T. D.; Hunn, J. D.; Trammell, M. P.

    2008-10-01

    The next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) is a combined complex of a very high temperature reactor (VHTR) and hydrogen production facility. The VHTR can have a prismatic or pebble bed design and is powered by TRISO fuel in the form of a fuel compact (prismatic) or pebble (pebble bed). The US is scheduled to build a demonstration VHTR at the Idaho National Laboratory site by 2020. The first step toward building of this facility is development and qualification of the fuel for the reactor. This paper summarizes the research and development efforts performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) toward development of a qualified fuel compact for a VHTR.

  10. Design and fabrication of an optical probe with a phase filter for extended depth of focus.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jingchao; Kim, Junyoung; Yoo, Hongki

    2016-01-25

    The trade-off between spot size and depth of focus (DOF) often limits the performance of optical systems, such as optical coherence tomography and optical tweezers. Although researchers have proposed various methods to extend the DOF in free-space optics, many are difficult to implement in miniaturized optical probes due to space limitations. In this study, we present an optical probe with an extended DOF using a binary phase spatial filter (BPSF). The BPSF pattern was fabricated on the distal tip of an optical probe with a diameter of 1 mm by replica molding soft lithography, which can be easily implemented in a miniaturized optical probe due to its simple configuration. We optimized the BPSF pattern to enhance DOF, spot diameter, and light efficiency. To evaluate the fabricated endoscopic optical probe, we measured the three-dimensional point spread function of the BPSF probe and compared it with a probe without BPSF. The BPSF probe has a spot diameter of 3.56 μm and a DOF of 199.7 μm, while the probe without BPSF has a spot diameter of 3.69 μm and a DOF of 73.9 μm, representing a DOF gain of 2.7. We anticipate that this optical probe can be used in biomedical applications, including optical imaging and optical trapping techniques.

  11. Fabrication and photoluminescence of strong phase-separated InGaN based nanopillar LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Zhu, Chuanrui; Zhou, Yufan; Wang, Xuesong; Liu, Baoli; Wang, Xuelin; Lv, Yuanjie; Feng, Zhihong; Xu, Xiangang; Ji, Ziwu

    2015-12-01

    A strong phase-separated InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) light-emitting diode (LED) producing a blue-green dual-wavelength spectrum has been grown, and fabricated into two nanopillar array structures with different etching depths: one fabricated only on the p-GaN layer and the other penetrating through the active layers. Micro-photoluminescence (μ-PL) spectra have shown that compared with the as-grown (planar) LED, light extraction efficiency (LEE) is improved for both the shorter and the longer nanopillar array structures due to the increased light-extracting surface area and light-guiding effect, in contrast, internal quantum efficiency (IQE) is improved for only the longer one due to the relaxation of strain in the MQWs embedded in the nanopillars. Furthermore, the strain relaxation-induced peak blue-shift value is smaller for the green emission from In-rich quantum dots (QDs) than the blue emission from the InGaN matrix, and decreases for both the emissions with increasing temperature. The former is attributed to the quantum-confined Stark effect (QCSE) in the strong localized QDs of small size being smaller than in the InGaN matrix, the latter is due to the decrease of the thermal-mismatch strain in the MQWs with increasing temperature.

  12. Cotton fabrics treated with novel oxidic phases acting as effective smoke suppressants.

    PubMed

    Alongi, Jenny; Malucelli, Giulio

    2012-09-01

    Sol-gel processes have been applied to cotton fabrics in order to coat the fibres with a silica film, able to improve their thermo-oxidative resistance and their combustion behaviour under the irradiative heat flow of a cone calorimeter. To this aim, tetramethoxysilane, inorganic precursor of the silica phase, has been employed alone or coupled with species having either smoke suppressant features (namely, zinc oxide, zinc acetate dihydrate and zinc borate) or well known flame retardant properties (like ammonium pentaborate octahydrate, boron phosphate, ammonium polyphosphate and 9,10-dihydro-9-oxa-10-phosphaphenanthrene-10-oxide). In addition, the use of barium sulphate, which is a smoke suppressant and, at the same time, a flame retardant, has been investigated. Cone calorimetry turned out to be a suitable technique for assessing the flammability and smoke production of the treated fabrics (particularly when referring to total smoke release, smoke production rate and CO and CO2 yields). The composition and morphology of the deposited coatings, assessed by scanning electron microscopy, have been found to influence their combustion behaviour, as well as their thermal and thermo-oxidative stability evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis in nitrogen and air, respectively. PMID:24751038

  13. Micro solid oxide fuel cell fabricated on porous stainless steel: a new strategy for enhanced thermal cycling ability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kun Joong; Park, Byung Hyun; Kim, Sun Jae; Lee, Younki; Bae, Hongyeul; Choi, Gyeong Man

    2016-03-01

    Miniaturized solid oxide fuel cells (micro-SOFCs) are being extensively studied as a promising alternative to Li batteries for next generation portable power. A new micro-SOFC is designed and fabricated which shows enhanced thermal robustness by employing oxide-based thin-film electrode and porous stainless steel (STS) substrate. To deposit gas-tight thin-film electrolyte on STS, nano-porous composite oxide is proposed and applied as a new contact layer on STS. The micro-SOFC fabricated on composite oxide- STS dual layer substrate shows the peak power density of 560 mW cm(-2) at 550 °C and maintains this power density during rapid thermal cycles. This cell may be suitable for portable electronic device that requires high power-density and fast thermal cycling.

  14. Micro solid oxide fuel cell fabricated on porous stainless steel: a new strategy for enhanced thermal cycling ability

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kun Joong; Park, Byung Hyun; Kim, Sun Jae; Lee, Younki; Bae, Hongyeul; Choi, Gyeong Man

    2016-01-01

    Miniaturized solid oxide fuel cells (micro-SOFCs) are being extensively studied as a promising alternative to Li batteries for next generation portable power. A new micro-SOFC is designed and fabricated which shows enhanced thermal robustness by employing oxide-based thin-film electrode and porous stainless steel (STS) substrate. To deposit gas-tight thin-film electrolyte on STS, nano-porous composite oxide is proposed and applied as a new contact layer on STS. The micro-SOFC fabricated on composite oxide- STS dual layer substrate shows the peak power density of 560 mW cm−2 at 550 °C and maintains this power density during rapid thermal cycles. This cell may be suitable for portable electronic device that requires high power-density and fast thermal cycling. PMID:26928921

  15. Testing of a cathode fabricated by painting with a brush pen for anode-supported tubular solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Renzhu; Zhao, Chunhua; Li, Junliang; Wang, Shaorong; Wen, Zhaoyin; Wen, Tinglian

    We have studied the properties of a cathode fabricated by painting with a brush pen for use with anode-supported tubular solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The porous cathode connects well with the electrolyte. A preliminary examination of a single tubular cell, consisting of a Ni-YSZ anode support tube, a Ni-ScSZ anode functional layer, a ScSZ electrolyte film, and a LSM-ScSZ cathode fabricated by painting with a brush pen, has been carried out, and an improved performance is obtained. The ohmic resistance of the cathode side clearly decreases, falling to a value only 37% of that of the comparable cathode made by dip-coating at 850 °C. The single cell with the painted cathode generates a maximum power density of 405 mW cm -2 at 850 °C, when operating with humidified hydrogen.

  16. Micro solid oxide fuel cell fabricated on porous stainless steel: a new strategy for enhanced thermal cycling ability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kun Joong; Park, Byung Hyun; Kim, Sun Jae; Lee, Younki; Bae, Hongyeul; Choi, Gyeong Man

    2016-01-01

    Miniaturized solid oxide fuel cells (micro-SOFCs) are being extensively studied as a promising alternative to Li batteries for next generation portable power. A new micro-SOFC is designed and fabricated which shows enhanced thermal robustness by employing oxide-based thin-film electrode and porous stainless steel (STS) substrate. To deposit gas-tight thin-film electrolyte on STS, nano-porous composite oxide is proposed and applied as a new contact layer on STS. The micro-SOFC fabricated on composite oxide- STS dual layer substrate shows the peak power density of 560 mW cm(-2) at 550 °C and maintains this power density during rapid thermal cycles. This cell may be suitable for portable electronic device that requires high power-density and fast thermal cycling. PMID:26928921

  17. Micro solid oxide fuel cell fabricated on porous stainless steel: a new strategy for enhanced thermal cycling ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kun Joong; Park, Byung Hyun; Kim, Sun Jae; Lee, Younki; Bae, Hongyeul; Choi, Gyeong Man

    2016-03-01

    Miniaturized solid oxide fuel cells (micro-SOFCs) are being extensively studied as a promising alternative to Li batteries for next generation portable power. A new micro-SOFC is designed and fabricated which shows enhanced thermal robustness by employing oxide-based thin-film electrode and porous stainless steel (STS) substrate. To deposit gas-tight thin-film electrolyte on STS, nano-porous composite oxide is proposed and applied as a new contact layer on STS. The micro-SOFC fabricated on composite oxide- STS dual layer substrate shows the peak power density of 560 mW cm-2 at 550 °C and maintains this power density during rapid thermal cycles. This cell may be suitable for portable electronic device that requires high power-density and fast thermal cycling.

  18. MATERIALS, FABRICATION, AND MANUFACTURING OF MICRO/NANOSTRUCTURED SURFACES FOR PHASE-CHANGE HEAT TRANSFER ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, M; Gerasopoulos, K; Maroo, SC; Hart, AJ

    2014-07-23

    This article describes the most prominent materials, fabrication methods, and manufacturing schemes for micro- and nanostructured surfaces that can be employed to enhance phase-change heat transfer phenomena. The numerous processes include traditional microfabrication techniques such as thin-film deposition, lithography, and etching, as well as template-assisted and template-free nanofabrication techniques. The creation of complex, hierarchical, and heterogeneous surface structures using advanced techniques is also reviewed. Additionally, research needs in the field and future directions necessary to translate these approaches from the laboratory to high-performance applications are identified. Particular focus is placed on the extension of these techniques to the design of micro/nanostructures for increased performance, manufacturability, and reliability. The current research needs and goals are detailed, and potential pathways forward are suggested.

  19. Polarization Sensitive THz TDS and Fabrication of Alignment Cells for Solution Phase THz Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Deepu Koshy

    sense that it makes use of the polarization state of THz pulse which is also the case for the alignment spectroscopy. PMOTS technique detects the rotation and change in ellipticity to the incident polarization from which the hall coefficients of the sample can be calculated. The final section deals with the fabrication of Dynamical Alignment Terahertz Spectroscopy cells for solution phase measurements. Design, fabrication and process optimization are detailed. Micro-fabrication based on optical lithography and SU-8 negative photoresist has been explored.

  20. Design, fabrication, and testing of an external fuel (UO2), full-length thermionic converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schock, A.; Raab, B.

    1971-01-01

    The development of a full-length external-fuel thermionic converter for in-pile testing is described. The development program includes out-of-pile performance testing of the fully fueled-converter, using RF-induction heating, before its installation in the in-pile test capsule. The external-fuel converter is cylindrical in shape, and consists of an inner, centrally cooled collector, and an outer emitter surrounded by nuclear fuel. The term full-length denotes that the converter is long enough to extend over the full height of the reactor core. Thus, the converter is not a scaled-down test device, but a full-scale fuel element of the thermionic reactor. The external-fuel converter concept permits a number of different design options, particularly with respect to the fuel composition and shape, and the collector cooling arrangement. The converter described was developed for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and is based on their concept for a thermionic reactor with uninsulated collector cooling as previously described. The converter is double-ended, with through-flow cooling, and with ceramic seals and emitter and collector power take-offs at both ends. The design uses a revolver-shaped tungsten emitter body, with the central emitter hole surrounded by six peripheral fuel holes loaded with cylindrical UO2 pellets.

  1. Fuel/engine/airframe tradeoff study, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peacock, A. T.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of broadening the specifications for JP-4 and JP-8 fueled on the performance and cost of all USAF aircraft presently using JP-4 as well as those expected to be introduced into the force structure by 1983 are investigated. Test results indicated that there was no impact on engine performance, turbine durability, and coking, however there was a small maintenance cost increase as a result of a small combustor life decrease. Using JP-4 as standard fuel will avoid the use of high demand middle distillate fuels and give producers flexibility. Extensive use of JP-8 in the United States will increase middle distillate demand and cause a slight increase in engine hot-section maintenance. It is also concluded that the maximum allowable freeze point of JP-4 or JP-8 cannot be increased without degrading system performance and safety as critical conditions are approached.

  2. Analytical fuel property effects, small combustors, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of nonstandard aviation fuels on a typical small gas turbine combustor was analyzed. The T700/CT7 engine family was chosen as being representative of the class of aircraft power plants desired. Fuel properties, as specified by NASA, are characterized by low hydrogen content and high aromatics levels. Higher than normal smoke output and flame radiation intensity for the current T700 combustor which serves as a baseline were anticipated. It is, therefore, predicted that out of specification smoke visibility and higher than normal shell temperatures will exist when using NASA ERBS fuels with a consequence of severe reduction in cyclic life. Three new designs are proposed to compensate for the deficiencies expected with the existing design. They have emerged as the best of the eight originally proposed redesigns or combinations thereof. After the five choices that were originally made by NASA on the basis of competing performance factors, General Electric narrowed the field to the three proposed.

  3. Program for refan JT8D engine design, fabrication and test, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, J. A.; Zimmerman, E. S.; Scaramella, V. M.

    1975-01-01

    The objective of the JT8D refan program was to design, fabricate, and test certifiable modifications of the JT8D engine which would reduce noise generated by JT8D powered aircraft. This was to be accomplished without affecting reliability and maintainability, at minimum retrofit cost, and with no performance penalty. The mechanical design, engine performance and stability characteristics at sea-level and altitude, and the engine noise characteristics of the test engines are documented. Results confirmed the structural integrity of the JT8D-109. Engine operation was stable throughout the airplane flight envelope. Fuel consumption of the test engines was higher than that required to meet the goal of no airplane performance penalty, but the causes were identified and corrected during a normal pre-certification engine development program. Compared to the baseline JT8D-109 engine, the acoustically treated JT8D-109 engine showed noise reductions of 6 PNdB at takeoff and 11 PNdB at a typical approach power setting.

  4. Technology Development for Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell Powerplant, Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christner, L.

    1980-01-01

    The technology development for materials, cells, and reformers for on site integrated energy systems is described. The carbonization of 25 cu cm, 350 cu cm, and 1200 cu cm cell test hardware was accomplished and the performance of 25 cu cm fuel cells was improved. Electrochemical corrosion rates of graphite/phenolic resin composites in phosphoric acid were determined. Three cells (5 in by 15 in stacks) were operated for longer than 7000 hours. Specified endurance stacks completed a total of 4000 hours. An electrically heated reformer was tested and is to provide hydrogen for 23 cell fuel cell stack.

  5. Determination of alternative fuels combustion products: Phase 1 report

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, K.A.

    1997-09-01

    This report describes the laboratory effort to identify and quantify organic exhaust species generated from alternative-fueled light-duty vehicles operating over the Federal Test Procedure on compressed natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, methanol, ethanol, and reformulated gasoline. The exhaust species from these vehicles were identified and quantified for fuel/air equivalence ratios of 0.8, 1.0, and 1.2, nominally, and were analyzed with and without a vehicle catalyst in place to determine the influence of a catalytic converter on species formation.

  6. Microscale phase change of fuels for MEMS power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haendler, Brenda

    As portable electronics technology advances, systems are becoming smaller and more energy intensive. While batteries are currently the only commercial power source for these applications, work is being done to create liquid fuel based portable power packs. These systems would leverage the higher energy density (W-hr/l) and specific energy (W-hr/kg) of liquid hydrocarbon fuels over available battery chemistries. For micro engines and small fuels cells there are advantages to preheating and vaporizing the fuel in a microchannel. The work presented in this dissertation focuses on understanding and characterizing the temperature and pressure signatures that result from microscale boiling of fuels in etched silicon channels approximately 100 mm in diameter. Building on previous microscale boiling work which used water as the working fluid for electronics cooling applications, the studies presented in this dissertation use both water and fuels including methanol, ethanol, and octane. Results are presented in the form of pressure and temperature measurements for a range of working fluids, volumetric flow rates, superheat temperatures and channel geometries. From a Fourier transform analysis of the pressure signatures, it was found that the frequency of the pressure fluctuations increases with superheat for ethanol as the working fluid while for methanol the frequency increases with volumetric flow rate. Tests were also conducted with sudden expansion geometries, which reduce the amplitude of the pressure fluctuations and create a localized cooling in the working fluid. Results are compared using fluid properties, including surface tension and heat of vaporization, and non-dimensional numbers including the Weber and the Jakob number. This study presents a significant contribution to the body of knowledge on microscale boiling. One application of microscale boiling for portable power technologies is also presented. Fuel cracking, breaking apart of long hydrocarbon chain

  7. Size distribution of EC, OC and particle-phase PAHs emissions from a diesel engine fueled with three fuels.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tian; Huang, Zhen; Cheung, C S; Ma, Jing

    2012-11-01

    The size distribution of elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC) and particle-phase PAHs emission from a direct injection diesel engine fueled with a waste cooking biodiesel, ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD, 10-ppm-wt), and low sulfur diesel (LSD, 400-ppm-wt) were investigated experimentally. The emission factor of biodiesel EC is 90.6 mg/kh, which decreases by 60.3 and 71.7%, compared with ULSD and LSD respectively and the mass mean diameter (MMD) of EC was also decreased with the use of biodiesel. The effect of biodiesel on OC emission might depend on the engine operation condition, and the difference in OC size distribution is not that significant among the three fuels. For biodiesel, its brake specific emission of particle-phase PAHs is obviously smaller than that from the two diesel fuels, and the reduction effect appears in almost all size ranges. In terms of size distribution, the MMD of PAHs from biodiesel is larger than that from the two diesel fuels, which could be attributed to the more effective reduction on combustion derived PAHs in nuclei mode. The toxicity analysis indicates that biodiesel could reduce the total PAHs emissions, as well as the carcinogenic potency of particle-phase PAHs in almost all the size ranges.

  8. NASA Broad Specification Fuels Combustion Technology program - Pratt and Whitney Aircraft Phase I results and status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohmann, R. P.; Fear, J. S.

    1982-01-01

    In connection with increases in the cost of fuels and the reduced availability of high quality petroleum crude, a modification of fuel specifications has been considered to allow acceptance of poorer quality fuels. To obtain the information upon which a selection of appropriate fuels for aircraft can be based, the Broad Specification Fuels Combustion Technology program was formulated by NASA. A description is presented of program-related investigations conducted by an American aerospace company. The specific objective of Phase I of this program has been to evaluate the impact of the use of broadened properties fuels on combustor design through comprehensive combustor rig testing. Attention is given to combustor concepts, experimental evaluation, results obtained with single stage combustors, the stage combustor concept, and the capability of a variable geometry combustor.

  9. Highly flexible TiO2-coated stainless steel fabric electrode prepared by liquid-phase deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Hong Seo; Lee, Jeong Beom; Jung, Jiwon; Lee, Seyoung; Ryu, Ji Heon; Oh, Seung M.

    2016-10-01

    In order to construct flexible lithium-ion batteries, stainless steel (SUS) fabric is used as a current collector for the negative electrode of lithium-ion batteries. TiO2 is coated onto the SUS fabric by liquid-phase deposition to construct an electrode consisting of an SUS wire core and a TiO2 shell. A folding test is then conducted to assess the robustness of TiO2-coated SUS fabric, during which no detachment of TiO2 particles from the SUS current collector is observed; the negative electrode shows a consistent electrochemical cycle performance even under severe physical duress. The TiO2-SUS fabric integration shows excellent flexibility without loss of electrochemical efficacy under mechanical stress, which occurs owing to three main factors. First, the mechanical stress imposed by folding is effectively dissipated by the 3-dimensional structure of the SUS fabric. Secondly, the TiO2 electrode itself is free from mechanical stress owing to negligible volume change during electrochemical cycling. Thirdly, the high interfacial adhesion strength between TiO2 and SUS fabric due to covalent bond formation during liquid-phase deposition prevents the loss of active material from the negative electrode during the folding tests.

  10. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM LANDFILL GAS: PHASE II. PRETREATMENT SYSTEM PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes Phase II of a demonstration of the utilization of commercial phosphoric acid fuel cells to recover energy from landfill gas. This phase consisted primarily of the construction and testing of a Gas Pretreatment Unit (GPU) whose function is to remove those impu...

  11. Analysis of the possibility of fabricating compact combustion-driven DF lasers due to fuel preheating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xiaoting; Yuan, Shengfu; Hua, Weihong

    2016-09-01

    We report a theoretical calculation of the processes proceeding in the combustor of combustion-driven cw DF/HF chemical lasers with different mixtures of fuels preheated to high temperatures. Calculation results demonstrate a great effect of the preheating temperature on the yield of F atoms and strongest deactivator, on the primary dilution ratio ψp and on the estimated specific power. When fuels are preheated to about 1300 K, the specific power is improved by about 74.2%, and the total mass of the fuel is reduced by about 43%, which makes it possible to realise a more compact and efficient design of combustion-driven cw DF/HF chemical lasers at elevated combustor pressures. Fuel preheating can facilitate the development of chemical lasers and high-power lasers based not only on airborne and space-borne platforms, but also on mobile ground-based platforms.

  12. Fabrication and characterization of a fuel flexible micro-reformer fully integrated in silicon for micro-solid oxide fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pla, D.; Salleras, M.; Garbayo, I.; Morata, A.; Sabaté, N.; Divins, N. J.; Llorca, J.; Tarancón, A.

    2015-05-01

    A novel design of a fuel-flexible micro-reactor for hydrogen generation from ethanol and methane is proposed in this work. The micro-reactor is fully fabricated with mainstream MEMS technology and consists of an array of more than 20000 through-silicon vertically aligned micro-channels per cm2 of 50 μm in diameter. Due to this unique configuration, the micro-reformer presents a total surface per projected area of 16 cm2/cm2 and per volume of 320 cm2/cm3. The active surface of the micro-reformer, i.e. the walls of the micro-channels, is homogenously coated with a thin film of Rh- Pd/CeO2 catalyst. Excellent steam reforming of ethanol and dry reforming of methane are presented with hydrogen production rates above 3 mL/min·cm2 and hydrogen selectivity of ca. 50% on a dry basis at operations conditions suitable for application in micro-solid oxide fuel cells (micro-SOFCs), i.e. 700-800ºC and fuel flows of 0.02 mLL/min for ethanol and 36 mLG/min for methane (corresponding to a system able to produce one electrical watt).

  13. Status Report on the Fabrication of Fuel Cladding Chemical Interaction Test Articles for ATR Irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G.; Howard, Richard H.

    2015-09-28

    FeCrAl alloys are a promising new class of alloys for light water reactor (LWR) applications due to their superior oxidation and corrosion resistance in high temperature environments. The current R&D efforts have focused on the alloy composition and processing routes to generate nuclear grade FeCrAl alloys with optimized properties for enhanced accident tolerance while maintaining properties needed for normal operation conditions. Therefore, the composition and processing routes must be optimized to maintain the high temperature steam oxidation (typically achieved by increasing the Cr and Al content) while still exhibiting properties conducive to normal operation in a LWR (such as radiation tolerance where reducing Cr content is favorable). Within this balancing act is the addition of understanding the influence on composition and processing routes on the FeCrAl alloys for fuel-cladding chemical interactions (FCCI). Currently, limited knowledge exists on FCCI for the FeCrAl-UO2 clad-fuel system. To overcome the knowledge gaps on the FCCI for the FeCrAl-UO2 clad-fuel system a series of fueled irradiation tests have been developed for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) housed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The first series of tests has already been reported. These tests used miniaturized 17x17 PWR fuel geometry rodlets of second-generation FeCrAl alloys fueled with industrial Westinghouse UO2 fuel. These rodlets were encapsulated within a stainless steel housing.To provide high fidelity experiments and more robust testing, a new series of rodlets have been developed deemed the Accident Tolerant Fuel Experiment #1 Oak Ridge National Laboratory FCCI test (ATF-1 ORNL FCCI). The main driving factor, which is discussed in detail, was to provide a radiation environment where prototypical fuel-clad interface temperatures are met while still maintaining constant contact between industrial fuel and the candidate cladding alloys

  14. Facile Fabrication of Graphene-Containing Foam as a High-Performance Anode for Microbial Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lu; Wang, Shuqin; Peng, Shuqin; Jiang, Hongmei; Zhang, Youming; Deng, Wenfang; Tan, Yueming; Ma, Ming; Xie, Qingji

    2015-07-20

    Facile fabrication of novel three-dimensional anode materials to increase the bacterial loading capacity and improve substrate transport in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) is of great interest and importance. Herein, a novel graphene-containing foam (GCF) was fabricated easily by freeze-drying and pyrolysis of a graphene oxide-agarose gel. Owing to the involvement of graphene and stainless-steel mesh in the GCF, the GCF shows high electrical conductivity, enabling the GCF to be a conductive electrode for MFC applications. With the aid of agarose, the GCF electrode possesses a supermacroporous structure with pore sizes ranging from 100-200 μm and a high surface area, which greatly increase the bacterial loading capacity. Cell viability measurements indicate that the GCF possesses excellent biocompatibility. The MFC, equipped with a 0.4 mm-thick GCF anode, shows a maximum area power density of 786 mW m(-2) , which is 4.1 times that of a MFC equipped with a commercial carbon cloth anode. The simple fabrication route in combination with the outstanding electrochemical performance of the GCF indicates a promising anode for MFC applications. PMID:26095648

  15. Facile Fabrication of Graphene-Containing Foam as a High-Performance Anode for Microbial Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lu; Wang, Shuqin; Peng, Shuqin; Jiang, Hongmei; Zhang, Youming; Deng, Wenfang; Tan, Yueming; Ma, Ming; Xie, Qingji

    2015-07-20

    Facile fabrication of novel three-dimensional anode materials to increase the bacterial loading capacity and improve substrate transport in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) is of great interest and importance. Herein, a novel graphene-containing foam (GCF) was fabricated easily by freeze-drying and pyrolysis of a graphene oxide-agarose gel. Owing to the involvement of graphene and stainless-steel mesh in the GCF, the GCF shows high electrical conductivity, enabling the GCF to be a conductive electrode for MFC applications. With the aid of agarose, the GCF electrode possesses a supermacroporous structure with pore sizes ranging from 100-200 μm and a high surface area, which greatly increase the bacterial loading capacity. Cell viability measurements indicate that the GCF possesses excellent biocompatibility. The MFC, equipped with a 0.4 mm-thick GCF anode, shows a maximum area power density of 786 mW m(-2) , which is 4.1 times that of a MFC equipped with a commercial carbon cloth anode. The simple fabrication route in combination with the outstanding electrochemical performance of the GCF indicates a promising anode for MFC applications.

  16. New insights in Microbial Fuel Cells: novel solid phase anolyte.

    PubMed

    Tommasi, Tonia; Salvador, Gian Paolo; Quaglio, Marzia

    2016-01-01

    For the development of long lasting portable microbial fuel cells (MFCs) new strategies are necessary to overcome critical issues such as hydraulic pump system and the biochemical substrate retrieval overtime to sustain bacteria metabolism. The present work proposes the use of a synthetic solid anolyte (SSA), constituted by agar, carbonaceous and nitrogen sources dissolved into diluted seawater. Results of a month-test showed the potential of the new SSA-MFC as a long lasting low energy consuming system. PMID:27375205

  17. New insights in Microbial Fuel Cells: novel solid phase anolyte

    PubMed Central

    Tommasi, Tonia; Salvador, Gian Paolo; Quaglio, Marzia

    2016-01-01

    For the development of long lasting portable microbial fuel cells (MFCs) new strategies are necessary to overcome critical issues such as hydraulic pump system and the biochemical substrate retrieval overtime to sustain bacteria metabolism. The present work proposes the use of a synthetic solid anolyte (SSA), constituted by agar, carbonaceous and nitrogen sources dissolved into diluted seawater. Results of a month-test showed the potential of the new SSA-MFC as a long lasting low energy consuming system. PMID:27375205

  18. New insights in Microbial Fuel Cells: novel solid phase anolyte.

    PubMed

    Tommasi, Tonia; Salvador, Gian Paolo; Quaglio, Marzia

    2016-07-04

    For the development of long lasting portable microbial fuel cells (MFCs) new strategies are necessary to overcome critical issues such as hydraulic pump system and the biochemical substrate retrieval overtime to sustain bacteria metabolism. The present work proposes the use of a synthetic solid anolyte (SSA), constituted by agar, carbonaceous and nitrogen sources dissolved into diluted seawater. Results of a month-test showed the potential of the new SSA-MFC as a long lasting low energy consuming system.

