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Sample records for function metabolic control

  1. Circadian Clock Control of Liver Metabolic Functions.

    PubMed

    Reinke, Hans; Asher, Gad

    2016-03-01

    The circadian clock is an endogenous biological timekeeping system that synchronizes physiology and behavior to day/night cycles. A wide variety of processes throughout the entire gastrointestinal tract and notably the liver appear to be under circadian control. These include various metabolic functions such as nutrient uptake, processing, and detoxification, which align organ function to cycle with nutrient supply and demand. Remarkably, genetic or environmental disruption of the circadian clock can cause metabolic diseases or exacerbate pathological states. In addition, modern lifestyles force more and more people worldwide into asynchrony between the external time and their circadian clock, resulting in a constant state of social jetlag. Recent evidence indicates that interactions between altered energy metabolism and disruptions in the circadian clock create a downward spiral that can lead to diabetes and other metabolic diseases. In this review, we provide an overview of rhythmic processes in the liver and highlight the functions of circadian clock genes under physiological and pathological conditions; we focus on their roles in regulation of hepatic glucose as well as lipid and bile acid metabolism and detoxification and their potential effects on the development of fatty liver and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Hypothalamic inflammation in the control of metabolic function.

    PubMed

    Valdearcos, Martin; Xu, Allison W; Koliwad, Suneil K

    2015-01-01

    Diet-induced obesity leads to devastating and common chronic diseases, fueling ongoing interest in determining new mechanisms underlying both obesity and its consequences. It is now well known that chronic overnutrition produces a unique form of inflammation in peripheral insulin target tissues, and efforts to limit this inflammation have met with some success in preserving insulin sensitivity in obese individuals. Recently, the activation of inflammatory pathways by dietary excess has also been observed among cells located in the mediobasal hypothalamus, a brain area that exerts central control over peripheral glucose, fat, and energy metabolism. Here we review progress in the field of diet-induced hypothalamic inflammation, drawing key distinctions between metabolic inflammation in the hypothalamus and that occurring in peripheral tissues. We focus on specific stimuli of the inflammatory response, the roles of individual hypothalamic cell types, and the links between hypothalamic inflammation and metabolic function under normal and pathophysiological circumstances. Finally, we explore the concept of controlling hypothalamic inflammation to mitigate metabolic disease.

  3. microRNA control of HDL Metabolism and Function

    PubMed Central

    Rayner, Katey J; Moore, Kathryn J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent discoveries of microRNAs (miRNAs) that control HDL abundance and function have expanded our knowledge of the mechanisms regulating this important lipoprotein subclass. miRNAs have been shown to regulate gene networks that control HDL biogenesis and uptake, as well as discrete steps in the reverse cholesterol transport pathway. Furthermore, HDL itself has been shown to selectively transport miRNAs in health and disease, offering new possibilities of how this lipoprotein may alter gene expression in distal target cells and tissues. Collectively, these discoveries offer new insights into the mechanisms governing HDL metabolism and function, and open new avenues for the development of therapeutics for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. PMID:24385511

  4. Metabolically active functional food ingredients for weight control.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, E M R; Mela, D J

    2006-02-01

    The scale of the obesity epidemic creates a pressing consumer need as well as an enormous business opportunity for successful development and marketing of food products with added benefits for weight control. A number of proposed functional food ingredients have been shown to act post-absorptively to influence substrate utilization or thermogenesis. Characteristics and supporting data on conjugated linoleic acid, diglycerides, medium-chain triglycerides, green tea, ephedrine, caffeine, capsaicin and calcium, are reviewed here, giving examples of how these could act to alter energy expenditure or appetite control. Consideration is also given to other factors, in addition to efficacy, which must be satisfied to get such ingredients into foods. We conclude that, for each of the safe, putatively metabolically active agents, there remain gaps in clinical evidence or knowledge of mechanisms, which need to be addressed in order to specify the dietary conditions and food product compositions where these ingredients could be of most benefit for weight control.

  5. Transcriptional Control of Cardiac Fuel Metabolism and Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Leone, T.C.; Kelly, D.P.

    2012-01-01

    As a persistent pump, the mammalian heart demands a high-capacity mitochondrial system. Significant progress has been made in delineating the gene regulatory networks that control mitochondrial biogenesis and function in striated muscle. The PPARγ coactivator-1 (PGC-1) coactivators serve as inducible boosters of downstream transcription factors that control the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial energy transduction, ATP synthesis, and biogenesis. PGC-1 gain-of-function and loss-of-function studies targeting two PGC-1 family members, PGC-1α and PGC-1β, have provided solid evidence that these factors are both necessary and sufficient for perinatal mitochondrial biogenesis and maintenance of high-capacity mitochondrial function in postnatal heart. In humans, during the development of heart failure owing to hypertension or obesity-related diabetes, the activity of the PGC-1 coactivators, and several downstream target transcription factors, is altered. Gene targeting studies in mice have demonstrated that loss of PGC-1α and PGC-1β in heart leads to heart failure. Interestingly, the pattern of dysregulation within the PGC-1 transcriptional regulatory circuit distinguishes the heart disease caused by hypertension from that caused by diabetes. This transcriptional regulatory cascade and downstream metabolic pathways should be considered as targets for novel etiology-specific therapeutics aimed at the early stages of heart failure. PMID:22096028

  6. Metabolic Control of Dendritic Cell Activation and Function: Recent Advances and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Everts, Bart; Pearce, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are key regulators of both immunity and tolerance by controlling activation and polarization of effector T helper cell and regulatory T cell responses. Therefore, there is a major focus on developing approaches to manipulate DC function for immunotherapy. It is well known that changes in cellular activation are coupled to profound changes in cellular metabolism. Over the past decade there is a growing appreciation that these metabolic changes also underlie the capacity of immune cells to perform particular functions. This has led to the concept that the manipulation of cellular metabolism can be used to shape innate and adaptive immune responses. While most of our understanding in this area has been gained from studies with T cells and macrophages, evidence is emerging that the activation and function of DCs are also dictated by the type of metabolism these cells commit to. We here discuss these new insights and explore whether targeting of metabolic pathways in DCs could hold promise as a novel approach to manipulate the functional properties of DCs for clinical purposes. PMID:24847328

  7. Sphingomyelin metabolism controls the shape and function of the Golgi cisternae

    PubMed Central

    Campelo, Felix; van Galen, Josse; Turacchio, Gabriele; Parashuraman, Seetharaman; Kozlov, Michael M; García-Parajo, María F; Malhotra, Vivek

    2017-01-01

    The flat Golgi cisterna is a highly conserved feature of eukaryotic cells, but how is this morphology achieved and is it related to its function in cargo sorting and export? A physical model of cisterna morphology led us to propose that sphingomyelin (SM) metabolism at the trans-Golgi membranes in mammalian cells essentially controls the structural features of a Golgi cisterna by regulating its association to curvature-generating proteins. An experimental test of this hypothesis revealed that affecting SM homeostasis converted flat cisternae into highly curled membranes with a concomitant dissociation of membrane curvature-generating proteins. These data lend support to our hypothesis that SM metabolism controls the structural organization of a Golgi cisterna. Together with our previously presented role of SM in controlling the location of proteins involved in glycosylation and vesicle formation, our data reveal the significance of SM metabolism in the structural organization and function of Golgi cisternae. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.24603.001 PMID:28500756

  8. Brain glucose sensing, glucokinase and neural control of metabolism and islet function.

    PubMed

    Ogunnowo-Bada, E O; Heeley, N; Brochard, L; Evans, M L

    2014-09-01

    It is increasingly apparent that the brain plays a central role in metabolic homeostasis, including the maintenance of blood glucose. This is achieved by various efferent pathways from the brain to periphery, which help control hepatic glucose flux and perhaps insulin-stimulated insulin secretion. Also, critically important for the brain given its dependence on a constant supply of glucose as a fuel--emergency counter-regulatory responses are triggered by the brain if blood glucose starts to fall. To exert these control functions, the brain needs to detect rapidly and accurately changes in blood glucose. In this review, we summarize some of the mechanisms postulated to play a role in this and examine the potential role of the low-affinity hexokinase, glucokinase, in the brain as a key part of some of this sensing. We also discuss how these processes may become altered in diabetes and related metabolic diseases.

  9. Control of metabolic and cardiovascular function by the leptin-brain melanocortin pathway.

    PubMed

    do Carmo, Jussara M; da Silva, Alexandre A; Dubinion, John; Sessums, Price O; Ebaady, Sabira H; Wang, Zhen; Hall, John E

    2013-08-01

    Obesity is recognized as a major worldwide health problem. Excess weight gain is the most common cause of elevated blood pressure (BP) and markedly increases the risk of metabolic, cardiovascular and renal diseases. Although the mechanisms linking obesity with hypertension have not been fully elucidated, increased sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity contributes to elevated BP in obese subjects. Recent evidence indicates that leptin and the central nervous system (CNS) melanocortin system, including melanocortin 4 receptors (MC4R), play a key role in linking obesity with increased SNS activity and hypertension. Leptin, a peptide-hormone produced by adipose tissue, crosses the blood-brain barrier and activates brain centers that control multiple metabolic functions as well as SNS activity and BP via the CNS melanocortin system. The crosstalk between peripheral signals (e.g., leptin) and activation of CNS pathways (e.g., MC4R) that regulate energy balance, SNS activity and BP represents an important target for treating obesity and its metabolic and cardiovascular consequences. © 2013 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  10. The Deubiquitylase MATH-33 Controls DAF-16 Stability and Function in Metabolism and Longevity

    PubMed Central

    Heimbucher, Thomas; Liu, Zheng; Bossard, Carine; McCloskey, Richard; Carrano, Andrea C.; Riedel, Christian G.; Tanasa, Bogdan; Klammt, Christian; Fonslow, Bryan R.; Riera, Celine E.; Lillemeier, Bjorn F.; Kemphues, Kenneth; Yates, John R.; O'Shea, Clodagh; Hunter, Tony; Dillin, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY One of the major determinants of aging in organisms ranging from worms to man are FOXO family transcription factors, which are downstream effectors of Insulin/IGF-1 signaling (IIS). The molecular mechanisms that actively promote DAF16/FOXO stability and function are unknown. Here we identify the deubiquitylating enzyme MATH-33 as an essential DAF-16 regulator in IIS, which stabilizes active DAF-16 protein levels and, as a consequence, influences DAF-16 functions, such as metabolism, stress response and longevity in C. elegans. MATH-33 associates with DAF-16 in cellulo and in vitro. MATH-33 functions as a deubiquitylase by actively removing ubiquitin moieties from DAF-16, thus counteracting the action of the RLE-1 E3-ubiquitin ligase. Our findings support a model in which MATH-33 promotes DAF-16 stability in response to decreased IIS by directly modulating its ubiquitylation state, suggesting that regulated oscillations in the stability of DAF-16 protein play an integral role in controlling processes such as metabolism and longevity. PMID:26154057

  11. Interferon Regulatory Factor 4 controls TH1 cell effector function and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mahnke, Justus; Schumacher, Valéa; Ahrens, Stefanie; Käding, Nadja; Feldhoff, Lea Marie; Huber, Magdalena; Rupp, Jan; Raczkowski, Friederike; Mittrücker, Hans-Willi

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor Interferon Regulatory Factor 4 (IRF4) is essential for TH2 and TH17 cell formation and controls peripheral CD8+ T cell differentiation. We used Listeria monocytogenes infection to characterize the function of IRF4 in TH1 responses. IRF4−/− mice generated only marginal numbers of listeria-specific TH1 cells. After transfer into infected mice, IRF4−/− CD4+ T cells failed to differentiate into TH1 cells as indicated by reduced T-bet and IFN-γ expression, and showed limited proliferation. Activated IRF4−/− CD4+ T cells exhibited diminished uptake of the glucose analog 2-NBDG, limited oxidative phosphorylation and strongly reduced aerobic glycolysis. Insufficient metabolic adaptation contributed to the limited proliferation and TH1 differentiation of IRF4−/− CD4+ T cells. Our study identifies IRF4 as central regulator of TH1 responses and cellular metabolism. We propose that this function of IRF4 is fundamental for the initiation and maintenance of all TH cell responses. PMID:27762344

  12. A sturgeon-derived bioactive compound beneficially modulates nuclear receptors controlling metabolic functions in patients with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Marotta, Francesco; Lorenzetti, Aldo; Catanzaro, Roberto; Zerbinati, Nicola; Jain, Shalini; Solimene, Umberto; Yaduvanshi, Santos K; Yadav, Hariom; Sapienza, Chiara; Srivastava, Nalini; Milazzo, Michele; Italia, Angelo

    2013-06-19

    The aim of the present study was to test the possible effects of a novel sturgeon-derived compound  (LD-1227) on inflammatory markers related to metabolic nuclear receptors in patients with metabolic syndrome. The study population consisted of 76 patients with metabolic syndrome and 30 healthy subjects who were maintained to their current treatments and randomly supplemented: A) LD-1227 (n=38) or B) placebo (n=38) as compared to C) healthy controls (n=30). LD-1227 or placebo (water-soluble starch) were given daily at breakfast and dinner for three months. Levels of hs-CRP, IL-6, TNF-α, leptin and adiponectin/ resistin index were assayed at the entry, 1 month and 3 months afterwards. At the end of the study period, as compared to B group, LD-1227-treated patients showed a significant improvement of all parameters tested, irrespective of the presence of diabetes. In particular, levels of adiponectin and adiponectin/ resistin index significantly increased following LD-1227 administration. Although the metabolic syndrome remains a multifaceted condition requiring a complex approach, LD-1227 could be a potential safe therapeutic tool to be integrated into a wider treatment and preventive medicine schedule strategy.

  13. Relationship between β-cell function, metabolic control, and microvascular complications in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lihua; Ma, Jing; Wang, Shaoxin; Xie, Yun

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship among β-cell function, metabolic control, and diabetic microvascular complications in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In total, 885 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) were recruited from January 2012 to January 2014 and grouped into three groups according to the area under the curve of C-peptide [AUC(C-pep)] during the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test. Logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the association between C-peptide and microvascular complications. The prevalence of diabetic microvascular complications decreased from the first to the third AUC(C-pep) tertile (P < 0.01 for all), whereas the rates of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) was positively associated with AUC(C-pep) values. Patients with lower AUC(C-pep) tertile exhibited higher levels of glycosylated hemoglobin and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and longer duration of DM; however, levels of triglycerides, fasting C-peptide, 2-h C-peptide, body mass index, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index were lower compared with the third tertile. Comparison among patients with a similar DM duration showed a higher level of AUC(C-pep) was inversely associated with prevalence of microvascular complications. The odds ratios for nephropathy, retinopathy, and neuropathy in the lowest versus the highest AUC(C-pep) tertile were 3.10 (95% confidence interval, 2.01-4.78), 2.83 (1.73-4.64), and 2.04 (1.37-3.04) after adjustment for confounding factors. Higher AUC(C-pep) levels were associated with a decreased prevalence of microvascular complications and a good level of glycemic control, whereas higher endogenous insulin levels were linked to the components of metabolic syndrome and increased rates of NAFLD.

  14. Structural Control of Metabolic Flux

    PubMed Central

    Sajitz-Hermstein, Max; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2013-01-01

    Organisms have to continuously adapt to changing environmental conditions or undergo developmental transitions. To meet the accompanying change in metabolic demands, the molecular mechanisms of adaptation involve concerted interactions which ultimately induce a modification of the metabolic state, which is characterized by reaction fluxes and metabolite concentrations. These state transitions are the effect of simultaneously manipulating fluxes through several reactions. While metabolic control analysis has provided a powerful framework for elucidating the principles governing this orchestrated action to understand metabolic control, its applications are restricted by the limited availability of kinetic information. Here, we introduce structural metabolic control as a framework to examine individual reactions' potential to control metabolic functions, such as biomass production, based on structural modeling. The capability to carry out a metabolic function is determined using flux balance analysis (FBA). We examine structural metabolic control on the example of the central carbon metabolism of Escherichia coli by the recently introduced framework of functional centrality (FC). This framework is based on the Shapley value from cooperative game theory and FBA, and we demonstrate its superior ability to assign “share of control” to individual reactions with respect to metabolic functions and environmental conditions. A comparative analysis of various scenarios illustrates the usefulness of FC and its relations to other structural approaches pertaining to metabolic control. We propose a Monte Carlo algorithm to estimate FCs for large networks, based on the enumeration of elementary flux modes. We further give detailed biological interpretation of FCs for production of lactate and ATP under various respiratory conditions. PMID:24367246

  15. Recent insights into the implications of metabolism in plasmacytoid dendritic cell innate functions: Potential ways to control these functions.

    PubMed

    Saas, Philippe; Varin, Alexis; Perruche, Sylvain; Ceroi, Adam

    2017-01-01

    There are more and more data concerning the role of cellular metabolism in innate immune cells, such as macrophages or conventional dendritic cells. However, few data are available currently concerning plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDC), another type of innate immune cells. These cells are the main type I interferon (IFN) producing cells, but they also secrete other pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g., tumor necrosis factor or interleukin [IL]-6) or immunomodulatory factors (e.g., IL-10 or transforming growth factor-β). Through these functions, PDC participate in antimicrobial responses or maintenance of immune tolerance, and have been implicated in the pathophysiology of several autoimmune diseases, as well as in tumor immune escape mechanisms. Recent data support the idea that the glycolytic pathway (or glycolysis), as well as lipid metabolism (including both cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism) may impact some innate immune functions of PDC or may be involved in these functions after Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7/9 triggering. The kinetics of glycolysis after TLR7/9 triggering may differ between human and murine PDC. In mouse PDC, metabolism changes promoted by TLR7/9 activation may depend on an autocrine/paracrine loop, implicating type I IFN and its receptor IFNAR. This could explain a delayed glycolysis in mouse PDC. Moreover, PDC functions can be modulated by the metabolism of cholesterol and fatty acids. This may occur via the production of lipid ligands that activate nuclear receptors (e.g., liver X receptor [LXR]) in PDC or through limiting intracellular cholesterol pool size (by statin or LXR agonist treatment) in these cells. Finally, lipid-activated nuclear receptors (i.e., LXR or peroxisome proliferator activated receptor) may also directly interact with pro-inflammatory transcription factors, such as NF-κB. Here, we discuss how glycolysis and lipid metabolism may modulate PDC functions and how this may be harnessed in pathological situations where PDC

  16. Recent insights into the implications of metabolism in plasmacytoid dendritic cell innate functions: Potential ways to control these functions

    PubMed Central

    Saas, Philippe; Varin, Alexis; Perruche, Sylvain; Ceroi, Adam

    2017-01-01

    There are more and more data concerning the role of cellular metabolism in innate immune cells, such as macrophages or conventional dendritic cells. However, few data are available currently concerning plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDC), another type of innate immune cells. These cells are the main type I interferon (IFN) producing cells, but they also secrete other pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g., tumor necrosis factor or interleukin [IL]-6) or immunomodulatory factors (e.g., IL-10 or transforming growth factor-β). Through these functions, PDC participate in antimicrobial responses or maintenance of immune tolerance, and have been implicated in the pathophysiology of several autoimmune diseases, as well as in tumor immune escape mechanisms. Recent data support the idea that the glycolytic pathway (or glycolysis), as well as lipid metabolism (including both cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism) may impact some innate immune functions of PDC or may be involved in these functions after Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7/9 triggering. The kinetics of glycolysis after TLR7/9 triggering may differ between human and murine PDC. In mouse PDC, metabolism changes promoted by TLR7/9 activation may depend on an autocrine/paracrine loop, implicating type I IFN and its receptor IFNAR. This could explain a delayed glycolysis in mouse PDC. Moreover, PDC functions can be modulated by the metabolism of cholesterol and fatty acids. This may occur via the production of lipid ligands that activate nuclear receptors (e.g., liver X receptor [LXR]) in PDC or through limiting intracellular cholesterol pool size (by statin or LXR agonist treatment) in these cells. Finally, lipid-activated nuclear receptors (i.e., LXR or peroxisome proliferator activated receptor) may also directly interact with pro-inflammatory transcription factors, such as NF-κB. Here, we discuss how glycolysis and lipid metabolism may modulate PDC functions and how this may be harnessed in pathological situations where PDC

  17. Effects of Community Exercise Therapy on Metabolic, Brain, Physical, and Cognitive Function Following Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial.

    PubMed

    Moore, Sarah A; Hallsworth, Kate; Jakovljevic, Djordje G; Blamire, Andrew M; He, Jiabao; Ford, Gary A; Rochester, Lynn; Trenell, Michael I

    2015-08-01

    Exercise therapy could potentially modify metabolic risk factors and brain physiology alongside improving function post stroke. To explore the short-term metabolic, brain, cognitive, and functional effects of exercise following stroke. A total of 40 participants (>50 years, >6 months post stroke, independently mobile) were recruited to a single-blind, parallel, randomized controlled trial of community-based exercise (19 weeks, 3 times/wk, "exercise" group) or stretching ("control" group). Primary outcome measures were glucose control and cerebral blood flow. Secondary outcome measures were cardiorespiratory fitness, blood pressure, lipid profile, body composition, cerebral tissue atrophy and regional brain metabolism, and physical and cognitive function. Exercise did not change glucose control (homeostasis model assessment 1·5 ± 0·8 to 1·5 ± 0·7 vs 1·6 ± 0·8 to 1·7 ± 0·7, P = .97; CI = -0·5 to 0·49). Medial temporal lobe tissue blood flow increased with exercise (38 ± 8 to 42 ± 10 mL/100 g/min; P < .05; CI = 9.0 to 0.1) without any change in gray matter tissue volume. There was no change in medial temporal lobe tissue blood flow in the control group (41 ± 8 to 40 ± 7 mL/100 g/min; P = .13; CI = -3.6 to 6.7) but significant gray matter atrophy. Cardiorespiratory fitness, diastolic blood pressure, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, physical function, and cognition also improved with exercise. Exercise therapy improves short-term metabolic, brain, physical, and cognitive function, without changes in glucose control following stroke. The long-term impact of exercise on stroke recurrence, cardiovascular health, and disability should now be explored. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Engineering of metabolic control

    DOEpatents

    Liao, James C.

    2004-03-16

    The invention features a method of producing heterologous molecules in cells under the regulatory control of a metabolite and metabolic flux. The method can enhance the synthesis of heterologous polypeptides and metabolites.

  19. Engineering of metabolic control

    DOEpatents

    Liao, James C.

    2006-10-17

    The invention features a method of producing heterologous molecules in cells under the regulatory control of a metabolite and metabolic flux. The method can enhance the synthesis of heterologous polypeptides and metabolites.

  20. Fas cell surface death receptor controls hepatic lipid metabolism by regulating mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Item, Flurin; Wueest, Stephan; Lemos, Vera; Stein, Sokrates; Lucchini, Fabrizio C; Denzler, Rémy; Fisser, Muriel C; Challa, Tenagne D; Pirinen, Eija; Kim, Youngsoo; Hemmi, Silvio; Gulbins, Erich; Gross, Atan; O'Reilly, Lorraine A; Stoffel, Markus; Auwerx, Johan; Konrad, Daniel

    2017-09-07

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is one of the most prevalent metabolic disorders and it tightly associates with obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Reduced mitochondrial lipid oxidation contributes to hepatic fatty acid accumulation. Here, we show that the Fas cell surface death receptor (Fas/CD95/Apo-1) regulates hepatic mitochondrial metabolism. Hepatic Fas overexpression in chow-fed mice compromises fatty acid oxidation, mitochondrial respiration, and the abundance of mitochondrial respiratory complexes promoting hepatic lipid accumulation and insulin resistance. In line, hepatocyte-specific ablation of Fas improves mitochondrial function and ameliorates high-fat-diet-induced hepatic steatosis, glucose tolerance, and insulin resistance. Mechanistically, Fas impairs fatty acid oxidation via the BH3 interacting-domain death agonist (BID). Mice with genetic or pharmacological inhibition of BID are protected from Fas-mediated impairment of mitochondrial oxidation and hepatic steatosis. We suggest Fas as a potential novel therapeutic target to treat obesity-associated fatty liver and insulin resistance.Hepatic steatosis is a common disease closely associated with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance. Here Item et al. show that Fas, a member of the TNF receptor superfamily, contributes to mitochondrial dysfunction, steatosis development, and insulin resistance under high fat diet.

  1. Adolescents with type 1 diabetes: parental perceptions of child health and family functioning and their relationship to adolescent metabolic control.

    PubMed

    Moore, Susan M; Hackworth, Naomi J; Hamilton, Victoria E; Northam, Elisabeth P; Cameron, Fergus J

    2013-03-22

    Adolescents with Type 1 diabetes (T1D) show less effective metabolic control than other age groups, partly because of biological changes beyond their control and partly because in this period of developmental transition, psychosocial factors can militate against young people upholding their lifestyle and medical regimens. Parents have an important role to play in supporting adolescents to self-manage their disease, but resultant family tensions can be high. In this study, we aimed to assess family functioning and adolescent behaviour/ adjustment and examine the relationships between these parent-reported variables and adolescent metabolic control (HbA1c), self-reported health and diabetes self-care. A sample of 76 parents of Australian adolescents with T1D completed the Child Health Questionnaire -Parent form. Their adolescent child with T1D provided their HbA1c level from their most recent clinic visit, their self-reported general health, and completed a measure of diabetes self-care. Parent-reported family conflict was high, as was disease impact on family dynamics and parental stress. Higher HbA1c (poorer metabolic control) and less adequate adolescent self-care were associated with lower levels of family functioning, more adolescent behavioural difficulties and poorer adolescent mental health. The implication of these findings was discussed in relation to needs for information and support among Australian families with an adolescent with T1D, acknowledging the important dimension of family functioning and relationships in adolescent chronic disease management.

  2. Small RNA-dependent expression of secondary metabolism is controlled by Krebs cycle function in Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Kasumi; Kiefer, Patrick; Reimmann, Cornelia; Keel, Christoph; Dubuis, Christophe; Rolli, Joëlle; Vorholt, Julia A; Haas, Dieter

    2009-12-11

    Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0, an antagonist of phytopathogenic fungi in the rhizosphere of crop plants, elaborates and excretes several secondary metabolites with antibiotic properties. Their synthesis depends on three small RNAs (RsmX, RsmY, and RsmZ), whose expression is positively controlled by the GacS-GacA two-component system at high cell population densities. To find regulatory links between primary and secondary metabolism in P. fluorescens and in the related species Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we searched for null mutations that affected central carbon metabolism as well as the expression of rsmY-gfp and rsmZ-gfp reporter constructs but without slowing down the growth rate in rich media. Mutation in the pycAB genes (for pyruvate carboxylase) led to down-regulation of rsmXYZ and secondary metabolism, whereas mutation in fumA (for a fumarase isoenzyme) resulted in up-regulation of the three small RNAs and secondary metabolism in the absence of detectable nutrient limitation. These effects required the GacS sensor kinase but not the accessory sensors RetS and LadS. An analysis of intracellular metabolites in P. fluorescens revealed a strong positive correlation between small RNA expression and the pools of 2-oxoglutarate, succinate, and fumarate. We conclude that Krebs cycle intermediates (already known to control GacA-dependent virulence factors in P. aeruginosa) exert a critical trigger function in secondary metabolism via the expression of GacA-dependent small RNAs.

  3. Sleep and metabolic function

    PubMed Central

    Morselli, Lisa L.; Guyon, Aurore; Spiegel, Karine

    2012-01-01

    Evidence for the role of sleep on metabolic and endocrine function has been reported more than four decades ago. In the past 30 years, the prevalence of obesity and diabetes has greatly increased in industrialized countries, and self-imposed sleep curtailment, now very common, is starting to be recognized as a contributing factor, alongside with increased caloric intake and decreased physical activity. Furthermore, obstructive sleep apnea, a chronic condition characterized by recurrent upper airway obstruction leading to intermittent hypoxemia and sleep fragmentation, has also become highly prevalent as a consequence of the epidemic of obesity and has been shown to contribute, in a vicious circle, to the metabolic disturbances observed in obese patients. In this article, we summarize the current data supporting the role of sleep in the regulation of glucose homeostasis and the hormones involved in the regulation of appetite. We also review the results of the epidemiologic and laboratory studies that investigated the impact of sleep duration and quality on the risk of developing diabetes and obesity, as well as the mechanisms underlying this increased risk. Finally, we discuss how obstructive sleep apnea affects glucose metabolism and the beneficial impact of its treatment, the continuous positive airway pressure. In conclusion, the data available in the literature highlight the importance of getting enough good sleep for metabolic health. PMID:22101912

  4. L-arginine metabolism in myeloid cells controls T-lymphocyte functions.

    PubMed

    Bronte, Vincenzo; Serafini, Paolo; Mazzoni, Alessandra; Segal, David M; Zanovello, Paola

    2003-06-01

    Although current attention has focused on regulatory T lymphocytes as suppressors of autoimmune responses, powerful immunosuppression is also mediated by a subset of myeloid cells that enter the lymphoid organs and peripheral tissues during times of immune stress. If these myeloid suppressor cells (MSCs) receive signals from activated T lymphocytes in the lymphoid organs, they block T-cell proliferation. MSCs use two enzymes involved in arginine metabolism to control T-cell responses: inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2), which generates nitric oxide (NO) and arginase 1 (Arg1), which depletes the milieu of arginine. Th1 cytokines induce NOS2, whereas Th2 cytokines upregulate Arg1. Induction of either enzyme alone results in a reversible block in T-cell proliferation. When both enzymes are induced together, peroxynitrites, generated by NOS2 under conditions of limiting arginine, cause activated T lymphocytes to undergo apoptosis. Thus, NOS2 and Arg1 might act separately or synergistically in vivo to control specific types of T-cell responses, and selective antagonists of these enzymes might prove beneficial in fighting diseases in which T-cell responses are inappropriately suppressed. This Opinion is the second in a series on the regulation of the immune system by metabolic pathways.

  5. Rethinking metabolic control.

    PubMed

    Morandini, Piero

    2009-04-01

    Modulation of metabolic fluxes in plants is usually not a successful business. The main reason is our limited understanding of metabolic plasticity and metabolic control, with the latter still largely influenced by the idea that each pathway has a rate limiting step controlling the flux. Not only is experimental evidence for such steps lacking for most pathways, despite intensive search, but there are also theoretical arguments against the idea that highly regulated enzymes catalyzing reactions far from equilibrium must be considered a priori rate limiting. Conversely, it is argued that reactions close to equilibrium need a lot of enzyme to be maintained close to equilibrium and, contrary to accepted wisdom, begin to limit flux when reduced. Using a few key examples of plant metabolic pathways as case studies, I draw some general conclusions. The approach of augmenting flux by pushing a pathway from above is well exemplified by the attempts at increasing starch content in potato tubers, where several different approaches failed. Also pulling at the other end (close to the end product) has yielded little improvement, while targeting a reaction close to equilibrium (ADP/ATP translocation at the plastid envelope) successfully increased starch content. Rethinking control is equally well applicable to photosynthesis, with prime examples of 'neglected', unregulated enzymes exerting significant control and overprized 'limiting' enzymes having little control in normal conditions like rubisco. In this new paradigm, the role of most control mechanisms is also challenged: feedback inhibition and post-translational modification of enzymes are relevant to metabolite homeostasis rather than flux control, with moiety conservation being a major reason for this constraint. I advocate a more extensive use of control circuitry elements (e.g. sensors like riboswitches), metabolic shortcuts and transcription factors in metabolic engineering. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All

  6. Nutritional control of immunity: Balancing the metabolic requirements with an appropriate immune function.

    PubMed

    De Rosa, Veronica; Galgani, Mario; Santopaolo, Marianna; Colamatteo, Alessandra; Laccetti, Roberta; Matarese, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    The immune system is a highly integrated network of cells sensitive to a number of environmental factors. Interestingly, recent years have seen a dramatic increase in our understanding of how diet makes a crucial contribution to human health, affecting the immune system, secretion of adipocytokines and metabolic pathways. Recent experimental evidence indicates that diet and its components are able to profoundly influence immune responses, thus affecting the development of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. This review aims to discuss some of the main topics concerning the impact of nutrients and their relative composition on immune cell development and function that may be particularly important for regulating the balance between inflammatory and tolerogenic processes. We also highlight the effects of diet on commensal bacteria and how changes in the composition of the microbiota alter intestinal and systemic immune homeostasis. Finally, we summarize the effects of dietary compounds on epigenetic mechanisms involved in the regulation of several immune related genes.

  7. Prenatal malnutrition leads to deficits in attentional set shifting and decreases metabolic activity in prefrontal subregions that control executive function.

    PubMed

    McGaughy, Jill A; Amaral, Ana C; Rushmore, R Jarrett; Mokler, David J; Morgane, Peter J; Rosene, Douglas L; Galler, Janina R

    2014-01-01

    Globally, over 25% of all children under the age of 5 years experience malnutrition leading to cognitive and emotional impairments that can persist into adulthood and beyond. We use a rodent model to determine the impact of prenatal protein malnutrition on executive functions in an attentional set-shifting task and metabolic activity in prefrontal cortex (PFC) subregions critical to these behaviors. Long-Evans dams were provided with a low (6% casein) or adequate (25% casein) protein diet 5 weeks before mating and during pregnancy. At birth, the litters were culled to 8 pups and fostered to control dams on the 25% casein diet. At postnatal day 90, prenatally malnourished rats were less able to shift attentional set and reverse reward contingencies than controls, demonstrating cognitive rigidity. Naive same-sexed littermates were assessed for regional brain activity using the metabolic marker (14)C-2-deoxyglucose (2DG). The prenatally malnourished rats had lower metabolic activity than controls in prelimbic, infralimbic, anterior cingulate, and orbitofrontal cortices, but had comparable activity in the nearby piriform cortex and superior colliculus. This study demonstrates that prenatal protein malnutrition in a well-described animal model produces cognitive deficits in tests of attentional set shifting and reversal learning, similar to findings of cognitive inflexibility reported in humans exposed to early childhood malnutrition. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Structural and Functional Study of Yer067w, a New Protein Involved in Yeast Metabolism Control and Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Domitrovic, Tatiana; Kozlov, Guennadi; Freire, João Claudio Gonçalves; Masuda, Claudio Akio; da Silva Almeida, Marcius; Montero-Lomeli, Mónica; Atella, Georgia Correa; Matta-Camacho, Edna; Gehring, Kalle; Kurtenbach, Eleonora

    2010-01-01

    The genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is arguably the best studied eukaryotic genome, and yet, it contains approximately 1000 genes that are still relatively uncharacterized. As the majority of these ORFs have no homologs with characterized sequence or protein structure, traditional sequence-based approaches cannot be applied to deduce their biological function. Here, we characterize YER067W, a conserved gene of unknown function that is strongly induced in response to many stress conditions and repressed in drug resistant yeast strains. Gene expression patterns of YER067W and its paralog YIL057C suggest an involvement in energy metabolism. We show that yeast lacking YER067W display altered levels of reserve carbohydrates and a growth deficiency in media that requires aerobic metabolism. Impaired mitochondrial function and overall reduction of ergosterol content in the YER067W deleted strain explained the observed 2- and 4-fold increase in resistance to the drugs fluconazole and amphotericin B, respectively. Cell fractionation and immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that Yer067w is associated with cellular membranes despite the absence of a transmembrane domain in the protein. Finally, the 1.7 Å resolution crystal structure of Yer067w shows an alpha-beta fold with low similarity to known structures and a putative functional site. YER067W's involvement with aerobic energetic metabolism suggests the assignment of the gene name RGI1, standing for respiratory growth induced 1. Altogether, the results shed light on a previously uncharacterized protein family and provide basis for further studies of its apparent role in energy metabolism control and drug resistance. PMID:20567505

  9. Acylation of Biomolecules in Prokaryotes: a Widespread Strategy for the Control of Biological Function and Metabolic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Hentchel, Kristy L.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Acylation of biomolecules (e.g., proteins and small molecules) is a process that occurs in cells of all domains of life and has emerged as a critical mechanism for the control of many aspects of cellular physiology, including chromatin maintenance, transcriptional regulation, primary metabolism, cell structure, and likely other cellular processes. Although this review focuses on the use of acetyl moieties to modify a protein or small molecule, it is clear that cells can use many weak organic acids (e.g., short-, medium-, and long-chain mono- and dicarboxylic aliphatics and aromatics) to modify a large suite of targets. Acetylation of biomolecules has been studied for decades within the context of histone-dependent regulation of gene expression and antibiotic resistance. It was not until the early 2000s that the connection between metabolism, physiology, and protein acetylation was reported. This was the first instance of a metabolic enzyme (acetyl coenzyme A [acetyl-CoA] synthetase) whose activity was controlled by acetylation via a regulatory system responsive to physiological cues. The above-mentioned system was comprised of an acyltransferase and a partner deacylase. Given the reversibility of the acylation process, this system is also referred to as reversible lysine acylation (RLA). A wealth of information has been obtained since the discovery of RLA in prokaryotes, and we are just beginning to visualize the extent of the impact that this regulatory system has on cell function. PMID:26179745

  10. Combinatorial control of diverse metabolic and physiological functions by transcriptional regulators of the yeast sulfur assimilation pathway

    PubMed Central

    Petti, Allegra A.; McIsaac, R. Scott; Ho-Shing, Olivia; Bussemaker, Harmen J.; Botstein, David

    2012-01-01

    Methionine abundance affects diverse cellular functions, including cell division, redox homeostasis, survival under starvation, and oxidative stress response. Regulation of the methionine biosynthetic pathway involves three DNA-binding proteins—Met31p, Met32p, and Cbf1p. We hypothesized that there exists a “division of labor” among these proteins that facilitates coordination of methionine biosynthesis with diverse biological processes. To explore combinatorial control in this regulatory circuit, we deleted CBF1, MET31, and MET32 individually and in combination in a strain lacking methionine synthase. We followed genome-wide gene expression as these strains were starved for methionine. Using a combination of bioinformatic methods, we found that these regulators control genes involved in biological processes downstream of sulfur assimilation; many of these processes had not previously been documented as methionine dependent. We also found that the different factors have overlapping but distinct functions. In particular, Met31p and Met32p are important in regulating methionine metabolism, whereas p functions as a “generalist” transcription factor that is not specific to methionine metabolism. In addition, Met31p and Met32p appear to regulate iron–sulfur cluster biogenesis through direct and indirect mechanisms and have distinguishable target specificities. Finally, CBF1 deletion sometimes has the opposite effect on gene expression from MET31 and MET32 deletion. PMID:22696679

  11. Combinatorial control of diverse metabolic and physiological functions by transcriptional regulators of the yeast sulfur assimilation pathway.

    PubMed

    Petti, Allegra A; McIsaac, R Scott; Ho-Shing, Olivia; Bussemaker, Harmen J; Botstein, David

    2012-08-01

    Methionine abundance affects diverse cellular functions, including cell division, redox homeostasis, survival under starvation, and oxidative stress response. Regulation of the methionine biosynthetic pathway involves three DNA-binding proteins-Met31p, Met32p, and Cbf1p. We hypothesized that there exists a "division of labor" among these proteins that facilitates coordination of methionine biosynthesis with diverse biological processes. To explore combinatorial control in this regulatory circuit, we deleted CBF1, MET31, and MET32 individually and in combination in a strain lacking methionine synthase. We followed genome-wide gene expression as these strains were starved for methionine. Using a combination of bioinformatic methods, we found that these regulators control genes involved in biological processes downstream of sulfur assimilation; many of these processes had not previously been documented as methionine dependent. We also found that the different factors have overlapping but distinct functions. In particular, Met31p and Met32p are important in regulating methionine metabolism, whereas p functions as a "generalist" transcription factor that is not specific to methionine metabolism. In addition, Met31p and Met32p appear to regulate iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis through direct and indirect mechanisms and have distinguishable target specificities. Finally, CBF1 deletion sometimes has the opposite effect on gene expression from MET31 and MET32 deletion.

