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Sample records for fuel spray process

  1. Photomicrographic Studies of Fuel Sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Dana W; Spencer, Robert C

    1934-01-01

    A large number of photomicrographs of fuel sprays were taken for the purpose of studying the spray structure and the process of spray formation. They were taken at magnifying powers of 2.5, 3.25, and 10, using a spark discharge of very short duration for illumination. Several types and sizes of nozzles were investigated, different liquids were used, and a wide range of injection pressures was employed. The sprays were photographed as they were injected into a glass-walled chamber in which the air density was varied from 14 atmospheres to 0.0013 atmosphere.

  2. Detailed fuel spray analysis techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mularz, E. J.; Bosque, M. A.; Humenik, F. M.

    1983-01-01

    Detailed fuel spray analyses are a necessary input to the analytical modeling of the complex mixing and combustion processes which occur in advanced combustor systems. It is anticipated that by controlling fuel-air reaction conditions, combustor temperatures can be better controlled, leading to improved combustion system durability. Thus, a research program is underway to demonstrate the capability to measure liquid droplet size, velocity, and number density throughout a fuel spray and to utilize this measurement technique in laboratory benchmark experiments. The research activities from two contracts and one grant are described with results to data. The experiment to characterize fuel sprays is also described. These experiments and data should be useful for application to and validation of turbulent flow modeling to improve the design systems of future advanced technology engines.

  3. Solid oxide fuel cell processing using plasma arc spray deposition techniques. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, E.R.; Spengler, C.J.; Herman, H.

    1991-07-01

    The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, in conjunction with the Thermal Spray Laboratory of the State University of New York, Stony Brook, investigated the fabrication of a gas-tight interconnect layer on a tubular solid oxide fuel cell with plasma arc spray deposition. The principal objective was to determine the process variables for the plasma spray deposition of an interconnect with adequate electrical conductivity and other desired properties. Plasma arc spray deposition is a process where the coating material in powder form is heated to or above its melting temperature, while being accelerated by a carrier gas stream through a high power electric arc. The molten powder particles are directed at the substrate, and on impact, form a coating consisting of many layers of overlapping, thin, lenticular particles or splats. The variables investigated were gun power, spray distance, powder feed rate, plasma gas flow rates, number of gun passes, powder size distribution, injection angle of powder into the plasma plume, vacuum or atmospheric plasma spraying, and substrate heating. Typically, coatings produced by both systems showed bands of lanthanum rich material and cracking with the coating. Preheating the substrate reduced but did not eliminate internal coating cracking. A uniformly thick, dense, adherent interconnect of the desired chemistry was finally achieved with sufficient gas- tightness to allow fabrication of cells and samples for measurement of physical and electrical properties. A cell was tested successfully at 1000{degree}C for over 1,000 hours demonstrating the mechanical, electrical, and chemical stability of a plasma-arc sprayed interconnect layer.

  4. Solid oxide fuel cell processing using plasma arc spray deposition techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, E.R.; Spengler, C.J.; Herman, H.

    1991-07-01

    The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, in conjunction with the Thermal Spray Laboratory of the State University of New York, Stony Brook, investigated the fabrication of a gas-tight interconnect layer on a tubular solid oxide fuel cell with plasma arc spray deposition. The principal objective was to determine the process variables for the plasma spray deposition of an interconnect with adequate electrical conductivity and other desired properties. Plasma arc spray deposition is a process where the coating material in powder form is heated to or above its melting temperature, while being accelerated by a carrier gas stream through a high power electric arc. The molten powder particles are directed at the substrate, and on impact, form a coating consisting of many layers of overlapping, thin, lenticular particles or splats. The variables investigated were gun power, spray distance, powder feed rate, plasma gas flow rates, number of gun passes, powder size distribution, injection angle of powder into the plasma plume, vacuum or atmospheric plasma spraying, and substrate heating. Typically, coatings produced by both systems showed bands of lanthanum rich material and cracking with the coating. Preheating the substrate reduced but did not eliminate internal coating cracking. A uniformly thick, dense, adherent interconnect of the desired chemistry was finally achieved with sufficient gas- tightness to allow fabrication of cells and samples for measurement of physical and electrical properties. A cell was tested successfully at 1000{degree}C for over 1,000 hours demonstrating the mechanical, electrical, and chemical stability of a plasma-arc sprayed interconnect layer.

  5. Measurements in liquid fuel sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chigier, N.

    1984-01-01

    Techniques for studying the events directly preceding combustion in the liquid fuel sprays are being used to provide information as a function of space and time on droplet size, shape, number density, position, angle of flight and velocity. Spray chambers were designed and constructed for: (1) air-assist liquid fuel research sprays; (2) high pressure and temperature chamber for pulsed diesel fuel sprays; and (3) coal-water slurry sprays. Recent results utilizing photography, cinematography, and calibration of the Malvern particle sizer are reported. Systems for simultaneous measurement of velocity and particle size distributions using laser Doppler anemometry interferometry and the application of holography in liquid fuel sprays are being calibrated.

  6. Investigation of the spray characteristics for a secondary fuel injection nozzle using a digital image processing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Haeyoung; Lee, Kihyung; Ikeda, Yuji

    2007-05-01

    There are many ways to reduce diesel engine exhaust emissions. However, NOx emission is difficult to reduce because the hydrocarbon (HC) concentration in a diesel engine is not sufficient for NOx conversion. Therefore, in order to create stoichiometric conditions in the De-NOx catalyst, a secondary injection system is designed to inject liquid HC into the exhaust pipe. The atomization and distribution characteristics of the HC injected from a secondary injector are key technologies to obtain a high NOx conversion because inhomogeneous droplets of injected HC cause not only high fuel consumption but also deterioration of NOx emission. This paper describes the spray characteristics of a secondary injector including the spray angle, penetration length and breakup behaviour of the spray to optimize the reduction rate of the NOx catalyst. In this study, various optical diagnostics were applied to investigate these spray characteristics, the atomization mechanism and spray developing process. The visualization and image processing method for the spray pulsation were developed by high speed photography. The influence of the fuel supply pressure on the spray behaviour and a more detailed spray developing process have been analysed experimentally using image processing. Finally, the experimental results were used to correlate the spray structure to the injection system performance and to provide a design guide for a secondary injector nozzle.

  7. Impact of alternative fuel rheology on spraying process of small pressure-swirl atomizer

    SciTech Connect

    Malý, Milan Janáčková, Lada; Jedelský, Jan Jícha, Miroslav

    2016-06-30

    A systematic investigation was made to analyse the atomizing performance of a small pressure-swirl atomizer with different crude-oil based fuels and water. The atomizer performance is characterized in terms of discharge coefficient, droplet Sauter mean diameter and nozzle efficiency. Phase-Doppler anemometry was used to measure droplets sizes and velocities and to determine the mean structure of the developed spray. A strong dependence of liquid viscosity on the mass flow rate through the atomizer as well as on the spray quality was found and discussed in comparison with relevant literature.

  8. Impact of alternative fuel rheology on spraying process of small pressure-swirl atomizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malý, Milan; Janáčková, Lada; Jedelský, Jan; Jícha, Miroslav

    2016-06-01

    A systematic investigation was made to analyse the atomizing performance of a small pressure-swirl atomizer with different crude-oil based fuels and water. The atomizer performance is characterized in terms of discharge coefficient, droplet Sauter mean diameter and nozzle efficiency. Phase-Doppler anemometry was used to measure droplets sizes and velocities and to determine the mean structure of the developed spray. A strong dependence of liquid viscosity on the mass flow rate through the atomizer as well as on the spray quality was found and discussed in comparison with relevant literature.

  9. Modeling of gas turbine fuel nozzle spray

    SciTech Connect

    Rizk, N.K.; Chin, J.S.; Razdan, M.K.

    1997-01-01

    Satisfactory performance of the gas turbine combustor relies on the careful design of various components, particularly the fuel injector. It is, therefore, essential to establish a fundamental basis for fuel injection modeling that involves various atomization processes. A two-dimensional fuel injection model has been formulated to simulate the airflow within and downstream of the atomizer and address the formation and breakup of the liquid sheet formed at the atomizer exit. The sheet breakup under the effects of airblast, fuel pressure, or the combined atomization mode of the air-assist type is considered in the calculation. The model accounts for secondary breakup of drops and the stochastic Lagrangian treatment of spray. The calculation of spray evaporation addresses both droplet heat-up and steady-state mechanisms, and fuel vapor concentration is based on the partial pressure concept. An enhanced evaporation model has been developed that accounts for multicomponent, finite mass diffusivity and conductivity effects, and addresses near-critical evaporation. The present investigation involved predictions of flow and spray characteristics of two distinctively different fuel atomizers under both nonreacting and reacting conditions. The predictions of the continuous phase velocity components and the spray mean drop sizes agree well with the detailed measurements obtained for the two atomizers, which indicates the model accounts for key aspects of atomization. The model also provides insight into ligament formation and breakup at the atomizer exit and the initial drop sizes formed in the atomizer near field region where measurements are difficult to obtain. The calculations of the reacting spray show the fuel-rich region occupied most of the spray volume with two-peak radial gas temperature profiles. The results also provided local concentrations of unburned hydrocarbon and CO in atomizer flowfield.

  10. Ignition of Fuel Sprays.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    bidisperse distribution, k = 2. For a continuous size distribution such as Rosin - Rammler distribution [15], k will be infinite and the summation in Eq...with do = 50 microns. In Figure 2, the ignition time delays are plotted versus the overall equivalence ratios for decane fuel. Note that for the...ignition-delay plots in Figures 1-4, we could have plotted ignition energies, but the conclusions would be the same. 15.0 ~~~Q( ,) .._ 10.0 A - do - 100

  11. Sensors in Spray Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauchais, P.; Vardelle, M.

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents what is our actual knowledge about sensors, used in the harsh environment of spray booths, to improve the reproducibility and reliability of coatings sprayed with hot or cold gases. First are described, with their limitations and precisions, the different sensors following the in-flight hot particle parameters (trajectories, temperatures, velocities, sizes, and shapes). A few comments are also made about techniques, still under developments in laboratories, to improve our understanding of coating formation such as plasma jet temperature measurements in non-symmetrical conditions, hot gases heat flux, particles flattening and splats formation, particles evaporation. Then are described the illumination techniques by laser flash of either cold particles (those injected in hot gases, or in cold spray gun) or liquid injected into hot gases (suspensions or solutions). The possibilities they open to determine the flux and velocities of cold particles or visualize liquid penetration in the core of hot gases are discussed. Afterwards are presented sensors to follow, when spraying hot particles, substrate and coating temperature evolution, and the stress development within coatings during the spray process as well as the coating thickness. The different uses of these sensors are then described with successively: (i) Measurements limited to particle trajectories, velocities, temperatures, and sizes in different spray conditions: plasma (including transient conditions due to arc root fluctuations in d.c. plasma jets), HVOF, wire arc, cold spray. Afterwards are discussed how such sensor data can be used to achieve a better understanding of the different spray processes, compare experiments to calculations and improve the reproducibility and reliability of the spray conditions. (ii) Coatings monitoring through in-flight measurements coupled with those devoted to coatings formation. This is achieved by either maintaining at their set point both in-flight and

  12. Thermal spray processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, H.; Berndt, C. C.

    1995-01-01

    Thermal spray processing has been used for a number of years to cost-effecticely apply TBC's for a wide range of heat engine applications. In particular, bond coats are applied by plasma spray and HVOF techniques and partially-stabilized zirconia top coats are applied by plasma spray methods. Thermal spray involves melting and rapid transport of the molten particles to the substrate, where high-rate solidification and coating build-up occur. It is the very nature of this melt processing that leads to the unique layered microstructure, as well as the apparent imperfections, so readily identified with thermal spray. Modeling the process, process-induced residual stresses, and thermal conductivity will be discussed in light of a new understanding of porosity and its anisotropy. Microcracking can be understood using new approaches, allowing a fuller view of the processing-performance connection. Detailed electron microscopic, novel neutron diffraction and fracture analysis of the deposits can lead to a better understanding of how overall microstructure can be controlled to influence critical properties of the deposited TBC system.

  13. Experiments on the Distribution of Fuel in Fuel Sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Dana W

    1933-01-01

    The distribution of fuel in sprays for compression-ignition engines was investigated by taking high-speed spark photographs of fuel sprays reproduced under a wide variety of conditions, and also by injecting them against pieces of plasticine. A photographic study was made of sprays injected into evacuated chambers, into the atmosphere, into compressed air, and into transparent liquids. Pairs of identical sprays were injected counter to each other and their behavior analyzed. Small high velocity air jets were directed normally to the axes of fuel sprays, with the result that the envelope of spray which usually obscures the core was blown aside, leaving the core exposed on one side. The results showed that the distribution of the fuel within the sprays was very uneven.

  14. Dynamic characteristics of pulsed supersonic fuel sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pianthong, K.; Matthujak, A.; Takayama, K.; Milton, B. E.; Behnia, M.

    2008-06-01

    This paper describes the dynamic characteristics of pulsed, supersonic liquid fuel sprays or jets injected into ambient air. Simple, single hole nozzles were employed with the nozzle sac geometries being varied. Different fuel types, diesel fuel, bio-diesel, kerosene, and gasoline were used to determine the effects of fuel properties on the spray characteristics. A vertical two-stage light gas gun was employed as a projectile launcher to provide a high velocity impact to produce the liquid jet. The injection pressure was around 0.88-1.24 GPa in all cases. The pulsed, supersonic fuel sprays were visualized by using a high-speed video camera and shadowgraph method. The spray tip penetration and velocity attenuation and other characteristics were examined and are described here. An instantaneous spray tip velocity of 1,542 m/s (Mach number 4.52) was obtained. However, this spray tip velocity can be sustained for only a very short period (a few microseconds). It then attenuates very quickly. The phenomenon of multiple high frequency spray pulses generated by a single shot impact and the changed in the angle of the shock structure during the spray flight, which had already been observed in previous studies, is again noted. Multiple shock waves from the conical nozzle spray were also clearly captured.

  15. Evaporation And Ignition Of Dense Fuel Sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth G.

    1988-01-01

    Simple theoretical model makes useful predictions of trends. Pair of reports presents theoretical model of evaporation and ignition of sprayed liquid fuel. Developed as part of research in combustion of oil and liquid fuels derived from coal, tar sand, and shale in furnace. Work eventually contributes to increase efficiency of combustion and decrease pollution generated by burning of such fuels.

  16. Digital Image Processing application to spray and flammability studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernan, M. A.; Parikh, P.; Sarohia, V.

    1985-01-01

    Digital Image Processing has been integrated into a new technique for measurements of fuel spray characteristics. The advantages of this technique are: a wide dynamic range of droplet sizes, accounting for nonspherical droplet shapes not possible with other spray assessment techniques. Finally, the technique has been applied to the study of turbojet engine fuel nozzle atomization performance with Jet A and antimisting fuel.

  17. Effect of the increase in the entrance convergent section length of the gun nozzle on the high-velocity oxygen fuel and cold spray process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaki, K.; Shimizu, Y.

    2001-09-01

    Nozzle geometry, which influences combustion gas dynamics and, therefore, sprayed particle behavior, is one of the most important parameters in the high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray process. The nozzle geometry is also important in the cold spray method. The gas flows in the entrance convergent section of the nozzle exhibit a relatively higher temperature and are subsonic; thus, this region is most suitable for heating spray particles. In this study, numerical simulation and experiments investigated the effect of the entrance geometry of the gun nozzle on the HVOF process. The process changes inside the nozzle, as obtained by numerical simulation studies, were related to the coating properties. An Al2O3-40 mass% TiO2 powder was used for the experimental studies. The change in entrance convergent section length (rather than barrel part length or total length) of the gun nozzle had a significant effect on the deposition efficiency, microstructure, and hardness. The deposition efficiency and hardness increased as this geometry increased. On the other hand, the calculated and measured particle velocity showed a slight decrease. This effect on the HVOF process will also be applied to the nozzle design for the cold spray method.

  18. Preliminary Photomicrographic Studies of Fuel Sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Dana W; Spencer, Robert C

    1932-01-01

    Photomicrographs were taken of fuel sprays injected into air at various densities for the purpose of studying the spray structure and the stages in the atomization of the fuel. The photomicrographs were taken at magnifying powers of 2.5, 3.25, and 10, using a spark discharge of very short duration for illumination. The results indicate that the theory advanced by Dr. R. A. Castleman, Jr., on the atomization of fuel in carburetors may also be applied to the atomization of fuel sprays of the solid-injection type. The fuel leaves the nozzle as a solid column, is ruffled and then torn into small, irregular ligaments by the action of the air. These ligaments are then quickly broken up into drops by the surface tension of the fuel. The photomicrographs also show that the dispersion of a fuel spray at a given distance from the nozzle increases with an increase in the jet velocity or an increase in the air density. The first portions of fuel sprays injected from an automatic injection valve into air at atmospheric density have a much greater dispersion than the later portions, but this difference decreases rapidly as the air density is increased.

  19. Processing-Microstructure-Property Relationships for Cold Spray Powder Deposition of Al-Cu Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    Characteristics Cold spray is one many types of thermal spray processes, such as plasma spray, flame spray, and high velocity oxygen fuel spraying...MICROSTRUCTURE-PROPERTY RELATIONSHIPS FOR COLD SPRAY POWDER DEPOSITION OF Al-Cu ALLOYS by Jeremy D. Leazer June 2015 Thesis Advisor: Sarath K...3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE PROCESSING-MICROSTRUCTURE-PROPERTY RELATIONSHIPS FOR COLD SPRAY POWDER

  20. Analysis of polydisperse fuel spray flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, Ophir; Lehavi, Yaron; Ajadi, Suraju; Gol'dshtein, Vladimir

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we analyzed the model of polydisperse fuel spray flame by using the sectional approach to describe the droplet-droplet interaction within the spray. The radii of the droplets are described by a probability density function. Our numerical simulations include a comparative analysis between three empirical droplet size distributions: the Rosin-Rammler distribution, the log-normal distribution and the Nakiyama-Tanasawa distribution. The log-normal distribution was found to produce a reasonable approximation to both the number and volume size distribution function. In addition our comparative analysis includes the application of the homotopy analysis method which yields convergent solutions for all values of the relevant parameters. We compared the above results to experimental fuel spray data such as {it{Tetralin}}, n-{it{Decane}}, and n-{it{Heptane}}.

  1. High-pressure combustion of binary fuel sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikami, Masato; Kono, Michikata; Sato, Jun'ichi; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Williams, Forman A.

    1995-01-01

    The ultimate objective of this study is to obtain fundamental information relevant to combustion processes that occur in fuel sprays of practical interest at high pressures in internal combustion engines. Since practical fuels are multicomponent and derived from petroleum, the present work involves the model alkane mixture of n-heptane and n-hexadecane. Since burning droplets in sprays can interact with each other, the present work involves investigation of the effects of this interaction on flame shapes and droplet burning times. The small droplets in practical combustion chambers are not significantly influenced by buoyancy. Since such small droplets are difficult to study experimentally, the present work takes advantage of microgravity to lessen buoyancy and enable information about droplet interactions to be obtained by studying larger droplets. The results are intended to provide fundamental understanding that can be used in improving descriptions of practical spray combustion.

  2. High Speed Imaging of Diesel Fuel Sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Ja'kira; Bittle, Joshua

    2016-11-01

    Fuel sprays primarily serve as methods for fuel distribution, fuel/air mixing, and atomization. In this research, a constant pressure flow rig vessel is being tested at various pressures and temperatures using n-heptane. The experiment requires two imaging techniques: color Schlieren and Mie-scatter. Schlieren captures density gradients in a spray which includes both liquid and vapor phases while Mie-scatter is only sensitive to the liquid phase of the fuel spray. Essentially, studies are mainly focused on extracting the liquid boundary from the Schlieren to possibly eliminate the need for acquiring the Mie-Scatter technique. Four test conditions (combination of low and high pressure and temperatures) are used in the application to attempt to find the liquid boundary independent of the Mie-scatter technique. In this pursuit the following methods were used: a color threshold, a value threshold, and the time variation in color. All methods provided some indication of the liquid region but none were able to capture the full liquid boundary as obtained by the Mie-scatter results. Funding from NSF REU site Grant EEC 1358991 is greatly appreciated.

  3. Effect of fuel rate and annealing process of LiFePO{sub 4} cathode material for Li-ion batteries synthesized by flame spray pyrolysis method

    SciTech Connect

    Halim, Abdul; Setyawan, Heru; Machmudah, Siti; Nurtono, Tantular; Winardi, Sugeng

    2014-02-24

    In this study the effect of fuel rate and annealing on particle formation of LiFePO{sub 4} as battery cathode using flame spray pyrolysis method was investigated numerically and experimentally. Numerical study was done using ANSYS FLUENT program. In experimentally, LiFePO{sub 4} was synthesized from inorganic aqueous solution followed by annealing. LPG was used as fuel and air was used as oxidizer and carrier gas. Annealing process attempted in inert atmosphere at 700°C for 240 min. Numerical result showed that the increase of fuel rate caused the increase of flame temperature. Microscopic observation using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) revealed that all particles have sphere and polydisperse. Increasing fuel rate caused decreasing particle size and increasing particles crystallinity. This phenomenon attributed to the flame temperature. However, all produced particles still have more amorphous phase. Therefore, annealing needed to increase particles crystallinity. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) analysis showed that all particles have PO4 function group. Increasing fuel rate led to the increase of infrared spectrum absorption corresponding to the increase of particles crystallinity. This result indicated that phosphate group vibrated easily in crystalline phase. From Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) analysis, annealing can cause the increase of Li{sup +} diffusivity. The diffusivity coefficient of without and with annealing particles were 6.84399×10{sup −10} and 8.59888×10{sup −10} cm{sup 2} s{sup −1}, respectively.

  4. Process Sprays Uniforms Plasma Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.; Jacobson, T. P.; Walther, G. C.; Nakamura, H. H.

    1983-01-01

    Composite-powder processing procedure developed along with plasma-spray parameters to achieve homogeneous, well-bonded, low-porosity, self-lubricating coatings. Multicomponent plasma coatings are applied without segretation of components.

  5. Vacuum plasma spray applications on liquid fuel rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckechnie, T. N.; Zimmerman, F. R.; Bryant, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    The vacuum plasma spray process (VPS) has been developed by NASA and Rocketdyne for a variety of applications on liquid fuel rocket engines, including the Space Shuttle Main Engine. These applications encompass thermal barrier coatings which are thermal shock resistant for turbopump blades and nozzles; bond coatings for cryogenic titanium components; wear resistant coatings and materials; high conductivity copper, NaRloy-Z, combustion chamber liners, and structural nickel base material, Inconel 718, for nozzle and combustion chamber support jackets.

  6. Vacuum plasma spray applications on liquid fuel rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKechnie, T. N.; Zimmerman, F. R.; Bryant, M. A.

    1992-07-01

    The vacuum plasma spray process (VPS) has been developed by NASA and Rocketdyne for a variety of applications on liquid fuel rocket engines, including the Space Shuttle Main Engine. These applications encompass thermal barrier coatings which are thermal shock resistant for turbopump blades and nozzles; bond coatings for cryogenic titanium components; wear resistant coatings and materials; high conductivity copper, NaRloy-Z, combustion chamber liners, and structural nickel base material, Inconel 718, for nozzle and combustion chamber support jackets.

  7. Air/fuel ratio visualization in a diesel spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carabell, Kevin David

    1993-01-01

    To investigate some features of high pressure diesel spray ignition, we have applied a newly developed planar imaging system to a spray in an engine-fed combustion bomb. The bomb is designed to give flow characteristics similar to those in a direct injection diesel engine yet provide nearly unlimited optical access. A high pressure electronic unit injector system with on-line manually adjustable main and pilot injection features was used. The primary scalar of interest was the local air/fuel ratio, particularly near the spray plumes. To make this measurement quantitative, we have developed a calibration LIF technique. The development of this technique is the key contribution of this dissertation. The air/fuel ratio measurement was made using biacetyl as a seed in the air inlet to the engine. When probed by a tripled Nd:YAG laser the biacetyl fluoresces, with a signal proportional to the local biacetyl concentration. This feature of biacetyl enables the fluorescent signal to be used as as indicator of local fuel vapor concentration. The biacetyl partial pressure was carefully controlled, enabling estimates of the local concentration of air and the approximate local stoichiometry in the fuel spray. The results indicate that the image quality generated with this method is sufficient for generating air/fuel ratio contours. The processes during the ignition delay have a marked effect on ignition and the subsequent burn. These processes, vaporization and pre-flame kinetics, very much depend on the mixing of the air and fuel. This study has shown that poor mixing and over-mixing of the air and fuel will directly affect the type of ignition. An optimal mixing arrangement exists and depends on the swirl ratio in the engine, the number of holes in the fuel injector and the distribution of fuel into a pilot and main injection. If a short delay and a diffusion burn is desired, the best mixing parameters among those surveyed would be a high swirl ratio, a 4-hole nozzle and a

  8. Spray deposition of Nafion membranes: Electrode-supported fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, Thomas; Pham, Hung Cuong; Sasaki, Kazunari; Lyth, Stephen Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Fuel cells are a key technology for the successful transition towards a hydrogen society. In order to accelerate fuel cell commercialization, improvements in performance are required. Generally, polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEFCs) are membrane-supported; the electrocatalyst layer is sprayed onto both sides of the membrane, and sandwiched between carbon-based gas diffusion layers (GDLs). In this work we redesign the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) and fabricate an electrode-supported PEFC. First the electrocatalyst layer is sprayed onto the GDL, and then Nafion dispersion is sprayed over the top of this to form a thin membrane. This method has the advantage of simplifying the fabrication process, allowing the fabrication of extremely thin electrolyte layers (down to ∼10 μm in this case), and reducing the amount of ionomer required in the cell. Electrode-supported PEFCs operate at significantly increased power density compared to conventional membrane-supported PEFCs, with a maximum of 581 mW/cm2 at 80 °C (atmospheric pressure, air at the cathode). Impedance spectroscopy confirmed that the origin of the improved performance was an 80% reduction in the membrane resistance due the thinner Nafion layer. This novel fabrication method is a step towards cheaper, thinner, fully printable PEFCs with high power density and efficiency.

  9. CFD Modeling of Superheated Fuel Sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, M. S.

    2008-01-01

    An understanding of fuel atomization and vaporization behavior at superheat conditions is identified to be a topic of importance in the design of modern supersonic engines. As a part of the NASA aeronautics initiative, we have undertaken an assessment study to establish baseline accuracy of existing CFD models used in the evaluation of a ashing jet. In a first attempt towards attaining this goal, we have incorporated an existing superheat vaporization model into our spray solution procedure but made some improvements to combine the existing models valid at superheated conditions with the models valid at stable (non-superheat) evaporating conditions. Also, the paper reports some validation results based on the experimental data obtained from the literature for a superheated spray generated by the sudden release of pressurized R134A from a cylindrical nozzle. The predicted profiles for both gas and droplet velocities show a reasonable agreement with the measured data and exhibit a self-similar pattern similar to the correlation reported in the literature. Because of the uncertainty involved in the specification of the initial conditions, we have investigated the effect of initial droplet size distribution on the validation results. The predicted results were found to be sensitive to the initial conditions used for the droplet size specification. However, it was shown that decent droplet size comparisons could be achieved with properly selected initial conditions, For the case considered, it is reasonable to assume that the present vaporization models are capable of providing a reasonable qualitative description for the two-phase jet characteristics generated by a ashing jet. However, there remains some uncertainty with regard to the specification of certain initial spray conditions and there is a need for experimental data on separate gas and liquid temperatures in order to validate the vaporization models based on the Adachi correlation for a liquid involving R134A.

  10. Spark Ignition of Monodisperse Fuel Sprays. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danis, Allen M.; Cernansky, Nicholas P.; Namer, Izak

    1987-01-01

    A study of spark ignition energy requirements was conducted with a monodisperse spray system allowing independent control of droplet size, equivalent ratio, and fuel type. Minimum ignition energies were measured for n-heptane and methanol sprays characterized at the spark gap in terms of droplet diameter, equivalence ratio (number density) and extent of prevaporization. In addition to sprays, minimum ignition energies were measured for completely prevaporized mixtures of the same fuels over a range of equivalence ratios to provide data at the lower limit of droplet size. Results showed that spray ignition was enhanced with decreasing droplet size and increasing equivalence ratio over the ranges of the parameters studied. By comparing spray and prevaporized ignition results, the existence of an optimum droplet size for ignition was indicated for both fuels. Fuel volatility was seen to be a critical factor in spray ignition. The spray ignition results were analyzed using two different empirical ignition models for quiescent mixtures. Both models accurately predicted the experimental ignition energies for the majority of the spray conditions. Spray ignition was observed to be probabilistic in nature, and ignition was quantified in terms of an ignition frequency for a given spark energy. A model was developed to predict ignition frequencies based on the variation in spark energy and equivalence ratio in the spark gap. The resulting ignition frequency simulations were nearly identical to the experimentally observed values.

  11. Characterization of coal-water slurry fuel sprays from diesel engine injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Caton, J.A.; Kihm, K.D.

    1993-06-01

    Experiments were conducted to characterize coal-water slurry fuel sprays from diesel engine injectors. Since the combustion event is a strong function of the fuel spray, full characterization of the spray is a necessity for successful engine design and for modeling of the combustion process. Two experimental facilities were used at TAMU to study the injection of coal slurry fuels. The first experimental facility incorporates General Electric locomotive engine components (injection pump, fuel line, and nozzle) and a specially designed diaphragm to separate the abrasive coal slurry fuel from the moving parts of the pump. The second experimental facility is based on an accumulator injector from General Electric. Instrumentation includes instantaneous needle lift and fuel line pressure. A pressurized visualization chamber was used to provide a spray environment which simulated the engine gas density and permitted the use of spray diagnostic techniques. The study was divided into two phases: (1) overall characterization of the spray, and (2) detailed droplet size and size distribution characterization. In addition to this overall characterization of the spray, the second phase of this study characterized the details of the atomization quality.

  12. Preliminary Tests on the Vaporization of Fuel Sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M

    1932-01-01

    High-speed motion pictures were taken of fuel sprays injected into the combustion chamber of the N.A.C.A. combustion apparatus. Three fuels, ethyl alcohol, gasoline, and fuel oil, which differed considerably in volatility were tested. By maintaining the engine temperature below that required for ignition the spray could be studied from soon after the start of injection until 130 crank degrees later. The results show that the sprays vaporize appreciably so that it is possible for the ignition in high speed compression-ignition engines to take place from the vapor phase.

  13. Spray Characterization of Gas-to-Liquid Synthetic Jet Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannaiyan, Kumaran; Sadr, Reza; GTL jet fuel Consortium Team

    2012-11-01

    Gas-to-Liquid (GTL) Synthetic Paraffinic Kerosene (SPK) fuel obtained from Fischer-Tropsch synthesis has grabbed the global attention due to its cleaner combustion characteristics. GTL fuels are expected to meet the vital qualities such as atomization, combustion and emission characteristics of conventional jet fuels. It is imperative to understand fuel atomization in order to gain insights on the combustion and emission aspects of an alternative fuel. In this work spray characteristics of GTL-SPK, which could be used as a drop-in fuel in aircraft gas turbine engines, is studied. This work outlines the spray experimental facility, the methodology used and the results obtained using two SPK's with different chemical compositions. The spray characteristics, such as droplet size and distribution, are presented at three differential pressures across a simplex nozzle and compared with that of the conventional Jet A-1 fuel. Experimental results clearly show that although the chemical composition is significantly different between SPK's, the spray characteristics are not very different. This could be attributed to the minimal difference in fluid properties between the SPK's. Also, the spray characteristics of SPK's show close resemblance to the spray characteristics of Jet A-1 fuel.

  14. Spray Characterization of Gas-to-Liquid Synthetic Jet Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannaiyan, Kumaran; Sadr, Reza

    2011-11-01

    In the recent years, development of alternative jet fuels is gaining importance owing to the demand for cleaner combustion. In addition to having energy density that matches those of conventional fuels, alternate jet fuels need to possess vital qualities such as rapid atomization and vaporization, quick re-ignition at high altitude, less emission, and poses ease of handling. The fuel preparatory steps (atomization and vaporization) and mixing in a combustion chamber play a crucial role on the subsequent combustion and emission characteristics. Gas-to-Liquid (GTL) synthetic jet fuel obtained from Fischer-Tropsch synthesis has grabbed the global attention due to its cleaner combustion characteristics as a result of the absence of aromatics and sulphur. As a part of an on-going joint effort between Texas A&M at Qatar (TAMUQ), Rolls-Royce (UK), and German Aerospace Laboratory (DLR), a spray characterization experimental facility is set up at TAMUQ to study the spray characteristics of GTL fuel and highlights the influence of change in fuel composition on the spray characteristics. In this work, spray characteristics such as droplet size, velocity, and distribution of different GTL fuel blends is investigated and compared with the spray characteristics of conventional JetA1 fuel. Supported by Qatar Science and Technology Park, QSTP.

  15. Effect of Fuel Additives on Spray Performance of Alternative Jet Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannaiyan, Kumaran; Sadr, Reza

    2015-11-01

    Role of alternative fuels on reducing the combustion pollutants is gaining momentum in both land and air transport. Recent studies have shown that addition of nanoscale metal particles as fuel additives to liquid fuels have a positive effect not only on their combustion performance but also in reducing the pollutant formation. However, most of those studies are still in the early stages of investigation with the addition of nanoparticles at low weight percentages. Such an addition can affect the hydrodynamic and thermo-physical properties of the fuel. In this study, the near nozzle spray performance of gas-to-liquid jet fuel with and without the addition of alumina nanoparticles are investigated at macro- and microscopic levels using optical diagnostic techniques. At macroscopic level, the addition of nanoparticles is seen to enhance the sheet breakup process when compared to that of the base fuel. Furthermore, the microscopic spray characteristics such as droplet size and velocity are also found to be affected. Although the addition of nanoscale metal particles at low weight percentages does not affect the bulk fluid properties, the atomization process is found to be affected in the near nozzle region. Funded by Qatar National Research Fund.

  16. Design Optimization of Liquid Fueled High Velocity Oxy- Fuel Thermal Spraying Technique for Durable Coating for Fossil Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhuri, Ahsan; Love, Norman

    2016-11-04

    High-velocity oxy–fuel (HVOF) thermal spraying was developed in 1930 and has been commercially available for twenty-five years. HVOF thermal spraying has several benefits over the more conventional plasma spray technique including a faster deposition rate which leads to quicker turn-around, with more durable coatings and higher bond strength, hardness and wear resistance due to a homogeneous distribution of the sprayed particles. HVOF thermal spraying is frequently used in engineering to deposit cermets, metallic alloys, composites and polymers, to enhance product life and performance. HVOF thermal spraying system is a highly promising technique for applying durable coatings on structural materials for corrosive and high temperature environments in advanced ultra-supercritical coal- fired (AUSC) boilers, steam turbines and gas turbines. HVOF thermal spraying is the preferred method for producing coatings with low porosity and high adhesion. HVOF thermal spray process has been shown to be one of the most efficient techniques to deposit high performance coatings at moderate cost. Variables affecting the deposit formation and coating properties include hardware characteristics such as nozzle geometry and spraying distance and process parameters such as equivalence ratio, gas flow density, and powder feedstock. In the spray process, the powder particles experience very high speeds combined with fast heating to the powder material melting point or above. This high temperature causes evaporation of the powder, dissolution, and phase transformations. Due to the complex nature of the HVOF technique, the control and optimization of the process is difficult. In general, good coating quality with suitable properties and required performance for specific applications is the goal in producing thermal spray coatings. In order to reach this goal, a deeper understanding of the spray process as a whole is needed. Although many researchers studied commercial HVOF thermal spray

  17. Experimental study on spray characteristics of alternate jet fuels using Phase Doppler Anemometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannaiyan, Kumaran; Sadr, Reza

    2013-11-01

    Gas-to-Liquid (GTL) fuels have gained global attention due to their cleaner combustion characteristics. The chemical and physical properties of GTL jet fuels are different from conventional jet fuels owing to the difference in their production methodology. It is important to study the spray characteristics of GTL jet fuels as the change of physical properties can affect atomization, mixing, evaporation and combustion process, ultimately affecting emission process. In this work, spray characteristics of two GTL synthetic jet fuels are studied using a pressure-swirl nozzle at different injection pressures and atmospheric ambient condition. Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) measurements of droplet size and velocity are compared with those of regular Jet A-1 fuel at several axial and radial locations downstream of the nozzle exit. Experimental results show that although the GTL fuels have different physical properties such as viscosity, density, and surface tension, among each other the resultant change in the spray characteristics is insignificant. Furthermore, the presented results show that GTL fuel spray characteristics exhibit close similarity to those of Jet A-1 fuel. Funded by Qatar Science and Technology Park.

  18. Some Characteristics of Fuel Sprays at Low-injection Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Waldron, C D

    1931-01-01

    This report presents the results of tests conducted at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory, Langley Field, Va., to determine some of the characteristics of the fuel sprays obtained from an 0.008-inch and a 0.020-inch open nozzle when injection pressures from 100 to 500 pounds per square inch were used. Fuel oil and gasoline were injected into air at densities of atmospheric land 0.325 pound per cubic foot. It was found that the penetration rate at these low pressures was about the same as the rate obtained with higher pressures. Spray cone-angles were small and individual oil drops were visible in all the sprays. Gasoline and fuel oil sprays had similar characteristics.

  19. Mixing of an Airblast-atomized Fuel Spray Injected into a Crossflow of Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leong, May Y.; McDonell, Vincent G.; Samuelsen, G. Scott

    2000-01-01

    The injection of a spray of fuel droplets into a crossflow of air provides a means of rapidly mixing liquid fuel and air for combustion applications. Injecting the liquid as a spray reduces the mixing length needed to accommodate liquid breakup, while the transverse injection of the spray into the air stream takes advantage of the dynamic mixing induced by the jet-crossflow interaction. The structure of the spray, formed from a model plain-jet airblast atomizer, is investigated in order to determine and understand the factors leading to its dispersion. To attain this goal, the problem is divided into the following tasks which involve: (1) developing planar imaging techniques that visualize fuel and air distributions in the spray, (2) characterizing the airblast spray without a crossflow, and (3) characterizing the airblast spray upon injection into a crossflow. Geometric and operating conditions are varied in order to affect the atomization, penetration, and dispersion of the spray into the crossflow. The airblast spray is first characterized, using imaging techniques, as it issues into a quiescent environment. The spray breakup modes are classified in a liquid Reynolds number versus airblast Weber number regime chart. This work focuses on sprays formed by the "prompt" atomization mode, which induces a well-atomized and well-dispersed spray, and which also produces a two-lobed liquid distribution corresponding to the atomizing air passageways in the injector. The characterization of the spray jet injected into the crossflow reveals the different processes that control its dispersion. Correlations that describe the inner and outer boundaries of the spray jet are developed, using the definition of a two-phase momentum-flux ratio. Cross-sections of the liquid spray depict elliptically-shaped distributions, with the exception of the finely-atomized sprays which show kidney-shaped distributions reminiscent of those obtained in gaseous jet in crossflow systems. A droplet

  20. AE Monitoring and Analysis of HVOF Thermal Spraying Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faisal, N. H.; Ahmed, R.; Reuben, R. L.; Allcock, B.

    2011-09-01

    This work presents an in situ monitoring of HVOF thermal spraying process through an acoustic emission (AE) technique in an industrial coating chamber. Single layer thermal spraying on substrate was carried out through slits. Continuous multilayer thermal spraying onto the sample without slit was also conducted. The AE was measured using a broadband piezoelectric AE sensor positioned on the back of the substrate. A mathematical model has been developed to determine the total kinetic energy of particles impacting the substrate through slits. Results of this work demonstrate that AE associated with particle impacts can be used for in situ monitoring of coating process. Results also show that the amplitude and AE energy is related to the spray gun transverse speed and the oxy-fuel pressure. The measured AE energy was found to vary with the number of particles impacting the substrate, determined using the mathematical model.

  1. Expert system for the plasma spray process

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Petrone, S.

    1994-12-31

    The plasma spray process, like other thermal spray processes, has few on-line monitoring sensors and many process variables which cannot be easily and precisely formulated. This provides an opportunity for improving and controlling the process through artificial intelligence. An expert system has been constructed for selecting plasma spray parameters in the development of new coatings. The expert system is based on operator experience and heuristics on the subject using symbolic reasoning, and coupled with numerical calculations. For less experienced users, the system can assist in solving process problems.

  2. Comprehensive Fuel Spray Modeling and Impacts on Chamber Acoustics in Combustion Dynamics Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    susceptible to thermoacoustic instabilities. Since the LDI engine is operated at fuel-lean conditions, the chemical ki- netics and flame surface are...iments of reacting sprays are used to characterize thermoacoustic instabilities in the LDI gas turbine combustor. Fuel Spray Modeling The fuel spray model

  3. The Gas Dynamics of High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel Thermal Sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackett, Charles Marcou

    An experimental study of the gas dynamics of the High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray process has been performed. With this process, a hot, combustion-driven, supersonic jet is used to propel particles onto a surface, thus forming metal coatings that provide wear, temperature, and corrosion resistance. The fundamental physics of the spray process were studied and several key areas of interest were identified for in-depth study. Optical diagnostic techniques, including microsecond -exposure schlieren and shadowgraph imaging, were used to visualize the hot supersonic jet produced during the spray process. Energetic turbulent mixing of the jet with the surrounding atmosphere was observed. Measurements of oxide levels in aluminum and mild steel coatings sprayed for a range of conditions indicated that the turbulent mixing influences coating oxidation. However, experiments conducted with a low-speed coaxial shroud of inert gas demonstrated that coating oxide formation can be effectively controlled during the spray process. A simple numerical model was developed to predict the behavior of a spray particle in the HVOF jet. The results of computations indicated that independent control of spray particle velocity and temperature was possible through systematic variations in combustion chamber pressure and particle injection location within the nozzle. This hypothesis was confirmed through a series of experiments in which stainless steel particle velocity and temperature were measured using trace velocimetry and two-color radiative pyrometry, respectively. Combustion chamber pressure had a strong effect on particle velocity. Injection location was used to control the residence time of a particle within the flow, thus allowing manipulation of particle temperature without a measurable effect on velocity. Thus, the results of these experiments revealed that the gas dynamics--the behavior of the compressible gas flow--of the HVOF spray process strongly influenced spray

  4. Application of digital image analysis techniques to antimisting fuel spray characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Fleeter, R.; Sarohia, V.; Toaz, R.

    1983-01-01

    A system for fuel mist characterization using digital image analysis and processing techniques has been developed and applied to research on aviation safety fuels. Pulsed ruby laser sheet illumination of the spray is used for initial data recording on very high resolution photographic film. Digitization of mosaic elements is accomplished with a vidicon and video digitizer whose output is stored in computer RAM (Random Access Memory) memory for processing. Highly non-spherical elements and a wide range of drop diameters (8-2000 ..mu..m) resulting from the unusual rheological properties of the fuel-additive system are accomodated by the device configuration and algorithms. Generation of two-dimensional images via scattered light also eliminates errors resulting from variations in the index of refraction and from the presence of submicron scattering sites often present within the modified fuel. No a priori information on the drop size distribution nor on system response to various drop sizes is required. This wide dynamic range, insensitivity to drop optical properties and the lack of a priori assumptions concerning drop shape are some of the unique features of the present analysis technique which are not available in single currently available drop counting methods. A drop histogram is generated for any portion of a spray or for an entire spray field along with local and global spray Sauter mean diameter (SMD) and density information. The technique is applied to analysis of sprays formed in a simulation of an aircraft crash with fuel spillage. Measurements of spray SMD and density are correlated with the results of flammability tests.

  5. Fuel Spray and Flame Formation in a Compression-Ignition Engine Employing Air Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Waldron, C D

    1937-01-01

    The effects of air flow on fuel spray and flame formation in a high-speed compression-ignition engine have been investigated by means of the NACA combustion apparatus. The process was studied by examining high-speed motion pictures taken at the rate of 2,200 frames a second. The combustion chamber was of the flat-disk type used in previous experiments with this apparatus. The air flow was produced by a rectangular displacer mounted on top of the engine piston. Three fuel-injection nozzles were tested: a 0.020-inch single-orifice nozzle, a 6-orifice nozzle, and a slit nozzle. The air velocity within the combustion chamber was estimated to reach a value of 425 feet a second. The results show that in no case was the form of the fuel spray completely destroyed by the air jet although in some cases the direction of the spray was changed and the spray envelope was carried away by the moving air. The distribution of the fuel in the combustion chamber of a compression-ignition engine can be regulated to some extent by the design of the combustion chamber, by the design of the fuel-injection nozzle, and by the use of air flow.

  6. Image processing system to analyze droplet distributions in sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertollini, Gary P.; Oberdier, Larry M.; Lee, Yong H.

    1987-01-01

    An image processing system was developed which automatically analyzes the size distributions in fuel spray video images. Images are generated by using pulsed laser light to freeze droplet motion in the spray sample volume under study. This coherent illumination source produces images which contain droplet diffraction patterns representing the droplets degree of focus. The analysis is performed by extracting feature data describing droplet diffraction patterns in the images. This allows the system to select droplets from image anomalies and measure only those droplets considered in focus. Unique features of the system are the totally automated analysis and droplet feature measurement from the grayscale image. The feature extraction and image restoration algorithms used in the system are described. Preliminary performance data is also given for two experiments. One experiment gives a comparison between a synthesized distribution measured manually and automatically. The second experiment compares a real spray distribution measured using current methods against the automatic system.

  7. Measurement of fuel spray vaporisation by laser techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yule, A. J.; Seng, C. A.; Felton, P. G.; Ungut, A.; Chigier, N. A.

    1980-01-01

    Comparison of fuel spray structures in heated and in cold environments is made by using a new laser tomographic technique and laser anemometry. The tomography technique is shown to give accurate and rapid 'point' measurements of droplet sizes and concentrations. Experimental results show acceleration of droplets to the local gas velocity, preferential vaporisation of the smallest droplets and the dispersion of droplets by the turbulence.

  8. Experimental investigation on the characteristics of supersonic fuel spray and configurations of induced shock waves

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Yu, Yu-song; Li, Guo-xiu; Jia, Tao-ming

    2017-01-01

    The macro characteristics and configurations of induced shock waves of the supersonic sprays are investigated by experimental methods. Visualization study of spray shape is carried out with the high-speed camera. The macro characteristics including spray tip penetration, velocity of spray tip and spray angle are analyzed. The configurations of shock waves are investigated by Schlieren technique. For supersonic sprays, the concept of spray front angle is presented. Effects of Mach number of spray on the spray front angle are investigated. The results show that the shape of spray tip is similar to blunt body when fuel spray is at transonic region. If spray entered the supersonic region, the oblique shock waves are induced instead of normal shock wave. With the velocity of spray increasing, the spray front angle and shock wave angle are increased. The tip region of the supersonic fuel spray is commonly formed a cone. Mean droplet diameter of fuel spray is measured using Malvern’s Spraytec. Then the mean droplet diameter results are compared with three popular empirical models (Hiroyasu’s, Varde’s and Merrigton’s model). It is found that the Merrigton’s model shows a relative good correlation between models and experimental results. Finally, exponent of injection velocity in the Merrigton’s model is fitted with experimental results. PMID:28054555

  9. Experimental investigation on the characteristics of supersonic fuel spray and configurations of induced shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Yu, Yu-Song; Li, Guo-Xiu; Jia, Tao-Ming

    2017-01-01

    The macro characteristics and configurations of induced shock waves of the supersonic sprays are investigated by experimental methods. Visualization study of spray shape is carried out with the high-speed camera. The macro characteristics including spray tip penetration, velocity of spray tip and spray angle are analyzed. The configurations of shock waves are investigated by Schlieren technique. For supersonic sprays, the concept of spray front angle is presented. Effects of Mach number of spray on the spray front angle are investigated. The results show that the shape of spray tip is similar to blunt body when fuel spray is at transonic region. If spray entered the supersonic region, the oblique shock waves are induced instead of normal shock wave. With the velocity of spray increasing, the spray front angle and shock wave angle are increased. The tip region of the supersonic fuel spray is commonly formed a cone. Mean droplet diameter of fuel spray is measured using Malvern’s Spraytec. Then the mean droplet diameter results are compared with three popular empirical models (Hiroyasu’s, Varde’s and Merrigton’s model). It is found that the Merrigton’s model shows a relative good correlation between models and experimental results. Finally, exponent of injection velocity in the Merrigton’s model is fitted with experimental results.

  10. Spray sealing: A breakthrough in integral fuel tank sealing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Martin D.; Zadarnowski, J. H.

    1989-11-01

    In a continuing effort to increase readiness, a new approach to sealing integral fuel tanks is being developed. The technique seals potential leak sources by spraying elastomeric materials inside the tank cavity. Laboratory evaluations project an increase in aircraft supportability and reliability, an improved maintainability, decreasing acquisition and life cycle costs. Increased usable fuel volume and lower weight than conventional bladders improve performance. Concept feasibility was demonstrated on sub-scale aircraft fuel tanks. Materials were selected by testing sprayable elastomers in a fuel tank environment. Chemical stability, mechanical properties, and dynamic durability of the elastomer are being evaluated at the laboratory level and in sub-scale and full scale aircraft component fatigue tests. The self sealing capability of sprayable materials is also under development. Ballistic tests show an improved aircraft survivability, due in part to the elastomer's mechanical properties and its ability to damp vibrations. New application equipment, system removal, and repair methods are being investigated.

  11. A Comparison of Fuel Sprays from Several Types of Injection Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Dana W

    1936-01-01

    This report presents the tests results of a series of tests made of the sprays from 14 fuel injection nozzles of 9 different types, the sprays being injected into air at atmospheric density and at 6 and 14 times atmospheric density. High-speed spark photographs of the sprays from each nozzle at each air density were taken at the rate of 2,000 per second, and from them were obtained the dimensions of the sprays and the rates of spray-tip penetration. The sprays were also injected against plasticine targets placed at different distances from the nozzles, and the impressions made in the plasticine were used as an indication of the distribution of the fuel within the spray. Cross-sectional sketches of the different types of sprays are given showing the relative sizes of the spray cores and envelopes. The characteristics of the sprays are compared and discussed with respect to their application to various types of engines.

  12. Spray automated balancing of rotors - How process parameters influence performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, A. J.; Baldwin, R. M.; Fleming, D. P.; Yuhas, J. S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper addresses the application of spray-automated balancing of rotors, and the influence that various operating parameters will have on balancing performance. Spray-automated balancing uses the fuel-air repetitive explosion process to imbed short, discrete bursts of high velocity, high temperature powder into a rotating part at an angle selected to reduce unbalance of the part. The shortness of the burst, the delay in firing of the gun, the speed of the disk and the variability in speed all influence the accuracy and effectiveness of the automated balancing process. The paper evaluates this influence by developing an analytical framework and supplementing the analysis with empirical data obtained while firing the gun at a rotating disk. Encouraging results are obtained, and it is shown that the process should perform satisfactorily over a wide range of operating parameters. Further experimental results demonstrate the ability of the method to reduce vibration levels induced by mass unbalance in a rotating disk.

  13. Measurements of Fuel Distribution Within Sprays for Fuel-Injection Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Dana W

    1937-01-01

    Two methods were used to measure fuel distribution within sprays from several types of fuel-injection nozzles. A small tube inserted through the wall of an air tight chamber into which the sprays were injected could be moved about inside the chamber. When the pressure was raised to obtain air densities of 6 and 14 atmospheres, some air was forced through the tube and the fuel that was carried with it was separated by absorbent cotton and weighed. Cross sections of sprays from plain, pintle, multiple-orifice, impinging-jets, centrifugal, lip, slit, and annular-orifice nozzles were investigated, at distances of 1, 3, 5, and 7 inches from the nozzles.

  14. Thermal spray coatings: New materials, processes and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Longo, F.N.

    1985-01-01

    The major areas of thermal spray, including materials, equipment, processes, coatings and applications, are covered. Emphasis of the papers is on practical recommendations and solutions to present applications. The author provides information on linear gas mass controllers, metal sprayed coating systems, plasma sprayed coatings, thermal sprayed coatings in marine applications and for repairing equipment parts, and advances in arc coating technology.

  15. Dense spray evaporation as a mixing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rivas, A.; Villermaux, E.

    2016-05-01

    We explore the processes by which a dense set of small liquid droplets (a spray) evaporates in a dry, stirred gas phase. A dense spray of micron-sized liquid (water or ethanol) droplets is formed in air by a pneumatic atomizer in a closed chamber. The spray is conveyed in ambient air as a plume whose extension depends on the relative humidity of the diluting medium. Standard shear instabilities develop at the plume edge, forming the stretched lamellar structures familiar with passive scalars. Unlike passive scalars however, these lamellae vanish in a finite time, because individual droplets evaporate at their border in contact with the dry environment. Experiments demonstrate that the lifetime of an individual droplet embedded in a lamellae is much larger than expected from the usual d2 law describing the fate of a single drop evaporating in a quiescent environment. By analogy with the way mixing times are understood from the convection-diffusion equation for passive scalars, we show that the lifetime of a spray lamellae stretched at a constant rate γ is tv=1/γ ln(1/+ϕ ϕ ) , where ϕ is a parameter that incorporates the thermodynamic and diffusional properties of the vapor in the diluting phase. The case of time-dependent stretching rates is examined too. A dense spray behaves almost as a (nonconserved) passive scalar.

  16. The Effects of Fuel and Cylinder Gas Densities on the Characteristics of Fuel Sprays for Oil Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joachim, W F; Beardsley, Edward G

    1928-01-01

    This investigation was conducted as a part of a general research on fuel-injection engines for aircraft. The purpose of the investigation was to determine the effects of fuel and cylinder gas densities with several characteristics of fuel sprays for oil engines. The start, growth, and cut-off of single fuel sprays produced by automatic injection valves were recorded on photographic film by means of special high-speed motion-picture apparatus. This equipment, which has been described in previous reports, is capable of taking twenty-five consecutive pictures of the moving spray at the rate of 4,000 per second. The penetrations of the fuel sprays increased and the cone angles and relative distributions decreased with increase in the specific gravity of the fuel. The density of the gas into which the fuel sprays were injected controlled their penetration. This was the only characteristic of the chamber gas that had a measurable effect upon the fuel sprays. Application of fuel-spray penetration data to the case of an engine, in which the pressure is rising during injection, indicated that fuel sprays may penetrate considerably farther than when injected into a gas at a density equal to that of the gas in an engine cylinder at top center.

  17. Current problems in plasma spray processing

    SciTech Connect

    Berndt, C.C.; Brindley, W.; Goland, A.N.; Herman, H.; Houck, D.L.; Jones, K.; Miller, R.A.; Neiser, R.; Riggs, W.; Sampath, S.; Smith, M.; Spanne, P.

    1991-12-31

    This detailed report summarizes 8 contributions from a thermal spray conference that was held in late 1991 at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Upton, Long Island, NY, USA). The subject of ``Plasma Spray Processing`` is presented under subject headings of Plasma-particle interactions, Deposit formation dynamics, Thermal properties of thermal barrier coatings, Mechanical properties of coatings, Feed stock materials, Porosity: An integrated approach, Manufacture of intermetallic coatings, and Synchrotron x-ray microtomographic methods for thermal spray materials. Each section is intended to present a concise statement of a specific practical and/or scientific problem, then describe current work that is being performed to investigate this area, and finally to suggest areas of research that may be fertile for future activity.

  18. Current problems in plasma spray processing

    SciTech Connect

    Berndt, C.C.; Brindley, W.; Goland, A.N.; Herman, H.; Houck, D.L.; Jones, K.; Miller, R.A.; Neiser, R.; Riggs, W.; Sampath, S.; Smith, M.; Spanne, P. . Thermal Spray Lab.)

    1991-01-01

    This detailed report summarizes 8 contributions from a thermal spray conference that was held in late 1991 at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Upton, Long Island, NY, USA). The subject of Plasma Spray Processing'' is presented under subject headings of Plasma-particle interactions, Deposit formation dynamics, Thermal properties of thermal barrier coatings, Mechanical properties of coatings, Feed stock materials, Porosity: An integrated approach, Manufacture of intermetallic coatings, and Synchrotron x-ray microtomographic methods for thermal spray materials. Each section is intended to present a concise statement of a specific practical and/or scientific problem, then describe current work that is being performed to investigate this area, and finally to suggest areas of research that may be fertile for future activity.

  19. Spray Cooling Processes for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizito, John P.; VanderWal, Randy L.; Berger, Gordon; Tryggvason, Gretar

    2004-01-01

    The present paper reports ongoing work to develop numerical and modeling tools used to design efficient and effective spray cooling processes and to determine characteristic non-dimensional parametric dependence for practical fluids and conditions. In particular, we present data that will delineate conditions towards control of the impingement dynamics of droplets upon a heated substrate germane to practical situations.

  20. Photo-ignition of Carbon Nanotube for Ignition of Liquid Fuel Spray and Solid Fuel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    photoignition of the gaseous fuel and air mixture showed distributed ignition.10,11 There has been a recent report on the photoignition of graphene ...is scalable, while the application of the photoignition has been demonstrated for small scale fuel spray and simulated solid propellants in this...Sergey Dubin, Alireza Badakhshan, Jabari Farrar, Stephen. A. Danczyk, Richard B. Kaner, “Photothermal Deoxygenation of Graphene Oxide for Patterning

  1. Fuel gas conditioning process

    DOEpatents

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.

    2000-01-01

    A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

  2. Electrostatic Fuel Atomization and Spray Dispersal Demonstration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    2.4 bar absolute influence the droplet formation process. A "best fit" continuous Rosin - Rammler distri- Increasing background pressure serves to bution...empirical pressure. This is an intrinsic feature of charge Rosin - Rammler curve the comparison is use- injection atomizers that serves both to sharpen ful...interval between 35 and 42 microns. The atomizer operating in a five atmosphere back- crudely approximate Rosin - Rammler distri- ground pressure, the

  3. High Resolution Numerical Simulations of Primary Atomization in Diesel Sprays with Single Component Reference Fuels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    ARL-RP-0549 ● SEP 2015 US Army Research Laboratory High Resolution Numerical Simulations of Primary Atomization in Diesel Sprays...0549 ● SEP 2015 US Army Research Laboratory High Resolution Numerical Simulations of Primary Atomization in Diesel Sprays with Single...AND SUBTITLE High Resolution Numerical Simulations of Primary Atomization in Diesel Sprays with Single Component Reference Fuels 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER

  4. Automated Plasma Spray (APS) process feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetheroff, C. W.; Derkacs, T.; Matay, I. M.

    1981-01-01

    An automated plasma spray (APS) process was developed to apply two layer (NiCrAlY and ZrO2-12Y2O3) thermal barrier coatings to aircraft and stationary gas turbine engine blade airfoils. The APS process hardware consists of four subsystems: a mechanical positioning subsystem incorporating two interlaced six degree of freedom assemblies (one for coating deposition and one for coating thickness monitoring); a noncoherent optical metrology subsystem (for in process gaging of the coating thickness buildup at specified points on the specimen); a microprocessor based adaptive system controller (to achieve the desired overall thickness profile on the specimen); and commerical plasma spray equipment. Over fifty JT9D first stage aircraft turbine blade specimens, ten W501B utility turbine blade specimens and dozens of cylindrical specimens were coated with the APS process in preliminary checkout and evaluation studies. The best of the preliminary turbine blade specimens achieved an overall coating thickness uniformity of 53 micrometers (2.1 mils), much better than is achievable manually. Comparative evaluations of coating thickness uniformity for manually sprayed and APS coated specimens were performed. One of the preliminary turbine blade evaluation specimens was subjected to a torch test and metallographic evaluation. Some cylindrical specimens coated with the APS process survived up to 2000 cycles in subsequent burner rig testing.

  5. Combustion characteristics in the transition region of liquid fuel sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cernansky, N. P.; Namer, I.; Tidona, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    A number of important effects have been observed in the droplet size transition region in spray combustion systems. In this region, where the mechanism of flame propagation is transformed from diffusive to premixed dominated combustion, the following effects have been observed: (1) maxima in burning velocity; (2) extension of flammability limits; (3) minima in ignition energy; and (4) minima in NOx formation. A monodisperse aerosol generator has been used to form and deliver a well controlled liquid fuel spray to the combustion test section where measurements of ignition energy have been made. The ignition studies were performed on monodisperse n-heptane sprays at atmospheric pressure over a range of equivalence ratios and droplet diameters. A capacitive discharge spark ignition system was used as the ignition source, providing independent control of spark energy and duration. Preliminary measurements were made to optimize spark duration and spark gap, optimum conditions being those at which the maximum frequency or probability of ignition was observed. Using the optimum electrode spacing and spark duration, the frequency of ignition was determined as a function of spark energy for three overall equivalence ratios (0.6, 0.8, and 1.0) and for initial droplet diameters of 25, 40, 50, 60, and 70 micro m.

  6. Carbon nanotube reinforced aluminum nanocomposite via plasma and high velocity oxy-fuel spray forming.

    PubMed

    Laha, T; Liu, Y; Agarwal, A

    2007-02-01

    Free standing structures of hypereutectic aluminum-23 wt% silicon nanocomposite with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) reinforcement have been successfully fabricated by two different thermal spraying technique viz Plasma Spray Forming (PSF) and High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) Spray Forming. Comparative microstructural and mechanical property evaluation of the two thermally spray formed nanocomposites has been carried out. Presence of nanosized grains in the Al-Si alloy matrix and physically intact and undamaged carbon nanotubes were observed in both the nanocomposites. Excellent interfacial bonding between Al alloy matrix and MWCNT was observed. The elastic modulus and hardness of HVOF sprayed nanocomposite is found to be higher than PSF sprayed composites.

  7. The Effect of Fuel Injector Nozzle Configuration on JP-8 Sprays at Diesel Engine Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    CFD study was conducted to compare modeling to experimental results. Fuel spray studies investigating liquid and vapor penetrations lengths can be...injectors tested. In addition, a 3D CFD study was conducted to compare modeling to experimental results. Fuel spray studies investigating liquid and...with six fuels including conventional (No. 2 Diesel, JP-8, Jet -A), alternative fuels, and a surrogate with the objective of assessing the performance

  8. Fuel Surrogate Physical Property Effects on Direct Injection Spray and Ignition Behavior

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    emissions, and spray characteristics to the properties of alternative diesel fuels, such as dimethyl ether ( DME ), biodiesel, and jet fuel, which are... kinetic energy flow rate from the fuel injection (Ėkinetic,injection) as follows: fuel fuelU ρ 1 ∝ (Eq. 5) fuelfuelm ρ∝ (Eq. 6) ( ) fuel...fuelfuelinjectionkinetic UmE ρ 12 , ∝∝  (Eq. 7) 15 UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED As indicated by Equation 7, the kinetic energy introduced by the fuel

  9. Characterization of simulated small-droplet fuel sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    1986-01-01

    A two-fluid pneumatic atomizer operating at relatively high liquid and gas pressures produced water sprays that simulated small-droplet clouds of liquid fuel for use in studying vaporization and fuel-air mixing effects on combustor performance and emissions. To characterize the sprays, a scattered-light scanning instrument was developed and measurements of volume median or volume mean diameter, D sub V.5, were correlated with D sub O, W sub w, and W sub n, i.e., orifice diameter, water, and nitrogen gas flow rates, respectively, to give the general expression: D sub v.5 approx. (D sub o sup 0.2) (W sub w sup m) (W sub n sup n), which yields D sub v.5 = 45 (D sub o sup 0.2) (W sub w sup 0.2) (W sub w sup - 1.2). Values of D sub o, W sub w, and W sub n are in centimeters and grams/second, respectively. Farther downstream at an axial distance of 6.7 cm, exponent m increased from 0.2 to 0.4 and exponent n decreased from -1.2 to -1.0 and at a distance of 25 cm downstream of the atomizer, n decreased to -0.8. The increase in exponent m and decrease in exponent n was attributed to a loss of very small droplets from the spray due primarily to vaporization and diffusion effects on clouds of small droplets traveling a distance of 25 cm.

  10. Automated Plasma Spray (APS) process feasibility study: Plasma spray process development and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetheroff, C. W.; Derkacs, T.; Matay, I. M.

