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Sample records for full wave analysis

  1. Imaging the shallow subsurface with surface waves: dispersion curve analysis versus full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés Pérez Solano, Carlos; Donno, Daniela; Strobbia, Claudio; Chauris, Hervé

    2014-05-01

    Seismic surface wave analysis is a standard tool in geotechnical engineering for imaging the shallow subsurface. Most current surface wave analysis methods assume a horizontally layered medium, and estimate the near-surface shear velocity profile from dispersion curves, which are picked on frequency-wavenumber (f-k) gathers and then inverted using 1D modelling approaches. Media containing high velocity contrasts and irregular lateral variations might be difficult to be handled with the local 1D approximation. For 2D model estimation, full waveform inversion (FWI) is an alternative and can estimate high resolution models. The classical FWI objective function consists of the least-squares misfit between observed and modelled shot gathers (Tarantola, 1986). Classical FWI needs an accurate initial model for achieving convergence. Data sets containing surface waves could be inverted, without falling into secondary minima, if the data contains sufficiently low frequencies and large offsets such that multi-scale and time windowing approaches can be applied. We propose to invert surface waves with an alternative FWI-based approach that uses a modified objective function. It is based on the least-squares misfit between the absolute value of the f-k transform of windowed shot gathers. We refer to this approach as the windowed-Amplitude Waveform Inversion (w-AWI). Some secondary minima problems are mitigated: the choice of an initial model is easier in w-AWI than in FWI. The alternative objective function is intermediary between the one used in the 1D inversion approach (dispersion curves) and classical FWI. As most of the phase information is neglected in w-AWI, we use it as a first step before classical FWI. This sequential inversion approach using w-AWI followed by classical FWI aims at estimating a high-resolution near-surface velocity model, by explaining the complete elastic wavefield, even when the initial velocity model is far from the exact one. The proposed approach

  2. Full wave analysis and miniaturization of microstrip antenna on ferrimagnetics substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavor, Otávio Paulino; Fernandes, Humberto Cesar Chaves

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the miniaturization of the microstrip antenna on ferrimagnetic substrate for operate at a frequency of 2.5 GHz, where the full wave method Transverse Transmission Line-TTL is used it for obtain resonance frequency. For validate this method in these substrates, the results as function of DC magnetic field are shown. When the field is 132.6 AT/m, the value of reference is 151.7 MHz and the value of TTL is 151.3 MHz. The dimensions are obtained for the frequency of 2.5 GHz and a comparison is done with ferrites and conventional substrate, showing a reduction in volume of the antenna of 2808.96 mm3 for 0.39 mm3 when the ferrites are used.

  3. Portable tremor monitor system for real-time full-wave monitoring and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Meng-Hsiang; Sheu, Yung-Hoh; Shih, Yuan-Hsing; Young, M. S.

    2003-03-01

    Tremors, which occur anytime during the daily 24 h cycle, may be missed if monitoring is performed on a short-term basis. Improving this situation requires long-term ambulatory recording capability. There are traditionally two methods for long-term recording of tremors: one is the analog recorder, which is both heavy and inconvenient when transferring data to a PC system; the other is the Actigraph, in which only movement counts are recorded, such data being incomplete. Thus, for long-term and continuous tremor monitoring, this study presents a wrist-worn portable system that can save an entire 24 h tremor wave form in an expansible compact flash memory card. With a rechargeable battery and USB interface, the system has two modes: (1) the monitoring mode while connected to a host computer allows confirmation of system operation, calibration of accelerometers, and immediate display of data on a PC screen and (2) the collecting mode saves data during daily activity on the compact flash memory card within the device. After collection, data are accessed to a host computer for processing. Analysis based on complete tremor wave form including tremor frequency and intensity of 24 h data is expected to allow improved understanding and treatment of tremors.

  4. One dimensional full wave analysis of slow-to-fast mode conversion in lower hybrid frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Guo-Zhang; Gao, Zhe

    2014-12-15

    The linear conversion from the slow wave to the fast wave in the lower hybrid range of frequencies is analyzed numerically by using the set of field equations describing waves in a cold plane-stratified plasma. The equations are solved as a two-point boundary value problem, where the polarizations of each mode are set consistently in the boundary conditions. The scattering coefficients and the field patterns are obtained for various density profiles. It is shown that, for large density scale length, the results agree well with the traditional cognitions. In contrast, the reflected component and the probable transmitted-converted component from the conversion region, which are neglected in the usual calculations, become significant when the scale length is smaller than the wavelength of the mode. The inclusion of these new components will improve the accuracy of the simulated propagation and deposition for the injected rf power when the conversion process is involved within a sharp-varying density profile. Meanwhile, the accessibility of the incident slow wave for the low frequency case is also affected by the scale length of the density profile.

  5. A parametric analysis of lithospheric imaging by Full-Waveform Inversion of teleseismic body-waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beller, Stephen; Monteiller, Vadim; Operto, Stéphane; Nolet, Guust; Virieux, Jean

    2015-04-01

    With the deployment of dense seismic arrays and the continuous growth of computing facilities, full-waveform inversion (FWI) of teleseismic data has become a method of choice for 3D high-resolution lithospheric imaging. FWI is a local optimization problem that seeks to estimate Earth's elastic properties by iteratively minimizing the misfit function between observed and modeled seismograms. Recent investigations have shown the feasibility of such local inversions by injecting a pre-computed global wavefield at the edges of the lithospheric target. In this study, we present all the methodological ingredients needed for the application of FWI to lithospheric data. The global wavefield, which is computed in an axisymmetric global earth with AxiSEM, is injected in the lithospheric target by the so-called total-field/scattered-field method. The inversion, which is implemented with an adjoint formalism, is performed following a multiscale approach, proceeding hierarchically from low to high frequencies. We further perform a parametric analysis in a realistic model representative of the Western Alps. This analysis mainly focus on the FWI sensitivity to the source characteristics. One key issue is the estimation of the temporal source excitation, as there might be some trade-off between the source estimation and the subsurface update. We also investigate the imprint of the sources repartition on the spatial resolution of the imaging, the FWI sensitivity to the accuracy of the starting model and the effects of considering a complex topography. Seismic modeling in the FWI models allows us to assess which parts of the teleseismic wavefield significantly contribute to the imaging.

  6. Nonlinear full-wave-interaction analysis of a gyrotron-traveling-wave-tube amplifier based on a lossy dielectric-lined circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Du Chaohai; Liu Pukun

    2010-03-15

    The stability of the millimeter-wave gyrotron-traveling-wave-tube (gyro-TWT) amplifier can be effectively improved via controlling the propagation characteristics of the operating modes using lossy dielectric-lined (DL) waveguide. Self-consistent nonlinear theory of the electron cyclotron maser (ECM) interaction in lossy DL circuit is developed based on a full-wave study of the propagation characteristics of the DL waveguide. This nonlinear theory fully takes into consideration the waveguide structure and the lossy dielectric characteristics. It is capable of accurately calculating the ECM instability between a cyclotron harmonic and a circular polarized mode, and effectively predicting the nonlinear stability of the DL waveguide-based gyro-TWT. Systematic investigation of a Ka-band TE{sub 01} mode DL waveguide-based gyro-TWT is carried out, and numerical calculation reveals a series of interesting results. This work provides a basic theoretical tool for further exploring the application of the lossy DL waveguide in millimeter-wave gyro-TWTs.

  7. Source Estimation by Full Wave Form Inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Sjögreen, Björn; Petersson, N. Anders

    2013-08-07

    Given time-dependent ground motion recordings at a number of receiver stations, we solve the inverse problem for estimating the parameters of the seismic source. The source is modeled as a point moment tensor source, characterized by its location, moment tensor components, the start time, and frequency parameter (rise time) of its source time function. In total, there are 11 unknown parameters. We use a non-linear conjugate gradient algorithm to minimize the full waveform misfit between observed and computed ground motions at the receiver stations. An important underlying assumption of the minimization problem is that the wave propagation is accurately described by the elastic wave equation in a heterogeneous isotropic material. We use a fourth order accurate finite difference method, developed in [12], to evolve the waves forwards in time. The adjoint wave equation corresponding to the discretized elastic wave equation is used to compute the gradient of the misfit, which is needed by the non-linear conjugated minimization algorithm. A new source point moment source discretization is derived that guarantees that the Hessian of the misfit is a continuous function of the source location. An efficient approach for calculating the Hessian is also presented. We show how the Hessian can be used to scale the problem to improve the convergence of the non-linear conjugated gradient algorithm. Numerical experiments are presented for estimating the source parameters from synthetic data in a layer over half-space problem (LOH.1), illustrating rapid convergence of the proposed approach.

  8. Full spectrum millimeter-wave modulation.

    PubMed

    Macario, Julien; Yao, Peng; Shi, Shouyuan; Zablocki, Alicia; Harrity, Charles; Martin, Richard D; Schuetz, Christopher A; Prather, Dennis W

    2012-10-01

    In recent years, the development of new lithium niobate electro-optic modulator designs and material processing techniques have contributed to support the increasing need for faster optical networks by considerably extending the operational bandwidth of modulators. In an effort to provide higher bandwidths for future generations of networks, we have developed a lithium niobate electro-optic phase modulator based on a coplanar waveguide ridged structure that operates up to 300 GHz. By thinning the lithium niobate substrate down to less than 39 µm, we are able to eliminate substrate modes and observe optical sidebands over the full millimeter-wave spectrum.

  9. Full Wave Analysis of Passive Microwave Monolithic Integrated Circuit Devices Using a Generalized Finite Difference Time Domain (GFDTD) Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, Faiza S.; Rascoe, Daniel L.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a modified Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) technique using a generalized conformed orthogonal grid. The use of the Conformed Orthogonal Grid, Finite Difference Time Domain (GFDTD) enables the designer to match all the circuit dimensions, hence eliminating a major source o error in the analysis.

  10. An efficient global analysis of a rectenna using the combination of a full-wave model and a rational approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, P.; Akoun, G.; Essakhi, B.; Santandrea, L.; Pichon, L.; Guyot, C.

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents a reliable model for the susceptibility analysis of a Rectenna (Rectifying Antenna) in the context of microwave energy transfer. The approach allows to take into account both distributed electromagnetic portions of the antenna and the rectifier circuit including lumped elements. From the 3D electromagnetic modelling of the structure the input impedance is obtained as a function of frequency. Then a rational approximation of the Laplace variable is chosen to describe the port behaviour. The technique provides a straightforward way for a time domain simulation using Pspice or Saber. The proposed approach can be efficiently used to provide a non-linear time-domain study in the framework of EMC (Electromagnetic Compatibility) for various electronic equipments involving printed circuit-boards, internal structures of electronic components or Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS).

  11. Full-wave and half-wave rectification in second-order motion perception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, J. A.; Sperling, G.

    1994-01-01

    Microbalanced stimuli are dynamic displays which do not stimulate motion mechanisms that apply standard (Fourier-energy or autocorrelational) motion analysis directly to the visual signal. In order to extract motion information from microbalanced stimuli, Chubb and Sperling [(1988) Journal of the Optical Society of America, 5, 1986-2006] proposed that the human visual system performs a rectifying transformation on the visual signal prior to standard motion analysis. The current research employs two novel types of microbalanced stimuli: half-wave stimuli preserve motion information following half-wave rectification (with a threshold) but lose motion information following full-wave rectification; full-wave stimuli preserve motion information following full-wave rectification but lose motion information following half-wave rectification. Additionally, Fourier stimuli, ordinary square-wave gratings, were used to stimulate standard motion mechanisms. Psychometric functions (direction discrimination vs stimulus contrast) were obtained for each type of stimulus when presented alone, and when masked by each of the other stimuli (presented as moving masks and also as nonmoving, counterphase-flickering masks). RESULTS: given sufficient contrast, all three types of stimulus convey motion. However, only one-third of the population can perceive the motion of the half-wave stimulus. Observers are able to process the motion information contained in the Fourier stimulus slightly more efficiently than the information in the full-wave stimulus but are much less efficient in processing half-wave motion information. Moving masks are more effective than counterphase masks at hampering direction discrimination, indicating that some of the masking effect is interference between motion mechanisms, and some occurs at earlier stages. When either full-wave and Fourier or half-wave and Fourier gratings are presented simultaneously, there is a wide range of relative contrasts within which the

  12. Wave energy and wave-induced flow reduction by full-scale model Posidonia oceanica seagrass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manca, E.; Cáceres, I.; Alsina, J. M.; Stratigaki, V.; Townend, I.; Amos, C. L.

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents results from experiments in a large flume on wave and flow attenuation by a full-scale artificial Posidonia oceanica seagrass meadow in shallow water. Wave height and in-canopy wave-induced flows were reduced by the meadow under all tested regular and irregular wave conditions, and were affected by seagrass density, submergence and distance from the leading edge. The energy of irregular waves was reduced at all components of the spectra, but reduction was greater at the peak spectral frequency. Energy dissipation factors were largest for waves with small orbital amplitudes and at low wave Reynolds numbers. An empirical model, commonly applied to predict friction factors by rough beds, proved applicable to the P. oceanica bed. However at the lowest Reynolds numbers, under irregular waves, the data deviated significantly from the model. In addition, the wave-induced flow dissipation in the lower canopy increased with increasing wave orbital amplitude and increasing density of the mimics. The analysis of the wave-induced flow spectra confirm this trend: the reduction of flow was greatest at the longer period component of the spectra. Finally, we discuss the implications of these findings for sediment dynamics and the role of P. oceanica beds in protecting the shore from erosion.

  13. Local full-wave energy in nonuniform plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Smithe, D.N.

    1988-10-01

    The subject of local wave energy in plasmas is treated via quasilinear theory from the dual perspectives of the action-angle formalism and gyrokinetics analysis. This work presents an extension to all orders in the gyroradius of the self-consistent wave-propagation/quasilinear-absorption problem using gyrokinetics. Questions of when and under what conditions local energy should be of definite sign are best answered using the action-angle formalism. An important result is that the ''dielectric operators'' of the linearized wave equation and of the local energy are not the same, a fact which is obscured when the eikonal or WKB assumption is invoked. Even though the two dielectrics are very different in character (one operates linearly on electric field for the plasma current, the other operates quadratically for the energy), it is demonstrated that they are nevertheless related by a simple mathematical statement. This study was originally motivated by concern and lively discussion over the questions of local energy for rf-heating of plasmas, where in certain instances, full-wave effects such as refraction, strong absorption, and mode conversion are of primary importance. Fundamentally, the rf-absorption must equate with the energy moment of the quasilinear term to achieve a correct energy balance. This fact governs the derivation (as opposed to postulation) of the local absorption. The troublesome ''kinetic flux'' may then be chosen (it is not unique) to satisfy a wave-energy balance relation with the Poynting flux and local absorption. It is shown that at least one such choice reduces asymptotically to the Stix form away from nonuniformities, thereby demonstrating energy conservation to all orders in Larmor radius. 25 refs.

  14. Full Wave Analysis of RF Signal Attenuation in a Lossy Cave using a High Order Time Domain Vector Finite Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Pingenot, J; Rieben, R; White, D

    2004-12-06

    We present a computational study of signal propagation and attenuation of a 200 MHz dipole antenna in a cave environment. The cave is modeled as a straight and lossy random rough wall. To simulate a broad frequency band, the full wave Maxwell equations are solved directly in the time domain via a high order vector finite element discretization using the massively parallel CEM code EMSolve. The simulation is performed for a series of random meshes in order to generate statistical data for the propagation and attenuation properties of the cave environment. Results for the power spectral density and phase of the electric field vector components are presented and discussed.

  15. Full Wave Simulation of Integrated Circuits Using Hybrid Numerical Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jilin

    Transmission lines play an important role in digital electronics, and in microwave and millimeter-wave circuits. Analysis, modeling, and design of transmission lines are critical to the development of the circuitry in the chip, subsystem, and system levels. In the past several decays, at the EM modeling level, the quasi-static approximation has been widely used due to its great simplicity. As the clock rates increase, the inter-connect effects such as signal delay, distortion, dispersion, reflection, and crosstalk, limit the performance of microwave systems. Meanwhile, the quasi-static approach loses its validity for some complex system structures. Since the successful system design of the PCB, MCM, and the chip packaging, rely very much on the computer aided EM level modeling and simulation, many new methods have been developed, such as the full wave approach, to guarantee the successful design. Many difficulties exist in the rigorous EM level analysis. Some of these include the difficulties in describing the behavior of the conductors with finite thickness and finite conductivity, the field singularity, and the arbitrary multilayered multi-transmission lines structures. This dissertation concentrates on the full wave study of the multi-conductor transmission lines with finite conductivity and finite thickness buried in an arbitrary lossy multilayered environment. Two general approaches have been developed. The first one is the integral equation method in which the dyadic Green's function for arbitrary layered media has been correctly formulated and has been tested both analytically and numerically. By applying this method, the double layered high dielectric permitivitty problem and the heavy dielectrical lossy problem in multilayered media in the CMOS circuit design have been solved. The second approach is the edge element method. In this study, the correct functional for the two dimensional propagation problem has been successfully constructed in a rigorous way

  16. The mixed Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin-full-wave approach and its application to lower hybrid wave propagation and absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z. X.; Zonca, F.; Cardinali, A.

    2013-03-01

    The mixed Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB)-full-wave approach for the calculation of the 2D mode structure in tokamak plasmas is further developed based on our previous work [A. Cardinali and F. Zonca, Phys. Plasmas 10, 4199 (2003) and Z. X. Lu et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 042104 (2012)]. A new scheme for theoretical analysis and numerical implementation of the mixed WKB-full-wave approach is formulated, based on scale separation and asymptotic analysis. Besides its capability to efficiently investigate the initial value problem for 2D mode structures and linear stability, in this work, the mixed WKB-full-wave approach is extended to the investigation of radio frequency wave propagation and absorption, e.g., lower hybrid waves. As a novel method, its comparison with other approaches, e.g., WKB and beam tracing methods, is discussed. Its application to lower hybrid wave propagation in concentric circular tokamak plasmas using typical FTU discharge parameters is also demonstrated.

  17. Full wave effects on the lower hybrid wave spectrum and driven current profile in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraiwa, S.; Ko, J.; Meneghini, O.; Parker, R.; Schmidt, A. E.; Greenwald, M.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J.; Ma, Y.; Podpaly, Y.; Rice, J. E.; Wallace, G.; Wolfe, S. M.; C-Mod Group, Alcator; Scott, S.; Wilson, J. R.

    2011-08-15

    A numerical modeling of current profile modification by lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) using a fullwave/Fokker-Planck simulation code is presented. A MHD stable LHCD discharge on Alcator C-Mod was analyzed, and the current profile from full wave simulations was found to show better agreement with the experiment than a ray-tracing code. Comparison of full wave and ray-tracing simulation shows that, although ray-tracing can reproduce the stochastic wave spectrum broadening, the full wave calculation predicts even wider spectrum broadening, and the wave spectrum fills all of the kinematically allowed domain. This is the first demonstration of LHCD current profile modeling using a full wave simulation code in a multi-pass absorption regime, showing the clear impact of full wave effects on the LHCD driven current profile.

  18. Full Wave Analysis of RF Signal Attenuation in a Lossy Rough Surface Cave using a High Order Time Domain Vector Finite Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Pingenot, J; Rieben, R; White, D; Dudley, D

    2005-10-31

    We present a computational study of signal propagation and attenuation of a 200 MHz planar loop antenna in a cave environment. The cave is modeled as a straight and lossy random rough wall. To simulate a broad frequency band, the full wave Maxwell equations are solved directly in the time domain via a high order vector finite element discretization using the massively parallel CEM code EMSolve. The numerical technique is first verified against theoretical results for a planar loop antenna in a smooth lossy cave. The simulation is then performed for a series of random rough surface meshes in order to generate statistical data for the propagation and attenuation properties of the antenna in a cave environment. Results for the mean and variance of the power spectral density of the electric field are presented and discussed.

  19. Full-wave calculations in flux coordinates for toroidal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Carreras, B.A.; Lynch, V.E.; Jaeger, E.F.; Batchelor, D.B.

    1988-01-01

    A new 2-D full-wave code, HYPERION, employing a poloidal and toroidal mode expansion and including the toroidal terms arising in the wave equation has been developed. It is based on the existing modules developed for the MHD stability codes and uses as input the tokamak equilibria calculated with the RSTEQ code. At present the plasma response is described by the collisionally broadened cold plasma conductivity. However, the code is written in straight field line coordinates, this permits the accurate representation of k /sub /parallel// and as a consequence allows the incorporation of the plasma Z functions. This code also retains the E/sub /parallel// component of the electric field which will allow the study of the low density region of the plasma. We have done detailed benchmarking of the HYPERION code in the cold plasma limit with the existing finite difference ORION full-wave code. The agreement is very good.

  20. Full-wave Modeling of EBWs in Pegasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallian, Sara; Bongard, Michael; Volpe, Francesco; Jacquot, Jonathan; Köhn, Alf

    2010-11-01

    We model the injection of ordinary(O) and extraordinary(X) waves at 2.45GHz, their conversion in Electron Bernstein Waves(EBWs) and the initial propagation of EBWs in the Pegasus spherical torus, by means of the recently improved IPF-FDMC finite-difference-time-domain Maxwell-fluid solver. Simulations are performed in 2D in cylindrical and Cartesian coordinates, in a poloidal, horizontal or ``oblique'' cut (at the magnetic pitch inclination, where the OXB conversion is most efficient). The OXB and XB conversion efficiencies are evaluated for various antenna designs and launch geometries. Reflections from the wall and collisions at the upper hybrid are included. The motivation for the full-wave approach is that the O and X vacuum wavelength (12cm) is comparable with the plasma radius(30-45cm). EBWs, however, develop a short wavelength fulfilling the ray tracing approximation. For this reason, EBW wavefronts are separated from the long-wavelength O and X-mode by means of high-pass spatial filtering of the full-wave results. Then, local wave-vectors are defined, that might serve as initial conditions for future ray tracings including absorption.

  1. Reactive power in the full Gaussian light wave.

    PubMed

    Seshadri, S R

    2009-11-01

    The electric current sources that are required for the excitation of the fundamental Gaussian beam and the corresponding full Gaussian light wave are determined. The current sources are situated on the secondary source plane that forms the boundary between the two half-spaces in which the waves are launched. The electromagnetic fields and the complex power generated by the current sources are evaluated. For the fundamental Gaussian beam, the reactive power vanishes, and the normalization is chosen such that the real power is 2 W. The various full Gaussian waves are identified by the length parameter b(t) that lies in the range 0 < or = b(t) < or = b, where b is the Rayleigh distance. The other parameters are the wavenumber k, the free-space wavelength lambda, and the beam waist w0 at the input plane. The dependence of the real power of the full Gaussian light wave on b(t)/b and w0/lambda is examined. For a specified w0/lambda, the reactive power, which can be positive or negative, increases as b(t)/b is increased from 0 to 1 and becomes infinite for b(t)/b=1. For a specified b(t)/b, the reactive power approaches zero as kw0 is increased and reaches the limiting value of zero of the paraxial beam.

  2. Full Quantum Analysis of Two-Photon Absorption Using Two-Photon Wave Function: Comparison of Two-Photon Absorption with One-Photon Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, Toshihiro; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Sugiyama, Kazuhiko; Kitano, Masao

    2009-10-01

    For dissipation-free photon-photon interaction at the single photon level, we analyze one-photon and two-photon transitions induced by photon pairs in three-level atoms using two-photon wave functions. We show that two-photon absorption can be substantially enhanced by adjusting the time correlation of photon pairs. We study two typical cases: a Gaussian wave function and a rectangular wave function. In the latter, we find that under special conditions one-photon transition is completely suppressed, while two-photon transition is maintained with a high probability.

  3. Benchmarking ICRF Full-wave Solvers for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    R. V. Budny, L. Berry, R. Bilato, P. Bonoli, M. Brambilla, R. J. Dumont, A. Fukuyama, R. Harvey, E. F. Jaeger, K. Indireshkumar, E. Lerche, D. McCune, C. K. Phillips, V. Vdovin, J. Wright, and members of the ITPA-IOS

    2011-01-06

    Abstract Benchmarking of full-wave solvers for ICRF simulations is performed using plasma profiles and equilibria obtained from integrated self-consistent modeling predictions of four ITER plasmas. One is for a high performance baseline (5.3 T, 15 MA) DT H-mode. The others are for half-field, half-current plasmas of interest for the pre-activation phase with bulk plasma ion species being either hydrogen or He4. The predicted profiles are used by six full-wave solver groups to simulate the ICRF electromagnetic fields and heating, and by three of these groups to simulate the current-drive. Approximate agreement is achieved for the predicted heating power for the DT and He4 cases. Factor of two disagreements are found for the cases with second harmonic He3 heating in bulk H cases. Approximate agreement is achieved simulating the ICRF current drive.

  4. Full-wave modeling of EMIC waves near the He+ gyrofrequency

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kim, Eun -Hwa; Johnson, Jay R.

    2016-01-06

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are known to be excited by the cyclotron instability associated with hot and anisotropic ion distributions in the equatorial region of the magnetosphere and are thought to play a key role in radiation belt losses. Although detection of these waves at the ground can provide a global view of the EMIC wave environment, it is not clear what signatures, if any, would be expected. One of the significant scientific issues concerning EMIC waves is to understand how these waves are detected at the ground. In order to solve this puzzle, it is necessary to understandmore » the propagation characteristics of the field-aligned EMIC waves, which include polarization reversal, cutoff, resonance, and mode coupling between different wave modes, in a dipolar magnetic field. However, the inability of ray tracing to adequately describe wave propagation near the crossover cutoff-resonance frequencies in multi-ion plasmas is one of reasons why these scientific questions remain unsolved. Using a recently developed 2-D full-wave code that solves the full-wave equations in global magnetospheric geometry, we demonstrate how EMIC waves propagate from the equatorial region to higher magnetic latitude in an electron-proton-He+ plasma. We find that polarization reversal occurs at the crossover frequency from left-hand polarization (LHP) to right-hand (RHP) polarization and such RHP EMIC waves can either propagate to the inner magnetosphere or reflect to the outer magnetosphere at the Buchsbaum resonance location. Lastly, we also find that mode coupling from guided LHP EMIC waves to unguided RHP or LHP waves (i.e., fast mode) occurs.« less

  5. Full-wave modeling of EMIC waves near the He+ gyrofrequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eun-Hwa; Johnson, Jay R.

    2016-01-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are known to be excited by the cyclotron instability associated with hot and anisotropic ion distributions in the equatorial region of the magnetosphere and are thought to play a key role in radiation belt losses. Although detection of these waves at the ground can provide a global view of the EMIC wave environment, it is not clear what signatures, if any, would be expected. One of the significant scientific issues concerning EMIC waves is to understand how these waves are detected at the ground. In order to solve this puzzle, it is necessary to understand the propagation characteristics of the field-aligned EMIC waves, which include polarization reversal, cutoff, resonance, and mode coupling between different wave modes, in a dipolar magnetic field. However, the inability of ray tracing to adequately describe wave propagation near the crossover cutoff-resonance frequencies in multi-ion plasmas is one of reasons why these scientific questions remain unsolved. Using a recently developed 2-D full-wave code that solves the full-wave equations in global magnetospheric geometry, we demonstrate how EMIC waves propagate from the equatorial region to higher magnetic latitude in an electron-proton-He+ plasma. We find that polarization reversal occurs at the crossover frequency from left-hand polarization (LHP) to right-hand (RHP) polarization and such RHP EMIC waves can either propagate to the inner magnetosphere or reflect to the outer magnetosphere at the Buchsbaum resonance location. We also find that mode coupling from guided LHP EMIC waves to unguided RHP or LHP waves (i.e., fast mode) occurs.

  6. Numerical modelling of nonlinear full-wave acoustic propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Velasco-Segura, Roberto Rendón, Pablo L.

    2015-10-28

    The various model equations of nonlinear acoustics are arrived at by making assumptions which permit the observation of the interaction with propagation of either single or joint effects. We present here a form of the conservation equations of fluid dynamics which are deduced using slightly less restrictive hypothesis than those necessary to obtain the well known Westervelt equation. This formulation accounts for full wave diffraction, nonlinearity, and thermoviscous dissipative effects. A two-dimensional, finite-volume method using Roe’s linearisation has been implemented to obtain numerically the solution of the proposed equations. This code, which has been written for parallel execution on a GPU, can be used to describe moderate nonlinear phenomena, at low Mach numbers, in domains as large as 100 wave lengths. Applications range from models of diagnostic and therapeutic HIFU, to parametric acoustic arrays and nonlinear propagation in acoustic waveguides. Examples related to these applications are shown and discussed.

  7. Direct Calculations of Current Drive with a Full Wave Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, John C.; Phillips, Cynthia K.

    1997-11-01

    We have developed a current drive package that evaluates the current driven by fast magnetosonic waves in arbitrary flux geometry. An expression for the quasilinear flux has been derived which accounts for coupling between modes in the spectrum of waves launched from the antenna. The field amplitudes are calculated in the full wave code, FISIC, and the current response function, \\chi, also known as the Spitzer function, is determined with Charles Karney's Fokker-Planck code, adj.f. Both codes have been modified to incorporate the same numerical equilibria. To model the effects of a trapped particle population, the bounce averaged equations for current and power are used, and the bounce averaged flux is calculated. The computer model is benchmarked against the homogenous equations for a high aspect ratio case in which the expected agreement is confirmed. Results from cases for TFTR, NSTX and CDX-U are contrasted with the predictions of the Ehst-Karney parameterization of current drive for circular equilibria. For theoretical background, please see the authors' archive of papers. (http://w3.pppl.gov/ ~jwright/Publications)

  8. Full-wave reflection of lightning long-wave radio pulses from the ionospheric D- region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, A. R.; Shao, X.; Holzworth, R.

    2008-12-01

    A model is developed for calculating ionospheric reflection of electromagnetic pulses emitted by lightning, with most energy in the long-wave spectral region (f = 3 - 100 kHz). The building-block of the calculation is a differential-equation full-wave solution of Maxwell's Equations for the complex reflection of individual plane waves incident from below, by the anisotropic, dissipative, diffuse dielectric profile of the lower ionosphere. This full-wave solution is then put into a summation over plane waves in an angular Direct Fourier Transform to obtain the reflection properties of curved wavefronts. This step models also the diffraction effects of long- wave ionospheric reflections observed at short or medium range (200 - 500 km). The calculation can be done with any arbitrary but smooth dielectric profile versus altitude. For an initial test, we use the classic D- region exponential profiles of electron density and collision rate given by Wait. With even these simple profiles, our model of full-wave reflection of curved wavefronts captures some of the basic attributes of observed reflected waveforms recorded with the Los Alamos Sferic Array.

  9. Beamforming Based Full-Duplex for Millimeter-Wave Communication.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Xiao, Zhenyu; Bai, Lin; Choi, Jinho; Xia, Pengfei; Xia, Xiang-Gen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study beamforming based full-duplex (FD) systems in millimeter-wave (mmWave) communications. A joint transmission and reception (Tx/Rx) beamforming problem is formulated to maximize the achievable rate by mitigating self-interference (SI). Since the optimal solution is difficult to find due to the non-convexity of the objective function, suboptimal schemes are proposed in this paper. A low-complexity algorithm, which iteratively maximizes signal power while suppressing SI, is proposed and its convergence is proven. Moreover, two closed-form solutions, which do not require iterations, are also derived under minimum-mean-square-error (MMSE), zero-forcing (ZF), and maximum-ratio transmission (MRT) criteria. Performance evaluations show that the proposed iterative scheme converges fast (within only two iterations on average) and approaches an upper-bound performance, while the two closed-form solutions also achieve appealing performances, although there are noticeable differences from the upper bound depending on channel conditions. Interestingly, these three schemes show different robustness against the geometry of Tx/Rx antenna arrays and channel estimation errors. PMID:27455256

  10. Beamforming Based Full-Duplex for Millimeter-Wave Communication.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Xiao, Zhenyu; Bai, Lin; Choi, Jinho; Xia, Pengfei; Xia, Xiang-Gen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study beamforming based full-duplex (FD) systems in millimeter-wave (mmWave) communications. A joint transmission and reception (Tx/Rx) beamforming problem is formulated to maximize the achievable rate by mitigating self-interference (SI). Since the optimal solution is difficult to find due to the non-convexity of the objective function, suboptimal schemes are proposed in this paper. A low-complexity algorithm, which iteratively maximizes signal power while suppressing SI, is proposed and its convergence is proven. Moreover, two closed-form solutions, which do not require iterations, are also derived under minimum-mean-square-error (MMSE), zero-forcing (ZF), and maximum-ratio transmission (MRT) criteria. Performance evaluations show that the proposed iterative scheme converges fast (within only two iterations on average) and approaches an upper-bound performance, while the two closed-form solutions also achieve appealing performances, although there are noticeable differences from the upper bound depending on channel conditions. Interestingly, these three schemes show different robustness against the geometry of Tx/Rx antenna arrays and channel estimation errors.

  11. Beamforming Based Full-Duplex for Millimeter-Wave Communication

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao; Xiao, Zhenyu; Bai, Lin; Choi, Jinho; Xia, Pengfei; Xia, Xiang-Gen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study beamforming based full-duplex (FD) systems in millimeter-wave (mmWave) communications. A joint transmission and reception (Tx/Rx) beamforming problem is formulated to maximize the achievable rate by mitigating self-interference (SI). Since the optimal solution is difficult to find due to the non-convexity of the objective function, suboptimal schemes are proposed in this paper. A low-complexity algorithm, which iteratively maximizes signal power while suppressing SI, is proposed and its convergence is proven. Moreover, two closed-form solutions, which do not require iterations, are also derived under minimum-mean-square-error (MMSE), zero-forcing (ZF), and maximum-ratio transmission (MRT) criteria. Performance evaluations show that the proposed iterative scheme converges fast (within only two iterations on average) and approaches an upper-bound performance, while the two closed-form solutions also achieve appealing performances, although there are noticeable differences from the upper bound depending on channel conditions. Interestingly, these three schemes show different robustness against the geometry of Tx/Rx antenna arrays and channel estimation errors. PMID:27455256

  12. An assessment of full-wave effects on the propagation and absorption of lower hybrid waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, John

    2008-11-01

    Lower hybrid (LH) waves have the attractive property of damping strongly via electron Landau resonance on relatively fast tail electrons. Consequently these waves are well-suited to driving current in the plasma periphery where the electron temperature is lower, making LH current drive (LHCD) a promising technique for off--axis (r/a˜0.60) current profile control in reactor grade plasmas. Established modeling techniques use WKB expansions with non-Maxwellian self-consistent distributions. Higher order WKB expansions have shown some effects on the parallel wavenumber evolution and consequently on the damping due to diffraction [1]. A massively parallel version of the TORIC full-wave electromagnetic field solver valid in the LH range of frequencies has been developed [2] and applied to scenarios at the density and magnetic field characteristic of devices such as Alcator C-Mod and ITER [B0 5 T, ne 1x10^20 m-3]. We find that retaining full wave effects due to diffraction and focusing has a strong effect on the location of wave absorption. Diffraction occurs at caustic surfaces and in resonance cones resulting in a large upshift of the parallel wavenumber and localized power deposition. For some values of density and magnetic field when the waves are fully accessible to the center of the plasma, the full wave description predicts all power being damped at larger radii (r/a ˜ 0.7) in contrast to ray tracing which shows more central power absorption. By incorporating a Fokker-Planck code for self-consistent treatment of the electron distribution and using an synthetic hard X-ray diagnostic we compare the code predictions by both full wave and ray tracing methods with recent Alcator C-Mod experiments. We will compare full-wave and ray tracing for low and high single pass damping regimes. [0pt] [1] G. Pereverzev, Nucl. Fusion 32 1091 (1991). [0pt] [2] J. C. Wright, E. J. Valeo, C. K. Phillips and P. T. Bonoli, Comm. in Comput. Physics 4 545 (2008).

  13. High-efficiency passive full wave rectification for electromagnetic harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Mehmet; Tunkar, Bassam A.; Park, Sangtak; Elrayes, Karim; Mahmoud, Mohamed A. E.; Abdel-Rahman, Eihab; Yavuz, Mustafa

    2014-10-01

    We compare the performance of four types of full-wave bridge rectifiers designed for electromagnetic energy harvesters based on silicon diodes, Schottky diodes, passive MOSFETs, and active MOSFETs. Simulation and experimental results show that MOSFET-type rectifiers are more efficient than diode-type rectifiers, reaching voltage and power efficiency of 99% for ideal voltage source with input amplitudes larger than 800 mV. Since active MOSFETs require extra components and an external DC power supply, we conclude that passive MOSFETs are superior for micro-power energy harvesting systems. We demonstrate passive MOSFET rectifiers implemented using discrete, off-shelf components and show that they outperform all electromagnetic harvester rectifiers hitherto reported obtaining a power efficiency of 95%. Furthermore, we show that passive MOSFET rectifiers do not affect the center frequency, harvesting bandwidth, or optimal resistance of electromagnetic harvesters. We demonstrate a complete power management module by adding a capacitor to the rectifier output terminal. We found that this configuration changed the optimal resistive load from 40 Ω to 55 Ω and decreased output power efficiency to 86%.

  14. Full-wave simulations of electromagnetic cloaking structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummer, Steven A.; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Schurig, David; Smith, David R.; Pendry, John

    2006-09-01

    Pendry have reported electromagnetically anisotropic and inhomogeneous shells that, in theory, completely shield an interior structure of arbitrary size from electromagnetic fields without perturbing the external fields. Neither the coordinate transformation-based analytical formulation nor the supporting ray-tracing simulation indicate how material perturbations and full-wave effects might affect the solution. We report fully electromagnetic simulations of the cylindrical version of this cloaking structure using ideal and nonideal (but physically realizable) electromagnetic parameters that show that the low-reflection and power-flow bending properties of the electromagnetic cloaking structure are not especially sensitive to modest permittivity and permeability variations. The cloaking performance degrades smoothly with increasing loss, and effective low-reflection shielding can be achieved with a cylindrical shell composed of an eight- (homogeneous) layer approximation of the ideal continuous medium. An imperfect but simpler version of the cloaking material is derived and is shown to reproduce the ray bending of the ideal material in a manner that may be easier to experimentally realize.

  15. Full wave simulation of waves in ECRIS plasmas based on the finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Torrisi, G.; Mascali, D.; Neri, L.; Castro, G.; Patti, G.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Ciavola, G.; Di Donato, L.; Sorbello, G.; Isernia, T.

    2014-02-12

    This paper describes the modeling and the full wave numerical simulation of electromagnetic waves propagation and absorption in an anisotropic magnetized plasma filling the resonant cavity of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). The model assumes inhomogeneous, dispersive and tensorial constitutive relations. Maxwell's equations are solved by the finite element method (FEM), using the COMSOL Multiphysics{sup ®} suite. All the relevant details have been considered in the model, including the non uniform external magnetostatic field used for plasma confinement, the local electron density profile resulting in the full-3D non uniform magnetized plasma complex dielectric tensor. The more accurate plasma simulations clearly show the importance of cavity effect on wave propagation and the effects of a resonant surface. These studies are the pillars for an improved ECRIS plasma modeling, that is mandatory to optimize the ion source output (beam intensity distribution and charge state, especially). Any new project concerning the advanced ECRIS design will take benefit by an adequate modeling of self-consistent wave absorption simulations.

  16. Flow Field Thresholds for Bottom Roughness Transformation in Full Scale Laboratory Generated Waves and Solitary Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wengrove, M. E.; Foster, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    In field environments, bottom roughness transformation have been observed in response to extreme storm events, flooding, and tsunamis. Bottom roughness transformation is considered to be instances when an observed stable bed state (e.g. ripples) rapidly transforms into an alternate stable state (e.g. flat bed). This type of extreme change is observed when forcing mechanisms due to shear stress and pressure gradients reach significant magnitude and duration. This research utilizes a full scale wave laboratory environment (O.H. Hinsdale Large Wave Flume at Oregon State University) over a sandy substrate to closely investigate bottom boundary layer dynamics coupled with observations of extreme morphologic change from a rippled to a flat bed. The observational array includes two millimeter scale resolution profiling ADVs (Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter), a PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) used to estimate velocity fields as well as morphologic evolution, porewater pressure sensors, and multiple single point ADVs and wave gages. An emphasis is made towards investigating the effects of solitary waves (i.e. tsunamis) upon events of extreme morphologic change, both isolated as well as introduced into bimodal wave groups. Additionally, observations demonstrate that instances of roughness flattening and then rebuilding occurring within sets of irregular waves (i.e. storm events). During instances of rapid bed flattening boundary layer streaming is observed in coincidence with estimates of excess applied bed stress and exceedance of critical Shields parameter for sediment motion. Additionally, during extreme flattening, measured pressure gradients indicate conditions for pressure gradient induced sediment transport, supported by the porewater pressure sensor data and the estimated Sleath parameter.

  17. From supersonic shear wave imaging to full-field optical coherence shear wave elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahas, Amir; Tanter, Mickaël; Nguyen, Thu-Mai; Chassot, Jean-Marie; Fink, Mathias; Claude Boccara, A.

    2013-12-01

    Elasticity maps of tissue have proved to be particularly useful in providing complementary contrast to ultrasonic imaging, e.g., for cancer diagnosis at the millimeter scale. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) offers an endogenous contrast based on singly backscattered optical waves. Adding complementary contrast to OCT images by recording elasticity maps could also be valuable in improving OCT-based diagnosis at the microscopic scale. Static elastography has been successfully coupled with full-field OCT (FF-OCT) in order to realize both micrometer-scale sectioning and elasticity maps. Nevertheless, static elastography presents a number of drawbacks, mainly when stiffness quantification is required. Here, we describe the combination of two methods: transient elastography, based on speed measurements of shear waves induced by ultrasonic radiation forces, and FF-OCT, an en face OCT approach using an incoherent light source. The use of an ultrafast ultrasonic scanner and an ultrafast camera working at 10,000 to 30,000 images/s made it possible to follow shear wave propagation with both modalities. As expected, FF-OCT is found to be much more sensitive than ultrafast ultrasound to tiny shear vibrations (a few nanometers and micrometers, respectively). Stiffness assessed in gel phantoms and an ex vivo rat brain by FF-OCT is found to be in good agreement with ultrasound shear wave elastography.

  18. Generalized Full-Information Item Bifactor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cai, Li; Yang, Ji Seung; Hansen, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Full-information item bifactor analysis is an important statistical method in psychological and educational measurement. Current methods are limited to single-group analysis and inflexible in the types of item response models supported. We propose a flexible multiple-group item bifactor analysis framework that supports a variety of…

  19. Application of full-wave inversion to real crosshole data

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Z.; Williamson, P.R.

    1994-12-31

    A 2.5D acoustic frequency domain fullwave inversion method was applied to a real dataset from an open-cast coal exploration site. The only data processing required was the removal of tube waves, because no shear wave arrivals were observed. The inversion is efficient because only a few frequency components are needed. The authors encounter two site-specific problems (source inconsistency and anisotropy) which are addressed by simple adaptations of the inversion algorithm. High resolution results are achieved for both velocity and attenuation reconstructions. The fullwave inversion method combines the advantages of first-arrival travel-time tomography and reflected waves migration. To evaluate the inversion result, they model time domain traces using a source signature estimated by fitting the frequency domain response of the reconstructed model to the observed data across the spectrum. The synthetic traces match the early arrivals in the real data reasonably well.

  20. An assessment of full wave effects on the propagation and absorption of lower hybrid waves

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J. C.; Bonoli, P. T.; Schmidt, A. E.; Phillips, C. K.; Valeo, E. J.; Harvey, R. W.; Brambilla, M. A.

    2009-07-15

    Lower hybrid (LH) waves ({omega}{sub ci}<<{omega}<<{omega}{sub ce}, where {omega}{sub i,e}{identical_to}Z{sub i,e}eB/m{sub i,e}c) have the attractive property of damping strongly via electron Landau resonance on relatively fast tail electrons and consequently are well-suited to driving current. Established modeling techniques use Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) expansions with self-consistent non-Maxwellian distributions. Higher order WKB expansions have shown some effects on the parallel wave number evolution and consequently on the damping due to diffraction [G. Pereverzev, Nucl. Fusion 32, 1091 (1991)]. A massively parallel version of the TORIC full wave electromagnetic field solver valid in the LH range of frequencies has been developed [J. C. Wright et al., Comm. Comp. Phys. 4, 545 (2008)] and coupled to an electron Fokker-Planck solver CQL3D[R. W. Harvey and M. G. McCoy, in Proceedings of the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting, Montreal, 1992 (IAEA Institute of Physics Publishing, Vienna, 1993), USDOC/NTIS Document No. DE93002962, pp. 489-526] in order to self-consistently evolve nonthermal electron distributions characteristic of LH current drive (LHCD) experiments in devices such as Alcator C-Mod and ITER (B{sub 0}{approx_equal}5 T, n{sub e0}{approx_equal}1x10{sup 20} m{sup -3}). These simulations represent the first ever self-consistent simulations of LHCD utilizing both a full wave and Fokker-Planck calculation in toroidal geometry.

  1. Full spectrum analysis in environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Sascha

    2014-08-01

    In environmental radiation monitoring, the time-variable natural gamma radiation background complicates the nuclide identification and analysis of a gamma spectrum. A full spectrum analysis based on the noise adjusted singular value decomposition method for the description of the time-variable background and adjustment calculations is a possible analysis method, which may provide advantages compared with a peak-based analysis, if applied to a time series of gamma spectra. An analysis example is shown and discussed with a measured time series of gamma spectra obtained from a spectroscopic gamma detector with a NaI(Tl) scintillator as it is used in the environmental radiation monitoring.

  2. Fast full-wave seismic inversion using source encoding.

    SciTech Connect

    Ho Cha, Young; Baumstein, Anatoly; Lee, Sunwoong; Hinkley, David; Anderson, John E.; Neelamani, Ramesh; Krebs, Jerome R.; Lacasse, Martin-Daniel

    2010-05-01

    Full Wavefield Seismic Inversion (FWI) estimates a subsurface elastic model by iteratively minimizing the difference between observed and simulated data. This process is extremely compute intensive, with a cost on the order of at least hundreds of prestack reverse time migrations. For time-domain and Krylov-based frequency-domain FWI, the cost of FWI is proportional to the number of seismic sources inverted. We have found that the cost of FWI can be significantly reduced by applying it to data processed by encoding and summing individual source gathers, and by changing the encoding functions between iterations. The encoding step forms a single gather from many input source gathers. This gather represents data that would have been acquired from a spatially distributed set of sources operating simultaneously with different source signatures. We demonstrate, using synthetic data, significant cost reduction by applying FWI to encoded simultaneous-source data.

  3. Full-wave description of the lower hybrid reflection of whistler waves

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzichev, I. V. Shklyar, D. R.

    2013-10-15

    A quasi-electrostatic whistler wave propagating in the direction of increasing lower hybrid resonance (LHR) frequency experiences reflection from the region in which its frequency becomes lower than the LHR frequency. This phenomenon is usually described in the framework of geometrical optics. For a wave propagating along a magnetospheric trajectory, the LHR reflection frequently takes place in the ionospheric region in which electron-neutral collisions are essential and lead to wave attenuation. In this case, the wave approach to the description of the LHR reflection is most consistent. This work is aimed at developing such an approach. The coefficients of the wave reflection are calculated for different plasma parameters. The relation between the problem under consideration and the problem of exit of whistler-mode waves to the ground is considered.

  4. A Full-wave Model for Wave Propagation and Dissipation in the Inner Magnetosphere Using the Finite Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest Valeo, Jay R. Johnson, Eun-Hwa and Cynthia Phillips

    2012-03-13

    A wide variety of plasma waves play an important role in the energization and loss of particles in the inner magnetosphere. Our ability to understand and model wave-particle interactions in this region requires improved knowledge of the spatial distribution and properties of these waves as well as improved understanding of how the waves depend on changes in solar wind forcing and/or geomagnetic activity. To this end, we have developed a two-dimensional, finite element code that solves the full wave equations in global magnetospheric geometry. The code describes three-dimensional wave structure including mode conversion when ULF, EMIC, and whistler waves are launched in a two-dimensional axisymmetric background plasma with general magnetic field topology. We illustrate the capabilities of the code by examining the role of plasmaspheric plumes on magnetosonic wave propagation; mode conversion at the ion-ion and Alfven resonances resulting from external, solar wind compressions; and wave structure and mode conversion of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves launched in the equatorial magnetosphere, which propagate along the magnetic field lines toward the ionosphere. We also discuss advantages of the finite element method for resolving resonant structures, and how the model may be adapted to include nonlocal kinetic effects.

  5. Multichannel analysis of surface waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Park, C.B.; Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.

    1999-01-01

    The frequency-dependent properties of Rayleigh-type surface waves can be utilized for imaging and characterizing the shallow subsurface. Most surface-wave analysis relies on the accurate calculation of phase velocities for the horizontally traveling fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave acquired by stepping out a pair of receivers at intervals based on calculated ground roll wavelengths. Interference by coherent source-generated noise inhibits the reliability of shear-wave velocities determined through inversion of the whole wave field. Among these nonplanar, nonfundamental-mode Rayleigh waves (noise) are body waves, scattered and nonsource-generated surface waves, and higher-mode surface waves. The degree to which each of these types of noise contaminates the dispersion curve and, ultimately, the inverted shear-wave velocity profile is dependent on frequency as well as distance from the source. Multichannel recording permits effective identification and isolation of noise according to distinctive trace-to-trace coherency in arrival time and amplitude. An added advantage is the speed and redundancy of the measurement process. Decomposition of a multichannel record into a time variable-frequency format, similar to an uncorrelated Vibroseis record, permits analysis and display of each frequency component in a unique and continuous format. Coherent noise contamination can then be examined and its effects appraised in both frequency and offset space. Separation of frequency components permits real-time maximization of the S/N ratio during acquisition and subsequent processing steps. Linear separation of each ground roll frequency component allows calculation of phase velocities by simply measuring the linear slope of each frequency component. Breaks in coherent surface-wave arrivals, observable on the decomposed record, can be compensated for during acquisition and processing. Multichannel recording permits single-measurement surveying of a broad depth range, high levels of

  6. Full-wave reflection of lightning long-wave radio pulses from the ionospheric D region: Numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Abram R.; Shao, Xuan-Min; Holzworth, Robert

    2009-03-01

    A model is developed for calculating ionospheric reflection of electromagnetic pulses emitted by lightning, with most energy in the long-wave spectral region (f ~ 3-100 kHz). The building block of the calculation is a differential equation full-wave solution of Maxwell's equations for the complex reflection of individual plane waves incident from below, by the anisotropic, dissipative, diffuse dielectric profile of the lower ionosphere. This full-wave solution is then put into a summation over plane waves in an angular direct Fourier transform to obtain the reflection properties of curved wavefronts. This step models also the diffraction effects of long-wave ionospheric reflections observed at short or medium range (~200-500 km). The calculation can be done with any arbitrary but smooth dielectric profile versus altitude. For an initial test, this article uses the classic D region exponential profiles of electron density and collision rate given by Volland. With even these simple profiles, our model of full-wave reflection of curved wavefronts captures some of the basic attributes of observed reflected waveforms recorded with the Los Alamos Sferic Array. A follow-on article will present a detailed comparison with data in order to retrieve ionospheric parameters.

  7. Calculation of Ion Velocity-Space Diffusion Coefficients Due to Full-Wave ICRF Fields in Toroidal Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, R. W.; Smirnov, A. P.; Ershov, N. M.; Bonoli, P.; Wright, J. C.; Jaeger, F.; Batchelor, D. B.; Berry, L. A.; Carter, M. D.; Smithe, D. N.

    2003-10-01

    Numerical calculations of bounce-averaged ion velocity-space diffusion coefficients resulting from full-wave code electromagnetic fields in tokamak geometry have been implemented by two methods: (1) appropriate averaging of velocity "kicks" during one transit of the torus cross-section calculated by direct numerical integration of the Lorentz equation of motion in tokamak and full-wave EM fields; and (2) local Fourier analysis of full-wave fields to obtain wavenumbers and polarizations, followed by analysis with a previously implemented ray-tracing/quasilinear-diffusion-coefficient calculation in the CQL3D collisional-quasilinear Fokker-Planck code. Diffusion coefficient results from the two approaches are compared. The diffusion coefficients are used in the FP code for calculation of the RF-driven nonthermal ion distributions.

  8. Full-wave model and numerical study of electromagnetic plane wave scattering by multilayered, fiber-based periodic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C. Y.; Lesselier, D.; Zhong, Y.

    2015-07-01

    The present work aims at building up a full-wave computational model of electromagnetic nondestructive testing of composite materials produced by stacking up dielectric slabs one over the other. In each such dielectric slab, a periodic array of infinite cylindrical fibers is embedded. Electromagnetic scattering of such a multilayered, fiber-based periodic composite is investigated here for an obliquely incident plane wave, the plane of incidence of which differs from the plane orthogonal to the fibers' axes. Full-wave field representations are given first by multipole and plane wave expansions. Mode matching at boundaries between layers then yields the propagating matrices, which are applied to connect reflection and transmission coefficients of the longitudinal field components. Power reflection and transmission coefficients are obtained from time-averaged Poynting vectors. Numerical experiments with comparisons with known results illustrate the accuracy of the model proposed.

  9. Monte Carlo orbit/full wave simulation of ion cyclotron resonance frequency wave damping on resonant ions in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, M.; Chan, V.S.; Pinsker, R.I.; Chiu, S.C.; Heidbrink, W.W.

    2005-07-15

    To investigate the experimentally observed interaction between beam ion species and fast Alfven wave (FW), a Monte Carlo code, ORBIT-RF [V. S. Chan, S. C. Chiu, and Y. A. Omelchenko, Phys. Plasmas 9, 501 (2002)], which solves the time-dependent Hamiltonian guiding center drift equations, has been upgraded to incorporate a steady-state neutral beam ion slowing-down distribution, a quasilinear high harmonic radio frequency diffusion operator and the wave fields from the two-dimensional ion cyclotron resonance frequency full wave code (TORIC4) [M. Brambilla, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 41, 1 (1999)]. Comparison of ORBIT-RF simulation of power absorption with fixed amplitudes of FW fields from TORIC4 power absorption calculation, which assumes Maxwellian plasma distributions, attains agreement within a factor of two. The experimentally measured enhanced neutron rate is reproduced to within 30% from ORBIT-RF simulation using a single dominant toroidal and poloidal wave number.

  10. Calculation of the Full Scattering Amplitude without Partial Wave Decomposition. 2; Inclusion of Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shertzer, Janine; Temkin, Aaron

    2004-01-01

    The development of a practical method of accurately calculating the full scattering amplitude, without making a partial wave decomposition is continued. The method is developed in the context of electron-hydrogen scattering, and here exchange is dealt with by considering e-H scattering in the static exchange approximation. The Schroedinger equation in this approximation can be simplified to a set of coupled integro-differential equations. The equations are solved numerically for the full scattering wave function. The scattering amplitude can most accurately be calculated from an integral expression for the amplitude; that integral can be formally simplified, and then evaluated using the numerically determined wave function. The results are essentially identical to converged partial wave results.

  11. Full-wave simulations on ultrashort-pulse reflectometry for helical plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hojo, H.; Fukuchi, A.; Itakura, A.; Mase, A.

    2004-10-01

    The full-wave simulations on ultrashort-pulse reflectometry for helical plasmas are studied based on the FDTD method in two dimensions. The propagation of an ultrashort-pulse electromagnetic wave is computed in helical plasmas modeled for the Large Helical Device magnetic field configuration. The density-profile reconstruction is performed by the Abel inversion method with the time delay data for the reflected waves from plasma, and it is shown that the reconstructed density profile coincides well with the original profile.

  12. Velocity-Space Diffusion Coefficients Due to Full-Wave ICRF Fields in Toroidal Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R.W.; Jaeger, F.; Berry, L.A.; Batchelor, D.B.; D'Azevedo, E.; Carter, M.D.; Ershov, N.M.; Smirnov, A.P.; Bonoli, P.; Wright, J.C.; Smithe, D.N.

    2005-09-26

    Jaeger et al. have calculated bounce-averaged QL diffusion coefficients from AORSA full-wave fields, based on non-Maxwellian distributions from CQL3D Fokker-Planck code. A zero banana-width approximation is employed. Complementing this calculation, a fully numerical calculation of ion velocity diffusion coefficients using the full-wave fields in numerical tokamak equilibria has been implemented to determine the finite orbit width effects. The un-approximated Lorentz equation of motion is integrated to obtain the change in velocity after one complete poloidal transit of the tokamak. Averaging velocity changes over initial starting gyro-phase and toroidal angle gives bounce-averaged diffusion coefficients. The coefficients from the full-wave and Lorentz orbit methods are compared for an ITER DT second harmonic tritium ICRF heating case: the diffusion coefficients are similar in magnitude but reveal substantial finite orbit effects.

  13. ICRF Mode Conversion Studies with Phase Contrast Imaging and Comparisons with Full-Wave Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujii, N.; Bonoli, P. T.; Lin, Y.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J.; Porkolab, M.; Jaeger, E. F.; Harvey, R. W.

    2011-12-23

    Waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) are widely used to heat toka-mak plasmas. In a multi-ion-species plasma, the FW converts to ion cyclotron waves (ICW) and ion Bernstein waves (IBW) around the ion-ion hybrid resonance (mode conversion). The mode converted wave is of interest as an actuator to optimise plasma performance through flow drive and current drive. Numerical simulations are essential to describe these processes accurately, and it is important that these simulation codes be validated. On Alcator C-Mod, direct measurements of the mode converted waves have been performed using Phase Contrast Imaging (PCI), which measures the line-integrated electron density fluctuations. The results were compared to full-wave simulations AORSA and TORIC. AORSA is coupled to a Fokker-Planck code CQL3D for self-consistent simulation of the wave electric field and the minority distribution function. The simulation results are compared to PCI measurements using synthetic diagnostic. The experiments were performed in D-H and D-{sup 3}He plasmas over a wide range of ion species concentrations. The simulations agreed well with the measurements in the strong absorption regime. However, the measured fluctuation intensity was smaller by 1-2 orders of magnitudes in the weakly abosorbing regime, and a realistic description of the plasma edge including dissipation and antenna geometry may be required in these cases.

  14. Compressive sensing of full wave field data for structural health monitoring applications.

    PubMed

    Di Ianni, Tommaso; De Marchi, Luca; Perelli, Alessandro; Marzani, Alessandro

    2015-07-01

    Numerous nondestructive evaluations and structural health monitoring approaches based on guide waves rely on analysis of wave fields recorded through scanning laser Doppler vibrometers (SLDVs) or ultrasonic scanners. The informative content which can be extracted from these inspections is relevant; however, the acquisition process is generally time-consuming, posing a limit in the applicability of such approaches. To reduce the acquisition time, we use a random sampling scheme based on compressive sensing (CS) to minimize the number of points at which the field is measured. The CS reconstruction performance is mostly influenced by the choice of a proper decomposition basis to exploit the sparsity of the acquired signal. Here, different bases have been tested to recover the guided waves wave field acquired on both an aluminum and a composite plate. Experimental results show that the proposed approach allows a reduction of the measurement locations required for accurate signal recovery to less than 34% of the original sampling grid.

  15. Full wave characterization of microstrip open end discontinuities patterned on anisotropic substrates using potential theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toncich, S. S.; Collin, R. E.; Bhasin, K. B.

    1993-01-01

    A technique for a full wave characterization of microstrip open end discontinuities fabricated on uniaxial anisotropic substrates using potential theory is presented. The substrate to be analyzed is enclosed in a cutoff waveguide, with the anisotropic axis aligned perpendicular to the air-dielectric interface. A full description of the sources on the microstrip line is included with edge conditions built in. Extention to other discontinuities is discussed.

  16. Monte-Carlo Orbit/Full Wave Simulation of Fast Alfven Wave (FW) Damping on Resonant Ions in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, M.; Chan, V.S.; Pinsker, R.I.; Tang, V.; Bonoli, P.; Wright, J.

    2005-09-26

    To simulate the resonant interaction of fast Alfven wave (FW) heating and Coulomb collisions on energetic ions, including finite orbit effects, a Monte-Carlo code ORBIT-RF has been coupled with a 2D full wave code TORIC4. ORBIT-RF solves Hamiltonian guiding center drift equations to follow trajectories of test ions in 2D axisymmetric numerical magnetic equilibrium under Coulomb collisions and ion cyclotron radio frequency quasi-linear heating. Monte-Carlo operators for pitch-angle scattering and drag calculate the changes of test ions in velocity and pitch angle due to Coulomb collisions. A rf-induced random walk model describing fast ion stochastic interaction with FW reproduces quasi-linear diffusion in velocity space. FW fields and its wave numbers from TORIC are passed on to ORBIT-RF to calculate perpendicular rf kicks of resonant ions valid for arbitrary cyclotron harmonics. ORBIT-RF coupled with TORIC using a single dominant toroidal and poloidal wave number has demonstrated consistency of simulations with recent DIII-D FW experimental results for interaction between injected neutral-beam ions and FW, including measured neutron enhancement and enhanced high energy tail. Comparison with C-Mod fundamental heating discharges also yielded reasonable agreement.

  17. An assessment of full wave effects on the propagation and absorption of lower hybrid wavesa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, J. C.; Bonoli, P. T.; Schmidt, A. E.; Phillips, C. K.; Valeo, E. J.; Harvey, R. W.; Brambilla, M. A.

    2009-07-01

    Lower hybrid (LH) waves (Ωci≪ω≪Ωce, where Ωi ,e≡Zi ,eeB/mi ,ec) have the attractive property of damping strongly via electron Landau resonance on relatively fast tail electrons and consequently are well-suited to driving current. Established modeling techniques use Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) expansions with self-consistent non-Maxwellian distributions. Higher order WKB expansions have shown some effects on the parallel wave number evolution and consequently on the damping due to diffraction [G. Pereverzev, Nucl. Fusion 32, 1091 (1991)]. A massively parallel version of the TORIC full wave electromagnetic field solver valid in the LH range of frequencies has been developed [J. C. Wright et al., Comm. Comp. Phys. 4, 545 (2008)] and coupled to an electron Fokker-Planck solver CQL3D [R. W. Harvey and M. G. McCoy, in Proceedings of the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting, Montreal, 1992 (IAEA Institute of Physics Publishing, Vienna, 1993), USDOC/NTIS Document No. DE93002962, pp. 489-526] in order to self-consistently evolve nonthermal electron distributions characteristic of LH current drive (LHCD) experiments in devices such as Alcator C-Mod and ITER (B0≈5 T, ne0≈1×1020 m-3). These simulations represent the first ever self-consistent simulations of LHCD utilizing both a full wave and Fokker-Planck calculation in toroidal geometry.

  18. Imaging of transient surface acoustic waves by full-field photorefractive interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Jichuan; Xu, Xiaodong E-mail: christ.glorieux@fys.kuleuven.be; Glorieux, Christ E-mail: christ.glorieux@fys.kuleuven.be; Matsuda, Osamu; Cheng, Liping

    2015-05-15

    A stroboscopic full-field imaging technique based on photorefractive interferometry for the visualization of rapidly changing surface displacement fields by using of a standard charge-coupled device (CCD) camera is presented. The photorefractive buildup of the space charge field during and after probe laser pulses is simulated numerically. The resulting anisotropic diffraction upon the refractive index grating and the interference between the polarization-rotated diffracted reference beam and the transmitted signal beam are modeled theoretically. The method is experimentally demonstrated by full-field imaging of the propagation of photoacoustically generated surface acoustic waves with a temporal resolution of nanoseconds. The surface acoustic wave propagation in a 23 mm × 17 mm area on an aluminum plate was visualized with 520 × 696 pixels of the CCD sensor, yielding a spatial resolution of 33 μm. The short pulse duration (8 ns) of the probe laser yields the capability of imaging SAWs with frequencies up to 60 MHz.

  19. Modeling of EAST ICRF antenna performance using the full-wave code TORIC

    SciTech Connect

    Edlund, E. M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Porkolab, M.; Wukitch, S. J.

    2015-12-10

    Access to advanced operating regimes in the EAST tokamak will require a combination of electron-cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH), neutral beam injection (NBI) and ion cyclotron range frequency heating (ICRF), with the addition of lower-hybrid current drive (LHCD) for current profile control. Prior experiments at the EAST tokamak facility have shown relatively weak response of the plasma temperature to application of ICRF heating, with typical coupled power about 2 MW out of 12 MW source. The launched spectrum, at n{sub φ} = 34 for 0-π -0-π phasing and 27 MHz, is largely inaccessible at line-averaged densities of approximately 2 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}. However, with variable antenna phasing and frequency, this system has considerable latitude to explore different heating schemes. To develop an ICRF actuator control model, we have used the full-wave code TORIC to explore the physics of ICRF wave propagation in EAST. The results presented from this study use a spectrum analysis using a superposition of n{sub φ} spanning −50 to +50. The low density regime typical of EAST plasmas results in a perpendicular wavelength comparable to the minor radius which results in global cavity resonance effects and eigenmode formation when the single-pass absorption is low. This behavior indicates that improved performance can be attained by lowering the peak of the k{sub ||} spectrum by using π/3 phasing of the 4-strap antenna. Based on prior studies conducted at Alcator C-Mod, this phasing is also expected to have the advantage of nearly divergence-free box currents, which should result in reduced levels of impurity production. Significant enhancements of the loading resistance may be achieved by using low k{sub ||} phasing and a combination of magnetic field and frequency to vary the location of the resonance and mode conversion regions. TORIC calculations indicate that the significant power may be channeled to the electrons and deuterium majority. We expect that

  20. Modeling of EAST ICRF antenna performance using the full-wave code TORIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edlund, E. M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Porkolab, M.; Wukitch, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Access to advanced operating regimes in the EAST tokamak will require a combination of electron-cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH), neutral beam injection (NBI) and ion cyclotron range frequency heating (ICRF), with the addition of lower-hybrid current drive (LHCD) for current profile control. Prior experiments at the EAST tokamak facility have shown relatively weak response of the plasma temperature to application of ICRF heating, with typical coupled power about 2 MW out of 12 MW source. The launched spectrum, at nφ = 34 for 0-π -0-π phasing and 27 MHz, is largely inaccessible at line-averaged densities of approximately 2 × 1019 m-3. However, with variable antenna phasing and frequency, this system has considerable latitude to explore different heating schemes. To develop an ICRF actuator control model, we have used the full-wave code TORIC to explore the physics of ICRF wave propagation in EAST. The results presented from this study use a spectrum analysis using a superposition of nφ spanning -50 to +50. The low density regime typical of EAST plasmas results in a perpendicular wavelength comparable to the minor radius which results in global cavity resonance effects and eigenmode formation when the single-pass absorption is low. This behavior indicates that improved performance can be attained by lowering the peak of the k|| spectrum by using π/3 phasing of the 4-strap antenna. Based on prior studies conducted at Alcator C-Mod, this phasing is also expected to have the advantage of nearly divergence-free box currents, which should result in reduced levels of impurity production. Significant enhancements of the loading resistance may be achieved by using low k|| phasing and a combination of magnetic field and frequency to vary the location of the resonance and mode conversion regions. TORIC calculations indicate that the significant power may be channeled to the electrons and deuterium majority. We expect that implementation of these recommendations in EAST

  1. Nonlinear Fourier analysis with cnoidal waves

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, A.R.

    1996-12-31

    Fourier analysis is one of the most useful tools to the ocean engineer. The approach allows one to analyze wave data and thereby to describe a dynamical motion in terms of a linear superposition of ordinary sine waves. Furthermore, the Fourier technique allows one to compute the response function of a fixed or floating structure: each sine wave in the wave or force spectrum yields a sine wave in the response spectrum. The counting of fatigue cycles is another area where the predictable oscillations of sine waves yield procedures for the estimation of the fatigue life of structures. The ocean environment, however, is a source of a number of nonlinear effects which must also be included in structure design. Nonlinearities in ocean waves deform the sinusoidal shapes into other kinds of waves such as the Stokes wave, cnoidal wave or solitary wave. A key question is: Does there exist a generalization of linear Fourier analysis which uses nonlinear basis functions rather than the familiar sine waves? Herein addresses the dynamics of nonlinear wave motion in shallow water where the basis functions are cnoidal waves and discuss nonlinear Fourier analysis in terms of a linear superposition of cnoidal waves plus their mutual nonlinear interactions. He gives a number of simple examples of nonlinear Fourier wave motion and then analyzes an actual surface-wave time series obtained on an offshore platform in the Adriatic Sea. Finally, he briefly discusses application of the cnoidal wave spectral approach to the computation of the frequency response function of a floating vessel. The results given herein will prove useful in future engineering studies for the design of fixed, floating and complaint offshore structures.