  12. Neuroendocrine control of metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kuliczkowska-Plaksej, J; Milewicz, A; Jakubowska, J

    2012-03-01

    Metabolism is controlled through homeostatic system consisting of central centers, gut hormones, hormones from adipose tissue and the other hormonal axes. This cooperation is based on cross-talk between central and peripheral signals. Among them the hypothalamus plays a crucial role, with interconnected nuclei forming neuronal circuits. Other regions in the brain, such as the brain stem, the endocannabinoid system, the vagal afferents, are also involved in energy balance. The second component is peripheral source of signals--the gastrointestinal tract hormones. Additionally, adipokines from adipose tissue, thyrotropic, gonadotropic and somatotropic axes play a role in energy homeostasis. Knowledge about all components of this neuroendocrine circuit will be helpful in developing novel therapeutic approaches against the metabolic syndrome and its components.

  13. Metabolic control of signalling pathways and metabolic auto-regulation.

    PubMed

    Lorendeau, Doriane; Christen, Stefan; Rinaldi, Gianmarco; Fendt, Sarah-Maria

    2015-08-01

    Metabolic alterations have emerged as an important hallmark in the development of various diseases. Thus, understanding the complex interplay of metabolism with other cellular processes such as cell signalling is critical to rationally control and modulate cellular physiology. Here, we review in the context of mammalian target of rapamycin, AMP-activated protein kinase and p53, the orchestrated interplay between metabolism and cellular signalling as well as transcriptional regulation. Moreover, we discuss recent discoveries in auto-regulation of metabolism (i.e. how metabolic parameters such as metabolite levels activate or inhibit enzymes and thus metabolic pathways). Finally, we review functional consequences of post-translational modification on metabolic enzyme abundance and/or activities.

  14. Mammalian Polyamine Metabolism and Function

    PubMed Central

    Pegg, Anthony E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Polyamines are ubiquitous small basic molecules that play multiple essential roles in mammalian physiology. Their cellular content is highly regulated and there is convincing evidence that altered metabolism is involvement in many disease states. Drugs altering polyamine levels may therefore have a variety of important targets. This review will summarize the current state of understanding of polyamine metabolism and function, the regulation of polyamine content, and heritable pathological conditions that may be derived from altered polyamine metabolism. PMID:19603518

  15. Functional Alignment of Metabolic Networks.

    PubMed

    Mazza, Arnon; Wagner, Allon; Ruppin, Eytan; Sharan, Roded

    2016-05-01

    Network alignment has become a standard tool in comparative biology, allowing the inference of protein function, interaction, and orthology. However, current alignment techniques are based on topological properties of networks and do not take into account their functional implications. Here we propose, for the first time, an algorithm to align two metabolic networks by taking advantage of their coupled metabolic models. These models allow us to assess the functional implications of genes or reactions, captured by the metabolic fluxes that are altered following their deletion from the network. Such implications may spread far beyond the region of the network where the gene or reaction lies. We apply our algorithm to align metabolic networks from various organisms, ranging from bacteria to humans, showing that our alignment can reveal functional orthology relations that are missed by conventional topological alignments.

  16. Dietary and Metabolic Control of Stem Cell Function in Physiology and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mihaylova, Maria M.; Sabatini, David M.; Yilmaz, Ömer H.

    2014-01-01

    Organismal diet has a profound impact on tissue homeostasis and health in mammals. Adult stem cells are a keystone of tissue homeostasis that alter tissue composition by balancing self-renewal and differentiation divisions. Because somatic stem cells may respond to shifts in organismal physiology to orchestrate tissue remodeling and some cancers are understood to arise from transformed stem cells, there is a likely possibility that organismal diet, stem cell function, and cancer initiation are interconnected. Here we will explore the emerging effects of diet on nutrient-sensing pathways active in mammalian tissue stem cells and their relevance to normal and cancerous growth. PMID:24607404

  17. Kupffer Cell Metabolism and Function

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen-Lefebvre, Anh Thu; Horuzsko, Anatolij

    2015-01-01

    Kupffer cells are resident liver macrophages and play a critical role in maintaining liver functions. Under physiological conditions, they are the first innate immune cells and protect the liver from bacterial infections. Under pathological conditions, they are activated by different components and can differentiate into M1-like (classical) or M2-like (alternative) macrophages. The metabolism of classical or alternative activated Kupffer cells will determine their functions in liver damage. Special functions and metabolism of Kupffer cells suggest that they are an attractive target for therapy of liver inflammation and related diseases, including cancer and infectious diseases. Here we review the different types of Kupffer cells and their metabolism and functions in physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:26937490

  18. Lactate Regulates Metabolic and Pro-inflammatory Circuits in Control of T Cell Migration and Effector Functions

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Robert; Smith, Joanne; Rocher-Ros, Vidalba; Nadkarni, Suchita; Montero-Melendez, Trinidad; D’Acquisto, Fulvio; Bland, Elliot J.; Bombardieri, Michele; Pitzalis, Costantino; Perretti, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Lactate has long been considered a “waste” by-product of cell metabolism, and it accumulates at sites of inflammation. Recent findings have identified lactate as an active metabolite in cell signalling, although its effects on immune cells during inflammation are largely unexplored. Here we ask whether lactate is responsible for T cells remaining entrapped in inflammatory sites, where they perpetuate the chronic inflammatory process. We show that lactate accumulates in the synovia of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Extracellular sodium lactate and lactic acid inhibit the motility of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, respectively. This selective control of T cell motility is mediated via subtype-specific transporters (Slc5a12 and Slc16a1) that we find selectively expressed by CD4+ and CD8+ subsets, respectively. We further show both in vitro and in vivo that the sodium lactate-mediated inhibition of CD4+ T cell motility is due to an interference with glycolysis activated upon engagement of the chemokine receptor CXCR3 with the chemokine CXCL10. In contrast, we find the lactic acid effect on CD8+ T cell motility to be independent of glycolysis control. In CD4+ T helper cells, sodium lactate also induces a switch towards the Th17 subset that produces large amounts of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-17, whereas in CD8+ T cells, lactic acid causes the loss of their cytolytic function. We further show that the expression of lactate transporters correlates with the clinical T cell score in the synovia of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Finally, pharmacological or antibody-mediated blockade of subtype-specific lactate transporters on T cells results in their release from the inflammatory site in an in vivo model of peritonitis. By establishing a novel role of lactate in control of proinflammatory T cell motility and effector functions, our findings provide a potential molecular mechanism for T cell entrapment and functional changes in inflammatory sites that drive chronic

  19. Effect of pioglitazone on systemic inflammation is independent of metabolic control and cardiac autonomic function in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Nerla, Roberto; Pitocco, Dario; Zaccardi, Francesco; Scalone, Giancarla; Coviello, Ilaria; Mollo, Roberto; Ghirlanda, Giovanni; Lanza, Gaetano A; Crea, Filippo

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this article is to investigate the relation of the anti-inflammatory effect of pioglitazone with cardiac autonomic function and metabolic control in diabetic patients. In this prospective open label trial, 36 type 2 diabetic patients (age 60 ± 10, 20 M) without overt cardiovascular disease were randomized to add pioglitazone (30 mg) to their therapy or to continue standard therapy. C-reactive protein (CRP) serum levels, metabolic parameters and cardiac autonomic function (assessed by heart rate variability [HRV] on 24-h ECG Holter monitoring) were measured at baseline and after 3 months. Clinical and laboratory variables were similar in the two groups. No significant changes were observed after 3 months for metabolic and anthropometric parameters, except for a mild increase in HDL levels in the pioglitazone group only (P = 0.04 vs. controls). CRP levels decreased significantly at follow-up in the pioglitazone group (3.2 ± 1.97 vs. 2.37 ± 1.56 mg/l) but not in the control group (3.0 ± 1.92 vs. 3.93 ± 2.14 mg/l; P = 0.003). No differences were found in basal and follow-up HRV variables between the two groups. In type 2 diabetic patients pioglitazone exerts favourable effects on inflammation even after short-term therapy. This effect precedes those on metabolic and anthropometric parameters and is not associated with changes in cardiac autonomic function.

  20. Metabolic control of renin secretion

    PubMed Central

    Gevorgyan, Haykanush; Lam, Lisa; Riquier-Brison, Anne

    2015-01-01

    One emerging topic in renin–angiotensin system (RAS) research is the direct local control of renin synthesis and release by endogenous metabolic intermediates. During the past few years, our laboratory has characterized the localization and signaling of the novel metabolic receptor GPR91 in the normal and diabetic kidney and established GPR91 as a new, direct link between high glucose and RAS activation in diabetes. GPR91 (also called SUCNR1) binds tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediate succinate which can rapidly accumulate in the local tissue environment when energy supply and demand are out of balance. In a variety of physiological and pathological conditions associated with metabolic stress, succinate signaling via GPR91 appears to be an important mediator or modulator of renin secretion. This review summarizes our current knowledge on the control of renin release by molecules of endogenous metabolic pathways with the main focus on succinate/GPR91. PMID:22729752

  1. Metabolic control of renin secretion.

    PubMed

    Peti-Peterdi, János; Gevorgyan, Haykanush; Lam, Lisa; Riquier-Brison, Anne

    2013-01-01

    One emerging topic in renin-angiotensin system (RAS) research is the direct local control of renin synthesis and release by endogenous metabolic intermediates. During the past few years, our laboratory has characterized the localization and signaling of the novel metabolic receptor GPR91 in the normal and diabetic kidney and established GPR91 as a new, direct link between high glucose and RAS activation in diabetes. GPR91 (also called SUCNR1) binds tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediate succinate which can rapidly accumulate in the local tissue environment when energy supply and demand are out of balance. In a variety of physiological and pathological conditions associated with metabolic stress, succinate signaling via GPR91 appears to be an important mediator or modulator of renin secretion. This review summarizes our current knowledge on the control of renin release by molecules of endogenous metabolic pathways with the main focus on succinate/GPR91.

  2. Blueberries Improve Endothelial Function, but Not Blood Pressure, in Adults with Metabolic Syndrome: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Stull, April J.; Cash, Katherine C.; Champagne, Catherine M.; Gupta, Alok K.; Boston, Raymond; Beyl, Robbie A.; Johnson, William D.; Cefalu, William T.

    2015-01-01

    Blueberry consumption has been shown to have various health benefits in humans. However, little is known about the effect of blueberry consumption on blood pressure, endothelial function and insulin sensitivity in humans. The present study investigated the role of blueberry consumption on modifying blood pressure in subjects with metabolic syndrome. In addition, endothelial function and insulin sensitivity (secondary measurements) were also assessed. A double-blind and placebo-controlled study was conducted in 44 adults (blueberry, n = 23; and placebo, n = 21). They were randomized to receive a blueberry or placebo smoothie twice daily for six weeks. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory blood pressure, endothelial function and insulin sensitivity were assessed pre- and post-intervention. The blood pressure and insulin sensitivity did not differ between the blueberry and placebo groups. However, the mean change in resting endothelial function, expressed as reactive hyperemia index (RHI), was improved significantly more in the group consuming the blueberries versus the placebo group (p = 0.024). Even after adjusting for confounding factors, i.e., the percent body fat and gender, the blueberry group still had a greater improvement in endothelial function when compared to their counterpart (RHI; 0.32 ± 0.13 versus −0.33 ± 0.14; p = 0.0023). In conclusion, daily dietary consumption of blueberries did not improve blood pressure, but improved (i.e., increased) endothelial function over six weeks in subjects with metabolic syndrome. PMID:26024297

  3. Blueberries improve endothelial function, but not blood pressure, in adults with metabolic syndrome: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Stull, April J; Cash, Katherine C; Champagne, Catherine M; Gupta, Alok K; Boston, Raymond; Beyl, Robbie A; Johnson, William D; Cefalu, William T

    2015-05-27

    Blueberry consumption has been shown to have various health benefits in humans. However, little is known about the effect of blueberry consumption on blood pressure, endothelial function and insulin sensitivity in humans. The present study investigated the role of blueberry consumption on modifying blood pressure in subjects with metabolic syndrome. In addition, endothelial function and insulin sensitivity (secondary measurements) were also assessed. A double-blind and placebo-controlled study was conducted in 44 adults (blueberry, n = 23; and placebo, n = 21). They were randomized to receive a blueberry or placebo smoothie twice daily for six weeks. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory blood pressure, endothelial function and insulin sensitivity were assessed pre- and post-intervention. The blood pressure and insulin sensitivity did not differ between the blueberry and placebo groups. However, the mean change in resting endothelial function, expressed as reactive hyperemia index (RHI), was improved significantly more in the group consuming the blueberries versus the placebo group (p = 0.024). Even after adjusting for confounding factors, i.e., the percent body fat and gender, the blueberry group still had a greater improvement in endothelial function when compared to their counterpart (RHI; 0.32 ± 0.13 versus -0.33 ± 0.14; p = 0.0023). In conclusion, daily dietary consumption of blueberries did not improve blood pressure, but improved (i.e., increased) endothelial function over six weeks in subjects with metabolic syndrome.

  4. Matched and Mismatched Metabolic Fuels in Lymphocyte Function

    PubMed Central

    Caro-Maldonado, Alfredo; Gerriets, Valerie A.; Rathmell, Jeffrey C.

    2012-01-01

    Immunological function requires metabolic support to suit the needs of lymphocytes at a variety of distinct differentiation and activation states. It is now evident that the signaling pathways that drive lymphocyte survival and activity can directly control cellular metabolism. This linkage provides a mechanism by which activation and specific signaling pathways provide a supply of appropriate and required nutrients to support cell functions in a pro-active supply rather than consumption-based metabolic model. In this way, the metabolism and fuel choices of lymphocytes are guided to specifically match the anticipated needs. If the fuel choice or metabolic pathways of lymphocytes are dysregulated, however, metabolic checkpoints can become activated to disrupt immunological function. These changes are now shown in several immunological diseases and may open new opportunities to selectively enhance or suppress specific immune functions through targeting of glucose, lipid, or amino acid metabolism. PMID:23290889

  5. Serum CA19-9 Level Associated with Metabolic Control and Pancreatic Beta Cell Function in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haoyong; Li, Ruixia; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Haibing; Bao, Yuqian; Jia, Weiping

    2012-01-01

    CA19-9 is a tumor-associated antigen. It is also a marker of pancreatic tissue damage that might be caused by diabetes. Long-term poor glycemic control may lead to pancreatic beta cell dysfunction which is reflected by elevated serum CA19-9 level. Intracellular cholesterol accumulation leads to islet dysfunction and impaired insulin secretion which provide a new lipotoxic model. This study firstly found total cholesterol was one of the independent contributors to CA19-9. Elevated serum CA19-9 level in diabetic patients may indicate further investigations of glycemic control, pancreatic beta cell function, and total cholesterol level. PMID:22778715

  6. Cell biology. Metabolic control of cell death.

    PubMed

    Green, Douglas R; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-09-19

    Beyond their contribution to basic metabolism, the major cellular organelles, in particular mitochondria, can determine whether cells respond to stress in an adaptive or suicidal manner. Thus, mitochondria can continuously adapt their shape to changing bioenergetic demands as they are subjected to quality control by autophagy, or they can undergo a lethal permeabilization process that initiates apoptosis. Along similar lines, multiple proteins involved in metabolic circuitries, including oxidative phosphorylation and transport of metabolites across membranes, may participate in the regulated or catastrophic dismantling of organelles. Many factors that were initially characterized as cell death regulators are now known to physically or functionally interact with metabolic enzymes. Thus, several metabolic cues regulate the propensity of cells to activate self-destructive programs, in part by acting on nutrient sensors. This suggests the existence of "metabolic checkpoints" that dictate cell fate in response to metabolic fluctuations. Here, we discuss recent insights into the intersection between metabolism and cell death regulation that have major implications for the comprehension and manipulation of unwarranted cell loss.

  7. Effect of keishibukuryogan on endothelial function in patients with at least one component of the diagnostic criteria for metabolic syndrome: a controlled clinical trial with crossover design.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Yutaka; Goto, Hirozo; Hikiami, Hiroaki; Nogami, Tatsuya; Fujimoto, Makoto; Shibahara, Naotoshi; Shimada, Yutaka

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of keishibukuryogan (KBG; Guizhi-Fuling-Wan), a traditional Japanese (Kampo) formula, on endothelial function assessed by reactive hyperemia peripheral arterial tonometry (Endo-PAT2000) in patients with metabolic syndrome-related factors by controlled clinical trial with crossover design. Ninety-two patients were assigned to group A (first KBG-treatment period, then control period; each lasting 4 weeks, with about one-year interval) or group B (first control, then KBG-treatment). In forty-nine (27, group A; 22, group B) patients completing all tests, the mean value of the natural logarithmic-scaled reactive hyperemia index (L_RHI) increased and those of serum nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA), malondialdehyde, and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 decreased significantly during the KBG-treatment period, but not during the control period, and 4-week changes of L_RHI, NEFA, and malondialdehyde between the 2 periods showed significance. These results suggest that KBG has beneficial effect on endothelial function in patients with metabolic syndrome-related factors.

  8. Effect of Keishibukuryogan on Endothelial Function in Patients with at Least One Component of the Diagnostic Criteria for Metabolic Syndrome: A Controlled Clinical Trial with Crossover Design

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Yutaka; Goto, Hirozo; Hikiami, Hiroaki; Nogami, Tatsuya; Fujimoto, Makoto; Shibahara, Naotoshi; Shimada, Yutaka

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of keishibukuryogan (KBG; Guizhi-Fuling-Wan), a traditional Japanese (Kampo) formula, on endothelial function assessed by reactive hyperemia peripheral arterial tonometry (Endo-PAT2000) in patients with metabolic syndrome-related factors by controlled clinical trial with crossover design. Ninety-two patients were assigned to group A (first KBG-treatment period, then control period; each lasting 4 weeks, with about one-year interval) or group B (first control, then KBG-treatment). In forty-nine (27, group A; 22, group B) patients completing all tests, the mean value of the natural logarithmic-scaled reactive hyperemia index (L_RHI) increased and those of serum nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA), malondialdehyde, and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 decreased significantly during the KBG-treatment period, but not during the control period, and 4-week changes of L_RHI, NEFA, and malondialdehyde between the 2 periods showed significance. These results suggest that KBG has beneficial effect on endothelial function in patients with metabolic syndrome-related factors. PMID:22675380

  9. Hypothalamic control of bone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sharan, Kunal; Yadav, Vijay K

    2014-10-01

    Bones are structures in vertebrates that provide support to organs, protect soft organs, and give them shape and defined features, functions that are essential for their survival. To perform these functions, bones are constantly renewed throughout life. The process through which bones are renewed is known as bone remodeling, an energy demanding process sensitive to changes in energy homeostasis of the organism. A close interplay takes place between the diversity of nutritional cues and metabolic signals with different elements of the hypothalamic circuits to co-ordinate energy metabolism with the regulation of bone mass. In this review, we focus on how mouse and human genetics have elucidated the roles of hormonal signals and neural circuits that originate in, or impinge on, the hypothalamus in the regulation of bone mass. This will help to understand the mechanisms whereby regulation of bone is gated and dynamically regulated by the hypothalamus.

  10. Metabolic Control of Redox and Redox Control of Metabolism in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Reduction-oxidation (Redox) status operates as a major integrator of subcellular and extracellular metabolism and is simultaneously itself regulated by metabolic processes. Redox status not only dominates cellular metabolism due to the prominence of NAD(H) and NADP(H) couples in myriad metabolic reactions but also acts as an effective signal that informs the cell of the prevailing environmental conditions. After relay of this information, the cell is able to appropriately respond via a range of mechanisms, including directly affecting cellular functioning and reprogramming nuclear gene expression. Recent Advances: The facile accession of Arabidopsis knockout mutants alongside the adoption of broad-scale post-genomic approaches, which are able to provide transcriptomic-, proteomic-, and metabolomic-level information alongside traditional biochemical and emerging cell biological techniques, has dramatically advanced our understanding of redox status control. This review summarizes redox status control of metabolism and the metabolic control of redox status at both cellular and subcellular levels. Critical Issues: It is becoming apparent that plastid, mitochondria, and peroxisome functions influence a wide range of processes outside of the organelles themselves. While knowledge of the network of metabolic pathways and their intraorganellar redox status regulation has increased in the last years, little is known about the interorganellar redox signals coordinating these networks. A current challenge is, therefore, synthesizing our knowledge and planning experiments that tackle redox status regulation at both inter- and intracellular levels. Future Directions: Emerging tools are enabling ever-increasing spatiotemporal resolution of metabolism and imaging of redox status components. Broader application of these tools will likely greatly enhance our understanding of the interplay of redox status and metabolism as well as elucidating and

  11. Hepatic Control of Energy Metabolism via the Autonomic Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Although the human liver comprises approximately 2.8% of the body weight, it plays a central role in the control of energy metabolism. While the biochemistry of energy substrates such as glucose, fatty acids, and ketone bodies in the liver is well understood, many aspects of the overall control system for hepatic metabolism remain largely unknown. These include mechanisms underlying the ascertainment of its energy metabolism status by the liver, and the way in which this information is used to communicate and function together with adipose tissues and other organs involved in energy metabolism. This review article summarizes hepatic control of energy metabolism via the autonomic nervous system. PMID:27592630

  12. Hepatic Control of Energy Metabolism via the Autonomic Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Yahagi, Naoya

    2017-01-01

    Although the human liver comprises approximately 2.8% of the body weight, it plays a central role in the control of energy metabolism. While the biochemistry of energy substrates such as glucose, fatty acids, and ketone bodies in the liver is well understood, many aspects of the overall control system for hepatic metabolism remain largely unknown. These include mechanisms underlying the ascertainment of its energy metabolism status by the liver, and the way in which this information is used to communicate and function together with adipose tissues and other organs involved in energy metabolism.This review article summarizes hepatic control of energy metabolism via the autonomic nervous system.

  13. Ghrelin acylation and metabolic control.

    PubMed

    Al Massadi, O; Tschöp, M H; Tong, J

    2011-11-01

    Since its discovery, many physiologic functions have been ascribed to ghrelin, a gut derived hormone. The presence of a median fatty acid side chain on the ghrelin peptide is required for the binding and activation of the classical ghrelin receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR)-1a. Ghrelin O-acyl transferase (GOAT) was recently discovered as the enzyme responsible for this acylation process. GOAT is expressed in all tissues that have been found to express ghrelin and has demonstrated actions on several complex endocrine organ systems such as the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal, insular and adrenal axis as well as the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, bone and gustatory system. Ghrelin acylation is dependent on the function of GOAT and the availability of substrates such as proghrelin and short- to medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs). This process is governed by GOAT activity and has been shown to be modified by dietary lipids. In this review, we provided evidence that support an important role of GOAT in the regulation of energy homeostasis and glucose metabolism by modulating acyl ghrelin (AG) production. The relevance of GOAT and AG during periods of starvation remains to be defined. In addition, we summarized the recent literature on the metabolic effects of GOAT specific inhibitors and shared our view on the potential of targeting GOAT for the treatment of metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  14. Metabolic control of methylation and acetylation.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiaoyang; Wellen, Kathryn E; Rabinowitz, Joshua D

    2016-02-01

    Methylation and acetylation of DNA and histone proteins are the chemical basis for epigenetics. From bacteria to humans, methylation and acetylation are sensitive to cellular metabolic status. Modification rates depend on the availability of one-carbon and two-carbon substrates (S-adenosylmethionine, acetyl-CoA, and in bacteria also acetyl-phosphate). In addition, they are sensitive to demodification enzyme cofactors (α-ketoglutarate, NAD(+)) and structural analog metabolites that function as epigenetic enzyme inhibitors (e.g., S-adenosylhomocysteine, 2-hydroxyglutarate). Methylation and acetylation likely initially evolved to tailor protein activities in microbes to their metabolic milieu. While the extracellular environment of mammals is more tightly controlled, the combined impact of nutrient abundance and metabolic enzyme expression impacts epigenetics in mammals sufficiently to drive important biological outcomes such as stem cell fate and cancer.

  15. Metabolic control of methylation and acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xiaoyang; Wellen, Kathryn E.; Rabinowitz, Joshua D

    2015-01-01

    Methylation and acetylation of DNA and histone proteins are the chemical basis for epigenetics. From bacteria to humans, methylation and acetylation are sensitive to cellular metabolic status. Modification rates depend on the availability of one-carbon and two-carbon substrates (S-adenosylmethionine, acetyl-CoA, and in bacteria also acetyl-phosphate). In addition, they are sensitive to demodification enzyme cofactors (α-ketoglutarate, NAD+) and structural analog metabolites that function as epigenetic enzyme inhibitors (e.g., S-adenosylhomocysteine, 2-hydroxyglutarate). Methylation and acetylation likely initially evolved to tailor protein activities in microbes to their metabolic milieu. While the extracellular environment of mammals is more tightly controlled, the combined impact of nutrient abundance and metabolic enzyme expression impacts epigenetics in mammals sufficiently to drive important biological outcomes such as stem cell fate and cancer. PMID:26629854

  16. Effect of Probiotic Supplementation on Cognitive Function and Metabolic Status in Alzheimer's Disease: A Randomized, Double-Blind and Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Akbari, Elmira; Asemi, Zatollah; Daneshvar Kakhaki, Reza; Bahmani, Fereshteh; Kouchaki, Ebrahim; Tamtaji, Omid Reza; Hamidi, Gholam Ali; Salami, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with severe cognitive impairments as well as some metabolic defects. Scant studies in animal models indicate a link between probiotics and cognitive function. This randomized, double-blind, and controlled clinical trial was conducted among 60 AD patients to assess the effects of probiotic supplementation on cognitive function and metabolic status. The patients were randomly divided into two groups (n = 30 in each group) treating with either milk (control group) or a mixture of probiotics (probiotic group). The probiotic supplemented group took 200 ml/day probiotic milk containing Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei, Bifidobacterium bifidum, and Lactobacillus fermentum (2 × 109 CFU/g for each) for 12 weeks. Mini-mental state examination (MMSE) score was recorded in all subjects before and after the treatment. Pre- and post-treatment fasting blood samples were obtained to determine the related markers. After 12 weeks intervention, compared with the control group (−5.03% ± 3.00), the probiotic treated (+27.90% ± 8.07) patients showed a significant improvement in the MMSE score (P <0.001). In addition, changes in plasma malondialdehyde (−22.01% ± 4.84 vs. +2.67% ± 3.86 μmol/L, P <0.001), serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (−17.61% ± 3.70 vs. +45.26% ± 3.50 μg/mL, P <0.001), homeostasis model of assessment-estimated insulin resistance (+28.84% ± 13.34 vs. +76.95% ± 24.60, P = 0.002), Beta cell function (+3.45% ± 10.91 vs. +75.62% ± 23.18, P = 0.001), serum triglycerides (−20.29% ± 4.49 vs. −0.16% ± 5.24 mg/dL, P = 0.003), and quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (−1.83 ± 1.26 vs. −4.66 ± 1.70, P = 0.006) in the probiotic group were significantly varied compared to the control group. We found that the probiotic treatment had no considerable effect on other biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation, fasting plasma glucose, and other lipid profiles. Overall, the current

  17. Intensive practical lifestyle intervention improves endothelial function in metabolic syndrome independent of weight loss: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Seligman, Beatriz G S; Polanczyk, Carisi A; Santos, Angela S B; Foppa, Murilo; Junges, Mauricio; Bonzanini, Laisa; Nicolaidis, Gabriela; Camey, Suzi; Lopes, André L; Sehl, Paulo; Duncan, Bruce B; Clausell, Nadine

    2011-12-01

    The objective was to evaluate the metabolic and vascular effects of lifestyle interventions involving a healthy diet and either a moderate- or a high-intensity exercise regimen in nondiabetic subjects with metabolic syndrome. The effects of these interventions on flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) and risk profiles were compared with a standard low-fat diet and engaging in daily walking (standard of care). Seventy-five healthy adults with metabolic syndrome (30-55 years old) were randomized to a 10,000-steps-a-day exercise program, a 3-times-a-week fitness (>75% peak VO(2)) program, or a 1-hour-walking-a-day program for 12 weeks. The first 2 interventions were combined with an accessible healthy, no-sugar diet; and the third was combined with a tailored low-fat diet. The outcomes, including FMD and risk factors, were examined at 12 weeks and at 1-year reassessment. Significant increase in FMD (mean difference = 1.51%, 95% confidence interval = 1.05%-3.017%, P = .0007) and decrease in arterial pressure (mean difference = 19.3 ± 2.3/-12.6 ± 1.8 mm Hg, P = .0001) were observed in all groups. However, the FMD changed most favorably in the high-intensity, low-sugar group (mean difference = 1.56%, 95% confidence interval = 0.1%-3.02%, P = .036). Significant improvements in body mass index, waist, insulin-like growth factor-1, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, insulin, glucose, urinary albumin excretion, and lipid profiles occurred in all groups. Metabolic syndrome was resolved in 64%. One year later, weight loss (-9.1 ± 2.3 kg, P = .0001) and arterial pressure decrease (-18.5 ± 2.3/-12.3 ± 2.1 mm Hg, P = .0001) were maintained. Practical, health-centered diet combined with high-intensity exercise is associated with enhanced vascular protection. These data suggest that more intense exercise combined with a low-sugar diet modulates endothelium-dependent vasodilation.

  18. Primitive control of cellular metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitz, M. A.

    1974-01-01

    It is pointed out that control substances must have existed from the earliest times in the evolution of life and that the same control mechanisms must exist today. The investigation reported is concerned with the concept that carbon dioxide is a primitive regulator of cell function. The effects of carbon dioxide on cellular materials are examined, taking into account questions of solubilization, dissociation, changes of charge, stabilization, structural changes, wettability, the exclusion of other gases, the activation of compounds, changes in plasticity, and changes in membrane permeability.

  19. Primitive control of cellular metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitz, M. A.

    1974-01-01

    It is pointed out that control substances must have existed from the earliest times in the evolution of life and that the same control mechanisms must exist today. The investigation reported is concerned with the concept that carbon dioxide is a primitive regulator of cell function. The effects of carbon dioxide on cellular materials are examined, taking into account questions of solubilization, dissociation, changes of charge, stabilization, structural changes, wettability, the exclusion of other gases, the activation of compounds, changes in plasticity, and changes in membrane permeability.

  20. Cellular metabolic and autophagic pathways: traffic control by redox signaling.

    PubMed

    Dodson, Matthew; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Zhang, Jianhua

    2013-10-01

    It has been established that the key metabolic pathways of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation are intimately related to redox biology through control of cell signaling. Under physiological conditions glucose metabolism is linked to control of the NADH/NAD redox couple, as well as providing the major reductant, NADPH, for thiol-dependent antioxidant defenses. Retrograde signaling from the mitochondrion to the nucleus or cytosol controls cell growth and differentiation. Under pathological conditions mitochondria are targets for reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and are critical in controlling apoptotic cell death. At the interface of these metabolic pathways, the autophagy-lysosomal pathway functions to maintain mitochondrial quality and generally serves an important cytoprotective function. In this review we will discuss the autophagic response to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species that are generated from perturbations of cellular glucose metabolism and bioenergetic function. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cellular Metabolic and Autophagic Pathways: Traffic Control by Redox Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dodson, Matthew; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Zhang, Jianhua

    2013-01-01

    It has been established that the key metabolic pathways of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation are intimately related to redox biology through control of cell signaling. Under physiological conditions glucose metabolism is linked to control of the NADH/NAD redox couple, as well as providing the major reductant, NADPH, for thiol-dependent antioxidant defenses. Retrograde signaling from the mitochondrion to the nucleus or cytosol controls cell growth and differentiation. Under pathological conditions mitochondria are targets for reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and are critical in controlling apoptotic cell death. At the interface of these metabolic pathways, the autophagy-lysosomal pathway functions to maintain mitochondrial quality, and generally serves an important cytoprotective function. In this review we will discuss the autophagic response to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species that are generated from perturbations of cellular glucose metabolism and bioenergetic function. PMID:23702245

  2. Computational Functional Analysis of Lipid Metabolic Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Bagnato, Carolina; Have, Arjen Ten; Prados, María B; Beligni, María V

    2017-01-01

    The computational analysis of enzymes that participate in lipid metabolism has both common and unique challenges when compared to the whole protein universe. Some of the hurdles that interfere with the functional annotation of lipid metabolic enzymes that are common to other pathways include the definition of proper starting datasets, the construction of reliable multiple sequence alignments, the definition of appropriate evolutionary models, and the reconstruction of phylogenetic trees with high statistical support, particularly for large datasets. Most enzymes that take part in lipid metabolism belong to complex superfamilies with many members that are not involved in lipid metabolism. In addition, some enzymes that do not have sequence similarity catalyze similar or even identical reactions. Some of the challenges that, albeit not unique, are more specific to lipid metabolism refer to the high compartmentalization of the routes, the catalysis in hydrophobic environments and, related to this, the function near or in biological membranes.In this work, we provide guidelines intended to assist in the proper functional annotation of lipid metabolic enzymes, based on previous experiences related to the phospholipase D superfamily and the annotation of the triglyceride synthesis pathway in algae. We describe a pipeline that starts with the definition of an initial set of sequences to be used in similarity-based searches and ends in the reconstruction of phylogenies. We also mention the main issues that have to be taken into consideration when using tools to analyze subcellular localization, hydrophobicity patterns, or presence of transmembrane domains in lipid metabolic enzymes.

  3. Circadian control of glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kalsbeek, Andries; la Fleur, Susanne; Fliers, Eric

    2014-07-01

    The incidence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has risen to epidemic proportions. The pathophysiology of T2DM is complex and involves insulin resistance, pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and visceral adiposity. It has been known for decades that a disruption of biological rhythms (which happens the most profoundly with shift work) increases the risk of developing obesity and T2DM. Recent evidence from basal studies has further sparked interest in the involvement of daily rhythms (and their disruption) in the development of obesity and T2DM. Most living organisms have molecular clocks in almost every tissue, which govern rhythmicity in many domains of physiology, such as rest/activity rhythms, feeding/fasting rhythms, and hormonal secretion. Here we present the latest research describing the specific role played by the molecular clock mechanism in the control of glucose metabolism and speculate on how disruption of these tissue clocks may lead to the disturbances in glucose homeostasis.

  4. Circadian control of glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kalsbeek, Andries; la Fleur, Susanne; Fliers, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has risen to epidemic proportions. The pathophysiology of T2DM is complex and involves insulin resistance, pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and visceral adiposity. It has been known for decades that a disruption of biological rhythms (which happens the most profoundly with shift work) increases the risk of developing obesity and T2DM. Recent evidence from basal studies has further sparked interest in the involvement of daily rhythms (and their disruption) in the development of obesity and T2DM. Most living organisms have molecular clocks in almost every tissue, which govern rhythmicity in many domains of physiology, such as rest/activity rhythms, feeding/fasting rhythms, and hormonal secretion. Here we present the latest research describing the specific role played by the molecular clock mechanism in the control of glucose metabolism and speculate on how disruption of these tissue clocks may lead to the disturbances in glucose homeostasis. PMID:24944897

  5. Undercover: gene control by metabolites and metabolic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    van der Knaap, Jan A.; Verrijzer, C. Peter

    2016-01-01

    To make the appropriate developmental decisions or maintain homeostasis, cells and organisms must coordinate the expression of their genome and metabolic state. However, the molecular mechanisms that relay environmental cues such as nutrient availability to the appropriate gene expression response remain poorly understood. There is a growing awareness that central components of intermediary metabolism are cofactors or cosubstrates of chromatin-modifying enzymes. As such, their concentrations constitute a potential regulatory interface between the metabolic and chromatin states. In addition, there is increasing evidence for a direct involvement of classic metabolic enzymes in gene expression control. These dual-function proteins may provide a direct link between metabolic programing and the control of gene expression. Here, we discuss our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms connecting metabolism to gene expression and their implications for development and disease. PMID:27881599

  6. Control of bacterial metabolism by quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Goo, Eunhye; An, Jae Hyung; Kang, Yongsung; Hwang, Ingyu

    2015-09-01

    Bacterial quorum sensing (QS)-dependent gene expression is a dynamic response to cell density. Bacteria produce costly public goods for the benefit of the population as a whole. As an example, QS rewires cellular metabolism to produce oxalate (a public good) to enable survival during the stationary phase in Burkholderia glumae, Burkholderia thailandensis, and Burkholderia pseudomallei. Recent reports showed that QS serves as a metabolic brake to maintain homeostatic primary metabolism in B. glumae and readjusts the central metabolism of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this review, we emphasize the dynamics and complexity of the control of gene expression by QS and discuss the metabolic costs and possible metabolic options to sustain cooperativity. We then focus on how QS influences bacterial central metabolism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Metabolic function of the CTRP family of hormones

    PubMed Central

    Seldin, Marcus M.; Tan, Stefanie Y.; Wong, G. William

    2013-01-01

    Maintaining proper energy balance in mammals entails intimate crosstalk between various tissues and organs. These inter-organ communications are mediated, to a great extent, by secreted hormones that circulate in blood. Regulation of the complex metabolic networks by secreted hormones (e.g., insulin, glucagon, leptin, adiponectin, FGF21) constitutes an important mechanism governing the integrated control of whole-body metabolism. Disruption of hormone-mediated metabolic circuits frequently results in dysregulated energy metabolism and pathology. As part of an effort to identify novel metabolic hormones, we recently characterized a highly conserved family of fifteen secreted proteins, the C1q/TNF-related proteins (CTRP1–15). While related to adiponectin in sequence and structural organization, each CTRP has its own unique tissue expression profile and non-redundant function in regulating sugar and/or fat metabolism. Here, we summarize the current understanding of the physiological functions of CTRPs, emphasizing their metabolic roles. Future studies using gain-of-function and loss-of-function mouse models will provide greater mechanistic insights into the critical role CTRPs play in regulating systemic energy homeostasis. PMID:23963681

  8. Microtubule Control of Metabolism in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    tested whether metabolic inhibitors, metformin or 2-deoxy-glucose, function synergistically with docetaxel to block prostate cancer cell proliferation...not significantly different from either drug alone, reducing confidence in the overall conclusion of synergy. docetaxel, metformin , 2-deoxy-glucose...in several prostate cancer cell lines treated with 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG), an inhibitor of glycolysis (6). Metformin is another metabolic regulator

  9. Microtubule Control of Metabolism in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    that increase cell death when combined with docetaxel.Here we tested whether two metabolic inhibitors, metformin or 2- deoxy-glucose, function...microtubule cytoskeleton (docetaxel, paclitaxel, or nocodazole) singly, or in combination with metabolic inhibitors ( metformin or 2-deoxy-glucose...Microtubule-targeted drugs, which either stabilize or destabilize microtubules, acted synergistically with either metformin or 2-deoxy-glucose to

  10. Drug target identification in sphingolipid metabolism by computational systems biology tools: metabolic control analysis and metabolic pathway analysis.

