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Sample records for full-length enriched cdna

  1. cDNA Library Enrichment of Full Length Transcripts for SMRT Long Read Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, Benjamin; Reinhardt, Richard; Schneeberger, Korbinian

    2016-01-01

    The utility of genome assemblies does not only rely on the quality of the assembled genome sequence, but also on the quality of the gene annotations. The Pacific Biosciences Iso-Seq technology is a powerful support for accurate eukaryotic gene model annotation as it allows for direct readout of full-length cDNA sequences without the need for noisy short read-based transcript assembly. We propose the implementation of the TeloPrime Full Length cDNA Amplification kit to the Pacific Biosciences Iso-Seq technology in order to enrich for genuine full-length transcripts in the cDNA libraries. We provide evidence that TeloPrime outperforms the commonly used SMARTer PCR cDNA Synthesis Kit in identifying transcription start and end sites in Arabidopsis thaliana. Furthermore, we show that TeloPrime-based Pacific Biosciences Iso-Seq can be successfully applied to the polyploid genome of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) not only to efficiently annotate gene models, but also to identify novel transcription sites, gene homeologs, splicing isoforms and previously unidentified gene loci. PMID:27327613

  2. Analysis of expressed sequence tags generated from full-length enriched cDNA libraries of melon

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Melon (Cucumis melo), an economically important vegetable crop, belongs to the Cucurbitaceae family which includes several other important crops such as watermelon, cucumber, and pumpkin. It has served as a model system for sex determination and vascular biology studies. However, genomic resources currently available for melon are limited. Result We constructed eleven full-length enriched and four standard cDNA libraries from fruits, flowers, leaves, roots, cotyledons, and calluses of four different melon genotypes, and generated 71,577 and 22,179 ESTs from full-length enriched and standard cDNA libraries, respectively. These ESTs, together with ~35,000 ESTs available in public domains, were assembled into 24,444 unigenes, which were extensively annotated by comparing their sequences to different protein and functional domain databases, assigning them Gene Ontology (GO) terms, and mapping them onto metabolic pathways. Comparative analysis of melon unigenes and other plant genomes revealed that 75% to 85% of melon unigenes had homologs in other dicot plants, while approximately 70% had homologs in monocot plants. The analysis also identified 6,972 gene families that were conserved across dicot and monocot plants, and 181, 1,192, and 220 gene families specific to fleshy fruit-bearing plants, the Cucurbitaceae family, and melon, respectively. Digital expression analysis identified a total of 175 tissue-specific genes, which provides a valuable gene sequence resource for future genomics and functional studies. Furthermore, we identified 4,068 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and 3,073 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the melon EST collection. Finally, we obtained a total of 1,382 melon full-length transcripts through the analysis of full-length enriched cDNA clones that were sequenced from both ends. Analysis of these full-length transcripts indicated that sizes of melon 5' and 3' UTRs were similar to those of tomato, but longer than many other dicot

  3. Characterization of expressed sequence tags from a full-length enriched cDNA library of Cryptomeria japonica male strobili

    PubMed Central

    Futamura, Norihiro; Totoki, Yasushi; Toyoda, Atsushi; Igasaki, Tomohiro; Nanjo, Tokihiko; Seki, Motoaki; Sakaki, Yoshiyuki; Mari, Adriano; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Shinohara, Kenji

    2008-01-01

    Background Cryptomeria japonica D. Don is one of the most commercially important conifers in Japan. However, the allergic disease caused by its pollen is a severe public health problem in Japan. Since large-scale analysis of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) in the male strobili of C. japonica should help us to clarify the overall expression of genes during the process of pollen development, we constructed a full-length enriched cDNA library that was derived from male strobili at various developmental stages. Results We obtained 36,011 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from either one or both ends of 19,437 clones derived from the cDNA library of C. japonica male strobili at various developmental stages. The 19,437 cDNA clones corresponded to 10,463 transcripts. Approximately 80% of the transcripts resembled ESTs from Pinus and Picea, while approximately 75% had homologs in Arabidopsis. An analysis of homologies between ESTs from C. japonica male strobili and known pollen allergens in the Allergome Database revealed that products of 180 transcripts exhibited significant homology. Approximately 2% of the transcripts appeared to encode transcription factors. We identified twelve genes for MADS-box proteins among these transcription factors. The twelve MADS-box genes were classified as DEF/GLO/GGM13-, AG-, AGL6-, TM3- and TM8-like MIKCC genes and type I MADS-box genes. Conclusion Our full-length enriched cDNA library derived from C. japonica male strobili provides information on expression of genes during the development of male reproductive organs. We provided potential allergens in C. japonica. We also provided new information about transcription factors including MADS-box genes expressed in male strobili of C. japonica. Large-scale gene discovery using full-length cDNAs is a valuable tool for studies of gymnosperm species. PMID:18691438

  4. Full-length enriched cDNA libraries and ORFeome analysis of sugarcane hybrid and ancestor genotypes.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Milton Yutaka; Ferreira, Savio Siqueira; Tang, Pei-Zhong; Becker, Scott; Pörtner-Taliana, Antje; Souza, Glaucia Mendes

    2014-01-01

    Sugarcane is a major crop used for food and bioenergy production. Modern cultivars are hybrids derived from crosses between Saccharum officinarum and Saccharum spontaneum. Hybrid cultivars combine favorable characteristics from ancestral species and contain a genome that is highly polyploid and aneuploid, containing 100-130 chromosomes. These complex genomes represent a huge challenge for molecular studies and for the development of biotechnological tools that can facilitate sugarcane improvement. Here, we describe full-length enriched cDNA libraries for Saccharum officinarum, Saccharum spontaneum, and one hybrid genotype (SP803280) and analyze the set of open reading frames (ORFs) in their genomes (i.e., their ORFeomes). We found 38,195 (19%) sugarcane-specific transcripts that did not match transcripts from other databases. Less than 1.6% of all transcripts were ancestor-specific (i.e., not expressed in SP803280). We also found 78,008 putative new sugarcane transcripts that were absent in the largest sugarcane expressed sequence tag database (SUCEST). Functional annotation showed a high frequency of protein kinases and stress-related proteins. We also detected natural antisense transcript expression, which mapped to 94% of all plant KEGG pathways; however, each genotype showed different pathways enriched in antisense transcripts. Our data appeared to cover 53.2% (17,563 genes) and 46.8% (937 transcription factors) of all sugarcane full-length genes and transcription factors, respectively. This work represents a significant advancement in defining the sugarcane ORFeome and will be useful for protein characterization, single nucleotide polymorphism and splicing variant identification, evolutionary and comparative studies, and sugarcane genome assembly and annotation.

  5. Construction of a Full-Length Enriched cDNA Library and Preliminary Analysis of Expressed Sequence Tags from Bengal Tiger Panthera tigris tigris

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changqing; Liu, Dan; Guo, Yu; Lu, Taofeng; Li, Xiangchen; Zhang, Minghai; Ma, Jianzhang; Ma, Yuehui; Guan, Weijun

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a full-length enriched cDNA library was successfully constructed from Bengal tiger, Panthera tigris tigris, the most well-known wild Animal. Total RNA was extracted from cultured Bengal tiger fibroblasts in vitro. The titers of primary and amplified libraries were 1.28 × 106 pfu/mL and 1.56 × 109 pfu/mL respectively. The percentage of recombinants from unamplified library was 90.2% and average length of exogenous inserts was 0.98 kb. A total of 212 individual ESTs with sizes ranging from 356 to 1108 bps were then analyzed. The BLASTX score revealed that 48.1% of the sequences were classified as a strong match, 45.3% as nominal and 6.6% as a weak match. Among the ESTs with known putative function, 26.4% ESTs were found to be related to all kinds of metabolisms, 19.3% ESTs to information storage and processing, 11.3% ESTs to posttranslational modification, protein turnover, chaperones, 11.3% ESTs to transport, 9.9% ESTs to signal transducer/cell communication, 9.0% ESTs to structure protein, 3.8% ESTs to cell cycle, and only 6.6% ESTs classified as novel genes. By EST sequencing, a full-length gene coding ferritin was identified and characterized. The recombinant plasmid pET32a-TAT-Ferritin was constructed, coded for the TAT-Ferritin fusion protein with two 6× His-tags in N and C-terminal. After BCA assay, the concentration of soluble Trx-TAT-Ferritin recombinant protein was 2.32 ± 0.12 mg/mL. These results demonstrated that the reliability and representativeness of the cDNA library attained to the requirements of a standard cDNA library. This library provided a useful platform for the functional genome and transcriptome research of Bengal tigers. PMID:23708105

  6. Generation and analysis of a large-scale expressed sequence tags from a full-length enriched cDNA library of Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica).

    PubMed

    Guo, Yu; Liu, Changqing; Lu, Taofeng; Liu, Dan; Bai, Chunyu; Li, Xiangchen; Ma, Yuehui; Guan, Weijun

    2014-05-15

    In this study, a full-length enriched cDNA library was successfully constructed from Siberian tiger, the world's most endangered species. The titers of primary and amplified libraries were 1.28×10(6)pfu/mL and 1.59×10(10)pfu/mL respectively. The proportion of recombinants from unamplified library was 91.3% and the average length of exogenous inserts was 1.06kb. A total of 279 individual ESTs with sizes ranging from 316 to 1258bps were then analyzed. Furthermore, 204 unigenes were successfully annotated and involved in 49 functions of the GO classification, cell (175, 85.5%), cellular process (165, 80.9%), and binding (152, 74.5%) are the dominant terms. 198 unigenes were assigned to 156 KEGG pathways, and the pathways with the most representation are metabolic pathways (18, 9.1%). The proportion pattern of each COG subcategory was similar among Panthera tigris altaica, P. tigris tigris and Homo sapiens, and general function prediction only cluster (44, 15.8%) represents the largest group, followed by translation, ribosomal structure and biogenesis (33, 11.8%), replication, recombination and repair (24, 8.6%), and only 7.2% ESTs classified as novel genes. Moreover, the recombinant plasmid pET32a-TAT-COL6A2 was constructed, coded for the Trx-TAT-COL6A2 fusion protein with two 6× His-tags in N and C-terminal. After BCA assay, the concentration of soluble Trx-TAT-COL6A2 recombinant protein was 2.64±0.18mg/mL. This library will provide a useful platform for the functional genome and transcriptome research of for the P. tigris and other felid animals in the future.

  7. A drosophila full-length cDNA resource

    SciTech Connect

    Stapleton, Mark; Carlson, Joseph; Brokstein, Peter; Yu, Charles; Champe, Mark; George, Reed; Guarin, Hannibal; Kronmiller, Brent; Pacleb, Joanne; Park, Soo; Rubin, Gerald M.; Celniker, Susan E.

    2003-05-09

    Background: A collection of sequenced full-length cDNAs is an important resource both for functional genomics studies and for the determination of the intron-exon structure of genes. Providing this resource to the Drosophila melanogaster research community has been a long-term goal of the Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project. We have previously described the Drosophila Gene Collection (DGC), a set of putative full-length cDNAs that was produced by generating and analyzing over 250,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) derived from a variety of tissues and developmental stages. Results: We have generated high-quality full-insert sequence for 8,921 clones in the DGC. We compared the sequence of these clones to the annotated Release 3 genomic sequence, and identified more than 5,300 cDNAs that contain a complete and accurate protein-coding sequence. This corresponds to at least one splice form for 40 percent of the predicted D. melanogaster genes. We also identified potential new cases of RNA editing. Conclusions: We show that comparison of cDNA sequences to a high-quality annotated genomic sequence is an effective approach to identifying and eliminating defective clones from a cDNA collection and ensure its utility for experimentation. Clones were eliminated either because they carry single nucleotide discrepancies, which most probably result from reverse transcriptase errors, or because they are truncated and contain only part of the protein-coding sequence.

  8. Construction and Evaluation of Normalized cDNA Libraries Enriched with Full-Length Sequences for Rapid Discovery of New Genes from Sisal (Agave sisalana Perr.) Different Developmental Stages

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wen-Zhao; Zhang, Yan-Mei; Lu, Jun-Ying; Li, Jun-Feng

    2012-01-01

    To provide a resource of sisal-specific expressed sequence data and facilitate this powerful approach in new gene research, the preparation of normalized cDNA libraries enriched with full-length sequences is necessary. Four libraries were produced with RNA pooled from Agave sisalana multiple tissues to increase efficiency of normalization and maximize the number of independent genes by SMART™ method and the duplex-specific nuclease (DSN). This procedure kept the proportion of full-length cDNAs in the subtracted/normalized libraries and dramatically enhanced the discovery of new genes. Sequencing of 3875 cDNA clones of libraries revealed 3320 unigenes with an average insert length about 1.2 kb, indicating that the non-redundancy of libraries was about 85.7%. These unigene functions were predicted by comparing their sequences to functional domain databases and extensively annotated with Gene Ontology (GO) terms. Comparative analysis of sisal unigenes and other plant genomes revealed that four putative MADS-box genes and knotted-like homeobox (knox) gene were obtained from a total of 1162 full-length transcripts. Furthermore, real-time PCR showed that the characteristics of their transcripts mainly depended on the tight expression regulation of a number of genes during the leaf and flower development. Analysis of individual library sequence data indicated that the pooled-tissue approach was highly effective in discovering new genes and preparing libraries for efficient deep sequencing. PMID:23202944

  9. Construction and evaluation of normalized cDNA libraries enriched with full-length sequences for rapid discovery of new genes from Sisal (Agave sisalana Perr.) different developmental stages.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wen-Zhao; Zhang, Yan-Mei; Lu, Jun-Ying; Li, Jun-Feng

    2012-10-12

    To provide a resource of sisal-specific expressed sequence data and facilitate this powerful approach in new gene research, the preparation of normalized cDNA libraries enriched with full-length sequences is necessary. Four libraries were produced with RNA pooled from Agave sisalana multiple tissues to increase efficiency of normalization and maximize the number of independent genes by SMART™ method and the duplex-specific nuclease (DSN). This procedure kept the proportion of full-length cDNAs in the subtracted/normalized libraries and dramatically enhanced the discovery of new genes. Sequencing of 3875 cDNA clones of libraries revealed 3320 unigenes with an average insert length about 1.2 kb, indicating that the non-redundancy of libraries was about 85.7%. These unigene functions were predicted by comparing their sequences to functional domain databases and extensively annotated with Gene Ontology (GO) terms. Comparative analysis of sisal unigenes and other plant genomes revealed that four putative MADS-box genes and knotted-like homeobox (knox) gene were obtained from a total of 1162 full-length transcripts. Furthermore, real-time PCR showed that the characteristics of their transcripts mainly depended on the tight expression regulation of a number of genes during the leaf and flower development. Analysis of individual library sequence data indicated that the pooled-tissue approach was highly effective in discovering new genes and preparing libraries for efficient deep sequencing.

  10. Targeting a complex transcriptome: the construction of the mouse full-length cDNA encyclopedia.

    PubMed

    Carninci, Piero; Waki, Kazunori; Shiraki, Toshiyuki; Konno, Hideaki; Shibata, Kazuhiro; Itoh, Masayoshi; Aizawa, Katsunori; Arakawa, Takahiro; Ishii, Yoshiyuki; Sasaki, Daisuke; Bono, Hidemasa; Kondo, Shinji; Sugahara, Yuichi; Saito, Rintaro; Osato, Naoki; Fukuda, Shiro; Sato, Kenjiro; Watahiki, Akira; Hirozane-Kishikawa, Tomoko; Nakamura, Mari; Shibata, Yuko; Yasunishi, Ayako; Kikuchi, Noriko; Yoshiki, Atsushi; Kusakabe, Moriaki; Gustincich, Stefano; Beisel, Kirk; Pavan, William; Aidinis, Vassilis; Nakagawara, Akira; Held, William A; Iwata, Hiroo; Kono, Tomohiro; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Lyons, Paul; Wells, Christine; Hume, David A; Fagiolini, Michela; Hensch, Takao K; Brinkmeier, Michelle; Camper, Sally; Hirota, Junji; Mombaerts, Peter; Muramatsu, Masami; Okazaki, Yasushi; Kawai, Jun; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2003-06-01

    We report the construction of the mouse full-length cDNA encyclopedia,the most extensive view of a complex transcriptome,on the basis of preparing and sequencing 246 libraries. Before cloning,cDNAs were enriched in full-length by Cap-Trapper,and in most cases,aggressively subtracted/normalized. We have produced 1,442,236 successful 3'-end sequences clustered into 171,144 groups, from which 60,770 clones were fully sequenced cDNAs annotated in the FANTOM-2 annotation. We have also produced 547,149 5' end reads,which clustered into 124,258 groups. Altogether, these cDNAs were further grouped in 70,000 transcriptional units (TU),which represent the best coverage of a transcriptome so far. By monitoring the extent of normalization/subtraction, we define the tentative equivalent coverage (TEC),which was estimated to be equivalent to >12,000,000 ESTs derived from standard libraries. High coverage explains discrepancies between the very large numbers of clusters (and TUs) of this project,which also include non-protein-coding RNAs,and the lower gene number estimation of genome annotations. Altogether,5'-end clusters identify regions that are potential promoters for 8637 known genes and 5'-end clusters suggest the presence of almost 63,000 transcriptional starting points. An estimate of the frequency of polyadenylation signals suggests that at least half of the singletons in the EST set represent real mRNAs. Clones accounting for about half of the predicted TUs await further sequencing. The continued high-discovery rate suggests that the task of transcriptome discovery is not yet complete.

  11. Targeting a Complex Transcriptome: The Construction of the Mouse Full-Length cDNA Encyclopedia

    PubMed Central

    Carninci, Piero; Waki, Kazunori; Shiraki, Toshiyuki; Konno, Hideaki; Shibata, Kazuhiro; Itoh, Masayoshi; Aizawa, Katsunori; Arakawa, Takahiro; Ishii, Yoshiyuki; Sasaki, Daisuke; Bono, Hidemasa; Kondo, Shinji; Sugahara, Yuichi; Saito, Rintaro; Osato, Naoki; Fukuda, Shiro; Sato, Kenjiro; Watahiki, Akira; Hirozane-Kishikawa, Tomoko; Nakamura, Mari; Shibata, Yuko; Yasunishi, Ayako; Kikuchi, Noriko; Yoshiki, Atsushi; Kusakabe, Moriaki; Gustincich, Stefano; Beisel, Kirk; Pavan, William; Aidinis, Vassilis; Nakagawara, Akira; Held, William A.; Iwata, Hiroo; Kono, Tomohiro; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Lyons, Paul; Wells, Christine; Hume, David A.; Fagiolini, Michela; Hensch, Takao K.; Brinkmeier, Michelle; Camper, Sally; Hirota, Junji; Mombaerts, Peter; Muramatsu, Masami; Okazaki, Yasushi; Kawai, Jun; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2003-01-01

    We report the construction of the mouse full-length cDNA encyclopedia,the most extensive view of a complex transcriptome,on the basis of preparing and sequencing 246 libraries. Before cloning,cDNAs were enriched in full-length by Cap-Trapper,and in most cases,aggressively subtracted/normalized. We have produced 1,442,236 successful 3′-end sequences clustered into 171,144 groups, from which 60,770 clones were fully sequenced cDNAs annotated in the FANTOM-2 annotation. We have also produced 547,149 5′ end reads,which clustered into 124,258 groups. Altogether, these cDNAs were further grouped in 70,000 transcriptional units (TU),which represent the best coverage of a transcriptome so far. By monitoring the extent of normalization/subtraction, we define the tentative equivalent coverage (TEC),which was estimated to be equivalent to >12,000,000 ESTs derived from standard libraries. High coverage explains discrepancies between the very large numbers of clusters (and TUs) of this project,which also include non-protein-coding RNAs,and the lower gene number estimation of genome annotations. Altogether,5′-end clusters identify regions that are potential promoters for 8637 known genes and 5′-end clusters suggest the presence of almost 63,000 transcriptional starting points. An estimate of the frequency of polyadenylation signals suggests that at least half of the singletons in the EST set represent real mRNAs. Clones accounting for about half of the predicted TUs await further sequencing. The continued high-discovery rate suggests that the task of transcriptome discovery is not yet complete. PMID:12819125

  12. Construction of a full-length infectious cDNA clone of Cowpea mild mottle virus.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Silvia L; Nagata, Tatsuya; Junqueira, Bruna R; Zanardo, Larissa G; Paiva, Ana C S; Carvalho, Claudine M

    2017-02-01

    Infectious cDNA clones are an important tool to study the molecular and cellular process of RNA virus infection. In vitro and in vivo transcription systems are the two main strategies used in the generation of infectious cDNA clones for RNA viruses. This study describes the first generation of a full-length infectious cDNA clone of Cowpea mild mottle virus (CPMMV), a Carlavirus. The full-length genome was synthesized by Overlap Extension PCR of two overlapping fragments and cloned in a pUC-based vector under control of the SP6 RNA polymerase promoter. After in vitro run-off transcription, the produced RNA was mechanically inoculated into soybean plants cv. CD206. The systemic infection was confirmed by RT-PCR and further sequencing of amplified cDNA fragments. To simplify the transfection process, the complete genome was subcloned into a binary vector under control of the 35S promoter of cauliflower mosaic virus by the Gibson Assembly protocol. The resulting clones were inoculated by particle bombardment onto soybean seedlings and the recovery of the virus was confirmed 2 weeks later by RT-PCR. Our results indicate the constructs of the full-length cDNA of CPMMV are fully infectious in both in vitro and in vivo transcription strategies.

  13. High-efficiency cloning of full-length cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Okayama, H; Berg, P

    1982-01-01

    A widely recognized difficulty of presently used methods for cDNA cloning is obtaining cDNA segments that contain the entire nucleotide sequence of the corresponding mRNA. The cloning procedure described here mitigates this shortcoming. Of the 10(5) plasmid-cDNA recombinants obtained per microgram of rabbit reticulocyte mRNA, about 10% contained a complete alpha- of beta-globin mRNA sequence, and at least 30 to 50%, but very likely more, contained the entire globin coding regions. We attribute the high efficiency of cloning full- or nearly full-length cDNA to (i) the fact that the plasmid DNA vector itself serves as the primer for first- and second-strand cDNA synthesis, (ii) the lack of any nuclease treatment of the products, and (iii) the fact that one of the steps in the procedure results in preferential cloning of recombinants with full-length cDNA's over those with truncated cDNA's. Images PMID:6287227

  14. Construction of an infectious full-length cDNA clone of potato virus M.

    PubMed

    Flatken, S; Ungewickell, V; Menzel, W; Maiss, E

    2008-01-01

    An infectious full-length cDNA clone of potato virus M (PVM) was produced. Total RNA was extracted from PVM-infected Nicotiana hesperis plants and used for cDNA synthesis. Subsequent RT-PCR produced two DNA fragments of about 5.5 and 3.2 kbp, which were ligated downstream of an enhanced 35S cauliflower mosaic virus promoter. After cloning of the enhanced 35S promoter with the PVM sequence into a modified pBIN19 plasmid and electroporation of Agrobacterium tumefaciens, the agroinoculated PVM full-length clone (pPVM-flc) led to systemic PVM infections in different host plants, causing symptoms indistinguishable from those caused by wild-type PVM.

  15. Generation of Arabidopsis mutants by heterologous expression of a full length cDNA library from tomato fruits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heterologous expression of cDNA libraries in Arabidopsis and other plants has been used for gene identifications. To identify functions of tomato genes, we expressed a tomato full-length cDNA library in Arabidopsis thaliana and generated over 7,000 mutants. We constructed a tomato cDNA library with ...

  16. Screening of novel malaria DNA vaccine candidates using full-length cDNA library.

    PubMed

    Shibui, Akiko; Nakae, Susumu; Watanabe, Junichi; Sato, Yoshitaka; Tolba, Mohammed E M; Doi, Junko; Shiibashi, Takashi; Nogami, Sadao; Sugano, Sumio; Hozumi, Nobumichi

    2013-11-01

    No licensed malaria vaccine exists, in spite of intensive development efforts. We have been investigating development of a DNA vaccine to prevent malaria infection. To date, we have established a full-length cDNA expression library from the erythrocytic-stage murine malaria parasite, Plasmodium berghei. We found that immunization of mice with combined 2000 clones significantly prolonged survival after challenge infection and that splenocytes from the immunized mice showed parasite-specific cytokine production. We determined the 5'-end one-pass sequence of these clones and mapped a draft genomic sequence for P. berghei for use in screening vaccine candidates for efficacy. In this study, we annotated these cDNA clones by comparing them with the genomic sequence of Plasmodium falciparum. We then divided them into several subsets based on their characteristics and examined their protective effects against malaria infection. Consequently, we selected 104 clones that strongly induced specific IgG production and decreased the mortality rate in the early phase. Most of these 104 clones coded for unknown proteins. The results suggest that these clones represent potential novel malaria vaccine candidates.

  17. Construction, characterization and expression of full length cDNA clone of sheep YAP1 gene.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Li, Da; Su, Rui; Musa, Hassan H; Chen, Ling; Zhou, Hong

    2014-02-01

    RT-PCR, 5'RACE, 3'RACE were used to clone sheep full length cDNA sequence of YAP1 (Yes-associated protein 1), eukaryotic expression plasmid and a mutant that cannot be phosphorylated at Ser42 was successfully constructed. The amino acid sequence analysis revealed that sheep YAP1 gene encoded water-soluble protein and its relative molecular weight and isoelectric point was 44,079.0 Da and 4.91, respectively. Sub-cellular localization of YAP1 was in the nucleus, it is hydrophilic non-transmembrane and non-secreted protein. YAP1 protein contained 33 phosphorylation sites, seven glycosylation sites and two WW domains. The secondary structure of YAP1 was mainly composed of random coil, while the tertiary structure of domain area showed a forniciform helix structure. YAP1 gene was expressed in different tissues, the highest expression was in kidney and the lowest was in hypothalamus. The CDS of sheep YAP1was amplified by RT-PCR from healthy sheep longissimus dorsi muscle, cloned into pMD19-T simple vector by T/A ligation. YAP1 coding region was further sub-cloned into pEGFP-C1 vector by T4 Ligase to construct a eukaryotic expression plasmid and then make the eukaryotic expression vector as the template to construct the phosphorylation site mutant. PCR, restriction enzyme and sequencing were used to confirm the recombinant plasmid. The sheep full-length YAP1 cDNA sequence is 1712 in length encoding 403 amino acids. It was confirmed that the sheep YAP1 CDS was correctly inserted into eukaryotic expression vector and serine had been mutated to alanine by PCR, restriction digestion and sequencing. The result showed that the recombinant plasmid pEGFP-C1-YAP1 and pEGFP-C1-YAP1 S42A was constructed correctly, this will help for further studies on the YAP1 protein expression and its biological activities.

  18. Recovery of duck hepatitis A virus 3 from a stable full-length infectious cDNA clone.

    PubMed

    Pan, Meng; Yang, Xiaorong; Du, Jige; Zhou, Lei; Ge, Xinna; Guo, Xin; Liu, Jinhua; Zhang, Dabing; Yang, Hanchun

    2011-09-01

    Recently, duck hepatitis A virus 3 (DHAV-3) with genetically distinct characteristics from DHAV-1 and DHAV-2 was recognized in South Korea and China. In this short communication, we successfully constructed a stable full-length infectious cDNA clone derived from DHAV-3 by solving instability of cloned full-length cDNA in Escherichia coli (E. coli). The cDNA fragments amplified from the genome of DHAV-3 were assembled and inserted into a low-copy-number plasmid. Finally, a full-length cDNA clone containing an engineered SacII site that served as a genetic marker was obtained. The cDNA clone showed stable by serial passages in E. coli when propagated at 25°C under low level of antibiotic selection. BHK-21 cells were transfected with transcribed RNA from the full-length cDNA clone; infectious viral particles were rescued, showing its fatality to 10-day-old duck embryos. The results indicated that the constructed full-length cDNA clone of DHAV-3 is infectious. By various virological assays, our results indicated that the rescued virus exhibited similar biological properties with the parental virus. Animal experiments revealed that the rescued virus retained the high pathogenicity to 1-day-old ducklings and could induce a fatal hepatitis indistinguishable from its parental virus. Our present studies provide a useful tool for future research on genomic functions and molecular pathogenesis of DHAV-3.

  19. Identification of Putative Noncoding RNAs Among the RIKEN Mouse Full-Length cDNA Collection

    PubMed Central

    Numata, Koji; Kanai, Akio; Saito, Rintaro; Kondo, Shinji; Adachi, Jun; Wilming, Laurens G.; Hume, David A.; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Tomita, Masaru

    2003-01-01

    With the sequencing and annotation of genomes and transcriptomes of several eukaryotes, the importance of noncoding RNA (ncRNA)—RNA molecules that are not translated to protein products—has become more evident. A subclass of ncRNA transcripts are encoded by highly regulated, multi-exon, transcriptional units, are processed like typical protein-coding mRNAs and are increasingly implicated in regulation of many cellular functions in eukaryotes. This study describes the identification of candidate functional ncRNAs from among the RIKEN mouse full-length cDNA collection, which contains 60,770 sequences, by using a systematic computational filtering approach. We initially searched for previously reported ncRNAs and found nine murine ncRNAs and homologs of several previously described nonmouse ncRNAs. Through our computational approach to filter artifact-free clones that lack protein coding potential, we extracted 4280 transcripts as the largest-candidate set. Many clones in the set had EST hits, potential CpG islands surrounding the transcription start sites, and homologies with the human genome. This implies that many candidates are indeed transcribed in a regulated manner. Our results demonstrate that ncRNAs are a major functional subclass of processed transcripts in mammals. PMID:12819127

  20. Giardia canis: ultrastructural analysis of G. canis trophozoites transfected with full length G. canis virus cDNA transcripts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Giardia canis virus (GCV) is a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) virus of the family Totiviridae. In this study, the full-length cDNA of the G. canis virus was constructed in pPoly2/sfinot vector and RNA was transcribed in vitro. Virus-free G. canis trophozoites were transfected with in vitro transcribed ...

  1. Polymerase reaction without primers throughout for the reconstruction of full-length cDNA from products of rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE).

    PubMed

    Sunohara, Mitsuhiro; Kawakami, Masanori; Kage, Hidenori; Watanabe, Kousuke; Emoto, Noriko; Nagase, Takahide; Ohishi, Nobuya; Takai, Daiya

    2011-07-01

    Rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) has widely been used to determine both ends of the cDNA from its partial sequence. Conventionally, 5'- and 3'-RACE products were ligated at a restriction site in the overlap region to reconstruct the full-length cDNA; however, reconstruction is difficult if no appropriate restriction enzymes are available. Here, we report a novel method to reconstruct full-length cDNA with DNA polymerase. Instead of usual PCR, chain reactions were avoided and the elongation time was shortened, which enables non-specific products or undesired point mutations to be minimized. We successfully reconstructed and TA-cloned a full-length cDNA of echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion gene variant 2 from RACE products obtained from a surgically resected lung adenocarcinoma sample. We also evaluated some parameters to provide recommendations for this new method.

  2. An efficient full-length cDNA amplification strategy based on bioinformatics technology and multiplexed PCR methods.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nan; Wang, Wei-Min; Wang, Huan-Ling

    2016-01-13

    A novel strategy for amplification full-length cDNA and promoter sequences has been developed using bioinformatics technology and multiplexed PCR methods in this study. The amplification of 3' ends of cDNA is performed according to the modified classic 3' RACE techniques, therein the more efficient and effective oligo(dT)-anchor primer with hairpin structure is specially designed. For the amplification of 5' ends of cDNA, two or three-round TAIL-PCR or touch-down PCR using arbitrary degenerate (AD) and sequence-specific reverse (SPR) primers is performed until the 5' sequence of multi-assembled fragment reaches the exon1 region identified by aligning this fragment to reference genome database. Then another TAIL-PCR or touch-down PCR using genomic DNA as template is conducted to obtain the remaining 5' and promoter sequences. The 5' end sites of cDNA are predicted by aligning finally assembled fragment to homologous reference genes of other species, and screening the relative locations of common characteristic cis-elements in silico on promoter. The putative 5' ends are further validated by primers corresponding to these predicted sites in cDNAs. This method is suitable for researchers to isolate limited full-length cDNA sequences due to its operability, inexpensiveness, efficiency and speediness.

  3. An efficient full-length cDNA amplification strategy based on bioinformatics technology and multiplexed PCR methods

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Nan; Wang, Wei-Min; Wang, Huan-Ling

    2016-01-01

    A novel strategy for amplification full-length cDNA and promoter sequences has been developed using bioinformatics technology and multiplexed PCR methods in this study. The amplification of 3′ ends of cDNA is performed according to the modified classic 3′ RACE techniques, therein the more efficient and effective oligo(dT)-anchor primer with hairpin structure is specially designed. For the amplification of 5′ ends of cDNA, two or three-round TAIL-PCR or touch-down PCR using arbitrary degenerate (AD) and sequence-specific reverse (SPR) primers is performed until the 5′ sequence of multi-assembled fragment reaches the exon1 region identified by aligning this fragment to reference genome database. Then another TAIL-PCR or touch-down PCR using genomic DNA as template is conducted to obtain the remaining 5′ and promoter sequences. The 5′ end sites of cDNA are predicted by aligning finally assembled fragment to homologous reference genes of other species, and screening the relative locations of common characteristic cis-elements in silico on promoter. The putative 5′ ends are further validated by primers corresponding to these predicted sites in cDNAs. This method is suitable for researchers to isolate limited full-length cDNA sequences due to its operability, inexpensiveness, efficiency and speediness. PMID:26758040

  4. Revolutions in rapid amplification of cDNA ends: new strategies for polymerase chain reaction cloning of full-length cDNA ends.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, B C

    1995-05-20

    Rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) is a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based technique which was developed to facilitate the cloning of full-length cDNA 5'- and 3'-ends after a partial cDNA sequence has been obtained by other methods. While RACE can yield complete sequences of cDNA ends in only a few days, the RACE procedure frequently results in the exclusive amplification of truncated cDNA ends, undermining efforts to generate full-length clones. Many investigators have suggested modifications to the RACE protocol to improve the effectiveness of the technique. Based on first-hand experience with RACE, a critical review of numerous published variations of the key steps in the RACE method is presented. Also included is a detailed, effective protocol based on RNA ligase-mediated RACE/reverse ligation-mediated PCR, as well as a demonstration of its utility.

  5. Hibiscus latent Fort Pierce virus in Brazil and synthesis of its biologically active full-length cDNA clone.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ruimin; Niu, Shengniao; Dai, Weifang; Kitajima, Elliot; Wong, Sek-Man

    2016-10-01

    A Brazilian isolate of Hibiscus latent Fort Pierce virus (HLFPV-BR) was firstly found in a hibiscus plant in Limeira, SP, Brazil. RACE PCR was carried out to obtain the full-length sequences of HLFPV-BR which is 6453 nucleotides and has more than 99.15 % of complete genomic RNA nucleotide sequence identity with that of HLFPV Japanese isolate. The genomic structure of HLFPV-BR is similar to other tobamoviruses. It includes a 5' untranslated region (UTR), followed by open reading frames encoding for a 128-kDa protein and a 188-kDa readthrough protein, a 38-kDa movement protein, 18-kDa coat protein, and a 3' UTR. Interestingly, the unique feature of poly(A) tract is also found within its 3'-UTR. Furthermore, from the total RNA extracted from the local lesions of HLFPV-BR-infected Chenopodium quinoa leaves, a biologically active, full-length cDNA clone encompassing the genome of HLFPV-BR was amplified and placed adjacent to a T7 RNA polymerase promoter. The capped in vitro transcripts from the cloned cDNA were infectious when mechanically inoculated into C. quinoa and Nicotiana benthamiana plants. This is the first report of the presence of an isolate of HLFPV in Brazil and the successful synthesis of a biologically active HLFPV-BR full-length cDNA clone.

  6. An analysis of expressed sequence tags of developing castor endosperm using a full-length cDNA library

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chaofu; Wallis, James G; Browse, John

    2007-01-01

    Background Castor seeds are a major source for ricinoleate, an important industrial raw material. Genomics studies of castor plant will provide critical information for understanding seed metabolism, for effectively engineering ricinoleate production in transgenic oilseeds, or for genetically improving castor plants by eliminating toxic and allergic proteins in seeds. Results Full-length cDNAs are useful resources in annotating genes and in providing functional analysis of genes and their products. We constructed a full-length cDNA library from developing castor endosperm, and obtained 4,720 ESTs from 5'-ends of the cDNA clones representing 1,908 unique sequences. The most abundant transcripts are genes encoding storage proteins, ricin, agglutinin and oleosins. Several other sequences are also very numerous, including two acidic triacylglycerol lipases, and the oleate hydroxylase (FAH12) gene that is responsible for ricinoleate biosynthesis. The role(s) of the lipases in developing castor seeds are not clear, and co-expressing of a lipase and the FAH12 did not result in significant changes in hydroxy fatty acid accumulation in transgenic Arabidopsis seeds. Only one oleate desaturase (FAD2) gene was identified in our cDNA sequences. Sequence and functional analyses of the castor FAD2 were carried out since it had not been characterized previously. Overexpression of castor FAD2 in a FAH12-expressing Arabidopsis line resulted in decreased accumulation of hydroxy fatty acids in transgenic seeds. Conclusion Our results suggest that transcriptional regulation of FAD2 and FAH12 genes maybe one of the mechanisms that contribute to a high level of ricinoleate accumulation in castor endosperm. The full-length cDNA library will be used to search for additional genes that affect ricinoleate accumulation in seed oils. Our EST sequences will also be useful to annotate the castor genome, which whole sequence is being generated by shotgun sequencing at the Institute for Genome

  7. Human uroporphyrinogen III synthase: Molecular cloning, nucleotide sequence, and expression of a full-length cDNA

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Shihfeng; Bishop, D.F.; Desnick, R.J. )

    1988-10-01

    Uroporphyrinogen III synthase, the fourth enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway, is responsible for conversion of the linear tetrapyrrole, hydroxymethylbilane, to the cyclic tetrapyrrole, uroporphyrinogen III. The deficient activity of URO-synthase is the enzymatic defect in the autosomal recessive disorder congenital erythropoietic porphyria. To facilitate the isolation of a full-length cDNA for human URO-synthase, the human erythrocyte enzyme was purified to homogeneity and 81 nonoverlapping amino acids were determined by microsequencing the N terminus and four tryptic peptides. Two synthetic oligonucleotide mixtures were used to screen 1.2 {times} 10{sup 6} recombinants from a human adult liver cDNA library. Eight clones were positive with both oligonucleotide mixtures. Of these, dideoxy sequencing of the 1.3 kilobase insert from clone pUROS-2 revealed 5' and 3' untranslated sequences of 196 and 284 base pairs, respectively, and an open reading frame of 798 base pairs encoding a protein of 265 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 28,607 Da. The isolation and expression of this full-length cDNA for human URO-synthase should facilitate studies of the structure, organization, and chromosomal localization of this heme biosynthetic gene as well as the characterization of the molecular lesions causing congenital erythropoietic porphyria.

  8. [Full-length cDNA cloning of flavonol synthase genes of Carthamus tinctorius and construction plant expression vector].

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen-ting; Liu, Xiu-ming; Wan, Qiu; Yao, Na; Wang, Nan; Zhang, Xue-meng; Jiao, Zhong-da; Li, Hai-yan; Li, Xiao-kun

    2015-02-01

    Flavonol synthase (FLS) is one of the key enzymes in flavonoids metabolic pathways. In this study, middle sequence was obtained from Carthamus tinctorius transcriptome sequencing results. Full-length cDNAs of FLS was cloned from petals of C. tinctorius to FLS by using RT-PCR and RACE technology. Its full-length cDNA was 1,201 bp, with an open reading frame of 1,101 bp and 336 encoded amino acids. The phylogenetic analysis showed that, FLS gene encoded amino acids in C. tinctorius were highly homologous with amino acids in congeneric Compositae species, especially Rudbeckia laciniata. The pBASTA-FLS plant expression vector was successfully built by the molecular biology method, which lays a foundation for further studying biology functions of the gene and biosynthesis mechanism of flavonoids.

  9. FOX-superroots of Lotus corniculatus, overexpressing Arabidopsis full-length cDNA, show stable variations in morphological traits.

    PubMed

    Himuro, Yasuyo; Tanaka, Hidenori; Hashiguchi, Masatsugu; Ichikawa, Takanari; Nakazawa, Miki; Seki, Motoaki; Fujita, Miki; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Matsui, Minami; Akashi, Ryo; Hoffmann, Franz

    2011-01-15

    Using the full-length cDNA overexpressor (FOX) gene-hunting system, we have generated 130 Arabidopsis FOX-superroot lines in bird's-foot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus) for the systematic functional analysis of genes expressed in roots and for the selection of induced mutants with interesting root growth characteristics. We used the Arabidopsis-FOX Agrobacterium library (constructed by ligating pBIG2113SF) for the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of superroots (SR) and the subsequent selection of gain-of-function mutants with ectopically expressed Arabidopsis genes. The original superroot culture of L. corniculatus is a unique host system displaying fast root growth in vitro, allowing continuous root cloning, direct somatic embryogenesis and mass regeneration of plants under entirely hormone-free culture conditions. Several of the Arabidopsis FOX-superroot lines show interesting deviations from normal growth and morphology of roots from SR-plants, such as differences in pigmentation, growth rate, length or diameter. Some of these mutations are of potential agricultural interest. Genomic PCR analysis revealed that 100 (76.9%) out of the 130 transgenic lines showed the amplification of single fragments. Sequence analysis of the PCR fragments from these 100 lines identified full-length cDNA in 74 of them. Forty-three out of 74 full-length cDNA carried known genes. The Arabidopsis FOX-superroot lines of L. corniculatus, produced in this study, expand the FOX hunting system and provide a new tool for the genetic analysis and control of root growth in a leguminous forage plant.

  10. Construction and EST sequencing of full-length, drought stress cDNA libraries for common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Common bean is an important legume crop with only a moderate number of short expressed sequence tags (ESTs) made with traditional methods. The goal of this research was to use full-length cDNA technology to develop ESTs that would overlap with the beginning of open reading frames and therefore be useful for gene annotation of genomic sequences. The library was also constructed to represent genes expressed under drought, low soil phosphorus and high soil aluminum toxicity. We also undertook comparisons of the full-length cDNA library to two previous non-full clone EST sets for common bean. Results Two full-length cDNA libraries were constructed: one for the drought tolerant Mesoamerican genotype BAT477 and the other one for the acid-soil tolerant Andean genotype G19833 which has been selected for genome sequencing. Plants were grown in three soil types using deep rooting cylinders subjected to drought and non-drought stress and tissues were collected from both roots and above ground parts. A total of 20,000 clones were selected robotically, half from each library. Then, nearly 10,000 clones from the G19833 library were sequenced with an average read length of 850 nucleotides. A total of 4,219 unigenes were identified consisting of 2,981 contigs and 1,238 singletons. These were functionally annotated with gene ontology terms and placed into KEGG pathways. Compared to other EST sequencing efforts in common bean, about half of the sequences were novel or represented the 5' ends of known genes. Conclusions The present full-length cDNA libraries add to the technological toolbox available for common bean and our sequencing of these clones substantially increases the number of unique EST sequences available for the common bean genome. All of this should be useful for both functional gene annotation, analysis of splice site variants and intron/exon boundary determination by comparison to soybean genes or with common bean whole-genome sequences. In addition the

  11. RNA transcripts of full-length cDNA clones of rabbit hepatitis E virus are infectious in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Cossaboom, Caitlin M; Huang, Yao-Wei; Yugo, Danielle M; Kenney, Scott P; Piñeyro, Pablo; Matzinger, Shannon R; Heffron, C Lynn; Pierson, F William; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2014-11-07

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV), the causative agent of hepatitis E, is a single-stranded positive-sense RNA virus belonging to the family Hepeviridae. At least four genotypes of the family infect humans: genotypes 1 and 2 are transmitted to humans through contaminated water, while genotypes 3 and 4 are zoonotic and have animal reservoirs. A novel strain of HEV recently identified in rabbits is a distant member of genotype 3, and thus poses a potential risk of zoonotic transmission to humans. The objective of this study was to construct and characterize an infectious cDNA clone of the rabbit HEV. Two full-length cDNA clones of rabbit HEV, pT7g-rabHEV and pT7-rabHEV, were constructed and their infectivity was tested by in vitro transfection of Huh7 human liver cells and by direct intrahepatic inoculation of rabbits with capped RNA transcripts. Results showed that positive signal for rabbit HEV protein was detected by an immunofluorescence assay with a HEV-specific antibody in Huh7 human liver cells transfected with capped RNA transcripts from the two full-length cDNA clones. Rabbits intrahepatically inoculated with capped RNA transcripts from each of the two clones developed active HEV infection as evidenced by seroconversion to anti-HEV antibodies, and detection of rabbit HEV RNA in sera and feces of inoculated animals. The availability of a rabbit HEV infectious cDNA clone now affords us the ability to delineate the mechanism of HEV replication and cross-species infection in a small animal model.

  12. A new set of ESTs and cDNA clones from full-length and normalized libraries for gene discovery and functional characterization in citrus

    PubMed Central

    Marques, M Carmen; Alonso-Cantabrana, Hugo; Forment, Javier; Arribas, Raquel; Alamar, Santiago; Conejero, Vicente; Perez-Amador, Miguel A

    2009-01-01

    Background Interpretation of ever-increasing raw sequence information generated by modern genome sequencing technologies faces multiple challenges, such as gene function analysis and genome annotation. Indeed, nearly 40% of genes in plants encode proteins of unknown function. Functional characterization of these genes is one of the main challenges in modern biology. In this regard, the availability of full-length cDNA clones may fill in the gap created between sequence information and biological knowledge. Full-length cDNA clones facilitate functional analysis of the corresponding genes enabling manipulation of their expression in heterologous systems and the generation of a variety of tagged versions of the native protein. In addition, the development of full-length cDNA sequences has the power to improve the quality of genome annotation. Results We developed an integrated method to generate a new normalized EST collection enriched in full-length and rare transcripts of different citrus species from multiple tissues and developmental stages. We constructed a total of 15 cDNA libraries, from which we isolated 10,898 high-quality ESTs representing 6142 different genes. Percentages of redundancy and proportion of full-length clones range from 8 to 33, and 67 to 85, respectively, indicating good efficiency of the approach employed. The new EST collection adds 2113 new citrus ESTs, representing 1831 unigenes, to the collection of citrus genes available in the public databases. To facilitate functional analysis, cDNAs were introduced in a Gateway-based cloning vector for high-throughput functional analysis of genes in planta. Herein, we describe the technical methods used in the library construction, sequence analysis of clones and the overexpression of CitrSEP, a citrus homolog to the Arabidopsis SEP3 gene, in Arabidopsis as an example of a practical application of the engineered Gateway vector for functional analysis. Conclusion The new EST collection denotes an

  13. Genetic manipulation of porcine epidemic diarrhoea virus recovered from a full-length infectious cDNA clone.

    PubMed

    Jengarn, Juggragarn; Wongthida, Phonphimon; Wanasen, Nanchaya; Frantz, Phanramphoei Namprachan; Wanitchang, Asawin; Jongkaewwattana, Anan

    2015-08-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhoea virus (PEDV) causes acute diarrhoea and dehydration in swine of all ages, with significant mortality in neonatal pigs. The recent rise of PEDV outbreaks in Asia and North America warrants an urgent search for effective vaccines. However, PEDV vaccine research has been hampered by difficulties in isolating and propagating the virus in mammalian cells, thereby complicating the recovery of infectious PEDV using a full-length infectious clone. Here, we engineered VeroE6 cells to stably express porcine aminopeptidase N (pAPN) and used them as a platform to obtain a high-growth variant of PEDV, termed PEDVAVCT12. Subsequently, the full-length cDNA clone was constructed by assembling contiguous cDNA fragments encompassing the complete genome of PEDVAVCT12 in a bacterial artificial chromosome. Infectious PEDV could be recovered, and the rescued virus displayed phenotypic properties identical to the parental virus. Interestingly, we found that PEDVAVCT12 contained a C-terminal deletion of the spike gene, resulting in disruption of the ORF3 start codon. When a functional ORF3 gene was restored, the recombinant virus could not be rescued, suggesting that ORF3 could suppress PEDV replication in vitro. In addition, a high-growth and genetically stable recombinant PEDV expressing a foreign protein could be rescued by replacing the ORF3 gene with the mCherry gene. Together, the results of this study provide a means to generate genetically defined PEDV as a promising vaccine candidate.

  14. Isolation and characterization of a full length cDNA for dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Oyake, M.; Onodera, O.; Ikeuchi, T.

    1994-09-01

    Hereditary dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) is an autosomal dominant spinocerebellar degeneration characterized by anticipation and variable combination of symptoms including myoclonus, epilepsy, cerebellar ataxia, choleoathetosis, and dementia. Recently, we discovered that DRPLA is caused by unstable expansion of a CAG repeat of a B37 gene on chromosome 12. To characterize functions of the DRPLA gene product, we isolated several cDNA clones for the DRPLA gene from human adult and fetus brain cDNA libraries, using an oligonucleotide flanking the CAG repeat. The cDNA spans 4247 bp in length and there is only an open reading frame coding for 986 amino acids. The CAG repeat, which is expanded in DRPLA, is located 291 bp downstream from the initiation methionine and encodes a polyglutamine tract. The deduced amino acid sequence from amino acids residues 582 to 707 has a high homology to published human hippocampus derived expressed sequence (M78755) located at chromosome 1p (63.8% identity), and 3{prime}-untranslated region of the DRPLA cDNA revealed homology to the mouse small nuclear RNA U7 gene (X54165). Northern blot analysis revealed a 4.7 knt transcript which is widely expressed in various tissues including heart, lung, kidney, placenta, skeletal muscle, and brain. In human adult brain, the transcript was broadly expressed including amygdala, caudate nucleus, corpus callosum, hippocampus, hypothalamus, substantia nigra, subthalamic nucleus and thalamus, and was not specific to the dentatorubral-pallidoluysian system. The availability of a full length cDNA will be highly useful for analyzing the pathogenesis of this unique neurodegenerative disease as well as for analyzing other CAG repeat related neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Full-Length cDNA Cloning, Molecular Characterization and Differential Expression Analysis of Lysophospholipase I from Ovis aries

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nan-Nan; Liu, Zeng-Shan; Hu, Pan; Zhang, Ying; Lu, Shi-Ying; Li, Yan-Song; Yang, Yong-Jie; Zhang, Dong-Song; Zhou, Yu; Ren, Hong-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Lysophospholipase I (LYPLA1) is an important protein with multiple functions. In this study, the full-length cDNA of the LYPLA1 gene from Ovis aries (OaLypla1) was cloned using primers and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) technology. The full-length OaLypla1 was 2457 bp with a 5′-untranslated region (UTR) of 24 bp, a 3′-UTR of 1740 bp with a poly (A) tail, and an open reading frame (ORF) of 693 bp encoding a protein of 230 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular weight of 24,625.78 Da. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the OaLypla1 protein shared a high amino acid identity with LYPLA1 of Bos taurus. The recombinant OaLypla1 protein was expressed and purified, and its phospholipase activity was identified. Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against OaLypla1 that bound native OaLypla1 were generated. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that OaLypla1 was constitutively expressed in the liver, spleen, lung, kidney, and white blood cells of sheep, with the highest level in the kidney. Additionally, the mRNA levels of OaLypla1 in the buffy coats of sheep challenged with virulent or avirulent Brucella strains were down-regulated compared to untreated sheep. The results suggest that OaLypla1 may have an important physiological role in the host response to bacteria. The function of OaLypla1 in the host response to bacterial infection requires further study in the future. PMID:27483239

  16. Integrative Annotation of 21,037 Human Genes Validated by Full-Length cDNA Clones

    PubMed Central

    Imanishi, Tadashi; Itoh, Takeshi; Suzuki, Yutaka; O'Donovan, Claire; Fukuchi, Satoshi; Koyanagi, Kanako O; Barrero, Roberto A; Tamura, Takuro; Yamaguchi-Kabata, Yumi; Tanino, Motohiko; Yura, Kei; Miyazaki, Satoru; Ikeo, Kazuho; Homma, Keiichi; Kasprzyk, Arek; Nishikawa, Tetsuo; Hirakawa, Mika; Thierry-Mieg, Jean; Thierry-Mieg, Danielle; Ashurst, Jennifer; Jia, Libin; Nakao, Mitsuteru; Thomas, Michael A; Mulder, Nicola; Karavidopoulou, Youla; Jin, Lihua; Kim, Sangsoo; Yasuda, Tomohiro; Lenhard, Boris; Eveno, Eric; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Yamasaki, Chisato; Takeda, Jun-ichi; Gough, Craig; Hilton, Phillip; Fujii, Yasuyuki; Sakai, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Susumu; Amid, Clara; Bellgard, Matthew; Bonaldo, Maria de Fatima; Bono, Hidemasa; Bromberg, Susan K; Brookes, Anthony J; Bruford, Elspeth; Carninci, Piero; Chelala, Claude; Couillault, Christine; de Souza, Sandro J.; Debily, Marie-Anne; Devignes, Marie-Dominique; Dubchak, Inna; Endo, Toshinori; Estreicher, Anne; Eyras, Eduardo; Fukami-Kobayashi, Kaoru; R. Gopinath, Gopal; Graudens, Esther; Hahn, Yoonsoo; Han, Michael; Han, Ze-Guang; Hanada, Kousuke; Hanaoka, Hideki; Harada, Erimi; Hashimoto, Katsuyuki; Hinz, Ursula; Hirai, Momoki; Hishiki, Teruyoshi; Hopkinson, Ian; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Kanapin, Alexander; Kaneko, Yayoi; Kasukawa, Takeya; Kelso, Janet; Kersey, Paul; Kikuno, Reiko; Kimura, Kouichi; Korn, Bernhard; Kuryshev, Vladimir; Makalowska, Izabela; Makino, Takashi; Mano, Shuhei; Mariage-Samson, Regine; Mashima, Jun; Matsuda, Hideo; Mewes, Hans-Werner; Minoshima, Shinsei; Nagai, Keiichi; Nagasaki, Hideki; Nagata, Naoki; Nigam, Rajni; Ogasawara, Osamu; Ohara, Osamu; Ohtsubo, Masafumi; Okada, Norihiro; Okido, Toshihisa; Oota, Satoshi; Ota, Motonori; Ota, Toshio; Otsuki, Tetsuji; Piatier-Tonneau, Dominique; Poustka, Annemarie; Ren, Shuang-Xi; Saitou, Naruya; Sakai, Katsunaga; Sakamoto, Shigetaka; Sakate, Ryuichi; Schupp, Ingo; Servant, Florence; Sherry, Stephen; Shiba, Rie; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Shimoyama, Mary; Simpson, Andrew J; Soares, Bento; Steward, Charles; Suwa, Makiko; Suzuki, Mami; Takahashi, Aiko; Tamiya, Gen; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Taylor, Todd; Terwilliger, Joseph D; Unneberg, Per; Veeramachaneni, Vamsi; Watanabe, Shinya; Wilming, Laurens; Yasuda, Norikazu; Yoo, Hyang-Sook; Stodolsky, Marvin; Makalowski, Wojciech; Go, Mitiko; Nakai, Kenta; Takagi, Toshihisa; Kanehisa, Minoru; Sakaki, Yoshiyuki; Quackenbush, John; Okazaki, Yasushi; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Hide, Winston; Chakraborty, Ranajit; Nishikawa, Ken; Sugawara, Hideaki; Tateno, Yoshio; Chen, Zhu; Oishi, Michio; Tonellato, Peter; Apweiler, Rolf; Okubo, Kousaku; Wagner, Lukas; Wiemann, Stefan; Strausberg, Robert L; Isogai, Takao; Auffray, Charles; Nomura, Nobuo; Sugano, Sumio

    2004-01-01

    The human genome sequence defines our inherent biological potential; the realization of the biology encoded therein requires knowledge of the function of each gene. Currently, our knowledge in this area is still limited. Several lines of investigation have been used to elucidate the structure and function of the genes in the human genome. Even so, gene prediction remains a difficult task, as the varieties of transcripts of a gene may vary to a great extent. We thus performed an exhaustive integrative characterization of 41,118 full-length cDNAs that capture the gene transcripts as complete functional cassettes, providing an unequivocal report of structural and functional diversity at the gene level. Our international collaboration has validated 21,037 human gene candidates by analysis of high-quality full-length cDNA clones through curation using unified criteria. This led to the identification of 5,155 new gene candidates. It also manifested the most reliable way to control the quality of the cDNA clones. We have developed a human gene database, called the H-Invitational Database (H-InvDB; http://www.h-invitational.jp/). It provides the following: integrative annotation of human genes, description of gene structures, details of novel alternative splicing isoforms, non-protein-coding RNAs, functional domains, subcellular localizations, metabolic pathways, predictions of protein three-dimensional structure, mapping of known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), identification of polymorphic microsatellite repeats within human genes, and comparative results with mouse full-length cDNAs. The H-InvDB analysis has shown that up to 4% of the human genome sequence (National Center for Biotechnology Information build 34 assembly) may contain misassembled or missing regions. We found that 6.5% of the human gene candidates (1,377 loci) did not have a good protein-coding open reading frame, of which 296 loci are strong candidates for non-protein-coding RNA genes. In

  17. Isolation and expression of the full-length cDNA encoding CD59 antigen of human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Sawada, R; Ohashi, K; Anaguchi, H; Okazaki, H; Hattori, M; Minato, N; Naruto, M

    1990-04-01

    To identify the primary structure of CD59 antigen and to elucidate its function, a full-length cDNA clone of CD59 was isolated. The cDNA sequence contained an open reading frame that encodes an 128-amino-acid peptide. The amino-terminal 25 amino acids represented a typical signal peptide sequence and the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic amino acids were characteristic for phosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins. The predicted mature protein sequence showed 35% homology with murine Ly-6C.1 and 31% with Ly-6A.2. The number and the distribution of cysteine residues were conserved, implying that the CD59 represented a human homologue of murine Ly-6. RNA blot hybridization analysis revealed the expression of CD59 mRNA in placental, lung, and pancreatic tissues. The mRNA was not only expressed in T-cell lines but in some of monocytic, myeloid, and B-cell lines. In all of these tissues and cell lines, at least four mRNA species were detected. DNA blot hybridization analysis revealed a rather simple genomic structure, which suggested a single gene as compared with the complex multigene family of murine Ly-6.

  18. Sequencing analysis of 20,000 full-length cDNA clones from cassava reveals lineage specific expansions in gene families related to stress response

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Tetsuya; Plata, Germán; Rodríguez-Zapata, Fausto; Seki, Motoaki; Salcedo, Andrés; Toyoda, Atsushi; Ishiwata, Atsushi; Tohme, Joe; Sakaki, Yoshiyuki; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Ishitani, Manabu

    2007-01-01

    Background Cassava, an allotetraploid known for its remarkable tolerance to abiotic stresses is an important source of energy for humans and animals and a raw material for many industrial processes. A full-length cDNA library of cassava plants under normal, heat, drought, aluminum and post harvest physiological deterioration conditions was built; 19968 clones were sequence-characterized using expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Results The ESTs were assembled into 6355 contigs and 9026 singletons that were further grouped into 10577 scaffolds; we found 4621 new cassava sequences and 1521 sequences with no significant similarity to plant protein databases. Transcripts of 7796 distinct genes were captured and we were able to assign a functional classification to 78% of them while finding more than half of the enzymes annotated in metabolic pathways in Arabidopsis. The annotation of sequences that were not paired to transcripts of other species included many stress-related functional categories showing that our library is enriched with stress-induced genes. Finally, we detected 230 putative gene duplications that include key enzymes in reactive oxygen species signaling pathways and could play a role in cassava stress response features. Conclusion The cassava full-length cDNA library here presented contains transcripts of genes involved in stress response as well as genes important for different areas of cassava research. This library will be an important resource for gene discovery, characterization and cloning; in the near future it will aid the annotation of the cassava genome. PMID:18096061

  19. Cloning Full-Length cDNAs from Vascular Tissues and Cells by Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE) and RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Shen

    1999-01-01

    The isolation of full-length cDNAs remains a frequent task undertaken in many laboratories. A full-length cDNA is often desirable for one of the following purposes: 1) to complete the sequence of a partial cDNA cloned by library screenings or the yeast one- or two-hybrid system; 2) to derive the cDNA sequence encoding a protein, based on peptide sequences; 3) to obtain the sequence of a reported cDNA for functional analysis or expression studies; and 4) to define exon/intron boundaries of a cloned gene or determine transcription start site(s) of a promoter.

  20. Large scale full-length cDNA sequencing reveals a unique genomic landscape in a lepidopteran model insect, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Suetsugu, Yoshitaka; Futahashi, Ryo; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Kadono-Okuda, Keiko; Sasanuma, Shun-ichi; Narukawa, Junko; Ajimura, Masahiro; Jouraku, Akiya; Namiki, Nobukazu; Shimomura, Michihiko; Sezutsu, Hideki; Osanai-Futahashi, Mizuko; Suzuki, Masataka G; Daimon, Takaaki; Shinoda, Tetsuro; Taniai, Kiyoko; Asaoka, Kiyoshi; Niwa, Ryusuke; Kawaoka, Shinpei; Katsuma, Susumu; Tamura, Toshiki; Noda, Hiroaki; Kasahara, Masahiro; Sugano, Sumio; Suzuki, Yutaka; Fujiwara, Haruhiko; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Arunkumar, Kallare P; Tomar, Archana; Nagaraju, Javaregowda; Goldsmith, Marian R; Feng, Qili; Xia, Qingyou; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Shimada, Toru; Mita, Kazuei

    2013-09-04

    The establishment of a complete genomic sequence of silkworm, the model species of Lepidoptera, laid a foundation for its functional genomics. A more complete annotation of the genome will benefit functional and comparative studies and accelerate extensive industrial applications for this insect. To realize these goals, we embarked upon a large-scale full-length cDNA collection from 21 full-length cDNA libraries derived from 14 tissues of the domesticated silkworm and performed full sequencing by primer walking for 11,104 full-length cDNAs. The large average intron size was 1904 bp, resulting from a high accumulation of transposons. Using gene models predicted by GLEAN and published mRNAs, we identified 16,823 gene loci on the silkworm genome assembly. Orthology analysis of 153 species, including 11 insects, revealed that among three Lepidoptera including Monarch and Heliconius butterflies, the 403 largest silkworm-specific genes were composed mainly of protective immunity, hormone-related, and characteristic structural proteins. Analysis of testis-/ovary-specific genes revealed distinctive features of sexual dimorphism, including depletion of ovary-specific genes on the Z chromosome in contrast to an enrichment of testis-specific genes. More than 40% of genes expressed in specific tissues mapped in tissue-specific chromosomal clusters. The newly obtained FL-cDNA sequences enabled us to annotate the genome of this lepidopteran model insect more accurately, enhancing genomic and functional studies of Lepidoptera and comparative analyses with other insect orders, and yielding new insights into the evolution and organization of lepidopteran-specific genes.

  1. Large Scale Full-Length cDNA Sequencing Reveals a Unique Genomic Landscape in a Lepidopteran Model Insect, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Suetsugu, Yoshitaka; Futahashi, Ryo; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Kadono-Okuda, Keiko; Sasanuma, Shun-ichi; Narukawa, Junko; Ajimura, Masahiro; Jouraku, Akiya; Namiki, Nobukazu; Shimomura, Michihiko; Sezutsu, Hideki; Osanai-Futahashi, Mizuko; Suzuki, Masataka G; Daimon, Takaaki; Shinoda, Tetsuro; Taniai, Kiyoko; Asaoka, Kiyoshi; Niwa, Ryusuke; Kawaoka, Shinpei; Katsuma, Susumu; Tamura, Toshiki; Noda, Hiroaki; Kasahara, Masahiro; Sugano, Sumio; Suzuki, Yutaka; Fujiwara, Haruhiko; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Arunkumar, Kallare P.; Tomar, Archana; Nagaraju, Javaregowda; Goldsmith, Marian R.; Feng, Qili; Xia, Qingyou; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Shimada, Toru; Mita, Kazuei

    2013-01-01

    The establishment of a complete genomic sequence of silkworm, the model species of Lepidoptera, laid a foundation for its functional genomics. A more complete annotation of the genome will benefit functional and comparative studies and accelerate extensive industrial applications for this insect. To realize these goals, we embarked upon a large-scale full-length cDNA collection from 21 full-length cDNA libraries derived from 14 tissues of the domesticated silkworm and performed full sequencing by primer walking for 11,104 full-length cDNAs. The large average intron size was 1904 bp, resulting from a high accumulation of transposons. Using gene models predicted by GLEAN and published mRNAs, we identified 16,823 gene loci on the silkworm genome assembly. Orthology analysis of 153 species, including 11 insects, revealed that among three Lepidoptera including Monarch and Heliconius butterflies, the 403 largest silkworm-specific genes were composed mainly of protective immunity, hormone-related, and characteristic structural proteins. Analysis of testis-/ovary-specific genes revealed distinctive features of sexual dimorphism, including depletion of ovary-specific genes on the Z chromosome in contrast to an enrichment of testis-specific genes. More than 40% of genes expressed in specific tissues mapped in tissue-specific chromosomal clusters. The newly obtained FL-cDNA sequences enabled us to annotate the genome of this lepidopteran model insect more accurately, enhancing genomic and functional studies of Lepidoptera and comparative analyses with other insect orders, and yielding new insights into the evolution and organization of lepidopteran-specific genes. PMID:23821615

  2. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of Full-Length cDNA of Calmodulin Gene from Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xing-Xia; Yu, Wen-Chao; Cai, Zhong-Qiang; He, Cheng; Wei, Na

    2016-01-01

    The shell of the pearl oyster (Pinctada fucata) mainly comprises aragonite whereas that of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) is mainly calcite, thereby suggesting the different mechanisms of shell formation between above two mollusks. Calmodulin (CaM) is an important gene for regulating the uptake, transport, and secretion of calcium during the process of shell formation in pearl oyster. It is interesting to characterize the CaM in oysters, which could facilitate the understanding of the different shell formation mechanisms among mollusks. We cloned the full-length cDNA of Pacific oyster CaM (cgCaM) and found that the cgCaM ORF encoded a peptide of 113 amino acids containing three EF-hand calcium-binding domains, its expression level was highest in the mantle, hinting that the cgCaM gene is probably involved in shell formation of Pacific oyster, and the common ancestor of Gastropoda and Bivalvia may possess at least three CaM genes. We also found that the numbers of some EF hand family members in highly calcified species were higher than those in lowly calcified species and the numbers of these motifs in oyster genome were the highest among the mollusk species with whole genome sequence, further hinting the correlation between CaM and biomineralization. PMID:27703977

  3. Sequencing and analysis of 10967 full-length cDNA clones from Xenopus laevis and Xenopus tropicalis

    SciTech Connect

    Morin, R D; Chang, E; Petrescu, A; Liao, N; Kirkpatrick, R; Griffith, M; Butterfield, Y; Stott, J; Barber, S; Babakaiff, R; Matsuo, C; Wong, D; Yang, G; Smailus, D; Brown-John, M; Mayo, M; Beland, J; Gibson, S; Olson, T; Tsai, M; Featherstone, R; Chand, S; Siddiqui, A; Jang, W; Lee, E; Klein, S; Prange, C; Myers, R M; Green, E D; Wagner, L; Gerhard, D; Marra, M; Jones, S M; Holt, R

    2005-10-31

    Sequencing of full-insert clones from full-length cDNA libraries from both Xenopus laevis and Xenopus tropicalis has been ongoing as part of the Xenopus Gene Collection initiative. Here we present an analysis of 10967 clones (8049 from X. laevis and 2918 from X. tropicalis). The clone set contains 2013 orthologs between X. laevis and X. tropicalis as well as 1795 paralog pairs within X. laevis. 1199 are in-paralogs, believed to have resulted from an allotetraploidization event approximately 30 million years ago, and the remaining 546 are likely out-paralogs that have resulted from more ancient gene duplications, prior to the divergence between the two species. We do not detect any evidence for positive selection by the Yang and Nielsen maximum likelihood method of approximating d{sub N}/d{sub S}. However, d{sub N}/d{sub S} for X. laevis in-paralogs is elevated relative to X. tropicalis orthologs. This difference is highly significant, and indicates an overall relaxation of selective pressures on duplicated gene pairs. Within both groups of paralogs, we found evidence of subfunctionalization, manifested as differential expression of paralogous genes among tissues, as measured by EST information from public resources. We have observed, as expected, a higher instance of subfunctionalization in out-paralogs relative to in-paralogs.

  4. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of Full-Length cDNA of Calmodulin Gene from Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Li, Xing-Xia; Yu, Wen-Chao; Cai, Zhong-Qiang; He, Cheng; Wei, Na; Wang, Xiao-Tong; Yue, Xi-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The shell of the pearl oyster (Pinctada fucata) mainly comprises aragonite whereas that of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) is mainly calcite, thereby suggesting the different mechanisms of shell formation between above two mollusks. Calmodulin (CaM) is an important gene for regulating the uptake, transport, and secretion of calcium during the process of shell formation in pearl oyster. It is interesting to characterize the CaM in oysters, which could facilitate the understanding of the different shell formation mechanisms among mollusks. We cloned the full-length cDNA of Pacific oyster CaM (cgCaM) and found that the cgCaM ORF encoded a peptide of 113 amino acids containing three EF-hand calcium-binding domains, its expression level was highest in the mantle, hinting that the cgCaM gene is probably involved in shell formation of Pacific oyster, and the common ancestor of Gastropoda and Bivalvia may possess at least three CaM genes. We also found that the numbers of some EF hand family members in highly calcified species were higher than those in lowly calcified species and the numbers of these motifs in oyster genome were the highest among the mollusk species with whole genome sequence, further hinting the correlation between CaM and biomineralization.

  5. Computer-based methods for the mouse full-length cDNA encyclopedia: real-time sequence clustering for construction of a nonredundant cDNA library.

    PubMed

    Konno, H; Fukunishi, Y; Shibata, K; Itoh, M; Carninci, P; Sugahara, Y; Hayashizaki, Y

    2001-02-01

    We developed computer-based methods for constructing a nonredundant mouse full-length cDNA library. Our cDNA library construction process comprises assessment of library quality, sequencing the 3' ends of inserts and clustering, and completing a re-array to generate a nonredundant library from a redundant one. After the cDNA libraries are generated, we sequence the 5' ends of the inserts to check the quality of the library; then we determine the sequencing priority of each library. Selected libraries undergo large-scale sequencing of the 3' ends of the inserts and clustering of the tag sequences. After clustering, the nonredundant library is constructed from the original libraries, which have redundant clones. All libraries, plates, clones, sequences, and clusters are uniquely identified, and all information is saved in the database according to this identifier. At press time, our system has been in place for the past two years; we have clustered 939,725 3' end sequences into 127,385 groups from 227 cDNA libraries/sublibraries (see http://genome.gse.riken.go.jp/).

  6. Sequencing and analysis of 10,967 full-length cDNA clones from Xenopus laevis and Xenopus tropicalis reveals post-tetraploidization transcriptome remodeling.

    PubMed

    Morin, Ryan D; Chang, Elbert; Petrescu, Anca; Liao, Nancy; Griffith, Malachi; Chow, William; Kirkpatrick, Robert; Butterfield, Yaron S; Young, Alice C; Stott, Jeffrey; Barber, Sarah; Babakaiff, Ryan; Dickson, Mark C; Matsuo, Corey; Wong, David; Yang, George S; Smailus, Duane E; Wetherby, Keith D; Kwong, Peggy N; Grimwood, Jane; Brinkley, Charles P; Brown-John, Mabel; Reddix-Dugue, Natalie D; Mayo, Michael; Schmutz, Jeremy; Beland, Jaclyn; Park, Morgan; Gibson, Susan; Olson, Teika; Bouffard, Gerard G; Tsai, Miranda; Featherstone, Ruth; Chand, Steve; Siddiqui, Asim S; Jang, Wonhee; Lee, Ed; Klein, Steven L; Blakesley, Robert W; Zeeberg, Barry R; Narasimhan, Sudarshan; Weinstein, John N; Pennacchio, Christa Prange; Myers, Richard M; Green, Eric D; Wagner, Lukas; Gerhard, Daniela S; Marra, Marco A; Jones, Steven J M; Holt, Robert A

    2006-06-01

    Sequencing of full-insert clones from full-length cDNA libraries from both Xenopus laevis and Xenopus tropicalis has been ongoing as part of the Xenopus Gene Collection Initiative. Here we present 10,967 full ORF verified cDNA clones (8049 from X. laevis and 2918 from X. tropicalis) as a community resource. Because the genome of X. laevis, but not X. tropicalis, has undergone allotetraploidization, comparison of coding sequences from these two clawed (pipid) frogs provides a unique angle for exploring the molecular evolution of duplicate genes. Within our clone set, we have identified 445 gene trios, each comprised of an allotetraploidization-derived X. laevis gene pair and their shared X. tropicalis ortholog. Pairwise dN/dS, comparisons within trios show strong evidence for purifying selection acting on all three members. However, dN/dS ratios between X. laevis gene pairs are elevated relative to their X. tropicalis ortholog. This difference is highly significant and indicates an overall relaxation of selective pressures on duplicated gene pairs. We have found that the paralogs that have been lost since the tetraploidization event are enriched for several molecular functions, but have found no such enrichment in the extant paralogs. Approximately 14% of the paralogous pairs analyzed here also show differential expression indicative of subfunctionalization.

  7. Original reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction method to obtain the full-length cDNA of rice tungro spherical virus.

    PubMed

    Perrin, Y; Hull, R

    1999-05-01

    A two-step reverse transcription reaction combined with long PCR was developed in order to obtain the full-length cDNA from the 12.2 kbp genomic RNA of rice tungro spherical virus. A first step reverse transcription, performed at 45 degrees C using a reverse transcriptase deprived of RNase H activity, allowed the synthesis of a nearly full-length cDNA of 11.7 kbp. A second step reaction, carried out at 65 degrees C using a thermostable polymerase, was necessary to destabilise secondary structures present at the 5' extremity of the RNA template which hampered the reverse transcription reaction in this region. The full-length cDNA obtained by the two-step reverse transcription was amplified successfully by long PCR and subsequently cloned into a plasmid vector. The cloned cDNA showed toxicity and proved to be unstable when amplified in E. coli.

  8. Detection of infectious viral particles in plant protoplasts inoculated with transcripts of full-length shallot virus X cDNA.

    PubMed

    Vishnichenko, V K; Zavriev, S K

    2001-01-01

    Flexible filamentous shallot virus X (ShVX) particles were detected in extracts of Beta vulgaris protoplasts inoculated with transcripts from a full-length ShVX cDNA. Extracts from ShVX-infected protoplast were infectious for ShVX-healthy shallot seedlings. Western blot analysis of inoculated plants revealed the accumulation of the ShVX coat protein, while electron microscopy confirmed the presence of ShVX virions. The results suggest that the in vitro RNA transcripts from full-length ShVX cDNA give rise to infectious viral particles.

  9. The Status, Quality, and Expansion of the NIH Full-Length cDNA Project: The Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC)

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health's Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC) project was designed to generate and sequence a publicly accessible cDNA resource containing a complete open reading frame (ORF) for every human and mouse gene. The project initially used a random strategy to select clones from a large number of cDNA libraries from diverse tissues. Candidate clones were chosen based on 5′-EST sequences, and then fully sequenced to high accuracy and analyzed by algorithms developed for this project. Currently, more than 11,000 human and 10,000 mouse genes are represented in MGC by at least one clone with a full ORF. The random selection approach is now reaching a saturation point, and a transition to protocols targeted at the missing transcripts is now required to complete the mouse and human collections. Comparison of the sequence of the MGC clones to reference genome sequences reveals that most cDNA clones are of very high sequence quality, although it is likely that some cDNAs may carry missense variants as a consequence of experimental artifact, such as PCR, cloning, or reverse transcriptase errors. Recently, a rat cDNA component was added to the project, and ongoing frog (Xenopus) and zebrafish (Danio) cDNA projects were expanded to take advantage of the high-throughput MGC pipeline. PMID:15489334

  10. Screening cDNA Libraries Using Partial Probes to Isolate Full-Length cDNAs from Vascular Cells.

    PubMed

    Csortos, C; Lazar, V; Garcia, J G

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of screening cDNA libraries is to isolate a particular cDNA clone encoding a mRNA and by implication, a protein, of interest. The screening is based on identification of the desired clone among a large number of recombinant clones within the library selected (1,2). As an example of both the utility and power of library screening, we will relate our own library screening efforts utilized to isolate the nonmuscle high molecular weight myosin light chain kinase isoform from a human umbilical vein endothelial cell cDNA library (3). This unique nonmuscle myosin light chain kinase isoform phosphorylates myosin light chains, thereby playing an essential role in agonist-mediated endothelial cell contraction, paracellular gap formation and increased vascular permeability. We are hopeful that this step-by-step approach will help the reader to understand the discussed methods.

  11. Construction of a full-length cDNA library of Solen grandis dunker and identification of defense- and immune-related genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guohua; Liu, Xiangquan; Ren, Lihua; Yang, Jianmin; Wei, Xiumei; Yang, Jialong

    2013-11-01

    The basic genetic characteristics, important functional genes, and entire transcriptome of Solen grandis Dunker were investigated by constructing a full-length cDNA library with the `switching mechanism at the 5'-end of the RNA transcript' (SMART) technique. Total RNA was isolated from the immune-relevant tissues, gills and hemocytes, using the Trizol reagent, and cDNA fragments were digested with Sfi I before being ligated to the pBluescript II SK* vector. The cDNA library had a titer of 1048 cfu μL-1 and a storage capacity of 1.05×106 cfu. Approximately 98% of the clones in the library were recombinants, and the fragment lengths of insert cDNA ranged from 0.8 kb to 3.0 kb. A total of 2038 expressed sequence tags were successfully sequenced and clustered into 965 unigenes. BLASTN analysis showed that 240 sequences were highly similar to the known genes (E-value < 1e -5; percent identity >80%), accounting for 25% of the total unigenes. According to the Gene Ontology, these unigenes were related to several biological processes, including cell structure, signal transport, protein synthesis, transcription, energy metabolism, and immunity. Fifteen of the identified sequences were related to defense and immunity. The full-length cDNA sequence of HSC70 was obtained. The cDNA library of S. grandis provided a useful resource for future researches of functional genomics related to stress tolerance, immunity, and other physiological activities.

  12. Identification and isolation of full-length cDNA sequences by sequencing and analysis of expressed sequence tags from guarana (Paullinia cupana).

    PubMed

    Figueirêdo, L C; Faria-Campos, A C; Astolfi-Filho, S; Azevedo, J L

    2011-06-21

    The current intense production of biological data, generated by sequencing techniques, has created an ever-growing volume of unanalyzed data. We reevaluated data produced by the guarana (Paullinia cupana) transcriptome sequencing project to identify cDNA clones with complete coding sequences (full-length clones) and complete sequences of genes of biotechnological interest, contributing to the knowledge of biological characteristics of this organism. We analyzed 15,490 ESTs of guarana in search of clones with complete coding regions. A total of 12,402 sequences were analyzed using BLAST, and 4697 full-length clones were identified, responsible for the production of 2297 different proteins. Eighty-four clones were identified as full-length for N-methyltransferase and 18 were sequenced in both directions to obtain the complete genome sequence, and confirm the search made in silico for full-length clones. Phylogenetic analyses were made with the complete genome sequences of three clones, which showed only 0.017% dissimilarity; these are phylogenetically close to the caffeine synthase of Theobroma cacao. The search for full-length clones allowed the identification of numerous clones that had the complete coding region, demonstrating this to be an efficient and useful tool in the process of biological data mining. The sequencing of the complete coding region of identified full-length clones corroborated the data from the in silico search, strengthening its efficiency and utility.

  13. Development of an agroinoculation system for full-length and GFP-tagged cDNA clones of cucumber green mottle mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hongying; Xiao, Caili; Han, Kelei; Peng, Jiejun; Lin, Lin; Lu, Yuwen; Xie, Li; Wu, Xiaohua; Xu, Pei; Li, Guojing; Chen, Jianping; Yan, Fei

    2015-11-01

    The complete 6243-nucleotide sequence of a cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) isolate from bottle gourd in Zhejiang province, China, was determined. A full-length cDNA clone of this isolate was constructed by inserting the cDNA between the 35S promoter and the ribozyme in the binary plasmid pCB301-CH. A suspension of an Agrobacterium tumefaciens EHA105 clone carrying this construct was highly infectious in Nicotiana benthamiana and bottle gourd. Another infectious clone containing the green fluorescence protein (GFP) reporter gene was also successfully constructed. This study is the first report of the efficient use of agroinoculation for generating CGMMV infections.