  19. New insights in Microbial Fuel Cells: novel solid phase anolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tommasi, Tonia; Salvador, Gian Paolo; Quaglio, Marzia

    2016-07-01

    For the development of long lasting portable microbial fuel cells (MFCs) new strategies are necessary to overcome critical issues such as hydraulic pump system and the biochemical substrate retrieval overtime to sustain bacteria metabolism. The present work proposes the use of a synthetic solid anolyte (SSA), constituted by agar, carbonaceous and nitrogen sources dissolved into diluted seawater. Results of a month-test showed the potential of the new SSA-MFC as a long lasting low energy consuming system.

  20. RECENT PROGRESS IN THE FABRICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF DUCTILE-PHASE-TOUGHENED TUNGSTEN LAMINATES FOR PLASMA-FACING MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, Kevin; Odette, G Robert; Fields, Kirk A.; Gragg, David; Yamamoto, Takuya; Zok, Frank W.; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Borlaug, Brennan A.

    2015-09-23

    A promising approach to increasing the fracture toughness of W-alloys is ductile-phase toughening (DPT). A ductile phase reinforcement in a brittle matrix increases toughness primarily by crack bridging. A W-Cu laminate was fabricated and the properties of the constituent metals were characterized along with those for the composite. Development of a design model for large-scale crack bridging continued.

  1. RECENT PROGRESS IN THE FABRICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF DUCTILE-PHASE-TOUGHENED TUNGSTEN COMPOSITES FOR PLASMA-FACING MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, Kevin; Odette, G Robert; Fields, Kirk A.; Gragg, David; Zok, Frank W.; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Borlaug, Brennan A.

    2014-08-29

    A promising approach to increasing fracture toughness and decreasing the DBTT of a W-alloy is by ductile-phase toughening (DPT). In this method, a ductile phase is included in a brittle matrix to prevent crack propagation by bridging. Composite specimens were fabricated by two methods: 1) sintering W powders together with carburized W wires, and 2) hot pressing W and Cu foils together with W wires. These composites were tested in tension and three-point bending.

  2. Experimental study on spray characteristics of alternate jet fuels using Phase Doppler Anemometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannaiyan, Kumaran; Sadr, Reza

    2013-11-01

    Gas-to-Liquid (GTL) fuels have gained global attention due to their cleaner combustion characteristics. The chemical and physical properties of GTL jet fuels are different from conventional jet fuels owing to the difference in their production methodology. It is important to study the spray characteristics of GTL jet fuels as the change of physical properties can affect atomization, mixing, evaporation and combustion process, ultimately affecting emission process. In this work, spray characteristics of two GTL synthetic jet fuels are studied using a pressure-swirl nozzle at different injection pressures and atmospheric ambient condition. Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) measurements of droplet size and velocity are compared with those of regular Jet A-1 fuel at several axial and radial locations downstream of the nozzle exit. Experimental results show that although the GTL fuels have different physical properties such as viscosity, density, and surface tension, among each other the resultant change in the spray characteristics is insignificant. Furthermore, the presented results show that GTL fuel spray characteristics exhibit close similarity to those of Jet A-1 fuel. Funded by Qatar Science and Technology Park.

  3. Fire loading calculations for 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Myott, C.F.

    1994-01-24

    Fire loading analyses were provided for the N Reactor Fuel Supply Buildings 3712, 3716, 303A, 303B, 303E, 303G, and 303K. Fire loading calculations, maximum temperatures, and fire durations were provided to support the safety analyses documentation. The ``combustibles`` for this document include: wood, cardboard, cloth, and plastic, and does not include the uranium and fuel assembly loading. The information in this document will also be used to support the fire hazard analysis for the same buildings, therefore, it is assumed that sprinkler systems do not work, or the maximum possible fire loss is assumed.

  4. Fabrication of mixed phase TiO2 heterojunction nanorods and their enhanced photoactivities.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Amritanjali; Mondal, Indranil; Ghosh, Saptarshi; Chattopadhyay, Nitin; Pal, Ujjwal

    2016-06-01

    Substantial efforts have been made in recent times in solving the major limiting factors affecting the efficiency of a photocatalyst. The fabrication of efficient junction architectures is one of the viable approaches to resolve this setback. We have developed a facile and systematic approach for the synthesis of anatase TiO2 () nanoparticles and 1-D anatase and rutile TiO2 () heterojunction nanorods to enhance the interfacial contact area by adjusting the titanium(iv) butoxide (TBOT) to titanium chloride (TiCl4) volume ratio. Their narrower band gap, increasing surface area and anatase phase composition engineered by adjusting the relative concentrations of titanium butoxide (TBOT) and titanium chloride (TiCl4) (TBOT/TiCl4, 1 : 0, 1 : 0.25, 1 : 1 and 1 : 4 v/v for , , and respectively) are also addressed. The materials showed impressive photocatalytic activity for H2 evolution from water/methanol and the photodegradation of organic pollutants like rhodamine B (RhB) and methylene blue (MB) dyes. showed superior activity (16.4 mmol g(-1) h(-1)) with an apparent quantum efficiency (AQE) of 7.7% together with its long-term stability. This is attributed to the synergistic effect observed in the mixed phase nanorod heterojunction photocatalyst. Methyl viologen (MV(2+)) has been used as a probe to elucidate the photocatalytic activities and highlight the heterojunction driven separation of photo-excited charge carriers for enhanced hydrogen production. PMID:27212470

  5. Fabrication of a superhydrophobic surface from porous polymer using phase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianfeng; Xiao, Xinyan; Shi, Yinlong; Wan, Caixia

    2014-04-01

    The present work reports a simple method to fabricate superhydrophobic porous polymeric surfaces by a phase separation process. The method involves the in situ polymerization of butyl methacrylate (BMA) and ethylene dimethacrylate (EDMA) in the presence of co-porogens of 1,4-butanediol (BDO) and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) to afford superhydrophobic surfaces with the micro/nano roughness structure. The influences of the polymerization mixture on the morphology and hydrophobicity were investigated by adjusting the composition of the co-porogens and the mass ratio of monomers to co-porogens, respectively. And a precise description of the underlying mechanism of the microstructure formation was presented. The as-prepared surface shows a superhydrophobicity with water contact angle (WCA) of 159.5° and low sliding angle (SA) of 3.1°. Moreover, the superhydrophobic surface shows good chemical stability with better resistance to acid, alkali or salt aqueous solutions and excellent thermal stability. The method is simple and low-cost and can be used for the preparation of the self-cleaning superhydrophobic surfaces.

  6. Facile fabrication of hierarchical porous resins via high internal phase emulsion and polymeric porogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Libin; Luo, Xiaogang; Cai, Ning; Xue, Yanan; Zhu, San; Fu, Zhen; Yu, Faquan

    2014-06-01

    To achieve the dual features of fast oil absorption rate and high oil absorbency for the practical application in emergency treatment of spilled chemical pollutants, hierarchical porous resins were synthesized. The polymerization of high internal phase emulsion was applied to fabricate the porous structure for the purpose of high oil absorbency. Polymeric porogens were proposed to adjust the second-order or interconnected pore structure for fast oil absorption rate. SEM revealed the hierarchical porous structure. Molecular weight and dose of polymeric porogen were investigated for the effect on the formation of porous structure and absorption features. Optimized resins have 31.5 g/g or 17.1 g/g absorbency for chloroform and toluene, respectively, and only 5 min is needed to reach their saturation absorption. Besides, the porous resins demonstrated high oil retention under pressure. The absorption/desorption cycling results revealed the high repeatability of recovered resins. All these tests predicted the potential applications of porous resins of this kind particularly in the emergency treatment of oil and chemical pollution.

  7. Life Cycle Assessment of Vehicle Lightweighting: Novel Mathematical Methods to Estimate Use-Phase Fuel Consumption.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Chul; Wallington, Timothy J; Sullivan, John L; Keoleian, Gregory A

    2015-08-18

    Lightweighting is a key strategy to improve vehicle fuel economy. Assessing the life-cycle benefits of lightweighting requires a quantitative description of the use-phase fuel consumption reduction associated with mass reduction. We present novel methods of estimating mass-induced fuel consumption (MIF) and fuel reduction values (FRVs) from fuel economy and dynamometer test data in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) database. In the past, FRVs have been measured using experimental testing. We demonstrate that FRVs can be mathematically derived from coast down coefficients in the EPA vehicle test database avoiding additional testing. MIF and FRVs calculated for 83 different 2013 MY vehicles are in the ranges 0.22-0.43 and 0.15-0.26 L/(100 km 100 kg), respectively, and increase to 0.27-0.53 L/(100 km 100 kg) with powertrain resizing to retain equivalent vehicle performance. We show how use-phase fuel consumption can be estimated using MIF and FRVs in life cycle assessments (LCAs) of vehicle lightweighting from total vehicle and vehicle component perspectives with, and without, powertrain resizing. The mass-induced fuel consumption model is illustrated by estimating lifecycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emission benefits from lightweighting a grille opening reinforcement component using magnesium or carbon fiber composite for 83 different vehicle models. PMID:26168234

  8. Life Cycle Assessment of Vehicle Lightweighting: Novel Mathematical Methods to Estimate Use-Phase Fuel Consumption.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Chul; Wallington, Timothy J; Sullivan, John L; Keoleian, Gregory A

    2015-08-18

    Lightweighting is a key strategy to improve vehicle fuel economy. Assessing the life-cycle benefits of lightweighting requires a quantitative description of the use-phase fuel consumption reduction associated with mass reduction. We present novel methods of estimating mass-induced fuel consumption (MIF) and fuel reduction values (FRVs) from fuel economy and dynamometer test data in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) database. In the past, FRVs have been measured using experimental testing. We demonstrate that FRVs can be mathematically derived from coast down coefficients in the EPA vehicle test database avoiding additional testing. MIF and FRVs calculated for 83 different 2013 MY vehicles are in the ranges 0.22-0.43 and 0.15-0.26 L/(100 km 100 kg), respectively, and increase to 0.27-0.53 L/(100 km 100 kg) with powertrain resizing to retain equivalent vehicle performance. We show how use-phase fuel consumption can be estimated using MIF and FRVs in life cycle assessments (LCAs) of vehicle lightweighting from total vehicle and vehicle component perspectives with, and without, powertrain resizing. The mass-induced fuel consumption model is illustrated by estimating lifecycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emission benefits from lightweighting a grille opening reinforcement component using magnesium or carbon fiber composite for 83 different vehicle models.

  9. Fabrication of Fiber-Optic Tilted Bragg Grating Filter in 40 nm Range with A Single Phase Mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Joseph; Wang, Y.; Sharma, A.; Burdine, Robert V. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Fiber-optic Bragg grating filters are fabricated with a range of Bragg wavelength between 1296 and 1336 nm, using a single phase mask. 30 mW of continuous-wave light at 244 nm is used from a frequency-doubled argon-ion laser having an intracavity etalon. Gratings are fabricated by tilting the photosensitive fiber with respect to the phase mask up to an angle of 15 degrees. The variation of Bragg wavelength with the fiber-tilt is explained with a simple formula. High spatial coherence of 244 nm light makes it possible to displace the fiber as much as 6 mm in front of the phase mask and tilt the fiber by as much as 15 degrees. This results in nearly constant band-width and near 100% reflectively for all gratings throughout the 40 nm range.

  10. Fabrication and characterization of analyzer gratings with high aspect ratios for phase contrast imaging using a Talbot interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Kenntner, Johannes; Altapova, Venera; Grund, Thomas; Pantenburg, Franz Josef; Meiser, Jan; Baumbach, Tilo; Mohr, Juergen

    2012-05-17

    In recent years, X-ray imaging based on the differential phase contrast gained more and more attention to be used in X-ray imaging. Among other techniques like crystal-based diffraction and propagation methods, the grating based Talbot interferometry offers an approach measuring phase modulations of X-rays while passing low absorbing objects. The Talbot interferometer yields for highly efficient X-ray imaging signals for hard X-rays with energies above 10 keV. One factor with high impact on the imaging performance of such grating interferometers is the gratings quality. We introduce a fabrication process allowing both, the fabrication of phase modulating and analyzer gratings with high aspect ratios, up to 100. Structural deviations from the optimal geometry of the gratings are investigated and their influence on the obtained image quality is discussed.

  11. McDonnell 40-kW Giromill Wind System. Phase II. Fabrication and test

    SciTech Connect

    Brulle, R

    1980-06-01

    A 40 kW vertical axis windmill called a ''Giromill'' was fabricated, erected, and tested. The system design is described as well as some design changes made during fabrication. Manufacturing cost estimates are updated. Fabrication of the turbine blades, support arms, and fixed and rotating tower is described as well as the tests. Testing included control systems acceptance tests; Giromill system acceptance tests; structural, mechanical, control system and electric generation operational tests; and performance tests connected to the utility grid. (LEW)

  12. Technology development for phosphoric acid fuel cell powerplant, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christner, L.

    1981-01-01

    The development of materials, cell components, and reformers for on site integrated energy systems is described. Progress includes: (1) heat-treatment of 25 sq cm, 350 sq cm and 1200 sq cm cell test hardware was accomplished. Performance of fuel cells is improved by using this material; (2) electrochemical and chemical corrosion rates of heat-treated and as-molded graphite/phenolic resin composites in phosphoric acid were determined; (3) three cell, 5 in. x 15 in. stacks operated for up to 10,000 hours and 12 in. x 17 in. five cell stacks were tested for 5,000 hours; (4) a three cell 5 in. x 15 in. stack with 0.12 mg Pt/sq cm anodes and 0.25 mg Pt/sq cm cathodes was operated for 4,500 hours; and (5) an ERC proprietary high bubble pressure matrix, MAT-1, was tested for up to 10,000 hours.

  13. TRIGA FUEL PHASE I AND II CRITICALITY CALCULATION

    SciTech Connect

    L. Angers

    1999-11-23

    The purpose of this calculation is to characterize the criticality aspect of the codisposal of TRIGA (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomic) reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) with Savannah River Site (SRS) high-level waste (HLW). The TRIGA SNF is loaded into a Department of Energy (DOE) standardized SNF canister which is centrally positioned inside a five-canister defense SRS HLW waste package (WP). The objective of the calculation is to investigate the criticality issues for the WP containing the five SRS HLW and DOE SNF canisters in various stages of degradation. This calculation will support the analysis that will be performed to demonstrate the viability of the codisposal concept for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR).

  14. Multi-fuel low-NOx burner development, phase 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, H. A.; Khinkis, M. J.; Waibel, R. T.

    1982-05-01

    The development of high efficiency, low nitrogen-oxides producing multi-fuel industrial burners with flame and heat transfer characteristics suitable for specific industrial processes was investigated. Burners for three industrial processes were designed to achieve a reduction in NOx emissions compared with currently used standard burners: (1) a high excess air burner used in direct air dryers for applications in the food processing industry; (2) a hot air burner with high convective heat transfer for direct fired metal processing furnaces; and (3) a hot air burner with a long, luminous flame for direct fired process furnaces in the steel, aluminum, and glass industries. The high convective, hot air burner achieved NOx emission reduction of up to 50%. NOx emissions from the hot air burner with a long, luminous flame were 45 to 60% lower than the standard burner.

  15. Determination of alternative fuels combustion products: Phase 2 final report

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, K.A.

    1997-06-01

    This report describes the laboratory efforts to accomplish four independent tasks: (1) speciation of hydrocarbon exhaust emissions from a light-duty vehicle operated over the chassis dynamometer portion of the light-duty FTP after modifications for operation on butane and butane blends; (2) evaluation of NREL`s Variable Conductance Vacuum Insulated Catalytic Converter Test Article 4 for the reduction of cold-start FTP exhaust emissions after extended soak periods for a Ford FFV Taurus operating on E85; (3) support of UDRI in an attempt to define correlations between engine-out combustion products identified by SwRI during chassis dynamometer testing, and those found during flow tube reactor experiments conducted by UDRI; and (4) characterization of small-diameter particulate matter from a Ford Taurus FFV operating in a simulated fuel-rich failure mode on CNG, LPG, M85, E85, and reformulated gasoline. 22 refs., 18 figs., 17 tabs.

  16. The NASA broad-specification fuels combustion technology program: An assessment of phase 1 test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fear, J. S.

    1983-01-01

    An assessment is made of the results of Phase 1 screening testing of current and advanced combustion system concepts using several broadened-properties fuels. The severity of each of several fuels-properties effects on combustor performance or liner life is discussed, as well as design techniques with the potential to offset these adverse effects. The selection of concepts to be pursued in Phase 2 refinement testing is described. This selection takes into account the relative costs and complexities of the concepts, the current outlook on pollutant emissions control, and practical operational problems.

  17. Comparison of Global Sizing Velocimetry and Phase Doppler Anemometry measurements of alternative jet fuel sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadr, Reza; Kannaiyan, Kumaran

    2013-11-01

    Atomization plays a crucial precursor role in liquid fuel combustion that directly affects the evaporation, mixing, and emission levels. Laser diagnostic techniques are often used to study the spray characteristics of liquid fuels. The objective of this work is to compare the spray measurements of Gas-to Liquid (GTL) jet fuels obtained using Global Sizing Velocimetry (GSV) and Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) techniques at global and local levels, respectively. The chemical and physical properties of GTL fuels are different from conventional jet fuels, owing to the difference in their production methodology. In this work, the experimental facility, the measurement techniques, and spray characteristics of two different GTL fuels are discussed and compared with those of Jet A-1 fuel. Results clearly demonstrate that although the global measurement gives an overall picture of the spray, fine details are obtained only through local measurements and complement in gaining more inferences into the spray characteristics. The results also show a close similarity in spray characteristics between GTL and Jet A-1 fuels. Funded by Qatar Science and Technology Park.

  18. One-step fabrication of membraneless microbial fuel cell cathode by electropolymerization of polypyrrole onto stainless steel mesh.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chunhua; Wan, Qunyi; Lv, Zhisheng; Yue, Xianjun; Chen, Yanfeng; Wei, Chaohai

    2011-05-15

    A unique one-step method for fabrication of a membraneless microbial fuel cell (MFC) cathode was developed by coating a conductive polymer onto stainless steel mesh. The resulting polypyrrole/anthraquinone-2-sulfonate (PPy/AQS) film was synthesized via electropolymerization using AQS as the dopants. The scanning electron microscopy results indicated that the PPy/AQS film was uniformly formed on the metal mesh electrode without cracks on its surface and featuring a globular structure. Being equipped with such a cathode that was able to catalyze oxygen reduction and prevent water leakage, the membraneless MFC allowed power generation over 250 h and exhibited a maximum power density of 575 mW m(-2). Increasing film thickness seemed to result in a reduction in power performance due to the increased ohmic resistance of the cathode material and the enhanced difficulty for oxygen diffusion inside the cathode.

  19. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM LANDFILL GAS - PHASE III. DEMONSTRATION TESTS - PHASE IV. GUIDELINES AND DEMONSTRATIONS - VOLUME 2. APPENDICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes the results of a four-phase program to demonstrate that fuel cell energy recovery using a commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell is both environmentally sound and commercially feasible. Phase I, a conceptual design and evaluation study, addressed the technical...

  20. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM LANDFILL GAS - PHASE III. DEMONSTRATION TESTS - PHASE IV. GUIDELINES AND RECOMMENDATIONS- VOLUME 1. TECHNICAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes the results of a four-phase program to demonstrate that fuel cell energy recovery using a commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell is both environmentally sound and commercially feasible. Phase I, a conceptual design and evaluation study, addressed the technical...

  1. Fabrication of Yttria stabilized zirconia thin films on poroussubstrates for fuel cell applications

    SciTech Connect

    Leming, Andres

    2003-06-16

    A process for the deposition of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) films, on porous substrates, has been developed. These films have possible applications as electrolyte membranes in fuel cells. The films were deposited from colloidal suspensions through the vacuum infiltration technique. Films were deposited on both fully sintered and partially sintered substrates. A critical cracking thickness for the films was identified and strategies are presented to overcome this barrier. Green film density was also examined, and a method for improving green density by changing suspension pH and surfactant was developed. A dependence of film density on film thickness was observed, and materials interactions are suggested as a possible cause. Non-shorted YSZ films were obtained on co-fired substrates, and a cathode supported solid oxide fuel cell was constructed and characterized.

  2. CERAMIC FUEL ELEMENT MATERIAL FOR A NEUTRONIC REACTOR AND METHOD OF FABRICATING SAME

    DOEpatents

    Duckworth, W.H.

    1957-12-01

    This patent relates to ceramic composition, and to neutronic reactor fuel elements formed therefrom. These ceramic elements have high density and excellent strength characteristics and are formed by conventional ceramic casting and sintering at a temperature of about 2700 deg F in a nitrogen atmosphere. The composition consists of silicon carbide, silicon, uranium oxide and a very small percentage of molybdenum. Compositions containing molybdenum are markedly stronger than those lacking this ingredient.

  3. Safeguards instrumentation for continuous unattended monitoring in plutonium fuel fabrication plants

    SciTech Connect

    Menlove, H.O.; Miller, M.C.; Ohtani, T.; Seya, M.; Takahashi, S.

    1993-06-01

    Nondestructive assay (NDA) systems have been developed for use in an automated mixed oxide fabrication facility. Unique features have been developed for the NDA systems to accommodate robotic sample handling and remote operation. In addition, the systems have been designed to obtain International Atomic Energy Agency inspection data without the need for an inspector at the facility at the time of the measurements. The equipment is being designed to operate continuously in an unattended mode with data storage for periods of up to one month. The design, performance characteristics, and authentication of the NDA systems are described. The data related to reliability, precision, and accuracy are presented.

  4. Phase-induced amplitude apodization complex mask coronagraph mask fabrication, characterization, and modeling for WFIRST-AFTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Brian; Guyon, Olivier; Belikov, Ruslan; Wilson, Daniel; Muller, Richard; Sidick, Erkin; Balasubramanian, Bala; Krist, John; Poberezhskiy, Ilya; Tang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    This work describes the fabrication, characterization, and modeling of a second-generation occulting mask for a phase-induced amplitude apodization complex mask coronagraph, designed for use on the WFIRST-AFTA mission. The mask has many small features (˜micron lateral scales) and was fabricated at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Microdevices Laboratory, then characterized using a scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscope, and optical interferometric microscope. The measured fabrication errors were then fed to a wavefront control model which predicts the contrast performance of a full coronagraph. The expected coronagraphic performance using this mask is consistent with observing ˜15 planetary targets with WFIRST-AFTA in a reasonable time (<1 day/target).

  5. Design, fabrication and testing of an air-breathing micro direct methanol fuel cell with compound anode flow field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Luwen; Zhang, Yufeng; Zhao, Youran; An, Zijiang; Zhou, Zhiping; Liu, Xiaowei

    2011-10-01

    An air-breathing micro direct methanol fuel cell (μDMFC) with a compound anode flow field structure (composed of the parallel flow field and the perforated flow field) is designed, fabricated and tested. To better analyze the effect of the compound anode flow field on the mass transfer of methanol, the compound flow field with different open ratios (ratio of exposure area to total area) and thicknesses of current collectors is modeled and simulated. Micro process technologies are employed to fabricate the end plates and current collectors. The performances of the μDMFC with a compound anode flow field are measured under various operating parameters. Both the modeled and the experimental results show that, comparing the conventional parallel flow field, the compound one can enhance the mass transfer resistance of methanol from the flow field to the anode diffusion layer. The results also indicate that the μDMFC with an anode open ratio of 40% and a thickness of 300 µm has the optimal performance under the 7 M methanol which is three to four times higher than conventional flow fields. Finally, a 2 h stability test of the μDMFC is performed with a methanol concentration of 7 M and a flow velocity of 0.1 ml min-1. The results indicate that the μDMFC can work steadily with high methanol concentration.

  6. Phase 1 remediation of jet fuel contaminated soil and groundwater at JFK International Airport using dual phase extraction and bioventing

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, R.; Bianco, P. Rizzo, M.; Pressly, N.; Frumer, B.

    1995-12-31

    Soil and groundwater contaminated with jet fuel at Terminal One of the JFK International Airport in New York have been remediated using dual phase extraction (DPE) and bioventing. Two areas were remediated using 51 DPE wells and 20 air sparging/air injection wells. The total area remediated by the DPE wells is estimated to be 4.8 acres. Groundwater was extracted to recover nonaqueous phase and aqueous phase jet fuel from the shallow aquifer and treated above ground by the following processes; oil/water separation, iron-oxidation, flocculation, sedimentation, filtration, air stripping and liquid-phase granular activated carbon (LPGAC) adsorption. The extracted vapors were treated by vapor-phase granular activated carbon (VPGAC) adsorption in one area, and catalytic oxidation and VPGAC adsorption in another area. After 6 months of remediation, approximately 5,490 lbs. of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were removed by soil vapor extraction (SVE), 109,650 lbs. of petroleum hydrocarbons were removed from the extracted groundwater, and 60,550 lbs. of petroleum hydrocarbons were biologically oxidized by subsurface microorganisms. Of these three mechanisms, the rate of petroleum hydrocarbon removal was the highest for biological oxidation in one area and by groundwater extraction in another area.

  7. Data collection plan for Phase 2 Alternative Fuels Bus Data Collection Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Krenelka, T

    1993-07-01

    This document constitutes the plan for collecting and reporting data associated with a special set of transit bus demonstrations to be conducted under the Urban Bus Program of the Alternative Motor Fuels Act (AMFA) of 1988. This program, called the Phase 2 Bus Data Collection Program, serves as an adjunct to the Phase I Bus Data Collection Program, collecting detailed data on just a few buses to augment and enhance the Phase 1 data in fulfilling the urban bus requirements of AMFA. Demonstrations will be conducted at a few transit system locations throughout the US and will use alternative fuels and associated technologies to reduce undesirable transit bus exhaust emissions. Several organizations will be involved in the data collection; NREL will manage the program, analyze and store vehicle data, and make these data available through the Alternative Fuels Data Center. This information will enable transit agencies, equipment manufacturers, fuel suppliers, and government policy makers to make informed decisions about buying and using alternative fuels.

  8. Thermodynamic analysis of fuels in gas phase: ethanol, gasoline and ethanol - gasoline predicted by DFT method.

    PubMed

    Neto, A F G; Lopes, F S; Carvalho, E V; Huda, M N; Neto, A M J C; Machado, N T

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study using density functional theory to calculate thermodynamics properties of major molecules compounds at gas phase of fuels like gasoline, ethanol, and gasoline-ethanol mixture in thermal equilibrium on temperature range up to 1500 K. We simulated a composition of gasoline mixture with ethanol for a thorough study of thermal energy, enthalpy, Gibbs free energy, entropy, heat capacity at constant pressure with respect to temperature in order to study the influence caused by ethanol as an additive to gasoline. We used semi-empirical computational methods as well in order to know the efficiency of other methods to simulate fuels through this methodology. In addition, the ethanol influence through the changes in percentage fractions of chemical energy released in combustion reaction and the variations on thermal properties for autoignition temperatures of fuels was analyzed. We verified how ethanol reduces the chemical energy released by gasoline combustion and how at low temperatures the gas phase fuels in thermal equilibrium have similar thermodynamic behavior. Theoretical results were compared with experimental data, when available, and showed agreement. Graphical Abstract Thermodynamic analysis of fuels in gas phase.