  2. Three dimensional full-wave nonlinear acoustic simulations: Applications to ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinton, Gianmarco

    2015-10-01

    Characterization of acoustic waves that propagate nonlinearly in an inhomogeneous medium has significant applications to diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound. The generation of an ultrasound image of human tissue is based on the complex physics of acoustic wave propagation: diffraction, reflection, scattering, frequency dependent attenuation, and nonlinearity. The nonlinearity of wave propagation is used to the advantage of diagnostic scanners that use the harmonic components of the ultrasonic signal to improve the resolution and penetration of clinical scanners. One approach to simulating ultrasound images is to make approximations that can reduce the physics to systems that have a low computational cost. Here a maximalist approach is taken and the full three dimensional wave physics is simulated with finite differences. This paper demonstrates how finite difference simulations for the nonlinear acoustic wave equation can be used to generate physically realistic two and three dimensional ultrasound images anywhere in the body. A specific intercostal liver imaging scenario for two cases: with the ribs in place, and with the ribs removed. This configuration provides an imaging scenario that cannot be performed in vivo but that can test the influence of the ribs on image quality. Several imaging properties are studied, in particular the beamplots, the spatial coherence at the transducer surface, the distributed phase aberration, and the lesion detectability for imaging at the fundamental and harmonic frequencies. The results indicate, counterintuitively, that at the fundamental frequency the beamplot improves due to the apodization effect of the ribs but at the same time there is more degradation from reverberation clutter. At the harmonic frequency there is significantly less improvement in the beamplot and also significantly less degradation from reverberation. It is shown that even though simulating the full propagation physics is computationally challenging it

  3. Three dimensional full-wave nonlinear acoustic simulations: Applications to ultrasound imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Pinton, Gianmarco

    2015-10-28

    Characterization of acoustic waves that propagate nonlinearly in an inhomogeneous medium has significant applications to diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound. The generation of an ultrasound image of human tissue is based on the complex physics of acoustic wave propagation: diffraction, reflection, scattering, frequency dependent attenuation, and nonlinearity. The nonlinearity of wave propagation is used to the advantage of diagnostic scanners that use the harmonic components of the ultrasonic signal to improve the resolution and penetration of clinical scanners. One approach to simulating ultrasound images is to make approximations that can reduce the physics to systems that have a low computational cost. Here a maximalist approach is taken and the full three dimensional wave physics is simulated with finite differences. This paper demonstrates how finite difference simulations for the nonlinear acoustic wave equation can be used to generate physically realistic two and three dimensional ultrasound images anywhere in the body. A specific intercostal liver imaging scenario for two cases: with the ribs in place, and with the ribs removed. This configuration provides an imaging scenario that cannot be performed in vivo but that can test the influence of the ribs on image quality. Several imaging properties are studied, in particular the beamplots, the spatial coherence at the transducer surface, the distributed phase aberration, and the lesion detectability for imaging at the fundamental and harmonic frequencies. The results indicate, counterintuitively, that at the fundamental frequency the beamplot improves due to the apodization effect of the ribs but at the same time there is more degradation from reverberation clutter. At the harmonic frequency there is significantly less improvement in the beamplot and also significantly less degradation from reverberation. It is shown that even though simulating the full propagation physics is computationally challenging it

  4. Acoustic modal analysis of a full-scale annular combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karchmer, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    An acoustic modal decomposition of the measured pressure field in a full scale annular combustor installed in a ducted test rig is described. The modal analysis, utilizing a least squares optimization routine, is facilitated by the assumption of randomly occurring pressure disturbances which generate equal amplitude clockwise and counter-clockwise pressure waves, and the assumption of statistical independence between modes. These assumptions are fully justified by the measured cross spectral phases between the various measurement points. The resultant modal decomposition indicates that higher order modes compose the dominant portion of the combustor pressure spectrum in the range of frequencies of interest in core noise studies. A second major finding is that, over the frequency range of interest, each individual mode which is present exists in virtual isolation over significant portions of the spectrum. Finally, a comparison between the present results and a limited amount of data obtained in an operating turbofan engine with the same combustor is made. The comparison is sufficiently favorable to warrant the conclusion that the structure of the combustor pressure field is preserved between the component facility and the engine.

  5. Full waveform inversion of marine reflection data in the plane-wave domain

    SciTech Connect

    Minkoff, S.E.; Symes, W.W.

    1997-03-01

    Full waveform inversion of a p-{tau} marine data set from the Gulf of Mexico provides estimates of the long-wavelength P-wave background velocity, anisotropic seismic source, and three high-frequency elastic parameter reflectivities that explain 70% of the total seismic data and 90% of the data in an interval around the gas sand target. The forward simulator is based on a plane-wave viscoelastic model for P-wave propagation and primary reflections in a layered earth. Differential semblance optimization, a variant of output least-squares inversion, successfully estimates the nonlinear P-wave background velocity and linear reflectivities. Once an accurate velocity is estimated, output least-squares inversion reestimates the reflectivities and an anisotropic seismic source simultaneously. The viscoelastic model predicts the amplitude-versus-angle trend in the data more accurately than does an elastic model. Simultaneous inversion for reflectivities and source explains substantially more of the actual data than does inversion for reflectivities with fixed source from an air-gun modeler. The best reflectivity estimates conform to widely accepted lithologic relationships and closely match the filtered well logs.

  6. Visco-elastic controlled-source full waveform inversion without surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paschke, Marco; Krause, Martin; Bleibinhaus, Florian

    2016-04-01

    We developed a frequency-domain visco-elastic full waveform inversion for onshore seismic experiments with topography. The forward modeling is based on a finite-difference time-domain algorithm by Robertsson that uses the image-method to ensure a stress-free condition at the surface. The time-domain data is Fourier-transformed at every point in the model space during the forward modeling for a given set of frequencies. The motivation for this approach is the reduced amount of memory when computing kernels, and the straightforward implementation of the multiscale approach. For the inversion, we calculate the Frechet derivative matrix explicitly, and we implement a Levenberg-Marquardt scheme that allows for computing the resolution matrix. To reduce the size of the Frechet derivative matrix, and to stabilize the inversion, an adapted inverse mesh is used. The node spacing is controlled by the velocity distribution and the chosen frequencies. To focus the inversion on body waves (P, P-coda, and S) we mute the surface waves from the data. Consistent spatiotemporal weighting factors are applied to the wavefields during the Fourier transform to obtain the corresponding kernels. We test our code with a synthetic study using the Marmousi model with arbitrary topography. This study also demonstrates the importance of topography and muting surface waves in controlled-source full waveform inversion.

  7. Two-dimensional full-wave code for reflectometry simulations in TJ-II

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco, E.; Heuraux, S.; Estrada, T.; Sanchez, J.; Cupido, L.

    2004-10-01

    A two-dimensional full-wave code in the extraordinary mode has been developed to simulate reflectometry in TJ-II. The code allows us to study the measurement capabilities of the future correlation reflectometer that is being installed in TJ-II. The code uses the finite-difference-time-domain technique to solve Maxwell's equations in the presence of density fluctuations. Boundary conditions are implemented by a perfectly matched layer to simulate free propagation. To assure the stability of the code, the current equations are solved by a fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. Density fluctuation parameters such as fluctuation level, wave numbers, and correlation lengths are extrapolated from those measured at the plasma edge using Langmuir probes. In addition, realistic plasma shape, density profile, magnetic configuration, and experimental setup of TJ-II are included to determine the plasma regimes in which accurate information may be obtained.

  8. Calculation of the Full Scattering Amplitude without Partial Wave Decomposition II: Inclusion of Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shertzer, Janine; Temkin, A.

    2003-01-01

    As is well known, the full scattering amplitude can be expressed as an integral involving the complete scattering wave function. We have shown that the integral can be simplified and used in a practical way. Initial application to electron-hydrogen scattering without exchange was highly successful. The Schrodinger equation (SE), which can be reduced to a 2d partial differential equation (pde), was solved using the finite element method. We have now included exchange by solving the resultant SE, in the static exchange approximation, which is reducible to a pair of coupled pde's. The resultant scattering amplitudes, both singlet and triplet, calculated as a function of energy are in excellent agreement with converged partial wave results.

  9. Full-wave modeling of the O-X mode conversion in the Pegasus toroidal experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhn, A.; Jacquot, J.; Bongard, M. W.; Gallian, S.; Hinson, E. T.; Volpe, F. A.

    2011-08-01

    The ordinary-extraordinary (O-X) mode conversion is modeled with the aid of a 2D full-wave code in the Pegasus toroidal experiment as a function of the launch angles. It is shown how the shape of the plasma density profile in front of the antenna can significantly influence the mode conversion efficiency and, thus, the generation of electron Bernstein waves (EBWs). It is therefore desirable to control the density profile in front of the antenna for successful operation of an EBW heating and current drive system. On the other hand, the conversion efficiency is shown to be resilient to vertical displacements of the plasma as large as ±10 cm.

  10. Wavefield Analysis of Rayleigh Waves for Near-Surface Shear-Wave Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Chong

    2011-12-01

    Shear (S)-wave velocity is a key property of near-surface materials and is the fundamental parameter for many environmental and engineering geophysical studies. Directly acquiring accurate S-wave velocities from a seismic shot gather is usually difficult due to the poor signal-to-noise ratio. The relationship between Rayleigh-wave phase velocity and frequency has been widely utilized to estimate the S-wave velocities in shallow layers using the multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) technique. Hence, Rayleigh wave is a main focus of most near-surface seismic studies. Conventional dispersion analysis of Rayleigh waves assumes that the earth is laterally homogeneous and the free surface is horizontally flat, which limits the application of surface-wave methods to only 1D earth models or very smooth 2D models. In this study I extend the analysis of Rayleigh waves to a 2D domain by employing the 2D full elastic wave equation so as to address the lateral heterogeneity problem. I first discuss the accurate simulation of Rayleigh waves through finite-difference method and the boundary absorbing problems in the numerical modeling with a high Poisson's ratio (> 0.4), which is a unique near-surface problem. Then I develop an improved vacuum formulation to generate accurate synthetic seismograms focusing on Rayleigh waves in presence of surface topography and internal discontinuities. With these solutions to forward modeling of Rayleigh waves, I evaluate the influence of surface topography to conventional dispersion analysis in 2D and 3D domains by numerical investigations. At last I examine the feasibility of inverting waveforms of Rayleigh waves for shallow S-wave velocities using a genetic algorithm. Results of the study show that Rayleigh waves can be accurately simulated in near surface using the improved vacuum formulation. Spurious reflections during the numerical modeling can be efficiently suppressed by the simplified multiaxial perfectly matched layers. The

  11. Full skin quantitative optical coherence elastography achieved by combining vibration and surface acoustic wave methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunhui; Guan, Guangying; Huang, Zhihong; Wang, Ruikang K.; Nabi, Ghulam

    2015-03-01

    By combining with the phase sensitive optical coherence tomography (PhS-OCT), vibration and surface acoustic wave (SAW) methods have been reported to provide elastography of skin tissue respectively. However, neither of these two methods can provide the elastography in full skin depth in current systems. This paper presents a feasibility study on an optical coherence elastography method which combines both vibration and SAW in order to give the quantitative mechanical properties of skin tissue with full depth range, including epidermis, dermis and subcutaneous fat. Experiments are carried out on layered tissue mimicking phantoms and in vivo human forearm and palm skin. A ring actuator generates vibration while a line actuator were used to excited SAWs. A PhS-OCT system is employed to provide the ultrahigh sensitive measurement of the generated waves. The experimental results demonstrate that by the combination of vibration and SAW method the full skin bulk mechanical properties can be quantitatively measured and further the elastography can be obtained with a sensing depth from ~0mm to ~4mm. This method is promising to apply in clinics where the quantitative elasticity of localized skin diseases is needed to aid the diagnosis and treatment.

  12. Benchmarking the OLGA lower-hybrid full-wave code for a future integration with ALOHA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preinhaelter, J.; Hillairet, J.; Urban, J.

    2014-02-01

    The ALOHA [1] code is frequently used as a standard to solve the coupling of lower hybrid grills to the plasma. To remove its limitations on the linear density profile, homogeneous magnetic field and the fully decoupled fast and slow waves in the determination of the plasma surface admittance, we exploit the recently developed efficient full wave code OLGA [2]. There is simple connection between these two codes, namely, the plasma surface admittances used in ALOHA-2D can be expressed as the slowly varying parts of the coupling element integrands in OLGA and the ALOHA coupling elements are then linear combinations of OLGA coupling elements. We developed AOLGA module (subset of OLGA) for ALOHA. An extensive benchmark has been performed. ALOHA admittances differ from AOLGA results mainly for N∥in the inaccessible region but the coupling elements differ only slightly. We compare OLGA and ALOHA for a simple 10-waveguide grill operating at 3.7 GHz and the linear density profile as it is used in ALOHA. Hence we can detect pure effects of fast and slow waves coupling on grill efficiency. The effects are weak for parameters near the optimum coupling and confirm the ALOHA results validity. We also compare the effect of the plasma surface density and the density gradient on the grill coupling determined by OLGA and ALOHA.

  13. Shortcut to adiabaticity in full-wave optics for ultra-compact waveguide junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Valle, Giuseppe; Perozziello, Gerardo; Longhi, Stefano

    2016-09-01

    We extend the concept of shortcuts to adiabaticity to full-wave optics and provide an application to the design of an ultra-compact waveguide junction. In particular, we introduce a procedure allowing one to synthesize a purely dielectric optical potential that precisely compensates for non-adiabatic losses of the transverse electric fundamental mode in any (sufficiently regular) two-dimensional waveguide junction. Our results are corroborated by finite-element method numerical simulations in a Pöschl–Teller waveguide mode expander.

  14. Full-wave modeling of the O-X mode conversion in the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhn, A.; Jacquot, J.; Bongard, M. W.; Gallian, S.; Hinson, E. T.; Volpe, F. A.

    2011-12-01

    The potential of an EBW heating scheme via the O—X—B mode conversion scenarios has been investigated for the PEGASUS toroidal experiment. With the 2D full-wave code IPF-FDMC the O—X conversion has been modeled as a function of the poloidal and toroidal injection angles for a microwave frequency of 2.45 GHz. Based on preliminary Langmuir probe measurements in the mode conversion layer, different density profiles have been also included in the simulations. A maximum mode conversion efficiency of approximately 80 % has been found, making EBW heating an attractive heating scheme for PEGASUS.

  15. Measurements of ion cyclotron range of frequencies mode converted wave intensity with phase contrast imaging in Alcator C-Mod and comparison with full-wave simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujii, N.; Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Lin, Y.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J.; Jaeger, E. F.; Green, D. L.; Harvey, R. W.

    2012-08-01

    Radio frequency waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) are widely used to heat tokamak plasmas. In ICRF heating schemes involving multiple ion species, the launched fast waves convert to ion cyclotron waves or ion Bernstein waves at the two-ion hybrid resonances. Mode converted waves are of interest as actuators to optimise plasma performance through current drive and flow drive. In order to describe these processes accurately in a realistic tokamak geometry, numerical simulations are essential, and it is important that these codes be validated against experiment. In this study, the mode converted waves were measured using a phase contrast imaging technique in D-H and D-3He plasmas. The measured mode converted wave intensity in the D-3He mode conversion regime was found to be a factor of ˜50 weaker than the full-wave predictions. The discrepancy was reduced in the hydrogen minority heating regime, where mode conversion is weaker.

  16. Imaging of transient surface acoustic waves by full-field photorefractive interferometry.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jichuan; Xu, Xiaodong; Glorieux, Christ; Matsuda, Osamu; Cheng, Liping

    2015-05-01

    A stroboscopic full-field imaging technique based on photorefractive interferometry for the visualization of rapidly changing surface displacement fields by using of a standard charge-coupled device (CCD) camera is presented. The photorefractive buildup of the space charge field during and after probe laser pulses is simulated numerically. The resulting anisotropic diffraction upon the refractive index grating and the interference between the polarization-rotated diffracted reference beam and the transmitted signal beam are modeled theoretically. The method is experimentally demonstrated by full-field imaging of the propagation of photoacoustically generated surface acoustic waves with a temporal resolution of nanoseconds. The surface acoustic wave propagation in a 23 mm × 17 mm area on an aluminum plate was visualized with 520 × 696 pixels of the CCD sensor, yielding a spatial resolution of 33 μm. The short pulse duration (8 ns) of the probe laser yields the capability of imaging SAWs with frequencies up to 60 MHz. PMID:26026514

  17. Further SEASAT SAR coastal ocean wave analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasischke, E. S.; Shuchman, R. A.; Meadows, G. A.; Jackson, P. L.; Tseng, Y.

    1981-01-01

    Analysis techniques used to exploit SEASAT synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data of gravity waves are discussed and the SEASAT SAR's ability to monitor large scale variations in gravity wave fields in both deep and shallow water is evaluated. The SAR analysis techniques investigated included motion compensation adjustments and the semicausal model for spectral analysis of SAR wave data. It was determined that spectra generated from fast Fourier transform analysis (FFT) of SAR wave data were not significantly altered when either range telerotation adjustments or azimuth focus shifts were used during processing of the SAR signal histories, indicating that SEASAT imagery of gravity waves is not significantly improved or degraded by motion compensation adjustments. Evaluation of the semicausal (SC) model using SEASAT SAR data from Rev. 974 indicates that the SC spectral estimates were not significantly better than the FFT results.

  18. Statistical Analysis of Bursty Langmuir Waves and Coincident VLF Waves in the Cusp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dombrowski, M. P.; Labelle, J. W.; Rowland, D. E.; Pfaff, R. F.; Kletzing, C.

    2012-12-01

    Satellite and rocket experiments in the cusp ionosphere have measured Langmuir wave bursts of duration 10's to 100's of ms. The waves show a complex frequency structure with multiple peaks separated by <1 to >50 kHz. This structure has been interpreted as the result of the superposition of multiple Langmuir normal-mode waves, with the resultant modulation producing a beat pattern between waves with ~10 kHz frequency differences. The multiple normal-mode waves could be generated either through wave-wave interactions involving VLF waves, or could be excited independently through linear instability. The Twin Rockets to Investigate Cusp Electrodynamics (TRICE) high-flyer was launched 10 Dec 2007 at 0900 from the Andoya Rocket Range, Norway, reaching an apogee of 1145 km. The payload included an ensemble of electric-field wave instruments. Dartmouth College supplied an HF receiver with double probes parallel to B_0, separated by 0.3 m, and the NASA GSFC supplied a VLF receiver with double probes perpendicular to B_0, separated by 3 m. The TRICE high-flyer encountered regions of strong Langmuir wave activity throughout the flight, including ~1,000 discrete Langmuir wave bursts [LaBelle et al., 2010]. Close analysis of a 10-second interval showed no correlation between bursty Langmuir waves and VLF emissions; however, analysis of the full flight shows some periods of correlation. We examine a longer interval of TRICE-HIGH data to address the questions: What fraction of the approximately 1000 Langmuir bursts are accompanied by VLF wave power? For those that are, what fraction have coincident VLF waves with peak frequencies corresponding to normal-mode frequency differences in the Langmuir wave spectrum? This study will help distinguish between the theories of Langmuir modulation. A high degree of correlation favors the three-wave hypothesis, whereas a low degree of correlation favors the independent linear excitation of the Langmuir modes. Reference LaBelle, J., I. H

  19. Full Wave Parallel Code for Modeling RF Fields in Hot Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Joseph; Svidzinski, Vladimir; Evstatiev, Evstati; Galkin, Sergei; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2015-11-01

    FAR-TECH, Inc. is developing a suite of full wave RF codes in hot plasmas. It is based on a formulation in configuration space with grid adaptation capability. The conductivity kernel (which includes a nonlocal dielectric response) is calculated by integrating the linearized Vlasov equation along unperturbed test particle orbits. For Tokamak applications a 2-D version of the code is being developed. Progress of this work will be reported. This suite of codes has the following advantages over existing spectral codes: 1) It utilizes the localized nature of plasma dielectric response to the RF field and calculates this response numerically without approximations. 2) It uses an adaptive grid to better resolve resonances in plasma and antenna structures. 3) It uses an efficient sparse matrix solver to solve the formulated linear equations. The linear wave equation is formulated using two approaches: for cold plasmas the local cold plasma dielectric tensor is used (resolving resonances by particle collisions), while for hot plasmas the conductivity kernel is calculated. Work is supported by the U.S. DOE SBIR program.

  20. Full-wave modeling of therapeutic ultrasound: Nonlinear ultrasound propagation in ideal fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginter, Siegfried; Liebler, Marko; Steiger, Eckard; Dreyer, Thomas; Riedlinger, Rainer E.

    2002-05-01

    The number of applications of high-intense, focused ultrasound for therapeutic purposes is growing. Besides established applications like lithotripsy, new applications like ultrasound in orthopedics or for the treatment of tumors arise. Therefore, new devices have to be developed which provide pressure waveforms and distributions in the focal zone specifically for the application. In this paper, a nonlinear full-wave simulation model is presented which predicts the therapeutically important characteristics of the generated ultrasound field for a given transducer and initial pressure signal. A nonlinear acoustic approximation in conservation form of the original hydrodynamic equations for ideal fluids rather than a wave equation provides the base for the nonlinear model. The equations are implemented with an explicit high-order finite-difference time-domain algorithm. The necessary coefficients are derived according to the dispersion relation preserving method. Simulation results are presented for two different therapeutic transducers: a self-focusing piezoelectric and one with reflector focusing. The computational results are validated by comparison with analytical solutions and measurements. An agreement of about 10% is observed between the simulation and experimental results.

  1. Development of a GPU-Accelerated 3-D Full-Wave Code for Reflectometry Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuther, K. S.; Kubota, S.; Feibush, E.; Johnson, I.

    2013-10-01

    1-D and 2-D full-wave codes used as synthetic diagnostics in microwave reflectometry are standard tools for understanding electron density fluctuations in fusion plasmas. The accuracy of the code depends on how well the wave properties along the ignored dimensions can be pre-specified or neglected. In a toroidal magnetic geometry, such assumptions are never strictly correct and ray tracing has shown that beam propagation is inherently a 3-D problem. Previously, we reported on the application of GPGPU's (General-Purpose computing on Graphics Processing Units) to a 2-D FDTD (Finite-Difference Time-Domain) code ported to utilize the parallel processing capabilities of the NVIDIA C870 and C1060. Here, we report on the development of a FDTD code for 3-D problems. Initial tests will use NVIDIA's M2070 GPU and concentrate on the launching and propagation of Gaussian beams in free space. If available, results using a plasma target will also be presented. Performance will be compared with previous generations of GPGPU cards as well as with NVIDIA's newest K20C GPU. Finally, the possibility of utilizing multiple GPGPU cards in a cluster environment or in a single node will also be discussed. Supported by U.S. DoE Grants DE-FG02-99-ER54527 and DE-AC02-09CH11466 and the DoE National Undergraduate Fusion Fellowship.

  2. Spin waves in full-polarized state of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya helimagnets: Small-angle neutron scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, S. V.; Sukhanov, A. S.; Altynbaev, E. V.; Siegfried, S.-A.; Heinemann, A.; Kizhe, P.; Maleyev, S. V.

    2015-12-01

    We develop the technique to study the spin-wave dynamics of the full-polarized state of the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya helimagnets by polarized small-angle neutron scattering. We have experimentally proven that the spin-waves dispersion in this state has the anisotropic form. We show that the neutron scattering image displays a circle with a certain radius which is centered at the momentum transfer corresponding to the helix wave vector in helimagnetic phase ks, which is oriented along the applied magnetic field H . The radius of this circle is directly related to the spin-wave stiffness of this system. This scattering depends on the neutron polarization showing the one-handed nature of the spin waves in Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya helimagnets in the full-polarized phase. We show that the spin-wave stiffness A for MnSi helimagnet decreased twice as the temperature increases from zero to the critical temperature Tc.

  3. Analysis of guided wave propagation in a tapered composite panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandowski, Tomasz; Malinowski, Pawel; Moll, Jochen; Radzienski, Maciej; Ostachowicz, Wieslaw

    2015-03-01

    Many studies have been published in recent years on Lamb wave propagation in isotropic and (multi-layered) anisotropic structures. In this paper, adiabatic wave propagation phenomenon in a tapered composite panel made out of glass fiber reinforced polymers (GFRP) will be considered. Such structural elements are often used e.g. in wind turbine blades and aerospace structures. Here, the wave velocity of each wave mode does not only change with frequency and the direction of wave propagation. It further changes locally due to the varying cross-section of the GFRP panel. Elastic waves were excited using a piezoelectric transducer. Full wave-field measurements using scanning Laser Doppler vibrometry have been performed. This approach allows the detailed analysis of elastic wave propagation in composite specimen with linearly changing thickness. It will be demonstrated here experimentally, that the wave velocity changes significantly due to the tapered geometry of the structure. Hence, this work motivates the theoretical and experimental analysis of adiabatic mode propagation for the purpose of Non-Destructive Testing and Structural Health Monitoring.

  4. 2D full wave modeling for a synthetic Doppler backscattering diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Hillesheim, J. C.; Schmitz, L.; Kubota, S.; Rhodes, T. L.; Carter, T. A.; Holland, C.

    2012-10-15

    Doppler backscattering (DBS) is a plasma diagnostic used in tokamaks and other magnetic confinement devices to measure the fluctuation level of intermediate wavenumber (k{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub s}{approx} 1) density fluctuations and the lab frame propagation velocity of turbulence. Here, a synthetic DBS diagnostic is described, which has been used for comparisons between measurements in the DIII-D tokamak and predictions from nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. To estimate the wavenumber range to which a Gaussian beam would be sensitive, a ray tracing code and a 2D finite difference, time domain full wave code are used. Experimental density profiles and magnetic geometry are used along with the experimental antenna and beam characteristics. An example of the effect of the synthetic diagnostic on the output of a nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation is presented.

  5. 2D full wave modeling for a synthetic Doppler backscattering diagnostica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillesheim, J. C.; Holland, C.; Schmitz, L.; Kubota, S.; Rhodes, T. L.; Carter, T. A.

    2012-10-01

    Doppler backscattering (DBS) is a plasma diagnostic used in tokamaks and other magnetic confinement devices to measure the fluctuation level of intermediate wavenumber (kθρs ˜ 1) density fluctuations and the lab frame propagation velocity of turbulence. Here, a synthetic DBS diagnostic is described, which has been used for comparisons between measurements in the DIII-D tokamak and predictions from nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. To estimate the wavenumber range to which a Gaussian beam would be sensitive, a ray tracing code and a 2D finite difference, time domain full wave code are used. Experimental density profiles and magnetic geometry are used along with the experimental antenna and beam characteristics. An example of the effect of the synthetic diagnostic on the output of a nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation is presented.

  6. Frequency-domain seismic-wave modeling, migration, and full-waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kun

    In the dissertation, I have proposed and developed new approaches for seismic modeling, migration, and full-waveform inversion in the frequency domain. For 3D scalar-wave simulations in the frequency-space domain, we develop a fourth-order compact finite-difference (FD) form with a high-order spatial accuracy (4-5 grid points per shortest wavelength), and optimal one-way wave-equation (OWWE) absorbing boundary conditions (ABCs) with only one outer layer; these strategies greatly reduce the total number of the model grid points, and thus the overall computational cost. For reverse-time migration (RTM) using the cross-correlation imaging condition in the time domain, extra disk storage or wavefield simulations are required to make the forward propagated source and backward-propagated receiver wavefields available at the same time. We propose a new method to implement RTM in the frequency domain. Using virtual sources for the backward propagation of the receiver wavefield, we can straightforwardly implement the excitation-time and cross-correlation imaging conditions at each frequency without any disk storage or I/O and with complete spatial coverage of the migrated images. As both time and frequency domains have their own advantages for the inversion, we implement a hybrid scheme to combine both advantages in elastic full-waveform inversion (FWI). We simulate the wavefields using a time-domain high-precision finite-element (FE) modeling parallelized over shots with the message passing interface (MPI), and implement the inversion in the frequency domain via Fourier transform. Thus, we can easily apply both frequency-selection and time-windowing techniques to reduce the nonlinearity in inversion. To decouple different parameters in elastic FWI, we propose a new multi-steplength gradient approach to assign individual weights separately for each parameter gradient, and search for an optimal steplength along the composite gradient direction. As variations in the results

  7. A Survey Version of Full-Profile Conjoint Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chrzan, Keith

    Two studies were conducted to test the viability of a survey version of full-profile conjoint analysis. Conjoint analysis describes a variety of analytic techniques for measuring subjects'"utilities," or preferences for the individual attributes or levels of attributes that constitute objects under study. The first study compared the developed…

  8. Full-Trajectory Diagnosis of Laser-Driven Radiative Blast Waves in Search of Thermal Plasma Instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, A. S.; Gumbrell, E. T.; Lazarus, J.; Hohenberger, M.; Robinson, J. S.; Smith, R. A.; Plant, T. J. A.; Symes, D. R.; Dunne, M.

    2008-02-08

    Experimental investigations into the dynamics of cylindrical, laser-driven, high-Mach-number shocks are used to study the thermal cooling instability predicted to occur in astrophysical radiative blast waves. A streaked Schlieren technique measures the full blast-wave trajectory on a single-shot basis, which is key for observing shock velocity oscillations. Electron density profiles and deceleration parameters associated with radiative blast waves were recorded, enabling the calculation of important blast-wave parameters including the fraction of radiated energy, {epsilon}, as a function of time for comparison with radiation-hydrodynamics simulations.

  9. Full-trajectory diagnosis of laser-driven radiative blast waves in search of thermal plasma instabilities.

    PubMed

    Moore, A S; Gumbrell, E T; Lazarus, J; Hohenberger, M; Robinson, J S; Smith, R A; Plant, T J A; Symes, D R; Dunne, M

    2008-02-01

    Experimental investigations into the dynamics of cylindrical, laser-driven, high-Mach-number shocks are used to study the thermal cooling instability predicted to occur in astrophysical radiative blast waves. A streaked Schlieren technique measures the full blast-wave trajectory on a single-shot basis, which is key for observing shock velocity oscillations. Electron density profiles and deceleration parameters associated with radiative blast waves were recorded, enabling the calculation of important blast-wave parameters including the fraction of radiated energy, epsilon, as a function of time for comparison with radiation-hydrodynamics simulations. PMID:18352379

  10. Newtonian-noise cancellation in full-tensor gravitational-wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harms, Jan; Paik, Ho Jung

    2015-07-01

    Terrestrial gravity noise, also known as Newtonian noise, produced by ambient seismic and infrasound fields will pose one of the main sensitivity limitations in low-frequency, ground-based, gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. It is estimated that this noise foreground needs to be suppressed by about 3-5 orders of magnitude in the frequency band 10 mHz to 1 Hz, which will be extremely challenging. In this article, we present a new approach that greatly facilitates cancellation of gravity noise in full-tensor GW detectors. The method uses optimal combinations of tensor channels and environmental sensors such as seismometers and microphones to reduce gravity noise. It makes explicit use of the direction of propagation of a GW and can, therefore, either be implemented in directional searches for GWs or in observations of known sources. We show that by using the extra strain channels in full-tensor GW detectors and a modest number of environmental sensors, the Newtonian-noise foreground can be reduced by a few orders of magnitude independent of the GW direction of propagation.

  11. Determination of medium electrical properties through full-wave modelling of frequency domain reflectrometry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Frédéric; Lambot, Sébastien

    2015-04-01

    Accurate knowledge of the shallow soil properties is of prime importance in agricultural, hydrological and environmental engineering. During the last decade, numerous geophysical techniques, either invasive or resorting to proximal or remote sensing, have been developed and applied for quantitative characterization of soil properties. Amongst them, time domain reflectrometry (TDR) and frequency domain reflectometry (FDR) are recognized as standard techniques for the determination of soil dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity, based on the reflected electromagnetic waves from a probe inserted into the soil. TDR data were first commonly analyzed in the time domain using methods considering only a part of the waveform information. Later, advancements have led to the possibility of analyzing the TDR signal through full-wave inverse modeling either in the time or the frequency domains. A major advantage of FDR compared to TDR is the possibility to increase the bandwidth, thereby increasing the information content of the data and providing more detailed characterization of the medium. Amongst the recent works in this field, Minet et al. (2010) developed a modeling procedure for processing FDR data based on an exact solution of Maxwell's equations for wave propagation in one-dimensional multilayered media. In this approach, the probe head is decoupled from the medium and is fully described by characteristic transfer functions. The authors successfully validated the method for homogeneous sand subject to a range of water contents. In the present study, we further validated the modelling approach using reference liquids with well-characterized frequency-dependent electrical properties. In addition, the FDR model was coupled with a dielectric mixing model to investigate the ability of retrieving water content, pore water electrical conductivity and sand porosity from inversion of FDR data acquired in sand subject to different water content levels. Finally, the

  12. A combined full wave equation tomography - full waveform inversion and its application to 12 km long streamer data from offshore western Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Singh, S. C.; Ghosal, D.

    2012-12-01

    Seismic full waveform inversion is an emerging technique to determine fine-scale subsurface velocity structure. However, it requires a good starting velocity model, which is generally obtained using travel time tomography, to converge to a global minimum. Furthermore, the computing cost of full waveform inversion could be very high. In order to converge to a global solution, we have developed a combined full wave equation tomography (WET) and full waveform inversion (FWI) where the large and medium scale velocity is determined using full wave equation tomography first and then the fine-scale elastic parameters are inverted using full waveform inversion. WET and FWI both utilize full wavefield modeling, but differ on the definition of objective functions: WET aims to minimize L2-norm of cross-correlation synthetic and observed data, which is mainly sensitive to travel times, while FWI aims to optimize the L2-norm full waveform misfit, which is sensitive to both amplitudes and travel times of arrivals. Adjoint method is used to calculate the gradient for both methods efficiently. To compensate the energy loss due to wave propagation in the adjoint calculation and geometric limitation of survey, we apply an approximate Hessian preconditioning to the gradient. Further more, to stabilize WET, we precondition the time delay measures observed from cross-relation with maximum cross-correlation coefficients and perform tomographic model regularization to avoid local minimum. By exploring the band-limited feature of seismic wavefield, WET can provide better resolution than ray-based travel time tomography, and hence better suited for the FWI to converge to the true model, which provides very fine detail P and S-wave velocity. Both WET and WFI are based on the solution of full elastic wave equation and hence can model all types of wave present data. In order to reduce the computation cost and to invert seismic refraction arrivals first, we downward continue the streamer data

  13. Extension of Migration Velocity Analysis to transmitted wave fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lameloise, Charles-Antoine; Chauris, Hervé

    2016-08-01

    Migration Velocity Analysis aims at automatically updating the large scale components of the velocity model, called macromodel. Extended Common Image Gathers are panels used to evaluate focusing after imaging and are constructed as a function of a spatial shift introduced in the imaging condition. We investigate how transmitted waves can also be used in Migration Velocity Analysis: instead of back-propagating the residuals associated to reflected waves, we propose to back-propagate the full wave field. The image function, equivalent of the migrated section for reflected data does not exhibit localised events in space along horizons but is still sensitive to the choice of the background velocity model and can thus be coupled to the same objective function defined in the image domain. In order to enhance the benefits of direct waves, we consider a cross-well configuration. Direct waves provide a large illumination between two vertical wells. Associated Common Image Gathers present different characteristics than the ones associated to reflected waves in surface acquisition. In particular, energy is spread over up to the maximum penetration depth. We invert cross-well seismic data along two lines. In the first case, the input data contain the full wavefield dominated by transmitted waves. It demonstrates the possibility to handle transmitted waves to determine the velocity model. It appears that the misfit in the data domain is largely reduced after inversion. In the second case, we use the same algorithm, but with reflected observed data only, as in a classical approach. Most of velocity updates are localised around the reflectivity, leading to an incorrect final model. This demonstrates the benefit of transmitted waves for Migration Velocity Analysis in a cross-well configuration

  14. C1IV:. Gravitational Wave Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyaprakash, B. S.

    2002-09-01

    Resonant bar detectors are routinely searching for astronomical sources of gravitational waves and to setting upper limits on event rates. Interferometric detectors are beginning to operate at sensitivity levels good enough to set meaningful upper limits and begin astrophysical searches. With the long baseline interferometers scheduled to take data at unprecedented sensitivity levels the next few years will be a very exciting period for gravitational waves. In session C1iv there were talks focusing on gravitational wave searches (Krolak and Sintes), setting upper limits on astrophysical signals (Brady and Whelan), theoretical developments in modelling binary black holes (Iyer), testing general relativity with gravitational wave data (Will) and tools for gravitational wave data analysis (Schutz). There was also a one-hour round-table discussion on setting upper limits chaired by Andersson.

  15. Full-scale system impact analysis: Digital document storage project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The Digital Document Storage Full Scale System can provide cost effective electronic document storage, retrieval, hard copy reproduction, and remote access for users of NASA Technical Reports. The desired functionality of the DDS system is highly dependent on the assumed requirements for remote access used in this Impact Analysis. It is highly recommended that NASA proceed with a phased, communications requirement analysis to ensure that adequate communications service can be supplied at a reasonable cost in order to validate recent working assumptions upon which the success of the DDS Full Scale System is dependent.

  16. AB 1007 Full Fuel Cycle Analysis (FFCA) Peer Review

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, D; Armstrong, D; Campbell, C; Lamont, A; Gallegos, G; Stewart, J; Upadhye, R

    2007-01-19

    LLNL is a participant of California's Advanced Energy Pathways (AEP) team funded by DOE (NETL). At the AEP technical review meeting on November 9, 2006. The AB 1007 FFCA team (Appendix A) requested LLNL participate in a peer review of the FFCA reports. The primary contact at the CEC was McKinley Addy. The following reports/presentations were received by LLNL: (1) Full Fuel Cycle Energy and Emissions Assumptions dated September 2006, TIAX; (2) Full Fuel cycle Assessment-Well to Tank Energy Inputs, Emissions, and Water Impacts dated December 2006, TIAX; and (3) Full Fuel Cycle Analysis Assessment dated October 12, 2006, TIAX.

  17. Crack Detection with Lamb Wave Wavenumber Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Leckey, Cara; Rogge, Matt; Yu, Lingyu

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we present our study of Lamb wave crack detection using wavenumber analysis. The aim is to demonstrate the application of wavenumber analysis to 3D Lamb wave data to enable damage detection. The 3D wavefields (including vx, vy and vz components) in time-space domain contain a wealth of information regarding the propagating waves in a damaged plate. For crack detection, three wavenumber analysis techniques are used: (i) two dimensional Fourier transform (2D-FT) which can transform the time-space wavefield into frequency-wavenumber representation while losing the spatial information; (ii) short space 2D-FT which can obtain the frequency-wavenumber spectra at various spatial locations, resulting in a space-frequency-wavenumber representation; (iii) local wavenumber analysis which can provide the distribution of the effective wavenumbers at different locations. All of these concepts are demonstrated through a numerical simulation example of an aluminum plate with a crack. The 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) was used to obtain the 3D wavefields, of which the vz (out-of-plane) wave component is compared with the experimental measurement obtained from a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV) for verification purposes. The experimental and simulated results are found to be in close agreement. The application of wavenumber analysis on 3D EFIT simulation data shows the effectiveness of the analysis for crack detection. Keywords: : Lamb wave, crack detection, wavenumber analysis, EFIT modeling

  18. Guided wave tomography performance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huthwaite, Peter; Lowe, Michael; Cawley, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Quantifying wall loss caused by corrosion is a significant challenge for the petrochemical industry. Corrosion commonly occurs at pipe supports, where surface access for inspection is limited. Guided wave tomography is pursued as a solution to this: guided waves are transmitted through the region of interest from an array, and tomographic reconstruction techniques are applied to the measured signals in order to produce a map of thickness. There are many parameters in the system which can affect the performance; this paper investigates how the accuracy varies as defect width and depth, operating frequency and guided wave mode are all changed. For the S0 mode, the best performance was seen around 170kHz on the 10mm plate, with poor performance seen at almost all other frequencies. A0 showed better performance across a broad range of frequencies, with resolution improving with frequency as the wavelength reduced. However, it was shown that the resolution limit did drop relative to the wavelength, limiting the performance at high frequencies slightly.

  19. Characterization of an SRF gun: a 3D full wave simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, E.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Wang, J.

    2011-03-28

    We characterized a BNL 1.3GHz half-cell SRF gun is tested for GaAs photocathode. The gun already was simulated several years ago via two-dimensional (2D) numerical codes (i.e., Superfish and Parmela) with and without the beam. In this paper, we discuss our investigation of its characteristics using a three dimensional (3D) full-wave code (CST STUDIO SUITE{trademark}).The input/pickup couplers are sited symmetrically on the same side of the gun at an angle of 180{sup o}. In particular, the inner conductor of the pickup coupler is considerably shorter than that of the input coupler. We evaluated the cross-talk between the beam (trajectory) and the signal on the input coupler compared our findings with published results based on analytical models. The CST STUDIO SUITE{trademark} also was used to predict the field within the cavity; particularly, a combination of transient/eigenmode solvers was employed to accurately construct the RF field for the particles, which also includes the effects of the couplers. Finally, we explored the beam's dynamics with a particle in cell (PIC) simulation, validated the results and compare them with 2D code result.

  20. Performance analysis of a full-field and full-range swept-source OCT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauter, J.; Boettcher, T.; Körner, K.; Gronle, M.; Osten, W.; Passilly, N.; Froehly, L.; Perrin, S.; Gorecki, C.

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, optical coherence tomography (OCT) became gained importance in medical disciplines like ophthalmology, due to its noninvasive optical imaging technique with micrometer resolution and short measurement time. It enables e. g. the measurement and visualization of the depth structure of the retina. In other medical disciplines like dermatology, histopathological analysis is still the gold standard for skin cancer diagnosis. The EU-funded project VIAMOS (Vertically Integrated Array-type Mirau-based OCT System) proposes a new type of OCT system combined with micro-technologies to provide a hand-held, low-cost and miniaturized OCT system. The concept is a combination of full-field and full-range swept-source OCT (SS-OCT) detection in a multi-channel sensor based on a micro-optical Mirau-interferometer array, which is fabricated by means of wafer fabrication. This paper presents the study of an experimental proof-of-concept OCT system as a one-channel sensor with bulk optics. This sensor is a Linnik-interferometer type with similar optical parameters as the Mirau-interferometer array. A commercial wavelength tunable light source with a center wavelength at 845nm and 50nm spectral bandwidth is used with a camera for parallel OCT A-Scan detection. In addition, the reference microscope objective lens of the Linnik-interferometer is mounted on a piezo-actuated phase-shifter. Phase-shifting interferometry (PSI) techniques are applied for resolving the conjugate complex artifact and consequently contribute to an increase of image quality and depth range. A suppression ratio of the complex conjugate term of 36 dB is shown and a system sensitivity greater than 96 dB could be measured.

  1. Millimeter-wave sensor image analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William J.; Suess, Helmut

    1989-01-01

    Images of an airborne, scanning, radiometer operating at a frequency of 98 GHz, have been analyzed. The mm-wave images were obtained in 1985/1986 using the JPL mm-wave imaging sensor. The goal of this study was to enhance the information content of these images and make their interpretation easier for human analysis. In this paper, a visual interpretative approach was used for information extraction from the images. This included application of nonlinear transform techniques for noise reduction and for color, contrast and edge enhancement. Results of the techniques on selected mm-wave images are presented.

  2. Variational full wave calculation of fast wave current drive in DIII-D using the ALCYON code

    SciTech Connect

    Becoulet, A.; Moreau, D.

    1992-04-01

    Initial fast wave current drive simulations performed with the ALCYON code for the 60 MHz DIII-D experiment are presented. Two typical shots of the 1991 summer campaign were selected with magnetic field intensities of 1 and 2 teslas respectively. The results for the wave electromagnetic field in the plasma chamber are displayed. They exhibit a strong enrichment of the poloidal mode number m-spectrum which leads to the upshift of the parallel wavenumber, {kappa}{perpendicular}, and to the wave absorption. The m-spectrum is bounded when the local poloidal wavenumber reaches the Alfven wavenumber and the {kappa}{perpendicular} upshifts do not destroy the wave directionality. Linear estimations of the driven current are made. The current density profiles are found to be peaked and we find that about 88 kA can be driven in the 1 tesla/1.7 keV phase with 1.7 MW coupled to the electrons. In the 2 tesla/3.4 keV case, 47 kA are driven with a total power of 1.5 MW, 44% of which are absorbed on the hydrogen minority, through the second harmonic ion cyclotron resonance. The global efficiency is then 0.18 {times} 10{sup 19} A m{sup {minus}2}W{sup {minus}1} if one considers only the effective power going to the electrons.

  3. Measurements of ion cyclotron range of frequencies mode converted wave intensity with phase contrast imaging in Alcator C-Mod and comparison with full-wave simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujii, N.; Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Lin, Y.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J.; Jaeger, E. F.; Green, D. L.; Harvey, R. W.

    2012-08-15

    Radio frequency waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) are widely used to heat tokamak plasmas. In ICRF heating schemes involving multiple ion species, the launched fast waves convert to ion cyclotron waves or ion Bernstein waves at the two-ion hybrid resonances. Mode converted waves are of interest as actuators to optimise plasma performance through current drive and flow drive. In order to describe these processes accurately in a realistic tokamak geometry, numerical simulations are essential, and it is important that these codes be validated against experiment. In this study, the mode converted waves were measured using a phase contrast imaging technique in D-H and D-{sup 3}He plasmas. The measured mode converted wave intensity in the D-{sup 3}He mode conversion regime was found to be a factor of {approx}50 weaker than the full-wave predictions. The discrepancy was reduced in the hydrogen minority heating regime, where mode conversion is weaker.

  4. Characterization of forest litter horizons through full-wave inversion of ground-penetrating radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Frédéric; Jonard, Mathieu; Jonard, François; Lambot, Sébastien

    2015-04-01

    Decomposing litter accumulated at the soil surface in forest ecosystems play a major role in a series of ecosystem processes (soil carbon sequestration, nutrient release through decomposition, water retention, buffering of soil temperature variations, tree regeneration, population dynamics of ground vegetation and soil fauna, ...). Besides, the presence of litter is acknowledged to influence remote sensing radar data over forested areas and accurate quantification of litter radiative properties is essential for proper processing of these data. In these respects, ground-penetrating radar (GPR) presents particular interests, potentially allowing for fast and non-invasive characterization of organic layers with fine spatial and/or temporal resolutions as well as for providing detailed information on litter electrical properties which are required for modeling either active or passive microwave remote sensing data. We designed an experiment in order to analyze the backscattering from forest litter horizons and to investigate the potentialities of GPR for retrieving the physical properties of these horizons. For that purpose, we used an ultrawide band radar system connected to a transmitting and receiving horn antenna. The GPR data were processed resorting to full-wave inversion of the signal, through which antenna effects are accounted for. In a first step, GPR data were acquired over artificially reconstructed layers of three different beech litter types (i.e., (i) recently fallen litter with easily discernible plant organs (OL layer), (ii) fragmented litter in partial decomposition without entire plant organs (OF layer) and (iii) combination of OL and OF litter layers) and considering in each case a range of layer thicknesses. In a second step, so as to validate the adopted methodology in real natural conditions, GPR measurements were performed in situ along a transect crossing a wide range of litter properties in terms of thickness and composition through stands of

  5. Full-wave Ambient Noise Tomography of Mt Rainier volcano, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flinders, Ashton; Shen, Yang

    2015-04-01

    Mount Rainier towers over the landscape of western Washington (USA), ranking with Fuji-yama in Japan, Mt Pinatubo in the Philippines, and Mt Vesuvius in Italy, as one of the great stratovolcanoes of the world. Notwithstanding its picturesque stature, Mt Rainier is potentially the most devastating stratovolcano in North America, with more than 3.5 million people living beneath is shadow in the Seattle-Tacoma area. The primary hazard posed by the volcano is in the form of highly destructive debris flows (lahars). These lahars form when water and/or melted ice erode away and entrain preexisting volcanic sediment. At Mt Rainier these flows are often initiated by sector collapse of the volcano's hydrothermally rotten flanks and compounded by Mt Rainier's extensive snow and glacial ice coverage. It is therefore imperative to ascertain the extent of the volcano's summit hydrothermal alteration, and determine areas prone to collapse. Despite being one of the sixteen volcanoes globally designated by the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth's Interior as warranting detailed and focused study, Mt Rainier remains enigmatic both in terms of the shallow internal structure and the degree of summit hydrothermal alteration. We image this shallow internal structure and areas of possible summit alteration using ambient noise tomography. Our full waveform forward modeling includes high-resolution topography allowing us to accuratly account for the effects of topography on the propagation of short-period Rayleigh waves. Empirical Green's functions were extracted from 80 stations within 200 km of Mt Rainier, and compared with synthetic greens functions over multiple frequency bands from 2-28 seconds.

  6. Digital techniques for ULF wave polarization analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arthur, C. W.

    1979-01-01

    Digital power spectral and wave polarization analysis are powerful techniques for studying ULF waves in the earth's magnetosphere. Four different techniques for using the spectral matrix to perform such an analysis have been presented in the literature. Three of these techniques are similar in that they require transformation of the spectral matrix to the principal axis system prior to performing the polarization analysis. The differences in the three techniques lie in the manner in which determine this transformation. A comparative study of these three techniques using both simulated and real data has shown them to be approximately equal in quality of performance. The fourth technique does not require transformation of the spectral matrix. Rather, it uses the measured spectral matrix and state vectors for a desired wave type to design a polarization detector function in the frequency domain. The design of various detector functions and their application to both simulated and real data will be presented.

  7. The Modularized Software Package ASKI - Full Waveform Inversion Based on Waveform Sensitivity Kernels Utilizing External Seismic Wave Propagation Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, F.; Friederich, W.

    2015-12-01

    We present the modularized software package ASKI which is a flexible and extendable toolbox for seismic full waveform inversion (FWI) as well as sensitivity or resolution analysis operating on the sensitivity matrix. It utilizes established wave propagation codes for solving the forward problem and offers an alternative to the monolithic, unflexible and hard-to-modify codes that have typically been written for solving inverse problems. It is available under the GPL at www.rub.de/aski. The Gauss-Newton FWI method for 3D-heterogeneous elastic earth models is based on waveform sensitivity kernels and can be applied to inverse problems at various spatial scales in both Cartesian and spherical geometries. The kernels are derived in the frequency domain from Born scattering theory as the Fréchet derivatives of linearized full waveform data functionals, quantifying the influence of elastic earth model parameters on the particular waveform data values. As an important innovation, we keep two independent spatial descriptions of the earth model - one for solving the forward problem and one representing the inverted model updates. Thereby we account for the independent needs of spatial model resolution of forward and inverse problem, respectively. Due to pre-integration of the kernels over the (in general much coarser) inversion grid, storage requirements for the sensitivity kernels are dramatically reduced.ASKI can be flexibly extended to other forward codes by providing it with specific interface routines that contain knowledge about forward code-specific file formats and auxiliary information provided by the new forward code. In order to sustain flexibility, the ASKI tools must communicate via file output/input, thus large storage capacities need to be accessible in a convenient way. Storing the complete sensitivity matrix to file, however, permits the scientist full manual control over each step in a customized procedure of sensitivity/resolution analysis and full

  8. An Analysis of the Full-Floating Journal Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, M.C.; Nussdorfer, T.J.

    1947-01-01

    An analysis of the operating characteristics of a full-floating bearing - a bearing in which a floating sleeve is located between the journal and bearing surfaces - is presented together with charts - from which the performance of such bearings may be predicted. Examples are presented to illustrate the use of these charts and a limited number of experiments conducted upon a glass full-floating bearing to verify some results of the analysis are reported. The floating sleeve can operate over a wide range of speeds for a given shaft speed, the exact value depending principally upon the ratio of clearances and upon the ratio of radii of the bearing. Lower operating temperatures at high rotative speeds are to be expected by using a full-floating bearing. This lower operating temperature would be obtained at the expense of the load-carrying capacity of the bearing if, for comparison, the clearances remain the same in both bearings. A full-floating bearing having the same load capacity as a conventional journal bearing may be designed if decreased clearances are allowable.

  9. Validation of full-wave simulations for mode conversion of waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies with phase contrast imaging in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujii, N.; Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Edlund, E. M.; Ennever, P. C.; Lin, Y.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J.; Jaeger, E. F.; Green, D. L.; Harvey, R. W.

    2015-08-15

    Mode conversion of fast waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is known to result in current drive and flow drive under optimised conditions, which may be utilized to control plasma profiles and improve fusion plasma performance. To describe these processes accurately in a realistic toroidal geometry, numerical simulations are essential. Quantitative comparison of these simulations and the actual experimental measurements is important to validate their predictions and to evaluate their limitations. The phase contrast imaging (PCI) diagnostic has been used to directly detect the ICRF waves in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The measurements have been compared with full-wave simulations through a synthetic diagnostic technique. Recently, the frequency response of the PCI detector array on Alcator C-Mod was recalibrated, which greatly improved the comparison between the measurements and the simulations. In this study, mode converted waves for D-{sup 3}He and D-H plasmas with various ion species compositions were re-analyzed with the new calibration. For the minority heating cases, self-consistent electric fields and a minority ion distribution function were simulated by iterating a full-wave code and a Fokker-Planck code. The simulated mode converted wave intensity was in quite reasonable agreement with the measurements close to the antenna, but discrepancies remain for comparison at larger distances.

  10. Comparative dynamic analysis of the full Grossman model.

    PubMed

    Ried, W

    1998-08-01

    The paper applies the method of comparative dynamic analysis to the full Grossman model. For a particular class of solutions, it derives the equations implicitly defining the complete trajectories of the endogenous variables. Relying on the concept of Frisch decision functions, the impact of any parametric change on an endogenous variable can be decomposed into a direct and an indirect effect. The focus of the paper is on marginal changes in the rate of health capital depreciation. It also analyses the impact of either initial financial wealth or the initial stock of health capital. While the direction of most effects remains ambiguous in the full model, the assumption of a zero consumption benefit of health is sufficient to obtain a definite for any direct or indirect effect.

  11. ISEE/ICE plasma wave data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenstadt, E. W.

    1989-01-01

    The work performed for the period 1 Jan. 1985 to 30 Oct. 1989 is presented. The objective was to provide reduction and analysis of data from a scientific instrument designed to study solar wind and plasma wave phenomena on the International Sun Earth Explorer 3 (ISEE-3)/International Cometary Explorer (ICE) missions.

  12. Analysis and Optimization of "Full-Length" Diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, Alfred

    2012-01-19

    A method of analyzing the axial variation of the heat generation rate, temperature, voltage, current density and emitter heat flux in a thermionic converter is described. The method is particularly useful for the case of "long" diodes, each extending over the full length of the reactor core. For a given diode geometry and fuel distribution, the analysis combines a nuclear solution of the axial fission density profile with the iterative solution of four differential equations representing the thermal, electrical, and thermionic interactions within the diode. The digital computer program developed to solve these equations can also perform a design optimization with respect to lead resistance, load voltage, and emitter thickness, for a specified maximum emitter temperature. Typical results are presented, and the use of this analysis for predicting the diode operating characteristics is illustrated.

  13. 'Wave' analysis of Venus ionospheric flux ropes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luhmann, J. G.

    1990-01-01

    The behavior of the general field fluctuations observed by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter magnetometer in the Venusian ionosphere is approached via the application of wave-analysis techniques to their compressional amplitude, ellipticity, and polarization. The most marked change in these properties occurs within about 15 deg of the terminator; ellipticity and compressional power plummet, implying that flux ropes either drastically change in character there or are confined to the dayside hemisphere, within about 75 percent of the subsolar point. Attention is given to a heuristic model which attempts to unify dayside flux-rope and 'terminator wave' interpretations.

  14. Microbial community analysis of a full-scale DEMON bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Martinez, Alejandro; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Alejandro; Muñoz-Palazon, Barbara; Garcia-Ruiz, Maria-Jesus; Osorio, Francisco; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Gonzalez-Lopez, Jesus

    2015-03-01

    Full-scale applications of autotrophic nitrogen removal technologies for the treatment of digested sludge liquor have proliferated during the last decade. Among these technologies, the aerobic/anoxic deammonification process (DEMON) is one of the major applied processes. This technology achieves nitrogen removal from wastewater through anammox metabolism inside a single bioreactor due to alternating cycles of aeration. To date, microbial community composition of full-scale DEMON bioreactors have never been reported. In this study, bacterial community structure of a full-scale DEMON bioreactor located at the Apeldoorn wastewater treatment plant was analyzed using pyrosequencing. This technique provided a higher-resolution study of the bacterial assemblage of the system compared to other techniques used in lab-scale DEMON bioreactors. Results showed that the DEMON bioreactor was a complex ecosystem where ammonium oxidizing bacteria, anammox bacteria and many other bacterial phylotypes coexist. The potential ecological role of all phylotypes found was discussed. Thus, metagenomic analysis through pyrosequencing offered new perspectives over the functioning of the DEMON bioreactor by exhaustive identification of microorganisms, which play a key role in the performance of bioreactors. In this way, pyrosequencing has been proven as a helpful tool for the in-depth investigation of the functioning of bioreactors at microbiological scale.

  15. Gradient Index Devices for the Full Control of Elastic Waves in Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yabin; Torrent, Daniel; Pennec, Yan; Pan, Yongdong; Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we present a method for the design of gradient index devices for elastic waves in plates. The method allows the design of devices to control the three fundamental modes, despite the fact that their dispersion relation is managed by different elastic constants. It is shown that by means of complex graded phononic crystals and thickness variations it is possible to independently design the three refractive indexes of these waves, allowing therefore their simultaneous control. The effective medium theory required for this purpose is presented, and the method is applied to the design of the Luneburg and Maxwell lenses as well as to the design of a flat gradient index lens. Finally, numerical simulations are used to demonstrate the performance of the method in a broadband frequency region.

  16. Gradient Index Devices for the Full Control of Elastic Waves in Plates.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yabin; Torrent, Daniel; Pennec, Yan; Pan, Yongdong; Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram

    2016-04-14

    In this work, we present a method for the design of gradient index devices for elastic waves in plates. The method allows the design of devices to control the three fundamental modes, despite the fact that their dispersion relation is managed by different elastic constants. It is shown that by means of complex graded phononic crystals and thickness variations it is possible to independently design the three refractive indexes of these waves, allowing therefore their simultaneous control. The effective medium theory required for this purpose is presented, and the method is applied to the design of the Luneburg and Maxwell lenses as well as to the design of a flat gradient index lens. Finally, numerical simulations are used to demonstrate the performance of the method in a broadband frequency region.

  17. Gradient Index Devices for the Full Control of Elastic Waves in Plates

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yabin; Torrent, Daniel; Pennec, Yan; Pan, Yongdong; Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present a method for the design of gradient index devices for elastic waves in plates. The method allows the design of devices to control the three fundamental modes, despite the fact that their dispersion relation is managed by different elastic constants. It is shown that by means of complex graded phononic crystals and thickness variations it is possible to independently design the three refractive indexes of these waves, allowing therefore their simultaneous control. The effective medium theory required for this purpose is presented, and the method is applied to the design of the Luneburg and Maxwell lenses as well as to the design of a flat gradient index lens. Finally, numerical simulations are used to demonstrate the performance of the method in a broadband frequency region. PMID:27075601

  18. Full wave simulations of fast wave efficiency and power losses in the scrape-off layer of tokamak plasmas in mid/high harmonic and minority heating regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertelli, N.; Jaeger, E. F.; Hosea, J. C.; Phillips, C. K.; Berry, L.; Bonoli, P. T.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Green, D.; LeBlanc, B.; Perkins, R. J.; Qin, C. M.; Pinsker, R. I.; Prater, R.; Ryan, P. M.; Taylor, G.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, J. C.; Zhang, X. J.

    2016-01-01

    Several experiments on different machines and in different fast wave (FW) heating regimes, such as hydrogen minority heating and high harmonic fast waves (HHFW), have found strong interaction between radio-frequency (RF) waves and the scrape-off layer (SOL) region. This paper examines the propagation and the power loss in the SOL by using the full wave code AORSA, in which the edge plasma beyond the last closed flux surface (LCFS) is included in the solution domain and a collisional damping parameter is used as a proxy to represent the real, and most likely nonlinear, damping processes. 2D and 3D AORSA results for the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) have shown a strong transition to higher SOL power losses (driven by the RF field) when the FW cut-off is removed from in front of the antenna by increasing the edge density. Here, full wave simulations have been extended for ‘conventional’ tokamaks with higher aspect ratios, such as the DIII-D, Alcator C-Mod, and EAST devices. DIII-D results in HHFW regime show similar behavior found in NSTX and NSTX-U, consistent with previous DIII-D experimental observations. In contrast, a different behavior has been found for C-Mod and EAST, which operate in the minority heating regime. This article is dedicated to the memory of Cynthia K. Phillips

  19. Full wave simulations of fast wave efficiency and power losses in the scrape-off layer of tokamak plasmas in mid/high harmonic and minority heating regimes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bertelli, N.; Jaeger, E. F.; Hosea, J. C.; Phillips, C. K.; Berry, L.; Bonoli, P. T.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Green, D.; LeBlanc, B.; Perkins, R. J.; et al

    2015-12-17

    Here, several experiments on different machines and in different fast wave (FW) heating regimes, such as hydrogen minority heating and high harmonic fast waves (HHFW), have found strong interaction between radio-frequency (RF) waves and the scrape-off layer (SOL) region. This paper examines the propagation and the power loss in the SOL by using the full wave code AORSA, in which the edge plasma beyond the last closed flux surface (LCFS) is included in the solution domain and a collisional damping parameter is used as a proxy to represent the real, and most likely nonlinear, damping processes. 2D and 3D AORSAmore » results for the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) have shown a strong transition to higher SOL power losses (driven by the RF field) when the FW cut-off is removed from in front of the antenna by increasing the edge density. Here, full wave simulations have been extended for 'conventional' tokamaks with higher aspect ratios, such as the DIII-D, Alcator C-Mod, and EAST devices. DIII-D results in HHFW regime show similar behavior found in NSTX and NSTX-U, consistent with previous DIII-D experimental observations. In contrast, a different behavior has been found for C-Mod and EAST, which operate in the minority heating regime.« less

  20. Full wave simulations of fast wave efficiency and power losses in the scrape-off layer of tokamak plasmas in mid/high harmonic and minority heating regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Bertelli, N.; Jaeger, E. F.; Hosea, J. C.; Phillips, C. K.; Berry, L.; Bonoli, P. T.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Green, D.; LeBlanc, B.; Perkins, R. J.; Qin, C. M.; Pinsker, R. I.; Prater, R.; Ryan, P. M.; Taylor, G.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, J. C.; Zhang, X. J.

    2015-12-17

    Here, several experiments on different machines and in different fast wave (FW) heating regimes, such as hydrogen minority heating and high harmonic fast waves (HHFW), have found strong interaction between radio-frequency (RF) waves and the scrape-off layer (SOL) region. This paper examines the propagation and the power loss in the SOL by using the full wave code AORSA, in which the edge plasma beyond the last closed flux surface (LCFS) is included in the solution domain and a collisional damping parameter is used as a proxy to represent the real, and most likely nonlinear, damping processes. 2D and 3D AORSA results for the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) have shown a strong transition to higher SOL power losses (driven by the RF field) when the FW cut-off is removed from in front of the antenna by increasing the edge density. Here, full wave simulations have been extended for 'conventional' tokamaks with higher aspect ratios, such as the DIII-D, Alcator C-Mod, and EAST devices. DIII-D results in HHFW regime show similar behavior found in NSTX and NSTX-U, consistent with previous DIII-D experimental observations. In contrast, a different behavior has been found for C-Mod and EAST, which operate in the minority heating regime.

  1. Acoustic Emission and Guided Wave Monitoring of Fatigue Crack Growth on a Full Pipe Specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Watson, Bruce E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2011-05-06

    Continuous on-line monitoring of active and passive systems, structures and components in nuclear power plants will be critical to extending the lifetimes of nuclear power plants in the US beyond 60 years. Acoustic emission and guided ultrasonic waves are two tools for continuously monitoring passive systems, structures and components within nuclear power plants and are the focus of this study. These tools are used to monitor fatigue damage induced in a SA 312 TP304 stainless steel pipe specimen. The results of acoustic emission monitoring indicate that crack propagation signals were not directly detected. However, acoustic emission monitoring exposed crack formation prior to visual confirmation through the detection of signals caused by crack closure friction. The results of guided ultrasonic wave monitoring indicate that this technology is sensitive to the presence and size of cracks. The sensitivity and complexity of GUW signals is observed to vary with respect to signal frequency and path traveled by the guided ultrasonic wave relative to the crack orientation.

  2. Full 3D dispersion curve solutions for guided waves in generally anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernando Quintanilla, F.; Lowe, M. J. S.; Craster, R. V.

    2016-02-01

    Dispersion curves of guided waves provide valuable information about the physical and elastic properties of waves propagating within a given waveguide structure. Algorithms to accurately compute these curves are an essential tool for engineers working in non-destructive evaluation and for scientists studying wave phenomena. Dispersion curves are typically computed for low or zero attenuation and presented in two or three dimensional plots. The former do not always provide a clear and complete picture of the dispersion loci and the latter are very difficult to obtain when high values of attenuation are involved and arbitrary anisotropy is considered in single or multi-layered systems. As a consequence, drawing correct and reliable conclusions is a challenging task in the modern applications that often utilize multi-layered anisotropic viscoelastic materials. These challenges are overcome here by using a spectral collocation method (SCM) to robustly find dispersion curves in the most complicated cases of high attenuation and arbitrary anisotropy. Solutions are then plotted in three-dimensional frequency-complex wavenumber space, thus gaining much deeper insight into the nature of these problems. The cases studied range from classical examples, which validate this approach, to new ones involving materials up to the most general triclinic class for both flat and cylindrical geometry in multi-layered systems. The apparent crossing of modes within the same symmetry family in viscoelastic media is also explained and clarified by the results. Finally, the consequences of the centre of symmetry, present in every crystal class, on the solutions are discussed.

  3. All-Sky Search for Periodic Gravitational Waves in the Full S5 LIGO Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G. S.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Amin, R. S.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Arain, M. S.; Araya, M. C.; Aston, S. M.; Blackburn, L.; Camp, J. B.; Cannizzo, J.

    2011-01-01

    We report on an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency band 50-800 Hz and with the frequency time derivative in the range of 0 through -6 x 10(exp -9) Hz/s. Such a signal could be produced by a nearby spinning and slightly non-axisymmetric isolated neutron star in our galaxy. After recent improvements in the search program that yielded a 10x increase in computational efficiency, we have searched in two years of data. collected during LIGO's fifth science run and have obtained the most sensitive all-sky upper limits on gravitational wave strain to date. Near 150 Hz our upper limit on worst-case linearly polarized strain amplitude h(sub 0) is 1 x 10(exp -24), while at the high end of our frequency ra.nge we achieve a worst-case upper limit of 3.8 x 10(exp -24) for all polarizations and sky locations. These results constitute a factor of two improvement upop. previously published data. A new detection pipeline utilizing a Loosely Coherent algorithm was able to follow up weaker outliers, increasing the volume of space where signals can be detected by a factor of 10, but has not revealed any gravitational wave signals. The pipeline has been tested for robustness with respect to deviations from the model of an isolated neutron star, such as caused by a low-mass or long.period binary companion.

  4. Analysis of critically refracted longitudinal waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Ning; Bond, Leonard J.

    2015-03-01

    Fabrication processes, such as, welding, forging, and rolling can induce residual stresses in metals that will impact product performance and phenomena such as cracking and corrosion. To better manage residual stress tools are needed to map their distribution. The critically refracted ultrasonic longitudinal (LCR) wave is one such approach that has been used for residual stress characterization. It has been shown to be sensitive to stress and less sensitive to the effects of the texture of the material. Although the LCR wave is increasingly widely applied, the factors that influence the formation of the LCR beam are seldom discussed. This paper reports a numerical model used to investigate the transducers' parameters that can contribute to the directionality of the LCR wave and hence enable performance optimization when used for industrial applications. An orthogonal test method is used to study the transducer parameters which influence the LCR wave beams. This method provides a design tool that can be used to study and optimize multiple parameter experiments and it can identify which parameter or parameters are of most significance. The simulation of the sound field in a 2-D "water-steel" model is obtained using a Spatial Fourier Analysis method. The effects of incident angle, standoff, the aperture and the center frequency of the transducer were studied. Results show that the aperture of the transducer, the center frequency and the incident angle are the most important factors in controlling the directivity of the resulting LCR wave fields.

  5. Analysis of critically refracted longitudinal waves

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, Ning Bond, Leonard J.

    2015-03-31

    Fabrication processes, such as, welding, forging, and rolling can induce residual stresses in metals that will impact product performance and phenomena such as cracking and corrosion. To better manage residual stress tools are needed to map their distribution. The critically refracted ultrasonic longitudinal (LCR) wave is one such approach that has been used for residual stress characterization. It has been shown to be sensitive to stress and less sensitive to the effects of the texture of the material. Although the LCR wave is increasingly widely applied, the factors that influence the formation of the LCR beam are seldom discussed. This paper reports a numerical model used to investigate the transducers' parameters that can contribute to the directionality of the LCR wave and hence enable performance optimization when used for industrial applications. An orthogonal test method is used to study the transducer parameters which influence the LCR wave beams. This method provides a design tool that can be used to study and optimize multiple parameter experiments and it can identify which parameter or parameters are of most significance. The simulation of the sound field in a 2-D 'water-steel' model is obtained using a Spatial Fourier Analysis method. The effects of incident angle, standoff, the aperture and the center frequency of the transducer were studied. Results show that the aperture of the transducer, the center frequency and the incident angle are the most important factors in controlling the directivity of the resulting LCR wave fields.

  6. Full-motion video analysis for improved gender classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flora, Jeffrey B.; Lochtefeld, Darrell F.; Iftekharuddin, Khan M.

    2014-06-01

    The ability of computer systems to perform gender classification using the dynamic motion of the human subject has important applications in medicine, human factors, and human-computer interface systems. Previous works in motion analysis have used data from sensors (including gyroscopes, accelerometers, and force plates), radar signatures, and video. However, full-motion video, motion capture, range data provides a higher resolution time and spatial dataset for the analysis of dynamic motion. Works using motion capture data have been limited by small datasets in a controlled environment. In this paper, we explore machine learning techniques to a new dataset that has a larger number of subjects. Additionally, these subjects move unrestricted through a capture volume, representing a more realistic, less controlled environment. We conclude that existing linear classification methods are insufficient for the gender classification for larger dataset captured in relatively uncontrolled environment. A method based on a nonlinear support vector machine classifier is proposed to obtain gender classification for the larger dataset. In experimental testing with a dataset consisting of 98 trials (49 subjects, 2 trials per subject), classification rates using leave-one-out cross-validation are improved from 73% using linear discriminant analysis to 88% using the nonlinear support vector machine classifier.

