Science.gov

Sample records for fuels demonstration program

  1. Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, C.M.

    1990-01-01

    Hawaii has abundant natural energy resources, especially biomass, that could be used to produce alternative fuels for ground transportation and electricity. This report summarizes activities performed during 1988 to June 1991 in the first phase of the Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program. The Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program was funded initially by the Energy Division of the State of Hawaii's Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism, and then by the US Department of Energy. This program was intended to support the transition to an altemative transportation fuel, methanol, by demonstrating the use of methanol fuel and methanol-fueled vehicles, and solving the problems associated with that fuel. Specific objectives include surveying renewable energy resources and ground transportation in Hawaii; installing a model methanol fueling station; demonstrating a methanol-fueled fleet of (spark-ignition engine) vehicles; evaluating modification strategies for methanol-fueled diesel engines and fuel additives; and investigating the transition to methanol fueling. All major objectives of Phase I were met (survey of local renewable resources and ground transportation, installation of methanol refueling station, fleet demonstration, diesel engine modification and additive evaluation, and dissemination of information on alternative fueling), and some specific problems (e.g., relating to methanol fuel contamination during handling and refueling) were identified and solved. Several key issues emerging from Phase I (e.g., methanol corrosion, flame luminosity, and methanol-transition technoeconomics) were recommended as topics for follow-on research in subsequent phases of this program.

  2. Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, C.M.

    1990-12-31

    Hawaii has abundant natural energy resources, especially biomass, that could be used to produce alternative fuels for ground transportation and electricity. This report summarizes activities performed during 1988 to June 1991 in the first phase of the Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program. The Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program was funded initially by the Energy Division of the State of Hawaii`s Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism, and then by the US Department of Energy. This program was intended to support the transition to an altemative transportation fuel, methanol, by demonstrating the use of methanol fuel and methanol-fueled vehicles, and solving the problems associated with that fuel. Specific objectives include surveying renewable energy resources and ground transportation in Hawaii; installing a model methanol fueling station; demonstrating a methanol-fueled fleet of (spark-ignition engine) vehicles; evaluating modification strategies for methanol-fueled diesel engines and fuel additives; and investigating the transition to methanol fueling. All major objectives of Phase I were met (survey of local renewable resources and ground transportation, installation of methanol refueling station, fleet demonstration, diesel engine modification and additive evaluation, and dissemination of information on alternative fueling), and some specific problems (e.g., relating to methanol fuel contamination during handling and refueling) were identified and solved. Several key issues emerging from Phase I (e.g., methanol corrosion, flame luminosity, and methanol-transition technoeconomics) were recommended as topics for follow-on research in subsequent phases of this program.

  3. Fuel consolidation demonstration program: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    EPRI, Northeast Utilities, Baltimore Gas and Electric, the US Department of Energy and Combustion Engineering are engaged in a program to develop a system for consolidating spent fuel and a method of storing the consolidated fuel in the spent fuel storage pool which is licensable by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Fuel consolidation offers a means of substantially increasing the capacity of spent fuel storage pools. This is a final report of the Fuel Consolidation Demonstration Program. It provides a review of the overall program, a summary of the results obtained, the lessons learned, and an assessment of the present status of the consolidation system developed in the program. 7 refs., 15 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Alternative-fueled truck demonstration natural gas program: Caterpillar G3406LE development and demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    In 1990, the California Energy Commission, the South Coast Air Quality Management District, and the Southern California Gas Company joined together to sponsor the development and demonstration of compressed natural gas engines for Class 8 heavy-duty line-haul trucking applications. This program became part of an overall Alternative-Fueled Truck Demonstration Program, with the goal of advancing the technological development of alternative-fueled engines. The demonstration showed natural gas to be a technically viable fuel for Class 8 truck engines.

  5. Synthetic Fuel Blend Demonstration Program at Fort Bliss, Texas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    such as natural gas, coal , biomass, or other carbon-containing streams. In each case, the starting resource must first be converted to synthesis gas...the conversion of natural gas to FT-derived liquid hydrocarbons; similarly, the acronyms commonly used for coal and biomass are “CTL” and “BTL...Unclassified 1 1.0 BACKGROUND Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthetic fuel can be produced from various resources such as natural gas, coal , biomass

  6. Alternative fuels for vehicles fleet demonstration program. Final report, volume 2: Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    The Alternative Fuels for Vehicles Fleet Demonstration Program (AFV-FDP) was a multiyear effort to collect technical data for use in determining the costs and benefits of alternative-fuel vehicles (AFVs) in typical applications in New York State. This report, Volume 2, includes 13 appendices to Volume 1 that expand upon issues raised therein. Volume 1 provides: (1) Information about the purpose and scope of the AFV-FDP; (2) A summary of AFV-FDP findings organized on the basis of vehicle type and fuel type; (3) A short review of the status of AFV technology development, including examples of companies in the State that are active in developing AFVs and AFV components; and (4) A brief overview of the status of AFV deployment in the State. Volume 3 provides expanded reporting of AFV-FDP technical details, including the complete texts of the brochure Garage Guidelines for Alternative Fuels and the technical report Fleet Experience Survey Report, plus an extensive glossary of AFV terminology. The appendices cover a wide range of issues including: emissions regulations in New York State; production and health effects of ozone; vehicle emissions and control systems; emissions from heavy-duty engines; reformulated gasoline; greenhouse gases; production and characteristics of alternative fuels; the Energy Policy Act of 1992; the Clean Fuel Fleet Program; garage design guidelines for alternative fuels; surveys of fleet managers using alternative fuels; taxes on conventional and alternative fuels; and zero-emission vehicle technology.

  7. Extended Burnup Demonstration Reactor Fuels Program. Annual progress report, April 1983-March 1984. [BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Exarhos, C.A.

    1985-06-20

    The US Department of Energy, Consumers Power Company, Exxon Nuclear Company, and General Public Utilities Nuclear Corporation have participated since 1979 in a cooperative Extended Burnup Demonstration Program. Under the program, standard ENC-fabricated reload fuel in the Big Rock Point and Oyster Creek reactor cores has been irradiated to discharge burnups at or beyond 35,000 MWD/MTU, one to two cycles beyond its originally projected exposure life. The program provides for examination of the fuel at poolside before and after each extended burnup cycle as well as for limited destructive hot cell examination. The 1984 progress report covers work performed under the EBD program between April 1983 and March 1984. Major milestones reached during the period include completion of a hot cell examination on four high burnup rods from Big Rock Point and of a poolside on the Oyster Creek EBD fuel at discharge. The hot cell examination of four rods at burnups to 37.2 GWD/MTU confirmed poolside measurements on the same fuel, showing the urania and gadolinia-bearing fuel rods to be in excellent condition. No major cladding degradation, pellet restructuring, or pellet-clad interaction was found in any of the samples examined. The Oyster Creek fuel, examined at an assembly average exposure of 34.5 GWD/MTU, showed good performance with regard to both diametral creepdown and clad oxide accumulation.

  8. Alternative fuels for vehicles fleet demonstration program final report. Volume 1: Summary

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    The Alternative Fuels for Vehicles Fleet Demonstration Program (AFV-FDP) was a multiyear effort to collect technical data for use in determining the costs and benefits of alternative-fuel vehicles in typical applications in New York State. During 3 years of collecting data, 7.3 million miles of driving were accumulated, 1,003 chassis-dynamometer emissions tests were performed, 862,000 gallons of conventional fuel were saved, and unique information was developed about garage safety recommendations, vehicle performance, and other topics. Findings are organized by vehicle and fuel type. For light-duty compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles, technology has evolved rapidly and closed-loop, electronically-controlled fuel systems provide performance and emissions advantages over open-loop, mechanical systems. The best CNG technology produces consistently low tailpipe emissions versus gasoline, and can eliminate evaporative emissions. Reduced driving range remains the largest physical drawback. Fuel cost is low ($/Btu) but capital costs are high, indicating that economics are best with vehicles that are used intensively. Propane produces impacts similar to CNG and is less expensive to implement, but fuel cost is higher than gasoline and safety codes limit use in urban areas. Light-duty methanol/ethanol vehicles provide performance and emissions benefits over gasoline with little impact on capital costs, but fuel costs are high. Heavy-duty CNG engines are evolving rapidly and provide large reductions in emissions versus diesel. Capital costs are high for CNG buses and fuel efficiency is reduced, but the fuel is less expensive and overall operating costs are about equal to those of diesel buses. Methanol buses provide performance and emissions benefits versus diesel, but fuel costs are high. Other emerging technologies were also evaluated, including electric vehicles, hybrid-electric vehicles, and fuel cells.

  9. SunLine Test Drives Hydrogen Bus: Hydrogen Fuel Cell& Infrastructure Technologies Program, Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration Projects (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Eudy, L.

    2003-08-01

    Fact sheet describes the ThunderPower hydrogen fuel cell bus that was demonstrated at SunLine Transit Agency from November 2002 to February 2003. The bus was evaluated by DOE's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity.

  10. Industrial fuel gas demonstration plant program. License agreements for proprietary processes. (Deliverable No. 30)

    SciTech Connect

    1980-01-01

    The proprietary processes included within the Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant are listed. Draft license agreements covering the use of these processes, with the exception of the Westfield Process (Conoco), have been included at the end of this document. Except for the Claus Process (Amoco) all draft license agreements will be executed directly between MLGW and the licensor. All the draft license agreements provided have been prepared by the licensors after preliminary discussions. Presently these agreements are being reviewed by MLGW for acceptability. As stated above, the Amoco Sulfur Recovery Process will be covered by an existing agreement between Standard Oil and FWEC. Suitable clauses have been provided under Tab V. These clauses will be incorporated into the MLGW/FWEC subcontract for the protection of MLGW, FWEC, and licensor. At this writing the Industrial Team has no secrecy agreement executed with Conoco Methanation Company (Westfield Methanation Process) nor has any draft license agreement been transmitted by Conoco.

  11. Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant Program. Task III, Demonstration plant safety, industrial hygiene, and major disaster plan (Deliverable No. 35)

    SciTech Connect

    1980-03-01

    This Health and Safety Plan has been adopted by the IFG Demonstration Plant managed by Memphis Light, Gas and Water at Memphis, Tennessee. The plan encompasses the following areas of concern: Safety Plan Administration, Industrial Health, Industrial Safety, First Aid, Fire Protection (including fire prevention and control), and Control of Safety Related Losses. The primary objective of this plan is to achieve adequate control of all potentially hazardous activities to assure the health and safety of all employees and eliminate lost work time to both the employees and the company. The second objective is to achieve compliance with all Federal, state and local laws, regulations and codes. Some thirty specific safe practice instruction items are included.

  12. LADWP FUEL CELL DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Thai Ta

    2003-09-12

    Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) is currently one of the most active power utility companies in researching fuel cell technology. Fuel cells offer many benefits and are now used as an alternative to traditional internal combustion engines in power generation. In continuing it's role as the leader in fuel cell research, LADWP has installed a pre-commercial molten carbonate fuel cell on August 2001 at its headquarter, the John Ferraro Building (JFB). The goal of this project is to learn more about the actual behavior of the fuel cell running under real world conditions. The fuel cell ran smoothly through the first year of operation with very high efficiency, but with some minor setbacks. The JFB fuel cell project is funded by the City of Los Angeles Department of Water and Power with partial grant funding from the Department of Defense's Climate Change Fuel Cell Buydown Program. The technical evaluation and the benefit-cost evaluation of the JFB fuel cell are both examined in this report.

  13. Navy fuel cell demonstration project.

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Billy D.; Akhil, Abbas Ali

    2008-08-01

    This is the final report on a field evaluation by the Department of the Navy of twenty 5-kW PEM fuel cells carried out during 2004 and 2005 at five Navy sites located in New York, California, and Hawaii. The key objective of the effort was to obtain an engineering assessment of their military applications. Particular issues of interest were fuel cell cost, performance, reliability, and the readiness of commercial fuel cells for use as a standalone (grid-independent) power option. Two corollary objectives of the demonstration were to promote technological advances and to improve fuel performance and reliability. From a cost perspective, the capital cost of PEM fuel cells at this stage of their development is high compared to other power generation technologies. Sandia National Laboratories technical recommendation to the Navy is to remain involved in evaluating successive generations of this technology, particularly in locations with greater environmental extremes, and it encourages their increased use by the Navy.

  14. The VHITAL program to demonstrate the performance and lifetime of a bismuth-fueled very high isp hall thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrese-Reading, Colleen; Sengupta, Anita; Frisbee, Robert; Polk, Jay; Capelli, Mark; Boyd, Iain; Keidar, Michael; Tverdokhlebov, Sergey; Semenkin, Sasha; Markusic, Tom; Yalin, Azer; Knowles, Timothy

    2005-01-01

    In the Very High Isp Thruster with Anode Layer (VHITAL) Program the performance, plume and lifetime capability of the radiatively-cooled two stage, bismuth-fueled VHITAL-160 will be characterized in the US and Russia.

  15. Fuel consolidation demonstration: Consolidation concept development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-02-01

    EPRI, Northeast utilities Service Company (NUSCO), DOE, Baltimore Gas Electric Company, and Combustion Engineering, Inc. (C-E) are engaged in a program to develop a system for consolidating spent fuel, in which the consolidated fuel will be licensable by NRC for storage in the spent-fuel storage pool. Fuel consolidation offers a means of substantially increasing the capacity of spent-fuel storage pools. Consolidation equipment design, development, construction, and testing are being performed by C-E in Windsor, Connecticut. Seismic and structural evaluation of the capability of the Millstone Unit 2 spent-fuel pool and building to accommodate the increased fuel capacity is being conducted by NUSCO. NUSCO plans to obtain a license to store consolidated fuel in the Millstone-2 spent-fuel storage pool. NUSCO also plans to perform a hot demonstration of the integrated consolidation system with spent fuel at Millstone-2. This report describes the consolidation system design that forms the basis for the detailed design of the equipment comprising the system, including information on the fabrication and testing of the equipment. Appendix B describes an evaluation of the ability of the system under development to consolidate LWR spent-fuel assemblies other than the 14 {times} 14 fuel of C-E design stored at Millstone-2. A comparison was made of fuel-assembly designs on the basis of information available in open literature. It was concluded that with appropriate dimensional modifications the spent-fuel consolidation system equipment design is applicable to almost all PWR fuel-assembly configurations. 8 refs., 20 figs.

  16. DOD Residential Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell Demonstration Program. Volume 1. Summary of the Fiscal Year 2001 Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-02-01

    de- tailed special provisions concerning patent rights, rights in technical data and computer software, reporting requirements, equal employment...Fuel Cells (860) 673-9181 Revised draft of the technical report is in the review process. ERDC/CERL TR-04-3 43 IEC TC105 Working Group 2...Champaign, IL 61826-9005 Final Report Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Prepared for U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Washington

  17. Residential Fuel Cell Demonstration Handbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrero, E.; McClelland, R.

    2002-07-01

    This report is a guide for rural electric cooperatives engaged in field testing of equipment and in assessing related application and market issues. Dispersed generation and its companion fuel cell technology have attracted increased interest by rural electric cooperatives and their customers. In addition, fuel cells are a particularly interesting source because their power quality, efficiency, and environmental benefits have now been coupled with major manufacturer development efforts. The overall effort is structured to measure the performance, durability, reliability, and maintainability of these systems, to identify promising types of applications and modes of operation, and to assess the related prospect for future use. In addition, technical successes and shortcomings will be identified by demonstration participants and manufacturers using real-world experience garnered under typical operating environments.

  18. Demonstration of catalytic combustion with residual fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodds, W. J.; Ekstedt, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to demonstrate catalytic combustion of a residual fuel oil. Three catalytic reactors, including a baseline configuration and two backup configurations based on baseline test results, were operated on No. 6 fuel oil. All reactors were multielement configurations consisting of ceramic honeycomb catalyzed with palladium on stabilized alumina. Stable operation on residual oil was demonstrated with the baseline configuration at a reactor inlet temperature of about 825 K (1025 F). At low inlet temperature, operation was precluded by apparent plugging of the catalytic reactor with residual oil. Reduced plugging tendency was demonstrated in the backup reactors by increasing the size of the catalyst channels at the reactor inlet, but plugging still occurred at inlet temperature below 725 K (845 F). Operation at the original design inlet temperature of 589 K (600 F) could not be demonstrated. Combustion efficiency above 99.5% was obtained with less than 5% reactor pressure drop. Thermally formed NO sub x levels were very low (less than 0.5 g NO2/kg fuel) but nearly 100% conversion of fuel-bound nitrogen to NO sub x was observed.

  19. Propane Vehicle Demonstration Grant Program

    SciTech Connect

    Jack Mallinger

    2004-08-27

    Project Description: Propane Vehicle Demonstration Grants The Propane Vehicle Demonstration Grants was established to demonstrate the benefits of new propane equipment. The US Department of Energy, the Propane Education & Research Council (PERC) and the Propane Vehicle Council (PVC) partnered in this program. The project impacted ten different states, 179 vehicles, and 15 new propane fueling facilities. Based on estimates provided, this project generated a minimum of 1,441,000 new gallons of propane sold for the vehicle market annually. Additionally, two new off-road engines were brought to the market. Projects originally funded under this project were the City of Portland, Colorado, Kansas City, Impco Technologies, Jasper Engines, Maricopa County, New Jersey State, Port of Houston, Salt Lake City Newspaper, Suburban Propane, Mutual Liquid Propane and Ted Johnson.

  20. Southern Nevada Alternative Fuels Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, Dan; Fast, Matthew

    2009-12-31

    The Southern Nevada Alternative Fuels Program is designed to demonstrate, in a day-to-day bus operation, the reliability and efficiency of a hydrogen bus operation under extreme conditions. By using ICE technology and utilizing a virtually emission free fuel, benefits to be derived include air quality enhancement and vehicle performance improvements from domestically produced, renewable energy sources. The project objective is to help both Ford and the City demonstrate and evaluate the performance characteristics of the E-450 H2ICE shuttle buses developed by Ford, which use a 6.8-liter supercharged Triton V-10 engine with a hydrogen storage system equivalent to 29 gallons of gasoline. The technology used during the demonstration project in the Ford buses is a modified internal combustion engine that allows the vehicles to run on 100% hydrogen fuel. Hydrogen gives a more thorough fuel burn which results in more power and responsiveness and less pollution. The resultant emissions from the tailpipe are 2010 Phase II compliant with NO after treatment. The City will lease two of these E-450 H2ICE buses from Ford for two years. The buses are outfitted with additional equipment used to gather information needed for the evaluation. Performance, reliability, safety, efficiency, and rider comments data will be collected. The method of data collection will be both electronically and manually. Emissions readings were not obtained during the project. The City planned to measure the vehicle exhaust with an emissions analyzer machine but discovered the bus emission levels were below the capability of their machine. Passenger comments were solicited on the survey cards. The majority of comments were favorable. The controllable issues encountered during this demonstration project were mainly due to the size of the hydrogen fuel tanks at the site and the amount of fuel that could be dispensed during a specified period of time. The uncontrollable issues encountered during this

  1. NASA Advanced Fuels Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    1998-01-01

    NASA with the USAF Research Laboratory and it's industry partners, has been conducting planning and research into advanced fuels. This work is sponsored under the NASA Advanced Space Transportation Program (ASTP). The current research focus is on Alternative Hydrocarbon fuels, Monopropellants, and Solid Cryogens for storing atoms of Hydrogen, Boron, Carbon, and Aluminum. Alternative hydrocarbons that are under consideration are bi cyclo propylidene, spiro pentane, and tri propargyl amine. These three fuels have been identified as initial candidates to increase the specific impulse of hydrocarbon fueled rockets by 10-15 seconds over 02/RP-1. Formulation of these propellants is proceeding this year, and rocket engine testing is planned for the near future. Monopropellant investigations are focused on dinitramine based fuels, and potential collaborations with the US Navy. The dinitramine fuel work is being conducted under an Small Business Innovation research (SBIR) contract with the team of Orbital Technologies Corp. (Madison, WI) and SRI (Menlo Park, CA). This work may lead to a high density, high specific impulse monopropellants that can simplify the operations for launch vehicles and spacecraft. Solid Cryogens are being considered to store atoms of Hydrogen, Boron, Carbon, and Aluminum. Stored atom propellants are potentially the highest specific impulse chemical rockets that may be practical. These fuels are composed of atoms, stored in solid cryogenic particles, suspended in a cryogenic liquid or gel. The fuel would be fed to a rocket engine as a slurry or gelled cryogenic liquid with the suspended particles with the trapped atoms. Testing is planned to demonstrate the formation of the particles, and then characterize the slurry flows. Rocket propellant and propulsion technology improvements can be used to reduce the development time and operational costs of new space vehicle programs. Advanced propellant technologies can make the space vehicles safer, more

  2. Automotive Fuel Processor Development and Demonstration with Fuel Cell Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nuvera Fuel Cells

    2005-04-15

    The potential for fuel cell systems to improve energy efficiency and reduce emissions over conventional power systems has generated significant interest in fuel cell technologies. While fuel cells are being investigated for use in many applications such as stationary power generation and small portable devices, transportation applications present some unique challenges for fuel cell technology. Due to their lower operating temperature and non-brittle materials, most transportation work is focusing on fuel cells using proton exchange membrane (PEM) technology. Since PEM fuel cells are fueled by hydrogen, major obstacles to their widespread use are the lack of an available hydrogen fueling infrastructure and hydrogen's relatively low energy storage density, which leads to a much lower driving range than conventional vehicles. One potential solution to the hydrogen infrastructure and storage density issues is to convert a conventional fuel such as gasoline into hydrogen onboard the vehicle using a fuel processor. Figure 2 shows that gasoline stores roughly 7 times more energy per volume than pressurized hydrogen gas at 700 bar and 4 times more than liquid hydrogen. If integrated properly, the fuel processor/fuel cell system would also be more efficient than traditional engines and would give a fuel economy benefit while hydrogen storage and distribution issues are being investigated. Widespread implementation of fuel processor/fuel cell systems requires improvements in several aspects of the technology, including size, startup time, transient response time, and cost. In addition, the ability to operate on a number of hydrocarbon fuels that are available through the existing infrastructure is a key enabler for commercializing these systems. In this program, Nuvera Fuel Cells collaborated with the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop efficient, low-emission, multi-fuel processors for transportation applications. Nuvera's focus was on (1) developing fuel processor

  3. Shore Facility Fuel Cell Demonstration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-11-01

    Demonstration Aildftl’. IDSVLOP-0 FINAL REPORT November 2004 I MN This document is available to the U.S. public through the National Technical Information... report . This report does not constitute a standard, specification, or regulation. SELopV Marc B. Mandler, Ph.D. "V Technical Director United States Coast...Guard * Research & Development Center 1082 Shennecossett Road "-tt Groton, CT 06340-6048 Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. 2

  4. Integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) demonstration test

    SciTech Connect

    Steinfeld, G.; Ghezel-Ayagh, H.; Sanderson, R.; Abens, S.

    2000-07-01

    As concern about the environment generates interest in ultra-clean energy plants, fuel cell power plants can respond to the challenge. Fuel cells convert hydrocarbon fuels to electricity at efficiencies exceeding conventional heat engine technologies while generating extremely low emissions. Emissions of SOx and NOx are expected to be well below current and anticipated future standards. Nitrogen oxides, a product of combustion, will be extremely low in this power plant because power is produced electrochemically rather than by combustion. Due to its higher efficiencies, a fuel cell power plant also produces less carbon dioxide. Fuel cells in combination with coal gasification, are an efficient and environmentally acceptable means to utilize the abundant coal reserves both in the US and around the world. To demonstrate this technology, FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE), is planning to build and test a 2-MW Fuel Cell Power Plant for operation on coal derived gas. This power plant is based on Direct Fuel Cell (DFC{trademark}) technology and will be part of a Clean Coal V IGCC project supported by the US DOE. A British Gas Lurgi (BGL) slagging fixed-bed gasification system with cold gas clean up is planned as part of a 400 MW IGCC power plant to provide a fuel gas slip stream to the fuel cell. The IGFC power plant will be built by Kentucky Pioneer Energy, A subsidiary of Global Energy, in Clark County, KY. This demonstration will result in the world's largest fuel cell power plant operating on coal derived gas. The objective of this test is to demonstrate fuel cell operation on coal derived gas at a commercial scale and to verify the efficiency and environmental benefits.

  5. DOD Residential Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell Demonstration Program. Volume 2. Summary of Fiscal Year 2001-2003 Projects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    SAR] teams into inaccessible areas on the east, north, and west sides of Mount Rainier , lowering rangers to the ground by a cable device known as...Navigation Team is located in Bristol, RI on a penin- sula located between the Narragansett and Mount Hope Bays. Bristol is about 12 miles southeast...be mounted side by side at the host site and connected to the Salt River Project grid system. There is no plan to attempt during this demonstration

  6. INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE PROJECT 2 MW FUEL CELL DEMONSTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    FuelCell Energy

    2005-05-16

    With about 50% of power generation in the United States derived from coal and projections indicating that coal will continue to be the primary fuel for power generation in the next two decades, the Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) has been conducted since 1985 to develop innovative, environmentally friendly processes for the world energy market place. The 2 MW Fuel Cell Demonstration was part of the Kentucky Pioneer Energy (KPE) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) project selected by DOE under Round Five of the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. The participant in the CCTDP V Project was Kentucky Pioneer Energy for the IGCC plant. FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE), under subcontract to KPE, was responsible for the design, construction and operation of the 2 MW fuel cell power plant. Duke Fluor Daniel provided engineering design and procurement support for the balance-of-plant skids. Colt Engineering Corporation provided engineering design, fabrication and procurement of the syngas processing skids. Jacobs Applied Technology provided the fabrication of the fuel cell module vessels. Wabash River Energy Ltd (WREL) provided the test site. The 2 MW fuel cell power plant utilizes FuelCell Energy's Direct Fuel Cell (DFC) technology, which is based on the internally reforming carbonate fuel cell. This plant is capable of operating on coal-derived syngas as well as natural gas. Prior testing (1992) of a subscale 20 kW carbonate fuel cell stack at the Louisiana Gasification Technology Inc. (LGTI) site using the Dow/Destec gasification plant indicated that operation on coal derived gas provided normal performance and stable operation. Duke Fluor Daniel and FuelCell Energy developed a commercial plant design for the 2 MW fuel cell. The plant was designed to be modular, factory assembled and truck shippable to the site. Five balance-of-plant skids incorporating fuel processing, anode gas oxidation, heat recovery, water

  7. Texas LPG fuel cell development and demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2004-07-26

    The State Energy Conservation Office has executed its first Fuel Cell Project which was awarded under a Department of Energy competitive grant process. The Texas LPG Fuel Processor Development and Fuel Cell Demonstration Program is a broad-based public/private partnership led by the Texas State Energy Conservation Office (SECO). Partners include the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division (AFRED) of the Railroad Commission of Texas; Plug Power, Inc., Latham, NY, UOP/HyRadix, Des Plaines, IL; Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), San Antonio, TX; the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC), and the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT). The team proposes to mount a development and demonstration program to field-test and evaluate markets for HyRadix's LPG fuel processor system integrated into Plug Power's residential-scale GenSys(TM) 5C (5 kW) PEM fuel cell system in a variety of building types and conditions of service. The program's primary goal is to develop, test, and install a prototype propane-fueled residential fuel cell power system supplied by Plug Power and HyRadix in Texas. The propane industry is currently funding development of an optimized propane fuel processor by project partner UOP/HyRadix through its national checkoff program, the Propane Education and Research Council (PERC). Following integration and independent verification of performance by Southwest Research Institute, Plug Power and HyRadix will produce a production-ready prototype unit for use in a field demonstration. The demonstration unit produced during this task will be delivered and installed at the Texas Department of Transportation's TransGuide headquarters in San Antonio, Texas. Simultaneously, the team will undertake a market study aimed at identifying and quantifying early-entry customers, technical and regulatory requirements, and other challenges and opportunities that need to be addressed in planning commercialization of the units. For further

  8. DIMETHYL ETHER (DME)-FUELED SHUTTLE BUS DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Elana M. Chapman; Shirish Bhide; Jennifer Stefanik; Andre L. Boehman; David Klinikowski

    2003-04-01

    The objectives of this research and demonstration program are to convert a campus shuttle bus to operation on dimethyl ether, a potential ultra-clean alternative diesel fuel. To accomplish this objective, this project includes laboratory evaluation of a fuel conversion strategy, as well as, field demonstration of the DME-fueled shuttle bus. Since DME is a fuel with no lubricity (i.e., it does not possess the lubricating quality of diesel fuel), conventional fuel delivery and fuel injection systems are not compatible with dimethyl ether. Therefore, to operate a diesel engine on DME one must develop a fuel-tolerant injection system, or find a way to provide the necessary lubricity to the DME. In this project, they have chosen the latter strategy in order to achieve the objective with minimal need to modify the engine. The strategy is to blend DME with diesel fuel, to obtain the necessary lubricity to protect the fuel injection system and to achieve low emissions. The laboratory studies have included work with a Navistar V-8 turbodiesel engine, demonstration of engine operation on DME-diesel blends and instrumentation for evaluating fuel properties. The field studies have involved performance, efficiency and emissions measurements with the Champion Motorcoach ''Defender'' shuttle bus which will be converted to DME-fueling. The results include baseline emissions, performance and combustion measurements on the Navistar engine for operation on a federal low sulfur diesel fuel (300 ppm S). Most recently, they have completed engine combustion studies on DME-diesel blends up to 30 wt% DME addition.

  9. Hydrogen production from liquid hydrocarbons demonstration program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohara, J. B.; Chow, T. K.; Ling, J. K.

    1986-09-01

    The Air Force now uses diesel engine generators as sources of heat and electricity at selected remote sites. Simultaneously, it has investigated alternative cogeneration candidates that offer improved reliability, maintain ability, and economics. One system that shows high potential is a phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) power plant consisting of a fuel conditioner to convert logistic fuels such as DEF-2, DF-a and JP-4 to a hydrogen-rich gas, and a power conditioner to convert the direct current power to alternating current. The objective was to define, and demonstrate, a fuel conditioner to meet performance criteria estabilished for the Air Force Remote Site Fuel Cell Power Plant program. Key criteria included high fuel-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency, rapid startup and load following capability, and minimum water consumption during operations. A process configuration which has the potential to produce a minimum of 0.365 pound of hydrogen per pound of feed diesel consumed is described. The hydrogen-containing product is suitable for phosphoric acid fuel 1 cell power plant. A 2 mole per hour (hydrogen) demonstration plant was designed, constructed and started up.

  10. DIMETHYL ETHER (DME)-FUELED SHUTTLE BUS DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Elana M. Chapman; Shirish Bhide; Andre L. Boehman; David Klinikowski

    2003-04-01

    The objectives of this research and demonstration program are to convert a campus shuttle bus to operation on dimethyl ether, a potential ultra-clean alternative diesel fuel. To accomplish this objective, this project includes laboratory evaluation of a fuel conversion strategy, as well as field demonstration of the DME-fueled shuttle bus. Since DME is a fuel with no lubricity (i.e., it does not possess the lubricating quality of diesel fuel), conventional fuel delivery and fuel injection systems are not compatible with dimethyl ether. Therefore, to operate a diesel engine on DME one must develop a fuel-tolerant injection system, or find a way to provide the necessary lubricity to the DME. In this project, they have chosen the latter strategy in order to achieve the objective with minimal need to modify the engine. The strategy is to blend DME with diesel fuel, to obtain the necessary lubricity to protect the fuel injection system and to achieve low emissions. Within the Combustion Laboratory of the Penn State Energy Institute, they have installed and equipped a Navistar V-8 direct-injection turbodiesel engine for measurement of gaseous and particulate emissions and examination of the impact of fuel composition on diesel combustion. They have also reconfigured a high-pressure viscometer for studies of the viscosity, bulk modulus (compressibility) and miscibility of blends of diesel fuel, dimethyl ether and lubricity additives. The results include baseline emissions, performance and combustion measurements on the Navistar engine for operation on a federal low sulfur diesel fuel (300 ppm S). Most recently, they have examined blends of an oxygenated fuel additive (a liquid fuel called CETANER{trademark}) produced by Air Products, for comparison with dimethyl ether blended at the same weight of oxygen addition, 2 wt.%. While they have not operated the engine on DME yet, they are now preparing to do so. A fuel system for delivery of DME/Diesel blends has been configured

  11. DOD fuel cell demonstration program

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, F.H.; Binder, M.J.; Taylor, W.R.

    1996-12-31

    The supply of reliable, cost-effective electric power with minimal environmental impact is a constant concern of Department of Defense (DOD) installation energy personnel. Electricity purchased from the local utility is expensive and represents only about 30% of the original energy input at the generating station due to generation and distribution inefficiencies. Because of master metering and large air conditioning loads, the demand portion of the installation`s electric bill can be in excess of 50% of the total bill. While the electric utilities in the United States have a very good record of reliability, there is significant potential for improving the security of electrical power supplied by using on-site power generation. On-site, dispersed power generation can reduce power outages due to weather, terrorist activities, or lack of utility generating capacity. In addition, as increased emphasis is placed on global warming, acid rain, and air pollution in general, the development of clean, highly efficient power producing technologies is not only desirable, but mandatory. Since the majority of central heat plants on U.S. military installations are nearing the end of their useful life, there is an opportunity to replace outdated existing equipment with modem technologies.

  12. Demonstration of Passive Fuel Cell Thermal Management Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Kenneth A.; Jakupca, Ian; Colozza, Anthony; Wynne, Robert; Miller, Michael; Meyer, Al; Smith, William

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is developing advanced passive thermal management technology to reduce the mass and improve the reliability of space fuel cell systems for the NASA Exploration program. The passive thermal management system relies on heat conduction within highly thermally conductive cooling plates to move the heat from the central portion of the cell stack out to the edges of the fuel cell stack. Using the passive approach eliminates the need for a coolant pump and other cooling loop components within the fuel cell system which reduces mass and improves overall system reliability. Previous development demonstrated the performance of suitable highly thermally conductive cooling plates and integrated heat exchanger technology to collect the heat from the cooling plates (Ref. 1). The next step in the development of this passive thermal approach was the demonstration of the control of the heat removal process and the demonstration of the passive thermal control technology in actual fuel cell stacks. Tests were run with a simulated fuel cell stack passive thermal management system outfitted with passive cooling plates, an integrated heat exchanger and two types of cooling flow control valves. The tests were run to demonstrate the controllability of the passive thermal control approach. Finally, successful demonstrations of passive thermal control technology were conducted with fuel cell stacks from two fuel cell stack vendors.

  13. The NASA Flight Demonstration Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, G. M.; Routh, D.

    1985-01-01

    The Flight Demonstration Program was initiated by the Office of Space Flight in October 1983. The purposes of this program are to conduct an ongoing series of flight demonstrations which demonstrate critical enabling technology to potential Shuttle users and at the same time provide hands on experience to NASA engineers. Flight demonstrations are selected through a peer review process in response to an annual solicitation issued by the Flight Demonstration Office at NASA Headquarters. As of July 1985 one major flight demonstration has been successfully conducted, two flight demonstrations are scheduled to fly in November on STS 61-B, and five flight demonstrations are in various stages of development and planned to be flown during the next three years.

  14. Diesel fueled ship propulsion fuel cell demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Kumm, W.H.

    1996-12-31

    The paper describes the work underway to adapt a former US Navy diesel electric drive ship as a 2.4 Megawatt fuel cell powered, US Coast Guard operated, demonstrator. The Project will design the new configuration, and then remove the four 600 kW diesel electric generators and auxiliaries. It will design, build and install fourteen or more nominal 180 kW diesel fueled molten carbonate internal reforming direct fuel cells (DFCs). The USCG cutter VINDICATOR has been chosen. The adaptation will be carried out at the USCG shipyard at Curtis Bay, MD. A multi-agency (state and federal) cooperative project is now underway. The USCG prime contractor, AEL, is performing the work under a Phase III Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) award. This follows their successful completion of Phases I and II under contract to the US Naval Sea Systems (NAVSEA) from 1989 through 1993 which successfully demonstrated the feasibility of diesel fueled DFCs. The demonstrated marine propulsion of a USCG cutter will lead to commercial, naval ship and submarine applications as well as on-land applications such as diesel fueled locomotives.

  15. National Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Learning Demonstration Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.

    2012-07-01

    This report discusses key analysis results based on data from early 2005 through September 2011 from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Validation and Demonstration Project, also referred to as the National Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle (FCEV) Learning Demonstration. This report serves as one of many mechanisms to help transfer knowledge and lessons learned within various parts of DOE's Fuel Cell Technologies Program, as well as externally to other stakeholders. It is the fifth and final such report in a series, with previous reports being published in July 2007, November 2007, April 2008, and September 2010.

  16. Fuel cell technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The results of a solid polymer electrolyte fuel cell development program are summarized. A base line design was defined, and materials and components of the base line configuration were fabricated and tested. Concepts representing base line capability extensions in the areas of life, power, specific weight and volume, versatility of operation, field maintenance, and thermal control were identified and evaluated. Liaison and coordination with space shuttle contractors resulted in the exchange of engineering data.

  17. Electric thermal storage demonstration program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    In early 1989, MMWEC, a joint action agency comprised of 30 municipal light departments in Massachusetts and on affiliate in Rhode Island, responded to a DOE request to proposal for the Least Cost Utility Planning program. The MMWEC submission was for the development of a program, focused on small rural electric utilities, to promote the use of electric thermal storage heating systems in residential applications. This report discusses the demonstration of ETS equipment at four member light departments.

  18. Electric thermal storage demonstration program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    In early 1989, MMWEC, a joint action agency comprised of 30 municipal light departments in Massachusetts and on affiliate in Rhode Island, responded to a DOE request to proposal for the Least Cost Utility Planning program. The MMWEC submission was for the development of a program, focused on small rural electric utilities, to promote the use of electric thermal storage heating systems in residential applications. This report discusses the demonstration of ETS equipment at four member light departments.

  19. Tubular solid oxide fuel cell demonstration activities

    SciTech Connect

    Veyo, S.E.

    1995-08-01

    The development of a viable fuel cell driven electrical power generation system involves not only the development of cell and stack technology, but also the development of the overall system concept, the strategy for control, and the ancillary subsystems. The design requirements used to guide system development must reflect a customer focus in order to evolve a commercial product. In order to obtain useful customer feedback, Westinghouse has practiced the deployment with customers of fully integrated, automatically controlled, packaged solid oxide fuel cell power generation systems. These field units have served to demonstrate to customers first hand the beneficial attributes of the SOFC, to expose deficiencies through experience in order to guide continued development, and to garner real world feedback and data concerning not only cell and stack parameters, but also transportation, installation, permitting and licensing, start-up and shutdown, system alarming, fault detection, fault response, and operator interaction.

  20. CHP Fuel Cell Durability Demonstration - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Petrecky, James; Ashley, Christopher J

    2014-07-21

    Plug Power has managed a demonstration project that has tested multiple units of its high-temperature, PEM fuel cell system in micro-combined heat and power (μ-CHP) applications in California. The specific objective of the demonstration project was to substantiate the durability of GenSys Blue, and, thereby, verify its technology and commercial readiness for the marketplace. In the demonstration project, Plug Power, in partnership with the National Fuel Cell Research Center (NFCRC) at the University of California, Irvine (UCI), and Sempra, will execute two major tasks: • Task 1: Internal durability/reliability fleet testing. Six GenSys Blue units will be built and will undergo an internal test regimen to estimate failure rates. This task was modified to include 3 GenSys Blue units installed in a lab at UCI. • Task 2: External customer testing. Combined heat and power units will be installed and tested in real-world residential and/or light commercial end user locations in California.

  1. Fuel cell technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A fuel cell technology program was established to advance the state-of-the-art of hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells using low temperature, potassium hydroxide electrolyte technology as the base. Program tasks are described consisting of baseline cell design and stack testing, hydrogen pump design and testing, and DM-2 powerplant testing and technology extension efforts. A baseline cell configuration capable of a minimum of 2000 hours of life was defined. A 6-cell prototype stack, incorporating most of the scheme cell features, was tested for a total of 10,497 hours. A 6-cell stack incorporating all of the design features was tested. The DM-2 powerplant with a 34 cell stack, an accessory section packaged in the basic configuration anticipated for the space shuttle powerplant and a powerplant control unit, was defined, assembled, and tested. Cells were used in the stack and a drag-type hydrogen pump was installed in the accessory section. A test program was established, in conjunction with NASA/JSC, based on space shuttle orbiter mission. A 2000-hour minimum endurance test and a 5000-hour goal were set and the test started on August 8, 1972. The 2000-hour milestone was completed on November 3, 1972. On 13 March 1973, at the end of the thirty-first simulated seven-day mission and 5072 load hours, the test was concluded, all goals having been met. At this time, the DM-2 was in excellent condition and capable of additional endurance.

  2. Fuel Cells Today: Early Market Applications and Learning Demonstrations

    SciTech Connect

    2015-09-09

    This MP3 provides an overview of early market fuel cell applications including today's commercially available fuel cells and "learning demonstrations" to validate fuel cell technology in real world conditions.

  3. Propulsion and Power Rapid Response Research and Development Support. Delivery Order 0042: Demonstration and Evaluation of Fischer-Tropsch Research Fuels for the DoD Assured Fuels Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    constructed in cooperation with the Department of Energy (DOE) via funding provided by the Department’s Ultra-Clean Fuels Program. As part of this DOE...of Analysis cSt centistokes CU Conductivity Units deg Degrees DESC Defense Energy Support Center DoD Department of Defense DOE Department...of Energy EAFB Edwards Air Force Base FBP Final Boiling Point FSII Fuel System Icing Inhibitor FT Fischer-Tropsch ISO International

  4. Renewable Fuel Standard Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about regulations, developed by EPA, in collaboration with refiners, renewable fuel producers, and many other stakeholders, that ensure that transportation fuel sold in the United States contains a minimum volume of renewable fuel.

  5. EPRI fuel cladding integrity program

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, R.

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of the EPRI fuel program is to supplement the fuel vendor research to assure that utility economic and operational interests are met. To accomplish such objectives, EPRI has conducted research and development efforts to (1) reduce fuel failure rates and mitigate the impact of fuel failures on plant operation, (2) provide technology to extend burnup and reduce fuel cycle cost. The scope of R&D includes fuel and cladding. In this paper, only R&D related to cladding integrity will be covered. Specific areas aimed at improving fuel cladding integrity include: (1) Fuel Reliability Data Base; (2) Operational Guidance for Defective Fuel; (3) Impact of Water Chemistry on Cladding Integrity; (4) Cladding Corrosion Data and Model; (5) Cladding Mechanical Properties; and (6) Transient Fuel Cladding Response.

  6. Ansaldo programs on fuel cell vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Marcenaro, B.G.; Federici, F.

    1996-12-31

    The growth in traffic and the importance of maintaining a stable ecology at the global scale, particularly with regard to atmospheric pollution, raises the necessity to realize a new generation of vehicles which are more efficient, more economical and compatible with the environment. At European level, the Car of Tomorrow task force has identified fuel cells as a promising alternative propulsion system. Ansaldo Ricerche has been involved in the development of fuel cell vehicles since the early nineties. Current ongoing programs relates to: (1) Fuel cell bus demonstrator (EQHEPP BUS) Test in 1996 (2) Fuel cell boat demonstrator (EQHHPP BOAT) Test in 1997 (3) Fuel cell passenger car prototype (FEVER) Test in 1997 (4) 2nd generation Fuel cell bus (FCBUS) 1996-1999 (5) 2nd generation Fuel cell passenger car (HYDRO-GEN) 1996-1999.

  7. The MAJORANA Demonstrator Radioassay Program

    SciTech Connect

    Abgrall, N.; Arnquist, Isaac J.; Avignone, F. T.; Back, Henning O.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Bradley, A. W.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, Matthew; Buuck, M.; Byram, D.; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Christofferson, C. D.; Chu, P. H.; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Dunmore, J. A.; Efremenko, Yuri; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S.; Finnerty, P.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gehman, Victor M.; Gilliss, T.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, J.; Green, M. P.; Gruszko, J.; Guinn, I.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Henning, R.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Howard, S.; Howe, M. A.; Jasinski, B. R.; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K.; Kidd, M. F.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Laferriere, Brian D.; Leon, Jonathan D.; Loach, J. C.; MacMullin, J.; MacMullin, S.; Martin, R. D.; Massarcyk, R.; Meijer, S. J.; Mertens, S.; Miller, M. L.; Orrell, John L.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Overman, Nicole R.; Poon, Alan W.; Pushkin, K.; Radford, D. C.; Rager, J.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shanks, B.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, Kyle J.; Snyder, N.; Steele, David; Suriano, Anne-Marie; Tedeschi, D.; Trimble, J. E.; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, Sergey; Vetter, K.; Vorren, Kris R.; White, B. R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wiseman, C.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, Vladimir; Zhitnikov, I.

    2016-05-03

    The Majorana collaboration is constructing the Majorana Demonstrator at the Sanford Underground Research Facility at the Homestake gold mine, in Lead, SD. The apparatus will use Ge detectors, enriched in isotope 76Ge, to demonstrate the feasibility of a large-scale Ge detector experiment to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. The long half-life of this postulated process requires that the apparatus be extremely low in radioactive isotopes whose decays may produce backgrounds to the search. The radioassay program conducted by the collaboration to ensure that the materials comprising the apparatus are suffciently pure is described. The resulting measurements of the radioactiveisotope contamination for a number of materials studied for use in the detector are reported.

  8. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR radioassay program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abgrall, N.; Arnquist, I. J.; Avignone, F. T.; Back, H. O.; Barabash, A. S.; Bertrand, F. E.; Boswell, M.; Bradley, A. W.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Buuck, M.; Byram, D.; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Y.-D.; Christofferson, C. D.; Chu, P.-H.; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, J. A.; Dunmore, J. A.; Efremenko, Yu.; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Finnerty, P.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gehman, V. M.; Gilliss, T.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, J.; Green, M. P.; Gruszko, J.; Guinn, I. S.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Henning, R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Howard, S.; Howe, M. A.; Jasinski, B. R.; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K. J.; Kidd, M. F.; Kochetov, O.; Konovalov, S. I.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Leon, J.; Loach, J. C.; MacMullin, J.; MacMullin, S.; Martin, R. D.; Massarczyk, R.; Meijer, S.; Mertens, S.; Miller, M. L.; Orrell, J. L.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Overman, N. R.; Poon, A. W. P.; Pushkin, K.; Radford, D. C.; Rager, J.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, A. G.; Shanks, B.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, K. J.; Snyder, N.; Steele, D.; Suriano, A. M.; Tedeschi, D.; Trimble, J. E.; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, S.; Vetter, K.; Vorren, K.; White, B. R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wiseman, C.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Yu, C.-H.; Yumatov, V.; Zhitnikov, I.