  14. Cloning of a full-length cDNA encoding ent-kaurene synthase from Gibberella fujikuroi: functional analysis of a bifunctional diterpene cyclase.

    PubMed

    Toyomasu, T; Kawaide, H; Ishizaki, A; Shinoda, S; Otsuka, M; Mitsuhashi, W; Sassa, T

    2000-03-01

    We report here the nucleotide sequence of a full-length cDNA encoding ent-kaurene synthase that was isolated by a reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction from Gibberella fujikuroi (Gcps/ks). This cDNA encodes 952 amino acid residues with a relative molecular mass of 107 kDa. The sequence similarity between Gcps/ks and ent-kaurene synthase of the gibberellin A1-producing fungus, Phaeosphaeria sp. L487, is very high, suggesting that Gcps/ks is also a bifunctional diterpene cyclase. Its recombinant protein expressed in Escherichia coli converted geranylgeranyl diphosphate to copalyl diphosphate and ent-kaurene.

  15. Identification of stress-tolerance-related transcription-factor genes via mini-scale Full-length cDNA Over-eXpressor (FOX) gene hunting system.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Miki; Mizukado, Saho; Fujita, Yasunari; Ichikawa, Takanari; Nakazawa, Miki; Seki, Motoaki; Matsui, Minami; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko; Shinozaki, Kazuo

    2007-12-14

    Recently, we developed a novel system known as Full-length cDNA Over-eXpressor (FOX) gene hunting [T. Ichikawa, M. Nakazawa, M. Kawashima, H. Iizumi, H. Kuroda, Y. Kondou, Y. Tsuhara, K. Suzuki, A. Ishikawa, M. Seki, M. Fujita, R. Motohashi, N. Nagata, T. Takagi, K. Shinozaki, M. Matsui, The FOX hunting system: an alternative gain-of-function gene hunting technique, Plant J. 48 (2006) 974-985], which involves the random overexpression of a normalized Arabidopsis full-length cDNA library. While our system allows large-scale collection of full-length cDNAs for gene discovery, we sought to downsize it to analyze a small pool of full-length cDNAs. As a model system, we focused on stress-inducible transcription factors. The full-length cDNAs of 43 stress-inducible transcription factors were mixed to create a transgenic plant library. We screened for salt-stress-resistant lines in the T1 generation and identified a number of salt-tolerant lines that harbored the same transgene (F39). F39 encodes a bZIP-type transcription factor that is identical to AtbZIP60, which is believed to be involved in the endoplasmic reticulum stress response. Microarray analysis revealed that a number of stress-inducible genes were up-regulated in the F39-overexpressing lines, suggesting that AtbZIP60 is involved in stress signal transduction. Thus, our mini-scale FOX system may be used to screen for genes with valuable functions, such as transcription factors, from a small pool of genes that show similar expression profiles.

  16. Rapid Construction of Stable Infectious Full-Length cDNA Clone of Papaya Leaf Distortion Mosaic Virus Using In-Fusion Cloning

    PubMed Central

    Tuo, Decai; Shen, Wentao; Yan, Pu; Li, Xiaoying; Zhou, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus (PLDMV) is becoming a threat to papaya and transgenic papaya resistant to the related pathogen, papaya ringspot virus (PRSV). The generation of infectious viral clones is an essential step for reverse-genetics studies of viral gene function and cross-protection. In this study, a sequence- and ligation-independent cloning system, the In-Fusion® Cloning Kit (Clontech, Mountain View, CA, USA), was used to construct intron-less or intron-containing full-length cDNA clones of the isolate PLDMV-DF, with the simultaneous scarless assembly of multiple viral and intron fragments into a plasmid vector in a single reaction. The intron-containing full-length cDNA clone of PLDMV-DF was stably propagated in Escherichia coli. In vitro intron-containing transcripts were processed and spliced into biologically active intron-less transcripts following mechanical inoculation and then initiated systemic infections in Carica papaya L. seedlings, which developed similar symptoms to those caused by the wild-type virus. However, no infectivity was detected when the plants were inoculated with RNA transcripts from the intron-less construct because the instability of the viral cDNA clone in bacterial cells caused a non-sense or deletion mutation of the genomic sequence of PLDMV-DF. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the construction of an infectious full-length cDNA clone of PLDMV and the splicing of intron-containing transcripts following mechanical inoculation. In-Fusion cloning shortens the construction time from months to days. Therefore, it is a faster, more flexible, and more efficient method than the traditional multistep restriction enzyme-mediated subcloning procedure. PMID:26633465

  17. Rapid Construction of Stable Infectious Full-Length cDNA Clone of Papaya Leaf Distortion Mosaic Virus Using In-Fusion Cloning.

    PubMed

    Tuo, Decai; Shen, Wentao; Yan, Pu; Li, Xiaoying; Zhou, Peng

    2015-12-01

    Papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus (PLDMV) is becoming a threat to papaya and transgenic papaya resistant to the related pathogen, papaya ringspot virus (PRSV). The generation of infectious viral clones is an essential step for reverse-genetics studies of viral gene function and cross-protection. In this study, a sequence- and ligation-independent cloning system, the In-Fusion(®) Cloning Kit (Clontech, Mountain View, CA, USA), was used to construct intron-less or intron-containing full-length cDNA clones of the isolate PLDMV-DF, with the simultaneous scarless assembly of multiple viral and intron fragments into a plasmid vector in a single reaction. The intron-containing full-length cDNA clone of PLDMV-DF was stably propagated in Escherichia coli. In vitro intron-containing transcripts were processed and spliced into biologically active intron-less transcripts following mechanical inoculation and then initiated systemic infections in Carica papaya L. seedlings, which developed similar symptoms to those caused by the wild-type virus. However, no infectivity was detected when the plants were inoculated with RNA transcripts from the intron-less construct because the instability of the viral cDNA clone in bacterial cells caused a non-sense or deletion mutation of the genomic sequence of PLDMV-DF. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the construction of an infectious full-length cDNA clone of PLDMV and the splicing of intron-containing transcripts following mechanical inoculation. In-Fusion cloning shortens the construction time from months to days. Therefore, it is a faster, more flexible, and more efficient method than the traditional multistep restriction enzyme-mediated subcloning procedure.

  18. Salmo salar and Esox lucius full-length cDNA sequences reveal changes in evolutionary pressures on a post-tetraploidization genome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Salmonids are one of the most intensely studied fish, in part due to their economic and environmental importance, and in part due to a recent whole genome duplication in the common ancestor of salmonids. This duplication greatly impacts species diversification, functional specialization, and adaptation. Extensive new genomic resources have recently become available for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), but documentation of allelic versus duplicate reference genes remains a major uncertainty in the complete characterization of its genome and its evolution. Results From existing expressed sequence tag (EST) resources and three new full-length cDNA libraries, 9,057 reference quality full-length gene insert clones were identified for Atlantic salmon. A further 1,365 reference full-length clones were annotated from 29,221 northern pike (Esox lucius) ESTs. Pairwise dN/dS comparisons within each of 408 sets of duplicated salmon genes using northern pike as a diploid out-group show asymmetric relaxation of selection on salmon duplicates. Conclusions 9,057 full-length reference genes were characterized in S. salar and can be used to identify alleles and gene family members. Comparisons of duplicated genes show that while purifying selection is the predominant force acting on both duplicates, consistent with retention of functionality in both copies, some relaxation of pressure on gene duplicates can be identified. In addition, there is evidence that evolution has acted asymmetrically on paralogs, allowing one of the pair to diverge at a faster rate. PMID:20433749

  19. The complete sequence of a full length cDNA for human liver glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase: evidence for multiple mRNA species.

    PubMed Central

    Arcari, P; Martinelli, R; Salvatore, F

    1984-01-01

    A recombinant M13 clone (O42) containing a 65 b.p. cDNA fragment from human fetal liver mRNA coding for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase has been identified and it has been used to isolate from a full-length human adult liver cDNA library a recombinant clone, pG1, which has been subcloned in M13 phage and completely sequenced with the chain terminator method. Besides the coding region of 1008 b.p., the cDNA sequence includes 60 nucleotides at the 5'-end and 204 nucleotides at the 3'-end up to the polyA tail. Hybridization of pG1 to human liver total RNA shows only one band about the size of pG1 cDNA. A much stronger hybridization signal was observed using RNA derived from human hepatocarcinoma and kidney carcinoma cell lines. Sequence homology between clone 042 and the homologous region of clone pG1 is 86%. On the other hand, homology among the translated sequences and the known human muscle protein sequence ranges between 77 and 90%; these data demonstrate the existence of more than one gene coding for G3PD. Southern blot of human DNA, digested with several restriction enzymes, also indicate that several homologous sequences are present in the human genome. Images PMID:6096821

  20. Divergence of host range and biological properties between natural isolate and full-length infectious cDNA clone of the Beet mild yellowing virus 2ITB.

    PubMed

    Klein, Elodie; Brault, Véronique; Klein, Delphine; Weyens, Guy; Lefèbvre, Marc; Ziegler-Graff, Véronique; Gilmer, David

    2014-01-01

    Plant infection by poleroviruses is restricted to phloem tissues, preventing any classical leaf rub inoculation with viral RNA or virions. Efficient virus inoculation to plants is achieved by viruliferous aphids that acquire the virus by feeding on infected plants. The use of promoter-driven infectious cDNA is an alternative means to infect plants and allows reverse genetic studies to be performed. Using Beet mild yellowing virus isolate 2ITB (BMYV-2ITB), we produced a full-length infectious cDNA clone of the virus (named BMYV-EK) placed under the control of the T7 RNA polymerase and the Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoters. Infectivity of the engineered BMYV-EK virus was assayed in different plant species and compared with that of the original virus. We showed that in vitro- or in planta-derived transcripts were infectious in protoplasts and in whole plants. Importantly, the natural aphid vector Myzus persicae efficiently transmitted the viral progeny produced in infected plants. By comparing agroinoculation and aphid infection in a host range assay, we showed that the engineered BMYV-EK virus displayed a similar host range to BMYV-2ITB, except for Nicotiana benthamiana, which proved to be resistant to systemic infection with BMYV-EK. Finally, both the BMYV-EK P0 and the full-length clone were able to strongly interfere with post-transcriptional gene silencing.

  1. [Cloning of full-length cDNA of HMGR from Gobiocypris rarus and analysis of its expression profiles in male exposed to pentachlorophenol].

    PubMed

    Deng, Chuan; Mao, Si-Yu; Xiong, Li; Zhang, Xiao-Zheng; Li, Wei; Gao, Xiang; Liu, Qiu-Ping; Chen, Yun; Liu, Yan

    2014-08-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) is the first rate-limiting enzyme in the mevalonate (MVA) pathway. The full-length cDNA of HMGR was cloned from Gobiocypris rarus, and HMGR expression profiles in different tissues and in response to different treatments of pentachlorophenol (PCP) were analyzed by real-time PCR, to investigate the endocrine disruption mechanism of PCP, which altered steroid hormone precursors (cholesterol) levels by modulating gene transcription profiles of HMGR. Based on the homologous clone strategy and rapid-amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) technology, the full-length 3 101-base-pair (bp) cDNA of HMGR was isolated from the livers of rare minnow (Gobiocypris rarus) for the first time, and was designated as GrHMGR (GenBank accession number KF885724). GrHMGR encoded a protein of 884 amino acids and phylogenetic tree analysis indicated that the deduced protein GrHMGR had extensive sequence similarities to other fish HMGRs. Real-time PCR analyses indicated that GrHMGR mRNA expression was tightly controlled in a tissue-specific fashion, with the sites of expression being brain, gonads and liver, and the highest site of expression being gonads. After male rare minnows were exposed to different concentrations of PCP, significant decrease in GrHMGR gene expression with increased PCP concentration in the brain and gonads were observed, together with the differential gene expression trend in the liver. Furthermore, it was found that the decrease of HMGR could reduce the synthesis of cholesterol. This proved that PCP might disrupt the pathway of cholesterol synthesis and then influenced the endocrine system of rare minnow.

  2. Construction of a full-length cDNA library and preliminary analysis of expressed sequence tags from lymphocytes of half-pipe snowboarding athletes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y H; Zhang, Z B; Zhao, C Q; Zhang, Y; Wang, Y F; Guan, W J; Zhu, Z Q

    2015-10-21

    The genes of top athletes are a valuable genetic resource for the human race, and could be exploited to identify novel genes related to sports ability, as well as other functions. We analyzed the expressed sequence tags from top half-pipe snowboarding athletes using the SMART complementary DNA (cDNA) library construction method to elucidate the characteristics of the athlete genome and the differential expression of the genes it contains. Overall, we established a full-length cDNA library from the lymphocytes of half-pipe snowboarding athletes and analyzed the inserted gene fragments. We also classified those genes according to molecular function, biological characteristics, cellular composition, protein types, and signal paths. A total of 201 functional genes were noted, which were distributed in 27 pathways. TXN, MDH1, ARL1, ARPC3, ACTG1, and other genes measured in sequence may be associated with physical ability. This suggests that the SMART cDNA library constructed from the genetic material from top athletes is an effective tool for preserving genetic sports resources and providing genetic markers of physical ability for athlete selection.

  3. Uroporphyrinogen-III synthase: Molecular cloning, nucleotide sequence, expression of a mouse full-length cDNA, and its localization on mouse chromosome 7

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, W.; Desnick, R.J.; Kozak, C.A.

    1995-04-10

    Uroporphyrinogen-III synthase, the fourth enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway, is responsible for the conversion of hydroxymethylbilane to the cyclic tetrapyrrole, uroporphyrinogen III. The deficient activity of URO-S is the enzymatic defect in congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP), an autosomal recessive disorder. For the generation of a mouse model of CEP, the human URO-S cDNA was used to screen 2 X 10{sup 6} recombinants from a mouse adult liver cDNA library. Ten positive clones were isolated, and dideoxy sequencing of the entire 1.6-kb insert of clone pmUROS-1 revealed 5{prime} and 3{prime} untranslated sequences of 144 and 623 bp, respectively, and an open reading frame of 798 bp encoding a 265-amino-acid polypeptide with a predicted molecular mass of 28,501 Da. The mouse and human coding sequences had 80.5 and 77.8% nucleotide and amino acid identity, respectively. The authenticity of the mouse cDNA was established by expression of the active monomeric enzyme in Escherichia coli. In addition, the analysis of two multilocus genetic crosses localized the mouse gene on chromosome 7, consistent with the mapping of the human gene to a position of conserved synteny on chromosome 10. The isolation, expression, and chromosomal mapping of this full-length cDNA should facilitate studies of the structure and organization of the mouse genomic sequence and the development of a mouse model of CEP for characterization of the disease pathogenesis and evaluation of gene therapy. 38 refs., 1 tab.

  4. Insights from computational analysis of full-length β-ketoacyl-[ACP] synthase-II cDNA isolated from American and African oil palms

    PubMed Central

    Bhore, Subhash J.; Cha, Thye S.; Amelia, Kassim; Shah, Farida H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Palm oil derived from fruits (mesocarp) of African oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq. Tenera) and American oil palm (E. oleifera) is important for food industry. Due to high yield, Elaeis guineensis (Tenera) is cultivated on commercial scale, though its oil contains high (~54%) level of saturated fatty acids. The rate-limiting activity of beta-ketoacyl-[ACP] synthase-II (KAS-II) is considered mainly responsible for the high (44%) level of palmitic acid (C16:0) in the oil obtained from E. guineensis. Objective: The objective of this study was to annotate KAS-II cDNA isolated from American and African oil palms. Materials and Methods: The full-length E. oleifera KAS-II (EoKAS-II) cDNA clone was isolated using random method of gene isolation. Whereas, the E. guineensis KAS-II (EgTKAS-II) cDNA was isolated using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique; and missing ends were obtained by employing 5’and 3’ RACE technique. Results: The results show that EoKAS-II and EgTKAS-II open reading frames (ORFs) are of 1689 and 1721 bp in length, respectively. Further analysis of the both EoKAS-II and EgTKAS-II predicted protein illustrates that they contains conserved domains for ‘KAS-I and II’, ‘elongating’ condensing enzymes, ‘condensing enzymes super-family’, and ‘3-oxoacyl-[ACP] synthase II’. The predicted protein sequences shows 95% similarity with each other. Consecutively, the three active sites (Cys, His, and His) were identified in both proteins. However, difference in positions of two active Histidine (His) residues was noticed. Conclusion: These insights may serve as the foundation in understanding the variable activity of KAS-II in American and African oil palms; and cDNA clones could be useful in the genetic engineering of oil palms. PMID:24678202

  5. Expressed Sequence Tags Analysis and Design of Simple Sequence Repeats Markers from a Full-Length cDNA Library in Perilla frutescens (L.)

    PubMed Central

    Seong, Eun Soo; Yoo, Ji Hye; Choi, Jae Hoo; Kim, Chang Heum; Jeon, Mi Ran; Kang, Byeong Ju; Lee, Jae Geun; Choi, Seon Kang; Ghimire, Bimal Kumar; Yu, Chang Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Perilla frutescens is valuable as a medicinal plant as well as a natural medicine and functional food. However, comparative genomics analyses of P. frutescens are limited due to a lack of gene annotations and characterization. A full-length cDNA library from P. frutescens leaves was constructed to identify functional gene clusters and probable EST-SSR markers via analysis of 1,056 expressed sequence tags. Unigene assembly was performed using basic local alignment search tool (BLAST) homology searches and annotated Gene Ontology (GO). A total of 18 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were designed as primer pairs. This study is the first to report comparative genomics and EST-SSR markers from P. frutescens will help gene discovery and provide an important source for functional genomics and molecular genetic research in this interesting medicinal plant. PMID:26664999

  6. Identification of Vitis vinifera (-)-alpha-terpineol synthase by in silico screening of full-length cDNA ESTs and functional characterization of recombinant terpene synthase.

    PubMed

    Martin, Diane M; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2004-05-01

    The flavour and aroma of certain Vitis vinifera grape varieties is dominated by volatile terpenes and small volatile aldehydes. Monoterpenes contribute to the final grape and wine aroma and flavour in form of free volatiles and as glycoside conjugates of monoterpene alcohols. Typical monoterpenol components of the cultivar Gewürztraminer and other aroma-rich grape varieties are linalool, geraniol, nerol, citronellol, and alpha-terpineol. In a functional genomics effort to identify genes for the formation of monoterpene alcohols in V. vinifera, a database of full-length cDNA sequences was screened in silico and yielded two clones for putative monoterpene synthases. The gene products were functionally characterized by expression in Escherichia coli, in vitro enzyme assay and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) product identification as multi-product (-)-alpha-terpineol synthases.

  7. Agroinoculation of a full-length cDNA clone of cotton leafroll dwarf virus (CLRDV) results in systemic infection in cotton and the model plant Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Delfosse, Verónica C; Casse, María F; Agrofoglio, Yamila C; Kresic, Iván Bonacic; Hopp, Horacio E; Ziegler-Graff, Véronique; Distéfano, Ana J

    2013-07-01

    Cotton blue disease is the most important viral disease of cotton in the southern part of South America. Its etiological agent, cotton leafroll dwarf virus (CLRDV), is specifically transmitted to host plants by the aphid vector (Aphis gossypii) and any attempt to perform mechanical inoculations of this virus into its host has failed. This limitation has held back the study of this virus and the disease it causes. In this study, a full-length cDNA of CLRDV was constructed and expressed in vivo under the control of cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. An agrobacterium-mediated inoculation system for the cloned cDNA construct of CLRDV was developed. Northern and immunoblot analyses showed that after several weeks the replicon of CLRDV delivered by Agrobacterium tumefaciens in Gossypium hirsutum plants gave rise to a systemic infection and typical blue disease symptoms correlated to the presence of viral RNA and P3 capsid protein. We also demonstrated that the virus that accumulated in the agroinfected plants was transmissible by the vector A. gossypii. This result confirms the production of biologically active transmissible virions. In addition, the clone was infectious in Nicotiana benthamiana plants which developed interveinal chlorosis three weeks postinoculation and CLRDV was detected both in the inoculated and systemic leaves. Attempts to agroinfect Arabidopsis thaliana plants were irregularly successful. Although no symptoms were observed, the P3 capsid protein as well as the genomic and subgenomic RNAs were irregularly detected in systemic leaves of some agroinfiltrated plants. The inefficient infection rate infers that A. thaliana is a poor host for CLRDV. This is the first report on the construction of a biologically-active infectious full-length clone of a cotton RNA virus showing successful agroinfection of host and non-host plants. The system herein developed will be useful to study CLRDV viral functions and plant-virus interactions using a reverse

  8. The multimerization state of retroviral RNA is modulated by ammonium ions and affects HIV-1 full-length cDNA synthesis in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, S; Häusl, G; Famulok, M; König, B

    1993-01-01

    Genomic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA fragments containing the dimer linkage structure (DLS) can be dimerized and multimerized in the presence of NH4+ and in the absence of any other cation and any viral or cellular protein. This effect strongly supports the notion that dimerization and multimerization of genomic RNA occurs via purine-quartet formation in quadruple helical RNA structures. The efficiency of RNA dimerization and multimerization in the presence of ammonium ions is about 400 fold increased as compared to alkali metal ions such as potassium. Dimerized retroviral RNA representing a pseudodiploid genome could account for genetic recombination within the virion and during reverse transcription. Application of a novel South-Northern-Blotting procedure with biotinylated RNA and digoxigenin-labelled cDNA in vitro reveals that efficient human- and bovine tRNA(Lys3) primed full-length cDNA-synthesis only takes place with a predominantly monomerized RNA template. Dimerization and multimerization of the RNA significantly reduces full-length cDNA-synthesis. This suggests that monomerization of the dimerized RNA, effected by deionization in vitro, is essential for efficient retroviral reverse transcription in vivo. Images PMID:8177734

  9. [Identification and expression analysis of a full-length cDNA encoding Brassica napus small nuclear ribonucleoprotein BnSmD1].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiao-Meng; Zhou, Yun-Tao; Zhang, Hong-Yan; Xue, Hua; Zhou, Lin; Zhao, Yun

    2007-12-01

    By using substractive hybridization (SSH) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends-polymerase chain reaction (RACE-PCR), a full-length cDNA encoding Brassica napus small nuclear ribonucleoprotein, named BnSmD1, was obtained. It had 484 base pairs in length containing an open reading frame (ORF) of 354 bp and encoding a predicted protein of 118 amino acids with a molecular weight of 13 kDa. The BnSmD1 protein shares two highly conserved Sm folds (Sm-1 and Sm-2) and a C-terminal RG dipeptide repeat. Northern blot analysis revealed that BnSmD1 was expressed in all tested organs in B. napus, but its transcript level in early floral buds was much higher than that in leaf and stem tissues. No obvious expression difference was observed in leaf and stem tissues between the apetalous line Apet33-10 petalled near-isogenic line Pet33-10. Compared with wild type, the expression of BnSmD1 in the early floral buds of apetalous mutant Apet33-10 was significantly reduced. Taken together, our results suggest that BnSmD1 may play an important role in early floral petal development in B. napus.

  10. hSmad5 gene, a human hSmad family member: its full length cDNA, genomic structure, promoter region and mutation analysis in human tumors.

    PubMed

    Gemma, A; Hagiwara, K; Vincent, F; Ke, Y; Hancock, A R; Nagashima, M; Bennett, W P; Harris, C C

    1998-02-19

    hSmad (mothers against decapentaplegic)-related proteins are important messengers within the Transforming Growth Factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) superfamily signal transduction pathways. To further characterize a member of this family, we obtained a full length cDNA of the human hSmad5 (hSmad5) gene by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) and then determined the genomic structure of the gene. There are eight exons and two alternative transcripts; the shorter transcript lacks exon 2. We identified the hSmad5 promoter region from a human genomic YAC clone by obtaining the nucleotide sequence extending 1235 base pairs upstream of the 5' end of the cDNA. We found a CpG island consistent with a promoter region, and we demonstrated promoter activity in a 1232 bp fragment located upstream of the transcription initiation site. To investigate the frequency of somatic hSmad5 mutations in human cancers, we designed intron-based primers to examine coding regions by polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) analysis. Neither homozygous deletions or point mutations were found in 40 primary gastric tumors and 51 cell lines derived from diverse types of human cancer including 20 cell lines resistant to the growth inhibitory effects of TGF-beta1. These results suggest that the hSmad5 gene is not commonly mutated and that other genetic alterations mediate the loss of TGF-beta1 responsiveness in human cancers.

  11. Cloning and sequence analysis of a full-length cDNA of SmPP1cb encoding turbot protein phosphatase 1 beta catalytic subunit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Fei; Guo, Huarong; Wang, Jian

    2008-02-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation, catalyzed by protein kinases and phosphatases, is an important and versatile mechanism by which eukaryotic cells regulate almost all the signaling processes. Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is the first and well-characterized member of the protein serine/threonine phosphatase family. In the present study, a full-length cDNA encoding the beta isoform of the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1(PP1cb), was for the first time isolated and sequenced from the skin tissue of flatfish turbot Scophthalmus maximus, designated SmPP1cb, by the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) technique. The cDNA sequence of SmPP1cb we obtained contains a 984 bp open reading frame (ORF), flanked by a complete 39 bp 5' untranslated region and 462 bp 3' untranslated region. The ORF encodes a putative 327 amino acid protein, and the N-terminal section of this protein is highly acidic, Met-Ala-Glu-Gly-Glu-Leu-Asp-Val-Asp, a common feature for PP1 catalytic subunit but absent in protein phosphatase 2B (PP2B). And its calculated molecular mass is 37 193 Da and pI 5.8. Sequence analysis indicated that, SmPP1cb is extremely conserved in both amino acid and nucleotide acid levels compared with the PP1cb of other vertebrates and invertebrates, and its Kozak motif contained in the 5'UTR around ATG start codon is GXXAXXGXX ATGG, which is different from mammalian in two positions A-6 and G-3, indicating the possibility of different initiation of translation in turbot, and also the 3'UTR of SmPP1cb is highly diverse in the sequence similarity and length compared with other animals, especially zebrafish. The cloning and sequencing of SmPP1cb gene lays a good foundation for the future work on the biological functions of PP1 in the flatfish turbot.

  12. Full-Length Venom Protein cDNA Sequences from Venom-Derived mRNA: Exploring Compositional Variation and Adaptive Multigene Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Modahl, Cassandra M.; Mackessy, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Envenomation of humans by snakes is a complex and continuously evolving medical emergency, and treatment is made that much more difficult by the diverse biochemical composition of many venoms. Venomous snakes and their venoms also provide models for the study of molecular evolutionary processes leading to adaptation and genotype-phenotype relationships. To compare venom complexity and protein sequences, venom gland transcriptomes are assembled, which usually requires the sacrifice of snakes for tissue. However, toxin transcripts are also present in venoms, offering the possibility of obtaining cDNA sequences directly from venom. This study provides evidence that unknown full-length venom protein transcripts can be obtained from the venoms of multiple species from all major venomous snake families. These unknown venom protein cDNAs are obtained by the use of primers designed from conserved signal peptide sequences within each venom protein superfamily. This technique was used to assemble a partial venom gland transcriptome for the Middle American Rattlesnake (Crotalus simus tzabcan) by amplifying sequences for phospholipases A2, serine proteases, C-lectins, and metalloproteinases from within venom. Phospholipase A2 sequences were also recovered from the venoms of several rattlesnakes and an elapid snake (Pseudechis porphyriacus), and three-finger toxin sequences were recovered from multiple rear-fanged snake species, demonstrating that the three major clades of advanced snakes (Elapidae, Viperidae, Colubridae) have stable mRNA present in their venoms. These cDNA sequences from venom were then used to explore potential activities derived from protein sequence similarities and evolutionary histories within these large multigene superfamilies. Venom-derived sequences can also be used to aid in characterizing venoms that lack proteomic profiles and identify sequence characteristics indicating specific envenomation profiles. This approach, requiring only venom, provides

  13. Full-Length Venom Protein cDNA Sequences from Venom-Derived mRNA: Exploring Compositional Variation and Adaptive Multigene Evolution.

    PubMed

    Modahl, Cassandra M; Mackessy, Stephen P

    2016-06-01

    Envenomation of humans by snakes is a complex and continuously evolving medical emergency, and treatment is made that much more difficult by the diverse biochemical composition of many venoms. Venomous snakes and their venoms also provide models for the study of molecular evolutionary processes leading to adaptation and genotype-phenotype relationships. To compare venom complexity and protein sequences, venom gland transcriptomes are assembled, which usually requires the sacrifice of snakes for tissue. However, toxin transcripts are also present in venoms, offering the possibility of obtaining cDNA sequences directly from venom. This study provides evidence that unknown full-length venom protein transcripts can be obtained from the venoms of multiple species from all major venomous snake families. These unknown venom protein cDNAs are obtained by the use of primers designed from conserved signal peptide sequences within each venom protein superfamily. This technique was used to assemble a partial venom gland transcriptome for the Middle American Rattlesnake (Crotalus simus tzabcan) by amplifying sequences for phospholipases A2, serine proteases, C-lectins, and metalloproteinases from within venom. Phospholipase A2 sequences were also recovered from the venoms of several rattlesnakes and an elapid snake (Pseudechis porphyriacus), and three-finger toxin sequences were recovered from multiple rear-fanged snake species, demonstrating that the three major clades of advanced snakes (Elapidae, Viperidae, Colubridae) have stable mRNA present in their venoms. These cDNA sequences from venom were then used to explore potential activities derived from protein sequence similarities and evolutionary histories within these large multigene superfamilies. Venom-derived sequences can also be used to aid in characterizing venoms that lack proteomic profiles and identify sequence characteristics indicating specific envenomation profiles. This approach, requiring only venom, provides

  14. Development of the full-length cDNA clones of two porcine epidemic diarrhea disease virus isolates with different virulence

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Jin, Zhonghui; Gao, Yueyi; Zhou, Lei; Ge, Xinna; Guo, Xin; Yang, Hanchun

    2017-01-01

    The recently emerged highly virulent variants of porcine epidemic and diarrhea virus (PEDV) remain a huge threat to the worldwide swine industry. Here, we describe the development of a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) reverse genetics system for PEDV based on two recent Chinese field isolates, namely CHM2013 and BJ2011C. Phylogenetically, CHM2013 is closely related to the vaccine strain SM98 whereas the isolate BJ2011C belongs to the GIIb group, a cluster that contains many recent pandemic strains. The full-length cDNA clones of the two isolates were constructed into BAC under the control of CMV promoter. The rescued viruses rBJ2011C and rCHM2013 were found to replicate at the kinetics similar to their respective parental viruses in cell culture. When tested in the 2-day-old pig model, rBJ2011C caused severe diarrhea of piglets with extensive damages to the intestinal epithelium, leading to 100% fatality within 48 hours. In contrast, the rCHM2013-inoculated piglets all survived with only very minor tissue damage observed. Thus, we have successfully established a convenient platform for PEDV genome manipulation. This study also represents the first description of a DNA-launched reverse genetics system for the highly virulent PEDV. PMID:28301551

  15. Full-length cDNA nucleotide sequence of a serologically undetectable HLA-DQA1 allele: HLA-DQA1*"LA".

    PubMed

    Lardy, N M; Otting, N; van der Horst, A R; Bontrop, R E; de Waal, L P

    1997-10-01

    This study describes the characterization of a serological HLA-DQ"blank" specificity that segregates with the HLA-A2, -B7, -DR14, -DR52 haplotype. Although conventional serological typing techniques could not detect an HLA-DQ product on the haplotype positive for the HLA-DQ"blank" specificity, sequence-specific oligonucleotide (SSO) dot-blot analysis demonstrated the presence of the HLA-DQA1*01 and HLA-DQB1*05 alleles. Full-length cDNA nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that the HLA-DQB1 allele that segregated with the HLA-DQ"blank" specificity was identical to HLA-DQB1*05031. As for the HLA DQA1 allele, one nucleotide substitution distinguished the HLA-DQA1 "blank" allele from HLA-DQA1*0104. In exon 2 at nucleotide position 304 a C was substituted for a T (Arg-->Cys). Pending official recognition by the WHO Nomenclature Committee, this HLA-DQA1 "blank" allele is termed HLA-DQA1*"LA". Furthermore, it is postulated that the introduction of cysteine at amino acid position 102 abrogates the classical HLA-DQ1 specificity.

  16. Production of infectious RNA transcripts from full-length cDNA clones representing two subgroups of peanut stunt virus strains: mapping satellite RNA support to RNA1.

    PubMed

    Hu, C C; Sanger, M; Ghabrial, S A

    1998-08-01

    Full-length cDNA clones from which infectious transcripts could be generated were constructed from the genomic RNAs of two distinct strains of peanut stunt cucumovirus (PSV), PSV-ER and PSV-W. PSV-ER, a subgroup I strain, is known to support efficient replication of satellite RNA (satRNA) in infected plants, whereas PSV-W, a subgroup II strain, does not support satRNA replication. Although artificial reassortants (pseudorecombinants) of all possible combinations of infectious transcripts representing RNA1, RNA2 and RNA3 were infectious, only those having RNA1 from PSV-ER supported the replication of satRNA. These results demonstrate conclusively that support of PSV satRNA replication maps to RNA1. Comparisons of secondary structure predictions of the C-terminal helicase-like domain of the 1a proteins of four PSV strains belonging to two subgroups did not reveal any obvious differences between strains that differ in satRNA support. The complete nucleotide sequence of RNA1 from strains PSV-ER and PSV-W were determined and found to be 79% identical. Sequence comparison analysis of RNA1 sequences of cucumoviruses confirmed the placement of the PSV strains into two distinct subgroups.

  17. Efficient and simpler method to construct normalized cDNA libraries with improved representations of full-length cDNAs

    DOEpatents

    Soares, M.B.; Fatima Bonaldo, M. de

    1998-12-08

    This invention provides a method to normalize a cDNA library comprising: (a) constructing a directionally cloned library containing cDNA inserts wherein the insert is capable of being amplified by polymerase chain reaction; (b) converting a double-stranded cDNA library into single-stranded DNA circles; (c) generating single-stranded nucleic acid molecules complementary to the single-stranded DNA circles converted in step (b) by polymerase chain reaction with appropriate primers; (d) hybridizing the single-stranded DNA circles converted in step (b) with the complementary single-stranded nucleic acid molecules generated in step (c) to produce partial duplexes to an appropriate Cot; and (e) separating the unhybridized single-stranded DNA circles from the hybridized DNA circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. This invention also provides a method to normalize a cDNA library wherein the generating of single-stranded nucleic acid molecules complementary to the single-stranded DNA circles converted in step (b) is by excising cDNA inserts from the double-stranded cDNA library; purifying the cDNA inserts from cloning vectors; and digesting the cDNA inserts with an exonuclease. This invention further provides a method to construct a subtractive cDNA library following the steps described above. This invention further provides normalized and/or subtractive cDNA libraries generated by the above methods. 25 figs.

  18. Efficient and simpler method to construct normalized cDNA libraries with improved representations of full-length cDNAs

    DOEpatents

    Soares, Marcelo Bento; Bonaldo, Maria de Fatima

    1998-01-01

    This invention provides a method to normalize a cDNA library comprising: (a) constructing a directionally cloned library containing cDNA inserts wherein the insert is capable of being amplified by polymerase chain reaction; (b) converting a double-stranded cDNA library into single-stranded DNA circles; (c) generating single-stranded nucleic acid molecules complementary to the single-stranded DNA circles converted in step (b) by polymerase chain reaction with appropriate primers; (d) hybridizing the single-stranded DNA circles converted in step (b) with the complementary single-stranded nucleic acid molecules generated in step (c) to produce partial duplexes to an appropriate Cot; and (e) separating the unhybridized single-stranded DNA circles from the hybridized DNA circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. This invention also provides a method to normalize a cDNA library wherein the generating of single-stranded nucleic acid molecules complementary to the single-stranded DNA circles converted in step (b) is by excising cDNA inserts from the double-stranded cDNA library; purifying the cDNA inserts from cloning vectors; and digesting the cDNA inserts with an exonuclease. This invention further provides a method to construct a subtractive cDNA library following the steps described above. This invention further provides normalized and/or subtractive cDNA libraries generated by the above methods.

  19. Analysis of a cDNA clone expressing a human autoimmune antigen: full-length sequence of the U2 small nuclear RNA-associated B antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Habets, W.J.; Sillekens, P.T.G.; Hoet, M.H.; Schalken, J.A.; Roebroek, A.J.M.; Leunissen, J.A.M.; Van de Ven, W.J.M.; Van Venrooij, W.J.

    1987-04-01

    A U2 small nuclear RNA-associated protein, designated B'', was recently identified as the target antigen for autoimmune sera from certain patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and other rheumatic diseases. Such antibodies enabled them to isolate cDNA clone lambdaHB''-1 from a phage lambdagt11 expression library. This clone appeared to code for the B'' protein as established by in vitro translation of hybrid-selected mRNA. The identity of clone lambdaHB''-1 was further confirmed by partial peptide mapping and analysis of the reactivity of the recombinant antigen with monospecific and monoclonal antibodies. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the 1015-base-pair cDNA insert of clone lambdaHB''-1 revealed a large open reading frame of 800 nucleotides containing the coding sequence for a polypeptide of 25,457 daltons. In vitro transcription of the lambdaHB''-1 cDNA insert and subsequent translation resulted in a protein product with the molecular size of the B'' protein. These data demonstrate that clone lambdaHB''-1 contains the complete coding sequence of this antigen. The deduced polypeptide sequence contains three very hydrophilic regions that might constitute RNA binding sites and/or antigenic determinants. These findings might have implications both for the understanding of the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases as well as for the elucidation of the biological function of autoimmune antigens.

  20. Molecular cloning of a full-length cDNA for dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy and regional expressions of the expanded alleles in the CNS

    SciTech Connect

    Onodera, Osamu; Oyake, Mutsuo; Takano, Hiroki

    1995-11-01

    Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by genetic anticipation and variable combinations of symptoms including myoclonus, epilepsy, cerebellar ataxia, choreoathetosis, and dementia. Recently, we discovered that DRPLA is caused by unstable expansion of a CAG repeat of a gene on the short arm of chromosome 12. We determined the consensus DRPLA cDNA sequence containing the complete coding region for 1,185 amino acids. The CAG repeat, which is expanded in DRPLA, is located 1,462 bp downstream from the putative methionine initiation codon and encodes a poly-glutamine tract. Although poly-serine and proline tracts exist near the CAG repeats, these poly-serine or proline tracts did not show any polymorphisms, which is in strong contrast to the high heterogeneity in the length of the CAG repeat. Northern blot analysis revealed a 4.7-kb transcript that is widely expressed in various tissues including heart, lung, kidney, placenta, skeletal muscle, and brain. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that the expanded alleles are transcribed to levels comparable to those of normal alleles. These results indicate that there is no difference in transcriptional efficiency between expanded and normal alleles. Furthermore, mRNA from cerebellar hemispheres of DRPLA patients showed smaller sizes of CAG repeats compared with other regions of the brain, which reflects somatic mosaicism of the expanded alleles of the DRPLA gene. 49 refs., 6 figs.

  1. An infectious RNA with a hepta-adenosine stretch responsible for programmed -1 ribosomal frameshift derived from a full-length cDNA clone of Hibiscus latent Singapore virus.

    PubMed

    Niu, Shengniao; Cao, Shishu; Wong, Sek-Man

    2014-01-20

    Hibiscus latent Singapore virus (HLSV) is a member of Tobamovirus and its full-length cDNA clones were constructed. The in vitro transcripts from two HLSV full-length cDNA clones, which contain a hepta-adenosine stretch (pHLSV-7A) and an octo-adenosine stretch (pHLSV-8A), are both infectious. The replication level of HLSV-7A in Nicotiana benthamiana protoplasts was 5-fold lower, as compared to that of HLSV-8A. The replicase proteins of HLSV-7A were produced through programmed -1 ribosomal frameshift (-1 PRF) and the 7A stretch was a slippery sequence for -1 PRF. Mutations to the downstream pseudoknot of 7A stretch showed that the pseudoknot was not required for the frameshift in vitro. The stretch was found to be extended to 8A after subsequent replication cycles in vivo. It is envisaged that HLSV employs the monotonous runs of A and -1 PRF to convert its 7A to 8A to reach higher replication for its survival in plants.

  2. In vitro mutagenesis of a full-length cDNA clone of Semliki Forest virus: the small 6,000-molecular-weight membrane protein modulates virus release.

    PubMed Central

    Liljeström, P; Lusa, S; Huylebroeck, D; Garoff, H

    1991-01-01

    We report on the construction of a full-length cDNA clone of Semliki Forest virus (SFV). By placing the cDNA under the SP6 promoter, infectious RNA can be produced in vitro and used to transfect cells to initiate virus infection. To achieve efficient transfections, a new protocol for electroporation of RNA was developed. This method gave up to 500-fold improvement over the traditional DEAE-dextran transfection procedure. Since virtually 100% of the cells can be transfected by electroporation, this method is a useful tool for detailed biochemical studies of null mutations of SFV that abolish production of infections virus particles. We used the cDNA clone of SFV to study what effects a deletion of the 6,000-molecular-weight membrane protein (6K membrane protein) had on virus replication. The small 6K protein is part of the structural precursor molecule (C-p62-6K-E1) of the virus. Our results conclusively show that the 6K protein is not needed for the heterodimerization of the p62 and E1 spike membrane proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum, nor is it needed for their transport out to the cell surface. The absence of the 6K protein did, however, result in a dramatic reduction in virus release, suggesting that the protein exerts its function late in the assembly pathway, possibly during virus budding. Images PMID:2072446

  3. Construction and characterization of a full-length infectious cDNA clone of foot-and-mouth disease virus strain O/JPN/2010 isolated in Japan in 2010.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Tatsuya; Onozato, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Seiichi; Fukai, Katsuhiko; Yamada, Manabu; Morioka, Kazuki; Kanno, Toru

    2016-06-01

    A full-length infectious cDNA clone of the genome of a foot-and-mouth disease virus isolated from the 2010 epidemic in Japan was constructed and designated pSVL-f02. Transfection of Cos-7 or IBRS-2 cells with this clone allowed the recovery of infectious virus. The recovered virus had the same in vitro characterization as the parental virus with regard to antigenicity in neutralization and indirect immunofluorescence tests, plaque size and one-step growth. Pigs were experimentally infected with the parental virus or the recombinant virus recovered from pSVL-f02 transfected cells. There were no significant differences in clinical signs or antibody responses between the two groups, and virus isolation and viral RNA detection from clinical samples were similar. Virus recovered from transfected cells therefore retained the in vitro characteristics and the in vivo pathogenicity of their parental strain. This cDNA clone should be a valuable tool to analyze determinants of pathogenicity and mechanisms of virus replication, and to develop genetically engineered vaccines against foot-and-mouth disease virus.

  4. Mosquito carboxylesterase Est alpha 2(1) (A2). Cloning and sequence of the full-length cDNA for a major insecticide resistance gene worldwide in the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, A; Hemingway, J

    1995-07-14

    Organophosphorus insecticide resistance in Culex mosquitoes is commonly caused by increased activity of one or more esterases. The commonest phenotype involves elevation of the esterases Est alpha 2 (A2) and Est beta 2 (B2). A cDNA encoding the Est alpha 2 esterase has now been isolated from a Sri Lankan insecticide-resistant mosquito (Culex quinquefasciatus, Say) expression library. In line with a recently suggested nomenclature system (Karunaratne, S. H. P. P. (1994) Characterization of Multiple Variants of Carboxylesterases Which Are Involved in Insecticide Resistance in the Mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus. Ph.D. thesis, University of London), as the first sequenced variant of this esterase, it is now referred to as Est alpha 2(1). The full-length cDNA of est alpha 2(1) codes for a 540-amino acid protein, which has high homology with other esterases and lipases and belongs to the serine or B-esterase enzyme family. The predicted secondary structure of Est alpha 2(1) is similar to the consensus secondary structure of proteins within the esterase/lipase family where the secondary and tertiary structures have been resolved. The level of identity (approximately 47% at the amino acid level) between the est alpha 2(1) and the various Culex est beta (B1 and B2) cDNA alleles that have been cloned and sequenced suggests that the two esterase loci are closely related and arose originally from duplication of a common ancestral gene. The lack of a distinct hydrophobic signal sequence for Est alpha 2(1) and two possible N-linked glycosylation sites, both situated close to the active site serine, suggest that it is a nonglycosylated protein that is not exported from the cell. Southern and dot blot analysis of genomic DNA from various insecticide-resistant and susceptible mosquito strains show that the est alpha 2(1) gene, like est beta 2(1), is amplified in resistant strains. The restriction fragment length polymorphism patterns, after probing Southern blots of Eco

  5. Complete nucleotide sequences and construction of full-length infectious cDNA clones of cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) in a versatile newly developed binary vector including both 35S and T7 promoters.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan-Hwan; Ju, Hye-Kyoung; Han, Jae-Yeong; Park, Jong-Seo; Kim, Ik-Hyun; Seo, Eun-Young; Kim, Jung-Kyu; Hammond, John; Lim, Hyoun-Sub

    2017-04-01

    Seed-transmitted viruses have caused significant damage to watermelon crops in Korea in recent years, with cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) infection widespread as a result of infected seed lots. To determine the likely origin of CGMMV infection, we collected CGMMV isolates from watermelon and melon fields and generated full-length infectious cDNA clones. The full-length cDNAs were cloned into newly constructed binary vector pJY, which includes both the 35S and T7 promoters for versatile usage (agroinfiltration and in vitro RNA transcription) and a modified hepatitis delta virus ribozyme sequence to precisely cleave RNA transcripts at the 3' end of the tobamovirus genome. Three CGMMV isolates (OMpj, Wpj, and Mpj) were separately evaluated for infectivity in Nicotiana benthamiana, demonstrated by either Agroinfiltration or inoculation with in vitro RNA transcripts. CGMMV nucleotide identities to other tobamoviruses were calculated from pairwise alignments using DNAMAN. CGMMV identities were 49.89% to tobacco mosaic virus; 49.85% to pepper mild mottle virus; 50.47% to tomato mosaic virus; 60.9% to zucchini green mottle mosaic virus; and 60.96% to kyuri green mottle mosaic virus, confirming that CGMMV is a distinct species most similar to other cucurbit-infecting tobamoviruses. We further performed phylogenetic analysis to determine relationships of our new Korean CGMMV isolates to previously characterized isolates from Canada, China, India, Israel, Japan, Korea, Russia, Spain, and Taiwan available from NCBI. Analysis of CGMMV amino acid sequences showed three major clades, broadly typified as 'Russian,' 'Israeli,' and 'Asian' groups. All of our new Korean isolates fell within the 'Asian' clade. Neither the 128 nor 186 kDa RdRps of the three new isolates showed any detectable gene silencing suppressor function.

  6. Technology development for gene discovery and full-length sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Marcelo Bento Soares

    2004-07-19

    In previous years, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, we developed methods for construction of normalized and subtracted cDNA libraries, and constructed hundreds of high-quality libraries for production of Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs). Our clones were made widely available to the scientific community through the IMAGE Consortium, and millions of ESTs were produced from our libraries either by collaborators or by our own sequencing laboratory at the University of Iowa. During this grant period, we focused on (1) the development of a method for preferential cloning of tissue-specific and/or rare transcripts, (2) its utilization to expedite EST-based gene discovery for the NIH Mouse Brain Molecular Anatomy Project, (3) further development and optimization of a method for construction of full-length-enriched cDNA libraries, and (4) modification of a plasmid vector to maximize efficiency of full-length cDNA sequencing by the transposon-mediated approach. It is noteworthy that the technology developed for preferential cloning of rare mRNAs enabled identification of over 2,000 mouse transcripts differentially expressed in the hippocampus. In addition, the method that we optimized for construction of full-length-enriched cDNA libraries was successfully utilized for the production of approximately fifty libraries from the developing mouse nervous system, from which over 2,500 full-ORF-containing cDNAs have been identified and accurately sequenced in their entirety either by our group or by the NIH-Mammalian Gene Collection Program Sequencing Team.

  7. A full-length cDNA infectious clone of North American type 1 porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus: expression of green fluorescent protein in the Nsp2 region.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ying; Rowland, Raymond R R; Roof, Michael; Lunney, Joan K; Christopher-Hennings, Jane; Nelson, Eric A

    2006-12-01

    The recent emergence of a unique group of North American type 1 porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) in the United States presents new disease control problems for a swine industry that has already been impacted seriously by North American type 2 PRRSV. In this study, a full-length cDNA infectious clone was generated from a low-virulence North American type 1 PRRSV isolate, SD01-08. In vitro studies demonstrated that the cloned virus maintained growth properties similar to those of the parental virus. Virological, pathological, and immunological observations from animals challenged with cloned viruses were similar to those from animals challenged with the parental virus and a modified live virus vaccine. To further explore the potential use as a viral backbone for expressing foreign genes, the green fluorescent protein (GFP) was inserted into a unique deletion site located at amino acid positions 348 and 349 of the predicted Nsp2 region in the virus, and expression of the Nsp2-GFP fusion protein was visualized by fluorescent microscopy. The availability of this North American type 1 infectious clone provides an important research tool for further study of the basic viral biology and pathogenic mechanisms of this group of type 1 PRRSV in the United States.

  8. Construction of a full-length cDNA Library from Chinese oak silkworm pupa and identification of a KK-42-binding protein gene in relation to pupa-diapause termination.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Ping; Xia, Run-Xi; Wang, Huan; Li, Xi-Sheng; Liu, Yan-Qun; Wei, Zhao-Jun; Lu, Cheng; Xiang, Zhong-Huai

    2009-06-24

    In this study we successfully constructed a full-length cDNA library from Chinese oak silkworm, Antheraea pernyi, the most well-known wild silkworm used for silk production and insect food. Total RNA was extracted from a single fresh female pupa at the diapause stage. The titer of the library was 5 x 10(5) cfu/ml and the proportion of recombinant clones was approximately 95%. Expressed sequence tag (EST) analysis was used to characterize the library. A total of 175 clustered ESTs consisting of 24 contigs and 151 singlets were generated from 250 effective sequences. Of the 175 unigenes, 97 (55.4%) were known genes but only five from A. pernyi, 37 (21.2%) were known ESTs without function annotation, and 41 (23.4%) were novel ESTs. By EST sequencing, a gene coding KK-42-binding protein in A. pernyi (named as ApKK42-BP; GenBank accession no. FJ744151) was identified and characterized. Protein sequence analysis showed that ApKK42-BP was not a membrane protein but an extracellular protein with a signal peptide at position 1-18, and contained two putative conserved domains, abhydro_lipase and abhydrolase_1, suggesting it may be a member of lipase superfamily. Expression analysis based on number of ESTs showed that ApKK42-BP was an abundant gene in the period of diapause stage, suggesting it may also be involved in pupa-diapause termination.

  9. Identification of Habitat-Specific Biomes of Aquatic Fungal Communities Using a Comprehensive Nearly Full-Length 18S rRNA Dataset Enriched with Contextual Data.

    PubMed

    Panzer, Katrin; Yilmaz, Pelin; Weiß, Michael; Reich, Lothar; Richter, Michael; Wiese, Jutta; Schmaljohann, Rolf; Labes, Antje; Imhoff, Johannes F; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Reich, Marlis

    2015-01-01

    Molecular diversity surveys have demonstrated that aquatic fungi are highly diverse, and that they play fundamental ecological roles in aquatic systems. Unfortunately, comparative studies of aquatic fungal communities are few and far between, due to the scarcity of adequate datasets. We combined all publicly available fungal 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences with new sequence data from a marine fungi culture collection. We further enriched this dataset by adding validated contextual data. Specifically, we included data on the habitat type of the samples assigning fungal taxa to ten different habitat categories. This dataset has been created with the intention to serve as a valuable reference dataset for aquatic fungi including a phylogenetic reference tree. The combined data enabled us to infer fungal community patterns in aquatic systems. Pairwise habitat comparisons showed significant phylogenetic differences, indicating that habitat strongly affects fungal community structure. Fungal taxonomic composition differed considerably even on phylum and class level. Freshwater fungal assemblage was most different from all other habitat types and was dominated by basal fungal lineages. For most communities, phylogenetic signals indicated clustering of sequences suggesting that environmental factors were the main drivers of fungal community structure, rather than species competition. Thus, the diversification process of aquatic fungi must be highly clade specific in some cases.The combined data enabled us to infer fungal community patterns in aquatic systems. Pairwise habitat comparisons showed significant phylogenetic differences, indicating that habitat strongly affects fungal community structure. Fungal taxonomic composition differed considerably even on phylum and class level. Freshwater fungal assemblage was most different from all other habitat types and was dominated by basal fungal lineages. For most communities, phylogenetic signals indicated clustering of

  10. Identification of Habitat-Specific Biomes of Aquatic Fungal Communities Using a Comprehensive Nearly Full-Length 18S rRNA Dataset Enriched with Contextual Data

    PubMed Central

    Panzer, Katrin; Yilmaz, Pelin; Weiß, Michael; Reich, Lothar; Richter, Michael; Wiese, Jutta; Schmaljohann, Rolf; Labes, Antje; Imhoff, Johannes F.; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Reich, Marlis

    2015-01-01

    Molecular diversity surveys have demonstrated that aquatic fungi are highly diverse, and that they play fundamental ecological roles in aquatic systems. Unfortunately, comparative studies of aquatic fungal communities are few and far between, due to the scarcity of adequate datasets. We combined all publicly available fungal 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences with new sequence data from a marine fungi culture collection. We further enriched this dataset by adding validated contextual data. Specifically, we included data on the habitat type of the samples assigning fungal taxa to ten different habitat categories. This dataset has been created with the intention to serve as a valuable reference dataset for aquatic fungi including a phylogenetic reference tree. The combined data enabled us to infer fungal community patterns in aquatic systems. Pairwise habitat comparisons showed significant phylogenetic differences, indicating that habitat strongly affects fungal community structure. Fungal taxonomic composition differed considerably even on phylum and class level. Freshwater fungal assemblage was most different from all other habitat types and was dominated by basal fungal lineages. For most communities, phylogenetic signals indicated clustering of sequences suggesting that environmental factors were the main drivers of fungal community structure, rather than species competition. Thus, the diversification process of aquatic fungi must be highly clade specific in some cases.The combined data enabled us to infer fungal community patterns in aquatic systems. Pairwise habitat comparisons showed significant phylogenetic differences, indicating that habitat strongly affects fungal community structure. Fungal taxonomic composition differed considerably even on phylum and class level. Freshwater fungal assemblage was most different from all other habitat types and was dominated by basal fungal lineages. For most communities, phylogenetic signals indicated clustering of

  11. Anchoring a Defined Sequence to the 55' Ends of mRNAs : The Bolt to Clone Rare Full Length mRNAs and Generate cDNA Libraries porn a Few Cells.

    PubMed

    Baptiste, J; Milne Edwards, D; Delort, J; Mallet, J

    1993-01-01

    Among numerous applications, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (1,2) provides a convenient means to clone 5' ends of rare mRNAs and to generate cDNA libraries from tissue available in amounts too low to be processed by conventional methods. Basically, the amplification of cDNAs by the PCR requires the availability of the sequences of two stretches of the molecule to be amplified. A sequence can easily be imposed at the 5' end of the first-strand cDNAs (corresponding to the 3' end of the mRNAs) by priming the reverse transcription with a specific primer (for cloning the 5' end of rare messenger) or with an oligonucleotide tailored with a poly (dT) stretch (for cDNA library construction), taking advantage of the poly (A) sequence that is located at the 3' end of mRNAs. Several strategies have been devised to tag the 3' end of the ss-cDNAs (corresponding to the 55' end of the mRNAs). We (3) and others have described strategies based on the addition of a homopolymeric dG (4,5) or dA (6,7) tail using terminal deoxyribonucleotide transferase (TdT) ("anchor-PCR" [4]). However, this strategy has important limitations. The TdT reaction is difficult to control and has a low efficiency (unpublished observations). But most importantly, the return primers containing a homopolymeric (dC or dT) tail generate nonspecific amplifications, a phenomenon that prevents the isolation of low abundance mRNA species and/or interferes with the relative abundance of primary clones in the library. To circumvent these drawbacks, we have used two approaches. First, we devised a strategy based on a cRNA enrichment procedure, which has been useful to eliminate nonspecific-PCR products and to allow detection and cloning of cDNAs of low abundance (3). More recently, to avoid the nonspecific amplification resulting from the annealing of the homopolymeric tail oligonucleotide, we have developed a novel anchoring strategy that is based on the ligation of an oligonucleotide to the 35' end of ss

  12. A Full-Length Infectious cDNA Clone of Zika Virus from the 2015 Epidemic in Brazil as a Genetic Platform for Studies of Virus-Host Interactions and Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Tsetsarkin, Konstantin A.; Kenney, Heather; Chen, Rubing; Liu, Guangping; Manukyan, Hasmik; Whitehead, Stephen S.; Laassri, Majid

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT An arthropod-borne virus, Zika virus (ZIKV), has recently emerged as a major human pathogen. Associated with complications during perinatal development and Guillain-Barré syndrome in adults, ZIKV raises new challenges for understanding the molecular determinants of flavivirus pathogenesis. This underscores the necessity for the development of a reverse genetic system based on an epidemic ZIKV strain. Here, we describe the generation and characterization in cell cultures of an infectious cDNA clone of ZIKV isolated from the 2015 epidemic in Brazil. The cDNA-derived ZIKV replicated efficiently in a variety of cell lines, including those of both neuronal and placental origin. We observed that the growth of cDNA-derived virus was attenuated compared to the growth of the parental isolate in most cell lines, which correlates with substantial differences in sequence heterogeneity between these viruses that were determined by deep-sequencing analysis. Our findings support the role of genetic diversity in maintaining the replicative fitness of viral populations under changing conditions. Moreover, these results indicate that caution should be exercised when interpreting the results of reverse-genetics experiments in attempts to accurately predict the biology of natural viruses. Finally, a Vero cell-adapted cDNA clone of ZIKV was generated that can be used as a convenient platform for studies aimed at the development of ZIKV vaccines and therapeutics. PMID:27555311

  13. Genomics of hybrid poplar (Populus trichocarpax deltoides) interacting with forest tent caterpillars (Malacosoma disstria): normalized and full-length cDNA libraries, expressed sequence tags, and a cDNA microarray for the study of insect-induced defences in poplar.

    PubMed

    Ralph, Steven; Oddy, Claire; Cooper, Dawn; Yueh, Hesther; Jancsik, Sharon; Kolosova, Natalia; Philippe, Ryan N; Aeschliman, Dana; White, Rick; Huber, Dezene; Ritland, Carol E; Benoit, François; Rigby, Tracey; Nantel, André; Butterfield, Yaron S N; Kirkpatrick, Robert; Chun, Elizabeth; Liu, Jerry; Palmquist, Diana; Wynhoven, Brian; Stott, Jeffrey; Yang, George; Barber, Sarah; Holt, Robert A; Siddiqui, Asim; Jones, Steven J M; Marra, Marco A; Ellis, Brian E; Douglas, Carl J; Ritland, Kermit; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2006-04-01

    As part of a genomics strategy to characterize inducible defences against insect herbivory in poplar, we developed a comprehensive suite of functional genomics resources including cDNA libraries, expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and a cDNA microarray platform. These resources are designed to complement the existing poplar genome sequence and poplar (Populus spp.) ESTs by focusing on herbivore- and elicitor-treated tissues and incorporating normalization methods to capture rare transcripts. From a set of 15 standard, normalized or full-length cDNA libraries, we generated 139,007 3'- or 5'-end sequenced ESTs, representing more than one-third of the c. 385,000 publicly available Populus ESTs. Clustering and assembly of 107,519 3'-end ESTs resulted in 14,451 contigs and 20,560 singletons, altogether representing 35,011 putative unique transcripts, or potentially more than three-quarters of the predicted c. 45,000 genes in the poplar genome. Using this EST resource, we developed a cDNA microarray containing 15,496 unique genes, which was utilized to monitor gene expression in poplar leaves in response to herbivory by forest tent caterpillars (Malacosoma disstria). After 24 h of feeding, 1191 genes were classified as up-regulated, compared to only 537 down-regulated. Functional classification of this induced gene set revealed genes with roles in plant defence (e.g. endochitinases, Kunitz protease inhibitors), octadecanoid and ethylene signalling (e.g. lipoxygenase, allene oxide synthase, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase), transport (e.g. ABC proteins, calreticulin), secondary metabolism [e.g. polyphenol oxidase, isoflavone reductase, (-)-germacrene D synthase] and transcriptional regulation [e.g. leucine-rich repeat transmembrane kinase, several transcription factor classes (zinc finger C3H type, AP2/EREBP, WRKY, bHLH)]. This study provides the first genome-scale approach to characterize insect-induced defences in a woody perennial providing a solid platform for

  14. Full-Length Minor Ampullate Spidroin Gene Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gefei; Liu, Xiangqin; Zhang, Yunlong; Lin, Senzhu; Yang, Zijiang; Johansson, Jan; Rising, Anna; Meng, Qing

    2012-01-01

    Spider silk includes seven protein based fibers and glue-like substances produced by glands in the spider's abdomen. Minor ampullate silk is used to make the auxiliary spiral of the orb-web and also for wrapping prey, has a high tensile strength and does not supercontract in water. So far, only partial cDNA sequences have been obtained for minor ampullate spidroins (MiSps). Here we describe the first MiSp full-length gene sequence from the spider species Araneus ventricosus, using a multidimensional PCR approach. Comparative analysis of the sequence reveals regulatory elements, as well as unique spidroin gene and protein architecture including the presence of an unusually large intron. The spliced full-length transcript of MiSp gene is 5440 bp in size and encodes 1766 amino acid residues organized into conserved nonrepetitive N- and C-terminal domains and a central predominantly repetitive region composed of four units that are iterated in a non regular manner. The repeats are more conserved within A. ventricosus MiSp than compared to repeats from homologous proteins, and are interrupted by two nonrepetitive spacer regions, which have 100% identity even at the nucleotide level. PMID:23251707

  15. A phloem-enriched cDNA library from Ricinus: insights into phloem function.

    PubMed

    Doering-Saad, C; Newbury, H J; Couldridge, C E; Bale, J S; Pritchard, J

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify genes that are expressed in the phloem. Increased knowledge of phloem regulation will contribute to our understanding of its many roles, from transport of solutes to information about interactions with pathogens. A cDNA library constructed from phloem-enriched sap exuding from cut Ricinus communis (L.) hypocotyls was sequenced. To assess contamination from other tissues, two libraries were constructed: one using the first 15 min of exudation and the other from sap collected after 120 min of exudation had elapsed. Of 1012 clones sequenced, 158 unique transcripts were identified. The presence of marker molecules such as profilin, the low occurrence of chloroplast-related mRNAs, and the sieve element localization of constituent mRNA using in situ hybridization were consistent with a phloem origin of the sap. Functional analysis of the cDNAs revealed classifications including ribosomal function, interaction with the environment, transport, DNA/RNA binding, and protein turnover. An analysis of the closest Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) homologue for each clone indicated that genes involved in cell localization, protein synthesis, tissue localization, organ localization, organ differentiation, and cell fate were represented at twice the level occurring in the whole Arabidopsis genome. The transcripts found in this phloem-enriched library are discussed in the context of phloem function and the relationship between the companion cell and sieve element.

  16. Full-length fuel rod behavior under severe accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardo, N J; Lanning, D D; Panisko, F E

    1992-12-01

    This document presents an assessment of the severe accident phenomena observed from four Full-Length High-Temperature (FLHT) tests that were performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor at Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. These tests were conducted for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) as part of the Severe Accident Research Program. The objectives of the test were to simulate conditions and provide information on the behavior of full-length fuel rods during hypothetical, small-break, loss-of-coolant severe accidents, in commercial light water reactors.

  17. Synthesis of full length cDNAs from four partially purified oviduct mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Buell, G N; Wickens, M P; Payvar, F; Schimke, R T

    1978-04-10

    Total poly(A)-containing RNA prepared from hen oviduct and centrifuged on an isokinetic sucrose gradient displays four peaks of optical absorbance. These have been identified by translation in vitro as lysozyme, ovomucoid, ovalbumin, and conalbumin mRNAs. Isolation and recentrifugation of the peaks results in partial purification of each mRNA. Molecular weights have been determined for the mRNAs on agarose gels containing 20 mM methylmercury hydroxide. Each mRNA possesses a number of apparently untranslated nucleotides ranging from approximately 900 bases for ovalbumin and conalbumin mRNAs to 200 bases for ovomucoid and lysozyme mRNAs. The mRNAs have been copied with avian myeloblastosis virus reverse transcriptase. Each mRNA with the exception of conalbumin gives rise to a high proportion of full length cDNA. Several parameters previously reported to influence the size distribution of cDNA had no effect on the length of cDNA made from any mRNA fraction. The proportion of full length copy does depend on the reverse transcriptase lot.

  18. Full-length RNA-seq from single cells using Smart-seq2.

    PubMed

    Picelli, Simone; Faridani, Omid R; Björklund, Asa K; Winberg, Gösta; Sagasser, Sven; Sandberg, Rickard

    2014-01-01

    Emerging methods for the accurate quantification of gene expression in individual cells hold promise for revealing the extent, function and origins of cell-to-cell variability. Different high-throughput methods for single-cell RNA-seq have been introduced that vary in coverage, sensitivity and multiplexing ability. We recently introduced Smart-seq for transcriptome analysis from single cells, and we subsequently optimized the method for improved sensitivity, accuracy and full-length coverage across transcripts. Here we present a detailed protocol for Smart-seq2 that allows the generation of full-length cDNA and sequencing libraries by using standard reagents. The entire protocol takes ∼2 d from cell picking to having a final library ready for sequencing; sequencing will require an additional 1-3 d depending on the strategy and sequencer. The current limitations are the lack of strand specificity and the inability to detect nonpolyadenylated (polyA(-)) RNA.

  19. Sequencing and Analysis of Full-Length cDNAs, 5′-ESTs and 3′-ESTs from a Cartilaginous Fish, the Elephant Shark (Callorhinchus milii)

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yue Ying; Kodzius, Rimantas; Tay, Boon-Hui; Tay, Alice; Brenner, Sydney; Venkatesh, Byrappa

    2012-01-01

    Cartilaginous fishes are the most ancient group of living jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes) and are, therefore, an important reference group for understanding the evolution of vertebrates. The elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii), a holocephalan cartilaginous fish, has been identified as a model cartilaginous fish genome because of its compact genome (∼910 Mb) and a genome project has been initiated to obtain its whole genome sequence. In this study, we have generated and sequenced full-length enriched cDNA libraries of the elephant shark using the ‘oligo-capping’ method and Sanger sequencing. A total of 6,778 full-length protein-coding cDNA and 10,701 full-length noncoding cDNA were sequenced from six tissues (gills, intestine, kidney, liver, spleen, and testis) of the elephant shark. Analysis of their polyadenylation signals showed that polyadenylation usage in elephant shark is similar to that in mammals. Furthermore, both coding and noncoding transcripts of the elephant shark use the same proportion of canonical polyadenylation sites. Besides BLASTX searches, protein-coding transcripts were annotated by Gene Ontology, InterPro domain, and KEGG pathway analyses. By comparing elephant shark genes to bony vertebrate genes, we identified several ancient genes present in elephant shark but differentially lost in tetrapods or teleosts. Only ∼6% of elephant shark noncoding cDNA showed similarity to known noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). The rest are either highly divergent ncRNAs or novel ncRNAs. In addition to full-length transcripts, 30,375 5′-ESTs and 41,317 3′-ESTs were sequenced and annotated. The clones and transcripts generated in this study are valuable resources for annotating transcription start sites, exon-intron boundaries, and UTRs of genes in the elephant shark genome, and for the functional characterization of protein sequences. These resources will also be useful for annotating genes in other cartilaginous fishes whose genomes have been targeted for

  20. Recovering full-length viral genomes from metagenomes

    PubMed Central

    Smits, Saskia L.; Bodewes, Rogier; Ruiz-González, Aritz; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Koopmans, Marion P.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Schürch, Anita C.

    2015-01-01

    Infectious disease metagenomics is driven by the question: “what is causing the disease?” in contrast to classical metagenome studies which are guided by “what is out there?” In case of a novel virus, a first step to eventually establishing etiology can be to recover a full-length viral genome from a metagenomic sample. However, retrieval of a full-length genome of a divergent virus is technically challenging and can be time-consuming and costly. Here we discuss different assembly and fragment linkage strategies such as iterative assembly, motif searches, k-mer frequency profiling, coverage profile binning, and other strategies used to recover genomes of potential viral pathogens in a timely and cost-effective manner. PMID:26483782

  1. Irradiation performance of full-length metallic IFR fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Neimark, L.A.

    1992-07-01

    An assembly irradiation of 169 full-length U-Pu-Zr metallic fuel pins was successfully completed in FFTF to a goal burnup of 10 at.%. All test fuel pins maintained their cladding integrity during the irradiation. Postirradiation examination showed minimal fuel/cladding mechanical interaction and excellent stability of the fuel column. Fission-gas release was normal and consistent with the existing data base from irradiation testing of shorter metallic fuel pins in EBR-II.

  2. Conformational states of the full-length glucagon receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Linlin; Yang, Dehua; de Graaf, Chris; Moeller, Arne; West, Graham M.; Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Wang, Chong; Siu, Fai Y.; Song, Gaojie; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen; Pascal, Bruce D.; Wu, Beili; Potter, Clinton S.; Zhou, Hu; Griffin, Patrick R.; Carragher, Bridget; Yang, Huaiyu; Wang, Ming-Wei; Stevens, Raymond C.; Jiang, Hualiang

    2015-01-01

    Class B G protein-coupled receptors are composed of an extracellular domain (ECD) and a seven-transmembrane (7TM) domain, and their signalling is regulated by peptide hormones. Using a hybrid structural biology approach together with the ECD and 7TM domain crystal structures of the glucagon receptor (GCGR), we examine the relationship between full-length receptor conformation and peptide ligand binding. Molecular dynamics (MD) and disulfide crosslinking studies suggest that apo-GCGR can adopt both an open and closed conformation associated with extensive contacts between the ECD and 7TM domain. The electron microscopy (EM) map of the full-length GCGR shows how a monoclonal antibody stabilizes the ECD and 7TM domain in an elongated conformation. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) studies and MD simulations indicate that an open conformation is also stabilized by peptide ligand binding. The combined studies reveal the open/closed states of GCGR and suggest that glucagon binds to GCGR by a conformational selection mechanism. PMID:26227798

  3. Conformational states of the full-length glucagon receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Linlin; Yang, Dehua; de Graaf, Chris; Moeller, Arne; West, Graham M.; Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Wang, Chong; Siu, Fai Y.; Song, Gaojie; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen; Pascal, Bruce D.; Wu, Beili; Potter, Clinton S.; Zhou, Hu; Griffin, Patrick R.; Carragher, Bridget; Yang, Huaiyu; Wang, Ming-Wei; Stevens, Raymond C.; Jiang, Hualiang

    2015-07-01

    Class B G protein-coupled receptors are composed of an extracellular domain (ECD) and a seven-transmembrane (7TM) domain, and their signalling is regulated by peptide hormones. Using a hybrid structural biology approach together with the ECD and 7TM domain crystal structures of the glucagon receptor (GCGR), we examine the relationship between full-length receptor conformation and peptide ligand binding. Molecular dynamics (MD) and disulfide crosslinking studies suggest that apo-GCGR can adopt both an open and closed conformation associated with extensive contacts between the ECD and 7TM domain. The electron microscopy (EM) map of the full-length GCGR shows how a monoclonal antibody stabilizes the ECD and 7TM domain in an elongated conformation. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) studies and MD simulations indicate that an open conformation is also stabilized by peptide ligand binding. The combined studies reveal the open/closed states of GCGR and suggest that glucagon binds to GCGR by a conformational selection mechanism.

  4. Structural photoactivation of a full-length bacterial phytochrome

    PubMed Central

    Björling, Alexander; Berntsson, Oskar; Lehtivuori, Heli; Takala, Heikki; Hughes, Ashley J.; Panman, Matthijs; Hoernke, Maria; Niebling, Stephan; Henry, Léocadie; Henning, Robert; Kosheleva, Irina; Chukharev, Vladimir; Tkachenko, Nikolai V.; Menzel, Andreas; Newby, Gemma; Khakhulin, Dmitry; Wulff, Michael; Ihalainen, Janne A.; Westenhoff, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Phytochromes are light sensor proteins found in plants, bacteria, and fungi. They function by converting a photon absorption event into a conformational signal that propagates from the chromophore through the entire protein. However, the structure of the photoactivated state and the conformational changes that lead to it are not known. We report time-resolved x-ray scattering of the full-length phytochrome from Deinococcus radiodurans on micro- and millisecond time scales. We identify a twist of the histidine kinase output domains with respect to the chromophore-binding domains as the dominant change between the photoactivated and resting states. The time-resolved data further show that the structural changes up to the microsecond time scales are small and localized in the chromophore-binding domains. The global structural change occurs within a few milliseconds, coinciding with the formation of the spectroscopic meta-Rc state. Our findings establish key elements of the signaling mechanism of full-length bacterial phytochromes. PMID:27536728

  5. Development of a full-length human protein production pipeline

    PubMed Central

    Saul, Justin; Petritis, Brianne; Sau, Sujay; Rauf, Femina; Gaskin, Michael; Ober-Reynolds, Benjamin; Mineyev, Irina; Magee, Mitch; Chaput, John; Qiu, Ji; LaBaer, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    There are many proteomic applications that require large collections of purified protein, but parallel production of large numbers of different proteins remains a very challenging task. To help meet the needs of the scientific community, we have developed a human protein production pipeline. Using high-throughput (HT) methods, we transferred the genes of 31 full-length proteins into three expression vectors, and expressed the collection as N-terminal HaloTag fusion proteins in Escherichia coli and two commercial cell-free (CF) systems, wheat germ extract (WGE) and HeLa cell extract (HCE). Expression was assessed by labeling the fusion proteins specifically and covalently with a fluorescent HaloTag ligand and detecting its fluorescence on a LabChip® GX microfluidic capillary gel electrophoresis instrument. This automated, HT assay provided both qualitative and quantitative assessment of recombinant protein. E. coli was only capable of expressing 20% of the test collection in the supernatant fraction with ≥20 μg yields, whereas CF systems had ≥83% success rates. We purified expressed proteins using an automated HaloTag purification method. We purified 20, 33, and 42% of the test collection from E. coli, WGE, and HCE, respectively, with yields ≥1 μg and ≥90% purity. Based on these observations, we have developed a triage strategy for producing full-length human proteins in these three expression systems. PMID:24806540

  6. Simulations of The Dalles Dam Proposed Full Length Spillwall

    SciTech Connect

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.

    2008-02-25

    This report presents results of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling study to evaluatethe impacts of a full-length spillwall at The Dalles Dam. The full-length spillwall is being designed and evaluated as a structural means to improve tailrace egress and thus survival of juvenile fish passing through the spillway. During the course of this study, a full-length spillwall at Bays 6/7 and 8/9 were considered. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has proposed extending the spillwall constructed in the stilling basin between spillway Bays 6 and 7 about 590 ft farther downstream. It is believed that the extension of the spillwall will improve egress conditions for downstream juvenile salmonids by moving them more rapidly into the thalweg of the river hence reducing their exposure to predators. A numerical model was created, validated, and applied the The Dalles Dam tailrace. The models were designed to assess impacts to flow, tailrace egress, navigation, and adult salmon passage of a proposed spill wall extension. The more extensive model validation undertaken in this study greatly improved our confidence in the numerical model to represent the flow conditions in The Dalles tailrace. This study used these validated CFD models to simulate the potential impacts of a spillwall extension for The Dalles Dam tailrace for two locations. We determined the following: (1)The construction of an extended wall (between Bays 6/7) will not adversely impact entering or exiting the navigation lock. Impact should be less if a wall were constructed between Bays 8/9. (2)The construction of a wall between Bays 6/7 will increase the water surface elevation between the wall and the Washington shore. Although the increased water surface elevation would be beneficial to adult upstream migrants in that it decreases velocities on the approach to the adult ladder, the increased flow depth would enhance dissolved gas production, impacting potential operations of the project because of

  7. Universal full-length nucleosome mapping sequence probe.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Vijay; Salih, Bilal; Trifonov, Edward N

    2015-01-01

    For the computational sequence-directed mapping of the nucleosomes, the knowledge of the nucleosome positioning motifs - 10-11 base long sequences - and respective matrices of bendability, is not sufficient, since there is no justified way to fuse these motifs in one continuous nucleosome DNA sequence. Discovery of the strong nucleosome (SN) DNA sequences, with visible sequence periodicity allows derivation of the full-length nucleosome DNA bendability pattern as matrix or consensus sequence. The SN sequences of three species (A. thaliana, C. elegans, and H. sapiens) are aligned (512 sequences for each species), and long (115 dinucleotides) matrices of bendability derived for the species. The matrices have strong common property - alternation of runs of purine-purine (RR) and pyrimidine-pyrimidine (YY) dinucleotides, with average period 10.4 bases. On this basis the universal [R,Y] consensus of the nucleosome DNA sequence is derived, with exactly defined positions of respective penta- and hexamers RRRRR, RRRRRR, YYYYY, and YYYYYY.

  8. Analysis and Optimization of "Full-Length" Diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, Alfred

    2012-01-19

    A method of analyzing the axial variation of the heat generation rate, temperature, voltage, current density and emitter heat flux in a thermionic converter is described. The method is particularly useful for the case of "long" diodes, each extending over the full length of the reactor core. For a given diode geometry and fuel distribution, the analysis combines a nuclear solution of the axial fission density profile with the iterative solution of four differential equations representing the thermal, electrical, and thermionic interactions within the diode. The digital computer program developed to solve these equations can also perform a design optimization with respect to lead resistance, load voltage, and emitter thickness, for a specified maximum emitter temperature. Typical results are presented, and the use of this analysis for predicting the diode operating characteristics is illustrated.

  9. Isolation and characterization of full-length putative alcohol dehydrogenase genes from polygonum minus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, Nur Athirah Abd; Ismail, Ismanizan

    2013-11-01

    Polygonum minus, locally named as Kesum is an aromatic herb which is high in secondary metabolite content. Alcohol dehydrogenase is an important enzyme that catalyzes the reversible oxidation of alcohol and aldehyde with the presence of NAD(P)(H) as co-factor. The main focus of this research is to identify the gene of ADH. The total RNA was extracted from leaves of P. minus which was treated with 150 μM Jasmonic acid. Full-length cDNA sequence of ADH was isolated via rapid amplification cDNA end (RACE). Subsequently, in silico analysis was conducted on the full-length cDNA sequence and PCR was done on genomic DNA to determine the exon and intron organization. Two sequences of ADH, designated as PmADH1 and PmADH2 were successfully isolated. Both sequences have ORF of 801 bp which encode 266 aa residues. Nucleotide sequence comparison of PmADH1 and PmADH2 indicated that both sequences are highly similar at the ORF region but divergent in the 3' untranslated regions (UTR). The amino acid is differ at the 107 residue; PmADH1 contains Gly (G) residue while PmADH2 contains Cys (C) residue. The intron-exon organization pattern of both sequences are also same, with 3 introns and 4 exons. Based on in silico analysis, both sequences contain "classical" short chain alcohol dehydrogenases/reductases ((c) SDRs) conserved domain. The results suggest that both sequences are the members of short chain alcohol dehydrogenase family.

  10. Crystal Structure of a Full-Length Autotransporter

    SciTech Connect

    van den Berg, B.