  7. Bayesian analysis on gravitational waves and exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xihao

    Attempts to detect gravitational waves using a pulsar timing array (PTA), i.e., a collection of pulsars in our Galaxy, have become more organized over the last several years. PTAs act to detect gravitational waves generated from very distant sources by observing the small and correlated effect the waves have on pulse arrival times at the Earth. In this thesis, I present advanced Bayesian analysis methods that can be used to search for gravitational waves in pulsar timing data. These methods were also applied to analyze a set of radial velocity (RV) data collected by the Hobby- Eberly Telescope on observing a K0 giant star. They confirmed the presence of two Jupiter mass planets around a K0 giant star and also characterized the stellar p-mode oscillation. The first part of the thesis investigates the effect of wavefront curvature on a pulsar's response to a gravitational wave. In it we show that we can assume the gravitational wave phasefront is planar across the array only if the source luminosity distance " 2piL2/lambda, where L is the pulsar distance to the Earth (˜ kpc) and lambda is the radiation wavelength (˜ pc) in the PTA waveband. Correspondingly, for a point gravitational wave source closer than ˜ 100 Mpc, we should take into account the effect of wavefront curvature across the pulsar-Earth line of sight, which depends on the luminosity distance to the source, when evaluating the pulsar timing response. As a consequence, if a PTA can detect a gravitational wave from a source closer than ˜ 100 Mpc, the effects of wavefront curvature on the response allows us to determine the source luminosity distance. The second and third parts of the thesis propose a new analysis method based on Bayesian nonparametric regression to search for gravitational wave bursts and a gravitational wave background in PTA data. Unlike the conventional Bayesian analysis that introduces a signal model with a fixed number of parameters, Bayesian nonparametric regression sets

  8. Complete Bistatic (4 Pi) Polarimetric Characterization of Waves Scattered from and across Two-Dimensional Random Rough Surfaces Using the Full Wave Approach.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Bom Son

    1995-01-01

    In this work, the full wave approach (Bahar, 1981a, 1991; Bahar and Lee, 1994a, 1995a) is used to obtain the expressions for the scatter cross sections for two-dimensional random rough surfaces. Formally, it involves 10-dimensional integrals. Under certain justifiable conditions, this expression can be reduced to a tractable form. This work is strictly restricted to rough surfaces with large radii of curvature compared to wavelength. The limitations of the generalized full wave solutions that have been recently cited in the technical literature (Thompson and Chapman, 1993; Collin, 1994) are not addressed in this work. The large radii of curvature restriction is introduced in order to reduce to three, the dimension of the multiple integrals used to compute the cross sections for two dimensional rough surfaces. If, in addition to the large radii of surface curvature assumption, the rough surface is homogeneous and isotropic, the 10-dimensional integral can be expressed as a 3-dimensional integral. This integral accounts for the surface height/slope correlation through the use of the conditional joint characteristic functions (Bahar, 1991; Bahar and Lee, 1994a). This full wave solution is shown to reduce to the small perturbation solution (Rice, 1951) and reduce to the physical optics solution (Beckmann and Spizzichino, 1963) in their appropriate regions of validity. The full wave results are compared with the associated small perturbation and physical/geometrical optics results as well as the experimental (O'Donell and Mendez, 1987) and numerical (Sanchez-Gil and Nieto-Vesperinas, 1991) results. The scattering cross sections are the top left 2 x 2 elements of the modified Mueller matrix. The Mueller matrix elements are related to the like and cross polarized radar cross sections as well as to the relative phase of the vertically and horizontally polarized waves. The 4 x 4 Mueller matrix completely characterizes the scattered fields from the target. These Mueller

  9. A full 3D plane-wave-expansion model for 1-3 piezoelectric composite structures.

    PubMed

    Wilm, Mikaël; Ballandras, Sylvain; Laude, Vincent; Pastureaud, Thomas

    2002-09-01

    The plane-wave-expansion (PWE) approach dedicated to the simulation of periodic devices has been extended to 1-3 connectivity piezoelectric composite structures. The case of simple but actual piezoelectric composite structures is addressed, taking piezoelectricity, acoustic losses, and electrical excitation conditions rigorously into account. The material distribution is represented by using a bidimensional Fourier series and the electromechanical response is simulated using a Bloch-Floquet expansion together with the Fahmy-Adler formulation of the Christoffel problem. Application of the model to 1-3 connectivity piezoelectric composites is reported and compared to previously published analyses of this problem.

  10. Terrestrial detector for low-frequency gravitational waves based on full tensor measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paik, H. J.; Moody, M. V.; Griggs, C. E.; Lee, H. M.; Majorana, E.

    2016-05-01

    Two serious obstacles in constructing terrestrial gravitational wave (GW) detectors that can resolve low-frequency signals (≤ 10 Hz) are seismic and Newtonian noises. Here we describe a new detector concept by adopting new measurement techniques and configurations to overcome the present low-frequency barrier due to these noises. Six magnetically levitated superconducting test masses, widely separated along three orthogonal axes, each with three degrees of freedom, constitute a tensor GW detector. The tensor outputs could be combined to better reject the Newtonian noise. Unlike current two-dimensional detectors, a single tensor detector is able to determine the polarization of GWs and the direction to sources on its own.

  11. Development of gastric slow waves and effects of feeding in pre-term and full-term infants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Ouyang, H; Zhu, H B; Zhu, H; Lin, X; Co, E; Hayes, J; Chen, J D Z

    2006-04-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the difference in developmental process of gastric slow waves and the effects of feeding in pre-term and full-term infants. Twenty-six pre-term and 31 full-term infants were enrolled in the study. Gastric myoelectrical activity was recorded using electrogastrography (EGG) from birth to month 6. An increase in the % of 2-4 cpm slow waves was noted in both pre-term (P < 0.01) and full-term infants (P < 0.04) from birth to month 4. The pre-term infants showed a reduced dominant EGG power at certain points of the study. (3) Breast or formula feeding resulted in no difference in the EGG in the full-term infants and showed a difference in the postprandial dominant power of the EGG in the pre-term infants only at month 2 after birth (P < 0.05) but not at other times. The gastric slow wave in pre-term infants is of a significantly reduced amplitude but similar rhythmicity. The method of feeding has no effects on the EGG in full-term infants and minimal effects (may be of non-clinical significance) on the EGG in pre-term infants as the difference was noted only at one time point during the 6-month follow-up study. PMID:16553583

  12. GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOW SCALING RELATIONS FOR THE FULL BLAST WAVE EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Van Eerten, Hendrik J.; MacFadyen, Andrew I.

    2012-03-10

    We demonstrate that gamma-ray burst afterglow spectra and light curves can be calculated for arbitrary explosion and radiation parameters by scaling the peak flux and the critical frequencies connecting different spectral regimes. Only one baseline calculation needs to be done for each jet opening angle and observer angle. These calculations are done numerically using high-resolution relativistic hydrodynamical afterglow blast wave simulations which include the two-dimensional dynamical features of expanding and decelerating afterglow blast waves. Any light curve can then be generated by applying scaling relations to the baseline calculations. As a result, it is now possible to fully fit for the shape of the jet break, e.g., at early-time X-ray and optical frequencies. In addition, late-time radio calorimetry can be improved since the general shape of the transition into the Sedov-Taylor regime is now known for arbitrary explosion parameters so the exact moment when the Sedov-Taylor asymptote is reached in the light curve is no longer relevant. When calculating the baselines, we find that the synchrotron critical frequency {nu}{sub m} and the cooling break frequency {nu}{sub c} are strongly affected by the jet break. The {nu}{sub m} temporal slope quickly drops to the steep late-time Sedov-Taylor slope, while the cooling break {nu}{sub c} first steepens and then rises to meet the level of its shallow late-time asymptote.

  13. Wave energy budget analysis in the Earth's radiation belts uncovers a missing energy.

    PubMed

    Artemyev, A V; Agapitov, O V; Mourenas, D; Krasnoselskikh, V V; Mozer, F S

    2015-05-15

    Whistler-mode emissions are important electromagnetic waves pervasive in the Earth's magnetosphere, where they continuously remove or energize electrons trapped by the geomagnetic field, controlling radiation hazards to satellites and astronauts and the upper-atmosphere ionization or chemical composition. Here, we report an analysis of 10-year Cluster data, statistically evaluating the full wave energy budget in the Earth's magnetosphere, revealing that a significant fraction of the energy corresponds to hitherto generally neglected very oblique waves. Such waves, with 10 times smaller magnetic power than parallel waves, typically have similar total energy. Moreover, they carry up to 80% of the wave energy involved in wave-particle resonant interactions. It implies that electron heating and precipitation into the atmosphere may have been significantly under/over-valued in past studies considering only conventional quasi-parallel waves. Very oblique waves may turn out to be a crucial agent of energy redistribution in the Earth's radiation belts, controlled by solar activity.

  14. Source-independent full wavefield converted-phase elastic migration velocity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabelansky, A. H.; Malcolm, A. E.; Fehler, M. C.; Shang, X.; Rodi, W. L.

    2015-02-01

    Converted phase (CP) elastic seismic signals are comparable in amplitude to the primary signals recorded at large offsets and have the potential to be used in seismic imaging and velocity analysis. We present an approach for CP elastic wave equation velocity analysis that does not use source information and is applicable to surface-seismic, microseismic, teleseismic and vertical seismic profile (VSP) studies. Our approach is based on the cross-correlation between reflected or transmitted PP and CP PS (and/or SS and CP PS) waves propagated backward in time, and is formulated as an optimization problem with a differential semblance criterion objective function for the simultaneous update of both P- and S-wave velocity models. The merit of this approach is that it is fully data-driven, uses full waveform information, and requires only one elastic backward propagation to form an image rather than the two (one forward and one backward) propagations needed for standard reverse-time migration. Moreover, as the method does not require forward propagation, it does not suffer from migration operator source aliasing when a small number of shots are used. We present a derivation of the method and test it with a synthetic model and field micro-seismic data.

  15. Multi-component joint analysis of surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Moro, Giancarlo; Moura, Rui Miguel Marques; Moustafa, Sayed S. R.

    2015-08-01

    Propagation of surface waves can occur with complex energy distribution amongst the various modes. It is shown that even simple VS (shear-wave velocity) profiles can generate velocity spectra that, because of a complex mode excitation, can be quite difficult to interpret in terms of modal dispersion curves. In some cases, Rayleigh waves show relevant differences depending on the considered component (radial or vertical) and the kind of source (vertical impact or explosive). Contrary to several simplistic assumptions often proposed, it is shown, both via synthetic and field datasets, that the fundamental mode of Rayleigh waves can be almost completely absent. This sort of evidence demonstrates the importance of a multi-component analysis capable of providing the necessary elements to properly interpret the data and adequately constrain the subsurface model. It is purposely shown, also through the sole use of horizontal geophones, how it can be possible to efficiently and quickly acquire both Love and Rayleigh (radial-component) waves. The presented field dataset reports a case where Rayleigh waves (both their vertical and radial components) appear largely dominated by higher modes with little or no evidence of the fundamental mode. The joint inversion of the radial and vertical components of Rayleigh waves jointly with Love waves is performed by adopting a multi-objective inversion scheme based on the computation of synthetic seismograms for the three considered components and the minimization of the whole velocity spectra misfits (Full Velocity Spectra - FVS - inversion). Such a FVS multi-component joint inversion can better handle complex velocity spectra thus providing a more robust subsurface model not affected by erroneous velocity spectra interpretations and non-uniqueness of the solution.

  16. Single-shot digital holographic interferometry using a high power pulsed laser for full field measurement of traveling waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Greef, Daniël; Dirckx, Joris J. J.

    2012-06-01

    In the past, interferometric holographic techniques have been used extensively to perform full-field, yet timeaveraged analysis of vibrational patterns. When time-resolved information was needed, optical scanning single-point measurement techniques, such as heterodyne interferometric vibrometry, were available. Recently, stroboscopically illuminated digital holography has proven to yield both full-field and time-resolved information of vibrations with nanometer range amplitudes. In this technique, short laser pulses, synchronized to the vibration phase, are recorded. Good results have been achieved for high-frequency vibrations. However, due to the low energy in a single pulse, acquisition time increases for decreasing vibration frequency in order to receive enough energy on the camera, introducing problems such as artifacts due to slow movements of the object or electronic read-out noise. In this work, stroboscopic holography is combined with a high power, frequency doubled pulsed Nd:YAG laser, which produces enough energy in a single pulse to perform single-shot holographic recordings. This new setup allows imaging vibrations ranging from quasi-static deformations to high-frequency vibrations (1 - 20000 Hz), while avoiding the earlier mentioned acquisition issues. The additional challenge is to synchronize the lasers flash tube and Q-switch to the image acquisition and the vibration phase of the measured object. Results of measurements on a stretched circular latex membrane will be presented. The out-of-plane displacement of the membrane is visualized over the entire surface as a function of time, thus providing true four-dimensional information. Extracting the vibration phase map is useful, for instance to reveal travelling waves, which are invisible on time averaged images.

  17. Investigation of damping and radiation using full plane wave decomposition in ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allam, Sabry; Åbom, Mats

    2006-05-01

    A general plane wave decomposition procedure that determines both the wave amplitudes (or the reflection coefficient) and the wavenumbers is proposed for in-duct measurements. To improve the quality of the procedure, overdetermination and a nonlinear least-squares procedure is used. The procedure has been tested using a six microphone array, and used for accurate measurements of the radiation from an open unflanged pipe with flow. The experimental results for the reflection coefficient magnitude and the end correction have been compared with the theory of Munt. The agreement is very good if the maximum speed rather than the average is used to compare measurements and theory. This result is the first complete experimental validation of the theory of Munt [Acoustic transmission properties of a jet pipe with subsonic jet flow, I: the cold jet reflection coefficient, Journal of Sound and Vibration 142(3) (1990) 413-436]. The damping of the plane wave (the imaginary part of the wavenumber) could also be obtained from the experimental data. It is found that the damping increases strongly, compared with the damping for a quiescent fluid, when the acoustic boundary layer becomes thicker than the viscous sublayer. This finding is in agreement with a few earlier measurements and is also in agreement with a theoretical model proposed by Howe [The damping of sound by wall turbulent sheer layers, Journal of Acoustic Society of America 98(3) (1995) 1723-1730]. The results reported here are the first experimental verifications of Howe's model. It is found that the model works well typically up to a normalized acoustic boundary layer thickness δA+ of 30-40. For values of a δA+ less than 10, corresponding to higher frequencies or lower flow speeds, the model proposed by Dokumaci [A note on transmission of sound in a wide pipe with mean flow and viscothermal attenuation, Journal of Sound and Vibration 208(4) (1997) 653-655] is also in good agreement with the experimental data.

  18. Full-wave simulation of a three-dimensional metamaterial prism

    SciTech Connect

    Basilio, Lorena I.; Langston, William L.; Warne, Larry K.; Johnson, William A.; Sinclair, Michael B.

    2015-01-23

    In our article, a negative-index metamaterial prism based on a composite unit cell containing a split-ring resonator and a z-dipole is designed and simulated. The design approach combines simulations of a single unit cell to identify the appropriate cell design (yielding the desired negative-index behavior) together with subcell modeling (which simplifies the mesh representation of the resonator geometry and allows for a larger number of resonator cells to be handled). Furthermore, to describe the methodology used in designing a n = -1 refractive index prism, our results include the effective-medium parameters, the far-field scattered patterns, and the near-zone field distributions corresponding to a normally incident plane-wave excitation of the prism.

  19. Full-wave simulation of a three-dimensional metamaterial prism

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Basilio, Lorena I.; Langston, William L.; Warne, Larry K.; Johnson, William A.; Sinclair, Michael B.

    2015-01-23

    In our article, a negative-index metamaterial prism based on a composite unit cell containing a split-ring resonator and a z-dipole is designed and simulated. The design approach combines simulations of a single unit cell to identify the appropriate cell design (yielding the desired negative-index behavior) together with subcell modeling (which simplifies the mesh representation of the resonator geometry and allows for a larger number of resonator cells to be handled). Furthermore, to describe the methodology used in designing a n = -1 refractive index prism, our results include the effective-medium parameters, the far-field scattered patterns, and the near-zone field distributionsmore » corresponding to a normally incident plane-wave excitation of the prism.« less

  20. A full-duplex multiband access radio-over-fiber link with frequency multiplying millimeter-wave generation and wavelength reuse for upstream signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianxin; Li, Yanjie

    2015-01-01

    A full-duplex radio-over-fiber (RoF) link providing multiband wireless accesses including 20 GHz, 40 GHz and 60 GHz millimeter (mm)-wave signal using a 10 GHz RF signal source is proposed. According to our theoretical analysis and simulation of the transmission performance of the signal along the single mode fiber, the code form distortion caused by the sideband walk-off effect due to the fiber chromatic dispersion can be eliminated, and the degradation caused by the fading effect on the down-stream signal is removed by adjusting the relative phase shift between the two sidebands. The upstream signal carried by the optical carrier abstracted from the downlink signal is also immune to the code outline distortion. The numerical simulation results show that the 20 km full-duplex RoF link with our generated optical mm-wave signal maintains good performance.

  1. Laplace-domain wave-equation modeling and full waveform inversion in 3D isotropic elastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Woohyun; Pyun, Sukjoon; Shin, Changsoo; Kim, Han-Joon

    2014-06-01

    The 3D elastic problem has not been widely studied because of the computational burden. Over the past few years, 3D elastic full waveform inversion (FWI) techniques in the time and frequency domains have been proposed by some researchers based on developments in computer science. However, these techniques still have the non-uniqueness and high nonlinearity problems. In this paper, we propose a 3D elastic FWI algorithm in the Laplace domain that can mitigate these problems. To efficiently solve the impedance matrix, we adopt a first-order absorbing boundary condition that results in a symmetric system. A conjugate gradient (CG) solver can be used because the Laplace-domain wave equation is naturally positive definite. We apply the Jacobi preconditioner to increase the convergence speed. We identify the permissible range of Laplace damping constants through dispersion analysis and accuracy tests. We perform the Laplace-domain FWI based on a logarithmic objective function, and the inversion examples are designed for a land setting, which means that the source is vertically excited and multi-component data are considered. The inversion results indicate that the inversion that uses only the vertical component performs slightly better than the multi-component inversion. This unexpected result is obtained partly because we use a vertically polarized source. We analyze the residuals and Frechet derivatives for each component to examine the characteristics of the Laplace-domain multi-component FWI. The results indicate that the residuals and Frechet derivatives for the horizontal component have a singularity problem. The numerical examples demonstrate that the singularity problem is related to the directivity of the displacement and to taking the logarithm of Laplace-domain wave fields. To avoid this singularity problem, we use a simple method that excludes the data near the singular region. Although we can use either simultaneous or sequential strategies to invert the

  2. BayesWave Analysis for LIGO Detector Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Key, Joey Shapiro; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors successfully collected data during the first observing run (O1) September 2015 to January 2016. The Bayesian inference wavelet decomposition algorithm BayesWave uses a phenomenological parameterized model to characterize the data. Among the BayesWave products are reconstructed waveforms and spectral analysis of instrument noise transients (``glitches''). The BayesWave analysis contributes to our understanding of the LIGO instrument and our ability to distinguish instrument glitches from burst sources of gravitational waves. Preliminary BayesWave analysis of the LIGO O1 data will be presented.

  3. Novel wave power analysis linking pressure-flow waves, wave potential, and the forward and backward components of hydraulic power.

    PubMed

    Mynard, Jonathan P; Smolich, Joseph J

    2016-04-15

    Wave intensity analysis provides detailed insights into factors influencing hemodynamics. However, wave intensity is not a conserved quantity, so it is sensitive to diameter variations and is not distributed among branches of a junction. Moreover, the fundamental relation between waves and hydraulic power is unclear. We, therefore, propose an alternative to wave intensity called "wave power," calculated via incremental changes in pressure and flow (dPdQ) and a novel time-domain separation of hydraulic pressure power and kinetic power into forward and backward wave-related components (ΠP±and ΠQ±). Wave power has several useful properties:1) it is obtained directly from flow measurements, without requiring further calculation of velocity;2) it is a quasi-conserved quantity that may be used to study the relative distribution of waves at junctions; and3) it has the units of power (Watts). We also uncover a simple relationship between wave power and changes in ΠP±and show that wave reflection reduces transmitted power. Absolute values of ΠP±represent wave potential, a recently introduced concept that unifies steady and pulsatile aspects of hemodynamics. We show that wave potential represents the hydraulic energy potential stored in a compliant pressurized vessel, with spatial gradients producing waves that transfer this energy. These techniques and principles are verified numerically and also experimentally with pressure/flow measurements in all branches of a central bifurcation in sheep, under a wide range of hemodynamic conditions. The proposed "wave power analysis," encompassing wave power, wave potential, and wave separation of hydraulic power provides a potent time-domain approach for analyzing hemodynamics. PMID:26873972

  4. Novel wave power analysis linking pressure-flow waves, wave potential, and the forward and backward components of hydraulic power.

    PubMed

    Mynard, Jonathan P; Smolich, Joseph J

    2016-04-15

    Wave intensity analysis provides detailed insights into factors influencing hemodynamics. However, wave intensity is not a conserved quantity, so it is sensitive to diameter variations and is not distributed among branches of a junction. Moreover, the fundamental relation between waves and hydraulic power is unclear. We, therefore, propose an alternative to wave intensity called "wave power," calculated via incremental changes in pressure and flow (dPdQ) and a novel time-domain separation of hydraulic pressure power and kinetic power into forward and backward wave-related components (ΠP±and ΠQ±). Wave power has several useful properties:1) it is obtained directly from flow measurements, without requiring further calculation of velocity;2) it is a quasi-conserved quantity that may be used to study the relative distribution of waves at junctions; and3) it has the units of power (Watts). We also uncover a simple relationship between wave power and changes in ΠP±and show that wave reflection reduces transmitted power. Absolute values of ΠP±represent wave potential, a recently introduced concept that unifies steady and pulsatile aspects of hemodynamics. We show that wave potential represents the hydraulic energy potential stored in a compliant pressurized vessel, with spatial gradients producing waves that transfer this energy. These techniques and principles are verified numerically and also experimentally with pressure/flow measurements in all branches of a central bifurcation in sheep, under a wide range of hemodynamic conditions. The proposed "wave power analysis," encompassing wave power, wave potential, and wave separation of hydraulic power provides a potent time-domain approach for analyzing hemodynamics.

  5. Full Waveform Inversion of Diving & Reflected Waves based on Scale Separation for Velocity and Impedance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brossier, Romain; Zhou, Wei; Operto, Stéphane; Virieux, Jean

    2015-04-01

    Full Waveform Inversion (FWI) is an appealing method for quantitative high-resolution subsurface imaging (Virieux et al., 2009). For crustal-scales exploration from surface seismic, FWI generally succeeds in recovering a broadband of wavenumbers in the shallow part of the targeted medium taking advantage of the broad scattering-angle provided by both reflected and diving waves. In contrast, deeper targets are often only illuminated by short-spread reflections, which favor the reconstruction of the short wavelengths at the expense of the longer ones, leading to a possible notch in the intermediate part of the wavenumber spectrum. To update the velocity macromodel from reflection data, image-domain strategies (e.g., Symes & Carazzone, 1991) aim to maximize a semblance criterion in the migrated domain. Alternatively, recent data-domain strategies (e.g., Xu et al., 2012, Ma & Hale, 2013, Brossier et al., 2014), called Reflection FWI (RFWI), inspired by Chavent et al. (1994), rely on a scale separation between the velocity macromodel and prior knowledge of the reflectivity to emphasize the transmission regime in the sensitivity kernel of the inversion. However, all these strategies focus on reflected waves only, discarding the low-wavenumber information carried out by diving waves. With the current development of very long-offset and wide-azimuth acquisitions, a significant part of the recorded energy is provided by diving waves and subcritical reflections, and high-resolution tomographic methods should take advantage of all types of waves. In this presentation, we will first review the issues of classical FWI when applied to reflected waves and how RFWI is able to retrieve the long wavelength of the model. We then propose a unified formulation of FWI (Zhou et al., 2014) to update the low wavenumbers of the velocity model by the joint inversion of diving and reflected arrivals, while the impedance model is updated thanks to reflected wave only. An alternate inversion of

  6. The physical meaning of transmission-line parameters in a full-wave theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambousky, Ronald; Nitsch, Jürgen; Tkachenko, Sergey

    2016-09-01

    In the potential-current representation, transmission-line parameters in the Transmission-Line Super Theory (TLST) do not have a direct physical meaning - they are gauge dependent, i.e.: they are different in the Lorenz and Coulomb gauge. However, they retain traces of their classical origin: They are constituted of capacitances and inductances for forward and backward running waves along the lines. Therefore their corresponding matrices are not symmetrical as in the case of classical transmission-line theory. In the charge-current representation the parameter matrices have a physical meaning: their elements consist of damping functions due to the non-uniformities of the lines and of the propagation functions along the lines, incorporating conductor and radiation losses. The transmission line parameters also contribute to the total radiated power of the lines. The attempt to quantize radiation locally, fails because radiation describes a long-range (integral) interaction, and therefore affects all conductor parts of all lines. However, it can be stated that at stronger inhomogeneities the local contributions to radiation increase, and are particularly recognizable along the risers.

  7. An analysis of whistler waves at interplanetary shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lengyel-Frey, D.; Farrell, W. M.; Stone, R. G.; Balogh, A.; Forsyth, R.

    1994-01-01

    We present an analysis of whistler wave magnetic and electric field amplitude ratios from which we compute wave propagation angles and energies of electrons in resonance with the waves. To do this analysis, we compute the theoretical dependence of ratios of wave components on the whistler wave propagation angle Theta for various combinations of orthogonal wave components. Ratios of wave components that would be observed by a spinning spacecraft are determined, and the effects of arbitrary inclinations of the spacecraft to the ambient magnetic field and to the whistler wave vector are studied. This analysis clearly demonstrates that B/E, the ratio of magnetic to electric field amplitudes, cannot be assumed to be the wave index of refraction, contrary to assumptions of some earlier studies. Therefore previous interpretations of whistler wave observations based on this assumption must be reinvestigated. B/E ratios derived using three orthogonal wave components can be used to unambiguously determine Theta. Using spin plane observations alone, a significant uncertainty occurs in the determination of Theta. Nevertheless, for whistler waves observed downstream of several interplanetary shocks by the Ulysses plasma wave experiment we find that Theta is highly oblique. We suggest that the analysis of wave amplitude ratios used in conjunction with traditional stability analyses provide a promising tool for determining which particle distributions and resonances are likely to be dominant contributors to wave growth.

  8. SciDAC Center for Simulation of Wave-Plasma Interactions - Iterated Finite-Orbit Monte Carlo Simulations with Full-Wave Fields for Modeling Tokamak ICRF Wave Heating Experiments - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Myunghee; Chan, Vincent S.

    2014-02-28

    This final report describes the work performed under U.S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement DE-FC02-08ER54954 for the period April 1, 2011 through March 31, 2013. The goal of this project was to perform iterated finite-orbit Monte Carlo simulations with full-wall fields for modeling tokamak ICRF wave heating experiments. In year 1, the finite-orbit Monte-Carlo code ORBIT-RF and its iteration algorithms with the full-wave code AORSA were improved to enable systematical study of the factors responsible for the discrepancy in the simulated and the measured fast-ion FIDA signals in the DIII-D and NSTX ICRF fast-wave (FW) experiments. In year 2, ORBIT-RF was coupled to the TORIC full-wave code for a comparative study of ORBIT-RF/TORIC and ORBIT-RF/AORSA results in FW experiments.

  9. Terrestrial detector for low frequency gravitational waves based on full tensor measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyung Mok; Paik, Hojung; Majorana, Ettore; Vol Moody, M.; Griggs, Cornelius E.; Nielsen, Alex; Kim, Chumglee

    2015-08-01

    Terrestrial gravitational wave (GW) detectors are mostly based on Michelson-type laser interferometers with arm lengths of a few km to reach a strain sensitivity of 10-23 Hz-1/2 in the frequency range of a few 100 to a few 1000 Hz. There should be a large variety of sources generating GWs at lower frequencies below 10 Hz. However, seismic and Newtonian noise has been serious obstacle in realizing terrestrial low-frequency GW detectors. Here we describe a new GW detector concept by adopting new measurement techniques and configurations to overcome the present low-frequency barrier due to seismic and Newtonian noise. The detector is an extension of the superconducting gravity gradiometer (SGG) that has been developed at the University of Maryland to measure all components of the gravity gradient tensor by orthogonally combining three bars with test masses at each end. The oscillating component of the gravity gradient tensor is the GW strain tensor, but the actual signal is likely to be dominated by Newtonian and seismic noise, whose amplitudes are several orders of magnitude larger than the GWs. We propose to mitigate seismic noise by (a) constructing detector in deep underground, (b) applying passive isolation with pendulum suspension, and (c) using the common-mode rejection characteristic of the detector. The Newtonian noise can be suppressed by combining the components of the gradient tensor with signals detected by seismometers and microphones. By constructing a detector of 100-m long bars cooled to 0.1 K, a strain sensitivity of a few times 10-21 Hz-1/2 can be achieved in the frequency range between 0.1 to 10 Hz. Binaries composed of intermediate mass black holes of 1000 to 10,000 M¤ could be detected at distances up to a few Gpc with this detector. Detectable range for the merging white dwarf binaries is up to a few Mpc. Unlike current two-dimensional detectors, our single detector is able to determine the polarization of GWs and the direction to sources on

  10. High resolution imaging of lithospheric structures beneath the Pyrenees by full waveform inversion of shortperiod teleseismic P waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Chevrot, Sébastien; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Monteiller, Vadim; Durochat, Clément

    2016-04-01

    Thanks to the deployment of permanent and temporary broadband arrays, coverage and data quality have dramatically improved in the last decade, especially for regional-scale studies. In addition, owing to the progress of high-performance resources and numerical simulation techniques, waveform inversion approaches nowadays become a viable alternative to classical asymptotic ray based tomographic approaches. Exploiting full waveforms in seismic tomography requires an efficient and precise method to solve the elastic wave equation in 3D inhomogeneous media. Since resolution of waveform inversion is limited by the seismic wavelength as well as the wavefield sampling density, it is crucial to exploit short-period teleseismic waves recorded by dense regional arrays. However, modeling the propagation of short-period body waves in heterogeneous media is still very challenging, even on the largest modern supercomputers. For this reason, we have developed a hybrid method that couples a global wave propagation method in a 1D Earth to a 3D spectral-element method in a regional domain. This hybrid method restricts the costly 3D computations to inside the regional domain, which dramatically decreases the computational cost, allows us to compute teleseismic wavefields down to 1s period, thus accounting for the complexities that affect the propagation of seismic waves in the regional domain. We present the first application of this new waveform inversion approach to broadband data coming from two dense transects deployed during the PYROPE experiment across the Pyrenees mountains. We obtain the first high-resolution lithospheric section of compressional and shear velocities across an orogenic belt. The tomographic model provides clear evidence for the under-thrusting of the thinned Iberian crust beneath the European plate and for the important role of rift-inherited mantle structures during the formation of the Pyrenees.

  11. Effect of the scrape-off layer in AORSA full wave simulations of fast wave minority, mid/high harmonic, and helicon heating regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Bertelli, N. Gerhardt, S.; Hosea, J. C.; LeBlanc, B.; Perkins, R. J.; Phillips, C. K.; Taylor, G.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Jaeger, E. F.; Lau, C.; Blazevski, D.; Green, D. L.; Berry, L.; Ryan, P. M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C.; Pinsker, R. I.; Prater, R.; Qin, C. M.; and others

    2015-12-10

    Several experiments on different machines and in different fast wave (FW) heating regimes, such as hydrogen minority heating and high harmonic fast waves, have found strong interactions between radio-frequency (RF) waves and the scrape-off layer (SOL) region. This paper examines the propagation and the power loss in the SOL by using the full wave code AORSA, in which the edge plasma beyond the last closed flux surface (LCFS) is included in the solution domain and a collisional damping parameter is used as a proxy to represent the real, and most likely nonlinear, damping processes. 3D AORSA results for the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX), where a full antenna spectrum is reconstructed, are shown, confirming the same behavior found for a single toroidal mode results in Bertelli et al, Nucl. Fusion, 54 083004, 2014, namely, a strong transition to higher SOL power losses (driven by the RF field) when the FW cut-off is moved away from in front of the antenna by increasing the edge density. Additionally, full wave simulations have been extended to “conventional” tokamaks with higher aspect ratios, such as the DIII-D, Alcator C-Mod, and EAST devices. DIII-D results show similar behavior found in NSTX and NSTX-U, consistent with previous DIII-D experimental observations. In contrast, a different behavior has been found for Alcator C-Mod and EAST, which operate in the minority heating regime unlike NSTX/NSTX-U and DIII-D, which operate in the mid/high harmonic regime. A substantial discussion of some of the main aspects, such as (i) the pitch angle of the magnetic field; (ii) minority heating vs. mid/high harmonic regimes is presented showing the different behavior of the RF field in the SOL region for NSTX-U scenarios with different plasma current. Finally, the preliminary results of the impact of the SOL region on the evaluation of the helicon current drive efficiency in DIII-D is presented for the first time and briefly compared with the different regimes

  12. Effect of the scrape-off layer in AORSA full wave simulations of fast wave minority, mid/high harmonic, and helicon heating regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Bertelli, Nicola; Jaeger, E. F.; Lau, Cornwall H; Blazevski, Dan; Green, David L; Berry, Lee Alan; Bonoli, P. T.; Gerhardt, S.P.; Hosea, J. C.; LeBlanc, B.; Perkins, R. J.; Phillips, Cynthia; Pinsker, R. I.; Prater, R.; Qin, C M; Ryan, P. M.; Taylor, G.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, Randy; Wright, J.; Zhang, X J

    2015-01-01

    Several experiments on different machines and in different fast wave (FW) heating regimes, such as hydrogen minority heating and high harmonic fast waves, have found strong interactions between radio-frequency (RF) waves and the scrape-off layer (SOL) region. This paper examines the propagation and the power loss in the SOL by using the full wave code AORSA, in which the edge plasma beyond the last closed flux surface (LCFS) is included in the solution domain and a collisional damping parameter is used as a proxy to represent the real, and most likely nonlinear, damping processes. 3D AORSA results for the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX), where a full antenna spectrum is reconstructed, are shown, confirming the same behavior found for a single toroidal mode results in Bertelli et al, Nucl. Fusion, 54 083004, 2014, namely, a strong transition to higher SOL power losses (driven by the RF field) when the FW cut-off is moved away from in front of the antenna by increasing the edge density. Additionally, full wave simulations have been extended to "conventional" tokamaks with higher aspect ratios, such as the DIII-D, Alcator C-Mod, and EAST devices. DIII-D results show similar behavior found in NSTX and NSTX-U, consistent with previous DIII-D experimental observations. In contrast, a different behavior has been found for Alcator C-Mod and EAST, which operate in the minority heating regime unlike NSTX/NSTX-U and DIII-D, which operate in the mid/high harmonic regime. A substantial discussion of some of the main aspects, such as (i) the pitch angle of the magnetic field; (ii) minority heating vs. mid/high harmonic regimes is presented showing the different behavior of the RF field in the SOL region for NSTX-U scenarios with different plasma current. Finally, the preliminary results of the impact of the SOL region on the evaluation of the helicon current drive efficiency in DIII-D is presented for the first time and briefly compared with the different regimes

  13. The first full-length endogenous hepadnaviruses: identification and analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Pan, Shaokun; Yang, Huijuan; Bai, Weiya; Shen, Zhongliang; Liu, Jing; Xie, Youhua

    2012-09-01

    In silico screening of metazoan genome data identified multiple endogenous hepadnaviral elements in the budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus) genome, most notably two elements comprising about 1.3 × and 1.0 × the full-length genome. Phylogenetic and molecular dating analyses show that endogenous budgerigar hepatitis B viruses (eBHBV) share an ancestor with extant avihepadnaviruses and infiltrated the budgerigar genome millions of years ago. Identification of full-length genomes with preserved key features like ε signals could enable resurrection of ancient BHBV. PMID:22718817

  14. Iterated finite-orbit Monte Carlo simulations with full-wave fields for modeling tokamak ion cyclotron resonance frequency wave heating experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, M.; Chan, V. S.; Lao, L. L.; Pinsker, R. I.; Green, D.; Berry, L. A.; Jaeger, F.; Park, J. M.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Liu, D.; Podesta, M.; Harvey, R.; Smithe, D. N.; Bonoli, P.

    2010-05-15

    The five-dimensional finite-orbit Monte Carlo code ORBIT-RF[M. Choi et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 1 (2005)] is successfully coupled with the two-dimensional full-wave code all-orders spectral algorithm (AORSA) [E. F. Jaeger et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 056101 (2006)] in a self-consistent way to achieve improved predictive modeling for ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) wave heating experiments in present fusion devices and future ITER [R. Aymar et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 1301 (2001)]. The ORBIT-RF/AORSA simulations reproduce fast-ion spectra and spatial profiles qualitatively consistent with fast ion D-alpha [W. W. Heidbrink et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 49, 1457 (2007)] spectroscopic data in both DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] and National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 1435 (2001)] high harmonic ICRF heating experiments. This work verifies that both finite-orbit width effect of fast-ion due to its drift motion along the torus and iterations between fast-ion distribution and wave fields are important in modeling ICRF heating experiments.

  15. Iterated finite-orbit Monte Carlo simulations with full-wave fields for modeling tokamak ion cyclotron resonance frequency wave heating experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, M.; Green, David L; Heidbrink, W. W.; Harvey, R. W.; Liu, D.; Chan, V. S.; Berry, Lee A; Jaeger, Erwin Frederick; Lao, L.L.; Pinsker, R. I.; Podesta, M.; Smithe, D. N.; Park, J. M.; Bonoli, P.

    2010-01-01

    The five-dimensional finite-orbit Monte Carlo code ORBIT-RF [M. Choi , Phys. Plasmas 12, 1 (2005)] is successfully coupled with the two-dimensional full-wave code all-orders spectral algorithm (AORSA) [E. F. Jaeger , Phys. Plasmas 13, 056101 (2006)] in a self-consistent way to achieve improved predictive modeling for ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) wave heating experiments in present fusion devices and future ITER [R. Aymar , Nucl. Fusion 41, 1301 (2001)]. The ORBIT-RF/AORSA simulations reproduce fast-ion spectra and spatial profiles qualitatively consistent with fast ion D-alpha [W. W. Heidbrink , Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 49, 1457 (2007)] spectroscopic data in both DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] and National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono , Nucl. Fusion 41, 1435 (2001)] high harmonic ICRF heating experiments. This work verifies that both finite-orbit width effect of fast-ion due to its drift motion along the torus and iterations between fast-ion distribution and wave fields are important in modeling ICRF heating experiments. (C) 2010 American Institute of Physics. [doi:10.1063/1.3314336

  16. Full-wave Feasibility Study of Magnetic Diagnostic based on O-X Mode Conversion and Oblique Reflectometry Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpe, F. A.; Choi, M.; Patel, Y.; Meneghini, O.

    2013-10-01

    We present initial two-dimensional full-wave modeling of an innovative diagnostic of the magnetic field vector as a function of the minor radius in the pedestal region. An angularly broad millimeter-wave beam of ordinary (O) polarization is obliquely injected in the magnetized plasma; part of it converts in the extraordinary (X) mode at the O-mode cutoff, the rest is reflected. The reflected beam pattern, measured with an array of receivers, contains information on the angular-dependent mode conversion, which contains information on the magnetic pitch angle at the cutoff. Measurements at various frequencies provide radially resolved measurements of pitch angle. The new technique proposed does not require the plasma to be an overdense emitter of Electron Bernstein Waves and is applicable whenever reflectometry is applicable. Simulations performed with the finite-element COMSOL Multiphysics code in ``DIII-D-like'' plasma slabs confirmed the presence of a minimum in reflectivity of an externally injected O-mode beam. The dependence of such reflectivity ``hole'' upon magnetic field is under study. Future inclusion of toroidal ripple, density and magnetic fluctuation effects, as well as possible extensions to a fully three-dimensional diagnostic of the magnetic field will be discussed. Current address: Imsol-X.

  17. Determination of the full elastic moduli of single crystals using shear-wave velocities by Brillouin spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, D.; Mao, Z.; Lin, J.; Yang, J.

    2013-12-01

    Brillouin light scattering (BLS) is the inelastic scattering of monochromatic laser light by phonons in the GHz frequency range [1]. BLS spectroscopy can be used to measure sound velocities traveling along certain directions of a single crystal through the frequency shifts of the scattered light from the acoustic phonons [1]. Over the past few decades, BLS spectroscopy has been widely used to measure the velocities of acoustic waves for a wide range of Earth's materials, in which the full elastic constants were derived from the measured compressional (VP) and shear wave (VS) velocities. However, the VP velocities of minerals normally overlap with the shear-wave velocities of diamonds in Brillouin measurements approximately above 25 GPa [2-5] such that only VS of minerals can be measured experimentally. Theoretical models have showed that the shear-wave velocities of minerals also carry necessary information to invert the full elastic tensors [2], although previous studies at high pressures have focused on measuring velocities within the principle planes of the crystals. This leads to a strong trade-off among individual Cij, preventing the derivation of the full elastic tensors from the VS velocities alone [3-5]. In this study, we have come up with an elastic model to overcome this problem by finding a suitable crystallographic plane that has optimized VS-VP interactions in the elastic tensors. Using MgO, spinel and zoisite as test samples, we have used measured VP/VS or VS velocities of these crystals using BLS spectroscopy to derive their full elastic tensors. This new approach sheds lights on future high-pressure elasticity studies relevant to materials the Earth's deep interior. 1. Sinogeikin, S.V., Bass, J.D., Phys. Earth Planet. Inter., 120, 43 (2000). 2. Every, A. G., Phys. Rev. B., 22, 1746, (1980) 3. Marquardt, H., Speziale, S., Reichmann, H.J., Frost, D.J., and Schilling, F.R., Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 287, 345 (2009). 4. Marquardt, H., Speziale, S

  18. Vector Finite Element Modeling of the Full-Wave Maxwell Equations to Evaluate Power Loss in Bent Optical Fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Koning, J; Rieben, R; Rodrigue, G

    2004-12-09

    We measure the loss of power incurred by the bending of a single mode step-indexed optical fiber using vector finite element modeling of the full-wave Maxwell equations in the optical regime. We demonstrate fewer grid elements can be used to model light transmission in longer fiber lengths by using high-order basis functions in conjunction with a high order energy conserving time integration method. The power in the core is measured at several points to determine the percentage loss. We also demonstrate the effect of bending on the light polarization.

  19. Wave intensity analysis in air-filled flexible vessels.

    PubMed

    Clavica, Francesco; Parker, Kim H; Khir, Ashraf W

    2015-02-26

    Wave intensity analysis (WIA) is an analytical technique generally used to investigate the propagation of waves in the cardiovascular system. Despite its increasing usage in the cardiovascular system, to our knowledge WIA has never been applied to the respiratory system. Given the analogies between arteries and airways (i.e. fluid flow in flexible vessels), the aim of this work is to test the applicability of WIA with gas flow instead of liquid flow. The models employed in this study are similar to earlier studies used for arterial investigations. Simultaneous pressure (P) and velocity (U) measurements were initially made in a single tube and then in several flexible tubes connected in series. Wave speed was calculated using the foot-to-foot method (cf), which was used to separate analytically the measured P and U waveforms into their forward and backward components. Further, the data were used to calculate wave intensity, which was also separated into its forward and backward components. Although the measured wave speed was relatively high, the results showed that the onsets and the nature of reflections (compression/expansion) derived with WIA, corresponded well to those anticipated using the theory of waves in liquid-filled elastic tubes. On average the difference between the experimental and theoretical arrival time of reflection was 6.1% and 3.6% for the single vessel and multivessel experiment, respectively. The results suggest that WIA can provide relatively accurate information on reflections in air-filled flexible tubes, warranting further studies to explore the full potential of this technique in the respiratory system. PMID:25595424

  20. Wave intensity analysis in air-filled flexible vessels.

    PubMed

    Clavica, Francesco; Parker, Kim H; Khir, Ashraf W

    2015-02-26

    Wave intensity analysis (WIA) is an analytical technique generally used to investigate the propagation of waves in the cardiovascular system. Despite its increasing usage in the cardiovascular system, to our knowledge WIA has never been applied to the respiratory system. Given the analogies between arteries and airways (i.e. fluid flow in flexible vessels), the aim of this work is to test the applicability of WIA with gas flow instead of liquid flow. The models employed in this study are similar to earlier studies used for arterial investigations. Simultaneous pressure (P) and velocity (U) measurements were initially made in a single tube and then in several flexible tubes connected in series. Wave speed was calculated using the foot-to-foot method (cf), which was used to separate analytically the measured P and U waveforms into their forward and backward components. Further, the data were used to calculate wave intensity, which was also separated into its forward and backward components. Although the measured wave speed was relatively high, the results showed that the onsets and the nature of reflections (compression/expansion) derived with WIA, corresponded well to those anticipated using the theory of waves in liquid-filled elastic tubes. On average the difference between the experimental and theoretical arrival time of reflection was 6.1% and 3.6% for the single vessel and multivessel experiment, respectively. The results suggest that WIA can provide relatively accurate information on reflections in air-filled flexible tubes, warranting further studies to explore the full potential of this technique in the respiratory system.

  1. Development of Scientific Simulation 3D Full Wave ICRF Code for Stellarators and Heating/CD Scenarios Development

    SciTech Connect

    Vdovin V.L.

    2005-08-15

    In this report we describe theory and 3D full wave code description for the wave excitation, propagation and absorption in 3-dimensional (3D) stellarator equilibrium high beta plasma in ion cyclotron frequency range (ICRF). This theory forms a basis for a 3D code creation, urgently needed for the ICRF heating scenarios development for the operated LHD, constructed W7-X, NCSX and projected CSX3 stellarators, as well for re evaluation of ICRF scenarios in operated tokamaks and in the ITER . The theory solves the 3D Maxwell-Vlasov antenna-plasma-conducting shell boundary value problem in the non-orthogonal flux coordinates ({Psi}, {theta}, {var_phi}), {Psi} being magnetic flux function, {theta} and {var_phi} being the poloidal and toroidal angles, respectively. All basic physics, like wave refraction, reflection and diffraction are self consistently included, along with the fundamental ion and ion minority cyclotron resonances, two ion hybrid resonance, electron Landau and TTMP absorption. Antenna reactive impedance and loading resistance are also calculated and urgently needed for an antenna -generator matching. This is accomplished in a real confining magnetic field being varying in a plasma major radius direction, in toroidal and poloidal directions, through making use of the hot dense plasma wave induced currents with account to the finite Larmor radius effects. We expand the solution in Fourier series over the toroidal ({var_phi}) and poloidal ({theta}) angles and solve resulting ordinary differential equations in a radial like {Psi}-coordinate by finite difference method. The constructed discretization scheme is divergent-free one, thus retaining the basic properties of original equations. The Fourier expansion over the angle coordinates has given to us the possibility to correctly construct the ''parallel'' wave number k{sub //}, and thereby to correctly describe the ICRF waves absorption by a hot plasma. The toroidal harmonics are tightly coupled with each

  2. Full-Envelope Launch Abort System Performance Analysis Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aubuchon, Vanessa V.

    2014-01-01

    The implementation of a new dispersion methodology is described, which dis-perses abort initiation altitude or time along with all other Launch Abort System (LAS) parameters during Monte Carlo simulations. In contrast, the standard methodology assumes that an abort initiation condition is held constant (e.g., aborts initiated at altitude for Mach 1, altitude for maximum dynamic pressure, etc.) while dispersing other LAS parameters. The standard method results in large gaps in performance information due to the discrete nature of initiation conditions, while the full-envelope dispersion method provides a significantly more comprehensive assessment of LAS abort performance for the full launch vehicle ascent flight envelope and identifies performance "pinch-points" that may occur at flight conditions outside of those contained in the discrete set. The new method has significantly increased the fidelity of LAS abort simulations and confidence in the results.

  3. Analysis of reconstructions in full view fluorescence molecular tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyde, Damon; Soubret, Antoine; Dunham, Joshua; Lasser, Tobias; Miller, Eric; Brooks, Dana; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2007-02-01

    Fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) is an emerging modality for the in-vivo imaging of fluorescent probes which improves upon existing planar photographic imaging techniques by quantitatively reconstructing fluorochrome distributions in-vivo. We present here results using an FMT system capable of full view imaging for arbitrary surface geometries. Results are presented comparing single and multiple projection configurations, and illustrating the need for properly implemented non-negativity constraints.

  4. Full-Scale Three-Dimensional Electromagnetic Simulations of a Terahertz Folded-Waveguide Traveling-Wave Tube Using ICEPIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gensheimer, P. D.; Walker, C. K.; Ziolkowski, R. W.; Drouet d'Aubigny, C.

    2012-03-01

    This paper discusses simulation and modeling of the slow wave structure of a folded-waveguide terahertz traveling wave tube (TWT) using the Improved Concurrent Electromagnetic Particle In Cell (ICEPIC) software. This is the first time ICEPIC has been used for simulation of a TWT amplifier. Cold test simulations compare favorably with analytical models; at 368 GHz, the on-axis interaction impedance is 7.8 Ω. Hot test (beam included) ICEPIC simulations were used to determine the effects of space charge on the gain calculations. At 368 GHz, the normalized beam plasma frequency from ICEPIC simulations is Ωp = 0.56. Analysis of our ICEPIC simulations at 368 GHz indicates a normalized beam plasma frequency 75% larger than an analytical model we improvised from a sheath helix model taken from the literature. The hot test ICEPIC simulations at 368 GHz for a 64 periods long slow wave structure and a 10 mA, 25 kV electron beam produce small signal gain of 27 dB. The small-signal fractional 3-dB bandwidth of the TWT is 2.9%. The saturated fractional 3-dB bandwidth is 3.2%. Large signal simulations indicate that the saturated power at 368 GHz is 39.4 dBm and the saturated gain is 21.8 dB. A snapshot of a cross section of the electron beam shows bunching in space and a corresponding modulation in the velocity of the electron beam.

  5. Full Range MGA Plutonium Isotopic Analysis using Single Ge Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, W.M.; Wang, T.F.; Friensehner, A.; Kreek, S.A.; Lanier, R.G.; Parker, W.E.; Ruhter, W.; Twomey, T.; Martinez, D.; Keyser, R.; Sangsingkeow, P.

    2000-06-26

    The Gamma-Ray multi-group analysis code MGA developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has been widely used in the area of gamma-ray non-destructive plutonium assay. This plutonium isotopic analysis code de-convolutes the complicated, 100-keV x-ray and gamma-ray region to obtain the ratio of Pu isotopes. Calibration of the detector efficiency is not required, but is determined intrinsically from the measured spectra. The code can either analyze low-energy gamma-ray spectrum taken using a high-resolution HPGe detector for energies below 300 keV, or analyze the low-energy spectrum combined with a high-energy spectrum (up to 1 MeV) in the two-detector analysis mode. In the latter case, the use of two detectors has been mandated by the conflicting requirements: excellent resolution at low energies (characteristic of small planar detectors) with good high-energy efficiency (characteristic of coaxial detectors). Usually, a high-energy spectrum taken using a coaxial Ge detector will not provide sufficient energy resolution for 100-keV plutonium isotopic analysis, while the small planar used at low energies has inadequate high-energy efficiency. An optimized-geometry ORTEC HPGe detector has been developed which combines good energy resolution at 100 keV combined with acceptable high-energy ({approx} 1 MeV) efficiency in a single detector. It has been used to gather spectra of both low- and high-energy regions of plutonium spectra simultaneously, for analysis by MGA in the two-detector mode. Five Pu gamma-ray calibration standard sources were used in this study of this special detector.

  6. Full core reactor analysis: Running Denovo on Jaguar

    SciTech Connect

    Jarrell, J. J.; Godfrey, A. T.; Evans, T. M.; Davidson, G. G.

    2012-07-01

    Fully-consistent, full-core, 3D, deterministic neutron transport simulations using the orthogonal mesh code Denovo were run on the massively parallel computing architecture Jaguar XT5. Using energy and spatial parallelization schemes, Denovo was able to efficiently scale to more than 160 k processors. Cell-homogenized cross sections were used with step-characteristics, linear-discontinuous finite element, and trilinear-discontinuous finite element spatial methods. It was determined that using the finite element methods gave considerably more accurate eigenvalue solutions for large-aspect ratio meshes than using step-characteristics. (authors)

  7. Full Core Reactor Analysis: Running Denovo on Jaguar

    SciTech Connect

    Jarrell, Joshua J; Godfrey, Andrew T; Evans, Thomas M; Davidson, Gregory G

    2013-01-01

    Fully-consistent, full-core, 3D, deterministic neutron transport simulations using the orthogonal mesh code Denovo were run on the massively parallel computing architecture Jaguar XT5. Using energy and spatial parallelization schemes, Denovo was able to efficiently scale to more than 160k processors. Cell-homogenized cross sections were used with step-characteristics, linear-discontinuous finite element, and trilinear-discontinuous finite element spatial methods. It was determined that using the finite element methods gave considerably more accurate eigenvalue solutions for large-aspect ratio meshes than using step-characteristics.

  8. Full Core Reactor Analysis: Running Denovo on Jaguar

    SciTech Connect

    Jarrell, Joshua J; Godfrey, Andrew T; Evans, Thomas M; Davidson, Gregory G

    2012-01-01

    Fully-consistent, full-core, 3D, deterministic simulations using the orthogonal mesh code Denovo were run on the massively parallel computing architecture Jaguar XT5. Using energy and spatial parallelization schemes, Denovo was able to efficiently scale to over 160k processors. Cell-homogenized cross-sections were used with Step-Characteristics, Linear-Discontinuous Finite Element, and Tri-Linear-Discontinuous Finite Element spatial methods. It was determined that using the finite element methods gave considerably more accurate eigenvalue solutions for large aspect ratios meshes than those using Step-Characteristics.

  9. Wake coupling to full potential rotor analysis code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, Francisco J.; Chang, I-Chung; Oh, Byung K.

    1990-01-01

    The wake information from a helicopter forward flight code is coupled with two transonic potential rotor codes. The induced velocities for the near-, mid-, and far-wake geometries are extracted from a nonlinear rigid wake of a standard performance and analysis code. These, together with the corresponding inflow angles, computation points, and azimuth angles, are then incorporated into the transonic potential codes. The coupled codes can then provide an improved prediction of rotor blade loading at transonic speeds.

  10. Preliminary analysis of knee stress in Full Extension Landing

    PubMed Central

    Makinejad, Majid Davoodi; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan; Wan Abas, Wan Abu Bakar; Bayat, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study provides an experimental and finite element analysis of knee-joint structure during extended-knee landing based on the extracted impact force, and it numerically identifies the contact pressure, stress distribution and possibility of bone-to-bone contact when a subject lands from a safe height. METHODS: The impact time and loads were measured via inverse dynamic analysis of free landing without knee flexion from three different heights (25, 50 and 75 cm), using five subjects with an average body mass index of 18.8. Three-dimensional data were developed from computed tomography scans and were reprocessed with modeling software before being imported and analyzed by finite element analysis software. The whole leg was considered to be a fixed middle-hinged structure, while impact loads were applied to the femur in an upward direction. RESULTS: Straight landing exerted an enormous amount of pressure on the knee joint as a result of the body's inability to utilize the lower extremity muscles, thereby maximizing the threat of injury when the load exceeds the height-safety threshold. CONCLUSIONS: The researchers conclude that extended-knee landing results in serious deformation of the meniscus and cartilage and increases the risk of bone-to-bone contact and serious knee injury when the load exceeds the threshold safety height. This risk is considerably greater than the risk of injury associated with walking downhill or flexion landing activities. PMID:24141832

  11. Wave Journal Bearing. Part 1: Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimofte, Florin

    1995-01-01

    A wave journal bearing concept features a waved inner bearing diameter of the non-rotating bearing side and it is an alternative to the plain journal bearing. The wave journal bearing has a significantly increased load capacity in comparison to the plain journal bearing operating at the same eccentricity. It also offers greater stability than the plain circular bearing under all operating conditions. The wave bearing's design is relatively simple and allows the shaft to rotate in either direction. Three wave bearings are sensitive to the direction of an applied stationary side load. Increasing the number of waves reduces the wave bearing's sensitivity to the direction of the applied load relative to the wave. However, the range in which the bearing performance can be varied decreases as the number of waves increases. Therefore, both the number and the amplitude of the waves must be properly selected to optimize the wave bearing design for a specific application. It is concluded that the stiffness of an air journal bearing, due to hydrodynamic effect, could be doubled and made to run stably by using a six or eight wave geometry with a wave amplitude approximately half of the bearing radial clearance.

  12. Nonlinear analysis of helix traveling wave tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, H.P.; Zaidman, E.G.; Vanderplaats, N.R.; Kodis, M.A.

    1994-12-31

    A nonlinear formulation of the interaction in a helix traveling wave tube (TWT) is presented. The formulation is intended to treat a wide class of helix TWTs including both emission-gated and multi-tone operation. The essential feature of each of these configurations is that multiple waves must be included in the formulation. As a result, a fully time-dependent analysis is required. The numerical procedure for this in a helix TWT is complicated by the fact that the radial profile of the field varies with frequency. This contrasts, for example, with the case of a smooth bore waveguide in which the radial profile for each TE{sub ln} or TM{sub ln} mode is invariant in frequency. Because of this, a complete self-consistent particle-in-cell (PIC) formulation must be three-dimensional. In order to circumvent the computational expense of a 3D PIC formulation, the authors adopt an approach in which the electromagnetic field is represented as a superposition of azimuthally symmetric modes in a vacuum sheath helix. The specific electron distributions are chosen to model either a continuous beam for the multi-tone TWT and a pulsed beam for the emission-gated TWT. Numerical results of the simulation for examples of interest to an emission-gated TWT experiment at NRL will be presented.

  13. ICE/ISEE plasma wave data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenstadt, E. W.; Moses, S. L.

    1993-01-01

    This report is one of the final processing of ICE plasma wave (pw) data and analysis of late ISEE 3, ICE cometary, and ICE cruise trajectory data, where coronal mass ejections (CME's) were the first locus of attention. Interest in CME's inspired an effort to represent our pw data in a condensed spectrogram format that facilitated rapid digestion of interplanetary phenomena on long (greater than 1 day) time scales. The format serendipitously allowed us to also examine earth-orbiting data from a new perspective, invigorating older areas of investigation in Earth's immediate environment. We, therefore, continued to examine with great interest the last year of ISEE 3's precomet phase, when it spent considerable time far downwind from Earth, recording for days on end conditions upstream, downstream, and across the very weak, distant flank bow shock. Among other motivations has been the apparent similarity of some shock and post shock structures to the signatures of the bow wave surrounding comet Giacobini-Zinner, whose ICE-phase data we revisited.

  14. Analysis of thermal depolarization compensation using full vectorial beam propagation method in laser amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Rainer; Pflaum, Christoph; Graupeter, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    We developed a complex physical model for simulating laser amplifiers to numerically analyze birefringence effects. This model includes pump configuration, thermal lensing effects, birefringence, and beam propagation in the laser amplifier. Temperature, deformation, and stress inside the laser crystal were calculated using a three-dimensional finite element analysis (FEA). The pump configuration is simulated using a three-dimensional ray tracing or an approximation based on super-Gaussian functions. Our simulations show the depolarization of a linearly polarized electromagnetic wave in a cylindrical laser crystal. These simulations were performed using a three-dimensional full vectorial beam propagation method (VBPM). Stress induced birefringence can be compensated well for moderate pumping powers. High power amplification requires sensitive alignment. Our simulation technique calculates the influence of the photo-elastic effect inside the laser crystal accurately. Detailed knowledge about beam waist and depolarization is needed to develop compensation techniques for high power output beams with low depolarization losses.

  15. Mathematical Methods in Wave Propagation: Part 2--Non-Linear Wave Front Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffrey, Alan

    1971-01-01

    The paper presents applications and methods of analysis for non-linear hyperbolic partial differential equations. The paper is concluded by an account of wave front analysis as applied to the piston problem of gas dynamics. (JG)

  16. Full text clustering and relationship network analysis of biomedical publications.

    PubMed

    Guan, Renchu; Yang, Chen; Marchese, Maurizio; Liang, Yanchun; Shi, Xiaohu

    2014-01-01

    Rapid developments in the biomedical sciences have increased the demand for automatic clustering of biomedical publications. In contrast to current approaches to text clustering, which focus exclusively on the contents of abstracts, a novel method is proposed for clustering and analysis of complete biomedical article texts. To reduce dimensionality, Cosine Coefficient is used on a sub-space of only two vectors, instead of computing the Euclidean distance within the space of all vectors. Then a strategy and algorithm is introduced for Semi-supervised Affinity Propagation (SSAP) to improve analysis efficiency, using biomedical journal names as an evaluation background. Experimental results show that by avoiding high-dimensional sparse matrix computations, SSAP outperforms conventional k-means methods and improves upon the standard Affinity Propagation algorithm. In constructing a directed relationship network and distribution matrix for the clustering results, it can be noted that overlaps in scope and interests among BioMed publications can be easily identified, providing a valuable analytical tool for editors, authors and readers.

  17. Full core analysis of IRIS reactor by using MCNPX.

    PubMed

    Amin, E A; Bashter, I I; Hassan, Nabil M; Mustafa, S S

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes neutronic analysis for fresh fuelled IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure) reactor by MCNPX code. The analysis included criticality calculations, radial power and axial power distribution, nuclear peaking factor and axial offset percent at the beginning of fuel cycle. The effective multiplication factor obtained by MCNPX code is compared with previous calculations by HELIOS/NESTLE, CASMO/SIMULATE, modified CORD-2 nodal calculations and SAS2H/KENO-V code systems. It is found that k-eff value obtained by MCNPX is closer to CORD-2 value. The radial and axial powers are compared with other published results carried out using SAS2H/KENO-V code. Moreover, the WIMS-D5 code is used for studying the effect of enriched boron in form of ZrB2 on the effective multiplication factor (K-eff) of the fuel pin. In this part of calculation, K-eff is calculated at different concentrations of Boron-10 in mg/cm at different stages of burnup of unit cell. The results of this part are compared with published results performed by HELIOS code. PMID:27135607

  18. Full core analysis of IRIS reactor by using MCNPX.

    PubMed

    Amin, E A; Bashter, I I; Hassan, Nabil M; Mustafa, S S

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes neutronic analysis for fresh fuelled IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure) reactor by MCNPX code. The analysis included criticality calculations, radial power and axial power distribution, nuclear peaking factor and axial offset percent at the beginning of fuel cycle. The effective multiplication factor obtained by MCNPX code is compared with previous calculations by HELIOS/NESTLE, CASMO/SIMULATE, modified CORD-2 nodal calculations and SAS2H/KENO-V code systems. It is found that k-eff value obtained by MCNPX is closer to CORD-2 value. The radial and axial powers are compared with other published results carried out using SAS2H/KENO-V code. Moreover, the WIMS-D5 code is used for studying the effect of enriched boron in form of ZrB2 on the effective multiplication factor (K-eff) of the fuel pin. In this part of calculation, K-eff is calculated at different concentrations of Boron-10 in mg/cm at different stages of burnup of unit cell. The results of this part are compared with published results performed by HELIOS code.

  19. Full text clustering and relationship network analysis of biomedical publications.

    PubMed

    Guan, Renchu; Yang, Chen; Marchese, Maurizio; Liang, Yanchun; Shi, Xiaohu

    2014-01-01

    Rapid developments in the biomedical sciences have increased the demand for automatic clustering of biomedical publications. In contrast to current approaches to text clustering, which focus exclusively on the contents of abstracts, a novel method is proposed for clustering and analysis of complete biomedical article texts. To reduce dimensionality, Cosine Coefficient is used on a sub-space of only two vectors, instead of computing the Euclidean distance within the space of all vectors. Then a strategy and algorithm is introduced for Semi-supervised Affinity Propagation (SSAP) to improve analysis efficiency, using biomedical journal names as an evaluation background. Experimental results show that by avoiding high-dimensional sparse matrix computations, SSAP outperforms conventional k-means methods and improves upon the standard Affinity Propagation algorithm. In constructing a directed relationship network and distribution matrix for the clustering results, it can be noted that overlaps in scope and interests among BioMed publications can be easily identified, providing a valuable analytical tool for editors, authors and readers. PMID:25250864

  20. Analysis of Radarsat-2 Full Polarimetric Data for Forest Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghsoudi, Yasser

    Forests are a major natural resource of the Earth and control a wide range of environmental processes. Forests comprise a major part of the planet's plant biodiversity and have an important role in the global hydrological and biochemical cycles. Among the numerous potential applications of remote sensing in forestry, forest mapping plays a vital role for characterization of the forest in terms of species. Particularly, in Canada where forests occupy 45% of the territory, representing more than 400 million hectares of the total Canadian continental area. In this thesis, the potential of polarimetric SAR (PolSAR) Radarsat-2 data for forest mapping is investigated. This thesis has two principle objectives. First is to propose algorithms for analyzing the PolSAR image data for forest mapping. There are a wide range of SAR parameters that can be derived from PolSAR data. In order to make full use of the discriminative power offered by all these parameters, two categories of methods are proposed. The methods are based on the concept of feature selection and classifier ensemble. First, a nonparametric definition of the evaluation function is proposed and hence the methods NFS and CBFS. Second, a fast wrapper algorithm is proposed for the evaluation function in feature selection and hence the methods FWFS and FWCBFS. Finally, to incorporate the neighboring pixels information in classification an extension of the FWCBFS method i.e. CCBFS is proposed. The second objective of this thesis is to provide a comparison between leaf-on (summer) and leaf-off (fall) season images for forest mapping. Two Radarsat-2 images acquired in fine quad-polarized mode were chosen for this study. The images were collected in leaf-on and leaf-off seasons. We also test the hypothesis whether combining the SAR parameters obtained from both images can provide better results than either individual datasets. The rationale for this combination is that every dataset has some parameters which may be

  1. Analysis of traveling wave tube materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamartine, B. C.; Lampert, W. V.; Rochocki, K. D.; Baun, W. L.; Haas, T. W.

    1982-03-01

    A wide variety of materials are utilized in the construction of traveling wave tubes (TWT) used as microwave amplification elements for many Air Force applications. The only active component is the cathode which is heated to thermionic temperatures to serve as the electron emitting element in the electron gun section of the tube. Considerable interest exists in the correct scientific model of an activated cathode. Most such cathodes are barium-based and this research program has shown that barium in the metallic state is necessary on the surface of dispenser cathodes in order to get an acceptably low (< or = 1eV) work function. Other TWT materials investigated in this program include an evaluation of the electron bombardment resistance of boron nitride insulators and the determination of the activation mechanism and characteristics of nonevaporable zirconium-graphite getters. Other failure analysis investigations of TWT's are also reported herein.

  2. Full quantum mechanical analysis of atomic three-grating Mach-Zehnder interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz, A. S.; Davidović, M.; Božić, M.

    2015-02-01

    Atomic three-grating Mach-Zehnder interferometry constitutes an important tool to probe fundamental aspects of the quantum theory. There is, however, a remarkable gap in the literature between the oversimplified models and robust numerical simulations considered to describe the corresponding experiments. Consequently, the former usually lead to paradoxical scenarios, such as the wave-particle dual behavior of atoms, while the latter make difficult the data analysis in simple terms. Here these issues are tackled by means of a simple grating working model consisting of evenly-spaced Gaussian slits. As is shown, this model suffices to explore and explain such experiments both analytically and numerically, giving a good account of the full atomic journey inside the interferometer, and hence contributing to make less mystic the physics involved. More specifically, it provides a clear and unambiguous picture of the wavefront splitting that takes place inside the interferometer, illustrating how the momentum along each emerging diffraction order is well defined even though the wave function itself still displays a rather complex shape. To this end, the local transverse momentum is also introduced in this context as a reliable analytical tool. The splitting, apart from being a key issue to understand atomic Mach-Zehnder interferometry, also demonstrates at a fundamental level how wave and particle aspects are always present in the experiment, without incurring in any contradiction or interpretive paradox. On the other hand, at a practical level, the generality and versatility of the model and methodology presented, makes them suitable to attack analogous problems in a simple manner after a convenient tuning.

  3. Full quantum mechanical analysis of atomic three-grating Mach–Zehnder interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Sanz, A.S.; Davidović, M.; Božić, M.

    2015-02-15

    Atomic three-grating Mach–Zehnder interferometry constitutes an important tool to probe fundamental aspects of the quantum theory. There is, however, a remarkable gap in the literature between the oversimplified models and robust numerical simulations considered to describe the corresponding experiments. Consequently, the former usually lead to paradoxical scenarios, such as the wave–particle dual behavior of atoms, while the latter make difficult the data analysis in simple terms. Here these issues are tackled by means of a simple grating working model consisting of evenly-spaced Gaussian slits. As is shown, this model suffices to explore and explain such experiments both analytically and numerically, giving a good account of the full atomic journey inside the interferometer, and hence contributing to make less mystic the physics involved. More specifically, it provides a clear and unambiguous picture of the wavefront splitting that takes place inside the interferometer, illustrating how the momentum along each emerging diffraction order is well defined even though the wave function itself still displays a rather complex shape. To this end, the local transverse momentum is also introduced in this context as a reliable analytical tool. The splitting, apart from being a key issue to understand atomic Mach–Zehnder interferometry, also demonstrates at a fundamental level how wave and particle aspects are always present in the experiment, without incurring in any contradiction or interpretive paradox. On the other hand, at a practical level, the generality and versatility of the model and methodology presented, makes them suitable to attack analogous problems in a simple manner after a convenient tuning. - Highlights: • A simple model is proposed to analyze experiments based on atomic Mach–Zehnder interferometry. • The model can be easily handled both analytically and computationally. • A theoretical analysis based on the combination of the position and

  4. Full-wave algorithm to model effects of bedding slopes on the response of subsurface electromagnetic geophysical sensors near unconformities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainath, Kamalesh; Teixeira, Fernando L.

    2016-05-01

    We propose a full-wave pseudo-analytical numerical electromagnetic (EM) algorithm to model subsurface induction sensors, traversing planar-layered geological formations of arbitrary EM material anisotropy and loss, which are used, for example, in the exploration of hydrocarbon reserves. Unlike past pseudo-analytical planar-layered modeling algorithms that impose parallelism between the formation's bed junctions, our method involves judicious employment of Transformation Optics techniques to address challenges related to modeling relative slope (i.e., tilting) between said junctions (including arbitrary azimuth orientation of each junction). The algorithm exhibits this flexibility, both with respect to loss and anisotropy in the formation layers as well as junction tilting, via employing special planar slabs that coat each "flattened" (i.e., originally tilted) planar interface, locally redirecting the incident wave within the coating slabs to cause wave fronts to interact with the flattened interfaces as if they were still tilted with a specific, user-defined orientation. Moreover, since the coating layers are homogeneous rather than exhibiting continuous material variation, a minimal number of these layers must be inserted and hence reduces added simulation time and computational expense. As said coating layers are not reflectionless however, they do induce artificial field scattering that corrupts legitimate field signatures due to the (effective) interface tilting. Numerical results, for two half-spaces separated by a tilted interface, quantify error trends versus effective interface tilting, material properties, transmitter/receiver spacing, sensor position, coating slab thickness, and transmitter and receiver orientation, helping understand the spurious scattering's effect on reliable (effective) tilting this algorithm can model. Under the effective tilting constraints suggested by the results of said error study, we finally exhibit responses of sensors

  5. Full vector spherical harmonic analysis of the Holocene geomagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Marcia

    High-quality time-series paleomagnetic measurements have been used to derive spherical harmonic models of Earth's magnetic field for the past 2,000 years. A newly-developed data compilation, PSVMOD2.0 consists of time-series directional and intensity records that significantly improve the data quality and global distribution used to develop previous spherical harmonic models. PSVMOD2.0 consists of 185 paleomagnetic time series records from 85 global sites, including 30 full-vector records (inclination, declination and intensity). It includes data from additional sites in the Southern Hemisphere and Arctic and includes globally distributed sediment relative paleointensity records, significantly improving global coverage over previous models. PSVMOD2.0 records have been assessed in a series of 7 regional intercomparison studies, four in the Northern Hemisphere and 3 in the southern hemisphere. Comparisons on a regional basis have improved the quality and chronology of the data and allowed investigation of spatial coherence and the scale length associated with paleomagnetic secular variation (PSV) features. We have developed a modeling methodology based on nonlinear inversion of the PSVMOD2.0 directional and intensity records. Models of the geomagnetic field in 100-year snapshots have been derived for the past 2,000 with the ultimate goal of developing models spanning the past 8,000 years. We validate the models and the methodology by comparing with the GUFM1 historical models during the 400-year period of overlap. We find that the spatial distribution of sites and quality of data are sufficient to derive models that agree with GUFM1 in the large-scale characteristics of the field. We use the the models derived in this study to downward continue the field to the core-mantle boundary and examine characteristics of the large-scale structure of the magnetic field at the source region. The derived models are temporally consistent from one epoch to the next and exhibit

  6. The new BNL partial wave analysis programs

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, J.P.; Weygand, D.P.