    PubMed

    Ozbayraktar, F Betül Kavun; Ulgen, Kutlu O

    2010-08-01

    Sphingolipids regulate cellular processes that are critically important in cell's fate and function in cancer development and progression. This fact underlies the basics of the novel cancer therapy approach. The pharmacological manipulation of the sphingolipid metabolism in cancer therapeutics necessitates the detailed understanding of the pathway. Two computational systems biology tools are used to identify potential drug target enzymes among sphingolipid pathway that can be further utilized in drug design studies for cancer therapy. The enzymes in sphingolipid pathway were ranked according to their roles in controlling the metabolic network by metabolic control analysis. The physiologically connected reactions, i.e. biologically significant and functional modules of network, were identified by metabolic pathway analysis. The final set of candidate drug target enzymes are selected such that their manipulation leads to ceramide accumulation and long chain base phosphates depletion. The mathematical tools' efficiency for drug target identification performed in this study is validated by clinically available drugs. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Control of fluxes in metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    Basler, Georg; Nikoloski, Zoran; Larhlimi, Abdelhalim; Barabási, Albert-László; Liu, Yang-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the control of large-scale metabolic networks is central to biology and medicine. However, existing approaches either require specifying a cellular objective or can only be used for small networks. We introduce new coupling types describing the relations between reaction activities, and develop an efficient computational framework, which does not require any cellular objective for systematic studies of large-scale metabolism. We identify the driver reactions facilitating control of 23 metabolic networks from all kingdoms of life. We find that unicellular organisms require a smaller degree of control than multicellular organisms. Driver reactions are under complex cellular regulation in Escherichia coli, indicating their preeminent role in facilitating cellular control. In human cancer cells, driver reactions play pivotal roles in malignancy and represent potential therapeutic targets. The developed framework helps us gain insights into regulatory principles of diseases and facilitates design of engineering strategies at the interface of gene regulation, signaling, and metabolism. PMID:27197218

  12. Control of fluxes in metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Basler, Georg; Nikoloski, Zoran; Larhlimi, Abdelhalim; Barabási, Albert-László; Liu, Yang-Yu

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the control of large-scale metabolic networks is central to biology and medicine. However, existing approaches either require specifying a cellular objective or can only be used for small networks. We introduce new coupling types describing the relations between reaction activities, and develop an efficient computational framework, which does not require any cellular objective for systematic studies of large-scale metabolism. We identify the driver reactions facilitating control of 23 metabolic networks from all kingdoms of life. We find that unicellular organisms require a smaller degree of control than multicellular organisms. Driver reactions are under complex cellular regulation in Escherichia coli, indicating their preeminent role in facilitating cellular control. In human cancer cells, driver reactions play pivotal roles in malignancy and represent potential therapeutic targets. The developed framework helps us gain insights into regulatory principles of diseases and facilitates design of engineering strategies at the interface of gene regulation, signaling, and metabolism.

  13. Functions for diverse metabolic activities in heterochromatin.

    PubMed

    Su, Xue Bessie; Pillus, Lorraine

    2016-03-15

    Growing evidence demonstrates that metabolism and chromatin dynamics are not separate processes but that they functionally intersect in many ways. For example, the lysine biosynthetic enzyme homocitrate synthase was recently shown to have unexpected functions in DNA damage repair, raising the question of whether other amino acid metabolic enzymes participate in chromatin regulation. Using an in silico screen combined with reporter assays, we discovered that a diverse range of metabolic enzymes function in heterochromatin regulation. Extended analysis of the glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (Gdh1) revealed that it regulates silent information regulator complex recruitment to telomeres and ribosomal DNA. Enhanced N-terminal histone H3 proteolysis is observed in GDH1 mutants, consistent with telomeric silencing defects. A conserved catalytic Asp residue is required for Gdh1's functions in telomeric silencing and H3 clipping. Genetic modulation of α-ketoglutarate levels demonstrates a key regulatory role for this metabolite in telomeric silencing. The metabolic activity of glutamate dehydrogenase thus has important and previously unsuspected roles in regulating chromatin-related processes.

  14. Functions for diverse metabolic activities in heterochromatin

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xue Bessie; Pillus, Lorraine

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence demonstrates that metabolism and chromatin dynamics are not separate processes but that they functionally intersect in many ways. For example, the lysine biosynthetic enzyme homocitrate synthase was recently shown to have unexpected functions in DNA damage repair, raising the question of whether other amino acid metabolic enzymes participate in chromatin regulation. Using an in silico screen combined with reporter assays, we discovered that a diverse range of metabolic enzymes function in heterochromatin regulation. Extended analysis of the glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (Gdh1) revealed that it regulates silent information regulator complex recruitment to telomeres and ribosomal DNA. Enhanced N-terminal histone H3 proteolysis is observed in GDH1 mutants, consistent with telomeric silencing defects. A conserved catalytic Asp residue is required for Gdh1’s functions in telomeric silencing and H3 clipping. Genetic modulation of α-ketoglutarate levels demonstrates a key regulatory role for this metabolite in telomeric silencing. The metabolic activity of glutamate dehydrogenase thus has important and previously unsuspected roles in regulating chromatin-related processes. PMID:26936955

  15. Heart Failure and Loss of Metabolic Control

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhao V.; Li, Dan L.; Hill, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, currently affecting 5 million Americans. A syndrome defined on clinical terms, heart failure is the end-result of events occurring in multiple heart diseases, including hypertension, myocardial infarction, genetic mutations and diabetes, and metabolic dysregulation is a hallmark feature. Mounting evidence from clinical and preclinical studies suggests strongly that fatty acid uptake and oxidation are adversely affected, especially in end-stage heart failure. Moreover, metabolic flexibility, the heart’s ability to move freely among diverse energy substrates, is impaired in heart failure. Indeed, impairment of the heart’s ability to adapt to its metabolic milieu, and associated metabolic derangement, are important contributing factors in heart failure pathogenesis. Elucidation of molecular mechanisms governing metabolic control in heart failure will provide critical insights into disease initiation and progression, raising the prospect of advances with clinical relevance. PMID:24336014

  16. A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing the Effects of Sitagliptin and Glimepiride on Endothelial Function and Metabolic Parameters: Sapporo Athero-Incretin Study 1 (SAIS1)

    PubMed Central

    Nomoto, Hiroshi; Miyoshi, Hideaki; Furumoto, Tomoo; Oba, Koji; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Atsushi; Atsumi, Tatsuya; Manda, Naoki; Kurihara, Yoshio; Aoki, Shin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The DPP-4 inhibitors are incretin-related drugs that improve hyperglycemia in a glucose-dependent manner and have been reported to exert favorable effects on atherosclerosis. However, it has not been fully elucidated whether DPP-4 inhibitors are able to improve endothelial function in patients with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, we investigated the efficacy of sitagliptin, a DPP-4 inhibitor, on endothelial function and glycemic metabolism compared with that of the sulfonylurea glimepiride. Materials and Methods In this multicenter, prospective, randomized parallel-group comparison study, 103 outpatients with type 2 diabetes (aged 59.9 ± 9.9 years with HbA1c levels of 7.5 ± 0.4%) with dietary cure only and/or current metformin treatment were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive sitagliptin or glimepiride therapy once daily for 26 weeks. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD), a comprehensive panel of hemodynamic parameters (Task Force® Monitor), and serum metabolic markers were assessed before and after the treatment. Results During the study period, no statistically significant change in %FMD was seen in both groups (sitagliptin, 5.6 to 5.6%; glimepiride, 5.6 to 6.0%). Secretory units of islets in transplantation, TNF-α, adiponectin and biological antioxidant potential significantly improved in the sitagliptin group, and superoxide dismutase also tended to improve in the sitagliptin group, while improvements in HbA1c levels were similar between groups. Cardiac index, blood pressure and most other metabolic parameters were not different. Conclusions Regardless of glycemic improvement, early sitagliptin therapy did not affect endothelial function but may provide favorable effects on beta-cell function and on inflammatory and oxidative stress in patients with type 2 diabetes without advanced atherosclerosis. Trial Registration UMIN Clinical Trials Registry System UMIN 000004955 PMID:27711199

  17. Regulation and control of metabolic fluxes in microbes.

    PubMed

    Gerosa, Luca; Sauer, Uwe

    2011-08-01

    After about ten years of research renaissance in metabolism, the present challenge is to understand how metabolic fluxes are controlled by a complex interplay of overlapping regulatory mechanisms. Reconstruction of various regulatory network topologies is steaming, illustrating that we underestimated the broad importance of post-translational modifications such as enzyme phosphorylation or acetylation for microbial metabolism. With the growing topological knowledge, the functional relevance of these regulatory events becomes an even more pressing need. A major knowledge gap resides in the regulatory network of protein-metabolite interactions, simply because we lacked pertinent methods for systematic analyses - but a start has now been made. Perhaps most dramatic was the conceptual shift in our perception of metabolism from an engine of cellular operation to a generator of input and feedback signals for regulatory circuits that govern many important decisions on cell proliferation, differentiation, death, and naturally metabolism. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Amino acids: metabolism, functions, and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guoyao

    2009-05-01

    Recent years have witnessed the discovery that amino acids (AA) are not only cell signaling molecules but are also regulators of gene expression and the protein phosphorylation cascade. Additionally, AA are key precursors for syntheses of hormones and low-molecular weight nitrogenous substances with each having enormous biological importance. Physiological concentrations of AA and their metabolites (e.g., nitric oxide, polyamines, glutathione, taurine, thyroid hormones, and serotonin) are required for the functions. However, elevated levels of AA and their products (e.g., ammonia, homocysteine, and asymmetric dimethylarginine) are pathogenic factors for neurological disorders, oxidative stress, and cardiovascular disease. Thus, an optimal balance among AA in the diet and circulation is crucial for whole body homeostasis. There is growing recognition that besides their role as building blocks of proteins and polypeptides, some AA regulate key metabolic pathways that are necessary for maintenance, growth, reproduction, and immunity. They are called functional AA, which include arginine, cysteine, glutamine, leucine, proline, and tryptophan. Dietary supplementation with one or a mixture of these AA may be beneficial for (1) ameliorating health problems at various stages of the life cycle (e.g., fetal growth restriction, neonatal morbidity and mortality, weaning-associated intestinal dysfunction and wasting syndrome, obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, the metabolic syndrome, and infertility); (2) optimizing efficiency of metabolic transformations to enhance muscle growth, milk production, egg and meat quality and athletic performance, while preventing excess fat deposition and reducing adiposity. Thus, AA have important functions in both nutrition and health.

  19. [Metabolic control of seed germination].

    PubMed

    Catusse, Julie; Strub, Jean-Marc; Job, Claudette; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Job, Dominique

    2008-01-01

    We have used proteomics to better characterize germination and early seedling vigor in sugarbeet. Our strategy includes (1) construction of proteome reference maps for dry and germinating seeds of a high-vigor reference seed lot; (2) investigation of the specific tissue accumulation of proteins (root, cotyledon, perisperm); (3) investigation of changes in protein expression profiles detected in the reference seed lot subjected to different vigor-modifying treatments, e.g. aging and/or priming. More than 1 000 sugarbeet seed proteins have been identified by LC/MS-MS mass spectrometry (albumins, globulins and glutelins have been analyzed separately). Due to the conservation of protein sequences and the quality of MS sequencing (more than 10 000 peptide sequences have been obtained), the success rate of protein identification was on the average of 80%. This is to our knowledge the best detailed proteome analysis ever carried out in seeds. The data allowed us to build a detailed metabolic chart of the sugarbeet seed, generating new insights into the molecular mechanisms determining the development of a new seedling. Also, the proteome of a seed-storage tissue as the perisperm is described for the first time.

  20. Drug-metabolizing enzymes: mechanisms and functions.

    PubMed

    Sheweita, S A

    2000-09-01

    Drug-metabolizing enzymes are called mixed-function oxidase or monooxygenase and containing many enzymes including cytochrome P450, cytochrome b5, and NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase and other components. The hepatic cytochrome P450s (Cyp) are a multigene family of enzymes that play a critical role in the metabolism of many drugs and xenobiotics with each cytochrome isozyme responding differently to exogenous chemicals in terms of its induction and inhibition. For example, Cyp 1A1 is particularly active towards polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), activating them into reactive intermediates those covalently bind to DNA, a key event in the initiation of carcinogenesis. Likewise, Cyp 1A2 activates a variety of bladder carcinogens, such as aromatic amines and amides. Also, some forms of cytochrome P450 isozymes such as Cyp 3A and 2E1 activate the naturally occurring carcinogens (e.g. aflatoxin B1) and N-nitrosamines respectively into highly mutagenic and carcinogenic agents. The carcinogenic potency of PAHs, and other carcinogens and the extent of binding of their ultimate metabolites to DNA and proteins are correlated with the induction of cytochrome P450 isozymes. Phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes such as glutathione S-transferase, aryl sulfatase and UDP-glucuronyl transferase inactivate chemical carcinogens into less toxic or inactive metabolites. Many drugs change the rate of activation or detoxification of carcinogens by changing the activities of phases I and II drug-metabolizing enzymes. The balance of detoxification and activation reactions depends on the chemical structure of the agents, and is subjected to many variables that are a function of this structure, or genetic background, sex, endocrine status, age, diet, and the presence of other chemicals. It is important to realize that the enzymes involved in carcinogen metabolism are also involved in the metabolism of a variety of substrates, and thus the introduction of specific xenobiotics may change

  1. Biological functions and metabolism of oleoylethanolamide.

    PubMed

    Thabuis, Clémentine; Tissot-Favre, Delphine; Bezelgues, Jean-Baptiste; Martin, Jean-Charles; Cruz-Hernandez, Cristina; Dionisi, Fabiola; Destaillats, Frédéric

    2008-10-01

    The present review is focused on the metabolism and the emerging roles of oleoylethanolamide (OEA) with emphasis on its effects on food intake control and lipid metabolism. The biological mechanism of action, including a non-genomic effect mediated through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR-alpha) and transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor, is discussed. The research related to fatty acid ethanolamides has been focused until recently on anandamide and its interaction with cannabinoid receptor subtype 1. The roles of other N-acyl ethanolamine fatty acid derivatives have been neglected until it was demonstrated that OEA can modulate food intake control through interaction with PPAR-alpha. Further investigations demonstrated that OEA modulates lipid and glucose metabolism, and recent study confirmed that OEA is an antagonist of TRVP1. It has been demonstrated that OEA has beneficial effects on health by inducing food intake control, lipid beta-oxidation, body weight loss and analgesic effects. The investigation of the mechanism of action revealed that OEA activates PPAR-alpha and stimulates the vagal nerve through the capsaicin receptor TRPV1. Pre-clinical studies showed that OEA remains active when administered orally.

  2. Functional and regulatory profiling of energy metabolism in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Malecki, Michal; Bitton, Danny A; Rodríguez-López, Maria; Rallis, Charalampos; Calavia, Noelia Garcia; Smith, Graeme C; Bähler, Jürg

    2016-11-25

    The control of energy metabolism is fundamental for cell growth and function and anomalies in it are implicated in complex diseases and ageing. Metabolism in yeast cells can be manipulated by supplying different carbon sources: yeast grown on glucose rapidly proliferates by fermentation, analogous to tumour cells growing by aerobic glycolysis, whereas on non-fermentable carbon sources metabolism shifts towards respiration. We screened deletion libraries of fission yeast to identify over 200 genes required for respiratory growth. Growth media and auxotrophic mutants strongly influenced respiratory metabolism. Most genes uncovered in the mutant screens have not been implicated in respiration in budding yeast. We applied gene-expression profiling approaches to compare steady-state fermentative and respiratory growth and to analyse the dynamic adaptation to respiratory growth. The transcript levels of most genes functioning in energy metabolism pathways are coherently tuned, reflecting anticipated differences in metabolic flows between fermenting and respiring cells. We show that acetyl-CoA synthase, rather than citrate lyase, is essential for acetyl-CoA synthesis in fission yeast. We also investigated the transcriptional response to mitochondrial damage by genetic or chemical perturbations, defining a retrograde response that involves the concerted regulation of distinct groups of nuclear genes that may avert harm from mitochondrial malfunction. This study provides a rich framework of the genetic and regulatory basis of energy metabolism in fission yeast and beyond, and it pinpoints weaknesses of commonly used auxotroph mutants for investigating metabolism. As a model for cellular energy regulation, fission yeast provides an attractive and complementary system to budding yeast.

  3. Effect of one year continuous subcutaneous infusion of a somatostatin analogue, octreotide, on early retinopathy, metabolic control and thyroid function in Type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kirkegaard, C; Nørgaard, K; Snorgaard, O; Bek, T; Larsen, M; Lund-Andersen, H

    1990-06-01

    Growth hormone is assumed to be involved in the development of diabetic retinopathy. In a randomized study we evaluated the possible effects of one year treatment with a somatostatin (SRIH) analogue, octreotide, on early retinopathy and on metabolism in Type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. Eleven patients were allocated to treatment with a continuous sc infusion of 400 micrograms octreotide per day and 9 served as controls. Only 7 patients from each group completed the study. Three octreotide-treated patients left the study owing to severe diarrhea. The subjects were evaluated at entry, after 2, 6 and 12 months treatment, and 2 months after withdrawal. Octreotide induced a decrease in GH secretion, expressed as the area under the 24 h serum GH profiles (p less than 0.05), and of the serum levels of IGF-I (p less than 0.05). The entire decline in GH levels occurred during the daytime, whereas the nocturnal levels were unaffected. Retinopathy, as assessed by determination of the blood retina barrier permeability, by colour fundus photography, and flurescein angiography was unchanged in both groups. Apart from a decline in insulin requirements, octreotide had no major effect on glycemic control, but induced a mild transient pituitary hypothyroidism, not clinically relevant. We conclude that treatment with octreotide for one year has modest effects on GH, IGF-I, and glucose metabolism, but has no significant effect on early retinopathy in Type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes.

  4. The effects of legumes on metabolic features, insulin resistance and hepatic function tests in women with central obesity: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Mohammad; Gharaaghaji, Rasool; Gargari, Bahram Pourghassem

    2014-06-01

    The effect of high-legume hypocaloric diet on metabolic features in women is unclear. This study provided an opportunity to find effects of high-legume diet on metabolic features in women who consumed high legumes at pre-study period. In this randomized controlled trial after 2 weeks of a run-in period on an isocaloric diet, 42 premenopausal women with central obesity were randomly assigned into two groups: (1) Hypocaloric diet enriched in legumes (HDEL) and (2) hypocaloric diet without legumes (HDWL) for 6 weeks. The following variables were assessed before intervention and 3 and 6 weeks after its beginning: Waist circumference (WC), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), fasting serum concentrations of triglyceride (TG), high density lipoprotein cholesterol, fasting blood sugar (FBS), insulin, homeostasis model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST). We used multifactor model of nested multivariate analysis of variance repeated measurements and t-test for statistical analysis. HDEL and HDWL significantly reduced the WC. HDEL significantly reduced the SBP and TG. Both HDEL and HDWL significantly increased fasting concentration of insulin and HOMA-IR after 3 weeks, but their significant effects on insulin disappeared after 6 weeks and HDEL returned HOMA-IR to basal levels in the subsequent 3 weeks. In HDEL group percent of decrease in AST and ALT between 3(rd) and 6(th) weeks was significant. In HDWL group percent of increase in SBP, DBP, FBS and TG between 3(rd) and 6(th) weeks was significant. The study indicated beneficial effects of hypocaloric legumes on metabolic features.

  5. Functional Analysis of the N-Acetylglucosamine Metabolic Genes of Streptomyces coelicolor and Role in Control of Development and Antibiotic Production

    PubMed Central

    Świątek, Magdalena A.; Tenconi, Elodie; Rigali, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    N-Acetylglucosamine, the monomer of chitin, is a favored carbon and nitrogen source for streptomycetes. Its intracellular catabolism requires the combined actions of the N-acetylglucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcNAc-6P) deacetylase NagA and the glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN-6P) deaminase/isomerase NagB. GlcNAc acts as a signaling molecule in the DasR-mediated nutrient sensing system, activating development and antibiotic production under poor growth conditions (famine) and blocking these processes under rich conditions (feast). In order to understand how a single nutrient can deliver opposite information according to the nutritional context, we carried out a mutational analysis of the nag metabolic genes nagA, nagB, and nagK. Here we show that the nag genes are part of the DasR regulon in Streptomyces coelicolor, which explains their transcriptional induction by GlcNAc. Most likely as the result of the intracellular accumulation of GlcN-6P, nagB deletion mutants fail to grow in the presence of GlcNAc. This toxicity can be alleviated by the additional deletion of nagA. We recently showed that in S. coelicolor, GlcNAc is internalized as GlcNAc-6P via the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS). Considering the relevance of GlcNAc for the control of antibiotic production, improved insight into GlcNAc metabolism in Streptomyces may provide new leads toward biotechnological applications. PMID:22194457

  6. PPARs: fatty acid sensors controlling metabolism.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Lars la Cour; Siersbæk, Majken; Mandrup, Susanne

    2012-08-01

    The peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear receptors that play key roles in the regulation of lipid metabolism, inflammation, cellular growth, and differentiation. The receptors bind and are activated by a broad range of fatty acids and fatty acid derivatives and they thereby serve as major transcriptional sensors of fatty acids. Here we review the function, regulation, and mechanism of the different PPAR subtypes with special emphasis on their role in the regulation of lipid metabolism. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Metabolic Functions of the Lung, Disorders and Associated Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado, Alcibey; Arce, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    The primary function of the lungs is gas exchange. Approximately 400 million years ago, the Earth’s atmosphere gained enough oxygen in the gas phase for the animals that emerged from the sea to breathe air. The first lungs were merely primitive air sacs with a few vessels in the walls that served as accessory organs of gas exchange to supplement the gills. Eons later, as animals grew accustomed to a solely terrestrial life, the lungs became highly compartmentalized to provide the vast air-blood surface necessary for O2 uptake and CO2 elimination, and a respiratory control system was developed to regulate breathing in accordance with metabolic demands and other needs. With the evolution and phylogenetic development, lungs were taking a variety of other specialized functions to maintain homeostasis, which we will call the non-respiratory functions of the lung and that often, and by mistake, are believed to have little or no connection with the replacement gas. In this review, we focus on the metabolic functions of the lung, perhaps the least known, and mainly, in the lipid metabolism and blood-adult lung vascular endothelium interaction. When these functions are altered, respiratory disorders or diseases appear, which are discussed concisely, emphasizing how they impact the most important function of the lungs: external respiration. PMID:27635172

  8. Metabolic Functions of the Lung, Disorders and Associated Pathologies.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Alcibey; Arce, Isabel

    2016-10-01

    The primary function of the lungs is gas exchange. Approximately 400 million years ago, the Earth's atmosphere gained enough oxygen in the gas phase for the animals that emerged from the sea to breathe air. The first lungs were merely primitive air sacs with a few vessels in the walls that served as accessory organs of gas exchange to supplement the gills. Eons later, as animals grew accustomed to a solely terrestrial life, the lungs became highly compartmentalized to provide the vast air-blood surface necessary for O2 uptake and CO2 elimination, and a respiratory control system was developed to regulate breathing in accordance with metabolic demands and other needs. With the evolution and phylogenetic development, lungs were taking a variety of other specialized functions to maintain homeostasis, which we will call the non-respiratory functions of the lung and that often, and by mistake, are believed to have little or no connection with the replacement gas. In this review, we focus on the metabolic functions of the lung, perhaps the least known, and mainly, in the lipid metabolism and blood-adult lung vascular endothelium interaction. When these functions are altered, respiratory disorders or diseases appear, which are discussed concisely, emphasizing how they impact the most important function of the lungs: external respiration.

  9. Gestational diabetes mellitus: metabolic control during labour.

    PubMed

    Balsells, M; Corcoy, R; Adelantado, J M; García-Patterson, A; Altirriba, O; de Leiva, A

    2000-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess, in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM): 1) metabolic control during labour using a standardised protocol; 2) the influence of therapy during pregnancy in intrapartum metabolic control and insulin requirements; and 3) the impact of maternal glycaemia during labour on neonatal hypoglycaemia. An observational study of 85 women with GDM (54 insulin-treated) was performed. Intrapartum metabolic management included i.v. glucose and insulin infusions, urinary ketone measurement and hourly capillary blood glucose (CBG) monitoring. Mean CBG from arrival to delivery was 4.7 +/- 1.1 mmol/l with 83% of mean CBG values within the target range (2.8-6.9 mmol/l). Mean CBG and insulin requirements were unrelated to therapy during pregnancy, but hypoglycaemia (CBG<2.8 mmol/l) was more frequent in women receiving insulin during pregnancy (40.7 vs 19.4 %, p<0.01). In several logistic regression models, CBG during labour was predictive of neonatal hypoglycaemia. We conclude that in women with GDM, the use of a standardised intrapartum management protocol is associated to fair metabolic control, that insulin requirements during labour are unrelated to therapy during pregnancy and that high CBG during labour increases the risk of neonatal hypoglycaemia.

  10. Metabolism and functions of copper in brain.

    PubMed

    Scheiber, Ivo F; Mercer, Julian F B; Dringen, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    Copper is an important trace element that is required for essential enzymes. However, due to its redox activity, copper can also lead to the generation of toxic reactive oxygen species. Therefore, cellular uptake, storage as well as export of copper have to be tightly regulated in order to guarantee sufficient copper supply for the synthesis of copper-containing enzymes but also to prevent copper-induced oxidative stress. In brain, copper is of importance for normal development. In addition, both copper deficiency as well as excess of copper can seriously affect brain functions. Therefore, this organ possesses ample mechanisms to regulate its copper metabolism. In brain, astrocytes are considered as important regulators of copper homeostasis. Impairments of homeostatic mechanisms in brain copper metabolism have been associated with neurodegeneration in human disorders such as Menkes disease, Wilson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. This review article will summarize the biological functions of copper in the brain and will describe the current knowledge on the mechanisms involved in copper transport, storage and export of brain cells. The role of copper in diseases that have been connected with disturbances in brain copper homeostasis will also be discussed.

  11. Application of computer algebra-techniques to metabolic control analysis.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Mustafa; Celik, Ercan

    2003-05-01

    For practical purposes the calculation of rate constants is not particularly valuable, since their physical significance is not clear. Of greater practical use are metabolic control coefficients and elasticities. Given the definition of the flux control coefficients C(E)(J), concentration control coefficient C(E)(X) and elasticity epsilon (X)(v(1)). We can calculate symbolic formulae for these using computer algebra-techniques. These are then functions of V(max), K(m), K(i) enzyme and concentrations. Having derived estimates of V(max), K(m), K(i) using the fitting method we can then calculate values of the control coefficients and elasticities. Furthermore we can calculate the metabolic control parameters using symbolic values for the conventional kinetic parameters. Using these we have verified the summation and connectivity theorems. This is a useful cross check on the reliability of the calculations.

  12. [Poor metabolic control in primary care].

    PubMed

    Wacher, Niels H; Silva, Mara; Valdez, Leticia; Cruz, Miguel; Gómez-Díaz, Rita A

    2016-01-01

    Poor metabolic control is a constant in patients with diabetes worldwide, despite resources demonstrated to achieve therapeutic targets. The object of this study was to identify causes of poor metabolic control in patients with diabetes treated in Family Medicine Clinics in metropolitan Mexico City at the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social. We analyzed 638 of 1,170 patients studied between 2000 and 2006. Anthropometric variables, occurrence of infections, treatment adherence, medical prescriptions, diet, exercise, and laboratory results were recorded. The proportion of patients with HbA1c < 7% worsened over time: from 38.9% at baseline it decreased to 21.4% (p < 0.001); LDL cholesterol decreased from 51.9 to 12.2% (p < 0.001), and controlled blood pressure from 35.6 to 23.3% (p < 0.001). A diet high in calories was associated with poor metabolic control (OR: 2.36; 95% CI: 1.34-4.13) and treatment intensification with elevated HbA1c (OR: 2.1; 95% CI: 1.14-4.14). Treatment was not intensified in 90% of patients outside targets. Infections, non-adherence, and drugs that interfere with oral hypoglycemic agents were not associated with higher HbA1c. The main factors associated with higher HbA1c were: disease progression, an inadequate diet, and lack of treatment intensification. Any program designed to improve the conditions of these patients must consider these factors.

  13. Control of lipid metabolism by Tachykinin in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wei; Veenstra, Jan A.; Perrimon, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Summary The intestine is a key organ for lipid uptake and distribution, and abnormal intestinal lipid metabolism is associated with obesity and hyperlipidemia. Although multiple regulatory gut hormones secreted from enteroendocrine cells (EEs) regulate systemic lipid homeostasis, such as appetite control and energy balance in adipose tissue, their respective roles regarding lipid metabolism in the intestine are not well understood. We demonstrate that Tachykinins (TKs), one of the most abundant secreted peptides expressed in midgut EEs, regulate intestinal lipid production and subsequently control systemic lipid homeostasis in Drosophila, and that TKs repress lipogenesis in enterocytes (ECs) associated with the TKR99D receptor and PKA signaling. Interestingly, nutrient deprivation enhances the production of TKs in the midgut. Finally, unlike the physiological roles of TKs produced from the brain, gut-derived TKs do not affect behavior, thus demonstrating that gut TK hormones specifically regulate intestinal lipid metabolism without affecting neuronal functions. PMID:25263556

  14. The human metabolic reconstruction Recon 1 directs hypotheses of novel human metabolic functions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Metabolic network reconstructions formalize our knowledge of metabolism. Gaps in these networks pinpoint regions of metabolism where biological components and functions are "missing." At the same time, a major challenge in the post genomic era involves characterisation of missing biological components to complete genome annotation. Results We used the human metabolic network reconstruction RECON 1 and established constraint-based modelling tools to uncover novel functions associated with human metabolism. Flux variability analysis identified 175 gaps in RECON 1 in the form of blocked reactions. These gaps were unevenly distributed within metabolic pathways but primarily found in the cytosol and often caused by compounds whose metabolic fate, rather than production, is unknown. Using a published algorithm, we computed gap-filling solutions comprised of non-organism specific metabolic reactions capable of bridging the identified gaps. These candidate solutions were found to be dependent upon the reaction environment of the blocked reaction. Importantly, we showed that automatically generated solutions could produce biologically realistic hypotheses of novel human metabolic reactions such as of the fate of iduronic acid following glycan degradation and of N-acetylglutamate in amino acid metabolism. Conclusions The results demonstrate how metabolic models can be utilised to direct hypotheses of novel metabolic functions in human metabolism; a process that we find is heavily reliant upon manual curation and biochemical insight. The effectiveness of a systems approach for novel biochemical pathway discovery in mammals is demonstrated and steps required to tailor future gap filling algorithms to mammalian metabolic networks are proposed. PMID:21962087

  15. Compact energy metabolism model: brain controlled energy supply.

    PubMed

    Göbel, Britta; Langemann, Dirk; Oltmanns, Kerstin M; Chung, Matthias

    2010-06-21

    The regulation of the energy metabolism is crucial to ensure the functionality of the entire organism. Deregulations may lead to severe pathologies such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The decisive role of the brain as the active controller and heavy consumer in the complex whole body energy metabolism is the matter of recent research. Latest studies suggest that the brain's energy supply has the highest priority while all organs in the organism compete for the available energy resources. In our novel mathematical model, we address these new findings. We integrate energy fluxes and their control signals such as glucose fluxes, insulin signals as well as the ingestion momentum in our new dynamical system. As a novel characteristic, the hormone insulin is regarded as central feedback signal of the brain. Hereby, our model particularly contains the competition for energy between brain and body periphery. The analytical investigation of the presented dynamical system shows a stable long-term behavior of the entire energy metabolism while short time observations demonstrate the typical oscillating blood glucose variations as a consequence of food intake. Our simulation results demonstrate a realistic behavior even in situations like exercise or exhaustion, and key elements like the brain's preeminence are reflected. The presented dynamical system is a step towards a systemic understanding of the human energy metabolism and thus may shed light to defects causing diseases based on deregulations in the energy metabolism. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Control of mitochondrial volume by mitochondrial metabolic water.

    PubMed

    Casteilla, Louis; Devin, Anne; Carriere, Audrey; Salin, Bénédicte; Schaeffer, Jacques; Rigoulet, Michel

    2011-11-01

    It is well-known that mitochondrial volume largely controls mitochondrial functioning. We investigate whether metabolic water produced by oxidative phosphorylation could be involved in mitochondrial volume regulation. We modulated the generation of this water in liver mitochondria and assess their volume by two independent techniques. In liver mitochondria, the mitochondrial volume was specifically decreased when no water was produced independently of energetic parameters and uncoupling activity. In all other conditions associated with water generation, there was no significant change in mitochondrial metabolic volume. Altogether these data demonstrate that mitochondrial volume is regulated, independently of energetic status, by the mitochondrial metabolic water that acts as a signal. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

  17. Irisin levels in relation to metabolic and liver functions in Egyptian patients with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Fatma H; Elshweikh, Samah A; Abd El-Naby, Amira Y

    2016-04-01

    Irisin is a new myokine that is suspected to influence metabolic syndrome (MetS). However, there is a great controversy with respect to its level in cases of MetS and its correlation with different metabolic parameters. The present study assesses irisin levels in MetS patients and studies its relationship to metabolic and liver functions to evaluate the possible role of the liver in regulation of this level. Sixty subjects were included in this experiment, who were divided into 3 groups: group I (normal control), group II (MetS patients with normal liver enzymes), and group III (MetS with elevated liver enzymes and fatty liver disease). Serum irisin levels showed significant increases in groups II and III compared with group I, and significant increases in group III compared with group II. Also, irisin levels were positively correlated with body mass index, serum triglycerides, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR), and liver enzymes. We concluded that serum irisin levels increased in patients with MetS, especially those with elevated liver enzymes, and had a positive correlation with parameters of lipid metabolism and glucose homeostasis with the possibility of hepatic clearance to irisin.

  18. β-cell function is associated with metabolic syndrome in Mexican subjects

    PubMed Central

    Baez-Duarte, Blanca G; Sánchez-Guillén, María Del Carmen; Pérez-Fuentes, Ricardo; Zamora-Ginez, Irma; Leon-Chavez, Bertha Alicia; Revilla-Monsalve, Cristina; Islas-Andrade, Sergio

    2010-01-01

    Aims The clinical diagnosis of metabolic syndrome does not find any parameters to evaluate the insulin sensitivity (IS) or β-cell function. The evaluation of these parameters would detect early risk of developing metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study is to determine the relationship between β-cell function and presence of metabolic syndrome in Mexican subjects. Material and methods This study is part of the Mexican Survey on the Prevention of Diabetes (MexDiab Study) with headquarters in the city of Puebla, Mexico. The study comprised of 444 subjects of both genders, aged between 18 and 60 years and allocated into two study groups: (1) control group of individuals at metabolic balance without metabolic syndrome and (2) group composed of subjects with metabolic syndrome and diagnosed according to the criteria of the Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel on Defection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults. Anthropometric, biochemical, and clinical assessments were carried out. Results Average age of the subjects in the control group (n = 254) was 35.7 ± 11.5 years and 42.0 ± 10.7 years for subjects in the metabolic syndrome group (n = 190). Subjects at metabolic balance without metabolic syndrome showed decreased IS, increased insulin resistance (IR), and altered β-cell function. Individuals with metabolic syndrome showed a high prevalence (P ≤ 0.05) of family history of type 2 diabetes (T2D). This group also showed a significant metabolic imbalance with glucose and insulin levels and lipid profile outside the ranges considered safe to prevent the development of cardiovascular disease and T2D. Conclusion The main finding in this study was the detection of altered β-cell function, decreased IS, an increased IR in subjects at metabolic balance, and the progressive deterioration of β-cell function and IS in subjects with metabolic syndrome as the number of features of metabolic syndrome increases

  19. Role and function of short chain fatty acids in rumen epithelial metabolism, development and importance of the rumen epithelium in understanding control of transcriptome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The epithelial lining of the rumen is uniquely placed to have impact on the nutrient metabolism of the animal. The symbiotic relationship with the microbial populations that inhabit the rumen, serves to provide a constant supply of nutrients from roughage that would otherwise be unusable. Metaboli...

  20. (Im)Perfect robustness and adaptation of metabolic networks subject to metabolic and gene-expression regulation: marrying control engineering with metabolic control analysis.

    PubMed

    He, Fei; Fromion, Vincent; Westerhoff, Hans V

    2013-11-21

    biology, correspond to the 'perfect' regulatory structures designed by control engineering vis-à-vis optimal functions such as robustness. To the extent that they are not, the analyses suggest how they may become so and this in turn should facilitate synthetic biology and metabolic engineering.

  1. Control of immune response by amino acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Grohmann, Ursula; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2010-07-01

    The interaction between pathogenic microorganisms and their hosts is regulated by reciprocal survival strategies, including competition for essential nutrients. Though paradoxical, mammalian hosts have learned to take advantage of amino acid catabolism for controlling pathogen invasion and, at the same time, regulating their own immune responses. In this way, ancient catabolic enzymes have acquired novel functions and evolved into new structures with highly specialized functions, which go beyond the struggle for survival. In this review, we analyze the evidence supporting a critical role for the metabolism of various amino acids in regulating different steps of both innate and adaptive immunity.

  2. Metabolic control analysis of eucaryotic pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex.

    PubMed

    Modak, Jayant; Deckwer, Wolf-Dieter; Zeng, An-Ping

    2002-01-01

    Metabolic control analysis (MCA) of pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme (PDH) complex of eucaryotic cells has been carried out using both in vitro and in vivo mechanistic models. Flux control coefficients (FCC) for the sensitivity of pyruvate decarboxylation rate to activities of various PDH complex reactions are determined. FCCs are shown to be strong functions of both pyruvate levels and various components of PDH complex. With the in vitro model, FCCs are shown to be sensitive to only the E1 component of the PDH complex at low pyruvate concentrations. At high pyruvate concentrations, the control is shared by all of the components, with E1 having a negative influence while the other three components, E2, X, and K, exert a positive control over the pyruvate decarboxylation rate. An unusual behavior of deactivation of the E1 component leading to higher net PDH activity is shown to be linked to the combined effect of protein X acylation and E1 deactivation. The steady-state analysis of the in vivo model reveals multiple steady state behavior of pyruvate metabolism with two stable and one unstable steady-states branches. FCCs also display multiplicity, showing completely different control distribution exerted by pyruvate and PDH components on three branches. At low pyruvate concentrations, pyruvate supply dominates the decarboxylation rate and PDH components do not exert any significant control. Reverse control distribution is observed at high pyruvate concentration. The effect of dilution due to cell growth on pyruvate metabolism is investigated in detail. While pyruvate dilution effects are shown to be negligible under all conditions, significant PDH complex dilution effects are observed under certain conditions. Comparison of in vitro and in vivo models shows that PDH components exert different degrees of control outside and inside the cells. At high pyruvate levels, PDH components are shown to exert a higher degree of control when reactions are taking place inside

  3. Sucrose metabolism gene families and their biological functions.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shu-Ye; Chi, Yun-Hua; Wang, Ji-Zhou; Zhou, Jun-Xia; Cheng, Yan-Song; Zhang, Bao-Lan; Ma, Ali; Vanitha, Jeevanandam; Ramachandran, Srinivasan

    2015-11-30

    Sucrose, as the main product of photosynthesis, plays crucial roles in plant development. Although studies on general metabolism pathway were well documented, less information is available on the genome-wide identification of these genes, their expansion and evolutionary history as well as their biological functions. We focused on four sucrose metabolism related gene families including sucrose synthase, sucrose phosphate synthase, sucrose phosphate phosphatase and UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. These gene families exhibited different expansion and evolutionary history as their host genomes experienced differentiated rates of the whole genome duplication, tandem and segmental duplication, or mobile element mediated gene gain and loss. They were evolutionarily conserved under purifying selection among species and expression divergence played important roles for gene survival after expansion. However, we have detected recent positive selection during intra-species divergence. Overexpression of 15 sorghum genes in Arabidopsis revealed their roles in biomass accumulation, flowering time control, seed germination and response to high salinity and sugar stresses. Our studies uncovered the molecular mechanisms of gene expansion and evolution and also provided new insight into the role of positive selection in intra-species divergence. Overexpression data revealed novel biological functions of these genes in flowering time control and seed germination under normal and stress conditions.