    1979-01-01

    An automated plasma spray (APS) process was developed to apply two layer (NiCrAlY and ZrO2-12Y2O3) thermal-barrier coatings to aircraft gas turbine engine blade airfoils. The APS process hardware consists of four subsystems: a mechanical blade positioner incorporating two interlaced six-degree-of-freedom assemblies; a noncoherent optical metrology subsystem; a microprocessor-based adaptive system controller; and commercial plasma spray equipment. Over fifty JT9D first stage turbine blades specimens were coated with the APS process in preliminary checkout and evaluation studies. The best of the preliminary specimens achieved an overall coating thickness uniformity of + or - 53 micrometers, much better than is achievable manually. Factors limiting this performance were identified and process modifications were initiated accordingly. Comparative evaluations of coating thickness uniformity for manually sprayed and APS coated specimens were initiated. One of the preliminary evaluation specimens was subjected to a torch test and metallographic evaluation.

  11. Analysis of a High Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray torch. Part 1, Numerical formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Talpallikar, M.

    1994-01-01

    The fluid and particle dynamics of a High Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) torch are analyzed using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) techniques. The thermal spray device analyzed is similar to a Metco Diamond Jet torch with powder injection. The spray nozzle is axisymmetric with powder injection on the centerline, premixed fuel and oxygen fed from an annulus, and air cooling injected along the interior surface of the aircap. Choked flow conditions occur at the exit of the aircap and a supersonic, under-expanded jet develops externally. The CFD simulation assumes three injection streams (solid metal particles with argon as a carrier gas, premixed oxygen/fuel, and air) inside the aircap and solves the combusting two-phase flow until the external spray stream decays to sonic conditions. The numerical formulation solves the mass, momentum, and energy transfer for both the gas and particle phase and strongly couples each phase. The combustion process is modeled using approximate equilibrium chemistry with dissociation of the gas with a total of nine species. Melting and re-solidification of the metal panicles is modeled as a lumped-mass system. Turbulent flow is modeled by a two equation k-{epsilon} turbulence model, including compressibility effects on turbulent dissipation. A time iterative, implicit, finite volume numerical method is used to solve the partial differential equations. A companion paper [10] presents the results of the numerical simulation and gives a detailed discussion of the gas and panicle dynamics.

  12. Evaluation of Convergent Spray Technology(TM) Spray Process for Roof Coating Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarpa, J.; Creighton, B.; Hall, T.; Hamlin, K.; Howard, T.

    1998-01-01

    The overall goal of this project was to demonstrate the feasibility of(CST) Convergent Spray Technology (Trademark) for the roofing industry. This was accomplished by producing an environmentally compliant coating utilization recycled materials, a CST(Trademark) spray process portable application cart, and hand-held applicator with a CST(Trademark) spray process nozzle. The project culminated with application of this coating to a nine hundred sixty square foot metal for NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama.

  13. A Nonlinear Model for Fuel Atomization in Spray Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Nan-Suey (Technical Monitor); Ibrahim, Essam A.; Sree, Dave

    2003-01-01

    Most gas turbine combustion codes rely on ad-hoc statistical assumptions regarding the outcome of fuel atomization processes. The modeling effort proposed in this project is aimed at developing a realistic model to produce accurate predictions of fuel atomization parameters. The model involves application of the nonlinear stability theory to analyze the instability and subsequent disintegration of the liquid fuel sheet that is produced by fuel injection nozzles in gas turbine combustors. The fuel sheet is atomized into a multiplicity of small drops of large surface area to volume ratio to enhance the evaporation rate and combustion performance. The proposed model will effect predictions of fuel sheet atomization parameters such as drop size, velocity, and orientation as well as sheet penetration depth, breakup time and thickness. These parameters are essential for combustion simulation codes to perform a controlled and optimized design of gas turbine fuel injectors. Optimizing fuel injection processes is crucial to improving combustion efficiency and hence reducing fuel consumption and pollutants emissions.

  14. A Nonlinear Model for Fuel Atomization in Spray Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Nan-Suey (Technical Monitor); Ibrahim, Essam A.; Sree, Dave

    2003-01-01

    Most gas turbine combustion codes rely on ad-hoc statistical assumptions regarding the outcome of fuel atomization processes. The modeling effort proposed in this project is aimed at developing a realistic model to produce accurate predictions of fuel atomization parameters. The model involves application of the nonlinear stability theory to analyze the instability and subsequent disintegration of the liquid fuel sheet that is produced by fuel injection nozzles in gas turbine combustors. The fuel sheet is atomized into a multiplicity of small drops of large surface area to volume ratio to enhance the evaporation rate and combustion performance. The proposed model will effect predictions of fuel sheet atomization parameters such as drop size, velocity, and orientation as well as sheet penetration depth, breakup time and thickness. These parameters are essential for combustion simulation codes to perform a controlled and optimized design of gas turbine fuel injectors. Optimizing fuel injection processes is crucial to improving combustion efficiency and hence reducing fuel consumption and pollutants emissions.

  15. Effects of fuel cetane number on the structure of diesel spray combustion: An accelerated Eulerian stochastic fields method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jangi, Mehdi; Lucchini, Tommaso; Gong, Cheng; Bai, Xue-Song

    2015-09-01

    An Eulerian stochastic fields (ESF) method accelerated with the chemistry coordinate mapping (CCM) approach for modelling spray combustion is formulated, and applied to model diesel combustion in a constant volume vessel. In ESF-CCM, the thermodynamic states of the discretised stochastic fields are mapped into a low-dimensional phase space. Integration of the chemical stiff ODEs is performed in the phase space and the results are mapped back to the physical domain. After validating the ESF-CCM, the method is used to investigate the effects of fuel cetane number on the structure of diesel spray combustion. It is shown that, depending of the fuel cetane number, liftoff length is varied, which can lead to a change in combustion mode from classical diesel spray combustion to fuel-lean premixed burned combustion. Spray combustion with a shorter liftoff length exhibits the characteristics of the classical conceptual diesel combustion model proposed by Dec in 1997 (http://dx.doi.org/10.4271/970873), whereas in a case with a lower cetane number the liftoff length is much larger and the spray combustion probably occurs in a fuel-lean-premixed mode of combustion. Nevertheless, the transport budget at the liftoff location shows that stabilisation at all cetane numbers is governed primarily by the auto-ignition process.

  16. Investigation of Fuel Oil/Lube Oil Spray Fires On Board Vessels. Volume 3.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-11-01

    U.S. Coast Guard Research and Development Center 1082 Shennecossett Road, Groton, CT 06340-6096 Report No. CG-D-01-99, III Investigation of Fuel ...4. Title and Subtitle Investigation of Fuel Oil/Lube Oil Spray Fires On Board Vessels - Volume Appendix C: LMIS Events and Associated Event Trees...measures (technological advancements as well as safety management systems) for preventing or mitigating the impacts of fuel oil or lube oil spray fires on

  17. Some Effects of Air and Fuel Oil Temperatures on Spray Penetration and Dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelalles, A G

    1930-01-01

    Presented here are experimental results obtained from a brief investigation of the appearance, penetration, and dispersion of oil sprays injected into a chamber of highly heated air at atmospheric pressure. The development of single sprays injected into a chamber containing air at room temperature and at high temperature was recorded by spray photography equipment. A comparison of spray records showed that with the air at the higher temperature, the spray assumed the appearance of thin, transparent cloud, the greatest part of which rapidly disappeared from view. With the chamber air at room temperature, a compact spray with an opaque core was obtained. Measurements of the records showed a decrease in penetration and an increase in the dispersion of the spray injected into the heated air. No ignition of the fuel injected was observed or recorded until the spray particles came in contact with the much hotter walls of the chamber about 0.3 second after the start of injection.

  18. Simulation of fundamental atomization mechanisms in fuel sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, Robert, E.; Mansour, Nagi N.

    1988-01-01

    Growth of instabilities on the liquid/gas interface in the initial region of fuel sprays is studied by means of numerical simulations. The simulations are based on solutions of the variable-density incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, which are obtained with a new numerical algorithm. The simulations give good agreement with analytical results for the instabilities on a liquid cylinder induced by surface tension and wind-induced instabilities. The effects of boundary layers on the wind-induced instabilities are investigated. It is found that a boundary layer reduces the growth rate for a single interface, and a comparison with inviscid theory suggests that boundary layer effects may be significantly more important than surface tension effects. The results yield a better estimate than inviscid theory for the drop sizes as reported for diesel sprays. Results for the planar jet show that boundary layer effects hasten the growth of Squire's 'symmetric' mode, which is responsible for jet disintegration. This result helps explain the rapid atomization which occurs in swirl and air-blast atomizers.

  19. Gas density effect on dropsize of simulated fuel sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, Robert D.

    1989-01-01

    Two-phase flow in pneumatic two-fluid fuel nozzles was investigated experimentally to determine the effect of atomizing-gas density and gas mass-flux on liquid-jet breakup in sonic-velocity gas-flow. Dropsize data were obtained for the following atomizing-gases: nitrogen; argon; carbon dioxide; and helium. They were selected to cover a gas molecular-weight range of 4 to 44. Atomizing-gas mass-flux ranged from 6 to 50 g/sq cm-sec and four differently sized two-fluid fuel nozzles were used having orifice diameters that varied from 0.32 to 0.56 cm. The ratio of liquid-jet diameter to SMD, D sub o/D sub 32, was correlated with aerodynamic and liquid-surface forces based on the product of the Weber and Reynolds number, We*Re, and gas-to-liquid density ratio, rho sub g/rho sub l. To correlate spray dropsize with breakup forces produced by using different atomizing-gases, a new molecular-scale dimensionless group was derived. The derived dimensionless group was used to obtain an expression for the ratio of liquid-jet diameter to SMD, D sub o/D sub 32. The mathematical expression of this phenomenon incorporates the product of the Weber and Reynolds number, liquid viscosity, surface tension, acoustic gas velocity, the RMS velocity of gas molecules, the acceleration of gas molecules due to gravity, and gas viscosity. The mathematical expression encompassing these parameters agrees well with the atomization theory for liquid-jet breakup in high velocity gas flow. Also, it was found that at the same gas mass-flux, helium was considerably more effective than nitrogen in producing small droplet sprays with SMD's in the order of 5 micrometers.

  20. Convergent spray process for environmentally friendly coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarpa, Jack

    1995-01-01

    Conventional spray application processes have poor transfer efficiencies, resulting in an exorbitant loss in materials, solvents, and time. Also, with ever tightening Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations and Occupational Safety and Health Administration requirements, the low transfer efficiencies have a significant impact on the quantities of materials and solvents that are released into the environment. High solids spray processes are also limited by material viscosities, thus requiring many passes over the surface to achieve a thickness in the 0.125 -inch range. This results in high application costs and a negative impact on the environment. Until recently, requirements for a 100 percent solid sprayable, environmentally friendly, lightweight thermal protection system that can be applied in a thick (greater than 0.125 inch) single-pass operation exceeded the capability of existing systems. Such coatings must be applied by hand lay-up techniques, especially for thermal and/or fire protection systems. The current formulation of these coatings has presented many problems such as worker safety, environmental hazards, waste, high cost, and application constraints. A system which can apply coatings without using hazardous materials would alleviate many of these problems. Potential applications include the aerospace thermal protective specialty coatings, chemical and petroleum industries that require fire-protection coatings that resist impact, chemicals, and weather. These markets can be penetrated by offering customized coatings applied by automated processes that are environmentally friendly.

  1. Ultrafast high-repetition imaging of fuel sprays using picosecond fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Purwar, Harsh; Wang, Hongjie; Tang, Mincheng; Idlahcen, Saïd; Rozé, Claude; Blaisot, Jean-Bernard; Godin, Thomas; Hideur, Ammar

    2015-12-28

    Modern diesel injectors operate at very high injection pressures of about 2000 bar resulting in injection velocities as high as 700 m/s near the nozzle outlet. In order to better predict the behavior of the atomization process at such high pressures, high-resolution spray images at high repetition rates must be recorded. However, due to extremely high velocity in the near-nozzle region, high-speed cameras fail to avoid blurring of the structures in the spray images due to their exposure time. Ultrafast imaging featuring ultra-short laser pulses to freeze the motion of the spray appears as an well suited solution to overcome this limitation. However, most commercial high-energy ultrafast sources are limited to a few kHz repetition rates. In the present work, we report the development of a custom-designed picosecond fiber laser generating ∼ 20 ps pulses with an average power of 2.5 W at a repetition rate of 8.2 MHz, suitable for high-speed imaging of high-pressure fuel jets. This fiber source has been proof tested by obtaining backlight images of diesel sprays issued from a single-orifice injector at an injection pressure of 300 bar. We observed a consequent improvement in terms of image resolution compared to standard white-light illumination. In addition, the compactness and stability against perturbations of our fiber laser system makes it particularly suitable for harsh experimental conditions.

  2. Study of ethanol and gasoline fuel sprays using mie-scatter and schlieren imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Lauren; Bittle, Joshua; Puzinauskas, Paul

    2016-11-01

    Many cars today are capable of running on both gasoline and ethanol, however it is not clear how well optimized the engines are for the multiple fuels. This experiment looks specifically at the fuel spray in a direct injection system. The length and angle of direct injection sprays were characterized and a comparison between ethanol and gasoline sprays was made. Fuels were tested using a modified diesel injector in a test chamber at variable ambient pressures and temperatures in order to simulate both high and low load combustion chamber conditions. Rainbow schlieren and mie-scatter imaging were both used to investigate the liquid and vapor portions of the sprays. The sprays behaved as expected with temperature and pressure changes. There was no noticeable fuel effect on the liquid portion of the spray (mie-scatter), though the gasoline vapor spray angles were wider than ethanol spray angles (possible a result of the distillation curves of the two fuels). Funding from NSF REU site Grant EEC 1358991 is greatly appreciated.

  3. Evaluation of phase doppler particle analyzer for measuring dense sprays from a gas turbine fuel injector

    SciTech Connect

    Kraemer, G.; Bachalo, W.D.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to evaluate the suitability of the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA) for measuring sprays produced by fuel injectors. The instrument was subjected to several tests at simulated spray and combustion chamber operating conditions. Light beam attenuations produced by contaminated windows and optical-path length through the spray were insignificant sources of error. Off-axis forward and off-axis back scatter measurements were made and demonstrated good agreement. As expected, increased laser power was required for the back scatter measurements. Line averaged measurements of the Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD) were determined and compared to Fraunhofer diffraction measurements. The results were in agreement to within 5 percent. Although the instrument has a relatively large dynamic range of 35, size distributions at different ranges needed to be combined to cover the very large size ranges produced by the injector operating at off design conditions. Simultaneous drop size, velocity, and number density measurements produced by the instrument provide the information needed for combustor development and modeling of the air-fuel mixing processes.

  4. Comparison of Global Sizing Velocimetry and Phase Doppler Anemometry measurements of alternative jet fuel sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadr, Reza; Kannaiyan, Kumaran

    2013-11-01

    Atomization plays a crucial precursor role in liquid fuel combustion that directly affects the evaporation, mixing, and emission levels. Laser diagnostic techniques are often used to study the spray characteristics of liquid fuels. The objective of this work is to compare the spray measurements of Gas-to Liquid (GTL) jet fuels obtained using Global Sizing Velocimetry (GSV) and Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) techniques at global and local levels, respectively. The chemical and physical properties of GTL fuels are different from conventional jet fuels, owing to the difference in their production methodology. In this work, the experimental facility, the measurement techniques, and spray characteristics of two different GTL fuels are discussed and compared with those of Jet A-1 fuel. Results clearly demonstrate that although the global measurement gives an overall picture of the spray, fine details are obtained only through local measurements and complement in gaining more inferences into the spray characteristics. The results also show a close similarity in spray characteristics between GTL and Jet A-1 fuels. Funded by Qatar Science and Technology Park.

  5. A Numerical Study on Gas Phase Dynamics of High-Velocity Oxygen Fuel Thermal Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baik, Jae-Sang; Park, Sun-Kyu; Kim, Youn-Jea

    2008-08-01

    The high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) thermal spray is used for a particulate deposition process in which micro-sized particles are propelled and heated in a supersonic combusting gas stream. It is characterized by high gas velocity and high density and is being used in an increasing variety of coating applications, such as ceramic and composite coatings, to improve wear and abrasion resistance. The particle temperature and velocity are two of the most important parameters in HVOF thermal spraying, which affect the quality of the coatings. To understand the particle dynamics, it is necessary to study, first, the thermal flow characteristics in the HVOF system. In this study, a numerical analysis is performed to predict the gas dynamic behaviors, and the effect of the geometrical parameter is studied to optimize the nozzle design.

  6. EVALUATION OF CONVERGENT SPRAY TECHNOLOGYTM SPRAY PROCESS FOR ROOF COATING APPLICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The overall goal of this project was to demonstrate the feasibility of Convergent Spray TechnologyTM for the roofing industry. This was accomplished by producing an environmentally compliant coating utilizing recycled materials, a CSTTM spray process portable application cart, a...

  7. EVALUATION OF CONVERGENT SPRAY TECHNOLOGYTM SPRAY PROCESS FOR ROOF COATING APPLICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The overall goal of this project was to demonstrate the feasibility of Convergent Spray TechnologyTM for the roofing industry. This was accomplished by producing an environmentally compliant coating utilizing recycled materials, a CSTTM spray process portable application cart, a...

  8. Characterization of Liquid Fuel Evaporation of a Lifted Methanol Spray Flame in a Vitiated Coflow Burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabra, Ricardo; Dibble, Robert W.; Chen, Jyh-Yuan

    2002-01-01

    An experimental investigation of lifted spray flames in a coflow of hot, vitiated gases is presented. The vitiated coflow burner is a spray flame that issues into a coaxial flow of hot combustion products from a lean, premixed H2/Air flame. The spray flame in a vitiated coflow emulates the combustion that occurs in many advanced combustors without the detailed fluid mechanics. Two commercially available laser diagnostic systems are used to characterize the spray flame and to demonstrate the vitiated coflow burner's amenability to optical investigation. The Ensemble Particle Concentration and Size (EPCS) system is used to measure the path-average droplet size distribution and liquid volume fraction at several axial locations while an extractive probe instrument named the Real-time Fuel-air Analyzer (RFA) is used to measure the air to fuel ratio downstream of the spray nozzle with high temporal and spatial resolution. The effect of coflow conditions (stoichiometry) and dilution of the fuel with water was studied with the EPCS optical system. As expected, results show that water retards the evaporation and combustion of fuels. Measurements obtained by the RFA extractive probe show that while the Delavan manufactured nozzle does distribute the fuel over the manufacturer specified spray angle, it unfortunately does not distribute the fuel uniformly, providing conditions that may result in the production of unwanted NOx. Despite some limitations due to the inherent nature of the experimental techniques, the two diagnostics can be readily applied to spray flames in the vitiated coflow environment.

  9. A laser tomographic investigation of liquid fuel sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yule, A. J.; Ahseng, C.; Felton, P.; Ungut, A.; Chigier, N. A.

    1980-01-01

    A light scattering technique is combined with a tomographic transformation to convert line of sight integrated data, measured in sprays, to measurements of droplet size and concentration in volume elements within the spray. The technique is developed and assessed by systematic experiments in axisymmetric sprays generated by twin-fluid atomisers. The good agreement found shows that, provided certain conditions are satisfied by the local spray structure, the technique provides information on spray structure, similar in detail and extent to that derived by photography, but with reduced experimental time. The technique is applied to an investigation of a kerosene spray vaporizing in a hot gas stream.

  10. Improved Orifice Plate for Spray Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, W.

    1986-01-01

    Erratic spray pattern of commercial spray gun changed to repeatable one by simple redesign of two parts. In modified spray gun orifice plate and polytetrafluoroethylene bushing redesigned to assure centering and alignment with nozzle. Such improvement useful in many industrial applications requiring repeatable spray patterns. Might include spraying of foam insulation, paint, other protective coatings, detergents, abrasives, adhesives, process chemicals, or fuels. Unmodified spray gun produces erratic spray because lateral misalignment between orifice plate and nozzle.

  11. Improved Orifice Plate for Spray Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, W.

    1986-01-01

    Erratic spray pattern of commercial spray gun changed to repeatable one by simple redesign of two parts. In modified spray gun orifice plate and polytetrafluoroethylene bushing redesigned to assure centering and alignment with nozzle. Such improvement useful in many industrial applications requiring repeatable spray patterns. Might include spraying of foam insulation, paint, other protective coatings, detergents, abrasives, adhesives, process chemicals, or fuels. Unmodified spray gun produces erratic spray because lateral misalignment between orifice plate and nozzle.

  12. Plasma Spray-CVD: A New Thermal Spray Process to Produce Thin Films from Liquid or Gaseous Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gindrat, M.; Höhle, H.-M.; von Niessen, K.; Guittienne, Ph.; Grange, D.; Hollenstein, Ch.

    2011-06-01

    New dedicated coating processes which are based on the well-known LPPS™ technology but operating at lower work pressure (100 Pa) are being actively developed. These hybrid technologies contribute to improve the efficiencies in the turbine industry such as aero-engines and land-based gas turbines. They also have a great potential in the domain of new energy concepts in applications like Solid Oxide Fuel Cells, membranes, and photovoltaic with the adoption of new ways of producing coatings by thermal spray. Such processes include Plasma Spray-Thin Film (PS-TF) which gives the possibility to coat thin and dense layers from splats through a classical thermal spray approach but at high velocities (400-800 m/s) and enthalpy (8000-15000 kJ/kg). Plasma Spray-PVD (PS-PVD) which allows producing thick columnar-structured Thermal Barrier Coatings (100-300 μm) from the vapor phase with the employment of the high enthalpy gun and specific powder feedstock material. On the other hand, the Plasma Spray-CVD (PS-CVD) process uses modified conventional thermal spray components operated below 100 Pa which allows producing CVD-like coatings (<1-10 μm) at higher deposition rates using liquid or gaseous precursors as feedstock material. The advantages of such thermal spray-enhanced CVD processes are the high ionization degree and high throughput for the deposition of thin layers. In this article, we present an overview of the possibilities and limitations encountered while producing thin film coatings using liquid and gaseous precursors with this new type of low pressure plasma spray equipment and point out the challenges faced to obtain efficient injection and mixing of the precursors in the plasma jet. In particular, SiO x thin films from Hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO or C6H18OSi2) can be deposited on wafers at deposition rates of up to 35 nm/s at an efficiency of about 50%. The process was also used for producing metal oxide coatings (Al2O3, ZnO, and SnO2) by evaporating different

  13. Computational fluid dynamic analysis of a High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray torch

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, B.; Oberkampf, W.L.; Neiser, R.A.; Roemer, T.J.

    1995-09-01

    The gas dynamics of a High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) torch are analyzed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques. The thermal spray device analyzed is similar to a Metco Diamond Jet torch with powder feed. The injection nozzle is assumed to be axisymmetric with premixed fuel and oxygen fed from an annulus, and air cooling injected along the interior surface of the aircap. The aircap, a cronically converging nozzle, achieves choked flow conditions at the exit and a supersonic, under-expanded jet develops externally. Finite difference equations for mass, momentum, and energy conservation are solved for the gas dynamics. The combustion process is modeled using a single-step and a 12-step quasi-global finite-rate chemistry model with dissociation of the gas and a total of nine species. Turbulent flow inside the aircap and in the free-jet decay is modeled using a two-equation k-{epsilon} model. An iterative, implicit, finite volume numerical method is used to solve the gas dynamic equations inside and outside the torch . The CFD results are compared with recent experimental measurements of pressure inside the HVOF aircap. Comparisons are made for two flow rates of premixed fuel and oxygen and air cooling. This paper presents the first published comparisons of CFD predictions and experimental measurements for HVOF tbermal spraying.

  14. Investigation of spray characteristics for flashing injection of fuels containing dissolved air and superheated fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, A. S. P.; Chen, L. D.; Faeth, G. M.

    1982-01-01

    The flow, atomization and spreading of flashing injector flowing liquids containing dissolved gases (jet/air) as well as superheated liquids (Freon II) were considered. The use of a two stage expansion process separated by an expansion chamber, ws found to be beneficial for flashing injection particularly for dissolved gas systems. Both locally homogeneous and separated flow models provided good predictions of injector flow properties. Conventional correlations for drop sizes from pressure atomized and airblast injectors were successfully modified, using the separated flow model to prescribe injector exit conditions, to correlate drop size measurements. Additional experimental results are provided for spray angle and combustion properties of sprays from flashing injectors.

  15. X-ray imaging of shock waves generated by high-pressure fuel sprays.

    PubMed

    MacPhee, Andrew G; Tate, Mark W; Powell, Christopher F; Yue, Yong; Renzi, Matthew J; Ercan, Alper; Narayanan, Suresh; Fontes, Ernest; Walther, Jochen; Schaller, Johannes; Gruner, Sol M; Wang, Jin

    2002-02-15

    Synchrotron x-radiography and a fast x-ray detector were used to record the time evolution of the transient fuel sprays from a high-pressure injector. A succession of 5.1-microsecond radiographs captured the propagation of the spray-induced shock waves in a gaseous medium and revealed the complex nature of the spray hydrodynamics. The monochromatic x-radiographs also allow quantitative analysis of the shock waves that has been difficult if not impossible with optical imaging. Under injection conditions similar to those found in operating engines, the fuel jets can exceed supersonic speeds and result in gaseous shock waves.

  16. Application of digital image analysis techniques to antimisting fuel spray characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleeter, R.; Toaz, R.; Sarohia, V.

    1982-01-01

    Pulsed ruby laser sheet illumination of the spray is used for the initial recording of data on very-high-resolution photographic film. The digitization of mosaic elements is effected with a vidicon and video digitizer whose output is stored in computer RAM memory for processing. Highly nonspherical elements and a broad range of drop diameters (8-2000 microns) resulting from the unusual rheological properties of the fuel-additive system are accommodated by the device configuration and algorithms. It is found that the generation of two-dimensional images by means of scattered light also eliminates errors resulting from variations in the index of refraction and from the submicron scattering sites that are often present within the modified fuel. No a priori information on the drop size distribution or on the system response to various drop sizes is required.

  17. The Effect of Spray Distance and Scanning Step on the Coating Thickness Uniformity in Cold Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Zhenhua; Deng, Sihao; Liao, Hanlin; Zeng, Chunnian; Montavon, Ghislain

    2014-02-01

    In the process of cold spray applications, robot kinematic parameters represent significant influences on the coating quality. Those parameters include: spray distance, spray angle, gun relative velocity to substrate, scanning step, and cycle numbers. The combined effects which are caused by their interactions determine the coating thickness. The increasing requirements of coating productivity lead to the objectivity of analyzing the effect of robot kinematic parameters. So it becomes necessary to optimize the robot trajectory for spraying process in order to obtain a desired coating thickness. This study aims at investigating the relationship between the coating profile and the spray distance, scanning step, and introducing the basic principle of a software toolkit named thermal spray toolkit (TST) developed in our laboratory to generate the optimized robot trajectories in spray processes including thermal spray and cold spray. Experiments have been carried out to check the reliability of the simulated coating profile and the calculated coating thickness by TST.

  18. Coal-water slurry spray characteristics of a positive displacement fuel injection system

    SciTech Connect

    Seshadri, A.K.; Caton, J.A.; Kihm, K.D.

    1992-12-31

    Experiments have been completed to characterized coal-water slurry sprays from a modified positive displacement fuel injection system of a diesel engine. The injection system includes an injection jerk pump driven by an electric motor, a specially designed diaphragm to separate the abrasive coal from the pump, and a single-hole fuel nozzle. The sprays were injected into a pressurized chamber equipped with windows. High speed movies and instantaneous fuel line pressures were obtained. For injection pressures of order 30 MPa or higher, the sprays were similar for coal-water slurry, diesel fuel and water. The time until the center core of the spray broke-up (break-up time) was determined from both the movies and from a model using the fuel line pressures. Results from these two independent procedures were in good agreement. For the base conditions, the break-up time was 0.58 and 0.50 ms for coal-water slurry and diesel fuel, respectively. The break-up times increased with increasing nozzle orifice size and with decreasing chamber density. The break-up time was not a function of coal loading for coal loadings up to 53%. Cone angles of the sprays were dependent on the operating conditions and fluid, as well as on the time and location of the measurement. For one set of cases studied, the time-averaged cone angle was 15.9{degree} and 16.3{degree} for coal-water slurry and diesel fuel, respectively.

  19. Cold spray deposition of Ti2AlC coatings for improved nuclear fuel cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Benjamin R.; Garcia-Diaz, Brenda L.; Hauch, Benjamin; Olson, Luke C.; Sindelar, Robert L.; Sridharan, Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Coatings of Ti2AlC MAX phase compound have been successfully deposited on Zircaloy-4 (Zry-4) test flats, with the goal of enhancing the accident tolerance of LWR fuel cladding. Low temperature powder spray process, also known as cold spray, has been used to deposit coatings ∼90 μm in thickness using powder particles of <20 μm. X-ray diffraction analysis showed the phase-content of the deposited coatings to be identical to the powders indicating that no phase transformation or oxidation had occurred during the coating deposition process. The coating exhibited a high hardness of about 800 HK and pin-on-disk wear tests using abrasive ruby ball counter-surface showed the wear resistance of the coating to be significantly superior to the Zry-4 substrate. Scratch tests revealed the coatings to be well-adhered to the Zry-4 substrate. Such mechanical integrity is required for claddings from the standpoint of fretting wear resistance and resisting wear handling and insertion. Air oxidation tests at 700 °C and simulated LOCA tests at 1005 °C in steam environment showed the coatings to be significantly more oxidation resistant compared to Zry-4 suggesting that such coatings can potentially provide accident tolerance to nuclear fuel cladding.

  20. Computations of spray, fuel-air mixing, and combustion in a lean-premixed-prevaporized combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dasgupta, A.; Li, Z.; Shih, T. I.-P.; Kundu, K.; Deur, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    A code was developed for computing the multidimensional flow, spray, combustion, and pollutant formation inside gas turbine combustors. The code developed is based on a Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation and utilizes an implicit finite-volume method. The focus of this paper is on the spray part of the code (both formulation and algorithm), and a number of issues related to the computation of sprays and fuel-air mixing in a lean-premixed-prevaporized combustor. The issues addressed include: (1) how grid spacings affect the diffusion of evaporated fuel, and (2) how spurious modes can arise through modelling of the spray in the Lagrangian computations. An upwind interpolation scheme is proposed to account for some effects of grid spacing on the artificial diffusion of the evaporated fuel. Also, some guidelines are presented to minimize errors associated with the spurious modes.

  1. Effect of aviation fuel type and fuel injection conditions on the spray characteristics of pressure swirl and hybrid air blast fuel injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feddema, Rick

    Feddema, Rick T. M.S.M.E., Purdue University, December 2013. Effect of Aviation Fuel Type and Fuel Injection Conditions on the Spray Characteristics of Pressure Swirl and Hybrid Air Blast Fuel Injectors. Major Professor: Dr. Paul E. Sojka, School of Mechanical Engineering Spray performance of pressure swirl and hybrid air blast fuel injectors are central to combustion stability, combustor heat management, and pollutant formation in aviation gas turbine engines. Next generation aviation gas turbine engines will optimize spray atomization characteristics of the fuel injector in order to achieve engine efficiency and emissions requirements. Fuel injector spray atomization performance is affected by the type of fuel injector, fuel liquid properties, fuel injection pressure, fuel injection temperature, and ambient pressure. Performance of pressure swirl atomizer and hybrid air blast nozzle type fuel injectors are compared in this study. Aviation jet fuels, JP-8, Jet A, JP-5, and JP-10 and their effect on fuel injector performance is investigated. Fuel injector set conditions involving fuel injector pressure, fuel temperature and ambient pressure are varied in order to compare each fuel type. One objective of this thesis is to contribute spray patternation measurements to the body of existing drop size data in the literature. Fuel droplet size tends to increase with decreasing fuel injection pressure, decreasing fuel injection temperature and increasing ambient injection pressure. The differences between fuel types at particular set conditions occur due to differences in liquid properties between fuels. Liquid viscosity and surface tension are identified to be fuel-specific properties that affect the drop size of the fuel. An open aspect of current research that this paper addresses is how much the type of aviation jet fuel affects spray atomization characteristics. Conventional aviation fuel specifications are becoming more important with new interest in alternative

  2. The Effect of Nozzle Design and Operating Conditions on the Atomization and Distribution of Fuel Sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Dana W

    1933-01-01

    The atomization and distribution characteristics of fuel sprays from automatic injection valves for compression-ignition engines were determined by catching the fuel drops on smoked-glass plates, and then measuring and counting the impressions made in the lampblack. The experiments were made in an air-tight chamber in which the air density was raised to values corresponding to engine conditions.

  3. Spray drying technique. I: Hardware and process parameters.

    PubMed

    Cal, Krzysztof; Sollohub, Krzysztof

    2010-02-01

    Spray drying is a transformation of feed from a fluid state into a dried particulate form by spraying the feed into a hot drying medium. The main aim of drying by this method in pharmaceutical technology is to obtain dry particles with desired properties. This review presents the hardware and process parameters that affect the properties of the dried product. The atomization devices, drying chambers, air-droplet contact systems, the collection of dried product, auxiliary devices, the conduct of the spray drying process, and the significance of the individual parameters in the drying process, as well as the obtained product, are described and discussed.

  4. Thermomechanical processing of plasma sprayed intermetallic sheets

    DOEpatents

    Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Scorey, Clive; Sikka, Vinod K.; Deevi, Seetharama C.; Fleischhauer, Grier; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton; German, Randall M.

    2001-01-01

    A powder metallurgical process of preparing a sheet from a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as an iron, nickel or titanium aluminide. The sheet can be manufactured into electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 4 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.0.05% Zr .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Ni, .ltoreq.0.75% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.1% submicron oxide particles and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, and/or .ltoreq.3% Cu. The process includes forming a non-densified metal sheet by consolidating a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as by roll compaction, tape casting or plasma spraying, forming a cold rolled sheet by cold rolling the non-densified metal sheet so as to increase the density and reduce the thickness thereof and annealing the cold rolled sheet. The powder can be a water, polymer or gas atomized powder which is subjecting to sieving and/or blending with a binder prior to the consolidation step. After the consolidation step, the sheet can be partially sintered. The cold rolling and/or annealing steps can be repeated to achieve the desired sheet thickness and properties. The annealing can be carried out in a vacuum furnace with a vacuum or inert atmosphere. During final annealing, the cold rolled sheet recrystallizes to an average grain size of about 10 to 30 .mu.m. Final stress relief annealing can be carried out in the B2 phase temperature range.

  5. MONOLITHIC FUEL FABRICATION PROCESS DEVELOPMENT AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn A. Moore; Francine J. Rice; Nicolas E. Woolstenhulme; W. David SwanK; DeLon C. Haggard; Jan-Fong Jue; Blair H. Park; Steven E. Steffler; N. Pat Hallinan; Michael D. Chapple; Douglas E. Burkes

    2008-10-01

    Within the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program directed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), UMo fuel-foils are being developed in an effort to realize high density monolithic fuel plates for use in high-flux research and test reactors. Namely, targeted are reactors that are not amenable to Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel conversion via utilization of high density dispersion-based fuels, i.e. 8-9 gU/cc. LEU conversion of reactors having a need for >8-9 gU/cc fuel density will only be possible by way of monolithic fuel forms. The UMo fuel foils under development afford fuel meat density of ~16 gU/cc and thus have the potential to facilitate LEU conversions without any significant reactor-performance penalty. Two primary challenges have been established with respect to UMo monolithic fuel development; namely, fuel element fabrication and in-reactor fuel element performance. Both issues are being addressed concurrently at the Idaho National Laboratory. An overview is provided of the ongoing monolithic UMo fuel development effort at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL); including development of complex/graded fuel foils. Fabrication processes to be discussed include: UMo alloying and casting, foil fabrication via hot rolling, fuel-clad interlayer application via co-rolling and thermal spray processes, clad bonding via Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) and Friction Bonding (FB), and fuel plate finishing.

  6. Coal-water slurry spray characteristics of an electronically-controlled accumulator fuel injection system

    SciTech Connect

    Caton, J.A.; Payne, S.E.; Terracina, D.P.; Kihm, K.D.

    1993-12-31

    Experiments have been complete to characterize coal-water slurry sprays from a electronically-controlled accumulator fuel injection system of diesel engine. The sprays were injected into a pressurized chamber equipped with windows. High speed movies, fuel pressures and needle lifts were obtained as a function of time, orifice diameter, coal loading, gas density in the chamber, and accumulator fuel pressure. For the base conditions 50% (by mass) coal loading, 0.4 mm diameter nozzle hole, coal-water slurry pressure of 82 MPa (12,000 psi), and a chamber density of 25 kg/m{sup 3}, the break-up time was 0. 30 ms. An empirical correlation for both spray tip penetration and initial jet velocity was developed. For the conditions of this study, the spray tip penetration and initial jet velocity were 15% greater for coal-water slurry than for diesel fuel or water. Cone angles of the sprays were dependent on the operating conditions and fluid, as well as the time and locations of the measurement. The time-averaged cone angle for the base case conditions was 13.6{degree}. Results of this study and the correlation are specific to the tested coal-water slurry and are not general for other coal-water slurry fuels.

  7. Development of process data capturing, analysis and controlling for thermal spray techniques - SprayTracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelber, C.; Marke, S.; Trommler, U.; Rupprecht, C.; Weis, S.

    2017-03-01

    Thermal spraying processes are becoming increasingly important in high-technology areas, such as automotive engineering and medical technology. The method offers the advantage of a local layer application with different materials and high deposition rates. Challenges in the application of thermal spraying result from the complex interaction of different influencing variables, which can be attributed to the properties of different materials, operating equipment supply, electrical parameters, flow mechanics, plasma physics and automation. In addition, spraying systems are subject to constant wear. Due to the process specification and the high demands on the produced coatings, innovative quality assurance tools are necessary. A central aspect, which has not yet been considered, is the data management in relation to the present measured variables, in particular the spraying system, the handling system, working safety devices and additional measuring sensors. Both the recording of all process-characterizing variables, their linking and evaluation as well as the use of the data for the active process control presuppose a novel, innovative control system (hardware and software) that was to be developed within the scope of the research project. In addition, new measurement methods and sensors are to be developed and qualified in order to improve the process reliability of thermal spraying.

  8. Combustion of Drops and Sprays of Heavy Fuel Oils and Their Emulsions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    of isolated drops can be generated by supplying the fuel from a pressurized fuel tank through a fine needle shaped hypodermic tube. For spray...Another severe problem that arose during these tests was clogging of the hypodermic needle through which single drops were injected. This was thought to be...caused essentially by the liquid phase cracking of the fuel inside the hypodermic needle . Therefore, we decided to use a slightly larger inside

  9. Spent graphite fuel element processing

    SciTech Connect

    Holder, N.D.; Olsen, C.W.

    1981-07-01

    The Department of Energy currently sponsors two programs to demonstrate the processing of spent graphite fuel elements. General Atomic in San Diego operates a cold pilot plant to demonstrate the processing of both US and German high-temperature reactor fuel. Exxon Nuclear Idaho Company is demonstrating the processing of spent graphite fuel elements from Rover reactors operated for the Nuclear Rocket Propulsion Program. This work is done at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, where a hot facility is being constructed to complete processing of the Rover fuel. This paper focuses on the graphite combustion process common to both programs.

  10. Numerical Simulation and Experimental Characterization of a Binary Aluminum Alloy Spray - Application to the Spray Rolling Process

    SciTech Connect

    S. B. Johnson; J.-P. Delplanque; Y. Lin; Y. Zhou; E. J. Lavernia; K. M. McHugh

    2005-02-01

    A stochastic, droplet-resolved model has been developed to describe the behavior of a binary aluminum alloy spray during the spray-rolling process. In this process, a molten aluminum alloy is atomized and the resulting spray is depostied on the rolls of a twin-roll caster to produce aluminum strip. The one-way coupled spray model allows the prediction of spray characteristics such as enthalph and solid fraction, and their distribution between the nozzle and the depostion surface. This paper outlines the model development and compares the predicted spray dynamics to PDI measurements performed in a controlled configuration. Predicted and measured droplet velocity and size distributions are presented for two points along the spray centerline along with predicted spray averaged specific enthalph and solid fraction curves.

  11. Plasma Spray-PVD: A New Thermal Spray Process to Deposit Out of the Vapor Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Niessen, Konstantin; Gindrat, Malko

    2011-06-01

    Plasma spray-physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD) is a low pressure plasma spray technology recently developed by Sulzer Metco AG (Switzerland). Even though it is a thermal spray process, it can deposit coatings out of the vapor phase. The basis of PS-PVD is the low pressure plasma spraying (LPPS) technology that has been well established in industry for several years. In comparison to conventional vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) or low pressure plasma spraying (LPPS), the new proposed process uses a high energy plasma gun operated at a reduced work pressure of 0.1 kPa (1 mbar). Owing to the high energy plasma and further reduced work pressure, PS-PVD is able to deposit a coating not only by melting the feed stock material which builds up a layer from liquid splats but also by vaporizing the injected material. Therefore, the PS-PVD process fills the gap between the conventional physical vapor deposition (PVD) technologies and standard thermal spray processes. The possibility to vaporize feedstock material and to produce layers out of the vapor phase results in new and unique coating microstructures. The properties of such coatings are superior to those of thermal spray and electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) coatings. In contrast to EB-PVD, PS-PVD incorporates the vaporized coating material into a supersonic plasma plume. Owing to the forced gas stream of the plasma jet, complex shaped parts such as multi-airfoil turbine vanes can be coated with columnar thermal barrier coatings using PS-PVD. Even shadowed areas and areas which are not in the line of sight of the coating source can be coated homogeneously. This article reports on the progress made by Sulzer Metco in developing a thermal spray process to produce coatings out of the vapor phase. Columnar thermal barrier coatings made of Yttria-stabilized Zircona (YSZ) are optimized to serve in a turbine engine. This process includes not only preferable coating properties such as strain tolerance and erosion

  12. Penetration and Duration of Fuel Sprays from a Pump Injection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Marsh, E T

    1934-01-01

    High-speed motion pictures were taken of individual fuel sprays from a pump injection system. The changes in the spray-tip penetration with changes in the pump speed, injection-valve opening and closing pressures, discharge-orifice area, injection-tube length and diameter, and pump throttle setting were measured. The pump was used with and without a check valve. The results show that the penetration of the spray tip can be controlled by the dimensions of the injection tube, the area of the discharge orifice, and the injection-valve opening and closing pressures.

  13. Process optimization of ultrasonic spray coating of polymer films.

    PubMed

    Bose, Sanjukta; Keller, Stephan S; Alstrøm, Tommy S; Boisen, Anja; Almdal, Kristoffer

    2013-06-11

    In this work we have performed a detailed study of the influence of various parameters on spray coating of polymer films. Our aim is to produce polymer films of uniform thickness (500 nm to 1 μm) and low roughness compared to the film thickness. The coatings are characterized with respect to thickness, roughness (profilometer), and morphology (optical microscopy). Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) is used to do a full factorial design of experiments with selected process parameters such as temperature, distance between spray nozzle and substrate, and speed of the spray nozzle. A mathematical model is developed for statistical analysis which identifies the distance between nozzle and substrate as the most significant parameter. Depending on the drying of the sprayed droplets on the substrate, we define two broad regimes, "dry" and "wet". The optimum condition of spraying lies in a narrow window between these two regimes, where we obtain a film of desired quality. Both with increasing nozzle-substrate distance and temperature, the deposition moves from a wet state to a dry regime. Similar results are also achieved for solvents with low boiling points. Finally, we study film formation during spray coating with poly (D,L-lactide) (PDLLA). The results confirm the processing knowledge obtained with PVP and indicate that the observed trends are identical for spraying of other polymer films.

  14. Catalysts for improved fuel processing

    SciTech Connect

    Borup, R.L.; Inbody, M.A.

    2000-09-01

    This report covers our technical progress on fuel processing catalyst characterization for the specific purpose of hydrogen production for proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cells. These development efforts support DOE activities in the development of compact, transient capable reformers for on-board hydrogen generation starting from candidate fuels. The long-term objective includes increased durability and lifetime, in addition to smaller volume, improved performance, and other specifications required meeting fuel processor goals. The technical barriers of compact fuel processor size, transient capability, and compact, efficient thermal management all are functions of catalyst performance. Significantly, work at LANL now tests large-scale fuel processors for performance and durability, as influenced by fuels and fuel constituents, and complements that testing with micro-scale catalyst evaluation which is accomplished under well controlled conditions.

  15. Fuel processing device

    DOEpatents

    Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.; Ahmed, Shabbir; Lee, Sheldon H. D.

    2011-08-02

    An improved fuel processor for fuel cells is provided whereby the startup time of the processor is less than sixty seconds and can be as low as 30 seconds, if not less. A rapid startup time is achieved by either igniting or allowing a small mixture of air and fuel to react over and warm up the catalyst of an autothermal reformer (ATR). The ATR then produces combustible gases to be subsequently oxidized on and simultaneously warm up water-gas shift zone catalysts. After normal operating temperature has been achieved, the proportion of air included with the fuel is greatly diminished.

  16. Suspension High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (SHVOF)-Sprayed Alumina Coatings: Microstructure, Nanoindentation and Wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, J. W.; Ang, A. S. M.; Pala, Z.; Shaw, E. C.; Hussain, T.

    2016-12-01

    Suspension high velocity oxy-fuel spraying can be used to produce thermally sprayed coatings from powdered feedstocks too small to be processed by mechanical feeders, allowing formation of nanostructured coatings with improved density and mechanical properties. Here, alumina coatings were produced from submicron-sized feedstock in aqueous suspension, using two flame combustion parameters yielding contrasting microstructures. Both coatings were tested in dry sliding wear conditions with an alumina counterbody. The coating processed with high combustion power of 101 kW contained 74 wt.% amorphous phase and 26 wt.% crystalline phase (95 wt.% gamma and 3 wt.% alpha alumina), while the 72-kW coating contained lower 58 wt.% amorphous phase and 42 wt.% crystalline phases (73 wt.% was alpha and 26 wt.% gamma). The 101-kW coating had a dry sliding specific wear rate between 4 and 4.5 × 10-5 mm3/Nm, 2 orders of magnitude higher than the 72-kW coating wear rate of 2-4.2 × 10-7 mm3/Nm. A severe wear regime dominated by brittle fracture and grain pullout of the coating was responsible for the wear of the 101-kW coating, explained by mean fracture toughness three times lower than the 72-kW coating, owing to the almost complete absence of alpha alumina.

  17. Formation of oxides of nitrogen in monodisperse spray combustion of hydrocarbon fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nizami, A. A.; Singh, S.; Cernansky, N. P.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental results of exit plane NO/NO(x) emissions from atmospheric monodisperse fuel spray combustion are presented. Six different hydrocarbon fuels were studied: isopropanol, n-propanol, n-octane, iso-octane, n-heptane and methanol. The results indicate an optimum droplet size for minimizing NO/NO(x) production for all of the test fuels. At the optimum droplet diameter, reductions in NO/NO(x) relative to the NO(x) occurred at droplet diameters of 55 and 48 microns respectively, as compared to a 50-micron droplet size for isopropanol. The occurrence of the minimum NO(x) point at different droplet diameters for the different fuels appears to be governed by the extent of prevaporization of the fuel in the spray, and is consistent with theoretical calculations based on each fuel's physical properties. Estimates are also given for the behavior of heavy fuels and of polydisperse fuel sprays in shifting the minimum NO(x) point compared to a monodisperse situation.

  18. Solid oxide fuel cell electrolytes produced via very low pressure suspension plasma spray and electrophoretic deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleetwood, James D.

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are a promising element of comprehensive energy policies due to their direct mechanism for converting the oxidization of fuel, such as hydrogen, into electrical energy. Both very low pressure plasma spray and electrophoretic deposition allow working with high melting temperature SOFC suspension based feedstock on complex surfaces, such as in non-planar SOFC designs. Dense, thin electrolytes of ideal composition for SOFCs can be fabricated with each of these processes, while compositional control is achieved with dissolved dopant compounds that are incorporated into the coating during deposition. In the work reported, sub-micron 8 mole % Y2O3-ZrO2 (YSZ) and gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC), powders, including those in suspension with scandium-nitrate dopants, were deposited on NiO-YSZ anodes, via very low pressure suspension plasma spray (VLPSPS) at Sandia National Laboratories' Thermal Spray Research Laboratory and electrophoretic deposition (EPD) at Purdue University. Plasma spray was carried out in a chamber held at 320 - 1300 Pa, with the plasma composed of argon, hydrogen, and helium. EPD was characterized utilizing constant current deposition at 10 mm electrode separation, with deposits sintered from 1300 -- 1500 °C for 2 hours. The role of suspension constituents in EPD was analyzed based on a parametric study of powder loading, powder specific surface area, polyvinyl butyral (PVB) content, polyethyleneimine (PEI) content, and acetic acid content. Increasing PVB content and reduction of particle specific surface area were found to eliminate the formation of cracks when drying. PEI and acetic acid content were used to control suspension stability and the adhesion of deposits. Additionally, EPD was used to fabricate YSZ/GDC bilayer electrolyte systems. The resultant YSZ electrolytes were 2-27 microns thick and up to 97% dense. Electrolyte performance as part of a SOFC system with screen printed LSCF cathodes was evaluated with peak

  19. Monolithic Fuel Fabrication Process Development

    SciTech Connect

    C. R. Clark; N. P. Hallinan; J. F. Jue; D. D. Keiser; J. M. Wight

    2006-05-01

    The pursuit of a high uranium density research reactor fuel plate has led to monolithic fuel, which possesses the greatest possible uranium density in the fuel region. Process developments in fabrication development include friction stir welding tool geometry and cooling improvements and a reduction in the length of time required to complete the transient liquid phase bonding process. Annealing effects on the microstructures of the U-10Mo foil and friction stir welded aluminum 6061 cladding are also examined.

  20. Vision-aided Monitoring and Control of Thermal Spray, Spray Forming, and Welding Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agapakis, John E.; Bolstad, Jon

    1993-01-01

    Vision is one of the most powerful forms of non-contact sensing for monitoring and control of manufacturing processes. However, processes involving an arc plasma or flame such as welding or thermal spraying pose particularly challenging problems to conventional vision sensing and processing techniques. The arc or plasma is not typically limited to a single spectral region and thus cannot be easily filtered out optically. This paper presents an innovative vision sensing system that uses intense stroboscopic illumination to overpower the arc light and produce a video image that is free of arc light or glare and dedicated image processing and analysis schemes that can enhance the video images or extract features of interest and produce quantitative process measures which can be used for process monitoring and control. Results of two SBIR programs sponsored by NASA and DOE and focusing on the application of this innovative vision sensing and processing technology to thermal spraying and welding process monitoring and control are discussed.

  1. Vision-aided monitoring and control of thermal spray, spray forming, and welding processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agapakis, John E.; Bolstad, Jon

    1993-02-01

    Vision is one of the most powerful forms of non-contact sensing for monitoring and control of manufacturing processes. However, processes involving an arc plasma or flame such as welding or thermal spraying pose particularly challenging problems to conventional vision sensing and processing techniques. The arc or plasma is not typically limited to a single spectral region and thus cannot be easily filtered out optically. This paper presents an innovative vision sensing system that uses intense stroboscopic illumination to overpower the arc light and produce a video image that is free of arc light or glare and dedicated image processing and analysis schemes that can enhance the video images or extract features of interest and produce quantitative process measures which can be used for process monitoring and control. Results of two SBIR programs sponsored by NASA and DOE and focusing on the application of this innovative vision sensing and processing technology to thermal spraying and welding process monitoring and control are discussed.

  2. Detailed investigation of a vaporising fuel spray. Part 1: Experimental investigation of time averaged spray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yule, A. J.; Seng, C. A.; Boulderstone, R.; Ungut, A.; Felton, P. G.; Chigier, N. A.

    1980-01-01

    A laser tomographic light scattering technique provides rapid and accurate high resolution measurements of droplet sizes, concentrations, and vaporization. Measurements using a computer interfaced thermocouple are presented and it is found that the potential exists for separating gas and liquid temperature measurements and diagnosing local spray density by in situ analysis of the response characteristics of the thermocouple. The thermocouple technique provides a convenient means for measuring mean gas velocity in both hot and cold two phase flows. The experimental spray is axisymmetric and has carefully controlled initial and boundary conditions. The flow is designed to give relatively insignificant transfer of momentum and mass from spray to air flow. The effects of (1) size-dependent droplet dispersion by the turbulence, (2) the initial spatial segregation of droplet sizes during atomization, and (3) the interaction between droplets and coherent large eddies are diagnosed.

  3. Fabrication of solid oxide fuel cell anode electrode by spray pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lin; Kim, Gap-Yong; Chandra, Abhijit

    Large triple phase boundaries (TPBs) and high gas diffusion capability are critical in enhancing the performance of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). In this study, ultrasonic spray pyrolysis has been investigated to assess its capability in controlling the anode microstructure. Deposition of porous anode film of nickel and Ce 0.9Gd 0.1O 1.95 on a dense 8 mol.% yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrate was carried out. First, an ultrasonic atomization model was utilized to predict the deposited particle size. The model accurately estimated the deposited particle size based on the feed solution condition. Second, effects of various process parameters, which included the precursor solution feed rate, precursor solution concentration and deposition temperature, on the TPB formation and porosity were investigated. The deposition temperature and precursor solution concentration were the most critical parameters that influenced the morphology, porosity and particle size of the anode electrode. Ultrasonic spray pyrolysis achieved homogeneous distribution of constitutive elements within the deposited particles and demonstrated capability to control the particle size and porosity in the range of 2-17 μm and 21-52%, respectively.

  4. Numerical Investigation of Combustion and Flow Dynamics in a High Velocity Oxygen-Fuel Thermal Spray Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Song, Qiuzhi; Yu, Zhiyi

    2016-02-01

    The combustion and flow behavior within a high velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray gun is very complex and involves multiphase flow, heat transfer, chemical reactions, and supersonic/subsonic transitions. Additionally, this behavior has a significant effect on the formation of a coating. Non-premixed combustion models have been developed and are able to provide insight into the underlying physics of the process. Therefore, this investigation employs a non-premixed combustion model and the SST k - ω turbulence model to simulate the flow field of the JP5000 (Praxair-TAFA, US) HVOF thermal spray gun. The predicted temperature and velocity have a high level of agreement with experimental data when using the non-premixed combustion model. The results are focused on the fuel combustion, the subsequent gas dynamics within the HVOF gun, and the development of a supersonic free jet outside the gun. Furthermore, the oxygen/fuel inlet turbulence intensity, the fuel droplet size, and the oxygen/fuel ratio are investigated to determine their effect on the supersonic flow characteristics of the combustion gas.

  5. Investigation of spray dispersion and particulate formation in diesel fuel flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, L. H.; Bankston, C. P.; Kwack, E. Y.; Bellan, J.; Harstad, K.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental study of electrostatical atomized and dispersed diesel fuel jets was conducted at various back pressures to 40 atm. A new electrostatic injection technique was utilized to generate continuous, stable fuel sprays at charge densities of 1.5 to 2.0 C/m3 of fluid at one atm, and about 1.0 C/m3 at 40 atm. Flowrates were varied from 0.5 to 2.5 ml/s and electric potentials to -18 kV. Visual observations showed that significant enhanced dispersion of charged fuel jets occurred at high back pressures compared to aerodynamic breakup and dispersion. The average drop size was about the same as the spray triode orifice diameter, and was between the Kelly theory and the Rayleigh limit. The ignition tests, done only at one atm, indicated stable combustion of the electrostatically dispersed fuel jets.

  6. Measurement of vapor/liquid distributions in a binary-component fuel spray using laser imaging of droplet scattering and vapor absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shiyan; Zhang, Yuyin; Wu, Shenqi; Xu, Bin

    2014-08-01

    Fuel volatility has a great effect on its evaporation processes and the mixture formation and thus combustion and emissions formation processes in internal combustion engines. To date, however, instead of the actual gasoline or diesel fuel, many researchers have been using single-component fuel in their studies, because the composition of the former is too complicated to understand the real physics behind the evaporation and combustion characteristics. Several research groups have reported their results on droplets evaporation in a spray of multi-component fuel, carried out both numerically and experimentally. However, there are plenty of difficulties in quantitative determination of vapor concentration and droplet distributions of each component in a multicomponent fuel spray. In this study, to determine the vapor phase concentration and droplet distributions in an evaporating binary component fuel spray, a laser diagnostics based on laser extinction by droplet scattering and vapor absorption was developed. In practice, measurements of the vapor concentration distributions of the lower (n-tridencane) and higher (n-octane) volatility components in the binary component fuel sprays have been carried out at ambient temperatures of 473K and 573K, by substituting p-xylene for noctane or α-methylnaphthalene for n-tridecane. p-Xylene and α-methylnaphthalene were selected as the substitutes is because they have strong absorption band near 266nm and transparent near 532nm and, their thermo-physical properties are similar to those of the original component. As a demonstration experiment, vapor/liquid distribution of the lower boiling point (LBP) and higher boiling point (HBP) components in the binary component fuel spray have been obtained.

  7. Ceramic plasma-sprayed coating of melting crucibles for casting metal fuel slugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki Hwan; Lee, Chong Tak; Lee, Chan Bock; Fielding, R. S.; Kennedy, J. R.

    2013-10-01

    Thermal cycling and melt reaction studies of ceramic coatings plasma-sprayed on Nb substrates were carried out to evaluate the performance of barrier coatings for metallic fuel casting applications. Thermal cycling tests of the ceramic plasma-sprayed coatings to 1450 °C showed that HfN, TiC, ZrC, and Y2O3 coating had good cycling characteristics with few interconnected cracks even after 20 cycles. Interaction studies by 1550 °C melt dipping tests of the plasma-sprayed coatings also indicated that HfN and Y2O3 do not form significant reaction layer between U-20 wt.% Zr melt and the coating layer. Plasma-sprayed Y2O3 coating exhibited the most promising characteristics among HfN, TiC, ZrC, and Y2O3 coating.

  8. Ceramic plasma-sprayed coating of melting crucibles for casting metal fuel slugs

    SciTech Connect

    K.H. Kim; C.T. Lee; C.B. Lee; R.S. Fielding; J.R. Kennedy

    2013-10-01

    Thermal cycling and melt reaction studies of ceramic coatings plasma-sprayed on Nb substrates were carried out to evaluate the performance of barrier coatings for metallic fuel casting applications. Thermal cycling tests of the ceramic plasma-sprayed coatings to 1450 degrees C showed that HfN, TiC, ZrC, and Y2O3 coating had good cycling characteristics with few interconnected cracks even after 20 cycles. Interaction studies by 1550 degrees C melt dipping tests of the plasma-sprayed coatings also indicated that HfN and Y2O3 do not form significant reaction layer between U–20 wt.% Zr melt and the coating layer. Plasma-sprayed Y2O3 coating exhibited the most promising characteristics among HfN, TiC, ZrC, and Y2O3 coating.

  9. New ceramic coating technique using laser spraying process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukamoto, Koichi; Yanagisawa, Takeshi; Uchiyama, Futodhi; Obara, Akira; Okutomi, Mamoru; Kimura, Shinji; Yamada, Akimasa; Shen, Hong L.; Wang, Zhongcheng; Shen, Qinwo; Chatterjee, Udit; Bhar, Gopal C.

    1998-08-01

    A new ceramic coating technique using a CO2 laser has been developed. A high power density laser beam passes near the substrate. Coating materials are supplied by an extra-high accuracy powder supply device and pass across the laser beam. The coating materials are melted in the laser beam and deposited on the substrate surface. A YSZ (Yttria Stabilized Zirconia) layer and a LaCoO3 layer are made for high temperature solid oxide fuel cells. The crystal structures of the coated layers are the same as that of the original coating materials. Superconducting BPSCCO ceramic films are also made with this process. The films show super-conductivity with Tc at 81 K. The Jc of the specimen is 440 A/cm2 at 77 K. We can easily handle and arrange not only metal but also refractory materials. By adopting a multi-axis robot and a surface treatment laser technique, the laser spraying method described here makes it possible to produce highly functional and three dimensional parts of devices directly from raw powder materials. Thus the proposed method will open the path to an unexplored field of key production technology.

  10. Properties of Aluminum Deposited by a High-Velocity Oxygen-Fueled Process

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, R; Decker, T A; Gansert, R V; Gansert, D; Lee, D

    2001-06-12

    Aluminum coatings deposited by a HVOF process have been demonstrated and relevant coating properties evaluated according to two deposition parameters, the spray distance and the oxygen-to-fuel flow ratio. The coating porosity, surface roughness, and microhardness are measured. The coating properties are fairly insensitive to spray distance, the distance between the nozzle and the workpiece, and fuel ratios, the oxygen-to-fuel flow. Increasing the fuel content does appear to improve the process productivity in terms of surface roughness. Minimization of nozzle loading is discussed.

  11. Study on Process Optimization of Cold Gas Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabbara, H.; Gu, S.; McCartney, D. G.; Price, T. S.; Shipway, P. H.

    2011-03-01

    Cold gas dynamic spraying is a relatively new spray coating technique capable of depositing a variety of materials without extensive heating. As a result the inherent degradation of the powder particles found during traditional thermal spraying can be avoided. The simplicity of this technique is its most salient feature. High pressure gas is accelerated through a convergent-divergent nozzle up to supersonic velocity. The powder particles are carried to the substrate by the gas and on impact the particles deform at temperatures below their melting point. Computational modeling of thermal spray systems can provide thorough descriptions of the complex, compressible, particle-laden flow, and therefore can be utilized to strengthen understanding and allow technological progress to be made in a more systematic fashion. The computational fluid dynamic approach is adopted in this study to examine the effects of changing the nozzle cross-section shape, particle size and process gas type on the gas flow characteristics through a cold spray nozzle, as well as the spray distribution and particle velocity variation at the exit.

  12. A Study on Reactive Spray Deposition Technology Processing Parameters in the Context of Pt Nanoparticle Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roller, Justin M.; Maric, Radenka

    2015-12-01

    Catalytic materials are complex systems in which achieving the desired properties (i.e., activity, selectivity and stability) depends on exploiting the many degrees of freedom in surface and bulk composition, geometry, and defects. Flame aerosol synthesis is a process for producing nanoparticles with ample processing parameter space to tune the desired properties. Flame dynamics inside the reactor are determined by the input process variables such as solubility of precursor in the fuel; solvent boiling point; reactant flow rate and concentration; flow rates of air, fuel and the carrier gas; and the burner geometry. In this study, the processing parameters for reactive spray deposition technology, a flame-based synthesis method, are systematically evaluated to understand the residence times, reactant mixing, and temperature profiles of flames used in the synthesis of Pt nanoparticles. This provides a framework for further study and modeling. The flame temperature and length are also studied as a function of O2 and fuel flow rates.

  13. Combustion characteristics in the transition region of liquid fuel sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cernansky, N. P.; Namer, I.; Tidona, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    A number of important effects were observed in the droplet size transition region in spray combustion systems. In this region, where the mechanism of flame propagation is transformed from diffusive to premixed dominated combustion, the following effects have been observed: (1) maxima in burning velocity; (2) extension of flammability limits; (3) minima in ignition energy; and (4) minima in NO(x) formation. Unfortunately, because of differences in experimental facilities and limitations in the ranges of experimental data, a unified description of these transition region effects is not available at this time. Consequently, a fundamental experimental investigation was initiated to study the effect of droplet size, size distribution, and operating parameters on these transition region phenomena in a single well controlled spray combustion facility.

  14. Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence fuel concentration measurements in isothermal Diesel sprays.

    PubMed

    Pastor, José; López, José; Juliá, J; Benajes, Jesús

    2002-04-08

    This paper presents a complete methodology to perform fuel concentration measurements of Diesel sprays in isothermal conditions using the Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) technique. The natural fluorescence of a commercial Diesel fuel is used with an excitation wavelength of 355 nm. The correction and calibration procedures to perform accurate measurements are studied. These procedures include the study of the fluorescence characteristics of the fuel as well as the correction of the laser sheet non-homogeneities and the losses due to Mie scattering, absorption and autoabsorption. The results obtained are compared with theoretical models and other experimental techniques.

  15. Furnace endoscope—measuring fuel spray properties in hot and corrosive environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miikkulainen, P.; Kankkunen, A.; Järvinen, M. P.

    2004-12-01

    A furnace endoscope was developed to carry out in-furnace measurements of black liquor sprays in order to discover the initial velocity, opening angle and trajectory of the spray, and compare spray disintegration mechanisms and spray appearance with the ones measured in a spray chamber. An error analysis of the velocity measurement method was carried out, and the meaning of the optimum measurement distance from the optics to the observed object is discussed. Some details of the development process of the probe are also presented, especially the definition of the scale of the image and the cooling system of the protection tubes. The furnace endoscope can be used in difficult conditions, such as those found inside a chemical recovery boiler (~1,200°C and corrosive chemicals) with promising and accurate measurement results. The equipment has been tested in several furnaces.