    1997-07-29

    Experiment E852 at Brookhaven National Laboratory is a meson spectroscopy experiment which took data at the Multi-Particle Spectrometer facility of the Alternating Gradient Syncrotron. Upgrades to the spectrometer`s data acquisition and trigger electronics allowed over 900 million data events, of numerous topologies, to be recorded to tape in 1995 running alone. One of the primary goals of E852 is identification of states beyond the quark model, i.e., states with gluonic degrees of freedom. Identification of such states involves the measurement of a systems spin-parity. Such a measurement is usually done using Partial Wave Analysis. Programs to perform such analyses exist, in fact, one was written at BNL and used in previous experiments by some of this group. This program, however, was optimized for a particular final state, and modification to allow analysis of the broad range of final states in E852 would have been difficult. The authors therefore decided to write a new program, with an eye towards generality that would allow analysis of a large class of reactions.

  7. Geotail MCA plasma wave data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Roger R.

    1994-01-01

    NASA Grant NAG 5-2346 supports the data analysis effort at The University of Iowa for the GEOTAIL Multi-Channel Analyzer (MCA) which is a part of the GEOTAIL Plasma Wave Instrument (PWI). At the beginning of this reporting period we had just begun to receive our GEOTAIL Sirius data on CD-ROMs. Much programming effort went into adapting and refining the data analysis programs to include the CD-ROM inputs. Programs were also developed to display the high-frequency-resolution PWI Sweep Frequency Analyzer (SFA) data and to include in all the various plot products the electron cyclotron frequency derived from the magnitude of the magnetic field extracted from the GEOTAIL Magnetic Field (MGF) data included in the GEOTAIL Sirius data. We also developed programs to use the MGF data residing in the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) GEOTAIL Scientific Data Base (SDB). Our programmers also developed programs and provided technical support for the GEOTAIL data analysis efforts of Co-lnvestigator William W. L. Taylor at Nichols Research Corporation (NRC). At the end of this report we have included brief summaries of the NRC effort and the progress being made.

  8. Detecting delaminations and disbondings on full-scale wing composite panel by guided waves based SHM system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, E.; Boffa, N. D.; Memmolo, V.; Ricci, F.; Maio, L.

    2016-04-01

    A full-scale lower wing panel made of composite material has been designed, manufactured and sensorised within the European Funded research project named SARISTU. The authors contributed to the whole development of the system, from design to implementation as well as to the impacts campaign phase where Barely Visible and Visible Damages (BVID and VID) are to be artificially induced on the panel by a pneumatic impact machine. This work summarise part of the experimental results related to damages production, their assessment by C-SCAN as reference NDT method as well as damage detection of delimitations by a guided waves based SHM. The SHM system is made by customized piezoelectric patches secondary bonded on the wing plate acting both as guided waves sources and receivers. The paper will deal mostly with the experimental impact campaign and the signal analyses carried out to extract the metrics more sensitive to damages induced. Image reconstruction of the damages dimensions and shapes will be also described based mostly on the combination of metrics maps over the plate partial surfaces. Finally a comparison of damages maps obtained by the SHM approach and those obtained by "classic" C-SCAN will be presented analyzing briefly pros and cons of the two different approached as a combination to the most effective structural maintenance scenario of a commercial aircraft.

  9. Accurate all-electron G0W0 quasiparticle energies employing the full-potential augmented plane-wave method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabok, Dmitrii; Gulans, Andris; Draxl, Claudia

    2016-07-01

    The G W approach of many-body perturbation theory has become a common tool for calculating the electronic structure of materials. However, with increasing number of published results, discrepancies between the values obtained by different methods and codes become more and more apparent. For a test set of small- and wide-gap semiconductors, we demonstrate how to reach the numerically best electronic structure within the framework of the full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave (FLAPW) method. We first evaluate the impact of local orbitals in the Kohn-Sham eigenvalue spectrum of the underlying starting point. The role of the basis-set quality is then further analyzed when calculating the G0W0 quasiparticle energies. Our results, computed with the exciting code, are compared to those obtained using the projector-augmented plane-wave formalism, finding overall good agreement between both methods. We also provide data produced with a typical FLAPW basis set as a benchmark for other G0W0 implementations.

  10. Linearization strategies for the Iterative Nonlinear Contrast Source method for full-wave simulation of nonlinear ultrasound fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verweij, Martin D.; Demi, Libertario; van Dongen, Koen W. A.

    2012-09-01

    The Iterative Nonlinear Contrast Source (INCS) method is a full-wave method for the accurate computation of wide-angle, pulsed, nonlinear ultrasound fields appearing in, e.g., medical echoscopy. The method is based on the Westervelt equation and considers the occurring nonlinear term as a distributed contrast source that operates in a linear background medium. This formulation leads to an integral equation, which is solved in an iterative way. The original INCS method uses a Neumann scheme to successively approximate the nonlinear wave field in homogeneous, lossless, nonlinear media. To cope with attenuative and/or inhomogeneous nonlinear media, additional contrast sources may be introduced. Since these deteriorate the convergence rate of the Neumann scheme, more advanced iterative solution schemes like Bi-CGSTAB are required. To overcome the difficulty that such schemes only apply to linear integral equations, the nonlinear contrast source is linearized, at the cost of a significant systematic error in the fourth and higher harmonics. In this paper, a strategy is proposed in which the relevant iterative solution scheme is restarted with an updated version of the linearized contrast source. Results demonstrate the effectiveness of this strategy in eliminating the systematic error. In addition, it is shown that the same approach also improves the convergence rate in case of nonlinear propagation in media with attenuation.

  11. Weak-wave analysis of shock interaction with a slipstream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barger, Raymond L.

    1988-01-01

    A weak wave analysis of shock interaction with a slipstream is presented. The theory is compared to that for the acoustic case and to the exact nonlinear analysis. Sample calculations indicate that the weak wave theory yields a good approximation to the exact solution when the shock waves are sufficiently weak that the associated entropy increase is negligible. A qualitative discussion of the case of counterflowing streams is also included.

  12. IWA : an analysis program for isentropic wave measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Ao, Tommy

    2009-02-01

    IWA (Isentropic Wave Analysis) is a program for analyzing velocity profiles of isentropic compression experiments. IWA applies incremental impedance matching correction to measured velocity profiles to obtain in-situ particle velocity profiles for Lagrangian wave analysis. From the in-situ velocity profiles, material properties such as wave velocities, stress, strain, strain rate, and strength are calculated. The program can be run in any current version of MATLAB (2008a or later) or as a Windows XP executable.

  13. Process to generate a synthetic diagnostic for microwave imaging reflectometry with the full-wave code FWR2D.

    PubMed

    Ren, X; Domier, C W; Kramer, G; Luhmann, N C; Muscatello, C M; Shi, L; Tobias, B J; Valeo, E

    2014-11-01

    A synthetic microwave imaging reflectometer (MIR) diagnostic employing the full-wave reflectometer code (FWR2D) has been developed and is currently being used to guide the design of real systems, such as the one recently installed on DIII-D. The FWR2D code utilizes real plasma profiles as input, and it is combined with optical simulation tools for synthetic diagnostic signal generation. A detailed discussion of FWR2D and the process to generate the synthetic signal are presented in this paper. The synthetic signal is also compared to a prescribed density fluctuation spectrum to quantify the imaging quality. An example is presented with H-mode-like plasma profiles derived from a DIII-D discharge, where the MIR focal is located in the pedestal region. It is shown that MIR is suitable for diagnosing fluctuations with poloidal wavenumber up to 2.0 cm(-1) and fluctuation amplitudes less than 5%.

  14. Study of ITER plasma position reflectometer using a two-dimensional full-wave finite-difference time domain code

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, F. da

    2008-10-15

    The EU will supply the plasma position reflectometer for ITER. The system will have channels located at different poloidal positions, some of them obliquely viewing a plasma which has a poloidal density divergence and curvature, both adverse conditions for profile measurements. To understand the impact of such topology in the reconstruction of density profiles a full-wave two-dimensional finite-difference time domain O-mode code with the capability for frequency sweep was used. Simulations show that the reconstructed density profiles still meet the ITER radial accuracy specifications for plasma position (1 cm), except for the highest densities. Other adverse effects such as multireflections induced by the blanket, density fluctuations, and MHD activity were considered and a first understanding on their impact obtained.

  15. A coupling modulation model of capillary waves from gravity waves: Theoretical analysis and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pengzhen; Wang, Xiaoqing; Liu, Li; Chong, Jinsong

    2016-06-01

    According to Bragg theory, capillary waves are the predominant scatterers of high-frequency band (such as Ka-band) microwave radiation from the surface of the ocean. Therefore, understanding the modulation mechanism of capillary waves is an important foundation for interpreting high-frequency microwave remote sensing images of the surface of the sea. In our experiments, we discovered that modulations of capillary waves are significantly larger than the values predicted by the classical theory. Further, analysis shows that the difference in restoring force results in an inflection point while the phase velocity changes from gravity waves region to capillary waves region, and this results in the capillary waves being able to resonate with gravity waves when the phase velocity of the gravity waves is equal to the group velocity of the capillary waves. Consequently, we propose a coupling modulation model in which the current modulates the capillary wave indirectly by modulating the resonant gravity waves, and the modulation of the former is approximated by that of the latter. This model very effectively explains the results discovered in our experiments. Further, based on Bragg scattering theory and this coupling modulation model, we simulate the modulation of normalized radar cross section (NRCS) of typical internal waves and show that the high-frequency bands are superior to the low-frequency bands because of their greater modulation of NRCS and better radiometric resolution. This result provides new support for choice of radar band for observation of wave-current modulation oceanic phenomena such as internal waves, fronts, and shears.

  16. Square wave analysis of dielectric rectangular waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabas, Deepender; Sharma, Jigyasa; Raghava, N. S.; De, Asok

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, rectangular wave guides have been analyzed using a square wave incidence which can be used for digital communicat ion techniques . The E 1/mnmode of propagation is solved using Eigen functions taking transverse propagation constant in different regions of dielectric waveguide and then the characteristic equations have been derived. The characteristic equations are solved graphically by mode matching inside and outside fields of waveguide. The normalized propagation constant so obtained, for square wave incidence is compared with the sinusoidal wave obtained by Marcatili method and other methods. The results match fairly well at frequencies near the cut-off of dielectric waveguide.

  17. Nonlinear analysis of helix traveling wave tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, H.P.; Zaidman, E.G.; Mankofsky, A.; Vanderplaats, N.R.; Kodis, M.A.

    1995-10-01

    A time-dependent nonlinear formulation of the interaction in the helix traveling wave tube is presented for a configuration in which an electron beam propagates through a sheath helix surrounded by a conducting wall. In order to describe both the variation in the wave dispersion and in the transverse inhomogeneity of the electromagnetic field with wave number, the field is represented as a superposition of waves in a vacuum sheath helix. An overall explicit sinusoidal variation of the form exp({ital ikz}{minus}{ital i}{omega}{ital t}) is assumed (where {omega} denotes the angular frequency corresponding to the wave number {ital k} in the vacuum sheath helix), and the polarization and radial variation of each wave is determined by the boundary conditions in a vacuum sheath helix. Thus, while the field is three-dimensional in nature, it is azimuthally symmetric. The propagation of each wave {ital in} {ital vacuo} as well as the interaction of each wave with the electron beam is included by allowing the amplitudes of the waves to vary in {ital z} and {ital t}. A dynamical equation for the field amplitudes is derived analogously to Poynting`s equation, and solved in conjunction with the three-dimensional Lorentz force equations for an ensemble of electrons. Numerical examples are presented corresponding to both single- and multiwave interactions. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  18. A mesoscale gravity wave event observed during CCOPE. I - Multiscale statistical analysis of wave characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Steven E.; Golus, Robert E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a statistical analysis of the characteristics of the wavelike activity that occurred over the north-central United States on July 11-12, 1981, using data from the Cooperative Convective Precipitation Experiment in Montana. In particular, two distinct wave episodes of about 8-h duration within a longer (33 h) period of wave activity were studied in detail. It is demonstrated that the observed phenomena display features consistent with those of mesoscale gravity waves. The principles of statistical methods used to detect and track mesoscale gravity waves are discussed together with their limitations.

  19. Electromagnetic cyclotron waves in the solar wind: Wind observation and wave dispersion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, L. K.; Moya, P. S.; Viñas, A. F.; Stevens, M.

    2016-03-01

    Wind observed long-lasting electromagnetic cyclotron waves near the proton cyclotron frequency on 11 March 2005, in the descending part of a fast wind stream. Bi-Maxwellian velocity distributions are fitted for core protons, beam protons, and α-particles. Using the fitted plasma parameters we conduct kinetic linear dispersion analysis and find ion cyclotron and/or firehose instabilities grow in six of 10 wave intervals. After Doppler shift, some of the waves have frequency and polarization consistent with observation, thus may be correspondence to the cyclotron waves observed.

  20. Plane-wave analysis of solar acoustic-gravity waves: A (slightly) new approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogart, Richard S.; Sa, L. A. D.; Duvall, Thomas L., Jr.; Haber, Deborah A.; Toomre, Juri; Hill, Frank

    1995-01-01

    The plane-wave decomposition of the acoustic-gravity wave effects observed in the photosphere provides a computationally efficient technique that probes the structure of the upper convective zone and boundary. In this region, the flat sun approximation is considered as being reasonably accurate. A technique to be used for the systematic plane-wave analysis of Michelson Doppler imager data, as part of the solar oscillations investigation, is described. Estimates of sensitivity are presented, and the effects of using different planar mappings are discussed. The technique is compared with previous approaches to the three dimensional plane-wave problem.

  1. Optical analysis of human eye using electromagnetic wave theory.

    PubMed

    Can, Melih G; Oner, Bilgehan B; Kurt, Hamza

    2013-10-01

    We present a two-dimensional electromagnetic analysis of light propagation through the human eye to examine the eye's optical properties. The electromagnetic approach has intriguing advantages over the conventional and frequently implemented ray optics analysis. The chromatic, spherical, and coma aberrations and the intensity of the focused light at the retina are computed in this work via full-wave analysis. We also investigate the effects of the cornea's and lens's curved structures on the focusing mechanism. The focal length and chromatic and spherical aberrations are observed to change owing to age-related refractive index variation in the lens. In addition, the effects of the lens and curvatures of the human eye on focusing are analyzed. Consequently, for both young and old human eye lenses, the differences due to the aberration variations, curvature surfaces, and gradient index are explored by the wave approach. The intensity distributions on the retina for both on- and off-axis illumination are calculated. A strong correlation between the locations of the nerve fibers and the intensity distribution is confirmed. On the basis of the findings, we can conclude that visual impairment due to deterioration of the human eye structure is more dramatic than that due to aging.

  2. Brain Wave Analysis and School Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Barry; And Others

    The Brain Wave Analyzer (BWA Ertl 02) was used to measure the brain potentials of 110 public school children. Resulting scores were correlated with concurrent measures of school achievement. Results indicate that certain brain wave scores have relatively low correlations with school achievement compared to traditional intelligence measures but may…

  3. Crack propagation monitoring in a full-scale aircraft fatigue test based on guided wave-Gaussian mixture model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Lei; Yuan, Shenfang; Bao, Qiao; Mei, Hanfei; Ren, Yuanqiang

    2016-05-01

    For aerospace application of structural health monitoring (SHM) technology, the problem of reliable damage monitoring under time-varying conditions must be addressed and the SHM technology has to be fully validated on real aircraft structures under realistic load conditions on ground before it can reach the status of flight test. In this paper, the guided wave (GW) based SHM method is applied to a full-scale aircraft fatigue test which is one of the most similar test status to the flight test. To deal with the time-varying problem, a GW-Gaussian mixture model (GW-GMM) is proposed. The probability characteristic of GW features, which is introduced by time-varying conditions is modeled by GW-GMM. The weak cumulative variation trend of the crack propagation, which is mixed in time-varying influence can be tracked by the GW-GMM migration during on-line damage monitoring process. A best match based Kullback-Leibler divergence is proposed to measure the GW-GMM migration degree to reveal the crack propagation. The method is validated in the full-scale aircraft fatigue test. The validation results indicate that the reliable crack propagation monitoring of the left landing gear spar and the right wing panel under realistic load conditions are achieved.

  4. ICE/ISEE plasma wave data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenstadt, E. W.

    1992-01-01

    The interval reported on, from Jan. 1990 to Dec. 1991, has been one of continued processing and archiving of ICE plasma wave (pw) data and transition from analysis of ISEE 3 and ICE cometary data to ICE data taken along its cruise trajectory, where coronal mass ejections are the focus of attention. We have continued to examine with great interest the last year of ISEE 3's precomet phase, when it spent considerable time far downwind from Earth, recording conditions upstream, downstream, and across the very weak, distant flank bow shock. Among other motivations was the apparent similarity of some shock and post shock structures to the signatures of the bow wave surrounding comet Giacobini-Zinner, whose ICE-phase data was revisited. While pursuing detailed, second-order scientific inquiries still pending from the late ISEE 3 recordings, we have also sought to position ourselves for study of CME's by instituting a data processing format new to the ISEE 3/ICE pw detector. Processed detector output has always been summarized and archived in 24-hour segments, with all pw channels individually plotted and stacked one above the next down in frequency, with each channel calibrated separately to keep all data patterns equally visible in the plots, regardless of gross differences in energy content at the various frequencies. Since CME's, with their preceding and following solar wind plasmas, can take more than one day to pass by the spacecraft, a more condensed synoptic view of the pw data is required to identify, let alone assess, CME characteristics than has been afforded by the traditional routines. This requirement is addressed in a major new processing initiative in the past two years. Besides our own ongoing and fresh investigations, we have cooperated, within our resources, with studies conducted extramurally by distant colleagues irrespective of the phase of the ISEE 3/ICE mission under scrutiny. The remainder of this report summarizes our processing activities, our

  5. 3D Lithospheric Imaging by Time-Domain Full-Waveform Inversion of Teleseismic Body-Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beller, S.; Monteiller, V.; Operto, S.; Nolet, G.; Combe, L.; Metivier, L.; Virieux, J.; Nissen-Meyer, T.; Paul, A.

    2014-12-01

    With the deployment of dense seismic arrays and the continuous growth of computing facilities, full-waveform inversion (FWI) of teleseismic data has become a method of choice for high-resolution lithospheric imaging. FWI can be recast as a local optimization problem that seeks to estimate Earth's elastic properties by iteratively minimizing the misfit function between observed and modeled seismograms.In passive teleseismic configurations, the seismic source no longer corresponds to a point source embedded in the targeted medium but rather corresponds to a wavefront incoming from the outside of the model. We develop a 3-dimensional time-domain full-waveform inversion program that is more designed for this configuration. The gradient of the misfit function is efficiently computed with the adjoint-state method. A velocity-stress finite-difference time-domain modeling engine, which is interfaced with the so-called total-field/scattered-field method, is used to propagate in the targeted medium the incident wavefield inferred from a global Earth simulation (AxiSEM). Such interfacing is required to account for the multiple arrivals in the incoming wavefield and the sphericity of the Earth. Despite the limited number of nearly plane-wave sources, the interaction of the incident wavefield with the topography (P-Sv conversions and P-P reflections acting as secondary sources) provides a suitable framework to record both transmitted wavefields and reflected wavefields from lithospheric reflectors. These recordings of both transmitted and reflected waves makes FWI amenable to a broadband-wavenumber (i.e., high resolution) reconstruction of the lithosphere.Feasibility of the method is assessed with a realistic synthetic model representative of the Western Alps. One key issue is the estimation of the temporal source excitation, as there might be some trade-off between the source estimation and the subsurface update. To avoid being trapped in a local minimum, we follow a

  6. Wave propagation analysis using the variance matrix.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Richa; Ivan, J Solomon; Narayanamurthy, C S

    2014-10-01

    The propagation of a coherent laser wave-field through a pseudo-random phase plate is studied using the variance matrix estimated from Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor data. The uncertainty principle is used as a tool in discriminating the data obtained from the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. Quantities of physical interest such as the twist parameter, and the symplectic eigenvalues, are estimated from the wavefront sensor measurements. A distance measure between two variance matrices is introduced and used to estimate the spatial asymmetry of a wave-field in the experiment. The estimated quantities are then used to compare a distorted wave-field with its undistorted counterpart. PMID:25401243

  7. Surface transverse waves: properties, devices, and analysis.

    PubMed

    Strashilov, Vesseline L; Yantchev, Ventsislav M

    2005-05-01

    Surface transverse waves represent a new generation of the surface acoustic wave (SAW) family that offers advantageous properties without further demand for new materials or improved design and technology. The most effective activity in the surface transverse wave (STW) area has been realized during the last decade with high-performance devices achieved and analytical methods developed. The present paper reviews the basic achievements in historical and factual order. A state-of-the-art introduction is combined with discussion on the development tendencies with specific emphasis on sensor technology.

  8. Spectral Formulation for the Solution of Full-Wave Scattering from a Conducting Wedge Tipped with a Corrugated Cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polycarpou, A. C.; Christou, M. A.

    2011-11-01

    A spectral mode-matching technique is formulated to solve for the full-wave scattering of a corrugated cylinder-tipped wedge in the presence of an impressed electric or magnetic line source. Asymptotic approximations of large-order Bessel or Henkel functions for a fixed argument were introduced in order to overcome numerical difficulties in their regular series expansions. The corrugations on the conducting cylinder have the shape of annular sectors. The primary objective of this work is to investigate the impact of corrugations on the scattered field in the shadow region of the structure. An optimally designed corrugated cylinder placed at the tip of a conducting wedge can effectively suppress electromagnetic scattering in the shadow region. Obtained numerical results using the proposed approach prove the above concept. These results were validated against numerical data obtained using a nodal finite element method. The aim of this research is to utilize these corrugated tips in horn antenna design for the reduction of side-lobe level and the shaping of the respective E-plane radiation pattern.

  9. Spectral Formulation for the Solution of Full-Wave Scattering from a Conducting Wedge Tipped with a Corrugated Cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Polycarpou, A. C.; Christou, M. A.

    2011-11-29

    A spectral mode-matching technique is formulated to solve for the full-wave scattering of a corrugated cylinder-tipped wedge in the presence of an impressed electric or magnetic line source. Asymptotic approximations of large-order Bessel or Henkel functions for a fixed argument were introduced in order to overcome numerical difficulties in their regular series expansions. The corrugations on the conducting cylinder have the shape of annular sectors. The primary objective of this work is to investigate the impact of corrugations on the scattered field in the shadow region of the structure. An optimally designed corrugated cylinder placed at the tip of a conducting wedge can effectively suppress electromagnetic scattering in the shadow region. Obtained numerical results using the proposed approach prove the above concept. These results were validated against numerical data obtained using a nodal finite element method. The aim of this research is to utilize these corrugated tips in horn antenna design for the reduction of side-lobe level and the shaping of the respective E-plane radiation pattern.

  10. 3D Guided Wave Motion Analysis on Laminated Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Leckey, Cara; Yu, Lingyu

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves have proved useful for structural health monitoring (SHM) and nondestructive evaluation (NDE) due to their ability to propagate long distances with less energy loss compared to bulk waves and due to their sensitivity to small defects in the structure. Analysis of actively transmitted ultrasonic signals has long been used to detect and assess damage. However, there remain many challenging tasks for guided wave based SHM due to the complexity involved with propagating guided waves, especially in the case of composite materials. The multimodal nature of the ultrasonic guided waves complicates the related damage analysis. This paper presents results from parallel 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) simulations used to acquire 3D wave motion in the subject laminated carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites. The acquired 3D wave motion is then analyzed by frequency-wavenumber analysis to study the wave propagation and interaction in the composite laminate. The frequency-wavenumber analysis enables the study of individual modes and visualization of mode conversion. Delamination damage has been incorporated into the EFIT model to generate "damaged" data. The potential for damage detection in laminated composites is discussed in the end.

  11. Fast and Efficient Approach in Surface Wave Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanli, A. I.

    2010-12-01

    Fast and Efficient Approach in Surface Wave Analysis Ali Ismet KANLI Istanbul University, Engineering Faculty, Department of Geophysical Engineering, 34320, Avcilar Campus, Istanbul-Turkey, E-mail: kanli@istanbul.edu.tr Abstract: A two-step surface wave analysis method is proposed including both the MASW (Multi-channel Analysis of Surface Waves) and Micro-tremor based techniques. This is an integrated approach and the MASW survey data are gathered to obtain the shear wave velocity-depth information up to at least 30 meters by using a special type active seismic source called as SR-II or Kangaroo. In the second step, the microtremor data which are based on surface waves from seismic noise at each site are used to determine the shear-wave velocity-depth profiles. In the second step of the process, the multichannel analysis of surface waves data are given as constraints in the microtremor inversion process. This proposed algorithm allows us to calculate shear wave velocity-depth information with all geotechnical parameters from near surface to bedrock depths very fast and efficiently.

  12. Direct comparison of full-wave and ray-tracing methods for a simple model of multi-dimensional mode conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Y.; Richardson, A.; Tracy, E.

    2007-11-01

    Mode conversion can occur in a nonuniform plasma when two waves of different character are locally resonant. Jaun et al. have recently developed a numerical ray-tracing algorithm for realistic tokamak models that accounts for the ray splitting that occurs at conversions [1,2]. Here we present a comparison of ray-based and full-wave methods by considering a simple model consisting of a pair of coupled wave equations in two spatial dimensions. The two spatially-dependent wave speeds, c1(x,y) and c2(x,y) are distinct for almost all (x,y), and are equal only along a line where conversion occurs. We launch a WKB-type wave packet in channel 1. There is initially no excitation in channel 2. Absorbing boundary conditions are used to avoid reflections which would complicate the results. From the full-wave output, we compute the initial energy density as a function of position and consider its evolution along a family of rays which undergo conversion. These full-wave results are then compared to the ray-based predictions. [1] A.Jaun, E.Tracy and A.Kaufman, Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 49, 43-67 (2007). [2] E.Tracy, A.Kaufman and A.Jaun, to appear in Phys. Plasmas.

  13. Analysis of Measured and Simulated Supraglottal Acoustic Waves.

    PubMed

    Fraile, Rubén; Evdokimova, Vera V; Evgrafova, Karina V; Godino-Llorente, Juan I; Skrelin, Pavel A

    2016-09-01

    To date, although much attention has been paid to the estimation and modeling of the voice source (ie, the glottal airflow volume velocity), the measurement and characterization of the supraglottal pressure wave have been much less studied. Some previous results have unveiled that the supraglottal pressure wave has some spectral resonances similar to those of the voice pressure wave. This makes the supraglottal wave partially intelligible. Although the explanation for such effect seems to be clearly related to the reflected pressure wave traveling upstream along the vocal tract, the influence that nonlinear source-filter interaction has on it is not as clear. This article provides an insight into this issue by comparing the acoustic analyses of measured and simulated supraglottal and voice waves. Simulations have been performed using a high-dimensional discrete vocal fold model. Results of such comparative analysis indicate that spectral resonances in the supraglottal wave are mainly caused by the regressive pressure wave that travels upstream along the vocal tract and not by source-tract interaction. On the contrary and according to simulation results, source-tract interaction has a role in the loss of intelligibility that happens in the supraglottal wave with respect to the voice wave. This loss of intelligibility mainly corresponds to spectral differences for frequencies above 1500 Hz. PMID:26377510

  14. Analysis of the Giacobini-Zinner bow wave

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, E.J.; Slavin, J.A.; Bame, S.J.; Thomsen, M.F.; Cowley, S.W.H.; Richardson, I.G.; Hovestadt, D.; Ipavich, F.M.; Ogilvie, K.W.; Coplan, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    The cometary bow wave of P/Giacobini-Zinner has been analyzed using the complete set of ICE field and particle observations to determine if it is a shock. Changes in the magnetic field and plasma flow velocities from upstream to downstream have been analyzed to determine the direction of the normal and the propagation velocity of the bow wave. The velocity has then been compared with the fast magnetosonic wave speed upstream to derive the Mach number and establish whether it is ''supersonic'', i.e., a shock, or ''subsonic,'' i.e., a large amplitude wave. The various measurements have also been compared with values derived from a Rankine-Hugoniot analysis. The results indicate that, inbound, the bow wave is a shock with M = 1.5. Outbound, a subsonic mach number is obtained, however, arguments are presented that the bow wave is also likely to be a shock at this location. 11 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Self-consistent full-wave and Fokker-Planck calculations for ion cyclotron heating in non-Maxwellian plasmasa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, E. F.; Berry, L. A.; Ahern, S. D.; Barrett, R. F.; Batchelor, D. B.; Carter, M. D.; D'Azevedo, E. F.; Moore, R. D.; Harvey, R. W.; Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.; Dumont, R. J.; Phillips, C. K.; Okuda, H.; Smithe, D. N.; Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C.; Choi, M.

    2006-05-01

    Magnetically confined plasmas can contain significant concentrations of nonthermal plasma particles arising from fusion reactions, neutral beam injection, and wave-driven diffusion in velocity space. Initial studies in one-dimensional and experimental results show that nonthermal energetic ions can significantly affect wave propagation and heating in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. In addition, these ions can absorb power at high harmonics of the cyclotron frequency where conventional two-dimensional global-wave models are not valid. In this work, the all-orders global-wave solver AORSA [E. F. Jaeger et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 195001 (2003)] is generalized to treat non-Maxwellian velocity distributions. Quasilinear diffusion coefficients are derived directly from the wave fields and used to calculate energetic ion velocity distributions with the CQL3D Fokker-Planck code [R. W. Harvey and M. G. McCoy, Proceedings of the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Simulation and Modeling of Thermonuclear Plasmas, Montreal, Canada, 1992 (USDOC NTIS Document No. DE93002962)]. For comparison, the quasilinear coefficients can be calculated numerically by integrating the Lorentz force equations along particle orbits. Self-consistency between the wave electric field and resonant ion distribution function is achieved by iterating between the global-wave and Fokker-Planck solutions.

  16. Terahertz wave spectrum analysis of microstrip structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Mei-jing; Li, Jiu-sheng

    2011-11-01

    Terahertz wave is a kind of electromagnetic wave ranging from 0.1~10THz, between microwave and infrared, which occupies a special place in the electromagnetic spectrum. Terahertz radiation has a strong penetration for many media materials and nonpolar substance, for example, dielectric material, plastic, paper carton and cloth. In recent years, researchers around the world have paid great attention on terahertz technology, such as safety inspection, chemical biology, medical diagnosis and terahertz wave imaging, etc. Transmission properties of two-dimensional metal microstrip structures in the terahertz regime are presented and tested. Resonant terahertz transmission was demonstrated in four different arrays of subwavelength microstrip structure patterned on semiconductor. The effects of microstrip microstrip structure shape were investigated by using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system. The resonant terahertz transmission has center frequency of 2.05 THz, transmission of 70%.

  17. Terahertz wave spectrum analysis of microstrip structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Mei-jing; Li, Jiu-sheng

    2012-03-01

    Terahertz wave is a kind of electromagnetic wave ranging from 0.1~10THz, between microwave and infrared, which occupies a special place in the electromagnetic spectrum. Terahertz radiation has a strong penetration for many media materials and nonpolar substance, for example, dielectric material, plastic, paper carton and cloth. In recent years, researchers around the world have paid great attention on terahertz technology, such as safety inspection, chemical biology, medical diagnosis and terahertz wave imaging, etc. Transmission properties of two-dimensional metal microstrip structures in the terahertz regime are presented and tested. Resonant terahertz transmission was demonstrated in four different arrays of subwavelength microstrip structure patterned on semiconductor. The effects of microstrip microstrip structure shape were investigated by using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system. The resonant terahertz transmission has center frequency of 2.05 THz, transmission of 70%.

  18. Clinical usefulness of wave intensity analysis.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Motoaki; Niki, Kiyomi; Ohte, Nobuyuki; Okada, Takashi; Harada, Akimitsu

    2009-02-01

    Wave intensity (WI) is a hemodynamic index, which can evaluate the working condition of the heart interacting with the arterial system. It can be defined at any site in the circulatory system and provides a great deal of information. However, we need simultaneous measurements of blood pressure and velocity to obtain wave intensity, which has limited the clinical application of wave intensity, in spite of its potential. To expand the application of wave intensity in the clinical setting, we developed a real-time non-invasive measurement system for wave intensity based on a combined color Doppler and echo-tracking system. We measured carotid arterial WI in normal subjects and patients with various cardiovascular diseases. In the coronary artery disease group, the magnitude of the first peak of carotid arterial WI (W (1)) increased with LV max. dP/dt (r = 0.74, P < 0.001), and the amplitude of the second peak (W (2)) decreased with an increase in the time constant of LV pressure decay (r = -0.77, P < 0.001). In the dilated cardiomyopathy group, the values of W (1) were much lower than those in the normal group (P < 0.0001). In the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy group, the values of W (2) were much smaller than those in the normal group (P < 0.0001). In mitral regurgitation before surgery, W (2) decreased or disappeared, but after surgery W (2) appeared clearly. In the hypertension group, the magnitude of reflection from the head was considerably greater than that in the normal group (P < 0.0001). We also evaluated hemodynamic effects of sublingual nitroglycerin in normal subjects. Nitroglycerin increased W (1) significantly (P < 0.001). WI can be obtained non-invasively using an echo-Doppler system in the clinical setting. This method will increase the clinical usefulness of wave intensity.

  19. Information content in frequency-dependent, multi-offset GPR data for layered media reconstruction using full-wave inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Coster, Albéric; Phuong Tran, Anh; Lambot, Sébastien

    2014-05-01

    Water lost through leaks can represent high percentages of the total production in water supply systems and constitutes an important issue. Leak detection can be tackled with various techniques such as the ground-penetrating radar (GPR). Based on this technology, various procedures have been elaborated to characterize a leak and its evolution. In this study, we focus on a new full-wave radar modelling approach for near-field conditions, which takes into account the antenna effects as well as the interactions between the antenna(s) and the medium through frequency-dependent global transmission and reflection coefficients. This approach is applied to layered media for which 3-D Green's functions can be calculated. The model allows for a quantitative estimation of the properties of multilayered media by using full-wave inversion. This method, however, proves to be limited to provide users with an on-demand assessment as it is generally computationally demanding and time consuming, depending on the medium configuration as well as the number of unknown parameters to retrieve. In that respect, we propose two leads in order to enhance the parameter retrieval step. The first one consists in analyzing the impact of the reduction of the number of frequencies on the information content. For both numerical and laboratory experiments, this operation has been achieved by investigating the response surface topography of objective functions arising from the comparison between measured and modelled data. The second one involves the numerical implementation of multistatic antenna configurations with constant and variable offsets in the model. These two kinds of analyses are then combined in numerical experiments to observe the conjugated effect of the number of frequencies and the offset configuration. To perform the numerical analyses, synthetic Green's functions were simulated for different multilayered medium configurations. The results show that an antenna offset increase leads

  20. Analysis of Slow-Wave Activity and Slow-Wave Oscillations Prior to Somnambulism

    PubMed Central

    Jaar, Olivier; Pilon, Mathieu; Carrier, Julie; Montplaisir, Jacques; Zadra, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectivies: Several studies have investigated slow wave sleep EEG parameters, including slow-wave activity (SWA) in relation to somnambulism, but results have been both inconsistent and contradictory. The first goal of the present study was to conduct a quantitative analysis of sleepwalkers' sleep EEG by studying fluctuations in spectral power for delta (1-4 Hz) and slow delta (0.5-1 Hz) before the onset of somnambulistic episodes. A secondary aim was to detect slow-wave oscillations to examine changes in their amplitude and density prior to behavioral episodes. Participants: Twenty-two adult sleepwalkers were investigated polysomnographically following 25 h of sleep deprivation. Results: Analysis of patients' sleep EEG over the 200 sec prior to the episodes' onset revealed that the episodes were not preceded by a gradual increase in spectral power for either delta or slow delta over frontal, central, or parietal leads. However, time course comparisons revealed significant changes in the density of slow-wave oscillations as well as in very slow oscillations with significant increases occurring during the final 20 sec immediately preceding episode onset. Conclusions: The specificity of these sleep EEG parameters for the occurrence and diagnosis of NREM parasomnias remains to be determined. Citation: Jaar O; Pilon M; Carrier J; Montplaisir J; Zadra A. Analysis of slow-wave activity and slow-wave oscillations prior to somnambulism. SLEEP 2010;33(11):1511-1516. PMID:21102993

  1. Analysis of sediment particle velocity in wave motion based on wave flume experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupiński, Adam

    2012-10-01

    The experiment described was one of the elements of research into sediment transport conducted by the Division of Geotechnics of West-Pomeranian University of Technology. The experimental analyses were performed within the framework of the project "Building a knowledge transfer network on the directions and perspectives of developing wave laboratory and in situ research using innovative research equipment" launched by the Institute of Hydroengineering of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Gdańsk. The objective of the experiment was to determine relations between sediment transport and wave motion parameters and then use the obtained results to modify formulas defining sediment transport in rivers, like Ackers-White formula, by introducing basic parameters of wave motion as the force generating bed material transport. The article presents selected results of the experiment concerning sediment velocity field analysis conducted for different parameters of wave motion. The velocity vectors of particles suspended in water were measured with a Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) apparatus registering suspended particles in a measurement flume by producing a series of laser pulses and analysing their displacement with a high-sensitivity camera connected to a computer. The article presents velocity fields of suspended bed material particles measured in the longitudinal section of the wave flume and their comparison with water velocity profiles calculated for the definite wave parameters. The results presented will be used in further research for relating parameters essential for the description of monochromatic wave motion to basic sediment transport parameters and "transforming" mean velocity and dynamic velocity in steady motion to mean wave front velocity and dynamic velocity in wave motion for a single wave.

  2. Wave energy budget analysis in the Earth's radiation belts uncovers a missing energy.

    PubMed

    Artemyev, A V; Agapitov, O V; Mourenas, D; Krasnoselskikh, V V; Mozer, F S

    2015-01-01

    Whistler-mode emissions are important electromagnetic waves pervasive in the Earth's magnetosphere, where they continuously remove or energize electrons trapped by the geomagnetic field, controlling radiation hazards to satellites and astronauts and the upper-atmosphere ionization or chemical composition. Here, we report an analysis of 10-year Cluster data, statistically evaluating the full wave energy budget in the Earth's magnetosphere, revealing that a significant fraction of the energy corresponds to hitherto generally neglected very oblique waves. Such waves, with 10 times smaller magnetic power than parallel waves, typically have similar total energy. Moreover, they carry up to 80% of the wave energy involved in wave-particle resonant interactions. It implies that electron heating and precipitation into the atmosphere may have been significantly under/over-valued in past studies considering only conventional quasi-parallel waves. Very oblique waves may turn out to be a crucial agent of energy redistribution in the Earth's radiation belts, controlled by solar activity. PMID:25975615

  3. Two dimensional kinetic analysis of electrostatic harmonic plasma waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca-Pongutá, E. C.; Ziebell, L. F.; Gaelzer, R.; Yoon, P. H.

    2016-06-01

    Electrostatic harmonic Langmuir waves are virtual modes excited in weakly turbulent plasmas, first observed in early laboratory beam-plasma experiments as well as in rocket-borne active experiments in space. However, their unequivocal presence was confirmed through computer simulated experiments and subsequently theoretically explained. The peculiarity of harmonic Langmuir waves is that while their existence requires nonlinear response, their excitation mechanism and subsequent early time evolution are governed by essentially linear process. One of the unresolved theoretical issues regards the role of nonlinear wave-particle interaction process over longer evolution time period. Another outstanding issue is that existing theories for these modes are limited to one-dimensional space. The present paper carries out two dimensional theoretical analysis of fundamental and (first) harmonic Langmuir waves for the first time. The result shows that harmonic Langmuir wave is essentially governed by (quasi)linear process and that nonlinear wave-particle interaction plays no significant role in the time evolution of the wave spectrum. The numerical solutions of the two-dimensional wave spectra for fundamental and harmonic Langmuir waves are also found to be consistent with those obtained by direct particle-in-cell simulation method reported in the literature.

  4. Wave climatological analysis in the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Dong, Changming; He, Yijun

    2016-06-01

    The ERA-40 and ERA-Interim datasets from ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) are used to study the wave and wind climate in the East China Sea (ECS). The temporal and spatial variablities in the wave and wind fields on multiple scales from the intraseasonal to decadal are discussed in detail. The results show that the wave height and the wind speed are highly correlated, especially in winter. For interannual and decadal scale, the wind and wave in the ECS is strongly influenced by the ENSO and PDO with the negative correlation. The trend spatial distributions of the mean state and extreme events are presented with wave height increase by 0.005-0.01 m a-1 in most of the ECS from 1979 to 2014. The influence of typhoon on the extreme wave is significant. Vector empirical orthogonal function (VEOF) methods are used to analyze the primary three modes of wave and wind variability. Because the monthly values are filtered the fluctuation with period shorter than 14 months before VEOF analysis, the three modes presents interannual variations. The first mode is presented as the wind blowing from land to sea or from sea to land. The second mode reflects the asymmetry of winter and summer monsoon for wind and wave. And the third mode presents as a cyclone located near 28°N which caused by a cyclonic eddy existing in the north of the ECS. The waves are further categorized based on quasi-wave age. The wind waves and swell distributions display obvious differences in different seasons. The wind waves are found to be dominated in autumn and winter in the ECS.

  5. Millimeter-Wave Polarimetry Instrumentation and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierman, Evan M.

    The chapters in this thesis roughly follow a reverse chronological order of my work in graduate school. Chapter 1 is the culmination of work with Dr. Dowell at Caltech, motivated by Professor Keating, to study polarized Galactic emission. Although the main goal of BICEP was to search for CMB B-modes, observation time was also spent on the Galactic plane region. Initially the data were collected to understand Galactic emission as a foreground of CMB polarization; however, the final paper focused on studying Galactic physics and not the CMB. Through comparison of BICEP data to other experiments, different models of the polarization production were explored. This paper also served as the initial instrument paper for the 220 GHz hardware added to BICEP for the second and third observing seasons. Chapter 2 is the software analysis work related to the paper in Chapter 1 that either did not make it into the paper or did not pan out. To explore BICEP's capabilities and produce better maps different scan strategies were explored such as full 360° scans and elevation scanning. BICEP observations are contaminated on large scales by a noise source that has not been fully identified. Different mapmaking methods were explored to remove this systematic as well as 1/ f noise and telescope systematics to maximize recovered signal. Chapter 3 represents a sample of contributions to the BICEP telescope and the UCSD FTS. To characterize the spectral response of the B ICEP telescope and the faraday rotation modulators, I helped design and construct the UCSD including layout and optical design, synthesizing wire grids, integrating the system with our lab's test cryostat, and developing software and analysis tools. My main contribution to the CMB polarization work on BICEP was analysis of calibration data. Specifically I talk about my work to understand the beams and differential pointing from observations of the Moon. Chapter 4 represents my work on Faraday Rotation devices. Initially

  6. A parametric analysis of two-dimensional elastic full waveform inversion of teleseismic data for lithospheric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pageot, Damien; Operto, Stéphane; Vallée, Martin; Brossier, Romain; Virieux, Jean

    2013-06-01

    The development of dense networks of broad-band seismographs makes teleseismic data amenable to full-waveform inversion (FWI) methods for high-resolution lithospheric imaging. Compared to scattered-field migration, FWI seeks to involve the full seismic wavefield in the inversion. We present a parametric analysis of 2-D frequency-domain FWI in the framework of lithospheric imaging from teleseismic data to identify the main factors that impact on the quality of the reconstructed compressional (P)-wave and shear (S)-wave speed models. Compared to controlled-source seismology, the main adaptation of FWI to teleseismic configuration consists of the implementation with a scattered-filed formulation of plane-wave sources that impinge on the base of the lithospheric target located below the receiver network at an arbitrary incidence angle. Seismic modelling is performed with a hp-adaptive discontinuous Galerkin method on unstructured triangular mesh. A quasi-Newton inversion algorithm provides an approximate accounting for the Hessian operator, which contributes to reduce the footprint of the coarse acquisition geometry in the imaging. A versatile algorithm to compute the gradient of the misfit function with the adjoint-state method allows for abstraction between the forward-problem operators and the meshes that are during seismic modelling and inversion, respectively. An approximate correction for obliquity is derived for future application to real teleseismic data under the two-dimension approximation. Comparisons between the characteristic scales involved in exploration geophysics and in teleseismic seismology suggest that the resolution gain provided by full waveform technologies should be of the same order of magnitude for both applications. We first show the importance of the surface-reflected wavefield to dramatically improve the resolving power of FWI by combining tomography-like and migration-like imaging through the incorporation of the forward-scattered and the

  7. Analysis shear wave velocity structure obtained from surface wave methods in Bornova, Izmir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamuk, Eren; Özdaǧ, Özkan Cevdet; Akgün, Mustafa

    2016-04-01

    Properties of the soil from the bedrock is necessary to describe accurately and reliably for the reduction of earthquake damage. Because seismic waves change their amplitude and frequency content owing to acoustic impedance difference between soil and bedrock. Firstly, shear wave velocity and depth information of layers on bedrock is needed to detect this changing. Shear wave velocity can be obtained using inversion of Rayleigh wave dispersion curves obtained from surface wave methods (MASW- the Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves, ReMi-Refraction Microtremor, SPAC-Spatial Autocorrelation). While research depth is limeted in active source study, a passive source methods are utilized for deep depth which is not reached using active source methods. ReMi method is used to determine layer thickness and velocity up to 100 m using seismic refraction measurement systems.The research carried out up to desired depth depending on radius using SPAC which is utilized easily in conditions that district using of seismic studies in the city. Vs profiles which are required to calculate deformations in under static and dynamic loads can be obtained with high resolution using combining rayleigh wave dispersion curve obtained from active and passive source methods. In the this study, Surface waves data were collected using the measurements of MASW, ReMi and SPAC at the İzmir Bornova region. Dispersion curves obtained from surface wave methods were combined in wide frequency band and Vs-depth profiles were obtained using inversion. Reliability of the resulting soil profiles were provided by comparison with theoretical transfer function obtained from soil paremeters and observed soil transfer function from Nakamura technique and by examination of fitting between these functions. Vs values are changed between 200-830 m/s and engineering bedrock (Vs>760 m/s) depth is approximately 150 m.

  8. Characteristic-Wave Approach Complements Modal Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    1990-01-01

    Aspects of estimation of unmodeled dynamics discussed. Report discusses solution of nonhomogeneous governing matrix equation for dynamics of short vibrational pulses propagating as characteristic waves in large structure. Applied to analyze response, to repeated pulses, of beam clamped at one end and free at other. Shows all qualitative characteristics occuring under arbitrary periodic excitations of beam and those of quasi-periodic excitations, in as much as such excitations obtained by linear superpositions of periodic excitations.

  9. Vector wave analysis of an electromagnetic high-order Bessel vortex beam of fractional type α.

    PubMed

    Mitri, F G

    2011-03-01

    The scalar wave theory of nondiffracting electromagnetic (EM) high-order Bessel vortex beams of fractional type α has been recently explored, and their novel features and promising applications have been revealed. However, complete characterization of the properties for this new type of beam requires a vector analysis to determine the fields' components in space because scalar wave theory is inadequate to describe such beams, especially when the central spot is comparable to the wavelength (k(r)/k≈1, where k(r) is the radial component of the wavenumber k). Stemming from Maxwell's vector equations and the Lorenz gauge condition, a full vector wave analysis for the electric and magnetic fields is presented. The results are of particular importance in the study of EM wave scattering of a high-order Bessel vortex beam of fractional type α by particles.

  10. Uncertainty analysis of wind-wave predictions in Lake Michigan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekouee, Navid; Ataie-Ashtiani, Behzad; Hamidi, Sajad Ahmad

    2016-10-01

    With all the improvement in wave and hydrodynamics numerical models, the question rises in our mind that how the accuracy of the forcing functions and their input can affect the results. In this paper, a commonly used numerical third-generation wave model, SWAN is applied to predict waves in Lake Michigan. Wind data are analyzed to determine wind variation frequency over Lake Michigan. Wave predictions uncertainty due to wind local effects are compared during a period where wind has a fairly constant speed and direction over the northern and southern basins. The study shows that despite model calibration in Lake Michigan area, the model deficiency arises from ignoring wind effects in small scales. Wave prediction also emphasizes that small scale turbulence in meteorological forces can increase prediction errors by 38%. Wave frequency and coherence analysis show that both models can predict the wave variation time scale with the same accuracy. Insufficient number of meteorological stations can result in neglecting local wind effects and discrepancies in current predictions. The uncertainty of wave numerical models due to input uncertainties and model principals should be taken into account for design risk factors.

  11. Geotail MCA Plasma Wave Investigation Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Roger R.

    1997-01-01

    The primary goals of the International Solar Terrestrial Physics/Global Geospace Science (ISTP/GGS) program are identifying, studying, and understanding the source, movement, and dissipation of plasma mass, momentum, and energy between the Sun and the Earth. The GEOTAIL spacecraft was built by the Japanese Institute of Space and Astronautical Science and has provided extensive measurements of entry, storage, acceleration, and transport in the geomagnetic tail and throughout the Earth's outer magnetosphere. GEOTAIL was launched on July 24, 1992, and began its scientific mission with eighteen extensions into the deep-tail region with apogees ranging from around 60 R(sub e) to more than 208 R(sub e) in the period up to late 1994. Due to the nature of the GEOTAIL trajectory which kept the spacecraft passing into the deep tail, GEOTAIL also made 'magnetopause skimming passes' which allowed measurements in the outer magnetosphere, magnetopause, magnetosheath, bow shock, and upstream solar wind regions as well as in the lobe, magnetosheath, boundary layers, and central plasma sheet regions of the tail. In late 1994, after spending nearly 30 months primarily traversing the deep tail region, GEOTAIL began its near-Earth phase. Perigee was reduced to 10 R(sub e) and apogee first to 50 R(sub e) and finally to 30 R(sub e) in early 1995. This orbit provides many more opportunities for GEOTAIL to explore the upstream solar wind, bow shock, magnetosheath, magnetopause, and outer magnetosphere as well as the near-Earth tail regions. The WIND spacecraft was launched on November 1, 1994 and the POLAR spacecraft was launched on February 24, 1996. These successful launches have dramatically increased the opportunities for GEOTAIL and the GGS spacecraft to be used to conduct the global research for which the ISTP program was designed. The measurement and study of plasma waves have made and will continue to make important contributions to reaching the ISTP/GGS goals and solving the

  12. Nonlinear Pressure Wave Analysis by Concentrated Mass Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Satoshi; Kondou, Takahiro; Matsuzaki, Kenichiro

    A pressure wave propagating in a tube often changes to a shock wave because of the nonlinear effect of fluid. Analyzing this phenomenon by the finite difference method requires high computational cost. To lessen the computational cost, a concentrated mass model is proposed. This model consists of masses, connecting nonlinear springs, connecting dampers, and base support dampers. The characteristic of a connecting nonlinear spring is derived from the adiabatic change of fluid, and the equivalent mass and equivalent damping coefficient of the base support damper are derived from the equation of motion of fluid in a cylindrical tube. Pressure waves generated in a hydraulic oil tube, a sound tube and a plane-wave tube are analyzed numerically by the proposed model to confirm the validity of the model. All numerical computational results agree very well with the experimental results carried out by Okamura, Saenger and Kamakura. Especially, the numerical analysis reproduces the phenomena that a pressure wave with large amplitude propagating in a sound tube or in a plane tube changes to a shock wave. Therefore, it is concluded that the proposed model is valid for the numerical analysis of nonlinear pressure wave problem.

  13. Detection of the electrocardiogram P-wave using wavelet analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Anant, K.S.; Rodrigue, G.H. |; Dowla, F.U.

    1994-01-01

    Since wavelet analysis is an effective tool for analyzing transient signals, we studied its feature extraction and representation properties for events in electrocardiogram (EKG) data. Significant features of the EKG include the P-wave, the QRS complex, and the T-wave. For this paper the feature that we chose to focus on was the P-wave. Wavelet analysis was used as a pre-processor for a backpropagation neural network with conjugate gradient learning. The inputs to the neural network were the wavelet transforms of EKGs at a particular scale. The desired output was the location of the P-wave. The results were compared to results obtained without using the wavelet transform as a pre-processor.

  14. Detection of the electrocardiogram P-wave using wavelet analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anant, Kanwaldip S.; Dowla, Farid U.; Rodrigue, Garry H.

    1994-03-01

    Since wavelet analysis is an effective tool for analyzing transient signals, we studied its feature extraction and representation properties for events in electrocardiogram (EKG) data. Significant features of the EKG include the P-wave, the QRS complex, and the T-wave. For this paper the feature that we chose to focus on was the P-wave. Wavelet analysis was used as a preprocessor for a backpropagation neural network with conjugate gradient learning. The inputs to the neural network were the wavelet transforms of EKGs at a particular scale. The desired output was the location of the P-wave. The results were compared to results obtained without using the wavelet transform as a preprocessor.

  15. multi-scale approaches for full waveform difference inversion and tomographic model analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Y.; Simons, F. J.; Luo, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Tomographic Earth models are solutions to mixed-determined inverse problems, which are formulated to minimize some measure of difference between synthetics and observed data. Typically, the measurement takes the form of a cross-correlation travel-time difference, or it might be the norm of the difference between the entire waveforms, in which case every wiggle is being used to extract information from the data. Full-waveform difference tomography suffers from a slow convergence rate and a danger of converging to local minima. In this presentation, we explore several routes to improving full-waveform inversion strategies for global and regional seismic tomography. First, we will discuss a wavelet-based multi-scale approach that works progressively from low to higher scales, step-by-step involving more details of the waveform. Second, we will discuss a hybrid misfit strategy that combines cross-correlation traveltime and waveform-difference measurements. We will discuss the making of multiscale sensitivity kernels using wavelet decompositions of the seismogram. Lastly, we move to the model space to conduct a multi-scale analysis of global tomographic models using a class of 3-D spherical wavelet bases that are implemented on the ``cubed ball'', the 3-D extension of the ``cubed sphere''. Using this novel transform we study the sparsity of global seismic tomographic models via thresholded reconstruction, and characterize the relative importance and patterns of features in the Earth models via individual and cumulative reconstructions of their wavelet coefficients. Whether on the side of the data, the sensitivity kernels, or in the model space, tomographic inverse problems have much to gain from the flexibility of the wavelet decomposition in one, two and three dimensions, and this on a global, regional or exploration scale, as we show by example. Full waveform difference inversion. The first figure shows our target model with two anomalous regions. The red stars

  16. Wave energy budget analysis in the Earth's radiation belts uncovers a missing energy

    PubMed Central

    Artemyev, A.V.; Agapitov, O.V.; Mourenas, D.; Krasnoselskikh, V.V.; Mozer, F.S.

    2015-01-01

    Whistler-mode emissions are important electromagnetic waves pervasive in the Earth's magnetosphere, where they continuously remove or energize electrons trapped by the geomagnetic field, controlling radiation hazards to satellites and astronauts and the upper-atmosphere ionization or chemical composition. Here, we report an analysis of 10-year Cluster data, statistically evaluating the full wave energy budget in the Earth's magnetosphere, revealing that a significant fraction of the energy corresponds to hitherto generally neglected very oblique waves. Such waves, with 10 times smaller magnetic power than parallel waves, typically have similar total energy. Moreover, they carry up to 80% of the wave energy involved in wave–particle resonant interactions. It implies that electron heating and precipitation into the atmosphere may have been significantly under/over-valued in past studies considering only conventional quasi-parallel waves. Very oblique waves may turn out to be a crucial agent of energy redistribution in the Earth's radiation belts, controlled by solar activity. PMID:25975615

  17. Challenges in the separation and analysis of scattered waves in angle-beam wavefield data

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, Alexander J.; Michaels, Jennifer E.; Michaels, Thomas E.

    2015-03-31

    The measurement of ultrasonic signals on a 2-D rectilinear grid resulting from a fixed source, referred to as wavefield imaging, is a powerful tool for visualizing wave propagation and scattering. Wavefield imaging provides a more complete picture of wave propagation than conventional single-point measurements, but creates more challenges for analysis. This work considers the development of wavefield-based methods for analyzing angle-beam wave propagation and scattering in plates. Methods of analysis focus on the separation of scattered waves from the total wavefield with the eventual goal of quantitative scatterer characterization in a laboratory environment. Two methods for wave separation are considered: frequency-wavenumber filtering and wavefield baseline subtraction. Frequency-wavenumber filtering is applied to wavefield data that are finely sampled in both space and time, whereas baseline subtraction is a technique that has typically been applied to individual signals recorded from fixed transducers rather than to full wavefield data. Baseline subtraction of wavefields, particularly for the frequency range considered here, is sensitive to both specimen alignment and temperature variations, whereas frequency-wavenumber methods are limited in their ability to separate waves traveling in the same direction. Results are shown for both methods with a focus on investigating and overcoming the challenges to full wavefield baseline subtraction.

  18. Analysis of negative material supported helix slow wave structure for traveling-wave tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purushothaman, N.; Srivastava, V.; Ghosh, S. K.

    2013-06-01

    We investigate the effect of negative materials used as support structures for helix travelling wave tubes (TWTs). Analysis is carried out with materials having negative permittivity or negative permeability and compared with the positive dielectric support materials. The work attempts to focus on the dispersion relation and interaction impedance as a measure to check for the feasibility of using negative materials in TWT.

  19. Gravitational wave astrophysics, data analysis and multimessenger astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyung Mok; Le Bigot, Eric-Olivier; Du, ZhiHui; Lin, ZhangXi; Guo, XiangYu; Wen, LinQing; Phukon, Khun Sang; Pandey, Vihan; Bose, Sukanta; Fan, Xi-Long; Hendry, Martin

    2015-12-01

    This paper reviews gravitational wave sources and their detection. One of the most exciting potential sources of gravitational waves are coalescing binary black hole systems. They can occur on all mass scales and be formed in numerous ways, many of which are not understood. They are generally invisible in electromagnetic waves, and they provide opportunities for deep investigation of Einstein's general theory of relativity. Sect. 1 of this paper considers ways that binary black holes can be created in the universe, and includes the prediction that binary black hole coalescence events are likely to be the first gravitational wave sources to be detected. The next parts of this paper address the detection of chirp waveforms from coalescence events in noisy data. Such analysis is computationally intensive. Sect. 2 reviews a new and powerful method of signal detection based on the GPUimplemented summed parallel infinite impulse response filters. Such filters are intrinsically real time alorithms, that can be used to rapidly detect and localise signals. Sect. 3 of the paper reviews the use of GPU processors for rapid searching for gravitational wave bursts that can arise from black hole births and coalescences. In sect. 4 the use of GPU processors to enable fast efficient statistical significance testing of gravitational wave event candidates is reviewed. Sect. 5 of this paper addresses the method of multimessenger astronomy where the discovery of electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational wave events can be used to identify sources, understand their nature and obtain much greater science outcomes from each identified event.

  20. Full-wave modeling of near-field ground-penetrating radar data for soil characterization: the problem solved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastien, L.; Andre, F.

    2011-12-01

    A new near-field ground-penetrating radar (GPR) modeling approach for wave propagation in planar layered media is presented. The radar antennas are modeled using an equivalent set of infinitesimal electric dipoles and characteristic, frequency-dependent, global reflection and transmission coefficients. These coefficients determine through a plane wave decomposition wave propagation between the radar reference plane, point sources, and field points. The interactions between the antenna and the ground are thereby inherently accounted for. The fields are calculated using three-dimensional Green's functions. We validated the model using both frequency and time domain radars that are commonly used in hydrogeophysical applications. The antenna characteristic coefficients were obtained from near- and far-field measurements over a copper plane. The proposed model provided unprecedented accuracy for describing near-field radar measurements collected over a water layer whose frequency-dependent electrical properties were described using the Debye model. The method was validated as well over a sand subject to a range of water contents and in field conditions for the retrieval of the shallow soil water content. The proposed approach shows great promise for digital soil mapping.

  1. Localized input fields in rigorous coupled-wave analysis.

    PubMed

    Auer, Maximilian; Brenner, Karl-Heinz

    2014-11-01

    We introduce a new treatment for localized input fields in coupled-wave theory. It consists of a combination of angular spectrum decomposition and a cyclic formulation of rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA), which does not require the computation of several standard RCWA calculations. The cyclic approach especially concerns the definition of the convolution matrix of the permittivity and enables the processing of multiple input plane waves in a single RCWA calculation. At the same time it ensures physically meaningful simulation results for finite truncation limits and thus inherently conserves energy. By adapting the three-dimensional (3D)-RCWA algorithm to efficiently simulate the effects of localized and arbitrarily polarized input fields to 3D volume gratings, various advanced diffraction problems such as fiber coupling, the influence of distorted plane waves, or the effects of focused beams on diffraction gratings can be investigated. Therefore, the impact of this work should concern many fields of application.

  2. Asymptotic analysis of numerical wave propagation in finite difference equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, M.; Thompkins, W. T., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    An asymptotic technique is developed for analyzing the propagation and dissipation of wave-like solutions to finite difference equations. It is shown that for each fixed complex frequency there are usually several wave solutions with different wavenumbers and the slowly varying amplitude of each satisfies an asymptotic amplitude equation which includes the effects of smoothly varying coefficients in the finite difference equations. The local group velocity appears in this equation as the velocity of convection of the amplitude. Asymptotic boundary conditions coupling the amplitudes of the different wave solutions are also derived. A wavepacket theory is developed which predicts the motion, and interaction at boundaries, of wavepackets, wave-like disturbances of finite length. Comparison with numerical experiments demonstrates the success and limitations of the theory. Finally an asymptotic global stability analysis is developed.

  3. Three-dimensional coupled mode analysis of internal-wave acoustic ducts.

    PubMed

    Shmelev, Alexey A; Lynch, James F; Lin, Ying-Tsong; Schmidt, Henrik

    2014-05-01

    A fully three-dimensional coupled mode approach is used in this paper to describe the physics of low frequency acoustic signals propagating through a train of internal waves at an arbitrary azimuth. A three layer model of the shallow water waveguide is employed for studying the properties of normal modes and their coupled interaction due to the presence of nonlinear internal waves. Using a robust wave number integration technique for Fourier transform computation and a direct global matrix approach, an accurate three-dimensional coupled mode full field solution is obtained for the tonal signal propagation through straight and parallel internal waves. This approach provides accurate results for arbitrary azimuth and includes the effects of backscattering. This enables one to provide an azimuthal analysis of acoustic propagation and separate the effects of mode coupled transparent resonance, horizontal reflection and refraction, the horizontal Lloyd's mirror, horizontal ducting and anti-ducting, and horizontal tunneling and secondary ducting.

  4. Nonstandard Analysis and Jump Conditions for Converging Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baty, Roy S.; Farassat, Fereidoun; Tucker, Don H.

    2008-01-01

    Nonstandard analysis is an area of modern mathematics which studies abstract number systems containing both infinitesimal and infinite numbers. This article applies nonstandard analysis to derive jump conditions for one-dimensional, converging shock waves in a compressible, inviscid, perfect gas. It is assumed that the shock thickness occurs on an infinitesimal interval and the jump functions in the thermodynamic and fluid dynamic parameters occur smoothly across this interval. Predistributions of the Heaviside function and the Dirac delta measure are introduced to model the flow parameters across a shock wave. The equations of motion expressed in nonconservative form are then applied to derive unambiguous relationships between the jump functions for the flow parameters.

  5. Finite frequency effects on apparent S-wave splitting in the D″ layer: comparison between ray theory and full-wave synthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgeaud, Anselme F. E.; Konishi, Kensuke; Kawai, Kenji; Geller, Robert J.

    2016-10-01

    We conduct a numerical experiment to investigate potential bias in measurements of S-wave splitting (apparent differences between the arrival times of SH and SV phases) for waves propagating close to the core-mantle boundary (CMB) in the D″ layer. The bias is defined as the discrepancy between shear wave splitting measured from finite frequency synthetic seismograms (`apparent splitting') and the splitting predicted by ray theory, which is a high-frequency approximation. For simple isotropic models, we find biases which are typically between 0.5 and 4 s, depending on the model, the Q structure and the dominant period of the synthetics. The bias increases for lower frequencies or lower Q values. The epicentral distance at which the bias starts depends on the frequency and the Q structure. We also compute synthetics for models based on mineral physics (using the elastic constants under lower-mantle pressure and temperature conditions, taking into account the phase transition from Mg-perovskite to Mg-post-perovskite) and geodynamics (the thermal boundary layer) and find that the depth of the positive velocity jump associated with the phase transition and the depth range over which the velocity decreases (due to temperature increases) in the thermal boundary layer significantly influence the wavefield in the lowermost mantle. For example, in cold regions beneath subduction zones, wavefields for SH and SV differ greatly due to the steep velocity decrease close to the CMB. For complex models, apparent splitting can also arise from the possibility that low amplitude direct phases might be overlooked, and larger amplitude later phases might instead incorrectly be picked as the direct arrival. Biases of the type investigated in this study combine with other sources of uncertainty for splitting in D″ (e.g. the correction for upper-mantle anisotropy and the difference between SH and SV ray paths) to make a precise evaluation of the anisotropy in D″ difficult.

  6. Finite frequency effects on apparent S-wave splitting in the D″ layer: comparison between ray theory and full-wave synthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgeaud, Anselme F. E.; Konishi, Kensuke; Kawai, Kenji; Geller, Robert J.

    2016-07-01

    We conduct a numerical experiment to investigate potential bias in measurements of S-wave splitting (apparent differences between the arrival times of SH and SV phases) for waves propagating close to the core-mantle boundary (CMB) in the D″ layer. The bias is defined as the discrepancy between shear wave splitting measured from finite frequency synthetic seismograms ("apparent splitting") and the splitting predicted by ray theory, which is a high-frequency approximation. For simple isotropic models, we find biases which are typically between 0.5 s and 4 s, depending on the model, the Q structure, and the dominant period of the synthetics. The bias increases for lower frequencies or lower Q values. The epicentral distance at which the bias starts depends on the frequency and the Q structure. We also compute synthetics for models based on mineral physics (using the elastic constants under lower mantle pressure and temperature conditions, taking into account the phase transition from Mg-perovskite to post-perovskite) and geodynamics (the thermal boundary layer) and find that the depth of the positive velocity jump associated with the phase transition and the depth range over which the velocity decreases (due to temperature increases) in the thermal boundary layer significantly influence the wavefield in the lowermost mantle. For example, in cold regions beneath subduction zones, wavefields for SH and SV differ greatly due to the steep velocity decrease close to the CMB. For complex models, apparent splitting can also arise from the possibility that low amplitude direct phases might be overlooked, and larger amplitude later phases might instead incorrectly be picked as the direct arrival. Biases of the type investigated in this study combine with other sources of uncertainty for splitting in D″ (e.g., the correction for upper mantle anisotropy and the difference between SH and SV raypaths) to make a precise evaluation of the anisotropy in D″ difficult.

  7. Near-field radiative heat transfer between metasurfaces: A full-wave study based on two-dimensional grooved metal plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jin; Dyakov, Sergey A.; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Yan, Min

    2016-09-01

    Metamaterials possess artificial bulk and surface electromagnetic states. Tamed dispersion properties of surface waves allow one to achieve a controllable super-Planckian radiative heat transfer (RHT) process between two closely spaced objects. We numerically demonstrate enhanced RHT between two two-dimensional grooved metal plates by a full-wave scattering approach. The enhancement originates from both transverse-magnetic spoof surface-plasmon polaritons and a series of transverse-electric bonding- and anti-bonding-waveguide modes at surfaces. The RHT spectrum is frequency selective and highly geometrically tailorable. Our simulation also reveals thermally excited nonresonant surface waves in constituent metallic materials may play a prevailing role for RHT at an extremely small separation between two metal plates, rendering metamaterial modes insignificant for the energy-transfer process.

  8. Simulation of the DIII-D Beam Ion Heating Experiment Using A Monte-Carlo Particle Code Combined With a Full Wave Code

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, M.; Chan, V. S.; Green, D.; Jaeger, E. F.; Berry, L. A.; Heidbrink, W. W.

    2009-11-26

    To fully account for finite drift orbit effect of fast ions on wave-particle interaction in ion-cyclotron radio frequency (ICRF) heating experiments in tokamaks, the 5-D finite orbit Monte-Carlo plasma distribution solver ORBIT-RF is coupled with the 2-D full wave code AORSA in a self-consistent way. Comparison results of ORBIT-RF/AORSA simulation against fast-ion D{sub {alpha}}(FIDA) measurement of fast-ion distribution as well as CQL3D/ray-tracing simulation with zero-orbit approximation in the DIII-D ICRF wave beam-ion acceleration experiment are presented. Preliminary ORBIT-RF/AORSA results suggest that finite orbit width effects may explain the outward radial shift of the spatial profile measured by FIDA.