  9. Fabrication and performance of a miniaturized 64-element high-frequency endoscopic phased array.

    PubMed

    Bezanson, Andre; Adamson, Rob; Brown, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a 40-MHz, 64-element phased-array transducer packaged in a 2.5 x 3.1 mm endoscopic form factor. The array is a forward-looking semi-kerfed design based on a 0.68Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb(2/3))O(3) - 0.32PbTiO3 (PMN-32%PT) single-crystal wafer with an element-to-element pitch of 38 µm. To achieve a miniaturized form factor, a novel technique of wire bonding the array elements to a polyimide flexible circuit board oriented parallel to the forward looking ultrasound beam and perpendicular to the array was developed. A technique of partially dicing into the back of the array was also implemented to improve the directivity of the array elements. The array was fabricated with a single-layer P(VDF-TrFE)-copolymer matching layer and a polymethylpentene (TPX) lens for passive elevation focusing to a depth of 7 mm. The two-way -6-dB pulse bandwidth was measured to be 55% and the average electromechanical coupling (k(eff)) for the individual elements was measured to be 0.62. The one-way -6-dB directivities from several array elements were measured to be ±20°, which was shown to be an improvement over an identical kerfless array. The -3-dB elevation focus resulting from the TPX lens was measured to be 152 µm at the focal depth, and the focused lateral resolution was measured to be 80 µm at a steering angle of 0°. To generate beam profiles and images, the probe was connected to a commercial ultrasound imaging platform which was reprogrammed to allow for phased array transmit beamforming and receive data collection. The collected RF data were then processed offline using a numerical computing script to generate sector images. The radiation pattern for the beamformed transmit pulse was collected along with images of wire phantoms in water and tissue-equivalent medium with a dynamic range of 60 dB. Finally, ex vivo tissue images were generated of porcine brain tissue.

  10. Design and evaluation of improved barrier fabrics for protection against toxic aerosols and biological agents. Phase 2. Final report, January 1993-December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hersh, S.P.; Tucker, P.A.

    1995-05-01

    The ultimate objective of this research is to develop semipermeable barrier fabrics which provide better protection for chemical protective clothing applications. In order to understand the relationship between the aerosol particle penetration and the structure of barrier fabrics, the research activities in Phase I focused on measuring the transmission of aerosols through test fabrics, determining the penetration mechanisms, and evaluating the pore size distributions in the fabrics. Based on the knowledge gained in Phase I, a set of 32 fabrics was designed, fabricated, and evaluated in Phase II using a 2-level, 7-factor, statistical design. Five additional outer fabrics and a carbon foam liner supplied by the U.S. Army Natick RDE Center (Natick) were evaluated to provide further insights into the effect of dual layers of fabrics and their relative orientations on aerosol penetration. The results of this research have been described in a Doctoral Dissertation by Dr. Surinder M. Maini (based on the 32 statistically designed fabrics) 1 and in a Master of Science thesis by Ms. Amelia Tosti 2 (on the fabrics supplied by Natick) in accordance with the research proposal. Abstracts of these two documents are presented in Section 2.0. The rest of this report describes the work and results conducted during Phase II. pg14. JMD.

  11. Fabrication and characterization of protonic-ceramic fuel cells and electrolysis cells utilizing infiltrated lanthanum nickelate electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babiniec, Sean M.

    High-temperature protonic ceramics (HTPCs) have gained interest as fuel cell and electrolysis cell electrolytes, as well as hydrogen separation membranes. The transport of hydrogen as opposed to oxygen results in several benefits and applications, including higher fuel efficiency, dehydrogenation of fuel streams, and hydrogen-based chemical synthesis. However, limited work has been done in the development of air/steam electrodes for these devices. This work presents the characterization of lanthanum nickelate, La 2NiO4+delta (LN), as a potential air/steam electrode material for use with BaCe0.2Zr0.7Y0.1O3-delta (BCZY27) HTPC electrolytes fabricated by the solid-state reactive sintering technique. Two types of devices were made; a symmetric cell used for electrode characterization, and a full fuel cell/electrolysis cell used for device performance characterization. The symmetric cell consists of a 1 mm thick BCZY27 substrate with identical air/steam electrodes on both sides. Air/steam electrodes were made by infiltrating ˜ 50 nm lanthanum nickelate nanoparticles into a BCZY27 porous backbone. The fuel cell/electrolysis cell consists of a 1mm thick Ni/BCZY27 anode support, a 25 mum thick BCZY27 electrolyte, and a 50 mum thick porous BCZY27 backbone infiltrated with lanthanum nickelate. Through symmetric cell testing, it was found that the electrode polarization resistance decreases with increasing oxygen content, indicating good oxygen reduction reaction characteristics. A minimum polarization resistance was found as 2.58 Ohm-cm2 in 3% humidied oxygen at 700 °C. Full cell testing revealed a peak power density of 27 mW-cm-2 at 700 °C. Hydrogen flux measurements were also taken in the both galvanic/post-galvanic and electrolytic operation. Galvanic/post-galvanic fluxes exhibit a very high faradaic efficiency. However, electrolytic hydrogen fluxes were much lower than the calculated hydrogen faradaic flux, indicating a different charge carrier other than protons is

  12. Hot Isostatic Press Manufacturing Process Development for Fabrication of RERTR Monolithic Fuel Plates

    SciTech Connect

    Crapps, Justin M.; Clarke, Kester D.; Katz, Joel D.; Alexander, David J.; Aikin, Beverly; Vargas, Victor D.; Montalvo, Joel D.; Dombrowski, David E.; Mihaila, Bogdan

    2012-06-06

    We use experimentation and finite element modeling to study a Hot Isostatic Press (HIP) manufacturing process for U-10Mo Monolithic Fuel Plates. Finite element simulations are used to identify the material properties affecting the process and improve the process geometry. Accounting for the high temperature material properties and plasticity is important to obtain qualitative agreement between model and experimental results. The model allows us to improve the process geometry and provide guidance on selection of material and finish conditions for the process strongbacks. We conclude that the HIP can must be fully filled to provide uniform normal stress across the bonding interface.

  13. NASA/General Electric broad-specification fuels combustion technology program - Phase I results and status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodds, W. J.; Ekstedt, E. E.; Bahr, D. W.; Fear, J. S.

    1982-01-01

    A program is being conducted to develop the technology required to utilize fuels with broadened properties in aircraft gas turbine engines. The first phase of this program consisted of the experimental evaluation of three different combustor concepts to determine their potential for meeting several specific emissions and performance goals, when operated on broadened property fuels. The three concepts were a single annular combustor; a double annular combustor; and a short single annular combustor with variable geometry. All of these concepts were sized for the General Electric CF6-80 engine. A total of 24 different configurations of these concepts were evaluated in a high pressure test facility, using four test fuels having hydrogen contents between 11.8 and 14%. Fuel effects on combustor performance, durability and emissions, and combustor design features to offset these effects were demonstrated.

  14. Development and validation of a two-phase, three-dimensional model for PEM fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ken Shuang

    2010-04-01

    The objectives of this presentation are: (1) To develop and validate a two-phase, three-dimensional transport modelfor simulating PEM fuel cell performance under a wide range of operating conditions; (2) To apply the validated PEM fuel cell model to improve fundamental understanding of key phenomena involved and to identify rate-limiting steps and develop recommendations for improvements so as to accelerate the commercialization of fuel cell technology; (3) The validated PEMFC model can be employed to improve and optimize PEM fuel cell operation. Consequently, the project helps: (i) address the technical barriers on performance, cost, and durability; and (ii) achieve DOE's near-term technical targets on performance, cost, and durability in automotive and stationary applications.

  15. Effects of inoculum size on solid-phase fermentation of fodder beets for fuel ethanol production

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, W.R.; Westby, C.A.

    1986-10-01

    This fuel ethanol study examined the effects of Saccharomyces cerevisiae inoculum size on solid-phase fermentation of fodder beet pulp. A 5% inoculum (wt/wt) resulted in rapid yeast and ethanol (9.1% (vol/vol)) production. Higher inocula showed no advantages. Lower inocula resulted in lowered final yeast populations and increased fermentation times.

  16. Method of fabricating a monolithic core for a solid oxide fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Zwick, Stanley A.; Ackerman, John P.

    1985-01-01

    A method is disclosed for forming a core for use in a solid oxide fuel cell that electrochemically combines fuel and oxidant for generating galvanic output. The core has an array of electrolyte and interconnect walls that are substantially devoid of any composite inert materials for support consisting instead only of the active anode, cathode, electrolyte and interconnect materials. Each electrolyte wall consists of cathode and anode materials sandwiching electrolyte material therebetween, and each interconnect wall consists of the cathode and anode materials sandwiching interconnect material therebetween. The electrolyte and interconnect walls define a plurality of substantially parallel core passageways alternately having respectively the inside faces thereof with only the anode material or with only the cathode material exposed. In the wall structure, the electrolyte and interconnect materials are only 0.002-0.01 cm thick; and the cathode and anode materials are only 0.002-0.05 cm thick. The method consists of building up the electrolyte and interconnect walls by depositing each material on individually and endwise of the wall itself, where each material deposit is sequentially applied for one cycle; and where the depositing cycle is repeated many times until the material buildup is sufficient to formulate the core. The core is heat cured to become dimensionally and structurally stable.

  17. Strategy for decommissioning of the glove-boxes in the Belgonucleaire Dessel MOX fuel fabrication plant

    SciTech Connect

    Vandergheynst, Alain; Cuchet, Jean-Marie

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: BELGONUCLEAIRE has been operating the Dessel plant from the mid-80's at industrial scale. In this period, over 35 metric tons of plutonium (HM) was processed into almost 100 reloads of MOX fuel for commercial West-European Light Water Reactors. In late 2005, the decision was made to stop the production because of the shortage of MOX fuel market remaining accessible to BELGONUCLEAIRE after the successive capacity increases of the MELOX plant (France) and the commissioning of the SMP plant (UK). As a significant part of the decommissioning project of this Dessel plant, about 170 medium-sized glove-boxes are planned for dismantling. In this paper, after having reviewed the different specifications of {+-}-contaminated waste in Belgium, the authors introduce the different options considered for cleaning, size reduction and packaging of the glove-boxes, and the main decision criteria (process, {alpha}-containment, mechanization and radiation protection, safety aspects, generation of secondary waste, etc) are analyzed. The selected strategy consists in using cold cutting techniques and manual operation in shielded disposable glove-tents, and packaging {alpha}-waste in 200-liter drums for off-site conditioning and intermediate disposal. (authors)

  18. How do evaporating thin films evolve? Unravelling phase-separation mechanisms during solvent-based fabrication of polymer blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wodo, Olga; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar

    2015-03-01

    Solvent-based fabrication is a flexible and affordable approach to manufacture organic thin films made from any combination of polymer, copolymers and/or small molecules. The properties of products made from such films can be tailored by the morphology of the films. Hence, it is of paramount importance to understand morphology evolution during fabrication. However, it is challenging to experimentally visualize morphology evolution during processing (processes involved are highly dynamic at low scale and typical components do not show high contrast). Consequently, details of morphology evolution during solvent-based thinning deposition are still under debate. Here, we identify four modes of phase formation and subsequent propagation within the thinning film during solvent-based fabrication. We unravel the origin of this behavior. Specifically, we focus on fundamental questions, when and where phases are formed, and how they evolve to form the final structure. We utilize a linear stability analysis to identify which mechanism of phase-separation is chosen for a given processing condition. Finally, we construct a mode diagram that maps processing conditions with individual modes. The idea introduced here enables choosing processing conditions to tailor film morphology characteristics and paves the ground for a deeper understanding of morphology control with the ultimate goal of precise, yet affordable, morphology manipulation for a large spectrum of applications.

  19. Development and fabrication of improved Schottky power diodes, phases I and II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordes, L. F.; Garfinkle, M.; Taft, E. A.

    1974-01-01

    Reproducible methods for the fabrication of silicon Schottky diodes were developed for the metals tungsten, aluminum, conventional platinum silicide and low temperature platinum silicide. Barrier heights and barrier lowering were measured permitting the accurate prediction of ideal forward and reverse diode performance. Processing procedures were developed which permit the fabrication of large area (approximately 1 sqcm) mesa-geometry power Schottky diodes with forward and reverse characteristics that approach theoretical values.

  20. Fabrication of 1/3 scale boron/epoxy booster thrust structure, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The design, materials, tooling, various manufacturing processes, quality control, test procedures, and results associated with the fabrication and testing of a 1/3 scale boron/epoxy, booster thrust structure are described. A complete two-dimensional truss type thrust structure, comprised of nine boron/epoxy tubular members and six apex fittings, was fabricated. This resulted in structurally representative flight hardware, and verified the manufacturing feasibility and projected weight savings (30%) for this type of structure.

  1. Design and fabrication of transmission quarter phase retarder at wavelength 1064 nm, using optical nanometric thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Zahra; Jahanshah, Fariborz; Fallah, Hamid Reza; Haji Mahmoodzade, Morteza; Sahraee, Masoume; Zabolian, Hosein

    2016-08-01

    We designed and fabricated the transmission quarter-wave plate phase retarder at 1064 nm using optical nanometric thin films of silicon oxide and titanium oxide. Final design consists of 32 layers. Transmissions of polarizations are equal and ≥99 % and their phase difference is 90°. System consists of two 16 layers systems that coated with the same condition on BK7 glass substrates then attached together with optical glue. Electron beam evaporation method was used for depositing materials. Photo spectrometer was used for measuring transmission spectrum of system. Transmission of polarizations was ≥95 % and equal. A polarimeter was used for testing systems. Polarization of beam was circular.

  2. Fabrication and microstructural analysis of UN-U3Si2 composites for accident tolerant fuel applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kyle D.; Raftery, Alicia M.; Lopes, Denise Adorno; Wallenius, Janne

    2016-08-01

    In this study, U3Si2 was synthesized via the use of arc-melting and mixed with UN powders, which together were sintered using the SPS method. The study revealed a number of interesting conclusions regarding the stability of the system - namely the formation of a probable but as yet unidentified ternary phase coupled with the reduction of the stoichiometry in the nitride phase - as well as some insights into the mechanics of the sintering process itself. By milling the silicide powders and reducing its particle size ratio compared to UN, it was possible to form a high density UN-U3Si2 composite, with desirable microstructural characteristics for accident tolerant fuel applications.

  3. Design, fabrication, and properties of 2-2 connectivity cement/polymer based piezoelectric composites with varied piezoelectric phase distribution

    PubMed Central

    Dongyu, Xu; Xin, Cheng; Banerjee, Sourav; Shifeng, Huang

    2014-01-01

    The laminated 2-2 connectivity cement/polymer based piezoelectric composites with varied piezoelectric phase distribution were fabricated by employing Lead Zirconium Titanate ceramic as active phase, and mixture of cement powder, epoxy resin, and hardener as matrix phase with a mass proportion of 4:4:1. The dielectric, piezoelectric, and electromechanical coupling properties of the composites were studied. The composites with large total volume fraction of piezoelectric phase have large piezoelectric strain constant and relative permittivity, and the piezoelectric and dielectric properties of the composites are independent of the dimensional variations of the piezoelectric ceramic layer. The composites with small total volume fraction of piezoelectric phase have large piezoelectric voltage constant, but also large dielectric loss. The composite with gradually increased dimension of piezoelectric ceramic layer has the smallest dielectric loss, and that with the gradually increased dimension of matrix layer has the largest piezoelectric voltage constant. The novel piezoelectric composites show potential applications in fabricating ultrasonic transducers with varied surface vibration amplitude of the transducer. PMID:25565725

  4. Design, fabrication, and properties of 2-2 connectivity cement/polymer based piezoelectric composites with varied piezoelectric phase distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Dongyu, Xu; Xin, Cheng; Shifeng, Huang; Banerjee, Sourav

    2014-12-28

    The laminated 2-2 connectivity cement/polymer based piezoelectric composites with varied piezoelectric phase distribution were fabricated by employing Lead Zirconium Titanate ceramic as active phase, and mixture of cement powder, epoxy resin, and hardener as matrix phase with a mass proportion of 4:4:1. The dielectric, piezoelectric, and electromechanical coupling properties of the composites were studied. The composites with large total volume fraction of piezoelectric phase have large piezoelectric strain constant and relative permittivity, and the piezoelectric and dielectric properties of the composites are independent of the dimensional variations of the piezoelectric ceramic layer. The composites with small total volume fraction of piezoelectric phase have large piezoelectric voltage constant, but also large dielectric loss. The composite with gradually increased dimension of piezoelectric ceramic layer has the smallest dielectric loss, and that with the gradually increased dimension of matrix layer has the largest piezoelectric voltage constant. The novel piezoelectric composites show potential applications in fabricating ultrasonic transducers with varied surface vibration amplitude of the transducer.

  5. Method of Fabrication of High Power Density Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    DOEpatents

    Pham, Ai Quoc; Glass, Robert S.

    2008-09-09

    A method for producing ultra-high power density solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The method involves the formation of a multilayer structure cells wherein a buffer layer of doped-ceria is deposited intermediate a zirconia electrolyte and a cobalt iron based electrode using a colloidal spray deposition (CSD) technique. For example, a cobalt iron based cathode composed of (La,Sr)(Co,Fe)O(LSCF) may be deposited on a zirconia electrolyte via a buffer layer of doped-ceria deposited by the CSD technique. The thus formed SOFC have a power density of 1400 mW/cm.sup.2 at 600.degree. C. and 900 mW/cm.sup.2 at 700.degree. C. which constitutes a 2-3 times increased in power density over conventionally produced SOFCs.

  6. Design, fabrication and characterization of a double layer solid oxide fuel cell (DLFC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guangjun; Wu, Xiangying; Cai, Yixiao; Ji, Yuan; Yaqub, Azra; Zhu, Bin

    2016-11-01

    A double layer solid oxide fuel cell (DLSOFC) without using the electrolyte (layer) has been designed by integrating advantages of positive electrode material of lithium ion battery(LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2) and oxygen-permeable membranes material (trace amount cobalt incorporated terbium doped ceria, TDC + Co) based on the semiconductor physics principle. Instead of using an electrolyte layer, the depletion layer between the anode and cathode served as an electronic insulator to block the electrons but to maintain the electrolyte function for ionic transport. Thus the device with two layers can realize the function of SOFC and at the same time avoids the electronic short circuiting problem. Such novel DLFC showed good performance at low temperatures, for instance, a maximum power density of 230 mWcm-2 was achieved at 500 °C. The working principle of the new device is presented.

  7. Method of fabricating an integral gas seal for fuel cell gas distribution assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Dettling, Charles J.; Terry, Peter L.

    1988-03-22

    A porous gas distribution plate assembly for a fuel cell, such as a bipolar assembly, includes an inner impervious region wherein the bipolar assembly has good surface porosity but no through-plane porosity and wherein electrical conductivity through the impervious region is maintained. A hot-pressing process for forming the bipolar assembly includes placing a layer of thermoplastic sealant material between a pair of porous, electrically conductive plates, applying pressure to the assembly at elevated temperature, and allowing the assembly to cool before removing the pressure whereby the layer of sealant material is melted and diffused into the porous plates to form an impervious bond along a common interface between the plates holding the porous plates together. The distribution of sealant within the pores along the surface of the plates provides an effective barrier at their common interface against through-plane transmission of gas.

  8. Integral gas seal for fuel cell gas distribution assemblies and method of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Dettling, Charles J.; Terry, Peter L.

    1985-03-19

    A porous gas distribution plate assembly for a fuel cell, such as a bipolar assembly, includes an inner impervious region wherein the bipolar assembly has good surface porosity but no through-plane porosity and wherein electrical conductivity through the impervious region is maintained. A hot-pressing process for forming the bipolar assembly includes placing a layer of thermoplastic sealant material between a pair of porous, electrically conductive plates, applying pressure to the assembly at elevated temperature, and allowing the assembly to cool before removing the pressure whereby the layer of sealant material is melted and diffused into the porous plates to form an impervious bond along a common interface between the plates holding the porous plates together. The distribution of sealant within the pores along the surface of the plates provides an effective barrier at their common interface against through-plane transmission of gas.

  9. Miniature fuel cell with monolithically fabricated Si electrodes - Alloy catalyst formation -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogura, Daiki; Suzuki, Takahiro; Katayama, Noboru; Dowaki, Kiyoshi; Hayase, Masanori

    2013-12-01

    A novel Pd-Pt catalyst formation process was proposed for reduction of Pt usage. In our miniature fuel cells, porous Pt was used as the catalyst, and the Pt usage was quite high. To reduce the Pt usage, we have attempted to deposit Pt on porous Pd by galvanic replacement, and relatively large output was demonstrated. In this study, in order to reduce more Pt usage and explore the alloy catalyst formation process, atomic layer deposition by UPD-SLRR (Under Potential Deposition - Surface Limited Redox Replacement) was applied to the Pd-Pt catalyst formation. The new process was verified at each process steps by EDS elemental analysis, and the expected spectra were obtained. Prototype cells were constructed by the new process, and cell output was raised to 420mW/cm2 by the Pd-Pt catalyst from 125mW/cm2 with Pd catalyst.

  10. An ultrathin self-humidifying membrane for PEM fuel cell application: fabrication, characterization, and experimental analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaobing; Zhang, Huamin; Zhang, Yu; Liang, Yongmin; Wang, Xiaoli; Yi, Baolian

    2006-07-27

    An ultrathin poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE)-reinforced multilayer self-humidifying composite membrane (20 microm, thick) is developed. The membrane is composed of Nafion-impregnated porous PTFE composite as the central layer, and SiO2 supported nanosized Pt particles (Pt-SiO2) imbedded into the Nafion as the two side layers. The proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell employing the self-humidifying membrane (Pt-SiO2/NP) turns out a peak power density of 1.40 W cm(-2) and an open circuit voltage (OCV) of 1.032 V under dry H2/O2 condition. The excellent performance is attributed to the combined result of both the accelerated water back-diffusion in the thin membrane and the adsorbing/releasing water properties of the Pt-SiO2 catalyst in the side layers. Moreover, the inclusion of the hygroscopic Pt-SiO2 catalyst inside the membrane results in an enhanced anode self-humidification capability and also the decreased cathode polarization (accordingly an improved cell OCV). Several techniques, such as transmission electronic microscopy, scanning electronic microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, thermal analysis and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy etc., are employed to characterize the Pt-SiO2/NP membrane. The results are discussed in comparison with the plain Nafion/PTFE membrane (NP). It is established that the reverse net water drag (from the cathode to the anode) across the Pt-SiO2/NP membrane reaches 0.16 H2O/H+. This implies a good hydration of the Pt-SiO2/NP membrane and thus ensures an excellent PEM fuel cell performance under self-humidification operation.

  11. Surrogate/spent fuel sabotage aerosol ratio testing:phase 1 summary and results.

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, Manuel Gilbert; Sorenson, Ken Bryce; Lange, F. , Germany); Nolte, O. (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Koch, W. (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Dickey, Roy R.; Yoshimura, Richard Hiroyuki; Molecke, Martin Alan; Autrusson, Bruno (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire , France); Young, F. I.; Pretzsch, Gunter Guido (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und reaktorsicherheit , Germany)

    2005-10-01

    This multinational test program is quantifying the aerosol particulates produced when a high energy density device (HEDD) impacts surrogate material and actual spent fuel test rodlets. The experimental work, performed in four consecutive test phases, has been in progress for several years. The overall program provides needed data that are relevant to some sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks, and associated risk assessments. This program also provides significant political benefits in international cooperation for nuclear security related evaluations. The spent fuel sabotage--aerosol test program is coordinated with the international Working Group for Sabotage Concerns of Transport and Storage Casks (WGSTSC), and supported by both the U.S. Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report summarizes the preliminary, Phase 1 work performed in 2001 and 2002 at Sandia National Laboratories and the Fraunhofer Institute, Germany, and documents the experimental results obtained, observations, and preliminary interpretations. Phase 1 testing included: performance quantifications of the HEDD devices; characterization of the HEDD or conical shaped charge (CSC) jet properties with multiple tests; refinement of the aerosol particle collection apparatus being used; and, CSC jet-aerosol tests using leaded glass plates and glass pellets, serving as representative brittle materials. Phase 1 testing was quite important for the design and performance of the following Phase 2 test program and test apparatus.

  12. Fabric phase sorptive extraction followed by UHPLC-MS/MS for the analysis of benzotriazole UV stabilizers in sewage samples.

    PubMed

    Montesdeoca-Esponda, Sarah; Sosa-Ferrera, Zoraida; Kabir, Abuzar; Furton, Kenneth G; Santana-Rodríguez, José Juan

    2015-10-01

    A fast and sensitive sample preparation strategy using fabric phase sorptive extraction followed by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry detection has been developed to analyse benzotriazole UV stabilizer compounds in aqueous samples. Benzotriazole UV stabilizer compounds are a group of compounds added to sunscreens and other personal care products which may present detrimental effects to aquatic ecosystems. Fabric phase sorptive extraction is a novel solvent minimized sample preparation approach that integrates the advantages of sol-gel derived hybrid inorganic-organic nanocomposite sorbents and the flexible, permeable and hydrophobic surface chemistry of polyester fabric. It is a highly sensitive, fast, efficient and inexpensive device that can be reused and does not suffer from coating damage, unlike SPME fibres or stir bars. In this paper, we optimized the extraction of seven benzotriazole UV filters evaluating the majority of the parameters involved in the extraction process, such as sorbent chemistry selection, extraction time, back-extraction solvent, back-extraction time and the impact of ionic strength. Under the optimized conditions, fabric phase sorptive extraction allows enrichment factors of 10 times with detection limits ranging from 6.01 to 60.7 ng L(-1) and intra- and inter-day % RSDs lower than 11 and 30 % for all compounds, respectively. The optimized sample preparation technique followed by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry detection was applied to determine the target analytes in sewage samples from wastewater treatment plants with different purification processes of Gran Canaria Island (Spain). Two UV stabilizer compounds were measured in ranges 17.0-60.5 ng mL(-1) (UV 328) and 69.3-99.2 ng mL(-1) (UV 360) in the three sewage water samples analysed. PMID:26345441

  13. Triple-phase boundary and power density enhancement in thin solid oxide fuel cells by controlled etching of the nickel anode.

    PubMed

    Ebrahim, Rabi; Yeleuov, Mukhtar; Issova, Ainur; Tokmoldin, Serekbol; Ignatiev, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Fabrication of microporous structures for the anode of a thin film solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC(s)) using controlled etching process has led us to increased power density and increased cell robustness. Micropores were etched in the nickel anode by both wet and electrochemical etching processes. The samples etched electrochemically showed incomplete etching of the nickel leaving linked nickel islands inside the pores. Samples which were wet- etched showed clean pores with no nickel island residues. Moreover, the sample with linked nickel islands in the anode pores showed higher output power density as compared to the sample with clean pores. This enhancement is related to the enlargement of the surface of contact between the fuel-anode-electrolyte (the triple-phase boundary).

  14. Triple-phase boundary and power density enhancement in thin solid oxide fuel cells by controlled etching of the nickel anode

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Fabrication of microporous structures for the anode of a thin film solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC(s)) using controlled etching process has led us to increased power density and increased cell robustness. Micropores were etched in the nickel anode by both wet and electrochemical etching processes. The samples etched electrochemically showed incomplete etching of the nickel leaving linked nickel islands inside the pores. Samples which were wet- etched showed clean pores with no nickel island residues. Moreover, the sample with linked nickel islands in the anode pores showed higher output power density as compared to the sample with clean pores. This enhancement is related to the enlargement of the surface of contact between the fuel-anode-electrolyte (the triple-phase boundary). PMID:24982602

  15. Solid-phase bioremediation of diesel fuel-contaminated soil utilizing indigenous microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Cagnetta, P.J.; Laubacher, R.C.