    2016-08-01

    The MAJORANA collaboration is constructing the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR at the Sanford Underground Research Facility at the Homestake gold mine, in Lead, SD. The apparatus will use Ge detectors, enriched in isotope 76Ge, to demonstrate the feasibility of a large-scale Ge detector experiment to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. The long half-life of this postulated process requires that the apparatus be extremely low in radioactive isotopes whose decays may produce backgrounds to the search. The radioassay program conducted by the collaboration to ensure that the materials comprising the apparatus are sufficiently pure is described. The resulting measurements from gamma-ray counting, neutron activation and mass spectroscopy of the radioactive-isotope contamination for the materials studied for use in the detector are reported. We interpret these numbers in the context of the expected background for the experiment.

  9. The Majorana Demonstrator radioassay program

    DOE PAGES

    Abgrall, N.; Arnquist, I. J.; Avignone, F. T.; ...

    2016-05-03

    The Majorana collaboration is constructing the Majorana Demonstrator at the Sanford Underground Research Facility at the Homestake gold mine, in Lead, SD. The apparatus will use Ge detectors, enriched in isotope 76Ge, to demonstrate the feasibility of a large-scale Ge detector experiment to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. The long half-life of this postulated process requires that the apparatus be extremely low in radioactive isotopes whose decays may produce backgrounds to the search. The radioassay program conducted by the collaboration to ensure that the materials comprising the apparatus are sufficiently pure is described. The resulting measurements from gamma-ray counting,more » neutron activation and mass spectroscopy of the radioactive-isotope contamination for the materials studied for use in the detector are reported. In conclusion, we interpret these numbers in the context of the expected background for the experiment.« less

  10. The Majorana Demonstrator radioassay program

    SciTech Connect

    Abgrall, N.; Arnquist, I. J.; Avignone, F. T.; Back, H. O.; Barabash, A. S.; Bertrand, F. E.; Boswell, Melissa; Bradley, A. W.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Buuck, M.; Byram, D.; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Y. -D.; Christofferson, C. D.; Chu, Pinghan; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, J. A.; Dunmore, J. A.; Efremenko, Yu.; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Finnerty, P.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gehman, V. M.; Gilliss, T.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, John Jerome; Green, M. P.; Gruszko, J.; Guinn, I. S.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Henning, R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Howard, S.; Howe, M. A.; Jasinski, B. R.; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K. J.; Kidd, M. F.; Kochetov, O.; Konovalov, S. I.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Leon, J.; Loach, J. C.; MacMullin, J.; MacMullin, S.; Martin, R. D.; Massarczyk, Ralph; Meijer, S.; Mertens, S.; Miller, M. L.; Orrell, J. L.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Overman, N. R.; Poon, A. W. P.; Pushkin, K.; Radford, D. C.; Rager, J.; Rielage, Keith Robert; Robertson, R. G. H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, A. G.; Shanks, B.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, K. J.; Snyder, N.; Steele, D.; Suriano, A. M.; Tedeschi, D.; Trimble, J. E.; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, S.; Vetter, K.; Vorren, K.; White, B. R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wiseman, C.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Yu, C. -H.; Yumatov, V.; Zhitnikov, I.

    2016-05-03

    The Majorana collaboration is constructing the Majorana Demonstrator at the Sanford Underground Research Facility at the Homestake gold mine, in Lead, SD. The apparatus will use Ge detectors, enriched in isotope 76Ge, to demonstrate the feasibility of a large-scale Ge detector experiment to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. The long half-life of this postulated process requires that the apparatus be extremely low in radioactive isotopes whose decays may produce backgrounds to the search. The radioassay program conducted by the collaboration to ensure that the materials comprising the apparatus are sufficiently pure is described. The resulting measurements from gamma-ray counting, neutron activation and mass spectroscopy of the radioactive-isotope contamination for the materials studied for use in the detector are reported. In conclusion, we interpret these numbers in the context of the expected background for the experiment.

  11. DIMETHYL ETHER (DME)-FUELED SHUTTLE BUS DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Elana M. Chapman; Shirish Bhide; Jennifer Stefanik; Howard Glunt; Andre L. Boehman; Allen Homan; David Klinikowski

    2003-04-01

    The objectives of this research and demonstration program are to convert a campus shuttle bus to operation on dimethyl ether, a potential ultra-clean alternative diesel fuel. To accomplish this objective, this project includes laboratory evaluation of a fuel conversion strategy, as well as, field demonstration of the DME-fueled shuttle bus. Since DME is a fuel with no lubricity (i.e., it does not possess the lubricating quality of diesel fuel), conventional fuel delivery and fuel injection systems are not compatible with dimethylether. Therefore, to operate a diesel engine on DME one must develop a fuel-tolerant injection system, or find a way to provide the necessary lubricity to the DME. In this project, they have chosen the latter strategy in order to achieve the objective with minimal need to modify the engine. The strategy is to blend DME with diesel fuel, to obtain the necessary lubricity to protect the fuel injection system and to achieve low emissions. The bulk of the efforts over the past year were focused on the conversion of the campus shuttle bus. This process, started in August 2001, took until April 2002 to complete. The process culminated in an event to celebrate the launching of the shuttle bus on DME-diesel operation on April 19, 2002. The design of the system on the shuttle bus was patterned after the system developed in the engine laboratory, but also was subjected to a rigorous failure modes effects analysis with help from Dr. James Hansel of Air Products. The result of this FMEA was the addition of layers of redundancy and over-pressure protection to the system on the shuttle bus. The system became operation in February 2002. Preliminary emissions tests and basic operation of the shuttle bus took place at the Pennsylvania Transportation institute's test track facility near the University Park airport. After modification and optimization of the system on the bus, operation on the campus shuttle route began in early June 2002. However, the work

  12. Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Prototype Demonstration for Consumer Electronics Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Carlstrom, Charles, M., Jr.

    2009-07-07

    This report is the final technical report for DOE Program DE-FC36-04GO14301 titled “Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Prototype Demonstration for Consumer Electronics Applications”. Due to the public nature of this report some of the content reported in confidential reports and meetings to the DOE is not covered in detail in this report and some of the content has been normalized to not show actual values. There is a comparison of the projects accomplishments with the objectives, an overview of some of the key subsystem work, and a review of the three levels of prototypes demonstrated during the program. There is also a description of the eventual commercial product and market this work is leading towards. The work completed under this program has significantly increased the understanding of how Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFC) can be deployed successfully to power consumer electronic devices. The prototype testing has demonstrated the benefits a direct methanol fuel cell system has over batteries typically used for powering consumer electronic devices. Three generations of prototypes have been developed and tested for performance, robustness and life. The technologies researched and utilized in the fuel cell stack and related subsystems for these prototypes are leveraged from advances in other industries such as the hydrogen fueled PEM fuel cell industry. The work under this program advanced the state of the art of direct methanol fuel cells. The system developed by MTI micro fuel cells aided by this program differs significantly from conventional DMFC designs and offers compelling advantages in the areas of performance, life, size, and simplicity. The program has progressed as planned resulting in the completion of the scope of work and available funding in December 2008. All 18 of the final P3 prototypes builds have been tested and the results showed significant improvements over P2 prototypes in build yield, initial performance, and durability. The systems have

  13. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM LANDFILL GAS - PHASE III. DEMONSTRATION TESTS - PHASE IV. GUIDELINES AND DEMONSTRATIONS - VOLUME 2. APPENDICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes the results of a four-phase program to demonstrate that fuel cell energy recovery using a commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell is both environmentally sound and commercially feasible. Phase I, a conceptual design and evaluation study, addressed the technical...

  14. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program: Program update 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (also referred to as the CCT Program) is a $6.9 billion cost-shared industry/government technology development effort. The program is to demonstrate a new generation of advanced coal-based technologies, with the most promising technologies being moved into the domestic and international marketplace. Technology has a vital role in ensuring that coal can continue to serve U.S. energy interests and enhance opportunities for economic growth and employment while meeting the national committment to a clean and healthy global environment. These technologies are being advanced through the CCT Program. The CCT Program supports three substantive national objectives: ensuring a sustainable environment through technology; enhancing energy efficiency and reliability; providing opportunities for economic growth and employment. The technologies being demonstrated under the CCT Program reduce the emissions of sulfur oxides, nitrogen oxides, greenhouse gases, hazardous air pollutants, solid and liquid wastes, and other emissions resulting from coal use or conversion to other fuel forms. These emissions reductions are achieved with efficiencies greater than or equal to currently available technologies.

  15. FUEL CELL BUS DEMONSTRATION IN MEXICO CITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the performance of a cull-size, zero-emission, Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel-cell-powered transit bus in the atmospheric environment of Mexico City. To address the air quality problems caused by vehicle emissions in Mexico City, a seminar on clean vehic...

  16. DIMETHYL ETHER (DME)-FUELED SHUTTLE BUS DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Elana M. Chapman; Shirish Bhide; Jennifer Stefanik; Howard Glunt; Andre L. Boehman; Allen Homan; David Klinikowski

    2003-04-01

    The objectives of this research and demonstration program are to convert a campus shuttle bus to operation on dimethyl ether, a potential ultra-clean alternative diesel fuel. To accomplish this objective, this project includes laboratory evaluation of a fuel conversion strategy, as well as, field demonstration of the DME-fueled shuttle bus. Since DME is a fuel with no lubricity (i.e., it does not possess the lubricating quality of diesel fuel), conventional fuel delivery and fuel injection systems are not compatible with dimethyl ether. Therefore, to operate a diesel engine on DME one must develop a fuel-tolerant injection system, or find a way to provide the necessary lubricity to the DME. In this project, they have chosen the latter strategy in order to achieve the objective with minimal need to modify the engine. Their strategy is to blend DME with diesel fuel, to obtain the necessary lubricity to protect the fuel injection system and to achieve low emissions. The bulk of the efforts over the past year were focused on the conversion of the campus shuttle bus. This process, started in August 2001, took until April 2002 to complete. The process culminated in an event to celebrate the launching of the shuttle bus on DME-diesel operation on April 19, 2002. The design of the system on the shuttle bus was patterned after the system developed in the engine laboratory, but also was subjected to a rigorous failure modes effects analysis (FMEA, referred to by Air Products as a ''HAZOP'' analysis) with help from Dr. James Hansel of Air Products. The result of this FMEA was the addition of layers of redundancy and over-pressure protection to the system on the shuttle bus. The system became operational in February 2002. Preliminary emissions tests and basic operation of the shuttle bus took place at the Pennsylvania Transportation Institute's test track facility near the University Park airport. After modification and optimization of the system on the bus, operation on the

  17. Electric thermal storage demonstration program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    In early 1989, MMWEC, a joint action agency comprised of 30 municipal light departments in Massachusetts and one affiliate in Rhode Island, responded to a Department of Energy request to proposal for the Least Cost Utility Planning program. The MMWEC submission was for the development of a program, focused on small rural electric utilities, to promote the use of electric thermal storage heating systems in residential applications. In this progress report, cost savings at Bolyston light department is discussed. (JL)

  18. Electric thermal storage demonstration program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    In early 1989, MMWEC, a joint action agency comprised of 30 municipal light departments in Massachusetts and one affiliate in Rhode Island, responded to a Department of Energy request to proposal for the Least Cost Utility Planning program. The MMWEC submission was for the development of a program, focused on small rural electric utilities, to promote the use of electric thermal storage heating systems in residential applications. In this progress report, cost savings at Bolyston light department is discussed. (JL)

  19. Demonstration of a 200-kilowatt biomass fueled power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, C.F.; Bray, A.P.; Purvis, C.R.

    1994-12-31

    ENERGEO, Inc. is engaged in a demonstration test program of its AGRIPOWER 200 unit fueled with biomass at Sutton Lumber Company in Tennga, Georgia. The objective of the program is to evaluate the operating and performance characteristics of the system using lumber wastes for fuel. The program is scheduled to accumulate 8000 hours of operation over a period of 1 to 2 years. The program became a reality due to initial funding from the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD`s) Strategic Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Air and Energy Research Laboratory (AEERL). The AGRIPOWER unit operates with an {open_quotes}open{close_quotes} Brayton cycle using a fluid bed combustor and several heat exchangers to heat compressed air which in turn drives a turbine/generator (T/G) set. The T/G set, which includes the compressor and a recuperator, is a Solar {open_quotes}Spartan{close_quotes} unit packaged for this application by Alturdyne, Inc. The combustor utilizes both in-bed and freeboard combustion zones, and the above-bed zone is well mixed to provide uniform temperatures. Design specifications call for consumption of 612 lb/hr (278 kg/hr) of fuel with a heating value of 5,270 Btu/lb (12,248 kJ/kg). The net electrical output will be approximately 200 kW-hr/hr. This corresponds to a heat rate of 16,130 Btu/kW-hr (17,001 kJ/kW-hr). The capital cost of an AGRIPOWER 200 unit will be approximately $2,250/kW of capacity.

  20. A micro direct methanol fuel cell demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wozniak, Konrad; Johansson, David; Bring, Martin; Sanz-Velasco, Anke; Enoksson, Peter

    2004-09-01

    The demand for compact power sources with high energy density is increasing. A direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is a renewable energy source which works at near room temperature, and allows for easier liquid fuel storage, which makes it a potential candidate. We report the design, fabrication and characterization of a self-driven DMFC made by micromachining techniques and macro-assembly. Several designs were created on the basis of state-of-the-art DMFCs. A simplified mathematical model was used mainly to design the flow channels and verify the polarization curves, which reveal the output power of a cell. Silicon was used as a substrate for the fabrication of electrodes, and the membrane electrode assembly was provided by Ion Power, Inc. A 0.25 cm2 cell showed a performance of 0.29 mW cm-2 and an open circuit voltage of 0.7 V. Ten microliters of 6 M methanol solution is sufficient to operate the cell for more than 1 h.

  1. STORABLE TOROIDAL COMBUSTOR DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    nitrogen tetroxide/50% hydrazine-50% unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (N2O4/N2H4- UDMH , 50-50) propellants. Injectors, workhorse chambers, and cooled...chambers are being designed and fabricated to support these demonstrations as discussed in this report. Results of a performance analysis are also presented. (Author)

  2. Alternative-engine-fuels demonstration and materials test

    SciTech Connect

    Thimsen, D.

    1981-01-01

    A portable demonstration was constructed to measure peak power and specific fuel consumption of a gasoline engine burning gasoline and ethanol, and a diesel engine burning No. 2 diesel and sunflower oil. The demonstrations were given at farm field days. Several metals were subjected to wet ethanol fuels to measure corrosion.

  3. Integral Ramjet Booster Demonstration Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-02-01

    OF AIR FORCE PROGRAM DATA 99 4.2 LABORATORY PROPELLANT STUDIES 102 4.2.1 Propellant Requirements 102 4.2.2 Evolution of LPC -691 Propellant 103...4.2.3 Characterization of LPC -69IB Propellant 106 4.2.4 Propellant Selection-Summary and Conclusions 111 4.2.5 Laboratory Studies of LPC -69ID 117 4.3...00F Versus NCO/OH LPC -691D Propellant 121 4-5 JANNAF Maximum True Stress at 700F Versus NCO/OH LPC -691D Propellant 122 4-6 Torch Test

  4. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. Program update 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    The Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT Program) is a $7.14 billion cost-shared industry/government technology development effort. The program is to demonstrate a new generation of advanced coal-based technologies, with the most promising technologies being moved into the domestic and international marketplace. Clean coal technologies being demonstrated under the CCT program are creating the technology base that allows the nation to meet its energy and environmental goals efficiently and reliably. The fact that most of the demonstrations are being conducted at commercial scale, in actual user environments, and under conditions typical of commercial operations allows the potential of the technologies to be evaluated in their intended commercial applications. The technologies are categorized into four market sectors: advanced electric power generation systems; environmental control devices; coal processing equipment for clean fuels; and industrial technologies. Sections of this report describe the following: Role of the Program; Program implementation; Funding and costs; The road to commercial realization; Results from completed projects; Results and accomplishments from ongoing projects; and Project fact sheets. Projects include fluidized-bed combustion, integrated gasification combined-cycle power plants, advanced combustion and heat engines, nitrogen oxide control technologies, sulfur dioxide control technologies, combined SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} technologies, coal preparation techniques, mild gasification, and indirect liquefaction. Industrial applications include injection systems for blast furnaces, coke oven gas cleaning systems, power generation from coal/ore reduction, a cyclone combustor with S, N, and ash control, cement kiln flue gas scrubber, and pulse combustion for steam coal gasification.

  5. Alcohol fuels program technical review

    SciTech Connect

    1981-07-01

    The last issue of the Alcohol Fuels Process R/D Newsletter contained a work breakdown structure (WBS) of the SERI Alcohol Fuels Program that stressed the subcontracted portion of the program and discussed the SERI biotechnology in-house program. This issue shows the WBS for the in-house programs and contains highlights for the remaining in-house tasks, that is, methanol production research, alcohol utilization research, and membrane research. The methanol production research activity consists of two elements: development of a pressurized oxygen gasifier and synthesis of catalytic materials to more efficiently convert synthesis gas to methanol and higher alcohols. A report is included (Finegold et al. 1981) that details the experimental apparatus and recent results obtained from the gasifier. The catalysis research is principally directed toward producing novel organometallic compounds for use as a homogeneous catalyst. The utilization research is directed toward the development of novel engine systems that use pure alcohol for fuel. Reforming methanol and ethanol catalytically to produce H/sub 2/ and CO gas for use as a fuel offers performance and efficiency advantages over burning alcohol directly as fuel in an engine. An application of this approach is also detailed at the end of this section. Another area of utilization is the use of fuel cells in transportation. In-house researchers investigating alternate electrolyte systems are exploring the direct and indirect use of alcohols in fuel cells. A workshop is being organized to explore potential applications of fuel cells in the transportation sector. The membrane research group is equipping to evaluate alcohol/water separation membranes and is also establishing cost estimation and energy utilization figures for use in alcohol plant design.

  6. Hawaii alternative fuels utilization program. Phase 3, final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, C.M.; Staackmann, M.

    1996-08-01

    The Hawaii Alternative Fuels Utilization Program originated as a five-year grant awarded by the US Department of Energy (USDOE) to the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. The overall program included research and demonstration efforts aimed at encouraging and sustaining the use of alternative (i.e., substitutes for gasoline and diesel) ground transportation fuels in Hawaii. Originally, research aimed at overcoming technical impediments to the widespread adoption of alternative fuels was an important facet of this program. Demonstration activities centered on the use of methanol-based fuels in alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs). In the present phase, operations were expanded to include flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs) which can operate on M85 or regular unleaded gasoline or any combination of these two fuels. Additional demonstration work was accomplished in attempting to involve other elements of Hawaii in the promotion and use of alcohol fuels for ground transportation in Hawaii.

  7. Controlled Speed Accessory Drive demonstration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoehn, F. W.

    1981-01-01

    A Controlled Speed Accessory Drive System was examined in an effort to improve the fuel economy of passenger cars. Concept feasibility and the performance of a typical system during actual road driving conditions were demonstrated. The CSAD system is described as a mechanical device which limits engine accessory speeds, thereby reducing parasitic horsepower losses and improving overall vehicle fuel economy. Fuel consumption data were compiled for fleets of GSA vehicles. Various motor pool locations were selected, each representing different climatic conditions. On the basis of a total accumulated fleet usage of nearly three million miles, an overall fuel economy improvement of 6 percent to 7 percent was demonstrated. Coincident chassis dynamometer tests were accomplished on selected vehicles to establish the effect of different accessory drive systems on exhaust emissions, and to evaluate the magnitude of the mileage benefits which could be derived.

  8. Clean coal technologies: Research, development, and demonstration program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy, has structured an integrated program for research, development, and demonstration of clean coal technologies that will enable the nation to use its plentiful domestic coal resources while meeting environmental quality requirements. The program provides the basis for making coal a low-cost, environmentally sound energy choice for electric power generation and fuels production. These programs are briefly described.

  9. Thin-Layer Fuel Cell for Teaching and Classroom Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shirkhanzadeh, M.

    2009-01-01

    A thin-layer fuel cell is described that is simple and easy to set up and is particularly useful for teaching and classroom demonstrations. The cell is both an electrolyzer and a fuel cell and operates using a thin layer of electrolyte with a thickness of approximately 127 micrometers and a volume of approximately 40 microliters. As an…

  10. Intergovernmental Advanced Stationary PEM Fuel Cell System Demonstration Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rich Chartrand

    2011-08-31

    A program to complete the design, construction and demonstration of a PEMFC system fuelled by Ethanol, LPG or NG for telecom applications was initiated in October 2007. Early in the program the economics for Ethanol were shown to be unfeasible and permission was given by DOE to focus on LPG only. The design and construction of a prototype unit was completed in Jun 2009 using commercially available PEM FC stack from Ballard Power Systems. During the course of testing, the high pressure drop of the stack was shown to be problematic in terms of control and stability of the reformer. Also, due to the power requirements for air compression the overall efficiency of the system was shown to be lower than a similar system using internally developed low pressure drop FC stack. In Q3 2009, the decision was made to change to the Plug power stack and a second prototype was built and tested. Overall net efficiency was shown to be 31.5% at 3 kW output. Total output of the system is 6 kW. Using the new stack hardware, material cost reduction of 63% was achieved over the previous Alpha design. During a November 2009 review meeting Plug Power proposed and was granted permission, to demonstrate the new, commercial version of Plug Power's telecom system at CERL. As this product was also being tested as part of a DOE Topic 7A program, this part of the program was transferred to the Topic 7A program. In Q32008, the scope of work of this program was expanded to include a National Grid demonstration project of a micro-CHP system using hightemperature PEM technology. The Gensys Blue system was cleared for unattended operation, grid connection, and power generation in Aug 2009 at Union College in NY state. The system continues to operate providing power and heat to Beuth House. The system is being continually evaluated and improvements to hardware and controls will be implemented as more is learned about the system's operation. The program is instrumental in improving the efficiency and

  11. Demonstration and implementation of ethanol as an aviation fuel. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-01

    The objectives of the program were to demonstrate the viability of ethanol as an aviation fuel at appropriate locations and audiences in the participating Biomass Energy Program Regions, and to promote implementation projects in the area. Seven demonstrations were to be performed during the Summer 1995 through December 1996 period. To maximize the cost effectiveness of the program, additional corporate co-sponsorships were sought at each demonstration site and the travel schedule was arranged to take advantage of appropriate events taking place in the vicinity of the schedule events or enroute. This way, the original funded amount was stretched to cover another year of activities increasing the number of demonstrations from seven to thirty-nine. While the Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center (RAFDC) contract focused on ethanol as an aviation fuel, RAFDC also promoted the broader use of ethanol as a transportation fuel. The paper summarizes locations and occasions, and gives a brief description of each demonstration/exhibit/presentation held during the term of the project. Most of the demonstrations took place at regularly scheduled air shows, such as the Oshkosh, Wisconsin Air Show. The paper also reviews current and future activities in the areas of certification, emission testing, the international Clean Airports Program, air pollution monitoring with instrumented aircraft powered by renewable fuels, training operation and pilot project on ethanol, turbine fuel research, and educational programs.

  12. Fuel cell systems program plan, Fiscal year 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    DOE Office of Fossil Energy (OoFE) is participating with private sector in developing molten carbon fuel cell (MCFC) and advanced concepts including solid oxide fuel cell for application in utility/commercial/industrial sectors. Phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) development was sponsored by OoFE and is now being commercialized. In 1993 DOD is undertaking use and demonstration of PAFC and other fuel cells. DOE Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy is sponsoring fuel cell development for propulsion. The Conservation program is focused on polymer electrolyte or proton exchange membrane fuel cells, although they also are implementing a demonstration program for PAFC buses. DOE fuel cell research, development and demonstration efforts are also supported by private sector funding. This Plan describes the fuel cell activities of the Office of Fossil Energy.

  13. Satellite servicer system flight demonstration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, James S.

    1989-01-01

    A program to develop the capability of servicing satellites in remote locations, where a series of flight that will demonstrate autonomous rendezvous and docking, supervised autonomous Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) exchange, supervised autonomous fluid transfer and, proximity operations for Space Station Freedom were planned, is described. The flight demonstrations are the results of several mission scenarios with complex technical objectives. Three Shuttle flights are planned to complete the multi-objective program. The major hardware elements of the program are described and discussed. Demonstration objectives and technical approaches to the flight demonstrations are discussed. Existing and developing technologies are assessed for applicability to the Satellite Servicer System (SSSFD) program.

  14. 1986 fuel cell seminar: Program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    1986-10-01

    Ninety nine brief papers are arranged under the following session headings: gas industry's 40 kw program, solid oxide fuel cell technology, phosphoric acid fuel cell technology, molten carbonate fuel cell technology, phosphoric acid fuel cell systems, power plants technology, fuel cell power plant designs, unconventional fuels, fuel cell application and economic assessments, and plans for commerical development. The papers are processed separately for the data base. (DLC)

  15. Data Analysis of Early Fuel Cell Market Demonstrations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.

    2009-11-17

    Presentation about early fuel cell markets, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Hydrogen Secure Data Center and its role in data analysis and demonstrations, and composite data products, and results reported to multiple stakeholders.

  16. CLIMATE CHANGE FUEL CELL PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Mike Walneuski

    2004-09-16

    ChevronTexaco has successfully operated a 200 kW PC25C phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant at the corporate data center in San Ramon, California for the past two years and seven months following installation in December 2001. This site was chosen based on the ability to utilize the combined heat (hot water) and power generation capability of this modular fuel cell power plant in an office park setting . In addition, this project also represents one of the first commercial applications of a stationary fuel cell for a mission critical data center to assess power reliability benefits. This fuel cell power plant system has demonstrated outstanding reliability and performance relative to other comparably sized cogeneration systems.

  17. Clean coal technology demonstration program: Program update 1996-97

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    The Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (known as the CCT Program) reached a significant milestone in 1996 with the completion of 20 of the 39 active projects. The CCT Program is responding to a need to demonstrate and deploy a portfolio of technologies that will assure the U.S. recoverable coal reserves of 297 billion tons could continue to supply the nation`s energy needs economically and in a manner that meets the nation`s environmental objectives. This portfolio of technologies includes environmental control devices that contributed to meeting the accords on transboundary air pollution recommended by the Special Envoys on Acid Rain in 1986. Operational, technical, environmental, and economic performance information and data are now flowing from highly efficient, low-emission, advanced power generation technologies that will enable coal to retain its prominent role into the next millennium. Further, advanced technologies are emerging that will enhance the competitive use of coal in the industrial sector, such as in steelmaking. Coal processing technologies will enable the entire coal resource base to be used while complying with environmental requirements. These technologies are producing products used by utilities and industrial processes. The capability to coproduce products, such as liquid and solid fuels, electricity, and chemicals, is being demonstrated at a commercial scale by projects in the CCT Program. In summary, this portfolio of technologies is satisfying the national need to maintain a multifuel energy mix in which coal is a key component because of its low-cost, availability, and abundant supply within the nation`s borders.

  18. City of Chula Vista hydrogen fuel cell bus demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafson, B.; Bamberger, B.

    1996-10-01

    Hydrogen as an energy carrier and fuel has potential for various uses including electricity, commercial, residential, transportation, and industrial. It is an energy carrier that can be produced from a variety of primary sources and potentially can accomplish these various uses while significantly reducing pollution by substituting for or reducing the use of fossil fuels. One of the most immediate and potentially viable roles for hydrogen as an energy carrier will be its use as a transportation fuel, especially in densely populated urban areas where automotive emissions contribute significantly to air pollution. The Department of Energy`s commitment to research and development of hydrogen as an alternative fuel, and California`s Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) requirements, both provide the impetus and favorable circumstance for demonstrating hydrogen as a transportation fuel on an urban bus system. The purpose of this project is to demonstrate the feasibility of using solid polymer fuel cells in a hydrogen-powered electric drive system for an urban transit bus application. Fuel cell buses use hydrogen fuel and oxygen from the air to produce electrical power with the only byproduct being pure water. Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells are proposed for this project. Current evidence suggests that fuel cells, which rely on hydrogen and a process known as proton exchange to generate their power, appear to have an infinite life span. All exhaust pollution is completely eliminated, resulting in a Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV). An urban bus system offers the potential for developing a market for the production of hydrogen propulsion technology due to extensive vehicular use in densely populated areas experiencing pollution from numerous sources, and because the central garaging facilities or the bus system facilitates fueling and maintenance functions.

  19. Santa Clara County Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Mitlitsky; Sara Mulhauser; David Chien; Deepak Shukla; David Weingaertner

    2009-11-14

    The Santa Clara County Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (PSOFC) project demonstrated the technical viability of pre-commercial PSOFC technology at the County 911 Communications headquarters, as well as the input fuel flexibility of the PSOFC. PSOFC operation was demonstrated on natural gas and denatured ethanol. The Santa Clara County Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (PSOFC) project goals were to acquire, site, and demonstrate the technical viability of a pre-commercial PSOFC technology at the County 911 Communications headquarters. Additional goals included educating local permit approval authorities, and other governmental entities about PSOFC technology, existing fuel cell standards and specific code requirements. The project demonstrated the Bloom Energy (BE) PSOFC technology in grid parallel mode, delivering a minimum 15 kW over 8760 operational hours. The PSOFC system demonstrated greater than 81% electricity availability and 41% electrical efficiency (LHV net AC), providing reliable, stable power to a critical, sensitive 911 communications system that serves geographical boundaries of the entire Santa Clara County. The project also demonstrated input fuel flexibility. BE developed and demonstrated the capability to run its prototype PSOFC system on ethanol. BE designed the hardware necessary to deliver ethanol into its existing PSOFC system. Operational parameters were determined for running the system on ethanol, natural gas (NG), and a combination of both. Required modeling was performed to determine viable operational regimes and regimes where coking could occur.

  20. Satellite Servicer System flight demonstration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, James S.; Levin, George M.; Ely, Neal

    1990-01-01

    The major hardware elements, demonstration objectives, and technical approaches, as well as existing and developing technologies for applicability to the Satellite Servicer System (SSSFD) program are presented. In a project to develop the capability of servicing satellites in remote locations, NASA and SDI have planned a series of flights to demonstrate autonomous rendezvous and docking, supervised autonomous fluid transfer, and supervised autonomous orbital replacement unit exchange. Program objectives, design reference mission, and flight demonstrations are described. The expanded capability demonstrated by the SSSFD program will provide alternatives to excessive dependence on ground operations personnel and training, increase the reach into unique space environments, and decrease the costs of managing and operating space assets.

  1. Demonstration of fuel resistant to pellet-cladding interaction: Phase 2. Second semiannual report, July-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenbaum, H.S.

    1980-03-01

    This program has as its ultimate objective the demonstration of an advanced fuel design that is resistant to the failure mechanism known as fuel pellet-cladding interaction (PCI). Two fuel concepts are being developed for possible demonstration within this program: (a) Cu-barrier fuel and (b) Zr-liner fuel. In the current report period the nuclear design of the demonstration was begun. The design calls for 132 bundles of barrier fuel to be inserted into the core of Quad Cities Unit 2 at the beginning of Cycle 6. Laboratory and in-reactor tests were started to evaluate the stability of Zr-liner fuel which remains in service after a defect has occurred which allows water to enter the rod. Results to date on intentionally defected fuel indicate that the Zr-liner fuel is not rapidly degraded despite ingress of water.

  2. FISCHER-TROPSCH FUELS PRODUCTION AND DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen P. Bergin

    2003-04-23

    This project has two primary purposes: (1) Build a small-footprint (SFP) fuel production plant to prove the feasibility of this relatively transportable technology on an intermediate scale (i.e. between laboratory-bench and commercial capacity) and produce as much as 150,000 gallons of hydrogen-saturated Fischer-Tropsch (FT) diesel fuel; and (2) Use the virtually sulfur-free fuel produced to demonstrate (over a period of at least six months) that it can not only be used in existing diesel engines, but that it also can enable significantly increased effectiveness and life of the next-generation exhaust-after-treatment emission control systems that are currently under development and that will be required for future diesel engines. Furthermore, a well-to-wheels economic analysis will be performed to characterize the overall costs and benefits that would be associated with the actual commercial production, distribution and use of such FT diesel fuel made by the process under consideration, from the currently underutilized (or entirely un-used) energy resources targeted, primarily natural gas that is stranded, sub-quality, off-shore, etc. During the first year of the project, which is the subject of this report, there have been two significant areas of progress: (1) Most of the preparatory work required to build the SFP fuel-production plant has been completed, and (2) Relationships have been established, and necessary project coordination has been started, with the half dozen project-partner organizations that will have a role in the fuel demonstration and evaluation phase of the project. Additional project tasks directly related to the State of Alaska have also been added to the project. These include: A study of underutilized potential Alaska energy resources that could contribute to domestic diesel and distillate fuel production by providing input energy for future commercial-size SFP fuel production plants; Demonstration of the use of the product fuel in a heavy

  3. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program: Program Update 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy

    2002-07-30

    Annual report on the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT Program). The report address the role of the CCT Program, implementation, funding and costs, accomplishments, project descriptions, legislative history, program history, environmental aspects, and project contacts. The project descriptions describe the technology and provides a brief summary of the demonstration results. Also includes Power Plant Improvement Initiative Projects.

  4. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program: Program Update 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy

    1999-03-01

    Annual report on the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT Program). The report address the role of the CCT Program, implementation, funding and costs, accomplishments, project descriptions, legislative history, program history, environmental aspects, and project contacts. The project descriptions describe the technology and provides a brief summary of the demonstration results.

  5. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program: Program Update 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy

    2001-04-01

    Annual report on the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT Program). The report address the role of the CCT Program, implementation, funding and costs, accomplishments, project descriptions, legislative history, program history, environmental aspects, and project contacts. The project descriptions describe the technology and provides a brief summary of the demonstration results.

  6. Spent nuclear fuel integrity during dry storage - performance tests and demonstrations

    SciTech Connect

    McKinnon, M.A.; Doherty, A.L.

    1997-06-01

    This report summarizes the results of fuel integrity surveillance determined from gas sampling during and after performance tests and demonstrations conducted from 1983 through 1996 by or in cooperation with the US DOE Office of Commercial Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The cask performance tests were conducted at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) between 1984 and 1991 and included visual observation and ultrasonic examination of the condition of the cladding, fuel rods, and fuel assembly hardware before dry storage and consolidation of fuel, and a qualitative determination of the effects of dry storage and fuel consolidation on fission gas release from the spent fuel rods. The performance tests consisted of 6 to 14 runs involving one or two loading, usually three backfill environments (helium, nitrogen, and vacuum backfills), and one or two storage system orientations. The nitrogen and helium backfills were sampled and analyzed to detect leaking spent fuel rods. At the end of each performance test, periodic gas sampling was conducted on each cask. A spent fuel behavior project (i.e., enhanced surveillance, monitoring, and gas sampling activities) was initiated by DOE in 1994 for intact fuel in a CASTOR V/21 cask and for consolidated fuel in a VSC-17 cask. The results of the gas sampling activities are included in this report. Information on spent fuel integrity is of interest in evaluating the impact of long-term dry storage on the behavior of spent fuel rods. Spent fuel used during cask performance tests at INEL offers significant opportunities for confirmation of the benign nature of long-term dry storage. Supporting cask demonstration included licensing and operation of an independent spent fuel storage installation (ISFSI) at the Virginia Power (VP) Surry reactor site. A CASTOR V/21, an MC-10, and a Nuclear Assurance NAC-I28 have been loaded and placed at the VP ISFSI as part of the demonstration program. 13 refs., 14 figs., 9 tabs.

  7. Five Kilowatt Fuel Cell Demonstration for Remote Power Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Witmer; Tom Johnson; Jack Schmid

    2008-12-31

    While most areas of the US are serviced by inexpensive, dependable grid connected electrical power, many areas of Alaska are not. In these areas, electrical power is provided with Diesel Electric Generators (DEGs), at much higher cost than in grid connected areas. The reasons for the high cost of power are many, including the high relative cost of diesel fuel delivered to the villages, the high operational effort required to maintain DEGs, and the reverse benefits of scale for small utilities. Recent progress in fuel cell technologies have lead to the hope that the DEGs could be replaced with a more efficient, reliable, environmentally friendly source of power in the form of fuel cells. To this end, the University of Alaska Fairbanks has been engaged in testing early fuel cell systems since 1998. Early tests were conducted on PEM fuel cells, but since 2001, the focus has been on Solid Oxide Fuel Cells. In this work, a 5 kW fuel cell was delivered to UAF from Fuel Cell Technologies of Kingston, Ontario. The cell stack is of a tubular design, and was built by Siemens Westinghouse Fuel Cell division. This stack achieved a run of more than 1 year while delivering grid quality electricity from natural gas with virtually no degradation and at an electrical efficiency of nearly 40%. The project was ended after two control system failures resulted in system damage. While this demonstration was successful, considerable additional product development is required before this technology is able to provide electrical energy in remote Alaska. The major issue is cost, and the largest component of system cost currently is the fuel cell stack cost, although the cost of the balance of plant is not insignificant. While several manufactures are working on schemes for significant cost reduction, these systems do not as yet provide the same level of performance and reliability as the larger scale Siemens systems, or levels that would justify commercial deployment.

  8. USEPA'S ARSENIC TREATMENT TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation will discuss the status of the arsenic treatment technology demonstration program. The presentation will include a review of the past activities of the site solicitation announcement, site selection, technology solicittion and response to technology solicitation. Fu...

  9. Fuel Flexible Turbine System (FFTS) Program

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2012-12-31

    tested in a C65 engine operating on 100% hydrogen and with the redesigned combustion liner - Combustion Liner Design A - installed. The results were promising for the FFTS program as the system was able to burn 100% hydrogen fuel without flashback while maintaining good combustion performance. While initial results have been demonstrated the feasibility of this program, further research is needed to determine whether these results will be repeated with FFTS-4 injectors installed in all injector ports and over a wide range of operating conditions and fuel variations.

  10. Spent fuel data for waste storage programs

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, E M

    1980-09-01

    Data on LWR spent fuel were compiled for dissemination to participants in DOE-sponsored waste storage programs. Included are mechanical descriptions of the existing major types of LWR fuel assemblies, spent LWR fuel fission product inventories and decay heat data, and inventories of LWR spent fuel currently in storage, with projections of future quantities.

  11. The Home Start Demonstration Program: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Child Development (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    Following a discussion of the Home Start program and its evaluation plan, the 16 Office of Child Development-funded Home Start projects in the United States are described. Home start is a 3-year Head Start demonstration program, aimed at the 3-5 years of age range, which focuses on enhancing the quality of children's lives by building upon…

  12. Demonstration of a PC 25 Fuel Cell in Russia

    SciTech Connect

    John C. Trocciola; Thomas N. Pompa; Linda S. Boyd

    2004-09-01

    This project involved the installation of a 200kW PC25C{trademark} phosphoric-acid fuel cell power plant at Orgenergogaz, a Gazprom industrial site in Russia. In April 1997, a PC25C{trademark} was sold by ONSI Corporation to Orgenergogaz, a subsidiary of the Russian company ''Gazprom''. Due to instabilities in the Russian financial markets, at that time, the unit was never installed and started by Orgenergogaz. In October of 2001 International Fuel Cells (IFC), now known as UTC Fuel Cells (UTCFC), received a financial assistance award from the United States Department of Energy (DOE) entitled ''Demonstration of PC 25 Fuel Cell in Russia''. Three major tasks were part of this award: the inspection of the proposed site and system, start-up assistance, and installation and operation of the powerplant.

  13. OVERVIEW OF USEPA'S ARSENIC TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation provides a summary on the Arsenic Treatment Technology Demonstration Program. The information includes the history and the current status of the demonstration projects on both round 1 and round 2 including some photos of the treatment systems. The presentation m...

  14. National Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Learning Demonstration Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.

    2012-07-01

    This report discusses key analysis results based on data from early 2005 through September 2011 from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Validation and Demonstration Project, also referred to as the National Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle (FCEV) Learning Demonstration. It is the fifth and final such report in a series, with previous reports being published in July 2007, November 2007, April 2008, and September 2010.

  15. Spent nuclear fuel storage -- Performance tests and demonstrations

    SciTech Connect

    McKinnon, M.A.; DeLoach, V.A.

    1993-04-01

    This report summarizes the results of heat transfer and shielding performance tests and demonstrations conducted from 1983 through 1992 by or in cooperation with the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Commercial Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The performance tests consisted of 6 to 14 runs involving one or two loadings, usually three backfill environments (helium, nitrogen, and vacuum backfills), and one or two storage system orientations. A description of the test plan, spent fuel load patterns, results from temperature and dose rate measurements, and fuel integrity evaluations are contained within the report.

  16. Integrated propulsion technology demonstrator. Program plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    NASA and Rockwell have embarked on a cooperative agreement to define, develop, fabricate, and operate an integrated propulsion technology demonstrator (IPTD) for the purpose of validating design, process, and technology improvements of launch vehicle propulsion systems. This program, a result of NRA8-11, Task Area 1 A, is jointly funded by both NASA and Rockwell and is sponsored by the Reusable Launch Vehicle office at NASA Marshall Space flight Center. This program plan provides to the joint NASA/Rockwell integrated propulsion technology demonstrator (IPTD) team a description of the activities within tasks / sub tasks and associated schedules required to successfully achieve program objectives. This document also defines the cost elements and manpower allocations for each sub task for purpose of program control. This plan is updated periodically by developing greater depth of direction for outyear tasks as the program matures. Updating is accomplished by adding revisions to existing pages or attaching page revisions to this plan. In either case, revisions will be identified by appropriate highlighting of the change, or specifying a revision page through the use of footnotes on the bottom right of each change page. Authorization for the change is provided by the principal investigators to maintain control of this program plan document and IPTD program activities.

  17. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM LANDFILL GAS - PHASE III. DEMONSTRATION TESTS - PHASE IV. GUIDELINES AND RECOMMENDATIONS- VOLUME 1. TECHNICAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes the results of a four-phase program to demonstrate that fuel cell energy recovery using a commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell is both environmentally sound and commercially feasible. Phase I, a conceptual design and evaluation study, addressed the technical...

  18. US Department of Energy fuel cell program for transportation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Pandit G.

    1992-01-01

    Fuel cells of offer promise as the best future replacement for internal combustion engines in transportation applications. Fuel cells operate more efficiently than internal combustion engines, and are capable of running on non-petroleum fuels such as methanol, ethanol, natural gas or hydrogen. Fuel cells can also have a major impact on improving air quality. They virtually eliminate particulates, NO(x) and sulfur oxide emissions, and significantly reduce hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide. The U.S. Department of Energy program on fuel cells for transportation applications is structured to advance fuel cells technologies from the R&D phase, through engineering design and scale-tip, to demonstration in cars, trucks, buses and locomotives, in order to provide energy savings, fuel flexibility and air quality improvements. This paper describes the present status of the U.S. program.

  19. Demonstrating and evaluating heavy-duty alternative fuel operations

    SciTech Connect

    Peerenboom, W.

    1998-02-01

    The principal objectives of this project was to understand the effects of using an alternative fuel on a truck operating fleet through actual operation of trucks. Information to be gathered was expected to be anecdotal, as opposed to statistically viable, because the Trucking Research institute (TRI) recognized that projects could not attract enough trucks to produce statistically credible volumes of data. TRI was to collect operational data, and provide them to NREL, who would enter the data into the alternative fuels database being constructed for heavy-duty trucks at the time. NREL would also perform data analysis, with the understanding that the demonstrations were generally pre-production model engines and vehicles. Other objectives included providing information to the trucking industry on the availability of alternative fuels, developing the alternative fuels marketplace, and providing information on experience with alternative fuels. In addition to providing information to the trucking industry, an objective was for TRI to inform NREL and DOE about the industry, and give feedback on the response of the industry to developments in alternative fuels in trucking. At the outset, only small numbers of vehicles participated in most of the projects. Therefore, they had to be considered demonstrations of feasibility, rather than data gathering tests from which statistically significant conclusions might be drawn. Consequently, data gathered were expected to be useful for making estimates and obtaining valuable practical lessons. Project data and lessons learned are the subjects of separate project reports. This report concerns itself with the work of TRI in meeting the overall objectives of the TRI-NREL partnership.

  20. Low NO/x/ heavy fuel combustor program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lister, E.; Niedzwiecki, R. W.; Nichols, L.

    1980-01-01

    The paper deals with the 'Low NO/x/ Heavy Fuel Combustor Program'. Main program objectives are to generate and demonstrate the technology required to develop durable gas turbine combustors for utility and industrial applications, which are capable of sustained, environmentally acceptable operation with minimally processed petroleum residual fuels. The program will focus on 'dry' reductions of oxides of nitrogen (NO/x/), improved combustor durability and satisfactory combustion of minimally processed petroleum residual fuels. Other technology advancements sought include: fuel flexibility for operation with petroleum distillates, blends of petroleum distillates and residual fuels, and synfuels (fuel oils derived from coal or shale); acceptable exhaust emissions of carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbons, sulfur oxides and smoke; and retrofit capability to existing engines.

  1. Low NO(x) heavy fuel combustor program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lister, E.; Niedzwiecki, R. W.; Nichols, L.

    1979-01-01

    The 'low nitrogen oxides heavy fuel combustor' program is described. Main program objectives are to generate and demonstrate the technology required to develop durable gas turbine combustors for utility and industrial applications, which are capable of sustained, environmentally acceptable operation with minimally processed petroleum residual fuels. The program will focus on 'dry' reductions of oxides of nitrogen, improved combustor durability, and satisfactory combustion of minimally processed petroleum residual fuels. Other technology advancements sought include: fuel flexibility for operation with petroleum distillates, blends of petroleum distillates and residual fuels, and synfuels (fuel oils derived from coal or shale); acceptable exhaust emissions of carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbons, sulfur oxides and smoke; and retrofit capability to existing engines.

  2. FUEL PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM Thermal Conductivity of Sphere-Pac Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Ades, M. J.

    1981-07-01

    Progress in understanding the thermal conductivity of sphere-pac fuel beds has been made both at Oregon State University and Exxon Nuclear Company supported by the Fuel Performance Improvement Program (FPIP). FPIP is sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy and is being performed by Consumers Power Company, Exxon Nuclear Company, and Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The purpose of the program is to test and demonstrate improved li9ht water reactor fuel concepts that are more resistant to failure from pellet-cladding interaction during power increases than standard pellet fuel.

  3. The Quantum Opportunity Program Demonstration: Final Impacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schirm, Allen; Stuart, Elizabeth; McKie, Allison

    2006-01-01

    From July 1995 through September 2001, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) and the Ford Foundation (Ford) operated a demonstration of the Quantum Opportunity Program (QOP). QOP offered intensive and comprehensive services to help at-risk youth graduate from high school and enroll in postsecondary education or training. QOP was mainly an…

  4. OVERVIEW OF USEPA'S SMALL SYSTEMS DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation provides an overview of the USEPA Arsenic Treatment Technology Demonstration Program. The information includes the status of the projects on both round 1 and round 2 including some photos of the treatment systems. Limited information is given on the results of t...