    2010-01-01

    The autotransporter (AT) secretion mechanism is the most common mechanism for the secretion of virulence factors across the outer membrane (OM) from pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. In addition, ATs have attracted biotechnological and biomedical interest for protein display on bacterial cell surfaces. Despite their importance, the mechanism by which passenger domains of ATs pass the OM is still unclear. The classical view is that the {beta}-barrel domain provides the conduit through which the unfolded passenger moves, with the energy provided by vectorial folding of the {beta}-strand-rich passenger on the extracellular side of the OM. We present here the first structure of a full-length AT, the esterase EstA from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, at a resolution of 2.5 {angstrom}. EstA has a relatively narrow, 12-stranded {beta}-barrel that is covalently attached to the passenger domain via a long, curved helix that occupies the lumen of the {beta}-barrel. The passenger has a structure that is dramatically different from that of other known passengers, with a globular fold that is dominated by {alpha}-helices and loops. The arrangement of secondary-structure elements suggests that the passenger can fold sequentially, providing the driving force for passenger translocation. The esterase active-site residues are located at the apical surface of the passenger, at the entrance of a large hydrophobic pocket that contains a bound detergent molecule that likely mimics substrate. The EstA structure provides insight into AT mechanism and will facilitate the design of fusion proteins for cell surface display.

  11. Massive Collection of Full-Length Complementary DNA Clones and Microarray Analyses:. Keys to Rice Transcriptome Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Shoshi

    2009-02-01

    Completion of the high-precision genome sequence analysis of rice led to the collection of about 35,000 full-length cDNA clones and the determination of their complete sequences. Mapping of these full-length cDNA sequences has given us information on (1) the number of genes expressed in the rice genome; (2) the start and end positions and exon-intron structures of rice genes; (3) alternative transcripts; (4) possible encoded proteins; (5) non-protein-coding (np) RNAs; (6) the density of gene localization on the chromosome; (7) setting the parameters of gene prediction programs; and (8) the construction of a microarray system that monitors global gene expression. Manual curation for rice gene annotation by using mapping information on full-length cDNA and EST assemblies has revealed about 32,000 expressed genes in the rice genome. Analysis of major gene families, such as those encoding membrane transport proteins (pumps, ion channels, and secondary transporters), along with the evolution from bacteria to higher animals and plants, reveals how gene numbers have increased through adaptation to circumstances. Family-based gene annotation also gives us a new way of comparing organisms. Massive amounts of data on gene expression under many kinds of physiological conditions are being accumulated in rice oligoarrays (22K and 44K) based on full-length cDNA sequences. Cluster analyses of genes that have the same promoter cis-elements, that have similar expression profiles, or that encode enzymes in the same metabolic pathways or signal transduction cascades give us clues to understanding the networks of gene expression in rice. As a tool for that purpose, we recently developed "RiCES", a tool for searching for cis-elements in the promoter regions of clustered genes.

  12. Full-length Dysferlin Transfer by the Hyperactive Sleeping Beauty Transposase Restores Dysferlin-deficient Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Escobar, Helena; Schöwel, Verena; Spuler, Simone; Marg, Andreas; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna

    2016-01-01

    Dysferlin-deficient muscular dystrophy is a progressive disease characterized by muscle weakness and wasting for which there is no treatment. It is caused by mutations in DYSF, a large, multiexonic gene that forms a coding sequence of 6.2 kb. Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon is a nonviral gene transfer vector, already used in clinical trials. The hyperactive SB system consists of a transposon DNA sequence and a transposase protein, SB100X, that can integrate DNA over 10 kb into the target genome. We constructed an SB transposon-based vector to deliver full-length human DYSF cDNA into dysferlin-deficient H2K A/J myoblasts. We demonstrate proper dysferlin expression as well as highly efficient engraftment (>1,100 donor-derived fibers) of the engineered myoblasts in the skeletal muscle of dysferlin- and immunodeficient B6.Cg-Dysfprmd Prkdcscid/J (Scid/BLA/J) mice. Nonviral gene delivery of full-length human dysferlin into muscle cells, along with a successful and efficient transplantation into skeletal muscle are important advances towards successful gene therapy of dysferlin-deficient muscular dystrophy. PMID:26784637

  13. Development of 5006 Full-Length CDNAs in Barley: A Tool for Accessing Cereal Genomics Resources

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Kazuhiro; Shin-I, Tadasu; Seki, Motoaki; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yoshida, Hideya; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Yamazaki, Yukiko; Conte, Matthieu; Kohara, Yuji

    2009-01-01

    A collection of 5006 full-length (FL) cDNA sequences was developed in barley. Fifteen mRNA samples from various organs and treatments were pooled to develop a cDNA library using the CAP trapper method. More than 60% of the clones were confirmed to have complete coding sequences, based on comparison with rice amino acid and UniProt sequences. Blastn homologies (E<1E-5) to rice genes and Arabidopsis genes were 89 and 47%, respectively. Of the 5028 possible amino acid sequences derived from the 5006 FLcDNAs, 4032 (80.2%) were classified into 1678 GreenPhyl multigenic families. There were 555 cDNAs showing low homology to both rice and Arabidopsis. Gene ontology annotation by InterProScan indicated that many of these cDNAs (71%) have no known molecular functions and may be unique to barley. The cDNAs showed high homology to Barley 1 GeneChip oligo probes (81%) and the wheat gene index (84%). The high homology between FLcDNAs (27%) and mapped barley expressed sequence tag enabled assigning linkage map positions to 151–233 FLcDNAs on each of the seven barley chromosomes. These comprehensive barley FLcDNAs provide strong platform to connect pre-existing genomic and genetic resources and accelerate gene identification and genome analysis in barley and related species. PMID:19150987

  14. Molecular cloning and properties of a full-length putative thyroid hormone receptor coactivator.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, A; Yen, P M; Misiti, S; Cardona, G R; Liu, Y; Chin, W W

    1996-08-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) are ligand-dependent transcription factors that regulate target gene transcription. The conserved carboxy-terminal region of the ligand-binding domain (AF-2) has been thought to play a critical role in mediating ligand-dependent transactivation by the interaction with coactivator(s). Using bacterially-expressed TR as a probe, far-Western-based expression cDNA library screening identified cDNAs that encode, in part, the recently reported partial steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1) sequence. Additional work, including 5' RACE, has characterized a full-length cDNA that encodes a approximately 160 kD protein as a putative thyroid hormone receptor coactivator (F-SRC-1). In vitro binding studies show that F-SRC-1 binds to a variety of nuclear hormone receptors in a ligand-dependent manner, along with TBP and TFIIB, suggesting that F-SRC-1 may play a role as a bridging molecule between nuclear hormone receptors and general transcription factors. Interestingly, AF-2 mutants also retain ligand-dependent interaction with F-SRC-1. Although F-SRC-1 recognizes the ligand-induced conformational changes of nuclear hormone receptors, our observations suggest that F-SRC-1 may bind directly with subregion(s) in nuclear hormone receptors other than the AF-2 region.

  15. Full-length novel MHC class I allele discovery by next-generation sequencing: two platforms are better than one.

    PubMed

    Dudley, Dawn M; Karl, Julie A; Creager, Hannah M; Bohn, Patrick S; Wiseman, Roger W; O'Connor, David H

    2014-01-01

    Deep sequencing has revolutionized major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I analysis of nonhuman primates by enabling high-throughput, economical, and comprehensive genotyping. Full-length MHC class I cDNA sequences, which are required to generate reagents such as MHC-peptide tetramers, cannot be directly obtained by short read deep sequencing. We combined data from two next-generation sequencing platforms to discover novel full-length MHC class I mRNA/cDNA transcripts in Chinese rhesus macaques. We first genotyped macaques by Roche/454 pyrosequencing using a 530-bp amplicon spanning the densely polymorphic exons 2 through 4 of the MHC class I loci that encode the peptide-binding region. We then mapped short paired-end 250 bp Illumina sequence reads spanning the full-length transcript to each 530-bp amplicon at high stringency and used paired-end information to reconstruct full-length allele sequences. We characterized 65 full-length sequences from six Chinese rhesus macaques. Overall, approximately 70 % of the alleles distinguished in these six animals contained new sequence information, including 29 novel transcripts. The flexibility of this approach should make full-length MHC class I allele genotyping accessible for any nonhuman primate population of interest. We are currently optimizing this method for full-length characterization of other highly polymorphic, duplicated loci such as the MHC class II DRB and killer immunoglobulin-like receptors. We anticipate that this method will facilitate rapid expansion and near completion of sequence libraries of polymorphic loci, such as MHC class I, within a few years.

  16. The Drosophila gene collection: Identification of putative full-length cDNAs for 70 percent of D. melanogaster genes

    SciTech Connect

    Stapleton, Mark; Liao, Guochun; Brokstein, Peter; Hong, Ling; Carninci, Piero; Shiraki, Toshiyuki; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Champe, Mark; Pacleb, Joanne; Wan, Ken; Yu, Charles; Carlson, Joe; George, Reed; Celniker, Susan; Rubin, Gerald M.

    2002-08-12

    Collections of full-length nonredundant cDNA clones are critical reagents for functional genomics. The first step toward these resources is the generation and single-pass sequencing of cDNA libraries that contain a high proportion of full-length clones. The first release of the Drosophila Gene Collection Release 1 (DGCr1) was produced from six libraries representing various tissues, developmental stages, and the cultured S2 cell line. Nearly 80,000 random 5prime expressed sequence tags (EST) from these libraries were collapsed into a nonredundant set of 5849 cDNAs, corresponding to {approx}40 percent of the 13,474 predicted genes in Drosophila. To obtain cDNA clones representing the remaining genes, we have generated an additional 157,835 5prime ESTs from two previously existing and three new libraries. One new library is derived from adult testis, a tissue we previously did not exploit for gene discovery; two new cap-trapped normalized libraries are derived from 0-22hr embryos and adult heads. Taking advantage of the annotated D. melanogaster genome sequence, we clustered the ESTs by aligning them to the genome. Clusters that overlap genes not already represented by cDNA clones in the DGCr1 were analyzed further, and putative full-length clones were selected for inclusion in the new DGC. This second release of the DGC (DGCr2) contains 5061 additional clones, extending the collection to 10,910 cDNAs representing >70 percent of the predicted genes in Drosophila.

  17. Detection of full-length and truncated neurokinin-1 receptor mRNA expression in human brain regions.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jian-Ping; Cnaan, Avital; Zhao, Huaqing; Douglas, Steven D

    2008-02-15

    We have applied a newly developed SYBR green-based real-time RT-PCR assay for quantification of full-length and truncated neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R) mRNA expression in nine regions of human brain tissues obtained from 23 subjects who died with no evidence of neurological or neurodegenerative disease. The following brain regions were examined: cingulate cortex, cerebellum, nucleus accumbens, caudate nucleus, putamen, pons, hippocampus, locus coeruleus, and basal ganglia. The SYBR green-based real-time PCR was more sensitive than TaqMan probe-based real-time PCR in amplifying both full-length and truncated NK1R mRNA. The real-time RT-PCR assay had excellent specificity and sensitivity, with a dynamic range of detection between 100 and 1,000,000 copies of the NK1R cDNA per reaction. The truncated NK1R mRNA levels were more abundant than those of the full-length NK1R in most of the regions examined and there was no significant difference in the truncated NK1R mRNA levels among the nine regions studied. There was, however, a significant difference in the expression of full-length NK1R mRNA levels among the nine regions (P=0.0024), and the putamen region expressed the highest full-length NK1R mRNA. Further studies are needed in order to examine the differences between full-length and truncated NK1R in signal transduction and functional consequences in order to delineate the significance of the co-presence of the two forms of NK1R in the human brain.

  18. Detection of Full-Length and Truncated Neurokinin-1 Receptor mRNA Expression in Human Brain Regions

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Jian-Ping; Cnaan, Avital; Zhao, Huaqing; Douglas, Steven D.

    2008-01-01

    We have applied a newly developed SYBR green based real-time RT-PCR assay for quantification of full-length and truncated neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R) mRNA expression in 9 regions of human brain tissues obtained from 23 subjects who died with no evidence of neurological or neurodegenerative disease. The following brain regions were examined: cingulate cortex, cerebellum, nucleus accumbens, caudate nucleus, putamen, pons, hippocampus, locus coeruleus, and basal ganglia. The SYBR green based-real-time PCR was more sensitive than TaqMan probe based real-time PCR in amplifying both full-length and truncated NK1R mRNA. The real-time RT-PCR assay had excellent specificity and sensitivity, with a dynamic range of detection between 100 and 1000,000 copies of the NK1R cDNA per reaction. The truncated NK1R mRNA levels were more abundant than those of the full-length NK1R in most of the regions examined and there was no significant difference in the truncated NK1R mRNA levels among the nine regions studied. There was, however, a significant difference in the expression of full-length NK1R mRNA levels among the nine regions (P=0.0024), and the putamen region expressed the highest full-length NK1R mRNA. Further studies are needed in order to examine the differences between full-length and truncated NK1R in signal transduction and functional consequences in order to delineate the significance of the copresence of the two forms of NK1R in the human brain. PMID:18035424

  19. Collection and comparative analysis of 1888 full-length cDNAs from wild rice Oryza rufipogon Griff. W1943.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tingting; Yu, Shuliang; Fan, Danlin; Mu, Jie; Shangguan, Yingying; Wang, Zixuan; Minobe, Yuzo; Lin, Zhixin; Han, Bin

    2008-10-01

    A huge amount of cDNA and EST resources have been developed for cultivated rice species Oryza sativa; however, only few cDNA resources are available for wild rice species. In this study, we isolated and completely sequenced 1888 putative full-length cDNA (FLcDNA) clones from wild rice Oryza rufipogon Griff. W1943 for comparative analysis between wild and cultivated rice species. Two cDNA libraries were constructed from 3-week-old leaf samples under either normal or cold-treated conditions. Homology searching of these cDNA sequences revealed that >96.8% of the wild rice cDNAs were matched to the cultivated rice O. sativa ssp. japonica cv. Nipponbare genome sequence. However, <22% of them were fully matched to the cv. Nipponbare genome sequence. The comparative analysis showed that O. rufipogon W1943 had greater similarity to O. sativa ssp. japonica than to ssp. indica cultivars. In addition, 17 novel rice cDNAs were identified, and 41 putative tissue-specific expression genes were defined through searching the rice massively parallel signature-sequencing database. In conclusion, these FLcDNA clones are a resource for further function verification and could be broadly utilized in rice biological studies.

  20. Systematic assembly of a full-length infectious clone of human coronavirus NL63.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Eric F; Yount, Boyd; Sims, Amy C; Burkett, Susan; Pickles, Raymond J; Baric, Ralph S

    2008-12-01

    Historically, coronaviruses were predominantly associated with mild upper respiratory disease in humans. More recently, three novel coronaviruses associated with severe human respiratory disease were found, including (i) the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus, associated with a significant atypical pneumonia and 10% mortality; (ii) HKU-1, associated with chronic pulmonary disease; and (iii) NL63, associated with both upper and lower respiratory tract disease in children and adults worldwide. These discoveries establish coronaviruses as important human pathogens and underscore the need for continued research toward the development of platforms that will enable genetic manipulation of the viral genome, allowing for rapid and rational development and testing of candidate vaccines, vaccine vectors, and therapeutics. In this report, we describe a reverse genetics system for NL63, whereby five contiguous cDNAs that span the entire genome were used to generate a full-length cDNA. Recombinant NL63 viruses which contained the expected marker mutations replicated as efficiently as the wild-type NL63 virus. In addition, we engineered the heterologous green fluorescent protein gene in place of open reading frame 3 (ORF3) of the NL63 clone, simultaneously creating a unique marker for NL63 infection and demonstrating that the ORF3 protein product is nonessential for the replication of NL63 in cell culture. The availability of the NL63 and NL63gfp clones and recombinant viruses provides powerful tools that will help advance our understanding of this important human pathogen.

  1. Large-scale collection and analysis of full-length cDNAs from Brachypodium distachyon and integration with Pooideae sequence resources.

    PubMed

    Mochida, Keiichi; Uehara-Yamaguchi, Yukiko; Takahashi, Fuminori; Yoshida, Takuhiro; Sakurai, Tetsuya; Shinozaki, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive collection of full-length cDNAs is essential for correct structural gene annotation and functional analyses of genes. We constructed a mixed full-length cDNA library from 21 different tissues of Brachypodium distachyon Bd21, and obtained 78,163 high quality expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from both ends of ca. 40,000 clones (including 16,079 contigs). We updated gene structure annotations of Brachypodium genes based on full-length cDNA sequences in comparison with the latest publicly available annotations. About 10,000 non-redundant gene models were supported by full-length cDNAs; ca. 6,000 showed some transcription unit modifications. We also found ca. 580 novel gene models, including 362 newly identified in Bd21. Using the updated transcription start sites, we searched a total of 580 plant cis-motifs in the -3 kb promoter regions and determined a genome-wide Brachypodium promoter architecture. Furthermore, we integrated the Brachypodium full-length cDNAs and updated gene structures with available sequence resources in wheat and barley in a web-accessible database, the RIKEN Brachypodium FL cDNA database. The database represents a "one-stop" information resource for all genomic information in the Pooideae, facilitating functional analysis of genes in this model grass plant and seamless knowledge transfer to the Triticeae crops.

  2. Functional and expression analyses of transcripts based on full-length cDNAs of Sorghum bicolor.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Setsuko; Makita, Yuko; Kuriyama-Kondou, Tomoko; Kawashima, Mika; Mochizuki, Yoshiki; Hirakawa, Hideki; Sato, Shusei; Toyoda, Tetsuro; Matsui, Minami

    2015-12-01

    Sorghum bicolor is one of the most important crops for food and bioethanol production. Its small diploid genome and resistance to environmental stress make sorghum an attractive model for studying the functional genomics of the Saccharinae and other C4 grasses. We analyzed the domain-based functional annotation of the cDNAs using the gene ontology (GO) categories for molecular function to characterize all the genes cloned in the full-length cDNA library of sorghum. The sorghum cDNA library successfully captured a wide range of cDNA-encoded proteins with various functions. To characterize the protein function of newly identified cDNAs, a search of their deduced domains and comparative analyses in the Oryza sativa and Zea mays genomes were carried out. Furthermore, genes on the sense strand corresponding to antisense transcripts were classified based on the GO of molecular function. To add more information about these genes, we have analyzed the expression profiles using RNA-Seq of three tissues (spikelet, seed and stem) during the starch-filling phase. We performed functional analysis of tissue-specific genes and expression analysis of genes of starch biosynthesis enzymes. This functional analysis of sorghum full-length cDNAs and the transcriptome information will facilitate further analysis of the Saccharinae and grass families.

  3. Functional and expression analyses of transcripts based on full-length cDNAs of Sorghum bicolor

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Setsuko; Makita, Yuko; Kuriyama-Kondou, Tomoko; Kawashima, Mika; Mochizuki, Yoshiki; Hirakawa, Hideki; Sato, Shusei; Toyoda, Tetsuro; Matsui, Minami

    2015-01-01

    Sorghum bicolor is one of the most important crops for food and bioethanol production. Its small diploid genome and resistance to environmental stress make sorghum an attractive model for studying the functional genomics of the Saccharinae and other C4 grasses. We analyzed the domain-based functional annotation of the cDNAs using the gene ontology (GO) categories for molecular function to characterize all the genes cloned in the full-length cDNA library of sorghum. The sorghum cDNA library successfully captured a wide range of cDNA-encoded proteins with various functions. To characterize the protein function of newly identified cDNAs, a search of their deduced domains and comparative analyses in the Oryza sativa and Zea mays genomes were carried out. Furthermore, genes on the sense strand corresponding to antisense transcripts were classified based on the GO of molecular function. To add more information about these genes, we have analyzed the expression profiles using RNA-Seq of three tissues (spikelet, seed and stem) during the starch-filling phase. We performed functional analysis of tissue-specific genes and expression analysis of genes of starch biosynthesis enzymes. This functional analysis of sorghum full-length cDNAs and the transcriptome information will facilitate further analysis of the Saccharinae and grass families. PMID:26546227

  4. Identification and Functional Analyses of 11 769 Full-length Human cDNAs Focused on Alternative Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Wakamatsu, Ai; Kimura, Kouichi; Yamamoto, Jun-ichi; Nishikawa, Tetsuo; Nomura, Nobuo; Sugano, Sumio; Isogai, Takao

    2009-01-01

    We analyzed diversity of mRNA produced as a result of alternative splicing in order to evaluate gene function. First, we predicted the number of human genes transcribed into protein-coding mRNAs by using the sequence information of full-length cDNAs and 5′-ESTs and obtained 23 241 of such human genes. Next, using these genes, we analyzed the mRNA diversity and consequently sequenced and identified 11 769 human full-length cDNAs whose predicted open reading frames were different from other known full-length cDNAs. Especially, 30% of the cDNAs we identified contained variation in the transcription start site (TSS). Our analysis, which particularly focused on multiple variable first exons (FEVs) formed due to the alternative utilization of TSSs, led to the identification of 261 FEVs expressed in the tissue-specific manner. Quantification of the expression profiles of 13 genes by real-time PCR analysis further confirmed the tissue-specific expression of FEVs, e.g. OXR1 had specific TSS in brain and tumor tissues, and so on. Finally, based on the results of our mRNA diversity analysis, we have created the FLJ Human cDNA Database. From our result, it has been understood mechanisms that one gene produces suitable protein-coding transcripts responding to the situation and the environment. PMID:19880432

  5. Extending Immunological Profiling in the Gilthead Sea Bream, Sparus aurata, by Enriched cDNA Library Analysis, Microarray Design and Initial Studies upon the Inflammatory Response to PAMPs.

    PubMed

    Boltaña, Sebastian; Castellana, Barbara; Goetz, Giles; Tort, Lluis; Teles, Mariana; Mulero, Victor; Novoa, Beatriz; Figueras, Antonio; Goetz, Frederick W; Gallardo-Escarate, Cristian; Planas, Josep V; Mackenzie, Simon

    2017-02-03

    This study describes the development and validation of an enriched oligonucleotide-microarray platform for Sparus aurata (SAQ) to provide a platform for transcriptomic studies in this species. A transcriptome database was constructed by assembly of gilthead sea bream sequences derived from public repositories of mRNA together with reads from a large collection of expressed sequence tags (EST) from two extensive targeted cDNA libraries characterizing mRNA transcripts regulated by both bacterial and viral challenge. The developed microarray was further validated by analysing monocyte/macrophage activation profiles after challenge with two Gram-negative bacterial pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs; lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and peptidoglycan (PGN)). Of the approximately 10,000 EST sequenced, we obtained a total of 6837 EST longer than 100 nt, with 3778 and 3059 EST obtained from the bacterial-primed and from the viral-primed cDNA libraries, respectively. Functional classification of contigs from the bacterial- and viral-primed cDNA libraries by Gene Ontology (GO) showed that the top five represented categories were equally represented in the two libraries: metabolism (approximately 24% of the total number of contigs), carrier proteins/membrane transport (approximately 15%), effectors/modulators and cell communication (approximately 11%), nucleoside, nucleotide and nucleic acid metabolism (approximately 7.5%) and intracellular transducers/signal transduction (approximately 5%). Transcriptome analyses using this enriched oligonucleotide platform identified differential shifts in the response to PGN and LPS in macrophage-like cells, highlighting responsive gene-cassettes tightly related to PAMP host recognition. As observed in other fish species, PGN is a powerful activator of the inflammatory response in S. aurata macrophage-like cells. We have developed and validated an oligonucleotide microarray (SAQ) that provides a platform enriched for the study of gene

  6. Extending Immunological Profiling in the Gilthead Sea Bream, Sparus aurata, by Enriched cDNA Library Analysis, Microarray Design and Initial Studies upon the Inflammatory Response to PAMPs

    PubMed Central

    Boltaña, Sebastian; Castellana, Barbara; Goetz, Giles; Tort, Lluis; Teles, Mariana; Mulero, Victor; Novoa, Beatriz; Figueras, Antonio; Goetz, Frederick W.; Gallardo-Escarate, Cristian; Planas, Josep V.; Mackenzie, Simon

    2017-01-01

    This study describes the development and validation of an enriched oligonucleotide-microarray platform for Sparus aurata (SAQ) to provide a platform for transcriptomic studies in this species. A transcriptome database was constructed by assembly of gilthead sea bream sequences derived from public repositories of mRNA together with reads from a large collection of expressed sequence tags (EST) from two extensive targeted cDNA libraries characterizing mRNA transcripts regulated by both bacterial and viral challenge. The developed microarray was further validated by analysing monocyte/macrophage activation profiles after challenge with two Gram-negative bacterial pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs; lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and peptidoglycan (PGN)). Of the approximately 10,000 EST sequenced, we obtained a total of 6837 EST longer than 100 nt, with 3778 and 3059 EST obtained from the bacterial-primed and from the viral-primed cDNA libraries, respectively. Functional classification of contigs from the bacterial- and viral-primed cDNA libraries by Gene Ontology (GO) showed that the top five represented categories were equally represented in the two libraries: metabolism (approximately 24% of the total number of contigs), carrier proteins/membrane transport (approximately 15%), effectors/modulators and cell communication (approximately 11%), nucleoside, nucleotide and nucleic acid metabolism (approximately 7.5%) and intracellular transducers/signal transduction (approximately 5%). Transcriptome analyses using this enriched oligonucleotide platform identified differential shifts in the response to PGN and LPS in macrophage-like cells, highlighting responsive gene-cassettes tightly related to PAMP host recognition. As observed in other fish species, PGN is a powerful activator of the inflammatory response in S. aurata macrophage-like cells. We have developed and validated an oligonucleotide microarray (SAQ) that provides a platform enriched for the study of gene

  7. Analysis of 4,664 high-quality sequence-finished poplar full-length

    SciTech Connect

    Ralph, S.; Gunter, Lee E; Tuskan, Gerald A; Douglas, Carl; Holt, Robert A.; Jones, Steven; Marra, Marco; Bohlmann, J.

    2008-01-01

    The genus Populus includes poplars, aspens and cottonwoods, which will be collectively referred to as poplars hereafter unless otherwise specified. Poplars are the dominant tree species in many forest ecosystems in the Northern Hemisphere and are of substantial economic value in plantation forestry. Poplar has been established as a model system for genomics studies of growth, development, and adaptation of woody perennial plants including secondary xylem formation, dormancy, adaptation to local environments, and biotic interactions. As part of the poplar genome sequencing project and the development of genomic resources for poplar, we have generated a full-length (FL)-cDNA collection using the biotinylated CAP trapper method. We constructed four FLcDNA libraries using RNA from xylem, phloem and cambium, and green shoot tips and leaves from the P. trichocarpa Nisqually-1 genotype, as well as insect-attacked leaves of the P. trichocarpa x P. deltoides hybrid. Following careful selection of candidate cDNA clones, we used a combined strategy of paired end reads and primer walking to generate a set of 4,664 high-accuracy, sequence-verified FLcDNAs, which clustered into 3,990 putative unique genes. Mapping FLcDNAs to the poplar genome sequence combined with BLAST comparisons to previously predicted protein coding sequences in the poplar genome identified 39 FLcDNAs that likely localize to gaps in the current genome sequence assembly. Another 173 FLcDNAs mapped to the genome sequence but were not included among the previously predicted genes in the poplar genome. Comparative sequence analysis against Arabidopsis thaliana and other species in the non-redundant database of GenBank revealed that 11.5% of the poplar FLcDNAs display no significant sequence similarity to other plant proteins. By mapping the poplar FLcDNAs against transcriptome data previously obtained with a 15.5 K cDNA microarray, we identified 153 FLcDNA clones for genes that were differentially expressed in

  8. Complete sequence and development of a full-length infectious clone of an Ohio isolate of Maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV).

    PubMed

    Stewart, L R; Bouchard, R; Redinbaugh, M G; Meulia, T

    2012-05-01

    Maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV) is an important and widespread aphid-transmitted virus of maize. It is a member of the genus Potyvirus in the family Potyviridae with a monopartite (+) ssRNA genome. Here we report the complete genome sequence and construction and testing of infectious clones of an Ohio isolate of MDMV. Full-length MDMV cDNA was cloned into the vector pSPORT. Full-length cDNA PCR-amplified from the vector constructs were used as template for in vitro transcription, and transcripts were inoculated to maize seeds by vascular puncture inoculation. Plants inoculated by this procedure showed symptoms typical of MDMV infection, and infection was confirmed by RT-PCR and mechanical transmission to new plants.

  9. Sequencing and comparative genomic analysis of 1227 Felis catus cDNA sequences enriched for developmental, clinical and nutritional phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The feline genome is valuable to the veterinary and model organism genomics communities because the cat is an obligate carnivore and a model for endangered felids. The initial public release of the Felis catus genome assembly provided a framework for investigating the genomic basis of feline biology. However, the entire set of protein coding genes has not been elucidated. Results We identified and characterized 1227 protein coding feline sequences, of which 913 map to public sequences and 314 are novel. These sequences have been deposited into NCBI's genbank database and complement public genomic resources by providing additional protein coding sequences that fill in some of the gaps in the feline genome assembly. Through functional and comparative genomic analyses, we gained an understanding of the role of these sequences in feline development, nutrition and health. Specifically, we identified 104 orthologs of human genes associated with Mendelian disorders. We detected negative selection within sequences with gene ontology annotations associated with intracellular trafficking, cytoskeleton and muscle functions. We detected relatively less negative selection on protein sequences encoding extracellular networks, apoptotic pathways and mitochondrial gene ontology annotations. Additionally, we characterized feline cDNA sequences that have mouse orthologs associated with clinical, nutritional and developmental phenotypes. Together, this analysis provides an overview of the value of our cDNA sequences and enhances our understanding of how the feline genome is similar to, and different from other mammalian genomes. Conclusions The cDNA sequences reported here expand existing feline genomic resources by providing high-quality sequences annotated with comparative genomic information providing functional, clinical, nutritional and orthologous gene information. PMID:22257742

  10. Retrotransposon mdg3 of Drosophila: General structure and functional domains of the full-length copy

    SciTech Connect

    Avedisov, S.N.; Ilyin, Yu.V.

    1995-09-01

    A full-length copy of the transposable element mdg3 from the plasmid clone Dm38 of Drosophila melanogaster was obtained by screening the DNA library of the cell culture 67J25D. Previous work demonstrated that only full-length copies of mdg3 (5.5 kb) are amplified in this culture, whereas the number of deleted copies probably has not changed since the cell line was established. We sequenced the full-length copy of mdg3 from cDm38 by the method described by Sanger. 10 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Fabrication and Testing of Full-Length Single-Cell Externally Fueled Converters for Thermionic Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, Alfred

    1995-08-01

    Paper presented at the 29th IECEC in Monterey, CA in August 1994. The present paper describes the fabrication and testing of full-length prototypcial converters, both unfueled and fueled, and presents parametric results of electrically heated tests.

  12. [Cloning of full-length coding sequence of tree shrew CD4 and prediction of its molecular characteristics].

    PubMed

    Tian, Wei-Wei; Gao, Yue-Dong; Guo, Yan; Huang, Jing-Fei; Xiao, Chang; Li, Zuo-Sheng; Zhang, Hua-Tang

    2012-02-01

    The tree shrews, as an ideal animal model receiving extensive attentions to human disease research, demands essential research tools, in particular cellular markers and monoclonal antibodies for immunological studies. In this paper, a 1 365 bp of the full-length CD4 cDNA encoding sequence was cloned from total RNA in peripheral blood of tree shrews, the sequence completes two unknown fragment gaps of tree shrews predicted CD4 cDNA in the GenBank database, and its molecular characteristics were analyzed compared with other mammals by using biology software such as Clustal W2.0 and so forth. The results showed that the extracellular and intracellular domains of tree shrews CD4 amino acid sequence are conserved. The tree shrews CD4 amino acid sequence showed a close genetic relationship with Homo sapiens and Macaca mulatta. Most regions of the tree shrews CD4 molecule surface showed positive charges as humans. However, compared with CD4 extracellular domain D1 of human, CD4 D1 surface of tree shrews showed more negative charges, and more two N-glycosylation sites, which may affect antibody binding. This study provides a theoretical basis for the preparation and functional studies of CD4 monoclonal antibody.

  13. Development of full-length cDNAs from Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa Subsp. pekinensis) and identification of marker genes for defence response.

    PubMed

    Abe, Hiroshi; Narusaka, Yoshihiro; Sasaki, Issei; Hatakeyama, Katsunori; Shin-I, Sadasu; Narusaka, Mari; Fukami-Kobayashi, Kaoru; Matsumoto, Satoru; Kobayashi, Masatomo

    2011-08-01

    Arabidopsis belongs to the Brassicaceae family and plays an important role as a model plant for which researchers have developed fine-tuned genome resources. Genome sequencing projects have been initiated for other members of the Brassicaceae family. Among these projects, research on Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa subsp. pekinensis) started early because of strong interest in this species. Here, we report the development of a library of Chinese cabbage full-length cDNA clones, the RIKEN BRC B. rapa full-length cDNA (BBRAF) resource, to accelerate research on Brassica species. We sequenced 10 000 BBRAF clones and confirmed 5476 independent clones. Most of these cDNAs showed high homology to Arabidopsis genes, but we also obtained more than 200 cDNA clones that lacked any sequence homology to Arabidopsis genes. We also successfully identified several possible candidate marker genes for plant defence responses from our analysis of the expression of the Brassica counterparts of Arabidopsis marker genes in response to salicylic acid and jasmonic acid. We compared gene expression of these markers in several Chinese cabbage cultivars. Our BBRAF cDNA resource will be publicly available from the RIKEN Bioresource Center and will help researchers to transfer Arabidopsis-related knowledge to Brassica crops.

  14. In vitro translation of the full-length RNA transcript of figwort mosaic virus (Caulimovirus).

    PubMed

    Ranu, R S; Gowda, S; Scholthof, H; Wu, F C; Shepherd, R J

    1996-01-01

    The circular DNA genome of FMV consists of seven tandemly arranged genes placed successively on a full-length RNA transcript that spans the entire circular viral genome. This transcript is a tentative mRNA for at least five of the six major conserved genes of this virus (genes I-V) that are positioned on this transcript. The sixth major gene (gene VI) is expressed as a separate monocistronic transcript. A long 5'-nontranslated leader (598 nucleotides), a small nonconserved gene (VII), and a short intergenic region (57 nucleotides) precede the five major conserved genes (I through V) on the full-length transcript. A reporter gene (CAT), as a separate cistron or fused in-frame, to viral cistrons in various downstream positions in cloned versions of the viral genome was used in a transcription vector to generate artificial full-length transcripts of FMV. When these mRNAs were translated in vitro (rabbit reticulocyte lysate system), the reporter gene was translated efficiently in all positions. Translation of internal native viral gene positioned on the full-length transcript of FMV was also determined (the gene VI product). These observations suggest that the full-length FMV transcript functions as a polycistronic mRNA in plants. Results are best explained on the basis of translational coupling/relay race model.

  15. Chinese hamster ovary cells contain transcriptionally active full-length type C proviruses.

    PubMed

    Lie, Y S; Penuel, E M; Low, M A; Nguyen, T P; Mangahas, J O; Anderson, K P; Petropoulos, C J

    1994-12-01

    We have isolated a genomic locus from Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells that contains a full-length provirus. Nucleotide sequence analysis indicates that it is a defective member of the rodent type C retrovirus family with an env region that is similar to those of mouse amphotropic retrovirus and subgroup B feline leukemia virus. We were able to demonstrate that this provirus is a member of a closely related family of full-length proviruses in CHO cells and Chinese hamster liver. Hybridization probes generated from this genomic clone were used to characterize type C retrovirus RNA expression in CHO cells. Full-length genomic RNA and subgenomic envelope mRNA were detected in CHO cell lines but not in the human-derived 293 cell line. Interestingly, we discovered that the site of retrovirus integration lies within a G repeat sequence belonging to the short interspersed element family of retroposons.

  16. Secretion of full-length tau or tau fragments in a cell culture model.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Mar; Cuadros, Raquel; Hernández, Félix; Avila, Jesús

    2016-11-10

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein that plays an important role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Several studies have suggested that tau may be secreted to extracellular medium and may be responsible of spreading of neurodegeneration. The overexpression of tau in cultured non-neuronal cells leads to the secretion of this protein. The proline-rich region of tau may serve as a membrane-binding site during the secretion of the full-length tau molecule. Tau fragments lacking this proline-region are either not secreted or are secreted in a distinct manner to the full-length molecule.

  17. piggyBac transposons expressing full-length human dystrophin enable genetic correction of dystrophic mesoangioblasts

    PubMed Central

    Loperfido, Mariana; Jarmin, Susan; Dastidar, Sumitava; Di Matteo, Mario; Perini, Ilaria; Moore, Marc; Nair, Nisha; Samara-Kuko, Ermira; Athanasopoulos, Takis; Tedesco, Francesco Saverio; Dickson, George; Sampaolesi, Maurilio; VandenDriessche, Thierry; Chuah, Marinee K.

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic neuromuscular disorder caused by the absence of dystrophin. We developed a novel gene therapy approach based on the use of the piggyBac (PB) transposon system to deliver the coding DNA sequence (CDS) of either full-length human dystrophin (DYS: 11.1 kb) or truncated microdystrophins (MD1: 3.6 kb; MD2: 4 kb). PB transposons encoding microdystrophins were transfected in C2C12 myoblasts, yielding 65±2% MD1 and 66±2% MD2 expression in differentiated multinucleated myotubes. A hyperactive PB (hyPB) transposase was then deployed to enable transposition of the large-size PB transposon (17 kb) encoding the full-length DYS and green fluorescence protein (GFP). Stable GFP expression attaining 78±3% could be achieved in the C2C12 myoblasts that had undergone transposition. Western blot analysis demonstrated expression of the full-length human DYS protein in myotubes. Subsequently, dystrophic mesoangioblasts from a Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy dog were transfected with the large-size PB transposon resulting in 50±5% GFP-expressing cells after stable transposition. This was consistent with correction of the differentiated dystrophic mesoangioblasts following expression of full-length human DYS. These results pave the way toward a novel non-viral gene therapy approach for DMD using PB transposons underscoring their potential to deliver large therapeutic genes. PMID:26682797

  18. Lentiviral vectors can be used for full-length dystrophin gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Counsell, John R.; Asgarian, Zeinab; Meng, Jinhong; Ferrer, Veronica; Vink, Conrad A.; Howe, Steven J.; Waddington, Simon N.; Thrasher, Adrian J.; Muntoni, Francesco; Morgan, Jennifer E.; Danos, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is caused by a lack of dystrophin expression in patient muscle fibres. Current DMD gene therapy strategies rely on the expression of internally deleted forms of dystrophin, missing important functional domains. Viral gene transfer of full-length dystrophin could restore wild-type functionality, although this approach is restricted by the limited capacity of recombinant viral vectors. Lentiviral vectors can package larger transgenes than adeno-associated viruses, yet lentiviral vectors remain largely unexplored for full-length dystrophin delivery. In our work, we have demonstrated that lentiviral vectors can package and deliver inserts of a similar size to dystrophin. We report a novel approach for delivering large transgenes in lentiviruses, in which we demonstrate proof-of-concept for a ‘template-switching’ lentiviral vector that harnesses recombination events during reverse-transcription. During this work, we discovered that a standard, unmodified lentiviral vector was efficient in delivering full-length dystrophin to target cells, within a total genomic load of more than 15,000 base pairs. We have demonstrated gene therapy with this vector by restoring dystrophin expression in DMD myoblasts, where dystrophin was expressed at the sarcolemma of myotubes after myogenic differentiation. Ultimately, our work demonstrates proof-of-concept that lentiviruses can be used for permanent full-length dystrophin gene therapy, which presents a significant advancement in developing an effective treatment for DMD. PMID:28303972

  19. piggyBac transposons expressing full-length human dystrophin enable genetic correction of dystrophic mesoangioblasts.

    PubMed

    Loperfido, Mariana; Jarmin, Susan; Dastidar, Sumitava; Di Matteo, Mario; Perini, Ilaria; Moore, Marc; Nair, Nisha; Samara-Kuko, Ermira; Athanasopoulos, Takis; Tedesco, Francesco Saverio; Dickson, George; Sampaolesi, Maurilio; VandenDriessche, Thierry; Chuah, Marinee K

    2016-01-29

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic neuromuscular disorder caused by the absence of dystrophin. We developed a novel gene therapy approach based on the use of the piggyBac (PB) transposon system to deliver the coding DNA sequence (CDS) of either full-length human dystrophin (DYS: 11.1 kb) or truncated microdystrophins (MD1: 3.6 kb; MD2: 4 kb). PB transposons encoding microdystrophins were transfected in C2C12 myoblasts, yielding 65±2% MD1 and 66±2% MD2 expression in differentiated multinucleated myotubes. A hyperactive PB (hyPB) transposase was then deployed to enable transposition of the large-size PB transposon (17 kb) encoding the full-length DYS and green fluorescence protein (GFP). Stable GFP expression attaining 78±3% could be achieved in the C2C12 myoblasts that had undergone transposition. Western blot analysis demonstrated expression of the full-length human DYS protein in myotubes. Subsequently, dystrophic mesoangioblasts from a Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy dog were transfected with the large-size PB transposon resulting in 50±5% GFP-expressing cells after stable transposition. This was consistent with correction of the differentiated dystrophic mesoangioblasts following expression of full-length human DYS. These results pave the way toward a novel non-viral gene therapy approach for DMD using PB transposons underscoring their potential to deliver large therapeutic genes.

  20. Lentiviral vectors can be used for full-length dystrophin gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Counsell, John R; Asgarian, Zeinab; Meng, Jinhong; Ferrer, Veronica; Vink, Conrad A; Howe, Steven J; Waddington, Simon N; Thrasher, Adrian J; Muntoni, Francesco; Morgan, Jennifer E; Danos, Olivier

    2017-12-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is caused by a lack of dystrophin expression in patient muscle fibres. Current DMD gene therapy strategies rely on the expression of internally deleted forms of dystrophin, missing important functional domains. Viral gene transfer of full-length dystrophin could restore wild-type functionality, although this approach is restricted by the limited capacity of recombinant viral vectors. Lentiviral vectors can package larger transgenes than adeno-associated viruses, yet lentiviral vectors remain largely unexplored for full-length dystrophin delivery. In our work, we have demonstrated that lentiviral vectors can package and deliver inserts of a similar size to dystrophin. We report a novel approach for delivering large transgenes in lentiviruses, in which we demonstrate proof-of-concept for a 'template-switching' lentiviral vector that harnesses recombination events during reverse-transcription. During this work, we discovered that a standard, unmodified lentiviral vector was efficient in delivering full-length dystrophin to target cells, within a total genomic load of more than 15,000 base pairs. We have demonstrated gene therapy with this vector by restoring dystrophin expression in DMD myoblasts, where dystrophin was expressed at the sarcolemma of myotubes after myogenic differentiation. Ultimately, our work demonstrates proof-of-concept that lentiviruses can be used for permanent full-length dystrophin gene therapy, which presents a significant advancement in developing an effective treatment for DMD.

  1. Delivery of Full-Length Factor VIII Using a piggyBac Transposon Vector to Correct a Mouse Model of Hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Hideto; Fujimoto, Naoko; Sasakawa, Noriko; Ohinata, Yasuhide; Shima, Midori; Yamanaka, Shinya; Sugimoto, Mitsuhiko; Hotta, Akitsu

    2014-01-01

    Viral vectors have been used for hemophilia A gene therapy. However, due to its large size, full-length Factor VIII (FVIII) cDNA has not been successfully delivered using conventional viral vectors. Moreover, viral vectors may pose safety risks, e.g., adverse immunological reactions or virus-mediated cytotoxicity. Here, we took advantages of the non-viral vector gene delivery system based on piggyBac DNA transposon to transfer the full-length FVIII cDNA, for the purpose of treating hemophilia A. We tested the efficiency of this new vector system in human 293T cells and iPS cells, and confirmed the expression of the full-length FVIII in culture media using activity-sensitive coagulation assays. Hydrodynamic injection of the piggyBac vectors into hemophilia A mice temporally treated with an immunosuppressant resulted in stable production of circulating FVIII for over 300 days without development of anti-FVIII antibodies. Furthermore, tail-clip assay revealed significant improvement of blood coagulation time in the treated mice.piggyBac transposon vectors can facilitate the long-term expression of therapeutic transgenes in vitro and in vivo. This novel gene transfer strategy should provide safe and efficient delivery of FVIII. PMID:25126862

  2. Delivery of full-length factor VIII using a piggyBac transposon vector to correct a mouse model of hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Hideto; Fujimoto, Naoko; Sasakawa, Noriko; Ohinata, Yasuhide; Shima, Midori; Yamanaka, Shinya; Sugimoto, Mitsuhiko; Hotta, Akitsu

    2014-01-01

    Viral vectors have been used for hemophilia A gene therapy. However, due to its large size, full-length Factor VIII (FVIII) cDNA has not been successfully delivered using conventional viral vectors. Moreover, viral vectors may pose safety risks, e.g., adverse immunological reactions or virus-mediated cytotoxicity. Here, we took advantages of the non-viral vector gene delivery system based on piggyBac DNA transposon to transfer the full-length FVIII cDNA, for the purpose of treating hemophilia A. We tested the efficiency of this new vector system in human 293T cells and iPS cells, and confirmed the expression of the full-length FVIII in culture media using activity-sensitive coagulation assays. Hydrodynamic injection of the piggyBac vectors into hemophilia A mice temporally treated with an immunosuppressant resulted in stable production of circulating FVIII for over 300 days without development of anti-FVIII antibodies. Furthermore, tail-clip assay revealed significant improvement of blood coagulation time in the treated mice. piggyBac transposon vectors can facilitate the long-term expression of therapeutic transgenes in vitro and in vivo. This novel gene transfer strategy should provide safe and efficient delivery of FVIII.

  3. Genetic characterization of near full length SIVdrl genomes from four captive drills (Mandrillus leucophaeus).

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Ursula; Landersz, Margot; Stahl-Hennig, Christiane; Geiger, Christina; Foley, Brian T

    2015-03-01

    We sequenced near full length SIVdrl genomes from four captive drills (Mandrillus leucophaeus). All four animals were born in captivity in German zoos. Although serologically SIV negative before acquisition in zoo A in 2008 and 2009, during a routine analysis all four animals were determined to be SIV antibody positive in 2011. Comparisons of the four new SIVdrl sequences showed high identity among each other (90.7-97.7% in env) and to the only published full length sequence SIVdrl FAO (90.5-92.8% in env), which is also derived from a captive drill. SIVdrl infections seem to be highly prevalent in captive drills, probably resulting from frequent animal transfers between the zoos in an effort to maintain this highly endangered species and its genetic diversity. This should be kept in mind as SIVdrl may be transmitted to uninfected animals in open groups and potentially also to animal keepers having contact with these nonhuman primates.

  4. Calcium-dependent regulation of the motor activity of recombinant full-length Physarum myosin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Kawamichi, Hozumi; Tanaka, Hideyuki; Yoshiyama, Shinji; Kohama, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Akio

    2012-08-01

    We successfully synthesized full-length and the mutant Physarum myosin and heavy meromyosin (HMM) constructs associated with Physarum regulatory light chain and essential light chain (PhELC) using Physarum myosin heavy chain in Sf-9 cells, and examined their Ca(2+)-mediated regulation. Ca(2+) inhibited the motility and ATPase activities of Physarum myosin and HMM. The Ca(2+) effect is also reversible at the in vitro motility of Physarum myosin. We demonstrated that full-length myosin increases the Ca(2+) inhibition more effectively than HMM. Furthermore, Ca(2+) did not affect the motility and ATPase activities of the mutant Physarum myosin with PhELC that lost Ca(2+)-binding ability. Therefore, we conclude that PhELC plays a critical role in Ca(2+)-dependent regulation of Physarum myosin.

  5. Full-length high-temperature severe fuel damage test No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Rausch, W.N.; Hesson, G.M.; Pilger, J.P.; King, L.L.; Goodman, R.L.; Panisko, F.E.

    1993-08-01

    This report describes the first full-length high-temperature test (FLHT-1) performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor at Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. The test is part of a series of experiments being performed for the NRC as a part of their Severe Fuel Damage Program and is one of several planned for PNL`s Coolant Boilaway and Damage Progression Program. The report summarizes the test design and test plan. it also provides a summary and discussion of the data collected during the test and of the photos taken during the post-test examination. All objectives for the test were met. The key objective was to demonstrate that severe fuel damage tests on full-length fuel bundles can be safely conducted in the NRU reactor.

  6. Structure of the full-length TRPV2 channel by cryo-EM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Kevin W.; Cohen, Matthew R.; Jiang, Jiansen; Samanta, Amrita; Lodowski, David T.; Zhou, Z. Hong; Moiseenkova-Bell, Vera Y.

    2016-03-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) proteins form a superfamily Ca2+-permeable cation channels regulated by a range of chemical and physical stimuli. Structural analysis of a `minimal' TRP vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) elucidated a mechanism of channel activation by agonists through changes in its outer pore region. Though homologous to TRPV1, other TRPV channels (TRPV2-6) are insensitive to TRPV1 activators including heat and vanilloids. To further understand the structural basis of TRPV channel function, we determined the structure of full-length TRPV2 at ~5 Å resolution by cryo-electron microscopy. Like TRPV1, TRPV2 contains two constrictions, one each in the pore-forming upper and lower gates. The agonist-free full-length TRPV2 has wider upper and lower gates compared with closed and agonist-activated TRPV1. We propose these newly revealed TRPV2 structural features contribute to diversity of TRPV channels.

  7. A Possible Role of the Full-Length Nascent Protein in Post-Translational Ribosome Recycling

    PubMed Central

    Das, Debasis; Samanta, Dibyendu; Bhattacharya, Arpita; Basu, Arunima; Das, Anindita; Ghosh, Jaydip; Chakrabarti, Abhijit; Das Gupta, Chanchal

    2017-01-01

    Each cycle of translation initiation in bacterial cell requires free 50S and 30S ribosomal subunits originating from the post-translational dissociation of 70S ribosome from the previous cycle. Literature shows stable dissociation of 70S from model post-termination complexes by the concerted action of Ribosome Recycling Factor (RRF) and Elongation Factor G (EF-G) that interact with the rRNA bridge B2a/B2b joining 50S to 30S. In such experimental models, the role of full-length nascent protein was never considered seriously. We observed relatively slow release of full-length nascent protein from 50Sof post translation ribosome, and in that process, its toe prints on the rRNA in vivo and in in vitro translation with E.coli S30 extract. We reported earlier that a number of chemically unfolded proteins like bovine carbonic anhydrase (BCA), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), lysozyme, ovalbumin etc., when added to free 70Sin lieu of the full length nascent proteins, also interact with identical RNA regions of the 23S rRNA. Interestingly the rRNA nucleotides that slow down release of the C-terminus of full-length unfolded protein were found in close proximity to the B2a/B2b bridge. It indicated a potentially important chemical reaction conserved throughout the evolution. Here we set out to probe that conserved role of unfolded protein conformation in splitting the free or post-termination 70S. How both the RRF-EFG dependent and the plausible nascent protein–EFG dependent ribosome recycling pathways might be relevant in bacteria is discussed here. PMID:28099529

  8. Full-length high-temperature severe fuel damage test No. 2. Final safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hesson, G.M.; Lombardo, N.J.; Pilger, J.P.; Rausch, W.N.; King, L.L.; Hurley, D.E.; Parchen, L.J.; Panisko, F.E.

    1993-09-01

    Hazardous conditions associated with performing the Full-Length High- Temperature (FLHT). Severe Fuel Damage Test No. 2 experiment have been analyzed. Major hazards that could cause harm or damage are (1) radioactive fission products, (2) radiation fields, (3) reactivity changes, (4) hydrogen generation, (5) materials at high temperature, (6) steam explosion, and (7) steam pressure pulse. As a result of this analysis, it is concluded that with proper precautions the FLHT- 2 test can be safely conducted.

  9. Synaptonemal complex extension from clustered telomeres mediates full-length chromosome pairing in Schmidtea mediterranea

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Youbin; Miller, Danny E.; Ross, Eric J.; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro; Hawley, R. Scott

    2014-01-01

    In the 1920s, József Gelei proposed that chromosome pairing in flatworms resulted from the formation of a telomere bouquet followed by the extension of synapsis from telomeres at the base of the bouquet, thus facilitating homolog pairing in a processive manner. A modern interpretation of Gelei’s model postulates that the synaptonemal complex (SC) is nucleated close to the telomeres and then extends progressively along the full length of chromosome arms. We used the easily visible meiotic chromosomes, a well-characterized genome, and RNAi in the sexual biotype of the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea to test that hypothesis. By identifying and characterizing S. mediterranea homologs of genes encoding synaptonemal complex protein 1 (SYCP1), the topoisomerase-like protein SPO11, and RAD51, a key player in homologous recombination, we confirmed that SC formation begins near the telomeres and progresses along chromosome arms during zygotene. Although distal regions pair at the time of bouquet formation, pairing of a unique interstitial locus is not observed until the formation of full-length SC at pachytene. Moreover, neither full extension of the SC nor homologous pairing is dependent on the formation of double-strand breaks. These findings validate Gelei’s speculation that full-length pairing of homologous chromosomes is mediated by the extension of the SC formed near the telomeres. S. mediterranea thus becomes the first organism described (to our knowledge) that forms a canonical telomere bouquet but does not require double-strand breaks for synapsis between homologous chromosomes. However, the initiation of SC formation at the base of the telomere bouquet, which then is followed by full-length homologous pairing in planarian spermatocytes, is not observed in other species and may not be conserved. PMID:25404302

  10. An improved and validated RNA HLA class I SBT approach for obtaining full length coding sequences.

    PubMed

    Gerritsen, K E H; Olieslagers, T I; Groeneweg, M; Voorter, C E M; Tilanus, M G J

    2014-11-01

    The functional relevance of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I allele polymorphism beyond exons 2 and 3 is difficult to address because more than 70% of the HLA class I alleles are defined by exons 2 and 3 sequences only. For routine application on clinical samples we improved and validated the HLA sequence-based typing (SBT) approach based on RNA templates, using either a single locus-specific or two overlapping group-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplifications, with three forward and three reverse sequencing reactions for full length sequencing. Locus-specific HLA typing with RNA SBT of a reference panel, representing the major antigen groups, showed identical results compared to DNA SBT typing. Alleles encountered with unknown exons in the IMGT/HLA database and three samples, two with Null and one with a Low expressed allele, have been addressed by the group-specific RNA SBT approach to obtain full length coding sequences. This RNA SBT approach has proven its value in our routine full length definition of alleles.

  11. Crystallization and X-ray structure of full-length recombinant human butyrylcholinesterase

    SciTech Connect

    Ngamelue, Michelle N.; Homma, Kohei; Lockridge, Oksana; Asojo, Oluwatoyin A.

    2007-09-01

    The first crystals and the 2.8 Å X-ray structure of full-length recombinant human butyrylcholinesterase are reported. Human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) has been shown to function as an endogenous scavenger of diverse poisons. BChE is a 340 kDa tetrameric glycoprotein that is present in human serum at a concentration of 5 mg l{sup −1}. The well documented therapeutic effects of BChE on cocaine toxicity and organophosphorus agent poisoning has increased the need for effective methods of producing recombinant therapeutic BChE. In order to be therapeutically useful, BChE must have a long circulatory residence time or associate as tetramers. Full-length recombinant BChE produced in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells or human embryonic kidney cells has been shown to associate as monomers, with a shorter circulatory residence time than the naturally occurring tetrameric serum protein. Based on the preceding observation as well as the need to develop novel methodologies to facilitate the mass production of therapeutic recombinant BChE, studies have been initiated to determine the structural basis of tetramer formation. Towards these ends, full-length monomeric recombinant BChE has been crystallized for the first time. A 2.8 Å X-ray structure was solved in space group P42{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 156, c = 146 Å.

  12. Computational analysis of full-length mouse cDNAs compared with human genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Kondo, S; Shinagawa, A; Saito, T; Kiyosawa, H; Yamanaka, I; Aizawa, K; Fukuda, S; Hara, A; Itoh, M; Kawai, J; Shibata, K; Hayashizaki, Y

    2001-09-01

    Although the sequencing of the human genome is complete, identification of encoded genes and determination of their structures remain a major challenge. In this report, we introduce a method that effectively uses full-length mouse cDNAs to complement efforts in carrying out these difficult tasks. A total of 61,227 RIKEN mouse cDNAs (21,076 full-length and 40,151 EST sequences containing certain redundancies) were aligned with the draft human sequences. We found 35,141 non-redundant genomic regions that showed a significant alignment with the mouse cDNAs. We analyzed the structures and compositional properties of the regions detected by the full-length cDNAs, including cross-species comparisons, and noted a systematic bias of GENSCAN against exons of small size and/or low GC-content. Of the cDNAs locating the 35,141 genomic regions, 3,217 did not match any sequences of the known human genes or ESTs. Among those 3,217 cDNAs, 1,141 did not show any significant similarity to any protein sequence in the GenBank non-redundant protein database and thus are candidates for novel genes.

  13. [Analysis of the molecular characteristics and cloning of full-length coding sequence of interleukin-2 in tree shrews].

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao-Yan; Li, Ming-Li; Xu, Juan; Gao, Yue-Dong; Wang, Wen-Guang; Yin, An-Guo; Li, Xiao-Fei; Sun, Xiao-Mei; Xia, Xue-Shan; Dai, Jie-Jie

    2013-04-01

    While the tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri chinensis) is an excellent animal model for studying the mechanisms of human diseases, but few studies examine interleukin-2 (IL-2), an important immune factor in disease model evaluation. In this study, a 465 bp of the full-length IL-2 cDNA encoding sequence was cloned from the RNA of tree shrew spleen lymphocytes, which were then cultivated and stimulated with ConA (concanavalin). Clustal W 2.0 was used to compare and analyze the sequence and molecular characteristics, and establish the similarity of the overall structure of IL-2 between tree shrews and other mammals. The homology of the IL-2 nucleotide sequence between tree shrews and humans was 93%, and the amino acid homology was 80%. The phylogenetic tree results, derived through the Neighbour-Joining method using MEGA5.0, indicated a close genetic relationship between tree shrews, Homo sapiens, and Macaca mulatta. The three-dimensional structure analysis showed that the surface charges in most regions of tree shrew IL-2 were similar to between tree shrews and humans; however, the N-glycosylation sites and local structures were different, which may affect antibody binding. These results provide a fundamental basis for the future study of IL-2 monoclonal antibody in tree shrews, thereby improving their utility as a model.

  14. Comparison of Next-Generation Sequencing Technologies for Comprehensive Assessment of Full-Length Hepatitis C Viral Genomes.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Emma; Ip, Camilla L C; Badhan, Anjna; Christiansen, Mette T; Adamson, Walt; Ansari, M Azim; Bibby, David; Breuer, Judith; Brown, Anthony; Bowden, Rory; Bryant, Josie; Bonsall, David; Da Silva Filipe, Ana; Hinds, Chris; Hudson, Emma; Klenerman, Paul; Lythgow, Kieren; Mbisa, Jean L; McLauchlan, John; Myers, Richard; Piazza, Paolo; Roy, Sunando; Trebes, Amy; Sreenu, Vattipally B; Witteveldt, Jeroen; Barnes, Eleanor; Simmonds, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Affordable next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies for hepatitis C virus (HCV) may potentially identify both viral genotype and resistance genetic motifs in the era of directly acting antiviral (DAA) therapies. This study compared the ability of high-throughput NGS methods to generate full-length, deep, HCV sequence data sets and evaluated their utility for diagnostics and clinical assessment. NGS methods using (i) unselected HCV RNA (metagenomics), (ii) preenrichment of HCV RNA by probe capture, and (iii) HCV preamplification by PCR implemented in four United Kingdom centers were compared. Metrics of sequence coverage and depth, quasispecies diversity, and detection of DAA resistance-associated variants (RAVs), mixed HCV genotypes, and other coinfections were compared using a panel of samples with different viral loads, genotypes, and mixed HCV genotypes/subtypes [geno(sub)types]. Each NGS method generated near-complete genome sequences from more than 90% of samples. Enrichment methods and PCR preamplification generated greater sequence depth and were more effective for samples with low viral loads. All NGS methodologies accurately identified mixed HCV genotype infections. Consensus sequences generated by different NGS methods were generally concordant, and majority RAVs were consistently detected. However, methods differed in their ability to detect minor populations of RAVs. Metagenomic methods identified human pegivirus coinfections. NGS provided a rapid, inexpensive method for generating whole HCV genomes to define infecting genotypes, RAVs, comprehensive viral strain analysis, and quasispecies diversity. Enrichment methods are particularly suited for high-throughput analysis while providing the genotype and information on potential DAA resistance.

  15. Rapid production of full-length cDNAs from rare transcripts: amplification using a single gene-specific oligonucleotide primer.

    PubMed Central

    Frohman, M A; Dush, M K; Martin, G R

    1988-01-01

    We have devised a simple and efficient cDNA cloning strategy that overcomes many of the difficulties encountered in obtaining full-length cDNA clones of low-abundance mRNAs. In essence, cDNAs are generated by using the DNA polymerase chain reaction technique to amplify copies of the region between a single point in the transcript and the 3' or 5' end. The minimum information required for this amplification is a single short stretch of sequence within the mRNA to be cloned. Since the cDNAs can be produced in one day, examined by Southern blotting the next, and readily cloned, large numbers of full-length cDNA clones of rare transcripts can be rapidly produced. Moreover, separation of amplified cDNAs by gel electrophoresis allows precise selection by size prior to cloning and thus facilitates the isolation of cDNAs representing variant mRNAs, such as those produced by alternative splicing or by the use of alternative promoters. The efficacy of this method was demonstrated by isolating cDNA clones of mRNA from int-2, a mouse gene that expresses four different transcripts at low abundance, the longest of which is approximately 2.9 kilobases. After less than 0.05% of the cDNAs produced had been screened, 29 independent int-2 clones were isolated. Sequence analysis demonstrated that the 3' and 5' ends of all four int-2 mRNAs were accurately represented by these clones. Images PMID:2461560

  16. Full-Length, Glycosylated NSP4 Is Localized to Plasma Membrane Caveolae by a Novel Raft Isolation Technique▿

    PubMed Central

    Storey, Stephen M.; Gibbons, Thomas F.; Williams, Cecelia V.; Parr, Rebecca D.; Schroeder, Friedhelm; Ball, Judith M.

    2007-01-01

    Rotavirus NSP4, initially characterized as an endoplasmic reticulum intracellular receptor, is a multifunctional viral enterotoxin that induces diarrhea in murine pups. There have been recent reports of the secretion of a cleaved NSP4 fragment (residues 112 to 175) and of the association of NSP4 with LC3-positive autophagosomes, raft membranes, and microtubules. To determine if NSP4 traffics to a specific subset of rafts at the plasma membrane, we isolated caveolae from plasma membrane-enriched material that yielded caveola membranes free of endoplasmic reticulum and nonraft plasma membrane markers. Analyses of the newly isolated caveolae from rotavirus-infected MDCK cells revealed full-length, high-mannose glycosylated NSP4. The lack of Golgi network-specific processing of the caveolar NSP4 glycans supports studies showing that NSP4 bypasses the Golgi apparatus. Confocal imaging showed the colocalization of NSP4 with caveolin-1 early and late in infection, elucidating the temporal and spatial NSP4-caveolin-1 association during infection. These data were extended with fluorescent resonance energy transfer analyses that confirmed the NSP4 and caveolin-1 interaction in that the specific fluorescently tagged antibodies were within 10 nm of each other during infection. Cells transfected with NSP4 showed patterns of staining and colocalization with caveolin-1 similar to those of infected cells. This study presents an endoplasmic reticulum contaminant-free caveola isolation protocol; describes the presence of full-length, endoglycosidase H-sensitive NSP4 in plasma membrane caveolae; provides confirmation of the NSP4-caveolin interaction in the presence and absence of other viral proteins; and provides a final plasma membrane destination for Golgi network-bypassing NSP4 transport. PMID:17376898

  17. A baculovirus-mediated strategy for full-length plant virus coat protein expression and purification

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Garlic production is severely affected by virus infection, causing a decrease in productivity and quality. There are no virus-free cultivars and garlic-infecting viruses are difficult to purify, which make specific antibody production very laborious. Since high quality antisera against plant viruses are important tools for serological detection, we have developed a method to express and purify full-length plant virus coat proteins using baculovirus expression system and insects as bioreactors. Results In this work, we have fused the full-length coat protein (cp) gene from the Garlic Mite-borne Filamentous Virus (GarMbFV) to the 3′-end of the Polyhedrin (polh) gene of the baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV). The recombinant baculovirus was amplified in insect cell culture and the virus was used to infect Spodoptera frugiperda larvae. Thus, the recombinant fused protein was easily purified from insect cadavers using sucrose gradient centrifugation and analyzed by Western Blotting. Interestingly, amorphous crystals were produced in the cytoplasm of cells infected with the recombinant virus containing the chimeric-protein gene but not in cells infected with the wild type and recombinant virus containing the hexa histidine tagged Polh. Moreover, the chimeric protein was used to immunize rats and generate antibodies against the target protein. The antiserum produced was able to detect plants infected with GarMbFV, which had been initially confirmed by RT-PCR. Conclusions The expression of a plant virus full-length coat protein fused to the baculovirus Polyhedrin in recombinant baculovirus-infected insects was shown to produce high amounts of the recombinant protein which was easily purified and efficiently used to generate specific antibodies. Therefore, this strategy can potentially be used for the development of plant virus diagnostic kits for those viruses that are difficult to purify, are present in low titers or are

  18. Regulation of tumor growth by circulating full-length chromogranin A

    PubMed Central

    Gasparri, Anna; Sacchi, Angelina; Colombo, Barbara; Fiocchi, Martina; Perani, Laura; Venturini, Massimo; Tacchetti, Carlo; Sen, Suvajit; Borges, Ricardo; Dondossola, Eleonora; Esposito, Antonio; Mahata, Sushil K.; Corti, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Chromogranin A (CgA), a neuroendocrine secretory protein, and its fragments are present in variable amounts in the blood of normal subjects and cancer patients. We investigated whether circulating CgA has a regulatory function in tumor biology and progression. Systemic administration of full-length CgA, but not of fragments lacking the C-terminal region, could reduce tumor growth in murine models of fibrosarcoma, mammary adenocarcinoma, Lewis lung carcinoma, and primary and metastatic melanoma, with U-shaped dose-response curves. Tumor growth inhibition was associated with reduction of microvessel density and blood flow in neoplastic tissues. Neutralization of endogenous CgA with antibodies against its C-terminal region (residues 410-439) promoted tumor growth. Structure-function studies showed that the C-terminal region of CgA contains a bioactive site and that cleavage of this region causes a marked loss of anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor potency. Mechanistic studies showed that full-length CgA could induce, with a U-shaped dose-response curve, the production of protease nexin-1 in endothelial cells, a serine protease inhibitor endowed of anti-angiogenic activity. Gene silencing or neutralization of protease nexin-1 with specific antibodies abolished both anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor effects of CgA. These results suggest that circulating full-length CgA is an important inhibitor of angiogenesis and tumor growth, and that cleavage of its C-terminal region markedly reduces its activity. Pathophysiological changes in CgA blood levels and/or its fragmentation might regulate disease progression in cancer patients. PMID:27683038

  19. Full-Length High-Temperature Severe Fuel Damage Test No. 5: Final safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lanning, D.D.; Lombardo, N.J.; Panisko, F.E.

    1993-09-01

    This report presents the final safety analysis for the preparation, conduct, and post-test discharge operation for the Full-Length High Temperature Experiment-5 (FLHT-5) to be conducted in the L-24 position of the National Research Universal (NRU) Reactor at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL), Ontario, Canada. The test is sponsored by an international group organized by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The test is designed and conducted by staff from Pacific Northwest Laboratory with CRNL staff support. The test will study the consequences of loss-of-coolant and the progression of severe fuel damage.

  20. Structural Organization of a Full-Length Gp130/LIF-R Cytokine Receptor Transmembrane Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Skiniotis, G.; Lupardus, P.J.; Martick, M.; Walz, T.; Garcia, K.C.

    2009-05-26

    gp130 is a shared receptor for at least nine cytokines, and can signal either as a homodimer, or as a heterodimer with Leukemia Inhibitory Factor Receptor (LIF-R). Here we biophysically and structurally characterize the full-length, transmembrane form of a quaternary cytokine receptor complex consisting of gp130, LIF-R, the cytokine Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor (CNTF), and its alpha receptor (CNTF-R{alpha}). Thermodynamic analysis indicates that, unlike the cooperative assembly of the symmetric gp130/Interleukin-6/IL-6R{alpha} hexameric complex, CNTF/CNTF-R{alpha} heterodimerizes gp130 and LIF-R via non-cooperative energetics to form an asymmetric 1:1:1:1 complex. Single particle electron microscopic (EM) analysis of the full-length gp130/LIF-R/CNTF-R{alpha}/CNTF quaternary complex elucidates an asymmetric structural arrangement, in which the receptor extracellular and transmembrane segments join as a continuous, rigid unit, poised to sensitively transduce ligand engagement to the membrane-proximal intracellular signaling regions. These studies also enumerate the organizing principles for assembly of the 'tall' class of gp130-family cytokine receptor complexes including LIF, IL-27, IL-12, and others.

  1. Full length parathyroid hormone (1–84) in the treatment of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Jódar-Gimeno, Esteban

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To review the pharmacological properties and the available clinical data of full length parathyroid hormone (PTH) in post-menopausal osteoporosis. Sources: A MEDLINE search was completed, together with a review of information obtained from the manufacturer and from the medicine regulatory agencies. Study and data selection: Studies were selected according to relevance and availability. Relevant information (design, objectives, patients’ characteristics, outcomes, adverse events, dosing, etc) was analyzed. Results: Different studies have shown that, when administered intermittently as a subcutaneous injection in the abdomen, PTH increases bone mineral density (BMD) and prevents vertebral fractures. On completion of PTH therapy (up to 24 months), there is evidence that sequential treatment with alendronate is associated with a therapeutic benefit in terms of increase in BMD. Further trials are necessary to determine long-term safety and the role of PTH in combination with other treatments for osteoporosis and the effect of repeated cycles of PTH followed by an anti-catabolic agent. There are currently no completed comparative trials with other osteoporosis treatments. Conclusions: Full length PTH, given intermittently as an abdominal subcutaneous injection, appears to be a safe and efficacious treatment option for high risk osteoporosis. More data are needed to determine its specific role in osteoporosis treatment. PMID:18044089

  2. Full-length hdmX transcripts decrease following genotoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    Markey, M; Berberich, SJ

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the mdmX gene is constitutively transcribed, and that MdmX protein activity is instead controlled by cellular localization and DNA damage induced Mdm2-mediated ubiquitination leading to proteasomal degradation. In these studies, we report that the human mdmX (hdmX) mRNA is reproducibly decreased in various human cell lines following treatment with various DNA-damaging agents. Repression of hdmX transcripts is observed in DNAdamaged HCT116 colon cancer cells and in isogenic p53−/− cells, suggesting that this effect is p53-independent. Reduction in the amount of hdmX transcript occurs in both human tumor cell lines and primary human diploid fibroblasts, and results in a significant reduction of HdmX protein. Examination of hdmX promoter activity suggests that damage-induced repression of hdmX mRNA is not significantly impacted by transcription initiation. In contrast, changes in hdmX mRNA splicing appear to partly explain the reduction in full-length hdmX mRNA levels in tumor cell lines with the destabilization of full-length hdmX transcripts, potentially through microRNA miR-34a regulation, also impacting transcript levels. Taken together, this study uncovers previously unrecognized cellular mechanisms by which hdmX mRNA levels are kept low following genotoxic stress. PMID:18711402

  3. Design, fabrication, and testing of an external fuel (UO2), full-length thermionic converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schock, A.; Raab, B.

    1971-01-01

    The development of a full-length external-fuel thermionic converter for in-pile testing is described. The development program includes out-of-pile performance testing of the fully fueled-converter, using RF-induction heating, before its installation in the in-pile test capsule. The external-fuel converter is cylindrical in shape, and consists of an inner, centrally cooled collector, and an outer emitter surrounded by nuclear fuel. The term full-length denotes that the converter is long enough to extend over the full height of the reactor core. Thus, the converter is not a scaled-down test device, but a full-scale fuel element of the thermionic reactor. The external-fuel converter concept permits a number of different design options, particularly with respect to the fuel composition and shape, and the collector cooling arrangement. The converter described was developed for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and is based on their concept for a thermionic reactor with uninsulated collector cooling as previously described. The converter is double-ended, with through-flow cooling, and with ceramic seals and emitter and collector power take-offs at both ends. The design uses a revolver-shaped tungsten emitter body, with the central emitter hole surrounded by six peripheral fuel holes loaded with cylindrical UO2 pellets.

  4. Shear-Induced Unfolding and Enzymatic Cleavage of Full-Length VWF Multimers

    PubMed Central

    Lippok, Svenja; Radtke, Matthias; Obser, Tobias; Kleemeier, Lars; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Budde, Ulrich; Netz, Roland R.; Rädler, Joachim O.

    2016-01-01

    Proteolysis of the multimeric blood coagulation protein von Willebrand Factor (VWF) by ADAMTS13 is crucial for prevention of microvascular thrombosis. ADAMTS13 cleaves VWF within the mechanosensitive A2 domain, which is believed to open under shear flow. In this study, we combine fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and a microfluidic shear cell to monitor real-time kinetics of full-length VWF proteolysis as a function of shear stress. For comparison, we also measure the Michaelis-Menten kinetics of ADAMTS13 cleavage of wild-type VWF in the absence of shear but partially denaturing conditions. Under shear, ADAMTS13 activity on full-length VWF arises without denaturing agent as evidenced by FCS and gel-based multimer analysis. In agreement with Brownian hydrodynamics simulations, we find a sigmoidal increase of the enzymatic rate as a function of shear at a threshold shear rate γ˙1/2 = 5522/s. The same flow-rate dependence of ADAMTS13 activity we also observe in blood plasma, which is relevant to predict hemostatic dysfunction. PMID:26840720

  5. Full-length dysferlin expression driven by engineered human dystrophic blood derived CD133+ stem cells.

    PubMed

    Meregalli, Mirella; Navarro, Claire; Sitzia, Clementina; Farini, Andrea; Montani, Erica; Wein, Nicolas; Razini, Paola; Beley, Cyriaque; Cassinelli, Letizia; Parolini, Daniele; Belicchi, Marzia; Parazzoli, Dario; Garcia, Luis; Torrente, Yvan

    2013-12-01

    The protein dysferlin is abundantly expressed in skeletal and cardiac muscles, where its main function is membrane repair. Mutations in the dysferlin gene are involved in two autosomal recessive muscular dystrophies: Miyoshi myopathy and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B. Development of effective therapies remains a great challenge. Strategies to repair the dysferlin gene by skipping mutated exons, using antisense oligonucleotides (AONs), may be suitable only for a subset of mutations, while cell and gene therapy can be extended to all mutations. AON-treated blood-derived CD133+ stem cells isolated from patients with Miyoshi myopathy led to partial dysferlin reconstitution in vitro but failed to express dysferlin after intramuscular transplantation into scid/blAJ dysferlin null mice. We thus extended these experiments producing the full-length dysferlin mediated by a lentiviral vector in blood-derived CD133+ stem cells isolated from the same patients. Transplantation of engineered blood-derived CD133+ stem cells into scid/blAJ mice resulted in sufficient dysferlin expression to correct functional deficits in skeletal muscle membrane repair. Our data suggest for the first time that lentivirus-mediated delivery of full-length dysferlin in stem cells isolated from Miyoshi myopathy patients could represent an alternative therapeutic approach for treatment of dysferlinopathies.

  6. Structural organization of a full-length gp130/LIF-R cytokine receptor transmembrane complex

    PubMed Central

    Skiniotis, Georgios; Lupardus, Patrick; Martick, Monika; Walz, Thomas; Garcia, K. Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Summary gp130 is a shared receptor for at least nine cytokines, and can signal either as a homodimer, or as a heterodimer with Leukemia Inhibitory Factor Receptor (LIF-R). Here we biophysically and structurally characterize the full-length, transmembrane form of a quaternary cytokine receptor complex consisting of gp130, LIF-R, the cytokine Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor (CNTF), and its alpha receptor (CNTF-Rα). Thermodynamic analysis indicates that, unlike the cooperative assembly of the symmetric gp130/Interleukin-6/IL-6Rα hexameric complex, CNTF/CNTF-Rα heterodimerizes gp130 and LIF-R via non-cooperative energetics to form an asymmetric 1:1:1:1 complex. Single particle electron microscopic (EM) analysis of the full-length gp130/LIF-R/CNTF-Rα/CNTF quaternary complex elucidates an asymmetric structural arrangement, in which the receptor extracellular and transmembrane segments join as a continuous, rigid unit, poised to sensitively transduce ligand engagement to the membrane-proximal intracellular signaling regions. These studies also enumerate the organizing principles for assembly of the ‘tall’ class of gp130-family cytokine receptor complexes including LIF, IL-27, IL-12, and others. PMID:18775332

  7. Generation of Full-Length cDNAs for Eight Putative GPCnR from the Cattle Tick, R. microplus Using a Targeted Degenerate PCR and Sequencing Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Corley, Sean W.; Piper, Emily K.; Jonsson, Nicholas N.

    2012-01-01

    We describe here a rapid and efficient method for the targeted isolation of specific members of gene families without the need for cloning. Using this strategy we isolated full length cDNAs for eight putative G-protein coupled neurotransmitter receptors (GPCnR) from the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus. Gene specific degenerate primers were designed using aligned amino acid sequences of similar receptor types from several insect and arachnid species. These primers were used to amplify and sequence a section of the target gene. Rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) PCR was used to generate full length cDNA sequences. Phylogenetic analysis placed 7 of these sequences into Class A G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) (Rm_α2AOR, Rm_β2AOR, Rm_Dop1R, Rm_Dop2R, Rm_INDR, Rm_5-HT7R and Rm_mAchR), and one into Class C GPCR (Rm_GABABR). Of the 7 Class A sequences, only Rm_mAchR is not a member of the biogenic amine receptor family. The isolation of these putative receptor sequences provides an opportunity to gain an understanding of acaricide resistance mechanisms such as amitraz resistance and might suggest possibilities for the development of new acaricides. PMID:22403662

  8. Cloning and functional characterization of the ovine Hormone Sensitive Lipase (HSL) full-length cDNAs: an integrated approach.

    PubMed

    Lampidonis, Antonis D; Argyrokastritis, Alexandros; Stravopodis, Dimitrios J; Voutsinas, Gerassimos E; Ntouroupi, Triantafyllia G; Margaritis, Lukas H; Bizelis, Iosif; Rogdakis, Emmanuel

    2008-06-15

    Hormone Sensitive Lipase (HSL) is a highly regulated enzyme that mediates lipolysis in adipocytes. HSL enzymatic activity is increased by adrenergic agonists, such as catecholamines and glucagons, which induce cyclic AMP (cAMP) intracellular production, subsequently followed by the activation of Protein Kinase A (PKA) and its downstream signalling cascade reactions. Since HSL constitutes the key enzyme in the regulation of lipid stores and the only enzyme being subjected to hormonal regulation [in terms of the recently identified Adipose Triglyceride Lipase (ATGL)], the ovine Hormone Sensitive Lipase (ovHSL) full-length cDNA clones were isolated, using a Polymerase Chain Reaction-based (PCR) strategy. The two isolated isoforms ovHSL-A and ovHSL-B contain two highly homologous Open Reading Frame (ORF) regions of 2.089 Kb and 2.086 Kb, respectively, the latter having been missed the 688th triplet coding for glutamine (DeltaQ(688)). The putative 695 and 694 amino acid respective sequences bear strong homologies with other HSL protein family members. Southern blotting analysis revealed that HSL is represented as a single copy gene in the ovine genome, while Reverse Transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) approaches unambiguously dictated its variable transcriptional expression profile in the different tissues examined. Interestingly, as undoubtedly corroborated by both RT-PCR and Western blotting analysis, ovHSL gene expression is notably enhanced in the adipose tissue during the fasting period, when lipolysis is highly increased in ruminant species. Based on the crystal structure of an Archaeoglobus fulgidus enzyme, a three-dimensional (3D) molecular model of the ovHSL putative catalytic domain was constructed, thus providing an inchoative insight into understanding the enzymatic activity and functional regulation mechanisms of the ruminant HSL gene product(s).