    1995-12-31

    In the spring of 1993, R.E. Wright Environmental, Inc. (REWEI) was retained by BP Oil Company (BP) to evaluate the use of bioremediation technology to remediate approximately 3,000 cubic yards (yd{sup 3}) of soil impacted with diesel fuel. The impacted soil resulted from the release of several hundred gallons of diesel fuel from a ruptured valve on an aboveground pipeline within a terminal. The overland flow of the diesel fuel resulted in a significant area of soil being impacted by the fuel. Immediate response activities limited vertical migration of the fuel through the excavation and stockpiling of the surface-impacted soil. The nature of the contaminant -- an unweathered, refined petroleum product comprised primarily of alkanes of a medium chain length -- and the biodegradable nature of the diesel fuel made bioremediation a cost-effective and technically feasible remedial option. The objective of the project was to reduce the concentrations of the petroleum hydrocarbons to below the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) soil cleanup levels in order to reuse the soil on-site as fill. Basic agronomic principles were applied throughout all phases of the project in order to successfully biodegrade the hydrocarbon.

  16. Phase and strain distributions associated with reactive contaminants inside a solid oxide fuel cell.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D. J.; Almer, J.

    2009-01-01

    A microfocused synchrotron x-ray diffraction method was used to reveal the quantitative distributions of phase fractions, internal strains, and their interdependences at different layer depths inside of a planar solid oxide fuel cell, which was deactivated by chromium contamination through direct contact with the metallic interconnect under typical operating conditions. These observations provide insight into the mechanism of Cr poisoning. The method can serve as a versatile tool for studying the electrochemical devices with thin-layered construction such as batteries and fuel cells under static or in situ conditions.

  17. Application of rigorously optimized phase masks for the fabrication of binary and blazed gratings with diffractive proximity lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuerzebecher, Lorenz; Fuchs, Frank; Harzendorf, Torsten; Meyer, Stefan; Zeitner, Uwe D.

    2014-03-01

    Gratings with binary and blazed profiles and periods in the low micron and sub-micron range define a class of microstructures with a huge application potential. We present a mask based photolithographic fabrication method for these demanding grating geometries. It combines the advantages of electron beam lithography and holographic exposure, which are superior homogeneity, high resolution and pattern flexibility on one hand, and a fast, large aerial exposure with the option for smooth profiles on the other hand. This is accomplished by the use of an electron beam written phase mask which contains a very homogeneous pattern of diffractive features and is used for a full-field exposure in a proximity mask aligner. The key for the beneficial use of the technology is the proper design of the phase mask surface profile which can have a binary or multilevel geometry. Since the patterns to be exposed are periodic, this is also the case for the phase mask which allows calculating their physical light transmission with exact methods like rigorous coupled wave analysis. An optimization algorithm has been developed which can find mask geometries that synthesize a desired complex aerial image in the proximity distance of choice. Aerial images offering e.g. high resolution features, phase shifts, and tilted propagation directions can be realized that way. This technology has been successfully used to fabricate e.g. binary gratings of very high quality with a period of 800 nm as well as blazed gratings with a period of 3 μm.

  18. IFR fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Battles, J.E.; Miller, W.E.; Lineberry, M.J.; Phipps, R.D.

    1992-04-01

    The next major milestone of the IFR program is engineering-scale demonstration of the pyroprocess fuel cycle. The EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility has just entered a startup phase, which includes completion of facility modifications and installation and cold checkout of process equipment. This paper reviews the development of the electrorefining pyroprocess, the design and construction of the facility for the hot demonstration, the design and fabrication of the equipment, and the schedule and initial plan for its operation.

  19. IFR fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Battles, J.E.; Miller, W.E. ); Lineberry, M.J.; Phipps, R.D. )

    1992-01-01

    The next major milestone of the IFR program is engineering-scale demonstration of the pyroprocess fuel cycle. The EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility has just entered a startup phase, which includes completion of facility modifications and installation and cold checkout of process equipment. This paper reviews the development of the electrorefining pyroprocess, the design and construction of the facility for the hot demonstration, the design and fabrication of the equipment, and the schedule and initial plan for its operation.

  20. A surfactant-free bio-compatible film with a highly ordered honeycomb pattern fabricated via an improved phase separation method.

    PubMed

    Bui, Van-Tien; Ko, Seung Hyeon; Choi, Ho-Suk

    2014-04-14

    Thin films of bio-compatible poly(lactic acid) with highly ordered hexagonal patterns were successfully fabricated under normal ambient conditions without using any surfactant via an improved phase separation method. The patterned surface was successfully applied to fabricate silicon/copper dome-patterned electrodes for high-performance hybrid capacitors.

  1. Effects of Random Circuit Fabrication Errors on Small Signal Gain and on Output Phase In a Traveling Wave Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittersdorf, I. M.; Antonsen, T. M., Jr.; Chernin, D.; Lau, Y. Y.

    2011-10-01

    Random fabrication errors may have detrimental effects on the performance of traveling-wave tubes (TWTs) of all types. A new scaling law for the modification in the average small signal gain and in the output phase is derived from the third order ordinary differential equation that governs the forward wave interaction in a TWT in the presence of random error that is distributed along the axis of the tube. Analytical results compare favorably with numerical results, in both gain and phase modifications as a result of random error in the phase velocity of the slow wave circuit. Results on the effect of the reverse-propagating circuit mode will be reported. This work supported by AFOSR, ONR, L-3 Communications Electron Devices, and Northrop Grumman Corporation.

  2. Design, fabrication and test of a lightweight shell structure, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Progress is reported in the construction of lightweight orthogrid shells. Graphite/epoxy panels are being used in the fabrication. The shell structure is diagramed in detail. Panel laminates, and panel stiffener flanges are described while illustrations delineate panel assembly procedures.

  3. Fabrication of large area X-ray diffraction grating for X-ray phase imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Noda, Daiji; Tokuoka, Atsushi; Katori, Megumi; Minamiyama, Yasuto; Yamashita, Kenji; Nishida, Satoshi; Hattori, Tadashi

    2012-07-31

    X-ray lithography, which uses highly directional synchrotron radiation, is one of the technologies that can be used for fabricating micrometer-sized structures. In X-ray lithography, the accuracy of the fabricated structure depends largely on the accuracy of the X-ray mask. Since X-ray radiation is highly directional, a micro-fabrication technology that produces un-tapered and high aspect ratio highly absorbent structures on a low absorbent membrane is required. Conventionally, a resin material is used as the support membrane for large area X-ray masks. However, resin membranes have the disadvantage that they can sag after several cycles of X-ray exposure due to the heat generated by the X-rays. Therefore, we proposed and used thin carbon wafers for the membrane material because carbon has an extremely small thermal expansion coefficient. We fabricated new carbon membrane X-ray masks, and these results of X-ray lithography demonstrate the superior performance.

  4. Optimizing photo-Fenton like process for the removal of diesel fuel from the aqueous phase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In recent years, pollution of soil and groundwater caused by fuel leakage from old underground storage tanks, oil extraction process, refineries, fuel distribution terminals, improper disposal and also spills during transferring has been reported. Diesel fuel has created many problems for water resources. The main objectives of this research were focused on assessing the feasibility of using photo-Fenton like method using nano zero-valent iron (nZVI/UV/H2O2) in removing total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) and determining the optimal conditions using Taguchi method. Results The influence of different parameters including the initial concentration of TPH (0.1-1 mg/L), H2O2 concentration (5-20 mmole/L), nZVI concentration (10-100 mg/L), pH (3-9), and reaction time (15-120 min) on TPH reduction rate in diesel fuel were investigated. The variance analysis suggests that the optimal conditions for TPH reduction rate from diesel fuel in the aqueous phase are as follows: the initial TPH concentration equals to 0.7 mg/L, nZVI concentration 20 mg/L, H2O2 concentration equals to 5 mmol/L, pH 3, and the reaction time of 60 min and degree of significance for the study parameters are 7.643, 9.33, 13.318, 15.185 and 6.588%, respectively. The predicted removal rate in the optimal conditions was 95.8% and confirmed by data obtained in this study which was between 95-100%. Conclusion In conclusion, photo-Fenton like process using nZVI process may enhance the rate of diesel degradation in polluted water and could be used as a pretreatment step for the biological removal of TPH from diesel fuel in the aqueous phase. PMID:24955242

  5. High performance anode-supported tubular solid oxide fuel cells fabricated by a novel slurry-casting method.

    PubMed

    Duan, Nan-Qi; Yan, Dong; Chi, Bo; Pu, Jian; Jian, Li

    2015-02-02

    Tubular solid oxide fuel cells were fabricated and evaluated for their microstructure and electrochemical performance. The tubular substrate was prepared by casting NiO-Y2O3 stabilized ZrO2 (YSZ) slurry on the inner wall of a plastic mold (tube). The wall thickness and uniformity were controlled by slurry viscosity and rotation speed of the tube. The cells consisted of Ni-YSZ functional anode, YSZ electrolyte and (La0.8Sr0.2)0.95MnO(3-δ) (LSM)-YSZ cathode prepared in sequence on the substrate by dip-coating and sintering. Their dimension was 50 mm in length, 0.8 mm in thickness and 10.5 mm in outside diameter. The peak power density of the cell at temperatures between 650 and 850°C was in the range from 85 to 522 mW cm(-2) and was greatly enhanced to the range from 308 to 1220 mW cm(-2) by impregnating PdO into LSM-YSZ cathode. During a cell testing at 0.7 A cm(-2) and 750°C for 282 h, the impregnated PdO particles grew by coalescence, which increased the cathode polarization resistance and so that decreased the cell performance. According to the degradation tendency, the cell performance will be stabilized in a longer run.

  6. High performance anode-supported tubular solid oxide fuel cells fabricated by a novel slurry-casting method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Nan-Qi; Yan, Dong; Chi, Bo; Pu, Jian; Jian, Li

    2015-02-01

    Tubular solid oxide fuel cells were fabricated and evaluated for their microstructure and electrochemical performance. The tubular substrate was prepared by casting NiO-Y2O3 stabilized ZrO2 (YSZ) slurry on the inner wall of a plastic mold (tube). The wall thickness and uniformity were controlled by slurry viscosity and rotation speed of the tube. The cells consisted of Ni-YSZ functional anode, YSZ electrolyte and (La0.8Sr0.2)0.95MnO3-δ (LSM)-YSZ cathode prepared in sequence on the substrate by dip-coating and sintering. Their dimension was 50 mm in length, 0.8 mm in thickness and 10.5 mm in outside diameter. The peak power density of the cell at temperatures between 650 and 850°C was in the range from 85 to 522 mW cm-2 and was greatly enhanced to the range from 308 to 1220 mW cm-2 by impregnating PdO into LSM-YSZ cathode. During a cell testing at 0.7 A cm-2 and 750°C for 282 h, the impregnated PdO particles grew by coalescence, which increased the cathode polarization resistance and so that decreased the cell performance. According to the degradation tendency, the cell performance will be stabilized in a longer run.

  7. High performance anode-supported tubular solid oxide fuel cells fabricated by a novel slurry-casting method

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Nan-Qi; Yan, Dong; Chi, Bo; Pu, Jian; Jian, Li

    2015-01-01

    Tubular solid oxide fuel cells were fabricated and evaluated for their microstructure and electrochemical performance. The tubular substrate was prepared by casting NiO-Y2O3 stabilized ZrO2 (YSZ) slurry on the inner wall of a plastic mold (tube). The wall thickness and uniformity were controlled by slurry viscosity and rotation speed of the tube. The cells consisted of Ni-YSZ functional anode, YSZ electrolyte and (La0.8Sr0.2)0.95MnO3-δ (LSM)-YSZ cathode prepared in sequence on the substrate by dip-coating and sintering. Their dimension was 50 mm in length, 0.8 mm in thickness and 10.5 mm in outside diameter. The peak power density of the cell at temperatures between 650 and 850°C was in the range from 85 to 522 mW cm−2 and was greatly enhanced to the range from 308 to 1220 mW cm−2 by impregnating PdO into LSM-YSZ cathode. During a cell testing at 0.7 A cm−2 and 750°C for 282 h, the impregnated PdO particles grew by coalescence, which increased the cathode polarization resistance and so that decreased the cell performance. According to the degradation tendency, the cell performance will be stabilized in a longer run. PMID:25640168

  8. Comparison of neutron dose quantities and instrument and dosemeter readings at representative locations in an MOX fuel fabrication plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, D. T.; Hager, L. G.; Tanner, R. J.; Haley, R. M.; Cooper, A. J.

    2002-01-01

    The relationships between operational and protection quantities, and values of personal dosemeter and instrument readings have been determined for a recently designed MOX fuel fabrication plant. The relationships between the quantities, and the readings of personal dosemeters are sensitive to both the energy and direction distribution of neutron fluence. The energy distributions were calculated using the Monte Carlo code MCBEND. The direction distribution was addressed by calculating independently, spectral components for which the direction distribution could be reasonably assumed. At representative locations, and for assumed worker orientations, the radiation field is analysed as having, in general, three components—a direct, unidirectional component from the nearest identified discrete source, which is considered incident A-P, several unidirectional components from other such sources which are treated as a rotational component and a scattered isotropic component. The calculated spectra were folded with conversion coefficients for personal dose equivalent, Hp(10) slab (A-P, ROT and ISO), effective dose, E, (A-P, ROT and ISO), ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), personal dosemeter (AP, ROT and ISO) and survey instrument response characteristics.

  9. Surrogate/spent fuel sabotage : aerosol ratio test program and Phase 2 test results.

    SciTech Connect

    Borek, Theodore Thaddeus III; Thompson, N. Slater; Sorenson, Ken Bryce; Hibbs, R.S.; Nolte, Oliver; Molecke, Martin Alan; Autrusson, Bruno; Young, F. I.; Koch, Wolfgang; Brochard, Didier; Pretzsch, Gunter Guido; Lange, Florentin

    2004-05-01

    A multinational test program is in progress to quantify the aerosol particulates produced when a high energy density device, HEDD, impacts surrogate material and actual spent fuel test rodlets. This program provides needed data that are relevant to some sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks, and associated risk assessments; the program also provides significant political benefits in international cooperation. We are quantifying the spent fuel ratio, SFR, the ratio of the aerosol particles released from HEDD-impacted actual spent fuel to the aerosol particles produced from surrogate materials, measured under closely matched test conditions. In addition, we are measuring the amounts, nuclide content, size distribution of the released aerosol materials, and enhanced sorption of volatile fission product nuclides onto specific aerosol particle size fractions. These data are crucial for predicting radiological impacts. This document includes a thorough description of the test program, including the current, detailed test plan, concept and design, plus a description of all test components, and requirements for future components and related nuclear facility needs. It also serves as a program status report as of the end of FY 2003. All available test results, observations, and analyses - primarily for surrogate material Phase 2 tests using cerium oxide sintered ceramic pellets are included. This spent fuel sabotage - aerosol test program is coordinated with the international Working Group for Sabotage Concerns of Transport and Storage Casks, WGSTSC, and supported by both the U.S. Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  10. Yb-doped large-mode-area laser fiber fabricated by halide-gas-phase-doping technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Kun; Wang, Yuying; Ni, Li; Wang, Zhen; Gao, Cong; Zhan, Huan; Wang, Jianjun; Jing, Feng; Lin, Aoxiang

    2015-06-01

    In this manuscript, we designed a rare-earth-halide gas-phase-doping setup to fabricate a large-mode-area fiber for high power laser applications. YbCl3 and AlCl3 halides are evaporated, carried respectively and finally mixed with usual host gas material SiCl4 at the hot zone of MCVD system. Owing to the all-gas-phasing reaction process and environment, the home-made Yb-doped fiber preform has a homogeneous large core and modulated refractive index profile to keep high beam quality. The drawn fiber core has a small numerical aperture of 0.07 and high Yb concentration of 9500 ppm. By using a master oscillator power amplifier system, nearly kW-level (951 W) laser output power was obtained with a slope efficiency of 83.3% at 1063.8 nm, indicating the competition and potential of the halide-gas-phase-doping technique for high power laser fiber fabrication.

  11. TEM identification of subsurface phases in ternary U-Pu-Zr fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitkaliyeva, Assel; Madden, James W.; Papesch, Cynthia A.; Cole, James I.

    2016-05-01

    Phases and microstructure in as-cast, annealed at 850 °C, and subsequently cooled U-23Pu-9Zr fuel were characterized using scanning and transmission electron microscopy techniques. SEM examination shows formation of three phases in the alloy that were identified in TEM using selective area diffraction pattern analysis: α-Zr globular and elongated δ-UZr2 inclusions and a thick oxide layer formed on top of β-Pu phase, which has been initially assumed to be ζ-(U, Pu). However, further examination of the cross-sectional TEM specimens identified the matrix phases as δ-UZr2, β-Pu, and (U, Zr)ht. Two types of inclusions were observed in the immediate vicinity of the specimen surface and they were consistent with α-Zr and ζ-(U, Pu).

  12. Spiral phase plates with radial discontinuities for the generation of multiring orbital angular momentum beams: fabrication, characterization, and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffato, Gianluca; Massari, Michele; Carli, Marta; Romanato, Filippo

    2015-11-01

    A design of spiral phase plates for the generation of multiring beams carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) is presented. Besides the usual helical profile, these phase plates present radial π-discontinuities in correspondence of the zeros of the associated Laguerre polynomials. Samples were fabricated by electron beam lithography over glass substrates coated with a polymethylmethacrylate resist layer. The optical response was analyzed and the purity of the generated beams was investigated in terms of Laguerre-Gaussian modes contributions. The far-field intensity pattern was compared with theoretical models and numerical simulations, while the expected phase features were confirmed by interferometric analysis with a Mach-Zehnder setup. The high quality of the output beams confirms the applicability of these phase plates for the generation of high-order OAM beams with nonzero radial index. An application consisting of the design of computer-generated holograms encoding information for light beams carrying phase singularities is presented and described. A numerical code based on an iterative Fourier transform algorithm has been developed for the computation of phase-only diffractive optical element for illumination under OAM beams. Numerical analysis and preliminary experimental results confirm the applicability of these devices as high-security optical elements for anticounterfeiting applications.

  13. Phase-space properties of magneto-optical traps utilising micro-fabricated gratings.

    PubMed

    McGilligan, J P; Griffin, P F; Riis, E; Arnold, A S

    2015-04-01

    We have used diffraction gratings to simplify the fabrication, and dramatically increase the atomic collection efficiency, of magneto-optical traps using micro-fabricated optics. The atom number enhancement was mainly due to the increased beam capture volume, afforded by the large area (4cm(2)) shallow etch (~ 200nm) binary grating chips. Here we provide a detailed theoretical and experimental investigation of the on-chip magneto-optical trap temperature and density in four different chip geometries using (87)Rb, whilst studying effects due to MOT radiation pressure imbalance. With optimal initial MOTs on two of the chips we obtain both large atom number (2×10(7)) and sub-Doppler temperatures (50 μK) after optical molasses.

  14. Self-organized nanocomb of ZnO fabricated by Au-catalyzed vapor-phase transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C. X.; Sun, X. W.; Dong, Z. L.; Yu, M. B.

    2004-10-01

    Based on a vapor-phase transport process, self-organized nanocomb structures of ZnO were fabricated on Au-coated Si substrate by employing a mixture of ZnO and graphite powders as source materials. The morphology of the product showed a ribbon-like stem and nanorod array aligned evenly along one side of the nanoribbon. It was found that the nanoribbon grew mainly along [ 1 0 1 bar 0 ] direction and the self-assembled branching nanorods grew epitaxially along [0 0 0 1] orientation from the (0 0 0 2) plane of the stem. The growth process was analyzed in detail.

  15. Development and fabrication of sealed silver-zinc cells, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, I. C.; Donnel, C. P., III

    1973-01-01

    A facility was designed, constructed and equipped for the production of prismatic alkaline rechargeable battery cells using inorganic (ceramic) separators. This unique facility is environmentally controlled and contains separate areas for electrode fabrication, separator processing, cell assembly, cell finishing and testing. An initial production run of 125 sealed silver zinc cells, using inorganic separators, was made in the facility in order to provide samples for baseline performance tests. Ten of these cells were given performance characterization and life cycle tests.

  16. 10 CFR Appendix O to Part 110 - Illustrative List of Fuel Element Fabrication Plant Equipment and Components Under NRC's Export...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... NRC's Export Licensing Authority Note: Nuclear fuel elements are manufactured from source or special nuclear material. For oxide fuels, the most common type of fuel equipment for pressing pellets, sintering... the integrity of completed fuel pins (or rods). This item typically includes equipment for: (i)...

  17. AFIP-6 Fabrication Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn A. Moore; M. Craig Marshall

    2011-09-01

    The AFIP-6 (ATR Full-size plate In center flux trap Position) experiment was designed to evaluate the performance of monolithic fuels at a scale prototypic of research reactor fuel plates. Two qualified fueled plates were fabricated for the AFIP-6 experiment; to be irradiated in the INL Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This report provides details of the fuel fabrication efforts, including material selection, fabrication processes, and fuel plate qualification.

  18. AFIP-4 Fabrication Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn A. Moore

    2010-02-01

    The AFIP-4 (ATR Full –size-plate In center flux trap Position) experiment was designed to evaluate the performance of monolithic fuels at a scale prototypic of research reactor fuel plates. Twelve qualified fueled plates were fabricated for the AFIP-4 experiment; to be irradiated in the INL Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This report provides details of the fuel fabrication efforts; including material selection, fabrication processes, and fuel plate qualification.

  19. AFIP-2 Fabrication Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn Moore

    2010-02-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Full-size Plate In Center Flux Trap Position (AFIP)-2 experiment was designed to evaluate the performance of monolithic fuels at a scale prototypic of research reactor fuel plates. Two qualified fueled plates were fabricated for the AFIP 2 experiment to be irradiated in the Idaho National Laboratory ATR. This report provides details of the fuel fabrication efforts, including material selection, fabrication processes, and fuel plate qualification.

  20. Fabrication, characterization and applications of iron selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Raja Azadar; Badshah, Amin; Lal, Bhajan

    2016-11-01

    This review article presents fabrication of FeSe by solid state reactions, solution chemistry routes, chemical vapor deposition, spray pyrolysis and chemical vapor transport. Different properties and applications such as crystal structure and phase transition, band structure, spectroscopy, superconductivity, photocatalytic activity, electrochemical sensing, and fuel cell activity of FeSe have been discussed.

  1. Phase Formation and Transformations in Transmutation Fuel Materials for the LIFE Engine Part I - Path Forward

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, P E; Kaufman, L; Fluss, M J

    2008-11-10

    The current specifications of the LLNL fusion-fission hybrid proposal, namely LIFE, impose severe constraints on materials, and in particular on the nuclear fissile or fertile nuclear fuel and its immediate environment. This constitutes the focus of the present report with special emphasis on phase formation and phase transformations of the transmutation fuel and their consequences on particle and pebble thermal, chemical and mechanical integrities. We first review the work that has been done in recent years to improve materials properties under the Gen-IV project, and with in particular applications to HTGR and MSR, and also under GNEP and AFCI in the USA. Our goal is to assess the nuclear fuel options that currently exist together with their issues. Among the options, it is worth mentioning TRISO, IMF, and molten salts. The later option will not be discussed in details since an entire report is dedicated to it. Then, in a second part, with the specific LIFE specifications in mind, the various fuel options with their most critical issues are revisited with a path forward for each of them in terms of research, both experimental and theoretical. Since LIFE is applicable to very high burn-up of various fuels, distinctions will be made depending on the mission, i.e., energy production or incineration. Finally a few conclusions are drawn in terms of the specific needs for integrated materials modeling and the in depth knowledge on time-evolution thermochemistry that controls and drastically affects the performance of the nuclear materials and their immediate environment. Although LIFE demands materials that very likely have not yet been fully optimized, the challenge are not insurmountable and a well concerted experimental-modeling effort should lead to dramatic advances that should well serve other fission programs such as Gen-IV, GNEP, AFCI as well as the international fusion program, ITER.

  2. Facile fabrication of ultrathin hybrid membrane for highly flexible supercapacitors via in-situ phase separation of polyethersulfone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaoning; Ran, Fen; Shen, Kuiwen; Yang, Yunlong; Wu, Jiayu; Niu, Xiaoqin; Kong, Lingbin; Kang, Long; Chen, Shaowei

    2016-10-01

    In this article, a facile method based on in-situ phase-separation was developed for the fabrication of ultrathin hybrid membranes for highly flexible supercapacitors. The structures and morphologies of the prepared electrodes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) measurements; and the electrochemical behaviors were examined in 2 M KOH solution. SEM and FTIR characterizations reveal that activated carbon was imbedded into the polymer membrane of polyethersulfone to form a uniform and flexible hybrid membrane. When the thin polymer-carbon membrane (PCM) was used as an electrode material for supercapacitor, a high specific capacitance of 169.4 Fg-1 was obtained at a current density of 0.5 Ag-1 along with good long-term cycle life of 94.6% capacity retention after 2000 charging-discharging cycles. Benefiting from these merits, the as-fabricated PCM//PCM cell shows an excellent electrochemical property. These results suggest a promising route towards the fabrication of highly flexible electrodes for high-performance supercapacitors.

  3. Enhancing Tabletop X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging with Nano-Fabrication.

    PubMed

    Miao, Houxun; Gomella, Andrew A; Harmon, Katherine J; Bennett, Eric E; Chedid, Nicholas; Znati, Sami; Panna, Alireza; Foster, Barbara A; Bhandarkar, Priya; Wen, Han

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging is a promising approach for improving soft-tissue contrast and lowering radiation dose in biomedical applications. While current tabletop imaging systems adapt to common x-ray tubes and large-area detectors by employing absorptive elements such as absorption gratings or monolithic crystals to filter the beam, we developed nanometric phase gratings which enable tabletop x-ray far-field interferometry with only phase-shifting elements, leading to a substantial enhancement in the performance of phase contrast imaging. In a general sense the method transfers the demands on the spatial coherence of the x-ray source and the detector resolution to the feature size of x-ray phase masks. We demonstrate its capabilities in hard x-ray imaging experiments at a fraction of clinical dose levels and present comparisons with the existing Talbot-Lau interferometer and with conventional digital radiography.

  4. Enhancing Tabletop X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging with Nano-Fabrication

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Houxun; Gomella, Andrew A.; Harmon, Katherine J.; Bennett, Eric E.; Chedid, Nicholas; Znati, Sami; Panna, Alireza; Foster, Barbara A.; Bhandarkar, Priya; Wen, Han

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging is a promising approach for improving soft-tissue contrast and lowering radiation dose in biomedical applications. While current tabletop imaging systems adapt to common x-ray tubes and large-area detectors by employing absorptive elements such as absorption gratings or monolithic crystals to filter the beam, we developed nanometric phase gratings which enable tabletop x-ray far-field interferometry with only phase-shifting elements, leading to a substantial enhancement in the performance of phase contrast imaging. In a general sense the method transfers the demands on the spatial coherence of the x-ray source and the detector resolution to the feature size of x-ray phase masks. We demonstrate its capabilities in hard x-ray imaging experiments at a fraction of clinical dose levels and present comparisons with the existing Talbot-Lau interferometer and with conventional digital radiography. PMID:26315891

  5. Polar fuel constituents: compound identification and equilibrium partitioning between nonaqueous phase liquids and water.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Torsten C; Kleinert, Peter; Stengel, Caroline; Goss, Kai-Uwe; Haderlein, Stefan B

    2002-10-01

    Groundwater contamination by fuel constituents from nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) on top of the groundwater table is a widespread problem. While leaching of classical fuel constituents such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) from NAPLs into groundwater has been studied extensively, little is known about the identity and partitioning of polar fuel components. Our work shows that gasoline commonly contains appreciable amounts of aniline, phenol, and their alkyl-substituted homologues as well as a suite of other polar compounds. To assess the potential for leaching of such compounds from NAPLs into groundwater we measured the equilibrium fuel/water partitioning coefficients, Kfw, of some representative constituents in batch systems. Kfw values for the investigated phenols, anilines, benzotriazoles, and S-heterocycles ranged from 0.2 to 1700. These values are up to 3 orders of magnitude lower than the Kfw of benzene. The NAPL--water partitioning of anilines and phenols strongly depends on the compounds' structure as well as on pH and the gasoline composition (e.g., MTBE content). Linear free energy relationships (LFERs) using Kow or Cwsat failed to predict measured Kfw values of polar solutes. In contrast, a polyparameter approach taking into account molecular interactions (van der Waals forces, hydrogen bonds) between solutes and major gasoline components allows precise a-priori predictions of Kfw values of both polar and BTEX fuel constituents without any fit parameters. Since most of the polar fuel constituents studied here are extracted from NAPLs by groundwater much more efficiently than BTEX, such compounds could form contaminant plumes threatening receiving wells before detectable concentrations of BTEX are present.

