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Sample records for full wave analysis

  1. Electromagnetic scattering and depolarization across rough surfaces: Full wave analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahar, Ezekiel; Huang, Guorong; Lee, Bom Son

    1995-05-01

    Full wave solutions are derived for vertically and horizontally polarized waves diffusely scattered across an interface that is two-dimensionally rough separating two different propagating media. Since the normal to the rough surface is not restricted to the reference plane of incidence, the waves are depolarized upon scattering; and the single scattered radiation fields are expressed as integrals of a surface element transmission scattering matrix that also accounts for coupling between the vertically and horizontally polarized waves. The integrations are over the rough surface area as well as the complete two-dimensional wave spectra of the radiation fields. The full wave solutions satisfy the duality and reciprocity relationships in electromagnetic theory, and the surface element scattering matrix is invariant to coordinate transformations. It is shown that in the high-frequency limit the full wave solutions reduce to the physical optics solutions, while in the low-frequency limit (for small mean square heights and slopes) the full wave solutions reduce to Rice's (1951) small perturbation solutions. Thus, the full wave solution accounts for specular point scattering as well as diffuse, Bragg-type scattering in a unified, self-consistent manner. It is therefore not necessary to use hybrid, perturbation and physical optics approaches (based on two-scale models of composite surfaces with large and small roughness scales) to determine the like- and cross-polarized fields scattered across the rough surface.

  2. Full-Wave Analysis of Lower Hybrid Wave Propagation in the Edge Plasma of a Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonoli, P. T.; Wallace, G. M.; Wright, J. C.; Meneghini, O.; Parker, R.; Porkolab, M.; Shiraiwa, S.; Harvey, R. W.; Phillips, C. K.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.

    2009-11-01

    Recent lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) experiments on Alcator C-Mod have revealed a transition density above which LHRF generated fast electrons are no longer detected [1]. This critical density is also well below the threshold density for parametric decay of the LH pump wave. Analysis of these plasmas using a ray tracing-Fokker Planck model shows that poorer wave penetration at higher density, accompanied by increased collisional damping in the Scrape off Layer (SOL) may possibly explain this transition [1]. We have used an electromagnetic field solver TORLH [2] to begin to assess the possible role of full-wave effects in this density limit. Results will be presented, including three-dimensional field reconstructions for varying edge plasma parameters such as SOL density, temperature, and density gradient scale length. [4pt] [1] G. Wallace et al, 18^th Topical Conf. on RF Power in Plasmas (Gent, Belgium, June, 2009) Paper B60. [0pt] [2] J. C. Wright et al, Physics of Plasmas 16, July (2009).

  3. Numerical simulations of full-wave fields and analysis of channel wave characteristics in 3-D coal mine roadway models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Si-Tong; Wei, Jiu-Chuan; Cheng, Jiu-Long; Shi, Long-Qing; Wen, Zhi-Jie

    2016-12-01

    Currently, numerical simulations of seismic channel waves for the advance detection of geological structures in coal mine roadways focus mainly on modeling twodimensional wave fields and therefore cannot accurately simulate three-dimensional (3-D) full-wave fields or seismic records in a full-space observation system. In this study, we use the first-order velocity-stress staggered-grid finite difference algorithm to simulate 3-D full-wave fields with P-wave sources in front of coal mine roadways. We determine the three components of velocity V x, V y, and V z for the same node in 3-D staggered-grid finite difference models by calculating the average value of V y, and V z of the nodes around the same node. We ascertain the wave patterns and their propagation characteristics in both symmetrical and asymmetric coal mine roadway models. Our simulation results indicate that the Rayleigh channel wave is stronger than the Love channel wave in front of the roadway face. The reflected Rayleigh waves from the roadway face are concentrated in the coal seam, release less energy to the roof and floor, and propagate for a longer distance. There are surface waves and refraction head waves around the roadway. In the seismic records, the Rayleigh wave energy is stronger than that of the Love channel wave along coal walls of the roadway, and the interference of the head waves and surface waves with the Rayleigh channel wave is weaker than with the Love channel wave. It is thus difficult to identify the Love channel wave in the seismic records. Increasing the depth of the receivers in the coal walls can effectively weaken the interference of surface waves with the Rayleigh channel wave, but cannot weaken the interference of surface waves with the Love channel wave. Our research results also suggest that the Love channel wave, which is often used to detect geological structures in coal mine stopes, is not suitable for detecting geological structures in front of coal mine roadways

  4. Full-wave analysis of the high frequency characteristics of the sine waveguide slow-wave structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Xia; Wei, Yanyu; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Qing; Wu, Gangxiong; Ding, Chong; Li, Qian; Zhang, Luqi; Jiang, Xuebing; Gong, Yubin; Wang, Wenxiang

    2017-08-01

    A theoretical model for calculation of the high frequency characteristics of the sine waveguide slow-wave structure (SWS) is proposed. The formulas of dispersion and interaction impedances of the hybrid modes are obtained by combining the Helmholtz equation with the appropriate boundary conditions. Using the full wave analysis method, it is proved that the periodic structures with a half-period shift followed leads to a pairwise closing of passbands characteristic of adjacent mode. The sine waveguide SWS for 0.22THz traveling wave tube (TWT) is chosen as an illustrative example to verify the validity of the theoretical model, and the calculation results of the dispersion curve and interaction impedance curve are consistent with the HFSS simulation results. In addition, the influences of dimensions of sine waveguide on the high frequency characteristics of +1st spatial harmonic wave are investigated by numerical calculation. The study indicates that the appropriate SWS parameters are helpful for improving the bandwidth and increasing output power of TWT.

  5. Imaging the shallow subsurface with surface waves: dispersion curve analysis versus full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés Pérez Solano, Carlos; Donno, Daniela; Strobbia, Claudio; Chauris, Hervé

    2014-05-01

    Seismic surface wave analysis is a standard tool in geotechnical engineering for imaging the shallow subsurface. Most current surface wave analysis methods assume a horizontally layered medium, and estimate the near-surface shear velocity profile from dispersion curves, which are picked on frequency-wavenumber (f-k) gathers and then inverted using 1D modelling approaches. Media containing high velocity contrasts and irregular lateral variations might be difficult to be handled with the local 1D approximation. For 2D model estimation, full waveform inversion (FWI) is an alternative and can estimate high resolution models. The classical FWI objective function consists of the least-squares misfit between observed and modelled shot gathers (Tarantola, 1986). Classical FWI needs an accurate initial model for achieving convergence. Data sets containing surface waves could be inverted, without falling into secondary minima, if the data contains sufficiently low frequencies and large offsets such that multi-scale and time windowing approaches can be applied. We propose to invert surface waves with an alternative FWI-based approach that uses a modified objective function. It is based on the least-squares misfit between the absolute value of the f-k transform of windowed shot gathers. We refer to this approach as the windowed-Amplitude Waveform Inversion (w-AWI). Some secondary minima problems are mitigated: the choice of an initial model is easier in w-AWI than in FWI. The alternative objective function is intermediary between the one used in the 1D inversion approach (dispersion curves) and classical FWI. As most of the phase information is neglected in w-AWI, we use it as a first step before classical FWI. This sequential inversion approach using w-AWI followed by classical FWI aims at estimating a high-resolution near-surface velocity model, by explaining the complete elastic wavefield, even when the initial velocity model is far from the exact one. The proposed approach

  6. Full-wave analysis of imaging by the Pendry-Ramakrishna stackable lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorofeenko, A. V.; Lisyansky, A. A.; Merzlikin, A. M.; Vinogradov, A. P.

    2006-06-01

    We perform a full-wave analysis of a stackable lens proposed in a recent paper [Ramakrishna , J. Mod. Optics 50, 1419 (2003)]. This lens was suggested for improving subwavelength imaging and can be obtained by splitting a single-layer lens into a set of thinner layers. Our analysis shows that (i) such a lens, which forms a one-dimensional photonic crystal (PC), is a resonator cavity for traveling Bloch waves that cannot leave this PC resonator due to total internal reflection; (ii) imaging is possible outside the band gaps only and no imaging can be achieved in the vicinity of the eigenstates of the PC resonator as well as near the state associated with the excitation of the volume plasmon; (iii) the expected advantage is due to thinning the layers, which results in shifting of both the band edge and the eigenstates toward higher values of the wave number; and (iv) a single-layer lens has the broadest working range compared to a stackable lens with the same elementary layer thickness.

  7. An Analysis of Lower Hybrid Grill Coupling Using an Efficient Full Wave Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preinhaelter, Josef; Urban, Jakub; Vahala, Linda; Vahala, George

    2012-03-01

    Lower hybrid (LH) waves are very important for heating and current drive in tokamaks. A code is developed for 3D grills and the problem of efficient coupling: the power density spectrum, the power reflection coefficient, the power lost by the waves launched in the inaccessible region and the directivity of the waves. An efficient adaptive full wave solver is used to determine the wave propagation in a 1D plasma slab geometry. The very large number of 2D k-space infinite integrals for the coupling elements are solved using high order Gaussian quadratures combined with 2D B-splines in the accessible region. The code can handle large structures and many modes because the computational time is only weakly dependent on the size of the problem. An iterative evaluation of the integrands in the inaccessible region solves the currently overlooked near singular behavior of the integrands as well as the spectral power density associated with the eigenmodes. The role of collisions is clarified. We determine the 3D electric field in front of the grill and consider several COMPASS grills operating either at 1.3 GHz or 3.7 GHz with various waveguide phasing.

  8. An analysis of lower hybrid grill coupling using an efficient full wave code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preinhaelter, Josef; Urban, Jakub; Vahala, Linda; Vahala, George

    2012-08-01

    Lower hybrid (LH) waves are very important for heating and current drive in tokamaks. Phased arrays of rectangular waveguides, generally called grills, are typically used as launchers. We develop a code which solves, in the 3D geometry of the grill structure, the problem of efficient coupling: the power density spectrum of the emitted waves, the power reflection coefficient, the power lost by the waves launched in the inaccessible region and the directivity of the waves transmitted into the accessible region. The code is also able to determine the 3D electric field in front of the grill. An efficient adaptive full wave solver is used to determine the wave propagation in a 1D plasma slab geometry. To evaluate the very large number of 2D k-space infinite integrals for the coupling elements, we have developed a method based on high order Gaussian quadratures combined with 2D B-splines in the accessible region for the plasma related part of the integrands. This method is well suited to handle large structures and many modes because the computational time is only weakly dependent on the size of the problem. An iterative evaluation of the integrands in the inaccessible region is adopted to handle the presently overlooked near singular behaviour of the integrands as well as the spectral power density associated with the eigenmodes. The role of collisions is clarified in this context. The code is applied to several COMPASS grills operating either at 1.3 GHz or at 3.7 GHz. First we thouroughly analyse the original 1.3 GHz, 8-waveguide conventional grill at various waveguide phasing. Then, the coupling of two grill designs for 3.7 GHz is solved. The suitability of all the grills is discussed, showing compatible grill and plasma parameter ranges.

  9. Scattering and Depolarization of Electromagnetic Waves--Full Wave Solutions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    Analysis," Proceedings of the International Union of Radio Science URSI Conference at Ciudad Universitaria , Madrid, August 1983, in press. . . 13...rough land and seat3 J. The full wave approach was also used to determine the scattering and depolarization of radio waves in irregular spheroidal struc...Full Wave Solutions," Radio Science, Vol. 17, No. 5, September-October 1982, pp. 1055-1066. 4. "Scattering and Depolarization by Rough Surfaces: Full

  10. Full wave analysis and miniaturization of microstrip antenna on ferrimagnetics substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavor, Otávio Paulino; Fernandes, Humberto Cesar Chaves

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the miniaturization of the microstrip antenna on ferrimagnetic substrate for operate at a frequency of 2.5 GHz, where the full wave method Transverse Transmission Line-TTL is used it for obtain resonance frequency. For validate this method in these substrates, the results as function of DC magnetic field are shown. When the field is 132.6 AT/m, the value of reference is 151.7 MHz and the value of TTL is 151.3 MHz. The dimensions are obtained for the frequency of 2.5 GHz and a comparison is done with ferrites and conventional substrate, showing a reduction in volume of the antenna of 2808.96 mm3 for 0.39 mm3 when the ferrites are used.

  11. Portable tremor monitor system for real-time full-wave monitoring and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Meng-Hsiang; Sheu, Yung-Hoh; Shih, Yuan-Hsing; Young, M. S.

    2003-03-01

    Tremors, which occur anytime during the daily 24 h cycle, may be missed if monitoring is performed on a short-term basis. Improving this situation requires long-term ambulatory recording capability. There are traditionally two methods for long-term recording of tremors: one is the analog recorder, which is both heavy and inconvenient when transferring data to a PC system; the other is the Actigraph, in which only movement counts are recorded, such data being incomplete. Thus, for long-term and continuous tremor monitoring, this study presents a wrist-worn portable system that can save an entire 24 h tremor wave form in an expansible compact flash memory card. With a rechargeable battery and USB interface, the system has two modes: (1) the monitoring mode while connected to a host computer allows confirmation of system operation, calibration of accelerometers, and immediate display of data on a PC screen and (2) the collecting mode saves data during daily activity on the compact flash memory card within the device. After collection, data are accessed to a host computer for processing. Analysis based on complete tremor wave form including tremor frequency and intensity of 24 h data is expected to allow improved understanding and treatment of tremors.

  12. Full-wave analysis of superconducting microstrip lines on anisotropic substrates using equivalent surface impedance approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, L.H.; Lyons, W.G.; Orlando, T.P.; Ali, S.M. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science); Lyons, W.G. . Lincoln Lab.); Withers, R.S. )

    1993-12-01

    A computationally efficient full-wave technique is developed to analyze single and coupled superconducting microstrip lines on anisotropic substrates. The optic axis of the dielectric is in the plane of the substrate at an arbitrary angle with respect to the propagation direction. A dyadic Green's function for layered, anisotropic media is used to formulate an integral equation for the current in the strips. To increase the efficiency of the method, the superconducting strips are replaced by equivalent surface impedances which account for the loss and kinetic inductance of the superconductors. The validity of this equivalent surface impedance (ESI) approach is verified by comparing the calculated complex propagation constant and characteristic impedance for superconducting microstrip lines on an isotropic substrate to measured results, and to numerical results by the more rigorous volume-integral equation method. The results calculated using the ESI approach for perfectly conducting coupled lines on an anisotropic substrate agree with the results by the finite-difference time-domain method. This efficient ESI technique is then used to study the effects of the optic axis orientation and the strip width on the characteristics of single and coupled superconducting microstrip lines on M-plane sapphire. The effects of the line separation and operating temperature on the coupled lines are also investigated.

  13. Rings Full of Waves (zoom)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image shows a close-up view of a density wave in Saturn's A ring. It was taken by the narrow angle camera on the Cassini spacecraft after successful entry into Saturn's orbit. The view shows the dark, or unlit, side of the rings.

  14. Full wave-field reflection coefficient inversion.

    PubMed

    Dettmer, Jan; Dosso, Stan E; Holland, Charles W

    2007-12-01

    This paper develops a Bayesian inversion for recovering multilayer geoacoustic (velocity, density, attenuation) profiles from a full wave-field (spherical-wave) seabed reflection response. The reflection data originate from acoustic time series windowed for a single bottom interaction, which are processed to yield reflection coefficient data as a function of frequency and angle. Replica data for inversion are computed using a wave number-integration model to calculate the full complex acoustic pressure field, which is processed to produce a commensurate seabed response function. To address the high computational cost of calculating short range acoustic fields, the inversion algorithms are parallelized and frequency averaging is replaced by range averaging in the forward model. The posterior probability density is interpreted in terms of optimal parameter estimates, marginal distributions, and credibility intervals. Inversion results for the full wave-field seabed response are compared to those obtained using plane-wave reflection coefficients. A realistic synthetic study indicates that the plane-wave assumption can fail, producing erroneous results with misleading uncertainty bounds, whereas excellent results are obtained with the full-wave reflection inversion.

  15. Nonlinear full-wave-interaction analysis of a gyrotron-traveling-wave-tube amplifier based on a lossy dielectric-lined circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Du Chaohai; Liu Pukun

    2010-03-15

    The stability of the millimeter-wave gyrotron-traveling-wave-tube (gyro-TWT) amplifier can be effectively improved via controlling the propagation characteristics of the operating modes using lossy dielectric-lined (DL) waveguide. Self-consistent nonlinear theory of the electron cyclotron maser (ECM) interaction in lossy DL circuit is developed based on a full-wave study of the propagation characteristics of the DL waveguide. This nonlinear theory fully takes into consideration the waveguide structure and the lossy dielectric characteristics. It is capable of accurately calculating the ECM instability between a cyclotron harmonic and a circular polarized mode, and effectively predicting the nonlinear stability of the DL waveguide-based gyro-TWT. Systematic investigation of a Ka-band TE{sub 01} mode DL waveguide-based gyro-TWT is carried out, and numerical calculation reveals a series of interesting results. This work provides a basic theoretical tool for further exploring the application of the lossy DL waveguide in millimeter-wave gyro-TWTs.

  16. Source Estimation by Full Wave Form Inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Sjögreen, Björn; Petersson, N. Anders

    2013-08-07

    Given time-dependent ground motion recordings at a number of receiver stations, we solve the inverse problem for estimating the parameters of the seismic source. The source is modeled as a point moment tensor source, characterized by its location, moment tensor components, the start time, and frequency parameter (rise time) of its source time function. In total, there are 11 unknown parameters. We use a non-linear conjugate gradient algorithm to minimize the full waveform misfit between observed and computed ground motions at the receiver stations. An important underlying assumption of the minimization problem is that the wave propagation is accurately described by the elastic wave equation in a heterogeneous isotropic material. We use a fourth order accurate finite difference method, developed in [12], to evolve the waves forwards in time. The adjoint wave equation corresponding to the discretized elastic wave equation is used to compute the gradient of the misfit, which is needed by the non-linear conjugated minimization algorithm. A new source point moment source discretization is derived that guarantees that the Hessian of the misfit is a continuous function of the source location. An efficient approach for calculating the Hessian is also presented. We show how the Hessian can be used to scale the problem to improve the convergence of the non-linear conjugated gradient algorithm. Numerical experiments are presented for estimating the source parameters from synthetic data in a layer over half-space problem (LOH.1), illustrating rapid convergence of the proposed approach.

  17. Full spectrum millimeter-wave modulation.

    PubMed

    Macario, Julien; Yao, Peng; Shi, Shouyuan; Zablocki, Alicia; Harrity, Charles; Martin, Richard D; Schuetz, Christopher A; Prather, Dennis W

    2012-10-08

    In recent years, the development of new lithium niobate electro-optic modulator designs and material processing techniques have contributed to support the increasing need for faster optical networks by considerably extending the operational bandwidth of modulators. In an effort to provide higher bandwidths for future generations of networks, we have developed a lithium niobate electro-optic phase modulator based on a coplanar waveguide ridged structure that operates up to 300 GHz. By thinning the lithium niobate substrate down to less than 39 µm, we are able to eliminate substrate modes and observe optical sidebands over the full millimeter-wave spectrum.

  18. The complex mixed Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin-full-wave approach and its application to the two dimensional mode structure analysis of ion temperature gradient/collisionless trapped electron mode drift waves

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Z. X.

    2015-05-15

    The complex mixed Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin (WKB)-full-wave approach is applied to the 2D mode structure analysis of ion temperature gradient/collisionless trapped electron mode drift waves in tokamak plasmas. The parallel mode structure is calculated with the full-wave approach, while the radial envelope is calculated with the complex WKB method. The tilting of the global mode structure along radius is demonstrated analytically. The effects of the phase and amplitude variation of the radial envelope on the parallel mode structure are included in terms of a complex radial wave vector in the parallel mode equation. It is shown that the radial equilibrium non-uniformity leads to the asymmetry of the parallel mode structure not only in configuration space but also in spectrum space. The mixed approach provides a practical way to analyze the asymmetric component of the global mode structure due to radial equilibrium non-uniformity.

  19. Full-Wave Modeling of EMIC Waves in the Earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, E. H.; Johnson, J.; Keller, S.

    2015-12-01

    Electromagnetic (EMIC) waves are known to be excited by the cyclotron instability associated with hot and anisotropic ion distributions in the equatorial region of the magnetosphere. One of the significant scientific issues concerning EMIC waves is to understand how these waves are detected at the ground. In order to solve this puzzle, it is necessary to understand the propagation characteristics of the field-aligned EMIC waves, which include polarization reversal, cutoff, resonance, and mode coupling between different wave modes, in dipolar magnetic field. However, the inability of ray-tracing to adequately describe wave propagation near the crossover cutoff-resonance frequencies in multi-ion plasma is a one of the reasons why the scientific questions remain unsolved. Using a recently developed 2D full-wave code that solves the full wave equations in global magnetospheric geometry, we demonstrate how EMIC waves propagate to higher magnetic latitude in an electron-proton-He+ plasma. We find that polarization reversal occurs at the crossover frequency from left-hand (LH) to right-hand (RH) polarization and the RH EMIC waves can either propagate to the inner magnetosphere or reflect to the outer magnetosphere at the Buchsbaum resonance location. We also clearly found mode-coupling from guided LH EMIC waves to unguided RH or LH waves (i.e., fast mode) occurs at the crossover location, which is consistent with previous 1D full-wave analysis.

  20. Full time-domain nonlinear coupled dynamic analysis of a truss spar and its mooring/riser system in irregular wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, MinDong; Teng, Bin; Xiao, LongFei; Ning, DeZhi; Shi, ZhongMin; Qu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    A new full time-domain nonlinear coupled method has been established and then applied to predict the responses of a Truss Spar in irregular wave. For the coupled analysis, a second-order time-domain approach is developed to calculate the wave forces, and a finite element model based on rod theory is established in three dimensions in a global coordinate system. In numerical implementation, the higher-order boundary element method (HOBEM) is employed to solve the velocity potential, and the 4th-order Adams-Bashforth-Moultn scheme is used to update the second-order wave surface. In deriving convergent solutions, the hull displacements and mooring tensions are kept consistent at the fairlead and the motion equations of platform and mooring-lines/risers are solved simultaneously using Newmark- β integration scheme including Newton-Raphson iteration. Both the coupled quasi-static analysis and the coupled dynamic analysis are performed. The numerical simulation results are also compared with the model test results, and they coincide very well as a whole. The slow-drift responses can be clearly observed in the time histories of displacements and mooring tensions. Some important characteristics of the coupled responses are concluded.

  1. Full Wave Analysis of Passive Microwave Monolithic Integrated Circuit Devices Using a Generalized Finite Difference Time Domain (GFDTD) Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, Faiza S.; Rascoe, Daniel L.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a modified Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) technique using a generalized conformed orthogonal grid. The use of the Conformed Orthogonal Grid, Finite Difference Time Domain (GFDTD) enables the designer to match all the circuit dimensions, hence eliminating a major source o error in the analysis.

  2. Full-wave and half-wave rectification in second-order motion perception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, J. A.; Sperling, G.

    1994-01-01

    Microbalanced stimuli are dynamic displays which do not stimulate motion mechanisms that apply standard (Fourier-energy or autocorrelational) motion analysis directly to the visual signal. In order to extract motion information from microbalanced stimuli, Chubb and Sperling [(1988) Journal of the Optical Society of America, 5, 1986-2006] proposed that the human visual system performs a rectifying transformation on the visual signal prior to standard motion analysis. The current research employs two novel types of microbalanced stimuli: half-wave stimuli preserve motion information following half-wave rectification (with a threshold) but lose motion information following full-wave rectification; full-wave stimuli preserve motion information following full-wave rectification but lose motion information following half-wave rectification. Additionally, Fourier stimuli, ordinary square-wave gratings, were used to stimulate standard motion mechanisms. Psychometric functions (direction discrimination vs stimulus contrast) were obtained for each type of stimulus when presented alone, and when masked by each of the other stimuli (presented as moving masks and also as nonmoving, counterphase-flickering masks). RESULTS: given sufficient contrast, all three types of stimulus convey motion. However, only one-third of the population can perceive the motion of the half-wave stimulus. Observers are able to process the motion information contained in the Fourier stimulus slightly more efficiently than the information in the full-wave stimulus but are much less efficient in processing half-wave motion information. Moving masks are more effective than counterphase masks at hampering direction discrimination, indicating that some of the masking effect is interference between motion mechanisms, and some occurs at earlier stages. When either full-wave and Fourier or half-wave and Fourier gratings are presented simultaneously, there is a wide range of relative contrasts within which the

  3. Full-wave and half-wave rectification in second-order motion perception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, J. A.; Sperling, G.

    1994-01-01

    Microbalanced stimuli are dynamic displays which do not stimulate motion mechanisms that apply standard (Fourier-energy or autocorrelational) motion analysis directly to the visual signal. In order to extract motion information from microbalanced stimuli, Chubb and Sperling [(1988) Journal of the Optical Society of America, 5, 1986-2006] proposed that the human visual system performs a rectifying transformation on the visual signal prior to standard motion analysis. The current research employs two novel types of microbalanced stimuli: half-wave stimuli preserve motion information following half-wave rectification (with a threshold) but lose motion information following full-wave rectification; full-wave stimuli preserve motion information following full-wave rectification but lose motion information following half-wave rectification. Additionally, Fourier stimuli, ordinary square-wave gratings, were used to stimulate standard motion mechanisms. Psychometric functions (direction discrimination vs stimulus contrast) were obtained for each type of stimulus when presented alone, and when masked by each of the other stimuli (presented as moving masks and also as nonmoving, counterphase-flickering masks). RESULTS: given sufficient contrast, all three types of stimulus convey motion. However, only one-third of the population can perceive the motion of the half-wave stimulus. Observers are able to process the motion information contained in the Fourier stimulus slightly more efficiently than the information in the full-wave stimulus but are much less efficient in processing half-wave motion information. Moving masks are more effective than counterphase masks at hampering direction discrimination, indicating that some of the masking effect is interference between motion mechanisms, and some occurs at earlier stages. When either full-wave and Fourier or half-wave and Fourier gratings are presented simultaneously, there is a wide range of relative contrasts within which the

  4. Full-Wave Radio Characterization of Ionospheric Modification at HAARP

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-26

    Full-Wave Radio Characterization of Ionospheric Modification at HAARP We have studied electrostatic and electromagnetic turbulence stimulated by...frequency, radio, full wave, plasma waves, plasma instabilites, remote sensing, electromagnetic emissions, antenna, radio imaging, descending layer REPORT...have studied electrostatic and electromagnetic turbulence stimulated by radiowave pumping and electron precipitation. We have made measurements of

  5. Full Wave Modeling of Helicon Operation in Proto-MPEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowicz, Pawel; Caneses, Juan; David, Green; Lau, Cornwall; Caughman, John; Goulding, Richard; Ruzic, David; Proto-MPEX Team

    2016-10-01

    An improved ``high density mode'' of operation of the helicon plasma source on Proto-MPEX has been observed recently. The high density mode is characterized by an increase in on-axis electron density (>5e19 m-3) and a flat electron temperature (2 - 3 eV) profile during a helicon pulse. Presently, this transition has only been observed when deuterium gas is puffed downstream of the helicon antenna and the delivered RF power exceeds 110 kW. Establishing plasma densities and magnetic field strengths under the antenna that support a stable resonant helicon mode are believed to be the reason for the improved mode of operation. A full wave model of the helicon antenna has been made using finite element analysis software, COMSOL Multiphysics. This model is used to investigate the wave fields produced by the helicon antenna before and after the high density transition occurs. The investigation of the wave fields will be used in identifying the experimental conditions that are necessary for the high density mode transition and the resonant helicon mode responsible for the transition. Simulation results will be compared to radial B-dot probe measurements at multiple axial locations. U.S. D.O.E. contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  6. RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS: RENORMALIZED EIGENVECTORS AND FULL WAVE DECOMPOSITION RIEMANN SOLVER

    SciTech Connect

    Anton, Luis; MartI, Jose M; Ibanez, Jose M; Aloy, Miguel A.; Mimica, Petar; Miralles, Juan A.

    2010-05-01

    We obtain renormalized sets of right and left eigenvectors of the flux vector Jacobians of the relativistic MHD equations, which are regular and span a complete basis in any physical state including degenerate ones. The renormalization procedure relies on the characterization of the degeneracy types in terms of the normal and tangential components of the magnetic field to the wave front in the fluid rest frame. Proper expressions of the renormalized eigenvectors in conserved variables are obtained through the corresponding matrix transformations. Our work completes previous analysis that present different sets of right eigenvectors for non-degenerate and degenerate states, and can be seen as a relativistic generalization of earlier work performed in classical MHD. Based on the full wave decomposition (FWD) provided by the renormalized set of eigenvectors in conserved variables, we have also developed a linearized (Roe-type) Riemann solver. Extensive testing against one- and two-dimensional standard numerical problems allows us to conclude that our solver is very robust. When compared with a family of simpler solvers that avoid the knowledge of the full characteristic structure of the equations in the computation of the numerical fluxes, our solver turns out to be less diffusive than HLL and HLLC, and comparable in accuracy to the HLLD solver. The amount of operations needed by the FWD solver makes it less efficient computationally than those of the HLL family in one-dimensional problems. However, its relative efficiency increases in multidimensional simulations.

  7. Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamics: Renormalized Eigenvectors and Full Wave Decomposition Riemann Solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antón, Luis; Miralles, Juan A.; Martí, José M.; Ibáñez, José M.; Aloy, Miguel A.; Mimica, Petar

    2010-05-01

    We obtain renormalized sets of right and left eigenvectors of the flux vector Jacobians of the relativistic MHD equations, which are regular and span a complete basis in any physical state including degenerate ones. The renormalization procedure relies on the characterization of the degeneracy types in terms of the normal and tangential components of the magnetic field to the wave front in the fluid rest frame. Proper expressions of the renormalized eigenvectors in conserved variables are obtained through the corresponding matrix transformations. Our work completes previous analysis that present different sets of right eigenvectors for non-degenerate and degenerate states, and can be seen as a relativistic generalization of earlier work performed in classical MHD. Based on the full wave decomposition (FWD) provided by the renormalized set of eigenvectors in conserved variables, we have also developed a linearized (Roe-type) Riemann solver. Extensive testing against one- and two-dimensional standard numerical problems allows us to conclude that our solver is very robust. When compared with a family of simpler solvers that avoid the knowledge of the full characteristic structure of the equations in the computation of the numerical fluxes, our solver turns out to be less diffusive than HLL and HLLC, and comparable in accuracy to the HLLD solver. The amount of operations needed by the FWD solver makes it less efficient computationally than those of the HLL family in one-dimensional problems. However, its relative efficiency increases in multidimensional simulations.

  8. Full Wave Analysis of RF Signal Attenuation in a Lossy Cave using a High Order Time Domain Vector Finite Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Pingenot, J; Rieben, R; White, D

    2004-12-06

    We present a computational study of signal propagation and attenuation of a 200 MHz dipole antenna in a cave environment. The cave is modeled as a straight and lossy random rough wall. To simulate a broad frequency band, the full wave Maxwell equations are solved directly in the time domain via a high order vector finite element discretization using the massively parallel CEM code EMSolve. The simulation is performed for a series of random meshes in order to generate statistical data for the propagation and attenuation properties of the cave environment. Results for the power spectral density and phase of the electric field vector components are presented and discussed.

  9. 3D Full-Wave Simulations of Reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Valeo, E. J.; Kramer, G. J.; Nazikian, R.

    2009-11-26

    The characterization of fluctuation amplitudes, spatial correlation lengths, and wave vectors through measurement of the correlation properties of reflected microwave diagnostic signals depends on a quantitative knowledge of propagation in toroidal, magnetized plasma. The disparity between the radiation wavelength (mm) and the plasma size makes full wave computations challenging. We extend a two dimensional model which computes propagation in a poloidal plane to include toroidal variation. The model reduces the computational burden compared to that of solving the full-wave equation everywhere-but retains both diffraction and refraction-by merging a description appropriate to the under dense plasma (paraxial) with the required full-wave description near the reflection layer. Initial results for ITER-like profiles demonstrate the utility of the tool as an aid in specifying antenna positioning and setting sensitivity requirements.

  10. Full wave effects on the lower hybrid wave spectrum and driven current profile in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraiwa, S.; Ko, J.; Meneghini, O.; Parker, R.; Schmidt, A. E.; Greenwald, M.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J.; Ma, Y.; Podpaly, Y.; Rice, J. E.; Wallace, G.; Wolfe, S. M.; C-Mod Group, Alcator; Scott, S.; Wilson, J. R.

    2011-08-15

    A numerical modeling of current profile modification by lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) using a fullwave/Fokker-Planck simulation code is presented. A MHD stable LHCD discharge on Alcator C-Mod was analyzed, and the current profile from full wave simulations was found to show better agreement with the experiment than a ray-tracing code. Comparison of full wave and ray-tracing simulation shows that, although ray-tracing can reproduce the stochastic wave spectrum broadening, the full wave calculation predicts even wider spectrum broadening, and the wave spectrum fills all of the kinematically allowed domain. This is the first demonstration of LHCD current profile modeling using a full wave simulation code in a multi-pass absorption regime, showing the clear impact of full wave effects on the LHCD driven current profile.

  11. Full Wave Analysis of RF Signal Attenuation in a Lossy Rough Surface Cave using a High Order Time Domain Vector Finite Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Pingenot, J; Rieben, R; White, D; Dudley, D

    2005-10-31

    We present a computational study of signal propagation and attenuation of a 200 MHz planar loop antenna in a cave environment. The cave is modeled as a straight and lossy random rough wall. To simulate a broad frequency band, the full wave Maxwell equations are solved directly in the time domain via a high order vector finite element discretization using the massively parallel CEM code EMSolve. The numerical technique is first verified against theoretical results for a planar loop antenna in a smooth lossy cave. The simulation is then performed for a series of random rough surface meshes in order to generate statistical data for the propagation and attenuation properties of the antenna in a cave environment. Results for the mean and variance of the power spectral density of the electric field are presented and discussed.

  12. Reactive power in the full Gaussian light wave.

    PubMed

    Seshadri, S R

    2009-11-01

    The electric current sources that are required for the excitation of the fundamental Gaussian beam and the corresponding full Gaussian light wave are determined. The current sources are situated on the secondary source plane that forms the boundary between the two half-spaces in which the waves are launched. The electromagnetic fields and the complex power generated by the current sources are evaluated. For the fundamental Gaussian beam, the reactive power vanishes, and the normalization is chosen such that the real power is 2 W. The various full Gaussian waves are identified by the length parameter b(t) that lies in the range 0 < or = b(t) < or = b, where b is the Rayleigh distance. The other parameters are the wavenumber k, the free-space wavelength lambda, and the beam waist w0 at the input plane. The dependence of the real power of the full Gaussian light wave on b(t)/b and w0/lambda is examined. For a specified w0/lambda, the reactive power, which can be positive or negative, increases as b(t)/b is increased from 0 to 1 and becomes infinite for b(t)/b=1. For a specified b(t)/b, the reactive power approaches zero as kw0 is increased and reaches the limiting value of zero of the paraxial beam.

  13. Extracorporeal shock waves improve angiogenesis after full thickness burn.

    PubMed

    Goertz, O; Lauer, H; Hirsch, T; Ring, A; Lehnhardt, M; Langer, S; Steinau, H U; Hauser, J

    2012-11-01

    Extensive wounds of burn patients remain a challenge due to wound infection and subsequent septicemia. We wondered whether extracorporeal shock wave application (ESWA) accelerates the healing process. The aim of the study was to analyze microcirculation, angiogenesis and leukocyte endothelium interaction after burns by using ESWA with two types of low intensity. Full-thickness burns were inflicted to the ears of hairless mice (n=51; area: 1.3 mm(2)). The mice were randomized into five groups: (A) low-energy shock waves after burn injury (0.04 mJ/mm(2)); (B) very low-energy shock waves after burn injury (0.015 mJ/mm(2)); (C) mice received burns but no ESWA (control group); (D) mice without burn were exposed to low-energy shock waves; (E) mice without burns and with no shock wave application. Intravital fluorescent microscopy was used to assess microcirculatory parameters, angiogenesis and leukocyte behavior. ESWA was performed on day 1, 3 and 7 (500 shoots, 1 Hz). Values were obtained straight after and on days 1, 3, 7 and 12 post burn. Group A showed accelerated angiogenesis (non-perfused area at day 12: 5.3% vs. 9.1% (group B) and 12.6% (group C), p=0.005). Both shock wave groups showed improved blood flow after burn compared to group C. Shock waves significantly increased the number of rolling leukocytes compared to the non-ESWA-treated animals (group D: 210.8% vs. group E: 83.3%, p=0.017 on day 7 and 172.3 vs. 90.9%, p=0.01 on day 12). Shock waves have a positive effect on several parameters of wound healing after burns, especially with regard to angiogenesis and leukocyte behaviour. In both ESWA groups, angiogenesis and blood flow outmatched the control group. Within the ESWA groups the higher intensity (0.04 mJ/mm(2)) showed better results than the lower intensity group. Moreover, shock waves increased the number of rolling and sticking leukocytes as a part of an improved metabolism. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  14. Benchmarking ICRF Full-wave Solvers for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    R. V. Budny, L. Berry, R. Bilato, P. Bonoli, M. Brambilla, R. J. Dumont, A. Fukuyama, R. Harvey, E. F. Jaeger, K. Indireshkumar, E. Lerche, D. McCune, C. K. Phillips, V. Vdovin, J. Wright, and members of the ITPA-IOS

    2011-01-06

    Abstract Benchmarking of full-wave solvers for ICRF simulations is performed using plasma profiles and equilibria obtained from integrated self-consistent modeling predictions of four ITER plasmas. One is for a high performance baseline (5.3 T, 15 MA) DT H-mode. The others are for half-field, half-current plasmas of interest for the pre-activation phase with bulk plasma ion species being either hydrogen or He4. The predicted profiles are used by six full-wave solver groups to simulate the ICRF electromagnetic fields and heating, and by three of these groups to simulate the current-drive. Approximate agreement is achieved for the predicted heating power for the DT and He4 cases. Factor of two disagreements are found for the cases with second harmonic He3 heating in bulk H cases. Approximate agreement is achieved simulating the ICRF current drive.

  15. Full-wave modeling of EMIC waves near the He+ gyrofrequency

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Eun -Hwa; Johnson, Jay R.

    2016-01-06

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are known to be excited by the cyclotron instability associated with hot and anisotropic ion distributions in the equatorial region of the magnetosphere and are thought to play a key role in radiation belt losses. Although detection of these waves at the ground can provide a global view of the EMIC wave environment, it is not clear what signatures, if any, would be expected. One of the significant scientific issues concerning EMIC waves is to understand how these waves are detected at the ground. In order to solve this puzzle, it is necessary to understandmore » the propagation characteristics of the field-aligned EMIC waves, which include polarization reversal, cutoff, resonance, and mode coupling between different wave modes, in a dipolar magnetic field. However, the inability of ray tracing to adequately describe wave propagation near the crossover cutoff-resonance frequencies in multi-ion plasmas is one of reasons why these scientific questions remain unsolved. Using a recently developed 2-D full-wave code that solves the full-wave equations in global magnetospheric geometry, we demonstrate how EMIC waves propagate from the equatorial region to higher magnetic latitude in an electron-proton-He+ plasma. We find that polarization reversal occurs at the crossover frequency from left-hand polarization (LHP) to right-hand (RHP) polarization and such RHP EMIC waves can either propagate to the inner magnetosphere or reflect to the outer magnetosphere at the Buchsbaum resonance location. Lastly, we also find that mode coupling from guided LHP EMIC waves to unguided RHP or LHP waves (i.e., fast mode) occurs.« less

  16. Full-wave modeling of EMIC waves near the He+ gyrofrequency

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Eun -Hwa; Johnson, Jay R.

    2016-01-06

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are known to be excited by the cyclotron instability associated with hot and anisotropic ion distributions in the equatorial region of the magnetosphere and are thought to play a key role in radiation belt losses. Although detection of these waves at the ground can provide a global view of the EMIC wave environment, it is not clear what signatures, if any, would be expected. One of the significant scientific issues concerning EMIC waves is to understand how these waves are detected at the ground. In order to solve this puzzle, it is necessary to understand the propagation characteristics of the field-aligned EMIC waves, which include polarization reversal, cutoff, resonance, and mode coupling between different wave modes, in a dipolar magnetic field. However, the inability of ray tracing to adequately describe wave propagation near the crossover cutoff-resonance frequencies in multi-ion plasmas is one of reasons why these scientific questions remain unsolved. Using a recently developed 2-D full-wave code that solves the full-wave equations in global magnetospheric geometry, we demonstrate how EMIC waves propagate from the equatorial region to higher magnetic latitude in an electron-proton-He+ plasma. We find that polarization reversal occurs at the crossover frequency from left-hand polarization (LHP) to right-hand (RHP) polarization and such RHP EMIC waves can either propagate to the inner magnetosphere or reflect to the outer magnetosphere at the Buchsbaum resonance location. Lastly, we also find that mode coupling from guided LHP EMIC waves to unguided RHP or LHP waves (i.e., fast mode) occurs.

  17. High frequency current conveyor precision full-wave rectifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toumazou, C.; Lidgey, F. J.; Chattong, S.

    1994-05-01

    The design of a precision full-wave rectifier using current conveyors is reported. The design uses a voltage reference circuit to clad the voltage excursions at the output of the rectifier during the zero crossings, which ensures that the usual large signal distortion associated with classical precision rectifiers is avoided. Measured rectifier performance using a 100 MHz current conveyor demonstrates good rectifier integrity at an operating frequency of 30 MHz.

  18. A full-wave Helmholtz model for continuous-wave ultrasound transmission.

    PubMed

    Huttunen, Tomi; Malinen, Matti; Kaipio, Jari P; White, Phillip Jason; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2005-03-01

    A full-wave Helmholtz model of continuous-wave (CW) ultrasound fields may offer several attractive features over widely used partial-wave approximations. For example, many full-wave techniques can be easily adjusted for complex geometries, and multiple reflections of sound are automatically taken into account in the model. To date, however, the full-wave modeling of CW fields in general 3D geometries has been avoided due to the large computational cost associated with the numerical approximation of the Helmholtz equation. Recent developments in computing capacity together with improvements in finite element type modeling techniques are making possible wave simulations in 3D geometries which reach over tens of wavelengths. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of a full-wave solution of the 3D Helmholtz equation for modeling of continuous-wave ultrasound fields in an inhomogeneous medium. The numerical approximation of the Helmholtz equation is computed using the ultraweak variational formulation (UWVF) method. In addition, an inverse problem technique is utilized to reconstruct the velocity distribution on the transducer which is used to model the sound source in the UWVF scheme. The modeling method is verified by comparing simulated and measured fields in the case of transmission of 531 kHz CW fields through layered plastic plates. The comparison shows a reasonable agreement between simulations and measurements at low angles of incidence but, due to mode conversion, the Helmholtz model becomes insufficient for simulating ultrasound fields in plates at large angles of incidence.

  19. Guided Wave Tomography Based on Full-Waveform Inversion.

    PubMed

    Rao, Jing; Ratassepp, Madis; Fan, Zheng

    2016-02-29

    In this paper, a guided wave tomography method based on Full Waveform Inversion (FWI) is developed for accurate and high resolu- tion reconstruction of the remaining wall thickness in isotropic plates. The forward model is computed in the frequency domain by solving a full-wave equation in a two-dimensional acoustic model, accounting for higher order eects such as diractions and multiple scattering. Both numerical simulations and experiments were carried out to obtain the signals of a dispersive guided mode propagating through defects. The inversion was based on local optimization of a waveform mist func- tion between modeled and measured data, and was applied iteratively to discrete frequency components from low to high frequencies. The resulting wave velocity maps were then converted to thickness maps by the dispersion characteristics of selected guided modes. The results suggest that the FWI method is capable to reconstruct the thickness map of a irregularly shaped defect accurately on a 10 mm thick plate with the thickness error within 0.5 mm.

  20. Full Wave Propagation Code in General 3D Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovich, Pavel; Cooper, W. Anthony; Villard, Laurent

    2003-10-01

    A full-wave propagation code (LEMan) has been developed and tested for 3D plasma configurations. The code solves the Maxwell operator for inhomogeneous plasma with a given external antenna. The plasma-wave interaction is modelled with full cold plasma dielectric tensor with finite electron mass. Special care is taken to avoid numerical pollution of the discretised spectrum: the wave equation is reformulated in terms of electromagnetic potentials. The discretisation is implemented with finite elements radially and Fourier decomposition in poloidal and toroidal angles. The LEMan code uses the equilibrium metric in Boozer magnetic coordinates produced with TERPSICHORE. The Fourier formulation of the problem gives a possibility to largely reduce matrix construction time by minimizing the number of numerical integrations of the equilibrium coefficients. Several mirror- and helix-like configurations have been analysed showing the expected structure of the spectrum in the Alfven frequency range with characteristic gaps and eigenmodes. In the case of both poloidal and toroidal mode coupling (2-period QAS stellarator) the spectrum is very complicated, but a comparison with the corresponding cylindrical branches still helps to distinguish the main modes and mode conversion surfaces.

  1. Numerical modelling of nonlinear full-wave acoustic propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Velasco-Segura, Roberto Rendón, Pablo L.

    2015-10-28

    The various model equations of nonlinear acoustics are arrived at by making assumptions which permit the observation of the interaction with propagation of either single or joint effects. We present here a form of the conservation equations of fluid dynamics which are deduced using slightly less restrictive hypothesis than those necessary to obtain the well known Westervelt equation. This formulation accounts for full wave diffraction, nonlinearity, and thermoviscous dissipative effects. A two-dimensional, finite-volume method using Roe’s linearisation has been implemented to obtain numerically the solution of the proposed equations. This code, which has been written for parallel execution on a GPU, can be used to describe moderate nonlinear phenomena, at low Mach numbers, in domains as large as 100 wave lengths. Applications range from models of diagnostic and therapeutic HIFU, to parametric acoustic arrays and nonlinear propagation in acoustic waveguides. Examples related to these applications are shown and discussed.

  2. Numerical modelling of nonlinear full-wave acoustic propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco-Segura, Roberto; Rendón, Pablo L.

    2015-10-01

    The various model equations of nonlinear acoustics are arrived at by making assumptions which permit the observation of the interaction with propagation of either single or joint effects. We present here a form of the conservation equations of fluid dynamics which are deduced using slightly less restrictive hypothesis than those necessary to obtain the well known Westervelt equation. This formulation accounts for full wave diffraction, nonlinearity, and thermoviscous dissipative effects. A two-dimensional, finite-volume method using Roe's linearisation has been implemented to obtain numerically the solution of the proposed equations. This code, which has been written for parallel execution on a GPU, can be used to describe moderate nonlinear phenomena, at low Mach numbers, in domains as large as 100 wave lengths. Applications range from models of diagnostic and therapeutic HIFU, to parametric acoustic arrays and nonlinear propagation in acoustic waveguides. Examples related to these applications are shown and discussed.

  3. Direct Calculations of Current Drive with a Full Wave Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, John C.; Phillips, Cynthia K.

    1997-11-01

    We have developed a current drive package that evaluates the current driven by fast magnetosonic waves in arbitrary flux geometry. An expression for the quasilinear flux has been derived which accounts for coupling between modes in the spectrum of waves launched from the antenna. The field amplitudes are calculated in the full wave code, FISIC, and the current response function, \\chi, also known as the Spitzer function, is determined with Charles Karney's Fokker-Planck code, adj.f. Both codes have been modified to incorporate the same numerical equilibria. To model the effects of a trapped particle population, the bounce averaged equations for current and power are used, and the bounce averaged flux is calculated. The computer model is benchmarked against the homogenous equations for a high aspect ratio case in which the expected agreement is confirmed. Results from cases for TFTR, NSTX and CDX-U are contrasted with the predictions of the Ehst-Karney parameterization of current drive for circular equilibria. For theoretical background, please see the authors' archive of papers. (http://w3.pppl.gov/ ~jwright/Publications)

  4. Numerical study of nonlinear full wave acoustic propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco-Segura, Roberto; Rendon, Pablo L.

    2013-11-01

    With the aim of describing nonlinear acoustic phenomena, a form of the conservation equations for fluid dynamics is presented, deduced using slightly less restrictive hypothesis than those necessary to obtain the well known Westervelt equation. This formulation accounts for full wave diffraction, nonlinearity, and thermoviscous dissipative effects. A CLAWPACK based, 2D finite-volume method using Roe's linearization has been implemented to obtain numerically the solution of the proposed equations. In order to validate the code, two different tests have been performed: one against a special Taylor shock-like analytic solution, the other against published results on a HIFU system, both with satisfactory results. The code is written for parallel execution on a GPU and improves performance by a factor of over 50 when compared to the standard CLAWPACK Fortran code. This code can be used to describe moderate nonlinear phenomena, at low Mach numbers, in domains as large as 100 wave lengths. Applications range from modest models of diagnostic and therapeutic HIFU, parametric acoustic arrays, to acoustic wave guides. A couple of examples will be presented showing shock formation and oblique interaction. DGAPA PAPIIT IN110411, PAEP UNAM 2013.

  5. Kinetic full wave analyses of O-X-B mode conversion of EC waves in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, Atsushi; Khan, Shabbir Ahmad; Igami, Hiroe; Idei, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    For heating and current drive in a high-density plasma of tokamak, especially spherical tokamak, the use of electron Bernstein waves and the O-X-B mode conversion were proposed and experimental observations have been reported. In order to evaluate the power deposition profile and the current drive efficiency, kinetic full wave analysis using an integral form of dielectric tensor has been developed. The incident angle dependence of wave structure and O-X-B mode conversion efficiency is examined using one-dimensional analysis in the major radius direction. Two-dimensional analyses on the horizontal plane and the poloidal plane are also conducted, and the wave structure and the power deposition profile are compared with those of previous analyses using ray tracing method and cold plasma approximation. This work is supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number JP26630471.

  6. Full wave propagation modelling in view to integrated ICRH wave coupling/RF sheaths modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquot, Jonathan; Bobkov, Volodymyr; Colas, Laurent; Heuraux, Stéphane; Křivská, Alena; Lu, Lingfeng; Noterdaeme, Jean-Marie

    2015-12-01

    RF sheaths rectification can be the reason for operational limits for Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) heating systems via impurity production or excessive heat loads. To simulate this process in realistic geometry, the Self-consistent Sheaths and Waves for Ion Cyclotron Heating (SSWICH) code is a minimal set of coupled equations that computes self-consistently wave propagation and DC plasma biasing. The present version of its wave propagation module only deals with the Slow Wave assumed to be the source of RF sheath oscillations. However the ICRF power coupling to the plasma is due to the fast wave (FW). This paper proposes to replace this one wave equation module by a full wave module in either 2D or 3D as a first step towards integrated modelling of RF sheaths and wave coupling. Since the FW is propagative in the main plasma, Perfectly Matched Layers (PMLs) adapted for plasmas were implemented at the inner side of the simulation domain to absorb outgoing waves and tested numerically with tilted B0 in Cartesian geometry, by either rotating the cold magnetized plasma dielectric tensors in 2D or rotating the coordinate vector basis in 3D. The PML was further formulated in cylindrical coordinates to account for for the toroidal curvature of the plasma. Toroidal curvature itself does not seem to change much the coupling. A detailed 3D geometrical description of Tore Supra and ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) antennas was included in the coupling code. The full antenna structure was introduced, since its toroidal symmetry with respect to the septum plane is broken (FS bars, toroidal phasing, non-symmetrical structure). Reliable convergence has been obtained with the density profile up to the leading edge of antenna limiters. Parallel electric field maps have been obtained as an input for the present version of SSWICH.

  7. Full-wave Electromagnetic Field Simulations of Lower Hybrid Waves in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.C.; Bonoli, P. T.; Brambilla, M.; D'Azevedo, E.; Berry, L.A.; Batchelor, D.B.; Jaeger, E.F.; Carter, M.D.; Phillips, C.K.; Okuda, H.; Harvey, R.W.; Myra, J.R.; D'Ippolito, D.A.; Smithe, D.N.

    2005-09-26

    The most common method for treating wave propagation in tokamaks in the lower hybrid range of frequencies (LHRF) has been toroidal ray tracing, owing to the short wavelengths (relative to the system size) found in this regime. Although this technique provides an accurate description of 2D and 3D plasma inhomogeneity effects on wave propagation, the approach neglects important effects related to focusing, diffraction, and finite extent of the RF launcher. Also, the method breaks down at plasma cutoffs and caustics. Recent adaptation of full-wave electromagnetic field solvers to massively parallel computers has made it possible to accurately resolve wave phenomena in the LHRF. One such solver, the TORIC code, has been modified to simulate LH waves by implementing boundary conditions appropriate for coupling the fast electromagnetic and the slow electrostatic waves in the LHRF. In this frequency regime the plasma conductivity operator can be formulated in the limits of unmagnetized ions and strongly magnetized electrons, resulting in a relatively simple and explicit form. Simulations have been done for parameters typical of the planned LHRF experiments on Alcator C-Mod, demonstrating fully resolved fast and slow LH wave fields using a Maxwellian non-relativistic plasma dielectric. Significant spectral broadening of the injected wave spectrum and focusing of the wave fields have been found, especially at caustic surfaces. Comparisons with toroidal ray tracing have also been done and differences between the approaches have been found, especially for cases where wave caustics form. The possible role of this diffraction-induced spectral broadening in filling the spectral gap in LH heating and current drive will be discussed.

  8. Beamforming Based Full-Duplex for Millimeter-Wave Communication

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao; Xiao, Zhenyu; Bai, Lin; Choi, Jinho; Xia, Pengfei; Xia, Xiang-Gen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study beamforming based full-duplex (FD) systems in millimeter-wave (mmWave) communications. A joint transmission and reception (Tx/Rx) beamforming problem is formulated to maximize the achievable rate by mitigating self-interference (SI). Since the optimal solution is difficult to find due to the non-convexity of the objective function, suboptimal schemes are proposed in this paper. A low-complexity algorithm, which iteratively maximizes signal power while suppressing SI, is proposed and its convergence is proven. Moreover, two closed-form solutions, which do not require iterations, are also derived under minimum-mean-square-error (MMSE), zero-forcing (ZF), and maximum-ratio transmission (MRT) criteria. Performance evaluations show that the proposed iterative scheme converges fast (within only two iterations on average) and approaches an upper-bound performance, while the two closed-form solutions also achieve appealing performances, although there are noticeable differences from the upper bound depending on channel conditions. Interestingly, these three schemes show different robustness against the geometry of Tx/Rx antenna arrays and channel estimation errors. PMID:27455256

  9. Full wave simulations of microwave interactions with turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Matthew; Vann, Roddy; Leddy, Jarrod; Koehn, Alf; University of York; IPP Garching Collaboration; University of York; Culham Microwave Group Team

    2016-10-01

    The interaction between electromagnetic radiation and plasma perturbations in the case that the radiation wavelength is comparable to the size of the perturbations is not a fully-understood problem. Yet the use of microwaves in magnetic confinement fusion plasmas is widespread for heating, current drive and both passive and active diagnostics, including in regimes for which there exist microwave length-scale plasma perturbations. We present simulation results using the full-wave cold plasma finite difference time domain codes EMIT-3D and IPF-FDMC developed independently at York and Stuttgart, respectively. First we present a novel systematic study of the scattering of microwaves through turbulence: we quantified the relationship between the normalised turbulent correlation length and the scattered power. Additionally we found a quadratic relationship between the scattered wave power and the turbulence amplitude. We go on to present results to model the Doppler back-scattering of a broad microwave beam from a moving turbulent slab. This second problem is particularly important for interpreting data from the Synthetic Aperture Microwave Imaging (SAMI) diagnostic currently installed on NSTX-U.

  10. Beamforming Based Full-Duplex for Millimeter-Wave Communication.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Xiao, Zhenyu; Bai, Lin; Choi, Jinho; Xia, Pengfei; Xia, Xiang-Gen

    2016-07-21

    In this paper, we study beamforming based full-duplex (FD) systems in millimeter-wave (mmWave) communications. A joint transmission and reception (Tx/Rx) beamforming problem is formulated to maximize the achievable rate by mitigating self-interference (SI). Since the optimal solution is difficult to find due to the non-convexity of the objective function, suboptimal schemes are proposed in this paper. A low-complexity algorithm, which iteratively maximizes signal power while suppressing SI, is proposed and its convergence is proven. Moreover, two closed-form solutions, which do not require iterations, are also derived under minimum-mean-square-error (MMSE), zero-forcing (ZF), and maximum-ratio transmission (MRT) criteria. Performance evaluations show that the proposed iterative scheme converges fast (within only two iterations on average) and approaches an upper-bound performance, while the two closed-form solutions also achieve appealing performances, although there are noticeable differences from the upper bound depending on channel conditions. Interestingly, these three schemes show different robustness against the geometry of Tx/Rx antenna arrays and channel estimation errors.

  11. Voltage mode electronically tunable full-wave rectifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, Predrag B.; Vesković, Milan; Đukić, Slobodan

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents a new realization of bipolar full-wave rectifier of input sinusoidal signals, employing one MO-CCCII (multiple output current controlled current conveyor), a zero-crossing detector (ZCD), and one resistor connected to fixed potential. The circuit provides the operating frequency up to 10 MHz with increased linearity and precision in processing of input voltage signal, with a very low harmonic distortion. The errors related to the signal processing and errors bound were investigated and provided in the paper. The PSpice simulations are depicted and agree well with the theoretical anticipation. The maximum power consumption of the converter is approximately 2.83 mW, at ±1.2 V supply voltages.

  12. Full-wave multiscale anisotropy tomography in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Pin; Zhao, Li; Hung, Shu-Huei

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the spatial variation of anisotropy in the upper mantle is important for characterizing the lithospheric deformation and mantle flow dynamics. In this study, we apply a full-wave approach to image the upper-mantle anisotropy in Southern California using 5954 SKS splitting data. Three-dimensional sensitivity kernels combined with a wavelet-based model parameterization are adopted in a multiscale inversion. Spatial resolution lengths are estimated based on a statistical resolution matrix approach, showing a finest resolution length of ~25 km in regions with densely distributed stations. The anisotropic model displays structural fabric in relation to surface geologic features such as the Salton Trough, the Transverse Ranges, and the San Andreas Fault. The depth variation of anisotropy does not suggest a lithosphere-asthenosphere decoupling. At long wavelengths, the fast directions of anisotropy are aligned with the absolute plate motion inside the Pacific and North American plates.

  13. Full wave simulation of lower hybrid waves in Maxwellian plasma based on the finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Meneghini, O.; Shiraiwa, S.; Parker, R.

    2009-09-15

    A full wave simulation of the lower-hybrid (LH) wave based on the finite element method is presented. For the LH wave, the most important terms of the dielectric tensor are the cold plasma contribution and the electron Landau damping (ELD) term, which depends only on the component of the wave vector parallel to the background magnetic field. The nonlocal hot plasma ELD effect was expressed as a convolution integral along the magnetic field lines and the resultant integro-differential Helmholtz equation was solved iteratively. The LH wave propagation in a Maxwellian tokamak plasma based on the Alcator C experiment was simulated for electron temperatures in the range of 2.5-10 keV. Comparison with ray tracing simulations showed good agreement when the single pass damping is strong. The advantages of the new approach include a significant reduction of computational requirements compared to full wave spectral methods and seamless treatment of the core, the scrape off layer and the launcher regions.

  14. An assessment of full-wave effects on the propagation and absorption of lower hybrid waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, John

    2008-11-01

    Lower hybrid (LH) waves have the attractive property of damping strongly via electron Landau resonance on relatively fast tail electrons. Consequently these waves are well-suited to driving current in the plasma periphery where the electron temperature is lower, making LH current drive (LHCD) a promising technique for off--axis (r/a˜0.60) current profile control in reactor grade plasmas. Established modeling techniques use WKB expansions with non-Maxwellian self-consistent distributions. Higher order WKB expansions have shown some effects on the parallel wavenumber evolution and consequently on the damping due to diffraction [1]. A massively parallel version of the TORIC full-wave electromagnetic field solver valid in the LH range of frequencies has been developed [2] and applied to scenarios at the density and magnetic field characteristic of devices such as Alcator C-Mod and ITER [B0 5 T, ne 1x10^20 m-3]. We find that retaining full wave effects due to diffraction and focusing has a strong effect on the location of wave absorption. Diffraction occurs at caustic surfaces and in resonance cones resulting in a large upshift of the parallel wavenumber and localized power deposition. For some values of density and magnetic field when the waves are fully accessible to the center of the plasma, the full wave description predicts all power being damped at larger radii (r/a ˜ 0.7) in contrast to ray tracing which shows more central power absorption. By incorporating a Fokker-Planck code for self-consistent treatment of the electron distribution and using an synthetic hard X-ray diagnostic we compare the code predictions by both full wave and ray tracing methods with recent Alcator C-Mod experiments. We will compare full-wave and ray tracing for low and high single pass damping regimes. [0pt] [1] G. Pereverzev, Nucl. Fusion 32 1091 (1991). [0pt] [2] J. C. Wright, E. J. Valeo, C. K. Phillips and P. T. Bonoli, Comm. in Comput. Physics 4 545 (2008).

  15. A heterogeneous nonlinear attenuating full-wave model of ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Pinton, Gianmarco F; Dahl, Jeremy; Rosenzweig, Stephen; Trahey, Gregg E

    2009-03-01

    A full-wave equation that describes nonlinear propagation in a heterogeneous attenuating medium is solved numerically with finite differences in the time domain (FDTD). Three-dimensional solutions of the equation are verified with water tank measurements of a commercial diagnostic ultrasound transducer and are shown to be in excellent agreement in terms of the fundamental and harmonic acoustic fields and the power spectrum at the focus. The linear and nonlinear components of the algorithm are also verified independently. In the linear nonattenuating regime solutions match results from Field II, a well established software package used in transducer modeling, to within 0.3 dB. Nonlinear plane wave propagation is shown to closely match results from the Galerkin method up to 4 times the fundamental frequency. In addition to thermoviscous attenuation we present a numerical solution of the relaxation attenuation laws that allows modeling of arbitrary frequency dependent attenuation, such as that observed in tissue. A perfectly matched layer (PML) is implemented at the boundaries with a numerical implementation that allows the PML to be used with high-order discretizations. A -78 dB reduction in the reflected amplitude is demonstrated. The numerical algorithm is used to simulate a diagnostic ultrasound pulse propagating through a histologically measured representation of human abdominal wall with spatial variation in the speed of sound, attenuation, nonlinearity, and density. An ultrasound image is created in silico using the same physical and algorithmic process used in an ultrasound scanner: a series of pulses are transmitted through heterogeneous scattering tissue and the received echoes are used in a delay-and-sum beam-forming algorithm to generate a images. The resulting harmonic image exhibits characteristic improvement in lesion boundary definition and contrast when compared with the fundamental image. We demonstrate a mechanism of harmonic image quality

  16. A Heterogeneous Nonlinear Attenuating Full-Wave Model of Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Pinton, Gianmarco F.; Dahl, Jeremy; Rosenzweig, Stephen; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2015-01-01

    A full-wave equation that describes nonlinear propagation in a heterogeneous attenuating medium is solved numerically with finite differences in the time domain (FDTD). Three-dimensional solutions of the equation are verified with water tank measurements of a commercial diagnostic ultrasound transducer and are shown to be in excellent agreement in terms of the fundamental and harmonic acoustic fields and the power spectrum at the focus. The linear and nonlinear components of the algorithm are also verified independently. In the linear nonattenuating regime solutions match results from Field II, a well established software package used in transducer modeling, to within 0.3 dB. Nonlinear plane wave propagation is shown to closely match results from the Galerkin method up to 4 times the fundamental frequency. In addition to thermoviscous attenuation we present a numerical solution of the relaxation attenuation laws that allows modeling of arbitrary frequency dependent attenuation, such as that observed in tissue. A perfectly matched layer (PML) is implemented at the boundaries with a numerical implementation that allows the PML to be used with high-order discretizations. A −78 dB reduction in the reflected amplitude is demonstrated. The numerical algorithm is used to simulate a diagnostic ultrasound pulse propagating through a histologically measured representation of human abdominal wall with spatial variation in the speed of sound, attenuation, nonlinearity, and density. An ultrasound image is created in silico using the same physical and algorithmic process used in an ultrasound scanner: a series of pulses are transmitted through heterogeneous scattering tissue and the received echoes are used in a delay-and-sum beam-forming algorithm to generate a images. The resulting harmonic image exhibits characteristic improvement in lesion boundary definition and contrast when compared with the fundamental image. We demonstrate a mechanism of harmonic image quality

  17. Full wave simulation of waves in ECRIS plasmas based on the finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Torrisi, G.; Mascali, D.; Neri, L.; Castro, G.; Patti, G.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Ciavola, G.; Di Donato, L.; Sorbello, G.; Isernia, T.

    2014-02-12

    This paper describes the modeling and the full wave numerical simulation of electromagnetic waves propagation and absorption in an anisotropic magnetized plasma filling the resonant cavity of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). The model assumes inhomogeneous, dispersive and tensorial constitutive relations. Maxwell's equations are solved by the finite element method (FEM), using the COMSOL Multiphysics{sup ®} suite. All the relevant details have been considered in the model, including the non uniform external magnetostatic field used for plasma confinement, the local electron density profile resulting in the full-3D non uniform magnetized plasma complex dielectric tensor. The more accurate plasma simulations clearly show the importance of cavity effect on wave propagation and the effects of a resonant surface. These studies are the pillars for an improved ECRIS plasma modeling, that is mandatory to optimize the ion source output (beam intensity distribution and charge state, especially). Any new project concerning the advanced ECRIS design will take benefit by an adequate modeling of self-consistent wave absorption simulations.

  18. From supersonic shear wave imaging to full-field optical coherence shear wave elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahas, Amir; Tanter, Mickaël; Nguyen, Thu-Mai; Chassot, Jean-Marie; Fink, Mathias; Claude Boccara, A.

    2013-12-01

    Elasticity maps of tissue have proved to be particularly useful in providing complementary contrast to ultrasonic imaging, e.g., for cancer diagnosis at the millimeter scale. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) offers an endogenous contrast based on singly backscattered optical waves. Adding complementary contrast to OCT images by recording elasticity maps could also be valuable in improving OCT-based diagnosis at the microscopic scale. Static elastography has been successfully coupled with full-field OCT (FF-OCT) in order to realize both micrometer-scale sectioning and elasticity maps. Nevertheless, static elastography presents a number of drawbacks, mainly when stiffness quantification is required. Here, we describe the combination of two methods: transient elastography, based on speed measurements of shear waves induced by ultrasonic radiation forces, and FF-OCT, an en face OCT approach using an incoherent light source. The use of an ultrafast ultrasonic scanner and an ultrafast camera working at 10,000 to 30,000 images/s made it possible to follow shear wave propagation with both modalities. As expected, FF-OCT is found to be much more sensitive than ultrafast ultrasound to tiny shear vibrations (a few nanometers and micrometers, respectively). Stiffness assessed in gel phantoms and an ex vivo rat brain by FF-OCT is found to be in good agreement with ultrasound shear wave elastography.