  9. Full-duplex bidirectional transmission of 10-Gb/s millimeter-wave QPSK signal in E-band optical wireless link.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuan; Yu, Jianjun; Chi, Nan; Xiao, Jiangnan

    2014-01-27

    We experimentally demonstrated full-duplex bidirectional transmission of 10-Gb/s millimeter-wave (mm-wave) quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) signal in E-band (71-76 GHz and 81-86 GHz) optical wireless link. Single-mode fibers (SMF) are connected at both sides of the antenna for uplink and downlink which realize 40-km SMF and 2-m wireless link for bidirectional transmission simultaneously. We utilized multi-level modulation format and coherent detection in such E-band optical wireless link for the first time. Mm-wave QPSK signal is generated by photonic technique to increase spectrum efficiency and received signal is coherently detected to improve receiver sensitivity. After the coherent detection, digital signal processing is utilized to compensate impairments of devices and transmission link.

  10. Partial Wave Analysis of Coupled Photonic Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, Kirk A.; Smith, David D.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The very high quality factors sustained by microcavity optical resonators are relevant to applications in wavelength filtering, routing, switching, modulation, and multiplexing/demultiplexing. Increases in the density of photonic elements require that attention be paid to how electromagnetic (EM) coupling modifies their optical properties. This is especially true when cavity resonances are involved, in which case, their characteristics may be fundamentally altered. Understanding the optical properties of microcavities that are near or in contact with photonic elements---such as other microcavities, nanostructures, couplers, and substrates---can be expected to advance our understanding of the roles that these structures may play in VLSI photonics, biosensors and similar device technologies. Wc present results from recent theoretical studies of the effects of inter- and intracavity coupling on optical resonances in compound spherical particles. Concentrically stratified spheres and bispheres constituted from homogeneous and stratified spheres are subjects of this investigation. A new formulation is introduced for the absorption of light in an arbitrary layer of a multilayered sphere, which is based on multiple reflections of the spherical partial waves of the Lorenz-Mie solution for scattering by a sphere. Absorption efficiencies, which can be used to profile cavity resonances and to infer fluorescence yields or the onset of nonlinear optical processes in the microcavities, are presented. Splitting of resonances in these multisphere systems is paid particular attention, and consequences for photonic device development and possible performance enhancements through carefully designed architectures that exploit EM coupling are considered.

  11. Slow Wave Vane Structure with Elliptical Cross-Section Slots, an Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmahl, Henry G.

    1994-01-01

    Mathematical analysis of the wave equation in cylinders with elliptical cross-section slots was performed. Compared to slow wave structures with rectangular slots higher impedance and lower power dissipation losses are evident. These features could lead to improved designs of traveling wave magnetrons and gigahertz backward-wave oscillators as well as linear traveling wave tubes with relatively shallow slots.

  12. Arterial stiffness estimation based photoplethysmographic pulse wave analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huotari, Matti; Maatta, Kari; Kostamovaara, Juha

    2010-11-01

    Arterial stiffness is one of the indices of vascular healthiness. It is based on pulse wave analysis. In the case we decompose the pulse waveform for the estimation and determination of arterial elasticity. Firstly, optically measured with photoplethysmograph and then investigating means by four lognormal pulse waveforms for which we can find very good fit between the original and summed decomposed pulse wave. Several studies have demonstrated that these kinds of measures predict cardiovascular events. While dynamic factors, e.g., arterial stiffness, depend on fixed structural features of the vascular wall. Arterial stiffness is estimated based on pulse wave decomposition analysis in the radial and tibial arteries. Elucidation of the precise relationship between endothelial function and vascular stiffness awaits still further study.

  13. A general numerical model for wave rotor analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel W.

    1992-01-01

    Wave rotors represent one of the promising technologies for achieving very high core temperatures and pressures in future gas turbine engines. Their operation depends upon unsteady gas dynamics and as such, their analysis is quite difficult. This report describes a numerical model which has been developed to perform such an analysis. Following a brief introduction, a summary of the wave rotor concept is given. The governing equations are then presented, along with a summary of the assumptions used to obtain them. Next, the numerical integration technique is described. This is an explicit finite volume technique based on the method of Roe. The discussion then focuses on the implementation of appropriate boundary conditions. Following this, some results are presented which first compare the numerical approximation to the governing differential equations and then compare the overall model to an actual wave rotor experiment. Finally, some concluding remarks are presented concerning the limitations of the simplifying assumptions and areas where the model may be improved.

  14. Attenuation of seismic waves obtained by coda waves analysis in the West Bohemia earthquake swarm region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachura, Martin; Fischer, Tomas

    2014-05-01

    with depth, where 1/Qc seems to be frequency independent in depth range of upper lithosphere. Lateral changes of 1/Qc were also reported - it decreases in the south-west direction from the Novy Kostel focal zone, where the attenuation is the highest. Results from more advanced methods that allow for separation of scattering and intrinsic loss show that intrinsic loss is a dominant factor for attenuating of seismic waves in the region. Determination of attenuation due to scattering appears ambiguous due to small hypocentral distances available for the analysis, where the effects of scattering in frequency range from 1 to 24 Hz are not significant.

  15. A Dynamic Analysis of Hydrodynamic Wave Journal Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ene, Nicoleta M.; Dimofte, Florin; Keith, Theo G.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study the dynamic behavior of a three-wave journal bearing using a transient approach. The transient analysis permits the determination of the rotor behavior after the fractional frequency whirl appears. The journal trajectory is determined by solving a set of nonlinear equations of motion using the Runge-Katta method. The fluid film forces are computed by integrating the transient Reynolds equation at each time step location of the shaft with respect to the bearing. Because of the large values of the rotational speeds, turbulent effects were included in the computations. The influence of the temperature on the viscosity was also considered. Numerical results were compared to experimenta1 results obtained at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Comparisons of the theoretical results with experimental data were found to be in good agreement. The numerical and experimental results showed that the fluid film of a three-wave journal bearing having a diameter of 30 mm, a length of 27 mm, and a wave amplitude ratio greater than 0.15 is stable even at rotational speeds of 60,000 RPM. For lower wave amplitude ratios, the threshold speed at which the fluid film becomes unstable depends on the wave amplitude and on the supply pocket pressure. Even if the fluid film is unstable, the wave bearing maintains the whirl orbit inside the bearing clearance.

  16. Full-wave feasibility study of anti-radar diagnostic of magnetic field based on O-X mode conversion and oblique reflectometry imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneghini, Orso; Volpe, Francesco A.

    2016-11-01

    An innovative millimeter wave diagnostic is proposed to measure the local magnetic field and edge current as a function of the minor radius in the tokamak pedestal region. The idea is to identify the direction of minimum reflectivity at the O-mode cutoff layer. Correspondingly, the transmissivity due to O-X mode conversion is maximum. That direction, and the angular map of reflectivity around it, contains information on the magnetic field vector B at the cutoff layer. Probing the plasma with different wave frequencies provides the radial profile of B. Full-wave finite-element simulations are presented here in 2D slab geometry. Modeling confirms the existence of a minimum in reflectivity that depends on the magnetic field at the cutoff, as expected from mode conversion physics, giving confidence in the feasibility of the diagnostic. The proposed reflectometric approach is expected to yield superior signal-to-noise ratio and to access wider ranges of density and magnetic field, compared with related radiometric techniques that require the plasma to emit electron Bernstein waves. Due to computational limitations, frequencies of 10-20 GHz were considered in this initial study. Frequencies above the edge electron-cyclotron frequency (f > 28 GHz here) would be preferable for the experiment, because the upper hybrid resonance and right cutoff would lie in the plasma, and would help separate the O-mode of interest from spurious X-waves.

  17. Extreme waves seasonality analysis: An application in the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartini, L.; Cassola, F.; Besio, G.

    2015-09-01

    A nonstationary model based on a time-dependent version of the Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD)-Poisson point process model has been implemented and applied to model extreme wave heights in the Mediterranean basin. Thirty-two years of wave hindcast data have been provided by a forecast/hindcast numerical chain model operational at the University of Genoa (www.dicca.unige.it/meteocean" http://www.dicca.unige.it/meteocean"www.dicca.unige.it/meteocean). The nonstationary behavior of wave height maxima prompted the modeling of GEV parameters with harmonic functions. Harmonics have been introduced to model seasonal cycles within a year, also taking into account long-term trend and covariates effects. The model has been applied on eight locations corresponding to buoys belonging to the RON (Rete Ondametrica Nazionale), chosen in order to represent best the main features and variability of waves along the Italian coast. The best performing model is chosen among a large set of possible candidates identified by different combinations of wave heights maxima and model parameters. Direct comparison with stationary results has been performed; furthermore, the model has demonstrated a good performance in gathering different seasonal behaviors related to the main meteorological forcing standing on the Mediterranean Sea. Trends related to extreme significant wave heights have also been evaluated in order to offer some insight into decadal-scale wave climate. Results achieved show how the use of a nonstationary statistical model together with the analysis of the main meteorological forcings characterizing the area could prove useful in understanding wave climate related to atmospheric dynamics.

  18. Full duplex fiber link for alternative wired and wireless access based on SSB optical millimeter-wave with 4-PAM signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianxin; Zhang, Junjie

    2015-03-01

    A novel full-duplex fiber-wireless link based on single sideband (SSB) optical millimeter (mm)-wave with 10 Gbit/s 4-pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) signal is proposed to provide alternative wired and 40 GHz wireless accesses for the user terminals. The SSB optical mm-wave with 4-PAM signal consists of two tones: one bears the 4-PAM signal and the other is unmodulated with high power. After transmission over the fiber to the hybrid optical network unit (HONU), the SSB optical mm-wave signal can be decomposed by fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) as the SSB optical mm-wave signal with reduced carrier-to-sideband ratio (the baseband 4-PAM optical signal) and the uplink optical carrier for the wireless (wired) access. This makes the HONU free from the laser source. For the uplink, since the wireless access signal is converted to the baseband by power detection, both the transmitter in the HONU and the receiver in optical line terminal (OLT) are co-shared for both wireless and wired accesses, which makes the full duplex link much simpler. In our scheme, the optical electrical field of the square-root increment level 4-PAM signal assures an equal level spacing receiving for both the downlink wired and wireless accesses. Since the downlink wireless signal is down-converted to the baseband by power detection, RF local oscillator is unnecessary. To confirm the feasibility of our proposed scheme, a simulation full duplex link with 40 GHz SSB optical mm-wave with 10 Gbit/s 4-PAM signal is built. The simulation results show that both down- and up-links for either wired or wireless access can keep good performance even if the link length of the SSMF is extended to 40 km.

  19. Data synthesis and display programs for wave distribution function analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storey, L. R. O.; Yeh, K. J.

    1992-01-01

    At the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) software was written to synthesize and display artificial data for use in developing the methodology of wave distribution analysis. The software comprises two separate interactive programs, one for data synthesis and the other for data display.

  20. SLAC three-body partial wave analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Aston, D.; Lasinski, T.A.; Sinervo, P.K.

    1985-10-01

    We present a heuristic description of the SLAC-LBL three-meson partial wave model, and describe how we have implemented it at SLAC. The discussion details the assumptions of the model and the analysis, and emphasizes the methods we have used to prepare and fit the data. 28 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  1. On Holo-Hilbert spectral analysis: a full informational spectral representation for nonlinear and non-stationary data

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Norden E.; Hu, Kun; Yang, Albert C. C.; Chang, Hsing-Chih; Jia, Deng; Liang, Wei-Kuang; Yeh, Jia Rong; Kao, Chu-Lan; Juan, Chi-Hung; Peng, Chung Kang; Meijer, Johanna H.; Wang, Yung-Hung; Long, Steven R.; Wu, Zhauhua

    2016-01-01

    The Holo-Hilbert spectral analysis (HHSA) method is introduced to cure the deficiencies of traditional spectral analysis and to give a full informational representation of nonlinear and non-stationary data. It uses a nested empirical mode decomposition and Hilbert–Huang transform (HHT) approach to identify intrinsic amplitude and frequency modulations often present in nonlinear systems. Comparisons are first made with traditional spectrum analysis, which usually achieved its results through convolutional integral transforms based on additive expansions of an a priori determined basis, mostly under linear and stationary assumptions. Thus, for non-stationary processes, the best one could do historically was to use the time–frequency representations, in which the amplitude (or energy density) variation is still represented in terms of time. For nonlinear processes, the data can have both amplitude and frequency modulations (intra-mode and inter-mode) generated by two different mechanisms: linear additive or nonlinear multiplicative processes. As all existing spectral analysis methods are based on additive expansions, either a priori or adaptive, none of them could possibly represent the multiplicative processes. While the earlier adaptive HHT spectral analysis approach could accommodate the intra-wave nonlinearity quite remarkably, it remained that any inter-wave nonlinear multiplicative mechanisms that include cross-scale coupling and phase-lock modulations were left untreated. To resolve the multiplicative processes issue, additional dimensions in the spectrum result are needed to account for the variations in both the amplitude and frequency modulations simultaneously. HHSA accommodates all the processes: additive and multiplicative, intra-mode and inter-mode, stationary and non-stationary, linear and nonlinear interactions. The Holo prefix in HHSA denotes a multiple dimensional representation with both additive and multiplicative capabilities. PMID:26953180

  2. On Holo-Hilbert spectral analysis: a full informational spectral representation for nonlinear and non-stationary data.

    PubMed

    Huang, Norden E; Hu, Kun; Yang, Albert C C; Chang, Hsing-Chih; Jia, Deng; Liang, Wei-Kuang; Yeh, Jia Rong; Kao, Chu-Lan; Juan, Chi-Hung; Peng, Chung Kang; Meijer, Johanna H; Wang, Yung-Hung; Long, Steven R; Wu, Zhauhua

    2016-04-13

    The Holo-Hilbert spectral analysis (HHSA) method is introduced to cure the deficiencies of traditional spectral analysis and to give a full informational representation of nonlinear and non-stationary data. It uses a nested empirical mode decomposition and Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) approach to identify intrinsic amplitude and frequency modulations often present in nonlinear systems. Comparisons are first made with traditional spectrum analysis, which usually achieved its results through convolutional integral transforms based on additive expansions of an a priori determined basis, mostly under linear and stationary assumptions. Thus, for non-stationary processes, the best one could do historically was to use the time-frequency representations, in which the amplitude (or energy density) variation is still represented in terms of time. For nonlinear processes, the data can have both amplitude and frequency modulations (intra-mode and inter-mode) generated by two different mechanisms: linear additive or nonlinear multiplicative processes. As all existing spectral analysis methods are based on additive expansions, either a priori or adaptive, none of them could possibly represent the multiplicative processes. While the earlier adaptive HHT spectral analysis approach could accommodate the intra-wave nonlinearity quite remarkably, it remained that any inter-wave nonlinear multiplicative mechanisms that include cross-scale coupling and phase-lock modulations were left untreated. To resolve the multiplicative processes issue, additional dimensions in the spectrum result are needed to account for the variations in both the amplitude and frequency modulations simultaneously. HHSA accommodates all the processes: additive and multiplicative, intra-mode and inter-mode, stationary and non-stationary, linear and nonlinear interactions. The Holo prefix in HHSA denotes a multiple dimensional representation with both additive and multiplicative capabilities.

  3. On Holo-Hilbert spectral analysis: a full informational spectral representation for nonlinear and non-stationary data.

    PubMed

    Huang, Norden E; Hu, Kun; Yang, Albert C C; Chang, Hsing-Chih; Jia, Deng; Liang, Wei-Kuang; Yeh, Jia Rong; Kao, Chu-Lan; Juan, Chi-Hung; Peng, Chung Kang; Meijer, Johanna H; Wang, Yung-Hung; Long, Steven R; Wu, Zhauhua

    2016-04-13

    The Holo-Hilbert spectral analysis (HHSA) method is introduced to cure the deficiencies of traditional spectral analysis and to give a full informational representation of nonlinear and non-stationary data. It uses a nested empirical mode decomposition and Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) approach to identify intrinsic amplitude and frequency modulations often present in nonlinear systems. Comparisons are first made with traditional spectrum analysis, which usually achieved its results through convolutional integral transforms based on additive expansions of an a priori determined basis, mostly under linear and stationary assumptions. Thus, for non-stationary processes, the best one could do historically was to use the time-frequency representations, in which the amplitude (or energy density) variation is still represented in terms of time. For nonlinear processes, the data can have both amplitude and frequency modulations (intra-mode and inter-mode) generated by two different mechanisms: linear additive or nonlinear multiplicative processes. As all existing spectral analysis methods are based on additive expansions, either a priori or adaptive, none of them could possibly represent the multiplicative processes. While the earlier adaptive HHT spectral analysis approach could accommodate the intra-wave nonlinearity quite remarkably, it remained that any inter-wave nonlinear multiplicative mechanisms that include cross-scale coupling and phase-lock modulations were left untreated. To resolve the multiplicative processes issue, additional dimensions in the spectrum result are needed to account for the variations in both the amplitude and frequency modulations simultaneously. HHSA accommodates all the processes: additive and multiplicative, intra-mode and inter-mode, stationary and non-stationary, linear and nonlinear interactions. The Holo prefix in HHSA denotes a multiple dimensional representation with both additive and multiplicative capabilities. PMID:26953180

  4. Full-duplex radio over fiber link with colorless source-free base station based on single sideband optical mm-wave signal with polarization rotated optical carrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianxin

    2016-07-01

    A full-duplex radio-over fiber (RoF) link scheme based on single sideband (SSB) optical millimeter (mm)-wave signal with polarization-rotated optical carrier is proposed to realize the source-free colorless base station (BS), in which a polarization beam splitter (PBS) is used to abstract part of the optical carrier for conveying the uplink data. Since the optical carrier for the uplink does not bear the downlink signal, no cross-talk from the downlink contaminates the uplink signal. The simulation results demonstrate that both down- and up-links maintain good performance. The mm-wave signal distribution network based on the proposed full duplex fiber link scheme can use the uniform source-free colorless BSs, which makes the access system very simpler.

  5. Multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) - Active and passive methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Park, C.B.; Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.; Ivanov, J.

    2007-01-01

    The conventional seismic approaches for near-surface investigation have usually been either high-resolution reflection or refraction surveys that deal with a depth range of a few tens to hundreds meters. Seismic signals from these surveys consist of wavelets with frequencies higher than 50 Hz. The multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) method deals with surface waves in the lower frequencies (e.g., 1-30 Hz) and uses a much shallower depth range of investigation (e.g., a few to a few tens of meters). ?? 2007 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  6. Stochastic template placement algorithm for gravitational wave data analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Harry, I. W.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Allen, B.

    2009-11-15

    This paper presents an algorithm for constructing matched-filter template banks in an arbitrary parameter space. The method places templates at random, then removes those which are 'too close' together. The properties and optimality of stochastic template banks generated in this manner are investigated for some simple models. The effectiveness of these template banks for gravitational wave searches for binary inspiral waveforms is also examined. The properties of a stochastic template bank are then compared to the deterministically placed template banks that are currently used in gravitational wave data analysis.

  7. Underdetermined system theory applied to qualitative analysis of response caused by attenuating plane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Yukio

    1989-05-01

    A qualitative analysis of the mechanical response of rate-dependent media caused by a one-dimensional plane smooth wave front and by a continuous wave front attenuating in the media is performed by an underdetermined system of nonlinear partial differential equations. The analysis reveals that smooth strain, particle velocity, and stress profiles, which the smooth wave front has, are not similar and that the wave front is composed of some partial waves having different properties. The property is represented by a set of strain rate, acceleration, and stress rate. The wave front derived here from the analysis is composed of four different partial waves. The front of the wave front is necessarily a contraction wave in which strain, particle velocity, and stress increase with time, while the rear is a rarefaction wave where they all decrease with time. Between these two wave fronts there are two remaining wave fronts. We call these wave fronts mesocontraction waves I and II. Wave front I is a wave in which stress decreases notwithstanding the increase in strain and particle velocity with time, which is followed by the other, i.e., wave front II, where with time, particle velocity, and stress decrease in spite of the increase in strain. The continuous wave front having continuous and nonsmooth profiles of strain, particle velocity, and stress can also be composed of four waves. These waves possess the same property as the corresponding waves in the smooth wave front mentioned above. The velocities at three boundaries that the waves have are discontinuous. Therefore, these four wave fronts are independent waves, just as a shock wave and a rarefraction wave. Specifically, the front wave, i.e., a contraction wave front is being outrun by a second wave front, the second one is being outrun by a third wave front, and the third is being outrun by a fourth wave front, i.e., a rarefaction wave. We call the second wave front degenerate contraction wave I. We also call the third

  8. Wave intensity wall analysis: a novel noninvasive method to measure wave intensity.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Matilda; Bjällmark, Anna; Lind, Britta; Balzano, Rita; Peolsson, Michael; Winter, Reidar; Brodin, Lars-Ake

    2009-09-01

    Wave intensity analysis is a concept providing information about the interaction of the heart and the vascular system. Originally, the technique was invasive. Since then new noninvasive methods have been developed. A recently developed ultrasound technique to estimate tissue motion and deformation is speckle-tracking echocardiography. Speckle tracking-based techniques allow for accurate measurement of movement and deformation variables in the arterial wall in both the radial and the longitudinal direction. The aim of this study was to test if speckle tracking-derived deformation data could be used as input for wave intensity calculations. The new concept was to approximate changes of flow and pressure by deformation changes of the arterial wall in longitudinal and radial directions. Flow changes (dU/dt) were approximated by strain rate (sr, 1/s) of the arterial wall in the longitudinal direction, whereas pressure changes (dP/dt) were approximated by sign reversed strain rate (1/s) in the arterial wall in the radial direction. To validate the new concept, a comparison between the newly developed Wave Intensity Wall Analysis (WIWA) algorithm and a commonly used and validated wave intensity system (SSD-5500, Aloka, Tokyo, Japan) was performed. The studied population consisted of ten healthy individuals (three women, seven men) and ten patients (all men) with coronary artery disease. The present validation study indicates that the mechanical properties of the arterial wall, as measured by a speckle tracking-based technique are a possible input for wave intensity calculations. The study demonstrates good visual agreement between the two systems and the time interval between the two positive peaks (W1-W2) measured by the Aloka system and the WIWA system correlated for the total group (r = 0.595, P < 0.001). The correlation for the diseased subgroup was r = 0.797, P < 0.001 and for the healthy subgroup no significant correlation was found (P > 0.05). The results of the

  9. Guided Wave Delamination Detection and Quantification With Wavefield Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Campbell Leckey, Cara A.; Seebo, Jeffrey P.; Yu, Lingyu

    2014-01-01

    Unexpected damage can occur in aerospace composites due to impact events or material stress during off-nominal loading events. In particular, laminated composites are susceptible to delamination damage due to weak transverse tensile and inter-laminar shear strengths. Developments of reliable and quantitative techniques to detect delamination damage in laminated composites are imperative for safe and functional optimally-designed next-generation composite structures. In this paper, we investigate guided wave interactions with delamination damage and develop quantification algorithms by using wavefield data analysis. The trapped guided waves in the delamination region are observed from the wavefield data and further quantitatively interpreted by using different wavenumber analysis methods. The frequency-wavenumber representation of the wavefield shows that new wavenumbers are present and correlate to trapped waves in the damage region. These new wavenumbers are used to detect and quantify the delamination damage through the wavenumber analysis, which can show how the wavenumber changes as a function of wave propagation distance. The location and spatial duration of the new wavenumbers can be identified, providing a useful means not only for detecting the presence of delamination damage but also allowing for estimation of the delamination size. Our method has been applied to detect and quantify real delamination damage with complex geometry (grown using a quasi-static indentation technique). The detection and quantification results show the location, size, and shape of the delamination damage.

  10. Dyadic analysis of partially coherent submillimeter-wave antenna systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withington, S.; Yassin, G.; Murphy, J. A.

    2001-08-01

    We describe a procedure for simulating the behavior of partially coherent submillimeter-wave antenna systems. The procedure is based on the principle that the second-order statistical properties of any partially coherent vector field can be decomposed into a sum of fully coherent, but completely uncorrelated, natural modes. Any of the standard electromagnetic analysis techniques-physical optics, geometrical theory of diffraction, etc.-can be used to propagate and scatter the modes individually, and the statistical properties of the total transformed field reconstructed at the output surface by means of superposition. In the case of modal optics-plane waves, Gaussian optics, waveguide mode matching, etc.-the properties of the field can be traced directly by means of scattering matrices. The overall procedure is of considerable value for calculating the behavior of astronomical instruments comprising planar and waveguide multimode bolometers, submillimeter-wave optical components, and large reflecting antennas.

  11. Multichannel analysis of surface wave method with the autojuggie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tian, G.; Steeples, D.W.; Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Spikes, K.T.; Ralston, M.D.

    2003-01-01

    The shear (S)-wave velocity of near-surface materials and its effect on seismic-wave propagation are of fundamental interest in many engineering, environmental, and groundwater studies. The multichannel analysis of surface wave (MASW) method provides a robust, efficient, and accurate tool to observe near-surface S-wave velocity. A recently developed device used to place large numbers of closely spaced geophones simultaneously and automatically (the 'autojuggie') is shown here to be applicable to the collection of MASW data. In order to demonstrate the use of the autojuggie in the MASW method, we compared high-frequency surface-wave data acquired from conventionally planted geophones (control line) to data collected in parallel with the automatically planted geophones attached to steel bars (test line). The results demonstrate that the autojuggie can be applied in the MASW method. Implementation of the autojuggie in very shallow MASW surveys could drastically reduce the time required and costs incurred in such surveys. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Impedance-matching analysis in IR leaky-wave antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premkumar, Navaneeth; Xu, Yuancheng; Lail, Brian A.

    2015-08-01

    Planar leaky-wave antennas (LWA) that are capable of full-space scanning have long since been the pursuit for applications including, but not limited to, integration onto vehicles and into cameras for wide-angle of view beam-steering. Such a leaky-wave surface (LWS) was designed for long-wave infrared frequencies with frequency scanning capability. The LWS is based on a microstrip patch array design of a leaky-wave impedance surface and is made up of gold microstrip patches on a grounded zinc sulphide substrate. A 1D composite right/left-handed (CRLH) metamaterial made by periodically stacking a unit cell of the LWS in the longitudinal direction to form a LWA was designed. This paper deals with loading the LWA with a nickel bolometer to collect leaky-wave signals. The LWA radiates a backward leaking wave at 30 degrees at 28.3THz and scans through broadside for frequencies 20THz through 40THz. The paper deals with effectively placing the bolometer in order for the collected signal to exhibit the designed frequency regime. An effective way to maximize the power coupling into the load from the antenna is also explored. The benefit of such a metamaterial/holographic antennacoupled detector is its ability to provide appreciable capture cross-sections while delivering smart signals to subwavelength sized detectors. Due to their high-gain, low-profile, fast response time of the detector and ease of fabrication, this IR LWA-coupled bolometer harbors great potential in the areas of high resolution, uncooled, infrared imaging.

  13. Application of homomorphic signal processing to stress wave factor analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. H., Jr.; Lee, S. S.; Karaguelle, H.

    1985-01-01

    The stress wave factor (SWF) signal, which is the output of an ultrasonic testing system where the transmitting and receiving transducers are coupled to the same face of the test structure, is analyzed in the frequency domain. The SWF signal generated in an isotropic elastic plate is modelled as the superposition of successive reflections. The reflection which is generated by the stress waves which travel P times as a longitudinal (P) wave and s times as a shear (S) wave through the plate while reflecting back and forth between the bottom and top faces of the plate is designated as the reflection with P, s. Short-time portions of the SWF signal are considered for obtaining spectral information on individual reflections. If the significant reflections are not overlapped, the short-time Fourier analysis is used. A summary of the elevant points of homomorphic signal processing, which is also called cepstrum analysis, is given. Homomorphic signal processing is applied to short-time SWF signals to obtain estimates of the log spectra of individual reflections for cases in which the reflections are overlapped. Two typical SWF signals generated in aluminum plates (overlapping and non-overlapping reflections) are analyzed.

  14. Field analysis of helix traveling wave tube interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderplaats, N.R.; Kodis, M.A.; Freund, H.P.

    1994-12-31

    Recent results are presented for the linear field analysis of the coupled beam-wave system for the traveling wave tube (TWT) and numerical techniques for TWT design. The basic model includes an electron beam of constant current density located inside the helix. The helix is loaded externally by lossy dielectric material, a conducting shell and vanes for dispersion modification. The model is further divided into axial regions which may include severs, lossy materials, or circuit velocity steps, with the helix geometry varied arbitrarily in each region. The backward-wave root of the coupled dispersion equation is discarded and the sum of the fields for the three forward waves is followed to the circuit output. The dispersion equations are expressed in terms of equating admittance functions at radial boundaries. The numerical procedures to solve the dispersion equations will be described. Results obtained using the field analysis will be compared with those from the conventional coupled-mode Pierce theory for the same geometry. The issue of weak (Brillouin) vs. strong focusing will be discussed and recent refinements to the field theory will be described.

  15. Phase Velocity and Full-Waveform Analysis of Co-located Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) Channels and Geophone Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, L.; Mellors, R. J.; Thurber, C. H.; Wang, H. F.; Zeng, X.

    2015-12-01

    A 762-meter Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) array with a channel spacing of one meter was deployed at the Garner Valley Downhole Array in Southern California. The array was approximately rectangular with dimensions of 180 meters by 80 meters. The array also included two subdiagonals within the rectangle along which three-component geophones were co-located. Several active sources were deployed, including a 45-kN, swept-frequency, shear-mass shaker, which produced strong Rayleigh waves across the array. Both DAS and geophone traces were filtered in 2-Hz steps between 4 and 20 Hz to obtain phase velocities as a function of frequency from fitting the moveout of travel times over distances of 35 meters or longer. As an alternative to this traditional means of finding phase velocity, it is theoretically possible to find the Rayleigh-wave phase velocity at each point of co-location as the ratio of DAS and geophone responses, because DAS is sensitive to ground strain and geophones are sensitive to ground velocity, after suitable corrections for instrument response (Mikumo & Aki, 1964). The concept was tested in WPP, a seismic wave propagation program, by first validating and then using a 3D synthetic, full-waveform seismic model to simulate the effect of increased levels of noise and uncertainty as data go from ideal to more realistic. The results obtained from this study provide a better understanding of the DAS response and its potential for being combined with traditional seismometers for obtaining phase velocity at a single location. This analysis is part of the PoroTomo project (Poroelastic Tomography by Adjoint Inverse Modeling of Data from Seismology, Geodesy, and Hydrology, http://geoscience.wisc.edu/feigl/porotomo).

  16. Detonation-wave technique for on-load deposit removal from surfaces exposed to fouling; Part 2: Full-scale application

    SciTech Connect

    Hanjalic, K. ); Smajevic, I. )

    1994-01-01

    The paper reports on the full-scale application and testing of the detonation-wave technique in two boilers, fired with pulverized coal, of total thermal power of 600 MW. Continuous monitoring over a period of several years confirmed earlier laboratory findings, reported in the companion Part 1 of the paper. The testing proved that the technique is efficient and reliable, with a number of advantages in comparison with various conventional cleaning methods. In spite of the fact that the lining of one of the boilers is made of classic refractory material, careful records and inspection over several years of daily application of the detonation wave technique showed no signs of any undesirable effects. The method was officially adopted as a routine deposits removal technique in the Power Plant Kakanj'' in Bosnia.

  17. Simulation and Analysis of Converging Shock Wave Test Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, Scott D.; Shashkov, Mikhail J.

    2012-06-21

    Results and analysis pertaining to the simulation of the Guderley converging shock wave test problem (and associated code verification hydrodynamics test problems involving converging shock waves) in the LANL ASC radiation-hydrodynamics code xRAGE are presented. One-dimensional (1D) spherical and two-dimensional (2D) axi-symmetric geometric setups are utilized and evaluated in this study, as is an instantiation of the xRAGE adaptive mesh refinement capability. For the 2D simulations, a 'Surrogate Guderley' test problem is developed and used to obviate subtleties inherent to the true Guderley solution's initialization on a square grid, while still maintaining a high degree of fidelity to the original problem, and minimally straining the general credibility of associated analysis and conclusions.

  18. Analysis of Metric Type II Burst and EUV Waves Generated by Shock Wave Driven by Cme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha-Silva, Rafael; Fernandes, Francisco; Selhorst, Caius

    2016-07-01

    The relationship between solar type II radio bursts produced by plasma oscillations and coronal shocks is well shown since the 1960s. However, the details of the association between the drivers of the shocks and the metric type II bursts remains a controversial issue. The flares and the coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the potential drivers of these shocks. In this work, we present the analysis of a metric type II burst observed on May 17, 2013, by spectrometers from e-CALLISTO network and EUV images from the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI), aboard the STEREO. The event was associated with an M3.2 X-ray flare and a halo CME. The EUV images show the EUV wave was produced by the expansion of the CME. The heights of the EUV wave fronts and the magnetic field intensity determined in the regions of the shock are consistent with those the heights of radio source obtained with the three-fold Newkirk density model, which suggests an oblique propagation of the shock. The finding of an accelerating shock with speed of 530-640 km/s and of 870-1220 km/s for the first and the second stages of the type II emission, respectively, is consistent with both the average speed of the associated EUV wave front, of 626 km/s, during the initial expansion of the CME, and with the linear speed of the CME, of 1345 km/s. These results will be presented and discussed.

  19. Linear analysis of a backward wave oscillator with triangular corrugated slow wave structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saber, Md. Ghulam; Sagor, Rakibul Hasan; Amin, Md. Ruhul

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a backward wave oscillator (BWO) with triangularly corrugated periodic metallic slow wave structure (TrCSWS) driven by an infinitely thin annular electron beam is studied using linear theory. The electron beam is assumed to be guided by a strong magnetic field. The triangular axial profile of the SWS is approximated by a Fourier series in order to apply the linear Rayleigh-Fourier (R-F) theory that has long been used in the theoretical analysis of BWOs with sinusoidally corrugated SWS (SCSWS). The dispersion equation for various beam parameters has been solved and the temporal growth rate (TGR) of the electromagnetic wave for the fundamental TM_{01} mode is calculated numerically. The TGR values for different beam parameters have been compared with those of the BWO with SCSWS, semi-circularly corrugated SWS (SCCSWS) and trapezoidally corrugated SWS (TCSWS). In order to compare the TGR values, the amplitude of corrugation of the TrCSWS is varied so that its dispersion curve of TM_{01} mode almost coincides with that of the SCSWS and TCSWS. The study reveals that the performance (in terms of TGR) of the proposed BWO with TrCSWS is comparable to that of other BWOs with SCSWS and TCSWS for the same set of beam parameters and it provides significantly better performance than SCCSWS. So, the proposed TrCSWS that can easily be constructed may replace SCSWS, SCCSWS or TCSWS as their viable alternative.

  20. Abstracts versus Full Texts and Patents: A Quantitative Analysis of Biomedical Entities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Bernd; Klinger, Roman; Gurulingappa, Harsha; Mevissen, Heinz-Theodor; Hofmann-Apitius, Martin; Fluck, Juliane; Friedrich, Christoph M.

    In information retrieval, named entity recognition gives the opportunity to apply semantic search in domain specific corpora. Recently, more full text patents and journal articles became freely available. As the information distribution amongst the different sections is unknown, an analysis of the diversity is of interest.

  1. An Analysis of Student Satisfaction: Full-Time vs. Part-Time Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moro-Egido, Ana I.; Panades, Judith

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines how full-time or part-time status affects students' level of satisfaction with their degree programs. For our analysis, we obtained data from a survey of graduate students. The survey was conducted at a public university in Spain from 2001 to 2004. The decision to undertake paid employment while studying emerges as one of the…

  2. Analysis of Unbound Aggregate Layer Deformation Behavior from Full Scale Aircraft Gear Loading with Wander

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donovan, Phillip Raymond

    2009-01-01

    This study focuses on the analysis of the behavior of unbound aggregates to offset wheel loads. Test data from full-scale aircraft gear loading conducted at the National Airport Pavement Test Facility (NAPTF) by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) are used to investigate the effects of wander (offset loads) on the deformation behavior of…

  3. A Two-Tier Full-Information Item Factor Analysis Model with Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cai, Li

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by Gibbons et al.'s (Appl. Psychol. Meas. 31:4-19, "2007") full-information maximum marginal likelihood item bifactor analysis for polytomous data, and Rijmen, Vansteelandt, and De Boeck's (Psychometrika 73:167-182, "2008") work on constructing computationally efficient estimation algorithms for latent variable models, a two-tier item…

  4. Construction and analysis of full-length and normalized cDNA libraries from citrus.

    PubMed

    Marques, M Carmen; Perez-Amador, Miguel A

    2012-01-01

    We have developed an integrated method to generate a normalized cDNA collection enriched in full-length and rare transcripts from citrus, using different species and multiple tissues and developmental stages. Interpretation of ever-increasing raw sequence information generated by modern genome sequencing technologies faces multiple challenges, such as gene function analysis and genome annotation. In this regard, the availability of full-length cDNA clones facilitates functional analysis of the corresponding genes enabling manipulation of their expression and the generation of a variety of tagged versions of the native protein. The development of full-length cDNA sequences has the power to improve the quality of genome annotation, as well as provide tools for functional characterization of genes. PMID:22130983

  5. Full cost accounting in the analysis of separated waste collection efficiency: A methodological proposal.

    PubMed

    D'Onza, Giuseppe; Greco, Giulio; Allegrini, Marco

    2016-02-01

    Recycling implies additional costs for separated municipal solid waste (MSW) collection. The aim of the present study is to propose and implement a management tool - the full cost accounting (FCA) method - to calculate the full collection costs of different types of waste. Our analysis aims for a better understanding of the difficulties of putting FCA into practice in the MSW sector. We propose a FCA methodology that uses standard cost and actual quantities to calculate the collection costs of separate and undifferentiated waste. Our methodology allows cost efficiency analysis and benchmarking, overcoming problems related to firm-specific accounting choices, earnings management policies and purchase policies. Our methodology allows benchmarking and variance analysis that can be used to identify the causes of off-standards performance and guide managers to deploy resources more efficiently. Our methodology can be implemented by companies lacking a sophisticated management accounting system. PMID:26613351

  6. Full cost accounting in the analysis of separated waste collection efficiency: A methodological proposal.

    PubMed

    D'Onza, Giuseppe; Greco, Giulio; Allegrini, Marco

    2016-02-01

    Recycling implies additional costs for separated municipal solid waste (MSW) collection. The aim of the present study is to propose and implement a management tool - the full cost accounting (FCA) method - to calculate the full collection costs of different types of waste. Our analysis aims for a better understanding of the difficulties of putting FCA into practice in the MSW sector. We propose a FCA methodology that uses standard cost and actual quantities to calculate the collection costs of separate and undifferentiated waste. Our methodology allows cost efficiency analysis and benchmarking, overcoming problems related to firm-specific accounting choices, earnings management policies and purchase policies. Our methodology allows benchmarking and variance analysis that can be used to identify the causes of off-standards performance and guide managers to deploy resources more efficiently. Our methodology can be implemented by companies lacking a sophisticated management accounting system.

  7. Finite range distorted-wave Born approximation analysis of (p,t) reactions with a realistic triton wave function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werby, M. F.; Strayer, M. R.; Nagarajan, M. A.

    1980-06-01

    Exact finite range distorted-wave Born approximation analysis of the ground state reactions 208Pb(p,t)206Pb and 18O(p,t)16O are presented. The calculations are carried out using a realistic triton wave function comprising a spatially symmetric S and mixed symmetric S' and D states. The transfer interaction is treated consistently with the interaction used in obtaining the triton wave function. The use of a realistic wave function and transfer potential yields improved agreement between experimental and theoretical angular distributions. Calculations using the wave function of the transferred neutron pair suggest it is possible to explain both the absolute magnitude and shape of the angular distribution for these transitions. NUCLEAR REACTIONS (p,t), distorted-wave Born approximation analyses.

  8. Kinematic analysis of tandem gait on a sine wave walkway

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Shingo; Fujisawa, Hiroyuki; Tomizawa, Yoshiyuki; Murakami, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to ascertain the kinematic characteristics on a horizontal plane, including knee joint rotation, when walking with a tandem gait on a sine wave walkway. [Subjects and Methods] Eighteen healthy adults were enrolled as subjects in this study. They walked with a tandem gait on a sine wave walkway. A three-dimensional motion analysis system was used to record data and calculate the trunk, hip joint, and knee joint rotation angles. [Results] The rotation angle ranges for the trunk, hip joint, and knee joint were 23.3°, 53.3°, and 47.3°, respectively. The trunk generally rotated towards the direction of movement, and when turning left using the left leg as the pivot, the hip joint was internally rotated and the knee joint was externally rotated. In contrast, when making a directional change to the right using the left leg as the pivot, the hip joint was externally rotated and the knee joint was internally rotated. [Conclusion] Through tandem gait analysis on a sine wave walkway, knee joint rotation was found to be important in changes of direction. PMID:27799663

  9. Quasilinear analysis of ion Bernstein and lower hybrid waves synergy

    SciTech Connect

    Paoletti, F.; Shoucri, M.; Shkarofsky, A.; Bernabei, S.; Ono, M.

    1996-02-01

    A quasilinear analysis of the absorption of Ion Bernstein Wave (IBW) by the electron population of the plasma is performed. It uses an analytical calculation of the amplitude of the electric field along the trajectory to obtain the quasilinear diffusion coefficient. A numerical integration of the Fokker-Planck equation is performed together with the dynamical evolution of the IBW and Lower Hybrid Wave (LHW) ray trajectories. The damping of IBW is calculated on the distorted distribution function generated by the previous application of Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) which has bridged the {ital n}{sub {parallel}}-gap. This calculation is particularly relevant because of the IBW/LHW experiments on the Princeton Beta Experiment-Modified (PBX-M). {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Experimental analysis and prediction of antisymmetric wave motion in a tapered anisotropic waveguide.

    PubMed

    Moll, Jochen; Wandowski, Tomasz; Malinowski, Pawel; Radzienski, Maciej; Opoka, Szymon; Ostachowicz, Wieslaw

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents experimental results for wave propagation in an anisotropic multilayered structure with linearly varying cross section. Knowing the dispersion and wave propagation properties in such a structure is of great importance for non-destructive material testing and structural health monitoring applications for accurate damage detection and localization. In the proposed study, the wavefield is generated by a circular piezoelectric wafer active sensor and measured by a scanning laser-Doppler-vibrometer. The measurements are compared with a theoretical group delay estimation and a signal prediction for the antisymmetric wave motion along the non-uniform propagation path. The required dispersion curves are derived from the well-known global matrix method for segments of constant thickness. A multidimensional frequency-wavenumber analysis of linescan data and the full wavefield provides further insight of the adiabatic wave motion because the wavenumber changes along the tapered geometry of the waveguide. In addition, it is demonstrated that a terahertz time-domain system can be used in glass-fiber reinforced plastic structures as a tool to estimate the thickness profile of thin structures by means of time-of-flight measurements. This information is particularly important for guided wave-based diagnostics of structures with unknown thickness. PMID:26233030

  11. Linking Science Analysis with Observation Planning: A Full Circle Data Lifecycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosvenor, Sandy; Jones, Jeremy; Koratkar, Anuradha; Li, Connie; Mackey, Jennifer; Neher, Ken; Wolf, Karl; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A clear goal of the Virtual Observatory (VO) is to enable new science through analysis of integrated astronomical archives. An additional and powerful possibility of the VO is to link and integrate these new analyses with planning of new observations. By providing tools that can be used for observation planning in the VO, the VO will allow the data lifecycle to come full circle: from theory to observations to data and back around to new theories and new observations. The Scientist's Expert Assistant (SEA) Simulation Facility (SSF) is working to combine the ability to access existing archives with the ability to model and visualize new observations. Integrating the two will allow astronomers to better use the integrated archives of the VO to plan and predict the success of potential new observations more efficiently, The full circle lifecycle enabled by SEA can allow astronomers to make substantial leaps in the quality of data and science returns on new observations. Our paper examines the exciting potential of integrating archival analysis with new observation planning, such as performing data calibration analysis on archival images and using that analysis to predict the success of new observations, or performing dynamic signal-to-noise analysis combining historical results with modeling of new instruments or targets. We will also describe how the development of the SSF is progressing and what have been its successes and challenges.

  12. Linking Science Analysis with Observation Planning: A Full Circle Data Lifecycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jeremy; Grosvenor, Sandy; Wolf, Karl; Li, Connie; Koratkar, Anuradha; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A clear goal of the Virtual Observatory (VO) is to enable new science through analysis of integrated astronomical archives. An additional and powerful possibility of the VO is to link and integrate these new analyses with planning of new observations. By providing tools that can be used for observation planning in the VO, the VO will allow the data lifecycle to come full circle: from theory to observations to data and back around to new theories and new observations. The Scientist's Expert Assistant (SEA) Simulation Facility (SSF) is working to combine the ability to access existing archives with the ability to model and visualize new observations. Integrating the two will allow astronomers to better use the integrated archives of the VO to plan and predict the success of potential new observations. The full circle lifecycle enabled by SEA can allow astronomers to make substantial leaps in the quality of data and science returns on new observations. Our paper will examine the exciting potential of integrating archival analysis with new observation planning, such as performing data calibration analysis on archival images and using that analysis to predict the success of new observations, or performing dynamic signal-to-noise analysis combining historical results with modeling of new instruments or targets. We will also describe how the development of the SSF is progressing and what has been its successes and challenges.

  13. Analysis, scale modeling, and full-scale testing of shipping containers for radioactive materials

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, H.R.; Huerta, M.

    1981-01-01

    This paper reviews numerical analysis and scale modeling techniques used to analyze the response of spent-nuclear-fuel shipping containers in severe impact environments. Illustrations of how these techniques have been utilized to analyze two extremely severe hypothetical accident environments are presented. The accident environments include the headon impact of a tractor trailer system and cask into a rigid barrier at 129 km/h (80 mph) and the broadside impact of a cask by a locomotive traveling at 129 km/h (80 mph). The results of the analysis techniques are discussed and compared to results of full-scale tests of the accident scenarios conducted subsequent to the analyses. It is shown that the analyses successfully predicted the response of the full-scale hardware.

  14. Full-length high-temperature severe fuel damage test No. 2. Final safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hesson, G.M.; Lombardo, N.J.; Pilger, J.P.; Rausch, W.N.; King, L.L.; Hurley, D.E.; Parchen, L.J.; Panisko, F.E.

    1993-09-01

    Hazardous conditions associated with performing the Full-Length High- Temperature (FLHT). Severe Fuel Damage Test No. 2 experiment have been analyzed. Major hazards that could cause harm or damage are (1) radioactive fission products, (2) radiation fields, (3) reactivity changes, (4) hydrogen generation, (5) materials at high temperature, (6) steam explosion, and (7) steam pressure pulse. As a result of this analysis, it is concluded that with proper precautions the FLHT- 2 test can be safely conducted.

  15. Full-observability analysis and implementation of the general SLAM model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souici, Ae.; Courdesses, M.; Ouldali, A.; Chatila, R.

    2013-03-01

    Simultaneous localisation and mapping (SLAM) problem is a non-linear system with dynamic state and measurement dimensions. The full observability of such system was ignored, in spite of the fact that system observability is a fundamental aspect in any state estimation problem. In this article, we present a full observability analysis of the general SLAM model. We show that known landmarks (anchor) solution does not guarantee full observability. Furthermore, we prove that to make the general SLAM model fully observable, a combination of known landmarks and invariant metrics are needed. Moreover, we propose a solution to implement a fully observable SLAM model based on mature landmark and virtual observation concepts. Simulations and experimental results are presented demonstrating the validity of the solutions in real world.

  16. Feature Analysis of Ocean Waves in North Central Pacific Ocean Based ASAR Wave Spectral Data and Wave Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jichao; Zhang, Jie; Yang, Jungang; Meng, Junmin

    2013-01-01

    Directional Spectrum of the ocean waves could be obtained form Envisat advanced synthetic aperture radar (ASAR) wave spectral data. The wave model WAVEWATCH III (WW3) is applied to simulate the ocean wave field. Study area is 185°E-215°E and 15°N-30°N, time range is from 1 January 2008 to 31 December 2008. Based on ASAR and buoy data, the wave numerical simulation and assimilation of the north central Pacific Ocean is carried out. The validation and assessment of ASAR ocean wave spectra products is performed. The optimal interpolation (OI) algorithm is used in model WW3 for assimilating ASAR wave spectra data. Based on the result of the simulation and assimilation, mean waves direction (MWD), significant wave height (SWH) and mean wave period (MWP) are analysed. SWH and MWP are larger in winter and SWH reach to more than 2.5 meters. Seasonal change of SWH and MWP are significant.

  17. Computation of rotor aerodynamic loads in forward flight using a full-span free wake analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quackenbush, Todd R.; Bliss, Donald B.; Wachspress, Daniel A.; Boschitsch, Alexander H.; Chua, Kiat

    1990-01-01

    The development of an advanced computational analysis of unsteady aerodynamic loads on isolated helicopter rotors in forward flight is described. The primary technical focus of the development was the implementation of a freely distorting filamentary wake model composed of curved vortex elements laid out along contours of constant vortex sheet strength in the wake. This model captures the wake generated by the full span of each rotor blade and makes possible a unified treatment of the shed and trailed vorticity in the wake. This wake model was coupled to a modal analysis of the rotor blade dynamics and a vortex lattice treatment of the aerodynamic loads to produce a comprehensive model for rotor performance and air loads in forward flight dubbed RotorCRAFT (Computation of Rotor Aerodynamics in Forward Flight). The technical background on the major components of this analysis are discussed and the correlation of predictions of performance, trim, and unsteady air loads with experimental data from several representative rotor configurations is examined. The primary conclusions of this study are that the RotorCRAFT analysis correlates well with measured loads on a variety of configurations and that application of the full span free wake model is required to capture several important features of the vibratory loading on rotor blades in forward flight.

  18. Hydroelastic analysis of ice shelves under long wave excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papathanasiou, Theodosios; Karperaki, Angeliki; Theotokoglou, Efstathios; Belibassakis, Kostas

    2014-05-01

    The transient hydroelastic response of an ice shelf, under long wave forcing, is analysed by means of the Finite Element method. Our main goal is to provide a simple model for tsunami wave - ice shelf interaction, capable of reproducing, in an at least qualitative manner, the stress field induced in the ice shelf, when excited by a tsunami wave. The analysis is aimed to model ice calving caused by wave impact, as was the case after the Honsu 2011 incident [1]. Adopting several simplifying but realistic assumptions, the ice shelf is modeled as a variable thickness, Euler-Bernoulli, cantilever beam, while the 1+1 linear shallow water equations are employed for the hydrodynamic field representation, as described in [2]. The fixed cantilever beam resembles a constrained, continuous ice shelf extending into the ocean. The solution of such a system, for a freely floating plate, has been presented by Sturova [3], where a modal expansion of the hydroelastic response with respect to the dry modes of the beam has been used. Our solution approach is based on the development of a special hydroelastic finite element for the governing equations. Cases of constant and variable bathymetry are considered. Bending moment time profiles yield the maximum tensile stress at the upper and lower surfaces of the ice shelf, which is the critical parameter for crack initiation or propagation. As expected, maximum absolute bending moment values appear at the base of the ice shelf, where no deflection or rotation occurs. The fact that the wave is fully reflected on the vertical impermeable boundary, corresponding to the continental shelf under the base of the floe, leads to extreme focusing and thus extreme bending moment values. Finally, the case of cracked shelves has been considered with use of the elementary defective beam theory of Kienzler and Herrmann [4]. Future enhancement of the present model is proposed on the grounds of a higher order beam/plate theory and a 2-D formulation

  19. An Analysis of Fundamental Mode Surface Wave Amplitude Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schardong, L.; Ferreira, A. M.; van Heijst, H. J.; Ritsema, J.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic tomography is a powerful tool to decipher the Earth's interior structure at various scales. Traveltimes of seismic waves are widely used to build velocity models, whereas amplitudes are still only seldomly accounted for. This mainly results from our limited ability to separate the various physical effects responsible for observed amplitude variations, such as focussing/defocussing, scattering and source effects. We present new measurements from 50 global earthquakes of fundamental-mode Rayleigh and Love wave amplitude anomalies measured in the period range 35-275 seconds using two different schemes: (i) a standard time-domain amplitude power ratio technique; and (ii) a mode-branch stripping scheme. For minor-arc data, we observe amplitude anomalies with respect to PREM in the range of 0-4, for which the two measurement techniques show a very good overall agreement. We present here a statistical analysis and comparison of these datasets, as well as comparisons with theoretical calculations for a variety of 3-D Earth models. We assess the geographical coherency of the measurements, and investigate the impact of source, path and receiver effects on surface wave amplitudes, as well as their variations with frequency in a wider range than previously studied.

  20. Basic gait analysis based on continuous wave radar.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun

    2012-09-01

    A gait analysis method based on continuous wave (CW) radar is proposed in this paper. Time-frequency analysis is used to analyze the radar micro-Doppler echo from walking humans, and the relationships between the time-frequency spectrogram and human biological gait are discussed. The methods for extracting the gait parameters from the spectrogram are studied in depth and experiments on more than twenty subjects have been performed to acquire the radar gait data. The gait parameters are calculated and compared. The gait difference between men and women are presented based on the experimental data and extracted features. Gait analysis based on CW radar will provide a new method for clinical diagnosis and therapy.

  1. Basic gait analysis based on continuous wave radar.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun

    2012-09-01

    A gait analysis method based on continuous wave (CW) radar is proposed in this paper. Time-frequency analysis is used to analyze the radar micro-Doppler echo from walking humans, and the relationships between the time-frequency spectrogram and human biological gait are discussed. The methods for extracting the gait parameters from the spectrogram are studied in depth and experiments on more than twenty subjects have been performed to acquire the radar gait data. The gait parameters are calculated and compared. The gait difference between men and women are presented based on the experimental data and extracted features. Gait analysis based on CW radar will provide a new method for clinical diagnosis and therapy. PMID:22951210

  2. High-resolution monitoring of root water uptake dynamics in laboratory conditions using full-wave inversion of near-field radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourmeaux, Nicolas; Meunier, Félicien; Tran, Phuong Anh; Draye, Xavier; Lambot, Sébastien

    2014-05-01

    Root water uptake dynamics at local scale can be studied in laboratory conditions by growing plants in rhizotron containing sand and by imaging the water content evolution of the medium using light transmission. This technique allows to retrieve the water content with high resolution but cannot be applied in opaque media such as leaf-mold or clay, which is a major limitation for more realistic applications. Recently, ground-penetrating radar (GPR) has proven to be one of the most promising techniques for high-resolution digital soil mapping at the field scale. Particularly, by using full-wave inverse modeling of near-field GPR data with a high frequency antenna, the electrical properties of soil and their correlated water content can be reconstructed with a high spatiotemporal resolution. In this study, we applied the approach by using an ultra-wideband frequency-domain radar with a transmitting and receiving horn antenna operating in the frequency range 3-6 GHz for imaging, in near-field conditions, a rhizotron containing sand subject to different water content conditions. Synthetic radar data were also generated to examine the well-posedness of the full-waveform inverse problem at high frequencies. Finally, we compared the water content obtained by GPR and light transmission measurements. The results have shown that the near-field modeled and measured GPR data match very well in the frequency and time domains for both dry and wet sands. In the case of the dry sand, the estimated water content based on GPR and light transmission data was retrieved with small differences. This research shows the potential of the GPR system and near-field full-wave antenna-medium model to accurately estimate the water content of soils with a high spatial resolution. Future studies will focus on the use of GPR to monitor root water uptake dynamics of plants in field conditions. This abstract is of interest for COST Action TU1208.

  3. Comparative Network Analysis of Preterm vs. Full-Term Infant-Mother Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kalmár, Magda; Tóth, Ildikó; Krishna, Sandeep; Jensen, Mogens H.; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have reported that interactions of mothers with preterm infants show differential characteristics compared to that of mothers with full-term infants. Interaction of preterm dyads is often reported as less harmonious. However, observations and explanations concerning the underlying mechanisms are inconsistent. In this work 30 preterm and 42 full-term mother-infant dyads were observed at one year of age. Free play interactions were videotaped and coded using a micro-analytic coding system. The video records were coded at one second resolution and studied by a novel approach using network analysis tools. The advantage of our approach is that it reveals the patterns of behavioral transitions in the interactions. We found that the most frequent behavioral transitions are the same in the two groups. However, we have identified several high and lower frequency transitions which occur significantly more often in the preterm or full-term group. Our analysis also suggests that the variability of behavioral transitions is significantly higher in the preterm group. This higher variability is mostly resulted from the diversity of transitions involving non-harmonious behaviors. We have identified a maladaptive pattern in the maternal behavior in the preterm group, involving intrusiveness and disengagement. Application of the approach reported in this paper to longitudinal data could elucidate whether these maladaptive maternal behavioral changes place the infant at risk for later emotional, cognitive and behavioral disturbance. PMID:23805298

  4. Comparative Network Analysis of Preterm vs. Full-Term Infant-Mother Interactions.

    PubMed

    Sipos, Lilla; Mengel Pers, Benedicte; Kalmár, Magda; Tóth, Ildikó; Krishna, Sandeep; Jensen, Mogens H; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have reported that interactions of mothers with preterm infants show differential characteristics compared to that of mothers with full-term infants. Interaction of preterm dyads is often reported as less harmonious. However, observations and explanations concerning the underlying mechanisms are inconsistent. In this work 30 preterm and 42 full-term mother-infant dyads were observed at one year of age. Free play interactions were videotaped and coded using a micro-analytic coding system. The video records were coded at one second resolution and studied by a novel approach using network analysis tools. The advantage of our approach is that it reveals the patterns of behavioral transitions in the interactions. We found that the most frequent behavioral transitions are the same in the two groups. However, we have identified several high and lower frequency transitions which occur significantly more often in the preterm or full-term group. Our analysis also suggests that the variability of behavioral transitions is significantly higher in the preterm group. This higher variability is mostly resulted from the diversity of transitions involving non-harmonious behaviors. We have identified a maladaptive pattern in the maternal behavior in the preterm group, involving intrusiveness and disengagement. Application of the approach reported in this paper to longitudinal data could elucidate whether these maladaptive maternal behavioral changes place the infant at risk for later emotional, cognitive and behavioral disturbance. PMID:23805298

  5. Analysis of upper mantle structure using wave field continuation of P waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walck, M. C.; Clayton, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    Wave field continuation theory, which allows transformation of the seismic record section data directly into velocity-depth space, is tested for upper mantle analysis using a large array-recorded data set obtained at the 200-station Caltech-USGS Southern California Seismic Network that is representative of the structure beneath the gulf of California. The method's resolution capability is illustrated by the comparison of the slant stacks and downward continuation of both synthetic and data record sections. It is stressed that when high-quality, densely sampled digital data are available, the technique is easy to implement, provides an inversion which contains all the data in the global format, and produces an objective estimate of depth resolution as a function of ray parameter.

  6. Time-Dependent Distribution Functions in C-Mod Calculated with the CQL3D-Hybrid-FOW, AORSA Full-Wave, and DC Lorentz Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, R. W. (Bob); Petrov, Yu. V.; Jaeger, E. F.; Berry, L. A.; Bonoli, P. T.; Bader, A.

    2015-11-01

    A time-dependent simulation of C-Mod pulsed ICRF power is made calculating minority hydrogen ion distribution functions with the CQL3D-Hybrid-FOW finite-orbit-width Fokker-Planck code. ICRF fields are calculated with the AORSA full wave code, and RF diffusion coefficients are obtained from these fields using the DC Lorentz gyro-orbit code. Prior results with a zero-banana-width simulation using the CQL3D/AORSA/DC time-cycles showed a pronounced enhancement of the H distribution in the perpendicular velocity direction compared to results obtained from Stix's quasilinear theory, in general agreement with experiment. The present study compares the new FOW results, including relevant gyro-radius effects, to determine the importance of these effects on the the NPA synthetic diagnostic time-dependence. The new NPA results give increased agreement with experiment, particularly in the ramp-down time after the ICRF pulse. Funded, through subcontract with Massachusetts Institute of Technology, by USDOE sponsored SciDAC Center for Simulation of Wave-Plasma Interactions.

  7. Qualitative analysis of response caused by growing plane waves by underdetermined system theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Yukio

    1991-03-01

    A qualitative analysis of the mechanical response of rate-dependent media caused by one-dimensional plane smooth- and continuous-wave fronts with the growing peaks of strain, particle velocity, and stress is performed by an underdetermined system of nonlinear partial differential equations. The response found by the analysis reveals that strain, particle velocity, and stress profiles in the smooth-wave front are not similar and that the front is composed of five partial waves having different properties. The property is represented by the set of strain rate, acceleration, and stress rate as in a previous study. The front of the wave front is necessarily a contraction wave in which strain, particle velocity, and stress increase with time. The second partial wave is another contraction wave. We call the wave a vice-contraction wave. The rear is assumed to be a rarefaction wave where they all decrease with time. Between these two partial waves there are two remaining partial waves. We call these waves mesorarefaction waves I and II. Wave II is a wave in which particle velocity and stress increase, notwithstanding the decrease in strain with time. It is followed by wave I in which the increase in stress with time occurs in spite of the decrease in strain and particle velocity. The continuous-wave front, which has discontinuous-movement velocities at the continuous, but nonsmooth, positions in the profiles of strain, particle velocity, and stress, is composed of five independent waves. These waves are a contraction wave, a vice-contraction wave, evolutional rarefaction waves II and I, and a rarefaction wave which possess the same properties as the corresponding partial waves in the smooth-wave front mentioned above. Both in the smooth-growing-wave front and in the continuous one the peak precedence is in the order of the strain, particle velocity, and stress peaks. The stress-strain path and stress-particle velocity path at a position in a rate-dependent medium which is

  8. Third generation sfermion decays into Z and W gauge bosons: Full one-loop analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Arhrib, Abdesslam; Benbrik, Rachid

    2005-05-01

    The complete one-loop radiative corrections to third-generation scalar fermions into gauge bosons Z and W{sup {+-}} is considered. We focus on f-tilde{sub 2}{yields}Zf-tilde{sub 1} and f-tilde{sub i}{yields}W{sup {+-}}f-tilde{sub j}{sup '}, f,f{sup '}=t,b. We include SUSY-QCD, QED, and full electroweak corrections. It is found that the electroweak corrections can be of the same order as the SUSY-QCD corrections. The two sets of corrections interfere destructively in some region of parameter space. The full one-loop correction can reach 10% in some supergravity scenario, while in model independent analysis like general the minimal supersymmetric standard model, the one-loop correction can reach 20% for large tan{beta} and large trilinear soft breaking terms A{sub b}.

  9. Analysis of π-mode Stopband in an Asymmetric Millimeter-Wave Helical Slow-Wave Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, S. K.; Kumar, Lalit; Basu, B. N.

    2008-11-01

    A simple closed form formula for the estimation of π-mode stopband in an azimuthally asymmetric helical slow-wave structure (SWS) was developed following coupled-mode analysis of multiple reflections of the degenerate space-harmonic modes from the support rod discontinuities. The method incorporates the effects of circuit loss, and accrues the accuracy of 3D electromagnetic analysis by allowing the use of dispersion characteristics obtainable from any standard electromagnetic modeling. The formula is simple and amenable to easy computation, even using a scientific calculator, and without resorting to exhaustive and time-intensive numerical computation, and at the same time, without sacrificing the accuracy in results. The analysis was benchmarked against published results and excellent agreement observed. The analysis was further used for demonstrating the stopband phenomenon for a typical millimeter-wave helical slow-wave structure. Compared to low frequency structures, the stopband phenomenon for a millimeter-wave structure was found to be more pronounced, and an interesting inference was drawn as to how asymmetry induced stopband might be made to advantage in combating π-mode instabilities in a millimeter-wave traveling-wave tube.

  10. Analysis of the 237Np-233Pa photon spectrum using the full response function method.

    PubMed

    Shchukin, G; Iakovlev, K; Morel, J

    2004-01-01

    A study has been made of X- and gamma-ray emission from 237Np in equilibrium with 233Pa using the full response function method. This analysis process is characterised by photon spectrometry in which the entire spectrum is modelled in a pseudo-empirical way by means of elementary functions describing the total absorption and escape peaks, the Compton diffusion internal and external to the detector and the peaks resulting from detection of internal conversion electrons. This method has been applied to determine the L X-, K X- and gamma-rays emission probabilities in 237Np and 233Pa decay studies.

  11. Analysis of the 237Np-233Pa photon spectrum using the full response function method.

    PubMed

    Shchukin, G; Iakovlev, K; Morel, J

    2004-01-01

    A study has been made of X- and gamma-ray emission from 237Np in equilibrium with 233Pa using the full response function method. This analysis process is characterised by photon spectrometry in which the entire spectrum is modelled in a pseudo-empirical way by means of elementary functions describing the total absorption and escape peaks, the Compton diffusion internal and external to the detector and the peaks resulting from detection of internal conversion electrons. This method has been applied to determine the L X-, K X- and gamma-rays emission probabilities in 237Np and 233Pa decay studies. PMID:14987650

  12. Full-Length High-Temperature Severe Fuel Damage Test No. 5: Final safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lanning, D.D.; Lombardo, N.J.; Panisko, F.E.

    1993-09-01

    This report presents the final safety analysis for the preparation, conduct, and post-test discharge operation for the Full-Length High Temperature Experiment-5 (FLHT-5) to be conducted in the L-24 position of the National Research Universal (NRU) Reactor at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL), Ontario, Canada. The test is sponsored by an international group organized by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The test is designed and conducted by staff from Pacific Northwest Laboratory with CRNL staff support. The test will study the consequences of loss-of-coolant and the progression of severe fuel damage.

  13. Stability and performance analysis of a full-train system with inerters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fu-Cheng; Hsieh, Min-Ruei; Chen, Hsueh-Ju

    2012-04-01

    This paper discusses the use of inerters to improve the stability and performance of a full-train system. First, we construct a 28 degree-of-freedom train model in AutoSim, and obtain a linearised model for analysis in Matlab. Then, the benefits of inerters are investigated by the critical speed, settling time and passenger comfort. In addition, we apply a new mechatronic network for further performance improvement, and synthesise the optimal electrical circuit for experimental verification. From the results, inerters are shown to be effective in improving the stability and performance of train systems.

  14. Linearization of the full activated sludge model No 1 for interaction analysis.

    PubMed

    Benhalla, Abdelhay; Houssou, Mohamed; Charif, Moussa

    2010-08-01

    This paper deals with the linearization of the full activated sludge model No 1 (ASM1) in the scope of interaction analysis. For consistency, the linearization procedure is developed and validated within the BSM1 simulation benchmark framework. It is based on reaction rate approximation by linear combinations of states. The linear rate models are identified and incorporated in the mass balance equations, yielding a linear locally equivalent to the ASM1 model. Linear models for anoxic and aerated compartments are proposed. It is observed that the presented models track very closely the nonlinear ASM1 responses to various influent data. The key feature of this linearization strategy is that the gotten linear version of the ASM1 model is linear time invariant (LTI) and that it conserves the states biological interpretation and the original ASM1 dimension. It allows, therefore, application of interaction analysis methods and makes it possible to determine motivated control configurations for the ASM1 model. PMID:20131068

  15. Technical Data to Justify Full Burnup Credit in Criticality Safety Licensing Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Enercon Services, Inc.

    2011-03-14

    ENERCON's understanding of the difficult issues related to obtaining and analyzing additional cross section test data to support Full Burnup Credit. A PIRT (Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table) analysis was performed by ENERCON to evaluate the costs and benefits of acquiring different types of nuclear data in support of Full Burnup Credit. A PIRT exercise is a formal expert elicitation process with the final output being the ranking tables. The PIRT analysis (Table 7-4: Results of PIRT Evaluation) showed that the acquisition of additional Actinide-Only experimental data, although beneficial, was associated with high cost and is not necessarily needed. The conclusion was that the existing Radiochemical Assay (RCA) data plus the French Haut Taux de Combustion (HTC)2 and handbook Laboratory Critical Experiment (LCE) data provide adequate benchmark validation for Actinide-Only Burnup Credit. The PIRT analysis indicated that the costs and schedule to obtain sufficient additional experimental data to support the addition of 16 fission products to Actinide-Only Burnup Credit to produce Full Burnup Credit are quite substantial. ENERCON estimates the cost to be $50M to $100M with a schedule of five or more years. The PIRT analysis highlights another option for fission product burnup credit, which is the application of computer-based uncertainty analyses (S/U - Sensitivity/Uncertainty methodologies), confirmed by the limited experimental data that is already available. S/U analyses essentially transform cross section uncertainty information contained in the cross section libraries into a reactivity bias and uncertainty. Recent work by ORNL and EPRI has shown that a methodology to support Full Burnup Credit is possible using a combination of traditional RCA and LCE validation plus S/U validation for fission product isotopics and cross sections. Further, the most recent cross section data (ENDF/B-VII) can be incorporated into the burnup credit codes at a reasonable cost

  16. System analysis of a bio-energy plantation: full greenhouse gas balance and energy accounting (POPFULL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceulemans, R.; Janssens, I.; Berhongaray, G.; Broeckx, L.; De Groote, T.; ElKasmioui, O.; Fichot, R.; Njakou Djomo, S.; Verlinden, M.; Zona, D.

    2011-12-01

    In recent year the environmental impact of fossil fuels and their reduced availability are leading to an increasing interest in renewable energy sources, among them bio-energy. However, the cost/benefit in establishing, managing, and using these plantations for energy production should be quantified together with their environmental impact. In this project we are performing a full life cycle analysis (LCA) balance of the most important greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4, N2O, H2O and O3), together with full energy accounting of a short-rotation coppice (SRC) plantation with fast-growing trees. We established the plantation two years ago and we have been monitoring net fluxes of CO2, N2O, CH4, and O3, in combination with biomass pools (incl. soil) and fluxes, and volatile organic carbon (VOCs). This poplar plantation will be monitored for another two years then harvested and transformed into bio-energy. For the energy accounting we are performing a life cycle analysis and energy efficiency assessments over the entire cycle of the plantation until the production of electricity and heat. Here we present an overview of the results from the first two years from the plantation establishment, and some of the projections based on these first results.

  17. Integrative microbial community analysis reveals full-scale enhanced biological phosphorus removal under tropical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Yingyu; Kirkegaard, Rasmus Hansen; Cokro, Angel Anisa; Liu, Xianghui; Arumugam, Krithika; Xie, Chao; Stokholm-Bjerregaard, Mikkel; Drautz-Moses, Daniela I.; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Wuertz, Stefan; Williams, Rohan B. H.