  5. Fuel economy and emissions evaluation of BMW hydrogen 7 mono-fuel demonstration vehicles.

    SciTech Connect

    Wallner, T.; Lohse-Busch, H.; Gurski, S.; Duoba, M.; Thiel, W.; Martin, D.; Korn, T.; Energy Systems; BMW Group Munich Germany; BMW Group Oxnard USA

    2008-12-01

    This article summarizes the testing of two BMW Hydrogen 7 Mono-Fuel demonstration vehicles at Argonne National Laboratory's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility (APRF). The BMW Hydrogen 7 Mono-Fuel demonstration vehicles are derived from the BMW Hydrogen 7 bi-fuel vehicles and based on a BMW 760iL. The mono-fuel as well as the bi-fuel vehicle(s) is equipped with cryogenic hydrogen on-board storage and a gaseous hydrogen port fuel injection system. The BMW Hydrogen 7 Mono-Fuel demonstration vehicles were tested for fuel economy as well as emissions on the Federal Test Procedure FTP-75 cold-start test as well as the highway test. The results show that these vehicles achieve emissions levels that are only a fraction of the Super Ultra Low Emissions Vehicle (SULEV) standard for nitric oxide (NO{sub x}) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions. For non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) emissions the cycle-averaged emissions are actually 0 g/mile, which require the car to actively reduce emissions compared to the ambient concentration. The fuel economy numbers on the FTP-75 test were 3.7 kg of hydrogen per 100 km, which, on an energy basis, is equivalent to a gasoline fuel consumption of 17 miles per gallon (mpg). Fuel economy numbers for the highway cycle were determined to be 2.1 kg of hydrogen per 100 km or 30 miles per gallon of gasoline equivalent (GGE). In addition to cycle-averaged emissions and fuel economy numbers, time-resolved (modal) emissions as well as air/fuel ratio data is analyzed to further investigate the root causes of the remaining emissions traces. The BMW Hydrogen 7 vehicles employ a switching strategy with lean engine operation at low engine loads and stoichiometric operation at high engine loads that avoids the NO{sub x} emissions critical operating regime with relative air/fuel ratios between 1 < {lambda} < 2. The switching between these operating modes was found to be a major source of the remaining NO{sub x} emissions. The emissions results collected

  6. X-51A Scramjet Demonstrator Program: Waverider Ground and Flight Test

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    USAF) WaveRider program. The overall test objective of the X-51A program was to demonstrate a scramjet engine using endothermic hydrocarbon fuel...Hypersonic Technology (HyTech) scramjet engine, integrated into the vehicle, used endothermic hydrocarbon fuel (JP-7). The X-51A was designed to be

  7. Research development and demonstration of a fuel cell/battery powered bus system. Annual report, January 1--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Wimmer, R.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the progress in the Georgetown University research, development and demonstration project of a fuel cell/battery powered bus system. The topics addressed in the report include demonstrations, vehicle design and application analysis, technology transfer activities, coordination and monitoring of system design and integration contractor, fuel cell bus test program, current problems, work planned, and manpower, cost and schedule reports.

  8. Fifth annual report to congress. Federal alternative motor fuels programs

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This report presents the status of the US Department of Energy`s alternative fuel vehicle demonstration and performance tracking programs being conducted in accordance with the Energy Policy and Conservation Act. These programs comprise the most comprehensive data collection effort ever undertaken on alternative transportation fuels and alternative fuel vehicles. The report summarizes tests and results from the fifth year. Electric vehicles are not included in these programs, and the annual report does not include information on them. Since the inception of the programs, great strides have been made in developing commercially viable alternative fuel vehicle technologies. However, as is the case in the commercialization of all new technologies, some performance problems have been experienced on vehicles involved in early demonstration efforts. Substantial improvements have been recorded in vehicle practicality, safety, and performance in real-world demonstrations. An aspect of particular interest is emissions output. Results from light duty alternative fuel vehicles have demonstrated superior inservice emissions performance. Heavy duty alternative fuel vehicles have demonstrated dramatic reductions in particulate emissions. However, emissions results from vehicles converted to run on alternative fuel have not been as promising. Although the technologies available today are commercially viable in some markets, further improvements in infrastructure and economics will result in greater market expansion. Information is included in this report on light and heavy duty vehicles, transit buses, vehicle conversions, safety, infrastructure support, vehicle availability, and information dissemination.

  9. General Motors automotive fuel cell program

    SciTech Connect

    Fronk, M.H.

    1995-08-01

    The objectives of the second phase of the GM/DOE fuel cell program is to develop and test a 30 kW fuel cell powerplant. This powerplant will be based on a methanol fuel processor and a proton exchange membrane PM fuel cell stack. In addition, the 10 kW system developed during phase I will be used as a {open_quotes}mule{close_quotes} to test automotive components and other ancillaries, needed for transient operation.

  10. 75 FR 37733 - Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: Modifications to Renewable Fuel Standard Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-30

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 80 RIN 2060-AQ31 Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: Modifications to Renewable... direct final rule. SUMMARY: EPA published a direct final rule to amend the Renewable Fuel Standard... direct final rule to amend the Renewable Fuel Standard program requirements, published on May 10,...

  11. 76 FR 18066 - Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: Changes to Renewable Fuel Standard Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 80 Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: Changes to Renewable Fuel Standard Program... producers and importers of renewable fuels for which RINs have been generated by the foreign...

  12. NASA Technology Demonstrations Missions Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Susan

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Fiscal Year 2010 (FY10) budget introduced a new strategic plan that placed renewed emphasis on advanced missions beyond Earth orbit. This supports NASA s 2011 strategic goal to create innovative new space technologies for our exploration, science, and economic future. As a result of this focus on undertaking many and more complex missions, NASA placed its attention on a greater investment in technology development, and this shift resulted in the establishment of the Technology Demonstrations Missions (TDM) Program. The TDM Program, within the newly formed NASA Office of the Chief Technologist, supports NASA s grand challenges by providing a steady cadence of advanced space technology demonstrations (Figure 1), allowing the infusion of flexible path capabilities for future exploration. The TDM Program's goal is to mature crosscutting capabilities to flight readiness in support of multiple future space missions, including flight test projects where demonstration is needed before the capability can transition to direct mission The TDM Program has several unique criteria that set it apart from other NASA program offices. For instance, the TDM Office matures a small number of technologies that are of benefit to multiple customers to flight technology readiness level (TRL) 6 through relevant environment testing on a 3-year development schedule. These technologies must be crosscutting, which is defined as technology with potential to benefit multiple mission directorates, other government agencies, or the aerospace industry, and they must capture significant public interest and awareness. These projects will rely heavily on industry partner collaboration, and funding is capped for all elements of the flight test demonstration including planning, hardware development, software development, launch costs, ground operations, and post-test assessments. In order to inspire collaboration across government and industry

  13. Ultra-clean Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Fuels Production and Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen P. Bergin

    2006-06-30

    The objective of the DOE-NETL Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Production and Demonstration Program was to produce and evaluate F-T fuel derived from domestic natural gas. The project had two primary phases: (1) fuel production of ultra-clean diesel transportation fuels from domestic fossil resources; and (2) demonstration and performance testing of these fuels in engines. The project also included a well-to-wheels economic analysis and a feasibility study of small-footprint F-T plants (SFPs) for remote locations such as rural Alaska. During the fuel production phase, ICRC partnered and cost-shared with Syntroleum Corporation to complete the mechanical design, construction, and operation of a modular SFP that converts natural gas, via F-T and hydro-processing reactions, into hydrogensaturated diesel fuel. Construction of the Tulsa, Oklahoma plant started in August 2002 and culminated in the production of over 100,000 gallons of F-T diesel fuel (S-2) through 2004, specifically for this project. That fuel formed the basis of extensive demonstrations and evaluations that followed. The ultra-clean F-T fuels produced had virtually no sulfur (less than 1 ppm) and were of the highest quality in terms of ignition quality, saturation content, backend volatility, etc. Lubricity concerns were investigated to verify that commercially available lubricity additive treatment would be adequate to protect fuel injection system components. In the fuel demonstration and testing phase, two separate bus fleets were utilized. The Washington DC Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) and Denali National Park bus fleets were used because they represented nearly opposite ends of several spectra, including: climate, topography, engine load factor, mean distance between stops, and composition of normally used conventional diesel fuel. Fuel evaluations in addition to bus fleet demonstrations included: bus fleet emission measurements; F-T fuel cold weather performance; controlled engine dynamometer

  14. DEMONSTRATION OF LONG-TERM STORAGE CAPABILITY FOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL IN L BASIN

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.; Deible, R.

    2011-04-27

    conclusion is that the fuel can be stored in L Basin, meeting general safety functions for fuel storage, for an additional 50 years and possibly beyond contingent upon continuation of existing fuel management activities and several augmented program activities. It is concluded that the technical bases and well-founded technologies have been established to store spent nuclear fuel in the L Basin. Methodologies to evaluate the fuel condition and characteristics, and systems to prepare fuel, isolate damaged fuel, and maintain water quality storage conditions have been established. Basin structural analyses have been performed against present NPH criteria. The aluminum fuel storage experience to date, supported by the understanding of the effects of environmental variables on materials performance, demonstrates that storage systems that minimize degradation and provide full retrievability of the fuel up to and greater than 50 additional years will require maintaining the present management programs, and with the recommended augmented/additional activities in this report.

  15. Fuel Cell Seminar, 1992: Program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    This year`s theme, ``Fuel Cells: Realizing the Potential,`` focuses on progress being made toward commercial manufacture and use of fuel cell products. Fuel cell power plants are competing for market share in some applications and demonstrations of market entry power plants are proceeding for additional applications. Development activity on fuel cells for transportation is also increasing; fuel cell products have potential in energy and transportation industries, with very favorable environmental impacts. This Seminar has the purpose of fostering communication by providing a forum for the international community interested in development, application, and business opportunities related fuel cells. Over 190 technical papers are included, the majority being processed for the data base.

  16. Detonation duct gas generator demonstration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wortman, Andrew; Brinlee, Gayl A.; Othmer, Peter; Whelan, Michael A.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of the generation of detonation waves moving periodically across high speed channel flow is experimentally demonstrated. Such waves are essential to the concept of compressing requirements and increasing the engine pressure compressor with the objective of reducing conventional compressor requirements and increasing the engine thermodynamic efficiency through isochoric energy addition. By generating transient transverse waves, rather than standing waves, shock wave losses are reduced by an order of magnitude. The ultimate objective is to use such detonation ducts downstream of a low pressure gas turbine compressor to produce a high overall pressure ratio thermodynamic cycle. A 4 foot long, 1 inch x 12 inch cross-section, detonation duct was operated in a blow-down mode using compressed air reservoirs. Liquid or vapor propane was injected through injectors or solenoid valves located in the plenum or the duct itself. Detonation waves were generated when the mixture was ignited by a row of spark plugs in the duct wall. Problems with fuel injection and mixing limited the air speeds to about Mach 0.5, frequencies to below 10 Hz, and measured pressure ratios of about 5 to 6. The feasibility of the gas dynamic compression was demonstrated and the critical problem areas were identified.

  17. Demonstration of optimum fuel-to-moderator ratio in a PWR unit fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Feltus, M.A.; Pozsgai, C. )

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear engineering students at The Pennsylvania State University develop scaled-down [[approx]350 MW(thermal)] pressurized water reactors (PWRs) using actual plants as references. The design criteria include maintaining the clad temperature below 2200[degree]F, fuel temperature below melting point, sufficient departure from nucleate boiling ratio (DNBR) margin, a beginning-of-life boron concentration that yields a negative moderator temperature coefficient, an adequate cycle power production (330 effective full-power days), and a batch loading scheme that is economical. The design project allows for many degrees of freedom (e.g., assembly number, pitch and height and batch enrichments) so that each student's result is unique. The iterative nature of the design process is stressed in the course. The LEOPARD code is used for the unit cell depletion, critical boron, and equilibrium xenon calculations. Radial two-group diffusion equations are solved with the TWIDDLE-DEE code. The steady-state ZEBRA thermal-hydraulics program is used for calculating DNBR. The unit fuel cell pin radius and pitch (fuel-to-moerator ratio) for the scaled-down design, however, was set equal to the already optimized ratio for the reference PWR. This paper describes an honors project that shows how the optimum fuel-to-moderator ratio is found for a unit fuel cell shown in terms of neutron economics. This exercise illustrates the impact of fuel-to-moderator variations on fuel utilization factor and the effect of assuming space and energy separability.

  18. Status of the US Fuel Cell Program

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.C.

    1996-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring major programs to develop high efficiency fuel cell technologies to produce electric power from natural gas and other hydrogen sources. Fuel cell systems offer attractive potential for future electric power generation and are expected to have worldwide markets. They offer ultra-high energy conversion efficiency and extremely low environmental emissions. As modular units for distributed power generation, fuel cells are expected to be particularly beneficial where their by-product, heat, can be effectively used in cogeneration applications. Advanced fuel cell power systems fueled with natural gas are expected to be commercially available after the turn of the century.

  19. Demonstration of fuel resistant to pellet-cladding interaction: Phase 2. Third semiannual report, January-June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenbaum, H.S.

    1980-09-01

    Two fuel concepts are being developed for possible demonstration within this program: (a) Cu-barrier fuel and (b) Zr-liner fuel. These advanced fuels (known collectively as barrier fuels) have special fuel cladding designed to avoid the harmful effects of localized stress and reactive fission products during reactor service. Within the work scope of this program one of these concepts is to be selected for demonstration in a commercial power reactor. It was decided to demonstrate Zr-liner in 132 bundles which have liners of either crystal-bar zirconium or of low-oxygen sponge zirconium in the reload for Quad Cities Unit 2, Cycle 6. Irradiation testing or barrier fuel was continued, and the superior PCI resistance of Zr-liner fuel was further substantiated in the current report period. Furthermore, an irradiation experiment in which Zr-liner fuel, having a deliberately fabricated cladding perforation, was operated at a linear heat generation rate of 35 kW/m to a burnup of approx. 3 MWd/kg U showed no unusual signs of degradation compared with a similarly defected reference fuel rod. Four lead test assemblies of barrier fuel (two of Zr-liner and two of Cu-barrier), presently under irradiation in Quad Cities Unit 1, have achieved a burnup of 11 MWd/kg U.

  20. Low NOx Heavy Fuel Combustor Concept Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novick, A. S.; Troth, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    The development of the technology required to operate an industrial gas turbine combustion system on minimally processed, heavy petroleum or residual fuels having high levels of fuel-bound nitrogen (FBN) while producing acceptable levels of exhaust emissions is discussed. Three combustor concepts were designed and fabricated. Three fuels were supplied for the combustor test demonstrations: a typical middle distillate fuel, a heavy residual fuel, and a synthetic coal-derived fuel. The primary concept was an air staged, variable-geometry combustor designed to produce low emissions from fuels having high levels of FBN. This combustor used a long residence time, fuel-rich primary combustion zone followed by a quick-quench air mixer to rapidly dilute the fuel rich products for the fuel-lean final burnout of the fuel. This combustor, called the rich quench lean (RQL) combustor, was extensively tested using each fuel over the entire power range of the model 570 K engine. Also, a series of parameteric tests was conducted to determine the combustor's sensitivity to rich-zone equivalence ratio, lean-zone equivalence ratio, rich-zone residence time, and overall system pressure drop. Minimum nitrogen oxide emissions were measured at 50 to 55 ppmv at maximum continuous power for all three fuels. Smoke was less than a 10 SAE smoke number.

  1. CLIMATE CHANGE FUEL CELL PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Steven A. Gabrielle

    2004-12-03

    This report discusses the first year of operation of a fuel cell power plant located at the Sheraton Edison Hotel, Edison, New Jersey. PPL EnergyPlus, LLC installed the plant under a contract with the Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc. A DFC{reg_sign}300 fuel cell, manufactured by FuelCell Energy, Inc. of Danbury, CT was selected for the project. The fuel cell successfully operated from June 2003 to May 2004. This report discusses the performance of the plant during this period.

  2. Compound cycle turbofan engine (CCTE). Task IX. Carbon-slurry fuel combustion evaluation program. Final report June-September 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, T.W.; Mongia, H.

    1980-03-01

    The carbon-slurry fuel evaluation program demonstrated the feasibility of running a currently available carbon-slurry fuel in a combustion rig and a turbine engine. This program also established the preliminary design criteria for operating on carbon-slurry fuels. Subcontracts work was performed by Pennsylvania State for fuel droplet measurements and by Suntech, Inc. for fuel development and manufacture.

  3. Demonstration of fuel resistant to pellet-cladding interaction: Phase 2. Fourth semiannual report, July-December 1980. [BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenbaum, H.S.

    1981-03-01

    This program has as its ultimate objective the demonstration of an advanced fuel design that is resistant to the failure mechanism known as fuel pellet-cladding interaction (PCI). Two fuel concepts have been developed for possible demonstration: (a) Cu-barrier fuel and (b) Zr-liner fuel. These advanced fuels (known collectively as barrier fuels) have special fuel cladding designed to avoid the harmful effects of localized stress and reactive fission products during reactor service. Within the scope of this program one of these concepts had to be selected for a large-scale demonstration in a commercial power reactor. The selection was made to demonstrate Zr-liner fuel and to include bundles which have liners prepared from either low oxygen sponge zirconium or of crystal bar zirconium. The demonstration is intended to include a total of 132 barrier bundles in the reload for Quad Cities Unit 2, Cycle 6. In the current report period changes in the nuclear design were made to respond to changes in the Energy Utilization Plan for Quad Cities Unit 2. Bundle designs were completed, and were licensed for use in a BWR/3. The core specific licensing will be done as part of the reload license for Quad Cities Unit 2, Cycle 6.

  4. Montana Integrated Carbon to Liquids (ICTL) Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Fiato, Rocco; Sharma, Ramesh; Allen, Mark; Peyton, Brent; Macur, Richard; Cameron, Jemima

    2013-09-30

    Integrated carbon-to-liquids technology (ICTL) incorporates three basic processes for the conversion of a wide range of feedstocks to distillate liquid fuels: (1) Direct Microcatalytic Coal Liquefaction (MCL) is coupled with biomass liquefaction via (2) Catalytic Hydrodeoxygenation and Isomerization (CHI) of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) or trigylceride fatty acids (TGFA) to produce liquid fuels, with process derived (3) CO{sub 2} Capture and Utilization (CCU) via algae production and use in BioFertilizer for added terrestrial sequestration of CO{sub 2}, or as a feedstock for MCL and/or CHI. This novel approach enables synthetic fuels production while simultaneously meeting EISA 2007 Section 526 targets, minimizing land use and water consumption, and providing cost competitive fuels at current day petroleum prices. ICTL was demonstrated with Montana Crow sub-bituminous coal in MCL pilot scale operations at the Energy and Environmental Research Center at the University of North Dakota (EERC), with related pilot scale CHI studies conducted at the University of Pittsburgh Applied Research Center (PARC). Coal-Biomass to Liquid (CBTL) Fuel samples were evaluated at the US Air Force Research Labs (AFRL) in Dayton and greenhouse tests of algae based BioFertilizer conducted at Montana State University (MSU). Econometric modeling studies were also conducted on the use of algae based BioFertilizer in a wheat-camelina crop rotation cycle. We find that the combined operation is not only able to help boost crop yields, but also to provide added crop yields and associated profits from TGFA (from crop production) for use an ICTL plant feedstock. This program demonstrated the overall viability of ICTL in pilot scale operations. Related work on the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of a Montana project indicated that CCU could be employed very effectively to reduce the overall carbon footprint of the MCL/CHI process. Plans are currently being made to conduct larger-scale process

  5. Climate Change Fuel Cell Program

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Belard

    2006-09-21

    Verizon is presently operating the largest Distributed Generation Fuel Cell project in the USA. Situated in Long Island, NY, the power plant is composed of seven (7) fuel cells operating in parallel with the Utility grid from the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA). Each fuel cell has an output of 200 kW, for a total of 1.4 mW generated from the on-site plant. The remaining power to meet the facility demand is purchased from LIPA. The fuel cell plant is utilized as a co-generation system. A by-product of the fuel cell electric generation process is high temperature water. The heat content of this water is recovered from the fuel cells and used to drive two absorption chillers in the summer and a steam generator in the winter. Cost savings from the operations of the fuel cells are forecasted to be in excess of $250,000 per year. Annual NOx emissions reductions are equivalent to removing 1020 motor vehicles from roadways. Further, approximately 5.45 million metric tons (5 millions tons) of CO2 per year will not be generated as a result of this clean power generation. The project was partially financed with grants from the New York State Energy R&D Authority (NYSERDA) and from Federal Government Departments of Defense and Energy.

  6. Near-Net Forging Technology Demonstration Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, I. Keith

    1996-01-01

    Significant advantages in specific mechanical properties, when compared to conventional aluminum (Al) alloys, make aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloys attractive candidate materials for use in cryogenic propellant tanks and dry bay structures. However, the cost of Al-Li alloys is typically five times that of 2219 aluminum. If conventional fabrication processes are employed to fabricate launch vehicle structure, the material costs will restrict their utilization. In order to fully exploit the potential cost and performance benefits of Al-Li alloys, it is necessary that near-net manufacturing methods be developed to off-set or reduce raw material costs. Near-net forging is an advanced manufacturing method that uses elevated temperature metal movement (forging) to fabricate a single piece, near-net shape, structure. This process is termed 'near-net' because only a minimal amount of post-forge machining is required. The near-net forging process was developed to reduce the material scrap rate (buy-to-fly ratio) and fabrication costs associated with conventional manufacturing methods. The goal for the near-net forging process, when mature, is to achieve an overall cost reduction of approximately 50 percent compared with conventional manufacturing options for producing structures fabricated from Al-Li alloys. This NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) sponsored program has been a part of a unique government / industry partnership, coordinated to develop and demonstrate near-net forging technology. The objective of this program was to demonstrate scale-up of the near-net forging process. This objective was successfully achieved by fabricating four integrally stiffened, 170- inch diameter by 20-inch tall, Al-Li alloy 2195, Y-ring adapters. Initially, two 2195 Al-Li ingots were converted and back extruded to produce four cylindrical blockers. Conventional ring rolling of the blockers was performed to produce ring preforms, which were then contour ring rolled to produce

  7. Results of 200 KW fuel cell evaluation programs

    SciTech Connect

    Torrey, J.M.; Merten, G.P.; Binder, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) has installed six monitoring systems on ONSI Corporation 200 kW phosphoric acid fuel cells. Three of the systems were installed for the U.S. Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (USACERL) which is coordinating the Department of Defense (DoD) fuel cell Demonstration Program and three were installed under a contract with the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). Monitoring of the three NYSERDA sites has been completed. Monitoring systems for the DoD fuel cells were installed in August, 1996 and thus no operating data was available at the time of this writing, but will be presented at the Fuel Cell Seminar. This paper will present the monitoring configuration and research approach for each program. Additionally, summary performance data is presented for the completed NYSERDA program.

  8. Brazil's alcohol motor fuel program

    SciTech Connect

    Goodrich, R.S.

    1982-01-01

    This is a status report on the production and use of ethanol as automotive fuel in Brazil. Ethanol, called in Portuguese Proalcool, will supply at least one-third of Brazil's expected fuel demand for transportation in the year 2000. In total energy terms, it should contribute on the same level as coal and twice the combined level of nuclear, solar and geothermal energies. 2 refs.

  9. Broad Specification Fuels Combustion Technology Program, Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohmann, R. P.; Jeroszko, R. A.; Kennedy, J. B.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental evaluation of two advanced technology combustor concepts was conducted to evolve and assess their capability for operation on broadened properties fuels. The concepts were based on the results of Phase 1 of the Broad Specification Fuel Combustor Technology Program which indicated that combustors with variable geometry or staged combustion zones had a flexibility of operation that could facilitate operation on these fuels. Emphasis in defining these concepts included the use of single pipe as opposed to duplex or staged fuels systems to avoid the risk of coking associated with the reduction in thermal stability expected in broadened properties fuels. The first concept was a variable geometry combustor in which the airflow into the primary zone could be altered through valves on the front while the second was an outgrowth of the staged Vorbix combustor, evolved under the NASA/P&W ECCP and EEE programs incorporating simplified fuel and air introduction. The results of the investigation, which involved the use of Experimental Referee Broad Specification (ERBS) fuel, indicated that in the form initially conceived, both of these combustor concepts were deficient in performance relative to many of the program goals for performance emissions. However, variations of both combustors were evaluated that incorporated features to simulate conceptual enhancement to demonstrate the long range potential of the combustor. In both cases, significant improvements relative to the program goals were observed.

  10. 2012 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-12-01

    In the past year, the DOE Hydrogen Program (the Program) made substantial progress toward its goals and objectives. The Program has conducted comprehensive and focused efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in diverse sectors of the economy. With emphasis on applications that will effectively strengthen our nation's energy security and improve our stewardship of the environment, the Program engages in research, development, and demonstration of critical improvements in the technologies. Highlights of the Program's accomplishments can be found in the sub-program chapters of this report.

  11. 2015 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    SciTech Connect

    Popovich, Neil

    2015-12-01

    In the past year, the DOE Hydrogen Program (the Program) made substantial progress toward its goals and objectives. The Program has conducted comprehensive and focused efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in diverse sectors of the economy. With emphasis on applications that will effectively strengthen our nation's energy security and improve our stewardship of the environment, the Program engages in research, development, and demonstration of critical improvements in the technologies. Highlights of the Program's accomplishments can be found in the sub-program chapters of this report.

  12. Chrysler Pentastar direct hydrogen fuel cell program

    SciTech Connect

    Kimble, M.; Deloney, D.

    1995-08-01

    The Chrysler Pentastar Electronics, Inc. Direct Hydrogen Fueled PEM Fuel Cell Hybrid Vehicle Program (DPHV) was initiated 1 July, 1994 with the following mission, {open_quotes}Design, fabricate, and test a Direct Hydrogen Fueled Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell System including onboard hydrogen storage, an efficient lightweight fuel cell, a gas management system, peak power augmentation and a complete system controls that can be economically mass produced and comply with all safety environmental and consumer requirements for vehicle applications for the 21st century.{close_quotes} The Conceptual Design for the entire system based upon the selection of an applicable vehicle and performance requirements that are consistent with the PNGV goals will be discussed. A Hydrogen Storage system that has been selected, packaged, and partially tested in accordance with perceived Hydrogen Safety and Infrastructure requirements will be discussed in addition to our Fuel Cell approach along with design of the {open_quotes}real{close_quotes} module. The Gas Management System and the Load Leveling System have been designed and the software programs have been developed and will be discussed along with a complete fuel cell test station that has the capability to test up to a 60 kW fuel cell system.

  13. The EBR-II spent fuel treatment program

    SciTech Connect

    Lineberry, M.J.; McFarlane, H.F.

    1995-12-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has refurbished and equipped an existing hot cell facility for demonstrating a high-temperature electrometallurgical process for treating spent nuclear fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-11. Two waste forms will be produced and qualified for geologic disposal of the fission and activation products. Relatively pure uranium will be separated for storage. Following additional development, transuranium elements will be blended into one of the high-level waste streams. The spent fuel treatment program will help assess the viability of electrometallurgical technology as a spent fuel management option.

  14. Solid Polymer Electrolyte (SPE) fuel cell technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The overall objectives of the Phase IV Solid Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Technology Program were to: (1) establish fuel cell life and performance at temperatures, pressures and current densities significantly higher than those previously demonstrated; (2) provide the ground work for a space energy storage system based on the solid polymer electrolyte technology (i.e., regenerative H2/O2 fuel cell); (3) design, fabricate and test evaluate a full-scale single cell unit. During this phase, significant progress was made toward the accomplishment of these objectives.

  15. Hydrogen Production from Liquid Hydrocarbons Demonstration Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    to naphtha . These hydrogen plant feedstocks have nil sulfur content. End uses for hydrogen include ammonia and methanol manufacture, hydrocracking...steam reformer (HTSR) to convert approximately 55% of the carbon content of the feed logistic fuel to oxides of carbon (carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide...and (2), an autothermal reformer (ATR) to convert the remainder of the hydrocarbon feedstock to a mixture of hydrogen and carbon oxides. Other

  16. 76 FR 67287 - Alternative Fuel Transportation Program; Alternative Fueled Vehicle Credit Program (Subpart F...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-31

    ...DOE today proposes a rule pursuant to the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA), that would revise the allocation of marketable credits under DOE's Alternative Fuel Transportation Program (AFTP or Program), by including EISA-specified electric drive vehicles and investments in qualified alternative fuel infrastructure, nonroad equipment, and relevant emerging technologies. DOE......

  17. Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program. National Program Plan FY 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This FY 1984 National Program Plan for the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) provides specific guidance from the Department of Energy (DOE) for FY 1984 CFRP activities and a baseline for activities in future years. This is the second issue of the Plan, which is updated anually and summarizes program objectives, summary plans and schedules, budget allocations, contractor involvement, and interfaces with other research programs. The National Program Plan is a controlling document for the Technical Program Plan, which is prepared annually by the CFRP at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and is one of the hierarchical group of planning documents. The CFRP is a part of the DOE's program of research and development (R and D) on nuclear fission systems and is directed by the LMFBR Fuel Cycle Projects Division, Office of Spent Fuel Management and Reprocessing Systems at DOE-Headquarters through the Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO). The strategy of the program is to maintain the capability to commit to a breeder option through a strong R and D program on breeder reprocessing and alternate fuels and fuel cycles in order to achieve operating and economic advantages.

  18. Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program: National Program Plan, FY 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    This FY 1983 National Program Plan for the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) provides specific guidance from the Department of Energy (DOE) for FY 1983 CFRP activities and a baseline for future year activities. This initial issue of the Plan, which will be updated annually, summarizes program objectives, summary plans and schedules, budget allocations, contractor involvement, and interfaces with other research programs. The National Program Plan is a controlling document for the Technical Program Plan, which is prepared annually by the CFRP at ORNL and is one of a hierarchical group of planning documents. The CFRP is a part of the DOE's program of research and development (R and D) on nuclear fission systems and is directed by the LMFBR Fuel Cycle Projects Division, Office of Spent Fuel Management and Reprocessing Systems at DOE-Headquarters through the Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO). The strategy of the program is to maintain the capability to commit to a breeder option through a strong R and D program on breeder reprocessing and alternate fuels and fuel cycles to achieve operating and economic advantages.

  19. Low NOx heavy fuel combustor concept program, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutrone, M. B.

    1981-01-01

    Combustion tests were completed with seven concepts, including three rich/lean concepts, three lean/lean concepts, and one catalytic combustor concept. Testing was conducted with ERBS petroleum distillate, petroleum residual, and SRC-II coal-derived liquid fuels over a range of operating conditions for the 12:1 pressure ratio General Electric MS7001E heavy-duty turbine. Blends of ERBS and SRC-II fuels were used to vary fuel properties over a wide range. In addition, pyridine was added to the ERBS and residual fuels to vary nitrogen level while holding other fuel properties constant. Test results indicate that low levels of NOx and fuel-bound nitrogen conversion can be achieved with the rich/lean combustor concepts for fuels with nitrogen contents up to 1.0% by weight. Multinozzle rich/lean Concept 2 demonstrated dry low Nox emissions within 10-15% of the EPA New Source Performance Standards goals for SRC-II fuel, with yields of approximately 15%, while meeting program goals for combustion efficiency, pressure drop, and exhaust gas temperature profile. Similar, if not superior, potential was demonstrated by Concept 3, which is a promising rich/lean combustor design.

  20. Small Scale SOFC Demonstration Using Bio-Based and Fossil Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Petrik, Michael; Ruhl, Robert

    2012-05-01

    Technology Management, Inc. (TMI) of Cleveland, Ohio, has completed the project entitled Small Scale SOFC Demonstration using Bio-based and Fossil Fuels. Under this program, two 1-kW systems were engineered as technology demonstrators of an advanced technology that can operate on either traditional hydrocarbon fuels or renewable biofuels. The systems were demonstrated at Patterson's Fruit Farm of Chesterland, OH and were open to the public during the first quarter of 2012. As a result of the demonstration, TMI received quantitative feedback on operation of the systems as well as qualitative assessments from customers. Based on the test results, TMI believes that > 30% net electrical efficiency at 1 kW on both traditional and renewable fuels with a reasonable entry price is obtainable. The demonstration and analysis provide the confidence that a 1 kW entry-level system offers a viable value proposition, but additional modifications are warranted to reduce sound and increase reliability before full commercial acceptance.

  1. Understanding the Effectiveness of Demonstration Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Allison; Boeving, Emily R.; Shender, Marisa A.; Ross, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    This project sought to understand guest engagement during great ape demonstrations conducted at the "Regenstein Center for African Apes" in the Lincoln Park Zoo. We were interested in how these demonstrations engaged audiences, relative to a non-demonstration-viewing experience, as well as how they compared to each other. In 2012 and…

  2. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Plan (September 2011)

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2011-09-01

    The Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Plan outlines the strategy, activities, and plans of the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, which includes hydrogen and fuel cell activities within the EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Program and the DOE offices of Nuclear Energy, Fossil Energy, and Science.

  3. ATP Interior Noise Technology and Flight Demonstration Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, David G.; Powell, Clemans A.

    1988-01-01

    The paper provides an overview of the ATP (Advanced Turboprop Program) acoustics program with emphasis on the NASA technology program and the recent NASA/Industry demonstration programs aimed at understanding and controlling passenger cabin noise. Technology developments in propeller (source) noise, cabin noise transmission, and subjective acoustics are described. Finally, an overview of the industry demonstrator programs is presented.

  4. Geothermal Energy Research Development and Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    The Federal program's goal, strategy, plans, and achievements are summarized. In addition, geothermal development by state and local governments and, where available, by the private sector is described. (MHR)

  5. The High Stability Engine Control (HISTEC) Program: Flight Demonstration Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLaat, John C.; Southwick, Robert D.; Gallops, George W.; Orme, John S.

    1998-01-01

    Future aircraft turbine engines, both commercial and military, must be able to accommodate expected increased levels of steady-state and dynamic engine-face distortion. The current approach of incorporating sufficient design stall margin to tolerate these increased levels of distortion would significantly reduce performance. The objective of the High Stability Engine Control (HISTEC) program is to design, develop, and flight-demonstrate an advanced, integrated engine control system that uses measurement-based estimates of distortion to enhance engine stability. The resulting distortion tolerant control reduces the required design stall margin, with a corresponding increase in performance and decrease in fuel burn. The HISTEC concept has been developed and was successfully flight demonstrated on the F-15 ACTIVE aircraft during the summer of 1997. The flight demonstration was planned and carried out in two phases, the first to show distortion estimation, and the second to show distortion accommodation. Post-flight analysis shows that the HISTEC technologies are able to successfully estimate and accommodate distortion, transiently setting the stall margin requirement on-line and in real-time. This allows the design stall margin requirement to be reduced, which in turn can be traded for significantly increased performance and/or decreased weight. Flight demonstration of the HISTEC technologies has significantly reduced the risk of transitioning the technology to tactical and commercial engines.

  6. Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program. National Program Plan, FY 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-03-01

    This FY 1985 National Program Plan for the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) provides specific guidance from the Department of Energy (DOE) for FY 1985 CFRP activities and a baseline for activities in future years. This is the third issue of the Plan, which is updated annually and summarizes program objectives, plans, and schedules, budget allocations, contractor involvements, and interfaces with other research programs. The National Program Plan is a controlling document for the Technical Program Plan, which is prepared annually by the CFRP at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and is one of a hierarchical group of planning documents. The CFRP is a part of the DOE's program of research and development (R and D) on nuclear fission systems and is directed by the LMFBR Fuel Cycle Projects Division, Office of Spent Fuel Management and Reprocessing Systems at DOE-Headquarters through the Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO). The strategy of the program is to maintain the capability to commit to a breeder option through a strong fuel cycle R and D program and international technical exchanges.

  7. Methanol fuel vehicle demonstration: Exhaust emission testing. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, J.D.

    1993-07-01

    Ford Motor Company converted four stock 1986 Ford Crown Victoria sedans to methanol flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs). During 143,108 operational miles from 1987 to 1990, the FFVs underwent more than 300 dynamometer driving tests to measure exhaust emissions, catalytic activity, fuel economy, acceleration, and driveability with gasoline and methanol blend fuels. Dynamometer driving tests included the Federal Test Procedure (FTP), the Highway Fuel Economy Test, and the New York City Cycle. Exhaust emission measurements included carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), non- oxygenated hydrocarbons, organic material hydrocarbon equivalent (OMHCE), formaldehyde, and methanol. Catalytic activity was based on exhaust emissions data from active and inactive catalysts. OMHCE, CO, and NO{sub x} were usually lower with M85 (85% methanol, 15% gasoline) than with gasoline for both active and inactive catalysts when initial engine and catalyst temperatures were at or near normal operating temperatures. CO was higher with M85 than with gasoline when initial engine and catalyst temperatures were at or near ambient temperature. Formaldehyde and methanol were higher with M85. Active catalyst FTP OMHCE, CO, and NO{sub x} increased as vehicle mileage increased, but increased less with M85 than with gasoline. Energy based fuel economy remained almost constant with changes in fuel composition and vehicle mileage.

  8. Occupational Therapy Assistants Program. Demonstration Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Board of Health, Madison.

    Between November 1964 and June 1967, 85 women and five men completed a 4-month course held in several Wisconsin locations to prepare them as Certified Occupational Therapy Assistants to (1) plan and direct a general activity or supportive program of occupational therapy, (2) train individual patients in independent performance of activities of…

  9. Renewable Fuel Standard Program (RFS1): Final Rule Additional Resources

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The final rule of fuels and fuel additives: renewable fuel standard program is published on May 1, 2007 and is effective on September 1, 2007. You will find the links to this final rule and technical amendments supporting this rule.

  10. SunLine Leads the Way in Demonstrating Hydrogen-Fueled Bus Technologies (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-01-01

    This brochure describes SunLine Transit Agency's newest advanced technology fuel cell electric bus. SunLine is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Program to evaluate the bus in revenue service. This bus represents the sixth generation of hydrogen-fueled buses that the agency has operated since 2000.

  11. Federal Funds: Fuel Conservation Fellowship Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobowski, Rita Cipalla

    1977-01-01

    To train individuals who might design and implement plans for developing alternative sources of energy like solar or geothermal power, the Office of Education supports graduate fellowships in mining, mineral, and mineral fuel conservation. Describes three projects funded by the fellowship program during the 1976-77 academic year. (Author/RK)

  12. Westinghouse Accident Tolerant Fuel Program

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Peng

    2013-08-21

    The PowerPoint presentation includes a timeline for the program implementation, the technical approach taken, a summary of testing results, a status of task 2, what has been done to share the results so far, and a summary of upcoming work.

  13. Startup, testing, and operation of the Santa Clara 2MW direct carbonate fuel cell demonstration plant

    SciTech Connect

    Skok, A.J.; Leo, A.J.; O`Shea, T.P.

    1996-12-31

    The Santa Clara Demonstration Project (SCDP) is a collaboration between several utility organizations, Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE), and the U.S. Dept. Of Energy aimed at the demonstration of Energy Research Corporation`s (ERC) direct carbonate fuel cell (DFC) technology. ERC has been pursuing the development of the DFC for commercialization near the end of this decade, and this project is an integral part of the ERC commercialization effort. The objective of the Santa Clara Demonstration Project is to provide the first full, commercial scale demonstration of this technology. The approach ERC has taken in the commercialization of the DFC is described in detail elsewhere. An aggressive core technology development program is in place which is focused by ongoing interaction with customers and vendors to optimize the design of the commercial power plant. ERC has selected a 2.85 MW power plant unit for initial market entry. Two ERC subsidiaries are supporting the commercialization effort: the Fuel Cell Manufacturing Corporation (FCMC) and the Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE). FCMC manufactures carbonate stacks and multi-stack modules, currently from its production facility in Torrington, CT. FCE is responsible for power plant design, integration of all subsystems, sales/marketing, and client services. FCE is serving as the prime contractor for the design, construction, and testing of the SCDP Plant. FCMC has manufactured the multi-stack submodules used in the DC power section of the plant. Fluor Daniel Inc. (FDI) served as the architect-engineer subcontractor for the design and construction of the plant and provided support to the design of the multi-stack submodules. FDI is also assisting the ERC companies in commercial power plant design.

  14. Improved night vision demonstrator program status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haran, Terence L.; James, J. Christopher; Roberts, David W.; Knotts, Michael E.; Wasilewski, Anthony A.; West, Leanne L.; Robinson, William G.; Bennett, Gisele

    2007-04-01

    Although existing night vision equipment provides a significant improvement in target detection in low light conditions, there are several limitations that limit their effectiveness. Focus is a significant problem for night vision equipment due to the low f-number optics required to obtain sufficient sensitivity as well as the dynamic nature of night vision applications, which requires frequent focus adjustments. The Georgia Tech Research Institute has developed a prototype next-generation night vision device called the Improved Night Vision Demonstrator (INVD) in order to address these shortfalls. This paper will describe the design of the INVD system as well as an analysis of its performance.

  15. Demonstration of improved vehicle fuel efficiency through innovative tire design, materials, and weight reduction technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Donley, Tim

    2014-12-31

    Cooper completed an investigation into new tire technology using a novel approach to develop and demonstrate a new class of fuel efficient tires using innovative materials technology and tire design concepts. The objective of this work was to develop a new class of fuel efficient tires, focused on the “replacement market” that would improve overall passenger vehicle fuel efficiency by 3% while lowering the overall tire weight by 20%. A further goal of this project was to accomplish the objectives while maintaining the traction and wear performance of the control tire. This program was designed to build on what has already been accomplished in the tire industry for rolling resistance based on the knowledge and general principles developed over the past decades. Cooper’s CS4 (Figure #1) premium broadline tire was chosen as the control tire for this program. For Cooper to achieve the goals of this project, the development of multiple technologies was necessary. Six technologies were chosen that are not currently being used in the tire industry at any significant level, but that showed excellent prospects in preliminary research. This development was divided into two phases. Phase I investigated six different technologies as individual components. Phase II then took a holistic approach by combining all the technologies that showed positive results during phase one development.

  16. Alaska low-rank coal-water fuel -- Diesel demonstration Phase 2: Construction

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W.; Benson, C.; Wilson, R.; Krier, G.; Ruckhaus, M.; Walsh, D.; Ward, C.

    1998-07-01

    The technical feasibility of producing and utilizing a premium low-rank coal-water fuel (LRCWF) made from ultra-low sulfur Alaskan subbituminous coal following hydrothermal treatment (HT) has been demonstrated in pilot plants in Australia, Japan and the US. Preliminary process economics suggest that LRCWF produced from subbituminous coal from the Beluga coal field near Anchorage, Alaska, with measured coal reserves approaching 2 billion tons, would be competitive with heavy oil priced above about $18 per barrel in Japan. Consequently, a consortium led by Usibelli Coal Mine, Inc. (UCM), the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) and Coal-Water Fuel Services (CWFS) was formed to seek funding for a commercial-scale demonstration project to be built at UAF. Arthur D. Little, Inc. (ADL), with support from the US Department of Energy (DOE), led a team that demonstrated the feasibility of using CWFs in medium speed diesel engines. They were awarded funding in DOE's fifth and final Clean Coal Technology Program solicitation to demonstrate the technology at commercial scale in a Maryland utility. Due to reduced power demands, the utility withdrew and project developers sought a new location. ADL was familiar with the potential synergism with the proposed Alaskan LRCWF project and have joined with the Alaskan team to formulate the LRCWF-Diesel Demonstration Project to be located at UAF. Coltec Industries, Fairbanks Morse Engine Division, will provide commercial CWF diesel technology.

  17. NP-MHTGR Fuel Development Program Results

    SciTech Connect

    Maki, John Thomas; Petti, David Andrew; Hobbins, Richard Redfield; McCardell, Richard K.; Shaber, Eric Lee; Southworth, Finis Hio

    2002-10-01

    In August 1988, the Secretary of Energy announced a strategy to acquire New Production Reactor capacity for producing tritium. The strategy involved construction of a New Production Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (NP-MHTGR) where the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) was selected as the Management and Operations contractor for the project. Immediately after the announcement in August 1988, tritium target particle development began with the INEEL selected as the lead laboratory. Fuel particle development was initially not considered to be on a critical path for the project, therefore, the fuel development program was to run concurrently with the design effort of the NP-MHTGR.

  18. HTGR Spent Fuel Treatment Program. HTGR Spent Fuel Treatment Development Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    The spent fuel treatment (SFT) program plan addresses spent fuel volume reduction, packaging, storage, transportation, fuel recovery, and disposal to meet the needs of the HTGR Lead Plant and follow-on plants. In the near term, fuel refabrication will be addressed by following developments in fresh fuel fabrication and will be developed in the long term as decisions on the alternatives dictate. The formulation of this revised program plan considered the implications of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA) which, for the first time, established a definitive national policy for management and disposal of nuclear wastes. Although the primary intent of the program is to address technical issues, the divergence between commercial and government interests, which arises as a result of certain provisions of the NWPA, must be addressed in the economic assessment of technically feasible alternative paths in the management of spent HTGR fuel and waste. This new SFT program plan also incorporates a significant cooperative research and development program between the United States and the Federal Republic of Germany. The major objective of this international program is to reduce costs by avoiding duplicate efforts.

  19. Gas turbine demonstration of pyrolysis: derived fuels. Third technical progress report, July 1, 1979-December 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Jasas, G.; Kasper, J.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this program is to demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing pyrolytic oil and char as a fuel for a combustion turbine engine. This is the first phase of an extended program with the ultimate goal of commercializing a gas turbine engine and electrical generating system which is independent of petroleum-based fuels. Maximum use of existing technology and current production engine hardware (Teledyne CAE Model J69-T-29 Turbojet Engine) is being incorporated for a sequence of test evaluations rating from isolated combustor component tests to full scale engine demonstration tests. The technical goals to be achieved during the course of this project are: pyrolytic fuel characterization in terms of its properties and constituents; pyrolytic fuel combustion technology in gas turbine application in terms of pyrolytic oil atomization, quantity of char burned, emissions, performance and associated combustion system aerothermodynamics; pyrolytic fuel (oil and char slurry) handling, mixing, and storage technology; and engine materials compatibility with the the pyrolytic fuel and its combustion products. Progress achieved during the period from July 1979 through Deember 1981 in design, analysis, an project management hardware fabrication and procurement, fuel chemistry and properties, and combustor rig tests are summarized.

  20. Fuel cell systems program plan, Fiscal year 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    Goal of the fuel cell program is to increase energy efficiency and economic effectiveness through development and commercialization of fuel cell systems which operate on fossil fuels in multiple end use sectors. DOE is participating with the private sector in sponsoring development of molten carbonate fuel cells and solid oxide fuel cells for application in the utility, commercial, and industrial sectors. Commercialization of phosphoric acid fuel cells is well underway. Besides the introduction, this document is divided into: goal/objectives, program strategy, technology description, technical status, program description/implementation, coordinated fuel cell activities, and international activities.