  19. From supersonic shear wave imaging to full-field optical coherence shear wave elastography.

    PubMed

    Nahas, Amir; Tanter, Mickaël; Nguyen, Thu-Mai; Chassot, Jean-Marie; Fink, Mathias; Claude Boccara, A

    2013-12-01

    Elasticity maps of tissue have proved to be particularly useful in providing complementary contrast to ultrasonic imaging, e.g., for cancer diagnosis at the millimeter scale. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) offers an endogenous contrast based on singly backscattered optical waves. Adding complementary contrast to OCT images by recording elasticity maps could also be valuable in improving OCT-based diagnosis at the microscopic scale. Static elastography has been successfully coupled with full-field OCT (FF-OCT) in order to realize both micrometer-scale sectioning and elasticity maps. Nevertheless, static elastography presents a number of drawbacks, mainly when stiffness quantification is required. Here, we describe the combination of two methods: transient elastography, based on speed measurements of shear waves induced by ultrasonic radiation forces, and FF-OCT, an en face OCT approach using an incoherent light source. The use of an ultrafast ultrasonic scanner and an ultrafast camera working at 10,000 to 30,000 images/s made it possible to follow shear wave propagation with both modalities. As expected, FF-OCT is found to be much more sensitive than ultrafast ultrasound to tiny shear vibrations (a few nanometers and micrometers, respectively). Stiffness assessed in gel phantoms and an ex vivo rat brain by FF-OCT is found to be in good agreement with ultrasound shear wave elastography.

  20. Comparison of Monte-Carlo Ion Cyclotron Heating Model with Full-Wave Linear Absorption Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, M.; Chan, V. S.; Berry, L. A.; Jaeger, E. F.; Green, D.; Bonoli, P.; Wright, J.

    2009-05-01

    To fully account for the wave-particle interaction physics in ion-cyclotron resonant frequency heating experiments, the 5-D Monte-Carlo code ORBIT-RF is being coupled with the 2-D full wave code AORSA to iteratively evolve ion distribution in x-v space that is used to update the dielectric tensor in AORSA for evaluating the full-wave fields. It is demonstrated that using the full-wave fields from a Maxwellian dielectric tensor in AORSA and confining the resonant ions to their initial orbits in ORBIT-RF, ORBIT-RF largely reproduces the AORSA linear wave absorption profiles for fundamental and higher harmonic ICRF heating. An exception is an observed inward shift of the ORBIT-RF absorption peak for high harmonics near the magnetic-axis compared with that of AORSA, which can be attributed to a finite orbit width effect. Analysis of power absorption in velocity space confirms that significant power is absorbed by energetic particles with their banana tips at resonance locations.

  1. Application of full-wave inversion to real crosshole data

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Z.; Williamson, P.R.

    1994-12-31

    A 2.5D acoustic frequency domain fullwave inversion method was applied to a real dataset from an open-cast coal exploration site. The only data processing required was the removal of tube waves, because no shear wave arrivals were observed. The inversion is efficient because only a few frequency components are needed. The authors encounter two site-specific problems (source inconsistency and anisotropy) which are addressed by simple adaptations of the inversion algorithm. High resolution results are achieved for both velocity and attenuation reconstructions. The fullwave inversion method combines the advantages of first-arrival travel-time tomography and reflected waves migration. To evaluate the inversion result, they model time domain traces using a source signature estimated by fitting the frequency domain response of the reconstructed model to the observed data across the spectrum. The synthetic traces match the early arrivals in the real data reasonably well.

  2. Two-dimensional full-wave simulation of microwave reflectometry on Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y.; Irby, J. H.; Nazikian, R.; Marmar, E. S.; Mazurenko, A.

    2001-01-01

    A new two-dimensional full-wave code has been developed to simulate ordinary (O) mode reflectometry signals caused by plasma density fluctuations. The code uses the finite-difference time-domain method with a perfectly matched layer absorption boundary to solve Maxwell's equations. Huygens wave sources are incorporated to generate Gaussian beams. The code has been used to simulate the reflectometer measurement of the quasicoherent mode (60--250 kHz) associated with enhanced D{sub {alpha}} (EDA) H modes in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. It is found that an analysis of the realistic experimental layout is essential for the quantitative interpretation of the mode amplitude.

  3. An assessment of full wave effects on the propagation and absorption of lower hybrid waves

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J. C.; Bonoli, P. T.; Schmidt, A. E.; Phillips, C. K.; Valeo, E. J.; Harvey, R. W.; Brambilla, M. A.

    2009-07-15

    Lower hybrid (LH) waves ({omega}{sub ci}<<{omega}<<{omega}{sub ce}, where {omega}{sub i,e}{identical_to}Z{sub i,e}eB/m{sub i,e}c) have the attractive property of damping strongly via electron Landau resonance on relatively fast tail electrons and consequently are well-suited to driving current. Established modeling techniques use Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) expansions with self-consistent non-Maxwellian distributions. Higher order WKB expansions have shown some effects on the parallel wave number evolution and consequently on the damping due to diffraction [G. Pereverzev, Nucl. Fusion 32, 1091 (1991)]. A massively parallel version of the TORIC full wave electromagnetic field solver valid in the LH range of frequencies has been developed [J. C. Wright et al., Comm. Comp. Phys. 4, 545 (2008)] and coupled to an electron Fokker-Planck solver CQL3D[R. W. Harvey and M. G. McCoy, in Proceedings of the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting, Montreal, 1992 (IAEA Institute of Physics Publishing, Vienna, 1993), USDOC/NTIS Document No. DE93002962, pp. 489-526] in order to self-consistently evolve nonthermal electron distributions characteristic of LH current drive (LHCD) experiments in devices such as Alcator C-Mod and ITER (B{sub 0}{approx_equal}5 T, n{sub e0}{approx_equal}1x10{sup 20} m{sup -3}). These simulations represent the first ever self-consistent simulations of LHCD utilizing both a full wave and Fokker-Planck calculation in toroidal geometry.

  4. Generalized Full-Information Item Bifactor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cai, Li; Yang, Ji Seung; Hansen, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Full-information item bifactor analysis is an important statistical method in psychological and educational measurement. Current methods are limited to single-group analysis and inflexible in the types of item response models supported. We propose a flexible multiple-group item bifactor analysis framework that supports a variety of…

  5. Generalized Full-Information Item Bifactor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cai, Li; Yang, Ji Seung; Hansen, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Full-information item bifactor analysis is an important statistical method in psychological and educational measurement. Current methods are limited to single-group analysis and inflexible in the types of item response models supported. We propose a flexible multiple-group item bifactor analysis framework that supports a variety of…

  6. Rotating machine fault diagnosis through enhanced stochastic resonance by full-wave signal construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Siliang; He, Qingbo; Zhang, Haibin; Kong, Fanrang

    2017-02-01

    This study proposes a full-wave signal construction (FSC) strategy for enhancing rotating machine fault diagnosis by exploiting stochastic resonance (SR). The FSC strategy is utilized to transform a half-wave signal (e.g., an envelope signal) into a full-wave one by conducting a Mirror-Cycle-Add (MCA) operation. The constructed full-wave signal evenly modulates the bistable potential and makes the potential tilt back and forth smoothly. This effect provides the equivalent transition probabilities of particle bounce between the two potential wells. A stable SR output signal with better periodicity, which is beneficial to periodic signal detection, can be obtained. In addition, the MCA operation can improve the input signal-to-noise ratio by enhancing the periodic component while attenuating the noise components. These two advantages make the proposed FSCSR method surpass the traditional SR method in fault signal processing. Performance evaluation is conducted by numerical analysis and experimental verification. The proposed MCA-based FSC strategy has the potential to be a universal signal pre-processing technique. Moreover, the proposed FSCSR method can be used in rotating machine fault diagnosis and other areas related to weak signal detection.

  7. On full-wave solution for VLF waves in the near-Earth space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzichev, I. V.; Shklyar, D. R.

    2010-08-01

    A VLF wave that propagates in the Earth's plasmasphere in the whistler mode must be converted into free space mode in order to be observed on the ground. This conversion takes place in collisional and highly inhomogeneous ionospheric plasma, which makes the description of the process not easy. Since an understanding of this process is vital for the analysis of VLF data, it has been in the focus of research since the beginning of whistler studies. A general approach to this problem, which is based on Maxwell's equations in magnetized plasma, is well developed and commonly accepted. However, its direct implementation meets serious difficulties which reveal themselves in numerical swamping. The intrinsic reason behind this is the existence of evanescent mode in the whistler frequency band. This leads to exponential growth of numerical solutions to the general set of equations. Various methods that have been developed to suppress this instability shift a solution of the physical problem to the field of simulation skill, so that the essential part of solution remains largely hidden. In this work we develop a new approach to the problem in which the evanescent mode is analytically excluded from consideration, making numerical calculations plain and straightforward. Using this approach, we find the field of whistler mode wave incident on the ionosphere from above in the whole span of altitudes, and calculate the reflection coefficient as a function of frequency for a number of incidence angles. We explain a quasiperiodic behaviour of the reflection coefficient by resonance absorption of the waves in the lower ionosphere.

  8. CMS-Wave Model: Part 5. Full-plane Wave Transformation and Grid Nesting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    directional Buoy 42040 (165-m depth), located 90 km offshore Dauphin Island , AL. The CMS-Wave PG extended from the 15-m depth contour to the shoreline (41 km... islands , semi-enclosed bays and lakes, where incident waves can come from different directions and local wind generation effects are important and...situations would occur when calculating waves around an island or islands . The HP and FP mode of CMS-Wave is controlled by the model parameter IVIEW

  9. Incident Wave Removal Through Frequency-Wavenumber Filtering of Full Wavefield Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaels, Thomas E.; Ruzzene, Massimo; Michaels, Jennifer E.

    2009-03-01

    Full wavefield measurements of guided waves in a structure provide a wealth of information that can be effectively used for the identification, localization and quantification of damage. Full field measurements can be obtained using an air-coupled transducer mounted on a scanning stage, or via a scanning laser vibrometer. The resulting detailed temporal and spatial information can be transformed to the frequency-wavenumber domain where waves propagating in different directions appear decoupled. Appropriate filtering strategies can be applied to effectively remove the contribution of incident waves while highlighting reflections and scattering associated with structural discontinuities or damage. This paper presents two frequency-wavenumber domain analysis methods. The first method is based upon multiple two-dimensional Fourier Transforms applied to waveform data in spatial polar coordinates, and the second applies the three-dimensional Fourier Transform in Cartesian coordinates. The utility of these methods is demonstrated on full wavefield data recorded on a composite plate before and after the introduction of damage.

  10. Full spectrum analysis in environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Sascha

    2014-08-01

    In environmental radiation monitoring, the time-variable natural gamma radiation background complicates the nuclide identification and analysis of a gamma spectrum. A full spectrum analysis based on the noise adjusted singular value decomposition method for the description of the time-variable background and adjustment calculations is a possible analysis method, which may provide advantages compared with a peak-based analysis, if applied to a time series of gamma spectra. An analysis example is shown and discussed with a measured time series of gamma spectra obtained from a spectroscopic gamma detector with a NaI(Tl) scintillator as it is used in the environmental radiation monitoring. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Fast full-wave seismic inversion using source encoding.

    SciTech Connect

    Ho Cha, Young; Baumstein, Anatoly; Lee, Sunwoong; Hinkley, David; Anderson, John E.; Neelamani, Ramesh; Krebs, Jerome R.; Lacasse, Martin-Daniel

    2010-05-01

    Full Wavefield Seismic Inversion (FWI) estimates a subsurface elastic model by iteratively minimizing the difference between observed and simulated data. This process is extremely compute intensive, with a cost on the order of at least hundreds of prestack reverse time migrations. For time-domain and Krylov-based frequency-domain FWI, the cost of FWI is proportional to the number of seismic sources inverted. We have found that the cost of FWI can be significantly reduced by applying it to data processed by encoding and summing individual source gathers, and by changing the encoding functions between iterations. The encoding step forms a single gather from many input source gathers. This gather represents data that would have been acquired from a spatially distributed set of sources operating simultaneously with different source signatures. We demonstrate, using synthetic data, significant cost reduction by applying FWI to encoded simultaneous-source data.

  12. Full-wave description of the lower hybrid reflection of whistler waves

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzichev, I. V. Shklyar, D. R.

    2013-10-15

    A quasi-electrostatic whistler wave propagating in the direction of increasing lower hybrid resonance (LHR) frequency experiences reflection from the region in which its frequency becomes lower than the LHR frequency. This phenomenon is usually described in the framework of geometrical optics. For a wave propagating along a magnetospheric trajectory, the LHR reflection frequently takes place in the ionospheric region in which electron-neutral collisions are essential and lead to wave attenuation. In this case, the wave approach to the description of the LHR reflection is most consistent. This work is aimed at developing such an approach. The coefficients of the wave reflection are calculated for different plasma parameters. The relation between the problem under consideration and the problem of exit of whistler-mode waves to the ground is considered.

  13. A Full-wave Model for Wave Propagation and Dissipation in the Inner Magnetosphere Using the Finite Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest Valeo, Jay R. Johnson, Eun-Hwa and Cynthia Phillips

    2012-03-13

    A wide variety of plasma waves play an important role in the energization and loss of particles in the inner magnetosphere. Our ability to understand and model wave-particle interactions in this region requires improved knowledge of the spatial distribution and properties of these waves as well as improved understanding of how the waves depend on changes in solar wind forcing and/or geomagnetic activity. To this end, we have developed a two-dimensional, finite element code that solves the full wave equations in global magnetospheric geometry. The code describes three-dimensional wave structure including mode conversion when ULF, EMIC, and whistler waves are launched in a two-dimensional axisymmetric background plasma with general magnetic field topology. We illustrate the capabilities of the code by examining the role of plasmaspheric plumes on magnetosonic wave propagation; mode conversion at the ion-ion and Alfven resonances resulting from external, solar wind compressions; and wave structure and mode conversion of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves launched in the equatorial magnetosphere, which propagate along the magnetic field lines toward the ionosphere. We also discuss advantages of the finite element method for resolving resonant structures, and how the model may be adapted to include nonlocal kinetic effects.

  14. Generalized Full-Information Item Bifactor Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Li; Yang, Ji Seung; Hansen, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Full-information item bifactor analysis is an important statistical method in psychological and educational measurement. Current methods are limited to single group analysis and inflexible in the types of item response models supported. We propose a flexible multiple-group item bifactor analysis framework that supports a variety of multidimensional item response theory models for an arbitrary mixing of dichotomous, ordinal, and nominal items. The extended item bifactor model also enables the estimation of latent variable means and variances when data from more than one group are present. Generalized user-defined parameter restrictions are permitted within or across groups. We derive an efficient full-information maximum marginal likelihood estimator. Our estimation method achieves substantial computational savings by extending Gibbons and Hedeker’s (1992) bifactor dimension reduction method so that the optimization of the marginal log-likelihood only requires two-dimensional integration regardless of the dimensionality of the latent variables. We use simulation studies to demonstrate the flexibility and accuracy of the proposed methods. We apply the model to study cross-country differences, including differential item functioning, using data from a large international education survey on mathematics literacy. PMID:21534682

  15. Multi-directional plasmonic surface-wave splitters with full bandwidth isolation

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Zhen; Gao, Fei; Zhang, Baile

    2016-03-14

    We present a multidirectional plasmonic surface-wave splitter with full bandwidth isolation experimentally based on coupled defect surface modes in a surface-wave photonic crystal. In contrast to conventional plasmonic surface-wave frequency splitters with polaritonic dispersion relations that overlap at low frequencies, this multidirectional plasmonic surface-wave splitter based on coupled defect surface modes can split different frequency bands into different waveguide branches without bandwidth overlap. Transmission spectra and near-field imaging measurements have been implemented in the microwave frequencies to verify the performance of the multidirectional plasmonic surface-wave splitter. This surface wave structure can be used as a plasmonic wavelength-division multiplexer that may find potential applications in the surface-wave integrated circuits from microwave to terahertz frequencies.

  16. Multi-directional plasmonic surface-wave splitters with full bandwidth isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhen; Gao, Fei; Zhang, Baile

    2016-03-01

    We present a multidirectional plasmonic surface-wave splitter with full bandwidth isolation experimentally based on coupled defect surface modes in a surface-wave photonic crystal. In contrast to conventional plasmonic surface-wave frequency splitters with polaritonic dispersion relations that overlap at low frequencies, this multidirectional plasmonic surface-wave splitter based on coupled defect surface modes can split different frequency bands into different waveguide branches without bandwidth overlap. Transmission spectra and near-field imaging measurements have been implemented in the microwave frequencies to verify the performance of the multidirectional plasmonic surface-wave splitter. This surface wave structure can be used as a plasmonic wavelength-division multiplexer that may find potential applications in the surface-wave integrated circuits from microwave to terahertz frequencies.

  17. Multichannel analysis of surface waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Park, C.B.; Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.

    1999-01-01

    The frequency-dependent properties of Rayleigh-type surface waves can be utilized for imaging and characterizing the shallow subsurface. Most surface-wave analysis relies on the accurate calculation of phase velocities for the horizontally traveling fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave acquired by stepping out a pair of receivers at intervals based on calculated ground roll wavelengths. Interference by coherent source-generated noise inhibits the reliability of shear-wave velocities determined through inversion of the whole wave field. Among these nonplanar, nonfundamental-mode Rayleigh waves (noise) are body waves, scattered and nonsource-generated surface waves, and higher-mode surface waves. The degree to which each of these types of noise contaminates the dispersion curve and, ultimately, the inverted shear-wave velocity profile is dependent on frequency as well as distance from the source. Multichannel recording permits effective identification and isolation of noise according to distinctive trace-to-trace coherency in arrival time and amplitude. An added advantage is the speed and redundancy of the measurement process. Decomposition of a multichannel record into a time variable-frequency format, similar to an uncorrelated Vibroseis record, permits analysis and display of each frequency component in a unique and continuous format. Coherent noise contamination can then be examined and its effects appraised in both frequency and offset space. Separation of frequency components permits real-time maximization of the S/N ratio during acquisition and subsequent processing steps. Linear separation of each ground roll frequency component allows calculation of phase velocities by simply measuring the linear slope of each frequency component. Breaks in coherent surface-wave arrivals, observable on the decomposed record, can be compensated for during acquisition and processing. Multichannel recording permits single-measurement surveying of a broad depth range, high levels of

  18. Robust baseline subtraction for ultrasonic full wavefield analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alguri, K. Supreet; Michaels, Jennifer E.; Harley, Joel B.

    2017-02-01

    Full wavefield analysis is used to study and characterize the interaction between waves and structural damage. Yet, as wavefields are measured and as damage evolves in a structure, environmental and operational variations can significantly affect wave propagation. Several approaches, including time-stretching and optimal baseline selection methods, can reduce variations, but these methods are often limited to specific effects, are ineffective for large environmental variations, or require an impractical number of prior baseline measurements. This paper presents a robust methodology for subtracting wavefields and isolating wave-damage interactions. The method is based on dictionary learning. It is robust to multiple types of environmental and operational variations and requires only one initial baseline. We learn the dictionary, which describes wave propagation for a particular wavefield, based on multiple frequencies of a baseline wavefield. We then use the dictionary and sparse regression to create new baselines for measurements with different environmental and operational conditions. The new baseline is then subtracted from the new wavefield to isolate damage wavefield.

  19. Investigation of the reconstruction accuracy of guided wave tomography using full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Jing; Ratassepp, Madis; Fan, Zheng

    2017-07-01

    Guided wave tomography is a promising tool to accurately determine the remaining wall thicknesses of corrosion damages, which are among the major concerns for many industries. Full Waveform Inversion (FWI) algorithm is an attractive guided wave tomography method, which uses a numerical forward model to predict the waveform of guided waves when propagating through corrosion defects, and an inverse model to reconstruct the thickness map from the ultrasonic signals captured by transducers around the defect. This paper discusses the reconstruction accuracy of the FWI algorithm on plate-like structures by using simulations as well as experiments. It was shown that this algorithm can obtain a resolution of around 0.7 wavelengths for defects with smooth depth variations from the acoustic modeling data, and about 1.5-2 wavelengths from the elastic modeling data. Further analysis showed that the reconstruction accuracy is also dependent on the shape of the defect. It was demonstrated that the algorithm maintains the accuracy in the case of multiple defects compared to conventional algorithms based on Born approximation.

  20. Full Waveform Misfit Kernels for Fault Zone Seismic Waves in the San Jacinto Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allam, A. A.; Tape, C.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Thurber, C. H.

    2016-12-01

    Fault zones have strong 3D heterogeneities including vertical interfaces and fault-parallel zones of low seismic velocity which result in complicated seismic phases. We present waveform modeling results, misfit kernels, and time-frequency goodness-of-fit measurements for body waves, surface waves, and trapped waves recorded along the San Jacinto fault zone in Southern California. This work is part of an ongoing effort to develop and implement a framework for full waveform tomographic inversion that accounts for the strong multi-scale 3D heterogeneity observed in fault zones. Using moment tensor solutions of 26 events with Mw>4.0 obtained by applying the CAP method (Zhu & Helmberger, 1996), we simulate these events using the spectral element method (Komatitsch & Tromp 1999) in the best seismic velocity models currently available including CVM-H (Shaw et al., 2015), CVM-S4.26 (Lee et al., 2014), and Fang et al. (2016). To quantify model performance, we employ the goodness-of-fit analysis of Kristekova et al. (2009), decomposing 3-component signals into the time-frequency domain and measuring the phase and amplitude difference of the signal envelopes in each time-frequency window. This method allows us to dissect the misfit, ascertaining not just how much two signals disagree, but specifically which phases and at which frequencies they disagree. Applying this method to recorded data and modeled waveforms, we find that the models generally fit P and S wave arrivals well, but do not accurately reproduce observed late-arriving high-amplitude surface and trapped waves especially between 0.4 and 2.3 Hz frequencies. Using this analysis to guide our choice of time and frequency windows, we construct fully 3D misfit kernels between data and synthetics using the adjoint method (Tromp et al., 2005) emphasizing phases with the largest time-frequency misfit. These kernels are the basis for a full waveform inversion, as they provide quantitative constraints on how the seismic

  1. Full-wave model and numerical study of electromagnetic plane wave scattering by multilayered, fiber-based periodic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C. Y.; Lesselier, D.; Zhong, Y.

    2015-07-01

    The present work aims at building up a full-wave computational model of electromagnetic nondestructive testing of composite materials produced by stacking up dielectric slabs one over the other. In each such dielectric slab, a periodic array of infinite cylindrical fibers is embedded. Electromagnetic scattering of such a multilayered, fiber-based periodic composite is investigated here for an obliquely incident plane wave, the plane of incidence of which differs from the plane orthogonal to the fibers' axes. Full-wave field representations are given first by multipole and plane wave expansions. Mode matching at boundaries between layers then yields the propagating matrices, which are applied to connect reflection and transmission coefficients of the longitudinal field components. Power reflection and transmission coefficients are obtained from time-averaged Poynting vectors. Numerical experiments with comparisons with known results illustrate the accuracy of the model proposed.

  2. Slow-wave analysis on double layered substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindy, M. A.

    Full wave analysis of a slow-wave microstrip transmission line on ferromagnetic semiconductor with insulator is presented. Spectral domain method with sampling theorem are used. A new current distribution is applied. The obtained slow-wave factor is higher than that when using lossless ferromagnetic material only. Phase shifting is achieved also by the same structure.

  3. Automatic Processing of Digital Ionograms and Full Wave Solutions for the Profile Inversion Problem.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    Korteweg - deVries Equation ," J. Math. Phys., 18, 2445 (1977). Kay, I., "The Inverse Scattering Problem," Report No. EM-74 of the Institute of Mathematical...3.2 Comparison of the IWKB Method with the Full-Wave Method for Profiles for Which the Full-Wave Equation can be Solved for Exactly 45 3.2.1 General...Section 2 describes the automatic scaling of Digisonde ionograms, and Section 3 investigates the possibility of solving the Schroedinger wave equation for

  4. Calculation of the Full Scattering Amplitude without Partial Wave Decomposition. 2; Inclusion of Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shertzer, Janine; Temkin, Aaron

    2004-01-01

    The development of a practical method of accurately calculating the full scattering amplitude, without making a partial wave decomposition is continued. The method is developed in the context of electron-hydrogen scattering, and here exchange is dealt with by considering e-H scattering in the static exchange approximation. The Schroedinger equation in this approximation can be simplified to a set of coupled integro-differential equations. The equations are solved numerically for the full scattering wave function. The scattering amplitude can most accurately be calculated from an integral expression for the amplitude; that integral can be formally simplified, and then evaluated using the numerically determined wave function. The results are essentially identical to converged partial wave results.

  5. Calculation of the Full Scattering Amplitude without Partial Wave Decomposition. 2; Inclusion of Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shertzer, Janine; Temkin, Aaron

    2004-01-01

    The development of a practical method of accurately calculating the full scattering amplitude, without making a partial wave decomposition is continued. The method is developed in the context of electron-hydrogen scattering, and here exchange is dealt with by considering e-H scattering in the static exchange approximation. The Schroedinger equation in this approximation can be simplified to a set of coupled integro-differential equations. The equations are solved numerically for the full scattering wave function. The scattering amplitude can most accurately be calculated from an integral expression for the amplitude; that integral can be formally simplified, and then evaluated using the numerically determined wave function. The results are essentially identical to converged partial wave results.

  6. Modeling RF Fields in Hot Plasmas with Parallel Full Wave Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Andrew; Svidzinski, Vladimir; Zhao, Liangji; Galkin, Sergei; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2016-10-01

    FAR-TECH, Inc. is developing a suite of full wave RF plasma codes. It is based on a meshless formulation in configuration space with adapted cloud of computational points (CCP) capability and using the hot plasma conductivity kernel to model the nonlocal plasma dielectric response. The conductivity kernel is calculated by numerically integrating the linearized Vlasov equation along unperturbed particle trajectories. Work has been done on the following calculations: 1) the conductivity kernel in hot plasmas, 2) a monitor function based on analytic solutions of the cold-plasma dispersion relation, 3) an adaptive CCP based on the monitor function, 4) stencils to approximate the wave equations on the CCP, 5) the solution to the full wave equations in the cold-plasma model in tokamak geometry for ECRH and ICRH range of frequencies, and 6) the solution to the wave equations using the calculated hot plasma conductivity kernel. We will present results on using a meshless formulation on adaptive CCP to solve the wave equations and on implementing the non-local hot plasma dielectric response to the wave equations. The presentation will include numerical results of wave propagation and absorption in the cold and hot tokamak plasma RF models, using DIII-D geometry and plasma parameters. Work is supported by the U.S. DOE SBIR program.

  7. Analysis of flexural wave cloaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Climente, Alfonso; Torrent, Daniel; Sánchez-Dehesa, José

    2016-12-01

    This work presents a comprehensive study of the cloak for bending waves theoretically proposed by Farhat et al. [see Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 024301 (2009)] and later on experimentally realized by Stenger et al. [see Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 014301 (2012)]. This study uses a semi-analytical approach, the multilayer scattering method, which is based in the Kirchoff-Love wave equation for flexural waves in thin plates. Our approach was unable to reproduce the predicted behavior of the theoretically proposed cloak. This disagreement is here explained in terms of the simplified wave equation employed in the cloak design, which employed unusual boundary conditions for the cloaking shell. However, our approach reproduces fairly well the measured displacement maps for the fabricated cloak, indicating the validity of our approach. Also, the cloak quality has been here analyzed using the so called averaged visibility and the scattering cross section. The results obtained from both analysis let us to conclude that there is room for further improvements of this type of flexural wave cloak by using better design procedures.

  8. Applications of elastic full waveform inversion to shallow seismic surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohlen, Thomas; Forbriger, Thomas; Groos, Lisa; Schäfer, Martin; Metz, Tilman

    2015-04-01

    Shallow-seismic Rayleigh waves are attractive for geotechnical site investigations. They exhibit a high signal to noise ratio in field data recordings and have a high sensitivity to the S-wave velocity, an important lithological and geotechnical parameter to characterize the very shallow subsurface. Established inversion methods assume (local) 1-D subsurface models, and allow the reconstruction of the S-wave velocity as a function of depth by inverting the dispersion properties of the Rayleigh waves. These classical methods, however, fail if significant lateral variations of medium properties are present. Then the full waveform inversion (FWI) of the elastic wave field seems to be the only solution. Moreover, FWI may have the potential to recover multi-parameter models of seismic wave velocities, attenuation and eventually mass density. Our 2-D elastic FWI is a conjugate-gradient method where the gradient of the misfit function is calculated by the time-domain adjoint method. The viscoelastic forward modelling is performed with a classical staggered-grid 2-D finite-difference forward solver. Viscoelastic damping is implemented in the time-domain by a generalized standard linear solid. We use a multi-scale inversion approach by applying frequency filtering in the inversion. We start with the lowest frequency oft the field data and increase the upper corner frequency sequentially. Our modelling and FWI software is freely available under the terms of GNU GPL on www.opentoast.de. In recent years we studied the applicability of two-dimensional elastic FWI using numerous synthetic reconstruction tests and several field data examples. Important pre-processing steps for the application of 2-D elastic FWI to shallow-seismic field data are the 3D to 2D correction of geometrical spreading and the estimation of a priori Q-values that must be used as a passive medium parameter during the FWI. Furthermore, a source-wavelet correction filter should be applied during the FWI

  9. Full system bifurcation analysis of endocrine bursting models.

    PubMed

    Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; Osinga, Hinke M; Riess, Thorsten; Sherman, Arthur

    2010-06-21

    Plateau bursting is typical of many electrically excitable cells, such as endocrine cells that secrete hormones and some types of neurons that secrete neurotransmitters. Although in many of these cell types the bursting patterns are regulated by the interplay between voltage-gated calcium channels and calcium-sensitive potassium channels, they can be very different. We investigate so-called square-wave and pseudo-plateau bursting patterns found in endocrine cell models that are characterized by a super- or subcritical Hopf bifurcation in the fast subsystem, respectively. By using the polynomial model of Hindmarsh and Rose (Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B 221 (1222) 87-102), which preserves the main properties of the biophysical class of models that we consider, we perform a detailed bifurcation analysis of the full fast-slow system for both bursting patterns. We find that both cases lead to the same possibility of two routes to bursting, that is, the criticality of the Hopf bifurcation is not relevant for characterizing the route to bursting. The actual route depends on the relative location of the full-system's fixed point with respect to a homoclinic bifurcation of the fast subsystem. Our full-system bifurcation analysis reveals properties of endocrine bursting that are not captured by the standard fast-slow analysis. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Strategies for efficient resolution analysis in full-waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fichtner, A.; van Leeuwen, T.; Trampert, J.

    2016-12-01

    Full-waveform inversion is developing into a standard method in the seismological toolbox. It combines numerical wave propagation for heterogeneous media with adjoint techniques in order to improve tomographic resolution. However, resolution becomes increasingly difficult to quantify because of the enormous computational requirements. Here we present two families of methods that can be used for efficient resolution analysis in full-waveform inversion. They are based on the targeted extraction of resolution proxies from the Hessian matrix, which is too large to store and to compute explicitly. Fourier methods rest on the application of the Hessian to Earth models with harmonic oscillations. This yields the Fourier spectrum of the Hessian for few selected wave numbers, from which we can extract properties of the tomographic point-spread function for any point in space. Random probing methods use uncorrelated, random test models instead of harmonic oscillations. Auto-correlating the Hessian-model applications for sufficiently many test models also characterises the point-spread function. Both Fourier and random probing methods provide a rich collection of resolution proxies. These include position- and direction-dependent resolution lengths, and the volume of point-spread functions as indicator of amplitude recovery and inter-parameter trade-offs. The computational requirements of these methods are equivalent to approximately 7 conjugate-gradient iterations in full-waveform inversion. This is significantly less than the optimisation itself, which may require tens to hundreds of iterations to reach convergence. In addition to the theoretical foundations of the Fourier and random probing methods, we show various illustrative examples from real-data full-waveform inversion for crustal and mantle structure.

  11. Velocity-Space Diffusion Coefficients Due to Full-Wave ICRF Fields in Toroidal Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R.W.; Jaeger, F.; Berry, L.A.; Batchelor, D.B.; D'Azevedo, E.; Carter, M.D.; Ershov, N.M.; Smirnov, A.P.; Bonoli, P.; Wright, J.C.; Smithe, D.N.

    2005-09-26

    Jaeger et al. have calculated bounce-averaged QL diffusion coefficients from AORSA full-wave fields, based on non-Maxwellian distributions from CQL3D Fokker-Planck code. A zero banana-width approximation is employed. Complementing this calculation, a fully numerical calculation of ion velocity diffusion coefficients using the full-wave fields in numerical tokamak equilibria has been implemented to determine the finite orbit width effects. The un-approximated Lorentz equation of motion is integrated to obtain the change in velocity after one complete poloidal transit of the tokamak. Averaging velocity changes over initial starting gyro-phase and toroidal angle gives bounce-averaged diffusion coefficients. The coefficients from the full-wave and Lorentz orbit methods are compared for an ITER DT second harmonic tritium ICRF heating case: the diffusion coefficients are similar in magnitude but reveal substantial finite orbit effects.

  12. Distributed source model for the full-wave electromagnetic simulation of nonlinear terahertz generation.

    PubMed

    Fumeaux, Christophe; Lin, Hungyen; Serita, Kazunori; Withayachumnankul, Withawat; Kaufmann, Thomas; Tonouchi, Masayoshi; Abbott, Derek

    2012-07-30

    The process of terahertz generation through optical rectification in a nonlinear crystal is modeled using discretized equivalent current sources. The equivalent terahertz sources are distributed in the active volume and computed based on a separately modeled near-infrared pump beam. This approach can be used to define an appropriate excitation for full-wave electromagnetic numerical simulations of the generated terahertz radiation. This enables predictive modeling of the near-field interactions of the terahertz beam with micro-structured samples, e.g. in a near-field time-resolved microscopy system. The distributed source model is described in detail, and an implementation in a particular full-wave simulation tool is presented. The numerical results are then validated through a series of measurements on square apertures. The general principle can be applied to other nonlinear processes with possible implementation in any full-wave numerical electromagnetic solver.

  13. Full-Information Item Factor Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bock, R. Darrell; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A method of item factor analysis is described, which is based on Thurstone's multiple-factor model and implemented by marginal maximum likelihood estimation and the EM algorithm. Also assessed are the statistical significance of successive factors added to the model, provisions for guessing and omitted items, and Bayes constraints. (TJH)

  14. Full wave simulations of fast wave heating losses in the scrape-off layer of NSTX and NSTX-U

    SciTech Connect

    Bertelli, Nicola; Jaeger, E. F.; Hosea, J.; Phillips, C. K.; Berry, Lee Alan; Gerhardt, S.; Green, David L; LeBlanc, B; Perkins, R. J.; Ryan, Philip Michael; Taylor, G.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    Full wave simulations of fusion plasmas show a direct correlation between the location of the fast-wave cut-off, radiofrequency (RF) field amplitude in the scrape-off layer (SOL) and the RF power losses in the SOL observed in the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX). In particular, the RF power losses in the SOL increase significantly when the launched waves transition from evanescent to propagating in that region. Subsequently, a large amplitude electric field occurs in the SOL, driving RF power losses when a proxy collisional loss term is added. A 3D reconstruction of absorbed power in the SOL is presented showing agreement with the RF experiments in NSTX. Loss predictions for the future experiment NSTX-Upgrade (NSTX-U) are also obtained and discussed.

  15. Simulations of NBI-ICRF synergy with the full-wave TORIC package

    SciTech Connect

    Bilato, R.; Brambilla, M.; Horton, L. D.; Maggi, C. F.; Stober, J.

    2009-11-26

    During the combined plasma heating with neutral beam injection (NBI) and waves in the ion cyclotron (IC) range of frequencies, the NBI fast ions are preferentially accelerated by IC waves close to the IC harmonics, as a consequence of finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects. Since the NBI fast ions are expected to have a strong influence on the wave absorption and propagation, we have implemented a NBI source in the quasilinear Fokker-Planck SSFPQL code, interfaced with the toroidal full-wave TORIC solver. In this implementation the NBI ionization sources are obtained from the output of a Monte Carlo code, such as FAFNER. The numerical scheme adopted in the TORIC-SSFPQL package allows to describe very anisotropic sources, such as NBI, and to iterate the solution of Maxwell's equation taking into account selfconsistently the fast ion tails. As a first application, we present modeling of an ASDEX-Upgrade discharge with combined NBI and ICRF heating.

  16. BN-600 full MOX core benchmark analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y. I.; Hill, R. N.; Grimm, K.; Rimpault, G.; Newton, T.; Li, Z. H.; Rineiski, A.; Mohanakrishan, P.; Ishikawa, M.; Lee, K. B.; Danilytchev, A.; Stogov, V.; Nuclear Engineering Division; International Atomic Energy Agency; CEA SERCO Assurance; China Inst. of Atomic Energy; Forschnungszentrum Karlsruhe; Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research; Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst.; Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst.; Inst. of Physics and Power Engineering

    2004-01-01

    As a follow-up of the BN-600 hybrid core benchmark, a full MOX core benchmark was performed within the framework of the IAEA co-ordinated research project. Discrepancies between the values of main reactivity coefficients obtained by the participants for the BN-600 full MOX core benchmark appear to be larger than those in the previous hybrid core benchmarks on traditional core configurations. This arises due to uncertainties in the proper modelling of the axial sodium plenum above the core. It was recognized that the sodium density coefficient strongly depends on the core model configuration of interest (hybrid core vs. fully MOX fuelled core with sodium plenum above the core) in conjunction with the calculation method (diffusion vs. transport theory). The effects of the discrepancies revealed between the participants results on the ULOF and UTOP transient behaviours of the BN-600 full MOX core were investigated in simplified transient analyses. Generally the diffusion approximation predicts more benign consequences for the ULOF accident but more hazardous ones for the UTOP accident when compared with the transport theory results. The heterogeneity effect does not have any significant effect on the simulation of the transient. The comparison of the transient analyses results concluded that the fuel Doppler coefficient and the sodium density coefficient are the two most important coefficients in understanding the ULOF transient behaviour. In particular, the uncertainty in evaluating the sodium density coefficient distribution has the largest impact on the description of reactor dynamics. This is because the maximum sodium temperature rise takes place at the top of the core and in the sodium plenum.

  17. Offshore Structure of the Cascadia Subduction Zone from Full-wave Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, H.

    2014-12-01

    We construct a preliminary offshore model of the crust and uppermost mantle at the Cascadia subduction zone using a full-wave tomographic method. We include the ocean bottom seismometers deployed by the Cascadia Initiative community experiment and Neptune Canada from 2011-2013, and the available broadband stations on land. We have extracted the empirical Green's functions from continuous seismic records on the vertical components of the OBS and inland station pairs with a frequency-time normalization method, which provide useful Rayleigh-wave signals within the periods of 7-50 s. We have also selected ~50 regional earthquakes between 2011-2013 offshore of the Cascadia subduction zone, which generated useful surface-wave signals up to 75 s period. We simulate wave propagation within a 3D Earth structure using a finite-difference method to generate a station Strain Greens Tensor database and synthetic waveforms. Rayleigh wave phase delays are obtained by cross-correlating the observed and synthetic waveforms. The sensitivity kernels of Rayleigh waves on the perturbations of Vp and Vs are calculated based on the Strain Greens Tensor database. We then invert for the velocity perturbation from the reference model and progressively improve the model resolution. Our preliminary full-wave tomographic imaging using the EGFs and earthquake Rayleigh waves shows: (1) Segmented low-velocity anomalies along the forearc, which are spatially correlated with the patterns of offshore basins and high slip patches; (2) Low velocities beneath the Blanco fracture zone; (3) The distribution of pseudofaults defines the seismic velocity heterogeneities; and (4) A low-velocity zone beneath the oceanic Moho near the trench, which may indicate serpentinization of the mantle lithosphere.

  18. Tools for THOR: Wave analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, Yasuhito; Haaland, Stein; Vaivads, Andris

    2017-04-01

    The THOR mission goal is to reveal particle acceleration and heating mechanisms in turbulent space and astrophysical plasmas. Understanding the properties of waves and turbulent fluctuations plays a key role in revealing the acceleration and heating processes. An extensive set of field and particle experiments are developed and mounted on board the spacecraft. Correspondingly, many of the data analysis methods are being prepared, some as a heritage from the past and the current spacecraft missions and the others as new analysis methods to maximize the scientific potential of the THOR mission. It is worth noting that the THOR mission performs not only single-point measurements but also multi-point measurements by interferometric probe technique. We offer a set of analysis tools designed for the THOR mission: energy spectra, compressibility, ellipticity, wavevector direction, phase speed, Poynting vector, helicity quantities, wave distribution function, higher order statistics, wave-particle resonance parameter, and detection of pitch angle scattering. The emphasis is on the use of both the field data (electric and magnetic fields) and the particle data.

  19. Full wave dc-to-dc converter using energy storage transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, E. T.; Wilson, T. G.

    1969-01-01

    Full wave dc-to-dc converter, for an ion thrustor, uses energy storage transformers to provide a method of dc-to-dc conversion and regulation. The converter has a high degree of physical simplicity, is lightweight and has high efficiency.

  20. Basic full-wave generalization of the real-argument Hermite-Gauss beam.

    PubMed

    Seshadri, S R

    2010-05-01

    The linearly polarized real-argument Hermite-Gauss beam is investigated by the Fourier transform method. The complex power is obtained and the reactive power of the paraxial beam is found to be zero. The complex space source required for the full-wave generalization of the real-argument Hermite-Gauss beam is deduced. The resulting basic full real-argument Hermite-Gauss wave is determined. The real and the reactive powers of the full wave are evaluated. The reactive power of the basic full real-argument Hermite-Gauss wave is infinite, and the reasons for this singularity are described. The real power depends on kw(0), m, and n, where k is the wavenumber, w(0) is the e-folding distance of the Gaussian part of the input distribution, and m and n are the mode numbers. The variation in the real power with respect to changes in kw(0) for specified m and n as well as with respect to changes in m and n for a specified kw(0) is examined.

  1. Experimental demonstration of the full-wave iterative compensation in free space optical communications.

    PubMed

    Biérent, Rudolph; Velluet, Marie-Thérèse; Védrenne, Nicolas; Michau, Vincent

    2013-07-01

    Long-range free space optical communications suffer from atmospheric turbulence effects. To mitigate them, a bidirectional full-wave compensation technique seems promising. We present an experimental implementation and characterization of this concept on a laboratory breadboard. Experimental results confirm former numerical results for similar propagation conditions. The effects of measurement and control errors are analyzed by numerical modeling.

  2. Full wave characterization of microstrip open end discontinuities patterned on anisotropic substrates using potential theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toncich, S. S.; Collin, R. E.; Bhasin, K. B.

    1993-01-01

    A technique for a full wave characterization of microstrip open end discontinuities fabricated on uniaxial anisotropic substrates using potential theory is presented. The substrate to be analyzed is enclosed in a cutoff waveguide, with the anisotropic axis aligned perpendicular to the air-dielectric interface. A full description of the sources on the microstrip line is included with edge conditions built in. Extention to other discontinuities is discussed.

  3. Enhanced Doppler reflectometry power response: physical optics and 2D full wave modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinzón, J. R.; Happel, T.; Blanco, E.; Conway, G. D.; Estrada, T.; Stroth, U.

    2017-03-01

    The power response of a Doppler reflectometer is investigated by means of the physical optics model; a simple model which considers basic scattering processes at the reflection layer. Apart from linear and saturated scattering regimes, non-linear regimes with an enhanced backscattered power are found. The different regimes are characterized and understood based on analytical calculations. The power response is also studied with two-dimensional full wave simulations, where the enhanced backscattered power regimes are also found in qualitative agreement with the physical optics results. The ordinary and extraordinary modes are compared for the same angle of incidence, with the conclusion that the ordinary mode is better suited for Doppler reflectometry turbulence level measurements due to the linearity of its response. The scattering efficiency is studied and a first approximation to describe it is proposed. At the end, the application of the physical optics results to experimental data analysis is discussed. In particular, a formula to assess the linearity of Doppler reflectometry measurements is provided.

  4. An assessment of full wave effects on the propagation and absorption of lower hybrid wavesa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, J. C.; Bonoli, P. T.; Schmidt, A. E.; Phillips, C. K.; Valeo, E. J.; Harvey, R. W.; Brambilla, M. A.

    2009-07-01

    Lower hybrid (LH) waves (Ωci≪ω≪Ωce, where Ωi ,e≡Zi ,eeB/mi ,ec) have the attractive property of damping strongly via electron Landau resonance on relatively fast tail electrons and consequently are well-suited to driving current. Established modeling techniques use Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) expansions with self-consistent non-Maxwellian distributions. Higher order WKB expansions have shown some effects on the parallel wave number evolution and consequently on the damping due to diffraction [G. Pereverzev, Nucl. Fusion 32, 1091 (1991)]. A massively parallel version of the TORIC full wave electromagnetic field solver valid in the LH range of frequencies has been developed [J. C. Wright et al., Comm. Comp. Phys. 4, 545 (2008)] and coupled to an electron Fokker-Planck solver CQL3D [R. W. Harvey and M. G. McCoy, in Proceedings of the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting, Montreal, 1992 (IAEA Institute of Physics Publishing, Vienna, 1993), USDOC/NTIS Document No. DE93002962, pp. 489-526] in order to self-consistently evolve nonthermal electron distributions characteristic of LH current drive (LHCD) experiments in devices such as Alcator C-Mod and ITER (B0≈5 T, ne0≈1×1020 m-3). These simulations represent the first ever self-consistent simulations of LHCD utilizing both a full wave and Fokker-Planck calculation in toroidal geometry.

  5. Nonlinear Fourier analysis with cnoidal waves

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, A.R.

    1996-12-31

    Fourier analysis is one of the most useful tools to the ocean engineer. The approach allows one to analyze wave data and thereby to describe a dynamical motion in terms of a linear superposition of ordinary sine waves. Furthermore, the Fourier technique allows one to compute the response function of a fixed or floating structure: each sine wave in the wave or force spectrum yields a sine wave in the response spectrum. The counting of fatigue cycles is another area where the predictable oscillations of sine waves yield procedures for the estimation of the fatigue life of structures. The ocean environment, however, is a source of a number of nonlinear effects which must also be included in structure design. Nonlinearities in ocean waves deform the sinusoidal shapes into other kinds of waves such as the Stokes wave, cnoidal wave or solitary wave. A key question is: Does there exist a generalization of linear Fourier analysis which uses nonlinear basis functions rather than the familiar sine waves? Herein addresses the dynamics of nonlinear wave motion in shallow water where the basis functions are cnoidal waves and discuss nonlinear Fourier analysis in terms of a linear superposition of cnoidal waves plus their mutual nonlinear interactions. He gives a number of simple examples of nonlinear Fourier wave motion and then analyzes an actual surface-wave time series obtained on an offshore platform in the Adriatic Sea. Finally, he briefly discusses application of the cnoidal wave spectral approach to the computation of the frequency response function of a floating vessel. The results given herein will prove useful in future engineering studies for the design of fixed, floating and complaint offshore structures.

  6. Changes in P-wave velocity with different full waveform sonic transmitter centre frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almalki, Majed; Harris, Brett; Dupuis, J. Christian

    2015-05-01

    Full waveform sonic logging, with the transmitter set at different centre frequencies, often provides different compressional wave velocities over the same interval. There may be several reasons why these velocity differences are recovered where the source has different frequency content. Examples include: intrinsic dispersion, scattering dispersion, geometric dispersion, processing artefacts and acquisition artefacts. We acquired and analysed multifrequency monopole full waveform sonic logging data from the cored drill hole intersecting a high-permeability sandy aquifer in the Northern Gnangara Mound, Perth Basin, Western Australia. A key interval of the shallow, sand-dominated Yarragadee Formation was selected and logged four times with transmitter centre frequencies set to 1, 3, 5 and 15 kHz. We compute apparent velocity dispersion as the percentage velocity differences in the P-wave velocity recovered from full waveform sonic logs completed at different dominant transmitter centre frequencies. We find that high-permeability sediments could be placed into broad groups: cross-bedded and non-cross-bedded sandstones. We find a distinctly different relationship between apparent P-wave velocity dispersion and permeability for cross-bedded and non-cross-bedded sandstones. Cross plots for the two sediment types show a general trend of increasing apparent dispersion with increasing permeability. Grouping the sandstone layers based on sediment type, as observed from core samples, illustrates different but positive correlation between the apparent P-wave velocity dispersion and permeability in these shallow, weakly-consolidated sandstones. The cross-bedded sandstone, for its part, has a wider range of permeability than the non-cross-bedded sandstone but a smaller range of apparent P-wave velocity dispersion. Given these results, our hypothesis is that while permeability plays a role, other factors such as geometric dispersion or scattering dispersion likely contribute the

  7. Imaging of transient surface acoustic waves by full-field photorefractive interferometry.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jichuan; Xu, Xiaodong; Glorieux, Christ; Matsuda, Osamu; Cheng, Liping

    2015-05-01

    A stroboscopic full-field imaging technique based on photorefractive interferometry for the visualization of rapidly changing surface displacement fields by using of a standard charge-coupled device (CCD) camera is presented. The photorefractive buildup of the space charge field during and after probe laser pulses is simulated numerically. The resulting anisotropic diffraction upon the refractive index grating and the interference between the polarization-rotated diffracted reference beam and the transmitted signal beam are modeled theoretically. The method is experimentally demonstrated by full-field imaging of the propagation of photoacoustically generated surface acoustic waves with a temporal resolution of nanoseconds. The surface acoustic wave propagation in a 23 mm × 17 mm area on an aluminum plate was visualized with 520 × 696 pixels of the CCD sensor, yielding a spatial resolution of 33 μm. The short pulse duration (8 ns) of the probe laser yields the capability of imaging SAWs with frequencies up to 60 MHz.

  8. Imaging of transient surface acoustic waves by full-field photorefractive interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Jichuan; Xu, Xiaodong; Glorieux, Christ; Matsuda, Osamu; Cheng, Liping

    2015-05-01

    A stroboscopic full-field imaging technique based on photorefractive interferometry for the visualization of rapidly changing surface displacement fields by using of a standard charge-coupled device (CCD) camera is presented. The photorefractive buildup of the space charge field during and after probe laser pulses is simulated numerically. The resulting anisotropic diffraction upon the refractive index grating and the interference between the polarization-rotated diffracted reference beam and the transmitted signal beam are modeled theoretically. The method is experimentally demonstrated by full-field imaging of the propagation of photoacoustically generated surface acoustic waves with a temporal resolution of nanoseconds. The surface acoustic wave propagation in a 23 mm × 17 mm area on an aluminum plate was visualized with 520 × 696 pixels of the CCD sensor, yielding a spatial resolution of 33 μm. The short pulse duration (8 ns) of the probe laser yields the capability of imaging SAWs with frequencies up to 60 MHz.

  9. Imaging of transient surface acoustic waves by full-field photorefractive interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Jichuan; Xu, Xiaodong E-mail: christ.glorieux@fys.kuleuven.be; Glorieux, Christ E-mail: christ.glorieux@fys.kuleuven.be; Matsuda, Osamu; Cheng, Liping

    2015-05-15

    A stroboscopic full-field imaging technique based on photorefractive interferometry for the visualization of rapidly changing surface displacement fields by using of a standard charge-coupled device (CCD) camera is presented. The photorefractive buildup of the space charge field during and after probe laser pulses is simulated numerically. The resulting anisotropic diffraction upon the refractive index grating and the interference between the polarization-rotated diffracted reference beam and the transmitted signal beam are modeled theoretically. The method is experimentally demonstrated by full-field imaging of the propagation of photoacoustically generated surface acoustic waves with a temporal resolution of nanoseconds. The surface acoustic wave propagation in a 23 mm × 17 mm area on an aluminum plate was visualized with 520 × 696 pixels of the CCD sensor, yielding a spatial resolution of 33 μm. The short pulse duration (8 ns) of the probe laser yields the capability of imaging SAWs with frequencies up to 60 MHz.

  10. Pulse wave analysis with diffusing-wave spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Belau, Markus; Scheffer, Wolfgang; Maret, Georg

    2017-07-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and thus at the origin of many deaths by e.g. heart attack or stroke. Hypertension is caused by many factors including an increase in arterial stiffness which leads to changes in pulse wave velocity and wave reflections. Those often result in an increased left ventricular load which may result in heart failure as well as an increased pulsatile pressure in the microcirculation l to damage to blood vessels. In order to specifically treat the different causes of hypertension it is desirable to perform a pulse wave analysis as a complement to measurements of systolic and diastolic pressure by brachial cuff sphygmomanometry. Here we show that Diffusing Wave Spectroscopy, a novel non-invasive portable tool, is able to monitor blood flow changes with a high temporal resolution. The measured pulse travel times give detailed information of the pulse wave blood flow profile.

  11. Development of a GPU-Accelerated 3-D Full-Wave Code for Electromagnetic Wave Propagation in a Cold Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodbury, D.; Kubota, S.; Johnson, I.

    2014-10-01

    Computer simulations of electromagnetic wave propagation in magnetized plasmas are an important tool for both plasma heating and diagnostics. For active millimeter-wave and microwave diagnostics, accurately modeling the evolution of the beam parameters for launched, reflected or scattered waves in a toroidal plasma requires that calculations be done using the full 3-D geometry. Previously, we reported on the application of GPGPU (General-Purpose computing on Graphics Processing Units) to a 3-D vacuum Maxwell code using the FDTD (Finite-Difference Time-Domain) method. Tests were done for Gaussian beam propagation with a hard source antenna, utilizing the parallel processing capabilities of the NVIDIA K20M. In the current study, we have modified the 3-D code to include a soft source antenna and an induced current density based on the cold plasma approximation. Results from Gaussian beam propagation in an inhomogeneous anisotropic plasma, along with comparisons to ray- and beam-tracing calculations will be presented. Additional enhancements, such as advanced coding techniques for improved speedup, will also be investigated. Supported by U.S. DoE Grant DE-FG02-99-ER54527 and in part by the U.S. DoE, Office of Science, WDTS under the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship program.

  12. Multi-Grid and Resolution Full-Wave Tomography and Moment Tensor Inversion (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-04

    in the transition zone is the strong low velocity anomalies north of the subducted Tethyan slabs (Hafkenscheid et al., 2006). One possible...Evidence for water injection into the transition zone by subduction , J. Geophys. Res. 99 (15): 813–815, 820. Paige, C.C. and M.A. Saunders (1982...provide new constraints on the entire upper mantle, including the upper mantle transition zone . Several iterations of full-wave tomographic inversion

  13. Three dimensional full-wave nonlinear acoustic simulations: Applications to ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinton, Gianmarco

    2015-10-01

    Characterization of acoustic waves that propagate nonlinearly in an inhomogeneous medium has significant applications to diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound. The generation of an ultrasound image of human tissue is based on the complex physics of acoustic wave propagation: diffraction, reflection, scattering, frequency dependent attenuation, and nonlinearity. The nonlinearity of wave propagation is used to the advantage of diagnostic scanners that use the harmonic components of the ultrasonic signal to improve the resolution and penetration of clinical scanners. One approach to simulating ultrasound images is to make approximations that can reduce the physics to systems that have a low computational cost. Here a maximalist approach is taken and the full three dimensional wave physics is simulated with finite differences. This paper demonstrates how finite difference simulations for the nonlinear acoustic wave equation can be used to generate physically realistic two and three dimensional ultrasound images anywhere in the body. A specific intercostal liver imaging scenario for two cases: with the ribs in place, and with the ribs removed. This configuration provides an imaging scenario that cannot be performed in vivo but that can test the influence of the ribs on image quality. Several imaging properties are studied, in particular the beamplots, the spatial coherence at the transducer surface, the distributed phase aberration, and the lesion detectability for imaging at the fundamental and harmonic frequencies. The results indicate, counterintuitively, that at the fundamental frequency the beamplot improves due to the apodization effect of the ribs but at the same time there is more degradation from reverberation clutter. At the harmonic frequency there is significantly less improvement in the beamplot and also significantly less degradation from reverberation. It is shown that even though simulating the full propagation physics is computationally challenging it

  14. Three dimensional full-wave nonlinear acoustic simulations: Applications to ultrasound imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Pinton, Gianmarco

    2015-10-28

    Characterization of acoustic waves that propagate nonlinearly in an inhomogeneous medium has significant applications to diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound. The generation of an ultrasound image of human tissue is based on the complex physics of acoustic wave propagation: diffraction, reflection, scattering, frequency dependent attenuation, and nonlinearity. The nonlinearity of wave propagation is used to the advantage of diagnostic scanners that use the harmonic components of the ultrasonic signal to improve the resolution and penetration of clinical scanners. One approach to simulating ultrasound images is to make approximations that can reduce the physics to systems that have a low computational cost. Here a maximalist approach is taken and the full three dimensional wave physics is simulated with finite differences. This paper demonstrates how finite difference simulations for the nonlinear acoustic wave equation can be used to generate physically realistic two and three dimensional ultrasound images anywhere in the body. A specific intercostal liver imaging scenario for two cases: with the ribs in place, and with the ribs removed. This configuration provides an imaging scenario that cannot be performed in vivo but that can test the influence of the ribs on image quality. Several imaging properties are studied, in particular the beamplots, the spatial coherence at the transducer surface, the distributed phase aberration, and the lesion detectability for imaging at the fundamental and harmonic frequencies. The results indicate, counterintuitively, that at the fundamental frequency the beamplot improves due to the apodization effect of the ribs but at the same time there is more degradation from reverberation clutter. At the harmonic frequency there is significantly less improvement in the beamplot and also significantly less degradation from reverberation. It is shown that even though simulating the full propagation physics is computationally challenging it

  15. Modeling of EAST ICRF antenna performance using the full-wave code TORIC

    SciTech Connect

    Edlund, E. M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Porkolab, M.; Wukitch, S. J.

    2015-12-10

    Access to advanced operating regimes in the EAST tokamak will require a combination of electron-cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH), neutral beam injection (NBI) and ion cyclotron range frequency heating (ICRF), with the addition of lower-hybrid current drive (LHCD) for current profile control. Prior experiments at the EAST tokamak facility have shown relatively weak response of the plasma temperature to application of ICRF heating, with typical coupled power about 2 MW out of 12 MW source. The launched spectrum, at n{sub φ} = 34 for 0-π -0-π phasing and 27 MHz, is largely inaccessible at line-averaged densities of approximately 2 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}. However, with variable antenna phasing and frequency, this system has considerable latitude to explore different heating schemes. To develop an ICRF actuator control model, we have used the full-wave code TORIC to explore the physics of ICRF wave propagation in EAST. The results presented from this study use a spectrum analysis using a superposition of n{sub φ} spanning −50 to +50. The low density regime typical of EAST plasmas results in a perpendicular wavelength comparable to the minor radius which results in global cavity resonance effects and eigenmode formation when the single-pass absorption is low. This behavior indicates that improved performance can be attained by lowering the peak of the k{sub ||} spectrum by using π/3 phasing of the 4-strap antenna. Based on prior studies conducted at Alcator C-Mod, this phasing is also expected to have the advantage of nearly divergence-free box currents, which should result in reduced levels of impurity production. Significant enhancements of the loading resistance may be achieved by using low k{sub ||} phasing and a combination of magnetic field and frequency to vary the location of the resonance and mode conversion regions. TORIC calculations indicate that the significant power may be channeled to the electrons and deuterium majority. We expect that

  16. Modeling of EAST ICRF antenna performance using the full-wave code TORIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edlund, E. M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Porkolab, M.; Wukitch, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Access to advanced operating regimes in the EAST tokamak will require a combination of electron-cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH), neutral beam injection (NBI) and ion cyclotron range frequency heating (ICRF), with the addition of lower-hybrid current drive (LHCD) for current profile control. Prior experiments at the EAST tokamak facility have shown relatively weak response of the plasma temperature to application of ICRF heating, with typical coupled power about 2 MW out of 12 MW source. The launched spectrum, at nφ = 34 for 0-π -0-π phasing and 27 MHz, is largely inaccessible at line-averaged densities of approximately 2 × 1019 m-3. However, with variable antenna phasing and frequency, this system has considerable latitude to explore different heating schemes. To develop an ICRF actuator control model, we have used the full-wave code TORIC to explore the physics of ICRF wave propagation in EAST. The results presented from this study use a spectrum analysis using a superposition of nφ spanning -50 to +50. The low density regime typical of EAST plasmas results in a perpendicular wavelength comparable to the minor radius which results in global cavity resonance effects and eigenmode formation when the single-pass absorption is low. This behavior indicates that improved performance can be attained by lowering the peak of the k|| spectrum by using π/3 phasing of the 4-strap antenna. Based on prior studies conducted at Alcator C-Mod, this phasing is also expected to have the advantage of nearly divergence-free box currents, which should result in reduced levels of impurity production. Significant enhancements of the loading resistance may be achieved by using low k|| phasing and a combination of magnetic field and frequency to vary the location of the resonance and mode conversion regions. TORIC calculations indicate that the significant power may be channeled to the electrons and deuterium majority. We expect that implementation of these recommendations in EAST

  17. Interpretation of lunar and planetary electromagnetic scattering using the full wave solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahar, E.; Haugland, M.

    1993-01-01

    Bistatic radar experiments carried out during the Apollo 14, 15, and 16 missions provide a very useful data set with which to compare theoretical models and experimental data. Vesecky, et al. report that their model for near grazing angles compares favorably with experimental data. However, for angles of incidence around 80 degrees, all the analytical models considered by Vesecky, et al. predict values for the quasi-specular cross sections that are about half the corresponding values taken from the Apollo 16 data. In this work, questions raised by this discrepancy between the reported analytical and experimental results are addressed. The unified full wave solutions are shown to be in good agreement with the bistatic radar taken during Apollo 14 and 16 missions. Using the full wave approach, the quasi-specular contributions to the scattered field from the large scale surface roughness as well as the diffuse Bragg-like scattering from the small scale surface roughness are accounted for in a unified self-consistent manner. Since the full wave computer codes for the scattering cross sections contain ground truth data only, it is shown how it can be reliably used to predict the rough surface parameters of planets based on the measured data.

  18. Full waveform inversion of marine reflection data in the plane-wave domain

    SciTech Connect

    Minkoff, S.E.; Symes, W.W.

    1997-03-01

    Full waveform inversion of a p-{tau} marine data set from the Gulf of Mexico provides estimates of the long-wavelength P-wave background velocity, anisotropic seismic source, and three high-frequency elastic parameter reflectivities that explain 70% of the total seismic data and 90% of the data in an interval around the gas sand target. The forward simulator is based on a plane-wave viscoelastic model for P-wave propagation and primary reflections in a layered earth. Differential semblance optimization, a variant of output least-squares inversion, successfully estimates the nonlinear P-wave background velocity and linear reflectivities. Once an accurate velocity is estimated, output least-squares inversion reestimates the reflectivities and an anisotropic seismic source simultaneously. The viscoelastic model predicts the amplitude-versus-angle trend in the data more accurately than does an elastic model. Simultaneous inversion for reflectivities and source explains substantially more of the actual data than does inversion for reflectivities with fixed source from an air-gun modeler. The best reflectivity estimates conform to widely accepted lithologic relationships and closely match the filtered well logs.

  19. Ion cyclotron emission calculations using a 2D full wave numerical code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchelor, D. B.; Jaeger, E. F.; Colestock, P. L.

    1987-09-01

    Measurement of radiation in the HF band due to cyclotron emission by energetic ions produced by fusion reactions or neutral beam injection promises to be a useful diagnostic on large devices which are entering the reactor regime of operation. A number of complications make the modelling and interpretation of such measurements difficult using conventional geometrical optics methods. In particular the long wavelength and lack of high directivity of antennas in this frequency regime make observation of a single path across the plasma into a viewing dump impractical. Pickup antennas effectively see the whole plasma and wall reflection effects are important. We have modified our 2D full wave ICRH code2 to calculate wave fields due to a distribution of energetic ions in tokamak geometry. The radiation is modeled as due to an ensemble of localized source currents distributed in space. The spatial structure of the coherent wave field is then calculated including cyclotron harmonic damping as compared to the usual procedure of incoherently summing powers of individual radiators. This method has the advantage that phase information from localized radiating currents is globally retained so the directivity of the pickup antennas is correctly represented. Also standing waves and wall reflections are automatically included.

  20. A full ellipsometric approach to optical sensing with Bloch surface waves on photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Sinibaldi, Alberto; Rizzo, Riccardo; Figliozzi, Giovanni; Descrovi, Emiliano; Danz, Norbert; Munzert, Peter; Anopchenko, Aleksei; Michelotti, Francesco

    2013-10-07

    We report on the investigation on the resolution of optical sensors exploiting Bloch surface waves sustained by one dimensional photonic crystals. A figure of merit is introduced to quantitatively assess the performance of such sensors and its dependency on the geometry and materials of the photonic crystal. We show that the figure of merit and the resolution can be improved by adopting a full ellipsometric phase-sensitive approach. The theoretical predictions are confirmed by experiments in which, for the first time, such type of sensors are operated in the full ellipsometric scheme.

  1. Analysis of Waves in the Near-Field of Wave Energy Converter Arrays through Stereo Video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, C.; Haller, M. C.

    2013-12-01

    Oregon State University conducted a series of laboratory experiments to measure and quantify the near-field wave effects caused within arrays of 3 and 5 Wave Energy Converters (WEC). As the waves and WECs interact, significant scattering and radiation occurs increasing/decreasing the wave heights as well as changing the direction the wave is traveling. These effects may vary based on the number of WECs within an array and their respective locations. The findings of this analysis will assist in selecting the WEC farm location and in improving WEC design. Analyzing the near-field waves will help determine the relative importance of absorption, scattering, and radiation as a function of the incident wave conditions and device performance. The WEC mooring system design specifications may also be impacted if the wave heights in the near-field are greater than expected. It is imperative to fully understand the near-field waves before full-scale WEC farms can be installed. Columbia Power Technologies' Manta served as the test WEC prototype on a 1 to 33 scale. Twenty-three wave gages measured the wave heights in both regular and real sea conditions at locations surrounding and within the WEC arrays. While these gages give a good overall picture of the water elevation behavior, it is difficult to resolve the complicated wave field within the WEC array using point gages. Here stereo video techniques are applied to extract the 3D water surface elevations at high resolution in order to reconstruct the multi-directional wave field in the near-field of the WEC array. The video derived wave information will also be compared against the wave gage data.

  2. Full elastic characterization of absorptive rubber using laser excited guided ultrasonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstraeten, Bert; Xu, Xiadong; Martinez, Loïc; Glorieux, Christ

    2012-05-01

    Because of the highly damping nature of rubber, it is difficult to characterize its dynamic elastic properties using classical methods. In this paper, an experimental approach employing laser excited guided acoustic waves is proposed to accurately determine the real and imaginary part of the longitudinal and shear elastic modulus of a rubber layer. From the spatiotemporal evolution of a propagating laser excited Lamb wave measured by a laser Doppler vibrometer, which is scanning along a line perpendicular to a line of excitation, the phase velocity dispersion curves in the wave number - frequency domain are obtained. The results are interpreted in the framework of a detailed semianalytical study, analyzing the influence of elastic damping on the Lamb dispersion curves. This analysis is exploited to adequately fit the experimental dispersion curves and thus extract information about the elastic moduli and absorption coefficients of the rubber plate. The results are validated by a pulse-echo measurement, and by guided wave propagation results with the rubber layer connected in a bi-layer plate configuration to non-damping plates.