  6. Fuel injector: Air swirl characterization aerothermal modeling, phase 2, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikjooy, M.; Mongia, H. C.; Mcdonell, V. G.; Samuelsen, G. S.

    1993-01-01

    A well integrated experimental/analytical investigation was conducted to provide benchmark quality relevant to a prefilming type airblast fuel nozzle and its interaction with the combustor dome air swirler. The experimental investigation included a systematic study of both single-phase flows that involved single and twin co-axial jets with and without swirl. A two-component Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA) was used to document the interaction of single and co-axial air jets with glass beads that simulate nonevaporating spray and simultaneously avoid the complexities associated with fuel atomization processes and attendant issues about the specification of relevant boundary conditions. The interaction of jets with methanol spray produced by practical airblast nozzle was also documented in the spatial domain of practical interest. Model assessment activities included the use of three turbulence models (k-epsilon, algebraic second moment (ASM), and differential second moment (DSM)) for the carrier phase, deterministic or stochastic Lagrangian treatment of the dispersed phase, and advanced numerical schemes. Although qualitatively good comparison with data was obtained for most of the cases investigated, the model deficiencies in regard to modeled dissipation rate transport equation, single length scale, pressure-strain correlation, and other critical closure issues need to be resolved before one can achieve the degree of accuracy required to analytically design combustion systems.

  7. Fuel Injector: Air swirl characterization aerothermal modeling, phase 2, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikjooy, M.; Mongia, H. C.; Mcdonell, V. G.; Samuelson, G. S.

    1993-01-01

    A well integrated experimental/analytical investigation was conducted to provide benchmark quality data relevant to prefilming type airblast fuel nozzle and its interaction with combustor dome air swirler. The experimental investigation included a systematic study of both single-phase flows that involved single and twin co-axial jets with and without swirl. A two-component Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA) equipment was used to document the interaction of single and co-axial air jets with glass beads that simulate nonevaporating spray and simultaneously avoid the complexities associated with fuel atomization processes and attendant issues about the specification of relevant boundary conditions. The interaction of jets with methanol spray produced by practical airblast nozzle was also documented in the spatial domain of practical interest. Model assessment activities included the use of three turbulence models (k-epsilon, algebraic second moment (ASM) and differential second moment (DSM)) for the carrier phase, deterministic or stochastic Lagrangian treatment of the dispersed phase, and advanced numerical schemes. Although qualitatively good comparison with data was obtained for most of the cases investigated, the model deficiencies in regard to modeled dissipation rate transport equation, single length scale, pressure-strain correlation, and other critical closure issues need to be resolved before one can achieve the degree of accuracy required to analytically design combustion systems.

  8. Characterization of polycrystalline VO2 thin film with low phase transition temperature fabricated by high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tiegui; Wang, Langping; Wang, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Yufen

    2016-04-01

    VO2 is a unique material that undergoes a reversible phase transformation around 68∘C. Currently, applications of VO2 on smart windows are limited by its high transition temperature. In order to reduce the temperature, VO2 thin film was fabricated on quartz glass substrate by high power impulse magnetron sputtering with a modulated pulsed power. The phase transition temperature has been reduced to as low as 32∘C. In addition, the VO2 film possesses a typical metal-insulator transition. X-ray diffraction and selected area electron diffraction patterns reveal that an obvious lattice distortion has been formed in the as-deposited polycrystalline VO2 thin film. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy proves that oxygen vacancies have been formed in the as-deposited thin film, which will induce a lattice distortion in the VO2 thin film.

  9. Fabrication and Structure Characterization of Alumina-Aluminum Interpenetrating Phase Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolata, Anna J.

    2016-01-01

    Alumina-Aluminum composites with interpenetrating networks structure belong to advanced materials with potentially better properties when compared with composites reinforced by particles or fibers. The paper presents the experimental results of fabrication and structure characterization of Al matrix composites locally reinforced via Al2O3 ceramic foam. The composites were obtained using centrifugal infiltration of porous ceramics by liquid aluminum alloy. Both scanning electron microscopy (SEM + EDS) and x-ray tomography were used to determine the structure of foams and composites especially in reinforced areas. The quality of castings, degree of pore filling in ceramic foams by Al alloy, and microstructure in area of interface were assessed.

  10. Fabrication and Structure Characterization of Alumina-Aluminum Interpenetrating Phase Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolata, Anna J.

    2016-08-01

    Alumina-Aluminum composites with interpenetrating networks structure belong to advanced materials with potentially better properties when compared with composites reinforced by particles or fibers. The paper presents the experimental results of fabrication and structure characterization of Al matrix composites locally reinforced via Al2O3 ceramic foam. The composites were obtained using centrifugal infiltration of porous ceramics by liquid aluminum alloy. Both scanning electron microscopy (SEM + EDS) and x-ray tomography were used to determine the structure of foams and composites especially in reinforced areas. The quality of castings, degree of pore filling in ceramic foams by Al alloy, and microstructure in area of interface were assessed.

  11. Design and fabrication of a large airborne phased-array antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, William P.; Harris, Joseph M.; Jameson, Calvin R.

    1989-01-01

    A large phased-array antenna has been developed and mounted for missile test range trials on the Dash 8 aircraft, with a view to eventual installation on the E-9A Airborne Platform. The antenna is a one-dimensional scan, multiple-channel phased array of 30-ft length and 30-in height. This polarization-insensitive antenna operates in the 2.2-2.4 range, and uses modular parts to improve reliability and reduce maintenance time; being electronically steerable, the phased-array antenna is able to simultaneously receive five independent telemetry signals within its field-of-view.

  12. Dynamic fabric phase sorptive extraction for a group of pharmaceuticals and personal care products from environmental waters.

    PubMed

    Lakade, Sameer S; Borrull, Francesc; Furton, Kenneth G; Kabir, Abuzar; Marcé, Rosa Maria; Fontanals, Núria

    2016-07-22

    This paper describes for the first time the use of a new extraction technique, based on fabric phase sorptive extraction (FPSE). This new mode proposes the extraction of the analytes in dynamic mode in order to reduce the extraction time. Dynamic fabric phase sorptive extraction (DFPSE) followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was evaluated for the extraction of a group of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) from environmental water samples. Different parameters affecting the extraction were optimized and best conditions were achieved when 50mL of sample at pH 3 was passed through 3 disks and analytes retained were eluted with 10mL of ethyl acetate. The recoveries were higher than 60% for most of compounds with the exception of the most polar ones (between 8% and 38%). The analytical method was validated with environmental samples such as river water and effluent and influent wastewater, and good performance was obtained. The analysis of samples revealed the presence of some PPCPs at low ngL(-1) concentrations. PMID:27295962

  13. How do evaporating thin films evolve? Unravelling phase-separation mechanisms during solvent-based fabrication of polymer blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wodo, Olga; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar

    2014-10-01

    Solvent-based fabrication is a flexible and affordable approach to manufacture polymer thin films. The properties of products made from such films can be tailored by the internal organization (morphology) of the films. However, a precise knowledge of morphology evolution leading to the final film structure remains elusive, thus limiting morphology control to a trial and error approach. In particular, understanding when and where phases are formed, and how they evolve would provide rational guidelines for more rigorous control. Here, we identify four modes of phase formation and subsequent propagation within the thinning film during solvent-based fabrication. We unravel the origin and propagation characteristics of each of these modes. Finally, we construct a mode diagram that maps processing conditions with individual modes. The idea introduced here enables choosing processing conditions to tailor film morphology characteristics and paves the ground for a deeper understanding of morphology control with the ultimate goal of precise, yet affordable, morphology manipulation for a large spectrum of applications.

  14. Fabrication of platinum nanoparticles in aqueous solution and solid phase using amphiphilic PB-b-PEO copolymer nanoreactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hoda, Numan; Budama, Leyla; Çakır, Burçin Acar; Topel, Önder; Ozisik, Rahmi

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: TEM image of Pt nanoparticles produced by reducing by NaBH{sub 4} within PB-b-PEO micelles in aqueous media (scale bar 1 nm). - Highlights: • Pt nanoparticles were synthesized within amphiphilic diblock copolymer micelles. • The effects of reducing agents and precursor dose on Pt np size were investigated. • The effect on fabrication of Pt np by reducing in aqueous and solid phases was compared. • The size of nanoparticles was about 1.4 nm for all doses and reducing agents types. - Abstract: Fabrication of Pt nanoparticles using an amphiphilic copolymer template in aqueous solution was achieved via polybutadiene-block-polyethyleneoxide copolymer micelles, which acted as nanoreactors. In addition, Pt nanoparticles were synthesized using hydrogen gas as the reducing agent in solid state for the first time to compare against solution synthesis. The influences of loaded precursor salt amount to micelles and the type of reducing agent on the size of nanoparticles were investigated through transmission electron microscopy. It was found that increasing the ratio of precursor salt to copolymer and using different type of reducing agent, even in solid phase reduction, did not affect the nanoparticle size. The average size of Pt nanoparticles was estimated to be 1.4 ± 0.1 nm. The reason for getting same sized nanoparticles was discussed in the light of nucleation, growth process, stabilization and diffusion of nanoparticles within micelles.

  15. Effect of Random Circuit Fabrication Errors on Small Signal Gain and Phase in Helix Traveling Wave Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pengvanich, P.; Chernin, D. P.; Lau, Y. Y.; Luginsland, J. W.; Gilgenbach, R. M.

    2007-11-01

    Motivated by the current interest in mm-wave and THz sources, which use miniature, difficult-to-fabricate circuit components, we evaluate the statistical effects of random fabrication errors on a helix traveling wave tube amplifier's small signal characteristics. The small signal theory is treated in a continuum model in which the electron beam is assumed to be monoenergetic, and axially symmetric about the helix axis. Perturbations that vary randomly along the beam axis are introduced in the dimensionless Pierce parameters b, the beam-wave velocity mismatch, C, the gain parameter, and d, the cold tube circuit loss. Our study shows, as expected, that perturbation in b dominates the other two. The extensive numerical data have been confirmed by our analytic theory. They show in particular that the standard deviation of the output phase is linearly proportional to standard deviation of the individual perturbations in b, C, and d. Simple formulas have been derived which yield the output phase variations in terms of the statistical random manufacturing errors. This work was supported by AFOSR and by ONR.

  16. Gas phase recovery of hydrogen sulfide contaminated polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakati, Biraj Kumar; Kucernak, Anthony R. J.

    2014-04-01

    The effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on the anode of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) and the gas phase recovery of the contaminated PEMFC using ozone (O3) were studied. Experiments were performed on fuel cell electrodes both in an aqueous electrolyte and within an operating fuel cell. The ex-situ analyses of a fresh electrode; a H2S contaminated electrode (23 μmolH2S cm-2); and the contaminated electrode cleaned with O3 shows that all sulfide can be removed within 900 s at room temperature. Online gas analysis of the recovery process confirms the recovery time required as around 720 s. Similarly, performance studies of an H2S contaminated PEMFC shows that complete rejuvenation occurs following 600-900 s O3 treatment at room temperature. The cleaning process involves both electrochemical oxidation (facilitated by the high equilibrium potential of the O3 reduction process) and direct chemical oxidation of the contaminant. The O3 cleaning process is more efficient than the external polarization of the single cell at 1.6 V. Application of O3 at room temperature limits the amount of carbon corrosion. Room temperature O3 treatment of poisoned fuel cell stacks may offer an efficient and quick remediation method to recover otherwise inoperable systems.

  17. The effects of hygroscopicity of fossil fuel BC on mixed-phase and cirrus ice clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Y.; Penner, J. E.

    2010-12-01

    Fossil fuel burning BC aerosols are often emitted together with sulfate, which coats the surface of these BC particles and changes their hygroscopicity. The ice forming capability of the fossil fuel burning BC can differ widely as a result of the amount of soluble coating on their surface. Due to the abundance of fossil fuel burning BC particles, a small change in their activated fraction can produce a large difference in their climate forcing. To better quantify the role of fossil fuel burning BC in climate change, a 3-BC (hydrophobic, hydrophilic and hygroscopic BC) scheme is developed to replace the 1-BC scheme in a coupled climate and aerosol transport model (CAM-IMPACT). The new scheme explicitly calculates the condensation and coagulation of sulfate on BC particles and keeps track of their coating in the 3-BC states. The hygroscopicity of BC is determined by the layers of sulfate coating on their surface according to criteria developed in laboratory observations. The ice formation scheme in mixed-phase and cirrus clouds is also updated to treat the 3 hygroscopicity BC groups separately according to their different ice freezing capabilities. This paper will report the climate forcing associated with the new BC scheme as well as comparison with observations.

  18. Phase 1A Final Report for the AREVA Team Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuels Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Morrell, Mike E.

    2015-03-19

    plants large scale investment by the fuel vendors is difficult to justify. Specific EATF enhancements considered by the AREVA team were; Improved performance in DB and BDB conditions; Reduced release to the environment in a catastrophic accident; Improved performance during normal operating conditions; Improved performance if US reactors start to load follow; Equal or improved economics of the fuel; and Improvements to the fuel behavior to support future transportation and storage of the used nuclear fuel (UNF). In pursuit of the above enhancements, EATF technology concepts that our team considered were; Additives to the fuel pellets which included; Chromia doping to increase fission gas retention. Chromia doping has the potential to improve load following characteristics, improve performance of the fuel pellet during clad failure, and potentially lock up cesium into the fuel matrix; Silicon Carbide (SiC) Fibers to improve thermal heat transfer in normal operating conditions which also improves margin in accident conditions and the potential to lock up iodine into the fuel matrix; Nano-diamond particles to enhance thermal conductivity; Coatings on the fuel cladding; and Nine coatings on the existing Zircaloy cladding to increase coping time and reduce clad oxidation and hydrogen generation during accident conditions, as well as reduce hydrogen pickup and mitigate hydride reorientation in the cladding. To facilitate the development process AREVA adopted a formal “Gate Review Process” (GR) that was used to review results and focus resources onto promising technologies to reduce costs and identify the technologies that would potentially be carried forward to LFAs within a 10 year period. During the initial discovery phase of the project AREVA took the decision to be relatively hands off and allow our university and National Laboratory partners to be free thinking and consider options that would not be constrained by preconceived ideas from the fuel vendor. To counter

  19. Field test of short-notice random inspections for inventory-change verification at a low-enriched-uranium fuel-fabrication plant: Preliminary summary

    SciTech Connect

    Fishbone, L.G. |; Moussalli, G.; Naegele, G.; Ikonomou, P.; Hosoya, M.; Scott, P.; Fager, J.; Sanders, C.; Colwell, D.; Joyner, C.J.

    1994-04-01

    An approach of short-notice random inspections (SNRIs) for inventory-change verification can enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of international safeguards at natural or low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel fabrication plants. According to this approach, the plant operator declares the contents of nuclear material items before knowing if an inspection will occur to verify them. Additionally, items about which declarations are newly made should remain available for verification for an agreed time. This report details a six-month field test of the feasibility of such SNRIs which took place at the Westinghouse Electric Corporation Commercial Nuclear Fuel Division. Westinghouse personnel made daily declarations about both feed and product items, uranium hexafluoride cylinders and finished fuel assemblies, using a custom-designed computer ``mailbox``. Safeguards inspectors from the IAEA conducted eight SNRIs to verify these declarations. Items from both strata were verified during the SNRIs by means of nondestructive assay equipment. The field test demonstrated the feasibility and practicality of key elements of the SNRI approach for a large LEU fuel fabrication plant.

  20. A critical review of two-phase flow in gas flow channels of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Ryan; Zhang, Lifeng; Ding, Yulong; Blanco, Mauricio; Bi, Xiaotao; Wilkinson, David P.

    Water management in PEM fuel cells has received extensive attention due to its key role in fuel cell performance. The unavoidable water, from humidified gas streams and electrochemical reaction, leads to gas-liquid two-phase flow in the flow channels of fuel cells. The presence of two-phase flow increases the complexity in water management in PEM fuel cells, which remains a challenging hurdle in the commercialization of this technology. Unique water emergence from the gas diffusion layer, which is different from conventional gas-liquid two-phase flow where water is introduced from the inlet together with the gas, leads to different gas-liquid flow behaviors, including pressure drop, flow pattern, and liquid holdup along flow field channels. These parameters are critical in flow field design and fuel cell operation and therefore two-phase flow has received increasing attention in recent years. This review emphasizes gas-liquid two-phase flow in minichannels or microchannels related to PEM fuel cell applications. In situ and ex situ experimental setups have been utilized to visualize and quantify two-phase flow phenomena in terms of flow regime maps, flow maldistribution, and pressure drop measurements. Work should continue to make the results more relevant for operating PEM fuel cells. Numerical simulations have progressed greatly, but conditions relevant to the length scales and time scales experienced by an operating fuel cell have not been realized. Several mitigation strategies exist to deal with two-phase flow, but often at the expense of overall cell performance due to parasitic power losses. Thus, experimentation and simulation must continue to progress in order to develop a full understanding of two-phase flow phenomena so that meaningful mitigation strategies can be implemented.

  1. Phase decomposition of γ-U (bcc) in U-10 wt% Mo fuel alloy during hot isostatic pressing of monolithic fuel plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y.; Eriksson, N.; Newell, R.; Keiser, D. D.; Sohn, Y. H.

    2016-11-01

    Eutectoid decomposition of γ-phase (cI2) into α-phase (oC4) and γ‧-phase (tI6) during the hot isostatic pressing (HIP) of the U-10 wt% Mo (U10Mo) alloy was investigated using monolithic fuel plate samples consisting of U10Mo fuel alloy, Zr diffusion barrier and AA6061 cladding. The decomposition of the γ-phase was observed because the HIP process is carried out near the eutectoid temperature, 555 °C. Initially, a cellular structure, consisting of γ‧-phase surrounded by α-phase, developed from the destabilization of the γ-phase. The cellular structure further developed into an alternating lamellar structure of α- and γ‧-phases. Using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, qualitative and quantitative microstructural analyses were carried out to identify the phase constituents, and elucidate the microstructural development based on time-temperature-transformation diagram of the U10Mo alloy. The destabilization of γ -phase into α- and γ‧-phases would be minimized when HIP process was carried out with rapid ramping/cooling rate and dwell temperature higher than 560 °C.

  2. Pulling at the fabric of the exotic phase diagram for a simple 2D model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almudallal, Ahmad; Saika-Voivod, Ivan; Buldyrev, Sergey

    2014-03-01

    We use computer simulation to study a simple, two-dimensional off-lattice model that was originally devised to understand the anomalous properties of water. The model comprises core-softened disks interacting through a repulsive square shoulder located inside a longer attractive square well. In calculating the phase diagram for the model we discover that the system exhibits the truly remarkable phenomenon of inverse melting, for which the system crystallizes upon isobaric heating, over a small range in pressure. Despite occurring in two dimensions, the melting transition is first order and to a liquid, rather than to a hexatic or quasicrystal phase. We find that by increasing the extent of the shoulder, we increase the pressure range over which inverse melting occurs. But as this range increases, the stability fields of other crystal phases must bend to accommodate the changing inverse melting line. This continues until the phase diagram breaks, with a triple point disappearing, new phases appearing, and a channel of liquid stability to low temperatures forming. We acknowledge support from NSERC, ACEnet, CFI and the Dr. Bernard W. Gamson Computational Science Center at Yeshiva College.

  3. Design, fabrication and test of graphite/epoxy metering truss structure components, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The design, materials, tooling, manufacturing processes, quality control, test procedures, and results associated with the fabrication and test of graphite/epoxy metering truss structure components exhibiting a near zero coefficient of thermal expansion are described. Analytical methods were utilized, with the aid of a computer program, to define the most efficient laminate configurations in terms of thermal behavior and structural requirements. This was followed by an extensive material characterization and selection program, conducted for several graphite/graphite/hybrid laminate systems to obtain experimental data in support of the analytical predictions. Mechanical property tests as well as the coefficient of thermal expansion tests were run on each laminate under study, the results of which were used as the selection criteria for the single most promising laminate. Further coefficient of thermal expansion measurement was successfully performed on three subcomponent tubes utilizing the selected laminate.

  4. Soot and liquid-phase fuel distributions in a newly designed optically accessible D.I. diesel engine

    SciTech Connect

    Dec, J.E.; Espey, C.

    1993-10-01

    Two-dimensional (2-D) laser-sheet imaging has been used to examine the soot and liquid-phase fuel distributions in a newly designed, optically accessible, direct-injection Diesel engine of the heavy-duty size class. The design of this engine preserves the intake port geometry and basic dimensions of a Cummins N-series production engine. It also includes several unique features to provide considerable optical access. Liquid-phase fuel and soot distribution studies were conducted at a medium speed (1,200 rpm) using a Cummins closed-nozzle fuel injector. The scattering was used to obtain planar images of the liquid-phase fuel distribution. These images show that the leading edge of the liquid-phase portion of the fuel jet reaches a maximum length of 24 mm, which is about half the combustion bowl radius for this engine. Beyond this point virtually all the fuel has vaporized. Soot distribution measurements were made at a high load condition using three imaging diagnostics: natural flame luminosity, 2-D laser-induced incandescence, and 2-D elastic scattering. This investigation showed that the soot distribution in the combusting fuel jet develops through three stages. First, just after the onset of luminous combustion, soot particles are small and nearly uniformly distributed throughout the luminous region of the fuel jet. Second, after about 2 crank angle degrees a pattern develops of a higher soot concentration of larger sized particles in the head vortex region of the jet and a lower soot concentration of smaller sized particles upstream toward the injector. Third, after fuel injection ends, both the soot concentration and soot particle size increase rapidly in the upstream portion of the fuel jet.

  5. Re-evaluating neptunium in uranyl phases derived from corroded spent fuel.

    SciTech Connect

    Fortner, J. A.; Finch, R. J.; Kropf, A. J.; Cunnane, J. C.; Chemical Engineering

    2004-11-01

    Interest in mechanisms that may control radioelement release from corroded commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) has been heightened by the selection of the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as the repository for high-level nuclear waste in the United States. Neptunium is an important radionuclide in repository models owing to its relatively long half-life and its high aqueous mobility as neptunyl [Np(V)O+2]. The possibility of neptunium sequestration into uranyl alteration phases produced by corroding CSNF would suggest-a process for lowering neptunium concentration and subsequent migration from a geologic repository. However, there remains little experimental evidence that uranyl compounds will, in fact, serve as long-term host phases for the retention of neptunium under conditions expected in a deep geologic repository. To directly explore this possibility, we examined specimens of uranyl alteration phases derived from humid-air-corroded CSNF by X-ray absorption spectroscopy to better determine neptunium uptake in these phases. Although neptunium fluorescence was readily observed from as-received CSNF, it was not observed from the uranyl alteration rind. We establish upper limits for neptunium incorporation into CSNF alteration phases that are significantly below previously reported concentrations obtained by using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). We attribute the discrepancy to a plural-scattering event that creates a spurious EELS peak at the neptunium-MV energy.

  6. Re-Evaluating Neptunium in Uranyl Phases Derived from Corroded Spent Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Fortner, Jeffrey A.; Finch, Robert J.; Kropf, A. Jeremy; Cunnane, James C.

    2004-11-15

    Interest in mechanisms that may control radioelement release from corroded commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) has been heightened by the selection of the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as the repository for high-level nuclear waste in the United States. Neptunium is an important radionuclide in repository models owing to its relatively long half-life and its high aqueous mobility as neptunyl [Np(V)O{sub 2}{sup +}]. The possibility of neptunium sequestration into uranyl alteration phases produced by corroding CSNF would suggest a process for lowering neptunium concentration and subsequent migration from a geologic repository. However, there remains little experimental evidence that uranyl compounds will, in fact, serve as long-term host phases for the retention of neptunium under conditions expected in a deep geologic repository. To directly explore this possibility, we examined specimens of uranyl alteration phases derived from humid-air-corroded CSNF by X-ray absorption spectroscopy to better determine neptunium uptake in these phases. Although neptunium fluorescence was readily observed from as-received CSNF, it was not observed from the uranyl alteration rind. We establish upper limits for neptunium incorporation into CSNF alteration phases that are significantly below previously reported concentrations obtained by using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). We attribute the discrepancy to a plural-scattering event that creates a spurious EELS peak at the neptunium-M{sub V} energy.

  7. Advanced Fabrication Method for the Preparation of MOF Thin Films: Liquid-Phase Epitaxy Approach Meets Spin Coating Method.

    PubMed

    Chernikova, Valeriya; Shekhah, Osama; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2016-08-10

    Here, we report a new and advanced method for the fabrication of highly oriented/polycrystalline metal-organic framework (MOF) thin films. Building on the attractive features of the liquid-phase epitaxy (LPE) approach, a facile spin coating method was implemented to generate MOF thin films in a high-throughput fashion. Advantageously, this approach offers a great prospective to cost-effectively construct thin-films with a significantly shortened preparation time and a lessened chemicals and solvents consumption, as compared to the conventional LPE-process. Certainly, this new spin-coating approach has been implemented successfully to construct various MOF thin films, ranging in thickness from a few micrometers down to the nanometer scale, spanning 2-D and 3-D benchmark MOF materials including Cu2(bdc)2·xH2O, Zn2(bdc)2·xH2O, HKUST-1, and ZIF-8. This method was appraised and proved effective on a variety of substrates comprising functionalized gold, silicon, glass, porous stainless steel, and aluminum oxide. The facile, high-throughput and cost-effective nature of this approach, coupled with the successful thin film growth and substrate versatility, represents the next generation of methods for MOF thin film fabrication. Therefore, paving the way for these unique MOF materials to address a wide range of challenges in the areas of sensing devices and membrane technology. PMID:27415640

  8. An electrostatic 3-phase linear stepper motor fabricated by vertical trench isolation technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarajlic, Edin; Yamahata, Christophe; Cordero, Mauricio; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    2009-07-01

    We present the design, microfabrication and characterization of an electrostatic 3-phase linear stepper micromotor constructed with vertical trench isolation technology. This suitable technology was used to create a monolithic stepper motor with high-aspect-ratio poles and an integrated 3-phase electrical network in the bulk of a standard single-crystal silicon wafer. The shuttle of the stepper motor is suspended by a flexure to avoid any mechanical contact during operation, enhancing the precision, repeatability and reliability of the stepping motion. The prototype is capable of a maximum travel of +/-26 µm (52 µm) at an actuation voltage of 30 V and a step size of 1.4 µm during a half-stepping sequence. This work was presented in part at the 19th MicroMechanics Europe Workshop (MME), 28-30 September 2008, Aachen, Germany.

  9. Heterogeneous Catalytic Conversion of Biobased Chemicals into Liquid Fuels in the Aqueous Phase.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kejing; Wu, Yulong; Chen, Yu; Chen, Hao; Wang, Jianlong; Yang, Mingde

    2016-06-22

    Different biobased chemicals are produced during the conversion of biomass into fuels through various feasible technologies (e.g., hydrolysis, hydrothermal liquefaction, and pyrolysis). The challenge of transforming these biobased chemicals with high hydrophilicity is ascribed to the high water content of the feedstock and the inevitable formation of water. Therefore, aqueous-phase processing is an interesting technology for the heterogeneous catalytic conversion of biobased chemicals. Different reactions, such as dehydration, isomerization, aldol condensation, ketonization, and hydrogenation, are applied for the conversion of sugars, furfural/hydroxymethylfurfural, acids, phenolics, and so on over heterogeneous catalysts. The activity, stability, and reusability of the heterogeneous catalysts in water are summarized, and deactivation processes and several strategies are introduced to improve the stability of heterogeneous catalysts in the aqueous phase. PMID:27158985

  10. Polymer scaffolds with no skin-effect for tissue engineering applications fabricated by thermally induced phase separation.