    2016-05-01

    Management of phosphorus discharge from human waste is essential for the control of eutrophication in surface waters. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is a sustainable, efficient way of removing phosphorus from waste water without employing chemical precipitation, but is assumed unachievable in tropical temperatures due to conditions that favour glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) over polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs). Here, we show these assumptions are unfounded by studying comparative community dynamics in a full-scale plant following systematic perturbation of operational conditions, which modified community abundance, function and physicochemical state. A statistically significant increase in the relative abundance of the PAO Accumulibacter was associated with improved EBPR activity. GAO relative abundance also increased, challenging the assumption of competition. An Accumulibacter bin-genome was identified from a whole community metagenomic survey, and comparative analysis against extant Accumulibacter genomes suggests a close relationship to Type II. Analysis of the associated metatranscriptome data revealed that genes encoding proteins involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and glycolysis pathways were highly expressed, consistent with metabolic modelling results. Our findings show that tropical EBPR is indeed possible, highlight the translational potential of studying competition dynamics in full-scale waste water communities and carry implications for plant design in tropical regions.

  18. Integrative microbial community analysis reveals full-scale enhanced biological phosphorus removal under tropical conditions.

    PubMed

    Law, Yingyu; Kirkegaard, Rasmus Hansen; Cokro, Angel Anisa; Liu, Xianghui; Arumugam, Krithika; Xie, Chao; Stokholm-Bjerregaard, Mikkel; Drautz-Moses, Daniela I; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Wuertz, Stefan; Williams, Rohan B H

    2016-01-01

    Management of phosphorus discharge from human waste is essential for the control of eutrophication in surface waters. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is a sustainable, efficient way of removing phosphorus from waste water without employing chemical precipitation, but is assumed unachievable in tropical temperatures due to conditions that favour glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) over polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs). Here, we show these assumptions are unfounded by studying comparative community dynamics in a full-scale plant following systematic perturbation of operational conditions, which modified community abundance, function and physicochemical state. A statistically significant increase in the relative abundance of the PAO Accumulibacter was associated with improved EBPR activity. GAO relative abundance also increased, challenging the assumption of competition. An Accumulibacter bin-genome was identified from a whole community metagenomic survey, and comparative analysis against extant Accumulibacter genomes suggests a close relationship to Type II. Analysis of the associated metatranscriptome data revealed that genes encoding proteins involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and glycolysis pathways were highly expressed, consistent with metabolic modelling results. Our findings show that tropical EBPR is indeed possible, highlight the translational potential of studying competition dynamics in full-scale waste water communities and carry implications for plant design in tropical regions.

  19. Integrative microbial community analysis reveals full-scale enhanced biological phosphorus removal under tropical conditions

    PubMed Central

    Law, Yingyu; Kirkegaard, Rasmus Hansen; Cokro, Angel Anisa; Liu, Xianghui; Arumugam, Krithika; Xie, Chao; Stokholm-Bjerregaard, Mikkel; Drautz-Moses, Daniela I.; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Wuertz, Stefan; Williams, Rohan B. H.

    2016-01-01

    Management of phosphorus discharge from human waste is essential for the control of eutrophication in surface waters. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is a sustainable, efficient way of removing phosphorus from waste water without employing chemical precipitation, but is assumed unachievable in tropical temperatures due to conditions that favour glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) over polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs). Here, we show these assumptions are unfounded by studying comparative community dynamics in a full-scale plant following systematic perturbation of operational conditions, which modified community abundance, function and physicochemical state. A statistically significant increase in the relative abundance of the PAO Accumulibacter was associated with improved EBPR activity. GAO relative abundance also increased, challenging the assumption of competition. An Accumulibacter bin-genome was identified from a whole community metagenomic survey, and comparative analysis against extant Accumulibacter genomes suggests a close relationship to Type II. Analysis of the associated metatranscriptome data revealed that genes encoding proteins involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and glycolysis pathways were highly expressed, consistent with metabolic modelling results. Our findings show that tropical EBPR is indeed possible, highlight the translational potential of studying competition dynamics in full-scale waste water communities and carry implications for plant design in tropical regions. PMID:27193869

  20. Integrative microbial community analysis reveals full-scale enhanced biological phosphorus removal under tropical conditions.

    PubMed

    Law, Yingyu; Kirkegaard, Rasmus Hansen; Cokro, Angel Anisa; Liu, Xianghui; Arumugam, Krithika; Xie, Chao; Stokholm-Bjerregaard, Mikkel; Drautz-Moses, Daniela I; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Wuertz, Stefan; Williams, Rohan B H

    2016-01-01

    Management of phosphorus discharge from human waste is essential for the control of eutrophication in surface waters. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is a sustainable, efficient way of removing phosphorus from waste water without employing chemical precipitation, but is assumed unachievable in tropical temperatures due to conditions that favour glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) over polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs). Here, we show these assumptions are unfounded by studying comparative community dynamics in a full-scale plant following systematic perturbation of operational conditions, which modified community abundance, function and physicochemical state. A statistically significant increase in the relative abundance of the PAO Accumulibacter was associated with improved EBPR activity. GAO relative abundance also increased, challenging the assumption of competition. An Accumulibacter bin-genome was identified from a whole community metagenomic survey, and comparative analysis against extant Accumulibacter genomes suggests a close relationship to Type II. Analysis of the associated metatranscriptome data revealed that genes encoding proteins involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and glycolysis pathways were highly expressed, consistent with metabolic modelling results. Our findings show that tropical EBPR is indeed possible, highlight the translational potential of studying competition dynamics in full-scale waste water communities and carry implications for plant design in tropical regions. PMID:27193869

  1. An Analysis of Model Scale Data Transformation to Full Scale Flight Using Chevron Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clifford; Bridges, James

    2003-01-01

    Ground-based model scale aeroacoustic data is frequently used to predict the results of flight tests while saving time and money. The value of a model scale test is therefore dependent on how well the data can be transformed to the full scale conditions. In the spring of 2000, a model scale test was conducted to prove the value of chevron nozzles as a noise reduction device for turbojet applications. The chevron nozzle reduced noise by 2 EPNdB at an engine pressure ratio of 2.3 compared to that of the standard conic nozzle. This result led to a full scale flyover test in the spring of 2001 to verify these results. The flyover test confirmed the 2 EPNdB reduction predicted by the model scale test one year earlier. However, further analysis of the data revealed that the spectra and directivity, both on an OASPL and PNL basis, do not agree in either shape or absolute level. This paper explores these differences in an effort to improve the data transformation from model scale to full scale.

  2. Analysis of a bubble deformation process in a microcapsule by shock waves for developing DDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamagawa, Masaaki; Morimoto, Kenshi

    2012-09-01

    This paper describes development of DDS (drug delivery systems) microcapsule using underwater shock waves, especially (1) making polymer microcapsules including a bubble and analysis of a bubble deformation process in a polymer capsule by pressure wave, (2) making liposome microcapsules with different elastic membrane and disintegration tests by ultrasonic waves.

  3. [Isolation, identification and full-length genome sequence analysis of encephalomyocarditis virus from local aardvarks].

    PubMed

    Chang, Hong-Tao; Liu, Hui-Min; He, Xiu-Yuan; Zhao, Jun; Chen, Lu; Wang, Xin-Wei; Yang, Xia; Yao, Hui-Xia; Wang, Chuan-Qing

    2014-07-01

    Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) is a natural epidemic zoonotic pathogen. However, no reports have been published regarding the isolation, identification and full-length genome of EMCV from a local aardvark population. In present study, an EMCV isolate HNXX13 was isolated from aardvarks named Huainan-pig in Henan Province. The systematic identification, full-length genome sequencing and molecular characteristic analysis of the isolate HNXX13 were conducted. The result showed that the isolate was spherical with a diameter of 24-30 nm, neither heat- nor acid-resistant, sensitive to trypsin, insensitive to chloroform, not protected by bivalent cationic, and the specific fluorescence was observed in the cytoplasm of BHK-21 cells infected with the isolate by using indirect fluorescence assay. The full-length genome of EMCV HNXX13 generated a 7 725bp sequence (GenBank: F771002), with 81.0%-99.9% nucleotide identity to reference strains from different animals, and 99.5% with a Chinese reference strain isolated earlier from a commercial pig herd. The phylogenetic tree based on the full-length genome and ORF sequences identified that all EMCV strains were divided into three groups G1, G2 and G3, and strain HNXX13 belonging to the G1 group with other Chinese reference strains. The result also identified that this EMCV infection could cause severe clinical signs in a local aardvark population, and enriches the molecular epidemiological data of EMCV in China. Regional differences exist in EMCV genome and transmission is limited within a certain area. However, the cross-infection and transmission of EMCV between aardvark and mice appears most likely. Mutations have occurred in some amino acids of EMCV strain HNXX13 during the transmission in local aardvark herd and these mutations might make the virus easier to infect the aardvark. PMID:25272589

  4. [Isolation, identification and full-length genome sequence analysis of encephalomyocarditis virus from local aardvarks].

    PubMed

    Chang, Hong-Tao; Liu, Hui-Min; He, Xiu-Yuan; Zhao, Jun; Chen, Lu; Wang, Xin-Wei; Yang, Xia; Yao, Hui-Xia; Wang, Chuan-Qing

    2014-07-01

    Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) is a natural epidemic zoonotic pathogen. However, no reports have been published regarding the isolation, identification and full-length genome of EMCV from a local aardvark population. In present study, an EMCV isolate HNXX13 was isolated from aardvarks named Huainan-pig in Henan Province. The systematic identification, full-length genome sequencing and molecular characteristic analysis of the isolate HNXX13 were conducted. The result showed that the isolate was spherical with a diameter of 24-30 nm, neither heat- nor acid-resistant, sensitive to trypsin, insensitive to chloroform, not protected by bivalent cationic, and the specific fluorescence was observed in the cytoplasm of BHK-21 cells infected with the isolate by using indirect fluorescence assay. The full-length genome of EMCV HNXX13 generated a 7 725bp sequence (GenBank: F771002), with 81.0%-99.9% nucleotide identity to reference strains from different animals, and 99.5% with a Chinese reference strain isolated earlier from a commercial pig herd. The phylogenetic tree based on the full-length genome and ORF sequences identified that all EMCV strains were divided into three groups G1, G2 and G3, and strain HNXX13 belonging to the G1 group with other Chinese reference strains. The result also identified that this EMCV infection could cause severe clinical signs in a local aardvark population, and enriches the molecular epidemiological data of EMCV in China. Regional differences exist in EMCV genome and transmission is limited within a certain area. However, the cross-infection and transmission of EMCV between aardvark and mice appears most likely. Mutations have occurred in some amino acids of EMCV strain HNXX13 during the transmission in local aardvark herd and these mutations might make the virus easier to infect the aardvark.

  5. Noninvasive pulmonary artery wave intensity analysis in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Quail, Michael A; Knight, Daniel S; Steeden, Jennifer A; Taelman, Liesbeth; Moledina, Shahin; Taylor, Andrew M; Segers, Patrick; Coghlan, Gerry J; Muthurangu, Vivek

    2015-06-15

    Pulmonary wave reflections are a potential hemodynamic biomarker for pulmonary hypertension (PH) and can be analyzed using wave intensity analysis (WIA). In this study we used pulmonary vessel area and flow obtained using cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) to implement WIA noninvasively. We hypothesized that this method could detect differences in reflections in PH patients compared with healthy controls and could also differentiate certain PH subtypes. Twenty patients with PH (35% CTEPH and 75% female) and 10 healthy controls (60% female) were recruited. Right and left pulmonary artery (LPA and RPA) flow and area curves were acquired using self-gated golden-angle, spiral, phase-contrast CMR with a 10.5-ms temporal resolution. These data were used to perform WIA on patients and controls. The presence of a proximal clot in CTEPH patients was determined from contemporaneous computed tomography/angiographic data. A backwards-traveling compression wave (BCW) was present in both LPA and RPA of all PH patients but was absent in all controls (P = 6e(-8)). The area under the BCW was associated with a sensitivity of 100% [95% confidence interval (CI) 63-100%] and specificity of 91% (95% CI 75-98%) for the presence of a clot in the proximal PAs of patients with CTEPH. In conclusion, WIA metrics were significantly different between patients and controls; in particular, the presence of an early BCW was specifically associated with PH. The magnitude of the area under the BCW showed discriminatory capacity for the presence of proximal PA clot in patients with CTEPH. We believe that these results demonstrate that WIA could be used in the noninvasive assessment of PH. PMID:25659483

  6. Theoretical Analysis of Shear Wave Interference Patterns by Means of Dynamic Acoustic Radiation Forces.

    PubMed

    Hoyt, Kenneth

    2011-03-01

    Acoustic radiation forces associated with high intensity focused ultrasound stimulate shear wave propagation allowing shear wave speed and shear viscosity estimation of tissue structures. As wave speeds are meters per second, real time displacement tracking over an extend field-of-view using ultrasound is problematic due to very high frame rate requirements. However, two spatially separated dynamic external sources can stimulate shear wave motion leading to shear wave interference patterns. Advantages are shear waves can be imaged at lower frame rates and local interference pattern spatial properties reflect tissue's viscoelastic properties. Here a theoretical analysis of shear wave interference patterns by means of dynamic acoustic radiation forces is detailed. Using a viscoelastic Green's function analysis, tissue motion due to a pair of focused ultrasound beams and associated radiation forces are presented. Overall, this paper theoretically demonstrates shear wave interference patterns can be stimulated using dynamic acoustic radiation forces and tracked using conventional ultrasound imaging.

  7. Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves and Dam Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karastathis, V. K.

    2012-12-01

    Geophysical methodologies and particularly the Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) effectively proved their efficiency in the non-destructive testing of the dams, in the last decade, after many successful applications worldwide. The MASW method developed in the outset of this decade considerably improved the prospects and the validity of these geophysical applications. Since MASW and the other geophysical techniques do not require drilling they progressively increased their popularity significantly. The Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves can be applied for the assessment of both earthen and concrete dams. Nevertheless, mostly cases of earthen dams can be found in the literature. The method can detect and map low shear wave velocity areas potentially associated with low cohesion zones due to differential settlement events in the core or increased seepage. The advantage of MASW is that it is not influenced by the water saturation of the interior of the dam contrary to other methods eg. p-wave tomography. Usually, a joint application of MASW with the p-wave techniques can be an optimal choice since the two methodologies can act complementary. An application of MASW on a three-dimensional structure, such as a dam, however, can actually be considered as a complicated problem since the effects of the lateral structural anomalies can strongly affect the results. For example, in an earthen dam the investigation of the core can be influenced by the presence of the shells. Therefore, the problem should be carefully examined by modeling all these the lateral anomalies with the aim to avoid a misinterpretation of the results. The effectiveness of MASW to the dam safety assessment is presented through two example applications, one at the Mornos Dam, an earthen dam responsible for the water supply of Athens, and a second one at the Marathon Dam which is a concrete dam also used for the water supply of Athens. In the case of Mornos Dam, MASW detected areas affected

  8. Analysis of waves in the plasma guided by a periodical vane-type slow wave structure

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, T.J.; Kou, C.S.

    2005-10-01

    In this study, the dispersion relation has been derived to characterize the propagation of the waves in the plasma guided by a periodical vane-type slow wave structure. The plasma is confined by a quartz plate. Results indicate that there are two different waves in this structure. One is the plasma mode that originates from the plasma surface wave propagating along the interface between the plasma and the quartz plate, and the other is the guide mode that originally travels along the vane-type slow wave structure. In contrast to its original slow wave characteristics, the guide mode becomes a fast wave in the low-frequency portion of the passband, and there exists a cut-off frequency for the guide mode. The vane-type guiding structure has been shown to limit the upper frequency of the passband of the plasma mode, compared with that of the plasma surface wave. In addition, the passband of the plasma mode increases with the plasma density while it becomes narrower for the guide mode. The influences of the parameters of the guiding structure and plasma density on the propagation of waves are also presented.

  9. Constraint likelihood analysis for a network of gravitational wave detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Klimenko, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mohanty, S.

    2005-12-15

    We propose a coherent method for detection and reconstruction of gravitational wave signals with a network of interferometric detectors. The method is derived by using the likelihood ratio functional for unknown signal waveforms. In the likelihood analysis, the global maximum of the likelihood ratio over the space of waveforms is used as the detection statistic. We identify a problem with this approach. In the case of an aligned pair of detectors, the detection statistic depends on the cross correlation between the detectors as expected, but this dependence disappears even for infinitesimally small misalignments. We solve the problem by applying constraints on the likelihood functional and obtain a new class of statistics. The resulting method can be applied to data from a network consisting of any number of detectors with arbitrary detector orientations. The method allows us reconstruction of the source coordinates and the waveforms of two polarization components of a gravitational wave. We study the performance of the method with numerical simulations and find the reconstruction of the source coordinates to be more accurate than in the standard likelihood method.

  10. IMPLODING IGNITION WAVES. I. ONE-DIMENSIONAL ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Kushnir, Doron; Waxman, Eli; Livne, Eli

    2012-06-20

    We show that converging spherical and cylindrical shock waves may ignite a detonation wave in a combustible medium, provided the radius at which the shocks become strong exceeds a critical radius, R{sub crit}. An approximate analytic expression for R{sub crit} is derived for an ideal gas equation of state and a simple (power-law-Arrhenius) reaction law, and shown to reproduce the results of numerical solutions. For typical acetylene-air experiments we find R{sub crit} {approx} 100 {mu}m (spherical) and R{sub crit} {approx} 1 mm (cylindrical). We suggest that the deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) observed in these systems may be due to converging shocks produced by the turbulent deflagration flow, which reaches sub- (but near) sonic velocities on scales >>R{sub crit}. Our suggested mechanism differs from that proposed by Zel'dovich et al., in which a fine-tuned spatial gradient in the chemical induction time is required to be maintained within the turbulent deflagration flow. Our analysis may be readily extended to more complicated equations of state and reaction laws. An order of magnitude estimate of R{sub crit} within a white dwarf at the pre-detonation conditions believed to lead to Type Ia supernova explosions is 0.1 km, suggesting that our proposed mechanism may be relevant for DDT initiation in these systems. The relevance of our proposed ignition mechanism to DDT initiation may be tested by both experiments and numerical simulations.

  11. Quantitative analysis of a transportable matter-wave gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desruelle, B.; Le Moigne, N.; Bonvalot, S.; Menoret, V.; Vermeulen, P.; Merlet, S.

    2015-12-01

    This paper summarizes the latest results obtained with our second generation Absolute Quantum Gravimeter (AQG). This instrument relies on the utilization of advanced matter-wave interferometry techniques, which allow us to precisely characterize the vertical acceleration experienced by a cloud of cold atoms over a free-fall of 10 cm. A significant research effort was conducted over the last months to optimize the instrument sensitivity as well as the rejection of ground vibrations, and we will present the technological solutions that were selected to meet our objectives. We will then present a detailed review of the characterizations performed with this instrument. This data shows a very satisfactory sensitivity of the AQG (2 μGal standard deviation after 1000 s of data integration) and a very robust behavior against ground vibrations. We will also present a detailed analysis of the long term behavior of the instrument. These results clearly demonstrate the high potential of matter-wave gravimeter for high performance absolute gravity measurements. Eventually, we will discuss the research activities we are conducting to develop a field version of this instrument.

  12. A quality assessment of 3D video analysis for full scale rockfall experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkwein, A.; Glover, J.; Bourrier, F.; Gerber, W.

    2012-04-01

    Main goal of full scale rockfall experiments is to retrieve a 3D trajectory of a boulder along the slope. Such trajectories then can be used to calibrate rockfall simulation models. This contribution presents the application of video analysis techniques capturing rock fall velocity of some free fall full scale rockfall experiments along a rock face with an inclination of about 50 degrees. Different scaling methodologies have been evaluated. They mainly differ in the way the scaling factors between the movie frames and the reality and are determined. For this purpose some scale bars and targets with known dimensions have been distributed in advance along the slope. The single scaling approaches are briefly described as follows: (i) Image raster is scaled to the distant fixed scale bar then recalibrated to the plane of the passing rock boulder by taking the measured position of the nearest impact as the distance to the camera. The distance between the camera, scale bar, and passing boulder are surveyed. (ii) The image raster was scaled using the four nearest targets (identified using frontal video) from the trajectory to be analyzed. The average of the scaling factors was finally taken as scaling factor. (iii) The image raster was scaled using the four nearest targets from the trajectory to be analyzed. The scaling factor for one trajectory was calculated by balancing the mean scaling factors associated with the two nearest and the two farthest targets in relation to their mean distance to the analyzed trajectory. (iv) Same as previous method but with varying scaling factors during along the trajectory. It has shown that a direct measure of the scaling target and nearest impact zone is the most accurate. If constant plane is assumed it doesn't account for the lateral deviations of the rock boulder from the fall line consequently adding error into the analysis. Thus a combination of scaling methods (i) and (iv) are considered to give the best results. For best results

  13. Oceanic lithospheric S wave velocities from the analysis of P wave polarization at the ocean floor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannemann, Katrin; Krüger, Frank; Dahm, Torsten

    2016-09-01

    Our knowledge of the absolute S wave velocities of the oceanic lithosphere is mainly based on global surface wave tomography, local active seismic or compliance measurements using oceanic infragravity waves. The results of tomography give a rather smooth picture of the actual S wave velocity structure and local measurements have limitations regarding the range of elastic parameters or the geometry of the measurement. Here, we use the P wave polarization (apparent P wave incidence angle) of teleseismic events to investigate the S wave velocity structure of the oceanic crust and the upper tens of kilometres of the mantle beneath single stations. In this study, we present an up to our knowledge new relation of the apparent P wave incidence angle at the ocean bottom dependent on the half space S wave velocity. We analyse the angle in different period ranges at ocean bottom stations (OBS) to derive apparent S wave velocity profiles. These profiles are dependent on the S wave velocity as well as on the thickness of the layers in the subsurface. Consequently, their interpretation results in a set of equally valid models. We analyse the apparent P wave incidence angles of an OBS data set which was collected in the Eastern Mid Atlantic. We are able to determine reasonable S wave velocity-depth models by a three step quantitative modelling after a manual data quality control, although layer resonance sometimes influences the estimated apparent S wave velocities. The apparent S wave velocity profiles are well explained by an oceanic PREM model in which the upper part is replaced by four layers consisting of a water column, a sediment, a crust and a layer representing the uppermost mantle. The obtained sediment has a thickness between 0.3 km and 0.9 km with S wave velocities between 0.7 km s-1 and 1.4 km s-1. The estimated total crustal thickness varies between 4 km and 10 km with S wave velocities between 3.5 km s-1 and 4.3 km s-1. We find a slight increase of the total

  14. Analysis of wear debris from full-scale bearing fatigue tests using the Ferrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Loewenthal, S. H.

    1980-01-01

    The Ferrograph was used to determine the types of quantities of wear particles generated during full-scale bearing fatigue tests. Deep-groove ball bearings made from AISI 52100 steel were used. A MIL-L-23699 tetraester lubricant was used in a recirculating lubrication system containing a 49-micron absolute filter. Test conditions included a maximum Hertz stress of 2.4 GPa, a shaft speed of 15,000 rpm and a lubricant supply temperature of 74 C (165 F). Four fatigue failures were detected by accelerometers in this test set. In general, the Ferrograph was more sensitive (up to 23 h) in detecting spall initiation than either accelerometers or the normal spectrographic oil analysis (SOAP). Four particle types were observed: normal rubbing wear particles, spheres, nonferrous particles, and severe wear (spall) fragments.

  15. Analysis of wear-debris from full-scale bearing fatigue tests using the ferrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R.; Loewenthal, S. H.

    1980-01-01

    The ferrograph was used to determine the types and quantities of wear particles generated during full-scale bearing fatigue tests. Deep-groove ball bearings made from AISI 52100 steel were used. A MIL-L-23699 tetraester lubricant was used in a recirculating lubrication system containing a 49 mm absolute filter. Test conditions included a maximum Hertz stress of 2.4 GPa, a shaft speed of 15,000 rpm, and a lubricant supply temperature of 74 C (165 F). Four fatigue failures were detected by accelerometers in this test set. In general, the ferrograph was more sensitive (up to 23 hr) in detecting spall initiation than either accelerometers or the normal spectrographic oil analysis. Four particle types were observed: normal rubbing wear particles, spheres, nonferrous particles, and severe wear (spall) fragments.

  16. Ferrographic analysis of wear debris from full-scale bearing fatigue tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Loewenthal, S. H.

    1979-01-01

    The Ferrograph was used to determine the types and quantities of wear particles generated during full scale bearing fatigue tests. Deep-groove ball bearings made from steel were used. A tetraester lubricant was used in a recirculating lubricant system containing a 49 micrometers absolute filter. Test conditions include a maximum Hertz stress of 2.4 GPa, a shaft speed of 15,000 rpm, and a lubricant supply temperature of 74 C (165 F). Four fatigue failures were detected by accelerometers in this test set. In general, the Ferrograph was more sensitive (up to 23 hr) in detecting spall initiation than either accelerometers or the normal spectrographic oil analysis. Four particle types were observed: normal rubbing weather particles, spheres, nonferrous particles, and severe wear (spall) fragments.

  17. Full quantitative phase analysis of hydrated lime using the Rietveld method

    SciTech Connect

    Lassinantti Gualtieri, Magdalena

    2012-09-15

    Full quantitative phase analysis (FQPA) using X-ray powder diffraction and Rietveld refinements is a well-established method for the characterization of various hydraulic binders such as Portland cement and hydraulic limes. In this paper, the Rietveld method is applied to hydrated lime, a non-hydraulic traditional binder. The potential presence of an amorphous phase in this material is generally ignored. Both synchrotron radiation and a conventional X-ray source were used for data collection. The applicability of the developed control file for the Rietveld refinements was investigated using samples spiked with glass. The results were cross-checked by other independent methods such as thermal and chemical analyses. The sample microstructure was observed by transmission electron microscopy. It was found that the consistency between the different methods was satisfactory, supporting the validity of FQPA for this material. For the samples studied in this work, the amount of amorphous material was in the range 2-15 wt.%.

  18. Analysis of the full genome of human group C rotaviruses reveals lineage diversification and reassortment.

    PubMed

    Medici, Maria Cristina; Tummolo, Fabio; Martella, Vito; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; De Conto, Flora; Chezzi, Carlo; Fehér, Enikő; Marton, Szilvia; Calderaro, Adriana; Bányai, Krisztián

    2016-08-01

    Group C rotaviruses (RVC) are enteric pathogens of humans and animals. Whole-genome sequences are available only for few RVCs, leaving gaps in our knowledge about their genetic diversity. We determined the full-length genome sequence of two human RVCs (PR2593/2004 and PR713/2012), detected in Italy from hospital-based surveillance for rotavirus infection in 2004 and 2012. In the 11 RNA genomic segments, the two Italian RVCs segregated within separate intra-genotypic lineages showed variation ranging from 1.9 % (VP6) to 15.9 % (VP3) at the nucleotide level. Comprehensive analysis of human RVC sequences available in the databases allowed us to reveal the existence of at least two major genome configurations, defined as type I and type II. Human RVCs of type I were all associated with the M3 VP3 genotype, including the Italian strain PR2593/2004. Conversely, human RVCs of type II were all associated with the M2 VP3 genotype, including the Italian strain PR713/2012. Reassortant RVC strains between these major genome configurations were identified. Although only a few full-genome sequences of human RVCs, mostly of Asian origin, are available, the analysis of human RVC sequences retrieved from the databases indicates that at least two intra-genotypic RVC lineages circulate in European countries. Gathering more sequence data is necessary to develop a standardized genotype and intra-genotypic lineage classification system useful for epidemiological investigations and avoiding confusion in the literature.

  19. ANALYSIS OF A GLOBAL MORETON WAVE OBSERVED ON 2003 OCTOBER 28

    SciTech Connect

    Muhr, N.; Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M.; Vrsnak, B.; Magdalenic, J. E-mail: mat@igam.uni-graz.a E-mail: bvrsnak@gmail.co

    2010-01-10

    We study the well-pronounced Moreton wave that occurred in association with the X17.2 flare/CME event of 2003 October 28. This Moreton wave is striking for its global propagation and two separate wave centers, which implies that two waves were launched simultaneously. The mean velocity of the Moreton wave, tracked within different sectors of propagation direction, lies in the range of v approx 900-1100 km s{sup -1} with two sectors showing wave deceleration. The perturbation profile analysis of the wave indicates amplitude growth followed by amplitude weakening and broadening of the perturbation profile, which is consistent with a disturbance first driven and then evolving into a freely propagating wave. The Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope wave front is found to lie on the same kinematical curve as the Moreton wave fronts indicating that both are different signatures of the same physical process. Bipolar coronal dimmings are observed on the same opposite east-west edges of the active region as the Moreton wave ignition centers. The radio type II source, which is cospatially located with the first wave front, indicates that the wave was launched from an extended source region (approx>60 Mm). These findings suggest that the Moreton wave is initiated by the coronal mass ejection expanding flanks.

  20. Toward rapid and precise source analysis using teleseismic body waves and tsunami waves: In case of the 2010 Chile earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, M.; Yamanaka, Y.; Watada, S.; Fujii, Y.; Satake, K.

    2015-12-01

    To provide accurate forecasts of arrival times and waveforms of tsunamis caused by great earthquakes, it is important to rapidly and precisely determine a source using real-time tsunami waveforms and teleseismic body waves data. In order to do that, the Green's function and the "tsunami" Green's functions that can be calculated with a low computational cost and predict observed waveforms precisely are required. We separately inverted the 2010 Chile earthquake using teleseismic body waves and tsunami wave. The Green's functions of teleseismic body waves inversion and the "tsunami" Green's functions of tsunami waveforms inversion are used a full-waveforms calculated by the Direct Solution Method [e.g., Kawai et al. 2006] and a phase-corrected long-wave proposed by Watada et al. [2014], respectively. The phase corrected tsunami Green's functions include the effects of the long wave dispersion caused by the elasticity of the sea bottom, compression and dilatation of sea water, and gravitational potential change associated with mass motion during tsunami propagation of sea water. The slip distributions obtained by the teleseismic body waves and the tsunami waveforms data are almost consistent. The synthetic seismograms are explained the observed waveforms well including later arriving PP waves and W phase, which cannot calculate the conventional ray theoretical Green's functions. The synthetic tsunami waveforms also well explained the observed waveforms near and far-field DART data. The tsunami waveforms inversion without phase corrections cause an apparent shift of the large slip area away from the stations i.e., toward deeper part of the fault, because of faster propagation speed of conventional linear long wave tsunami Green's functions. Furthermore, the teleseismic body wave inversion obtained by conventional ray theoretical Green's functions also cause a wrong results. The main reason is that the ray theoretical Green's functions cannot calculate the W phase. A

  1. A Big Data Analytics Pipeline for the Analysis of TESS Full Frame Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wampler-Doty, Matthew; Pierce Doty, John

    2015-12-01

    We present a novel method for producing a catalogue of extra-solar planets and transients using the full frame image data from TESS. Our method involves (1) creating a fast Monte Carlo simulation of the TESS science instruments, (2) using the simulation to create a labeled dataset consisting of exoplanets with various orbital durations as well as transients (such as tidal disruption events), (3) using supervised machine learning to find optimal matched filters, Support Vector Machines (SVMs) and statistical classifiers (i.e. naïve Bayes and Markov Random Fields) to detect astronomical objects of interest and (4) “Big Data” analysis to produce a catalogue based on the TESS data. We will apply the resulting methods to all stars in the full frame images. We hope that by providing libraries that conform to industry standards of Free Open Source Software we may invite researchers from the astronomical community as well as the wider data-analytics community to contribute to our effort.

  2. [Analysis of microbial community structure at full-scale wastewater treatment plants by oxidation ditch].

    PubMed

    Guo, Yun; Yang, Dian-hai; Lu, Wen-jian

    2012-08-01

    The microbial populations of the oxidation ditch process at the full-scale municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) in a city in north China were analyzed by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Fractions structure varieties and distribution characteristics of Accumulibacter as potential phosphorus accumulating organisms (PAOs), and Competibacter as potential glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) were quantified. The results indicated that Accumulibacter comprised around 2.0% +/- 0.6%, 3.4% +/- 0.6% and 3.5% +/- 1.2% of the total biomass in the anaerobic tank, anoxic zone and zone, respectively, while the corresponding values for Competibacter were 25.3% +/- 8.7%, 30.3% +/- 7.1% and 24.4% +/- 6.1%. Lower Accumulibacter fractions were found compared with previous full-scale reports (7%-22%), indicating low phosphorus removal efficiency in the oxidation ditch system. Statistical analysis indicated that the amount of PAOs was significantly higher in the anoxic zone and the aerobic zone compared with that in the anaerobic tank, while GAOs remained at the same level. PMID:23213894

  3. Seismic analysis of the large 70-meter antenna, part 1: Earthquake response spectra versus full transient analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiedron, K.; Chian, C. T.

    1985-01-01

    As a check on structure safety aspects, two approaches in seismic analysis for the large 70-m antennas are presented. The first approach, commonly used by civil engineers, utilizes known recommended design response spectra. The second approach, which is the full transient analysis, is versatile and applicable not only to earthquake loading but also to other dynamic forcing functions. The results obtained at the fundamental structural frequency show that the two approaches are in good agreement with each other and both approaches show a safe design. The results also confirm past 64-m antenna seismic studies done by the Caltech Seismology Staff.

  4. SRM Internal Flow Tests and Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis. Volume 2; CFD RSRM Full-Scale Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This document presents the full-scale analyses of the CFD RSRM. The RSRM model was developed with a 20 second burn time. The following are presented as part of the full-scale analyses: (1) RSRM embedded inclusion analysis; (2) RSRM igniter nozzle design analysis; (3) Nozzle Joint 4 erosion anomaly; (4) RSRM full motor port slag accumulation analysis; (5) RSRM motor analysis of two-phase flow in the aft segment/submerged nozzle region; (6) Completion of 3-D Analysis of the hot air nozzle manifold; (7) Bates Motor distributed combustion test case; and (8) Three Dimensional Polysulfide Bump Analysis.

  5. Three-dimensional shear wave imaging based on full-field laser speckle contrast imaging with one-dimensional mechanical scanning.

    PubMed

    Chao, Pei-Yu; Li, Pai-Chi

    2016-08-22

    The high imaging resolution and motion sensitivity of optical-based shear wave detection has made it an attractive technique in biomechanics studies with potential for improving the capabilities of shear wave elasticity imaging. In this study we implemented laser speckle contrast imaging for two-dimensional (X-Z) tracking of transient shear wave propagation in agarose phantoms. The mechanical disturbances induced by the propagation of the shear wave caused temporal and spatial fluctuations in the local speckle pattern, which manifested as local blurring. By mechanically moving the sample in the third dimension (Y), and performing two-dimensional shear wave imaging at every scan position, the three-dimensional shear wave velocity distribution of the phantom could be reconstructed. Based on comparisons with the reference shear wave velocity measurements obtained using a commercial ultrasound shear wave imaging system, the developed system can estimate the shear wave velocity with an error of less than 6% for homogeneous phantoms with shear moduli ranging from 1.52 kPa to 7.99 kPa. The imaging sensitivity of our system makes it capable of measuring small variations in shear modulus; the estimated standard deviation of the shear modulus was found to be less than 0.07 kPa. A submillimeter spatial resolution for three-dimensional shear wave imaging has been achieved, as demonstrated by the ability to detect a 1-mm-thick stiff plate embedded inside heterogeneous agarose phantoms. PMID:27557169

  6. Polarization measurement analysis. I. Impact of the full covariance matrix on polarization fraction and angle measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montier, L.; Plaszczynski, S.; Levrier, F.; Tristram, M.; Alina, D.; Ristorcelli, I.; Bernard, J.-P.

    2015-02-01

    With the forthcoming release of high precision polarization measurements, such as from the Planck satellite, the metrology of polarization needs to be improved. In particular, it is important to have full knowledge of the noise properties when estimating polarization fraction and polarization angle, which suffer from well-known biases. While strong simplifying assumptions have usually been made in polarization analysis, we present a method for including the full covariance matrix of the Stokes parameters in estimates of the distributions of the polarization fraction and angle. We thereby quantified the impact of the noise properties on the biases in the observational quantities and derived analytical expressions for the probability density functions of these quantities that take the full complexity of the covariance matrix into account, including the Stokes I intensity components. We performed Monte Carlo simulations to explore the impact of the noise properties on the statistical variance and bias of the polarization fraction and angle. We show that for low variations (< 10%) of the effective ellipticity between the Q and U components around the symmetrical case the covariance matrix may be simplified as is usually done, with a negligible impact on the bias. For S/Ns with intensity lower than 10, the uncertainty on the total intensity is shown to drastically increase the uncertainty of the polarization fraction but not the relative bias of the polarization fraction, while a 10% correlation between the intensity and the polarized components does not significantly affect the bias of the polarization fraction. We compare estimates of the uncertainties that affect polarization measurements, addressing limitations of the estimates of the S/N, and we show how to build conservative confidence intervals for polarization fraction and angle simultaneously. This study, which is the first in a set of papers dedicated to analysing polarization measurements, focuses on the

  7. Full genomic analysis of new variant rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus revealed multiple recombination events.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Ana M; Dalton, Kevin P; Magalhães, Maria J; Parra, Francisco; Esteves, Pedro J; Holmes, Edward C; Abrantes, Joana

    2015-06-01

    Rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV), a Lagovirus of the family Caliciviridae, causes rabbit hemorrhagic disease (RHD) in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus). The disease was first documented in 1984 in China and rapidly spread worldwide. In 2010, a new RHDV variant emerged, tentatively classified as 'RHDVb'. RHDVb is characterized by affecting vaccinated rabbits and those <2 months old, and is genetically distinct (~20 %) from older strains. To determine the evolution of RHDV, including the new variant, we generated 28 full-genome sequences from samples collected between 1994 and 2014. Phylogenetic analysis of the gene encoding the major capsid protein, VP60, indicated that all viruses sampled from 2012 to 2014 were RHDVb. Multiple recombination events were detected in the more recent RHDVb genomes, with a single major breakpoint located in the 5' region of VP60. This breakpoint divides the genome into two regions: one that encodes the non-structural proteins and another that encodes the major and minor structural proteins, VP60 and VP10, respectively. Additional phylogenetic analysis of each region revealed two types of recombinants with distinct genomic backgrounds. Recombinants always include the structural proteins of RHDVb, with non-structural proteins from non-pathogenic lagoviruses or from pathogenic genogroup 1 strains. Our results show that in contrast to the evolutionary history of older RHDV strains, recombination plays an important role in generating diversity in the newly emerged RHDVb.

  8. The full-length transcripts and promoter analysis of intergenic microRNAs in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jinjun; Zhang, Zan; Liang, Jingdong; Ge, Qiongqiong; Duan, Xuchu; Ma, Fei; Li, Fei

    2011-05-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) transcription is still not well understood until now. To increase the miRNA abundance, we stimulated miRNA transcription with CuSO(4) and knocked down Drosha enzyme using dsRNA in Drosophila S2 cells. The full length transcripts of bantam, miR-276a and miR-277, the 5'-end of miR-8, the 3'-end of miR-2b and miR-10 were obtained. We also conducted a series of miRNA promoter analysis to prove the reliability of RACE results. Luciferase-reporter assays proved that both bantam and miR-276a promoters successfully drove the expressions of downstream luciferase genes. The promoter activities were impaired by introducing one or multiple mutations at predicted transcription factor binding sites. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed that hypophosphorylated RNA polymerase II and transcription factor c-Myc physically bind at miRNA promoter. RNA interference of transcription factors Mad and Prd led to down-expression of bantam, miR-277 and miR-2b but not miR-276a, whereas RNAi of Dorsal had the opposite effect. PMID:21333734

  9. The application of thermoelastic stress analysis to full-scale aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruehmann, R. K.; Dulieu-Barton, J. M.; Quinn, S.; Peton-Walter, J.; Mousty, P. A. N.

    2012-08-01

    Non-destructive evaluation (NDE) techniques that can be applied in-situ are particularly relevant to the testing of large scale structures that cannot easily be taken into a laboratory for inspection. The application of established laboratory based techniques to the inspection of such structures therefore brings with it a new set of challenges associated with the change in operating environment between the laboratory and 'the field'. The current work investigates the use of thermoelastic stress analysis (TSA) to inspect carbon fibre composite aerospace components for manufacturing defects and in-service damage. An initial study using single transient loads to obtain a measureable change in temperature that can be related to the change in the sum of the principal stresses showed a good agreement with the traditional methodology. However, for large structures, the energy required to obtain a sufficiently large stress change to obtain a resolvable measurement may require an actuator that is not easily portable. Hence a number of ideas have been proposed to reduce the power requirement and deal with small signal to noise ratios. This paper describes the use of natural frequency vibration modes to enable large stress changes to be generated with minimal power input. Established signal processing in the form of a lock-in amplifier and Fourier signal analysis is applied. Tests on a laboratory scale flat plate and full-scale representative wing skin and stringer specimen are presented.

  10. 0.22 THz wideband sheet electron beam traveling wave tube amplifier: Cold test measurements and beam wave interaction analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Baig, Anisullah; Gamzina, Diana; Barchfeld, Robert; Domier, Calvin; Barnett, Larry R.; Luhmann, Neville C. Jr.

    2012-09-15

    In this paper, we describe micro-fabrication, RF measurements, and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation modeling analysis of the 0.22 THz double-vane half period staggered traveling wave tube amplifier (TWTA) circuit. The TWTA slow wave structure comprised of two sections separated by two sever ports loaded by loss material, with integrated broadband input/output couplers. The micro-metallic structures were fabricated using nano-CNC milling and diffusion bonded in a three layer process. The 3D optical microscopy and SEM analysis showed that the fabrication error was within 2-3 {mu}m and surface roughness was measured within 30-50 nm. The RF measurements were conducted with an Agilent PNA-X network analyzer employing WR5.1 T/R modules with a frequency range of 178-228 GHz. The in-band insertion loss (S{sub 21}) for both the short section and long section (separated by a sever) was measured as {approx}-5 dB while the return loss was generally around {approx}-15 dB or better. The measurements matched well with the S-matrix simulation analysis that predicted a 3 dB bandwidth of {approx}45 GHz with an operating frequency at 220 GHz. However, the measured S{sub 21} was {approx}3 dB less than the design values, and is attributed to surface roughness and alignment issues. The confirmation measurements were conducted over the full frequency band up to 270 GHz employing a backward wave oscillator (BWO) scalar network analyzer setup employing a BWO in the frequency range 190 GHz-270 GHz. PIC simulations were conducted for the realistic TWT output power performance analysis with incorporation of corner radius of 127 {mu}m, which is inevitably induced by nano-machining. Furthermore, the S{sub 21} value in both sections of the TWT structure was reduced to correspond to the measurements by using a degraded conductivity of 10% International Annealed Copper Standard. At 220 GHz, for an elliptic sheet electron beam of 20 kV and 0.25 A, the average output power of the tube was predicted

  11. 0.22 THz wideband sheet electron beam traveling wave tube amplifier: Cold test measurements and beam wave interaction analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baig, Anisullah; Gamzina, Diana; Barchfeld, Robert; Domier, Calvin; Barnett, Larry R.; Luhmann, Neville C.

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, we describe micro-fabrication, RF measurements, and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation modeling analysis of the 0.22 THz double-vane half period staggered traveling wave tube amplifier (TWTA) circuit. The TWTA slow wave structure comprised of two sections separated by two sever ports loaded by loss material, with integrated broadband input/output couplers. The micro-metallic structures were fabricated using nano-CNC milling and diffusion bonded in a three layer process. The 3D optical microscopy and SEM analysis showed that the fabrication error was within 2-3 μm and surface roughness was measured within 30-50 nm. The RF measurements were conducted with an Agilent PNA-X network analyzer employing WR5.1 T/R modules with a frequency range of 178-228 GHz. The in-band insertion loss (S21) for both the short section and long section (separated by a sever) was measured as ˜-5 dB while the return loss was generally around ˜-15 dB or better. The measurements matched well with the S-matrix simulation analysis that predicted a 3 dB bandwidth of ˜45 GHz with an operating frequency at 220 GHz. However, the measured S21 was ˜3 dB less than the design values, and is attributed to surface roughness and alignment issues. The confirmation measurements were conducted over the full frequency band up to 270 GHz employing a backward wave oscillator (BWO) scalar network analyzer setup employing a BWO in the frequency range 190 GHz-270 GHz. PIC simulations were conducted for the realistic TWT output power performance analysis with incorporation of corner radius of 127 μm, which is inevitably induced by nano-machining. Furthermore, the S21 value in both sections of the TWT structure was reduced to correspond to the measurements by using a degraded conductivity of 10% International Annealed Copper Standard. At 220 GHz, for an elliptic sheet electron beam of 20 kV and 0.25 A, the average output power of the tube was predicted to be reduced from 90 W (for ideal

  12. Medical Comorbidity of Full and Partial Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in United States Adults: Results from Wave 2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Pietrzak, Robert H.; Goldstein, Risë B.; Southwick, Steven M.; Grant, Bridget F.

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study examined associations between lifetime trauma exposures, PTSD and partial PTSD, and past-year medical conditions in a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults. Methods Face-to-face interviews were conducted with 34,653 participants in the Wave 2 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. Logistic regression analyses evaluated associations of trauma exposure, PTSD and partial PTSD with respondent-reported medical diagnoses. Results After adjustment for sociodemographic characteristics and comorbid Axis I and II disorders, respondents with full PTSD were more likely than traumatized respondents without full or partial PTSD (comparison group) to report diagnoses of diabetes mellitus, noncirrhotic liver disease, angina pectoris, tachycardia, hypercholesterolemia, other heart disease, stomach ulcer, HIV seropositivity, gastritis, and arthritis (odds ratios [ORs]=1.2-2.5). Respondents with partial PTSD were more likely than the comparison group to report past-year diagnoses of stomach ulcer, angina pectoris, tachycardia, and arthritis (ORs=1.3-1.6). Men with full and partial PTSD were more likely than controls to report diagnoses of hypertension (both ORs=1.6), and both men and women with PTSD (ORs=1.8 and 1.6, respectively), and men with partial PTSD (OR=2.0) were more likely to report gastritis. Total number of lifetime traumatic event types was associated with many assessed medical conditions (ORs=1.04-1.16), reducing the magnitudes and rendering non-significant some of the associations between PTSD status and medical conditions. Conclusions Greater lifetime trauma exposure and PTSD are associated with numerous medical conditions, many of which are stress-related and chronic, in U.S. adults. Partial PTSD is associated with intermediate odds of some of these conditions. PMID:21949429

  13. A selection model for accounting for publication bias in a full network meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Mavridis, Dimitris; Welton, Nicky J; Sutton, Alex; Salanti, Georgia

    2014-12-30

    Copas and Shi suggested a selection model to explore the potential impact of publication bias via sensitivity analysis based on assumptions for the probability of publication of trials conditional on the precision of their results. Chootrakool et al. extended this model to three-arm trials but did not fully account for the implications of the consistency assumption, and their model is difficult to generalize for complex network structures with more than three treatments. Fitting these selection models within a frequentist setting requires maximization of a complex likelihood function, and identification problems are common. We have previously presented a Bayesian implementation of the selection model when multiple treatments are compared with a common reference treatment. We now present a general model suitable for complex, full network meta-analysis that accounts for consistency when adjusting results for publication bias. We developed a design-by-treatment selection model to describe the mechanism by which studies with different designs (sets of treatments compared in a trial) and precision may be selected for publication. We fit the model in a Bayesian setting because it avoids the numerical problems encountered in the frequentist setting, it is generalizable with respect to the number of treatments and study arms, and it provides a flexible framework for sensitivity analysis using external knowledge. Our model accounts for the additional uncertainty arising from publication bias more successfully compared to the standard Copas model or its previous extensions. We illustrate the methodology using a published triangular network for the failure of vascular graft or arterial patency.

  14. Analysis of optical frequency-modulated continuous-wave interference.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jesse

    2004-07-20

    I systematically analyze the theory of optical frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) interference. There are three different versions of optical FMCW interference, discussed in detail: sawtooth-wave optical FMCW interference, triangular-wave optical FMCW interference, and sinusoidal-wave optical FMCW interference. The essential concepts and technical terms are clearly defined, the necessary simplifications are introduced according to the characteristics of optical waves, and the formulas used to calculate the signal intensities under two different situations (static and dynamic) are properly derived. Advantages and limitations of each version of optical FMCW interference are also discussed. PMID:15291063

  15. Dynamic Analysis of the Conditional Oscillator Underlying Slow Waves in Thalamocortical Neurons.

    PubMed

    David, François; Crunelli, Vincenzo; Leresche, Nathalie; Lambert, Régis C

    2016-01-01

    During non-REM sleep the EEG shows characteristics waves that are generated by the dynamic interactions between cortical and thalamic oscillators. In thalamic neurons, low-threshold T-type Ca(2+) channels play a pivotal role in almost every type of neuronal oscillations, including slow (< 1 Hz) waves, sleep spindles and delta waves. The transient opening of T channels gives rise to the low threshold spikes (LTSs), and associated high frequency bursts of action potentials, that are characteristically present during sleep spindles and delta waves, whereas the persistent opening of a small fraction of T channels, (i.e., ITwindow) is responsible for the membrane potential bistability underlying sleep slow oscillations. Surprisingly thalamocortical (TC) neurons express a very high density of T channels that largely exceed the amount required to generate LTSs and therefore, to support certain, if not all, sleep oscillations. Here, to clarify the relationship between T current density and sleep oscillations, we systematically investigated the impact of the T conductance level on the intrinsic rhythmic activities generated in TC neurons, combining in vitro experiments and TC neuron simulation. Using bifurcation analysis, we provide insights into the dynamical processes taking place at the transition between slow and delta oscillations. Our results show that although stable delta oscillations can be evoked with minimal T conductance, the full range of slow oscillation patterns, including groups of delta oscillations separated by Up states ("grouped-delta slow waves") requires a high density of T channels. Moreover, high levels of T conductance ensure the robustness of different types of slow oscillations.

  16. Dynamic Analysis of the Conditional Oscillator Underlying Slow Waves in Thalamocortical Neurons.

    PubMed

    David, François; Crunelli, Vincenzo; Leresche, Nathalie; Lambert, Régis C

    2016-01-01

    During non-REM sleep the EEG shows characteristics waves that are generated by the dynamic interactions between cortical and thalamic oscillators. In thalamic neurons, low-threshold T-type Ca(2+) channels play a pivotal role in almost every type of neuronal oscillations, including slow (< 1 Hz) waves, sleep spindles and delta waves. The transient opening of T channels gives rise to the low threshold spikes (LTSs), and associated high frequency bursts of action potentials, that are characteristically present during sleep spindles and delta waves, whereas the persistent opening of a small fraction of T channels, (i.e., ITwindow) is responsible for the membrane potential bistability underlying sleep slow oscillations. Surprisingly thalamocortical (TC) neurons express a very high density of T channels that largely exceed the amount required to generate LTSs and therefore, to support certain, if not all, sleep oscillations. Here, to clarify the relationship between T current density and sleep oscillations, we systematically investigated the impact of the T conductance level on the intrinsic rhythmic activities generated in TC neurons, combining in vitro experiments and TC neuron simulation. Using bifurcation analysis, we provide insights into the dynamical processes taking place at the transition between slow and delta oscillations. Our results show that although stable delta oscillations can be evoked with minimal T conductance, the full range of slow oscillation patterns, including groups of delta oscillations separated by Up states ("grouped-delta slow waves") requires a high density of T channels. Moreover, high levels of T conductance ensure the robustness of different types of slow oscillations. PMID:26941611

  17. Transient wave propagation analysis of a pantograph- catenary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Kyohei; Masuda, Arata

    2016-09-01

    This paper proposes a systematic method to analyze the dynamic response of an overhead catenary with pantographs moving at constant speed. The overhead catenary is modeled as a onedimensional infinite-length string, which is periodically supported by hangers. On the other hand, the pantograph is a sub-structure moving at a constant speed, which is modeled as a lumped mass system contacting the catenary. In this study, the whole system is divided into elements in the manner of the transfer matrix method. Then, the relationship among traveling waves in every element is systematically obtained in the Laplace domain following the method of reverberation-ray matrix. Since the governing equation of the system changes periodically with time, the analysis of the temporal evolution of the system can be realized by repeating a single period analysis starting from the instant when the pantograph comes into a unit cell by means of the reverberation-ray matrix analysis followed by the inverse Laplace transform. When the pantograph reaches the opposite hanger, the whole elements are shifted backward, and the catenary response of the forehead element is used as the initial condition of the next period.

  18. The analysis of optical wave beams propagation in lens systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakov, I.; Mosentsov, S.; Moskaletz, O.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper some aspects of the formation and propagation of optical wave beams in lens systems were considered. As an example, the two-lens optical information processing system was considered. Analysis of the two-lens optical circuit has been made with a systems approach perspective. As part of the radio-optical analogies had been applied certain provisions of the theory of dynamical systems to the spatial optical system. The lens system is represented as a simple series-connected optical elements with known spatial impulse response. General impulse response of such a system has been received, as well as consider some special cases of the impulse response. The question of the relationship between the parameters and the size of the input aperture lenses for undistorted transmission of the optical signal has been considered. Analysis of the energy loss resulting from the finite aperture of the lens. It's based on an assessment of the fraction of radiation that propagates beyond the lens. Analysis showed that the energy losses depend explicitly on the following parameters: radiation wavelength, distance between input aperture and lens, and ratio of the input aperture and lens aperture. With the computer help simulation the dependence of losses was shown on the above parameters

  19. Analysis of the Interactions of Planetary Waves with the Mean Flow of the Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.

    2007-01-01

    During the winter period, large scale waves (planetary waves) are observed to propagate from the troposphere into the stratosphere. Such wave events have been recognized since the 1 950s. The very largest wave events result in major stratospheric warmings. These large scale wave events have typical durations of a few days to 2 weeks. The wave events deposit easterly momentum in the stratosphere, decelerating the polar night jet and warming the polar region. In this presentation we show the typical characteristics of these events via a compositing analysis. We will show the typical periods and scales of motion and the associated decelerations and warmings. We will illustrate some of the differences between major and minor warming wave events. We will further illustrate the feedback by the mean flow on subsequent wave events.

  20. Analysis of panthers full-scale heat transfer tests with RELAP5

    SciTech Connect

    Parlatan, Y.; Boyer, B.D.; Jo, J.; Rohatgi, S.

    1996-01-01

    The RELAP5 code is being assessed on the full-scale Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS) in the Performance ANalysis and Testing of HEat Removal Systems (PANTHERS) facility at Societa Informazioni Termoidrauliche (SIET) in Italy. PANTHERS is a test facility with fall-size prototype beat exchangers for the PCCS in support of the General Electric`s (GE) Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) program. PANTHERS tests with a low noncondensable gas concentration and with a high noncondensable gas concentration were analyzed with RELAP5. The results showed that beat transfer rate decreases significantly along the PCCS tubes. In the test case with a higher inlet noncondensable gas fraction, the PCCS removed 35% less heat than in the test case with the lower noncondensable gas fraction. The dominant resistance to the overall heat transfer is the condensation beat transfer resistance inside the tubes. This resistance increased by about 5-fold between the inlet and exit of the tube due to the build up of noncondensable gases along the tube. The RELAP5 calculations also predicted that 4% to 5% of the heat removed to the PCCS pool occurs in the inlet steam piping and PCCS upper and lower headers. These piping needs to be modeled for other tests systems. The full-scale PANTHERS predictions are also compared against 1/400 scale GIRAFFE tests. GIRAFFE has 33% larger heat surface area, but its efficiency is only 15% and 23% higher than PANTHERS for the two cases analyzed This was explained by the high heat transfer resistance inside the tubes near the exit.

  1. Full sequence analysis and characterization of a human astrovirus type 1 isolate from South Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Geun; Kang, Lae-Hyung; Jheong, Weon-Hwa; Oh, Mi-Hwa; Lee, Gyu-Cheol; Park, Sujeong; Paik, Soon-Young

    2013-02-01

    Human astroviruses are recognized as an important cause of infantile gastroenteritis around the world. In South Korea, sporadic cases of HAstV infection have been reported since 2002. However, hitherto, there have been no studies reporting the whole genome sequence of an HAstV isolate from South Korea. Hence, we sequenced and analyzed the entire genome of an HAstV-1 strain (lhar) that was isolated in Seoul, South Korea. The whole-genome sequence analysis revealed 3 open reading frames comprising the whole genome: ORF1a (2,763 bp), ORF1b (1,548 bp), and ORF2 (2,364 bp). The lhar strain showed amino acid identities with 8 other reference strains of 87.6-98.7%, 94.2-98.8%, and 62.6-99.0% in the ORF1a, ORF1b, and ORF2 regions, respectively. The amino acid sequence of the capsid region encoded by ORF2 was compared with a total of 19 HAstV-1 strains and 8 HAstVs reference strains isolated in various countries. This revealed 1 amino acid substitution, at aa412 (Pro → Arg) in ORF2. This study, the first to report the full-length sequence of an HAstV isolated in South Korea, is meaningful in that it can be used as a full-length HAstV sequence standard for future comparison studies. It may also prove useful to the field of public health field by facilitating the diagnosis and the prediction of new emerging variants.

  2. Irregular Wave Energy Extraction Analysis for a Slider Crank WEC Power Take-Off System

    SciTech Connect

    Sang, Yuanrui; Karayaka, H. Bora; Yan, Yanjun; Zhang, James Z.; Muljadi, Eduard

    2015-09-02

    Slider crank Wave Energy Converter (WEC) is a novel energy conversion device. It converts wave energy into electricity at a relatively high efficiency, and it features a simple structure. Past analysis on this WEC has been done under regular sinusoidal wave conditions, and a suboptimal energy could be achieved. This paper presents the analysis of the system under irregular wave conditions; a time-domain hydrodynamics model is adopted and the control methodology is modified to better serve the irregular wave conditions. Results from the simulations show that the performance of the system under irregular wave conditions is different from that under regular sinusoidal wave conditions, but still a reasonable amount of energy can be extracted.

  3. Rotational excitations in para-H2+para-H2 collisions: Full- and reduced-dimensional quantum wave packet studies comparing different potential energy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Frank; Gatti, Fabien; Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2008-02-01

    We study the process of rotational excitation in the collisions of para-H2 with para-H2 by propagating wave packets with the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) algorithm. Transition probabilities are then calculated by the method of Tannor and Weeks based on time-correlation functions. Calculations were carried out up to a total angular momentum of J =70 to compute integral cross sections up to 1.2eV in collision energy and thermal rate coefficients from 100to3000K. The process is studied on the full-dimensional potential energy surface of Boothroyd-Martin-Keogh-Peterson (BMKP) as well as on the rigid rotor surface of Diep and Johnson. We test the validity of the rigid rotor approximation by also considering two rigid rotor restrictions of the BMKP potential energy surface (PES). Additionally, we investigate a variant of the BMKP PES suggested by Pogrebnya and Clary [Chem. Phys. Lett. 363, 523 (2002)] with reduced anisotropy. We compare our results with previous theoretical data for the cross sections and with experimental data for the rate coefficients at low temperatures.

  4. Progress report on development of intermediate fidelity full assembly analysis methods.

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, R.; Fanning, T. H.

    2011-09-30

    While high fidelity modeling capabilities for various physics phenomena are being pursued under advanced modeling and simulation initiatives under the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy, they generally rely on high-performance computation facilities and are too expensive to be used for parameter-space exploration or design analysis. One-dimensional system codes have been used for a long time and have reached a degree of maturity, but limit their validity to specific applications. Thus, an intermediate fidelity (IF) modeling method is being pursued in this work for a fast-running, modest-fidelity, whole-core transient analyses capability. The new approach is essential for design scoping and engineering analyses and could lead to improvements in the design of the new generations of reactors and to the reduction of uncertainties in safety analysis. This report summarizes the initial effort on the development of the intermediate-fidelity full assembly modeling method. The requirements and the desired merits of the IF approach have been defined. A three-dimensional momentum source model has been developed to model the anisotropic flow in the wire-wrapped rod bundle without the need to resolve the geometric details. It has been confirmed that the momentum source model works well if its affecting region is accurately imposed. The validity of the model is further verified by mesh and parameter sensitivity studies. The developed momentum source model, in principle, can be applied to any wire-wrapped bundle geometries and any flow regimes; while the modeling strategy can be applied to other conditions with complex or distorted geometry, such as flow in blocked channels.

  5. Full chip two-layer CD and overlay process window analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Rachit; Shang, Shumay; Sturtevant, John

    2015-03-01

    In-line CD and overlay metrology specifications are typically established by starting with design rules and making certain assumptions about error distributions which might be encountered in manufacturing. Lot disposition criteria in photo metrology (rework or pass to etch) are set assuming worst case assumptions for CD and overlay respectively. For example poly to active overlay specs start with poly endcap design rules and make assumptions about active and poly lot average and across lot CDs, and incorporate general knowledge about poly line end rounding to ensure that leakage current is maintained within specification. There is an opportunity to go beyond generalized guard band design rules to full-chip, design-specific, model-based exploration of worst case layout locations. Such an approach can leverage not only the above mentioned coupling of CD and overlay errors, but can interrogate all layout configurations for both layers to help determine lot-specific, design-specific CD and overlay dispositioning criteria for the fab. Such an approach can elucidate whether for a specific design layout there exist asymmetries in the response to misalignment which might be exploited in manufacturing. This paper will investigate an example of two-layer model-based analysis of CD and overlay errors. It is shown, somewhat non-intuitively, that there can be small preferred misalignment asymmetries which should be respected to protect yield. We will show this relationship for via-metal overlap. We additionally present a new method of displaying edge placement process window variability, akin to traditional CD process window analysis.

  6. CORONAL RESPONSE TO AN EUV WAVE FROM DEM ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Vanninathan, K.; Veronig, A. M.; Dissauer, K.; Hannah, I. G.; Kontar, E. P.

    2015-10-20

    Extreme-Ultraviolet (EUV) waves are globally propagating disturbances that have been observed since the era of the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Exteme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope instrument. Although the kinematics of the wave front and secondary wave components have been widely studied, there is not much known about the generation and plasma properties of the wave. In this paper we discuss the effect of an EUV wave on the local plasma as it passes through the corona. We studied the EUV wave, generated during the 2011 February 15 X-class flare/coronal mass ejection event, using Differential Emission Measure diagnostics. We analyzed regions on the path of the EUV wave and investigated the local density and temperature changes. From our study we have quantitatively confirmed previous results that during wave passage the plasma visible in the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 171 Å channel is getting heated to higher temperatures corresponding to AIA 193 and 211 Å channels. We have calculated an increase of 6%–9% in density and 5%–6% in temperature during the passage of the EUV wave. We have compared the variation in temperature with the adiabatic relationship and have quantitatively demonstrated the phenomenon of heating due to adiabatic compression at the wave front. However, the cooling phase does not follow adiabatic relaxation but shows slow decay indicating slow energy release being triggered by the wave passage. We have also identified that heating is taking place at the front of the wave pulse rather than at the rear. Our results provide support for the case that the event under study here is a compressive fast-mode wave or a shock.

  7. Regularized discriminate analysis for breast mass detection on full field digital mammograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jun; Sahiner, Berkman; Zhang, Yiheng; Chan, Heang-Ping; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Zhou, Chuan; Ge, Jun; Wu, Yi-Ta

    2006-03-01

    In computer-aided detection (CAD) applications, an important step is to design a classifier for the differentiation of the abnormal from the normal structures. We have previously developed a stepwise linear discriminant analysis (LDA) method with simplex optimization for this purpose. In this study, our goal was to investigate the performance of a regularized discriminant analysis (RDA) classifier in combination with a feature selection method for classification of the masses and normal tissues detected on full field digital mammograms (FFDM). The feature selection scheme combined a forward stepwise feature selection process and a backward stepwise feature elimination process to obtain the best feature subset. An RDA classifier and an LDA classifier in combination with this new feature selection method were compared to an LDA classifier with stepwise feature selection. A data set of 130 patients containing 260 mammograms with 130 biopsy-proven masses was used. All cases had two mammographic views. The true locations of the masses were identified by experienced radiologists. To evaluate the performance of the classifiers, we randomly divided the data set into two independent sets of approximately equal size for training and testing. The training and testing were performed using the 2-fold cross validation method. The detection performance of the CAD system was assessed by free response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) analysis. The average test FROC curve was obtained by averaging the FP rates at the same sensitivity along the two corresponding test FROC curves from the 2-fold cross validation. At the case-based sensitivities of 90%, 80% and 70% on the test set, our RDA classifier with the new feature selection scheme achieved an FP rate of 1.8, 1.1, and 0.6 FPs/image, respectively, compared to 2.1, 1.4, and 0.8 FPs/image with stepwise LDA with simplex optimization. Our results indicate that RDA in combination with the sequential forward inclusion

  8. Full-Range Public Health Leadership, Part 2: Qualitative Analysis and Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Carlton, Erik L; Holsinger, James W; Riddell, Martha C; Bush, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Public health leadership is an important topic in the era of U.S. health reform, population health innovation, and health system transformation. This study utilized the full-range leadership model in order to examine the public health leadership. We sought to understand local public health leadership from the perspective of local health department leaders and those who work with and for them. Public health leadership was explored through interviews and focus groups with directors (n = 4) and staff (n = 33) from local health departments. Qualitative analytic methods included reflexive journals, code-recode procedures, and member checking, with analysis facilitated by Atlas.ti v.6.0. Qualitative results supported and expanded upon previously reported quantitative findings. Leading by example and providing individual consideration to followers were found to be more important than other leader factors, such as intellectual stimulation, inspirational motivation, or idealized attributes of leaders. Having a clear and competent vision of public health, being able to work collaboratively with other community agencies, and addressing the current challenges to public health with creativity and innovation were also important findings. Idealized leadership behaviors and individual consideration should be the focus of student and professional development. Models that incorporate contextual considerations, such as the situational leadership model, could be utilized to ensure that optimal individual consideration is given to followers. PMID:26217654

  9. A quantitative analysis of signal reproduction from cylinder recordings measured via noncontact full surface mapping.

    PubMed

    Nascè, Antony; Hill, Martyn; McBride, John W; Boltryk, Peter J

    2008-10-01

    Sound reproduction via a noncontact surface mapping technique has great potential for sound archives, aiming to digitize content from early sound recordings such as wax cylinders, which may otherwise be "unplayable" with a stylus. If the noncontact techniques are to be considered a viable solution for sound archivists, a method for quantifying the quality of the reproduced signal needs to be developed. In this study, a specially produced test cylinder recording, encoded with sinusoids, provides the basis for the first quantitative analysis of signal reproduction from the noncontact full surface mapping method. The sampling and resolution of the measurement system are considered with respect to the requirements for digital archiving of cylinder recordings. Two different methods of audio signal estimation from a discrete groove cross section are described and rated in terms of signal-to-noise ratio and total harmonic distortion. Noncontact and stylus methods of sound reproduction are then compared using the same test cylinder. It is shown that noncontact methods appear to have distinct advantages over stylus reproduction, in terms of reduced harmonic distortion and lower frequency modulation. PMID:19062844

  10. Analysis of HAT-P-2b Warm Spitzer Full Orbit Light Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Nikole; Knuston, H.; Showman, A. P.; Fortney, J. J.; Agol, E.; Burrows, A.; Charbonneau, D.; Cowan, N. B.; Deming, D.; Desert, J.; Langton, J.; Laughlin, G.; Mighell, K. J.

    2011-05-01

    The Spitzer warm mission has already greatly expanded the field of exoplanet characterization with over 3000 hours of time dedicated to exoplanet observations. Observations of eclipsing systems with Spitzer are at the heart of these advances, as they allow us to move beyond simple mass and period estimates to determine planetary radius, dayside emission, and emission variations as a function of orbital phase. The eclipsing system HAT-P-2 is of special interest because the massive Jovian sized planet in this system is on a highly eccentric orbit (e=0.5171). Because HAT-P-2b's orbit is eccentric, the planet is subject to time variable heating and probable non-synchronous rotation. Circulation patterns that we expect to develop in HAT-P-2b's atmosphere will likely vary with both planetary local time and orbital phase. Here we present an analysis of a full orbit light curve from the HAT-P-2 system obtained during the most recent cycle of the Spitzer warm mission and discuss the constraints it imposes on the atmospheric circulation of HAT-P-2b. Support for this work was provided by NASA.

  11. Conformation Analysis of Ferrocene and Decamethylferrocene via Full-Potential Modeling of XANES and XAFS Spectra.

    PubMed

    Bourke, J D; Islam, M T; Best, S P; Tran, C Q; Wang, F; Chantler, C T

    2016-07-21

    Recent high-accuracy X-ray absorption measurements of the sandwich organometallics ferrocene (Fc) and decamethylferrocene (DmFc) at temperatures close to liquid helium are compared with new full-potential modeling of X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) covering the near-edge region (XANES) and above up to k = 7 Å(-1). The implementation of optimized calculations of the oscillatory part of the spectrum from the package FDMX allows detailed study of the spectra in regions of the photoelectron momentum most sensitive to differences in the molecular stereochemistry. For Fc and DmFc, this corresponds to the relative rotation of the cyclopentadienyl rings. When applied to high-accuracy XAFS of Fc and DmFc, the FDMX theory gives clear evidence for the eclipsed conformation for Fc and the staggered conformation for DmFc for frozen solutions at ca. 15 K. This represents the first clear experimental assignment of the solution structures of Fc and DmFc and reveals the potential of high-accuracy XAFS for structural analysis. PMID:27391765

  12. Full-Range Public Health Leadership, Part 2: Qualitative Analysis and Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Carlton, Erik L.; Holsinger, James W.; Riddell, Martha C.; Bush, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Public health leadership is an important topic in the era of U.S. health reform, population health innovation, and health system transformation. This study utilized the full-range leadership model in order to examine the public health leadership. We sought to understand local public health leadership from the perspective of local health department leaders and those who work with and for them. Public health leadership was explored through interviews and focus groups with directors (n = 4) and staff (n = 33) from local health departments. Qualitative analytic methods included reflexive journals, code-recode procedures, and member checking, with analysis facilitated by Atlas.ti v.6.0. Qualitative results supported and expanded upon previously reported quantitative findings. Leading by example and providing individual consideration to followers were found to be more important than other leader factors, such as intellectual stimulation, inspirational motivation, or idealized attributes of leaders. Having a clear and competent vision of public health, being able to work collaboratively with other community agencies, and addressing the current challenges to public health with creativity and innovation were also important findings. Idealized leadership behaviors and individual consideration should be the focus of student and professional development. Models that incorporate contextual considerations, such as the situational leadership model, could be utilized to ensure that optimal individual consideration is given to followers. PMID:26217654

  13. A full virial analysis of the prestellar cores in the Ophiuchus molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattle, Kate; Ward-Thompson, Derek

    2015-08-01

    We present the first observations of the Ophiuchus molecular cloud performed as part of the James Clerk Maxwell (JCMT) Gould Belt Survey with the SCUBA-2 instrument. We demonstrate methods for combining these data with HARP CO, Herschel and IRAM N2H+ observations in order to accurately quantify the properties of the SCUBA-2 sources in Ophiuchus.We perform a full virial analysis on the starless cores in Ophiuchus, including external pressure. We find that the majority of our cores are either bound or virialised, and that gravity and external pressure are typically of similar importance in confining cores. We find that the critical Bonnor-Ebert stability criterion is not a good indicator of the boundedness of our cores. We determine that N2H+ is a good tracer of the bound material of prestellar cores, and find that non-thermal linewidths decrease substantially between the intermediate-density gas traced by C18O and the high-density gas traced by N2H+, indicating the dissipation of turbulence within cores.We find variation from region to region in the virial balance of cores and the relative contributions of pressure and gravity to core support, as well as variation in the degree to which turbulence is dissipated within cores and in the relative numbers of protostellar and starless sources. We find further support for our previous hypothesis of a global evolutionary gradient from southwest to northeast across Ophiuchus, indicating sequential star formation across the region.