  16. Macroscopic and microscopic characteristics of a fuel spray impinged on the wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sung Wook; Lee, Chang Sik

    2004-11-01

    An experimental study was performed to investigate the macroscopic behavior and atomization characteristics of a high-speed diesel spray impinged on the wall at various injection and impinging conditions. The development processes of sprays impinged on the wall were visualized using the spray visualization system composed of a Nd:YAG laser and an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) camera. The atomization characteristics of the impinged spray on the wall were also explored in terms of mean droplet diameter and velocity distributions by using a phase Doppler particle analyzer (PDPA) system. The results provide the effects of injection parameters, wall conditions, and the other various experimental conditions on the macroscopic behavior and atomization characteristics of the impinged sprays on the wall.

  17. Penetration and Duration of Fuel Sprays from a Pump Injection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Marsh, E T

    1931-01-01

    High-speed motion pictures were taken of individual fuel sprays from a pump injection system. The changes in the spray-tip penetration with changes in the pump speed, injection-valve opening and closing pressures, discharge-orifice area, injection-tube length and diameter, and pump throttle setting were measured. In addition, the effects of the variables on the time lag and duration of injection can be controlled by the dimensions of the injection tube, the area of the discharge orifice, and the injection-valve opening and closing pressures.

  18. Production of Babbitt Coatings by High Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF) Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimento, A. R. C.; Ettouil, F. B.; Moreau, C.; Savoie, S.; Schulz, R.

    2017-10-01

    This work presents HVOF as an alternative means to produce dense Babbitt coatings by thermal spray. A radial injection setup and low fuel flow rates were used to minimize heat transfer to the low melting point alloy. In-flight particle diagnostic systems were used to correlate spray parameters with the changes in particle velocity and thermal radiation intensity. The use of particles with larger diameters resulted in higher deposition efficiencies. It was shown that HVOF Babbitt coatings combine a dense structure and a fine distribution of intermetallic phases when compared to more traditional babbitting techniques.

  19. Production of Babbitt Coatings by High Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF) Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimento, A. R. C.; Ettouil, F. B.; Moreau, C.; Savoie, S.; Schulz, R.

    2017-08-01

    This work presents HVOF as an alternative means to produce dense Babbitt coatings by thermal spray. A radial injection setup and low fuel flow rates were used to minimize heat transfer to the low melting point alloy. In-flight particle diagnostic systems were used to correlate spray parameters with the changes in particle velocity and thermal radiation intensity. The use of particles with larger diameters resulted in higher deposition efficiencies. It was shown that HVOF Babbitt coatings combine a dense structure and a fine distribution of intermetallic phases when compared to more traditional babbitting techniques.

  20. A compressible real gas eulerian model for LES of fuel sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, Edward; Doran, Eric

    2015-11-01

    A compressible solver for eulerian multiphase spray simulations is presented. This large eddy simulation solver employs a Peng-Robinson (PR) equation of state to describe mixtures of two species such as liquid dodecane and gaseous nitrogen. Modeling challenges associated with the use of PR are discussed, as are the resource requirements associated with using a compressible formulation to describe liquids when full fuel injector applications are considered. The solver is analyzed using canonical cases and the Spray A experiment from the Engine Combustion Network.

  1. Processing effects in spray casting of steel strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annavarapu, S.; Apelian, D.; Lawley, A.

    1988-12-01

    Spray cast strip of AISI 1026 and M2 has been produced by the Osprey™ process under controlled conditions of deposition. Droplet flight distance was varied over the range 325 to 475 mm and strip was spray cast onto either planar or roller substrates of copper and steel. Substrate surface speed was in the range of 0.02 to 1 m/s, which produced strip of 0.025 to 0.0007 m thickness, respectively, with a width of 0.1 m. Surface condition, microstructure, and extent of porosity in the strip were characterized as a function of distance from top and bottom surfaces. The microstructure of the strip is comprised of three regions —a ‘chill zone’ at the bottom surface consisting of fine grains of ferrite and pearlite with numerous pores; a middle region containing equiaxed or columnar grains, Widmanstätten plates, and fine pores; and a top region made up of equiaxed grains comprising Widmanstätten plates and a few pores. Process variables of primary importance with respect to microstructural integrity and surface condition of the strip are substrate velocity, the surface condition of the substrate, flight distance, and the uniformity of droplet flux in the spray cone. Flight distance determines the amount of cooling of the droplets by the atomizing gas and, therefore, the average temperature of the spray incident on the substrate. Microstructure is determined by convective cooling of the spray, and, to a lesser extent, by the substrate velocity and temperature. The processing conditions required to spray cast strip with a homogeneous microstructure and uniform thickness/surface condition have been established.

  2. Heat Transfer to Fuel Sprays Injected into Heated Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selden, Robert F; Spencer, Robert C

    1938-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study made of the influence of several variables on the pressure decrease accompanying injection of a relatively cool liquid into a heated compressed gas. Indirectly, this pressure decrease and the time rate of change of it are indicative of the total heat transferred as well as the rate of heat transfer between the gas and the injected liquid. Air, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide were used as ambient gases; diesel fuel and benzene were the injected liquids. The gas densities and gas-fuel ratios covered approximately the range used in compression-ignition engines. The gas temperatures ranged from 150 degrees c. to 350 degrees c.

  3. Iron-Based Amorphous Coatings Produced by HVOF Thermal Spray Processing-Coating Structure and Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Beardsley, M B

    2008-03-26

    The feasibility to coat large SNF/HLW containers with a structurally amorphous material (SAM) was demonstrated on sub-scale models fabricated from Type 316L stainless steel. The sub-scale model were coated with SAM 1651 material using kerosene high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) torch to thicknesses ranging from 1 mm to 2 mm. The process parameters such as standoff distance, oxygen flow, and kerosene flow, were optimized in order to improve the corrosion properties of the coatings. Testing in an electrochemical cell and long-term exposure to a salt spray environment were used to guide the selection of process parameters.

  4. Effect of Operating Parameters on a Dual-Stage High Velocity Oxygen Fuel Thermal Spray System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mohammed N.; Shamim, Tariq

    2014-08-01

    High velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) thermal spray systems are being used to apply coatings to prevent surface degradation. The coatings of temperature sensitive materials such as titanium and copper, which have very low melting points, cannot be applied using a single-stage HVOF system. Therefore, a dual-stage HVOF system has been introduced and modeled computationally. The dual-spray system provides an easy control of particle oxidation by introducing a mixing chamber. In addition to the materials being sprayed, the thermal spray coating quality depends to a large extent on flow behavior of reacting gases and the particle dynamics. The present study investigates the influence of various operating parameters on the performance of a dual-stage thermal spray gun. The objective is to develop a predictive understanding of various parameters. The gas flow field and the free jet are modeled by considering the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy with the turbulence and the equilibrium combustion sub models. The particle phase is decoupled from the gas phase due to very low particle volume fractions. The results demonstrate the advantage of a dual-stage system over a single-stage system especially for the deposition of temperature sensitive materials.

  5. Analysis of spray penetration and velocity dissipation for non-steady fuel injection

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, D.L.

    1984-02-01

    The time histories of spray penetration and velocity for conditions corresponding to non-steady fuel injection in a piston-engine cylinder are described in detail. Regions of influence are established for numerous factors affecting the spray-tip velocity curve, including injection-system characteristics, aerodynamic drag, and in-cylinder air swirl. The necessity of excluding the initial region, which is dominated by injection-system characteristics, from a generalized correlation is shown. Based on extensive experimental data, a universal curve of velocity versus penetration is then developed for the time domain in which the spray-tip velocity is decreasing. For a power-law drag formulation, general relationships for velocity and penetration are developed for any velocity exponent, and current correlations from the literature are interpreted in terms of the resulting functions. The inadequacies of the mathematical forms of both current spray-penetration correlations and correlations based upon power-law drag are then illustrated, and guidelines for developing continuously-differentiable penetration relationships are presented. Utilizing multi-term functions to describe the universal curve, an internally consistent set of relationships for spray-tip penetration and velocity is derived.

  6. Duplex coating of electroless nickel and HVOF (high-velocity oxygen fuel) sprayed WC-Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokinen, P.; Korpiola, K.; Mahiout, A.

    2000-06-01

    The porosity of thermal sprayed coatings is usually a problem when coatings are used in wet corrosion application. The porosity allows media to penetrate to the surface of the base material. Corrosion spreads rapidly and the coating loses contact with the substrate and delaminates. This problem can be initiated by impregnating different polymers into the pores. An alternative approach has been tested in the present work to prevent corrosion of cemented carbide coated carbon steel in wet corrosion environments. Carbon steel substrates were coated with a thin film of electroless nickel (electroless nickel plating) and then HVOF (High-Velocity Oxygen Fuel) sprayed with cemented carbide. Reference specimens without electroless nickel were sprayed at the same time. The microhardness of the specimens was measured and the coating structure examined using optical microscopy and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). The bond between the layers and the base material was examined by means of a bend test. A salt chamber test was also performed for the specimens. The structure of the electroless nickel layer was crystalline as a result of the HVOF spraying. There were no cracks in the nickel layer, if the layer was about 20 µm thick. According to the results of the bend test, the adhesion between coatings and substrate was good, and there was no difference between the duplex-coated specimen and the reference specimen. A sample with a thin nickel layer under an HVOF sprayed cemented carbide did not exhibit corrosion after 8 h in the salt chamber test.

  7. Cold Spraying of Armstrong Process Titanium Powder for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, D.; Fernández, R.; Delloro, F.; Jodoin, B.

    2016-12-01

    Titanium parts are ideally suited for aerospace applications due to their unique combination of high specific strength and excellent corrosion resistance. However, titanium as bulk material is expensive and challenging/costly to machine. Production of complex titanium parts through additive manufacturing looks promising, but there are still many barriers to overcome before reaching mainstream commercialization. The cold gas dynamic spraying process offers the potential for additive manufacturing of large titanium parts due to its reduced reactive environment, its simplicity to operate, and the high deposition rates it offers. A few challenges are to be addressed before the additive manufacturing potential of titanium by cold gas dynamic spraying can be reached. In particular, it is known that titanium is easy to deposit by cold gas dynamic spraying, but the deposits produced are usually porous when nitrogen is used as the carrier gas. In this work, a method to manufacture low-porosity titanium components at high deposition efficiencies is revealed. The components are produced by combining low-pressure cold spray using nitrogen as the carrier gas with low-cost titanium powder produced using the Armstrong process. The microstructure and mechanical properties of additive manufactured titanium components are investigated.

  8. A mathematical model of the spray deposition process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez-Miravete, E.; Lavernia, E. J.; Trapaga, G. M.; Szekely, J.; Grant, N. J.

    1989-01-01

    Spray deposition is a recently developed atomization process desigted to produce high density, bulk metal shapes directly from the melt. The process consists of two basic steps: first, a molten metal stream is atomized using a gas; the spray thus produced is then collected onto a suitably designed substrate. In this paper a mathematical model for the analysis of heat transfer during SD is described. The model is in two parts: the first part calculates the thermal histories of atomized droplets in flight, whereas the second part computes the transient temperature profiles inside the growing preform. More specifically, the mathematical model estimates droplet size distribution, temperatures, fractional solidification and microstructures of the atomized droplets in the spray, and the temperature field and microstructure of the resulting deposit. In contrast atively low (1 to 10 °C/second). The results also indicate that a small fraction of liquid mixed with solid exists at the top of the growing preform during deposition. The tiny pools of liquid may play a role in the formation of the characteristic equiaxed grain microstructure of as deposited preforms. The results of the calculations are very sensitive to the value of the enthalpy of the impinging spray. Therefore, the production of good quality deposits requires accurate control of the heat fluxes during deposition.

  9. Cold Spraying of Armstrong Process Titanium Powder for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, D.; Fernández, R.; Delloro, F.; Jodoin, B.

    2017-04-01

    Titanium parts are ideally suited for aerospace applications due to their unique combination of high specific strength and excellent corrosion resistance. However, titanium as bulk material is expensive and challenging/costly to machine. Production of complex titanium parts through additive manufacturing looks promising, but there are still many barriers to overcome before reaching mainstream commercialization. The cold gas dynamic spraying process offers the potential for additive manufacturing of large titanium parts due to its reduced reactive environment, its simplicity to operate, and the high deposition rates it offers. A few challenges are to be addressed before the additive manufacturing potential of titanium by cold gas dynamic spraying can be reached. In particular, it is known that titanium is easy to deposit by cold gas dynamic spraying, but the deposits produced are usually porous when nitrogen is used as the carrier gas. In this work, a method to manufacture low-porosity titanium components at high deposition efficiencies is revealed. The components are produced by combining low-pressure cold spray using nitrogen as the carrier gas with low-cost titanium powder produced using the Armstrong process. The microstructure and mechanical properties of additive manufactured titanium components are investigated.

  10. Droplet size and morphology characterization for dense sprays by image processing: application to the Diesel spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaisot, J. B.; Yon, J.

    2005-12-01

    Up to now, measurement of drop size remains difficult in dense sprays such as those encountered in Diesel applications. Commonly used diagnostics are often limited due to multi-scattering effects, high drop velocity and concentration and also nonspherical shapes. The advantage of image-based techniques on the others is its ability to describe the shape of liquid particles that are not fully atomized or relaxed. In the present study, a model is developed to correct the main drawbacks of imaging. It permits to define criteria for the correction of the apparent size of an unfocused drop and to determine a measurement volume independent of the drop size. This considerably reduces the over-estimation of large drops in the drop size distribution. Drop shapes are also characterized by four morphological parameters. The image-based granulometer is satisfactorily compared to a PDPA and a diffraction-based granulometer for measurements on an ultrasonic spray. Then, the new granulometer is applied to a diesel spray. One of the results of the analysis is that even if mean drop size distributions are stable 30 mm downstream from the nozzle outlet, the shape of the drops is still evolving towards the spherical shape. The atomization process is thus not totally established at this position in opposition to what can be deduced from the drop size distribution alone.

  11. Corrosion And Thermal Processing In Cold Gas Dynamic Spray Deposited Austenitic Stainless Steel Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    THERMAL PROCESSING IN COLD GAS DYNAMIC SPRAY DEPOSITED AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL COATINGS by John A Luhn June 2016 Thesis Advisor: Sarath...REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE CORROSION AND THERMAL PROCESSING IN COLD GAS DYNAMIC SPRAY DEPOSITED AUSTENITIC...produced by the cold gas dynamic spray process on 316L stainless steel substrates. Previous work on the use of the low-pressure cold spray process to

  12. Monitoring and Improving the Reliability of Plasma Spray Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauer, Georg; Rauwald, Karl-Heinz; Mücke, Robert; Vaßen, Robert

    2017-06-01

    Monitoring and improving of process reliability are prevalent issues in thermal spray technology. They are intended to accomplish specific quality characteristics by controlling the process. For this, implicit approaches are in demand to rapidly conclude on relevant coating properties, i.e., they are not directly measured, but it is assumed that the monitored variables are in fact suggestive for them. Such monitoring can be performed in situ (during the running process) instead of measuring coating characteristics explicitly (directly) and ex situ (after the process). Implicit approaches can be based on extrinsic variables (set from outside) as well as on intrinsic parameters (internal, not directly adjustable) having specific advantages and disadvantages, each. In this work, the effects of atmospheric plasma spray process variables are systemized in process schemes. On this basis, different approaches to contribute to improved process reliability are described and assessed paying particular attention to in-flight particle diagnostics. Finally, a new test applying spray bead analysis is introduced and first results are presented.

  13. Shaping process makes fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Tabak, S.A.; Krambeck, F.J.

    1985-09-01

    The Mobil Olefin to Gasoline and Distillate (MOGD) process is described in which light olefinic compunds can be converted to high quality gasoline and distillate. This process, now ready for commercialization is based on a unique synthetic zeolite catalyst, the shape of which selectively oligomerizes light olefins to higher molecular weight iso-olefins. The highly flexible process can be designed to produce distillate/gasoline ratios of 0/100 to 90/10 for a commercial plant, depending on market requirements. MOGD is applicable to a wide range of feed streams ranging from ethylene to 400 degrees F end point olefinic naphtha. The process has been tested using commercially produced catalyst in refinery-scale equipment.

  14. Effect of Moderate Air Flow on the Distribution of Fuel Sprays After Injection Cut-0ff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Spencer, R C

    1935-01-01

    High-speed motion pictures were taken of fuel sprays with the NACA spray-photographic apparatus to study the distribution of the liquid fuel from the instant of injection cut-off until about 0.05 second later. The fuel was injected into a glass-walled chamber in which the air density was varied from 1 to 13 times atmospheric air density (0.0765 to 0.99 pound per cubic foot) and in which the air was at room temperature. The air in the chamber was set in motion by means of a fan, and was directed counter to the spray at velocities up to 27 feet per second. The injection pressure was varied from 2,000 to 6,000 pounds per square inch. A 0.20-inch single-orifice nozzle, an 0.008-inch single-orifice nozzle, a multiorifice nozzle, and an impinging-jets nozzle were used. The best distribution was obtained by the use of air and a high-dispersion nozzle.

  15. Transition region ignition characteristics of n-heptane fuel sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danis, A. M.; Cernansky, N. P.; Namer, I.

    1985-01-01

    Ignition studies were perferred on monodisperse n-heptane sprays at atmospheric pressure over a range of equivalence ratios and droplet diameters. A capacitive discharge spark ignition system was used as the ignition source, providing independent control of spark energy and duration. Preliminary measurements were made to optimize spark duration and spark gap, optimum conditions being those at which the maximum frequency or probability of ignition was observed. The effect of spark duration on ignition frequency for several spark energies was determined for equivalence ratios of 0.5 and 1.0 and initial droplet diameters of 28 and 68 microns. Spark duration had little effect on ignition frequency over the entire 15 to 170 mu s range examined. Spark durations of 70 to 80 mu s were used for all subsequent work. The spark gap was optimized at equivalence ratios of 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0 and initial droplet diameters of 30, 40, 50, 60 and 70 microns by varying the electrode spacing from 0.5 to 5.0 mm while maintaining a constant spark energy. The optimum gap was determined to be 3.0 mm for nearly all conditions.

  16. Processing of titanium and titanium alloys by thermal spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Lugscheider, E.; Jokiel, P.

    1994-12-31

    Marine environments are generally known as aggressive corrosion atmospheres. Stainless steel applied as corrosion resistant material is very effective, but it is also an expensive solution since very often only localized areas may need protection. So, protective coatings such as aluminum, zinc, titanium or Cu/Ni alloys, organic paints and epoxies have been used to provide sufficient protection. Especially titanium and titanium alloys offer a high chemical resistance against various corrosive media due to a dense self healing oxide layer. Besides corrosion resistance, high mechanical strength combined with low specific weight are further advantages of titanium alloys. Economical restrictions still hinder titanium to be used as construction material outside of special applications in aircraft and medical technology. Generally most applications only deserve a thin protective coating. Thermal spray processes allow to combine cheap structural materials with a thin layer of high value material. The high affinity of titanium to oxygen has to be taken into account spraying this material. Therefore plasma spraying can be performed in vacuum or in inert atmosphere as well as using gas shrouds in order to shield the molten particles from reacting with the surrounding environment. This paper gives an overview on thermal spraying of titanium and titanium alloys. Coating formation as well as its characterization with regard to corrosion resistance and mechanical strength is examined.

  17. Spray mist cooling heat transfer in glass tempering process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sozbir, Nedim; Yao, S. C.

    2016-10-01

    Energy saving is a very important issue in glass plants, especially in a glass tempering process, where very high velocity air jet impingement is applied during the cooling process of glass tempering. In fact, air compressor energy may be reduced by a spray cooling due to its high heat transfer capabilities. Presently, in this paper, both pure air and water mist spray cooling are investigated in the glass tempering process. The test results indicate that thin and low-cost tempered glass can be made by mist cooling without fracture. It is possible to find the optimal water flux and duration of mist application to achieve a desirable temperature distribution in the glass for deep penetration of the cooling front but without inducing cracking during the tempering. The use of mist cooling could give about 29 % air pressure reduction for 2-mm glass plate and 50 % reduction for both 3- and 4-mm glass plates.

  18. Characterization of Spray Lubricants for the Die Casting Process

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2008-01-01

    During the die casting process, lubricants are sprayed in order to cool the dies and facilitate the ejection of the casting. The cooling effects of the die lubricant were investigated using Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), heat flux sensors (HFS), and infrared imaging. The evolution of the heat flux and pictures taken using a high speed infrared camera revealed that lubricant application was a transient process. The short time response of the HFS allows the monitoring and data acquisition of the surface temperature and heat flux without additional data processing. A similar set of experiments was performed with deionized water in order to assess the lubricant effect. The high heat flux obtained at 300 C was attributed to the wetting and absorbant properties of the lubricant. Pictures of the spray cone and lubricant flow on the die were also used to explain the heat flux evolution.

  19. Control modeling and regulation of plasma spraying process

    SciTech Connect

    Kankanala, S.V.; Kashani, R.

    1994-12-31

    Feedback control of plasma spraying will enhance the quality and consistency of coatings by increasing, as in any other process, the immunity of the process against uncertainties, such as parametric variations, and external disturbances. To synthesize any model-based controller for feedback control of the plasma spraying, the control model of the process is needed. In the first part of this study, the input/output data needed for system identification of the process, was generated using a one-dimensional model for the transient fluid flow and heat transfer in the plasma spraying process. In this paper, the data is generated from the solution of the thin-layer-Navier-Stokes (TLNS) equations. As before, the plasma velocity and temperature at the nozzle exit are randomly perturbed about their respective preset operating points. A multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) model is then developed to represent the relationship between the perturbed nozzle exit plasma velocity and temperature and the particle velocity and temperature before impact on the substrate.

  20. Optimization of Plasma Spray Process Using Statistical Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, F.; Huang, X.; Liu, R.; Yang, Q.

    2012-01-01

    The microstructure features of coatings produced by a plasma spray process are affected significantly by the process parameters such as powder size, spray gun nozzle size, total plasma gas flow, ratio of H2 + N2 over total gas flow, and so on. This article presents a study of the effects of these parameters on the microstructure (porosity, formation of crack, unmelted particle and oxide phase) of NiCrAlY coatings deposited by the Mettech Axial III™ System. A Taguchi array is used to design the spraying process parameters. The results of the microstructure evaluation are used to generate regression equations for the prediction of coating microstructure based on process parameters. The results predicted from the regression equations are in good agreement with the experimental results according to a confidence level of 0.95. Among the parameters examined, the powder size and the ratio of H2 + N2 over total gas flow rate are the most significant parameters affecting the occurrence of crack, porosity, unmelted particle and oxide. Within the range of the designed process parameters, lower powder size and higher ratio of H2 + N2 over total gas flow rate lead to less cracks, pores, unmelted particles but more oxides. Nozzle size has marginal influence on oxides which increase with nozzle size. Gas flow rate has no direct influence on any coating feature evaluated with the range of variation.

  1. Process Control Development for the Spray Forming Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-01

    Craig Madden, Mr. Robert Mattox, Mr. Steven Szpara and Mr. Paul Kelley. Dr. Moran was the group leader of the Spray Forming Technology Group until...Kelley were responsible for the actual runs studied herein and Mr. Robert Mattox and Mr. Steve Szpara provided significant technical support for

  2. Evaluation of tungsten shaped-charge liners spray-formed using the low-pressure plasma spray process

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, E.R.; Sickinger, A.

    1994-12-31

    This paper documents the results of a DARPA Phase 1 SBIR program which was awarded following a solicitation to develop new technologies for the forming of refractory metal shaped-charge liners. Holtgren had proposed to manufacture liners by spraying refractory metal powder onto a rapidly-rotating mandrel inside the chamber of a low-pressure plasma spray system. A total of nine tungsten shaped-charge liners were sprayed during the course of the program. Metallographic evaluation of the liners revealed that the as-sprayed microstructure was dense, averaging 98.5% density. The grain structure is equiaxed and fine, averaging five microns in diameter. The sprayed shapes were then processed to the final liner configuration by cylindrical grinding. The liners were ductile enough to withstand the strains of grinding and normal handling.

  3. Role of Oxides and Porosity on High-Temperature Oxidation of Liquid-Fueled HVOF Thermal-Sprayed Ni50Cr Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, B.; Bai, M.; Voisey, K. T.; Hussain, T.

    2017-02-01

    High chromium content in Ni50Cr thermally sprayed coatings can generate a dense and protective scale at the surface of coating. Thus, the Ni50Cr coating is widely used in high-temperature oxidation and corrosion applications. A commercially available gas atomized Ni50Cr powder was sprayed onto a power plant steel (ASME P92) using a liquid-fueled high velocity oxy-fuel thermal spray with three processing parameters in this study. Microstructure of as-sprayed coatings was examined using oxygen content analysis, mercury intrusion porosimetry, scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Short-term air oxidation tests (4 h) of freestanding coatings (without boiler steel substrate) in a thermogravimetric analyzer at 700 °C were performed to obtain the kinetics of oxidation of the as-sprayed coating. Long-term air oxidation tests (100 h) of the coated substrates were performed at same temperature to obtain the oxidation products for further characterization in detail using SEM/EDX and XRD. In all samples, oxides of various morphologies developed on top of the Ni50Cr coatings. Cr2O3 was the main oxidation product on the surface of all three coatings. The coating with medium porosity and medium oxygen content has the best high-temperature oxidation performance in this study.

  4. Application of TiC reinforced Fe-based coatings by means of High Velocity Air Fuel Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, K.; Öte, M.; Knoch, M. A.; Liao, X.; Sommer, J.

    2017-03-01

    In the field of hydraulic applications, different development trends can cause problems for coatings currently used as wear and corrosion protection for piston rods. Aqueous hydraulic fluids and rising raw material prices necessitate the search for alternatives to conventional coatings like galvanic hard chrome or High Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF)-sprayed WC/Co coatings. In a previous study, Fe/TiC coatings sprayed by a HVOF-process, were identified to be promising coating systems for wear and corrosion protection in hydraulic systems. In this feasibility study, the novel High Velocity Air Fuel (HVAF)-process, a modification of the HVOF-process, is investigated using the same feedstock material, which means the powder is not optimized for the HVAF-process. The asserted benefits of the HVAF-process are higher particle velocities and lower process temperatures, which can result in a lower porosity and oxidation of the coating. Further benefits of the HVAF process are claimed to be lower process costs and higher deposition rates. In this study, the focus is set on to the applicability of Fe/TiC coatings by HVAF in general. The Fe/TiC HVAF coating could be produced, successfully. The HVAF- and HVOF-coatings, produced with the same powder, were investigated using micro-hardness, porosity, wear and corrosion tests. A similar wear coefficient and micro-hardness for both processes could be achieved. Furthermore the propane/hydrogen proportion of the HVAF process and its influence on the coating thickness and the porosity was investigated.

  5. Simultaneous imaging of fuel vapor mass fraction and gas-phase temperature inside gasoline sprays using two-line excitation tracer planar laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Zigan, Lars; Trost, Johannes; Leipertz, Alfred

    2016-02-20

    This paper reports for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, on the simultaneous imaging of the gas-phase temperature and fuel vapor mass fraction distribution in a direct-injection spark-ignition (DISI) spray under engine-relevant conditions using tracer planar laser-induced fluorescence (TPLIF). For measurements in the spray, the fluorescence tracer 3-pentanone is added to the nonfluorescent surrogate fuel iso-octane, which is excited quasi-simultaneously by two different excimer lasers for two-line excitation LIF. The gas-phase temperature of the mixture of fuel vapor and surrounding gas and the fuel vapor mass fraction can be calculated from the two LIF signals. The measurements are conducted in a high-temperature, high-pressure injection chamber. The fluorescence calibration of the tracer was executed in a flow cell and extended significantly compared to the existing database. A detailed error analysis for both calibration and measurement is provided. Simultaneous single-shot gas-phase temperature and fuel vapor mass fraction fields are processed for the assessment of cyclic spray fluctuations.

  6. Spray formation processes of impinging jet injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. E.; Ryan, H. M.; Pal, S.; Santoro, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    A study examining impinging liquid jets has been underway to determine physical mechanisms responsible for combustion instabilities in liquid bi-propellant rocket engines. Primary atomization has been identified as an important process. Measurements of atomization length, wave structure, and drop size and velocity distribution were made under various ambient conditions. Test parameters included geometric effects and flow effects. It was observed that pre-impingement jet conditions, specifically whether they were laminar or turbulent, had the major effect on primary atomization. Comparison of the measurements with results from a two dimensional linear aerodynamic stability model of a thinning, viscous sheet were made. Measured turbulent impinging jet characteristics were contrary to model predictions; the structure of waves generated near the point of jet impingement were dependent primarily on jet diameter and independent of jet velocity. It has been postulated that these impact waves are related to pressure and momentum fluctuations near the impingement region and control the eventual disintegration of the liquid sheet into ligaments. Examination of the temporal characteristics of primary atomization (ligament shedding frequency) strongly suggests that the periodic nature of primary atomization is a key process in combustion instability.

  7. Spray formation processes of impinging jet injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, W. E.; Ryan, H. M.; Pal, S.; Santoro, R. J.

    1993-11-01

    A study examining impinging liquid jets has been underway to determine physical mechanisms responsible for combustion instabilities in liquid bi-propellant rocket engines. Primary atomization has been identified as an important process. Measurements of atomization length, wave structure, and drop size and velocity distribution were made under various ambient conditions. Test parameters included geometric effects and flow effects. It was observed that pre-impingement jet conditions, specifically whether they were laminar or turbulent, had the major effect on primary atomization. Comparison of the measurements with results from a two dimensional linear aerodynamic stability model of a thinning, viscous sheet were made. Measured turbulent impinging jet characteristics were contrary to model predictions; the structure of waves generated near the point of jet impingement were dependent primarily on jet diameter and independent of jet velocity. It has been postulated that these impact waves are related to pressure and momentum fluctuations near the impingement region and control the eventual disintegration of the liquid sheet into ligaments. Examination of the temporal characteristics of primary atomization (ligament shedding frequency) strongly suggests that the periodic nature of primary atomization is a key process in combustion instability.

  8. Synthetic fuels handbook: properties, process and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Speight, J.

    2008-07-01

    The handbook is a comprehensive guide to the benefits and trade-offs of numerous alternative fuels, presenting expert analyses of the different properties, processes, and performance characteristics of each fuel. It discusses the concept systems and technology involved in the production of fuels on both industrial and individual scales. Chapters 5 and 7 are of special interest to the coal industry. Contents: Chapter 1. Fuel Sources - Conventional and Non-conventional; Chapter 2. Natural Gas; Chapter 3. Fuels From Petroleum and Heavy Oil; Chapter 4. Fuels From Tar Sand Bitumen; Chapter 5. Fuels From Coal; Chapter 6. Fuels From Oil Shale; Chapter 7. Fuels From Synthesis Gas; Chapter 8. Fuels From Biomass; Chapter 9. Fuels From Crops; Chapter 10. Fuels From Wood; Chapter 11. Fuels From Domestic and Industrial Waste; Chapter 12. Landfill Gas. 3 apps.

  9. Microbial fuel cell treatment of fuel process wastewater

    DOEpatents

    Borole, Abhijeet P; Tsouris, Constantino

    2013-12-03

    The present invention is directed to a method for cleansing fuel processing effluent containing carbonaceous compounds and inorganic salts, the method comprising contacting the fuel processing effluent with an anode of a microbial fuel ell, the anode containing microbes thereon which oxidatively degrade one or more of the carbonaceous compounds while producing electrical energy from the oxidative degradation, and directing the produced electrical energy to drive an electrosorption mechanism that operates to reduce the concentration of one or more inorganic salts in the fuel processing effluent, wherein the anode is in electrical communication with a cathode of the microbial fuel cell. The invention is also directed to an apparatus for practicing the method.

  10. Inflight Particle Behavior in the Vacuum Kinetic Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyungkwon; Kwon, Hansol; Lee, Changhee

    2017-08-01

    The vacuum kinetic spray (VKS) process, also-called aerosol deposition, is a promising spray technology by which a thin or thick film can be fabricated at room temperature. Although a number of relevant studies have been performed, almost all have focused on the development of various applications, and unfortunately, the deposition mechanism has not yet been clarified. In this respect, the particle velocity in the flow field in VKS is investigated as a first stage of research into the VKS deposition mechanism. In this research, after a simulation prototype was derived based on the experimental results, the particle average and impact velocities were estimated. In addition, the change in particle velocities with gas flow rates, particle size, and working distance was analyzed based on simulation analyses and microstructural evidence. As a result, the gas flow rate, particle size, and working distance affect the particle impact velocity and further deposition behavior and film microstructure.

  11. Shock Interaction with Substrate in a Shock Induced Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrozinski, Kevin

    To further the knowledge of the Shock Induced Spray Process (SISP), an experimental apparatus which simulates Centerline's Waverider thermal spray gun was created which uses an unsteady flow to propel solid particles onto a substrate by the use of a shock wave to produce a coating. Experiments were conducted at a variety of operating supply pressures, firing frequencies, and stand off distances. A qualitative analysis was done using a custom Schlieren system along with a high speed camera. Insight into the flow behaviour in the SISP was established with the definition of six distinct phases. The formation of a bow shock, which is known to be detrimental to the SISP operation, is shown to be more prominent in the cases with higher supply pressure and close proximity of the apparatus exit to the substrate than with changes in firing frequency.

  12. Inflight Particle Behavior in the Vacuum Kinetic Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyungkwon; Kwon, Hansol; Lee, Changhee

    2017-10-01

    The vacuum kinetic spray (VKS) process, also-called aerosol deposition, is a promising spray technology by which a thin or thick film can be fabricated at room temperature. Although a number of relevant studies have been performed, almost all have focused on the development of various applications, and unfortunately, the deposition mechanism has not yet been clarified. In this respect, the particle velocity in the flow field in VKS is investigated as a first stage of research into the VKS deposition mechanism. In this research, after a simulation prototype was derived based on the experimental results, the particle average and impact velocities were estimated. In addition, the change in particle velocities with gas flow rates, particle size, and working distance was analyzed based on simulation analyses and microstructural evidence. As a result, the gas flow rate, particle size, and working distance affect the particle impact velocity and further deposition behavior and film microstructure.

  13. Monitoring of fuel consumption and aromatics formation in a kerosene spray flame as characterized by fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Allouis, C; Apicella, B; Barbella, R; Beretta, F; Ciajolo, A; Tregrossi, A

    2003-06-01

    The large presence of aromatic compounds in distillate fossil fuels should allow, in line of principle, to follow the fuel consumption and/or the presence of unburned fuel in a high temperature environment like a burner or the exhaust of combustion systems by exploiting the high fluorescence emission of aromatic fuel components. To this aim an UV-excited fluorescence source has to be used since the aromatic fuel components are strongly fluorescing in the UV region of the emission spectrum. In this work UV-excited laser induced fluorescence (LIF) diagnostics was applied to spray flames of kerosene in order to follow the fuel consumption and the formation of aromatic species. A strong UV signal was detected in the spray region of the flame that presented a shape similar to that found in the LIF spectra preliminary measured on the cold spray and in the room-temperature fluorescence of fuel solutions. The decrease of UV signal along the spray flame region was associated to the consumption of the fuel, but more difficult seems to be the attribution of a broad visible emission, that is present downstream of the flame. The visible emission feature could be assigned to flame-formed PAH species contained in the high molecular weight species, hypothesizing that their fluorescence spectra are shifted toward the visible for effect of the high temperature flame environment.

  14. Imaging of Droplets and Vapor Distributions in a Diesel Fuel Spray by Means of a Laser Absorption Scattering Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu-Yin; Yoshizaki, Takuo; Nishida, Keiya

    2000-11-01

    The droplets and vapor distributions in a fuel spray were imaged by a dual-wavelength laser absorption scattering technique. 1,3-dimethylnaphthalene, which has physical properties similar to those of Diesel fuel, strongly absorbs the ultraviolet light near the fourth harmonic (266 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser but is nearly transparent to the visible light near the second harmonic (532 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser. Therefore, droplets and vapor distributions in a Diesel spray can be visualized by an imaging system that uses a Nd:YAG laser as the incident light and 1,3-dimethylnaphthalene as the test fuel. For a quantitative application consideration, the absorption coefficients of dimethylnapthalene vapor at different temperatures and pressures were examined with an optical spectrometer. The findings of this study suggest that this imaging technique has great promise for simultaneously obtaining quantitative information of droplet density and vapor concentration in Diesel fuel spray.

  15. Imaging of droplets and vapor distributions in a diesel fuel spray by means of a laser absorption-scattering technique.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y Y; Yoshizaki, T; Nishida, K

    2000-11-20

    The droplets and vapor distributions in a fuel spray were imaged by a dual-wavelength laser absorption-scattering technique. 1,3-dimethylnaphthalene, which has physical properties similar to those of Diesel fuel, strongly absorbs the ultraviolet light near the fourth harmonic (266 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser but is nearly transparent to the visible light near the second harmonic (532 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser. Therefore, droplets and vapor distributions in a Diesel spray can be visualized by an imaging system that uses a Nd:YAG laser as the incident light and 1,3-dimethylnaphthalene as the test fuel. For a quantitative application consideration, the absorption coefficients of dimethylnapthalene vapor at different temperatures and pressures were examined with an optical spectrometer. The findings of this study suggest that this imaging technique has great promise for simultaneously obtaining quantitative information of droplet density and vapor concentration in Diesel fuel spray.

  16. A comparative study of high velocity oxygen fuel, vacuum plasma spray, and axial plasma spray for the deposition of CoNiCrAlY bond coat alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scrivani, A.; Bardi, U.; Carrafiello, L.; Lavacchi, A.; Niccolai, F.; Rizzi, G.

    2003-12-01

    In the aerospace field as well as in the stationary gas turbine field, thermally sprayed coatings are used to improve the surface properties of nickel-super-alloys materials. Coatings are commonly used as bond coat and antioxidation materials (mainly MCrAlY alloys) and as thermal barrier coatings (mainly yttria partially stabilized zirconia). The purpose of the current study was to assess the properties of thermally sprayed bond coat CoNiCrAlY alloys comparing the performance of three different techniques: vacuum plasma spray (VPS), high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF), and axial plasma spray (AxPS). The quality of the deposited films has been assessed and compared from the point of view of microstructural (porosity, oxide concentration, unmelted particles presence) and mechanical (hardness) characteristics. The surface composition and morphology of the coatings were also determined. Specific efficiency tests were performed for the three examined technologies. The highest quality coatings are obtained by VPS, but also high velocity oxygen fuel and AxPS sprayed films have interesting properties, which can make their use interesting for some applications.

  17. Processing sunflower oil for fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Backer, L.F.; Jacobsen, L.; Olson, C.

    1982-05-01

    Research on processing of sunflower seed for oil was initiated to evaluate the equipment that might adapt best to on-farm or small factory production facilities. The first devices identified for evaluation were auger press expeller units, primary oil cleaning equipment, and final filters. A series of standard finishing filtration tests were carried out on sunflower oil and sunflower oil - diesel fuel blends using sunflower oil from four different sources.

  18. Flame structure of wall-impinging diesel fuel sprays injected by group-hole nozzles

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Jian; Moon, Seoksu; Nishida, Keiya; Matsumoto, Yuhei; Zhang, Yuyin

    2009-06-15

    This paper describes an investigation of the flame structure of wall-impinging diesel sprays injected by group-hole nozzles in a constant-volume combustion vessel at experimental conditions typical of a diesel engine. The particular emphasis was on the effect of the included angle between two orifices (0-15 deg. in current study) on the flame structure and combustion characteristics under various simulated engine load conditions. The laser absorption scattering (LAS) technique was applied to analyze the spray and mixture properties. Direct flame imaging and OH chemiluminescence imaging were utilized to quantify the ignition delay, flame geometrical parameters, and OH chemiluminescence intensity. The images show that the asymmetric flame structure emerges in wall-impinging group-hole nozzle sprays as larger included angle and higher engine load conditions are applied, which is consistent with the spray shape observed by LAS. Compared to the base nozzle, group-hole nozzles with large included angles yield higher overall OH chemiluminescence intensity, wider flame area, and greater proportion of high OH intensity, implying the better fuel/air mixing and improved combustion characteristics. The advantages of group-hole nozzle are more pronounced under high load conditions. Based on the results, the feasibility of group-hole nozzle for practical direct injection diesel engines is also discussed. It is concluded that the asymmetric flame structure of a group-hole nozzle spray is favorable to reduce soot formation over wide engine loads. However, the hole configuration of the group-hole nozzle should be carefully considered so as to achieve proper air utilization in the combustion chamber. Stoichiometric diesel combustion is another promising application of group-hole nozzle. (author)

  19. Literature on fabrication of tungsten for application in pyrochemical processing of spent nuclear fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Edstrom, C.M.; Phillips, A.G.; Johnson, L.D.; Corle, R.R.

    1980-10-11

    The pyrochemical processing of nuclear fuels requires crucibles, stirrers, and transfer tubing that will withstand the temperature and the chemical attack from molten salts and metals used in the process. This report summarizes the literature that pertains to fabrication (joining, chemical vapor deposition, plasma spraying, forming, and spinning) is the main theme. This report also summarizes a sampling of literature on molbdenum and the work previously performed at Argonne National Laboratory on other container materials used for pyrochemical processing of spent nuclear fuels.

  20. Statistical representation of a spray as a point process

    SciTech Connect

    Subramaniam, S.

    2000-10-01

    The statistical representation of a spray as a finite point process is investigated. One objective is to develop a better understanding of how single-point statistical information contained in descriptions such as the droplet distribution function (ddf), relates to the probability density functions (pdfs) associated with the droplets themselves. Single-point statistical information contained in the droplet distribution function (ddf) is shown to be related to a sequence of single surrogate-droplet pdfs, which are in general different from the physical single-droplet pdfs. It is shown that the ddf contains less information than the fundamental single-point statistical representation of the spray, which is also described. The analysis shows which events associated with the ensemble of spray droplets can be characterized by the ddf, and which cannot. The implications of these findings for the ddf approach to spray modeling are discussed. The results of this study also have important consequences for the initialization and evolution of direct numerical simulations (DNS) of multiphase flows, which are usually initialized on the basis of single-point statistics such as the droplet number density in physical space. If multiphase DNS are initialized in this way, this implies that even the initial representation contains certain implicit assumptions concerning the complete ensemble of realizations, which are invalid for general multiphase flows. Also the evolution of a DNS initialized in this manner is shown to be valid only if an as yet unproven commutation hypothesis holds true. Therefore, it is questionable to what extent DNS that are initialized in this manner constitute a direct simulation of the physical droplets. Implications of these findings for large eddy simulations of multiphase flows are also discussed. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  1. Enhancement and Prediction of Adhesion Strength of Copper Cold Spray Coatings on Steel Substrates for Nuclear Fuel Repository

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, R.; MacDonald, D.; Nastić, A.; Jodoin, B.; Tieu, A.; Vijay, M.

    2016-12-01

    Thick copper coatings have been envisioned as corrosion protection barriers for steel containers used in repositories for nuclear waste fuel bundles. Due to its high deposition rate and low oxidation levels, cold spray is considered as an option to produce these coatings as an alternative to traditional machining processes to create corrosion protective sleeves. Previous investigations on the deposition of thick cold spray copper coatings using only nitrogen as process gas on carbon steel substrates have continuously resulted in coating delamination. The current work demonstrates the possibility of using an innovative surface preparation process, forced pulsed waterjet, to induce a complex substrate surface morphology that serves as anchoring points for the copper particles to mechanically adhere to the substrate. The results of this work show that, through the use of this surface preparation method, adhesion strength can be drastically increased, and thick copper coatings can be deposited using nitrogen. Through finite element analysis, it was shown that it is likely that the bonding created is purely mechanical, explaining the lack of adhesion when conventional substrate preparation methods are used and why helium is usually required as process gas.

  2. Computational sensitivity study of spray dispersion and mixing on the fuel properties in a gas turbine combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosshans, Holger; Cao, Le; Fuchs, Laszlo; Szász, Robert-Zoltán

    2017-04-01

    A swirl stabilized gas turbine burner has been simulated in order to assess the effects of the fuel properties on spray dispersion and fuel-air mixing. The properties under consideration include fuel surface tension, viscosity and density. The turbulence of the gas phase is modeled applying the methodology of large eddy simulation whereas the dispersed liquid phase is described by Lagrangian particle tracking. The exchange of mass, momentum and energy between the two phases is accounted for by two-way coupling. Bag and stripping breakup regimes are considered for secondary droplet breakup, using the Reitz-Diwakar and the Taylor analogy breakup models. Moreover, a model for droplet evaporation is included. The results reveal a high sensitivity of the spray structure to variations of all investigated parameters. In particular, a decrease in the surface tension or the fuel viscosity, or an increase in the fuel density, lead to less stable liquid structures. As a consequence, smaller droplets are generated and the overall spray surface area increases, leading to faster evaporation and mixing. Furthermore, with the trajectories of the small droplets being strongly influenced by aerodynamic forces (and less by their own inertia), the spray is more affected by the turbulent structures of the gaseous phase and the spray dispersion is enhanced.

  3. Particle Velocity and Deposition Efficiency in the Cold Spray Process

    SciTech Connect

    Dykhuizen, R.C.; Gilmore, D.L.; Neiser, R.A.; Roemer, T.J.; Smith, M.F.

    1998-11-12

    Copper powder was sprayed by the cold-gas dynamic method. In-flight particle velocities were measured with a laser-two-focus system as a function of process parameters such as gas temperature, gas pressure, and powder feed rate. Particle velocities were uniform in a relatively large volume within the plume and agreed with theoretical predictions. The presence of the substrate was found to have no significant effect on particle velocities. Cold-spray deposition efficiencies were measured on aluminum substrates as a function of particle velocity and incident angle of the plume. Deposition efficiencies of up to 95% were achieved. The critical velocity for deposition was determined to be about 640 meters per second. This work investigates both the in-flight characteristics of copper particles in a supersonic cold-spray plume and the build-up of the subsequent coating on aluminum substrates. Velocities were found to be relatively constant within a large volume of the plume. Particle counts dropped off sharply away from the central axis. The presence of a substrate was found to have no effect on the velocity of the particles. A substantial mass-loading effect on the particle velocity was observed; particle velocities begin to drop as the mass ratio of powder to gas flow rates exceeds 3%. The measured variation of velocity with gas pressure and pre-heat temperature was in fairly good agreement with theoretical predictions. Helium may be used as the driving gas instead of air in order to achieve higher particle velocities for a given temperature and pressure. Coating deposition efficiencies were found to increase with particle velocity and decrease with gun- substrate angle. There did not appear to be any dependence of the deposition efficiency on coating thickness. A critical velocity for deposition of about 640 mk appears to fit the data well. The cold-spray technique shows promise as a method for the deposition of materials which are thermally sensitive or may

  4. High-Velocity Oxygen Fuel Thermal Spray of Fe-Based Amorphous Alloy: a Numerical and Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajdelsztajn, L.; Dannenberg, J.; Lopez, J.; Yang, N.; Farmer, J.; Lavernia, E. J.

    2009-09-01

    The fabrication of dense coatings with appropriate properties using a high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) spray process requires an in-depth understanding of the complete gas flow field and particle behavior during the process. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is implemented to investigate the gas flow behavior that occurs during the HVOF process and a simplified one-dimensional decoupled model of the in-flight thermal behavior of the amorphous Fe-based powder particles was developed and applied for three different spray conditions. The numerical results were used to rationalize the different coating microstructures described in the experimental results. Low porosity and amorphous coatings were produced using two different particle size distributions (16 to 25 μm and 25 to 53 μm). The amorphous characteristics of the powder were retained in the coating due to melting and rapid solidification in the case of very fine powder or ligaments (<16 μm) and to the fact that the crystallization temperature was not reached in the case of the large particles (16 to 53 μm).

  5. Manufacturing and Properties of High-Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF)-Sprayed FeVCrC Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassatelli, Paolo; Bolelli, Giovanni; Lusvarghi, Luca; Manfredini, Tiziano; Rigon, Rinaldo

    2016-10-01

    This paper studies the microstructure, sliding wear behavior and corrosion resistance of high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF)-sprayed FeVCrC-based coatings. Various process parameters were tested to evaluate their effects on the coating properties, which were also compared to those of HVOF-sprayed NiCrBSi and Stellite-6 coatings. The Fe alloy coatings are composed of flattened splats, originating from molten droplets and consisting of a super-saturated solid solution, together with rounded particles, coming from partially unmolten material and containing V- and Fe-based carbide precipitates. All process parameters, apart from "extreme" settings with excess comburent in the flame, produce dense coatings, indicating that the feedstock powder is quite easily processable by HVOF. These coatings, with a microhardness of 650-750 HV0.3, exhibit wear rates of ≈2 × 10-6 mm3/(Nm) in ball-on-disk tests against sintered Al2O3 spheres. They perform far better than the reference coatings, and better than other Fe- and Ni-based alloy coatings tested in previous research. On the other hand, the corrosion resistance of the coating material (tested by electrochemical polarization in 0.1 M HCl solution) is quite low. Even in the absence of interconnected porosity, this results in extensive, selective damage to the Fe-based matrix. This coating material is therefore unadvisable for severely corrosive environments.

  6. Synchronized droplet size measurements for Coal-Water-Slurry (CWS) diesel sprays of an electronically-controlled fuel injection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kihm, K. D.; Terracina, D. P.; Payne, S. E.; Caton, J. A.

    Experiments were completed to study intermittent coal-water slurry (CWS) fuel sprays injected from an electronically-controlled accumulator injector system. A laser diffraction particle analyzing (LDPA) technique was used to measure the spray diameters (Sauter mean diameter, SMD) assuming the Rosin-Rammler two parameter model. In order to ensure an accurate synchronization of the measurement with the intermittent sprays, a new synchronization technique was developed using the light extinction signal as a triggering source for the data taking initiation. This technique allowed measurement of SMD's near the spray tip where the light extinction was low and the data were free from the multiscattering bias. Coal-water slurry fuel with 50% coal loading in mass containing 5 (mu)m mass median diameter coal particulates was considered. Injection pressures ranging from 28 to 110 MPa, two different nozzle orifice diameters, 0.2 ad 0.4 mm, and four axial measurement locations from 60 to 120 mm from the nozzle orifice were studied. Measurements were made for pressurized (2.0 MPa in gauge) and for ambient chamber conditions. The spray SMD showed an increase with the distance of the axial measurement location and with the ambient gas density, and showed a decrease with increasing injection pressure. A correlation of the Sauter mean diameter with the injection conditions was determined. The results were also compared with previous SMD correlations that were available only for diesel fuel sprays.

  7. Synchronized droplet size measurements for coal-water-slurry (CWS) diesel sprays of an electronically-controlled fuel injection system

    SciTech Connect

    Kihm, K.D.; Terracina, D.P.; Payne, S.E.; Caton, J.A.

    1993-12-31

    Experiments were completed to study intermittent coal-water slurry (CWS) fuel sprays injected from an electronically-controlled accumulator injector system. A laser diffraction particle analyzing (LDPA) technique was used to measure the spray diameters (Sauter mean diameter, SMD) assuming the Rosin-Rammler two parameter model. In order to ensure an accurate synchronization of the measurement with the intermittent sprays, a new synchronization technique was developed using the light extinction signal as a triggering source for the data taking initiation. This technique allowed measurement of SMDs near the spray tip where the light extinction was low and the data were free from the multiscattering bias. Coal-water slurry fuel with 50% coal loading in mass containing 5 {mu}m mass median diameter coal particulates was considered. Injection pressures ranging from 28 to 110 MPa, two different nozzle orifice diameters, 0.2 ad 0.4 mm, and four axial measurement locations from 60 to 120 mm from the nozzle orifice were studied. Measurements were made for pressurized (2.0 MPa in gauge) and for ambient chamber conditions. The spray SMD showed an increase with the distance of the axial measurement location and with the ambient gas density, and showed a decrease with increasing injection pressure. A correlation of the Sauter mean diameter with the injection conditions was determined. The results were also compared with previous SMD correlations that were available only for diesel fuel sprays.

  8. Oxides of Nitrogen Emissions from the Combustion of Monodisperse Liquid Fuel Sprays. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarv, H.

    1985-01-01

    A study of NO sub x formation in a one dimensional monodisperse spray combustion system, which allowed independent droplet size variation, was conducted. Temperature, NO and NO sub x concentrations were measured in the transition region, encompassing a 26 to 74 micron droplet size range. Emission measurements of hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and oxygen were also made. The equivalence ratio was varied between 0.8 and 1.2 for the fuels used, including methanol, isopropanaol, n-heptane and n-octane. Pyridine and pyrrole were added to n-heptane as nitrogen-containing additives in order to simulate synthetic fuels. Results obtained from the postflame regions using the pure fuels indicate an optimum droplet size in the range of 43 to 58 microns for minimizing NO sub x production. For the fuels examined, the maximum NO sub x reductions relative to the small droplet size limit were about 10 to 20% for lean and 20 to 30% for stoichiometric and rich mixtures. This behavior is attributed to droplet interactions and the transition from diffusive to premixed type of burning. Preflame vaporization controls the gas phase stoichiometry which has a significant effect on the volume of the hot gases surrounding a fuel droplet, where NO sub x is formed.

  9. Dry process dependency of dupic fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Kwangheon; Whang, Juho; Kim, Yun-goo; Kim, Heemoon

    1996-12-31

    During the Dry Process, volatile and semi-volatile elements are released from the fuel. The effects of these released radioactive nuclides on DUPIC fuel cycle are analyzed from the view-point of radiation hazard, decay beat, and hazard index. Radiation hazard of fresh and spent DUPIC fuel is sensitive to the method of Dry Process. Decay beat of the fuel is also affected. Hazard index turned out not to be dependent on Dry Process.

  10. Electrostatic fuel atomization and spray-dispersal demonstration. Final report, September 1989-January 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, A.J.

    1990-07-01

    The purpose of this work is to characterize charged spray plumes, test the validity of existing spray/plume models, provide a basis for evaluating these plumes for gas turbine fuel and ignitor systems service. Plumes generated by a charge injection atomizer in nitrogen (< or = bar, absolute) have been analyzed using an Aerometrics Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA). A 10 bar the outer, small droplet sheath is characterized by a Sauter mean diameter (D32) of about 55 microns, a span of about 0.7 and a number median of about 20 microns. The inner, large droplet core is characterized by D32 about = 110 microns and the same span. These data conform to a predicted overall droplet size distribution exhibiting a polydispersed profile: primary peak at about 105 microns, and secondary peaks at about 85 and 135 microns. The peaks are associated with the core region; the near constant profile below about 85 microns is characteristic of the sheath. Contrary to prediction, D32 increased modestly with pressure in these tests due to two factors: output charge density levels remained fixed with increasing pressure due to shortening of the sprayer caused by droplets stagnating in the test chamber; and, the predictable, lateral plume core expansion to the probe sampling position. A modest air flow over the spray unit corrects these problems.

  11. Prediction of the structure of fuel sprays in gas turbine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuen, J.-S.

    1986-01-01

    The structure of fuel sprays in a combustion chamber is theoretically investigated using computer models of current interest. Three representative spray models are considered: (1) a locally homogeneous flow (LHF) model, which assumes infinitely fast interphase transport rates; (2) a deterministic separated flow (DSF) model, which considers finite rates of interphase transport but ignores effects of droplet/turbulence interactions; and (3) a stochastic separated flow (SSF) model, which considers droplet/turbulence interactions using random sampling for turbulence properties in conjunction with random-walk computations for droplet motion and transport. Two flow conditions are studied to investigate the influence of swirl on droplet life histories and the effects of droplet/turbulence interactions on flow properties. Comparison of computed results with the experimental data show that general features of the flow structure can be predicted with reasonable accuracy using the two separated flow models. In contrast, the LHF model overpredicts the rate of development of the flow. While the SSF model provides better agreement with measurements than the DSF model, definitive evaluation of the significance of droplet/turbulence interaction is not achieved due to uncertainties in the spray initial conditions.

  12. Prediction of the structure of fuel sprays in gas turbine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuen, J. S.

    1985-01-01

    The structure of fuel sprays in a combustion chamber is theoretically investigated using computer models of current interest. Three representative spray models are considered: (1) a locally homogeneous flow (LHF) model, which assumes infinitely fast interphase transport rates; (2) a deterministic separated flow (DSF) model, which considers finite rates of interphase transport but ignores effects of droplet/turbulence interactions; and (3) a stochastic separated flow (SSF) model, which considers droplet/turbulence interactions using random sampling for turbulence properties in conjunction with random-walk computations for droplet motion and transport. Two flow conditions are studied to investigate the influence of swirl on droplet life histories and the effects of droplet/turbulence interactions on flow properties. Comparison of computed results with the experimental data show that general features of the flow structure can be predicted with reasonable accuracy using the two separated flow models. In contrast, the LHF model overpredicts the rate of development of the flow. While the SSF model provides better agreement with measurements than the DSF model, definitive evaluation of the significance of droplet/turbulence interaction is not achieved due to uncertainties in the spray initial conditions.

  13. Plasma sprayed manganese-cobalt spinel coatings: Process sensitivity on phase, electrical and protective performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Su Jung; Pala, Zdenek; Sampath, Sanjay

    2016-02-01

    Manganese cobalt spinel (Mn1.5Co1.5O4, MCO) coatings are prepared by the air plasma spray (APS) process to examine their efficacy in serving as protective coatings from Cr-poisoning of the cathode side in intermediate temperature-solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs). These complex oxides are susceptible to process induced stoichiometric and phase changes which affect their functional performance. To critically examine these effects, MCO coatings are produced with deliberate modifications to the spray process parameters to explore relationship among process conditions, microstructure and functional properties. The resultant interplay among particle thermal and kinetic energies are captured through process maps, which serve to characterize the parametric effects on properties. The results show significant changes to the chemistry and phase composition of the deposited material resulting from preferential evaporation of oxygen. Post deposition annealing recovers oxygen in the coatings and allows partial recovery of the spinel phase, which is confirmed through thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA)/differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), and magnetic hysteresis measurements. In addition, coatings with high density after sintering show excellent electrical conductivity of 40 S cm-1 at 800 °C while simultaneously providing requisite protection characteristics against Cr-poisoning. This study provides a framework for optimal evaluation of MCO coatings in intermediate temperature SOFCs.

  14. Some Factors Affecting the Reproducibility of Penetration and the Cut-Off of Oil Sprays for Fuel-injection Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beardsley, E G

    1928-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory in connection with a general research on fuel-injection for aircraft. The purpose of the investigation was to determine the factors controlling the reproducibility of spray penetration and secondary discharges after cut-off. The development of single sprays from automatic injection valves was recorded by means of special high-speed photographic apparatus capable of taking 25 consecutive pictures of the moving spray at a rate of 4,000 per second. The effect of two types of injection valves, injection-valve tube length, initial pressure in the injection-valve tube, speed of the injection control mechanism, and time of spray cut-off, on the reproducibility of spray penetration, and on secondary discharges were investigated. It was found that neither type of injection valve materially affected spray reproducibility. The initial pressure in the injection-valve tube controlled the reproducibility of spray penetrations. An increase in the initial pressure or in the length of the injection-valve tube slightly increased the spray penetration within the limits of this investigation. The speed of the injection-control mechanism did not affect the penetration. Analysis of the results indicates that secondary discharges were caused in this apparatus by pressure waves initiated by the rapid opening of the cut-off valve. The secondary discharges were eliminated in this investigation by increasing the length of the injection-valve tube. (author)

  15. Development of a Convergent Spray Technologies(tm) Spray Process for a Solventless Sprayable Coating, MCC-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Anil K.; Meeks, C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of Convergent Spray Technologies (TM) Spray Process to the development and successful implementation of Marshall Convergent Coating (MCC-1) as a primary Thermal Protection System (TPS) for the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs). This paper discusses the environmental and process benefits of the MCC-1 technology, shows the systematic steps taken in developing the technology, including statistical sensitivity studies of about 35 variables. Based on the process and post-flight successes on the SRB, it will be seen that the technology is "field-proven". Application of this technology to other aerospace and commercial programs is summarized to illustrate the wide range of possibilities.

  16. Preparation of polyaniline/sodium alanate hybrid using a spray-drying process

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, B. R. E-mail: fabiopassador@gmail.com Passador, F. R. E-mail: fabiopassador@gmail.com Pessan, L. A. E-mail: fabiopassador@gmail.com

    2014-05-15

    Nowadays, hydrogen is highly interesting as an energy source, in particular in the automotive field. In fact, hydrogen is attractive as a fuel because it prevents air pollution and greenhouse emissions. One of the main problems with the utilization of hydrogen as a fuel is its on-board storage. The purpouse of this work was to develop a new hybrid material consisting of a polyaniline matrix with sodium alanate (NaAlH{sub 4}) using a spray-drying process. The polyaniline used for this experiment was synthesized by following a well-established method for the synthesis of the emeraldine base form of polyaniline using dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid as dopant. Micro particles of polyaniline/sodium alanate hybrids with 30 and 50 wt% of sodium alanate were prepared by using a spray-drying technique. Dilute solutions of polyaniline/sodium alanate were first prepared, 10g of the solid materials were mixed with 350 ml of toluene under stirring at room temperature for 24h and the solutions were dried using spray-dryer (Büchi, Switzerland) with 115°C of an inlet temperature. The hybrids were analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry, FT-IR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The addition of sodium alanate decreased the glass transition temperature of the hybrids when compared to neat polyaniline. FT-IR spectrum analysis was performed to identify the bonding environment of the synthesized material and was observed that simply physically mixture occurred between polyaniline and sodium alanate. The SEM images of the hybrids showed the formation of microspheres with sodium alanate dispersed in the polymer matrix.

  17. Preparation of polyaniline/sodium alanate hybrid using a spray-drying process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, B. R.; Passador, F. R.; Pessan, L. A.

    2014-05-01

    Nowadays, hydrogen is highly interesting as an energy source, in particular in the automotive field. In fact, hydrogen is attractive as a fuel because it prevents air pollution and greenhouse emissions. One of the main problems with the utilization of hydrogen as a fuel is its on-board storage. The purpouse of this work was to develop a new hybrid material consisting of a polyaniline matrix with sodium alanate (NaAlH4) using a spray-drying process. The polyaniline used for this experiment was synthesized by following a well-established method for the synthesis of the emeraldine base form of polyaniline using dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid as dopant. Micro particles of polyaniline/sodium alanate hybrids with 30 and 50 wt% of sodium alanate were prepared by using a spray-drying technique. Dilute solutions of polyaniline/sodium alanate were first prepared, 10g of the solid materials were mixed with 350 ml of toluene under stirring at room temperature for 24h and the solutions were dried using spray-dryer (Büchi, Switzerland) with 115°C of an inlet temperature. The hybrids were analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry, FT-IR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The addition of sodium alanate decreased the glass transition temperature of the hybrids when compared to neat polyaniline. FT-IR spectrum analysis was performed to identify the bonding environment of the synthesized material and was observed that simply physically mixture occurred between polyaniline and sodium alanate. The SEM images of the hybrids showed the formation of microspheres with sodium alanate dispersed in the polymer matrix.

  18. Interior flow and near-nozzle spray development in a marine-engine diesel fuel injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hult, J.; Simmank, P.; Matlok, S.; Mayer, S.; Falgout, Z.; Linne, M.

    2016-04-01

    A consolidated effort at optically characterising flow patterns, in-nozzle cavitation, and near-nozzle jet structure of a marine diesel fuel injector is presented. A combination of several optical techniques was employed to fully transparent injector models, compound metal-glass and full metal injectors. They were all based on a common real-scale dual nozzle hole geometry for a marine two-stroke diesel engine. In a stationary flow rig, flow velocities in the sac-volume and nozzle holes were measured using PIV, and in-nozzle cavitation visualized using high-resolution shadowgraphs. The effect of varying cavitation number was studied and results compared to CFD predictions. In-nozzle cavitation and near-nozzle jet structure during transient operation were visualized simultaneously, using high-speed imaging in an atmospheric pressure spray rig. Near-nozzle spray formation was investigated using ballistic imaging. Finally, the injector geometry was tested on a full-scale marine diesel engine, where the dynamics of near-nozzle jet development was visualized using high-speed shadowgraphy. The range of studies focused on a single common geometry allows a comprehensive survey of phenomena ranging from first inception of cavitation under well-controlled flow conditions to fuel jet structure at real engine conditions.