    PubMed

    Kasoju, Naresh; Kubies, Dana; Sedlačík, Tomáš; Janoušková, Olga; Koubková, Jana; Kumorek, Marta M; Rypáček, František

    2016-01-11

    Thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) based methods are widely used for the fabrication of porous scaffolds for tissue engineering and related applications. However, formation of a less-/non-porous layer at the scaffold's outer surface at the air-liquid interface, often known as the skin-effect, restricts the cell infiltration inside the scaffold and therefore limits its efficacy. To this end, we demonstrate a TIPS-based process involving the exposure of the just quenched poly(lactide-co-caprolactone):dioxane phases to the pure dioxane for a short time while still being under the quenching strength, herein after termed as the second quenching (2Q). Scanning electron microscopy, mercury intrusion porosimetry and contact angle analysis revealed a direct correlation between the time of 2Q and the gradual disappearance of the skin, followed by the widening of the outer pores and the formation of the fibrous filaments over the surface, with no effect on the internal pore architecture and the overall porosity of scaffolds. The experiments at various quenching temperatures and polymer concentrations revealed the versatility of 2Q in removing the skin. In addition, the in vitro cell culture studies with the human primary fibroblasts showed that the scaffolds prepared by the TIPS based 2Q process, with the optimal exposure time, resulted in a higher cell seeding and viability in contrast to the scaffolds prepared by the regular TIPS. Thus, TIPS including the 2Q step is a facile, versatile and innovative approach to fabricate the polymer scaffolds with a skin-free and fully open porous surface morphology for achieving a better cell response in tissue engineering and related applications.

  11. Application of charge-dissipation material in MEBES phase-shift mask fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Zoilo C. H.; Sauer, Charles A.

    1994-12-01

    Several charge dissipation materials were evaluated for their ability to improve the overlay accuracy during phase shift mask (PSM) registered writing on a MEBES system. These included an organic conductive polymer and a number of thin inorganic films, which were applied above or below the resist on a coated mask. When used with the resists, all conductive materials evaluated were capable of providing adequate charge dissipation during registered writing. Overlay accuracy of mean + 3 sigma

  12. Design, fabrication, and operation of capsules for the irradiation testing of candidate advanced space reactor fuel pins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thoms, K. R.

    1975-01-01

    Fuel irradiation experiments were designed, built, and operated to test uranium mononitride (UN) fuel clad in tungsten-lined T-111 and uranium dioxide fuel clad in both tungsten-lined T-111 and tungsten-lined Nb-1% Zr. A total of nine fuel pins was irradiated at average cladding temperatures ranging from 931 to 1015 C. The UN experiments, capsules UN-4 and -5, operated for 10,480 and 10,037 hr, respectively, at an average linear heat generation rate of 10 kW/ft. The UO2 experiment, capsule UN-6, operated for 8333 hr at an average linear heat generation rate of approximately 5 kW/ft. Following irradiation, the nine fuel pins were removed from their capsules, externally examined, and sent to the NASA Plum Brook Facility for more detailed postirradiation examination. During visual examination, it was discovered that the cladding of the fuel pin containing dense UN in each of capsules UN-4 and -5 had failed, exposing the UN fuel to the NaK in which the pins were submerged and permitting the release of fission gas from the failed pins. A rough analysis of the fission gas seen in samples of the gas in the fuel pin region indicated fission gas release-to-birth rates from these fuel pins in the range of .00001.

  13. Developments in the use and fabrication of organic monolithic phases for use with high-performance liquid chromatography and capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Smith, Norman W; Jiang, Zhengjin

    2008-03-14

    Capillary electrochromatography suffered in its development because of difficulty in producing stable columns with good permeability. Variability in frit characteristics gave rise to non-reproducible capillaries whose fabrication was extremely difficult and time consuming. Monolithic stationary phases gained popularity in the early 1990s due to the fact that they were easy to fabricate and required no retaining frits. They were also able to be manufactured in a wide variety of chemistries which made them very interesting to the analytical chemist who is constantly looking for materials with different selectivity to the popular silica-based stationary phases.

  14. Assessment of PNGV fuels infrastructure. Phase 1 report: Additional capital needs and fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.; Stork, K.; Vyas, A.; Mintz, M.; Singh, M.; Johnson, L.

    1997-01-01

    This report presents the methodologies and results of Argonne`s assessment of additional capital needs and the fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts of using six different fuels in the vehicles with tripled fuel economy (3X vehicles) that the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles is currently investigating. The six fuels included in this study are reformulated gasoline, low-sulfur diesel, methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether, and hydrogen. Reformulated gasoline, methanol, and ethanol are assumed to be burned in spark-ignition, direct-injection engines. Diesel and dimethyl ether are assumed to be burned in compression-ignition, direct-injection engines. Hydrogen and methanol are assumed to be used in fuel-cell vehicles. The authors have analyzed fuels infrastructure impacts under a 3X vehicle low market share scenario and a high market share scenario. The assessment shows that if 3X vehicles are mass-introduced, a considerable amount of capital investment will be needed to build new fuel production plants and to establish distribution infrastructure for methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether, and hydrogen. Capital needs for production facilities will far exceed those for distribution infrastructure. Among the four fuels, hydrogen will bear the largest capital needs. The fuel efficiency gain by 3X vehicles translates directly into reductions in total energy demand, fossil energy demand, and CO{sub 2} emissions. The combination of fuel substitution and fuel efficiency results in substantial petroleum displacement and large reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxide, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, sulfur oxide, and particulate matter of size smaller than 10 microns.

  15. Research and development of proton-exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell system for transportation applications. Phase I final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    Objective during Phase I was to develop a methanol-fueled 10-kW fuel cell power source and evaluate its feasibility for transportation applications. This report documents research on component (fuel cell stack, fuel processor, power source ancillaries and system sensors) development and the 10-kW power source system integration and test. The conceptual design study for a PEM fuel cell powered vehicle was documented in an earlier report (DOE/CH/10435-01) and is summarized herein. Major achievements in the program include development of advanced membrane and thin-film low Pt-loaded electrode assemblies that in reference cell testing with reformate-air reactants yielded performance exceeding the program target (0.7 V at 1000 amps/ft{sup 2}); identification of oxidation catalysts and operating conditions that routinely result in very low CO levels ({le} 10 ppm) in the fuel processor reformate, thus avoiding degradation of the fuel cell stack performance; and successful integrated operation of a 10-kW fuel cell stack on reformate from the fuel processor.

  16. Tracing Gas and Particle Phase Oxidation From Engine Sources as a Function of Fuel Type, Load, and Photochemical Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, B.; Farmer, D.; Jathar, S.; Galang, A.; Fulgham, R.; Link, M.; Brophy, P.

    2015-12-01

    Motor vehicle emissions are an important source of anthropogenic gases and particles in the atmosphere. To study the gas and particle phase emissions, an HR-TOF-AMS and HR-TOF-CIMS were deployed at the CSU Engines Lab, along with an oxidative flow reactor, to measure emissions from a 4.5 L John Deere engine, which ran either diesel or biodiesel fuel. Concurrent gas-phase and particle-phase measurements allowed determination of the gas-phase and particle-phase oxidation properties as a function of fuel type, fuel load, and photochemical age. The impacts of particulate filers on composition and oxidation state were also assessed. While aerosol composition and associated oxidation properties for the biodiesel and diesel fuel types were similar, differences in photochemical production existed for the amount of load, or efficiency of the engine. The mean particulate oxygen to carbon ratios (O:C) and mean hydrogen to carbon ratios (H:C) moved from an initial 0.1 and 2 to a final 0.55 and 1.6, respectively, upon idle biodiesel and diesel engine exhaust exposure to approximately 7 days of OH exposure. The more efficient higher load biodiesel and diesel engine exhaust experienced less changes in the mean O:C and H:C values (an initial 0.1 and 2 to a final 0.3 and 1.7, respectively) with approximately the same amount of OH exposure. Despite largely scrubbing the majority of particles from the engine exhaust, experiments with engine particulate filters still showed photochemical production of oxidized particle-phase species at high photochemical ages, similar to that of idle engine exhaust without any particulate filters. Bulk gas-phase data was compared to bulk aerosol data in Van Krevelen space in order to understand how particle-phase oxidation traces gas-phase oxidation as a function of fuel type, engine load, and photochemical age.

  17. DELTA PHASE PLUTONIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Cramer, E.M.; Ellinger, F.H.; Land. C.C.

    1960-03-22

    Delta-phase plutonium alloys were developed suitable for use as reactor fuels. The alloys consist of from 1 to 4 at.% zinc and the balance plutonium. The alloys have good neutronic, corrosion, and fabrication characteristics snd possess good dimensional characteristics throughout an operating temperature range from 300 to 490 deg C.

  18. Fabrication development for high-level nuclear waste containers for the tuff repository; Phase 1 final report

    SciTech Connect

    Domian, H.A.; Holbrook, R.L.; LaCount, D.F. |

    1990-09-01

    This final report completes Phase 1 of an engineering study of potential manufacturing processes for the fabrication of containers for the long-term storage of nuclear waste. An extensive literature and industry review was conducted to identify and characterize various processes. A technical specification was prepared using the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code (ASME BPVC) to develop the requirements. A complex weighting and evaluation system was devised as a preliminary method to assess the processes. The system takes into account the likelihood and severity of each possible failure mechanism in service and the effects of various processes on the microstructural features. It is concluded that an integral, seamless lower unit of the container made by back extrusion has potential performance advantages but is also very high in cost. A welded construction offers lower cost and may be adequate for the application. Recommendations are made for the processes to be further evaluated in the next phase when mock-up trials will be conducted to address key concerns with various processes and materials before selecting a primary manufacturing process. 43 refs., 26 figs., 34 tabs.

  19. 35/70 MPa Small-scale Hydrogen Fueling Appliance (SHFA) Phase 2a - Design of the First-Generation (Alpha) device - Final Report and Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly Jezierski, NextEnergy; Ted Barnes, GTI; Stephen Jones, ITM Power

    2011-08-31

    The NextEnergy Center MicroGrid Power Pavilion and Hydrogen Fueling Facility construction was divided into 5 phases, as described in further detail below. Phases 1 through 4 involved build out of the facility and phase 5 included the development of the 35/70 MPa (10,000 psi) Small-scale Hydrogen Fueling Appliance (SHFA).

  20. Fabrication of Rare-earth Aluminate (ReAlO3) Glass and Crystalline phases by Aerodynamic Levitation (ADL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basavalingu, B.; Yoda, Shinichi; Kumar, M. S. Vijaya

    2012-07-01

    Containerless processing by levitation technique has been extensively used for material science and engineering because it suppresses inhomogeneous nucleation from the container wall and helps to produce stable, metastable and glass phases. The containerless levitation technique is widely explored for material processing because of its technological and scientific advantages. Recently, research on bulk glass and glass-ceramics have attracted the attention of material scientists as they are considered as low cost optical materials of the future. In the present study, the formation of bulk spherical glass and crystalline ReAlO _{3}(Re=La-Lu,Y) phases has been investigated due to their unique features in terms of the solidification process from an undercooled melt, glass structure and optical properties. An Aerodynamic levitation (ADL) was used to undercool the melt well below the melting temperature. Sintered bits of ReAlO _{3} sample with a diameter of ~2.5 mm and mass of ~20-25 mg was levitated by an ADL and completely melted by a CO _{2} laser and then the droplet was cooled by turning off the CO _{2} laser and solidified. The surface temperature and solidification process of the levitated droplet was monitored using pyrometer and high speed video camera, respectively. Among the rare earth aluminum perovskites Lanthanum, Neodymium and samarium aluminum perovskites solidified as glass and others YAlO _{3} and Europium to Lutetium aluminum perovskites solidified as crystalline phases. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of cross-sectioned samples, TG/DTA, Transmittance and Refractive Index studies were performed for both glass and crystalline phases. The results of the above studies revealed the formation of glass and crystalline phases directly from the undercooled melt. The glass transition temperature (Tg) gradually increased with increasing ionic radius of the rare-earth elements. The NdAlO _{3} glass phase showed a high refractive index of ~1

  1. Multi-fuel reformers for fuel cells used in transportation: Assessment of hydrogen storage technologies. Phase 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This report documents a portion of the work performed Multi-fuel Reformers for Fuel Cells Used in Transportation. One objective for development is to develop advanced fuel processing systems to reform methanol, ethanol, natural gas, and other hydrocarbons into hydrogen for use in transportation fuel cell systems, while a second objective is to develop better systems for on-board hydrogen storage. This report examines techniques and technology available for storage of pure hydrogen on board a vehicle as pure hydrogen of hydrides. The report focuses separately on near- and far-term technologies, with particular emphasis on the former. Development of lighter, more compact near-term storage systems is recommended to enhance competitiveness and simplify fuel cell design. The far-term storage technologies require substantial applied research in order to become serious contenders.

  2. Potential use of California lignite and other alternate fuel for enhanced oil recovery. Phase I and II. Final report. [As alternative fuels for steam generation in thermal EOR

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, R.; Shimizu, A.; Briggs, A.

    1980-02-01

    The Nation's continued reliance on liquid fossil fuels and decreasing reserves of light oils gives increased impetus to improving the recovery of heavy oil. Thermal enhanced oil recovery EOR techniques, such as steam injection, have generally been the most effective for increasing heavy oil production. However, conventional steam generation consumes a large fraction of the produced oil. The substitution of alternate (solid) fuels would release much of this consumed oil to market. This two-part report focuses on two solid fuels available in California, the site of most thermal EOR - petroleum coke and lignite. Phase I, entitled Economic Analysis, shows detailed cost comparisons between the two candidate fuels and also with Western coal. The analysis includes fuels characterizations, process designs for several combustion systems, and a thorough evaluation of the technical and economic uncertainties. In Phase II, many technical parameters of petroleum coke combustion were measured in a pilot-plant fluidized bed. The results of the study showed that petroleum coke combustion for EOR is feasible and cost effective in a fluidized bed combustor.

  3. Kinetic Stabilization of Ordered Intermetallic Phases as Fuel Cell Anode Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yi; Lowe, Michael A.; DiSalvo, Francis J.; Abruña, Héctor D.

    2010-08-16

    The influence of fuel molecules on the stability of the ordered intermetallic PtBi and PtPb phases has been extensively studied by synchrotron-based in situ X-ray grazing incidence diffraction under active electrochemical control. Cycling the potential to increasingly positive values resulted in little change to the surface composition and crystalline structure when specific fuel molecules (such as formic acid for PtBi and formic acid or methanol for PtPb) were oxidized at the intermetallic electrode surface. This was demonstrated by the absence of diffraction peaks due to Pt domains that would be generated by the leaching out of the less noble metal. This phenomenon has been rationalized as a competition process between the oxidation of fuel molecules at the electrode surface and corrosion and damage of the surface due to the electrochemical treatment. For example, PtBi electrodes, which exhibit excellent catalytic activity toward the oxidation of formic acid, could be kinetically stabilized to such a corrosion/degradation process in the presence of formic acid even at relatively positive potentials. An analogous effect was observed for PtPb in the presence of methanol as fuel. In the absence of fuel molecules (formic acid for PtBi and formic acid and/or methanol for PtPb), various surface layers were generated by different electrochemical pretreatments in the presence of only a supporting electrolyte. Crystalline oxidized bismuth species (such as Bi2O3) with an ~50 nm domain size were formed on the PtBi electrode surface by holding the potential at +1.00 V or beyond for at least 30 min. On the other hand, platinum nanopaticles with an ~5 nm crystalline domain size were formed when cycling the potential to higher values. In the case of PtPb, the only detected corrosion product was PbSO 4, whose diffraction peaks were utilized to qualitatively analyze the lead leaching-out and dissolution processes. No crystalline lead oxide species

  4. Carbon nanotubes reinforced poly(L-lactide) scaffolds fabricated by thermally induced phase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Haiyun; Xue, Li

    2015-01-01

    In tissue engineering, porous nanocomposite scaffolds can potentially mimic aspects of the nanoscale architecture of the extra-cellular matrix, as well as enhance the mechanical properties required for successful weight-bearing implants. In this paper, we demonstrate that highly porous thermoplastic poly(L-lactide) nanocomposite scaffolds containing different types of functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The nanocomposite scaffolds were manufactured by a thermally induced phase separation method. This experiment produced an uniform distribution of CNTs throughout the scaffold without obvious aggregations for funtionalized CNTs filled scaffolds by scanning electron microscope observation. The CNTs were frequently located on the pore surface, forming rough, hairy nano-textures. The pore size was reduced with the increasing of CNT loading. Parts of PLLA matrix was induced into nanofibrous structures from solid-walled state, which reduced the crystallinity of the PLLA characterized by DSC measurement. The CNT incorporation significantly improved the compression modulus of the nanocomposite scaffolds, especially the functionalized CNTs. The capacity of protein adsorption is significantly improved when the concentration of the CNTs was higher than 1.0 wt.% and the cell attachment was also enhanced by the addition of CNTs, especially N-CNT.

  5. Carbon nanotubes reinforced poly(L-lactide) scaffolds fabricated by thermally induced phase separation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Haiyun; Xue, Li

    2015-01-16

    In tissue engineering, porous nanocomposite scaffolds can potentially mimic aspects of the nanoscale architecture of the extra-cellular matrix, as well as enhance the mechanical properties required for successful weight-bearing implants. In this paper, we demonstrate that highly porous thermoplastic poly(L-lactide) nanocomposite scaffolds containing different types of functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The nanocomposite scaffolds were manufactured by a thermally induced phase separation method. This experiment produced an uniform distribution of CNTs throughout the scaffold without obvious aggregations for funtionalized CNTs filled scaffolds by scanning electron microscope observation. The CNTs were frequently located on the pore surface, forming rough, hairy nano-textures. The pore size was reduced with the increasing of CNT loading. Parts of PLLA matrix was induced into nanofibrous structures from solid-walled state, which reduced the crystallinity of the PLLA characterized by DSC measurement. The CNT incorporation significantly improved the compression modulus of the nanocomposite scaffolds, especially the functionalized CNTs. The capacity of protein adsorption is significantly improved when the concentration of the CNTs was higher than 1.0 wt.% and the cell attachment was also enhanced by the addition of CNTs, especially N-CNT.

  6. Novel application of aluminum salt for cost-effective fabrication of a highly creep-resistant nickel-aluminum anode for a molten carbonate fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hoonhee; Lee, Insung; Lee, Dokyol; Lim, Heechun

    A one-step sintering process using aluminum acetate as an aluminum source is used to fabricate a nickel-based anode for a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC). The process is designed to replace existing partial or full oxidation and reduction processes, which are quite complicated and expensive. The aim is to simplify the fabrication process of a highly creep-resistant Ni-Al anode and eventually to contribute to the commercialization of a MCFC. Considering the solubility limit of Al in Ni, two types of anodes, Ni-2.5 wt.%Al and Ni-5 wt.%Al, are fabricated by sintering at either 1000 or 1100 °C for 2 h in a 99.5% H 2 atmosphere. After characterizing the resulting material by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, it is confirmed that among the anodes fabricated, the Ni-5 wt.%Al sample sintered at 1100 °C contained the most suitable Al 2O 3 in a dispersed form. A 100-h creep test reveals that the creep strain of the anode has the lowest value of 1.3% compared with the other anodes. This value is superior to the creep strain of 2.3% obtained from a Ni-5 wt.%Al anode using Al powder as a fine Al 2O 3 dispersion source in a Ni-base anode matrix. A single cell using the Ni-5 wt.%Al anode fabricated in this study shows a stable closed-circuit voltage of 0.795 V for 1000 h at 150 mA cm -2.

  7. Tunable complex magnetic states of epitaxial core-shell metal oxide nanocrystals fabricated by the phase decomposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, S. J.; Lam, T. N.; Yang, C. Y.; Chen, Y. L.; Chu, Y. H.; Chueh, Y. L.; Tseng, Y. C.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the successful fabrication of epitaxial-discrete Co x Fe3-x O4/CoO magnetic nanostructures on a SrTiO3 substrate as well as the results of a thorough investigation of the magnetic cross-reactions of the two phases in the vicinity of the epitaxial junction. These nanostructures were originally prepared as Fe3O4-CoO core-shell structures through the phase decomposition of bismuth perovskite precursors by pulsed-laser deposition. An antiphase boundary emerged during the structural/electronic transition from the CoO core to the Co1-x Fe2+X O4 shell; this then developed into a ferrimagnetic/antiferromagnetic interface. Uncompensated spins (UCS) arose from the Co x Fe3-x O4/CoO interface as a result of strong ferrimagnetic-antiferromagnetic interactions. A notable exchange bias as well as a significant exchange enhancement was observed owing to the UCS, which had a locking effect because of the decoupling of the Co1-x Fe2+X O4/CoO reversal from the antiphase boundary. Control of the precursor ratio allowed for the fine-tuning of the Co1-x Fe2+X O4 phase and the associated locking behaviors. This, in turn, allowed the anisotropy and coercivity of the nanostructures to be manipulated. Thus, we were able to create and thoroughly understand a complex epitaxial configuration with tunable structural and magnetic properties. This study should open new opportunities with regard to current magnetic oxide technology, which requires novel methods for pursuing extremity of controllable properties over an atomic landscape.

  8. Tunable complex magnetic states of epitaxial core-shell metal oxide nanocrystals fabricated by the phase decomposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, S. J.; Lam, T. N.; Yang, C. Y.; Chen, Y. L.; Chu, Y. H.; Chueh, Y. L.; Tseng, Y. C.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the successful fabrication of epitaxial-discrete Co x Fe3‑x O4/CoO magnetic nanostructures on a SrTiO3 substrate as well as the results of a thorough investigation of the magnetic cross-reactions of the two phases in the vicinity of the epitaxial junction. These nanostructures were originally prepared as Fe3O4-CoO core-shell structures through the phase decomposition of bismuth perovskite precursors by pulsed-laser deposition. An antiphase boundary emerged during the structural/electronic transition from the CoO core to the Co1‑x Fe2+X O4 shell; this then developed into a ferrimagnetic/antiferromagnetic interface. Uncompensated spins (UCS) arose from the Co x Fe3‑x O4/CoO interface as a result of strong ferrimagnetic–antiferromagnetic interactions. A notable exchange bias as well as a significant exchange enhancement was observed owing to the UCS, which had a locking effect because of the decoupling of the Co1‑x Fe2+X O4/CoO reversal from the antiphase boundary. Control of the precursor ratio allowed for the fine-tuning of the Co1‑x Fe2+X O4 phase and the associated locking behaviors. This, in turn, allowed the anisotropy and coercivity of the nanostructures to be manipulated. Thus, we were able to create and thoroughly understand a complex epitaxial configuration with tunable structural and magnetic properties. This study should open new opportunities with regard to current magnetic oxide technology, which requires novel methods for pursuing extremity of controllable properties over an atomic landscape.

  9. Process Modeling Phase I Summary Report for the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program

    SciTech Connect

    Pannala, Sreekanth; Daw, C Stuart; Boyalakuntla, Dhanunjay S; FINNEY, Charles E A

    2006-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of preliminary work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to demonstrate application of computational fluid dynamics modeling to the scale-up of a Fluidized Bed Chemical Vapor Deposition (FBCVD) process for nuclear fuels coating. Specifically, this work, referred to as Modeling Scale-Up Phase I, was conducted between January 1, 2006 and March 31, 2006 in support of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Program. The objective was to develop, demonstrate and "freeze" a version of ORNL's computational model of the TRI ISOtropic (TRISO) fuel-particle coating process that can be specifically used to assist coater scale-up activities as part of the production of AGR-2 fuel. The results in this report are intended to serve as input for making decisions about initiating additional FBCVD modeling work (referred to as Modeling Scale-Up Phase II) in support of AGR-2. The main computational tool used to implement the model is the general-purpose multiphase fluid-dynamics computer code known as MFIX (Multiphase Flow with Interphase eXchanges), which is documented in detail on the DOE-sponsored website http://www.mfix.org. Additional computational tools are also being developed by ORNL for post-processing MFIX output to efficiently summarize the important information generated by the coater simulations. The summarized information includes quantitative spatial and temporal measures (referred to as discriminating characteristics, or DCs) by which different coater designs and operating conditions can be compared and correlated with trends in product quality. The ORNL FBCVD modeling work is being conducted in conjunction with experimental coater studies at ORNL with natural uranium CO (NUCO) and surrogate fuel kernels. Data are also being obtained from ambient-temperature, spouted-bed characterization experiments at the University of Tennessee and theoretical studies of carbon and silicon carbide chemical vapor deposition kinetics at Iowa State

  10. Fuel and power coproduction: The Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) process demonstration at Kingsport

    SciTech Connect

    Drown, D.P.; Brown, W.R.; Heydorn, E.C.; Moore, R.B.; Schaub, E.S.; Brown, D.M.; Jones, W.C.; Kornosky, R.M.

    1997-12-31

    The Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) process uses a slurry bubble column reactor to convert syngas (primarily a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen) to methanol. Because of its superior heat management, the process is able to be designed to directly handle the carbon monoxide (CO)-rich syngas characteristic of the gasification of coal, petroleum coke, residual oil, wastes, or of other hydrocarbon feedstocks. When added to an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant, the LPMEOH{trademark} process converts a portion of the CO-rich syngas produced by the gasifier to methanol, and the remainder of the unconverted gas is used to fuel the gas turbine combined-cycle power plant. The LPMEOH{trademark} process has the flexibility to operate in a daily electricity demand load-following manner. Coproduction of power and methanol via IGCC and the LPMEOH{trademark} process provides opportunities for energy storage for electrical demand peak shaving, clean fuel for export, and/or chemical methanol sales.

  11. End plate assembly having a two-phase fluid-filled bladder and method for compressing a fuel cell stack

    DOEpatents

    Carlstrom, Jr., Charles M.

    2001-01-01

    An end plate assembly is disclosed for use in a fuel cell assembly in which the end plate assembly includes a housing having a cavity, and a bladder receivable in the cavity and engageable with the fuel cell stack. The bladder includes a two-phase fluid having a liquid portion and a vapor portion. Desirably, the two-phase fluid has a vapor pressure between about 100 psi and about 600 psi at a temperature between about 70 degrees C. to about 110 degrees C.