  4. Sucrose metabolism gene families and their biological functions

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shu-Ye; Chi, Yun-Hua; Wang, Ji-Zhou; Zhou, Jun-Xia; Cheng, Yan-Song; Zhang, Bao-Lan; Ma, Ali; Vanitha, Jeevanandam; Ramachandran, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Sucrose, as the main product of photosynthesis, plays crucial roles in plant development. Although studies on general metabolism pathway were well documented, less information is available on the genome-wide identification of these genes, their expansion and evolutionary history as well as their biological functions. We focused on four sucrose metabolism related gene families including sucrose synthase, sucrose phosphate synthase, sucrose phosphate phosphatase and UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. These gene families exhibited different expansion and evolutionary history as their host genomes experienced differentiated rates of the whole genome duplication, tandem and segmental duplication, or mobile element mediated gene gain and loss. They were evolutionarily conserved under purifying selection among species and expression divergence played important roles for gene survival after expansion. However, we have detected recent positive selection during intra-species divergence. Overexpression of 15 sorghum genes in Arabidopsis revealed their roles in biomass accumulation, flowering time control, seed germination and response to high salinity and sugar stresses. Our studies uncovered the molecular mechanisms of gene expansion and evolution and also provided new insight into the role of positive selection in intra-species divergence. Overexpression data revealed novel biological functions of these genes in flowering time control and seed germination under normal and stress conditions. PMID:26616172

  5. (Im)Perfect robustness and adaptation of metabolic networks subject to metabolic and gene-expression regulation: marrying control engineering with metabolic control analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    are being identified by genomics and systems biology, correspond to the ‘perfect’ regulatory structures designed by control engineering vis-à-vis optimal functions such as robustness. To the extent that they are not, the analyses suggest how they may become so and this in turn should facilitate synthetic biology and metabolic engineering. PMID:24261908

  6. Linking community size structure and ecosystem functioning using metabolic theory.

    PubMed

    Yvon-Durocher, Gabriel; Allen, Andrew P

    2012-11-05

    Understanding how biogeochemical cycles relate to the structure of ecological communities is a central research question in ecology. Here we approach this problem by focusing on body size, which is an easily measured species trait that has a pervasive influence on multiple aspects of community structure and ecosystem functioning. We test the predictions of a model derived from metabolic theory using data on ecosystem metabolism and community size structure. These data were collected as part of an aquatic mesocosm experiment that was designed to simulate future environmental warming. Our analyses demonstrate significant linkages between community size structure and ecosystem functioning, and the effects of warming on these links. Specifically, we show that carbon fluxes were significantly influenced by seasonal variation in temperature, and yielded activation energies remarkably similar to those predicted based on the temperature dependencies of individual-level photosynthesis and respiration. We also show that community size structure significantly influenced fluxes of ecosystem respiration and gross primary production, particularly at the annual time-scale. Assessing size structure and the factors that control it, both empirically and theoretically, therefore promises to aid in understanding links between individual organisms and biogeochemical cycles, and in predicting the responses of key ecosystem functions to future environmental change.

  7. Calcitonin control of calcium metabolism during weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soliman, Karam F. A.

    1993-01-01

    The main objective of this proposal is to elucidate calcitonin role in calcium homeostasis during weightlessness. In this investigation our objectives are to study: the effect of weightlessness on thyroid and serum calcitonin, the effect of weightlessness on the circadian variation of calcitonin in serum and the thyroid gland, the role of light as zeitgeber for calcitonin circadian rhythm, the circadian pattern of thyroid sensitivity to release calcitonin in response to calcium load, and the role of serotonin and norepinephrine in the control of calcitonin release. The main objective of this research/proposal is to establish the role of calcitonin in calcium metabolism during weightlessness condition. Understanding the mechanism of these abnormalities will help in developing therapeutic means to counter calcium imbalance in spaceflights.

  8. Fueling Immunity: Insights into Metabolism and Lymphocyte Function

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Erika L.; Poffenberger, Maya C.; Chang, Chih-Hao; Jones, Russell G.

    2015-01-01

    Lymphocytes face major metabolic challenges upon activation. They must meet the bioenergetic and biosynthetic demands of increased cell proliferation and also adapt to changing environmental conditions, in which nutrients and oxygen may be limiting. An emerging theme in immunology is that metabolic reprogramming and lymphocyte activation are intricately linked. However, why T cells adopt specific metabolic programs and the impact that these programs have on T cell function and, ultimately, immunological outcome remain unclear. Research on tumor cell metabolism has provided valuable insight into metabolic pathways important for cell proliferation and the influence of metabolites themselves on signal transduction and epigenetic programming. In this Review, we highlight emerging concepts regarding metabolic reprogramming in proliferating cells and discuss their potential impact on T cell fate and function. PMID:24115444

  9. Estrogen and Mitochondria Function in Cardiorenal Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Guanghong; Aroor, Annayya R.; Sowers, James R.

    2015-01-01

    The cardiorenal metabolic syndrome (CRS) consists of a constellation of cardiac, renal, and metabolic disorders including insulin resistance (IR), obesity, metabolic dyslipidemia, high-blood pressure, and evidence of early cardiac and renal disease. Mitochondria dysfunction often occurs in the CRS, and this dysfunction is promoted by excess reactive oxygen species, genetic factors, IR, aging, and altered mitochondrial biogenesis. Recently, it has been shown that there are important sex-related differences in mitochondria function and metabolic, cardiovascular, and renal components. Sex differences in the CRS have mainly been attributed to the estrogen’s effects that are mainly mediated by estrogen receptor (ER) α, ERβ, and G-protein coupled receptor 30. In this review, we discuss the effects of estrogen on the mitochondrial function, insulin metabolic signaling, glucose transport, lipid metabolism, and inflammatory responses from liver, pancreatic β cells, adipocytes, skeletal muscle, and cardiovascular tissue. PMID:25149220

  10. Metabolic syndrome - dysregulation of adipose tissue endocrine function.

    PubMed

    Horská, Kateřina; Kučerová, Jana; Suchý, Pavel; Kotolová, Hana

    2014-08-01

    Metabolic syndrome, acondition increasing cardiovascular morbidity, mortality and risk for diabetes mellitus type 2, is currently worldwide reaching epidemic proportions. This complex disorder represents an urgent challenge for new pharmacotherapeutic strategies formulation. Pathophysiological mechanisms underlying metabolic syndrome are not completely understood, nevertheless growing evidence is supporting the hypothesis that multiple metabolic dysregulations do contribute to its development. Apotential target for pharmacological intervention is considered to be dysregulation of adipose tissue endocrine/paracrine function. Specific adipokines, proteins secreted by the adipose tissue, with some pleiotropic effects, have been identified with strong association to regulation of energy metabolism, appetite, insulin signaling, tissue insulin sensitivity and the proinflammatory state related to metabolic syndrome. The aim of this paper is to provide a brief overview of endocrine/paracrine functions of the adipose tissue with regard to metabolic syndrome development and pathophysiology and particular adipokines as potential targets for innovative pharmacotherapeutic approaches.

  11. Maternal metabolic stress may affect oviduct gatekeeper function.

    PubMed

    Jordaens, Lies; Van Hoeck, Veerle; Maillo, Veronica; Gutierrez-Adan, Alfonso; Marei, Waleed Fawzy A; Vlaeminck, Bruno; Thys, Sofie; Sturmey, Roger G S; Bols, Peter; Leroy, Jo

    2017-03-03

    We hypothesized that elevated non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) modify in vitro bovine oviduct epithelial cell (BOEC) metabolism and barrier function. Hereto, BOECs were studied in a polarized system with 24h-treatments at day 9: 1) CONTROL (0µM NEFA + 0%EtOH), 2) SOLVENT CONTROL (0µM NEFA + 0.45%EtOH), 3) BASAL NEFA (720µM NEFA + 0.45%EtOH in the basal compartment), 4) APICAL NEFA (720µM NEFA + 0.45%EtOH in the apical compartment). FITC-albumin was used for monolayer permeability assessment, and related to Transepithelial Electric Resistance (TER). Fatty acid (FA), glucose, lactate and pyruvate concentrations were measured in spent medium. Intracellular lipid droplets (LD) and FA-uptake were studied using Bodipy 493/503 and immunolabelling of FA-transporters (FAT/CD36, FABP3 and caveolin1). BOEC-mRNA was retrieved for qRT-PCR. Results revealed that APICAL NEFA reduced relative TER-increase (46.85%) during treatment, and increased FITC-albumin flux (27.59%) compared to other treatments. In BASAL NEFA, FAs were transferred to the apical compartment as free FAs: mostly palmitic and oleic acid increased, respectively 56.0 % and 33.5% of initial FA-concentrations. APICAL NEFA allowed no FA-transfer, but induced LD-accumulation and upregulated FA-transporter expression (↑CD36, ↑FABP3, ↑CAV1-protein-expression). Gene expression in APICAL NEFA indicated increased anti-apoptotic (↑BCL2) and anti-oxidative (↑SOD1) capacity, upregulated lipid metabolism (↑CPT1, ↑ACSL1 and ↓ACACA), and FA-uptake (↑CAV1). All treatments had similar carbohydrate metabolism and oviduct function specific gene expression (=OVGP1, ESR1, FOXJ1). Overall, elevated NEFAs affected BOEC-metabolism and barrier function differently depending on NEFA-exposure side. Data substantiate the concept of the oviduct as a gatekeeper that may actively alter early embryonic developmental conditions.

  12. 2011 Plant Lipids: Structure, Metabolism, & Function Gordon Research Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Benning

    2011-02-04

    This is the second Gordon Research Conference on 'Plant Lipids: Structure, Metabolism & Function'. It covers current topics in lipid structure, metabolism and function in eukaryotic photosynthetic organisms including seed plants, algae, mosses and ferns. Work in photosynthetic bacteria is considered as well as it serves the understanding of specific aspects of lipid metabolism in plants. Breakthroughs are discussed in research on plant lipids as diverse as glycerolipids, sphingolipids, lipids of the cell surface, isoprenoids, fatty acids and their derivatives. The program covers nine concepts at the forefront of research under which afore mentioned plant lipid classes are discussed. The goal is to integrate areas such as lipid signaling, basic lipid metabolism, membrane function, lipid analysis, and lipid engineering to achieve a high level of stimulating interaction among diverse researchers with interests in plant lipids. One Emphasis is on the dynamics and regulation of lipid metabolism during plant cell development and in response to environmental factors.

  13. The central melanocortin system directly controls peripheral lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Nogueiras, Ruben; Wiedmer, Petra; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Veyrat-Durebex, Christelle; Keogh, Julia M.; Sutton, Gregory M.; Pfluger, Paul T.; Castaneda, Tamara R.; Neschen, Susanne; Hofmann, Susanna M.; Howles, Philip N.; Morgan, Donald A.; Benoit, Stephen C.; Szanto, Ildiko; Schrott, Brigitte; Schürmann, Annette; Joost, Hans-Georg; Hammond, Craig; Hui, David Y.; Woods, Stephen C.; Rahmouni, Kamal; Butler, Andrew A.; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; O’Rahilly, Stephen; Rohner-Jeanrenaud, Françoise; Tschöp, Matthias H.

    2007-01-01

    Disruptions of the melanocortin signaling system have been linked to obesity. We investigated a possible role of the central nervous melanocortin system (CNS-Mcr) in the control of adiposity through effects on nutrient partitioning and cellular lipid metabolism independent of nutrient intake. We report that pharmacological inhibition of melanocortin receptors (Mcr) in rats and genetic disruption of Mc4r in mice directly and potently promoted lipid uptake, triglyceride synthesis, and fat accumulation in white adipose tissue (WAT), while increased CNS-Mcr signaling triggered lipid mobilization. These effects were independent of food intake and preceded changes in adiposity. In addition, decreased CNS-Mcr signaling promoted increased insulin sensitivity and glucose uptake in WAT while decreasing glucose utilization in muscle and brown adipose tissue. Such CNS control of peripheral nutrient partitioning depended on sympathetic nervous system function and was enhanced by synergistic effects on liver triglyceride synthesis. Our findings offer an explanation for enhanced adiposity resulting from decreased melanocortin signaling, even in the absence of hyperphagia, and are consistent with feeding-independent changes in substrate utilization as reflected by respiratory quotient, which is increased with chronic Mcr blockade in rodents and in humans with loss-of-function mutations in MC4R. We also reveal molecular underpinnings for direct control of the CNS-Mcr over lipid metabolism. These results suggest ways to design more efficient pharmacological methods for controlling adiposity. PMID:17885689

  14. Accessing Autonomic Function Can Early Screen Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Meng; Li, Mian; Yang, Zhi; Xu, Min; Xu, Yu; Lu, Jieli; Chen, Yuhong; Liu, Jianmin; Ning, Guang; Bi, Yufang

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome is time-consuming and invasive. Convenient instruments that do not require laboratory or physical investigation would be useful in early screening individuals at high risk of metabolic syndrome. Examination of the autonomic function can be taken as a directly reference and screening indicator for predicting metabolic syndrome. Methodology and Principal Findings The EZSCAN test, as an efficient and noninvasive technology, can access autonomic function through measuring electrochemical skin conductance. In this study, we used EZSCAN value to evaluate autonomic function and to detect metabolic syndrome in 5,887 participants aged 40 years or older. The EZSCAN test diagnostic accuracy was analyzed by receiver operating characteristic curves. Among the 5,815 participants in the final analysis, 2,541 were diagnosed as metabolic syndrome and the overall prevalence was 43.7%. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome increased with the elevated EZSCAN risk level (p for trend <0.0001). Moreover, EZSCAN value was associated with an increase in the number of metabolic syndrome components (p for trend <0.0001). Compared with the no risk group (EZSCAN value 0–24), participants at the high risk group (EZSCAN value: 50–100) had a 2.35 fold increased risk of prevalent metabolic syndrome after the multiple adjustments. The area under the curve of the EZSCAN test was 0.62 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.61–0.64) for predicting metabolic syndrome. The optimal operating point for the EZSCAN value to detect a high risk of prevalent metabolic syndrome was 30 in this study, while the sensitivity and specificity were 71.2% and 46.7%, respectively. Conclusions and Significance In conclusion, although less sensitive and accurate when compared with the clinical definition of metabolic syndrome, we found that the EZSCAN test is a good and simple screening technique for early predicting metabolic syndrome. PMID:22916265

  15. The Functions of Metamorphic Metallothioneins in Zinc and Copper Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Krężel, Artur; Maret, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Recent discoveries in zinc biology provide a new platform for discussing the primary physiological functions of mammalian metallothioneins (MTs) and their exquisite zinc-dependent regulation. It is now understood that the control of cellular zinc homeostasis includes buffering of Zn2+ ions at picomolar concentrations, extensive subcellular re-distribution of Zn2+, the loading of exocytotic vesicles with zinc species, and the control of Zn2+ ion signalling. In parallel, characteristic features of human MTs became known: their graded affinities for Zn2+ and the redox activity of their thiolate coordination environments. Unlike the single species that structural models of mammalian MTs describe with a set of seven divalent or eight to twelve monovalent metal ions, MTs are metamorphic. In vivo, they exist as many species differing in redox state and load with different metal ions. The functions of mammalian MTs should no longer be considered elusive or enigmatic because it is now evident that the reactivity and coordination dynamics of MTs with Zn2+ and Cu+ match the biological requirements for controlling—binding and delivering—these cellular metal ions, thus completing a 60-year search for their functions. MT represents a unique biological principle for buffering the most competitive essential metal ions Zn2+ and Cu+. How this knowledge translates to the function of other families of MTs awaits further insights into the specifics of how their properties relate to zinc and copper metabolism in other organisms. PMID:28598392

  16. Regulatory functions of PPARbeta in metabolism: implications for the treatment of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Paul A

    2007-08-01

    The prevalence of metabolic disturbances, collectively known as metabolic syndrome, has reached an epidemic proportion in industrialized countries. Lifestyle interventions and pharmacological treatments of such pathologies are only partially efficient and new therapeutic approaches are urgently needed. This review focuses on the recent findings describing the regulatory functions of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor beta (PPARbeta) on lipid metabolism in several tissues and on the implications of such findings on the therapeutic usefulness of PPARbeta agonists in the treatment of particular features of the metabolic syndrome, such as insulin resistance, obesity, dyslipidemia and cardiac dysfunctions.

  17. Steviol glycosides: chemical diversity, metabolism, and function.

    PubMed

    Ceunen, Stijn; Geuns, Jan M C

    2013-06-28

    Steviol glycosides are a group of highly sweet diterpene glycosides discovered in only a few plant species, most notably the Paraguayan shrub Stevia rebaudiana. During the past few decades, the nutritional and pharmacological benefits of these secondary metabolites have become increasingly apparent. While these properties are now widely recognized, many aspects related to their in vivo biochemistry and metabolism and their relationship to the overall plant physiology of S. rebaudiana are not yet understood. Furthermore, the large size of the steviol glycoside pool commonly found within S. rebaudiana leaves implies a significant metabolic investment and poses questions regarding the benefits S. rebaudiana might gain from their accumulation. The current review intends to thoroughly discuss the available knowledge on these issues.

  18. Dual function lipin proteins and glycerolipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Harris, Thurl E; Finck, Brian N

    2011-06-01

    Lipin family proteins are emerging as crucial regulators of lipid metabolism. In triglyceride synthesis, lipins act as lipid phosphatase enzymes at the endoplasmic reticular membrane, catalyzing the dephosphorylation of phosphatidic acid to form diacylglycerol, which is the penultimate step in this process. However, lipin proteins are not integral membrane proteins, and can rapidly translocate within the cell. In fact, emerging evidence suggests that lipins also play crucial roles in the nucleus as transcriptional regulatory proteins. Thus, lipins are poised to regulate cellular lipid metabolism at multiple regulatory nodal points. This review summarizes the history of lipin proteins, and discusses the current state of our understanding of lipin biology. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Estrogen-Related Receptor α (ERRα) and ERRγ Are Essential Coordinators of Cardiac Metabolism and Function

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; McDonald, Caitlin; Petrenko, Nataliya B.; Leblanc, Mathias; Wang, Tao; Giguere, Vincent; Evans, Ronald M.; Patel, Vickas V.

    2015-01-01

    Almost all cellular functions are powered by a continuous energy supply derived from cellular metabolism. However, it is little understood how cellular energy production is coordinated with diverse energy-consuming cellular functions. Here, using the cardiac muscle system, we demonstrate that nuclear receptors estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα) and ERRγ are essential transcriptional coordinators of cardiac energy production and consumption. On the one hand, ERRα and ERRγ together are vital for intact cardiomyocyte metabolism by directly controlling expression of genes important for mitochondrial functions and dynamics. On the other hand, ERRα and ERRγ influence major cardiomyocyte energy consumption functions through direct transcriptional regulation of key contraction, calcium homeostasis, and conduction genes. Mice lacking both ERRα and cardiac ERRγ develop severe bradycardia, lethal cardiomyopathy, and heart failure featuring metabolic, contractile, and conduction dysfunctions. These results illustrate that the ERR transcriptional pathway is essential to couple cellular energy metabolism with energy consumption processes in order to maintain normal cardiac function. PMID:25624346

  20. Calcium metabolism and cardiovascular function after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatton, Daniel C.; Yue, Qi; Dierickx, Jacqueline; Roullet, Chantal; Otsuka, Keiichi; Watanabe, Mitsuaki; Coste, Sarah; Roullet, Jean Baptiste; Phanouvang, Thongchan; Orwoll, Eric; Orwoll, Shiela; McCarron, David A.

    2002-01-01

    To determine the influence of dietary calcium on spaceflight-induced alterations in calcium metabolism and blood pressure (BP), 9-wk-old spontaneously hypertensive rats, fed either high- (2%) or low-calcium (0.02%) diets, were flown on an 18-day shuttle flight. On landing, flight animals had increased ionized calcium (P < 0.001), elevated parathyroid hormone levels (P < 0.001), reduced calcitonin levels (P < 0.05), unchanged 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) levels, and elevated skull (P < 0.01) and reduced femur bone mineral density. Basal and thrombin-stimulated platelet free calcium (intracellular calcium concentration) were also reduced (P < 0.05). There was a tendency for indirect systolic BP to be reduced in conscious flight animals (P = 0.057). However, mean arterial pressure was elevated (P < 0.001) after anesthesia. Dietary calcium altered all aspects of calcium metabolism (P < 0.001), as well as BP (P < 0.001), but the only interaction with flight was a relatively greater increase in ionized calcium in flight animals fed low- compared with high-calcium diets (P < 0.05). The results indicate that 1) flight-induced disruptions of calcium metabolism are relatively impervious to dietary calcium in the short term, 2) increased ionized calcium did not normalize low-calcium-induced elevations of BP, and 3) parathyroid hormone was paradoxically increased in the high-calcium-fed flight animals after landing.

  1. Calcium metabolism and cardiovascular function after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatton, Daniel C.; Yue, Qi; Dierickx, Jacqueline; Roullet, Chantal; Otsuka, Keiichi; Watanabe, Mitsuaki; Coste, Sarah; Roullet, Jean Baptiste; Phanouvang, Thongchan; Orwoll, Eric; hide

    2002-01-01

    To determine the influence of dietary calcium on spaceflight-induced alterations in calcium metabolism and blood pressure (BP), 9-wk-old spontaneously hypertensive rats, fed either high- (2%) or low-calcium (0.02%) diets, were flown on an 18-day shuttle flight. On landing, flight animals had increased ionized calcium (P < 0.001), elevated parathyroid hormone levels (P < 0.001), reduced calcitonin levels (P < 0.05), unchanged 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) levels, and elevated skull (P < 0.01) and reduced femur bone mineral density. Basal and thrombin-stimulated platelet free calcium (intracellular calcium concentration) were also reduced (P < 0.05). There was a tendency for indirect systolic BP to be reduced in conscious flight animals (P = 0.057). However, mean arterial pressure was elevated (P < 0.001) after anesthesia. Dietary calcium altered all aspects of calcium metabolism (P < 0.001), as well as BP (P < 0.001), but the only interaction with flight was a relatively greater increase in ionized calcium in flight animals fed low- compared with high-calcium diets (P < 0.05). The results indicate that 1) flight-induced disruptions of calcium metabolism are relatively impervious to dietary calcium in the short term, 2) increased ionized calcium did not normalize low-calcium-induced elevations of BP, and 3) parathyroid hormone was paradoxically increased in the high-calcium-fed flight animals after landing.

  2. Optimal control of metabolic networks with saturable enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed

    Oyarzuun, D A

    2011-03-01

    This note addresses the optimal control of non-linear metabolic networks by means of time-dependent enzyme synthesis rates. The authors consider networks with general topologies described by a control-affine dynamical system coupled with a linear model for enzyme synthesis and degradation. The problem formulation accounts for transitions between two metabolic equilibria, which typically arise in metabolic adaptations to environmental changes, and the minimisation of a quadratic functional that weights the cost/benefit relation between the transcriptional effort required for enzyme synthesis and the transition to the new phenotype. Using a linear time-variant approximation of the non-linear dynamics, the problem is recast as a sequence of linear-quadratic problems, the solution of which involves a sequence of differential Lyapunov equations. The authors provide conditions for convergence to an approximate solution of the original problem, which are naturally satisfied by a wide class of models for saturable enzyme kinetics. As a case study the authors use the method to examine the robustness of an optimal just-in-time gene expression pattern with respect to heterogeneity in the biosynthetic costs of individual proteins.

  3. Non-metabolic functions of glycolytic enzymes in tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Yu, X; Li, S

    2017-05-11

    Cancer cells reprogram their metabolism to meet the requirement for survival and rapid growth. One hallmark of cancer metabolism is elevated aerobic glycolysis and reduced oxidative phosphorylation. Emerging evidence showed that most glycolytic enzymes are deregulated in cancer cells and play important roles in tumorigenesis. Recent studies revealed that all essential glycolytic enzymes can be translocated into nucleus where they participate in tumor progression independent of their canonical metabolic roles. These noncanonical functions include anti-apoptosis, regulation of epigenetic modifications, modulation of transcription factors and co-factors, extracellular cytokine, protein kinase activity and mTORC1 signaling pathway, suggesting that these multifaceted glycolytic enzymes not only function in canonical metabolism but also directly link metabolism to epigenetic and transcription programs implicated in tumorigenesis. These findings underscore our understanding about how tumor cells adapt to nutrient and fuel availability in the environment and most importantly, provide insights into development of cancer therapy.

  4. A cellular perspective on brain energy metabolism and functional imaging.

    PubMed

    Magistretti, Pierre J; Allaman, Igor

    2015-05-20

    The energy demands of the brain are high: they account for at least 20% of the body's energy consumption. Evolutionary studies indicate that the emergence of higher cognitive functions in humans is associated with an increased glucose utilization and expression of energy metabolism genes. Functional brain imaging techniques such as fMRI and PET, which are widely used in human neuroscience studies, detect signals that monitor energy delivery and use in register with neuronal activity. Recent technological advances in metabolic studies with cellular resolution have afforded decisive insights into the understanding of the cellular and molecular bases of the coupling between neuronal activity and energy metabolism and point at a key role of neuron-astrocyte metabolic interactions. This article reviews some of the most salient features emerging from recent studies and aims at providing an integration of brain energy metabolism across resolution scales. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Physiology of leptin: energy homeostasis, neuroendocrine function and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyeong-Kyu; Ahima, Rexford S.

    2014-01-01

    Leptin is secreted by adipose tissue and regulates energy homeostasis, neuroendocrine function, metabolism, immune function and other systems through its effects on the central nervous system and peripheral tissues. Leptin administration has been shown to restore metabolic and neuroendocrine abnormalities in individuals with leptin-deficient states, including hypothalamic amenorrhea and lipoatrophy. In contrast, obese individuals are resistant to leptin. Recombinant leptin is beneficial in patients with congenital leptin deficiency or generalized lipodystrophy. However, further research on molecular mediators of leptin resistance is needed for the development of targeted leptin sensitizing therapies for obesity and related metabolic diseases. PMID:25199978

  6. Effects of metabolic syndrome on the functional outcomes of corticosteroid injection for De Quervain tenosynovitis.

    PubMed

    Roh, Y H; Noh, J H; Gong, H S; Baek, G H

    2017-06-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a constellation of medical conditions that arise from insulin resistance and abnormal adipose deposition and function. In patients with metabolic syndrome and De Quervain tenosynovitis this might affect the outcome of treatment by local corticosteroid injection. A total of 64 consecutive patients with De Quervain tenosynovitis and metabolic syndrome treated with corticosteroid injection were age- and sex-matched with 64 control patients without metabolic syndrome. The response to treatment, including visual analogue scale score for pain, objective findings consistent with De Quervain tenosynovitis (tenderness at first dorsal compartment, Finkelstein test result), and Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand score were assessed at 6, 12, and 24 weeks follow-up. Treatment failure was defined as persistence of symptoms or surgical intervention. Prior to treatment, patients with metabolic syndrome had mean initial pain visual analogue scale and Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand scores similar to those in the control group. The proportion of treatment failure in the metabolic syndrome group (43%) was significantly higher than that in the control group (20%) at 6 months follow-up. The pain visual analogue scale scores in the metabolic syndrome group were higher than the scores in the control group at the 12- and 24-week follow-ups. The Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand scores of the metabolic syndrome group were higher (more severe symptoms) than those of the control group at the 12- and 24-week follow-ups. Although considerable improvements in symptom severity and hand function will likely occur in patients with metabolic syndrome, corticosteroid injection for De Quervain tenosynovitis is not as effective in these patients compared with age- and sex-matched controls in terms of functional outcomes and treatment failure. III.

  7. Control of macrophage metabolism and activation by mTOR and Akt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Covarrubias, Anthony J.; Aksoylar, H. Ibrahim; Horng, Tiffany

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are pleiotropic cells that assume a variety of functions depending on their tissue of residence and tissue state. They maintain homeostasis as well as coordinate responses to stresses such as infection and metabolic challenge. The ability of macrophages to acquire diverse, context-dependent activities requires their activation (or polarization) to distinct functional states. While macrophage activation is well understood at the level of signal transduction and transcriptional regulation, the metabolic underpinnings are poorly understood. Importantly, emerging studies indicate that metabolic shifts play a pivotal role in control of macrophage activation and acquisition of context-dependent effector activities. The signals that drive macrophage activation impinge on metabolic pathways, allowing for coordinate control of macrophage activation and metabolism. Here we discuss how mTOR and Akt, major metabolic regulators and targets of such activation signals, control macrophage metabolism and activation. Dysregulated macrophage activities contribute to many diseases, including infectious, inflammatory, and metabolic diseases and cancer, thus a better understanding of metabolic control of macrophage activation could pave the way to the development of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26360589

  8. Control of macrophage metabolism and activation by mTOR and Akt signaling.

    PubMed

    Covarrubias, Anthony J; Aksoylar, H Ibrahim; Horng, Tiffany

    2015-08-01

    Macrophages are pleiotropic cells that assume a variety of functions depending on their tissue of residence and tissue state. They maintain homeostasis as well as coordinate responses to stresses such as infection and metabolic challenge. The ability of macrophages to acquire diverse, context-dependent activities requires their activation (or polarization) to distinct functional states. While macrophage activation is well understood at the level of signal transduction and transcriptional regulation, the metabolic underpinnings are poorly understood. Importantly, emerging studies indicate that metabolic shifts play a pivotal role in control of macrophage activation and acquisition of context-dependent effector activities. The signals that drive macrophage activation impinge on metabolic pathways, allowing for coordinate control of macrophage activation and metabolism. Here we discuss how mTOR and Akt, major metabolic regulators and targets of such activation signals, control macrophage metabolism and activation. Dysregulated macrophage activities contribute to many diseases, including infectious, inflammatory, and metabolic diseases and cancer, thus a better understanding of metabolic control of macrophage activation could pave the way to the development of new therapeutic strategies.

  9. Functional modules, structural topology, and optimal activity in metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Resendis-Antonio, Osbaldo; Hernández, Magdalena; Mora, Yolanda; Encarnación, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Modular organization in biological networks has been suggested as a natural mechanism by which a cell coordinates its metabolic strategies for evolving and responding to environmental perturbations. To understand how this occurs, there is a need for developing computational schemes that contribute to integration of genomic-scale information and assist investigators in formulating biological hypotheses in a quantitative and systematic fashion. In this work, we combined metabolome data and constraint-based modeling to elucidate the relationships among structural modules, functional organization, and the optimal metabolic phenotype of Rhizobium etli, a bacterium that fixes nitrogen in symbiosis with Phaseolus vulgaris. To experimentally characterize the metabolic phenotype of this microorganism, we obtained the metabolic profile of 220 metabolites at two physiological stages: under free-living conditions, and during nitrogen fixation with P. vulgaris. By integrating these data into a constraint-based model, we built a refined computational platform with the capability to survey the metabolic activity underlying nitrogen fixation in R. etli. Topological analysis of the metabolic reconstruction led us to identify modular structures with functional activities. Consistent with modular activity in metabolism, we found that most of the metabolites experimentally detected in each module simultaneously increased their relative abundances during nitrogen fixation. In this work, we explore the relationships among topology, biological function, and optimal activity in the metabolism of R. etli through an integrative analysis based on modeling and metabolome data. Our findings suggest that the metabolic activity during nitrogen fixation is supported by interacting structural modules that correlate with three functional classifications: nucleic acids, peptides, and lipids. More fundamentally, we supply evidence that such modular organization during functional nitrogen fixation is

  10. Can Cholesterol Metabolism Modulation Affect Brain Function and Behavior?

    PubMed

    Cartocci, Veronica; Servadio, Michela; Trezza, Viviana; Pallottini, Valentina

    2017-02-01

    Cholesterol is an important component for cell physiology. It regulates the fluidity of cell membranes and determines the physical and biochemical properties of proteins. In the central nervous system, cholesterol controls synapse formation and function and supports the saltatory conduction of action potential. In recent years, the role of cholesterol in the brain has caught the attention of several research groups since a breakdown of cholesterol metabolism has been associated with different neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases, and interestingly also with psychiatric conditions. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge about the connection between cholesterol dysregulation and various neurologic and psychiatric disorders based on clinical and preclinical studies. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 281-286, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Thiamine in plants: aspects of its metabolism and functions.

    PubMed

    Goyer, Aymeric

    2010-10-01

    Thiamine diphosphate (vitamin B(1)) plays a fundamental role as an enzymatic cofactor in universal metabolic pathways including glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. In addition, thiamine diphosphate has recently been shown to have functions other than as a cofactor in response to abiotic and biotic stress in plants. Recently, several steps of the plant thiamine biosynthetic pathway have been characterized, and a mechanism of feedback regulation of thiamine biosynthesis via riboswitch has been unraveled. This review focuses on these most recent advances made in our understanding of thiamine metabolism and functions in plants. Phenotypes of plant mutants affected in thiamine biosynthesis are described, and genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics data that have increased further our knowledge of plant thiamine metabolic pathways and functions are summarized. Aspects of thiamine metabolism such as catabolism, salvage, and transport in plants are discussed.

  12. Precision metabolic engineering: The design of responsive, selective, and controllable metabolic systems.

    PubMed

    McNerney, Monica P; Watstein, Daniel M; Styczynski, Mark P

    2015-09-01

    Metabolic engineering is generally focused on static optimization of cells to maximize production of a desired product, though recently dynamic metabolic engineering has explored how metabolic programs can be varied over time to improve titer. However, these are not the only types of applications where metabolic engineering could make a significant impact. Here, we discuss a new conceptual framework, termed "precision metabolic engineering," involving the design and engineering of systems that make different products in response to different signals. Rather than focusing on maximizing titer, these types of applications typically have three hallmarks: sensing signals that determine the desired metabolic target, completely directing metabolic flux in response to those signals, and producing sharp responses at specific signal thresholds. In this review, we will first discuss and provide examples of precision metabolic engineering. We will then discuss each of these hallmarks and identify which existing metabolic engineering methods can be applied to accomplish those tasks, as well as some of their shortcomings. Ultimately, precise control of metabolic systems has the potential to enable a host of new metabolic engineering and synthetic biology applications for any problem where flexibility of response to an external signal could be useful. Copyright © 2015 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Microalgal Metabolic Network Model Refinement through High-Throughput Functional Metabolic Profiling.

    PubMed

    Chaiboonchoe, Amphun; Dohai, Bushra Saeed; Cai, Hong; Nelson, David R; Jijakli, Kenan; Salehi-Ashtiani, Kourosh

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic modeling provides the means to define metabolic processes at a systems level; however, genome-scale metabolic models often remain incomplete in their description of metabolic networks and may include reactions that are experimentally unverified. This shortcoming is exacerbated in reconstructed models of newly isolated algal species, as there may be little to no biochemical evidence available for the metabolism of such isolates. The phenotype microarray (PM) technology (Biolog, Hayward, CA, USA) provides an efficient, high-throughput method to functionally define cellular metabolic activities in response to a large array of entry metabolites. The platform can experimentally verify many of the unverified reactions in a network model as well as identify missing or new reactions in the reconstructed metabolic model. The PM technology has been used for metabolic phenotyping of non-photosynthetic bacteria and fungi, but it has not been reported for the phenotyping of microalgae. Here, we introduce the use of PM assays in a systematic way to the study of microalgae, applying it specifically to the green microalgal model species Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The results obtained in this study validate a number of existing annotated metabolic reactions and identify a number of novel and unexpected metabolites. The obtained information was used to expand and refine the existing COBRA-based C. reinhardtii metabolic network model iRC1080. Over 254 reactions were added to the network, and the effects of these additions on flux distribution within the network are described. The novel reactions include the support of metabolism by a number of d-amino acids, l-dipeptides, and l-tripeptides as nitrogen sources, as well as support of cellular respiration by cysteamine-S-phosphate as a phosphorus source. The protocol developed here can be used as a foundation to functionally profile other microalgae such as known microalgae mutants and novel isolates.

  14. Microalgal Metabolic Network Model Refinement through High-Throughput Functional Metabolic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Chaiboonchoe, Amphun; Dohai, Bushra Saeed; Cai, Hong; Nelson, David R.; Jijakli, Kenan; Salehi-Ashtiani, Kourosh

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic modeling provides the means to define metabolic processes at a systems level; however, genome-scale metabolic models often remain incomplete in their description of metabolic networks and may include reactions that are experimentally unverified. This shortcoming is exacerbated in reconstructed models of newly isolated algal species, as there may be little to no biochemical evidence available for the metabolism of such isolates. The phenotype microarray (PM) technology (Biolog, Hayward, CA, USA) provides an efficient, high-throughput method to functionally define cellular metabolic activities in response to a large array of entry metabolites. The platform can experimentally verify many of the unverified reactions in a network model as well as identify missing or new reactions in the reconstructed metabolic model. The PM technology has been used for metabolic phenotyping of non-photosynthetic bacteria and fungi, but it has not been reported for the phenotyping of microalgae. Here, we introduce the use of PM assays in a systematic way to the study of microalgae, applying it specifically to the green microalgal model species Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The results obtained in this study validate a number of existing annotated metabolic reactions and identify a number of novel and unexpected metabolites. The obtained information was used to expand and refine the existing COBRA-based C. reinhardtii metabolic network model iRC1080. Over 254 reactions were added to the network, and the effects of these additions on flux distribution within the network are described. The novel reactions include the support of metabolism by a number of d-amino acids, l-dipeptides, and l-tripeptides as nitrogen sources, as well as support of cellular respiration by cysteamine-S-phosphate as a phosphorus source. The protocol developed here can be used as a foundation to functionally profile other microalgae such as known microalgae mutants and novel isolates. PMID:25540776

  15. Impact of Metabolism on T-Cell Differentiation and Function and Cross Talk with Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Kouidhi, Soumaya; Elgaaied, Amel Benammar; Chouaib, Salem

    2017-01-01

    The immune system and metabolism are highly integrated and multilevel interactions between metabolic system and T lymphocyte signaling and fate exist. Accumulating evidence indicates that the regulation of nutrient uptake and utilization in T cells is critically important for the control of their differentiation and manipulating metabolic pathways in these cells can shape their function and survival. This review will discuss some potential cell metabolism pathways involved in shaping T lymphocyte function and differentiation. It will also describe show subsets of T cells have specific metabolic requirements and signaling pathways that contribute to their respective function. Examples showing the apparent similarity between cancer cell metabolism and T cells during activation are illustrated and finally some mechanisms being used by tumor microenvironment to orchestrate T-cell metabolic dysregulation and the subsequent emergence of immune suppression are discussed. We believe that targeting T-cell metabolism may provide an additional opportunity to manipulate T-cell function in the development of novel therapeutics. PMID:28348562

  16. Carbon metabolism and the sign of control coefficients in metabolic adaptations underlying K-ras transformation.

    PubMed

    de Atauri, Pedro; Benito, Adrian; Vizán, Pedro; Zanuy, Miriam; Mangues, Ramón; Marín, Silvia; Cascante, Marta

    2011-06-01

    Metabolic adaptations are associated with changes in enzyme activities. These adaptations are characterized by patterns of positive and negative changes in metabolic fluxes and concentrations of intermediate metabolites. Knowledge of the mechanism and parameters governing enzyme kinetics is rarely available. However, the signs-increases or decreases-of many of these changes can be predicted using the signs of metabolic control coefficients. These signs require the only knowledge of the structure of the metabolic network and a limited qualitative knowledge of the regulatory dependences, which is widely available for carbon metabolism. Here, as a case study, we identified control coefficients with fixed signs in order to predict the pattern of changes in key enzyme activities which can explain the observed changes in fluxes and concentrations underlying the metabolic adaptations in oncogenic K-ras transformation in NIH-3T3 cells. The fixed signs of control coefficients indicate that metabolic changes following the oncogenic transformation-increased glycolysis and oxidative branch of the pentose-phosphate pathway, and decreased concentration in sugar-phosphates-could be associated with increases in activity for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, pyruvate kinase and lactate dehydrogenase, and decrease for transketolase. These predictions were validated experimentally by measuring specific activities. We conclude that predictions based on fixed signs of control coefficients are a very robust tool for the identification of changes in enzyme activities that can explain observed metabolic adaptations in carbon metabolism.