  19. In-flight particle pyrometer for thermal spray processes. Final report, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-20

    The objective of the project was to produce an industrial hardened particle temperature sensor. In general the thermal spray community believes that the particle temperature and velocity prior to impact on the substrate are two of the predominant parameters which effect coating quality. Prior to the full scale prototyping of such an instrument it was necessary to firmly establish the relationship between operating parameters, particle temperature and coating characteristics. It was shown in the first year of this project that the characteristics and consistency of the coatings formed are directly determined by particle velocity and temperature at impact. For the HVOF spray process the authors have also shown that the particle velocity is determined primarily by chamber pressure, while stoichiometry (the ratio of oxygen to fuel) has a minor influence. Hence, particle velocity can be controlled by maintaining the chamber pressure at a set point. Particle temperature, on the other hand is primarily a function of stoichiometry. Therefore particle velocity and temperature can be independently controlled. In the second year (FY-94), an industrial hardened prototype particle temperature sensor (In-flight Particle Pyrometer) was produced. The IPP is a two-color radiation pyrometer incorporating improvements which make the device applicable to the measurement of in-flight temperature of particles over a wide range of operating conditions in thermal spray processes. The device is insensitive to particulate loading (particle feed rate), particle composition, particle size distribution, and provides an ensemble average particle temperature. The sensor head is compact and coupled to the electronics via a fiber optic cable. Fiber optic coupling allows maximum flexibility of deployment while providing isolation of the electronics from electromagnetic interference and the hot, particulate laden environment of a typical spray booth. The device is applicable to all thermal spray

  20. Characterization of Droplets and Vapor Concentration Distributions in Split-Injection Diesel Sprays by Processing UV and Visible Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuyin; Nishida, Keiya; Yoshizaki, Takuo

    Recent experimental studies have shown that with split injection strategy, the soot and NOx emissions from a diesel engine can be reduced significantly in comparison with a conventional non-split injection. To understand the mechanism of emissions reduction, it is essential to clarify the process of mixture formation in the diesel spray. For characterizing the droplets and vapor concentration distributions inside a fuel spray, a dual-wavelength laser absorption-scattering technique (LAS) was developed by using the 2nd harmonic (532nm) and the 4th harmonic (266nm) of an Nd: YAG laser and using dimethylnaphthalene as a test fuel. By applying the ultraviolet-visible LAS imaging technique, the distributions of droplets and vapor concentrations in the spray, which was injected into a high-temperature and high-pressure nitrogen ambient in a constant volume vessel by a common-rail diesel injection system, were measured and quantitatively analyzed. The effect of injection mass ratio of double-pulse injections on distributions of equivalence ratios of vapor and droplets in the sprays was examined.

  1. Integrated process for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1991-03-06

    This invention is comprised of a process for recovering nuclear fuel from spent fuel assemblies that employs a single canister process container. The cladding and fuel are oxidized in the container, the fuel is dissolved and removed from the container for separation from the aqueous phase, the aqueous phase containing radioactive waste is returned to the container. This container is also the disposal vessel. Add solidification agents and compress container for long term storage.

  2. Relation between surface roughness of free films and process parameters in spray coating.

    PubMed

    Perfetti, G; Alphazan, T; van Hee, P; Wildeboer, W J; Meesters, G M H

    2011-02-14

    A novel spraying apparatus was developed to obtain reproducible free sprayed films. Aqueous solutions of PolyVinyl Alcohol PVA 4-98, HydroxyPropyl MethylCellulose HPMC 603 and HPMC 615 were used as reference coating materials. The apparatus is composed by a spraying system, a closed chamber containing a rotating Teflon cylinder, a pressured air supply system, a spray solution supply system, and a computerized control system. The spraying air pressure, the cylinder rotation speed, and the cylinder-spray nozzle distance were tailored in such a manner that the roughness of the obtained free films was similar to that from reference coated particles. Optimum spraying process conditions were found for all three coating materials using design of experiments. The morphology of the sprayed films obtained using the optimum conditions is evaluated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM), and then compared with those from corresponding cast films and coating layers on particles. A match was found between the morphology of sprayed films and that from the corresponding coating layer on the particle surface. The spray apparatus produced reproducible sprayed films with tuneable roughness and/or smoothness depending on the set of processing parameters. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Coal-water slurry sprays from an electronically controlled accumulator fuel injection system: Break-up distances and times

    SciTech Connect

    Caton, J.A.; Payne, S.E.; Terracina, D.P.; Kihm, K.D.

    1993-12-31

    Experiments have been completed to characterize coal-water slurry sprays from an electronically-controlled accumulator fuel injection system of a diesel engine. The sprays were injected into a pressurized chamber equipped with windows. High speed movies, fuel pressures and needle lifts were obtained as a function of time, orifice diameter, coal loading, gas density in the chamber, and accumulator fuel pressure. For the base conditions (50% (by man) coal loading, 0.4 mm diameter nozzle hole, coal-water slurry pressure of 82 MPa (12,000 psi), and a chamber density of 25 kg/m{sup 3}), the break-up time was 0.30 ms. An empirical correlation for spray tip penetration, break-up time and initial jet velocity was developed. For the conditions of this study, the spray tip penetration and initial jet velocity were 15% greater for coal-water slurry than for diesel fuel or water. Results of this study and the correlation are specific to the tested coal-water slurry and are not general for other coal-water slurry fuels.

  4. Computational analysis of a three-dimensional High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) Thermal Spray torch

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, B.; Lopez, A.R.; Oberkampf, W.L.

    1995-07-01

    An analysis of a High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel Thermal Spray torch is presented using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Three-dimensional CFD results are presented for a curved aircap used for coating interior surfaces such as engine cylinder bores. The device analyzed is similar to the Metco Diamond Jet Rotating Wire torch, but wire feed is not simulated. To the authors` knowledge, these are the first published 3-D results of a thermal spray device. The feed gases are injected through an axisymmetric nozzle into the curved aircap. Argon is injected through the center of the nozzle. Pre-mixed propylene and oxygen are introduced from an annulus in the nozzle, while cooling air is injected between the nozzle and the interior wall of the aircap. The combustion process is modeled assuming instantaneous chemistry. A standard, two-equation, K-{var_epsilon} turbulence model is employed for the turbulent flow field. An implicit, iterative, finite volume numerical technique is used to solve the coupled conservation of mass, momentum, and energy equations for the gas in a sequential manner. Flow fields inside and outside the aircap are presented and discussed.

  5. Highly Segmented Thermal Barrier Coatings Deposited by Suspension Plasma Spray: Effects of Spray Process on Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaolong; Honda, Hiroshi; Kuroda, Seiji; Araki, Hiroshi; Murakami, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Makoto; Sakka, Yoshio

    2016-12-01

    Effects of the ceramic powder size used for suspension as well as several processing parameters in suspension plasma spraying of YSZ were investigated experimentally, aiming to fabricate highly segmented microstructures for thermal barrier coating (TBC) applications. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used to observe the atomization process and the velocity distribution of atomized droplets and ceramic particles travelling toward the substrates. The tested parameters included the secondary plasma gas (He versus H2), suspension injection flow rate, and substrate surface roughness. Results indicated that a plasma jet with a relatively higher content of He or H2 as the secondary plasma gas was critical to produce highly segmented YSZ TBCs with a crack density up to 12 cracks/mm. The optimized suspension flow rate played an important role to realize coatings with a reduced porosity level and improved adhesion. An increased powder size and higher operation power level were beneficial for the formation of highly segmented coatings onto substrates with a wider range of surface roughness.

  6. Evaluation of Liquid Fuel Spray Models for Hybrid RANS/LES and DLES Prediction of Turbulent Reactive Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afshar, Ali

    An evaluation of Lagrangian-based, discrete-phase models for multi-component liquid sprays encountered in the combustors of gas turbine engines is considered. In particular, the spray modeling capabilities of the commercial software, ANSYS Fluent, was evaluated. Spray modeling was performed for various cold flow validation cases. These validation cases include a liquid jet in a cross-flow, an airblast atomizer, and a high shear fuel nozzle. Droplet properties including velocity and diameter were investigated and compared with previous experimental and numerical results. Different primary and secondary breakup models were evaluated in this thesis. The secondary breakup models investigated include the Taylor analogy breakup (TAB) model, the wave model, the Kelvin-Helmholtz Rayleigh-Taylor model (KHRT), and the Stochastic secondary droplet (SSD) approach. The modeling of fuel sprays requires a proper treatment for the turbulence. Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS), large eddy simulation (LES), hybrid RANS/LES, and dynamic LES (DLES) were also considered for the turbulent flows involving sprays. The spray and turbulence models were evaluated using the available benchmark experimental data.

  7. Study on Ceramic Interconnect Manufactured by Slurry Dip Coating and Plasma Spray Coating Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gil-Yong; Kim, Jong-Hee; Ryoo, Sung-Nam; Peck, Dong-Hyun; Jung, Doo-Hwan; Shul, Yong-Gun; Shin, Dong-Ryul; Song, Rak-Hyun

    To get a stable and dense interconnect layer of anode-supported flat tubular solid oxide fuel cell stack, we have studied on the synthesis of precursors with a fine particle size and the ceramic interconnect coating technology. Coated interconnects by slurry dipping and air plasma spray processes were sintered by 2-step sintering method. Ca-doped LaCrO3 perovskites such as La0.75Ca0.27CrO3(LCC27), La0.6Ca0.41CrO3(LCC41), and La0.8Sr0.05Ca0.15CrO3(LSCC), were synthesized by Pechini process and their average particle sizes were about 1 μm. LSCC layer is a functional layer to prevent Ca migration and then LCC41 layer is coated onto it. The Ca migration in the LSCC layer did not occur. The LCC41 was coated on the air plasma spray-coated LCC27 layer by slurry dip coating process and sintered at 1200°C for 20hr. Its electrical conductivity indicated about 27 S/cm at 800°C and the bubble test showed that there is no gas permeation at pressure difference of 0.4 kgf/cm2 at room temperature.

  8. The effect of process parameters on Twin Wire Arc spray pattern shape

    DOE PAGES

    Hall, Aaron Christopher; McCloskey, James Francis; Horner, Allison Lynne

    2015-04-20

    A design of experiments approach was used to describe process parameter—spray pattern relationships in the Twin Wire Arc process using zinc feed stock in a TAFA 8835 (Praxair, Concord, NH, USA) spray torch. Specifically, the effects of arc current, primary atomizing gas pressure, and secondary atomizing gas pressure on spray pattern size, spray pattern flatness, spray pattern eccentricity, and coating deposition rate were investigated. Process relationships were investigated with the intent of maximizing or minimizing each coating property. It was determined that spray pattern area was most affected by primary gas pressure and secondary gas pressure. Pattern eccentricity was mostmore » affected by secondary gas pressure. Pattern flatness was most affected by primary gas pressure. Lastly, coating deposition rate was most affected by arc current.« less

  9. The effect of process parameters on Twin Wire Arc spray pattern shape

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Aaron Christopher; McCloskey, James Francis; Horner, Allison Lynne

    2015-04-20

    A design of experiments approach was used to describe process parameter—spray pattern relationships in the Twin Wire Arc process using zinc feed stock in a TAFA 8835 (Praxair, Concord, NH, USA) spray torch. Specifically, the effects of arc current, primary atomizing gas pressure, and secondary atomizing gas pressure on spray pattern size, spray pattern flatness, spray pattern eccentricity, and coating deposition rate were investigated. Process relationships were investigated with the intent of maximizing or minimizing each coating property. It was determined that spray pattern area was most affected by primary gas pressure and secondary gas pressure. Pattern eccentricity was most affected by secondary gas pressure. Pattern flatness was most affected by primary gas pressure. Lastly, coating deposition rate was most affected by arc current.

  10. Properly synchronized measurements of droplet sizes for high-pressure intermittent coal-water slurry fuel sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kihm, K. D.; Terracina, D. P.; Payne, S. E.; Caton, J. A.

    1993-11-01

    Experiments were completed to study intermittent coal-water slurry (CWS) fuel sprays injected from an electronically-controlled accumulator injector system. A new synchronization technique was developed using the light extinction signal as a triggering source for the data taking initiation with a laser diffraction particle analyzing (LDPA) technique. This technique allowed measurement of Sauter mean diameters (SMD's) near the spray tip where the light extinction was low and the data were free from the multiscattering bias. Coal-water slurry fuel with 50% coal loading in mass containing 5 micron mass median diameter coal particulates was considered. A correlation of the SMD with the injection conditions was determined which show a satisfactory agreement with the measured SMD data. The spray SMD showed an increase with the distance of the axial measurement location and with the ambient gas density and showed a decrease with increasing injection pressure.

  11. Morphologically architectured spray pyrolyzed lanthanum ferrite-based cathodes-A phenomenal enhancement in solid oxide fuel cell performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Jayanta; Basu, Rajendra Nath

    2014-04-01

    Nanocrystalline single phase La1-xSrxCo1-yFeyO3-δ [LSCF] (0 < x ≤ 0.5, y = 0.2, 0.8) based cathodes (crystallite size 30-50 nm) are synthesized by two fluid spray-pyrolysis (SP) for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) application. The particulate sizes of the synthesized cathodes are found to be in the range of 100-200 nm. Particulate morphology of highest conducting cathode (∼1500 S cm-1) is tailored using homomolecular seeding agent of precalcined pyrolyzed ashes. Interfacial polarizations of the such SP synthesized screen printed cathodes onto gadolinium doped ceria (CGO) based electrolyte are found to be much lower (0.032-0.16 Ω cm2 at 800 °C-500 °C) with highest exchange current density (∼722 mA cm-2 at 800 °C) for oxygen reduction reaction. Enhanced current density of 4.0 A cm-2 (0.7 V, 800 °C) is obtained for SOFC button cells using optimized LSCF cathode with hydrogen as fuel and air as oxidant. LSCF cathodes synthesized by spray pyrolysis using homomolecular seeding exhibit interconnected mesoporosity having primary nano-particulates embedded within. Endurance test of button cells till 500 h results low degradation viz. 3.8% and 8.9% 1000 h-1 with electronic loads of 0.5 A cm-2 and 1.0 A cm-2 respectively. High performances of such cells are clinically correlated with SP processing conditions and particulate morphology of cathode powders.

  12. Modeling spray/puddle dissolution processes for deep-ultraviolet acid-hardened resists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchinson, John M.; Das, Siddhartha; Qian, Qi-De; Gaw, Henry T.

    1993-10-01

    A study of the dissolution behavior of acid-hardened resists (AHR) was undertaken for spray and spray/puddle development processes. The Site Services DSM-100 end-point detection system is used to measure both spray and puddle dissolution data for a commercially available deep-ultraviolet AHR resist, Shipley SNR-248. The DSM allows in situ measurement of dissolution rate on the wafer chuck and hence allows parameter extraction for modeling spray and puddle processes. The dissolution data for spray and puddle processes was collected across a range of exposure dose and postexposure bake temperature. The development recipe was varied to decouple the contribution of the spray and puddle modes to the overall dissolution characteristics. The mechanisms involved in spray versus puddle dissolution and the impact of spray versus puddle dissolution on process performance metrics has been investigated. We used the effective-dose-modeling approach and the measurement capability of the DSM-100 and developed a lumped parameter model for acid-hardened resists that incorporates the effects of exposure, postexposure bake temperature and time, and development condition. The PARMEX photoresist-modeling program is used to determine parameters for the spray and for the puddle process. The lumped parameter AHR model developed showed good agreement with experimental data.

  13. Mechanical and Microstructural Effects of Cold Spray Aluminum on Al 7075 Using Kinetic Metallization and Cold Spray Processes (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Prior to spraying the coatings, the Al7075 sheets substrates were grit blasted (TRINCO Dry Blast) using 16 to 20 grit aluminum oxide powder (TRINCO...the as-processed state. The effect of this age treatment alters the temper of the 5 Al7075 substrate from T6 to an overage T76 condition. Select

  14. Thermally Sprayed Large Tubular Solid Oxide Fuel Cells and Its Stack: Geometry Optimization, Preparation, and Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shan-Lin; Li, Cheng-Xin; Liu, Shuai; Li, Chang-Jiu; Yang, Guan-Jun; He, Peng-Jiang; Yun, Liang-Liang; Song, Bo; Xie, Ying-Xin

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we develop a large tubular solid oxide fuel cells design with several cells in series on a porous cermet support, which has many characteristics such as self-sealing, low Ohmic loss, high strength, and good thermal expansion coefficient matching. Here, we investigate aspects of the cell design, manufacture, performance, and application. Firstly, the cell length and number of cells in series are optimized by theoretical analysis. Then, thermal spraying is applied as a cost-effective method to prepare all the cell components. Finally, the performance of different types of cells and two types of stacks is characterized. The maximum output power of one tube, which had 20 cells in series, reaches 31 and 40.5 W at 800 and 900 °C, respectively. Moreover, the output power of a stack assembled with 56 tubes, each with ten cells in series, reaches 800 W at 830 °C. The excellent single tube and cell stack performance suggest that thermally sprayed tubular SOFCs have significant potential for commercialized application.

  15. Two-phase SLIPI for instantaneous LIF and Mie imaging of transient fuel sprays.

    PubMed

    Storch, Michael; Mishra, Yogeshwar Nath; Koegl, Matthias; Kristensson, Elias; Will, Stefan; Zigan, Lars; Berrocal, Edouard

    2016-12-01

    We report in this Letter a two-phase structured laser illumination planar imaging [two-pulse SLIPI (2p-SLIPI)] optical setup where the "lines structure" is spatially shifted by exploiting the birefringence property of a calcite crystal. By using this optical component and two cross-polarized laser pulses, the shift of the modulated pattern is not "time-limited" anymore. Consequently, two sub-images with spatially mismatched phases can be recorded within a few hundred of nanoseconds only, freezing the motion of the illuminated transient flow. In comparison with previous setups for instantaneous imaging based on structured illumination, the current optical design presents the advantage of having a single optical path, greatly simplifying its complexity. Due to its virtue of suppressing the effects from multiple light scattering, the 2p-SLIPI technique is applied here in an optically dense multi-jet direct-injection spark-ignition (DISI) ethanol spray. The fast formation of polydispersed droplets and appearance of voids after fuel injection are investigated by simultaneous detection of Mie scattering and liquid laser-induced fluorescence. The results allow for significantly improved analysis of the spray structure.

  16. Thermally Sprayed Large Tubular Solid Oxide Fuel Cells and Its Stack: Geometry Optimization, Preparation, and Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shan-Lin; Li, Cheng-Xin; Liu, Shuai; Li, Chang-Jiu; Yang, Guan-Jun; He, Peng-Jiang; Yun, Liang-Liang; Song, Bo; Xie, Ying-Xin

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we develop a large tubular solid oxide fuel cells design with several cells in series on a porous cermet support, which has many characteristics such as self-sealing, low Ohmic loss, high strength, and good thermal expansion coefficient matching. Here, we investigate aspects of the cell design, manufacture, performance, and application. Firstly, the cell length and number of cells in series are optimized by theoretical analysis. Then, thermal spraying is applied as a cost-effective method to prepare all the cell components. Finally, the performance of different types of cells and two types of stacks is characterized. The maximum output power of one tube, which had 20 cells in series, reaches 31 and 40.5 W at 800 and 900 °C, respectively. Moreover, the output power of a stack assembled with 56 tubes, each with ten cells in series, reaches 800 W at 830 °C. The excellent single tube and cell stack performance suggest that thermally sprayed tubular SOFCs have significant potential for commercialized application.

  17. Comparative characteristic and erosion behavior of NiCr coatings deposited by various high-velocity oxyfuel spray processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidhu, Hazoor Singh; Sidhu, Buta Singh; Prakash, S.

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze and compare the mechanical properties and microstructure details at the interface of high-velocity oxyfuel (HVOF)-sprayed NiCr-coated boiler tube steels, namely ASTM-SA-210 grade A1, ASTM-SA213-T-11, and ASTM-SA213-T-22. Coatings were developed by two different techniques, and in these techniques liquefied petroleum gas was used as the fuel gas. First, the coatings were characterized by metallographic, scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive x-ray analysis, x-ray diffraction, surface roughness, and microhardness, and then were subjected to erosion testing. An attempt has been made to describe the transformations taking place during thermal spraying. It is concluded that the HVOF wire spraying process offers a technically viable and cost-effective alternative to HVOF powder spraying process for applications in an energy generation power plant with a point view of life enhancement and to minimize the tube failures because it gives a coating having better resistance to erosion.

  18. Acoustic effects of sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, Maciej Z.; Przekwas, Andrzej J.

    1994-01-01

    Since the early 1960's, it has been known that realistic combustion models for liquid fuel rocket engines should contain at least a rudimentary treatment of atomization and spray physics. This is of particular importance in transient operations. It has long been recognized that spray characteristics and droplet vaporization physics play a fundamental role in determining the stability behavior of liquid fuel rocket motors. This paper gives an overview of work in progress on design of a numerical algorithm for practical studies of combustion instabilities in liquid rocket motors. For flexibility, the algorithm is composed of semi-independent solution modules, accounting for different physical processes. Current findings are report and future work is indicated. The main emphasis of this research is the development of an efficient treatment to interactions between acoustic fields and liquid fuel/oxidizer sprays.

  19. Fuel quality processing study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohara, J. B.; Bela, A.; Jentz, N. E.; Syverson, H. T.; Klumpe, H. W.; Kessler, R. E.; Kotzot, H. T.; Loran, B. L.

    1981-01-01

    A fuel quality processing study to provide a data base for an intelligent tradeoff between advanced turbine technology and liquid fuel quality, and also, to guide the development of specifications of future synthetic fuels anticipated for use in the time period 1985 to 2000 is given. Four technical performance tests are discussed: on-site pretreating, existing refineries to upgrade fuels, new refineries to upgrade fuels, and data evaluation. The base case refinery is a modern Midwest refinery processing 200,000 BPD of a 60/40 domestic/import petroleum crude mix. The synthetic crudes used for upgrading to marketable products and turbine fuel are shale oil and coal liquids. Of these syncrudes, 50,000 BPD are processed in the existing petroleum refinery, requiring additional process units and reducing petroleum feed, and in a new refinery designed for processing each syncrude to produce gasoline, distillate fuels, resid fuels, and turbine fuel, JPGs and coke. An extensive collection of synfuel properties and upgrading data was prepared for the application of a linear program model to investigate the most economical production slate meeting petroleum product specifications and turbine fuels of various quality grades. Technical and economic projections were developed for 36 scenarios, based on 4 different crude feeds to either modified existing or new refineries operated in 2 different modes to produce 7 differing grades of turbine fuels. A required product selling price of turbine fuel for each processing route was calculated. Procedures and projected economics were developed for on-site treatment of turbine fuel to meet limitations of impurities and emission of pollutants.

  20. Fuel quality processing study, volume 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohara, J. B.; Bela, A.; Jentz, N. E.; Syverson, H. T.; Klumpe, H. W.; Kessler, R. E.; Kotzot, H. T.; Loran, B. L.

    1981-04-01

    A fuel quality processing study to provide a data base for an intelligent tradeoff between advanced turbine technology and liquid fuel quality, and also, to guide the development of specifications of future synthetic fuels anticipated for use in the time period 1985 to 2000 is given. Four technical performance tests are discussed: on-site pretreating, existing refineries to upgrade fuels, new refineries to upgrade fuels, and data evaluation. The base case refinery is a modern Midwest refinery processing 200,000 BPD of a 60/40 domestic/import petroleum crude mix. The synthetic crudes used for upgrading to marketable products and turbine fuel are shale oil and coal liquids. Of these syncrudes, 50,000 BPD are processed in the existing petroleum refinery, requiring additional process units and reducing petroleum feed, and in a new refinery designed for processing each syncrude to produce gasoline, distillate fuels, resid fuels, and turbine fuel, JPGs and coke. An extensive collection of synfuel properties and upgrading data was prepared for the application of a linear program model to investigate the most economical production slate meeting petroleum product specifications and turbine fuels of various quality grades. Technical and economic projections were developed for 36 scenarios, based on 4 different crude feeds to either modified existing or new refineries operated in 2 different modes to produce 7 differing grades of turbine fuels. A required product selling price of turbine fuel for each processing route was calculated. Procedures and projected economics were developed for on-site treatment of turbine fuel to meet limitations of impurities and emission of pollutants.

  1. Macro controlling of copper oxide deposition processes and spray mode by using home-made fully computerized spray pyrolysis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essa, Mohammed Sh.; Chiad, Bahaa T.; Shafeeq, Omer Sh.

    2017-09-01

    Thin Films of Copper Oxide (CuO) absorption layer have been deposited using home-made Fully Computerized Spray Pyrolysis Deposition system FCSPD on glass substrates, at the nozzle to substrate distance equal to 20,35 cm, and computerized spray mode (continues spray, macro-control spray). The substrate temperature has been kept at 450 °c with the optional user can enter temperature tolerance values ± 5 °C. Also that fixed molar concentration of 0.1 M, and 2D platform speed or deposition platform speed of 4mm/s. more than 1000 instruction program code, and specific design of graphical user interface GUI to fully control the deposition process and real-time monitoring and controlling the deposition temperature at every 200 ms. The changing in the temperature has been recorded during deposition processes, in addition to all deposition parameters. The films have been characterized to evaluate the thermal distribution over the X, Y movable hot plate, the structure and optical energy gap, thermal and temperature distribution exhibited a good and uniform distribution over 20 cm2 hot plate area, X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement revealed that the films are polycrystalline in nature and can be assigned to monoclinic CuO structure. Optical band gap varies from 1.5-1.66 eV depending on deposition parameter.

  2. The functional TiO2-biodegradable plastic composite material produced by HVOF spraying process.

    PubMed

    Bang, Hee-Seon; Bang, Han-Sur; Lee, Yoon-Ki

    2007-11-01

    Photocatalytic TiO2 coatings on bio-degradable plastic(polybutylene succinate: PBS) were prepared by HVOF spraying using three kinds of agglomerated powders (P200: 200 nm, P30: 30 nm, P7: 7 nm). The microstructures of the coatings were characterized with SEM and XRD analysis, and the photocatalytic efficiency of the coatings was evaluated by photo degradation of gaseous acetaldehyde. For both the HVOF sprayed P200 and P30 coatings, high anatase ratio of 100% was achieved, regardless of the fuel gas pressure. On the other hand, for the HVOF sprayed P7 coating, the anatase ratio decreased from 100% to 49.1% with increasing fuel gas pressure. This decrease may be attributed to the much higher susceptibility to heat of the 7 nm agglomerated powders than the 30 nm and 200 nm agglomerated powders. In terms of the photocatalytic efficiency, HVOF sprayed P200 and P30 coatings seemed to outperform the P7 coatings because of their higher anatase ratios. However, the HVOF sprayed P7 coatings did not show photocatalytic activity possibly because of the extremely small reaction surface area to the photo-catalytic activity and low anatase ratio. Therefore, the present study found that functional PBS plastic with photocatalytic performance could be produced by spraying of ceramics such as TiO2.

  3. Dry Processing of Used Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    K. M. Goff; M. F. Simpson

    2009-09-01

    Dry (non-aqueous) separations technologies have been used for treatment of used nuclear fuel since the 1960s, and they are still being developed and demonstrated in many countries. Dry technologies offer potential advantages compared to traditional aqueous separations including: compactness, resistance to radiation effects, criticality control benefits, compatibility with advanced fuel types, and ability to produce low purity products. Within the Department of Energy’s Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, an electrochemical process employing molten salts is being developed for recycle of fast reactor fuel and treatment of light water reactor oxide fuel to produce a feed for fast reactors. Much of the development of this technology is based on treatment of used Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) fuel, which is metallic. Electrochemical treatment of the EBR-II fuel has been ongoing in the Fuel Conditioning Facility, located at the Materials and Fuel Complex of Idaho National Laboratory since 1996. More than 3.8 metric tons of heavy metal of metallic fast reactor fuel have been treated using this technology. This paper will summarize the status of electrochemical development and demonstration activities with used nuclear fuel, including high-level waste work. A historic perspective on the background of dry processing will also be provided.

  4. Fuel processing requirements and techniques for fuel cell propulsion power

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.; Yu, M.

    1993-08-01

    Fuels for fuel cells in transportation systems are likely to be methanol, natural gas, hydrogen, propane, or ethanol. Fuels other than hydrogen wig need to be reformed to hydrogen on-board the vehicle. The fuel reformer must meet stringent requirements for weight and volume, product quality, and transient operation. It must be compact and lightweight, must produce low levels of CO and other byproducts, and must have rapid start-up and good dynamic response. Catalytic steam reforming, catalytic or noncatalytic partial oxidation reforming, or some combination of these processes may be used. This paper discusses salient features of the different kinds of reformers and describes the catalysts and processes being examined for the oxidation reforming of methanol and the steam reforming of ethanol. Effective catalysts and reaction conditions for the former have been identified; promising catalysts and reaction conditions for the latter are being investigated.

  5. Computer-Controlled Detonation Spraying: From Process Fundamentals Toward Advanced Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulianitsky, V.; Shtertser, A.; Zlobin, S.; Smurov, I.

    2011-06-01

    Detonation spraying is a well-known technology which is applied for deposition of diverse powders, in particular cermets, to form various protective coatings. Actual progress is related to a recently developed technique of computer-controlled detonation spraying and its application in non-traditional domains as development of composite and graded coatings or metallization of plastics. The gas detonation parameters are analyzed to estimate the efficiency of different fuels to vary particle-in-flight velocity and temperature over a broad range thus providing conditions to spray diverse powders. A particle of a given nature and fixed size could be sprayed in a solid state or being strongly overheated above the melting point by variation of the quantity of the explosive gas mixture which is computer-controlled. Particle-in-flight velocity and temperature are calculated and compared with jet monitoring by a CCD-camera-based diagnostic tool and experimental data on splats formation.

  6. Fuel quality/processing study. Volume 3: Fuel upgrading studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, G. E., Jr.; Bruggink, P.; Sinnett, C.

    1981-01-01

    The methods used to calculate the refinery selling prices for the turbine fuels of low quality are described. Detailed descriptions and economics of the upgrading schemes are included. These descriptions include flow diagrams showing the interconnection between processes and the stream flows involved. Each scheme is in a complete, integrated, stand alone facility. Except for the purchase of electricity and water, each scheme provides its own fuel and manufactures, when appropriate, its own hydrogen.

  7. Fluidized-Solid-Fuel Injection Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, William

    1992-01-01

    Report proposes development of rocket engines burning small grains of solid fuel entrained in gas streams. Main technical discussion in report divided into three parts: established fluidization technology; variety of rockets and rocket engines used by nations around the world; and rocket-engine equation. Discusses significance of specific impulse and ratio between initial and final masses of rocket. Concludes by stating three important reasons to proceed with new development: proposed engines safer; fluidized-solid-fuel injection process increases variety of solid-fuel formulations used; and development of fluidized-solid-fuel injection process provides base of engineering knowledge.

  8. Comparision on dynamic behavior of diesel spray and rapeseed oil spray in diesel engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapit, Azwan; Azahari Razali, Mohd; Faisal Hushim, Mohd; Jaat, Norrizam; Nizam Mohammad, Akmal; Khalid, Amir

    2017-04-01

    Fuel-air mixing is important process in diesel combustion. It significantly affects the combustion and emission of diesel engine. Biomass fuel has high viscosity and high distillation temperature and may negatively affect the fuel-air mixing process. Thus, study on the spray development and atomization of this type of fuel is important. This study investigates the atomization characteristics and droplet dynamic behaviors of diesel engine spray fuelled by rapeseed oil (RO) and comparison to diesel fuel (GO). Optical observation of RO spray was carried out using shadowgraph photography technique. Single nano-spark photography technique was used to study the characteristics of the spray while dual nano-spark shadowgraph technique was used to study the spray droplet behavior. Using in-house image processing algorithm, the images were processed and the boundary condition of each spray was also studied. The results show that RO has very poor atomization due to the high viscosity nature of the fuel when compared to GO. This is in agreement with the results from spray droplet dynamic behavior studies that shows due to the high viscosity, the RO spray droplets are large in size and travel downward, with very little influence of entrainment effect due to its large kinematic energy.

  9. Examination on Substrate Preheating Process in Cold Gas Dynamic Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shuo; Wang, Xiao-Fang; Li, Wen-Ya; Guo, Xue-Ping

    2011-06-01

    Substrate preheating always takes an important role in particle bonding and formation of the first layer coating in cold gas dynamic spraying (CGDS). In this study, a systemic investigation on substrate preheating process is conducted with Cu, Al, Steel, and Ti substrate by both numerical and experimental methods. The computational fluid dynamic (CFD) approach is adopted to simulate the heat exchange process between gas and solid substrate. The numerical results show that substrate can be significantly preheated by the high-temperature gas, especially by the gas at the near-wall zone behind the bow shock where the temperature is extremely high. Moreover, the comparison between different substrates implies that substrates with smaller thermal conductivity can achieve higher surface temperature and larger temperature gradient which may greatly contribute to the generation of residual stress, such as Ti substrate in this study. For the heat flux, Cu substrate obtains the largest value at the center zone of the substrate surface, followed by Al, Steel, and Ti substrate, but at the outer zone, the heat flux through the Cu substrate surface is smaller than the other three types of substrates. Besides, based on the experimental results, it is found that the substrate surface temperature amounts to the peak value only when the preheating time is sufficiently long.

  10. Study on diesel-DME spray using open-source CFD (OpenFoam)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajar, Rizqon; Sugiarto, Bambang; Darsono, Dody

    2012-06-01

    In this work, a numerical study has been performed to evaluate the fuel spray of diesel, dimethyl ether (DME) and its mixture using CFD code OpenFoam. This study uses a general method, based on simulating fuel sprays injected into a constant volume vessel. Calculations results are presented as profiles of diameter (MD) and temperature of fuel droplets as function of fuel type. The results have shown that the diameter of fuel droplet decreased as the fraction of DME in the mixture is higher. Fuel properties affected the atomization and evaporation process. The SMD increased with viscosity and the evaporation rate of fuel spray increased with fuel volatility.

  11. The N.A.C.A. Apparatus for Studying the Formation and Combustion of Fuel Sprays and the Results from Preliminary Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M

    1931-01-01

    Described here is an apparatus for studying the formation and combustion of fuel sprays under conditions closely simulating those in a high speed compression-ignition engine. The apparatus consists of a single-cylinder modified test engine, a fuel injection system so designed that a single charge of fuel can be injected into the combustion chamber, an electric driving motor, and a high-speed photographic apparatus. The cylinder head of the engine has a vertical disk form of combustion chamber whose sides are glass windows. When the fuel is injected into the combustion chamber, motion pictures at the rate of 2000 per second are taken of the spray formation by means of spark discharges. When combustion takes place, the light of combustion is recorded on the same photographic film as the spray photographs. Included here are the results of some tests to determine the effect of air temperature, air flow, and nozzle design on the spray formation. The results show that the compression temperature has little effect on the penetration of the fuel spray, but does not affect the dispersion, that air velocities of about 300 feet per second are necessary to destroy the core of the spray, and that the effect of air flow on the spray is controlled to a certain extent by the design of the injection nozzle. The results on the combustion of the spray show that when ignition does not take place until after spray cut-off, the ignition may start almost simultaneously throughout the combustion chamber or at different points throughout the chamber. When ignition takes place before spray cut-off, the combustion starts around the edge of the spray and then spreads throughout the chamber.

  12. Photocatalytic Iron Oxide Coatings Produced by Thermal Spraying Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navidpour, A. H.; Salehi, M.; Amirnasr, M.; Salimijazi, H. R.; Azarpour Siahkali, M.; Kalantari, Y.; Mohammadnezhad, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recently, hematite coatings with semiconductor properties have received attention for photocatalytic applications. In this study, plasma and flame spraying techniques were used for hematite deposition on 316 stainless steel plates. X-ray diffraction was used for phase composition analysis, and methylene blue was used as an organic pollutant to evaluate the photocatalytic activity of thermally sprayed coatings. The results showed that all these coatings could act under visible-light irradiation but the one deposited by flame spraying at 20 cm stand-off distance showed the highest photocatalytic activity. The results showed that wavelength of the light source and pH of the solution affected the photocatalytic activity significantly. It was also shown that thermally sprayed iron oxide coatings could have a high photo-absorption ability, which could positively affect the photocatalytic activity.

  13. Fuel Conditioning Facility Electrorefiner Process Model

    SciTech Connect

    DeeEarl Vaden

    2005-10-01

    The Fuel Conditioning Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory processes spent nuclear fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor II using electro-metallurgical treatment. To process fuel without waiting for periodic sample analyses to assess process conditions, an electrorefiner process model predicts the composition of the electrorefiner inventory and effluent streams. For the chemical equilibrium portion of the model, the two common methods for solving chemical equilibrium problems, stoichiometric and non stoichiometric, were investigated. In conclusion, the stoichiometric method produced equilibrium compositions close to the measured results whereas the non stoichiometric method did not.

  14. Deposition and properties of high-velocity-oxygen-fuel and plasma-sprayed Mo-Mo2C composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prchlik, L.; Gutleber, J.; Sampath, S.

    2001-12-01

    Molybdenum thermal-spray coatings, dispersion strengthened by molybdenum oxides and molybdenum carbides, play an important role in industrial tribological applications. Traditionally, they have been prepared by plasma and wire flame spraying. High porosity and lower cohesion strength limit their application in situations where both galling and abrasion wear is involved. In this study, high-velocity-oxygen-fuel (HVOF) deposition of molybdenum and molybdenum carbide coatings was attempted. Deposition was achieved for all powders used. Composition, microstructure, mechanical, and wear properties of the HVOF synthesized coatings were evaluated and compared with plasma-sprayed counterparts. The HVOF coatings possessed a very good abrasion resistance, whereas plasma deposits performed better in dry sliding tests. Measurements showed a close relationship between the coating surface hardness and its abrasion resistance. Results also suggested correlation between molybdenum carbide distribution in the molybdenum matrix and the sliding friction response of Mo-Mo2C coatings.

  15. Mathematical modeling of biomass fuels formation process.

    PubMed

    Gaska, Krzysztof; Wandrasz, Andrzej J

    2008-01-01

    The increasing demand for thermal and electric energy in many branches of industry and municipal management accounts for a drastic diminishing of natural resources (fossil fuels). Meanwhile, in numerous technical processes, a huge mass of wastes is produced. A segregated and converted combustible fraction of the wastes, with relatively high calorific value, may be used as a component of formed fuels. The utilization of the formed fuel components from segregated groups of waste in associated processes of co-combustion with conventional fuels causes significant savings resulting from partial replacement of fossil fuels, and reduction of environmental pollution resulting directly from the limitation of waste migration to the environment (soil, atmospheric air, surface and underground water). The realization of technological processes with the utilization of formed fuel in associated thermal systems should be qualified by technical criteria, which means that elementary processes as well as factors of sustainable development, from a global viewpoint, must not be disturbed. The utilization of post-process waste should be preceded by detailed technical, ecological and economic analyses. In order to optimize the mixing process of fuel components, a mathematical model of the forming process was created. The model is defined as a group of data structures which uniquely identify a real process and conversion of this data in algorithms based on a problem of linear programming. The paper also presents the optimization of parameters in the process of forming fuels using a modified simplex algorithm with a polynomial worktime. This model is a datum-point in the numerical modeling of real processes, allowing a precise determination of the optimal elementary composition of formed fuels components, with assumed constraints and decision variables of the task.

  16. The erosion performance of cold spray deposited metal matrix composite coatings with subsequent friction stir processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peat, Tom; Galloway, Alexander; Toumpis, Athanasios; McNutt, Philip; Iqbal, Naveed

    2017-02-01

    This study forms an initial investigation into the development of SprayStir, an innovative processing technique for generating erosion resistant surface layers on a chosen substrate material. Tungsten carbide - cobalt chromium, chromium carbide - nickel chromium and aluminium oxide coatings were successfully cold spray deposited on AA5083 grade aluminium. In order to improve the deposition efficiency of the cold spray process, coatings were co-deposited with powdered AA5083 using a twin powder feed system that resulted in thick (>300 μm) composite coatings. The deposited coatings were subsequently friction stir processed to embed the particles in the substrate in order to generate a metal matrix composite (MMC) surface layer. The primary aim of this investigation was to examine the erosion performance of the SprayStirred surfaces and demonstrate the benefits of this novel process as a surface engineering technique. Volumetric analysis of the SprayStirred surfaces highlighted a drop of approx. 40% in the level of material loss when compared with the cold spray deposited coating prior to friction stir processing. Micro-hardness testing revealed that in the case of WC-CoCr reinforced coating, the hardness of the SprayStirred material exhibits an increase of approx. 540% over the unaltered substrate and 120% over the as-deposited composite coating. Microstructural examination demonstrated that the increase in the hardness of the MMC aligns with the improved dispersion of reinforcing particles throughout the aluminium matrix.

  17. Combustion processes in wildland fuels

    Treesearch

    Charles K. McMahon

    1985-01-01

    Abstract. A 5-year summary of accomplishments, current activities, and planned actions for fire research project SE-2110 are presented. Areas of discussion center on: (1) characterization of wildland smoke, and (2) fuel, fire, and emission relationships. Characterization summaries include physical and chemical properties of smoke, smoke from...

  18. Electrostatic application of antimicrobial sprays to sanitize food handling and processing surfaces for enhanced food safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, Shawn M.; Harrison, Mark A.; Law, S. Edward

    2011-06-01

    Human illnesses and deaths caused by foodborne pathogens (e.g., Salmonella enterica, Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7, etc.) are of increasing concern globally in maintaining safe food supplies. At various stages of the food production, processing and supply chain antimicrobial agents are required to sanitize contact surfaces. Additionally, during outbreaks of contagious pathogenic microorganisms (e.g., H1N1 influenza), public health requires timely decontamination of extensive surfaces within public schools, mass transit systems, etc. Prior publications verify effectiveness of air-assisted, induction-charged (AAIC) electrostatic spraying of various chemical and biological agents to protect on-farm production of food crops...typically doubling droplet deposition efficiency with concomitant increases in biological control efficacy. Within a biosafety facility this present work evaluated the AAIC electrostatic-spraying process for application of antimicrobial liquids onto various pathogen-inoculated food processing and handling surfaces as a food safety intervention strategy. Fluoroanalysis of AAIC electrostatic sprays (-7.2 mC/kg charge-to-mass ratio) showed significantly greater (p<0.05) mass of tracer active ingredient (A.I.) deposited onto target surfaces at various orientations as compared both to a similar uncharged spray nozzle (0 mC/kg) and to a conventional hydraulic-atomizing nozzle. Per unit mass of A.I. dispensed toward targets, for example, A.I. mass deposited by AAIC electrostatic sprays onto difficult to coat backsides was 6.1-times greater than for similar uncharged sprays and 29.0-times greater than for conventional hydraulic-nozzle sprays. Even at the 56% reduction in peracetic acid sanitizer A.I. dispensed by AAIC electrostatic spray applications, they achieved equal or greater CFU population reductions of Salmonella on most target orientations and materials as compared to uncharged sprays and conventional full-rate hydraulic

  19. Analysis of processes in DC arc plasma torches for spraying that use air as plasma forming gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, V.; Ivanov, D.; Toropchin, A.

    2014-11-01

    Developed in Saint Petersburg State Polytechnical University technological processes of air-plasma spraying of wear-resistant, regenerating, hardening and decorative coatings used in number of industrial areas are described. The article contains examples of applications of air plasma spraying of coatings as well as results of mathematical modelling of processes in air plasma torches for spraying.

  20. Investigation about the Chrome Steel Wire Arc Spray Process and the Resulting Coating Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilden, J.; Bergmann, J. P.; Jahn, S.; Knapp, S.; van Rodijnen, F.; Fischer, G.

    2007-12-01

    Nowadays, wire-arc spraying of chromium steel has gained an important market share for corrosion and wear protection applications. However, detailed studies are the basis for further process optimization. In order to optimize the process parameters and to evaluate the effects of the spray parameters DoE-based experiments had been carried out with high-speed camera shoots. In this article, the effects of spray current, voltage, and atomizing gas pressure on the particle jet properties, mean particle velocity and mean particle temperature and plume width on X46Cr13 wire are presented using an online process monitoring device. Moreover, the properties of the coatings concerning the morphology, composition and phase formation were subject of the investigations using SEM, EDX, and XRD-analysis. These deep investigations allow a defined verification of the influence of process parameters on spray plume and coating properties and are the basis for further process optimization.

  1. Comparison of different hard, metal-like coatings sprayed by plasma and detonation gun processes

    SciTech Connect

    Vuoristo, P.; Niemi, K.; Maentylae, T.; Berger, L.M.; Nebelung, M.

    1995-12-31

    Structure and wear properties of atmospheric plasma sprayed and detonation gun sprayed coatings prepared from an experimental (Ti,Mo)C-28.4%NiCo powder were compared to coatings sprayed from commercially available WC-12%Co and Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-25%NiCr powders. All powders had an agglomerated (spray dried) and sintered structure and nearly the same content of the metallic binder of approximately 20 vol.-%. The powders were characterized by SEM (morphology and cross-sections) and X-ray diffraction (phase composition). The coatings were studied by optical microscope, microhardness measurements, X-ray diffraction analysis and by abrasion and erosion wear tests. The X-ray diffraction patterns of the coatings show that the (Ti,Mo)C-28.4%NiCo powder is characterized by high phase stability in both spray processes, whereas the WC-12%Co powder is prone to significant phase transformations during spraying. The results clearly show the high potential of the experimental (Ti,Mo)C-28.4%NiCo coatings in substituting the conventional systems in wear applications. For instance, it was found that plasma spraying of the (Ti,Mo)C-28.4%NiCo powder with an Ar-H{sub 2} plasma gas resulted in coatings with wear resistance comparable to WC-12%Co coatings. However, detonation gun sprayed WC-12%Co coatings showed somewhat better abrasion wear resistance.

  2. Spray granulation: importance of process parameters on in vitro and in vivo behavior of dried nanosuspensions.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Carlos E; Bose, Sonali

    2013-11-01

    The use of fluid bed granulation for drying of pharmaceutical nanoparticulates on micron-sized granule substrates is a relatively new technique, with limited understanding in the current literature of the effects of process parameters on the physical properties of the dried nanoparticle powders. This work evaluated the effects of spray mode, spray rate and atomizing pressure for spray granulation of drug nanosuspensions through a systematic study. Naproxen and a proprietary Novartis compound were converted into nanosuspensions through wet media milling and dried onto a mannitol based substrate using spray granulation. For naproxen, various physical properties of the granules, as well as the in vitro re-dispersion and dissolution characteristics of the nano-crystals, were measured. It was found that the spray mode had the most drastic effect, where top spray yielded smaller re-dispersed particle sizes and faster release rates of drug from granules than bottom spray. This was attributed to the co-current spraying in bottom spray resulting in denser, homogenous films on the substrate. Similar in vitro results were obtained for the proprietary molecule, Compound A. In vivo studies in beagle dogs with Compound A showed no significant difference between the liquid and the dried forms of the nanosuspension in terms of overall AUC, differences were observed in the tmax which correlated with the rank ordering observed from the in vitro dissolution profiles. These findings make spray granulation amenable to the production of powders with desired processing and handling properties, without compromising the overall exposure of the compound under investigation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Physical mechanisms for atomization of a jet spray

    SciTech Connect

    Bower, G.; Chang, S.K.; Corradini, M.L.; El-Beshbeeshy, M.; Martin, J.K.; Krueger, J.

    1988-01-01

    Because combustion in direct injection engines is strongly influenced by the details of the fuel spray in thes engines, the authors have begun a broad research effort of jet breakup experiments and modelling of these high pressure sprays. The main objective of this effort is to better understand fuel injection from the study of the spray-jet breakup process and the associated fuel-oxidant mixing. The focus of this paper is the development of specific models for atomization of the spray-jet. These models are then compared to each other and to preliminary data from the spray-jet breakup experiments. Initial results indicate that KIVA with this proposed spray model shows good agreement with low pressure data (69 MPa) but underestimates spray penetration for higher pressures (104 MPa).

  4. Carbon oxides free fuel processing for fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Tushar V.

    Fuel processing represents a very important aspect of fuel cell technology. The widespread utilization of fuel cells will only be possible if CO x-free hydrogen producing technologies are developed. Towards this objective, step-wise reforming of hydrocarbons and catalytic decomposition of ammonia were investigated for hydrogen production. Also, novel Au-based catalysts were synthesized for preferentially eliminating CO in the presence of excess hydrogen. The step-wise reforming of hydrocarbons was investigated for production of CO-free hydrogen for proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Proof of concept pulse reactor experiments employing Ni-based catalysts clearly showed the feasibility of the cyclic step-wise reforming process for clean hydrogen production. Under optimum conditions the CO content in the hydrogen was found to be less than 20 ppm by this process (a large amount of CO is obtained as a by-product from conventional methods of hydrogen production). The step-wise reforming process thus greatly simplifies fuel reforming, as expensive and circuitous post-reforming hydrogen purification processes are eliminated. The process was profoundly influenced by the operating temperature, space velocity and nature of the catalyst support. Catalytic ammonia decomposition was investigated for COx-free hydrogen production for alkaline fuel cells. These studies revealed that Ru, Ir and Ni-based catalysts were active for the process with Ru being the most active and Ni the least. The catalyst supports played a decisive role in determining the ammonia decomposition activity. Partial pressure dependence studies of the reaction rate on model Ir (100) catalysts yielded a positive order (0.9 +/- 0.l) with respect to ammonia and negative order (-0.7 +/- 0.l) with respect to hydrogen. The negative order with respect to hydrogen was attributed to the enhancement in the reverse of the ammonia decomposition reaction in the presence of surface hydrogen atoms. Novel nano-Au catalysts

  5. Process for vaporizing a liquid hydrocarbon fuel

    DOEpatents

    Szydlowski, Donald F.; Kuzminskas, Vaidotas; Bittner, Joseph E.

    1981-01-01

    The object of the invention is to provide a process for vaporizing liquid hydrocarbon fuels efficiently and without the formation of carbon residue on the apparatus used. The process includes simultaneously passing the liquid fuel and an inert hot gas downwardly through a plurality of vertically spaed apart regions of high surface area packing material. The liquid thinly coats the packing surface, and the sensible heat of the hot gas vaporizes this coating of liquid. Unvaporized liquid passing through one region of packing is uniformly redistributed over the top surface of the next region until all fuel has been vaporized using only the sensible heat of the hot gas stream.

  6. The corrosion behavior and microstructure of high-velocity oxy-fuel sprayed nickel-base amorphous/nanocrystalline coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dent, A. H.; Horlock, A. J.; McCartney, D. G.; Harris, S. J.

    1999-09-01

    The corrosion characteristics of two Ni-Cr-Mo-B alloy powders sprayed by the high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) process have been studied using potentiodynamic and potentiostatic corrosion analysis in 0.5 M H2SO4. The deposits were also microstructurally characterized using x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) (utilizing both secondary electron and backscattered electron modes), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results from the microstructural examination of the two alloys have revealed a predominantly amorphous/nanocrystalline face centered cubic (fcc) matrix containing submicron boride precipitates as well as regions of martensitically transformed laths. Apparent recrystallization of the amorphous matrix has also been observed in the form of cellular crystals with a fcc structure. The oxide stringers observed at splat boundaries were found to be columnar grained α-Cr2O3, though regions of the spinel oxide NiCr2O4 with a globular morphology were also observed. The coatings of the two alloys exhibited comparable resistance to corrosion in 0.5 M H2SO4, as revealed by potentiodynamic tests. They both had rest potentials approximately equal to -300 mV saturated calomel electrode (SCE) and passive region current densities of ˜1 mA/cm2. Microstructural examination of samples tested potentiostatically revealed the prevalence of degradation at splat boundaries, especially those where significant oxidation of the deposit occurred.

  7. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of a wire-feed, high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray torch

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, A.R.; Hassan, B.; Oberkampf, W.L.; Neiser, R.A.; Roemer, T.J.

    1996-09-01

    The fluid and particle dynamics of a High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel Thermal Spray torch are analyzed using computational and experimental techniques. Three-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) results are presented for a curved aircap used for coating interior surfaces such as engine cylinder bores. The device analyzed is similar to the Metco Diamond Jet Rotating Wire (DJRW) torch. The feed gases are injected through an axisymmetric nozzle into the curved aircap. Premixed propylene and oxygen are introduced from an annulus in the nozzle, while cooling air is injected between the nozzle and the interior wall of the aircap. The combustion process is modeled using a single-step finite-rate chemistry model with a total of 9 gas species which includes dissociation of combustion products. A continually-fed steel wire passes through the center of the nozzle and melting occurs at a conical tip near the exit of the aircap. Wire melting is simulated computationally by injecting liquid steel particles into the flow field near the tip of the wire. Experimental particle velocity measurements during wire feed were also taken using a Laser Two-Focus (L2F) velocimeter system. Flow fields inside and outside the aircap are presented and particle velocity predictions are compared with experimental measurements outside of the aircap.

  8. Reactivity of fly ashes in a spray dryer FGD process

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, W.T.; Reed, G.D.

    1983-05-01

    During the period 1981-1982, a study was performed to determine the ability of various fly ashes to retain sulfur dioxide in a pilot plant spray dryer/fabric filter flue gas desulfurization system. This knowledge would provide design engineers with the necessary data to determine whether the fly ash from a particular utility could be used as an effective supplement or substitute for slaked lime in a spray dryer system. The study commenced with the collection of 22 fly ashes from lignite, subbituminous, and bituminous eastern and western coals. The ashes were contacted with the flue gas entering the pilot plant by two different techniques. In the first, the ashes were slurried in water and injected into the spray dryer through a spinning disk atomizer. In the second, the ashes were injected as a dry additive into the flue gas upstream of the spray dryer. Analyses were conducted to determine the ability of each ash to retain sulfur dioxide in the system followed by statistical correlations of the sulfur retention with the physical/chemical properties of each ash. 17 references, 32 figures, 19 tables.

  9. An investigation of occupational metal exposure in thermal spraying processes.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, J K; Wilson, H K; White, M A

    1997-06-20

    A cross-sectional study of 34 workers engaged in thermal spraying at six worksites was undertaken in order to determine levels of exposure to and uptake of metals during different metal spraying activities. Levels of exposure to cobalt, chromium and nickel were highest in plasma sprayers and, on occasions exceeded UK Occupational Exposure Limits. Exposure to metals during detonation gun and electric arc spraying was better controlled and levels remained below the relevant Occupational Exposure Limits throughout the study period. Urinary levels of cobalt and nickel mirrored the airborne concentrations and the highest urine concentrations were again found in plasma sprayers. Urinary chromium levels were highest in electric arc sprayers, which may also reflect an increased body burden in this group due to a longer history of exposure. The findings clearly indicate that exposure to and uptake of metals may exceed UK Occupational Limits or Standards when spraying is performed manually or semi-automatically and where control relies on local exhaust ventilation (LEV) and personal respiratory protective equipment (RPE).

  10. Particle Behavior During the Arc Spraying Process with Cored Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, W.; Vogli, E.; Abdulgader, M.; Gurris, M.; Kuzmin, D.; Turek, S.

    2008-12-01

    To use the manifold possibilities that arc spraying offers to deposit wear resistance layers, knowledge of the particle formation and their behavior is necessary. This work is focused on studying the particle properties during arc spraying with cored wires. Different cored wires under various spraying parameters are investigated by means of a high speed camera. Particle properties in-flight, such as velocity and temperature, are determined. Correlation between particle behavior and particle characteristics at different spraying conditions is established. At the same time, the particle-laden gas flow is simulated numerically and the computed solutions are used to illustrate the utility of the proposed CFD model and compared with experimental results. The employed mathematical model represents a system of macroscopic conservation laws for the continuous gas phase and for the gas-solid mixture. This approach formulation makes it possible to circumvent the numerical difficulties associated with the implementation of a (potentially ill-posed) two-fluid model. The discretization in space is performed using a high-resolution finite element scheme based on algebraic flux correction in terms of local characteristic variables. The artificial diffusion operator is constructed on the discrete level and fitted to the local solution behavior using a multidimensional flux limiter of TVD type.

  11. Prediction of Particle Velocity for the Cold Spray Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    to deposit and form a coating. Particle velocities can be calculated from the drag relationship between the particle and flowing gas . The relative...6  2.6  Gas Flow ...utilized one-dimensional (1-D), frictionless, gas -dynamic calculations in order to predict gas flow velocities for various cold spray operating conditions

  12. Development of Universal Portable Spray Stand for Touch-Up Process in The Automotive Paintshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatah Muhamed Mukhtar, Muhamed Abdul; Mohideen Shahul Hameed, Rasool

    2016-02-01

    A spray stand is a custom-made tool used to hold the automotive body parts as well as the devices used to facilitate the operator during the Touch Up process in Paint shop production. This paper discusses about the development of Universal Portable Spray Stand (UPSS) as a tool to hold various types of automotive body parts and model of car during the painting process. The main objective of this study is to determine the effective application of UPSS at the International College of Automotive (ICAM) and also in the automotive industry. This will be helpful to add features to the current spray stand in ICAM and to add value to the spray stand based on selected criteria which are universal, portable and cost saving. In addition, study in the UPSS is also expected to bring reduction in cycle time during the touch up process, in the paint defects and in the ergonomics issues among the operators.

  13. Lead-free piezoelectric ceramic coatings fabricated by thermal spray process.

    PubMed

    Yao, Kui; Chen, Shuting; Guo, Kun; Tan, Chee Kiang Ivan; Mirshekarloo, Meysam Sharifzadeh; Tay, Francis Eng Hock

    2017-09-04

    The paper starts from a review on the progress in fabrication of piezoelectric ceramic coatings by thermal spray method. For our experimental work, two types of lead-free piezoelectric ceramic coatings, including potassium sodium niobate (KNN)-based and bismuth sodium titanate (BNT)-based, are fabricated by thermal spray process, and their structure, morphology and piezoelectric properties are characterized. Our obtained lead-free ceramic coatings exhibit single phase of perovskite structure, relatively dense morphology, and competitive piezoelectric coefficients. The mechanism of forming the piezoelectric perovskite crystalline phase by thermal spray involving melting-recrystallization process is analyzed in comparison to that of ceramic synthesis through solid state reaction. Suppression of volatile loss and decomposition at high temperature due to the extremely high melting and cooling rate in the thermal spray process, and the impact on the resulting structure are discussed. Significant advantages of the thermal spray method over alternative processing methods for forming piezoelectric ceramic coatings are summarized. The combination of environmentally friendly lead-free compositions and the scalable thermal spray processing method will promote more applications of piezoelectric ceramic coatings for producing distributive sensors and transducers, and forming advanced smart structures and systems.

  14. Study of Electrostatic Modulation of Fuel Sprays to Enhance Combustion Performance in an Aviation Gas Turbine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    Electrostatic spraying has found practical application in such diverse areas as high- speed ink- jet printing , pesticide, paint and liquid metal... Electrohydrodynamically Sprayed Liquid Droplets," The Physics of Fluids, V. 10, pp. 2149-2154, October 1967. 8. Rayleigh, J. W. S., "On the Instability of Jets ...biock number) I ELD OGROUP SUB. GR. Electrohydrodynamic Spraying, Electrostatic f I Atomization, Gas Turbine Combustor, Combustion UTRACT (Continue

  15. Liquid fuel spray processes in high-pressure gas flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    Atomization of single liquid jets injected downstream in high pressure and high velocity airflow was investigated to determine the effect of airstream pressure on mean drop size as measured with a scanning radiometer. For aerodynamic - wave breakup of liquid jets, the ratio of orifice diameter D sub o to measured mean drop diameter D sub m which is assumed equal to D sub 32 or Sauter mean diameter, was correlated with the product of the Weber and Reynolds numbers WeRe and the dimensionless group G1/square root of c, where G is the gravitational acceleration, 1 the mean free molecular path, and square root of C the root mean square velocity, as follows; D sub o/D sub 32 = 1.2 (WeRe) to the 0.4 (G1/square root of c) to the 0.15 for values of WeRe 1 million and an airstream pressure range of 0.10 to 2.10 MPa.

  16. Plasma method for processing spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Timofeev, A. V.

    2007-11-15

    Plasma methods for processing spent nuclear fuel are analyzed. It is shown that, by ICR heating in a nonuniform magnetic field, the energy of the heated ash ions can be increased substantially, while nuclear fuel ions can be kept cold. Two methods for extracting heated ash ions from a cold plasma flow are considered, specifically, that by increasing the ion gyroradius and that due to ion drift in a curved magnetic field. It is found that the required degree of separation of ash and fuel ions can be achieved in systems with quite moderate parameters.

  17. Fuel processing and thermochemical/photochemical cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Arlon J.

    A long sought goal of energy research has been to find a method to produce hydrogen fuel economically by splitting water using sunlight as the source of energy. Implementing method of producing useful fuels from raw materials using sunlight on a large scale generally involves significant capital and energy costs. Sunlight is an attractive means of providing a renewable source of energy to drive the process after providing the initial capital outlay. However, the combination of capital costs to provide concentrated solar energy and the elaborate and expensive plants required to carry out the chemical processes puts a heavy financial burden on this approach to a clean and renewable energy economy. Solar driven fuel processing methods include thermal decomposition, thermochemical, photochemical, electrochemical, biochemical, and hybrid reactions. The range of approaches to carry out these processes runs the gamut from well established chemical engineering practices with near term predictable costs, to long term basic photochemical processes, the details of which are still speculative.

  18. The Potential of the Cold Spray Process for the Repair and Manufacture of Aluminium Alloy Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, David; Marrocco, Tiziana

    Being capable of producing deposits up to several centimetres thick, the cold spray process is emerging as an attractive technology for the manufacture and repair of high value aluminium and magnesium components. During the cold spray process fine aluminium or aluminium alloy powders are propelled at high velocities in the solid state at the target substrate. Due to the high velocity particle impacts, strong bonds are formed between the coating and the substrate and between particles within the deposited layer. Metallographic sections of cold sprayed coatings reveal microstructures characterised by very low porosity. With the objective of improving the abrasive wear and erosion resistance of cold sprayed coatings, ceramic reinforcements such as SiC, B4C and Al2O3 have been introduced in the feedstock to produce composite coatings, and these composite materials have been deposited with thicknesses in excess of 25mm. Several applications employing commercially available equipment have achieved industrialisation.

  19. Arc-Plasma Wire Spraying: An Optical Study of Process Phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulyaev, I. P.; Dolmatov, A. V.; Kharlamov, M. Yu.; Gulyaev, P. Yu.; Jordan, V. I.; Krivtsun, I. V.; Korzhyk, V. M.; Demyanov, O. I.

    2015-12-01

    In the present paper, we report on the results of an experimental study of heat- and mass-transfer processes in a Plazer 30-PL-W plasma-jet facility used for arc-plasma wire spraying. Using an original optical diagnostic system, we have studied melting behavior of the metal wire, break up and atomization of liquid metal. For the first time, experimental data on the in-flight velocity and temperature of spray particles in arc-plasma wire spraying were obtained. In spite of moderate particle velocities (about 50 m/s), the obtained steel coatings proved to have a low porosity of 1.5%. While studying the spraying process of tungsten wire, we observed the occurrence of anomalous high-velocity (over 4000 m/s) outbursts ejected from the surface of liquid metal droplets. The nature of such outbursts calls for further study.

  20. Flow characteristic of in-flight particles in supersonic plasma spraying process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Pei; Wei, Zhengying; Zhao, Guangxi; Du, Jun; Bai, Y.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a computational model based on supersonic plasma spraying (SAPS) is developed to describe the plasma jet coupled with the injection of carrier gas and particles for SAPS. Based on a high-efficiency supersonic spraying gun, the 3D computational model of spraying gun was built to study the features of plasma jet and its interactions with the sprayed particles. Further the velocity and temperature of in-flight particles were measured by Spray Watch 2i, the shape of in-flight particles was observed by scanning electron microscope. Numerical results were compared with the experimental measurements and a good agreement has been achieved. The flight process of particles in plasma jet consists of three stages: accelerated stage, constant speed stage and decelerated stage. Numerical and experimental indicates that the H2 volume fraction in mixture gas of Ar + H2 should keep in the range of 23-26 %, and the distance of 100 mm is the optimal spraying distance in Supersonic atmosphere plasma spraying. Particles were melted and broken into small child particles by plasma jet and the diameters of most child particles were less than 30 μm. In general, increasing the particles impacting velocity and surface temperature can decrease the coating porosity.

  1. Recent developments in plasma spray processes for applications in energy technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauer, G.; Jarligo, M. O.; Marcano, D.; Rezanka, S.; Zhou, D.; Vaßen, R.