  1. The whole-core LEU silicide fuel demonstration in the JMTR

    SciTech Connect

    Aso, Tomokazu; Akashi, Kazutomo; Nagao, Yoshiharu

    1997-08-01

    The JMTR was fully converted to LEU silicide (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) fuel with cadmium wires as burnable absorber in January, 1994. The reduced enrichment program for the JMTR was initiated in 1979, and the conversion to MEU (enrichment ; 45%) aluminide fuel was carried out in 1986 as the first step of the program. The final goal of the program was terminated by the present LEU conversion. This paper describes the results of core physics measurement through the conversion phase from MEU fuel core to LEU fuel core. Measured excess reactivities of the LEU fuel cores are mostly in good agreement with predicted values. Reactivity effect and burnup of cadmium wires, therefore, were proved to be well predicted. Control rod worth in the LEU fuel core is mostly less than that in the MEU fuel core. Shutdown margin was verified to be within the safety limit. There is no significant difference in temperature coefficient of reactivity between the MEU and LEU fuel cores. These results verified that the JMTR was successfully and safely converted to LEU fuel. Extension of the operating cycle period was achieved and reduction of spend fuel elements is expected by using the fuel with high uranium density.

  2. Network Analysis of a Demonstration Program for the Developmentally Disabled

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredericks, Kimberly A.

    2005-01-01

    This chapter presents the findings from a network analysis of a demonstration program for the developmentally disabled to show the application of graphical network analysis in program evaluation. The developmentally disabled demonstration (DDD) program was a five-year pilot project to provide person-centered service environments to people with …

  3. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM ANAEROBIC DIGESTER GAS - PHASE I. CONCEPTUAL DESIGN, PRELIMINARY COST, AND EVALUATION STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses Phase I (a conceptual design, preliminary cost, and evaluation study) of a program to demonstrate the recovery of energy from waste methane produced by anaerobic digestion of waste water treatment sludge. The fuel cell is being used for this application becau...

  4. A decision analysis framework to support long-term planning for nuclear fuel cycle technology research, development, demonstration and deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Sowder, A.G.; Machiels, A.J.; Dykes, A.A.; Johnson, D.H.

    2013-07-01

    To address challenges and gaps in nuclear fuel cycle option assessment and to support research, develop and demonstration programs oriented toward commercial deployment, EPRI (Electric Power Research Institute) is seeking to develop and maintain an independent analysis and assessment capability by building a suite of assessment tools based on a platform of software, simplified relationships, and explicit decision-making and evaluation guidelines. As a demonstration of the decision-support framework, EPRI examines a relatively near-term fuel cycle option, i.e., use of reactor-grade mixed-oxide fuel (MOX) in U.S. light water reactors. The results appear as a list of significant concerns (like cooling of spent fuels, criticality risk...) that have to be taken into account for the final decision.

  5. Energy efficient engine program contributions to aircraft fuel conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batterton, P. G.

    1984-01-01

    Significant advances in high bypass turbofan technologies that enhance fuel efficiency have been demonstrated in the NASA Energy Efficient Engine Program. This highly successful second propulsion element of the NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency Program included major contract efforts with both General Electric and Pratt & Whitney. Major results of these efforts will be presented including highlights from the NASA/General Electric E3 research turbofan engine test. Direct application of all the E3 technologies could result in fuel savings of over 18% compared to the CF6-50 and JT9D-7. Application of the E3 technologies to new and derivative engines such as the CF6-80C and PW 2037, as well as others, will be discussed. Significant portions of the fuel savings benefit for these new products can be directly related to the E3 technology program. Finally, results of a study looking at far term advanced turbofan engines will be briefly described. The study shows that substantial additional fuel savings over E3 are possible with additional turbofan technology programs.

  6. Automotive fuel economy and emissions program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowdy, M. W.; Baisley, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental data were generated to support an assessment of the relationship between automobile fuel economy and emissions control systems. Tests were made at both the engine and vehicle levels. Detailed investigations were made on cold-start emissions devices, exhaust gas recirculation systems, and air injection reactor systems. Based on the results of engine tests, an alternative emission control system and modified control strategy were implemented and tested in the vehicle. With the same fuel economy and NOx emissions as the stock vehicle, the modified vehicle reduced HC and CO emissions by about 20 percent. By removing the NOx emissions constraint, the modified vehicle demonstrated about 12 percent better fuel economy than the stock vehicle.

  7. Final Technical Report: Residential Fuel Cell Demonstration by the Delaware County Electric Cooperative, Inc.

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Hilson Schneider

    2007-06-06

    This demonstration project contributes to the knowledge base in the area of fuel cells in stationary applications, propane fuel cells, edge-of-grid applications for fuel cells, and energy storage in combination with fuel cells. The project demonstrated that it is technically feasible to meet the whole-house electrical energy needs of a typical upstate New York residence with a 5-kW fuel cell in combination with in-home energy storage without any major modifications to the residence or modifications to the consumption patterns of the residents of the home. The use of a fuel cell at constant output power through a 120-Volt inverter leads to system performance issues including: • relatively poor power quality as quantified by the IEEE-defined short term flicker parameter • relatively low overall system efficiency Each of these issues is discussed in detail in the text of this report. The fuel cell performed well over the 1-year demonstration period in terms of availability and efficiency of conversion from chemical energy (propane) to electrical energy at the fuel cell output terminals. Another strength of fuel cell performance in the demonstration was the low requirements for maintenance and repair on the fuel cell. The project uncovered a new and important installation consideration for propane fuel cells. Alcohol added to new propane storage tanks is preferentially absorbed on the surface of some fuel cell reformer desulfurization filters. The experience on this project indicates that special attention must be paid to the volume and composition of propane tank additives. Size, composition, and replacement schedules for the de-sulfurization filter bed should be adjusted to account for propane tank additives to avoid sulfur poisoning of fuel cell stacks. Despite good overall technical performance of the fuel cell and the whole energy system, the demonstration showed that such a system is not economically feasible as compared to other commercially available

  8. Fuel Cell Vehicle Learning Demonstration: Spring 2008 Results; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Garbak, J.

    2008-04-01

    Conference paper presented at the 2008 National Hydrogen Association Meeting that describes the spring, 2008 results of the Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project.

  9. Optimization and Demonstration of a Solid Oxide Regenerative Fuel Cell System

    SciTech Connect

    James F. McElroy; Darren B. Hickey; Fred Mitlitsky

    2006-09-30

    Single cell solid oxide regenerative fuel cells (SORFCs) have been demonstrated for over 1000 hours of operation at degradation rates as low as 0.5% per thousand hours for current densities as high as 300mA/cm{sup 2}. Efficiency levels (fuel cell power out vs. electrolysis power in) have been demonstrated in excess of 80% at 100mA/cm{sup 2}. All testing has been performed with metallic based interconnects and non-noble metal electrodes in order to limit fabrication costs for commercial considerations. The SORFC cell technology will be scaled up to a 1kW sized stack which will be demonstrated in Year 2 of the program. A self contained SORFC system requires efficient thermal management in order to maintain operating temperatures during exothermic and endothermic operational modes. The use of LiF as a phase change material (PCM) was selected as the optimum thermal storage medium by virtue of its superior thermal energy density by volume. Thermal storage experiments were performed using LiF and a simulated SORFC stack. The thermal storage concept was deemed to be technically viable for larger well insulated systems, although it would not enable a high efficiency thermally self-sufficient SORFC system at the 1 kW level.

  10. Caterpillar MorElectric DOE Idle Reduction Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect

    John Bernardi

    2007-09-30

    This project titled 'Demonstration of the New MorElectric{trademark} Technology as an Idle Reduction Solution' is one of four demonstration projects awarded by the US Department of Energy in 2002. The goal of these demonstration and evaluation projects was to gather objective in-use information on the performance of available idle reduction technologies by characterizing the cost; fuel, maintenance, and engine life savings; payback; and user impressions of various systems and techniques. In brief, the Caterpillar Inc. project involved applying electrically driven accessories for cab comfort during engine-off stops and for reducing fuel consumption during on-highway operation. Caterpillar had equipped and operated five new trucks with the technology in conjunction with International Truck and Engine Corporation and COX Transfer. The most significant result of the project was a demonstrated average idle reduction of 13.8% for the 5 truck MEI fleet over the control fleet. It should be noted that the control fleet trucks were also equipped with an idle reduction device that would start and stop the main engine automatically in order to maintain cab temperature. The control fleet idle usage would have been reduced by 3858 hours over the 2 year period with the MEI system installed, or approximately 2315 gallons of fuel less (calculations assume a fuel consumption of 0.6 gallons per hour for the 13 liter engine at idle). The fuel saved will be significantly larger for higher displacement engines without idle reduction equipment such as the engine auto start/stop device used by COX Transfer. It is common for engines to consume 1.0 gallons per hour which would increase the fuel savings to approximately 1260 gallons per truck per year of typical idling (1800 hours idle/yr).

  11. Fuel-performance-improvement program. Semiannual progress report, October 1980-March 1981. [Sphere-pac and annular-coated-pressurized

    SciTech Connect

    Crouthamel, C E; Freshley, M D

    1981-04-01

    Progress on the Fuel Performance Improvement Program's fuel test and demonstration irradiations is reported for the period of October 1980-March 1981. The purpose of the program is to test and demonstrate improved light water reactor fuel concepts that are more resistant to failure from pellet-cladding interaction during power increases than standard pellet fuel. This would also offer extended burnup potential and, hence, improved uranium utilization.

  12. Bluetooth wireless monitoring, diagnosis and calibration interface for control system of fuel cell bus in Olympic demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Jianfeng; Lin, Xinfan; Xu, Liangfei; Li, Jianqiu; Ouyang, Minggao

    With the worldwide deterioration of the natural environment and the fossil fuel crisis, the possible commercialization of fuel cell vehicles has become a hot topic. In July 2008, Beijing started a clean public transportation plan for the 29th Olympic games. Three fuel cell city buses and 497 other low-emission vehicles are now serving the Olympic core area and Beijing urban areas. The fuel cell buses will operate along a fixed bus line for 1 year as a public demonstration of green energy vehicles. Due to the specialized nature of fuel cell engines and electrified power-train systems, measurement, monitoring and calibration devices are indispensable. Based on the latest Bluetooth wireless technology, a novel Bluetooth universal data interface was developed for the control system of the fuel cell city bus. On this platform, a series of wireless portable control auxiliary systems have been implemented, including wireless calibration, a monitoring system and an in-system programming platform, all of which are ensuring normal operation of the fuel cell buses used in the demonstration.

  13. Broad specification fuels combustion technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodds, W. J.; Ekstedt, E. E.

    1984-01-01

    Design and development efforts to evolve promising aircraft gas turbine combustor configurations for burning broadened-properties fuels were discussed. Design and experimental evaluations of three different combustor concepts in sector combustor rig tests was conducted. The combustor concepts were a state of the art single-annular combustor, a staged double-annular combustor, and a short single-annular combustor with variable geometry to control primary zone stoichiometry. A total of 25 different configurations of the three combustor concepts were evaluated. Testing was conducted over the full range of CF6-80A engine combustor inlet conditions, using four fuels containing between 12% and 14% hydrogen by weight. Good progress was made toward meeting specific program emissions and performance goals with each of the three combustor concepts. The effects of reduced fuel hydrogen content, including increased flame radiation, liner metal temperature, smoke, and NOx emissions were documented. The most significant effect on the baseline combustor was a projected 33% life reduction, for a reduction from 14% to 13% fuel hydrogen content, due to increased liner temperatures.

  14. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) PROGRAM CASE STUDIES: DEMONSTRATING PROGRAM OUTCOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program evaluates the performance of innovative air, water, pollution prevention and monitoring technologies that have the potential to improve human health and the environment. This bookle...

  15. Environmental Technology Verification Program - ETV - Case Studies: Demonstrating Program Outcomes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program evaluates the performance of innovative air, water, pollution prevention and monitoring technologies that have the potential to improve human health and the environment. This cd con...

  16. Vision for the development of an international nuclear fuel recycling program

    SciTech Connect

    Kok, Kenneth D.

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of the development of an international nuclear fuel recycle program is to: - Demonstrate advanced recycling by working to prove the technologies needed to close the fuel cycle, minimize waste, and obtain more energy benefit for each unit of fuel. - Build a global vision by enlisting partners to limit the spread of sensitive nuclear technologies in a way that enables nuclear power to meet global challenges. The program will begin with the establishment of a smaller scale secure fuel cycle facility that would serve as a model for international nuclear fuel reprocessing centers that would eventually be built in several countries world wide. The operating process plants will provide the secure and safe guarded environment for the recycle of spent fuel from nuclear power stations around the world. The demonstration site will provide for developing and testing processes that would lead to the more complete use of the energy available in nuclear fuels and the minimization of long lived nuclear waste. (author)

  17. Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration Results. Fourth Report

    SciTech Connect

    Eudy, Leslie; Post, Matthew

    2015-07-02

    This report presents results of a demonstration of fuel cell electric buses (FCEB) operating in Oakland, California. Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit) leads the Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) demonstration, which includes 12 advanced-design fuel cell buses and two hydrogen fueling stations. The FCEBs in service at AC Transit are 40-foot, low-floor buses built by Van Hool with a hybrid electric propulsion system that includes a US Hybrid fuel cell power system and EnerDel lithium-based energy storage system. The buses began revenue service in May 2010.

  18. Fourth annual report to Congress, Federal Alternative Motor Fuels Programs

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This annual report to Congress presents the current status of the alternative fuel vehicle programs being conducted across the country in accordance with the Alternative Motor Fuels Act of 1988. These programs, which represent the most comprehensive data collection effort ever undertaken on alternative fuels, are beginning their fifth year. This report summarizes tests and results from the fourth year.

  19. ULTRA-CLEAN FISCHER-TROPSCH FUELS PRODUCTION AND DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Bergin

    2003-10-17

    The Syntroleum plant is mechanically complete and currently undergoing start-up. The fuel production and demonstration plan is near completion. The study on the impact of small footprint plant (SFP) fuel on engine performance is about half-completed. Cold start testing has been completed. Preparations have been completed for testing the fuel in diesel electric generators in Alaska. Preparations are in progress for testing the fuel in bus fleets at Denali National Park and the Washington Metropolitan Transit Authority. The experiments and analyses conducted during this project show that Fischer-Tropsch (FT) gas-to-liquid diesel fuel can easily be used in a diesel engine with little to no modifications. Additionally, based on the results and discussion presented, further improvements in performance and emissions can be realized by configuring the engine to take advantage of FT diesel fuel's properties. The FT fuel also shows excellent cold start properties and enabled the engine tested to start at more the ten degrees than traditional fuels would allow. This plant produced through this project will produce large amounts of FT fuel. This will allow the fuel to be tested extensively, in current, prototype, and advanced diesel engines. The fuel may also contribute to the nation's energy security. The military has expressed interest in testing the fuel in aircraft and ground vehicles.

  20. 45 CFR 2532.10 - Military Installation Conversion Demonstration programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Military Installation Conversion Demonstration programs. 2532.10 Section 2532.10 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE INNOVATIVE AND SPECIAL DEMONSTRATION PROGRAMS §...

  1. Advanced technology lightweight fuel cell program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    The potential of the alkaline electrolyte fuel cell as the power source in a multi hundred kilowatt orbital energy storage system was studied. The total system weight of an electrolysis cell energy storage system was determined. The tests demonstrated: (1) the performance stability of a platinum on carbon anode catalyst configuration after 5000 hours of testing has no loss in performance; (2) capability of the alkaline fuel cell to operate to a cyclical load profile; (3) suitability of a lightweight graphite electrolyte reservoir plate for use in the alkaline fuel cell; (4) long life potential of a hybrid polysulfone cell edge frame construction; and (5) long term stability of a fiber reinforced potassium titanate matrix structure. The power section tested operates with passive water removal eliminating the requirement for a dynamic hydrogen pump water separator thereby allowing a powerplant design with reduced weight, lower parasite power, and a potential for high reliability and extended endurance. It is concluded that two perovskites are unsuitable for use as a catalyst or as a catalyst support at the cathode of an alkaline fuel cell.

  2. The DOE Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program

    SciTech Connect

    David Petti; Hans Gougar; Gary Bell

    2005-05-01

    The Department of Energy has established the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program to address the following overall goals: Provide a baseline fuel qualification data set in support of the licensing and operation of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). Gas-reactor fuel performance demonstration and qualification comprise the longest duration research and development (R&D) task for the NGNP feasibility. The baseline fuel form is to be demonstrated and qualified for a peak fuel centerline temperature of 1250°C. Support near-term deployment of an NGNP by reducing market entry risks posed by technical uncertainties associated with fuel production and qualification. Utilize international collaboration mechanisms to extend the value of DOE resources. The Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program consists of five elements: fuel manufacture, fuel and materials irradiations, postirradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing, fuel performance modeling, and fission product transport and source term evaluation. An underlying theme for the fuel development work is the need to develop a more complete fundamental understanding of the relationship between the fuel fabrication process, key fuel properties, the irradiation performance of the fuel, and the release and transport of fission products in the NGNP primary coolant system. Fuel performance modeling and analysis of the fission product behavior in the primary circuit are important aspects of this work. The performance models are considered essential for several reasons, including guidance for the plant designer in establishing the core design and operating limits, and demonstration to the licensing authority that the applicant has a thorough understanding of the in-service behavior of the fuel system. The fission product behavior task will also provide primary source term data needed for licensing. An overview of the program and recent progress will be presented.

  3. 75 FR 79964 - Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: Modifications to Renewable Fuel Standard Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-21

    ...EPA is finalizing amendments to certain of the Renewable Fuel Standard program regulations that were published on March 26, 2010, and that took effect on July 1, 2010 (``the RFS2 regulations''). Following publication of the RFS2 regulations, promulgated in response to the requirements of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, EPA discovered some technical errors and areas within the......

  4. 75 FR 26025 - Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: Modifications to Renewable Fuel Standard Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-10

    ...EPA is taking direct final action to amend certain of the Renewable Fuel Standard program regulations published on March 26, 2010, that are scheduled to take effect on July 1, 2010 (the ``RFS2 regulations''). Following publication of the RFS2 regulations, promulgated in response to the requirements of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, EPA discovered some technical errors and......

  5. Fuel cell systems program plan: Fiscal year 1988

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1988-05-01

    The DOE fuel cell program supports high-risk, high-payoff technology development. This provides industry with the capability to develop and apply fuel cell systems that use conventional and alternative hydrocarbon fuels. The principal DOE fuel cell program goal is to develop cost effective, efficient, and environmentally benign fuel cell systems which will operate on coal-based fuels (and dual fuels: coal and gas) in multiple end use sectors. In the near-term, and as an interim step in achieving this goal, distillate fuel and natural fuel cell system technologies will also be developed. This interim step is a logical progression to the more complex coal-fueled systems and provides a marketable gas-fueled technology. The specific near- to mid-term (mid-1990s) objectives are to develop the key fuel cell technology for phosphoric acid, molten carbonate, and solid oxide fuel cell systems, and to evaluate and conduct research on more advanced fuel cell concepts that would further improve technical and economic performance. Advanced fuel cell concepts may in the long-term (post 2000) offer potential for use in additional applications such as in the transportation and residential sectors. In these applications oil could be displaced by fuel cell systems using fuels derived from coal.

  6. Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Program

    SciTech Connect

    Horner, M.W.; Ekstedt, E.E.; Gal, E.; Jackson, M.R.; Kimura, S.G.; Lavigne, R.G.; Lucas, C.; Rairden, J.R.; Sabla, P.E.; Savelli, J.F.; Slaughter, D.M.; Spiro, C.L.; Staub, F.W.

    1989-02-01

    The objective of the original Request for Proposal was to establish the technological bases necessary for the subsequent commercial development and deployment of advanced coal-fueled gas turbine power systems by the private sector. The offeror was to identify the specific application or applications, toward which his development efforts would be directed; define and substantiate the technical, economic, and environmental criteria for the selected application; and conduct such component design, development, integration, and tests as deemed necessary to fulfill this objective. Specifically, the offeror was to choose a system through which ingenious methods of grouping subcomponents into integrated systems accomplishes the following: (1) Preserve the inherent power density and performance advantages of gas turbine systems. (2) System must be capable of meeting or exceeding existing and expected environmental regulations for the proposed application. (3) System must offer a considerable improvement over coal-fueled systems which are commercial, have been demonstrated, or are being demonstrated. (4) System proposed must be an integrated gas turbine concept, i.e., all fuel conditioning, all expansion gas conditioning, or post-expansion gas cleaning, must be integrated into the gas turbine system.

  7. CETA Demonstration Provides Lessons On Implementing Youth Programs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-08

    CETA DEMONSTRATION PROVIDES LESSONS ON IMPLEMENTING YOUTH PROR--ETC(U) UNCLASSIFIED GAO/HRD-81-1N L mommmmmmmmm mmEmmmmmmmmmEE -m mmm EE EE...ress OF THE UNITED STATES ’ CETA Demonstration Provides N Lessons On Implementing ! Youth Programs The Youth Incentive Entitlement Pilot Proj- ects was...D: t , ap c jal vim ,.." COMPTROLLER GENERAL’S CETA DEMONSTRATION PROVIDES REPORT TO THE CONGRESS LESSONS ON IMPLEMENTING YOUTH PROGRAMS The

  8. Emergency fuels utilization guidebook. Alternative Fuels Utilization Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    The basic concept of an emergency fuel is to safely and effectively use blends of specification fuels and hydrocarbon liquids which are free in the sense that they have been commandeered or volunteered from lower priority uses to provide critical transportation services for short-duration emergencies on the order of weeks, or perhaps months. A wide variety of liquid hydrocarbons not normally used as fuels for internal combustion engines have been categorized generically, including limited information on physical characteristics and chemical composition which might prove useful and instructive to fleet operators. Fuels covered are: gasoline and diesel fuel; alcohols; solvents; jet fuels; kerosene; heating oils; residual fuels; crude oils; vegetable oils; gaseous fuels.

  9. HYDROGEN-OXYGEN PRIMARY EXTRATERRESTRIAL (HOPE) FUEL CELL PROGRAM

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The HOPE (Hydrogen-Oxygen Primary Extraterrestrial) Fuel Cell Program is a multi-phase effort to advance the state-of-the-art of fuel cells by...configuration fuel cell module. The HOPE spacecraft, fuel supply tanks, pneumatics, and thermal systems were designed and fabricated to provide...verify water removal, thermal design, and 30-day shelf-life of the fuel cell . The 35-cell module was subjected to a series of performance tests

  10. Tubular solid oxide fuel cell development program

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Westinghouse Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) development activities and current program status. The Westinghouse goal is to develop a cost effective cell that can operate for 50,000 to 100,000 hours. Progress toward this goal will be discussed and test results presented for multiple single cell tests which have now successfully exceeded 56,000 hours of continuous power operation at temperature. Results of development efforts to reduce cost and increase power output of tubular SOFCs are described.

  11. Final Rule for Additional Qualifying Renewable Fuel Pathways Documents under the Renewable Fuel Standard Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is issuing a supplemental final rule associated with the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) program, determining that renewable fuel made from giant reed (Arundo donax) and napier grass (Pennisetum purpureum) meet the GHG reduction requirements

  12. Non-Flow-Through Fuel Cell System Test Results and Demonstration on the SCARAB Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheidegger, Brianne; Burke, Kenneth; Jakupca, Ian

    2012-01-01

    This presentation describes the results of the demonstration of a non-flow-through PEM fuel cell as part of a power system on the SCARAB rover at the NASA Glenn Research Center. A 16-cell non-flow-through fuel cell stack from Infinity Fuel Cell and Hydrogen, Inc. was incorporated into a power system designed to act as a range extender by providing power to the SCARAB rover s hotel loads. The power system, including the non-flow-through fuel cell technology, successfully demonstrated its goal as a range extender by powering hotel loads on the SCARAB rover, making this demonstration the first to use the non-flow-through fuel cell technology on a mobile platform.

  13. Non-Flow-Through Fuel Cell System Test Results and Demonstration on the SCARAB Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheidegger, Brianne, T.; Burke, Kenneth A.; Jakupca, Ian J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the results of the demonstration of a non-flow-through PEM fuel cell as part of a power system on the SCARAB rover. A 16-cell non-flow-through fuel cell stack from Infinity Fuel Cell and Hydrogen, Inc. was incorporated into a power system designed to act as a range extender by providing power to the rover s hotel loads. This work represents the first attempt at a ground demonstration of this new technology aboard a mobile test platform. Development and demonstration were supported by the Office of the Chief Technologist s Space Power Systems Project and the Advanced Exploration System Modular Power Systems Project.

  14. Alaska low-rank coal-water fuel diesel demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, C.; Wilson, R.; Walsh, D.; Ward, C.; Willson, W.

    1997-12-31

    A Coal-Water Fuel (CWF)-Diesel Demonstration Project developed by ADLittle (ADL) and Cooper-Energy Systems (CES) was selected for funding in US Dept. of Energy`s (DOE`s) Clean Coal Technology Program (CCT). The $38.3 million demonstration was originally planned for a utility in Maryland using CWF made from cleaned Ohio bituminous coal. When the host utility withdrew from the project, the sponsors sought a new location. During this time the technical feasibility of producing a premium low-rank coal-water fuel (LRCWF) from hydrothermally treated (HT) ultra-low S Alaskan subbituminous coal had been demonstrated at the pilot-scale. Since preliminary cost analyses showed Alaskan LRCWF to be competitive with Chinese bituminous CWF and oil priced at about $18 per barrel, an Alaskan consortium was seeking funding for a commercial-scale LRCWF demonstration project proposed for the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF). Since the engine developers at CES were already familiar with the features of LRCWF, the projects were combined and DOE approved relocating the LRCWF-Diesel CCT Project to UAF. The combined project will feature a 6.3 MWe diesel generation set with advanced emission controls capable of operating with either LRCWF or diesel, an oil-designed boiler also modified to use LRCWF or oil, and a nominal 120 tpd LRCWF production plant. Key project objectives are to develop commercial-scale LRCWF production costs, determine derating requirements and deratings for oil-designed boilers fired with LRCWF and to operate a LRCWF-fired diesel engine long enough to establish operating and wear characteristics.

  15. Fuel Cell Power Plant Initiative. Volume 1; Solid Oxide Fuel Cell/Logistics Fuel Processor 27 kWe Power System Demonstration for ARPA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veyo, S.E.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the successful testing of a 27 kWe Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) generator fueled by natural gas and/or a fuel gas produced by a brassboard logistics fuel preprocessor (LFP). The test period began on May 24, 1995 and ended on February 26, 1996 with the successful completion of all program requirements and objectives. During this time period, this power system produced 118.2 MWh of electric power. No degradation of the generator's performance was measured after 5582 accumulated hours of operation on these fuels: local natural gas - 3261 hours, jet fuel reformate gas - 766 hours, and diesel fuel reformate gas - 1555 hours. This SOFC generator was thermally cycled from full operating temperature to room temperature and back to operating temperature six times, because of failures of support system components and the occasional loss of test site power, without measurable cell degradation. Numerous outages of the LFP did not interrupt the generator's operation because the fuel control system quickly switched to local natural gas when an alarm indicated that the LFP reformate fuel supply had been interrupted. The report presents the measured electrical performance of the generator on all three fuel types and notes the small differences due to fuel type. Operational difficulties due to component failures are well documented even though they did not affect the overall excellent performance of this SOFC power generator. The final two appendices describe in detail the LFP design and the operating history of the tested brassboard LFP.

  16. The Canadian fuel cell R&D program

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, N.R.; Hammerli, M.

    1996-12-31

    This paper gives an overview of the Canadian Fuel Cell R&D Program (CFCP). The program includes both mobile and stationary applications. It is based on Canadian as well as other fuel cell technologies. The Canadian fuel cell technologies comprise the development of the Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell (PEFC) of Ballard Power Systems Inc., as well as the Alkaline Fuel Cell of Astris Inc. Materials development issues are an important element of the Program. An outstanding example is the creation of the new BAM3G membrane technology of Ballard Advanced Materials in support of the Canadian PEFC technology. Finally, some system successes will be highlighted.

  17. Second-Generation Fuel Cell Stack Durability and Freeze Capability from National FCV Learning Demonstration (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Garbak, J.

    2009-11-18

    This presentation provides information about the objectives and partners of the National Fuel Cell Vehicle Learning Demonstration, the status of vehicle and station deployment, and results of vehicle and infrastructure analysis.

  18. Demonstration of a fuel-saving system for paint-curing ovens

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, W P

    1980-12-01

    Two curing ovens at Roll Coater, Inc. (the Greenfield, Indiana plant) were retrofitted to save fuel and cost. Included in the fuel conserving retrofit was the design, fabrication, and installation of an afterburner for each of the two ovens, piping their combustion products to each of two commonly housed waste heat boilers before discharge from those units to the atmosphere at about 450 F. Depending on the product being run and the coating applied, natural gas requirements have been reduced by 45 to 65% with operation of the zone incinerators only and by as much as 65 to 85% including the effects of both the zone incineration and heat recovery by means of the afterburners and waste heat boilers. A demonstration program on conversion work at the No. 3 line at Greenfield and results are described in Section 2. Section 3 describes the retrofit design and the system construction. System performance (tests and measurements, qualitative performance, maintenance factors, and economic performance) is described in Section 4. Conclusions and recommendations are summarized.

  19. DoD Climate Change Fuel Cell Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Olsen

    2006-09-15

    This report discusses the first year of operation of a fuel cell power plant located at the Ocean County College, Toms River, New Jersey. PPL EnergyPlus, LLC installed the plant under a contract with Ocean County College. A DFC{reg_sign}300 fuel cell, manufactured by Fuel Cell Energy, Inc. of Danbury, CT was selected for the project. The fuel cell successfully operated from January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2004. This report discusses the performance of the plant during this period. Ocean County College's decision to contract for use of a fuel cell at the college reflects the institution's commitment to managing energy costs, exercising environmental leadership, and leveraging innovative technologies to accomplish its energy and environmental goals. Ocean County College's director of facilities was interested in finding new energy cost reduction opportunities that could build on the institution's growing reputation for commitment to energy efficiency and environmental quality while exploring new technologies. This combination of goals positioned Ocean County College to value the prospect of installing a fuel cell as a demonstration project that could deliver on its commitment. PPL EnergyPlus, LLC developed the project and Millennium Builders, a PPL company, was chosen as the general contractor for the project. PPL and Ocean County College worked very closely with Jersey Central Power and Light (JCP&L) and New Jersey Natural Gas (NJNG) Company to assure integration of the fuel cell with the local utilities. The 250 kW molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) and its balance of plant is contained in an all-weather container located just outside the college's Instructional Building on a cement pad in a fenced-in 30 x 50 foot area in close proximity to the college's boiler and electrical rooms. Cables and piping bring power and hot water from the fuel cell into these interior control areas. The unit's electrical output is fed onto the college's main circuit while the hot water

  20. Web Cast on Arsenic Demonstration Program: Lessons Learned

    EPA Science Inventory

    Web cast presentation covered 10 Lessons Learned items selected from the Arsenic Demonstration Program with supporting information. The major items discussed include system design and performance items and the cost of the technologies.

  1. EPAct Alternative Fuel Transporation Program - State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets: Frequently Asked Questions

    SciTech Connect

    2010-03-01

    Factsheet answering frequently asked questions about the U.S. Department of Energy's Alternative Fuel Transportation Program (the Program) that implements provisions of Titles III–V of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct). Answers to questions that are frequently asked about the Program by managers of state government and alternative fuel provider fleets are provided in the factsheet.

  2. Ultra-Clean Fischer-Tropsch Fuels Production and Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Bergin

    2005-10-14

    The Report Abstract provides summaries of the past year's activities relating to each of the main project objectives. Some of the objectives will be expanded on in greater detail further down in the report. The following objectives have their own addition sections in the report: Dynamometer Durability Testing, the Denali Bus Fleet Demonstration, Bus Fleet Demonstrations Emissions Analysis, Impact of SFP Fuel on Engine Performance, Emissions Analysis, Feasibility Study of SFPs for Rural Alaska, and Cold Weather Testing of Ultra Clean Fuel.

  3. Analysis of code related responses from the solar demonstration program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-01-01

    The building regulatory information gathered during the course of the Residential Solar Demonstration Program from inception of the program through September 30, 1978 is documented. It is concluded that existing codes do not present a barrier to the installation and acceptance of solar systems; however, code officials need additional training and better back-up material to properly evaluate solar systems.

  4. 2011 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program (Book)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-11-01

    In the past year, the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program (the Program) made substantial progress toward its goals and objectives. The Program has conducted comprehensive and focused efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in diverse sectors of the economy. With emphasis on applications that will effectively strengthen our nation's energy security and improve our stewardship of the environment, the Program engages in research, development, and demonstration of critical improvements in the technologies. Highlights of the Program's accomplishments can be found in the sub-program chapters of this report.

  5. Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration Results: Fifth Report

    SciTech Connect

    Eudy, Leslie; Post, Matthew; Jeffers, Matthew

    2016-06-01

    This report presents results of a demonstration of fuel cell electric buses (FCEB) operating in Oakland, California. Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit) leads the Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) demonstration, which includes 13 advanced-design fuel cell buses and two hydrogen fueling stations. The ZEBA partners are collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the buses in revenue service. NREL has published four previous reports describing operation of these buses. This report presents new and updated results covering data from January 2015 through December 2015.

  6. Demonstrate fuel disassembly/encapsulation. Technical progress report, April 1981-June 1981

    SciTech Connect

    1981-08-03

    Work on this project is focused on demonstrating disassembly and encapsulation of nuclear fuels as a means to increase spent fuel storage. The effort commenced on April 17, 1980, and is progressing satisfactorily. The Equipment/Procedure Preparation sub-task is essentially complete. The Equipment Demonstration sub-task and the Process Assessment Studies sub-task continue. The equipment design effort associated with the first sub-task, the component testing and checking associated with the second sub-task, and the technical studies and investigations associated with the latter sub-task continue to verify the feasibility of this concept to enhance the use of fuel storage resources.

  7. Status of the Virginia Power/DOE Cooperative Cask Testing/Demonstration Program: A video presentation

    SciTech Connect

    McKinnon, M.A.; Creer, J.M. ); Collantes, C.E. . Richland Operations Office)

    1990-01-01

    This paper is documentation of a video presentation and provides a brief summary of the Virginia power/US Department of Energy Cooperative Cask Testing/Demonstration Program. The program consists of two phases. The first phase has been completed and involved the unlicensed performance testing (heat transfer and shielding) of three metal spent fuel storage casks at the federally owned Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The second phase is ongoing and consists of licensed demonstrations of standard casks from two different vendors and of one or two enhanced capacity casks. 6 refs., 1 tab.

  8. EPAct Alternative Fuel Transportation Program: Success Story (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-08-01

    This success story highlights the EPAct Alternative Fuel Transportation Program's series of workshops that bring fleets regulated under the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) together with Clean Cities stakeholders and fuel providers to form and strengthen regional partnerships and initiate projects that will deploy more alternative fuel infrastructure.

  9. Student Assistance Program Demonstration Project Evaluation. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollard, John A.; Houle, Denise M.

    This document presents the final report on the evaluation of California's model student assistance program (SAP) demonstration projects implemented in five locations across the state from July 1989 through June 1992. The report provides an overall, integrated review of the evaluation of the SAP demonstration projects, summarizes important findings…

  10. 45 CFR 2532.10 - Military Installation Conversion Demonstration programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Military Installation Conversion Demonstration... Military Installation Conversion Demonstration programs. (a) Purposes. The purposes of this section are to...) Fully utilize military installations affected by closures or realignments; (3) Encourage...

  11. 45 CFR 2532.10 - Military Installation Conversion Demonstration programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Military Installation Conversion Demonstration... Military Installation Conversion Demonstration programs. (a) Purposes. The purposes of this section are to...) Fully utilize military installations affected by closures or realignments; (3) Encourage...

  12. 45 CFR 2532.10 - Military Installation Conversion Demonstration programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Military Installation Conversion Demonstration... Military Installation Conversion Demonstration programs. (a) Purposes. The purposes of this section are to...) Fully utilize military installations affected by closures or realignments; (3) Encourage...

  13. Fuel cell energy service Enron`s commerical program

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, M.W.

    1996-04-01

    Enron, the premier provider of clean fuels worldwide, has launched a unique energy service based on fuel cell technology. The goal of this program is to bring the benefits of fuel cell power to the broad commercial marketplace. Enron`s Energy Service is currently based on a 200 kilowatt phosphoric acid power plant manufactured by ONSI Corporation. This plant is fueled by natural gas or propane, and exhibits superior performance. Enron offers a `no hassle` package that provides customers with immediate benefits with no upfront capital or technical risks. This paper describes Enron`s fuel cell commercial program.

  14. 1990 fuel cell seminar: Program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    This volume contains author prepared short resumes of the presentations at the 1990 Fuel Cell Seminar held November 25-28, 1990 in Phoenix, Arizona. Contained herein are 134 short descriptions organized into topic areas entitled An Environmental Overview, Transportation Applications, Technology Advancements for Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells, Technology Advancements for Solid Fuel Cells, Component Technologies and Systems Analysis, Stationary Power Applications, Marine and Space Applications, Technology Advancements for Acid Type Fuel Cells, and Technology Advancement for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.

  15. Alcohol Fuels Program technical review, Spring 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-10-01

    The alcohol fuels program consists of in-house and subcontracted research for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into fuel alcohols via thermoconversion and bioconversion technologies. In the thermoconversion area, the SERI gasifier has been operated on a one-ton per day scale and produces a clean, medium-Btu gas that can be used to manufacture methanol with a relatively small gas-water shift reaction requirement. Recent research has produced catalysts that make methanol and a mixture of higher alcohols from the biomass-derived synthetic gas. Three hydrolysis processes have emerged as candidates for more focused research. They are: a high-temperature, dilute-acid, plug-flow approach based on the Dartmouth reactor; steam explosion pretreatment followed by hydrolysis using the RUT-C30 fungal organism; and direct microbial conversion of the cellulose to ethanol using bacteria in a single or mixed culture. Modeling studies, including parametric and sensitivity analyses, have recently been completed. The results of these studies will lead to a better definition of the present state-of-the-art for these processes and provide a framework for establishing the research and process engineering issues that still need resolution. In addition to these modeling studies, economic feasibility studies are being carried out by commercial engineering firms. Their results will supplement and add commercial validity to the program results. The feasibility contractors will provide input at two levels: Technical and economic assessment of the current state-of-the-art in alcohol production from lignocellulosic biomass via thermoconversion to produce methanol and higher alcohol mixtures and bioconversion to produce ethanol; and identification of research areas having the potential to significantly reduce the cost of production of alcohols.

  16. ULTRA-CLEAN FISCHER-TROPSCH FUELS PRODUCTION AND DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Bergin

    2004-10-18

    The Report Abstract provides summaries of the past year's activities relating to each of the main project objectives. Some of the objectives will be expanded on in greater detail further down in the report. The following objectives have their own addition sections in the report: SFP Construction and Fuel Production, Impact of SFP Fuel on Engine Performance, Fleet Testing at WMATA and Denali National Park, Demonstration of Clean Diesel Fuels in Diesel Electric Generators in Alaska, and Economic Analysis. ICRC provided overall project organization and budget management for the project. ICRC held meetings with various project participants. ICRC presented at the Department of Energy's annual project review meeting. The plant began producing fuel in October 2004. The first delivery of finished fuel was made in March of 2004 after the initial start-up period.

  17. 76 FR 5427 - TIGGER and Clean Fuels Grant Program Funds

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-31

    ... Federal Transit Administration TIGGER and Clean Fuels Grant Program Funds AGENCY: Federal Transit Administration (FTA), DOT. ACTION: TIGGER and Clean Fuels Grant Program Announcement of Project Selections... selection of projects funded in support of the Transit Investments for Greenhouse Gas and Energy...

  18. Office of Alcohol Fuels Program plan, FY 1981

    SciTech Connect

    1980-10-01

    The goal of the Office of Alcohol Fuels is to promote the production, distribution, and use of alcohol fuels. The program objectives are defined and the strategy for implementation is described. An organizational model of the operation is included. The roles of the 3 program offices and various field offices are described. (DMC)

  19. 14 CFR 91.1507 - Fuel tank system inspection program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fuel tank system inspection program. 91.1507 Section 91.1507 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Airworthiness and Safety Improvements § 91.1507 Fuel tank system inspection program. (a) Except as provided...

  20. 14 CFR 91.1507 - Fuel tank system inspection program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank system inspection program. 91.1507 Section 91.1507 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Airworthiness and Safety Improvements § 91.1507 Fuel tank system inspection program. (a) Except as provided...

  1. 14 CFR 91.1507 - Fuel tank system inspection program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fuel tank system inspection program. 91.1507 Section 91.1507 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Airworthiness and Safety Improvements § 91.1507 Fuel tank system inspection program. (a) Except as provided...

  2. 14 CFR 129.113 - Fuel tank system maintenance program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fuel tank system maintenance program. 129.113 Section 129.113 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Continued Airworthiness and Safety Improvements § 129.113 Fuel tank system maintenance program. (a)...

  3. 14 CFR 129.113 - Fuel tank system maintenance program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fuel tank system maintenance program. 129.113 Section 129.113 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Continued Airworthiness and Safety Improvements § 129.113 Fuel tank system maintenance program. (a)...

  4. 14 CFR 125.507 - Fuel tank system inspection program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fuel tank system inspection program. 125.507 Section 125.507 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Airworthiness and Safety Improvements § 125.507 Fuel tank system inspection program. (a) Except as provided...

  5. 14 CFR 91.1507 - Fuel tank system inspection program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fuel tank system inspection program. 91.1507 Section 91.1507 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Airworthiness and Safety Improvements § 91.1507 Fuel tank system inspection program. (a) Except as provided...

  6. 14 CFR 121.1113 - Fuel tank system maintenance program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fuel tank system maintenance program. 121.1113 Section 121.1113 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Improvements § 121.1113 Fuel tank system maintenance program. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (g) of...

  7. 14 CFR 125.507 - Fuel tank system inspection program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fuel tank system inspection program. 125.507 Section 125.507 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Airworthiness and Safety Improvements § 125.507 Fuel tank system inspection program. (a) Except as provided...

  8. 14 CFR 121.1113 - Fuel tank system maintenance program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fuel tank system maintenance program. 121.1113 Section 121.1113 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Improvements § 121.1113 Fuel tank system maintenance program. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (g) of...

  9. 2015 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2015-12-23

    The 2015 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2015 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production; hydrogen delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; systems analysis; and market transformation.

  10. Summary of Fuel Cell Programs at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Davis, Marla

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this program is to develop passive ancillary component technology to be teamed with a hydrogen-oxygen unitized regenerative fuel cell (URFC) stack to form a revolutionary new regenerative fuel cell energy (RFC) storage system for aerospace applications. Replacement of active RFC ancillary components with passive components minimizes parasitic power losses and allows the RFC to operate as a H2/O2 battery. The goal of this program is to demonstrate an integrated passive lkW URFC system.

  11. Low-cost flywheel demonstration program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-04-01

    The Applied Physics Laboratory/Department of Energy Low Cost Flywheel Demonstration Program was initiated on 1 October 1977 and was successfully concluded on 31 December 19'9. The total cost of this program was $355,190. All primary objectives were successfully achieved as follows: demonstration of a full-size, 1)kWh flywheel having an estimated cost in large-volume production of approximately $50/kWh; developmeNt of a ball-bearing system having losses comparable to the losses in a totally magnetic suspension system; successful and repeated demonstration of the low-cost flywheel in a complete flywheel energy-storage system based on the use of ordinary house voltage and frequency; and application of the experience gained in the hardware program to project the system design into a complete, full-scale, 30-kWh home-type flywheel energy-storage system.

  12. Recovery Act. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Diesel Auxilliary Power Unit Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Geiger, Gail E.

    2013-09-30

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Diesel Auxilliary Power Unit Demonstration Project. Summarizing development of Delphi’s next generation SOFC system as the core power plant to prove the viability of the market opportunity for a 3-5 kW diesel SOFC system. Report includes test and demonstration results from testing the diesel APU in a high visibility fleet customer vehicle application.

  13. Hybrid Propulsion Demonstration Program 250K Hybrid Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Story, George; Zoladz, Tom; Arves, Joe; Kearney, Darren; Abel, Terry; Park, O.

    2003-01-01

    The Hybrid Propulsion Demonstration Program (HPDP) program was formed to mature hybrid propulsion technology to a readiness level sufficient to enable commercialization for various space launch applications. The goal of the HPDP was to develop and test a 250,000 pound vacuum thrust hybrid booster in order to demonstrate hybrid propulsion technology and enable manufacturing of large hybrid boosters for current and future space launch vehicles. The HPDP has successfully conducted four tests of the 250,000 pound thrust hybrid rocket motor at NASA's Stennis Space Center. This paper documents the test series.

  14. Overview of the solar dynamic ground test demonstration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaltens, Richard K.; Boyle, Robert V.

    1993-01-01

    The Solar Dynamic (SD) Ground Test Demonstration (GTD) program demonstrates the availability of SD technologies in a simulated space environment at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) vacuum facility. An aerospace industry/ government team is working together to design, fabricate, build, and test a complete SD system. This paper reviews the goals and status of the SD GTD program. A description of the SD system includes key design features of the system, subsystems, and components as reported at the Critical Design Review (CDR).

  15. Review of the Vortec soil remediation demonstration program

    SciTech Connect

    Patten, J.S.

    1994-12-31

    The principal objective of the METC/Vortec program is to develop and demonstrate the effectiveness of the Vortec CMS in remediating soils contaminated with hazardous materials and/or low levels of radionuclides. To convincingly demonstrate the CMS`s capability, a Demonstration Plant will be constructed and operated at a DOE site that has a need for the remediation of contamination soil. The following objectives will be met during the program: (1) establish the glass chemistry requirements to achieve vitrification of contaminated soils found at the selected DOE site; (2) complete the design of a fully integrated soil vitrification demonstration plant with a capacity to process 25 TPD of soil; (3) establish the cost of a fully integrated soil demonstration plant with a capacity to process 25 TPD of soil; (4) construct and operate a fully integrated demonstration plant; (5) analyze all influent and effluent streams to establish the partitioning of contaminants and to demonstrate compliance with all applicable health, safety, and environmental requirements; (6) demonstrate that the CMS technology has the capability to produce a vitrified product that will immobilize the hazardous and radionuclide materials consistent with the needs of the specific DOE waste repositories.

  16. Coordinated Fuel Cell System Programs for Government and Commercial Applications: Are We in a New Era?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warshay, Marvin; Prokopius, Paul

    1996-01-01

    Though the fuel cell was invented in 1839, it was not until the early 1960's that the fuel cell power system was developed and used for a real application, for the NASA Space Mission Gemini. Unfortunately, fuel cell power systems did not, as a result, become in widespread use. Nevertheless, a great deal of progress has been made by both government and industry, culminating in many successful fuel cell power system demonstrations. Initially, each government agency and each private organization went its own way. Later, it became evident that coordination among programs was essential. An overview is presented of the current coordinated efforts by government and industry in fuel cells, with a sufficient historical background. The primary barriers to coordination of programs were institutional and differing application requirements. Initially, in the institutional area, it was the energy crisis and the formation of DOE which fostered close working relationships among government, manufacturers, and users. The authors discuss the fuel cell power system programs (of NASA, DOE, DOT, DOC, EPRI, GRI, industry, and universities), including missions and applications, technology advances, and demonstrations. The discussion covers the new Solar Regenerative Fuel Cell (RFC) program which has space, defense, and commercial terrestrial applications, and which is an excellent example of both program coordination and the Clinton Administration's dual-use application policy.