  9. Full-length and internally deleted forms of interleukin-7 are present in horse (Equus caballus) lymph node tissue.

    PubMed

    Cook, R Frank; Cook, Sheila J; Even, Deborah L; Schaffer, Catherine; Issel, Charles J

    2008-09-15

    Horse IL-7 (HIL-7) cDNA was isolated from adult lymph node tissue by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using oligonucleotide primers based on horse genomic sequences (The Broad Institute). In addition, to the full-length (FL) 531bp reading frame encoding 176 amino acids, shorter open-reading frames of 477, 396 and 264bp were also amplified. Nucleotide sequence analysis of these RT-PCR products demonstrated they were homologous except the shorter species were missing internal sequences consistent with multiple RNA splicing events. Consequently, the shorter open-reading frames were re-named splice variant (SV) 1 (477bp), 2 (396bp) and 3 (264bp). Organization of the horse IL-7 is predicted to be similar to that in humans with exon 5 deleted from SV1, exons 3, 5 deleted from SV2 and exons 3, 4, and 5 missing from SV3. Each of these open-reading frames has the potential to be stably expressed as demonstrated using a polyclonal antiserum against human IL-7 to visualize the protein products produced when the FL HIL-7 and each SV were molecularly cloned into pCI and transfected in brefeldin A treated HEK 293 cells. Furthermore, addition of supernatants to horse PBMC from HEK cells transfected (without brefeldin A treatment) with pCI HIL-7 FL, pCI HIL-7SV1, pCI HIL-7SV2 and pCI IL-7SV3 all induced significant incorporation of (3)H-thymidine in the presence of sub-stimulatory amounts of concanavalin A compared to supernatants from mock-transfected cells. Therefore, all isoforms of horse IL-7 described in this report have the ability to stimulate proliferative responses in ex vivo horse PBMC cultures.

  10. Full-length apolipoprotein E protects against the neurotoxicity of an apoE-related peptide

    PubMed Central

    Crutcher, K.A.; Lilley, H.N.; Anthony, S. R.; Zhou, W.; Narayanaswami, V.

    2009-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E was found to protect against the neurotoxic effects of a dimeric peptide derived from the receptor-binding region of this protein (residues 141–149). Both apoE3 and apoE4 conferred protection but the major N-terminal fragment of each isoform did not. Nor was significant protection provided by bovine serum albumin or apoA-I. Full-length apoE3 and apoE4 also inhibited the uptake of a fluorescent-labeled derivative of the peptide, suggesting that the mechanism of inhibition might involve competition for cell surface receptors/proteoglycans that mediate endocytosis and/or signaling pathways. These results might bear on the question of the role of apoE in neuronal degeneration, such as occurs in Alzheimer’s disease where apoE4 confers a significantly greater risk of pathology. PMID:19836363

  11. MELCOR benchmarking: The NRU full-length high-temperature-4 test

    SciTech Connect

    Madni, I.K.; Guo, X.D. )

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a MELCOR simulation of the national research universal (NRU) full-length high-temperature-4 (FLHT-4) test and to compare results with test data and predictions from the SCDAP mechanistic code. This study provides code-to-code as well as code-to-data comparisons and will help to identify input refinements and model improvements for MELCOR. It will also help in assessing MELCOR's ability and limitations in predicting events and conditions associated with the early phase of severe core damage. This benchmarking analysis was performed as part of an overall MELCOR assessment effort being carried out for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission by Brookhaven National Laboratory. The results are considered applicable equally to the recently released MELCOR 1.8.2 as to the earlier version 1.8.1.

  12. Efficient expression of full-length antibodies in the cytoplasm of engineered bacteria.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Michael-Paul; Ke, Na; Lobstein, Julie; Peterson, Cristen; Szkodny, Alana; Mansell, Thomas J; Tuckey, Corinna; Riggs, Paul D; Colussi, Paul A; Noren, Christopher J; Taron, Christopher H; DeLisa, Matthew P; Berkmen, Mehmet

    2015-08-27

    Current methods for producing immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies in engineered cells often require refolding steps or secretion across one or more biological membranes. Here, we describe a robust expression platform for biosynthesis of full-length IgG antibodies in the Escherichia coli cytoplasm. Synthetic heavy and light chains, both lacking canonical export signals, are expressed in specially engineered E. coli strains that permit formation of stable disulfide bonds within the cytoplasm. IgGs with clinically relevant antigen- and effector-binding activities are readily produced in the E. coli cytoplasm by grafting antigen-specific variable heavy and light domains into a cytoplasmically stable framework and remodelling the fragment crystallizable domain with amino-acid substitutions that promote binding to Fcγ receptors. The resulting cytoplasmic IgGs—named 'cyclonals'—effectively bypass the potentially rate-limiting steps of membrane translocation and glycosylation.

  13. Cocrystallization studies of full-length recombinant butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) with cocaine

    SciTech Connect

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin Ajibola; Asojo, Oluyomi Adebola; Ngamelue, Michelle N.; Homma, Kohei; Lockridge, Oksana

    2011-09-16

    Human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE; EC 3.1.1.8) is a 340 kDa tetrameric glycoprotein that is present in human serum at about 5 mg l{sup -1} and has well documented therapeutic effects on cocaine toxicity. BChE holds promise as a therapeutic that reduces and finally eliminates the rewarding effects of cocaine, thus weaning an addict from the drug. There have been extensive computational studies of cocaine hydrolysis by BChE. Since there are no reported structures of BChE with cocaine or any of the hydrolysis products, full-length monomeric recombinant wild-type BChE was cocrystallized with cocaine. The refined 3 {angstrom} resolution structure appears to retain the hydrolysis product benzoic acid in sufficient proximity to form a hydrogen bond to the active-site Ser198.

  14. Structure and function of the Zika virus full-length NS5 protein.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Baoyu; Yi, Guanghui; Du, Fenglei; Chuang, Yin-Chih; Vaughan, Robert C; Sankaran, Banumathi; Kao, C Cheng; Li, Pingwei

    2017-03-27

    The recent outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) has infected over 1 million people in over 30 countries. ZIKV replicates its RNA genome using virally encoded replication proteins. Nonstructural protein 5 (NS5) contains a methyltransferase for RNA capping and a polymerase for viral RNA synthesis. Here we report the crystal structures of full-length NS5 and its polymerase domain at 3.0 Å resolution. The NS5 structure has striking similarities to the NS5 protein of the related Japanese encephalitis virus. The methyltransferase contains in-line pockets for substrate binding and the active site. Key residues in the polymerase are located in similar positions to those of the initiation complex for the hepatitis C virus polymerase. The polymerase conformation is affected by the methyltransferase, which enables a more efficiently elongation of RNA synthesis in vitro. Overall, our results will contribute to future studies on ZIKV infection and the development of inhibitors of ZIKV replication.

  15. Structure and function of the Zika virus full-length NS5 protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Baoyu; Yi, Guanghui; Du, Fenglei; Chuang, Yin-Chih; Vaughan, Robert C.; Sankaran, Banumathi; Kao, C. Cheng; Li, Pingwei

    2017-01-01

    The recent outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) has infected over 1 million people in over 30 countries. ZIKV replicates its RNA genome using virally encoded replication proteins. Nonstructural protein 5 (NS5) contains a methyltransferase for RNA capping and a polymerase for viral RNA synthesis. Here we report the crystal structures of full-length NS5 and its polymerase domain at 3.0 Å resolution. The NS5 structure has striking similarities to the NS5 protein of the related Japanese encephalitis virus. The methyltransferase contains in-line pockets for substrate binding and the active site. Key residues in the polymerase are located in similar positions to those of the initiation complex for the hepatitis C virus polymerase. The polymerase conformation is affected by the methyltransferase, which enables a more efficiently elongation of RNA synthesis in vitro. Overall, our results will contribute to future studies on ZIKV infection and the development of inhibitors of ZIKV replication. PMID:28345656

  16. Structure of the Full-length VEGFR-1 Extracellular Domain in Complex with VEGF-A.

    PubMed

    Markovic-Mueller, Sandra; Stuttfeld, Edward; Asthana, Mayanka; Weinert, Tobias; Bliven, Spencer; Goldie, Kenneth N; Kisko, Kaisa; Capitani, Guido; Ballmer-Hofer, Kurt

    2017-02-07

    Vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) regulate blood and lymph vessel development upon activation of three receptor tyrosine kinases: VEGFR-1, -2, and -3. Partial structures of VEGFR/VEGF complexes based on single-particle electron microscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering, and X-ray crystallography revealed the location of VEGF binding and domain arrangement of individual receptor subdomains. Here, we describe the structure of the full-length VEGFR-1 extracellular domain in complex with VEGF-A at 4 Å resolution. We combined X-ray crystallography, single-particle electron microscopy, and molecular modeling for structure determination and validation. The structure reveals the molecular details of ligand-induced receptor dimerization, in particular of homotypic receptor interactions in immunoglobulin homology domains 4, 5, and 7. Functional analyses of ligand binding and receptor activation confirm the relevance of these homotypic contacts and identify them as potential therapeutic sites to allosterically inhibit VEGFR-1 activity.

  17. Mechanism of activation gating in the full-length KcsA K[superscript +] channel

    SciTech Connect

    Uysal, Serdar; Cuello, Luis G.; Cortes, D. Marien; Koide, Shohei; Kossiakoff, Anthony A.; Perozo, Eduardo

    2012-10-25

    Using a constitutively active channel mutant, we solved the structure of full-length KcsA in the open conformation at 3.9 {angstrom}. The structure reveals that the activation gate expands about 20 {angstrom}, exerting a strain on the bulge helices in the C-terminal domain and generating side windows large enough to accommodate hydrated K{sup +} ions. Functional and spectroscopic analysis of the gating transition provides direct insight into the allosteric coupling between the activation gate and the selectivity filter. We show that the movement of the inner gate helix is transmitted to the C-terminus as a straightforward expansion, leading to an upward movement and the insertion of the top third of the bulge helix into the membrane. We suggest that by limiting the extent to which the inner gate can open, the cytoplasmic domain also modulates the level of inactivation occurring at the selectivity filter.

  18. Features of Arabidopsis genes and genome discovered using full-length cDNAs.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, Nickolai N; Troukhan, Maxim E; Brover, Vyacheslav V; Tatarinova, Tatiana; Flavell, Richard B; Feldmann, Kenneth A

    2006-01-01

    Arabidopsis is currently the reference genome for higher plants. A new, more detailed statistical analysis of Arabidopsis gene structure is presented including intron and exon lengths, intergenic distances, features of promoters, and variant 5'-ends of mRNAs transcribed from the same transcription unit. We also provide a statistical characterization of Arabidopsis transcripts in terms of their size, UTR lengths, 3'-end cleavage sites, splicing variants, and coding potential. These analyses were facilitated by scrutiny of our collection of sequenced full-length cDNAs and much larger collection of 5'-ESTs, together with another set of full-length cDNAs from Salk/Stanford/Plant Gene Expression Center/RIKEN. Examples of alternative splicing are observed for transcripts from 7% of the genes and many of these genes display multiple spliced isoforms. Most splicing variants lie in non-coding regions of the transcripts. Non-canonical splice sites constitute less than 1% of all splice sites. Genes with fewer than four introns display reduced average mRNA levels. Putative alternative transcription start sites were observed in 30% of highly expressed genes and in more than 50% of the genes with low expression. Transcription start sites correlate remarkably well with a CG skew peak in the DNA sequences. The intergenic distances vary considerably, those where genes are transcribed towards one another being significantly shorter. New transcripts, missing in the current TIGR genome annotation and ESTs that are non-coding, including those antisense to known genes, are derived and cataloged in the Supplementary Material. They identify 148 new loci in the Arabidopsis genome. The conclusions drawn provide a better understanding of the Arabidopsis genome and how the gene transcripts are processed. The results also allow better predictions to be made for, as yet, poorly defined genes and provide a reference for comparisons with other plant genomes whose complete sequences are currently

  19. Expression of soluble and functional full-length human matrix metalloproteinase-2 in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Andrezza N.; Meschiari, Cesar A.; Stetler-Stevenson, William G.; Nonato, M. Cristina; Alves, Cleidson P.; Espreafico, Enilza M.; Gerlach, Raquel F.

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of the matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) substrates and understanding of its function remain difficult because up to date preparations containing minor amounts of other eukaryotic proteins that are co-purified with MMP-2 are still used. In this work, the expression of a soluble and functional full-length recombinant human MMP-2 (rhMMP-2) in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli is reported, and the purification of this metalloproteinase is described. Culture of this bacterium at 18 °C culminated in maintenance of the soluble and functional rhMMP-2 in the soluble fraction of the E. coli lysate and its purification by affinity with gelatin-sepharose yielded approximately 0.12 mg/L of medium. Western Blotting and zymographic analysis revealed that the most abundant form was the 72-kDa MMP-2, but some gelatinolytic bands corresponding to proteins with lower molecular weight were also detected. The obtained rhMMP-2 was demonstrated to be functional in a gelatinolytic fluorimetric assay, suggesting that the purified rhMMP-2 was correctly folded. The method described here involves fewer steps, is less expensive, and is less prone to contamination with other proteinases and MMP inhibitors as compared to expression of rhMMP-2 in eukaryotic tissue culture. This protocol will facilitate the use of the full-length rhMMP-2 expressed in bacteria and will certainly help researchers to acquire new knowledge about the substrates and biological activities of this important proteinase. PMID:22001844

  20. First structure of full-length mammalian phenylalanine hydroxylase reveals the architecture of an autoinhibited tetramer.

    PubMed

    Arturo, Emilia C; Gupta, Kushol; Héroux, Annie; Stith, Linda; Cross, Penelope J; Parker, Emily J; Loll, Patrick J; Jaffe, Eileen K

    2016-03-01

    Improved understanding of the relationship among structure, dynamics, and function for the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) can lead to needed new therapies for phenylketonuria, the most common inborn error of amino acid metabolism. PAH is a multidomain homo-multimeric protein whose conformation and multimerization properties respond to allosteric activation by the substrate phenylalanine (Phe); the allosteric regulation is necessary to maintain Phe below neurotoxic levels. A recently introduced model for allosteric regulation of PAH involves major domain motions and architecturally distinct PAH tetramers [Jaffe EK, Stith L, Lawrence SH, Andrake M, Dunbrack RL, Jr (2013) Arch Biochem Biophys 530(2):73-82]. Herein, we present, to our knowledge, the first X-ray crystal structure for a full-length mammalian (rat) PAH in an autoinhibited conformation. Chromatographic isolation of a monodisperse tetrameric PAH, in the absence of Phe, facilitated determination of the 2.9 Å crystal structure. The structure of full-length PAH supersedes a composite homology model that had been used extensively to rationalize phenylketonuria genotype-phenotype relationships. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) confirms that this tetramer, which dominates in the absence of Phe, is different from a Phe-stabilized allosterically activated PAH tetramer. The lack of structural detail for activated PAH remains a barrier to complete understanding of phenylketonuria genotype-phenotype relationships. Nevertheless, the use of SAXS and X-ray crystallography together to inspect PAH structure provides, to our knowledge, the first complete view of the enzyme in a tetrameric form that was not possible with prior partial crystal structures, and facilitates interpretation of a wealth of biochemical and structural data that was hitherto impossible to evaluate.

  1. Fabrication and Testing of Full-Length Single-Cell Externally Fueled Converters for Thermionic Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, Alfred

    1994-06-01

    The preceding paper described designs and analyses of thermionic reactors employing full-core-length single-cell converters with their heated emitters located on the outside of their internally cooled collectors, and it presented results of detailed parametric analyses which illustrate the benefits of this unconventional design. The present paper describes the fabrication and testing of full-length prototypical converters, both unfueled and fueled, and presents parametric results of electrically heated tests. The unfueled converter tests demonstrated the practicality of operating such long converters without shorting across a 0.3-mm interelectrode gap. They produced a measured peak output of 751 watts(e) from a single diode and a peak efficiency of 15.4%. The fueled converter tests measured the parametric performance of prototypic UO(subscript 2)-fueled converters designed for subsequent in-pile testing. They employed revolver-shaped tungsten elements with a central emitter hole surrounded by six fuel chambers. The full-length converters were heated by a water-cooled RF-induction coil inside an ion-pumped vacuum chamber. This required development of high-vacuum coaxial RF feedthroughs. In-pile test rules required multiple containment of the UO (subscript 2)-fuel, which complicated the fabrication of the test article and required successful development of techniques for welding tungsten and other refractory components. The test measured a peak power output of 530 watts(e) or 7.1 watts/cm (superscript 2) at an efficiency of 11.5%. There are three copies in the file. Cross-Reference a copy FSC-ESD-217-94-529 in the ESD files with a CID #8574.

  2. Aggregation Behavior of Chemically Synthesized, Full-Length Huntingtin Exon1

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Repeat length disease thresholds vary among the 10 expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) repeat diseases, from about 20 to about 50 glutamine residues. The unique amino acid sequences flanking the polyQ segment are thought to contribute to these repeat length thresholds. The specific portions of the flanking sequences that modulate polyQ properties are not always clear, however. This ambiguity may be important in Huntington’s disease (HD), for example, where in vitro studies of aggregation mechanisms have led to distinctly different mechanistic models. Most in vitro studies of the aggregation of the huntingtin (HTT) exon1 fragment implicated in the HD mechanism have been conducted on inexact molecules that are imprecise either on the N-terminus (recombinantly produced peptides) or on the C-terminus (chemically synthesized peptides). In this paper, we investigate the aggregation properties of chemically synthesized HTT exon1 peptides that are full-length and complete, containing both normal and expanded polyQ repeat lengths, and compare the results directly to previously investigated molecules containing truncated C-termini. The results on the full-length peptides are consistent with a two-step aggregation mechanism originally developed based on studies of the C-terminally truncated analogues. Thus, we observe relatively rapid formation of spherical oligomers containing from 100 to 600 HTT exon1 molecules and intermediate formation of short protofibril-like structures containing from 500 to 2600 molecules. In contrast to this relatively rapid assembly, mature HTT exon1 amyloid requires about one month to dissociate in vitro, which is similar to the time required for neuronal HTT exon1 aggregates to disappear in vivo after HTT production is discontinued. PMID:24921664

  3. Structure of full-length Toxascaris leonina galectin with two carbohydrate-recognition domains.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Mi Suk; Hwang, Hyun Gi; Yu, Hak Sun; Jang, Se Bok

    2013-02-01

    The full-length crystal structure of Toxascaris leonine galectin (Tl-gal), a galectin-9 homologue protein, was determined at a resolution of 2.0 Å. Galectin-9 exhibits a variety of biological functions, including cell aggregation, eosinophil chemoattraction, activation and apoptosis of murine thymocytes, T cells and human melanoma cells. Similar to this galectin, Tl-gal may function as a regulatory molecule in the host immune system; however, no molecular or structural information has been reported for Tl-gal. Moreover, until now, there have been no reports of a full-length galectin structure. There are two molecules of Tl-gal per asymmetric unit in space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), and the N-terminal and C-terminal carbohydrate-recognition domains (NCRD and CCRD) of Tl-gal are composed of six-stranded β-sheets and five-stranded β-sheets with a short α-helix. The NCRD of Tl-gal resembles that of human galectin-7 and its CCRD resembles human galectin-9, but the residues in the interface and loop regions of the NCRD and CCRD are flexible and are related to interaction. Engagement of the T-cell immunoglobulin mucin-3 (Tim-3) immunoglobulin variable (IgV) domain by a galectin-9 ligand is known to be important for appropriate termination of T-helper 1 immune responses. To investigate the binding site of Tl-gal, the interaction between Tl-gal and Tim-3 was modelled. Tim-3 is docked into a major groove of the Tl-gal structure, which is larger and deeper than the minor groove. The structural information presented here will provide insight into the development of novel anti-inflammatory agents or selective modulators of immune response.

  4. Quasispecies Analyses of the HIV-1 Near-full-length Genome With Illumina MiSeq.

    PubMed

    Ode, Hirotaka; Matsuda, Masakazu; Matsuoka, Kazuhiro; Hachiya, Atsuko; Hattori, Junko; Kito, Yumiko; Yokomaku, Yoshiyuki; Iwatani, Yasumasa; Sugiura, Wataru

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) exhibits high between-host genetic diversity and within-host heterogeneity, recognized as quasispecies. Because HIV-1 quasispecies fluctuate in terms of multiple factors, such as antiretroviral exposure and host immunity, analyzing the HIV-1 genome is critical for selecting effective antiretroviral therapy and understanding within-host viral coevolution mechanisms. Here, to obtain HIV-1 genome sequence information that includes minority variants, we sought to develop a method for evaluating quasispecies throughout the HIV-1 near-full-length genome using the Illumina MiSeq benchtop deep sequencer. To ensure the reliability of minority mutation detection, we applied an analysis method of sequence read mapping onto a consensus sequence derived from de novo assembly followed by iterative mapping and subsequent unique error correction. Deep sequencing analyses of aHIV-1 clone showed that the analysis method reduced erroneous base prevalence below 1% in each sequence position and discarded only < 1% of all collected nucleotides, maximizing the usage of the collected genome sequences. Further, we designed primer sets to amplify the HIV-1 near-full-length genome from clinical plasma samples. Deep sequencing of 92 samples in combination with the primer sets and our analysis method provided sufficient coverage to identify >1%-frequency sequences throughout the genome. When we evaluated sequences of pol genes from 18 treatment-naïve patients' samples, the deep sequencing results were in agreement with Sanger sequencing and identified numerous additional minority mutations. The results suggest that our deep sequencing method would be suitable for identifying within-host viral population dynamics throughout the genome.

  5. Comparison of Next-Generation Sequencing Technologies for Comprehensive Assessment of Full-Length Hepatitis C Viral Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Emma; Ip, Camilla L. C.; Badhan, Anjna; Christiansen, Mette T.; Adamson, Walt; Ansari, M. Azim; Breuer, Judith; Brown, Anthony; Bowden, Rory; Bonsall, David; Da Silva Filipe, Ana; Hinds, Chris; Hudson, Emma; Klenerman, Paul; Lythgow, Kieren; Mbisa, Jean L.; McLauchlan, John; Myers, Richard; Piazza, Paolo; Roy, Sunando; Trebes, Amy; Sreenu, Vattipally B.; Witteveldt, Jeroen; Simmonds, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Affordable next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies for hepatitis C virus (HCV) may potentially identify both viral genotype and resistance genetic motifs in the era of directly acting antiviral (DAA) therapies. This study compared the ability of high-throughput NGS methods to generate full-length, deep, HCV sequence data sets and evaluated their utility for diagnostics and clinical assessment. NGS methods using (i) unselected HCV RNA (metagenomics), (ii) preenrichment of HCV RNA by probe capture, and (iii) HCV preamplification by PCR implemented in four United Kingdom centers were compared. Metrics of sequence coverage and depth, quasispecies diversity, and detection of DAA resistance-associated variants (RAVs), mixed HCV genotypes, and other coinfections were compared using a panel of samples with different viral loads, genotypes, and mixed HCV genotypes/subtypes [geno(sub)types]. Each NGS method generated near-complete genome sequences from more than 90% of samples. Enrichment methods and PCR preamplification generated greater sequence depth and were more effective for samples with low viral loads. All NGS methodologies accurately identified mixed HCV genotype infections. Consensus sequences generated by different NGS methods were generally concordant, and majority RAVs were consistently detected. However, methods differed in their ability to detect minor populations of RAVs. Metagenomic methods identified human pegivirus coinfections. NGS provided a rapid, inexpensive method for generating whole HCV genomes to define infecting genotypes, RAVs, comprehensive viral strain analysis, and quasispecies diversity. Enrichment methods are particularly suited for high-throughput analysis while providing the genotype and information on potential DAA resistance. PMID:27385709

  6. Construction of phosphorylation interaction networks by text mining of full-length articles using the eFIP system.

    PubMed

    Tudor, Catalina O; Ross, Karen E; Li, Gang; Vijay-Shanker, K; Wu, Cathy H; Arighi, Cecilia N

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a reversible post-translational modification where a protein kinase adds a phosphate group to a protein, potentially regulating its function, localization and/or activity. Phosphorylation can affect protein-protein interactions (PPIs), abolishing interaction with previous binding partners or enabling new interactions. Extracting phosphorylation information coupled with PPI information from the scientific literature will facilitate the creation of phosphorylation interaction networks of kinases, substrates and interacting partners, toward knowledge discovery of functional outcomes of protein phosphorylation. Increasingly, PPI databases are interested in capturing the phosphorylation state of interacting partners. We have previously developed the eFIP (Extracting Functional Impact of Phosphorylation) text mining system, which identifies phosphorylated proteins and phosphorylation-dependent PPIs. In this work, we present several enhancements for the eFIP system: (i) text mining for full-length articles from the PubMed Central open-access collection; (ii) the integration of the RLIMS-P 2.0 system for the extraction of phosphorylation events with kinase, substrate and site information; (iii) the extension of the PPI module with new trigger words/phrases describing interactions and (iv) the addition of the iSimp tool for sentence simplification to aid in the matching of syntactic patterns. We enhance the website functionality to: (i) support searches based on protein roles (kinases, substrates, interacting partners) or using keywords; (ii) link protein entities to their corresponding UniProt identifiers if mapped and (iii) support visual exploration of phosphorylation interaction networks using Cytoscape. The evaluation of eFIP on full-length articles achieved 92.4% precision, 76.5% recall and 83.7% F-measure on 100 article sections. To demonstrate eFIP for knowledge extraction and discovery, we constructed phosphorylation-dependent interaction

  7. Full-length infectious clone of an Iranian isolate of chicken anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Kaffashi, Amir; Eshratabadi, Fatemeh; Shoushtari, Abdelhamed

    2017-04-01

    An Iranian field strain of chicken anemia virus (CAV), designated IR CAV, was isolated in the Marek's disease virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell line MDCC-MSB1 (MSB1) culture for the first time. The full-length CAV DNA of this strain was cloned in the bacterial plasmid pTZ57R/T to create the molecular clone pTZ-CAV. The nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of viral proteins of IR CAV were compared with those of representative CAV sequences including reference and commercial vaccine strains. IR CAV was not related to vaccine strains and also found to have glutamine at positions 139 and 144 confirming previous studies in which such mutations were associated with a slow rate of virus spread in cell culture. pTZ-CAV was digested with PstI to release IR CAV DNA and then transfected into MSB1 cell by electroporation. The transfected cells showed cytopathic effect similar to virion-initiated infection. One-day old specific pathogen-free chicks were inoculated with the regenerated virus, which had been obtained from transfected MSB1 cells, and compared with the chicks inoculated with IR CAV. Gross lesions in the birds inoculated with the regenerated virus illustrated the infectious nature of the regenerated virus from the cloned IR CAV DNA.

  8. Alternative interdomain configurations of the full-length MMP-2 enzyme explored by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Natalia; Suárez, Dimas

    2012-03-08

    Conformational freedom between the different domains of the matrix metalloproteinase family of enzymes has been repeatedly invoked to explain the mechanism of hydrolysis of some of their most complex macromolecular substrates. This proposed interdomain motion has been experimentally confirmed to occur in solution for matrix metalloproteinases MMP-1, MMP-9, and MMP-12. In this work, we computationally assess the likely conformational freedom in aqueous solution of the full-length form of the MMP-2 enzyme in the absence of its pro-peptide domain. To this end, we perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and approximate free energy analyses in four different arrangements of the protein domains that correspond to (a) the compact conformation observed in the X-ray structure; (b) an initially elongated structure in which the hemopexin (HPX) domain is separated from the catalytic (CAT) and fibronectin domains; and (c-d) two alternative conformations suggested by protein-protein docking calculations. Overall, our results indicate that the interdomain flexibility is very likely a general property of the MMP-2 enzyme in solution.

  9. Use of Dried Blood Spots to Elucidate Full-Length Transmitted/Founder HIV-1 Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F.; Salazar, Maria G.; Tully, Damien C.; Ogilvie, Colin B.; Learn, Gerald H.; Allen, Todd M.; Heath, Sonya L.; Goepfert, Paul; Bar, Katharine J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Identification of HIV-1 genomes responsible for establishing clinical infection in newly infected individuals is fundamental to prevention and pathogenesis research. Processing, storage, and transportation of the clinical samples required to perform these virologic assays in resource-limited settings requires challenging venipuncture and cold chain logistics. Here, we validate the use of dried-blood spots (DBS) as a simple and convenient alternative to collecting and storing frozen plasma. Methods We performed parallel nucleic acid extraction, single genome amplification (SGA), next generation sequencing (NGS), and phylogenetic analyses on plasma and DBS. Results We demonstrated the capacity to extract viral RNA from DBS and perform SGA to infer the complete nucleotide sequence of the transmitted/founder (TF) HIV-1 envelope gene and full-length genome in two acutely infected individuals. Using both SGA and NGS methodologies, we showed that sequences generated from DBS and plasma display comparable phylogenetic patterns in both acute and chronic infection. SGA was successful on samples with a range of plasma viremia, including samples as low as 1,700 copies/ml and an estimated ∼50 viral copies per blood spot. Further, we demonstrated reproducible efficiency in gp160 env sequencing in DBS stored at ambient temperature for up to three weeks or at -20°C for up to five months. Conclusions These findings support the use of DBS as a practical and cost-effective alternative to frozen plasma for clinical trials and translational research conducted in resource-limited settings. PMID:27819061

  10. Efficient plant gene identification based on interspecies mapping of full-length cDNAs.

    PubMed

    Amano, Naoki; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Numa, Hisataka; Sakai, Hiroaki; Itoh, Takeshi

    2010-10-01

    We present an annotation pipeline that accurately predicts exon-intron structures and protein-coding sequences (CDSs) on the basis of full-length cDNAs (FLcDNAs). This annotation pipeline was used to identify genes in 10 plant genomes. In particular, we show that interspecies mapping of FLcDNAs to genomes is of great value in fully utilizing FLcDNA resources whose availability is limited to several species. Because low sequence conservation at 5'- and 3'-ends of FLcDNAs between different species tends to result in truncated CDSs, we developed an improved algorithm to identify complete CDSs by the extension of both ends of truncated CDSs. Interspecies mapping of 71 801 monocot FLcDNAs to the Oryza sativa genome led to the detection of 22 142 protein-coding regions. Moreover, in comparing two mapping programs and three ab initio prediction programs, we found that our pipeline was more capable of identifying complete CDSs. As demonstrated by monocot interspecies mapping, in which nucleotide identity between FLcDNAs and the genome was ∼80%, the resultant inferred CDSs were sufficiently accurate. Finally, we applied both inter- and intraspecies mapping to 10 monocot and dicot genomes and identified genes in 210 551 loci. Interspecies mapping of FLcDNAs is expected to effectively predict genes and CDSs in newly sequenced genomes.

  11. Full-length structure of a monomeric histidine kinase reveals basis for sensory regulation.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Cancel, Giomar; Ko, Wen-huang; Tomchick, Diana R; Correa, Fernando; Gardner, Kevin H

    2014-12-16

    Although histidine kinases (HKs) are critical sensors of external stimuli in prokaryotes, the mechanisms by which their sensor domains control enzymatic activity remain unclear. Here, we report the full-length structure of a blue light-activated HK from Erythrobacter litoralis HTCC2594 (EL346) and the results of biochemical and biophysical studies that explain how it is activated by light. Contrary to the standard view that signaling occurs within HK dimers, EL346 functions as a monomer. Its structure reveals that the light-oxygen-voltage (LOV) sensor domain both controls kinase activity and prevents dimerization by binding one side of a dimerization/histidine phosphotransfer-like (DHpL) domain. The DHpL domain also contacts the catalytic/ATP-binding (CA) domain, keeping EL346 in an inhibited conformation in the dark. Upon light stimulation, interdomain interactions weaken to facilitate activation. Our data suggest that the LOV domain controls kinase activity by affecting the stability of the DHpL/CA interface, releasing the CA domain from an inhibited conformation upon photoactivation. We suggest parallels between EL346 and dimeric HKs, with sensor-induced movements in the DHp similarly remodeling the DHp/CA interface as part of activation.

  12. Pulse-field electrophoresis indicates full-length Mycoplasma chromosomes range widely in size.

    PubMed Central

    Neimark, H C; Lange, C S

    1990-01-01

    Full-size linear chromosomes were prepared from mycoplasmas by using gamma-irradiation to introduce one (on average) double-strand break in their circular chromosomes. Chromosome sizes were estimated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) from the mobilities of these full-length molecules relative to DNA size references. Sizes estimated for Ureaplasma urealyticum T960 and 16 Mycoplasma species ranged from 684 kbp (M. hominis) to 1315 kbp (M. iowae). Using this sample, we found no correlation between the mobility of the full-size linear chromosomes and their G + C content. Sizes for A. laidlawii and A. hippikon were within the range expected from renaturation kinetics. PFGE size estimates are in good agreement with sizes determined by other methods, including electron microscopy, an ordered clone library, and summation of restriction fragments. Our estimates also agree with those from renaturation kinetics for both the largest and some of the smallest chromosomes, but in the intermediate size range, renaturation kinetics consistently provides lower values than PFGE or electron microscopy. Our PFGE estimates show that mycoplasma chromosomes span a continual range of sizes, with several intermediate values falling between the previously recognized large and small chromosome size clusters. Images PMID:2216718

  13. Near Full-Length Sequence Analysis of HIV Type 1 BF Recombinants from Italy

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Brian T.; Rosi, Andrea; Vicenti, Ilaria; Nannetti, Giulio; Meini, Genny; Razzolini, Francesca; Zazzi, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Recombination between HIV-1 subtypes B and F has generated several circulating and unique recombinant forms, particularly in Latin American areas. In Italy, subtype B is highly prevalent while subtype F is the most common pure non-B subtype. To investigate the recombination pattern in Italian BF recombinant viruses, we characterized full-length sequences derived from 15 adult patients, mostly Italian and infected by the heterosexual route. One of the BF mosaics was a CRF29, three sequences clustered with low bootstrap values with CRF39, CRF40, and CRF42. With the exception of the CRF29-like sequence, the other recombination patterns were unique, but two possible clusters were identified. Analysis of the gp120 V3 domain suggested a possible link with subtype F from Eastern Europe rather than from Latin America, favoring the hypothesis of local recombination between clade B and F viruses over that of import of BF recombinants from Latin America. HIV-1 subtypes B and F appear prone to generation of unique recombinants in Italy, warranting epidemiological surveillance and investigation of a possible clinical significance. PMID:21740272

  14. Improving the diffraction of full-length human selenomethionyl metavinculin crystals by streak-seeding

    SciTech Connect

    Rangarajan, Erumbi S.; Izard, Tina

    2012-06-28

    Metavinculin is an alternatively spliced isoform of vinculin that has a 68-residue insert in its tail domain (1134 total residues) and is exclusively expressed in cardiac and smooth muscle tissue, where it plays important roles in myocyte adhesion complexes. Mutations in the metavinculin-specific insert are associated with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in man. Crystals of a DCM-associated mutant of full-length selenomethionine-labeled metavinculin grown by hanging-drop vapor diffusion diffracted poorly and were highly sensitive to radiation, preventing the collection of a complete X-ray diffraction data set at the highest possible resolution. Streak-seeding markedly improved the stability, crystal-growth rate and diffraction quality of DCM-associated mutant metavinculin crystals, allowing complete data collection to 3.9 {angstrom} resolution. These crystals belonged to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2, with two molecules in the asymmetric unit and unit-cell parameters a = b = 170, c = 211 {angstrom}, {alpha} = {beta} = {gamma} = 90{sup o}.

  15. Stable preparations of tyrosine hydroxylase provide the solution structure of the full-length enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Bezem, Maria T.; Baumann, Anne; Skjærven, Lars; Meyer, Romain; Kursula, Petri; Martinez, Aurora; Flydal, Marte I.

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of catecholamine neurotransmitters. TH is a highly complex enzyme at mechanistic, structural, and regulatory levels, and the preparation of kinetically and conformationally stable enzyme for structural characterization has been challenging. Here, we report on improved protocols for purification of recombinant human TH isoform 1 (TH1), which provide large amounts of pure, stable, active TH1 with an intact N-terminus. TH1 purified through fusion with a His-tagged maltose-binding protein on amylose resin was representative of the iron-bound functional enzyme, showing high activity and stabilization by the natural feedback inhibitor dopamine. TH1 purified through fusion with a His-tagged ZZ domain on TALON is remarkably stable, as it was partially inhibited by resin-derived cobalt. This more stable enzyme preparation provided high-quality small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data and reliable structural models of full-length tetrameric TH1. The SAXS-derived model reveals an elongated conformation (Dmax = 20 nm) for TH1, different arrangement of the catalytic domains compared with the crystal structure of truncated forms, and an N-terminal region with an unstructured tail that hosts the phosphorylation sites and a separated Ala-rich helical motif that may have a role in regulation of TH by interacting with binding partners. PMID:27462005

  16. Full-length RNA structure prediction of the HIV-1 genome reveals a conserved core domain

    PubMed Central

    Sükösd, Zsuzsanna; Andersen, Ebbe S.; Seemann, Stefan E.; Jensen, Mads Krogh; Hansen, Mathias; Gorodkin, Jan; Kjems, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    A distance constrained secondary structural model of the ≈10 kb RNA genome of the HIV-1 has been predicted but higher-order structures, involving long distance interactions, are currently unknown. We present the first global RNA secondary structure model for the HIV-1 genome, which integrates both comparative structure analysis and information from experimental data in a full-length prediction without distance constraints. Besides recovering known structural elements, we predict several novel structural elements that are conserved in HIV-1 evolution. Our results also indicate that the structure of the HIV-1 genome is highly variable in most regions, with a limited number of stable and conserved RNA secondary structures. Most interesting, a set of long distance interactions form a core organizing structure (COS) that organize the genome into three major structural domains. Despite overlapping protein-coding regions the COS is supported by a particular high frequency of compensatory base changes, suggesting functional importance for this element. This new structural element potentially organizes the whole genome into three major domains protruding from a conserved core structure with potential roles in replication and evolution for the virus. PMID:26476446

  17. Quench performance of Fermilab/General Dynamics built full length SSC collider dipole magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, J.; Orris, D.; Mazur, P.O.; Bleadon, M.; Bossert, R.; Carson, J.; Delchamps, S.W.; Gourlay, S.; Hanft, R.; Koska, W.; Kuchnir, M.; Lamm, M.J.; Ozelis, J.; Wake, M. ); Devred, A.; DiMarco, J.; Kuzminski, J.; Nah, W.; Ogitsu, T.; Puglisi, M.; Tompkins, J.C.; Yu, Y.; Zhao, Y.; Zheng, H. )

    1992-04-01

    In this paper we present results of quench testing of full length SSC dipole magnets at Fermilab. The data are from the first six of a series of thirteen 15 m long, 50 mm aperture SSC dipole magnets which are being built and tested at Fermilab. These magnets were designed jointly by Fermilab, Brookhaven Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and the SSC laboratory. Among the major goals for this series of magnets are to transfer magnet production technology to the lead vendor for the Collider Dipole Magnet, the General Dynamics Corporation, and to demonstrate industrial production by the vendor. The first magnet in the series, DCA311, was built by Fermilab technicians to establish assembly procedures. The second magnet, DCA312, was the ''technology transfer magnet'' and was built jointly by Fermilab and General Dynamics technicians. The next seven, DCA313- 319 are being built by General Dynamics personnel using Fermilab facilities and procedures. However, Fermilab personnel still operate the major tooling, provide the welders, perform assembly of items that would not be part of production magnets (e.g. voltage taps), and oversee the QA program. Five of these 7 GD-built magnets will be used in the Accelerator Systems String Test (ASST) to be carried out in Dallas later this year. The last four magnets, DCA320-323, are being built by Fermilab alone.

  18. Molecular cloning and biological characterization of full-length HIV-1 subtype C from Botswana.

    PubMed

    Ndung'u, T; Renjifo, B; Novitsky, V A; McLane, M F; Gaolekwe, S; Essex, M

    2000-12-20

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) subtype C is now responsible for more than half of all HIV-1 infections in the global epidemic and for the high levels of HIV-1 prevalence in southern Africa. To facilitate studies of the biological nature and the underlying molecular determinants of this virus, we constructed eight full-length proviral clones from two asymptomatic and three AIDS patients infected with HIV-1 subtype C from Botswana. Analysis of viral lysates showed that Gag, Pol, and Env structural proteins were present in the virions. In four clones, the analysis suggested inefficient envelope glycoprotein processing. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the eight clones did not reveal frameshifts, deletions, premature truncations, or translational stop codons in any structural, regulatory, or accessory genes. None of the subtype C clones were replication competent in donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), macrophages, Jurkat(tat) cells, or U87. CD4.CCR5 cells. However, infection by two clones could be rescued by complementation with a functional subtype C envelope clone, resulting in a productive infection of PBMCs, macrophages, and U87. CD4.CCR5 cells.

  19. Blueprint for a High-Performance Biomaterial: Full-Length Spider Dragline Silk Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ayoub, Nadia A.; Garb, Jessica E.; Tinghitella, Robin M.; Collin, Matthew A.; Hayashi, Cheryl Y.

    2007-01-01

    Spider dragline (major ampullate) silk outperforms virtually all other natural and manmade materials in terms of tensile strength and toughness. For this reason, the mass-production of artificial spider silks through transgenic technologies has been a major goal of biomimetics research. Although all known arthropod silk proteins are extremely large (>200 kiloDaltons), recombinant spider silks have been designed from short and incomplete cDNAs, the only available sequences. Here we describe the first full-length spider silk gene sequences and their flanking regions. These genes encode the MaSp1 and MaSp2 proteins that compose the black widow's high-performance dragline silk. Each gene includes a single enormous exon (>9000 base pairs) that translates into a highly repetitive polypeptide. Patterns of variation among sequence repeats at the amino acid and nucleotide levels indicate that the interaction of selection, intergenic recombination, and intragenic recombination governs the evolution of these highly unusual, modular proteins. Phylogenetic footprinting revealed putative regulatory elements in non-coding flanking sequences. Conservation of both upstream and downstream flanking sequences was especially striking between the two paralogous black widow major ampullate silk genes. Because these genes are co-expressed within the same silk gland, there may have been selection for similarity in regulatory regions. Our new data provide complete templates for synthesis of recombinant silk proteins that significantly improve the degree to which artificial silks mimic natural spider dragline fibers. PMID:17565367

  20. Structural and functional characterization of full-length heparin-binding growth associated molecule.

    PubMed Central

    Hampton, B S; Marshak, D R; Burgess, W H

    1992-01-01

    Heparin-binding growth-associated molecule (HB-GAM) was purified from adult bovine brain and chicken heart. The yield of HB-GAM is increased by 5- to 10-fold when 250 mM NaCl is added to the homogenization buffer, indicating that HB-GAM may exist as a complex with an insoluble component of the tissue. The complete amino acid sequence of the brain-derived HB-GAM was established by automated Edman degradation of the intact protein and chemically or enzymatically derived fragments. The mass of bovine HB-GAM as determined by plasma desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry is 15,291 mass units, which compares favorably with the calculated mass of 15,289 based on the amino acid sequence. Therefore, HB-GAM has not undergone any major post-translational modifications other than cleavage of the signal peptide. These results indicate that previous amino acid sequence analysis of this protein was carried out using truncated HB-GAM. Full-length HB-GAM is not a mitogen for Balb/3T3 clone A31, Balb MK, NRK, or human umbilical vein endothelial cells. HB-GAM does, however, have adhesive properties and neurite extension activity for chick embryo cerebral cortical derived neurons when presented to these cells as a substrate. HB-GAM had little neurite extension activity when presented as a soluble factor. Images PMID:1550956

  1. Full-length RNA structure prediction of the HIV-1 genome reveals a conserved core domain.

    PubMed

    Sükösd, Zsuzsanna; Andersen, Ebbe S; Seemann, Stefan E; Jensen, Mads Krogh; Hansen, Mathias; Gorodkin, Jan; Kjems, Jørgen

    2015-12-02

    A distance constrained secondary structural model of the ≈10 kb RNA genome of the HIV-1 has been predicted but higher-order structures, involving long distance interactions, are currently unknown. We present the first global RNA secondary structure model for the HIV-1 genome, which integrates both comparative structure analysis and information from experimental data in a full-length prediction without distance constraints. Besides recovering known structural elements, we predict several novel structural elements that are conserved in HIV-1 evolution. Our results also indicate that the structure of the HIV-1 genome is highly variable in most regions, with a limited number of stable and conserved RNA secondary structures. Most interesting, a set of long distance interactions form a core organizing structure (COS) that organize the genome into three major structural domains. Despite overlapping protein-coding regions the COS is supported by a particular high frequency of compensatory base changes, suggesting functional importance for this element. This new structural element potentially organizes the whole genome into three major domains protruding from a conserved core structure with potential roles in replication and evolution for the virus.

  2. Full-length structure of a monomeric histidine kinase reveals basis for sensory regulation

    DOE PAGES

    Rivera-Cancel, Giomar; Ko, Wen-huang; Tomchick, Diana R.; ...

    2014-12-02

    Although histidine kinases (HKs) are critical sensors of external stimuli in prokaryotes, the mechanisms by which their sensor domains control enzymatic activity remain unclear. In this paper, we report the full-length structure of a blue light-activated HK from Erythrobacter litoralis HTCC2594 (EL346) and the results of biochemical and biophysical studies that explain how it is activated by light. Contrary to the standard view that signaling occurs within HK dimers, EL346 functions as a monomer. Its structure reveals that the light–oxygen–voltage (LOV) sensor domain both controls kinase activity and prevents dimerization by binding one side of a dimerization/histidine phosphotransfer-like (DHpL) domain.more » The DHpL domain also contacts the catalytic/ATP-binding (CA) domain, keeping EL346 in an inhibited conformation in the dark. Upon light stimulation, interdomain interactions weaken to facilitate activation. Our data suggest that the LOV domain controls kinase activity by affecting the stability of the DHpL/CA interface, releasing the CA domain from an inhibited conformation upon photoactivation. Finally, we suggest parallels between EL346 and dimeric HKs, with sensor-induced movements in the DHp similarly remodeling the DHp/CA interface as part of activation.« less

  3. Identification and Nearly Full-Length Genome Characterization of Novel Porcine Bocaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Can-ping; Yao, Dong-ping; Liu, Na; Cui, Shu-xian; Jin, Yu; Duan, Zhao-jun

    2010-01-01

    The genus bocavirus includes bovine parvovirus (BPV), minute virus of canines (MVC), and a group of human bocaviruses (HBoV1-4). Using sequence-independent single primer amplification (SISPA), a novel bocavirus group was discovered with high prevalence (12.59%) in piglet stool samples. Two nearly full-length genome sequences were obtained, which were approximately 5,100 nucleotides in length. Multiple alignments revealed that they share 28.7–56.8% DNA sequence identity with other members of Parvovirinae. Phylogenetic analyses indicated their closest neighbors were members of the genus bocavirus. The new viruses had a putative non-structural NP1 protein, which was unique to bocaviruses. They were provisionally named porcine bocavirus 1 and 2 (PBoV1, PBoV2). PBoV1 and PBoV2 shared 94.2% nucleotide identity in NS1 gene sequence, suggesting that they represented two different bocavirus species. Two additional samples (6V, 7V) were amplified for 2,407 bp and 2,434 bp products, respectively, including a partial NP1 gene and the complete VP1 gene; Phylogenetic analysis indicated that 6Vand 7V grouped with PBoV1 and PBoV2 in the genus of bocavirus, but were in the separate clusters. Like other parvoviruses, PBoV1, PBoV2, 6Vand 7V also contained a putative secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) motif in the VP1 unique region, with a conserved HDXXY motif in the catalytic center. The conserved motif YXGXF of the Ca2+-binding loop of sPLA2 identified in human bocavirus was also found in porcine bocavirus, which differs from the YXGXG motif carried by most other parvoviruses. The observation of PBoV and potentially other new bocavirus genus members may aid in molecular and functional characterization of the genus bocavirus. PMID:21049037

  4. Designing a soluble near full-length HIV-1 gp41 trimer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Guofen; Wieczorek, Lindsay; Peachman, Kristina K; Polonis, Victoria R; Alving, Carl R; Rao, Mangala; Rao, Venigalla B

    2013-01-04

    The HIV-1 envelope spike is a trimer of heterodimers composed of an external glycoprotein gp120 and a transmembrane glycoprotein gp41. gp120 initiates virus entry by binding to host receptors, whereas gp41 mediates fusion between viral and host membranes. Although the basic pathway of HIV-1 entry has been extensively studied, the detailed mechanism is still poorly understood. Design of gp41 recombinants that mimic key intermediates is essential to elucidate the mechanism as well as to develop potent therapeutics and vaccines. Here, using molecular genetics and biochemical approaches, a series of hypotheses was tested to overcome the extreme hydrophobicity of HIV-1 gp41 and design a soluble near full-length gp41 trimer. The two long heptad repeat helices HR1 and HR2 of gp41 ectodomain were mutated to disrupt intramolecular HR1-HR2 interactions but not intermolecular HR1-HR1 interactions. This resulted in reduced aggregation and improved solubility. Attachment of a 27-amino acid foldon at the C terminus and slow refolding channeled gp41 into trimers. The trimers appear to be stabilized in a prehairpin-like structure, as evident from binding of a HR2 peptide to exposed HR1 grooves, lack of binding to hexa-helical bundle-specific NC-1 mAb, and inhibition of virus neutralization by broadly neutralizing antibodies 2F5 and 4E10. Fusion to T4 small outer capsid protein, Soc, allowed display of gp41 trimers on the phage nanoparticle. These approaches for the first time led to the design of a soluble gp41 trimer containing both the fusion peptide and the cytoplasmic domain, providing insights into the mechanism of entry and development of gp41-based HIV-1 vaccines.

  5. Modelling the structure of full-length Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Mushtaq; Gatherer, Derek; Wilson, Joanna B

    2014-12-01

    Epstein-Barr virus is a clinically important human virus associated with several cancers and is the etiologic agent of infectious mononucleosis. The viral nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA1) is central to the replication and propagation of the viral genome and likely contributes to tumourigenesis. We have compared EBNA1 homologues from other primate lymphocryptoviruses and found that the central glycine/alanine repeat (GAr) domain as well as predicted cellular protein (USP7 and CK2) binding sites are present in homologues in the Old World primates, but not the marmoset, suggesting that these motifs may have co-evolved. Using the resolved structure of the C-terminal one-third of EBNA1 (homodimerization and DNA binding domain), we have gone on to develop monomeric and dimeric models in silico of the full-length protein. The C-terminal domain is predicted to be structurally highly similar between homologues, indicating conserved function. Zinc could be stably incorporated into the model, bonding with two N-terminal cysteines predicted to facilitate multimerisation. The GAr contains secondary structural elements in the models, while the protein binding regions are unstructured, irrespective of the prediction approach used and sequence origin. These intrinsically disordered regions may facilitate the diversity observed in partner interactions. We hypothesize that the structured GAr could mask the disordered regions, thereby protecting the protein from default degradation. In the dimer conformation, the C-terminal tails of each monomer wrap around a proline-rich protruding loop of the partner monomer, providing dimer stability, a feature which could be exploited in therapeutic design.

  6. Purification and Activity Testing of the Full-Length YycFGHI Proteins of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Türck, Michael; Bierbaum, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    Background The YycFG two-component regulatory system (TCS) of Staphylococcus aureus represents the only essential TCS that is almost ubiquitously distributed in Gram-positive bacteria with a low G+C-content. YycG (WalK/VicK) is a sensor histidine-kinase and YycF (WalR/VicR) is the cognate response regulator. Both proteins play an important role in the biosynthesis of the cell envelope and mutations in these proteins have been involved in development of vancomycin and daptomycin resistance. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we present high yield expression and purification of the full-length YycG and YycF proteins as well as of the auxiliary proteins YycH and YycI of Staphylococcus aureus. Activity tests of the YycG kinase and a mutated version, that harbours an Y306N exchange in its cytoplasmic PAS domain, in a detergent-micelle-model and a phosholipid-liposome-model showed kinase activity (autophosphorylation and phosphoryl group transfer to YycF) only in the presence of elevated concentrations of alkali salts. A direct comparison of the activity of the kinases in the liposome-model indicated a higher activity of the mutated YycG kinase. Further experiments indicated that YycG responds to fluidity changes in its microenvironment. Conclusions/Significance The combination of high yield expression, purification and activity testing of membrane and membrane-associated proteins provides an excellent experimental basis for further protein-protein interaction studies and for identification of all signals received by the YycFGHI system. PMID:22276191

  7. Structural characterization suggests models for monomeric and dimeric forms of full-length ezrin.

    PubMed

    Phang, Juanita M; Harrop, Stephen J; Duff, Anthony P; Sokolova, Anna V; Crossett, Ben; Walsh, James C; Beckham, Simone A; Nguyen, Cuong D; Davies, Roberta B; Glöckner, Carina; Bromley, Elizabeth H C; Wilk, Krystyna E; Curmi, Paul M G

    2016-09-15

    Ezrin is a member of the ERM (ezrin-radixin-moesin) family of proteins that have been conserved through metazoan evolution. These proteins have dormant and active forms, where the latter links the actin cytoskeleton to membranes. ERM proteins have three domains: an N-terminal FERM [band Four-point-one (4.1) ERM] domain comprising three subdomains (F1, F2, and F3); a helical domain; and a C-terminal actin-binding domain. In the dormant form, FERM and C-terminal domains form a stable complex. We have determined crystal structures of the active FERM domain and the dormant FERM:C-terminal domain complex of human ezrin. We observe a bistable array of phenylalanine residues in the core of subdomain F3 that is mobile in the active form and locked in the dormant form. As subdomain F3 is pivotal in binding membrane proteins and phospholipids, these transitions may facilitate activation and signaling. Full-length ezrin forms stable monomers and dimers. We used small-angle X-ray scattering to determine the solution structures of these species. As expected, the monomer shows a globular domain with a protruding helical coiled coil. The dimer shows an elongated dumbbell structure that is twice as long as the monomer. By aligning ERM sequences spanning metazoan evolution, we show that the central helical region is conserved, preserving the heptad repeat. Using this, we have built a dimer model where each monomer forms half of an elongated antiparallel coiled coil with domain-swapped FERM:C-terminal domain complexes at each end. The model suggests that ERM dimers may bind to actin in a parallel fashion.

  8. Correlation of the level of full-length CFTR transcript with pulmonary phenotype in patients carrying R117H and 1342-1,-2delAG mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Hamosh, A.; Cutting, G.R.; Oates, R.; Amos, J.

    1994-09-01

    The R117H mutation occurs on two chromosome backgrounds, one associated with a 7 thymidine tract (7T-R11H) in the splice-acceptor site of intron 8, the other with a 5 thymidine tract (5T-R117H). We examined exon 9 splicing efficiency in 5 patients of genotype R117H/{delta}F508 and one carrying 1342-1,-2delAG{delta}F508, an obligate exon 9 slice site mutation. Four patients carried R117H on a 7T background -- three adult men with congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens and one adolescent female with pancreatitis and borderline sweat chloride concentration. The patient with R117H on a 5T background had pancreatic sufficient CF (PS-CF). The 1342-1,-2delAG patient has classic pancreatic insufficient CF (PI-CF). cDNA was synthesized from total RNA extracted from nasal epithlial cells and analyzed for CFTR splicing by 35 cycle PCR using primers in exon 7 and 11. The quantity of full length transcript derived from the R117H or {delta}F508 alleles was assessed by allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization. While 91.4% of transcript from the 5T-R117H allele was full-length, only 42.2% of CFTR transcript from the 5T-R117H allele was full length. Since CBAVD patients have no lung disease and PS-CF patients do, this indicates that the threshold of developing CF lung disease is crossed when the amount of CFTR transcript bearing R117H is reduced by half. Interestingly, 17.1% of transcript derived from the 1342-1,-2delAG allele (or 8.6% of total CFTR transcript) was normal and full length. This suggests that up to 9% of full length wild-type CFTR transcript may be inadequate to escape the lung disease of CF and that a 9 thymidine tract followed by AAC (the result of the AG deletion) can be used as a splice donor with 2-9% efficiency.

  9. A novel copper(II) coordination at His186 in full-length murine prion protein

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Yasuko; Hiraoka, Wakako; Igarashi, Manabu; Ito, Kimihito; Shimoyama, Yuhei; Horiuchi, Motohiro; Yamamori, Tohru; Yasui, Hironobu; Kuwabara, Mikinori; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Inanami, Osamu

    2010-04-09

    To explore Cu(II) ion coordination by His{sup 186} in the C-terminal domain of full-length prion protein (moPrP), we utilized the magnetic dipolar interaction between a paramagnetic metal, Cu(II) ion, and a spin probe introduced in the neighborhood of the postulated binding site by the spin labeling technique (SDSL technique). Six moPrP mutants, moPrP(D143C), moPrP(Y148C), moPrP(E151C), moPrP(Y156C), moPrP(T189C), and moPrP(Y156C,H186A), were reacted with a methane thiosulfonate spin probe and a nitroxide residue (R1) was created in the binding site of each one. Line broadening of the ESR spectra was induced in the presence of Cu(II) ions in moPrP(Y148R1), moPrP(Y151R1), moPrP(Y156R1), and moPrP(T189R1) but not moPrP(D143R1). This line broadening indicated the presence of electron-electron dipolar interaction between Cu(II) and the nitroxide spin probe, suggesting that each interspin distance was within 20 A. The interspin distance ranges between Cu(II) and the spin probes of moPrP(Y148R1), moPrP(Y151R1), moPrP(Y156R1), and moPrP(T189R1) were estimated to be 12.1 A, 18.1 A, 10.7 A, and 8.4 A, respectively. In moPrP(Y156R1,H186A), line broadening between Cu(II) and the spin probe was not observed. These results suggest that a novel Cu(II) binding site is involved in His186 in the Helix2 region of the C-terminal domain of moPrP{sup C}.

  10. Soluble expression, purification and characterization of the full length IS2 Transposase

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The two-step transposition pathway of insertion sequences of the IS3 family, and several other families, involves first the formation of a branched figure-of-eight (F-8) structure by an asymmetric single strand cleavage at one optional donor end and joining to the flanking host DNA near the target end. Its conversion to a double stranded minicircle precedes the second insertional step, where both ends function as donors. In IS2, the left end which lacks donor function in Step I acquires it in Step II. The assembly of two intrinsically different protein-DNA complexes in these F-8 generating elements has been intuitively proposed, but a barrier to testing this hypothesis has been the difficulty of isolating a full length, soluble and active transposase that creates fully formed synaptic complexes in vitro with protein bound to both binding and catalytic domains of the ends. We address here a solution to expressing, purifying and structurally analyzing such a protein. Results A soluble and active IS2 transposase derivative with GFP fused to its C-terminus functions as efficiently as the native protein in in vivo transposition assays. In vitro electrophoretic mobility shift assay data show that the partially purified protein prepared under native conditions binds very efficiently to cognate DNA, utilizing both N- and C-terminal residues. As a precursor to biophysical analyses of these complexes, a fluorescence-based random mutagenesis protocol was developed that enabled a structure-function analysis of the protein with good resolution at the secondary structure level. The results extend previous structure-function work on IS3 family transposases, identifying the binding domain as a three helix H + HTH bundle and explaining the function of an atypical leucine zipper-like motif in IS2. In addition gain- and loss-of-function mutations in the catalytic active site define its role in regional and global binding and identify functional signatures that are common

  11. Drug resistance is conferred on the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by expression of full-length melanoma-associated human ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCB5.

    PubMed

    Keniya, Mikhail V; Holmes, Ann R; Niimi, Masakazu; Lamping, Erwin; Gillet, Jean-Pierre; Gottesman, Michael M; Cannon, Richard D

    2014-10-06

    ABCB5, an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, is highly expressed in melanoma cells, and may contribute to the extreme resistance of melanomas to chemotherapy by efflux of anti-cancer drugs. Our goal was to determine whether we could functionally express human ABCB5 in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in order to demonstrate an efflux function for ABCB5 in the absence of background pump activity from other human transporters. Heterologous expression would also facilitate drug discovery for this important target. DNAs encoding ABCB5 sequences were cloned into the chromosomal PDR5 locus of a S. cerevisiae strain in which seven endogenous ABC transporters have been deleted. Protein expression in the yeast cells was monitored by immunodetection using both a specific anti-ABCB5 antibody and a cross-reactive anti-ABCB1 antibody. ABCB5 function in recombinant yeast cells was measured by determining whether the cells possessed increased resistance to known pump substrates, compared to the host yeast strain, in assays of yeast growth. Three ABCB5 constructs were made in yeast. One was derived from the ABCB5-β mRNA, which is highly expressed in human tissues but is a truncation of a canonical full-size ABC transporter. Two constructs contained full-length ABCB5 sequences: either a native sequence from cDNA or a synthetic sequence codon-harmonized for S. cerevisiae. Expression of all three constructs in yeast was confirmed by immunodetection. Expression of the codon-harmonized full-length ABCB5 DNA conferred increased resistance, relative to the host yeast strain, to the putative substrates rhodamine 123, daunorubicin, tetramethylrhodamine, FK506, or clorgyline. We conclude that full-length ABCB5 can be functionally expressed in S. cerevisiae and confers drug resistance.

  12. A cDNA clone for 3-carene synthase from Salvia stenophylla.

    PubMed

    Hoelscher, Dirk J; Williams, David C; Wildung, Mark R; Croteau, Rodney

    2003-04-01

    The essential oil of Salvia stenophylla contains (+)-3-carene as the principal monoterpene component. Using an enriched cDNA library prepared from mRNA isolated from S. stenophylla peltate glandular trichomes, and a homology-based cloning strategy, a full-length cDNA was isolated that encoded a preprotein of 69.7 kDa which resembled a monoterpene synthase in sequence. Heterologous expression of the gene in Escherichia coli provided a soluble recombinant enzyme capable of catalyzing the divalent metal ion-dependent conversion of geranyl diphosphate to (+)-3-carene and to lesser amounts of limonene, myrcene, 4-carene and beta-phellandrene. This multiple-product synthase is responsible for the production of all of the essential oil monoterpenes of S. stenophylla.

  13. Full-length HLA-DRB1 coding sequences generated by a hemizygous RNA-SBT approach.

    PubMed

    Gerritsen, K E H; Groeneweg, M; Meertens, C M H; Voorter, C E M; Tilanus, M G J

    2015-11-01

    Currently 1582 HLA-DRB1 alleles have been identified in the IMGT/HLA database (v3.18). Among those alleles, more than 90% have incomplete allele sequences, which complicates the analysis of the functional relevance of polymorphism beyond exon 2. The polymorphic index of each individual exon of the currently known allele sequences, shows that polymorphism is present in all exons, albeit not equally abundant. Full-length HLA-DRB1 RNA sequencing identifies polymorphism of the complete coding region. Here we describe a hemizygous full-length RNA sequence-based typing (SBT) approach based on group-specific HLA-DRB1 amplification and subsequent sequencing. RNA full-length sequences can easily be accessed because of the short amplicon length (801 bp). The RNA-SBT approach was successfully validated on a panel of DRB1 alleles having fully known coding sequences according to the IMGT/HLA database, and cover all serological equivalents. Subsequently, the approach was applied on a panel of 54 alleles with incomplete allele sequences, resulting in full-length coding sequences and the identification of one new and one corrected allele. This study shows the universal applicability of the RNA-based sequencing approach to identify full-length coding sequences and to define the polymorphic content of HLA-DRB1 alleles.

  14. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the CRP-cAMP-DNA (full length) complex.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jing; Liu, Jing; Tao, Wenbing; Yang, Zhenxing; Qiu, Rui; Yu, Shaoning; Ji, Chaoneng

    2013-05-01

    The Escherichia coli cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) is a well known transcription activator protein. In this study, CRP was overexpressed, purified and cocrystallized with cAMP and a 38 bp full-length double-stranded DNA fragment. The full-length segment differed from the half-site fragments used in previous crystallization experiments and is more similar to the environment in vivo. CRP-cAMP-DNA crystals were obtained and diffracted to 2.9 Å resolution. The crystals belonged to space group P3121, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 76.03, c = 144.00 Å. The asymmetric unit was found to contain one protein molecule and half a 38 bp full-length double-stranded DNA fragment, with a Matthews coefficient of 2.62 Å(3) Da(-1) and a solvent content of 53.14%.

  15. Differential regulation of trypsinogen mRNA translation: full-length mRNA sequences encoding two oppositely charged trypsinogen isoenzymes in the dog pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Pinsky, S D; LaForge, K S; Scheele, G

    1985-01-01

    In the absence of changes in functional mRNA levels, stimulation of the pancreas with caerulein, a peptide analog of cholecystokinin, has been previously shown to increase the synthesis of anionic but not cationic trypsinogen. To look for structure-function correlations, a high-yield, full-length cDNA library has been constructed from canine pancreatic poly(A)+ mRNA. Full-length clones coding for the two major trypsinogen isoenzyme forms have been identified by colony hybridization and verified by in vitro translation of hybrid-selected mRNA in the presence of microsomal membranes and an optimal redox potential. Disulfide-bonded translation products were separated and identified by two-dimensional isoelectric focusing-sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis. Nucleotide sequence analysis allowed us to deduce the amino acid sequences for the anionic and cationic forms of canine trypsinogen, which contain 232 and 231 residues, respectively (77% amino acid identity), and the 15-residue amino terminal signal sequences (53% amino acid identity) associated with the two presecretory forms. Measurements of relative and absolute mRNA levels, when related to relative protein synthesis values, indicated that the translational efficiency of anionic trypsinogen mRNA exceeded that of cationic trypsinogen mRNA by 1.5- to 2.9-fold under basal conditions. Analysis of the 5' noncoding regions of trypsinogen mRNAs revealed a striking conservation of sequence (10 of 12 bases) between dog and rat anionic trypsinogen forms. This contrasted markedly with the divergence of the 5' noncoding regions observed between dog anionic and cationic trypsinogen mRNAs. Images PMID:3841794

  16. Caspase 3 inactivates biologically active full length interleukin-33 as a classical cytokine but does not prohibit nuclear translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Shafaqat; Nguyen, Dang Quan; Falk, Werner; Martin, Michael Uwe

    2010-01-15

    IL-33 is a member of the IL-1 family of cytokines with dual function which either activates cells via the IL-33 receptor in a paracrine fashion or translocates to the nucleus to regulate gene transcription in an intracrine manner. We show that full length murine IL-33 is active as a cytokine and that it is not processed by caspase 1 to mature IL-33 but instead cleaved by caspase 3 at aa175 to yield two products which are both unable to bind to the IL-33 receptor. Full length IL-33 and its N-terminal caspase 3 breakdown product, however, translocate to the nucleus. Finally, bioactive IL-33 is not released by cells constitutively or after activation. This suggests that IL-33 is not a classical cytokine but exerts its function in the nucleus of intact cells and only activates others cells via its receptor as an alarm mediator after destruction of the producing cell.

  17. Platelet full length TFPI-α in healthy volunteers is not affected by sex or hormonal use

    PubMed Central

    Winckers, Kristien; Thomassen, Stella; ten Cate, Hugo; Hackeng, Tilman M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Only 10% of plasma TFPIα (TFPI) exists in the full length form, the rest circulates as a C-terminally truncated form. However, blood platelets exclusively contain full length TFPI, which is released at the site of injury upon platelet activation, and which could play an important local regulatory role in thrombin generation and prevention of thrombosis. Methods The anticoagulant activities of full length and truncated TFPI were investigated using thrombin generation assays. Blood samples were obtained from 30 healthy volunteers (10 male subjects, 10 female subjects, and 10 females using oral contraceptives). Platelet TFPI was released in platelet rich plasma and in platelet isolates using convulxin or thrombin, and measured by free TFPI ELISA and thrombin generation assays. Results Full length TFPI and platelet TFPI were much more potent inhibitors of thrombin generation than truncated TFPI, which was virtually inactive. Although mean plasma TFPI antigen levels decreased from men (0.30 nM) to women (0.20 nM) to women using oral contraceptives (0.11 nM), no relevant differences were found in platelet TFPI among those subgroups. Conclusions Platelets release similar amounts of TFPI regardless of plasma TFPI concentrations and is unaffected by sex or oral contraceptive use. We speculate that platelet TFPI is important to prevent systemic coagulation and thrombosis and restrict thrombus formation to the site of the growing platelet plug. The stable contribution of platelet TFPI to the anticoagulant potential in plasma is likely to become particularly relevant under conditions of low plasma TFPI levels in combination of oral contraceptives use. PMID:28158181

  18. Genetic suppression of neurodegeneration and neurotransmitter release abnormalities caused by expanded full-length huntingtin accumulating in the cytoplasm.

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Eliana; Cha, Guang-Ho; Verstreken, Patrik; Ly, Cindy V.; Hughes, Robert; Bellen, Hugo J.; Botas, Juan

    2008-01-01

    Summary Huntington's Disease (HD) is a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by expansion of a translated CAG repeat in the N-terminus of the huntingtin protein. Here we describe the generation and characterization of a novel full-length HD Drosophila model to reveal a previously unknown disease mechanism that occurs early in the course of pathogenesis, before expanded huntingtin is cleaved and imported into the nucleus in detectable amounts. We find that expanded full-length huntingtin (128QhttFL) leads to behavioral, neurodegenerative, and electrophysiological phenotypes. These phenotypes are caused by a Ca2+-dependent increase in neurotransmitter release efficiency in 128QhttFL animals. Partial loss of function in synaptic transmission (Syntaxin, Snap, Rop) and voltage-gated Ca2+ channel genes suppresses both the electrophysiological and the neurodegenerative phenotypes. Thus, our data indicate that increased neurotransmission is at the root of neuronal degeneration caused by expanded full-length huntingtin during early stages of pathogenesis. PMID:18184562

  19. Database Independent Protein Sequencing (DiPS) enables full-length de-novo protein and antibody sequence determination.

    PubMed

    Savidor, Alon; Barzilay, Rotem; Elinger, Dalia; Yarden, Yosef; Lindzen, Moshit; Gabashvili, Alexandra; Adiv Tal, Ophir; Levin, Yishai

    2017-03-27

    Traditional 'bottom-up' proteomics approaches use proteolytic digestion, LC-MS/MS and database searching to elucidate peptide identities and their parent proteins. Protein sequences absent from the database cannot be identified, and even if present in the database, complete sequence coverage is rarely achieved even for the most abundant proteins in the sample. Thus, sequencing of unknown proteins such as antibodies or constituents of metaproteomes remains a challenging problem. To date, there is no available method for full-length protein sequencing, independent of a reference database, in high throughput. Here we present Database Independent Protein Sequencing (DiPS), a method for unambiguous, rapid, database independent, full-length protein sequencing. The method is a novel combination of non-enzymatic, semi-random cleavage of the protein, LC-MS/MS analysis, peptide de novo sequencing, extraction of peptide tags, and their assembly into a consensus sequence using an algorithm named "Peptide Tag Assembler" (pTA). As proof-of-concept, the method was applied to samples of three known proteins representing three size classes and to a previously un-sequenced, clinically relevant, monoclonal antibody. Excluding leucine/isoleucine and glutamic-acid/deamidated glutamine ambiguities, end-to-end, full-length de novo sequencing was achieved with 99-100% accuracy for all benchmarking proteins and the antibody light chain. Accuracy of the sequenced antibody heavy chain, including the entire variable region, was also 100% but there was a 23 residue gap in the constant region sequence.

  20. Near Full-Length Identification of a Novel HIV-1 CRF01_AE/B/C Recombinant in Northern Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan-Heng; Chen, Xin; Liang, Yue-Bo; Pang, Wei; Qin, Wei-Hong; Zhang, Chiyu; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2015-08-01

    The Myanmar-China border appears to be the "hot spot" region for the occurrence of HIV-1 recombination. The majority of the previous analyses of HIV-1 recombination were based on partial genomic sequences, which obviously cannot reflect the reality of the genetic diversity of HIV-1 in this area well. Here, we present a near full-length characterization of a novel HIV-1 CRF01_AE/B/C recombinant isolated from a long-distance truck driver in Northern Myanmar. It is the first description of a near full-length genomic sequence in Myanmar since 2003, and might be one of the most complicated HIV-1 chimeras ever detected in Myanmar, containing four CRF01_AE, six B segments, and five C segments separated by 14 breakpoints throughout its genome. The discovery and characterization of this new CRF01_AE/B/C recombinant indicate that intersubtype recombination is ongoing in Myanmar, continuously generating new forms of HIV-1. More work based on near full-length sequence analyses is urgently needed to better understand the genetic diversity of HIV-1 in these regions.

  1. RT-PCR and sequence analysis of the full-length fusion protein of Canine Distemper Virus from domestic dogs.

    PubMed

    Romanutti, Carina; Gallo Calderón, Marina; Keller, Leticia; Mattion, Nora; La Torre, José

    2016-02-01

    During 2007-2014, 84 out of 236 (35.6%) samples from domestic dogs submitted to our laboratory for diagnostic purposes were positive for Canine Distemper Virus (CDV), as analyzed by RT-PCR amplification of a fragment of the nucleoprotein gene. Fifty-nine of them (70.2%) were from dogs that had been vaccinated against CDV. The full-length gene encoding the Fusion (F) protein of fifteen isolates was sequenced and compared with that of those of other CDVs, including wild-type and vaccine strains. Phylogenetic analysis using the F gene full-length sequences grouped all the Argentinean CDV strains in the SA2 clade. Sequence identity with the Onderstepoort vaccine strain was 89.0-90.6%, and the highest divergence was found in the 135 amino acids corresponding to the F protein signal-peptide, Fsp (64.4-66.7% identity). In contrast, this region was highly conserved among the local strains (94.1-100% identity). One extra putative N-glycosylation site was identified in the F gene of CDV Argentinean strains with respect to the vaccine strain. The present report is the first to analyze full-length F protein sequences of CDV strains circulating in Argentina, and contributes to the knowledge of molecular epidemiology of CDV, which may help in understanding future disease outbreaks.

  2. Significance of the variant and full-length forms of the very low density lipoprotein receptor in brain.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Y; Yamamoto, M; Kumamaru, E

    2001-12-20

    The very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) is a newly described receptor which binds to apolipoprotein E (apoE) specifically. The authors designed a synthetic peptide of 17 amino acids representing the N-terminus of the putative first ligand binding domain of human VLDLR, this being a unique domain for VLDLR. When the synthetic peptide was used as the antigen, two different monoclonal antibodies were obtained (anti-VLDLR1 and anti-VLDLR2). Expressional cloning revealed that anti-VLDLR1 recognized the variant form of VLDLR which lacks 84 bp of O-linked sugar domain and anti-VLDLR2 recognized the full length form of VLDLR. The variant VLDLR was expressed in neuroblasts as well as matrix cells and Cajal-Retzius cells in the early stages of the developing human brain; later its expression was sequentially found in glioblasts, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and finally in myelin. The expression of a full length form of VLDLR was detected in senile plaques and some neurons and satellite glia in aged and Alzheimer brains. This suggests that the variant VLDLR is important for the developing human brain and the full length VLDLR has modified functions in aged and Alzheimer brains.

  3. Structural analysis of the complex between calmodulin and full-length myelin basic protein, an intrinsically disordered molecule.

    PubMed

    Majava, Viivi; Wang, Chaozhan; Myllykoski, Matti; Kangas, Salla M; Kang, Sung Ung; Hayashi, Nobuhiro; Baumgärtel, Peter; Heape, Anthony M; Lubec, Gert; Kursula, Petri

    2010-06-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP) is present between the cytoplasmic leaflets of the compact myelin membrane in both the peripheral and central nervous systems, and characterized to be intrinsically disordered in solution. One of the best-characterized protein ligands for MBP is calmodulin (CaM), a highly acidic calcium sensor. We pulled down MBP from human brain white matter as the major calcium-dependent CaM-binding protein. We then used full-length brain MBP, and a peptide from rodent MBP, to structurally characterize the MBP-CaM complex in solution by small-angle X-ray scattering, NMR spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy, and size exclusion chromatography. We determined 3D structures for the full-length protein-protein complex at different stoichiometries and detect ligand-induced folding of MBP. We also obtained thermodynamic data for the two CaM-binding sites of MBP, indicating that CaM does not collapse upon binding to MBP, and show that CaM and MBP colocalize in myelin sheaths. In addition, we analyzed the post-translational modifications of rat brain MBP, identifying a novel MBP modification, glucosylation. Our results provide a detailed picture of the MBP-CaM interaction, including a 3D model of the complex between full-length proteins.

  4. The full-length Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sgs1 protein is a vigorous DNA helicase that preferentially unwinds holliday junctions.

    PubMed

    Cejka, Petr; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C

    2010-03-12

    The highly conserved RecQ family of DNA helicases has multiple roles in the maintenance of genome stability. Sgs1, the single RecQ homologue in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, acts both early and late during homologous recombination. Here we present the expression, purification, and biochemical analysis of full-length Sgs1. Unlike the truncated form of Sgs1 characterized previously, full-length Sgs1 binds diverse single-stranded and double-stranded DNA substrates, including DNA duplexes with 5'- and 3'-single-stranded DNA overhangs. Similarly, Sgs1 unwinds a variety of DNA substrates, including blunt-ended duplex DNA. Significantly, a substrate containing a Holliday junction is unwound most efficiently. DNA unwinding is catalytic, requires ATP, and is stimulated by replication protein A. Unlike RecQ homologues from multicellular organisms, Sgs1 is remarkably active at picomolar concentrations and can efficiently unwind duplex DNA molecules as long as 23,000 base pairs. Our analysis shows that Sgs1 resembles Escherichia coli RecQ protein more than any of the human RecQ homologues with regard to its helicase activity. The full-length recombinant protein will be invaluable for further investigation of Sgs1 biochemistry.

  5. Strategies to facilitate the development of uncloned or cloned infectious full-length viral cDNAs: Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus as a case study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Approaches to simplify and streamline the construction of full-length infectious cDNA clones (FL-cDNAs) are needed. Among desirable improvements are the ability to use total nucleic acids (TNA) extracts from infected hosts (to bypass viral purification limitations) for the direct one-step amplification of large FL-cDNAs, the possibility to inoculate plants with uncloned FL-cDNAs and the simplified cloning of these large molecules. Results Using the 7.55 kb genome of Apple chlorotic leaf spot trichovirus (ACLSV) approaches allowing the rapid generation from TNA extracts of FL-cDNAs under the control of the T7 promoter and the successful inoculation of plants using in vitro transcripts obtained from these uncloned amplification products have been developed. We also show that the yeast homologous recombination system permits efficient cloning of FL-cDNAs and the simultaneous one-step tailoring of a ternary Yeast-Escherichia coli-Agrobacterium tumefaciens shuttle vector allowing efficient inoculation of both herbaceous and woody host plants by agroinfiltration. Conclusions The fast and efficient strategies described here should have broad applications, in particular for the study of "difficult" plant viruses, such as those infecting woody hosts, and potentially for other, non plant-infecting viral agents. PMID:22040379

  6. Characterization of tissue expression and full-length coding sequence of a novel human gene mapping at 3q12.1 and transcribed in oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Fayein, Nicole-Adeline; Stankoff, Bruno; Auffray, Charles; Devignes, Marie-Dominique

    2002-05-01

    Macro-array differential hybridization of a collection of 5058 human gene transcripts represented in an IMAGE infant brain cDNA library has led to the identification of transcripts displaying preferential or specific expression in brain (Genome Res. 9 (1999) 195; http://idefix.upr420.vjf.cnrs.fr/IMAGE). Most of these genes correspond to as yet undescribed functions. Detailed characterization of the expression, sequence, and genome assignment of one of these genes named C3orf4, is reported here. The full-length sequence of the transcript was obtained by 5' extension RT-PCR. The gene transcript (2.8 kb) encodes a 253 amino acid long protein, with four transmembrane domains. The position of the C3orf4 gene was determined at 3q12.1 thanks to the draft sequence of the human genome. It is composed of five exons spanning more than 7 kb. No TATAA box but a CpG island was found upstream of the beginning of the gene. Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridization revealed a predominant expression in myelinated structures such as corpus callosum and spinal cord. RT-PCR showed expression of the C3orf4 gene in rat optic nerve and cultured oligodendrocytes, the myelinating cells of the central nervous system, but not in astrocytes. This work supports further investigations aimed at determining the role of the C3orf4 gene in myelinating cells.