  3. Wavefield Analysis of Rayleigh Waves for Near-Surface Shear-Wave Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Chong

    2011-12-01

    Shear (S)-wave velocity is a key property of near-surface materials and is the fundamental parameter for many environmental and engineering geophysical studies. Directly acquiring accurate S-wave velocities from a seismic shot gather is usually difficult due to the poor signal-to-noise ratio. The relationship between Rayleigh-wave phase velocity and frequency has been widely utilized to estimate the S-wave velocities in shallow layers using the multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) technique. Hence, Rayleigh wave is a main focus of most near-surface seismic studies. Conventional dispersion analysis of Rayleigh waves assumes that the earth is laterally homogeneous and the free surface is horizontally flat, which limits the application of surface-wave methods to only 1D earth models or very smooth 2D models. In this study I extend the analysis of Rayleigh waves to a 2D domain by employing the 2D full elastic wave equation so as to address the lateral heterogeneity problem. I first discuss the accurate simulation of Rayleigh waves through finite-difference method and the boundary absorbing problems in the numerical modeling with a high Poisson's ratio (> 0.4), which is a unique near-surface problem. Then I develop an improved vacuum formulation to generate accurate synthetic seismograms focusing on Rayleigh waves in presence of surface topography and internal discontinuities. With these solutions to forward modeling of Rayleigh waves, I evaluate the influence of surface topography to conventional dispersion analysis in 2D and 3D domains by numerical investigations. At last I examine the feasibility of inverting waveforms of Rayleigh waves for shallow S-wave velocities using a genetic algorithm. Results of the study show that Rayleigh waves can be accurately simulated in near surface using the improved vacuum formulation. Spurious reflections during the numerical modeling can be efficiently suppressed by the simplified multiaxial perfectly matched layers. The

  4. High-resolution global tomography: A full-wave technique for forward and inverse modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissen-Meyer, Tarje; Sigloch, Karin; Fournier, Alexandre

    2010-05-01

    In recent years, seismology has greatly benefitted from significant progress in digital data collection and processing, accurate numerical methods for wave propagation, and high-performance computing to explore crucial scales of interest in both data and model spaces. We will present a full-wave technique to address the seismic forward and inverse problem at the global scale, with a specific focus on diffracted waves in the lowermost mantle: Our 2D spectral-element method tackles 3D wave propagation through spherically symmetric background models down to seismic frequencies of 1 Hz and delivers the wavefields necessary to construct sensitivity kernels. This specific approach distinguishes itself from the adjoint method in that it requires no knowledge about data structure or observables at the time of forward modeling by means of storing entire reference space-time wavefields. To obtain a direct view of the interconnection between surface displacements and earth structure, we examine the time-dependent sensitivity of the seismic signal to 3D model perturbations. Being highly sensitive to such parameters as epicentral distance, earthquake radiation pattern, depth, frequency, receiver components and time windows, this effort suggests criteria for data selection to optimally illuminate a specific region within the earth. As shown with core-diffracted P-waves, we measure and model our observables (e.g. traveltimes, amplitudes) in multiple-frequency passbands, thereby increasing robustness of the inverse problem and path coverage. This allows us to selectively draw only upon frequency bands with high signal-to-noise ratio. We discuss the selection and usability of data for such a Pdiff tomographic setting, coverage maps and target regions. We also touch upon the validity of a 1D reference model and quantify the applicability range of the first-order Born approximation.

  5. Acoustic modal analysis of a full-scale annular combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karchmer, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    An acoustic modal decomposition of the measured pressure field in a full scale annular combustor installed in a ducted test rig is described. The modal analysis, utilizing a least squares optimization routine, is facilitated by the assumption of randomly occurring pressure disturbances which generate equal amplitude clockwise and counter-clockwise pressure waves, and the assumption of statistical independence between modes. These assumptions are fully justified by the measured cross spectral phases between the various measurement points. The resultant modal decomposition indicates that higher order modes compose the dominant portion of the combustor pressure spectrum in the range of frequencies of interest in core noise studies. A second major finding is that, over the frequency range of interest, each individual mode which is present exists in virtual isolation over significant portions of the spectrum. Finally, a comparison between the present results and a limited amount of data obtained in an operating turbofan engine with the same combustor is made. The comparison is sufficiently favorable to warrant the conclusion that the structure of the combustor pressure field is preserved between the component facility and the engine.

  6. Gravitational-wave detection using multivariate analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Thomas S.; Meacher, Duncan; Clark, James; Sutton, Patrick J.; Jones, Gareth; Minot, Ariana

    2013-09-01

    Searches for gravitational-wave bursts (transient signals, typically of unknown waveform) require identification of weak signals in background detector noise. The sensitivity of such searches is often critically limited by non-Gaussian noise fluctuations that are difficult to distinguish from real signals, posing a key problem for transient gravitational-wave astronomy. Current noise rejection tests are based on the analysis of a relatively small number of measured properties of the candidate signal, typically correlations between detectors. Multivariate analysis (MVA) techniques probe the full space of measured properties of events in an attempt to maximize the power to accurately classify events as signal or background. This is done by taking samples of known background events and (simulated) signal events to train the MVA classifier, which can then be applied to classify events of unknown type. We apply the boosted decision tree (BDT) MVA technique to the problem of detecting gravitational-wave bursts associated with gamma-ray bursts. We find that BDTs are able to increase the sensitive distance reach of the search by as much as 50%, corresponding to a factor of ˜3 increase in sensitive volume. This improvement is robust against trigger sky position, large sky localization error, poor data quality, and the simulated signal waveforms that are used. Critically, we find that the BDT analysis is able to detect signals that have different morphologies from those used in the classifier training and that this improvement extends to false alarm probabilities beyond the 3σ significance level. These findings indicate that MVA techniques may be used for the robust detection of gravitational-wave bursts with a priori unknown waveform.

  7. Calculation of the Full Scattering Amplitude without Partial Wave Decomposition II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shertzer, J.; Temkin, A.

    2003-01-01

    As is well known, the full scattering amplitude can be expressed as an integral involving the complete scattering wave function. We have shown that the integral can be simplified and used in a practical way. Initial application to electron-hydrogen scattering without exchange was highly successful. The Schrodinger equation (SE) can be reduced to a 2d partial differential equation (pde), and was solved using the finite element method. We have now included exchange by solving the resultant SE, in the static exchange approximation. The resultant equation can be reduced to a pair of coupled pde's, to which the finite element method can still be applied. The resultant scattering amplitudes, both singlet and triplet, as a function of angle can be calculated for various energies. The results are in excellent agreement with converged partial wave results.

  8. Calculation of the Full Scattering Amplitude without Partial Wave Decomposition II: Inclusion of Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shertzer, Janine; Temkin, A.

    2003-01-01

    As is well known, the full scattering amplitude can be expressed as an integral involving the complete scattering wave function. We have shown that the integral can be simplified and used in a practical way. Initial application to electron-hydrogen scattering without exchange was highly successful. The Schrodinger equation (SE), which can be reduced to a 2d partial differential equation (pde), was solved using the finite element method. We have now included exchange by solving the resultant SE, in the static exchange approximation, which is reducible to a pair of coupled pde's. The resultant scattering amplitudes, both singlet and triplet, calculated as a function of energy are in excellent agreement with converged partial wave results.

  9. Full-wave modeling of the O-X mode conversion in the Pegasus toroidal experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Koehn, A.; Jacquot, J.; Bongard, M. W.; Hinson, E. T.; Volpe, F. A.; Gallian, S.

    2011-08-15

    The ordinary-extraordinary (O-X) mode conversion is modeled with the aid of a 2D full-wave code in the Pegasus toroidal experiment as a function of the launch angles. It is shown how the shape of the plasma density profile in front of the antenna can significantly influence the mode conversion efficiency and, thus, the generation of electron Bernstein waves (EBWs). It is therefore desirable to control the density profile in front of the antenna for successful operation of an EBW heating and current drive system. On the other hand, the conversion efficiency is shown to be resilient to vertical displacements of the plasma as large as {+-}10 cm.

  10. Full-wave modeling of THz RTD-gated GaN HEMTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenneti, Sai N.; Nahar, Niru K.; Volakis, John L.

    2015-09-01

    Modeling transistors at terahertz frequencies is challenging, because electromagnetic and quantum effects that are negligible in lower frequencies become limiting factors in device performance. Though previous work has focused on modeling the channel of a high-electron mobility transistor (HEMT) using hydrodynamic equations, a more complete toolset is needed to describe submillimeter-wave device gain performance. This paper introduces a simulator that couples full-wave Maxwell's equations with Schrodinger-based charge transport equations, and is used to evaluate the gain performance of a GaN HEMT at THz. This novel simulator is also used to evaluate the effect on gain when a resonant tunneling diode (RTD) is integrated with a HEMT. Upon validation with published work, we state the feasibility of RTD-gated GaN HEMT structures that have resonances up to 2.3 THz and gain up to 6 dB.

  11. Two-dimensional full-wave code for reflectometry simulations in TJ-II

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco, E.; Heuraux, S.; Estrada, T.; Sanchez, J.; Cupido, L.

    2004-10-01

    A two-dimensional full-wave code in the extraordinary mode has been developed to simulate reflectometry in TJ-II. The code allows us to study the measurement capabilities of the future correlation reflectometer that is being installed in TJ-II. The code uses the finite-difference-time-domain technique to solve Maxwell's equations in the presence of density fluctuations. Boundary conditions are implemented by a perfectly matched layer to simulate free propagation. To assure the stability of the code, the current equations are solved by a fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. Density fluctuation parameters such as fluctuation level, wave numbers, and correlation lengths are extrapolated from those measured at the plasma edge using Langmuir probes. In addition, realistic plasma shape, density profile, magnetic configuration, and experimental setup of TJ-II are included to determine the plasma regimes in which accurate information may be obtained.

  12. Calculation of the Full Scattering Amplitude without Partial Wave Decomposition II: Inclusion of Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shertzer, Janine; Temkin, A.

    2003-01-01

    As is well known, the full scattering amplitude can be expressed as an integral involving the complete scattering wave function. We have shown that the integral can be simplified and used in a practical way. Initial application to electron-hydrogen scattering without exchange was highly successful. The Schrodinger equation (SE), which can be reduced to a 2d partial differential equation (pde), was solved using the finite element method. We have now included exchange by solving the resultant SE, in the static exchange approximation, which is reducible to a pair of coupled pde's. The resultant scattering amplitudes, both singlet and triplet, calculated as a function of energy are in excellent agreement with converged partial wave results.

  13. Calculation of the Full Scattering Amplitude without Partial Wave Decomposition II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shertzer, J.; Temkin, A.

    2003-01-01

    As is well known, the full scattering amplitude can be expressed as an integral involving the complete scattering wave function. We have shown that the integral can be simplified and used in a practical way. Initial application to electron-hydrogen scattering without exchange was highly successful. The Schrodinger equation (SE) can be reduced to a 2d partial differential equation (pde), and was solved using the finite element method. We have now included exchange by solving the resultant SE, in the static exchange approximation. The resultant equation can be reduced to a pair of coupled pde's, to which the finite element method can still be applied. The resultant scattering amplitudes, both singlet and triplet, as a function of angle can be calculated for various energies. The results are in excellent agreement with converged partial wave results.

  14. Spin wave measurements over the full Brillouin zone of multiferroic BiFeO3.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jaehong; Goremychkin, E A; Guidi, T; Nakajima, K; Jeon, Gun Sang; Kim, Shin-Ae; Furukawa, S; Kim, Yong Baek; Lee, Seongsu; Kiryukhin, V; Cheong, S-W; Park, Je-Geun

    2012-02-17

    Using the inelastic neutron scattering technique, we measured the spin wave dispersion over the entire Brillouin zone of room temperature multiferroic BiFeO(3) single crystals with magnetic excitations extending to as high as 72.5 meV. The full spin waves can be explained by a simple Heisenberg Hamiltonian with a nearest-neighbor exchange interaction (J=4.38 meV), a next-nearest-neighbor exchange interaction (J'=0.15 meV), and a Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya-like term (D=0.107 meV). This simple Hamiltonian determined, for the first time, for BiFeO(3) provides a fundamental ingredient for understanding the novel magnetic properties of BiFeO(3).

  15. A simple derivation of relativistic full-wave equations at electron cyclotron resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, D. C.; Cairns, R. A.; Lashmore-Davies, C. N.

    1994-10-01

    When a wave passes through an electron gyroresonance, in a plasma in the presence of a magnetic field gradient, there is a small spread in the resonance due to the electron's Larmor radius. Mathematically this is represented by the inclusion of the so called gyrokinetic term in the resonance condition, Lashmore-Davies and Dendy. The smallness of this term, compared with other effects such as relativistic broadening, suggests that it should be negligible. However, we shall show here, by extending the method of Cairns et al., into the relativistic regime, that its inclusion is vital for producing self consistent full-wave equations which describe electron gyroresonance. The method is considerably simpler than those used previously by Maroli et al., Petrillo et al., and Lampis et al., for obtaining similar equations. As an example we include a calculation for the O-Mode passing perpendicularly through the fundamental.

  16. Development of full wave code for modeling RF fields in hot non-uniform plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liangji; Svidzinski, Vladimir; Spencer, Andrew; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2016-10-01

    FAR-TECH, Inc. is developing a full wave RF modeling code to model RF fields in fusion devices and in general plasma applications. As an important component of the code, an adaptive meshless technique is introduced to solve the wave equations, which allows resolving plasma resonances efficiently and adapting to the complexity of antenna geometry and device boundary. The computational points are generated using either a point elimination method or a force balancing method based on the monitor function, which is calculated by solving the cold plasma dispersion equation locally. Another part of the code is the conductivity kernel calculation, used for modeling the nonlocal hot plasma dielectric response. The conductivity kernel is calculated on a coarse grid of test points and then interpolated linearly onto the computational points. All the components of the code are parallelized using MPI and OpenMP libraries to optimize the execution speed and memory. The algorithm and the results of our numerical approach to solving 2-D wave equations in a tokamak geometry will be presented. Work is supported by the U.S. DOE SBIR program.

  17. Full skin quantitative optical coherence elastography achieved by combining vibration and surface acoustic wave methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunhui; Guan, Guangying; Huang, Zhihong; Wang, Ruikang K.; Nabi, Ghulam

    2015-03-01

    By combining with the phase sensitive optical coherence tomography (PhS-OCT), vibration and surface acoustic wave (SAW) methods have been reported to provide elastography of skin tissue respectively. However, neither of these two methods can provide the elastography in full skin depth in current systems. This paper presents a feasibility study on an optical coherence elastography method which combines both vibration and SAW in order to give the quantitative mechanical properties of skin tissue with full depth range, including epidermis, dermis and subcutaneous fat. Experiments are carried out on layered tissue mimicking phantoms and in vivo human forearm and palm skin. A ring actuator generates vibration while a line actuator were used to excited SAWs. A PhS-OCT system is employed to provide the ultrahigh sensitive measurement of the generated waves. The experimental results demonstrate that by the combination of vibration and SAW method the full skin bulk mechanical properties can be quantitatively measured and further the elastography can be obtained with a sensing depth from ~0mm to ~4mm. This method is promising to apply in clinics where the quantitative elasticity of localized skin diseases is needed to aid the diagnosis and treatment.

  18. Trend analysis of the wave storminess: the wave direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas Prat, M.; Sierra, J. P.; Mösso, C.; Sánchez-Arcilla, A.

    2009-09-01

    directionality. It is based on 44 year hindcast model data (1958-2001) of the HIPOCAS project, enabling to work with a longer time series compared to the existing measured ones. 41 nodes of this database are used, containing 3 hourly simulated data of significant wave height and wave direction, among other parameters. For storm definition, the Peak Over Threshold (POT) method is used with some additional duration requirements in order to analyse statistically independent events (Mendoza & Jiménez, 2006). Including both wave height and storm duration, the wave storminess is characterised by the energy content (Mendoza & Jiménez, 2004), being in turn log-transformed because of its positive scale. Separately, the wave directionality itself is analysed in terms of different sectors and approaching their probability of occurrence by counting events and using Bayesian inference (Agresti, 2002). Therefore, the original data is transformed into compositional data and, before performing the trend analysis, the isometric logratio (ilr) transformation (Egozcue et al., 2003) is done. In general, the trend analysis methodology consists in two steps: 1) trend detection and 2) trend quantification. For 1) the Mann Kendall test is used in order to identify the nodes with significant trend. For these selected nodes, the trend quantification is done, comparing two methods: 1) a simple linear regression analysis complemented with the bootstrap technique and 2) a Bayesian analysis, assuming normally distributed data with linearly increasing mean. Preliminary results show no significant trend for both annual mean and maximum energy content except for some nodes located to the Northern Catalan coast. Regarding the wave direction (but not only considering stormy conditions) there is a tendency of North direction to decrease whereas South and Southeast direction seems to increase.

  19. Impedance modeling of electromagnetic energy harvesting system using full-wave bridge rectifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Junrui; Ge, Cong; Shu, Yi-Chung

    2017-04-01

    In the conventional model of general vibration energy harvesters, the harvesting effect was regarded as only the electrically induced damping. Such intuition has overlooked the detailed dynamic contribution of practical power conditioning circuits. This paper presents an improved impedance model for the electromagnetic energy harvesting (EMEH) system considering the detailed dynamic components, which are introduced by the most extensively used full-wave bridge rectifier. The operation of the power electronics is studied under harmonic excitation. The waveforms, energy cycles, and impedance picture are illustrated for showing more information about the EMEH system. The theoretical prediction on harvesting power can properly describe the changing trend of the experimental result.

  20. Full Waveform 2.5D Teleseismic Surface Wave Tomography with Application to the Tien Shan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roecker, S. W.; Priestley, K. F.; Baker, B. I.

    2011-12-01

    We adapt the 2.5D spectral domain finite difference waveform tomography algorithm of Roecker et al. (2010) to permit the analysis of teleseismically recorded surface waves. The teleseismic body wave technique of generating synthetic waveforms by specifying an analytic solution for a background wavefield in a 1D model and solving for a scattered field excited by this background is equally applicable to surface waves. We use the locked mode approach of Gomberg and Masters (1988) to calculate the background Greens functions at each point of the finite difference (FD) grid. Because of the much greater concentration of energy at the surface, we adopt the cell-based FD operators of Min et al. (2004) to calculate the free surface boundary conditions, and the generalized stretching function of Komatitch and Martin (2007) to improve the absorption in the PML. We use this algorithm to analyze broad band seismograms of events in Sumatra recorded by the MANAS array in the Tien Shan. Our results show that the upper mantle beneath much of the central Tien Shan has shear wavespeeds at least 10% lower than the lithosphere beneath the Tarim basin to the south or the Kazach shield to the north. At the same time, there appears to be a remnant lithospheric lid beneath the Kyrgyz range in the north, an observation consistent with previous receiver function studies in this area.

  1. Optical Nonlinear Wakefield Vortices: Results from Full-Wave Vector Maxwell Equation Simulations in Two Spatial Dimensions and Time,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    In this paper we report the first multi-dimensional, full-wave, vector Maxwell’s equation solutions to problems describing the interaction of ultra...time domain (NL-FDTD) method which combines a nonlinear generalization of a standard, FDTD, full-wave, vector, linear Maxwell’s equation solver with

  2. Further SEASAT SAR coastal ocean wave analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasischke, E. S.; Shuchman, R. A.; Meadows, G. A.; Jackson, P. L.; Tseng, Y.

    1981-01-01

    Analysis techniques used to exploit SEASAT synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data of gravity waves are discussed and the SEASAT SAR's ability to monitor large scale variations in gravity wave fields in both deep and shallow water is evaluated. The SAR analysis techniques investigated included motion compensation adjustments and the semicausal model for spectral analysis of SAR wave data. It was determined that spectra generated from fast Fourier transform analysis (FFT) of SAR wave data were not significantly altered when either range telerotation adjustments or azimuth focus shifts were used during processing of the SAR signal histories, indicating that SEASAT imagery of gravity waves is not significantly improved or degraded by motion compensation adjustments. Evaluation of the semicausal (SC) model using SEASAT SAR data from Rev. 974 indicates that the SC spectral estimates were not significantly better than the FFT results.

  3. Analysis of guided wave propagation in a tapered composite panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandowski, Tomasz; Malinowski, Pawel; Moll, Jochen; Radzienski, Maciej; Ostachowicz, Wieslaw

    2015-03-01

    Many studies have been published in recent years on Lamb wave propagation in isotropic and (multi-layered) anisotropic structures. In this paper, adiabatic wave propagation phenomenon in a tapered composite panel made out of glass fiber reinforced polymers (GFRP) will be considered. Such structural elements are often used e.g. in wind turbine blades and aerospace structures. Here, the wave velocity of each wave mode does not only change with frequency and the direction of wave propagation. It further changes locally due to the varying cross-section of the GFRP panel. Elastic waves were excited using a piezoelectric transducer. Full wave-field measurements using scanning Laser Doppler vibrometry have been performed. This approach allows the detailed analysis of elastic wave propagation in composite specimen with linearly changing thickness. It will be demonstrated here experimentally, that the wave velocity changes significantly due to the tapered geometry of the structure. Hence, this work motivates the theoretical and experimental analysis of adiabatic mode propagation for the purpose of Non-Destructive Testing and Structural Health Monitoring.

  4. Method for improving accuracy in full evaporation headspace analysis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei-Qi; Chai, Xin-Sheng

    2017-03-21

    We report a new headspace analytical method in which multiple headspace extraction is incorporated with the full evaporation technique. The pressure uncertainty caused by the solid content change in the samples has a great impact to the measurement accuracy in the conventional full evaporation headspace analysis. The results (using ethanol solution as the model sample) showed that the present technique is effective to minimize such a problem. The proposed full evaporation multiple headspace extraction analysis technique is also automated and practical, and which could greatly broaden the applications of the full-evaporation-based headspace analysis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Full-field multidimensional deconvolution to retrieve body-wave reflections from sparse passive sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartstra, I. E.; Almagro Vidal, C.; Wapenaar, K.

    2017-08-01

    Our objective is to complement lithospheric seismic tomography with an interferometric method to retrieve high-resolution reflectivity images from local earthquake recordings. The disadvantage of using local earthquakes for the retrieval of reflected body-waves is their usual sparse distribution. We propose an alternative formulation of passive seismic interferometry by multidimensional deconvolution (MDD) which uses the multiples in the full recordings to compensate for missing illumination angles. This method only requires particle-velocity recordings at the surface from passive transient sources and retrieves body-wave reflection responses without free-surface multiples. We conduct an acoustic modelling experiment to compare this formulation to a previous MDD method and Green's function retrieval by crosscorrelation for different source distributions. We find that in the case of noise-contaminated recordings obtained under severely limited and irregular illumination conditions, the alternative MDD method introduced here still retrieves the complete reflection response without free-surface multiples where the other interferometric methods break down.

  6. Full Wave Parallel Code for Modeling RF Fields in Hot Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Joseph; Svidzinski, Vladimir; Evstatiev, Evstati; Galkin, Sergei; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2015-11-01

    FAR-TECH, Inc. is developing a suite of full wave RF codes in hot plasmas. It is based on a formulation in configuration space with grid adaptation capability. The conductivity kernel (which includes a nonlocal dielectric response) is calculated by integrating the linearized Vlasov equation along unperturbed test particle orbits. For Tokamak applications a 2-D version of the code is being developed. Progress of this work will be reported. This suite of codes has the following advantages over existing spectral codes: 1) It utilizes the localized nature of plasma dielectric response to the RF field and calculates this response numerically without approximations. 2) It uses an adaptive grid to better resolve resonances in plasma and antenna structures. 3) It uses an efficient sparse matrix solver to solve the formulated linear equations. The linear wave equation is formulated using two approaches: for cold plasmas the local cold plasma dielectric tensor is used (resolving resonances by particle collisions), while for hot plasmas the conductivity kernel is calculated. Work is supported by the U.S. DOE SBIR program.

  7. Rapid acquisition of high resolution full wave-field borehole seismic data

    SciTech Connect

    Sleefe, G.E.; Harding, R.S. Jr.; Fairborn, J.W.; Paulsson, B.N.P.

    1993-04-01

    An essential requirement for both Vertical Seismic Profiling (VSP) and Cross-Hole Seismic Profiling (CHSP) is the rapid acquisition of high resolution borehole seismic data. Additionally, full wave-field recording using three-component receivers enables the use of both transmitted and reflected elastic wave events in the resulting seismic images of the subsurface. To this end, an advanced three- component multi-station borehole seismic receiver system has been designed and developed by Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and OYO Geospace. The system requires data from multiple three-component wall-locking accelerometer packages and telemeters digital data to the surface in real-time. Due to the multiplicity of measurement stations and the real-time data link, acquisition time for the borehole seismic survey is significantly reduced. The system was tested at the Chevron La Habra Test Site using Chevron`s clamped axial borehole vibrator as the seismic source. Several source and receiver fans were acquired using a four-station version of the advanced system. For comparison purposes, an equivalent data set was acquired using a standard analog wall-locking geophone receiver. The test data indicate several enhancements provided by the multi-station receiver relative to the standard, drastically improved signal-to-noise ratio, increased signal bandwidth, the detection of multiple reflectors, and a true 4:1 reduction in survey time.

  8. Full-wave modeling of therapeutic ultrasound: Nonlinear ultrasound propagation in ideal fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginter, Siegfried; Liebler, Marko; Steiger, Eckard; Dreyer, Thomas; Riedlinger, Rainer E.

    2002-05-01

    The number of applications of high-intense, focused ultrasound for therapeutic purposes is growing. Besides established applications like lithotripsy, new applications like ultrasound in orthopedics or for the treatment of tumors arise. Therefore, new devices have to be developed which provide pressure waveforms and distributions in the focal zone specifically for the application. In this paper, a nonlinear full-wave simulation model is presented which predicts the therapeutically important characteristics of the generated ultrasound field for a given transducer and initial pressure signal. A nonlinear acoustic approximation in conservation form of the original hydrodynamic equations for ideal fluids rather than a wave equation provides the base for the nonlinear model. The equations are implemented with an explicit high-order finite-difference time-domain algorithm. The necessary coefficients are derived according to the dispersion relation preserving method. Simulation results are presented for two different therapeutic transducers: a self-focusing piezoelectric and one with reflector focusing. The computational results are validated by comparison with analytical solutions and measurements. An agreement of about 10% is observed between the simulation and experimental results.

  9. Full wave modeling of ultrasonic NDE benchmark problems using Nyström method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurrala, Praveen; Chen, Kun; Song, Jiming; Roberts, Ron

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we simulate some of the benchmark problems proposed by the World Federation of Nondestructive Evaluation Centers (WFNDEC) using a full wave simulation model based on accurate solutions to the boundary integral equations for ultrasonic scattering. Much of the previous work on modeling these problems relied on the Kirch-hoff approximation to find the scattered fields from defects. Here we instead use a numerical method, called the Nyström method, for finding the scattered fields more accurately by solving the boundary integral equations of scattering. We compare our model's predictions with both measurements and Kirchhoff approximation based models. We expect the presented results to serve as a validation of our model as well as a comparison between the Kirchhoff approximation and the Nyström method.

  10. Prediction of the bottomonium D-wave spectrum from full lattice QCD.

    PubMed

    Daldrop, J O; Davies, C T H; Dowdall, R J

    2012-03-09

    We calculate the full spectrum of D-wave states in the Υ system in lattice QCD for the first time, by using an improved version of nonrelativistic QCD on coarse and fine "second-generation" gluon field configurations from the MILC Collaboration that include the effect of up, down, strange, and charm quarks in the sea. By taking the 2S-1S splitting to set the lattice spacing, we determine the (3)D2-1S splitting to 2.3% and find agreement with experiment. Our prediction of the fine structure relative to the (3)D2 gives the (3)D3 at 10.181(5) GeV and the (3)D1 at 10.147(6) GeV. We also discuss the overlap of (3)D1 operators with (3)S1 states.

  11. 2D full wave modeling for a synthetic Doppler backscattering diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Hillesheim, J. C.; Schmitz, L.; Kubota, S.; Rhodes, T. L.; Carter, T. A.; Holland, C.

    2012-10-15

    Doppler backscattering (DBS) is a plasma diagnostic used in tokamaks and other magnetic confinement devices to measure the fluctuation level of intermediate wavenumber (k{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub s}{approx} 1) density fluctuations and the lab frame propagation velocity of turbulence. Here, a synthetic DBS diagnostic is described, which has been used for comparisons between measurements in the DIII-D tokamak and predictions from nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. To estimate the wavenumber range to which a Gaussian beam would be sensitive, a ray tracing code and a 2D finite difference, time domain full wave code are used. Experimental density profiles and magnetic geometry are used along with the experimental antenna and beam characteristics. An example of the effect of the synthetic diagnostic on the output of a nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation is presented.

  12. A Full-Wave Solution of the Maxwell's Equations in 3D Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovich, P.; Mellet, N.; Villard, L.; Cooper, W. A.

    2005-09-01

    We present a new global solver for the Maxwell's equations in stellarator plasmas (LEMan). The 3D geometrical effects are fully taken into account, no assumption on the wavelength is made. The full cold plasma dielectric tensor including finite electron mass is implemented, extension to the kinetic model is under development. The wave equation is discretised with finite elements (linear or cubic) radially and Fourier decomposition in the poloidal and toroidal angles. Special care is taken to correctly treat the problem near the magnetic axis. Unicity of the solution, gauge condition and the energy conservation are ensured. Some results and benchmarks for the Alfvén and ion cyclotron frequency ranges are presented.

  13. Determination of medium electrical properties through full-wave modelling of frequency domain reflectrometry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Frédéric; Lambot, Sébastien

    2015-04-01

    Accurate knowledge of the shallow soil properties is of prime importance in agricultural, hydrological and environmental engineering. During the last decade, numerous geophysical techniques, either invasive or resorting to proximal or remote sensing, have been developed and applied for quantitative characterization of soil properties. Amongst them, time domain reflectrometry (TDR) and frequency domain reflectometry (FDR) are recognized as standard techniques for the determination of soil dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity, based on the reflected electromagnetic waves from a probe inserted into the soil. TDR data were first commonly analyzed in the time domain using methods considering only a part of the waveform information. Later, advancements have led to the possibility of analyzing the TDR signal through full-wave inverse modeling either in the time or the frequency domains. A major advantage of FDR compared to TDR is the possibility to increase the bandwidth, thereby increasing the information content of the data and providing more detailed characterization of the medium. Amongst the recent works in this field, Minet et al. (2010) developed a modeling procedure for processing FDR data based on an exact solution of Maxwell's equations for wave propagation in one-dimensional multilayered media. In this approach, the probe head is decoupled from the medium and is fully described by characteristic transfer functions. The authors successfully validated the method for homogeneous sand subject to a range of water contents. In the present study, we further validated the modelling approach using reference liquids with well-characterized frequency-dependent electrical properties. In addition, the FDR model was coupled with a dielectric mixing model to investigate the ability of retrieving water content, pore water electrical conductivity and sand porosity from inversion of FDR data acquired in sand subject to different water content levels. Finally, the

  14. Ab initio treatment of noncollinear magnets with the full-potential linearized augmented plane wave method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurz, Ph.; Förster, F.; Nordström, L.; Bihlmayer, G.; Blügel, S.

    2004-01-01

    The massively parallelized full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave bulk and film program FLEUR for first-principles calculations in the context of density functional theory was adapted to allow calculations of materials with complex magnetic structures—i.e., with noncollinear spin arrangements and incommensurate spin spirals. The method developed makes no shape approximation to the charge density and works with the continuous vector magnetization density in the interstitial and vacuum region and a collinear magnetization density in the spheres. We give an account of the implementation. Important technical aspects, such as the formulation of a constrained local moment method in a full-potential method that works with a vector magnetization density to deal with specific preselected nonstationary-state spin configurations, the inclusion of the generalized gradient approximation in a noncollinear framework, and the spin-relaxation method are discussed. The significance and validity of different approximations are investigated. We present examples to the various strategies to explore the magnetic ground state, metastable states, and magnetic phase diagrams by relaxation of spin arrangements or by performing calculations for constraint spin configurations to invest the functional dependence of the total energy and magnetic moment with respect to external parameters.

  15. An Analysis of the Full-Floating Journal Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, M C; Nussdorfer, T J , Jr

    1947-01-01

    An analysis of the operating characteristics of a full-floating journal bearing, a bearing in which a floating sleeve is located between the journal and bearing surfaces, is presented together with charts from which the performance of such bearings may be predicted. Examples are presented to illustrate the use of these charts and a limited number of experiments conducted upon a glass full-floating bearing are reported to verify some results of the analysis.

  16. Crack Detection with Lamb Wave Wavenumber Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Leckey, Cara; Rogge, Matt; Yu, Lingyu

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we present our study of Lamb wave crack detection using wavenumber analysis. The aim is to demonstrate the application of wavenumber analysis to 3D Lamb wave data to enable damage detection. The 3D wavefields (including vx, vy and vz components) in time-space domain contain a wealth of information regarding the propagating waves in a damaged plate. For crack detection, three wavenumber analysis techniques are used: (i) two dimensional Fourier transform (2D-FT) which can transform the time-space wavefield into frequency-wavenumber representation while losing the spatial information; (ii) short space 2D-FT which can obtain the frequency-wavenumber spectra at various spatial locations, resulting in a space-frequency-wavenumber representation; (iii) local wavenumber analysis which can provide the distribution of the effective wavenumbers at different locations. All of these concepts are demonstrated through a numerical simulation example of an aluminum plate with a crack. The 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) was used to obtain the 3D wavefields, of which the vz (out-of-plane) wave component is compared with the experimental measurement obtained from a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV) for verification purposes. The experimental and simulated results are found to be in close agreement. The application of wavenumber analysis on 3D EFIT simulation data shows the effectiveness of the analysis for crack detection. Keywords: : Lamb wave, crack detection, wavenumber analysis, EFIT modeling

  17. A combined full wave equation tomography - full waveform inversion and its application to 12 km long streamer data from offshore western Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Singh, S. C.; Ghosal, D.

    2012-12-01

    Seismic full waveform inversion is an emerging technique to determine fine-scale subsurface velocity structure. However, it requires a good starting velocity model, which is generally obtained using travel time tomography, to converge to a global minimum. Furthermore, the computing cost of full waveform inversion could be very high. In order to converge to a global solution, we have developed a combined full wave equation tomography (WET) and full waveform inversion (FWI) where the large and medium scale velocity is determined using full wave equation tomography first and then the fine-scale elastic parameters are inverted using full waveform inversion. WET and FWI both utilize full wavefield modeling, but differ on the definition of objective functions: WET aims to minimize L2-norm of cross-correlation synthetic and observed data, which is mainly sensitive to travel times, while FWI aims to optimize the L2-norm full waveform misfit, which is sensitive to both amplitudes and travel times of arrivals. Adjoint method is used to calculate the gradient for both methods efficiently. To compensate the energy loss due to wave propagation in the adjoint calculation and geometric limitation of survey, we apply an approximate Hessian preconditioning to the gradient. Further more, to stabilize WET, we precondition the time delay measures observed from cross-relation with maximum cross-correlation coefficients and perform tomographic model regularization to avoid local minimum. By exploring the band-limited feature of seismic wavefield, WET can provide better resolution than ray-based travel time tomography, and hence better suited for the FWI to converge to the true model, which provides very fine detail P and S-wave velocity. Both WET and WFI are based on the solution of full elastic wave equation and hence can model all types of wave present data. In order to reduce the computation cost and to invert seismic refraction arrivals first, we downward continue the streamer data

  18. Full wavefield decomposition of high-frequency secondary microseisms reveals distinct arrival azimuths for Rayleigh and Love waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, M.; Reading, A. M.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Koper, K. D.; Burlacu, R.

    2017-06-01

    In the secondary microseism band (0.1-1.0 Hz) the theoretical excitation of Rayleigh waves (Rg/LR), through oceanic wave-wave interaction, is well understood. For Love waves (LQ), the excitation mechanism in the secondary microseism band is less clear. We explore high-frequency secondary microseism excitation between 0.35 and 1 Hz by analyzing a full year (2013) of records from a three-component seismic array in Pilbara (PSAR), Australia. Our recently developed three-component waveform decomposition algorithm (CLEAN-3C) fully decomposes the beam power in slowness space into multiple point sources. This method allows for a directionally dependent power estimation for all separable wave phases. In this contribution, we compare quantitatively microseismic energy recorded on vertical and transverse components. We find the mean power representation of Rayleigh and Love waves to have differing azimuthal distributions, which are likely a result of their respective generation mechanisms. Rayleigh waves show correlation with convex coastlines, while Love waves correlate with seafloor sedimentary basins. The observations are compared to the WAVEWATCH III ocean model, implemented at the Institut Français de Recherche pour l'Exploitation de la Mer (IFREMER), which describes the spatial and temporal characteristics of microseismic source excitation. We find Love wave energy to originate from raypaths coinciding with seafloor sedimentary basins where strong Rayleigh wave excitation is predicted by the ocean model. The total power of Rg waves is found to dominate at 0.35-0.6 Hz, and the Rayleigh/Love wave power ratio strongly varies with direction and frequency.

  19. Full wave model of image formation in optical coherence tomography applicable to general samples.

    PubMed

    Munro, Peter R T; Curatolo, Andrea; Sampson, David D

    2015-02-09

    We demonstrate a highly realistic model of optical coherence tomography, based on an existing model of coherent optical microscopes, which employs a full wave description of light. A defining feature of the model is the decoupling of the key functions of an optical coherence tomography system: sample illumination, light-sample interaction and the collection of light scattered by the sample. We show how such a model can be implemented using the finite-difference time-domain method to model light propagation in general samples. The model employs vectorial focussing theory to represent the optical system and, thus, incorporates general illumination beam types and detection optics. To demonstrate its versatility, we model image formation of a stratified medium, a numerical point-spread function phantom and a numerical phantom, based upon a physical three-dimensional structured phantom employed in our laboratory. We show that simulated images compare well with experimental images of a three-dimensional structured phantom. Such a model provides a powerful means to advance all aspects of optical coherence tomography imaging.

  20. Characterization of an SRF gun: a 3D full wave simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, E.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Wang, J.

    2011-03-28

    We characterized a BNL 1.3GHz half-cell SRF gun is tested for GaAs photocathode. The gun already was simulated several years ago via two-dimensional (2D) numerical codes (i.e., Superfish and Parmela) with and without the beam. In this paper, we discuss our investigation of its characteristics using a three dimensional (3D) full-wave code (CST STUDIO SUITE{trademark}).The input/pickup couplers are sited symmetrically on the same side of the gun at an angle of 180{sup o}. In particular, the inner conductor of the pickup coupler is considerably shorter than that of the input coupler. We evaluated the cross-talk between the beam (trajectory) and the signal on the input coupler compared our findings with published results based on analytical models. The CST STUDIO SUITE{trademark} also was used to predict the field within the cavity; particularly, a combination of transient/eigenmode solvers was employed to accurately construct the RF field for the particles, which also includes the effects of the couplers. Finally, we explored the beam's dynamics with a particle in cell (PIC) simulation, validated the results and compare them with 2D code result.

  1. Sources of image degradation in fundamental and harmonic ultrasound imaging using nonlinear, full-wave simulations.

    PubMed

    Pinton, Gianmarco F; Trahey, Gregg E; Dahl, Jeremy J

    2011-04-01

    A full-wave equation that describes nonlinear propagation in a heterogeneous attenuating medium is solved numerically with finite differences in the time domain (FDTD). This numerical method is used to simulate propagation of a diagnostic ultrasound pulse through a measured representation of the human abdomen with heterogeneities in speed of sound, attenuation, density, and nonlinearity. Conventional delay-andsum beamforming is used to generate point spread functions (PSF) that display the effects of these heterogeneities. For the particular imaging configuration that is modeled, these PSFs reveal that the primary source of degradation in fundamental imaging is reverberation from near-field structures. Reverberation clutter in the harmonic PSF is 26 dB higher than the fundamental PSF. An artificial medium with uniform velocity but unchanged impedance characteristics indicates that for the fundamental PSF, the primary source of degradation is phase aberration. An ultrasound image is created in silico using the same physical and algorithmic process used in an ultrasound scanner: a series of pulses are transmitted through heterogeneous scattering tissue and the received echoes are used in a delay-and-sum beamforming algorithm to generate images. These beamformed images are compared with images obtained from convolution of the PSF with a scatterer field to demonstrate that a very large portion of the PSF must be used to accurately represent the clutter observed in conventional imaging. © 2011 IEEE

  2. Variational full wave calculation of fast wave current drive in DIII-D using the ALCYON code

    SciTech Connect

    Becoulet, A.; Moreau, D.

    1992-04-01

    Initial fast wave current drive simulations performed with the ALCYON code for the 60 MHz DIII-D experiment are presented. Two typical shots of the 1991 summer campaign were selected with magnetic field intensities of 1 and 2 teslas respectively. The results for the wave electromagnetic field in the plasma chamber are displayed. They exhibit a strong enrichment of the poloidal mode number m-spectrum which leads to the upshift of the parallel wavenumber, {kappa}{perpendicular}, and to the wave absorption. The m-spectrum is bounded when the local poloidal wavenumber reaches the Alfven wavenumber and the {kappa}{perpendicular} upshifts do not destroy the wave directionality. Linear estimations of the driven current are made. The current density profiles are found to be peaked and we find that about 88 kA can be driven in the 1 tesla/1.7 keV phase with 1.7 MW coupled to the electrons. In the 2 tesla/3.4 keV case, 47 kA are driven with a total power of 1.5 MW, 44% of which are absorbed on the hydrogen minority, through the second harmonic ion cyclotron resonance. The global efficiency is then 0.18 {times} 10{sup 19} A m{sup {minus}2}W{sup {minus}1} if one considers only the effective power going to the electrons.

  3. Rapid decay of nonlinear whistler waves in two dimensions: Full particle simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeda, Takayuki; Saito, Shinji; Nariyuki, Yasuhiro

    2017-05-01

    The decay of a nonlinear, short-wavelength, and monochromatic electromagnetic whistler wave is investigated by utilizing a two-dimensional (2D) fully relativistic electromagnetic particle-in-cell code. The simulation is performed under a low-beta condition in which the plasma pressure is much lower than the magnetic pressure. It has been shown that the nonlinear (large-amplitude) parent whistler wave decays through the parametric instability in a one-dimensional (1D) system. The present study shows that there is another channel for the decay of the parent whistler wave in 2D, which is much faster than in the timescale of the parametric decay in 1D. The parent whistler wave decays into two sideband daughter whistlers propagating obliquely with respect to the ambient magnetic field with a frequency close to the parent wave and two quasi-perpendicular electromagnetic modes with a frequency close to zero via a 2D decay instability. The two sideband daughter oblique whistlers also enhance a nonlinear longitudinal electrostatic wave via a three-wave interaction as a secondary process.

  4. Full-scale system impact analysis: Digital document storage project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The Digital Document Storage Full Scale System can provide cost effective electronic document storage, retrieval, hard copy reproduction, and remote access for users of NASA Technical Reports. The desired functionality of the DDS system is highly dependent on the assumed requirements for remote access used in this Impact Analysis. It is highly recommended that NASA proceed with a phased, communications requirement analysis to ensure that adequate communications service can be supplied at a reasonable cost in order to validate recent working assumptions upon which the success of the DDS Full Scale System is dependent.

  5. AB 1007 Full Fuel Cycle Analysis (FFCA) Peer Review

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, D; Armstrong, D; Campbell, C; Lamont, A; Gallegos, G; Stewart, J; Upadhye, R

    2007-01-19

    LLNL is a participant of California's Advanced Energy Pathways (AEP) team funded by DOE (NETL). At the AEP technical review meeting on November 9, 2006. The AB 1007 FFCA team (Appendix A) requested LLNL participate in a peer review of the FFCA reports. The primary contact at the CEC was McKinley Addy. The following reports/presentations were received by LLNL: (1) Full Fuel Cycle Energy and Emissions Assumptions dated September 2006, TIAX; (2) Full Fuel cycle Assessment-Well to Tank Energy Inputs, Emissions, and Water Impacts dated December 2006, TIAX; and (3) Full Fuel Cycle Analysis Assessment dated October 12, 2006, TIAX.

  6. Performance analysis of a full-field and full-range swept-source OCT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauter, J.; Boettcher, T.; Körner, K.; Gronle, M.; Osten, W.; Passilly, N.; Froehly, L.; Perrin, S.; Gorecki, C.

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, optical coherence tomography (OCT) became gained importance in medical disciplines like ophthalmology, due to its noninvasive optical imaging technique with micrometer resolution and short measurement time. It enables e. g. the measurement and visualization of the depth structure of the retina. In other medical disciplines like dermatology, histopathological analysis is still the gold standard for skin cancer diagnosis. The EU-funded project VIAMOS (Vertically Integrated Array-type Mirau-based OCT System) proposes a new type of OCT system combined with micro-technologies to provide a hand-held, low-cost and miniaturized OCT system. The concept is a combination of full-field and full-range swept-source OCT (SS-OCT) detection in a multi-channel sensor based on a micro-optical Mirau-interferometer array, which is fabricated by means of wafer fabrication. This paper presents the study of an experimental proof-of-concept OCT system as a one-channel sensor with bulk optics. This sensor is a Linnik-interferometer type with similar optical parameters as the Mirau-interferometer array. A commercial wavelength tunable light source with a center wavelength at 845nm and 50nm spectral bandwidth is used with a camera for parallel OCT A-Scan detection. In addition, the reference microscope objective lens of the Linnik-interferometer is mounted on a piezo-actuated phase-shifter. Phase-shifting interferometry (PSI) techniques are applied for resolving the conjugate complex artifact and consequently contribute to an increase of image quality and depth range. A suppression ratio of the complex conjugate term of 36 dB is shown and a system sensitivity greater than 96 dB could be measured.

  7. Non-invasive coronary wave intensity analysis.

    PubMed

    Broyd, Christopher J; Rigo, Fausto; Davies, Justin

    2017-07-01

    Wave intensity analysis is calculated from simultaneously acquired measures of pressure and flow. Its mathematical computation produces a profile that provides quantitative information on the energy exchange driving blood flow acceleration and deceleration. Within the coronary circulation it has proven most useful in describing the wave that originates from the myocardium and that is responsible for driving the majority of coronary flow, labelled the backward decompression wave. Whilst this wave has demonstrated valuable insights into the pathogenic processes of a number of disease states, its measurement is hampered by its invasive necessity. However, recent work has used transthoracic echocardiography and an established measures of central aortic pressure to produce coronary flow velocity and pressure waveforms respectively. This has allowed a non-invasive measure of coronary wave intensity analysis, and in particular the backward decompression wave, to be calculated. It is anticipated that this will allow this tool to become more applicable and widespread, ultimately moving it from the research to the clinical domain.

  8. Existence and stability of rarefaction wave to 1-D piston problem for the relativistic full Euler equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Min

    2017-06-01

    We consider the 1-D piston problem for the compressible relativistic full Euler equations when the total variations of the initial data and the piston velocity are both sufficiently small. By using a modified wave front tracking method, we establish the global existence of entropy solutions including a strong rarefaction wave without restriction on the strength. Moreover, we study the asymptotic behavior of the solutions as t → + ∞.

  9. Characterization of forest litter horizons through full-wave inversion of ground-penetrating radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Frédéric; Jonard, Mathieu; Jonard, François; Lambot, Sébastien

    2015-04-01

    Decomposing litter accumulated at the soil surface in forest ecosystems play a major role in a series of ecosystem processes (soil carbon sequestration, nutrient release through decomposition, water retention, buffering of soil temperature variations, tree regeneration, population dynamics of ground vegetation and soil fauna, ...). Besides, the presence of litter is acknowledged to influence remote sensing radar data over forested areas and accurate quantification of litter radiative properties is essential for proper processing of these data. In these respects, ground-penetrating radar (GPR) presents particular interests, potentially allowing for fast and non-invasive characterization of organic layers with fine spatial and/or temporal resolutions as well as for providing detailed information on litter electrical properties which are required for modeling either active or passive microwave remote sensing data. We designed an experiment in order to analyze the backscattering from forest litter horizons and to investigate the potentialities of GPR for retrieving the physical properties of these horizons. For that purpose, we used an ultrawide band radar system connected to a transmitting and receiving horn antenna. The GPR data were processed resorting to full-wave inversion of the signal, through which antenna effects are accounted for. In a first step, GPR data were acquired over artificially reconstructed layers of three different beech litter types (i.e., (i) recently fallen litter with easily discernible plant organs (OL layer), (ii) fragmented litter in partial decomposition without entire plant organs (OF layer) and (iii) combination of OL and OF litter layers) and considering in each case a range of layer thicknesses. In a second step, so as to validate the adopted methodology in real natural conditions, GPR measurements were performed in situ along a transect crossing a wide range of litter properties in terms of thickness and composition through stands of

  10. Digital techniques for ULF wave polarization analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arthur, C. W.

    1979-01-01

    Digital power spectral and wave polarization analysis are powerful techniques for studying ULF waves in the earth's magnetosphere. Four different techniques for using the spectral matrix to perform such an analysis have been presented in the literature. Three of these techniques are similar in that they require transformation of the spectral matrix to the principal axis system prior to performing the polarization analysis. The differences in the three techniques lie in the manner in which determine this transformation. A comparative study of these three techniques using both simulated and real data has shown them to be approximately equal in quality of performance. The fourth technique does not require transformation of the spectral matrix. Rather, it uses the measured spectral matrix and state vectors for a desired wave type to design a polarization detector function in the frequency domain. The design of various detector functions and their application to both simulated and real data will be presented.

  11. Full-wave Ambient Noise Tomography of Mt Rainier volcano, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flinders, Ashton; Shen, Yang

    2015-04-01

    Mount Rainier towers over the landscape of western Washington (USA), ranking with Fuji-yama in Japan, Mt Pinatubo in the Philippines, and Mt Vesuvius in Italy, as one of the great stratovolcanoes of the world. Notwithstanding its picturesque stature, Mt Rainier is potentially the most devastating stratovolcano in North America, with more than 3.5 million people living beneath is shadow in the Seattle-Tacoma area. The primary hazard posed by the volcano is in the form of highly destructive debris flows (lahars). These lahars form when water and/or melted ice erode away and entrain preexisting volcanic sediment. At Mt Rainier these flows are often initiated by sector collapse of the volcano's hydrothermally rotten flanks and compounded by Mt Rainier's extensive snow and glacial ice coverage. It is therefore imperative to ascertain the extent of the volcano's summit hydrothermal alteration, and determine areas prone to collapse. Despite being one of the sixteen volcanoes globally designated by the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth's Interior as warranting detailed and focused study, Mt Rainier remains enigmatic both in terms of the shallow internal structure and the degree of summit hydrothermal alteration. We image this shallow internal structure and areas of possible summit alteration using ambient noise tomography. Our full waveform forward modeling includes high-resolution topography allowing us to accuratly account for the effects of topography on the propagation of short-period Rayleigh waves. Empirical Green's functions were extracted from 80 stations within 200 km of Mt Rainier, and compared with synthetic greens functions over multiple frequency bands from 2-28 seconds.

  12. Rapid full-wave phase aberration correction method for transcranial high-intensity focused ultrasound therapies.

    PubMed

    Almquist, Scott; Parker, Dennis L; Christensen, Douglas A

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) can be used to treat a variety of disorders, including those in the brain. However, the differences in acoustic properties between the skull and the surrounding soft tissue cause aberrations in the path of the ultrasonic beam, hindering or preventing treatment. We present a method for correcting these aberrations that is fast, full-wave, and allows for corrections at multiple treatment locations. The method is simulation-based: an acoustic model is built based on high-resolution CT scans, and simulations are performed using the hybrid angular spectrum (HAS) method to determine the phases needed for correction. Computation of corrections for clinically applicable resolutions can be achieved in approximately 15 min. Experimental results with a plastic model designed to mimic the aberrations caused by the skull show that the method can recover 95 % of the peak pressure obtained using hydrophone-based time-reversal methods. Testing using an ex vivo human skull flap resulted in recovering up to 70 % of the peak pressure at the focus and 61 % when steering (representing, respectively, a 1.52- and 1.19-fold increase in the peak pressure over the uncorrected case). Additionally, combining the phase correction method with rapid HAS simulations allows evaluation of such treatment metrics as the effect of misregistration on resulting pressure levels. The method presented here is able to rapidly compute phases required to improve ultrasound focusing through the skull at multiple treatment locations. Combining phase correction with rapid simulation techniques allows for evaluation of various treatment metrics such as the effect of steering on pressure levels. Since the method computes 3D pressure patterns, it may also be suitable for predicting off-focus hot spots during treatments-a primary concern for transcranial HIFU. Additionally, the plastic-skull method presented here may be a useful tool in evaluating the

  13. Full-wave theory of a quasi-optical launching system for lower-hybrid waves: Preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Cincotti, G.; Gori, F.; Santarsiero, M.; Serrecchia, R. ); Frezza, F.; Schettini, G. ); Santini, F. )

    1994-10-15

    Numerical studies on the use of an advanced launcher to couple lower-hybrid waves to a plasma, for current drive in tokamaks, are currently under development. The study of the coupling has been carried out in a rigorous way, through the solution of the scattering from cylinders with parallel axes in the presence of a plane of discontinuity for electromagnetic constants. We present the general features of the proposed method together with preliminary results on launched spectra and coupled power.

  14. Full Information Item Factor Analysis of the FCI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagedorn, Eric

    2010-02-01

    Traditional factor analytical methods, principal factors or principal components analysis, are inappropriate techniques for analyzing dichotomously scored responses to standardized tests or concept inventories because they lead to artifactual factors often referred to as ``difficulty factors.'' Full information item factor analysis (Bock, Gibbons and Muraki, 1988) based on Thurstone's multiple factor model and calculated using marginal maximum likelihood estimation, is an appropriate technique for such analyses. Force Concept Inventory (Hestenes, Wells and Swackhamer, 1992) data from 1582 university students completing an introductory physics course, was analyzed using the full information item factor analysis software TESTFACT v. 4. Analyzing the statistical significance of successive factors added to the model, using chi-squared statistics, led to a six factor model interpretable in terms of the conceptual dimensions of the FCI. )

  15. The Data Analysis in Gravitational Wave Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao-ge, Wang; Lebigot, Eric; Zhi-hui, Du; Jun-wei, Cao; Yun-yong, Wang; Fan, Zhang; Yong-zhi, Cai; Mu-zi, Li; Zong-hong, Zhu; Jin, Qian; Cong, Yin; Jian-bo, Wang; Wen, Zhao; Yang, Zhang; Blair, David; Li, Ju; Chun-nong, Zhao; Lin-qing, Wen

    2017-01-01

    Gravitational wave (GW) astronomy based on the GW detection is a rising interdisciplinary field, and a new window for humanity to observe the universe, followed after the traditional astronomy with the electromagnetic waves as the detection means, it has a quite important significance for studying the origin and evolution of the universe, and for extending the astronomical research field. The appearance of laser interferometer GW detector has opened a new era of GW detection, and the data processing and analysis of GWs have already been developed quickly around the world, to provide a sharp weapon for the GW astronomy. This paper introduces systematically the tool software that commonly used for the data analysis of GWs, and discusses in detail the basic methods used in the data analysis of GWs, such as the time-frequency analysis, composite analysis, pulsar timing analysis, matched filter, template, χ2 test, and Monte-Carlo simulation, etc.

  16. The Modularized Software Package ASKI - Full Waveform Inversion Based on Waveform Sensitivity Kernels Utilizing External Seismic Wave Propagation Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, F.; Friederich, W.

    2015-12-01

    We present the modularized software package ASKI which is a flexible and extendable toolbox for seismic full waveform inversion (FWI) as well as sensitivity or resolution analysis operating on the sensitivity matrix. It utilizes established wave propagation codes for solving the forward problem and offers an alternative to the monolithic, unflexible and hard-to-modify codes that have typically been written for solving inverse problems. It is available under the GPL at www.rub.de/aski. The Gauss-Newton FWI method for 3D-heterogeneous elastic earth models is based on waveform sensitivity kernels and can be applied to inverse problems at various spatial scales in both Cartesian and spherical geometries. The kernels are derived in the frequency domain from Born scattering theory as the Fréchet derivatives of linearized full waveform data functionals, quantifying the influence of elastic earth model parameters on the particular waveform data values. As an important innovation, we keep two independent spatial descriptions of the earth model - one for solving the forward problem and one representing the inverted model updates. Thereby we account for the independent needs of spatial model resolution of forward and inverse problem, respectively. Due to pre-integration of the kernels over the (in general much coarser) inversion grid, storage requirements for the sensitivity kernels are dramatically reduced.ASKI can be flexibly extended to other forward codes by providing it with specific interface routines that contain knowledge about forward code-specific file formats and auxiliary information provided by the new forward code. In order to sustain flexibility, the ASKI tools must communicate via file output/input, thus large storage capacities need to be accessible in a convenient way. Storing the complete sensitivity matrix to file, however, permits the scientist full manual control over each step in a customized procedure of sensitivity/resolution analysis and full

  17. Validation of full-wave simulations for mode conversion of waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies with phase contrast imaging in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujii, N.; Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Edlund, E. M.; Ennever, P. C.; Lin, Y.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J.; Jaeger, E. F.; Green, D. L.; Harvey, R. W.

    2015-08-15

    Mode conversion of fast waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is known to result in current drive and flow drive under optimised conditions, which may be utilized to control plasma profiles and improve fusion plasma performance. To describe these processes accurately in a realistic toroidal geometry, numerical simulations are essential. Quantitative comparison of these simulations and the actual experimental measurements is important to validate their predictions and to evaluate their limitations. The phase contrast imaging (PCI) diagnostic has been used to directly detect the ICRF waves in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The measurements have been compared with full-wave simulations through a synthetic diagnostic technique. Recently, the frequency response of the PCI detector array on Alcator C-Mod was recalibrated, which greatly improved the comparison between the measurements and the simulations. In this study, mode converted waves for D-{sup 3}He and D-H plasmas with various ion species compositions were re-analyzed with the new calibration. For the minority heating cases, self-consistent electric fields and a minority ion distribution function were simulated by iterating a full-wave code and a Fokker-Planck code. The simulated mode converted wave intensity was in quite reasonable agreement with the measurements close to the antenna, but discrepancies remain for comparison at larger distances.

  18. Identifying Surface Water Content From Full-Wave Inversion of off-Ground Monostatic Ground-Penetrating Radar Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambot, S.; Weihermuller, L.; Huisman, J. A.; Vanclooster, M.; Slob, E. C.

    2005-12-01

    identifying the surface dielectric permittivity and water content from full-wave radar inversion, by focusing in the time domain on the surface wave reflection. Numerical experiments were performed to elucidate the physical limitations of the current surface reflection method and to investigate the well-posedness of the inverse scattering problem. Then, laboratory and field scale experiments were conducted to give insights into the sensitivity of signal inversion with respect to actual modeling and measurement errors. Finally, an experimental analysis was performed regarding the effect of soil surface roughness on the GPR signal.

  19. Integrated inversion using combined wave-equation tomography and full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haiyang; Singh, Satish C.; Calandra, Henri

    2014-07-01

    Wave-equation tomography (WT) and full waveform inversion (FWI) are combined through a hybrid misfit function to estimate high-resolution subsurface structures starting from a poorly constrained initial velocity model. Both methods share the same wavefield forward modelling and inversion schemes, while they differ only on the ways to calculate misfit functions and hence the ways to sample in the model space. Aiming at minimizing the cross-correlation phase delay between synthetic and real data, WT can be used to retrieve the long- and middle-wavelength model components, which are essential to FWI. Compared to ray-based traveltime tomography that is based on asymptotic high-frequency approximation, WT provides a better resolution by exploring the band-limited feature of seismic wavefield. On the other hand, FWI is capable of resolving the short-wavelength model component, complementing the WT. In this study, we apply WT to surface first-arrival refraction data, and apply FWI to both refraction and reflection data. We assign adaptive weights to the two different misfit measurements and build a progressive inversion strategy. To illustrate the advantage of our strategy over conventional `ray tomography + FWI' approach, we show in a synthetic lens test that WT can provide extra subsurface information that is critical for a successful FWI application. To further show the efficiency, we test our strategy on the 2-D Marmousi model where satisfactory inversion results are achieved without much manual intervention. Finally, we apply the inversion strategy to a deep-water seismic data set acquired offshore Sumatra with a 12-km-long streamer. In order to alleviate several practical problems posed by the deep-water setting, we apply downward continuation (DC) to generate a virtual ocean bottom experiment data set prior to inversion. The new geometry after DC boosts up the shallow refractions, as well as avoiding cumbersome modelling through the thick water column, thus

  20. 3D Microwave Imaging through Full Wave Methods for Heterogenous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Mengqing

    In this thesis, a 3D microwave imaging method is developed for a microwave imaging system with an arbitrary background medium. In the previous study on the breast cancer detection of our research group, a full wave inverse method, the Diagonal Tensor approximation combined with Born Iterative Method (DTA-BIM), was proposed to reconstruct the electrical profile of the inversion domain in a homogenous background medium and a layered background medium. In order to evaluate the performance of the DTA-BIM method in a realistic microwave imaging system, an experimental prototype of an active 3D microwave imaging system with scanning antennas is constructed. For the objects immersed in a homogenous background medium or a layered background medium, the inversion results based on the experimental data show that the resolution of the DTA-BIM method can reach finely to a quarter of wavelength of the background medium, and the system's signal-noise-ratio (SNR) requirement is 10 dB. However, the defects of this system make it difficult to be implemented in a realistic application. Thus, another active 3D microwave imaging system is proposed to overcome the problems of the previous system. The new system employs a fixed patch antenna array with electric switch to record the data. The antenna array introduces a non-canonical inhomogeneous background in the inversion system. The analytical Greens' functions employed in the original DTA-BIM method become unavailable. Thus, a modified DTA-BIM method, which use the numerical Green's functions combined with measured voltage, is proposed. This modified DTA-BIM method can be used to the inversion in a non-canonical inhomogeneous background with the measured voltages (or S 21 parameters). In order to verify the performance of this proposed inversion method, we investigate a prototype 3D microwave imaging system with a fixed antenna array. The inversion results from the synthetic data show that this method works well with a fixed antenna

  1. ISEE/ICE plasma wave data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenstadt, E. W.

    1989-01-01

    The work performed for the period 1 Jan. 1985 to 30 Oct. 1989 is presented. The objective was to provide reduction and analysis of data from a scientific instrument designed to study solar wind and plasma wave phenomena on the International Sun Earth Explorer 3 (ISEE-3)/International Cometary Explorer (ICE) missions.

  2. An Analysis of the Full-Floating Journal Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, M.C.; Nussdorfer, T.J.

    1947-01-01

    An analysis of the operating characteristics of a full-floating bearing - a bearing in which a floating sleeve is located between the journal and bearing surfaces - is presented together with charts - from which the performance of such bearings may be predicted. Examples are presented to illustrate the use of these charts and a limited number of experiments conducted upon a glass full-floating bearing to verify some results of the analysis are reported. The floating sleeve can operate over a wide range of speeds for a given shaft speed, the exact value depending principally upon the ratio of clearances and upon the ratio of radii of the bearing. Lower operating temperatures at high rotative speeds are to be expected by using a full-floating bearing. This lower operating temperature would be obtained at the expense of the load-carrying capacity of the bearing if, for comparison, the clearances remain the same in both bearings. A full-floating bearing having the same load capacity as a conventional journal bearing may be designed if decreased clearances are allowable.

  3. Wave analysis of the evolution of a single wave packet in supersonic boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yermolaev, Yury G.; Yatskikh, Aleksey A.; Kosinov, Alexander D.; Semionov, Nickolay V.

    2016-10-01

    The evolution of the artificial wave packet in laminar flat-plate boundary layer was experimentally studied by hot-wire measurements at M=2. The localized disturbances were generated by pulse glow discharge. The wave analysis of evolution of wave packet was provided. It was found, that the most unstable waves are oblique, that consistent with results of linear theory.

  4. Partial wave analysis using graphics processing units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Niklaus; Beijiang, Liu; Jike, Wang

    2010-04-01

    Partial wave analysis is an important tool for determining resonance properties in hadron spectroscopy. For large data samples however, the un-binned likelihood fits employed are computationally very expensive. At the Beijing Spectrometer (BES) III experiment, an increase in statistics compared to earlier experiments of up to two orders of magnitude is expected. In order to allow for a timely analysis of these datasets, additional computing power with short turnover times has to be made available. It turns out that graphics processing units (GPUs) originally developed for 3D computer games have an architecture of massively parallel single instruction multiple data floating point units that is almost ideally suited for the algorithms employed in partial wave analysis. We have implemented a framework for tensor manipulation and partial wave fits called GPUPWA. The user writes a program in pure C++ whilst the GPUPWA classes handle computations on the GPU, memory transfers, caching and other technical details. In conjunction with a recent graphics processor, the framework provides a speed-up of the partial wave fit by more than two orders of magnitude compared to legacy FORTRAN code.

  5. Analysis of critically refracted longitudinal waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Ning; Bond, Leonard J.

    2015-03-01

    Fabrication processes, such as, welding, forging, and rolling can induce residual stresses in metals that will impact product performance and phenomena such as cracking and corrosion. To better manage residual stress tools are needed to map their distribution. The critically refracted ultrasonic longitudinal (LCR) wave is one such approach that has been used for residual stress characterization. It has been shown to be sensitive to stress and less sensitive to the effects of the texture of the material. Although the LCR wave is increasingly widely applied, the factors that influence the formation of the LCR beam are seldom discussed. This paper reports a numerical model used to investigate the transducers' parameters that can contribute to the directionality of the LCR wave and hence enable performance optimization when used for industrial applications. An orthogonal test method is used to study the transducer parameters which influence the LCR wave beams. This method provides a design tool that can be used to study and optimize multiple parameter experiments and it can identify which parameter or parameters are of most significance. The simulation of the sound field in a 2-D "water-steel" model is obtained using a Spatial Fourier Analysis method. The effects of incident angle, standoff, the aperture and the center frequency of the transducer were studied. Results show that the aperture of the transducer, the center frequency and the incident angle are the most important factors in controlling the directivity of the resulting LCR wave fields.

  6. Analysis of critically refracted longitudinal waves

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, Ning Bond, Leonard J.

    2015-03-31

    Fabrication processes, such as, welding, forging, and rolling can induce residual stresses in metals that will impact product performance and phenomena such as cracking and corrosion. To better manage residual stress tools are needed to map their distribution. The critically refracted ultrasonic longitudinal (LCR) wave is one such approach that has been used for residual stress characterization. It has been shown to be sensitive to stress and less sensitive to the effects of the texture of the material. Although the LCR wave is increasingly widely applied, the factors that influence the formation of the LCR beam are seldom discussed. This paper reports a numerical model used to investigate the transducers' parameters that can contribute to the directionality of the LCR wave and hence enable performance optimization when used for industrial applications. An orthogonal test method is used to study the transducer parameters which influence the LCR wave beams. This method provides a design tool that can be used to study and optimize multiple parameter experiments and it can identify which parameter or parameters are of most significance. The simulation of the sound field in a 2-D 'water-steel' model is obtained using a Spatial Fourier Analysis method. The effects of incident angle, standoff, the aperture and the center frequency of the transducer were studied. Results show that the aperture of the transducer, the center frequency and the incident angle are the most important factors in controlling the directivity of the resulting LCR wave fields.

  7. Full wave simulations of fast wave efficiency and power losses in the scrape-off layer of tokamak plasmas in mid/high harmonic and minority heating regimes

    DOE PAGES

    Bertelli, N.; Jaeger, E. F.; Hosea, J. C.; ...