    2017-03-01

    This work focuses on recent developments of plasma spray processes with respect to specific demands in energy technology. High Velocity Atmospheric Plasma Spraying (HV-APS) is a novel variant of plasma spraying devoted to materials which are prone to oxidation or decomposition. It is shown how this process can be used for metallic bondcoats in thermal barrier coating systems. Furthermore, Suspension Plasma Spraying (SPS) is a new method to process submicron-sized feedstock powders which are not sufficiently flowable to feed them in dry state. SPS is presently promoted by the development of novel torch concepts with axial feedstock injection. An example for a columnar structured double layer thermal barrier coating is given. Finally, Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) is a novel technology operating in controlled atmosphere at low pressure and high plasma power. At such condition, vaporization even of high-melting oxide ceramics is possible enabling the formation of columnar structured, strain tolerant coatings with low thermal conductivity. Applying different conditions, the deposition is still dominated by liquid splats. Such process is termed Low Pressure Plasma Spraying-Thin Film (LPPS-TF). Two examples of applications are gas-tight and highly ionic and electronic conductive electrolyte and membrane layers which were deposited on porous metallic substrates.

  2. SOFC system with integrated catalytic fuel processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finnerty, Caine; Tompsett, Geoff. A.; Kendall, Kevin; Ormerod, R. Mark

    In recent years, there has been much interest in the development of solid oxide fuel cell technology operating directly on hydrocarbon fuels. The development of a catalytic fuel processing system, which is integrated with the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power source is outlined here. The catalytic device utilises a novel three-way catalytic system consisting of an in situ pre-reformer catalyst, the fuel cell anode catalyst and a platinum-based combustion catalyst. The three individual catalytic stages have been tested in a model catalytic microreactor. Both temperature-programmed and isothermal reaction techniques have been applied. Results from these experiments were used to design the demonstration SOFC unit. The apparatus used for catalytic characterisation can also perform in situ electrochemical measurements as described in previous papers [C.M. Finnerty, R.H. Cunningham, K. Kendall, R.M. Ormerod, Chem. Commun. (1998) 915-916; C.M. Finnerty, N.J. Coe, R.H. Cunningham, R.M. Ormerod, Catal. Today 46 (1998) 137-145]. This enabled the performance of the SOFC to be determined at a range of temperatures and reaction conditions, with current output of 290 mA cm -2 at 0.5 V, being recorded. Methane and butane have been evaluated as fuels. Thus, optimisation of the in situ partial oxidation pre-reforming catalyst was essential, with catalysts producing high H 2/CO ratios at reaction temperatures between 873 K and 1173 K being chosen. These included Ru and Ni/Mo-based catalysts. Hydrocarbon fuels were directly injected into the catalytic SOFC system. Microreactor measurements revealed the reaction mechanisms as the fuel was transported through the three-catalyst device. The demonstration system showed that the fuel processing could be successfully integrated with the SOFC stack.

  3. Pyrochemical processing of DOE spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Laidler, J.J.

    1995-02-01

    A compact, efficient method for conditioning spent nuclear fuel is under development. This method, known as pyrochemical processing, or {open_quotes}pyroprocessing,{close_quotes} provides a separation of fission products from the actinide elements present in spent fuel and further separates pure uranium from the transuranic elements. The process can facilitate the timely and environmentally-sound treatment of the highly diverse collection of spent fuel currently in the inventory of the United States Department of Energy (DOE). The pyroprocess utilizes elevated-temperature processes to prepare spent fuel for fission product separation; that separation is accomplished by a molten salt electrorefining step that provides efficient (>99.9%) separation of transuranics. The resultant waste forms from the pyroprocess, are stable under envisioned repository environment conditions and highly leach-resistant. Treatment of any spent fuel type produces a set of common high-level waste forms, one a mineral and the other a metal alloy, that can be readily qualified for repository disposal and avoid the substantial costs that would be associated with the qualification of the numerous spent fuel types included in the DOE inventory.

  4. Matching refractive indices of two fluids and finding interfacial tension for the purpose of fuel spray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Y. H.

    2017-06-01

    This study attempts to prepare a fluid pair for use in spray dynamics investigations. Better understanding the behavior of fuel sprays is one of the things that can help improve the efficiency of internal combustion engines. To address the scattering issue in current imaging methods, the refractive index difference between the injected fluid and the medium that it is injected into is eliminated. Two immiscible fluids (sucrose solution and silicone oil) with the same refractive index was identified, their surface tension to build a model fluid engine system injection was also studied. At the same time, Weber number is found to help correct the difference. Results show that 63.7% mass sucrose solution has the same refractive index as silicone oil, and the sucrose solution/silicone oil interface has a surface tension of 0.08941 N/m, which is roughly four times larger than that of ethanol/air. This means using the sucrose/silicone oil fluid pair to model fuel spray will involve some adjustments to be accurate.

  5. Spray forming process for producing molds, dies and related tooling

    DOEpatents

    McHugh, Kevin M.; Key, James F.

    1998-01-01

    A method for spray forming manufacturing of near-net-shape molds, dies and related toolings, wherein liquid material such as molten metal, metallic alloys, or polymers are atomized into fine droplets by a high temperature, high velocity gas and deposited onto a pattern. Quenching of the atomized droplets provides a heat sink, thereby allowing undercooled and partially solidified droplets to be formed in-flight. Composites can be formed by combining the atomized droplets with solid particles such as whiskers or fibers.

  6. Composite monolayer fabrication by an arc-spray process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westfall, Leonard J.

    1988-01-01

    A single layer (monotape) technique for fabricating complex high-temperature tungsten-fiber-reinforced superalloy composites is proposed. The fabrication of sheets of arc-sprayed monotape 38 cm wide and 122 cm long has been demonstrated. Composites fabricated using the method are shown to have equal tensile strength and a cleaner matrix than composites fabricated from powder metal cloth monotapes, and the present technique is less expensive than the powder metal fabrication techniques.

  7. Biomass conversion processes for energy and fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofer, S. S.; Zaborsky, O. R.

    The book treats biomass sources, promising processes for the conversion of biomass into energy and fuels, and the technical and economic considerations in biomass conversion. Sources of biomass examined include crop residues and municipal, animal and industrial wastes, agricultural and forestry residues, aquatic biomass, marine biomass and silvicultural energy farms. Processes for biomass energy and fuel conversion by direct combustion (the Andco-Torrax system), thermochemical conversion (flash pyrolysis, carboxylolysis, pyrolysis, Purox process, gasification and syngas recycling) and biochemical conversion (anaerobic digestion, methanogenesis and ethanol fermentation) are discussed, and mass and energy balances are presented for each system.

  8. Application of sol gel spin coated yttria-stabilized zirconia layers for the improvement of solid oxide fuel cell electrolytes produced by atmospheric plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Lars; Kesler, Olivera; Tang, Zhaolin; Burgess, Alan

    Due to its high thermal stability and purely oxide ionic conductivity, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is the most commonly used electrolyte material for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Standard electrolyte fabrication techniques for planar SOFCs involve wet ceramic techniques such as tape-casting or screen printing, requiring sintering steps at temperatures above 1300 °C. Plasma spraying (PS) may provide a more rapid and cost efficient method to produce SOFCs without sintering. High-temperature sintering requires long processing times and can lead to oxidation of metal alloys used as mechanical supports, or to detrimental interreactions between the electrolyte and adjacent electrode layers. This study investigates the use of spin coated sol gel derived YSZ precursor solutions to fill the pores present in plasma sprayed YSZ layers, and to enhance the surface area for reaction at the electrolyte-cathode interface, without the use of high-temperature firing steps. The effects of different plasma conditions and sol concentrations and solid loadings on the gas permeability and fuel cell performance have been investigated.

  9. Nano and microparticle engineering of water insoluble drugs using a novel spray-drying process.

    PubMed

    Schafroth, Nina; Arpagaus, Cordin; Jadhav, Umesh Y; Makne, Sushil; Douroumis, Dennis

    2012-02-01

    In the current study nano and microparticle engineering of water insoluble drugs was conducted using a novel piezoelectric spray-drying approach. Cyclosporin A (CyA) and dexamethasone (DEX) were encapsulated in biodegradable poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) grades of different molecular weights. Spray-drying studies carried out with the Nano Spray Dryer B-90 employed with piezoelectric driven actuator. The processing parameters including inlet temperature, spray mesh diameter, sample flow rate, spray rate, applied pressure and sample concentration were examined in order to optimize the particle size and the obtained yield. The process parameters and the solute concentration showed a profound effect on the particle engineering and the obtained product yield. The produced powder presented consistent and reproducible spherical particles with narrow particle size distribution. Cyclosporin was found to be molecularly dispersed while dexamethasone was in crystalline state within the PLGA nanoparticles. Further evaluation revealed excellent drug loading, encapsulation efficiency and production yield. In vitro studies demonstrated sustained release patterns for the active substances. This novel spray-drying process proved to be efficient for nano and microparticle engineering of water insoluble active substances.

  10. The freezing process of continuously sprayed water droplets on the superhydrophobic silicone acrylate resin coating surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jianlin; Xu, Ke; Wu, Yao; Lan, Binhuan; Jiang, Xingliang; Shu, Lichun

    2014-10-01

    This study conducted experiments on freezing process of water droplets on glass slides covered with superhydrophobic coatings under the continuous water spray condition in the artificial climatic chamber which could simulate low temperature and high humidity environments. The freezing mechanism and freezing time of water droplets under the condition of continuous spray were observed by the microscope and were compared with those of the single static droplet. Then, differences of freezing process between continuously sprayed droplets and single static droplet were analyzed. Furthermore, the effects of static contact angle (CA), contact angle hysteresis (CAH) and roughness of the superhydrophobic coating surface on the freezing time of continuously sprayed droplets were explored. Results show that the freezing process of the continuously sprayed droplets on the superhydrophobic coating started with the homogeneous nucleation at gas-liquid interfaces. In addition, the temperature difference between the location near the solid-liquid interface and the location near the gas-liquid interface was the key factor that influenced the ice crystallization mechanism of water droplets. Moreover, with the larger CA, the smaller CAH and the greater roughness of the surface, droplets were more likely to roll down the surface and the freezing duration on the surface was delayed. Based on the findings, continuous water spray is suggested in the anti-icing superhydrophobic coatings research.

  11. Three-dimensional numerical simulation of gas dynamics effects on spray forming process

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, H.; Chyu, M.K.; Pien, S.J.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes three dimensional computational simulations of transport phenomena in a spray forming process. Major effort of this study has been focused on investigation of the effects of three-dimensional gas flow characteristics on the aluminum droplets deposition in an actual spray chamber. The preform shape resulted from the existing chamber condition is statistically modeled and compared with a two-dimensional simulation under similar conditions. The numerical procedure presented in this study is a fully interacting combination of Eulerian flow and Lagrangian droplet calculations combined with droplet turbulent dispersion and solidification models. It also includes a physical model of interaction between spray droplets and substrate. The rebound velocity of an impinging droplet is modeled based on the size, velocity, and solid fraction of the droplet. The present simulation suggests that three-dimensional modeling is critical to accurately simulate the transport phenomena in the present spray chamber.

  12. The spray-drying process is sufficient to inactivate infectious porcine epidemic diarrhea virus in plasma.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Priscilla F; Xiao, Chao-Ting; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Jianqiang; Halbur, Patrick G; Opriessnig, Tanja

    2014-11-07

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is considered an emergent pathogen associated with high economic losses in many pig rearing areas. Recently it has been suggested that PEDV could be transmitted to naïve pig populations through inclusion of spray-dried porcine plasma (SDPP) into the nursery diet which led to a ban of SDPP in several areas in North America and Europe. To determine the effect of spray-drying on PEDV infectivity, 3-week-old pigs were intragastrically inoculated with (1) raw porcine plasma spiked with PEDV (RAW-PEDV-CONTROL), (2) porcine plasma spiked with PEDV and then spray dried (SD-PEDV-CONTROL), (3) raw plasma from PEDV infected pigs (RAW-SICK), (4) spray-dried plasma from PEDV infected pigs (SD-SICK), or (5) spray-dried plasma from PEDV negative pigs (SD-NEG-CONTROL). For the spray-drying process, a tabletop spray-dryer with industry-like settings for inlet and outlet temperatures was used. In the RAW-PEDV-CONTROL group, PEDV RNA was present in feces at day post infection (dpi) 3 and the pigs seroconverted by dpi 14. In contrast, PEDV RNA in feces was not detected in any of the pigs in the other groups including the SD-PEDV-CONTROL group and none of the pigs had seroconverted by termination of the project at dpi 28. This work provides direct evidence that the experimental spray-drying process used in this study was effective in inactivating infectious PEDV in the plasma. Additionally, plasma collected from PEDV infected pigs at peak disease did not contain infectious PEDV. These findings suggest that the risk for PEDV transmission through commercially produced SDPP is minimal.

  13. Spray forming process for producing molds, dies and related tooling

    DOEpatents

    McHugh, K.M.; Key, J.F.

    1998-02-17

    A method is disclosed for spray forming manufacturing of near-net-shape molds, dies and related toolings, wherein liquid material such as molten metal, metallic alloys, or polymers are atomized into fine droplets by a high temperature, high velocity gas and deposited onto a pattern. Quenching of the atomized droplets provides a heat sink, thereby allowing undercooled and partially solidified droplets to be formed in-flight. Composites can be formed by combining the atomized droplets with solid particles such as whiskers or fibers. 17 figs.

  14. Ballistic Imaging of Liquid Breakup Processes in Dense Sprays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-24

    spray breakup in its entirety. Gas-phase flowfield dynamics can be captured via particle image velocimetry (PIV) and/or laser Doppler velocimetry... Coherent Legend Ti:Sapphire regenerative amplifier, seeded with a Spectra-Physics Tsunami Ti:Sapphire mode-locked laser generating 40 fs, 2.5 mJ pulses...scattering turbid media. Laser Phys. Lett., 3(9):464–7, 2006. [44] B. Kaldvee, A. Ehn, J. Bood, and M. Aldén. Development of a picosecond- LIDAR system

  15. Atomization and particle-jet interactions in the wire-arc spraying process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussary, N. A.; Heberlein, J. V. R.

    2001-12-01

    The wire-arc spraying process, one of several thermal spray processes, has gained a sizable part of the thermal spray market. However, better control is needed for this process to be used for applications of high precision coatings. This study is aimed at investigating the liquid-metal droplet formation process in order to identify methods for droplet trajectory control. A high speed Kodak imaging system has been used to observe the droplet formation for different operating conditions. Decreasing the upstream pressure and the current levels leads to a reduction in the asymmetric melting of both the anode and cathode. By decreasing the interactions of the large eddy structures with the formed metal agglomerates, one can achieve better control of the particle trajectories and jet divergence. Thus, coatings can be obtained with higher definition and improved reliability.

  16. Experimental and numerical evaluation of the performance of supersonic two-stage high-velocity oxy-fuel thermal spray (Warm Spray) gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katanoda, H.; Morita, H.; Komatsu, M.; Kuroda, S.

    2011-03-01

    The water-cooled supersonic two-stage high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray gun was developed to make a coating of temperature-sensitive material, such as titanium, on a substrate. The gun has a combustion chamber (CC) followed by a mixing chamber (MC), in which the combustion gas is mixed with the nitrogen gas at room temperature. The mixed gas is accelerated to supersonic speed through a converging-diverging (C-D) nozzle followed by a straight passage called the barrel. This paper proposes an experimental procedure to estimate the cooling rate of CC, MC and barrel separately. Then, the mathematical model is presented to predict the pressure and temperature in the MC for the specific mass flow rates of fuel, oxygen and nitrogen by assuming chemical equilibrium with water-cooling in the CC and MC, and frozen flow with constant specific heat from stagnant condition to the throat in the CC and MC. Finally, the present mathematical model was validated by comparing the calculated and measured stagnant pressures of the CC of the two-stage HVOF gun.

  17. Process, properties, and environmental response of plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Richard C.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental results are shown which demonstrate that the properties of plasma sprayed fully stabilized zirconia are strongly influenced by the process parameters. Properties of the coatings in the as-sprayed condition are shown to be additionally influenced by environmental exposure. This behavior is dependent on raw material considerations and processing conditions as well as exposure time and temperature. Process control methodology is described which can take into consideration these complex interactions and help to produce thermal barrier coatings in a cost effective way while meeting coating technical requirements.

  18. Process, properties and environmental response of plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, R. C.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental results are shown which demonstrate that the properties of plasma sprayed fully stabilized zirconia are strongly influenced by the process parameters. Properties of the coatings in the as-sprayed condition are shown to be additionally influenced by environmental exposure. This behavior is dependent on raw material considerations and processing conditions as well as exposure time and temperature. Process control methodology is described which can take into consideration these complex interactions and help to produce thermal barrier coatings in a cost effective way while meeting coating technical requirements.

  19. Process, properties, and environmental response of plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Richard C.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental results are shown which demonstrate that the properties of plasma sprayed fully stabilized zirconia are strongly influenced by the process parameters. Properties of the coatings in the as-sprayed condition are shown to be additionally influenced by environmental exposure. This behavior is dependent on raw material considerations and processing conditions as well as exposure time and temperature. Process control methodology is described which can take into consideration these complex interactions and help to produce thermal barrier coatings in a cost effective way while meeting coating technical requirements.

  20. Alternative Fuel for Portland Cement Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, Anton K; Duke, Steve R; Burch, Thomas E; Davis, Edward W; Zee, Ralph H; Bransby, David I; Hopkins, Carla; Thompson, Rutherford L; Duan, Jingran; Venkatasubramanian, Vignesh; Stephen, Giles

    2012-06-30

    The production of cement involves a combination of numerous raw materials, strictly monitored system processes, and temperatures on the order of 1500 °C. Immense quantities of fuel are required for the production of cement. Traditionally, energy from fossil fuels was solely relied upon for the production of cement. The overarching project objective is to evaluate the use of alternative fuels to lessen the dependence on non-renewable resources to produce portland cement. The key objective of using alternative fuels is to continue to produce high-quality cement while decreasing the use of non-renewable fuels and minimizing the impact on the environment. Burn characteristics and thermodynamic parameters were evaluated with a laboratory burn simulator under conditions that mimic those in the preheater where the fuels are brought into a cement plant. A drop-tube furnace and visualization method were developed that show potential for evaluating time- and space-resolved temperature distributions for fuel solid particles and liquid droplets undergoing combustion in various combustion atmospheres. Downdraft gasification has been explored as a means to extract chemical energy from poultry litter while limiting the throughput of potentially deleterious components with regards to use in firing a cement kiln. Results have shown that the clinkering is temperature independent, at least within the controllable temperature range. Limestone also had only a slight effect on the fusion when used to coat the pellets. However, limestone addition did display some promise in regards to chlorine capture, as ash analyses showed chlorine concentrations of more than four times greater in the limestone infused ash as compared to raw poultry litter. A reliable and convenient sampling procedure was developed to estimate the combustion quality of broiler litter that is the best compromise between convenience and reliability by means of statistical analysis. Multi-day trial burns were conducted

  1. Processing Conditions Affecting Grain Size and Mechanical Properties in Nanocomposites Produced via Cold Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaliere, P.; Perrone, A.; Silvello, A.

    2014-10-01

    Cold spray is a coating technology based on aerodynamics and high-speed impact dynamics. In this process, spray particles (usually 1-50 μm in diameter) are accelerated to a high velocity (typically 300-1200 m/s) by a high-speed gas (pre-heated air, nitrogen, or helium) flow that is generated through a convergent-divergent de Laval-type nozzle. A coating is formed through the intensive plastic deformation of particles impacting on a substrate at a temperature below the melting point of the spray material. In the present paper the main processing parameters affecting the microstructural and mechanical behavior of metal-metal cold spray deposits are described. The effect of process parameters on grain refinement and mechanical properties were analyzed for composite particles of Al-Al2O3, Ni-BN, Cu-Al2O3, and Co-SiC. The properties of the formed nanocomposites were compared with those of the parent materials sprayed under the same conditions. The process conditions, leading to a strong grain refinement with an acceptable level of the deposit mechanical properties such as porosity and adhesion strength, are discussed.

  2. High-speed visualization of fuel spray impingement in the near-wall region using a DISI injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, N.; Kintaka, K.; Tomita, E.

    2017-02-01

    We used a multi-hole injector to spray isooctane under atmospheric conditions and observed droplet impingement behaviors. It is generally known that droplet impact regimes such as splashing, deposition, or bouncing are governed by the Weber number. However, owing to its complexity, little has been reported on microscopic visualization of poly-dispersed spray. During the spray impingement process, a large number of droplets approach, hit, then interact with the wall. It is therefore difficult to focus on a single droplet and observe the impingement process. We solved this difficulty using high-speed microscopic visualization. The spray/wall interaction processes were recorded by a high-speed camera (Shimadzu HPV-X2) with a long-distance microscope. We captured several impinging microscopic droplets. After optimizing the magnification and frame rate, the atomization behaviors, splashing and deposition, were recorded. Then, we processed the images obtained to determine droplet parameters such as the diameter, velocity, and impingement angle. Based on this information, the critical threshold between splashing and deposition was investigated in terms of the normal and parallel components of the Weber number with respect to the wall. The results suggested that, on a dry wall, we should set the normal critical Weber number to 300.

  3. Fuel Retention Improvement at High Temperatures in Tungsten-Uranium Dioxide Dispersion Fuel Elements by Plasma-Spray Cladding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grisaffe, Salvatore J.; Caves, Robert M.

    1964-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to determine the feasibility of depositing integrally bonded plasma-sprayed tungsten coatings onto 80-volume-percent tungsten - 20-volume-percent uranium dioxide composites. These composites were face clad with thin tungsten foil to inhibit uranium dioxide loss at elevated temperatures, but loss at the unclad edges was still significant. By preheating the composite substrates to approximately 3700 degrees F in a nitrogen environment, metallurgically bonded tungsten coatings could be obtained directly by plasma spraying. Furthermore, even though these coatings were thin and somewhat porous, they greatly inhibited the loss of uranium dioxide. For example, a specimen that was face clad but had no edge cladding lost 5.8 percent uranium dioxide after 2 hours at 4750 dgrees F in flowing hydrogen. A similar specimen with plasma-spray-coated edges, however, lost only 0.75 percent uranium dioxide under the same testing conditions.

  4. Effect of plastic viscosity and yield value on spray characteristics of magnesium-slurry fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prok, George M

    1957-01-01

    Magnesium slurries were sprayed onto a sheet of paper from an air-atomizing injector. Drop sizes and distributions were then determined from photomicrographs. Four different surface-active additives were used in preparing the slurries to give plastic viscosities between 0.22 and 0.51 poise and yield values between 150 and 810 dynes-cm(exp 2). It was found that there was no significant variation in the spray characteristics of these slurries when tested under the same conditions.

  5. Characterization of sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chigier, N.; Mao, C.-P.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that most practical power generation and propulsion systems involve the burning of different types of fuel sprays, taking into account aircraft propulsion, industrial furnaces, boilers, gas turbines, and diesel engines. There has been a lack of data which can serve as a basis for spray model development and validation. A major aim of the present investigation is to fill this gap. Experimental apparatus and techniques for studying the characteristics of fuel sprays are discussed, taking into account two-dimensional still photography, cinematography, holography, a laser diffraction particle sizer, and a laser anemometer. The considered instruments were used in a number of experiments, taking into account three different types of fuel spray. Attention is given to liquid fuel sprays, high pressure pulsed diesel sprays, and coal-water slurry sprays.

  6. Influence of the Process Parameters on the Properties of Diamax Deposits Obtained by Flame Thermal Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baciu, M. A.; Nanu, C.; Sandu, G. I.; Toma, B. F.; Bejinariu, C.; Cazac, A.; Toma, S. L.

    2017-06-01

    The paper aims to determine the influence of the process parameters, namely: C2H2 gas flow rate and inclination angle of the spraying gun on physico and mechanical properties of the hardalloyed layers of Diamax 10999 Eutalloy, on steel support - obtained by flame thermal spray process. For this purpose, the two technological parameters varied on three levels and in each case were evaluated the deposits properties. Investigations conducted by electronical microscopy SEM, X-ray, micro-hardness and by adherence evaluation and of the deposits porosity allowed the establishment of the performant deposit. Thus it was found that at the decreasing of the spraying distance,the deposit porosity decreases; in layer appear the phenomena of overheating, issue that determine the adherence reducing in average of 22%, and also the modification of chemical composition. The results recorded have afforded the obtaining of an optimum domain of variation of the process parameters.

  7. Processing of driver fuel assemblies at FFTF

    SciTech Connect

    Danko, A.D.; Hicks, D.F.; Arneson, S.O.

    1982-07-01

    The ability to disassemble an irradiated Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Driver Fuel Assembly (DFA) is important both to the continued operation of the FFTF and the future of the Breeder Reactor Program. At the FFTF, DFA's with up to three (3)* kilowatts of decay heat will be placed in the Interim Examination and Maintenance (IEM) Cell for disassembly and nondestructive examination. This process includes sodium removal, duct measurement, duct cutting and pulling, fuel pin removal, and component disposition to other laboratories for destructive examination.

  8. Connecting marine productivity to sea-spray via microscale biological processes: phytoplancton demise and viral infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facchini, C.; O'Dowd, C. D. D.; Danovaro, R.

    2015-12-01

    The processes that link phytoplankton biomass and productivity to the organic matter enrichment in sea spray aerosol are far from being elucidated and modelling predictions remain highly uncertain at the moment. While some studies have asserted that the enrichment of OM in sea spray aerosol is independent on marine productivity, others, have shown significant correlation with phytoplankton biomass and productivity (Chl-a retrieved by satellites). We present here new results illustrating a clear link between OM mass-fraction enrichment in sea spray (OMss) and both phytoplankton-biomass and Net Primary Productivity (NPP). We suggest that the OM enrichment of sea spray through the demise of the bloom, driven by nanoscale biological processes (such as viral infections), which determine the release of celldebris, exudates and other colloidal material. This OM, through processes, leads to enrichment in sea-spray, thus demonstrating an important coupling between biologically-drive plankton bloom termination, marine productivity and sea-spraymodification with potentially significant climate impacts.

  9. Effect of spray drying processing parameters on the insecticidal activity of two encapsulated formulations of baculovirus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of spray dryer processing parameters on the process yield and insecticidal activity of baculovirus to support the development of this beneficial group of microbes as biopesticides. For each of two baculoviruses [granulovirus (GV) from Pieris rapae (L....

  10. Vacuum Plasma Spray of CuCrNb Alloy for Advanced Liquid - Fuel Combustion Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Frank

    2000-01-01

    The copper-8 atomic percent chromium-4 atomic percent niobium (CuCrNb) alloy was developed by Glenn Research Center (formally Lewis Research Center) as an improved alloy for combustion chamber liners. In comparison to NARloy-Z, the baseline (as in Space Shuttle Main Engine) alloy for such liners, CuCrNb demonstrates mechanical and thermophysical properties equivalent to NARloy-Z, but at temperatures 100 C to 150 C (180 F to 270 F) higher. Anticipated materials related benefits include decreasing the thrust cell liner weight 5% to 20%, increasing the service life at least two fold over current combustion chamber design, and increasing the safety margins available to designers. By adding an oxidation and thermal barrier coating to the liner, the combustion chamber can operate at even higher temperatures. For all these benefits, however, this alloy cannot be formed using conventional casting and forging methods because of the levels of chromium and niobium, which exceed their solubility limit in copper. Until recently, the only forming process that maintains the required microstructure of CrNb intermetallics is powder metallurgy formation of a billet from powder stock, followed by extrusion. This severely limits its usefulness in structural applications, particularly the complex shapes required for combustion chamber liners. Vacuum plasma spray (VPS) has been demonstrated as a method to form structural articles including small combustion chambers from the CuCrNb alloy. In addition, an oxidation and thermal barrier layer can be formed integrally on the hot wall of the liner that improve performance and extend service life. This paper discusses the metallurgy and thermomechanical properties of VPS formed CuCrNb versus the baseline powder metallurgy process, and the manufacturing of small combustion chamber liners at Marshall Space Flight Center using the VPS process. The benefits to advanced propulsion initiatives of using VPS to fabricate combustion chamber liners

  11. Vacuum Plasma Spray of CuCrNb Alloy for Advanced Liquid - Fuel Combustion Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Frank

    2000-01-01

    The copper-8 atomic percent chromium-4 atomic percent niobium (CuCrNb) alloy was developed by Glenn Research Center (formally Lewis Research Center) as an improved alloy for combustion chamber liners. In comparison to NARloy-Z, the baseline (as in Space Shuttle Main Engine) alloy for such liners, CuCrNb demonstrates mechanical and thermophysical properties equivalent to NARloy-Z, but at temperatures 100 C to 150 C (180 F to 270 F) higher. Anticipated materials related benefits include decreasing the thrust cell liner weight 5% to 20%, increasing the service life at least two fold over current combustion chamber design, and increasing the safety margins available to designers. By adding an oxidation and thermal barrier coating to the liner, the combustion chamber can operate at even higher temperatures. For all these benefits, however, this alloy cannot be formed using conventional casting and forging methods because of the levels of chromium and niobium, which exceed their solubility limit in copper. Until recently, the only forming process that maintains the required microstructure of CrNb intermetallics is powder metallurgy formation of a billet from powder stock, followed by extrusion. This severely limits its usefulness in structural applications, particularly the complex shapes required for combustion chamber liners. Vacuum plasma spray (VPS) has been demonstrated as a method to form structural articles including small combustion chambers from the CuCrNb alloy. In addition, an oxidation and thermal barrier layer can be formed integrally on the hot wall of the liner that improve performance and extend service life. This paper discusses the metallurgy and thermomechanical properties of VPS formed CuCrNb versus the baseline powder metallurgy process, and the manufacturing of small combustion chamber liners at Marshall Space Flight Center using the VPS process. The benefits to advanced propulsion initiatives of using VPS to fabricate combustion chamber liners

  12. FUEL PROCESSING FOR FUEL CELLS: EFFECTS ON CATALYST DURABILITY AND CARBON FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    R. BORUP; M. INBODY; B. MORTON; L. BROWN

    2001-05-01

    On-board production of hydrogen for fuel cells for automotive applications is a challenging developmental task. The fuel processor must show long term durability and under challenging conditions. Fuel processor catalysts in automotive fuel processors will be exposed to large thermal variations, vibrations, exposure to uncontrolled ambient conditions, and various impurities from ambient air and from fuel. For the commercialization of fuel processors, the delineation of effects on catalyst activity and durability are required. We are studying fuels and fuel constituent effects on the fuel processor system as part of the DOE Fuel Cells for Transportation program. Pure fuel components are tested to delineate the fuel component effect on the fuel processor and fuel processor catalysts. Component blends are used to simulate ''real fuels'', with various fuel mixtures being examined such as reformulated gasoline and naptha. The aliphatic, napthenic, olefin and aromatic content are simulated to represent the chemical kinetics of possible detrimental reactions, such as carbon formation, during fuel testing. Testing has examined the fuel processing performance of different fuel components to help elucidate the fuel constituent effects on fuel processing performance and upon catalyst durability. Testing has been conducted with vapor fuels, including natural gas and pure methane. The testing of pure methane and comparable testing with natural gas (97% methane) have shown some measurable differences in performance in the fuel processor. Major gasoline fuel constituents, such as aliphatic compounds, napthanes, and aromatics have been compared for their effect on the fuel processing performance. Experiments have been conducted using high-purity compounds to observe the fuel processing properties of the individual components and to document individual fuel component performance. The relative carbon formation of different fuel constituents have been measured by monitoring carbon via

  13. Connecting marine productivity to sea-spray via nanoscale biological processes: Phytoplankton Dance or Death Disco?

    PubMed

    O'Dowd, Colin; Ceburnis, Darius; Ovadnevaite, Jurgita; Bialek, Jakub; Stengel, Dagmar B; Zacharias, Merry; Nitschke, Udo; Connan, Solene; Rinaldi, Matteo; Fuzzi, Sandro; Decesari, Stefano; Facchini, Maria Cristina; Marullo, Salvatore; Santoleri, Rosalia; Dell'Anno, Antonio; Corinaldesi, Cinzia; Tangherlini, Michael; Danovaro, Roberto

    2015-10-14

    Bursting bubbles at the ocean-surface produce airborne salt-water spray-droplets, in turn, forming climate-cooling marine haze and cloud layers. The reflectance and ultimate cooling effect of these layers is determined by the spray's water-uptake properties that are modified through entrainment of ocean-surface organic matter (OM) into the airborne droplets. We present new results illustrating a clear dependence of OM mass-fraction enrichment in sea spray (OMss) on both phytoplankton-biomass, determined from Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) and Net Primary Productivity (NPP). The correlation coefficient for OMss as a function of Chl-a increased form 0.67 on a daily timescale to 0.85 on a monthly timescale. An even stronger correlation was found as a function of NPP, increasing to 0.93 on a monthly timescale. We suggest the observed dependence is through the demise of the bloom, driven by nanoscale biological processes (such as viral infections), releasing large quantities of transferable OM comprising cell debris, exudates and other colloidal materials. This OM, through aggregation processes, leads to enrichment in sea-spray, thus demonstrating an important coupling between biologically-driven plankton bloom termination, marine productivity and sea-spray modification with potentially significant climate impacts.

  14. Formulation parameters of crystalline nanosuspensions on spray drying processing: a DoE approach.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sumit; Xu, Xiaoming; Gokhale, Rajeev; Burgess, Diane J

    2014-04-10

    Nanocrystalline suspensions offer a promising approach to improve dissolution of BCS class II/IV compounds. Spray drying was utilized as a downstream process to improve the physical and chemical stability of dried nanocrystals. The effect of nanocrystalline suspension formulation variables on spray-drying processing was investigated. Naproxen and indomethacin nanocrystalline formulations were formulated with either Dowfax 2A1 (small molecule) or HPMC E15 (high molecular weight polymer) and spray drying was performed. A DoE approach was utilized to understand the effect of critical formulation variables, i.e. type of stabilizer, type of drug, ratio of drug-to-stabilizer and drug concentration. The powders were analyzed for particle size, moisture content, powder X-ray diffraction and dissolution. A dialysis sac adapter for USP apparatus II was developed which provided good discrimination between aggregated and non-aggregated formulations. Nanocrystal aggregation was dependent on the drug-to-stabilizer ratio. The glass transition temperature and the charge effect played a dominant role on spray-dried powder yield. Those formulations with low drug-to-excipient ratios were less aggregating and showed faster dissolution compared to those formulations with high drug-to-excipient ratios. All stable (less aggregated) formulations were subjected to accelerated storage stability testing. The Flory-Huggins interaction parameter (between drug and excipients) correlated with the spray-dried nanocrystal formulations stability. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Evaluation of a Heat Flux Sensor for Spray Cooling for the Die Casting Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S; Wu, Zhuoxi

    2007-02-01

    During the die casting process, lubricants are sprayed in order to cool the dies and facilitate the ejection of the casting. In this paper, a new technique for measuring the heat flux during lubricant application is evaluated. Data from experiments conducted using water spray are first presented. Water spray experiments were conducted for different initial plate temperatures. Measurements were conducted for the application of two different lubricants, of dilution ratios of 1/15 and 1/50 of lubricant in water. The measurement uncertainties were documented. The results show that the surface temperature decreases initially very fast. Numerical simulation results confirmed that the abrupt temperature drop is not an artifact but illustrates the thermal shock experienced by the dies during the initial stages of lubricant application. The lubricant experiments show that the sensor can be successfully used for testing die lubricants with typical dilution ratios encountered in the die casting process.

  16. Recycling of nuclear spent fuel with AIROX processing

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, D.; Jahshan, S.N.; Allison, C.M.; Kuan, P.; Thomas, T.R.

    1992-12-01

    This report examines the concept of recycling light water reactor (LWR) fuel through use of a dry-processing technique known as the AIROX (Atomics International Reduction Oxidation) process. In this concept, the volatiles and the cladding from spent LWR fuel are separated from the fuel by the AIROX process. The fuel is then reenriched and made into new fuel pins with new cladding. The feasibility of the concept is studied from a technical and high level waste minimization perspective.

  17. Optimization and scale-up of a fluid bed tangential spray rotogranulation process.

    PubMed

    Bouffard, J; Dumont, H; Bertrand, F; Legros, R

    2007-04-20

    The production of pellets in the pharmaceutical industry generally involves multi-step processing: (1) mixing, (2) wet granulation, (3) spheronization and (4) drying. While extrusion-spheronization processes have been popular because of their simplicity, fluid-bed rotogranulation (FBRG) is now being considered as an alternative, since it offers the advantages of combining the different steps into one processing unit, thus reducing processing time and material handling. This work aimed at the development of a FBRG process for the production of pellets in a 4.5-l Glatt GCPG1 tangential spray rotoprocessor and its optimization using factorial design. The factors considered were: (1) rotor disc velocity, (2) gap air pressure, (3) air flow rate, (4) binder spray rate and (5) atomization pressure. The pellets were characterized for their physical properties by measuring size distribution, roundness and flow properties. The results indicated that: pellet mean particle size is negatively affected by air flow rate and rotor plate speed, while binder spray rate has a positive effect on size; pellet flow properties are enhanced by operating with increased air flow rate and worsened with increased binder spray rate. Multiple regression analysis enabled the identification of an optimal operating window for production of acceptable pellets. Scale-up of these operating conditions was tested in a 30-l Glatt GPCG15 FBRG.

  18. Ceramic Top Coats of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings: Materials, Processes, and Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakan, Emine; Vaßen, Robert

    2017-08-01

    The ceramic top coat has a major influence on the performance of the thermal barrier coating systems (TBCs). Yttria-partially-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is the top coat material frequently used, and the major deposition processes of the YSZ top coat are atmospheric plasma spraying and electron beam physical vapor deposition. Recently, also new thermal spray processes such as suspension plasma spraying or plasma spray-physical vapor deposition have been intensively investigated for TBC top coat deposition. These new processes and particularly the different coating microstructures that can be deposited with them will be reviewed in this article. Furthermore, the properties and the intrinsic-extrinsic degradation mechanisms of the YSZ will be discussed. Following the TBC deposition processes and standard YSZ material, alternative ceramic materials such as perovskites and hexaaluminates will be summarized, while properties of pyrochlores with regard to their crystal structure will be discussed more in detail. The merits of the pyrochlores such as good CMAS resistance as well as their weaknesses, e.g., low fracture toughness, processability issues, will be outlined.

  19. Prontonic ceramic membrane fuel cells with layered GdBaCo 2O 5+ x cathode prepared by gel-casting and suspension spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Bin; Zhang, Shangquan; Zhang, Linchao; Bi, Lei; Ding, Hanping; Liu, Xingqin; Gao, Jianfeng; Meng, Guangyao

    In order to develop a simple and cost-effective route to fabricate protonic ceramic membrane fuel cells (PCMFCs) with layered GdBaCo 2O 5+ x (GBCO) cathode, a dense BaZr 0.1Ce 0.7Y 0.2O 3- δ (BZCY7) electrolyte was fabricated on a porous anode by gel-casting and suspension spray. The porous NiO-BaZr 0.1Ce 0.7Y 0.2O 3- δ (NiO-BZCY7) anode was directly prepared from metal oxide (NiO, BaCO 3, ZrO 2, CeO 2 and Y 2O 3) by a simple gel-casting process. A suspension of BaZr 0.1Ce 0.7Y 0.2O 3- δ powders synthesized by gel-casting was then employed to deposit BaZr 0.1Ce 0.7Y 0.2O 3- δ (BZCY7) thin layer by pressurized spray process on NiO-BZCY7 anode. The bi-layer with 10 μm dense BZCY7 electrolyte was obtained by co-sintering at 1400 °C for 5 h. With layered GBCO cathode synthesized by gel-casting on the bi-layer, single cells were assembled and tested with H 2 as fuel and the static air as oxidant. An open-circuit potential of 0.98 V, a maximum power density of 266 mW cm -2, and a low polarization resistance of the electrodes of 0.16 Ω cm 2 was achieved at 700 °C.

  20. Production of dissolvable microneedles using an atomised spray process: effect of microneedle composition on skin penetration.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Marie G; Vucen, Sonja; Vrdoljak, Anto; Kelly, Adam; O'Mahony, Conor; Crean, Abina M; Moore, Anne

    2014-02-01

    Dissolvable microneedles offer an attractive delivery system for transdermal drug and vaccine delivery. They are most commonly formed by filling a microneedle mold with liquid formulation using vacuum or centrifugation to overcome the constraints of surface tension and solution viscosity. Here, we demonstrate a novel microneedle fabrication method employing an atomised spray technique that minimises the effects of the liquid surface tension and viscosity when filling molds. This spray method was successfully used to fabricate dissolvable microneedles (DMN) from a wide range of sugars (trehalose, fructose and raffinose) and polymeric materials (polyvinyl alcohol, polyvinylpyrrolidone, carboxymethylcellulose, hydroxypropylmethylcellulose and sodium alginate). Fabrication by spraying produced microneedles with amorphous content using single sugar compositions. These microneedles displayed sharp tips and had complete fidelity to the master silicon template. Using a method to quantify the consistency of DMN penetration into different skin layers, we demonstrate that the material of construction significantly influenced the extent of skin penetration. We demonstrate that this spraying method can be adapted to produce novel laminate-layered as well as horizontally-layered DMN arrays. To our knowledge, this is the first report documenting the use of an atomising spray, at ambient, mild processing conditions, to create dissolvable microneedle arrays that can possess novel, laminate layering.

  1. Distributed generation - the fuel processing example

    SciTech Connect

    Victor, R.A.; Farris, P.J.; Maston, V.

    1996-12-31

    The increased costs of transportation and distribution are leading many commercial and industrial firms to consider the on-site generation for energy and other commodities used in their facilities. This trend has been accelerated by the development of compact, efficient processes for converting basic raw materials into finished services at the distributed sites. Distributed generation with the PC25{trademark} fuel cell power plant is providing a new cost effective technology to meet building electric and thermal needs. Small compact on-site separator systems are providing nitrogen and oxygen to many industrial users of these gases. The adaptation of the fuel processing section of the PC25 power plant for on-site hydrogen generation at industrial sites extends distributed generation benefits to the users of industrial hydrogen.

  2. Chemical compatibility and properties of suspension plasma-sprayed SrTiO3-based anodes for intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shan-Lin; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2014-10-01

    La-doped strontium titanate (LST) is a promising, redox-stable perovskite material for direct hydrocarbon oxidation anodes in intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs). In this study, nano-sized LST and Sm-doped ceria (SDC) powders are produced by the sol-gel and glycine-nitrate processes, respectively. The chemical compatibility between LST and electrolyte materials is studied. A LST-SDC composite anode is prepared by suspension plasma spraying (SPS). The effects of annealing conditions on the phase structure, microstructure, and chemical stability of the LST-SDC composite anode are investigated. The results indicate that the suspension plasma-sprayed LST-SDC anode has the same phase structure as the original powders. LST exhibits a good chemical compatibility with SDC and Mg/Sr-doped lanthanum gallate (LSGM). The anode has a porosity of ∼40% with a finely porous structure that provides high gas permeability and a long three-phase boundary for the anode reaction. Single cells assembled with the LST-SDC anode, La0.8Sr0.2Ga0.8Mg0.2O3 electrolyte, and La0.8Sr0.2CoO3-SDC cathode show a good performance at 650-800 °C. The annealing reduces the impedances due to the enhancement in the bonding between the particles in the anode and interface of anode and LSGM electrolyte, thus improving the output performance of the cell.

  3. Fabrication of flexible ultraviolet photodetectors using an all-spray-coating process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Junebeom; Lee, Jonghun; Ju, Sanghyun

    2016-04-01

    We report on a flexible ultraviolet (UV) photodetector fabricated using an all-spray-coating process. Two spray coating units were utilized to deposit semiconducting tin oxide nanowires as an active channel layer and metallic silver nanowires as an electrode layer. The device was mounted on the back of a human hand, and the UV intensities in sunlight were monitored over time. The fabricated flexible UV photodetector showed highly sensitive, stable, and reproducible detection properties. The main advantage of the proposed fabrication method is the extension of the integration environment by allowing direct application on various substrates, such as clothes and human skin, with varying device size and shape.

  4. The effect of processing parameters on plasma sprayed beryllium for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, R.G.; Stanek, P.W.; Jacobson, L.A.; Cowgill, D.F.; Snead, L.L.

    1993-10-01

    Plasma spraying is being investigated as a potential coating technique for applying thin (0.1--5mm) layers of beryllium on plasma facing surfaces of blanket modules in ITER and also as an in-situ repair technique for repairing eroded beryllium surfaces in high heat flux divertor regions. High density spray deposits (>98% of theoretical density) of beryllium will be required in order to maximize the thermal conductivity of the beryllium coatings. A preliminary investigation was done to determine the effect of various processing parameters (particle size, particle morphology, secondary gas additions and reduced chamber pressure) on the as-deposited density of beryllium. The deposits were made using spherical beryllium feedstock powder which was produced by centrifugal atomization at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Improvements in the as-deposited densities and deposit efficiencies of the beryllium spray deposits will be discussed along with the corresponding thermal conductivity and outgassing behavior of these deposits.

  5. The N.A.C.A. Photographic Apparatus for Studying Fuel Sprays from Oil Engine Injection Valves and Test Results from Several Researches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beardsley, Edward G

    1928-01-01

    Apparatus for recording photographically the start, growth, and cut-off of oil sprays from injection valves has been developed at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory. The apparatus consists of a high-tension transformer by means of which a bank of condensers is charged to a high voltage. The controlled discharge of these condensers in sequence, at a rate of several thousand per second, produces electric sparks of sufficient intensity to illuminate the moving spray for photographing. The sprays are injected from various types of valves into a chamber containing gases at pressures up to 600 pounds per square inch. Several series of pictures are shown. The results give the effects of injection pressure, chamber pressure, specific gravity of the fuel oil used, and injection-valve design, upon spray characteristics.

  6. Development of self-lubricating coatings via cold spray process: Feedstock formulation and deformation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Gaurav

    Because of their low density, high specific strength and high stiffness, titanium alloys are one of the prime candidates for structural application often requiring specific tribological properties. However, their relatively high friction coefficients and low wear resistance are limiting their application over a wider temperature range. Various coatings deposited with technologies like high velocity oxy flame (HVOF), detonation gun (DGun), electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD), etc., can improve wear performance and decrease corrosion damage. These technologies require high processing temperatures precluding the integration of thermally vulnerable lubricants. This research looks at a relatively new coating process called Cold Spray for self-lubricating coatings on Ti-6Al-4V alloys. Cold Spray can produce coatings without significant heating of the sprayed powder or substrate. The particles are in solid state as they hit the substrate, and the formation of coatings occurs mainly due to the kinetic energy of the particles. Therefore, the impact velocity plays an important role. Below a critical value, the particles can cause densification and abrasion of the substrate. The focus of this study is to design composite coatings for the cold spray process and determination of the critical velocity through finite element modeling. Different powders and feedstock formulation techniques are discussed in order to find an optimum formulation for self-lubricating coatings. A composite powder (Ni coated hBN) was found to be the best candidate for the feedstock. The deformation of composite particles upon impact on the substrate was modeled and compared to the experiments. A number of approaches involving different modeling platforms, particle-substrate geometries, and material models have been tried. This work presents the results of ANSYS (version 10.0) analysis using an axisymmetric model of the particle impact. Stress and strain distributions in the particle

  7. In Situ fuel processing in a microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Bahartan, Karnit; Amir, Liron; Israel, Alvaro; Lichtenstein, Rachel G; Alfonta, Lital

    2012-09-01

    A microbial fuel cell (MFC) was designed in which fuel is generated in the cell by the enzyme glucoamylase, which is displayed on the surface of yeast. The enzyme digests starch specifically into monomeric glucose units and as a consequence enables further glucose oxidation by microorganisms present in the MFC anode. The oxidative enzyme glucose oxidase was coupled to the glucoamylase digestive enzyme. When both enzymes were displayed on the surface of yeast cells in a mixed culture, superior fuel-cell performance was observed in comparison with other combinations of yeast cells, unmodified yeast, or pure enzymes. The feasibility of the use of the green macroalgae Ulva lactuca in such a genetically modified MFC was also demonstrated. Herein, we report the performance of such fuel cells as a proof of concept for the enzymatic digestion of complex organic fuels in the anode of MFCs to render the fuel more available to microorganisms.

  8. Analytical methods to characterize heterogeneous raw material for thermal spray process: cored wire Inconel 625

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, T.; Bonebeau, S.; Drehmann, R.; Grund, T.; Pawlowski, L.; Lampke, T.

    2016-03-01

    In wire arc spraying, the raw material needs to exhibit sufficient formability and ductility in order to be processed. By using an electrically conductive, metallic sheath, it is also possible to handle non-conductive and/or brittle materials such as ceramics. In comparison to massive wire, a cored wire has a heterogeneous material distribution. Due to this fact and the complex thermodynamic processes during wire arc spraying, it is very difficult to predict the resulting chemical composition in the coating with sufficient accuracy. An Inconel 625 cored wire was used to investigate this issue. In a comparative study, the analytical results of the raw material were compared to arc sprayed coatings and droplets, which were remelted in an arc furnace under argon atmosphere. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis were used to determine the chemical composition. The phase determination was performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results were related to the manufacturer specifications and evaluated in respect to differences in the chemical composition. The comparison between the feedstock powder, the remelted droplets and the thermally sprayed coatings allows to evaluate the influence of the processing methods on the resulting chemical and phase composition.

  9. Pyroprocess for processing spent nuclear fuel

    DOEpatents

    Miller, William E.; Tomczuk, Zygmunt

    2002-01-01

    This is a pyroprocess for processing spent nuclear fuel. The spent nuclear fuel is chopped into pieces and placed in a basket which is lowered in to a liquid salt solution. The salt is rich in ZrF.sub.4 and containing alkali or alkaline earth fluorides, and in particular, the salt chosen was LiF-50 mol % ZrF.sub.4 with a eutectic melting point of 500.degree. C. Prior to lowering the basket, the salt is heated to a temperature of between 550.degree. C. and 700.degree. C. in order to obtain a molten solution. After dissolution the oxides of U, Th, rare earth and other like oxides, the salt bath solution is subject to hydro-fluorination to remove the oxygen and then to a fluorination step to remove U as gaseous UF.sub.6. In addition, after dissolution, the basket contains PuO.sub.2 and undissolved parts of the fuel rods, and the basket and its contents are processed to remove the Pu.

  10. The study on injection parameters of selected alternative fuels used in diesel engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balawender, K.; Kuszewski, H.; Lejda, K.; Lew, K.

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents selected results concerning fuel charging and spraying process for selected alternative fuels, including regular diesel fuel, rape oil, FAME, blends of these fuels in various proportions, and blends of rape oil with diesel fuel. Examination of the process included the fuel charge measurements. To this end, a set-up for examination of Common Rail-type injection systems was used constructed on the basis of Bosch EPS-815 test bench, from which the high-pressure pump drive system was adopted. For tests concerning the spraying process, a visualisation chamber with constant volume was utilised. The fuel spray development was registered with the use of VisioScope (AVL).

  11. Prediction of soot and thermal radiation in a model gas turbine combustor burning kerosene fuel spray at different swirl levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghose, Prakash; Patra, Jitendra; Datta, Amitava; Mukhopadhyay, Achintya

    2016-05-01

    Combustion of kerosene fuel spray has been numerically simulated in a laboratory scale combustor geometry to predict soot and the effects of thermal radiation at different swirl levels of primary air flow. The two-phase motion in the combustor is simulated using an Eulerian-Lagragian formulation considering the stochastic separated flow model. The Favre-averaged governing equations are solved for the gas phase with the turbulent quantities simulated by realisable k-ɛ model. The injection of the fuel is considered through a pressure swirl atomiser and the combustion is simulated by a laminar flamelet model with detailed kinetics of kerosene combustion. Soot formation in the flame is predicted using an empirical model with the model parameters adjusted for kerosene fuel. Contributions of gas phase and soot towards thermal radiation have been considered to predict the incident heat flux on the combustor wall and fuel injector. Swirl in the primary flow significantly influences the flow and flame structures in the combustor. The stronger recirculation at high swirl draws more air into the flame region, reduces the flame length and peak flame temperature and also brings the soot laden zone closer to the inlet plane. As a result, the radiative heat flux on the peripheral wall decreases at high swirl and also shifts closer to the inlet plane. However, increased swirl increases the combustor wall temperature due to radial spreading of the flame. The high incident radiative heat flux and the high surface temperature make the fuel injector a critical item in the combustor. The injector peak temperature increases with the increase in swirl flow mainly because the flame is located closer to the inlet plane. On the other hand, a more uniform temperature distribution in the exhaust gas can be attained at the combustor exit at high swirl condition.

  12. Connecting marine productivity to sea-spray via nanoscale biological processes: Phytoplankton Dance or Death Disco?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dowd, Colin; Ceburnis, Darius; Ovadnevaite, Jurgita; Bialek, Jakub; Stengel, Dagmar B.; Zacharias, Merry; Nitschke, Udo; Connan, Solene; Rinaldi, Matteo; Fuzzi, Sandro; Decesari, Stefano; Cristina Facchini, Maria; Marullo, Salvatore; Santoleri, Rosalia; Dell'Anno, Antonio; Corinaldesi, Cinzia; Tangherlini, Michael; Danovaro, Roberto

    2015-10-01

    Bursting bubbles at the ocean-surface produce airborne salt-water spray-droplets, in turn, forming climate-cooling marine haze and cloud layers. The reflectance and ultimate cooling effect of these layers is determined by the spray’s water-uptake properties that are modified through entrainment of ocean-surface organic matter (OM) into the airborne droplets. We present new results illustrating a clear dependence of OM mass-fraction enrichment in sea spray (OMss) on both phytoplankton-biomass, determined from Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) and Net Primary Productivity (NPP). The correlation coefficient for OMss as a function of Chl-a increased form 0.67 on a daily timescale to 0.85 on a monthly timescale. An even stronger correlation was found as a function of NPP, increasing to 0.93 on a monthly timescale. We suggest the observed dependence is through the demise of the bloom, driven by nanoscale biological processes (such as viral infections), releasing large quantities of transferable OM comprising cell debris, exudates and other colloidal materials. This OM, through aggregation processes, leads to enrichment in sea-spray, thus demonstrating an important coupling between biologically-driven plankton bloom termination, marine productivity and sea-spray modification with potentially significant climate impacts.

  13. Connecting marine productivity to sea-spray via nanoscale biological processes: Phytoplankton Dance or Death Disco?

    PubMed Central

    O’Dowd, Colin; Ceburnis, Darius; Ovadnevaite, Jurgita; Bialek, Jakub; Stengel, Dagmar B.; Zacharias, Merry; Nitschke, Udo; Connan, Solene; Rinaldi, Matteo; Fuzzi, Sandro; Decesari, Stefano; Cristina Facchini, Maria; Marullo, Salvatore; Santoleri, Rosalia; Dell’Anno, Antonio; Corinaldesi, Cinzia; Tangherlini, Michael; Danovaro, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Bursting bubbles at the ocean-surface produce airborne salt-water spray-droplets, in turn, forming climate-cooling marine haze and cloud layers. The reflectance and ultimate cooling effect of these layers is determined by the spray’s water-uptake properties that are modified through entrainment of ocean-surface organic matter (OM) into the airborne droplets. We present new results illustrating a clear dependence of OM mass-fraction enrichment in sea spray (OMss) on both phytoplankton-biomass, determined from Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) and Net Primary Productivity (NPP). The correlation coefficient for OMss as a function of Chl-a increased form 0.67 on a daily timescale to 0.85 on a monthly timescale. An even stronger correlation was found as a function of NPP, increasing to 0.93 on a monthly timescale. We suggest the observed dependence is through the demise of the bloom, driven by nanoscale biological processes (such as viral infections), releasing large quantities of transferable OM comprising cell debris, exudates and other colloidal materials. This OM, through aggregation processes, leads to enrichment in sea-spray, thus demonstrating an important coupling between biologically-driven plankton bloom termination, marine productivity and sea-spray modification with potentially significant climate impacts. PMID:26464099

  14. The production of porous layers for the solid oxide fuel cell by vacuum plasma spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Fendler, E.; Henne, R.; Lang, M.

    1995-12-31

    The vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) method was used to produce porous perovskite and Ni/YSZ (Yttria Stabilized Zirconia) cermet layers as cathode and anode for a SOFC, respectively. The perovskite powder was deposited without decomposition of the perovskite phase due to the use of Laval-nozzles and the adaption of spray parameters. The deposition of porous Ni/YSZ cermets demanded a modification of the Laval-nozzle. With this modification high deposition rates compared to conventional nozzles could be attained. The deposition of NiAl-YSZ and subsequently etching of Al is a successful method to produce anode layers with very fine porosity. Up to now the feasibility of producing porous deposits was examined. The next step of investigation will be the electrochemical testing of the electrodes. The results of those tests will influence the further development of anode`s and cathode`s microstructure.

  15. Numerical prediction of a turbulent evaporating fuel spray in a recirculating flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi-Qing; Pereira, Fernandes

    1994-03-01

    A comprehensive spray evaporation model, based on a Eulerian model of the gas field and a Lagrangian model of the droplet field in conjunction with the stochastic description of gas turbulence effect on the droplet motion, is applied to a turbulent evaporating spray in a recirculating flow and validated by comparison between predictions and measurements. Unlike many previous numerical predictions this note has been able to avoid the usual problem of a lack of detailed initial droplet-size and velocity-distribution conditions, and incorporated the turbulent temporal and directional correlation. We have adopted Zhou and Leschziner's methodology to include turbulent temporal and directional correlations in the numerical modeling, which has proved to be an improvement over the conventional particle-eddy modeling in simple flows.

  16. Chemical process safety at fuel cycle facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Ayres, D.A.

    1997-08-01

    This NUREG provides broad guidance on chemical safety issues relevant to fuel cycle facilities. It describes an approach acceptable to the NRC staff, with examples that are not exhaustive, for addressing chemical process safety in the safe storage, handling, and processing of licensed nuclear material. It expounds to license holders and applicants a general philosophy of the role of chemical process safety with respect to NRC-licensed materials; sets forth the basic information needed to properly evaluate chemical process safety; and describes plausible methods of identifying and evaluating chemical hazards and assessing the adequacy of the chemical safety of the proposed equipment and facilities. Examples of equipment and methods commonly used to prevent and/or mitigate the consequences of chemical incidents are discussed in this document.

  17. Crumpled rGO-supported Pt-Ir bifunctional catalyst prepared by spray pyrolysis for unitized regenerative fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, In Gyeom; Nah, In Wook; Oh, In-Hwan; Park, Sehkyu

    2017-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) crumpled reduced graphene oxide supported Pt-Ir alloys that served as bifunctional oxygen catalysts for use in untized regenerative fuel cells were synthesized by a facile spray pyrolysis method. Pt-Ir catalysts supported on rGO (Pt-Ir/rGOs) were physically characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) to observe change in composition by heat treatment, alloying, and morphological transition of the catalysts. Their catalytic activities and stabilities for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) conditions were electrochemically investigated using cyclic voltammetry (CV), linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), potential cycling and hold tests on the rotating disk electrode (RDE). Pt-Ir/rGO with no post heat-treatment (Pt-Ir/rGO_NP) showed a lower activity for ORR and OER although metal nanoparticles decorated on the support are relatively small. However, Pt-Ir/rGO showed remarkably enhanced activity following heat treatment, depending on temperature. Pt-Ir/rGO heat-treated at 600 °C after spray pyrolysis (Pt-Ir/rGO_P600) exhibited a higher activity and stability than a commercially available Pt/C catalyst kept under the ORR condition, and it also revealed a comparable OER activity and durability versus the commercial unsupported Ir catalyst.

  18. Characterization of Copper Coatings Deposited by High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel Spray for Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimijazi, H. R.; Aghaee, M.; Salehi, M.; Garcia, E.

    2017-08-01

    Copper coatings were deposited on steel substrates by high-velocity oxy-fuel spraying. The microstructure of the feedstock copper powders and free-standing coatings were evaluated by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The x-ray diffraction pattern was utilized to determine phase compositions of powders and coatings. Oxygen content was determined by a LECO-T300 oxygen determiner. The thermal conductivity of the coatings was measured in two directions, through-thickness and in-plane by laser flash apparatus. The electrical resistivity of the coatings was measured by the four-point probe method. Oxygen content of the coatings was two times higher than that of the initial powders (0.35-0.37%). The thermal and electrical conductivities of the coatings were different depending on the direction of the measurement. The thermal and electrical conductivity of the coatings improved after annealing for 6 h at a temperature of 600°C.

  19. Audit of fuel processing restoration property

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    In April, 1992, due to a diminished need for reprocessed uranium, the Secretary of Energy terminated the Fuel Processing Restoration (FPR) project. The termination left management and operating (M&O) contractors at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (Laboratory) with over $54 million in tools, equipment and material to be retained, utilized or disposed of. The objectives of the audit were to determine whether FPR property was adequately accounted for and whether the property was properly redistributed or excessed when the FPR project was terminated.

  20. Method and Process Development of Advanced Atmospheric Plasma Spraying for Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihm, Sebastian; Duda, Thomas; Gruner, Heiko; Thomas, Georg; Dzur, Birger

    2012-06-01

    Over the last few years, global economic growth has triggered a dramatic increase in the demand for resources, resulting in steady rise in prices for energy and raw materials. In the gas turbine manufacturing sector, process optimizations of cost-intensive production steps involve a heightened potential of savings and form the basis for securing future competitive advantages in the market. In this context, the atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) process for thermal barrier coatings (TBC) has been optimized. A constraint for the optimization of the APS coating process is the use of the existing coating equipment. Furthermore, the current coating quality and characteristics must not change so as to avoid new qualification and testing. Using experience in APS and empirically gained data, the process optimization plan included the variation of e.g. the plasma gas composition and flow-rate, the electrical power, the arrangement and angle of the powder injectors in relation to the plasma jet, the grain size distribution of the spray powder and the plasma torch movement procedures such as spray distance, offset and iteration. In particular, plasma properties (enthalpy, velocity and temperature), powder injection conditions (injection point, injection speed, grain size and distribution) and the coating lamination (coating pattern and spraying distance) are examined. The optimized process and resulting coating were compared to the current situation using several diagnostic methods. The improved process significantly reduces costs and achieves the requirement of comparable coating quality. Furthermore, a contribution was made towards better comprehension of the APS of ceramics and the definition of a better method for future process developments.

  1. 76 FR 44049 - Guidance for Fuel Cycle Facility Change Processes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-22

    ... COMMISSION Guidance for Fuel Cycle Facility Change Processes AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION... for Fuel Cycle Facility Change Processes'' in the Federal Register for a 30 day public comment period.... DG-3037 describes the types of changes for fuel cycle facilities for which licensees are to...

  2. MONOLITHIC FUEL FABRICATION PROCESS DEVELOPMENT AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY_

    SciTech Connect

    G. A. Moore; F. J. Rice; N. E. Woolstenhulme; J-F. Jue; B. H. Park; S. E. Steffler; N. P. Hallinan; M. D. Chapple; M. C. Marshall; B. L. Mackowiak; C. R. Clark; B. H. Rabin

    2009-11-01

    Full-size/prototypic U10Mo monolithic fuel-foils and aluminum clad fuel plates are being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC). These efforts are focused on realizing Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) high density monolithic fuel plates for use in High Performance Research and Test Reactors. The U10Mo fuel foils under development afford a fuel meat density of ~16 gU/cc and thus have the potential to facilitate LEU conversions without any significant reactor-performance penalty. An overview is provided of the ongoing monolithic UMo fuel development effort, including application of a zirconium barrier layer on fuel foils, fabrication scale-up efforts, and development of complex/graded fuel foils. Fuel plate clad bonding processes to be discussed include: Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) and Friction Bonding (FB).

  3. Process and composition for stabilized distillate fuel oils

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, D.K.

    1987-03-10

    A process is described for stabilizing distillate fuel oil which comprises adding to the fuel oil an effective stabilizing amount of a mixture of (a) N-(2-aminoethyl)piperazine, (b) triethylenetetramine, and (c) N,N-diethylhydroxylamine.

  4. Process and composition for color stabilized distillate fuel oils

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, D.K.

    1987-03-03

    A process is described for inhibiting color deterioration of distillate fuel oil which comprises adding to the fuel oil an effective inhibiting amount of a mixture of (a) N-(2-aminoethyl) piperazine and (b) N, N-diethylhydroxylamine.