  12. An in situ vapour phase hydrothermal surface doping approach for fabrication of high performance Co3O4 electrocatalysts with an exceptionally high S-doped active surface.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhijin; Liu, Porun; Zhang, Haimin; Wang, Yun; Al-Mamun, Mohammad; Yang, Hua Gui; Wang, Dan; Tang, Zhiyong; Zhao, Huijun

    2015-04-01

    A facile in situ vapour phase hydrothermal (VPH) surface doping approach has been developed for fabrication of high performance S-doped Co3O4 electrocatalysts with an unprecedentedly high surface S content (>47%). The demonstrated VPH doping approach could be useful for enrichment of surface active sites for other metal oxide electrocatalysts. PMID:25714902

  13. μPIV measurements of two-phase flows of an operated direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgmann, Sebastian; Blank, Mirja; Panchenko, Olha; Wartmann, Jens

    2013-05-01

    In direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs), two-phase flows appear in the channels of the anode side (CO2 bubbles in a liquid water-methanol environment) as well as of the cathode side (water droplets or films in an ambient air flow). CO2 bubbles or water droplets may almost completely fill the cross-section of a channel. The instantaneous effect of the formation of two-phase flows on the cell performance has not been investigated in detail, yet. In the current project, the micro particle image velocimetry (μPIV) technique is used to elucidate the corresponding flow phenomena on the anode as well as on the cathode side of a DMFC and to correlate those phenomena with the performance of the cell. A single-channel DMFC with optical access at the anode and the cathode side is constructed and assembled that allows for μPIV measurements at both sides as well as a detailed time-resolved cell voltage recording. The appearance and evolution of CO2 bubbles on the anode side is qualitatively and quantitatively investigated. The results clearly indicate that the cell power increases when the free cross-section area of the channel is decreased by huge bubbles. Methanol is forced into the porous gas diffusion layer (GDL) between the channels and the membrane is oxidized to CO2, and hence, the fuel consumption is increased and the cell performance rises. Eventually, a bubble forms a moving slug that effectively cleans the channel from CO2 bubbles on its way downstream. The blockage effect is eliminated; the methanol flow is not forced into the GDL anymore. The remaining amount of methanol in the GDL is oxidized. The cell power decreases until enough CO2 is produced to eventually form bubbles again and the process starts again. On the other hand under the investigated conditions, water on the cathode side only forms liquid films on the channels walls rather than channel-filling droplets. Instantaneous changes of the cell power due to liquid water formation could not be observed. The

  14. Joule-Heated Ceramic-Lined Melter to Vitrify Liquid Radioactive Wastes Containing Am241 Generated From MOX Fuel Fabrication in Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, E C; Bowan II, B W; Pegg, I; Jardine, L J

    2004-11-16

    The governments of the United Stated of America and the Russian Federation (RF) signed an Agreement September 1, 2000 to dispose of weapons plutonium that has been designated as no longer required for defense purposes. The Agreement declares that each country will disposition 34MT of excess weapons grade plutonium from their stockpiles. The preferred disposition technology is the fabrication of mixed oxide (MOx) fuel for use or burning in pressurized water reactors to destroy the plutonium. Implementation of this Agreement will require the conversion of plutonium metal to oxide and the fabrication of MOx fuel within the Russian Federation. The MOx fuel fabrication and metal to oxide conversion processes will generate solid and liquid radioactive wastes containing trace amounts of plutonium, neptunium, americium, and uranium requiring treatment, storage, and disposal. Unique to the Russian MOx fuel fabrication facility's flow-sheet is a liquid waste stream with high concentrations ({approx}1 g/l) of {sup 241}Am and non radioactive silver. The silver is used to dissolve PuO{sub 2} feed materials to the MOx fabrication facility. Technical solutions are needed to treat and solidify this liquid waste stream. Alternative treatment technologies for this liquid waste stream are being evaluated by a Russian engineering team. The technologies being evaluated include borosilicate and phosphate vitrification alternatives. The evaluations are being performed at a conceptual design level of detail under a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) contract with the Russian organization TVEL using DOE NA-26 funding. As part of this contract, the RF team is evaluating the technical and economic feasibility of the US borosilicate glass vitrification technology based on a Duratek melter to solidify this waste stream into a form acceptable for storage and geologic disposal. The composition of the glass formed from treating the waste is dictated by the concentration of silver and

  15. Synthesis of dimethyl ether and alternative fuels in the liquid phase from coal-derived synthesis gas. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    Through the mid-1980s, Air Products has brought the liquid phase approach to a number of other synthesis gas reactions where effective heat management is a key issue. In 1989, in response to DOE`s PRDA No. DE-RA22-88PC88805, Air Products proposed a research and development program entitled ``Synthesis of Dimethyl Ether and Alternative Fuels in the Liquid Phase from Coal Derived Syngas.`` The proposal aimed at extending the LPMEOH experience to convert coal-derived synthesis gas to other useful fuels and chemicals. The work proposed included development of a novel one-step synthesis of dimethyl ether (DME) from syngas, and exploration of other liquid phase synthesis of alternative fuel directly from syngas. The one-step DME process, conceived in 1986 at Air Products as a means of increasing syngas conversion to liquid products, envisioned the concept of converting product methanol in situ to DME in a single reactor. The slurry reactor based liquid phase technology is ideally suited for such an application, since the second reaction (methanol to DME) can be accomplished by adding a second catalyst with dehydration activity to the methanol producing reactor. An area of exploration for other alternative fuels directly from syngas was single-step slurry phase synthesis of hydrocarbons via methanol and DME as intermediates. Other possibilities included the direct synthesis of mixed alcohols and mixed ethers in a slurry reactor.

  16. Gas-phase saturation and evaporative cooling effects during wet compression of a fuel aerosol under RCM conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsborough, S.S.; Johnson, M.V.; Zhu, G.S.; Aggarwal, S.K.

    2011-01-15

    Wet compression of a fuel aerosol has been proposed as a means of creating gas-phase mixtures of involatile diesel-representative fuels and oxidizer + diluent gases for rapid compression machine (RCM) experiments. The use of high concentration aerosols (e.g., {proportional_to}0.1 mL{sub fuel}/L{sub gas}, {proportional_to}1 x 10{sup 9} droplets/L{sub gas} for stoichiometric fuel loading at ambient conditions) can result in droplet-droplet interactions which lead to significant gas-phase fuel saturation and evaporative cooling during the volumetric compression process. In addition, localized stratification (i.e., on the droplet scale) of the fuel vapor and of temperature can lead to non-homogeneous reaction and heat release processes - features which could prevent adequate segregation of the underlying chemical kinetic rates from rates of physical transport. These characteristics are dependent on many factors including physical parameters such as overall fuel loading and initial droplet size relative to the compression rate, as well as fuel and diluent properties such as the boiling curve, vaporization enthalpy, heat capacity, and mass and thermal diffusivities. This study investigates the physical issues, especially fuel saturation and evaporative cooling effects, using a spherically-symmetric, single-droplet wet compression model. n-Dodecane is used as the fuel with the gas containing 21% O{sub 2} and 79% N{sub 2}. An overall compression time and compression ratio of 15.3 ms and 13.4 are used, respectively. It is found that smaller droplets (d{sub 0}{proportional_to} 2-3 {mu}m) are more affected by 'far-field' saturation and cooling effects, while larger droplets (d{sub 0}{proportional_to} 14 {mu}m) result in greater localized stratification of the gas-phase due to the larger diffusion distances for heat and mass transport. Vaporization of larger droplets is more affected by the volumetric compression process since evaporation requires more time to be completed

  17. Comparison of Homogeneous and Heterogeneous CFD Fuel Models for Phase I of the IAEA CRP on HTR Uncertainties Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhard Strydom; Su-Jong Yoon

    2014-04-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) evaluation of homogeneous and heterogeneous fuel models was performed as part of the Phase I calculations of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinate Research Program (CRP) on High Temperature Reactor (HTR) Uncertainties in Modeling (UAM). This study was focused on the nominal localized stand-alone fuel thermal response, as defined in Ex. I-3 and I-4 of the HTR UAM. The aim of the stand-alone thermal unit-cell simulation is to isolate the effect of material and boundary input uncertainties on a very simplified problem, before propagation of these uncertainties are performed in subsequent coupled neutronics/thermal fluids phases on the benchmark. In many of the previous studies for high temperature gas cooled reactors, the volume-averaged homogeneous mixture model of a single fuel compact has been applied. In the homogeneous model, the Tristructural Isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles in the fuel compact were not modeled directly and an effective thermal conductivity was employed for the thermo-physical properties of the fuel compact. On the contrary, in the heterogeneous model, the uranium carbide (UCO), inner and outer pyrolytic carbon (IPyC/OPyC) and silicon carbide (SiC) layers of the TRISO fuel particles are explicitly modeled. The fuel compact is modeled as a heterogeneous mixture of TRISO fuel kernels embedded in H-451 matrix graphite. In this study, a steady-state and transient CFD simulations were performed with both homogeneous and heterogeneous models to compare the thermal characteristics. The nominal values of the input parameters are used for this CFD analysis. In a future study, the effects of input uncertainties in the material properties and boundary parameters will be investigated and reported.

  18. RELAP5 Model of a Two-phase ThermoSyphon Experimental Facility for Fuels and Materials Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Carbajo, Juan J; McDuffee, Joel Lee

    2013-01-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) does not have a separate materials-irradiation flow loop and requires most materials and all fuel experiments to be placed inside a containment. This is necessary to ensure that internal contaminants such as fission products cannot be released into the primary coolant. As part of the safety basis justification, HFIR also requires that all experiments be able to withstand various accident conditions (e.g., loss of coolant) without generating vapor bubbles on the surface of the experiment in the primary coolant. As with any parallel flow system, HFIR is vulnerable to flow excursion events when vapor is generated in one of those flow paths. The effects of these requirements are to artificially increase experiment temperatures by introducing a barrier between the experimental materials and the HFIR coolant and to reduce experiment heat loads to ensure boiling doesn t occur. A new experimental facility for materials irradiation and testing in the HFIR is currently being developed to overcome these limitations. The new facility is unique in that it will have its own internal cooling flow totally independent of the reactor primary coolant and boiling is permitted. The reactor primary coolant will cool the outside of this facility without contacting the materials inside. The ThermoSyphon Test Loop (TSTL), a full scale prototype of the proposed irradiation facility to be tested outside the reactor, is being designed and fabricated (Ref. 1). The TSTL is a closed system working as a two-phase thermosyphon. A schematic is shown in Fig. 1. The bottom central part is the boiler/evaporator and contains three electric heaters. The vapor generated by the heaters will rise and be condensed in the upper condenser, the condensate will drain down the side walls and be circulated via a downcomer back into the bottom of the boiler. An external flow system provides coolant that simulates the HFIR primary coolant

  19. Fabrication of a Dipole-assisted Solid Phase Extraction Microchip for Trace Metal Analysis in Water Samples.

    PubMed

    Shih, Tsung-Ting; Hsu, I-Hsiang; Chen, Ping-Hung; Chen, Shun-Niang; Tseng, Sheng-Hao; Deng, Ming-Jay; Lin, Yang-Wei; Sun, Yuh-Chang

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a fabrication protocol for a dipole-assisted solid phase extraction (SPE) microchip available for trace metal analysis in water samples. A brief overview of the evolution of chip-based SPE techniques is provided. This is followed by an introduction to specific polymeric materials and their role in SPE. To develop an innovative dipole-assisted SPE technique, a chlorine (Cl)-containing SPE functionality was implanted into a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microchip. Herein, diverse analytical techniques including contact angle analysis, Raman spectroscopic analysis, and laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analysis were employed to validate the utility of the implantation protocol of the C-Cl moieties on the PMMA. The analytical results of the X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) analysis also demonstrated the feasibility of the Cl-containing PMMA used as an extraction medium by virtue of the dipole-ion interactions between the highly electronegative C-Cl moieties and the positively charged metal ions. PMID:27584954

  20. Study of diffusion bond development in 6061 aluminum and its relationship to future high density fuels fabrication.

    SciTech Connect

    Prokofiev, I.; Wiencek, T.; McGann, D.

    1997-10-07

    Powder metallurgy dispersions of uranium alloys and silicides in an aluminum matrix have been developed by the RERTR program as a new generation of proliferation-resistant fuels. Testing is done with miniplate-type fuel plates to simulate standard fuel with cladding and matrix in plate-type configurations. In order to seal the dispersion fuel plates, a diffusion bond must exist between the aluminum coverplates surrounding the fuel meat. Four different variations in the standard method for roll-bonding 6061 aluminum were studied. They included mechanical cleaning, addition of a getter material, modifications to the standard chemical etching, and welding methods. Aluminum test pieces were subjected to a bend test after each rolling pass. Results, based on 400 samples, indicate that at least a 70% reduction in thickness is required to produce a diffusion bond using the standard rollbonding method versus a 60% reduction using the Type II method in which the assembly was welded 100% and contained open 9mm holes at frame corners.

  1. Innovative fossil fuel fired vitrification technology for soil remediation. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    Vortec has successfully completed Phase 1 of the ``Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation`` program. The Combustion and Melting System (CMS) has processed 7000 pounds of material representative of contaminated soil that is found at DOE sites. The soil was spiked with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals surrogates, an organic contaminant, and a surrogate radionuclide. The samples taken during the tests confirmed that virtually all of the radionuclide was retained in the glass and that it did not leach to the environment-as confirmed by both ANS 16.1 and Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) testing. The organic contaminant, anthracene, was destroyed during the test with a Destruction and Removal Efficiency (DRE) of at least 99.99%. RCRA metal surrogates, that were in the vitrified product, were retained and did not leach to the environment as confirmed by the TCLP testing. Semi-volatile RCRA metal surrogates were captured by the Air Pollution Control (APC) system, and data on the amount of metal oxide particulate and the chemical composition of the particulate were established for use in the Phase 2 APC subsystem design.

  2. Field test of short-notice random inspections for inventory-change verification at a low-enriched-uranium fuel-fabrication plant

    SciTech Connect

    Fishbone, L.G. |; Moussalli, G.; Naegele, G.

    1995-05-01

    An approach of short-notice random inspections (SNRIs) for inventory-change verification can enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of international safeguards at natural or low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel fabrication plants. According to this approach, the plant operator declares the contents of nuclear material items before knowing if an inspection will occur to verify them. Additionally, items about which declarations are newly made should remain available for verification for an agreed time. Then a statistical inference can be made from verification results for items verified during SNRIs to the entire populations, i.e. the entire strata, even if inspectors were not present when many items were received or produced. A six-month field test of the feasibility of such SNRIs took place at the Westinghouse Electric Corporation Commercial Nuclear Fuel Division during 1993. Westinghouse personnel made daily declarations about both feed and product items, uranium hexafluoride cylinders and finished fuel assemblies, using a custom-designed computer ``mailbox``. Safeguards inspectors from the IAEA conducted eight SNRIs to verify these declarations. They arrived unannounced at the plant, in most cases immediately after travel from Canada, where the IAEA maintains a regional office. Items from both strata were verified during the SNRIs by meant of nondestructive assay equipment.

  3. Application of the UMACS process to highly dense U1-xAmxO2±δ MABB fuel fabrication for the DIAMINO irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delahaye, Thibaud; Lebreton, Florent; Horlait, Denis; Herlet, Nathalie; Dehaudt, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The DIAMINO irradiation program aims to assess the influence of Am content and microstructure on He release and fuel swelling for different irradiation temperatures during heterogeneous transmutation in the OSIRIS reactor. Such irradiation programs call for ceramic fuels compliant with strict specifications. In the case of the DIAMINO experiment, Am-bearing blanket fuels with two compositions (U1-xAmxO2±δ (x = 0.075, 0.15)) and two microstructures (dense and porous) were selected, corresponding with four sample sets. Porous samples (<85%TD) were fabricated using a process previously developed for a similar irradiation program while a new dedicated process, UMACS, was developed and applied to produce dense samples. Despite americium presence, this process, based on conventional sintering, produces samples with high density (˜96%TD) close to that usually obtained for UO2. In the case of Minor Actinide Bearing Blankets (MABB), such a result has never been obtained reproducibly even with reactive sintering or impregnation methods.

  4. Phase Characteristics of a Number of U-Pu-Am-Np-Zr Metallic Alloys for Use as Fast Reactor Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas E. Burkes; J. Rory Kennedy; Thomas Hartmann; Cynthia A. Papesch; Denis D. Keiser, Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Metallic fuel alloys consisting of uranium, plutonium, and zirconium with minor additions of americium and neptunium are under evaluation for potential use to transmute long-lived transuranic actinide isotopes in fast reactors. A series of test designs for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) have been irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), designated as the AFC-1 and AFC-2 designs. Metal fuel compositions in these designs have included varying amounts of U, Pu, Zr, and minor actinides (Am, Np). Investigations into the phase behavior and relationships based on the alloy constituents have been conducted using x-ray diffraction and differential thermal analysis. Results of these investigations, along with proposed relationships between observed behavior and alloy composition, are provided. In general, observed behaviors can be predicted by a ternary U-Pu-Zr phase diagram, with transition temperatures being most dependent on U content. Furthermore, the enthalpy associated with transitions is strongly dependent on the as-cast microstructural characteristics.

  5. Phase diagram, design of monolayer binary colloidal crystals, and their fabrication based on ethanol-assisted self-assembly at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhengfei; Li, Yue; Duan, Guotao; Jia, Lichao; Cai, Weiping

    2012-08-28

    Flexible structural design and accurate controlled fabrication with structural tunability according to need for binary or multicomponent colloidal crystals have been expected. However, it is still a challenge. In this work, the phase diagram of monolayer binary colloidal crystals (bCCs) is established on the assumption that both large and small polystyrene (PS) colloidal spheres can stay at the air/water interface, and the range diagram for the size ratio and number ratio of small to large colloidal spheres is presented. From this phase diagram, combining the range diagram, we can design and relatively accurately control fabrication of the bCCs with specific structures (or patterns) according to need, including single or mixed patterns with the given relative content. Further, a simple and facile approach is presented to fabricate large-area (more than 10 cm(2)) monolayer bCCs without any surfactants, using differently sized PS spheres, based on ethanol-assisted self-assembly at the air/water interface. bCCs with different patterns and stoichiometries are thus designed from the established phase diagram and then successfully fabricated based on the volume ratios (V(S/L)) of the small to large PS suspensions using the presented colloidal self-assembling method. Interestingly, these monolayer bCCs can be transferred to any desired substrates using water as the medium. This study allows us to design desired patterns of monolayer bCCs and to more accurately control their structures with the used V(S/L).

  6. REVIEW OF RESULTS FOR THE OECD/NEA PHASE VII BENCHMARK: STUDY OF SPENT FUEL COMPOSITIONS FOR LONG TERM DISPOSAL

    SciTech Connect

    Radulescu, Georgeta; Wagner, John C

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes the problem specification and compares participants results for the OECD/NEA/WPNCS Expert Group on Burn-up Credit Criticality Safety Phase VII Benchmark Study of Spent Fuel Compositions for Long-Term Disposal. The Phase VII benchmark was developed to study the ability of relevant computer codes and associated nuclear data to predict spent fuel isotopic compositions and corresponding keff values in a cask configuration over the time duration relevant to spent nuclear fuel (SNF) disposal. The benchmark was divided into two sets of calculations: (1) decay calculations out to 1,000,000 years for provided pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) UO2 discharged fuel compositions and (2) burnup credit criticality calculations for a representative cask model at selected time steps. Contributions from 15 organizations and companies in 10 countries were submitted to the Phase VII benchmark exercise. This paper provides a description of the Phase VII benchmark and detailed comparisons of the participants isotopic compositions and keff values that were calculated with a diversity of computer codes and nuclear data sets. Differences observed in the calculated time-dependent nuclide densities are attributed to different decay data or code-specific numerical approximations. The variability of the keff results is consistent with the evaluated uncertainty associated with cross-section data.

  7. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM ANAEROBIC DIGESTER GAS - PHASE I. CONCEPTUAL DESIGN, PRELIMINARY COST, AND EVALUATION STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses Phase I (a conceptual design, preliminary cost, and evaluation study) of a program to demonstrate the recovery of energy from waste methane produced by anaerobic digestion of waste water treatment sludge. The fuel cell is being used for this application becau...

  8. The origin of organic pollutants from the combustion of alternative fuels: Phase 5/6 report

    SciTech Connect

    Sidhu, S.; Graham, J.; Taylor, P.; Dellinger, B.

    1998-05-01

    As part of the US Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory program on alternative automotive fuels, the subcontractor has been conducting studies on the origin and fate of organic pollutants from the combustion of alternative fuels. Laboratory experiments were conducted simulating cold start of four alterative fuels (compressed natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, methanol-gasoline mix, and ethanol-gasoline mix) using a commercial three-way catalyst under fuel-lean conditions. This report summarizes the results of these experiments. It appears that temperature of the catalyst is a more important parameter for fuel conversion and pollutant formation than oxygen concentration or fuel composition.

  9. Modeling of selected ceramic processing parameters employed in the fabrication of 238PuO2 fuel pellets

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brockman, R. A.; Kramer, D. P.; Barklay, C. D.; Cairns-Gallimore, D.; Brown, J. L.; Huling, J. C.; Van Pelt, C. E.

    2011-10-01

    Recent deep space missions utilize the thermal output of the radioisotope plutonium-238 as the fuel in the thermal to electrical power system. Since the application of plutonium in its elemental state has several disadvantages, the fuel employed in these deep space power systems is typically in the oxide form such as plutonium-238 dioxide (238PuO2). As an oxide, the processing of the plutonium dioxide into fuel pellets is performed via ''classical'' ceramic processing unit operations such as sieving of the powder, pressing, sintering, etc. Modeling of these unit operations can be beneficial in the understanding and control of processing parameters withmore » the goal of further enhancing the desired characteristics of the 238PuO2 fuel pellets. A finite element model has been used to help identify the time-temperature-stress profile within a pellet during a furnace operation taking into account that 238PuO2 itself has a significant thermal output. The results of the modeling efforts will be discussed.« less

  10. Modeling of Selected Ceramic Processing Parameters Employed in the Fabrication of 238PuO 2 Fuel Pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockman, R. A.; Kramer, D. P.; Barklay, C. D.; Cairns-Gallimore, D.; Brown, J. L.; Huling, J. C.; Van Pelt, C. E.

    Recent deep space missions utilize the thermal output of the radioisotope plutonium-238 as the fuel in the thermal to electrical power system. Since the application of plutonium in its elemental state has several disadvantages, the fuel employed in these deep space power systems is typically in the oxide form such as plutonium-238 dioxide (238PuO2). As an oxide, the processing of the plutonium dioxide into fuel pellets is performed via "classical" ceramic processing unit operations such as sieving of the powder, pressing, sintering, etc. Modeling of these unit operations can be beneficial in the understanding and control of processing parameters with the goal of further enhancing the desired characteristics of the 238PuO2 fuel pellets. A finite element model has been used to help identify the time-temperature-stress profile within a pellet during a furnace operation taking into account that 238PuO2 itself has a significant thermal output. Results of the modeling efforts will be discussed.

  11. Separation of Corn Fiber and Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals Phase II: Pilot-scale Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Abbas, Charles; Beery, Kyle; Orth, Rick; Zacher, Alan

    2007-09-28

    The purpose of the Department of Energy (DOE)-supported corn fiber conversion project, “Separation of Corn Fiber and Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals Phase II: Pilot-scale Operation” is to develop and demonstrate an integrated, economical process for the separation of corn fiber into its principal components to produce higher value-added fuel (ethanol and biodiesel), nutraceuticals (phytosterols), chemicals (polyols), and animal feed (corn fiber molasses). This project has successfully demonstrated the corn fiber conversion process on the pilot scale, and ensured that the process will integrate well into existing ADM corn wet-mills. This process involves hydrolyzing the corn fiber to solubilize 50% of the corn fiber as oligosaccharides and soluble protein. The solubilized fiber is removed and the remaining fiber residue is solvent extracted to remove the corn fiber oil, which contains valuable phytosterols. The extracted oil is refined to separate the phytosterols and the remaining oil is converted to biodiesel. The de-oiled fiber is enzymatically hydrolyzed and remixed with the soluble oligosaccharides in a fermentation vessel where it is fermented by a recombinant yeast, which is capable of fermenting the glucose and xylose to produce ethanol. The fermentation broth is distilled to remove the ethanol. The stillage is centrifuged to separate the yeast cell mass from the soluble components. The yeast cell mass is sold as a high-protein yeast cream and the remaining sugars in the stillage can be purified to produce a feedstock for catalytic conversion of the sugars to polyols (mainly ethylene glycol and propylene glycol) if desirable. The remaining materials from the purification step and any materials remaining after catalytic conversion are concentrated and sold as a corn fiber molasses. Additional high-value products are being investigated for the use of the corn fiber as a dietary fiber sources.

  12. Low NO sub x heavy fuel combustor concept program. Phase 1A: Combustion technology generation coal gas fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherlock, T. P.

    1982-01-01

    Combustion tests of two scaled burners using actual coal gas from a 25 ton/day fluidized bed coal gasifier are described. The two combustor configurations studied were a ceramic lined, staged rich/lean burner and an integral, all metal multiannual swirl burner (MASB). The tests were conducted over a range of temperature and pressures representative of current industrial combustion turbine inlet conditions. Tests on the rich lean burner were conducted at three levels of product gas heating values: 104, 197 and 254 btu/scf. Corresponding levels of NOx emissions were 5, 20 and 70 ppmv. Nitrogen was added to the fuel in the form of ammonia, and conversion efficiencies of fuel nitrogen to NOx were on the order of 4 percent to 12 percent, which is somewhat lower than the 14 percent to 18 percent conversion efficiency when src-2 liquid fuel was used. The MASB was tested only on medium btu gas (220 to 270 btu/scf), and produced approximately 80 ppmv NOx at rated engine conditions. Both burners operated similarly on actual coal gas and erbs fuel, and all heating values tested can be successfully burned in current machines.

  13. RERTR Fuel Developmemt and Qualification Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Wachs

    2007-01-01

    In late 2003 it became evident that U-Mo aluminum fuels under development exhibited significant fuel performance problems under the irradiation conditions required for conversion of most high-powered research reactors. Solutions to the fuel performance issue have been proposed and show promise in early testing. Based on these results, a Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) program strategy has been mapped to allow generic fuel qualification to occur prior to the end of FY10 and reactor conversion to occur prior to the end of FY14. This strategy utilizes a diversity of technologies, test conditions, and test types. Scoping studies using miniature fuel plates will be completed in the time frame of 2006-2008. Irradiation of larger specimens will occur in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) in the United States, the Belgian Reactor-2 (BR2) reactor in Belgium, and in the OSIRIS reactor in France in 2006-2009. These scoping irradiation tests provide a large amount of data on the performance of advanced fuel types under irradiation and allow the down selection of technology for larger scale testing during the final stages of fuel qualification. In conjunction with irradiation testing, fabrication processes must be developed and made available to commercial fabricators. The commercial fabrication infrastructure must also be upgraded to ensure a reliable low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel supply. Final qualification of fuels will occur in two phases. Phase I will obtain generic approval for use of dispersion fuels with density less than 8.5 g-U/cm3. In order to obtain this approval, a larger scale demonstration of fuel performance and fabrication technology will be necessary. Several Materials Test Reactor (MTR) plate-type fuel assemblies will be irradiated in both the High Flux Reactor (HFR) and the ATR (other options include the BR2 and Russian Research Reactor, Dmitrovgrad, Russia [MIR] reactors) in 2008-2009. Following postirradiation examination, a report

  14. Measuring the noble metal and iodine composition of extracted noble metal phase from spent nuclear fuel using instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Palomares, R I; Dayman, K J; Landsberger, S; Biegalski, S R; Soderquist, C Z; Casella, A J; Brady Raap, M C; Schwantes, J M

    2015-04-01

    Masses of noble metal and iodine nuclides in the metallic noble metal phase extracted from spent fuel are measured using instrumental neutron activation analysis. Nuclide presence is predicted using fission yield analysis, and radionuclides are identified and the masses quantified using neutron activation analysis. The nuclide compositions of noble metal phase derived from two dissolution methods, UO2 fuel dissolved in nitric acid and UO2 fuel dissolved in ammonium-carbonate and hydrogen-peroxide solution, are compared. PMID:25644079

  15. Microstructural Characterization of Cast Metallic Transmutation Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    J. I. Cole; D. D. Keiser; J. R. Kennedy

    2007-09-01

    As part of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) and the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), the US Department of Energy (DOE) is participating in an international collaboration to irradiate prototypic actinide-bearing transmutation fuels in the French Phenix fast reactor (FUTURIX-FTA experiment). The INL has contributed to this experiment by fabricating and characterizing two compositions of metallic fuel; a non-fertile 48Pu-12Am-40Zr fuel and a low-fertile 35U-29Pu-4Am-2Np-30Zr fuel for insertion into the reactor. This paper highlights results of the microstructural analysis of these cast fuels, which were reasonably homogeneous in nature, but had several distinct phase constituents. Spatial variations in composition appeared to be more pronounced in the low-fertile fuel when compared to the non-fertile fuel.

  16. Fabric phase sorptive extraction: An innovative sample preparation approach applied to the analysis of specific migration from food packaging.

    PubMed

    Aznar, M; Alfaro, P; Nerin, C; Kabir, A; Furton, K G

    2016-09-14

    Additives added to food packaging materials can migrate to food in contact with them during storage and shelf life. A novel simple, fast and sensitive analyte extraction method based on fabric phase sorptive extraction (FPSE), followed by analysis using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry detection (UPLC-MS) was applied to the analysis of 18 common non-volatile plastic additives. Three FPSE media coated with different sol-gel sorbents characterized with different polarities including sol-gel poly(dimethylsiloxane), sol-gel poly(ethylene glycol) and sol-gel poly(tetrahydrofuran) were studied. All three FPSE media showed very satisfactory results. In general, compounds with low logP values seemed to have higher enrichment factors (EFs), especially with poly(tetrahydrofuran) and poly(ethylene glycol) media. For compounds with high logP values, the use of sol-gel poly(dimethylsiloxane) improved the enrichment capacity. Sample preparation time was optimized at 20 min for sample extraction and 10 min for solvent desorption. Acetonitrile was selected as desorption solvent since recoveries were over 70% for 13 out of 18 selected compounds in all FPSE media. The best extraction recovery values were obtained when compounds were dissolved in aqueous acetic acid solution (3%), where 17 out of 18 compounds showed improvement in their signal intensity after FPSE extraction and 10 obtained enrichment factors above 3 for all the tested FPSE media. When FPSE extracts were concentrated under nitrogen, 11 out of 18 compounds reached EFs values above 100. PMID:27566344

  17. Fabric phase sorptive extraction: An innovative sample preparation approach applied to the analysis of specific migration from food packaging.