    2015-12-17

    Here, several experiments on different machines and in different fast wave (FW) heating regimes, such as hydrogen minority heating and high harmonic fast waves (HHFW), have found strong interaction between radio-frequency (RF) waves and the scrape-off layer (SOL) region. This paper examines the propagation and the power loss in the SOL by using the full wave code AORSA, in which the edge plasma beyond the last closed flux surface (LCFS) is included in the solution domain and a collisional damping parameter is used as a proxy to represent the real, and most likely nonlinear, damping processes. 2D and 3D AORSAmore » results for the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) have shown a strong transition to higher SOL power losses (driven by the RF field) when the FW cut-off is removed from in front of the antenna by increasing the edge density. Here, full wave simulations have been extended for 'conventional' tokamaks with higher aspect ratios, such as the DIII-D, Alcator C-Mod, and EAST devices. DIII-D results in HHFW regime show similar behavior found in NSTX and NSTX-U, consistent with previous DIII-D experimental observations. In contrast, a different behavior has been found for C-Mod and EAST, which operate in the minority heating regime.« less

  8. Full wave simulations of fast wave efficiency and power losses in the scrape-off layer of tokamak plasmas in mid/high harmonic and minority heating regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Bertelli, N.; Jaeger, E. F.; Hosea, J. C.; Phillips, C. K.; Berry, L.; Bonoli, P. T.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Green, D.; LeBlanc, B.; Perkins, R. J.; Qin, C. M.; Pinsker, R. I.; Prater, R.; Ryan, P. M.; Taylor, G.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, J. C.; Zhang, X. J.

    2015-12-17

    Here, several experiments on different machines and in different fast wave (FW) heating regimes, such as hydrogen minority heating and high harmonic fast waves (HHFW), have found strong interaction between radio-frequency (RF) waves and the scrape-off layer (SOL) region. This paper examines the propagation and the power loss in the SOL by using the full wave code AORSA, in which the edge plasma beyond the last closed flux surface (LCFS) is included in the solution domain and a collisional damping parameter is used as a proxy to represent the real, and most likely nonlinear, damping processes. 2D and 3D AORSA results for the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) have shown a strong transition to higher SOL power losses (driven by the RF field) when the FW cut-off is removed from in front of the antenna by increasing the edge density. Here, full wave simulations have been extended for 'conventional' tokamaks with higher aspect ratios, such as the DIII-D, Alcator C-Mod, and EAST devices. DIII-D results in HHFW regime show similar behavior found in NSTX and NSTX-U, consistent with previous DIII-D experimental observations. In contrast, a different behavior has been found for C-Mod and EAST, which operate in the minority heating regime.

  9. Full-Wave Tomographic and Moment Tensor Inversion Based on 3D Multigrid Strain Green’s Tensor Databases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-30

    105. Shen, Y., et al., 2013, Construction of a nested, global empirical Green’s tensor database, Seismological Society of America meeting, Salt...W. Zhang, 2010, Full-wave ambient noise tomography of the northern Cascadia, SSA meeting (abstract), Seismological Research Letters, 81, 300. Shen

  10. Self-consistent full-wave and Fokker-Planck calculations for ion cyclotron heating in non-Maxwellian plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, E. F.

    2005-10-01

    High-performance burning plasma devices such as ITER will contain significant concentrations of non-thermal plasma particles arising from fusion reactions, neutral beam injection, and wave-driven diffusion in velocity space. Initial studies in 1-D [1] and experimental results [2] show that non-thermal energetic ions can significantly alter wave propagation and absorption in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. In addition, these ions can absorb power at high harmonics of the cyclotron frequency where conventional 2-D global-wave models are not valid. In this work, the all-orders, full-wave solver AORSA [3] is generalized to treat non-Maxwellian velocity distributions. Quasi-linear diffusion coefficients are derived directly from the global wave fields and used to calculate the energetic ion velocity distribution with the CQL3D Fokker-Planck code [4]. Alternately, the quasi-linear coefficients can be calculated numerically by integrating the Lorentz force equations along particle orbits. Self-consistency between the wave electric field and resonant ion distribution function is achieved by iterating between the full-wave and Fokker-Planck solutions.[1] R. J. Dumont, C. K. Phillips and D. N. Smithe, Phys. Plasmas 12, 042508 (2005).[2] A. L. Rosenberg, J. E. Menard, J. R. Wilson, et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2441(2004).[3] E. F. Jaeger, L. A. Berry, J. R. Myra, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 195001-1 (2003).[4] R. W. Harvey and M. G. McCoy, in Proceedings of the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Advances in Simulation and Modeling of Thermonuclear Plasmas (IAEA, Montreal, 1992).

  11. Gradient Index Devices for the Full Control of Elastic Waves in Plates.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yabin; Torrent, Daniel; Pennec, Yan; Pan, Yongdong; Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram

    2016-04-14

    In this work, we present a method for the design of gradient index devices for elastic waves in plates. The method allows the design of devices to control the three fundamental modes, despite the fact that their dispersion relation is managed by different elastic constants. It is shown that by means of complex graded phononic crystals and thickness variations it is possible to independently design the three refractive indexes of these waves, allowing therefore their simultaneous control. The effective medium theory required for this purpose is presented, and the method is applied to the design of the Luneburg and Maxwell lenses as well as to the design of a flat gradient index lens. Finally, numerical simulations are used to demonstrate the performance of the method in a broadband frequency region.

  12. Full-wave iterative image reconstruction in photoacoustic tomography with acoustically inhomogeneous media.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao; Wang, Kun; Nie, Liming; Wang, Lihong V; Anastasio, Mark A

    2013-06-01

    Existing approaches to image reconstruction in photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) with acoustically heterogeneous media are limited to weakly varying media, are computationally burdensome, and/or cannot effectively mitigate the effects of measurement data incompleteness and noise. In this work, we develop and investigate a discrete imaging model for PACT that is based on the exact photoacoustic (PA) wave equation and facilitates the circumvention of these limitations. A key contribution of the work is the establishment of a procedure to implement a matched forward and backprojection operator pair associated with the discrete imaging model, which permits application of a wide-range of modern image reconstruction algorithms that can mitigate the effects of data incompleteness and noise. The forward and backprojection operators are based on the k-space pseudospectral method for computing numerical solutions to the PA wave equation in the time domain. The developed reconstruction methodology is investigated by use of both computer-simulated and experimental PACT measurement data.

  13. Gradient Index Devices for the Full Control of Elastic Waves in Plates

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yabin; Torrent, Daniel; Pennec, Yan; Pan, Yongdong; Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present a method for the design of gradient index devices for elastic waves in plates. The method allows the design of devices to control the three fundamental modes, despite the fact that their dispersion relation is managed by different elastic constants. It is shown that by means of complex graded phononic crystals and thickness variations it is possible to independently design the three refractive indexes of these waves, allowing therefore their simultaneous control. The effective medium theory required for this purpose is presented, and the method is applied to the design of the Luneburg and Maxwell lenses as well as to the design of a flat gradient index lens. Finally, numerical simulations are used to demonstrate the performance of the method in a broadband frequency region. PMID:27075601

  14. Full-wave simulations of ICRF heating regimes in toroidal plasma with non-Maxwellian distribution functions

    DOE PAGES

    Bertelli, N.; Valeo, E. J.; Green, D. L.; ...

    2017-04-03

    At the power levels required for significant heating and current drive in magnetically-confined toroidal plasma, modification of the particle distribution function from a Maxwellian shape is likely (Stix 1975 Nucl. Fusion 15 737), with consequent changes in wave propagation and in the location and amount of absorption. In order to study these effects computationally, both the finite-Larmor-radius and the high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW), versions of the full-wave, hot-plasma toroidal simulation code TORIC (Brambilla 1999 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 41 1 and Brambilla 2002 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 44 2423), have been extended to allow the prescription of arbitrary velocity distributionsmore » of the form f(v(parallel to), v(perpendicular to) , psi, theta). For hydrogen (H) minority heating of a deuterium (D) plasma with anisotropic Maxwellian H distributions, the fractional H absorption varies significantly with changes in parallel temperature but is essentially independent of perpendicular temperature. On the other hand, for HHFW regime with anisotropic Maxwellian fast ion distribution, the fractional beam ion absorption varies mainly with changes in the perpendicular temperature. The evaluation of the wave-field and power absorption, through the full wave solver, with the ion distribution function provided by either a Monte-Carlo particle and Fokker-Planck codes is also examined for Alcator C-Mod and NSTX plasmas. Non-Maxwellian effects generally tend to increase the absorption with respect to the equivalent Maxwellian distribution.« less

  15. Full-wave simulations of ICRF heating regimes in toroidal plasmas with non-Maxwellian distribution functions

    DOE Data Explorer

    Bertelli, N. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Valeo, E.J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Green, D.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gorelenkova, M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Phillips, C.K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Podesta, M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)] (ORCID:0000000349750585); Lee, J.P. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Wright, J.C. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Jaeger, E.F. [XCEL Engineering Inc., 1066 Commerce Park Drive, Oak Ridge, TN 37830, United States of America

    2017-05-01

    At the power levels required for significant heating and current drive in magnetically-confined toroidal plasma, modification of the particle distribution function from a Maxwellian shape is likely [T. H. Stix, Nucl. Fusion, 15 737 (1975)], with consequent changes in wave propagation and in the location and amount of absorption. In order to study these effects computationally, both the finite-Larmor-radius and the high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW), versions of the full-wave, hot-plasma toroidal simulation code TORIC [M. Brambilla, Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 41, 1 (1999) and M. Brambilla, Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 44, 2423 (2002)], have been extended to allow the prescription of arbitrary velocity distributions of the form f(v||, v_perp, psi , theta). For hydrogen (H) minority heating of a deuterium (D) plasma with anisotropic Maxwellian H distributions, the fractional H absorption varies significantly with changes in parallel temperature but is essentially independent of perpendicular temperature. On the other hand, for HHFW regime with anisotropic Maxwellian fast ion distribution, the fractional beam ion absorption varies mainly with changes in the perpendicular temperature. The evaluation of the wave-field and power absorption, through the full wave solver, with the ion distribution function provided by either aMonte-Carlo particle and Fokker-Planck codes is also examined for Alcator C-Mod and NSTX plasmas. Non-Maxwellian effects generally tends to increase the absorption with respect to the equivalent Maxwellian distribution.

  16. Full-wave simulations of ICRF heating regimes in toroidal plasma with non-Maxwellian distribution functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertelli, N.; Valeo, E. J.; Green, D. L.; Gorelenkova, M.; Phillips, C. K.; Podestà, M.; Lee, J. P.; Wright, J. C.; Jaeger, E. F.

    2017-05-01

    At the power levels required for significant heating and current drive in magnetically-confined toroidal plasma, modification of the particle distribution function from a Maxwellian shape is likely (Stix 1975 Nucl. Fusion 15 737), with consequent changes in wave propagation and in the location and amount of absorption. In order to study these effects computationally, both the finite-Larmor-radius and the high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW), versions of the full-wave, hot-plasma toroidal simulation code TORIC (Brambilla 1999 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 41 1 and Brambilla 2002 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 44 2423), have been extended to allow the prescription of arbitrary velocity distributions of the form f≤ft({{v}\\parallel},{{v}\\bot},\\psi,θ \\right) . For hydrogen (H) minority heating of a deuterium (D) plasma with anisotropic Maxwellian H distributions, the fractional H absorption varies significantly with changes in parallel temperature but is essentially independent of perpendicular temperature. On the other hand, for HHFW regime with anisotropic Maxwellian fast ion distribution, the fractional beam ion absorption varies mainly with changes in the perpendicular temperature. The evaluation of the wave-field and power absorption, through the full wave solver, with the ion distribution function provided by either a Monte-Carlo particle and Fokker-Planck codes is also examined for Alcator C-Mod and NSTX plasmas. Non-Maxwellian effects generally tend to increase the absorption with respect to the equivalent Maxwellian distribution.

  17. Full-wave Moment Tensor and Tomographic Inversions Based on 3D Strain Green Tensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-31

    comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS...finite-difference codes to GPU clusters should be relatively straightforward and inexpensive. This will significantly lower the costs of computational...33/PDF/hpcs.pdf), 2009. Bassin C, Laske G, Masters G. The current limits of resolution for surface wave tomography in North America, Eos Trans AGU

  18. All-Sky Search for Periodic Gravitational Waves in the Full S5 LIGO Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; hide

    2011-01-01

    We report on an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency band 50-800 Hz and with the frequency time derivative in the range of 0 through -6 x 10(exp -9) Hz/s. Such a signal could be produced by a nearby spinning and slightly non-axisymmetric isolated neutron star in our galaxy. After recent improvements in the search program that yielded a 10x increase in computational efficiency, we have searched in two years of data. collected during LIGO's fifth science run and have obtained the most sensitive all-sky upper limits on gravitational wave strain to date. Near 150 Hz our upper limit on worst-case linearly polarized strain amplitude h(sub 0) is 1 x 10(exp -24), while at the high end of our frequency ra.nge we achieve a worst-case upper limit of 3.8 x 10(exp -24) for all polarizations and sky locations. These results constitute a factor of two improvement upop. previously published data. A new detection pipeline utilizing a Loosely Coherent algorithm was able to follow up weaker outliers, increasing the volume of space where signals can be detected by a factor of 10, but has not revealed any gravitational wave signals. The pipeline has been tested for robustness with respect to deviations from the model of an isolated neutron star, such as caused by a low-mass or long.period binary companion.

  19. All-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the full S5 LIGO data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G. S.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Amin, R. S.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M. C.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atkinson, D.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Basti, A.; Batch, J.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Bebronne, M.; Behnke, B.; Beker, M. G.; Bell, A. S.; Belletoile, A.; Belopolski, I.; Benacquista, M.; Berliner, J. M.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beveridge, N.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biswas, R.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bogan, C.; Bondarescu, R.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Bouhou, B.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brummit, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burguet–Castell, J.; Burmeister, O.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chaibi, O.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chalkley, E.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H.; Christensen, N.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, D. E.; Clark, J.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colacino, C. N.; Colas, J.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Conte, A.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M.; Coulon, J.-P.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Cutler, R. M.; Dahl, K.; Danilishin, S. L.; Dannenberg, R.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; de Rosa, R.; Debra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Del Pozzo, W.; Del Prete, M.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; Derosa, R.; Desalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; di Fiore, L.; Diguglielmo, J.; di Lieto, A.; di Palma, I.; di Paolo Emilio, M.; di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Dorsher, S.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Endrőczi, G.; Engel, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, K.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, Y.; Farr, B. F.; Farr, W.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Flanigan, M.; Foley, S.; Forsi, E.; Forte, L. A.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franc, J.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P. J.; Fyffe, M.; Galimberti, M.; Gammaitoni, L.; Ganija, M. R.; Garcia, J.; Garofoli, J. A.; Garufi, F.; Gáspár, M. E.; Gemme, G.; Geng, R.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. Á.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, C.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L. M.; González, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Gray, N.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Greverie, C.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gupta, R.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Ha, T.; Hage, B.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hartman, M. T.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Hayau, J.-F.; Hayler, T.; Heefner, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hendry, M. A.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Herrera, V.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Hong, T.; Hooper, S.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; Jang, H.; Jaranowski, P.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kamaretsos, I.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Keresztes, Z.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, B.; Kim, C.; Kim, D.; Kim, H.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, P. J.; Kinsey, M.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R.; Koranda, S.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D.; Kringel, V.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, R.; Kwee, P.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Lang, M.; Lantz, B.; Lastzka, N.; Lawrie, C.; Lazzarini, A.; Leaci, P.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. M.; Leindecker, N.; Leong, J. R.; Leonor, I.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Li, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Liguori, N.; Lindquist, P. E.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lodhia, D.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Luan, J.; Lubinski, M.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; MacDonald, E.; Machenschalk, B.; Macinnis, M.; MacLeod, D. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mantovani, M.; Marandi, A.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McKechan, D. J. A.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meier, T.; Melatos, A.; Melissinos, A. C.; Mendell, G.; Menendez, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Minenkov, Y.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Miyakawa, O.; Moe, B.; Moesta, P.; Mohan, M.; Mohanty, S. D.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morgado, N.; Morgia, A.; Mori, T.; Mosca, S.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nash, T.; Naticchioni, L.; Nawrodt, R.; Necula, V.; Nelson, J.; Newton, G.; Nishizawa, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Nuttall, L.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Oldenburg, R. G.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Page, A.; Pagliaroli, G.; Palladino, L.; Palomba, C.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Paoletti, F.; Papa, M. A.; Parisi, M.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patel, P.; Pedraza, M.; Peiris, P.; Pekowsky, L.; Penn, S.; Peralta, C.; Perreca, A.; Persichetti, G.; Phelps, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pietka, M.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Plissi, M. V.; Poggiani, R.; Pöld, J.; Postiglione, F.; Prato, M.; Predoi, V.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Rácz, I.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramet, C. R.; Rankins, B.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Re, V.; Redwine, K.; Reed, C. M.; Reed, T.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ricci, F.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinet, F.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Rocchi, A.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, C.; Rodruck, M.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Röver, C.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Ryll, H.; Sainathan, P.; Sakosky, M.; Salemi, F.; Samblowski, A.; Sammut, L.; Sancho de La Jordana, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sankar, S.; Sannibale, V.; Santamaría, L.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Santostasi, G.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sato, S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R. L.; Schilling, R.; Schlamminger, S.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schulz, B.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Searle, A. C.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sibley, A.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Sintes, A. M.; Skelton, G.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Somiya, K.; Sorazu, B.; Soto, J.; Speirits, F. C.; Sperandio, L.; Stefszky, M.; Stein, A. J.; Steinert, E.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steplewski, S.; Stochino, A.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S.; Stroeer, A. S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sung, M.; Susmithan, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Tacca, M.; Taffarello, L.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, J. R.; Taylor, R.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Thüring, A.; Titsler, C.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toncelli, A.; Tonelli, M.; Torre, O.; Torres, C.; Torrie, C. I.; Tournefier, E.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trias, M.; Tseng, K.; Ugolini, D.; Urbanek, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; van den Broeck, C.; van der Putten, S.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vavoulidis, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Veltkamp, C.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Villar, A. E.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vitale, S.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Wan, Y.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Wanner, A.; Ward, R. L.; Was, M.; Wei, P.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wen, S.; Wessels, P.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, H. R.; Williams, L.; Willke, B.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Yang, H.; Yeaton-Massey, D.; Yoshida, S.; Yu, P.; Yvert, M.; Zadroźny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.

    2012-01-01

    We report on an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency band 50-800 Hz and with the frequency time derivative in the range of 0 through -6×10-9Hz/s. Such a signal could be produced by a nearby spinning and slightly nonaxisymmetric isolated neutron star in our Galaxy. After recent improvements in the search program that yielded a 10× increase in computational efficiency, we have searched in two years of data collected during LIGO’s fifth science run and have obtained the most sensitive all-sky upper limits on gravitational-wave strain to date. Near 150 Hz our upper limit on worst-case linearly polarized strain amplitude h0 is 1×10-24, while at the high end of our frequency range we achieve a worst-case upper limit of 3.8×10-24 for all polarizations and sky locations. These results constitute a factor of 2 improvement upon previously published data. A new detection pipeline utilizing a loosely coherent algorithm was able to follow up weaker outliers, increasing the volume of space where signals can be detected by a factor of 10, but has not revealed any gravitational-wave signals. The pipeline has been tested for robustness with respect to deviations from the model of an isolated neutron star, such as caused by a low-mass or long-period binary companion.

  20. Full 3D dispersion curve solutions for guided waves in generally anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernando Quintanilla, F.; Lowe, M. J. S.; Craster, R. V.

    2016-02-01

    Dispersion curves of guided waves provide valuable information about the physical and elastic properties of waves propagating within a given waveguide structure. Algorithms to accurately compute these curves are an essential tool for engineers working in non-destructive evaluation and for scientists studying wave phenomena. Dispersion curves are typically computed for low or zero attenuation and presented in two or three dimensional plots. The former do not always provide a clear and complete picture of the dispersion loci and the latter are very difficult to obtain when high values of attenuation are involved and arbitrary anisotropy is considered in single or multi-layered systems. As a consequence, drawing correct and reliable conclusions is a challenging task in the modern applications that often utilize multi-layered anisotropic viscoelastic materials. These challenges are overcome here by using a spectral collocation method (SCM) to robustly find dispersion curves in the most complicated cases of high attenuation and arbitrary anisotropy. Solutions are then plotted in three-dimensional frequency-complex wavenumber space, thus gaining much deeper insight into the nature of these problems. The cases studied range from classical examples, which validate this approach, to new ones involving materials up to the most general triclinic class for both flat and cylindrical geometry in multi-layered systems. The apparent crossing of modes within the same symmetry family in viscoelastic media is also explained and clarified by the results. Finally, the consequences of the centre of symmetry, present in every crystal class, on the solutions are discussed.

  1. Acoustic Emission and Guided Wave Monitoring of Fatigue Crack Growth on a Full Pipe Specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Watson, Bruce E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2011-05-06

    Continuous on-line monitoring of active and passive systems, structures and components in nuclear power plants will be critical to extending the lifetimes of nuclear power plants in the US beyond 60 years. Acoustic emission and guided ultrasonic waves are two tools for continuously monitoring passive systems, structures and components within nuclear power plants and are the focus of this study. These tools are used to monitor fatigue damage induced in a SA 312 TP304 stainless steel pipe specimen. The results of acoustic emission monitoring indicate that crack propagation signals were not directly detected. However, acoustic emission monitoring exposed crack formation prior to visual confirmation through the detection of signals caused by crack closure friction. The results of guided ultrasonic wave monitoring indicate that this technology is sensitive to the presence and size of cracks. The sensitivity and complexity of GUW signals is observed to vary with respect to signal frequency and path traveled by the guided ultrasonic wave relative to the crack orientation.

  2. Comparative dynamic analysis of the full Grossman model.

    PubMed

    Ried, W

    1998-08-01

    The paper applies the method of comparative dynamic analysis to the full Grossman model. For a particular class of solutions, it derives the equations implicitly defining the complete trajectories of the endogenous variables. Relying on the concept of Frisch decision functions, the impact of any parametric change on an endogenous variable can be decomposed into a direct and an indirect effect. The focus of the paper is on marginal changes in the rate of health capital depreciation. It also analyses the impact of either initial financial wealth or the initial stock of health capital. While the direction of most effects remains ambiguous in the full model, the assumption of a zero consumption benefit of health is sufficient to obtain a definite for any direct or indirect effect.

  3. Bayesian analysis on gravitational waves and exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xihao

    Attempts to detect gravitational waves using a pulsar timing array (PTA), i.e., a collection of pulsars in our Galaxy, have become more organized over the last several years. PTAs act to detect gravitational waves generated from very distant sources by observing the small and correlated effect the waves have on pulse arrival times at the Earth. In this thesis, I present advanced Bayesian analysis methods that can be used to search for gravitational waves in pulsar timing data. These methods were also applied to analyze a set of radial velocity (RV) data collected by the Hobby- Eberly Telescope on observing a K0 giant star. They confirmed the presence of two Jupiter mass planets around a K0 giant star and also characterized the stellar p-mode oscillation. The first part of the thesis investigates the effect of wavefront curvature on a pulsar's response to a gravitational wave. In it we show that we can assume the gravitational wave phasefront is planar across the array only if the source luminosity distance " 2piL2/lambda, where L is the pulsar distance to the Earth (˜ kpc) and lambda is the radiation wavelength (˜ pc) in the PTA waveband. Correspondingly, for a point gravitational wave source closer than ˜ 100 Mpc, we should take into account the effect of wavefront curvature across the pulsar-Earth line of sight, which depends on the luminosity distance to the source, when evaluating the pulsar timing response. As a consequence, if a PTA can detect a gravitational wave from a source closer than ˜ 100 Mpc, the effects of wavefront curvature on the response allows us to determine the source luminosity distance. The second and third parts of the thesis propose a new analysis method based on Bayesian nonparametric regression to search for gravitational wave bursts and a gravitational wave background in PTA data. Unlike the conventional Bayesian analysis that introduces a signal model with a fixed number of parameters, Bayesian nonparametric regression sets

  4. Analysis and Optimization of "Full-Length" Diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, Alfred

    2012-01-19

    A method of analyzing the axial variation of the heat generation rate, temperature, voltage, current density and emitter heat flux in a thermionic converter is described. The method is particularly useful for the case of "long" diodes, each extending over the full length of the reactor core. For a given diode geometry and fuel distribution, the analysis combines a nuclear solution of the axial fission density profile with the iterative solution of four differential equations representing the thermal, electrical, and thermionic interactions within the diode. The digital computer program developed to solve these equations can also perform a design optimization with respect to lead resistance, load voltage, and emitter thickness, for a specified maximum emitter temperature. Typical results are presented, and the use of this analysis for predicting the diode operating characteristics is illustrated.

  5. Specialty and Full-Service Hospitals: A Comparative Cost Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Kathleen; Burgess, James F; Young, Gary J

    2008-01-01

    Objective To compare the costs of physician-owned cardiac, orthopedic, and surgical single specialty hospitals with those of full-service hospital competitors. Data Sources The primary data sources are the Medicare Cost Reports for 1998–2004 and hospital inpatient discharge data for three of the states where single specialty hospitals are most prevalent, Texas, California, and Arizona. The latter were obtained from the Texas Department of State Health Services, the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development, and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project. Additional data comes from the American Hospital Association Annual Survey Database. Study Design We identified all physician-owned cardiac, orthopedic, and surgical specialty hospitals in these three states as well as all full-service acute care hospitals serving the same market areas, defined using Dartmouth Hospital Referral Regions. We estimated a hospital cost function using stochastic frontier regression analysis, and generated hospital specific inefficiency measures. Application of t-tests of significance compared the inefficiency measures of specialty hospitals with those of full-service hospitals to make general comparisons between these classes of hospitals. Principal Findings Results do not provide evidence that specialty hospitals are more efficient than the full-service hospitals with whom they compete. In particular, orthopedic and surgical specialty hospitals appear to have significantly higher levels of cost inefficiency. Cardiac hospitals, however, do not appear to be different from competitors in this respect. Conclusions Policymakers should not embrace the assumption that physician-owned specialty hospitals produce patient care more efficiently than their full-service hospital competitors. PMID:18662170

  6. Full-spectrum analysis of natural gamma-ray spectra.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, P H; Limburg, J; de Meijer, R J

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, a new system to measure natural gamma-radiation in situ will be presented. This system combines a high-efficiency BGO scintillation detector with full-spectrum data analysis (FSA). This technique uses the (nearly) full spectral shape and the so-called 'standard spectra' to calculate the activity concentrations of 40K, 232Th and 238U present in a geological matrix (sediment, rock, etc.). We describe the FSA and the determination of the standard spectra. Standard spectra are constructed for various geometries and a comparison in intensity and shape will be made. The performance of such a system has been compared to a more traditional system, consisting of a NaI detector in combination with the 'windows' analysis. For count rates typically encountered in field experiments, the same accuracy is obtained 10-20 times faster using the new system. This allows for shorter integration times and hence shorter measurements or a better spatial resolution. The applicability of such a system will be illustrated via an example of an airborne experiment in which the new system produced results comparable to those of much larger traditional systems. This paper will conclude with a discussion of the current status of the system and an outlook for future research.

  7. Terrestrial detector for low-frequency gravitational waves based on full tensor measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paik, H. J.; Moody, M. V.; Griggs, C. E.; Lee, H. M.; Majorana, E.

    2016-05-01

    Two serious obstacles in constructing terrestrial gravitational wave (GW) detectors that can resolve low-frequency signals (≤ 10 Hz) are seismic and Newtonian noises. Here we describe a new detector concept by adopting new measurement techniques and configurations to overcome the present low-frequency barrier due to these noises. Six magnetically levitated superconducting test masses, widely separated along three orthogonal axes, each with three degrees of freedom, constitute a tensor GW detector. The tensor outputs could be combined to better reject the Newtonian noise. Unlike current two-dimensional detectors, a single tensor detector is able to determine the polarization of GWs and the direction to sources on its own.

  8. Microbial community analysis of a full-scale DEMON bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Martinez, Alejandro; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Alejandro; Muñoz-Palazon, Barbara; Garcia-Ruiz, Maria-Jesus; Osorio, Francisco; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Gonzalez-Lopez, Jesus

    2015-03-01

    Full-scale applications of autotrophic nitrogen removal technologies for the treatment of digested sludge liquor have proliferated during the last decade. Among these technologies, the aerobic/anoxic deammonification process (DEMON) is one of the major applied processes. This technology achieves nitrogen removal from wastewater through anammox metabolism inside a single bioreactor due to alternating cycles of aeration. To date, microbial community composition of full-scale DEMON bioreactors have never been reported. In this study, bacterial community structure of a full-scale DEMON bioreactor located at the Apeldoorn wastewater treatment plant was analyzed using pyrosequencing. This technique provided a higher-resolution study of the bacterial assemblage of the system compared to other techniques used in lab-scale DEMON bioreactors. Results showed that the DEMON bioreactor was a complex ecosystem where ammonium oxidizing bacteria, anammox bacteria and many other bacterial phylotypes coexist. The potential ecological role of all phylotypes found was discussed. Thus, metagenomic analysis through pyrosequencing offered new perspectives over the functioning of the DEMON bioreactor by exhaustive identification of microorganisms, which play a key role in the performance of bioreactors. In this way, pyrosequencing has been proven as a helpful tool for the in-depth investigation of the functioning of bioreactors at microbiological scale.

  9. Wave energy budget analysis in the Earth's radiation belts uncovers a missing energy.

    PubMed

    Artemyev, A V; Agapitov, O V; Mourenas, D; Krasnoselskikh, V V; Mozer, F S

    2015-05-15

    Whistler-mode emissions are important electromagnetic waves pervasive in the Earth's magnetosphere, where they continuously remove or energize electrons trapped by the geomagnetic field, controlling radiation hazards to satellites and astronauts and the upper-atmosphere ionization or chemical composition. Here, we report an analysis of 10-year Cluster data, statistically evaluating the full wave energy budget in the Earth's magnetosphere, revealing that a significant fraction of the energy corresponds to hitherto generally neglected very oblique waves. Such waves, with 10 times smaller magnetic power than parallel waves, typically have similar total energy. Moreover, they carry up to 80% of the wave energy involved in wave-particle resonant interactions. It implies that electron heating and precipitation into the atmosphere may have been significantly under/over-valued in past studies considering only conventional quasi-parallel waves. Very oblique waves may turn out to be a crucial agent of energy redistribution in the Earth's radiation belts, controlled by solar activity.

  10. Shape optimization of solid-air porous phononic crystal slabs with widest full 3D bandgap for in-plane acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alessandro, Luca; Bahr, Bichoy; Daniel, Luca; Weinstein, Dana; Ardito, Raffaele

    2017-09-01

    The use of Phononic Crystals (PnCs) as smart materials in structures and microstructures is growing due to their tunable dynamical properties and to the wide range of possible applications. PnCs are periodic structures that exhibit elastic wave scattering for a certain band of frequencies (called bandgap), depending on the geometric and material properties of the fundamental unit cell of the crystal. PnCs slabs can be represented by plane-extruded structures composed of a single material with periodic perforations. Such a configuration is very interesting, especially in Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems industry, due to the easy fabrication procedure. A lot of topologies can be found in the literature for PnCs with square-symmetric unit cell that exhibit complete 2D bandgaps; however, due to the application demand, it is desirable to find the best topologies in order to guarantee full bandgaps referred to in-plane wave propagation in the complete 3D structure. In this work, by means of a novel and fast implementation of the Bidirectional Evolutionary Structural Optimization technique, shape optimization is conducted on the hole shape obtaining several topologies, also with non-square-symmetric unit cell, endowed with complete 3D full bandgaps for in-plane waves. Model order reduction technique is adopted to reduce the computational time in the wave dispersion analysis. The 3D features of the PnC unit cell endowed with the widest full bandgap are then completely analyzed, paying attention to engineering design issues.

  11. Full-Wave Iterative Image Reconstruction in Photoacoustic Tomography With Acoustically Inhomogeneous Media

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chao; Wang, Kun; Nie, Liming; Wang, Lihong V.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Existing approaches to image reconstruction in photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) with acoustically heterogeneous media are limited to weakly varying media, are computationally burdensome, and/or cannot effectively mitigate the effects of measurement data incompleteness and noise. In this work, we develop and investigate a discrete imaging model for PACT that is based on the exact photoacoustic (PA) wave equation and facilitates the circumvention of these limitations. A key contribution of the work is the establishment of a procedure to implement a matched forward and backprojection operator pair associated with the discrete imaging model, which permits application of a wide-range of modern image reconstruction algorithms that can mitigate the effects of data incompleteness and noise. The forward and backprojection operators are based on the k-space pseudospectral method for computing numerical solutions to the PA wave equation in the time domain. The developed reconstruction methodology is investigated by use of both computer-simulated and experimental PACT measurement data. PMID:23529196

  12. Review article: Wave analysis methods for space plasma experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, Yasuhito

    2017-05-01

    A review of analysis methods is given on quasi-monochromatic waves, turbulent fluctuations, and wave-wave and wave-particle interactions for single-spacecraft data in situ in near-Earth space and interplanetary space, in particular using magnetic field and electric field data. Energy spectra for different components of the fluctuating fields, minimum variance analysis, propagation and polarization properties of electromagnetic waves, wave distribution function, helicity quantities, higher-order statistics, and detection methods for wave-particle interactions are explained.

  13. Characterization of guided acoustic waves in an arbitrary direction with full-field instantaneous maps of the acoustic displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luís Deán-Ben, X.; Trillo, Cristina; Doval, Ángel F.; Fernández, José L.

    2012-08-01

    The full-field optical measurement of guided acoustic waves presents important advantages derived from the capability to map the acoustic field in a two dimensional region, so that acoustic information over a large area can be retrieved with each measurement. In this work, we introduce an extension of the well-established two dimensional spatio-temporal Fourier transform method to calculate the frequency spectrum of guided acoustic waves. For this, we take advantage of the unique capability of a self-developed double-pulsed television holography system to acquire the acoustic displacement field in two spatial dimensions and time. Then, the spatio-temporal Fourier transform method is expanded to three dimensions according to the nature of the experimental data, so that the frequency spectrum of the waves propagating in an arbitrary direction can be calculated. The method is tested experimentally by generating narrowband Lamb waves in an aluminium plate with a piezoelectric transducer. The good agreement between the theoretical and experimental spectra in a broad zone anticipates the applicability of the method to characterize guided acoustic waves as a function of the propagation direction in materials or structures presenting anisotropic propagation behaviour.

  14. Full-motion video analysis for improved gender classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flora, Jeffrey B.; Lochtefeld, Darrell F.; Iftekharuddin, Khan M.

    2014-06-01

    The ability of computer systems to perform gender classification using the dynamic motion of the human subject has important applications in medicine, human factors, and human-computer interface systems. Previous works in motion analysis have used data from sensors (including gyroscopes, accelerometers, and force plates), radar signatures, and video. However, full-motion video, motion capture, range data provides a higher resolution time and spatial dataset for the analysis of dynamic motion. Works using motion capture data have been limited by small datasets in a controlled environment. In this paper, we explore machine learning techniques to a new dataset that has a larger number of subjects. Additionally, these subjects move unrestricted through a capture volume, representing a more realistic, less controlled environment. We conclude that existing linear classification methods are insufficient for the gender classification for larger dataset captured in relatively uncontrolled environment. A method based on a nonlinear support vector machine classifier is proposed to obtain gender classification for the larger dataset. In experimental testing with a dataset consisting of 98 trials (49 subjects, 2 trials per subject), classification rates using leave-one-out cross-validation are improved from 73% using linear discriminant analysis to 88% using the nonlinear support vector machine classifier.

  15. Full-wave simulation of a three-dimensional metamaterial prism

    SciTech Connect

    Basilio, Lorena I.; Langston, William L.; Warne, Larry K.; Johnson, William A.; Sinclair, Michael B.

    2015-01-23

    In our article, a negative-index metamaterial prism based on a composite unit cell containing a split-ring resonator and a z-dipole is designed and simulated. The design approach combines simulations of a single unit cell to identify the appropriate cell design (yielding the desired negative-index behavior) together with subcell modeling (which simplifies the mesh representation of the resonator geometry and allows for a larger number of resonator cells to be handled). Furthermore, to describe the methodology used in designing a n = -1 refractive index prism, our results include the effective-medium parameters, the far-field scattered patterns, and the near-zone field distributions corresponding to a normally incident plane-wave excitation of the prism.

  16. A full-wave solver of the Maxwell's equations in 3D cold plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovich, P.; Cooper, W. A.; Villard, L.

    2006-08-01

    A new solver for Maxwell's equations in three-dimensional (3D) plasma configurations is presented. The new code LEMan ( Low-frequency Electro Magnetic w ave propagatio n) determines a global solution of the wave equation in a realistic stellarator geometry at low frequencies. The code is aimed at the applications with relatively small computational resources and is very efficient in the Alfvén frequency range. In the present work, the cold plasma model is implemented. Finite elements are applied for the radial discretization and the spectral representation is used for the poloidal and toroidal angles. Special care is taken to avoid the numerical pollution of the spectrum as well as to ensure the energy conservation. The numerical scheme and the convergence properties are discussed. Several benchmarks and results in different geometries are presented.

  17. Full-wave simulation of a three-dimensional metamaterial prism

    DOE PAGES

    Basilio, Lorena I.; Langston, William L.; Warne, Larry K.; ...

    2015-01-23

    In our article, a negative-index metamaterial prism based on a composite unit cell containing a split-ring resonator and a z-dipole is designed and simulated. The design approach combines simulations of a single unit cell to identify the appropriate cell design (yielding the desired negative-index behavior) together with subcell modeling (which simplifies the mesh representation of the resonator geometry and allows for a larger number of resonator cells to be handled). Furthermore, to describe the methodology used in designing a n = -1 refractive index prism, our results include the effective-medium parameters, the far-field scattered patterns, and the near-zone field distributionsmore » corresponding to a normally incident plane-wave excitation of the prism.« less

  18. Novel wave power analysis linking pressure-flow waves, wave potential, and the forward and backward components of hydraulic power.

    PubMed

    Mynard, Jonathan P; Smolich, Joseph J

    2016-04-15

    Wave intensity analysis provides detailed insights into factors influencing hemodynamics. However, wave intensity is not a conserved quantity, so it is sensitive to diameter variations and is not distributed among branches of a junction. Moreover, the fundamental relation between waves and hydraulic power is unclear. We, therefore, propose an alternative to wave intensity called "wave power," calculated via incremental changes in pressure and flow (dPdQ) and a novel time-domain separation of hydraulic pressure power and kinetic power into forward and backward wave-related components (ΠP±and ΠQ±). Wave power has several useful properties:1) it is obtained directly from flow measurements, without requiring further calculation of velocity;2) it is a quasi-conserved quantity that may be used to study the relative distribution of waves at junctions; and3) it has the units of power (Watts). We also uncover a simple relationship between wave power and changes in ΠP±and show that wave reflection reduces transmitted power. Absolute values of ΠP±represent wave potential, a recently introduced concept that unifies steady and pulsatile aspects of hemodynamics. We show that wave potential represents the hydraulic energy potential stored in a compliant pressurized vessel, with spatial gradients producing waves that transfer this energy. These techniques and principles are verified numerically and also experimentally with pressure/flow measurements in all branches of a central bifurcation in sheep, under a wide range of hemodynamic conditions. The proposed "wave power analysis," encompassing wave power, wave potential, and wave separation of hydraulic power provides a potent time-domain approach for analyzing hemodynamics. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Full Transcriptome Analysis of Early Dorsoventral Patterning in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Horváth, Balázs; Molnár, János; Nagy, István; Tóth, Gábor; Wilson, Stephen W.; Varga, Máté

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the molecular interactions that lead to the establishment of the major body axes during embryogenesis is one of the main goals of developmental biology. Although the past two decades have revolutionized our knowledge about the genetic basis of these patterning processes, the list of genes involved in axis formation is unlikely to be complete. In order to identify new genes involved in the establishment of the dorsoventral (DV) axis during early stages of zebrafish embryonic development, we employed next generation sequencing for full transcriptome analysis of normal embryos and embryos lacking overt DV pattern. A combination of different statistical approaches yielded 41 differentially expressed candidate genes and we confirmed by in situ hybridization the early dorsal expression of 32 genes that are transcribed shortly after the onset of zygotic transcription. Although promoter analysis of the validated genes suggests no general enrichment for the binding sites of early acting transcription factors, most of these genes carry “bivalent” epigenetic histone modifications at the time when zygotic transcription is initiated, suggesting a “poised” transcriptional status. Our results reveal some new candidates of the dorsal gene regulatory network and suggest that a plurality of the earliest upregulated genes on the dorsal side have a role in the modulation of the canonical Wnt pathway. PMID:23922899

  20. Physical optics and full-wave simulations of transmission of electromagnetic fields through electrically large planar meta-sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öziş, Ezgi; Osipov, Andrey V.; Eibert, Thomas F.

    2017-09-01

    Ultra-thin metamaterials, called meta-surfaces or meta-sheets, open up new opportunities in designing microwave radomes, including an improved transmission over a broader range of antenna scan angles, tailorable and reconfigurable frequency bands, polarization transformations, one-way transmission and switching ability. The smallness of the unit cells combined with the large electrical size of microwave radomes significantly complicates full-wave numerical simulations as a very fine sampling over an electrically large area is required. Physical optics (PO) can be used to approximately describe transmission through the radome in terms of the homogenized transmission coefficient of the radome wall. This paper presents the results of numerical simulations of electromagnetic transmission through planar meta-sheets (infinite and circularly shaped) obtained by using a full-wave electromagnetic field simulator and a PO-based solution.

  1. Induced P-wave superfluidity within the full energy- and momentum-dependent Eliashberg approximation in asymmetric dilute Fermi gases

    SciTech Connect

    Bulgac, Aurel; Yoon, Sukjin

    2009-05-15

    We consider a very asymmetric system of fermions with an interaction characterized by a positive scattering length only. The minority atoms pair and form a Bose-Einstein condensate of dimers, while the surplus fermions interact only indirectly through the exchange of Bogoliubov sound modes. This interaction has a finite range, the retardation effects are significant, and the surplus fermions will form a P-wave superfluid. We compute the P-wave pairing gap in the BCS and Eliashberg approximations with only energy-dependence approximations, and demonstrate their inadequacy in comparison with a full treatment of the momentum and energy dependence of the induced interaction. The pairing gap computed with a full momentum and energy dependence is significantly larger in magnitude, and that makes it more likely that this new exotic paired phase could be put in evidence in atomic trap experiments.

  2. A four-diode full-wave ionic current rectifier based on bipolar membranes: overcoming the limit of electrode capacity.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsson, Erik O; Janson, Per; Tybrandt, Klas; Simon, Daniel T; Berggren, Magnus

    2014-08-13

    Full-wave rectification of ionic currents is obtained by constructing the typical four-diode bridge out of ion conducting bipolar membranes. Together with conjugated polymer electrodes addressed with alternating current, the bridge allows for generation of a controlled ionic direct current for extended periods of time without the production of toxic species or gas typically arising from electrode side-reactions. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SHALLOW WATER WAVES: LINEAR ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Heng, Kevin; Spitkovsky, Anatoly E-mail: anatoly@astro.princeton.ed

    2009-10-01

    We present a linear analysis of inviscid, incompressible, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shallow water systems. In spherical geometry, a generic property of such systems is the existence of five wave modes. Three of them (two magneto-Poincare modes and one magneto-Rossby mode) are previously known. The other two wave modes are strongly influenced by the magnetic field and rotation, and have substantially lower angular frequencies; as such, we term them 'magnetostrophic modes'. We obtain analytical functions for the velocity, height, and magnetic field perturbations in the limit that the magnitude of the MHD analogue of Lamb's parameter is large. On a sphere, the magnetostrophic modes reside near the poles, while the other modes are equatorially confined. Magnetostrophic modes may be an ingredient in explaining the frequency drifts observed in Type I X-ray bursts from neutron stars.

  4. A phase-plane analysis of localized frictional waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putelat, T.; Dawes, J. H. P.; Champneys, A. R.

    2017-07-01

    Sliding frictional interfaces at a range of length scales are observed to generate travelling waves; these are considered relevant, for example, to both earthquake ground surface movements and the performance of mechanical brakes and dampers. We propose an explanation of the origins of these waves through the study of an idealized mechanical model: a thin elastic plate subject to uniform shear stress held in frictional contact with a rigid flat surface. We construct a nonlinear wave equation for the deformation of the plate, and couple it to a spinodal rate-and-state friction law which leads to a mathematically well-posed problem that is capable of capturing many effects not accessible in a Coulomb friction model. Our model sustains a rich variety of solutions, including periodic stick-slip wave trains, isolated slip and stick pulses, and detachment and attachment fronts. Analytical and numerical bifurcation analysis is used to show how these states are organized in a two-parameter state diagram. We discuss briefly the possible physical interpretation of each of these states, and remark also that our spinodal friction law, though more complicated than other classical rate-and-state laws, is required in order to capture the full richness of wave types.

  5. Full Waveform Inversion of Diving & Reflected Waves based on Scale Separation for Velocity and Impedance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brossier, Romain; Zhou, Wei; Operto, Stéphane; Virieux, Jean

    2015-04-01

    Full Waveform Inversion (FWI) is an appealing method for quantitative high-resolution subsurface imaging (Virieux et al., 2009). For crustal-scales exploration from surface seismic, FWI generally succeeds in recovering a broadband of wavenumbers in the shallow part of the targeted medium taking advantage of the broad scattering-angle provided by both reflected and diving waves. In contrast, deeper targets are often only illuminated by short-spread reflections, which favor the reconstruction of the short wavelengths at the expense of the longer ones, leading to a possible notch in the intermediate part of the wavenumber spectrum. To update the velocity macromodel from reflection data, image-domain strategies (e.g., Symes & Carazzone, 1991) aim to maximize a semblance criterion in the migrated domain. Alternatively, recent data-domain strategies (e.g., Xu et al., 2012, Ma & Hale, 2013, Brossier et al., 2014), called Reflection FWI (RFWI), inspired by Chavent et al. (1994), rely on a scale separation between the velocity macromodel and prior knowledge of the reflectivity to emphasize the transmission regime in the sensitivity kernel of the inversion. However, all these strategies focus on reflected waves only, discarding the low-wavenumber information carried out by diving waves. With the current development of very long-offset and wide-azimuth acquisitions, a significant part of the recorded energy is provided by diving waves and subcritical reflections, and high-resolution tomographic methods should take advantage of all types of waves. In this presentation, we will first review the issues of classical FWI when applied to reflected waves and how RFWI is able to retrieve the long wavelength of the model. We then propose a unified formulation of FWI (Zhou et al., 2014) to update the low wavenumbers of the velocity model by the joint inversion of diving and reflected arrivals, while the impedance model is updated thanks to reflected wave only. An alternate inversion of

  6. Three-dimensional plane-wave full-band quantum transport using empirical pseudopotentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jingtian; Vandenberghe, William; Fischetti, Massimo

    2015-03-01

    We study theoretically the ballistic performance of future sub-5 nm Field-Effect Transistors (FETs) using an atomistic quantum transport formalism based on empirical pseudopotentials, with armchair Graphene NanoRibbons (aGNRs), Silicon NanoWires (SiNWs) and zigzag Carbon NanoTubes (zCNTs) as channel structures. Due to the heavy computational burden from the plane-wave basis set, we restrict our study to ultrasmall devices, characterized by 5 nm channel lengths and 0.7 nm × 0.7 nm cross-sectional areas. Band structure calculations show that aGNRs have an oscillating chirality-dependent band gap. AGNRs with dimer lines N=3p+1 have large band gaps and aGNRFETs show promising device performance in terms of high Ion/Ioff, small drain-induced barrier lowering and limited short channel effects due to their very thin body and associated excellent electrostatics control. N=3p+2 aGNRs have small band gaps and band-to-band tunneling generates a large current at high bias. We also discuss spurious solutions introduced by the envelope function approximation. Device characteristics of SiNWFETs and zCNTFETs are compared to aGNRFETs as well. We acknowledge the support of Nanoelectronics Research Initiatives's (NRI's) Southwest Academy of Nanoelectronics (SWAN).

  7. Stress formulation in the all-electron full-potential linearized augmented plane wave method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasako, Naoyuki; Oguchi, Tamio

    2012-02-01

    Stress formulation in the linearlized augmented plane wave (LAPW) method has been proposed in 2002 [1] as an extension of the force formulation in the LAPW method [2]. However, pressure calculations only for Al and Si were reported in Ref.[1] and even now stress calculations have not yet been fully established in the LAPW method. In order to make it possible to efficiently relax lattice shape and atomic positions simultaneously and to precisely evaluate the elastic constants in the LAPW method, we reformulate stress formula in the LAPW method with the Soler-Williams representation [3]. Validity of the formulation is tested by comparing the pressure obtained as the trace of stress tensor with that estimated from total energies for a wide variety of material systems. Results show that pressure is estimated within the accuracy of less than 0.1 GPa. Calculations of the shear elastic constant show that the shear components of the stress tensor are also precisely computed with the present formulation [4].[4pt] [1] T. Thonhauser et al., Solid State Commun. 124, 275 (2002).[0pt] [2] R. Yu et al., Phys. Rev. B 43, 6411 (1991).[0pt] [3] J. M. Soler and A. R. Williams, Phys. Rev. B 40, 1560 (1989).[0pt] [4] N. Nagasako and T. Oguchi, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 80, 024701 (2011).

  8. Repetitive extracorporeal shock wave applications are superior in inducing angiogenesis after full thickness burn compared to single application.

    PubMed

    Goertz, O; von der Lohe, L; Lauer, H; Khosrawipour, T; Ring, A; Daigeler, A; Lehnhardt, M; Kolbenschlag, J

    2014-11-01

    Burn wounds remain a challenge due to subsequent wound infection and septicemia, which can be prevented by acceleration of wound healing. The aim of the study was to analyze microcirculation and leukocyte endothelium interaction with particular focus on angiogenesis after full-thickness burn using three different repetitions of low energy shock waves. Full-thickness burns were inflicted to the ears of hairless mice (n=44; area: 1.6±0.05 mm2 (mean±SEM)). Mice were randomized into four groups: the control group received a burn injury but no shock waves; group A received ESWA (0.03 mJ/mm2) on day one after burn injury; group B received shock waves on day one and day three after burn injury; group C ESWA on day one, three and seven after burn injury. Intravital fluorescent microscopy was used to assess microcirculatory parameters, angiogenesis and leukocyte interaction. Values were obtained before burn (baseline value) immediately after and on days 1, 3, 7 and 12 after burn. Shock-wave treated groups showed significantly accelerated angiogenesis compared to the control group. The non-perfused area (NPA) is regarded as a parameter for angiogenesis and showed the following data on day 12 2.7±0.4% (group A, p=0.001), 1.4±0.5% (group B, p<0.001), 1.0±0.3% (group C, p<0.001), 6.1±0.9% (control group). Edema formation is positively correlated with the number of shock wave applications: day 12: group A: 173.2±9.8%, group B: 184.2±6.6%, group C: 201.1±6.9%, p=0.009 vs. control: 162.3±8.7% (all data: mean±SEM). According to our data shock waves positively impact the wound healing process following burn injury. Angiogenesis showed significantly improved activity after shock wave application. In all three treatment groups angiogenesis was higher compared to the control group. Within the ESWA groups, double applications showed better results than single application and three applications showed better results than single or double applications. Copyright © 2014

  9. SciDAC Center for Simulation of Wave-Plasma Interactions - Iterated Finite-Orbit Monte Carlo Simulations with Full-Wave Fields for Modeling Tokamak ICRF Wave Heating Experiments - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Myunghee; Chan, Vincent S.

    2014-02-28

    This final report describes the work performed under U.S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement DE-FC02-08ER54954 for the period April 1, 2011 through March 31, 2013. The goal of this project was to perform iterated finite-orbit Monte Carlo simulations with full-wall fields for modeling tokamak ICRF wave heating experiments. In year 1, the finite-orbit Monte-Carlo code ORBIT-RF and its iteration algorithms with the full-wave code AORSA were improved to enable systematical study of the factors responsible for the discrepancy in the simulated and the measured fast-ion FIDA signals in the DIII-D and NSTX ICRF fast-wave (FW) experiments. In year 2, ORBIT-RF was coupled to the TORIC full-wave code for a comparative study of ORBIT-RF/TORIC and ORBIT-RF/AORSA results in FW experiments.

  10. Wavelet analysis of internal gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, J.; Warn-Varnas, A.; Chin-Bing, S.; King, D.; Smolarkiewicsz, P.

    2005-05-01

    A series of model studies of internal gravity waves (igw) have been conducted for several regions of interest. Dispersion relations from the results have been computed using wavelet analysis as described by Meyers (1993). The wavelet transform is repeatedly applied over time and the components are evaluated with respect to their amplitude and peak position (Torrence and Compo, 1998). In this sense we have been able to compute dispersion relations from model results and from measured data. Qualitative agreement has been obtained in some cases. The results from wavelet analysis must be carefully interpreted because the igw models are fully nonlinear and wavelet analysis is fundamentally a linear technique. Nevertheless, a great deal of information describing igw propagation can be obtained from the wavelet transform. We address the domains over which wavelet analysis techniques can be applied and discuss the limits of their applicability.

  11. Northern Korean Peninsula 1-D velocity model from surface wave dispersion and full-waveform data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. J.; Rhie, J.; Kim, S.; Kang, T. S.; Cho, C.

    2016-12-01

    Monitoring seismic activities in the northern Korean Peninsula is important not only for understanding the characteristics of earthquakes but also for watching nuclear tests. To better monitor those natural and man-made seismic activities, reliable seismic velocity models are required. However, the seismic velocity structure of the region is not known well due to the lack of available seismic data directly measured in the region. This study presents 1-D velocity models of the region using two different datasets comprised of two-year-long continuous waveform and the 2013 North Korea nuclear test event waveform recorded at stations surrounding the region. Two reference 1-D models for the inland and offshore areas (Western East Sea) were estimated by 1-D inversion of surface wave dispersion measurements from ambient noise cross-correlations of the continuous waveform. To investigate the variations in the velocity models, many 1-D models for the paths between the 2013 nuclear test site and stations in China and South Korea were constructed by forward waveform modeling. The velocity variations are not significant for both models representing the inland and offshore paths, respectively. The 1-D models for the inland paths are similar to the models constructed for the southern Korean Peninsula. Interestingly, waveforms sampling through the offshore paths are not well explained by simple 1-D isotropic models. The preliminary result indicates that there exists radial anisotropy with SH being faster than SV by 3-5% in the upper mantle beneath the offshore northern Korean Peninsula, although further studies are necessary to explain the origin of anisotropy. A proper characterization of propagation effects along the offshore paths would be useful for monitoring future nuclear tests because many seismic stations in the eastern South Korea record waveforms sampling the offshore region from the nuclear test site to those stations.

  12. Local One-Dimensional ICRF Full-Wave Solutions Valid to All Orders in k-Perpendicular-Rho

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, D.B.; Berry, L.A.; Jaeger, E.F.

    1999-04-12

    High harmonic ion cyclotron resonances are important for understanding future fast wave heating experiments on NSTX 1 as well as recent ICRF flow drive experiments on PBX-M2 and TFTR3. Unfortunately, many of our ICRF wave analysis codes are based on an expansion to second order in k-perpendicular-Rho where k-perpendicular is the perpendicular wave number, and Rho is the Larmor radius. Such codes are limited to cyclotron harmonics less than or equal to 2. Integral codes4,5 on the other hand, are valid to all orders in both k-perpendicular-Rho and Rho/LL where L is the equilibrium scale length. But velocity space integrals in these codes require long running times. Here we take a simpler approach which assumes a local plasma conductivity (Rho/L << 1), while still retaining all orders in k-perpendicular-Rho. This allows high harmonic fast wave and flow drive applications, while requiring less computing time than conventional integral codes.

  13. GPView: A program for wave function analysis and visualization.

    PubMed

    Shi, Tian; Wang, Ping

    2016-11-01

    In this manuscript, we will introduce a recently developed program GPView, which can be used for wave function analysis and visualization. The wave function analysis module can calculate and generate 3D cubes for various types of molecular orbitals and electron density of electronic excited states, such as natural orbitals, natural transition orbitals, natural difference orbitals, hole-particle density, detachment-attachment density and transition density. The visualization module of GPView can display molecular and electronic (iso-surfaces) structures. It is also able to animate single trajectories of molecular dynamics and non-adiabatic excited state molecular dynamics using the data stored in existing files. There are also other utilities to extract and process the output of quantum chemistry calculations. The GPView provides full graphic user interface (GUI), so it very easy to use. It is available from website http://life-tp.com/gpview.

  14. Terrestrial detector for low frequency gravitational waves based on full tensor measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyung Mok; Paik, Hojung; Majorana, Ettore; Vol Moody, M.; Griggs, Cornelius E.; Nielsen, Alex; Kim, Chumglee

    2015-08-01

    Terrestrial gravitational wave (GW) detectors are mostly based on Michelson-type laser interferometers with arm lengths of a few km to reach a strain sensitivity of 10-23 Hz-1/2 in the frequency range of a few 100 to a few 1000 Hz. There should be a large variety of sources generating GWs at lower frequencies below 10 Hz. However, seismic and Newtonian noise has been serious obstacle in realizing terrestrial low-frequency GW detectors. Here we describe a new GW detector concept by adopting new measurement techniques and configurations to overcome the present low-frequency barrier due to seismic and Newtonian noise. The detector is an extension of the superconducting gravity gradiometer (SGG) that has been developed at the University of Maryland to measure all components of the gravity gradient tensor by orthogonally combining three bars with test masses at each end. The oscillating component of the gravity gradient tensor is the GW strain tensor, but the actual signal is likely to be dominated by Newtonian and seismic noise, whose amplitudes are several orders of magnitude larger than the GWs. We propose to mitigate seismic noise by (a) constructing detector in deep underground, (b) applying passive isolation with pendulum suspension, and (c) using the common-mode rejection characteristic of the detector. The Newtonian noise can be suppressed by combining the components of the gradient tensor with signals detected by seismometers and microphones. By constructing a detector of 100-m long bars cooled to 0.1 K, a strain sensitivity of a few times 10-21 Hz-1/2 can be achieved in the frequency range between 0.1 to 10 Hz. Binaries composed of intermediate mass black holes of 1000 to 10,000 M¤ could be detected at distances up to a few Gpc with this detector. Detectable range for the merging white dwarf binaries is up to a few Mpc. Unlike current two-dimensional detectors, our single detector is able to determine the polarization of GWs and the direction to sources on

  15. High resolution imaging of lithospheric structures beneath the Pyrenees by full waveform inversion of shortperiod teleseismic P waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Chevrot, Sébastien; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Monteiller, Vadim; Durochat, Clément

    2016-04-01

    Thanks to the deployment of permanent and temporary broadband arrays, coverage and data quality have dramatically improved in the last decade, especially for regional-scale studies. In addition, owing to the progress of high-performance resources and numerical simulation techniques, waveform inversion approaches nowadays become a viable alternative to classical asymptotic ray based tomographic approaches. Exploiting full waveforms in seismic tomography requires an efficient and precise method to solve the elastic wave equation in 3D inhomogeneous media. Since resolution of waveform inversion is limited by the seismic wavelength as well as the wavefield sampling density, it is crucial to exploit short-period teleseismic waves recorded by dense regional arrays. However, modeling the propagation of short-period body waves in heterogeneous media is still very challenging, even on the largest modern supercomputers. For this reason, we have developed a hybrid method that couples a global wave propagation method in a 1D Earth to a 3D spectral-element method in a regional domain. This hybrid method restricts the costly 3D computations to inside the regional domain, which dramatically decreases the computational cost, allows us to compute teleseismic wavefields down to 1s period, thus accounting for the complexities that affect the propagation of seismic waves in the regional domain. We present the first application of this new waveform inversion approach to broadband data coming from two dense transects deployed during the PYROPE experiment across the Pyrenees mountains. We obtain the first high-resolution lithospheric section of compressional and shear velocities across an orogenic belt. The tomographic model provides clear evidence for the under-thrusting of the thinned Iberian crust beneath the European plate and for the important role of rift-inherited mantle structures during the formation of the Pyrenees.

  16. Post-Processing of the Full Matrix of Ultrasonic Transmit-Receive Array Data for Guided Wave Pipe Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velichko, A.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2009-03-01

    The paper describes a method for processing data from a guided wave transducer array on a pipe. The raw data set from such an array contains the full matrix of time-domain signals from each transmitter-receiver combination. It is shown that for certain configurations of an array the total focusing method can be applied which allows the array to be focused at every point on a pipe surface in both transmission and reception. The effect of array configuration parameters on the sensitivity of the proposed method to the random and coherent noise is discussed. Experimental results are presented using electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMAT) for exciting and detecting the S0 Lamb wave mode in a 12 inch steel pipe at 200 kHz excitation frequency. The results show that using the imaging algorithm a 2-mm-diameter (0.08 wavelength) half-thickness hole can be detected.

  17. Full Wave Function Optimization with Quantum Monte Carlo and Its Effect on the Dissociation Energy of FeS.

    PubMed

    Haghighi Mood, Kaveh; Lüchow, Arne

    2017-08-17

    Diffusion quantum Monte Carlo calculations with partial and full optimization of the guide function are carried out for the dissociation of the FeS molecule. For the first time, quantum Monte Carlo orbital optimization for transition metal compounds is performed. It is demonstrated that energy optimization of the orbitals of a complete active space wave function in the presence of a Jastrow correlation function is required to obtain agreement with the experimental dissociation energy. Furthermore, it is shown that orbital optimization leads to a (5)Δ ground state, in agreement with experiments but in disagreement with other high-level ab initio wave function calculations which all predict a (5)Σ(+) ground state. The role of the Jastrow factor in DMC calculations with pseudopotentials is investigated. The results suggest that a large Jastrow factor may improve the DMC accuracy substantially at small additional cost.

  18. Full waveform inversion of diving & reflected waves for velocity model building with impedance inversion based on scale separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wei; Brossier, Romain; Operto, Stéphane; Virieux, Jean

    2015-09-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) aims to reconstruct high-resolution subsurface models from the full wavefield, which includes diving waves, post-critical reflections and short-spread reflections. Most successful applications of FWI are driven by the information carried by diving waves and post-critical reflections to build the long-to-intermediate wavelengths of the velocity structure. Alternative approaches, referred to as reflection waveform inversion (RWI), have been recently revisited to retrieve these long-to-intermediate wavelengths from short-spread reflections by using some prior knowledge of the reflectivity and a scale separation between the velocity macromodel and the reflectivity. This study presents a unified formalism of FWI, named as Joint FWI, whose aim is to efficiently combine the diving and reflected waves for velocity model building. The two key ingredients of Joint FWI are, on the data side, the explicit separation between the short-spread reflections and the wide-angle arrivals and, on the model side, the scale separation between the velocity macromodel and the short-scale impedance model. The velocity model and the impedance model are updated in an alternate way by Joint FWI and waveform inversion of the reflection data (least-squares migration), respectively. Starting from a crude velocity model, Joint FWI is applied to the streamer seismic data computed in the synthetic Valhall model. While the conventional FWI is stuck into a local minimum due to cycle skipping, Joint FWI succeeds in building a reliable velocity macromodel. Compared with RWI, the use of diving waves in Joint FWI improves the reconstruction of shallow velocities, which translates into an improved imaging at deeper depths. The smooth velocity model built by Joint FWI can be subsequently used as a reliable initial model for conventional FWI to increase the high-wavenumber content of the velocity model.

  19. Effect of the scrape-off layer in AORSA full wave simulations of fast wave minority, mid/high harmonic, and helicon heating regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Bertelli, N. Gerhardt, S.; Hosea, J. C.; LeBlanc, B.; Perkins, R. J.; Phillips, C. K.; Taylor, G.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Jaeger, E. F.; Lau, C.; Blazevski, D.; Green, D. L.; Berry, L.; Ryan, P. M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C.; Pinsker, R. I.; Prater, R.; Qin, C. M.; and others

    2015-12-10

    Several experiments on different machines and in different fast wave (FW) heating regimes, such as hydrogen minority heating and high harmonic fast waves, have found strong interactions between radio-frequency (RF) waves and the scrape-off layer (SOL) region. This paper examines the propagation and the power loss in the SOL by using the full wave code AORSA, in which the edge plasma beyond the last closed flux surface (LCFS) is included in the solution domain and a collisional damping parameter is used as a proxy to represent the real, and most likely nonlinear, damping processes. 3D AORSA results for the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX), where a full antenna spectrum is reconstructed, are shown, confirming the same behavior found for a single toroidal mode results in Bertelli et al, Nucl. Fusion, 54 083004, 2014, namely, a strong transition to higher SOL power losses (driven by the RF field) when the FW cut-off is moved away from in front of the antenna by increasing the edge density. Additionally, full wave simulations have been extended to “conventional” tokamaks with higher aspect ratios, such as the DIII-D, Alcator C-Mod, and EAST devices. DIII-D results show similar behavior found in NSTX and NSTX-U, consistent with previous DIII-D experimental observations. In contrast, a different behavior has been found for Alcator C-Mod and EAST, which operate in the minority heating regime unlike NSTX/NSTX-U and DIII-D, which operate in the mid/high harmonic regime. A substantial discussion of some of the main aspects, such as (i) the pitch angle of the magnetic field; (ii) minority heating vs. mid/high harmonic regimes is presented showing the different behavior of the RF field in the SOL region for NSTX-U scenarios with different plasma current. Finally, the preliminary results of the impact of the SOL region on the evaluation of the helicon current drive efficiency in DIII-D is presented for the first time and briefly compared with the different regimes

  20. Effect of the scrape-off layer in AORSA full wave simulations of fast wave minority, mid/high harmonic, and helicon heating regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Bertelli, Nicola; Jaeger, E. F.; Lau, Cornwall H; Blazevski, Dan; Green, David L; Berry, Lee Alan; Bonoli, P. T.; Gerhardt, S.P.; Hosea, J. C.; LeBlanc, B.; Perkins, R. J.; Phillips, Cynthia; Pinsker, R. I.; Prater, R.; Qin, C M; Ryan, P. M.; Taylor, G.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, Randy; Wright, J.; Zhang, X J

    2015-01-01

    Several experiments on different machines and in different fast wave (FW) heating regimes, such as hydrogen minority heating and high harmonic fast waves, have found strong interactions between radio-frequency (RF) waves and the scrape-off layer (SOL) region. This paper examines the propagation and the power loss in the SOL by using the full wave code AORSA, in which the edge plasma beyond the last closed flux surface (LCFS) is included in the solution domain and a collisional damping parameter is used as a proxy to represent the real, and most likely nonlinear, damping processes. 3D AORSA results for the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX), where a full antenna spectrum is reconstructed, are shown, confirming the same behavior found for a single toroidal mode results in Bertelli et al, Nucl. Fusion, 54 083004, 2014, namely, a strong transition to higher SOL power losses (driven by the RF field) when the FW cut-off is moved away from in front of the antenna by increasing the edge density. Additionally, full wave simulations have been extended to "conventional" tokamaks with higher aspect ratios, such as the DIII-D, Alcator C-Mod, and EAST devices. DIII-D results show similar behavior found in NSTX and NSTX-U, consistent with previous DIII-D experimental observations. In contrast, a different behavior has been found for Alcator C-Mod and EAST, which operate in the minority heating regime unlike NSTX/NSTX-U and DIII-D, which operate in the mid/high harmonic regime. A substantial discussion of some of the main aspects, such as (i) the pitch angle of the magnetic field; (ii) minority heating vs. mid/high harmonic regimes is presented showing the different behavior of the RF field in the SOL region for NSTX-U scenarios with different plasma current. Finally, the preliminary results of the impact of the SOL region on the evaluation of the helicon current drive efficiency in DIII-D is presented for the first time and briefly compared with the different regimes

  1. Mixed augmented variational formulation (MAVF) for lower hybrid full-wave calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Peysson, Y.; Roche, J. R.; Kirsch, C.; Mokrani, A.; Labrunie, S.; Bertrand, P.; Chatenet, J.-H.