  7. Type III secretion as a generalizable strategy for the production of full-length biopolymer-forming proteins.

    PubMed

    Azam, Anum; Li, Cheng; Metcalf, Kevin J; Tullman-Ercek, Danielle

    2016-11-01

    Biopolymer-forming proteins are integral in the development of customizable biomaterials, but recombinant expression of these proteins is challenging. In particular, biopolymer-forming proteins have repetitive, glycine-rich domains and, like many heterologously expressed proteins, are prone to incomplete translation, aggregation, and proteolytic degradation in the production host. This necessitates tailored purification processes to isolate each full-length protein of interest from the truncated forms as well as other contaminating proteins; owing to the repetitive nature of these proteins, the truncated polypeptides can have very similar chemistry to the full-length form and are difficult to separate from the full-length protein. We hypothesized that bacterial expression and secretion would be a promising alternative option for biomaterials-forming proteins, simplifying isolation of the full-length target protein. By using a selective secretion system, truncated forms of the protein are not secreted and thus are not found in the culture harvest. We show that a synthetically upregulated type III secretion system leads to a general increase in secretion titer for each protein that we tested. Moreover, we observe a substantial enhancement in the homogeneity of full-length forms of pro-resilin, tropo-elastin crosslinking domains, and silk proteins produced in this manner, as compared with proteins purified from the cytosol. Secretion via the type III apparatus limits co-purification of truncated forms of the target protein and increases protein purity without extensive purification steps. Demonstrating the utility of such a system, we introduce several modifications to resilin-based peptides and use an un-optimized, single-column process to purify these proteins. The resulting materials are of sufficiently high quantity and yield for the production of antimicrobial hydrogels with highly reproducible rheological properties. The ease of this process and its

  8. 20(S)-Protopanaxadiol-aglycone Downregulation of the Full-length and Splice Variants of Androgen Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Bo; Liu, Xichun; Li, Jing; Liu, Shuang; Qi, Yanfeng; Xiong, Zhenggang; Zhang, Allen; Wiese, Thomas; Fu, Xueqi; Gu, Jingkai; Rennie, Paul S.; Sartor, Oliver; Lee, Benjamin R.; Ip, Clement; Zhao, Lijuan; Zhang, Haitao; Dong, Yan

    2012-01-01

    As a public health problem, prostate cancer engenders huge economic and life-quality burden. Developing effective chemopreventive regimens to alleviate the burden remains a major challenge. Androgen signaling is vital to the development and progression of prostate cancer. Targeting androgen signaling via blocking the production of the potent ligand dihydrotestosterone has been shown to decrease prostate cancer incidence. However, the potential of increasing the incidence of high-grade prostate cancers has been a concern. Mechanisms of disease progression after the intervention may include increased expression of androgen receptor (AR) in prostate tissue and expression of the constitutively-active AR splice variants (AR-Vs) lacking the ligand-binding domain. Thus, novel agents targeting the receptor, preferentially both the full-length and AR-Vs, are urgently needed. In the present study, we show that ginsenoside 20(S)-protopanaxadiol-aglycone (PPD) effectively downregulates the expression and activity of both the full-length AR and AR-Vs. The effects of PPD on AR and AR-Vs are manifested by an immediate drop in proteins followed by a reduction in transcripts, attributed to PPD induction of proteasome-mediated degradation and inhibition of the transcription of the AR gene. We further show that although PPD inhibits the growth as well as AR expression and activity in LNCaP xenograft tumors, the morphology and AR expression in normal prostates are not affected. This study is the first to show that PPD suppresses androgen signaling through downregulating both the full-length AR and AR-Vs, and provides strong rationale for further developing PPD as a promising agent for the prevention and/or treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:22907191

  9. Analysis of a shortened form of human carbonic anhydrase VII expressed in vitro compared to the full-length enzyme.

    PubMed

    Bootorabi, Fatemeh; Jänis, Janne; Smith, Elona; Waheed, Abdul; Kukkurainen, Sampo; Hytönen, Vesa; Valjakka, Jarkko; Supuran, Claudiu T; Vullo, Daniela; Sly, William S; Parkkila, Seppo

    2010-08-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzymes are expressed in all organs of the mammalian body where they participate in important physiological functions. CA VII is a cytosolic isozyme which may be expressed as two forms according to the recent GenBank data. We designed a present study to express and characterize the human CA VII forms: full-length CA VII and short form (predicted to lack 56 residues from the N-terminus). Reverse transcriptase PCR analysis revealed mRNAs for both CA VII forms in the human brain. These different forms were expressed as recombinant proteins to investigate their biochemical properties. The full-length CA VII was used to raise a polyclonal antiserum in a rabbit, and the antiserum was then employed in western blot analyses and immunohistochemistry of mouse tissues. Data from mass spectrometry and comparative modeling showed that CA VII protein contains a single intramolecular disulfide bridge (Cys-56 to Cys-180) which is lacking in the short form. The computer model suggested distinctly different folding for the different forms. The more exposed structure and the absence of the disulfide bridge in the short form could make this protein more susceptible to degradation. In fact, this was realized in several protein purification efforts in which the short form readily degraded during the experimental procedures. From these results, we conclude that the full-length CA VII is a predominant active form in human brain and also in other tissues. In addition to the brain, CA VII is expressed in several other organs including the stomach, duodenum, colon, liver, and skeletal muscle. The distribution pattern suggests multiple functions for CA VII in different organs.

  10. Synthesis of full length PB1-F2 influenza A virus proteins from 'Spanish flu' and 'bird flu'.

    PubMed

    Röder, René; Bruns, Karsten; Sharma, Alok; Eissmann, André; Hahn, Friedrich; Studtrucker, Nicole; Fossen, Torgils; Wray, Victor; Henklein, Peter; Schubert, Ulrich

    2008-08-01

    The proapoptotic influenza A virus PB1-F2 protein contributes to viral pathogenicity and is present in most human and avian isolates. Previous synthetic protocols have been improved to provide a synthetic full length H1N1 type PB1-F2 protein that is encoded by the 'Spanish flu' isolate and an equivalent protein from an avian host that is representative of a highly pathogenic H5N1 'bird flu' isolate, termed SF2 and BF2, respectively. Full length SF2, different mutants of BF2 and a number of fragments of these peptides have been synthesized by either the standard solid-phase peptide synthesis method or by native chemical ligation of unprotected N- and C-terminal peptide fragments. For SF2 chemical ligation made use of the histidine and the cysteine residues located in positions 41 and 42 of the native sequence, respectively, to afford a highly efficient synthesis of SF2 compared to the standard SPPS elongation method. By-product formation at the aspartic acid residue in position 23 was prevented by specific modifications of the SPPS protocol. As the native sequence of BF2 does not contain a cysteine residue two different mutants of BF2 (Y42C) and BF2 (S47C) with appropriate cysteine exchanges were produced. In addition to the full length molecules, fragments of the native sequences were synthesized for comparison of their physical characteristics with those from the H1N1 human isolate A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1). All peptides were analyzed by mass spectrometry, (1)H NMR spectroscopy, and SDS-PAGE. The protocols allow the synthesis of significant amounts of PB1-F2 and its related peptides.

  11. The Juxtamembrane Linker of Full-length Synaptotagmin 1 Controls Oligomerization and Calcium-dependent Membrane Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Bin; Kiessling, Volker; Tamm, Lukas K.; Cafiso, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Synaptotagmin 1 (Syt1) is the calcium sensor for synchronous neurotransmitter release. The two C2 domains of Syt1, which may mediate fusion by bridging the vesicle and plasma membranes, are connected to the vesicle membrane by a 60-residue linker. Here, we use site-directed spin labeling and a novel total internal reflection fluorescence vesicle binding assay to characterize the juxtamembrane linker and to test the ability of reconstituted full-length Syt1 to interact with opposing membrane surfaces. EPR spectroscopy demonstrates that the majority of the linker interacts with the membrane interface, thereby limiting the extension of the C2A and C2B domains into the cytoplasm. Pulse dipolar EPR spectroscopy provides evidence that purified full-length Syt1 is oligomerized in the membrane, and mutagenesis indicates that a glycine zipper/GXXXG motif within the linker helps mediate oligomerization. The total internal reflection fluorescence-based vesicle binding assay demonstrates that full-length Syt1 that is reconstituted into supported lipid bilayers will capture vesicles containing negatively charged lipid in a Ca2+-dependent manner. Moreover, the rate of vesicle capture increases with Syt1 density, and mutations in the GXXXG motif that inhibit oligomerization of Syt1 reduce the rate of vesicle capture. This work demonstrates that modifications within the 60-residue linker modulate both the oligomerization of Syt1 and its ability to interact with opposing bilayers. In addition to controlling its activity, the oligomerization of Syt1 may play a role in organizing proteins within the active zone of membrane fusion. PMID:24973220

  12. Activated full-length myosin-X moves processively on filopodia with large steps toward diverse two-dimensional directions

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Osamu; Jung, Hyun Suk; Komatsu, Satoshi; Tsukasaki, Yoshikazu; Watanabe, Tomonobu M.; Homma, Kazuaki; Ikebe, Mitsuo

    2017-01-01

    Myosin-X, (Myo 10), is an unconventional myosin that transports the specific cargos to filopodial tips, and is associated with the mechanism underlying filopodia formation and extension. To clarify the innate motor characteristic, we studied the single molecule movement of a full-length myosin-X construct with leucine zipper at the C-terminal end of the tail (M10FullLZ) and the tail-truncated myosin-X without artificial dimerization motif (BAP-M101–979HMM). M10FullLZ localizes at the tip of filopodia like myosin-X full-length (M10Full). M10FullLZ moves on actin filaments in the presence of PI(3,4,5)P3, an activator of myosin-X. Single molecule motility analysis revealed that the step sizes of both M10FullLZ and BAP-M101–979HMM are widely distributed on single actin filaments that is consistent with electron microscopy observation. M10FullLZ moves on filopodial actin bundles of cells with a mean step size (~36 nm), similar to the step size on single actin filaments (~38 nm). Cartesian plot analysis revealed that M10FullLZ meandered on filopodial actin bundles to both x- and y- directions. These results suggest that the lever-arm of full-length myosin-X is flexible enough to processively steps on different actin filaments within the actin bundles of filopodia. This characteristic of myosin-X may facilitate actin filament convergence for filopodia production. PMID:28287133

  13. Recognition of intermolecular G-quadruplexes by full length nucleophosmin. Effect of a leukaemia-associated mutation.

    PubMed

    Bañuelos, Sonia; Lectez, Benoît; Taneva, Stefka G; Ormaza, Georgina; Alonso-Mariño, Marián; Calle, Xabier; Urbaneja, María A

    2013-07-11

    Nucleophosmin (NPM) is a nucleolar protein involved in ribosome biogenesis. NPM1 gene is frequently mutated in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), correlating with aberrant cytoplasmic localization of the protein. NPM attachment to the nucleolus in physiological conditions probably depends on binding to nucleic acids, and this recognition could be altered in AML. NPM associates to guanine-rich DNA sequences, able to fold as "G-quadruplexes". We have analyzed the interaction of pentameric, full length NPM with G-rich oligonucleotides, finding that the protein binds preferentially high-order G-quadruplexes. AML-associated mutation significantly hampers DNA binding, pointing to a possible mechanism contributing to pathological mislocalization of NPM.

  14. Analysis of the mouse transcriptome based on functional annotation of 60,770 full-length cDNAs.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Y; Furuno, M; Kasukawa, T; Adachi, J; Bono, H; Kondo, S; Nikaido, I; Osato, N; Saito, R; Suzuki, H; Yamanaka, I; Kiyosawa, H; Yagi, K; Tomaru, Y; Hasegawa, Y; Nogami, A; Schönbach, C; Gojobori, T; Baldarelli, R; Hill, D P; Bult, C; Hume, D A; Quackenbush, J; Schriml, L M; Kanapin, A; Matsuda, H; Batalov, S; Beisel, K W; Blake, J A; Bradt, D; Brusic, V; Chothia, C; Corbani, L E; Cousins, S; Dalla, E; Dragani, T A; Fletcher, C F; Forrest, A; Frazer, K S; Gaasterland, T; Gariboldi, M; Gissi, C; Godzik, A; Gough, J; Grimmond, S; Gustincich, S; Hirokawa, N; Jackson, I J; Jarvis, E D; Kanai, A; Kawaji, H; Kawasawa, Y; Kedzierski, R M; King, B L; Konagaya, A; Kurochkin, I V; Lee, Y; Lenhard, B; Lyons, P A; Maglott, D R; Maltais, L; Marchionni, L; McKenzie, L; Miki, H; Nagashima, T; Numata, K; Okido, T; Pavan, W J; Pertea, G; Pesole, G; Petrovsky, N; Pillai, R; Pontius, J U; Qi, D; Ramachandran, S; Ravasi, T; Reed, J C; Reed, D J; Reid, J; Ring, B Z; Ringwald, M; Sandelin, A; Schneider, C; Semple, C A M; Setou, M; Shimada, K; Sultana, R; Takenaka, Y; Taylor, M S; Teasdale, R D; Tomita, M; Verardo, R; Wagner, L; Wahlestedt, C; Wang, Y; Watanabe, Y; Wells, C; Wilming, L G; Wynshaw-Boris, A; Yanagisawa, M; Yang, I; Yang, L; Yuan, Z; Zavolan, M; Zhu, Y; Zimmer, A; Carninci, P; Hayatsu, N; Hirozane-Kishikawa, T; Konno, H; Nakamura, M; Sakazume, N; Sato, K; Shiraki, T; Waki, K; Kawai, J; Aizawa, K; Arakawa, T; Fukuda, S; Hara, A; Hashizume, W; Imotani, K; Ishii, Y; Itoh, M; Kagawa, I; Miyazaki, A; Sakai, K; Sasaki, D; Shibata, K; Shinagawa, A; Yasunishi, A; Yoshino, M; Waterston, R; Lander, E S; Rogers, J; Birney, E; Hayashizaki, Y

    2002-12-05

    Only a small proportion of the mouse genome is transcribed into mature messenger RNA transcripts. There is an international collaborative effort to identify all full-length mRNA transcripts from the mouse, and to ensure that each is represented in a physical collection of clones. Here we report the manual annotation of 60,770 full-length mouse complementary DNA sequences. These are clustered into 33,409 'transcriptional units', contributing 90.1% of a newly established mouse transcriptome database. Of these transcriptional units, 4,258 are new protein-coding and 11,665 are new non-coding messages, indicating that non-coding RNA is a major component of the transcriptome. 41% of all transcriptional units showed evidence of alternative splicing. In protein-coding transcripts, 79% of splice variations altered the protein product. Whole-transcriptome analyses resulted in the identification of 2,431 sense-antisense pairs. The present work, completely supported by physical clones, provides the most comprehensive survey of a mammalian transcriptome so far, and is a valuable resource for functional genomics.

  15. Global Identification of the Full-Length Transcripts and Alternative Splicing Related to Phenolic Acid Biosynthetic Genes in Salvia miltiorrhiza

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhichao; Luo, Hongmei; Ji, Aijia; Zhang, Xin; Song, Jingyuan; Chen, Shilin

    2016-01-01

    Salvianolic acids are among the main bioactive components in Salvia miltiorrhiza, and their biosynthesis has attracted widespread interest. However, previous studies on the biosynthesis of phenolic acids using next-generation sequencing platforms are limited with regard to the assembly of full-length transcripts. Based on hybrid-seq (next-generation and single molecular real-time sequencing) of the S. miltiorrhiza root transcriptome, we experimentally identified 15 full-length transcripts and four alternative splicing events of enzyme-coding genes involved in the biosynthesis of rosmarinic acid. Moreover, we herein demonstrate that lithospermic acid B accumulates in the phloem and xylem of roots, in agreement with the expression patterns of the identified key genes related to rosmarinic acid biosynthesis. According to co-expression patterns, we predicted that six candidate cytochrome P450s and five candidate laccases participate in the salvianolic acid pathway. Our results provide a valuable resource for further investigation into the synthetic biology of phenolic acids in S. miltiorrhiza. PMID:26904067

  16. Clusterin: full-length protein and one of its chains show opposing effects on cellular lipid accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Matukumalli, Suvarsha Rao; Tangirala, Ramakrishna; Rao, C. M.

    2017-01-01

    Proteins, made up of either single or multiple chains, are designed to carry out specific biological functions. We found an interesting example of a two-chain protein where administration of one of its chains leads to a diametrically opposite outcome than that reported for the full-length protein. Clusterin is a highly glycosylated protein consisting of two chains, α- and β-clusterin. We have investigated the conformational features, cellular localization, lipid accumulation, in vivo effects and histological changes upon administration of recombinant individual chains of clusterin. We demonstrate that recombinant α- and β-chains exhibit structural and functional differences and differ in their sub-cellular localization. Full-length clusterin is known to lower lipid levels. In contrast, we find that β-chain-treated cells accumulate 2-fold more lipid than controls. Interestingly, α-chain-treated cells do not show such increase. Rabbits injected with β-chain, but not α-chain, show ~40% increase in weight, with adipocyte hypertrophy, liver and kidney steatosis. Many, sometimes contrasting, roles are ascribed to clusterin in obesity, metabolic syndrome and related conditions. Our findings of differential localization and activities of individual chains of clusterin should help in understanding better the roles of clusterin in metabolism. PMID:28120874

  17. Near full-length genomic characterization of a HIV type 1 BC recombinant strain from Manipur, India.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Roni; Sarkar, Kamalesh; Singh, N Brajachand; Singh, Y Manihar; Chakrabarti, Sekhar

    2012-10-01

    Genetic complexity of HIV-1 is brought about by recombination between HIV-1 subtypes which leads to the development of epidemiologically significant founder strains. In the present study, the near full-length genome sequence of an HIV-1 isolate from an injecting drug user of Manipur (India) was determined, which evidenced the presence of a novel HIV-1 BC recombinant strain. Near full-length genome was amplified by polymerase chain reaction using primer walking approach. The recombination break points were detected using bootscan and simplot analyses. This isolate exhibited a mosaic structure consisting of subtype C backbone with subtype B insertions at the upstream of pol gene (3026-3259) and the downstream of env gene which spanned till the nef gene (8183-8961). Phylogenetic relationships determined with neighbor-joining trees, revealed that the subtype C sequences clustered with sequences from Indian subtype C HIV-1 strains, and the subtype B sequences clustered with HIV-1 subtype B strains from Thailand. This finding may create a complex scenario of HIV-1 epidemic among the injecting drug users of Manipur in near future.

  18. Functional Recombinant Extra Membrane Loop of Human CD20, an Alternative of the Full Length CD20 Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Anbouhi, Mahdi Habibi; Baraz, Aida Feiz; Bouzari, Saeid; Abolhassani, Mohsen; Khanahmad, Hossein; Golkar, Majid; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Behdani, Mahdi; Najafabadi, Ali Jahanian; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali

    2012-01-01

    Background: Targeting of CD20 antigen with monoclonal antibodies has become the mainstay in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and immunotherapeutic depletion of malignant B cells. Accessibility of antigen is one of the crucial factors in development of monoclonal antibodies against this antigen. One major problem in expression of full length CD20 is aggregation and misfolding. Therefore, production of an alternative polypeptide is easer and favorable comparing to that of a full length transmembrane protein CD20. Methods: In this study, we expressed the extra membrane loop of hCD20 (exCD20) consisting of a non-glycosylated 47-amino acids region. The exCD20 coding sequence was amplified by PCR and cloned in pET32a(+) expression vector. The desired protein was expressed in fusion with thioredoxin and 6× His tag in E. coli Origami strain. ELISA and Western-blotting data were performed to indicate the functionality of this protein. Results: We have obtained the exCD20 recombinant protein which can be detected in ELISA and Western-blot experiments. This recombinant fusion protein was soluble and stable without aggregation and misfolding problems. Conclusion: The recombinant extra membrane loop of human CD20 protein in fusion with thioredoxin (exCD20) can be used in function assays and some applications such as ELISA, immuneblotting, affinity purification, immunization, screening, and development of anti-CD20 antibodies. PMID:23023212

  19. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the full-length cystathionine β-synthase from Apis mellifera

    PubMed Central

    Oyenarte, Iker; Majtan, Tomas; Ereño, June; Corral-Rodríguez, María Angeles; Klaudiny, Jaroslav; Majtan, Juraj; Kraus, Jan P.; Martínez-Cruz, Luis Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    Cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) is a pyridoxal-5′-phosphate-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the first step of the transsulfuration pathway, namely the condensation of serine with homocysteine to form cystathionine. Mutations in the CBS gene are the single most common cause of hereditary homocystinuria, a multisystemic disease affecting to various extents the vasculature, connective tissues and central nervous system. At present, the crystal structure of CBS from Drosophila melanogaster is the only available structure of the full-length enzyme. Here we describe a cloning, overexpression, purification and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a full-length CBS from Apis mellifera (AmCBS) which maintains 51 and 46% sequence identity with its Drosophila and human homologs, respectively. The AmCBS yielded crystals belonging to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 85.90, b = 95.87, c = 180.33 Å. Diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 3.0 Å. The crystal structure contained two molecules in the asymmetric unit which presumably correspond to the dimeric species observed in solution. PMID:23143241

  20. Characterization of 40 full-length MHC class IIA functional alleles in miiuy croaker: Polymorphism and positive selection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tianjun; Liu, Jiang; Sun, Yueyan; Zhu, Zhihuang; Liu, Tianxing

    2016-02-01

    The major histocompatibility complex is a highly polymorphic gene superfamily in vertebrates that plays an important role in adaptive immune response. In the present study, we identified 40 full-length miiuy croaker MHC class IIA (Mimi-DAA) functional alleles from 26 miiuy croaker individuals and found that the alleles encode 30 amino acid sequences. A high level of polymorphism in Mimi-DAA was detected in miiuy croaker. The rate of non-synonymous substitutions (d(N)) occurred at a significantly higher frequency than that of synonymous substitutions (d(S)) in the peptide-binding region (PBR) and non-PBR. This result suggests that balancing selection maintains polymorphisms at the Mimi-DAA locus. Phylogenetic analysis based on the full-length sequences showed that the Mimi-DAA alleles clustered into three groups. However, the phylogenetic tree constructed using the exon 2 sequences indicated that the Mimi-DAA alleles clustered into two groups. A total of 22 positively selected sites were identified on the Mimi-DAA alleles after testing for positive selection, and five sites were predicted to be associated with the binding of peptide antigen, suggesting that a few selected residues may play a significant role in immune function.

  1. Bacterial Expression, Purification and In Vitro Phosphorylation of Full-Length Ribosomal S6 Kinase 2 (RSK2)

    PubMed Central

    Derewenda, Urszula; Artamonov, Mykhaylo V.; Somlyo, Avril V.; Derewenda, Zygmunt S.

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal S6 kinases (RSK) play important roles in cell signaling through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Each of the four RSK isoforms (RSK1-4) is a single polypeptide chain containing two kinase domains connected by a linker sequence with regulatory phosphorylation sites. Here, we demonstrate that full-length RSK2—which is implicated in several types of cancer, and which is linked to the genetic Coffin-Lowry syndrome—can be overexpressed with high yields in Escherichia coli as a fusion with maltose binding protein (MBP), and can be purified to homogeneity after proteolytic removal of MBP by affinity and size-exclusion chromatography. The purified protein can be fully activated in vitro by phosphorylation with protein kinases ERK2 and PDK1. Compared to full-length RSK2 purified from insect host cells, the bacterially expressed and phosphorylated murine RSK2 shows the same levels of catalytic activity after phosphorylation, and sensitivity to inhibition by RSK-specific inhibitor SL0101. Interestingly, we detect low levels of phosphorylation in the nascent RSK2 on Ser386, owing to autocatalysis by the C-terminal domain, independent of ERK. This observation has implications for in vivo signaling, as it suggests that full activation of RSK2 by PDK1 alone is possible, circumventing at least in some cases the requirement for ERK. PMID:27732676

  2. Full-length RecE enhances linear-linear homologous recombination and facilitates direct cloning for bioprospecting.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jun; Bian, Xiaoying; Hu, Shengbaio; Wang, Hailong; Huang, Fan; Seibert, Philipp M; Plaza, Alberto; Xia, Liqiu; Müller, Rolf; Stewart, A Francis; Zhang, Youming

    2012-05-01

    Functional analysis of genome sequences requires methods for cloning DNA of interest. However, existing methods, such as library cloning and screening, are too demanding or inefficient for high-throughput application to the wealth of genomic data being delivered by massively parallel sequencing. Here we describe direct DNA cloning based on the discovery that the full-length Rac prophage protein RecE and its partner RecT mediate highly efficient linear-linear homologous recombination mechanistically distinct from conventional recombineering mediated by Redαβ from lambda phage or truncated versions of RecET. We directly cloned all ten megasynthetase gene clusters (each 10–52 kb in length) from Photorhabdus luminescens into expression vectors and expressed two of them in a heterologous host to identify the metabolites luminmycin A and luminmide A/B. We also directly cloned cDNAs and exactly defined segments from bacterial artificial chromosomes. Direct cloning with full-length RecE expands the DNA engineering toolbox and will facilitate bioprospecting for natural products.

  3. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the full-length cystathionine β-synthase from Apis mellifera.

    PubMed

    Oyenarte, Iker; Majtan, Tomas; Ereño, June; Corral-Rodríguez, María Angeles; Klaudiny, Jaroslav; Majtan, Juraj; Kraus, Jan P; Martínez-Cruz, Luis Alfonso

    2012-11-01

    Cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) is a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the first step of the transsulfuration pathway, namely the condensation of serine with homocysteine to form cystathionine. Mutations in the CBS gene are the single most common cause of hereditary homocystinuria, a multisystemic disease affecting to various extents the vasculature, connective tissues and central nervous system. At present, the crystal structure of CBS from Drosophila melanogaster is the only available structure of the full-length enzyme. Here we describe a cloning, overexpression, purification and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a full-length CBS from Apis mellifera (AmCBS) which maintains 51 and 46% sequence identity with its Drosophila and human homologs, respectively. The AmCBS yielded crystals belonging to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a=85.90, b=95.87, c=180.33 Å. Diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 3.0 Å. The crystal structure contained two molecules in the asymmetric unit which presumably correspond to the dimeric species observed in solution.

  4. Identification of an IRF-1 splicing transcript in APL cells sharing similar transactivation activity of the full length one.

    PubMed

    Lou, Yejiang; Xia, Di; Yu, Mengxia; Tong, Jianhua; Jin, Jie

    2017-03-20

    Interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) is a member of the interferon regulatory factor family. It acts as a transcriptional activator and plays a critical role in antiviral defense, immune response, cell growth regulation, apoptosis and cell differentiation. Deletions, mutations or aberrant splicing of IRF-1 would result in its functional inactivation, and closely related to the tumorigenesis. In this work, we identified an IRF-1 splicing transcript (IRF-1-s) in all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-treated acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cell line NB4 cells. It lost the exon 8 and 9 of the full length IRF-1, expressed in numerous cell types and could be induced to expression by ATRA in NB4 cells. It turned out similar biological activity as full length IRF-1 to enhance the transcription of interferon stimulated response element (ISRE)-containing target genes. Identification of IRF-1-s in NB4 cells would be benefit for our further exploring the signaling pathway of ATRA and interferons, as well as the mechanisms of differentiation of APL cells.

  5. Analysis of the mouse gut microbiome using full-length 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jongoh; Lee, Sooin; Go, Min-Jeong; Lee, Sang Yup; Kim, Sun Chang; Lee, Chul-Ho; Cho, Byung-Kwan

    2016-01-01

    Demands for faster and more accurate methods to analyze microbial communities from natural and clinical samples have been increasing in the medical and healthcare industry. Recent advances in next-generation sequencing technologies have facilitated the elucidation of the microbial community composition with higher accuracy and greater throughput than was previously achievable; however, the short sequencing reads often limit the microbial composition analysis at the species level due to the high similarity of 16S rRNA amplicon sequences. To overcome this limitation, we used the nanopore sequencing platform to sequence full-length 16S rRNA amplicon libraries prepared from the mouse gut microbiota. A comparison of the nanopore and short-read sequencing data showed that there were no significant differences in major taxonomic units (89%) except one phylotype and three taxonomic units. Moreover, both sequencing data were highly similar at all taxonomic resolutions except the species level. At the species level, nanopore sequencing allowed identification of more species than short-read sequencing, facilitating the accurate classification of the bacterial community composition. Therefore, this method of full-length 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing will be useful for rapid, accurate and efficient detection of microbial diversity in various biological and clinical samples. PMID:27411898

  6. A comparison of the psychometric properties of the psychopathic personality inventory full-length and short-form versions.

    PubMed

    Kastner, Rebecca M; Sellbom, Martin; Lilienfeld, Scott O

    2012-03-01

    The Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI) has shown promising construct validity as a measure of psychopathy. Because of its relative efficiency, a short-form version of the PPI (PPI-SF) was developed and has proven useful in many psychopathy studies. The validity of the PPI-SF, however, has not been thoroughly examined, and no studies have directly compared the validity of the short form with that of the full-length version. The current study was designed to compare the psychometric properties of both PPI versions, with an emphasis on convergent and discriminant validity in predicting external criteria conceptually relevant to psychopathy. We used both prison (n = 558) and college samples (n = 322) for this investigation. PPI scale scores were more reliable and more strongly correlated with the conceptually relevant criterion measures compared with the PPI-SF, particularly in the prison sample. There were no differences in relative discriminant validity. Thus, overall, the PPI full-length version showed more evidence of construct validity than did the short form, and the consequences of this psychometric difference should be considered when evaluating the clinical utility of each measure.

  7. Construction and biological activity of a full-length molecular clone of human Torque teno virus (TTV) genotype 6.

    PubMed

    Kakkola, Laura; Tommiska, Johanna; Boele, Linda C L; Miettinen, Simo; Blom, Tea; Kekarainen, Tuija; Qiu, Jianming; Pintel, David; Hoeben, Rob C; Hedman, Klaus; Söderlund-Venermo, Maria

    2007-09-01

    Torque teno virus (TTV) is a non-enveloped human virus with a circular negative-sense (approximately 3800 nucleotides) ssDNA genome. TTV resembles in genome organization the chicken anemia virus, the animal pathogen of the Circoviridae family, and is currently classified as a member of a new, floating genus, Anellovirus. Molecular and cell biological research on TTV has been restricted by the lack of permissive cell lines and functional, replication-competent plasmid clones. In order to examine the key biological activities (i.e. RNA transcription and DNA replication) of this still poorly characterized ssDNA virus, we cloned the full-length genome of TTV genotype 6 and transfected it into cells of several types. TTV mRNA transcription was detected by RT-PCR in all the cell types: KU812Ep6, Cos-1, 293, 293T, Chang liver, Huh7 and UT7/Epo-S1. Replicating TTV DNA was detected in the latter five cell types by a DpnI-based restriction enzyme method coupled with Southern analysis, a novel approach to assess TTV DNA replication. The replicating full-length clone, the cell lines found to support TTV replication, and the methods presented here will facilitate the elucidation of the molecular biology and the life cycle of this recently identified human virus.

  8. An expanded taxonomy of hepatitis C virus genotype 6: Characterization of 22 new full-length viral genomes.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunhua; Barnes, Eleanor; Newton, Paul N; Fu, Yongshui; Vongsouvath, Manivanh; Klenerman, Paul; Okamoto, Hiroaki; Abe, Kenji; Pybus, Oliver G; Lu, Ling

    2015-02-01

    We characterized the full-length genomes of 22 hepatitis C virus genotype 6 (HCV-6) isolates: 10 from Vietnam (classified into subtypes 6e, 6h, 6p, 6r, 6s, and 6u), one from China (confirmed as a new subtype 6xd), and 11 from the Lao PDR (representing a new subtype 6xe plus eight novel variants). With these 22 new genomes, HCV-6 now has a diverse and extended taxonomic structure, comprised of 28 assigned subtypes (denoted 6a-6xe) and 27 unassigned lineages, all of which have been represented by full-length genomes. Our phylogenetic analyses also included many partially-sequenced novel variants of HCV-6 from Lao PDR. This revealed that Lao HCV isolates are genetically very diverse and are phylogenetically distributed in multiple lineages within genotype 6. Our results suggest that HCV-6 has been maintained in Laos, a landlocked country, since the common ancestor of genotype 6 and indicates historical dispersal of HCV-6 across Southeast Asia.

  9. Human anti-EGFL7 recombinant full-length antibodies selected from a mammalian cell-based antibody display library.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Liu, Yan-Hong; Li, Yan-Wen; Ju, Qian; Chen, Lin; Xie, Ping-Li; Li, Yue-Hui; Li, Guan-Cheng

    2012-06-01

    Epidermal growth factor-like domain 7 (EGFL7) has been implicated in promoting solid tumor growth and metastasis via stimulating tumor-associated angiogenesis. The advent of antibody display technology (phage, bacteria, and yeast) led to an enormous revival in the use of antibodies as diagnostic and therapeutic tools for fighting cancer. However, problems with protein folding, posttranslational modification, and codon usage still limit the number of improved antibodies that can be obtained. We describe here the isolation of an EGFL7-specific antibody from a mammalian cell-based full-length antibody display library generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. Using a novel vector, contained glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor and restriction enzyme sites NheI and ClaI, antibody libraries are displayed as whole IgG molecules on the cell surface and screened for specific antigen binding by a combination of magnetic beads and measured by cell ELISA. Anti-EGFL7 antibody was successfully isolated from the library. The mammalian cell-based full-length antibody display library is a great potential application for rapid identification and cloning of human mAbs of targeting hepatocellular carcinoma.

  10. Full-Length Fibronectin Drives Fibroblast Accumulation at the Surface of Collagen Microtissues during Cell-Induced Tissue Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Foolen, Jasper; Shiu, Jau-Ye; Mitsi, Maria; Zhang, Yang; Chen, Christopher S.; Vogel, Viola

    2016-01-01

    Generating and maintaining gradients of cell density and extracellular matrix (ECM) components is a prerequisite for the development of functionality of healthy tissue. Therefore, gaining insights into the drivers of spatial organization of cells and the role of ECM during tissue morphogenesis is vital. In a 3D model system of tissue morphogenesis, a fibronectin-FRET sensor recently revealed the existence of two separate fibronectin populations with different conformations in microtissues, i.e. ‘compact and adsorbed to collagen’ versus ‘extended and fibrillar’ fibronectin that does not colocalize with the collagen scaffold. Here we asked how the presence of fibronectin might drive this cell-induced tissue morphogenesis, more specifically the formation of gradients in cell density and ECM composition. Microtissues were engineered in a high-throughput model system containing rectangular microarrays of 12 posts, which constrained fibroblast-populated collagen gels, remodeled by the contractile cells into trampoline-shaped microtissues. Fibronectin’s contribution during the tissue maturation process was assessed using fibronectin-knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts (Fn-/- MEFs) and floxed equivalents (Fnf/f MEFs), in fibronectin-depleted growth medium with and without exogenously added plasma fibronectin (full-length, or various fragments). In the absence of full-length fibronectin, Fn-/- MEFs remained homogenously distributed throughout the cell-contracted collagen gels. In contrast, in the presence of full-length fibronectin, both cell types produced shell-like tissues with a predominantly cell-free compacted collagen core and a peripheral surface layer rich in cells. Single cell assays then revealed that Fn-/- MEFs applied lower total strain energy on nanopillar arrays coated with either fibronectin or vitronectin when compared to Fnf/f MEFs, but that the presence of exogenously added plasma fibronectin rescued their contractility. While collagen

  11. Contribution of intertwined loop to membrane association revealed by Zika virus full-length NS1 structure.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoying; Song, Hao; Qi, Jianxun; Liu, Yuqian; Wang, Haiyuan; Su, Chao; Shi, Yi; Gao, George F

    2016-10-17

    The association of Zika virus (ZIKV) infections with microcephaly and neurological diseases has highlighted an emerging public health concern. Here, we report the crystal structure of the full-length ZIKV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1), a major host-interaction molecule that functions in flaviviral replication, pathogenesis, and immune evasion. Of note, a long intertwined loop is observed in the wing domain of ZIKV NS1, and forms a hydrophobic "spike", which can contribute to cellular membrane association. For different flaviviruses, the amino acid sequences of the "spike" are variable but their common characteristic is either hydrophobic or positively charged, which is a beneficial feature for membrane binding. Comparative studies with West Nile and Dengue virus NS1 structures reveal conserved features, but diversified electrostatic characteristics on both inner and outer faces. Our results suggest different mechanisms of flavivirus pathogenesis and should be considered during the development of diagnostic tools.

  12. The Helios Prototype flying wing stretches almost the full length of the 300-foot-long hangar at NAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Helios Prototype flying wing stretches almost the full length of the 300-foot-long hangar at NASA's Dryden flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The 247-foot span solar-powered aircraft, resting on its ground maneuvering dolly, was on display for a visit of NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe and other NASA officials on January 31, 2002. The unique solar-electric flying wing reached an altitude of 96,863 feet during an almost 17-hour flight near Hawaii on August 13, 2001, a world record for sustained horizontal flight by a non-rocket powered aircraft. Developed by AeroVironment, Inc., under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project, the Helios Prototype is the forerunner of a planned fleet of slow-flying, long duration, high-altitude uninhabited aerial vehicles (UAV) which can serve as 'atmospheric satellites,' performing Earth science missions or functioning as telecommunications relay platforms in the stratosphere.

  13. Fluorescence anisotropy microplate assay to investigate the interaction of full-length steroid receptor coactivator-1a with steroid receptors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chen; Nordeen, Steven K.; Shapiro, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Estrogens, acting via estrogen receptor (ER) play key roles in growth, differentiation and gene regulation in the reproductive, central nervous and skeletal systems. ER-mediated gene transcription contributes to the development and spread of breast, uterine, and liver cancer. Steroid receptor coactivator-1a (SRC1a) belongs to the P160 family of coactivators, which is the best known of the many coactivators implicated in ER-mediated transactivation. Binding of full-length P160 coactivators to steroid receptors has been difficult to investigate in vitro. This chapter details how to investigate the interaction of SRC1a with ER using the fluorescence anisotropy/polarization microplate assay (FAMA). PMID:23436375

  14. Full-length protein extraction protocols and gel-based downstream applications in formalin-fixed tissue proteomics.

    PubMed

    Tanca, Alessandro; Uzzau, Sergio; Addis, Maria Filippa

    2015-01-01

    Archival formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue repositories and their associated clinical information can represent a valuable resource for tissue proteomics. In order to make these tissues available for protein biomarker discovery and validation studies, dedicated sample preparation procedures overcoming the intermolecular cross-links introduced by formalin need to be implemented. This chapter describes a full-length protein extraction protocol optimized for downstream gel-based proteomics applications. Using the procedures detailed here, SDS-PAGE, western immunoblotting, GeLC-MS/MS, 2D-PAGE, and 2D-DIGE can be carried out on FFPE tissues. Technical tips, critical aspects, and drawbacks of the method are presented and discussed.

  15. Full length nucleotide sequences of 30 common SLC44A2 alleles encoding human neutrophil antigen-3 (HNA-3)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qing; Srivastava, Kshitij; Ardinski, Stefanie C.; Lam, Kevin; Huvard, Michael J.; Schmid, Pirmin; Flegel, Willy A.

    2015-01-01

    Background HNA-3a alloantibodies can cause severe transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). The frequency of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) indicative of the two clinically relevant HNA-3a/b antigens are known in many populations. In the present study, we determined the full length nucleotide sequence of common SLC44A2 alleles encoding the choline transporter-like protein-2 (CTL2) that harbors HNA-3a/b antigens. Study design and methods A method was devised to determine the full length coding sequence and adjacent intron sequences from genomic DNA by 8 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplifications covering all 22 SLC44A2 exons. Samples from 200 African American, 96 Caucasian, 2 Hispanic and 4 Asian blood donors were analyzed. We developed a decision tree to determine alleles (confirmed haplotypes) from the genotype data. Results A total of 10 SNPs were detected in the SLC44A2 coding sequence. The non-coding sequences harbored an additional 28 SNPs (1 in the 5’-untranslated region (UTR); 23 in the introns; and 4 in the 3’-UTR). No SNP indicative of a non-functional allele was detected. The nucleotide sequences for 30 SLC44A2 alleles (haplotypes) were confirmed. There may be 66 haplotypes among the 604 chromosomes screened. Conclusions We found 38 SNPs, including 1 novel SNP, in 8192 nucleotides covering the coding sequence of the SLC44A2 gene among 302 blood donors. Population frequencies of these SNPs were established for African Americans and Caucasians. Because alleles encoding HNA-3b are more common than non-functional SLC44A2 alleles, we confirmed our previous postulate that African American donors are less likely to form HNA-3a antibodies compared to Caucasians. PMID:26437811

  16. Misassembly of full-length Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia 1 protein is linked to altered dopamine homeostasis and behavioral deficits

    PubMed Central

    Trossbach, S V; Bader, V; Hecher, L; Pum, M E; Masoud, S T; Prikulis, I; Schäble, S; de Souza Silva, M A; Su, P; Boulat, B; Chwiesko, C; Poschmann, G; Stühler, K; Lohr, K M; Stout, K A; Oskamp, A; Godsave, S F; Müller-Schiffmann, A; Bilzer, T; Steiner, H; Peters, P J; Bauer, A; Sauvage, M; Ramsey, A J; Miller, G W; Liu, F; Seeman, P; Brandon, N J; Huston, J P; Korth, C

    2016-01-01

    Disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) is a mental illness gene first identified in a Scottish pedigree. So far, DISC1-dependent phenotypes in animal models have been confined to expressing mutant DISC1. Here we investigated how pathology of full-length DISC1 protein could be a major mechanism in sporadic mental illness. We demonstrate that a novel transgenic rat model, modestly overexpressing the full-length DISC1 transgene, showed phenotypes consistent with a significant role of DISC1 misassembly in mental illness. The tgDISC1 rat displayed mainly perinuclear DISC1 aggregates in neurons. Furthermore, the tgDISC1 rat showed a robust signature of behavioral phenotypes that includes amphetamine supersensitivity, hyperexploratory behavior and rotarod deficits, all pointing to changes in dopamine (DA) neurotransmission. To understand the etiology of the behavioral deficits, we undertook a series of molecular studies in the dorsal striatum of tgDISC1 rats. We observed an 80% increase in high-affinity DA D2 receptors, an increased translocation of the dopamine transporter to the plasma membrane and a corresponding increase in DA inflow as observed by cyclic voltammetry. A reciprocal relationship between DISC1 protein assembly and DA homeostasis was corroborated by in vitro studies. Elevated cytosolic dopamine caused an increase in DISC1 multimerization, insolubility and complexing with the dopamine transporter, suggesting a physiological mechanism linking DISC1 assembly and dopamine homeostasis. DISC1 protein pathology and its interaction with dopamine homeostasis is a novel cellular mechanism that is relevant for behavioral control and may have a role in mental illness. PMID:26754951

  17. The feline oral microbiome: a provisional 16S rRNA gene based taxonomy with full-length reference sequences.

    PubMed

    Dewhirst, Floyd E; Klein, Erin A; Bennett, Marie-Louise; Croft, Julie M; Harris, Stephen J; Marshall-Jones, Zoe V

    2015-02-25

    The human oral microbiome is known to play a significant role in human health and disease. While less well studied, the feline oral microbiome is thought to play a similarly important role. To determine roles oral bacteria play in health and disease, one first has to be able to accurately identify bacterial species present. 16S rRNA gene sequence information is widely used for molecular identification of bacteria and is also useful for establishing the taxonomy of novel species. The objective of this research was to obtain full 16S rRNA gene reference sequences for feline oral bacteria, place the sequences in species-level phylotypes, and create a curated 16S rRNA based taxonomy for common feline oral bacteria. Clone libraries were produced using "universal" and phylum-selective PCR primers and DNA from pooled subgingival plaque from healthy and periodontally diseased cats. Bacteria in subgingival samples were also cultivated to obtain isolates. Full-length 16S rDNA sequences were determined for clones and isolates that represent 171 feline oral taxa. A provisional curated taxonomy was developed based on the position of each taxon in 16S rRNA phylogenetic trees. The feline oral microbiome curated taxonomy and 16S rRNA gene reference set will allow investigators to refer to precisely defined bacterial taxa. A provisional name such as "Propionibacterium sp. feline oral taxon FOT-327" is an anchor to which clone, strain or GenBank names or accession numbers can point. Future next-generation-sequencing studies of feline oral bacteria will be able to map reads to taxonomically curated full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences.

  18. A Novel mouse model of enhanced proteostasis: Full-length human heat shock factor 1 transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Anson; Wei, Rochelle; Halade, Dipti; Yoo, Si-Eun; Ran, Qitao; Richardson, Arlan

    2010-11-05

    Research highlights: {yields} Development of mouse overexpressing native human HSF1 in all tissues including CNS. {yields} HSF1 overexpression enhances heat shock response at whole-animal and cellular level. {yields} HSF1 overexpression protects from polyglutamine toxicity and favors aggresomes. {yields} HSF1 overexpression enhances proteostasis at the whole-animal and cellular level. -- Abstract: The heat shock response (HSR) is controlled by the master transcriptional regulator heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). HSF1 maintains proteostasis and resistance to stress through production of heat shock proteins (HSPs). No transgenic model exists that overexpresses HSF1 in tissues of the central nervous system (CNS). We generated a transgenic mouse overexpressing full-length non-mutant HSF1 and observed a 2-4-fold increase in HSF1 mRNA and protein expression in all tissues studied of HSF1 transgenic (HSF1{sup +/0}) mice compared to wild type (WT) littermates, including several regions of the CNS. Basal expression of HSP70 and 90 showed only mild tissue-specific changes; however, in response to forced exercise, the skeletal muscle HSR was more elevated in HSF1{sup +/0} mice compared to WT littermates and in fibroblasts following heat shock, as indicated by levels of inducible HSP70 mRNA and protein. HSF1{sup +/0} cells elicited a significantly more robust HSR in response to expression of the 82 repeat polyglutamine-YFP fusion construct (Q82YFP) and maintained proteasome-dependent processing of Q82YFP compared to WT fibroblasts. Overexpression of HSF1 was associated with fewer, but larger Q82YFP aggregates resembling aggresomes in HSF1{sup +/0} cells, and increased viability. Therefore, our data demonstrate that tissues and cells from mice overexpressing full-length non-mutant HSF1 exhibit enhanced proteostasis.

  19. Short-read assembly of full-length 16S amplicons reveals bacterial diversity in subsurface sediments.

    PubMed

    Miller, Christopher S; Handley, Kim M; Wrighton, Kelly C; Frischkorn, Kyle R; Thomas, Brian C; Banfield, Jillian F

    2013-01-01

    In microbial ecology, a fundamental question relates to how community diversity and composition change in response to perturbation. Most studies have had limited ability to deeply sample community structure (e.g. Sanger-sequenced 16S rRNA libraries), or have had limited taxonomic resolution (e.g. studies based on 16S rRNA hypervariable region sequencing). Here, we combine the higher taxonomic resolution of near-full-length 16S rRNA gene amplicons with the economics and sensitivity of short-read sequencing to assay the abundance and identity of organisms that represent as little as 0.01% of sediment bacterial communities. We used a new version of EMIRGE optimized for large data size to reconstruct near-full-length 16S rRNA genes from amplicons sheared and sequenced with Illumina technology. The approach allowed us to differentiate the community composition among samples acquired before perturbation, after acetate amendment shifted the predominant metabolism to iron reduction, and once sulfate reduction began. Results were highly reproducible across technical replicates, and identified specific taxa that responded to the perturbation. All samples contain very high alpha diversity and abundant organisms from phyla without cultivated representatives. Surprisingly, at the time points measured, there was no strong loss of evenness, despite the selective pressure of acetate amendment and change in the terminal electron accepting process. However, community membership was altered significantly. The method allows for sensitive, accurate profiling of the "long tail" of low abundance organisms that exist in many microbial communities, and can resolve population dynamics in response to environmental change.

  20. High-Throughput Plasmid cDNA Library Screening

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Kenneth H.; Yu, Charles; George, Reed A.; Carlson, JosephW.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Svirskas, Robert; Stapleton, Mark; Celniker, SusanE.

    2006-05-24

    Libraries of cDNA clones are valuable resources foranalysing the expression, structure, and regulation of genes, as well asfor studying protein functions and interactions. Full-length cDNA clonesprovide information about intron and exon structures, splice junctionsand 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions (UTRs). Open reading frames (ORFs)derived from cDNA clones can be used to generate constructs allowingexpression of native proteins and N- or C-terminally tagged proteins.Thus, obtaining full-length cDNA clones and sequences for most or allgenes in an organism is critical for understanding genome functions.Expressed sequence tag (EST) sequencing samples cDNA libraries at random,which is most useful at the beginning of large-scale screening projects.However, as projects progress towards completion, the probability ofidentifying unique cDNAs via EST sequencing diminishes, resulting in poorrecovery of rare transcripts. We describe an adapted, high-throughputprotocol intended for recovery of specific, full-length clones fromplasmid cDNA libraries in five days.

  1. Rapid hepatic clearance of full length CCN-2/CTGF: a putative role for LRP1-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Gerritsen, K G F; Bovenschen, N; Nguyen, T Q; Sprengers, D; Koeners, M P; van Koppen, A N; Joles, J A; Goldschmeding, R; Kok, R J

    2016-12-01

    CCN-2 (connective tissue growth factor; CTGF) is a key factor in fibrosis. Plasma CCN-2 has biomarker potential in numerous fibrotic disorders, but it is unknown which pathophysiological factors determine plasma CCN-2 levels. The proteolytic amino-terminal fragment of CCN-2 is primarily eliminated by the kidney. Here, we investigated elimination and distribution profiles of full length CCN-2 by intravenous administration of recombinant CCN-2 to rodents. After bolus injection in mice, we observed a large initial distribution volume (454 mL/kg) and a fast initial clearance (120 mL/kg/min). Immunosorbent assay and immunostaining showed that CCN-2 distributed mainly to the liver and was taken up by hepatocytes. Steady state clearance in rats, determined by continuous infusion of CCN-2, was fast (45 mL/kg/min). Renal CCN-2 clearance, determined by arterial and renal vein sampling, accounted for only 12 % of total clearance. Co-infusion of CCN-2 with receptor-associated protein (RAP), an antagonist of LDL-receptor family proteins, showed that RAP prolonged CCN-2 half-life and completely prevented CCN-2 internalization by hepatocytes. This suggests that hepatic uptake of CCN-2 is mediated by a RAP-sensitive mechanism most likely involving LRP1, a member of the LDL-receptor family involved in hepatic clearance of various plasma proteins. Surface plasmon resonance binding studies confirmed that CCN-2 is an LRP1 ligand. Co-infusion of CCN-2 with an excess of the heparan sulphate-binding protamine lowered the large initial distribution volume of CCN-2 by 88 % and reduced interstitial staining of CCN-2, suggesting binding of CCN-2 to heparan sulphate proteoglycans (HSPGs). Protamine did not affect clearance rate, indicating that RAP-sensitive clearance of CCN-2 is HSPG independent. In conclusion, unlike its amino-terminal fragment which is cleared by the kidney, full length CCN-2 is primarily eliminated by the liver via a fast RAP-sensitive, probably LRP1-dependent

  2. A Full-Length Plasmodium falciparum Recombinant Circumsporozoite Protein Expressed by Pseudomonas fluorescens Platform as a Malaria Vaccine Candidate

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangming; Coelho-dos-Reis, Jordana G. A.; Funakoshi, Ryota; Giardina, Steve; Jin, Hongfan; Retallack, Diane M.; Haverstock, Ryan; Allen, Jeffrey R.; Vedvick, Thomas S.; Fox, Christopher B.; Reed, Steven G.; Ayala, Ramses; Roberts, Brian; Winram, Scott B.; Sacci, John; Tsuji, Moriya; Zavala, Fidel; Gutierrez, Gabriel M.

    2014-01-01

    The circumsporozoite protein (CSP) of Plasmodium falciparum is a major surface protein, which forms a dense coat on the sporozoite's surface. Preclinical research on CSP and clinical evaluation of a CSP fragment-based RTS, S/AS01 vaccine have demonstrated a modest degree of protection against P. falciparum, mediated in part by humoral immunity and in part by cell-mediated immunity. Given the partial protective efficacy of the RTS, S/AS01 vaccine in a recent Phase 3 trial, further improvement of CSP-based vaccines is crucial. In this report, we describe the preclinical development of a full-length, recombinant CSP (rCSP)-based vaccine candidate against P. falciparum malaria suitable for current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) production. Utilizing a novel high-throughput Pseudomonas fluorescens expression platform, we demonstrated greater efficacy of full-length rCSP as compared to N-terminally truncated versions, rapidly down-selected a promising lead vaccine candidate, and developed a high-yield purification process to express immunologically active, intact antigen for clinical trial material production. The rCSP, when formulated with various adjuvants, induced antigen-specific antibody responses as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunofluorescence assay (IFA), as well as CD4+ T-cell responses as determined by ELISpot. The adjuvanted rCSP vaccine conferred protection in mice when challenged with transgenic P. berghei sporozoites containing the P. falciparum repeat region of CSP. Furthermore, heterologous prime/boost regimens with adjuvanted rCSP and an adenovirus type 35-vectored CSP (Ad35CS) showed modest improvements in eliciting CSP-specific T-cell responses and anti-malarial protection, depending on the order of vaccine delivery. Collectively, these data support the importance of further clinical development of adjuvanted rCSP, either as a stand-alone product or as one of the components in a heterologous prime/boost strategy

  3. Construction and manipulation of a full-length infectious bacterial artificial chromosome clone of equine herpesvirus type 3 (EHV-3).

    PubMed

    Akhmedzhanov, Maksat; Scrochi, Mariela; Barrandeguy, Maria; Vissani, Aldana; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Damiani, Armando Mario

    2017-01-15

    Equine herpesvirus type 3 (EHV-3) is the causal agent of equine coital exanthema, a disease characterized by pox-like lesions on the penis of stallions and the vulva of mares. Although the complete genomic sequence of EHV-3 has been recently made available, its genomic content remains poorly characterized and the molecular mechanisms of disease development not yet elucidated. In an attempt to facilitate genetic manipulation of EHV-3, we describe here the construction of a full-length infectious bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone of EHV-3. Mini-F vector sequences were inserted into the intergenic region between ORF19 and ORF20 (UL41 and UL40, respectively) of EHV-3 strain C175 by homologous recombination in equine dermal cells (NBL-6). DNA of the resulting recombinant virus was electroporated into E. coli and a full-length EHV-3 BAC clone was recovered. Virus reconstituted after transfection of the EHV-3 BAC into NBL-6 cells showed growth properties in vitro that were indistinguishable from those of the parental virus. To assess the feasibility of mutagenesis of the cloned EHV-3 genome, recombinant viruses targeting the glycoprotein E (gE) gene were generated using Red recombination in E. coli and in vitro growth properties of the recombinant viruses were evaluated. We first repaired the gE (ORF74) coding region, since the parental virus used for BAC cloning specifies a truncated version of the gene, and then created gE-tagged and gE-null versions of the virus. Our results demonstrated that: (i) EHV-3 can be efficiently cloned as a BAC allowing easy manipulation of its genome; (ii) gE is dispensable for EHV-3 growth in vitro and is expressed as a product of approximately 110-kDa in infected cells; (iii) viruses having a deletion compromising gE expression or with a truncation of the cytoplasmic and transmembrane domains are significantly compromised with regard cell-to-cell spread. The cloning of EHV-3 as a BAC simplifies future studies to identify the role

  4. Full-length model of the human galectin-4 and insights into dynamics of inter-domain communication.

    PubMed

    Rustiguel, Joane K; Soares, Ricardo O S; Meisburger, Steve P; Davis, Katherine M; Malzbender, Kristina L; Ando, Nozomi; Dias-Baruffi, Marcelo; Nonato, Maria Cristina

    2016-09-19

    Galectins are proteins involved in diverse cellular contexts due to their capacity to decipher and respond to the information encoded by β-galactoside sugars. In particular, human galectin-4, normally expressed in the healthy gastrointestinal tract, displays differential expression in cancerous tissues and is considered a potential drug target for liver and lung cancer. Galectin-4 is a tandem-repeat galectin characterized by two carbohydrate recognition domains connected by a linker-peptide. Despite their relevance to cell function and pathogenesis, structural characterization of full-length tandem-repeat galectins has remained elusive. Here, we investigate galectin-4 using X-ray crystallography, small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering, molecular modelling, molecular dynamics simulations, and differential scanning fluorimetry assays and describe for the first time a structural model for human galectin-4. Our results provide insight into the structural role of the linker-peptide and shed light on the dynamic characteristics of the mechanism of carbohydrate recognition among tandem-repeat galectins.

  5. Full length genome sequence of Tioman virus, a novel paramyxovirus in the genus Rubulavirus isolated from fruit bats in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Chua, K B; Wang, L-F; Lam, S K; Eaton, B T

    2002-07-01

    A novel paramyxovirus in the genus Rubulavirus, named Tioman virus (TiV), was isolated in 1999 from a number of pooled urine samples of Island Flying Foxes (Pteropus hypomelanus) during the search for the reservoir host of Nipah virus. TiV is antigenically related to Menangle virus (MenV) that was isolated in Australia in 1997 during disease outbreak in pigs. Sequence analysis of the full length genome indicated that TiV is a novel member of the genus Rubulavirus within the subfamily Paramyxovirinae, family Paramyxoviridae. However, there are several features of TiV which make it unique among known paramyxoviruses and rubulaviruses in particular: (1) TiV, like MenV, uses the nucleotide G as a transcriptional initiation site, rather than the A residue used by all other known paramyxoviruses; (2) TiV uses C as the +1 residue for all intergenic regions, a feature not seen for rubulaviruses but common for all other members within the subfamily Paramyxovirinae; (3) Although the attachment protein of TiV has structural features that are conserved in other rubulaviruses, it manifests no overall sequence homology with members of the genus, lacks the sialic acid-binding motif N-R-K-S-C-S and has only two out of the six highly conserved residues known to be important for the catalytic activity of neuraminidase.

  6. Two distinct trimeric conformations of natively membrane-anchored full-length herpes simplex virus 1 glycoprotein B

    PubMed Central

    Zeev-Ben-Mordehai, Tzviya; Vasishtan, Daven; Hernández Durán, Anna; Vollmer, Benjamin; White, Paul; Prasad Pandurangan, Arun; Siebert, C. Alistair; Topf, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Many viruses are enveloped by a lipid bilayer acquired during assembly, which is typically studded with one or two types of glycoproteins. These viral surface proteins act as the primary interface between the virus and the host. Entry of enveloped viruses relies on specialized fusogen proteins to help merge the virus membrane with the host membrane. In the multicomponent herpesvirus fusion machinery, glycoprotein B (gB) acts as this fusogen. Although the structure of the gB ectodomain postfusion conformation has been determined, any other conformations (e.g., prefusion, intermediate conformations) have so far remained elusive, thus restricting efforts to develop antiviral treatments and prophylactic vaccines. Here, we have characterized the full-length herpes simplex virus 1 gB in a native membrane by displaying it on cell-derived vesicles and using electron cryotomography. Alongside the known postfusion conformation, a novel one was identified. Its structure, in the context of the membrane, was determined by subvolume averaging and found to be trimeric like the postfusion conformation, but appeared more condensed. Hierarchical constrained density-fitting of domains unexpectedly revealed the fusion loops in this conformation to be apart and pointing away from the anchoring membrane. This vital observation is a substantial step forward in understanding the complex herpesvirus fusion mechanism, and opens up new opportunities for more targeted intervention of herpesvirus entry. PMID:27035968

  7. Endothelial progenitor cell-dependent angiogenesis requires localization of the full-length form of uPAR in caveolae.

    PubMed

    Margheri, Francesca; Chillà, Anastasia; Laurenzana, Anna; Serratì, Simona; Mazzanti, Benedetta; Saccardi, Riccardo; Santosuosso, Michela; Danza, Giovanna; Sturli, Niccolò; Rosati, Fabiana; Magnelli, Lucia; Papucci, Laura; Calorini, Lido; Bianchini, Francesca; Del Rosso, Mario; Fibbi, Gabriella

    2011-09-29

    Endothelial urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is thought to provide a regulatory mechanism in angiogenesis. Here we studied the proangiogenic role of uPAR in endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs), a cell population identified in human umbilical blood that embodies all of the properties of an endothelial progenitor cell matched with a high proliferative rate. By using caveolae-disrupting agents and by caveolin-1 silencing, we have shown that the angiogenic properties of ECFCs depend on caveolae integrity and on the presence of full-length uPAR in such specialized membrane invaginations. Inhibition of uPAR expression by antisense oligonucleotides promoted caveolae disruption, suggesting that uPAR is an inducer of caveolae organization. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) promoted accumulation of uPAR in ECFC caveolae in its undegraded form. We also demonstrated that VEGF-dependent ERK phosphorylation required integrity of caveolae as well as caveolar uPAR expression. VEGF activity depends on inhibition of ECFC MMP12 production, which results in impairment of MMP12-dependent uPAR truncation. Further, MMP12 overexpression in ECFC inhibited vascularization in vitro and in vivo. Our data suggest that intratumor homing of ECFCs suitably engineered to overexpress MMP12 could have the chance to control uPAR-dependent activities required for tumor angiogenesis and malignant cells spreading.

  8. Analysis of full-length genomes of porcine teschovirus (PTV) and the effect of purifying selection on phylogenetic trees.

    PubMed

    Villanova, Fabiola; Cui, Shangjin; Ai, Xia; Leal, Élcio

    2016-05-01

    To study the outcome of natural selection using phylogenetic trees, we analyzed full-length genome sequences of porcine teschovirus (PTV). PTV belongs to the family Picornaviridae and has a positive-stranded RNA genome, the replication of which is carried out by the error-prone viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. The viral RNA encodes a single polyprotein that is cleaved into structural (i.e., L, VP4, VP2, VP3 and VP1) and nonstructural proteins (i.e., 2A, 2B, 2C, 3A, 3B, and 3C). A high degree of genetic diversity was found based on the pairwise nucleotide distances and on the mean ratio of the number of nonsynonymous (dN) and synonymous (dS) substitutions (dN/dS) in the structural genes. Conversely, the diversity of the nonstructural genes was lower. The differences in genetic diversity between the structural and nonstructural genomic regions were likely due to strong purifying selection; consequently, the estimates of phylogenies were also discordant among these genes. In particular, maximum-likelihood and Bayesian methods generated short-branched trees when loci that are under strong purifying selection were used. These findings indicate that even in an RNA virus with an intrinsically high mutation rate, a strong purifying selection will curb genetic diversity and should be considered an important source of bias in future studies based on phylogenetic methods.

  9. Full-length VP2 gene analysis of canine parvovirus reveals emergence of newer variants in India.

    PubMed

    Nookala, Mangadevi; Mukhopadhyay, Hirak Kumar; Sivaprakasam, Amsaveni; Balasubramanian, Brindhalakshmi; Antony, Prabhakar Xavier; Thanislass, Jacob; Srinivas, Mouttou Vivek; Pillai, Raghavan Madhusoodanan

    2016-12-01

    The canine parvovirus (CPV) infection is a highly contagious and serious enteric disease of dogs with high fatality rate. The present study was taken up to characterize the full-length viral polypeptide 2 (VP2) gene of CPV of Indian origin along with the commercially available vaccines. The faecal samples from parvovirus suspected dogs were collected from various states of India for screening by PCR assay and 66.29% of samples were found positive. Six CPV-2a, three CPV-2b, and one CPV-2c types were identified by sequence analysis. Several unique and existing mutations have been noticed in CPV types analyzed indicating emergence of newer variants of CPV in India. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that all the field CPV types were grouped in different subclades within two main clades, but away from the commercial vaccine strains. CPV-2b and CPV-2c types with unique mutations were found to be establishing in India apart from the prevailing CPV-2a type. Mutations and the positive selection of the mutants were found to be the major mechanism of emergence and evolution of parvovirus. Therefore, the incorporation of local strain in the vaccine formulation may be considered for effective control of CPV infections in India.

  10. DPP4 truncated GM-CSF & IL-3 manifest distinct receptor binding & regulatory functions compared to their full length forms.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, H A; Capitano, M; Cooper, S; Mantel, C; Boswell, H S; Kapur, R; Ramdas, B; Chan, R; Deng, L; Qu, C-K; Broxmeyer, H E

    2017-03-27

    Dipeptidylpeptidase 4 (DPP4/CD26) enzymatically cleaves select penultimate amino acids of proteins, including colony stimulating factors (CSFs), and has been implicated in cellular regulation. To better understand the role of DPP4 regulation of hematopoiesis, we analyzed the activity of DPP4 on the surface of immature blood cells and then comparatively assessed the interactions and functional effects of full-length (FL) and DPP4 truncated factors [(T)-GM-CSF and- IL-3] on both in vitro and in vivo models of normal and leukemic cells. T-GM-CSF and T-IL-3 had enhanced receptor binding, but decreased CSF activity, compared to their FL forms. Importantly, T-GM-CSF and T-IL-3 significantly, and reciprocally, blunted receptor binding and myeloid progenitor cell proliferation activity of both FL-GM-CSF and FL-IL-3 in vitro and in vivo. Similar effects were apparent in vitro using cluster forming cells from patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) regardless of cytogenetic or molecular alterations and in vivo utilizing animal models of leukemia. This suggests that DPP4 T-molecules have modified binding and functions compared to their FL counterparts and may serve regulatory roles in normal and malignant hematopoiesis.Leukemia accepted article preview online, 27 March 2017. doi:10.1038/leu.2017.98.

  11. Full-length model of the human galectin-4 and insights into dynamics of inter-domain communication

    PubMed Central

    Rustiguel, Joane K.; Soares, Ricardo O. S.; Meisburger, Steve P.; Davis, Katherine M.; Malzbender, Kristina L.; Ando, Nozomi; Dias-Baruffi, Marcelo; Nonato, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Galectins are proteins involved in diverse cellular contexts due to their capacity to decipher and respond to the information encoded by β-galactoside sugars. In particular, human galectin-4, normally expressed in the healthy gastrointestinal tract, displays differential expression in cancerous tissues and is considered a potential drug target for liver and lung cancer. Galectin-4 is a tandem-repeat galectin characterized by two carbohydrate recognition domains connected by a linker-peptide. Despite their relevance to cell function and pathogenesis, structural characterization of full-length tandem-repeat galectins has remained elusive. Here, we investigate galectin-4 using X-ray crystallography, small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering, molecular modelling, molecular dynamics simulations, and differential scanning fluorimetry assays and describe for the first time a structural model for human galectin-4. Our results provide insight into the structural role of the linker-peptide and shed light on the dynamic characteristics of the mechanism of carbohydrate recognition among tandem-repeat galectins. PMID:27642006

  12. Cloning, high level expression, purification, and crystallization of the full length Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin type E light chain.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rakhi; Eswaramoorthy, Subramaniam; Kumaran, Desigan; Dunn, John J; Swaminathan, Subramanyam

    2004-03-01

    The catalytic activity of the highly potent botulinum neurotoxins are confined to their N-terminal light chains ( approximately 50kDa). A full-length light chain for the type E neurotoxin with a C-terminal 6x His-tag, BoNT/E-LC, has been cloned in a pET-9c vector and over-expressed in BL21 (DE3) cells. BoNT/E-LC was purified to homogeneity by affinity chromatography on Ni-NTA agarose followed by exclusion chromatography using a Superdex-75 sizing column. The purified protein has very good solubility and can be stored stably at -20 degrees C; however, it seems to undergo auto-proteolysis when stored at temperature #10878;4-10 degrees C. BoNT/E-LC is active on its natural substrate, the synaptosomal associated 25kDa protein, SNAP-25, indicating that it retains a native-like conformation and therefore can be considered as a useful tool in studying the structure/function of the catalytic light chain. Recombinant BoNT/E-LC has been crystallized under five different conditions and at various pHs. Crystals diffract to better than 2.1A.

  13. Genomic integration of the full-length dystrophin coding sequence in Duchenne muscular dystrophy induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Farruggio, Alfonso P; Bhakta, Mital S; du Bois, Haley; Ma, Julia; P Calos, Michele

    2017-04-01

    The plasmid vectors that express the full-length human dystrophin coding sequence in human cells was developed. Dystrophin, the protein mutated in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, is extraordinarily large, providing challenges for cloning and plasmid production in Escherichia coli. The authors expressed dystrophin from the strong, widely expressed CAG promoter, along with co-transcribed luciferase and mCherry marker genes useful for tracking plasmid expression. Introns were added at the 3' and 5' ends of the dystrophin sequence to prevent translation in E. coli, resulting in improved plasmid yield. Stability and yield were further improved by employing a lower-copy number plasmid origin of replication. The dystrophin plasmids also carried an attB site recognized by phage phiC31 integrase, enabling the plasmids to be integrated into the human genome at preferred locations by phiC31 integrase. The authors demonstrated single-copy integration of plasmid DNA into the genome and production of human dystrophin in the human 293 cell line, as well as in induced pluripotent stem cells derived from a patient with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Plasmid-mediated dystrophin expression was also demonstrated in mouse muscle. The dystrophin expression plasmids described here will be useful in cell and gene therapy studies aimed at ameliorating Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  14. Mapping of chimpanzee full-length cDNAs onto the human genome unveils large potential divergence of the transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Sakate, Ryuichi; Suto, Yumiko; Imanishi, Tadashi; Tanoue, Tetsuya; Hida, Munetomo; Hayasaka, Ikuo; Kusuda, Jun; Gojobori, Takashi; Hashimoto, Katsuyuki; Hirai, Momoki

    2007-09-01

    The genetic basis of the phenotypic difference between human and chimpanzee is one of the most actively pursued issues in current genomics. Although the genomic divergence between the two species has been described, the transcriptomic divergence has not been well documented. Thus, we newly sequenced and analyzed chimpanzee full-length cDNAs (FLcDNAs) representing 87 protein-coding genes. The number of nucleotide substitutions and sites of insertions/deletions (indels) was counted as a measure of sequence divergence between the chimpanzee FLcDNAs and the human genome onto which the FLcDNAs were mapped. Difference in transcription start/termination sites (TSSs/TTSs) and alternative splicing (AS) exons was also counted as a measure of structural divergence between the chimpanzee FLcDNAs and their orthologous human transcripts (NCBI RefSeq). As a result, we found that transposons (Alu) and repetitive segments caused large indels, which strikingly increased the average amount of sequence divergence up to more than 2% in the 3'-UTRs. Moreover, 20 out of the 87 transcripts contained more than 10% structural divergence in length. In particular, two-thirds of the structural divergence was found in the 3'-UTRs, and variable transcription start sites were conspicuous in the 5'-UTRs. As both transcriptional and translational efficiency were supposed to be related to 5'- and 3'-UTR sequences, these results lead to the idea that the difference in gene regulation can be a major cause of the difference in phenotype between human and chimpanzee.

  15. Full-length model of the human galectin-4 and insights into dynamics of inter-domain communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustiguel, Joane K.; Soares, Ricardo O. S.; Meisburger, Steve P.; Davis, Katherine M.; Malzbender, Kristina L.; Ando, Nozomi; Dias-Baruffi, Marcelo; Nonato, Maria Cristina

    2016-09-01

    Galectins are proteins involved in diverse cellular contexts due to their capacity to decipher and respond to the information encoded by β-galactoside sugars. In particular, human galectin-4, normally expressed in the healthy gastrointestinal tract, displays differential expression in cancerous tissues and is considered a potential drug target for liver and lung cancer. Galectin-4 is a tandem-repeat galectin characterized by two carbohydrate recognition domains connected by a linker-peptide. Despite their relevance to cell function and pathogenesis, structural characterization of full-length tandem-repeat galectins has remained elusive. Here, we investigate galectin-4 using X-ray crystallography, small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering, molecular modelling, molecular dynamics simulations, and differential scanning fluorimetry assays and describe for the first time a structural model for human galectin-4. Our results provide insight into the structural role of the linker-peptide and shed light on the dynamic characteristics of the mechanism of carbohydrate recognition among tandem-repeat galectins.

  16. Aminoglycosides restore full-length type VII collagen by overcoming premature termination codons: therapeutic implications for dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Cogan, Jon; Weinstein, Jacqueline; Wang, Xinyi; Hou, Yingping; Martin, Sabrina; South, Andrew P; Woodley, David T; Chen, Mei

    2014-10-01

    Patients with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) have severe, incurable skin fragility, blistering, and multiple skin wounds due to mutations in the gene encoding type VII collagen (C7), the major component of anchoring fibrils mediating epidermal-dermal adherence. Nearly 10-25% of RDEB patients carry nonsense mutations leading to premature stop codons (PTCs) that result in truncated C7. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of using aminoglycosides to suppress PTCs and induce C7 expression in two RDEB keratinocyte cell lines (Q251X/Q251X and R578X/R906) and two primary RDEB fibroblasts (R578X/R578X and R163X/R1683X). Incubation of these cells with aminoglycosides (geneticin, gentamicin, and paromomycin) resulted in the synthesis and secretion of a full-length C7 in a dose-dependent and sustained manner. Importantly, aminoglycoside-induced C7 reversed the abnormal RDEB cell phenotype and incorporated into the dermal-epidermal junction of skin equivalents. We further demonstrated the general utility of aminoglycoside-mediated readthrough in 293 cells transiently transfected with expression vectors encoding 22 different RDEB nonsense mutations. This is the first study demonstrating that aminoglycosides can induce PTC readthrough and restore functional C7 in RDEB caused by nonsense mutations. Therefore, aminoglycosides may have therapeutic potential for RDEB patients and other inherited skin diseases caused by nonsense mutations.

  17. Association of murine lupus and thymic full-length endogenous retroviral expression maps to a bone marrow stem cell

    SciTech Connect

    Krieg, A.M.; Gourley, M.F.; Steinberg, A.D. )

    1991-05-01

    Recent studies of thymic gene expression in murine lupus have demonstrated 8.4-kb (full-length size) modified polytropic (Mpmv) endogenous retroviral RNA. In contrast, normal control mouse strains do not produce detectable amounts of such RNA in their thymuses. Prior studies have attributed a defect in experimental tolerance in murine lupus to a bone marrow stem cell rather than to the thymic epithelium; in contrast, infectious retroviral expression has been associated with the thymic epithelium, rather than with the bone marrow stem cell. The present study was designed to determine whether the abnormal Mpmv expression associated with murine lupus mapped to thymic epithelium or to a marrow precursor. Lethally irradiated control and lupus-prone mice were reconstituted with T cell depleted bone marrow; one month later their thymuses were studied for endogenous retroviral RNA and protein expression. Recipients of bone marrow from nonautoimmune donors expressed neither 8.4-kb Mpmv RNA nor surface MCF gp70 in their thymuses. In contrast, recipients of bone marrow from autoimmune NZB or BXSB donors expressed thymic 8.4-kb Mpmv RNA and mink cell focus-forming gp70. These studies demonstrate that lupus-associated 8.4-kb Mpmv endogenous retroviral expression is determined by bone marrow stem cells.

  18. Full-length PGC-1α salvages the phenotype of a mouse model of human neuropathy through mitochondrial proliferation.

    PubMed

    Rona-Voros, Krisztina; Eschbach, Judith; Vernay, Aurélia; Wiesner, Diana; Schwalenstocker, Birgit; Geniquet, Pauline; Mousson De Camaret, Bénédicte; Echaniz-Laguna, Andoni; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe; Ludolph, Albert C; Weydt, Patrick; Dupuis, Luc

    2013-12-20

    Increased mitochondrial mass, commonly termed mitochondrial proliferation, is frequently observed in many human diseases directly or indirectly involving mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondrial proliferation is thought to counterbalance a compromised energy metabolism, yet it might also be detrimental through alterations of mitochondrial regulatory functions such as apoptosis, calcium metabolism or oxidative stress. Here, we show that prominent mitochondrial proliferation occurs in Cramping mice, a model of hereditary neuropathy caused by a mutation in the dynein heavy chain gene Dync1h1. The mitochondrial proliferation correlates with post-prandial induction of full-length (FL) and N-terminal truncated (NT) isoforms of the transcriptional co-activator PGC-1α. The selective knock-out of FL-PGC-1α isoform, preserving expression and function of NT-PGC-1α, led to a complete reversal of mitochondrial proliferation. Moreover, FL-PGC-1α ablation potently exacerbated the mitochondrial dysfunction and led to severe weight loss. Finally, FL-PGC-1α ablation triggered pronounced locomotor dysfunction, tremors and inability to rear in Cramping mice. In summary, endogenous FL-PGC-1α activates mitochondrial proliferation and salvages neurological and metabolic health upon disease. NT-PGC-1α cannot fulfil this protective action. Activation of this endogenous salvage pathway might thus be a valuable therapeutic target for diseases involving mitochondrial dysfunction.

  19. REAL-Select: full-length antibody display and library screening by surface capture on yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Rhiel, Laura; Krah, Simon; Günther, Ralf; Becker, Stefan; Kolmar, Harald; Hock, Björn

    2014-01-01

    We describe a novel approach named REAL-Select for the non-covalent display of IgG-molecules on the surface of yeast cells for the purpose of antibody engineering and selection. It relies on the capture of secreted native full-length antibodies on the cell surface via binding to an externally immobilized ZZ domain, which tightly binds antibody Fc. It is beneficial for high-throughput screening of yeast-displayed IgG-libraries during antibody discovery and development. In a model experiment, antibody-displaying yeast cells were isolated from a 1:1,000,000 mixture with control cells confirming the maintenance of genotype-phenotype linkage. Antibodies with improved binding characteristics were obtained by affinity maturation using REAL-Select, demonstrating the ability of this system to display antibodies in their native form and to detect subtle changes in affinity by flow cytometry. The biotinylation of the cell surface followed by functionalization with a streptavidin-ZZ fusion protein is an approach that is independent of the genetic background of the antibody-producing host and therefore can be expected to be compatible with other eukaryotic expression hosts such as P. pastoris or mammalian cells.

  20. Structure and Function of the First Full-Length Murein Peptide Ligase (Mpl) Cell Wall Recycling Protein

    PubMed Central

    Das, Debanu; Hervé, Mireille; Feuerhelm, Julie; Farr, Carol L.; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Elsliger, Marc-André; Knuth, Mark W.; Klock, Heath E.; Miller, Mitchell D.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Deacon, Ashley M.; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Wilson, Ian A.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial cell walls contain peptidoglycan, an essential polymer made by enzymes in the Mur pathway. These proteins are specific to bacteria, which make them targets for drug discovery. MurC, MurD, MurE and MurF catalyze the synthesis of the peptidoglycan precursor UDP-N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanyl-γ-D-glutamyl-meso-diaminopimelyl-D-alanyl-D-alanine by the sequential addition of amino acids onto UDP-N-acetylmuramic acid (UDP-MurNAc). MurC-F enzymes have been extensively studied by biochemistry and X-ray crystallography. In Gram-negative bacteria, ∼30–60% of the bacterial cell wall is recycled during each generation. Part of this recycling process involves the murein peptide ligase (Mpl), which attaches the breakdown product, the tripeptide L-alanyl-γ-D-glutamyl-meso-diaminopimelate, to UDP-MurNAc. We present the crystal structure at 1.65 Å resolution of a full-length Mpl from the permafrost bacterium Psychrobacter arcticus 273-4 (PaMpl). Although the Mpl structure has similarities to Mur enzymes, it has unique sequence and structure features that are likely related to its role in cell wall recycling, a function that differentiates it from the MurC-F enzymes. We have analyzed the sequence-structure relationships that are unique to Mpl proteins and compared them to MurC-F ligases. We have also characterized the biochemical properties of this enzyme (optimal temperature, pH and magnesium binding profiles and kinetic parameters). Although the structure does not contain any bound substrates, we have identified ∼30 residues that are likely to be important for recognition of the tripeptide and UDP-MurNAc substrates, as well as features that are unique to Psychrobacter Mpl proteins. These results provide the basis for future mutational studies for more extensive function characterization of the Mpl sequence-structure relationships. PMID:21445265

  1. A simple strategy for the purification of native recombinant full-length human RPL10 protein from inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Larissa M; Silva, Luana R; Alves, Joseane F; Marin, Nélida; Silva, Flavio Sousa; Morganti, Ligia; Silva, Ismael D C G; Affonso, Regina

    2014-09-01

    The L10 ribosomal protein (RPL10) plays a role in the binding of the 60 S and 40 S ribosomal subunits and in mRNA translation. The evidence indicates that RPL10 also has multiple extra-ribosomal functions, including tumor suppression. Recently, the presence of RPL10 in prostate and ovarian cancers was evaluated, and it was demonstrated to be associated with autistic disorders and premature ovarian failure. In the present work, we successfully cloned and expressed full-length human RPL10 (hRPL10) protein and isolated inclusion bodies containing this protein that had formed under mild growth conditions. The culture produced 376mg of hRPL10 protein per liter of induced bacterial culture, of which 102.4mg was present in the soluble fraction, and 25.6mg was recovered at approximately 94% purity. These results were obtained using a two-step process of non-denaturing protein extraction from pelleted inclusion bodies. We studied the characteristics of this protein using circular dichroism spectroscopy and by monitoring the changes induced by the presence or absence of zinc ions using fluorescence spectrometry. The results demonstrated that the protein obtained using these non-conventional methods retained its secondary and tertiary structure. The conformational changes induced by the incorporation of zinc suggested that this protein could interact with Jun or the SH3 domain of c-yes. The results suggested that the strategy used to obtain hRPL10 is simple and could be applied to obtaining other proteins that are susceptible to degradation.