  17. Metabolic Damage and Metabolic Damage Control in Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Andrew D.; Henry, Christopher S.; Fiehn, Oliver; Crecy-Lagard, Valerie de

    2016-01-01

    It is increasingly clear that (a) many metabolites undergo spontaneous or enzyme-catalyzed side reactions in vivo, (b) the damaged metabolites formed by these reactions can be harmful, and (c) organisms have biochemical systems that limit the buildup of damaged metabolites. These damage-control systems either return a damaged molecule to its pristine state (metabolite repair) or convert harmful molecules to harmless ones (damage preemption). Because all organisms share a core set of metabolites that suffer the same chemical and enzymatic damage reactions, certain damage-control systems are widely conserved across the kingdoms of life. Relatively few damage reactions and damage-control systems are well known. Uncovering new damage reactions and identifying the corresponding damaged metabolites, damage-control genes, and enzymes demands a coordinated mix of chemistry, metabolomics, cheminformatics, biochemistry, and comparative genomics. This review illustrates the above points using examples from plants, which are at least as prone to metabolite damage as other organisms.

  18. Functional crosstalk of CAR-LXR and ROR-LXR in drug metabolism and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lei; Xie, Xinni; Zhai, Yonggong

    2010-10-30

    Nuclear receptor crosstalk represents an important mechanism to expand the functions of individual receptors. The liver X receptors (LXR, NR1H2/3), both the α and β isoforms, are nuclear receptors that can be activated by the endogenous oxysterols and other synthetic agonists. LXRs function as cholesterol sensors, which protect mammals from cholesterol overload. LXRs have been shown to regulate the expression of a battery of metabolic genes, especially those involved in lipid metabolism. LXRs have recently been suggested to play a novel role in the regulation of drug metabolism. The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) is a xenobiotic receptor that regulates the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. Disruption of CAR alters sensitivity to toxins, increasing or decreasing it depending on the compounds. More recently, additional roles for CAR have been discovered. These include the involvement of CAR in lipid metabolism. Mechanistically, CAR forms an intricate regulatory network with other members of the nuclear receptor superfamily, foremost the LXRs, in exerting its effect on lipid metabolism. Retinoid-related orphan receptors (RORs, NR1F1/2/3) have three isoforms, α, β and γ. Recent reports have shown that loss of RORα and/or RORγ can positively or negatively influence the expression of multiple drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters in the liver. The effects of RORs on expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes were reasoned to be, at least in part, due to the crosstalk with LXR. This review focuses on the CAR-LXR and ROR-LXR crosstalk, and the implications of this crosstalk in drug metabolism and lipid metabolism.

  19. Precision Metabolic Engineering: the Design of Responsive, Selective, and Controllable Metabolic Systems

    PubMed Central

    McNerney, Monica P.; Watstein, Daniel M.; Styczynski, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic engineering is generally focused on static optimization of cells to maximize production of a desired product, though recently dynamic metabolic engineering has explored how metabolic programs can be varied over time to improve titer. However, these are not the only types of applications where metabolic engineering could make a significant impact. Here, we discuss a new conceptual framework, termed “precision metabolic engineering,” involving the design and engineering of systems that make different products in response to different signals. Rather than focusing on maximizing titer, these types of applications typically have three hallmarks: sensing signals that determine the desired metabolic target, completely directing metabolic flux in response to those signals, and producing sharp responses at specific signal thresholds. In this review, we will first discuss and provide examples of precision metabolic engineering. We will then discuss each of these hallmarks and identify which existing metabolic engineering methods can be applied to accomplish those tasks, as well as some of their shortcomings. Ultimately, precise control of metabolic systems has the potential to enable a host of new metabolic engineering and synthetic biology applications for any problem where flexibility of response to an external signal could be useful. PMID:26189665

  20. Transcriptional control of circadian metabolic rhythms in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Li, Siming; Lin, Jiandie D.

    2015-01-01

    Diurnal metabolic rhythms add an important temporal dimension to metabolic homeostasis in mammals. While it remains a challenge to untangle the intricate networks of crosstalk among the body clock, nutrient signaling, and tissue metabolism, there is little doubt that the rhythmic nature of nutrient and energy metabolism is a central aspect of metabolic physiology. Disruption of the synchrony between clock and metabolism has been causally linked to diverse pathophysiological states. As such, restoring the rhythmicity of body physiology and therapeutic targeting directed at specific time windows during the day may have important implications in human health and medicine. In this review, we summarize recent findings on the integration of hepatic glucose metabolism and the body clock through a regulatory network centered on the PGC-1 transcriptional coactivators. In addition, we discuss the transcriptional mechanisms underlying circadian control of the autophagy gene program and autophagy in the liver. PMID:26332966

  1. mTORC1-dependent metabolic reprogramming is a prerequisite for Natural Killer cell effector function

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Raymond P.; Loftus, Róisín M.; Keating, Sinéad E.; Liou, Kevin T.; Biron, Christine A.; Gardiner, Clair M.; Finlay, David K.

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamcyin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a key regulator of cellular metabolism and also has fundamental roles in controlling immune responses. Emerging evidence suggests that these two functions of mTORC1 are integrally linked. However, little is known regarding mTORC1 function in controlling the metabolism and function of natural killer (NK) cells, lymphocytes that play key roles in anti-viral and anti-tumour immunity. This study investigated the hypothesis that mTORC1-controlled metabolism underpins normal NK cell pro-inflammatory function. We demonstrate that mTORC1 is robustly stimulated in NK cells activated in vivo and in vitro. This mTORC1 activity is required for the production of the key NK cell effector molecules IFNγ, important in delivering antimicrobial and immunoregulatory functions, and granzyme B, a critical component of NK cell cytotoxic granules. The data reveal that NK cells undergo dramatic metabolic reprogramming upon activation, up-regulating rates of glucose uptake and glycolysis, and that mTORC1 activity is essential for attaining this elevated glycolytic state. Directly limiting the rate of glycolysis is sufficient to inhibit IFNγ production and granzyme B expression. This study provides the highly novel insight that mTORC1-mediated metabolic reprogramming of NK cells is a prerequisite for the acquisition of normal effector functions. PMID:25261477

  2. Insulin action in brain regulates systemic metabolism and brain function.

    PubMed

    Kleinridders, André; Ferris, Heather A; Cai, Weikang; Kahn, C Ronald

    2014-07-01

    Insulin receptors, as well as IGF-1 receptors and their postreceptor signaling partners, are distributed throughout the brain. Insulin acts on these receptors to modulate peripheral metabolism, including regulation of appetite, reproductive function, body temperature, white fat mass, hepatic glucose output, and response to hypoglycemia. Insulin signaling also modulates neurotransmitter channel activity, brain cholesterol synthesis, and mitochondrial function. Disruption of insulin action in the brain leads to impairment of neuronal function and synaptogenesis. In addition, insulin signaling modulates phosphorylation of tau protein, an early component in the development of Alzheimer disease. Thus, alterations in insulin action in the brain can contribute to metabolic syndrome, and the development of mood disorders and neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. The LKB1-AMPK pathway: metabolism and growth control in tumor suppression

    PubMed Central

    Shackelford, David B.; Shaw, Reuben J.

    2009-01-01

    In the past decade, studies of the human tumor suppressor LKB1 have uncovered a novel signaling pathway that links cell metabolism to growth control and cell polarity. LKB1 encodes a serine/threonine kinase that directly phosphorylates and activates AMPK, a central metabolic sensor. AMPK regulates lipid, cholesterol and glucose metabolism in specialized metabolic tissues such as liver, muscle, and adipose, a function that has made it a key therapeutic target in patients with diabetes. The connection of AMPK with several tumor suppressors suggests that therapeutic manipulation of this pathway with established diabetes drugs warrants further investigation in patients with cancer. PMID:19629071

  4. The LKB1-AMPK pathway: metabolism and growth control in tumour suppression.

    PubMed

    Shackelford, David B; Shaw, Reuben J

    2009-08-01

    In the past decade, studies of the human tumour suppressor LKB1 have uncovered a novel signalling pathway that links cell metabolism to growth control and cell polarity. LKB1 encodes a serine-threonine kinase that directly phosphorylates and activates AMPK, a central metabolic sensor. AMPK regulates lipid, cholesterol and glucose metabolism in specialized metabolic tissues, such as liver, muscle and adipose tissue. This function has made AMPK a key therapeutic target in patients with diabetes. The connection of AMPK with several tumour suppressors suggests that therapeutic manipulation of this pathway using established diabetes drugs warrants further investigation in patients with cancer.

  5. Space Station CMIF extended duration metabolic control test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schunk, Richard G.; Bagdigian, Robert M.; Carrasquillo, Robyn L.; Ogle, Kathryn Y.; Wieland, Paul O.

    1989-01-01

    The Space Station Extended Duration Metabolic Control Test (EMCT) was conducted at the MSFC Core Module Integration Facility. The primary objective of the EMCT was to gather performance data from a partially-closed regenerative Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) system functioning under steady-state conditions. Included is a description of the EMCT configuration, a summary of events, a discussion of anomalies that occurred during the test, and detailed results and analysis from individual measurements of water and gas samples taken during the test. A comparison of the physical, chemical, and microbiological methods used in the post test laboratory analyses of the water samples is included. The preprototype ECLS hardware used in the test, providing an overall process description and theory of operation for each hardware item. Analytical results pertaining to a system level mass balance and selected system power estimates are also included.

  6. Metabolic Assessment of Suited Mobility Using Functional Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norcross, J. R.; McFarland, S. M.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Existing methods for evaluating extravehicular activity (EVA) suit mobility have typically focused on isolated joint range of motion or torque, but these techniques have little to do with how well a crewmember functionally performs in an EVA suit. To evaluate suited mobility at the system level through measuring metabolic cost (MC) of functional tasks.

  7. Molecules in motion: influences of diffusion on metabolic structure and function in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Kinsey, Stephen T.; Locke, Bruce R.; Dillaman, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic processes are often represented as a group of metabolites that interact through enzymatic reactions, thus forming a network of linked biochemical pathways. Implicit in this view is that diffusion of metabolites to and from enzymes is very fast compared with reaction rates, and metabolic fluxes are therefore almost exclusively dictated by catalytic properties. However, diffusion may exert greater control over the rates of reactions through: (1) an increase in reaction rates; (2) an increase in diffusion distances; or (3) a decrease in the relevant diffusion coefficients. It is therefore not surprising that skeletal muscle fibers have long been the focus of reaction–diffusion analyses because they have high and variable rates of ATP turnover, long diffusion distances, and hindered metabolite diffusion due to an abundance of intracellular barriers. Examination of the diversity of skeletal muscle fiber designs found in animals provides insights into the role that diffusion plays in governing both rates of metabolic fluxes and cellular organization. Experimental measurements of metabolic fluxes, diffusion distances and diffusion coefficients, coupled with reaction–diffusion mathematical models in a range of muscle types has started to reveal some general principles guiding muscle structure and metabolic function. Foremost among these is that metabolic processes in muscles do, in fact, appear to be largely reaction controlled and are not greatly limited by diffusion. However, the influence of diffusion is apparent in patterns of fiber growth and metabolic organization that appear to result from selective pressure to maintain reaction control of metabolism in muscle. PMID:21177946

  8. Metabolic Syndrome and Sexual Function in Postmenopausal Women.

    PubMed

    Trompeter, Susan E; Bettencourt, Ricki; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth

    2016-12-01

    Limited literature suggests that sexual dysfunction in women covaries with the metabolic syndrome. This study examined the association of sexual function with metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease in healthy older women. There were 376 postmenopausal, community-dwelling women from the Rancho Bernardo Study (mean baseline age = 73 years) that completed a clinic visit during 1999-2002 and returned the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) questionnaire mailed in 2002. Thirty-nine percent reported being sexually active; 41.5% met a diagnosis of metabolic syndrome. The number of metabolic syndrome components was strongly associated with decreased sexual activity, desire, and low sexual satisfaction. Waist girth, diabetes, and hypertension were associated with decreased sexual activity. Elevated triglycerides were associated with low desire. Among the cardiovascular endpoints, heart attack, coronary artery bypass, and angina were associated with decreased sexual activity, but not with sexual desire or satisfaction. Past diagnosis of heart failure, poor circulation, and stroke were not associated with sexual function. Sexually active women with metabolic syndrome met criteria for sexual dysfunction in desire, arousal, orgasm, and satisfaction domains. The FSFI Total Score did not differ significantly between sexually active and inactive women. Metabolic syndrome was associated with decreased sexual activity, desire, and satisfaction in all women and with sexual dysfunction in most domains in sexually active women. Coronary artery disease was more prevalent in women with low sexual activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Patterns of control of maximum metabolic rate in humans.

    PubMed

    Hochachka, Peter W; Beatty, Cheryl L

    2003-09-01

    In this analysis, four performance phenotypes were used to compare mechanisms of control of aerobic maximum metabolic rate (MMR): (i) untrained sedentary (US) subjects, as a reference group against which to compare (ii) power trained (PT), (iii) endurance trained (ET) and (iv) high altitude adapted native (HA) subject groups. Sprinters represented the PT group; long distance runners illustrated the ET group; and Quechuas represented the HA group. Numerous recent studies have identified contributors to control on both the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) supply side and the ATP demand side of ATP turnover. Control coefficients or c(i) values were defined as fractional change in MMR/fractional change in the capacity of any given step in ATP turnover. From the best available evidence it appears that at MMR all five of the major steps in energy delivery (namely, ventilation, pulmonary diffusion, cardiac output, tissue capillary - mitochondrial O(2) transfer, and aerobic cell metabolism per se) approach an upper functional ceiling, with control strength being distributed amongst the various O(2) flux steps. On the energy demand side, the situation is somewhat simplified since at MMR approximately 90% of O(2)-based ATP synthesis is used for actomyosin (AM) and Ca(2+) ATPases; at MMR these two ATP demand rates also appear to be near an upper functional ceiling. In consequence, at MMR the control contributions or c(i) values are rather evenly divided amongst all seven major steps in ATP supply and ATP demand pathways right to the point of fatigue. Relative to US (the reference group), in PT subjects at MMR control strength shifts towards O(2) delivery steps (ventilation, pulmonary diffusion and cardiac output). In contrast in ET and HA subjects at MMR control shifts towards the energy demand steps (AM and Ca(2+) ATPases), and more control strength is focussed on tissue level ATP supply and ATP demand. One obvious advantage of the ET and HA control pattern is improved

  10. Thermodynamic-based computational profiling of cellular regulatory control in hepatocyte metabolism.

    PubMed

    Beard, Daniel A; Qian, Hong

    2005-03-01

    Thermodynamic-based constraints on biochemical fluxes and concentrations are applied in concert with mass balance of fluxes in glycogenesis and glycogenolysis in a model of hepatic cell metabolism. Constraint-based modeling methods that facilitate predictions of reactant concentrations, reaction potentials, and enzyme activities are introduced to identify putative regulatory and control sites in biological networks by computing the minimal control scheme necessary to switch between metabolic modes. Computational predictions of control sites in glycogenic and glycogenolytic operational modes in the hepatocyte network compare favorably with known regulatory mechanisms. The developed hepatic metabolic model is used to computationally analyze the impairment of glucose production in von Gierke's and Hers' diseases, two metabolic diseases impacting glycogen metabolism. The computational methodology introduced here can be generalized to identify downstream targets of agonists, to systematically probe possible drug targets, and to predict the effects of specific inhibitors (or activators) on integrated network function.

  11. Circadian rhythms in myocardial metabolism and function

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Circadian rhythms in myocardial function and dysfunction are firmly established in both animal models and humans. For example, the incidence of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death increases when organisms awaken. Such observations have classically been explained by circadian rhythms in neurohumoral...

  12. Metabolism control by the circadian clock and vice versa

    PubMed Central

    Eckel-Mahan, Kristin; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms govern a wide variety of physiological and metabolic functions in most organisms. At the heart of these regulatory pathways in mammals is the clock machinery, a remarkably coordinated transcription-translation system that relies on dynamic changes in chromatin states. Recent findings indicate that regulation also goes the other way, as specific elements of the clock can sense changes in the cellular metabolism. Understanding in full detail the intimate links between cellular metabolism and the circadian clock machinery will provide not only crucial insights into system physiology but also new avenues toward pharmacological intervention of metabolic disorders. PMID:19421159

  13. Metabolism Is Central to Tolerogenic Dendritic Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Wen Jing; Ahl, Patricia Jennifer; Connolly, John Edward

    2016-01-01

    Immunological tolerance is a fundamental tenant of immune homeostasis and overall health. Self-tolerance is a critical component of the immune system that allows for the recognition of self, resulting in hyporeactivity instead of immunogenicity. Dendritic cells are central to the establishment of dominant immune tolerance through the secretion of immunosuppressive cytokines and regulatory polarization of T cells. Cellular metabolism holds the key to determining DC immunogenic or tolerogenic cell fate. Recent studies have demonstrated that dendritic cell maturation leads to a shift toward a glycolytic metabolic state and preferred use of glucose as a carbon source. In contrast, tolerogenic dendritic cells favor oxidative phosphorylation and fatty acid oxidation. This dichotomous metabolic reprogramming of dendritic cells drives differential cellular function and plays a role in pathologies, such as autoimmune disease. Pharmacological alterations in metabolism have promising therapeutic potential. PMID:26980944

  14. Cell-selective metabolic labeling of biomolecules with bioorthogonal functionalities.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ran; Hong, Senlian; Chen, Xing

    2013-10-01

    Metabolic labeling of biomolecules with bioorthogonal functionalities enables visualization, enrichment, and analysis of the biomolecules of interest in their physiological environments. This versatile strategy has found utility in probing various classes of biomolecules in a broad range of biological processes. On the other hand, metabolic labeling is nonselective with respect to cell type, which imposes limitations for studies performed in complex biological systems. Herein, we review the recent methodological developments aiming to endow metabolic labeling strategies with cell-type selectivity. The cell-selective metabolic labeling strategies have emerged from protein and glycan labeling. We envision that these strategies can be readily extended to labeling of other classes of biomolecules. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Basic mechanisms: structure, function and metabolism of plasma lipoproteins].

    PubMed

    Errico, Teresa L; Chen, Xiangyu; Martin Campos, Jesús M; Julve, Josep; Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to present basic information on the lipoprotein physiology. The protein fraction of lipoproteins consists of several apolipoproteins and enzymes whose functions are lipid transport and metabolism. Classification of lipoproteins is based on their density. Chylomicrons, VLDL, IDL, LDL and HDL can be isolated by ultracentrifugation. Both chylomicrons- and VLDL-triglycerides are transported from the intestine and liver, respectively, to the peripheral tissues. The metabolism of VLDL originates IDL and LDL. LDL is the main transporter of cholesterol to extrahepatic tissues. HDL mobilizes cholesterol from peripheral tissues to the liver where it is secreted to bile as free cholesterol or bile salts, a process termed reverse cholesterol transport. Lipoprotein metabolism can be regulated by nuclear receptors that regulate the expression of genes involved in triglyceride and apolipoprotein metabolism. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEA. All rights reserved.

  16. Diabetes, insulin-mediated glucose metabolism and Sertoli/blood-testis barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Marco G.; Martins, Ana D.; Cavaco, José E.; Socorro, Sílvia; Oliveira, Pedro F.

    2013-01-01

    Blood testis barrier (BTB) is one of the tightest blood-barriers controlling the entry of substances into the intratubular fluid. Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is an epidemic metabolic disease concurrent with falling fertility rates, which provokes severe detrimental BTB alterations. It induces testicular alterations, disrupting the metabolic cooperation between the cellular constituents of BTB, with dramatic consequences on sperm quality and fertility. As Sertoli cells are involved in the regulation of spermatogenesis, providing nutritional support for germ cells, any metabolic alteration in these cells derived from DM may be responsible for spermatogenesis disruption, playing a crucial role in fertility/subfertility associated with this pathology. These cells have a glucose sensing machinery that reacts to hormonal fluctuations and several mechanisms to counteract hyper/hypoglycemic events. The role of DM on Sertoli/BTB glucose metabolism dynamics and the metabolic molecular mechanisms through which DM and insulin deregulation alter its functioning, affecting male reproductive potential will be discussed. PMID:24665384

  17. Preserved pontine glucose metabolism in Alzheimer disease: A reference region for functional brain image (PET) analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Minoshima, Satoshi; Frey, K.A.; Foster, N.L.; Kuhl, D.W.

    1995-07-01

    Our goal was to examine regional preservation of energy metabolism in Alzheimer disease (AD) and to evaluate effects of PET data normalization to reference regions. Regional metabolic rates in the pons, thalamus, putamen, sensorimotor cortex, visual cortex, and cerebellum (reference regions) were determined stereotaxically and examined in 37 patients with probable AD and 22 normal controls based on quantitative {sup 18}FDG-PET measurements. Following normalization of metabolic rates of the parietotemporal association cortex and whole brain to each reference region, distinctions of the two groups were assessed. The pons showed the best preservation of glucose metabolism in AD. Other reference regions showed relatively preserved metabolism compared with the parietotemporal association cortex and whole brain, but had significant metabolic reduction. Data normalization to the pons not only enhanced statistical significance of metabolic reduction in the parietotemporal association cortex, but also preserved the presence of global cerebral metabolic reduction indicated in analysis of the quantitative data. Energy metabolism in the pons in probable AD is well preserved. The pons is a reliable reference for data normalization and will enhance diagnostic accuracy and efficiency of quantitative and nonquantitative functional brain imaging. 39 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Phosphatidylserine in the brain: metabolism and function.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Yong; Huang, Bill X; Spector, Arthur A

    2014-10-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) is the major anionic phospholipid class particularly enriched in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane in neural tissues. PS is synthesized from phosphatidylcholine or phosphatidylethanolamine by exchanging the base head group with serine, and this reaction is catalyzed by phosphatidylserine synthase 1 and phosphatidylserine synthase 2 located in the endoplasmic reticulum. Activation of Akt, Raf-1 and protein kinase C signaling, which supports neuronal survival and differentiation, requires interaction of these proteins with PS localized in the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane. Furthermore, neurotransmitter release by exocytosis and a number of synaptic receptors and proteins are modulated by PS present in the neuronal membranes. Brain is highly enriched with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and brain PS has a high DHA content. By promoting PS synthesis, DHA can uniquely expand the PS pool in neuronal membranes and thereby influence PS-dependent signaling and protein function. Ethanol decreases DHA-promoted PS synthesis and accumulation in neurons, which may contribute to the deleterious effects of ethanol intake. Improvement of some memory functions has been observed in cognitively impaired subjects as a result of PS supplementation, but the mechanism is unclear.

  19. Coronary circulatory function in patients with the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Di Carli, Marcelo F; Charytan, David; McMahon, Graham T; Ganz, Peter; Dorbala, Sharmila; Schelbert, Heinrich R

    2011-09-01

    The metabolic syndrome affects 25% of the U.S. population and greatly increases the risk of diabetes and coronary artery disease (CAD). We tested the hypothesis that the metabolic syndrome is associated with impaired coronary vasodilator function, a marker of atherosclerotic disease activity. Four hundred sixty-two patients at risk for CAD, as defined by a low-density lipoprotein cholesterol ≥ 160 mg/dL with fewer than 2 coronary risk factors, a low-density lipoprotein cholesterol ≥ 130 mg/dL with 2 or more coronary risk factors, or with documented CAD were included. A subset of 234 individuals underwent repeated PET at 1 y. Myocardial blood flow (MBF) and vasodilator reserve were assessed by PET. Modified criteria of the National Cholesterol Education Program, Adult Treatment Panel III were used to characterize the metabolic syndrome. Adenosine- and cold-stimulated MBF were similar in patients with and without metabolic syndrome, whereas baseline MBF showed a stepwise increase with increasing features of the syndrome. Consequently, patients with metabolic syndrome showed a lower coronary flow reserve (CFR) (2.5 ± 1.0) than those without metabolic syndrome (3.0 ± 0.9, P = 0.004). Differences in CFR were no longer present after correcting rest flows for the rate-pressure product. Change in MBF and CFR at 1 y were not different across groups of patients with increasing features of the metabolic syndrome. Patients with metabolic syndrome demonstrate impaired CFR, which is related to the augmentation in resting coronary blood flow caused by hypertension. In high-risk individuals, peak adenosine- and cold-stimulated blood flows are impaired even in the absence of the metabolic syndrome.

  20. Vitamin D metabolism, sex hormones, and male reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Blomberg Jensen, Martin

    2012-08-01

    The spectrum of vitamin D (VD)-mediated effects has expanded in recent years, and VD is now recognized as a versatile signaling molecule rather than being solely a regulator of bone health and calcium homeostasis. One of the recently identified target areas of VD is male reproductive function. The VD receptor (VDR) and the VD metabolizing enzyme expression studies documented the presence of this system in the testes, mature spermatozoa, and ejaculatory tract, suggesting that both systemic and local VD metabolism may influence male reproductive function. However, it is still debated which cell is the main VD target in the testis and to what extent VD is important for sex hormone production and function of spermatozoa. This review summarizes descriptive studies on testicular VD metabolism and spatial distribution of VDR and the VD metabolizing enzymes in the mammalian testes and discusses mechanistic and association studies conducted in animals and humans. The reviewed evidence suggests some effects of VD on estrogen and testosterone biosynthesis and implicates involvement of both systemic and local VD metabolism in the regulation of male fertility potential.

  1. Metabolic Derangements in Lichen Planus - A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Bikash Ranjan; Panda, Maitreyee

    2016-01-01

    Introduction An association between psoriasis and metabolic syndrome has been established in previous studies. Lichen Planus (LP) is also a chronic inflammatory disease morphologically related to psoriasis and few studies have shown association of metabolic derangements in LP. Aim To study the association of metabolic derangements in LP. Materials and Methods A prospective case control study was undertaken for a period of one year. Age and sex matched patients of LP and other non-inflammatory diseases were taken as cases and controls respectively. Data on height, weight, lipid profile and fasting blood glucose levels were collected for all the patients. Body Mass Index (BMI) was calculated. Results A total of 80 patients were recruited, 40 cases and 40 controls. The mean values for all the lipid and glucose parameters were high in cases as compared to controls with significant p-values. Conclusion In the present study metabolic derangements were seen in patients with LP. PMID:28050485

  2. Functional and metabolic consequences of skeletal muscle remodeling in hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    McAllister, R M; Ogilvie, R W; Terjung, R L

    1991-02-01

    Functional and metabolic responses of hypothyroid skeletal muscle were evaluated during steady-state isometric contraction conditions, using an isolated perfused rat hindlimb preparation. Treating rats with propylthiouracil (PTU) for 4-5 mo resulted in a 55% decrease (P less than 0.001) in citrate synthase activity in plantaris muscle and phenotypic remodeling of the plantaris, evident by a threefold increase in type I fiber area and a 13% decrease in type II fiber area. Perfusion of PTU (n = 9) and control (n = 9) rat hindlimbs of similar size, with similar inflow (approximately 10 ml/min) and oxygen content (approximately 20 g/100 ml), resulted in similar oxygen deliveries to the contracting muscles (PTU 11.4 +/- 0.58, control 9.54 +/- 0.75 mumol.min-1.g-1; P greater than 0.05). Ten-minute tetanic contraction (100 ms at 100 Hz) periods at 4, 8, 15, 30, and 45 tetani/min were elicited in consecutive ascending order. Oxygen consumption (VO2) was lower in the PTU group at all contraction frequencies (P less than 0.005), with a decrease in peak VO2 of 44% (PTU 3.01 +/- 0.29, control 5.35 +/- 0.42 mumol.min-1.g-1; P less than 0.001). Oxygen extraction by the PTU muscle was only approximately 25% of that delivered. Developed tension was initially less (15%; P less than 0.05) in the PTU group but declined in a similar manner, as a percent of initial, to that of the control group. The slightly lower absolute tension development of the PTU muscle could not account for the large reduction in VO2.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Gut microbiota functions: metabolism of nutrients and other food components.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Ian; Gibson, Glenn; Heinken, Almut; Scott, Karen; Swann, Jonathan; Thiele, Ines; Tuohy, Kieran

    2017-04-09

    The diverse microbial community that inhabits the human gut has an extensive metabolic repertoire that is distinct from, but complements the activity of mammalian enzymes in the liver and gut mucosa and includes functions essential for host digestion. As such, the gut microbiota is a key factor in shaping the biochemical profile of the diet and, therefore, its impact on host health and disease. The important role that the gut microbiota appears to play in human metabolism and health has stimulated research into the identification of specific microorganisms involved in different processes, and the elucidation of metabolic pathways, particularly those associated with metabolism of dietary components and some host-generated substances. In the first part of the review, we discuss the main gut microorganisms, particularly bacteria, and microbial pathways associated with the metabolism of dietary carbohydrates (to short chain fatty acids and gases), proteins, plant polyphenols, bile acids, and vitamins. The second part of the review focuses on the methodologies, existing and novel, that can be employed to explore gut microbial pathways of metabolism. These include mathematical models, omics techniques, isolated microbes, and enzyme assays.

  4. Myocardial Function and Lipid Metabolism in the Chronic Alcoholic Animal

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Timothy J.; Khan, Mohammad I.; Ettinger, Philip O.; Haider, Bunyad; Lyons, Michael M.; Oldewurtel, Henry A.; Weber, Marilyn

    1974-01-01

    In view of the variables that obscure the pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy, a study was undertaken in mongrel dogs fed ethanol as 36% of calories for up to 22 mo. Both the experimental and control groups maintained body weight, hematocrit, plasma vitamin, and protein levels. Left ventricular function was evaluated in the intact anesthetized dog using indicator dilution for end-diastolic and stroke volume determinations. During increased afterload with angiotensin, the ethanol group exhibited a larger rise of end-diastolic pressure (P<0.01), whereas end-diastolic and stroke volume responses were significantly less than in controls. Preload increments with saline elicited a significantly higher end-diastolic pressure rise in the ethanol group (P<0.01). No hypertrophy, inflammation, or fibrosis was present and it was postulated that the enhanced diastolic stiffness was related to accumulation of Alcian Blue-positive material in the ventricular interstitium. To evaluate myocardial lipid metabolism, [1-14C]oleic acid was infused systemically. Plasma specific activity and myocardial lipid uptake were similar in both groups. There was a significantly increased incorporation of label into triglyceride, associated with a reduced 14CO2 production, considered the basis for a twofold increment of triglyceride content. In addition, diminished incorporation of [14C]oleic acid into phospholipid was observed accompanied by morphologic abnormalities of cardiac cell membranes. Potassium loss and sodium gain, like the lipid alteration, was more prominent in the subendocardium. Thus, chronic ethanol ingestion in this animal model is associated with abnormalities of ventricular function without evident malnutrition, analogous to the preclinical malfunction described in the human alcoholic. Images PMID:4368946

  5. Metabolic control of cancer cell stemness: Lessons from iPS cells

    PubMed Central

    Menendez, Javier A

    2015-01-01

    The Nobel prized discovery of nuclear reprogramming is swiftly providing mechanistic evidence of a role for metabolism in the generation of cancer stem cells (CSC). Traditionally, the metabolic demands of tumors have been viewed as drivers of the genetic programming detected in cancer tissues. Beyond the energetic requirements of specific cancer cell states, it is increasingly recognized that metabolism per se controls epi-transcriptional networks to dictate cancer cell fate, i.e., metabolism can define CSC. Here I review the CSC-related metabolic features found in induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells to provide an easily understandable framework in which the infrastructure and functioning of cellular metabolism might control the efficiency and kinetics of reprogramming in the re-routing of non-CSC to CSC-like cellular states. I suggest exploring how metabolism-dependent regulation of epigenetics can play a role in directing CSC states beyond conventional energetic demands of stage-specific cancer cell states, opening a new dimension of cancer in which the “physiological state” of CSC might be governed not only by cell-autonomous cues but also by local micro-environmental and systemic metabolo-epigenetic interactions. Forthcoming studies should decipher how specific metabolites integrate and mediate the overlap between the CSC-intrinsic “micro-epigenetics” and the “upstream” local and systemic “macro-epigenetics," thus paving the way for targeted epigenetic regulation of CSCs through metabolic modulation including "smart foods" or systemic "metabolic nichotherapies." PMID:25738999

  6. Psychosocial and metabolic function by smoking status in individuals with binge eating disorder and obesity.

    PubMed

    Udo, Tomoko; White, Marney A; Barnes, Rachel D; Ivezaj, Valentina; Morgan, Peter; Masheb, Robin M; Grilo, Carlos M

    2016-02-01

    Individuals with binge eating disorder (BED) report smoking to control appetite and weight. Smoking in BED is associated with increased risk for comorbid psychiatric disorders, but its impact on psychosocial functioning and metabolic function has not been evaluated. Participants were 429 treatment-seeking adults (72.4% women; mean age 46.2±11.0years old) with BED comorbid with obesity. Participants were categorized into current smokers (n=66), former smokers (n=145), and never smokers (n=218). Smoking status was unrelated to most historical eating/weight variables and to current eating disorder psychopathology. Smoking status was associated with psychiatric, psychosocial, and metabolic functioning. Compared with never smokers, current smokers were more likely to meet lifetime diagnostic criteria for alcohol (OR=5.51 [95% CI=2.46-12.33]) and substance use disorders (OR=7.05 [95% CI=3.37-14.72]), poorer current physical quality of life, and increased risk for metabolic syndrome (OR=1.80 [95% CI=0.97-3.35]) and related metabolic risks (reduced HDL, elevated total cholesterol). On the other hand, the odds of meeting criteria for lifetime psychiatric comorbidity or metabolic abnormalities were not significantly greater in former smokers, relative to never smokers. Our findings suggest the importance of promoting smoking cessation in treatment-seeking patients with BED and obesity for its potential long-term implications for psychiatric and metabolic functioning.

  7. Comparison of the independent and combined effects of sub-chronic therapy with metformin and a stable GLP-1 receptor agonist on cognitive function, hippocampal synaptic plasticity and metabolic control in high-fat fed mice.

    PubMed

    Lennox, Rachael; Porter, David W; Flatt, Peter R; Holscher, Christian; Irwin, Nigel; Gault, Victor A

    2014-11-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is more common in individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Currently, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and metformin are important therapeutic options for patients with T2DM. However, their potential effects on cognitive function, including underlying mechanisms, are yet to be fully determined. We have compared the individual and combined effects of treatment for 20 days with (Val(8))GLP-1(GluPAL), an enzymatically stable GLP-1-receptor agonist, and metformin on metabolic control and aspects of learning and memory in high fat fed mice. (Val(8))GLP-1(GluPAL) treatment for 20 days alone, or in combination with metformin, improved (p < 0.05) the recognition index in high fat mice, indicating enhanced learning and memory. In addition, these mice exhibited a complete reversal of the deleterious effects of prolonged high-fat feeding on long-term potentiation in the hippocampal CA1 region. This was linked to reduced hippocampal levels of 8-oxoguanine (p < 0.01) and glial fibriallary acidic protein (p < 0.001), indicating decreased oxidative stress and inflammation; respectively. Expression of fundamental hippocampal genes including mTOR, VEGF, NTRK2 and SIRT1 was also increased significantly (p < 0.001) by all treatments. (Val(8))GLP-1(GluPAL) monotherapy, or in combination with metformin, reduced circulating glucose (p < 0.05) and increased insulin (p < 0.05 to p < 0.01) concentrations, as well as improving glucose tolerance (p < 0.001) and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (p < 0.05 to p < 0.01). Insulin sensitivity and measurements of energy regulation and metabolic rate were not altered. These studies highlight the neuroprotective properties of (Val(8))GLP-1(GluPAL), alone and in combination with metformin, in T2DM. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Control of oxidative sulfur metabolism in Chlorobium

    SciTech Connect

    Maka, A.

    1986-01-01

    The photosynthetic, anaerobic microorganism Chlorobium limicola forma sp. thiosulfatophilum is being investigated as a possible biocatalyst for the removal of acid gases (primarily H/sub 2/S) generated by the hydroprocessing of fossil fuels. The organism was grown in an anaerobic, fed-batch photobioreactor which was continuously supplied with N/sub 2/, CO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/S. The effect of light intensity, surface area of illuminated bioreactor, H/sub 2/S flow rate and various wavelength regions of light on oxidative sulfur metabolism by Chlorobium was examined. Light intensity, surface area of illuminated bioreactor, and H/sub 2/S flow rate regulated oxidative sulfur metabolism. The H/sub 2/S utilization rate increased with a corresponding increase in light intensity. The photoautotroph grew in any selected wavelength region with production of the various sulfur compounds, i.e., thiosulfate, sulfate, and sulfur. However, the rate of H/sub 2/S oxidation was wavelength dependent. The photosynthetic quantum efficiency (which is the molecules of sulfur (S/sup 0/) produced per photon utilized) was determined for this system. It is possible that the quantum efficiency can be used as a sufficiency factor for a photobioreactor. The sufficiency factor would be a unique characteristic of the reactor and demonstrate the relationship between light intensity and the rate of the light driven reaction. This sufficiency factor could be used for the determination of a light efficient photobioreactor.

  9. Trypanosoma brucei metabolism is under circadian control.

    PubMed

    Rijo-Ferreira, Filipa; Pinto-Neves, Daniel; Barbosa-Morais, Nuno L; Takahashi, Joseph S; Figueiredo, Luisa M

    2017-03-13

    The Earth's rotation forced life to evolve under cyclic day and night environmental changes. To anticipate such daily cycles, prokaryote and eukaryote free-living organisms evolved intrinsic clocks that regulate physiological and behavioural processes. Daily rhythms have been observed in organisms living within hosts, such as parasites. Whether parasites have intrinsic molecular clocks or whether they simply respond to host rhythmic physiological cues remains unknown. Here, we show that Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of human sleeping sickness, has an intrinsic circadian clock that regulates its metabolism in two different stages of the life cycle. We found that, in vitro, ∼10% of genes in T. brucei are expressed with a circadian rhythm. The maximum expression of these genes occurs at two different phases of the day and may depend on a post-transcriptional mechanism. Circadian genes are enriched in cellular metabolic pathways and coincide with two peaks of intracellular adenosine triphosphate concentration. Moreover, daily changes in the parasite population lead to differences in suramin sensitivity, a drug commonly used to treat this infection. These results demonstrate that parasites have an intrinsic circadian clock that is independent of the host, and which regulates parasite biology throughout the day.