    2009-11-26

    In the continuation of the works led in cylindrical geometry, a full toroidal description for an arbitrary poloidal cross-section of the plasma has been developed. For simulation purpose a mixed augmented variational formulation (MAVF), which is particularly well suited for solving Maxwell equations, is considered. The discretization of the MAVF is carried out using Taylor-Hood P2-iso-P1 finite elements. This formulation provide a natural implementation for parallel processing, a particularly important aspect when simulations for plasmas of large size must be considered. Details on the specific application of the MAVF to the LH problem are presented, as well as the structure of the corresponding matrices. A first application to a realistic small tokamak configuration is considered.

  2. Wave intensity analysis in air-filled flexible vessels.

    PubMed

    Clavica, Francesco; Parker, Kim H; Khir, Ashraf W

    2015-02-26

    Wave intensity analysis (WIA) is an analytical technique generally used to investigate the propagation of waves in the cardiovascular system. Despite its increasing usage in the cardiovascular system, to our knowledge WIA has never been applied to the respiratory system. Given the analogies between arteries and airways (i.e. fluid flow in flexible vessels), the aim of this work is to test the applicability of WIA with gas flow instead of liquid flow. The models employed in this study are similar to earlier studies used for arterial investigations. Simultaneous pressure (P) and velocity (U) measurements were initially made in a single tube and then in several flexible tubes connected in series. Wave speed was calculated using the foot-to-foot method (cf), which was used to separate analytically the measured P and U waveforms into their forward and backward components. Further, the data were used to calculate wave intensity, which was also separated into its forward and backward components. Although the measured wave speed was relatively high, the results showed that the onsets and the nature of reflections (compression/expansion) derived with WIA, corresponded well to those anticipated using the theory of waves in liquid-filled elastic tubes. On average the difference between the experimental and theoretical arrival time of reflection was 6.1% and 3.6% for the single vessel and multivessel experiment, respectively. The results suggest that WIA can provide relatively accurate information on reflections in air-filled flexible tubes, warranting further studies to explore the full potential of this technique in the respiratory system. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Full-wave solution for an aperture-coupled patch fed by perpendicular coplanar strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herscovici, Naftali I.; Pozar, D. M.

    1994-04-01

    In recent years, the rectangular slot has been proposed as a means of power transfer between layers in multilayer printed antennas. Compared to probes, slots reduce fabrication complexity considerably, and allow more flexibility in the design of multilayer configurations. In the past, the aperture-coupled microstrip patch has been analyzed using the reciprocity theorem for the feeding line and the method of moments for the patch. The same method is used here for the analysis of an aperture-coupled patch fed by perpendicular coplanar strips. Theoretical results from this solution are compared with measurements for the input impedance of this antenna, and design data are given for the characteristic impedance of the coplanar strip feed line.

  4. Iterated finite-orbit Monte Carlo simulations with full-wave fields for modeling tokamak ion cyclotron resonance frequency wave heating experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, M.; Chan, V. S.; Lao, L. L.; Pinsker, R. I.; Green, D.; Berry, L. A.; Jaeger, F.; Park, J. M.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Liu, D.; Podesta, M.; Harvey, R.; Smithe, D. N.; Bonoli, P.

    2010-05-15

    The five-dimensional finite-orbit Monte Carlo code ORBIT-RF[M. Choi et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 1 (2005)] is successfully coupled with the two-dimensional full-wave code all-orders spectral algorithm (AORSA) [E. F. Jaeger et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 056101 (2006)] in a self-consistent way to achieve improved predictive modeling for ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) wave heating experiments in present fusion devices and future ITER [R. Aymar et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 1301 (2001)]. The ORBIT-RF/AORSA simulations reproduce fast-ion spectra and spatial profiles qualitatively consistent with fast ion D-alpha [W. W. Heidbrink et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 49, 1457 (2007)] spectroscopic data in both DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] and National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 1435 (2001)] high harmonic ICRF heating experiments. This work verifies that both finite-orbit width effect of fast-ion due to its drift motion along the torus and iterations between fast-ion distribution and wave fields are important in modeling ICRF heating experiments.

  5. Iterated finite-orbit Monte Carlo simulations with full-wave fields for modeling tokamak ion cyclotron resonance frequency wave heating experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, M.; Green, David L; Heidbrink, W. W.; Harvey, R. W.; Liu, D.; Chan, V. S.; Berry, Lee A; Jaeger, Erwin Frederick; Lao, L.L.; Pinsker, R. I.; Podesta, M.; Smithe, D. N.; Park, J. M.; Bonoli, P.

    2010-01-01

    The five-dimensional finite-orbit Monte Carlo code ORBIT-RF [M. Choi , Phys. Plasmas 12, 1 (2005)] is successfully coupled with the two-dimensional full-wave code all-orders spectral algorithm (AORSA) [E. F. Jaeger , Phys. Plasmas 13, 056101 (2006)] in a self-consistent way to achieve improved predictive modeling for ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) wave heating experiments in present fusion devices and future ITER [R. Aymar , Nucl. Fusion 41, 1301 (2001)]. The ORBIT-RF/AORSA simulations reproduce fast-ion spectra and spatial profiles qualitatively consistent with fast ion D-alpha [W. W. Heidbrink , Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 49, 1457 (2007)] spectroscopic data in both DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] and National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono , Nucl. Fusion 41, 1435 (2001)] high harmonic ICRF heating experiments. This work verifies that both finite-orbit width effect of fast-ion due to its drift motion along the torus and iterations between fast-ion distribution and wave fields are important in modeling ICRF heating experiments. (C) 2010 American Institute of Physics. [doi:10.1063/1.3314336

  6. AE Source Orientation by Plate Wave Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorman, Michael R.; Prosser, William H.

    1991-01-01

    Lead breaks (Hsu-Neilsen source) were used to generate simulated acoustic emission signals in an aluminum plate at angles of 0, 30, 60, and 90 degrees with respect to the plane of the plate. This was accomplished by breaking the lead on slots cut into the plate at the respective angles. The out-of-plane and in-plane displacement components of the resulting signals were detected by broad band transducers and digitized. Analysis of the waveforms showed them to consist of the extensional and flexural plate modes. The amplitude of both components of the two modes was dependent on the source orientation angle. This suggests that plate wave analysis may be used to determine the source orientation of acoustic emission sources.

  7. Full waveform inversion of seismic waves reflected in a stratified porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Barros, Louis; Dietrich, Michel; Valette, Bernard

    2010-09-01

    In reservoir geophysics applications, seismic imaging techniques are expected to provide as much information as possible on fluid-filled reservoir rocks. Since seismograms are, to some degree, sensitive to the mechanical parameters and fluid properties of porous media, inversion methods can be devised to directly estimate these quantities from the waveforms obtained in seismic reflection experiments. An inversion algorithm that uses a generalized least-squares, quasi-Newton approach is described to determine the porosity, permeability, interstitial fluid properties and mechanical parameters of porous media. The proposed algorithm proceeds by iteratively minimizing a misfit function between observed data and synthetic wavefields computed with the Biot theory. Simple models consisting of plane-layered, fluid-saturated and poro-elastic media are considered to demonstrate the concept and evaluate the performance of such a full waveform inversion scheme. Numerical experiments show that, when applied to synthetic data, the inversion procedure can accurately reconstruct the vertical distribution of a single model parameter, if all other parameters are perfectly known. However, the coupling between some of the model parameters does not permit the reconstruction of several model parameters at the same time. To get around this problem, we consider composite parameters defined from the original model properties and from a priori information, such as the fluid saturation rate or the lithology, to reduce the number of unknowns. Another possibility is to apply this inversion algorithm to time-lapse surveys carried out for fluid substitution problems, such as CO2 injection, since in this case only a few parameters may vary as a function of time. We define a two-step differential inversion approach which allows us to reconstruct the fluid saturation rate in reservoir layers, even though the medium properties are poorly known.

  8. Development of Scientific Simulation 3D Full Wave ICRF Code for Stellarators and Heating/CD Scenarios Development

    SciTech Connect

    Vdovin V.L.

    2005-08-15

    In this report we describe theory and 3D full wave code description for the wave excitation, propagation and absorption in 3-dimensional (3D) stellarator equilibrium high beta plasma in ion cyclotron frequency range (ICRF). This theory forms a basis for a 3D code creation, urgently needed for the ICRF heating scenarios development for the operated LHD, constructed W7-X, NCSX and projected CSX3 stellarators, as well for re evaluation of ICRF scenarios in operated tokamaks and in the ITER . The theory solves the 3D Maxwell-Vlasov antenna-plasma-conducting shell boundary value problem in the non-orthogonal flux coordinates ({Psi}, {theta}, {var_phi}), {Psi} being magnetic flux function, {theta} and {var_phi} being the poloidal and toroidal angles, respectively. All basic physics, like wave refraction, reflection and diffraction are self consistently included, along with the fundamental ion and ion minority cyclotron resonances, two ion hybrid resonance, electron Landau and TTMP absorption. Antenna reactive impedance and loading resistance are also calculated and urgently needed for an antenna -generator matching. This is accomplished in a real confining magnetic field being varying in a plasma major radius direction, in toroidal and poloidal directions, through making use of the hot dense plasma wave induced currents with account to the finite Larmor radius effects. We expand the solution in Fourier series over the toroidal ({var_phi}) and poloidal ({theta}) angles and solve resulting ordinary differential equations in a radial like {Psi}-coordinate by finite difference method. The constructed discretization scheme is divergent-free one, thus retaining the basic properties of original equations. The Fourier expansion over the angle coordinates has given to us the possibility to correctly construct the ''parallel'' wave number k{sub //}, and thereby to correctly describe the ICRF waves absorption by a hot plasma. The toroidal harmonics are tightly coupled with each

  9. Determination of the full elastic moduli of single crystals using shear-wave velocities by Brillouin spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, D.; Mao, Z.; Lin, J.; Yang, J.

    2013-12-01

    Brillouin light scattering (BLS) is the inelastic scattering of monochromatic laser light by phonons in the GHz frequency range [1]. BLS spectroscopy can be used to measure sound velocities traveling along certain directions of a single crystal through the frequency shifts of the scattered light from the acoustic phonons [1]. Over the past few decades, BLS spectroscopy has been widely used to measure the velocities of acoustic waves for a wide range of Earth's materials, in which the full elastic constants were derived from the measured compressional (VP) and shear wave (VS) velocities. However, the VP velocities of minerals normally overlap with the shear-wave velocities of diamonds in Brillouin measurements approximately above 25 GPa [2-5] such that only VS of minerals can be measured experimentally. Theoretical models have showed that the shear-wave velocities of minerals also carry necessary information to invert the full elastic tensors [2], although previous studies at high pressures have focused on measuring velocities within the principle planes of the crystals. This leads to a strong trade-off among individual Cij, preventing the derivation of the full elastic tensors from the VS velocities alone [3-5]. In this study, we have come up with an elastic model to overcome this problem by finding a suitable crystallographic plane that has optimized VS-VP interactions in the elastic tensors. Using MgO, spinel and zoisite as test samples, we have used measured VP/VS or VS velocities of these crystals using BLS spectroscopy to derive their full elastic tensors. This new approach sheds lights on future high-pressure elasticity studies relevant to materials the Earth's deep interior. 1. Sinogeikin, S.V., Bass, J.D., Phys. Earth Planet. Inter., 120, 43 (2000). 2. Every, A. G., Phys. Rev. B., 22, 1746, (1980) 3. Marquardt, H., Speziale, S., Reichmann, H.J., Frost, D.J., and Schilling, F.R., Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 287, 345 (2009). 4. Marquardt, H., Speziale, S

  10. 2.5D Full Waveform Inversion of Teleseismic Body and Surface Waves in the Tien Shan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, B. I.; Roecker, S. W.

    2013-12-01

    The Tien Shan is the best contemporary example of intracontinental shortening resulting from continental collision, a process believed to have been significant in the evolution of a number of ancient orogens. Previous tomographic studies of the Tien Shan implicate structures in the crust and upper mantle as key to understanding the dynamics of the region. In this study we apply recently developed full waveform inversion (FWI) techniques to passive data collected by the linear dense MANAS array between 2005 to 2007 in order to obtain higher resolution images of lateral heterogeneity beneath the Tien Shan than have previously been available. Our technique is an extension of that proposed by Roecker et al (2010); specifically the forward problem can now account for topographic features with a new 2.5D p-adaptive finite element solver. We incorporate a method developed by Bielak et. al. (2003) to input an appropriate force distribution to accommodate sources external to our model. The p-adaptivity allows us to suit element size to expected resolution as a function of depth and reduce the number of variables in inversion. Consequently, we can now explicitly calculate Frechet derivatives and generate the corresponding Gauss-Newton form with a model covariance regularization matrix all for modest additional computational expense. In order to take advantage of the complimentary sensitivities of different kinds of observations, we simultaneously invert fundamental mode Rayleigh waves and teleseismic P-wave coda. Our strategy is a multiscale approach by which we fit the longer period surface waves first followed by inclusion of body wave data.

  11. Wave Journal Bearing. Part 1: Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimofte, Florin

    1995-01-01

    A wave journal bearing concept features a waved inner bearing diameter of the non-rotating bearing side and it is an alternative to the plain journal bearing. The wave journal bearing has a significantly increased load capacity in comparison to the plain journal bearing operating at the same eccentricity. It also offers greater stability than the plain circular bearing under all operating conditions. The wave bearing's design is relatively simple and allows the shaft to rotate in either direction. Three wave bearings are sensitive to the direction of an applied stationary side load. Increasing the number of waves reduces the wave bearing's sensitivity to the direction of the applied load relative to the wave. However, the range in which the bearing performance can be varied decreases as the number of waves increases. Therefore, both the number and the amplitude of the waves must be properly selected to optimize the wave bearing design for a specific application. It is concluded that the stiffness of an air journal bearing, due to hydrodynamic effect, could be doubled and made to run stably by using a six or eight wave geometry with a wave amplitude approximately half of the bearing radial clearance.

  12. ICE/ISEE plasma wave data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenstadt, E. W.; Moses, S. L.

    1993-01-01

    This report is one of the final processing of ICE plasma wave (pw) data and analysis of late ISEE 3, ICE cometary, and ICE cruise trajectory data, where coronal mass ejections (CME's) were the first locus of attention. Interest in CME's inspired an effort to represent our pw data in a condensed spectrogram format that facilitated rapid digestion of interplanetary phenomena on long (greater than 1 day) time scales. The format serendipitously allowed us to also examine earth-orbiting data from a new perspective, invigorating older areas of investigation in Earth's immediate environment. We, therefore, continued to examine with great interest the last year of ISEE 3's precomet phase, when it spent considerable time far downwind from Earth, recording for days on end conditions upstream, downstream, and across the very weak, distant flank bow shock. Among other motivations has been the apparent similarity of some shock and post shock structures to the signatures of the bow wave surrounding comet Giacobini-Zinner, whose ICE-phase data we revisited.

  13. Methodology investigations for shear wave splitting analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Fansheng

    Over the past several decades, shear wave splitting analyses have been increasingly utilized to delineate mantle structure and probe mantle dynamics. However, the reported splitting parameters (fast polarization orientations and splitting times) are frequently inconsistent among different studies, partially due to the different techniques used to estimate the splitting parameters. Here the study conduct research on methodology investigations for shear wave splitting analysis, which are composed of two sub-topics, i.e., a systematic comparison of the transverse minimization (TM) and the splitting intensity (SI) techniques and applicability of the multiple-event stacking technique (MES). Numerical experiments are conducted using both synthetic and observed data. In addition, crustal anisotropy beneath 71 broadband seismic stations situated at the eastern Tibetan Plateau and adjacent areas is investigated based on the sinusoidal moveout of P-to-S conversions from the Moho and an intra-crustal discontinuity with an average splitting time of 0.39 +/- 0.19 s and dominantly fracture-parallel fast orientations. The crustal anisotropy measurements support the existences of mid/lower crustal flow in the southern Songpan-Ganzi Terrane and crustal shortening deformation beneath the Longmenshan fault zone.

  14. Wave-Plan Analysis of Unsteady Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsch, Robert G.; Lightner, Charlene; Wood, Don J.

    1965-01-01

    An analytical method for computing unsteady flow conditions in liquid-filled flow systems is developed. The method which is called the wave plan incorporates distributed parameter and nonlinear effects including the effects of viscous resistance. The wave plan is essentially a solution synthesized from the effects of incremental step pressure pulses. The pressure pulses are generated because of incremental flow-rate changes that originate in a hydraulic system from a variety of sources, including the mechanical motion of the system structure. The pressure pulses propagate throughout the system at sonic velocity and are partially transmitted and reflected at each discontinuity. The velocity change caused by each pressure pulse is obtained from the Joukowski relation. Pressure and velocity time histories at any point in the system are obtained by a timewise summation of the contributions of the incremental pressure pulses passing that point. The analysis is presented in a form general enough to be applied to a variety of hydraulic systems. To illustrate the application of the method to a specific system, the response of a straight hydraulic line to a sinusoidal orifice-area variation of an upstream valve is computed. Both a constant-cross- section line and a tapered line are analyzed in the examples, and various nonlinear effects evaluated. Comparisons are carried out with experimental data obtained for the constant-diameter line and good agreement is shown to exist.

  15. A full-wave phase aberration correction method for transcranial high-intensity focused ultrasound brain therapies.

    PubMed

    Almquist, Scott; de Bever, Joshua; Merrill, Robb; Parker, Dennis; Christensen, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial high-intensity focused ultrasound has recently been used to noninvasively treat several types of brain disorders. However, due to the large differences in acoustic properties of skulls and the surrounding soft tissue, it can be a challenge to adequately focus an ultrasonic beam through the skull. We present a novel, fast, full-wave method of correcting the aberrations caused by the skull by phasing the elements of a phased-array transducer to create constructive interference at the target. Because the method is full-wave, it also allows for trajectory planning by determining the phases required for multiple target points with negligible additional computational costs. Experimental hydrophone scans with an ex vivo skull sample using a 256-element 1-MHz transducer show an improvement of 6.2% in peak pressure at the focus and a reduction of side-lobe pressure by a factor of 2.31. Additionally, mispositioning of the peak pressure from the intended treatment location is reduced from 2.3 to 0.5 mm.

  16. Mathematical Methods in Wave Propagation: Part 2--Non-Linear Wave Front Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffrey, Alan

    1971-01-01

    The paper presents applications and methods of analysis for non-linear hyperbolic partial differential equations. The paper is concluded by an account of wave front analysis as applied to the piston problem of gas dynamics. (JG)

  17. Mathematical Methods in Wave Propagation: Part 2--Non-Linear Wave Front Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffrey, Alan

    1971-01-01

    The paper presents applications and methods of analysis for non-linear hyperbolic partial differential equations. The paper is concluded by an account of wave front analysis as applied to the piston problem of gas dynamics. (JG)

  18. Full-Envelope Launch Abort System Performance Analysis Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aubuchon, Vanessa V.

    2014-01-01

    The implementation of a new dispersion methodology is described, which dis-perses abort initiation altitude or time along with all other Launch Abort System (LAS) parameters during Monte Carlo simulations. In contrast, the standard methodology assumes that an abort initiation condition is held constant (e.g., aborts initiated at altitude for Mach 1, altitude for maximum dynamic pressure, etc.) while dispersing other LAS parameters. The standard method results in large gaps in performance information due to the discrete nature of initiation conditions, while the full-envelope dispersion method provides a significantly more comprehensive assessment of LAS abort performance for the full launch vehicle ascent flight envelope and identifies performance "pinch-points" that may occur at flight conditions outside of those contained in the discrete set. The new method has significantly increased the fidelity of LAS abort simulations and confidence in the results.

  19. BOOK REVIEW Analysis of Gravitational-Wave Data Analysis of Gravitational-Wave Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairhurst, Stephen

    2010-12-01

    The field of gravitational-wave data analysis has expanded greatly over the past decade and significant developments have been made in methods of analyzing the data taken by resonant bar and interferometric detectors, as well as analysis of mock LISA data. This book introduces much of the required theoretical background in gravitational physics, statistics and time series analysis before moving on to a discussion of gravitational-wave data analysis techniques themselves. The book opens with an overview of the theory of gravitational radiation, providing a comprehensive discussion of various introductory topics: linearized gravity, transverse traceless gauge, the effects of gravitational waves (via geodesic deviation), energy and momentum carried by the waves, and generation of gravitational waves. The second chapter provides an introduction to the various sources of gravitational waves, followed by more detailed expositions on some of the primary sources. For example, the description of compact binary coalescence is thorough and includes a brief exposition of the post-Newtonian formalism and the effective one body method. There also follows extended derivations of gravitational waves from distorted neutron stars, supernovae and a stochastic background. Chapter three provides an introduction to the statistical theory of signal detection, including a discussion of parameter estimation via the Fisher matrix formalism. This is presented from a very mathematical, postulate based, standpoint and I expect that even established gravitational-wave data analysts will find the derivations here more formal than they are used to. The discussion of likelihood ratio tests and the importance of prior probabilities are presented particularly clearly. The fourth chapter covers time series analysis, with power spectrum estimation, extraction of periodic signals and goodness of fit tests. Chapter five switches topics and gives the details of the response of gravitational-wave

  20. Statistical analysis of plasmaspheric EMIC waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Y.; Miyoshi, Y.; Sakaguchi, K.; Kasahara, Y.; Keika, K.; Shoji, M.; Kitamura, N.; Hasegawa, S.; Kumamoto, A.; Shiokawa, K.

    2014-12-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in the inner magnetosphere are important since EMIC waves cause the pitch angle scattering of ring current ions as well as relativistic electrons of the radiation belts. Although the spatial distributions of EMIC waves have been investigated by several spacecraft such as CRRES, THEMIS and AMPTE/CCE, there have been little studies on plasmaspheric EMIC waves. We investigate statistically EMIC wave data using the Akebono/VLF measurements. The plasmaspheric EMIC waves tend to be distributed at lower L-shell region (L~2) than the slot region. There are no significant MLT dependences, which are different from the EMIC waves outside the plasmapause. The plasmaspheric EMIC wave frequencies depend on the equatorial cyclotron frequency, suggesting that the plasmaspheric EMIC waves are not propagated from high L-shell but generated near the equivalent L-shell magnetic equator. This result is consistent with the result of the dependence of resonance energy. Using the in-situ thermal plasma density measured by the Akebono satellite, we estimate the resonance energy of energetic ions, and the resonance energies of the plasmaspheric EMIC waves are few tens keV to ~ 1 MeV. The results indicate that the ring current and radiation belt ions may contribute the generation of the plasmaspheric EMIC waves.

  1. Full Core Reactor Analysis: Running Denovo on Jaguar

    SciTech Connect

    Jarrell, Joshua J; Godfrey, Andrew T; Evans, Thomas M; Davidson, Gregory G

    2012-01-01

    Fully-consistent, full-core, 3D, deterministic simulations using the orthogonal mesh code Denovo were run on the massively parallel computing architecture Jaguar XT5. Using energy and spatial parallelization schemes, Denovo was able to efficiently scale to over 160k processors. Cell-homogenized cross-sections were used with Step-Characteristics, Linear-Discontinuous Finite Element, and Tri-Linear-Discontinuous Finite Element spatial methods. It was determined that using the finite element methods gave considerably more accurate eigenvalue solutions for large aspect ratios meshes than those using Step-Characteristics.

  2. Full Core Reactor Analysis: Running Denovo on Jaguar

    SciTech Connect

    Jarrell, Joshua J; Godfrey, Andrew T; Evans, Thomas M; Davidson, Gregory G

    2013-01-01

    Fully-consistent, full-core, 3D, deterministic neutron transport simulations using the orthogonal mesh code Denovo were run on the massively parallel computing architecture Jaguar XT5. Using energy and spatial parallelization schemes, Denovo was able to efficiently scale to more than 160k processors. Cell-homogenized cross sections were used with step-characteristics, linear-discontinuous finite element, and trilinear-discontinuous finite element spatial methods. It was determined that using the finite element methods gave considerably more accurate eigenvalue solutions for large-aspect ratio meshes than using step-characteristics.

  3. Full core reactor analysis: Running Denovo on Jaguar

    SciTech Connect

    Jarrell, J. J.; Godfrey, A. T.; Evans, T. M.; Davidson, G. G.

    2012-07-01

    Fully-consistent, full-core, 3D, deterministic neutron transport simulations using the orthogonal mesh code Denovo were run on the massively parallel computing architecture Jaguar XT5. Using energy and spatial parallelization schemes, Denovo was able to efficiently scale to more than 160 k processors. Cell-homogenized cross sections were used with step-characteristics, linear-discontinuous finite element, and trilinear-discontinuous finite element spatial methods. It was determined that using the finite element methods gave considerably more accurate eigenvalue solutions for large-aspect ratio meshes than using step-characteristics. (authors)

  4. Quantitative full time course analysis of nonlinear enzyme cycling kinetics.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wenxiang; De La Cruz, Enrique M

    2013-01-01

    Enzyme inhibition due to the reversible binding of reaction products is common and underlies the origins of negative feedback inhibition in many metabolic and signaling pathways. Product inhibition generates non-linearity in steady-state time courses of enzyme activity, which limits the utility of well-established enzymology approaches developed under the assumption of irreversible product release. For more than a century, numerous attempts to find a mathematical solution for analysis of kinetic time courses with product inhibition have been put forth. However, no practical general method capable of extracting common enzymatic parameters from such non-linear time courses has been successfully developed. Here we present a simple and practical method of analysis capable of efficiently extracting steady-state enzyme kinetic parameters and product binding constants from non-linear kinetic time courses with product inhibition and/or substrate depletion. The method is general and applicable to all enzyme systems, independent of reaction schemes and pathways.

  5. Wake coupling to full potential rotor analysis code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, Francisco J.; Chang, I-Chung; Oh, Byung K.

    1990-01-01

    The wake information from a helicopter forward flight code is coupled with two transonic potential rotor codes. The induced velocities for the near-, mid-, and far-wake geometries are extracted from a nonlinear rigid wake of a standard performance and analysis code. These, together with the corresponding inflow angles, computation points, and azimuth angles, are then incorporated into the transonic potential codes. The coupled codes can then provide an improved prediction of rotor blade loading at transonic speeds.

  6. Preliminary analysis of knee stress in Full Extension Landing

    PubMed Central

    Makinejad, Majid Davoodi; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan; Wan Abas, Wan Abu Bakar; Bayat, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study provides an experimental and finite element analysis of knee-joint structure during extended-knee landing based on the extracted impact force, and it numerically identifies the contact pressure, stress distribution and possibility of bone-to-bone contact when a subject lands from a safe height. METHODS: The impact time and loads were measured via inverse dynamic analysis of free landing without knee flexion from three different heights (25, 50 and 75 cm), using five subjects with an average body mass index of 18.8. Three-dimensional data were developed from computed tomography scans and were reprocessed with modeling software before being imported and analyzed by finite element analysis software. The whole leg was considered to be a fixed middle-hinged structure, while impact loads were applied to the femur in an upward direction. RESULTS: Straight landing exerted an enormous amount of pressure on the knee joint as a result of the body's inability to utilize the lower extremity muscles, thereby maximizing the threat of injury when the load exceeds the height-safety threshold. CONCLUSIONS: The researchers conclude that extended-knee landing results in serious deformation of the meniscus and cartilage and increases the risk of bone-to-bone contact and serious knee injury when the load exceeds the threshold safety height. This risk is considerably greater than the risk of injury associated with walking downhill or flexion landing activities. PMID:24141832

  7. The new BNL partial wave analysis programs

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, J.P.; Weygand, D.P.

    1997-07-29

    Experiment E852 at Brookhaven National Laboratory is a meson spectroscopy experiment which took data at the Multi-Particle Spectrometer facility of the Alternating Gradient Syncrotron. Upgrades to the spectrometer`s data acquisition and trigger electronics allowed over 900 million data events, of numerous topologies, to be recorded to tape in 1995 running alone. One of the primary goals of E852 is identification of states beyond the quark model, i.e., states with gluonic degrees of freedom. Identification of such states involves the measurement of a systems spin-parity. Such a measurement is usually done using Partial Wave Analysis. Programs to perform such analyses exist, in fact, one was written at BNL and used in previous experiments by some of this group. This program, however, was optimized for a particular final state, and modification to allow analysis of the broad range of final states in E852 would have been difficult. The authors therefore decided to write a new program, with an eye towards generality that would allow analysis of a large class of reactions.

  8. Analysis of cardamonin by square wave voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ana M; Gonçalves, Luís M; Valente, Inês M; Rodrigues, José A; Barros, Aquiles A

    2012-01-01

    Several biochemical studies have already shown that cardamonin has health promoting properties, such is in agreement with typical characteristics of chalcones. Although being a very promising compound for the nutraceutical field there is a lack of studies concerning its electroanalytical properties. To develop an electroanalytical methodology for the quantification of cardamonin in cardamom. Cardamonin was analysed electrochemically by means of a hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE) using square wave voltammetry (SWV). It was extracted from cardamom spice and quantified thereafter using the standard additions method to overcome matrix effects. A limit of detection (LOD) of 0.15 mg/L and good linearity (r²  = 0.9998) were obtained. Decoction using ethanol as the extraction solvent appears to be the simplest extraction technique. Spectrophotometric analysis (maximum absorbance peak was found in ethanol at 344 nm with a value of molar extinction coefficient of (2.8 ± 0.1) × 10⁴  L mol⁻¹ cm⁻¹) and mass spectrometry analysis by electrospray in the positive ion mode were also performed. Cardamonin was detected voltammetrically. The LOD and limit of quantification (LOQ) of the proposed voltammetric methodology are adequate for trace analysis of this compound in several phytochemical matrices. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Geotail MCA plasma wave data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Roger R.

    1994-01-01

    NASA Grant NAG 5-2346 supports the data analysis effort at The University of Iowa for the GEOTAIL Multi-Channel Analyzer (MCA) which is a part of the GEOTAIL Plasma Wave Instrument (PWI). At the beginning of this reporting period we had just begun to receive our GEOTAIL Sirius data on CD-ROMs. Much programming effort went into adapting and refining the data analysis programs to include the CD-ROM inputs. Programs were also developed to display the high-frequency-resolution PWI Sweep Frequency Analyzer (SFA) data and to include in all the various plot products the electron cyclotron frequency derived from the magnitude of the magnetic field extracted from the GEOTAIL Magnetic Field (MGF) data included in the GEOTAIL Sirius data. We also developed programs to use the MGF data residing in the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) GEOTAIL Scientific Data Base (SDB). Our programmers also developed programs and provided technical support for the GEOTAIL data analysis efforts of Co-lnvestigator William W. L. Taylor at Nichols Research Corporation (NRC). At the end of this report we have included brief summaries of the NRC effort and the progress being made.

  10. Upper mantle structure of the Congo Craton and the East African Rift from full wave ambient noise tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emry, E.; Shen, Y.; Nyblade, A.; Bao, X.; Flinders, A. F.

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between lithospheric structure, mantle flow, and continental rifting along the East African Rift is the subject of ongoing discussion. The upper mantle beneath the Main Ethiopian Rift and the East African Rift farther south has been seismically imaged following the deployment of several temporary regional arrays. However, due to uneven distribution of seismic arrays, key questions regarding a connection between these upper mantle anomalies at the Turkana Depression and the effect that the thick Congo Craton has on diverting upwelling material towards the East African Rift are poorly resolved. We use overlapping records from several temporary and permanent broadband seismic arrays (1980-2014) located throughout the African continent and surrounding regions in order to image the upper mantle beneath the East African Rift and the Congo Craton where regional seismic arrays have not been deployed. We do this by seismic ambient noise tomography using the recently developed frequency-time normalization (FTN) method to extract empirical Green's functions (EGFs) at periods of 7-250 seconds. We cross correlate the normalized continuous records and stack them to obtain EGFs for each temporally coincident station-station pair. We simulate wave propagation through a spherical Earth using a finite-difference method, measure phase delay times between synthetics and EGFs, and invert them for velocity perturbations with 3D Rayleigh wave sensitivity kernels. We will present results from full-wave ambient noise inversions that illuminate upper mantle structure throughout the continent, with particular focus on the Congo Craton and northern sections of the East African Rift System.

  11. Centaur Standard Shroud (CSS) full jettison test dynamic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasper, H. J.; Donovan, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    During the space power facility jettison tests, the non-domed half of the Centaur standard shroud was allowed to completely separate from its hinge connection and was caught in a horizontal catch net. A rigid body dynamic analysis that was performed to predict the half shroud prior to and after net contact is presented. Analytical predictions of the longitudinal and circumferential bending moments imposed on the half shroud by the catch net and the net pressure on the half shroud corrugated skin are also presented.

  12. IWA : an analysis program for isentropic wave measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Ao, Tommy

    2009-02-01

    IWA (Isentropic Wave Analysis) is a program for analyzing velocity profiles of isentropic compression experiments. IWA applies incremental impedance matching correction to measured velocity profiles to obtain in-situ particle velocity profiles for Lagrangian wave analysis. From the in-situ velocity profiles, material properties such as wave velocities, stress, strain, strain rate, and strength are calculated. The program can be run in any current version of MATLAB (2008a or later) or as a Windows XP executable.

  13. Full text clustering and relationship network analysis of biomedical publications.

    PubMed

    Guan, Renchu; Yang, Chen; Marchese, Maurizio; Liang, Yanchun; Shi, Xiaohu

    2014-01-01

    Rapid developments in the biomedical sciences have increased the demand for automatic clustering of biomedical publications. In contrast to current approaches to text clustering, which focus exclusively on the contents of abstracts, a novel method is proposed for clustering and analysis of complete biomedical article texts. To reduce dimensionality, Cosine Coefficient is used on a sub-space of only two vectors, instead of computing the Euclidean distance within the space of all vectors. Then a strategy and algorithm is introduced for Semi-supervised Affinity Propagation (SSAP) to improve analysis efficiency, using biomedical journal names as an evaluation background. Experimental results show that by avoiding high-dimensional sparse matrix computations, SSAP outperforms conventional k-means methods and improves upon the standard Affinity Propagation algorithm. In constructing a directed relationship network and distribution matrix for the clustering results, it can be noted that overlaps in scope and interests among BioMed publications can be easily identified, providing a valuable analytical tool for editors, authors and readers.

  14. Full core analysis of IRIS reactor by using MCNPX.

    PubMed

    Amin, E A; Bashter, I I; Hassan, Nabil M; Mustafa, S S

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes neutronic analysis for fresh fuelled IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure) reactor by MCNPX code. The analysis included criticality calculations, radial power and axial power distribution, nuclear peaking factor and axial offset percent at the beginning of fuel cycle. The effective multiplication factor obtained by MCNPX code is compared with previous calculations by HELIOS/NESTLE, CASMO/SIMULATE, modified CORD-2 nodal calculations and SAS2H/KENO-V code systems. It is found that k-eff value obtained by MCNPX is closer to CORD-2 value. The radial and axial powers are compared with other published results carried out using SAS2H/KENO-V code. Moreover, the WIMS-D5 code is used for studying the effect of enriched boron in form of ZrB2 on the effective multiplication factor (K-eff) of the fuel pin. In this part of calculation, K-eff is calculated at different concentrations of Boron-10 in mg/cm at different stages of burnup of unit cell. The results of this part are compared with published results performed by HELIOS code.

  15. Full Text Clustering and Relationship Network Analysis of Biomedical Publications

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Renchu; Yang, Chen; Marchese, Maurizio; Liang, Yanchun; Shi, Xiaohu

    2014-01-01

    Rapid developments in the biomedical sciences have increased the demand for automatic clustering of biomedical publications. In contrast to current approaches to text clustering, which focus exclusively on the contents of abstracts, a novel method is proposed for clustering and analysis of complete biomedical article texts. To reduce dimensionality, Cosine Coefficient is used on a sub-space of only two vectors, instead of computing the Euclidean distance within the space of all vectors. Then a strategy and algorithm is introduced for Semi-supervised Affinity Propagation (SSAP) to improve analysis efficiency, using biomedical journal names as an evaluation background. Experimental results show that by avoiding high-dimensional sparse matrix computations, SSAP outperforms conventional k-means methods and improves upon the standard Affinity Propagation algorithm. In constructing a directed relationship network and distribution matrix for the clustering results, it can be noted that overlaps in scope and interests among BioMed publications can be easily identified, providing a valuable analytical tool for editors, authors and readers. PMID:25250864

  16. Wave energy patterns of counterpulsation: a novel approach with wave intensity analysis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Pong-Jeu; Yang, Chi-Fu Jeffrey; Wu, Meng-Yu; Hung, Chun-Hao; Chan, Ming-Yao; Hsu, Tzu-Cheng

    2011-11-01

    In counterpulsation, diastolic augmentation increases coronary blood flow and systolic unloading reduces left ventricular afterload. We present a new approach with wave intensity analysis to revisit and explain counterpulsation principles. In an acute porcine model, a standard intra-aortic balloon pump was placed in descending aorta in 4 pigs. We measured pressure and velocity with probes in left anterior descending artery and aorta during and without intra-aortic balloon pump assistance. Wave intensities of aortic and left coronary waves were derived from pressure and flow measurements with synchronization correction. We identified predominating waves in counterpulsation. In the aorta, during diastolic augmentation, intra-aortic balloon inflation generated a backward compression wave, with a "pushing" effect toward the aortic root that translated to a forward compression wave into coronary circulation. During systolic unloading, intra-aortic balloon pump deflation generated a backward expansion wave that "sucked" blood from left coronary bed into the aorta. While this backward expansion wave translated to reduced left ventricular afterload, the "sucking" effect resulted in left coronary blood steal, as demonstrated by a forward expansion wave in left anterior descending coronary flow. The waves were sensitive to inflation and deflation timing, with just 25 ms delay from standard deflation timing leading to weaker forward expansion wave and less coronary regurgitation. Intra-aortic balloon pumps generate backward-traveling waves that predominantly drive aortic and coronary blood flow during counterpulsation. Wave intensity analysis of arterial circulations may provide a mechanism to explain diastolic augmentation and systolic unloading of intra-aortic balloon pump counterpulsation. Copyright © 2011 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Detecting delaminations and disbondings on full-scale wing composite panel by guided waves based SHM system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, E.; Boffa, N. D.; Memmolo, V.; Ricci, F.; Maio, L.

    2016-04-01

    A full-scale lower wing panel made of composite material has been designed, manufactured and sensorised within the European Funded research project named SARISTU. The authors contributed to the whole development of the system, from design to implementation as well as to the impacts campaign phase where Barely Visible and Visible Damages (BVID and VID) are to be artificially induced on the panel by a pneumatic impact machine. This work summarise part of the experimental results related to damages production, their assessment by C-SCAN as reference NDT method as well as damage detection of delimitations by a guided waves based SHM. The SHM system is made by customized piezoelectric patches secondary bonded on the wing plate acting both as guided waves sources and receivers. The paper will deal mostly with the experimental impact campaign and the signal analyses carried out to extract the metrics more sensitive to damages induced. Image reconstruction of the damages dimensions and shapes will be also described based mostly on the combination of metrics maps over the plate partial surfaces. Finally a comparison of damages maps obtained by the SHM approach and those obtained by "classic" C-SCAN will be presented analyzing briefly pros and cons of the two different approached as a combination to the most effective structural maintenance scenario of a commercial aircraft.

  18. Full-scale testing of leakage of blast waves inside a partially vented room exposed to external air blast loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codina, R.; Ambrosini, D.

    2017-06-01

    For the last few decades, the effects of blast loading on structures have been studied by many researchers around the world. Explosions can be caused by events such as industrial accidents, military conflicts or terrorist attacks. Urban centers have been prone to various threats including car bombs, suicide attacks, and improvised explosive devices. Partially vented constructions subjected to external blast loading represent an important topic in protective engineering. The assessment of blast survivability inside structures and the development of design provisions with respect to internal elements require the study of the propagation and leakage of blast waves inside buildings. In this paper, full-scale tests are performed to study the effects of the leakage of blast waves inside a partially vented room that is subjected to different external blast loadings. The results obtained may be useful for proving the validity of different methods of calculation, both empirical and numerical. Moreover, the experimental results are compared with those computed using the empirical curves of the US Defense report/manual UFC 3-340. Finally, results of the dynamic response of the front masonry wall are presented in terms of accelerations and an iso-damage diagram.

  19. Full quantum mechanical analysis of atomic three-grating Mach–Zehnder interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Sanz, A.S.; Davidović, M.; Božić, M.

    2015-02-15

    Atomic three-grating Mach–Zehnder interferometry constitutes an important tool to probe fundamental aspects of the quantum theory. There is, however, a remarkable gap in the literature between the oversimplified models and robust numerical simulations considered to describe the corresponding experiments. Consequently, the former usually lead to paradoxical scenarios, such as the wave–particle dual behavior of atoms, while the latter make difficult the data analysis in simple terms. Here these issues are tackled by means of a simple grating working model consisting of evenly-spaced Gaussian slits. As is shown, this model suffices to explore and explain such experiments both analytically and numerically, giving a good account of the full atomic journey inside the interferometer, and hence contributing to make less mystic the physics involved. More specifically, it provides a clear and unambiguous picture of the wavefront splitting that takes place inside the interferometer, illustrating how the momentum along each emerging diffraction order is well defined even though the wave function itself still displays a rather complex shape. To this end, the local transverse momentum is also introduced in this context as a reliable analytical tool. The splitting, apart from being a key issue to understand atomic Mach–Zehnder interferometry, also demonstrates at a fundamental level how wave and particle aspects are always present in the experiment, without incurring in any contradiction or interpretive paradox. On the other hand, at a practical level, the generality and versatility of the model and methodology presented, makes them suitable to attack analogous problems in a simple manner after a convenient tuning. - Highlights: • A simple model is proposed to analyze experiments based on atomic Mach–Zehnder interferometry. • The model can be easily handled both analytically and computationally. • A theoretical analysis based on the combination of the position and

  20. Analysis of Radarsat-2 Full Polarimetric Data for Forest Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghsoudi, Yasser

    Forests are a major natural resource of the Earth and control a wide range of environmental processes. Forests comprise a major part of the planet's plant biodiversity and have an important role in the global hydrological and biochemical cycles. Among the numerous potential applications of remote sensing in forestry, forest mapping plays a vital role for characterization of the forest in terms of species. Particularly, in Canada where forests occupy 45% of the territory, representing more than 400 million hectares of the total Canadian continental area. In this thesis, the potential of polarimetric SAR (PolSAR) Radarsat-2 data for forest mapping is investigated. This thesis has two principle objectives. First is to propose algorithms for analyzing the PolSAR image data for forest mapping. There are a wide range of SAR parameters that can be derived from PolSAR data. In order to make full use of the discriminative power offered by all these parameters, two categories of methods are proposed. The methods are based on the concept of feature selection and classifier ensemble. First, a nonparametric definition of the evaluation function is proposed and hence the methods NFS and CBFS. Second, a fast wrapper algorithm is proposed for the evaluation function in feature selection and hence the methods FWFS and FWCBFS. Finally, to incorporate the neighboring pixels information in classification an extension of the FWCBFS method i.e. CCBFS is proposed. The second objective of this thesis is to provide a comparison between leaf-on (summer) and leaf-off (fall) season images for forest mapping. Two Radarsat-2 images acquired in fine quad-polarized mode were chosen for this study. The images were collected in leaf-on and leaf-off seasons. We also test the hypothesis whether combining the SAR parameters obtained from both images can provide better results than either individual datasets. The rationale for this combination is that every dataset has some parameters which may be

  1. Single-molecule analysis of the full transcription cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strick, Terence

    2005-03-01

    By monitoring the extension of a mechanically stretched, supercoiled DNA molecule containing a single bacterial promoter, we have been able to directly observe in real time the change in DNA extension associated with topological unwinding of ˜1 helical turn of promoter DNA by RNAP during transcription initiation. We find that this stage of transcription initiation is extremely sensitive to the torque acting on the supercoiled DNA. Upon addition of limited sets of nucleotides, changes in the polymerase/promoter interaction which are related to the process of abortive initiation can be studied in detail. Upon addition of the full set of nucleotides, the subsequent stages of transcription -- promoter escape, productive elongation and transcription termination -- can also be observed in real-time. The changes in DNA topology which occur at each of these stages have been determined, and these results provide for the first global view of the entire transcription cycle at the resolution of single molecules. Co-authors: Richard H. Ebright, Chen-Yu Liu and Andrey Revyakin, HHMI & Waksman Institute, Rutgers University.

  2. Full-length genome analysis of canine coronavirus type I.

    PubMed

    Decaro, Nicola; Mari, Viviana; Elia, Gabriella; Lanave, Gianvito; Dowgier, Giulia; Colaianni, Maria Loredana; Martella, Vito; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2015-12-02

    Canine coronavirus types I (CCoV-I) and II (CCoV-II) are usually responsible for mild enteritis in dogs. While the CCoV-II genome has been completely sequenced, to date there are no complete genomic sequence data available publicly for CCoV-I. Thus, the aim of the present study was to analyze the full-length genome of a CCoV-I prototype strain that had been recovered from a dog with diarrhea in Italy. CCoV-I strain 23/03 has a genome of 30,000 nucleotides, excluding the 3' poly(A) tail, displaying the typical Alphacoronavirus-1 organization and the highest genetic relatedness to CCoV-II. However, two distinct features were observed in the CCoV-I genome: (i) the presence of an additional ORF between the spike (S) protein gene and ORF3a; (ii) the diversity of the S protein, which is more closely related to that of feline coronavirus type I and presents a furin cleavage site. The present study may contribute to a better understanding of the Alphacoronavirus-1 evolutionary pattern and may be paradigmatic of how coronaviruses evolve through gene losses, acquisition and exchanges among different members. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Full-Length Genomic Analysis of Korean Porcine Sapelovirus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Joseph; Choi, Jong-Soon; Kang, Mun-Il; Belsham, Graham J.; Cho, Kyoung-Oh

    2014-01-01

    Porcine sapelovirus (PSV), a species of the genus Sapelovirus within the family Picornaviridae, is associated with diarrhea, pneumonia, severe neurological disorders, and reproductive failure in pigs. However, the structural features of the complete PSV genome remain largely unknown. To analyze the structural features of PSV genomes, the full-length nucleotide sequences of three Korean PSV strains were determined and analyzed using bioinformatic techniques in comparison with other known PSV strains. The Korean PSV genomes ranged from 7,542 to 7,566 nucleotides excluding the 3′ poly(A) tail, and showed the typical picornavirus genome organization; 5′untranslated region (UTR)-L-VP4-VP2-VP3-VP1-2A-2B-2C-3A-3B-3C-3D-3′UTR. Three distinct cis-active RNA elements, the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) in the 5′UTR, a cis-replication element (CRE) in the 2C coding region and 3′UTR were identified and their structures were predicted. Interestingly, the structural features of the CRE and 3′UTR were different between PSV strains. The availability of these first complete genome sequences for PSV strains will facilitate future investigations of the molecular pathogenesis and evolutionary characteristics of PSV. PMID:25229940

  4. Equivalent Circuit Analysis of Serpentine Folded-waveguide Slow-wave Structures for Millimeter-wave Traveling-wave Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumathy, M.; Vinoy, K. J.; Datta, S. K.

    2009-02-01

    A simple equivalent circuit model for the analysis of dispersion and interaction impedance characteristics of serpentine folded-waveguide slow-wave structure was developed by considering the straight and curved portions of structure supporting the dominant TE 10-mode of the rectangular waveguide. Expressions for the lumped capacitance and inductance per period of the slow-wave structure were derived in terms of the physical dimensions of the structure, incorporating the effects of the beam-hole in the lumped parameters. The lumped parameters were subsequently interpreted for obtaining the dispersion and interaction impedance characteristics of the structure. The analysis was simple yet accurate in predicting the dispersion and interaction impedance behaviour at millimeter-wave frequencies. The analysis was benchmarked against measurement as well as with 3D electromagnetic modeling using MAFIA for two typical slow-wave structures (one at the Ka-band and the other at the W-band) and close agreement observed.

  5. Novel wave intensity analysis of arterial pulse wave propagation accounting for peripheral reflections.

    PubMed

    Alastruey, Jordi; Hunt, Anthony A E; Weinberg, Peter D

    2014-02-01

    We present a novel analysis of arterial pulse wave propagation that combines traditional wave intensity analysis with identification of Windkessel pressures to account for the effect on the pressure waveform of peripheral wave reflections. Using haemodynamic data measured in vivo in the rabbit or generated numerically in models of human compliant vessels, we show that traditional wave intensity analysis identifies the timing, direction and magnitude of the predominant waves that shape aortic pressure and flow waveforms in systole, but fails to identify the effect of peripheral reflections. These reflections persist for several cardiac cycles and make up most of the pressure waveform, especially in diastole and early systole. Ignoring peripheral reflections leads to an erroneous indication of a reflection-free period in early systole and additional error in the estimates of (i) pulse wave velocity at the ascending aorta given by the PU-loop method (9.5% error) and (ii) transit time to a dominant reflection site calculated from the wave intensity profile (27% error). These errors decreased to 1.3% and 10%, respectively, when accounting for peripheral reflections. Using our new analysis, we investigate the effect of vessel compliance and peripheral resistance on wave intensity, peripheral reflections and reflections originating in previous cardiac cycles. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal for Numerical Methods in Biomedical Engineering published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Novel wave intensity analysis of arterial pulse wave propagation accounting for peripheral reflections

    PubMed Central

    Alastruey, Jordi; Hunt, Anthony A E; Weinberg, Peter D

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel analysis of arterial pulse wave propagation that combines traditional wave intensity analysis with identification of Windkessel pressures to account for the effect on the pressure waveform of peripheral wave reflections. Using haemodynamic data measured in vivo in the rabbit or generated numerically in models of human compliant vessels, we show that traditional wave intensity analysis identifies the timing, direction and magnitude of the predominant waves that shape aortic pressure and flow waveforms in systole, but fails to identify the effect of peripheral reflections. These reflections persist for several cardiac cycles and make up most of the pressure waveform, especially in diastole and early systole. Ignoring peripheral reflections leads to an erroneous indication of a reflection-free period in early systole and additional error in the estimates of (i) pulse wave velocity at the ascending aorta given by the PU–loop method (9.5% error) and (ii) transit time to a dominant reflection site calculated from the wave intensity profile (27% error). These errors decreased to 1.3% and 10%, respectively, when accounting for peripheral reflections. Using our new analysis, we investigate the effect of vessel compliance and peripheral resistance on wave intensity, peripheral reflections and reflections originating in previous cardiac cycles. PMID:24132888

  7. Full Moment Tensor Analysis at The Geysers Geothermal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, O. S.; Dreger, D. S.; Hellweg, M.; Lombard, P. N.; Ford, S. R.; Taira, T.; Taggart, J.; Weldon, T. J.

    2011-12-01

    Geothermal energy has been produced at The Geysers Geothermal Field in Northern California for more than forty years. It has been demonstrated that increased steam production and fluid injection correlates positively with changes in earthquake activity, resulting in thousands of tiny earthquakes each year with events ranging in magnitude up to 4.5. We determine source parameters for the largest of these earthquakes using a regional distance moment tensor method. We invert three-component, complete waveform data from broadband stations of the Berkeley Digital Seismic Network, the Northern California Seismic Network and the USArray deployment (2005-2007) for the complete, six-element moment tensor. Some solutions depart substantially from a pure double-couple with some events having large volumetric components. Care is needed in the assessment of the significance of the non-double-couple terms. We have worked to develop a systematic procedure for the evaluation of aleatoric and epistemic solution uncertainty (e.g. Ford et al., 2009; Ford et al., 2010). We will present the solutions for The Geysers events together with estimates of random errors and systematic errors due to imperfect station coverage and knowledge of the velocity structure, which are needed to compute Green's functions for the inversion. Preliminary results indicate that some events have large isotropic components that appear to be stable and suggestive of fluid or gas involvement during the rupture processes. We are presently incorporating full moment tensor capability in the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory's automatic processing system and analyst interface. This upgrade will enable improved monitoring at The Geysers and volcanically active regions of California.

  8. Sources of Image Degradation in Fundamental and Harmonic Ultrasound Imaging: A Nonlinear, Full-Wave, Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Pinton, Gianmarco F.; Trahey, Gregg E.; Dahl, Jeremy J.

    2011-01-01

    A full-wave equation that describes nonlinear propagation in a heterogeneous attenuating medium is solved numerically with finite differences in the time domain (FDTD). This numerical method is used to simulate propagation of a diagnostic ultrasound pulse through a measured representation of the human abdomen with heterogeneities in speed of sound, attenuation, density, and nonlinearity. Conventional delay-and-sum beamforming is used to generate point spread functions (PSF) that display the effects of these heterogeneities. For the particular imaging configuration that is modeled, these PSFs reveal that the primary source of degradation in fundamental imaging is due to reverberation from near-field structures. Compared to fundamental imaging, reverberation clutter in harmonic imaging is 27.1 dB lower. Simulated tissue with uniform velocity but unchanged impedance characteristics indicates that for fundamental imaging, the primary source of degradation is phase aberration. PMID:21507753

  9. Erratum: Sources of Image Degradation in Fundamental and Harmonic Ultrasound Imaging: A Nonlinear, Full-Wave, Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Pinton, Gianmarco F.; Trahey, Gregg E.; Dahl, Jeremy J.

    2015-01-01

    A full-wave equation that describes nonlinear propagation in a heterogeneous attenuating medium is solved numerically with finite differences in the time domain. This numerical method is used to simulate propagation of a diagnostic ultrasound pulse through a measured representation of the human abdomen with heterogeneities in speed of sound, attenuation, density, and nonlinearity. Conventional delay-and-sum beamforming is used to generate point spread functions (PSFs) that display the effects of these heterogeneities. For the particular imaging configuration that is modeled, these PSFs reveal that the primary source of degradation in fundamental imaging is due to reverberation from near-field structures. Compared with fundamental imaging, reverberation clutter in harmonic imaging is 27.1 dB lower. Simulated tissue with uniform velocity but unchanged impedance characteristics indicates that for harmonic imaging, the primary source of degradation is phase aberration. PMID:21693410

  10. Study of ITER plasma position reflectometer using a two-dimensional full-wave finite-difference time domain code

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, F. da

    2008-10-15

    The EU will supply the plasma position reflectometer for ITER. The system will have channels located at different poloidal positions, some of them obliquely viewing a plasma which has a poloidal density divergence and curvature, both adverse conditions for profile measurements. To understand the impact of such topology in the reconstruction of density profiles a full-wave two-dimensional finite-difference time domain O-mode code with the capability for frequency sweep was used. Simulations show that the reconstructed density profiles still meet the ITER radial accuracy specifications for plasma position (1 cm), except for the highest densities. Other adverse effects such as multireflections induced by the blanket, density fluctuations, and MHD activity were considered and a first understanding on their impact obtained.

  11. A mesoscale gravity wave event observed during CCOPE. I - Multiscale statistical analysis of wave characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Steven E.; Golus, Robert E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a statistical analysis of the characteristics of the wavelike activity that occurred over the north-central United States on July 11-12, 1981, using data from the Cooperative Convective Precipitation Experiment in Montana. In particular, two distinct wave episodes of about 8-h duration within a longer (33 h) period of wave activity were studied in detail. It is demonstrated that the observed phenomena display features consistent with those of mesoscale gravity waves. The principles of statistical methods used to detect and track mesoscale gravity waves are discussed together with their limitations.

  12. Electromagnetic cyclotron waves in the solar wind: Wind observation and wave dispersion analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jian, L. K.; Moya, P. S.; Viñas, A. F.; Stevens, M.

    2016-03-25

    Wind observed long-lasting electromagnetic cyclotron waves near the proton cyclotron frequency on 11 March 2005, in the descending part of a fast wind stream. Bi-Maxwellian velocity distributions are fitted for core protons, beam protons, and α-particles. Using the fitted plasma parameters we conduct kinetic linear dispersion analysis and find ion cyclotron and/or firehose instabilities grow in six of 10 wave intervals. After Doppler shift, some of the waves have frequency and polarization consistent with observation, thus may be correspondence to the cyclotron waves observed.

  13. Electromagnetic Cyclotron Waves in the Solar Wind: Wind Observation and Wave Dispersion Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jian, L. K.; Moya, P. S.; Vinas, A. F.; Stevens, M.

    2016-01-01

    Wind observed long-lasting electromagnetic cyclotron waves near the proton cyclotron frequency on 11 March 2005, in the descending part of a fast wind stream. Bi-Maxwellian velocity distributions are fitted for core protons, beam protons, and alpha-particles. Using the fitted plasma parameters we conduct kinetic linear dispersion analysis and find ion cyclotron and/or firehose instabilities grow in six of 10 wave intervals. After Doppler shift, some of the waves have frequency and polarization consistent with observation, thus may be correspondence to the cyclotron waves observed.

  14. Plane-wave analysis of solar acoustic-gravity waves: A (slightly) new approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogart, Richard S.; Sa, L. A. D.; Duvall, Thomas L., Jr.; Haber, Deborah A.; Toomre, Juri; Hill, Frank

    1995-01-01

    The plane-wave decomposition of the acoustic-gravity wave effects observed in the photosphere provides a computationally efficient technique that probes the structure of the upper convective zone and boundary. In this region, the flat sun approximation is considered as being reasonably accurate. A technique to be used for the systematic plane-wave analysis of Michelson Doppler imager data, as part of the solar oscillations investigation, is described. Estimates of sensitivity are presented, and the effects of using different planar mappings are discussed. The technique is compared with previous approaches to the three dimensional plane-wave problem.

  15. Full-duplex RoF link with broadband mm-wave signal in W-band based on WDM-PON access network with optical mm-wave local oscillator broadcasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianxin; Zhang, Ruijiao; Li, Yanjie; Zhang, Qi; Yu, Jianguo

    2015-02-01

    A novel full-duplex link with an optical mm-wave local oscillator broadcasting for broadband millimeter (mm)-wave wireless access in W-band is proposed based on the WDM-PON-RoF. In our scheme, a universal optical mm-wave local oscillator in W-band is distributed over the whole network to up-convert the downlink IF optical signal, which not only improves the spectrum efficiency by reducing the bandwidth requirement of each downlink, but also decreases the degradation caused by the fiber chromatic dispersion. Moreover, since the incoherently down-converted uplink signal is modulated on the reused blank optical carrier extracted from the downlink signal, the base stations (BSs) need no optical source, and so its structure is simplified. The numerical simulation results agree well with the theoretical analysis and show that the proposed full-duplex link for the W-band wireless access based on WDM-PON-RoF maintains good performance with cost effective implement.

  16. Dynamic analysis of sea wave data measured by LED lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Yasukuni; Shimada, Shohei; Shiina, Tatsuo; Baji, Hiroyuki; Takemoto, Sae

    2016-10-01

    Form of sea wave is greatly affected by not just flow and depth of sea water, but also wind blowing on the sea surface. Therefore, measurement and analysis of sea wave motion is of assistance for control and operational safety of boats and ships. Generally, oceanic information is gauged by acoustic and electric wave. But these methods have not provided enough spatial and temporal resolution, and are completely out of touch with the on-site needs. Thus, the LED liar for sea wave measurement has been developed. The dynamic analysis of sea wave image measured by the LED lidar was conducted and the relationship with wind speed was evaluated. In this report, we first present the specifications and measurement methodologies of the LED lidar. Then we describe the actual measurements of sea wave with shallow angle by using this lidar and the results of their analysis.

  17. Full vector spherical harmonic analysis of the Holocene geomagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Marcia

    High-quality time-series paleomagnetic measurements have been used to derive spherical harmonic models of Earth's magnetic field for the past 2,000 years. A newly-developed data compilation, PSVMOD2.0 consists of time-series directional and intensity records that significantly improve the data quality and global distribution used to develop previous spherical harmonic models. PSVMOD2.0 consists of 185 paleomagnetic time series records from 85 global sites, including 30 full-vector records (inclination, declination and intensity). It includes data from additional sites in the Southern Hemisphere and Arctic and includes globally distributed sediment relative paleointensity records, significantly improving global coverage over previous models. PSVMOD2.0 records have been assessed in a series of 7 regional intercomparison studies, four in the Northern Hemisphere and 3 in the southern hemisphere. Comparisons on a regional basis have improved the quality and chronology of the data and allowed investigation of spatial coherence and the scale length associated with paleomagnetic secular variation (PSV) features. We have developed a modeling methodology based on nonlinear inversion of the PSVMOD2.0 directional and intensity records. Models of the geomagnetic field in 100-year snapshots have been derived for the past 2,000 with the ultimate goal of developing models spanning the past 8,000 years. We validate the models and the methodology by comparing with the GUFM1 historical models during the 400-year period of overlap. We find that the spatial distribution of sites and quality of data are sufficient to derive models that agree with GUFM1 in the large-scale characteristics of the field. We use the the models derived in this study to downward continue the field to the core-mantle boundary and examine characteristics of the large-scale structure of the magnetic field at the source region. The derived models are temporally consistent from one epoch to the next and exhibit

  18. Multivariate analysis of full-term neonatal polysomnographic data.

    PubMed

    Gerla, V; Paul, K; Lhotska, L; Krajca, V

    2009-01-01

    Polysomnography (PSG) is one of the most important noninvasive methods for studying maturation of the child brain. Sleep in infants is significantly different from sleep in adults. This paper addresses the problem of computer analysis of neonatal polygraphic signals. We applied methods designed for differentiating three important neonatal behavioral states: quiet sleep, active sleep, and wakefulness. The proportion of these states is a significant indicator of the maturity of the newborn brain in clinical practice. In this study, we used data provided by the Institute for Care of Mother and Child, Prague (12 newborn infants of similar postconceptional age). The data were scored by an experienced physician to four states (wake, quiet sleep, active sleep, movement artifact). For accurate classification, it was necessary to determine the most informative features. We used a method based on power spectral density (PSD) applied to each EEG channel. We also used features derived from electrooculogram (EOG), electromyogram (EMG), ECG, and respiration [pneumogram (PNG)] signals. The most informative feature was the measure of regularity of respiration from the PNG signal. We designed an algorithm for interpreting these characteristics. This algorithm was based on Markov models. The results of automatic detection of sleep states were compared to the "sleep profiles" determined visually. We evaluated both the success rate and the true positive rate of the classification, and statistically significant agreement of the two scorings was found. Two variants, for learning and for testing, were applied, namely learning from the data of all 12 newborns and tenfold cross-validation, and learning from the data of 11 newborns and testing on the data from the 12th newborn. We utilized information obtained from several biological signals (EEG, ECG, PNG, EMG, EOG) for our final classification. We reached the final success rate of 82.5%. The true positive rate was 81.8% and the false

  19. Chorus Wave Energy Budget Analysis in the Earth's Radiation Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blancarte, J.; Agapitov, O. V.; Mozer, F.

    2016-12-01

    Whistler-mode chorus emissions are important electromagnetic waves in the Earth's magnetosphere, where they continuously scatter and accelerate electrons of the outer radiation belt, controlling radiation hazards to satellites and astronauts. Here, we present an analysis of Van Allen Probes electric and magnetic field VLF waveform data, evaluating the wave energy budget, and show that a significant fraction of the energy corresponds to very oblique waves. Such waves, with a generally much smaller (up to 10 times) magnetic power than parallel waves, typically have comparable or even larger total energy. Very oblique waves may turn out to be a crucial agent of energy redistribution in the Earth's radiation belts and also provide nonlinear effects due to wave-particle interaction through the Landau resonance due to the significant electric field component parallel to the background magnetic field.

  20. Brain Wave Analysis and School Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Barry; And Others

    The Brain Wave Analyzer (BWA Ertl 02) was used to measure the brain potentials of 110 public school children. Resulting scores were correlated with concurrent measures of school achievement. Results indicate that certain brain wave scores have relatively low correlations with school achievement compared to traditional intelligence measures but may…

  1. Brain Wave Analysis and School Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Barry; And Others

    The Brain Wave Analyzer (BWA Ertl 02) was used to measure the brain potentials of 110 public school children. Resulting scores were correlated with concurrent measures of school achievement. Results indicate that certain brain wave scores have relatively low correlations with school achievement compared to traditional intelligence measures but may…

  2. Crack propagation monitoring in a full-scale aircraft fatigue test based on guided wave-Gaussian mixture model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Lei; Yuan, Shenfang; Bao, Qiao; Mei, Hanfei; Ren, Yuanqiang

    2016-05-01

    For aerospace application of structural health monitoring (SHM) technology, the problem of reliable damage monitoring under time-varying conditions must be addressed and the SHM technology has to be fully validated on real aircraft structures under realistic load conditions on ground before it can reach the status of flight test. In this paper, the guided wave (GW) based SHM method is applied to a full-scale aircraft fatigue test which is one of the most similar test status to the flight test. To deal with the time-varying problem, a GW-Gaussian mixture model (GW-GMM) is proposed. The probability characteristic of GW features, which is introduced by time-varying conditions is modeled by GW-GMM. The weak cumulative variation trend of the crack propagation, which is mixed in time-varying influence can be tracked by the GW-GMM migration during on-line damage monitoring process. A best match based Kullback-Leibler divergence is proposed to measure the GW-GMM migration degree to reveal the crack propagation. The method is validated in the full-scale aircraft fatigue test. The validation results indicate that the reliable crack propagation monitoring of the left landing gear spar and the right wing panel under realistic load conditions are achieved.