  17. 45 CFR 2532.10 - Military Installation Conversion Demonstration programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... described in section 325(e)(1) of the Job Training Partnership Act (29 U.S.C. 1662d(e)(1)). (2) Community...) Carrying out, at the installation, a construction or economic development project that is of substantial... a project through a demonstration program may use the funds made available through such grant to...

  18. MINE WASTE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM - UNDERGROUND MINE SOURCE CONTROL DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents results of the Mine Waste Technology Program Activity III, Project 8, Underground Mine Source Control Demonstration Project implemented and funded by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and jointly administered by EPA and the U. S. Department of E...

  19. 78 FR 44575 - Sickle Cell Disease Treatment Demonstration Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Sickle Cell Disease Treatment Demonstration... Services (HHS). ACTION: Request for Class Deviation for Non-Competitive Extension: Sickle Cell Disease... nine programs that are funded through competitive grant awards under the Sickle Cell Disease...

  20. Puerto Rico Nursing Career Cooperative Demonstration Program. Final Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puerto Rico State Dept. of Education, Hato Rey.

    The Puerto Rico Nursing Career Cooperative Demonstration Project and Associate Nursing Program provided education and onsite occupational training laboratory to upgrade the education of 20 licensed practical nurses (LPNs) from 1989-90. The nurses were upgraded to associate nurses in an 18-month period at the Technological Institute of Puerto Rico.…

  1. Strategy for Fuel Rod Receipt, Characterization, Sample Allocation for the Demonstration Sister Rods

    SciTech Connect

    Marschman, Steven C.; Warmann, Stephan A.; Rusch, Chris

    2014-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), Office of Fuel Cycle Technology, has established the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) to conduct the research and development activities related to storage, transportation, and disposal of used nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The mission of the UFDC is to identify alternatives and conduct scientific research and technology development to enable storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and wastes generated by existing and future nuclear fuel cycles. The UFDC Storage and Transportation staffs are responsible for addressing issues regarding the extended or long-term storage of UNF and its subsequent transportation. The near-term objectives of the Storage and Transportation task are to use a science-based approach to develop the technical bases to support the continued safe and secure storage of UNF for extended periods, subsequent retrieval, and transportation. While low burnup fuel [that characterized as having a burnup of less than 45 gigawatt days per metric tonne uranium (GWD/MTU)] has been stored for nearly three decades, the storage of high burnup used fuels is more recent. The DOE has funded a demonstration project to confirm the behavior of used high burnup fuel under prototypic conditions. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is leading a project team to develop and implement the Test Plan to collect this data from a UNF dry storage system containing high burnup fuel. The Draft Test Plan for the demonstration outlines the data to be collected; the high burnup fuel to be included; the technical data gaps the data will address; and the storage system design, procedures, and licensing necessary to implement the Test Plan. To provide data that is most relevant to high burnup fuel in dry storage, the design of the test storage system must closely mimic real conditions high burnup SNF experiences during all stages of dry storage: loading, cask drying

  2. Assessment of the integrity of spent fuel assemblies used in dry storage demonstrations at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Dobbins, J.C.; Zaloudek, F.R.

    1987-07-01

    This report summarizes the histories of 17 Zircaloy-clad spent fuel assemblies used in dry storage tests and demonstrations at the Engine Maintenance and Disassembly (EMAD) and Climax facilities at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The 18th assembly was shipped to the Battelle Columbus Laboratory (BCL) and remained there for extensive characterization and as a source of specimens for whole-rod and rod-segment dry storage tests. The report traces the history of the assemblies after discharge from the Turkey Point Unit 3 pressurized-water reactor (1975 and 1977) through shipment (first arrival at EMAD in December 1978), dry storage tests and demonstrations, and shipment by truck cask from EMAD to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in May/June 1986. The principal objectives of this report are to assess and document the integrity of the fuel during the extensive dry storage activities at NTS and BCL, and to briefly summarize the dry storage technologies and procedures demonstrated in this program. The dry storage tests and demonstrations involved the following concepts and facilities: (1) surface drywells (EMAD); (2) deep drywells (425 m underground in the Climax granite formation); (3) concrete silo (EMAD); (4) air-cooled vault (EMAD); (5) electrically-heated module for fuel assembly thermal calibration and testing (EMAD/FAITM). 20 refs., 43 figs., 9 tabs.

  3. Fuel cell transit bus development & commercialization programs at Gerogetown University

    SciTech Connect

    Wimmer, R.; Larkins, J.; Romano, S.

    1996-12-31

    Fourteen years ago, Georgetown University (GU) perceived the need for a clean, efficient power systems for transportation that could operate on non-petroleum based fuels. The transit bus application was selected to begin system development. GU recognized the range and recharge constraints of a pure battery powered transit bus. A Fuel Cell power system would circumvent these limitations and, with an on board reformer, accommodate liquid fuel for rapid refueling. Feasibility studies for Fuel Cell power systems for transit buses were conducted with the Los Alamos National Laboratory in 1983. Successful results of this investigation resulted in the DOT/DOE Fuel Cell transit bus development program. The first task was to prove that small Fuel Cell power plants were possible. This was achieved with the Phase I development of two 25 kW Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell (PAFC) brassboard systems. A liquid cooled version was selected for the Phase II activity in which three 30-foot Fuel Cell powered Test Bed Buses (TBBs) were fabricated. The first of these TBBs was delivered in the spring of 1994. All three of these development vehicles are now in Phase III of the program to conduct testing and evaluation, is conducting operational testing of the buses. The test will involve two fuel cell-operated buses; one with a proton exchange fuel cell and the other with a phosphoric acid fuel cell.

  4. 76 FR 12073 - Extension of Web-Based TRICARE Assistance Program Demonstration Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-04

    ... of the Secretary Extension of Web-Based TRICARE Assistance Program Demonstration Program AGENCY: Department of Defense. ACTION: Notice of a Two Year Extension of the Web-Based TRICARE Assistance Program...) demonstration project, under authority of Title 10, U.S. Code, Section 1092, entitled Web-Based...

  5. Spent Nuclear Fuel Dry Transfer System Cold Demonstration Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, Max R; McKinnon, M. A.

    1999-12-01

    The spent nuclear fuel dry transfer system (DTS) provides an interface between large and small casks and between storage-only and transportation casks. It permits decommissioning of reactor pools after shutdown and allows the use of large storage-only casks for temporary onsite storage of spent nuclear fuel irrespective of reactor or fuel handling limitations at a reactor site. A cold demonstration of the DTS prototype was initiated in August 1996 at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The major components demonstrated included the fuel assembly handling subsystem, the shield plug/lid handling subsystem, the cask interface subsystem, the demonstration control subsystem, a support frame, and a closed circuit television and lighting system. The demonstration included a complete series of DTS operations from source cask receipt and opening through fuel transfer and closure of the receiving cask. The demonstration included both normal operations and recovery from off-normal events. It was designed to challenge the system to determine whether there were any activities that could be made to jeopardize the activities of another function or its safety. All known interlocks were challenged. The equipment ran smoothly and functioned as designed. A few "bugs" were corrected. Prior to completion of the demonstration testing, a number of DTS prototype systems were modified to apply lessons learned to date. Additional testing was performed to validate the modifications. In general, all the equipment worked exceptionally well. The demonstration also helped confirm cost estimates that had been made at several points in the development of the system.

  6. A feasibility demonstration program for superconducting magnetic energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Filios, P.G. )

    1988-01-01

    The Defense Nuclear Agency, as the agent of the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) Office, has begun a program to build an engineering test model (ETM) of a superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) system. The ETM will serve to demonstrate the feasibility of using SMES technology to meet both SDI and public utility requirements for electric energy storage. SMES technology characteristics are reviewed and related to SDI and electric utility requirements. Program structure and schedule are related to specific objectives, and critical issues are defined.

  7. 78 FR 62462 - Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: Modifications to Renewable Fuel Standard Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... transportation fuels, including gasoline and diesel fuel, or renewable fuels such as ethanol and biodiesel, as... biodiesel) that were produced for the highway diesel market but were also suitable for other markets such...

  8. Sphere-pac fuel development program. First semi-annual progress report, October 1979-March 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Felt, R.E.

    1980-05-01

    Development of processes by Exxon Nuclear Company, Inc. for fabricating spherical particle nuclear fuel (sphere-pac) during October 1979 through March 1980 is reported. The program surveyed available technology to develop an initial flowsheet as a design basis for process development. An 0.1 ton/day pilot plant was built to develop and demonstrate the fabrication of sphere-pac fuel. Process and equipment efforts have been directed towards the demonstration of processes and equipment necessary to fabricate sphere-pac fuel on a commercial scale.

  9. Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program Case Studies: Demonstrating Program Outcomes, Volume III

    EPA Science Inventory

    This booklet, ETV Program Case Studies: Demonstrating Program Outcomes, Volume III contains two case studies, addressing verified environmental technologies for decentalized wastewater treatment and converting animal waste to energy. Each case study contains a brief description ...

  10. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM LANDFILL GAS: PHASE II. PRETREATMENT SYSTEM PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes Phase II of a demonstration of the utilization of commercial phosphoric acid fuel cells to recover energy from landfill gas. This phase consisted primarily of the construction and testing of a Gas Pretreatment Unit (GPU) whose function is to remove those impu...

  11. Power conversion and quality of the Santa Clara 2 MW direct carbonate fuel cell demonstration plant

    SciTech Connect

    Skok, A.J.; Abueg, R.Z.; Schwartz, P.

    1996-12-31

    The Santa Clara Demonstration Project (SCDP) is the first application of a commercial-scale carbonate fuel cell power plant on a US electric utility system. It is also the largest fuel cell power plant ever operated in the United States. The 2MW plant, located in Santa Clara, California, utilizes carbonate fuel cell technology developed by Energy Research Corporation (ERC) of Danbury, Connecticut. The ultimate goal of a fuel cell power plant is to deliver usable power into an electrical distribution system. The power conversion sub-system does this for the Santa Clara Demonstration Plant. A description of this sub-system and its capabilities follows. The sub-system has demonstrated the capability to deliver real power, reactive power and to absorb reactive power on a utility grid. The sub-system can be operated in the same manner as a conventional rotating generator except with enhanced capabilities for reactive power. Measurements demonstrated the power quality from the plant in various operating modes was high quality utility grade power.

  12. United States National Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle and Infrastructure Learning Demonstration - Status and Results (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Wipke,K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Garbak, J.

    2009-03-06

    This presentation provides status and results for the United States National Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Learning Demonstration, including project objectives, partners, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's role in the project and methodology, how to access complete results, and results of vehicle and infrastructure analysis.

  13. Institutional conservation program: Energy use data base demonstration: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-01

    An attempt was made to motivate implementation of energy accounting programs in seven states. None of the seven states initiated a systematic statewide accounting program. The principal reason was lack of personnel. The project strategy was reformed to disseminate information to all states and territories and to other interested organizations. Recipients of the reports greeted them positively and expressed interest in energy accounting. However, there is no evidence that any state or local government instituted an energy accounting program because of the reports. The project was again reformed to attempt to demonstrate the initiation of an energy accounting service. Prison inmates who were students in computer classes could provide data processing and handling. Officials in New York State explored the possibility of starting, at Attica Correctional Facility, an energy accounting service to serve public buildings in New York.

  14. Demonstration program for Omega receiver prototype microcomputer data processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilley, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    The JOLT (TM) commercial microcomputer, based on the MOS Technology 6502 processor chip, for use in Omega navigation system is evaluated. A computer program was prepared in hand-assembled code to demonstrate receiver operation. The processor provides binary processing with interrupts enabled, a carriage return is given to initialize the teleprinter, and a jump is performed to enter the program loop to wait for an interrupt. The program loop operates continuously testing the interrupt flag. The interrupt routine reads the receiver status word and determines whether the current time-slot is the A slot. If so, the interrupt flag, which is also the data index pointer, is reset to zero. The status word is stored in the status buffer. If the time-slot is not A, the interrupt flag/pointer is incremented by one to index the phase and status to the proper buffer words for later use by the print routine.

  15. Broad specification fuels technology program, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohmann, R. P.; Jeroszko, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental evaluation was conducted to assess the impact of the use of broadened properties fuels on combustor design concepts. Emphasis was placed on establishing the viability of design modifications to current combustor concepts and the use of advanced technology concepts to facilitate operation on Experimental Referee Broad Specification (ERBS) fuel while meeting exhaust emissions and performance specifications and maintaining acceptable durability. Three different combustor concepts, representative of progressively more aggressive technology levels, were evaluated. When operated on ERBS rather than Jet A fuel, a single stage combustor typical of that in the most recent versions of the JT9D-7 engine was found to produce excess carbon monoxide emissions at idle and elevated liner temperatures at high power levels that were projected to reduced liner life by 13 percent. The introduction of improved component technology, such as refined fuel injectors and advanced liner cooling concepts were shown to have the potential of enhancing the fuel flexibility of the single stage combustor.

  16. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    2012-04-11

    These progress reports summarize the year's hydrogen and fuel cell R&D and analysis activities and accomplishments. This work was conducted by industry, academia, and national laboratories for the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and the offices of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Fossil Energy, Nuclear Energy, and Science.

  17. 1994 Fernald field characterization demonstration program data report

    SciTech Connect

    Rautman, C.A.; Cromer, M.V.; Newman, G.C.; Beiso, D.A.

    1995-12-01

    The 1994 Fernald field characterization demonstration program, hosted by Fernald Environmental Management Project, was established to investigate technologies that are applicable to the characterization and remediation of soils contaminated with uranium. An important part of this effort was evaluating field-screening tools potentially capable of acquiring high-resolution information on uranium contamination distribution in surface soils. Further-more, the information needed to be obtained in a cost- and time-efficient manner. Seven advanced field-screening technologies were demonstrated at a uranium-contaminated site at Fernald, located 29 kilometers northwest of Cincinnati, Ohio. The seven technologies tested were: (1) alpha-track detectors, (2) a high-energy beta scintillometer, (3) electret ionization chambers, (4) and (5) two variants of gamma-ray spectrometry, (6) laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy, and (7) long-range alpha detection. The goals of this field demonstration were to evaluate the capabilities of the detectors and to demonstrate their utility within the US Department of Energy`s Environmental Restoration Program. Identical field studies were conducted using four industry-standard characterization tools: (1) a sodium-iodide scintillometer, (2) a low-energy FIDLER scintillometer, (3) a field-portable x-ray fluorescence detector, and (4) standard soil sampling coupled with laboratory analysis. Another important aspect of this program was the application of a cost/risk decision model to guide characterization of the site. This document is a compilation of raw data submitted by the technologies and converted total uranium data from the 1994 Fernald field characterization demonstration.

  18. Pecan Street Grid Demonstration Program. Final technology performance report

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2015-02-10

    This document represents the final Regional Demonstration Project Technical Performance Report (TPR) for Pecan Street Inc.’s (Pecan Street) Smart Grid Demonstration Program, DE-OE-0000219. Pecan Street is a 501(c)(3) smart grid/clean energy research and development organization headquartered at The University of Texas at Austin (UT). Pecan Street worked in collaboration with Austin Energy, UT, Environmental Defense Fund (EDF), the City of Austin, the Austin Chamber of Commerce and selected consultants, contractors, and vendors to take a more detailed look at the energy load of residential and small commercial properties while the power industry is undergoing modernization. The Pecan Street Smart Grid Demonstration Program signed-up over 1,000 participants who are sharing their home or businesses’s electricity consumption data with the project via green button protocols, smart meters, and/or a home energy monitoring system (HEMS). Pecan Street completed the installation of HEMS in 750 homes and 25 commercial properties. The program provided incentives to increase the installed base of roof-top solar photovoltaic (PV) systems, plug-in electric vehicles with Level 2 charging, and smart appliances. Over 200 participants within a one square mile area took advantage of Austin Energy and Pecan Street’s joint PV incentive program and installed roof-top PV as part of this project. Of these homes, 69 purchased or leased an electric vehicle through Pecan Street’s PV rebate program and received a Level 2 charger from Pecan Street. Pecan Street studied the impacts of these technologies along with a variety of consumer behavior interventions, including pricing models, real-time feedback on energy use, incentive programs, and messaging, as well as the corresponding impacts on Austin Energy’s distribution assets.The primary demonstration site was the Mueller community in Austin, Texas. The Mueller development, located less than three miles from the Texas State Capitol

  19. Performance demonstration program plan for analysis of simulated headspace gases

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for analysis of headspace gases will consist of regular distribution and analyses of test standards to evaluate the capability for analyzing VOCs, hydrogen, and methane in the headspace of transuranic (TRU) waste throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Each distribution is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles will provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for TRU waste characterization. Laboratory performance will be demonstrated by the successful analysis of blind audit samples of simulated TRU waste drum headspace gases according to the criteria set within the text of this Program Plan. Blind audit samples (hereinafter referred to as PDP samples) will be used as an independent means to assess laboratory performance regarding compliance with the QAPP QAOs. The concentration of analytes in the PDP samples will encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual waste characterization gas samples. Analyses which are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with various regulatory requirements and which are included in the PDP must be performed by laboratories which have demonstrated acceptable performance in the PDP.

  20. Registration System's User Guide for the Renewable Fuel Standard Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This EPA document is the User Guide for the OTAQ Fuels Program Registration (OTAQReg) online application describing the processes a user must follow to register; update their user profile; associate to companies as well as create, view and edit companies.

  1. Construction and start-up of a 250 kW natural gas fueled MCFC demonstration power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Figueroa, R.A.; Carter, J.; Rivera, R.; Otahal, J.

    1996-12-31

    San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E) is participating with M-C Power in the development and commercialization program of their internally manifolded heat exchanger (IMHEX{reg_sign}) carbonate fuel cell technology. Development of the IMHEX technology base on the UNOCAL test facility resulted in the demonstration of a 250 kW thermally integrated power plant located at the Naval Air Station at Miramar, California. The members of the commercialization team lead by M-C Power (MCP) include Bechtel Corporation, Stewart & Stevenson Services, Inc., and Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries (IHI). MCP produced the fuel cell stack, Bechtel was responsible for the process engineering including the control system, Stewart & Stevenson was responsible for packaging the process equipment in a skid (pumps, desulfurizer, gas heater, turbo, heat exchanger and stem generator), IHI produced a compact flat plate catalytic reformer operating on natural gas, and SDG&E assumed responsibility for plant construction, start-up and operation of the plant.

  2. Fuel efficient traffic signal operation and evaluation: Garden Grove Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-02-01

    The procedures and results of a case study of fuel efficient traffic signal operation and evaluation in the City of Garden Grove, California are documented. Improved traffic signal timing was developed for a 70-intersection test network in Garden Grove using an optimization tool called the TRANSYT Version 8 computer program. Full-scale field testing of five alternative timing plans was conducted using two instrumented vehicles equipped to measure traffic performance characteristics and fuel consumption. The field tests indicated that significant improvements in traffic flow and fuel consumption result from the use of timing plans generated by the TRANSYT optimization model. Changing from pre-existing to an optimized timing plan yields a networkwide 5 percent reduction in total travel time, more than 10 percent reduction in both the number of stops and stopped delay time, and 6 percent reduction in fuel consumption. Projections are made of the benefits and costs of implementing such a program at the 20,000 traffic signals in networks throughout the State of California.

  3. BWR fuel rod performance evaluation program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, T.C.

    1986-05-01

    The joint EPRI/GE fuel performance program, RP510-1, involved thorough preirradiation characterization of fuel used in lead test assemblies, detailed surveillance of their operation, and interim site examinations of the assemblies during reactor outages. The program originally included four GE-5 lead test assemblies operating in the Peach Bottom-2 reactor. The program was later modified to include the pressurized fuel rod test assembly in the Peach Bottom-3 reactor (RP510-2). The program modification also included extending the operation of the Peach Bottom-2 and Peach Bottom-3 lead test assembly fuel beyond normal discharge exposures. Interim site examination results following the first four cycles of operation of the Peach Bottom-2 lead test assemblies up to 35 GWd/MT and the examination of the Peach Bottom-3 pressurized test assembly at 32 GWd/MT are presented in this report. Elements of the examinations included visual examination of the fuel bundles; individual fuel rod visual examinations, rod length measurements, ultrasonic and eddy current nondestructive testing, Zircaloy cladding oxide thickness measurements and fission gas measurements. Channel measurements were made on the PB-2 Lead Test Assemblies after each of the first three operating cycles. All of the bundles were found to be in good condition. Since the pressurized test assembly contained pressurized and nonpressurized fuel rods in symmetric positions, it was possible to make direct comparisons of the fission gas release from pairs of pressurized and nonpressurized fuel rods with identical power histories. With one exception, the release was less from the pressurized fuel rod of each pair. Fuel rod power histories were calculated using new physics methods for all of the fuel rods that were punctured for fission gas release measurements. 28 refs., 41 figs., 16 tabs.

  4. Milliken Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Project. Project performance summary, Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2002-11-30

    The New York State Electric & Gas Corporation (NYSEG) demonstrated a combination of technologies at its Milliken Station in Lansing, New York, designed to: (1) achieve high sulfur dioxide (SO2) capture efficiency, (2) bring nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions into compliance with Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA), (3) maintain high station efficiency, and (4) eliminate waste water discharge. This project is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) established to address energy and environmental concerns related to coal use. DOE sought cost-shared partnerships with industry through five nationally competed solicitations to accelerate commercialization of the most promising advance coal-based power generation and pollution control technologies. The CCTDP, valued at over five billion dollars, has significantly leveraged federal funding by forging effective partnerships founded on sound principles. For every federal dollar invested, CCTDP participants have invested two dollars. These participants include utilities, technology developers, state governments, and research organizations. The project presented here was one of nine selected in January 1991 from 33 proposals submitted in response to the program's fourth solicitation.

  5. 40 CFR 80.1104 - What are the implementation dates for the Renewable Fuel Standard Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the Renewable Fuel Standard Program? 80.1104 Section 80.1104 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Renewable Fuel Standard § 80.1104 What are the implementation dates for the Renewable Fuel Standard Program? The...

  6. 40 CFR 80.1104 - What are the implementation dates for the Renewable Fuel Standard Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the Renewable Fuel Standard Program? 80.1104 Section 80.1104 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Renewable Fuel Standard § 80.1104 What are the implementation dates for the Renewable Fuel Standard Program? The...

  7. 40 CFR 80.1104 - What are the implementation dates for the Renewable Fuel Standard Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the Renewable Fuel Standard Program? 80.1104 Section 80.1104 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Renewable Fuel Standard § 80.1104 What are the implementation dates for the Renewable Fuel Standard Program? The...

  8. 40 CFR 80.1104 - What are the implementation dates for the Renewable Fuel Standard Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the Renewable Fuel Standard Program? 80.1104 Section 80.1104 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Renewable Fuel Standard § 80.1104 What are the implementation dates for the Renewable Fuel Standard Program? The...

  9. 40 CFR 80.1104 - What are the implementation dates for the Renewable Fuel Standard Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the Renewable Fuel Standard Program? 80.1104 Section 80.1104 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Renewable Fuel Standard § 80.1104 What are the implementation dates for the Renewable Fuel Standard Program? The...

  10. 40 CFR 88.304-94 - Clean-fuel Fleet Vehicle Credit Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Clean-fuel Fleet Vehicle Credit Program... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CLEAN-FUEL VEHICLES Clean-Fuel Fleet Program § 88.304-94 Clean-fuel Fleet Vehicle... purchasing clean-fuel vehicles (CFVs) directly and by trading and banking CFFV credits for vehicle...

  11. Supplemental Determination for Renewable Fuels Produced under the Renewable Fuel Standard Program for Grain Sorghum Documents

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The final rule and fact sheet contains a lifecycle greenhouse gas analysis for grain sorghum ethanol and regulatory determination that grain sorghum ethanol qualifies as a renewable fuel under the RFS program.

  12. Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration Results: Third Report

    SciTech Connect

    Eudy, L.; Post, M.

    2014-05-01

    This report presents results of a demonstration of 12 fuel cell electric buses (FCEB) operating in Oakland, California. The 12 FCEBs operate as a part of the Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Demonstration, which also includes two new hydrogen fueling stations. This effort is the largest FCEB demonstration in the United States and involves five participating transit agencies. The ZEBA partners are collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the buses in revenue service. NREL has published two previous reports, in August 2011 and July 2012, describing operation of these buses. New results in this report provide an update covering eight months through October 2013.

  13. Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration: Second Results Report

    SciTech Connect

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

    2012-07-01

    This report presents results of a demonstration of 12 new fuel cell electric buses (FCEB) operating in Oakland, California. The 12 FCEBs operate as a part of the Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Demonstration, which also includes two new hydrogen fueling stations. This effort is the largest FCEB demonstration in the United States and involves five participating transit agencies. The ZEBA partners are collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the buses in revenue service. The first results report was published in August 2011, describing operation of these new FCEBs from September 2010 through May 2011. New results in this report provide an update through April 2012.

  14. Fuel performance improvement program. The development of graphite-coated cladding for improved PCI performance of LWR fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Bunnell, L.R.; Welty, R.K.

    1981-06-01

    One of the fuel concepts being tested and demonstrated as part of the Fuel Performance Improvement Program includes a graphite coating applied to the inner surface of the Zircaloy cladding. The technology for producing acceptable coatings was developed starting with the selection of a suitable graphite and culminating with the coating of 200 cladding tubes for demonstration irradiations in the Big Rock Point Reactor. During the process development, methods for controlling the coating thickness and minimizing its hydrogen content were developed that were compatible with production scale operation. During the same period, the graphite coatings were characterized and their properties were determined, mainly to provide information needed for fuel design and licensing considerations. Purity, structure, coating-to-cladding compatibility, thermal conductivity, and friction/wear characteristics were measured.

  15. Low-Boom SR-71 Modified Signature Demonstration Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lux, David; Ehernberger, L. J.; Moes, Timothy R.; Haering, Edward A.

    1999-01-01

    A flight program using the SR-71 airplane to validate sonic boom technologies for High-Speed Commercial Transport (HSCT) operation and potentially for low- or softened-boom design configurations is described. This program employs a shaped signature modification to the SR-71 airplane which is designed to demonstrate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) design technology at a full-scale HSCT operating condition of Mach 1.8 at 48,000 feet altitude. Test plans call for measurements in the near-field, at intermediate propagation altitudes, and through the more turbulent boundary layer near the Earth surface. The shaped signature modification to the airplane is comprised of added cross-section areas on the underside of the airplane forward of the wing and engine nacelles. Because the flight demonstration does not approach maximum SR-71 altitude or Mach number, the airplane provides more than adequate performance and maneuver margins for safe operation of the modified airplane. Probe airplane measurements in the near-field will use fast response pressure sensors. Far-field and ground-based boom measurements will use high response microphones or conventional sonic boom field recorders. Scope of the planned demonstration flights also includes ground level measurements during conditions which cause minimal signature distortion and conditions which cause high distortion of the signature.

  16. License renewal demonstration program: NRC observations and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Prato, R.J.; Kuo, P.T.; Newberry, S.F.

    1996-12-01

    This report summarizes the Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff`s observations and lessons learned from the five License Renewal Demonstration Program (LRDP) site visits performed by the staff from March 25, 1996, through August 16, 1996. The LRDP was a Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) program intended to assess the effectiveness of the guidance provided by NEI 95-10, Revision 0, {open_quotes}Industry Guideline for Implementing the Requirements of 10 CFR Part 54 - The License Renewal Rule,{close_quotes} to implement the requirements of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 54 (10 CFR Part 54), {open_quotes}Requirements for Renewal of Operating Licenses for Nuclear Power Plants.{close_quotes} In general, NEI 95-10 appeared to contain the basic guidance needed for scoping, screening, identifying aging effects, developing aging management programs, and performing time-limited aging analyses. However, inconsistent implementation of this guidance in some areas was an indication that clarification of existing guidance and/or the inclusion-of some new guidance may be needed for applicants to develop a license renewal program that is consistent with the intent of the rule.

  17. "Dedicated To The Continued Education, Training and Demonstration of PEM Fuel Cell Powered Lift Trucks In Real-World Applications."

    SciTech Connect

    Dever, Thomas J.

    2011-11-29

    The project objective was to further assist in the commercialization of fuel cell and H2 technology by building further upon the successful fuel cell lift truck deployments that were executed by LiftOne in 2007, with longer deployments of this technology in real-world applications. We involved facilities management, operators, maintenance personnel, safety groups, and Authorities Having Jurisdiction. LiftOne strived to educate a broad group from many areas of industry and the community as to the benefits of this technology. Included were First Responders from the local areas. We conducted month long deployments with end-users to validate the value proposition and the market requirements for fuel cell powered lift trucks. Management, lift truck operators, Authorities Having Jurisdiction and the general public experienced 'hands on' fuel cell experience in the material handling applications. We partnered with Hydrogenics in the execution of the deployment segment of the program. Air Products supplied the compressed H2 gas and the mobile fueler. Data from the Fuel Cell Power Packs and the mobile fueler was sent to the DOE and NREL as required. Also, LiftOne conducted the H2 Education Seminars on a rotating basis at their locations for lift trucks users and for other selected segments of the community over the project's 36 month duration. Executive Summary The technology employed during the deployments program was not new, as the equipment had been used in several previous demos and early adoptions within the material handling industry. This was the case with the new HyPx Series PEM - Fuel Cell Power Packs used, which had been demo'd before during the 2007 Greater Columbia Fuel Cell Challenge. The Air Products HF-150 Fueler was used outdoors during the deployments and had similarly been used for many previous demo programs. The methods used centered on providing this technology as the power for electric sit-down lift trucks at high profile companies operating large

  18. Vehicle Technologies and Fuel Cell Technologies Program: Prospective Benefits Assessment Report for Fiscal Year 2016

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, T. S.; Taylor, C. H.; Moore, J. S.; Ward, J.

    2016-02-23

    Under a diverse set of programs, the Vehicle Technologies and Fuel Cell Technologies offices of DOE’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy invest in research, development, demonstration, and deployment of advanced vehicle, hydrogen production, delivery and storage, and fuel cell technologies. This report estimates the benefits of successfully developing and deploying these technologies (a “Program Success” case) relative to a base case (the “No Program” case). The Program Success case represents the future with completely successful deployment of Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) and Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) technologies. The No Program case represents a future in which there is no contribution after FY 2016 by the VTO or FCTO to these technologies. The benefits of advanced vehicle, hydrogen production, delivery and storage, and fuel cell technologies were estimated on the basis of differences in fuel use, primary energy use, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from light-, medium- and heavy-duty vehicles, including energy and emissions from fuel production, between the base case and the Program Success case. Improvements in fuel economy of various vehicle types, growth in the stock of fuel cell vehicles and other advanced technology vehicles, and decreased GHG intensity of hydrogen production and delivery in the Program Success case over the No Program case were projected to result in savings in petroleum use and GHG emissions. Benefits were disaggregated by individual program technology areas, which included the FCTO program and the VTO subprograms of batteries and electric drives; advanced combustion engines; fuels and lubricants; materials (for reduction in vehicle mass, or “lightweighting”); and, for medium- and heavy-duty vehicles, reduction in rolling and aerodynamic resistance. Projections for the Program Success case indicate that by 2035, the average fuel economy of on-road, light-duty vehicle stock could be 47% to 76

  19. Origins and Overview of the Shaped Sonic Boom Demonstration Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawlowski, Joseph W.; Graham, David H.; Boccadoro, Charles H.; Coen, Peter G.; Maglieri, Domenic J.

    2005-01-01

    The goal of the DARPA Shaped Sonic Boom Demonstration (SSBD) Program was to demonstrate for the first time in flight that sonic booms can be substantially reduced by incorporating specialized aircraft shaping techniques. Although mitigation of the sonic boom via specialized shaping techniques was theorized decades ago, until now, this theory had never been tested with a flight vehicle subjected to actual flight conditions in a real atmosphere. The demonstrative success, which occurred on 27 August 2003 with repeat flights in the supersonic corridor at Edwards Air Force Base, is a critical milestone in the development of next generation supersonic aircraft that could one day fly unrestricted over land and help usher in a new era of time-critical air transport. Pressure measurements obtained on the ground and in the air confirmed that the specific modifications made to a Northrop Grumman F-5E aircraft not only changed the shape of the shock wave signature emanating from the aircraft, but also produced a flat-top signature whose shape persisted, as predicted, as the pressure waves propagated through the atmosphere to the ground. This accomplishment represents a major advance towards reducing the startling and potentially damaging noise of a sonic boom. This paper describes the evolution of the SSBD program, including the rationale for test article selection, and provides an overview of the history making accomplishments achieved during the SSBD effort, as well as, the follow-on NASA Shaped Sonic Boom Experiment (SSBE) Program, whose goal was to further evaluate the characteristics and robustness of shaped boom signatures.

  20. Lessons Learned from NASA UAV Science Demonstration Program Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wegener, Steven S.; Schoenung, Susan M.

    2003-01-01

    During the summer of 2002, two airborne missions were flown as part of a NASA Earth Science Enterprise program to demonstrate the use of uninhabited aerial vehicles (UAVs) to perform earth science. One mission, the Altus Cumulus Electrification Study (ACES), successfully measured lightning storms in the vicinity of Key West, Florida, during storm season using a high-altitude Altus(TM) UAV. In the other, a solar-powered UAV, the Pathfinder Plus, flew a high-resolution imaging mission over coffee fields in Kauai, Hawaii, to help guide the harvest.

  1. FY 1987 biochemical conversion/alcohol fuels program: Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-11-01

    Ethanol, a high-octane liquid fuel compatible with today's transportation system, can be produced by biological processes from lignocellulosic feedstocks. The Biochemical Conversion/Alcohol Fuels Research Program managed by the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) for the US Department of Energy's Biofuels and Municipal Waste Technology Division carries out a program of research and development with the goals of developing processes for converting lignocellulosic materials to ethanol and other fuels in an efficient and cost-effective manner, and facilitating the adoption of these processes by industry. This annual report for FY 1987 summarizes the state of the art and the research conducted by the Biochemical Conversion/Alcohol Fuels Research Program in the past year. The appendices contain detailed descriptions of the individual research projects, organized into the following categories: Acid Hydrolysis, Enzymatic Hydrolysis, Xylose Fermentation, and Lignin Conversion.

  2. Alcohol fuel production training program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, J.

    1982-06-30

    The purpose of the project was to offer instruction in the small scale production of ethanol, which can be added to gasoline by about 10%. The course was designed to help farmers in particular to make ethanol to extend fuel use. This project has four objectives. They are: (1) design an alcohol fuel production course with appropriate equipment for hands-on training; (2) offer at least three training sessions on alcohol fuel production in Cumberland County each year of the project; (3) work with the Governor's Task Force on Gasohol to disseminate the necessary information on alcohol production to the public; (4) identify, in consultation with the New Jersey Department of Energy and Agriculture, other training sites in the state and offer at least three training sessions outside of Cumberland County during the second year of the project. As of March 31, 1982, Cumberland County College completed all activities and objectives outlined in its Appropriate Technology project ''Alcohol Fuel Production.'' Given the six month extension requested to accommodate farmers in other parts of the state and the growing season, this project was completed within the stated time schedule. Although the response for the course was high in the beginning of 1981, the increased supply of low cost fuels at the end of the year probably accounts for the decline in the public's willingness to take a course of this nature.

  3. Support and power plant documentation for the gas turbine powered bus demonstration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nigro, D. N.; Stewart, R. G.; Apple, S. A.

    1982-01-01

    The operational experience obtained for the GT404-4 gas turbine engines in the intercity and intracity Bus Demonstration Programs is described for the period January 1980 through September 1981. Support for the engines and automatic transmissions involved in this program provided engineering and field service, spare parts and tools, training, and factory overhauls. the Greyhound (intercity) coaches accumulated 183,054 mi (294,595 km) and 5154 hr of total operation. The Baltimore Transit (intracity) coaches accumulated 40,567 mi (65,285 km) and 1840 hr of total operation. In service, the turbine powered Greyhound and Transit coaches achieved approximately 25% and 40% lower fuel mileage, respectively, than did the production diesel powered coaches. The gas turbine engine will require the advanced ceramic development currently being sponsored by the DOE and NASA to achieve fuel economy equivalent not only to that of today's diesel engines but also to the projected fuel economy of the advanced diesel engines of the 1990s. Sufficient experience was not achieved with the coaches prior to the start of service to identify and eliminate many of the problems associated with the startup of new equipment. Because of these problems, the mean miles between incident were unacceptably low. The future gas turbine system should be developed sufficiently to establish satisfactory durability prior to evaluation in revenue service. Commercialization of the gas turbine bus engine remains a viable goal for the future.

  4. Evaluation of battery converters based on 4. 8-MW fuel cell demonstrator inverter. Final report. [Contains brief glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    Electrical power conditioning is a critical element in the development of advanced electrochemical energy storage systems. This program evaluates the use of existing self-commutated converter technology (as developed by the Power Systems Division of United Technologies for the 4.8-MW Fuel Cell Demonstrator) with modification for use in battery energy storage systems. The program consists of three parts: evaluation of the cost and performance of a self-commutated converter modified to maintain production commonality between battery and fuel cell power conditioners, demonstration of the principal characteristics required for the battery application in MW-scale hardware, and investigation of the technical requirements of operation isolated from the utility system. A power-conditioning system consisting of a self-commutated converter augmented with a phase-controlled rectifier was selected and a preliminary design, prepared. A principal factor in this selection was production commonality with the fuel cell inverter system. Additional types of augmentation, and the use of a self-commutated converter system without augmentation, were also considered. A survey of advanced battery manufacturers was used to establish the dc interface characteristics. The principal characteristics of self-commutated converter operation required for battery application were demonstrated with the aid of an available 0.5-MW development system. A survey of five REA and municipal utilities and three A and E firms was conducted to determine technical requirements for operation in a mode isolated from the utility. Definitive requirements for this application were not established because of the limited scope of this study. 63 figures, 37 tables.

  5. Low NOx heavy fuel combustor concept program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, D. J.; Kubasco, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    Three simulated coal gas fuels based on hydrogen and carbon monoxide were tested during an experimental evaluation with a rich lean can combustor: these were a simulated Winkler gas, Lurgi gas and Blue Water gas. All three were simulated by mixing together the necessary pure component species, to levels typical of fuel gases produced from coal. The Lurgi gas was also evaluated with ammonia addition. Fuel burning in a rich lean mode was emphasized. Only the Blue Water gas, however, could be operated in such fashion. This showed that the expected NOx signature form could be obtained, although the absolute values of NOx were above the 75 ppm goals for most operating conditions. Lean combustion produced very low NOx well below 75 ppm with the Winkler and Lurgi gases. In addition, these low levels were not significantly impacted by changes in operating conditions.

  6. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program: Project fact sheets 2000, status as of June 30, 2000

    SciTech Connect

    2000-09-01

    The Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT Program), a model of government and industry cooperation, responds to the Department of Energy's (DOE) mission to foster a secure and reliable energy system that is environmentally and economically sustainable. The CCT Program represents an investment of over $5.2 billion in advanced coal-based technology, with industry and state governments providing an unprecedented 66 percent of the funding. With 26 of the 38 active projects having completed operations, the CCT Program has yielded clean coal technologies (CCTs) that are capable of meeting existing and emerging environmental regulations and competing in a deregulated electric power marketplace. The CCT Program is providing a portfolio of technologies that will assure that U.S. recoverable coal reserves of 274 billion tons can continue to supply the nation's energy needs economically and in an environmentally sound manner. As the nation embarks on a new millennium, many of the clean coal technologies have realized commercial application. Industry stands ready to respond to the energy and environmental demands of the 21st century, both domestically and internationally, For existing power plants, there are cost-effective environmental control devices to control sulfur dioxide (S02), nitrogen oxides (NO,), and particulate matter (PM). Also ready is a new generation of technologies that can produce electricity and other commodities, such as steam and synthetic gas, and provide efficiencies and environmental performance responsive to global climate change concerns. The CCT Program took a pollution prevention approach as well, demonstrating technologies that remove pollutants or their precursors from coal-based fuels before combustion. Finally, new technologies were introduced into the major coal-based industries, such as steel production, to enhance environmental performance. Thanks in part to the CCT Program, coal--abundant, secure, and economical--can continue in

  7. The low-energy program of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massarczyk, Ralph; MAJORANA Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The MAJORANA Collaboration constructed an ultra-low background, modular high-purity Ge detector array to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay in 76Ge. Located at the 4850-ft level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility, the DEMONSTRATOR detector assembly has the goal to show that it is possible to achieve background rates necessary for future ton-scale experiments. The ultra-clean assembly in combination with low-noise p-type point contact detectors allows measurements with thresholds in the keV range. The talk will give an overview of the low-energy physics and recent achievements made since the completed DEMONSTRATOR array started data taking in mid 2016. Recent results from campaign will be presented, including new limits on bosonic dark matter interaction rates. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, the Particle Astrophysics Program of the National Science Foundation, and the Sanford Underground Research Facility. We acknowledge the support of the U.S. Department of Energy through the LANL/LDRD Program.

  8. Program test objectives milestone 3. [Integrated Propulsion Technology Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaynor, T. L.

    1994-01-01

    The following conclusions have been developed relative to propulsion system technology adequacy for efficient development and operation of recoverable and expendable launch vehicles (RLV and ELV) and the benefits which the integrated propulsion technology demonstrator will provide for enhancing technology: (1) Technology improvements relative to propulsion system design and operation can reduce program cost. Many features or improvement needs to enhance operability, reduce cost, and improve payload are identified. (2) The Integrated Propulsion Technology Demonstrator (IPTD) Program provides a means of resolving the majority of issues associated with improvement needs. (3) The IPTD will evaluate complex integration of vehicle and facility functions in fluid management and propulsion control systems, and provides an environment for validating improved mechanical and electrical components. (4) The IPTD provides a mechanism for investigating operational issues focusing on reducing manpower and time to perform various functions at the launch site. These efforts include model development, collection of data to validate subject models, and ultimate development of complex time line models. (5) The IPTD provides an engine test bed for tri/bi-propellant engine development firings which is representative of the actual vehicle environment. (6) The IPTD provides for only a limited multiengine configuration integration environment for RLV. Multiengine efforts may be simulated for a number of subsystems and a number of subsystems are relatively independent of the multiengine influences.

  9. Beyond Demonstration: The Role of Fuel Cells in DoD’s Energy Strategy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-19

    BEYOND DEMONSTRATION: THE ROLE OF FUEL CELLS IN DoD’S ENERGY STRATEGY Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting ...Directorate for Information Operations and Reports , 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington VA 22202-4302. Respondents should be aware...does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 19 OCT 2011 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Beyond

  10. Demonstration and Verification of a Turbine Power Generation System Utilizing Renewable Fuel: Landfill Gas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    demonstrated at Ft. Benning, the LFG is diluted with ambient air and aspirated directly into the turbine’s compressor with minimal pretreatment (see section...2.1). Some alternative fuel sources (e.g., spent solvent vapors) may require additional gas cleaning, cooling, or pretreatment to avoid excessive...in the air plenum. • Ener-Core reviewed whether flame detectors on the startup system duct burners (E401 warmer and combustor) were required to

  11. Lessons learned from the CDC's Colorectal Cancer Screening Demonstration Program.

    PubMed

    Seeff, Laura C; Rohan, Elizabeth A

    2013-08-01

    This report briefly summarizes 13 articles in this dedicated supplement to Cancer documenting the full implementation and evaluation of CDC's Colorectal Cancer Screening Demonstration Program (CRCSDP). The supplement includes 3 articles that describe clinical and quality outcomes; 2 articles that describe programmatic and clinical costs; 3 that were based on a multiple case study, using qualitative methods to describe the overall implementation experience of this initiative; and 4 articles written by and about individual program sites. The comprehensive, multi-methods evaluation conducted alongside the program produced many important lessons regarding the design, start-up, and implementation of colorectal cancer screening in this high-need population, and paved the way for the CDC to establish a larger, population-based colorectal cancer control initiative, broadly aligned with expectations of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act through its population-based emphasis on using a health systems approach to increase colorectal cancer screening. Cancer 2013;119(15 suppl):2817-9. © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  12. Solid Polymer Electrolyte (SPE) fuel cell technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Many previously demonstrated improved fuel cell features were consolidated to (1) obtain a better understanding of the observed characteristics of the operating laboratory-sized cells; (2) evaluate appropriate improved fuel cell features in 0.7 sq ft cell hardware; and (3) study the resultant fuel cell capability and determine its impact on various potential fuel cell space missions. The observed performance characteristics of the fuel cell at high temperatures and high current densities were matched with a theoretical model based on the change in Gibbs free energy voltage with respect to temperature and internal resistance change with current density. Excellent agreement between the observed and model performance was obtained. The observed performance decay with operational time on cells with very low noble metal loadings (0.05 mg/sq cm) were shown to be related to loss in surface area. Cells with the baseline amount of noble catalyst electrode loading demonstrated over 40,000 hours of stable performance.

  13. Data collection plan for Phase 2 Alternative Fuels Bus Data Collection Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Krenelka, T

    1993-07-01

    This document constitutes the plan for collecting and reporting data associated with a special set of transit bus demonstrations to be conducted under the Urban Bus Program of the Alternative Motor Fuels Act (AMFA) of 1988. This program, called the Phase 2 Bus Data Collection Program, serves as an adjunct to the Phase I Bus Data Collection Program, collecting detailed data on just a few buses to augment and enhance the Phase 1 data in fulfilling the urban bus requirements of AMFA. Demonstrations will be conducted at a few transit system locations throughout the US and will use alternative fuels and associated technologies to reduce undesirable transit bus exhaust emissions. Several organizations will be involved in the data collection; NREL will manage the program, analyze and store vehicle data, and make these data available through the Alternative Fuels Data Center. This information will enable transit agencies, equipment manufacturers, fuel suppliers, and government policy makers to make informed decisions about buying and using alternative fuels.

  14. Intended validation in the Swedish program for spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Cronhjort, B.; Sheng, G.

    1996-12-01

    In September 1992, for the third time, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) presented its triennial R&D program, as stipulated by the Swedish Act on Nuclear Activities with amendments, e.g. SFS 1995:875. The program, entitled Programme for Research, Development, Demonstration and Other Measures, was carefully reviewed by some forty various national organizations, and universities, as well as by national authorities. In December 1993, the Government decided amongst other things, to ask SKB to develop a validation strategy for models related to the safety assessment of the intended disposal system. Thus, SKB has supplemented its RD&D-Programme 92, and the program with supplement has been reviewed anew by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI), and by the National Council for Nuclear Waste (KASAM). SKB has commented upon the reviews. The final Government decision became available on May 18, 1995. In making no comments on SKB`s offered strategy, the Government would seem to reflect tacit approval. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the intended validation strategy. The deliberations related to SKB`s developing the strategy were presented by the authors in a companion paper. In conclusion, the authors relate SKB`s intended strategy to some recent independent research on validation of general system models.