  2. EAVK "segment c" sequence confers Ca(2+)-dependent changes to the kinetics of full length human Ano1.

    PubMed

    Strege, Peter R; Gibbons, Simon J; Mazzone, Amelia; Bernard, Cheryl E; Beyder, Arthur; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2017-03-23

    Anoctamin1 (Ano1, TMEM16A) is a calcium-activated chloride channel specifically expressed in interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract muscularis propria. Ano1 is necessary for normal electrical slow waves and ICC proliferation. The full length human Ano1 sequence includes an additional exon, exon "0," at the N-terminus. Ano1 with exon "0" (Ano1(0)) had a lower EC50 for intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) and faster chloride current (ICl) kinetics. The Ano1 alternative splice variant with segment "c" encoding exon 13 expresses on the first intracellular loop four additional amino acid residues, EAVK, which alter ICl at low [Ca(2+)]i Exon 13 is expressed in 75-100% of Ano1 transcripts in most human tissues but only 25% in human stomach. Our aim was to determine the effect of EAVK deletion on Ano1(0) ICl parameters. By voltage-clamp electrophysiology, we examined ICl in HEK293 cells transiently expressing Ano1(0) with or without the EAVK sequence (Ano1(0)ΔEAVK). The EC50 values of activating and deactivating ICl for [Ca(2+)]i was 438±7 and 493±9 nM for Ano1(0) but higher for Ano1(0)ΔEAVK at 746±47 and 761±26 nM, respectively. Meanwhile, the EC50 values for the ratio of instantaneous to steady-state ICl were not different between variants. Congruently, the time constant of activation was slower for Ano1(0)ΔEAVK than Ano1(0) currents at intermediate [Ca(2+)]i These results suggest that EAVK decreases the calcium sensitivity of Ano1(0) current activation and deactivation by slowing activation kinetics. Differential expression of EAVK in human stomach may function as a switch to increase sensitivity to [Ca(2+)]i via faster gating of Ano1.

  3. Comparison of Newly Assembled Full Length HIV-1 Integrase With Prototype Foamy Virus Integrase: Structure-Function Prospective

    PubMed Central

    Dayer, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background Drug design against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase through its mechanistic study is of great interest in the area in biological research. The main obstacle in this area is the absence of the full-length crystal structure for HIV-1 integrase to be used as a model. A complete structure, similar to HIV-1 of a prototype foamy virus integrase in complex with DNA, including all conservative residues, is available and has been extensively used in recent investigations. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine whether the above model is precisely representative of HIV-1 integrase. This would critically determine the success of any designed drug using the model in deactivation of integrase and AIDS treatment. Materials and Methods Primarily, a new structure for HIV-1 was constructed, using a crystal structure of prototype foamy virus as the starting structure. The constructed structure of HIV-1 integrase was simultaneously simulated with a prototype foamy virus integrase on a separate occasion. Results Our results indicate that the HIV-1 system behaves differently from the prototype foamy virus in terms of folding, hydration, hydrophobicity of binding site and stability. Conclusions Based on our findings, we can conclude that HIV-1 integrase is vastly different from the prototype foamy virus integrase and does not resemble it, and the modeling output of the prototype foamy virus simulations could not be simply generalized to HIV-1 integrase. Therefore, our HIV-1 model seems to be more representative and more useful for future research. PMID:27540450

  4. Computational Study on Full-length Human Ku70 with Double Stranded DNA: Dynamics, Interactions and Functional Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Shaowen; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2009-01-01

    The Ku70/80 heterodimer is the first repair protein in the initial binding of double-strand break (DSB) ends following DNA damage, and is a component of nonhomologous end joining repair, the primary pathway for DSB repair in mammalian cells. In this study we constructed a full-length human Ku70 structure based on its crystal structure, and performed 20 ns conventional molecular dynamic (CMD) simulations on this protein and several other complexes with short DNA duplexes of different sequences. The trajectories of these simulations indicated that, without the topological support of Ku80, the residues in the bridge and C-terminal arm of Ku70 are more flexible than other experimentally identified domains. We studied the two missing loops in the crystal structure and predicted that they are also very flexible. Simulations revealed that they make an important contribution to the Ku70 interaction with DNA. Dislocation of the previously studied SAP domain was observed in several systems, implying its role in DNA binding. Targeted molecular dynamic (TMD) simulation was also performed for one system with a far-away 14bp DNA duplex. The TMD trajectory and energetic analysis disclosed detailed interactions of the DNA-binding residues during the DNA dislocation, and revealed a possible conformational transition for a DSB end when encountering Ku70 in solution. Compared to experimentally based analysis, this study identified more detailed interactions between DNA and Ku70. Free energy analysis indicated Ku70 alone is able to bind DNA with relatively high affinity, with consistent contributions from various domains of Ku70 in different systems. The functional implications of these domains in the processes of Ku heterodimerization and DNA damage recognition and repair can be characterized in detail based upon this analysis.

  5. Glucocorticoid inhibition of growth in rats: partial reversal with the full-length ghrelin analog BIM-28125.

    PubMed

    Tulipano, Giovanni; Taylor, John E; Halem, Heather A; Datta, Rakesh; Dong, Jesse Z; Culler, Michael D; Bianchi, Irene; Cocchi, Daniela; Giustina, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are important immunosuppressive hormones; these steroids also inhibit somatic growth by decreased growth hormone (GH) secretion and induced protein catabolism. The ability of ghrelin, the endogenous ligand for the GHS-1a receptor, to increase body weight is attributed to a combination of enhanced food intake, increased gastric emptying and increased food assimilation, coupled with potent GH releasing activity. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the ability of a full-length, metabolically stabilized ghrelin agonist, BIM-28125, to reverse the dexamethasone-induced decrease of growth rate of prepubertal Sprague-Dawley male rats. Twenty-one days old rats were randomly assigned to two treatment groups. Beginning on day 23 of age, 16 animals were treated ip either with saline or DEX (40 microg/kg/day). On day 33 after birth, these two groups were further subdivided and treated sc with either vehicle or BIM-28125 (80 nmol/kg, t.i.d.). On day 47 after birth, rats were killed and trunk blood was collected for hormone determinations. DEX significantly reduced final body weight and nose-anal length; BIM-28125 increased linear growth in saline-treated rats and reversed growth inhibition in DEX-treated rats. The inhibitory effects of DEX on somatic growth was paralleled by decreased 24 h food intake (FI), decreased food efficiency (FE) and lower plasma IGF-1 levels versus vehicle-treated rats. BIM-28125 induced an increase of FI, FE and plasma IGF-1 in saline-treated rats, and reversed the inhibitory effects of DEX. These preclinical results leads to the conclusion that BIM-28125 may represent a good tool to reverse the catabolic effects induced by glucocorticoids.

  6. Aph-1 associates directly with full-length and C-terminal fragments of gamma-secretase substrates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Allen C; Guo, Lucie Y; Ostaszewski, Beth L; Selkoe, Dennis J; LaVoie, Matthew J

    2010-04-09

    Gamma-secretase is a ubiquitous, multiprotein enzyme composed of presenilin, nicastrin, Aph-1, and Pen-2. It mediates the intramembrane proteolysis of many type 1 proteins, plays an essential role in numerous signaling pathways, and helps drive the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease by excising the hydrophobic, aggregation-prone amyloid beta-peptide from the beta-amyloid precursor protein. A central unresolved question is how its many substrates bind and enter the gamma-secretase complex. Here, we provide evidence that both the beta-amyloid precursor protein holoprotein and its C-terminal fragments, the immediate substrates of gamma-secretase, can associate with Aph-1 at overexpressed as well as endogenous protein levels. This association was observed using bi-directional co-immunoprecipitation in multiple systems and detergent conditions, and an beta-amyloid precursor protein-Aph-1 complex was specifically isolated following in situ cross-linking in living cells. In addition, another endogenous canonical gamma-substrate, Jagged, showed association of both its full-length and C-terminal fragment forms with Aph-1. We were also able to demonstrate that this interaction with substrates was conserved across the multiple isoforms of Aph-1 (beta, alphaS, and alphaL), as they were all able to bind beta-amyloid precursor protein with similar affinity. Finally, two highly conserved intramembrane histidines (His-171 and His-197) within Aph-1, which were recently shown to be important for gamma-secretase activity, are required for efficient binding of substrates. Taken together, our data suggest a dominant role for Aph-1 in interacting with gamma-secretase substrates prior to their processing by the proteolytic complex.

  7. Innocuous full-length botulinum neurotoxin targets and promotes the expression of lentiviral vectors in central and autonomic neurons.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, V B; Ovsepian, S V; Raghunath, A; Huo, Q; Lawrence, G W; Smith, L; Dolly, J O

    2011-07-01

    Fragments of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) have been explored as potential targeting moieties and carriers of biomolecules into neurons, although with lower binding and translocation efficiency compared with intact proteins. This study exploits a detoxified recombinant form of full-length BoNT/B (BoTIM/B) fused with core streptavidin (CS-BoTIM/B) for lentiviral targeting to central and autonomic neurons. CS-BoTIM/B underwent an activity-dependent entry into cultured spinal cord neurons. Coupling CS-BoTIM/B to biotinylated lentivirus-encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) endowed considerable neuron selectivity to the vector as evident from the preferential expression of the reporter in neurons co-cultured with skeletal muscle cells. CS-BoTIM/B-guided lentiviral transduction with the expression of a SNARE protein, SNAP-25 (S25), rendered non-susceptible to proteolysis by three BoNT serotypes, yielded a sizable decrease in cleaved S25 upon exposure of spinal cord neurons to these toxins. This was accompanied by synaptic transmission being spared from blockade by BoNT/A or BoNT/E, reflecting adequate translation and functional competence of recombinant multi-toxin-resistant S25. The augmented neurotropism conveyed on the lentivirus by CS-BoTIM/B was also demonstrated in vivo through enhanced expression of a reporter in intramural ganglionic neurons in the rat trachea, after injection of the targeted GFP-encoding lentivirus. Thus, a novel and realistic prospect for gene therapy of peripheral neuropathies is offered in this study through lentiviral targeting to neurons by CS-BoTIM/B.

  8. An Adenoviral Vaccine Encoding Full-Length Inactivated Human HER2 Exhibits Potent Immunogenicty and Enhanced Therapeutic Efficacy Without Oncogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Zachary; Wei, Junping; Osada, Takuya; Glass, Oliver; Lei, Gangjun; Yang, Xiao-Yi; Peplinski, Sharon; Kim, Dong-Wan; Xia, Wenle; Spector, Neil; Marks, Jeffrey; Barry, William; Hobeika, Amy; Devi, Gayathri; Amalfitano, Andrea; Morse, Michael A.; Lyerly, H. Kim; Clay, Timothy M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Overexpression of the breast cancer oncogene HER2 correlates with poor survival. Current HER2-directed therapies confer limited clinical benefits and most patients experience progressive disease. Because refractory tumors remain strongly HER2+, vaccine approaches targeting HER2 have therapeutic potential, but wild type (wt) HER2 cannot safely be delivered in imunogenic viral vectors because it is a potent oncogene. We designed and tested several HER2 vaccines devoid of oncogenic activity to develop a safe vaccine for clinical use. Experimental Design We created recombinant adenoviral vectors expressing the extracellular domain of HER2 (Ad-HER2-ECD), ECD plus the transmembrane domain (Ad-HER2-ECD-TM) and full length HER2 inactivated for kinase function (Ad-HER2-ki) and determined their immunogenicity and anti-tumor effect in wild type (WT) and HER2 tolerant mice. To assess their safety, we compared their effect on the cellular transcriptome, cell proliferation, anchorage-dependent growth, and transformation potential in vivo. Results Ad-HER2-ki was the most immunogenic vector in WT animals, retained immunogenicity in HER2-transgenic tolerant animals, and showed strong therapeutic efficacy in treatment models. Despite being highly expressed, HER2-ki protein was not phosphorylated and did not produce an oncogenic gene signature in primary human cells. And, in contrast to HER2-wt, cells overexpressing HER2-ki were less proliferative, displayed less anchorage independent growth and were not transformed in vivo. Conclusions Vaccination with mutationally inactivated, non-oncogenic Ad-HER2-ki results in robust polyclonal immune responses to HER2 in tolerant models, which translates into strong and effective anti-tumor responses in vivo. Ad-HER2-ki is thus a safe and promising vaccine for evaluation in clinical trials. PMID:20179231

  9. Full-length genomic analysis of porcine rotavirus strains isolated from pigs with diarrhea in Northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Monini, Marina; Zaccaria, Guendalina; Ianiro, Giovanni; Lavazza, Antonio; Vaccari, Gabriele; Ruggeri, Franco M

    2014-07-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVA) cause acute dehydrating diarrhea in young of man and many animal species, including pigs. Swine RVA has an important economic impact on the farming industry, and pigs represent a potential reservoir for zoonotic transmission of RVA to humans. To investigate the genetic diversity of porcine RVA strains in Italy and identify their possible zoonotic characteristics, 25 RVA-positive feces were collected from diarrheic pigs in Northern Italy, in 2009-2010; all viral strains were characterized by G and P genotyping RT-PCR. Three samples were selected for full genome sequencing. Sequencing of the NSP3 genes of all samples was also performed. Rotavirus diagnosis was carried out by ELISA and electron microscopy. RT-PCR and Sanger sequencing were performed in a one-tube format, using primer sets specific for each of the 11 genome segments. Analysis of the G (VP7) and P (VP4) genotypes showed that all strains identified were typical porcine RVAs (G4, G5, G9; P[6], P[13], P[23]). Full-length genome sequencing was performed on selected G9 isolates. Most segments belonged to the genotype constellation 1 (Wa-like), which is shared by most human RVA strains, but gene types such as I5 (VP6) and A8 (NSP1), which are typical of porcine and rare among human RVAs, were also detected. We identified RVA strains showing the T7 genotype, an NSP3 gene type that was previously reported in unusual strains of possible porcine or bovine origin from children with diarrhea. Recent reports suggested that G9 RVA may have been introduced from swine to human populations involving gene reassortment events. The observation that some of the RVA genotypes from swine in Italy were similar to viruses characterized in children underlines the importance of animal RVA surveillance, to clarify and monitor the role of animals as genetic reservoirs of emerging RVA strains pathogenic for humans.

  10. The Photoinitiated Reaction Pathway of Full-length Cyanobacteriochrome Tlr0924 Monitored Over 12 Orders of Magnitude*

    PubMed Central

    Hauck, Anna F. E.; Hardman, Samantha J. O.; Kutta, Roger J.; Greetham, Gregory M.; Heyes, Derren J.; Scrutton, Nigel S.

    2014-01-01

    The coupling of photochemistry to protein chemical and structural change is crucial to biological light-activated signaling mechanisms. This is typified by cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs), members of the phytochrome superfamily of photoreceptors that exhibit a high degree of spectral diversity, collectively spanning the entire visible spectrum. CBCRs utilize a basic E/Z isomerization of the bilin chromophore as the primary step in their photocycle, which consists of reversible photoconversion between two photostates. Despite intense interest in these photoreceptors as signal transduction modules a complete description of light-activated chemical and structural changes has not been reported. The CBCR Tlr0924 contains both phycocyanobilin and phycoviolobilin chromophores, and these two species photoisomerize in parallel via spectrally and kinetically equivalent intermediates before the second step of the photoreaction where the reaction pathways diverge, the loss of a thioether linkage to a conserved cysteine residue occurs, and the phycocyanobilin reaction terminates in a red-absorbing state, whereas the phycoviolobilin reaction proceeds more rapidly to a final green-absorbing state. Here time-resolved visible transient absorption spectroscopy (femtosecond to second) has been used, in conjunction with time-resolved IR spectroscopy (femtosecond to nanosecond) and cryotrapping techniques, to follow the entire photoconversion of the blue-absorbing states to the green- and red-absorbing states of the full-length form of Tlr0924 CBCR. Our analysis shows that Tlr0924 undergoes an unprecedented long photoreaction that spans from picoseconds to seconds. We show that the thermally driven, long timescale changes are less complex than those reported for the red/far-red photocycles of the related phytochrome photoreceptors. PMID:24817121

  11. Rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE).

    PubMed

    Yeku, Oladapo; Frohman, Michael A

    2011-01-01

    Rapid Amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) provides an inexpensive and powerful tool to quickly obtain full-length cDNA when the sequence is only partially known. Starting with an mRNA mixture, gene-specific primers generated from the known regions of the gene and non-specific anchors, full-length sequences can be identified in as little as 3 days. RACE can also be used to identify alternative transcripts of a gene when the partial or complete sequence of only one transcript is known. In the following sections, we outline details for rapid amplification of 5(') and 3(') cDNA ends using the "new RACE" technique.

  12. Sequence Based Structural Characterization and Genetic Diversity Analysis of Full Length TLR4 CDS in Crossbred and Indigenous Cattle.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Chinmoy; Kumar, Subodh; Sonwane, Arvind Asaram; Yathish, H M; Chaudhary, Rajni

    2017-01-02

    The exploration of candidate genes for immune response in cattle may be vital for improving our understanding regarding the species specific response to pathogens. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is mostly involved in protection against the deleterious effects of Gram negative pathogens. Approximately 2.6 kb long cDNA sequence of TLR4 gene covering the entire coding region was characterized in two Indian milk cattle (Vrindavani and Tharparkar). The phylogenetic analysis confirmed that the bovine TLR4 was apparently evolved from an ancestral form that predated the appearance of vertebrates, and it is grouped with buffalo, yak, and mithun TLR4s. Sequence analysis revealed a 2526-nucleotide long open reading frame (ORF) encoding 841 amino acids, similar to other cattle breeds. The calculated molecular weight of the translated ORF was 96144 and 96040.9 Da; the isoelectric point was 6.35 and 6.42 in Vrindavani and Tharparkar cattle, respectively. The Simple Modular Architecture Research Tool (SMART) analysis identified 14 leucine rich repeats (LRR) motifs in bovine TLR4 protein. The deduced TLR4 amino acid sequence of Tharparkar had 4 different substitutions as compared to Bos taurus, Sahiwal, and Vrindavani. The signal peptide cleavage site predicted to lie between 16th and 17th amino acid of mature peptide. The transmebrane helix was identified between 635-657 amino acids in the mature peptide.

  13. A full-length infectious clone of beet soil-borne virus indicates the dispensability of the RNA-2 for virus survival in planta and symptom expression on Chenopodium quinoa leaves.

    PubMed

    Crutzen, François; Mehrvar, Mohsen; Gilmer, David; Bragard, Claude

    2009-12-01

    For a better understanding of the functionality and pathogenicity of beet soil-borne virus (BSBV), full-length cDNA clones have been constructed for the three genomic RNAs. With the aim of assessing their effectiveness and relative contribution to the virus housekeeping functions, transcripts were inoculated on Chenopodium quinoa and Beta macrocarpa leaves using five genome combinations. Both RNAs-1 (putative replicase) and -3 (putative movement proteins) proved to be essential for virus replication in planta and symptom production on C. quinoa, whereas RNA-2 (putative coat protein, CP, and a read-through domain, RT) was not. No symptoms were recorded on B. macrocarpa, but viral RNAs were detected. In both host plants, the 19 kDa CP was detected by Western blotting as well as a 115 kDa protein corresponding to the CP-RT.

  14. Potency of Full- Length MGF to Induce Maximal Activation of the IGF-I R Is Similar to Recombinant Human IGF-I at High Equimolar Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Joseph A. M. J. L.; Hofland, Leo J.; Strasburger, Christian J.; van den Dungen, Elisabeth S. R.; Thevis, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Aims To compare full-length mechano growth factor (full-length MGF) with human recombinant insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and human recombinant insulin (HI) in their ability to activate the human IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR), the human insulin receptor (IR-A) and the human insulin receptor-B (IR-B), respectively. In addition, we tested the stimulatory activity of human MGF and its stabilized analog Goldspink-MGF on the IGF-IR. Methods The effects of full-length MGF, IGF-I, human mechano growth factor (MGF), Goldspink-MGF and HI were compared using kinase specific receptor activation (KIRA) bioassays specific for IGF-I, IR-A or IR-B, respectively. These assays quantify activity by measuring auto-phosphorylation of the receptor upon ligand binding. Results IGF-IR: At high equimolar concentrations maximal IGF-IR stimulating effects generated by full-length MGF were similar to that of IGF-I (89-fold vs. 77-fold, respectively). However, EC50 values of IGF-I and full-length MGF for the IGF-I receptor were 0.86 nmol/L (95% CI 0.69–1.07) and 7.83 nmol/L (95% CI: 4.87–12.58), respectively. No IGF-IR activation was observed by human MGF and Goldspink-MGF, respectively. IR-A/IR-B: At high equimolar concentrations similar maximal IR-A stimulating effects were observed for full -length MGF and HI, but maximal IR-B stimulation achieved by full -length MGF was stronger than that by HI (292-fold vs. 98-fold). EC50 values of HI and full-length MGF for the IR-A were 1.13 nmol/L (95% CI 0.69–1.84) and 73.11 nmol/L (42.87–124.69), respectively; for IR-B these values were 1.28 nmol/L (95% CI 0.64–2.57) and 35.10 nmol/L (95% 17.52–70.33), respectively. Conclusions Full-length MGF directly stimulates the IGF-IR. Despite a higher EC50 concentration, at high equimolar concentrations full-length MGF showed a similar maximal potency to activate the IGF-IR as compared to IGF-I. Further research is needed to understand the actions of full-length MGF in vivo and to define the

  15. [cDNA library construction from panicle meristem of finger millet].

    PubMed

    Radchuk, V; Pirko, Ia V; Isaenkov, S V; Emets, A I; Blium, Ia B

    2014-01-01

    The protocol for production of full-size cDNA using SuperScript Full-Length cDNA Library Construction Kit II (Invitrogen) was tested and high quality cDNA library from meristematic tissue of finger millet panicle (Eleusine coracana (L.) Gaertn) was created. The titer of obtained cDNA library comprised 3.01 x 10(5) CFU/ml in avarage. In average the length of cDNA insertion consisted about 1070 base pairs, the effectivity of cDNA fragment insertions--99.5%. The selective sequencing of cDNA clones from created library was performed. The sequences of cDNA clones were identified with usage of BLAST-search. The results of cDNA library analysis and selective sequencing represents prove good functionality and full length character of inserted cDNA clones. Obtained cDNA library from meristematic tissue of finger millet panicle represents good and valuable source for isolation and identification of key genes regulating metabolism and meristematic development and for mining of new molecular markers to conduct out high quality genetic investigations and molecular breeding as well.

  16. Particle infectivity of HIV-1 full-length genome infectious molecular clones in a subtype C heterosexual transmission pair following high fidelity amplification and unbiased cloning

    SciTech Connect

    Deymier, Martin J.; Claiborne, Daniel T.; Ende, Zachary; Ratner, Hannah K.; Kilembe, William; Hunter, Eric

    2014-11-15

    The high genetic diversity of HIV-1 impedes high throughput, large-scale sequencing and full-length genome cloning by common restriction enzyme based methods. Applying novel methods that employ a high-fidelity polymerase for amplification and an unbiased fusion-based cloning strategy, we have generated several HIV-1 full-length genome infectious molecular clones from an epidemiologically linked transmission pair. These clones represent the transmitted/founder virus and phylogenetically diverse non-transmitted variants from the chronically infected individual's diverse quasispecies near the time of transmission. We demonstrate that, using this approach, PCR-induced mutations in full-length clones derived from their cognate single genome amplicons are rare. Furthermore, all eight non-transmitted genomes tested produced functional virus with a range of infectivities, belying the previous assumption that a majority of circulating viruses in chronic HIV-1 infection are defective. Thus, these methods provide important tools to update protocols in molecular biology that can be universally applied to the study of human viral pathogens. - Highlights: • Our novel methodology demonstrates accurate amplification and cloning of full-length HIV-1 genomes. • A majority of plasma derived HIV variants from a chronically infected individual are infectious. • The transmitted/founder was more infectious than the majority of the variants from the chronically infected donor.

  17. Full-length coding sequence for 12 bovine viral diarrhea virus isolates from persistently infected cattle in a feedyard in Kansas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report here the full-length coding sequence of 12 bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) isolates from persistently infected cattle from a feedyard in southwest Kansas, USA. These 12 genomes represent the three major genotypes (BVDV 1a, 1b, and 2a) of BVDV currently circulating in the United States....

  18. Studies of nontarget-mediated distribution of human full-length IgG1 antibody and its FAb fragment in cardiovascular and metabolic-related tissues.

    PubMed

    Davidsson, Pia; Söderling, Ann-Sofi; Svensson, Lena; Ahnmark, Andrea; Flodin, Christine; Wanag, Ewa; Screpanti-Sundqvist, Valentina; Gennemark, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Tissue distribution and pharmacokinetics (PK) of full-length nontargeted antibody and its antigen-binding fragment (FAb) were evaluated for a range of tissues primarily of interest for cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Mice were intravenously injected with a dose of 10 mg/kg of either human IgG1or its FAb fragment; perfused tissues were collected at a range of time points over 3 weeks for the human IgG1 antibody and 1 week for the human FAb antibody. Tissues were homogenized and antibody concentrations were measured by specific immunoassays on the Gyros system. Exposure in terms of maximum concentration (Cmax ) and area under the curve was assessed for all nine tissues. Tissue exposure of full-length antibody relative to plasma exposure was found to be between 1% and 10%, except for brain (0.2%). Relative concentrations of FAb antibody were the same, except for kidney tissue, where the antibody concentration was found to be ten times higher than in plasma. However, the absolute tissue uptake of full-length IgG was significantly higher than the absolute tissue uptake of the FAb antibody. This study provides a reference PK state for full-length whole and FAb antibodies in tissues related to cardiovascular and metabolic diseases that do not include antigen or antibody binding.

  19. Integration of the full-length HPV16 genome in cervical cancer and Caski and Siha cell lines and the possible ways of HPV integration.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Cao, Meng; Shi, Qinfeng; Chen, Hongwei; Wang, Yili; Li, Xu

    2015-04-01

    Integration of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) into the host genome is a key event for cervical carcinogenesis. Different methods have been used to explore the physical states of the HPV genome to reveal the mechanisms for malignant transformation of the infected cells. Consensus has been reached that, although variable portions of the HPV genome are deleted in the integrated HPV sequences, common disruption of the viral E2 gene has been demonstrated in different studies. The head-to-tail concatemers of the full-length HPV16 genome is another typical integration pattern of HPV16, typically found in Caski cell lines, but its prevalence in cervical cancer has never been tested. Here, by introducing a modified PCR, we identified this head-to-tail concatemers of full-length HPV genomes in advanced cervical cancer with HPV16 single positive. Our results show that more than half of the cases contain this integrated head-to-tail concatemers of full-length HPV16 genomes. Further studies in two cervical cell lines, Caski cells and Siha cells, revealed a correlation between the prevalence of the spliced variants of integrated HPV16 sequences and the full-length transcription of the integrated head-to-tail concatemers of the full-length HPV16 genome. Based on these results, we propose that HPV16 integrated into host cells by two mechanisms: one mechanism is shared by other DNA virus and cause integration of the head-to-tail concatemers of the viral genome; another is related to the reverse transcription process, which the integrated HPV sequence is generated by the reverse transcription of the viral mRNA.

  20. Pharmacological efficacy of anti-IL-1β scFv, Fab and full-length antibodies in treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jianying; Ye, Xianlong; Ren, Guiping; Kan, Fangming; Zhang, Yu; Guo, Mo; Zhang, Zhiyi; Li, Deshan

    2014-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease that mainly causes the synovial joint inflammation and cartilage destruction. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is an important proinflammatory cytokine involved in the pathogenesis of RA. In this study, we constructed and expressed anti-IL-1β-full-length antibody in CHO-K1-SV, anti-IL-1β-Fab and anti-IL-1β-scFv in Rosetta. We compared the therapeutic efficacy of three anti-IL-1β antibodies for CIA mice. Mice with CIA were subcutaneously injected with humanized anti-IL-1β-scFv, anti-IL-1β-Fab or anti-IL-1β-full-length antibody. The effects of treatment were determined by arthritis severity score, autoreactive humoral, cellular immune responses, histological lesion and cytokines production. Compared with anti-IL-1β-scFv treatments, anti-IL-1β-Fab and anti-IL-1β-full-length antibody therapy resulted in more significant effect in alleviating the severity of arthritis by preventing bone damage and cartilage destruction, reducing humoral and cellular immune responses, and down-regulating the expression of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-2, IFN-γ, TNF-α and MMP-3 in inflammatory tissue. The therapeutic effects of anti-IL-1β-Fab and anti-IL-1β-full-length antibodies on CIA mice had no significant difference. However, production of anti-IL-1β-full-length antibody in eukaryotic system is, in general, time-consuming and more expensive than that of anti-IL-1β-Fab in prokaryotic systems. In conclusion, as a small molecule antibody, anti-IL-1β-Fab is an ideal candidate for RA therapy.

  1. The Impact of Full-Length, Trimeric and Globular Adiponectin on Lipolysis in Subcutaneous and Visceral Adipocytes of Obese and Non-Obese Women.

    PubMed

    Wedellova, Zuzana; Kovacova, Zuzana; Tencerova, Michaela; Vedral, Tomas; Rossmeislova, Lenka; Siklova-Vitkova, Michaela; Stich, Vladimir; Polak, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Contribution of individual adiponectin isoforms to lipolysis regulation remains unknown. We investigated the impact of full-length, trimeric and globular adiponectin isoforms on spontaneous lipolysis in subcutaneous abdominal (SCAAT) and visceral adipose tissues (VAT) of obese and non-obese subjects. Furthermore, we explored the role of AMPK (5'-AMP-activated protein kinase) in adiponectin-dependent lipolysis regulation and expression of adiponectin receptors type 1 and 2 (AdipoR1 and AdipoR2) in SCAAT and VAT. Primary adipocytes isolated from SCAAT and VAT of obese and non-obese women were incubated with 20 µg/ml of: A) full-length adiponectin (physiological mixture of all adiponectin isoforms), B) trimeric adiponectin isoform or C) globular adiponectin isoform. Glycerol released into media was used as a marker of lipolysis. While full-length adiponectin inhibited lipolysis by 22% in non-obese SCAAT, globular isoform inhibited lipolysis by 27% in obese SCAAT. No effect of either isoform was detected in non-obese VAT, however trimeric isoform inhibited lipolysis by 21% in obese VAT (all p<0.05). Trimeric isoform induced Thr172 p-AMPK in differentiated preadipocytes from a non-obese donor, while globular isoform induced Ser79 p-ACC by 32% (p<0.05) and Ser565 p-HSL by 52% (p = 0.08) in differentiated preadipocytes from an obese donor. AdipoR2 expression was 17% and 37% higher than AdipoR1 in SCAAT of obese and non-obese groups and by 23% higher in VAT of obese subjects (all p<0.05). In conclusion, the anti-lipolytic effect of adiponectin isoforms is modified with obesity: while full-length adiponectin exerts anti-lipolytic action in non-obese SCAAT, globular and trimeric isoforms show anti-lipolytic activity in obese SCAAT and VAT, respectively.

  2. Molecular comparisons of full length metapneumovirus (MPV) genomes, including newly determined French AMPV-C and -D isolates, further supports possible subclassification within the MPV Genus.

    PubMed

    Brown, Paul A; Lemaitre, Evelyne; Briand, François-Xavier; Courtillon, Céline; Guionie, Olivier; Allée, Chantal; Toquin, Didier; Bayon-Auboyer, Marie-Hélène; Jestin, Véronique; Eterradossi, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Four avian metapneumovirus (AMPV) subgroups (A-D) have been reported previously based on genetic and antigenic differences. However, until now full length sequences of the only known isolates of European subgroup C and subgroup D viruses (duck and turkey origin, respectively) have been unavailable. These full length sequences were determined and compared with other full length AMPV and human metapneumoviruses (HMPV) sequences reported previously, using phylogenetics, comparisons of nucleic and amino acid sequences and study of codon usage bias. Results confirmed that subgroup C viruses were more closely related to HMPV than they were to the other AMPV subgroups in the study. This was consistent with previous findings using partial genome sequences. Closer relationships between AMPV-A, B and D were also evident throughout the majority of results. Three metapneumovirus "clusters" HMPV, AMPV-C and AMPV-A, B and D were further supported by codon bias and phylogenetics. The data presented here together with those of previous studies describing antigenic relationships also between AMPV-A, B and D and between AMPV-C and HMPV may call for a subclassification of metapneumoviruses similar to that used for avian paramyxoviruses, grouping AMPV-A, B and D as type I metapneumoviruses and AMPV-C and HMPV as type II.

  3. A method for high precision sequencing of near full-length 16S rRNA genes on an Illumina MiSeq

    PubMed Central

    Darling, Aaron E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The bacterial 16S rRNA gene has historically been used in defining bacterial taxonomy and phylogeny. However, there are currently no high-throughput methods to sequence full-length 16S rRNA genes present in a sample with precision. Results We describe a method for sequencing near full-length 16S rRNA gene amplicons using the high throughput Illumina MiSeq platform and test it using DNA from human skin swab samples. Proof of principle of the approach is demonstrated, with the generation of 1,604 sequences greater than 1,300 nt from a single Nano MiSeq run, with accuracy estimated to be 100-fold higher than standard Illumina reads. The reads were chimera filtered using information from a single molecule dual tagging scheme that boosts the signal available for chimera detection. Conclusions This method could be scaled up to generate many thousands of sequences per MiSeq run and could be applied to other sequencing platforms. This has great potential for populating databases with high quality, near full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences from under-represented taxa and environments and facilitates analyses of microbial communities at higher resolution. PMID:27688981

  4. The full-length E1-circumflexE4 protein of human papillomavirus type 18 modulates differentiation-dependent viral DNA amplification and late gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Regina; Ryan, Gordon B.; Knight, Gillian L.; Laimins, Laimonis A.; Roberts, Sally . E-mail: s.roberts@bham.ac.uk

    2007-06-05

    Activation of the productive phase of the human papillomavirus (HPV) life cycle in differentiated keratinocytes is coincident with high-level expression of E1-circumflexE4 protein. To determine the role of E1-circumflexE4 in the HPV replication cycle, we constructed HPV18 mutant genomes in which expression of the full-length E1-circumflexE4 protein was abrogated. Undifferentiated keratinocytes containing mutant genomes showed enhanced proliferation when compared to cells containing wildtype genomes, but there were no differences in maintenance of viral episomes. Following differentiation, cells with mutant genomes exhibited reduced levels of viral DNA amplification and late gene expression, compared to wildtype genome-containing cells. This indicates that HPV18 E1-circumflexE4 plays an important role in regulating HPV late functions, and it may also function in the early phase of the replication cycle. Our finding that full-length HPV18 E1-circumflexE4 protein plays a significant role in promoting viral genome amplification concurs with a similar report with HPV31, but is in contrast to an HPV11 study where viral DNA amplification was not dependent on full-length E1-circumflexE4 expression, and to HPV16 where only C-terminal truncations in E1-circumflexE4 abrogated vegetative genome replication. This suggests that type-specific differences exist between various E1-circumflexE4 proteins.

  5. Reconstitution of an E box-binding Myc:Max complex with recombinant full-length proteins expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Farina, Anthony; Faiola, Francesco; Martinez, Ernest

    2004-04-01

    The c-Myc oncoprotein (Myc) is a DNA sequence-specific transcription factor that regulates transcription of a wide variety of genes involved in the control of cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis and its deregulated expression is implicated in many types of human cancer. Myc has an N-terminal transcription activation domain (TAD) that interacts with various coactivators and a C-terminal basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper (bHLHZip) domain required for E box-specific DNA-binding and heterodimerization with its obligatory bHLHZip protein partner Max. The analysis of the mechanisms by which the Myc:Max complex regulates transcription at the molecular level in vitro has been hampered by the difficulty in obtaining highly pure recombinant Myc:Max heterodimers that contain full-length Myc with its complete TAD domain and that have sequence-specific DNA-binding activity. Here, we describe a simple method to reconstitute recombinant Myc:Max complexes from highly purified full-length proteins expressed in Escherichia coli that are soluble and highly active in E box-specific DNA-binding in vitro. The reconstituted Myc:Max complexes are stable and lack Max:Max homodimers. This procedure should facilitate the characterization of the DNA-binding and transcription activation functions of full-length Myc:Max complexes in vitro and in particular the role of Myc TAD-interacting cofactors and Myc:Max post-translational modifications.

  6. Reconstitution of an E box-binding Myc:Max complex with recombinant full-length proteins expressed in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Farina, Anthony; Faiola, Francesco; Martinez, Ernest

    2014-01-01

    The c-Myc oncoprotein (Myc) is a DNA sequence-specific transcription factor that regulates transcription of a wide variety of genes involved in the control of cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis and its deregulated expression is implicated in many types of human cancer. Myc has an N-terminal transcription activation domain (TAD) that interacts with various coactivators and a C-terminal basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper (bHLHZip) domain required for E box-specific DNA-binding and heterodimerization with its obligatory bHLHZip protein partner Max. The analysis of the mechanisms by which the Myc:Max complex regulates transcription at the molecular level in vitro has been hampered by the difficulty in obtaining highly pure recombinant Myc:Max heterodimers that contain full-length Myc with its complete TAD domain and that have sequence-specific DNA-binding activity. Here, we describe a simple method to reconstitute recombinant Myc:Max complexes from highly purified full-length proteins expressed in Escherichia coli that are soluble and highly active in E box-specific DNA-binding in vitro. The reconstituted Myc:Max complexes are stable and lack Max:Max homodimers. This procedure should facilitate the characterization of the DNA-binding and transcription activation functions of full-length Myc:Max complexes in vitro and in particular the role of Myc TAD-interacting cofactors and Myc:Max post-translational modifications. PMID:15003254

  7. Particle infectivity of HIV-1 full-length genome infectious molecular clones in a subtype C heterosexual transmission pair following high fidelity amplification and unbiased cloning.

    PubMed

    Deymier, Martin J; Claiborne, Daniel T; Ende, Zachary; Ratner, Hannah K; Kilembe, William; Allen, Susan; Hunter, Eric

    2014-11-01

    The high genetic diversity of HIV-1 impedes high throughput, large-scale sequencing and full-length genome cloning by common restriction enzyme based methods. Applying novel methods that employ a high-fidelity polymerase for amplification and an unbiased fusion-based cloning strategy, we have generated several HIV-1 full-length genome infectious molecular clones from an epidemiologically linked transmission pair. These clones represent the transmitted/founder virus and phylogenetically diverse non-transmitted variants from the chronically infected individual׳s diverse quasispecies near the time of transmission. We demonstrate that, using this approach, PCR-induced mutations in full-length clones derived from their cognate single genome amplicons are rare. Furthermore, all eight non-transmitted genomes tested produced functional virus with a range of infectivities, belying the previous assumption that a majority of circulating viruses in chronic HIV-1 infection are defective. Thus, these methods provide important tools to update protocols in molecular biology that can be universally applied to the study of human viral pathogens.

  8. Rescue of rinderpest virus from cloned cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Baron, M D; Barrett, T

    1997-01-01

    Rinderpest virus is a morbillivirus and is the causative agent of a widespread and important disease of cattle. The viral genome is a single strand of RNA in the negative sense. We have constructed plasmids containing cDNA copies of the 5' and 3' termini of the virus separated by a reporter gene and have shown that antigenome-sense RNA transcripts of these model genomes can be replicated, transcribed, and packaged by helper virus, both rinderpest virus and the related measles virus. Further, these genome analogs can be replicated and transcribed by viral proteins expressed from cDNA clones by using a recombinant vaccinia virus expressing T7 RNA polymerase (MVA-T7). Using this latter system, we have rescued live rinderpest virus from a full-length cDNA copy of the genome of the RBOK vaccine strain. The recombinant virus appears to grow in tissue culture identically to the original virus. PMID:8995650

  9. Qualitative de novo analysis of full length cDNA and quantitative analysis of gene expression for common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) transcriptomes using parallel long-read technology and short-read sequencing.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Makiko; Iwano, Shunsuke; Uno, Yasuhiro; Uehara, Shotaro; Inoue, Takashi; Murayama, Norie; Onodera, Jun; Sasaki, Erika; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) is a non-human primate that could prove useful as human pharmacokinetic and biomedical research models. The cytochromes P450 (P450s) are a superfamily of enzymes that have critical roles in drug metabolism and disposition via monooxygenation of a broad range of xenobiotics; however, information on some marmoset P450s is currently limited. Therefore, identification and quantitative analysis of tissue-specific mRNA transcripts, including those of P450s and flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMO, another monooxygenase family), need to be carried out in detail before the marmoset can be used as an animal model in drug development. De novo assembly and expression analysis of marmoset transcripts were conducted with pooled liver, intestine, kidney, and brain samples from three male and three female marmosets. After unique sequences were automatically aligned by assembling software, the mean contig length was 718 bp (with a standard deviation of 457 bp) among a total of 47,883 transcripts. Approximately 30% of the total transcripts were matched to known marmoset sequences. Gene expression in 18 marmoset P450- and 4 FMO-like genes displayed some tissue-specific patterns. Of these, the three most highly expressed in marmoset liver were P450 2D-, 2E-, and 3A-like genes. In extrahepatic tissues, including brain, gene expressions of these monooxygenases were lower than those in liver, although P450 3A4 (previously P450 3A21) in intestine and P450 4A11- and FMO1-like genes in kidney were relatively highly expressed. By means of massive parallel long-read sequencing and short-read technology applied to marmoset liver, intestine, kidney, and brain, the combined next-generation sequencing analyses reported here were able to identify novel marmoset drug-metabolizing P450 transcripts that have until now been little reported. These results provide a foundation for mechanistic studies and pave the way for the use of marmosets as model animals for drug development in the future.

  10. Qualitative De Novo Analysis of Full Length cDNA and Quantitative Analysis of Gene Expression for Common Marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) Transcriptomes Using Parallel Long-Read Technology and Short-Read Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Uno, Yasuhiro; Uehara, Shotaro; Inoue, Takashi; Murayama, Norie; Onodera, Jun; Sasaki, Erika; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) is a non-human primate that could prove useful as human pharmacokinetic and biomedical research models. The cytochromes P450 (P450s) are a superfamily of enzymes that have critical roles in drug metabolism and disposition via monooxygenation of a broad range of xenobiotics; however, information on some marmoset P450s is currently limited. Therefore, identification and quantitative analysis of tissue-specific mRNA transcripts, including those of P450s and flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMO, another monooxygenase family), need to be carried out in detail before the marmoset can be used as an animal model in drug development. De novo assembly and expression analysis of marmoset transcripts were conducted with pooled liver, intestine, kidney, and brain samples from three male and three female marmosets. After unique sequences were automatically aligned by assembling software, the mean contig length was 718 bp (with a standard deviation of 457 bp) among a total of 47,883 transcripts. Approximately 30% of the total transcripts were matched to known marmoset sequences. Gene expression in 18 marmoset P450- and 4 FMO-like genes displayed some tissue-specific patterns. Of these, the three most highly expressed in marmoset liver were P450 2D-, 2E-, and 3A-like genes. In extrahepatic tissues, including brain, gene expressions of these monooxygenases were lower than those in liver, although P450 3A4 (previously P450 3A21) in intestine and P450 4A11- and FMO1-like genes in kidney were relatively highly expressed. By means of massive parallel long-read sequencing and short-read technology applied to marmoset liver, intestine, kidney, and brain, the combined next-generation sequencing analyses reported here were able to identify novel marmoset drug-metabolizing P450 transcripts that have until now been little reported. These results provide a foundation for mechanistic studies and pave the way for the use of marmosets as model animals for drug development in the future. PMID:24977701

  11. Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends for RNA Transcript Sequencing in Staphylococcus.

    PubMed

    Miller, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) is a technique that was developed to swiftly and efficiently amplify full-length RNA molecules in which the terminal ends have not been characterized. Current usage of this procedure has been more focused on sequencing and characterizing RNA 5' and 3' untranslated regions. Herein is described an adapted RACE protocol to amplify bacterial RNA transcripts.

  12. One-step affinity tag purification of full-length recombinant human AP-1 complexes from bacterial inclusion bodies using a polycistronic expression system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Ming; Lee, A-Young; Chiang, Cheng-Ming

    2008-05-01

    The AP-1 transcription factor is a dimeric protein complex formed primarily between Jun (c-Jun, JunB, JunD) and Fos (c-Fos, FosB, Fra-1, Fra-2) family members. These distinct AP-1 complexes are expressed in many cell types and modulate target gene expression implicated in cell proliferation, differentiation, and stress responses. Although the importance of AP-1 has long been recognized, the biochemical characterization of AP-1 remains limited in part due to the difficulty in purifying full-length, reconstituted dimers with active DNA-binding and transcriptional activity. Using a combination of bacterial coexpression and epitope-tagging methods, we successfully purified all 12 heterodimers (3 Junx4 Fos) of full-length human AP-1 complexes as well as c-Jun/c-Jun, JunD/JunD, and c-Jun/JunD dimers from bacterial inclusion bodies using one-step nickel-NTA affinity tag purification following denaturation and renaturation of coexpressed AP-1 subunits. Coexpression of two constitutive components in a dimeric AP-1 complex helps stabilize the proteins when compared with individual protein expression in bacteria. Purified dimeric AP-1 complexes are functional in sequence-specific DNA binding, as illustrated by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and DNase I footprinting, and are also active in transcription with in vitro-reconstituted human papillomavirus (HPV) chromatin containing AP-1-binding sites in the native configuration of HPV nucleosomes. The availability of these recombinant full-length human AP-1 complexes has greatly facilitated mechanistic studies of AP-1-regulated gene transcription in many biological systems.

  13. Sensitive Multiplexed Quantitative Analysis of Autoantibodies to Cancer Antigens with Chemically S-Cationized Full-Length and Water-Soluble Denatured Proteins.

    PubMed

    Futami, Junichiro; Nonomura, Hidenori; Kido, Momoko; Niidoi, Naomi; Fujieda, Nao; Hosoi, Akihiro; Fujita, Kana; Mandai, Komako; Atago, Yuki; Kinoshita, Rie; Honjo, Tomoko; Matsushita, Hirokazu; Uenaka, Akiko; Nakayama, Eiichi; Kakimi, Kazuhiro

    2015-10-21

    Humoral immune responses against tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) or cancer/testis antigens (CTAs) aberrantly expressed in tumor cells are frequently observed in cancer patients. Recent clinical studies have elucidated that anticancer immune responses with increased levels of anti-TAA/CTA antibodies improve cancer survival rates. Thus, these antibody levels are promising biomarkers for diagnosing the efficiency of cancer immunotherapy. Full-length antigens are favored for detecting anti-TAA/CTA antibodies because candidate antigen proteins contain multiple epitopes throughout their structures. In this study, we developed a methodology to prepare purified water-soluble and full-length antigens by using cysteine sulfhydryl group cationization (S-cationization) chemistry. S-Cationized antigens can be prepared from bacterial inclusion bodies, and they exhibit improved protein solubility but preserved antigenicity. Anti-TAA/CTA antibodies detected in cancer patients appeared to recognize linear epitopes, as well as conformational epitopes, and because the frequency of cysteine side-residues on the epitope-paratope interface was low, any adverse effects of S-cationization were virtually negligible for antibody binding. Furthermore, S-cationized antigen-immobilized Luminex beads could be successfully used in highly sensitive quantitative-multiplexed assays. Indeed, patients with a more broadly induced serum anti-TAA/CTA antibody level showed improved progression-free survival after immunotherapy. The comprehensive anti-TAA/CTA assay system, which uses S-cationized full-length and water-soluble recombinant antigens, may be a useful diagnostic tool for assessing the efficiency of cancer immunotherapy.

  14. Gene VI of figwort mosaic virus (caulimovirus group) functions in posttranscriptional expression of genes on the full-length RNA transcript.

    PubMed

    Gowda, S; Wu, F C; Scholthof, H B; Shepherd, R J

    1989-12-01

    Experimental evidence for a molecular function for gene VI of the caulimoviruses is presented. Based on experiments with the figwort mosaic virus (FMV), it appears that gene VI has a role in the posttranscriptional expression of the closely packed genes (VII and I-V), which appear on the larger, full-length RNA transcript of this virus. Gene VI with its flanking 5'/3' expression signals included as a separate plasmid during electroporation of DNA into protoplasts of Nicotiana edwardsonii shows an unusual type of transactivation of a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene fused at its 5' end to a small open reading frame (gene VII) of the long 5' leader of the full-length RNA transcript of the FMV genome. The level of activity of the CAT gene is increased up to 20-fold over the activity of control plasmids when gene VI is included in the electroporation mixture. Mutagenesis of the coding portions of gene VI of pGS1 RVI, a transactivating plasmid used in the electroporation experiments, demonstrated that it was probably the polypeptide product of gene VI that was responsible for the transactivating effect. Experiments with various portions of the 5' leader of the large, full-length RNA of FMV showed that the coding region of gene VII is necessary for the transactivation event. Clones of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) or FMV with intact gene VI were found to reciprocally transactivate gene VII-CAT fusions (FMV) or gene I-CAT fusions (CaMV) located downstream of the 5' leader sequences of either viral genome.

  15. Triple trans-splicing adeno-associated virus vectors capable of transferring the coding sequence for full-length dystrophin protein into dystrophic mice.

    PubMed

    Koo, Taeyoung; Popplewell, Linda; Athanasopoulos, Takis; Dickson, George

    2014-02-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors have been shown to permit very efficient widespread transgene expression in skeletal muscle after systemic delivery, making these increasingly attractive as vectors for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene therapy. DMD is a severe muscle-wasting disorder caused by DMD gene mutations leading to complete loss of dystrophin protein. One of the major issues associated with delivery of the DMD gene, as a therapeutic approach for DMD, is its large open reading frame (ORF; 11.1 kb). A series of truncated microdystrophin cDNAs (delivered via a single AAV) and minidystrophin cDNAs (delivered via dual-AAV trans-spliced/overlapping reconstitution) have thus been extensively tested in DMD animal models. However, critical rod and hinge domains of dystrophin required for interaction with components of the dystrophin-associated protein complex, such as neuronal nitric oxide synthase, syntrophin, and dystrobrevin, are missing; these dystrophin domains may still need to be incorporated to increase dystrophin functionality and stabilize membrane rigidity. Full-length DMD gene delivery using AAV vectors remains elusive because of the limited single-AAV packaging capacity (4.7 kb). Here we developed a novel method for the delivery of the full-length DMD coding sequence to skeletal muscles in dystrophic mdx mice using a triple-AAV trans-splicing vector system. We report for the first time that three independent AAV vectors carrying "in tandem" sequential exonic parts of the human DMD coding sequence enable the expression of the full-length protein as a result of trans-splicing events cojoining three vectors via their inverted terminal repeat sequences. This method of triple-AAV-mediated trans-splicing could be applicable to the delivery of any large therapeutic gene (≥11 kb ORF) into postmitotic tissues (muscles or neurons) for the treatment of various inherited metabolic and genetic diseases.

  16. Completion of the full-length genome sequence of Menangle virus: characterisation of the polymerase gene and genomic 5' trailer region.

    PubMed

    Bowden, T R; Boyle, D B

    2005-10-01

    Menangle virus (MenV), isolated in 1997 from stillborn piglets during an outbreak of reproductive disease at a large commercial piggery, is the only new paramyxovirus to be identified in Australia since Hendra virus in 1994. Following partial characterisation of the MenV genome, we previously showed that MenV is a novel member of the genus Rubulavirus. Here we report the characterisation of the large (L) polymerase gene and the adjacent 5' trailer region of MenV, which completes the full-length genome sequence of this novel paramyxovirus (15,516 nucleotides), and thereby confirm its taxonomic position within the family Paramyxoviridae.

  17. Construction of infectious cDNA clone derived from a classical swine fever virus field isolate in BAC vector using in vitro overlap extension PCR and recombination.

    PubMed

    Kamboj, Aman; Saini, Mohini; Rajan, Lekshmi S; Patel, Chhabi Lal; Chaturvedi, V K; Gupta, Praveen K

    2015-12-15

    To develop reverse genetics system of RNA viruses, cloning of full-length viral genome is required which is often challenging due to many steps involved. In this study, we report cloning of full-length cDNA from an Indian field isolate (CSFV/IVRI/VB-131) of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) using in vitro overlap extension PCR and recombination which drastically reduced the number of cloning steps. The genome of CSFV was amplified in six overlapping cDNA fragments, linked by overlap extension PCR and cloned in a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) vector using in vitro recombination method to generate full-length cDNA clone. The full-length CSFV cDNA clone was found stable in E. coli Stellar and DH10B cells. The full-length RNA was transcribed in vitro using T7 RNA polymerase and transfected in PK15 cells using Neon-tip electroporator to rescue infectious CSFV. The progeny CSFV was propagated in PK15 cells and found indistinguishable from the parent virus. The expression of CSFV proteins were detected in cytoplasm of PK15 cells infected with progeny CSFV at 72 h post-infection. We concluded that the in vitro overlap extension PCR and recombination method is useful to construct stable full-length cDNA clone of RNA virus in BAC vector.

  18. Crystal structure of full-length human collagenase 3 (MMP-13) with peptides in the active site defines exosites in the catalytic domain

    PubMed Central

    Stura, Enrico A.; Visse, Robert; Cuniasse, Philippe; Dive, Vincent; Nagase, Hideaki

    2013-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 is one of the mammalian collagenases that play key roles in tissue remodelling and repair and in progression of diseases such as cancer, arthritis, atherosclerosis, and aneurysm. For collagenase to cleave triple helical collagens, the triple helical structure has to be locally unwound before hydrolysis, but this process is not well understood. We report crystal structures of catalytically inactive full-length human MMP-13(E223A) in complex with peptides of 14–26 aa derived from the cleaved prodomain during activation. Peptides are bound to the active site of the enzyme by forming an extended β-strand with Glu40 or Tyr46 inserted into the S1′ specificity pocket. The structure of the N-terminal part of the peptides is variable and interacts with different parts of the catalytic domain. Those areas are designated substrate-dependent exosites, in that they accommodate different peptide structures, whereas the precise positioning of the substrate backbone is maintained in the active site. These modes of peptide-MMP-13 interactions have led us to propose how triple helical collagen strands fit into the active site cleft of the collagenase.—Stura, E. A., Visse, R., Cuniasse, P., Dive, V., Nagase, H. Crystal structure of full-length human collagenase 3 (MMP-13) with peptides in the active site defines exosites in the catalytic domain. PMID:23913860

  19. Differing Efficacies of Lead Group A Streptococcal Vaccine Candidates and Full-Length M Protein in Cutaneous and Invasive Disease Models

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Hernandez, Tania; Pandey, Manisha; Henningham, Anna; Cole, Jason; Choudhury, Biswa; Cork, Amanda J.; Gillen, Christine M.; Ghaffar, Khairunnisa Abdul; West, Nicholas P.; Silvestri, Guido; Good, Michael F.; Moyle, Peter M.; Toth, Istvan; Nizet, Victor; Batzloff, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is an important human pathogen responsible for both superficial infections and invasive diseases. Autoimmune sequelae may occur upon repeated infection. For this reason, development of a vaccine against GAS represents a major challenge, since certain GAS components may trigger autoimmunity. We formulated three combination vaccines containing the following: (i) streptolysin O (SLO), interleukin 8 (IL-8) protease (Streptococcus pyogenes cell envelope proteinase [SpyCEP]), group A streptococcal C5a peptidase (SCPA), arginine deiminase (ADI), and trigger factor (TF); (ii) the conserved M-protein-derived J8 peptide conjugated to ADI; and (iii) group A carbohydrate lacking the N-acetylglucosamine side chain conjugated to ADI. We compared these combination vaccines to a “gold standard” for immunogenicity, full-length M1 protein. Vaccines were adjuvanted with alum, and mice were immunized on days 0, 21, and 28. On day 42, mice were challenged via cutaneous or subcutaneous routes. High-titer antigen-specific antibody responses with bactericidal activity were detected in mouse serum samples for all vaccine candidates. In comparison with sham-immunized mice, all vaccines afforded protection against cutaneous challenge. However, only full-length M1 protein provided protection in the subcutaneous invasive disease model. PMID:27302756

  20. An ancestral host defence peptide within human β-defensin 3 recapitulates the antibacterial and antiviral activity of the full-length molecule

    PubMed Central

    Nigro, Ersilia; Colavita, Irene; Sarnataro, Daniela; Scudiero, Olga; Zambrano, Gerardo; Granata, Vincenzo; Daniele, Aurora; Carotenuto, Alfonso; Galdiero, Stefania; Folliero, Veronica; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Urbanowicz, Richard A.; Ball, Jonathan K.; Salvatore, Francesco; Pessi, Antonello

    2015-01-01

    Host defence peptides (HDPs) are critical components of innate immunity. Despite their diversity, they share common features including a structural signature, designated “γ-core motif”. We reasoned that for each HDPs evolved from an ancestral γ-core, the latter should be the evolutionary starting point of the molecule, i.e. it should represent a structural scaffold for the modular construction of the full-length molecule, and possess biological properties. We explored the γ-core of human β-defensin 3 (HBD3) and found that it: (a) is the folding nucleus of HBD3; (b) folds rapidly and is stable in human serum; (c) displays antibacterial activity; (d) binds to CD98, which mediates HBD3 internalization in eukaryotic cells; (e) exerts antiviral activity against human immunodeficiency virus and herpes simplex virus; and (f) is not toxic to human cells. These results demonstrate that the γ-core within HBD3 is the ancestral core of the full-length molecule and is a viable HDP per se, since it is endowed with the most important biological features of HBD3. Notably, the small, stable scaffold of the HBD3 γ-core can be exploited to design disease-specific antimicrobial agents. PMID:26688341

  1. Plasma Membrane Invaginations Containing Clusters of Full-length PrPSc are an Early Form of Prion-associated Neuropathology in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Godsave, Susan F.; Wille, Holger; Pierson, Jason; Prusiner, Stanley B.; Peters, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    During prion disease cellular prion protein (PrPC) is refolded into a pathogenic isoform (PrPSc) that accumulates in the central nervous system and causes neurodegeneration and death. We used immunofluorescence, quantitative cryo-immunogold EM and tomography to detect nascent, full-length PrPSc in the hippocampus of prion-infected mice from early pre-clinical disease stages onwards. Comparison of uninfected and infected brains showed that sites containing full-length PrPSc could be recognized in the neuropil by bright spots and streaks of immunofluorescence on semi-thin (200 nm) sections, and by clusters of cryo-immunogold EM labeling. PrPSc was found mainly on neuronal plasma membranes, most strikingly on membrane invaginations and sites of cell-to-cell contact, and was evident by 65 days postinoculation, or 54% of the incubation period to terminal disease. Both axons and dendrites in the neuropil were affected. We hypothesize that closely apposed plasma membranes provide a favourable environment for prion conversion and intercellular prion transfer. Only a small proportion of clustered PrP immunogold labeling was found at synapses, indicating that synapses are not targeted specifically in prion disease. PMID:23481568

  2. Assessing the genetic diversity of Cu resistance in mine tailings through high-throughput recovery of full-length copA genes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaofang; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Shaban, Babak; Bruxner, Timothy J. C.; Bond, Philip L.; Huang, Longbin

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing the genetic diversity of microbial copper (Cu) resistance at the community level remains challenging, mainly due to the polymorphism of the core functional gene copA. In this study, a local BLASTN method using a copA database built in this study was developed to recover full-length putative copA sequences from an assembled tailings metagenome; these sequences were then screened for potentially functioning CopA using conserved metal-binding motifs, inferred by evolutionary trace analysis of CopA sequences from known Cu resistant microorganisms. In total, 99 putative copA sequences were recovered from the tailings metagenome, out of which 70 were found with high potential to be functioning in Cu resistance. Phylogenetic analysis of selected copA sequences detected in the tailings metagenome showed that topology of the copA phylogeny is largely congruent with that of the 16S-based phylogeny of the tailings microbial community obtained in our previous study, indicating that the development of copA diversity in the tailings might be mainly through vertical descent with few lateral gene transfer events. The method established here can be used to explore copA (and potentially other metal resistance genes) diversity in any metagenome and has the potential to exhaust the full-length gene sequences for downstream analyses. PMID:26286020

  3. Lyso-myristoyl phosphatidylcholine micelles sustain the activity of Dengue non-structural (NS) protein 3 protease domain fused with the full-length NS2B.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiwei; Li, Qingxin; Joy, Joma; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Ruiz-Carrillo, David; Hill, Jeffrey; Lescar, Julien; Kang, Congbao

    2013-12-01

    Dengue virus (DENV), a member of the flavivirus genus, affects 50-100 million people in tropical and sub-tropical regions. The DENV protease domain is located at the N-terminus of the NS3 protease and requires for its enzymatic activity a hydrophilic segment of the NS2B that acts as a cofactor. The protease is an important antiviral drug target because it plays a crucial role in virus replication by cleaving the genome-coded polypeptide into mature functional proteins. Currently, there are no drugs to inhibit DENV protease activity. Most structural and functional studies have been conducted using protein constructs containing the NS3 protease domain connected to a soluble segment of the NS2B membrane protein via a nine-residue linker. For in vitro structural and functional studies, it would be useful to produce a natural form of the DENV protease containing the NS3 protease domain and the full-length NS2B protein. Herein, we describe the expression and purification of a natural form of DENV protease (NS2BFL-NS3pro) containing the full-length NS2B protein and the protease domain of NS3 (NS3pro). The protease was expressed and purified in detergent micelles necessary for its folding. Our results show that this purified protein was active in detergent micelles such as lyso-myristoyl phosphatidylcholine (LMPC). These findings should facilitate further structural and functional studies of the protease and will facilitate drug discovery targeting DENV.

  4. The full-length transcript of a caulimovirus is a polycistronic mRNA whose genes are trans activated by the product of gene VI.

    PubMed

    Scholthof, H B; Gowda, S; Wu, F C; Shepherd, R J

    1992-05-01

    Gene expression of figwort mosaic virus (FMV), a caulimovirus, was investigated by electroporation of Nicotiana edwardsonii cell suspension protoplasts with cloned viral constructs in which a reporter gene was inserted at various positions on the genome. The results showed that the genome of FMV contains two promoters; one is used for the production of a full-length RNA and another initiates synthesis of a separate monocistronic RNA for gene VI. Evidence is provided that the full-length transcript, the probable template for reverse transcription, can serve as a polycistronic mRNA for translation of genes I through V and perhaps also gene VI. Expression of all the genes on the polycistronic mRNA is trans activated by the gene VI protein. Reporter gene expression appears most efficient when its start codon is in close proximity to the stop codon of the preceding gene, as for the native genes of caulimoviruses. We propose that the gene VI product enables expression of the polycistronic mRNA by promoting reinitiation of ribosomes to give translational coupling of individual genes.

  5. Production of full-length soluble Plasmodium falciparum RH5 protein vaccine using a Drosophila melanogaster Schneider 2 stable cell line system.

    PubMed

    Hjerrild, Kathryn A; Jin, Jing; Wright, Katherine E; Brown, Rebecca E; Marshall, Jennifer M; Labbé, Geneviève M; Silk, Sarah E; Cherry, Catherine J; Clemmensen, Stine B; Jørgensen, Thomas; Illingworth, Joseph J; Alanine, Daniel G W; Milne, Kathryn H; Ashfield, Rebecca; de Jongh, Willem A; Douglas, Alexander D; Higgins, Matthew K; Draper, Simon J

    2016-07-26

    The Plasmodium falciparum reticulocyte-binding protein homolog 5 (PfRH5) has recently emerged as a leading candidate antigen against the blood-stage human malaria parasite. However it has proved challenging to identify a heterologous expression platform that can produce a soluble protein-based vaccine in a manner compliant with current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP). Here we report the production of full-length PfRH5 protein using a cGMP-compliant platform called ExpreS(2), based on a Drosophila melanogaster Schneider 2 (S2) stable cell line system. Five sequence variants of PfRH5 were expressed that differed in terms of mutagenesis strategies to remove potential N-linked glycans. All variants bound the PfRH5 receptor basigin and were recognized by a panel of monoclonal antibodies. Analysis following immunization of rabbits identified quantitative and qualitative differences in terms of the functional IgG antibody response against the P. falciparum parasite. The antibodies induced by one protein variant were shown to be qualitatively similar to responses induced by other vaccine platforms. This work identifies Drosophila S2 cells as a clinically-relevant platform suited for the production of 'difficult-to-make' proteins from Plasmodium parasites, and identifies a PfRH5 sequence variant that can be used for clinical production of a non-glycosylated, soluble full-length protein vaccine immunogen.

  6. Replication of phage phi 29 DNA with purified terminal protein and DNA polymerase: synthesis of full-length phi 29 DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, L; Salas, M

    1985-01-01

    A system that replicates bacteriophage phi 29 DNA with protein p3 covalently attached to the two 5' ends, using as the only proteins the phi 29 DNA polymerase and the terminal protein, is described. Restriction analysis of the 32P-labeled DNA synthesized in vitro showed that all phi 29 DNA fragments were labeled. Analysis by alkaline sucrose gradient centrifugation of the DNA labeled during a 10-min pulse showed that, after a 20-min chase, about half of the DNA molecules had reached apparently full-length phi 29 DNA (approximately equal to 18,000 nucleotides). Ammonium ions strongly stimulated phi 29 DNA-protein p3 replication, the effect being due to stimulation of the initiation reaction. ATP was not required for phi 29 DNA-protein p3 replication, either in the initiation or elongation steps. The results show that the phi 29 DNA polymerase functions, not only in the formation of the p3-dAMP covalent initiation complex but also in the elongation of the latter, as the only DNA polymerase to produce full-length phi 29 DNA. Images PMID:3863101

  7. Full length and protease domain activity of chikungunya virus nsP2 differ from other alphavirus nsP2 proteases in recognition of small peptide substrates.

    PubMed

    Saisawang, Chonticha; Sillapee, Pornpan; Sinsirimongkol, Kwanhathai; Ubol, Sukathida; Smith, Duncan R; Ketterman, Albert J

    2015-04-22

    Alphavirus nsP2 proteins are multifunctional and essential for viral replication. The protease role of nsP2 is critical for virus replication as only the virus protease activity is used for processing of the viral non-structural polypeptide. Chikungunya virus is an emerging disease problem that is becoming a world-wide health issue. We have generated purified recombinant chikungunya virus nsP2 proteins, both full length and a truncated protease domain from the C-terminus of the nsP2 protein. Enzyme characterization shows that the protease domain alone has different properties compared with the full length nsP2 protease. We also show chikungunya nsP2 protease possesses different substrate specificity to the canonical alphavirus nsP2 polyprotein cleavage specificity. Moreover, the chikungunya nsP2 also appears to differ from other alphavirus nsP2 in its distinctive ability to recognize small peptide substrates.

  8. Full length and protease domain activity of chikungunya virus nsP2 differ from other alphavirus nsP2 proteases in recognition of small peptide substrates

    PubMed Central

    Saisawang, Chonticha; Sillapee, Pornpan; Sinsirimongkol, Kwanhathai; Ubol, Sukathida; Smith, Duncan R.; Ketterman, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Alphavirus nsP2 proteins are multifunctional and essential for viral replication. The protease role of nsP2 is critical for virus replication as only the virus protease activity is used for processing of the viral non-structural polypeptide. Chikungunya virus is an emerging disease problem that is becoming a world-wide health issue. We have generated purified recombinant chikungunya virus nsP2 proteins, both full length and a truncated protease domain from the C-terminus of the nsP2 protein. Enzyme characterization shows that the protease domain alone has different properties compared with the full length nsP2 protease. We also show chikungunya nsP2 protease possesses different substrate specificity to the canonical alphavirus nsP2 polyprotein cleavage specificity. Moreover, the chikungunya nsP2 also appears to differ from other alphavirus nsP2 in its distinctive ability to recognize small peptide substrates. PMID:26182358

  9. Production of full-length soluble Plasmodium falciparum RH5 protein vaccine using a Drosophila melanogaster Schneider 2 stable cell line system

    PubMed Central

    Hjerrild, Kathryn A.; Jin, Jing; Wright, Katherine E.; Brown, Rebecca E.; Marshall, Jennifer M.; Labbé, Geneviève M.; Silk, Sarah E.; Cherry, Catherine J.; Clemmensen, Stine B.; Jørgensen, Thomas; Illingworth, Joseph J.; Alanine, Daniel G. W.; Milne, Kathryn H.; Ashfield, Rebecca; de Jongh, Willem A.; Douglas, Alexander D.; Higgins, Matthew K.; Draper, Simon J.

    2016-01-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum reticulocyte-binding protein homolog 5 (PfRH5) has recently emerged as a leading candidate antigen against the blood-stage human malaria parasite. However it has proved challenging to identify a heterologous expression platform that can produce a soluble protein-based vaccine in a manner compliant with current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP). Here we report the production of full-length PfRH5 protein using a cGMP-compliant platform called ExpreS2, based on a Drosophila melanogaster Schneider 2 (S2) stable cell line system. Five sequence variants of PfRH5 were expressed that differed in terms of mutagenesis strategies to remove potential N-linked glycans. All variants bound the PfRH5 receptor basigin and were recognized by a panel of monoclonal antibodies. Analysis following immunization of rabbits identified quantitative and qualitative differences in terms of the functional IgG antibody response against the P. falciparum parasite. The antibodies induced by one protein variant were shown to be qualitatively similar to responses induced by other vaccine platforms. This work identifies Drosophila S2 cells as a clinically-relevant platform suited for the production of ‘difficult-to-make’ proteins from Plasmodium parasites, and identifies a PfRH5 sequence variant that can be used for clinical production of a non-glycosylated, soluble full-length protein vaccine immunogen. PMID:27457156

  10. Rational Design of High-Number dsDNA Fragments Based on Thermodynamics for the Construction of Full-Length Genes in a Single Reaction.

    PubMed

    Birla, Bhagyashree S; Chou, Hui-Hsien

    2015-01-01

    Gene synthesis is frequently used in modern molecular biology research either to create novel genes or to obtain natural genes when the synthesis approach is more flexible and reliable than cloning. DNA chemical synthesis has limits on both its length and yield, thus full-length genes have to be hierarchically constructed from synthesized DNA fragments. Gibson Assembly and its derivatives are the simplest methods to assemble multiple double-stranded DNA fragments. Currently, up to 12 dsDNA fragments can be assembled at once with Gibson Assembly according to its vendor. In practice, the number of dsDNA fragments that can be assembled in a single reaction are much lower. We have developed a rational design method for gene construction that allows high-number dsDNA fragments to be assembled into full-length genes in a single reaction. Using this new design method and a modified version of the Gibson Assembly protocol, we have assembled 3 different genes from up to 45 dsDNA fragments at once. Our design method uses the thermodynamic analysis software Picky that identifies all unique junctions in a gene where consecutive DNA fragments are specifically made to connect to each other. Our novel method is generally applicable to most gene sequences, and can improve both the efficiency and cost of gene assembly.

  11. Crystal structure of full-length Zika virus NS5 protein reveals a conformation similar to Japanese encephalitis virus NS5.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Anup K; Cyr, Matthew; Longenecker, Kenton; Tripathi, Rakesh; Sun, Chaohong; Kempf, Dale J

    2017-03-01

    The rapid spread of the recent Zika virus (ZIKV) epidemic across various countries in the American continent poses a major health hazard for the unborn fetuses of pregnant women. To date, there is no effective medical intervention. The nonstructural protein 5 of Zika virus (ZIKV-NS5) is critical for ZIKV replication through the 5'-RNA capping and RNA polymerase activities present in its N-terminal methyltransferase (MTase) and C-terminal RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domains, respectively. The crystal structure of the full-length ZIKV-NS5 protein has been determined at 3.05 Å resolution from a crystal belonging to space group P21212 and containing two protein molecules in the asymmetric unit. The structure is similar to that reported for the NS5 protein from Japanese encephalitis virus and suggests opportunities for structure-based drug design targeting either its MTase or RdRp domain.

  12. The self-inhibited structure of full-length PCSK9 at 1.9 A reveals structural homology with resistin within the C-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Eric N; Knuth, Mark W; Li, Jun; Harris, Jennifer L; Lesley, Scott A; Spraggon, Glen

    2007-09-11

    Mutations in proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) are strongly associated with levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in the blood plasma and, thereby, occurrence or resistance to atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. Despite this importance, relatively little is known about the biology of PCSK9. Here, the crystal structure of a full-length construct of PCSK9 solved to 1.9-A resolution is presented. The structure contains a fully folded C-terminal cysteine-rich domain (CRD), showing a distinct structural similarity to the resistin homotrimer, a small cytokine associated with obesity and diabetes. This structural relationship between the CRD of PCSK9 and the resistin family is not observed in primary sequence comparisons and strongly suggests a distant evolutionary link between the two molecules. This three-dimensional homology provides insight into the function of PCSK9 at the molecular level and will help to dissect the link between PCSK9 and CHD.

  13. Unexpected cause of a right hemiplegia secondary to the painless full-length aortic dissection: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shu; Sun, Jialan; Li, Longxuan

    2015-01-01

    Painless aortic dissections in general are uncommon and are frequently misdiagnosed. Here we reported a rare case of acute ischemic stroke secondary to completely painless acute full-length dissection (DeBakey I) and provide a brief review of the literature. A 56-year-old man was referred to our department with right hemiplegia. Ischaemic stroke and thrombolytic treatment were considered initially. At the second examination, the patient was found to have decreased blood pressure, asymmetrical blood pressure/pulses between the bilateral limbs, and sudden loss of pulse in a lower extremity. Laboratory results revealed leucocytosis, elevated creatinine and CK without obvious cause. An aortic dissection was subsequently confirmed by contrast enhanced thoracic and abdominal CT scan. Our report provides some clues for the early diagnosis of painless aortic dissections.

  14. Isolation and expression analysis of peanut chlorotic streak caulimovirus (PClSV) full-length transcript (FLt) promoter in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Maiti, I B; Shepherd, R J

    1998-03-17

    A promoter fragment from peanut chlorotic streak caulimovirus (PClSV) full-length transcript (FLt) was identified and later modified to have duplicated enhancer domain. The FLt promoter with its single or double enhancer domains, fused with the GUS reporter gene to form chimeric gene constructs, showed a high level of expression of these genes in cells and transgenic plants. The FLt promoter with its double enhancer domain gives an average threefold greater expression of genes compared to the FLt promoter with its single enhancer domain in transgenic plants. In young seedlings the expression was in the order root > leaf > stem. The histochemical GUS assay in young seedlings showed more activity in root tips and leaf midribs, veins, and other vascular tissues. The expression from the PClSV FLt promoter was compared with that from the figwort mosaic virus promoter in transgenic plants. These constitutive promoters were comparable in respect to GUS expression level.

  15. Promoter/leader deletion analysis and plant expression vectors with the figwort mosaic virus (FMV) full length transcript (FLt) promoter containing single or double enhancer domains.

    PubMed

    Maiti, I B; Gowda, S; Kiernan, J; Ghosh, S K; Shepherd, R J

    1997-03-01

    The boundaries required for maximal expression from the promoter/leader region of the full length transcript of figwort mosaic virus (FLt promoter) coupled to reporter genes were defined by 5' and 3' deletion analyses. In transient expression assays using protoplasts of Nicotiana edwardsonii, a 314 bp FLt promoter fragment sequence (-249 to +65 from the transcription start site) was sufficient for strong expression activity. Plant expression vectors developed with modified FLt promoters were tested with GUS or CAT as reporter genes in transgenic plants. The FLt promoter is a strong constitutive promoter, with strength comparable to or greater than that of the CaMV 35S promoter. The FLt promoter with its double enhancer domain linked to GUS or CAT reporter genes provides an average 4-fold greater activity than the FLt promoter with a single enhancer domain (-55 to -249 bp upstream fragment) in tests with transgenic plants and in protoplast transient expression assays.

  16. Near full-length genome identification of a novel HIV type 1 B'/C recombinant isolate JL100091 in Jilin, China.

    PubMed

    Ning, Chuanyi; Li, Xingguang; He, Xiang; Xing, Hui; Hong, Kunxue; Yang, Rongge; Shao, Yiming

    2013-12-01

    We report here a novel HIV-1 B'/C recombinant isolate JL100091, identified from an HIV-positive female subject infected through heterosexual transmission in Jilin in 2006. The near full-length genome analyses of the novel recombinant (JL10091) showed that one subtype B' region (3,085 bp) was inserted into the subtype C backbone, with two breakpoints observed in gag and pol genes. To our knowledge, this is the first detection of a novel HIV-1 B'/C recombinant in Jilin, which indicates ongoing transmission of networks among the heterosexual population in the region. The novel HIV-1 B'/C recombinant (JL10091) in Jilin originated from India subtype C and China subtype B' may suggest potential transmission routes of HIV-1 in China. Further monitoring of the molecular epidemiology of the HIV-1 epidemic in Jilin will provide critical information for designing effective control and prevention measures against HIV transmission in the region.

  17. A general strategy for generating intact, full-length IgG antibodies that penetrate into the cytosol of living cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Dong-Ki; Bae, Jeomil; Shin, Seung-Min; Shin, Ju-Yeon; Kim, Sunghoon; Kim, Yong-Sung

    2014-01-01

    Full-length IgG antibodies cannot cross cell membranes of living cells; this limits their use for direct targeting of cytosolic proteins. Here, we describe a general strategy for the generation of intact, full-length IgG antibodies, herein called cytotransmabs, which internalize into living cells and localize in the cytosol. We first generated a humanized light chain variable domain (VL) that could penetrate into the cytosol of living cells and was engineered for association with various subtypes of human heavy chain variable domains (VHs). When light chains with humanized VL were co-expressed with 3 heavy chains (HCs), including 2 HCs of the clinically approved adalimumab (Humira®) and bevacizumab (Avastin®), all 3 purified IgG antibodies were internalized into the cytoplasm of living cells. Cytotransmabs primarily internalized into living cells by the clathrin-mediated endocytic pathway through interactions with heparin sulfate proteoglycan that was expressed on the cell surface. The cytotransmabs escaped into the cytosol from early endosomes without being further transported into other cellular compartments, like the lysosomes, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, and nucleus. Furthermore, we generated a cytotransmab that co-localized with the targeted cytosolic protein when it was incubated with living cells, demonstrating that the cytotransmab can directly target cytosolic proteins. Internalized cytotransmabs did not show any noticeable cytotoxicity and remained in the cytosol for more than 6 h before being degraded by proteosomes. These results suggest that cytotransmabs, which efficiently enter living cells and reach the cytosolic space, will find widespread uses as research, diagnostic, and therapeutic agents. PMID:25484049

  18. Novel insights into structure–function mechanism and tissue-specific expression profiling of full-length dxr gene from Cymbopogon winterianus

    PubMed Central

    Devi, Kamalakshi; Dehury, Budheswar; Phukon, Munmi; Modi, Mahendra Kumar; Sen, Priyabrata

    2015-01-01

    The 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR; EC1.1.1.267), an NADPH-dependent reductase, plays a pivotal role in the methylerythritol 4-phosphate pathway (MEP), in the conversion of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate (DXP) into MEP. The sheath and leaf of citronella (Cymbopogon winterianus) accumulates large amount of terpenes and sesquiterpenes with proven medicinal value and economic uses. Thus, sequencing of full length dxr gene and its characterization seems to be a valuable resource in metabolic engineering to alter the flux of isoprenoid active ingredients in plants. In this study, full length DXR from citronella was characterized through in silico and tissue-specific expression studies to explain its structure–function mechanism, mode of cofactor recognition and differential expression. The modelled DXR has a three-domain architecture and its active site comprised of a cofactor (NADPH) binding pocket and the substrate-binding pocket. Molecular dynamics simulation studies indicated that DXR model retained most of its secondary structure during 10 ns simulation in aqueous solution. The modelled DXR superimposes well with its closest structural homolog but subtle variations in the charge distribution over the cofactor recognition site were noticed. Molecular docking study revealed critical residues aiding tight anchoring NADPH within the active pocket of DXR. Tissue-specific differential expression analysis using semi-quantitative RT-PCR and qRT-PCR in various tissues of citronella plant revealed distinct differential expression of DXR. To our knowledge, this is the first ever report on DXR from the important medicinal plant citronella and further characterization of this gene will open up better avenues for metabolic engineering of secondary metabolite pathway genes from medicinal plants in the near future. PMID:25941629

  19. Comparative functional analysis of full-length and N-terminal fragments of phytochrome C, D and E in red light-induced signaling.