  3. A review of wave mechanics in the pulmonary artery with an emphasis on wave intensity analysis.

    PubMed

    Su, J; Hilberg, O; Howard, L; Simonsen, U; Hughes, A D

    2016-12-01

    Mean pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) remain the most common haemodynamic measures to evaluate the severity and prognosis of pulmonary hypertension. However, PVR only captures the non-oscillatory component of the right ventricular hydraulic load and neglects the dynamic compliance of the pulmonary arteries and the contribution of wave transmission. Wave intensity analysis offers an alternative way to assess the pulmonary vasculature in health and disease. Wave speed is a measure of arterial stiffness, and the magnitude and timing of wave reflection provide information on the degree of impedance mismatch between the proximal and distal circulation. Studies in the pulmonary artery have demonstrated distinct differences in arterial wave propagation between individuals with and without pulmonary vascular disease. Notably, greater wave speed and greater wave reflection are observed in patients with pulmonary hypertension and in animal models exposed to hypoxia. Studying wave propagation makes a valuable contribution to the assessment of the arterial system in pulmonary hypertension, and here, we briefly review the current state of knowledge of the methods used to evaluate arterial waves in the pulmonary artery. © 2016 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. A review of wave mechanics in the pulmonary artery with an emphasis on wave intensity analysis

    PubMed Central

    Su, Junjing; Hilberg, Ole; Howard, Luke; Simonsen, Ulf; Hughes, Alun D

    2016-01-01

    Mean pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance remain the most common hemodynamic measures to evaluate the severity and prognosis of pulmonary hypertension. However, pulmonary vascular resistance only captures the non-oscillatory component of the right ventricular hydraulic load and neglects the dynamic compliance of the pulmonary arteries and the contribution of wave transmission. Wave intensity analysis offers an alternative way to assess the pulmonary vasculature in health and disease. Wave speed is a measure of arterial stiffness and the magnitude and timing of wave reflection provide information on the degree of impedance mismatch between the proximal and distal circulation. Studies in the pulmonary artery have demonstrated distinct differences in arterial wave propagation between individuals with and without pulmonary vascular disease. Notably, greater wave speed and greater wave reflection are observed in patients with pulmonary hypertension and in animal models exposed to hypoxia. Studying wave propagation makes a valuable contribution to the assessment of the arterial system in pulmonary hypertension and here, we briefly review the current state of knowledge of the methods used to evaluate arterial waves in the pulmonary artery. PMID:27636734

  5. Multichannel analysis of forward scattered body waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, Scott Lawrence

    We describe a series of innovations which are the basis for a multichannel approach to direct imaging of forward scattered body waves recorded on broadband seismic arrays. The foundation is a method through which the irregularly sampled observed seismograms are interpolated onto an arbitrarily fine grid by means of a convolution between a spatial window function and the actual station locations. The result is a weighted stack which employs all the data to compute a robust and stable multichannel estimate of the wavefield. Deconvolution of the stacked data is shown to be equivalent to a multichannel deconvolution, with spatially variable weights equal to those used in stacking. Application to data from the Lodore array in Colorado and Wyoming shows variations in crustal structure across the array and also images upper mantle discontinuities. A second innovation focuses on the design of deconvolution operators that account for the loss of high frequency components of P-to- S conversions. Two variants are presented, the first increases linearly with P-to-S lag time, the second is based on convolutional quelling and a t* attenuation model. Both methods account for the high attentuation of S waves in the upper mantle. The quelling approach however, has two advantages; it is physically based, and it provides a unified framework for the combination of stacking and deconvolution. We apply multichannel stacking to derive three quantities from the observed data and the associated receiver functions: (1) correlation between stacks of the entire array and local subarray stacks, (2) RMS amplitude of the receiver functions, and (3) Pms-to- P amplitude variations. Application of these attributes to data from recent broadband array deployments in southern Africa, Colorado and Wyoming, and the Tien Shan of central Asia shows these attributes to be highly correlated with the geology of the study areas and to be indicative of major lithospheric discontinuities beneath an array

  6. ICE/ISEE plasma wave data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenstadt, E. W.

    1992-01-01

    The interval reported on, from Jan. 1990 to Dec. 1991, has been one of continued processing and archiving of ICE plasma wave (pw) data and transition from analysis of ISEE 3 and ICE cometary data to ICE data taken along its cruise trajectory, where coronal mass ejections are the focus of attention. We have continued to examine with great interest the last year of ISEE 3's precomet phase, when it spent considerable time far downwind from Earth, recording conditions upstream, downstream, and across the very weak, distant flank bow shock. Among other motivations was the apparent similarity of some shock and post shock structures to the signatures of the bow wave surrounding comet Giacobini-Zinner, whose ICE-phase data was revisited. While pursuing detailed, second-order scientific inquiries still pending from the late ISEE 3 recordings, we have also sought to position ourselves for study of CME's by instituting a data processing format new to the ISEE 3/ICE pw detector. Processed detector output has always been summarized and archived in 24-hour segments, with all pw channels individually plotted and stacked one above the next down in frequency, with each channel calibrated separately to keep all data patterns equally visible in the plots, regardless of gross differences in energy content at the various frequencies. Since CME's, with their preceding and following solar wind plasmas, can take more than one day to pass by the spacecraft, a more condensed synoptic view of the pw data is required to identify, let alone assess, CME characteristics than has been afforded by the traditional routines. This requirement is addressed in a major new processing initiative in the past two years. Besides our own ongoing and fresh investigations, we have cooperated, within our resources, with studies conducted extramurally by distant colleagues irrespective of the phase of the ISEE 3/ICE mission under scrutiny. The remainder of this report summarizes our processing activities, our

  7. Analysis of Wave Characteristics in Extreme Seas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    AMERICAN IRON AND STEEL INSTITU_] Mr. Alexander D. Wilson Dr. Martin Prager Member Agencies: Address Correspondence to: United States Coast Guard 1...hurricane Camille are illustrated. Task 1 demonstrated the utility of the half-cycle matrix (HACYM) method in analyzing nonlinear time-series data. Task 2...Springfield, VA 22161 or Nonlinear Wave Spectrum Marine Tech. Information Facility Wave Modeling National Maritime Research Center Half-Cycle Matrix

  8. Ultrasound shear wave simulation based on nonlinear wave propagation and Wigner-Ville Distribution analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidari, Pooya Sobhe; Alirezaie, Javad; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents a method for modeling and simulation of shear wave generation from a nonlinear Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) that is considered as a distributed force applied at the focal region of a HIFU transducer radiating in nonlinear regime. The shear wave propagation is simulated by solving the Navier's equation from the distributed nonlinear ARFI as the source of the shear wave. Then, the Wigner-Ville Distribution (WVD) as a time-frequency analysis method is used to detect the shear wave at different local points in the region of interest. The WVD results in an estimation of the shear wave time of arrival, its mean frequency and local attenuation which can be utilized to estimate medium's shear modulus and shear viscosity using the Voigt model.

  9. 3D Guided Wave Motion Analysis on Laminated Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Leckey, Cara; Yu, Lingyu

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves have proved useful for structural health monitoring (SHM) and nondestructive evaluation (NDE) due to their ability to propagate long distances with less energy loss compared to bulk waves and due to their sensitivity to small defects in the structure. Analysis of actively transmitted ultrasonic signals has long been used to detect and assess damage. However, there remain many challenging tasks for guided wave based SHM due to the complexity involved with propagating guided waves, especially in the case of composite materials. The multimodal nature of the ultrasonic guided waves complicates the related damage analysis. This paper presents results from parallel 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) simulations used to acquire 3D wave motion in the subject laminated carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites. The acquired 3D wave motion is then analyzed by frequency-wavenumber analysis to study the wave propagation and interaction in the composite laminate. The frequency-wavenumber analysis enables the study of individual modes and visualization of mode conversion. Delamination damage has been incorporated into the EFIT model to generate "damaged" data. The potential for damage detection in laminated composites is discussed in the end.

  10. Fast and Efficient Approach in Surface Wave Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanli, A. I.

    2010-12-01

    Fast and Efficient Approach in Surface Wave Analysis Ali Ismet KANLI Istanbul University, Engineering Faculty, Department of Geophysical Engineering, 34320, Avcilar Campus, Istanbul-Turkey, E-mail: kanli@istanbul.edu.tr Abstract: A two-step surface wave analysis method is proposed including both the MASW (Multi-channel Analysis of Surface Waves) and Micro-tremor based techniques. This is an integrated approach and the MASW survey data are gathered to obtain the shear wave velocity-depth information up to at least 30 meters by using a special type active seismic source called as SR-II or Kangaroo. In the second step, the microtremor data which are based on surface waves from seismic noise at each site are used to determine the shear-wave velocity-depth profiles. In the second step of the process, the multichannel analysis of surface waves data are given as constraints in the microtremor inversion process. This proposed algorithm allows us to calculate shear wave velocity-depth information with all geotechnical parameters from near surface to bedrock depths very fast and efficiently.

  11. An improved numerical model for wave rotor design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.; Wilson, Jack

    1992-01-01

    A numerical model has been developed which can predict both the unsteady flows within a wave rotor and the steady averaged flows in the ports. The model is based on the assumptions of one-dimensional, unsteady, and perfect gas flow. Besides the dominant wave behavior, it is also capable of predicting the effects of finite tube opening time, leakage from the tube ends, and viscosity. The relative simplicity of the model makes it useful for design, optimization, and analysis of wave rotor cycles for any application. This paper discusses some details of the model and presents comparisons between the model and two laboratory wave rotor experiments.

  12. An improved numerical model for wave rotor design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.; Wilson, Jack

    1993-01-01

    A numerical model has been developed which can predict both the unsteady flows within a wave rotor and the steady averaged flows in the ports. The model is based on the assumptions of one-dimensional, unsteady, and perfect gas flow. Besides the dominant wave behavior, it is also capable of predicting the effects of finite tube opening time, leakage from the tube ends, and viscosity. The relative simplicity of the model makes it useful for design, optimization, and analysis of wave rotor cycles for any application. This paper discusses some details of the model and presents comparisons between the model and two laboratory wave rotor experiments.

  13. Analysis of the Giacobini-Zinner bow wave

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, E.J.; Slavin, J.A.; Bame, S.J.; Thomsen, M.F.; Cowley, S.W.H.; Richardson, I.G.; Hovestadt, D.; Ipavich, F.M.; Ogilvie, K.W.; Coplan, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    The cometary bow wave of P/Giacobini-Zinner has been analyzed using the complete set of ICE field and particle observations to determine if it is a shock. Changes in the magnetic field and plasma flow velocities from upstream to downstream have been analyzed to determine the direction of the normal and the propagation velocity of the bow wave. The velocity has then been compared with the fast magnetosonic wave speed upstream to derive the Mach number and establish whether it is ''supersonic'', i.e., a shock, or ''subsonic,'' i.e., a large amplitude wave. The various measurements have also been compared with values derived from a Rankine-Hugoniot analysis. The results indicate that, inbound, the bow wave is a shock with M = 1.5. Outbound, a subsonic mach number is obtained, however, arguments are presented that the bow wave is also likely to be a shock at this location. 11 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Analysis of the Giacobini-Zinner bow wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. J.; Slavin, J. A.; Bame, S. J.; Thomsen, M. F.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Richardson, I. G.; Hovestadt, D.; Ipavich, F. M.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Coplan, M. A.

    1986-01-01

    The cometary bow wave of P/Giacobini-Zinner has been analyzed using the complete set of ICE field and particle observations to determine if it is a shock. Changes in the magnetic field and plasma flow velocities from upstream to downstream have been analyzed to determine the direction of the normal and the propagation velocity of the bow wave. The velocity has then been compared with the fast magnetosonic wave speed upstream to derive the Mach number and establish whether it is supersonic, i.e., a shock, or subsonic, i.e., a large amplitude wave. The various measurements have also been compared with values derived from a Rankine-Hugoniot analysis. The results indicate that, inbound, the bow wave is a shock with M = 1.5. Outbound, a subsonic Mach number is obtained, however, arguments are presented that the bow wave is also likely to be a shock at this location.

  15. Acoustic wave-equation based full-waveform microseismic source location using improved scattering-integral approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chao; Dong, Liang-guo; Liu, Yu-zhu; Yang, Ji-zhong

    2017-06-01

    A novel acoustic wave-equation-based full-waveform source location method is proposed to locate microseismic sources accurately and efficiently. The proposed Fréchet derivatives of waveform with respect to location parameters are in two parts, one of which accounts for the influence of geometrical perturbation, the other accounts for the influence of spatial velocity variation on source location. Sources are accurately located with the new formula, especially in complex velocity models. The proposed method uses an improved scattering-integral (SI) approach which efficiently locates the source and almost halves the usual computation cost. To further accelerate the locating procedure, the truncated Gauss-Newton method is applied at negligible extra computation cost. Numerical tests show that far fewer iterations are needed for source location using this method than with the more commonly used conjugate gradient method. To reduce the problem of cycle skipping, correlation is applied to select the best starting source positions. Both 2-D and 3-D numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the validity and high efficiency of the proposed method, and the robustness of the proposed method is also tested for the case when the velocity model is inaccurate or the signal to noise ratio is low. Finally, field data are used to show the realistic performance of the proposed method.

  16. Acoustic wave-equation based full-waveform microseismic source location using improved scattering-integral approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chao; Dong, Liang-guo; Liu, Yu-zhu; Yang, Ji-zhong

    2017-03-01

    A novel acoustic wave-equation-based full-waveform source location method is proposed to locate microseismic sources accurately and efficiently. The proposed Fréchet derivatives of waveform with respect to location parameters are in two parts, one of which accounts for the influence of geometrical perturbation, the other accounts for the influence of spatial velocity variation on source location. Sources are accurately located with the new formula, especially in complex velocity models. The proposed method uses an improved scattering-integral (SI) approach which efficiently locates the source and almost halves the usual computation cost. To further accelerate the locating procedure, the truncated Gauss-Newton (TGN) method is applied at negligible extra computation cost. Numerical tests show that far fewer iterations are needed for source location using this method than with the more commonly used conjugate gradient method. To reduce the problem of cycle skipping, correlation is applied to select the best starting source positions. Both 2D and 3D numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the validity and high efficiency of the proposed method, and the robustness of the proposed method is also tested for the case when the velocity model is inaccurate or the signal to noise ratio is low. Finally, field data are used to show the realistic performance of the proposed method.

  17. Efficient calculation of full waveform time domain inversion for electromagnetic problem using fictitious wave domain method and cascade decimation decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamura, N.; Schultz, A.

    2016-12-01

    Recently, a full waveform time domain inverse solution has been developed for the magnetotelluric (MT) and controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) methods. The ultimate goal of this approach is to obtain a computationally tractable direct waveform joint inversion to solve simultaneously for source fields and earth conductivity structure in three and four dimensions. This is desirable on several grounds, including the improved spatial resolving power expected from use of a multitude of source illuminations, the ability to operate in areas of high levels of source signal spatial complexity, and non-stationarity. This goal would not be obtainable if one were to adopt the pure time domain solution for the inverse problem. This is particularly true for the case of MT surveys, since an enormous number of degrees of freedom are required to represent the observed MT waveforms across a large frequency bandwidth. This means that for the forward simulation, the smallest time steps should be finer than that required to represent the highest frequency, while the number of time steps should also cover the lowest frequency. This leads to a sensitivity matrix that is computationally burdensome to solve a model update. We have implemented a code that addresses this situation through the use of cascade decimation decomposition to reduce the size of the sensitivity matrix substantially, through quasi-equivalent time domain decomposition. We also use a fictitious wave domain method to speed up computation time of the forward simulation in the time domain. By combining these refinements, we have developed a full waveform joint source field/earth conductivity inverse modeling method. We found that cascade decimation speeds computations of the sensitivity matrices dramatically, keeping the solution close to that of the undecimated case. For example, for a model discretized into 2.6x105 cells, we obtain model updates in less than 1 hour on a 4U rack-mounted workgroup Linux server, which

  18. Terahertz wave spectrum analysis of microstrip structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Mei-jing; Li, Jiu-sheng

    2012-03-01

    Terahertz wave is a kind of electromagnetic wave ranging from 0.1~10THz, between microwave and infrared, which occupies a special place in the electromagnetic spectrum. Terahertz radiation has a strong penetration for many media materials and nonpolar substance, for example, dielectric material, plastic, paper carton and cloth. In recent years, researchers around the world have paid great attention on terahertz technology, such as safety inspection, chemical biology, medical diagnosis and terahertz wave imaging, etc. Transmission properties of two-dimensional metal microstrip structures in the terahertz regime are presented and tested. Resonant terahertz transmission was demonstrated in four different arrays of subwavelength microstrip structure patterned on semiconductor. The effects of microstrip microstrip structure shape were investigated by using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system. The resonant terahertz transmission has center frequency of 2.05 THz, transmission of 70%.

  19. Terahertz wave spectrum analysis of microstrip structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Mei-jing; Li, Jiu-sheng

    2011-11-01

    Terahertz wave is a kind of electromagnetic wave ranging from 0.1~10THz, between microwave and infrared, which occupies a special place in the electromagnetic spectrum. Terahertz radiation has a strong penetration for many media materials and nonpolar substance, for example, dielectric material, plastic, paper carton and cloth. In recent years, researchers around the world have paid great attention on terahertz technology, such as safety inspection, chemical biology, medical diagnosis and terahertz wave imaging, etc. Transmission properties of two-dimensional metal microstrip structures in the terahertz regime are presented and tested. Resonant terahertz transmission was demonstrated in four different arrays of subwavelength microstrip structure patterned on semiconductor. The effects of microstrip microstrip structure shape were investigated by using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system. The resonant terahertz transmission has center frequency of 2.05 THz, transmission of 70%.

  20. Using Artificially Generated VLF Electromagnetic Signals, Produced by the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) Full Transmitter Array, as Geophysical Probe Waves.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzykowski, M.; Solie, D.; Stevens, R.

    2008-12-01

    Field measurements were made to test the feasibility of using HAARP stimulated ionospheric emissions of Very Low Frequency (VLF) electromagnetic signals, as probe waves for geophysical studies. The test site chosen for the experiment was a mud volcano near Tolsona, Alaska on the Glenn Highway. Data acquisition was done with a Zonge GDP-32 Receiver. HAARP was run at full power and modulated at varying frequencies in the VLF range at frequencies of: 1, 4, 8, 16, 32, 96, 4096 and 6144 Hz. Both natural and induced VLF signals were recorded, with the intention of seeing a stronger signal at HAARP-generated frequencies upon examination of the data. Even though significant interference was caused by nearby power lines during the experiment, we measured correlated electric and magnetic field strengths significantly above the natural and artificial background for two frequencies (4096Hz and 6144Hz.). Our analysis indicates that given favorable ionospheric conditions, HAARP-generated VLF signals have the signal strength necessary for use as probe waves in geophysical field studies. This experiment was part of, and made possible by, the PARS 2007 Summer School.

  1. Analysis of thermal wave in soil medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacko, P. Tessy; Mahesh, N. R.

    2017-06-01

    Radiant energy from the sun is the major source of thermal regime of the soil. Thermal properties and the way in which thermal wave passes through the laterite soil in eastern tropical region are analyzed. The amplitude of thermal wave comes down corresponding to increases in the order of harmonics and remain without much change at different soil layers. Heat flow through the soil considerably influences plant growth and meteorology. Thermal properties of the soil determine the amount of heat flows and temperature variations in the soil.

  2. Self-consistent full-wave and Fokker-Planck calculations for ion cyclotron heating in non-Maxwellian plasmasa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, E. F.; Berry, L. A.; Ahern, S. D.; Barrett, R. F.; Batchelor, D. B.; Carter, M. D.; D'Azevedo, E. F.; Moore, R. D.; Harvey, R. W.; Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.; Dumont, R. J.; Phillips, C. K.; Okuda, H.; Smithe, D. N.; Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C.; Choi, M.

    2006-05-01

    Magnetically confined plasmas can contain significant concentrations of nonthermal plasma particles arising from fusion reactions, neutral beam injection, and wave-driven diffusion in velocity space. Initial studies in one-dimensional and experimental results show that nonthermal energetic ions can significantly affect wave propagation and heating in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. In addition, these ions can absorb power at high harmonics of the cyclotron frequency where conventional two-dimensional global-wave models are not valid. In this work, the all-orders global-wave solver AORSA [E. F. Jaeger et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 195001 (2003)] is generalized to treat non-Maxwellian velocity distributions. Quasilinear diffusion coefficients are derived directly from the wave fields and used to calculate energetic ion velocity distributions with the CQL3D Fokker-Planck code [R. W. Harvey and M. G. McCoy, Proceedings of the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Simulation and Modeling of Thermonuclear Plasmas, Montreal, Canada, 1992 (USDOC NTIS Document No. DE93002962)]. For comparison, the quasilinear coefficients can be calculated numerically by integrating the Lorentz force equations along particle orbits. Self-consistency between the wave electric field and resonant ion distribution function is achieved by iterating between the global-wave and Fokker-Planck solutions.

  3. High-resolution P and S-wave Velocity Structures from Elastic Full Waveform Inversion of Multi-Component Ocean Bottom Cable Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sears, T.; Singh, S. C.; Barton, P.

    2007-12-01

    Full waveform inversion is becoming a realistic option with the advent of modern computing facilities, both in global and exploration seismology. Over the last ten years, we have developed a series of elastic full waveform inversion algorithm and have applied to a variety of acquisition geometry. The forward modelling is based on the finite difference approximation to the full elastic wave equation in the time domain, which can incorporate converted waves, refraction, and attenuation. The inversion algorithm is based on the minimisation of observed data with synthetic data in a least-squares sense, and requires a cross-correlation of the back propagation of residual with forward propagated wavefield in a background media. Starting with the background velocity obtained using travel time inversion, we first invert wide-angle and low frequency data, which provides medium wavelength velocity structure, and then invert near offset and high frequencies that leads to high-resolution P- and S-wave velocity structure. We first invert vertical component data to obtain short wavelength P- and S-wave velocities, which are constrained by amplitude versus offset behaviour of the P-P reflection, and then invert horizontal component data to obtain very-high resolution S-wave velocity structure, which is constrained by P-S reflection. Finally, we invert all the data simultaneously to have consistency over the data and model space. We found that the high-resolution S-wave velocity image is far superior than the P-wave velocity image and provides information that may not be present in the P-wave velocity image. Combined P and S-wave velocity structure could be used to quantify sub-surface lithology and fluid saturation and pressure. In this presentation we will highlight the challenges faced during the development of our waveform inversion and their implication for the global seismology problems.

  4. Air-coupled guided wave detection and wavenumber filtering to full-field representation of delamination in composite plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testoni, N.; De Marchi, L.; Marzani, A.

    2014-03-01

    Delamination faults in composite plates are considered dangerous as they can cause catastrophic failure before being visually assessed. Effects of delaminations are particularly relevant in guided waves scattering, local resonances and mode conversion. Detecting and analyzing these phenomena is relevant for plate characterization. In this work, leaky guided waves are used to detect delamination in composite plates. To such purpose, a hybrid ultrasonic set-up and a dedicated signal processing are proposed. An air-probe with a proper lift-off is used to detect the leakage in terms of air pressure wave over the plate surface. A piezoelectric transducer is used to generate acoustic guided waves in the composite plate. Multiple acquisitions are averaged to increase the SNR for each position of the air-probe. Curvelet Transform (CT) domain processing of the projection coefficients of the acquired elastic wave is exploited to decompose waves that are overlapped both in the time/space and in the frequency/wavenumber domain. In fact, CT is a special member of the family of multiscale and multidimensional transforms whose spatial and temporal localization is very well suited for processing signals which are sparse in the above mentioned domains. In this work this sparsity is exploited to emphasize the information of leaky guided waves scattered by the delamination by removing from the data the information related to the incident wave field. As an application, the presence of a delamination generated by a 21 Joule impact performed on a 4.9 mm thickness composite laminate was detected contactless by exploiting guided wave leakage.

  5. Two dimensional kinetic analysis of electrostatic harmonic plasma waves

    SciTech Connect

    Fonseca-Pongutá, E. C.; Ziebell, L. F.; Gaelzer, R.; Yoon, P. H.

    2016-06-15

    Electrostatic harmonic Langmuir waves are virtual modes excited in weakly turbulent plasmas, first observed in early laboratory beam-plasma experiments as well as in rocket-borne active experiments in space. However, their unequivocal presence was confirmed through computer simulated experiments and subsequently theoretically explained. The peculiarity of harmonic Langmuir waves is that while their existence requires nonlinear response, their excitation mechanism and subsequent early time evolution are governed by essentially linear process. One of the unresolved theoretical issues regards the role of nonlinear wave-particle interaction process over longer evolution time period. Another outstanding issue is that existing theories for these modes are limited to one-dimensional space. The present paper carries out two dimensional theoretical analysis of fundamental and (first) harmonic Langmuir waves for the first time. The result shows that harmonic Langmuir wave is essentially governed by (quasi)linear process and that nonlinear wave-particle interaction plays no significant role in the time evolution of the wave spectrum. The numerical solutions of the two-dimensional wave spectra for fundamental and harmonic Langmuir waves are also found to be consistent with those obtained by direct particle-in-cell simulation method reported in the literature.

  6. Preliminary Analysis of a Submerged Wave Energy Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, J. R.; Wagner, J. J.; Hayatdavoodi, M.; Ertekin, R. C.

    2016-02-01

    Preliminary analysis of a submerged wave energy harvesting device is presented. The device is composed of a thin, horizontally submerged plate that is restricted to heave oscillations under the influence of surface waves. The submerged plate is oscillating, and it can be attached to a fixed rotor, or a piston, to harvest the wave energy. A fully submerged wave energy converter is preferred over a surface energy convertor due to its durability and less visual and physical distractions it presents. In this study, the device is subject to nonlinear shallow-water waves. Wave loads on the submerged oscillating plate are obtained via the Level I Green-Naghdi equations. The unsteady motion of the plate is obtained by solving the nonlinear equations of motion. The results are obtained for a range of waves with varying heights and periods. The amplitude and period of plate oscillations are analyzed as functions of the wave parameters and plate width. Particular attention is given to the selection of the site of desired wave field. Initial estimation on the amount of energy extraction from the device, located near shore at a given site, is provided.

  7. Time-series analysis of offshore-wind-wave groupiness

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, H.B.

    1988-01-01

    This research is to applies basic time-series-analysis techniques on the complex envelope function where the study of the offshore-wind-wave groupiness is a relevant interest. In constructing the complex envelope function, a phase-unwrapping technique is integrated into the algorithm for estimating the carrier frequency and preserving the phase information for further studies. The Gaussian random wave model forms the basis of the wave-group statistics by the envelope-amplitude crossings. Good agreement between the theory and the analysis of field records is found. Other linear models, such as the individual-waves approach and the energy approach, are compared to the envelope approach by analyzing the same set of records. It is found that the character of the filter used in each approach dominates the wave-group statistics. Analyses indicate that the deep offshore wind waves are weakly nonlinear and the Gaussian random assumption remains appropriate for describing the sea state. Wave groups statistics derived from the Gaussian random wave model thus become applicable.

  8. Information content in frequency-dependent, multi-offset GPR data for layered media reconstruction using full-wave inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Coster, Albéric; Phuong Tran, Anh; Lambot, Sébastien

    2014-05-01

    Water lost through leaks can represent high percentages of the total production in water supply systems and constitutes an important issue. Leak detection can be tackled with various techniques such as the ground-penetrating radar (GPR). Based on this technology, various procedures have been elaborated to characterize a leak and its evolution. In this study, we focus on a new full-wave radar modelling approach for near-field conditions, which takes into account the antenna effects as well as the interactions between the antenna(s) and the medium through frequency-dependent global transmission and reflection coefficients. This approach is applied to layered media for which 3-D Green's functions can be calculated. The model allows for a quantitative estimation of the properties of multilayered media by using full-wave inversion. This method, however, proves to be limited to provide users with an on-demand assessment as it is generally computationally demanding and time consuming, depending on the medium configuration as well as the number of unknown parameters to retrieve. In that respect, we propose two leads in order to enhance the parameter retrieval step. The first one consists in analyzing the impact of the reduction of the number of frequencies on the information content. For both numerical and laboratory experiments, this operation has been achieved by investigating the response surface topography of objective functions arising from the comparison between measured and modelled data. The second one involves the numerical implementation of multistatic antenna configurations with constant and variable offsets in the model. These two kinds of analyses are then combined in numerical experiments to observe the conjugated effect of the number of frequencies and the offset configuration. To perform the numerical analyses, synthetic Green's functions were simulated for different multilayered medium configurations. The results show that an antenna offset increase leads

  9. Theoretical analysis of wave impact forces on platform deck structures

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, P.; Murray, J.J.; Yu, W.C.

    1995-12-31

    A description is given of the theoretical analysis procedures used to predict the wave impact forces acting on offshore platform deck structures in large incident waves. Both vertical and horizontal plane forces are considered, in terms of the different type elements that make up such structures and the type of hydrodynamic force mathematical models used to represent the basic forces. Effects of wave surface nonlinearity (including kinematics), deck material porosity, and velocity blockage and shielding are considered in the analysis, which also includes a physical explanation of various observed phenomena. Results of comparison and correlation with experimental model test data are presented, including description of procedures used in data analysis to eliminate extraneous dynamic effects that often contaminate such data. The influence of wave heading angle relative to different structural elements (and overall structures) is also described, including both analytical representations and physical interpretations.

  10. Optimizing detection and analysis of slow waves in sleep EEG.

    PubMed

    Mensen, Armand; Riedner, Brady; Tononi, Giulio

    2016-12-01

    Analysis of individual slow waves in EEG recording during sleep provides both greater sensitivity and specificity compared to spectral power measures. However, parameters for detection and analysis have not been widely explored and validated. We present a new, open-source, Matlab based, toolbox for the automatic detection and analysis of slow waves; with adjustable parameter settings, as well as manual correction and exploration of the results using a multi-faceted visualization tool. We explore a large search space of parameter settings for slow wave detection and measure their effects on a selection of outcome parameters. Every choice of parameter setting had some effect on at least one outcome parameter. In general, the largest effect sizes were found when choosing the EEG reference, type of canonical waveform, and amplitude thresholding. Previously published methods accurately detect large, global waves but are conservative and miss the detection of smaller amplitude, local slow waves. The toolbox has additional benefits in terms of speed, user-interface, and visualization options to compare and contrast slow waves. The exploration of parameter settings in the toolbox highlights the importance of careful selection of detection METHODS: The sensitivity and specificity of the automated detection can be improved by manually adding or deleting entire waves and or specific channels using the toolbox visualization functions. The toolbox standardizes the detection procedure, sets the stage for reliable results and comparisons and is easy to use without previous programming experience. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Millimeter-Wave Polarimetry Instrumentation and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierman, Evan M.

    The chapters in this thesis roughly follow a reverse chronological order of my work in graduate school. Chapter 1 is the culmination of work with Dr. Dowell at Caltech, motivated by Professor Keating, to study polarized Galactic emission. Although the main goal of BICEP was to search for CMB B-modes, observation time was also spent on the Galactic plane region. Initially the data were collected to understand Galactic emission as a foreground of CMB polarization; however, the final paper focused on studying Galactic physics and not the CMB. Through comparison of BICEP data to other experiments, different models of the polarization production were explored. This paper also served as the initial instrument paper for the 220 GHz hardware added to BICEP for the second and third observing seasons. Chapter 2 is the software analysis work related to the paper in Chapter 1 that either did not make it into the paper or did not pan out. To explore BICEP's capabilities and produce better maps different scan strategies were explored such as full 360° scans and elevation scanning. BICEP observations are contaminated on large scales by a noise source that has not been fully identified. Different mapmaking methods were explored to remove this systematic as well as 1/ f noise and telescope systematics to maximize recovered signal. Chapter 3 represents a sample of contributions to the BICEP telescope and the UCSD FTS. To characterize the spectral response of the B ICEP telescope and the faraday rotation modulators, I helped design and construct the UCSD including layout and optical design, synthesizing wire grids, integrating the system with our lab's test cryostat, and developing software and analysis tools. My main contribution to the CMB polarization work on BICEP was analysis of calibration data. Specifically I talk about my work to understand the beams and differential pointing from observations of the Moon. Chapter 4 represents my work on Faraday Rotation devices. Initially

  12. Pulse echo and combined resonance techniques: a full set of LGT acoustic wave constants and temperature coefficients.

    PubMed

    Sturtevant, Blake T; Davulis, Peter M; da Cunha, Mauricio Pereira

    2009-04-01

    This work reports on the determination of langatate elastic and piezoelectric constants and their associated temperature coefficients employing 2 independent methods, the pulse echo overlap (PEO) and a combined resonance technique (CRT) to measure bulk acoustic wave (BAW) phase velocities. Details on the measurement techniques are provided and discussed, including the analysis of the couplant material in the PEO technique used to couple signal to the sample, which showed to be an order of magnitude more relevant than the experimental errors involved in the data extraction. At room temperature, elastic and piezoelectric constants were extracted by the PEO and the CRT methods and showed results consistent to within a few percent for the elastic constants. Both raw acquired data and optimized constants, based on minimization routines applied to all the modes involved in the measurements, are provided and discussed. Comparison between the elastic constants and their temperature behavior with the literature reveals the recent efforts toward the consistent growth and characterization of LGT, in spite of significant variations (between 1 and 30%) among the constants extracted by different groups at room temperature. The density, dielectric permittivity constants, and respective temperature coefficients used in this work have also been independently determined based on samples from the same crystal boule. The temperature behavior of the BAW modes was extracted using the CRT technique, which has the advantage of not relying on temperature dependent acoustic couplants. Finally, the extracted temperature coefficients for the elastic and piezoelectric constants between room temperature and 120 degrees C are reported and discussed in this work.

  13. Analysis shear wave velocity structure obtained from surface wave methods in Bornova, Izmir

    SciTech Connect

    Pamuk, Eren Akgün, Mustafa; Özdağ, Özkan Cevdet

    2016-04-18

    Properties of the soil from the bedrock is necessary to describe accurately and reliably for the reduction of earthquake damage. Because seismic waves change their amplitude and frequency content owing to acoustic impedance difference between soil and bedrock. Firstly, shear wave velocity and depth information of layers on bedrock is needed to detect this changing. Shear wave velocity can be obtained using inversion of Rayleigh wave dispersion curves obtained from surface wave methods (MASW- the Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves, ReMi-Refraction Microtremor, SPAC-Spatial Autocorrelation). While research depth is limeted in active source study, a passive source methods are utilized for deep depth which is not reached using active source methods. ReMi method is used to determine layer thickness and velocity up to 100 m using seismic refraction measurement systems.The research carried out up to desired depth depending on radius using SPAC which is utilized easily in conditions that district using of seismic studies in the city. Vs profiles which are required to calculate deformations in under static and dynamic loads can be obtained with high resolution using combining rayleigh wave dispersion curve obtained from active and passive source methods. In the this study, Surface waves data were collected using the measurements of MASW, ReMi and SPAC at the İzmir Bornova region. Dispersion curves obtained from surface wave methods were combined in wide frequency band and Vs-depth profiles were obtained using inversion. Reliability of the resulting soil profiles were provided by comparison with theoretical transfer function obtained from soil paremeters and observed soil transfer function from Nakamura technique and by examination of fitting between these functions. Vs values are changed between 200-830 m/s and engineering bedrock (Vs>760 m/s) depth is approximately 150 m.

  14. Near Real-time Full-wave Centroid Moment Tensor (CMT) Inversion for Ground-motion forecast in 3D Earth Structure of Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P.; Lee, E.; Jordan, T. H.; Maechling, P. J.

    2011-12-01

    Accurate and rapid CMT inversion is important for seismic hazard analysis. We have developed an algorithm for very rapid full-wave CMT inversions in a 3D Earth structure model and applied it on earthquakes recorded by the Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN). The procedure relies on the use of receiver-side Green tensors (RGTs), which comprise the spatial-temporal displacements produced by the three orthogonal unit impulsive point forces acting at the receiver. We have constructed a RGT database for 219 broadband stations in Southern California using an updated version of the 3D SCEC Community Velocity Model (CVM) version 4.0 and a staggered-grid finite-difference code. Finite-difference synthetic seismograms for any earthquake in our modeling volume can be simply calculated by extracting a small, source-centered volume from the RGT database and applying the reciprocity principle. We have developed an automated algorithm that combines a grid-search for suitable epicenter and focal mechanisms with a gradient-descent method that further refines the grid-search results. In this algorithm, the CMT solutions are inverted near real-time by using waveform in a 3D Earth structure. Comparing with the CMT solutions provided by the Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN) shows that our solutions generally provide better fit to the observed waveforms. Our algorithm may provide more robust CMT solutions for earthquakes in Southern California. In addition, the rapid and accurate full-wave CMT inversion has potential to extent to accurate near real-time ground-motion prediction based on 3D structure model for earthquake early warning purpose. When combined with real-time telemetered waveform recordings, our algorithm can provide (near) real-time ground-motion forecast.

  15. Characteristic-Wave Approach Complements Modal Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    1990-01-01

    Aspects of estimation of unmodeled dynamics discussed. Report discusses solution of nonhomogeneous governing matrix equation for dynamics of short vibrational pulses propagating as characteristic waves in large structure. Applied to analyze response, to repeated pulses, of beam clamped at one end and free at other. Shows all qualitative characteristics occuring under arbitrary periodic excitations of beam and those of quasi-periodic excitations, in as much as such excitations obtained by linear superpositions of periodic excitations.

  16. Dispersive Wave Analysis Using the Chirplet Transform

    SciTech Connect

    Kerber, Florian; Luangvilai, Kritsakorn; Kuttig, Helge; Niethammer, Marc; Jacobs, Laurence J.

    2007-03-21

    Time-frequency representations (TFR) are a widely used tool to analyze signals of guided waves such as Lamb waves. As a consequence of the uncertainty principle, however, the resolution in time and frequency is limited for all existing TFR methods. Due to the multi-modal and dispersive character of Lamb waves, displacement or energy related quantities can only be allocated to individual modes when they are well-separated in the time-frequency plane.The chirplet transform (CT) has been introduced as a generalization of both the wavelet and Short-time Fourier transform (STFT). It offers additional degrees of freedom to adjust time-frequency atoms which can be exploited in a model-based approach to match the group delay of individual modes. Thus, more exact allocation of quantities of interest is possible.The objective of this research is to use a previously developed adaptive algorithm based on the CT for nondestructive evaluation. Both numerically and experimentally generated data for a single aluminum plate is analyzed to determine the accuracy and robustness of the new method in comparison the classical STFT.

  17. Uncertainty analysis of wind-wave predictions in Lake Michigan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekouee, Navid; Ataie-Ashtiani, Behzad; Hamidi, Sajad Ahmad

    2016-10-01

    With all the improvement in wave and hydrodynamics numerical models, the question rises in our mind that how the accuracy of the forcing functions and their input can affect the results. In this paper, a commonly used numerical third-generation wave model, SWAN is applied to predict waves in Lake Michigan. Wind data are analyzed to determine wind variation frequency over Lake Michigan. Wave predictions uncertainty due to wind local effects are compared during a period where wind has a fairly constant speed and direction over the northern and southern basins. The study shows that despite model calibration in Lake Michigan area, the model deficiency arises from ignoring wind effects in small scales. Wave prediction also emphasizes that small scale turbulence in meteorological forces can increase prediction errors by 38%. Wave frequency and coherence analysis show that both models can predict the wave variation time scale with the same accuracy. Insufficient number of meteorological stations can result in neglecting local wind effects and discrepancies in current predictions. The uncertainty of wave numerical models due to input uncertainties and model principals should be taken into account for design risk factors.

  18. Bethe-Salpeter wave functions of ηc(2 S ) and ψ (2 S ) states from full lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nochi, Kazuki; Kawanai, Taichi; Sasaki, Shoichi

    2016-12-01

    We discuss the internal structure of radially excited charmonium mesons based on the equal-time and Coulomb gauge Bethe-Salpeter (BS) amplitudes, which are obtained in lattice QCD. Our simulations are performed with a relativistic heavy-quark action for the charm quark on the (2 +1 )-flavor PACS-CS gauge configurations at the lightest pion mass, Mπ=156 (7 ) MeV . The variational method is applied to the study of the optimal charmonium operators for ground and first excited states of S -wave charmonia. We successfully calculate the BS wave functions of ηc(2 S ) and ψ (2 S ) states, as well as ηc(1 S ) and J /ψ states, and then estimate the root-mean-square radii of both the 1 S and 2 S charmonium states. We also examine whether a series of the BS wave functions from the ground state to excited states can be described by a single set of the spin-independent and spin-dependent interquark potentials with a unique quark mass. It is found that the quark kinetic mass and both the central and the spin-spin charmonium potentials, determined from the 2 S wave functions, fairly agree with the ones from the 1 S wave functions. This strongly supports the validity of the potential description for the charmonium system—at least, below the open-charm threshold.

  19. Shallow seismic surface waves analysis across a tectonic fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazdova, R.; Vilhelm, J.; Kolinsky, P.

    2011-12-01

    When performing a seismic survey of a shallow medium, we record wave motion which can be excited by a sledge hammer blow on the ground surface. The recorded wave motion is a complex combination of different types of waves, propagating directly from the source to the receiver, reflecting from velocity boundaries, passing through multiple layers or forming dispersive surface waves. We can use all of these wave types to identify the structure of the medium. In the presented contribution we deal with interpretation of surface waves. In contrast with body waves, the surface wave velocity is frequency-dependent. This property is called dispersion, and the dependence of the velocity on the frequency is known as the dispersion curve. The measured dispersion of the surface waves can be used to assess the structural velocity distribution in the layered medium, through which the waves propagate. We analyze surface waves recorded within the geophysical survey of the paleoseismological trench site over the Hluboka tectonic fault, Czech Republic, Central Europe. The surface waves in frequency range 15 - 70 Hz were recorded by the three component geophones with the active (sledge hammer) source. Group velocities are analyzed by the program SVAL which is based on the multiple filtering technique. It is a standard method of the Fourier transform-based frequency-time analysis. The spectrum of each record is multiplied by weighting functions centered at many discrete frequencies. Five local envelope maxima of all quasiharmonic components obtained by the inverse Fourier transform are found and their propagation times determined. These maxima are assigned to different modes of direct surface waves as well as to possible reflected, converted and multipathed modes. Filtered fundamental modes at pairs of geophones are correlated and phase velocities of surface waves are computed from the delays of propagation times of all quasiharmonic components. From the dispersion curves the shear wave

  20. Geotail MCA Plasma Wave Investigation Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Roger R.

    1997-01-01

    The primary goals of the International Solar Terrestrial Physics/Global Geospace Science (ISTP/GGS) program are identifying, studying, and understanding the source, movement, and dissipation of plasma mass, momentum, and energy between the Sun and the Earth. The GEOTAIL spacecraft was built by the Japanese Institute of Space and Astronautical Science and has provided extensive measurements of entry, storage, acceleration, and transport in the geomagnetic tail and throughout the Earth's outer magnetosphere. GEOTAIL was launched on July 24, 1992, and began its scientific mission with eighteen extensions into the deep-tail region with apogees ranging from around 60 R(sub e) to more than 208 R(sub e) in the period up to late 1994. Due to the nature of the GEOTAIL trajectory which kept the spacecraft passing into the deep tail, GEOTAIL also made 'magnetopause skimming passes' which allowed measurements in the outer magnetosphere, magnetopause, magnetosheath, bow shock, and upstream solar wind regions as well as in the lobe, magnetosheath, boundary layers, and central plasma sheet regions of the tail. In late 1994, after spending nearly 30 months primarily traversing the deep tail region, GEOTAIL began its near-Earth phase. Perigee was reduced to 10 R(sub e) and apogee first to 50 R(sub e) and finally to 30 R(sub e) in early 1995. This orbit provides many more opportunities for GEOTAIL to explore the upstream solar wind, bow shock, magnetosheath, magnetopause, and outer magnetosphere as well as the near-Earth tail regions. The WIND spacecraft was launched on November 1, 1994 and the POLAR spacecraft was launched on February 24, 1996. These successful launches have dramatically increased the opportunities for GEOTAIL and the GGS spacecraft to be used to conduct the global research for which the ISTP program was designed. The measurement and study of plasma waves have made and will continue to make important contributions to reaching the ISTP/GGS goals and solving the

  1. Realizing full visible spectrum metamaterial half-wave plates with patterned metal nanoarray/insulator/metal film structure.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yanmeng; Ren, Wenzhen; Cai, Hongbing; Ding, Huaiyi; Pan, Nan; Wang, Xiaoping

    2014-04-07

    Abrupt phase shift introduced by plasmonic resonances has been frequently used to design subwavelength wave plates for optical integration. Here, with the sandwich structure consisting of a top periodic patterned silver nanopatch, an in-between insulator layer and a bottom thick Au film, we realize a broadband half-wave plate which is capable to cover entire visible light spectrum ranging from 400 to 780 nm. Moreover, when the top layer is replaced with a periodic array of composite super unit cell comprised of two nanopatches with different sizes, the operation bandwidth can be further improved to exceed an octave (400-830 nm). In particular, we demonstrate that the designed half-wave plate can be used efficiently to rotate the polarization state of an ultra-fast light pulse with reserved pulse width. Our result offers a new strategy to design and construct broadband high efficiency phase-response based optical components using patterned metal nanoarray/insulator/metal structure.

  2. Full frequency-range transient solution for compressional waves in a fluid-saturated viscoacoustic porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Carcione, J.M.; Quiroga-Goode, G.

    1996-01-01

    An analytical transient solution is obtained for propagation of compressional waves in a homogeneous porous dissipative medium. The solution, based on a generalization of Biot`s poroelastic equations, holds for the low- and high-frequency ranges, and includes viscoelastic phenomena of a very general nature, besides the Biot relaxation mechanism. The viscodynamic operator is used to model the dynamic behavior associated with the relative motion of the fluid in the pores at all frequency ranges. Viscoelasticity is introduced through the standard linear solid which allows the modeling of a general relaxation spectrum. The solution is used to study the influence of the material properties, such as bulk moduli, porosity, viscosity, permeability and intrinsic attenuation, on the kinematic and dynamic characteristics of the two compressional waves supported by the medium. The authors also obtain snapshots of the static mode arising from the diffusive behavior of the slow wave at low frequencies.

  3. Full vectorial finite element analysis of photonic crystal devices: Application to low-loss modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woo Jun

    A full vectorial finite element analysis is presented for the design and analysis of photonic crystal structures. Finite element C++ class libraries are developed based on the vector formulation of the two and three dimensional wave equation. Whitney 1-forms, often called edge elements, are used as basis functions to avoid spurious modes in eigenanalyses. The current finite element codes can solve 2-D and 3-D eigenvalue and scattering problems with boundary conditions: the perfect electric conductor (PEC), the perfect magnetic conductor (PMC) and the Bloch boundary condition. Open boundary problems can also be solved by implementing the perfectly matched layers (PML). Eigenanalyses are performed for various types of photonic crystal structures such as unit cells, infinite waveguides and defect cavities. The transmission spectra of the photonic crystal guiding structures, straight waveguides, waveguide bends and waveguide branches, are derived using scattering formulation. Experimental verification is also presented for a single and five missing line photonic crystal waveguides. Based on the calculated transmission spectra, we conducted simulated annealing optimization of branches and bends to increase the transmission. We applied previous results to a Mach-Zehnder type optical interferometer. The design of waveguide arms is modified to increase the sensitivity. Change of lattice constant gives rise to the shift of the waveguide band. Thus, the operating frequency can be moved to the bandedge which exhibits more dispersive characteristics. We also investigated the coupled-resonator optical waveguide (CROW) structures for the same purpose. By inserting the defect air holes in the waveguide channel, the shape and the frequency range of the band can be engineered. The increase in the sensitivity of the CROW is analyzed by varying the radii of the defect air holes in the waveguide channel. Also group velocities and their dispersion characteristics are investigated and

  4. Analysis of Rectangular Folded-Waveguide Millimeter-Wave Slow-wave Structures using Conformal Transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumathy, M.; Vinoy, K. J.; Datta, S. K.

    2009-03-01

    An analysis of rectangular folded-waveguide slow-wave structure was developed using conformal mapping technique through Schwarz’s polygon transformation and closed form expressions for the lumped capacitance and inductance per period of the slow-wave structure were derived in terms of the physical dimensions of the structure, incorporating the effects of the beam hole in the lumped parameters. The lumped parameters were subsequently interpreted for obtaining the dispersion and interaction impedance characteristics of the structure. The analysis was benchmarked for two typical millimeter-wave structures, one operating in Ka-band and the other operating in Q-band, against measurement and 3D electromagnetic modeling using MAFIA.

  5. Wave energy budget analysis in the Earth's radiation belts uncovers a missing energy

    PubMed Central

    Artemyev, A.V.; Agapitov, O.V.; Mourenas, D.; Krasnoselskikh, V.V.; Mozer, F.S.

    2015-01-01

    Whistler-mode emissions are important electromagnetic waves pervasive in the Earth's magnetosphere, where they continuously remove or energize electrons trapped by the geomagnetic field, controlling radiation hazards to satellites and astronauts and the upper-atmosphere ionization or chemical composition. Here, we report an analysis of 10-year Cluster data, statistically evaluating the full wave energy budget in the Earth's magnetosphere, revealing that a significant fraction of the energy corresponds to hitherto generally neglected very oblique waves. Such waves, with 10 times smaller magnetic power than parallel waves, typically have similar total energy. Moreover, they carry up to 80% of the wave energy involved in wave–particle resonant interactions. It implies that electron heating and precipitation into the atmosphere may have been significantly under/over-valued in past studies considering only conventional quasi-parallel waves. Very oblique waves may turn out to be a crucial agent of energy redistribution in the Earth's radiation belts, controlled by solar activity. PMID:25975615

  6. Challenges in the separation and analysis of scattered waves in angle-beam wavefield data

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, Alexander J.; Michaels, Jennifer E.; Michaels, Thomas E.

    2015-03-31

    The measurement of ultrasonic signals on a 2-D rectilinear grid resulting from a fixed source, referred to as wavefield imaging, is a powerful tool for visualizing wave propagation and scattering. Wavefield imaging provides a more complete picture of wave propagation than conventional single-point measurements, but creates more challenges for analysis. This work considers the development of wavefield-based methods for analyzing angle-beam wave propagation and scattering in plates. Methods of analysis focus on the separation of scattered waves from the total wavefield with the eventual goal of quantitative scatterer characterization in a laboratory environment. Two methods for wave separation are considered: frequency-wavenumber filtering and wavefield baseline subtraction. Frequency-wavenumber filtering is applied to wavefield data that are finely sampled in both space and time, whereas baseline subtraction is a technique that has typically been applied to individual signals recorded from fixed transducers rather than to full wavefield data. Baseline subtraction of wavefields, particularly for the frequency range considered here, is sensitive to both specimen alignment and temperature variations, whereas frequency-wavenumber methods are limited in their ability to separate waves traveling in the same direction. Results are shown for both methods with a focus on investigating and overcoming the challenges to full wavefield baseline subtraction.

  7. multi-scale approaches for full waveform difference inversion and tomographic model analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Y.; Simons, F. J.; Luo, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Tomographic Earth models are solutions to mixed-determined inverse problems, which are formulated to minimize some measure of difference between synthetics and observed data. Typically, the measurement takes the form of a cross-correlation travel-time difference, or it might be the norm of the difference between the entire waveforms, in which case every wiggle is being used to extract information from the data. Full-waveform difference tomography suffers from a slow convergence rate and a danger of converging to local minima. In this presentation, we explore several routes to improving full-waveform inversion strategies for global and regional seismic tomography. First, we will discuss a wavelet-based multi-scale approach that works progressively from low to higher scales, step-by-step involving more details of the waveform. Second, we will discuss a hybrid misfit strategy that combines cross-correlation traveltime and waveform-difference measurements. We will discuss the making of multiscale sensitivity kernels using wavelet decompositions of the seismogram. Lastly, we move to the model space to conduct a multi-scale analysis of global tomographic models using a class of 3-D spherical wavelet bases that are implemented on the ``cubed ball'', the 3-D extension of the ``cubed sphere''. Using this novel transform we study the sparsity of global seismic tomographic models via thresholded reconstruction, and characterize the relative importance and patterns of features in the Earth models via individual and cumulative reconstructions of their wavelet coefficients. Whether on the side of the data, the sensitivity kernels, or in the model space, tomographic inverse problems have much to gain from the flexibility of the wavelet decomposition in one, two and three dimensions, and this on a global, regional or exploration scale, as we show by example. Full waveform difference inversion. The first figure shows our target model with two anomalous regions. The red stars

  8. Asymptotic analysis of numerical wave propagation in finite difference equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, M.; Thompkins, W. T., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    An asymptotic technique is developed for analyzing the propagation and dissipation of wave-like solutions to finite difference equations. It is shown that for each fixed complex frequency there are usually several wave solutions with different wavenumbers and the slowly varying amplitude of each satisfies an asymptotic amplitude equation which includes the effects of smoothly varying coefficients in the finite difference equations. The local group velocity appears in this equation as the velocity of convection of the amplitude. Asymptotic boundary conditions coupling the amplitudes of the different wave solutions are also derived. A wavepacket theory is developed which predicts the motion, and interaction at boundaries, of wavepackets, wave-like disturbances of finite length. Comparison with numerical experiments demonstrates the success and limitations of the theory. Finally an asymptotic global stability analysis is developed.

  9. Analysis and optimization of Love wave liquid sensors.

    PubMed

    Jakoby, B; Vellekoop, M J

    1998-01-01

    Love wave sensors are highly sensitive microacoustic devices, which are well suited for liquid sensing applications thanks to the shear polarization of the wave. The sensing mechanism thereby relies on the mechanical (or acoustic) interaction of the device with the liquid. The successful utilization of Love wave devices for this purpose requires proper shielding to avoid unwanted electric interaction of the liquid with the wave and the transducers. In this work we describe the effects of this electric interaction and the proper design of a shield to prevent it. We present analysis methods, which illustrate the impact of the interaction and which help to obtain an optimized design of the proposed shield. We also present experimental results for devices that have been fabricated according to these design rules.

  10. Full-wave feasibility study of magnetic diagnostic based on O-X mode conversion and oblique reflectometry imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Meneghini, Orso; Choi, Myunghee; Volpe, Francesco

    2014-02-12

    An innovative millimeter wave diagnostic is proposed to measure the local magnetic field and the edge current as a function of the minor radius in the pedestal region. The idea behind such diagnostic is to localize and characterize a direction of reduced reflectivity at the O-mode cutoff layer. We modeled the wave scattering and mode-conversion processes by means of the finite-element COMSOL Multiphysics code in two dimensions (2D). Sensitivity studies were performed for parameters mocking up DIII-D plasmas. Simulations confirmed the presence of a minimum in reflectivity of an externally injected O-mode beam, and confirmed that this minimum depends on the magnetic field at the cutoff, as expected from the OX mode conversion physics. This study gives confidence in the feasibility of the diagnostic.

  11. Wave intensity analysis and its application to the coronary circulation

    PubMed Central

    Davies, JE; Escaned, JE; Hughes, A; Parker, K

    Wave intensity analysis (WIA) is a technique developed from the field of gas dynamics that is now being applied to assess cardiovascular physiology. It allows quantification of the forces acting to alter flow and pressure within a fluid system, and as such it is highly insightful in ascribing cause to dynamic blood pressure or velocity changes. When co-incident waves arrive at the same spatial location they exert either counteracting or summative effects on flow and pressure. WIA however allows waves of different origins to be measured uninfluenced by other simultaneously arriving waves. It therefore has found particular applicability within the coronary circulation where both proximal (aortic) and distal (myocardial) ends of the coronary artery can markedly influence blood flow. Using these concepts, a repeating pattern of 6 waves has been consistently identified within the coronary arteries, 3 originating proximally and 3 distally. Each has been associated with a particular part of the cardiac cycle. The most clinically relevant wave to date is the backward decompression wave, which causes the marked increase in coronary flow velocity observed at the start of the diastole. It has been proposed that this wave is generated by the elastic re-expansion of the intra-myocardial blood vessels that are compressed during systolic contraction. Particularly by quantifying this wave, WIA has been used to provide mechanistic and prognostic insight into a number of conditions including aortic stenosis, left ventricular hypertrophy, coronary artery disease and heart failure. It has proven itself to be highly sensitive and as such a number of novel research directions are encouraged where further insights would be beneficial. PMID:28971104

  12. Three-dimensional coupled mode analysis of internal-wave acoustic ducts.

    PubMed

    Shmelev, Alexey A; Lynch, James F; Lin, Ying-Tsong; Schmidt, Henrik

    2014-05-01

    A fully three-dimensional coupled mode approach is used in this paper to describe the physics of low frequency acoustic signals propagating through a train of internal waves at an arbitrary azimuth. A three layer model of the shallow water waveguide is employed for studying the properties of normal modes and their coupled interaction due to the presence of nonlinear internal waves. Using a robust wave number integration technique for Fourier transform computation and a direct global matrix approach, an accurate three-dimensional coupled mode full field solution is obtained for the tonal signal propagation through straight and parallel internal waves. This approach provides accurate results for arbitrary azimuth and includes the effects of backscattering. This enables one to provide an azimuthal analysis of acoustic propagation and separate the effects of mode coupled transparent resonance, horizontal reflection and refraction, the horizontal Lloyd's mirror, horizontal ducting and anti-ducting, and horizontal tunneling and secondary ducting.

  13. A Guided Wave Sensor Enabling Simultaneous Wavenumber-Frequency Analysis for Both Lamb and Shear-Horizontal Waves

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Baiyang; Cho, Hwanjeong; Lissenden, Cliff J.

    2017-01-01

    Guided waves in plate-like structures have been widely investigated for structural health monitoring. Lamb waves and shear horizontal (SH) waves, two commonly used types of waves in plates, provide different benefits for the detection of various types of defects and material degradation. However, there are few sensors that can detect both Lamb and SH waves and also resolve their modal content, namely the wavenumber-frequency spectrum. A sensor that can detect both waves is desirable to take full advantage of both types of waves in order to improve sensitivity to different discontinuity geometries. We demonstrate that polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) film provides the basis for a multi-element array sensor that detects both Lamb and SH waves and also measures their modal content, i.e., the wavenumber-frequency spectrum. PMID:28257065

  14. A guided wave sensor enabling simultaneous wavenumber-frequency analysis for both lamb and shear-horizontal waves

    DOE PAGES

    Ren, Baiyang; Cho, Hwanjeong; Lissenden, Cliff J.

    2017-03-01

    Guided waves in plate-like structures have been widely investigated for structural health monitoring. Lamb waves and shear horizontal (SH) waves, two commonly used types of waves in plates, provide different benefits for the detection of various types of defects and material degradation. However, there are few sensors that can detect both Lamb and SH waves and also resolve their modal content, namely the wavenumber-frequency spectrum. A sensor that can detect both waves is desirable to take full advantage of both types of waves in order to improve sensitivity to different discontinuity geometries. As a result, we demonstrate that polyvinylidene difluoridemore » (PVDF) film provides the basis for a multi-element array sensor that detects both Lamb and SH waves and also measures their modal content, i.e., the wavenumber-frequency spectrum.« less

  15. A Guided Wave Sensor Enabling Simultaneous Wavenumber-Frequency Analysis for Both Lamb and Shear-Horizontal Waves.

    PubMed

    Ren, Baiyang; Cho, Hwanjeong; Lissenden, Cliff J

    2017-03-01

    Guided waves in plate-like structures have been widely investigated for structural health monitoring. Lamb waves and shear horizontal (SH) waves, two commonly used types of waves in plates, provide different benefits for the detection of various types of defects and material degradation. However, there are few sensors that can detect both Lamb and SH waves and also resolve their modal content, namely the wavenumber-frequency spectrum. A sensor that can detect both waves is desirable to take full advantage of both types of waves in order to improve sensitivity to different discontinuity geometries. We demonstrate that polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) film provides the basis for a multi-element array sensor that detects both Lamb and SH waves and also measures their modal content, i.e., the wavenumber-frequency spectrum.

  16. The strength analysis of the wave piercing buoy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dong; Li, Wenhua; Chen, Xinyang; Chen, Haiquan

    2017-04-01

    The wave piercing buoy in this paper is different with the traditional cylindrical buoy, it is made by ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) and has six middle pontoons. In order to guarantee the stability of the buoy structure, it is necessary to carry out the strength analysis. This paper use the ANSYS software to carry on the simulation analysis to the buoy, and the result of it is compare with the actual operation, therefore ensure the strength of the wave piercing buoy meet the related requirements.

  17. Nonstandard Analysis and Jump Conditions for Converging Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baty, Roy S.; Farassat, Fereidoun; Tucker, Don H.

    2008-01-01

    Nonstandard analysis is an area of modern mathematics which studies abstract number systems containing both infinitesimal and infinite numbers. This article applies nonstandard analysis to derive jump conditions for one-dimensional, converging shock waves in a compressible, inviscid, perfect gas. It is assumed that the shock thickness occurs on an infinitesimal interval and the jump functions in the thermodynamic and fluid dynamic parameters occur smoothly across this interval. Predistributions of the Heaviside function and the Dirac delta measure are introduced to model the flow parameters across a shock wave. The equations of motion expressed in nonconservative form are then applied to derive unambiguous relationships between the jump functions for the flow parameters.

  18. Nonstandard analysis and jump conditions for converging shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baty, Roy S.; Farassat, F.; Tucker, Don H.

    2008-06-01

    Nonstandard analysis is an area of modern mathematics that studies abstract number systems containing both infinitesimal and infinite numbers. This article applies nonstandard analysis to derive jump conditions for one-dimensional, converging shock waves in a compressible, inviscid, perfect gas. It is assumed that the shock thickness occurs on an infinitesimal interval and the jump functions in the thermodynamic and fluid dynamic parameters occur smoothly across this interval. Predistributions of the Heaviside function and the Dirac delta measure are introduced to model the flow parameters across a shock wave. The equations of motion expressed in nonconservative form are then applied to derive unambiguous relationships between the jump functions for the flow parameters.

  19. Slow Wave Vane Structure with Elliptical Cross-Section Slots, an Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmahl, Henry G.

    1994-01-01

    Mathematical analysis of the wave equation in cylinders with elliptical cross-section slots was performed. Compared to slow wave structures with rectangular slots higher impedance and lower power dissipation losses are evident. These features could lead to improved designs of traveling wave magnetrons and gigahertz backward-wave oscillators as well as linear traveling wave tubes with relatively shallow slots.

  20. Finite frequency effects on apparent S-wave splitting in the D″ layer: comparison between ray theory and full-wave synthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgeaud, Anselme F. E.; Konishi, Kensuke; Kawai, Kenji; Geller, Robert J.

    2016-10-01

    We conduct a numerical experiment to investigate potential bias in measurements of S-wave splitting (apparent differences between the arrival times of SH and SV phases) for waves propagating close to the core-mantle boundary (CMB) in the D″ layer. The bias is defined as the discrepancy between shear wave splitting measured from finite frequency synthetic seismograms (`apparent splitting') and the splitting predicted by ray theory, which is a high-frequency approximation. For simple isotropic models, we find biases which are typically between 0.5 and 4 s, depending on the model, the Q structure and the dominant period of the synthetics. The bias increases for lower frequencies or lower Q values. The epicentral distance at which the bias starts depends on the frequency and the Q structure. We also compute synthetics for models based on mineral physics (using the elastic constants under lower-mantle pressure and temperature conditions, taking into account the phase transition from Mg-perovskite to Mg-post-perovskite) and geodynamics (the thermal boundary layer) and find that the depth of the positive velocity jump associated with the phase transition and the depth range over which the velocity decreases (due to temperature increases) in the thermal boundary layer significantly influence the wavefield in the lowermost mantle. For example, in cold regions beneath subduction zones, wavefields for SH and SV differ greatly due to the steep velocity decrease close to the CMB. For complex models, apparent splitting can also arise from the possibility that low amplitude direct phases might be overlooked, and larger amplitude later phases might instead incorrectly be picked as the direct arrival. Biases of the type investigated in this study combine with other sources of uncertainty for splitting in D″ (e.g. the correction for upper-mantle anisotropy and the difference between SH and SV ray paths) to make a precise evaluation of the anisotropy in D″ difficult.

  1. Properties of Baryons from Bonn-Gatchina Partial Wave Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarantsev, Andrey

    The recent results from the Bonn-Gatchinal partial wave analysis are reported. The analysis includes a large number of new pseudoscalar meson photoproduction data taken with polarized beam and target. The analysis also includes the information about photoproduction of vector mesons, which reveals resonant signals at masses above 2 GeV. The impact of the new data on spectrum of baryons and their properties is discussed.

  2. Partial Wave Analysis of Coupled Photonic Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, Kirk A.; Smith, David D.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The very high quality factors sustained by microcavity optical resonators are relevant to applications in wavelength filtering, routing, switching, modulation, and multiplexing/demultiplexing. Increases in the density of photonic elements require that attention be paid to how electromagnetic (EM) coupling modifies their optical properties. This is especially true when cavity resonances are involved, in which case, their characteristics may be fundamentally altered. Understanding the optical properties of microcavities that are near or in contact with photonic elements---such as other microcavities, nanostructures, couplers, and substrates---can be expected to advance our understanding of the roles that these structures may play in VLSI photonics, biosensors and similar device technologies. Wc present results from recent theoretical studies of the effects of inter- and intracavity coupling on optical resonances in compound spherical particles. Concentrically stratified spheres and bispheres constituted from homogeneous and stratified spheres are subjects of this investigation. A new formulation is introduced for the absorption of light in an arbitrary layer of a multilayered sphere, which is based on multiple reflections of the spherical partial waves of the Lorenz-Mie solution for scattering by a sphere. Absorption efficiencies, which can be used to profile cavity resonances and to infer fluorescence yields or the onset of nonlinear optical processes in the microcavities, are presented. Splitting of resonances in these multisphere systems is paid particular attention, and consequences for photonic device development and possible performance enhancements through carefully designed architectures that exploit EM coupling are considered.

  3. Attenuation of seismic waves obtained by coda waves analysis in the West Bohemia earthquake swarm region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachura, Martin; Fischer, Tomas

    2014-05-01

    with depth, where 1/Qc seems to be frequency independent in depth range of upper lithosphere. Lateral changes of 1/Qc were also reported - it decreases in the south-west direction from the Novy Kostel focal zone, where the attenuation is the highest. Results from more advanced methods that allow for separation of scattering and intrinsic loss show that intrinsic loss is a dominant factor for attenuating of seismic waves in the region. Determination of attenuation due to scattering appears ambiguous due to small hypocentral distances available for the analysis, where the effects of scattering in frequency range from 1 to 24 Hz are not significant.

  4. A Dynamic Analysis of Hydrodynamic Wave Journal Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ene, Nicoleta M.; Dimofte, Florin; Keith, Theo G.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study the dynamic behavior of a three-wave journal bearing using a transient approach. The transient analysis permits the determination of the rotor behavior after the fractional frequency whirl appears. The journal trajectory is determined by solving a set of nonlinear equations of motion using the Runge-Katta method. The fluid film forces are computed by integrating the transient Reynolds equation at each time step location of the shaft with respect to the bearing. Because of the large values of the rotational speeds, turbulent effects were included in the computations. The influence of the temperature on the viscosity was also considered. Numerical results were compared to experimenta1 results obtained at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Comparisons of the theoretical results with experimental data were found to be in good agreement. The numerical and experimental results showed that the fluid film of a three-wave journal bearing having a diameter of 30 mm, a length of 27 mm, and a wave amplitude ratio greater than 0.15 is stable even at rotational speeds of 60,000 RPM. For lower wave amplitude ratios, the threshold speed at which the fluid film becomes unstable depends on the wave amplitude and on the supply pocket pressure. Even if the fluid film is unstable, the wave bearing maintains the whirl orbit inside the bearing clearance.

  5. A Dynamic Analysis of Hydrodynamic Wave Journal Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ene, Nicoleta M.; Dimofte, Florin; Keith, Theo G.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study the dynamic behavior of a three-wave journal bearing using a transient approach. The transient analysis permits the determination of the rotor behavior after the fractional frequency whirl appears. The journal trajectory is determined by solving a set of nonlinear equations of motion using the Runge-Katta method. The fluid film forces are computed by integrating the transient Reynolds equation at each time step location of the shaft with respect to the bearing. Because of the large values of the rotational speeds, turbulent effects were included in the computations. The influence of the temperature on the viscosity was also considered. Numerical results were compared to experimenta1 results obtained at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Comparisons of the theoretical results with experimental data were found to be in good agreement. The numerical and experimental results showed that the fluid film of a three-wave journal bearing having a diameter of 30 mm, a length of 27 mm, and a wave amplitude ratio greater than 0.15 is stable even at rotational speeds of 60,000 RPM. For lower wave amplitude ratios, the threshold speed at which the fluid film becomes unstable depends on the wave amplitude and on the supply pocket pressure. Even if the fluid film is unstable, the wave bearing maintains the whirl orbit inside the bearing clearance.