  14. Comparative study of binding constants from Love wave surface acoustic wave and surface plasmon resonance biosensors using kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangdae; Kim, Yong-Il; Kim, Ki-Bok

    2013-11-01

    Biosensors are used in a variety of fields for early diagnosis of diseases, measurement of toxic contaminants, quick detection of pathogens, and separation of specific proteins or DNA. In this study, we fabricated and evaluated the capability of a high sensitivity Love wave surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensor. The experimental setup was composed of the fabricated 155-MHz Love wave SAW biosensor, a signal measurement system, a liquid flow system, and a temperature-control system. Subsequently, we measured the lower limit of detection (LOD) of the 155-MHz Love wave SAW biosensor, and calculated the association and dissociation constants between protein G and anti-mouse IgG using kinetic analysis. We compared these results with those obtained using a commercial surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor. We found that the LOD of the SAW biosensor for anti-mouse IgG and mouse IgG was 0.5 and 1 microg/ml, respectively, and the resultant equilibrium association and dissociation constants were similar to the corresponding values obtaining using the commercial SPR biosensor. Thus, we conclude that the fabricated 155-MHz Love wave SAW biosensor exhibited the high sensitivity of the commercial SPR biosensor and was able to analyze the binding properties of the ligand and receptor by kinetic analysis similarly to the commercial SPR biosensor.

  15. Analysis of spike waves in epilepsy using Hilbert-Huang transform.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jin-De; Lin, Chin-Feng; Chang, Shun-Hsyung; Wang, Jung-Hua; Peng, Tsung-Ii; Chien, Yu-Yi

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we used the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) analysis method to examine the time-frequency characteristics of spike waves for detecting epilepsy symptoms. We obtained a sample of spike waves and nonspike waves for HHT decomposition by using numerous intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) of the Hilbert transform (HT) to determine the instantaneous, marginal, and Hilbert energy spectra. The Pearson correlation coefficients of the IMFs, and energy-IMF distributions for the electroencephalogram (EEG) signal without spike waves, Spike I, Spike II and Spike III sample waves were determined. The analysis results showed that the ratios of the referred wave and Spike III wave to the referred total energy for IMF1, IMF2, and the residual function exceeded 10%. Furthermore, the energy ratios for IMF1, IMF2, IMF3 and the residual function of Spike I, Spike II to their total energy exceeded 10%. The Pearson correlation coefficients of the IMF3 of the EEG signal without spike waves and Spike I wave, EEG signal without spike waves and Spike II wave, EEG signal without spike waves and Spike III wave, Spike I and II waves, Spike I and III waves, and Spike II and III waves were 0.002, 0.06, 0.01, 0.17, 0.03, and 0.3, respectively. The energy ratios of IMF3 in the δ band to its referred total energy for the EEG signal without spike waves, and of the Spike I, II, and III waves were 4.72, 6.75, 5.41, and 5.55%, respectively. The weighted average frequency of the IMF1, IMF2, and IMF3 of the EEG signal without spike waves was lower than that of the IMF1, IMF2, and IMF3 of the spike waves, respectively. The weighted average magnitude of the IMF3, IMF4, and IMF5 of the EEG signal without spike waves was lower than that of the IMF1, IMF2, and IMF3 of spike waves, respectively.

  16. Synthetic-aperture-radar imaging of the ocean surface using the slightly-rough facet model and a full surface-wave spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, James C.; Moore, Richard K.; Holtzman, Julian C.

    1990-01-01

    A new model of synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) imaging of ocean waves is described. The model is based on mapping individual, slightly-rough surface facets through the SAR processor into the image and responses of the facets in the image domain are added together coherently to give the composite image. A windowing technique allows both the orbital motion and the phase velocity of the long waves to be included. It is determined that the azimuthal cut-off is due to a smearing of the response of the facets in the image induced by the random orbital motion of the intermediate large-scale waves and that the focus adjustment that gives the greatest image contrast is half the phase velocity of the dominant long wave. The optimal processing technique, however, may consist of spatially offsetting the multiple looks on the image domain to compensate the propagation of long waves during the integration time of the SAR.

  17. Spectral analysis of wave propagation in connected waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Gopalakrishnan

    1992-01-01

    The spectral element method combined with the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) is a powerful and versatile tool for analysis of wave propagation problems in connected structures. They are formulated entirely in the frequency domain and use matrix assembly procedures analogous to the finite element method. This thesis extends the approach to connected structures involving non-uniformities and discontinuities. To handle situations involving deep waveguides, spectral elements are formulated based on the higher order waveguide theories of Timoshenko beam and Mindlin-Herrmann rod. Approximate tapered elements (derived using a frequency domain Ritz method) are formulated to handle situations involving member cross-section variations. For waveguides with embedded discontinuities like cracks and holes, the irregular behavior near the discontinuity is isolated by performing Local/Global analysis via the super spectral element concept. Efficient computation of the super element stiffness is the key to the success of the method and it is addressed directly. The formulated element is verified by comparison with the conventional finite element solution. Some interesting problems involving joints, cracks and holes are solved. One of the distinct advantages of the spectral approach is the capability to perform inverse problems. The concept is demonstrated with some illustrative examples involving multiple boundaries.

  18. Surface acoustic wave nebulization facilitating lipid mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sung Hwan; Huang, Yue; Edgar, J Scott; Ting, Ying S; Heron, Scott R; Kao, Yuchieh; Li, Yanyan; Masselon, Christophe D; Ernst, Robert K; Goodlett, David R

    2012-08-01

    Surface acoustic wave nebulization (SAWN) is a novel method to transfer nonvolatile analytes directly from the aqueous phase to the gas phase for mass spectrometric analysis. The lower ion energetics of SAWN and its planar nature make it appealing for analytically challenging lipid samples. This challenge is a result of their amphipathic nature, labile nature, and tendency to form aggregates, which readily precipitate clogging capillaries used for electrospray ionization (ESI). Here, we report the use of SAWN to characterize the complex glycolipid, lipid A, which serves as the membrane anchor component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and has a pronounced tendency to clog nano-ESI capillaries. We also show that unlike ESI SAWN is capable of ionizing labile phospholipids without fragmentation. Lastly, we compare the ease of use of SAWN to the more conventional infusion-based ESI methods and demonstrate the ability to generate higher order tandem mass spectral data of lipid A for automated structure assignment using our previously reported hierarchical tandem mass spectrometry (HiTMS) algorithm. The ease of generating SAWN-MS(n) data combined with HiTMS interpretation offers the potential for high throughput lipid A structure analysis.

  19. Analysis of supercritical vapor explosions using thermal detonation wave theory

    SciTech Connect

    Shamoun, B.I.; Corradini, M.L.

    1995-09-01

    The interaction of certain materials such as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with water results in vapor explosions with very high (supercritical) pressures and propagation velocities. A quasi-steady state analysis of supercritical detonation in one-dimensional multiphase flow was applied to analyze experimental data of the KROTOS (26-30) set of experiments conducted at the Joint Research Center at Ispra, Italy. In this work we have applied a new method of solution which allows for partial fragmentation of the fuel in the shock adiabatic thermodynamic model. This method uses known experiment values of the shock pressure and propagation velocity to estimate the initial mixing conditions of the experiment. The fuel and coolant were both considered compressible in this analysis. In KROTOS 26, 28, 29, and 30 the measured values of the shock pressure by the experiment were found to be higher than 25, 50, 100, and 100 Mpa respectively. Using the above data for the wave velocity and our best estimate for the values of the pressure, the predicted minimum values of the fragmented mass of the fuel were found to be 0.026. 0.04, 0.057, and 0.068 kg respectively. The predicted values of the work output corresponding to the above fragmented masses of the fuel were found to be 40, 84, 126, and 150 kJ respectively, with predicted initial void fractions of 112%, 12.5%, 8%, and 6% respectively.

  20. Capillary-gravity waves on a liquid film of arbitrary depth: analysis of the wave resistance.

    PubMed

    Wędołowski, Karol; Napiórkowski, Marek

    2013-10-01

    We discuss the wave resistance in the case of an externally perturbed viscous liquid film of arbitrary thickness. Emphasis is placed on the dependence of the wave resistance on the film thickness H, the length scale b characterizing the external perturbation, and its velocity V. In particular, the effectiveness of the mechanisms of capillary-gravity waves and the viscous dissipation localized in the vicinity of the perturbation are compared and discussed as functions of H and V. We show that, in general, the wave resistance is a nonmonotonous function of H with a maximum whose amplitude and position depend on b and V. In the case of small H the wave resistance depends on a parameter S proportional V/H(3). We find three different regimes of this parameter in which the wave resistance behaves like S(r) with the exponent r equal to 1, 1/3, and -1. These results are also obtained independently within the thin liquid film approximation. This allows us to assess the range of validity of the thin liquid film approximation in various cases, in particular its dependence on the perturbation length scale b. PMID:24229283

  1. Capillary-gravity waves on a liquid film of arbitrary depth: analysis of the wave resistance.

    PubMed

    Wędołowski, Karol; Napiórkowski, Marek

    2013-10-01

    We discuss the wave resistance in the case of an externally perturbed viscous liquid film of arbitrary thickness. Emphasis is placed on the dependence of the wave resistance on the film thickness H, the length scale b characterizing the external perturbation, and its velocity V. In particular, the effectiveness of the mechanisms of capillary-gravity waves and the viscous dissipation localized in the vicinity of the perturbation are compared and discussed as functions of H and V. We show that, in general, the wave resistance is a nonmonotonous function of H with a maximum whose amplitude and position depend on b and V. In the case of small H the wave resistance depends on a parameter S proportional V/H(3). We find three different regimes of this parameter in which the wave resistance behaves like S(r) with the exponent r equal to 1, 1/3, and -1. These results are also obtained independently within the thin liquid film approximation. This allows us to assess the range of validity of the thin liquid film approximation in various cases, in particular its dependence on the perturbation length scale b.

  2. Hydrodynamic analysis of elastic floating collars in random waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xiao-dong; Zhao, Yun-peng; Dong, Guo-hai; Li, Yu-cheng

    2015-06-01

    As the main load-bearing component of fish cages, the floating collar supports the whole cage and undergoes large deformations. In this paper, a mathematical method is developed to study the motions and elastic deformations of elastic floating collars in random waves. The irregular wave is simulated by the random phase method and the statistical approach and Fourier transfer are applied to analyze the elastic response in both time and frequency domains. The governing equations of motions are established by Newton's second law, and the governing equations of deformations are obtained based on curved beam theory and modal superposition method. In order to validate the numerical model of the floating collar attacked by random waves, a series of physical model tests are conducted. Good relationship between numerical simulation and experimental observations is obtained. The numerical results indicate that the transfer function of out-of-plane and in-plane deformations increase with the increasing of wave frequency. In the frequency range between 0.6 Hz and 1.1 Hz, a linear relationship exists between the wave elevations and the deformations. The average phase difference between the wave elevation and out-of-plane deformation is 60° with waves leading and the phase between the wave elevation and in-plane deformation is 10° with waves lagging. In addition, the effect of fish net on the elastic response is analyzed. The results suggest that the deformation of the floating collar with fish net is a little larger than that without net.

  3. Wave-front analysis of personal eye protection.

    PubMed

    Eppig, Timo; Zoric, Katja; Speck, Alexis; Zelzer, Benedikt; Götzelmann, Jens; Nagengast, Dieter; Langenbucher, Achim

    2012-07-30

    Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensing has been successfully applied to many fields of optical testing including the human eye itself. We propose wave-front measurement for testing protective eye wear for production control and investigation of aberrations. Refractive power data is derived from the wave-front data and compared to a subjective measurement technique based on a focimeter. Additional image quality classification was performed with a multivariate model using objective parameters to resample a subjectively determined visual quality. Wave-front measurement advances optical testing of protective eye wear and may be used for objective quality control.

  4. Seismic response of a full-scale wind turbine tower using experimental and numerical modal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandil, Kamel Sayed Ahmad; Saudi, Ghada N.; Eltaly, Boshra Aboul-Anen; El-khier, Mostafa Mahmoud Abo

    2016-09-01

    Wind turbine technology has developed tremendously over the past years. In Egypt, the Zafarana wind farm is currently generating at a capacity of 517 MW, making it one of the largest onshore wind farms in the world. It is located in an active seismic zone along the west side of the Gulf of Suez. Accordingly, seismic risk assessment is demanded for studying the structural integrity of wind towers under expected seismic hazard events. In the context of ongoing joint Egypt-US research project "Seismic Risk Assessment of Wind Turbine Towers in Zafarana wind Farm Egypt" (Project ID: 4588), this paper describes the dynamic performance investigation of an existing Nordex N43 wind turbine tower. Both experimental and numerical work are illustrated explaining the methodology adopted to investigate the dynamic behavior of the tower under seismic load. Field dynamic testing of the full-scale tower was performed using ambient vibration techniques (AVT). Both frequency domain and time domain methods were utilized to identify the actual dynamic properties of the tower as built in the site. Mainly, the natural frequencies, their corresponding mode shapes and damping ratios of the tower were successfully identified using AVT. A vibration-based finite element model (FEM) was constructed using ANSYS V.12 software. The numerical and experimental results of modal analysis were both compared for matching purpose. Using different simulation considerations, the initial FEM was updated to finally match the experimental results with good agreement. Using the final updated FEM, the response of the tower under the AQABA earthquake excitation was investigated. Time history analysis was conducted to define the seismic response of the tower in terms of the structural stresses and displacements. This work is considered as one of the pioneer structural studies of the wind turbine towers in Egypt. Identification of the actual dynamic properties of the existing tower was successfully performed

  5. Current (re-)Distribution inside an ITER Full-Size Conductor: a Qualitative Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Zenobio, A.; Muzzi, L.; Turtù, S.; Della Corte, A.; Verdini, L.

    2006-06-01

    The comprehension of the current re-distribution phenomenon inside multi-filamentary conductors is a crucial point for the design of ITER-relevant coils, as it is by now assessed that current non-uniformity among cable sub-stages may strongly deteriorate Cable-in-Conduit Conductors (CICC) performances. The only feasible way to get information about the current flowing inside CICC sub-stages is an indirect evaluation by self-field measurements in regions very close to conductor surface. A 7m full-size NbTi conductor (Bus-Bar III) has been used as short-circuit during the test of an ITER Toroidal Field Coil HTS current lead at FzK. Its relatively simple shape and the absence of any other magnetic field source (background coils, etc.), made BBIII one of the most desirable candidate for a reliable measurement of the current distribution under controlled conditions. This is why it has been ad hoc instrumented with different arrangements of Hall-probes (rings and arrays), as well as with transverse and longitudinal voltage taps. This paper gives a qualitative interpretation of the current (re-)distribution events inside the conductor as derived from the analysis of the Hall sensors and the voltage taps signals, during Tcs measurements and as a function of different dI/dt. It has been shown that Hall probes represent a very reliable tool to investigate this issue. In fact, re-distribution phenomena have been clearly observed during transition, and even far before reaching Tcs, when voltage transverse signals had not yet showed any appreciable onset.

  6. Analysis of magnetometer data/wave signals in the Earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engebretson, Mark J.

    1993-01-01

    Work on the reduction and analysis of Dynamics Explorer (DE) satellite magnetometer data with special emphasis on the ULF fluctuations and waves evident in such data is described. Research focused on the following: (1) studies of Pc 1 wave packets near the plasmapause; (2) satellite-ground pulsation study; (3) support for studies of ion energization processes; (4) search for Pc 1 wave events in 1981 DE 1 data; (5) study of Pc 3-5 events observed simultaneously by DE 1 and by AMPTE CCE; (6) support for studies of electromagnetic transients on DE 1; and (7) analysis of wave events induced by sudden impulses.

  7. Polar Plasma Wave Investigation Data Analysis in the Extended Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, Donald A.; Menietti, J. D.

    2003-01-01

    The low latitude boundary layer (LLBL) is a region where solar wind momentum and energy is transferred to the magnetosphere. Enhanced "broadband" electric plasma waves from less than 5 Hz to l0(exp 5) Hz and magnetic waves from less than 5 Hz to the electron cyclotron frequency are characteristic of the LLBL. Analyses of Polar plasma waves show that these "broadband" waves are actually discrete electrostatic and electromagnetic modes as well as solitary bipolar pulses (electron holes). It is noted that all wave modes can be generated by approx. 100 eV to approx. 10 keV auroral electrons and protons. We will review wave-particle interactions, with focus on cross- diffusion rates and the contributions of such interactions toward the formation of the boundary layer. In summary, we will present a scenario where the global solar wind-magnetosphere interaction is responsible for the auroral zone particle beams, and hence for the generation of plasma waves and the formation of the boundary layer. It is speculated that all planetary magnetospheres will have boundary layers and they will be characterized by similar currents and plasma wave modes.

  8. Polar Plasma Wave Investigation Data Analysis in the Extended Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    2004-01-01

    The low latitude boundary layer (LLBL) is a region where solar wind momentum and energy is transferred to the magnetosphere. Enhanced "broadband" electric plasma waves from less than 5 Hz to 10(exp 5) Hz and magnetic waves from less than 5 Hz to the electron cyclotron frequency are characteristic of the LLBL. Analyses of Polar plasma waves show that these "broadband" waves are actually discrete electrostatic and electromagnetic modes as well as solitary bipolar pulses (electron holes). It is noted that all wave modes can be generated by approx. 100 eV to approx. 10 keV auroral electrons and protons. We will review wave-particle interactions, with focus on cross-diffusion rates and the contributions of such interactions toward the formation of the boundary layer. In summary, we will present a scenario where the global solar wind-magnetosphere interaction is responsible for the auroral zone particle beams, and hence for the generation of plasma waves and the formation of the boundary layer. It is speculated that all planetary magnetospheres will have boundary layers and they will be characterized by similar currents and plasma wave modes.

  9. Estimation of Arterial Stiffness by Time-Frequency Analysis of Pulse Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Masashi; Yamamoto, Yuya; Shibayama, Yuka; Matsukawa, Mami; Watanabe, Yoshiaki; Furuya, Mio; Asada, Takaaki

    2011-07-01

    Evaluation of a pulse wave is effective for the early diagnosis of arteriosclerosis because the pulse wave contains the reflected wave that is the age- and stiffness-dependent component. In this study, we attempted to extract the parameter reflecting the component by pulse wave analysis using continuous wavelet transform. The Morlet wavelet was used as the mother wavelet. We then investigated the relationship between the parameter and the reflected wave that was extracted from the pulse wave by our previously reported separation technique. Consequently, the result of wavelet transform of the differentiated pulse waveform changed markedly owing to age and had medium correlation with the peak of the reflected wave (R=0.68).

  10. A full set of langatate high-temperature acoustic wave constants: elastic, piezoelectric, dielectric constants up to 900°C.

    PubMed

    Davulis, Peter M; da Cunha, Mauricio Pereira

    2013-04-01

    A full set of langatate (LGT) elastic, dielectric, and piezoelectric constants with their respective temperature coefficients up to 900°C is presented, and the relevance of the dielectric and piezoelectric constants and temperature coefficients are discussed with respect to predicted and measured high-temperature SAW propagation properties. The set of constants allows for high-temperature acoustic wave (AW) propagation studies and device design. The dielectric constants and polarization and conductive losses were extracted by impedance spectroscopy of parallel-plate capacitors. The measured dielectric constants at high temperatures were combined with previously measured LGT expansion coefficients and used to determine the elastic and piezoelectric constants using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) measurements at temperatures up to 900°C. The extracted LGT piezoelectric constants and temperature coefficients show that e11 and e14 change by up to 62% and 77%, respectively, for the entire 25°C to 900°C range when compared with room-temperature values. The LGT high-temperature constants and temperature coefficients were verified by comparing measured and predicted phase velocities (vp) and temperature coefficients of delay (TCD) of SAW delay lines fabricated along 6 orientations in the LGT plane (90°, 23°, Ψ) up to 900°C. For the 6 tested orientations, the predicted SAW vp agree within 0.2% of the measured vp on average and the calculated TCD is within 9.6 ppm/°C of the measured value on average over the temperature range of 25°C to 900°C. By including the temperature dependence of both dielectric and piezoelectric constants, the average discrepancies between predicted and measured SAW properties were reduced, on average: 77% for vp, 13% for TCD, and 63% for the turn-over temperatures analyzed.

  11. Travelling wave analysis of a mathematical model of glioblastoma growth.

    PubMed

    Gerlee, Philip; Nelander, Sven

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we analyse a previously proposed cell-based model of glioblastoma (brain tumour) growth, which is based on the assumption that the cancer cells switch phenotypes between a proliferative and motile state (Gerlee and Nelander, 2012). The dynamics of this model can be described by a system of partial differential equations, which exhibits travelling wave solutions whose wave speed depends crucially on the rates of phenotypic switching. We show that under certain conditions on the model parameters, a closed form expression of the wave speed can be obtained, and using singular perturbation methods we also derive an approximate expression of the wave front shape. These new analytical results agree with simulations of the cell-based model, and importantly show that the inverse relationship between wave front steepness and speed observed for the Fisher equation no longer holds when phenotypic switching is considered.

  12. Time dependent wave envelope finite difference analysis of sound propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1984-01-01

    A transient finite difference wave envelope formulation is presented for sound propagation, without steady flow. Before the finite difference equations are formulated, the governing wave equation is first transformed to a form whose solution tends not to oscillate along the propagation direction. This transformation reduces the required number of grid points by an order of magnitude. Physically, the transformed pressure represents the amplitude of the conventional sound wave. The derivation for the wave envelope transient wave equation and appropriate boundary conditions are presented as well as the difference equations and stability requirements. To illustrate the method, example solutions are presented for sound propagation in a straight hard wall duct and in a two dimensional straight soft wall duct. The numerical results are in good agreement with exact analytical results.

  13. Travelling wave analysis of a mathematical model of glioblastoma growth.

    PubMed

    Gerlee, Philip; Nelander, Sven

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we analyse a previously proposed cell-based model of glioblastoma (brain tumour) growth, which is based on the assumption that the cancer cells switch phenotypes between a proliferative and motile state (Gerlee and Nelander, 2012). The dynamics of this model can be described by a system of partial differential equations, which exhibits travelling wave solutions whose wave speed depends crucially on the rates of phenotypic switching. We show that under certain conditions on the model parameters, a closed form expression of the wave speed can be obtained, and using singular perturbation methods we also derive an approximate expression of the wave front shape. These new analytical results agree with simulations of the cell-based model, and importantly show that the inverse relationship between wave front steepness and speed observed for the Fisher equation no longer holds when phenotypic switching is considered. PMID:27021919

  14. On the resolution of ECG acquisition systems for the reliable analysis of the P-wave.

    PubMed

    Censi, Federica; Calcagnini, Giovanni; Corazza, Ivan; Mattei, Eugenio; Triventi, Michele; Bartolini, Pietro; Boriani, Giuseppe

    2012-02-01

    The analysis of the P-wave on surface ECG is widely used to assess the risk of atrial arrhythmias. In order to provide reliable results, the automatic analysis of the P-wave must be precise and reliable and must take into account technical aspects, one of those being the resolution of the acquisition system. The aim of this note is to investigate the effects of the amplitude resolution of ECG acquisition systems on the P-wave analysis. Starting from ECG recorded by an acquisition system with a less significant bit (LSB) of 31 nV (24 bit on an input range of 524 mVpp), we reproduced an ECG signal as acquired by systems with lower resolution (16, 15, 14, 13 and 12 bit). We found that, when the LSB is of the order of 128 µV (12 bit), a single P-wave is not recognizable on ECG. However, when averaging is applied, a P-wave template can be extracted, apparently suitable for the P-wave analysis. Results obtained in terms of P-wave duration and morphology revealed that the analysis of ECG at lowest resolutions (from 12 to 14 bit, LSB higher than 30 µV) could lead to misleading results. However, the resolution used nowadays in modern electrocardiographs (15 and 16 bit, LSB <10 µV) is sufficient for the reliable analysis of the P-wave.

  15. Finite Element Modeling of scattered electromagnetic waves for stroke analysis.

    PubMed

    Priyadarshini, N; Rajkumar, E R

    2013-01-01

    Stroke has become one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide and about 800 in every 100,000 people suffer from stroke each year. The occurrence of stroke is ranked third among the causes of acute death and first among the causes for neurological dysfunction. Currently, Neurological examinations followed by medical imaging with CT, MRI or Angiography are used to provide better identification of the location and the type of the stroke, however they are neither fast, cost-effective nor portable. Microwave technology has emerged to complement these modalities to diagnose stroke as it is sensitive to the differences between the distinct dielectric properties of the brain tissues and blood. This paper investigates the possibility of diagnosing the type of stroke using Finite Element Analysis (FEA). The object of interest is a simulated head phantom with stroke, created with its specifying material characteristics like electrical conductivity and relative permittivity. The phantom is then placed in an electromagnetic field generated by a dipole antenna radiating at 1 GHz. The FEM forward model solver computes the scattered electromagnetic field by finding the solution for the Maxwell's wave equation in the head volume. Subsequently the inverse scattering problem is solved using the Contrast Source Inversion (CSI) method to reconstruct the dielectric profile of the head phantom.

  16. Dynamic Analysis of the Conditional Oscillator Underlying Slow Waves in Thalamocortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    David, François; Crunelli, Vincenzo; Leresche, Nathalie; Lambert, Régis C.

    2016-01-01

    During non-REM sleep the EEG shows characteristics waves that are generated by the dynamic interactions between cortical and thalamic oscillators. In thalamic neurons, low-threshold T-type Ca2+ channels play a pivotal role in almost every type of neuronal oscillations, including slow (< 1 Hz) waves, sleep spindles and delta waves. The transient opening of T channels gives rise to the low threshold spikes (LTSs), and associated high frequency bursts of action potentials, that are characteristically present during sleep spindles and delta waves, whereas the persistent opening of a small fraction of T channels, (i.e., ITwindow) is responsible for the membrane potential bistability underlying sleep slow oscillations. Surprisingly thalamocortical (TC) neurons express a very high density of T channels that largely exceed the amount required to generate LTSs and therefore, to support certain, if not all, sleep oscillations. Here, to clarify the relationship between T current density and sleep oscillations, we systematically investigated the impact of the T conductance level on the intrinsic rhythmic activities generated in TC neurons, combining in vitro experiments and TC neuron simulation. Using bifurcation analysis, we provide insights into the dynamical processes taking place at the transition between slow and delta oscillations. Our results show that although stable delta oscillations can be evoked with minimal T conductance, the full range of slow oscillation patterns, including groups of delta oscillations separated by Up states (“grouped-delta slow waves”) requires a high density of T channels. Moreover, high levels of T conductance ensure the robustness of different types of slow oscillations. PMID:26941611

  17. The Extended GMRT Radio Halo Survey. II. Further results and analysis of the full sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kale, R.; Venturi, T.; Giacintucci, S.; Dallacasa, D.; Cassano, R.; Brunetti, G.; Cuciti, V.; Macario, G.; Athreya, R.

    2015-07-01

    The intra-cluster medium contains cosmic rays and magnetic fields that are manifested through the large scale synchrotron sources, termed radio haloes, relics, and mini-haloes. The Extended Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) Radio Halo Survey (EGRHS) is an extension of the GMRT Radio Halo Survey (GRHS) designed to search for radio haloes using GMRT 610/235 MHz observations. The GRHS and EGRHS consists of 64 clusters in the redshift range 0.2-0.4 that have an X-ray luminosity larger than 5 × 1044 erg s-1 in the 0.1-2.4 keV band and declination, δ > -31° in the REFLEX and eBCS X-ray cluster catalogues. In this second paper in the series, GMRT 610/235 MHz data on the last batch of 11 galaxy clusters and the statistical analysis of the full sample are presented. A new mini-halo in RX J2129.6+0005 and candidate diffuse sources in Z5247, A2552, and Z1953 have been discovered. A unique feature of this survey are the upper limits on the detections of 1 Mpc sized radio haloes; 4 new are presented here, making a total of 31 in the survey. Of the sample, 58 clusters with adequately sensitive radio information were used to obtain the most accurate occurrence fractions so far. The occurrence fractions of radio haloes, mini-haloes and relics in our sample are ~22%, ~16% and ~5%, respectively. The P1.4 GHz-LX diagrams for the radio haloes and mini-haloes are presented. The morphological estimators - centroid shift (w), concentration parameter (c), and power ratios (P3/P0) derived from the Chandra X-ray images - are used as proxies for the dynamical states of the GRHS and EGRHS clusters. The clusters with radio haloes and mini-haloes occupy distinct quadrants in the c-w, c-P3/P0 and w-P3/P0 planes, corresponding to the more and less morphological disturbance, respectively. The non-detections span both the quadrants. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. The dynamics of the 2001 Etna eruption as seen by full moment tensor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraò, A.; Cocina, O.; Privitera, E.; Panza, G. F.

    2010-05-01

    The Mt. Etna eruption of July 2001 was announced by severe seismic activity and by the opening of a 7-km-long zone of densely distributed fractures. The large amount of data collected gave a unique opportunity to study the magma migration process and to infer the position and geometry of the uprising dyke. Results from multidisciplinary approaches suggest that the observed phenomenology was the result of the rapid intrusion of a vertical dyke, oriented roughly N-S and located a few km south of the summit region. To add new constraints to the dynamics of the eruption process, in this study we determine the full seismic moment tensors of 61 earthquakes, selected among those occurring between July 12 and July 18 (Md >= 2.2), located in a depth ranging from 1 km above sea level (a.s.l.) to 3 km below sea level (b.s.l.). At the beginning of the seismic swarm, the dominant component of the seismic source tensor is double-couple percentage (around 65 per cent on average) statistical significant at 95 per cent confidence level and in the following hours the non-double-couple components increase at the expenses of the double-couple. Such observations are related well with the system of fractures formed just before the eruption, whereas the increasing non-double-couple components can be explained as the response of the confining rocks to the rising magma and degassing processes. The type of focal mechanisms retrieved are predominantly of normal fault type (44 per cent), strike slip (30 per cent) and thrust mechanisms (9 per cent), and outline a scenario that concurs with the stress regime induced by a dyke injection. The space-time analysis of seismic source locations and source moment tensors (1) confirms the evidence of a vertical dyke emplacement that fed the 2001 lateral eruption and (2) adds new insights to support the hypothesis of the injection of a second aborted dyke, 2 km SE from the fractures zone.

  19. Statistical Analysis of Acoustic Wave Parameters Near Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabello-Soares, M. Cristina; Bogart, Richard S.; Scherrer, Philip H.

    2016-08-01

    In order to quantify the influence of magnetic fields on acoustic mode parameters and flows in and around active regions, we analyze the differences in the parameters in magnetically quiet regions nearby an active region (which we call “nearby regions”), compared with those of quiet regions at the same disk locations for which there are no neighboring active regions. We also compare the mode parameters in active regions with those in comparably located quiet regions. Our analysis is based on ring-diagram analysis of all active regions observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) during almost five years. We find that the frequency at which the mode amplitude changes from attenuation to amplification in the quiet nearby regions is around 4.2 mHz, in contrast to the active regions, for which it is about 5.1 mHz. This amplitude enhacement (the “acoustic halo effect”) is as large as that observed in the active regions, and has a very weak dependence on the wave propagation direction. The mode energy difference in nearby regions also changes from a deficit to an excess at around 4.2 mHz, but averages to zero over all modes. The frequency difference in nearby regions increases with increasing frequency until a point at which the frequency shifts turn over sharply, as in active regions. However, this turnover occurs around 4.9 mHz, which is significantly below the acoustic cutoff frequency. Inverting the horizontal flow parameters in the direction of the neigboring active regions, we find flows that are consistent with a model of the thermal energy flow being blocked directly below the active region.

  20. Analysis of 4,664 high-quality sequence-finished poplar full-length

    SciTech Connect

    Ralph, S.; Gunter, Lee E; Tuskan, Gerald A; Douglas, Carl; Holt, Robert A.; Jones, Steven; Marra, Marco; Bohlmann, J.

    2008-01-01

    The genus Populus includes poplars, aspens and cottonwoods, which will be collectively referred to as poplars hereafter unless otherwise specified. Poplars are the dominant tree species in many forest ecosystems in the Northern Hemisphere and are of substantial economic value in plantation forestry. Poplar has been established as a model system for genomics studies of growth, development, and adaptation of woody perennial plants including secondary xylem formation, dormancy, adaptation to local environments, and biotic interactions. As part of the poplar genome sequencing project and the development of genomic resources for poplar, we have generated a full-length (FL)-cDNA collection using the biotinylated CAP trapper method. We constructed four FLcDNA libraries using RNA from xylem, phloem and cambium, and green shoot tips and leaves from the P. trichocarpa Nisqually-1 genotype, as well as insect-attacked leaves of the P. trichocarpa x P. deltoides hybrid. Following careful selection of candidate cDNA clones, we used a combined strategy of paired end reads and primer walking to generate a set of 4,664 high-accuracy, sequence-verified FLcDNAs, which clustered into 3,990 putative unique genes. Mapping FLcDNAs to the poplar genome sequence combined with BLAST comparisons to previously predicted protein coding sequences in the poplar genome identified 39 FLcDNAs that likely localize to gaps in the current genome sequence assembly. Another 173 FLcDNAs mapped to the genome sequence but were not included among the previously predicted genes in the poplar genome. Comparative sequence analysis against Arabidopsis thaliana and other species in the non-redundant database of GenBank revealed that 11.5% of the poplar FLcDNAs display no significant sequence similarity to other plant proteins. By mapping the poplar FLcDNAs against transcriptome data previously obtained with a 15.5 K cDNA microarray, we identified 153 FLcDNA clones for genes that were differentially expressed in

  1. Nonlinear time series analysis: towards an effective forecast of rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinmeyer, Günter; Birkholz, Simon; Brée, Carsten; Demircan, Ayhan

    2016-03-01

    Rogue waves are extremely large waves that exceed any expectation based on long-term observation and Gaussian statistics. Ocean rogue waves exceed the significant wave height in the ocean by a factor 2. Similar phenomena have been observed in a multiplicity of optical systems. While the optical systems show a much higher frequency of rogue events than the ocean, it appears nevertheless questionable what conclusions can be drawn for the prediction of ocean rogue waves. Here we tackle the problem from a different perspective and analyze the predictability of rogue events in two optical systems as well as in the ocean using nonlinear time-series analysis. Our analysis is exclusively based on experimental data. The results appear rather surprising as the optical rogue wave scenario of fiber-based supercontinuum generation does not allow any prediction whereas real ocean rogue waves and a multifilament scenario do bear a considerable amount of determinism, which allows, at least in principle, the prediction of extreme events. It becomes further clear that there exist two fundamentally different types of rogue-wave supporting systems. One class of rogue waves is obviously seeded by quantum fluctuations whereas in the other class, linear random interference of waves seems to prevail.

  2. New Software for Long-Term Storage and Analysis of Seismic Wave Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervelli, D. P.; Cervelli, P. F.; Murray, T. L.

    2004-12-01

    Large seismic networks generate a substantial quantity of data that must be first archived, and then disseminated, visualized, and analyzed, in real-time, in the office or from afar. To achieve these goals for the Alaska Volcano Observatory we developed two software packages: Winston, a database for storing seismic wave data, and Swarm, an application for analyzing and browsing the data. We also modified an existing package, Valve, an internet web-browser based interface to various data sets developed at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, to communicate with Winston. These programs provide users with the tools necessary to monitor many commonly used geophysical parameters. Winston, Wave Information Storage Network, uses a vendor-neutral SQL database to store seismic wave data. Winston's primary design goal was simple: develop a more robust, scalable, long-term replacement for the Earthworm waveserver. Access to data within the Winston database is through a scalable internet based server application, an Earthworm waveserver emulator, or directly via SQL queries. Some benefits of using an SQL database are easy backups and exports, speed, and reliability. Swarm, Seismic Wave Analysis and Real-time Monitor, is a stand-alone application that was designed to replace the traditional drum helicorder and computer wave viewer with an intuitive and interactive interface for rapidly assessing volcanic hazard, browsing through past data, and analyzing waveforms. Users can easily view waves in traditional analytic ways, such as frequency spectra or spectrograms, and employ standard analytic tools like filtering. Swarm allows efficient dissemination of data and breaks cross-disciplinary barriers by creating an accessible interface to seismic data for non-seismologists. Swarm currently operates with many seismic data sources including Earthworm waveservers and SEED files. Lastly, Swarm can be a valuable education and outreach tool by using its Kiosk Mode: a full-screen mode that

  3. Stochastic analysis and modeling of abnormally large waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Konstantin; Shamin, Roman; Yudin, Aleksandr

    2016-04-01

    In this work stochastics of amplitude characteristics of waves during the freak waves formation was estimated. Also amplitude characteristics of freak wave was modeling with the help of the developed Markov model on the basis of in-situ and numerical experiments. Simulation using the Markov model showed a great similarity of results of in-situ wave measurements[1], results of directly calculating the Euler equations[2] and stochastic modeling data. This work is supported by grant of Russian Foundation for Basic Research (RFBR) n°16-35-00526. 1. K. I. Kuznetsov, A. A. Kurkin, E. N. Pelinovsky and P. D. Kovalev Features of Wind Waves at the Southeastern Coast of Sakhalin according to Bottom Pressure Measurements //Izvestiya, Atmospheric and Oceanic Physics, 2014, Vol. 50, No. 2, pp. 213-220. DOI: 10.1134/S0001433814020066. 2. R.V. Shamin, V.E. Zakharov, A.I. Dyachenko. How probability for freak wave formation can be found // THE EUROPEAN PHYSICAL JOURNAL - SPECIAL TOPICS Volume 185, Number 1, 113-124, DOI: 10.1140/epjst/e2010-01242-y 3.E. N. Pelinovsky, K. I. Kuznetsov, J. Touboul, A. A. Kurkin Bottom pressure caused by passage of a solitary wave within the strongly nonlinear Green-Naghdi model //Doklady Physics, April 2015, Volume 60, Issue 4, pp 171-174. DOI: 10.1134/S1028335815040035

  4. Multi-channel analysis of surface waves MASW of models with high shear-wave velocity contrast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanov, J.; Miller, R.D.; Peterie, S.; Zeng, C.; Xia, J.; Schwenk, T.

    2011-01-01

    We use the multi-channel analysis of surface waves MASW method to analyze synthetic seismic data calculated using models with high shear-wave velocity Vs contrast. The MASW dispersion-curve images of the Rayleigh wave are obtained using various sets of source-offset and spread-size configurations from the synthetic seismic data and compared with the theoretically calculated fundamental- and higher-mode dispersion-curves. Such tests showed that most of the dispersion-curve images are dominated by higher-mode energy at the low frequencies, especially when analyzing data from long receiver offsets and thus significantly divert from numerically expected dispersion-curve trends, which can lead to significant Vs overestimation. Further analysis showed that using data with relatively short spread lengths and source offsets can image the desired fundamental-mode of the Rayleigh wave that matches the numerically expected dispersion-curve pattern. As a result, it was concluded that it might be possible to avoid higher-mode contamination at low frequencies at sites with high Vs contrast by appropriate selection of spread size and seismic source offset. ?? 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  5. Photon wave function formalism for analysis of Mach-Zehnder interferometer and sum-frequency generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritboon, Atirach; Daengngam, Chalongrat; Pengpan, Teparksorn

    2016-08-01

    Biakynicki-Birula introduced a photon wave function similar to the matter wave function that satisfies the Schrödinger equation. Its second quantization form can be applied to investigate nonlinear optics at nearly full quantum level. In this paper, we applied the photon wave function formalism to analyze both linear optical processes in the well-known Mach-Zehnder interferometer and nonlinear optical processes for sum-frequency generation in dispersive and lossless medium. Results by photon wave function formalism agree with the well-established Maxwell treatments and existing experimental verifications.

  6. SAR imaging and hydrodynamic analysis of ocean bottom topographic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Quanan; Li, Li; Guo, Xiaogang; Ge, Yong; Zhu, Dayong; Li, Chunyan

    2006-09-01

    The satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images display wave-like patterns of the ocean bottom topographic features at the south outlet of Taiwan Strait (TS). Field measurements indicate that the most TS water body is vertically stratified. However, SAR imaging models available were developed for homogeneous waters. Hence explaining SAR imaging mechanisms of bottom features in a stratified ocean is beyond the scope of those models. In order to explore these mechanisms and to determine the quantitative relations between the SAR imagery and the bottom features, a two-dimensional, three-layer ocean model with sinusoidal bottom topographic features is developed. Analytical solutions and inferences of the momentum equations of the ocean model lead to the following conditions. (1) In the lower layer, the topography-induced waves (topographic waves hereafter) exist in the form of stationary waves, which satisfy a lower boundary resonance condition σ = kC0, here σ is an angular frequency of the stationary waves, k is a wavenumber of bottom topographic corrugation, and C0 is a background current speed. (2) As internal waves, the topographic waves may propagate vertically to the upper layer with an unchanged wavenumber k, if a frequency relation N3 < σ < N2 is satisfied, here N2 and N3 are the Brunt-Wäisälä frequencies of middle layer and upper layer, respectively. (3) The topographic waves are extremely amplified if an upper layer resonance condition is satisfied. The SAR image of topographic waves is derived on the basis of current-modulated small wave spectra. The results indicate that the topographic waves on SAR images have the same wavelength of bottom topographic corrugation, and the imagery brightness peaks are either inphase or antiphase with respect to the topographic corrugation, depending on a sign of a coupling factor. These theoretical predictions are verified by field observations. The results of this study provide a physical basis for quantitative

  7. Multidimensional Fourier Methods: Analysis of Internal Soliton Data and Acoustic Wave Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, A.

    2005-05-01

    The aggressive pursuit of a satisfactory level of physical understanding of nonlinear oceanic wave dynamics has lead to the use of multidimensional Fourier analysis as a tool for the time series analysis of both internal wave motion and acoustic wave propagation. These new tools have arisen naturally for studies using the inverse scattering transform to particular nonlinear wave equations. When applied to the Korteweg-deVries equation, for example, one finds that the approach can be extended to arbitrarily high order. There are several advantages for using multidimensional Fourier methods over ordinary Fourier analysis: (1) fully nonlinear wave dynamics can be studied, (2) solitons become a natural component in the theory and correspond to the diagonal elements of the "Riemann matrix", (3) nonlinear interactions are accounted for by the off-diagonal elements of this matrix, (4) nonlinear acoustic modes are found to also have an (albeit static) solitonic component. These surprising results lead to new interpretations of acoustic waves propagating in the presence of a nonlinear internal wave field. One of the most important results is the implication that new nonlinear filtering techniques allow for the spectral decomposition of both the internal wave field and of the acoustic field. With regard to the acoustic field, one can foresee the application of the method to the observations of phenomena in the "hidden zones", where one would normally conclude that acoustic wave propagation does not occur.

  8. A Simple and Accurate Analysis of Conductivity Loss in Millimeter-Wave Helical Slow-Wave Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, S. K.; Kumar, Lalit; Basu, B. N.

    2009-04-01

    Electromagnetic field analysis of a helix slow-wave structure was carried out and a closed form expression was derived for the inductance per unit length of the transmission-line equivalent circuit of the structure, taking into account the actual helix tape dimensions and surface current on the helix over the actual metallic area of the tape. The expression of the inductance per unit length, thus obtained, was used for estimating the increment in the inductance per unit length caused due to penetration of the magnetic flux into the conducting surfaces following Wheeler’s incremental inductance rule, which was subsequently interpreted for the attenuation constant of the propagating structure. The analysis was computationally simple and accurate, and accrues the accuracy of 3D electromagnetic analysis by allowing the use of dispersion characteristics obtainable from any standard electromagnetic modeling. The approach was benchmarked against measurement for two practical structures, and excellent agreement was observed. The analysis was subsequently applied to demonstrate the effects of conductivity on the attenuation constant of a typical broadband millimeter-wave helical slow-wave structure with respect to helix materials and copper plating on the helix, surface finish of the helix, dielectric loading effect and effect of high temperature operation - a comparative study of various such aspects are covered.

  9. Refined Fourier-transform method of analysis of full two-dimensional digitized interferograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovrić, Davorin; Vučić, Zlatko; Gladić, Jadranko; Demoli, Nazif; Mitrović, Slobodan; Milas, Mirko

    2003-03-01

    A refined Fourier-transform method of analysis of interference patterns is presented. The refinements include a method of automatic background subtraction and a way of treating the problem of heterodyning. The method proves particularly useful for analysis of long sequences of interferograms.

  10. Spectral analysis of wave motion in plane solids with boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, S. A.; Doyle, J. F.

    1992-01-01

    A spectral formulation is employed whereby in-plane stress waves are synthesized from the superposition of components at discrete frequencies and wavenumbers. The summations are performed using the fast Fourier transform and the Fourier series, respectively. Because the components are discrete, the solution to problems (over the entire field) with completely arbitrary loading, both in time and space, is made tractable. Waves generated from a line load acting on an infinite and semiinfinite plane are first considered. A cascade approach is then adopted for the treatment of these waves incident on a free, fixed, and elastic boundary. At each stage, the results are compared with those obtained from the available classical solutions and/or finite element results. These studies will form the basis for the investigation of in-plane stress waves in multiply layered media.

  11. Analysis of Helix Slow Wave Structure for High Efficiency Space TWT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaria, Mukesh Kumar; Bera, A.; Sinha, A. K.; Srivastava, V.

    2009-03-01

    This paper describes the analysis of helix slow-wave structure (SWS) for a high efficiency space traveling wave tube that is carried out using Ansoft HFSS and CST microwave studio, which is a 3D electromagnetic field simulators. Two approaches of simulating the dispersion and impedance characteristics of the helix slow wave structure have been discussed and compared with measured results. The dispersion characteristic gives the information about axial propagation constant (Beta). Which in turn yields the phase velocity at a particular frequency. The dispersion and impedance characteristics can be used in finding the pertinent design parameters of the helix slow-wave structure. Therefore a new trend has been initiated at CEERI to use Ansoft HFSS code to analysis of the helix slow wave structure in its real environment. The analysis of the helix SWS for Ku-band 140W space TWT has been carried out and compared with experimental results, and found is close agreement.

  12. Analysis of wave propagation in periodic 3D waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaal, Christoph; Bischoff, Stefan; Gaul, Lothar

    2013-11-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) is a growing research field in the realm of civil engineering. SHM concepts are implemented using integrated sensors and actuators to evaluate the state of a structure. Within this work, wave-based techniques are addressed. Dispersion effects for propagating waves in waveguides of different materials are analyzed for various different cross-sections. Since analytical theory is limited, a general approach based on the Waveguide Finite Element Method is applied. Numerical results are verified experimentally.

  13. Self-adaptive method for high frequency multi-channel analysis of surface wave method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When the high frequency multi-channel analysis of surface waves (MASW) method is conducted to explore soil properties in the vadose zone, existing rules for selecting the near offset and spread lengths cannot satisfy the requirements of planar dominant Rayleigh waves for all frequencies of interest ...

  14. [Analysis of full-length gene sequence of rabies vaccine virus aG strain].

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Cao, Shou-Chun; Shi, Lei-Tai; Wu, Xiao-Hong; Liu, Jing-Hua; Wang, Yun-Peng; Tang, Jian-Rong; Yu, Yong-Xin; Dong, Guan-Mu

    2013-06-01

    To sequence and analyze the full-length gene sequence of rabies vaccine virus aG strain. The full-length gene sequence of aG strain was amplified by RT-PCR by 8 fragments,each PCR product was cloned into vector pGEM-T respectively, sequenced and assemblied; The 5' leader sequence was sequenced with method of 5' RACE. The homology between aG and other rabies vaccine virus was analyzed by using DNAstar and Mega4. 0 software. aG strain was 11 925nt(GenBank accession number: JN234411) in length and belonged to the genotype I . The Bioinformatics revealed that the homology showed disparation form different rabies vaccine virus. the full-length gene sequence of rabies vaccine virus aG strain provided a support for perfecting the standard for quality control of virus strains for production of rabies vaccine for human use in China.

  15. Mathematical analysis of plasmonic resonances for nanoparticles: The full Maxwell equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammari, Habib; Ruiz, Matias; Yu, Sanghyeon; Zhang, Hai

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we use the full Maxwell equations for light propagation in order to analyze plasmonic resonances for nanoparticles. We mathematically define the notion of plasmonic resonance and analyze its shift and broadening with respect to changes in size, shape, and arrangement of the nanoparticles, using the layer potential techniques associated with the full Maxwell equations. We present an effective medium theory for resonant plasmonic systems and derive a condition on the volume fraction under which the Maxwell-Garnett theory is valid at plasmonic resonances.

  16. Error analysis of single-snapshot full-Stokes division-of-aperture imaging polarimeters.

    PubMed

    Mu, Tingkui; Zhang, Chunmin; Li, Qiwei; Liang, Rongguang

    2015-04-20

    Single-snapshot full-Stokes imaging polarimetry is a powerful tool for the acquisition of the spatial polarization information in real time. According to the general linear model of a polarimeter, to recover full Stokes parameters at least four polarimetric intensities should be measured. In this paper, four types of single-snapshot full-Stokes division-of-aperture imaging polarimeter with four subapertures are presented and compared, with maximum spatial resolution for each polarimetric image on a single area-array detector. By using the error propagation theories for different incident states of polarization, the performance of four polarimeters are evaluated for several main sources of error, including retardance error, alignment error of retarders, and noise perturbation. The results show that the configuration of four 132° retarders with angular positions of ( ± 51.7°, ± 15.1°) is an optimal choice for the configuration of four subaperture single-snapshot full-Stokes imaging polarimeter. The tolerance and uncertainty of this configuration are analyzed. PMID:25969119

  17. Comparison of Test and Finite Element Analysis for Two Full-Scale Helicopter Crash Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annett, Martin S.; Horta,Lucas G.

    2011-01-01

    Finite element analyses have been performed for two full-scale crash tests of an MD-500 helicopter. The first crash test was conducted to evaluate the performance of a composite deployable energy absorber under combined flight loads. In the second crash test, the energy absorber was removed to establish the baseline loads. The use of an energy absorbing device reduced the impact acceleration levels by a factor of three. Accelerations and kinematic data collected from the crash tests were compared to analytical results. Details of the full-scale crash tests and development of the system-integrated finite element model are briefly described along with direct comparisons of acceleration magnitudes and durations for the first full-scale crash test. Because load levels were significantly different between tests, models developed for the purposes of predicting the overall system response with external energy absorbers were not adequate under more severe conditions seen in the second crash test. Relative error comparisons were inadequate to guide model calibration. A newly developed model calibration approach that includes uncertainty estimation, parameter sensitivity, impact shape orthogonality, and numerical optimization was used for the second full-scale crash test. The calibrated parameter set reduced 2-norm prediction error by 51% but did not improve impact shape orthogonality.

  18. Detection and analysis of coherent groups in three-dimensional fully-nonlinear potential wave fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanina, E. V.; Suslov, S. A.; Chalikov, D.; Babanin, A. V.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the emergence of coherent groups in three-dimensional fully-nonlinear potential deep water waves whose initial spectrum is assumed to be of the JONSWAP type with directional distribution given by cos nθ, where n is the integer varying from 1 to 16. The analysis is based on the results of long-term wave simulations performed using a numerical solution of a three-dimensional Laplace equation for the velocity potential subject to nonlinear kinematic and dynamic boundary conditions at the free surface. The main characteristics of wave groups such as their average velocity, maximum group wave height, lifetime and length are analysed. The statistics of extreme waves occurring in the detected groups are discussed. Spatial and temporal scale characteristics of wave groups are compared to the previous results.

  19. Laminar analysis of slow wave activity in humans

    PubMed Central

    Csercsa, Richárd; Dombovári, Balázs; Fabó, Dániel; Wittner, Lucia; Erőss, Loránd; Entz, László; Sólyom, András; Rásonyi, György; Szűcs, Anna; Kelemen, Anna; Jakus, Rita; Juhos, Vera; Grand, László; Magony, Andor; Halász, Péter; Freund, Tamás F.; Maglóczky, Zsófia; Cash, Sydney S.; Papp, László; Karmos, György; Halgren, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Brain electrical activity is largely composed of oscillations at characteristic frequencies. These rhythms are hierarchically organized and are thought to perform important pathological and physiological functions. The slow wave is a fundamental cortical rhythm that emerges in deep non-rapid eye movement sleep. In animals, the slow wave modulates delta, theta, spindle, alpha, beta, gamma and ripple oscillations, thus orchestrating brain electrical rhythms in sleep. While slow wave activity can enhance epileptic manifestations, it is also thought to underlie essential restorative processes and facilitate the consolidation of declarative memories. Animal studies show that slow wave activity is composed of rhythmically recurring phases of widespread, increased cortical cellular and synaptic activity, referred to as active- or up-state, followed by cellular and synaptic inactivation, referred to as silent- or down-state. However, its neural mechanisms in humans are poorly understood, since the traditional intracellular techniques used in animals are inappropriate for investigating the cellular and synaptic/transmembrane events in humans. To elucidate the intracortical neuronal mechanisms of slow wave activity in humans, novel, laminar multichannel microelectrodes were chronically implanted into the cortex of patients with drug-resistant focal epilepsy undergoing cortical mapping for seizure focus localization. Intracortical laminar local field potential gradient, multiple-unit and single-unit activities were recorded during slow wave sleep, related to simultaneous electrocorticography, and analysed with current source density and spectral methods. We found that slow wave activity in humans reflects a rhythmic oscillation between widespread cortical activation and silence. Cortical activation was demonstrated as increased wideband (0.3–200 Hz) spectral power including virtually all bands of cortical oscillations, increased multiple- and single-unit activity and

  20. Full potential methods for analysis/design of complex aerospace configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shankar, Vijaya; Szema, Kuo-Yen; Bonner, Ellwood

    1986-01-01

    The steady form of the full potential equation, in conservative form, is employed to analyze and design a wide variety of complex aerodynamic shapes. The nonlinear method is based on the theory of characteristic signal propagation coupled with novel flux biasing concepts and body-fitted mapping procedures. The resulting codes are vectorized for the CRAY XMP and the VPS-32 supercomputers. Use of the full potential nonlinear theory is demonstrated for a single-point supersonic wing design and a multipoint design for transonic maneuver/supersonic cruise/maneuver conditions. Achievement of high aerodynamic efficiency through numerical design is verified by wind tunnel tests. Other studies reported include analyses of a canard/wing/nacelle fighter geometry.

  1. Computational analysis of compaction wave dissipation in porous metalized explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Pratap; Gonthier, Keith A.

    2014-05-01

    It is well established that the inclusion of reactive metals in explosive formulations can enhance post-detonation energy release but it remains unclear, even for idealized systems, how the composition and microstructure of metal containing porous solid explosives affects dissipative heating within compaction waves that is important for weak initiation of detonation. In this study, we perform inert meso-scale simulations to computationally examine how the initial porosity and metal mass fraction of aluminized HMX influences dissipation within compaction waves and we compare predictions to those given by a macro-scale compaction theory. The meso-scale model uses a hyperthermoelastic-viscoplastic and stick-slip friction theory to track the evolution of thermomechanical fields within individual particles that result from pore collapse within waves. Effective quasi-steady wave profiles are obtained by averaging meso-scale fields over space and time. The macro-scale theory predicts the variation in effective thermomechanical fields within waves due to imbalances in the phase-specific pressures and configurational stresses. Qualitative agreement exists between meso-scale and macro-scale predictions.

  2. Analysis of Compaction Wave Dissipation in Porous Metalized Explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Pratap; Gonthier, Keith

    2013-06-01

    It is well established that the inclusion of reactive metals in explosive formulations can enhance post-detonation energy release but it remains unclear, even for idealized systems, how the composition and microstructure of metal containing porous solid explosives affects dissipative heating within compaction waves that is important for weak initiation of detonation. In this study, we perform inert meso-scale simulations to computationally examine how the initial porosity and metal mass fraction of aluminized HMX influences dissipation within compaction waves and we compare predictions to those given by a macro-scale compaction theory. The meso-scale model uses a hyperthermoelastic-viscoplastic and stick-slip friction theory to track the evolution of thermomechanical fields within individual particles that result from pore collapse within waves. Effective quasi-steady wave profiles are obtained by averaging meso-scale fields over space and time. The macro-scale theory predicts the variation in effective thermomechanical fields within waves due to imbalances in phase-specific pressures and configurational stresses. Qualitative agreement exists between meso-scale and macro-scale predictions. This research is supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) under sponsor award number HDTRA1-10-1-0018, and the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL-RWME) under sponsor award number FA8651-09-0021.

  3. Causal diagrams and multivariate analysis I: a quiver full of arrows.

    PubMed

    Jupiter, Daniel C

    2014-01-01

    How do we know which variables we should include in our multivariate analyses? What role does each variable play in our understanding of the analysis? In this article I begin a discussion of these issues and describe 2 different types of studies for which this problem must be handled in different ways.

  4. Wavelet Transform Based Higher Order Statistical Analysis of Wind and Wave Time Histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib Huseni, Gulamhusenwala; Balaji, Ramakrishnan

    2016-06-01

    Wind, blowing on the surface of the ocean, imparts the energy to generate the waves. Understanding the wind-wave interactions is essential for an oceanographer. This study involves higher order spectral analyses of wind speeds and significant wave height time histories, extracted from European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast database at an offshore location off Mumbai coast, through continuous wavelet transform. The time histories were divided by the seasons; pre-monsoon, monsoon, post-monsoon and winter and the analysis were carried out to the individual data sets, to assess the effect of various seasons on the wind-wave interactions. The analysis revealed that the frequency coupling of wind speeds and wave heights of various seasons. The details of data, analysing technique and results are presented in this paper.

  5. Factorized molecular wave functions: Analysis of the nuclear factor

    SciTech Connect

    Lefebvre, R.

    2015-06-07

    The exact factorization of molecular wave functions leads to nuclear factors which should be nodeless functions. We reconsider the case of vibrational perturbations in a diatomic species, a situation usually treated by combining Born-Oppenheimer products. It was shown [R. Lefebvre, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 074106 (2015)] that it is possible to derive, from the solutions of coupled equations, the form of the factorized function. By increasing artificially the interstate coupling in the usual approach, the adiabatic regime can be reached, whereby the wave function can be reduced to a single product. The nuclear factor of this product is determined by the lowest of the two potentials obtained by diagonalization of the potential matrix. By comparison with the nuclear wave function of the factorized scheme, it is shown that by a simple rectification, an agreement is obtained between the modified nodeless function and that of the adiabatic scheme.

  6. An Analysis of Wave Interactions in Swept-Wing Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, H. L.

    1984-01-01

    Crossflow instabilities dominate disturbance growth in the leading-edge region of swept wings. Streamwise vortices in a boundary layer strongly influence the behavior of other disturbances. Amplification of crossflow vortices near the leading edge produces a residual spanwise nonuniformity in the mid-chord regions where Tollmien-Schlichting (T-S) waves are strongly amplified. Should the T-S wave undergo double-exponential growth because of this effect, the usual transition prediction methods would fail. The crossflow/Tollmien-Schlichting wave interaction was modeled as a secondary instability. The effects of suction are included, and different stability criteria are examined. The results are applied to laminar flow control wings characteristic of energy-efficient aircraft designs.

  7. Pedigree analysis: One teaching strategy to incorporate genetics into a full FNP program.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Gretchen; Conway, Alice E; Sparlin, Judith A

    2006-05-01

    The successful completion of the genome project in April 2003 and explosion of genetic knowledge is impacting healthcare at a dramatic rate. All healthcare providers need to update themselves on genetics in order to provide comprehensive care. This article describes a national grant obtained to educate faculty regarding incorporating genetics into courses. It also presents an innovate method for incorporating genetics into a full Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) curriculum. Student responses and guidelines for one assignment are included. Utilizing this type of assignment in FNP courses is beneficial to both students and faculty. With more FNPs assessing patterns for illness in families, primary prevention and earlier intervention in primary care can be achieved.

  8. Full 3D Analysis of the GE90 Turbofan Primary Flowpath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Mark G.

    2000-01-01

    The multistage simulations of the GE90 turbofan primary flowpath components have been performed. The multistage CFD code, APNASA, has been used to analyze the fan, fan OGV and booster, the 10-stage high-pressure compressor and the entire turbine system of the GE90 turbofan engine. The code has two levels of parallel, and for the 18 blade row full turbine simulation has 87.3 percent parallel efficiency with 121 processors on an SGI ORIGIN. Grid generation is accomplished with the multistage Average Passage Grid Generator, APG. Results for each component are shown which compare favorably with test data.

  9. Quantum phase-gate operation based on nonlinear optics: Full quantum analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ottaviani, C.; Rebic, S.; Vitali, D.; Tombesi, P.

    2006-01-15

    We present a full quantum treatment of a five-level atomic system coupled to two quantum and two classical light fields. The two quantum fields undergo a cross-phase-modulation induced by electromagnetically induced transparency. The performance of this configuration as a two-qubit quantum phase gate for traveling single photons is examined. A trade-off between the size of the conditional phase shift and the fidelity of the gate is found. Nonetheless, a satisfactory gate performance is still found to be possible in the transient regime, corresponding to a fast gate operation.

  10. MIDAS - A microcomputer-based image display and analysis system with full Landsat frame processing capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofman, L. B.; Erickson, W. K.; Donovan, W. E.

    1984-01-01

    Image Display and Analysis Systems (MIDAS) developed at NASA/Ames for the analysis of Landsat MSS images is described. The MIDAS computer power and memory, graphics, resource-sharing, expansion and upgrade, environment and maintenance, and software/user-interface requirements are outlined; the implementation hardware (including 32-bit microprocessor, 512K error-correcting RAM, 70 or 140-Mbyte formatted disk drive, 512 x 512 x 24 color frame buffer, and local-area-network transceiver) and applications software (ELAS, CIE, and P-EDITOR) are characterized; and implementation problems, performance data, and costs are examined. Planned improvements in MIDAS hardware and design goals and areas of exploration for MIDAS software are discussed.

  11. Getting full control of canonical correlation analysis with the AutoBiplot.CCA function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, M. Rui

    2016-06-01

    Function AutoBiplot.CCA was built in R language. Given two multivariate data sets, this function carries out a conventional canonical correlation analysis, followed by the automatic production of predictive biplots based on the accuracy of readings as assessed by a mean standard predictive error and a user defined tolerance value. As the user's intervention is mainly restricted to the choice of the magnitude of the t.axis value, common misinterpretations, overestimations and adjustments between outputs and personal beliefs are avoided.

  12. Strong correlation effects on the d-wave superconductor- spectral weight analysis by variational wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Chung-Pin; Lee, T. K.; Ho, Chang-Ming

    2009-03-01

    We examine the strong correlation effects of the d-wave superconducting state by including the Gutzwiller projection for no electron double occupancy at each lattice site. The spectral weights (SW's) for adding and removing an electon on the projected superconducting state, the ground state of the 2-dimensional t-t'-t"-J model with moderate doped holes describing the high Tc cuprates, are studied numerically on finite lattices and compared with the observation made by low-temperature tunneling (particle asymmetry of tunneling conductance) and angle-resolved photoemission (SW transfer from the projected Fermi liquid tate) spectoscopies. The contast with the dwave case without projection is alo presented.

  13. Reporting of dental status from full-arch radiographs: Descriptive analysis and methodological aspects

    PubMed Central

    Huettig, Fabian; Axmann, Detlef

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To identify standards, how entities of dental status are assessed and reported from full-arch radiographs of adults. METHODS: A PubMed (Medline) search was performed in November 2011. Literature had to report at least one out of four defined entities using radiographs: number of teeth or implants; caries, fillings or restorations; root-canal fillings and apical health; alveolar bone level. Cohorts included to the study had to be of adult age. Methods of radiographic assessment were noted and checked for the later mode of report in text, tables or diagrams. For comparability, the encountered mode of report was operationalized to a logical expression. RESULTS: Thirty-seven out of 199 articles were evaluated via full-text review. Only one article reported all four entities. Eight articles reported at the maximum 3 comparable entities. However, comparability is impeded because of the usage of absolute or relative frequency, mean or median values as well as grouping. Furthermore the methods of assessment were different or not described sufficiently. Consequently, established sum scores turned out to be highly questionable, too. The amount of missing data within all studies remained unclear. It is even so remissed to mention supernumerary and aplased teeth as well as the count of third molars. CONCLUSION: Data about dental findings from radiographs is, if at all possible, only comparable with serious limitations. A standardization of both, assessing and reporting entities of dental status from radiographs is missing and has to be established within a report guideline. PMID:25325067

  14. LS-DYNA Analysis of a Full-Scale Helicopter Crash Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annett, Martin S.

    2010-01-01

    A full-scale crash test of an MD-500 helicopter was conducted in December 2009 at NASA Langley's Landing and Impact Research facility (LandIR). The MD-500 helicopter was fitted with a composite honeycomb Deployable Energy Absorber (DEA) and tested under vertical and horizontal impact velocities of 26 ft/sec and 40 ft/sec, respectively. The objectives of the test were to evaluate the performance of the DEA concept under realistic crash conditions and to generate test data for validation of a system integrated LS-DYNA finite element model. In preparation for the full-scale crash test, a series of sub-scale and MD-500 mass simulator tests was conducted to evaluate the impact performances of various components, including a new crush tube and the DEA blocks. Parameters defined within the system integrated finite element model were determined from these tests. The objective of this paper is to summarize the finite element models developed and analyses performed, beginning with pre-test and continuing through post test validation.

  15. Comparative analysis of American Dengue virus type 1 full-genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, S E S; Martin, D P; Oliveira, L M; Ribeiro, B M; Nagata, T

    2010-02-01

    Dengue virus (DENV; Genus Flavivirus, Family Flaviviridae) has been circulating in Brazil since at least the mid-1980s and continues to be responsible for sporadic cases of Dengue fever and Dengue hemorrhagic fever throughout this country. Here, we describe the full genomes of two new Brazilian DENV-serotype 1 (DENV-1) variants and analyze these together with all other available American DENV-1 full-genome sequences. Besides confirming the existence of various country-specific DENV-1 founder effects that have produced a high degree of geographical structure in the American DENV-1 population, we also identify that one of the new viruses is one of only three detectable intra-American DENV-1 recombinants. Although such obvious evidence of genetic exchange among epidemiologically unlinked Latin American DENV-1 sequences is relatively rare, we find that at the population-scale there exists substantial evidence of pervasive recombination that most likely occurs between viruses that are so genetically similar that it is not possible to reliably distinguish and characterize individual recombination events.

  16. Asymptotic analysis of dissipative waves with applications to their numerical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagstrom, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    Various problems involving the interplay of asymptotics and numerics in the analysis of wave propagation in dissipative systems are studied. A general approach to the asymptotic analysis of linear, dissipative waves is developed. It was applied to the derivation of asymptotic boundary conditions for numerical solutions on unbounded domains. Applications include the Navier-Stokes equations. Multidimensional traveling wave solutions to reaction-diffusion equations are also considered. A preliminary numerical investigation of a thermo-diffusive model of flame propagation in a channel with heat loss at the walls is presented.

  17. Joint analysis of refractions with surface waves: An inverse solution to the refraction-traveltime problem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanov, J.; Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.; Steeples, D.; Park, C.B.

    2006-01-01

    We describe a possible solution to the inverse refraction-traveltime problem (IRTP) that reduces the range of possible solutions (nonuniqueness). This approach uses a reference model, derived from surface-wave shear-wave velocity estimates, as a constraint. The application of the joint analysis of refractions with surface waves (JARS) method provided a more realistic solution than the conventional refraction/tomography methods, which did not benefit from a reference model derived from real data. This confirmed our conclusion that the proposed method is an advancement in the IRTP analysis. The unique basic principles of the JARS method might be applicable to other inverse geophysical problems. ?? 2006 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  18. Shear Wave Splitting Analysis of Aftershocks of the 2013 Mw6.6 Lushan Earthquake, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Zhang, H.

    2013-12-01

    Shear wave splits into faster and slower shear waves that are nearly perpendicular when it travels through an anisotropic medium. There are two important parameters of shear wave splitting, one is the fast polarization direction of the fast shear wave and the other one is the time delay of the slow shear wave. The mechanisms for anisotropy in the upper crust can be divided into two categories. The first category is stress-induced anisotropy related to alignment of cracks in response to the in situ stress field. The second category is structural anisotropy associated with aligned planar features such as fault zone fabrics, sedimentary bedding planes and aligned minerals. We can characterize anisotropy around fault zone by shear wave splitting analysis. We used cross-correlation method for the shear wave splitting analysis. Since the faster shear wave and the slower shear wave are from the same source, they will correlate well after the time delay correction. We rotated two horizontal seismograms at a 10 increment of azimuth α from 00 to 1800. For each α, the cross-correlation coefficients between the two orthogonal seismograms are calculated for a range of time delays τ. When the absolute value of cross-correlation coefficient reaches a maximum, the corresponding values of α and τ are chosen as the fast polarization direction of the faster shear wave and the time delay of the slower shear wave, respectively. We chose 200 aftershocks observed at a temporary array consisting of 29 stations in the Lushan region. Shear wave arrivals were first picked for setting up the time window for the shear wave splitting analysis using the cross-correlation method. Because these 200 events are shallower than 20km, we can infer that the shear wave splitting is caused by crustal anisotropy. The rose diagram of the fast polarization directions of the fast shear waves showed two major directions. One is nearly parallel to the south-north trending fault system in this region, and

  19. Off-axis propagation of Ultrasonic Guided Waves in Thin Orthotropic Layers: Theoretical Analysis and Dynamic Holographic Imaging Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Telschow, Kenneth Louis; Deason, Vance Albert; Mukdadi, O.; Datta, S. K.