    PubMed

    Ádám, Éva; Kircher, Stefan; Liu, Peng; Mérai, Zsuzsanna; González-Schain, Nahuel; Hörner, Maximilian; Viczián, András; Monte, Elena; Sharrock, Robert A; Schäfer, Eberhard; Nagy, Ferenc

    2013-10-01

    Phytochromes (phy) C, D and E are involved in the regulation of red/far-red light-induced photomorphogenesis of Arabidopsis thaliana, but only limited data are available on the mode of action and biological function of these lesser studied phytochrome species. We fused N-terminal fragments or full-length PHYC, D and E to YELLOW FLUORESCENT PROTEIN (YFP), and analyzed the function, stability and intracellular distribution of these fusion proteins in planta. The activity of the constitutively nuclear-localized homodimers of N-terminal fragments was comparable with that of full-length PHYC, D, E-YFP, and resulted in the regulation of various red light-induced photomorphogenic responses in the studied genetic backgrounds. PHYE-YFP was active in the absence of phyB and phyD, and PHYE-YFP controlled responses, as well as accumulation, of the fusion protein in the nuclei, was saturated at low fluence rates of red light and did not require functional FAR-RED ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL1 (FHY-1) and FHY-1-like proteins. Our data suggest that PHYC-YFP, PHYD-YFP and PHYE-YFP fusion proteins, as well as their truncated N-terminal derivatives, are biologically active in the modulation of red light-regulated photomorphogenesis. We propose that PHYE-YFP can function as a homodimer and that low-fluence red light-induced translocation of phyE and phyA into the nuclei is mediated by different molecular mechanisms.

  20. Preparation and properties of pure, full-length IclR protein of Escherichia coli. Use of time-of-flight mass spectrometry to investigate the problems encountered.

    PubMed

    Donald, L J; Chernushevich, I V; Zhou, J; Verentchikov, A; Poppe-Schriemer, N; Hosfield, D J; Westmore, J B; Ens, W; Duckworth, H W; Standing, K G

    1996-08-01

    IclR protein, the repressor of the aceBAK operon of Escherichia coli, has been examined by time-of-flight mass spectrometry, with ionization by matrix assisted laser desorption or by electrospray. The purified protein was found to have a smaller mass than that predicted from the base sequence of the cloned iclR gene. Additional measurements were made on mixtures of peptides derived from IclR by treatment with trypsin and cyanogen bromide. They showed that the amino acid sequence is that predicted from the gene sequence, except that the protein has suffered truncation by removal of the N-terminal eight or, in some cases, nine amino acid residues. The peptide bond whose hydrolysis would remove eight residues is a typical target for the E. coli protease OmpT. We find that, by taking precautions to minimize Omp T proteolysis, or by eliminating it through mutation of the host strain, we can isolate full-length IclR protein (lacking only the N-terminal methionine residue). Full-length IclR is a much better DNA-binding protein than the truncated versions: it binds the aceBAK operator sequence 44-fold more tightly, presumably because of additional contacts that the N-terminal residues make with the DNA. Our experience thus demonstrates the advantages of using mass spectrometry to characterize newly purified proteins produced from cloned genes, especially where proteolysis or other covalent modification is a concern. This technique gives mass spectra from complex peptide mixtures that can be analyzed completely, without any fractionation of the mixtures, by reference to the amino acid sequence inferred from the base sequence of the cloned gene.

  1. Preparation and properties of pure, full-length IclR protein of Escherichia coli. Use of time-of-flight mass spectrometry to investigate the problems encountered.

    PubMed Central

    Donald, L. J.; Chernushevich, I. V.; Zhou, J.; Verentchikov, A.; Poppe-Schriemer, N.; Hosfield, D. J.; Westmore, J. B.; Ens, W.; Duckworth, H. W.; Standing, K. G.

    1996-01-01

    IclR protein, the repressor of the aceBAK operon of Escherichia coli, has been examined by time-of-flight mass spectrometry, with ionization by matrix assisted laser desorption or by electrospray. The purified protein was found to have a smaller mass than that predicted from the base sequence of the cloned iclR gene. Additional measurements were made on mixtures of peptides derived from IclR by treatment with trypsin and cyanogen bromide. They showed that the amino acid sequence is that predicted from the gene sequence, except that the protein has suffered truncation by removal of the N-terminal eight or, in some cases, nine amino acid residues. The peptide bond whose hydrolysis would remove eight residues is a typical target for the E. coli protease OmpT. We find that, by taking precautions to minimize Omp T proteolysis, or by eliminating it through mutation of the host strain, we can isolate full-length IclR protein (lacking only the N-terminal methionine residue). Full-length IclR is a much better DNA-binding protein than the truncated versions: it binds the aceBAK operator sequence 44-fold more tightly, presumably because of additional contacts that the N-terminal residues make with the DNA. Our experience thus demonstrates the advantages of using mass spectrometry to characterize newly purified proteins produced from cloned genes, especially where proteolysis or other covalent modification is a concern. This technique gives mass spectra from complex peptide mixtures that can be analyzed completely, without any fractionation of the mixtures, by reference to the amino acid sequence inferred from the base sequence of the cloned gene. PMID:8844850

  2. Structure of the Full-Length Bacteriophytochrome from the Plant Pathogen Xanthomonas campestris Provides Clues to its Long-Range Signaling Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Otero, Lisandro Horacio; Klinke, Sebastián; Rinaldi, Jimena; Velázquez-Escobar, Francisco; Mroginski, María Andrea; Fernández López, María; Malamud, Florencia; Vojnov, Adrián Alberto; Hildebrandt, Peter; Goldbaum, Fernando Alberto; Bonomi, Hernán Ruy

    2016-09-25

    Phytochromes constitute a major superfamily of light-sensing proteins that are reversibly photoconverted between a red-absorbing (Pr) and a far-red-absorbing (Pfr) state. Bacteriophytochromes (BphPs) are found among photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic bacteria, including pathogens. To date, several BphPs have been biophysically characterized. However, it is still not fully understood how structural changes are propagated from the photosensory module to the output module during the signal transduction event. Most phytochromes share a common architecture consisting of an N-terminal photosensor that includes the PAS2-GAF-PHY domain triad and a C-terminal variable output module. Here we present the crystal structure of the full-length BphP from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (XccBphP) bearing its photosensor and its complete output module, a PAS9 domain. In the crystals, the protein was found to be in the Pr state, whereas diffraction data together with resonance Raman spectroscopic and theoretical results indicate a ZZZssa and a ZZEssa chromophore configuration corresponding to a mixture of Pr and Meta-R state, the precursor of Pfr. The XccBphP quaternary assembly reveals a head-to-head dimer in which the output module contributes to the helical dimer interface. The photosensor, which is shown to be a bathy-like BphP, is influenced in its dark reactions by the output module. Our structural analyses suggest that the photoconversion between the Pr and Pfr states in the full-length XccBphP may involve changes in the relative positioning of the output module. This work contributes to understand the light-induced structural changes propagated from the photosensor to the output modules in phytochrome signaling.

  3. Copper and Zinc Interactions with Cellular Prion Proteins Change Solubility of Full-Length Glycosylated Isoforms and Induce the Occurrence of Heterogeneous Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Brim, Svetlana; Groschup, Martin H.; Kuczius, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Prion diseases are characterized biochemically by protein aggregation of infectious prion isoforms (PrPSc), which result from the conformational conversion of physiological prion proteins (PrPC). PrPC are variable post-translationally modified glycoproteins, which exist as full length and as aminoterminally truncated glycosylated proteins and which exhibit differential detergent solubility. This implicates the presence of heterogeneous phenotypes, which overlap as protein complexes at the same molecular masses. Although the biological function of PrPC is still enigmatic, evidence reveals that PrPC exhibits metal-binding properties, which result in structural changes and decreased solubility. In this study, we analyzed the yield of PrPC metal binding affiliated with low solubility and changes in protein banding patterns. By implementing a high-speed centrifugation step, the interaction of zinc ions with PrPC was shown to generate large quantities of proteins with low solubility, consisting mainly of full-length glycosylated PrPC; whereas unglycosylated PrPC remained in the supernatants as well as truncated glycosylated proteins which lack of octarepeat sequence necessary for metal binding. This effect was considerably lower when PrPC interacted with copper ions; the presence of other metals tested exhibited no effect under these conditions. The binding of zinc and copper to PrPC demonstrated differentially soluble protein yields within distinct PrPC subtypes. PrPC–Zn2+-interaction may provide a means to differentiate glycosylated and unglycosylated subtypes and offers detailed analysis of metal-bound and metal-free protein conversion assays. PMID:27093554

  4. Lysine-Specific Demethylase 1A (KDM1A/LSD1): Product Recognition and Kinetic Analysis of Full-Length Histones.

    PubMed

    Burg, Jonathan M; Gonzalez, Julie J; Maksimchuk, Kenneth R; McCafferty, Dewey G

    2016-03-22

    Lysine-specific demethylase 1A (KDM1A/LSD1) is a FAD-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative demethylation of histone H3K4me1/2 and H3K9me1/2 repressing and activating transcription, respectively. Although the active site is expanded compared to that of members of the greater amine oxidase superfamily, it is too sterically restricted to encompass the minimal 21-mer peptide substrate footprint. The remainder of the substrate/product is therefore expected to extend along the surface of KDM1A. We show that full-length histone H3, which lacks any posttranslational modifications, is a tight-binding, competitive inhibitor of KDM1A demethylation activity with a Ki of 18.9 ± 1.2 nM, a value that is approximately 100-fold higher than that of the 21-mer peptide product. The relative H3 affinity is independent of preincubation time, suggesting that H3 rapidly reaches equilibrium with KDM1A. Jump dilution experiments confirmed the increased binding affinity of full-length H3 was at least partially due to a slow off rate (koff) of 1.2 × 10(-3) s(-1), corresponding to a half-life (t1/2) of 9.63 min, and a residence time (τ) of 13.9 min. Independent affinity capture surface plasmon resonance experiments confirmed the tight-binding nature of the H3/KDM1A interaction, revealing a Kd of 9.02 ± 2.3 nM, a kon of (9.3 ± 1.5) × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1), and a koff of (8.4 ± 0.3) × 10(-4) s(-1). Additionally, no other core histones exhibited inhibition of KDM1A demethylation activity, which is consistent with H3 being the preferred histone substrate of KDM1A versus H2A, H2B, and H4. Together, these data suggest that KDM1A likely contains a histone H3 secondary specificity element on the enzyme surface that contributes significantly to its recognition of substrates and products.

  5. The CEA/CD3-Bispecific Antibody MEDI-565 (MT111) Binds a Nonlinear Epitope in the Full-Length but Not a Short Splice Variant of CEA

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiaqi; Brohawn, Philip; Morehouse, Chris; Lekstrom, Kristen; Baeuerle, Patrick A.; Wu, Herren; Yao, Yihong; Coats, Steven R.; Dall’Acqua, William; Damschroder, Melissa; Hammond, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    MEDI-565 (also known as MT111) is a bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE®) antibody in development for the treatment of patients with cancers expressing carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). MEDI-565 binds CEA on cancer cells and CD3 on T cells to induce T-cell mediated killing of cancer cells. To understand the molecular basis of human CEA recognition by MEDI-565 and how polymorphisms and spliced forms of CEA may affect MEDI-565 activity, we mapped the epitope of MEDI-565 on CEA using mutagenesis and homology modeling approaches. We found that MEDI-565 recognized a conformational epitope in the A2 domain comprised of amino acids 326–349 and 388–410, with critical residues F326, T328, N333, V388, G389, P390, E392, I408, and N410. Two non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs10407503, rs7249230) were identified in the epitope region, but they are found at low homozygosity rates. Searching the National Center for Biotechnology Information GenBank® database, we further identified a single, previously uncharacterized mRNA splice variant of CEA that lacks a portion of the N-terminal domain, the A1 and B1 domains, and a large portion of the A2 domain. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of multiple cancers showed widespread expression of full-length CEA in these tumors, with less frequent but concordant expression of the CEA splice variant. Because the epitope was largely absent from the CEA splice variant, MEDI-565 did not bind or mediate T-cell killing of cells solely expressing this form of CEA. In addition, the splice variant did not interfere with MEDI-565 binding or activity when co-expressed with full-length CEA. Thus MEDI-565 may broadly target CEA-positive tumors without regard for expression of the short splice variant of CEA. Together our data suggest that MEDI-565 activity will neither be impacted by SNPs nor by a splice variant of CEA. PMID:22574157

  6. Lysine-Specific Demethylase 1A (KDM1A/LSD1): Product Recognition and Kinetic Analysis of Full-Length Histones

    PubMed Central

    Burg, Jonathan M.; Gonzalez, Julie J.; Maksimchuk, Kenneth R.; McCafferty, Dewey G.

    2016-01-01

    Lysine-specific demethylase 1A (KDM1A/LSD1) is a FAD-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative demethylation of histone H3K4me1/2 and H3K9me1/2 repressing and activating transcription, respectively. Although the active site is expanded compared to that of members of the greater amine oxidase superfamily, it is too sterically restricted to encompass the minimal 21-mer peptide substrate footprint. The remainder of the substrate/product is therefore expected to extend along the surface of KDM1A. We show that full-length histone H3, which lacks any posttranslational modifications, is a tight-binding, competitive inhibitor of KDM1A demethylation activity with a Ki of 18.9 ± 1.2 nM, a value that is approximately 100-fold higher than that of the 21-mer peptide product. The relative H3 affinity is independent of preincubation time, suggesting that H3 rapidly reaches equilibrium with KDM1A. Jump dilution experiments confirmed the increased binding affinity of full-length H3 was at least partially due to a slow off rate (koff) of 1.2 × 10−3 s−1, corresponding to a half-life (t1/2) of 9.63 min, and a residence time (τ) of 13.9 min. Independent affinity capture surface plasmon resonance experiments confirmed the tight-binding nature of the H3/KDM1A interaction, revealing a Kd of 9.02 ± 2.3 nM, a kon of (9.3 ± 1.5) × 104 M−1 s−1, and a koff of (8.4 ± 0.3) × 10−4 s−1. Additionally, no other core histones exhibited inhibition of KDM1A demethylation activity, which is consistent with H3 being the preferred histone substrate of KDM1A versus H2A, H2B, and H4. Together, these data suggest that KDM1A likely contains a histone H3 secondary specificity element on the enzyme surface that contributes significantly to its recognition of substrates and products. PMID:26673564

  7. In contrast to agonist monoclonal antibodies, both C-terminal truncated form and full length form of Pleiotrophin failed to activate vertebrate ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase)?

    PubMed

    Mathivet, Thomas; Mazot, Pierre; Vigny, Marc

    2007-12-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase essentially and transiently expressed during development in specific regions of the central and peripheral nervous system. ALK expression persists at a lower level in the adult brain. Thus, it might play an important role in both the normal development and function of the nervous system. The nature of the cognate ligand of this receptor in vertebrates is still a matter of debate. Pleiotrophin and midkine have been proposed as ligands of ALK but several independent studies do not confirm this hypothesis. Interestingly, a recent study proposed that a C-terminal truncated form of Pleiotrophin (Pleiotrophin.15) and not the full length form (Pleiotrophin.18) promotes glioblastoma proliferation in an ALK-dependent fashion. These data were obviously a strong basis to conciliate the conflicting results so far reported in the literature. In the present study, we first purified to homogeneity the two forms of Pleiotrophin secreted by HEK 293 cells. In contrast to agonist monoclonal antibodies, both Pleiotrophin.15 and Pleiotrophin.18 failed to activate ALK in neuroblastoma and glioblastoma cells expressing this receptor. Thus, for our point of view, ALK is still an orphan receptor in vertebrates.

  8. A full-length bifunctional protein involved in c-di-GMP turnover is required for long-term survival under nutrient starvation in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Bharati, Binod K; Sharma, Indra Mani; Kasetty, Sanjay; Kumar, Manish; Mukherjee, Raju; Chatterji, Dipankar

    2012-06-01

    The bacterial second messenger cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) plays an important role in a variety of cellular functions, including biofilm formation, alterations in the cell surface, host colonization and regulation of bacterial flagellar motility, which enable bacteria to survive changing environmental conditions. The cellular level of c-di-GMP is regulated by a balance between opposing activities of diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) and cognate phosphodiesterases (PDE-As). Here, we report the presence and importance of a protein, MSDGC-1 (an orthologue of Rv1354c in Mycobacterium tuberculosis), involved in c-di-GMP turnover in Mycobacterium smegmatis. MSDGC-1 is a multidomain protein, having GAF, GGDEF and EAL domains arranged in tandem, and exhibits both c-di-GMP synthesis and degradation activities. Most other proteins containing GGDEF and EAL domains have been demonstrated to have either DGC or PDE-A activity. Unlike other bacteria, which harbour several copies of the protein involved in c-di-GMP turnover, M. smegmatis has a single genomic copy, deletion of which severely affects long-term survival under conditions of nutrient starvation. Overexpression of MSDGC-1 alters the colony morphology and growth profile of M. smegmatis. In order to gain insights into the regulation of the c-di-GMP level, we cloned individual domains and tested their activities. We observed a loss of activity in the separated domains, indicating the importance of full-length MSDGC-1 for controlling bifunctionality.

  9. Improvement of genome assembly completeness and identification of novel full-length protein-coding genes by RNA-seq in the giant panda genome

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meili; Hu, Yibo; Liu, Jingxing; Wu, Qi; Zhang, Chenglin; Yu, Jun; Xiao, Jingfa; Wei, Fuwen; Wu, Jiayan

    2015-01-01

    High-quality and complete gene models are the basis of whole genome analyses. The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) genome was the first genome sequenced on the basis of solely short reads, but the genome annotation had lacked the support of transcriptomic evidence. In this study, we applied RNA-seq to globally improve the genome assembly completeness and to detect novel expressed transcripts in 12 tissues from giant pandas, by using a transcriptome reconstruction strategy that combined reference-based and de novo methods. Several aspects of genome assembly completeness in the transcribed regions were effectively improved by the de novo assembled transcripts, including genome scaffolding, the detection of small-size assembly errors, the extension of scaffold/contig boundaries, and gap closure. Through expression and homology validation, we detected three groups of novel full-length protein-coding genes. A total of 12.62% of the novel protein-coding genes were validated by proteomic data. GO annotation analysis showed that some of the novel protein-coding genes were involved in pigmentation, anatomical structure formation and reproduction, which might be related to the development and evolution of the black-white pelage, pseudo-thumb and delayed embryonic implantation of giant pandas. The updated genome annotation will help further giant panda studies from both structural and functional perspectives. PMID:26658305

  10. Characterization of the cloned full-length and a truncated human target of rapamycin: Activity, specificity, and enzyme inhibition as studied by a high capacity assay

    SciTech Connect

    Toral-Barza, Lourdes; Zhang Weiguo; Lamison, Craig; LaRocque, James; Gibbons, James; Yu, Ker . E-mail: yuk@wyeth.com

    2005-06-24

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR/TOR) is implicated in cancer and other human disorders and thus an important target for therapeutic intervention. To study human TOR in vitro, we have produced in large scale both the full-length TOR (289 kDa) and a truncated TOR (132 kDa) from HEK293 cells. Both enzymes demonstrated a robust and specific catalytic activity towards the physiological substrate proteins, p70 S6 ribosomal protein kinase 1 (p70S6K1) and eIF4E binding protein 1 (4EBP1), as measured by phosphor-specific antibodies in Western blotting. We developed a high capacity dissociation-enhanced lanthanide fluorescence immunoassay (DELFIA) for analysis of kinetic parameters. The Michaelis constant (K {sub m}) values of TOR for ATP and the His6-S6K substrate were shown to be 50 and 0.8 {mu}M, respectively. Dose-response and inhibition mechanisms of several known inhibitors, the rapamycin-FKBP12 complex, wortmannin and LY294002, were also studied in DELFIA. Our data indicate that TOR exhibits kinetic features of those shared by traditional serine/threonine kinases and demonstrate the feasibility for TOR enzyme screen in searching for new inhibitors.

  11. Benchmark analysis of algorithms for determining and quantifying full-length mRNA splice forms from RNA-seq data

    PubMed Central

    Hayer, Katharina E.; Pizarro, Angel; Lahens, Nicholas F.; Hogenesch, John B.; Grant, Gregory R.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Because of the advantages of RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) over microarrays, it is gaining widespread popularity for highly parallel gene expression analysis. For example, RNA-Seq is expected to be able to provide accurate identification and quantification of full-length splice forms. A number of informatics packages have been developed for this purpose, but short reads make it a difficult problem in principle. Sequencing error and polymorphisms add further complications. It has become necessary to perform studies to determine which algorithms perform best and which if any algorithms perform adequately. However, there is a dearth of independent and unbiased benchmarking studies. Here we take an approach using both simulated and experimental benchmark data to evaluate their accuracy. Results: We conclude that most methods are inaccurate even using idealized data, and that no method is highly accurate once multiple splice forms, polymorphisms, intron signal, sequencing errors, alignment errors, annotation errors and other complicating factors are present. These results point to the pressing need for further algorithm development. Availability and implementation: Simulated datasets and other supporting information can be found at http://bioinf.itmat.upenn.edu/BEERS/bp2 Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. Contact: hayer@upenn.edu PMID:26338770

  12. Llama immunization with full-length VAR2CSA generates cross-reactive and inhibitory single-domain antibodies against the DBL1X domain

    PubMed Central

    Nunes-Silva, Sofia; Gangnard, Stéphane; Vidal, Marta; Vuchelen, Anneleen; Dechavanne, Sebastien; Chan, Sherwin; Pardon, Els; Steyaert, Jan; Ramboarina, Stephanie; Chêne, Arnaud; Gamain, Benoît

    2014-01-01

    VAR2CSA stands today as the leading vaccine candidate aiming to protect future pregnant women living in malaria endemic areas against the severe clinical outcomes of pregnancy associated malaria (PAM). The rational design of an efficient VAR2CSA-based vaccine relies on a profound understanding of the molecular interactions associated with P. falciparum infected erythrocyte sequestration in the placenta. Following immunization of a llama with the full-length VAR2CSA recombinant protein, we have expressed and characterized a panel of 19 nanobodies able to recognize the recombinant VAR2CSA as well as the surface of erythrocytes infected with parasites originating from different parts of the world. Domain mapping revealed that a large majority of nanobodies targeted DBL1X whereas a few of them were directed towards DBL4ε, DBL5ε and DBL6ε. One nanobody targeting the DBL1X was able to recognize the native VAR2CSA protein of the three parasite lines tested. Furthermore, four nanobodies targeting DBL1X reproducibly inhibited CSA adhesion of erythrocytes infected with the homologous NF54-CSA parasite strain, providing evidences that DBL1X domain is part or close to the CSA binding site. These nanobodies could serve as useful tools to identify conserved epitopes shared between different variants and to characterize the interactions between VAR2CSA and CSA. PMID:25487735

  13. Rearrangements Occurring Adjacent to a Single Ty1 Yeast Retrotransposon in the Presence and Absence of Full-Length Ty1 Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, P. R.; Liebman, S. W.

    1992-01-01

    The structures of two unusual deletions from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are described. These deletions extend from a single Ty1 retrotransposon to an endpoint near a repetitive tRNA(Gly) gene. The deletions suggest that unique sequences flanked by two nonidentical repetitive sequences, or bordered on only one side by a transposable element, have the potential to be mobilized in the yeast genome. Models for the formation of these two unusual deletions were tested by isolating and analyzing 32 additional unusual deletions of the CYC1 region that extend from a single Ty1 retrotransposon. Unlike the most common class of deletions recovered in this region, these deletions are not attributable solely to homologous recombination among repetitive Ty1 or delta elements. They arose by two distinct mechanisms. In an SPT8 genetic background, most unusual deletions arose by transposition of a Ty1 element to a position adjacent to a tRNA(Gly) gene followed by Ty1-Ty1 recombination. In an spt8 strain, where full-length Ty1 transcription and, therefore, transposition are reduced, most deletions were due to gene conversion of a 7-kb chromosomal interval flanked by a Ty1 element and a tRNA(Gly) gene. PMID:1325387

  14. Crystal structure of full-length Zika virus NS5 protein reveals a conformation similar to Japanese encephalitis virus NS5

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Anup K.; Longenecker, Kenton; Tripathi, Rakesh; Sun, Chaohong; Kempf, Dale J.

    2017-01-01

    The rapid spread of the recent Zika virus (ZIKV) epidemic across various countries in the American continent poses a major health hazard for the unborn fetuses of pregnant women. To date, there is no effective medical intervention. The nonstructural protein 5 of Zika virus (ZIKV-NS5) is critical for ZIKV replication through the 5′-RNA capping and RNA polymerase activities present in its N-terminal methyltransferase (MTase) and C-terminal RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domains, respectively. The crystal structure of the full-length ZIKV-NS5 protein has been determined at 3.05 Å resolution from a crystal belonging to space group P21212 and containing two protein molecules in the asymmetric unit. The structure is similar to that reported for the NS5 protein from Japanese encephalitis virus and suggests opportunities for structure-based drug design targeting either its MTase or RdRp domain. PMID:28291746

  15. Full-length L1 elements have arisen recently in the same 1-kb region of the gorilla and human genomes.

    PubMed

    DeBerardinis, R J; Kazazian, H H

    1998-09-01

    New copies of the mammalian retrotransposon L1 arise in the germline at an undetermined rate. Each new L1 copy appears at a specific evolutionary time point that can be estimated by phylogenetic analysis. In humans, the active L1 sequence L1.2 resides at the genomic locus LRE1. Here we analyzed the region surrounding the LRE1 locus in humans and gorillas to determine the evolutionary history of the region and to estimate the age of L1.2. We found that the region was composed of an ancient L1, L1Hs-Lrg, which was significantly divergent from all other L1 sequences available in the databases. We also determined that L1.2 was absent from the gorilla genome and arose in humans after the divergence of gorilla and human lineages. In the gorilla LRE1 region, we discovered a different full-length L1 element, L1Gg-1, which was allelic and present at a high gene frequency in gorillas but absent from other primates. We determined the nucleotide sequence of L1Gg-1 and found that it was 98% identical to L1.2, suggesting a close relationship between active L1s in gorillas and humans.

  16. Interaction of the Full-length Bax Protein with Biomimetic Mitochondrial Liposomes: A Small-Angle Neutron Scattering and Fluorescence Study

    SciTech Connect

    Satsoura, D; Kucerka, Norbert; Shivakumar, S; Pencer, J; Griffiths, C; Leber, B; Andrews, D.W; Katsaras, John; Fradin, C

    2012-01-01

    In response to apoptotic stimuli, the pro-apoptotic protein Bax inserts in the outer mitochondrial membrane, resulting in the formation of pores and the release of several mitochondrial components, and sealing the cell's fate. To study the binding of Bax to membranes, we used an in vitro system consisting of 50 nm diameter liposomes prepared with a lipid composition mimicking that of mitochondrial membranes in which recombinant purified full-length Bax was inserted via activation with purified tBid. We detected the association of the protein with the membrane using fluorescence fluctuation methods, and found that it could well be described by an equilibrium between soluble and membrane-bound Bax and that at a high protein-toliposome ratio the binding seemed to saturate at about 15 Bax proteins per 50 nm diameter liposome. We then obtained structural data for samples in this saturated binding regime using small-angle neutron scattering under different contrast matching conditions. Utilizing a simple model to fit the neutron data, we observed that a significant amount of the protein mass protrudes above the membrane, in contrast to the conjecture that all of the membrane-associated Bax states are umbrella-like. Upon protein binding, we also observed a thinning of the lipid bilayer accompanied by an increase in liposome radius, an effect reminiscent of the action of antimicrobial peptides on membranes.

  17. The N-terminal domain plays a crucial role in the structure of a full-length human mitochondrial Lon protease

    PubMed Central

    Kereïche, Sami; Kováčik, Lubomír; Bednár, Jan; Pevala, Vladimír; Kunová, Nina; Ondrovičová, Gabriela; Bauer, Jacob; Ambro, Ľuboš; Bellová, Jana; Kutejová, Eva; Raška, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Lon is an essential, multitasking AAA+ protease regulating many cellular processes in species across all kingdoms of life. Altered expression levels of the human mitochondrial Lon protease (hLon) are linked to serious diseases including myopathies, paraplegia, and cancer. Here, we present the first 3D structure of full-length hLon using cryo-electron microscopy. hLon has a unique three-dimensional structure, in which the proteolytic and ATP-binding domains (AP-domain) form a hexameric chamber, while the N-terminal domain is arranged as a trimer of dimers. These two domains are linked by a narrow trimeric channel composed likely of coiled-coil helices. In the presence of AMP-PNP, the AP-domain has a closed-ring conformation and its N-terminal entry gate appears closed, but in ADP binding, it switches to a lock-washer conformation and its N-terminal gate opens, which is accompanied by a rearrangement of the N-terminal domain. We have also found that both the enzymatic activities and the 3D structure of a hLon mutant lacking the first 156 amino acids are severely disturbed, showing that hLon’s N-terminal domains are crucial for the overall structure of the hLon, maintaining a conformation allowing its proper functioning. PMID:27632940

  18. A truncated fragment of Ov-ASP-1 consisting of the core pathogenesis-related-1 (PR-1) domain maintains adjuvanticity as the full-length protein.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jingjing; Yang, Yi; Xiao, Wenjun; Sun, Weilai; Yu, Hong; Du, Lanying; Lustigman, Sara; Jiang, Shibo; Kou, Zhihua; Zhou, Yusen

    2015-04-15

    The Onchocerca volvulus activation-associated secreted protein-1 (Ov-ASP-1) has good adjuvanticity for a variety of antigens and vaccines, probably due to its ability activate antigen-processing cells (APCs). However, the functional domain of Ov-ASP-1 as an adjuvant is not clearly defined. Based on the structural prediction of this protein family, we constructed a 16-kDa recombinant protein of Ov-ASP-1 that contains only the core pathogenesis-related-1 (PR-1) domain (residues 10-153), designated ASPPR. We found that ASPPR exhibits adjuvanticity similar to that of the full-length Ov-ASP-1 (residues 10-220) for various antigens, including ovalbumin (OVA), HBsAg protein antigen, and the HIV peptide 5 (Pep5) antigen, but it is more suitable for vaccine design in ASPPR-antigen fusion proteins, and more stable in PBS than Ov-ASP-1 stored at -70 °C. These results suggest that ASPPR might be the functional region of Ov-ASP-1 as an adjuvant, and therefore could be developed as an adjuvant for human use.

  19. Improvement of genome assembly completeness and identification of novel full-length protein-coding genes by RNA-seq in the giant panda genome.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meili; Hu, Yibo; Liu, Jingxing; Wu, Qi; Zhang, Chenglin; Yu, Jun; Xiao, Jingfa; Wei, Fuwen; Wu, Jiayan

    2015-12-11

    High-quality and complete gene models are the basis of whole genome analyses. The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) genome was the first genome sequenced on the basis of solely short reads, but the genome annotation had lacked the support of transcriptomic evidence. In this study, we applied RNA-seq to globally improve the genome assembly completeness and to detect novel expressed transcripts in 12 tissues from giant pandas, by using a transcriptome reconstruction strategy that combined reference-based and de novo methods. Several aspects of genome assembly completeness in the transcribed regions were effectively improved by the de novo assembled transcripts, including genome scaffolding, the detection of small-size assembly errors, the extension of scaffold/contig boundaries, and gap closure. Through expression and homology validation, we detected three groups of novel full-length protein-coding genes. A total of 12.62% of the novel protein-coding genes were validated by proteomic data. GO annotation analysis showed that some of the novel protein-coding genes were involved in pigmentation, anatomical structure formation and reproduction, which might be related to the development and evolution of the black-white pelage, pseudo-thumb and delayed embryonic implantation of giant pandas. The updated genome annotation will help further giant panda studies from both structural and functional perspectives.

  20. The insertion of a full-length Bos taurus LINE element is responsible for a transcriptional deregulation of the Normande Agouti gene.

    PubMed

    Girardot, Michael; Guibert, Sylvain; Laforet, Marie-Pierre; Gallard, Yves; Larroque, Hélène; Oulmouden, Ahmad

    2006-08-01

    Mammalian pigmentation is controlled by the concerted action of Tyr, Tyrp1 and Dct producing eumelanin and/or pheomelanin in melanocytes. The ratio of these two pigments is determined by the agonist alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone and the antagonist Agouti protein acting on the Mc1r. Here we show that the Agouti gene is over-expressed in Normande breed compared with Prim'Holstein breed. The Normande cattle have a characteristic coat color phenotype with a variable presence of black (eumelanin) hair over a red/brown background. We have found a previously undescribed full-length L1-BT element inserted in the 5'-genomic sequence of the Agouti gene in Normande cattle which promotes the over-expression of alternative transcripts. The variable expression of the alternative transcript directed by the long interspersed nuclear element promoter may be the origin of the brindle coat color pattern of the Normande breed. This new bovine Agouti allele isolated in Normande breed has been named Abr. Finally, as ectopic over-expression of Agouti in Ay mice is responsible for the obesity syndrome, we discuss the possible consequences of Abr for meat and milk production in cattle.

  1. Restoration of Full-Length SMN Promoted by Adenoviral Vectors Expressing RNA Antisense Oligonucleotides Embedded in U7 snRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Geib, Till; Hertel, Klemens J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disease that leads to specific loss of motor neurons. It is caused by deletions or mutations of the survival of motor neuron 1 gene (SMN1). The remaining copy of the gene, SMN2, generates only low levels of the SMN protein due to a mutation in SMN2 exon 7 that leads to exon skipping. Methodology/Principal Findings To correct SMN2 splicing, we use Adenovirus type 5–derived vectors to express SMN2-antisense U7 snRNA oligonucleotides targeting the SMN intron 7/exon 8 junction. Infection of SMA type I–derived patient fibroblasts with these vectors resulted in increased levels of exon 7 inclusion, upregulating the expression of SMN to similar levels as in non–SMA control cells. Conclusions/Significance These results show that Adenovirus type 5–derived vectors delivering U7 antisense oligonucleotides can efficiently restore full-length SMN protein and suggest that the viral vector-mediated oligonucleotide application may be a suitable therapeutic approach to counteract SMA. PMID:19997596

  2. A Novel Drug-Resistant HIV-1 Circulating Recombinant Form CRF76_01B Identified by Near Full-Length Genome Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Satoko; Hachiya, Atsuko; Hosaka, Masumi; Matsuda, Masakazu; Ode, Hirotaka; Shigemi, Urara; Okazaki, Reiko; Sadamasu, Kenji; Nagashima, Mami; Toyokawa, Takao; Tateyama, Masao; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Sugiura, Wataru; Yokomaku, Yoshiyuki; Iwatani, Yasumasa

    2016-03-01

    HIV-1 CRF01_AE and subtype B (B) have dominated and their different circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) have emerged in East and Southeast Asian countries. Here, we report a novel drug-resistant HIV-1 CRF. Five independent recombinant specimens exhibiting discordant subtype results for the gag, pol, and env sequences were isolated. These recombinants had the CRF01_AE (gag p17)/B (pol PR-RT and IN)/CRF01_AE (env C2-V3) pattern similar to CRF69_01B. Sequence analysis of four near full-length HIV-1 genomes revealed a unique phylogenetic cluster distinct from previously reported CRFs. Of the four recombinants, three shared an identical mosaic structure including seven breakpoints in the gag, pol, vif, and env regions, designated CRF76_01B. The one remaining recombinant had additional recombination breakpoints in the vpu region and exhibited another unique recombinant form composed of CRF76_01B and B. These findings provide important insight into the transmission dynamics of HIV-1 in Asia that may be important for its effective prevention.

  3. Near full-length genome identification of a novel HIV-1 recombinant form (CRF01_AE/B'/C) among heterosexuals in Jilin, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingguang; Ning, Chuanyi; Chen, Yanli; Feng, Yi; Wei, Min; Xing, Hui; Shao, Yiming

    2014-07-01

    Recombinant forms contribute significantly to the genetic diversity of HIV-1. Here we report a novel HIV-1 recombinant form (CRF01_AE/B'/C) detected from a comprehensive HIV-1 molecular epidemiologic study among heterosexuals in Jilin province of northeastern China. Recombinant analyses of the near full-length genome (NFLG) of the novel HIV-1 recombinant isolate (JL.RF01) showed that the backbone of the genome was CRF01_AE, and three insertions of subtype B' (242, 370, and 233 bp) and C (1142, 230, and 271 bp), respectively, were inserted along the genome. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the novel HIV-1 recombinant form (CRF01_AE/B'/C) more likely originated from Thailand subtype B' and CRF01_AE and India subtype C. We report a unique mosaic structure that is distinct to HIV-1 CRF01_AE/B'/C recombinant viruses reported to date. The emergence of this novel recombinant form (CRF01_AE/B'/C) suggests the increasing significance of heterosexual transmission contributing to the complexity of the HIV-1 epidemic in northeastern China.

  4. Multiplexed next-generation sequencing and de novo assembly to obtain near full-length HIV-1 genome from plasma virus.

    PubMed

    Aralaguppe, Shambhu G; Siddik, Abu Bakar; Manickam, Ashokkumar; Ambikan, Anoop T; Kumar, Milner M; Fernandes, Sunjay Jude; Amogne, Wondwossen; Bangaruswamy, Dhinoth K; Hanna, Luke Elizabeth; Sonnerborg, Anders; Neogi, Ujjwal

    2016-10-01

    Analysing the HIV-1 near full-length genome (HIV-NFLG) facilitates new understanding into the diversity of virus population dynamics at individual or population level. In this study we developed a simple but high-throughput next generation sequencing (NGS) protocol for HIV-NFLG using clinical specimens and validated the method against an external quality control (EQC) panel. Clinical specimens (n=105) were obtained from three cohorts from two highly conserved HIV-1C epidemics (India and Ethiopia) and one diverse epidemic (Sweden). Additionally an EQC panel (n=10) was used to validate the protocol. HIV-NFLG was performed amplifying the HIV-genome (Gag-to-nef) in two fragments. NGS was performed using the Illumina HiSeq2500 after multiplexing 24 samples, followed by de novo assembly in Iterative Virus Assembler or VICUNA. Subtyping was carried out using several bioinformatics tools. Amplification of HIV-NFLG has 90% (95/105) success-rate in clinical specimens. NGS was successful in all clinical specimens (n=45) and EQA samples (n=10) attempted. The mean error for mutations for the EQC panel viruses were <1%. Subtyping identified two as A1C recombinant. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of a simple NGS-based HIV-NFLG that can potentially be used in the molecular surveillance for effective identification of subtypes and transmission clusters for operational public health intervention.

  5. The identification of a novel HIV-1 CRF01_AE/B recombinant using the near full length genome in Jiangsu Province, China.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongxiong; Hu, Haiyang; Zhou, Ying; Huan, Xiping; Qiu, Tao; Fu, Gengfeng; Lu, Jing; Wang, Xiaoliang

    2014-12-01

    CRF01_AE and subtype B are the two major HIV-1 clades circulating in China. Heterosexual transmission is the predominant route for the spread of HIV and heterosexuals often include men who have sex with men and intravenous drug users. Furthermore, many kinds of circulating recombinant forms (CRF) and unique recombinant forms (URF) between CRF01_AE and subtype B were recently identified in Southeast Asia. Therefore it is inevitable that the new recombinant of CRF01_AE/B will emerge among them. Here we identified a novel recombinant of CRF01_AE/B, isolated from heterosexuals, which has a distinctly different genome structure from other CRF01Bs and URFs reported before. The analysis of the near full-length sequence of JS2011001 shows that it is composed of at least five interlaced CRF01_AE and B segments. Recently, many kinds of URFs and CRFs began to prevail within a short period in China, which implies that a mix of HIV-1 infections is common in China and more attention should focus on it.

  6. The analysis of near full-length genome sequences of HIV type 1 subtype A viruses from Russia supports the monophyly of major intrasubtype clusters.

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, Aurora; Revilla, Ana; Vázquez-de Parga, Elena; Vinogradova, Anna; Rakhmanova, Aza; Karamov, Eduard; Carrera, Cristina; Delgado, Elena; Pérez-Álvarez, Lucía; Nájera, Rafael; Osmanov, Saladin; Thomson, Michael M

    2012-10-01

    The HIV-1 epidemic in Russia has been insufficiently studied, with only 11 complete genome sequences from this country currently available, only three of which are of the locally predominant genetic form, the former Soviet Union (FSU) subtype A variant (A(FSU)). Here we analyze 10 newly derived A(FSU) near full-length genome sequences from Russia. Samples were selected based on phylogenetic clustering in protease-reverse transcriptase in two of the major A(FSU) clusters, V77I(PR) (n=6), widely circulating in Russia and other FSU countries, and A(SP1) (n=4), predominant in St. Petersburg. The phylogenetic analysis shows that the V77I(PR) genomes group in a monophyletic cluster together with 10 previously obtained A(FSU) genome sequences from Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, Russia, and Cyprus, all bearing the V77I substitution in protease. Similarly, the four A(SP1) genomes group in a monophyletic cluster. These results therefore show that the monophyly of V77I(PR) and A(SP1) A(FSU) clusters is supported in near complete genomes.

  7. Llama immunization with full-length VAR2CSA generates cross-reactive and inhibitory single-domain antibodies against the DBL1X domain.

    PubMed

    Nunes-Silva, Sofia; Gangnard, Stéphane; Vidal, Marta; Vuchelen, Anneleen; Dechavanne, Sebastien; Chan, Sherwin; Pardon, Els; Steyaert, Jan; Ramboarina, Stephanie; Chêne, Arnaud; Gamain, Benoît

    2014-12-09

    VAR2CSA stands today as the leading vaccine candidate aiming to protect future pregnant women living in malaria endemic areas against the severe clinical outcomes of pregnancy associated malaria (PAM). The rational design of an efficient VAR2CSA-based vaccine relies on a profound understanding of the molecular interactions associated with P. falciparum infected erythrocyte sequestration in the placenta. Following immunization of a llama with the full-length VAR2CSA recombinant protein, we have expressed and characterized a panel of 19 nanobodies able to recognize the recombinant VAR2CSA as well as the surface of erythrocytes infected with parasites originating from different parts of the world. Domain mapping revealed that a large majority of nanobodies targeted DBL1X whereas a few of them were directed towards DBL4ε, DBL5ε and DBL6ε. One nanobody targeting the DBL1X was able to recognize the native VAR2CSA protein of the three parasite lines tested. Furthermore, four nanobodies targeting DBL1X reproducibly inhibited CSA adhesion of erythrocytes infected with the homologous NF54-CSA parasite strain, providing evidences that DBL1X domain is part or close to the CSA binding site. These nanobodies could serve as useful tools to identify conserved epitopes shared between different variants and to characterize the interactions between VAR2CSA and CSA.

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of the full-length bacteriophytochrome from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris.

    PubMed

    Klinke, Sebastián; Otero, Lisandro H; Rinaldi, Jimena; Sosa, Santiago; Guimarães, Beatriz G; Shepard, William E; Goldbaum, Fernando A; Bonomi, Hernán R

    2014-12-01

    Phytochromes give rise to the largest photosensor family known to date. However, they are underrepresented in the Protein Data Bank. Plant, cyanobacterial, fungal and bacterial phytochromes share a canonical architecture consisting of an N-terminal photosensory module (PAS2-GAF-PHY domains) and a C-terminal variable output module. The bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, a worldwide agricultural pathogen, codes for a single bacteriophytochrome (XccBphP) that has this canonical architecture, bearing a C-terminal PAS9 domain as the output module. Full-length XccBphP was cloned, expressed and purified to homogeneity by nickel-NTA affinity and size-exclusion chromatography and was then crystallized at room temperature bound to its cofactor biliverdin. A complete native X-ray diffraction data set was collected to a maximum resolution of 3.25 Å. The crystals belonged to space group P43212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 103.94, c = 344.57 Å and a dimer in the asymmetric unit. Refinement is underway after solving the structure by molecular replacement.

  9. The Analysis of Near Full-Length Genome Sequences of HIV Type 1 Subtype A Viruses from Russia Supports the Monophyly of Major Intrasubtype Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-García, Aurora; Revilla, Ana; Vázquez-de Parga, Elena; Vinogradova, Anna; Rakhmanova, Aza; Karamov, Eduard; Carrera, Cristina; Delgado, Elena; Pérez-Álvarez, Lucía; Nájera, Rafael; Osmanov, Saladin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The HIV-1 epidemic in Russia has been insufficiently studied, with only 11 complete genome sequences from this country currently available, only three of which are of the locally predominant genetic form, the former Soviet Union (FSU) subtype A variant (AFSU). Here we analyze 10 newly derived AFSU near full-length genome sequences from Russia. Samples were selected based on phylogenetic clustering in protease-reverse transcriptase in two of the major AFSU clusters, V77IPR (n=6), widely circulating in Russia and other FSU countries, and ASP1 (n=4), predominant in St. Petersburg. The phylogenetic analysis shows that the V77IPR genomes group in a monophyletic cluster together with 10 previously obtained AFSU genome sequences from Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, Russia, and Cyprus, all bearing the V77I substitution in protease. Similarly, the four ASP1 genomes group in a monophyletic cluster. These results therefore show that the monophyly of V77IPR and ASP1 AFSU clusters is supported in near complete genomes. PMID:22251084

  10. TALENs-directed knockout of the full-length transcription factor Nrf1α that represses malignant behaviour of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yonggang; Qiu, Lu; Lü, Fenglin; Ru, Xufang; Li, Shaojun; Xiang, Yuancai; Yu, Siwang; Zhang, Yiguo

    2016-04-11

    The full-length Nrf1α is processed into distinct isoforms, which together regulate genes essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and organ integrity, and liver-specific loss of Nrf1 in mice results in spontaneous hepatoma. Herein, we report that the human constitutive Nrf1α, rather than smaller Nrf1β/γ, expression is attenuated or abolished in the case of low-differentiated high-metastatic hepatocellular carcinomas. Therefore, Nrf1α is of importance in the physio-pathological origin and development, but its specific pathobiological function(s) remains elusive. To address this, TALENs-directed knockout of Nrf1α, but not Nrf1β/γ, is created in the human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells. The resulting Nrf1α(-/-) cells are elongated, with slender spindle-shapes and enlarged gaps between cells observed under scanning electron microscope. When compared with wild-type controls, the invasive and migratory abilities of Nrf1α(-/-) cells are increased significantly, along with the cell-cycle G2-M arrest and S-phase reduction, as accompanied by suppressed apoptosis. Despite a modest increase in the soft-agar colony formation of Nrf1α(-/-) cells, its loss-of-function markedly promotes malgrowth of the subcutaneous carcinoma xenograft in nude mice with hepatic metastasis. Together with molecular expression results, we thus suppose requirement of Nrf1α (and major derivates) for gene regulatory mechanisms repressing cancer cell process (e.g. EMT) and malignant behaviour (e.g. migration).

  11. Conservation of a portion of the S. cerevisiae Ure2p prion domain that interacts with the full-length protein

    PubMed Central

    Edskes, Herman K.; Wickner, Reed B.

    2002-01-01

    The [URE3] prion of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a self-propagating inactive amyloid form of the Ure2 protein. Ure2p residues 1–65 constitute the prion domain, and the remaining C-terminal portion regulates nitrogen catabolism. We have examined the URE2 genes of wild-type isolates of S. cerevisiae and those of several pathogenic yeasts and a filamentous fungus. We find that the normal function of the S. cerevisiae Ure2p in nitrogen regulation is fully complemented by the Ure2p of Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida kefyr, Candida maltosa, Saccharomyces bayanus, and Saccharomyces paradoxus, all of which have high homology in the C-terminal nitrogen regulation domain. However, there is considerable divergence of their N-terminal domains from that of Ure2p of S. cerevisiae. [URE3Sc] showed efficient transmission into S. cerevisiae ure2Δ cells if expressing a Ure2p of species within Saccharomyces. However, [URE3Sc] did not seed self-propagating inactivation of the Ure2p's from the other yeasts. When overexpressed as a fusion with green fluorescent protein, residues 5–47 of the S. cerevisiae prion domain are necessary for curing the [URE3] prion. Residues 11–39 are necessary for an inactivating interaction with the full-length Ure2p. A nearly identical region is highly conserved among many of the yeasts examined in this study, despite the wide divergence of sequences found in other parts of the N-terminal domains. PMID:12177423

  12. TALENs-directed knockout of the full-length transcription factor Nrf1α that represses malignant behaviour of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yonggang; Qiu, Lu; Lü, Fenglin; Ru, Xufang; Li, Shaojun; Xiang, Yuancai; Yu, Siwang; Zhang, Yiguo

    2016-01-01

    The full-length Nrf1α is processed into distinct isoforms, which together regulate genes essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and organ integrity, and liver-specific loss of Nrf1 in mice results in spontaneous hepatoma. Herein, we report that the human constitutive Nrf1α, rather than smaller Nrf1β/γ, expression is attenuated or abolished in the case of low-differentiated high-metastatic hepatocellular carcinomas. Therefore, Nrf1α is of importance in the physio-pathological origin and development, but its specific pathobiological function(s) remains elusive. To address this, TALENs-directed knockout of Nrf1α, but not Nrf1β/γ, is created in the human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells. The resulting Nrf1α−/− cells are elongated, with slender spindle-shapes and enlarged gaps between cells observed under scanning electron microscope. When compared with wild-type controls, the invasive and migratory abilities of Nrf1α−/− cells are increased significantly, along with the cell-cycle G2-M arrest and S-phase reduction, as accompanied by suppressed apoptosis. Despite a modest increase in the soft-agar colony formation of Nrf1α−/− cells, its loss-of-function markedly promotes malgrowth of the subcutaneous carcinoma xenograft in nude mice with hepatic metastasis. Together with molecular expression results, we thus suppose requirement of Nrf1α (and major derivates) for gene regulatory mechanisms repressing cancer cell process (e.g. EMT) and malignant behaviour (e.g. migration). PMID:27065079

  13. Proteome Analysis of Liver Cells Expressing a Full- Length Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Replicon and Biopsy Specimens of Posttransplantation Liver from HCV-Infected Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Jon M.; Diamond, Deborah L.; Chan, Eric Y.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Qian, Weijun; Stastna, Miroslava; Baas, Tracey; Camp, David G.; Carithers, Jr., Robert L.; Smith, Richard D.; Katze, Michael G.

    2005-06-01

    The development of a reproducible model system for the study of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has the potential to significantly enhance the study of virus-host interactions and provide future direction for modeling the pathogenesis of HCV. While there are studies describing global gene expression changes associated with HCV infection, changes in the proteome have not been characterized. We report the first large scale proteome analysis of the highly permissive Huh-7.5 cell line containing a full length HCV replicon. We detected > 4,400 proteins in this cell line, including HCV replicon proteins, using multidimensional liquid chromatographic (LC) separations coupled to mass spectrometry (MS). The set of Huh-7.5 proteins confidently identified is, to our knowledge, the most comprehensive yet reported for a human cell line. Consistent with the literature, a comparison of Huh-7.5 cells (+) and (-) the HCV replicon identified expression changes of proteins involved in lipid metabolism. We extended these analyses to liver biopsy material from HCV-infected patients where > 1,500 proteins were detected from 2 {micro}g protein lysate using the Huh-7.5 protein database and the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag strategy. These findings demonstrate the utility of multidimensional proteome analysis of the HCV replicon model system for assisting the determination of proteins/pathways affected by HCV infection. Our ability to extend these analyses to the highly complex proteome of small liver biopsies with limiting protein yields offers the unique opportunity to begin evaluating the clinical significance of protein expression changes associated with HCV infection.

  14. Sequencing and Phylogenetic Analysis of Near Full-Length HIV-1 Subtypes A, B, G and Unique Recombinant AC and AD Viral Strains Identified in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Eduan; Holzmayer, Vera; Jacobs, Graeme B.; de Oliveira, Tulio; Brennan, Catherine A.; Hackett, John; van Rensburg, Estrelita Janse

    2015-01-01

    Abstract By the end of 2012, more than 6.1 million people were infected with HIV-1 in South Africa. Subtype C was responsible for the majority of these infections and more than 300 near full-length genomes (NFLGs) have been published. Currently very few non-subtype C isolates have been identified and characterized within the country, particularly full genome non-C isolates. Seven patients from the Tygerberg Virology (TV) cohort were previously identified as possible non-C subtypes and were selected for further analyses. RNA was isolated from five individuals (TV047, TV096, TV101, TV218, and TV546) and DNA from TV016 and TV1057. The NFLGs of these samples were amplified in overlapping fragments and sequenced. Online subtyping tools REGA version 3 and jpHMM were used to screen for subtypes and recombinants. Maximum likelihood (ML) phylogenetic analysis (phyML) was used to infer subtypes and SimPlot was used to confirm possible intersubtype recombinants. We identified three subtype B (TV016, TV047, and TV1057) isolates, one subtype A1 (TV096), one subtype G (TV546), one unique AD (TV101), and one unique AC (TV218) recombinant form. This is the first NFLG of subtype G that has been described in South Africa. The subtype B sequences described also increased the NFLG subtype B sequences in Africa from three to six. There is a need for more NFLG sequences, as partial HIV-1 sequences may underrepresent viral recombinant forms. It is also necessary to continue monitoring the evolution and spread of HIV-1 in South Africa, because understanding viral diversity may play an important role in HIV-1 prevention strategies. PMID:25492033

  15. Cloning and recombinant expression of active full-length xylosyltransferase I (XT-I) and characterization of subcellular localization of XT-I and XT-II.

    PubMed

    Schön, Sylvia; Prante, Christian; Bahr, Claudia; Kuhn, Joachim; Kleesiek, Knut; Götting, Christian

    2006-05-19

    Xylosyltransferase I (XT-I) catalyzes the transfer of xylose from UDP-xylose to serine residues in proteoglycan core proteins. This is the first and apparently rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of the tetrasaccharide linkage region in glycosaminoglycan-containing proteoglycans. The XYLT-II gene codes for a highly homologous protein, but its physiological function is not yet known. Here we present for the first time the construction of a vector encoding the full-length GFP-tagged human XT-I and the recombinant expression of the active enzyme in mammalian cells. We expressed XT-I-GFP and various GFP-tagged XT-I and XT-II mutants with C-terminal truncations and deletions in HEK-293 and SaOS-2 cells in order to investigate the intracellular localization of XT-I and XT-II. Immunofluorescence analysis showed a distinct perinuclear pattern of XT-I-GFP and XT-II-GFP similar to that of alpha-mannosidase II, which is a known enzyme of the Golgi cisternae. Furthermore, a co-localization of native human XT-I and alpha-mannosidase II could also be demonstrated in untransfected cells. Using brefeldin A, we could also show that both xylosyltransferases are resident in the early cisternae of the Golgi apparatus. For its complete Golgi retention, XT-I requires the N-terminal 214 amino acids. Unlike XT-I, for XT-II, the first 45 amino acids are sufficient to target and retain the GFP reporter in the Golgi compartment. Here we show evidence that the stem regions were indispensable for Golgi localization of XT-I and XT-II.

  16. Effect of the electrostatic surface potential on the oligomerization of full-length human recombinant prion protein at single-molecule level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Lou, Zhichao; Zhang, Haiqian; Xu, Bingqian

    2016-03-01

    The electrostatic surface potential (ESP) of prion oligomers has critical influences on the aggregating processes of the prion molecules. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) and structural simulation were combined to investigate the molecular basis of the full-length human recombinant prion oligomerization on mica surfaces. The high resolution non-intrusive AFM images showed that the prion oligomers formed different patterns on mica surfaces at different buffer pH values. The basic binding units for the large oligomers were determined to be prion momoners (Ms), dimers (Ds), and trimers (Ts). The forming of the D and T units happened through the binding of hydrophobic β-sheets of the M units. In contrast, the α-helices of these M, D, and T units were the binding areas for the formation of large oligomers. At pH 4.5, the binding units M, D, and T showed clear polarized ESP distributions on the surface domains, while at pH 7.0, they showed more evenly distributed ESPs. Based on the conformations of oligomers observed from AFM images, the D and T units were more abundantly on mica surface at pH 4.5 because the ESP re-distribution of M units helped to stabilize these larger oligomers. The amino acid side chains involved in the binding interfaces were stabilized by hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions. The detailed analysis of the charged side chains at pH 4.5 indicated that the polarized ESPs induced the aggregations among M, D, and T to form larger oligomers. Therefore, the hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions worked together to form the stabilized prion oligomers.

  17. High level of full-length cereblon mRNA in lower risk myelodysplastic syndrome with isolated 5q deletion is implicated in the efficacy of lenalidomide.

    PubMed

    Jonasova, Anna; Bokorova, Radka; Polak, Jaroslav; Vostry, Martin; Kostecka, Arnost; Hajkova, Hana; Neuwirtova, Radana; Siskova, Magda; Sponerova, Dana; Cermak, Jaroslav; Mikulenkova, Dana; Cervinek, Libor; Brezinova, Jana; Michalova, Kyra; Fuchs, Ota

    2015-07-01

    Downregulation of cereblon (CRBN) gene expression is associated with resistance to the immunomodulatory drug lenalidomide and poor survival outcomes in multiple myeloma (MM) patients. However, the importance of CRBN gene expression in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and its impact on lenalidomide therapy are not clear. In this study, we evaluate cereblon expression in mononuclear cells isolated from bone marrow [23 lower risk MDS patients with isolated 5q deletion (5q-), 37 lower risk MDS patients with chromosome 5 without the deletion of long arms (non-5q-), and 24 healthy controls] and from peripheral blood (38 patients with 5q-, 52 non-5q- patients and 25 healthy controls) to gain insight into, firstly, the role of cereblon in lower risk MDS patients with or without 5q deletion and, secondly, into the mechanisms of lenalidomide action. Patients with 5q- lower risk MDS have the highest levels of CRBN mRNA in comparison with both lower risk MDS without the deletion of long arms of chromosome 5 and healthy controls. CRBN gene expression was measured using the quantitative TaqMan real-time PCR. High levels of CRBN mRNA were detected in all lenalidomide responders during the course of therapy. A significant decrease of the CRBN mRNA level during lenalidomide treatment is associated with loss of response to treatment and disease progression. These results suggest that, similar to the treatment of MM, high levels of full-length CRBN mRNA in lower risk 5q- patients are necessary for the efficacy of lenalidomide.

  18. Tetrapeptide Endomorphin Analogs Require Both Full Length and Truncated Splice Variants of the Mu Opioid Receptor Gene Oprm1 for Analgesia.

    PubMed

    Marrone, Gina F; Lu, Zhigang; Rossi, Grace; Narayan, Ankita; Hunkele, Amanda; Marx, Sarah; Xu, Jin; Pintar, John; Majumdar, Susruta; Pan, Ying-Xian; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2016-12-21

    The mu opioid receptor gene undergoes extensive alternative splicing. Mu opioids can be divided into three classes based on the role of different groups of splice variants. Morphine and methadone require only full length seven transmembrane (7TM) variants for analgesia, whereas IBNtxA (3'-iodobenzyol-6β-naltrexamide) needs only truncated 6TM variants. A set of endomorphin analogs fall into a third group that requires both 6TM and 7TM splice variants. Unlike morphine, endomorphin 1 and 2, DAPP (Dmt,d-Ala-Phe-Phe-NH2), and IDAPP (3'-iodo-Dmt-d-Ala-Phe-Phe-NH2) analgesia was lost in an exon 11 knockout mouse lacking 6TM variants. Restoring 6TM variant expression in a knockout mouse lacking both 6TM and 7TM variants failed to rescue DAPP or IDAPP analgesia. However, re-establishing 6TM expression in an exon 11 knockout mouse that still expressed 7TM variants did rescue the response, consistent with the need for both 6TM and 7TM variants. In receptor binding assays, (125)I-IDAPP labeled more sites (Bmax) than (3)H-DAMGO ([d-Ala(2),N-MePhe(4),Gly(ol)(5)]-enkephalin) in wild-type mice. In exon 11 knockout mice, (125)I-IDAPP binding was lowered to levels similar to (3)H-DAMGO, which remained relatively unchanged compared to wild-type mice. (125)I-IDAPP binding was totally lost in an exon 1/exon 11 knockout model lacking all Oprm1 variant expression, confirming that the drug was not cross labeling non-mu opioid receptors. These findings suggested that (125)I-IDAPP labeled two populations of mu binding sites in wild-type mice, one corresponding to 7TM variants and the second dependent upon 6TM variants. Together, these data indicate that endomorphin analogs represent a unique, genetically defined, and distinct class of mu opioid analgesic.

  19. Amyloid Core Formed of Full-Length Recombinant Mouse Prion Protein Involves Sequence 127–143 but Not Sequence 107–126

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Biswanath; Lee, Chung-Yu; Lin, Chen; Chen, Eric H.-L.; Huang, Chao-Li; Yang, Chien-Chih; Chen, Rita P.-Y.

    2013-01-01

    The principal event underlying the development of prion disease is the conversion of soluble cellular prion protein (PrPC) into its disease-causing isoform, PrPSc. This conversion is associated with a marked change in secondary structure from predominantly α-helical to a high β-sheet content, ultimately leading to the formation of aggregates consisting of ordered fibrillar assemblies referred to as amyloid. In vitro, recombinant prion proteins and short prion peptides from various species have been shown to form amyloid under various conditions and it has been proposed that, theoretically, any protein and peptide could form amyloid under appropriate conditions. To identify the peptide segment involved in the amyloid core formed from recombinant full-length mouse prion protein mPrP(23–230), we carried out seed-induced amyloid formation from recombinant prion protein in the presence of seeds generated from the short prion peptides mPrP(107–143), mPrP(107–126), and mPrP(127–143). Our results showed that the amyloid fibrils formed from mPrP(107–143) and mPrP(127–143), but not those formed from mPrP(107–126), were able to seed the amyloidogenesis of mPrP(23–230), showing that the segment residing in sequence 127–143 was used to form the amyloid core in the fibrillization of mPrP(23–230). PMID:23844138

  20. BAY 81-8973, a full-length recombinant factor VIII: Human heat shock protein 70 improves the manufacturing process without affecting clinical safety.

    PubMed

    Maas Enriquez, Monika; Thrift, John; Garger, Stephen; Katterle, Yvonne

    2016-11-01

    BAY 81-8973 is a full-length, unmodified recombinant human factor VIII (FVIII) approved for the treatment of hemophilia A. BAY 81-8973 has the same amino acid sequence as the currently marketed sucrose-formulated recombinant FVIII (rFVIII-FS) product and is produced using additional advanced manufacturing technologies. One of the key manufacturing advances for BAY 81-8973 is introduction of the gene for human heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) into the rFVIII-FS cell line. HSP70 facilitates proper folding of proteins, enhances cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis, and potentially impacts rFVIII glycosylation. HSP70 expression in the BAY 81-8973 cell line along with other manufacturing advances resulted in a higher-producing cell line and improvements in the pharmacokinetics of the final product as determined in clinical studies. HSP70 protein is not detected in the harvest or in the final BAY 81-8973 product. However, because this is a new process, clinical trial safety assessments included monitoring for anti-HSP70 antibodies. Most patients, across all age groups, had low levels of anti-HSP70 antibodies before exposure to the investigational product. During BAY 81-8973 treatment, 5% of patients had sporadic increases in anti-HSP70 antibody levels above a predefined threshold (cutoff value, 239 ng/mL). No clinical symptoms related to anti-HSP70 antibody development occurred. In conclusion, addition of HSP70 to the BAY 81-8973 cell line is an innovative technology for manufacturing rFVIII aimed at improving protein folding and expression. Improved pharmacokinetics and no effect on safety of BAY 81-8973 were observed in clinical trials in patients with hemophilia A.

  1. Structure of the HIV-1 Full-Length Capsid Protein in a Conformationally Trapped Unassembled State Induced by Small-Molecule Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Shoucheng; Betts, Laurie; Yang, Ruifeng; Shi, Haibin; Concel, Jason; Ahn, Jinwoo; Aiken, Christopher; Zhang, Peijun; Yeh, Joanne I.

    2012-11-26

    The capsid (CA) protein plays crucial roles in HIV infection and replication, essential to viral maturation. The absence of high-resolution structural data on unassembled CA hinders the development of antivirals effective in inhibiting assembly. Unlike enzymes that have targetable, functional substrate-binding sites, the CA does not have a known site that affects catalytic or other innate activity, which can be more readily targeted in drug development efforts. We report the crystal structure of the HIV-1 CA, revealing the domain organization in the context of the wild-type full-length (FL) unassembled CA. The FL CA adopts an antiparallel dimer configuration, exhibiting a domain organization sterically incompatible with capsid assembly. A small compound, generated in situ during crystallization, is bound tightly at a hinge site ('H site'), indicating that binding at this interdomain region stabilizes the ADP conformation. Electron microscopy studies on nascent crystals reveal both dimeric and hexameric lattices coexisting within a single condition, in agreement with the interconvertibility of oligomeric forms and supporting the feasibility of promoting assembly-incompetent dimeric states. Solution characterization in the presence of the H-site ligand shows predominantly unassembled dimeric CA, even under conditions that promote assembly. Our structure elucidation of the HIV-1 FL CA and characterization of a potential allosteric binding site provides three-dimensional views of an assembly-defective conformation, a state targeted in, and thus directly relevant to, inhibitor development. Based on our findings, we propose an unprecedented means of preventing CA assembly, by 'conformationally trapping' CA in assembly-incompetent conformational states induced by H-site binding.

  2. Structure of the HIV-1 Full-Length Capsid in a Conformationally-Trapped Unassembled State Induced by Small-Molecule Binding

    PubMed Central

    Du, Shoucheng; Betts, Laurie; Yang, Ruifeng; Shi, Haibin; Concel, Jason; Ahn, Jinwoo; Aiken, Christopher; Zhang, Peijun; Yeh, Joanne I.

    2011-01-01

    The capsid protein (CA) plays crucial roles in HIV-infection and replication, essential to viral maturation. The absence of high-resolution structural data on unassembled CA hinders the development of antivirals effective in inhibiting assembly. Unlike enzymes that have targetable functional substrate binding sites, the CA does not have a known site that affects catalytic or other innate activity, which can be more readily targeted in drug development efforts. We report the crystal structure of the HIV-1 CA, revealing the domain organization in context of the wild-type full-length (FL) unassembled CA. The FL CA adopts an antiparallel dimer (APD) configuration, exhibiting a domain organization sterically incompatible with capsid assembly. A small compound, generated in-situ during crystallization, is bound tightly at a hinge-site (“H-site”), indicating that binding at this interdomain region stabilizes the ADP conformation. Electron microscopy studies on nascent crystals reveal both dimeric and hexameric lattices coexisting within a single condition, in agreement with the interconvertibility of oligomeric forms and supporting the feasibility of promoting assembly-incompetent dimeric states. Solution characterization in the presence of the H-site ligand shows predominantly unassembled dimeric CA, even under conditions that promote assembly. Our structure elucidation of the HIV-1 FL CA and characterization of a potential allosteric binding site provides 3D views of an assembly-defective conformation, a state targeted in and, thus, directly relevant to, inhibitor development. Based on our findings, we propose an unprecedented means of preventing CA assembly, by ‘conformationally-trapping’ CA in assembly-incompetent conformational states, induced by H-site binding. PMID:21146540

  3. Crystal Structure of Full-length Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv Glycogen Branching Enzyme; Insights of N-Terminal [beta]-Sandwich in Sustrate Specifity and Enzymatic Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, Kuntal; Kumar, Shiva; Sharma, Shikha; Garg, Saurabh Kumar; Alam, Mohammad Suhail; Xu, H. Eric; Agrawal, Pushpa; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam

    2010-07-13

    The open reading frame Rv1326c of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) H37Rv encodes for an {alpha}-1,4-glucan branching enzyme (MtbGlgB, EC 2.4.1.18, Uniprot entry Q10625). This enzyme belongs to glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 13 and catalyzes the branching of a linear glucose chain during glycogenesis by cleaving a 1 {yields} 4 bond and making a new 1 {yields} 6 bond. Here, we show the crystal structure of full-length MtbGlgB (MtbGlgBWT) at 2.33-{angstrom} resolution. MtbGlgBWT contains four domains: N1 {beta}-sandwich, N2 {beta}-sandwich, a central ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} domain that houses the catalytic site, and a C-terminal {beta}-sandwich. We have assayed the amylase activity with amylose and starch as substrates and the glycogen branching activity using amylose as a substrate for MtbGlgBWT and the N1 domain-deleted (the first 108 residues deleted) Mtb{Delta}108GlgB protein. The N1 {beta}-sandwich, which is formed by the first 105 amino acids and superimposes well with the N2 {beta}-sandwich, is shown to have an influence in substrate binding in the amylase assay. Also, we have checked and shown that several GH13 family inhibitors are ineffective against MtbGlgBWT and Mtb{Delta}108GlgB. We propose a two-step reaction mechanism, for the amylase activity (1 {yields} 4 bond breakage) and isomerization (1 {yields} 6 bond formation), which occurs in the same catalytic pocket. The structural and functional properties of MtbGlgB and Mtb{Delta}108GlgB are compared with those of the N-terminal 112-amino acid-deleted Escherichia coli GlgB (EC{Delta}112GlgB).

  4. The E1 copper binding domain of full-length amyloid precursor protein mitigates copper-induced growth inhibition in brain metastatic prostate cancer DU145 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gough, Mallory Blanthorn-Hazell, Sophee Delury, Craig Parkin, Edward

    2014-10-31

    Highlights: • Copper levels are elevated in the tumour microenvironment. • APP mitigates copper-induced growth inhibition of DU145 prostate cancer (PCa) cells. • The APP intracellular domain is a prerequisite; soluble forms have no effect. • The E1 CuBD of APP is also a prerequisite. • APP copper binding potentially mitigates copper-induced PCa cell growth inhibition. - Abstract: Copper plays an important role in the aetiology and growth of tumours and levels of the metal are increased in the serum and tumour tissue of patients affected by a range of cancers including prostate cancer (PCa). The molecular mechanisms that enable cancer cells to proliferate in the presence of elevated copper levels are, therefore, of key importance in our understanding of tumour growth progression. In the current study, we have examined the role played by the amyloid precursor protein (APP) in mitigating copper-induced growth inhibition of the PCa cell line, DU145. A range of APP molecular constructs were stably over-expressed in DU145 cells and their effects on cell proliferation in the presence of copper were monitored. Our results show that endogenous APP expression was induced by sub-toxic copper concentrations in DU145 cells and over-expression of the wild-type protein was able to mitigate copper-induced growth inhibition via a mechanism involving the cytosolic and E1 copper binding domains of the full-length protein. APP likely represents one of a range of copper binding proteins that PCa cells employ in order to ensure efficient proliferation despite elevated concentrations of the metal within the tumour microenvironment. Targeting the expression of such proteins may contribute to therapeutic strategies for the treatment of cancers.

  5. Cloning and functional expression of a human pancreatic islet glucose-transporter cDNA

    SciTech Connect

    Permutt, M.A.; Koranyi, L.; Keller, K.; Lacy, P.E.; Scharp, D.W.; Mueckler, M. )

    1989-11-01

    Previous studies have suggested that pancreatic islet glucose transport is mediated by a high-K{sub m}, low-affinity facilitated transporter similar to that expressed in liver. To determine the relationship between islet and liver glucose transporters, liver-type glucose-transporter cDNA clones were isolated from a human liver cDNA library. The liver-type glucose-transporter cDNA clone hybridized to mRNA transcripts of the same size in human liver and pancreatic islet RNA. A cDNA library was prepared from purified human pancreatic islet tissue and screened with human liver-type glucose-transporter cDNA. The authors isolated two overlapping cDNA clones encompassing 2600 base pairs, which encode a pancreatic islet protein identical in sequence to that of the putative liver-type glucose-transporter protein. Xenopus oocytes injected with synthetic mRNA transcribed from a full-length cDNA construct exhibited increased uptake of 2-deoxyglucose, confirming the functional identity of the clone. These cDNA clones can now be used to study regulation of expression of the gene and to assess the role of inherited defects in this gene as a candidate for inherited susceptibility to non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

  6. Fine-mapping naturally occurring NY-ESO-1 antibody epitopes in melanoma patients' sera using short overlapping peptides and full-length recombinant protein.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Nobukazu; Jackson, Heather M; Chan, Kok-fei; Oveissi, Sara; Cebon, Jonathan; Itoh, Kyogo; Chen, Weisan

    2013-07-01

    The tumor antigen NY-ESO-1 is one of the most antigenic cancer-testis antigens, first identified by serologic analysis of a recombinant cDNA expression library (SEREX). NY-ESO-1 is expressed in different types of cancers including melanoma. NY-ESO-1-specific spontaneous humoral and cellular immune responses are detected in a large proportion of patients with advanced NY-ESO-1-expressing cancers. Therefore NY-ESO-1 is a good candidate antigen for immunotherapy. Although cellular immune responses to NY-ESO-1 are well characterized, much less is known about the humoral immune responses. In this study, we finely mapped linear antibody epitopes using sera from melanoma patients and shorter overlapping peptide sets. We have shown that melanoma patients' humoral immune systems responded to NY-ESO-1 differently in each individual with widely differing antibody specificity, intensity and antibody subtypes. This knowledge will help us further understand anti-tumor immunity and may also help us to monitor cancer progress and cancer vaccine efficacy in the future.

  7. Preparation of cDNA libraries from vascular cells.

    PubMed

    Lieb, M E; Taubman, M B

    1999-01-01

    The vast majority of past and present efforts in the molecular cloning of expressed sequences involve isolation of clones from cDNA libraries constructed in bacteriophage lambda (1,2). As discussed in Chapter 6 , screening these cDNA libraries using labeled probes remains the most straightforward method to isolate full length cDNAs for which some partial sequence information is known. Although the availability of high quality reagents and kits over the past decade has made the process of library construction increasingly straightforward, generation of high-quality libraries is a task that still requires a fair amount of dedicated effort. Because alternative PCR-based cloning strategies have become increasingly popular alternatives to cDNA library screening, it is useful to consider the advantages and disadvantages of each strategy before embarking on a project to construct a cDNA library (Table 1). In our opinion, it is worthwhile to construct a cDNA library when the transcript of interest is not exceedingly rare (i.e., can readily be detected by Northern blot analysis of total RNA), when multiple cDNAs will need to be cloned over a period of time, and in situations where occasional mutations can not be tolerated (for example, if the cDNA is to be expressed in mammalian cells to examine function). In situations where the transcript of interest is expressed at exceedingly low levels, or when only a single cDNA needs to be cloned, a PCR-based strategy should be considered. When the tissue source is precious (such as a unique clinical specimen), successful construction of a phage library provides a resource that can be amplified and used for multiple cloning projects over many years, but runs the risk of consuming the available RNA if the library construction fails. Table 1 Comparison of Relative Advantages of cDNA Cloning from Lambda Phage Libraries by Plaque Hybridization Compared to Newer PCR- Based Strategies Lambda phage cDNA library PCR-based strategy Freedom

  8. Human full-length coagulation factor X and a GLA domain-derived 40-mer polypeptide bind to different regions of the adenovirus serotype 5 hexon capsomer.

    PubMed

    Sumarheni, Sudir; Hong, Saw See; Josserand, Véronique; Coll, Jean-Luc; Boulanger, Pierre; Schoehn, Guy; Fender, Pascal

    2014-04-01

    The interaction of human adenovirus (HAdV)-C5 and many other adenoviruses with blood coagulation factors (e.g., human factor X, FX) involves the binding of their GLA domain to the hexon capsomers, resulting in high levels of hepatotropism and potential hepatotoxicity. In this study, we tested the possibility of preventing these undesirable effects by using a GLA-mimicking peptide as a competitor. An FX GLA domain-derived, 40-mer polypeptide carrying 12 carboxyglutamate residues was synthesized (GLA(mim)). Surface plasmon resistance (SPR) analysis showed that GLA(mim) reacted with free and capsid-embedded hexon with a nanomolar affinity. Unexpectedly, GLA(mim) failed to compete with FX for hexon binding, and instead significantly increased the formation of FX-hexon or FX-adenovirion complexes. This observation was confirmed by in vitro cell transduction experiments using HAdV-C5-Luciferase vector (HAdV5-Luc), as preincubation of HAdV5-Luc with GLA(mim) before FX addition resulted in a higher transgene expression compared with FX alone. HAdV-C5 virions complexed with GLA(mim) were analyzed by cryoelectron microscopy. Image reconstruction demonstrated the bona fide hexon-GLA(mim) interaction, as for the full-length FX, although with considerable differences in stoichiometry and relative location on the hexon capsomer. Three extra densities were found at the periphery of each hexon, whereas one single FX molecule occupied the central cavity of the hexon trimeric capsomer. A refined analysis indicated that each extra density is found at the expected location of one highly variable loop 1 of the hexon, involved in scavenger receptor recognition. HAdV5-Luc complexed with a bifunctional GLA(mim)RGD peptide showed a lesser hepatotropism, compared with control HAdV5-Luc alone, and efficiently targeted αβ-integrin-overexpressing tumor cells in an in vivo mouse tumor model. Collectively, our findings open new perspectives in the design of adenoviral vectors for biotherapy.

  9. Vaccination of full-length HPV16 E6 or E7 protein inhibits the growth of HPV16 associated tumors.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Li; Qiu, Xu-Hua; Shen, Chen; Liu, Jian-Ning; Zhang, Jing

    2010-11-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the primary etiologic agent of cervical cancer. Two HPV16 proteins, E6 and E7, are consistently expressed in tumor cells. Most therapeutic vaccines target one or both of these proteins. Taking the advantages of safety and no human leukocyte antigen restriction, protein vaccine has become the most popular form of HPV therapeutic vaccines. Here we demonstrate that immunization with full-length HPV16 E6 or E7 protein elicited specific immunological effect and inhibition of TC-1 cell growth using TC-1 mouse model. HPV16 E6 and E7 genes were cloned into pET-28a(+) and introduced into E. coli Rosetta. Expression of the genes was induced by IPTG. Proteins were purified by Ni-NTA agarose and they were detected by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. C57BL/6 mice were vaccinated with 1.5 nmol HPV16 E6 or E7 protein. Then they were implanted with 1x10(5) TC-1 cells. No tumor was detected in any mouse vaccinated with E7 protein. Forty days later, the tumor-free mice and control mice were challenged with 2x10(5) TC-1 cells. All control mice developed tumors 6 days later, but E7 immunized mice were tumor free until 90 days. Tumor growth was slow in the E6 immunized mice, but 83% of the mice developed tumors and the survival percentage was not significantly different from the control. An adoptive immune model was used to demonstrate the therapeutic effect. Results showed that the development of TC-1 cells was obviously reduced by transfusion of T-cells but not serum from mice immunized with E7 protein. T-cells from E7 immunized mice also induced the lysis of TC-1 cells in the cytotoxic T lymphocyte assay. These findings show that immunization with HPV16 E6 or E7 protein was able to elicit specific protective immunity against TC-1 tumor growth.