  5. Quantitative fuel vapor/air mixing imaging in droplet/gas regions of an evaporating spray flow using filtered Rayleigh scattering.

    PubMed

    Allison, Patton M; McManus, Thomas A; Sutton, Jeffrey A

    2016-03-15

    This Letter demonstrates the application of filtered Rayleigh scattering (FRS) for quantitative two-dimensional fuel vapor/air mixing measurements in an evaporating hydrocarbon fuel spray flow. Using the FRS approach, gas-phase measurements are made in the presence of liquid-phase droplets without interference. Effective suppression of the liquid-phase droplet scattering using FRS is enabled by the high spectral purity of the current Nd:YAG laser system. Simultaneous Mie-scattering imaging is used to visualize the droplet field and illustrate the droplet loading under which the FRS imaging is applied in the current spray flows. The initial quantification of the FRS imaging is based on calibration measurements from a flow cell of known fuel vapor/air mixtures, while future work targets the utilization of a Rayleigh-Brillouin spectral model for quantification of the FRS signals.

  6. Arc spraying in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianjun

    2001-03-01

    Although are spraying is not a new technique, recent development of arc spraying device systems, spray wires, research on the coating mechanism, and the dynamic behavior of spraying make it a most active thermal spray process. In China, the arc spraying technique is the most efficient way for long life corrosion protection of steel structures. In addition, the arc spraying process is widely used for renovation and surface modification of machine components, mold making for plastic products, high-temperature corrosion resistance for waterwalls of boilers, antisliding coatings, self-lubricating coatings, etc.

  7. Comparison of the Mechanical and Electrochemical Properties of WC-25Co Coatings Obtained by High Velocity Oxy-Fuel and Cold Gas Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couto, M.; Dosta, S.; Fernández, J.; Guilemany, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Cold gas spray (CGS) coatings were previously produced by spraying WC-25Co cermet powders onto Al7075-T6 and low-carbon steel substrates. Unlike conventional flame spray techniques (e.g., high-velocity oxy-fuel; HVOF), no melting of the powder occurs; the particles are deformed and bond together after being sprayed by a supersonic jet of compressed gas, thereby building up several layers and forming a coating. WC-Co cermets are used in wear-resistant parts, because of their combination of mechanical, physical, and chemical properties. XRD tests were previously run on the initial powder and the coatings to determine possible phase changes during spraying. The bonding strength of the coatings was measured by adhesion tests. Here, WC-25Co coatings were also deposited on the same substrates by HVOF spraying. The wear resistance and fracture toughness of the coatings obtained previously by CGS and the HVOF coatings obtained here were studied. Their corrosion resistance was determined by electrochemical measurements. It was possible to achieve thick, dense, and hard CGS coatings on Al7075-T6 and low-carbon steel substrates, with better or the same mechanical and electrochemical properties as those of the HVOF coatings; making the former a highly competitive method for producing WC-25Co coatings.

  8. Overview of fuel processing options for polymer electrolyte fuel cell systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.

    1995-12-31

    The polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) is being developed for use in heavy- and light-duty transportation applications. While this fuel cell has been used successfully in buses and vans with compressed hydrogen as the on-board fuel [1,2], the fuel cell system must incorporate fuel processing (reforming) for any other on-board fuel to produce the hydrogen or hydrogen-rich fuel gas to be fed to the fuel cell stack. This is true even for alternative methods of storing hydrogen, such as use of a metal hydride or liquefied hydrogen. The ``fuel processing`` needed to recover the hydrogen includes providing the heat of dissociation of the hydride and cooling the hydrogen to the temperature of the fuel cell stack. Discussed below are some of the options being considered for processing of on-board fuels (other than compressed hydrogen) to generate the fuel cell anode gas, and the effects of fuel processing on system design, efficiency, steady-state and dynamic performance, and other factors.

  9. Dust Explosion Characteristics of Aluminum, Titanium, Zinc, and Iron-Based Alloy Powders Used in Cold Spray Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, K.; Tagomori, K.; Sugiyama, N.; Sasaki, S.; Shinya, Y.; Nanbu, T.; Kawashita, Y.; Narita, I.; Kuwatori, K.; Ikeda, T.; Hara, R.; Miyahara, H.

    2014-01-01

    Compared to conventional thermal spray coating, cold spray processing typically employs finer, smaller-diameter metal powders. Furthermore, cold-sprayed particles exhibit fewer surface oxides than thermally sprayed particles due to the absence of particle melting during spraying. For these reasons, it is important to consider the potential for dust explosions or fires during cold spray processing, for both industrial and R&D applications. This work examined the dust explosion characteristics of metal powders typically used in cold spray coating, for the purpose of preventing dust explosions and fires and thus protecting the health and safety of workers and guarding against property damage. In order to safely make use of the new cold spray technology in industrial settings, it is necessary to manage the risks based on an appropriate assessment of the hazards. However, there have been few research reports focused on such risk management. Therefore, in this study, the dust explosion characteristics of aluminum, titanium, zinc, carbonyl iron, and eutectoid steel containing chromium at 4 wt.% (4 wt.% Cr-eutectoid steel) powders were evaluated according to the standard protocols JIS Z 8818, IEC61241-2-3(1994-09) section 3, and JIS Z 8817. This paper reports our results concerning the dust explosion properties of the above-mentioned metal powders.

  10. Thermal spray vitrification process for the removal of lead oxide contained in organic paints

    SciTech Connect

    Karthikeyan, J.; Chen, J.; Bancke, G.A.; Herman, H.; Berndt, C.C.; Breslin, V.T.

    1995-12-31

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (US-EPA) regulations have necessitated the removal and containment of toxic lead from lead oxide containing paints. The Thermal Spray Vitrification Process (TSVP) is a novel technique in which a glass powder of appropriate composition is flame sprayed onto the painted surface to achieve removal and vitrification of the lead. Two different glass systems, i.e., alkali silicate and ferrous silicate, were chosen for detailed study. Appropriate amounts of raw materials were mixed, fused, quenched, ground and sieved to obtain the spray quality powders. Grit blasted mild steel coupons were used as test substrates for the spray parameter optimization studies; while those coupons with lead oxide containing organic paint were used for the lead removal experiments. The powders and deposits were investigated using Microtrac particle size analysis (for powders), optical microscopy, XRD and SEM. The remnant lead in the panel was measured using a specially prepared X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) system. The lead leach rate was recorded as per US-EPA approved Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). The results of this study have shown that lead oxide can be successfully removed form the paint by flame spraying a maximum of three layers of glass onto the painted surface. It is possible to obtain much higher lead removal rate with ferrous silicate glass as compared to alkali silicate glass is much higher than the ferrous silicate glass. The in situ vitrification has not been completely optimized; however, the lead containing glass coating can be remelted in situ or on site to enhance the vitrification of the lead which had been absorbed in the glass coating.

  11. A Model-Based Methodology for Spray-Drying Process Development.

    PubMed

    Dobry, Dan E; Settell, Dana M; Baumann, John M; Ray, Rod J; Graham, Lisa J; Beyerinck, Ron A

    2009-09-01

    Solid amorphous dispersions are frequently used to improve the solubility and, thus, the bioavailability of poorly soluble active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). Spray-drying, a well-characterized pharmaceutical unit operation, is ideally suited to producing solid amorphous dispersions due to its rapid drying kinetics. This paper describes a novel flowchart methodology based on fundamental engineering models and state-of-the-art process characterization techniques that ensure that spray-drying process development and scale-up are efficient and require minimal time and API. This methodology offers substantive advantages over traditional process-development methods, which are often empirical and require large quantities of API and long development times. This approach is also in alignment with the current guidance on Pharmaceutical Development Q8(R1). The methodology is used from early formulation-screening activities (involving milligrams of API) through process development and scale-up for early clinical supplies (involving kilograms of API) to commercial manufacturing (involving metric tons of API). It has been used to progress numerous spray-dried dispersion formulations, increasing bioavailability of formulations at preclinical through commercial scales.

  12. Manufacturing of solid dispersions of poorly water soluble drugs by spray drying: formulation and process considerations.

    PubMed

    Paudel, Amrit; Worku, Zelalem Ayenew; Meeus, Joke; Guns, Sandra; Van den Mooter, Guy

    2013-08-30

    Spray drying is an efficient technology for solid dispersion manufacturing since it allows extreme rapid solvent evaporation leading to fast transformation of an API-carrier solution to solid API-carrier particles. Solvent evaporation kinetics certainly contribute to formation of amorphous solid dispersions, but also other factors like the interplay between the API, carrier and solvent, the solution state of the API, formulation parameters (e.g. feed concentration or solvent type) and process parameters (e.g. drying gas flow rate or solution spray rate) will influence the final physical structure of the obtained solid dispersion particles. This review presents an overview of the interplay between manufacturing process, formulation parameters, physical structure, and performance of the solid dispersions with respect to stability and drug release characteristics.

  13. PEM Fuel Cell Mechanisms and Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Mahlon

    2000-03-01

    A fuel cell produces electrical energy via an electrochemical reaction. Unlike a conventional battery, the "fuel" and oxidant are supplied to the device from external sources. The device can thus be operated until the fuel (or oxidant) supply is exhausted, which can provide very high energy densities for the overall system. Historically, fuel cells have been of principle interest to the space program because of their high intrinsic conversion efficiencies and benign reaction product (water). Because of these various advantages and ever increasing environmental concerns, most types of fuel cells are attracting greater commercial and government interest. However, the popularity of a relatively new type of fuel cell, the polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell, is rapidly outpacing the others. Unlike most other types of fuel cells, which use liquid electrolytes, the PEM fuel cell uses a quasi-solid electrolyte based on a polymer backbone with side-chains possessing acid-based groups. The numerous advantages of this family of electrolytes make the PEM fuel cell particularly attractive for smaller scale terrestrial applications such as transportation, home-based distributed power, and portable power applications. Despite the many advantages, the conventional PEM introduces some unique challenges that significantly impact the design and operation of PEM-based fuel cells. In this presentation, an overview of PEM fuel cells will be provided starting with the fundamental principles on through the contributions and characteristics of the key components, the basics of PEM fuel cell operation, the considerations of various applications and the ramifications on system design.

  14. Charge generation associated with liquid spraying in tank cleaning and comparable processes - preliminary experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Carsten; Losert, Oswald F. J.

    2015-10-01

    The BG RCI has initiated investigations in order to improve the data basis for assessing the ignition hazard by electrostatic charging processes associated with the spraying of liquids. On the base of preliminary experiments, we established procedures for measurements of electric field strength and charging current in the presence of aerosol particles. Results obtained with three different nozzle types, variation of pressure and with built-in deflecting plate are presented.

  15. Low platinum loading for high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell developed by ultrasonic spray coating technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Huaneng; Jao, Ting-Chu; Barron, Olivia; Pollet, Bruno G.; Pasupathi, Sivakumar

    2014-12-01

    This paper reports use of an ultrasonic-spray for producing low Pt loadings membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) with the catalyst coated substrate (CCS) fabrication technique. The main MEA sub-components (catalyst, membrane and gas diffusion layer (GDL)) are supplied from commercial manufacturers. In this study, high temperature (HT) MEAs with phosphoric acid (PA)-doped poly(2,5-benzimidazole) (AB-PBI) membrane are fabricated and tested under 160 °C, hydrogen and air feed 100 and 250 cc min-1 and ambient pressure conditions. Four different Pt loadings (from 0.138 to 1.208 mg cm-2) are investigated in this study. The experiment data are determined by in-situ electrochemical methods such as polarization curve, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The high Pt loading MEA exhibits higher performance at high voltage operating conditions but lower performances at peak power due to the poor mass transfer. The Pt loading 0.350 mg cm-2 GDE performs the peak power density and peak cathode mass power to 0.339 W cm-2 and 0.967 W mgPt-1, respectively. This work presents impressive cathode mass power and high fuel cell performance for high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells (HT-PEMFCs) with low Pt loadings.

  16. The effect of spraying parameters on micro-structural properties of WC-12%Co coating deposited on copper substrate by HVOF process

    SciTech Connect

    Sathwara, Nishit; Jariwala, C. Chauhan, N.; Raole, P. M.; Basa, D. K.

    2015-08-28

    High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal sprayed coatingmade from Tungsten Carbide (WC) isconsidered as one of the most durable materials as wear resistance for industrial applications at room temperature. WC coating offers high wear resistance due to its high hardness and tough matrix imparts. The coating properties strongly depend on thermal spray processing parameters, surface preparation and surface finish. In this investigation, the effect of variousHVOF process parameters was studied on WC coating properties. The WC-12%Co coating was produced on Copper substrate. Prior to coating, theCopper substrate surface was prepared by grit blasting. WC-12%Co coatings were deposited on Coppersubstrates with varying process parameters such as Oxygen gas pressure, Air pressure, and spraying distance. Microstructure of coating was examined using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and characterization of phasespresentin the coating was examined by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Microhardness of all coatingswas measured by VickerMicrohardness tester. At low Oxygen Pressure(10.00 bar), high Air pressure (7bar) and short nozzle to substrate distance of 170mm, best coating adhesion and porosity less structure isachieved on Coppersubstrate.

  17. Cost reductions of fuel cells for transport applications: fuel processing options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teagan, W. P.; Bentley, J.; Barnett, B.

    The highly favorable efficiency/environmental characteristics of fuel cell technologies have now been verified by virtue of recent and ongoing field experience. The key issue regarding the timing and extent of fuel cell commercialization is the ability to reduce costs to acceptable levels in both stationary and transport applications. It is increasingly recognized that the fuel processing subsystem can have a major impact on overall system costs, particularly as ongoing R&D efforts result in reduction of the basic cost structure of stacks which currently dominate system costs. The fuel processing subsystem for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology, which is the focus of transport applications, includes the reformer, shift reactors, and means for CO reduction. In addition to low cost, transport applications require a fuel processor that is compact and can start rapidly. This paper describes the impact of factors such as fuel choice, operating temperature, material selection, catalyst requirements, and controls on the cost of fuel processing systems. There are fuel processor technology paths which manufacturing cost analyses indicate are consistent with fuel processor subsystem costs of under 150/kW in stationary applications and 30/kW in transport applications. As such, the costs of mature fuel processing subsystem technologies should be consistent with their use in commercially viable fuel cell systems in both application categories.

  18. Effect of Spray Particle Velocity on Cavitation Erosion Resistance Characteristics of HVOF and HVAF Processed 86WC-10Co4Cr Hydro Turbine Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R. K.; Kamaraj, M.; Seetharamu, S.; Pramod, T.; Sampathkumaran, P.

    2016-08-01

    The hydro plants utilizing silt-laden water for power generation suffer from severe metal wastage due to particle-induced erosion and cavitation. High-velocity oxy-fuel process (HVOF)-based coatings is widely applied to improve the erosion life. The process parameters such as particle velocity, size, powder feed rate, temperature, affect their mechanical properties. The high-velocity air fuel (HVAF) technology, with higher particle velocities and lower spray temperatures, gives dense and substantially nonoxidized coating. In the present study, the cavitation resistance of 86WC-10Co4Cr-type HVOF coating processed at 680 m/s spray particle velocity was compared with HVAF coatings made at 895, 960, and 1010 m/s. The properties such as porosity, hardness, indentation toughness, and cavitation resistance were investigated. The surface damage morphology has been analyzed in SEM. The cohesion between different layers has been examined qualitatively through scratch depth measurements across the cross section. The HVAF coatings have shown a lower porosity, higher hardness, and superior cavitation resistance. Delamination, extensive cracking of the matrix interface, and detachment of the WC grains were observed in HVOF coating. The rate of metal loss is low in HVAF coatings implying that process parameters play a vital role in achieving improved cavitation resistance.

  19. Variable area fuel cell process channels

    DOEpatents

    Kothmann, Richard E.

    1981-01-01

    A fuel cell arrangement having a non-uniform distribution of fuel and oxidant flow paths, on opposite sides of an electrolyte matrix, sized and positioned to provide approximately uniform fuel and oxidant utilization rates, and cell conditions, across the entire cell.

  20. Processing-microstructure-properties relationships in small-particle plasma-sprayed ceramic coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawdsley, Jennifer Renee

    The objective of this study was to determine processing-microstructure-properties relationships for small-particle plasma-sprayed (SPPS) ceramic coatings. Plasma-sprayed yttria partially-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings, which are used to protect superalloys from heat and the environment in turbine engines, and plasma-sprayed alumina coatings, which are being investigated as a potential replacement for chrome in corrosion protection applications, were fabricated using SPPS technology and their microstructure and pertinent properties were examined. The properties of plasma-sprayed YSZ and alumina coatings were investigated with designed experiments. The parameters varied include power, spray distance, total plasma gas flow, percent hydrogen in the plasma gas, injector angle, injector offset and carrier gas flow. The variations in thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity, elastic modulus, and hardness for the YSZ SPPS coatings were found to correlate to the variations in density, which were related to the processing variables. It was found that surface roughness was related to the amount of splashing and debris associated with the single splats. In four-point bending strain tolerance and fatigue tests, the SPPS YSZ coatings showed very little acoustic emission activity, except in the case of tensile fatigue of a coating without network cracks. Small angle X-ray scattering experiments revealed that SPPS YSZ coatings have significantly less submicron intersplat porosity than conventional plasma-sprayed coatings, and that the pore and microcrack scattering area decreases with heat treatment due to the sintering of microcracks and small pores. The SPPS alumina coatings were optimized to produce a coating with excellent corrosion protection capabilities. It was found that the hardest SPPS alumina coatings did not provide the best corrosion protection due to unique porosity defect structures associated with surface bumps in the coatings. The surface bumps were

  1. Optimization of the Büchi B-90 spray drying process using central composite design for preparation of solid dispersions.

    PubMed

    Gu, Bing; Linehan, Brian; Tseng, Yin-Chao

    2015-08-01

    A central composite design approach was applied to study the effect of polymer concentration, inlet temperature and air flow rate on the spray drying process of the Büchi B-90 nano spray dryer (B-90). Hypromellose acetate succinate-LF was used for the Design of Experiment (DoE) study. Statistically significant models to predict the yield, spray rate, and drying efficiency were generated from the study. The spray drying conditions were optimized according to the models to maximize the yield and efficiency of the process. The models were further validated using a poorly water-soluble investigational compound (BI064) from Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals. The polymer/drug ratio ranged from 1/1 to 3/1w/w. The spray dried formulations were amorphous determined by differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray powder diffraction. The particle size of the spray dried formulations was 2-10 μm under polarized light microscopy. All the formulations were physically stable for at least 3h when suspended in an aqueous vehicle composed of 1% methyl cellulose. This study demonstrates that DoE is a useful tool to optimize the spray drying process, and the B-90 can be used to efficiently produce amorphous solid dispersions with a limited quantity of drug substance available during drug discovery stages.

  2. Influence of spray nozzle shape upon atomization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beniuga, Marius; Mihai, Ioan

    2016-12-01

    The atomization process is affected by a number of operating parameters (pressure, viscosity, temperature, etc.) [1-6] and the adopted constructive solution. In this article are compared parameters of atomized liquid jet with two nozzles that have different lifespan, one being new and the other one out. The last statement shows that the second nozzle was monitored as time of operation on the one hand and on the other hand, two dimensional nozzles have been analyzed using laser profilometry. To compare the experimental parameters was carried an experimental stand to change the period and pulse width in injecting liquid through two nozzles. Atomized liquid jets were photographed and filmed quickly. Images obtained were analyzed using a Matlab code that allowed to determine a number of parameters that characterize an atomized jet. Knowing the conditions and operating parameters of atomized jet, will establish a new wastewater nozzle block of parameter values that can be implemented in controller that provides dosing of the liquid injected. Experimental measurements to observe the myriad forms of atomized droplets to a wide range of operating conditions, realized using the electronic control module.

  3. Exposure to MDI during the process of insulating buildings with sprayed polyurethane foam.

    PubMed

    Crespo, J; Galán, J

    1999-08-01

    Buildings are often insulated with sprayed-in-place polyurethane foam in spite of the fact that few studies have been carried out on exposure levels to isocyanates during the spraying process. This paper is meant to provide new data on personal exposure to methylene-bis (4-phenylisocyanate) (MDI) while dwellings and office buildings are being insulated with polyurethane foam. An impinger using a 1-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazine toluene solution as absorbent was used to take personal samples for the sprayer and helper during indoor and outdoor applications. The analytical results show that the levels of exposure were significant, especially for the sprayer, with values of up to 0.077 mg m-3 and 0.400 mg m-3 during outdoor and indoor applications, respectively. The helper's exposure was always lower.

  4. Numerical Study of In-flight Particle Parameters in Low-Pressure Cold Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Xian-Jin; Wang, Quan-Sheng; Ma, Zhuang; Kim, Hyung-Jun

    2010-12-01

    A 2-D model of the low-pressure cold spray with a radial powder feeding was established using CFD software in this study. The flow field was simulated for both propellant gases of nitrogen and helium. To predict the in-flight particle velocity and temperature, discrete phase model was introduced to simulate the interaction of particle and the supersonic gas jet. The experimental velocity of copper powder with different sizes was used to validate the calculated one for low-pressure cold spray process. The results show that the computational model can provide a satisfactory prediction of the supersonic gas flow, which is consistent with the experimental Schlieren photos. It was found that similar velocity was obtained with the drag coefficient formula of Henderson and with that of Morsi and Alexander. As the shape factor was estimated, the reasonable prediction of velocity for non-spherical particle can be obtained, to compare with the experimental results.

  5. Fabrication of Nanosized Lanthanum Zirconate Powder and Deposition of Thermal Barrier Coating by Plasma Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S. K.; Jagdeesh, N.; Pathak, L. C.

    2016-07-01

    The present manuscript discusses our findings on fabrication of nanosized lanthanum zirconate powder for thermal barrier coating application and its coating by plasma spray on nickel-based superalloy substrate. Single-phase La2Zr2O7 coating of thickness of the order of 45 µm on the Ni-Cr-Al bond coat coated Ni-based superalloy substrate was deposited by plasma spray process. The layers at the interface did not show spallation and inter diffusion was very less. The microstructure, interface, porosity, and mechanical properties of different layers are investigated. The lanthanum zirconate hardness and modulus were 10.5 and 277 GPa, respectively. The load depth curve for lanthanum zirconate showed good elastic recovery around 74%.

  6. Significance of chamber pressure to complex multi-phase physics in jet engine fuel injection processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahms, Rainer; Oefelein, Joseph

    2014-11-01

    Injection processes in jet engines at chamber pressures in excess of the thermodynamic critical pressure of the liquid fuel are not well understood. Under some conditions, a distinct two-phase interface may not exist anymore which eliminates the presence of classical spray atomization phenomena. A comprehensive model for jet engine fuel injections is derived to quantify the conditions under which the interfacial dynamics transition to diffusion-dominated mixing processes without surface tension. At certain conditions, the model shows two-phase interfaces with substantially increased thicknesses and distinctively reduced mean free paths in comparison to ambient pressure conditions. Then, the underlying assumptions of a distinct two-phase interface do not apply anymore and the interface along with its surface tension is shown to deteriorate as it broadens substantially. As a consequence of this physical complexity, the conceptual view of spray atomization and evaporation as an appropriate model for jet engine injection processes is, contrary to conventional wisdom, questionable at certain operating conditions. Instead, a Large Eddy Simulation using a dense-fluid approximation is applied which takes the complex thermo-physics of real-fluid behavior into account.

  7. Process-directed self-assembly of multiblock copolymers: Solvent casting vs spray coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Q.; Tang, J.; Müller, M.

    2016-10-01

    Using computer simulation of a soft, coarse-grained model and self-consistent field theory we investigate how collapsed, globular chain conformations in the initial stages of structure formation, which are produced by spray-coating, affect the single-chain structure and morphology of microphase-separated multiblock copolymers. Comparing spray-coated films with films that start from a disordered state of Gaussian chains, we observe that the collapsed molecular conformations in the initial stage give rise to (1) a smaller fraction of blocks that straddle domains (bridges), (2) a significant reduction of the molecular extension normal to the internal interfaces, and (3) a slightly larger lamellar domain spacing in the final morphology. The relaxation of molecular conformations towards equilibrium is very protracted for both processes - solvent casting and spray coating. These findings illustrate that the process conditions of the copolymer materials may significantly affect materials properties (such as mechanical properties) because the system does not reach thermal equilibrium on the relevant time scales.

  8. Process maps for plasma spray: Part 1: Plasma-particle interactions

    SciTech Connect

    GILMORE,DELWYN L.; NEISER JR.,RICHARD A.; WAN,YUEPENG; SAMPATH,SANJAY

    2000-01-26

    This is the first paper of a two part series based on an integrated study carried out at Sandia National Laboratories and the State University of New York at Stony Brook. The aim of the study is to develop a more fundamental understanding of plasma-particle interactions, droplet-substrate interactions, deposit formation dynamics and microstructural development as well as final deposit properties. The purpose is to create models that can be used to link processing to performance. Process maps have been developed for air plasma spray of molybdenum. Experimental work was done to investigate the importance of such spray parameters as gun current, auxiliary gas flow, and powder carrier gas flow. In-flight particle diameters, temperatures, and velocities were measured in various areas of the spray plume. Samples were produced for analysis of microstructures and properties. An empirical model was developed, relating the input parameters to the in-flight particle characteristics. Multi-dimensional numerical simulations of the plasma gas flow field and in-flight particles under different operating conditions were also performed. In addition to the parameters which were experimentally investigated, the effect of particle injection velocity was also considered. The simulation results were found to be in good general agreement with the experimental data.

  9. Scalable organic solvent free supercritical fluid spray drying process for producing dry protein formulations.

    PubMed

    Nuchuchua, O; Every, H A; Hofland, G W; Jiskoot, W

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we evaluated the influence of supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) spray drying conditions, in the absence of organic solvent, on the ability to produce dry protein/trehalose formulations at 1:10 and 1:4 (w/w) ratios. When using a 4L drying vessel, we found that decreasing the solution flow rate and solution volume, or increasing the scCO2 flow rate resulted in a significant reduction in the residual water content in dried products (Karl Fischer titration). The best conditions were then used to evaluate the ability to scale the scCO2 spray drying process from 4L to 10L chamber. The ratio of scCO2 and solution flow rate was kept constant. The products on both scales exhibited similar residual moisture contents, particle morphologies (SEM), and glass transition temperatures (DSC). After reconstitution, the lysozyme activity (enzymatic assay) and structure (circular dichroism, HP-SEC) were fully preserved, but the sub-visible particle content was slightly increased (flow imaging microscopy, nanoparticle tracking analysis). Furthermore, the drying condition was applicable to other proteins resulting in products of similar quality as the lysozyme formulations. In conclusion, we established scCO2 spray drying processing conditions for protein formulations without an organic solvent that holds promise for the industrial production of dry protein formulations.

  10. Elastoplastic analysis of process induced residual stresses in thermally sprayed coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yongxiong; Liang Xiubing; Liu Yan; Xu Binshi

    2010-07-15

    The residual stresses induced from thermal spraying process have been extensively investigated in previous studies. However, most of such works were focused on the elastic deformation range. In this paper, an elastoplastic model for predicting the residual stresses in thermally sprayed coatings was developed, in which two main contributions were considered, namely the deposition induced stress and that due to differential thermal contraction between the substrate and coating during cooling. The deposition induced stress was analyzed based on the assumption that the coating is formed layer-by-layer, and then a misfit strain is accommodated within the multilayer structure after the addition of each layer (plastic deformation is induced consequently). From a knowledge of specimen dimensions, processing temperatures, and material properties, residual stress distributions within the structure can be determined by implementing the model with a simple computer program. A case study for the plasma sprayed NiCoCrAlY on Inconel 718 system was performed finally. Besides some similar phenomena observed from the present study as compared with previous elastic model reported in literature, the elastoplastic model also provides some interesting features for prediction of the residual stresses.

  11. Optimization of spray drying process for developing seabuckthorn fruit juice powder using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Selvamuthukumaran, Meenakshisundaram; Khanum, Farhath

    2014-12-01

    The response surface methodology was used to optimize the spray drying process for development of seabuckthorn fruit juice powder. The independent variables were different levels of inlet air temperature and maltodextrin concentration. The responses were moisture, solubility, dispersibility, vitamin C and overall color difference value. Statistical analysis revealed that independent variables significantly affected all the responses. The Inlet air temperature showed maximum influence on moisture and vitamin C content, while the maltodextrin concentration showed similar influence on solubility, dispersibility and overall color difference value. Contour plots for each response were used to generate an optimum area by superimposition. The seabuckthorn fruit juice powder was developed using the derived optimum processing conditions to check the validity of the second order polynomial model. The experimental values were found to be in close agreement to the predicted values and were within the acceptable limits indicating the suitability of the model in predicting quality attributes of seabuckthorn fruit juice powder. The recommended optimum spray drying conditions for drying 100 g fruit juice slurry were inlet air temperature and maltodextrin concentration of 162.5 °C and 25 g, respectively. The spray dried juice powder contains higher amounts of antioxidants viz., vitamin C, vitamin E, total carotenoids, total anthocyanins and total phenols when compared to commercial fruit juice powders and they are also found to be free flowing without any physical alterations such as caking, stickiness, collapse and crystallization by exhibiting greater glass transition temperature.

  12. Characteristics of bovine lactoferrin powders produced through spray and freeze drying processes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Timilsena, Yakindra Prasad; Blanch, Ewan; Adhikari, Benu

    2017-02-01

    Bovine lactoferrin (LFb) powders were produced using spray drying and freeze drying. Industrially obtained fresh liquid-LFb was used as starting material. The antioxidant capacity, solubility in water, moisture sorption behaviour, the extent of denaturation and changes in the secondary structural features of spray-dried (SDLFb) and freeze-dried bovine lactoferrin (FDLFb) powders were determined. The residual moisture content, water activity, particle size and amorphous/crystalline nature of the SDLFb and FDLFb were also measured. Results showed that both SDLFb and FDLFb powders had negligible denaturation and conformation changes compared to the liquid-LFb. Both SDLFb and FDLFb showed type II sorption behaviour with almost identical monolayer moisture content. The SDLFb powders were amorphous in nature with >98% solubility in water. The antioxidant activity of SDLFb was similar to that of the liquid-LFb while it was ∼6% less in FDLFb. Based on the residual moisture content, water activity, solubility and preservation of secondary structure of LFb in resultant powders, a spray drying process with 180°C inlet and 95°C outlet temperature was found to produce similar or better quality LFb powders compared to the ones produced through a freeze drying process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Low Emissions Burner Technology for Metal Processing Industry using Byproducts and Biomass Derived Liquid Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Ajay; Taylor, Robert

    2013-09-30

    This research and development efforts produced low-emission burner technology capable of operating on natural gas as well as crude glycerin and/or fatty acids generated in biodiesel plants. The research was conducted in three stages (1) Concept definition leading to the design and development of a small laboratory scale burner, (2) Scale-up to prototype burner design and development, and (3) Technology demonstration with field vefiication. The burner design relies upon the Flow Blurring (FB) fuel injection based on aerodynamically creating two-phase flow near the injector exit. The fuel tube and discharge orifice both of inside diameter D are separated by gap H. For H < 0.25D, the atomizing air bubbles into liquid fuel to create a two-phase flow near the tip of the fuel tube. Pressurized two-phase fuel-air mixture exits through the discharge orifice, which results in expansion and breakup of air bubbles yielding a spray with fine droplets. First, low-emission combustion of diesel, biodiesel and straight VO (soybean oil) was achieved by utilizing FB injector to yield fine sprays for these fuels with significantly different physical properties. Visual images for these baseline experiments conducted with heat release rate (HRR) of about 8 kW illustrate clean blue flames indicating premixed combustion for all three fuels. Radial profiles of the product gas temperature at the combustor exit overlap each other signifying that the combustion efficiency is independent of the fuel. At the combustor exit, the NOx emissions are within the measurement uncertainties, while CO emissions are slightly higher for straight VO as compared to diesel and biodiesel. Considering the large variations in physical and chemical properties of fuels considered, the small differences observed in CO and NOx emissions show promise for fuel-flexible, clean combustion systems. FB injector has proven to be very effective in atomizing fuels with very different physical properties, and it offers a

  14. Transport phenomena relevant to the impact regime of the process of spray deposition: A review. Part 1: Heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Poulikakos, D.; Waldvogel, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    Spray deposition is a novel rapid solidification technology for the creation of advanced metals and metal composites. This technology is particularly attractive to manufacturing because it shows promise to provide materials and products that combine superior properties and near net shape. With reference to the former, the extremely high cooling rates present in the process of spray deposition capture non equilibrium states that cannot be captured by more conventional casting methods because the atomic mobility in the liquid phase of a metal is far greater than that in the solid phase. To this end, the cooling rates at the early stages of the spray deposition process are of the order of (10{sup 6} to 10{sup 8}) {sup 0}C/s. With reference to the latter, the spray deposition process has been shown to produce near net shape products which eliminates the need for additional finishing steps in the manufacturing process. Moreover, the fine and homogeneous microstructure that appears to be resulting from the spray deposition process may eliminate the need for additional mechanical working. In this, as well as its companion paper appearing subsequently in this volume, a review is presented of the existing knowledge base of the impact regime of the process of spray deposition, focusing on issues in which transport phenomena are relevant. Further, this paper addresses only heat transfer aspects of the process which do not involve sophisticated modeling of the accompanying complex fluid dynamics.

  15. A Design of Experiment approach to predict product and process parameters for a spray dried influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kanojia, Gaurav; Willems, Geert-Jan; Frijlink, Henderik W; Kersten, Gideon F A; Soema, Peter C; Amorij, Jean-Pierre

    2016-09-25

    Spray dried vaccine formulations might be an alternative to traditional lyophilized vaccines. Compared to lyophilization, spray drying is a fast and cheap process extensively used for drying biologicals. The current study provides an approach that utilizes Design of Experiments for spray drying process to stabilize whole inactivated influenza virus (WIV) vaccine. The approach included systematically screening and optimizing the spray drying process variables, determining the desired process parameters and predicting product quality parameters. The process parameters inlet air temperature, nozzle gas flow rate and feed flow rate and their effect on WIV vaccine powder characteristics such as particle size, residual moisture content (RMC) and powder yield were investigated. Vaccine powders with a broad range of physical characteristics (RMC 1.2-4.9%, particle size 2.4-8.5μm and powder yield 42-82%) were obtained. WIV showed no significant loss in antigenicity as revealed by hemagglutination test. Furthermore, descriptive models generated by DoE software could be used to determine and select (set) spray drying process parameter. This was used to generate a dried WIV powder with predefined (predicted) characteristics. Moreover, the spray dried vaccine powders retained their antigenic stability even after storage for 3 months at 60°C. The approach used here enabled the generation of a thermostable, antigenic WIV vaccine powder with desired physical characteristics that could be potentially used for pulmonary administration.

  16. The Use of Particle/Substrate Material Models in Simulation of Cold-Gas Dynamic-Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmati, Saeed; Ghaei, Abbas

    2014-02-01

    Cold spray is a coating deposition method in which the solid particles are accelerated to the substrate using a low temperature supersonic gas flow. Many numerical studies have been carried out in the literature in order to study this process in more depth. Despite the inability of Johnson-Cook plasticity model in prediction of material behavior at high strain rates, it is the model that has been frequently used in simulation of cold spray. Therefore, this research was devoted to compare the performance of different material models in the simulation of cold spray process. Six different material models, appropriate for high strain-rate plasticity, were employed in finite element simulation of cold spray process for copper. The results showed that the material model had a considerable effect on the predicted deformed shapes.

  17. Distillate Fuel Processing for Marine Fuel Cell Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-17

    Steinfeld, R. Sanderson, H. Ghezel-Ayagh, S. Abens FuelCell Energy, Inc. 3 Great Pasture Road Danbury, CT 06811 Mark C. Cervi Naval Surface Warfare...in its publications Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to...information, including suggestions for reducing this burden, to Washington Headquarters Services, Directorate for Information Operations and Reports

  18. A fully spray-coated fuel cell membrane electrode assembly using Aquivion ionomer with a graphene oxide/cerium oxide interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitwieser, Matthias; Bayer, Thomas; Büchler, Andreas; Zengerle, Roland; Lyth, Stephen M.; Thiele, Simon

    2017-05-01

    A novel multilayer membrane electrode assembly (MEA) for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) is fabricated in this work, within a single spray-coating device. For the first time, direct membrane deposition is used to fabricate a PEMFC by spraying the short-side-chain ionomer Aquivion directly onto the gas diffusion electrodes. The fully sprayed MEA, with an Aquivion membrane 10 μm in thickness, achieved a high power density of 1.6 W/cm2 for H2/air operation at 300 kPaabs. This is one of the highest reported values for thin composite membranes operated in H2/air atmosphere. By the means of confocal laser scanning microscopy, individual carbon fibers from the gas diffusion layer are identified to penetrate through the micro porous layer (MPL), likely causing a low electrical cell resistance in the range of 150 Ω cm2 through the thin sprayed membranes. By spraying a 200 nm graphene oxide/cerium oxide (GO/CeO2) interlayer between two layers of Aquivion ionomer, the impact of the electrical short is eliminated and the hydrogen crossover current density is reduced to about 1 mA/cm2. The peak power density of the interlayer-containing MEA drops only by 10% compared to a pure Aquivion membrane of similar thickness.

  19. Microstructural Characterization and Wear Behavior of Nano-Boride Dispersed Coating on AISI 304 Stainless Steel by Hybrid High Velocity Oxy-Fuel Spraying Laser Surface Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Prashant; Majumdar, Jyotsna Dutta

    2015-07-01

    The current study concerns the detailed microstructural characterization and investigation of wear behavior of nano-boride dispersed coating developed on AISI 304 stainless steel by high velocity oxy-fuel spray deposition of nickel-based alloy and subsequent laser melting. There is a significant refinement and homogenization of microstructure with improvement in microhardness due to laser surface melting (1200 VHN as compared to 945 VHN of as-sprayed and 250 VHN of as-received substrate). The high temperature phase stability of the as-coated and laser melted surface has been studied by differential scanning calorimeter followed by detailed phase analysis at room and elevated temperature. There is a significant improvement in wear resistance of laser melted surface as compared to as-sprayed and the as-received one due to increased hardness and reduced coefficient of friction. The mechanism of wear has been investigated in details. Corrosion resistance of the coating in a 3.56 wt pct NaCl solution is significantly improved (4.43 E-2 mm/year as compared to 5 E-1 mm/year of as-sprayed and 1.66 mm/year of as-received substrate) due to laser surface melting as compared to as-sprayed surface.

  20. Fabrication of gas turbine water-cooled composite nozzle and bucket hardware employing plasma spray process

    DOEpatents

    Schilke, Peter W.; Muth, Myron C.; Schilling, William F.; Rairden, III, John R.

    1983-01-01

    In the method for fabrication of water-cooled composite nozzle and bucket hardware for high temperature gas turbines, a high thermal conductivity copper alloy is applied, employing a high velocity/low pressure (HV/LP) plasma arc spraying process, to an assembly comprising a structural framework of copper alloy or a nickel-based super alloy, or combination of the two, and overlying cooling tubes. The copper alloy is plamsa sprayed to a coating thickness sufficient to completely cover the cooling tubes, and to allow for machining back of the copper alloy to create a smooth surface having a thickness of from 0.010 inch (0.254 mm) to 0.150 inch (3.18 mm) or more. The layer of copper applied by the plasma spraying has no continuous porosity, and advantageously may readily be employed to sustain a pressure differential during hot isostatic pressing (HIP) bonding of the overall structure to enhance bonding by solid state diffusion between the component parts of the structure.

  1. Heat Flux Estimation of a Flame Thermal Spray Process Using a Thermally Thin Composite Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Duo; Serio, Bruno; Lecler, Sylvain; Pfeiffer, Pierre; Costil, Sophie

    2016-12-01

    Temperature measurements take on prime importance in the field of the thermal spray coating since the temperature variation greatly affects the formation of splat morphology and also the coating properties and qualities. The evaluation of the heat flux is therefore essential since temperature variation comes from the energy transfer and conduction of the thermal system. The aim of this study is to estimate the heat flux of a flame thermal spray by solving an inverse heat conduction problem. Firstly, the substrate material and geometry are well designed so that the Biot number is small enough to conform to the lumped capacitance conditions. A lumped capacitance model of a substrate with its coating subjected to a uniform echelon heat flux is evaluated by solving a heat balance equation in the Laplace domain. Then, a thermally thin calorimeter is designed and the experimental thermogram is obtained by embedding a thin-wire micro-thermocouple onto the front and rear faces of the substrate. The forced convective heat transfer coefficient as well as the net incident heat flux density brought to the substrate during the thermal spray process are estimated. The theoretical composite surface temperature is compared to the experimental recording, the result showing a good agreement.

  2. Liquid Feedstock Plasma Spraying: An Emerging Process for Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markocsan, Nicolaie; Gupta, Mohit; Joshi, Shrikant; Nylén, Per; Li, Xin-Hai; Wigren, Jan

    2017-08-01

    Liquid feedstock plasma spraying (LFPS) involves deposition of ultrafine droplets of suspensions or solution precursors (typically ranging from nano- to submicron size) and permits production of coatings with unique microstructures that are promising for advanced thermal barrier coating (TBC) applications. This paper reviews the recent progress arising from efforts devoted to development of high-performance TBCs using the LFPS approach. Advancements in both suspension plasma spraying and solution precursor plasma spraying, which constitute the two main variants of LFPS, are presented. Results illustrating the different types of the microstructures that can be realized in LFPS through appropriate process parameter control, model-assisted assessment of influence of coating defects on thermo-mechanical properties and the complex interplay between pore coarsening, sintering and crystallite growth in governing thermal conductivity are summarized. The enhancement in functional performances/lifetime possible in LFPS TBCs with multilayered architectures and by incorporating new pyrochlore chemistries such as gadolinium zirconate, besides the conventional single 8 wt.% yttria-stabilized zirconia insulating ceramic layer, is specifically highlighted.

  3. Erosion Performance of Gadolinium Zirconate-Based Thermal Barrier Coatings Processed by Suspension Plasma Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahade, Satyapal; Curry, Nicholas; Björklund, Stefan; Markocsan, Nicolaie; Nylén, Per; Vaßen, Robert

    2017-01-01

    7-8 wt.% Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is the standard thermal barrier coating (TBC) material used by the gas turbines industry due to its excellent thermal and thermo-mechanical properties up to 1200 °C. The need for improvement in gas turbine efficiency has led to an increase in the turbine inlet gas temperature. However, above 1200 °C, YSZ has issues such as poor sintering resistance, poor phase stability and susceptibility to calcium magnesium alumino silicates (CMAS) degradation. Gadolinium zirconate (GZ) is considered as one of the promising top coat candidates for TBC applications at high temperatures (>1200 °C) due to its low thermal conductivity, good sintering resistance and CMAS attack resistance. Single-layer 8YSZ, double-layer GZ/YSZ and triple-layer GZdense/GZ/YSZ TBCs were deposited by suspension plasma spray (SPS) process. Microstructural analysis was carried out by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A columnar microstructure was observed in the single-, double- and triple-layer TBCs. Phase analysis of the as-sprayed TBCs was carried out using XRD (x-ray diffraction) where a tetragonal prime phase of zirconia in the single-layer YSZ TBC and a cubic defect fluorite phase of GZ in the double and triple-layer TBCs was observed. Porosity measurements of the as-sprayed TBCs were made by water intrusion method and image analysis method. The as-sprayed GZ-based multi-layered TBCs were subjected to erosion test at room temperature, and their erosion resistance was compared with single-layer 8YSZ. It was shown that the erosion resistance of 8YSZ single-layer TBC was higher than GZ-based multi-layered TBCs. Among the multi-layered TBCs, triple-layer TBC was slightly better than double layer in terms of erosion resistance. The eroded TBCs were cold-mounted and analyzed by SEM.

  4. Fuel Cell Stations Automate Processes, Catalyst Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Glenn Research Center looks for ways to improve fuel cells, which are an important source of power for space missions, as well as the equipment used to test fuel cells. With Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) awards from Glenn, Lynntech Inc., of College Station, Texas, addressed a major limitation of fuel cell testing equipment. Five years later, the company obtained a patent and provided the equipment to the commercial world. Now offered through TesSol Inc., of Battle Ground, Washington, the technology is used for fuel cell work, catalyst testing, sensor testing, gas blending, and other applications. It can be found at universities, national laboratories, and businesses around the world.

  5. Wear Resistant Carbide-based Thermal Sprayed Coatings: Process, Properties, Mechanical Degradation and Wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghabchi, Arash

    Thermally sprayed ceramic-metallic composite (CerMet) materials consist of ceramic particles mainly in form of carbides reinforced by metallic binder exhibit unique microstructural and mechanical characteristics. Such structure brings in a novel combination of hardness and toughness enabling application of this class of material in wear resistant surfaces. Final deposit microstructure that defines the mechanical properties and wear performance of material depends on process parameters and starting material characteristics. Complex interaction of in-flight particles with supersonic flame, formation of complex defective deposit structure comprising of pores, cracks and splat boundaries make comprehending of interrelation of process, microstructure, properties and performance a difficult task. Additional challenge is development of systematic understanding on mechanical degradation, damage and wear mechanisms of cermet coatings due to their complex structure. This dissertation attempts to address these issues first by taking a systematic step by step approach, process map, to establish a correlation between process, particle state, microstructure and properties. Different strategies were proposed and examined to control the high velocity thermal spray process. This strategy assessment enabled a better control over in-flight particles state in high velocity thermal spray process and provided better understanding on interaction of in-flight particles with the flame. Further, possible advantages of reducing the carbide particle size from micron to nano in terms of mechanical properties and different wear performance were explored. It was suggested that poor wear performance of nano-structured coating is due to presence of brittle phases and less available binder promotes the excessive stress detrimental to load carrying capability of material. Material damage and wear mechanisms of coating under different tribological conditions were examined. The results suggest a

  6. Effects of Fuel Spray Modeling on Combustion Instability Predictions in a Single-Element Lean Direct Injection (LDI) Gas Turbine Combustor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Modeling on Combustion Instability Predictions in a Single- Element Lean Direct Injection (LDI) Gas Turbine Combustor 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...injection (LDI) gas turbine combustor were performed to assess the effects of fuel spray modeling in predicting combustion instability. Concurrently...Research Laboratory (AFRL), Edwards AFB, CA, 93524 Simulations of a model configuration of a lean direct injection (LDI) gas turbine combustor were

  7. Comparative study of the flame structure of the burning sprays of the emulsions of jet a fuel water water and methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Gollahalli, S.R.; Javadi, S.H.

    1981-01-01

    Data are presented on the relative effects of emulsifying Jet A fuel with water and methanol on the flame properties of its sprays. Flame length, composition profiles, temperature profiles, flame radiation, emission of nitrogen oxides, and particulate concentration are studied. Results indicate that reductions of flame radiation, particulate concentration and nitrogen oxide emission can be achieved in both cases and water is more effective than methanol for causing those changes. 38 refs.

  8. High-pressure flame visualization of autoignition and flashback phenomena with liquid-fuel spray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marek, C. J.; Baker, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    A study was undertaken to determine the effect of boundary layers on autoignition and flashback for premixed Jet-A fuel in a unique high-pressure windowed test facility. A plate was placed in the center of the fuel-air stream to establish a boundary layer. Four experimental configurations were tested: a 24.5-cm-long plate with either a pointed leading edge, a rounded edge or an edge with a 0.317-cm step, or the duct without the plate. Experiments at an equivalence ratio ranging from 0.4 to 0.9 were performed at pressures to 2500 kPa (25 atm.) at temperatures of 600, 645, and 700 K and velocities to 115 meters per second. Flame shapes were observed during flashback and autoignition using high speed cinematography. Flashback and autoignition limits were determined.

  9. Feasibility Demonstration of Exciplex Fluorescence Measurements in Evaporating Laminar Sprays of Diesel Fuel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-15

    Next, we introduce PDPA measurements of the droplet size and velocity distributions to correlate them with the spectroscopic ones. Ultimately we...reflection from a dye cell used for intensity calibration of the laser beam. A TSI Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer ( PDPA ) is used to measure the...temperature temperature. PDPA Measurements Figure 6 shows histograms of the droplet diameter at different fuel flow rates. The droplet diameter

  10. Process for producing fluid fuel from coal

    DOEpatents

    Hyde, Richard W.; Reber, Stephen A.; Schutte, August H.; Nadkarni, Ravindra M.

    1977-01-01

    Process for producing fluid fuel from coal. Moisture-free coal in particulate form is slurried with a hydrogen-donor solvent and the heated slurry is charged into a drum wherein the pressure is so regulated as to maintain a portion of the solvent in liquid form. During extraction of the hydrocarbons from the coal, additional solvent is added to agitate the drum mass and keep it up to temperature. Subsequently, the pressure is released to vaporize the solvent and at least a portion of the hydrocarbons extracted. The temperature of the mass in the drum is then raised under conditions required to crack the hydrocarbons in the drum and to produce, after subsequent stripping, a solid coke residue. The hydrocarbon products are removed and fractionated into several cuts, one of which is hydrotreated to form the required hydrogen-donor solvent while other fractions can be hydrotreated or hydrocracked to produce a synthetic crude product. The heaviest fraction can be used to produce ash-free coke especially adapted for hydrogen manufacture. The process can be made self-sufficient in hydrogen and furnishes as a by-product a solid carbonaceous material with a useful heating value.

  11. Renewable hydrogen production for fossil fuel processing

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.

    1994-09-01

    The objective of this mission-oriented research program is the production of renewable hydrogen for fossil fuel processing. This program will build upon promising results that have been obtained in the Chemical Technology Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory on the utilization of intact microalgae for photosynthetic water splitting. In this process, specially adapted algae are used to perform the light-activated cleavage of water into its elemental constituents, molecular hydrogen and oxygen. The great potential of hydrogen production by microalgal water splitting is predicated on quantitative measurement of their hydrogen-producing capability. These are: (1) the photosynthetic unit size of hydrogen production; (2) the turnover time of photosynthetic hydrogen production; (3) thermodynamic efficiencies of conversion of light energy into the Gibbs free energy of molecular hydrogen; (4) photosynthetic hydrogen production from sea water using marine algae; (5) the original development of an evacuated photobiological reactor for real-world engineering applications; (6) the potential for using modern methods of molecular biology and genetic engineering to maximize hydrogen production. The significance of each of these points in the context of a practical system for hydrogen production is discussed. This program will be enhanced by collaborative research between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and senior faculty members at Duke University, the University of Chicago, and Iowa State University. The special contribution that these organizations and faculty members will make is access to strains and mutants of unicellular algae that will potentially have useful properties for hydrogen production by microalgal water splitting.

  12. Electrocatalytic and fuel processing studies for portable fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matter, Paul H.

    In the field of catalysis, the development of alternative catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) cathodes has been an ongoing task for researchers over the past two decades. PEM fuel cells are considered to be potential replacements for internal combustion engines in automobiles, and their reduced emissions and better efficiency would have huge payoffs for our environment, and in reducing our nation's dependence on foreign oil. To date, PEMFC cathode over-potentials are still significant, and the only materials discovered to be highly active and stable catalysts in an acidic environment are platinum-based. Despite several major advances in recent years in reducing platinum loading in fuel cell electrodes, the high expense and low availability of platinum will hinder the large-scale commercialization of PEM fuel cells. The most hopeful advances being made in replacing platinum are related to pyrolyzed organic macrocycles with transition metal centers (such as Fe or Co porphyrins and phthalocyanines). Encouragingly, it has recently been discovered that active electrodes could be prepared by heat-treating metal and nitrogen precursors (not necessarily organic macrocycles) together in the presence of a carbon support. In the first study of this dissertation, catalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR) were prepared by the pyrolysis of acetonitrile over various supports. The supports used included Vulcan Carbon, high purity alumina, silica, magnesia, and these same supports impregnated with Fe, Co, or Ni in the form of acetate salt. The catalysts were characterized by BET surface area analysis, BJH Pore Size Distribution (PSD), conductivity testing, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Temperature Programmed Oxidation (TPO), Thermo-Gravimetric Analysis (TGA), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray Photo-electron Spectroscopy (XPS), Mossbauer Spectroscopy, Rotating Disk Electrode (RDE) half cell testing, and

  13. Thermal transport properties of thermally sprayed coatings: An integrated study of materials, processing and microstructural effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Weiguang

    The complex microstructures of thermally sprayed coatings are very sensitive to processing conditions and have a significant influence on the properties. The thermal transport property is a very important design parameter for thermally sprayed coatings. Despite considerable progress in this area, there is continued need to clarify the interrelationships among processing, microstructure and thermal transport properties. This has been enabled through continued advancements in processing science and control, enhancements in microstructural characterization and new methods of property characterization. The purpose of this research is to seek a successive pathway to prior efforts in understanding the effect of microstructural defects on the thermal transport property of thermally sprayed coatings. Relationship between microstructure and thermal conductivity is investigated for three sets of plasma sprayed yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coating systems made using different morphology powders, different particle size distribution and controlled modification of particle states via plasma torch parameters. By integrating the results, maps of the thermal conductivity-porosity relationship have been established. Such maps highlight the role of splat thickness and interfaces in thermal conductivity. Furthermore, a new microstructural parameter termed "effective porosity" is proposed which considers the dominating role of interlamellar pores on through thickness thermal transport in thermally sprayed coatings. This effective porosity is rationalized based on the heat transport mechanism and enables better understanding of microstructure-thermal transport property correlation. An inverse linear model and a percolation model are established which can serve as predictive tools for understanding microstructure-thermal conductivity relationships. In addition, a systematic assessment of thermal conductivity anisotropy has been carried out for YSZ, Al2O 3 and several metallic

  14. Microencapsulation of menadione sodium bisulphite with polydimethylsiloxane by the spray-drying process: characterization by thermal analysis.

    PubMed

    Gronchi, P; Del Rosso, R; Centola, P; Cosentino, R F

    1992-01-01

    Menadione sodium bisulphite was microencapsulated with a polydimethylsiloxane membrane using spray-drying technology. Tests were performed using laboratory equipment and a Niro Atomizer pilot plant to scale up the process. The products were characterized with differential thermal analysis (DTA) and chemical and physical methods. Many differences between raw material and microencapsulated powder result from DTA data. The thermal characterization confirms that the spray-drying microcoating could be used to protect powder from the oxidative actions of the atmosphere.

  15. Solid oxide fuel cell process and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, Matthew Ellis [Morgantown, WV; Bayless, David J [Athens, OH; Trembly, Jason P [Durham, NC

    2011-11-15

    Conveying gas containing sulfur through a sulfur tolerant planar solid oxide fuel cell (PSOFC) stack for sulfur scrubbing, followed by conveying the gas through a non-sulfur tolerant PSOFC stack. The sulfur tolerant PSOFC stack utilizes anode materials, such as LSV, that selectively convert H.sub.2S present in the fuel stream to other non-poisoning sulfur compounds. The remaining balance of gases remaining in the completely or near H.sub.2S-free exhaust fuel stream is then used as the fuel for the conventional PSOFC stack that is downstream of the sulfur-tolerant PSOFC. A broad range of fuels such as gasified coal, natural gas and reformed hydrocarbons are used to produce electricity.

  16. A modified suspension spray combined with particle gradation method for preparation of protonic ceramic membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Kui; Yan, Ruiqiang; Dong, Dehua; Wang, Songlin; Chen, Xiaorui; Jiang, Tao; Lin, Bin; Wei, Ming; Liu, Xingqin; Meng, Guangyao

    2008-05-01

    In order to prepare a dense proton-conductive Ba(Zr0.1Ce0.7)Y0.2O3-δ (BZCY7) electrolyte membrane, a proper anode composition with 65% Ni2O3 in weight ratio was determined after investigating the effects of anode compositions on anode shrinkages for co-sintering. The thermal expansion margins between sintered anodes and electrolytes, which were less than 1% below 750 °C, also showed good thermal expansion compatibility. A suspension spray combined with particle gradation method had been introduced to prepare dense electrolyte membrane on porous anode support. After a heat treatment at 1400 °C for 5 h, a cell with La0.5Sr0.5CoO3-δ (LSCO) cathode was assembled and tested with hydrogen and ammonia as fuels. The outputs reached as high as 330 mW cm-2 in hydrogen and 300 mW cm-2 in ammonia at 700 °C, respectively. Comparing with the interface of another cell prepared by dry-pressing method, this one also showed a good interface contact between electrodes and electrolyte. To sum up, this combined technique can be considered as commercial fabrication technology candidate.

  17. Renewable hydrogen production for fossil fuel processing

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.; Lee, J.W.; Tevault, C.V.

    1995-06-01

    In the fundamental biological process of photosynthesis, atmospheric carbon dioxide is reduced to carbohydrate using water as the source of electrons with simultaneous evolution of molecular oxygen: H{sub 2}O + CO{sub 2} + light {yields} O{sub 2} + (CH{sub 2}O). It is well established that two light reactions, Photosystems I and II (PSI and PSII) working in series, are required to perform oxygenic photosynthesis. Experimental data supporting the two-light reaction model are based on the quantum requirement for complete photosynthesis, spectroscopy, and direct biochemical analysis. Some algae also have the capability to evolve molecular hydrogen in a reaction energized by the light reactions of photosynthesis. This process, now known as biophotolysis, can use water as the electron donor and lead to simultaneous evolution of molecular hydrogen and oxygen. In green algae, hydrogen evolution requires prior incubation under anaerobic conditions. Atmospheric oxygen inhibits hydrogen evolution and also represses the synthesis of hydrogenase enzyme. CO{sub 2} fixation competes with proton reduction for electrons relased from the photosystems. Interest in biophotolysis arises from both the questions that it raises concerning photosynthesis and its potential practical application as a process for converting solar energy to a non-carbon-based fuel. Prior data supported the requirement for both Photosystem I and Photosystem II in spanning the energy gap necessary for biophotolysis of water to oxygen and hydrogen. In this paper we report the at PSII alone is capable of driving sustained simultaneous photoevolution of molecular hydrogen and oxygen in an anaerobically adapted PSI-deficient strain of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, mutant B4, and that CO{sub 2} competes as an electron acceptor.

  18. Fracture toughness of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier ceramics: Influence of processing, microstructure, and thermal aging

    DOE PAGES

    Dwivedi, Gopal; Viswanathan, Vaishak; Sampath, Sanjay; ...

    2014-06-09

    Fracture toughness has become one of the dominant design parameters that dictates the selection of materials and their microstructure to obtain durable thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). Much progress has been made in characterizing the fracture toughness of relevant TBC compositions in bulk form, and it has become apparent that this property is significantly affected by process-induced microstructural defects. In this investigation, a systematic study of the influence of coating microstructure on the fracture toughness of atmospheric plasma sprayed (APS) TBCs has been carried out. Yttria partially stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings were fabricated under different spray process conditions inducing different levelsmore » of porosity and interfacial defects. Fracture toughness was measured on free standing coatings in as-processed and thermally aged conditions using the double torsion technique. Results indicate significant variance in fracture toughness among coatings with different microstructures including changes induced by thermal aging. Comparative studies were also conducted on an alternative TBC composition, Gd2Zr2O7 (GDZ), which as anticipated shows significantly lower fracture toughness compared to YSZ. Furthermore, the results from these studies not only point towards a need for process and microstructure optimization for enhanced TBC performance but also a framework for establishing performance metrics for promising new TBC compositions.« less

  19. Fracture toughness of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier ceramics: Influence of processing, microstructure, and thermal aging

    SciTech Connect

    Dwivedi, Gopal; Viswanathan, Vaishak; Sampath, Sanjay; Shyam, Amit; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2014-06-09

    Fracture toughness has become one of the dominant design parameters that dictates the selection of materials and their microstructure to obtain durable thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). Much progress has been made in characterizing the fracture toughness of relevant TBC compositions in bulk form, and it has become apparent that this property is significantly affected by process-induced microstructural defects. In this investigation, a systematic study of the influence of coating microstructure on the fracture toughness of atmospheric plasma sprayed (APS) TBCs has been carried out. Yttria partially stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings were fabricated under different spray process conditions inducing different levels of porosity and interfacial defects. Fracture toughness was measured on free standing coatings in as-processed and thermally aged conditions using the double torsion technique. Results indicate significant variance in fracture toughness among coatings with different microstructures including changes induced by thermal aging. Comparative studies were also conducted on an alternative TBC composition, Gd2Zr2O7 (GDZ), which as anticipated shows significantly lower fracture toughness compared to YSZ. Furthermore, the results from these studies not only point towards a need for process and microstructure optimization for enhanced TBC performance but also a framework for establishing performance metrics for promising new TBC compositions.

  20. Fuel Quality/Processing Study. Volume I. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, J B; Bela, A; Jentz, N E; Syverson, H T; Klumpe, H W; Kessler, R E; Kotzot, H T; Loran, B I

    1981-04-01

    This report presents the results of the Fuel Quality/Processing Study project for production of gas turbine fuels. The objective was to provide a data base for establishing intelligent trade-off between advanced turbine technology and liquid fuel quality. Synthetic fuels to be emphasized include those derived from coal and shale. The intent is to use the data base produced to guide the development of specifications for future synthetic liquid fuels anticipated for use in the time period 1985-2000. It is also to be used as a basis for evaluating the value and benefits of federally sponsored R and D efforts in the field of advanced gas turbine technology. The project assessed relative fuel costs, quality and energy efficiency for a number of fuel sources and processing alternatives. An objective was to accelerate implementation of fuel-flexible combustors for industrial and utility stationary gas turbine systems. This is to be accomplished by generating and demonstrating the technology base for development of reliable gas turbine combustors capable of sustained environmentally acceptable operation when using minimally processed synthetic fuels. The key program results are summarized for the following subject areas: literature survey, on-site fuel pretreatment, existing refineries to upgrade fuels, new refineries to upgrade fuels, and environmental considerations. An inhouse linear programming model served as the basis for determining economic processing paths for the existing refineries and new refineries syncrude upgrading. This involved development of extensive input data comprised of fuel properties, yields, component blending characteristics, incremental capital and operating costs, feed and product costs. Economics are based on March 1980 price levels.

  1. Suspension Plasma Sprayed Sr2Fe1.4Mo0.6O6- δ Electrodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shan-Lin; Zhang, Ai-Ping; Li, Cheng-Xin; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2017-02-01

    In this study, suspension plasma spraying (SPS) was applied to deposit double perovskite Sr2Fe1.4Mo0.6O6- δ (SFM) which can be used as both cathode and anode for solid oxide fuel cells. The effects of SFM concentration on the electrode phase composition, microstructure, and catalytic performance were investigated. The electrodes showed a dense structure when it was deposited at a concentration of 0.05 mol/L. The cathode performance was limited by the limited three-phase boundaries and poor gas diffusion. At 750 °C, cathode polarization ( R pc) was 0.19 Ω cm2. When the SFM concentration increased to 0.075 mol/L, the deposits revealed a porous microstructure with well-bonded fine particles. As a result, the Rpc decreased significantly to 0.078 Ω cm2 at 750 °C. However, when the SFM concentration was further increased to 0.1 mol/L, the R pc increased owing to the limited interface bonding between the non-molten particles. As a result, it was found that the SFM suspension concentration should be optimized to achieve a highly active SFM by SPS process. Moreover, when the optimized deposit was employed as an anode and tested in a hydrogen atmosphere, it showed anode polarization resistance (Rpa) of 1.5 Ω cm2 at 750 °C.

  2. An easy and innovative method based on spray-pyrolysis deposition to obtain high efficiency cathodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos-Gómez, L.; Porras-Vázquez, J. M.; Martín, F.; Ramos-Barrado, J. R.; Losilla, E. R.; Marrero-López, D.

    2016-07-01

    A novel electrode preparation method based on the spray-pyrolysis deposition of metal nitrate solutions onto a porous electrolyte scaffold is proposed. This method has been proved with different cathode materials, usually used in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells, such as La0.8Sr0.2MnO3-δ and La0.6Sr0.4Co1-xFexO3-δ (x = 0, 0.2, 0.8 and 1). The electrode microstructure is composed by two layers; the inner layer is a porous electrolyte scaffold homogeneously coated by cathode nanoparticles, providing an increased number of triple phase boundary sites for oxygen reduction, whereas, the top layer is formed by only cathode nanoparticles and acts mainly as a current collector. Polarization resistance values as low as 0.07 and 1.0 Ω cm2 at 600 and 450 °C, respectively, are obtained at open circuit voltage. This alternative approach has several advantages with respect to the traditional wet infiltration method for large area electrode fabrication, such as higher reproducibility, shorter preparation time in a single thermal deposition step, and easy implementation at industrial scale as a continuous process.