    2001-11-01

    The elastic properties of many materials in sheet or plate form can be approximated with orthotropic symmetry. In many sheet material manufacturing industries (e.g., the paper industry), manufacturers desire knowledge of certain anisotropic elastic properties in the sheet for handling and quality issues. Ultrasonic wave propagation in plate materials forms a method to determine the anisotropic elastic properties in a nondestructive manner. This work explores exact and approximate analysis methods of ultrasonic guided wave propagation in thin layers, explicitly dealing with orthotropic symmetry and propagation off-axis with respect to the manufacturing direction. Recent advances in full-field ultrasonic imaging methods, based on dynamic holography, allow simultaneous measurement of the plate wave motion in all planar directions within a single image. Results from this laser ultrasonic imaging approach are presented that record the lowest anti-symmetric (flexural) mode wavefront in a single image without scanning. Specific numerical predictions for flexural wave propagation in two distinctly different types of paper are presented and compared with direct imaging measurements. Very good agreement is obtained for the lowest anti-symmetric plate mode using paper properties independently determined by a third party. Complete determination of the elastic modulus tensor for orthotropic layers requires measurement of other modes in addition to the lowest anti-symmetric. Theoretical predictions are presented for other guided wave modes [extensional (S), flexural (A), and shear-horizontal (SH)] in orthotropic plates with emphasis on propagation in all planar directions. It is shown that there are significant changes in the dispersion characterization of these modes at certain frequencies (including off-axis mode coupling) that can be exploited to measure additional in-plane elastic moduli of thin layers. At present, the sensitivity of the imaging measurement approach limits

  20. Assessing the Equatorial Long-Wave Approximation: Asymptotics and Observational Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stechmann, S. N.; Ogrosky, H. R.

    2015-12-01

    Equatorial long-wave theory applies where a small horizontal aspect ratio between meridional and zonal lengthscales is assumed. In an idealized setting, the theory suggests that (i) meridional wind is small, (ii) geostrophic balance holds in the meridional direction, and (iii) inertio-gravity waves are small in amplitude or "filtered out". In this paper a spectral data analysis method is used to quantitatively assess the spatial and temporal scales on which each of these aspects of long-wave dynamics is observed in reanalysis data. Three different perspectives are used in this assessment: primitive variables, characteristic variables, and wave variables. To define each wave variable, the eigenvectors and theoretical wave structures of the equatorial shallow water equations are used. Evidence is presented that the range of spatial and temporal scales on which long-wave dynamics holds depends on which aspect of the dynamics is considered. For example, while meridional winds are an order of magnitude smaller than zonal winds over only a very narrow range of spatiotemporal scales (planetary wavenumber |k| < 2), an examination of meridional geostrophic balance and inertio-gravity waves indicates long-wave dynamics for a broader range of scales (|k| < 5). A simple prediction is also presented for this range of scales based on physical and mathematical reasoning.

  1. Energy Sources and Systems Analysis: 40 South Lincoln Redevelopment District (Full Report)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-08-01

    This report presents the results of a case study to analyze district energy systems for their potential use in a project that involves redeveloping 270 units of existing public housing, along with other nearby sites. When complete, the redevelopment project will encompass more than 900 mixed-income residential units, commercial and retail properties, and open space. The analysis estimated the hourly heating, cooling, domestic hot water, and electric loads required by the community; investigated potential district system technologies to meet those needs; and researched available fuel sources to power such systems.

  2. An analysis of network reciprocity in Prisoner's Dilemma games using Full Factorial Designs of Experiment.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Atsuo; Tanimoto, Jun; Hagishima, Aya

    2011-01-01

    Despite hundreds of studies on the Prisoner's Dilemma (PD) game, understanding about network reciprocity remains a unsolved puzzle. Thus, we performed a series of Full Factorial Design of Experiments (FFDOE) to evaluate what dominates emerging cooperation in the PD game on various networks. The results qualitatively reveal the influence of each factor and show that some combinations of factors have complicated interactions. Remarkably, the choice of strategy update rule or update dynamics is much more important than the type of network imposed or, at least, the factorial effect of the average degree of the network reported by Nowak (Science 314, 5805, 1560-1563, 2006) and Ohtsuki et al. (Nature 441, 502-505, 2006). Furthermore, the decision of which PD game type to investigate (whether all PD games, PD-Chicken boundary games or Donor & Recipient games) is important for discussing network reciprocity.

  3. Molecular analysis of methanogens involved in methanogenic degradation of tetramethylammonium hydroxide in full-scale bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Whang, Liang-Ming; Hu, Tai-Ho; Liu, Pao-Wen Grace; Hung, Yu-Ching; Fukushima, Toshikazu; Wu, Yi-Ju; Chang, Shao-Hsiung

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated methanogenic communities involved in degradation of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) in three full-scale bioreactors treating TMAH-containing wastewater. Based on the results of terminal-restriction fragment-length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and quantitative PCR analyses targeting the methyl-coenzyme M reductase alpha subunit (mcrA) genes retrieved from three bioreactors, Methanomethylovorans and Methanosarcina were the dominant methanogens involved in the methanogenic degradation of TMAH in the bioreactors. Furthermore, batch experiments were conducted to evaluate mcrA messenger RNA (mRNA) expression during methanogenic TMAH degradation, and the results indicated that a higher level of TMAH favored mcrA mRNA expression by Methansarcina, while Methanomethylovorans could only express considerable amount of mcrA mRNA at a lower level of TMAH. These results suggest that Methansarcina is responsible for methanogenic TMAH degradation at higher TMAH concentrations, while Methanomethylovorans may be important at a lower TMAH condition.

  4. Three-dimensional local structure refinement using a full-potential XANES analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Smolentsev, G.; Soldatov, A. V.; Feiters, M. C.

    2007-04-01

    A technique of three-dimensional (3D) local structure refinement is proposed and demonstrated by applying it to the metal complex Ni(acacR){sub 2}. The method is based on the fitting of experimental x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) using a multidimensional interpolation of spectra and full potential calculations of XANES. The low number of calculations required is the main advantage of the method, which allows a computationally time-expensive method using a non-muffin-tin potential to be applied. The possibility to determine bond angles in addition to bond lengths accessible to extended x-ray-absorption fine structure opens new perspectives of XANES as a 3D structure probe.

  5. Transonic flow analysis for rotors. Part 2: Three-dimensional, unsteady, full-potential calculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, I. C.

    1985-01-01

    A numerical method is presented for calculating the three-dimensional unsteady, transonic flow past a helicopter rotor blade of arbitrary geometry. The method solves the full-potential equations in a blade-fixed frame of reference by a time-marching implicit scheme. At the far-field, a set of first-order radiation conditions is imposed, thus minimizing the reflection of outgoing wavelets from computational boundaries. Computed results are presented to highlight radial flow effects in three dimensions, to compare surface pressure distributions to quasi-steady predictions, and to predict the flow field on a swept-tip blade. The results agree well with experimental data for both straight- and swept-tip blade geometries.

  6. Ultrasonic guided wave based horizontal crack imaging in metal plate by local wavenumber analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C. G.; Xu, B. Q.; Luo, Y.; Xu, G. D.; Yuan, F. G.

    2015-05-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves are one of the most prominent tools for SHM in plate-like structure. However, complex propagation characteristics of guided waves as well as traditional contact ultrasonic transducers limit its application in the practical damage detection. Scanning Laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV) technology is an effective non-contact method to obtain ultrasonic guided wavefield with ultra-high spatial resolution. Based on abundant wavefield data, wavenumber imaging algorithms are capable of not only damage location, but also assessment of damage characteristics such as size and shape. In this work, we adopt local wavenumber analysis method for horizontal crack detection in platelike structure. Instead of using SLDV in experiment, 3D finite element numerical method is adopted to obtain full ultrasonic guided wavefield data. Since the horizontal cracks result in decrease of local thickness, the wavenumber in corresponding area shows significant increase, which is used as indicators for crack imaging. The effects of different damage shapes, depths and spatial window sizes on imaging are also discussed. Numerical simulation results and imaging algorithm laid the foundation for the method applied in experiment and practice.

  7. A numerical model for dynamic wave rotor analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, D. E.

    1995-01-01

    A numerical model has been developed which can predict the dynamic (and steady state) performance of a wave rotor, given the geometry and time dependent boundary conditions. The one-dimensional, perfect gas, CFD based code tracks the gasdynamics in each of the wave rotor passages as they rotate past the various ducts. The model can operate both on and off-design, allowing dynamic behavior to be studied throughout the operating range of the wave rotor. The model accounts for several major loss mechanisms including finite passage opening time, fluid friction, heat transfer to and from the passage walls, and leakage to and from the passage ends. In addition, it can calculate the amount of work transferred to and from the fluid when the flow in the ducts is not aligned with the passages such as occurs in off-design operation. Since it is one-dimensional, the model runs reasonably fast on a typical workstation. This paper will describe the model and present the results of some transient calculations for a conceptual four port wave rotor designed as a topping cycle for a small gas turbine engine.

  8. Analysis of Wave Fields induced by Offshore Pile Driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhnau, M.; Heitmann, K.; Lippert, T.; Lippert, S.; von Estorff, O.

    2015-12-01

    Impact pile driving is the common technique to install foundations for offshore wind turbines. With each hammer strike the steel pile - often exceeding 6 m in diameter and 80 m in length - radiates energy into the surrounding water and soil, until reaching its targeted penetration depth. Several European authorities introduced limitations regarding hydroacoustic emissions during the construction process to protect marine wildlife. Satisfying these regulations made the development and application of sound mitigation systems (e.g. bubble curtains or insulation screens) inevitable, which are commonly installed within the water column surrounding the pile or even the complete construction site. Last years' advances have led to a point, where the seismic energy tunneling the sound mitigation systems through the soil and radiating back towards the water column gains importance, as it confines the maximum achievable sound mitigation. From an engineering point of view, the challenge of deciding on an effective noise mitigation layout arises, which especially requires a good understanding of the soil-dependent wave field. From a geophysical point of view, the pile acts like a very unique line source, generating a characteristic wave field dominated by inclined wave fronts, diving as well as head waves. Monitoring the seismic arrivals while the pile penetration steadily increases enables to perform quasi-vertical seismic profiling. This work is based on datasets that have been collected within the frame of three comprehensive offshore measurement campaigns during pile driving and demonstrates the potential of seismic arrivals induced by pile driving for further soil characterization.

  9. Early enteral nutrition in critical illness: a full economic analysis using US costs

    PubMed Central

    Doig, Gordon S; Chevrou-Séverac, Hélène; Simpson, Fiona

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Although published meta-analyses demonstrate patient survival may be improved if enteral nutrition (EN) is provided to critically ill patients within 24 hours of injury or admission to the intensive care unit (ICU), these publications did not investigate the impact of early EN on measures of health care resource consumption and total costs. Materials and methods From the perspective of the US acute care hospital system, a cost-effectiveness analysis was undertaken based on a large-scale Monte Carlo simulation (N = 1,000,000 trials) of a 1,000-patient stochastic model, developed using clinical outcomes and measures of resource consumption reported by published meta-analyses combined with cost distributions obtained from the published literature. The mean cost differences between early EN and standard care, along with respective 95% confidence intervals, were obtained using the percentile method. Results and conclusion The provision of early EN to critically ill patients is a dominant technology: Patient survival is significantly improved and total costs of care reduced meaningfully. Under conservative assumptions, the total costs of acute hospital care were reduced by US$14,462 per patient (95% confidence interval US$5,464 to US$23,669). These results were robust, with all sensitivity analyses demonstrating significant savings attributable to the use of early EN, including sensitivity analysis conducted using European cost data. PMID:24003308

  10. Analysis and Prediction of Ice Shedding for a Full-Scale Heated Tail Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreeger, Richard E.; Work, Andrew; Douglass, Rebekah; Gazella, Matthew; Koster, Zakery; Turk, Jodi

    2016-01-01

    When helicopters are to fly in icing conditions, it is necessary to consider the possibility of ice shed from the rotor blades. In 2013, a series of tests were conducted on a heated tail rotor at NASA Glenn's Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). The tests produced several shed events that were captured on camera. Three of these shed events were captured at a sufficiently high frame rate to obtain multiple images of the shed ice in flight that had a sufficiently long section of shed ice for analysis. Analysis of these shed events is presented and compared to an analytical Shedding Trajectory Model (STM). The STM is developed and assumes that the ice breaks off instantly as it reaches the end of the blade, while frictional and viscous forces are used as parameters to fit the STM. The trajectory of each shed is compared to that predicted by the STM, where the STM provides information of the shed group of ice as a whole. The limitations of the model's underlying assumptions are discussed in comparison to experimental shed events.

  11. Analysis of Full Charge Reconstruction Algorithms for X-Ray Pixelated Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Baumbaugh, A.; Carini, G.; Deptuch, G.; Grybos, P.; Hoff, J.; Siddons, P., Maj.; Szczygiel, R.; Trimpl, M.; Yarema, R.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-21

    Existence of the natural diffusive spread of charge carriers on the course of their drift towards collecting electrodes in planar, segmented detectors results in a division of the original cloud of carriers between neighboring channels. This paper presents the analysis of algorithms, implementable with reasonable circuit resources, whose task is to prevent degradation of the detective quantum efficiency in highly granular, digital pixel detectors. The immediate motivation of the work is a photon science application requesting simultaneous timing spectroscopy and 2D position sensitivity. Leading edge discrimination, provided it can be freed from uncertainties associated with the charge sharing, is used for timing the events. Analyzed solutions can naturally be extended to the amplitude spectroscopy with pixel detectors.

  12. Analysis of full charge reconstruction algorithms for x-ray pixelated detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Baumbaugh, A.; Carini, G.; Deptuch, G.; Grybos, P.; Hoff, J.; Siddons, P., Maj.; Szczygiel, R.; Trimpl, M.; Yarema, R.; /Fermilab

    2011-11-01

    Existence of the natural diffusive spread of charge carriers on the course of their drift towards collecting electrodes in planar, segmented detectors results in a division of the original cloud of carriers between neighboring channels. This paper presents the analysis of algorithms, implementable with reasonable circuit resources, whose task is to prevent degradation of the detective quantum efficiency in highly granular, digital pixel detectors. The immediate motivation of the work is a photon science application requesting simultaneous timing spectroscopy and 2D position sensitivity. Leading edge discrimination, provided it can be freed from uncertainties associated with the charge sharing, is used for timing the events. Analyzed solutions can naturally be extended to the amplitude spectroscopy with pixel detectors.

  13. VFMA: Topographic Analysis of Sensitivity Data From Full-Field Static Perimetry

    PubMed Central

    Weleber, Richard G.; Smith, Travis B.; Peters, Dawn; Chegarnov, Elvira N.; Gillespie, Scott P.; Francis, Peter J.; Gardiner, Stuart K.; Paetzold, Jens; Dietzsch, Janko; Schiefer, Ulrich; Johnson, Chris A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze static visual field sensitivity with topographic models of the hill of vision (HOV), and to characterize several visual function indices derived from the HOV volume. Methods: A software application, Visual Field Modeling and Analysis (VFMA), was developed for static perimetry data visualization and analysis. Three-dimensional HOV models were generated for 16 healthy subjects and 82 retinitis pigmentosa patients. Volumetric visual function indices, which are measures of quantity and comparable regardless of perimeter test pattern, were investigated. Cross-validation, reliability, and cross-sectional analyses were performed to assess this methodology and compare the volumetric indices to conventional mean sensitivity and mean deviation. Floor effects were evaluated by computer simulation. Results: Cross-validation yielded an overall R2 of 0.68 and index of agreement of 0.89, which were consistent among subject groups, indicating good accuracy. Volumetric and conventional indices were comparable in terms of test–retest variability and discriminability among subject groups. Simulated floor effects did not negatively impact the repeatability of any index, but large floor changes altered the discriminability for regional volumetric indices. Conclusions: VFMA is an effective tool for clinical and research analyses of static perimetry data. Topographic models of the HOV aid the visualization of field defects, and topographically derived indices quantify the magnitude and extent of visual field sensitivity. Translational Relevance: VFMA assists with the interpretation of visual field data from any perimetric device and any test location pattern. Topographic models and volumetric indices are suitable for diagnosis, monitoring of field loss, patient counseling, and endpoints in therapeutic trials. PMID:25938002

  14. Shear-wave velocity and site-amplification factors for 50 Australian sites determined by the spectral analysis of surface waves method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kayen, Robert E.; Carkin, Bradley A.; Allen, Trevor; Collins, Clive; McPherson, Andrew; Minasian, Diane L.

    2015-01-01

    One-dimensional shear-wave velocity (VS ) profiles are presented at 50 strong motion sites in New South Wales and Victoria, Australia. The VS profiles are estimated with the spectral analysis of surface waves (SASW) method. The SASW method is a noninvasive method that indirectly estimates the VS at depth from variations in the Rayleigh wave phase velocity at the surface.

  15. Linear stability analysis and the speed of gravitational waves in dynamical Chern-Simons modified gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Garfinkle, David; Pretorius, Frans; Yunes, Nicolas

    2010-08-15

    We perform a linear stability analysis of dynamical Chern-Simons modified gravity in the geometric optics approximation and find that it is linearly stable on the backgrounds considered. Our analysis also reveals that gravitational waves in the modified theory travel at the speed of light in Minkowski spacetime. However, on a Schwarzschild background the characteristic speed of propagation along a given direction splits into two modes, one subluminal and one superluminal. The width of the splitting depends on the azimuthal components of the propagation vector, is linearly proportional to the mass of the black hole, and decreases with the third inverse power of the distance from the black hole. Radial propagation is unaffected, implying that as probed by gravitational waves the location of the event horizon of the spacetime is unaltered. The analysis further reveals that when a high frequency, pure gravitational wave is scattered from a black hole, a scalar wave of comparable amplitude is excited, and vice versa.

  16. Phase defect analysis with actinic full-field EUVL mask blank inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamane, Takeshi; Tanaka, Toshihiko; Terasawa, Tsuneo; Suga, Osamu

    2011-11-01

    We had developed an actinic full-field inspection system to detect multilayer phase-defects with dark field imaging. Regarding the actinic inspection of native defects, the influence of the defect's surface dimension and multilayer structure, on the intensity-signal obtained from the inspection was analyzed. Three mask blanks were inspected from which 55 defects, observed with AFM and SEM, were classified as amplitude-defects or phase-defects. The surface dimensions and SEVDs (sphere equivalent volume diameters) of the defects were measured with the AFM. In the case where their SEVDs were same as of the programmed phase-defects, they were found to produce stronger intensitysignals in comparison to the ones from the programmed phase-defects. Cross-sectional multilayer structures of two native phase-defects were observed with TEM, and those defects formed non-conformal structures in the multilayer. This result means that most of the native phase-defects tend to form a non-conformal structure, and can make large impact on the wafer image in comparison to the ones from a conformal structure. Besides phase-defects, the actinic inspection also detected amplitude-defects. Although the sensitivities of the amplitude-defects were found to be lower than those of the phase-defects, an amplitude-defect higher than 30 nm could be detected with high probability.

  17. Comprehensive analysis of the green-to-blue photoconversion of full-length Cyanobacteriochrome Tlr0924.

    PubMed

    Hardman, Samantha J O; Hauck, Anna F E; Clark, Ian P; Heyes, Derren J; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2014-11-01

    Cyanobacteriochromes are members of the phytochrome superfamily of photoreceptors and are of central importance in biological light-activated signaling mechanisms. These photoreceptors are known to reversibly convert between two states in a photoinitiated process that involves a basic E/Z isomerization of the bilin chromophore and, in certain cases, the breakage of a thioether linkage to a conserved cysteine residue in the bulk protein structure. The exact details and timescales of the reactions involved in these photoconversions have not been conclusively shown. The cyanobacteriochrome Tlr0924 contains phycocyanobilin and phycoviolobilin chromophores, both of which photoconvert between two species: blue-absorbing and green-absorbing, and blue-absorbing and red-absorbing, respectively. Here, we followed the complete green-to-blue photoconversion process of the phycoviolobilin chromophore in the full-length form of Tlr0924 over timescales ranging from femtoseconds to seconds. Using a combination of time-resolved visible and mid-infrared transient absorption spectroscopy and cryotrapping techniques, we showed that after photoisomerization, which occurs with a lifetime of 3.6 ps, the phycoviolobilin twists or distorts slightly with a lifetime of 5.3 ?s. The final step, the formation of the thioether linkage with the protein, occurs with a lifetime of 23.6 ms. PMID:25418104

  18. Comprehensive Analysis of the Green-to-Blue Photoconversion of Full-Length Cyanobacteriochrome Tlr0924

    PubMed Central

    Hardman, Samantha J.O.; Hauck, Anna F.E.; Clark, Ian P.; Heyes, Derren J.; Scrutton, Nigel S.

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacteriochromes are members of the phytochrome superfamily of photoreceptors and are of central importance in biological light-activated signaling mechanisms. These photoreceptors are known to reversibly convert between two states in a photoinitiated process that involves a basic E/Z isomerization of the bilin chromophore and, in certain cases, the breakage of a thioether linkage to a conserved cysteine residue in the bulk protein structure. The exact details and timescales of the reactions involved in these photoconversions have not been conclusively shown. The cyanobacteriochrome Tlr0924 contains phycocyanobilin and phycoviolobilin chromophores, both of which photoconvert between two species: blue-absorbing and green-absorbing, and blue-absorbing and red-absorbing, respectively. Here, we followed the complete green-to-blue photoconversion process of the phycoviolobilin chromophore in the full-length form of Tlr0924 over timescales ranging from femtoseconds to seconds. Using a combination of time-resolved visible and mid-infrared transient absorption spectroscopy and cryotrapping techniques, we showed that after photoisomerization, which occurs with a lifetime of 3.6 ps, the phycoviolobilin twists or distorts slightly with a lifetime of 5.3 μs. The final step, the formation of the thioether linkage with the protein, occurs with a lifetime of 23.6 ms. PMID:25418104

  19. Full sky harmonic analysis hints at large ultra-high energy cosmic ray deflections

    SciTech Connect

    Tinyakov, P. G. Urban, F. R.

    2015-03-15

    The full-sky multipole coefficients of the ultra-high energy cosmic ray (UHECR) flux have been measured for the first time by the Pierre Auger and Telescope Array collaborations using a joint data set with E > 10 EeV. We calculate these harmonic coefficients in the model where UHECR are protons and sources trace the local matter distribution, and compare our results with observations. We find that the expected power for low multipoles (dipole and quadrupole, in particular) is sytematically higher than in the data: the observed flux is too isotropic. We then investigate to which degree our predictions are influenced by UHECR deflections in the regular Galactic magnetic field. It turns out that the UHECR power spectrum coefficients C{sub l} are quite insensitive to the effects of the Galactic magnetic field, so it is unlikely that the discordance can be reconciled by tuning the Galactic magnetic field model. On the contrary, a sizeable fraction of uniformly distributed flux (representing for instance an admixture of heavy nuclei with considerably larger deflections) can bring simulations and observations to an accord.

  20. A Comparative Analysis of Two Full-Scale MD-500 Helicopter Crash Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littell, Justin D.

    2011-01-01

    Two full scale crash tests were conducted on a small MD-500 helicopter at NASA Langley Research Center fs Landing and Impact Research Facility. One of the objectives of this test series was to compare airframe impact response and occupant injury data between a test which outfitted the airframe with an external composite passive energy absorbing honeycomb and a test which had no energy absorbing features. In both tests, the nominal impact velocity conditions were 7.92 m/sec (26 ft/sec) vertical and 12.2 m/sec (40 ft/sec) horizontal, and the test article weighed approximately 1315 kg (2900 lbs). Airframe instrumentation included accelerometers and strain gages. Four Anthropomorphic Test Devices were also onboard; three of which were standard Hybrid II and III, while the fourth was a specialized torso. The test which contained the energy absorbing honeycomb showed vertical impact acceleration loads of approximately 15 g, low risk for occupant injury probability, and minimal airframe damage. These results were contrasted with the test conducted without the energy absorbing honeycomb. The test results showed airframe accelerations of approximately 40 g in the vertical direction, high risk for injury probability in the occupants, and substantial airframe damage.

  1. Full-genome sequence analysis of a multirecombinant echovirus 3 strain isolated from sewage in Greece.

    PubMed

    Kyriakopoulou, Zaharoula; Dedepsidis, Evaggelos; Pliaka, Vaia; Tsakogiannis, Dimitris; Pratti, Anastassia; Levidiotou-Stefanou, Stamatina; Markoulatos, Panayotis

    2010-05-01

    An echovirus 3 (Echo3) strain (strain LR31G7) was isolated from a sewage treatment plant in Greece in 2005. Full-genome molecular, phylogenetic, and SimPlot analyses were conducted in order to reveal the evolutionary pathways of the isolate. Nucleotide and phylogenetic analyses of part of the VP1 genomic region revealed that the isolated strain correlates with Echo3 strains isolated during the same year in France and Japan, implying that the same virus circulated in Europe and Asia. LR31G7 was found to be a recombinant that shares the 3' part of its genome with an Echo25 strain isolated from asymptomatic infants in Norway in 2003. Nucleotide and SimPlot analyses of the VP1-2A junction, where the recombination was located, revealed the exact recombination breakpoint (nucleotides 3357 to 3364). Moreover, there is evidence that recombination events had occurred in 3B-3D region in the evolutionary history of the isolate. Our study indicates that recombination events play major roles in enterovirus evolution and that the circulation of multirecombinant strains with unknown properties could be potentially dangerous for public health.

  2. Sequencing and annotated analysis of full genome of Holstein breed bull.

    PubMed

    Kõks, Sulev; Reimann, Ene; Lilleoja, Rutt; Lättekivi, Freddy; Salumets, Andres; Reemann, Paula; Jaakma, Ülle

    2014-08-01

    In the present study, we describe the deep sequencing and structural analysis of the Holstein breed bull genome. Our aim was to receive a high-quality Holstein bull genome reference sequence and to describe different types of variations in its genome compared to Hereford breed as a reference. We generated four mate-paired libraries and one fragment library from 30 μg of genomic DNA. Colour space fasta were mapped and paired to the reference cow (Bos taurus) genome assembly from Oct. 2011 (Baylor 4.6.1/bosTau7). Initial sequencing resulted in the 4,864,054,296 of 50-bp reads. Average mapping efficiency was 71.7 % and altogether 3,494,534,136 reads and 157,928,163,086 bp were successfully mapped, resulting in 60 × coverage. This is the highest coverage for bovine genome published so far. Tertiary analysis found 6,362,988 SNPs in the bull's genome, 4,045,889 heterozygous and 2,317,099 homozygous variants. Annotation revealed that 4,330,337 of all discovered SNPs were annotated in the dbSNP database (build 137) and therefore 2,032,651 SNPs were novel. Large indel variations accounted for the 245,947,845 bp of the variation in entire genome and their number was 312,879. We also found that small indels (number was 633,310) accounted for the total variation of 2,542,552 nucleotides in the genome. Only 106,768 small indels were listed in the dbSNP. Finally, we identified 2,758 inversions in the genome of the bull covering in total 23,099,054 bp of genome's variation. The largest inversion was 87,440 bp in size. In conclusion, the present study discovered different types of novel variants in bull's genome after high-coverage sequencing. Better knowledge of the functions of these variations is needed.

  3. An analysis of a full sky redshift survey of IRAS galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Karl Booth

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented from an all-sky redshift survey of 5307 galaxies extracted from the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) Point Source Catalog. The analysis presented in this thesis focuses on the spatial distribution and clustering of IRAS galaxies in this survey. We present an in-depth analysis of the possibility of density evolution in the catalogue. We conclude that the 1.2 Jy IRAS survey is consistent with no evolution, if the comoving density of galaxies is characterized as evolving proportional to (1 + z)alpha, we find alpha = 2 +/- 3, where the quoted error includes both random and systematic components. The random errors in alpha, of order 2, arise primarily from counting statistics, and are comparable to those found by previous authors. We discuss a variety of important random and systematic errors which decrease the certainty with which we can measure evolution: limited knowledge of the cosmological model, the unknown intrinsic spectral energy distribution of IRAS galaxies from 16 to 140 mu m, the effect of density fluctuations, a Malmquist-like bias arising from flux errors in the parent IRAS Point Source Catalog, and possible incompleteness of the sample at high redshifts and low Galactic latitudes. We show that the Malmquist bias could result in a significant overestimation of the evolution rate, especially if the catalog has a flux limit near the completion limit of the Point Source Catalog. We examine the two-point correlation function of the sample in both real and redshift space. The redshift space correlation function, xi(s), is shown to be robust and independent of the depth of the sample in which it is computed. We have also computed the Fourier conjugate of the correlation function, the power spectrum of galaxy clustering, P(k), for the 1.2 Jy IRAS survey using a window function which minimizes the aliasing due to the sample boundaries. We compare the IRAS power spectrum qualitatively with a variety of theoretical models, and conclude

  4. Isolation, characterization and functional analysis of full length p53 cDNA from Bubalus bubalis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Minu; Aggarwal, Suruchi; Mohanty, Ashok K; Mukhopadhyay, Tapas

    2015-09-01

    p53 plays a pivotal role in maintaining the genomic integrity of the cell and has an important role in cellular transformation. We isolated and cloned a full length p53 cDNA (Bp53) from water buffalo in expression vectors designed to generate tagged proteins with FLAG or GFP. Bp53 was found to be 1161 nucleotide long and codes for 386 amino acid residues with 79% homology with human p53 containing 393 amino acids. Although Bp53 has some inherent differences in amino acid composition in different functional domains as compared to human p53 but the total electrostatic charge of amino acids has been maintained. Bp53 cDNA was transiently transfected in a p53 null human NSCLC cell line and as expected, it was predominantly localized in the nucleus. Besides, Bp53 effectively transactivates a number of target genes similar to human p53 and exerts most of its anti-tumorigenic potential in culture as observed in clonogenic and cell viability assays. Like human p53 mutants, core domain mutant version of Bp53 was found to be mis-localized to cytoplasm with diminished tumor suppressor activity. However, Bp53 appeared to be more sensitive to mdm2 mediated degradation and as a result, this protein was less stable as compared to human p53. For the first time we have characterized a functionally efficient wild-type p53 from buffalo having lower stability than human p53 and thus, buffalo p53 could be used as a model system for further insight to the molecular basis of wild-type p53 instability.

  5. Analysis and gyrokinetic simulation of MHD Alfven wave interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielson, Kevin Derek

    The study of low-frequency turbulence in magnetized plasmas is a difficult problem due to both the enormous range of scales involved and the variety of physics encompassed over this range. Much of the progress that has been made in turbulence theory is based upon a result from incompressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), in which energy is only transferred from large scales to small via the collision of Alfven waves propagating oppositely along the mean magnetic field. Improvements in laboratory devices and satellite measurements have demonstrated that, while theories based on this premise are useful over inertial ranges, describing turbulence at scales that approach particle gyroscales requires new theory. In this thesis, we examine the limits of incompressible MHD theory in describing collisions between pairs of Alfven waves. This interaction represents the fundamental unit of plasma turbulence. To study this interaction, we develop an analytic theory describing the nonlinear evolution of interacting Alfven waves and compare this theory to simulations performed using the gyrokinetic code AstroGK. Gyrokinetics captures a much richer set of physics than that described by incompressible MHD, and is well-suited to describing Alfvenic turbulence around the ion gyroscale. We demonstrate that AstroGK is well suited to the study of physical Alfven waves by reproducing laboratory Alfven dispersion data collected using the LAPD. Additionally, we have developed an initialization alogrithm for use with AstroGK that allows exact Alfven eigenmodes to be initialized with user specified amplitudes and phases. We demonstrate that our analytic theory based upon incompressible MHD gives excellent agreement with gyrokinetic simulations for weakly turbulent collisions in the limit that k⊥rho i << 1. In this limit, agreement is observed in the time evolution of nonlinear products, and in the strength of nonlinear interaction with respect to polarization and scale. We also examine the

  6. Analysis and Forecasting of Winds and Waves at Floating Type Wind Turbine Demonstration Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mase, Hajime; Yasuda, Tomohiro; Mori, Nobuhito; Tom, Tracey; Ikemoto, Ai; Utsunomiya, Tomoaki

    2013-04-01

    1. Introduction The floating type wind turbine demonstration project is being performed in Japan, and a 1:2 scale model was installed off the Kabashima Island in Nagasaki Prefecture on June 11th, 2012. As for the design, external forces such as wind and wave on the floating type wind turbine demonstration site were evaluated using various kinds of re-analysis and prediction data including NCEP wind data, JMA meteorological GPV data and NEDO data. Considerations for the design were given for wave characteristics of maximum and mean wave height, crest height, 2D height-period distribution, and wave energy spectrum. Tides, currents and winds were also evaluated. In addition the extreme wind speed was estimated including typhoon effects considering grid resolution dependence gust factor. A wind and wave prediction system was developed and its validity was examined by statistically comparing predicted values with measured data at the demonstration site. The present information system gives information for various user selected areas and lead times with both visual animations and time series graphs. 2. Design wave and wind The site is located off the Kabashima Island in Nagasaki Prefecture, Japan. Design forces were determined from extreme wind and wave statistics and an empirical method. The results are: 50 years return period wave and wind: Hs = 7.73 m, Ts = 14.0 s, U = 53.1 m/s 100 years return period wave and wind: Hs = 8.20 m, Ts = 14.3 m, U = 57.0 m/s Other characteristics were also determined, such as the maximum wave height, crest height, 2D height-period distribution and wave energy spectrum, tide, current and maximum wind. 3. Wind and wave prediction system The system composed of NCEP GFS (Global Forecasting System) meteorological data, down-scaling wind field by WRF (Weather Research Forecasting), JMA HAGPV (Hourly Analyzed Grid Point Value) 10m wind data, and wind-wave forecast data by SWAN (Simulating Waves Nearshore). The flowchart shown in Fig. 1 displays

  7. Comparative full-length sequence analysis of Marek's disease virus vaccine strain 814.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Liu, Chang-Jun; Zhang, Yan-Ping; Li, Zhi-Jie; Liu, Ai-Ling; Yan, Fu-Hai; Cong, Feng; Cheng, Yun

    2012-01-01

    The complete DNA sequence of Marek's disease virus (MDV) serotype 1 vaccine strain 814 was determined. It consisted of 172,541 bp, with an overall gene organization identical to that of the MDV-1 type strains. Comparative genomic analysis of vaccine strains (814 and CVI988) and other strains (CU-2, Md5, and Md11) showed that 814 was most similar to CVI988. Several unique insertions, deletions, and substitutions were identified in strain 814. Of note, a 177-bp insertion in the overlapping genes encoding the Meq, RLORF6, and 23-kDa proteins of strain 814 was identified, and a 69-bp deletion was also located in the origin of replication site (Ori) in the gene encoding RLORF12. Compared to the CVI988 vaccine strain, a deletion of 510 bp was identified in the UL36 gene. These analyses identified key mutations in the 814 strain and the vaccine strain that could be exploited for future MDV vaccine design.

  8. Mobile dune fixation by a fast-growing clonal plant: a full life-cycle analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shou-Li; Yu, Fei-Hai; Werger, Marinus J. A.; Dong, Ming; During, Heinjo J.; Zuidema, Pieter A.

    2015-01-01

    Desertification is a global environmental problem, and arid dunes with sparse vegetation are especially vulnerable to desertification. One way to combat desertification is to increase vegetation cover by planting plant species that can realize fast population expansion, even in harsh environments. To evaluate the success of planted species and provide guidance for selecting proper species to stabilize active dunes, demographic studies in natural habitats are essential. We studied the life history traits and population dynamics of a dominant clonal shrub Hedysarum laeve in Inner-Mongolia, northern China. Vital rates of 19057 ramets were recorded during three annual censuses (2007–2009) and used to parameterize Integral Projection Models to analyse population dynamics. The life history of H. laeve was characterized by high ramet turnover and population recruitment entirely depended on clonal propagation. Stochastic population growth rate was 1.32, suggesting that the populations were experiencing rapid expansion. Elasticity analysis revealed that clonal propagation was the key contributor to population growth. The capacity of high clonal propagation and rapid population expansion in mobile dunes makes H. laeve a suitable species to combat desertification. Species with similar life-history traits to H. laeve are likely to offer good opportunities for stabilizing active dunes in arid inland ecosystems. PMID:25757743

  9. Full image spectral analysis of elemental emissions from an echelle spectrograph

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, W.A.

    2000-01-27

    A new algorithm compares the background corrected echelle emission image obtained from reference standards to images of unknowns for quantitative elemental analyses. Wavelength was not used in the calculations but instead pixel position and intensity. The data reduction solution was unique to the particular detector/spectrometer. The approach was found useful for several types of images including ICP, DCP and glow discharge images. The analysis scheme required that the emission pattern of standards and background be held in memory. A dual weighting scheme was used that decreased the importance of pixels in high background areas and enhanced the importance of signals from pixels where the standards had emissions. Threshold values were used to limit the calculations to signals in the linear range of the electronics. Logarithmic weighting, (by taking the square root), was found to work well for weighting pixels from the standards. This assured that minor emissions had some influence on the data fit. In the program the best-fit scalar was determined using simple iterative guess, change and test approaches. The test looked for the minimum least square residual value in the areas of the flagged pixels.

  10. Analysis of Real Ship Rolling Dynamics under Wave Excitement Force Composed of Sums of Cosine Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y. S.; Cai, F.; Xu, W. M.

    2011-09-28

    The ship motion equation with a cosine wave excitement force describes the slip moments in regular waves. A new kind of wave excitement force model, with the form as sums of cosine functions was proposed to describe ship rolling in irregular waves. Ship rolling time series were obtained by solving the ship motion equation with the fourth-order-Runger-Kutta method. These rolling time series were synthetically analyzed with methods of phase-space track, power spectrum, primary component analysis, and the largest Lyapunove exponent. Simulation results show that ship rolling presents some chaotic characteristic when the wave excitement force was applied by sums of cosine functions. The result well explains the course of ship rolling's chaotic mechanism and is useful for ship hydrodynamic study.

  11. Analysis of birefringence effects in laser crystals by full vectorial beam propagation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Rainer; Pflaum, Christoph; Graupeter, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Modern laser technology demands powerful numerical tools to predict the efficiency of laser configurations. Birefringence has a strong influence on the beam quality and output power of a laser amplifier. We developed a complex physical model for simulating laser amplifiers and analyzing the birefringence effects. This model includes pump configuration, thermal lensing effects, birefringence, and beam propagation in the laser amplifier. The pump configuration is simulated using a complete three-dimensional ray tracing or by an approximation based on super-Gaussian functions. For an accurate modeling of the thermal lensing effect, the deformation of the end faces and the polarization dependent index of refraction was taken into account. Temperature, deformation and stress inside the laser crystal were calculated by a three-dimensional finite element analysis (FEA). In particular, the refractive index was accurately calculated by considering its temperature dependency and the photo elastic effect. This refractive index was used in the simulation of laser beam propagation through an amplifier. These simulations were performed by a complete three-dimensional vectorial beam propagation method (VBPM). The advantage of VBPM is that it can be applied to a polarization dependent index of refraction. This is important when taking into account the birefringence obtained by the photo elastic effect inside the laser crystal. The beam propagation method is based on finite elements on block structured grids as well as a Crank-Nicolson approximation in the propagation direction (FE-BPM). Reflecting boundaries were eliminated by introducing a perfect matching layer (PML). Simulation results show that a complete three-dimensional simulation model was useful in analyzing and optimizing high power laser amplifiers. The value of our model lies in the fact that it can take into account the crystal cut direction. Based on this the birefringence for simulating the laser beam quality and

  12. Analysis of the 1980 heat wave in Memphis.

    PubMed

    Applegate, W B; Runyan, J W; Brasfield, L; Williams, M L; Konigsberg, C; Fouche, C

    1981-08-01

    During the heat wave of 1980, average daily temperatures in Memphis first rose above the mean on June 25 and remained elevated for 26 consecutive days. In July, 1980, 83 heat-related deaths were recorded as compared to non in July 1979. Most of these deaths occurred in elderly, poor, black, inner-city residents. There was a statistically significant increase in total mortality rates, death from natural causes, cardiovascular mortality rates, and the rate for persons dead on arrival. Virtually all the excess mortality was in persons over the age of 60. The rise in heat-related emergency room visits occurred three days prior to the rise in heat-related deaths. Local planning for future heat waves should focus on the inner-city black elderly. Heat-related deaths and emergency room visits should be reported to public health officials. PMID:7264123

  13. Quasilinear analysis of absorption of ion Bernstein waves by electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Cardinali, A.; Paoletti, F.; Bernabei, S.; Ono, M.

    1995-01-01

    The effects induced on plasma electrons by an externally launched ion Bernstein wave (IBW), in the presence of a lower hybrid wave (LHW) in the current drive regime, are studied by analytical integration of the IBW ray-tracing equations along with the amplitude transport equation (Poynting theorem). The electric field amplitude parallel and perpendicular to the external magnetic field, the quasilinear diffusion coefficient, and the modified electron distribution function are analytically calculated in the case of IBW. The analytical calculation is compared to the numerical solution obtained by using a 2-D Fokker-Planck code for the distribution function, without any approximation for the collision operator. The synergy between the IBW and LHW can be accounted for, and the absorption of the IBW power when the electron distribution function presents a tail generated by the LHW in the current drive regime can be calculated.

  14. Quasilinear analysis of absorption of ion Bernstein waves by electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Cardinali, A.; Paoletti, F.; Bernabei, S.; Ono, M.

    1995-05-01

    The effects induced on plasma electrons by an externally launched ion Bernstein wave (IBW), in the presence of a lower hybrid wave (LHW) in the current drive regime, are studied by analytical integration of the IBW ray-tracing equations, along with the amplitude transport equation (Poynting theorem). The electric field amplitude parallel and perpendicular to the external magnetic field, the quasilinear diffusion coefficient, and the modified electron distribution function are analytically calculated in the case of IBW. The analytical calculation is compared to the numerical solution obtained by using a two-dimensional (2-D) Fokker--Planck code for the distribution function, without any approximation for the collision operator. The synergy between the IBW and LHW can be accounted for, and the absorption of the IBW power when the electron distribution function presents a tail generated by the LHW in the current drive regime can be calculated.

  15. Local stability analysis for a planar shock wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salas, M. D.

    1984-01-01

    A procedure to study the local stability of planar shock waves is presented. The procedure is applied to a Rankine-Hugoniot shock in a divergent/convergent nozzle, to an isentropic shock in a divergent/convergent nozzle, and to Rankine-Hugoniot shocks attached to wedges and cones. It is shown that for each case, the equation governing the shock motion is equivalent to the damped harmonic oscillator equation.

  16. Analysis and synthesis of textured motion: particles and waves.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yizhou; Zhu, Song-Chun

    2004-10-01

    Natural scenes contain a wide range of textured motion phenomena which are characterized by the movement of a large amount of particle and wave elements, such as falling snow, wavy water, and dancing grass. In this paper, we present a generative model for representing these motion patterns and study a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm for inferring the generative representation from observed video sequences. Our generative model consists of three components. The first is a photometric model which represents an image as a linear superposition of image bases selected from a generic and overcomplete dictionary. The dictionary contains Gabor and LoG bases for point/particle elements and Fourier bases for wave elements. These bases compete to explain the input images and transfer them to a token (base) representation with an O(10(2))-fold dimension reduction. The second component is a geometric model which groups spatially adjacent tokens (bases) and their motion trajectories into a number of moving elements--called "motons." A moton is a deformable template in time-space representing a moving element, such as a falling snowflake or a flying bird. The third component is a dynamic model which characterizes the motion of particles, waves, and their interactions. For example, the motion of particle objects floating in a river, such as leaves and balls, should be coupled with the motion of waves. The trajectories of these moving elements are represented by coupled Markov chains. The dynamic model also includes probabilistic representations for the birth/death (source/sink) of the motons. We adopt a stochastic gradient algorithm for learning and inference. Given an input video sequence, the algorithm iterates two steps: 1) computing the motons and their trajectories by a number of reversible Markov chain jumps, and 2) learning the parameters that govern the geometric deformations and motion dynamics. Novel video sequences are synthesized from the learned models and, by

  17. Femtosecond laser excitation of multiple spin waves and composition dependence of Gilbert damping in full-Heusler Co{sub 2}Fe{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}Al films

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chuyuan; Li, Shufa; Lai, Tianshu E-mail: jhzhao@red.semi.ac.cn; Meng, Kangkang; Zhao, Jianhua E-mail: jhzhao@red.semi.ac.cn

    2013-12-02

    Spin-wave dynamics in 30 nm thick Co{sub 2}Fe{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}Al full-Heusler films is investigated using time-resolved magneto-optical polar Kerr spectroscopy under an external field perpendicular to films. Damon-Eshbach (DE) and the first-order perpendicular standing spin-wave (PSSW) modes are observed simultaneously in four samples with x = 0, 0.3, 0.7, and 1. The frequency of DE and PSSW modes does not apparently depend on composition x, but damping of DE mode significantly on x and reaches the minimum as x = 0.7. The efficient coherent excitation of DE spin wave exhibits the promising application of Co{sub 2}Fe{sub 0.3}Mn{sub 0.7}Al films in magnonic devices.

  18. Analysis of non linear partially standing waves from 3D velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drevard, D.; Rey, V.; Svendsen, Ib; Fraunie, P.

    2003-04-01

    Surface gravity waves in the ocean exhibit an energy spectrum distributed in both frequency and direction of propagation. Wave data collection is of great importance in coastal zones for engineering and scientific studies. In particular, partially standing waves measurements near coastal structures and steep or barred beaches may be a requirement, for instance for morphodynamic studies. The aim of the present study is the analysis of partially standing surface waves icluding non-linear effects. According to 1st order Stokes theory, synchronous measurements of horizontal and vertical velocity components allow calculation of rate of standing waves (Drevard et al, 2003). In the present study, it is demonstrated that for deep water conditions, partially standing 2nd order Stokes waves induced velocity field is still represented by the 1st order solution for the velocity potential contrary to the surface elevation which exhibits harmonic components. For intermediate water depth, harmonic components appear not only in the surface elevation but also in the velocity fields, but their weight remains much smaller, because of the vertical decreasing wave induced motion. For irregular waves, the influence of the spectrum width on the non-linear effects in the analysis is discussed. Keywords: Wave measurements ; reflection ; non-linear effects Acknowledgements: This work was initiated during the stay of Prof. Ib Svendsen, as invited Professor, at LSEET in autumn 2002. This study is carried out in the framework of the Scientific French National Programmes PNEC ART7 and PATOM. Their financial supports are acknowledged References: Drevard, D., Meuret, A., Rey, V. Piazzola, J. And Dolle, A.. (2002). "Partially reflected waves measurements using Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV)", Submitted to ISOPE 03, Honolulu, Hawaii, May 2003.

  19. Detection, location, and analysis of earthquakes using seismic surface waves (Beno Gutenberg Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekström, Göran

    2015-04-01

    For shallow sources, Love and Rayleigh waves are the largest seismic phases recorded at teleseismic distances. The utility of these waves for earthquake characterization was traditionally limited to magnitude estimation, since geographically variable dispersion makes it difficult to determine useful travel-time information from the waveforms. Path delays due to heterogeneity of several tens of seconds are typical for waves at 50 sec period, and these delays must be accounted for with precision and accuracy in order to extract propagation-phase and source-phase information. Advances in tomographic mapping of global surface-wave phase velocities, and continuous growth and improvements of seismographic networks around the world, now make possible new applications of surface waves for earthquake monitoring and analysis. Through continuous back propagation of the long-period seismic wave field recorded by globally distributed stations, nearly all shallow earthquakes greater than M=5 can be detected and located with a precision of 25 km. Some of the detected events do not appear in standard earthquake catalogs and correspond to non-tectonic earthquakes, including landslides, glacier calving, and volcanic events. With the improved ability to predict complex propagation effects of surface waves across a heterogeneous Earth, moment-tensor and force representations of seismic sources can be routinely determined for all earthquakes greater than M=5 by waveform fitting of surface waves. A current area of progress in the use of surface waves for earthquake studies is the determination of precise relative locations of remote seismicity by systematic cross correlation and analysis of surface waves generated by neighboring sources. Preliminary results indicate that a location precision of 5 km may be achievable in many areas of the world.

  20. Analysis of wave propagation in sandwich plates with and without heavy fluid loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, S. V.

    2004-04-01

    The paper addresses wave motions in an unbounded sandwich plate with and without heavy fluid loading in a plane problem formulation. A sandwich plate is composed of two identical isotropic skin plies and an isotropic core ply. Several alternative theories for stationary dynamics of such a plate or a beam are derived, including a formulation in the framework of a theory of elasticity applied for a core ply. 'In-phase' and 'anti-phase' wave motions (with respect to transverse deflections of skins) of a sandwich beam are analyzed independently of each other. Dispersion curves obtained by the use of 'elementary' theories are compared with those obtained by the use of an 'exact' theory (which involves the theory of elasticity in a description of wave motion in a core ply) for a plate without fluid loading. It is shown that these simplified models are capable of giving a complete and accurate description of all propagating waves in not too high-frequency range, which is sufficient in practical naval and aerospace engineering. In the case of heavy fluid loading, similar analysis is performed for 'anti-phase' wave motions of a beam. Two simplified theories as well as an 'exact' one are extended to capture fluid loading effects. A good agreement between results obtained in 'elementary' and 'exact' problem formulations is demonstrated. The role of fluid's compressibility in the generation of propagating waves in a sandwich plate is explored. It is shown that, whereas analysis of wave motions in the case of an incompressible fluid predicts an existence of two propagating waves, only one such wave exists when a fluid is sufficiently compressible. The threshold magnitude of the ratio of a sound speed in an acoustic medium to a sound speed in a skin's material is found, which separates these two regimes of wave motions for a given set of parameters of sandwich plate composition.

  1. Surface Waves Properties in Cosserat Continuum: Construction of Solution and Analysis Using Wavelet Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulesh, M.; Holschneider, M.; Shardakov, I.

    2005-12-01

    The problem of the surface elastic wave propagation in the half-space within the framework of the Cosserat continuum has been considered. Medium deformation in this model is described not only by the displacement vector, but also by kinematically independent rotation vector. This model can be used for the description of the media with microstructure, for example concrete, sand, sandy-gravel mixture etc. At the same time the applications of these models almost do not exist in praxis, since there are no reliable data about the material properties in nonsymmetrical elasticity theory and in fact there are no experiments which can demonstrate the effects of couple-stress behavior in solid under deformation. The main result of presented work consist in fact, that within the framework of the Cosserat continuum in half-space besides elliptical Rayleigh wave can be in existence the surface shear wave with only transversal component. Geometrically such wave is equal to Love wave, but in classical elasticity theory existence of the Love wave as surface elastic wave is defined by presence of a layer on a half-space, and while a layer thickness vanishing the Love wave proceeds to a plane wave. Thus, in Cosserat medium the new wave mode is found out, and there is no analogue of it in classical elasticity theory. As a second result of presented work the method of the displacement seismogram inversion has been proposed. This method is based on continues wavelet transform and allows to restore the wave number, phase and group velocities. These results can be effectively used in possible experiments which are aimed at the detection of couple-stress effects in medium and further at the identification of material constants of nonsymmetrical elasticity theory. This work was supported by Russian Foundation of Fundamental Research under project 03-01-00561 and by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) within the framework of the priority program SPP 1114, Mathematical methods for time

  2. Stochastic sensitivity analysis for timing and amplitude of pressure waves in the arterial system.

    PubMed

    Eck, V G; Feinberg, J; Langtangen, H P; Hellevik, L R

    2015-04-01

    In the field of computational hemodynamics, sensitivity quantification of pressure and flow wave dynamics has received little attention. This work presents a novel study of the sensitivity of pressure-wave timing and amplitude in the arterial system with respect to arterial stiffness. Arterial pressure and flow waves were simulated with a one-dimensional distributed wave propagation model for compliant arterial networks. Sensitivity analysis of this model was based on a generalized polynomial chaos expansion evaluated by a stochastic collocation method. First-order statistical sensitivity indices were formulated to assess the effect of arterial stiffening on timing and amplitude of the pressure wave and backward-propagating pressure wave in the ascending aorta, at the maximum pressure and inflection point in the systolic phase. Only the stiffness of aortic arteries was found to significantly influence timing and amplitude of the backward-propagating pressure wave, whereas other large arteries in the systemic tree showed marginal impact. Furthermore, the ascending aorta, aortic arch, thoracic aorta, and infrarenal abdominal aorta had the largest influence on amplitude, whereas only the thoracic aorta influenced timing. Our results showed that the non-intrusive polynomial chaos expansion is an efficient method to compute statistical sensitivity measures for wave propagation models. These sensitivities provide new knowledge in the relative importance of arterial stiffness at various locations in the arterial network. Moreover, they will significantly influence clinical data collection and effective composition of the arterial tree for in-silico clinical studies.

  3. Spectrum analysis of seismic surface waves and its applications in seismic landmine detection.

    PubMed

    Alam, Mubashir; McClellan, James H; Scott, Waymond R

    2007-03-01

    In geophysics, spectrum analysis of surface waves (SASW) refers to a noninvasive method for soil characterization. However, the term spectrum analysis can be used in a wider sense to mean a method for determining and identifying various modes of seismic surface waves and their properties such as velocity, polarization, etc. Surface waves travel along the free boundary of a medium and can be easily detected with a transducer placed on the free surface of the boundary. A new method based on vector processing of space-time data obtained from an array of triaxial sensors is proposed to produce high-resolution, multimodal spectra from surface waves. Then individual modes can be identified in the spectrum and reconstructed in the space-time domain; also, reflected waves can be separated easily from forward waves in the spectrum domain. This new SASW method can be used for detecting and locating landmines by analyzing the reflected waves for resonance. Processing examples are presented for numerically generated data, experimental data collected in a laboratory setting, and field data.

  4. Analysis of expressed sequence tags generated from full-length enriched cDNA libraries of melon

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Melon (Cucumis melo), an economically important vegetable crop, belongs to the Cucurbitaceae family which includes several other important crops such as watermelon, cucumber, and pumpkin. It has served as a model system for sex determination and vascular biology studies. However, genomic resources currently available for melon are limited. Result We constructed eleven full-length enriched and four standard cDNA libraries from fruits, flowers, leaves, roots, cotyledons, and calluses of four different melon genotypes, and generated 71,577 and 22,179 ESTs from full-length enriched and standard cDNA libraries, respectively. These ESTs, together with ~35,000 ESTs available in public domains, were assembled into 24,444 unigenes, which were extensively annotated by comparing their sequences to different protein and functional domain databases, assigning them Gene Ontology (GO) terms, and mapping them onto metabolic pathways. Comparative analysis of melon unigenes and other plant genomes revealed that 75% to 85% of melon unigenes had homologs in other dicot plants, while approximately 70% had homologs in monocot plants. The analysis also identified 6,972 gene families that were conserved across dicot and monocot plants, and 181, 1,192, and 220 gene families specific to fleshy fruit-bearing plants, the Cucurbitaceae family, and melon, respectively. Digital expression analysis identified a total of 175 tissue-specific genes, which provides a valuable gene sequence resource for future genomics and functional studies. Furthermore, we identified 4,068 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and 3,073 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the melon EST collection. Finally, we obtained a total of 1,382 melon full-length transcripts through the analysis of full-length enriched cDNA clones that were sequenced from both ends. Analysis of these full-length transcripts indicated that sizes of melon 5' and 3' UTRs were similar to those of tomato, but longer than many other dicot

  5. Methodology of full-core Monte Carlo calculations with leakage parameter evaluations for benchmark critical experiment analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sboev, A. G.; Ilyashenko, A. S.; Vetrova, O. A.

    1997-02-01

    The method of bucking evaluation, realized in the MOnte Carlo code MCS, is described. This method was applied for calculational analysis of well known light water experiments TRX-1 and TRX-2. The analysis of this comparison shows, that there is no coincidence between Monte Carlo calculations, obtained by different ways: the MCS calculations with given experimental bucklings; the MCS calculations with given bucklings evaluated on base of full core MCS direct simulations; the full core MCNP and MCS direct simulations; the MCNP and MCS calculations, where the results of cell calculations are corrected by the coefficients taking into the account the leakage from the core. Also the buckling values evaluated by full core MCS calculations have differed from experimental ones, especially in the case of TRX-1, when this difference has corresponded to 0.5 percent increase of Keff value.

  6. Long-wave Marangoni convection in a layer of surfactant solution: Bifurcation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, M.; Oron, A.; Nepomnyashchy, A. A.

    2015-08-01

    We carry out a bifurcation analysis of the deformational mode of oscillatory Marangoni instability emerging in a heated layer of surfactant solution in the presence of the Soret effect and surfactant sorption at the free surface. The analysis is based on a set of long-wave evolution equations derived in our earlier work. By means of weakly nonlinear expansions about the instability threshold, we access the stability of a variety of convective patterns including single traveling and standing waves, superpositions of two traveling and two standing waves, and superpositions of three traveling waves. We have found that stability of convective patterns depends strongly on surfactant sorption; in particular, when adsorption is sufficiently strong the bifurcation is subcritical for any physically feasible value of system parameters.

  7. A light-curve distortion-wave analysis of eight RS Canum Venaticorum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caton, D. B.

    1986-01-01

    A program of differential U,B,V photometry of 14 RS CVn systems carried out at Rosemary Hill Observatory in 1978 - 1981 is described, and an analysis of the light curves for the characteristic distortion wave for eight of the systems is presented. The V light curves of the systems are shown. Significant waves were observed in RS CVn, RZ Eri, and RW UMa. No significant waves were found in UX Com, GK Hya, AR Lac, LX Per, or TY Pyx. Unusual light curve distortions were observed in UX Com and AR Lac.

  8. Finite element analysis of electromagnetic propagation in an absorbing wave guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, Kenneth J.

    1986-01-01

    Wave guides play a significant role in microwave space communication systems. The attenuation per unit length of the guide depends on its construction and design frequency range. A finite element Galerkin formulation has been developed to study TM electromagnetic propagation in complex two-dimensional absorbing wave guides. The analysis models the electromagnetic absorptive characteristics of a general wave guide which could be used to determine wall losses or simulate resistive terminations fitted into the ends of a guide. It is believed that the general conclusions drawn by using this simpler two-dimensional geometry will be fundamentally the same for other geometries.

  9. Wave Propagation in Exponentially Varying Cross-Section Rods and Vibration Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nikkhah-Bahrami, Mansour; Loghmani, Masih; Pooyanfar, Mostafa

    2008-09-01

    In this paper vibration as propagating waves is used to calculate frequencies of exponentially varying cross-section rods with various boundary conditions. From wave standpoint, vibrations propagate, reflect and transmit in structures. The propagation and reflection matrices are combined to provide a concise and systematic approach to free longitudinal vibration analysis of exponentially varying cross-section rods. The results are compared with another method.

  10. Wave-theory analysis of acousto-optic Bragg diffraction image formation.

    PubMed

    Mehrl, D J; Liu, Z C; Korpel, A

    1993-09-10

    We analyze anastigmatic Bragg diffraction imaging by use of an efficient numerical method that makes use of a plane-wave spectrum formalism applicable to weak acousto-optic diffraction involving threedimensional light and sound fields. Results from this wave-theory analysis are compared with previous results derived on the basis of ray theory, and are shown to be in good agreement, thus corroborating the validity of both techniques.

  11. Phase velocity spectrum analysis for a time delay comb transducer for guided wave mode excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Quarry, M J; Rose, J L

    2000-09-26

    A theoretical model for the analysis of ultrasonic guided wave mode excitation of a comb transducer with time delay features was developed. Time delay characteristics are included via a Fourier transform into the frequency domain. The phase velocity spectrum can be used to determine the mode excitation on the phase velocity dispersion curves for a given structure. Experimental and theoretical results demonstrate the tuning of guided wave modes using a time delay comb transducer.

  12. Polar Plasma Wave Investigation Data Analysis in the Extended Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, Donald A.; Hoffman, Robert A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This Summary of Research is being submitted to NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in fulfillment of the final reporting requirement under Grant NAG5-7943, which terminated on March 31, 2002. The following contains a summary of the significant accomplishments of the Polar Plasma Wave Investigation (PWI) team during the period of the grant, April 1, 1999 through March 31, 2002, and a listing of all of the publications that resulted from work carried out under the grant. Also included below is a listing of the numerous public outreach activities that took place during the period of the grant in which the Polar mission and Polar PWI science were discussed.

  13. Surface Acoustic Wave Monitor for Deposition and Analysis of Ultra-Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Jacqueline H. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) based thin film deposition monitor device and system for monitoring the deposition of ultra-thin films and nanomaterials and the analysis thereof is characterized by acoustic wave device embodiments that include differential delay line device designs, and which can optionally have integral reference devices fabricated on the same substrate as the sensing device, or on a separate device in thermal contact with the film monitoring/analysis device, in order to provide inherently temperature compensated measurements. These deposition monitor and analysis devices can include inherent temperature compensation, higher sensitivity to surface interactions than quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) devices, and the ability to operate at extreme temperatures.

  14. Rigorous coupled wave analysis of acousto-optics with relativistic considerations.

    PubMed

    Xia, Guoqiang; Zheng, Weijian; Lei, Zhenggang; Zhang, Ruolan

    2015-09-01

    A relativistic analysis of acousto-optics is presented, and a rigorous coupled wave analysis is generalized for the diffraction of the acousto-optical effect. An acoustic wave generates a grating with temporally and spatially modulated permittivity, hindering direct applications of the rigorous coupled wave analysis for the acousto-optical effect. In a reference frame which moves with the acoustic wave, the grating is static, the medium moves, and the coupled wave equations for the static grating may be derived. Floquet's theorem is then applied to cast these equations into an eigenproblem. Using a Lorentz transformation, the electromagnetic fields in the grating region are transformed to the lab frame where the medium is at rest, and relativistic Doppler frequency shifts are introduced into various diffraction orders. In the lab frame, the boundary conditions are considered and the diffraction efficiencies of various orders are determined. This method is rigorous and general, and the plane waves in the resulting expansion satisfy the dispersion relation of the medium and are propagation modes. Properties of various Bragg diffractions are results, rather than preconditions, of this method. Simulations of an acousto-optical tunable filter made by paratellurite, TeO(2), are given as examples. PMID:26367426

  15. Rigorous coupled wave analysis of acousto-optics with relativistic considerations.

    PubMed

    Xia, Guoqiang; Zheng, Weijian; Lei, Zhenggang; Zhang, Ruolan

    2015-09-01

    A relativistic analysis of acousto-optics is presented, and a rigorous coupled wave analysis is generalized for the diffraction of the acousto-optical effect. An acoustic wave generates a grating with temporally and spatially modulated permittivity, hindering direct applications of the rigorous coupled wave analysis for the acousto-optical effect. In a reference frame which moves with the acoustic wave, the grating is static, the medium moves, and the coupled wave equations for the static grating may be derived. Floquet's theorem is then applied to cast these equations into an eigenproblem. Using a Lorentz transformation, the electromagnetic fields in the grating region are transformed to the lab frame where the medium is at rest, and relativistic Doppler frequency shifts are introduced into various diffraction orders. In the lab frame, the boundary conditions are considered and the diffraction efficiencies of various orders are determined. This method is rigorous and general, and the plane waves in the resulting expansion satisfy the dispersion relation of the medium and are propagation modes. Properties of various Bragg diffractions are results, rather than preconditions, of this method. Simulations of an acousto-optical tunable filter made by paratellurite, TeO(2), are given as examples.

  16. A comprehensive analysis of ion cyclotron waves in the equatorial magnetosphere of Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meeks, Zachary; Simon, Sven; Kabanovic, Slawa

    2016-09-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of ion cyclotron waves in the equatorial magnetosphere of Saturn, considering all magnetic field data collected during the Cassini era (totaling to over 4 years of data from the equatorial plane). This dataset includes eight targeted flybys of Enceladus, three targeted flybys of Dione, and three targeted flybys of Rhea. Because all remaining orbits of Cassini are high-inclination, our study provides the complete map of ion cyclotron waves in Saturn's equatorial magnetosphere during the Cassini era. We provide catalogs of the radial and longitudinal dependencies of the occurrence rate and amplitude of the ion cyclotron fundamental and first harmonic wave modes. The fundamental wave mode is omnipresent between the orbits of Enceladus and Dione and evenly distributed across all Local Times. The occurrence rate of the fundamental mode displays a Fermi-Dirac-like profile with respect to radial distance from Saturn. Detection of the first harmonic mode is a rare event occurring in only 0.49% of measurements taken and always in conjunction with the fundamental mode. We also search for a dependency of the ion cyclotron wave field on the orbital positions of the icy moons Enceladus, Dione, and Rhea. On magnetospheric length scales, the wave field is independent of the moons' orbital positions. For Enceladus, we analyze wave amplitude profiles of seven close flybys (E9, E12, E13, E14, E17, E18, and E19), which occurred during the studied trajectory segments, to look for any local effects of Enceladan plume variability on the wave field. We find that even in the close vicinity of Enceladus, the wave amplitudes display no discernible dependency on Enceladus' angular distance to its orbital apocenter. Thus, the correlation between plume activity and angular distance to apocenter proposed by Hedman et al. (2013) does not leave a clearly distinguishable imprint in the ion cyclotron wave field.

  17. Wave Climate and Extreme Events Analysis in the Central Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morucci, S.; Inghilesi, R.; Orasi, A.; Nardone, G.

    2012-04-01

    Wind wave time series are serially correlated, have variable autocorrelation dependent on the geographic position and exhibit different properties on different time scales. While there is evidence of daily and seasonal periodicity, results for longer time scales are not yet conclusive, given the length of the available series. In fact, since the use of accelerometric buoys has been introduced in relatively recent times, waves time series are generally not longer than 30 years. In this study, the statistical analysis on more than 2 decades of wave data, collected on 15 locations in the Central Mediterranean Sea all around the Italian coasts, is presented. Wave recordings have been taken from the archive of the Italian National Wind Wave Measurement Network (RON), run by ISPRA since 1989. An effort has been made in order to provide a common level of homogeneity and quality control to the series. The statistics considered are mainly the Joint Frequency Functions of significant wave heights with respect to directions, peak periods and mean periods. The distribution of significant wave heights and direction, known as 'wave climate', is shown in the form of two-entries tables and wind roses. In order to determine the relative importance of the historical storms in terms of the return times and to estimate the expected values of the wave heights over several decades, the Peak Over Threshold method is applied to sets of independent events extracted from each series. Attention has been focused on the determination of the independent events introducing a specific threshold in the autocorrelation function. Even though the series are limited to a 22 years period, the analysis gives valuable information about the spatial distribution of the storms and their variability on a decadal time scale in the Central Mediterranean Sea.

  18. Pseudospectral modeling and dispersion analysis of Rayleigh waves in viscoelastic media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, K.; Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Chen, C.

    2011-01-01

    Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) is one of the most widely used techniques in environmental and engineering geophysics to determine shear-wave velocities and dynamic properties, which is based on the elastic layered system theory. Wave propagation in the Earth, however, has been recognized as viscoelastic and the propagation of Rayleigh waves presents substantial differences in viscoelastic media as compared with elastic media. Therefore, it is necessary to carry out numerical simulation and dispersion analysis of Rayleigh waves in viscoelastic media to better understand Rayleigh-wave behaviors in the real world. We apply a pseudospectral method to the calculation of the spatial derivatives using a Chebyshev difference operator in the vertical direction and a Fourier difference operator in the horizontal direction based on the velocity-stress elastodynamic equations and relations of linear viscoelastic solids. This approach stretches the spatial discrete grid to have a minimum grid size near the free surface so that high accuracy and resolution are achieved at the free surface, which allows an effective incorporation of the free surface boundary conditions since the Chebyshev method is nonperiodic. We first use an elastic homogeneous half-space model to demonstrate the accuracy of the pseudospectral method comparing with the analytical solution, and verify the correctness of the numerical modeling results for a viscoelastic half-space comparing the phase velocities of Rayleigh wave between the theoretical values and the dispersive image generated by high-resolution linear Radon transform. We then simulate three types of two-layer models to analyze dispersive-energy characteristics for near-surface applications. Results demonstrate that the phase velocity of Rayleigh waves in viscoelastic media is relatively higher than in elastic media and the fundamental mode increases by 10-16% when the frequency is above 10. Hz due to the velocity dispersion of P

  19. Analysis of millimeter-wave imaging and detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanigan, W.; Butler, E.; Duffy, E.; Mc Auley, I.; Young, L.; Gradziel, M.; O'Sullivan, C.; Murphy, J. A.; May, R.; Trappe, N.

    2007-02-01

    The properties of terahertz (THz) radiation potentially make it ideal for medical imaging but the difficulty of producing laboratory sources and detectors has meant that it is the last unexplored part of the electromagnetic spectrum. In this paper we report on near-field reflection and absorption measurements of biological samples at 0.1THz as a first step towards developing THz and millimetre-wave imaging schemes. Variation of the absorption and reflection of THz in these samples is investigated as a means of determining information about the sample structure. Operating at 100 GHz with standard detecting devices we illustrate preliminary results in imaging (transmission and reflection) measurements of meat samples using various optical configurations and draw conclusions on the scope of the techniques. Some encouraging provisional results are discussed as well as limitations in "intensity only" measurements due, primarily, to standing waves and a lack of dynamic range. These experiments were performed as part of a Masters thesis. A discussion on a variety of absorbing materials utilized to reduce reflected radiation from surrounding optical components is also given. In addition we report on initial trials in extracting information about an object's size by sparsely measuring points in the equivalent Fourier plane in a simple optical setup, thus avoiding the need for time consuming raster scanning. This technique has many potential applications in detecting and scanning systems. Here the background theory and preliminary results are presented.

  20. Small Explorer project: Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite (SWAS). Mission operations and data analysis plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melnick, Gary J.

    1990-01-01

    The Mission Operations and Data Analysis Plan is presented for the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite (SWAS) Project. It defines organizational responsibilities, discusses target selection and navigation, specifies instrument command and data requirements, defines data reduction and analysis hardware and software requirements, and discusses mission operations center staffing requirements.