  10. Cocoa flavanol consumption improves cognitive function, blood pressure control, and metabolic profile in elderly subjects: the Cocoa, Cognition, and Aging (CoCoA) Study—a randomized controlled trial1234

    PubMed Central

    Mastroiacovo, Daniela; Kwik-Uribe, Catherine; Grassi, Davide; Necozione, Stefano; Raffaele, Angelo; Pistacchio, Luana; Righetti, Roberta; Bocale, Raffaella; Lechiara, Maria Carmela; Marini, Carmine; Ferri, Claudio; Desideri, Giovambattista

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent evidence has indicated that flavanol consumption may have many health benefits in humans, including improved cognitive activities. Objective: The aim was to evaluate the effect of flavanol consumption on cognitive performance in cognitively intact elderly subjects. Design: This was a double-blind, controlled, parallel-arm study conducted in 90 elderly individuals without clinical evidence of cognitive dysfunction who were randomly assigned to consume daily for 8 wk a drink containing 993 mg [high flavanol (HF)], 520 mg [intermediate flavanol (IF)], or 48 mg [low flavanol (LF)] cocoa flavanols (CFs). Cognitive function was assessed at baseline and after 8 wk by using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), the Trail Making Test (TMT) A and B, and the Verbal Fluency Test (VFT). Results: The changes in MMSE score in response to the 3 different treatments were not different. In contrast, there was a positive impact of the intervention on specific aspects of cognitive function. Mean changes (±SEs) in the time required to complete the TMT A and B after consumption of the HF (−8.6 ± 0.4 and −16.5 ± 0.8 s, respectively) and IF (−6.7 ± 0.5 and −14.2 ± 0.5 s, respectively) drinks significantly (P < 0.0001) differed from that after consumption of the LF drinks (−0.8 ± 1.6 and −1.1 ± 0.7 s, respectively). Similarly, VFT scores significantly improved among all treatment groups, but the magnitude of improvement in the VFT score was significantly (P < 0.0001) greater in the HF group (7.7 ± 1.1 words/60 s) than in the IF (3.6 ± 1.2 words/60 s) and LF (1.3 ± 0.5 words/60 s) groups. Significantly different improvements in insulin resistance (P < 0.0001), blood pressure (P < 0.0001), and lipid peroxidation (P = 0.001) were also observed for the HF and IF groups in comparison with the LF group. Changes in insulin resistance explained ∼17% of changes in composite z score (partial r2 = 0.1703, P < 0.0001). Conclusions: This dietary

  11. Metabolic functions of FABPs— mechanisms and therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Hotamisligil, Gökhan S.; Bernlohr, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular and extracellular interactions with proteins enables the functional and mechanistic diversity of lipids. Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) were originally described as intracellular proteins that can affect lipid fluxes, metabolism and signalling within cells. As the functions of this protein family have been further elucidated, it has become evident that they are critical mediators of metabolism and inflammatory processes, both locally and systemically, and therefore are potential therapeutic targets for immunometabolic diseases. In particular, genetic deficiency and small molecule-mediated inhibition of FABP4 (also known as aP2) and FABP5 can potently improve glucose homeostasis and reduce atherosclerosis in mouse models. Further research has shown that in addition to their intracellular roles, some FABPs are found outside the cells, and FABP4 undergoes regulated, vesicular secretion. The circulating form of FABP4 has crucial hormonal functions in systemic metabolism. In this Review we discuss the roles and regulation of both intracellular and extracellular FABP actions, highlighting new insights that might direct drug discovery efforts and opportunities for management of chronic metabolic diseases. PMID:26260145

  12. Resistance Training Effects on Metabolic Function Among Youth: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Bea, Jennifer W; Blew, Robert M; Howe, Carol; Hetherington-Rauth, Megan; Going, Scott B

    2017-08-01

    This systematic review evaluates the relationship between resistance training and metabolic function in youth. PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, CINAHL, and ClinicalTrials. gov were searched for articles that (1): studied children (2); included resistance training (3); were randomized interventions; and (4) reported markers of metabolic function. The selected studies were analyzed using the Cochrane Risk-of-Bias Tool. Thirteen articles met inclusion criteria. Mean age ranged from 12.2 to 16.9 years, but most were limited to high school (n = 11) and overweight/obese (n = 12). Sample sizes (n = 22-304), session duration (40-60min), and intervention length (8-52 wks) varied. Exercise frequency was typically 2-3 d/wk. Resistance training was metabolically beneficial compared with control or resistance plus aerobic training in 5 studies overall and 3 out of the 4 studies with the fewest threats to bias (p ≤ .05); each was accompanied by beneficial changes in body composition, but only one study adjusted for change in body composition. Limited evidence suggests that resistance training may positively affect metabolic parameters in youth. Well-controlled resistance training interventions of varying doses are needed to definitively determine whether resistance training can mitigate metabolic dysfunction in youth and whether training benefits on metabolic parameters are independent of body composition changes.

  13. You Are What You Eat: Metabolic Control of Bacterial Division.

    PubMed

    Monahan, Leigh G; Harry, Elizabeth J

    2016-03-01

    Fluctuations in nutrient availability are a fact of life for bacterial cells in the 'wild'. To survive and compete, bacteria must rapidly modulate cell-cycle processes to accommodate changing nutritional conditions and concomitant changes in cell growth. Our understanding of how this is achieved has been transformed in recent years, with cellular metabolism emerging as a central player. Several metabolic enzymes, in addition to their normal catalytic functions, have been shown to directly modulate cell-cycle processes in response to changing nutrient levels. Here we focus on cell division, the final event in the bacterial cell cycle, and discuss recent compelling evidence connecting division regulation to nutritional status and metabolic activity.

  14. Control of Glutamine Metabolism By the Tumor Suppressor Rb

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Miriam R.; Lane, Andrew N.; Robertson, Brian; Kemp, Sharen; Liu, Yongqing; Hill, Bradford G.; Dean, Douglas C.; Clem, Brian F.

    2014-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (Rb) protein is a tumor suppressor that is dysregulated in a majority of human cancers. Rb functions to inhibit cell cycle progression in part by directly disabling the E2F family of cell cycle-promoting transcription factors. Because the de novo synthesis of multiple glutamine-derived anabolic precursors is required for cell cycle progression, we hypothesized that Rb also may directly regulate proteins involved in glutamine metabolism. We examined glutamine metabolism in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) isolated from mice that have triple knock-outs (TKO) of all three Rb family members (Rb-1, Rbl1, and Rbl2) and found that loss of global Rb function caused a marked increase in 13C-glutamine uptake and incorporation into glutamate and TCA cycle intermediates in part via upregulated expression of the glutamine transporter ASCT2 and the activity of glutaminase 1 (GLS1). The Rb-controlled transcription factor E2F-3 altered glutamine uptake by direct regulation of ASCT2 mRNA and protein expression, and E2F-3 was observed to associate with the ASCT2 promoter. We next examined the functional consequences of the observed increase in glutamine uptake and utilization and found that glutamine exposure potently increased oxygen consumption whereas glutamine deprivation selectively decreased ATP concentration in the Rb TKO MEFs but not the WT MEFs. In addition, TKO MEFs exhibited elevated production of glutathione from exogenous glutamine, and had increased expression of gamma-glutamylcysteine ligase relative to WT MEFs. Importantly, this metabolic shift towards glutamine utilization was required for the proliferation of Rb TKO MEFs but not for the proliferation of the WT MEFs. Last, addition of the TCA cycle intermediate α-ketoglutarate to the Rb TKO MEFs reversed the inhibitory effects of glutamine deprivation on ATP, GSH levels, and viability. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that the Rb/E2F cascade directly regulates a major energetic and

  15. Control of glutamine metabolism by the tumor suppressor Rb.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, M R; Lane, A N; Robertson, B; Kemp, S; Liu, Y; Hill, B G; Dean, D C; Clem, B F

    2014-01-30

    Retinoblastoma (Rb) protein is a tumor suppressor that is dysregulated in a majority of human cancers. Rb functions to inhibit cell cycle progression in part by directly disabling the E2F family of cell cycle-promoting transcription factors. Because the de novo synthesis of multiple glutamine-derived anabolic precursors is required for cell cycle progression, we hypothesized that Rb also may directly regulate proteins involved in glutamine metabolism. We examined glutamine metabolism in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) isolated from mice that have triple knock-outs (TKO) of all three Rb family members (Rb-1, Rbl1 and Rbl2) and found that loss of global Rb function caused a marked increase in (13)C-glutamine uptake and incorporation into glutamate and tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) intermediates in part via upregulated expression of the glutamine transporter ASCT2 and the activity of glutaminase 1 (GLS1). The Rb-controlled transcription factor E2F-3 altered glutamine uptake by direct regulation of ASCT2 mRNA and protein expression, and E2F-3 was observed to associate with the ASCT2 promoter. We next examined the functional consequences of the observed increase in glutamine uptake and utilization and found that glutamine exposure potently increased oxygen consumption, whereas glutamine deprivation selectively decreased ATP concentration in the Rb TKO MEFs but not the wild-type (WT) MEFs. In addition, TKO MEFs exhibited elevated production of glutathione from exogenous glutamine and had increased expression of gamma-glutamylcysteine ligase relative to WT MEFs. Importantly, this metabolic shift towards glutamine utilization was required for the proliferation of Rb TKO MEFs but not for the proliferation of the WT MEFs. Last, addition of the TCA cycle intermediate α-ketoglutarate to the Rb TKO MEFs reversed the inhibitory effects of glutamine deprivation on ATP, GSH levels and viability. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that the Rb/E2F cascade directly

  16. Insulin Action in Brain Regulates Systemic Metabolism and Brain Function

    PubMed Central

    Kleinridders, André; Ferris, Heather A.; Cai, Weikang

    2014-01-01

    Insulin receptors, as well as IGF-1 receptors and their postreceptor signaling partners, are distributed throughout the brain. Insulin acts on these receptors to modulate peripheral metabolism, including regulation of appetite, reproductive function, body temperature, white fat mass, hepatic glucose output, and response to hypoglycemia. Insulin signaling also modulates neurotransmitter channel activity, brain cholesterol synthesis, and mitochondrial function. Disruption of insulin action in the brain leads to impairment of neuronal function and synaptogenesis. In addition, insulin signaling modulates phosphorylation of tau protein, an early component in the development of Alzheimer disease. Thus, alterations in insulin action in the brain can contribute to metabolic syndrome, and the development of mood disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24931034

  17. Effect of Metabolic Syndrome on Mitsugumin 53 Expression and Function

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Zehua; Cui, Yuqi; Zhou, Xinyu; Zhou, Xuefeng; Zhang, Bo; Adesanya, T. M. Ayodele; Yi, Frank; Park, Ki Ho; Tan, Tao; Chen, Zhishui; Zhu, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors, such as obesity, insulin resistance, and hyperlipidemia that increases the individual’s likelihood of developing cardiovascular diseases. Patients inflicted with metabolic disorders also suffer from tissue repair defect. Mitsugumin 53 (MG53) is a protein essential to cellular membrane repair. It facilitates the nucleation of intracellular vesicles to sites of membrane disruption to create repair patches, contributing to the regenerative capacity of skeletal and cardiac muscle tissues upon injury. Since individuals suffering from metabolic syndrome possess tissue regeneration deficiency and MG53 plays a crucial role in restoring membrane integrity, we studied MG53 activity in mice models exhibiting metabolic disorders induced by a 6 month high-fat diet (HFD) feeding. Western blotting showed that MG53 expression is not altered within the skeletal and cardiac muscles of mice with metabolic syndrome. Rather, we found that MG53 levels in blood circulation were actually reduced. This data directly contradicts findings presented by Song et. al that indict MG53 as a causative factor for metabolic syndrome (Nature 494, 375-379). The diminished MG53 serum level observed may contribute to the inadequate tissue repair aptitude exhibited by diabetic patients. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analyses reveal that skeletal muscle fibers of mice with metabolic disorders experience localization of subcellular MG53 around mitochondria. This clustering may represent an adaptive response to oxidative stress resulting from HFD feeding and may implicate MG53 as a guardian to protect damaged mitochondria. Therapeutic approaches that elevate MG53 expression in serum circulation may be a novel method to treat the degenerative tissue repair function of diabetic patients. PMID:25950605

  18. Physiological Interactions of Nanoparticles in Energy Metabolism, Immune Function and Their Biosafety: A Review.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Antony; Sengupta, Jayeeta; Datta, Poulami; Ghosh, Sourav; Gomes, Aparna

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles owing to their unique physico-chemical properties have found its application in various biological processes, including metabolic pathways taking place within the body. This review tried to focus the involvement of nanoparticles in metabolic pathways and its influence in the energy metabolism, a fundamental criteria for the survival and physiological activity of living beings. The human body utilizes energy derived from food resources through a series of biochemical reactions involving several enzymes, co-factors (metals, non-metals, vitamins etc.) through the metabolic pathways (glycolysis, tri carboxylic acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, electron transport chain, etc.) in cellular system. Energy metabolism is also involved in the immune networking of the body for self defence and against pathophysiology. The immune system comprises of different cells and tissues, bioactive molecules for self defence and to fight against diseases. In the recent times, it has been reported through in vivo and in vitro studies that nanoparticles have direct influence on body's immune functions, and can modulate immunity by either suppressing or enhancing it. A comprehensive overview of nanoparticles and its involvement in immune function of the body in normal and pathophysiological conditions has been discussed. Considering these perspectives on nanoparticle interaction another important area which has been highlighted is the biosafety issues which are necessary before therapeutic applications. It is expected that development of physiologically compatible nanoparticles controlling energy metabolic processes, immune functions may show new dimension in the pathophysiology linked with energy and immunity.

  19. The skin function: a factor of anti-metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shi-Sheng; Li, Da; Zhou, Yi-Ming; Cao, Ji-Min

    2012-04-26

    The body's total antioxidant capacity represents a sum of the antioxidant capacity of various tissues/organs. A decrease in the body's antioxidant capacity may induce oxidative stress and subsequent metabolic syndrome, a clustering of risk factors for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The skin, the largest organ of the body, is one of the major components of the body's total antioxidant defense system, primarily through its xenobiotic/drug biotransformation system, reactive oxygen species-scavenging system, and sweat glands- and sebaceous glands-mediated excretion system. Notably, unlike other contributors, the skin contribution is variable, depending on lifestyles and ambient temperature or seasonal variations. Emerging evidence suggests that decreased skin's antioxidant and excretory functions (e.g., due to sedentary lifestyles and low ambient temperature) may increase the risk for metabolic syndrome. This review focuses on the relationship between the variability of skin-mediated detoxification and elimination of exogenous and endogenous toxic substances and the development of metabolic syndrome. The potential role of sebum secretion in lipid and cholesterol homeostasis and its impact on metabolic syndrome, and the association between skin disorders (acanthosis nigricans, acne, and burn) and metabolic syndrome are also discussed.

  20. The skin function: a factor of anti-metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The body’s total antioxidant capacity represents a sum of the antioxidant capacity of various tissues/organs. A decrease in the body’s antioxidant capacity may induce oxidative stress and subsequent metabolic syndrome, a clustering of risk factors for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The skin, the largest organ of the body, is one of the major components of the body’s total antioxidant defense system, primarily through its xenobiotic/drug biotransformation system, reactive oxygen species-scavenging system, and sweat glands- and sebaceous glands-mediated excretion system. Notably, unlike other contributors, the skin contribution is variable, depending on lifestyles and ambient temperature or seasonal variations. Emerging evidence suggests that decreased skin’s antioxidant and excretory functions (e.g., due to sedentary lifestyles and low ambient temperature) may increase the risk for metabolic syndrome. This review focuses on the relationship between the variability of skin-mediated detoxification and elimination of exogenous and endogenous toxic substances and the development of metabolic syndrome. The potential role of sebum secretion in lipid and cholesterol homeostasis and its impact on metabolic syndrome, and the association between skin disorders (acanthosis nigricans, acne, and burn) and metabolic syndrome are also discussed. PMID:22537765

  1. Cocoa flavanol consumption improves cognitive function, blood pressure control, and metabolic profile in elderly subjects: the Cocoa, Cognition, and Aging (CoCoA) Study--a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mastroiacovo, Daniela; Kwik-Uribe, Catherine; Grassi, Davide; Necozione, Stefano; Raffaele, Angelo; Pistacchio, Luana; Righetti, Roberta; Bocale, Raffaella; Lechiara, Maria Carmela; Marini, Carmine; Ferri, Claudio; Desideri, Giovambattista

    2015-03-01

    Recent evidence has indicated that flavanol consumption may have many health benefits in humans, including improved cognitive activities. The aim was to evaluate the effect of flavanol consumption on cognitive performance in cognitively intact elderly subjects. This was a double-blind, controlled, parallel-arm study conducted in 90 elderly individuals without clinical evidence of cognitive dysfunction who were randomly assigned to consume daily for 8 wk a drink containing 993 mg [high flavanol (HF)], 520 mg [intermediate flavanol (IF)], or 48 mg [low flavanol (LF)] cocoa flavanols (CFs). Cognitive function was assessed at baseline and after 8 wk by using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), the Trail Making Test (TMT) A and B, and the Verbal Fluency Test (VFT). The changes in MMSE score in response to the 3 different treatments were not different. In contrast, there was a positive impact of the intervention on specific aspects of cognitive function. Mean changes (±SEs) in the time required to complete the TMT A and B after consumption of the HF (-8.6 ± 0.4 and -16.5 ± 0.8 s, respectively) and IF (-6.7 ± 0.5 and -14.2 ± 0.5 s, respectively) drinks significantly (P < 0.0001) differed from that after consumption of the LF drinks (-0.8 ± 1.6 and -1.1 ± 0.7 s, respectively). Similarly, VFT scores significantly improved among all treatment groups, but the magnitude of improvement in the VFT score was significantly (P < 0.0001) greater in the HF group (7.7 ± 1.1 words/60 s) than in the IF (3.6 ± 1.2 words/60 s) and LF (1.3 ± 0.5 words/60 s) groups. Significantly different improvements in insulin resistance (P < 0.0001), blood pressure (P < 0.0001), and lipid peroxidation (P = 0.001) were also observed for the HF and IF groups in comparison with the LF group. Changes in insulin resistance explained ∼17% of changes in composite z score (partial r² = 0.1703, P < 0.0001). This dietary intervention study provides evidence that regular CF consumption can

  2. Adipocyte Metabolic Pathways Regulated by Diet Control the Female Germline Stem Cell Lineage in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Shinya; Armstrong, Alissa R; Sampson, Leesa L; Laws, Kaitlin M; Drummond-Barbosa, Daniela

    2017-06-01

    Nutrients affect adult stem cells through complex mechanisms involving multiple organs. Adipocytes are highly sensitive to diet and have key metabolic roles, and obesity increases the risk for many cancers. How diet-regulated adipocyte metabolic pathways influence normal stem cell lineages, however, remains unclear. Drosophila melanogaster has highly conserved adipocyte metabolism and a well-characterized female germline stem cell (GSC) lineage response to diet. Here, we conducted an isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) proteomic analysis to identify diet-regulated adipocyte metabolic pathways that control the female GSC lineage. On a rich (relative to poor) diet, adipocyte Hexokinase-C and metabolic enzymes involved in pyruvate/acetyl-CoA production are upregulated, promoting a shift of glucose metabolism toward macromolecule biosynthesis. Adipocyte-specific knockdown shows that these enzymes support early GSC progeny survival. Further, enzymes catalyzing fatty acid oxidation and phosphatidylethanolamine synthesis in adipocytes promote GSC maintenance, whereas lipid and iron transport from adipocytes controls vitellogenesis and GSC number, respectively. These results show a functional relationship between specific metabolic pathways in adipocytes and distinct processes in the GSC lineage, suggesting the adipocyte metabolism-stem cell link as an important area of investigation in other stem cell systems. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  3. Dietary Fiber Supplements: Effects in Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome and Relationship to Gastrointestinal Functions

    PubMed Central

    Papathanasopoulos, Athanasios; Camilleri, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Dietary fiber (DF) is a term that reflects to a heterogenous group of natural food sources, processed grains and commercial supplements. Several forms of DF have been used as complementary or alternative agents in the management of manifestations of the metabolic syndrome, including obesity. Not surprisingly, there is a great variation in the biological efficacy of DF in metabolic syndrome and body weight control. Diverse factors and mechanisms have been reported as mediators of the effects of DF on the metabolic syndrome and obesity. Among this array of mechanisms, the modulation of gastric sensorimotor influences appears to be crucial for the effects of DF, but also quite variable. This article focuses on the role, mechanism of action and benefits of different forms of fiber and supplements on obesity and metabolic syndrome, glycemia, dyslipidemia, cardiovascular risk, and explores the effects of DF on gastric sensorimotor function and satiety in mediating these actions of DF. PMID:19931537

  4. The metabolic control of schistosome egg production

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Edward J.; Huang, Stanley Ching-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a Neglected Tropical Disease caused by infection with trematode parasites of the genus Schistosoma. Despite ongoing treatment programs, the prevalence of schistosomiasis has failed to decline and the disease remains a cause of severe morbidity in millions of people. Understanding the biology of egg production by schistosomes is critical since eggs allow transmission of the infection, and when trapped in host tissues induce the immune responses that are responsible for the pathologic changes that underlie disease development. Unusually among trematodes, adult schistosomes exhibit sexual dimorphism and display a fascinating codependency in that the female is dependent on the male to grow and sexually mature. Thus virgin females are developmentally stunted compared to females from mixed-sex infections and are unable to lay eggs. Moreover, fecund female schistosomes rapidly lose the ability to produce eggs when placed in tissue culture. Here we discuss the metabolic regulation of egg production in schistosomes, and in particular the critical role played by fatty acid oxidation in this process. PMID:25850569

  5. [Nitrogen metabolism and its control mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Bergner, H

    1989-01-01

    N intake in the form of protein has neither got an upper nor a lower limit for agricultural working animals within a diet and there is no control mechanism for it. A high surplus of certain amino acids results in a reduction of feed intake. N excretion in faeces depends on 1) the excretion of N containing indigestible feedstuffs, 2) bacterial nitrogen synthesis in the large intestine and 3) the excretion of true endogenous N containing substances (digestion enzymes, intestinal epithelium, N containing endogenous secretion). There are no other control mechanisms for N excretion in faeces. N excretion in urine mainly comprises the nitrogen from the degeneration of amino acids and nucleic acids. The interrelations between urea, NH3, allantoin, creatine and creatinine, uric acid and hippuric acid depend on the species (monogastric or ruminants), on the nitrogen and N amount consumed and on the recycling ratio of the amino acids. The absolute amount of N excretion is not subject to any control mechanism, it depends on the intake of protein and NPN substances, the interim stages, however, which lead to the formation of excretory products, are intermediately controlled. The most important interim stage is protein biosynthesis, which is a fixed, intermediately controlled value in maintenance level. Under growth conditions only, the protein synthesis quota can exceed the protein degradation quota of the total organism (positive N balance). The control mechanisms of protein biosynthesis have, according to current knowledge, the following structure: Stimulation: 1) growth hormone (STH) stimulates protein synthesis by means of somatomedins; 2) hormones of the thyroid gland (T4 and T3) are controlled by the hormone stimulating the thyroid gland (TSH); 3) insulin. Inhibition: 1) somatostatin inhibits STH, TSH and insulin; 2) cortisol directly inhibits protein synthesis and stimulates protein degradation. The control mechanisms of protein turnover in addition to genetic coding

  6. A Comparison of the Effects of the GLP-1 Analogue Liraglutide and Insulin Glargine on Endothelial Function and Metabolic Parameters: A Randomized, Controlled Trial Sapporo Athero-Incretin Study 2 (SAIS2)

    PubMed Central

    Nomoto, Hiroshi; Miyoshi, Hideaki; Furumoto, Tomoo; Oba, Koji; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki; Miyoshi, Arina; Kondo, Takuma; Tsuchida, Kenichi; Atsumi, Tatsuya; Manda, Naoki; Kurihara, Yoshio; Aoki, Shin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives GLP-1 improves hyperglycemia, and it has been reported to have favorable effects on atherosclerosis. However, it has not been fully elucidated whether GLP-1 is able to improve endothelial function in patients with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, we investigated the efficacy of the GLP-1 analogue, liraglutide on endothelial function and glycemic metabolism compared with insulin glargine therapy. Materials and Methods In this multicenter, prospective randomized parallel-group comparison study, 31 diabetic outpatients (aged 60.3 ± 10.3 years with HbA1c levels of 8.6 ± 0.8%) with current metformin and/or sulfonylurea treatment were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive liraglutide or glargine therapy once daily for 14 weeks. Flow mediated dilation (FMD), a comprehensive panel of hemodynamic parameters (Task Force Monitor), and serum metabolic markers were assessed before and after the treatment period. Results A greater reduction (worsening) in %FMD was observed in the glargine group, although this change was not statistically different from the liraglutide group (liraglutide; 5.7 to 5.4%, glargine 6.7 to 5.7%). The augmentation index, C-peptide index, derivatives of reactive oxygen metabolites and BMI were significantly improved in the liraglutide group. Central systolic blood pressure and NT-proBNP also tended to be improved in the liraglutide-treated group, while improvements in HbA1c levels were similar between groups. Cardiac index, blood pressure and most other metabolic parameters were not different. Conclusions Regardless of glycemic improvement, early liraglutide therapy did not affect endothelial function but may provide favorable effects on beta-cell function and cardioprotection in type 2 diabetics without advanced atherosclerosis. Trial Registration UMIN Clinical Trials Registry System as trial ID UMIN000005331. PMID:26284918

  7. Bile acids, farnesoid X receptor, atherosclerosis and metabolic control.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, Folkert; Stroeve, Johanna H M; Caron, Sandrine; Staels, Bart

    2007-06-01

    Bile acids are amphiphilic molecules synthesized from cholesterol exclusively in the liver that are essential for effective absorption of dietary fat. In addition to this 'classical role', bile acids act as signalling molecules that control their own metabolism by activating the nuclear receptor, farnesoid X receptor. Recent work demonstrates that farnesoid X receptor exerts metabolic control beyond bile acid homeostasis, notably effects on HDL, triglyceride and glucose metabolism. Farnesoid X receptor influences insulin sensitivity of tissues that are not part of the enterohepatic circulation, for example, adipose tissue. Certain metabolic effects in the liver appear to be mediated via farnesoid X receptor-stimulated release of an intestinal growth factor. In addition, novel signalling pathways independent of farnesoid X receptor have been identified that may contribute to bile acid-mediated metabolic regulation. Farnesoid X receptor represents a potentially attractive target for treatment of various aspects of the metabolic syndrome and for prevention of atherosclerosis. Yet, in view of its pleiotropic effects and apparent species-specificity, it is evident that successful interference of the farnesoid X receptor signalling system will require the development of gene-specific and/or organ-specific farnesoid X receptor modulators and extensive testing in human models of disease.

  8. Functional analysis of colonic bacterial metabolism: relevant to health?

    PubMed Central

    Hamer, Henrike M.; De Preter, Vicky; Windey, Karen

    2012-01-01

    With the use of molecular techniques, numerous studies have evaluated the composition of the intestinal microbiota in health and disease. However, it is of major interest to supplement this with a functional analysis of the microbiota. In this review, the different approaches that have been used to characterize microbial metabolites, yielding information on the functional end products of microbial metabolism, have been summarized. To analyze colonic microbial metabolites, the most conventional way is by application of a hypothesis-driven targeted approach, through quantification of selected metabolites from carbohydrate (e.g., short-chain fatty acids) and protein fermentation (e.g., p-cresol, phenol, ammonia, or H2S), secondary bile acids, or colonic enzymes. The application of stable isotope-labeled substrates can provide an elegant solution to study these metabolic pathways in vivo. On the other hand, a top-down approach can be followed by applying metabolite fingerprinting techniques based on 1H-NMR or mass spectrometric analysis. Quantification of known metabolites and characterization of metabolite patterns in urine, breath, plasma, and fecal samples can reveal new pathways and give insight into physiological regulatory processes of the colonic microbiota. In addition, specific metabolic profiles can function as a diagnostic tool for the identification of several gastrointestinal diseases, such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Nevertheless, future research will have to evaluate the relevance of associations between metabolites and different disease states. PMID:22016433

  9. Functional analysis of colonic bacterial metabolism: relevant to health?

    PubMed

    Hamer, Henrike M; De Preter, Vicky; Windey, Karen; Verbeke, Kristin

    2012-01-01

    With the use of molecular techniques, numerous studies have evaluated the composition of the intestinal microbiota in health and disease. However, it is of major interest to supplement this with a functional analysis of the microbiota. In this review, the different approaches that have been used to characterize microbial metabolites, yielding information on the functional end products of microbial metabolism, have been summarized. To analyze colonic microbial metabolites, the most conventional way is by application of a hypothesis-driven targeted approach, through quantification of selected metabolites from carbohydrate (e.g., short-chain fatty acids) and protein fermentation (e.g., p-cresol, phenol, ammonia, or H(2)S), secondary bile acids, or colonic enzymes. The application of stable isotope-labeled substrates can provide an elegant solution to study these metabolic pathways in vivo. On the other hand, a top-down approach can be followed by applying metabolite fingerprinting techniques based on (1)H-NMR or mass spectrometric analysis. Quantification of known metabolites and characterization of metabolite patterns in urine, breath, plasma, and fecal samples can reveal new pathways and give insight into physiological regulatory processes of the colonic microbiota. In addition, specific metabolic profiles can function as a diagnostic tool for the identification of several gastrointestinal diseases, such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Nevertheless, future research will have to evaluate the relevance of associations between metabolites and different disease states.

  10. Cell size control - a mechanism for maintaining fitness and function.

    PubMed

    Miettinen, Teemu P; Caldez, Matias J; Kaldis, Philipp; Björklund, Mikael

    2017-09-01

    The maintenance of cell size homeostasis has been studied for years in different cellular systems. With the focus on 'what regulates cell size', the question 'why cell size needs to be maintained' has been largely overlooked. Recent evidence indicates that animal cells exhibit nonlinear cell size dependent growth rates and mitochondrial metabolism, which are maximal in intermediate sized cells within each cell population. Increases in intracellular distances and changes in the relative cell surface area impose biophysical limitations on cells, which can explain why growth and metabolic rates are maximal in a specific cell size range. Consistently, aberrant increases in cell size, for example through polyploidy, are typically disadvantageous to cellular metabolism, fitness and functionality. Accordingly, cellular hypertrophy can potentially predispose to or worsen metabolic diseases. We propose that cell size control may have emerged as a guardian of cellular fitness and metabolic activity. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Controllability in cancer metabolic networks according to drug targets as driver nodes.

    PubMed

    Asgari, Yazdan; Salehzadeh-Yazdi, Ali; Schreiber, Falk; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Networks are employed to represent many nonlinear complex systems in the real world. The topological aspects and relationships between the structure and function of biological networks have been widely studied in the past few decades. However dynamic and control features of complex networks have not been widely researched, in comparison to topological network features. In this study, we explore the relationship between network controllability, topological parameters, and network medicine (metabolic drug targets). Considering the assumption that targets of approved anticancer metabolic drugs are driver nodes (which control cancer metabolic networks), we have applied topological analysis to genome-scale metabolic models of 15 normal and corresponding cancer cell types. The results show that besides primary network parameters, more complex network metrics such as motifs and clusters may also be appropriate for controlling the systems providing the controllability relationship between topological parameters and drug targets. Consequently, this study reveals the possibilities of following a set of driver nodes in network clusters instead of considering them individually according to their centralities. This outcome suggests considering distributed control systems instead of nodal control for cancer metabolic networks, leading to a new strategy in the field of network medicine.

  12. Controllability in Cancer Metabolic Networks According to Drug Targets as Driver Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Asgari, Yazdan; Salehzadeh-Yazdi, Ali; Schreiber, Falk; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Networks are employed to represent many nonlinear complex systems in the real world. The topological aspects and relationships between the structure and function of biological networks have been widely studied in the past few decades. However dynamic and control features of complex networks have not been widely researched, in comparison to topological network features. In this study, we explore the relationship between network controllability, topological parameters, and network medicine (metabolic drug targets). Considering the assumption that targets of approved anticancer metabolic drugs are driver nodes (which control cancer metabolic networks), we have applied topological analysis to genome-scale metabolic models of 15 normal and corresponding cancer cell types. The results show that besides primary network parameters, more complex network metrics such as motifs and clusters may also be appropriate for controlling the systems providing the controllability relationship between topological parameters and drug targets. Consequently, this study reveals the possibilities of following a set of driver nodes in network clusters instead of considering them individually according to their centralities. This outcome suggests considering distributed control systems instead of nodal control for cancer metabolic networks, leading to a new strategy in the field of network medicine. PMID:24282504

  13. Metabolic functions of glucocorticoid receptor in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Taiyi; Harris, Charles A; Wang, Jen-Chywan

    2013-11-05

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) exert key metabolic influences on skeletal muscle. GCs increase protein degradation and decrease protein synthesis. The released amino acids are mobilized from skeletal muscle to liver, where they serve as substrates for hepatic gluconeogenesis. This metabolic response is critical for mammals' survival under stressful conditions, such as fasting and starvation. GCs suppress insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and utilization and glycogen synthesis, and play a permissive role for catecholamine-induced glycogenolysis, thus preserving the level of circulating glucose, the major energy source for the brain. However, chronic or excess exposure of GCs can induce muscle atrophy and insulin resistance. GCs convey their signal mainly through the intracellular glucocorticoid receptor (GR). While GR can act through different mechanisms, one of its major actions is to regulate the transcription of its primary target genes through genomic glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) by directly binding to DNA or tethering onto other DNA-binding transcription factors. These GR primary targets trigger physiological and pathological responses of GCs. Much progress has been made to understand how GCs regulate protein and glucose metabolism. In this review, we will discuss how GR primary target genes confer metabolic functions of GCs, and the mechanisms governing the transcriptional regulation of these targets. Comprehending these processes not only contributes to the fundamental understanding of mammalian physiology, but also will provide invaluable insight for improved GC therapeutics.

  14. Detection of driver metabolites in the human liver metabolic network using structural controllability analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Abnormal states in human liver metabolism are major causes of human liver diseases ranging from hepatitis to hepatic tumor. The accumulation in relevant data makes it feasible to derive a large-scale human liver metabolic network (HLMN) and to discover important biological principles or drug-targets based on network analysis. Some studies have shown that interesting biological phenomenon and drug-targets could be discovered by applying structural controllability analysis (which is a newly prevailed concept in networks) to biological networks. The exploration on the connections between structural controllability theory and the HLMN could be used to uncover valuable information on the human liver metabolism from a fresh perspective. Results We applied structural controllability analysis to the HLMN and detected driver metabolites. The driver metabolites tend to have strong ability to influence the states of other metabolites and weak susceptibility to be influenced by the states of others. In addition, the metabolites were classified into three classes: critical, high-frequency and low-frequency driver metabolites. Among the identified 36 critical driver metabolites, 27 metabolites were found to be essential; the high-frequency driver metabolites tend to participate in different metabolic pathways, which are important in regulating the whole metabolic systems. Moreover, we explored some other possible connections between the structural controllability theory and the HLMN, and find that transport reactions and the environment play important roles in the human liver metabolism. Conclusion There are interesting connections between the structural controllability theory and the human liver metabolism: driver metabolites have essential biological functions; the crucial role of extracellular metabolites and transport reactions in controlling the HLMN highlights the importance of the environment in the health of human liver metabolism. PMID:24885538

  15. Insulin receptor substrate signaling controls cardiac energy metabolism and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Guo, Cathy A; Guo, Shaodong

    2017-06-01

    The heart is an insulin-dependent and energy-consuming organ in which insulin and nutritional signaling integrates to the regulation of cardiac metabolism, growth and survival. Heart failure is highly associated with insulin resistance, and heart failure patients suffer from the cardiac energy deficiency and structural and functional dysfunction. Chronic pathological conditions, such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus, involve various mechanisms in promoting heart failure by remodeling metabolic pathways, modulating cardiac energetics and impairing cardiac contractility. Recent studies demonstrated that insulin receptor substrates 1 and 2 (IRS-1,-2) are major mediators of both insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signaling responsible for myocardial energetics, structure, function and organismal survival. Importantly, the insulin receptor substrates (IRS) play an important role in the activation of the phosphatidylinositide-3-dependent kinase (PI-3K) that controls Akt and Foxo1 signaling cascade, regulating the mitochondrial function, cardiac energy metabolism and the renin-angiotensin system. Dysregulation of this branch in signaling cascades by insulin resistance in the heart through the endocrine system promotes heart failure, providing a novel mechanism for diabetic cardiomyopathy. Therefore, targeting this branch of IRS→PI-3K→Foxo1 signaling cascade and associated pathways may provide a fundamental strategy for the therapeutic and nutritional development in control of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we focus on insulin signaling and resistance in the heart and the role energetics play in cardiac metabolism, structure and function. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  16. Sialic acid metabolism and sialyltransferases: natural functions and applications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanhong

    2012-01-01

    Sialic acids are a family of negatively charged monosaccharides which are commonly presented as the terminal residues in glycans of the glycoconjugates on eukaryotic cell surface or as components of capsular polysaccharides or lipooligosaccharides of some pathogenic bacteria. Due to their important biological and pathological functions, the biosynthesis, activation, transfer, breaking down, and recycle of sialic acids are attracting increasing attention. The understanding of the sialic acid metabolism in eukaryotes and bacteria leads to the development of metabolic engineering approaches for elucidating the important functions of sialic acid in mammalian systems and for large-scale production of sialosides using engineered bacterial cells. As the key enzymes in biosynthesis of sialylated structures, sialyltransferases have been continuously identified from various sources and characterized. Protein crystal structures of seven sialyltransferases have been reported. Wild-type sialyltransferases and their mutants have been applied with or without other sialoside biosynthetic enzymes for producing complex sialic acid-containing oligosaccharides and glycoconjugates. This mini-review focuses on current understanding and applications of sialic acid metabolism and sialyltransferases. PMID:22526796

  17. Brain glycogen—new perspectives on its metabolic function and regulation at the subcellular level

    PubMed Central

    Obel, Linea F.; Müller, Margit S.; Walls, Anne B.; Sickmann, Helle M.; Bak, Lasse K.; Waagepetersen, Helle S.; Schousboe, Arne

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen is a complex glucose polymer found in a variety of tissues, including brain, where it is localized primarily in astrocytes. The small quantity found in brain compared to e.g., liver has led to the understanding that brain glycogen is merely used during hypoglycemia or ischemia. In this review evidence is brought forward highlighting what has been an emerging understanding in brain energy metabolism: that glycogen is more than just a convenient way to store energy for use in emergencies—it is a highly dynamic molecule with versatile implications in brain function, i.e., synaptic activity and memory formation. In line with the great spatiotemporal complexity of the brain and thereof derived focus on the basis for ensuring the availability of the right amount of energy at the right time and place, we here encourage a closer look into the molecular and subcellular mechanisms underlying glycogen metabolism. Based on (1) the compartmentation of the interconnected second messenger pathways controlling glycogen metabolism (calcium and cAMP), (2) alterations in the subcellular location of glycogen-associated enzymes and proteins induced by the metabolic status and (3) a sequential component in the intermolecular mechanisms of glycogen metabolism, we suggest that glycogen metabolism in astrocytes is compartmentalized at the subcellular level. As a consequence, the meaning and importance of conventional terms used to describe glycogen metabolism (e.g., turnover) is challenged. Overall, this review represents an overview of contemporary knowledge about brain glycogen and its metabolism and function. However, it also has a sharp focus on what we do not know, which is perhaps even more important for the future quest of uncovering the roles of glycogen in brain physiology and pathology. PMID:22403540

  18. Control of mitochondrial metabolism and systemic energy homeostasis by microRNAs 378 and 378*

    PubMed Central

    Carrer, Michele; Liu, Ning; Grueter, Chad E.; Williams, Andrew H.; Frisard, Madlyn I.; Hulver, Matthew W.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity and metabolic syndrome are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and deranged regulation of metabolic genes. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1β (PGC-1β) is a transcriptional coactivator that regulates metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis through stimulation of nuclear hormone receptors and other transcription factors. We report that the PGC-1β gene encodes two microRNAs (miRNAs), miR-378 and miR-378*, which counterbalance the metabolic actions of PGC-1β. Mice genetically lacking miR-378 and miR-378* are resistant to high-fat diet-induced obesity and exhibit enhanced mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism and elevated oxidative capacity of insulin-target tissues. Among the many targets of these miRNAs, carnitine O-acetyltransferase, a mitochondrial enzyme involved in fatty acid metabolism, and MED13, a component of the Mediator complex that controls nuclear hormone receptor activity, are repressed by miR-378 and miR-378*, respectively, and are elevated in the livers of miR-378/378* KO mice. Consistent with these targets as contributors to the metabolic actions of miR-378 and miR-378*, previous studies have implicated carnitine O-acetyltransferase and MED13 in metabolic syndrome and obesity. Our findings identify miR-378 and miR-378* as integral components of a regulatory circuit that functions under conditions of metabolic stress to control systemic energy homeostasis and the overall oxidative capacity of insulin target tissues. Thus, these miRNAs provide potential targets for pharmacologic intervention in obesity and metabolic syndrome. PMID:22949648

  19. Triacylglycerol Metabolism, Function, and Accumulation in Plant Vegetative Tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Changcheng; Shanklin, John

    2016-02-03

    One of the most abundant energy-dense storage compounds in eukaryotes are oils in the form of triacylglycerols , and their metabolism plays a key role in cellular energy balance, lipid homeostasis, growth, and maintenance. Plants accumulate oils primarily in seeds and fruits. Moreover, plant oils are used for food and feed and, increasingly, as feedstocks for biodiesel and industrial chemicals. Although plant vegetative tissues do not accumulate significant levels of triacylglycerols, they possess a high capacity for their synthesis, storage, and metabolism. The development of plants that accumulate oil in vegetative tissues presents an opportunity for expanded production of triacylglycerols as a renewable and sustainable bioenergy source. We review recent progress in the understanding of triacylglycerol synthesis, turnover, storage, and function in leaves and discuss emerging genetic engineering strategies targeted at enhancing triacylglycerol accumulation in biomass crops. Such plants could potentially be modified to produce oleochemical feedstocks or nutraceuticals.