  6. Simultaneous laser excitation of backward volume and perpendicular standing spin waves in full-Heusler Co2FeAl0.5Si0.5 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhifeng; Yan, Yong; Li, Shufa; Xu, Xiaoguang; Jiang, Yong; Lai, Tianshu

    2017-02-01

    Spin-wave dynamics in full-Heusler Co2FeAl0.5Si0.5 films are studied using all-optical pump-probe magneto-optical polar Kerr spectroscopy. Backward volume magnetostatic spin-wave (BVMSW) mode is observed in films with thickness ranging from 20 to 100 nm besides perpendicular standing spin-wave (PSSW) mode, and found to be excited more efficiently than the PSSW mode. The field dependence of the effective Gilbert damping parameter appears especial extrinsic origin. The relationship between the lifetime and the group velocity of BVMSW mode is revealed. The frequency of BVMSW mode does not obviously depend on the film thickness, but the lifetime and the effective damping appear to do so. The simultaneous excitation of BVMSW and PSSW in Heusler alloy films as well as the characterization of their dynamic behaviors may be of interest for magnonic and spintronic applications.

  7. Femtosecond laser excitation of multiple spin waves and composition dependence of Gilbert damping in full-Heusler Co2Fe1-xMnxAl films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chuyuan; Meng, Kangkang; Li, Shufa; Zhao, Jianhua; Lai, Tianshu

    2013-12-01

    Spin-wave dynamics in 30 nm thick Co2Fe1-xMnxAl full-Heusler films is investigated using time-resolved magneto-optical polar Kerr spectroscopy under an external field perpendicular to films. Damon-Eshbach (DE) and the first-order perpendicular standing spin-wave (PSSW) modes are observed simultaneously in four samples with x = 0, 0.3, 0.7, and 1. The frequency of DE and PSSW modes does not apparently depend on composition x, but damping of DE mode significantly on x and reaches the minimum as x = 0.7. The efficient coherent excitation of DE spin wave exhibits the promising application of Co2Fe0.3Mn0.7Al films in magnonic devices.

  8. Full-duplex bidirectional transmission of 10-Gb/s millimeter-wave QPSK signal in E-band optical wireless link.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuan; Yu, Jianjun; Chi, Nan; Xiao, Jiangnan

    2014-01-27

    We experimentally demonstrated full-duplex bidirectional transmission of 10-Gb/s millimeter-wave (mm-wave) quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) signal in E-band (71-76 GHz and 81-86 GHz) optical wireless link. Single-mode fibers (SMF) are connected at both sides of the antenna for uplink and downlink which realize 40-km SMF and 2-m wireless link for bidirectional transmission simultaneously. We utilized multi-level modulation format and coherent detection in such E-band optical wireless link for the first time. Mm-wave QPSK signal is generated by photonic technique to increase spectrum efficiency and received signal is coherently detected to improve receiver sensitivity. After the coherent detection, digital signal processing is utilized to compensate impairments of devices and transmission link.

  9. Near-field radiative heat transfer between metasurfaces: A full-wave study based on two-dimensional grooved metal plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jin; Dyakov, Sergey A.; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Yan, Min

    2016-09-01

    Metamaterials possess artificial bulk and surface electromagnetic states. Tamed dispersion properties of surface waves allow one to achieve a controllable super-Planckian radiative heat transfer (RHT) process between two closely spaced objects. We numerically demonstrate enhanced RHT between two two-dimensional grooved metal plates by a full-wave scattering approach. The enhancement originates from both transverse-magnetic spoof surface-plasmon polaritons and a series of transverse-electric bonding- and anti-bonding-waveguide modes at surfaces. The RHT spectrum is frequency selective and highly geometrically tailorable. Our simulation also reveals thermally excited nonresonant surface waves in constituent metallic materials may play a prevailing role for RHT at an extremely small separation between two metal plates, rendering metamaterial modes insignificant for the energy-transfer process.

  10. Simultaneous laser excitation of backward volume and perpendicular standing spin waves in full-Heusler Co2FeAl0.5Si0.5 films

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhifeng; Yan, Yong; Li, Shufa; Xu, Xiaoguang; Jiang, Yong; Lai, Tianshu

    2017-01-01

    Spin-wave dynamics in full-Heusler Co2FeAl0.5Si0.5 films are studied using all-optical pump-probe magneto-optical polar Kerr spectroscopy. Backward volume magnetostatic spin-wave (BVMSW) mode is observed in films with thickness ranging from 20 to 100 nm besides perpendicular standing spin-wave (PSSW) mode, and found to be excited more efficiently than the PSSW mode. The field dependence of the effective Gilbert damping parameter appears especial extrinsic origin. The relationship between the lifetime and the group velocity of BVMSW mode is revealed. The frequency of BVMSW mode does not obviously depend on the film thickness, but the lifetime and the effective damping appear to do so. The simultaneous excitation of BVMSW and PSSW in Heusler alloy films as well as the characterization of their dynamic behaviors may be of interest for magnonic and spintronic applications. PMID:28195160

  11. A general numerical model for wave rotor analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel W.

    1992-01-01

    Wave rotors represent one of the promising technologies for achieving very high core temperatures and pressures in future gas turbine engines. Their operation depends upon unsteady gas dynamics and as such, their analysis is quite difficult. This report describes a numerical model which has been developed to perform such an analysis. Following a brief introduction, a summary of the wave rotor concept is given. The governing equations are then presented, along with a summary of the assumptions used to obtain them. Next, the numerical integration technique is described. This is an explicit finite volume technique based on the method of Roe. The discussion then focuses on the implementation of appropriate boundary conditions. Following this, some results are presented which first compare the numerical approximation to the governing differential equations and then compare the overall model to an actual wave rotor experiment. Finally, some concluding remarks are presented concerning the limitations of the simplifying assumptions and areas where the model may be improved.

  12. A general numerical model for wave rotor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paxson, Daniel W.

    1992-07-01

    Wave rotors represent one of the promising technologies for achieving very high core temperatures and pressures in future gas turbine engines. Their operation depends upon unsteady gas dynamics and as such, their analysis is quite difficult. This report describes a numerical model which has been developed to perform such an analysis. Following a brief introduction, a summary of the wave rotor concept is given. The governing equations are then presented, along with a summary of the assumptions used to obtain them. Next, the numerical integration technique is described. This is an explicit finite volume technique based on the method of Roe. The discussion then focuses on the implementation of appropriate boundary conditions. Following this, some results are presented which first compare the numerical approximation to the governing differential equations and then compare the overall model to an actual wave rotor experiment. Finally, some concluding remarks are presented concerning the limitations of the simplifying assumptions and areas where the model may be improved.

  13. Lifetimes and wave functions of ozone metastable vibrational states near the dissociation limit in a full-symmetry approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapierre, David; Alijah, Alexander; Kochanov, Roman; Kokoouline, Viatcheslav; Tyuterev, Vladimir

    2016-10-01

    Energies and lifetimes (widths) of vibrational states above the lowest dissociation limit of O163 were determined using a previously developed efficient approach, which combines hyperspherical coordinates and a complex absorbing potential. The calculations are based on a recently computed potential energy surface of ozone determined with a spectroscopic accuracy [Tyuterev et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 134307 (2013), 10.1063/1.4821638]. The effect of permutational symmetry on rovibrational dynamics and the density of resonance states in O3 is discussed in detail. Correspondence between quantum numbers appropriate for short- and long-range parts of wave functions of the rovibrational continuum is established. It is shown, by symmetry arguments, that the allowed purely vibrational (J =0 ) levels of O163 and O183, both made of bosons with zero nuclear spin, cannot dissociate on the ground-state potential energy surface. Energies and wave functions of bound states of the ozone isotopologue O163 with rotational angular momentum J =0 and 1 up to the dissociation threshold were also computed. For bound levels, good agreement with experimental energies is found: The rms deviation between observed and calculated vibrational energies is 1 cm-1. Rotational constants were determined and used for a simple identification of vibrational modes of calculated levels.

  14. Fracture parameter inversion from passive seismic shear-wave splitting: A validation study using full-waveform numerical synthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousef, B. M.; Almarzooq, H.; Angus, D. A.; Hildyard, M. W.

    2017-08-01

    Fractures are pervasive features within the Earth's crust and they have a significant influence on the multi-physical response of the subsurface. The presence of coherent fracture sets often leads to observable seismic anisotropy enabling seismic techniques to remotely locate and characterise fracture systems. Since fractures play a critical role in the geomechanical and fluid-flow response, there has been significant interest in quantitatively imaging in situ fractures for improved hydro-mechanical modelling. In this study we assess the robustness of inverting for fracture properties using shear-wave splitting measurements. We show that it is feasible to invert shear-wave splitting measurements to quantitatively estimate fracture strike and fracture density assuming an effective medium fracture model. Although the SWS results themselves are diagnostic of fracturing, the fracture inversion allows placing constraints on the physical properties of the fracture system. For the single seismic source case and optimum receiver array geometry, the inversion for strike has average errors of between 11° and 25°, whereas for density has average errors between 65% and 80% for the single fracture set and 30% and 90% for the double fracture sets. For real microseismic datasets, the range in magnitude of microseismicity (i.e., frequency content), spatial distribution and variable source mechanisms suggests that the inversion of fracture properties from SWS measurements is feasible.

  15. An axisymmetric time-domain spectral-element method for full-wave simulations: Application to ocean acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottero, Alexis; Cristini, Paul; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Asch, Mark

    2016-11-01

    The numerical simulation of acoustic waves in complex 3D media is a key topic in many branches of science, from exploration geophysics to non-destructive testing and medical imaging. With the drastic increase in computing capabilities this field has dramatically grown in the last twenty years. However many 3D computations, especially at high frequency and/or long range, are still far beyond current reach and force researchers to resort to approximations, for example by working in 2D (plane strain) or by using a paraxial approximation. This article presents and validates a numerical technique based on an axisymmetric formulation of a spectral finite-element method in the time domain for heterogeneous fluid-solid media. Taking advantage of axisymmetry enables the study of relevant 3D configurations at a very moderate computational cost. The axisymmetric spectral-element formulation is first introduced, and validation tests are then performed. A typical application of interest in ocean acoustics showing upslope propagation above a dipping viscoelastic ocean bottom is then presented. The method correctly models backscattered waves and explains the transmission losses discrepancies pointed out in Jensen et al. (2007). Finally, a realistic application to a double seamount problem is considered.

  16. An axisymmetric time-domain spectral-element method for full-wave simulations: Application to ocean acoustics.

    PubMed

    Bottero, Alexis; Cristini, Paul; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Asch, Mark

    2016-11-01

    The numerical simulation of acoustic waves in complex three-dimensional (3D) media is a key topic in many branches of science, from exploration geophysics to non-destructive testing and medical imaging. With the drastic increase in computing capabilities this field has dramatically grown in the last 20 years. However many 3D computations, especially at high frequency and/or long range, are still far beyond current reach and force researchers to resort to approximations, for example, by working in two dimensions (plane strain) or by using a paraxial approximation. This article presents and validates a numerical technique based on an axisymmetric formulation of a spectral finite-element method in the time domain for heterogeneous fluid-solid media. Taking advantage of axisymmetry enables the study of relevant 3D configurations at a very moderate computational cost. The axisymmetric spectral-element formulation is first introduced, and validation tests are then performed. A typical application of interest in ocean acoustics showing upslope propagation above a dipping viscoelastic ocean bottom is then presented. The method correctly models backscattered waves and explains the transmission losses discrepancies pointed out in F. B. Jensen, P. L. Nielsen, M. Zampolli, M. D. Collins, and W. L. Siegmann, Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Theoretical and Computational Acoustics (ICTCA) (2007). Finally, a realistic application to a double seamount problem is considered.

  17. Full-wave feasibility study of anti-radar diagnostic of magnetic field based on O-X mode conversion and oblique reflectometry imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneghini, Orso; Volpe, Francesco A.

    2016-11-01

    An innovative millimeter wave diagnostic is proposed to measure the local magnetic field and edge current as a function of the minor radius in the tokamak pedestal region. The idea is to identify the direction of minimum reflectivity at the O-mode cutoff layer. Correspondingly, the transmissivity due to O-X mode conversion is maximum. That direction, and the angular map of reflectivity around it, contains information on the magnetic field vector B at the cutoff layer. Probing the plasma with different wave frequencies provides the radial profile of B. Full-wave finite-element simulations are presented here in 2D slab geometry. Modeling confirms the existence of a minimum in reflectivity that depends on the magnetic field at the cutoff, as expected from mode conversion physics, giving confidence in the feasibility of the diagnostic. The proposed reflectometric approach is expected to yield superior signal-to-noise ratio and to access wider ranges of density and magnetic field, compared with related radiometric techniques that require the plasma to emit electron Bernstein waves. Due to computational limitations, frequencies of 10-20 GHz were considered in this initial study. Frequencies above the edge electron-cyclotron frequency (f > 28 GHz here) would be preferable for the experiment, because the upper hybrid resonance and right cutoff would lie in the plasma, and would help separate the O-mode of interest from spurious X-waves.

  18. Full-wave feasibility study of anti-radar diagnostic of magnetic field based on O-X mode conversion and oblique reflectometry imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Meneghini, Orso; Volpe, Francesco A.

    2016-08-19

    An innovative millimeter wave diagnostic is proposed to measure the local magnetic field and edge current as a function of the minor radius in the tokamak pedestal region. The idea is to identify the direction of minimum reflectivity at the O-mode cutoff layer. Correspondingly, the transmissivity due to O-X mode conversion is maximum. That direction, and the angular map of reflectivity around it, contain information on the magnetic field vector B at the cutoff layer. By probing the plasma with different wave frequencies it provides the radial profile of B. Full-wave finite-element simulations are presented here in 2D slab geometry. Modeling confirms the existence of a minimum in reflectivity that depends on the magnetic field at the cutoff, as expected from mode conversion physics, giving confidence in the feasibility of the diagnostic. We proposed an reflectometric approach in order to yield superior signal-to-noise ratio and to access wider ranges of density and magnetic field, compared with related radiometric techniques that require the plasma to emit Electron Bernstein Waves. Due to computational limitations, frequencies of 10-20 GHz were considered in this initial study. Furthermore, frequencies above the edge electron-cyclotron frequency (f >28 GHz here) would be preferable for the experiment, because the upper hybrid resonance and right cutoff would lie in the plasma, and would help separate the O-mode of interest from spurious X-waves.

  19. Full-wave feasibility study of anti-radar diagnostic of magnetic field based on O-X mode conversion and oblique reflectometry imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Meneghini, Orso; Volpe, Francesco A.

    2016-08-19

    An innovative millimeter wave diagnostic is proposed to measure the local magnetic field and edge current as a function of the minor radius in the tokamak pedestal region. The idea is to identify the direction of minimum reflectivity at the O-mode cutoff layer. Correspondingly, the transmissivity due to O-X mode conversion is maximum. That direction, and the angular map of reflectivity around it, contain information on the magnetic field vector B at the cutoff layer. By probing the plasma with different wave frequencies it provides the radial profile of B. Full-wave finite-element simulations are presented here in 2D slab geometry.more » Modeling confirms the existence of a minimum in reflectivity that depends on the magnetic field at the cutoff, as expected from mode conversion physics, giving confidence in the feasibility of the diagnostic. We proposed an reflectometric approach in order to yield superior signal-to-noise ratio and to access wider ranges of density and magnetic field, compared with related radiometric techniques that require the plasma to emit Electron Bernstein Waves. Due to computational limitations, frequencies of 10-20 GHz were considered in this initial study. Furthermore, frequencies above the edge electron-cyclotron frequency (f >28 GHz here) would be preferable for the experiment, because the upper hybrid resonance and right cutoff would lie in the plasma, and would help separate the O-mode of interest from spurious X-waves.« less

  20. Full-wave feasibility study of anti-radar diagnostic of magnetic field based on O-X mode conversion and oblique reflectometry imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Meneghini, Orso; Volpe, Francesco A.

    2016-11-15

    An innovative millimeter wave diagnostic is proposed to measure the local magnetic field and edge current as a function of the minor radius in the tokamak pedestal region. The idea is to identify the direction of minimum reflectivity at the O-mode cutoff layer. Correspondingly, the transmissivity due to O-X mode conversion is maximum. That direction, and the angular map of reflectivity around it, contains information on the magnetic field vector B at the cutoff layer. Probing the plasma with different wave frequencies provides the radial profile of B. Full-wave finite-element simulations are presented here in 2D slab geometry. Modeling confirms the existence of a minimum in reflectivity that depends on the magnetic field at the cutoff, as expected from mode conversion physics, giving confidence in the feasibility of the diagnostic. The proposed reflectometric approach is expected to yield superior signal-to-noise ratio and to access wider ranges of density and magnetic field, compared with related radiometric techniques that require the plasma to emit electron Bernstein waves. Due to computational limitations, frequencies of 10-20 GHz were considered in this initial study. Frequencies above the edge electron-cyclotron frequency (f > 28 GHz here) would be preferable for the experiment, because the upper hybrid resonance and right cutoff would lie in the plasma, and would help separate the O-mode of interest from spurious X-waves.

  1. Data synthesis and display programs for wave distribution function analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storey, L. R. O.; Yeh, K. J.

    1992-01-01

    At the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) software was written to synthesize and display artificial data for use in developing the methodology of wave distribution analysis. The software comprises two separate interactive programs, one for data synthesis and the other for data display.

  2. Fractional Cylindrical Functions Implementation for Electromagnetic Waves Scattering Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-01

    IMPLEMENTATION FOR ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES SCATTERING ANALYSIS D.V. Golovin , D.O. Batrakov. Kharkov National University, Ukraine Dmitry.O.Batrakov...N2 8. P. 1483. [2] Vorontsov A.A., Mirovitskaya S.D/I Radiotechnika i Electronika (in Russian) 1986. V.31. No 12. P. 2330. [3] Golovin D.V., Batrakov

  3. Full duplex fiber link for alternative wired and wireless access based on SSB optical millimeter-wave with 4-PAM signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianxin; Zhang, Junjie

    2015-03-01

    A novel full-duplex fiber-wireless link based on single sideband (SSB) optical millimeter (mm)-wave with 10 Gbit/s 4-pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) signal is proposed to provide alternative wired and 40 GHz wireless accesses for the user terminals. The SSB optical mm-wave with 4-PAM signal consists of two tones: one bears the 4-PAM signal and the other is unmodulated with high power. After transmission over the fiber to the hybrid optical network unit (HONU), the SSB optical mm-wave signal can be decomposed by fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) as the SSB optical mm-wave signal with reduced carrier-to-sideband ratio (the baseband 4-PAM optical signal) and the uplink optical carrier for the wireless (wired) access. This makes the HONU free from the laser source. For the uplink, since the wireless access signal is converted to the baseband by power detection, both the transmitter in the HONU and the receiver in optical line terminal (OLT) are co-shared for both wireless and wired accesses, which makes the full duplex link much simpler. In our scheme, the optical electrical field of the square-root increment level 4-PAM signal assures an equal level spacing receiving for both the downlink wired and wireless accesses. Since the downlink wireless signal is down-converted to the baseband by power detection, RF local oscillator is unnecessary. To confirm the feasibility of our proposed scheme, a simulation full duplex link with 40 GHz SSB optical mm-wave with 10 Gbit/s 4-PAM signal is built. The simulation results show that both down- and up-links for either wired or wireless access can keep good performance even if the link length of the SSMF is extended to 40 km.

  4. Data Analysis Technologies to Reduce Risk in Future Gravitational-Wave Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littenberg, Tyson

    The existence of gravitational waves has at last been confirmed by the LIGO/Virgo discovery of a binary black hole merger, heralding the beginning of a new fields of research in observational astronomy, astrophysics, and relativity research. the LISA Pathfinder mission has begun collecting science data, paving the way for space-based gravitational wave measurement. Gravitational wave science will reach its full potential with a space-based observatory able to access mHz frequencies. The proposed work will investigate how develop crucial data analysis infrastructure for a future space mission. The three key themes of the proposal are (i) to incorporate lessons learned from LISA Pathfinder into our understanding of a GW observatories performance, (ii) develop data analysis mcethods for inter-spacecraft ranging critical to achieving the measurement precision needed for GW detection, and (iii) explore how known sources in the mHz band can be used as calibration sources.

  5. Multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) - Active and passive methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Park, C.B.; Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.; Ivanov, J.

    2007-01-01

    The conventional seismic approaches for near-surface investigation have usually been either high-resolution reflection or refraction surveys that deal with a depth range of a few tens to hundreds meters. Seismic signals from these surveys consist of wavelets with frequencies higher than 50 Hz. The multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) method deals with surface waves in the lower frequencies (e.g., 1-30 Hz) and uses a much shallower depth range of investigation (e.g., a few to a few tens of meters). ?? 2007 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  6. Analysis of embedded shock waves calculated by relaxation methods.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, E. M.

    1973-01-01

    The requirements for uniqueness of the calculated jump conditions across embedded shock waves are investigated for type-dependent difference systems used in transonic flow studies. A mathematical analysis shows that sufficient conditions are (1) the equations should be differenced in conservative form and (2) a special difference operator should be used when switching from a hyperbolic to an elliptic operator. The latter results in a consistency condition on the integral equations, rather than the differential, at these points. Calculated jump conditions for several embedded and detached shock waves are analyzed in the physical and hodograph planes. Comparisons are made with previous results, a time-dependent calculation, and data.

  7. Sensitive Chiral Analysis via Microwave Three-Wave Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, David; Doyle, John M.

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate chirality-induced three-wave mixing in the microwave regime, using rotational transitions in cold gas-phase samples of 1,2-propanediol and 1,3-butanediol. We show that bulk three-wave mixing, which can only be realized in a chiral environment, provides a sensitive, species-selective probe of enantiomeric excess and is applicable to a broad class of molecules. The doubly resonant condition provides simultaneous identification of species and of handedness, which should allow sensitive chiral analysis even within a complex mixture.

  8. Resonant transmission in one-dimensional quantum mechanics with two independent point interactions: Full parameter analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Kohkichi; Nagasawa, Tomoaki; Takahashi, Rohta

    2017-10-01

    We discuss the scattering of a quantum particle by two independent successive point interactions in one dimension. The parameter space for two point interactions is given by U(2) × U(2) , which is described by eight real parameters. We perform an analysis of perfect resonant transmission on the whole parameter space. By investigating the effects of the two point interactions on the scattering matrix of plane wave, we find the condition under which perfect resonant transmission occurs. We also provide the physical interpretation of the resonance condition.

  9. Guided Wave Delamination Detection and Quantification With Wavefield Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Campbell Leckey, Cara A.; Seebo, Jeffrey P.; Yu, Lingyu

    2014-01-01

    Unexpected damage can occur in aerospace composites due to impact events or material stress during off-nominal loading events. In particular, laminated composites are susceptible to delamination damage due to weak transverse tensile and inter-laminar shear strengths. Developments of reliable and quantitative techniques to detect delamination damage in laminated composites are imperative for safe and functional optimally-designed next-generation composite structures. In this paper, we investigate guided wave interactions with delamination damage and develop quantification algorithms by using wavefield data analysis. The trapped guided waves in the delamination region are observed from the wavefield data and further quantitatively interpreted by using different wavenumber analysis methods. The frequency-wavenumber representation of the wavefield shows that new wavenumbers are present and correlate to trapped waves in the damage region. These new wavenumbers are used to detect and quantify the delamination damage through the wavenumber analysis, which can show how the wavenumber changes as a function of wave propagation distance. The location and spatial duration of the new wavenumbers can be identified, providing a useful means not only for detecting the presence of delamination damage but also allowing for estimation of the delamination size. Our method has been applied to detect and quantify real delamination damage with complex geometry (grown using a quasi-static indentation technique). The detection and quantification results show the location, size, and shape of the delamination damage.

  10. Finite element method for non-linear dispersive wave analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jung-Yu; Kawahara, Mutsuto

    1993-09-01

    This report presents the finite element method for the analysis of the short wave problem expressed by the Boussinesq equation. The Boussinesq equation considers the effect of wave crest curvature. The standard Galerkin finite element method is employed for the spatial discretization using the triangular finite element based on the linear interpolation function. The combination of the explicit and the quasi-explicit schemes-- i.e., the explicit scheme for the continuum equation and the quasi-explicit scheme for the momentum equation--is employed for the discretization in time. To show the applicability of the present method to the practical problem, the simulation of wave propagation in one-dimensional and two-dimensional channel flows is carried out. The numerical results are in good agreement with the experimental results being. The practical example for Miyako Bay is presented.

  11. Extension of On-Surface Radiation Condition (OSRC) Theory to Full-Vector Electromagnetic Wave Scattering by Three-Dimensional Conducting, Dielectric, and Coated Targets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-27

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION AUTHORITY 3 DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY OF REPORT 2b DECLASSIFICATION i DOWNGRADING SCHEDULE UNLIMITED 4. PERFORMING...NO. 11 TITLE (Include Security Classfication) Extension of OSRC to Full-Vector Electromagnetic Wave Scattering (UNCLASSIFIED) 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR (S... authors wish to thank the referees for their constructive remarks. They also wish to thank Mr. Thomas Moore for his Vii. RELATION TO PREVIOUS HIGH

  12. Multichannel analysis of surface wave method with the autojuggie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tian, G.; Steeples, D.W.; Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Spikes, K.T.; Ralston, M.D.

    2003-01-01

    The shear (S)-wave velocity of near-surface materials and its effect on seismic-wave propagation are of fundamental interest in many engineering, environmental, and groundwater studies. The multichannel analysis of surface wave (MASW) method provides a robust, efficient, and accurate tool to observe near-surface S-wave velocity. A recently developed device used to place large numbers of closely spaced geophones simultaneously and automatically (the 'autojuggie') is shown here to be applicable to the collection of MASW data. In order to demonstrate the use of the autojuggie in the MASW method, we compared high-frequency surface-wave data acquired from conventionally planted geophones (control line) to data collected in parallel with the automatically planted geophones attached to steel bars (test line). The results demonstrate that the autojuggie can be applied in the MASW method. Implementation of the autojuggie in very shallow MASW surveys could drastically reduce the time required and costs incurred in such surveys. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Analysis of fusion waves created with temporal pacing].

    PubMed

    Ueda, M; Shigemi, K; Hayashi, K; Kakihara, K; Nakajima, Y; Fukushima, H; Tanaka, Y

    1998-08-01

    Fifty-five beats of fusion waves were recorded continuously with an audio digital tape and the tape was re-played for analysis. A 45-year-old male (56 kg, 175 cm) with cervical spondylosis was scheduled to undergo laminoplasty of the cervical vertebral (C2-C6). A temporal ventricular (VVI mode) pacing lead was inserted from the right cubital vein to the right ventricular apex for preventing bradycardia while manipulating the medulla. The height of the R wave decreased gradually and the depth of S wave increased in the earlier period of fusion beats and it was reversed later. The narrow QRS width indicated that the electrode was placed near the cardiac conducting system. The gradually increasing intervals between P waves activated the pacing, and the P wave intervals recovered inhibiting the pacing. During the recovery phase, some beats were still activated by pacing instead of depressing the rate below the original rate. These beats suggest the importance of considering the atrial-ventricular conducting time. Arterial pressure fluctuated only slightly during the 'fusion beats, suggesting that despite the abnormality in the cardiac conduction system due to pacing, contraction of the ventricular muscles was only slightly affected in this case.

  14. Analysis methods for burst gravitational waves with TAMA data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Masaki; Arai, K.; Nagano, S.; Takahashi, R.; Sato, S.; Tatsumi, D.; Tsunesada, Y.; Kanda, N.; Kawamura, S.; Beyersdorf, P.; Zhu, Zonh-Hong; Numata, K.; Iida, Y.; Aso, Y.; Mio, N.; Moriwaki, S.; Somiya, K.; Miyoki, S.; Kondo, K.; Takahashi, H.; Hayama, K.; Tagoshi, H.; Fujimoto, M.-K.; Tsubono, K.; Kuroda, K.; TAMA Collaboration

    2004-10-01

    We describe analysis methods and results for burst gravitational waves with data obtained in the eighth observation run by the TAMA300 detector. In this analysis, we used an excess-power filter for signal detection, and two types of veto for fake-event rejection; one is a time-scale selection of events and the other is a veto with auxiliary information recorded together with the main signal. We generated an event-candidate list with this analysis procedure, which will be used for coincidence analysis with the other detectors.

  15. Full control of the spin-wave damping in a magnetic insulator using spin-orbit torque.

    PubMed

    Hamadeh, A; d'Allivy Kelly, O; Hahn, C; Meley, H; Bernard, R; Molpeceres, A H; Naletov, V V; Viret, M; Anane, A; Cros, V; Demokritov, S O; Prieto, J L; Muñoz, M; de Loubens, G; Klein, O

    2014-11-07

    It is demonstrated that the threshold current for damping compensation can be reached in a 5  μm diameter YIG(20  nm)|Pt(7  nm) disk. The demonstration rests upon the measurement of the ferromagnetic resonance linewidth as a function of I(dc) using a magnetic resonance force microscope (MRFM). It is shown that the magnetic losses of spin-wave modes existing in the magnetic insulator can be reduced or enhanced by at least a factor of 5 depending on the polarity and intensity of an in-plane dc current I(dc) flowing through the adjacent normal metal with strong spin-orbit interaction. Complete compensation of the damping of the fundamental mode by spin-orbit torque is reached for a current density of ∼3×10(11)  A·m(-2), in agreement with theoretical predictions. At this critical threshold the MRFM detects a small change of static magnetization, a behavior consistent with the onset of an auto-oscillation regime.

  16. On Holo-Hilbert spectral analysis: a full informational spectral representation for nonlinear and non-stationary data.

    PubMed

    Huang, Norden E; Hu, Kun; Yang, Albert C C; Chang, Hsing-Chih; Jia, Deng; Liang, Wei-Kuang; Yeh, Jia Rong; Kao, Chu-Lan; Juan, Chi-Hung; Peng, Chung Kang; Meijer, Johanna H; Wang, Yung-Hung; Long, Steven R; Wu, Zhauhua

    2016-04-13

    The Holo-Hilbert spectral analysis (HHSA) method is introduced to cure the deficiencies of traditional spectral analysis and to give a full informational representation of nonlinear and non-stationary data. It uses a nested empirical mode decomposition and Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) approach to identify intrinsic amplitude and frequency modulations often present in nonlinear systems. Comparisons are first made with traditional spectrum analysis, which usually achieved its results through convolutional integral transforms based on additive expansions of an a priori determined basis, mostly under linear and stationary assumptions. Thus, for non-stationary processes, the best one could do historically was to use the time-frequency representations, in which the amplitude (or energy density) variation is still represented in terms of time. For nonlinear processes, the data can have both amplitude and frequency modulations (intra-mode and inter-mode) generated by two different mechanisms: linear additive or nonlinear multiplicative processes. As all existing spectral analysis methods are based on additive expansions, either a priori or adaptive, none of them could possibly represent the multiplicative processes. While the earlier adaptive HHT spectral analysis approach could accommodate the intra-wave nonlinearity quite remarkably, it remained that any inter-wave nonlinear multiplicative mechanisms that include cross-scale coupling and phase-lock modulations were left untreated. To resolve the multiplicative processes issue, additional dimensions in the spectrum result are needed to account for the variations in both the amplitude and frequency modulations simultaneously. HHSA accommodates all the processes: additive and multiplicative, intra-mode and inter-mode, stationary and non-stationary, linear and nonlinear interactions. The Holo prefix in HHSA denotes a multiple dimensional representation with both additive and multiplicative capabilities.

  17. On Holo-Hilbert Spectral Analysis: A Full Informational Spectral Representation for Nonlinear and Non-Stationary Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Norden E.; Hu, Kun; Yang, Albert C. C.; Chang, Hsing-Chih; Jia, Deng; Liang, Wei-Kuang; Yeh, Jia Rong; Kao, Chu-Lan; Juan, Chi-Huang; Peng, Chung Kang; Meijer, Johanna H.; Wang, Yung-Hung; Long, Steven R.; Wu, Zhauhua

    2016-01-01

    The Holo-Hilbert spectral analysis (HHSA) method is introduced to cure the deficiencies of traditional spectral analysis and to give a full informational representation of nonlinear and non-stationary data. It uses a nested empirical mode decomposition and Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) approach to identify intrinsic amplitude and frequency modulations often present in nonlinear systems. Comparisons are first made with traditional spectrum analysis, which usually achieved its results through convolutional integral transforms based on additive expansions of an a priori determined basis, mostly under linear and stationary assumptions. Thus, for non-stationary processes, the best one could do historically was to use the time- frequency representations, in which the amplitude (or energy density) variation is still represented in terms of time. For nonlinear processes, the data can have both amplitude and frequency modulations (intra-mode and inter-mode) generated by two different mechanisms: linear additive or nonlinear multiplicative processes. As all existing spectral analysis methods are based on additive expansions, either a priori or adaptive, none of them could possibly represent the multiplicative processes. While the earlier adaptive HHT spectral analysis approach could accommodate the intra-wave nonlinearity quite remarkably, it remained that any inter-wave nonlinear multiplicative mechanisms that include cross-scale coupling and phase-lock modulations were left untreated. To resolve the multiplicative processes issue, additional dimensions in the spectrum result are needed to account for the variations in both the amplitude and frequency modulations simultaneously. HHSA accommodates all the processes: additive and multiplicative, intra-mode and inter-mode, stationary and nonstationary, linear and nonlinear interactions. The Holo prefix in HHSA denotes a multiple dimensional representation with both additive and multiplicative capabilities.

  18. On Holo-Hilbert spectral analysis: a full informational spectral representation for nonlinear and non-stationary data

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Norden E.; Hu, Kun; Yang, Albert C. C.; Chang, Hsing-Chih; Jia, Deng; Liang, Wei-Kuang; Yeh, Jia Rong; Kao, Chu-Lan; Juan, Chi-Hung; Peng, Chung Kang; Meijer, Johanna H.; Wang, Yung-Hung; Long, Steven R.; Wu, Zhauhua

    2016-01-01

    The Holo-Hilbert spectral analysis (HHSA) method is introduced to cure the deficiencies of traditional spectral analysis and to give a full informational representation of nonlinear and non-stationary data. It uses a nested empirical mode decomposition and Hilbert–Huang transform (HHT) approach to identify intrinsic amplitude and frequency modulations often present in nonlinear systems. Comparisons are first made with traditional spectrum analysis, which usually achieved its results through convolutional integral transforms based on additive expansions of an a priori determined basis, mostly under linear and stationary assumptions. Thus, for non-stationary processes, the best one could do historically was to use the time–frequency representations, in which the amplitude (or energy density) variation is still represented in terms of time. For nonlinear processes, the data can have both amplitude and frequency modulations (intra-mode and inter-mode) generated by two different mechanisms: linear additive or nonlinear multiplicative processes. As all existing spectral analysis methods are based on additive expansions, either a priori or adaptive, none of them could possibly represent the multiplicative processes. While the earlier adaptive HHT spectral analysis approach could accommodate the intra-wave nonlinearity quite remarkably, it remained that any inter-wave nonlinear multiplicative mechanisms that include cross-scale coupling and phase-lock modulations were left untreated. To resolve the multiplicative processes issue, additional dimensions in the spectrum result are needed to account for the variations in both the amplitude and frequency modulations simultaneously. HHSA accommodates all the processes: additive and multiplicative, intra-mode and inter-mode, stationary and non-stationary, linear and nonlinear interactions. The Holo prefix in HHSA denotes a multiple dimensional representation with both additive and multiplicative capabilities. PMID:26953180

  19. Impedance-matching analysis in IR leaky-wave antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premkumar, Navaneeth; Xu, Yuancheng; Lail, Brian A.

    2015-08-01

    Planar leaky-wave antennas (LWA) that are capable of full-space scanning have long since been the pursuit for applications including, but not limited to, integration onto vehicles and into cameras for wide-angle of view beam-steering. Such a leaky-wave surface (LWS) was designed for long-wave infrared frequencies with frequency scanning capability. The LWS is based on a microstrip patch array design of a leaky-wave impedance surface and is made up of gold microstrip patches on a grounded zinc sulphide substrate. A 1D composite right/left-handed (CRLH) metamaterial made by periodically stacking a unit cell of the LWS in the longitudinal direction to form a LWA was designed. This paper deals with loading the LWA with a nickel bolometer to collect leaky-wave signals. The LWA radiates a backward leaking wave at 30 degrees at 28.3THz and scans through broadside for frequencies 20THz through 40THz. The paper deals with effectively placing the bolometer in order for the collected signal to exhibit the designed frequency regime. An effective way to maximize the power coupling into the load from the antenna is also explored. The benefit of such a metamaterial/holographic antennacoupled detector is its ability to provide appreciable capture cross-sections while delivering smart signals to subwavelength sized detectors. Due to their high-gain, low-profile, fast response time of the detector and ease of fabrication, this IR LWA-coupled bolometer harbors great potential in the areas of high resolution, uncooled, infrared imaging.

  20. Application of homomorphic signal processing to stress wave factor analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karagulle, H.; Williams, J. H., Jr.; Lee, S. S.

    1985-01-01

    The stress wave factor (SWF) signal, which is the output of an ultrasonic testing system where the transmitting and receiving transducers are coupled to the same face of the test structure, is analyzed in the frequency domain. The SWF signal generated in an isotropic elastic plate is modelled as the superposition of successive reflections. The reflection which is generated by the stress waves which travel p times as a longitudinal (P) wave and s times as a shear (S) wave through the plate while reflecting back and forth between the bottom and top faces of the plate is designated as the reflection with p, s. Short-time portions of the SWF signal are considered for obtaining spectral information on individual reflections. If the significant reflections are not overlapped, the short-time Fourier analysis is used. A summary of the elevant points of homomorphic signal processing, which is also called cepstrum analysis, is given. Homomorphic signal processing is applied to short-time SWF signals to obtain estimates of the log spectra of individual reflections for cases in which the reflections are overlapped. Two typical SWF signals generated in aluminum plates (overlapping and non-overlapping reflections) are analyzed.

  1. Feasibility of cardiovascular magnetic resonance derived coronary wave intensity analysis.

    PubMed

    Raphael, Claire E; Keegan, Jennifer; Parker, Kim H; Simpson, Robin; Collinson, Julian; Vassiliou, Vass; Wage, Ricardo; Drivas, Peter; Strain, Stephen; Cooper, Robert; de Silva, Ranil; Stables, Rod H; Di Mario, Carlo; Frenneaux, Michael; Pennell, Dudley J; Davies, Justin E; Hughes, Alun D; Firmin, David; Prasad, Sanjay K

    2016-12-09

    Wave intensity analysis (WIA) of the coronary arteries allows description of the predominant mechanisms influencing coronary flow over the cardiac cycle. The data are traditionally derived from pressure and velocity changes measured invasively in the coronary artery. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) allows measurement of coronary velocities using phase velocity mapping and derivation of central aortic pressure from aortic distension. We assessed the feasibility of WIA of the coronary arteries using CMR and compared this to invasive data. CMR scans were undertaken in a serial cohort of patients who had undergone invasive WIA. Velocity maps were acquired in the proximal left anterior descending and proximal right coronary artery using a retrospectively-gated breath-hold spiral phase velocity mapping sequence with high temporal resolution (19 ms). A breath-hold segmented gradient echo sequence was used to acquire through-plane cross sectional area changes in the proximal ascending aorta which were used as a surrogate of an aortic pressure waveform after calibration with brachial blood pressure measured with a sphygmomanometer. CMR-derived aortic pressures and CMR-measured velocities were used to derive wave intensity. The CMR-derived wave intensities were compared to invasive data in 12 coronary arteries (8 left, 4 right). Waves were presented as absolute values and as a % of total wave intensity. Intra-study reproducibility of invasive and non-invasive WIA was assessed using Bland-Altman analysis and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The combination of the CMR-derived pressure and velocity data produced the expected pattern of forward and backward compression and expansion waves. The intra-study reproducibility of the CMR derived wave intensities as a % of the total wave intensity (mean ± standard deviation of differences) was 0.0 ± 6.8%, ICC = 0.91. Intra-study reproducibility for the corresponding invasive data was 0.0 ± 4

  2. Affective Outcomes of Schooling: Full-Information Item Factor Analysis of a Student Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muraki, Eiji; Engelhard, George, Jr.

    Recent developments in dichotomous factor analysis based on multidimensional item response models (Bock and Aitkin, 1981; Muthen, 1978) provide an effective method for exploring the dimensionality of questionnaire items. Implemented in the TESTFACT program, this "full information" item factor analysis accounts not only for the pairwise joint…

  3. Patterns of current and failed rifting in Africa from full wave long-period ambient noise tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emry, E.; Shen, Y.; Nyblade, A.; Flinders, A. F.; Bao, X.

    2016-12-01

    The spatial relationships between continental lithospheric structure, upper mantle flow, rift development and evolution, and topographic anomalies in Africa is a subject of ongoing interest. Despite pronounced increases in temporary and permanent broadband seismic coverage, seismic arrays are located unevenly throughout the continent. As a result, models of the upper mantle beneath Africa are well-resolved along parts of the East African Rift directly beneath seismic deployments, but other key regions throughout the continent are less understood. To better image upper mantle structure between existing broadband seismic arrays, we use a long-period ambient noise tomography approach that has been utilized to study structure in other sparsely instrumented regions. We use overlapping records from temporary and permanent broadband seismic arrays (1980-2015) throughout Africa, southern Europe, and the Middle East in order to image the upper mantle beneath the East African Rift and the Congo Craton. We extract empirical Green's functions (EGFs) by cross-correlating ambient seismic noise using a frequency-time normalization (FTN) method and stack them to retrieve coherent signal at 10-340 seconds. We then simulate wave propagation through the spherical Earth using a finite-difference method, measure the phase delay between data and synthetics, calculate sensitivity kernels using the scattering integral approach, and iteratively invert for structure. We include signal from 40-340 seconds from 180 stations, allowing for resolution throughout most of the upper mantle. Results indicate two distinct fast-velocity blocks through the depth profile of the Congo Craton; this separation had previously been imaged at shallow depths, with deeper depths imaged as one large cratonic mass. This separation throughout corresponds well with the surface separation between the North East Congo Block and the Kasai and Chailu-Gabon blocks by a proposed failed Neo-Proterozoic rift and the

  4. Direct Calculation of the Scattering Amplitude Without Partial Wave Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shertzer, J.; Temkin, A.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Two new developments in scattering theory are reported. We show, in a practical way, how one can calculate the full scattering amplitude without invoking a partial wave expansion. First, the integral expression for the scattering amplitude f(theta) is simplified by an analytic integration over the azimuthal angle. Second, the full scattering wavefunction which appears in the integral expression for f(theta) is obtained by solving the Schrodinger equation with the finite element method (FEM). As an example, we calculate electron scattering from the Hartree potential. With minimal computational effort, we obtain accurate and stable results for the scattering amplitude.

  5. Data reduction and analysis of HELIOS plasma wave data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Roger R.

    1988-01-01

    Reduction of data acquired from the HELIOS Solar Wind Plasma Wave Experiments on HELIOS 1 and 2 was continued. Production of 24 hour survey plots of the HELIOS 1 plasma wave data were continued and microfilm copies were submitted to the National Space Science Data Center. Much of the effort involved the shock memory from both HELIOS 1 and 2. This data had to be deconvoluted and time ordered before it could be displayed and plotted in an organized form. The UNIVAX 418-III computer was replaced by a DEC VAX 11/780 computer. In order to continue the reduction and analysis of the data set, all data reduction and analysis computer programs had to be rewritten.

  6. Simulation and Analysis of Converging Shock Wave Test Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, Scott D.; Shashkov, Mikhail J.

    2012-06-21

    Results and analysis pertaining to the simulation of the Guderley converging shock wave test problem (and associated code verification hydrodynamics test problems involving converging shock waves) in the LANL ASC radiation-hydrodynamics code xRAGE are presented. One-dimensional (1D) spherical and two-dimensional (2D) axi-symmetric geometric setups are utilized and evaluated in this study, as is an instantiation of the xRAGE adaptive mesh refinement capability. For the 2D simulations, a 'Surrogate Guderley' test problem is developed and used to obviate subtleties inherent to the true Guderley solution's initialization on a square grid, while still maintaining a high degree of fidelity to the original problem, and minimally straining the general credibility of associated analysis and conclusions.

  7. Analysis of Metric Type II Burst and EUV Waves Generated by Shock Wave Driven by Cme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha-Silva, Rafael; Fernandes, Francisco; Selhorst, Caius

    2016-07-01

    The relationship between solar type II radio bursts produced by plasma oscillations and coronal shocks is well shown since the 1960s. However, the details of the association between the drivers of the shocks and the metric type II bursts remains a controversial issue. The flares and the coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the potential drivers of these shocks. In this work, we present the analysis of a metric type II burst observed on May 17, 2013, by spectrometers from e-CALLISTO network and EUV images from the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI), aboard the STEREO. The event was associated with an M3.2 X-ray flare and a halo CME. The EUV images show the EUV wave was produced by the expansion of the CME. The heights of the EUV wave fronts and the magnetic field intensity determined in the regions of the shock are consistent with those the heights of radio source obtained with the three-fold Newkirk density model, which suggests an oblique propagation of the shock. The finding of an accelerating shock with speed of 530-640 km/s and of 870-1220 km/s for the first and the second stages of the type II emission, respectively, is consistent with both the average speed of the associated EUV wave front, of 626 km/s, during the initial expansion of the CME, and with the linear speed of the CME, of 1345 km/s. These results will be presented and discussed.

  8. Linear analysis of a backward wave oscillator with triangular corrugated slow wave structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saber, Md. Ghulam; Sagor, Rakibul Hasan; Amin, Md. Ruhul

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a backward wave oscillator (BWO) with triangularly corrugated periodic metallic slow wave structure (TrCSWS) driven by an infinitely thin annular electron beam is studied using linear theory. The electron beam is assumed to be guided by a strong magnetic field. The triangular axial profile of the SWS is approximated by a Fourier series in order to apply the linear Rayleigh-Fourier (R-F) theory that has long been used in the theoretical analysis of BWOs with sinusoidally corrugated SWS (SCSWS). The dispersion equation for various beam parameters has been solved and the temporal growth rate (TGR) of the electromagnetic wave for the fundamental TM_{01} mode is calculated numerically. The TGR values for different beam parameters have been compared with those of the BWO with SCSWS, semi-circularly corrugated SWS (SCCSWS) and trapezoidally corrugated SWS (TCSWS). In order to compare the TGR values, the amplitude of corrugation of the TrCSWS is varied so that its dispersion curve of TM_{01} mode almost coincides with that of the SCSWS and TCSWS. The study reveals that the performance (in terms of TGR) of the proposed BWO with TrCSWS is comparable to that of other BWOs with SCSWS and TCSWS for the same set of beam parameters and it provides significantly better performance than SCCSWS. So, the proposed TrCSWS that can easily be constructed may replace SCSWS, SCCSWS or TCSWS as their viable alternative.

  9. A full-dimensional time-dependent wave packet study of the H + CO2 → OH + CO reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Peng; Chen, Jun; Liu, Shu; Zhang, Dong H.

    2017-09-01

    A full dimensional quantum dynamics calculation has been carried out to study the prototypical complex forming H + CO2 → OH + CO reaction. The total reaction probability is converged with a propagation time much shorter than the reverse reaction, and only exhibits very small oscillatory structures, indicating the reaction proceeds mainly through a direct mechanism. The strong Fermi resonance between the (0 2 0) and (1 0 0) vibrationally excited states makes it hard to define their efficacy for reactivity, although it is conceivable that the bending excitation is much more effective than the symmetric excitation according to the geometry of the transition state in the entrance channel.

  10. An efficient full potential implicit method based on characteristics for analysis of supersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shankar, V.; Osher, S.

    1982-01-01

    A nonlinear aerodynamic prediction technique based on the full potential equation in conservation form has been developed for the treatment of supersonic flows. The method uses the theory of characteristic signal propagation to accurately simulate the flow structure, which includes shock waves and mixed elliptic-hyperbolic crossflow. An implicit approximate factorization scheme is employed to solve the finite-differenced equation. The necessary body-fitted grid system in every marching plane is generated numerically, using an elliptic grid solver. Results are shown for conical and nonconical wing-body combinations and compared with experimental data and Euler calculations. The method demonstrates an enormous savings in execution time and memory requirements over Euler methods.

  11. Spectral Analysis Of Digital Wave Data Computer Program: SPECTRUM

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    spectrum and time series analysis may be found in Bendat and Piersol (L97L), Borgman (1972), Borgman (1973), Lund (1986), and Welch (1967). The...Including Procedures Based on the Fast Fourier Transform Algorithm", STL #2008, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY. Lund , Robert B. "A Mathematical Model...Engineering Research Center, U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, MS. Rye, Henrik . 1977. "The Stability of Some Currently Used Wave

  12. Ocean Surface Wave Optical Roughness: Analysis of Innovative Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-16

    relationship of MSS to wind speed, and at times has shown a reversal of the Cox-Munk linear relationship. Furthermore, we observe measurable changes in...1985]. The variable speed allocation method has the effect of aliasing (cb) to slower waves, thereby increasing the exponent –m. Our analysis based ...RaDyO) program. The primary research goals of the program are to (1) examine time -dependent oceanic radiance distribution in relation to dynamic

  13. Full-scale fatigue tests of CX-100 wind turbine blades. Part II: analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Stuart G.; Jeong, Hyomi; Jang, Jae Kyeong; Park, Gyuhae; Farinholt, Kevin M.; Todd, Michael D.; Ammerman, Curtt M.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents the initial analysis results of several structural health monitoring (SHM) methods applied to two 9- meter CX-100 wind turbine blades subjected to fatigue loading at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). The first blade was a pristine blade, manufactured to standard CX-100 design specifications. The second blade was manufactured for the University of Massachusetts, Lowell (UMass), with intentional simulated defects within the fabric layup. Each blade was instrumented with a variety of sensors on its surface. The blades were subject to harmonic excitation at their first natural frequency with steadily increasing loading until ultimately reaching failure. Data from the sensors were collected between and during fatigue loading sessions. The data were measured at multi-scale frequency ranges using a variety of data acquisition equipment, including off-the-shelf systems and prototype data acquisition hardware. The data were analyzed to identify fatigue damage initiation and to assess damage progression. Modal response, diffuse wave-field transfer functions in time and frequency domains, and wave propagation methods were applied to assess the condition of the turbine blade. The analysis methods implemented were evaluated in conjunction with hardware-specific performance for their efficacy in enabling the assessment of damage progression in the blade. The results of this assessment will inform the selection of specific data to be collected and analysis methods to be implemented for a CX-100 flight test to be conducted in collaboration with Sandia National Laboratory at the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Conservation and Production Research Laboratory (CPRL) in Bushland, Texas.

  14. Phase Velocity and Full-Waveform Analysis of Co-located Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) Channels and Geophone Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, L.; Mellors, R. J.; Thurber, C. H.; Wang, H. F.; Zeng, X.

    2015-12-01

    A 762-meter Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) array with a channel spacing of one meter was deployed at the Garner Valley Downhole Array in Southern California. The array was approximately rectangular with dimensions of 180 meters by 80 meters. The array also included two subdiagonals within the rectangle along which three-component geophones were co-located. Several active sources were deployed, including a 45-kN, swept-frequency, shear-mass shaker, which produced strong Rayleigh waves across the array. Both DAS and geophone traces were filtered in 2-Hz steps between 4 and 20 Hz to obtain phase velocities as a function of frequency from fitting the moveout of travel times over distances of 35 meters or longer. As an alternative to this traditional means of finding phase velocity, it is theoretically possible to find the Rayleigh-wave phase velocity at each point of co-location as the ratio of DAS and geophone responses, because DAS is sensitive to ground strain and geophones are sensitive to ground velocity, after suitable corrections for instrument response (Mikumo & Aki, 1964). The concept was tested in WPP, a seismic wave propagation program, by first validating and then using a 3D synthetic, full-waveform seismic model to simulate the effect of increased levels of noise and uncertainty as data go from ideal to more realistic. The results obtained from this study provide a better understanding of the DAS response and its potential for being combined with traditional seismometers for obtaining phase velocity at a single location. This analysis is part of the PoroTomo project (Poroelastic Tomography by Adjoint Inverse Modeling of Data from Seismology, Geodesy, and Hydrology, http://geoscience.wisc.edu/feigl/porotomo).

  15. Simple and efficient full wave analysis of electromagnetic coupling in multilayer printed circuit board layouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Gaffoor, Mohammed Rajeek

    2000-09-01

    A simple method to model Printed Circuit Board (PCB) that takes advantage of the unique features found in PCBs is proposed. This method is capable of analyzing coupling between any nets in the entire multilayer PCB. Using the equivalence principle, the PCB is modeled as a cascade of parallel plate waveguides with half-space regions residing above and below the PCB. The problem is formulated using equivalent magnetic currents in the non- metallic regions of layer interfaces rather than in terms of electric currents in the planar metal layers. The equivalent magnetic currents at the dielectric interfaces are expressed in terms of the Rao-Wilton-Glisson (RWG) basis functions. The electric currents flowing on the vias inside dielectric layers are assumed constant in the vertical direction. These vertical electric currents radiate TEM modes in the parallel plate environment. Integral equations based on simple parallel plate and free-space Green's functions enforcing the boundary conditions are set up and solved using the Method of Moments. The equivalent magnetic currents in each layer interact only with currents in the adjacent layers, thereby resulting in a `` chained-block- banded'' matrix. Excitation is provided through ports defined at each pair of pads, or between a pad and nearby ground. These ports are located on the top and the bottom layers of the PCB where the circuit components and IC pins are mounted. Two different localized excitation schemes, one with a current loop injection and the other with a strip current excitation, are proposed. This formulation requires the computation of the MoM matrix once per frequency for any number of ports. Further, the solution for only those unknown equivalent magnetic currents around the port regions is required to obtain the N-port impedance parameter characterization of the PCB. Consequently, a memory efficient block matrix solution process can be used to solve problems of a large size for a given memory. Simple and realistic examples are given to illustrate the validity and efficiency of this approach.

  16. Full-waveform analysis of soil and sensor characteristics on EMI sensitivity and investigation depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Frédéric; Moghadas, Davood; Vereecken, Harry; Lambot, Sébastien

    2010-05-01

    , leading to erroneous analyses and data interpretation if not properly accounted for. We conducted synthetic experiments in order to investigate and quantify the effects of the different factors likely to affect EMI sensor vertical spatial sensitivity and investigation depth and to identify conditions for which the LIN approximation holds. The EMI signal was modelled from an exact solution of the three-dimensional Maxwell's equations for wave propagation in a horizontally multilayered medium. For this analysis, we examined different configurations for a two-layered subsurface, considering contrasted values for the two layer electrical conductivities within the range encountered for soils and varying the thickness of the first layer. For each of these configurations, several frequencies and transmitter-receiver coil separations were studied, encompassing the ranges of corresponding parameters found for the current EMI systems. Moreover, the effects of the orientation and of the height of the instrument above the soil surface were also analysed. These results bring interesting insights on the influence of both soil and sensor characteristics on the sensitivity with depth of the EMI signal and on the investigation depth, and point out situations for which the LIN approximation should be carefully considered. This study situates in the framework of the development of a new EMI approach, based on zero-offset co-planar coils and full-waveform inversion for exact parameter retrieval.

  17. Kinematic analysis of tandem gait on a sine wave walkway.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Shingo; Fujisawa, Hiroyuki; Tomizawa, Yoshiyuki; Murakami, Kenichi

    2016-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to ascertain the kinematic characteristics on a horizontal plane, including knee joint rotation, when walking with a tandem gait on a sine wave walkway. [Subjects and Methods] Eighteen healthy adults were enrolled as subjects in this study. They walked with a tandem gait on a sine wave walkway. A three-dimensional motion analysis system was used to record data and calculate the trunk, hip joint, and knee joint rotation angles. [Results] The rotation angle ranges for the trunk, hip joint, and knee joint were 23.3°, 53.3°, and 47.3°, respectively. The trunk generally rotated towards the direction of movement, and when turning left using the left leg as the pivot, the hip joint was internally rotated and the knee joint was externally rotated. In contrast, when making a directional change to the right using the left leg as the pivot, the hip joint was externally rotated and the knee joint was internally rotated. [Conclusion] Through tandem gait analysis on a sine wave walkway, knee joint rotation was found to be important in changes of direction.

  18. ASKI: A modular toolbox for scattering-integral-based seismic full waveform inversion and sensitivity analysis utilizing external forward codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Florian; Friederich, Wolfgang

    Due to increasing computational resources, the development of new numerically demanding methods and software for imaging Earth's interior remains of high interest in Earth sciences. Here, we give a description from a user's and programmer's perspective of the highly modular, flexible and extendable software package ASKI-Analysis of Sensitivity and Kernel Inversion-recently developed for iterative scattering-integral-based seismic full waveform inversion. In ASKI, the three fundamental steps of solving the seismic forward problem, computing waveform sensitivity kernels and deriving a model update are solved by independent software programs that interact via file output/input only. Furthermore, the spatial discretizations of the model space used for solving the seismic forward problem and for deriving model updates, respectively, are kept completely independent. For this reason, ASKI does not contain a specific forward solver but instead provides a general interface to established community wave propagation codes. Moreover, the third fundamental step of deriving a model update can be repeated at relatively low costs applying different kinds of model regularization or re-selecting/weighting the inverted dataset without need to re-solve the forward problem or re-compute the kernels. Additionally, ASKI offers the user sensitivity and resolution analysis tools based on the full sensitivity matrix and allows to compose customized workflows in a consistent computational environment. ASKI is written in modern Fortran and Python, it is well documented and freely available under terms of the GNU General Public License (http://www.rub.de/aski).

  19. Linear analysis of an oscillatory instability of radiative shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, R. A.; Imamura, J. N.

    1982-10-01

    A linear stability analysis of a planar radiative shock structure is presented that is applicable both to accretion onto compact objects and to radiative shock waves in the interstellar medium. The cooling function of the shock is directly proportional to temperature raised to the power alpha. An oscillatory instability similar to that found in numerical calculations of accretion onto degenerate dwarfs is investigated, and it is shown that multiple modes of oscillation are possible. Oscillation frequencies are determined, along with the values of alpha for which the various modes are unstable. It is concluded that the instability may explain why steady-state shock-wave models cannot reproduce certain observations of old supernova remnants and Herbig-Haro objects.

  20. Wave function analysis of MHC-peptide interactions.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Constanza; Obregón, Mateo; Balbín, Alejandro; Villaveces, José Luis; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2007-01-01

    We have carried out an analysis of the wave function data for three MHC-peptide complexes: HLA-DRbeta1*0101-HA, HLA-DRbeta1*0401-HA and HLA-DRbeta1*0401-Col. We used quantum chemistry computer programs to generate wave function coefficients for these complexes, from which we obtained both molecular and atomic orbital data for both pocket and peptide amino acids within each pocket region. From these discriminated data, interaction molecular orbitals (IMOs) were identified as those with large and similar atomic orbital coefficient contributions from both pocket and peptide amino acids. The present results correlate well with our previous research where only electrostatic moments were used to explore molecular component interactions. Furthermore, we show a quantum chemical methodology to produce more fine-grained results concerning amino acid behavior in the MHC-peptide interaction.

  1. Full-field local displacement analysis of two-sided paperboard

    Treesearch

    J.M. Considine; D.W. Vahey

    2007-01-01

    This report describes a method to examine full-field displacements of both sides of paperboard during tensile testing. Analysis showed out-of-plane shear behavior near the failures zones. The method was reliably used to examine out-of-plane shear in double notch shear specimens. Differences in shear behavior of machine direction and cross-machine direction specimens...

  2. A Two-Tier Full-Information Item Factor Analysis Model with Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cai, Li

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by Gibbons et al.'s (Appl. Psychol. Meas. 31:4-19, "2007") full-information maximum marginal likelihood item bifactor analysis for polytomous data, and Rijmen, Vansteelandt, and De Boeck's (Psychometrika 73:167-182, "2008") work on constructing computationally efficient estimation algorithms for latent variable…

  3. Analysis of Unbound Aggregate Layer Deformation Behavior from Full Scale Aircraft Gear Loading with Wander

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donovan, Phillip Raymond

    2009-01-01

    This study focuses on the analysis of the behavior of unbound aggregates to offset wheel loads. Test data from full-scale aircraft gear loading conducted at the National Airport Pavement Test Facility (NAPTF) by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) are used to investigate the effects of wander (offset loads) on the deformation behavior of…

  4. Analysis of Unbound Aggregate Layer Deformation Behavior from Full Scale Aircraft Gear Loading with Wander

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donovan, Phillip Raymond

    2009-01-01

    This study focuses on the analysis of the behavior of unbound aggregates to offset wheel loads. Test data from full-scale aircraft gear loading conducted at the National Airport Pavement Test Facility (NAPTF) by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) are used to investigate the effects of wander (offset loads) on the deformation behavior of…

  5. A Two-Tier Full-Information Item Factor Analysis Model with Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cai, Li

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by Gibbons et al.'s (Appl. Psychol. Meas. 31:4-19, "2007") full-information maximum marginal likelihood item bifactor analysis for polytomous data, and Rijmen, Vansteelandt, and De Boeck's (Psychometrika 73:167-182, "2008") work on constructing computationally efficient estimation algorithms for latent variable…

  6. Full cost accounting in the analysis of separated waste collection efficiency: A methodological proposal.

    PubMed

    D'Onza, Giuseppe; Greco, Giulio; Allegrini, Marco

    2016-02-01

    Recycling implies additional costs for separated municipal solid waste (MSW) collection. The aim of the present study is to propose and implement a management tool - the full cost accounting (FCA) method - to calculate the full collection costs of different types of waste. Our analysis aims for a better understanding of the difficulties of putting FCA into practice in the MSW sector. We propose a FCA methodology that uses standard cost and actual quantities to calculate the collection costs of separate and undifferentiated waste. Our methodology allows cost efficiency analysis and benchmarking, overcoming problems related to firm-specific accounting choices, earnings management policies and purchase policies. Our methodology allows benchmarking and variance analysis that can be used to identify the causes of off-standards performance and guide managers to deploy resources more efficiently. Our methodology can be implemented by companies lacking a sophisticated management accounting system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Do animals bite more during a full moon? Retrospective observational analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Chanchal; Bradley, Peter; Smith, Matt; Scally, Andrew J; Wilson, Bradley J

    2000-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that the incidence of animal bites increases at the time of a full moon. Design Retrospective observational analysis. Setting Accident and emergency department at a general hospital in an English city. Subjects 1621 consecutive patients, irrespective of age and sex. Main outcome measures Number of patients who attended an accident and emergency department during 1997 to 1999 after being bitten by an animal. The number of bites in each day was compared with the lunar phase in each month. Results The incidence of animal bites rose significantly at the time of a full moon. With the period of the full moon as the reference period, the incidence rate ratio of the bites for all other periods of the lunar cycle was significantly lower (P <0.001). Conclusions The full moon is associated with a significant increase in animal bites to humans. PMID:11124173

  8. Do animals bite more during a full moon? Retrospective observational analysis.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, C; Bradley, P; Smith, M; Scally, A J; Wilson, B J

    To test the hypothesis that the incidence of animal bites increases at the time of a full moon. Retrospective observational analysis. Accident and emergency department at a general hospital in an English city. 1621 consecutive patients, irrespective of age and sex. Number of patients who attended an accident and emergency department during 1997 to 1999 after being bitten by an animal. The number of bites in each day was compared with the lunar phase in each month. The incidence of animal bites rose significantly at the time of a full moon. With the period of the full moon as the reference period, the incidence rate ratio of the bites for all other periods of the lunar cycle was significantly lower (P <0.001). The full moon is associated with a significant increase in animal bites to humans.

  9. Hydroelastic analysis of ice shelves under long wave excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papathanasiou, Theodosios; Karperaki, Angeliki; Theotokoglou, Efstathios; Belibassakis, Kostas

    2014-05-01

    The transient hydroelastic response of an ice shelf, under long wave forcing, is analysed by means of the Finite Element method. Our main goal is to provide a simple model for tsunami wave - ice shelf interaction, capable of reproducing, in an at least qualitative manner, the stress field induced in the ice shelf, when excited by a tsunami wave. The analysis is aimed to model ice calving caused by wave impact, as was the case after the Honsu 2011 incident [1]. Adopting several simplifying but realistic assumptions, the ice shelf is modeled as a variable thickness, Euler-Bernoulli, cantilever beam, while the 1+1 linear shallow water equations are employed for the hydrodynamic field representation, as described in [2]. The fixed cantilever beam resembles a constrained, continuous ice shelf extending into the ocean. The solution of such a system, for a freely floating plate, has been presented by Sturova [3], where a modal expansion of the hydroelastic response with respect to the dry modes of the beam has been used. Our solution approach is based on the development of a special hydroelastic finite element for the governing equations. Cases of constant and variable bathymetry are considered. Bending moment time profiles yield the maximum tensile stress at the upper and lower surfaces of the ice shelf, which is the critical parameter for crack initiation or propagation. As expected, maximum absolute bending moment values appear at the base of the ice shelf, where no deflection or rotation occurs. The fact that the wave is fully reflected on the vertical impermeable boundary, corresponding to the continental shelf under the base of the floe, leads to extreme focusing and thus extreme bending moment values. Finally, the case of cracked shelves has been considered with use of the elementary defective beam theory of Kienzler and Herrmann [4]. Future enhancement of the present model is proposed on the grounds of a higher order beam/plate theory and a 2-D formulation

  10. Pulse wave analysis for the prediction of preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Carty, D M; Neisius, U; Rooney, L K; Dominiczak, A F; Delles, C

    2014-02-01

    Preeclampsia is associated with a number of changes to maternal vascular function. Assessment of arterial stiffness using pulse wave analysis (PWA) has been proposed as a means of predicting preeclampsia before the onset of clinically detectable disease. One hundred and eighty women with 2 risk factors for preeclampsia were examined at gestational weeks 16 and 28, of whom 17 (9.4%) developed preeclampsia. To study the effects of pregnancy itself women were also examined at 6-9 months post-natally; an additional 30 healthy non-pregnant women were also examined. PWA was performed using SphygmoCor; augmentation index (AIx), a marker of arterial wave reflection, was also measured using EndoPAT-2000. Women who developed preeclampsia were more likely to be overweight and had a higher brachial and central diastolic BP at gestational week 16 than those who remained normotensive. There was no difference in any parameter of arterial wave reflection between non-pregnant and pregnant women, nor between those who developed preeclampsia and those who remained normotensive, when examined at weeks 16 and 28 or post-natally. In this cohort of women with risk factors for preeclampsia, PWA did not provide additional information beyond brachial blood pressure and maternal risk factor profile about the risk of future development of preeclampsia.

  11. Waveform fitting and geometry analysis for full-waveform lidar feature extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Fuan; Lai, Jhe-Syuan; Cheng, Yi-Hsiu

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a systematic approach that integrates spline curve fitting and geometry analysis to extract full-waveform LiDAR features for land-cover classification. The cubic smoothing spline algorithm is used to fit the waveform curve of the received LiDAR signals. After that, the local peak locations of the waveform curve are detected using a second derivative method. According to the detected local peak locations, commonly used full-waveform features such as full width at half maximum (FWHM) and amplitude can then be obtained. In addition, the number of peaks, time difference between the first and last peaks, and the average amplitude are also considered as features of LiDAR waveforms with multiple returns. Based on the waveform geometry, dynamic time-warping (DTW) is applied to measure the waveform similarity. The sum of the absolute amplitude differences that remain after time-warping can be used as a similarity feature in a classification procedure. An airborne full-waveform LiDAR data set was used to test the performance of the developed feature extraction method for land-cover classification. Experimental results indicate that the developed spline curve- fitting algorithm and geometry analysis can extract helpful full-waveform LiDAR features to produce better land-cover classification than conventional LiDAR data and feature extraction methods. In particular, the multiple-return features and the dynamic time-warping index can improve the classification results significantly.