  3. Suspension Plasma Sprayed Sr2Fe1.4Mo0.6O6-δ Electrodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shan-Lin; Zhang, Ai-Ping; Li, Cheng-Xin; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2017-01-01

    In this study, suspension plasma spraying (SPS) was applied to deposit double perovskite Sr2Fe1.4Mo0.6O6-δ (SFM) which can be used as both cathode and anode for solid oxide fuel cells. The effects of SFM concentration on the electrode phase composition, microstructure, and catalytic performance were investigated. The electrodes showed a dense structure when it was deposited at a concentration of 0.05 mol/L. The cathode performance was limited by the limited three-phase boundaries and poor gas diffusion. At 750 °C, cathode polarization (R pc) was 0.19 Ω cm2. When the SFM concentration increased to 0.075 mol/L, the deposits revealed a porous microstructure with well-bonded fine particles. As a result, the Rpc decreased significantly to 0.078 Ω cm2 at 750 °C. However, when the SFM concentration was further increased to 0.1 mol/L, the R pc increased owing to the limited interface bonding between the non-molten particles. As a result, it was found that the SFM suspension concentration should be optimized to achieve a highly active SFM by SPS process. Moreover, when the optimized deposit was employed as an anode and tested in a hydrogen atmosphere, it showed anode polarization resistance (Rpa) of 1.5 Ω cm2 at 750 °C.

  4. Focused analyte spray emission apparatus and process for mass spectrometric analysis

    DOEpatents

    Roach, Patrick J [Kennewick, WA; Laskin, Julia [Richland, WA; Laskin, Alexander [Richland, WA

    2012-01-17

    An apparatus and process are disclosed that deliver an analyte deposited on a substrate to a mass spectrometer that provides for trace analysis of complex organic analytes. Analytes are probed using a small droplet of solvent that is formed at the junction between two capillaries. A supply capillary maintains the droplet of solvent on the substrate; a collection capillary collects analyte desorbed from the surface and emits analyte ions as a focused spray to the inlet of a mass spectrometer for analysis. The invention enables efficient separation of desorption and ionization events, providing enhanced control over transport and ionization of the analyte.

  5. [Effect of spray drying process on physical properties and dissolution of tanshinone].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yan-Rong; Zhang, Zhen-Hai; Ding, Dong-Mei; Yan, Hong-Mei; Sun, E; Jia, Xiao-Bin

    2014-03-01

    In order to improve the dissolution in vitro of components by processing tanshinone with the pray drying method, the physical properties of tanshinone power was analyzed by BET, differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray powder diffraction, and its dissolution in vitro was also investigated. The results of characterization showed decreased power size and increased specific surface area of tanshinone powder, and its existence in an amorphous state. Within 4 h, the accumulated dissolutions of tanshinone I and tanshinone II(A) in components of tanshinone reached 78.3%, 81.9%, respectively. Therefore, the spray-drying method was conducive to enhance the dissolution of components of tanshinone.

  6. Measuring Systems for Temperature Monitoring of Thermal Spraying and Combustion Processes in Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senchenko, V. N.; Dozhdikov, V. S.

    2003-09-01

    Conventional optical pyrometry methods do not always yield satisfactory results in cases of temperature monitoring in complicated industrial processes. For example, measuring the temperature of heated particles in thermal plasma spraying jets requires recognizing the object being measured by solving a mathematical problem. In addition to diagnosis of the temperature of a heated gas flow based on its self-radiation, it is necessary to utilize an irradiation physical model of IR active molecules. The paper briefly describes two diagnostic systems and methods for the above-mentioned industrial application. The main details of the system design, calibration and performance are presented.

  7. The fabrication of carbon nanotubes reinforced copper coating by a kinetic spray process.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yuming; Kang, Kicheol; Yoon, Sanghoon; Lee, Changhee

    2008-10-01

    In this paper, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) reinforced copper coating was deposited on copper sheet through kinetic spraying process. Effect of heat treatment on microstructure, conductivity, and hardness of the coating was investigated. The incompact MWCNTs reinforced copper coating exhibits a comparable hardness, but higher electrical resistivity than pure copper coating. After heat treatment at 600 degrees C for 2 h, the hardness of copper coatings significantly decreased due to the substantial grain growth. MWCNTs reinforced copper coating showed stable hardness and electrical conductivity against heat treatment owing to the inhibition of CNTs to grain growth and the intimate contact between CNTs and copper matrix.

  8. Vacuum plasma spray coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard R.; Mckechnie, Timothy N.

    1989-01-01

    Currently, protective plasma spray coatings are applied to space shuttle main engine turbine blades of high-performance nickel alloys by an air plasma spray process. Originally, a ceramic coating of yttria-stabilized zirconia (ZrO2.12Y2O3) was applied for thermal protection, but was removed because of severe spalling. In vacuum plasma spray coating, plasma coatings of nickel-chromium-aluminum-yttrium (NiCrAlY) are applied in a reduced atmosphere of argon/helium. These enhanced coatings showed no spalling after 40 MSFC burner rig thermal shock cycles between 927 C (1700 F) and -253 C (-423 F), while current coatings spalled during 5 to 25 test cycles. Subsequently, a process was developed for applying a durable thermal barrier coating of ZrO2.8Y2O3 to the turbine blades of first-stage high-pressure fuel turbopumps utilizing the enhanced NiCrAlY bond-coating process. NiCrAlY bond coating is applied first, with ZrO2.8Y2O3 added sequentially in increasing amounts until a thermal barrier coating is obtained. The enchanced thermal barrier coating has successfully passed 40 burner rig thermal shock cycles.

  9. Process for Generating Engine Fuel Consumption Map: Ricardo Cooled EGR Boost 24-bar Standard Car Engine Tier 2 Fuel

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document summarizes the process followed to utilize the fuel consumption map of a Ricardo modeled engine and vehicle fuel consumption data to generate a full engine fuel consumption map which can be used by EPA's ALPHA vehicle simulations.

  10. Formulation and process considerations for the design of sildenafil-loaded polymeric microparticles by vibrational spray-drying.

    PubMed

    Beck-Broichsitter, Moritz; Bohr, Adam; Aragão-Santiago, Leticia; Klingl, Andreas; Kissel, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    The current study reports the preparation and characterization of sildenafil-loaded poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)-based microparticles (MPs) by means of vibrational spray-drying. Emphasis was placed on relevant formulation and process parameters with influence on the properties of obtained powders. Materials and methods, results and discussion: The solid state solubility of sildenafil in spray-dried PLGA-MPs amounted to 17 wt.%. Thus, a drug loading below and above the determined solubility limit resulted in solid solutions and phase separation (i.e. solid dispersions), respectively. Furthermore, interactions between sildenafil and the PLGA matrix were observed for the spray-dried MPs. Optimization of spray-drying conditions allowed for a fabrication of defined MPs (size range of ∼4-8 μm) displaying a high sildenafil encapsulation efficiency (>90%) and sustained sildenafil release (from ∼4 to >12 h). The individual drug release rates from the spray-dried formulations were mainly a function of the drug loading, applied polymer and MP size. Finally, a scale-up of the preparation process did not result in a relevant change of the physicochemical and in vitro drug release properties of the prepared powders. Identification of relevant formulation and spray-drying parameters enabled the fabrication of tailored sildenafil-loaded PLGA-based MPs, which meet the needs of the individual application (e.g. controlled drug delivery to the lungs).

  11. Binder Jetting: A Novel Solid Oxide Fuel-Cell Fabrication Process and Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manogharan, Guha; Kioko, Meshack; Linkous, Clovis

    2015-03-01

    With an ever-growing concern to find a more efficient and less polluting means of producing electricity, fuel cells have constantly been of great interest. Fuel cells electrochemically convert chemical energy directly into electricity and heat without resorting to combustion/mechanical cycling. This article studies the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), which is a high-temperature (100°C to 1000°C) ceramic cell made from all solid-state components and can operate under a wide range of fuel sources such as hydrogen, methanol, gasoline, diesel, and gasified coal. Traditionally, SOFCs are fabricated using processes such as tape casting, calendaring, extrusion, and warm pressing for substrate support, followed by screen printing, slurry coating, spray techniques, vapor deposition, and sputter techniques, which have limited control in substrate microstructure. In this article, the feasibility of engineering the porosity and configuration of an SOFC via an additive manufacturing (AM) method known as binder jet printing was explored. The anode, cathode and oxygen ion-conducting electrolyte layers were fabricated through AM sequentially as a complete fuel cell unit. The cell performance was measured in two modes: (I) as an electrolytic oxygen pump and (II) as a galvanic electricity generator using hydrogen gas as the fuel. An analysis on influence of porosity was performed through SEM studies and permeability testing. An additional study on fuel cell material composition was conducted to verify the effects of binder jetting through SEM-EDS. Electrical discharge of the AM fabricated SOFC and nonlinearity of permeability tests show that, with additional work, the porosity of the cell can be modified for optimal performance at operating flow and temperature conditions.

  12. Spray Drying Ternary Amorphous Solid Dispersions of Ibuprofen - An Investigation into Critical Formulation and Processing Parameters.

    PubMed

    Ziaee, Ahmad; Albadarin, Ahmad B; Padrela, Luis; Faucher, Alexandra; O'Reilly, Emmet; Walker, Gavin

    2017-08-16

    A design of experiment (DoE) approach was used to investigate the critical formulation and processing parameters in spray drying ternary amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) of ibuprofen. A range of 16 formulations of ibuprofen, HPMCP-HP55 and Kollidon VA 64 were spray dried. Statistical analysis revealed the interrelation of various spray drying process conditions and formulation factors, namely solution feed rate, inlet temperature, Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (API)/excipients ratio and dichloromethane (DCM) /methanol (MeOH) ratio. Powder X-Ray diffraction analysis (PXRD) showed that all the samples with the lowest API/excipient ratio (1:4) were amorphous, while others were crystalline. Moreover, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis was employed to investigate ASD formulation more in-depth. The glass transition temperatures (Tg) of all ASDs were in the range 70-79 °C, while crystalline formulations displayed an endothermic peak of melting of crystalline ibuprofen in the range of 50-80 °C. The high Tg of ASDs was an indication of highly stable ASD formulations as verified via PXRD at zero day and afterward at 1, 1.5, 3 and 6 month intervals. The intermolecular interactions between ibuprofen molecule and excipients were studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) spectroscopy. FTIR and Carbon-13 ssNMR analysis indicated that hydrogen bond formation involving the carboxyl group in ibuprofen within the ASDs is likely. More importantly, the solubility of ibuprofen in ASD formulations is improved compared to pure ibuprofen. This was due to both the amorphous structure of ibuprofen and of the existence of amphiphilic excipient, Kollidon VA64, in the formulation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Effect of Solid Shield on Coating Properties in Atmospheric Plasma Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ting; Zheng, Lili; Zhang, Hui

    2016-12-01

    This paper investigates the impact of shrouded shield structure on plasma spray processes and the selection of optimal shield structure. Response of plasma flame characteristics to solid shield structures is studied first, and experimental investigations are then performed for both atmospheric (APS) and shrouded (SPS) plasma spray processes. It is found that the usage of conical shield (divergence angle 5.5°) with 90 mm in length is effective to form a low-oxygen (<2%) and high-temperature (>3000 K) region in the plasma flame and this region can cover the majority area for particles passing by. The average particle temperature is higher in SPS than in APS with the given conditions, and such behavior is intensified as solid shield length increases. Using the SPS process, more disk-shaped splats are obtained, and the oxygen concentration in coating is significantly reduced. The degree of the oxidation in the coatings is further reduced as the length of the solid shield increases from 50 to 90 mm. Applying solid shield will lead to high flame temperature and low oxidation; however, the substrate overheating and velocity reduction may occur. For the cases studied, the optimal shield length is around 90 mm.

  14. Quality by Design approach to spray drying processing of crystalline nanosuspensions.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sumit; Gokhale, Rajeev; Burgess, Diane J

    2014-04-10

    Quality by Design (QbD) principles were explored to understand spray drying process for the conversion of liquid nanosuspensions into solid nano-crystalline dry powders using indomethacin as a model drug. The effects of critical process variables: inlet temperature, flow and aspiration rates on critical quality attributes (CQAs): particle size, moisture content, percent yield and crystallinity were investigated employing a full factorial design. A central cubic design was employed to generate the response surface for particle size and percent yield. Multiple linear regression analysis and ANOVA were employed to identify and estimate the effect of critical parameters, establish their relationship with CQAs, create design space and model the spray drying process. Inlet temperature was identified as the only significant factor (p value <0.05) to affect dry powder particle size. Higher inlet temperatures caused drug surface melting and hence aggregation of the dried nano-crystalline powders. Aspiration and flow rates were identified as significant factors affecting yield (p value <0.05). Higher yields were obtained at higher aspiration and lower flow rates. All formulations had less than 3% (w/w) moisture content. Formulations dried at higher inlet temperatures had lower moisture compared to those dried at lower inlet temperatures.

  15. Fuel ethanol production: process design trends and integration opportunities.

    PubMed

    Cardona, Carlos A; Sánchez, Oscar J

    2007-09-01

    Current fuel ethanol research and development deals with process engineering trends for improving biotechnological production of ethanol. In this work, the key role that process design plays during the development of cost-effective technologies is recognized through the analysis of major trends in process synthesis, modeling, simulation and optimization related to ethanol production. Main directions in techno-economical evaluation of fuel ethanol processes are described as well as some prospecting configurations. The most promising alternatives for compensating ethanol production costs by the generation of valuable co-products are analyzed. Opportunities for integration of fuel ethanol production processes and their implications are underlined. Main ways of process intensification through reaction-reaction, reaction-separation and separation-separation processes are analyzed in the case of bioethanol production. Some examples of energy integration during ethanol production are also highlighted. Finally, some concluding considerations on current and future research tendencies in fuel ethanol production regarding process design and integration are presented.

  16. External characteristics of unsteady spray atomization from a nasal spray device.

    PubMed

    Fung, Man Chiu; Inthavong, Kiao; Yang, William; Lappas, Petros; Tu, Jiyuan

    2013-03-01

    The nasal route presents an enormous opportunity to exploit the highly vascularized respiratory airway for systemic drug delivery to provide more rapid onset of therapy and reduced drug degradation compared with conventional oral routes. The dynamics of atomization at low injection pressure is less known as typical spray atomization studies have focused on industrial applications such as fuel injection that are performed at much higher pressure. An experimental test station was designed in house and an alternative method to characterize the external spray is presented. This involved the use of high-speed camera to capture the temporal development of the spray as it is atomized through actuation of the spray device. An image-processing technique based on edge detection was developed to automate processing through the large number of images captured. The results showed that there are three main phases of spray development (prestable, stable, and poststable) that can be correlated by examining the spray width. A comparison with a human nasal cavity is made to put into perspective the dimensions and geometry that the spray atomization produces. This study aimed to extend the current existing set of data to contribute toward a better understanding in nasal spray drug delivery. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Heat Transfer Modeling of an Annular On-Line Spray Water Cooling Process for Electric-Resistance-Welded Steel Pipe.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zejun; Han, Huiquan; Ren, Wei; Huang, Guangjie

    2015-01-01

    On-line spray water cooling (OSWC) of electric-resistance-welded (ERW) steel pipes can replace the conventional off-line heat treatment process and become an important and critical procedure. The OSWC process improves production efficiency, decreases costs, and enhances the mechanical properties of ERW steel pipe, especially the impact properties of the weld joint. In this paper, an annular OSWC process is investigated based on an experimental simulation platform that can obtain precise real-time measurements of the temperature of the pipe, the water pressure and flux, etc. The effects of the modes of annular spray water cooling and related cooling parameters on the mechanical properties of the pipe are investigated. The temperature evolutions of the inner and outer walls of the pipe are measured during the spray water cooling process, and the uniformity of mechanical properties along the circumferential and longitudinal directions is investigated. A heat transfer coefficient model of spray water cooling is developed based on measured temperature data in conjunction with simulation using the finite element method. Industrial tests prove the validity of the heat transfer model of a steel pipe undergoing spray water cooling. The research results can provide a basis for the industrial application of the OSWC process in the production of ERW steel pipes.

  18. Heat Transfer Modeling of an Annular On-Line Spray Water Cooling Process for Electric-Resistance-Welded Steel Pipe

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zejun; Han, Huiquan; Ren, Wei; Huang, Guangjie

    2015-01-01

    On-line spray water cooling (OSWC) of electric-resistance-welded (ERW) steel pipes can replace the conventional off-line heat treatment process and become an important and critical procedure. The OSWC process improves production efficiency, decreases costs, and enhances the mechanical properties of ERW steel pipe, especially the impact properties of the weld joint. In this paper, an annular OSWC process is investigated based on an experimental simulation platform that can obtain precise real-time measurements of the temperature of the pipe, the water pressure and flux, etc. The effects of the modes of annular spray water cooling and related cooling parameters on the mechanical properties of the pipe are investigated. The temperature evolutions of the inner and outer walls of the pipe are measured during the spray water cooling process, and the uniformity of mechanical properties along the circumferential and longitudinal directions is investigated. A heat transfer coefficient model of spray water cooling is developed based on measured temperature data in conjunction with simulation using the finite element method. Industrial tests prove the validity of the heat transfer model of a steel pipe undergoing spray water cooling. The research results can provide a basis for the industrial application of the OSWC process in the production of ERW steel pipes. PMID:26201073

  19. Fuel quality/processing study. Volume 4: On site processing studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, G. E., Jr.; Cutrone, M.; Doering, H.; Hickey, J.

    1981-01-01

    Fuel treated at the turbine and the turbine exhaust gas processed at the turbine site are studied. Fuel treatments protect the turbine from contaminants or impurities either in the upgrading fuel as produced or picked up by the fuel during normal transportation. Exhaust gas treatments provide for the reduction of NOx and SOx to environmentally acceptable levels. The impact of fuel quality upon turbine maintenance and deterioration is considered. On site costs include not only the fuel treatment costs as such, but also incremental costs incurred by the turbine operator if a turbine fuel of low quality is not acceptably upgraded.

  20. Effects of spray-cooling processes on the microbiological conditions of decontaminated beef carcasses.

    PubMed

    Gill, C O; Landers, C

    2003-07-01

    Spray processes for cooling decontaminated carcasses were examined at four beef packing plants. Temperature histories were collected from deep leg sites on 25 carcasses and from randomly selected sites on the surfaces of a further 25 carcasses selected at random from carcasses undergoing cooling at each plant. Carcass cooling rates were similar at all four plants. Proliferation values calculated from surface temperature histories indicated similar increases of < or = 2 log units in the numbers of pseudomonads on carcasses at all plants and increases of <0.5 and >0.5 log units in the numbers of Escherichia coli on carcasses at plants A and B and plants C and D, respectively. The numbers of aerobes recovered from carcasses after cooling were about 1 log unit larger than the numbers recovered from carcasses before cooling at plants A, B, and C but >1.5 log units larger at plant D. These increases in numbers of aerobes were in agreement with the estimated proliferations of pseudomonads. The larger increase in the number of aerobes on carcasses at plant D may be attributable to carcasses not being pasteurized at that plant, while carcasses were pasteurized at all of the other plants. The numbers of E. coli recovered from carcasses after cooling at plants B, C, and D were also in agreement with the increases calculated from surface temperature histories. However, numbers of E. coli declined by about 1 log unit during carcass cooling at plant A. This decline may have been due to death occurring during chilling for some E. coli cells that were injured rather than killed by pasteurization with sprayed hot water at plant A, whereas pasteurization with steam at plants B and C seemingly left few injured E. coli cells. The growth of bacteria on decontaminated carcasses during spray cooling at the four plants was apparently constrained by temperature alone.

  1. Research on electrostatic electrification during jet kerosene spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Quanzhen; Zhang, Wentian; Li, Yipeng; Sun, Keping

    2013-03-01

    Multiple electrostatic electrifications during aircraft fuelling process may cause a fire disaster or explosion, so study on the protection measure for electrostatic electrification is very important for the security of aircraft fuelling. This paper investigated the electrostatic voltage and charge of the fuel nozzle and metal parts during the fuel spraying by self-designed jet kerosene spraying electrostatic electrification test system. The experimental results indicate that the voltage on the fuel nozzle and metal parts is very dangerous for electrostatic safety if they are not reliably grounded.

  2. Systems and processes for conversion of ethylene feedstocks to hydrocarbon fuels

    DOEpatents

    Lilga, Michael A.; Hallen, Richard T.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Cooper, Alan R.; Frye, John G.; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan Kallupalayam

    2017-05-30

    Systems, processes, and catalysts are disclosed for obtaining fuel and fuel blends containing selected ratios of open-chain and closed-chain fuel-range hydrocarbons suitable for production of alternate fuels including gasolines, jet fuels, and diesel fuels. Fuel-range hydrocarbons may be derived from ethylene-containing feedstocks and ethanol-containing feedstocks.

  3. Accumulated damage process of thermal sprayed coating under rolling contact by acoustic emission technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jia; Zhou, Zhen-yu; Piao, Zhong-yu

    2016-09-01

    The accumulated damage process of rolling contact fatigue (RCF) of plasma-sprayed coatings was investigated. The influences of surface roughness, loading condition, and stress cycle frequency on the accumulated damage status of the coatings were discussed. A ball-ondisc machine was employed to conduct RCF experiments. Acoustic emission (AE) technique was introduced to monitor the RCF process of the coatings. AE signal characteristics were investigated to reveal the accumulated damage process. Result showed that the polished coating would resist the asperity contact and remit accumulated damage. The RCF lifetime would then extend. Heavy load would aggravate the accumulated damage status and induce surface fracture. Wear became the main failure mode that reduced the RCF lifetime. Frequent stress cycle would aggravate the accumulated damage status and induce interface fracture. Fatigue then became the main failure mode that also reduced the RCF lifetime.

  4. Finite Element Modeling and Analysis of Powder Stream in Low Pressure Cold Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Tarun; Walia, Ravinderjit Singh; Sharma, Prince; Sidhu, Tejinder Singh

    2016-07-01

    Low pressure cold gas dynamic spray (LPCGDS) is a coating process that utilize low pressure gas (5-10 bars instead of 25-30 bars) and the radial injection of powder instead of axial injection with the particle range (1-50 μm). In the LPCGDS process, pressurized compressed gas is accelerated to the critical velocity, which depends on length of the divergent section of nozzle, the propellant gas and particle characteristics, and the diameters ratio of the inlet and outer diameters. This paper presents finite element modeling (FEM) of powder stream in supersonic nozzle wherein adiabatic gas flow and expansion of gas occurs in uniform manner and the same is used to evaluate the resultant temperature and velocity contours during coating process. FEM analyses were performed using commercial finite volume package, ANSYS CFD FLUENT. The results are helpful to predict the characteristics of powder stream at the exit of the supersonic nozzle.

  5. Development and Characterization of Multifunctional Directly Compressible Co-processed Excipient by Spray Drying Method.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Sohil I; Nathwani, Sandeep V; Soniwala, Moinuddin M; Chavda, Jayant R

    2016-08-01

    The present investigation was carried out to develop and characterize a multifunctional co-processed excipient for improving the compressibility of poorly compressible drugs. Etodolac was used as a model drug. Microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), lactose monohydrate (lactose), and StarCap 1500 (StarCap) were selected as components of the co-processed excipient. The spray drying method was used for co-processing of excipients. D-optimal mixture design was applied to optimize the proportion of component excipients. Statistical analysis of the D-optimal mixture design revealed that all response variables were significantly affected by the independent variables (p value < 0.05). Optimized composition was obtained from the desirability function. The optimized composition of the co-processed excipient was found to be 30% MCC, 25% lactose, and 45% StarCap. This optimized batch was evaluated for flow properties, compressibility parameters such as Kawakita's and Kuno's equation and Heckel's equation, and dilution potential. Evaluation parameters for flow properties (angle of repose, Carr's index, and Hausner's ratio) suggested excellent flow character. The parameters of Kawakita's and Kuno's equation and Heckel's equation suggested improvement in the compressibility of the model drug. Dilution potential was found to be 40%, and based on that, tablets of the model drug were formulated and evaluated for general evaluation parameters of tablets. All the parameters were found to be within the acceptance criteria which concluded that the multifunctional directly compressible co-processed excipient was prepared successfully that improved the compressibility of the poorly compressible model drug etodolac along with spray drying as an efficient method for the preparation of co-processed excipient.

  6. Fuel quality-processing study. Volume 2: Literature survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, G. E., Jr.; Amero, R.; Murthy, B.; Cutrone, M.

    1981-01-01

    The validity of initial assumptions about raw materials choices and relevant upgrading processing options was confirmed. The literature survey also served to define the on-site (at the turbine location) options for fuel treatment and exhaust gas treatment. The literature survey also contains a substantial compilation of specification and physical property information about liquid fuel products relevant to industrial gas turbines.

  7. Friction and wear properties of high-velocity oxygen fuel sprayed WC-17Co coating under rotational fretting conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jun; Cai, Zhenbing; Mo, Jiliang; Peng, Jinfang; Zhu, Minhao

    2016-05-01

    Rotational fretting which exist in many engineering applications has incurred enormous economic loss. Thus, accessible methods are urgently needed to alleviate or eliminate damage by rotational fretting. Surface engineering is an effective approach that is successfully adopted to enhance the ability of components to resist the fretting damage. In this paper, using a high-velocity oxygen fuel sprayed (HVOF) technique WC-17Co coating is deposited on an LZ50 steel surface to study its properties through Vickers hardness testing, scanning electric microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and X-ray diffractrometry (XRD). Rotational fretting wear tests are conducted under normal load varied from 10 N to 50 N, and angular displacement amplitudes vary from 0.125° to 1°. Wear scars are examined using SEM, EDX, optical microscopy (OM), and surface topography. The experimental results reveal that the WC-17Co coating adjusted the boundary between the partial slip regime (PSR) and the slip regime (SR) to the direction of smaller amplitude displacement. As a result, the coefficients of friction are consistently lower than the substrate's coefficients of friction both in the PSR and SR. The damage to the coating in the PSR is very slight. In the SR, the coating exhibits higher debris removal efficiency and load-carrying capacity. The bulge is not found for the coating due to the coating's higher hardness to restrain plastic flow. This research could provide experimental bases for promoting industrial application of WC-17Co coating in prevention of rotational fretting wear.

  8. Treatment of oxide spent fuel using the lithium reduction process

    SciTech Connect

    Karell, E.J.; Pierce, R.D.; Mulcahey, T.P.

    1996-05-01

    The wide variety in the composition of DOE spent nuclear fuel complicates its long-term disposition because of the potential requirement to individually qualify each type of fuel for repository disposal. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has developed the electrometallurgical treatment technique to convert all of these spent fuel types into a single set of disposal forms, simplifying the qualification process. While metallic fuels can be directly processed using the electrometallurgical treatment technique, oxide fuels must first be reduced to the metallic form. The lithium reduction process accomplishes this pretreatment. In the lithium process the oxide components of the fuel are reduced using lithium at 650 C in the presence of molten LiCl, yielding the corresponding metals and Li{sub 2}O. The reduced metal components are then separated from the LiCl salt phase and become the feed material for electrometallurgical treatment. A demonstration test of the lithium reduction process was successfully conducted using a 10-kg batch of simulated oxide spent fuel and engineering-scale equipment specifically constructed for that purpose. This paper describes the lithium process, the equipment used in the demonstration test, and the results of the demonstration test.

  9. Spray Behavior and Atomization Characteristics of Biodiesel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seung-Hun; Oh, Young-Taig

    Biodiesel has large amount of oxygen in itself, which make it very efficient in reducing exhaust emission by improving combustion inside an engine. But biodiesel has a low temperature flow problem because it has a high viscosity. In this study, the spray behavior and atomization characteristics were investigated to confirm of some effect for the combination of non-esterification biodiesel and fuel additive WDP and IPA. The process of spray was visualized through the visualization system composed of a halogen lamp and high speed camera, and atomization characteristics were investigated through LDPA. When blending WDP and IPA with biodiesel, atomization and spray characteristics were improved. Through this experimental result, SMD of blended fuel, WDP 25% and biodiesel 75%, was 33.9% reduced at distance 6cm from a nozzle tip under injection pressure 30MPa.

  10. Microencapsulate Aspergillus niger peptidases from agroindustrial waste wheat bran: spray process evaluation and stability.

    PubMed

    Cabral, T P F; Bellini, N C; Assis, K R; Teixeira, C C C; Lanchote, A D; Cabral, H; Freitas, L A P

    2017-08-29

    The aim of this work was to obtain microencapsulated stable Aspergillus niger peptidases by post fermentation spray drying. The enzymatic extract was evaluated before and after spray drying microencapsulation to verify the effects of five different process parameters on the extract enzymatic activity, i.e. air flow, extract feed rate, drying temperature, homogenising time and weight ratio of extract to encapsulation material. The optimal conditions were determined by desirability functions and experimentally confirmed. Additionally, the stability of the microparticles was assessed during 60 days at 4 °C, 25 °C and 40 °C. The results revealed that the microparticles stored at 4 °C retained approximately 100% of their proteolytic activity at nine days of storage. Considering the industrial adaptation of the bioprocess and the prospect of commercial application of the proteases, the evaluation of different parameters for drying enzymes is required as a valuable alternative to obtain biotechnological products with high added value.

  11. A discrete element based simulation framework to investigate particulate spray deposition processes

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Debanjan Zohdi, Tarek I.

    2015-06-01

    This work presents a computer simulation framework based on discrete element method to analyze manufacturing processes that comprise a loosely flowing stream of particles in a carrier fluid being deposited on a target surface. The individual particulate dynamics under the combined action of particle collisions, fluid–particle interactions, particle–surface contact and adhesive interactions is simulated, and aggregated to obtain global system behavior. A model for deposition which incorporates the effect of surface energy, impact velocity and particle size, is developed. The fluid–particle interaction is modeled using appropriate spray nozzle gas velocity distributions and a one-way coupling between the phases. It is found that the particle response times and the release velocity distribution of particles have a combined effect on inter-particle collisions during the flow along the spray. It is also found that resolution of the particulate collisions close to the target surface plays an important role in characterizing the trends in the deposit pattern. Analysis of the deposit pattern using metrics defined from the particle distribution on the target surface is provided to characterize the deposition efficiency, deposit size, and scatter due to collisions.

  12. Spray-coating process in preparing PTFE-PPS composite super-hydrophobic coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Rui; Zhang, Haifeng; Liu, Xiaowei

    2014-03-01

    In order to improve the performance of a liquid-floated rotor micro-gyroscope, the resistance of the moving interface between the rotor and the floating liquid must be reduced. Hydrophobic treatment can reduce the frictional resistance between such interfaces, therefore we proposed a method to prepare a poly-tetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-poly-phenylene sulphide (PPS) composite super-hydrophobic coating, based on a spraying process. This method can quickly prepare a continuous, uniform PTFE-PPS composite super-hydrophobic surface on a 2J85 material. This method can be divided into three steps, namely: pre-treatment; chemical etching; and spraying. The total time for this is around three hours. When the PTFE concentration is 4%, the average contact angle of the hydrophobic coating surface is 158°. If silicon dioxide nanoparticles are added, this can further improve the adhesion and mechanical strength of the super-hydrophobic composite coating. The maximum average contact angle can reach as high as 164° when the mass fraction of PTFE, PPS and silicon dioxide is 1:1:1.

  13. Fabrication and Microstructure of Hydroxyapatite Coatings on Zirconia by Room Temperature Spray Process.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dong Seok; Chae, Hak Cheol; Lee, Jong Kook

    2015-08-01

    Hydroxyapatite coatings were fabricated on zirconia substrates by a room temperature spray process and were investigated with regards to their microstructure, composition and dissolution in water. An initial hydroxyapatite powder was prepared by heat treatment of bovine-bone derived powder at 1100 °C for 2 h, while dense zirconia substrates were fabricated by pressing 3Y-TZP powder and sintering it at 1350 °C for 2 h. Room temperature spray coating was performed using a slit nozzle in a low pressure-chamber with a controlled coating time. The phase composition of the resultant hydroxyapatite coatings was similar to that of the starting powder, however, the grain size of the hydroxyapatite particles was reduced to about 100 nm due to their formation by particle impaction and fracture. All areas of the coating had a similar morphology, consisting of reticulated structure with a high surface roughness. The hydroxyapatite coating layer exhibited biostability in a stimulated body fluid, with no severe dissolution being observed during in vitro experimentation.

  14. A particle temperature sensor for monitoring and control of the thermal spray process

    SciTech Connect

    Swank, W.D.; Fincke, J.R.; Haggard, D.C.

    1995-12-01

    The temperature and velocity of thermally sprayed particles prior to their impact on the substrate are two of the predominant determinants of coating quality and characteristics. This paper describes an instrument developed for real time monitoring of in-flight particle temperature in an industrial environment. The instrument is designed to operate as a stand alone device for verifying that a desired particle temperature is attained or for developing process settings to yield a particular temperature. The device is also suitable for incorporation into a closed loop process controller. Data showing the relationship between torch parameters and average particle temperature are presented. There is good agreement between previous measurements using laboratory instrumentation and the simpler, industrially hardened technique described here. The assumption of gray body behavior is evaluated and for known emissivities corrections are developed.

  15. Preparation and pharmaceutical characterization of amorphous cefdinir using spray-drying and SAS-process.

    PubMed

    Park, Junsung; Park, Hee Jun; Cho, Wonkyung; Cha, Kwang-Ho; Kang, Young-Shin; Hwang, Sung-Joo

    2010-08-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of micronization and amorphorization of cefdinir on solubility and dissolution rate. The amorphous samples were prepared by spray-drying (SD) and supercritical anti-solvent (SAS) process, respectively and their amorphous natures were confirmed by DSC, PXRD and FT-IR. Thermal gravimetric analysis was performed by TGA. SEM was used to investigate the morphology of particles and the processed particle had a spherical shape, while the unprocessed crystalline particle had a needle-like shape. The mean particle size and specific surface area were measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and BET, respectively. The DLS result showed that the SAS-processed particle was the smallest, followed by SD and the unprocessed cefdinir. The BET result was the same as DLS result in that the SAS-processed particle had the largest surface area. Therefore, the processed cefdinir, especially the SAS-processed particle, appeared to have enhanced apparent solubility, improved intrinsic dissolution rate and better drug release when compared with SD-processed and unprocessed crystalline cefdinir due not only to its amorphous nature, but also its reduced particle size. Conclusions were that the solubility and dissolution rate of crystalline cefdinir could be improved by physically modifying the particles using SD and SAS-process. Furthermore, SAS-process was a powerful methodology for improving the solubility and dissolution rate of cefdinir.

  16. Development of Advanced LED Phosphors by Spray-based Processes for Solid State Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Cabot Corporation

    2007-09-30

    The overarching goal of the project was to develop luminescent materials using aerosol processes for making improved LED devices for solid state lighting. In essence this means improving white light emitting phosphor based LEDs by improvement of the phosphor and phosphor layer. The structure of these types of light sources, displayed in Figure 1, comprises of a blue or UV LED under a phosphor layer that converts the blue or UV light to a broad visible (white) light. Traditionally, this is done with a blue emitting diode combined with a blue absorbing, broadly yellow emitting phosphor such as Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}:Ce (YAG). A similar result may be achieved by combining a UV emitting diode and at least three different UV absorbing phosphors: red, green, and blue emitting. These emitted colors mix to make white light. The efficiency of these LEDs is based on the combined efficiency of the LED, phosphor, and the interaction between the two. The Cabot SSL project attempted to improve the over all efficiency of the LED light source be improving the efficiency of the phosphor and the interaction between the LED light and the phosphor. Cabot's spray based process for producing phosphor powders is able to improve the brightness of the powder itself by increasing the activator (the species that emits the light) concentration without adverse quenching effects compared to conventional synthesis. This will allow less phosphor powder to be used, and will decrease the cost of the light source; thus lowering the barrier of entry to the lighting market. Cabot's process also allows for chemical flexibility of the phosphor particles, which may result in tunable emission spectra and so light sources with improved color rendering. Another benefit of Cabot's process is the resulting spherical morphology of the particles. Less light scattering results when spherical particles are used in the phosphor layer (Figure 1) compared to when conventional, irregular shaped phosphor particles

  17. Simulation of primary fuel atomization processes at subcritical pressures.

    SciTech Connect

    Arienti, Marco

    2013-06-01

    This report documents results from an LDRD project for the first-principles simulation of the early stages of spray formation (primary atomization). The first part describes a Cartesian embedded-wall method for the calculation of flow internal to a real injector in a fully coupled primary calculation. The second part describes the extension to an all-velocity formulation by introducing a momentum-conservative semi-Lagrangian advection and by adding a compressible term in the Poissons equation. Accompanying the description of the new algorithms are verification tests for simple two-phase problems in the presence of a solid interface; a validation study for a scaled-up multi-hole Diesel injector; and demonstration calculations for the closing and opening transients of a single-hole injector and for the high-pressure injection of liquid fuel at supersonic velocity.

  18. Critical processing parameters of carbon dioxide spray drying for the production of dried protein formulations: A study with myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Nuchuchua, O; Every, H A; Jiskoot, W

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to gain fundamental insight into protein destabilization induced by supercritical CO2 spray drying processing parameters. Myoglobin was used as a model protein (5mg/ml with 50mg/ml trehalose in 10mM phosphate buffer, pH 6.2). The solution was exposed to sub- and supercritical CO2 conditions (65-130bar and 25-50°C), and CO2 spray drying under those conditions. The heme binding of myoglobin was determined by UV/Vis, fluorescence, and circular dichroism spectroscopy, while myoglobin aggregation was studied by using size-exclusion chromatography and flow imaging microscopy. It was found that pressure and temperature alone did not influence myoglobin's integrity. However, when pressurized CO2 was introduced into myoglobin solutions at any condition, the pH of the myoglobin formulation shifted to about 5 (measured after depressurization), resulting in heme binding destabilization and aggregation of myoglobin. When exposed to CO2, these degradation processes were enhanced by increasing temperature. Heme binding destabilization and myoglobin aggregation were also seen after CO2 spray drying, and to a greater extent. Moreover, the CO2 spray drying induced the partial loss of heme. In conclusion, pressurized CO2 destabilizes the myoglobin, leading to heme loss and protein aggregation upon spray drying.

  19. Integrated coke, asphalt and jet fuel production process and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Shang, Jer Y.

    1991-01-01

    A process and apparatus for the production of coke, asphalt and jet fuel m a feed of fossil fuels containing volatile carbon compounds therein is disclosed. The process includes the steps of pyrolyzing the feed in an entrained bed pyrolyzing means, separating the volatile pyrolysis products from the solid pyrolysis products removing at least one coke from the solid pyrolysis products, fractionating the volatile pyrolysis products to produce an overhead stream and a bottom stream which is useful as asphalt for road pavement, condensing the overhead stream to produce a condensed liquid fraction and a noncondensable, gaseous fraction, and removing water from the condensed liquid fraction to produce a jet fuel-containing product. The disclosed apparatus is useful for practicing the foregoing process. the process provides a useful method of mass producing and jet fuels from materials such as coal, oil shale and tar sands.

  20. Galvanic cell for processing of used nuclear fuel

    DOEpatents

    Garcia-Diaz, Brenda L.; Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael J.; Gray, Joshua R.; Olson, Luke C.

    2017-02-07

    A galvanic cell and methods of using the galvanic cell is described for the recovery of uranium from used nuclear fuel according to an electrofluorination process. The galvanic cell requires no input energy and can utilize relatively benign gaseous fluorinating agents. Uranium can be recovered from used nuclear fuel in the form of gaseous uranium compound such as uranium hexafluoride, which can then be converted to metallic uranium or UO.sub.2 and processed according to known methodology to form a useful product, e.g., fuel pellets for use in a commercial energy production system.

  1. Electrochemical fluorination for processing of used nuclear fuel

    DOEpatents

    Garcia-Diaz, Brenda L.; Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael J.; Gray, Joshua R.; Olson, Luke C.

    2016-07-05

    A galvanic cell and methods of using the galvanic cell is described for the recovery of uranium from used nuclear fuel according to an electrofluorination process. The galvanic cell requires no input energy and can utilize relatively benign gaseous fluorinating agents. Uranium can be recovered from used nuclear fuel in the form of gaseous uranium compound such as uranium hexafluoride, which can then be converted to metallic uranium or UO.sub.2 and processed according to known methodology to form a useful product, e.g., fuel pellets for use in a commercial energy production system.

  2. Synergize fuel and petrochemical processing plans with catalytic reforming

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    Depending on the market, refiner`s plans to produce clean fuels and higher value petrochemicals will weigh heavily on the catalytic reformer`s flexibility. It seems that as soon as a timely article related to catalytic reforming operations is published, a new {open_quotes}boutique{close_quotes} gasoline fuel specification is slapped on to existing fuel standards, affecting reformer operations and processing objectives. Just as importantly, the petrochemical market (such as aromatics) that refiners are targeting, can be very fickle. That`s why process engineers have endeavored to maintain an awareness of the flexibility that technology suppliers are building into modern catalytic reformers.

  3. Formulation Development, Process Optimization, and In Vitro Characterization of Spray-Dried Lansoprazole Enteric Microparticles

    PubMed Central

    Vora, Chintan; Patadia, Riddhish; Mittal, Karan; Mashru, Rajashree

    2016-01-01

    This research focuses on the development of enteric microparticles of lansoprazole in a single step by employing the spray drying technique and studies the effects of variegated formulation/process variables on entrapment efficiency and in vitro gastric resistance. Preliminary trials were undertaken to optimize the type of Eudragit and its various levels. Further trials included the incorporation of plasticizer triethyl citrate and combinations of other polymers with Eudragit S 100. Finally, various process parameters were varied to investigate their effects on microparticle properties. The results revealed Eudragit S 100 as the paramount polymer giving the highest gastric resistance in comparison to Eudragit L 100-55 and L 100 due to its higher pH threshold and its polymeric backbone. Incorporation of plasticizer not only influenced entrapment efficiency, but diminished gastric resistance severely. On the contrary, polymeric combinations reduced entrapment efficiency for both sodium alginate and glyceryl behenate, but significantly influenced gastric resistance for only sodium alginate and not for glyceryl behenate. The optimized process parameters were comprised of an inlet temperature of 150°C, atomizing air pressure of 2 kg/cm2, feed solution concentration of 6% w/w, feed solution spray rate of 3 ml/min, and aspirator volume of 90%. The SEM analysis revealed smooth and spherical shape morphologies. The DSC and PXRD study divulged the amorphous nature of the drug. Regarding stability, the product was found to be stable under 3 months of accelerated and long-term stability conditions as per ICH Q1A(R2) guidelines. Thus, the technique offers a simple means to generate polymeric enteric microparticles that are ready to formulate and can be directly filled into hard gelatin capsules. PMID:27222612

  4. Formulation Development, Process Optimization, and In Vitro Characterization of Spray-Dried Lansoprazole Enteric Microparticles.

    PubMed

    Vora, Chintan; Patadia, Riddhish; Mittal, Karan; Mashru, Rajashree

    2016-01-01

    This research focuses on the development of enteric microparticles of lansoprazole in a single step by employing the spray drying technique and studies the effects of variegated formulation/process variables on entrapment efficiency and in vitro gastric resistance. Preliminary trials were undertaken to optimize the type of Eudragit and its various levels. Further trials included the incorporation of plasticizer triethyl citrate and combinations of other polymers with Eudragit S 100. Finally, various process parameters were varied to investigate their effects on microparticle properties. The results revealed Eudragit S 100 as the paramount polymer giving the highest gastric resistance in comparison to Eudragit L 100-55 and L 100 due to its higher pH threshold and its polymeric backbone. Incorporation of plasticizer not only influenced entrapment efficiency, but diminished gastric resistance severely. On the contrary, polymeric combinations reduced entrapment efficiency for both sodium alginate and glyceryl behenate, but significantly influenced gastric resistance for only sodium alginate and not for glyceryl behenate. The optimized process parameters were comprised of an inlet temperature of 150°C, atomizing air pressure of 2 kg/cm(2), feed solution concentration of 6% w/w, feed solution spray rate of 3 ml/min, and aspirator volume of 90%. The SEM analysis revealed smooth and spherical shape morphologies. The DSC and PXRD study divulged the amorphous nature of the drug. Regarding stability, the product was found to be stable under 3 months of accelerated and long-term stability conditions as per ICH Q1A(R2) guidelines. Thus, the technique offers a simple means to generate polymeric enteric microparticles that are ready to formulate and can be directly filled into hard gelatin capsules.

  5. Effects of Atomization Injection on Nanoparticle Processing in Suspension Plasma Spray.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Hong-Bing; Zhang, Cheng-Yu; Zhang, Kai; Shao, Xue-Ming

    2016-05-20

    Liquid atomization is applied in nanostructure dense coating technology to inject suspended nano-size powder materials into a suspension plasma spray (SPS) torch. This paper presents the effects of the atomization parameters on the nanoparticle processing. A numerical model was developed to simulate the dynamic behaviors of the suspension droplets, the solid nanoparticles or agglomerates, as well as the interactions between them and the plasma gas. The plasma gas was calculated as compressible, multi-component, turbulent jet flow in Eulerian scheme. The droplets and the solid particles were calculated as discrete Lagrangian entities, being tracked through the spray process. The motion and thermal histories of the particles were given in this paper and their release and melting status were observed. The key parameters of atomization, including droplet size, injection angle and velocity were also analyzed. The study revealed that the nanoparticle processing in SPS preferred small droplets with better atomization and less aggregation from suspension preparation. The injection angle and velocity influenced the nanoparticle release percentage. Small angle and low initial velocity might have more nanoparticles released. Besides, the melting percentage of nanoparticles and agglomerates were studied, and the critical droplet diameter to ensure solid melting was drawn. Results showed that most released nanoparticles were well melted, but the agglomerates might be totally melted, partially melted, or even not melted at all, mainly depending on the agglomerate size. For better coating quality, the suspension droplet size should be limited to a critical droplet diameter, which was inversely proportional to the cubic root of weight content, for given critical agglomerate diameter of being totally melted.

  6. Effects of Atomization Injection on Nanoparticle Processing in Suspension Plasma Spray

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Hong-bing; Zhang, Cheng-yu; Zhang, Kai; Shao, Xue-ming

    2016-01-01

    Liquid atomization is applied in nanostructure dense coating technology to inject suspended nano-size powder materials into a suspension plasma spray (SPS) torch. This paper presents the effects of the atomization parameters on the nanoparticle processing. A numerical model was developed to simulate the dynamic behaviors of the suspension droplets, the solid nanoparticles or agglomerates, as well as the interactions between them and the plasma gas. The plasma gas was calculated as compressible, multi-component, turbulent jet flow in Eulerian scheme. The droplets and the solid particles were calculated as discrete Lagrangian entities, being tracked through the spray process. The motion and thermal histories of the particles were given in this paper and their release and melting status were observed. The key parameters of atomization, including droplet size, injection angle and velocity were also analyzed. The study revealed that the nanoparticle processing in SPS preferred small droplets with better atomization and less aggregation from suspension preparation. The injection angle and velocity influenced the nanoparticle release percentage. Small angle and low initial velocity might have more nanoparticles released. Besides, the melting percentage of nanoparticles and agglomerates were studied, and the critical droplet diameter to ensure solid melting was drawn. Results showed that most released nanoparticles were well melted, but the agglomerates might be totally melted, partially melted, or even not melted at all, mainly depending on the agglomerate size. For better coating quality, the suspension droplet size should be limited to a critical droplet diameter, which was inversely proportional to the cubic root of weight content, for given critical agglomerate diameter of being totally melted. PMID:28335222

  7. Characterization of microstructure and surface properties of hybrid coatings of WC-CoCr prepared by laser heat treatment and high velocity oxygen fuel spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Shihong Cho, Tong-Yul; Yoon, Jae-Hong; Fang, Wei; Song, Ki-O; Li Mingxi; Joo, Yun-Kon; Lee, Chan Gyu

    2008-10-15

    The microstructure and microhardness of high velocity oxygen fuel-sprayed WC-CoCr coatings were comparatively studied both before and after laser heat treatment of the coatings. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and microhardness testing were applied to investigate the microstructure, phase composition, porosity and microhardness. The results indicate that WC is still present, and W{sub 2}C has appeared, while neither cobalt nor {sigma}-CrCo is detectable. Co{sub 4}W{sub 2}C has appeared in the high velocity oxygen fuel-sprayed coating after laser heat treatment as compared to the coating before laser treatment. The relative content of the W{sub 2}C has not increased with laser treatment, but the laser treatment has essentially eliminated the porosity almost entirely, providing a more homogeneous and densified microstructure. The laser heat treatment has effected the formation of a denser compact coating on the substrate. After laser heat treatment, the thickness of the coating has decreased from 300 {mu}m to 225 {mu}m. This corresponds to an average porosity in the high velocity oxygen fuel-sprayed coating that is approximately five times greater than that in the subsequently laser heat-treated coating. The laser treatment has also resulted in an increased hardness of the coating near the surface, where the average value increased from Hv{sub 0.2} = 1262.4 in the coating before laser heat treatment to Hv{sub 0.2} = 1818.7 after laser heat treatment.

  8. Distillate fuel-oil processing for phosphoric acid fuel-cell power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ushiba, K. K.

    1980-02-01

    The current efforts to develop distillate oil-steam reforming processes are reviewed, and the applicability of these processes for integration with the fuel cell are discussed. The development efforts can be grouped into the following processing approaches: high-temperature steam reforming (HTSR); autothermal reforming (ATR); autothermal gasification (AG); and ultra desulfurization followed by steam reforming. Sulfur in the feed is a key problem in the process development. A majority of the developers consider sulfur as an unavoidable contaminant of distillate fuel and are aiming to cope with it by making the process sulfur-tolerant. In the HTSR development, the calcium aluminate catalyst developed by Toyo Engineering represents the state of the art. United Technology (UTC), Engelhard, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) are also involved in the HTSR research. The ATR of distillate fuel is investigated by UTC and JPL. The autothermal gasification (AG) of distillate fuel is being investigated by Engelhard and Siemens AG. As in the ATR, the fuel is catalytically gasified utilizing the heat generated by in situ partial combustion of feed, however, the goal of the AG is to accomplish the initial breakdown of the feed into light gases and not to achieve complete conversion to CO and H/sub 2/. For the fuel-cell integration, a secondary reforming of the light gases from the AG step is required. Engelhard is currently testing a system in which the effluent from the AG section enters the steam-reforming section, all housed in a single vessel. (WHK)

  9. Improvement on droplet production rate of ultrasonic - nebulizer in spray pyrolysis process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panatarani, Camellia; Demen, Tuti Aryati; Men, Liu Kin; Maulana, Dwindra Wilham; Hidayat, Darmawan; Joni, I. Made

    2013-09-01

    Atomization is an important part in Spray Pyrolysis (SP) process which is applied to synthesize submicron or nano sized particles or to deposit thin film. Ultrasonic Nebulizer (UN) is usually use in SP due to its homogeneous droplets production with size between 1-5 μm. The drawback of the UN is low droplets production rate. In this research, we successfully developed a Digital Ultrasonic Nebulizer (DUN) with high droplets production rate using two ultrasonic traducers with applied frequency of 2.4 MHz. The result of DUN atomization was improved 4-6 fold compare to the conventional UN. The DUN also has an additional digital features such as pushbutton, LCD and microcontroller which is allow to set duration and applied voltage.

  10. Computational fluid dynamic modeling of the flame spray pyrolysis process for silica nanopowder synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivas-Martinez, Miguel; Sohn, Hong Yong; Jang, Hee Dong; Rhee, Kang-In

    2015-07-01

    A computational fluid dynamic model that couples the fluid dynamics with various processes involving precursor droplets and product particles during the flame spray pyrolysis (FSP) synthesis of silica nanopowder from volatile precursors is presented. The synthesis of silica nanopowder from tetraethylorthosilicate and tetramethylorthosilicate in bench- and pilot-scale FSP reactors, with the ultimate purpose of industrial-scale production, was simulated. The transport and evaporation of liquid droplets are simulated from the Lagrangian viewpoint. The quadrature method of moments is used to solve the population balance equation for particles undergoing homogeneous nucleation and Brownian collision. The nucleation rate is computed based on the rates of thermal decomposition and oxidation of the precursor with no adjustable parameters. The computed results show that the model is capable of reproducing the magnitude as well as the variations of the average particle diameter with different experimental conditions using a single value of the collision efficiency factor α for a given reactor size.

  11. Influence of plasma spraying deposition process on optical properties of hydroxyapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belka, Radosław; Kowalski, Szymon; Żórawski, Wojciech; Suchańska, Małgorzata

    2015-09-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) is a well-known bioceramic, nonorganic material of the bones of the vertebrate responsible for their mechanical durability. In human bones it occupies 60-80 % of the volume depending on a number of factors. Synthetic HAp is valued in bone endoprosthetic to its high biocompatibility. It is widely used to fill cavities of bone and as the coating of bone implants to increase their biocompatibility and adhesion to bone surface. In this paper a diffuse reflectance spectra of plasma-spraying deposited hydroxyapatite were presented and compared with pure powder samples. Optical band gap were estimated basing on Kubelka-Munk functions and Tauc plot extrapolation. We found that deposition process affects the value of band gap.

  12. Thermal interaction between WC-Co coating and steel substrate in process of HVOF spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Guilemany, J.M.; Sobolev, V.V.; Nutting, J.; Dong, Z.; Calero, J.A. . Metalurgia Fisica-Ciencia de Materials)

    1994-10-01

    The WC-Co powders can be used to produce good adhesive and wear resistant HVOF thermal spray coatings on steel and light alloys substrates. In order to understand the properties of this kind of coating, the phases which are present in the coatings and structure changes during post heat treatments have been investigated. Although the coating properties depend very much on the structure developed in the substrate-coating interfacial region it has not been yet investigated in detail. The present study is devoted to the experimental and theoretical analysis of this interfacial region. The structure characterization has been performed mainly through the use of transmission electron microscopy. To provide a theoretical investigation a realistic prediction model of the process has been developed and on its base the mathematical simulation of the substrate-coating thermal interaction has been undertaken.

  13. Synthetic fuel formulation and process for producing the same

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, C.L.

    1981-05-05

    A synthetic fuel formulation is disclosed, together with a process of producing such synthetic fuel. Based on its total weight, the fuel is comprised of approximately fifty to about seventy-five percent of an aliphatic hydrocarbon alcohol containing two to eleven carbon atoms, about five to twelve percent water, approximately two or twenty weight percent of a solvent for the alcohol, and about one to about seven weight percent of a hydrocarbon glycol, acetone, and methyl ethyl ketone. Optional ingredients may also be included, such as antirust and anti-foaming agents, as well as an agent to increase the storage life of the fuel. To produce such synthetic fuel, the foregoing ingredients are mixed sequentially, starting with the alcohol and adding thereto the solvent, acetone, optional agents if utilized, methyl ethyl ketone, the glycol, and water.

  14. IFR fuel cycle process equipment design environment and objectives

    SciTech Connect

    Rigg, R.H.

    1993-03-01

    Argonne National laboratory (ANL) is refurbishing the hot cell facility originally constructed with the EBR-II reactor. When refurbishment is complete, the facility win demonstrate the complete fuel cycle for current generation high burnup metallic fuel elements. These are sodium bonded, stainless steel clad fuel pins of U-Zr or U-Pu-Zr composition typical of the fuel type proposed for a future Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) design. To the extent possible, the process equipment is being built at full commercial scale, and the facility is being modified to incorporate current DOE facility design requirements and modem remote maintenance principles. The current regulatory and safety environment has affected the design of the fuel fabrication equipment, most of which will be described in greater detail in subsequent papers in this session.

  15. IFR fuel cycle process equipment design environment and objectives

    SciTech Connect

    Rigg, R.H.

    1993-01-01

    Argonne National laboratory (ANL) is refurbishing the hot cell facility originally constructed with the EBR-II reactor. When refurbishment is complete, the facility win demonstrate the complete fuel cycle for current generation high burnup metallic fuel elements. These are sodium bonded, stainless steel clad fuel pins of U-Zr or U-Pu-Zr composition typical of the fuel type proposed for a future Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) design. To the extent possible, the process equipment is being built at full commercial scale, and the facility is being modified to incorporate current DOE facility design requirements and modem remote maintenance principles. The current regulatory and safety environment has affected the design of the fuel fabrication equipment, most of which will be described in greater detail in subsequent papers in this session.

  16. Superomniphobic and easily repairable coatings on copper substrates based on simple immersion or spray processes.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Thomaz C; Michels, Alexandre F; Horowitz, Flávio; Weibel, Daniel E

    2015-03-24

    Textures that resemble typical fern or bracken plant species (dendrite structures) were fabricated for liquid repellency by dipping copper substrates in a single-step process in solutions containing AgNO3 or by a simple spray liquid application. Superhydrophobic surfaces were produced using a solution containing AgNO3 and trimethoxypropylsilane (TMPSi), and superomniphobic surfaces were produced by a two-step procedure, immersing the copper substrate in a AgNO3 solution and, after that, in a solution containing 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyltriethoxysilane (PFDTES). The simple functionalization processes can also be used when the superomniphobic surfaces were destroyed by mechanical stress. By immersion of the wrecked surfaces in the above solutions or by the spray method and soft heating, the copper substrates could be easily repaired, regenerating the surfaces' superrepellency to liquids. The micro- and nanoroughness structures generated on copper surfaces by the deposition of silver dendrites functionalized with TMPSi presented apparent contact angles greater than 150° with a contact angle hysteresis lower than 10° when water was used as the test liquid. To avoid total wettability with very low surface tension liquids, such as rapeseed oil and hexadecane, a thin perfluorinated coating of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE), produced by physical vapor deposition, was used. A more efficient perfluorinated coating was obtained when PFDTES was used. The superomniphobic surfaces produced apparent contact angles above 150° with all of the tested liquids, including hexadecane, although the contact angle hysteresis with this liquid was above 10°. The coupling of dendritic structures with TMPSi/PTFE or directly by PFDTES coatings was responsible for the superrepellency of the as-prepared surfaces. These simple, fast, and reliable procedures allow the large area, and cost-effective scale fabrication of superrepellent surfaces on copper substrates for various industrial

  17. Established and Adapted Diagnostic Tools for Investigation of a Special Twin-Wire Arc Spraying Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Johannes; Lahres, Michael; Zimmermann, Stephan; Schein, Jochen

    2016-10-01

    In the LDS® ( Lichtbogendrahtspritzen) process, a twin-wire arc spraying (TWAS) process developed by Daimler AG, the gas injection and feed to the arc play a crucial role in separating the molten particles from the wire ends. This paper describes an investigation of the gas and particle behavior according to individual LDS® process parameters. Coating problems are not considered. The measurements are separated into two different parts: "cold" (without arc and particles) and "hot" (with arc and particles). The results provide the first detailed understanding of the effect of different LDS® process parameters. A correlation between the gas parameter settings and the particle beam properties was found. Using established and adapted diagnostic tools, as also applied for conventional TWAS processes, this special LDS® process was investigated and the results (gas and particle behavior) validated, thereby allowing explanation and comparison of the diagnostic methods, which is the main focus of this paper. Based on error analysis, individual instabilities, limits, and deviations during the gas determinations and particle measurements are explained in more detail. The paper concludes with presentation of the first particle-shadow diagnostic results and main statements regarding these investigations.

  18. Melt extrusion vs. spray drying: The effect of processing methods on crystalline content of naproxen-povidone formulations.

    PubMed

    Haser, Abbe; Cao, Tu; Lubach, Joe; Listro, Tony; Acquarulo, Larry; Zhang, Feng

    2017-03-01

    Our hypothesis is that melt extrusion is a more suitable processing method than spray drying to prepare amorphous solid dispersions of drugs with a high crystallization tendency. Naproxen-povidone K25 was used as the model system in this study. Naproxen-povidone K25 solid dispersions at 30% and 60% drug loadings were characterized by modulated DSC, powder X-ray diffraction, FT-IR, and solid-state (13)C NMR to identify phase separation and drug recrystallization during processing and storage. At 30% drug loading, hydrogen bond (H-bond) sites of povidone K25 were not saturated and the glass transition (Tg) temperature of the formulation was higher. As a result, both melt-extruded and spray-dried materials were amorphous initially and remained so after storage at 40°C. At 60% drug loading, H-bond sites were saturated, and Tg was low. We were not able to prepare amorphous materials. The initial crystallinity of the formulations was 0.4%±0.2% and 5.6%±0.6%, and increased to 2.7%±0.3% and 21.6%±1.0% for melt-extruded and spray-dried materials, respectively. Spray-dried material was more susceptible to re-crystallization during processing, due to the high diffusivity of naproxen molecules in the formulation matrix and lack of kinetic stabilization from polymer solution. A larger number of crystalline nucleation sites and high surface area made the spray-dried material more susceptible to recrystallization during storage. This study demonstrated the unique advantages of melt extrusion over spray drying for the preparation of amorphous solid dispersions of naproxen at high drug level.

  19. A deep look into the spray coating process in real-time—the crucial role of x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Stephan V.

    2016-10-01

    Tailoring functional thin films and coating by rapid solvent-based processes is the basis for the fabrication of large scale high-end applications in nanotechnology. Due to solvent loss of the solution or dispersion inherent in the installation of functional thin films and multilayers the spraying and drying processes are strongly governed by non-equilibrium kinetics, often passing through transient states, until the final structure is installed. Therefore, the challenge is to observe the structural build-up during these coating processes in a spatially and time-resolved manner on multiple time and length scales, from the nanostructure to macroscopic length scales. During installation, the interaction of solid-fluid interfaces and between the different layers, the flow and evaporation themselves determine the structure of the coating. Advanced x-ray scattering methods open a powerful pathway for observing the involved processes in situ, from the spray to the coating, and allow for gaining deep insight in the nanostructuring processes. This review first provides an overview over these rapidly evolving methods, with main focus on functional coatings, organic photovoltaics and organic electronics. Secondly the role and decisive advantage of x-rays is outlined. Thirdly, focusing on spray deposition as a rapidly emerging method, recent advances in investigations of spray deposition of functional materials and devices via advanced x-ray scattering methods are presented.

  20. Beneficial effects of laser irradiation on the deposition process of diamond/Ni60 composite coating with cold spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jianhua; Yang, Lijing; Li, Bo; Li, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    Although cold spray process has many unique advantages over other coating techniques, it has difficulties in depositing hard materials. This article presents a study in the beneficial effects of laser irradiation on the fabrication process of diamond/Ni60 composite coating using cold spray. The focus of this research is on the comparison between the composite coatings produced with laser cladding (LC) and with supersonic laser deposition (SLD), with respect to diamond graphitization and tribological properties, thus to demonstrate the beneficial effects of laser irradiation on the cold spray process. The influence of deposition temperature on the coating characteristics, such as deposition efficiency, diamond volume fraction, microstructure and phase is also investigated. The tribological properties of the diamond/Ni60 composite coating produced with SLD are determined using a pin-on-disc tribometer, along with the diamond/Ni60 coating produced using LC with the optimal process parameters for comparison. The experimental results show that with the assistance of laser irradiation, diamond/Ni60 composite coating can be successfully deposited using cold spray; the obtained coating is superior to that processed with LC, because SLD can suppress the graphitization of the diamond particles. The diamond/Ni60 composite coating fabricated with SLD has much better tribological properties than the LC coating.

  1. A deep look into the spray coating process in real-time-the crucial role of x-rays.

    PubMed

    Roth, Stephan V

    2016-10-12

    Tailoring functional thin films and coating by rapid solvent-based processes is the basis for the fabrication of large scale high-end applications in nanotechnology. Due to solvent loss of the solution or dispersion inherent in the installation of functional thin films and multilayers the spraying and drying processes are strongly governed by non-equilibrium kinetics, often passing through transient states, until the final structure is installed. Therefore, the challenge is to observe the structural build-up during these coating processes in a spatially and time-resolved manner on multiple time and length scales, from the nanostructure to macroscopic length scales. During installation, the interaction of solid-fluid interfaces and between the different layers, the flow and evaporation themselves determine the structure of the coating. Advanced x-ray scattering methods open a powerful pathway for observing the involved processes in situ, from the spray to the coating, and allow for gaining deep insight in the nanostructuring processes. This review first provides an overview over these rapidly evolving methods, with main focus on functional coatings, organic photovoltaics and organic electronics. Secondly the role and decisive advantage of x-rays is outlined. Thirdly, focusing on spray deposition as a rapidly emerging method, recent advances in investigations of spray deposition of functional materials and devices via advanced x-ray scattering methods are presented.