  20. Triacylglycerol Metabolism, Function, and Accumulation in Plant Vegetative Tissues

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Changcheng; Shanklin, John

    2016-02-03

    One of the most abundant energy-dense storage compounds in eukaryotes are oils in the form of triacylglycerols , and their metabolism plays a key role in cellular energy balance, lipid homeostasis, growth, and maintenance. Plants accumulate oils primarily in seeds and fruits. Moreover, plant oils are used for food and feed and, increasingly, as feedstocks for biodiesel and industrial chemicals. Although plant vegetative tissues do not accumulate significant levels of triacylglycerols, they possess a high capacity for their synthesis, storage, and metabolism. The development of plants that accumulate oil in vegetative tissues presents an opportunity for expanded production of triacylglycerolsmore » as a renewable and sustainable bioenergy source. We review recent progress in the understanding of triacylglycerol synthesis, turnover, storage, and function in leaves and discuss emerging genetic engineering strategies targeted at enhancing triacylglycerol accumulation in biomass crops. Such plants could potentially be modified to produce oleochemical feedstocks or nutraceuticals.« less

  1. The evolution, metabolism and functions of the apicoplast

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Liting; McFadden, Geoffrey Ian

    2010-01-01

    The malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, harbours a relict plastid known as the ‘apicoplast’. The discovery of the apicoplast ushered in an exciting new prospect for drug development against the parasite. The eubacterial ancestry of the organelle offers a wealth of opportunities for the development of therapeutic interventions. Morphological, biochemical and bioinformatic studies of the apicoplast have further reinforced its ‘plant-like’ characteristics and potential as a drug target. However, we are still not sure why the apicoplast is essential for the parasite's survival. This review explores the origins and metabolic functions of the apicoplast. In an attempt to decipher the role of the organelle within the parasite we also take a closer look at the transporters decorating the plastid to better understand the metabolic exchanges between the apicoplast and the rest of the parasite cell. PMID:20124342

  2. Controlling Cell Function with Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrksich, Milan

    2012-02-01

    This presentation will describe the use of patterned substrates to control cell shape with examples that illustrate the ways in which cell shape can regulate cell function. Most cells are adherent and must attach to and spread on a surface in order to survive, proliferate and function. In tissue, this surface is the extracellular matrix (ECM), an insoluble scaffold formed by the assembly of several large proteins---including fibronectin, the laminins and collagens and others---but in the laboratory, the surface is prepared by adsorbing protein to glass slides. To pattern cells, gold-coated slides are patterned with microcontact printing to create geometric features that promote cell attachment and that are surrounded by inert regions. Cells attach to these substrates and spread to adopt the shape defined by the underlying pattern and remain stable in culture for several days. Examples will be described that used a series of shapes to reveal the relationship between the shape of the cell and the structure of its cytoskeleton. These geometric cues were used to control cell polarity and the tension, or contractility, present in the cytoskeleton. These rules were further used to control the shapes of mesenchymal stem cells and in turn to control the differentiation of these cells into specialized cell types. For example, stem cells that were patterned into a ``star'' shape preferentially differentiated into bone cells whereas those that were patterned into a ``flower'' shape preferred a fat cell fate. These influences of shape on differentiation depend on the mechanical properties of the cytoskeleton. These examples, and others, reveal that shape is an important cue that informs cell function and that can be combined with the more common soluble cues to direct and study cell function.

  3. Physiology and genetics of metabolic flux control in Zymomonas mobilis

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, T.

    1992-01-01

    This work seeks to understand the role of gene expression in regulating glycolytic enzyme synthesis in a balance that allows proper glycoltic flux control. The seven genes targeted for study in this laboratory have been cloned and sequenced, and molecular details of regulation have been investigated. Clear that glycolytic enzyme synthesis is coordinated to prevent the build up of toxic metabolic intermediates. The genetic mechanisms responsible for regulating balanced expression of the EntnerDoudoroff and glycolytic genes in Z. mobilis are beginning to be understood. Several layers of genetic control, perhaps in a hierarchal arrangement act in concert to determine the relative abundance of the glycolytic enzymes. These genetic controls involve differential translational efficiency, highly conserved promoter sequences, transcription factors, differential mRNA stabilities, and nucleolytic mRNA processing. The serendipitous cloning of the glucose facilitator, glf, as a result of linkage to several other genes of interest will have a significant impact on the study of Z. mobilis metabolism. The glucose facilitator is being characterized in a genetically reconstituted system in E. coli. Molecular genetic studies indicate that the ratio of glf expression to that of glk, zmf, and edd is carefully regulated, and suggests a critical role in metabolic control. Regulation of glycolytic gene expression is now sufficiently well understood to allow use of the glycolytic genes as tools to manipulate specified enzyme levels for the purpose of analyzing metabolic flux control. The critical genes have been subcloned for stable expression in Z. mobilis and placed under control of a regulated promoter system involving the tac promoter, the lacI repressor, and gene induction in by IPTG. HPLC methods have been developed that allow quantitation of virtually all of the metabolic intermediates in the cell pool.

  4. The human NAD metabolome: Functions, metabolism and compartmentalization

    PubMed Central

    Nikiforov, Andrey; Kulikova, Veronika; Ziegler, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The metabolism of NAD has emerged as a key regulator of cellular and organismal homeostasis. Being a major component of both bioenergetic and signaling pathways, the molecule is ideally suited to regulate metabolism and major cellular events. In humans, NAD is synthesized from vitamin B3 precursors, most prominently from nicotinamide, which is the degradation product of all NAD-dependent signaling reactions. The scope of NAD-mediated regulatory processes is wide including enzyme regulation, control of gene expression and health span, DNA repair, cell cycle regulation and calcium signaling. In these processes, nicotinamide is cleaved from NAD+ and the remaining ADP-ribosyl moiety used to modify proteins (deacetylation by sirtuins or ADP-ribosylation) or to generate calcium-mobilizing agents such as cyclic ADP-ribose. This review will also emphasize the role of the intermediates in the NAD metabolome, their intra- and extra-cellular conversions and potential contributions to subcellular compartmentalization of NAD pools. PMID:25837229

  5. The human NAD metabolome: Functions, metabolism and compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Nikiforov, Andrey; Kulikova, Veronika; Ziegler, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    The metabolism of NAD has emerged as a key regulator of cellular and organismal homeostasis. Being a major component of both bioenergetic and signaling pathways, the molecule is ideally suited to regulate metabolism and major cellular events. In humans, NAD is synthesized from vitamin B3 precursors, most prominently from nicotinamide, which is the degradation product of all NAD-dependent signaling reactions. The scope of NAD-mediated regulatory processes is wide including enzyme regulation, control of gene expression and health span, DNA repair, cell cycle regulation and calcium signaling. In these processes, nicotinamide is cleaved from NAD(+) and the remaining ADP-ribosyl moiety used to modify proteins (deacetylation by sirtuins or ADP-ribosylation) or to generate calcium-mobilizing agents such as cyclic ADP-ribose. This review will also emphasize the role of the intermediates in the NAD metabolome, their intra- and extra-cellular conversions and potential contributions to subcellular compartmentalization of NAD pools.

  6. Phenylalanine control and family functioning in early-treated phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Reber, M; Kazak, A E; Himmelberg, P

    1987-12-01

    The association between effective metabolic control and patients' intelligence test performance and behavior in phenylketonuria (PKU) has been demonstrated frequently. The present study reexamined this relationship in a population of 41 young children with early-treated PKU, and added a dimension of family investigation to determine relationships between dietary phenylalanine control and patient functioning, family functioning and phenylalanine control, and family functioning and patient functioning. Significant correlations were found between concurrent phenylalanine control and patients' intelligence test scores, and lifetime phenylalanine control and patients' social competence. Parent-report measures of family psychological adjustment, stress, interaction, and socioeconomic status showed no significant association with children's dietary phenylalanine control. Family cohesion and adaptability correlated positively with patients' cognitive performance. Results support a policy of diet continuation in PKU, and suggest that family interaction patterns influence patient functioning. Longitudinal study of family factors in PKU is indicated.

  7. Association of altered cardiac autonomic function with psychopathology and metabolic profiles in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ming-Shun; Yang, Albert C; Lin, Yu-Chung; Lin, Chieh-Nan; Chang, Fang-Rong; Shen, Shu-hua; Ouyang, Wen-Chen; Loh, El-Wui; Chiu, Hsien-Jane

    2013-12-30

    Schizophrenia has been associated with autonomic dysregulation and increased cardiovascular co-morbidity. We hypothesised that autonomic dysregulation in patients with schizophrenia is associated with psychopathology and metabolic profiles. In this study, we aimed to evaluate psychopathology, comprehensive metabolic profiles and cardiac autonomic function using heart-rate variability (HRV) analysis in patients with schizophrenia. A total of 94 patients with schizophrenia and 51 healthy controls were recruited. Each patient underwent a physical examination, laboratory tests and rating scale evaluation, and all subjects underwent a 1-h electrocardiogram monitoring. Analysis of variance was used to compare demographic and HRV variables between control and patient groups. We applied multiple regression analysis with backward selection to examine the association between HRV indices and demographic, metabolic and psychopathology profiles. A decreased HRV was found in patient groups, compared to controls. Reduced vagal-related and complexity domain of HRV indices in patient groups were correlated with increased body mass indices, diastolic pressure, triglycerides, high- and low-density lipoprotein and severity of psychosis mainly in the negative symptom domain. This study provides evidence that altered autonomic function is associated with both psychopathology and metabolic profiles in patients with schizophrenia. These findings may warrant future research in using HRV as objective markers to monitor cardiovascular health and the severity of psychosis in patients with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Investigating Metabolic Control of Persister Formation in Biofilms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    in which the microenvironment of encased bacteria changes considerably as the film matures2-4. We hypothesized that metabolic transitions generate...and MG1655 carrying pUA66 as a control. The bacteria were assayed with a laser emitting at 488nm for GFP, and green fluorescence was collected by 525...0.05. Results and Discussion Establishment of a method to exogenously control carbon source availability in colony biofilms Bacteria can

  9. Hypothalamic control of hepatic lipid metabolism via the autonomic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Bruinstroop, Eveline; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2014-10-01

    Our body is well designed to store energy in times of nutrient excess, and release energy in times of food deprivation. This adaptation to the external environment is achieved by humoral factors and the autonomic nervous system. Claude Bernard, in the 19th century, showed the importance of the autonomic nervous system in the control of glucose metabolism. In the 20th century, the discovery of insulin and the development of techniques to measure hormone concentrations shifted the focus from the neural control of metabolism to the secretion of hormones, thus functionally "decapitating" the body. Just before the end of the 20th century, starting with the discovery of leptin in 1994, the control of energy metabolism went back to our heads. Since the start of 21st century, numerous studies have reported the involvement of hypothalamic pathways in the control of hepatic insulin sensitivity and glucose production. The autonomic nervous system is, therefore, acknowledged to be one of the important determinants of liver metabolism and a possible treatment target. In this chapter, we review research to date on the hypothalamic control of hepatic lipid metabolism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Resveratrol supplementation does not improve metabolic function in nonobese women with normal glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Jun; Conte, Caterina; Fontana, Luigi; Mittendorfer, Bettina; Imai, Shin-ichiro; Schechtman, Kenneth B; Gu, Charles; Kunz, Iris; Rossi Fanelli, Filippo; Patterson, Bruce W; Klein, Samuel

    2012-11-07

    Resveratrol has been reported to improve metabolic function in metabolically abnormal rodents and humans, but it has not been studied in nonobese people with normal glucose tolerance. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the metabolic effects of 12 weeks of resveratrol supplementation (75 mg/day) in nonobese, postmenopausal women with normal glucose tolerance. Although resveratrol supplementation increased plasma resveratrol concentration, it did not change body composition, resting metabolic rate, plasma lipids, or inflammatory markers. A two-stage hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp procedure, in conjunction with stable isotopically labeled tracer infusions, demonstrated that resveratrol did not increase liver, skeletal muscle, or adipose tissue insulin sensitivity. Consistent with the absence of in vivo metabolic effects, resveratrol did not affect its putative molecular targets, including AMPK, SIRT1, NAMPT, and PPARGC1A, in either skeletal muscle or adipose tissue. These findings demonstrate that resveratrol supplementation does not have beneficial metabolic effects in nonobese, postmenopausal women with normal glucose tolerance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Akt-mTORC1 signaling regulates Acly to integrate metabolic input to control of macrophage activation

    PubMed Central

    Covarrubias, Anthony J; Aksoylar, Halil Ibrahim; Yu, Jiujiu; Snyder, Nathaniel W; Worth, Andrew J; Iyer, Shankar S; Wang, Jiawei; Ben-Sahra, Issam; Byles, Vanessa; Polynne-Stapornkul, Tiffany; Espinosa, Erika C; Lamming, Dudley; Manning, Brendan D; Zhang, Yijing; Blair, Ian A; Horng, Tiffany

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage activation/polarization to distinct functional states is critically supported by metabolic shifts. How polarizing signals coordinate metabolic and functional reprogramming, and the potential implications for control of macrophage activation, remains poorly understood. Here we show that IL-4 signaling co-opts the Akt-mTORC1 pathway to regulate Acly, a key enzyme in Ac-CoA synthesis, leading to increased histone acetylation and M2 gene induction. Only a subset of M2 genes is controlled in this way, including those regulating cellular proliferation and chemokine production. Moreover, metabolic signals impinge on the Akt-mTORC1 axis for such control of M2 activation. We propose that Akt-mTORC1 signaling calibrates metabolic state to energetically demanding aspects of M2 activation, which may define a new role for metabolism in supporting macrophage activation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11612.001 PMID:26894960

  12. Akt-mTORC1 signaling regulates Acly to integrate metabolic input to control of macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Covarrubias, Anthony J; Aksoylar, Halil Ibrahim; Yu, Jiujiu; Snyder, Nathaniel W; Worth, Andrew J; Iyer, Shankar S; Wang, Jiawei; Ben-Sahra, Issam; Byles, Vanessa; Polynne-Stapornkul, Tiffany; Espinosa, Erika C; Lamming, Dudley; Manning, Brendan D; Zhang, Yijing; Blair, Ian A; Horng, Tiffany

    2016-02-19

    Macrophage activation/polarization to distinct functional states is critically supported by metabolic shifts. How polarizing signals coordinate metabolic and functional reprogramming, and the potential implications for control of macrophage activation, remains poorly understood. Here we show that IL-4 signaling co-opts the Akt-mTORC1 pathway to regulate Acly, a key enzyme in Ac-CoA synthesis, leading to increased histone acetylation and M2 gene induction. Only a subset of M2 genes is controlled in this way, including those regulating cellular proliferation and chemokine production. Moreover, metabolic signals impinge on the Akt-mTORC1 axis for such control of M2 activation. We propose that Akt-mTORC1 signaling calibrates metabolic state to energetically demanding aspects of M2 activation, which may define a new role for metabolism in supporting macrophage activation.

  13. Rebamipide ameliorates atherosclerosis by controlling lipid metabolism and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Jhun, JooYeon; Kwon, Jeong-Eun; Kim, Se-Young; Jeong, Jeong-Hee; Na, Hyun Sik; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Seung Hoon; Jung, KyungAh; Min, Jun-Ki; Cho, Mi-La

    2017-01-01

    The oral administration of rebamipide decreased plaque formation in atherosclerotic lesions as well as the markers of metabolic disorder in ApoE-deficient mice with atherosclerosis. Pro-inflammatory cytokines were also suppressed by rebamapide. In addition, the population of Th17 was decreased, whereas Treg was increased in the spleen of rebamipide-treated ApoE deficient mice. Rebamipide also ameliorated the severity of obese arthritis and has the capability to reduce the development of atherosclerosis by controlling the balance between Th17 and Treg cells. Thus, rebamipide could be a therapeutic agent to improve the progression of inflammation in metabolic diseases.

  14. Pleiotropic effects of apolipoprotein C3 on HDL functionality and adipose tissue metabolic activity.

    PubMed

    Zvintzou, Evangelia; Lhomme, Marie; Chasapi, Stella; Filou, Serafoula; Theodoropoulos, Vassilis; Xapapadaki, Eva; Kontush, Anatol; Spyroulias, George; Tellis, Constantinos C; Tselepis, Alexandros D; Constantinou, Caterina; Kypreos, Kyriakos E

    2017-09-01

    APOC3 is produced mainly by the liver and intestine and approximately half of plasma APOC3 associates with HDL. Though it was believed that APOC3 associates with HDL by simple binding to preexisting particles, recent data support that biogenesis of APOC3-containing HDL (APOC3-HDL) requires Abca1. Moreover, APOC3-HDL contributes to plasma triglyceride homeostasis by preventing APOC3 association with triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. Interestingly, APOC3-HDL also shows positive correlation with the morbidly obese phenotype. However, the roles of APOC3 in HDL functionality and adipose tissue metabolic activity remain unknown. Therefore, here we investigated the direct effects of APOC3 expression on HDL structure and function, as well as white adipose tissue (WAT) and brown adipose tissue (BAT) metabolic activity. C57BL/6 mice were infected with an adenovirus expressing human APOC3 or a recombinant attenuated control adenovirus expressing green fluorescent protein and blood and tissue samples were collected at 5 days postinfection. HDL was then analyzed for its apolipoprotein and lipid composition and particle functionality. Additionally, purified mitochondria from BAT and WAT were analyzed for uncoupling protein 1, cytochrome c (Cytc), and Cytc oxidase subunit 4 protein levels as an indirect measure of their metabolic activity. Serum metabolomic analysis was performed by NMR. Combined, our data show that APOC3 modulates HDL structure and function, while it selectively promotes BAT metabolic activation. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Circadian Control of Cardiac Metabolism: Physiologic Roles and Pathologic Implications.

    PubMed

    Young, Martin E

    2017-01-01

    Over the course of the day, the heart is challenged with dramatic fluctuations in energetic demand and nutrient availability. It is therefore not surprising that rhythms in cardiac metabolism have been reported at multiple levels, including the utilization of glucose, fatty acids, and amino acids. Evidence has emerged suggesting that the cardiomyocyte circadian clock is in large part responsible for governing cardiac metabolic rhythms. In doing so, the cardiomyocyte clock temporally partitions ATP generation for increased contractile function during the active period, promotes nutrient storage at the end of the active period, and facilitates protein turnover (synthesis and degradation) during the beginning of the sleep phase. This review highlights the roles of cardiac metabolism rhythms as well as the potential pathological consequences of their impairment.

  16. Ongoing resolution of duplicate gene functions shapes the diversification of a metabolic network

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Meihua Christina; Hutchins, Paul D; Russell, Jason D; Coon, Joshua J; Hittinger, Chris Todd

    2016-01-01

    The evolutionary mechanisms leading to duplicate gene retention are well understood, but the long-term impacts of paralog differentiation on the regulation of metabolism remain underappreciated. Here we experimentally dissect the functions of two pairs of ancient paralogs of the GALactose sugar utilization network in two yeast species. We show that the Saccharomyces uvarum network is more active, even as over-induction is prevented by a second co-repressor that the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacks. Surprisingly, removal of this repression system leads to a strong growth arrest, likely due to overly rapid galactose catabolism and metabolic overload. Alternative sugars, such as fructose, circumvent metabolic control systems and exacerbate this phenotype. We further show that S. cerevisiae experiences homologous metabolic constraints that are subtler due to how the paralogs have diversified. These results show how the functional differentiation of paralogs continues to shape regulatory network architectures and metabolic strategies long after initial preservation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19027.001 PMID:27690225

  17. Ongoing resolution of duplicate gene functions shapes the diversification of a metabolic network

    DOE PAGES

    Kuang, Meihua Christina; Hutchins, Paul D.; Russell, Jason D.; ...

    2016-09-30

    The evolutionary mechanisms leading to duplicate gene retention are well understood, but the long-term impacts of paralog differentiation on the regulation of metabolism remain underappreciated. Here we experimentally dissect the functions of two pairs of ancient paralogs of theGALactose sugar utilization network in two yeast species. Here, we show that theSaccharomyces uvarumnetwork is more active, even as over-induction is prevented by a second co-repressor that the model yeastSaccharomyces cerevisiaelacks. Surprisingly, removal of this repression system leads to a strong growth arrest, likely due to overly rapid galactose catabolism and metabolic overload. Alternative sugars, such as fructose, circumvent metabolic control systemsmore » and exacerbate this phenotype. Furthermore, we show thatS. cerevisiaeexperiences homologous metabolic constraints that are subtler due to how the paralogs have diversified. Our results show how the functional differentiation of paralogs continues to shape regulatory network architectures and metabolic strategies long after initial preservation.« less

  18. Ongoing resolution of duplicate gene functions shapes the diversification of a metabolic network

    SciTech Connect

    Kuang, Meihua Christina; Hutchins, Paul D.; Russell, Jason D.; Coon, Joshua J.; Hittinger, Chris Todd

    2016-09-30

    The evolutionary mechanisms leading to duplicate gene retention are well understood, but the long-term impacts of paralog differentiation on the regulation of metabolism remain underappreciated. Here we experimentally dissect the functions of two pairs of ancient paralogs of theGALactose sugar utilization network in two yeast species. Here, we show that theSaccharomyces uvarumnetwork is more active, even as over-induction is prevented by a second co-repressor that the model yeastSaccharomyces cerevisiaelacks. Surprisingly, removal of this repression system leads to a strong growth arrest, likely due to overly rapid galactose catabolism and metabolic overload. Alternative sugars, such as fructose, circumvent metabolic control systems and exacerbate this phenotype. Furthermore, we show thatS. cerevisiaeexperiences homologous metabolic constraints that are subtler due to how the paralogs have diversified. Our results show how the functional differentiation of paralogs continues to shape regulatory network architectures and metabolic strategies long after initial preservation.

  19. Beyond intestinal soap--bile acids in metabolic control.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, Folkert; Bloks, Vincent W; Groen, Albert K

    2014-08-01

    Over the past decade, it has become apparent that bile acids are involved in a host of activities beyond their classic functions in bile formation and fat absorption. The identification of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) as a nuclear receptor directly activated by bile acids and the discovery that bile acids are also ligands for the membrane-bound, G-protein coupled bile acid receptor 1 (also known as TGR5) have opened new avenues of research. Both FXR and TGR5 regulate various elements of glucose, lipid and energy metabolism. Consequently, a picture has emerged of bile acids acting as modulators of (postprandial) metabolism. Therefore, strategies that interfere with either bile acid metabolism or signalling cascades mediated by bile acids may represent novel therapeutic approaches for metabolic diseases. Synthetic modulators of FXR have been designed and tested, primarily in animal models. Furthermore, the use of bile acid sequestrants to reduce plasma cholesterol levels has unexpected benefits. For example, treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with sequestrants causes substantial reductions in plasma levels of glucose and HbA1c. This Review aims to provide an overview of the molecular mechanisms by which bile acids modulate glucose and energy metabolism, particularly focusing on the glucose-lowering actions of bile acid sequestrants in insulin resistant states and T2DM.

  20. Discrete Functions of Nuclear Receptor Rev-erbα Couple Metabolism to the Clock

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuxiang; Fang, Bin; Emmett, Matthew J.; Damle, Manashree; Sun, Zheng; Feng, Dan; Armour, Sean M.; Remsberg, Jarrett R.; Jager, Jennifer; Soccio, Raymond E.; Steger, David J.; Lazar, Mitchell A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Circadian and metabolic physiology are intricately intertwined, as illustrated by Rev-erbα, a transcription factor (TF) that functions both as a core repressive component of the cell autonomous clock and as a regulator of metabolic genes. Here we show that Rev-erbα modulates the clock and metabolism by different genomic mechanisms. Clock control requires Rev-erbα to bind directly to the genome at its cognate sites, where it competes with activating ROR TFs. By contrast, Rev-erbα regulates metabolic genes primarily by recruiting the HDAC3 corepressor to sites to which it is tethered by cell type-specific transcription factors. Thus, direct competition between Rev-erbα and ROR TFs provides a universal mechanism for self-sustained control of molecular clock across all tissues, whereas Rev-erbα utilizes lineage-determining factors to convey a tissue-specific epigenomic rhythm that regulates metabolism tailored to the specific need of that tissue. PMID:26044300

  1. GENE REGULATION. Discrete functions of nuclear receptor Rev-erbα couple metabolism to the clock.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuxiang; Fang, Bin; Emmett, Matthew J; Damle, Manashree; Sun, Zheng; Feng, Dan; Armour, Sean M; Remsberg, Jarrett R; Jager, Jennifer; Soccio, Raymond E; Steger, David J; Lazar, Mitchell A

    2015-06-26

    Circadian and metabolic physiology are intricately intertwined, as illustrated by Rev-erbα, a transcription factor (TF) that functions both as a core repressive component of the cell-autonomous clock and as a regulator of metabolic genes. Here, we show that Rev-erbα modulates the clock and metabolism by different genomic mechanisms. Clock control requires Rev-erbα to bind directly to the genome at its cognate sites, where it competes with activating ROR TFs. By contrast, Rev-erbα regulates metabolic genes primarily by recruiting the HDAC3 co-repressor to sites to which it is tethered by cell type-specific transcription factors. Thus, direct competition between Rev-erbα and ROR TFs provides a universal mechanism for self-sustained control of the molecular clock across all tissues, whereas Rev-erbα uses lineage-determining factors to convey a tissue-specific epigenomic rhythm that regulates metabolism tailored to the specific need of that tissue. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  2. Microspectrofluorometry for metabolic control analysis and the study of organelle morphogenesis in cell differentiation and transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschberg, Joseph G.; Kohen, Elli; Kohen, Cahide; Pinon, Raul

    1994-02-01

    Microspectrofluorometry has been used in conjunction with fluorescence micrography for metabolic control analysis in normal and genetically deficient human fibroblasts, as well as human melanoma cells. These studies point to the role of mitochondria as the `cell's policeman' with regard to metabolic control. Cytotoxic agents active on mitochondrial structure and function (i.e. anthralin, azelaic acid) produce an unleashing of extramitochondrial pathways characterized by large and out-of-control NAD(P)H transients elicited by microinjected substrates. An interesting aspect has been the demonstration of an active nuclear energy metabolism, by NAD(P)H fluorescence excited at 365 nm, which may help to link cell bioenergetics to gene expression in the eukaryotes by the use of DNA probes. The metabolic control analysis of cell bioenergetics has been extended to the pathways involved in the cell's handling of cytotoxic agents. Non invasive fluorescence equipment offers possibilities for diagnostics and therapeutics in dermatology. Structure and function studies can be carried out at considerably enhanced resolution and with on-line interpretation by introducing scanning nearfield optics microscopy (SNOM) and real-time interactive parameter experimentation control (RIPEC).

  3. Neuronal Shp2 tyrosine phosphatase controls energy balance and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Eric E.; Chapeau, Emilie; Hagihara, Kazuki; Feng, Gen-Sheng

    2004-01-01

    Shp2, a Src homology 2-containing tyrosine phosphatase, has been implicated in a variety of growth factor or cytokine signaling pathways. However, it is conceivable that this enzyme acts predominantly in one pathway versus the others in a cell, depending on the cellular context. To determine the putative functions of Shp2 in the adult brain, we selectively deleted Shp2 in postmitotic forebrain neurons by crossing CaMKIIα-Cre transgenic mice with a conditional Shp2 mutant (Shp2flox) strain. Surprisingly, a prominent phenotype of the mutant (CaMKIIα-Cre:Shp2flox/flox or CaSKO) mice was the development of early-onset obesity, with increased serum levels of leptin, insulin, glucose, and triglycerides. The mutant mice were not hyperphagic but developed enlarged and steatotic liver. Consistent with previous in vitro data, we found that Shp2 down-regulates Jak2/Stat3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) activation by leptin in the hypothalamus. However, Jak2/Stat3 down-regulation is offset by a dominant Shp2 promotion of the leptin-stimulated Erk pathway, leading to induction rather than suppression of leptin resistance upon Shp2 deletion in the brain. Collectively, these results suggest that a primary function of Shp2 in postmitotic forebrain neurons is to control energy balance and metabolism, and that this phosphatase is a critical signaling component of leptin receptor ObRb in the hypothalamus. Shp2 shows potential as a neuronal target for pharmaceutical sensitization of obese patients to leptin action. PMID:15520383

  4. Metabolic and Physical Control of Cell Elongation Rate

    PubMed Central

    Green, P. B.; Erickson, R. O.; Buggy, J.

    1971-01-01

    Several levels of control of elongation rate are revealed through the detailed study of responses of the Nitella internode to abrupt shifts in turgor. The immediate response, which apparently reflects the physical state of the cell, is approximately described by the equation r = (P — Y)m where r is rate, P is pressure, Y is the wall's yielding threshold, and m is related to the wall's apparent fluidity (reciprocal viscosity). Because P and Y are in the range 5 to 6 atmospheres, and (P — Y) is roughly 0.2 atmosphere, elongation rate is initially extremely sensitive to changes in P. A small step-down in turgor (0.7 atmosphere) stops growth, and a similar rise greatly accelerates it. These initial responses are, however, soon (15 minutes) compensated by changes in Y. An apparent metabolism-dependent reaction (azide-sensitive) lowers Y; strain hardening (azide-insensitive) raises it. These two opposing processes, acting on Y, serve as a governor on (P — Y), tending to maintain it at a given value despite changes in P. This ability to compensate is itself a function of turgor. Turgor step-downs are less and less well compensated, leading to lower rate, as turgor falls from 5 atmospheres to about 2 atmospheres where growth appears not to resume. This is the lowest attainable yield value, Y1. The turgor dependency of compensation reflects a turgor requirement of the Y-lowering (“wall-softening”) process. Thus the relation between steady state, rs, and turgor is an indirect one, derived from time-dependent alterations of the cell wall. This relationship superficially resembles the instantaneously valid one in that, roughly, rs = (P — Y1)ms. Y1 and ms, however, have much lower values than Y and m. The duality of the elongation rate versus turgor relation and the prominent role of Y in regulating rate are the major features of growth control in Nitella. PMID:16657635

  5. mTOR, metabolism, and the regulation of T-cell differentiation and function

    PubMed Central

    Waickman, Adam T; Powell, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Upon antigen recognition, naive T cells undergo rapid expansion and activation. The energy requirements for this expansion are formidable, and T-cell activation is accompanied by dramatic changes in cellular metabolism. Furthermore, the outcome of antigen engagement is guided by multiple cues derived from the immune microenvironment. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is emerging as a central integrator of these signals playing a critical role in driving T-cell differentiation and function. Indeed, multiple metabolic programs are controlled by mTOR signaling. In this review, we discuss the role of mTOR in regulating metabolism and how these pathways intersect with the ability of mTOR to integrate cues that guide the outcome of T-cell receptor engagement. PMID:22889214

  6. Loss of astrocyte cholesterol synthesis disrupts neuronal function and alters whole-body metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Heather A.; Perry, Rachel J.; Moreira, Gabriela V.; Shulman, Gerald I.; Horton, Jay D.; Kahn, C. Ronald

    2017-01-01

    Cholesterol is important for normal brain function. The brain synthesizes its own cholesterol, presumably in astrocytes. We have previously shown that diabetes results in decreased brain cholesterol synthesis by a reduction in sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 (SREBP2)-regulated transcription. Here we show that coculture of control astrocytes with neurons enhances neurite outgrowth, and this is reduced with SREBP2 knockdown astrocytes. In vivo, mice with knockout of SREBP2 in astrocytes have impaired brain development and behavioral and motor defects. These mice also have altered energy balance, altered body composition, and a shift in metabolism toward carbohydrate oxidation driven by increased glucose oxidation by the brain. Thus, SREBP2-mediated cholesterol synthesis in astrocytes plays an important role in brain and neuronal development and function, and altered brain cholesterol synthesis may contribute to the interaction between metabolic diseases, such as diabetes and altered brain function. PMID:28096339

  7. The role of metabolic reprogramming in T cell fate and function

    PubMed Central

    Patsoukis, Nikolaos; Bardhan, Kankana; Weaver, Jessica; Herbel, Christoph; Seth, Pankaj; Li, Lequn; Boussiotis, Vassiliki A.

    2016-01-01

    T lymphocytes undergo extensive changes in their metabolic properties during their transition through various differentiation states, from naïve to effector to memory or regulatory roles. The cause and effect relationship between metabolism and differentiation is a field of intense investigation. Many recent studies demonstrate the dependency of T cell functional outcomes on metabolic pathways and the possibility of metabolic intervention to modify these functions. In this review, we describe the basic metabolic features of T cells and new findings on how these correlate with various differentiation fates and functions. We also highlight the latest information regarding the main factors that affect T cell metabolic reprogramming. PMID:28356677

  8. Control of Metabolic Homeostasis by Stress Signaling Is Mediated by the Lipocalin NLaz

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Diego; Walker, David W.; Benzer, Seymour; Ganfornina, Maria D.; Jasper, Heinrich

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic homeostasis in metazoans is regulated by endocrine control of insulin/IGF signaling (IIS) activity. Stress and inflammatory signaling pathways—such as Jun-N-terminal Kinase (JNK) signaling—repress IIS, curtailing anabolic processes to promote stress tolerance and extend lifespan. While this interaction constitutes an adaptive response that allows managing energy resources under stress conditions, excessive JNK activity in adipose tissue of vertebrates has been found to cause insulin resistance, promoting type II diabetes. Thus, the interaction between JNK and IIS has to be tightly regulated to ensure proper metabolic adaptation to environmental challenges. Here, we identify a new regulatory mechanism by which JNK influences metabolism systemically. We show that JNK signaling is required for metabolic homeostasis in flies and that this function is mediated by the Drosophila Lipocalin family member Neural Lazarillo (NLaz), a homologue of vertebrate Apolipoprotein D (ApoD) and Retinol Binding Protein 4 (RBP4). Lipocalins are emerging as central regulators of peripheral insulin sensitivity and have been implicated in metabolic diseases. NLaz is transcriptionally regulated by JNK signaling and is required for JNK-mediated stress and starvation tolerance. Loss of NLaz function reduces stress resistance and lifespan, while its over-expression represses growth, promotes stress tolerance and extends lifespan—phenotypes that are consistent with reduced IIS activity. Accordingly, we find that NLaz represses IIS activity in larvae and adult flies. Our results show that JNK-NLaz signaling antagonizes IIS and is critical for metabolic adaptation of the organism to environmental challenges. The JNK pathway and Lipocalins are structurally and functionally conserved, suggesting that similar interactions represent an evolutionarily conserved system for the control of metabolic homeostasis. PMID:19390610

  9. Lipopolysaccharide markedly changes glucose metabolism and mitochondrial function in the longissimus muscle of pigs.

    PubMed

    Sun, H; Huang, Y; Yin, C; Guo, J; Zhao, R; Yang, X

    2016-07-01

    Most previous studies on the effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in pigs focused on the body's immune response, and few reports paid attention to body metabolism changes. To better understand the glucose metabolism changes in skeletal muscle following LPS challenge and to clarify the possible mechanism, 12 growing pigs were employed. Animals were treated with either 2 ml of saline or 15 µg/kg BW LPS, and samples were collected 6 h later. The glycolysis status and mitochondrial function in the longissimus dorsi (LD) muscle of pigs were analyzed. The results showed that serum lactate content and NADH content in LD muscle significantly increased compared with the control group. Most glycolysis-related genes expression, as well as hexokinase, pyruvate kinase and lactic dehydrogenase activity, in LD muscle was significantly higher compared with the control group. Mitochondrial complexes I and IV significantly increased, while mitochondrial ATP concentration markedly decreased. Significantly increased calcium content in the mitochondria was observed, and endoplasm reticulum (ER) stress has been demonstrated in the present study. The results showed that LPS treatment markedly changes glucose metabolism and mitochondrial function in the LD muscle of pigs, and increased calcium content induced by ER stress was possibly involved. The results provide new clues for clarifying metabolic diseases in muscle induced by LPS.

  10. Voluntary exercise improves hypothalamic and metabolic function in obese mice.

    PubMed

    Laing, Brenton T; Do, Khoa; Matsubara, Tomoko; Wert, David W; Avery, Michael J; Langdon, Erin M; Zheng, Donghai; Huang, Hu

    2016-05-01

    Exercise plays a critical role in regulating glucose homeostasis and body weight. However, the mechanism of exercise on metabolic functions associated with the CNS has not been fully understood. C57BL6 male mice (n=45) were divided into three groups: normal chow diet, high-fat diet (HFD) treatment, and HFD along with voluntary running wheel exercise training for 12 weeks. Metabolic function was examined by the Comprehensive Lab Animal Monitoring System and magnetic resonance imaging; phenotypic analysis included measurements of body weight, food intake, glucose and insulin tolerance tests, as well as insulin and leptin sensitivity studies. By immunohistochemistry, the amount changes in the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, neuronal proliferative maker Ki67, apoptosis positive cells as well as pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC)-expressing neurons in the arcuate area of the hypothalamus was identified. We found that 12 weeks of voluntary exercise training partially reduced body weight gain and adiposity induced by an HFD. Insulin and leptin sensitivity were enhanced in the exercise training group verses the HFD group. Furthermore, the HFD-impaired POMC-expressing neuron is remarkably restored in the exercise training group. The restoration of POMC neuron number may be due to neuroprotective effects of exercise on POMC neurons, as evidenced by altered proliferation and apoptosis. In conclusion, our data suggest that voluntary exercise training improves metabolic symptoms induced by HFD, in part through protected POMC-expressing neuron from HFD and enhanced leptin signaling in the hypothalamus that regulates whole-body energy homeostasis. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  11. Vitamin D metabolism and function in the skin.

    PubMed

    Bikle, Daniel D

    2011-12-05

    The keratinocytes of the skin are unique in being not only the primary source of vitamin D for the body, but in possessing the enzymatic machinery to metabolize vitamin D to its active metabolite 1,25(OH)(2)D. Furthermore, these cells also express the vitamin D receptor (VDR) that enables them to respond to the 1,25(OH)(2)D they produce. Numerous functions of the skin are regulated by 1,25(OH)(2)D and/or its receptor. These include inhibition of proliferation, stimulation of differentiation including formation of the permeability barrier, promotion of innate immunity, and promotion of the hair follicle cycle. Regulation of these actions is exerted by a number of different coregulators including the coactivators DRIP and SRC, the cosuppressor hairless (Hr), and β-catenin. This review will examine the regulation of vitamin D production and metabolism in the skin, and explore the various functions regulated by 1,25(OH)(2)D and its receptor. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Vitamin D Metabolism and Function in the Skin

    PubMed Central

    Bikle, Daniel D

    2011-01-01

    The keratinocytes of the skin are unique in being not only the primary source of vitamin D for the body, but in possessing the enzymatic machinery to metabolize vitamin D to its active metabolite 1,25(OH)2D. Furthermore, these cells also express the vitamin D receptor (VDR) that enables them to respond to the 1,25(OH)2D they produce. Numerous functions of the skin are regulated by 1,25(OH)2D and/or its receptor. These include inhibition of proliferation, stimulation of differentiation including formation of the permeability barrier, promotion of innate immunity, and promotion of the hair follicle cycle. Regulation of these actions is exerted by a number of different coregulators including the coactivators DRIP and SRC, the cosuppressor hairless (Hr), and β-catenin. This review will examine the regulation of vitamin D production and metabolism in the skin, and explore the various functions regulated by 1,25(OH)2D and its receptor. PMID:21664236

  13. Hypoxia-induced oxygen tolerance: maintenance of endothelial metabolic function

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, R.M.; Ann, H.S.; Oparil, S.