  15. Demonstrating a small utility approach to demand-side program implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    The US DOE awarded a grant to the Burlington Electric Department (B.E.D.) to test a demand-side management (DSM) demonstration program designed to quickly save a significant amount of power with little disruption to the utility's customers or its normal operations. B.E.D. is a small municipal utility located in northern Vermont, with a lengthy history of successful DSM involvement. In our grant application, we proposed to develop a replicable program and approach to DSM that might be useful to other small utilities and to write a report to enable such replication. We believe that this DSM program and/or individual program components are replicable. This report is designed to allow other utilities interested in DSM to replicate this program or specific program design features to meet their DSM goals. We also wanted to use the opportunity of this grant to test the waters of residential heating fuel-switching. We hoped to test the application of one fuel-switching technology, and to benefit from the lessons learned in developing a full-scale DSM program for this end- use. To this end the pilot effort has been very successful. In the pilot pressure we installed direct-vent gas fired space heaters sized as supplemental heating units in 44 residences heated solely by electric resistance heat. We installed the gas space heating units at no cost to the owners or residents. We surveyed participating customers. The results of those surveys are included in this report and preliminary estimates of winter peak capacity load reductions are also noted in this report.

  16. Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Analysis of Simulated Headspace Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsbad Field Office

    2006-04-01

    The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for headspace gases distributes sample gases of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for analysis. Participating measurement facilities (i.e., fixed laboratories, mobile analysis systems, and on-line analytical systems) are located across the United States. Each sample distribution is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for transuranic (TRU) waste characterization. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD) (DOE/CBFO-94-1012) and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF) issued by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The WAP requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAP. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and the applicable requirements of the WAP for the Headspace Gas (HSG) PDP. Participating measurement facilities analyze blind audit samples of simulated TRU waste package headspace gases according to the criteria set by this PDP Plan. Blind audit samples (hereafter referred to as PDP samples) are used as an independent means to assess each measurement facility’s compliance with the WAP quality assurance objectives (QAOs). To the extent possible, the concentrations of VOC analytes in the PDP samples encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual TRU waste package headspace gas samples. Analyses of headspace gases are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. These analyses must be performed by measurement facilities that have demonstrated acceptable performance in this PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses and the TRU waste package headspace gas samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples in this document. Participating measurement

  17. Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Analysis of Simulated Headspace Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsbad Field Office

    2007-11-19

    The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for headspace gases distributes blind audit samples in a gas matrix for analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Participating measurement facilities (i.e., fixed laboratories, mobile analysis systems, and on-line analytical systems) are located across the United States. Each sample distribution is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for transuranic (TRU) waste characterization. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD) (DOE/CBFO-94-1012) and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF) issued by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The WAP requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAP. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and the applicable requirements of the WAP for the Headspace Gas (HSG) PDP. Participating measurement facilities analyze blind audit samples of simulated TRU waste package headspace gases according to the criteria set by this PDP Plan. Blind audit samples (hereafter referred to as PDP samples) are used as an independent means to assess each measurement facility’s compliance with the WAP quality assurance objectives (QAOs). To the extent possible, the concentrations of VOC analytes in the PDP samples encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual TRU waste package headspace gas samples. Analyses of headspace gases are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. These analyses must be performed by measurement facilities that have demonstrated acceptable performance in this PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses and the TRU waste package headspace gas samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples in this document

  18. Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Analysis of Simulated Headspace Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsbad Field Office

    2007-11-13

    The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for headspace gases distributes blind audit samples in a gas matrix for analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Participating measurement facilities (i.e., fixed laboratories, mobile analysis systems, and on-line analytical systems) are located across the United States. Each sample distribution is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for transuranic (TRU) waste characterization. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD) (DOE/CBFO-94-1012) and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF) issued by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The WAP requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAP. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and the applicable requirements of the WAP for the Headspace Gas (HSG) PDP. Participating measurement facilities analyze blind audit samples of simulated TRU waste package headspace gases according to the criteria set by this PDP Plan. Blind audit samples (hereafter referred to as PDP samples) are used as an independent means to assess each measurement facility’s compliance with the WAP quality assurance objectives (QAOs). To the extent possible, the concentrations of VOC analytes in the PDP samples encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual TRU waste package headspace gas samples. Analyses of headspace gases are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. These analyses must be performed by measurement facilities that have demonstrated acceptable performance in this PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses and the TRU waste package headspace gas samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples in this document

  19. 2013 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-12-01

    The 2013 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2013 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen Program. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  20. 2011 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    SciTech Connect

    Satyapal, Sunita

    2011-11-01

    The 2011 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2011 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen Program. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; education; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  1. 2014 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-11-01

    The 2014 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2014 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen Program. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  2. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Budget

    SciTech Connect

    DOE

    2012-03-16

    Budget information for hydrogen and fuel cell research, development, and other activities at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is provided here. Included are budgets for DOE's Offices of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Fossil Energy, Nuclear Energy, and Science.

  3. Performance in the WIPP nondestructive assay performance demonstration program

    SciTech Connect

    Marcinkiewicz, C.J.; Connolly, M.J.; Becker, G.K.

    1997-11-01

    Measurement facilities performing nondestructive assay (NDA) of wastes intended for disposal at the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) are required to demonstrate their ability to meet specific Quality Assurance Objectives (QAOs). This demonstration is performed, in part, by participation in the NDA Performance Demonstration Program (PDP). The PDP is funded and managed by the Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) of DOE and is conducted by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. It tests the characteristics of precision, system bias and/or total uncertainty through the measurement of variable, blind combinations of simulated waste drums and certified radioactive standards. Each facility must successfully participate in the PDP using each different type of measurement system planned for use in waste characterization. The first cycle of the PDP using each different type of measurement system planned for use in waste characterization. The first cycle of the PDP was completed in July 1996 and the second is scheduled for completion by December 1996. Seven sites reported data in cycle 1 for 11 different measurement systems. This paper describes the design and operation of the PDP and provides the performance data from cycle 1. It also describes the preliminary results from cycle 2 and updates the status and future plans for the NDA PDP. 4 refs., 9 figs., 11 tabs.

  4. Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration: First Results Report

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2011-08-01

    This report documents the early implementation experience for the Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Demonstration, the largest fleet of fuel cell buses in the United States. The ZEBA Demonstration group includes five participating transit agencies: AC Transit (lead transit agency), Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA), Golden Gate Transit (GGT), San Mateo County Transit District (SamTrans), and San Francisco Municipal Railway (Muni). The ZEBA partners are collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the buses in revenue service.

  5. Development/Demonstration of an Advanced Oxy-Fuel Front-End System

    SciTech Connect

    Mighton, Steven, J.

    2007-08-06

    Owens Corning and other glass manufacturers have used oxy-fuel combustion technology successfully in furnaces to reduce emissions, increase throughput, reduce fuel consumption and, depending on the costs of oxygen and fuel, reduce energy costs. The front end of a fiberglass furnace is the refractory channel system that delivers glass from the melter to the forming process. After the melter, it is the second largest user of energy in a fiberglass plant. A consortium of glass companies and suppliers, led by Owens Corning, was formed to develop and demonstrate oxy/fuel combustion technology for the front end of a fiberglass melter, to demonstrate the viability of this energy saving technology to the U.S. glass industry, as a D.O.E. sponsored project. The project goals were to reduce natural gas consumption and CO2 green house gas emissions by 65 to 70% and create net cost savings after the purchase of oxygen to achieve a project payback of less than 2 years. Project results in Jackson, TN included achieving a 56% reduction in gas consumption and CO2 emissions. A subsequent installation in Guelph ON, not impacted by unrelated operational changes in Jackson, achieved a 64% reduction. Using the more accurate 64% reduction in the payback calculation yielded a 2.2 year payback in Jackson. The installation of the demonstration combustion system saves 77,000 DT/yr of natural gas or 77 trillion Btu/yr and eliminates 4500 tons/yr of CO2 emissions. This combustion system is one of several energy and green house gas reduction technologies being adopted by Owens Corning to achieve aggressive goals relating to the company’s global facility environmental footprint.

  6. 40 CFR 88.304-94 - Clean-fuel Fleet Vehicle Credit Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Clean-fuel Fleet Vehicle Credit...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CLEAN-FUEL VEHICLES Clean-Fuel Fleet Program § 88.304-94 Clean-fuel Fleet... purchasing clean-fuel vehicles (CFVs) directly and by trading and banking CFFV credits for vehicle...

  7. 40 CFR 88.304-94 - Clean-fuel Fleet Vehicle Credit Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Clean-fuel Fleet Vehicle Credit...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CLEAN-FUEL VEHICLES Clean-Fuel Fleet Program § 88.304-94 Clean-fuel Fleet... purchasing clean-fuel vehicles (CFVs) directly and by trading and banking CFFV credits for vehicle...

  8. 40 CFR 88.304-94 - Clean-fuel Fleet Vehicle Credit Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Clean-fuel Fleet Vehicle Credit...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CLEAN-FUEL VEHICLES Clean-Fuel Fleet Program § 88.304-94 Clean-fuel Fleet... purchasing clean-fuel vehicles (CFVs) directly and by trading and banking CFFV credits for vehicle...

  9. 40 CFR 88.304-94 - Clean-fuel Fleet Vehicle Credit Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Clean-fuel Fleet Vehicle Credit...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CLEAN-FUEL VEHICLES Clean-Fuel Fleet Program § 88.304-94 Clean-fuel Fleet... purchasing clean-fuel vehicles (CFVs) directly and by trading and banking CFFV credits for vehicle...

  10. NASA/General Electric broad-specification fuels combustion technology program - Phase I results and status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodds, W. J.; Ekstedt, E. E.; Bahr, D. W.; Fear, J. S.

    1982-01-01

    A program is being conducted to develop the technology required to utilize fuels with broadened properties in aircraft gas turbine engines. The first phase of this program consisted of the experimental evaluation of three different combustor concepts to determine their potential for meeting several specific emissions and performance goals, when operated on broadened property fuels. The three concepts were a single annular combustor; a double annular combustor; and a short single annular combustor with variable geometry. All of these concepts were sized for the General Electric CF6-80 engine. A total of 24 different configurations of these concepts were evaluated in a high pressure test facility, using four test fuels having hydrogen contents between 11.8 and 14%. Fuel effects on combustor performance, durability and emissions, and combustor design features to offset these effects were demonstrated.

  11. Status of the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, C.J.; Stephens, M.E. )

    1992-01-01

    The Canadian Concept for the permanent disposal of nuclear fuel waste has been developed extensively over the past several years, and is now well-advanced. The Concept, which involves the construction of a waste vault 500 to 1000 metres deep in plutonic rock located in the Canadian Precambrian Shield, is supported by an R D program with the following objectives: (1) to develop and demonstrate technology to site, design, build and operate a disposal facility; (2) to develop and demonstrate a methodology to evaluate the performance of the disposal system; and (3) to demonstrate that sites are likely to exist in the Canadian Precambrian Shield that would meet the regulatory requirements. A combination of engineered and natural barriers will be used to ensure that the vault design will meet rigorous safety standards. Experimental work is being carried out to elucidate all the important phenomena associated with the safety of the vault, including the performance of engineered barriers, natural geological barriers, and the biosphere.

  12. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Education Programs Demonstrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Reports from the session on Education Programs Demonstration include:Hands-On Activities for Exploring the Solar System in K-14; Formal Education and Informal Settings;Making Earth and Space Science and Exploration Accessible; New Thematic Solar System Exploration Products for Scientists and Educators Engaging Students of All Ages with Research-related Activities: Using the Levers of Museum Reach and Media Attention to Current Events; Astronomy Village: Use of Planetary Images in Educational Multimedia; ACUMEN: Astronomy Classes Unleashed: Meaningful Experiences for Neophytes; Unusual Guidebook to Terrestrial Field Work Studies: Microenvironmental Studies by Landers on Planetary Surfaces (New Atlas in the Series of the Solar System Notebooks on E tv s University, Hungary); and The NASA ADS: Searching, Linking and More.

  13. Program Area of Interest: Fuel Transformer Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Norman Bessette; Douglas S. Schmidt; Jolyon Rawson; Rhys Foster; Anthony Litka

    2006-02-01

    The following report documents the technical approach and conclusions made by Acumentrics Corporation during latest budget period toward the development of a low cost 10kW tubular SOFC power system. The present program, guided under direction from the National Energy Technology Laboratory of the US DOE, is a nine-year cost shared Cooperative Agreement totaling close to $74M funded both by the US DOE as well as Acumentrics Corporation and its partners. The latest budget period ran from July of 2005 through December 2005. Work focused on cell technology enhancements as well as BOP and power electronics improvements and overall system design. Significant progress was made in increasing cell power enhancements as well as decreasing material cost in a drive to meet the SECA cost targets. The following report documents these accomplishments in detail as well as the layout plans for further progress in next budget period.

  14. A description of the demonstration Integral Fast Reactor fuel cycle facility.

    PubMed

    Courtney, J C; Carnes, M D; Dwight, C C; Forrester, R J

    1991-10-01

    A fuel examination facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is being converted into a facility that will electrochemically process spent fuel. This is an important step in the demonstration of the Integral Fast Reactor concept being developed by Argonne National Laboratory. Renovations are designed to bring the facility up to current health and safety and environmental standards and to support its new mission. Improvements include the addition of high-reliability earthquake hardened off-gas and electrical power systems, the upgrading of radiological instrumentation, and the incorporation of advances in contamination control. A major task is the construction of a new equipment repair and decontamination facility in the basement of the building to support operations.

  15. Flexibility Demonstration Programs: Education Needs To Better Target Program Information. Report to Congressional Requesters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaul, Marnie S.

    The No Child Left Behind Act (NCLBA) established 2 flexibility demonstration programs--State- and Local-Flex--that allow up to 7 states and 80 school districts to redirect up to 100 percent of certain NCLBA programs funds. The General Accounting Office (GAO) was asked to determine factors that affect states' and districts' decisions about whether…

  16. DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel program plan

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has produced spent nuclear fuel (SNF) for many years as part of its various missions and programs. The historical process for managing this SNF was to reprocess it whereby valuable material such as uranium or plutonium was chemically separated from the wastes. These fuels were not intended for long-term storage. As the need for uranium and plutonium decreased, it became necessary to store the SNF for extended lengths of time. This necessity resulted from a 1992 DOE decision to discontinue reprocessing SNF to recover strategic materials (although limited processing of SNF to meet repository acceptance criteria remains under consideration, no plutonium or uranium extraction for other uses is planned). Both the facilities used for storage, and the fuel itself, began experiencing aging from this extended storage. New efforts are now necessary to assure suitable fuel and facility management until long-term decisions for spent fuel disposition are made and implemented. The Program Plan consists of 14 sections as follows: Sections 2--6 describe objectives, management, the work plan, the work breakdown structure, and the responsibility assignment matrix. Sections 7--9 describe the program summary schedules, site logic diagram, SNF Program resource and support requirements. Sections 10--14 present various supplemental management requirements and quality assurance guidelines.

  17. Fuel Cell Demonstration Project - 200 kW - Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell Power Plant Located at the National Transportation Research Center: FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, JB

    2005-05-06

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researches and develops distributed generation technology for the Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Distributed Energy Program. This report describes installation and operation of one such distributed generation system, a United Technology Corporation fuel cell located at the National Transportation Research Center in Knoxville, Tennessee. Data collected from June 2003 to June of 2004, provides valuable insight regarding fuel cell-grid compatibility and the cost-benefit of the fuel cell operation. The NTRC fuel cell included a high-heat recovery option so that use of thermal energy improves project economics and improves system efficiency to 59% year round. During the year the fuel cell supplied a total of 834MWh to the NTRC and provided 300MBtu of hot water. Installation of the NTRC fuel cell was funded by the Distributed Energy Program with partial funding from the Department of Defense's Climate Change Fuel Cell Buy Down Program, administered by the National Energy Technology Laboratory. On-going operational expenses are funded by ORNL's utility budget and are paid from operational cost savings. Technical information and the benefit-cost of the fuel cell are both evaluated in this report and sister reports.

  18. Progress on Fuel Receiving and Storage Decontamination Work at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, J. F.; Al-Daouk, A. M.; Moore, H. R.

    2003-02-25

    The West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) removed the last of its spent nuclear fuel assemblies from an on-site storage pool last year and is now decontaminating its Fuel Receiving and Storage (FRS) Facility. The decontamination project will reduce the long-lived curie inventory, associated radiological hazards, and the operational costs associated with the maintenance of this facility. Workers at the WVDP conducted the first phase of the FRS decontamination project in late 2001 by removing 149 canisters that previously contained spent fuel assemblies from the pool. Removal of the canisters from the pool paved the way for nuclear divers to begin removing canister storage racks and other miscellaneous material from the FRS pool in February 2002. This was only the third time in the history of the WVDP that nuclear divers were used to perform underwater work. After decontaminating the pool, it will be drained slowly until all of the water is removed. The water will be processed through an ion exchanger to remove radioactive contaminants as it is being drained, and a fixative will be applied to the walls above the water surface to secure residual contamination.

  19. 75 FR 71171 - Social Security Disability Program Demonstration Project: Benefit Offset National Demonstration...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-22

    ... disability or blindness under title XVI of the Act. However, we are only modifying title II program rules for... disability or blindness does not affect the recipient's disability or blindness status under the SSI program... based on disability and title XVI payments based on disability or blindness. We estimate that the...

  20. Low NO/sub x/ Heavy Fuel Combustor Concept Program. Phase I. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cutrone, M B

    1981-10-01

    Six combustor concepts were designed, fabricated, and underwent a series of combustion tests with the objective of evaluating and developing a combustor capable of meeting US New Source Performance Standards (NSPS), dry, for high-nitrogen liquid fuels. Three rich/lean and three lean/lean two-stage combustors were tested with ERBS distillate, petroleum residual, and SRC-II coal derived liquid (CDL) fuels with fuel-bound nitrogen contents of 0.0054, 0.23, and 0.87 weight percent, respectively. A lean/lean concept was demonstrated with ultralow NO/sub x/ emissions, dry, of 5 gm NO/sub x/kg fuel on ERBS, and NO/sub x/ emissions meeting the NSPS NO/sub x/ standard on residual fuel. This combustor concept met operational goals for pressure drop, smoke, exhaust pattern factor, and combustion efficiency. A rich/lean concept was identified and developed which demonstrated NO/sub x/ emissions approaching the NSPS standards, dry, for all liquid fuels including the 0.87 weight percent nitrogen SRC-II coal-derived liquid. Exhaust pattern factor and pressure drop met or approached goals. Smoke emissions were higher than the program goal. However, a significant improvement was made with only a minor modification of the fuel injector/air swirler system, and further development should result in meeting smoke goals for all fuels. Liner metal temperatures were higher than allowable for commercial application. Conceptual designs for further development of these two rich/lean and lean/lean concepts have been completed which address smoke and metal temperature concerns, and are available for the next phase of this NASA-sponsored, DOE-funded program. Tests of a rich/lean concept, and a catalytic combustor concept using low- and intermediate-Btu simulated coal-derived gases will be completed during the ongoing Phase IA extension of this program.

  1. National commercial solar heating and cooling demonstration: purposes, program activities, and implications for future programs

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, R.; Genest, M.; Bryant, B.

    1980-05-01

    The Solar Heating and Cooling Demonstration Act of 1974 created a set of activities to demonstrate the potential use of solar heating within a three-year period and of combined solar heating and cooling within a five-year period. This study assesses the Commercial Demonstration Program portion of the activity in terms of its stated goals and objectives. The primary data base was DOE contractor reports on commercial demonstration projects. It was concluded that the program did not provide data to support a positive decision for the immediate construction or purchase of commercial solar systems. However, the program may have contributed to other goals in the subsequent legislation; i.e., research and development information, stimulation of the solar industry, and more informed policy decisions.

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) PROGRAM: FUEL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program evaluates the performance of innovative air, water, pollution prevention and monitoring technologies that have the potential to improve human health and the environment. This techno...

  3. Announcements under the Renewable Fuel Standard Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    RFS program announcements are posted below by the calendar year in which the action was posted. Announcements will include rulemakings, responses to petitions, new pathway approvals, compliance deadlines, alternative plans, and among others.

  4. Overview of the U.S. DOE Accident Tolerant Fuel Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Jon Carmack; Frank Goldner; Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton; Lance L. Snead

    2013-09-01

    The United States Fuel Cycle Research and Development Advanced Fuels Campaign has been given the responsibility to conduct research and development on enhanced accident tolerant fuels with the goal of performing a lead test assembly or lead test rod irradiation in a commercial reactor by 2022. The Advanced Fuels Campaign has defined fuels with enhanced accident tolerance as those that, in comparison with the standard UO2-Zircaloy system currently used by the nuclear industry, can tolerate loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer time period (depending on the LWR system and accident scenario) while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations and operational transients, as well as design-basis and beyond design-basis events. This paper provides an overview of the FCRD Accident Tolerant Fuel program. The ATF attributes will be presented and discussed. Attributes identified as potentially important to enhance accident tolerance include reduced hydrogen generation (resulting from cladding oxidation), enhanced fission product retention under severe accident conditions, reduced cladding reaction with high-temperature steam, and improved fuel-cladding interaction for enhanced performance under extreme conditions. To demonstrate the enhanced accident tolerance of candidate fuel designs, metrics must be developed and evaluated using a combination of design features for a given LWR design, potential improvements to that design, and the design of an advanced fuel/cladding system. The aforementioned attributes provide qualitative guidance for parameters that will be considered for fuels with enhanced accident tolerance. It may be unnecessary to improve in all attributes and it is likely that some attributes or combination of attributes provide meaningful gains in accident tolerance, while others may provide only marginal benefits. Thus, an initial step in program implementation will be the development of quantitative

  5. Run - Beyond - Cladding - Breach (RBCB) test results for the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) metallic fuels program

    SciTech Connect

    Batte, G.L. ); Hoffman, G.L. )

    1990-01-01

    In 1984 Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) began an aggressive program of research and development based on the concept of a closed system for fast-reactor power generation and on-site fuel reprocessing, exclusively designed around the use of metallic fuel. This is the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). Although the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) has used metallic fuel since its creation 25 yeas ago, in 1985 ANL began a study of the characteristics and behavior of an advanced-design metallic fuel based on uranium-zirconium (U-Zr) and uranium-plutonium-zirconium (U-Pu-Zr) alloys. During the past five years several areas were addressed concerning the performance of this fuel system. In all instances of testing the metallic fuel has demonstrated its ability to perform reliably to high burnups under varying design conditions. This paper will present one area of testing which concerns the fuel system's performance under breach conditions. It is the purpose of this paper to document the observed post-breach behavior of this advanced-design metallic fuel. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Air Force fuel mainburner/turbine effects programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, T. A.

    1980-01-01

    A program for the determination of fuel property effects on aircraft gas turbine engine mainburners and turbines is discussed. The six engines selected as test candidates are the J79, J85, J57, TF30, TF39, and F100. Fuels election is the responsibility of the contractors with two fuels as exceptions. The petroleum JP-4 is to be used as a baseline in all tests. The shale JP-4 is to be used in nearly all tests. Fuel properties are to be correlated with combustion system performance paramters. In addition, life predictions are to be made for combustor and turbine hardware. These predictions are to be based on a typical mission for each system, measured metal temperatures and temperature gradients, and oxidation/corrosion effects.

  7. Teacher-Controlled Programs for Demonstrating Concepts in Calculus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hativa, Nira; Barall, Michael

    1984-01-01

    Describes the principles underlying computer programs designed to improve undergraduate calculus instruction. The programs were produced for teacher use on a single microcomputer for when there are not enough microcomputers available to allow students to have access to them. (JN)

  8. Summary report on fuel development and miniplate fabrication for the RERTR Program, 1978 to 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Wiencek, T.C.

    1995-08-01

    This report summarizes the efforts of the Fabrication Technology Section at Argonne National Laboratory in the program of Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactors (RERTR). The main objective of this program was to reduce the amount of high enriched ({approx}93% {sup 235}U) uranium (HEU) used in nonpower reactors. Conversion from low-density (0.8--1.6 g U/cm{sup 3}) HEU fuel elements to highly loaded (up to 7 g U/cm{sup 3}) low-enrichment (<20% {sup 235}U) uranium (LEU) fuel elements allows the same reactor power levels, core designs and sizes to be retained while greatly reducing the possibility of illicit diversion of HEU nuclear fuel. This document is intended as an overview of the period 1978--1990, during which the Section supported this project by fabricating mainly powder metallurgy uranium-silicide dispersion fuel plates. Most of the subjects covered in detail are fabrication-related studies of uranium silicide fuels and fuel plate properties. Some data are included for out-of-pile experiments such as corrosion and compatibility tests. Also briefly covered are most other aspects of the RERTR program such as irradiation tests, full-core demonstrations, and technology transfer. References included are for further information on most aspects of the entire program. A significant portion of the report is devoted to data that were never published in their entirety. The appendices contain a list of previous RERTR reports, ANL fabrication procedures, calculations for phases present in two-phase fuels, chemical analysis of fuels, miniplate characteristics, and a summary of bonding runs made by hot isostatic pressing.

  9. Subscale Beryllium Mirrors Demonstrator (SBMD) Program Summary and Ball Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendrick, Stephen; Brown, Robert; Stahl, Philip (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The SBMD Program was to design, fabricate, and test a 0.5-m beryllium lightweighted mirror applicable to space deployable systems with demanding optical and areal density requirements. This presentation summarizes the program's objectives and the mirror's tested technical performance along with lessons learned. In addition, test results are compared to modeling predictions. The SBMD Program was funded by NASA MSFC.

  10. Consolidated fuel reprocessing program: Criticality experiments with fast test reactor fuel pins in an organic moderator

    SciTech Connect

    Bierman, S.R.

    1986-12-01

    The results obtained in a series of criticality experiments performed as part of a joint program on criticality data development between the United States Department of Energy and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan are presented in this report along with a complete description of the experiments. The experiments involved lattices of Fast Test Reactor (FTR) fuel pins in an organic moderator mixture similar to that used in the solvent extraction stage of fuel reprocessing. The experiments are designed to provide data for direct comparison with previously performed experimental measurements with water moderated lattices of FTR fuel pins. The same lattice arrangements and FTR fuel pin types are used in these organic moderated experimental assemblies as were used in the water moderated experiments. The organic moderator is a mixture of 38 wt % tributylphosphate in a normal paraffin hydrocarbon mixture of C{sub 11}H{sub 24} to C{sub 15}H{sub 32} molecules. Critical sizes of 1054.8, 599.2, 301.8, 199.5 and 165.3 fuel pins were obtained respectively for organic moderated lattices having 0.761 cm, 0.968 cm, 1.242 cm, 1.537 cm and 1.935 cm square lattice pitches as compared to 1046.9, 571.9, 293.9, 199.7 and 165.1 fuel pins for the same lattices water moderated.

  11. Results from the DOE Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program

    SciTech Connect

    David Petti

    2014-06-01

    Modular HTGR designs were developed to provide natural safety, which prevents core damage under all design basis accidents and presently envisioned severe accidents. The principle that guides their design concepts is to passively maintain core temperatures below fission product release thresholds under all accident scenarios. This level of fuel performance and fission product retention reduces the radioactive source term by many orders of magnitude and allows potential elimination of the need for evacuation and sheltering beyond a small exclusion area. This level, however, is predicated on exceptionally high fuel fabrication quality and performance under normal operation and accident conditions. Germany produced and demonstrated high quality fuel for their pebble bed HTGRs in the 1980s, but no U.S. manufactured fuel had exhibited equivalent performance prior to the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. The design goal of the modular HTGRs is to allow elimination of an exclusion zone and an emergency planning zone outside the plant boundary fence, typically interpreted as being about 400 meters from the reactor. To achieve this, the reactor design concepts require a level of fuel integrity that is better than that claimed for all prior US manufactured TRISO fuel, by a few orders of magnitude. The improved performance level is about a factor of three better than qualified for German TRISO fuel in the 1980’s. At the start of the AGR program, without a reactor design concept selected, the AGR fuel program selected to qualify fuel to an operating envelope that would bound both pebble bed and prismatic options. This resulted in needing a fuel form that could survive at peak fuel temperatures of 1250°C on a time-averaged basis and high burnups in the range of 150 to 200 GWd/MTHM (metric tons of heavy metal) or 16.4 to 21.8% fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA). Although Germany has demonstrated excellent performance of TRISO-coated UO

  12. Consolidated fuel reprocessing. Program progress report, April 1-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    This progress report is compiled from major contributions from three programs: (1) the Advanced Fuel Recycle Program at ORNL; (2) the Converter Fuel Reprocessing Program at Savannah River Laboratory; and (3) the reprocessing components of the HTGR Fuel Recycle Program, primarily at General Atomic and ORNL. The coverage is generally overview in nature; experimental details and data are limited.

  13. Demonstration program for coal-oil mixture combustion in an electric utility boiler - Category III A. 1978 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-01

    The 1978 annual report covers New England Power Service Company's participation in the Department of Energy coal-oil mixture (COM) program. Continued world-wide unrest resulting in an unstable fuel oil supply coupled with rapidly inflating costs have caused continued interest in a demonstrable viable solution. NEPSCO's program, while not attaining all the milestones forecast, has made considerable progress. As of January 31, 1979, ninety-five (95% percent of engineering and design has been completed. Construction of facilities and installation of required equipment was approximately 75% complete and the six-week Feasibility Testing program was expected to commence during April 1979.

  14. Fuel System: Automotive Mechanics Instructional Program. Block 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Ralph D.

    The fourth of six instructional blocks in automotive mechanics, the lessons and supportive information in the document provide a guide for teachers in planning an instructional program in automotive fuel systems at the secondary and post secondary level. The material, as organized, is a suggested sequence of instruction within each block. Each…

  15. 40 CFR 63.7540 - How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the emission limitations, fuel specifications and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....7550. (c) If you elected to demonstrate that the unit meets the specifications for hydrogen sulfide and... mixtures of fuels burned would either result in lower emissions of hydrogen chloride and mercury than the... compliance with an applicable hydrogen chloride emission limit through fuel analysis and you plan to burn...

  16. 40 CFR 63.7540 - How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the emission limitations, fuel specifications and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....7550. (c) If you elected to demonstrate that the unit meets the specifications for hydrogen sulfide and... mixtures of fuels burned would either result in lower emissions of hydrogen chloride and mercury than the... compliance with an applicable hydrogen chloride emission limit through fuel analysis and you plan to burn...

  17. Technology Demonstration Summary Site Program Demonstration Test Soliditech Inc Solidification-stabilization Process

    EPA Science Inventory

    The major objective of the Soliditech, Inc., SITE demonstration was to develop reliable performance and cost information about the Soliditech solidification, stabilization technology. The Soliditech process mixes hazardous waste materials with Portland cement or pozzolanic m...

  18. Fire-resistant fuel program analysis and program management documentation. Final report, December 1985-January 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Dye, C.A.

    1986-01-31

    There was an urgent need to transition management of the Fire Resistant Fuel (FRF) Program from the Materials Fuels and Lubricants Laboratory (MFLL) to the Logistics Support Directorate (LSD). It is recommended that the LSD develop program management documentation (PMD) that supports a Milestone I review as soon as possible to include the following: System Concept Paper, Concept Formulation Package and a Test Evaluation Master Plan. This report describes programmatic analyses and subsequent programmatic recommendations.

  19. SITE TECHNOLOGY PROFILES, TENTH EDITION, VOLUME I - DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, now in its thirteenth year, is an integral part of EPA's research into alternative cleanup methods for hazardous waste sites around the nation. The SITE Program was created to encourage the development and routine us...

  20. SITE TECHNOLOGY PROFILES - 11TH EDITION - DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM, VOLUME 1

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, now in its eleventh year is an integral part of EPA's research into alternative cleanup methods for hazardous waste sites around the nation. The SITE Program was created to encourage the development and routine use o...

  1. Cooperative Demonstration Program To Train Aviation Maintenance Technicians. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Aviation and Technical Coll., Ozark.

    The Alabama Aviation and Technical College, working with representatives of the aviation industry, the military, the Alabama Department of Aeronautics, and the Federal Aviation Administration, developed a training program for aviation maintenance technicians. The program also aimed to emphasize and expand opportunities for minorities, females, and…

  2. Spent Fuel and Waste Management Technology Development Program. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    This report provides information on the progress of activities during fiscal year 1993 in the Spent Fuel and Waste Management Technology Development Program (SF&WMTDP) at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). As a new program, efforts are just getting underway toward addressing major issues related to the fuel and waste stored at the ICPP. The SF&WMTDP has the following principal objectives: Investigate direct dispositioning of spent fuel, striving for one acceptable waste form; determine the best treatment process(es) for liquid and calcine wastes to minimize the volume of high level radioactive waste (HLW) and low level waste (LLW); demonstrate the integrated operability and maintainability of selected treatment and immobilization processes; and assure that implementation of the selected waste treatment process is environmentally acceptable, ensures public and worker safety, and is economically feasible.

  3. National Program Plan Fuel Cells in Transportation. Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    Fuel cells are being developed for application in the transportation sector because they will convert hydrogen to electric power at high efficiencies with virtually no detrimental environmental impact. To realize these energy, environmental, and economic benefits, developers of FCVs need to (1) reduce the size and weight of current designs, (2) develop fuel cell propulsion systems with rapid start-up and greater load-following capability, (3) reduce system cost and/or improve performance, and (4) utilize alternative fuels to a large extent. This Plan addresses the FCV-related requirements of the Energy Act, describing a development program for light- and heavy-duty propulsion systems, a basic R&D program on fuel cell technology that is separate from, but feeds into, the system development activities, and supporting analyses. Implementation of the Program Plan by means of industry/government alliances will accelerate the commercialization of FCVs. In the long term, the successful deployment of large numbers of FCVs promises to eliminate the transportation sector as a major contributor to the nation`s environmental problems.

  4. Task 27 -- Alaskan low-rank coal-water fuel demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    Development of coal-water-fuel (CWF) technology has to-date been predicated on the use of high-rank bituminous coal only, and until now the high inherent moisture content of low-rank coal has precluded its use for CWF production. The unique feature of the Alaskan project is the integration of hot-water-drying (HWD) into CWF technology as a beneficiation process. Hot-water-drying is an EERC developed technology unavailable to the competition that allows the range of CWF feedstock to be extended to low-rank coals. The primary objective of the Alaskan Project, is to promote interest in the CWF marketplace by demonstrating the commercial viability of low-rank coal-water-fuel (LRCWF). While commercialization plans cannot be finalized until the implementation and results of the Alaskan LRCWF Project are known and evaluated, this report has been prepared to specifically address issues concerning business objectives for the project, and outline a market development plan for meeting those objectives.

  5. Cool-down performance of the new apparatus for fuel layering demonstrations of FIREX targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, A.; Norimatsu, T.; Nakai, M.; Sakagami, H.; Shiraga, H.; Azechi, H.

    2016-03-01

    FIREX targets have been developed under two layering strategies: foam shell and cone guide laser heating methods. Basic studies have been conducted by the collaboration research between ILE and NIFS. Then the next stage requires the characterization of a layered solid fuel. The present system is at the disadvantage of optical observations. Therefore, a new apparatus is designed to solve it. Glass windows with a wide aperture are installed for an interferometer and a microscope. To isolate the vibration from a cryocooler, active vibration control units are equipped, and flexible thermal conductive links are utilized. Furthermore, a quick target exchange mechanism is applied to deal with different types of FIREX targets. A target holder is detachable from a main vacuum chamber. A metal gasket with not fixing bolts but a load of ∼ thousand newtons on ensures GHe leak tightness for target cooling. Eventually, the design temperature of 10.00 K at a target container has been achieved. The cool-down performance indecates that the new apparatus provides a cryogenic environment for fuel layering demonstrations.

  6. Vocational Education Partnerships. Cecil County, Maryland. Cooperative Demonstration Program. Final Program Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cecil Community Coll., Elkton, MD.

    A cooperative demonstration project between Cecil Community College (Maryland) and corporate partners developed four model vocational training programs in basic carpentry skills, basic dry wall/finishing skills, straight truck driver training, and tractor trailer driver training. The objective of the project was to improve access to vocational…

  7. TRSB Microwave Landing System Demonstration Program at Nairobi, Kenya.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-02-01

    8217 was within the U.S. Phase III Program design requirements, the ICAO ’reduced capability system’ requirements, and the ICAO ’full capability system’ requirements. The TRSB system installation did not adversely affect the ILS. (Author)

  8. Coupling the core analysis program DeCART to the fuel performance application BISON

    SciTech Connect

    Gleicher, F. N.; Spencer, B.; Novascone, S.; Williamson, R.; Martineau, R. C.; Rose, M.; Downar, T. J.; Collins, B.

    2013-07-01

    The 3D neutron transport and core analysis program DeCART was coupled to the fuels performance application BISON to provide a higher fidelity tool for fuel performance simulation. This project is motivated by the desire to couple a high fidelity core analysis program (based on the method of characteristics) to a high fidelity fuel performance program, both of which can simulate 3D problems. DeCART provides sub-pin level resolution of the multigroup neutron flux, with resonance treatment, during burnup or a fast transient. BISON implicitly solves coupled thermomechanical equations for the fuel on a sub-millimeter level finite element mesh. A method was developed for mapping the fission rate density and fast neutron flux from DeCART to BISON. Multiple depletion cases were run with one-way data transfer from DeCART to BISON. The one-way data transfer of fission rate density is shown to agree with the fission rate density obtained from an internal Lassman-style model in BISON. One-way data transfer was also demonstrated in a 3D case in which azimuthal asymmetry was induced in the fission rate density profile of a fuel rod modeled in DeCART. Two-way data transfer was established by mapping the temperature distribution from BISON to DeCART. A Picard iterative algorithm was developed for the loose coupling with two-way data transfer. (authors)

  9. Demonstrating hydrogen production from ammonia using lithium imide - Powering a small proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Hazel M. A.; Makepeace, Joshua W.; Wood, Thomas J.; Mylius, O. Simon; Kibble, Mark G.; Nutter, Jamie B.; Jones, Martin O.; David, William I. F.

    2016-10-01

    Accessing the intrinsic hydrogen content within ammonia, NH3, has the potential to play a very significant role in the future of a CO2-free sustainable energy supply. Inexpensive light metal imides and amides are effective at decomposing ammonia to hydrogen and nitrogen (2NH3 → 3H2 + N2), at modest temperatures, and thus represent a low-cost approach to on-demand hydrogen production. Building upon this discovery, this paper describes the integration of an ammonia cracking unit with a post-reactor gas purification system and a small-scale PEM fuel cell to create a first bench-top demonstrator for the production of hydrogen using light metal imides.

  10. 75 FR 26049 - Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: Modifications to Renewable Fuel Standard Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-10

    ... fuels such as ethanol and biodiesel. Regulated categories and entities affected by this action include... for compliance purposes under RFS2. With regard to biodiesel and renewable diesel, the regulations at... were included in this provision because they are indicative of biodiesel and renewable...

  11. Survey of Dynamic Simulation Programs for Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Troy J. Tranter; Daryl R. Haefner

    2008-06-01

    The absence of any industrial scale nuclear fuel reprocessing in the U.S. has precluded the necessary driver for developing the advanced simulation capability now prevalent in so many other industries. Modeling programs to simulate the dynamic behavior of nuclear fuel separations and processing were originally developed to support the US government’s mission of weapons production and defense fuel recovery. Consequently there has been little effort is the US devoted towards improving this specific process simulation capability during the last two or three decades. More recent work has been focused on elucidating chemical thermodynamics and developing better models of predicting equilibrium in actinide solvent extraction systems. These equilibrium models have been used to augment flowsheet development and testing primarily at laboratory scales. The development of more robust and complete process models has not kept pace with the vast improvements in computational power and user interface and is significantly behind simulation capability in other chemical processing and separation fields.

  12. FY-94 buried waste integrated demonstration program report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) supports the applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a multitude of advanced technologies. These technologies are being integrated to form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. These efforts are identified and coordinated in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER/WM) needs and objectives. This document summarizes previous demonstrations and describes the FY-94 BWID technology development and demonstration activities. Sponsored by the DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD), BWID works with universities and private industry to develop these technologies, which are being transferred to the private sector for use nationally and internationally. A public participation policy has been established to provide stakeholders with timely and accurate information and meaningful opportunities for involvement in the technology development and demonstration process.

  13. Low-E Retrofit Demonstration and Educational Program

    SciTech Connect

    Culp, Thomas D; Wiehagen, Joseph; Drumheller, S Craig; Siegel, John; Stratmoen, Todd

    2013-11-16

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate the capability of low-emissivity (low-E) storm windows / panels and low-E retrofit glazing systems to significantly and cost effectively improve the energy efficiency of both existing residential and commercial buildings. The key outcomes are listed below: RESIDENTIAL CASE STUDIES: (a) A residential case study in two large multifamily apartment buildings in Philadelphia showed a substantial 18-22% reduction in heating energy use and a 9% reduction in cooling energy use by replacing old clear glass storm windows with modern low-E storm windows. Furthermore, the new low-E storm windows reduced the overall apartment air leakage by an average of 10%. (b) Air leakage testing on interior low-E panels installed in a New York City multifamily building over windows with and without AC units showed that the effective leakage area of the windows was reduced by 77-95%. (c) To study the use of low-E storm windows in a warmer mixed climate with a balance of both heating and cooling, 10 older homes near Atlanta with single pane windows were tested with three types of exterior storm windows: clear glass, low-E glass with high solar heat gain, and low-E glass with lower solar heat gain. The storm windows significantly reduced the overall home air leakage by an average of 17%, or 3.7 ACH50. Considerably high variability in the data made it difficult to draw strong conclusions about the overall energy usage, but for heating periods, the low-E storm windows showed approximately 15% heating energy savings, whereas clear storm windows were neutral in performance. For cooling periods, the low-E storm windows showed a wide range of performance from 2% to over 30% cooling energy savings. Overall, the study showed the potential for significantly more energy savings from using low-E glass versus no storm window or clear glass storm windows in warmer mixed climates, but it is difficult to conclusively say whether one type of low-E performed

  14. Recovery Act: Demonstration of a SOFC Generator Fueled by Propane to Provide Electrical Power to Real World Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bessette, Norman

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this project provided with funds through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) was to demonstrate a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) generator capable of operation on propane fuel to improve efficiency and reduce emissions over commercially available portable generators. The key objectives can be summarized as: Development of two portable electrical generators in the 1-3kW range utilizing Solid Oxide Fuel Cells and propane fuel; The development and demonstration of a proof-of-concept electro-mechanical propane fuel interface that provides a user friendly capability for managing propane fuel; The deployment and use of the fuel cell portable generators to power media production equipment over the course of several months at multiple NASCAR automobile racing events; The deployment and use of the fuel cell portable generators at scheduled events by first responders (police, fire) of the City of Folsom California; and Capturing data with regard to the systems’ ability to meet Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Targets and evaluating the ease of use and potential barriers to further adoption of the systems.

  15. TRSB Microwave Landing System Demonstration Program at Dakar, Senegal.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-02-01

    demonstrations indicated that the performance of the TRSB Small Community System configuration was within the Phase III design requirements and met the ICAO ’full capability system’ requirements. (Author)

  16. Low Cost Ideas. California Demonstration Program in Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Shirle; Solomon, Jorene

    Techniques and suggestions for establishing a junior high level individualized reading program stress efficiency, economy, and development of teacher and student morale. Over 20 tips, presented in alphabetical order, are illustrated. Examples of ideas discussed are: an answer key book, a book exchange, instruction notebooks and signs, evaluation…

  17. EPA'S REGIONAL VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT PROGRAM (REVA) DEMONSTRATING RESULTS THROUGH PARTNERSHIPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Regional Vulnerability Assessment (ReVA) program, a regional-scale comparative risk research effort, has been under development since 1998 with a pilot study focused on the Mid- Atlantic region. ReVA is part of the interagency Integrated Science for Ecosystem Challenges ini...

  18. Evaluation of Arsenic Removal Technology: Arsenic Demonstration Program

    EPA Science Inventory

    Specific objectives of this program are to evaluate the reliability of the arsenic technologies of small scale systems; to gauge the simplicity of system operations, maintenance and operator skill; to determine the cost-effectiveness of the treatment technologies; and to characte...

  19. MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE COMBUSTOR ASH DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM - "THE BOATHOUSE"

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report presents the results of a research program designed to examine the engineering and environmental acceptability of using municipal solid waste (MSW) combustor ash as an aggregate substitute in the manufacture of construction quality cement blocks. 50 tons of MSW combust...

  20. Efficient Swath Mapping Laser Altimetry Demonstration Instrument Incubator Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Anthony W.; Krainak, Michael A,; Harding, David J.; Abshire, James B.; Sun, Xiaoli; Cavanaugh, John; Valett, Susan

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we will discuss our eighteen-month progress of a three-year Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) funded by NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) on swath mapping laser altimetry system. This paper will discuss the system approach, enabling technologies and instrument concept for the swath mapping laser altimetry.

  1. Long-life high performance fuel cell program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    A multihundred kilowatt Regenerative Fuel Cell for use in a space station is envisioned. Three 0.508 sq ft (471.9 cm) active area multicell stacks were assembled and endurance tested. The long term performance stability of the platinum on carbon catalyst configuration suitability of the lightweight graphite electrolyte reservoir plate, the stability of the free standing butyl bonded potassium titanate matrix structure, and the long life potential of a hybrid polysulfone cell edge frame construction were demonstrated. A 18,000 hour demonstration test of multicell stack to a continuous cyclical load profile was conducted. A total of 12,000 cycles was completed, confirming the ability of the alkaline fuel cell to operate to a load profile simulating Regenerative Fuel Cell operation. An orbiter production hydrogen recirculation pump employed in support of the cyclical load profile test completed 13,000 hours of maintenance free operation. Laboratory endurance tests demonstrated the suitability of the butyl bonded potassium matrix, perforated nickel foil electrode substrates, and carbon ribbed substrate anode for use in the alkaline fuel cell. Corrosion testing of materials at 250 F (121.1 C) in 42% wgt. potassium identified ceria, zirconia, strontium titanate, strontium zirconate and lithium cobaltate as candidate matrix materials.

  2. Bachelor of Science-Engineering Technology Program and Fuel Cell Education Program Concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Block, David L.; Sleiti, Ahmad

    2011-09-19

    The Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology education project has addressed DOE goals by supplying readily available, objective, technical, and accurate information that is available to students, industry and the public. In addition, the program has supplied educated trainers and training opportunities for the next generation workforce needed for research, development, and demonstration activities in government, industry, and academia. The project has successfully developed courses and associated laboratories, taught the new courses and labs and integrated the HFCT option into the accredited engineering technology and mechanical engineering programs at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte (UNCC). The project has also established ongoing collaborations with the UNCC energy related centers of the Energy Production & Infrastructure Center (EPIC), the NC Motorsports and Automotive Research Center (NCMARC) and the Infrastructure, Design, Environment and Sustainability Center (IDEAS). The results of the project activities are presented as two major areas – (1) course and laboratory development, offerings and delivery, and (2) program recruitment, promotions and collaborations. Over the project period, the primary activity has been the development and offering of 11 HFCT courses and accompanying laboratories. This process has taken three years with the courses first being developed and then offered each year over the timeframe.