  10. Recombinant production and characterization of full-length and truncated β-1,3-glucanase PglA from Paenibacillus sp. S09

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    of non-catalytic modules on enzymatic properties of β-1,3-glucanase. Activity comparison of full-length PglA and truncated forms revealed the negative effect of C-terminal region on thermal stability of the enzyme. Both the N-and C-terminal domains exerted strong binding activity toward insoluble β-1,3-glucan, and could be classified into CBM families. PMID:24283345

  11. Alteration in BDNF and its receptors, full-length and truncated TrkB and p75(NTR) following penetrating traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Elham; Krueger, Frank; Plantman, Stefan; Davidsson, Johan; Agoston, Denes; Grafman, Jordan; Risling, Mårten

    2014-01-13

    The evidence that BDNF is involved in neuroprotection, neuronal repair and recovery after traumatic brain injury (TBI) is substantial. We have previously shown that the polymorphism of the human BDNF gene predicts cognitive recovery and outcome following penetrating TBI. The distribution of expression of BDNF and its receptors after penetrating TBI has not been investigated. In this study we examined the expression of these genes in a rat model of penetrating TBI. The injury is produced by a controlled penetration of a 2mm thick needle-shaped object, which is accelerated with a pellet from an air gun. We used in situ hybridization and investigated the mRNA expression of BDNF and its receptors: the full-length and the truncated TrkB and p75(NTR), from 1 day to 8 weeks following penetrating TBI. In addition, the protein level of BDNF in frontal cortex and hippocampus was measured by reverse phase protein microarray (RPPM). The mRNA expression of BDNF and its receptors decreased in the hippocampus in the border zone ipsilateral to the injury while there was an increase in mRNA expression at the contralateral side. The increase in BDNF mRNA expression in the hippocampus was sustained for 2 weeks following injury, with the highest expression noted in the CA3 cell layer. Furthermore, the protein analysis by RPPM showed increased levels of BDNF in the frontal cortex and the hippocampus up to 2 weeks after TBI. At 8 weeks following injury there was an intense labeling of the truncated TrkB receptor and the p75(NTR) in the area surrounding the cavity. Our study is the first report on the expression of BDNF and its receptors following penetrating TBI and suggests that their expression is altered long after the acute phase of injury. Further studies are needed to investigate if the late expressions of these receptors are beneficial or deleterious. In either case it indicates the possibility to influence the recovery after brain injury during the chronic phase and the

  12. Molecular cloning of a lectin cDNA from Alocasia macrorrhiza and prediction of its characteristics.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ya-Ran; Wang, Jie; Huang, Bing-Qiu; Hou, Xue-Wen

    2006-12-01

    The cDNA of Alocasia macrorrhiza lectin (aml, GenBank accession number: DQ340864) was cloned by RACE-PCR and its characteristics were predicted by various bioinformatics tools. GSPs (Gene Specific Primers) were designed according to the conserved regions of the genes encoded for lectins and similar proteins from the same family Araceae. Total RNAs were extracted from the tubers of A macrorrhiza by Qiagen RNeasy mini kit. The 3'- and 5'-RACE-PCRs were performed with the isolated total RNAs by SMART(TM)RACE cDNA amplification kit from BD Biosciences Clontech Company, respectively. The purified PCR products were ligated with pMD 18-T vector, and the confirmed clones were sequenced. The full-length cDNA of aml was obtained by combination of 3'- and 5'-end sequences, and was then confirmed by full-length 3'-RACE-PCR. The aml cDNA is 1 124 bp long. The deduced amino acid length of AML lectin is 270 aa. Its relative molecular weight is 29.7 kD. The results of homologous analysis showed a high similarity between AML and other mannose-binding lectins and similar proteins from Araceae family. Two typical B-lectin domains and three mannose- binding motifs were found in the sequence of AML. With all these taken together, it can be concluded that this newly cloned aml cDNA encodes for a mannose-binding lectin.

  13. Isolation and characterization of a Paracentrotus lividus cDNA encoding a stress-inducible chaperonin

    PubMed Central

    Gianguzza, Fabrizio; Antonietta Ragusa, Maria; Roccheri, Maria Carmela; Liegro, Italia Di; Rinaldi, Anna Maria

    2000-01-01

    Chaperonins are ubiquitous proteins that facilitate protein folding in an adenosine triphosphate–dependent manner. Here we report the isolation of a sea urchin cDNA (Plhsp60) coding for mitochondrial chaperonin (Cpn60), whose basal expression is further enhanced by heat shock. The described cDNA corresponds to a full-length mRNA encoding a protein of 582 amino acids, the first 32 of which constitute a putative mitochondrial targeting leader sequence. Comparative analysis has demonstrated that this protein is highly conserved in evolution. PMID:11147969

  14. Experimental Pathways towards Developing a Rotavirus Reverse Genetics System: Synthetic Full Length Rotavirus ssRNAs Are Neither Infectious nor Translated in Permissive Cells

    PubMed Central

    Richards, James E.; Desselberger, Ulrich; Lever, Andrew M.

    2013-01-01

    At present the ability to create rationally engineered mutant rotaviruses is limited because of the lack of a tractable helper virus-free reverse genetics system. Using the cell culture adapted bovine RV RF strain (G6P6 [1]), we have attempted to recover infectious RV by co-transfecting in vitro transcribed ssRNAs which are identical in sequence to the positive sense strand of each of the 11 dsRNA genomic segments of the RF strain. The RNAs were produced either from cDNAs cloned by a target sequence-independent procedure, or from purified double layered RV particles (DLPs). We have validated their translational function by in vitro synthesis of 35S-labelled proteins in rabbit reticulocyte lysates; all 11 proteins encoded by the RV genome were expressed. Transfection experiments with DLP- or cDNA-derived ssRNAs suggested that the RNAs do not act independently as mRNAs for protein synthesis, once delivered into various mammalian cell lines, and exhibit cytotoxicity. Transfected RNAs were not infectious since a viral cytopathic effect was not observed after infection of MA104 cells with lysates from transfected cells. By contrast, an engineered mRNA encoding eGFP was expressed when transfected under identical conditions into the same cell lines. Co-expression of plasmids encoding NSP2 and NSP5 using a fowlpox T7 polymerase recombinant virus revealed viroplasm-like structure formation, but this did not enable the translation of transfected RV ssRNAs. Attempts to recover RV from ssRNAs transcribed intracellularly from transfected cDNAs were also unsuccessful and suggested that these RNAs were also not translated, in contrast to successful translation from a transfected cDNA encoding an eGFP mRNA. PMID:24019962

  15. Application of an improved cDNA competition technique to identify prostate cancer-associated gene.

    PubMed

    Rinaldy, A R; Steiner, M S

    1999-11-01

    A technique to improve cDNA library screening was developed by using mixed probes derived from two closely related cDNA populations of high-metastatic MAT-LyLu and low-metastatic AT-1 Dunning R3227 rat prostate cancer sublines. The technique required the generation of a cDNA library from each subline followed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the cDNA insert population. The PCR products derived from the first library were radiolabeled and mixed with an excess amount of PCR products from the second library. The mixture and an excess amount of both the lambda and pBluescript DNA were used as a probe to screen the first cDNA library. This mixed probe (designated the competition probe) differentially cross-hybridized with the plaque lift of the screened first cDNA library. Weak radioactive signals indicated the cross-hybridization of cDNA sequences common to the competition probe mixture and the first cDNA library, whereas strong signals implied unhybridized unique or abundant cDNA sequences in the first cDNA library. The reproducibility of this technique was confirmed by showing that the full-length cDNA clones were associated with the phenotype of the screened first cell line. The isolated clones were characterized as rat nucleolar protein, rat mitochondrial genes coding for 16S and 12S rRNAs, and rat tRNAs specific for valine and phenyl-alanine. This result is consistent with the fact that the first cell line, MAT-LyLu, is metabolically more active than are AT-1 cells because of higher gene dosage or amplification of nucleolar and mitochondrial RNA and its associated genes. Another clone which had a strong signal represented a novel gene associated with the MAT-LyLu cancer phenotype.

  16. Full-Length Trimeric Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin II Membrane Fusion Protein and Shorter Constructs Lacking the Fusion Peptide or Transmembrane Domain: Hyperthermostability of the Full-Length Protein and the Soluble Ectodomain and Fusion Peptide Make Significant Contributions to Fusion of Membrane Vesicles†

    PubMed Central

    Ratnayake, Punsisi U.; Ekanayaka, E. A. Prabodha; Komanduru, Sweta S.; Weliky, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus is a Class I enveloped virus which is initially endocytosed into a host respiratory epithelial cell. Subsequent reduction of the pH to the 5–6 range triggers a structural change of the viral hemagglutinin II (HA2) protein, fusion of the viral and endosomal membranes, and release of the viral nucleocapsid into the cytoplasm. HA2 contains fusion peptide (FP), soluble ectodomain (SE), transmembrane (TM), and intraviral domains with respective lengths of ~25, ~160, ~25, and ~10 residues. The present work provides a straightforward protocol for producing and purifying mg quantities of full-length HA2 from expression in bacteria. Biophysical and structural comparisons are made between full-length HA2 and shorter constructs including SHA2 ≡ SE, FHA2 ≡ FP + SE, and SHA2-TM ≡ SE + TM constructs. The constructs are helical in detergent at pH 7.4 and the dominant trimer species. The proteins are highly thermostable in decylmaltoside detergent with Tm > 90 °C for HA2 with stabilization provided by the SE, FP, and TM domains. The proteins are likely in a trimer-of-hairpins structure, the final protein state during fusion. All constructs induce fusion of negatively-charged vesicles at pH 5.0 with much less fusion at pH 7.4. Attractive protein/vesicle electrostatics play a role in fusion, as the proteins are positively-charged at pH 5.0 and negatively-charged at pH 7.4 and the pH-dependence of fusion is reversed for positively-charged vesicles. Comparison of fusion between constructs supports significant contributions to fusion from the SE and the FP with little effect from the TM. PMID:26297995

  17. Peptidomic profiling of secreted products from pancreatic islet culture results in a higher yield of full-length peptide hormones than found using cell lysis procedures.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Steven W; Nikoulina, Svetlana E; Andon, Nancy L; Lowe, Carolyn

    2013-08-02

    Peptide Hormone Acquisition through Smart Sampling Technique-Mass Spectrometry (PHASST-MS) is a peptidomics platform that employs high resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) techniques to identify peptide hormones secreted from in vitro or ex vivo cultures enriched in endocrine cells. Application of the methodology to the study of murine pancreatic islets has permitted evaluation of the strengths and weaknesses of the approach, as well as comparison of our results with published islet studies that employed traditional cellular lysis procedures. We found that, while our PHASST-MS approach identified fewer peptides in total, we had greater representation of intact peptide hormones. The technique was further refined to improve coverage of hydrophilic as well as hydrophobic peptides and subsequently applied to human pancreatic islet cultures derived from normal donors or donors with type 2 diabetes. Interestingly, in addition to the expected islet hormones, we identified alpha-cell-derived bioactive GLP-1, consistent with recent reports of paracrine effects of this hormone on beta-cell function. We also identified many novel peptides derived from neurohormonal precursors and proteins related to the cell secretory system. Taken together, these results suggest the PHASST-MS strategy of focusing on cellular secreted products rather than the total tissue peptidome may improve the probability of discovering novel bioactive peptides and also has the potential to offer important new insights into the secretion and function of known hormones.

  18. Normalized cDNA libraries

    DOEpatents

    Soares, M.B.; Efstratiadis, A.

    1997-06-10

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3{prime} noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. 4 figs.

  19. Normalized cDNA libraries

    DOEpatents

    Soares, Marcelo B.; Efstratiadis, Argiris

    1997-01-01

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3' noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library.

  20. Isolation and nucleotide sequence of a cDNA clone encoding rat mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, P M; Tellam, J; May, V L; Strauss, A W

    1986-01-01

    We have determined the complete sequence of the rat mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH) precursor derived from nucleotide sequence of the cDNA. A single synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide probe was used to screen a rat atrial cDNA library constructed in lambda gt10. A 1.2 kb full-length cDNA clone provided the first complete amino acid sequence of pre-mMDH. The 1014 nucleotide-long open reading frame encodes the 314 residue long mature mMDH protein and a 24 amino acid NH2-terminal extension which directs mitochondrial import and is cleaved from the precursor after import to generate mature mMDH. The amino acid composition of the transit peptide is polar and basic. The pre-mMDH transit peptide shows marked homology with those of two other enzymes targeted to the rat mitochondrial matrix. Images PMID:3755817

  1. Chromosomal localization of a human cDNA containing a DIDS binding domain and demonstrating high homology to yeast omnipotent suppressor 45.

    PubMed

    Grenett, H E; Eipers, P G; Kidd, V J; Bounelis, P; Fuller, G M

    1992-01-01

    We recently have identified a full-length cDNA (TB3-1) from a human adenocarcinoma cell line T84 cDNA library that encodes a 47.8-kDa protein. TB3-1 shares identity with the putative yeast translation termination factor omnipotent suppressor 45. Using human-mouse somatic cell panel analysis, a family of sequences with high homology to the TB3-1 cDNA clone were localized to human chromosomes 5, 6, 7, and X. Southern analysis of a panel of mammalian and chicken genomic DNA demonstrates that TB3-1 is well conserved in higher vertebrates.

  2. Isolation of novel human cDNA (hGMF-gamma) homologous to Glia Maturation Factor-beta gene.

    PubMed

    Asai, K; Fujita, K; Yamamoto, M; Hotta, T; Morikawa, M; Kokubo, M; Moriyama, A; Kato, T

    1998-03-13

    A novel full-length human cDNA homologous to Glia Maturation Factor-beta (GMF-beta) gene was isolated. Sequence analysis of the entire cDNA revealed an open reading frame of 426 nucleotides with a deduced protein sequence of 142 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequences of its putative product is highly homologous to human GMF-beta (82% identity) and named for GMF-gamma. Northern blot analysis indicated that a message of 0.9 kb long, but not 4.1 kb of GMF-beta, is predominantly expressed in human lung, heart, and placenta.

  3. Structure of full-length Drosophila cryptochrome

    SciTech Connect

    Zoltowski, Brian D.; Vaidya, Anand T.; Top, Deniz; Widom, Joanne; Young, Michael W.; Crane, Brian R.

    2011-12-15

    The cryptochrome/photolyase (CRY/PL) family of photoreceptors mediates adaptive responses to ultraviolet and blue light exposure in all kingdoms of life. Whereas PLs function predominantly in DNA repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and 6-4 photolesions caused by ultraviolet radiation, CRYs transduce signals important for growth, development, magnetosensitivity and circadian clocks. Despite these diverse functions, PLs/CRYs preserve a common structural fold, a dependence on flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and an internal photoactivation mechanism. However, members of the CRY/PL family differ in the substrates recognized (protein or DNA), photochemical reactions catalysed and involvement of an antenna cofactor. It is largely unknown how the animal CRYs that regulate circadian rhythms act on their substrates. CRYs contain a variable carboxy-terminal tail that appends the conserved PL homology domain (PHD) and is important for function. Here, we report a 2.3-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of Drosophila CRY with an intact C terminus. The C-terminal helix docks in the analogous groove that binds DNA substrates in PLs. Conserved Trp536 juts into the CRY catalytic centre to mimic PL recognition of DNA photolesions. The FAD anionic semiquinone found in the crystals assumes a conformation to facilitate restructuring of the tail helix. These results help reconcile the diverse functions of the CRY/PL family by demonstrating how conserved protein architecture and photochemistry can be elaborated into a range of light-driven functions.

  4. Protein Methylation in Full Length Chlamydomonas Flagella

    PubMed Central

    Sloboda, Roger D.; Howard, Louisa

    2010-01-01

    Post-translational protein modification occurs extensively in eukaryotic flagella. Here we examine protein methylation, a protein modification that has only recently been reported to occur in flagella (Schneider et al. 2008). The cobalamin (vitamin B12) independent form of the enzyme methionine synthase (MetE), which catalyzes the final step in methionine production, is localized to flagella. Here we demonstrate, using immunogold scanning electron microscopy, that MetE is bound to the outer doublets of the flagellum. Methionine can be converted to S-adenosyl methionine, which then serves as the methyl donor for protein methylation reactions. Using antibodies that recognize symmetrically or asymmetrically methylated arginine residues, we identify three highly methylated proteins in intact flagella: two symmetrically methylated proteins of about 30 and 40 kDa, and one asymmetrically methylated protein of about 75 kDa. Several other relatively less methylated proteins could also be detected. Fractionation and immunoblot analysis shows that these proteins are components of the flagellar axoneme. Immunogold thin section electron microscopy indicates that the symmetrically methylated proteins are located in the central region of the axoneme, perhaps as components of the central pair complex and the radial spokes, while the asymmetrically methylated proteins are associated with the outer doublets. PMID:19472373

  5. Infectious Maize rayado fino virus from Cloned cDNA.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Michael C; Weiland, John J; Todd, Jane; Stewart, Lucy R

    2015-06-01

    A full-length cDNA clone was produced from a U.S. isolate of Maize rayado fino virus (MRFV), the type member of the genus Marafivirus within the family Tymoviridae. Infectivity of transcripts derived from cDNA clones was demonstrated by infection of maize plants and protoplasts, as well as by transmission via the known leafhopper vectors Dalbulus maidis and Graminella nigrifrons that transmit the virus in a persistent-propagative manner. Infection of maize plants through vascular puncture inoculation of seed with transcript RNA resulted in the induction of fine stipple stripe symptoms typical of those produced by wild-type MRFV and a frequency of infection comparable with that of the wild type. Northern and Western blotting confirmed the production of MRFV-specific RNAs and proteins in infected plants and protoplasts. An unanticipated increase in subgenomic RNA synthesis over levels in infected plants was observed in protoplasts infected with either wild-type or cloned virus. A conserved cleavage site motif previously demonstrated to function in both Oat blue dwarf virus capsid protein and tymoviral nonstructural protein processing was identified near the amino terminus of the MRFV replicase polyprotein, suggesting that cleavage at this site also may occur.

  6. Human somatostatin I: sequence of the cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, L P; Pictet, R L; Rutter, W J

    1982-01-01

    RNA has been isolated from a human pancreatic somatostatinoma and used to prepare a cDNA library. After prescreening, clones containing somatostatin I sequences were identified by hybridization with an anglerfish somatostatin I-cloned cDNA probe. From the nucleotide sequence of two of these clones, we have deduced an essentially full-length mRNA sequence, including the preprosomatostatin coding region, 105 nucleotides from the 5' untranslated region and the complete 150-nucleotide 3' untranslated region. The coding region predicts a 116-amino acid precursor protein (Mr, 12.727) that contains somatostatin-14 and -28 at its COOH terminus. The predicted amino acid sequence of human somatostatin-28 is identical to that of somatostatin-28 isolated from the porcine and ovine species. A comparison of the amino acid sequences of human and anglerfish preprosomatostatin I indicated that the COOH-terminal region encoding somatostatin-14 and the adjacent 6 amino acids are highly conserved, whereas the remainder of the molecule, including the signal peptide region, is more divergent. However, many of the amino acid differences found in the pro region of the human and anglerfish proteins are conservative changes. This suggests that the propeptides have a similar secondary structure, which in turn may imply a biological function for this region of the molecule. Images PMID:6126875

  7. Identification of Mutations in a Candidate Dengue 4 Vaccine Strain 341750 PDK20 and Construction of a Full-Length eDNA Clone of the PDK20 Vaccine Candidate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Identification of mutations in a candidate dengue 4 vaccine strain 341750 PDIង and construction of a full-length eDNA clone of the PDIង vaccine...history: Received 19 May 2009 Received in revised form 2 October 2009 Accepted IS October 2009 Available online 27 October 2009 Keywords: Dengue ...virus Vaccine virus mutat ion analysis Infectious clone Dengue 4 virus strain 34 1750 serially passaged 20 t imes in primary dog kidney ( PDK) cells

  8. Cloning of the canine beta-glucuronidase cDNA, mutation identification in canine MPS VII, and retroviral vector-mediated correction of MPS VII cells.

    PubMed

    Ray, J; Bouvet, A; DeSanto, C; Fyfe, J C; Xu, D; Wolfe, J H; Aguirre, G D; Patterson, D F; Haskins, M E; Henthorn, P S

    1998-03-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPS VII) is an inherited disease resulting from deficient activity of the lysosomal acid hydrolase beta-glucuronidase (GUSB) and has been reported in humans, mice, cats, and dogs. To characterize canine MPS VII, we have isolated and sequenced the canine GUSB cDNA from normal and affected animals. A single nucleotide substitution was detected in the GUSB cDNA derived from MPS VII dogs. This guanosine to adenine base change at nucleotide position 559 in the canine cDNA sequence causes an arginine to histidine substitution at amino acid position 166. Introduction of the G to A substitution at position 559 in a mammalian expression vector containing the normal canine GUSB cDNA nearly eliminated the GUSB enzymatic activity, demonstrating that this mutation is the cause of canine MPS VII. A retroviral vector expressing the full-length canine beta-glucuronidase cDNA corrected the deficiency in MPS VII cells.

  9. Equilibrium binding assays reveal the elevated stoichiometry and salt dependence of the interaction between full-length human sex-determining region on the Y chromosome (SRY) and DNA.

    PubMed

    Baud, Stephanie; Margeat, Emmanuel; Lumbroso, Serge; Paris, Françoise; Sultan, Charles; Royer, Catherine; Poujol, Nicolas

    2002-05-24

    In an effort to better define the molecular mechanism of the functional specificity of human sex-determining region on the Y chromosome (SRY), we have carried out equilibrium binding assays to study the interaction of the full-length bacterial-expressed protein with a DNA response element derived from the CD3epsilon gene enhancer. These assays are based on the observation of the fluorescence anisotropy of a fluorescein moiety covalently bound to the target oligonucleotide. The low anisotropy value due to the fast tumbling of the free oligonucleotide in solution increases substantially upon binding the protein to the labeled target DNA. Our results indicate that the full-length human wild-type SRY (SRY(WT)) forms a complex of high stoichiometry with its target DNA. Moreover, we have demonstrated a strong salt dependence of both the affinity and specificity of the interaction. We have also addressed the DNA bending properties of full-length human SRY(WT) in solution by fluorescence resonance energy transfer and revealed that maximal bending is achieved with a protein to DNA ratio significantly higher than the classical 1:1. Oligomerization thus appears, at least in vitro, to be tightly coupled to SRY-DNA interactions. Alteration of protein-protein interactions observed for the mutant protein SRY(Y129N), identified in a patient presenting with 46,XY sex reversal, suggests that oligomerization may play an important role in vivo as well.

  10. An efficient strategy for large-scale high-throughput transposon-mediated sequencing of cDNA clones

    PubMed Central

    Butterfield, Yaron S. N.; Marra, Marco A.; Asano, Jennifer K.; Chan, Susanna Y.; Guin, Ranabir; Krzywinski, Martin I.; Lee, Soo Sen; MacDonald, Kim W. K.; Mathewson, Carrie A.; Olson, Teika E.; Pandoh, Pawan K.; Prabhu, Anna-Liisa; Schnerch, Angelique; Skalska, Ursula; Smailus, Duane E.; Stott, Jeff M.; Tsai, Miranda I.; Yang, George S.; Zuyderduyn, Scott D.; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Jones, Steven J. M.

    2002-01-01

    We describe an efficient high-throughput method for accurate DNA sequencing of entire cDNA clones. Developed as part of our involvement in the Mammalian Gene Collection full-length cDNA sequencing initiative, the method has been used and refined in our laboratory since September 2000. Amenable to large scale projects, we have used the method to generate >7 Mb of accurate sequence from 3695 candidate full-length cDNAs. Sequencing is accomplished through the insertion of Mu transposon into cDNAs, followed by sequencing reactions primed with Mu-specific sequencing primers. Transposon insertion reactions are not performed with individual cDNAs but rather on pools of up to 96 clones. This pooling strategy reduces the number of transposon insertion sequencing libraries that would otherwise be required, reducing the costs and enhancing the efficiency of the transposon library construction procedure. Sequences generated using transposon-specific sequencing primers are assembled to yield the full-length cDNA sequence, with sequence editing and other sequence finishing activities performed as required to resolve sequence ambiguities. Although analysis of the many thousands (22 785) of sequenced Mu transposon insertion events revealed a weak sequence preference for Mu insertion, we observed insertion of the Mu transposon into 1015 of the possible 1024 5mer candidate insertion sites. PMID:12034834

  11. Cloning of the rat ErbB3 cDNA and characterization of the recombinant protein.

    PubMed

    Hellyer, N J; Kim, H H; Greaves, C H; Sierke, S L; Koland, J G

    1995-11-20

    Three cDNA fragments that encoded all but the extreme N terminus of the rat ErbB3 protein were cloned by low-stringency screening of a rat liver cDNA library with a human ERBB3 probe. The remaining 5'-end of the cDNA was generated by a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction method, and a single full-length rat ErbB3 cDNA was assembled. A comparison of the deduced amino acid (aa) sequences of human and rat ErbB3 was made, and the effects of certain aa substitutions in the putative protein tyrosine kinase domain were considered. The rat ErbB3 cDNA was subsequently expressed in cultured NIH-3T3 mouse fibroblasts, in which a high level of approx. 180-kDa recombinant ErbB3 (re-ErbB3) was generated. The rat re-ErbB3 produced in transfected fibroblasts was responsive to the polypeptide, heregulin, a known ligand for ErbB3. Challenge of transfected fibroblasts with heregulin stimulated the phosphorylation of rat re-ErbB3 on Tyr residues and promoted its association with the p85 subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. Together, these results indicate that a fully functional rat ErbB3 cDNA has been isolated, and that fibroblast cells expressing this cDNA will be suitable for investigations of the signal transduction mechanism of ErbB3.

  12. Horse cDNA clones encoding two MHC class I genes

    SciTech Connect

    Barbis, D.P.; Maher, J.K.; Stanek, J.; Klaunberg, B.A.; Antczak, D.F.

    1994-12-31

    Two full-length clones encoding MHC class I genes were isolated by screening a horse cDNA library, using a probe encoding in human HLA-A2.2Y allele. The library was made in the pcDNA1 vector (Invitrogen, San Diego, CA), using mRNA from peripheral blood lymphocytes obtained from a Thoroughbred stallion (No. 0834) homozygous for a common horse MHC haplotype (ELA-A2, -B2, -D2; Antczak et al. 1984; Donaldson et al. 1988). The clones were sequenced, using SP6 and T7 universal primers and horse-specific oligonucleotides designed to extend previously determined sequences.

  13. Regulatory effect of the glial Golli-BG21 protein on the full-length murine small C-terminal domain phosphatase (SCP1, or Golli-interacting protein).

    PubMed

    Jaramillo-Tatis, Sergio; Vassall, Kenrick A; Bamm, Vladimir V; Harauz, George

    2014-05-16

    The gene in the oligodendrocyte lineage (golli) encodes a number of proteins essential for myelination, comprising Golli and classic isoforms that are expressed in a developmentally-regulated manner. The Golli-interacting-protein (GIP) was previously discovered in a search for potential interacting partners of the Golli-isoform BG21, and was realised to be an acidic phosphatase belonging to the family of RNA-polymerase-2, small-subunit, C-terminal phosphatases (viz., SCP1). Here, we refer to this protein as mSCP1/GIP. In subsequent in vitro studies of recombinant murine SCP1/GIP, the inability to produce an active full-length version of the protein under native conditions necessitated the study of a truncated form ΔN-rmSCP1/GIP, but with inconclusive results regarding its interaction with BG21 [13]. We have since developed a new SUMO-expression and purification protocol for the preparation of a functional, full-length mGIP/SCP1, with no additional purification tags. Here, the interaction between mSCP1/GIP (with intact N-terminus) and BG21 is shown to be different than for the truncation mutant studied previously. Specifically, this interaction shows a dual effect on the enzymatic activity of mSCP1/GIP by BG21: BG21 enhanced mSCP1/GIP phosphatase activity (Ka = 30 μM), whereas PKCα-phosphorylated BG21 inhibited its activity (Ki = 2.9 μM), suggesting a potential role of BG21 as a molecular switch ("quick-brake mechanism") on mSCP1/GIP. The successful production of an active, full-length mSCP1/GIP thus demonstrates a role for its N-terminus in regulation of phosphatase activity, in events such as the regulation of transcription in oligodendrocytes.

  14. cDNA cloning and sequence analysis of human pancreatic procarboxypeptidase A1.

    PubMed Central

    Catasús, L; Villegas, V; Pascual, R; Avilés, F X; Wicker-Planquart, C; Puigserver, A

    1992-01-01

    Using polyclonal antibodies raised against human pancreatic procarboxypeptidases, a full-length cDNA coding for an A-type proenzyme was isolated from a lambda gt11 human pancreatic library. This cDNA contains standard 3' and 5' flanking regions, a poly(A)+ tail and a central region of 1260 nucleotides coding for a protein of 419 amino acids. On the basis of sequence comparisons, the human protein was classified as a procarboxypeptidase A1 which is very similar to the previously described A1 forms from rat and bovine pancreatic glands. The presence of the amino acid sequences assumed to be of importance for the zymogen inhibition by its activation segment, primarily on the basis of the recently reported crystal structure of the B form, further supports the proposed classification. PMID:1417781

  15. Cloning and functional expression of a cDNA encoding coffee bean alpha-galactosidase.

    PubMed

    Zhu, A; Goldstein, J

    1994-03-25

    Purified coffee bean alpha-galactosidase (alpha Gal) has been used for removing terminal alpha-galactose residues from the glyco-conjugates at the red cell surface, in studies of blood group conversion. Here, we report the isolation and sequence of the full-length clone for coffee bean alpha Gal by using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) techniques. The cDNA clone (1.4 kb) contains a single open reading frame which encodes a protein of 378 amino acids (aa). Its authenticity is confirmed by perfect alignment of aa sequences obtained from purified coffee bean alpha Gal, and by immune reaction with the antibody raised against the enzyme. Furthermore, the protein produced in insect cells shows enzymatic activity towards a synthetic alpha Gal substrate, p-nitro-phenyl-alpha-galactopyranoside.

  16. Cloned hepatitis delta virus cDNA is infectious in the chimpanzee.

    PubMed Central

    Sureau, C; Taylor, J; Chao, M; Eichberg, J W; Lanford, R E

    1989-01-01

    A head-to-tail trimer of a full-length cDNA clone of the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) genome was examined for infectivity by direct inoculation into the liver of a chimpanzee that was already infected with hepatitis B virus. Five weeks after inoculation, a marked elevation of serum alanine aminotransferase activity was observed, followed by the appearance of high levels of HDV RNA and antigen in both liver and serum and a high level of viral particles in the serum. A transient suppression of hepatitis B virus replication was evident during the acute phase of HDV infection. Seroconversion for antibodies to delta antigen occurred 3 weeks after the onset of the disease. These results demonstrate that a typical HDV infection can be initiated by inoculation of a susceptible animal with recombinant HDV cDNA. Images PMID:2778877

  17. Robust Expression of the Human Neonatal Fc Receptor in a Truncated Soluble Form and as a Full-Length Membrane-Bound Protein in Fusion with eGFP

    PubMed Central

    Seijsing, Johan; Lindborg, Malin; Löfblom, John; Uhlén, Mathias; Gräslund, Torbjörn

    2013-01-01

    Studies on the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) have revealed a multitude of important functions in mammals, including protection of IgG and serum albumin (SA) from lysosomal degradation. The pharmacokinetic behavior of therapeutic antibodies, IgG-Fc- and SA-containing drugs is therefore influenced by their interaction with FcRn. Pre-clinical development of such drugs is facilitated if their interaction with FcRn can be studied in vitro. For this reason we have developed a robust system for production of the soluble extracellular domain of human FcRn as well as the full-length receptor as fusion to green fluorescent protein, taking advantage of a lentivirus-based gene delivery system where stable over-expressing cells are easily and rapidly generated. Production of the extracellular domain in multiple-layered culture flasks, followed by affinity purification using immobilized IgG, resulted in capture of milligram amounts of soluble receptor per liter cell culture with retained IgG binding. The receptor was further characterized by SDS-PAGE, western blotting, circular dichroism spectroscopy, ELISA, surface plasmon resonance and a temperature stability assay showing a functional and stable protein of high purity. The full-length receptor was found to be successfully over-expressed in a membrane-bound form with retained pH-dependent IgG- and SA-binding. PMID:24260574

  18. Mass spectrometric identification of N- and O-glycosylation sites of full-length rat selenoprotein P and determination of selenide-sulfide and disulfide linkages in the shortest isoform.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shuguang; Hill, Kristina E; Burk, Raymond F; Caprioli, Richard M

    2003-08-19

    Rat selenoprotein P is an extracellular glycoprotein of 366 amino acid residues that is rich in cysteine and selenocysteine. Plasma contains four isoforms that differ principally by length at the C-terminal end. Mass spectrometry was used to identify sites of glycosylation on the full-length protein. Of the potential N-glycosylation sites, three located at residues 64, 155, and 169 were occupied, while the two at residues 351 and 356 were not occupied. Threonine 346 was variably O-glycosylated. Thus, full-length selenoprotein P is both N- and O-glycosylated. The shortest isoform of selenoprotein P, which terminates at residue 244, was analyzed for selenide-sulfide and disulfide linkages. In this isoform, a single selenocysteine and seven cysteines are present. Mass spectrometric analysis indicated that a selenide-sulfide bond exists between Sec40 and Cys43. Two disulfides were also detected as Cys149-Cys167 and Cys153-Cys156. The finding of a selenide-sulfide bond in the shortest isoform is compatible with a redox function of this pair that might be analogous to the selenol-thiol pair near the C terminus of animal thioredoxin reductase. The disulfide formed by Cys153-Cys156 also has some characteristics of a redox active pair.

  19. cDNA amplification by SMART-PCR and suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH)-PCR.

    PubMed

    Hillmann, Andrew; Dunne, Eimear; Kenny, Dermot

    2009-01-01

    The comparison of two RNA populations that differ from the effects of a single-independent variable, such as a drug treatment or a specific genetic defect, can identify differences in the abundance of specific transcripts that vary in a population-dependent manner. There are a variety of methods for identifying differentially expressed genes, including microarray, SAGE, qRT-PCR, and DDGE. This protocol describes a potentially less sensitive yet relatively easy and cost-effective alternative that does not require prior knowledge of the transcriptomes under investigation and is particularly applicable when minimal levels of starting material, RNA, are available. RNA input can often be a limiting factor when analyzing RNA from, for example, rigorously purified blood cells. This protocol describes the use of SMART-PCR to amplify cDNA from sub-microgram levels of RNA. The amplified cDNA populations under comparison are then subjected to suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH-PCR), a technique that couples subtractive hybridization with suppression PCR to selectively amplify fragments of differentially expressed genes. The final products are cDNA populations enriched for significantly over-represented transcripts in either of the two input RNA preparations. These cDNA populations may then be cloned to make subtracted cDNA libraries and/or used as probes to screen subtracted cDNA, global cDNA, or genomic DNA libraries.

  20. Expression cloning of the murine interferon gamma receptor cDNA.

    PubMed

    Munro, S; Maniatis, T

    1989-12-01

    A cDNA encoding a receptor for murine interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) was isolated from an expression library made from murine thymocytes. The clone was identified by transfecting the library into monkey COS cells and probing the transfected monolayer with radiolabeled murine IFN-gamma. Cells expressing the receptor were identified by autoradiography and plasmids encoding the receptor were directly rescued from those cells producing a positive signal. A partial cDNA so obtained was used to isolate a full-length cDNA from mouse L929 cells by conventional means. When this cDNA was expressed in COS cells it produced a specific binding site for murine IFN-gamma with an affinity constant similar to that of the receptor found on L929 cells. The predicted amino acid sequence of the murine IFN-gamma receptor shows homology to that previously reported for the human IFN-gamma receptor. However, although the two proteins are clearly related, they show less than 60% identity in both the putative extracellular domain and the intracellular domain.

  1. Display of a Maize cDNA library on baculovirus infected insect cells

    PubMed Central

    Meller Harel, Helene Y; Fontaine, Veronique; Chen, Hongying; Jones, Ian M; Millner, Paul A

    2008-01-01

    Background Maize is a good model system for cereal crop genetics and development because of its rich genetic heritage and well-characterized morphology. The sequencing of its genome is well advanced, and new technologies for efficient proteomic analysis are needed. Baculovirus expression systems have been used for the last twenty years to express in insect cells a wide variety of eukaryotic proteins that require complex folding or extensive posttranslational modification. More recently, baculovirus display technologies based on the expression of foreign sequences on the surface of Autographa californica (AcMNPV) have been developed. We investigated the potential of a display methodology for a cDNA library of maize young seedlings. Results We constructed a full-length cDNA library of young maize etiolated seedlings in the transfer vector pAcTMVSVG. The library contained a total of 2.5 × 105 independent clones. Expression of two known maize proteins, calreticulin and auxin binding protein (ABP1), was shown by western blot analysis of protein extracts from insect cells infected with the cDNA library. Display of the two proteins in infected insect cells was shown by selective biopanning using magnetic cell sorting and demonstrated proof of concept that the baculovirus maize cDNA display library could be used to identify and isolate proteins. Conclusion The maize cDNA library constructed in this study relies on the novel technology of baculovirus display and is unique in currently published cDNA libraries. Produced to demonstrate proof of principle, it opens the way for the development of a eukaryotic in vivo display tool which would be ideally suited for rapid screening of the maize proteome for binding partners, such as proteins involved in hormone regulation or defence. PMID:18700036

  2. Project ENRICH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gwaley, Elizabeth; And Others

    Project ENRICH was conceived in Beaver County, Pennsylvania, to: (1) identify preschool children with learning disabilities, and (2) to develop a program geared to the remediation of the learning disabilities within a school year, while allowing the child to be enrolled in a regular class situation for the following school year. Through…

  3. Construction of Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated tomato black ring virus infectious cDNA clones.

    PubMed

    Zarzyńska-Nowak, Aleksandra; Ferriol, Inmaculada; Falk, Bryce W; Borodynko-Filas, Natasza; Hasiów-Jaroszewska, Beata

    2017-02-15

    Tomato black ring virus (TBRV, genus Nepovirus) infects a wide range of economically important plants such as tomato, potato, tobacco and cucumber. Here, a successful construction of infectious full-length cDNA clones of the TBRV genomic RNAs (RNA1 and RNA2) is reported for the first time. The engineered constructs consisting of PCR-amplified DNAs were cloned into binary vector pJL89 immediately downstream of a double cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter, and upstream of the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme and nopaline synthase terminator (NOS). The symptoms induced on plants agroinoculated with both constructs were indistinguishable from those caused by the wild-type virus. The infectivity of obtained clones was verified by reinoculation to Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi, Chenopodium quinoa and Cucumis sativus. The presence of viral particles and RNA was confirmed by electron microscopy and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Constructed full-length infectious cDNA clones will serve as an excellent tool to study virus-host-vector interactions.

  4. Cloning of human PEX cDNA. Expression, subcellular localization, and endopeptidase activity.

    PubMed

    Lipman, M L; Panda, D; Bennett, H P; Henderson, J E; Shane, E; Shen, Y; Goltzman, D; Karaplis, A C

    1998-05-29

    Mutations in the PEX gene are responsible for X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets. To gain insight into the role of PEX in normal physiology we have cloned the human full-length cDNA and studied its tissue expression, subcellular localization, and peptidase activity. We show that the cDNA encodes a 749-amino acid protein structurally related to a family of neutral endopeptidases that include neprilysin as prototype. By Northern blot analysis, the size of the full-length PEX transcript is 6.5 kilobases. PEX expression, as determined by semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, is high in bone and in tumor tissue associated with the paraneoplastic syndrome of renal phosphate wasting. PEX is glycosylated in the presence of canine microsomal membranes and partitions exclusively in the detergent phase from Triton X-114 extractions of transiently transfected COS cells. Immunofluorescence studies in A293 cells expressing PEX tagged with a c-myc epitope show a predominant cell-surface location for the protein with its COOH-terminal domain in the extracellular compartment, substantiating the assumption that PEX, like other members of the neutral endopeptidase family, is a type II integral membrane glycoprotein. Cell membranes from cultured COS cells transiently expressing PEX efficiently degrade exogenously added parathyroid hormone-derived peptides, demonstrating for the first time that recombinant PEX can function as an endopeptidase. PEX peptidase activity may provide a convenient target for pharmacological intervention in states of altered phosphate homeostasis and in metabolic bone diseases.

  5. Analysis of full-length sequences of two Citrus yellow mosaic badnavirus isolates infecting Citrus jambhiri (Rough Lemon) and Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck (Sweet Orange) from a nursery in India.

    PubMed

    Anthony Johnson, A M; Borah, B K; Sai Gopal, D V R; Dasgupta, I

    2012-12-01

    Citrus yellow mosaic badna virus (CMBV), a member of the Family Caulimoviridae, Genus Badnavirus is the causative agent of mosaic disease among Citrus species in southern India. Despite its reported prevalence in several citrus species, complete information on clear functional genomics or functional information of full-length genomes from all the CMBV isolates infecting citrus species are not available in publicly accessible databases. CMBV isolates from Rough Lemon and Sweet Orange collected from a nursery were cloned and sequenced. The analysis revealed high sequence homology of the two CMBV isolates with previously reported CMBV sequences implying that they represent new variants. Based on computational analysis of the predicted secondary structures, the possible functions of some CMBV proteins have been analyzed.

  6. Induction of anti-melanoma CTL response using DC transfected with mutated mRNA encoding full-length Melan-A/MART-1 antigen with an A27L amino acid substitution.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Wahab, Zeinab; Kalady, Matthew F; Emani, Sirisha; Onaitis, Mark W; Abdel-Wahab, Omar I; Cisco, Robin; Wheless, Lee; Cheng, Tsung-Yen; Tyler, Douglas S; Pruitt, Scott K

    2003-08-01

    Modification of the parental immunodominant Melan-A/MART-1 peptide (MART-1(26-35)) by replacing the alanine with leucine (A27L) enhances its immunogenicity. Because of the reported advantages of RNA over peptides in DC vaccines, we sought to mutate the MART-1 gene to encode a full-length MART-1 antigen with an A27L amino acid substitution. Human DC were transfected with A27L-mutated MART-1 RNA (A27L RNA) or native MART-1 RNA, and then used to stimulate autologous T cells from a series of 8 HLA-A2+ volunteers. After three stimulations, all CTL induced with DC/A27L RNA exhibited more tetramer+ cells, and demonstrated stronger antigen-specific IFNgamma-secreting activity compared to CTL induced with DC/native RNA. A potent MART-1-specific, and predominantly class-I-restricted lysis was detected in most CTL induced with DC/A27L RNA, while native RNA-induced CTL showed minimal and non-specific lysis. HLA-A2+ DC and MART-1 negative/A2+ melanoma cells transfected with the A27L RNA were recognized and killed by MART-1-specific CTL, suggesting that these APC efficiently processed the A27L RNA and presented correct MART-1-specific epitope(s). In summary, introducing an A27L mutation into the MART-1 full-length mRNA sequence enhanced the immunogenicity of the encoded MART-1 Ag. The ease with which such a mutation can be made in RNA presents another potential advantage of using RNA for immunotherapy. Our results support considering this strategy for enhancing the immunogenicity of DC-based RNA vaccines.

  7. Impact of a deletion of the full-length and short isoform of p75NTR on cholinergic innervation and the population of postmitotic doublecortin positive cells in the dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Poser, Robert; Dokter, Martin; von Bohlen Und Halbach, Viola; Berger, Stefan M; Busch, Ruben; Baldus, Marian; Unsicker, Klaus; von Bohlen Und Halbach, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Analyses of mice carrying a deletion of the pan-neurotrophin receptor p75NTR have allowed identifying p75NTR as an important structural regulator of the hippocampus. Most of the previous analyses were done using p75NTR (ExIII) knockout mice which still express the short isoform of p75NTR. To scrutinize the role of p75NTR in the hippocampus, we analyzed adult and aged p75NTR (ExIV) knockout mice, in which both, the short and the full-length isoform are deleted. Deletion of these isoforms induced morphological alterations in the adult dentate gyrus (DG), leading to an increase in the thickness of the molecular and granular layer. Based on these observations, we next determined the morphological substrates that might contribute to this phenotype. The cholinergic innervation of the molecular and granular layer of the DG was found to be significantly increased in the knockout mice. Furthermore, adult neurogenesis in the DG was found to be significantly altered with increased numbers of doublecortin (DCX) positive cells and reduced numbers of apoptotic cells in p75NTR (ExIV) knockout mice. However, cell proliferation as measured by phosphohiston H3 (PH3) positive cell numbers was not affected. These morphological alterations (number of DCX-positive cells and increased cholinergic fiber densities) as well as reduced cell death in the DG are likely to contribute to the observed thickening of the granular layer in p75NTR (ExIV) knockout mice. In addition, Sholl-analysis of DCX-positive neurons revealed a higher dendritic complexity and could thus be a possible morphological correlate for the increased thickness of the molecular layer in p75NTR deficient animals. Our data clearly demonstrate that deletion of both, the short and the full-length isoform of p75NTR affects DG morphology, due to alterations of the cholinergic system and an imbalance between neurogenesis and programmed cell death within the subgranular zone.

  8. A splice variant of the two-pore domain potassium channel TREK-1 with only one pore domain reduces the surface expression of full-length TREK-1 channels.

    PubMed

    Rinné, Susanne; Renigunta, Vijay; Schlichthörl, Günter; Zuzarte, Marylou; Bittner, Stefan; Meuth, Sven G; Decher, Niels; Daut, Jürgen; Preisig-Müller, Regina

    2014-08-01

    We have identified a novel splice variant of the human and rat two-pore domain potassium (K2P) channel TREK-1. The splice variant TREK-1e results from skipping of exon 5, which causes a frame shift in exon 6. The frame shift produces a novel C-terminal amino acid sequence and a premature termination of translation, which leads to a loss of transmembrane domains M3 and M4 and of the second pore domain. RT-PCR experiments revealed a preferential expression of TREK-1e in kidney, adrenal gland, and amygdala. TREK-1e was nonfunctional when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. However, both the surface expression and the current density of full-length TREK-1 were reduced by co-expression of TREK-1e. Live cell imaging in COS-7 cells transfected with GFP-tagged TREK-1e showed that this splice variant was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Attachment of the C-terminus of TREK-1e to two different reporter proteins (Kir2.1 and CD8) led to a strong reduction in the surface expression of these fusion proteins. Progressive truncation of the C-terminus of TREK-1e in these reporter constructs revealed a critical region (amino acids 198 to 205) responsible for the intracellular retention. Mutagenesis experiments indicated that amino acids I204 and W205 are key residues mediating the ER retention of TREK-1e. Our results suggest that the TREK-1e splice variant may interfere with the vesicular traffic of full-length TREK-1 channels from the ER to the plasma membrane. Thus, TREK-1e might modulate the copy number of functional TREK-1 channels at the cell surface, providing a novel mechanism for fine tuning of TREK-1 currents.

  9. cDNA cloning and characterization of a putative 1,3-beta-D-glucanase transcript induced by fungal elicitor in bean cell suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Edington, B V; Lamb, C J; Dixon, R A

    1991-01-01

    Synthetic oligonucleotides based on similarity between tobacco 1,3-beta-D-glucanase and barley 1,3-1,4-beta-D-glucanase were used to prime the synthesis and amplification of a 162 bp bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) beta-glucanase cDNA by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The PCR product was used to isolate a near full-length beta-glucanase cDNA corresponding to an approximately 1400 bp full-length transcript, from a library containing cDNA sequences complementary to mRNA from fungal elicitor-treated bean cells. At the amino acid level, the bean beta-glucanase cDNA was 59% similar to tobacco 1,3-beta-D-glucanase, 46% similar to barley 1,3-beta-D-glucanase and 46% similar to barley 1,3-1,4-beta-D-glucanase. At the nucleotide level, the similarities were 65, 50 and 53% respectively. The beta-glucanase appeared to be encoded by a single gene with similar genomic organization in bean cultivars Canadian Wonder, Imuna and Saxa. On the basis of predicted Mr, isoelectric point, sequence similarity, and comparisons of rate of transcript appearance with induced enzyme activity, it was concluded that the cDNA encodes the basic bean endo-1,3-beta-D-glucanase. Glucanase transcripts were induced, from very low basal levels, with similar kinetics to chitinase transcripts in elicitor-treated bean cell suspension cultures.

  10. Cloning a Chymotrypsin-Like 1 (CTRL-1) Protease cDNA from the Jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Yunwi; Kwon, Young Chul; Bae, Seong Kyeong; Hwang, Duhyeon; Yang, Hye Ryeon; Choudhary, Indu; Lee, Hyunkyoung; Yum, Seungshic; Shin, Kyoungsoon; Yoon, Won Duk; Kang, Changkeun; Kim, Euikyung

    2016-01-01

    An enzyme in a nematocyst extract of the Nemopilema nomurai jellyfish, caught off the coast of the Republic of Korea, catalyzed the cleavage of chymotrypsin substrate in an amidolytic kinetic assay, and this activity was inhibited by the serine protease inhibitor, phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride. We isolated the full-length cDNA sequence of this enzyme, which contains 850 nucleotides, with an open reading frame of 801 encoding 266 amino acids. A blast analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence showed 41% identity with human chymotrypsin-like (CTRL) and the CTRL-1 precursor. Therefore, we designated this enzyme N. nomurai CTRL-1. The primary structure of N. nomurai CTRL-1 includes a leader peptide and a highly conserved catalytic triad of His69, Asp117, and Ser216. The disulfide bonds of chymotrypsin and the substrate-binding sites are highly conserved compared with the CTRLs of other species, including mammalian species. Nemopilema nomurai CTRL-1 is evolutionarily more closely related to Actinopterygii than to Scyphozoan (Aurelia aurita) or Hydrozoan (Hydra vulgaris). The N. nomurai CTRL1 was amplified from the genomic DNA with PCR using specific primers designed based on the full-length cDNA, and then sequenced. The N. nomurai CTRL1 gene contains 2434 nucleotides and four distinct exons. The 5′ donor splice (GT) and 3′ acceptor splice sequences (AG) are wholly conserved. This is the first report of the CTRL1 gene and cDNA structures in the jellyfish N. nomurai. PMID:27399771

  11. Characterization of cDNA clones encoding rabbit and human serum paraoxonase: The mature protein retains its signal sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Hassett, C.; Richter, R.J.; Humbert, R.; Omiecinski, C.J.; Furlong, C.E. ); Chapline, C.; Crabb, J.W. )

    1991-10-22

    Serum paraoxonase hydrolyzes the toxic metabolites of a variety of organophosphorus insecticides. High serum paraoxonase levels appear to protect against the neurotoxic effects of organophosphorus substrates of this enzyme. The amino acid sequence accounting for 42% of rabbit paraoxonase was determined. From these data, two oligonucleotide probes were synthesized and used to screen a rabbit liver cDNA library. Human paraoxonase clones were isolated from a liver cDNA library by using the rabbit cDNA as a hybridization probe. Inserts from three of the longest clones were sequenced, and one full-length clone contained an open reading frame encoding 355 amino acids, four less than the rabbit paraoxonase protein. Amino-terminal sequences derived from purified rabbit and human paraoxonase proteins suggested that the signal sequence is retained, with the exception of the initiator methionine residue. Characterization of the rabbit and human paraoxonase cDNA clones confirms that the signal sequences are not processed, except for the N-terminal methionine residue. The rabbit and human cDNA clones demonstrate striking nucleotide and deduced amino acid similarities (greater than 85%), suggesting an important metabolic role and constraints on the evolution of this protein.

  12. Full-length genome analyses of two new simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) strains from mustached monkeys (C. Cephus) in Gabon illustrate a complex evolutionary history among the SIVmus/mon/gsn lineage.

    PubMed

    Liégeois, Florian; Schmidt, Fabian; Boué, Vanina; Butel, Christelle; Mouacha, Fatima; Ngari, Paul; Ondo, Bertrand Mve; Leroy, Eric; Heeney, Jonathan L; Delaporte, Eric; Peeters, Martine; Rouet, François

    2014-07-22

    The Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) mus/mon/gsn lineage is a descendant of one of the precursor viruses to the HIV-1/SIVcpz/gor viral lineage. SIVmus and SIVgsn were sequenced from mustached and greater spot nosed monkeys in Cameroon and SIVmon from mona monkeys in Cameroon and Nigeria. In order to further document the genetic diversity of SIVmus, we analyzed two full-length genomes of new strains identified in Gabon. The whole genomes obtained showed the expected reading frames for gag, pol, vif, vpr, tat, rev, env, nef, and also for a vpu gene. Analyses showed that the Gabonese SIVmus strains were closely related and formed a monophyletic clade within the SIVmus/mon/gsn lineage. Nonetheless, within this lineage, the position of both new SIVmus differed according to the gene analyzed. In pol and nef gene, phylogenetic topologies suggested different evolutions for each of the two new SIVmus strains whereas in the other nucleic fragments studied, their positions fluctuated between SIVmon, SIVmus-1, and SIVgsn. In addition, in C1 domain of env, we identified an insertion of seven amino acids characteristic for the SIVmus/mon/gsn and HIV‑1/SIVcpz/SIVgor lineages. Our results show a high genetic diversity of SIVmus in mustached monkeys and suggest cross-species transmission events and recombination within SIVmus/mon/gsn lineage. Additionally, in Central Africa, hunters continue to be exposed to these simian viruses, and this represents a potential threat to humans.

  13. Full-Length Genome Analyses of Two New Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) Strains from Mustached Monkeys (C. Cephus) in Gabon Illustrate a Complex Evolutionary History among the SIVmus/mon/gsn Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Liégeois, Florian; Schmidt, Fabian; Boué, Vanina; Butel, Christelle; Mouacha, Fatima; Ngari, Paul; Mve Ondo, Bertrand; Leroy, Eric; Heeney, Jonathan L.; Delaporte, Eric; Peeters, Martine; Rouet, François

    2014-01-01

    The Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) mus/mon/gsn lineage is a descendant of one of the precursor viruses to the HIV-1/SIVcpz/gor viral lineage. SIVmus and SIVgsn were sequenced from mustached and greater spot nosed monkeys in Cameroon and SIVmon from mona monkeys in Cameroon and Nigeria. In order to further document the genetic diversity of SIVmus, we analyzed two full-length genomes of new strains identified in Gabon. The whole genomes obtained showed the expected reading frames for gag, pol, vif, vpr, tat, rev, env, nef, and also for a vpu gene. Analyses showed that the Gabonese SIVmus strains were closely related and formed a monophyletic clade within the SIVmus/mon/gsn lineage. Nonetheless, within this lineage, the position of both new SIVmus differed according to the gene analyzed. In pol and nef gene, phylogenetic topologies suggested different evolutions for each of the two new SIVmus strains whereas in the other nucleic fragments studied, their positions fluctuated between SIVmon, SIVmus-1, and SIVgsn. In addition, in C1 domain of env, we identified an insertion of seven amino acids characteristic for the SIVmus/mon/gsn and HIV‑1/SIVcpz/SIVgor lineages. Our results show a high genetic diversity of SIVmus in mustached monkeys and suggest cross-species transmission events and recombination within SIVmus/mon/gsn lineage. Additionally, in Central Africa, hunters continue to be exposed to these simian viruses, and this represents a potential threat to humans. PMID:25054885

  14. Apoptosis induced by a HIPK2 full-length-specific siRNA is due to off-target effects rather than prevalence of HIPK2-Δe8 isoform

    PubMed Central

    Di Rocco, Giuliana; Verdina, Alessandra; Gatti, Veronica; Virdia, Ilaria; Toietta, Gabriele; Todaro, Matilde; Stassi, Giorgio; Soddu, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are widely used to study gene function and extensively exploited for their potential therapeutic applications. HIPK2 is an evolutionary conserved kinase that binds and phosphorylates several proteins directly or indirectly related to apoptosis. Recently, an alternatively spliced isoform skipping 81 nucleotides of exon 8 (Hipk2-Δe8) has been described. Selective depletion of Hipk2 full-length (Hipk2-FL) with a specific siRNA that spares the Hipk2-Δe8 isoform has been shown to strongly induce apoptosis, suggesting an unpredicted dominant-negative effect of Hipk2-FL over the Δe8 isoform. From this observation, we sought to take advantage and assessed the therapeutic potential of generating Hipk2 isoform unbalance in tumor-initiating cells derived from colorectal cancer patients. Strong reduction of cell viability was induced in vitro and in vivo by the originally described exon 8-specific siRNA, supporting a potential therapeutic application. However, validation analyses performed with additional exon8-specific siRNAs with different stabilities showed that all exon8-targeting siRNAs can induce comparable Hipk2 isoform unbalance but only the originally reported e8-siRNA promotes cell death. These data show that loss of viability does not depend on the prevalence of Hipk2-Δe8 isoform but it is rather due to microRNA-like off-target effects. PMID:26625198

  15. A Method to Produce and Purify Full-Length Recombinant Alpha Dystroglycan: Analysis of N- and O-Linked Monosaccharide Composition in CHO Cells with or without LARGE Overexpression

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jung Hae; Xu, Rui; Martin, Paul

    2013-01-01

    α dystroglycan (αDG) is part of the dystrophin-associated glycoprotein (DAG) complex, a series of cytoskeletal, transmembrane, and membrane-associated proteins that serve to link the extracellular matrix (ECM) surrounding individual skeletal myofibers to the intracellular F-actin cytoskeleton. Glycosylation and ECM protein binding to αDG are regulated by a number of genes that, when defective, give rise to congenital or limb-girdle forms of muscular dystrophy termed dystroglycanopathies. One such dystroglycanopathy gene is LARGE. Here, we describe a method to produce and purify full-length, furin-resistant, recombinant αDG from CHO cells and CHO cells overexpressing LARGE (CHO-LARGE). In addition, we analyze the O- and N-linked monosaccharide composition of such proteins. αDG purified from CHO-LARGE cells had increased molar content of xylose and fucose relative to CHO, while no significant changes were found in N-linked monosaccharides. Glucuronic acid could not be quantified by the methods used. These studies describe a method to produce and purify the milligram amounts of αDG needed for certain biochemical methods, including monosaccharide analysis. Key words: Dystroglycan, muscular dystrophy, xylose, fucose, laminin, LARGE Correspondence: Paul.Martin@nationwidechildrens.org PMID:23390591

  16. In vitro binding of anthrax protective antigen on bacteriophage T4 capsid surface through Hoc-capsid interactions: A strategy for efficient display of large full-length proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shivachandra, Sathish B.; Rao, Mangala; Janosi, Laszlo; Sathaliyawala, Taheri; Matyas, Gary R.; Alving, Carl R.; Leppla, Stephen H.; Rao, Venigalla B. . E-mail: rao@cua.edu

    2006-02-05

    An in vitro binding system is described to display large full-length proteins on bacteriophage T4 capsid surface at high density. The phage T4 icosahedral capsid features 155 copies of a nonessential highly antigenic outer capsid protein, Hoc, at the center of each major capsid protein hexon. Gene fusions were engineered to express the 83-kDa protective antigen (PA) from Bacillus anthracis fused to the N-terminus of Hoc and the 130-kDa PA-Hoc protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The purified PA-Hoc was assembled in vitro on hoc {sup -} phage particles. Binding was specific, stable, and of high affinity. This defined in vitro system allowed manipulation of the copy number of displayed PA and imposed no significant limitation on the size of the displayed antigen. In contrast to in vivo display systems, the in vitro approach allows all the capsid binding sites to be occupied by the 130-kDa PA-Hoc fusion protein. The PA-T4 particles were immunogenic in mice in the absence of an adjuvant, eliciting strong PA-specific antibodies and anthrax lethal toxin neutralizing antibodies. The in vitro display on phage T4 offers a novel platform for potential construction of customized vaccines against anthrax and other infectious diseases.

  17. Near Full-Length Genome Sequence of a Novel HIV-1 Recombinant Form (CRF01_AE/B) Detected Among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Jilin Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xingguang; Feng, Yi; Yang, Yao; Chen, Yanli; Guo, Qi; Sun, Liuyan; Zang, Xihui; Xing, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We report here a novel HIV-1 recombinant form (CRF01_AE/B) detected from a comprehensive HIV-1 molecular epidemiologic study among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Jilin province of northeastern China. The near full-length genome (NFLG) analyses showed that the novel HIV-1 recombinant isolate (JL.RF07) was composed of CRF01_AE cluster 5 (northeastern China origin) and subtype B (U.S. and European origin), with six recombinant breakpoints observed in the pol, vif, tat, rev, and env gene regions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first detection of a novel HIV-1 recombinant form (CRF01_AE/B) in Jilin, which may indicate an active transmission network of HIV-1 infection among MSM in the region. Further studies of the molecular epidemiology of the HIV-1 epidemic among MSM in northeastern China are necessary to gain a fuller understanding of the transmission network and potential public health impact of HIV-1 among MSM in this region. PMID:24521207

  18. Near full-length genome sequence of a novel HIV-1 recombinant form (CRF01_AE/B) detected among men who have sex with men in Jilin Province, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingguang; Feng, Yi; Yang, Yao; Chen, Yanli; Guo, Qi; Sun, Liuyan; Zang, Xihui; Xing, Hui; Shao, Yiming

    2014-07-01

    We report here a novel HIV-1 recombinant form (CRF01_AE/B) detected from a comprehensive HIV-1 molecular epidemiologic study among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Jilin province of northeastern China. The near full-length genome (NFLG) analyses showed that the novel HIV-1 recombinant isolate (JL.RF07) was composed of CRF01_AE cluster 5 (northeastern China origin) and subtype B (U.S. and European origin), with six recombinant breakpoints observed in the pol, vif, tat, rev, and env gene regions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first detection of a novel HIV-1 recombinant form (CRF01_AE/B) in Jilin, which may indicate an active transmission network of HIV-1 infection among MSM in the region. Further studies of the molecular epidemiology of the HIV-1 epidemic among MSM in northeastern China are necessary to gain a fuller understanding of the transmission network and potential public health impact of HIV-1 among MSM in this region.

  19. The sodium channel Nav1.5a is the predominant isoform expressed in adult mouse dorsal root ganglia and exhibits distinct inactivation properties from the full-length Nav1.5 channel.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Niall C H; Gao, Zhan; Holmes, Fiona E; Hobson, Sally-Ann; Hancox, Jules C; Wynick, David; James, Andrew F

    2007-06-01

    Nav1.5 is the principal voltage-gated sodium channel expressed in heart, and is also expressed at lower abundance in embryonic dorsal root ganglia (DRG) with little or no expression reported postnatally. We report here the expression of Nav1.5 mRNA isoforms in adult mouse and rat DRG. The major isoform of mouse DRG is Nav1.5a, which encodes a protein with an IDII/III cytoplasmic loop reduced by 53 amino acids. Western blot analysis of adult mouse DRG membrane proteins confirmed the expression of Nav1.5 protein. The Na+ current produced by the Nav1.5a isoform has a voltage-dependent inactivation significantly shifted to more negative potentials (by approximately 5 mV) compared to the full-length Nav1.5 when expressed in the DRG neuroblastoma cell line ND7/23. These results imply that the alternatively spliced exon 18 of Nav1.5 plays a role in channel inactivation and that Nav1.5a is likely to make a significant contribution to adult DRG neuronal function.

  20. Using RNA-Seq to assemble a rose transcriptome with more than 13,000 full-length expressed genes and to develop the WagRhSNP 68k Axiom SNP array for rose (Rosa L.).

    PubMed

    Koning-Boucoiran, Carole F S; Esselink, G Danny; Vukosavljev, Mirjana; van 't Westende, Wendy P C; Gitonga, Virginia W; Krens, Frans A; Voorrips, Roeland E; van de Weg, W Eric; Schulz, Dietmar; Debener, Thomas; Maliepaard, Chris; Arens, Paul; Smulders, Marinus J M

    2015-01-01

    In order to develop a versatile and large SNP array for rose, we set out to mine ESTs from diverse sets of rose germplasm. For this RNA-Seq libraries containing about 700 million reads were generated from tetraploid cut and garden roses using Illumina paired-end sequencing, and from diploid Rosa multiflora using 454 sequencing. Separate de novo assemblies were performed in order to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within and between rose varieties. SNPs among tetraploid roses were selected for constructing a genotyping array that can be employed for genetic mapping and marker-trait association discovery in breeding programs based on tetraploid germplasm, both from cut roses and from garden roses. In total 68,893 SNPs were included on the WagRhSNP Axiom array. Next, an orthology-guided assembly was performed for the construction of a non-redundant rose transcriptome database. A total of 21,740 transcripts had significant hits with orthologous genes in the strawberry (Fragaria vesca L.) genome. Of these 13,390 appeared to contain the full-length coding regions. This newly established transcriptome resource adds considerably to the currently available sequence resources for the Rosaceae family in general and the genus Rosa in particular.

  1. Cloning and sequencing of cDNA and genomic DNA encoding PDM phosphatase of Fusarium moniliforme.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Iizuka, Mari; Narita, Takao; Norioka, Naoko; Norioka, Shigemi

    2006-12-01

    PDM phosphatase was purified approximately 500-fold through six steps from the extract of dried powder of the culture filtrate of Fusarium moniliforme. The purified preparation appeared homogeneous on SDS-PAGE although the protein band was broad. Amino acid sequence information was collected on tryptic peptides from this preparation. cDNA cloning was carried out based on the information. A full-length cDNA was obtained and sequenced. The sequence had an open reading frame of 651 amino acid residues with a molecular mass of 69,988 Da. Cloning and sequencing of the genomic DNA corresponding to the cDNA was also conducted. The deduced amino acid sequence could account for many but not all of the tryptic peptides, suggesting presence of contaminant protein(s). SDS-PAGE analysis after chemical deglycosylation showed two proteins with molecular masses of 58 and 68 kDa. This implied that the 58 kDa protein had been copurified with PDM phosphatase. Homology search showed that PDM phosphatase belongs to the purple acid phosphatase family, which is widely distributed in the biosphere. Sequence data of fungal purple acid phosphatases were collected from the database. Processing of the data revealed presence of two types, whose evolutionary relationships were discussed.

  2. Ohanin, a novel protein from king cobra venom: its cDNA and genomic organization.

    PubMed

    Pung, Yuh Fen; Kumar, Sanjeed Vijaya; Rajagopalan, Nandhakishore; Fry, Bryan G; Kumar, Prakash P; Kini, R Manjunatha

    2006-04-26

    Ohanin, from king cobra venom, is a novel protein which induces hypolocomotion and hyperalgesia in mice [Pung, Y.F., Wong, P.T.H., Kumar, P.P., Hodgson W.C., Kini, R.M., 2005. Ohanin, a novel protein from king cobra venom induces hypolocomotion and hyperalgesia in mice. J. Biol. Chem. 280, 13137-13147.]. It is weakly similar to PRY-SPRY domains (B30.2-like domain). Here we report the complete cDNA and genomic organization of ohanin. Interestingly, cDNA sequence does not show significant sequence similarity to any known sequences, including those of B30.2-like domain-containing proteins. Its full-length cDNA sequence of 1558 bp encodes for prepro-ohanin with a propeptide segment at the C-terminal. Ohanin is the first member of a new subfamily of proteins containing B30.2-like domain with short N-terminal segment. We named this subfamily as vespryns. There are two mRNA subtypes differing in their 5'-untranslated regions. Southern hybridization study shows that ohanin is encoded by a single gene. Its genomic sequence is 7086 bp with five exons and four introns, and the two types of mRNAs are generated by alternative splicing of exon 2. Our results indicate that ohanin and vespryns may have evolved from the same ancestral gene as B30.2 domain.

  3. Rapid and Efficient cDNA Library Screening by Self-Ligation ofInverse PCR Products (SLIP)

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskins, Roger A.; Stapleton, Mark; George, Reed A.; Yu, Charles; Wan, Kenneth H.; Carlson, Joseph W.; Celniker, Susan E.

    2005-04-22

    The production of comprehensive cDNA clone collections is an important goal of the human and model organism genome projects. cDNA sequences are used to determine the structures of transcripts, including splice junctions, polyadenylation sites, and 5' and 3' untranslated regions (UTRs). cDNA collections are also valuable resources for functional studies of genes and proteins. Expressed Sequence Tag (EST)sequencing is the method of choice for recovering cDNAs representing a majority of the transcripts encoded in a eukaryotic genome. However, EST sequencing samples a library at random, so it realizes diminishing returns as the project progresses. To drive cDNA collections toward completion new methods are needed to recover cDNAs representing specific genes and alternative transcripts, including transcripts with low expression levels. We describe a simple and effective inverse-PCR-based method for screening plasmid libraries to recover intact cDNAs for specific transcripts. We tested the method by screening libraries used in our Drosophila EST projects for 153 transcription factor genes that were not yet represented by full-length cDNAs. We recovered target-specific clones for 104 of the genes: 46 exactly match, 30 improve and 28partially match current gene annotations. Successful application of the screening method depends on cDNA library complexity and quality of the gene models. The approach should be effective for improving cDNA collections for other model organisms and the human. It also provides a simple and rapid method for isolating cDNAs of interest in any system for which plasmid cDNA libraries and complete or partial gene sequences are available.

  4. Optimization of yeast surface-displayed cDNA library screening for low abundance targets.

    PubMed

    Kim, Juh-Yung; Kim, Hyung Kyu; Jang, Hye Jeong; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Moon Kyu

    2015-04-01

    The yeast surface-displayed cDNA library has been used to identify unknown antigens. However, when unknown target antigens show moderate-to-low abundance, some modifications are needed in the screening process. In this study, a directional random-primed cDNA library was used to increase the number of candidates for the unknown antigen. To avoid the loss of target yeast clones that express proteins at a low frequency in the cDNA library, a comprehensive monitoring system based on magnetic-activated cell sorting, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and immunofluorescence was established, and a small number of target yeast cells was successfully enriched. These results showed that our optimized method has potential application for identifying rare unknown antigens of the human monoclonal antibody.

  5. Transcript expression levels of full-length alpha-synuclein and its three alternatively spliced variants in Parkinson’s disease brain regions and in a transgenic mouse model of alpha-synuclein overexpression

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Jesse R.; Hallett, Penelope J.; Cooper, Oliver; Stanley, Michael; Isacson, Ole

    2012-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a complex post-transcriptional process that can be regulated by cis-acting elements located within genomic non-coding regions. Recent studies have identified that polymorphic variations in non-coding regions of the α-synuclein gene (SNCA) locus are associated with an increased risk for developing Parkinson’s disease (PD). The underlying mechanism(s) for this susceptibility may involve changes in α-synuclein mRNA expression and alternative splicing. As a first step towards understanding the biology of α-synuclein splice variants in PD, we characterized the levels of the full-length SNCA-140 mRNA transcript and SNCA-126, -112, and -98 alternatively spliced variants in different neuronal regions from PD patients or transgenic mice overexpressing human α-synuclein (ASO). In human post-mortem tissue, α-synuclein spliced transcripts were expressed in a region-specific manner in cortex, substantia nigra, and cerebellum. We observed increased nigral SNCA-140 and SNCA-126 transcript levels in PD patients when compared to neurologically unaffected cases. Human α-synuclein splicing changes were also found to occur in a region-specific manner in ASO mice. Here, SNCA-126, -112, and -98 transcript levels did not increase proportionally with SNCA-140 levels, or parallel the region-specific mouse transcript ratios seen in wild-type (WT) littermates. While most transcripts were elevated in ASO mice when compared to WT mice, the most prominent increase was found in the ventral midbrain of 15-month-old ASO mice. These results demonstrate region-specific human α-synuclein transcript level abnormalities in PD patients and in a transgenic mouse model of α-synucleinopathy. This study is relevant to understanding the normal, adaptive, or pathological role(s) of α-synuclein splice variants. PMID:22155155

  6. Shedding of Endogenous Interleukin-6 Receptor (IL-6R) Is Governed by A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase (ADAM) Proteases while a Full-length IL-6R Isoform Localizes to Circulating Microvesicles*

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Neele; Meyer, Dörte; Mauermann, Andre; von der Heyde, Jan; Wolf, Janina; Schwarz, Jeanette; Knittler, Katharina; Murphy, Gillian; Michalek, Matthias; Garbers, Christoph; Bartsch, Jörg W.; Guo, Songbo; Schacher, Beate; Eickholz, Peter; Chalaris, Athena; Rose-John, Stefan; Rabe, Björn

    2015-01-01

    Generation of the soluble interleukin-6 receptor (sIL-6R) is a prerequisite for pathogenic IL-6 trans-signaling, which constitutes a distinct signaling pathway of the pleiotropic cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6). Although in vitro experiments using ectopically overexpressed IL-6R and candidate proteases revealed major roles for the metalloproteinases ADAM10 and ADAM17 in IL-6R shedding, the identity of the protease(s) cleaving IL-6R in more physiological settings, or even in vivo, remains unknown. By taking advantage of specific pharmacological inhibitors and primary cells from ADAM-deficient mice we established that endogenous IL-6R of both human and murine origin is shed by ADAM17 in an induced manner, whereas constitutive release of endogenous IL-6R is largely mediated by ADAM10. Although circulating IL-6R levels are altered in various diseases, the origin of blood-borne IL-6R is still poorly understood. It has been shown previously that ADAM17 hypomorphic mice exhibit unaltered levels of serum sIL-6R. Here, by quantification of serum sIL-6R in protease-deficient mice as well as human patients we also excluded ADAM10, ADAM8, neutrophil elastase, cathepsin G, and proteinase 3 from contributing to circulating sIL-6R. Furthermore, we ruled out alternative splicing of the IL-6R mRNA as a potential source of circulating sIL-6R in the mouse. Instead, we found full-length IL-6R on circulating microvesicles, establishing microvesicle release as a novel mechanism for sIL-6R generation. PMID:26359498

  7. High, broad, polyfunctional, and durable T cell immune responses induced in mice by a novel hepatitis C virus (HCV) vaccine candidate (MVA-HCV) based on modified vaccinia virus Ankara expressing the nearly full-length HCV genome.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Carmen E; Perdiguero, Beatriz; Cepeda, María Victoria; Mingorance, Lidia; García-Arriaza, Juan; Vandermeeren, Andrea; Sorzano, Carlos Óscar S; Esteban, Mariano

    2013-07-01

    A major goal in the control of hepatitis C infection is the development of a vaccine. Here, we have developed a novel HCV vaccine candidate based on the highly attenuated poxvirus vector MVA (referred to as MVA-HCV) expressing the nearly full-length (7.9-kbp) HCV sequence, with the aim to target almost all of the T and B cell determinants described for HCV. In infected cells, MVA-HCV produces a polyprotein that is subsequently processed into the structural and nonstructural HCV proteins, triggering the cytoplasmic accumulation of dense membrane aggregates. In both C57BL/6 and transgenic HLA-A2-vaccinated mice, MVA-HCV induced high, broad, polyfunctional, and long-lasting HCV-specific T cell immune responses. The vaccine-induced T cell response was mainly mediated by CD8 T cells; however, although lower in magnitude, the CD4(+) T cells were highly polyfunctional. In homologous protocol (MVA-HCV/MVA-HCV) the main CD8(+) T cell target was p7+NS2, whereas in heterologous combination (DNA-HCV/MVA-HCV) the main target was NS3. Antigenic responses were also detected against other HCV proteins (Core, E1-E2, and NS4), but the magnitude of the responses was dependent on the protocol used. The majority of the HCV-induced CD8(+) T cells were triple or quadruple cytokine producers. The MVA-HCV vaccine induced memory CD8(+) T cell responses with an effector memory phenotype. Overall, our data showed that MVA-HCV induced broad, highly polyfunctional, and durable T cell responses of a magnitude and quality that might be associated with protective immunity and open the path for future considerations of MVA-HCV as a prophylactic and/or therapeutic vaccine candidate against HCV.

  8. Multiple Different Defense Mechanisms Are Activated in the Young Transgenic Tobacco Plants Which Express the Full Length Genome of the Tobacco Mosaic Virus, and Are Resistant against this Virus

    PubMed Central

    Jada, Balaji; Soitamo, Arto J.; Siddiqui, Shahid Aslam; Murukesan, Gayatri; Aro, Eva-Mari; Salakoski, Tapio; Lehto, Kirsi

    2014-01-01

    Previously described transgenic tobacco lines express the full length infectious Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) genome under the 35S promoter (Siddiqui et al., 2007. Mol Plant Microbe Interact, 20: 1489–1494). Through their young stages these plants exhibit strong resistance against both the endogenously expressed and exogenously inoculated TMV, but at the age of about 7–8 weeks they break into TMV infection, with typical severe virus symptoms. Infections with some other viruses (Potato viruses Y, A, and X) induce the breaking of the TMV resistance and lead to synergistic proliferation of both viruses. To deduce the gene functions related to this early resistance, we have performed microarray analysis of the transgenic plants during the early resistant stage, and after the resistance break, and also of TMV-infected wild type tobacco plants. Comparison of these transcriptomes to those of corresponding wild type healthy plants indicated that 1362, 1150 and 550 transcripts were up-regulated in the transgenic plants before and after the resistance break, and in the TMV-infected wild type tobacco plants, respectively, and 1422, 1200 and 480 transcripts were down-regulated in these plants, respectively. These transcriptome alterations were distinctly different between the three types of plants, and it appears that several different mechanisms, such as the enhanced expression of the defense, hormone signaling and protein degradation pathways contributed to the TMV-resistance in the young transgenic plants. In addition to these alterations, we also observed a distinct and unique gene expression alteration in these plants, which was the strong suppression of the translational machinery. This may also contribute to the resistance by slowing down the synthesis of viral proteins. Viral replication potential may also be suppressed, to some extent, by the reduction of the translation initiation and elongation factors eIF-3 and eEF1A and B, which are required for the TMV

  9. Biogas production from hydrothermal liquefaction wastewater (HTLWW): Focusing on the microbial communities as revealed by high-throughput sequencing of full-length 16S rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huihui; Wan, Jingjing; Chen, Kaifei; Luo, Gang; Fan, Jiajun; Clark, James; Zhang, Shicheng

    2016-12-01

    Hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) is an emerging and promising technology for the conversion of wet biomass into bio-crude, however, little attention has been paid to the utilization of hydrothermal liquefaction wastewater (HTLWW) with high concentration of organics. The present study investigated biogas production from wastewater obtained from HTL of straw for bio-crude production, with focuses on the analysis of the microbial communities and characterization of the organics. Batch experiments showed the methane yield of HTLWW (R-HTLWW) was 184 mL/g COD, while HTLWW after petroleum ether extraction (PE-HTLWW), to extract additional bio-crude, had higher methane yield (235 mL/g COD) due to the extraction of recalcitrant organic compounds. Sequential batch experiments further demonstrated the higher methane yield of PE-HTLWW. LC-TOF-MS, HPLC and gel filtration chromatography showed organics with molecular weight (MW) < 1000 were well degraded. Results from the high-throughput sequencing of full-length 16S rRNA genes analysis showed similar microbial community compositions were obtained for the reactors fed with either R-HTLWW or PE-HTLWW. The degradation of fatty acids were related with Mesotoga infera, Syntrophomonas wolfei et al. by species level identification. However, the species related to the degradation of other compounds (e.g. phenols) were not found, which could be due to the presence of uncharacterized microorganisms. It was also found previously proposed criteria (97% and 98.65% similarity) for species identification of 16S rRNA genes were not suitable for a fraction of 16S rRNA genes.

  10. High, Broad, Polyfunctional, and Durable T Cell Immune Responses Induced in Mice by a Novel Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Vaccine Candidate (MVA-HCV) Based on Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara Expressing the Nearly Full-Length HCV Genome

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Carmen E.; Perdiguero, Beatriz; Cepeda, María Victoria; Mingorance, Lidia; García-Arriaza, Juan; Vandermeeren, Andrea; Sorzano, Carlos Óscar S.

    2013-01-01

    A major goal in the control of hepatitis C infection is the development of a vaccine. Here, we have developed a novel HCV vaccine candidate based on the highly attenuated poxvirus vector MVA (referred to as MVA-HCV) expressing the nearly full-length (7.9-kbp) HCV sequence, with the aim to target almost all of the T and B cell determinants described for HCV. In infected cells, MVA-HCV produces a polyprotein that is subsequently processed into the structural and nonstructural HCV proteins, triggering the cytoplasmic accumulation of dense membrane aggregates. In both C57BL/6 and transgenic HLA-A2-vaccinated mice, MVA-HCV induced high, broad, polyfunctional, and long-lasting HCV-specific T cell immune responses. The vaccine-induced T cell response was mainly mediated by CD8 T cells; however, although lower in magnitude, the CD4+ T cells were highly polyfunctional. In homologous protocol (MVA-HCV/MVA-HCV) the main CD8+ T cell target was p7+NS2, whereas in heterologous combination (DNA-HCV/MVA-HCV) the main target was NS3. Antigenic responses were also detected against other HCV proteins (Core, E1-E2, and NS4), but the magnitude of the responses was dependent on the protocol used. The majority of the HCV-induced CD8+ T cells were triple or quadruple cytokine producers. The MVA-HCV vaccine induced memory CD8+ T cell responses with an effector memory phenotype. Overall, our data showed that MVA-HCV induced broad, highly polyfunctional, and durable T cell responses of a magnitude and quality that might be associated with protective immunity and open the path for future considerations of MVA-HCV as a prophylactic and/or therapeutic vaccine candidate against HCV. PMID:23596307