  2. Spray drying of a poorly water-soluble drug nanosuspension for tablet preparation: formulation and process optimization with bioavailability evaluation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Ni, Rui; Zhang, Xin; Li, Luk Chiu; Mao, Shirui

    2015-06-01

    Spray drying experiments of an itraconazole nanosuspension were conducted to generate a dry nanocrystal powder which was subsequently formulated into a tablet formulation for direct compression. The nanosuspension was prepared by high pressure homogenization and characterized for particle-size distribution and surface morphology. A central composite statistical design approach was applied to identify the optimal drug-to-excipient ratio and spray drying temperature. It was demonstrated that the spray drying of a nanosuspension with a mannitol-to-drug mass ratio of 4.5 and at an inlet temperature of 120 °C resulted in a dry powder with the smallest increase in particle size as compared with that of the nanosuspension. X-ray diffraction results indicated that the crystalline structure of the drug was not altered during the spray-drying process. The tablet formulation was identified by determining the micromeritic properties such as flowability and compressibility of the powder mixtures composed of the spray dried nanocrystal powder and other commonly used direct compression excipients. The dissolution rate of the nanocrystal tablets was significantly enhanced and was found to be comparable to that of the marketed Sporanox®. No statistically significant difference in oral absorption between the nanocrystal tablets and Sporanox® capsules was found. In conclusion, the nanosuspension approach is feasible to improve the oral absorption of a BCS Class II drug in a tablet formulation and capable of achieving oral bioavailability equivalent to other well established oral absorption enhancement method.

  3. Physicochemical properties and oral bioavailability of amorphous atorvastatin hemi-calcium using spray-drying and SAS process.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Soo; Kim, Min-Soo; Park, Hee Jun; Jin, Shun-Ji; Lee, Sibeum; Hwang, Sung-Joo

    2008-07-09

    The objective of the study was to prepare amorphous atorvastatin hemi-calcium using spray-drying and supercritical antisolvent (SAS) process and evaluate its physicochemical properties and oral bioavailability. Atorvastatin hemi-calcium trihydrate was transformed to anhydrous amorphous form by spray-drying and SAS process. With the SAS process, the mean particle size and the specific surface area of amorphous atorvastatin were drastically changed to 68.7+/-15.8nm, 120.35+/-1.40m2/g and 95.7+/-12.2nm, 79.78+/-0.93m2/g from an acetone solution and a tetrahydrofuran solution, respectively and appeared to be associated with better performance in apparent solubility, dissolution and pharmacokinetic studies, compared with unprocessed crystalline atorvastatin. Oral AUC0-8h values in SD rats for crystalline and amorphous atorvastatin were as follow: 1121.4+/-212.0ngh/mL for crystalline atorvastatin, 3249.5+/-406.4ngh/mL and 3016.1+/-200.3ngh/mL for amorphous atorvastatin from an acetone solution and a tetrahydrofuran solution with SAS process, 2227.8+/-274.5 and 2099.9+/-339.2ngh/mL for amorphous atorvastatin from acetone and tetrahydrofuran with spray-drying. The AUCs of all amorphous atorvastatin significantly increased (P<0.05) compared with crystalline atorvastatin, suggesting that the enhanced bioavailability was attributed to amorphous nature and particle size reduction. In addition, the SAS process exhibits better bioavailability than spray-drying because of particle size reduction with narrow particle size distribution. It was concluded that physicochemical properties and bioavailability of crystalline atorvastatin could be improved by physical modification such as particle size reduction and generation of amorphous state using spray-drying and SAS process. Further, SAS process was a powerful methodology for improving the physicochemical properties and bioavailability of atorvastatin.

  4. Towards a reliable laser spray powder deposition system through process characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Keicher, D.M.; Jellison, J.L.; Schanwald, L.P.; Romero, J.A.; Abbott, D.H.

    1995-07-01

    A series of experiments have been performed to characterize the laser spray powder deposition tea-one (HAZ) in the process. Goal of these experiments was to minimize the heat affected base substrate while obtaining a maximum build-up rate of the deposited material. Response surface models have been developed to achieve this goal. These models indicate that laser irradiance and component travel speed are both important factors to be considered in optimization of this process. These models suggest that a minimum HAZ can be obtained with a maximum material build-up height by maintaining with a slow travel speed. Although these models are useful in identifying significant factor and process trends, further refinement is required for practical use in industrial applications. Weighting of the response variables used in generating the models is being considered to improve the model robustness. High speed imaging of the deposition process suggests that the powder particle size and/or size distribution affects the stability of this process.

  5. Economics of spray-dryer FGD system: the two-stage open-loop processes

    SciTech Connect

    Burnett, T.A.; O'Brien, W.E.

    1981-06-01

    Preliminary economics of the Rockwell International Corporation - Wheelabrator Frye, Inc., (RI/WF) two-stage open-loop flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process were determined for both lime and soda ash absorbents. This two-stage open-loop process is a throwaway system in which the alkali raw material (as a solution or slurry) is sprayed into the flue gas stream, dried by the latent heat in the hot flue gas, and collected as dry particulate matter in a baghouse. The fly ash is also collected in the baghouse as an inherent part of the process. An economic evaluation of a limestone slurry FGD process with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) for particulate matter removal was included for comparison. The basis was a 500-MW power plant burning 3.5% sulfur, 16% ash coal with 90% SO/sub 2/ removal and 0.1 lb/MBtu particulate matter emission. The economic evaluations were made using both TVA and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) economic premises. Cost differences between the two-stage open-loop lime and soda ash versions are largely the result of different waste disposal and raw material costs. Both RI/WF versions are more economical than limestone in most process elements except raw material costs. Cost differences between the TVA- and EPRI-based estimates are the result of different methods of estimating indirect costs, levelizing operating costs, and different raw material costs.

  6. Design of salmon calcitonin particles for nasal delivery using spray-drying and novel supercritical fluid-assisted spray-drying processes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Wonkyung; Kim, Min-Soo; Jung, Min-Sook; Park, Junsung; Cha, Kwang-Ho; Kim, Jeong-Soo; Park, Hee Jun; Alhalaweh, Amjad; Velaga, Sitaram P; Hwang, Sung-Joo

    2015-01-15

    The overall aim of this study was to prepare a nasal powder formulation of salmon calcitonin (sCT) using an absorption enhancer to improve its bioavailability. In this work, powder formulations for nasal delivery of sCT were studied using various absorption enhancers and stabilizers. Powders were prepared by two different methods: conventional spray-drying (SD) and novel supercritical fluid-assisted spray-drying (SASD) to investigate the role of CO2 in the particle formation process. The prepared sCT powder formulations were characterized by several analyses; powder X-ray diffractometry (PXRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy method. The particle size distribution was also evaluated. In vivo absorption tests were carried out in Sprague-Dawley rat using the prepared powder formulations, and the results were compared to those of raw sCT. Quantitative analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) indicated that sCT was chemically stable after both the SD and SASD processes. Results of PXRD, SEM, and FT-IR did not indicate a strong interaction or defragmentation of sCT. The in vivo absorption test showed that SD- and SASD-processed sCT powders increased the bioavailability of the drug when compared to the nasal administration of raw sCT. In addition, SASD-processed sCT exhibited higher nasal absorption when compared with SD-processed sCT in all formulations due to a reduction of particle size. The results from this study illustrate that the preparation of nasal powders using the SASD process could be a promising approach to improve nasal absorption of sCT.

  7. Role of pyro-chemical processes in advanced fuel cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawada, Hosadu Parameswara; Fukuda, Kosaku

    2005-02-01

    Partitioning and Transmutation (P&T) of Minor Actinides (MAs) and Long-Lived Fission Products (LLFP) arising out of the back-end of the fuel cycle would be one of the key-steps in any future sustainable nuclear fuel cycle. Pyro-chemical separation methods would form a critical stage of P&T by recovering long-lived elements and thus reducing the environmental impact by the back-end of the fuel-cycle. This paper attempts to overview global developments of pyro-chemical process that are envisaged in advanced nuclear fuel cycles. Research and development needs for molten-salt electro-refining as well as molten salt extraction process that are foreseen as partitioning methods for spent nuclear fuels such as oxide, metal and nitride fuels from thermal or fast reactors; high level liquid waste from back-end fuel cycle as well as targets from sub-critical Accelerator Driven Sub-critical reactors would be addressed. The role of high temperature thermodynamic data of minor actinides in defining efficiency of recovery or separation of minor actinides from other fission products such as lanthanides will also be illustrated. In addition, the necessity for determination of accurate high temperature thermodynamic data of minor actinides would be discussed.

  8. Process of producing liquid hydrocarbon fuels from biomass

    DOEpatents

    Kuester, James L.

    1987-07-07

    A continuous thermochemical indirect liquefaction process to convert various biomass materials into diesel-type transportation fuels which fuels are compatible with current engine designs and distribution systems comprising feeding said biomass into a circulating solid fluidized bed gasification system to produce a synthesis gas containing olefins, hydrogen and carbon monoxide and thereafter introducing the synthesis gas into a catalytic liquefaction system to convert the synthesis gas into liquid hydrocarbon fuel consisting essentially of C.sub.7 -C.sub.17 paraffinic hydrocarbons having cetane indices of 50+.

  9. Process of producing liquid hydrocarbon fuels from biomass

    DOEpatents

    Kuester, J.L.

    1987-07-07

    A continuous thermochemical indirect liquefaction process is described to convert various biomass materials into diesel-type transportation fuels which fuels are compatible with current engine designs and distribution systems comprising feeding said biomass into a circulating solid fluidized bed gasification system to produce a synthesis gas containing olefins, hydrogen and carbon monoxide and thereafter introducing the synthesis gas into a catalytic liquefaction system to convert the synthesis gas into liquid hydrocarbon fuel consisting essentially of C[sub 7]-C[sub 17] paraffinic hydrocarbons having cetane indices of 50+. 1 fig.

  10. Optimum catalytic process for alcohol fuels from syngas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-28

    The objectives of this contract are to discover and evaluate the catalytic properties of novel homogeneous, heterogeneous, or combination catalytic systems for the production of alcohol fuel extenders from syngas, to evaluate analytically and on the bench scale novel reactor concepts for use in converting syngas to liquid fuel products, and to develop on the bench scale the best combination of chemistry, reactor, and total process configuration to achieve the minimum product cost for conversion of syngas to liquid fuel products. Methanol production and heterogeneous catalysis utilizing transition elements supported on metal oxides with spinel structure are discussed. 12 figs., 16 tabs.

  11. Application of thermal spray coatings to aerospace structures

    SciTech Connect

    Novak, H.L.

    1994-12-31

    Reusable launch vehicles located by the ocean are subject to harsh seacoast environments before launch and immersion after splashdown at sea and tow back to the refurbishment facility. The use of various thermal spray processes for depositing corrosion and erosion protective materials to the alloy substrates has potential for enhancing the corrosion/erosion resistance and useful life of those expensive large reusable aerospace structures. Thermal spray processes such as high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF), plasma, arc spray and conventional oxygen fuel spray and the IVD process (pure aluminum only) have been used to coat test panels and scrap flight hardware with various applied materials. Pure aluminum, aluminum/aluminum oxide matrix (DURALCAN), and pure zinc have been applied over 2219-T87 aluminum alloy, 4340 steel alloy substrates. Salt spray testing has been conducted in accordance with ASTM B-117 as well as beach exposure tests at Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Adhesion tests have been performed for all materials applied to the various substrates as well as monitoring of substrate temperatures during the spray process. The pure aluminum, zinc, and aluminum/aluminum oxide matrix material afforded excellent corrosion protection in both beach exposure and salt spray environments. in conclusion, tests and actual applications have shown that the various thermal spray processes and coating materials have significant potential for enhancing corrosion/erosion resistance and extending the useful service life of expensive aerospace structures exposed to marine environments. The ability to effectively repair damaged IVD aluminum coated substrates using arc sprayed material adds flexibility to the maintenance process. Due to the excellent adhesion and corrosion protection of the substrate, tests are underway to determine if chromate conversion coating can be eliminated prior to primer/topcoat application.

  12. Analysis of the ATR fuel element swaging process

    SciTech Connect

    Richins, W.D.; Miller, G.K.

    1995-12-01

    This report documents a detailed evaluation of the swaging process used to connect fuel plates to side plates in Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) fuel elements. The swaging is a mechanical process that begins with fitting a fuel plate into grooves in the side plates. Once a fuel plate is positioned, a lip on each of two side plate grooves is pressed into the fuel plate using swaging wheels to form the joints. Each connection must have a specified strength (measured in terms, of a pullout force capacity) to assure that these joints do not fail during reactor operation. The purpose of this study is to analyze the swaging process and associated procedural controls, and to provide recommendations to assure that the manufacturing process produces swaged connections that meet the minimum strength requirement. The current fuel element manufacturer, Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) of Lynchburg, Virginia, follows established procedures that include quality inspections and process controls in swaging these connections. The procedures have been approved by Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies and are designed to assure repeatability of the process and structural integrity of each joint. Prior to July 1994, ATR fuel elements were placed in the Hydraulic Test Facility (HTF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (AGNAIL), Test Reactor Area (TRA) for application of Boehmite (an aluminum oxide) film and for checking structural integrity before placement of the elements into the ATR. The results presented in this report demonstrate that the pullout strength of the swaged connections is assured by the current manufacturing process (with several recommended enhancements) without the need for- testing each element in the HTF.

  13. Process-Property Relationship for Air Plasma-Sprayed Gadolinium Zirconate Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, Gopal; Tan, Yang; Viswanathan, Vaishak; Sampath, Sanjay

    2015-02-01

    The continuous need of elevating operating temperature of gas turbine engines has introduced several challenges with the current state-of-the-art yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)-based thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), requiring examination of new TBC material with high temperature phase stability, lower thermal conductivity, and resistance to environmental ash particles. Gadolinium zirconate (Gd2Zr2O7) (GDZ) has been shown to meet many of these requirements, and has, in fact, been successfully implemented in to engine components. However, several fundamental issues related to the process-ability, toughness, and microstructural differences for GDZ when compared to equivalent YSZ coating. This study seeks to critically address the process-structure-property correlations for plasma-sprayed GDZ coating subjected to controlled parametric exploration. Use of in-flight diagnostics coupled with in situ and ex situ coating property monitoring allows examination and comparison of the process-property interplay and the resultant differences between the two TBC compositions. The results indicate that it is feasible to retain material chemistry and fabricate relevant microstructures of interest with GDZ with concomitant performance advantages such as low conductivity, mechanical compliance, sintering resistance, and suppression of environmentally induced damage from ash particles. This study provides a framework for optimal design and manufacturing of emergent multi-layer and multi-material TBCs.

  14. Fe-Al Weld Overlay and High Velocity Oxy-Fuel Thermal Spray Coatings for Corrosion Protection of Waterwalls in Fossil Fired Plants with Low NOx Burners

    SciTech Connect

    Regina, J.R.

    2002-02-08

    Iron-aluminum-chromium coatings were investigated to determine the best candidates for coatings of boiler tubes in Low NOx fossil fueled power plants. Ten iron-aluminum-chromium weld claddings with aluminum concentrations up to 10wt% were tested in a variety of environments to evaluate their high temperature corrosion resistance. The weld overlay claddings also contained titanium additions to investigate any beneficial effects from these ternary and quaternary alloying additions. Several High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray coatings with higher aluminum concentrations were investigated as well. Gaseous corrosion testing revealed that at least 10wt%Al is required for protection in the range of environments examined. Chromium additions were beneficial in all of the environments, but additions of titanium were beneficial only in sulfur rich atmospheres. Similar results were observed when weld claddings were in contact with corrosive slag while simultaneously, exposed to the corrosive environments. An aluminum concentration of 10wt% was required to prevent large amounts of corrosion to take place. Again chromium additions were beneficial with the greatest corrosion protection occurring for welds containing both 10wt%Al and 5wt%Cr. The exposed thermal spray coatings showed either significant cracking within the coating, considerable thickness loss, or corrosion products at the coating substrate interface. Therefore, the thermal spray coatings provided the substrate very little protection. Overall, it was concluded that of the coatings studied weld overlay coatings provide superior protection in these Low NOx environments; specifically, the ternary weld composition of 10wt%Al and 5wt%Cr provided the best corrosion protection in all of the environments tested.

  15. A novel restraint spraying-Conform process for manufacturing hypereutectic Al–Si alloy with enhanced properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. G.; Yang, H.; Zhang, B. Q.; Liu, Y. L.; Yin, J. C.; Wei, W.; Zhong, Y.

    2017-02-01

    A novel restraint spraying-Conform (RS-C) process, which directly combines spraying with Conform to process metals in one step, has been proposed. Al-20Si alloy selected as experimental material was successfully fabricated by the RS-C process. The microstructures were dominated with fine and uniform primary silicon phases. The tensile strength and elongation to failure of the Al–20Si alloy were 204 MPa and 7.2% respectively after the RS-C process. The wear resistance of the processed Al–20Si alloy was increased significantly, about 1.7 times over the as-cast ingot. The experimental results indicate that RS-C is a promising near net shape forming technology.

  16. Microwave Processing of Simulated Advanced Nuclear Fuel Pellets

    SciTech Connect

    D.E. Clark; D.C. Folz

    2010-08-29

    Throughout the three-year project funded by the Department of Energy (DOE) and lead by Virginia Tech (VT), project tasks were modified by consensus to fit the changing needs of the DOE with respect to developing new inert matrix fuel processing techniques. The focus throughout the project was on the use of microwave energy to sinter fully stabilized zirconia pellets using microwave energy and to evaluate the effectiveness of techniques that were developed. Additionally, the research team was to propose fundamental concepts as to processing radioactive fuels based on the effectiveness of the microwave process in sintering the simulated matrix material.

  17. 31-mode piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducer with PZT thick film by granule spraying in vacuum process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Joontaek; Annapureddy, Venkateswarlu; Hwang, Geon-Tae; Song, Youngsup; Lee, Wonjun; Kang, Woojin; Ryu, Jungho; Choi, Hongsoo

    2017-05-01

    A piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducer (pMUT) is an ideal device for portable medical diagnosis systems, intravascular ultrasound systems, and ultrasonic cameras because of its favorable characteristics including small size, acoustic impedance matching with the body, low power consumption, and simple integration with the systems. Despite these advantages, practical applications are limited because of insufficient acoustic pressure of the pMUT caused by the thin active piezoelectric layer. Here, we report the fabrication of a thick piezoelectric Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT) film-based pMUT device having high deflection at low driving voltage using the granule spraying in vacuum (GSV) process. Pre-patterned high-density thick (exceeding 8 μm) PZT films were grown on 6-inch-diameter Si/SiO2/Ti/Pt silicon-on-insulator wafers at room temperature at a high deposition rate of ˜5 μm min-1. The fabrication process using the proposed GSV process was simple and fast, and the deflection of the pMUT exhibited a high value of 0.8 μm.

  18. Characterization of wet granulation process parameters using response surface methodology. 1. Top-spray fluidized bed.

    PubMed

    Lipps, D M; Sakr, A M

    1994-07-01

    Randomized full-factorial designs (3(2)) were used to investigate the effects of processing conditions in the top-spray fluidized bed (TSFB) on the granulation of acetaminophen powder (USP) using 5% polyvinylpyrrolidone (w/w) as the binder. Measured granule properties included the following: mean size and size distribution, specific surface area, bulk density, tapped density, flow rate through an orifice, angle of repose, residual moisture content, and percent overs (> 2 mm). The granules were then compressed (500, 1000, 1500 lbs) into tablets (9-mm shallow concave) using an instrumented rotary press and analyzed for both physical properties and drug-release characteristics. All experimental batches were run in triplicate to reduce the possibility of erroneous results and to increase the confidence in the resulting empirical relationships derived using response-surface methodology. Measured responses were then related to process parameters using two-factor and three-factor linear, interactions, and quadratic regression models. These models were used to generate three-dimensional response surfaces for use in the final analyses. Coefficients of determination (R2) ranging from 0.08 to 0.81 were obtained, indicating that only a portion of the variation in the data could be explained by the changes in process parameter settings during granulation and tableting. The best overall model fits were observed for mean granule size, size distribution, bulk density, tapped density, percent drug dissolution, tablet disintegration time, and tablet friability.

  19. Connecting section and associated systems concept for the spray calciner/in-can melter process

    SciTech Connect

    Petkus, L.L.; Gorton, P.S.; Blair, H.T.

    1981-06-01

    For a number of years, researchers at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory have been developing processes and equipment for converting high-level liquid wastes to solid forms. One of these processes is the Spray Calciner/In-Can Melter system. To immobilize high-level liquid wastes, this system must be operated remotely, and the calcine must be reliably conveyed from the calciner to the melting furnace. A concept for such a remote conveyance system was developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, and equipment was tested under full-scale, nonradioactive conditions. This concept and the design of demonstration equipment are described, and the results of equipment operation during experimental runs of 7 d are presented. The design includes a connecting section and its associated systems - a canister sypport and alignment concept and a weight-monitoring system for the melting furnace. Overall, the runs demonstrated that the concept design is an acceptable method of connecting the two pieces of process equipment together. Although the connecting section has not been optimized in all areas of concern, it provides a first-generation design of a production-oriented system.

  20. Characterization and performance assessment of solid dispersions prepared by hot melt extrusion and spray drying process.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Anjali M; Dudhedia, Mayur S; Patel, Ashwinkumar D; Raikes, Michelle S

    2013-11-30

    The present study investigated effect of manufacturing methods such as hot melt extrusion (HME) and spray drying (SD) on physicochemical properties, manufacturability, physical stability and product performance of solid dispersion. Solid dispersions of compound X and PVP VA64 (1:2) when prepared by SD and HME process were amorphous by polarized light microscopy, powder X-ray diffractometry, and modulated differential scanning calorimetry analyses with a single glass transition temperature. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and Raman spectroscopic analyses revealed similar molecular level interactions between compound X and PVP VA64 as evident by overlapping FT-IR and FT Raman spectra in SD and HME solid dispersions. The compactibility, tabletability, disintegration and dissolution performance were similar for solid dispersions prepared by both processing techniques. Differences in material properties such as surface area, morphological structure, powder densities, and flow characteristics were observed between SD and HME solid dispersion. The SD solid dispersion was physically less stable compared to HME solid dispersion under accelerated stability conditions. Findings from this study suggest that similar product performance could be obtained if the molecular properties of the solid dispersion processed by two different techniques are similar. However differences in material properties might affect the physical stability of the solid dispersions.

  1. Structurally Integrated, Damage Tolerant Thermal Spray Coatings: Processing Effects on Surface and System Functionalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vackel, Andrew

    Thermal Spray (TS) coatings have seen extensive application as protective surfaces to enhance the service life of substrates prone to damage in their operating environment (wear, corrosion, heat etc.). With the advent of high velocity TS processes, the ability to deposit highly dense (>99%) metallic and cermet coatings has further enhanced the protective ability of these coatings. In addition to surface functionality, the influence of the coating application on the mechanical performance of a coated component is of great concern when such a component will experience either static or cyclic loading during service. Using a process mapping methodology, the processing-property interplay between coating materials meant to provide damage tolerant surface or for structural restoration are explored in terms of relevant mechanical properties. Most importantly, the residual stresses inherent in TS deposited coatings are shown to play a significant role in the integrated mechanical performance of these coatings. Unique to high velocity TS processes is the ability to produce compressive stresses within the deposit from the cold working induced by the high kinetic energy particles upon impact. The extent of these formation stresses are explored with different coating materials, as well as processing influence. The ability of dense TS coatings to carry significant structural load and synergistically strengthen coated tensile specimens is demonstrated as a function of coating material, processing, and thickness. The sharing of load between the substrate and otherwise brittle coating enables higher loads before yield for the bi-material specimens, offering a methodology to improve the tensile performance of coated components for structural repair or multi-functionality (surface and structure). The concern of cyclic fatigue damage in coated components is explored, since the majority of service application are designed for loading to be well below the yield point. The role of

  2. Correlation between Hierarchical Structure and Processing Control of Large-area Spray-coated Polymer Solar Cells toward High Performance

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu-Ching; Tsao, Cheng-Si; Cha, Hou-Chin; Chuang, Chih-Min; Su, Chun-Jen; Jeng, U-Ser; Chen, Charn-Ying

    2016-01-01

    The formation mechanism of a spray-coated film is different from that of a spin-coated film. This study employs grazing incidence small- and wide-angle X-ray Scattering (GISAXS and GIWAXS, respectively) quantitatively and systematically to investigate the hierarchical structure and phase-separated behavior of a spray-deposited blend film. The formation of PCBM clusters involves mutual interactions with both the P3HT crystal domains and droplet boundary. The processing control and the formed hierarchical structure of the active layer in the spray-coated polymer/fullerene blend film are compared to those in the spin-coated film. How the different post-treatments, such as thermal and solvent vapor annealing, tailor the hierarchical structure of the spray-coated films is quantitatively studied. Finally, the relationship between the processing control and tailored BHJ structures and the performance of polymer solar cell devices is established here, taking into account the evolution of the device area from 1 × 0.3 and 1 × 1 cm2. The formation and control of the special networks formed by the PCBM cluster and P3HT crystallites, respectively, are related to the droplet boundary. These structures are favorable for the transverse transport of electrons and holes. PMID:26817585

  3. Correlation between Hierarchical Structure and Processing Control of Large-area Spray-coated Polymer Solar Cells toward High Performance.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Ching; Tsao, Cheng-Si; Cha, Hou-Chin; Chuang, Chih-Min; Su, Chun-Jen; Jeng, U-Ser; Chen, Charn-Ying

    2016-01-28

    The formation mechanism of a spray-coated film is different from that of a spin-coated film. This study employs grazing incidence small- and wide-angle X-ray Scattering (GISAXS and GIWAXS, respectively) quantitatively and systematically to investigate the hierarchical structure and phase-separated behavior of a spray-deposited blend film. The formation of PCBM clusters involves mutual interactions with both the P3HT crystal domains and droplet boundary. The processing control and the formed hierarchical structure of the active layer in the spray-coated polymer/fullerene blend film are compared to those in the spin-coated film. How the different post-treatments, such as thermal and solvent vapor annealing, tailor the hierarchical structure of the spray-coated films is quantitatively studied. Finally, the relationship between the processing control and tailored BHJ structures and the performance of polymer solar cell devices is established here, taking into account the evolution of the device area from 1 × 0.3 and 1 × 1 cm(2). The formation and control of the special networks formed by the PCBM cluster and P3HT crystallites, respectively, are related to the droplet boundary. These structures are favorable for the transverse transport of electrons and holes.

  4. Influence of process variable and physicochemical properties on the granulation mechanism of mannitol in a fluid bed top spray granulator.

    PubMed

    Bouffard, Jonathan; Kaster, Meagan; Dumont, Hubert

    2005-10-01

    This study investigated the influence of specific process variables, including the hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) binder solution atomization, on the fluidized bed top spray granulation of mannitol. Special attention was given to the relationship between wetting and the granule growth profile. The atomization of the HPC binder solution using a binary nozzle arrangement produced droplets of decreasing size as the atomization pressure was increased, while changes in the spray rate had little effect on the mean droplet size. Increasing the HPC binder concentration from 2 to 8% w/w increased the binder droplet size and was most likely attributed to higher solution viscosity. The top spray granulation of mannitol showed induction type growth behavior. Process conditions like high spray rate, low fluidizing air velocity and binder solution concentration that promote the availability of HPC binder solution at the surface of the particles appeared to be key in enhancing nucleation and growth of the granules. Increasing the bed moisture level, up to a certain value, reduced the contribution of attrition to the overall growth profile of the granule and, more significantly, produced less granule breakage on drying. It was observed that the mean granule size could be reduced as much as 40% between the end of granulation and the end of drying for lower initial bed moisture level despite a shorter drying phase. High atomization pressure, especially when maintained during the drying phase, contributed substantially to granule breakage.

  5. Portable Spray Booth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Timothy D.; Bardwell, Micheal J.

    1996-01-01

    Portable spray booth provides for controlled application of coating materials with high solvent contents. Includes contoured shroud and carbon filter bed limiting concentration of fumes in vicinity. Designed to substitute spraying for brush application of solvent-based adhesive prior to installing rubber waterproof seals over joints between segments of solid-fuel rocket motor. With minor adjustments and modifications, used to apply other solvent-based adhesives, paints, and like.

  6. Portable Spray Booth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Timothy D.; Bardwell, Micheal J.

    1996-01-01

    Portable spray booth provides for controlled application of coating materials with high solvent contents. Includes contoured shroud and carbon filter bed limiting concentration of fumes in vicinity. Designed to substitute spraying for brush application of solvent-based adhesive prior to installing rubber waterproof seals over joints between segments of solid-fuel rocket motor. With minor adjustments and modifications, used to apply other solvent-based adhesives, paints, and like.

  7. Processing of carbon composite paper as electrode for fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, R. B.; Maheshwari, Priyanka H.; Dhami, T. L.; Sharma, R. K.; Sharma, C. P.

    The porous carbon electrode in a fuel cell not only acts as an electrolyte and a catalyst support, but also allows the diffusion of hydrogen fuel through its fine porosity and serves as a current-carrying conductor. A suitable carbon paper electrode is developed and possesses the characteristics of high porosity, permeability and strength along with low electrical resistivity so that it can be effectively used in proton-exchange membrane and phosphoric acid fuel cells. The electrode is prepared through a combination of two important techniques, viz., paper-making technology by first forming a porous chopped carbon fibre preform, and composite technology using a thermosetting resin matrix. The study reveals an interdependence of one parameter on another and how judicious choice of the processing conditions are necessary to achieve the desired characteristics. The current-voltage performance of the electrode in a unit fuel cell matches that of a commercially-available material.

  8. CONVERTING PYROLYSIS OILS TO RENEWABLE TRANSPORT FUELS: PROCESSING CHALLENGES & OPPORTUNITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Holmgren, Jennifer; Nair, Prabhakar N.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Bain, Richard; Marinangelli, Richard

    2008-03-11

    To enable a sustained supply of biomass-based transportation fuels, the capability to process feedstocks outside the food chain must be developed. Significant industry efforts are underway to develop these new technologies, such as converting cellulosic wastes to ethanol. UOP, in partnership with U.S. Government labs, NREL and PNNL, is developing an alternate route using cellulosic feedstocks. The waste biomass is first subjected to a fast pyrolysis operation to generate pyrolysis oil (pyoil for short). Current efforts are focused on developing a thermochemical platform to convert pyoils to renewable gasoline, diesel and jet fuel. The fuels produced will be indistinguishable from their fossil fuel counterparts and, therefore, will be compatible with existing transport and distribution infrastructure.

  9. Numerical Studies of the Application of Shock Tube Technology for Cold Gas Dynamic Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickel, R.; Bobzin, K.; Lugscheider, E.; Parkot, D.; Varava, W.; Olivier, H.; Luo, X.

    2007-12-01

    A new method for a combustion-free spraying is studied fundamentally by modeling and simulation in comparison with first experiments. The article focuses on the numerical simulation of the gas-particle nozzle flow, which is generated by the shock reflection at the end wall section of a shock tube. To study the physical fundamentals of this process, at present only a single shot operation is considered. The particles are injected downstream of the nozzle throat into a supersonic nozzle flow. The measurements of the particle velocity made by a laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) set up show that the maximum velocity amounts to 1220 m/s for stainless steel particles of 15 μm diameter. The CFD-Code (Fluent) is first verified by a comparison with available numerical and experimental data for gas and gas-particle flow fields in a long Laval-nozzle. The good agreement implied the great potential of the new dynamic process concept for cold-gas coating applications. Then the flow fields in the short Laval nozzle designed and realized by the Shock Wave Laboratory (SWL) are investigated. The gas flow for experimentally obtained stagnation conditions is simulated. The gas-particle flow without and with the influence of the particles on the gas flow is calculated by the Surface Engineering Institute (IOT) and compared with experiments. The influence of the injection parameters on the particle velocities is investigated, as well.

  10. Bond Strength of Multicomponent White Cast Iron Coatings Applied by HVOF Thermal Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maranho, Ossimar; Rodrigues, Daniel; Boccalini, Mario; Sinatora, Amilton

    2009-12-01

    Multicomponent white cast iron is a new alloy that belongs to system Fe-C-Cr-W-Mo-V, and because of its excellent wear resistance it is used in the manufacture of hot rolling mills rolls. To date, this alloy has been processed by casting, powder metallurgy, and spray forming. The high-velocity oxyfuel process is now also considered for the manufacture of components with this alloy. The effects of substrate, preheating temperature, and coating thickness on bond strength of coatings have been determined. Substrates of AISI 1020 steel and of cast iron with preheating of 150 °C and at room temperature were used to apply coatings with 200 and 400 μm nominal thickness. The bond strength of coatings was measured with the pull-off test method and the failure mode by scanning electron microscopic analysis. Coatings with thickness of 200 μm and applied on substrates of AISI 1020 steel with preheating presented bond strength of 87 ± 4 MPa.

  11. High Temperature Oxidation Behavior of HVOF-sprayed Coatings for Use in Thixoextrusion Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Picas, J. A.; Punset, M.; Menargues, S.; Campillo, M.; Baile, M. T.; Forn, A.

    2011-05-04

    The dies used for the thixoextrusion of steels have to be capable of withstanding complex thermal and mechanical loads, while giving a sufficient wear resistance against abrasion and adhesion at very high temperatures. In order to improve the wear resistance and reduce the heating of the extrusion die it can be protected with a hard cermet coating. The purpose of this work is to study the high-temperature performance of CrC-CoNiCrAlY coating and explore the potential application of this coating to improve dies used in thixoextrusion processes. A two-layer 75CrC-25CoNiCrAlY coating with a CoNiCrAlY bond-coating was fabricated by the HVOF thermal spray process on a steel substrate. Coatings were heat-treated at a range of temperatures between 900 deg. C and 1100 deg. C. The microstructural characterization of the coatings before and after heat treatment was conducted by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and an X-ray diffractometer (XRD). The mechanical properties of coatings were determined as a function of the temperature of heat treatment. The bond coat effect on the thermal shock resistance of CrC-CoNiCrAlY coating was analyzed.

  12. Plasma sprayed ceria-containing interlayer

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Douglas S.; Folser, George R.

    2006-01-10

    A plasma sprayed ceria-containing interlayer is provided. The interlayer has particular application in connection with a solid oxide fuel cell used within a power generation system. The fuel cell advantageously comprises an air electrode, a plasma sprayed interlayer disposed on at least a portion of the air electrode, a plasma sprayed electrolyte disposed on at least a portion of the interlayer, and a fuel electrode applied on at least a portion of the electrolyte.

  13. Novel Redox Processes for Carbonaceous Fuel Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Feng

    The current study investigates oxygen carrier development, process intensification, and oxygen carrier attrition behaviors for a number of novel, redox-based energy conversion schemes. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF LOW-COST MANUFACTURING PROCESSES FOR PLANAR, MULTILAYER SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL ELEMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Swartz; Matthew Seabaugh; William Dawson; Harlan Anderson; Tim Armstrong; Michael Cobb; Kirby Meacham; James Stephan; Russell Bennett; Bob Remick; Chuck Sishtla; Scott Barnett; John Lannutti

    2004-06-12

    This report summarizes the results of a four-year project, entitled, ''Low-Cost Manufacturing Of Multilayer Ceramic Fuel Cells'', jointly funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, the State of Ohio, and by project participants. The project was led by NexTech Materials, Ltd., with subcontracting support provided by University of Missouri-Rolla, Michael A. Cobb & Co., Advanced Materials Technologies, Inc., Edison Materials Technology Center, Gas Technology Institute, Northwestern University, and The Ohio State University. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, though not formally a subcontractor on the program, supported the effort with separate DOE funding. The objective of the program was to develop advanced manufacturing technologies for making solid oxide fuel cell components that are more economical and reliable for a variety of applications. The program was carried out in three phases. In the Phase I effort, several manufacturing approaches were considered and subjected to detailed assessments of manufacturability and development risk. Estimated manufacturing costs for 5-kW stacks were in the range of $139/kW to $179/kW. The risk assessment identified a number of technical issues that would need to be considered during development. Phase II development work focused on development of planar solid oxide fuel cell elements, using a number of ceramic manufacturing methods, including tape casting, colloidal-spray deposition, screen printing, spin-coating, and sintering. Several processes were successfully established for fabrication of anode-supported, thin-film electrolyte cells, with performance levels at or near the state-of-the-art. The work in Phase III involved scale-up of cell manufacturing methods, development of non-destructive evaluation methods, and comprehensive electrical and electrochemical testing of solid oxide fuel cell materials and components.

  15. High Power Diode Laser-Treated HP-HVOF and Twin Wire Arc-Sprayed Coatings for Fossil Fuel Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, B. S.

    2013-08-01

    This article deals with high power diode laser (HPDL) surface modification of twin wire arc-sprayed (TWAS) and high pressure high velocity oxy-fuel (HP-HVOF) coatings to combat solid particle erosion occurring in fossil fuel power plants. To overcome solid particle impact wear above 673 K, Cr3C2-NiCr-, Cr3C2-CoNiCrAlY-, and WC-CrC-Ni-based HVOF coatings are used. WC-CoCr-based HVOF coatings are generally used below 673 K. Twin wire arc (TWA) spraying of Tafa 140 MXC and SHS 7170 cored wires is used for a wide range of applications for a temperature up to 1073 K. Laser surface modification of high chromium stainless steels for steam valve components and LPST blades is carried out regularly. TWA spraying using SHS 7170 cored wire, HP-HVOF coating using WC-CoCr powder, Ti6Al4V alloy, and high chromium stainless steels (X20Cr13, AISI 410, X10CrNiMoV1222, 13Cr4Ni, 17Cr4Ni) were selected in the present study. Using robotically controlled parameters, HPDL surface treatments of TWAS-coated high strength X10CrNiMoV1222 stainless steel and HP-HVOF-coated AISI 410 stainless steel samples were carried out and these were compared with HPDL-treated high chromium stainless steels and titanium alloy for high energy particle impact wear (HEPIW) resistance. The HPDL surface treatment of the coatings has improved the HEPIW resistance manifold. The improvement in HPDL-treated stainless steels and titanium alloys is marginal and it is not comparable with that of HPDL-treated coatings. These coatings were also compared with "as-sprayed" coatings for fracture toughness, microhardness, microstructure, and phase analyses. The HEPIW resistance has a strong relationship with the product of fracture toughness and microhardness of the HPDL-treated HP-HVOF and TWAS SHS 7170 coatings. This development opens up a possibility of using HPDL surface treatments in specialized areas where the problem of HEPIW is very severe. The HEPIW resistance of HPDL-treated high chromium stainless steels and

  16. Multi-Response Optimization of Process Parameters for Low-Pressure Cold Spray Coating Process Using Taguchi and Utility Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Tarun; Sidhu, T. S.; Walia, R. S.

    2014-01-01

    Most of the existing multi-response optimization approaches focus on the subjective and practical know-how of the process. As a result, some confusion and uncertainty are introduced in the overall decision-making process. In this work, an approach based on a Utility theory and Taguchi quality loss function has been applied to the process parameters for low-pressure cold spray process deposition of copper coatings, for simultaneous optimization of more than one response characteristics. In the present paper, two potential response parameters, i.e., coating thickness and coating density, have been selected. Utility values based on these response parameters have been analyzed for optimization using the Taguchi approach. The selected input parameters of powder feeding arrangement, substrate material, air stagnation pressure, air stagnation temperature, and stand-off distance significantly improve the Utility function (raw data) comprising quality characteristics (coating thickness and coating density). The percentage contribution of the parameters to achieve a higher value of Utility function is substrate material (50.03%), stand-off distance (28.87%), air stagnation pressure (6.41%), powder feeding arrangement (4.68%), and air stagnation temperature (2.64%).

  17. [Effect of air humidity on traditional Chinese medicine extract of spray drying process and prediction of its powder stability].

    PubMed

    He, Yan; Xie, Yin; Zheng, Long-jin; Liu, Wei; Rao, Xiao-yong; Luo, Xiao-jian

    2015-02-01

    In order to solve the adhesion and the softening problems of traditional Chinese medicine extract during spray drying, a new method of adding dehumidified air into spray drying process was proposed, and the storage stability conditions of extract powder could be predicted. Kouyanqing extract was taken as model drug to investigate on the wet air (RH = 70%) and dry air conditions of spray drying. Under the dry air condition, the influence of the spray drying result with different air compression ratio and the spray-dried powder properties (extract powder recovery rate, adhesion percentage, water content, angle of repose, compression ratio, particle size and distribution) with 100, 110, 120, 130, 140 °C inlet temperature were studied. The hygroscopic investigation and Tg value with different moisture content of ideal powder were determined. The water activity-equilibrium moisture content (aw-EMC) and the equilibrium moisture content-Tg (EMC-Tg) relationships were fitted by GAB equation and Gordon-Taylor model respectively, and the state diagram of kouyanqing powder was obtained to guide the rational storage conditions. The study found that in the condition of dry air, the extract powder water content decreased with the increase of air compression ratio and the spray drying effect with air compression ratio of 100% was the best performance; in the condition of wet air, the extract powder with high water content and low yield, and the value were 4.26% and 16.73 °C, while, in the dry air condition the values were 2.43% and 24.86 °C with the same other instru- ment parameters. From the analysis of kouyanqing powder state diagram, in order to keep the stability, the critical water content of 3.42% and the critical water content of 0.188. As the water decreased Tg value of extract powder is the major problem of causing adhesion and softening during spray drying, it is meaningful to aid dehumidified air during the process.

  18. Parametric Appraisal of Process Parameters for Adhesion of Plasma Sprayed Nanostructured YSZ Coatings Using Taguchi Experimental Design

    PubMed Central

    Mantry, Sisir; Mishra, Barada K.; Chakraborty, Madhusudan

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the application of the Taguchi experimental design in developing nanostructured yittria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings by plasma spraying process. This paper depicts dependence of adhesion strength of as-sprayed nanostructured YSZ coatings on various process parameters, and effect of those process parameters on performance output has been studied using Taguchi's L16 orthogonal array design. Particle velocities prior to impacting the substrate, stand-off-distance, and particle temperature are found to be the most significant parameter affecting the bond strength. To achieve retention of nanostructure, molten state of nanoagglomerates (temperature and velocity) has been monitored using particle diagnostics tool. Maximum adhesion strength of 40.56 MPa has been experimentally found out by selecting optimum levels of selected factors. The enhanced bond strength of nano-YSZ coating may be attributed to higher interfacial toughness due to cracks being interrupted by adherent nanozones. PMID:24288490

  19. Coal liquefaction process wherein jet fuel, diesel fuel and/or ASTM No. 2 fuel oil is recovered

    DOEpatents

    Bauman, Richard F.; Ryan, Daniel F.

    1982-01-01

    An improved process for the liquefaction of coal and similar solid carbonaceous materials wherein a hydrogen donor solvent or diluent derived from the solid carbonaceous material is used to form a slurry of the solid carbonaceous material and wherein the naphthenic components from the solvent or diluent fraction are separated and used as jet fuel components. The extraction increases the relative concentration of hydroaromatic (hydrogen donor) components and as a result reduces the gas yield during liquefaction and decreases hydrogen consumption during said liquefaction. The hydrogenation severity can be controlled to increase the yield of naphthenic components and hence the yield of jet fuel and in a preferred embodiment jet fuel yield is maximized while at the same time maintaining solvent balance.

  20. Fundamental studies of spray combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.C.; Libby, P.A.; Williams, F.A.

    1997-12-31

    Our research on spray combustion involves both experiment and theory and addresses the characteristics of individual droplets and of sprays in a variety of flows: laminar and turbulent, opposed and impinging. Currently our focus concerns water and fuel sprays in two stage laminar flames, i.e., flames arising, for example from a stream of fuel and oxidizer flowing opposite to an air stream carrying a water spray. Our interest in these flames is motivated by the goals of reducing pollutant emissions and extending the range of stable spray combustion. There remains considerable research to be carried out in order to achieve these goals. Thus far our research on the characteristics of sprays in turbulent flows has been limited to nonreacting jets impinging on a plate but this work will be extended to opposed flows with and without a flame. In the following we discuss details of these studies and our plans for future work.

  1. Microencapsulation of Bioactive Principles with an Airless Spray-Gun Suitable for Processing High Viscous Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Cocchietto, Moreno; Blasi, Paolo; Lapasin, Romano; Moro, Chiara; Gallo, Davide; Sava, Gianni

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: to design, assemble and test a prototype of a novel production plant, suitable for producing microparticles (MPs) by processing highly viscous feed solutions (FSs). Methods: the prototype has been built using a commercial air compressor, a piston pump, an airless spray-gun, a customized air-treatment section, a timer, a rotating base, and a filtration section. Preliminary prototype parameter setting was carried out to individuate the best performing nozzle’s dimension, the nebulization timing, and the CaCl2 concentration in the gelation fluid. In addition, prototype throughput (1 L to 5 L) and the range of practicable feed solution (FS) viscosities were assayed. A set of four batches was prepared in order to characterize the MPs, in terms of mean particle size and distribution, flow properties, swelling, encapsulation efficiency and release. Results: according to a qualitative scoring, the large nozzle was suitable to nebulize FSs at a higher alginate concentration. Conversely, the small nozzle performed better in the processing of FSs with an alginate concentration up to 2% w/v. Only at the highest degree of viscosity, corresponding to 5% w/v of alginate, the FS processing was not technically possible. Among the CaCl2 concentrations considered, 15% w/v was recognized as the most versatile. The prototype appears to be convenient and suitable to grant a high yield starting from 2 L of FS. The flow behavior of the FSs assayed can be satisfactorily described with the Carreau-Yasuda equation and the throughput begins to slightly decrease for FSs at alginate concentrations exceeding 3% w/v. MP morphology was irregular with crumpled shape. The angle of repose indicates a good flowability and the release studies showed gastro-resistance and potential prolonged release applications. Conclusions: the novel prototype of production plant is suitable to process large amounts (2 L or more) of FSs, characterized by a high viscosity, to produce MPs suitable for

  2. Advanced Fuels and Combustion Processes for Propulsion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    production from biomass steam reforming – Conduct a feasibility analysis of the proposed integrated process Energia Technologies - D. Nguyen & K. Parimi...strength foam material development by Ultramet – Combustion experiments performed U. Of Alabama – End-user input provided by Solar Turbines Major

  3. Proposed pyrometallurgical process for rapid recycle of discharged fuel materials from the integral fast reactor. [Metal fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Burris, L.; Steindler, M.; Miller, W.

    1984-01-01

    The pool-type Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept developed by Argonne National Laboratory includes on-site recycle of discharged core and blanket fuel materials. The process and fabrication steps will be demonstrated in the EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility with IFR fuel irradiated in EBR-II and the Fast Flux Test Facility. The proposed process consists of two major steps: a halide slagging step and an electrorefining step. The fuel is maintained in the metallic form to yield directly a metal product sufficiently decontaminated to allow recycle to the reactor as new fuel. The process is further described and available information to support its feasibility is presented.

  4. Effects of physical properties of fuels on diesel injection

    SciTech Connect

    Henein, N.A.; Jawad, B.; Gulari, E. )

    1990-07-01

    This paper reports on the physical properties of the fuel, such as density, viscosity, surface tension, and bulk modulus of elasticity that affect many aspects of the diesel injection process. The effects of these fuel properties on the fuel pressure in the high-pressure line, rate of injection, leakage, spray penetration, and droplet size distribution were determined experimentally. The mechanism of spray development was investigated by injecting the fuel into a high-pressure chamber. A pulsed Malvern drop-size analyzer, based on Fraunhofer diffraction, was utilized to determine droplet size ranges for various fuels.

  5. Self-healing atmospheric plasma sprayed Mn1.0Co1.9Fe0.1O4 protective interconnector coatings for solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grünwald, Nikolas; Sebold, Doris; Sohn, Yoo Jung; Menzler, Norbert Heribert; Vaßen, Robert

    2017-09-01

    Dense coatings on metallic interconnectors are necessary to suppress chromium poisoning of SOFC cathodes. Atmospherically plasma sprayed (APS) Mn1.0Co1.9Fe0.1O4 (MCF) protective layers demonstrated reduced chromium related degradation in laboratory and stack tests. Previous analyses revealed strong microstructural changes comparing the coating's as-sprayed and operated condition. This work concentrates on the layer-densification and crack-healing observed by annealing APS-MCF in air, which simulates the cathode operation conditions. The effect is described by a volume expansion induced by a phase transformation. Reducing conditions during the spray process lead to a deposition of the MCF in a metastable rock salt configuration. Annealing in air activates diffusion processes for a phase transformation to the low temperature stable spinel phase (T < 1050 °C). This transformation is connected to an oxygen incorporation which occurs at regions facing high oxygen partial pressures, as there are the sample surface, cracks and pore surfaces. Calculations reveal a volume expansion induced by the oxygen uptake which seals the cracks and densifies the coating. The process decelerates when the cracks are closed, as the gas route is blocked and further oxidation continues over solid state diffusion. The self-healing abilities of metastable APS coatings could be interesting for other applications.

  6. Pyrolysis process for producing fuel gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serio, Michael A. (Inventor); Kroo, Erik (Inventor); Wojtowicz, Marek A. (Inventor); Suuberg, Eric M. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Solid waste resource recovery in space is effected by pyrolysis processing, to produce light gases as the main products (CH.sub.4, H.sub.2, CO.sub.2, CO, H.sub.2O, NH.sub.3) and a reactive carbon-rich char as the main byproduct. Significant amounts of liquid products are formed under less severe pyrolysis conditions, and are cracked almost completely to gases as the temperature is raised. A primary pyrolysis model for the composite mixture is based on an existing model for whole biomass materials, and an artificial neural network models the changes in gas composition with the severity of pyrolysis conditions.

  7. Processing, structure, property and performance relationships for the thermal spray of the internal surface of aluminum cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, David James

    The increased need for automotive weight reduction has necessitated the use of aluminum for engine blocks. Conventional aluminum alloys cannot survive the constant wear from a piston ring reciprocating on the surface. However, a wear resistant thermal spray coating can be applied on the internal surface of the cylinder bore, which has significant advantages over other available options. Thermal spray is a well-established process for depositing molten, semi-molten, or solid particles onto a substrate to form a protective coating. For this application, the two main challenges were obtaining good wear resistance, and achieving good adhesion. To design a system capable of producing a well-adhered, wear resistant coating for this high volume application it is necessary to identify the overall processing, structure, properties, and performance relationships. The results will demonstrate that very important relationships exist among particle characteristics, substrate conditions, and the properties of the final coating. However, it is the scientific studies to understand some of the process physics in these relationships that allow recognition of the critical processing conditions that need to be controlled to ensure a consistent, reliable thermal spray coating. In this investigation, it will be shown that the critical microstructural aspect of the coating that produced the required tribological properties was the presence of wuestite (FeO). It was found that by using a low carbon steel material with compressed air atomizing gas, it was possible to create an Fe/FeO structure that exhibited excellent tribological properties. This study will also show that traditional thermal spray surface preparation techniques were not ideal for this application, therefore a novel alternative approach was developed. The application of a flux to the aluminum surface prior to thermal spray promotes excellent bond strengths to non-roughened aluminum. Analysis will show that this flux strips

  8. Fate of virginiamycin through the fuel ethanol production process

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Antibiotics are frequently used to prevent and treat bacterial contamination of commercial fuel ethanol fermentations, but there is concern that antibiotic residues may persist in the distillers grains coproducts. A study to evaluate the fate of virginiamycin during the ethanol production process wa...

  9. PROCESS OF DISSOLVING FUEL ELEMENTS OF NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Wall, E.M.V.; Bauer, D.T.; Hahn, H.T.

    1963-09-01

    A process is described for dissolving stainless-steelor zirconium-clad uranium dioxide fuel elements by immersing the elements in molten lead chloride, adding copper, cuprous chloride, or cupric chloride as a catalyst and passing chlorine through the salt mixture. (AEC)

  10. Simulation of spray development and turbulent combustion processes in low and high speed diesel engines by the CMC-ISR model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young J.; Huh, Kang Y.

    2012-02-01

    Simulation is performed to analyse the characteristics of turbulent spray combustion in conventional low and high speed diesel engine conditions. Turbulence-chemistry interaction is resolved by the Conditional Moment Closure (CMC) model in the spatially integrated form of an Incompletely Stirred Reactor (ISR). After validation against measured pressure traces, characteristic length and time scales and dimensionless numbers are estimated at the locations of sequentially injected fuel groups. Conditional flame structures are calculated for sequentially evaporated fuel groups to consider different available periods for ignition chemistry. Injection overlaps the combustion period in the high rpm engine, while most combustion occurs after injection and evaporation are complete in the low rpm engine. Ignition occurs in rich premixture with the initial peak temperature at the equivalence ratio around 2-4 as observed in Dec [2]. It corresponds to the most reactive mixture fraction of the minimum ignition delay for the given mixture states. Combustion proceeds to lean and rich sides in the mixture fraction space as a diffusion process by turbulence. The mean scalar dissipation rates (SDRs) are lower than the extinction limit to show stability of diffusion flames throughout the combustion period.

  11. Understanding the effects of process parameters on the properties of cold gas dynamic sprayed pure titanium coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Wilson

    The cold gas dynamic spraying of commercially pure titanium coatings was investigated. Specifically, the relationship between several key cold spray parameters on the quality of the resulting coatings was studied in order to gain a more thorough understanding of the cold spray process. To achieve this goal, three distinct investigations were performed. The first part of the investigation focussed on the effect of propelling gas, particularly helium and nitrogen, during the cold spraying of titanium coatings. Coatings were characterised by SEM and were evaluated for their deposition efficiency (DE), microhardness, and porosity. In selected conditions, three particle velocities were investigated such that for each condition, the propelling gasses temperature and pressure were attuned to attain similar particle velocities for each gas. In addition, a thick and fully dense cold sprayed titanium coating was achieved with optimised spray parameters and nozzle using helium. The corresponding average particle velocity was 1173 m/s. The second part of the investigation studied the effect of particle morphology (spherical, sponge, and irregular) and size distributions (mean particle sizes of 20, 29, and 36 mum) of commercially pure titanium on the mechanical properties of the resulting cold sprayed coatings. Numerous powder and coating characterisations were performed. From these data, semi-empirical flow (stress-strain) curves were generated based on the Johnson-Cook plasticity model which could be used as a measure of cold sprayability. Cold sprayability can be defined as the ease with which a powder can be cold sprayed. It was found that the sponge and irregular commercially pure titanium powders had higher oxygen content, poorer powder flowability, higher compression ratio, lower powder packing factor, and higher average particle impact velocities compared to the spherical powders. XRD results showed no new phases present when comparing the various feedstock powders to

  12. Analysis of on-board fuel processing designs for PEM fuel cell vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Kartha, S.; Fischer, S.; Kreutz, T.

    1996-12-31

    As a liquid fuel with weight and volume energy densities comparable to those of gasoline, methanol is an attractive energy carrier for mobile power systems. It is available without contaminants such as sulfur, and can be easily reformed at relatively low temperatures with inexpensive catalysts. This study is concerned with comparing the net efficiencies of PEM fuel cell vehicles fueled with methanol and hydrogen, using fuel cell system models developed using ASPEN chemical process simulation software. For both the methanol and hydrogen systems, base case designs are developed and several variations are considered that differ with respect to the degree of system integration for recovery of heat and compressive work. The methanol systems are based on steam reforming with the water-gas shift reaction and preferential oxidation, and the hydrogen systems are based on compressed hydrogen. This analysis is an exercise in optimizing the system design for each fuel, which ultimately entails balancing system efficiency against a host of other considerations, including system complexity, performance, cost, reliability, weight and volume.

  13. Microfluidic supercritical antisolvent continuous processing and direct spray-coating of poly(3-hexylthiophene) nanoparticles for OFET devices.

    PubMed

    Couto, Ricardo; Chambon, Sylvain; Aymonier, Cyril; Mignard, Emmanuel; Pavageau, Bertrand; Erriguible, Arnaud; Marre, Samuel

    2015-01-21

    We report for the first time the use of a microfluidic supercritical antisolvent process (μSAS) to synthesize semiconducting polymer nanoparticles (NPs) of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). Solvent-free P3HT NPs with average diameters as small as 36 ± 8 nm are obtained. They are continuously spray-coated on substrates to fabricate OFET devices, demonstrating hole mobility through the nanoparticle film equivalent to that of conventional spin-coated P3HT.

  14. Effect on the nasal bioavailability of co-processing drug and bioadhesive carrier via spray-drying.

    PubMed

    Coucke, D; Vervaet, C; Foreman, P; Adriaensens, P; Carleer, R; Remon, J P

    2009-09-08

    A mucoadhesive combination of a maize starch (Amioca, mainly consisting of amylopectine) and a cross-linked acrylic acid-based polymer (Carbopol 974P) was spray-dried with metoprolol tartrate (used as model molecule) in order to develop a powder suitable for nasal drug delivery via a one-step manufacturing process. The bioavailability of metoprolol tartrate after nasal administration of this powder to rabbits was compared with powders manufactured via other procedures: (a) freeze-drying of a dispersion prepared using the co-spray-dried powder, (b) freeze-drying of a dispersion prepared using a physical mixture of drug and mucoadhesive polymers. After co-processing via spray-drying a low bioavailability (BA 10.8+/-2.3%) was obtained, whereas manufacturing procedures based on freeze-drying yielded a higher BA: 37.9+/-12.8% using the co-processed powder and 73.6+/-24.9% using the physical mixture. The higher bioavailability was due to the deprotonation of poly(acrylic acid) during neutralisation of the dispersion prior to freeze-drying. This induced repulsion of the ionised carboxyl groups and a lower interaction between poly(acrylic acid) and starch, creating a less compact matrix upon hydration of the polymer and allowing an easier escape of metoprolol tartrate from the matrix. This study showed that co-processing of a mucoadhesive Amioca/Carbopol 974P formulation with metoprolol tartrate via co-spray-drying did not provide any added value towards the bioavailability of the drug after nasal administration of the mucoadhesive powder.

  15. Surface characteristic of chemically converted graphene coated low carbon steel by electro spray coating method for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell bipolar plate.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungsoo; Kim, Yang Do; Nam, Dae Geun

    2013-05-01

    Graphene was coated on low carbon steel (SS400) by electro spray coating method to improve its properties of corrosion resistance and contact resistance. Exfoliated graphite was made of the graphite by chemical treatment (Chemically Converted Graphene, CCG). CCG is distributed using dispersing agent, and low carbon steel was coated with diffuse graphene solution by electro spray coating method. The structure of the CCG was analyzed using XRD and the coating layer of surface was analyzed using SEM. Analysis showed that multi-layered graphite structure was destroyed and it was transformed in to fine layers graphene structure. And the result of SEM analysis on the surface and the cross section, graphene layer was uniformly formed with 3-5 microm thickness on the surface of substrate. Corrosion resistance test was applied in the corrosive solution which is similar to the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack inside. And interfacial contact resistance (ICR) test was measured to simulate the internal operating conditions of PEMFC stack. As a result of measuring corrosion resistance and contact resistance, it could be confirmed that low carbon steel coated with CCG was revealed to be more effective in terms of its applicability as PEMFC bipolar plate.

  16. Investigation into the diffusion and oxidation behavior of the interface between a plasma-sprayed anode and a porous steel support for solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shan-Lin; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu; Liu, Meilin; Yang, Guan-Jun

    2016-08-01

    Porous metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have attracted much attention because their potential to dramatically reduce the cost while enhancing the robustness and manufacturability. In particular, 430 ferritic steel (430L) is one of the popular choice for SOFC support because of its superior performance and low cost. In this study, we investigate the oxidation and diffusion behavior of the interface between a Ni-based anode and porous 430L support exposed to a humidified (3% H2O) hydrogen atmosphere at 700 °C. The Ni-GDC (Ce0.8Gd0.2O2-δ) cermet anodes are deposited on the porous 430L support by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS). The effect of exposure time on the microstructure and phase structure of the anode and the supports is studied and the element diffusion across the support/anode interface is characterized. Results indicate that the main oxidation product of the 430L support is Cr2O3, and that Cr and Fe will diffuse to the anode and the diffusion thickness increases with the exposure time. The diffusion thickness of Cr and Fe reach about 5 and 2 μm, respectively, after 1000 h exposure. However, the element diffusion and oxidation has little influence on the area-specific resistance, indicating that the porous 430L steel and plasma sprayed Ni-GDC anode are promising for durable SOFCs.

  17. Effects of various power process parameters on deposition efficiency of plasma-sprayed Al2O3-40% wt.TiO2 coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. J.; Xu, J. Y.; Zhao, Q. H.; Wang, Y.; Gao, B.

    2017-06-01

    To investigate effects of various power process parameters on deposition efficiency, Al2O3-40% wt. TiO2 is selected as raw material to be coated on Q235 steel substrate by air plasma spraying. Different variables of spraying current and voltage are designed, whose spraying power is from 12.8 KW to 16.8 KW and increment step is 0.8 KW. Deposition thickness is proposed as a simple method to characterize the deposition efficiency of coatings. Analysis of variance is used to observe the difference between two adjacent groups. It is shown that deposition efficiency increases with the increase of spraying current; by and large, it firstly rises and then decreases with the increment of spraying voltage. However, the effects of increasing the latter are much stronger on deposition efficiency.

  18. Processing Adipose-Rich Mohs Samples: A Comparative Study of Effectiveness of Pretreatment With Liquid Nitrogen Versus Flash Freezing Spray.

    PubMed

    Reserva, Jeave; Kozel, Zachary; Krol, Cindy; Speiser, Jodi; Adams, William; Tung, Rebecca

    2017-01-26

    Processing of adipose-rich Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) specimens poses challenges that may preclude complete margin evaluation. In this setting, the value of additional freezing methods using various cooling agents has not been previously investigated. The aim of this study is to compare the frozen section quality of high-adipose Mohs specimens processed without additional cooling treatments versus those pretreated with 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (TFE) or liquid nitrogen (LN2). A set of 3 sections were each taken from 24 adipose-rich Mohs micrographic surgery specimens. A section from each set was subjected to either no additional cooling treatment (control), two 10-second pulse sprays of 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane, or three 2-second pulse sprays of LN2. After staining, 2 blinded raters evaluated slide quality based on the presence or absence of the following features: margin completeness, nuclear clearing, epidermal or adipose folding, holes, or venetian blind-like artifacts. Pretreatment of the sample with LN2 produced a significantly (P < 0.001) greater number of high-quality slides (19/24) compared to pretreatment with 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (1/24) and no additional treatment (0/24). The adjunctive use of LN2 spray before tissue embedding circumvents the challenges of processing "thick" (high-adipose) specimens and facilitates the production of high-quality frozen section slides during Mohs micrographic surgery.

  19. Effect of ultrasonic cavitation erosion on corrosion behavior of high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) sprayed near-nanostructured WC-10Co-4Cr coating.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sheng; Wu, Yuping; Zhang, Jianfeng; Zheng, Yugui; Qin, Yujiao; Lin, Jinran

    2015-11-01

    The effect of ultrasonic cavitation erosion on electrochemical corrosion behavior of high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) sprayed near-nanostructured WC-10Co-4Cr coating in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution, was investigated using free corrosion potential, potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in comparison with stainless steel 1Cr18Ni9Ti. The results showed that cavitation erosion strongly enhanced the cathodic current density, shifted the free corrosion potential in the anodic direction, and reduced the magnitude of impedance of the coating. The impedance of the coating decreased more slowly under cavitation conditions than that of the stainless steel 1Cr18Ni9Ti, suggesting that corrosion behavior of the coating was less affected by cavitation erosion than that of the stainless steel.

  20. Slurry Erosion Behavior of F6NM Stainless Steel and High-Velocity Oxygen Fuel-Sprayed WC-10Co-4Cr Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, S. Y.; Miao, Q.; Liang, W. P.; Huang, B. Z.; Ding, Z.; Chen, B. W.

    2016-12-01

    WC-10Co-4Cr coating was applied to the surface of F6NM stainless steel by high-velocity oxygen-fuel spraying. The slurry erosion behavior of the matrix and coating was examined at different rotational speeds using a self-made machine. This experiment effectively simulates real slurry erosion in an environment with high silt load. At low velocity (<6 m/s), the main failure mechanism was cavitation. Small bubbles acted as an air cushion, obstructing direct contact between sand and the matrix surface. However, at velocity above 9 m/s, abrasive wear was the dominant failure mechanism. The results indicate that WC-10Co-4Cr coating significantly improved the slurry resistance at higher velocity, because it created a thin and dense WC coating on the surface.