  3. ETV/ESTCP Demonstration Plan - Demonstration and Verification of a Turbine Power Generation System Utilizing Renewable Fuel: Landfill Gas

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Test and Quality Assurance Plan (TQAP) provides data quality objections for the success factors that were validated during this demonstration include energy production, emissions and emission reductions compared to alternative systems, economics, and operability, including r...

  4. San Francisco Biofuel Program: Brown Grease to Biodiesel Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Jolis, Domènec; Martis, Mary; Jones, Bonnie; Miot, Alex; Ving, Karri; Sierra, Natalie; Niobi, Morayo

    2013-03-01

    Municipal wastewater treatment facilities have typically been limited to the role of accepting wastewater, treating it to required levels, and disposing of its treatment residuals. However, a new view is emerging which includes wastewater treatment facilities as regional resource recovery centers. This view is a direct result of increasingly stringent regulations, concerns over energy use, carbon footprint, and worldwide depletion of fossil fuel resources. Resources in wastewater include chemical and thermal energy, as well as nutrients, and water. A waste stream such as residual grease, which concentrates in the drainage from restaurants (referred to as Trap Waste), is a good example of a resource with an energy content that can be recovered for beneficial reuse. If left in wastewater, grease accumulates inside of the wastewater collection system and can lead to increased corrosion and pipe blockages that can cause wastewater overflows. Also, grease in wastewater that arrives at the treatment facility can impair the operation of preliminary treatment equipment and is only partly removed in the primary treatment process. In addition, residual grease increases the demand in treatment materials such as oxygen in the secondary treatment process. When disposed of in landfills, grease is likely to undergo anaerobic decay prior to landfill capping, resulting in the atmospheric release of methane, a greenhouse gas (GHG). This research project was therefore conceptualized and implemented by the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) to test the feasibility of energy recovery from Trap Waste in the form of Biodiesel or Methane gas.

  5. Microbial fuel cells demonstrate high coulombic efficiency applicable for water remediation.

    PubMed

    Devasahayam, Mercy; Masih, Sam A

    2012-06-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) convert biomass into electricity by the metabolic activity of microorganisms and are also used for remediation and water treatment. Power output was compared for a dual chambered membrane MFC using either E. coli or two Yamuna river samples, Yamuna (before the Sangam region)--slow flow (sample 1) and Sangam region--fast flow (sample 2). E. coli and the two river water samples 1 and 2 gave a maximum voltage of 779, 463 and 415 mV respectively. Using E. coli the maximum power density obtained with a 100 omega resistor was 220.66 mW/cm2 and the highest power generated 6068.41 mW. The results demonstrate E. coli, river sample 1 and river sample 2 have a comparable coulombic efficiency of 85.2, 71 and 77% respectively when using 0.4% sucrose as substrate. The decrease in chemical oxidative demand of all river water samples using MFC technology demonstrates efficient remediation of inland water.

  6. Current status of Westinghouse tubular solid oxide fuel cell program

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, W.G.

    1996-04-01

    In the last ten years the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) development program at Westinghouse has evolved from a focus on basic material science to the engineering of fully integrated electric power systems. Our endurance for this cell is 5 to 10 years. To date we have successfully operated at power for over six years. For power plants it is our goal to have operated before the end of this decade a MW class power plant. Progress toward these goals is described.

  7. SOLID STATE ENERGY CONVERSION ALLIANCE (SECA) SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2003-06-01

    This report summarizes the progress made during the September 2001-March 2002 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41245 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Program''. The program focuses on the development of a low-cost, high-performance 3-to-10-kW solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system suitable for a broad spectrum of power-generation applications. The overall objective of the program is to demonstrate a modular SOFC system that can be configured to create highly efficient, cost-competitive, and environmentally benign power plants tailored to specific markets. When fully developed, the system will meet the efficiency, performance, life, and cost goals for future commercial power plants.

  8. Transitioning Advanced Concept Technology Demonstrations to Acquisition Programs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    process by the new Secretary of Defense William Perry. In September 1994 the Defense Science and Technology Strategy refined the ACTD. The major...Test Military Utility Assessment Field Residual Assessment Strategy Up-front Planning ( Mgmt Plan) 28 In association with the system...Interoperability • Utility assessment • Operational preparations • Requirements dev. • PSI program ACTD Detailed ACTD Planning ACTD approval Mgmt

  9. New York TRACON Demonstration of Program Recoding Requirements Analysis Document.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    August 187 Requirements Analysis Document 6.P.*e.i 2i...~ Code A.CT-l0l ____________________________________________ . Psod.....ngO...atiet.o Rw No...converzion, octal digits that will be preserved (message codes and beacon codes ) will be translated to EBCDIC, for ease of use by TRACON programs. An...Guide, User’s Manual for ATC Support Software(NASP-3202-01). and three volumes of the NY TRACON Coding Specifications. The CPFS documents in the series

  10. An Overview of an Experimental Demonstration Aerotow Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, James E.; Bowers, Albion H.; Lokos, William A.; Peters, Todd L.; Gera, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    An overview of an experimental demonstration of aerotowing a delta-wing airplane with low-aspect ratio and relatively high wing loading is presented. Aerotowing of future space launch configurations is a new concept, and the objective of the work described herein is to demonstrate the aerotow operation using an airplane configuration similar to conceptual space launch vehicles. Background information on the use of aerotow for a space launch vehicle is presented, and the aerotow system used in this demonstration is described. The ground tests, analytical studies, and flight planning used to predict system behavior and to enhance flight safety are detailed. The instrumentation suite and flight test maneuvers flown are discussed, preliminary performance is assessed, and flight test results are compared with the preflight predictions.

  11. 75 FR 15693 - Extension of Web-Based TRICARE Assistance Program Demonstration Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... of the Secretary Extension of Web-Based TRICARE Assistance Program Demonstration Project AGENCY: Department of Defense (DoD). ACTION: Notice of a Web-Based TRICARE Assistance Program demonstration project..., entitled Web-Based TRICARE Assistance Program. This demonstration was effective August 1, 2009,...

  12. The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy Stationary Fuel Cell Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Mark C.; Strakey, Joseph P.; Surdoval, Wayne A.

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy's (FE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), in partnership with private industries, is leading a program for the development and demonstration of high efficiency solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and fuel cell/turbine hybrid power generation systems for near-term distributed generation markets, with emphasis on premium power and high reliability. NETL is partnering with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in developing new directions for research under the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) initiative to develop and commercialize modular, low cost, and fuel flexible SOFC systems. Through advanced materials, processing and system integration research and development (R&D), the SECA initiative will reduce the fuel cell cost to $400 kW -1 for stationary and auxiliary power unit markets. The SECA industry teams and core program have made significant progress in scale-up and performance. Presidential initiatives are focusing research toward a new hydrogen economy. The movement to a hydrogen economy would accomplish several strategic goals, namely that SOFCs have no emissions, and hence figure significantly in DOE strategies. The SOFC hybrid is a key part of the FutureGen plant, a major new DOE FE initiative to produce hydrogen from coal. The highly efficient SOFC hybrid plant will produce electric power while other parts of the plant could produce hydrogen and sequester CO 2. The produced hydrogen can be used in fuel cell cars and for SOFC distributed generation applications.

  13. Entering a New Stage of Learning from the U.S. Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Demonstration Project: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Garbak, J.

    2010-10-01

    The National Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Learning Demonstration is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) project that started in 2004. The purpose of this project is to conduct an integrated field validation that simultaneously examines the performance of fuel cell vehicles and the supporting hydrogen infrastructure. The DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has now analyzed data from over five years of the seven-year project. During this time, over 144 fuel cell electric vehicles have been deployed, and 23 project refueling stations were placed in use.

  14. Development and Demonstration of a New Generation High Efficiency 10kW Stationary Fuel Cell System

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, Thomas Russell

    2013-04-30

    The overall project objective is to develop and demonstrate a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell combined heat and power (PEMFC CHP) system that provides the foundation for commercial, mass produced units which achieve over 40% electrical efficiency (fuel to electric conversion) from 50-100% load, greater than 70% overall efficiency (fuel to electric energy + usable waste heat energy conversion), have the potential to achieve 40,000 hours durability on all major process components, and can be produced in high volumes at under $400/kW (revised to $750/kW per 2011 DOE estimates) capital cost.

  15. Alternate retrieval technology demonstrations program - test report (ARD Environmental, Inc.)

    SciTech Connect

    Berglin, E.J.

    1997-07-31

    A prototype vehicle, control system, and waste and water scavenging system were designed and fabricated with essentially the full capabilities of the vehicle system proposed by ARD Environmental. A test tank mockup, including riser and decontamination chamber were designed and fabricated, and approximately 830 cubic feet of six varieties of waste simulants poured. The tests were performed by ARD Environmental personnel at its site in Laurel, Maryland, from 4/22/97 through 5/2/97. The capabilities tested were deployment and retrieval, extended mobility and productivity, the ability to operate the system using video viewing only, retrieval after simulated failure, and retrieval and decontamination. Testing commenced with deployment of the vehicle into the tank. Deployment was accomplished using a crane and auxiliary winch to position the vehicle and lower it through the decontamination chamber, into the 36`` diameter x 6` high riser, and touch down on the waste field in the tank. The initial mobility tests were conducted immediately after deployment, prior to sluicing, as the waste field exhibited the greatest amount of variation at this time. This test demonstrated the ability of the vehicle to maneuver over the simulated waste field, and the ability of the operator to work with only video viewing available. In addition, the ability of the vehicle to right itself after being turned on its side was demonstrated. The production rate was evaluated daily through the testing period by measuring the surface and estimating the amount of material removed. The test demonstrated the ability of the vehicle to reduce the waste surface using 400 psi (nominal) water jets, scavenge water and material from the work area, and move to any location, even in the relatively confined space of the 20` diameter test tank. In addition, the ability to sluice to a remote scavenging module was demonstrated. The failure mode test demonstrated the ability to retrieve a stuck vehicle by pulling

  16. Systems Engineering Methodology for Fuel Efficiency and Its Application to the Fuel Efficient Demonstrator (FED) Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-13

    Air Over Titanium Coil Struts Aluminum Brake Calipers Aluminum Knuckles & Control Arms Liquid Circulating Garments Low Rolling Resistance...outside drive cycle 13 August 2010 14 Frequency Selective Damping Low Drag Foundation Brakes Accelerator Force Feedback Pedal 22.5” Aluminum

  17. Full-scale Transport Controlled Impact Demonstration Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and NASA conducted a full-scale air-to-surface impact-survivable impact demonstration with a remotely piloted transport aircraft on 1 December 1984, at Edwards Air Force Base, California. The test article consisted of experiments, special equipment, and supporting systems, such as antimisting kerosene (AMK), crashworthiness structural/restraint, analytical modeling, cabin fire safety, flight data recorders, post-impact investigation, instrumentation/data acquisition systems, remotely piloted vehicle/flight control systems, range and flight safety provisions, etc. This report describes the aircraft, experiments, systems, activities, and events which lead up to the Controlled Impact Demonstration (CID). An overview of the final unmanned remote control flight and sequence of impact events are delineated. Preliminary post CID observations are presented.

  18. Canola Oil Fuel Cell Demonstration. Volume 1. Literature Review of Current Reformer Technologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    into their base components. CH,,, -> nC + (t)H 2 This technique has a long history and has been used to convert relatively dirty fuels into clean fuels...can be converted to SI units as follows: Multiply By To Obtain acres 4,046.873 square meters cubic feet 0.02831685 cubic meters cubic inches...devices that convert chemical energy to electrical energy with very high efficiency. Due to their electrochemical conversion, fuel cell systems

  19. Daemen Alternative Energy/Geothermal Technologies Demonstration Program Erie County

    SciTech Connect

    Beiswanger, Jr, Robert C

    2010-05-20

    The purpose of the Daemen Alternative Energy/Geothermal Technologies Demonstration Project is to demonstrate the use of geothermal technology as model for energy and environmental efficiency in heating and cooling older, highly inefficient buildings. The former Marian Library building at Daemen College is a 19,000 square foot building located in the center of campus. Through this project, the building was equipped with geothermal technology and results were disseminated. Gold LEED certification for the building was awarded. 1) How the research adds to the understanding of the area investigated. This project is primarily a demonstration project. Information about the installation is available to other companies, organizations, and higher education institutions that may be interested in using geothermal energy for heating and cooling older buildings. 2) The technical effectiveness and economic feasibility of the methods or techniques investigated or demonstrated. According to the modeling and estimates through Stantec, the energy-efficiency cost savings is estimated at 20%, or $24,000 per year. Over 20 years this represents $480,000 in unrestricted revenue available for College operations. See attached technical assistance report. 3) How the project is otherwise of benefit to the public. The Daemen College Geothermal Technologies Ground Source Heat Pumps project sets a standard for retrofitting older, highly inefficient, energy wasting and environmentally irresponsible buildings quite typical of many of the buildings on the campuses of regional colleges and universities. As a model, the project serves as an energy-efficient system with significant environmental advantages. Information about the energy-efficiency measures is available to other colleges and universities, organizations and companies, students, and other interested parties. The installation and renovation provided employment for 120 individuals during the award period. Through the new Center, Daemen will

  20. Demonstration Erosion Control Project Monitoring Program. Fiscal Year 1994 Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-12-01

    Technical Report HL-96-22 December 1996 US Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station Demonstration Erosion Control Project...C. Watson, Colorado State University Approved For Public Release; Distribution Is Unlimited 19970520 143 Prepared for U.S. Army Engineer District...Derrick, Billy E. Johnson, Michael J. Trawle U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station 3909 Halls Ferry Road Vicksburg, MS 39180

  1. Zeolite vitrification demonstration program: characterization of radioactive vitrified zeolite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Barner, J O; Daniel, J L; Marshall, R K

    1984-01-01

    The leach behavior of radioactive vitrified zeolite material was studied as part of the Three Mile Island (TMI) Zeolite Vitrification Program conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Experimental procedures, test results, and discussions of the results are presented. The leach behavior of material from three canisters of vitrified zeolite is discussed in terms of the normalized weight loss of the glass-formers and the normalized activity loss of the fission products cesium and strontium. The leach behavior of the radioactive vitrified zeolite material is also compared to the leach behavior of MCC 76-68 reference glass. The effects of changes in the surface microstructure of the vitrified zeolite that occurred during leaching are also presented. 3 references, 23 figures, 10 tables.

  2. Producibility Demonstrator Program - Technological preeminence through concurrent engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dublinski, Alex C.

    1991-05-01

    The design to costs targets for the next generation of composite aircraft require a significant reduction in fabrication costs. These types of aircraft bring with them additional complexity due to new technical requirements. To achieve these goals, Sikorsky Aircraft formed a multi-disciplined concurrent enginering team (CET). The primary objective of the team was to successfully produce a series of low cost, high quality composite components with a repeatable process. The program utilizes a 2D CAD system which allows the transfer of information to all organizations directly involved with the design effort. This system also provides a common data base. This paper highlights the results of the CET, which are: molded integrated structures using cocure processing technology, elastomeric caul/preply tooling, flexible trim and drill fixtures, and thermoplastic structures.

  3. Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport- Demonstration of Approach and Results on Used Fuel Performance Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, Harold; Geelhood, Ken; Koeppel, Brian; Coleman, Justin; Bignell, John; Flores, Gregg; Wang, Jy-An; Sanborn, Scott; Spears, Robert; Klymyshyn, Nick

    2013-09-30

    This document addresses Oak Ridge National Laboratory milestone M2FT-13OR0822015 Demonstration of Approach and Results on Used Nuclear Fuel Performance Characterization. This report provides results of the initial demonstration of the modeling capability developed to perform preliminary deterministic evaluations of moderate-to-high burnup used nuclear fuel (UNF) mechanical performance under normal conditions of storage (NCS) and normal conditions of transport (NCT) conditions. This report also provides results from the sensitivity studies that have been performed. Finally, discussion on the long-term goals and objectives of this initiative are provided.

  4. HTGR Fuel Technology Program. Semiannual report for the period ending March 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-07-01

    This document reports the technical accomplishments of the HTGR Fuel Technology Program at GA Technologies Inc. during the first half of FY 83. The activities include the fuel process, fuel materials, fuel cycle, fission product transport, core component verification, and core technology transfer tasks necessary to support the design and development of a steam cycle/cogeneration (SC/C) version of the HTGR.

  5. Review of the Vortec soil remediation demonstration program

    SciTech Connect

    Patten, J.S.

    1994-11-01

    The DOE`s clean-up of its nuclear complex require the development of innovative technologies to convert soils contaminated by hazardous and/or radioactive wastes to forms which can be readily disposed in accordance with current waste disposal methods. The unique features of Votec CMS technology should make it particularly cost-effective process for the vitrification of soils, sediments, sludges, and mill tailings containing organic metallic and/or radioactive contaminants. This article describes the technology (Votec`s combustion and melting system), the results of testing, the demonstration plant system, and summarizes the future schedule and the equipment needed. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Photovoltaic test and demonstration project. [residential energy program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forestieri, A. F.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.; Deyo, J. N.

    1976-01-01

    The considered project consists of three subprojects related to applications, device performance and diagnostics, and endurance testing. The objectives of the applications subproject include the determination of the operating characteristics for a variety of photovoltaic conversion systems. A system test facility is being constructed in this connection and a prototype residence experiment is to be conducted. Market demand for solar cells is to be stimulated by demonstrating suitability of solar cells for specific near-term applications. Activities conducted in connection with device performance studies and diagnostics are also discussed along with developments in the area of endurance testing.

  7. German program for vitrified HLW and spent fuel management

    SciTech Connect

    Lutze, W.; Closs, K.D.; Tittel, G.; Brennecke, P.; Kunz, W.

    1993-12-31

    The paper covers four topics: management of vitrified waste, management of spent fuel, final disposal, and the repository safety assessment. At present, German spent fuel is reprocessed abroad and vitrified high-level radioactive waste will be returned for disposal. Interim storage of this waste in Germany will be necessary until the planned repository at Gorleben becomes available. Two interim storage facilities have been built. Additionally, about 60 m{sup 3} of HAWC (highly active waste concentrate) produced at the reprocessing plant in Karlsruhe prior to shutdown will be vitrified at the PAMELA plant in Mol, Belgium, following plant adaptations and the installation of a new melter. Direct disposal of spent fuel is being developed to technical maturity. A pilot conditioning and encapsulation plant is under construction at Gorleben, and repository-related demonstration tests are being performed. Layout and optimization studies for a common repository for reprocessing waste and spent fuel are underway, and a safeguards plan for spent fuel disposal has been developed. Results from these activities will be available early enough to be incorporated into the repository licensing procedure. The Gorleben salt dome has been selected for the construction and operation of a repository for all types of radioactive waste, especially heat generating, such as vitrified waste and spent fuel elements. Experimental research is being carried out to characterize and understand the long-term physico-chemical and geochemical behavior of the waste forms in the near field of the repository and the aquatic chemistry of radionuclides in the near and far fields.

  8. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM LANDFILL GAS - PHASE I FINAL REPORT: CONCEPTUAL STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses results of a conceptual design, cost, and evaluation study of energy recovery from landfill gas using a commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant. The conceptual design of the fuel cell energy recovery system is described, and its economic and environm...

  9. Automotive Stirling engine development program. [fuel economy assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitzner, E. W.

    1978-01-01

    The Ford/DOE automotive Stirling engine development program is directed towards establishing the technological and developmental base that would enable a decision on whether an engineering program should be directed at Stirling engine production. The fuel economy assessment aims to achieve, with a high degree of confidence, the ERDA proposal estimate of 20.6 MPG (gasoline) for a 4500 lb 1WC Stirling engine passenger car. The current M-H fuel economy projection for the 170 HP Stirling engine is 15.7 MPG. The confidence level for this projection is 32%. A confidence level of 29% is projected for a 22.1 MPG estimate. If all of the planned analyses and test work is accomplished at the end of the one year effort, and the projected improvements are substantiated, the confidence levels would rise to 59% for the 20.6 MPG projection and 54% for the 22.1 MPG projection. Progress achieved thus far during the fuel economy assessment is discussed.

  10. A near term space demonstration program for large structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathan, C. A.

    1978-01-01

    For applications involving an employment of ultralarge structures in space, it would be necessary to have some form of space fabrication and assembly in connection with launch vehicle payload and volume limitations. The findings of a recently completed NASA sponsored study related to an orbital construction demonstration are reported. It is shown how a relatively small construction facility which is assembled in three shuttle flights can substantially advance space construction know-how and provide the nation with a permanent shuttle tended facility that can further advance large structures technologies and provide a construction capability for deployment of large structural systems envisioned for the late 1980s. The large structures applications identified are related to communications, navigation, earth observation, energy systems, radio astronomy, illumination, space colonization, and space construction.

  11. 78 FR 69628 - Public Hearing for the 2014 Standards for the Renewable Fuel Standard Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 80 RIN 2060-AR76 Public Hearing for the 2014 Standards for the Renewable Fuel Standard... Renewable Fuel Standard Program, which EPA will publish separately in the Federal Register. The hearing will... proposed amendments to the renewable fuel standard program regulations to establish annual...

  12. 40 CFR 80.610 - What acts are prohibited under the diesel fuel sulfur program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... diesel fuel sulfur program? 80.610 Section 80.610 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... What acts are prohibited under the diesel fuel sulfur program? No person shall— (a) Standard, dye... milligrams per liter of solvent yellow 124, except for 500 ppm sulfur diesel fuel produced or imported...

  13. 40 CFR 80.610 - What acts are prohibited under the diesel fuel sulfur program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... diesel fuel sulfur program? 80.610 Section 80.610 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... What acts are prohibited under the diesel fuel sulfur program? No person shall— (a) Standard, dye... milligrams per liter of solvent yellow 124, except for 500 ppm sulfur diesel fuel sold, offered for...

  14. 40 CFR 80.610 - What acts are prohibited under the diesel fuel sulfur program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... diesel fuel sulfur program? 80.610 Section 80.610 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... What acts are prohibited under the diesel fuel sulfur program? No person shall— (a) Standard, dye... milligrams per liter of solvent yellow 124, except for 500 ppm sulfur diesel fuel sold, offered for...

  15. 40 CFR 80.610 - What acts are prohibited under the diesel fuel sulfur program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... diesel fuel sulfur program? 80.610 Section 80.610 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... What acts are prohibited under the diesel fuel sulfur program? No person shall— (a) Standard, dye... milligrams per liter of solvent yellow 124, except for 500 ppm sulfur diesel fuel produced or imported...

  16. Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Nondestructive Assay of Boxed Wastes for the TRU Waste Characterization Program

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2009-10-01

    Each testing and analytical facility performing waste characterization activities for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) participates in the Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) to comply with the Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WAC) (DOE/WIPP-02-3122) and the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD) (CBFO-94-1012). The PDP serves as a quality control check for data generated in the characterization of waste destined for WIPP. Single-blind audit samples are prepared and distributed to each of the facilities participating in the PDP. Different PDPs evaluate the analyses of simulated headspace gases (HSGs), constituents of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and transuranic (TRU) radionuclides using nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques.

  17. Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Nondestructive Assay of Drummed Wastes for the TRU Waste Characterization Program

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2009-04-01

    Each testing and analytical facility performing waste characterization activities for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) participates in the Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) to comply with the Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WAC) (DOE/WIPP-02-3122) and the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD) (CBFO-94-1012). The PDP serves as a quality control check for data generated in the characterization of waste destined for WIPP. Single blind audit samples are prepared and distributed to each of the facilities participating in the PDP. The PDP evaluates analyses of simulated headspace gases, constituents of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and transuranic (TRU) radionuclides using nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques.

  18. Alcohol-Fuel-Technology Grant Program: an evaluation and summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-09-01

    This report summarizes the research projects with respect to one of five process areas into which each was grouped. The process areas are feedstock preparation, feedstock conversion, product recovery, byproduct recovery, and end use. These areas encompass the conversion of biomass to fuels and the consumption of the fuels. In each of these process areas there are research needs which, if achieved, will provide improved economic feasibility for production. These needs revolve around improved alternate feedstocks, better conversion, lower energy, recycling of the biocatalysts, reduced energy input, less capital intensive recovery of byproducts and expanded byproduct markets. All of the short term projects in this program have directed these investigations to one of these needs. Some of these projects have achieved breakthroughs or shown insight into achieving an improved process. A more detailed technical abstract of each project is available in the Appendix. Within these reviews, the uniqueness of the individual project and its accomplishments are discussed.

  19. Research, development and demonstration of a fuel cell/battery powered bus system. Phase 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1990-02-28

    Purpose of the Phase I effort was to demonstrate feasibility of the fuel cell/battery system for powering a small bus (under 30 ft or 9 m) on an urban bus route. A brassboard powerplant was specified, designed, fabricated, and tested to demonstrate feasibility in the laboratory. The proof-of-concept bus, with a powerplant scaled up from the brassboard, will be demonstrated under Phase II.

  20. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Regulatory criteria evaluation report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    The primary objective of the ESPDP is to demonstrate successfully the use of 10CFR52 to obtain ESPs for one or more US sites for one (or more) ALWR nuclear power plants. It is anticipated that preparation of the ESP application and interaction with NRC during the application review process will result not only in an ESP for the applicant(s) but also in the development of criteria and definition of processes, setting the precedent that facilitates ESPs for subsequent ESP applications. Because siting regulatory processes and acceptance criteria are contained in over 100 separate documents, comprehensive licensing and technical reviews were performed to establish whether the requirements and documentation are self-consistent, whether the acceptance criteria are sufficiently well-defined and clear, and whether the licensing process leading to the issuance of an ESP is unambiguously specified. The results of the technical and licensing evaluations are presented in this report. The purpose, background, and organization of the ESPDP is delineated in Section 1. Section 11 contains flowcharts defining siting application requirements, environmental report requirements, and emergency planning/preparedness requirements for ALWRS. The licensing and technical review results are presented in Section III.

  1. Regenerative Fuel Cell System Testbed Program for Government and Commercial Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center's Electrochemical Technology Branch has led a multiagency effort to design, fabricate, and operate a regenerative fuel cell (RFC) system testbed. Key objectives of this program are to evaluate, characterize, and demonstrate fully integrated RFC's for space, military, and commercial applications. The Lewis-led team is implementing the program through a unique international coalition that encompasses both Government and industry participants. Construction of the 25-kW RFC testbed at the NASA facility at Edwards Air Force Base was completed in January 1995, and the system has been operational since that time.

  2. Liquid Tin Anode Direct Coal Fuel Cell Final Program Report

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Thomas

    2012-01-26

    This SBIR program will result in improved LTA cell technology which is the fundamental building block of the Direct Coal ECL concept. As described below, ECL can make enormous efficiency and cost contributions to utility scale coal power. This program will improve LTA cells for small scale power generation. As described in the Commercialization section, there are important intermediate military and commercial markets for LTA generators that will provide an important bridge to the coal power application. The specific technical information from this program relating to YSZ electrolyte durability will be broadly applicable SOFC developers working on coal based SOFC generally. This is an area about which very little is currently known and will be critical for successfully applying fuel cells to coal power generation.

  3. Pathways to Commercial Success. Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2010-08-01

    This report identifies the commercial and near-commercial (emerging) hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products that resulted from Department of Energy support through the Fuel Cell Technologies Program in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  4. Changes made to the New Website for the Renewable Fuel Standard Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    See the changes made to the new website for renewable fuel standard programs including regulations, developed by EPA, in collaboration with refiners, renewable fuel producers, and many other stakeholders.

  5. How to Prepare an Efficient Producer Petition for the Renewable Fuel Standard Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This EPA document provides step-by-step instructions for preparing a complete Efficient Producer (EP) petition for a new fuel pathway under the U.S. Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) program. (EPA publication # EPA-420-B-16-084)

  6. 76 FR 29228 - Funding Down Slate; Demonstration Grants for Indian Children Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-20

    ... Funding Down Slate; Demonstration Grants for Indian Children Program AGENCY: Office of Elementary and... 2010 competition for the Demonstration Grants for Indian Children program authorized by 20 U.S.C. 7441... Grants for Indian Children program for FY 2010 in the Federal Register on December 3, 2009 (74 FR...

  7. Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Horner, M.W.; Ekstedt, E.E.; Gal, E.; Jackson, M.R.; Kimura, S.G.; Lavigne, R.G.; Lucas, C.; Rairden, J.R.; Sabla, P.E.; Savelli, J.F.; Slaughter, D.M.; Spiro, C.L.; Staub, F.W.

    1989-02-01

    The objective of the original Request for Proposal was to establish the technological bases necessary for the subsequent commercial development and deployment of advanced coal-fueled gas turbine power systems by the private sector. The offeror was to identify the specific application or applications, toward which his development efforts would be directed; define and substantiate the technical, economic, and environmental criteria for the selected application; and conduct such component design, development, integration, and tests as deemed necessary to fulfill this objective. Specifically, the offeror was to choose a system through which ingenious methods of grouping subcomponents into integrated systems accomplishes the following: (1) Preserve the inherent power density and performance advantages of gas turbine systems. (2) System must be capable of meeting or exceeding existing and expected environmental regulations for the proposed application. (3) System must offer a considerable improvement over coal-fueled systems which are commercial, have been demonstrated, or are being demonstrated. (4) System proposed must be an integrated gas turbine concept, i.e., all fuel conditioning, all expansion gas conditioning, or post-expansion gas cleaning, must be integrated into the gas turbine system.

  8. Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Program

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen Minh

    2006-07-31

    This report summarizes the work performed for Phase I (October 2001 - August 2006) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41245 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled 'Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Program'. The program focuses on the development of a low-cost, high-performance 3-to-10-kW solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system suitable for a broad spectrum of power-generation applications. During Phase I of the program significant progress has been made in the area of SOFC technology. A high-efficiency low-cost system was designed and supporting technology developed such as fuel processing, controls, thermal management, and power electronics. Phase I culminated in the successful demonstration of a prototype system that achieved a peak efficiency of 41%, a high-volume cost of $724/kW, a peak power of 5.4 kW, and a degradation rate of 1.8% per 500 hours. . An improved prototype system was designed, assembled, and delivered to DOE/NETL at the end of the program. This prototype achieved an extraordinary peak efficiency of 49.6%.

  9. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Recommendations for communication activities and public participation in the Early Site Permit Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-27

    On October 24, 1992, President Bush signed into law the National Energy Policy Act of 1992. The bill is a sweeping, comprehensive overhaul of the Nation`s energy laws, the first in more than a decade. Among other provisions, the National Energy Policy Act reforms the licensing process for new nuclear power plants by adopting a new approach developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 1989, and upheld in court in 1992. The NRC 10 CFR Part 52 rule is a three-step process that guarantees public participation at each step. The steps are: early site permit approval; standard design certifications; and, combined construction/operating licenses for nuclear power reactors. Licensing reform increases an organization`s ability to respond to future baseload electricity generation needs with less financial risk for ratepayers and the organization. Costly delays can be avoided because design, safety and siting issues will be resolved before a company starts to build a plant. Specifically, early site permit approval allows for site suitability and acceptability issues to be addressed prior to an organization`s commitment to build a plant. Responsibility for site-specific activities, including communications and public participation, rests with those organizations selected to try out early site approval. This plan has been prepared to assist those companies (referred to as sponsoring organizations) in planning their communications and public involvement programs. It provides research findings, information and recommendations to be used by organizations as a resource and starting point in developing their own plans.

  10. Application of Thermoelectric Devices to Fuel Cell Power Generation: Demonstration and Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    High temperature Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells (MCFC) and Solid Oxide Fuel Cells ( SOFC ) resolve this problem by using the waste heat in conjunction...tem Flow Rate, and Electronic Load Resistance. CTC was to download this for analysis , as necessary, via a dedicated phone line connection. A Single...used for cooling purposes. Data collected by this system would be archived at CTC for analysis . Multiple Device Test Stand Objectives The expected

  11. Demonstration and Verification of a Turbine Power Generation System Utilizing Renewable Fuel: Landfill Gas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    landfills, facilities with anaerobic digesters for wastewater treatment, painting or printing operations, volatile organic compound (VOC) remediation...other similar fuel sources (e.g., digester gas). All assumptions and information sources are fully documented to give credibility to the results and...economics of the FP250 per se. For non-LFG fuel sources such as digester gas, extraction system costs are not relevant. Thus, Southern considers that

  12. Attendance Improvement and Dropout Prevention (AIDP) Demonstration and Replication Program 1989. OREA Evaluation Section Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Office of Research, Evaluation, and Assessment.

    Each of the 1989 dropout prevention programs funded under the New York City Attendance Improvement Dropout Prevention (AIDP) Demonstration and Replication Program was successful in meeting some of its objectives, and all of the programs were viewed as valuable by principals and teachers. The program encourages the design and implementation of…

  13. Evaluation of a Five-Year Demonstration Farm Program in Two Pennsylvania Counties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Joel A.; Brown, Emory J.

    This analysis of the impact of a result demonstration educational program was made in an effort to achieve the following goals: (1) identification of the objectives of the educational program; (2) description of the program; (3) assessment of awareness of the program by target clientele; (4) measurement of the amount of change that takes place;…

  14. Coated Particle Fuel and Deep Burn Program Monthly Highlights April 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, Lance Lewis; Bell, Gary L; Besmann, Theodore M

    2011-05-01

    The baseline change proposal BCP-FCRD-11026 submitted to change the due date for M21AF080202 'Demonstrate fabrication of Transuranic kernels of Plutonium-239/3.5at%Neptunium-237 using newly installed glove box facilities in ORNL 7930 hot cell complex' from 4/25/11 to 3/30/12 was approved this month. During FY 2011 the CP & DB Program will report Highlights on a monthly basis, but will no longer produce Quarterly Progress Reports. Technical details that were previously included in the quarterly reports will be included in the appropriate Milestone Reports that are submitted to FCRD Program Management. These reports will also be uploaded to the Deep Burn website. The Monthly Highlights report for March 2011, ORNL/TM-2011/96, was distributed to program participants on April 8, 2011. As reported previously, the final Quarterly for FY 2010, Deep Burn Program Quarterly Report for July - September 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/301, was announced to program participants and posted to the website on December 28, 2010. This report discusses the following: (1) Thermochemical Data and Model Development - (a) Thermochemical Modeling, (b) Thermomechanical Behavior, (c) Actinide and Fission Product Transport, (d) Radiation Damage and Properties; (2) TRU (transuranic elements) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) Development - (a) TRU Kernel Development, (b) Coating Development; (3) Advanced TRISO Applications - Metal Matrix Fuels for LWR; (4) LWR Fully Ceramic Fuel - (a) FCM Fabrication Development, (b) FCM Irradiation Testing; (5) Fuel Performance and Analytical Analysis - Fuel Performance Modeling; and (6) ZrC Properties and Handbook - Properties of ZrC.

  15. Microbial studies in the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program.

    PubMed

    Stroes-Gascoyne, S; West, J M

    1997-07-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has developed a concept for permanent geological disposal of used nuclear fuel in Canada. This concept, based on a multibarrier system, would involve disposal of nuclear fuel waste in titanium or copper containers, surrounded by compacted clay-based buffer and backfill materials, in a vault 500-1000 m deep in granitic rock of the Canadian Shield. Subsurface environments will not be sterile and an experimental program was initiated in 1991 by AECL to address and quantify the potential effects of microbial action on the integrity of the disposal vault. This microbial program focuses on answering specific questions in areas such as the survival of bacteria in compacted clay-based buffer materials under relevant radiation, temperature and desiccation conditions; mobility of microbes in compacted buffer materials; the potential for microbially influenced corrosion of containers; microbial gas production in backfill material; introduction of nutrients as a result of vault excavation and operation; the presence and activity of microbes in deep granitic groundwaters; and the effects of biofilms on radionuclide migration in the geosphere. This paper summarizes the results to date from the research activities at AECL.

  16. Main experimental results of the Phebus Severe Fuel Damage Program

    SciTech Connect

    Gonnier, C. )

    1993-01-01

    The main objective of this program is to improve our knowledge about the early phase of a pressurized water reactor in-vessel core melt degradation in a temperature range up to 2800 K. The experimental program performed from December 1986 to June 1989 consists of six in-pile experiments with 21 fresh fuel rod bundles of 0.8 m active length. It is divided into two series of tests: (1) The first one (B9, B9R, B9+) is mainly devoted to the oxidation phenomenon and its consequences for fuel degradation. This series is characterized by high oxidation rates. (2) The second series [C3, C3+, Ag-In-CD (AIC)] is characterized by low oxidation rates of the cladding in order to study the interaction between the remaining Zircaloy and the other materials: interactions with Inconel and UO[sub 2] for C3 and C3+ tests and interactions with the Ag-In-Cd alloy and stainless steel of the control rod for the AIC test.

  17. Synthesis and Characterization of Oxide Feedstock Powders for the Fuel Cycle R&D Program

    SciTech Connect

    Voit, Stewart L; Vedder, Raymond James; Johnson, Jared A

    2010-09-01

    Nuclear fuel feedstock properties, such as physical, chemical, and isotopic characteristics, have a significant impact on the fuel fabrication process and, by extension, the in-reactor fuel performance. This has been demonstrated through studies with UO{sub 2} spanning greater than 50 years. The Fuel Cycle R&D Program with The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy has initiated an effort to develop a better understanding of the relationships between oxide feedstock, fresh fuel properties, and in-reactor fuel performance for advanced mixed oxide compositions. Powder conditioning studies to enable the use of less than ideal powders for ceramic fuel pellet processing are ongoing at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and an understanding of methods to increase the green density and homogeneity of pressed pellets has been gained for certain powders. Furthermore, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is developing methods for the co-conversion of mixed oxides along with techniques to analyze the degree of mixing. Experience with the fabrication of fuel pellets using co-synthesized multi-constituent materials is limited. In instances where atomically mixed solid solutions of two or more species are needed, traditional ceramic processing methods have been employed. Solution-based processes may be considered viable synthesis options, including co-precipitation (AUPuC), direct precipitation, direct-conversion (Modified Direct Denitration or MDD) and internal/external gelation (sol-gel). Each of these techniques has various advantages and disadvantages. The Fiscal Year 2010 feedstock development work at ORNL focused on the synthesis and characterization of one batch of UO{sub x} and one batch of U{sub 80}Ce{sub 20}O{sub x}. Oxide material synthesized at ORNL is being shipped to LANL for fuel fabrication process development studies. The feedstock preparation was performed using the MDD process which utilizes a rotary kiln to continuously thermally denitrate double

  18. Appendix G - GPRA06 hydrogen, fuel cells, and infrastructure technologies (HFCIT) program

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    The target markets for the Office of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies (HFCIT) program include transportation (cars and light trucks) and stationary (particularly residential and commercial) applications.

  19. Demonstrating the potential of yttrium-doped barium zirconate electrolyte for high-performance fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Bae, Kiho; Jang, Dong Young; Choi, Hyung Jong; Kim, Donghwan; Hong, Jongsup; Kim, Byung-Kook; Lee, Jong-Ho; Son, Ji-Won; Shim, Joon Hyung

    2017-02-23

    In reducing the high operating temperatures (≥800 °C) of solid-oxide fuel cells, use of protonic ceramics as an alternative electrolyte material is attractive due to their high conductivity and low activation energy in a low-temperature regime (≤600 °C). Among many protonic ceramics, yttrium-doped barium zirconate has attracted attention due to its excellent chemical stability, which is the main issue in protonic-ceramic fuel cells. However, poor sinterability of yttrium-doped barium zirconate discourages its fabrication as a thin-film electrolyte and integration on porous anode supports, both of which are essential to achieve high performance. Here we fabricate a protonic-ceramic fuel cell using a thin-film-deposited yttrium-doped barium zirconate electrolyte with no impeding grain boundaries owing to the columnar structure tightly integrated with nanogranular cathode and nanoporous anode supports, which to the best of our knowledge exhibits a record high-power output of up to an order of magnitude higher than those of other reported barium zirconate-based fuel cells.

  20. Demonstrating the potential of yttrium-doped barium zirconate electrolyte for high-performance fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Kiho; Jang, Dong Young; Choi, Hyung Jong; Kim, Donghwan; Hong, Jongsup; Kim, Byung-Kook; Lee, Jong-Ho; Son, Ji-Won; Shim, Joon Hyung

    2017-01-01

    In reducing the high operating temperatures (≥800 °C) of solid-oxide fuel cells, use of protonic ceramics as an alternative electrolyte material is attractive due to their high conductivity and low activation energy in a low-temperature regime (≤600 °C). Among many protonic ceramics, yttrium-doped barium zirconate has attracted attention due to its excellent chemical stability, which is the main issue in protonic-ceramic fuel cells. However, poor sinterability of yttrium-doped barium zirconate discourages its fabrication as a thin-film electrolyte and integration on porous anode supports, both of which are essential to achieve high performance. Here we fabricate a protonic-ceramic fuel cell using a thin-film-deposited yttrium-doped barium zirconate electrolyte with no impeding grain boundaries owing to the columnar structure tightly integrated with nanogranular cathode and nanoporous anode supports, which to the best of our knowledge exhibits a record high-power output of up to an order of magnitude higher than those of other reported barium zirconate-based fuel cells. PMID:28230080

  1. Demonstrating the potential of yttrium-doped barium zirconate electrolyte for high-performance fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Kiho; Jang, Dong Young; Choi, Hyung Jong; Kim, Donghwan; Hong, Jongsup; Kim, Byung-Kook; Lee, Jong-Ho; Son, Ji-Won; Shim, Joon Hyung

    2017-02-01

    In reducing the high operating temperatures (>=800 °C) of solid-oxide fuel cells, use of protonic ceramics as an alternative electrolyte material is attractive due to their high conductivity and low activation energy in a low-temperature regime (<=600 °C). Among many protonic ceramics, yttrium-doped barium zirconate has attracted attention due to its excellent chemical stability, which is the main issue in protonic-ceramic fuel cells. However, poor sinterability of yttrium-doped barium zirconate discourages its fabrication as a thin-film electrolyte and integration on porous anode supports, both of which are essential to achieve high performance. Here we fabricate a protonic-ceramic fuel cell using a thin-film-deposited yttrium-doped barium zirconate electrolyte with no impeding grain boundaries owing to the columnar structure tightly integrated with nanogranular cathode and nanoporous anode supports, which to the best of our knowledge exhibits a record high-power output of up to an order of magnitude higher than those of other reported barium zirconate-based fuel cells.

  2. Development and demonstration of direct carbonate fuel cell systems at Energy Research Corporation

    SciTech Connect

    Leo, A.J.; Kush, A.K.; Farooque, M.

    1996-12-31

    Energy Research Corporation (ERC) has been pursuing the development of the direct carbonate fuel cell (DFC) for commercialization near the end of this decade. The DFC produces power directly from hydrocarbon fuels electrochemically, without the need for external reforming or intermediate mechanical conversion steps. As a result, the DFC has the potential to achieve very high efficiency with very low levels of environmental emissions. Modular DFC power plants, which can be shop-fabricated and sited near the user, are ideally suited for distributed generation, industrial, cogeneration, and defense applications. ERC has selected a 2.85 MW power plant unit for initial market entry. Significant advances have been made at ERC in the areas of cell and stack technology and system optimization. Development activities have progressed to the point where 130 kW stacks have been tested in ERC`s subscale power plant, and subscale stacks have been tested in utility and industrial sites around the world. In addition, the world`s first multi-megawatt scale DFC power plant was recently started. Two ERC subsidiaries have been formed to advance the commercialization effort: the Fuel Cell Manufacturing Corporation (FCMC) and the Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE). FCMC manufacturers carbonate stacks and multi-stack modules, currently from its manufacturing facility in Torrington, CT. FCE is responsible for power plant design, integration of all subsystems, sales/marketing, and client services. This paper describes the results of ERC`s ongoing development and commercialization efforts.

  3. EFFECT OF NITRATE ADDITION ON BIORESTORATION OF FUEL-CONTAMINATED AQUIFER: FIELD DEMONSTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A spill of JP-4 jet fuel at the U.S. Coast Guard Air Station in Traverse City, Michigan, contaminated a water-table aquifer. An infiltration gallery (30 ft × 30 ft) was installed above a section of the aquifer containing 700 gal JP-4. Purge wells recirculated three million gallon...

  4. NATURAL ATTENUATION OF FUEL HYDROCARBONS AT MULTIPLE AIR FORCE BASE DEMONSTRATION SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A major initiative to evaluate monitored natural attenuation(MNA) of ground water contaminated with fuel hydrocarbons began in June 1993 and continued through October 2000. During this time site characterization studies, both initial and follow-up, were conducted at 28 Air Forc...

  5. NATURAL ATTENUATION OF FUEL HYDROCARBONS AT MULTIPLE AIR FORCE BASE DEMONSTRATION SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT
    A major initiative to evaluate monitored natural attenuation (MNA) of ground-water contaminated with fuel hydrocarbons began in June, 1993, and continued through September, 1999. The main emphasis was to evaluate natural degradation mechanisms to reduce dissolved ...

  6. Solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) fuel cell technology program, phase 1/1A. [design and fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A solid polymer electrolyte fuel cell was studied for the purpose of improving the characteristics of the technology. Several facets were evaluated, namely: (1) reduced fuel cell costs; (2) reduced fuel cell weight; (3) improved fuel cell efficiency; and (4) increased systems compatibility. Demonstrated advances were incorporated into a full scale hardware design. A single cell unit was fabricated. A substantial degree of success was demonstrated.

  7. Impacts of the Weatherization Assistance Program in fuel-oil heated houses

    SciTech Connect

    Levins, W.P.; Ternes, M.P.

    1994-09-01

    The U.S. DOE Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) Division requested Oak Ridge National Laboratory to help design and conduct an up-to-date assessment of the Program. The evaluation includes five separate studies; the fuel oil study is the subject of this paper. The primary goal of the fuel-oil study was to provide a region-wide estimate of the space-heating fuel oil saved by the Program in the Northeast during the 1991 and 1992 program years. Other goals include assessing the cost effectiveness of the Program within the fuel-oil submarket, and identifying factors which caused fuel-oil savings to vary. This paper reports only the highlights from the fuel-oil study`s final report.

  8. Phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant system performance model and computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkasab, K. A.; Lu, C. Y.

    1984-01-01

    A FORTRAN computer program was developed for analyzing the performance of phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant systems. Energy mass and electrochemical analysis in the reformer, the shaft converters, the heat exchangers, and the fuel cell stack were combined to develop a mathematical model for the power plant for both atmospheric and pressurized conditions, and for several commercial fuels.