    PubMed

    Aznar, M; Alfaro, P; Nerin, C; Kabir, A; Furton, K G

    2016-09-14

    Additives added to food packaging materials can migrate to food in contact with them during storage and shelf life. A novel simple, fast and sensitive analyte extraction method based on fabric phase sorptive extraction (FPSE), followed by analysis using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry detection (UPLC-MS) was applied to the analysis of 18 common non-volatile plastic additives. Three FPSE media coated with different sol-gel sorbents characterized with different polarities including sol-gel poly(dimethylsiloxane), sol-gel poly(ethylene glycol) and sol-gel poly(tetrahydrofuran) were studied. All three FPSE media showed very satisfactory results. In general, compounds with low logP values seemed to have higher enrichment factors (EFs), especially with poly(tetrahydrofuran) and poly(ethylene glycol) media. For compounds with high logP values, the use of sol-gel poly(dimethylsiloxane) improved the enrichment capacity. Sample preparation time was optimized at 20 min for sample extraction and 10 min for solvent desorption. Acetonitrile was selected as desorption solvent since recoveries were over 70% for 13 out of 18 selected compounds in all FPSE media. The best extraction recovery values were obtained when compounds were dissolved in aqueous acetic acid solution (3%), where 17 out of 18 compounds showed improvement in their signal intensity after FPSE extraction and 10 obtained enrichment factors above 3 for all the tested FPSE media. When FPSE extracts were concentrated under nitrogen, 11 out of 18 compounds reached EFs values above 100.

  18. Improvement of cathode-electrolyte interfaces of tubular solid oxide fuel cells by fabricating dense YSZ electrolyte membranes with indented surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Dehua; Liu, Mingfei; Xie, Kui; Sheng, Jin; Wang, Yonghong; Peng, Xiaobo; Liu, Xingqin; Meng, Guangyao

    To improve cathode-electrolyte interfaces of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), dense YSZ electrolyte membranes with indented surfaces were fabricated on tubular NiO/YSZ anode supports by two comparable methods. Electrochemistry impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and current-voltage tests of the cells were carried out to characterize the cathode-electrolyte interfaces. Results showed that the electrode polarization resistances of the modified cells were reduced by 52% and 35% at 700 °C, and the maximum power densities of cells were remarkably increased, even by 146.6% and 117.8% at lower temperature (700 °C), respectively. The indented surfaces extended the active zone of cathode and enhanced interfacial adhesion, which led to the major improvement in the cell performance.

  19. Fabrication of lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite (LSCF) cathodes for high performance solid oxide fuel cells using a low price commercial inkjet printer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Gwon Deok; Neoh, Ke Chean; Bae, Kiho; Choi, Hyung Jong; Park, Suk Won; Son, Ji-Won; Shim, Joon Hyung

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we investigate a method to fabricate high quality lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite (LSCF) cathodes for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) using a commercial low price inkjet printer. The ink source is synthesized by dissolving the LSCF nanopowder in a water-based solvent with a proper amount of surfactants. Microstructures of the LSCF layer, including porosity and thickness per printing scan cycle, are adjusted by grayscale in the printing image. It is successfully demonstrated that anode-supported SOFCs with optimally printed LSCF cathodes can produce decent power output, i.e., a maximum peak power density of 377 mW cm-2 at 600 °C, in our experiment. We expect that this approach can support the quick and easy prototyping and evaluating of a variety of cathode materials in SOFC research.

  20. Report of an investigation into deterioration of the Plutonium Fuel Form Fabrication Facility (PuFF) at the DOE Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    This investigations of the Savannah River Site's Plutonium Fuel Form fabrication facility located in Building 235-F was initiated in April 1991. The purpose of the investigation was to determine whether, as has been alleged, operation of the facility's argon inert gas system was terminated with the knowledge that continued inoperability of the argon system would cause accelerated corrosion damage to the equipment in the plutonium 238 processing cells. The investigation quickly established that the decision to discontinue operation of the argon system, by not repairing it, was merely one of the measures, and not the most important one, which led to the current deteriorated state of the facility. As a result, the scope of the investigation was broadened to more identify and assess those factors which contributed to the facility's current condition. This document discusses the backgrounds, results, and recommendations of this investigation.

  1. Preparation and characterization of MWCNT-graft-PCA-Pt electrode fabricated by electrospray deposition method for proton exchange membrane fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Sarlak, Nahid; Karimi, Mostafa; Dourani, Akram

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, the development and application of a novel carbon nanotube/Polycitric acid (MWCNT-graft-PCA-Pt) nanocomposite as an efficient nanocatalyst for PEM fuel cell is reported. Covalent attachment to PCA agents is the main method for the modification of CNTs with polymers. By this method electrocatalysts with a narrow particle-size distribution and good dispersion have been produced. Carbon nanotube (CNT) film electrodes have been fabricated by a novel process involving the electrostatic spray deposition (ESD) of a CNT solution. The CNT film electrodes have shown well-entangled and interconnected porous structures with good adherence to the substrate. Cyclic voltammograms (CV) of catalysts using the spongy thin layer electrode technique were obtained for the catalysts surface at evaluation and for Methanol Oxidation reaction (MOR). CV results have demonstrated that the current density and MOR activity of the MWCNT-graft-PCA-Pt is respectively higher than of the MWCNT-Pt nanocatalyst.

  2. Krakow clean fossil fuels and energy efficiency program. Phase 1 report

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, T.; Pierce, B.

    1995-06-01

    Krakow is one of the largest and oldest cities in Poland. It is situated in the south of the country on the banks of the Vistula River. From the 11th until the 17th centuries, it was the capital of Poland. Today, Krakow is a city of 750,000 residents, one of the largest centers of higher education, an important industrial center, and is of particular importance because of the number and kinds of historic buildings and sites. For this reason, Krakow was included by the UNESCO in the list of the world`s cultural heritages. For about three decades, significant air pollution has been one of Krakow`s most serious problems. Because the city is situated in the Vistula River valley, it is poorly ventilated and experiences a high concentration of air pollutants. The quality of air in Krakow is affected mainly by industry (Sendzimir Steelworks, energy industry, chemical plants), influx from the Silesian industrial region (power plants, metallurgy), transboundary pollution (Ostrava - Czech Republic), and local sources of low pollution, i.e. more than 1,000 boiler houses using solid fuels and more than 100,000 coal-fired home stoves. These local sources, with low stacks and almost no pollution-control equipment, are responsible for about 35-40% of the air pollution. This report presents phase I results of a program to reduce pollution in krakow. Phase I was to gather information on emissions and costs, and to verify assumptions on existing heating methods and alternatives.

  3. High accuracy fuel flowmeter. Phase 2C and 3: The mass flowrate calibration of high accuracy fuel flowmeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craft, D. William

    1992-01-01

    A facility for the precise calibration of mass fuel flowmeters and turbine flowmeters located at AMETEK Aerospace Products Inc., Wilmington, Massachusetts is described. This facility is referred to as the Test and Calibration System (TACS). It is believed to be the most accurate test facility available for the calibration of jet engine fuel density measurement. The product of the volumetric flow rate measurement and the density measurement, results in a true mass flow rate determination. A dual-turbine flowmeter was designed during this program. The dual-turbine flowmeter was calibrated on the TACS to show the characteristics of this type of flowmeter. An angular momentum flowmeter was also calibrated on the TACS to demonstrate the accuracy of a true mass flowmeter having a 'state-of-the-art' design accuracy.

  4. High accuracy fuel flowmeter. Phase 2C and 3: The mass flowrate calibration of high accuracy fuel flowmeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craft, D. William

    1992-02-01

    A facility for the precise calibration of mass fuel flowmeters and turbine flowmeters located at AMETEK Aerospace Products Inc., Wilmington, Massachusetts is described. This facility is referred to as the Test and Calibration System (TACS). It is believed to be the most accurate test facility available for the calibration of jet engine fuel density measurement. The product of the volumetric flow rate measurement and the density measurement, results in a true mass flow rate determination. A dual-turbine flowmeter was designed during this program. The dual-turbine flowmeter was calibrated on the TACS to show the characteristics of this type of flowmeter. An angular momentum flowmeter was also calibrated on the TACS to demonstrate the accuracy of a true mass flowmeter having a 'state-of-the-art' design accuracy.

  5. Explicit Finite Element Modeling of Multilayer Composite Fabric for Gas Turbine Engine Containment Systems, Phase II. Part 3; Material Model Development and Simulation of Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, J.; Erlich, D.; Shockey, D.

    2009-01-01

    A team consisting of Arizona State University, Honeywell Engines, Systems & Services, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Glenn Research Center, and SRI International collaborated to develop computational models and verification testing for designing and evaluating turbine engine fan blade fabric containment structures. This research was conducted under the Federal Aviation Administration Airworthiness Assurance Center of Excellence and was sponsored by the Aircraft Catastrophic Failure Prevention Program. The research was directed toward improving the modeling of a turbine engine fabric containment structure for an engine blade-out containment demonstration test required for certification of aircraft engines. The research conducted in Phase II began a new level of capability to design and develop fan blade containment systems for turbine engines. Significant progress was made in three areas: (1) further development of the ballistic fabric model to increase confidence and robustness in the material models for the Kevlar(TradeName) and Zylon(TradeName) material models developed in Phase I, (2) the capability was improved for finite element modeling of multiple layers of fabric using multiple layers of shell elements, and (3) large-scale simulations were performed. This report concentrates on the material model development and simulations of the impact tests.

  6. Promising low-damage fabrication method for the photonic crystals with hexagonal or triangular air holes: selective area metal organic vapor phase epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lin; Motohisa, Junichi; Takeda, Junichiro; Fukui, Takashi

    2005-12-26

    The photonic band diagrams of the photonic crystal slabs (PCSs) with various structural air holes were calculated by plane wave expansion method with super cell method. The calculated results indicate that the PCSs with hexagonal or triangular air holes have enough large photonic band gaps in the guided mode spectrum, hence they are good candidates to be used for the PC devices. The PCs with hexagonal or triangular air holes were fabricated successfully on n-type GaAs (111)B substrate by selective-area metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (SA-MOVPE). Vertical and smooth facets are formed and the uniformities are very good. The same process was also used to fabricate hexagonal air hole arrays with the width of 100 nm successfully. A procedure was proposed and utilized to fabricate the air-bridge PCS with normal hexagonal air holes. The fabricated hexagonal air holes are very uniform and the sidewalls are smooth and vertical. Our experimental results indicate that SA-MOVPE growth is a promising low-damage fabrication method for PC devices and photonic nano-strucutres.

  7. Liquid phase fluid dynamic (methanol) run in the LaPorte alternative fuels development unit

    SciTech Connect

    Bharat L. Bhatt

    1997-05-01

    A fluid dynamic study was successfully completed in a bubble column at DOE's Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) in LaPorte, Texas. Significant fluid dynamic information was gathered at pilot scale during three weeks of Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOJP) operations in June 1995. In addition to the usual nuclear density and temperature measurements, unique differential pressure data were collected using Sandia's high-speed data acquisition system to gain insight on flow regime characteristics and bubble size distribution. Statistical analysis of the fluctuations in the pressure data suggests that the column was being operated in the churn turbulent regime at most of the velocities considered. Dynamic gas disengagement experiments showed a different behavior than seen in low-pressure, cold-flow work. Operation with a superficial gas velocity of 1.2 ft/sec was achieved during this run, with stable fluid dynamics and catalyst performance. Improvements included for catalyst activation in the design of the Clean Coal III LPMEOH{trademark} plant at Kingsport, Tennessee, were also confirmed. In addition, an alternate catalyst was demonstrated for LPMEOH{trademark}.

  8. Formation mechanism of gas bubble superlattice in UMo metal fuels: Phase-field modeling investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shenyang; Burkes, Douglas E.; Lavender, Curt A.; Senor, David J.; Setyawan, Wahyu; Xu, Zhijie

    2016-10-01

    Nano-gas bubble superlattices are often observed in irradiated UMo nuclear fuels. However, the formation mechanism of gas bubble superlattices is not well understood. A number of physical processes may affect the gas bubble nucleation and growth; hence, the morphology of gas bubble microstructures including size and spatial distributions. In this work, a phase-field model integrating a first-passage Monte Carlo method to investigate the formation mechanism of gas bubble superlattices was developed. Six physical processes are taken into account in the model: 1) heterogeneous generation of gas atoms, vacancies, and interstitials informed from atomistic simulations; 2) one-dimensional (1-D) migration of interstitials; 3) irradiation-induced dissolution of gas atoms; 4) recombination between vacancies and interstitials; 5) elastic interaction; and 6) heterogeneous nucleation of gas bubbles. We found that the elastic interaction doesn't cause the gas bubble alignment, and fast 1-D migration of interstitials along <110> directions in the body-centered cubic U matrix causes the gas bubble alignment along <110> directions. It implies that 1-D interstitial migration along [110] direction should be the primary mechanism of a fcc gas bubble superlattice which is observed in bcc UMo alloys. Simulations also show that fission rates, saturated gas concentration, and elastic interaction all affect the morphology of gas bubble microstructures.

  9. In situ fabrication of high-performance Ni-GDC-nanocube core-shell anode for low-temperature solid-oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Qiu, Nan; Ohara, Satoshi

    2015-11-01

    A core-shell anode consisting of nickel-gadolinium-doped-ceria (Ni-GDC) nanocubes was directly fabricated by a chemical process in a solution containing a nickel source and GDC nanocubes covered with highly reactive {001} facets. The cermet anode effectively generated a Ni metal framework even at 500 °C with the growth of the Ni spheres. Anode fabrication at such a low temperature without any sintering could insert a finely nanostructured layer close to the interface between the electrolyte and the anode. The maximum power density of the attractive anode was 97 mW cm-2, which is higher than that of a conventional NiO-GDC anode prepared by an aerosol process at 55 mW cm-2 and 600 °C, followed by sintering at 1300 °C. Furthermore, the macro- and microstructure of the Ni-GDC-nanocube anode were preserved before and after the power-generation test at 700 °C. Especially, the reactive {001} facets were stabled even after generation test, which served to reduce the activation energy for fuel oxidation successfully.

  10. In situ fabrication of high-performance Ni-GDC-nanocube core-shell anode for low-temperature solid-oxide fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Qiu, Nan; Ohara, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    A core–shell anode consisting of nickel–gadolinium-doped-ceria (Ni–GDC) nanocubes was directly fabricated by a chemical process in a solution containing a nickel source and GDC nanocubes covered with highly reactive {001} facets. The cermet anode effectively generated a Ni metal framework even at 500 °C with the growth of the Ni spheres. Anode fabrication at such a low temperature without any sintering could insert a finely nanostructured layer close to the interface between the electrolyte and the anode. The maximum power density of the attractive anode was 97 mW cm–2, which is higher than that of a conventional NiO–GDC anode prepared by an aerosol process at 55 mW cm–2 and 600 °C, followed by sintering at 1300 °C. Furthermore, the macro- and microstructure of the Ni–GDC-nanocube anode were preserved before and after the power-generation test at 700 °C. Especially, the reactive {001} facets were stabled even after generation test, which served to reduce the activation energy for fuel oxidation successfully. PMID:26615816

  11. In situ fabrication of high-performance Ni-GDC-nanocube core-shell anode for low-temperature solid-oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Qiu, Nan; Ohara, Satoshi

    2015-11-30

    A core-shell anode consisting of nickel-gadolinium-doped-ceria (Ni-GDC) nanocubes was directly fabricated by a chemical process in a solution containing a nickel source and GDC nanocubes covered with highly reactive {001} facets. The cermet anode effectively generated a Ni metal framework even at 500 °C with the growth of the Ni spheres. Anode fabrication at such a low temperature without any sintering could insert a finely nanostructured layer close to the interface between the electrolyte and the anode. The maximum power density of the attractive anode was 97 mW cm(-2), which is higher than that of a conventional NiO-GDC anode prepared by an aerosol process at 55 mW cm(-2) and 600 °C, followed by sintering at 1300 °C. Furthermore, the macro- and microstructure of the Ni-GDC-nanocube anode were preserved before and after the power-generation test at 700 °C. Especially, the reactive {001} facets were stabled even after generation test, which served to reduce the activation energy for fuel oxidation successfully.

  12. Fabrication, phase formation and microstructure of Ni4Nb2O9 ceramics fabricated by using the two-stage sintering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khamman, Orawan; Jainumpone, Jiraporn; Watcharapasorn, Anucha; Ananta, Supon

    2016-08-01

    The potential utilization of two-stage sintering for the production of very dense and pure nickel diniobate (Ni4Nb2O9) ceramics with low firing temperature was demonstrated. The effects of the designed sintering conditions on the phase formation, densification and microstructure of the ceramics were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Archimedes method and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The minor phase of columbite NiNb2O6 tended to form together with the desired Ni4Nb2O9 phase, depending on the sintering conditions. Optimization of the sintering conditions may lead to a single-phase Ni4Nb2O9 ceramics with an orthorhombic structure. The ceramics doubly sintered at 950/1250 °C for 4 h exhibited a maximum density of ~92%. Microstructures with denser angular grain-packing were generally found in the sintered Ni4Nb2O9 ceramics. However, the grains were irregular in shape when the samples were sintered at 1050/1250 °C. Two-stage sintering was also found to enhance the ferroelectric behavior of the Ni4Nb2O9 ceramic.

  13. HEU Measurements of Holdup and Recovered Residue in the Deactivation and Decommissioning Activities of the 321-M Reactor Fuel Fabrication Facility at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    DEWBERRY, RAYMOND; SALAYMEH, SALEEM R.; CASELLA, VITO R.; MOORE, FRANK S.

    2005-03-11

    This paper contains a summary of the holdup and material control and accountability (MC&A) assays conducted for the determination of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in the deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of Building 321-M at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The 321-M facility was the Reactor Fuel Fabrication Facility at SRS and was used to fabricate HEU fuel assemblies, lithium-aluminum target tubes, neptunium assemblies, and miscellaneous components for the SRS production reactors. The facility operated for more than 35 years. During this time thousands of uranium-aluminum-alloy (U-Al) production reactor fuel tubes were produced. After the facility ceased operations in 1995, all of the easily accessible U-Al was removed from the building, and only residual amounts remained. The bulk of this residue was located in the equipment that generated and handled small U-Al particles and in the exhaust systems for this equipment (e.g., Chip compactor, casting furnaces, log saw, lathes A & B, cyclone separator, Freon{trademark} cart, riser crusher, ...etc). The D&D project is likely to represent an important example for D&D activities across SRS and across the Department of Energy weapons complex. The Savannah River National Laboratory was tasked to conduct holdup assays to quantify the amount of HEU on all components removed from the facility prior to placing in solid waste containers. The U-235 holdup in any single component of process equipment must not exceed 50 g in order to meet the container limit. This limit was imposed to meet criticality requirements of the low level solid waste storage vaults. Thus the holdup measurements were used as guidance to determine if further decontamination of equipment was needed to ensure that the quantity of U-235 did not exceed the 50 g limit and to ensure that the waste met the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) of the solid waste storage vaults. Since HEU is an accountable nuclear material, the holdup assays and assays of recovered

  14. LIFE Materials: Phase Formation and Transformations in Transmutation Fuel Materials for the LIFE Engine Part I - Path Forward Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, P A; Kaufman, L; Fluss, M

    2008-12-19

    The current specifications of the LLNL fusion-fission hybrid proposal, namely LIFE, impose severe constraints on materials, and in particular on the nuclear fissile or fertile nuclear fuel and its immediate environment. This constitutes the focus of the present report with special emphasis on phase formation and phase transformations of the transmutation fuel and their consequences on particle and pebble thermal, chemical, and mechanical integrities. We first review the work that has been done in recent years to improve materials properties under the Gen-IV project, and with in particular applications to HTGR and MSR, and also under GNEP and AFCI in the USA. Our goal is to assess the nuclear fuel options that currently exist together with their issues. Among the options, it is worth mentioning TRISO, IMF, and molten salts. The later option will not be discussed in details since an entire report (Volume 8 - Molten-salt Fuels) is dedicated to it. Then, in a second part, with the specific LIFE specifications in mind, the various fuel options with their most critical issues are revisited with a path forward for each of them in terms of research, both experimental and theoretical. Since LIFE is applicable to very high burn-up of various fuels, distinctions will be made depending on the mission, i.e., energy production or incineration. Finally a few conclusions are drawn in terms of the specific needs for integrated materials modeling and the in depth knowledge on time-evolution thermo-chemistry that controls and drastically affects the performance of the nuclear materials and their immediate environment. Although LIFE demands materials that very likely have not yet been fully optimized, the challenges are not insurmountable, and a well concerted experimental-modeling effort should lead to dramatic advances that should well serve other fission programs such as Gen-IV, GNEP, AFCI as well as the international fusion program, ITER.

  15. Characterizing dynamic hysteresis and fractal statistics of chaotic two-phase flow and application to fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkholder, Michael B.; Litster, Shawn

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we analyze the stability of two-phase flow regimes and their transitions using chaotic and fractal statistics, and we report new measurements of dynamic two-phase pressure drop hysteresis that is related to flow regime stability and channel water content. Two-phase flow dynamics are relevant to a variety of real-world systems, and quantifying transient two-phase flow phenomena is important for efficient design. We recorded two-phase (air and water) pressure drops and flow images in a microchannel under both steady and transient conditions. Using Lyapunov exponents and Hurst exponents to characterize the steady-state pressure fluctuations, we develop a new, measurable regime identification criteria based on the dynamic stability of the two-phase pressure signal. We also applied a new experimental technique by continuously cycling the air flow rate to study dynamic hysteresis in two-phase pressure drops, which is separate from steady-state hysteresis and can be used to understand two-phase flow development time scales. Using recorded images of the two-phase flow, we show that the capacitive dynamic hysteresis is related to channel water content and flow regime stability. The mixed-wettability microchannel and in-channel water introduction used in this study simulate a polymer electrolyte fuel cell cathode air flow channel.

  16. Return-to-launch-site three degree of freedom analysis, constant inertial attitude during the fuel dissipation phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bown, R. L.; Winans, L. C.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented of a study to show the effect of selecting a constant inertial attitude during the fuel dissipation phase of a return-to-launch-site abort. Results are also presented which show that the selection of the constant inertial attitude will affect the arrival point on the range-velocity target line. An alternate selection of the inertial attitude will provide control over the trajectory shape.

  17. The Fabrication of Flow Field Plates for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Using Lithography and Radio Frequency Sputtering.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ho; Kao, Mu-Jung; Chen, Chih-Hao; Cho, Kun-Ching; Hsu, Chun-Yao; Chen, Zhi-Lun

    2015-08-01

    This study uses lithography to etch flow fields on a single side of a printed circuit board (PCB) and combines a flow field plate with a collector plate to make innovative anode flow field plates and cathode flow field plates for a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). TiO2 thin film is also sputtered on the anode flow field plate using radio frequency (RF) sputtering. The experimental results show that the prepared DMFC has a better maximum power density of 11.928 mW/cm2. Furthermore, when a TiO2 thin film is sputtered on the flow field plate of the assembled DMFC, the maximum power density is 14.426 mW/cm2, which is actually 21% more than that for a DMFC with no TiO2 thin film coated on the flow field plate.

  18. Fabrication of Highly Stable and Efficient PtCu Alloy Nanoparticles on Highly Porous Carbon for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Khan, Inayat Ali; Qian, Yuhong; Badshah, Amin; Zhao, Dan; Nadeem, Muhammad Arif

    2016-08-17

    Boosting the durability of Pt nanoparticles by controlling the composition and morphology is extremely important for fuel cells commercialization. We deposit the Pt-Cu alloy nanoparticles over high surface area carbon in different metallic molar ratios and optimize the conditions to achieve desired material. The novel bimetallic electro-catalyst {Pt-Cu/PC-950 (15:15%)} offers exceptional electrocatalytic activity when tested for both oxygen reduction reaction and methanol oxidation reactions. A high mass activity of 0.043 mA/μgPt (based on Pt mass) is recorded for ORR. An outstanding longevity of this electro-catalyst is noticed when compared to 20 wt % Pt loaded either on PC-950 or commercial carbon. The high surface area carbon support offers enhanced activity and prevents the nanoparticles from agglomeration, migration, and dissolution as evident by TEM analysis. PMID:27467199

  19. Anisotropy of out-of-phase magnetic susceptibility of rocks as a tool for direct determination of magnetic sub-fabrics of some minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrouda, Frantisek; Chadima, Martin; Jezek, Josef; Pokorny, Jiri

    2015-04-01

    The magnetic susceptibility measured in alternating field can in general be resolved into a component that is in-phase with the applied field and a component that is out-of-phase. While in diamagnetic, paramagnetic and many ferromagnetic materials the phase is effectively zero, in some ferromagnetic minerals, such as pyrrhotite, hematite, titanomagnetite or ultra-fine magnetically viscous grains of magnetite, it is clearly non-zero. The anisotropy of out-of-phase susceptibility (opAMS) offers itself as a tool for the direct determination of the magnetic sub-fabrics of the minerals with non-zero phase. The SAFYR program, originally destined for computing the in-phase AMS (ipAMS) measured with the MFK1-FA Kappabridge, was modified in such a way that it calculates also the opAMS using exactly the same calculus; the ipAMS and opAMS are determined in one measuring process. Five groups of specimens showing clearly non-zero phase were used to investigate the precisions in determining both the ipAMS and opAMS as well as the relationship between the ipAMS and opAMS. In the specimens investigated, the out-of-phase susceptibility is one to two orders of magnitude lower than the in-phase susceptibility. If the mean out-of-phase susceptibility is higher than 5 × 10-5 [SI], the accuracy in determination of the opAMS, expressed in terms of fitting error and confidence angles, is comparable to or only slightly worse than that of the ipAMS. In the specimens whose magnetism is dominantly carried by a mineral with non-zero phase, the ellipsoids of opAMS and ipAMS show similar shapes and orientations of respective principal directions. The degree of anisotropy, however, is significantly higher in opAMS than in ipAMS. The reasons for this phenomenon are not fully known, one of them can be masking effect of the minerals with zero-phase. In the specimens possessing non-coaxial magnetic sub-fabrics of the minerals with non-zero and zero-phase, not only the degrees of AMS, but also

  20. Partial oxidation for improved cold starts in alcohol-fueled engines: Phase 2 topical report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    Alcohol fuels exhibit poor cold-start performance because of their low volatility. Neat alcohol engines become difficult, if not impossible, to start at temperatures close to or below freezing. Improvements in the cold-start performance (both time to start and emissions) are essential to capture the full benefits of alcohols as an alternative transportation fuel. The objective of this project was to develop a neat alcohol partial oxidation (POX) reforming technology to improve an alcohol engine`s ability to start at low temperatures (as low as {minus}30 C) and to reduce its cold-start emissions. The project emphasis was on fuel-grade ethanol (E95) but the technology can be easily extended to other alcohol fuels. Ultimately a compact, on-vehicle, ethanol POX reactor was developed as a fuel system component to produce a hydrogen-rich, fuel-gas mixture for cold starts. The POX reactor is an easily controllable combustion device that allows flexibility during engine startup even in the most extreme conditions. It is a small device that is mounted directly onto the engine intake manifold. The gaseous fuel products (or reformate) from the POX reactor exit the chamber and enter the intake manifold, either replacing or supplementing the standard ethanol fuel consumed during an engine start. The combustion of the reformate during startup can reduce engine start time and tail-pipe emissions.