  12. Experimental and Theoretical Modal Analysis of Full-Sized Wood Composite Panels Supported on Four Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Cheng; Zhang, Houjiang; Wang, Xiping; Miao, Hu; Zhou, Lujing; Liu, Fenglu

    2017-01-01

    Key elastic properties of full-sized wood composite panels (WCPs) must be accurately determined not only for safety, but also serviceability demands. In this study, the modal parameters of full-sized WCPs supported on four nodes were analyzed for determining the modulus of elasticity (E) in both major and minor axes, as well as the in-plane shear modulus of panels by using a vibration testing method. The experimental modal analysis was conducted on three full-sized medium-density fiberboard (MDF) and three full-sized particleboard (PB) panels of three different thicknesses (12, 15, and 18 mm). The natural frequencies and mode shapes of the first nine modes of vibration were determined. Results from experimental modal testing were compared with the results of a theoretical modal analysis. A sensitivity analysis was performed to identify the sensitive modes for calculating E (major axis: Ex and minor axis: Ey) and the in-plane shear modulus (Gxy) of the panels. Mode shapes of the MDF and PB panels obtained from modal testing are in a good agreement with those from theoretical modal analyses. A strong linear relationship exists between the measured natural frequencies and the calculated frequencies. The frequencies of modes (2, 0), (0, 2), and (2, 1) under the four-node support condition were determined as the characteristic frequencies for calculation of Ex, Ey, and Gxy of full-sized WCPs. The results of this study indicate that the four-node support can be used in free vibration test to determine the elastic properties of full-sized WCPs. PMID:28773043

  13. Kelvin waves in ECMWF analysis: normal-mode diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaauw, Marten; Zagar, Nedjeljka

    2013-04-01

    Equatorial Kelvin waves show a large spread in spatial and temporal variability similar to their source of tropical convective forcing. Once decoupled from their source, Kelvin waves are modulated during their ascent by changes in the background wind and stability. In this presentation, we focus on the seasonal and interannual variability of Kelvin waves in relation with variability of (i) tropical convection and (ii) background zonal wind and static stability. Global data is extracted from ECMWF operational analysis from January 2007 till May 2011 on 91 model levels (top level at 0.01 hPa) and ~ 25 km horizontal resolution. Using three-dimensional orthogonal normal-mode expansions, we project input mass and wind data simultaneously onto balanced rotational modes and unbalanced inertia-gravity modes including Kelvin modes. Next, an inverse transformation of Kelvin modes to physical space is performed under the linearity assumption, allowing a study on the spatial and temporal variability of Kelvin wave zonal wind and temperature. Results show an annual cycle in KW zonal wind in agreement with other studies. Minima resp. maxima in zonal wind amplitudes are found in the Indian ocean resp. Western Pacific and are most pronounced in the tropical tropopause at 150 hPa in January and 100 hPa in July. The annual cycle is enhanced (reduced) through interaction with a descending westerly QBO phase and enhanced (reduced) convective forcing. We also note a gradual eastward shift of KW zonal wind maxima till January 2010 in correspondence with an eastward shift of tropical convection.

  14. Analysis of the power capacity of overmoded slow wave structures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Dian; Zhang, Jun; Zhong, Huihuang; Jin, Zhenxing

    2013-07-15

    As the generated wavelength shortens, overmoded slow wave structures (SWSs) with large diameters are employed in O-type Cerenkov high power microwave (HPM) generators to achieve high power capacity. However, reported experimental results suggest that overmoded slow wave HPM generators working at millimeter wavelength output much lower power than those working at X-band do, despite the fact that the value of D/λ (here, D is the average diameter of SWSs and λ is the generated wavelength) of the former is much larger than that of the latter. In order to understand this, the characteristics of the power capacity of the TM{sub 0n} modes in overmoded SWSs are numerically investigated. Our analysis reveals the following facts. First, the power capacity of higher order TM{sub 0n} modes is apparently larger than that of TM{sub 01} mode. This is quite different from the conclusion got in the foregone report, in which the power capacity of overmoded SWSs is estimated by that of smooth cylindrical waveguides. Second, the rate at which the power capacity of TM{sub 01} mode in overmoded SWSs grows with diameter does not slow down as the TM{sub 01} field transforms from “volume wave” to “surface wave.” Third, once the diameter of overmoded SWSs and the beam voltage are fixed, the power capacity of TM{sub 01} wave drops as periodic length L shortens and the generated frequency rises, although the value of D/λ increases significantly. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the capability of annular electron beam to interact efficiently with higher order TM{sub 0n} modes in overmoded SWSs if we want to improve the power capacity of overmoded O-type Cerenkov HPM generators working at high frequency.

  15. Frequency analysis of GaN MESFETs using full-band cellular Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakawa, S.; Goodnick, S. M.; Branlard, J.; Saraniti, M.

    2005-05-01

    A full-band electron transport calculation in wurtzite phase GaN based on a detailed model of the electron-phonon interactions using a Cellular Monte Carlo (CMC) approach is applied to the frequency analysis of MESFETs. Realistic polar-optical phonon, impurity, piezoelectric and dislocation scattering is included in the full-band CMC simulator, which shows good agreement with measured velocity-field data. The effect of the dislocation scattering on the MESFET RF characteristics is examined as well, indicating that the computed cut-off frequency is affected by the crystal dislocation density and bias conditions.

  16. Rigorous coupled-wave analysis for two-dimensional gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logofătu, Petre Cătălin

    2005-08-01

    Rigorous Coupled-Wave Analysis for 2D gratings is reviewed. The main features of RCWA such as the Fourier expansion of the dielectric function in the grating area, solving the Maxwell equation inside the grating, the eigenvalue problem and the matching of the tangential fields at the interfaces are described. Key improvements of the theory, that allows the reduction of the work time by orders of magnitude, such as the reduction of the sue of the matrix for the eigenvalue problem are stressed. The computer code written based on this theory passed consistency tests and was checked against other computer codes.

  17. Stability analysis for extended models of gap solitary waves

    PubMed

    Schollmann; Mayer

    2000-05-01

    A numerical linear stability analysis has been carried out for stationary spatially localized solutions of several systems of coupled nonlinear partial differential equations (PDE's) with two and more complex variables. These coupled PDE's have recently been discussed in the literature, mostly in the context of physical systems with a frequency gap in the dispersion relation of their linear excitations, and they are extensions of the Mills-Trullinger gap soliton model. Translational and oscillatory instabilities are identified, and their associated growth rates are computed as functions of certain parameters characterizing the solitary waves.

  18. Gas Analysis by Fourier Transform Mm-Wave Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Brent J.; Steber, Amanda L.; Lehmann, Kevin K.; Pate, Brooks H.

    2013-06-01

    Molecular rotational spectroscopy of low pressure, room temperature gases offers high chemical selectivity and sensitivity with the potential for a wide range of applications in gas analysis. A strength of the technique is the potential to identify molecules that have not been previously studied by rotational spectroscopy by comparing experimental results to predictions of the spectroscopic parameters from quantum chemistry -6 so called library-free detection. The development of Fourier transform mm-wave spectrometers using high peak power (30 mW) active multiplier chain mm-wave sources brings new measurement capabilities to the analysis of complex gas mixtures. Strategies for gas analysis based on high-throughput mm-wave spectroscopy and arbitrary waveform generator driven mm-wave sources are described. Several new measurement capabilities come from the intrinsic time-domain measurement technique. High-sensitivity double-resonance measurements can be performed to speed the analysis of a complex gas sample containing several species. This technique uses a "pi-pulse" to selectively invert the population of two selected rotational energy levels and the effect of this excitation pulse on all other transitions in the spectrometer operating range is monitored using segmented chirped-pulse Fourier transform spectroscopy. This method can lead to automated determination of the molecular rotational constants. Rapid pulse duration scan experiments can be used to estimate the magnitude and direction of the dipole moment of the molecule from an unknown spectrum. Coherent pulse echo experiments, using the traditional Hahn sequence or two-color population recovery methods, can be used to determine the collisional relaxation rate of the unknown molecule. This rate determination improves the ability to estimate the mass of the unknown molecule from the determination of the Doppler dephasing rate. By performing a suite of automated, high-throughput measurements, there is the

  19. A New Pion-Nucleon Partial Wave Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, Michael; Watson, Shon; Stahov, Jugoslav

    2006-10-01

    Existing determinations of the masses, widths and decay modes of low-lying excited states of the nucleon, as compiled in the Review of Particle Physics, are determined from energy-independent partial wave analyses of pion-nucleon scattering data. For the N*(1440) and most other resonances under 2 GeV, the analyses cited are the Karlsruhe-Helsinki, Carnegie Mellon-Berkeley and Kent State analyses, the latter of which used the elastic amplitudes from the other two. The data included in these analyses were published before 1980. Other analyses, notably the recent ones from George Washington University and the Pittsburgh-Argonne group, are ``not used for averages, fits, limits, etc.'' Complete sets of measurements (differential cross sections, analyzing powers and spin rotation parameters) have been measured in the N*(1440) resonance region since 1980, culminating in the Crystal Ball program at BNL to measure all-neutral final states (charge exchange, multiple pi-zero final states, and inverse photoproduction). A new partial wave analysis of the Karlsruhe-Helsinki type has been started by Abilene Christian University, University of Tuzla, and Rudjer Boskovic Institute. The analysis is constrained by fixed-t and interior hyperbolic dispersion relations. Comparisons of the new analysis to modern experimental data and to previous analyses will be presented.

  20. Basic gait analysis based on continuous wave radar.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun

    2012-09-01

    A gait analysis method based on continuous wave (CW) radar is proposed in this paper. Time-frequency analysis is used to analyze the radar micro-Doppler echo from walking humans, and the relationships between the time-frequency spectrogram and human biological gait are discussed. The methods for extracting the gait parameters from the spectrogram are studied in depth and experiments on more than twenty subjects have been performed to acquire the radar gait data. The gait parameters are calculated and compared. The gait difference between men and women are presented based on the experimental data and extracted features. Gait analysis based on CW radar will provide a new method for clinical diagnosis and therapy.

  1. Theoretical analysis of the kinetic performance of laboratory- and full-scale composting systems.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Marco; Silveira, Ana; Antunes, Fernando

    2012-07-01

    Composting research at laboratory-scale is critical for the development of optimized full-scale plants. Discrepancies between processes at laboratory-scale and full-scale systems have been investigated in terms of heat balances, but a kinetic analysis of this issue is still missing. In this study, the composting rate at laboratory-scale was, on average, between 1.9 and 5.7 times faster than in full-scale systems for a set of published studies using municipal solid waste, food waste or similar materials. Laboratory-scale performance and full-scale systems were limited to 71 and 46%, respectively, of their maximum potential due to poor management of environmental process conditions far from their optimum. The main limiting environmental factor was found to be moisture content, followed by temperature. Besides environmental factors, waste composition and particle size were identified as factors accounting for kinetic differences between laboratory- and full-scale systems. Overall, this study identifies those factors that affect the kinetics of the composting process most and revealed a significant margin for reducing process time in full-scale composting.

  2. Linking science analysis with observation planning: a full circle data lifecycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosvenor, Sandy; Jones, Jeremy E.; Koratkar, Anuradha; Li, Connie; Mackey, Jennifer; Neher, Ken; Wolf, Karl R.

    2001-11-01

    A clear goal of the Virtual Observatory (VO) is to enable new science through analysis of integrated astronomical archives. An additional and powerful possibility of the VO is to link and integrate these new analyses with planning of new observations. By providing tools that can be used for observation planning in the VO, the VO will allow the data lifecycle to come full circle: from theory to observations to data and back around to new theories and new observations. The Scientist's Expert Assistant (SEA) Simulation Facility (SSF) is working to combine the ability to access existing archives with the ability to model and visualize new observations. Integrating the two will allow astronomers to better use the integrated archives of the VO to plan and predict the success of potential new observations more efficiently. The full circle lifecycle enabled by SEA can allow astronomers to make substantial leaps in the quality of data and science returns on new observations. Our talk examines the exciting potential of integrating archival analysis with new observation planning, such as performing data calibration analysis on archival images and using that analysis to predict the success of new observations, or performing dynamic signal-to-noise analysis combining historical results with modeling of new instruments or targets. We will also describe how the development of the SSF is progressing and what have been its successes and challenges.

  3. Linking Science Analysis with Observation Planning: A Full Circle Data Lifecycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosvenor, Sandy; Jones, Jeremy; Koratkar, Anuradha; Li, Connie; Mackey, Jennifer; Neher, Ken; Wolf, Karl; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A clear goal of the Virtual Observatory (VO) is to enable new science through analysis of integrated astronomical archives. An additional and powerful possibility of the VO is to link and integrate these new analyses with planning of new observations. By providing tools that can be used for observation planning in the VO, the VO will allow the data lifecycle to come full circle: from theory to observations to data and back around to new theories and new observations. The Scientist's Expert Assistant (SEA) Simulation Facility (SSF) is working to combine the ability to access existing archives with the ability to model and visualize new observations. Integrating the two will allow astronomers to better use the integrated archives of the VO to plan and predict the success of potential new observations more efficiently, The full circle lifecycle enabled by SEA can allow astronomers to make substantial leaps in the quality of data and science returns on new observations. Our paper examines the exciting potential of integrating archival analysis with new observation planning, such as performing data calibration analysis on archival images and using that analysis to predict the success of new observations, or performing dynamic signal-to-noise analysis combining historical results with modeling of new instruments or targets. We will also describe how the development of the SSF is progressing and what have been its successes and challenges.

  4. Analysis of upper mantle structure using wave field continuation of P waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walck, M. C.; Clayton, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    Wave field continuation theory, which allows transformation of the seismic record section data directly into velocity-depth space, is tested for upper mantle analysis using a large array-recorded data set obtained at the 200-station Caltech-USGS Southern California Seismic Network that is representative of the structure beneath the gulf of California. The method's resolution capability is illustrated by the comparison of the slant stacks and downward continuation of both synthetic and data record sections. It is stressed that when high-quality, densely sampled digital data are available, the technique is easy to implement, provides an inversion which contains all the data in the global format, and produces an objective estimate of depth resolution as a function of ray parameter.

  5. High-resolution monitoring of root water uptake dynamics in laboratory conditions using full-wave inversion of near-field radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourmeaux, Nicolas; Meunier, Félicien; Tran, Phuong Anh; Draye, Xavier; Lambot, Sébastien

    2014-05-01

    Root water uptake dynamics at local scale can be studied in laboratory conditions by growing plants in rhizotron containing sand and by imaging the water content evolution of the medium using light transmission. This technique allows to retrieve the water content with high resolution but cannot be applied in opaque media such as leaf-mold or clay, which is a major limitation for more realistic applications. Recently, ground-penetrating radar (GPR) has proven to be one of the most promising techniques for high-resolution digital soil mapping at the field scale. Particularly, by using full-wave inverse modeling of near-field GPR data with a high frequency antenna, the electrical properties of soil and their correlated water content can be reconstructed with a high spatiotemporal resolution. In this study, we applied the approach by using an ultra-wideband frequency-domain radar with a transmitting and receiving horn antenna operating in the frequency range 3-6 GHz for imaging, in near-field conditions, a rhizotron containing sand subject to different water content conditions. Synthetic radar data were also generated to examine the well-posedness of the full-waveform inverse problem at high frequencies. Finally, we compared the water content obtained by GPR and light transmission measurements. The results have shown that the near-field modeled and measured GPR data match very well in the frequency and time domains for both dry and wet sands. In the case of the dry sand, the estimated water content based on GPR and light transmission data was retrieved with small differences. This research shows the potential of the GPR system and near-field full-wave antenna-medium model to accurately estimate the water content of soils with a high spatial resolution. Future studies will focus on the use of GPR to monitor root water uptake dynamics of plants in field conditions. This abstract is of interest for COST Action TU1208.

  6. Full-length high-temperature severe fuel damage test No. 2. Final safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hesson, G.M.; Lombardo, N.J.; Pilger, J.P.; Rausch, W.N.; King, L.L.; Hurley, D.E.; Parchen, L.J.; Panisko, F.E.

    1993-09-01

    Hazardous conditions associated with performing the Full-Length High- Temperature (FLHT). Severe Fuel Damage Test No. 2 experiment have been analyzed. Major hazards that could cause harm or damage are (1) radioactive fission products, (2) radiation fields, (3) reactivity changes, (4) hydrogen generation, (5) materials at high temperature, (6) steam explosion, and (7) steam pressure pulse. As a result of this analysis, it is concluded that with proper precautions the FLHT- 2 test can be safely conducted.

  7. The OSCAR experiment: using full-waveform inversion in the analysis of young oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverton, Akela; Morgan, Joanna; Wilson, Dean; Hobbs, Richard

    2017-04-01

    The OSCAR experiment aims to derive an integrated model to better explain the effects of heat loss and alteration by hydrothermal fluids, associated with the cooling of young oceanic crust at an axial ridge. High-resolution seismic imaging of the sediments and basaltic basement can be used to map fluid flow pathways between the oceanic crust and the surrounding ocean. To obtain these high-resolution images, we undertake full-waveform inversion (FWI), an advanced seismic imaging technique capable of resolving velocity heterogeneities at a wide range of length scales, from background trends to fine-scale geological/crustal detail, in a fully data-driven automated manner. This technology is widely used within the petroleum sector due to its potential to obtain high-resolution P-wave velocity models that lead to improvements in migrated seismic images of the subsurface. Here, we use the P-wave velocity model obtained from travel-time tomography as the starting model in the application of acoustic, time-domain FWI to a multichannel streamer field dataset acquired in the east Pacific along a profile between the Costa Rica spreading centre and the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) borehole 504B, where the crust is approximately six million years old. FWI iteratively improves the velocity model by minimizing the misfit between the predicted data and the field data. It seeks to find a high-fidelity velocity model that is capable of matching individual seismic waveforms of the original raw field dataset, with an initial focus on matching the low-frequency components of the early arriving energy. Quality assurance methods adopted during the inversion ensure convergence in the direction of the global minimum. We demonstrate that FWI is able to recover fine-scale, high-resolution velocity heterogeneities within the young oceanic crust along the profile. The highly resolved FWI velocity model is useful in the identification of the layer 2A/2B interface and low-velocity layers that

  8. Near full-length genome analysis of HCV genotype 5 strains from South Africa.

    PubMed

    Gededzha, Maemu P; Selabe, Selokela G; Blackard, Jason T; Kyaw, Thanda; Mphahlele, M Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 5 is the predominant genotype in South Africa. However, to date, only 2 full-length genotype 5 genomes have been sequenced and only one is from South Africa. This study characterized HCV genotype 5 sequences from South Africa, including six near full-length genomes, as well as the E1 region from an additional 12 genotype 5 samples. Phylogenetic analysis of these near full-length genome sequences revealed that all genotype 5 sequences formed a close cluster with high bootstrap support. Bayesian analysis of the E1 region was used to estimate the time of the most recent common ancestor (tMRCA). The tMRCA for HCV genotype 5a was estimated at 114-134 years before the last sampling date. In conclusion, this study provides six near full-length genotype 5 nucleotide sequences for use as references to design efficient vaccines and for the development of new antiviral agents, and provides further insight into the diversity of HCV genotypes circulating in South Africa. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Quantitative analysis of multiple components based on liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry in full scan mode.

    PubMed

    Xu, Min Li; Li, Bao Qiong; Wang, Xue; Chen, Jing; Zhai, Hong Lin

    2016-08-01

    Although liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry in full scan mode can obtain all the signals simultaneously in a large range and low cost, it is rarely used in quantitative analysis due to several problems such as chromatographic drifts and peak overlap. In this paper, we propose a Tchebichef moment method for the simultaneous quantitative analysis of three active compounds in Qingrejiedu oral liquid based on three-dimensional spectra in full scan mode of liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry. After the Tchebichef moments were calculated directly from the spectra, the quantitative linear models for three active compounds were established by stepwise regression. All the correlation coefficients were more than 0.9978. The limits of detection and limits of quantitation were less than 0.11 and 0.49 μg/mL, respectively. The intra- and interday precisions were less than 6.54 and 9.47%, while the recovery ranged from 102.56 to 112.15%. Owing to the advantages of multi-resolution and inherent invariance properties, Tchebichef moments could provide favorable results even in the situation of peaks shifting and overlapping, unknown interferences and noise signals, so it could be applied to the analysis of three-dimensional spectra in full scan mode of liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry.

  10. Wave-front analysis using Fresnel lens arrays.

    PubMed

    Spektor, B; Shamir, J

    1995-07-01

    A compact wave-front sensor is implemented by an array of two-beam common path inversion interferometers. Each element of the array consists of two Fresnel lenses in a confocal configuration. The wave-front data can be extracted from a superposition of the zero-order undiffracted wave and the twice-diffracted first-order wave. The result is a high-sensitivity, compact, and stable interferometric wave-front sensor.

  11. Time-Dependent Distribution Functions in C-Mod Calculated with the CQL3D-Hybrid-FOW, AORSA Full-Wave, and DC Lorentz Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, R. W. (Bob); Petrov, Yu. V.; Jaeger, E. F.; Berry, L. A.; Bonoli, P. T.; Bader, A.

    2015-11-01

    A time-dependent simulation of C-Mod pulsed ICRF power is made calculating minority hydrogen ion distribution functions with the CQL3D-Hybrid-FOW finite-orbit-width Fokker-Planck code. ICRF fields are calculated with the AORSA full wave code, and RF diffusion coefficients are obtained from these fields using the DC Lorentz gyro-orbit code. Prior results with a zero-banana-width simulation using the CQL3D/AORSA/DC time-cycles showed a pronounced enhancement of the H distribution in the perpendicular velocity direction compared to results obtained from Stix's quasilinear theory, in general agreement with experiment. The present study compares the new FOW results, including relevant gyro-radius effects, to determine the importance of these effects on the the NPA synthetic diagnostic time-dependence. The new NPA results give increased agreement with experiment, particularly in the ramp-down time after the ICRF pulse. Funded, through subcontract with Massachusetts Institute of Technology, by USDOE sponsored SciDAC Center for Simulation of Wave-Plasma Interactions.

  12. Analysis of electrical brain waves in neurotoxicology: γ-hydroxybutyrate.

    PubMed

    Binienda, Z K; Beaudoin, M A; Thorn, B T; Ali, S F

    2011-03-01

    Advances in computer technology have allowed quantification of the electroencephalogram (EEG) and expansion of quantitative EEG (qEEG) analysis in neurophysiology, as well as clinical neurology, with great success. Among the variety of techniques in this field, frequency (spectral) analysis using Fast Fourier Transforms (FFT) provides a sensitive tool for time-course studies of different compounds acting on particular neurotransmitter systems. Studies presented here include Electrocorticogram (ECoG) analysis following exposure to a glutamic acid analogue - domoic acid (DOM), psychoactive indole alkaloid - ibogaine, as well as cocaine and gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB). The ECoG was recorded in conscious rats via a tether and swivel system. The EEG signal frequency analysis revealed an association between slow-wave EEG activity delta and theta and the type of behavioral seizures following DOM administration. Analyses of power spectra obtained in rats exposed to cocaine alone or after pretreatment with ibogaine indicated the contribution of the serotonergic system in ibogaine mediated response to cocaine (increased power in alpha(1) band). Ibogaine also lowered the threshold for cocaine-induced electrographic seizures (increased power in the low-frequency bands, delta and theta). Daily intraperitoneal administration of cocaine for two weeks was associated with a reduction in slow-wave ECoG activity 24 hrs following the last injection when compared with controls. Similar decreased cortical activity in low-frequency bands observed in chronic cocaine users has been associated with reduced metabolic activity in the frontal cortex. The FFT analyses of power spectra relative to baseline indicated a significant energy increase over all except beta(2) frequency bands following exposure to 400 and 800 mg/kg GHB. The EEG alterations detected in rats following exposure to GHB resemble absence seizures observed in human petit mal epilepsy. Spectral analysis of the EEG signals

  13. Computation of rotor aerodynamic loads in forward flight using a full-span free wake analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quackenbush, Todd R.; Bliss, Donald B.; Wachspress, Daniel A.; Boschitsch, Alexander H.; Chua, Kiat

    1990-01-01

    The development of an advanced computational analysis of unsteady aerodynamic loads on isolated helicopter rotors in forward flight is described. The primary technical focus of the development was the implementation of a freely distorting filamentary wake model composed of curved vortex elements laid out along contours of constant vortex sheet strength in the wake. This model captures the wake generated by the full span of each rotor blade and makes possible a unified treatment of the shed and trailed vorticity in the wake. This wake model was coupled to a modal analysis of the rotor blade dynamics and a vortex lattice treatment of the aerodynamic loads to produce a comprehensive model for rotor performance and air loads in forward flight dubbed RotorCRAFT (Computation of Rotor Aerodynamics in Forward Flight). The technical background on the major components of this analysis are discussed and the correlation of predictions of performance, trim, and unsteady air loads with experimental data from several representative rotor configurations is examined. The primary conclusions of this study are that the RotorCRAFT analysis correlates well with measured loads on a variety of configurations and that application of the full span free wake model is required to capture several important features of the vibratory loading on rotor blades in forward flight.

  14. Wave speed in human coronary arteries is not influenced by microvascular vasodilation: implications for wave intensity analysis.

    PubMed

    Rolandi, M Cristina; De Silva, Kalpa; Lumley, Matthew; Lockie, Timothy P E; Clapp, Brian; Spaan, Jos A E; Perera, Divaka; Siebes, Maria

    2014-03-01

    Wave intensity analysis and wave separation are powerful tools for interrogating coronary, myocardial and microvascular physiology. Wave speed is integral to these calculations and is usually estimated by the single-point technique (SPc), a feasible but as yet unvalidated approach in coronary vessels. We aimed to directly measure wave speed in human coronary arteries and assess the impact of adenosine and nitrate administration. In 14 patients, the transit time Δt between two pressure signals was measured in angiographically normal coronary arteries using a microcatheter equipped with two high-fidelity pressure sensors located Δs = 5 cm apart. Simultaneously, intracoronary pressure and flow velocity were measured with a dual-sensor wire to derive SPc. Actual wave speed was calculated as DNc = Δs/Δt. Hemodynamic signals were recorded at baseline and during adenosine-induced hyperemia, before and after nitroglycerin administration. The energy of separated wave intensity components was assessed using SPc and DNc. At baseline, DNc equaled SPc (15.9 ± 1.8 vs. 16.6 ± 1.5 m/s). Adenosine-induced hyperemia lowered SPc by 40 % (p < 0.005), while DNc remained unchanged, leading to marked differences in respective separated wave energies. Nitroglycerin did not affect DNc, whereas SPc transiently fell to 12.0 ± 1.2 m/s (p < 0.02). Human coronary wave speed is reliably estimated by SPc under resting conditions but not during adenosine-induced vasodilation. Since coronary wave speed is unaffected by microvascular dilation, the SPc estimate at rest can serve as surrogate for separating wave intensity signals obtained during hyperemia, thus greatly extending the scope of WIA to study coronary physiology in humans.

  15. Comparative Network Analysis of Preterm vs. Full-Term Infant-Mother Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kalmár, Magda; Tóth, Ildikó; Krishna, Sandeep; Jensen, Mogens H.; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have reported that interactions of mothers with preterm infants show differential characteristics compared to that of mothers with full-term infants. Interaction of preterm dyads is often reported as less harmonious. However, observations and explanations concerning the underlying mechanisms are inconsistent. In this work 30 preterm and 42 full-term mother-infant dyads were observed at one year of age. Free play interactions were videotaped and coded using a micro-analytic coding system. The video records were coded at one second resolution and studied by a novel approach using network analysis tools. The advantage of our approach is that it reveals the patterns of behavioral transitions in the interactions. We found that the most frequent behavioral transitions are the same in the two groups. However, we have identified several high and lower frequency transitions which occur significantly more often in the preterm or full-term group. Our analysis also suggests that the variability of behavioral transitions is significantly higher in the preterm group. This higher variability is mostly resulted from the diversity of transitions involving non-harmonious behaviors. We have identified a maladaptive pattern in the maternal behavior in the preterm group, involving intrusiveness and disengagement. Application of the approach reported in this paper to longitudinal data could elucidate whether these maladaptive maternal behavioral changes place the infant at risk for later emotional, cognitive and behavioral disturbance. PMID:23805298

  16. Analysis of Stress Waves Generated in Water Using Ultrashort Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B.M.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Komashko, A.M.; Reidt, S.; Eichler, J.; Da Silva, L.B.

    2000-04-25

    A Mach-Zehnder interferometer was used for analysis of pressure waves generated by ultrashort laser pulse ablation of water. It was found that the shock wave generated by plasma formation rapidly decays to an acoustic wave. Both experimental and theoretical studies demonstrated that the energy transfer to the mechanical shock was less than 1%.

  17. Energy distribution in shallow water ship wakes from a spectral analysis of the wave field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplier, Clément; Rousseaux, Germain; Calluaud, Damien; David, Laurent

    2016-10-01

    This work presents an experimental study of the effects of finite water depth on the waves generated by a ship in a towing tank. The wakes of two hull forms representative of maritime and river ships are measured for both deep water and shallow water configurations and for several Froude numbers. The free surface deformations are measured with an optical stereo-correlation measurement method to access a full and detailed reconstruction of the wave fields. The spatial resolution of the reconstructed wakes allows us to perform a spectral analysis of the waves generated by the ships and to decompose them into a near-field hydrodynamic response and a far-field undulatory component. First, the spectral analysis method is presented and the effects of finite water depth on a theoretical point of view are studied. The analysis of subcritical, trans-critical, and supercritical ship wakes in both real space and spectral space highlights the effects of the finite water depth, of the ship speed, and of the hull shape on the energy distribution in the ship wakes through these different regimes.

  18. Theoretical analysis of a Love wave biosensor in liquid with a viscoelastic wave guiding layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huiyan; Xiong, Xiangming; Zu, Hongfei; Wang, James H.-C.; Wang, Qing-Ming

    2017-02-01

    The Love mode surface acoustic wave biosensor is considered as one of the most promising probing methods in biomedical research and diagnosis, which has been applied to detect the mechano-biological behaviors of cells attached to the surface of the device. Recent studies have reported the structural and functional optimization of Love wave biosensors for reducing propagation loss and improving sensitivity; however, the relevant device performance needs to be analyzed in depth in terms of device structure, electromechanical properties of piezoelectric crystal substrates, viscoelastic properties of wave guiding layers, and the effect of liquid loading. In this study, a 36° YX-LiTaO3 based Love wave sensor with a parylene-C wave guiding layer is considered as a cell-based biosensor. A theoretical model is proposed to describe the Love wave propagation in the wave guiding layer and penetration in the liquid medium. Decay length δ for the Love wave penetration in liquid is found to be in the order of ˜50 nm, which agrees well with experimental observations. In addition, the effects of the viscoelastic wave guiding layer and liquid medium on the effective electromechanical coupling coefficient K2 of the sensor, the propagation loss PL, and sensor response to mass loading (mass sensitivity) are investigated. The numerical results indicate that the maximum propagation velocity is found at h/λ = 0, where h is the thickness of the wave guiding layer and λ is the wavelength; and the optimal coupling coefficient and mass sensitivity can be obtained at h/λ = 0.045 and h/λ = ˜0.06 in a vacuum or ˜0.058 in water, respectively. For a good combination of these device performance parameters, it is suggested that the optimal wave guiding layer thickness in a Love wave biosensor is at the vicinity of h/λ = ˜0.05 in a vacuum and ˜0.048 in liquid (water).

  19. Second order harmonic guided wave mutual interactions in plate: Vector analysis, numerical simulation, and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasanian, Mostafa; Lissenden, Cliff J.

    2017-08-01

    The extraordinary sensitivity of nonlinear ultrasonic waves to the early stages of material degradation makes them excellent candidates for nondestructive material characterization. However, distinguishing weak material nonlinearity from instrumentation nonlinearity remains problematic for second harmonic generation approaches. A solution to this problem is to mix waves having different frequencies and to let their mutual interaction generate sum and difference harmonics at frequencies far from those of the instrumentation. Mixing of bulk waves and surface waves has been researched for some time, but mixing of guided waves has not yet been investigated in depth. A unique aspect of guided waves is their dispersive nature, which means we need to assure that a wave can propagate at the sum or difference frequency. A wave vector analysis is conducted that enables selection of primary waves traveling in any direction that generate phase matched secondary waves. We have tabulated many sets of primary waves and phase matched sum and difference harmonics. An example wave mode triplet of two counter-propagating collinear shear horizontal waves that interact to generate a symmetric Lamb wave at the sum frequency is simulated using finite element analysis and then laboratory experiments are conducted. The finite element simulation eliminates issues associated with instrumentation nonlinearities and signal-to-noise ratio. A straightforward subtraction method is used in the experiments to identify the material nonlinearity induced mutual interaction and show that the generated Lamb wave propagates on its own and is large enough to measure. Since the Lamb wave has different polarity than the shear horizontal waves the material nonlinearity is clearly identifiable. Thus, the mutual interactions of shear horizontal waves in plates could enable volumetric characterization of material in remote regions from transducers mounted on just one side of the plate.

  20. Third generation sfermion decays into Z and W gauge bosons: Full one-loop analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Arhrib, Abdesslam; Benbrik, Rachid

    2005-05-01

    The complete one-loop radiative corrections to third-generation scalar fermions into gauge bosons Z and W{sup {+-}} is considered. We focus on f-tilde{sub 2}{yields}Zf-tilde{sub 1} and f-tilde{sub i}{yields}W{sup {+-}}f-tilde{sub j}{sup '}, f,f{sup '}=t,b. We include SUSY-QCD, QED, and full electroweak corrections. It is found that the electroweak corrections can be of the same order as the SUSY-QCD corrections. The two sets of corrections interfere destructively in some region of parameter space. The full one-loop correction can reach 10% in some supergravity scenario, while in model independent analysis like general the minimal supersymmetric standard model, the one-loop correction can reach 20% for large tan{beta} and large trilinear soft breaking terms A{sub b}.

  1. Analysis of waves in the plasma guided by a periodical vane-type slow wave structure

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, T.J.; Kou, C.S.

    2005-10-01

    In this study, the dispersion relation has been derived to characterize the propagation of the waves in the plasma guided by a periodical vane-type slow wave structure. The plasma is confined by a quartz plate. Results indicate that there are two different waves in this structure. One is the plasma mode that originates from the plasma surface wave propagating along the interface between the plasma and the quartz plate, and the other is the guide mode that originally travels along the vane-type slow wave structure. In contrast to its original slow wave characteristics, the guide mode becomes a fast wave in the low-frequency portion of the passband, and there exists a cut-off frequency for the guide mode. The vane-type guiding structure has been shown to limit the upper frequency of the passband of the plasma mode, compared with that of the plasma surface wave. In addition, the passband of the plasma mode increases with the plasma density while it becomes narrower for the guide mode. The influences of the parameters of the guiding structure and plasma density on the propagation of waves are also presented.

  2. Analysis and simulation of standing wave pattern of powerful HF radio waves in ionospheric reflection region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chen; Zhou, Chen; Zhao, Zheng-Yu; Yang, Xu-Bo

    2015-08-01

    For the study of the various non-linear effects generated in ionospheric modulation experiments, accurate calculation of the field intensity variation in the whole reflection region for an electromagnetic wave vertically impinging upon the ionosphere is meaningful. In this paper, mathematical expressions of the electric field components of the characteristic heating waves are derived, by coupling the equation describing a wave initially impinging vertically upon the ionosphere with the Forsterling equation. The variation of each component of the electric field and the total electric field intensity of the standing wave pattern under a specific density profile are calculated by means of a uniform approximation, which is applied throughout the region near the reflection point. The numerical calculation results demonstrate that the total electric field intensity of the ordinary (O)-mode wave varies rapidly in space and reaches several maxima below the reflection point. Evident swelling phenomena of the electric field intensity are found. Our results also indicate that this effect is more pronounced at higher latitudes and that the geomagnetic field is important for wave pattern variation. The electric field intensity of the standing wave pattern of the extraordinary (X)-mode wave exhibits some growth below the reflection point, but its swelling effect is significantly weaker than that of the O-mode wave.

  3. Separating Internal Waves and Vortical Motions: Analysis of LatMix -EM-APEX Float Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Separating Internal Waves and Vortical Motions: Analysis...identify mechanisms of small-scale processes––i.e., internal tides, inertial waves , nonlinear internal waves , vortical modes, and turbulence mixing...focus as the complex interplay of internal waves from a variety of sources and turbulence makes this a current locus of uncertainty. Our focus is on

  4. Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves and Dam Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karastathis, V. K.

    2012-12-01

    Geophysical methodologies and particularly the Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) effectively proved their efficiency in the non-destructive testing of the dams, in the last decade, after many successful applications worldwide. The MASW method developed in the outset of this decade considerably improved the prospects and the validity of these geophysical applications. Since MASW and the other geophysical techniques do not require drilling they progressively increased their popularity significantly. The Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves can be applied for the assessment of both earthen and concrete dams. Nevertheless, mostly cases of earthen dams can be found in the literature. The method can detect and map low shear wave velocity areas potentially associated with low cohesion zones due to differential settlement events in the core or increased seepage. The advantage of MASW is that it is not influenced by the water saturation of the interior of the dam contrary to other methods eg. p-wave tomography. Usually, a joint application of MASW with the p-wave techniques can be an optimal choice since the two methodologies can act complementary. An application of MASW on a three-dimensional structure, such as a dam, however, can actually be considered as a complicated problem since the effects of the lateral structural anomalies can strongly affect the results. For example, in an earthen dam the investigation of the core can be influenced by the presence of the shells. Therefore, the problem should be carefully examined by modeling all these the lateral anomalies with the aim to avoid a misinterpretation of the results. The effectiveness of MASW to the dam safety assessment is presented through two example applications, one at the Mornos Dam, an earthen dam responsible for the water supply of Athens, and a second one at the Marathon Dam which is a concrete dam also used for the water supply of Athens. In the case of Mornos Dam, MASW detected areas affected

  5. Absorption Spectroscopy of Rubidium in an Alkali Metal Dispenser Cell and Bleached Wave Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY OF RUBIDIUM IN AN ALKALI METAL DISPENSER CELL AND BLEACHED WAVE ANALYSIS THESIS JAMES M. ROSENTHAL, 2 nd Lt...102 ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY OF RUBIDIUM IN AN ALKALI METAL DISPENSER CELL AND BLEACHED WAVE ANALYSIS THESIS Presented to the Faculty...SPECTROSCOPY OF RUBIDIUM IN AN ALKALI METAL DISPENSER CELL AND BLEACHED WAVE ANALYSIS James M. Rosenthal, BA 2 nd Lt, USAF Committee Membership

  6. Precoder Design and Capacity Analysis for Multi-Antenna Full-Duplex Relay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Young-Woo; Lee, Jong-Ho; Kim, Yong-Hwa; Kim, Seong-Cheol

    In this letter, a precoding design for a multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) full-duplex relay (FDR) system is proposed. For this system, mitigating the self-interference imposed by the transmit antennas on the receive antennas in the same relay station is crucial for improving the performance of the FDR system. The precoding scheme designed in this study uses block-diagonalization (BD). Using this precoding scheme, FDR capacity analysis is performed in the MIMO downlink relay system. Numerical results on system performance in terms of capacity are shown and discussed.

  7. Full-Length High-Temperature Severe Fuel Damage Test No. 5: Final safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lanning, D.D.; Lombardo, N.J.; Panisko, F.E.

    1993-09-01

    This report presents the final safety analysis for the preparation, conduct, and post-test discharge operation for the Full-Length High Temperature Experiment-5 (FLHT-5) to be conducted in the L-24 position of the National Research Universal (NRU) Reactor at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL), Ontario, Canada. The test is sponsored by an international group organized by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The test is designed and conducted by staff from Pacific Northwest Laboratory with CRNL staff support. The test will study the consequences of loss-of-coolant and the progression of severe fuel damage.

  8. Analysis of the 237Np-233Pa photon spectrum using the full response function method.

    PubMed

    Shchukin, G; Iakovlev, K; Morel, J

    2004-01-01

    A study has been made of X- and gamma-ray emission from 237Np in equilibrium with 233Pa using the full response function method. This analysis process is characterised by photon spectrometry in which the entire spectrum is modelled in a pseudo-empirical way by means of elementary functions describing the total absorption and escape peaks, the Compton diffusion internal and external to the detector and the peaks resulting from detection of internal conversion electrons. This method has been applied to determine the L X-, K X- and gamma-rays emission probabilities in 237Np and 233Pa decay studies.

  9. Full-Band Monte Carlo Analysis of Hot-Carrier Light Emission in GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferretti, I.; Abramo, A.; Brunetti, R.; Jacobini, C.

    1997-11-01

    A computational analysis of light emission from hot carriers in GaAs due to direct intraband conduction-conduction (c-c) transitions is presented. The emission rates have been evaluated by means of a Full-Band Monte-Carlo simulator (FBMC). Results have been obtained for the emission rate as a function of the photon energy, for the emitted and absorbed light polarization along and perpendicular to the electric field direction. Comparison has been made with available experimental data in MESFETs.

  10. PREFACE: 14th Gravitational Waves Data Analysis Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, Fulvio

    2010-04-01

    The 14th Gravitational Wave Data Analysis Workshop (GWDAW-14) is the last of a long series of annual meetings dedicated to the GW data analysis. This time the workshop was held at the Department of Physics of the University of Rome "Sapienza" and its scientic focus was on strengthening the connection among the gravitational wave and other astrophysical communities. Thus, a significant fraction of the workshop was dedicated to explore the potentialities of the multimessanger astronomy and in particular on the emerging neutrino observatories in conjunction with the GW observations. Moreover, several contributions were devoted to technical details of the analysis of real data from interferometric detectors, aimed at the improvement of the data quality for increasing the confidence in the detection of the first GW event. On the base of these techniques new GW upper limits on the strength of continuous signals from neutron stars and on stochastic background as the event rates of burst and inspiral signals have been set. As chairman of this workshop, I would like to thank the members of the organizing and scientic committees and all the participants which have been the crucial actors of the workshop success. Some of the talks presented during the conference appear in the special issue of Classical and Quantum Gravity, while remaining talks from the symposium are published in this companion volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. The ensemble of all these contributions represents the most up-to-date papers on the topics covered by the meeting and, it provides valuable details about current work. Finally , I would also like to thank the institutions and the sponsor that made this meeting possible: University of Rome La Sapienza Italian National Institute of Nuclear Physics - INFN Italian National Institute of Astrophyiscs - INAF University of Rome Tor Vergata University of Sannio E4-Computing Engineering s.p.a. Fulvio Ricci University of La Sapienza and INFN

  11. Constraint likelihood analysis for a network of gravitational wave detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Klimenko, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mohanty, S.

    2005-12-15

    We propose a coherent method for detection and reconstruction of gravitational wave signals with a network of interferometric detectors. The method is derived by using the likelihood ratio functional for unknown signal waveforms. In the likelihood analysis, the global maximum of the likelihood ratio over the space of waveforms is used as the detection statistic. We identify a problem with this approach. In the case of an aligned pair of detectors, the detection statistic depends on the cross correlation between the detectors as expected, but this dependence disappears even for infinitesimally small misalignments. We solve the problem by applying constraints on the likelihood functional and obtain a new class of statistics. The resulting method can be applied to data from a network consisting of any number of detectors with arbitrary detector orientations. The method allows us reconstruction of the source coordinates and the waveforms of two polarization components of a gravitational wave. We study the performance of the method with numerical simulations and find the reconstruction of the source coordinates to be more accurate than in the standard likelihood method.

  12. Imploding Ignition Waves. I. One-dimensional Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushnir, Doron; Livne, Eli; Waxman, Eli

    2012-06-01

    We show that converging spherical and cylindrical shock waves may ignite a detonation wave in a combustible medium, provided the radius at which the shocks become strong exceeds a critical radius, R crit. An approximate analytic expression for R crit is derived for an ideal gas equation of state and a simple (power-law-Arrhenius) reaction law, and shown to reproduce the results of numerical solutions. For typical acetylene-air experiments we find R crit ~ 100 μm (spherical) and R crit ~ 1 mm (cylindrical). We suggest that the deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) observed in these systems may be due to converging shocks produced by the turbulent deflagration flow, which reaches sub- (but near) sonic velocities on scales GtR crit. Our suggested mechanism differs from that proposed by Zel'dovich et al., in which a fine-tuned spatial gradient in the chemical induction time is required to be maintained within the turbulent deflagration flow. Our analysis may be readily extended to more complicated equations of state and reaction laws. An order of magnitude estimate of R crit within a white dwarf at the pre-detonation conditions believed to lead to Type Ia supernova explosions is 0.1 km, suggesting that our proposed mechanism may be relevant for DDT initiation in these systems. The relevance of our proposed ignition mechanism to DDT initiation may be tested by both experiments and numerical simulations.

  13. Analysis of electron acceleration in a vacuum beat wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamin, Yousef I.; Keitel, Christoph H.

    2000-11-01

    We present an exact analytic investigation of the electron dynamics in the field of two linearly polarized interfering copropagating laser beams of different frequencies, arbitrary intensities, and arbitrary relative polarizations. In one part of the paper, the laser fields are modelled by plane waves and in another part the fields are allowed to have one-dimensional sin2 pulse shapes which model focusing in the propagation direction. The general situation in which the electron is injected at an angle with the common direction of wave propagation is considered throughout. A cycle-by-cycle analysis of the electron motion, and its momentum and energy exchange with the laser fields is conducted. It is found that an electron may be accelerated, even from rest, to GeV energies over short distances using present-day laser field intensities. This leads, in principle, to energy gradients in the TeV m-1 range. The trajectory calculations also show clearly that the electron gets scattered away from its initial direction of motion during interaction with the laser fields. The transverse as well as longitudinal motions may be followed exactly using our equations, and predictions could thus be made concerning where the electron should, in principle, be ejected in order for it to emerge with a particular energy gain.

  14. IMPLODING IGNITION WAVES. I. ONE-DIMENSIONAL ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Kushnir, Doron; Waxman, Eli; Livne, Eli

    2012-06-20

    We show that converging spherical and cylindrical shock waves may ignite a detonation wave in a combustible medium, provided the radius at which the shocks become strong exceeds a critical radius, R{sub crit}. An approximate analytic expression for R{sub crit} is derived for an ideal gas equation of state and a simple (power-law-Arrhenius) reaction law, and shown to reproduce the results of numerical solutions. For typical acetylene-air experiments we find R{sub crit} {approx} 100 {mu}m (spherical) and R{sub crit} {approx} 1 mm (cylindrical). We suggest that the deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) observed in these systems may be due to converging shocks produced by the turbulent deflagration flow, which reaches sub- (but near) sonic velocities on scales >>R{sub crit}. Our suggested mechanism differs from that proposed by Zel'dovich et al., in which a fine-tuned spatial gradient in the chemical induction time is required to be maintained within the turbulent deflagration flow. Our analysis may be readily extended to more complicated equations of state and reaction laws. An order of magnitude estimate of R{sub crit} within a white dwarf at the pre-detonation conditions believed to lead to Type Ia supernova explosions is 0.1 km, suggesting that our proposed mechanism may be relevant for DDT initiation in these systems. The relevance of our proposed ignition mechanism to DDT initiation may be tested by both experiments and numerical simulations.

  15. Effective field analysis using the full angular spin-orbit torque magnetometry dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Tomek; Lee, Kyujoon; Krüger, Benjamin; Lo Conte, Roberto; Karnad, Gurucharan V.; Garcia, Karin; Vila, Laurent; Ocker, Berthold; Ravelosona, Dafiné; Kläui, Mathias

    2017-06-01

    Spin-orbit torques promise ultraefficient magnetization switching used for advanced devices based on emergent quasiparticles such as domain walls and skyrmions. Recently, the spin structure dynamics, materials, and systems with tailored spin-orbit torques are being developed. A method, which allows one to detect the acting torques in a given system as a function of the magnetization direction is the torque magnetometry method based on a higher harmonics analysis of the anomalous Hall effect. Here we show that the effective fields acting on magnetic domain walls that govern the efficiency of their dynamics require a sophisticated analysis taking into account the full angular dependence of the torques. Using a one-dimensional model, we compared the spin-orbit torque efficiencies by depinning measurements and spin torque magnetometry. We show that the effective fields can be accurately determined and we find good agreement. Thus, our method allows us now to rapidly screen materials and predict the resulting quasiparticle dynamics.

  16. A Rayleigh Wave Analysis at the DESERT Broadband Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laske, G.; Desert Team

    2003-12-01

    A variety of geophysical experiments conducted in the 2000/2001 DESERT project in Israel, Palestine and Jordan provided a rich palette of datasets to examine the crust and uppermost mantle beneath one of Earth's most prominent fault systems, the Dead Sea Transform system (DST). As part of the passive seismic component, thirty broad--band sensors were deployed across the DST for roughly one year. During this deployment we recorded 115 teleseismic earthquakes that are suitable for a fundamental mode surface wave analysis at intermediate periods (20-120s). Analyzing arrival angle measurements we are able to determine the orientation of the horizontal components to within one degree. Some sensors were misaligned by nearly 10 degrees which is confirmed by the station operators (e.g. one station was oriented parallel to a road because the compass broke). The frequency--dependent Rayleigh wave phase at each station is measured with respect to each other rather than relative to a synthetic. This results in a much more precise dataset than what is common for global dispersion datasets. A preliminary analysis reveals a seismically fast but thin lid (about 80~km) to the west of the DST. Toward the east, shallow seismic velocities are low while a deeper low velocity zone is not detected. This contradicts the currently favored thermo-mechanical model for the DST that predicts lithospheric thinning toward the east. Unfortunately, the distribution of sensors at the array was not ideal for a surface wave analysis. The stations west of the DST were equipped with true broad-band sensors (Streckeisen STS-2 or Guralp CMT-3T), while the stations east of the DST were equipped with ''wideband'' Guralp-40T that are considerably noisy at periods longer than 40s. We we able to measure dispersion down to 80~s, sometimes below that, depending on the size of the earthquake, but not for all earthquakes. Dispersion at these periods are needed to trace the bottom of the lithosphere. The apparent

  17. ANALYSIS OF A GLOBAL MORETON WAVE OBSERVED ON 2003 OCTOBER 28

    SciTech Connect

    Muhr, N.; Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M.; Vrsnak, B.; Magdalenic, J. E-mail: mat@igam.uni-graz.a E-mail: bvrsnak@gmail.co

    2010-01-10

    We study the well-pronounced Moreton wave that occurred in association with the X17.2 flare/CME event of 2003 October 28. This Moreton wave is striking for its global propagation and two separate wave centers, which implies that two waves were launched simultaneously. The mean velocity of the Moreton wave, tracked within different sectors of propagation direction, lies in the range of v approx 900-1100 km s{sup -1} with two sectors showing wave deceleration. The perturbation profile analysis of the wave indicates amplitude growth followed by amplitude weakening and broadening of the perturbation profile, which is consistent with a disturbance first driven and then evolving into a freely propagating wave. The Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope wave front is found to lie on the same kinematical curve as the Moreton wave fronts indicating that both are different signatures of the same physical process. Bipolar coronal dimmings are observed on the same opposite east-west edges of the active region as the Moreton wave ignition centers. The radio type II source, which is cospatially located with the first wave front, indicates that the wave was launched from an extended source region (approx>60 Mm). These findings suggest that the Moreton wave is initiated by the coronal mass ejection expanding flanks.

  18. Full-scale experimentations on alternative materials in roads: analysis of study practices.

    PubMed

    François, D; Jullien, A; Kerzreho, J P; Chateau, L

    2009-03-01

    In France beginning in the 1990s, the topic of road construction using various alternative materials has given rise to several studies aimed at clarifying the technical and environmental feasibility of such an option. Although crucial to understanding and forecasting their behaviour in the field, an analysis of feedback from onsite experiences (back analysis) of roads built with alternative materials has not yet been carried out. The aim of the CAREX project (2003-2005) has been to fill this gap at the national scale. Based on a stress-response approach applied to both the alternative material and the road structure and including the description of external factors, a dedicated standardised framework for field data classification and analysis was adopted. To carry out this analysis, a set of 17 documented field experiments was identified through a specific national survey. It appears that a great heterogeneity exists in data processing procedures among studies. The description of material is acceptable while it is generally poor regarding external factors and structure responses. Structure monitoring is usually brief and mechanical loads too weak, which limits the significance of field testing. For future full-scale experiments, strengthening the realism within the testing conditions would be appropriate.

  19. DISPELLING ILLUSIONS OF REFLECTION: A NEW ANALYSIS OF THE 2007 MAY 19 CORONAL 'WAVE' EVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Attrill, Gemma D. R.

    2010-07-20

    A new analysis of the 2007 May 19 coronal wave-coronal mass ejection-dimmings event is offered employing base difference extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) images. Previous work analyzing the coronal wave associated with this event concluded strongly in favor of purely an MHD wave interpretation for the expanding bright front. This conclusion was based to a significant extent on the identification of multiple reflections of the coronal wave front. The analysis presented here shows that the previously identified 'reflections' are actually optical illusions and result from a misinterpretation of the running difference EUV data. The results of this new multiwavelength analysis indicate that two coronal wave fronts actually developed during the eruption. This new analysis has implications for our understanding of diffuse coronal waves and questions the validity of the analysis and conclusions reached in previous studies.

  20. Dispelling Illusions of Reflection: A New Analysis of the 2007 May 19 Coronal "Wave" Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attrill, Gemma D. R.

    2010-07-01

    A new analysis of the 2007 May 19 coronal wave-coronal mass ejection-dimmings event is offered employing base difference extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) images. Previous work analyzing the coronal wave associated with this event concluded strongly in favor of purely an MHD wave interpretation for the expanding bright front. This conclusion was based to a significant extent on the identification of multiple reflections of the coronal wave front. The analysis presented here shows that the previously identified "reflections" are actually optical illusions and result from a misinterpretation of the running difference EUV data. The results of this new multiwavelength analysis indicate that two coronal wave fronts actually developed during the eruption. This new analysis has implications for our understanding of diffuse coronal waves and questions the validity of the analysis and conclusions reached in previous studies.

  1. Technical Data to Justify Full Burnup Credit in Criticality Safety Licensing Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Enercon Services, Inc.

    2011-03-14

    ENERCON's understanding of the difficult issues related to obtaining and analyzing additional cross section test data to support Full Burnup Credit. A PIRT (Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table) analysis was performed by ENERCON to evaluate the costs and benefits of acquiring different types of nuclear data in support of Full Burnup Credit. A PIRT exercise is a formal expert elicitation process with the final output being the ranking tables. The PIRT analysis (Table 7-4: Results of PIRT Evaluation) showed that the acquisition of additional Actinide-Only experimental data, although beneficial, was associated with high cost and is not necessarily needed. The conclusion was that the existing Radiochemical Assay (RCA) data plus the French Haut Taux de Combustion (HTC)2 and handbook Laboratory Critical Experiment (LCE) data provide adequate benchmark validation for Actinide-Only Burnup Credit. The PIRT analysis indicated that the costs and schedule to obtain sufficient additional experimental data to support the addition of 16 fission products to Actinide-Only Burnup Credit to produce Full Burnup Credit are quite substantial. ENERCON estimates the cost to be $50M to $100M with a schedule of five or more years. The PIRT analysis highlights another option for fission product burnup credit, which is the application of computer-based uncertainty analyses (S/U - Sensitivity/Uncertainty methodologies), confirmed by the limited experimental data that is already available. S/U analyses essentially transform cross section uncertainty information contained in the cross section libraries into a reactivity bias and uncertainty. Recent work by ORNL and EPRI has shown that a methodology to support Full Burnup Credit is possible using a combination of traditional RCA and LCE validation plus S/U validation for fission product isotopics and cross sections. Further, the most recent cross section data (ENDF/B-VII) can be incorporated into the burnup credit codes at a reasonable cost

  2. A full potential flow analysis with realistic wake influence for helicopter rotor airload prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egolf, T. Alan; Sparks, S. Patrick

    1987-01-01

    A 3-D, quasi-steady, full potential flow solver was adapted to include realistic wake influence for the aerodynamic analysis of helicopter rotors. The method is based on a finite difference solution of the full potential equation, using an inner and outer domain procedure for the blade flowfield to accommodate wake effects. The nonlinear flow is computed in the inner domain region using a finite difference solution method. The wake is modeled by a vortex lattice using prescribed geometry techniques to allow for the inclusion of realistic rotor wakes. The key feature of the analysis is that vortices contained within the finite difference mesh (inner domain) were treated with a vortex embedding technique while the influence of the remaining portion of the wake (in the outer domain) is impressed as a boundary condition on the outer surface of the finite difference mesh. The solution procedure couples the wake influence with the inner domain solution in a consistent and efficient solution process. The method has been applied to both hover and forward flight conditions. Correlation with subsonic and transonic hover airload data is shown which demonstrates the merits of the approach.

  3. System analysis of a bio-energy plantation: full greenhouse gas balance and energy accounting (POPFULL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceulemans, R.; Janssens, I.; Berhongaray, G.; Broeckx, L.; De Groote, T.; ElKasmioui, O.; Fichot, R.; Njakou Djomo, S.; Verlinden, M.; Zona, D.

    2011-12-01

    In recent year the environmental impact of fossil fuels and their reduced availability are leading to an increasing interest in renewable energy sources, among them bio-energy. However, the cost/benefit in establishing, managing, and using these plantations for energy production should be quantified together with their environmental impact. In this project we are performing a full life cycle analysis (LCA) balance of the most important greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4, N2O, H2O and O3), together with full energy accounting of a short-rotation coppice (SRC) plantation with fast-growing trees. We established the plantation two years ago and we have been monitoring net fluxes of CO2, N2O, CH4, and O3, in combination with biomass pools (incl. soil) and fluxes, and volatile organic carbon (VOCs). This poplar plantation will be monitored for another two years then harvested and transformed into bio-energy. For the energy accounting we are performing a life cycle analysis and energy efficiency assessments over the entire cycle of the plantation until the production of electricity and heat. Here we present an overview of the results from the first two years from the plantation establishment, and some of the projections based on these first results.

  4. Integrative microbial community analysis reveals full-scale enhanced biological phosphorus removal under tropical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Yingyu; Kirkegaard, Rasmus Hansen; Cokro, Angel Anisa; Liu, Xianghui; Arumugam, Krithika; Xie, Chao; Stokholm-Bjerregaard, Mikkel; Drautz-Moses, Daniela I.; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Wuertz, Stefan; Williams, Rohan B. H.

    2016-05-01

    Management of phosphorus discharge from human waste is essential for the control of eutrophication in surface waters. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is a sustainable, efficient way of removing phosphorus from waste water without employing chemical precipitation, but is assumed unachievable in tropical temperatures due to conditions that favour glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) over polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs). Here, we show these assumptions are unfounded by studying comparative community dynamics in a full-scale plant following systematic perturbation of operational conditions, which modified community abundance, function and physicochemical state. A statistically significant increase in the relative abundance of the PAO Accumulibacter was associated with improved EBPR activity. GAO relative abundance also increased, challenging the assumption of competition. An Accumulibacter bin-genome was identified from a whole community metagenomic survey, and comparative analysis against extant Accumulibacter genomes suggests a close relationship to Type II. Analysis of the associated metatranscriptome data revealed that genes encoding proteins involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and glycolysis pathways were highly expressed, consistent with metabolic modelling results. Our findings show that tropical EBPR is indeed possible, highlight the translational potential of studying competition dynamics in full-scale waste water communities and carry implications for plant design in tropical regions.

  5. Integrative microbial community analysis reveals full-scale enhanced biological phosphorus removal under tropical conditions.

    PubMed

    Law, Yingyu; Kirkegaard, Rasmus Hansen; Cokro, Angel Anisa; Liu, Xianghui; Arumugam, Krithika; Xie, Chao; Stokholm-Bjerregaard, Mikkel; Drautz-Moses, Daniela I; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Wuertz, Stefan; Williams, Rohan B H

    2016-05-19

    Management of phosphorus discharge from human waste is essential for the control of eutrophication in surface waters. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is a sustainable, efficient way of removing phosphorus from waste water without employing chemical precipitation, but is assumed unachievable in tropical temperatures due to conditions that favour glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) over polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs). Here, we show these assumptions are unfounded by studying comparative community dynamics in a full-scale plant following systematic perturbation of operational conditions, which modified community abundance, function and physicochemical state. A statistically significant increase in the relative abundance of the PAO Accumulibacter was associated with improved EBPR activity. GAO relative abundance also increased, challenging the assumption of competition. An Accumulibacter bin-genome was identified from a whole community metagenomic survey, and comparative analysis against extant Accumulibacter genomes suggests a close relationship to Type II. Analysis of the associated metatranscriptome data revealed that genes encoding proteins involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and glycolysis pathways were highly expressed, consistent with metabolic modelling results. Our findings show that tropical EBPR is indeed possible, highlight the translational potential of studying competition dynamics in full-scale waste water communities and carry implications for plant design in tropical regions.

  6. Integrative microbial community analysis reveals full-scale enhanced biological phosphorus removal under tropical conditions

    PubMed Central

    Law, Yingyu; Kirkegaard, Rasmus Hansen; Cokro, Angel Anisa; Liu, Xianghui; Arumugam, Krithika; Xie, Chao; Stokholm-Bjerregaard, Mikkel; Drautz-Moses, Daniela I.; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Wuertz, Stefan; Williams, Rohan B. H.

    2016-01-01

    Management of phosphorus discharge from human waste is essential for the control of eutrophication in surface waters. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is a sustainable, efficient way of removing phosphorus from waste water without employing chemical precipitation, but is assumed unachievable in tropical temperatures due to conditions that favour glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) over polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs). Here, we show these assumptions are unfounded by studying comparative community dynamics in a full-scale plant following systematic perturbation of operational conditions, which modified community abundance, function and physicochemical state. A statistically significant increase in the relative abundance of the PAO Accumulibacter was associated with improved EBPR activity. GAO relative abundance also increased, challenging the assumption of competition. An Accumulibacter bin-genome was identified from a whole community metagenomic survey, and comparative analysis against extant Accumulibacter genomes suggests a close relationship to Type II. Analysis of the associated metatranscriptome data revealed that genes encoding proteins involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and glycolysis pathways were highly expressed, consistent with metabolic modelling results. Our findings show that tropical EBPR is indeed possible, highlight the translational potential of studying competition dynamics in full-scale waste water communities and carry implications for plant design in tropical regions. PMID:27193869

  7. Population meta-analysis of low plasma glucose thresholds in full-term normal newborns.

    PubMed

    Alkalay, Arie L; Sarnat, Harvey B; Flores-Sarnat, Laura; Elashoff, Janet D; Farber, Sergio J; Simmons, Charles F

    2006-02-01

    There is extreme variation in the definition of low plasma glucose levels in newborn infants in the first postnatal days, ranging from < 30 to < or = 60 mg/dL. The goal of the present study was to define low thresholds (< or = 5th percentile) of plasma glucose concentrations in full-term normal newborns during the first 72 hours of life. Population meta-analysis was performed on published studies of neonatal hypoglycemia ascertained by MedLine search. One-way analysis of variance was computed across the studies for each of the following four postnatal time periods: 1 to 2 (physiological nadir), 3 to 23, 24 to 47, and 48 to 72 hours. The estimated < or = 5th percentiles of neonatal hypoglycemia during 1 to 2, 3 to 23, 24 to 47, and 48 to 72 hours after birth were < or = 28, < or = 40, < or = 41, and < or = 48 mg/dL, respectively. Based on this statistical definition, we recommend that low thresholds of plasma glucose levels of 28, 40, and 48 mg/dL be adopted in full-term normal newborns at 1 to 2, 3 to 47, and 48 to 72 hours of life, respectively.

  8. A Full Virial Analysis of the Prestellar Cores in the Ophiuchus Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattle, Kate; Ward-Thompson, Derek

    We use SCUBA-2, HARP C18O J= 3 -> 2, Herschel and IRAM N2H+ J= 1 -> 0 observations of the Ophiuchus molecular cloud to identify and characterise the properties of the starless cores in the region. The SCUBA-2, HARP and Herschel data were taken as part of the JCMT and Herschel Gould Belt Surveys. We determine masses and temperatures and perform a full virial analysis on our cores, and find that our cores are all either bound or virialised, with gravitational energy and external pressure energy on average of similar importance in confining the cores. There is wide variation from region to region, with cores in the region influenced by B stars (Oph A) being substantially gravitationally bound, and cores in the most quiescent region (Oph C) being pressure-confined. We observe dissipation of turbulence in all our cores, and find that this dissipation is more effective in regions which do not contain outflow-driving protostars. Full details of this analysis are presented by Pattle et al. (2015).

  9. COMPREHENSIVE ANALYSIS OF CORONAL MASS EJECTION MASS AND ENERGY PROPERTIES OVER A FULL SOLAR CYCLE

    SciTech Connect

    Vourlidas, A.; Howard, R. A.; Esfandiari, E.; Patsourakos, S.; Yashiro, S.; Michalek, G.

    2010-10-20

    The LASCO coronagraphs, in continuous operation since 1995, have observed the evolution of the solar corona and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) over a full solar cycle with high-quality images and regular cadence. This is the first time that such a data set becomes available and constitutes a unique resource for the study of CMEs. In this paper, we present a comprehensive investigation of the solar cycle dependence on the CME mass and energy over a full solar cycle (1996-2009) including the first in-depth discussion of the mass and energy analysis methods and their associated errors. Our analysis provides several results worthy of further studies. It demonstrates the possible existence of two event classes: 'normal' CMEs reaching constant mass for >10 R{sub sun} and {sup p}seudo{sup -}CMEs which disappear in the C3 field of view. It shows that the mass and energy properties of CME reach constant levels and therefore should be measured only above {approx}10 R{sub sun}. The mass density (g/R {sup 2}{sub sun}) of CMEs varies relatively little (< order of magnitude) suggesting that the majority of the mass originates from a small range in coronal heights. We find a sudden reduction in the CME mass in mid-2003 which may be related to a change in the electron content of the large-scale corona and we uncover the presence of a 6 month periodicity in the ejected mass from 2003 onward.

  10. An Analysis of Model Scale Data Transformation to Full Scale Flight Using Chevron Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clifford; Bridges, James

    2003-01-01

    Ground-based model scale aeroacoustic data is frequently used to predict the results of flight tests while saving time and money. The value of a model scale test is therefore dependent on how well the data can be transformed to the full scale conditions. In the spring of 2000, a model scale test was conducted to prove the value of chevron nozzles as a noise reduction device for turbojet applications. The chevron nozzle reduced noise by 2 EPNdB at an engine pressure ratio of 2.3 compared to that of the standard conic nozzle. This result led to a full scale flyover test in the spring of 2001 to verify these results. The flyover test confirmed the 2 EPNdB reduction predicted by the model scale test one year earlier. However, further analysis of the data revealed that the spectra and directivity, both on an OASPL and PNL basis, do not agree in either shape or absolute level. This paper explores these differences in an effort to improve the data transformation from model scale to full scale.

  11. Study of Ocean Bottom Interactions with Acoustic Waves by a New Elastic Wave Propagation Algorithm and an Energy Flow Analysis Technique

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    Study Of Ocean Bottom Interactions With Acoustic Waves By A New Elastic Wave Propagation Algorithm And An Energy Flow Analysis Technique Ru-Shan Wu...imaging to study the wave/sea-bottom interaction, energy partitioning, scattering mechanism and other problems that are crucial for many ocean bottom...Elastic Wave Propagation Algorithm And An Energy Flow Analysis Technique 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR

  12. First wave PMS pilots: a critical analysis