  9. 78 FR 11903 - Acceptability of Corrective Action Programs for Fuel Cycle Facilities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-20

    ... COMMISSION Acceptability of Corrective Action Programs for Fuel Cycle Facilities AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory... Fuel Cycle Facilities.'' The draft NUREG provides guidance to the NRC staff on how to determine whether a Corrective Action Plan (CAP) submitted by the licensee of a fuel cycle facility is...

  10. EXFILE: A program for compiling irradiation data on UN and UC fuel pins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, J. T.; Smith, R. L.; Weinstein, M. B.; Davison, H. W.

    1973-01-01

    A FORTRAN-4 computer program for handling fuel pin data is described. Its main features include standardized output, easy access for data manipulation, and tabulation of important material property data. An additional feature allows simplified preparation of input decks for a fuel swelling computer code (CYGRO-2). Data from over 300 high temperature nitride and carbide based fuel pin irradiations are listed.

  11. Research Evaluation and Social Demonstration Programs: The Case of the Food and Nutrition Program for the Aged.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Peggy J.

    The Food and Nutrition Program for Aged (FNPA) was established as 1 of 30 research and demonstration programs funded through the provisions of the "Older Americans Act" to promote improved nutrition among aged groups. In the first 3-year phase, the program concentrated on the delivery of nutritional services, and the development and demonstration…

  12. 75 FR 14582 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services-Special Demonstration Programs-Model...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-26

    .... Proposed Priority This notice contains one proposed priority. Model Demonstration Projects To Improve... to last at least one year or result in death. The SSI program is an income supplement program that... to Work program as an employment network services provider or through a cost reimbursement...

  13. Alabama Industrial Technician Education Cooperative Demonstration Program (I-TEC). Final Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John M. Patterson State Technical Coll., Montgomery, AL.

    A cooperative demonstration program between industry (General Electric) and education (John Patterson State Technical College, Alabama) designed and conducted a training program and competency assessment for individuals entering high technology positions related to industrial production in Alabama. The program was designed to develop employees as…

  14. Demonstration of Decision Support Tools for Sustainable Development - An Application on Alternative Fuels in the Greater Yellowstone-Teton Region

    SciTech Connect

    Shropshire, D.E.; Cobb, D.A.; Worhach, P.; Jacobson, J.J.; Berrett, S.

    2000-12-30

    The Demonstration of Decision Support Tools for Sustainable Development project integrated the Bechtel/Nexant Industrial Materials Exchange Planner and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory System Dynamic models, demonstrating their capabilities on alternative fuel applications in the Greater Yellowstone-Teton Park system. The combined model, called the Dynamic Industrial Material Exchange, was used on selected test cases in the Greater Yellow Teton Parks region to evaluate economic, environmental, and social implications of alternative fuel applications, and identifying primary and secondary industries. The test cases included looking at compressed natural gas applications in Teton National Park and Jackson, Wyoming, and studying ethanol use in Yellowstone National Park and gateway cities in Montana. With further development, the system could be used to assist decision-makers (local government, planners, vehicle purchasers, and fuel suppliers) in selecting alternative fuels, vehicles, and developing AF infrastructures. The system could become a regional AF market assessment tool that could help decision-makers understand the behavior of the AF market and conditions in which the market would grow. Based on this high level market assessment, investors and decision-makers would become more knowledgeable of the AF market opportunity before developing detailed plans and preparing financial analysis.

  15. Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Nondestructive Assay of Boxed Wastes for the TRU Waste Characterization Program

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsbad Field Office

    2001-01-31

    The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for nondestructive assay (NDA) consists of a series of tests to evaluate the capability for NDA of transuranic (TRU) waste throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Each test is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements obtained from NDA systems used to characterize the radiological constituents of TRU waste. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WAC; DOE 1999a) and the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD; DOE 1999b). The WAC requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAC. The WAC contains technical and quality requirements for acceptable NDA. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and applicable requirements of the WAC for the NDA PDP for boxed waste assay systems. Measurement facilities demonstrate acceptable performance by the successful testing of simulated waste containers according to the criteria set by this PDP Plan. Comparison among DOE measurement groups and commercial assay services is achieved by comparing the results of measurements on similar simulated waste containers reported by the different measurement facilities. These tests are used as an independent means to assess the performance of measurement groups regarding compliance with established quality assurance objectives (QAO’s). Measurement facilities must analyze the simulated waste containers using the same procedures used for normal waste characterization activities. For the boxed waste PDP, a simulated waste container consists of a modified standard waste box (SWB) emplaced with radioactive standards and fabricated matrix inserts. An SWB is a waste box with ends designed specifically to fit the TRUPACT-II shipping container. SWB’s will be used to package a substantial volume of the TRU waste for disposal. These PDP sample

  16. Annual Compliance Data for Obligated Parties and Renewable Fuel Exporters under the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Gasoline and diesel refiners and importers (Obligated Parties) demonstrate compliance with each of the four annual standards under the Renewable Fuel Standard by meeting the Renewable Volume Obligations (RVO).

  17. Planar Solid-Oxide Fuel Cell System Demonstration at UT SimCenter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-09

    presented in this report, potential of using the density-based approach for solving chemically reacting flow inside a catalytic reactor and SOFC is... reactor temperature profile and reforming efficiency. As a surrogate fuel, n-dodecane has the chemical formula of Q2H26 with hydrogen content 15.28 wt...microchannel reactors [101,102]. Flow with high turbulence can improve hot-spots since the turbulent flow enhances the heat transfer coefficient

  18. Issues and Potential Program on Denatured Fuel Utilization.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-12-01

    use of a mixture of uranium and thoriun oxides as reactor fuel (denatured fuel cycle). By reducing U-238 content, the amount of plutonium produced can...throughout the world. One of the more promising methods involves the use of a mixture of uranium and thorium oxides as reactor fuel (denatured fuel cycle...the performance characteristics of the U-Th oxide fuel. Next to economics, the licensing issue will likely be the principal underlying reason for

  19. Research development and demonstration of a fuel cell/battery powered bus system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, S.; Wimmer, R.

    1993-02-01

    During 1992, the design of the three test bed buses evolved. Georgetown participated in all the working meetings and the preliminary design review of the Test Bed Bus (TBB). Throughout the Year, Georgetown provided input on system design and integration issues, transit industry requirements, and bus performance. GU also attended technical seminars, presenting papers at two. The computer simulation 'HYBRID', developed by Georgetown, was used to assess performance of different bus designs and system control algorithms. GU also modified the simulation to be more flexible and allow easier evaluation of designs. Georgetown had Exhibitgroup design and construct, to our specifications, a fuel cell bus display with a 1/10 scale model of the TBB for use at trade shows and exhibits. Energy Partners of West Palm Beach, Florida completed their subcontract for the engineering design study of a hydrogen fueled, fuel-cell-powered multi-passenger vehicle. Georgetown performed a study to determine the size of the US bus fleet and expected new bus deliveries over the next 10 years. Trojan Battery Company of Santa Fe Springs, California conducted a study to determine the specific design characteristics required of a lead acid battery to meet the special requirements posed by hybrid vehicle operation. Finally, GU assisted the prime contractor with the design of the system controller and its control algorithms.

  20. The NASA LeRC regenerative fuel cell system testbed program for goverment and commercial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, Thomas M.; Prokopius, Paul R.; Voecks, Gerald E.

    1995-01-01

    The Electrochemical Technology Branch of the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) has initiated a program to develop a renewable energy system testbed to evaluate, characterize, and demonstrate fully integrated regenerative fuel cell (RFC) system for space, military, and commercial applications. A multi-agency management team, led by NASA LeRC, is implementing the program through a unique international coalition which encompasses both government and industry participants. This open-ended teaming strategy optimizes the development for space, military, and commercial RFC system technologies. Program activities to date include system design and analysis, and reactant storage sub-system design, with a major emphasis centered upon testbed fabrication and installation and testing of two key RFC system components, namely, the fuel cells and electrolyzers. Construction of the LeRC 25 kW RFC system testbed at the NASA-Jet Propulsion Labortory (JPL) facility at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) is nearly complete and some sub-system components have already been installed. Furthermore, planning for the first commercial RFC system demonstration is underway.

  1. Review of progress in the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, R.B.; Johnson, L.H.

    1986-01-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is reviewed, illustrating the progress that has been made in assessing the concept of disposal of nuclear fuel waste in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. Research is being conducted into used fuel storage and transportation, fuel waste immobilization, site characterization and selection methods, and performance assessment modelling. Details of achievements in these areas are outlined, and results of the most recent interim assessment are discussed.

  2. Simulated coal-gas-fueled molten carbonate fuel cell development program

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.H.

    1992-07-01

    In previous work, International Fuel Cells Corporation (EFC) found interactions between molten carbonate fuel cell cathode materials being considered as replacements for the presently used nickel oxide and matrix materials. Consequently, this work was conducted to screen additional new materials for mutual compatibility. As part of this program, experiments were performed to examine the compatibility of several candidate, alternative cathode materials with the standard lithium aluminate matrix material in the presence of electrolyte at cell potentials. Initial cathode candidates were materials lithium ferrite, yttrium iron garnet, lithium manganite and doped ceria which were developed by universities, national laboratories, or contractors to DOE, EPRI, or GRI. These investigations were conducted in laboratory scale experiments. None of the materials tested can directly replace nickel oxide or indicate greater stability of cell performance than afforded by nickel oxide. Specifically: (1) no further work on niobium doped ceria is warranted; (2) cobalt migration was found in the lithium ferrite cathode tested. This could possibly lead to shorting problems similiar to those encountered with nickel oxide; (3) Possible shorting problems may also exist with the proprietary dopant in YIG; (4) lithium ferrite and YIG cathode were not single phase materials. Assessment of the chemical stability, i.e., dopant loss, was severely impeded by dissolution of these second phases in the electrolyte; and (5) Magnesium doped lithium manganite warrants further work. Electrolytes should contain Mg ions to suppress dopant loss.

  3. Simulated coal-gas-fueled molten carbonate fuel cell development program. Topical report: Cathode compatibility tests

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.H.

    1992-07-01

    In previous work, International Fuel Cells Corporation (EFC) found interactions between molten carbonate fuel cell cathode materials being considered as replacements for the presently used nickel oxide and matrix materials. Consequently, this work was conducted to screen additional new materials for mutual compatibility. As part of this program, experiments were performed to examine the compatibility of several candidate, alternative cathode materials with the standard lithium aluminate matrix material in the presence of electrolyte at cell potentials. Initial cathode candidates were materials lithium ferrite, yttrium iron garnet, lithium manganite and doped ceria which were developed by universities, national laboratories, or contractors to DOE, EPRI, or GRI. These investigations were conducted in laboratory scale experiments. None of the materials tested can directly replace nickel oxide or indicate greater stability of cell performance than afforded by nickel oxide. Specifically: (1) no further work on niobium doped ceria is warranted; (2) cobalt migration was found in the lithium ferrite cathode tested. This could possibly lead to shorting problems similiar to those encountered with nickel oxide; (3) Possible shorting problems may also exist with the proprietary dopant in YIG; (4) lithium ferrite and YIG cathode were not single phase materials. Assessment of the chemical stability, i.e., dopant loss, was severely impeded by dissolution of these second phases in the electrolyte; and (5) Magnesium doped lithium manganite warrants further work. Electrolytes should contain Mg ions to suppress dopant loss.

  4. Detailed Fuel Cell Demonstration Site Summary Report: Naval Hospital at Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center - Twentynine Palms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    in the water for sodium ions in the resin . Resin costs work out to approximately $1,120 per one thousand op- erating hours. Appendix F presents...A bed of ion -exchange resin is used to soften the water in the water treatment system. The softening proc- ess exchanges calcium and magnesium ions ...Timeline The first formal activity related to the fuel cell demonstration unit at the Na - val Hospital was a site evaluation meeting held in December

  5. Ethyl-alcohol-fuel production from the Jerusalem artichoke. Alcohol-Fuels Grant Program

    SciTech Connect

    Middaugh, P.R.

    1983-03-01

    The project objective is to evaluate the commercial feasibility for production of fuel alcohol by fermentation of the carbohydrates in the tops of the Jerusalem artichoke. The maximum top biomass yields of the mammoth French white variety of Jerusalem artichoke was obtained at 119 days after plant emergence and maximum fresh weight of the tops was 31.6 tons per acre. During rapid growth the fresh stalks had 2% to 4% carbohydrate. After the plant reached a maximum height of 168 inches, and started to bud the stalk had a maximum of 4% carbohydrate. During blossoming the stalk carbohydrates rapidly translocated to the tuber. Single versus multiple cuttings demonstrated the maximum carbohydrate was obtained with a single harvest of the mature plants immediately following bud formation. The total carbohydrate yield from the top biomass was 1.26 tons per acre. The equivalent yield of fermentation alcohol is 180.6 gallons of anhydrous ethanol per acre. The tuber yield at both Mesa and Toppenish, WA, was 14 to 15 tons of fresh tubers with 18% total carbohydrates. The carbohydrate yield was 2.52 tons per acre. This is equivalent to a yield of 360 gallons of anhydrous ethanol per acre. Commercial scale fuel alcohol equipment was used to hammer mill and batch ferment tops and tubers. The steps for commercial processing of the biomass tops and tubers was discussed including extracting and fermentation of the carbohydrates to ethanol and their concentration by distillation and dehydration by molecular sieves to anhydrous fuel alcohol. The use of molecular sieves reduced the energy for dehydration of 95% ethanol to 5000 Btu per gallon. The economic feasibility and energy requirement for commercial processing was discussed.

  6. Effect of nitrate addition on biorestoration of fuel-contaminated aquifer: Field demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchins, S.R.; Downs, W.C.; Wilson, J.T.; Smith, G.B.; Kovacs, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    A spill of JP-4 jet fuel at the U.S. Coast Guard Air Station in Traverse City, Michigan, contaminated a water-table aquifer. An infiltration gallery (30 ft X 30 ft) was installed above a section of the aquifer containing 700 gal JP-4. Purge wells recirculated three million gallons of ground water per week through the infiltration gallery at a rate designed to raise the water table above the contaminated interval. Ground water containing ambient concentrations was first recirculated for 40 days. Concentrations of benzene in monitoring wells beneath the infiltration gallery were reduced from 760 to <1 micrograms/1. Concentrations of toluene, ethylbenzene, m,p-xylene, and o-xylene were reduced from 4500 to 17,840 to 44,2600 to 490, and 1400 to 260 micrograms/1, respectively. Average core concentrations of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m,p-xylene, and o-xylene were reduced from 0.84 to 0.032, 33 to 0.13, 18 to 0.36, 58 to 7.4, and 26 to 3.2 mg/kg, respectively. Ground water amended with nitrate (10 mg/1 nitrate-nitrogen) and nutrients was then recirculated for 76 days. Final core concentrations of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m,p-xylene and o-xylene were 0.017, 0.036, 0.019, 0.059, and 0.27 mg/kg, respectively. Final aqueous concentrations were <1 micrograms/1 for benzene and toluene, 6 micrograms/1 for ethylbenzene, and 20 to 40 micrograms/1 for the xylene isomers, in good agreement with predicted values based on residual fuel content and partitioning theory. Although alkylbenzene concentrations have been substantially reduced, the test plot is still contaminated with the weathered fuel. Based on stoichiometry, approximately 10 times more nitrate was consumed than could be accounted for by BTX degradation alone, indicating that other compounds were also degraded under denitrifying conditions.

  7. Detailed Fuel Cell Demonstration Site Summary Report: Edwards Air Force Base, CA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    208 hours and was attributed to a failure of a steam ejector . * Includes final forced outage that was never resolved. ERDC/CERL TR-06-19 33... ejector assembly. 22-Sep 7.5 Restarted power plant. 26-Sep 3.5 Troubleshot ancillary cooling loop. 29-Sep 9.5 Replaced TVC830. 30-Sep 9.5 Started...Fuel Cells personnel on phone. Restarted power plant. 24-Feb 6.0 Checked ejector and FCV012 for proper movement. Started power plant. 5-Mar 3.0 Took

  8. Quality Assurance Program Plan for AGR Fuel Development and Qualification Program

    SciTech Connect

    W. Ken Sowder

    2004-02-01

    Quality Assurance Plan (QPP) is to document the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Management and Operating (M&O) Contractor’s quality assurance program for AGR Fuel Development and Qualification activities, which is under the control of the INEEL. The QPP is an integral part of the Gen IV Program Execution Plan (PEP) and establishes the set of management controls for those systems, structures and components (SSCs) and related quality affecting activities, necessary to provide adequate confidence that items will perform satisfactorily in service.

  9. 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2011-09-01

    This report summarizes comments from the Peer Review Panel at the 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review, held on May 9-13, 2011, in Arlington, Virginia. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes, and standards; education; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  10. 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-10-01

    This report summarizes comments from the Peer Review Panel at the 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review, held on May 13-17, 2013, in Arlington, Virginia. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes, and standards; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  11. 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2012-09-01

    This report summarizes comments from the Peer Review Panel at the 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review, held on May 14-18, 2012, in Arlington, Virginia. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes, and standards; education; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  12. 1980 CRC Fuel Rating Program: Road Octane Performance in 1980 Model Cars

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    CRC Report No. 520 /198o CRC FUEL RATING PROGRAM: ROAD OCTANE PERFORMANCE IN 1980 MODEL CARS July 1981 C-3 .. % COORDINATING RESEARCH COUNCIL INC...30346 (404) 396-3400 1980 CRC FUEL RATING PROGRAM: ROAD OCTANE PERFORMANCE IN 1980 MODEL CARS (CRC Project No. CM-124-80) IN FORMULATING AND...Test Cars ......................................... 3 C. Road Rating Technique.............................. 3 D. Data Analysis

  13. 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-10-01

    This report summarizes comments from the Peer Review Panel at the 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review, held on June 16-20, 2014, in Washington, DC. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes, and standards; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  14. 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2015-10-01

    This report summarizes comments from the Peer Review Panel at the 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review, held on June 8-12, 2015, in Arlington, Virginia. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes, and standards; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  15. 40 CFR 52.351 - United States Postal Service substitute Clean Fuel Fleet Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Clean Fuel Fleet Program. 52.351 Section 52.351 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... § 52.351 United States Postal Service substitute Clean Fuel Fleet Program. Revisions to the Colorado State Implementation Plan, carbon monoxide NAAQS, United States Postal Service substitute...

  16. 40 CFR 52.351 - United States Postal Service substitute Clean Fuel Fleet Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Clean Fuel Fleet Program. 52.351 Section 52.351 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... § 52.351 United States Postal Service substitute Clean Fuel Fleet Program. Revisions to the Colorado State Implementation Plan, carbon monoxide NAAQS, United States Postal Service substitute...

  17. 40 CFR 52.351 - United States Postal Service substitute Clean Fuel Fleet Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Clean Fuel Fleet Program. 52.351 Section 52.351 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... § 52.351 United States Postal Service substitute Clean Fuel Fleet Program. Revisions to the Colorado State Implementation Plan, carbon monoxide NAAQS, United States Postal Service substitute...

  18. 40 CFR 52.351 - United States Postal Service substitute Clean Fuel Fleet Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Clean Fuel Fleet Program. 52.351 Section 52.351 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... § 52.351 United States Postal Service substitute Clean Fuel Fleet Program. Revisions to the Colorado State Implementation Plan, carbon monoxide NAAQS, United States Postal Service substitute...

  19. 40 CFR 52.351 - United States Postal Service substitute Clean Fuel Fleet Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Clean Fuel Fleet Program. 52.351 Section 52.351 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... § 52.351 United States Postal Service substitute Clean Fuel Fleet Program. Revisions to the Colorado State Implementation Plan, carbon monoxide NAAQS, United States Postal Service substitute...

  20. Low NOx heavy fuel combustor concept program addendum: Low/mid heating value gaseous fuel evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novick, A. S.; Troth, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    The combustion performance of a rich/quench/lean (RQL) combustor was evaluated when operated on low and mid heating value gaseous fuels. Two synthesized fuels were prepared having lower heating values of 10.2 MJ/cu m. (274 Btu/scf) and 6.6 MJ/cu m (176 Btu/scf). These fuels were configured to be representative of actual fuels, being composed primarily of nitrogen, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. A liquid fuel air assist fuel nozzle was modified to inject both of the gaseous fuels. The RQL combustor liner was not changed from the configuration used when the liquid fuels were tested. Both gaseous fuels were tested over a range of power levels from 50 percent load to maximum rated power of the DDN Model 570-K industrial gas turbine engine. Exhaust emissions were recorded for four power level at several rich zone equivalence ratios to determine NOx sensitivity to the rich zone operating point. For the mid Btu heating value gas, ammonia was added to the fuel to simulate a fuel bound nitrogen type gaseous fuel. Results at the testing showed that for the low heating value fuel NOx emissions were all below 20 ppmc and smoke was below a 10 smoke number. For the mid heating value fuel, NOx emissions were in the 50 to 70 ppmc range with the smoke below a 10 smoke number.

  1. 40 CFR 63.7530 - How do I demonstrate initial compliance with the emission limitations, fuel specifications and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... that the new fuel(s) does (do) not increase the chlorine, mercury, or TSM input into the unit through... while burning the new fuel(s). (1) You must establish the maximum chlorine fuel input (Clinput) during... process heater that has the highest content of chlorine. (ii) During the fuel analysis for...

  2. Fuel and power coproduction: The Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) process demonstration at Kingsport

    SciTech Connect

    Drown, D.P.; Brown, W.R.; Heydorn, E.C.; Moore, R.B.; Schaub, E.S.; Brown, D.M.; Jones, W.C.; Kornosky, R.M.

    1997-12-31

    The Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) process uses a slurry bubble column reactor to convert syngas (primarily a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen) to methanol. Because of its superior heat management, the process is able to be designed to directly handle the carbon monoxide (CO)-rich syngas characteristic of the gasification of coal, petroleum coke, residual oil, wastes, or of other hydrocarbon feedstocks. When added to an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant, the LPMEOH{trademark} process converts a portion of the CO-rich syngas produced by the gasifier to methanol, and the remainder of the unconverted gas is used to fuel the gas turbine combined-cycle power plant. The LPMEOH{trademark} process has the flexibility to operate in a daily electricity demand load-following manner. Coproduction of power and methanol via IGCC and the LPMEOH{trademark} process provides opportunities for energy storage for electrical demand peak shaving, clean fuel for export, and/or chemical methanol sales.

  3. Overview of the Solar Dynamic Ground Test Demonstration Program at the NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaltens, Richard K.

    1995-01-01

    The Solar Dynamic (SD) Ground Test Demonstration (GTD) program demonstrates the availability of SD technologies in a simulated space environment at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LERC) vacuum facility. Data from the SD GTD program will be provided to the joint U.S. and Russian team which is currently designing a 2 kW SD flight demonstration power system. This SD technology has the potential as a future power source for the International Space Station. This paper reviews the goals and status of the SD GTD program. A description of the SD GTD system includes key design features of the system, subsystems and components.

  4. Marine Fuel Cell Technology Verification Trainer Program: Operator Curriculum Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    ofinito acn. including suggestetns Ior reductng the burden, to Departnment of Defne, t . Washingtn Headquara Services., Diremtorte for information...materials, reference FuelCell Energy (FCE, the manufacturer) documentation are subject to change as the Direct Fuel Cell ( DFC ) SSFC plant technology matures...introduction to the Direct Fuel Cell Ship Service Fuel Cell ( DFC SSFC) for future operators. These modules would fill a 2- to 4- day lecture and

  5. ADDENDUM TO SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION PROGRAM TECHNOLOGY PROFILES, TENTH EDITION, VOLUME 1 - DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, now in its thirteenth year, is an integral part of EPA's research into alternative cleanup methods for hazardous waste sites around the nation. The SITE Program was created to encourage the development and routine us...

  6. 2013 Renewable Fuel Standards for Renewable Fuel Standard Program (RFS2): Final Rulemaking Documents

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's final rule establishes the 2013 renewable fuel standards for cellulosic biofuel, biomass-based diesel, advanced biofuel, and total renewable fuels. Find this final rule, proposed rule and fact sheet about this rule here.

  7. Measurement of Fresh Fuel Rods to Demonstrate Compliance with Criticality Safety Limits

    SciTech Connect

    Miko, David K.; Desimone, David J.

    2015-11-03

    In order to operate TA-66 as a radiological facility with the quantity of nuclear material required to fulfil its mission, a criticality safety evaluation was required. This evaluation defined the control parameters for operations at the facility. The resulting evaluation for TA-66 placed limits on the amount of SNM, as well as other materials such as beryllium. In addition, there is a limit on the number of uranium fuel rods allowed subject to enrichment, outer diameter, and overall length restrictions. The enrichments for the rods to be shipped to TA-66 were documented in LA-UR-13-23581, but the outer diameter and length were not documented. This report provides this information.

  8. Prototype Demonstration of Gamma- Blind Tensioned Metastable Fluid Neutron/Multiplicity/Alpha Detector – Real Time Methods for Advanced Fuel Cycle Applications

    SciTech Connect

    McDeavitt, Sean M.

    2016-12-20

    The content of this report summarizes a multi-year effort to develop prototype detection equipment using the Tensioned Metastable Fluid Detector (TMFD) technology developed by Taleyarkhan [1]. The context of this development effort was to create new methods for evaluating and developing advanced methods for safeguarding nuclear materials along with instrumentation in various stages of the fuel cycle, especially in material balance areas (MBAs) and during reprocessing of used nuclear fuel. One of the challenges related to the implementation of any type of MBA and/or reprocessing technology (e.g., PUREX or UREX) is the real-time quantification and control of the transuranic (TRU) isotopes as they move through the process. Monitoring of higher actinides from their neutron emission (including multiplicity) and alpha signatures during transit in MBAs and in aqueous separations is a critical research area. By providing on-line real-time materials accountability, diversion of the materials becomes much more difficult. The Tensioned Metastable Fluid Detector (TMFD) is a transformational technology that is uniquely capable of both alpha and neutron spectroscopy while being “blind” to the intense gamma field that typically accompanies used fuel – simultaneously with the ability to provide multiplicity information as well [1-3]. The TMFD technology was proven (lab-scale) as part of a 2008 NERI-C program [1-7]. The bulk of this report describes the advancements and demonstrations made in TMFD technology. One final point to present before turning to the TMFD demonstrations is the context for discussing real-time monitoring of SNM. It is useful to review the spectrum of isotopes generated within nuclear fuel during reactor operations. Used nuclear fuel (UNF) from a light water reactor (LWR) contains fission products as well as TRU elements formed through neutron absorption/decay chains. The majority of the fission products are gamma and beta emitters and they represent the

  9. NASA Broad Specification Fuels Combustion Technology program - Pratt and Whitney Aircraft Phase I results and status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohmann, R. P.; Fear, J. S.

    1982-01-01

    In connection with increases in the cost of fuels and the reduced availability of high quality petroleum crude, a modification of fuel specifications has been considered to allow acceptance of poorer quality fuels. To obtain the information upon which a selection of appropriate fuels for aircraft can be based, the Broad Specification Fuels Combustion Technology program was formulated by NASA. A description is presented of program-related investigations conducted by an American aerospace company. The specific objective of Phase I of this program has been to evaluate the impact of the use of broadened properties fuels on combustor design through comprehensive combustor rig testing. Attention is given to combustor concepts, experimental evaluation, results obtained with single stage combustors, the stage combustor concept, and the capability of a variable geometry combustor.

  10. EPAct Alternative Fuel Transportation Program: State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleet Compliance Annual Report; Fleet Compliance Results for MY 2013/FY 2014

    SciTech Connect

    2015-09-01

    Compliance rates for covered state government and alternative fuel provider fleets under the Alternative Fuel Transportation Program (pursuant to the Energy Policy Act or EPAct) are reported for MY 2013/FY 2014 in this publication.

  11. 75 FR 47798 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services-Special Demonstration Programs-Model...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services--Special Demonstration Programs--Model...) Served by State Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Agencies AGENCY: Office of Special Education...

  12. DEMONSTRATION AND EVALUATION OF INNOVATIVE REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES THROUGH THE EPA SITE PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program has successfuly promoted the development, commercialization and implementation of innovative hazardous waste treatment technologies for 18 years. SITE offers a mechanism for conducting joint technology demonstration an...

  13. Technology Evaluation Report - SITE PROGRAM DEMONSTRATION OF THE ULTROX INTERNATIONAL ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION OXIDATION TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    In support of EPA's Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, this report presents the results of the Ultrox International technology demonstration. The Ultrox® technology (a registered trademark of Ultrox International) simultaneously uses ultraviolet (UV) radi...

  14. SELENIUM TREATMENT/REMOVAL ALTERNATIVES DEMONSTRATION PROJECT - MINE WASTE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM ACTIVITY III, PROJECT 20

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is the final report for EPA's Mine WAste Technology Program (MWTP) Activity III, Project 20--Selenium Treatment/Removal Alternatives Demonstration project. Selenium contamination originates from many sources including mining operations, mineral processing, abandoned...

  15. Production of Jet Fuels from Coal Derived Liquids. Volume 7. GPGP Jet Fuels Production Program. Evaluation of Technical Uncertainties for Producing Jet Fuels from Liquid By-Products of the Great Plains Gasification Plant

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    AFWAL-TR-87-2042 VOLUME VII PRODUCTION OF JET FUELS FROM COAL DERIVED LIQUIDS I VOLUME VII -- GPGP JET FUELS PRODUCTION PROGRAM -- EVALUATION OF o...from Coal Derived Liquids, Vol VII - GPGP Jet Fuels Production Program - Evaluation of Technical Uncertainties for Producing Jet Fuels from Liquid By...potential of jet fuel production from the liquid by-product streams produced by the gasification of lignite at the Great Plains Gasification Plant ( GPGP

  16. Full-Scale Transport Controlled Impact Demonstration Program Photographic/Video Coverage.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-01

    AD-Al71 ?19 FULL-SCALE TRANSPORT CONTROLLED INPRCT DENONSTRTIOU I/5 IPROGRAM PNOTOOGRAPIIC..(U) JET PROPULSION LAS PASM" -5 I CA J D GREGOIRE APR 86...435 _ _-_ _ 4. Ttle and Subtitle S. Report D le Full-Scale Transport Controlled April 1986 Impact Demonstration Program 6. Performing 0,gon .a...Abstract The Full-Scale Transport Controlled Impact Demonstration Program was recorded on both film and video tape by the Photo-Duplication Section

  17. Western hardwoods: Value-added research and demonstration program. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.; von Segen, W.; Willits, S.

    1995-09-01

    Research results from the value-added research and demonstration program for western hardwoods are summarized in this report. The intent of the program was to enhance the economy of the Pacific Northwest by helping local communities and forest industries produce wood products more efficiently. Emphasis was given to value-added products and barriers to increased utilization. The program was coordinated by the Pacific Northwest Research Station, the Pacific Northwest region of State and Private Forestry, and the Forest Products Laboratory.

  18. EVALUATION OF OXYGEN-ENRICHED MSW/SEWAGE SLUDGE CO-INCINERATION DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report provides an evaluation of a two-phased demonstration program conducted for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Municipal Solid Waste Innovative Technology Evaluation Program, and the results thereof, of a recently developed method of sewage sludge managemen...

  19. School Violence Prevention Demonstration Program: Report on Year One, 1999-2000 School Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Louis

    This report is the research component of the Center for Civic Education's School Violence Prevention Demonstration Program, a scheme for middle-school-aged students that develops intellectual and participatory skills essential to effective and responsible citizenship. The program is an attempt to draw attention to ways in which civic education can…

  20. Something Special for Teachers. A Schoolhouse Energy Teaching Program. SEED: Schoolhouse Energy Efficiency Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Calvin E.; Bottinelli, Charles A.

    The Schoolhouse Energy Efficiency Demonstration (SEED) program was developed to assist schools in reducing the impact of rising energy costs. Developed as part of the SEED program, this publication was designed to provide background information on the energy issue and to briefly describe what future energy sources may be. It includes: (1)…

  1. A PROJECT DEMONSTRATING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION SERVICES IN A TOTAL PSYCHIATRIC CARE PROGRAM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Board of Health, Atlanta.

    A COOPERATIVE PROGRAM OFFERED A COMPLETE RANGE OF INTEGRATED MEDICAL, PSYCHOLOGICAL, SOCIAL, AND VOCATIONAL SERVICES TO REINTEGRATE MENTAL PATIENTS INTO THE LIFE OF THE COMMUNITY. THE PROGRAM PROPOSED TO DEMONSTRATE THE EFFECTIVENESS OF CERTAIN REHABILITATION PROCEDURES TO EXTEND AND IMPROVE REHABILITATION SERVICES, AND TO ESTABLISH EFFECTIVE…

  2. Kendall Demonstration Elementary School: The Special Opportunities Programs. Who It Serves and Why.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owner, Susan Zylstra

    1982-01-01

    The Special Opportunities Program (SOP) at the Kendall Demonstration Elementary School in Washington, DC, serves hearing impaired students (two to 14 years old) who have special learning problems on additional handicaps, including developmental disabilities. The SOP is also integrated with the regular program, which eases mainstreaming. (SEW)

  3. Teacher and Principal Survey Results in the National Preventive Dentistry Demonstration Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Stephen P.; And Others

    The National Preventive Dentistry Demonstration Program was conducted to assess the costs and benefits of combinations of school-based preventive dental care procedures. The program involved almost 30,000 elementary school children from 10 sites across the country. Classroom procedures, such as weekly fluoride mouthrinse, were administered or…

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) PROGRAM CASE STUDIES: DEMONSTRATING PROGRAM OUTCOMES, VOLUME II

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program evaluates the performance of innovative air, water, pollution prevention and monitoring technologies that have the potential to improve human health and the environment. This bookle...

  5. Synthetic Fuels Corporation’s Management of Demonstration Projects Would Be Limited.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-10

    November 1980 by a Pittsburg and Midway subcontractor to delete the syngas purification unit from the plant design. Because of plant design changes...to mitigate housing, sewer, and water shortages . Also, the Energy Impacted Area Development Assistance Program, administered by the Department of

  6. HTGR Fuel Technology Program. Semiannual report for the period ending March 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    This document reports the technical accomplishments on the HTGR Fuel Technology Program at General Atomic during the first half of FY-81. The activities include the fuel process, fuel materials, fuel cycle, fission product transport, and core component verification testing tasks necessary to support the design and development of a steam cycle/cogeneration (SC/C) version of the HTGR with a follow-on reformer (R) version. An important effort which was initiated during this period was the preparation of input data for a long-range technology program plan.

  7. Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program. Progress report, January 1-March 31, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-04-01

    The DOE has concentrated all US research and development on fuel reprocessing into one major program - the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) - under the management of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Oak Ridge Operations Office. Other major program participants are GA Technologies, Inc., where reprocessing research and development on the HTGR fuel cycle are done, and the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL). The coverage is generally overview in nature. Experimental details and data have been limited to (1) make the report more concise and (2) meet the requirements which would qualify the report for unrestricted distribution in the open literature. All research and development on civilian power reactor fuel reprocessing in the United States is managed under the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) centered at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Technical progress is reported in overview fashion in this series of quarterly progress reports.

  8. Electrostatic fuel atomization and spray-dispersal demonstration. Final report, September 1989-January 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, A.J.

    1990-07-01

    The purpose of this work is to characterize charged spray plumes, test the validity of existing spray/plume models, provide a basis for evaluating these plumes for gas turbine fuel and ignitor systems service. Plumes generated by a charge injection atomizer in nitrogen (< or = bar, absolute) have been analyzed using an Aerometrics Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA). A 10 bar the outer, small droplet sheath is characterized by a Sauter mean diameter (D32) of about 55 microns, a span of about 0.7 and a number median of about 20 microns. The inner, large droplet core is characterized by D32 about = 110 microns and the same span. These data conform to a predicted overall droplet size distribution exhibiting a polydispersed profile: primary peak at about 105 microns, and secondary peaks at about 85 and 135 microns. The peaks are associated with the core region; the near constant profile below about 85 microns is characteristic of the sheath. Contrary to prediction, D32 increased modestly with pressure in these tests due to two factors: output charge density levels remained fixed with increasing pressure due to shortening of the sprayer caused by droplets stagnating in the test chamber; and, the predictable, lateral plume core expansion to the probe sampling position. A modest air flow over the spray unit corrects these problems.

  9. Use of DWPF redox measurement technique on glasses from West Valley Nuclear Fuel Services Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1990-10-01

    Liquid high-level nuclear waste will be immobilized at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by vitrification in borosilicate glass in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). A similar vitrification facility exists at the West Valley Nuclear Fuel Services. In both of these facilities, control of the oxidation/reduction (redox) equilibrium in the glass melter is critical for processing of the nuclear waste. Redox can be determined by measuring the ratio of ferrous to ferric ions in the glass melt. A colorimetric procedure has been developed for the DWPF which has been shown to give rapid and reliable analytical results. This colorimetric technique has been shown to measure the Fe{sup 2+} component of glasses more accurately than other existing redox measurement methods. The DWPF redox technique was applied to a series of six glasses taken from the West Valley melter during a transient melter excursion. This excursion caused the glasses to become progressively more reducing with time. Application of the DWPF redox technique to these glasses correctly indicated the redox trends with a higher precision and with more accuracy than the West Valley wet chemical method and/or Alfred University's Mossbauer method. 1 fig., 18 refs.

  10. Soil remediation demonstration project: Biodegradation of heavy fuel oils. Special report

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, C.M.; Bhunia, P.; Koenen, B.A.

    1997-08-01

    Treatment of oil-contaminated soils is necessary to protect water supplies, human health, and environmental quality; but because of limited funds, cleanup costs are often prohibitive. High costs are exacerbated in cold regions such as Alaska, where spills are often in areas inaccessible to heavy equipment and where there is limited infrastructure. Owing to the lack of infrastructure, widespread fuel distribution systems, and the need for heating in the cold climate, there are numerous small-scale oil spills. Low-cost treatments applicable to small-scale spills are needed. The object of this CPAR project was to examine using cost-effective, on-site bioremediation techniques for heavy-oil-contaminated soil in cold regions. Both heavy-oil and diesel-contaminated soils were used to compare landfarming, a low-intensity treatment, to pile bioventing, a costlier treatment. For each soil-contaminant combination, we compared nutrient additions to a control with no nutrient additions. Under the conditions of this study, landfarming with nutrient additions was as effective for treating diesel-contaminated soil as was bioventing with nutrient additions. For heavy oils, landfarming with nutrients resulted in lower soil concentrations after one year, but differences among treatments were not statistically significant. Because landfarming does not require pumps, electricity, or plumbing, all costs are less than for bioventing. The minimal requirements for infrastructure also make landfarming attractive in remote sites typical of cold regions.

  11. Implications of Results from the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program on Licensing of Modular HTGRs

    SciTech Connect

    David Petti

    2001-10-01

    The high level of safety of modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) designs is achieved by passively maintaining core temperatures below fission product release thresholds under all envisioned accident scenarios. This level of fuel performance and fission product retention reduces the radioactive source term by many orders of magnitude relative to other reactor types but is predicated on exceptionally high coated-particle fuel fabrication quality and excellent fuel performance under normal operation and accident conditions. The Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification (AGR) Program decided to qualify for uranium oxide/uranium carbide (UCO) TRISO coated-particle fuel in an operating envelope that would bound both pebble bed and prismatic modular HTGR options. By using a mixture of uranium oxide and uranium carbide, the kernel composition is engineered to minimize CO formation and fuel kernel migration, which is key to maintain to fuel integrity at the higher burnups, temperatures, and temperature gradients anticipated in prismatic HTGRs. Fuel fabrication conducted at both laboratory and engineering scale has demonstrated the ability to fabricate high quality UCO TRISO fuel with very low defects. The first irradiation (AGR 1) exposed about 300,000 TRISO fuel particles to a peak burnup of 19.6% FIMA, a peak fast-neutron fluence of about 4.3 × 1025 n/m2, and a maximum time-averaged fuel temperature of about 1,200°C without a single particle failure. The very low release of key metallic fission products (except silver) measured in post-irradiation examination (PIE) confirms the excellent performance measured under irradiation. Very low releases have been measured in accident simulation heatup testing (''safety testing'') after hundreds of hours at 1600 and 1700°C and no particle failures (no noble gas release measured) have been observed. Even after hundreds of hours at 1800°C, the releases are still very low

  12. Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) Regional Sediment Management Demonstration Program Initiatives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) Regional Sediment Management (RSM) Demonstration Program (DP), which was led by the US Army Corps of Engineers Mobile District. Mobile s demonstration identified and prioritized projects and associated issues that could quickly realize the benefits resulting from a regional management approach. The experience gained from these initiatives has been extended and applied to other Mobile District projects throughout the

  13. Cost of Treatment Procedures in the National Preventive Dentistry Demonstration Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foch, Craig B.; And Others

    The National Preventive Dentistry Demonstration Program (NPDDP) delivered five different regimens of school based preventive dental care to groups of children in 10 American cities between 1977 and 1981. All clinical techniques employed had previously been demonstrated to be both safe and effective in clinical trials. The purpose of the NPDDP was…

  14. Implementation of alternative bio-based fuels in aviation: The Clean Airports Program

    SciTech Connect

    Shauck, M.E.; Zanin, M.G.

    1997-12-31

    The Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center at Baylor University in Waco, Texas, was designated, in March 1996, by the US Department of Energy (US DOE) as the national coordinator of the Clean Airports Program. This program, a spin-off of the Clean Cities Program, was initiated to increase the use of alternative fuels in aviation. There are two major fuels used in aviation today, the current piston engine aviation gasoline, and the current turbine engine fuel. The environmental impact of each of these fuels is significant. Aviation Gasoline (100LL), currently used in the General Aviation piston engine fleet, contributes 100% of the emissions containing lead in the USA today. In the case of the turbine engine fuel (Jet fuel), there are two major environmental impacts to be considered: the local, in the vicinity of the airports, and the global impact on climate change. The Clean Airports Program was established to promote the use of clean burning fuels in order to achieve and maintain clean air at and in the vicinities of airports through the use of alternative fuel-powered air and ground transportation vehicles.

  15. Voluntary Truck and Bus Fuel-Economy-Program marketing plan. Final technical report, September 29, 1980-January 29, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    The aim of the program is to improve the utilization of fuel by commercial trucks and buses by updating and implementing specific approaches for educating and monitoring the trucking industry on methods and means of conserving fuels. The following outlines the marketing plan projects: increase use of program logo by voluntary program members and others; solicit trade publication membership and support; brief Congressional delegations on fuel conservation efforts; increase voluntary program presence before trade groups; increase voluntary program presence at truck and trade shows; create a voluntary program display for use at trade shows and in other areas; review voluntary program graphics; increase voluntary program membership; and produce placemats carrying fuel conservation messages; produce a special edition of Fuel Economy News, emphasizing the driver's involvement in fuel conservation; produce posters carrying voluntary program fuel conservation message. Project objectives, activities, and results for each project are summarized.

  16. Demonstration of a Highly Efficient Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Power System Using Adiabatic Steam Reforming and Anode Gas Recirculation

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Michael R.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Chick, Lawrence A.; Mcvay, Gary L.

    2012-05-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are currently being developed for a wide variety of applications because of their high efficiency at multiple power levels. Applications for SOFCs encompass a large range of power levels including 1-2 kW residential combined heat and power applications, 100-250 kW sized systems for distributed generation and grid extension, and MW-scale power plants utilizing coal. This paper reports on the development of a highly efficient, small-scale SOFC power system operating on methane. The system uses adiabatic steam reforming of methane and anode gas recirculation to achieve high net electrical efficiency. The anode exit gas is recirculated and all of the heat and water required for the endothermic reforming reaction are provided by the anode gas emerging from the SOFC stack. Although the single-pass fuel utilization is only about 55%, because of the anode gas recirculation the overall fuel utilization is up to 93%. The demonstrated system achieved gross power output of 1650 to 2150 watts with a maximum net LHV efficiency of 56.7% at 1720 watts. Overall system efficiency could be further improved to over 60% with use of properly sized blowers.

  17. NASA Systems Autonomy Demonstration Program - A step toward Space Station automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starks, S. A.; Rundus, D.; Erickson, W. K.; Healey, K. J.

    1987-01-01

    This paper addresses a multiyear NASA program, the Systems Autonomy Demonstration Program (SADP), whose main objectives include the development, integration, and demonstration of automation technology in Space Station flight and ground support systems. The role of automation in the Space Station is reviewed, and the main players in SADP and their roles are described. The core research and technology being promoted by SADP are discussed, and a planned 1988 milestone demonstration of the automated monitoring, operation, and control of a complete mission operations subsystem is addressed.

  18. TRUEX hot demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Chamberlain, D.B.; Leonard, R.A.; Hoh, J.C.; Gay, E.C.; Kalina, D.G.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1990-04-01

    In FY 1987, a program was initiated to demonstrate technology for recovering transuranic (TRU) elements from defense wastes. This hot demonstration was to be carried out with solution from the dissolution of irradiated fuels. This recovery would be accomplished with both PUREX and TRUEX solvent extraction processes. Work planned for this program included preparation of a shielded-cell facility for the receipt and storage of spent fuel from commercial power reactors, dissolution of this fuel, operation of a PUREX process to produce specific feeds for the TRUEX process, operation of a TRUEX process to remove residual actinide elements from PUREX process raffinates, and processing and disposal of waste and product streams. This report documents the work completed in planning and starting up this program. It is meant to serve as a guide for anyone planning similar demonstrations of TRUEX or other solvent extraction processing in a shielded-cell facility.

  19. Crew station research and development facility training for the light helicopter demonstration/validation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsumoto, Joy Hamerman; Rogers, Steven; Mccauley, Michael; Salinas, AL

    1992-01-01

    The U.S. Army Crew Station Research and Development Branch (CSRDB) of the Aircraft Simulation Division (AVSCOM) was tasked by the Light Helicopter Program Manager (LH-PM) to provide training to Army personnel in advanced aircraft simulation technology. The purpose of this training was to prepare different groups of pilots to support and evaluate two contractor simulation efforts during the Demonstration/Validation (DEM/VAL) phase of the LH program. The personnel in the CSRDB developed mission oriented training programs to accomplish the objectives, conduct the programs, and provide guidance to army personnel and support personnel throughout the DEM/VAL phase.

  20. Impacts of a Medicaid Wraparound Model Demonstration Program on Youth Specialty Mental Health Services Use.

    PubMed

    Blizzard, Angela M; Glos, Lukas J; Stephan, Sharon H; Medoff, Deborah; Slade, Eric P

    2016-06-15

    Effective coordination of mental health care is critical in Medicaid wraparound model programs for youth. This study examined participation over time in mental health services for youth diverted or transitioned from residential care to a Medicaid wraparound demonstration program. Youth in wraparound had more sustained use of mental health outpatient clinic services than did propensity score matched youth who were not in wraparound. However, the rate of outpatient clinic follow-up after inpatient discharge was no greater in wraparound. Routine assessment of wraparound programs' impacts on receipt of mental health care may inform the development of Medicaid wraparound program performance standards.