    1988-01-01

    Hypoxia (10%-12% O2) preadaptation for 4-7 days effectively protects rats from oxygen toxicity. The present study was designed to investigate the hypothesis that the lung's microvascular endothelium shares in development of oxygen tolerance and therefore that endothelial metabolic function would be protected from oxygen toxicity by prior adaptation to hypoxia. Since pulmonary oxygen toxicity decreases lung capillary angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity, we assayed converting enzyme active sites in an isolated perfused rat lung preparation as a marker for the development of oxygen toxicity and tolerance. Rats were exposed to air, hypoxia (10% O2 for 4 days), hyperoxia (greater than 95% O2 for 2 days) alone, or hypoxia followed immediately by hyperoxia. Lung vascular ACE content was quantitated by measuring the single pass binding of an iodinated-converting enzyme inhibitor, 125I-MK351A, a derivative of lisinopril. Hypoxia adaptation per se had no effect on ACE content reflected in normal 125I-MK351A binding, whereas hyperoxia exposure caused a significant decrease in lung vascular ACE. Hyperoxia-induced decreases in ACE content were prevented partially by hypoxia adaptation, indicating that ACE content on luminal endothelial surfaces was protected from oxygen toxicity. In isolated perfused lungs 125I-MK351A binding reflects development of oxygen tolerance after hypoxia preadaptation and suggests that lung endothelial metabolic function is protected from oxygen toxicity.

  14. Physical, metabolic and developmental functions of the seed coat

    PubMed Central

    Radchuk, Volodymyr; Borisjuk, Ljudmilla

    2014-01-01

    The conventional understanding of the role of the seed coat is that it provides a protective layer for the developing zygote. Recent data show that the picture is more nuanced. The seed coat certainly represents a first line of defense against adverse external factors, but it also acts as channel for transmitting environmental cues to the interior of the seed. The latter function primes the seed to adjust its metabolism in response to changes in its external environment. The purpose of this review is to provide the reader with a comprehensive view of the structure and functionality of the seed coat, and to expose its hidden interaction with both the endosperm and embryo. Any breeding and/or biotechnology intervention seeking to increase seed size or modify seed features will have to consider the implications on this tripartite interaction. PMID:25346737

  15. Metabolism and biological functions of human milk oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Bertino, E; Peila, C; Giuliani, F; Martano, C; Cresi, F; Di Nicola, P; Occhi, L; Sabatino, G; Fabris, C

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that breastfeeding is beneficial both for its nutritional properties and for the presence of biologically active compounds. Among these, human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs), representing the third largest fraction of human milk, have been assigned important biological functions, such as prebiotic and immunomodulatory and antimicrobial effects. HMOs are synthesized in the mammary gland by glycosyltransferase enzymes and can be divided in core-oligosaccharides, sialo-oligosaccharides, fucosyl-oligosaccharides and sialo-fucosyl-oligosaccharides on the basis of their chemical structure. Glycosyltransferases enzymes are partially regulated by genetic mechanisms; according to the expression of secretory and Lewis' genes, it is possible to classify human milk in 4 different secretory groups. We hereby present a review of the current knowledge concerning HMOs, their metabolism and main biological functions.

  16. [Metabolic control in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Díaz-Cárdenas, Claudia; Wong, Carolina; Vargas Catalán, Nelson A

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) is an important disease in children and adolescent being a major risk factor for early morbidity and mortality. To know the degree of metabolic control and prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in T1D patients. Retrospective study including patients under 19 years of age with T1D controlled at a Chilean hospital in 2011. 94 patients were evaluated (average age at diagnosis: 7.3 years; current age: 11,9 years; evolution time: 4.5 years). Seventy-nine percent (79.8%) of patients presented glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) over the recommended level with an average of 8.9%. The group between 13 and 19 years of age exhibited the worst metabolic control (86% with HbA1c abnormal levels). Overweight or obesity occurred in 26.6% of patients, 20.3% had LDL >100mg/dl and 4.2% had hypertension. Only about twenty percent of patients had adequate metabolic control as measured by HbA1c, although cardiovascular risk profile was acceptable. Therapeutic and educational efforts must be reinforced mainly in adolescents, emphasizing the importance of adequate nutritional management as a primary method to treat this entity. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of dance exercise on cognitive function in elderly patients with metabolic syndrome: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Hong; Kim, Minjeong; Ahn, Yu-Bae; Lim, Hyun-Kook; Kang, Sung-Goo; Cho, Jung-Hyoun; Park, Seo-Jin; Song, Sang-Wook

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is associated with an increased risk of cognitive impairment. The purpose of this prospective pilot study was to examine the effects of dance exercise on cognitive function in elderly patients with metabolic syndrome. The participants included 38 elderly metabolic syndrome patients with normal cognitive function (26 exercise group and 12 control group). The exercise group performed dance exercise twice a week for 6 months. Cognitive function was assessed in all participants using the Korean version of the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's disease (CERAD-K). Repeated-measures ANCOVA was used to assess the effect of dance exercise on cognitive function and cardiometabolic risk factors. Compared with the control group, the exercise group significantly improved in verbal fluency (p = 0.048), word list delayed recall (p = 0.038), word list recognition (p = 0.007), and total CERAD-K score (p = 0.037). However, no significance difference was found in body mass index, blood pressure, waist circumference, fasting plasma glucose, triglyceride, and HDL cholesterol between groups over the 6-month period. In the present study, six months of dance exercise improved cognitive function in older adults with metabolic syndrome. Thus, dance exercise may reduce the risk for cognitive disorders in elderly people with metabolic syndrome. Key pointsMetabolic syndrome (MS) is associated with an increased risk of cognitive impairment.Aerobic exercise improves cognitive function in elderly people and contributes to the prevention of degenerative neurological disease and brain damage. Dance sport is a form of aerobic exercise that has the additional benefits of stimulating the emotions, promoting social interaction, and exposing subjects to acoustic stimulation and music.In the present study, dance exercise for a 6-month period improved cognitive function in older adults with MS. In particular, positive effects were observed in verbal fluency, word list

  18. Effect of Dance Exercise on Cognitive Function in Elderly Patients with Metabolic Syndrome: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Se-Hong; Kim, Minjeong; Ahn, Yu-Bae; Lim, Hyun-Kook; Kang, Sung-Goo; Cho, Jung-hyoun; Park, Seo-Jin; Song, Sang-Wook

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is associated with an increased risk of cognitive impairment. The purpose of this prospective pilot study was to examine the effects of dance exercise on cognitive function in elderly patients with metabolic syndrome. The participants included 38 elderly metabolic syndrome patients with normal cognitive function (26 exercise group and 12 control group). The exercise group performed dance exercise twice a week for 6 months. Cognitive function was assessed in all participants using the Korean version of the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer’s disease (CERAD-K). Repeated-measures ANCOVA was used to assess the effect of dance exercise on cognitive function and cardiometabolic risk factors. Compared with the control group, the exercise group significantly improved in verbal fluency (p = 0.048), word list delayed recall (p = 0.038), word list recognition (p = 0.007), and total CERAD-K score (p = 0.037). However, no significance difference was found in body mass index, blood pressure, waist circumference, fasting plasma glucose, triglyceride, and HDL cholesterol between groups over the 6-month period. In the present study, six months of dance exercise improved cognitive function in older adults with metabolic syndrome. Thus, dance exercise may reduce the risk for cognitive disorders in elderly people with metabolic syndrome. Key points Metabolic syndrome (MS) is associated with an increased risk of cognitive impairment. Aerobic exercise improves cognitive function in elderly people and contributes to the prevention of degenerative neurological disease and brain damage. Dance sport is a form of aerobic exercise that has the additional benefits of stimulating the emotions, promoting social interaction, and exposing subjects to acoustic stimulation and music. In the present study, dance exercise for a 6-month period improved cognitive function in older adults with MS. In particular, positive effects were observed in verbal fluency, word

  19. Leptin and the CNS Control of Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Gregory J.; Schwartz, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of body fat stores and blood glucose levels is critical for survival. This review highlights growing evidence that leptin action in the central nervous system (CNS) plays a key role in both processes. Investigation into underlying mechanisms has begun to clarify the physiological role of leptin in the control of glucose metabolism and raises interesting new possibilities for the treatment of diabetes and related disorders. PMID:21527729

  20. Using exercise training to understand control of skeletal muscle metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gibala, Martin J

    2017-01-01

    Bengt Saltin believed that exercise was the unsurpassed tool to study human integrative physiology. He demonstrated this over the course of his career by employing physical training as a model to advance our understanding of skeletal muscle metabolic control and the impact of physical activity on performance and health. Bengt was also a pioneer in advocating the concept of exercise is medicine. His scientific curiosity was perhaps exceeded only by his generosity.

  1. Selenium and the control of thyroid hormone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Köhrle, Josef

    2005-08-01

    Thyroid hormone synthesis, metabolism and action require adequate availability of the essential trace elements iodine and selenium, which affect homeostasis of thyroid hormone-dependent metabolic pathways. The three selenocysteine-containing iodothyronine deiodinases constitute a novel gene family. Selenium is retained and deiodinase expression is maintained at almost normal levels in the thyroid gland, the brain and several other endocrine tissues during selenium deficiency, thus guaranteeing adequate local and systemic levels of the active thyroid hormone T(3). Due to their low tissue concentrations and their mRNA SECIS elements deiodinases rank high in the cellular and tissue-specific hierarchy of selenium distribution among various selenoproteins. While systemic selenium status and expression of abundant selenoproteins (glutathione peroxidase or selenoprotein P) is already impaired in patients with cancer, disturbed gastrointestinal resorption, unbalanced nutrition or patients requiring intensive care treatment, selenium-dependent deiodinase function might still be adequate. However, disease-associated alterations in proinflammatory cytokines, growth factors, hormones and pharmaceuticals modulate deiodinase isoenzyme expression independent from altered selenium status and might thus pretend causal relationships between systemic selenium status and altered thyroid hormone metabolism. Limited or inadequate supply of both trace elements, iodine and selenium, leads to complex rearrangements of thyroid hormone metabolism enabling adaptation to unfavorable conditions.

  2. Experimental nonalcoholic steatohepatitis compromises ureagenesis, an essential hepatic metabolic function.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Karen Louise; Grønbæk, Henning; Glavind, Emilie; Hebbard, Lionel; Jessen, Niels; Clouston, Andrew; George, Jacob; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2014-08-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is increasing in prevalence, yet its consequences for liver function are unknown. We studied ureagenesis, an essential metabolic liver function of importance for whole body nitrogen homeostasis, in a rodent model of diet-induced NASH. Rats were fed a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet for 4 and 16 wk, resulting in early and advanced experimental NASH, respectively. We examined the urea cycle enzyme mRNAs in liver tissue, the hepatocyte urea cycle enzyme proteins, and the in vivo capacity of urea-nitrogen synthesis (CUNS). Early NASH decreased all of the urea cycle mRNAs to an average of 60% and the ornithine transcarbamylase protein to 10%, whereas the CUNS remained unchanged. Advanced NASH further decreased the carbamoyl phosphate synthetase protein to 63% and, in addition, decreased the CUNS by 20% [from 5.65 ± 0.23 to 4.58 ± 0.30 μmol × (min × 100 g)(-1); P = 0.01]. Early NASH compromised the genes and enzyme proteins involved in ureagenesis, whereas advanced NASH resulted in a functional reduction in the capacity for ureagenesis. The pattern of urea cycle perturbations suggests a prevailing mitochondrial impairment by NASH. The decrease in CUNS has consequences for the ability of the body to adjust to changes in the requirements for nitrogen homeostasis e.g., at stressful events. NASH, thus, in terms of metabolic consequences, is not an innocuous lesion, and the manifestations of the damage seem to be a continuum with increasing disease severity.

  3. Muscle metabolic function and free-living physical activity.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Gary R; Larson-Meyer, D Enette; Sirikul, Bovorn; Newcomer, Bradley R

    2006-11-01

    We have previously shown that muscle metabolic function measured during exercise is related to exercise performance and subsequent 1-yr weight gain. Because it is well established that physical activity is important in weight maintenance, we examined muscle function relationships with free-living energy expenditure and physical activity. Subjects were 71 premenopausal black and white women. Muscle metabolism was evaluated by (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy during 90-s isometric plantar flexion contractions (45% maximum). Free-living energy expenditure (TEE) was measured using doubly labeled water, activity-related energy expenditure (AEE) was calculated as 0.9 x TEE - sleeping energy expenditure from room calorimetry, and free-living physical activity (ARTE) was calculated by dividing AEE by energy cost of standard physical activities. At the end of exercise, anaerobic glycolytic rate (ANGLY) and muscle concentration of phosphomonoesters (PME) were negatively related to TEE, AEE, and ARTE (P < 0.05). Multiple regression analysis showed that both PME (partial r = -0.29, <0.02) and ANGLY (partial r = -0.24, P < 0.04) were independently related to ARTE. PME, primarily glucose-6-phosphate and fructose-6-phosphate, was significantly related to ratings of perceived exertion (r = 0.21, P < or = 0.05) during a maximal treadmill test. PME was not related to ARTE after inclusion of RPE in the multiple regression model, suggesting that PME may be obtaining its relationship with ARTE through an increased perception of effort during physical activity. In conclusion, physically inactive individuals tend to be more dependent on anaerobic glycolysis during exercise while relying on a glycolytic pathway that may not be functioning optimally.

  4. Sequence- and Structure-Based Functional Annotation and Assessment of Metabolic Transporters in Aspergillus oryzae: A Representative Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Raethong, Nachon; Wong-ekkabut, Jirasak; Laoteng, Kobkul; Vongsangnak, Wanwipa

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus oryzae is widely used for the industrial production of enzymes. In A. oryzae metabolism, transporters appear to play crucial roles in controlling the flux of molecules for energy generation, nutrients delivery, and waste elimination in the cell. While the A. oryzae genome sequence is available, transporter annotation remains limited and thus the connectivity of metabolic networks is incomplete. In this study, we developed a metabolic annotation strategy to understand the relationship between the sequence, structure, and function for annotation of A. oryzae metabolic transporters. Sequence-based analysis with manual curation showed that 58 genes of 12,096 total genes in the A. oryzae genome encoded metabolic transporters. Under consensus integrative databases, 55 unambiguous metabolic transporter genes were distributed into channels and pores (7 genes), electrochemical potential-driven transporters (33 genes), and primary active transporters (15 genes). To reveal the transporter functional role, a combination of homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulation was implemented to assess the relationship between sequence to structure and structure to function. As in the energy metabolism of A. oryzae, the H+-ATPase encoded by the AO090005000842 gene was selected as a representative case study of multilevel linkage annotation. Our developed strategy can be used for enhancing metabolic network reconstruction. PMID:27274991

  5. Intraspecific variation in flight metabolic rate in the bumblebee Bombus impatiens: repeatability and functional determinants in workers and drones.

    PubMed

    Darveau, Charles-A; Billardon, Fannie; Bélanger, Kasandra

    2014-02-15

    The evolution of flight energetics requires that phenotypes be variable, repeatable and heritable. We studied intraspecific variation in flight energetics in order to assess the repeatability of flight metabolic rate and wingbeat frequency, as well as the functional basis of phenotypic variation in workers and drones of the bumblebee species Bombus impatiens. We showed that flight metabolic rate and wingbeat frequency were highly repeatable in workers, even when controlling for body mass variation using residual analysis. We did not detect significant repeatability in drones, but a smaller range of variation might have prevented us from finding significant values in our sample. Based on our results and previous findings, we associated the high repeatability of flight phenotypes in workers to the functional links between body mass, thorax mass, wing size, wingbeat frequency and metabolic rate. Moreover, differences between workers and drones were as predicted from these functional associations, where drones had larger wings for their size, lower wingbeat frequency and lower flight metabolic rate. We also investigated thoracic muscle metabolic phenotypes by measuring the activity of carbohydrate metabolism enzymes, and we found positive correlations between mass-independent metabolic rate and the activity of all enzymes measured, but in workers only. When comparing workers and drones that differ in flight metabolic rate, only the activity of the enzymes hexokinase and trehalase showed the predicted differences. Overall, our study indicates that there should be correlated evolution among physiological phenotypes at multiple levels of organization and morphological traits associated with flight.

  6. Exploring metabolic pathways and regulation through functional chemoproteomic and metabolomic platforms.

    PubMed

    Medina-Cleghorn, Daniel; Nomura, Daniel K

    2014-09-18

    Genome sequencing efforts have revealed a strikingly large number of uncharacterized genes, including poorly or uncharacterized metabolic enzymes, metabolites, and metabolic networks that operate in normal physiology, and those enzymes and pathways that may be rewired under pathological conditions. Although deciphering the functions of the uncharacterized metabolic genome is a challenging prospect, it also presents an opportunity for identifying novel metabolic nodes that may be important in disease therapy. In this review, we will discuss the chemoproteomic and metabolomic platforms used in identifying, characterizing, and targeting nodal metabolic pathways important in physiology and disease, describing an integrated workflow for functional mapping of metabolic enzymes.

  7. Retinol Dehydrogenases Regulate Vitamin A Metabolism for Visual Function

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Bhubanananda; Maeda, Akiko

    2016-01-01

    The visual system produces visual chromophore, 11-cis-retinal from dietary vitamin A, all-trans-retinol making this vitamin essential for retinal health and function. These metabolic events are mediated by a sequential biochemical process called the visual cycle. Retinol dehydrogenases (RDHs) are responsible for two reactions in the visual cycle performed in retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells, photoreceptor cells and Müller cells in the retina. RDHs in the RPE function as 11-cis-RDHs, which oxidize 11-cis-retinol to 11-cis-retinal in vivo. RDHs in rod photoreceptor cells in the retina work as all-trans-RDHs, which reduce all-trans-retinal to all-trans-retinol. Dysfunction of RDHs can cause inherited retinal diseases in humans. To facilitate further understanding of human diseases, mouse models of RDHs-related diseases have been carefully examined and have revealed the physiological contribution of specific RDHs to visual cycle function and overall retinal health. Herein we describe the function of RDHs in the RPE and the retina, particularly in rod photoreceptor cells, their regulatory properties for retinoid homeostasis and future therapeutic strategy for treatment of retinal diseases. PMID:27879662

  8. Moonlighting transcriptional activation function of a fungal sulfur metabolism enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Levati, Elisabetta; Sartini, Sara; Bolchi, Angelo; Ottonello, Simone; Montanini, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Moonlighting proteins, including metabolic enzymes acting as transcription factors (TF), are present in a variety of organisms but have not been described in higher fungi so far. In a previous genome-wide analysis of the TF repertoire of the plant-symbiotic fungus Tuber melanosporum, we identified various enzymes, including the sulfur-assimilation enzyme phosphoadenosine-phosphosulfate reductase (PAPS-red), as potential transcriptional activators. A functional analysis performed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, now demonstrates that a specific variant of this enzyme, PAPS-red A, localizes to the nucleus and is capable of transcriptional activation. TF moonlighting, which is not present in the other enzyme variant (PAPS-red B) encoded by the T. melanosporum genome, relies on a transplantable C-terminal polypeptide containing an alternating hydrophobic/hydrophilic amino acid motif. A similar moonlighting activity was demonstrated for six additional proteins, suggesting that multitasking is a relatively frequent event. PAPS-red A is sulfur-state-responsive and highly expressed, especially in fruitbodies, and likely acts as a recruiter of transcription components involved in S-metabolism gene network activation. PAPS-red B, instead, is expressed at low levels and localizes to a highly methylated and silenced region of the genome, hinting at an evolutionary mechanism based on gene duplication, followed by epigenetic silencing of this non-moonlighting gene variant. PMID:27121330

  9. Is there more to learn about functional vitamin D metabolism?

    PubMed

    DeLuca, Hector F

    2015-04-01

    The state of information on the enzymes responsible for the conversion of vitamin D3 to 1α,25-dhydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25-(OH)2D3), the metabolic active form responsible for the well-known function of vitamin D on calcium metabolism and bone mineralization has been briefly reviewed. There remains an unidentified enzyme responsible for 25% of the 25-hydroxylation of vitamin D3, while 75% of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25-OH-D3) arises from CYP2R1. The well-established suppression of multiple sclerosis (MS) by sunlight has been confirmed using the mouse model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). This suppression results from a narrow band of ultraviolet light (300-315nm) that does not increase serum 25-OH-D3. Thus, UV light suppresses EAE by a mechanism not involving vitamin D. Vitamin D deficiency unexpectedly suppresses the development of EAE. Further, vitamin D receptor knockout in susceptible mice also prevents the development of EAE. On the other hand, deletion of CYP2R1 and the 1α-hydroxylase, CYP27B1, does not impair the development of EAE. Thus, either vitamin D itself or a heretofore-unknown metabolite is needed for the development of a component of the immune system necessary for development of EAE. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled '17th Vitamin D Workshop'.

  10. Effects of metabolic syndrome on language functions in aging.

    PubMed

    Cahana-Amitay, Dalia; Spiro, Avron; Cohen, Jason A; Oveis, Abigail C; Ojo, Emmanuel A; Sayers, Jesse T; Obler, Loraine K; Albert, Martin L

    2015-02-01

    This study explored effects of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) on language in aging. MetS is a constellation of five vascular and metabolic risk factors associated with the development of chronic diseases and increased risk of mortality, as well as brain and cognitive impairments. We tested 281 English-speaking older adults aged 55-84, free of stroke and dementia. Presence of MetS was based on the harmonized criteria (Alberti et al., 2009). Language performance was assessed by measures of accuracy and reaction time on two tasks of lexical retrieval and two tasks of sentence processing. Regression analyses, adjusted for age, education, gender, diabetes, hypertension, and heart disease, demonstrated that participants with MetS had significantly lower accuracy on measures of lexical retrieval (action naming) and sentence processing (embedded sentences, both subject and object relative clauses). Reaction time was slightly faster on the test of embedded sentences among those with MetS. MetS adversely affects the language performance of older adults, impairing accuracy of both lexical retrieval and sentence processing. This finding reinforces and extends results of earlier research documenting the negative influence of potentially treatable medical conditions (diabetes, hypertension) on language performance in aging. The unanticipated finding that persons with MetS were faster in processing embedded sentences may represent an impairment of timing functions among older individuals with MetS.

  11. [Review on periodontal disease and metabolic control of diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Steffens, João Paulo; Glaci Reinke, Stella Maria; Angel Muñoz, Miguel; Santos, Fábio André dos; Luiz Pilatti, Gibson

    2010-09-01

    There may be an interaction between periodontal disease and some systemic diseases such as diabetes mellitus. The objective of this review was to verify, by means of a review of clinical trials, if there is a positive association between periodontal disease and the glycemic control of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM-2) patients. Eleven articles that fi t the study criteria were revised. It was concluded that periodontal disease may influence the metabolic control of DM-2. Additional studies with larger sample sizes and longer follow up are necessary for a better clarification of this issue.

  12. Control of metabolism by nutrient-regulated nuclear receptors acting in the brain.

    PubMed

    Bantubungi, Kadiombo; Prawitt, Janne; Staels, Bart

    2012-07-01

    Today, we are witnessing a rising incidence of obesity worldwide. This increase is due to a sedentary life style, an increased caloric intake and a decrease in physical activity. Obesity contributes to the appearance of type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia and cardiovascular complications due to atherosclerosis, and nephropathy. Therefore, the development of new therapeutic strategies may become a necessity. Given the metabolism controlling properties of nuclear receptors in peripheral organs (such as liver, adipose tissues, pancreas) and their implication in various processes underlying metabolic diseases, they constitute interesting therapeutic targets for obesity, dyslipidemia, cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. The recent identification of the central nervous system as a player in the control of peripheral metabolism opens new avenues to our understanding of the pathophysiology of obesity and type 2 diabetes and potential novel ways to treat these diseases. While the metabolic functions of nuclear receptors in peripheral organs have been extensively investigated, little is known about their functions in the brain, in particular with respect to brain control of energy homeostasis. This review provides an overview of the relationships between nuclear receptors in the brain, mainly at the hypothalamic level, and the central regulation of energy homeostasis. In this context, we will particularly focus on the role of PPARα, PPARγ, LXR and Rev-erbα. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. AMPKα1-LDH pathway regulates muscle stem cell self-renewal by controlling metabolic homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Theret, Marine; Gsaier, Linda; Schaffer, Bethany; Juban, Gaëtan; Ben Larbi, Sabrina; Weiss-Gayet, Michèle; Bultot, Laurent; Collodet, Caterina; Foretz, Marc; Desplanches, Dominique; Sanz, Pascual; Zang, Zizhao; Yang, Lin; Vial, Guillaume; Viollet, Benoit; Sakamoto, Kei; Brunet, Anne; Chazaud, Bénédicte; Mounier, Rémi

    2017-07-03

    Control of stem cell fate to either enter terminal differentiation versus returning to quiescence (self-renewal) is crucial for tissue repair. Here, we showed that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), the master metabolic regulator of the cell, controls muscle stem cell (MuSC) self-renewal. AMPKα1(-/-) MuSCs displayed a high self-renewal rate, which impairs muscle regeneration. AMPKα1(-/-) MuSCs showed a Warburg-like switch of their metabolism to higher glycolysis. We identified lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) as a new functional target of AMPKα1. LDH, which is a non-limiting enzyme of glycolysis in differentiated cells, was tightly regulated in stem cells. In functional experiments, LDH overexpression phenocopied AMPKα1(-/-) phenotype, that is shifted MuSC metabolism toward glycolysis triggering their return to quiescence, while inhibition of LDH activity rescued AMPKα1(-/-) MuSC self-renewal. Finally, providing specific nutrients (galactose/glucose) to MuSCs directly controlled their fate through the AMPKα1/LDH pathway, emphasizing the importance of metabolism in stem cell fate. © 2017 The Authors.

  14. Altered Mitochondrial Function and Energy Metabolism Is Associated with a Radioresistant Phenotype in Oesophageal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lynam-Lennon, Niamh; Maher, Stephen G.; Maguire, Aoife; Phelan, James; Muldoon, Cian; Reynolds, John V.; O’Sullivan, Jacintha

    2014-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) is increasingly the standard of care for locally advanced oesophageal cancer. A complete pathological response to CRT is associated with a favourable outcome. Radiation therapy is important for local tumour control, however, radioresistance remains a substantial clinical problem. We hypothesise that alterations in mitochondrial function and energy metabolism are involved in the radioresistance of oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC). To investigate this, we used an established isogenic cell line model of radioresistant OAC. Radioresistant cells (OE33 R) demonstrated significantly increased levels of random mitochondrial mutations, which were coupled with alterations in mitochondrial function, size, morphology and gene expression, supporting a role for mitochondrial dysfunction in the radioresistance of this model. OE33 R cells also demonstrated altered bioenergetics, demonstrating significantly increased intracellular ATP levels, which was attributed to enhanced mitochondrial respiration. Radioresistant cells also demonstrated metabolic plasticity, efficiently switching between the glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation energy metabolism pathways, which were accompanied by enhanced clonogenic survival. This data was supported in vivo, in pre-treatment OAC tumour tissue. Tumour ATP5B expression, a marker of oxidative phosphorylation, was significantly increased in patients who subsequently had a poor pathological response to neoadjuvant CRT. This suggests for the first time, a role for specific mitochondrial alterations and metabolic remodelling in the radioresistance of OAC. PMID:24968221

  15. Altered mitochondrial function and energy metabolism is associated with a radioresistant phenotype in oesophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lynam-Lennon, Niamh; Maher, Stephen G; Maguire, Aoife; Phelan, James; Muldoon, Cian; Reynolds, John V; O'Sullivan, Jacintha

    2014-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) is increasingly the standard of care for locally advanced oesophageal cancer. A complete pathological response to CRT is associated with a favourable outcome. Radiation therapy is important for local tumour control, however, radioresistance remains a substantial clinical problem. We hypothesise that alterations in mitochondrial function and energy metabolism are involved in the radioresistance of oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC). To investigate this, we used an established isogenic cell line model of radioresistant OAC. Radioresistant cells (OE33 R) demonstrated significantly increased levels of random mitochondrial mutations, which were coupled with alterations in mitochondrial function, size, morphology and gene expression, supporting a role for mitochondrial dysfunction in the radioresistance of this model. OE33 R cells also demonstrated altered bioenergetics, demonstrating significantly increased intracellular ATP levels, which was attributed to enhanced mitochondrial respiration. Radioresistant cells also demonstrated metabolic plasticity, efficiently switching between the glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation energy metabolism pathways, which were accompanied by enhanced clonogenic survival. This data was supported in vivo, in pre-treatment OAC tumour tissue. Tumour ATP5B expression, a marker of oxidative phosphorylation, was significantly increased in patients who subsequently had a poor pathological response to neoadjuvant CRT. This suggests for the first time, a role for specific mitochondrial alterations and metabolic remodelling in the radioresistance of OAC.

  16. Effects of Diet-Induced Obesity on Metabolic Parameters and Reproductive Function in Female Ossabaw Minipigs

    PubMed Central

    Newell-Fugate, Annie E; Taibl, Jessica N; Clark, Sherrie G; Alloosh, Mouhamad; Sturek, Michael; Krisher, Rebecca L

    2014-01-01

    This study characterizes the effect of an excess-calorie, high-fat, high-cholesterol, high-fructose diet on metabolic parameters and reproductive function in female Ossabaw minipigs. Cycling sows were fed a hypercaloric, high-fat, high-cholesterol, and high-fructose diet (obese, n = 4) or a control diet (control, n = 5) for 13 mo. During the final 4 mo, ovarian ultrasonography was done, blood was collected, and weights and measures were taken. Pigs then underwent ovarian stimulation. Cycle length and androstenedione, total testosterone, progesterone, estradiol, follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, insulin, fructosamine, lipid, and glucose levels were measured. In addition, adipose tissue aromatase gene expression was assessed. As compared with control pigs, obese pigs were hyperglycemic and hyperinsulinemic; had elevated total cholesterol, triglyceride, and leptin levels, and demonstrated abdominal adiposity. Visceral adipose tissue of obese pigs, as compared with control pigs, showed increased aromatase gene expression. Obese pigs had longer estrous cycles, higher serum androstenedione, and higher luteal phase serum luteinizing hormone, compared with control pigs. During the luteal phase, obese pigs had more medium, ovulatory, and cystic ovarian follicles, whereas control pigs had more small ovarian follicles. When fed an excess-calorie, high-fat, high-cholesterol, high-fructose diet, female Ossabaw minipigs develop obesity, metabolic syndrome, and abnormal reproductive function. This animal model may be applicable to studies of the effects of obesity on fertility in women. PMID:24512960

  17. Metabolic Incorporation of Azide Functionality into Cellular RNA.

    PubMed

    Nainar, Sarah; Beasley, Samantha; Fazio, Michael; Kubota, Miles; Dai, Nan; Corrêa, Ivan R; Spitale, Robert C

    2016-11-17

    Real-time tracking of RNA expression can provide insight into the mechanisms used to generate cellular diversity, as well as help determine the underlying causes of disease. Here we present the exploration of azide-modified nucleoside analogues and their ability to be metabolically incorporated into cellular RNA. We report robust incorporation of adenosine analogues bearing azide handles at both the 2'- and N6-positions; 5-methylazidouridine was not incorporated into cellular RNA. We further demonstrate selectivity of our adenosine analogues for transcription and polyadenylation. We predict that azidonucleosides will find widespread utility in examining RNA functions inside living cells, as well as in more complex systems such as tissues and living animals. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Molecular and cellular regulation of hypothalamic melanocortin neurons controlling food intake and energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Koch, M; Horvath, T L

    2014-07-01

    The brain receives and integrates environmental and metabolic information, transforms these signals into adequate neuronal circuit activities, and generates physiological behaviors to promote energy homeostasis. The responsible neuronal circuitries show lifetime plasticity and guaranty metabolic health and survival. However, this highly evolved organization has become challenged nowadays by chronic overload with nutrients and reduced physical activity, which results in an ever-increasing number of obese individuals worldwide. Research within the last two decades has aimed to decipher the responsible molecular and cellular mechanisms for regulation of the hypothalamic melanocortin neurons, which have a key role in the control of food intake and energy metabolism. This review maps the central connections of the melanocortin system and highlights its global position and divergent character in physiological and pathological metabolic events. Moreover, recently uncovered molecular and cellular processes in hypothalamic neurons and glial cells that drive plastic morphological and physiological changes in these cells, and account for regulation of food intake and energy metabolism, are brought into focus. Finally, potential functional interactions between metabolic disorders and psychiatric diseases are discussed.

  19. Overexpressing superoxide dismutase 2 induces a supernormal cardiac function by enhancing redox-dependent mitochondrial function and metabolic dilation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Patrick T; Chen, Chwen-Lih; Ohanyan, Vahagn; Luther, Daniel J; Meszaros, J Gary; Chilian, William M; Chen, Yeong-Renn

    2015-11-01

    During heightened cardiac work, O2 consumption by the heart benefits energy production via mitochondria. However, some electrons leak from the respiratory chain and yield superoxide, which is rapidly metabolized into H2O2 by SOD2. To understand the systemic effects of the metabolic dilator, H2O2, we studied mice with cardiac-specific SOD2 overexpression (SOD2-tg), which increases the H2O2 produced by cardiac mitochondria. Contrast echocardiography was employed to evaluate cardiac function, indicating that SOD2-tg had a significantly greater ejection fraction and a lower mean arterial pressure (MAP) that was partially normalized by intravenous injection of catalase. Norepinephrine-mediated myocardial blood flow (MBF) was significantly enhanced in SOD2-tg mice. Coupling of MBF to the double product (Heart Rate×MAP) was increased in SOD2-tg mice, indicating that the metabolic dilator, "spilled" over, inducing systemic vasodilation. The hypothesis that SOD2 overexpression effectively enhances mitochondrial function was further evaluated. Mitochondria of SOD2-tg mice had a decreased state 3 oxygen consumption rate, but maintained the same ATP production flux under the basal and L-NAME treatment conditions, indicating a higher bioenergetic efficiency. SOD2-tg mitochondria produced less superoxide, and had lower redox activity in converting cyclic hydroxylamine to stable nitroxide, and a lower GSSG concentration. EPR analysis of the isolated mitochondria showed a significant decrease in semiquinones at the SOD2-tg Qi site. These results support a more reductive physiological setting in the SOD2-tg murine heart. Cardiac mitochondria exhibited no significant differences in the respiratory control index between WT and SOD2-tg. We conclude that SOD2 overexpression in myocytes enhances mitochondrial function and metabolic vasodilation, leading to a phenotype of supernormal cardiac function.

  20. Overexpressing Superoxide Dismutase 2 Induces a Supernormal Cardiac Function by Enhancing Redox-dependent Mitochondrial Function and Metabolic Dilation*

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Patrick T.; Chen, Chwen-Lih; Ohanyan, Vahagn; Luther, Daniel J.; Meszaros, J. Gary; Chilian, William M.; Chen, Yeong-Renn

    2015-01-01

    During heightened cardiac work, O2 consumption by the heart benefits energy production via mitochondria. However, some electrons leak from the respiratory chain and yield superoxide, which is rapidly metabolized into H2O2 by SOD2. To understand the systemic effects of the metabolic dilator, H2O2, we studied mice with cardiac-specific SOD2 overexpression (SOD2-tg), which increases the H2O2 produced by cardiac mitochondria. Contrast echocardiography was employed to evaluate cardiac function, indicating that SOD2-tg had a significantly greater ejection fraction and a lower mean arterial pressure (MAP) that was partially normalized by intravenous injection of catalase. Norepinephrine-mediated myocardial blood flow (MBF) was significantly enhanced in SOD2-tg mice. Coupling of MBF to the double product (Heart Rate × MAP) was increased in SOD2-tg mice, indicating that the metabolic dilator, “spilled” over, inducing systemic vasodilation. The hypothesis that SOD2 overexpression effectively enhances mitochondrial function was further evaluated. Mitochondria of SOD2-tg mice had a decreased state 3 oxygen consumption rate, but maintained the same ATP production flux under the basal and L-NAME treatment conditions, indicating a higher bioenergetic efficiency. SOD2-tg mitochondria produced less superoxide, and had lower redox activity in converting cyclic hydroxylamine to stable nitroxide, and a lower GSSG concentration. EPR analysis of the isolated mitochondria showed a significant decrease in semiquinones at the SOD2-tg Qi site. These results support a more reductive physiological setting in the SOD2-tg murine heart. Cardiac mitochondria exhibited no significant differences in the respiratory control index between WT and SOD2-tg. We conclude that SOD2 overexpression in myocytes enhances mitochondrial function and metabolic vasodilation, leading to a phenotype of supernormal cardiac function. PMID:26374996

  1. Maternal blood metal levels and fetal markers of metabolic function

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley-Martin, Jillian; Dodds, Linda; Arbuckle, Tye E.; Ettinger, Adrienne S.; Shapiro, Gabriel D.; Fisher, Mandy; Taback, Shayne; Bouchard, Maryse F.; Monnier, Patricia; Dallaire, Renee; Fraser, William D.

    2015-01-15

    Exposure to metals commonly found in the environment has been hypothesized to be associated with measures of fetal growth but the epidemiological literature is limited. The Maternal–Infant Research on Environmental Chemicals (MIREC) study recruited 2001 women during the first trimester of pregnancy from 10 Canadian sites. Our objective was to assess the association between prenatal exposure to metals (lead, arsenic, cadmium, and mercury) and fetal metabolic function. Average maternal metal concentrations in 1st and 3rd trimester blood samples were used to represent prenatal metals exposure. Leptin and adiponectin were measured in 1363 cord blood samples and served as markers of fetal metabolic function. Polytomous logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between metals and both high (≥90%) and low (≤10%) fetal adiponectin and leptin levels. Leptin levels were significantly higher in female infants compared to males. A significant relationship between maternal blood cadmium and odds of high leptin was observed among males but not females in adjusted models. When adjusting for birth weight z-score, lead was associated with an increased odd of high leptin. No other significant associations were found at the top or bottom 10th percentile in either leptin or adiponectin models. This study supports the proposition that maternal levels of cadmium influence cord blood adipokine levels in a sex-dependent manner. Further investigation is required to confirm these findings and to determine how such findings at birth will translate into childhood anthropometric measures. - Highlights: • We determined relationships between maternal metal levels and cord blood adipokines. • Cord blood leptin levels were higher among female than male infants. • Maternal cadmium was associated with elevated leptin in male, not female infants. • No significant associations were observed between metals and

  2. PPAR signaling in the control of cardiac energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Barger, P M; Kelly, D P

    2000-08-01

    Cardiac energy metabolic shifts occur as a normal response to diverse physiologic and dietary conditions and as a component of the pathophysiologic processes which accompany cardiac hypertrophy, heart failure, and myocardial ischemia. The capacity to produce energy via the utilization of fats by the mammalian postnatal heart is controlled in part at the level of expression of nuclear genes encoding enzymes involved in mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation (FAO). The principal transcriptional regulator of FAO enzyme genes is the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha), a member of the ligand-activated nuclear receptor superfamily. Among the ligand activators of PPARalpha are long-chain fatty acids; therefore, increased uptake of fatty acid substrate into the cardiac myocyte induces a transcriptional response leading to increased expression of FAO enzymes. PPARalpha-mediated control of cardiac metabolic gene expression is activated during postnatal development, short-term starvation, and in response to exercise training. In contrast, certain pathophysiologic states, such as pressure overload-induced hypertrophy, result in deactivation of PPARalpha and subsequent dysregulation of FAO enzyme gene expression, which sets the stage for abnormalities in cardiac lipid homeostasis and energy production, some of which are influenced by gender. Thus, PPARalpha not only serves a critical role in normal cardiac metabolic homeostasis, but alterations in PPARalpha signaling likely contribute to the pathogenesis of a variety of disease states. PPARalpha as a ligand-activated transcription factor is a potential target for the development of new therapeutic strategies aimed at the prevention of pathologic cardiac remodeling.

  3. Rebamipide ameliorates atherosclerosis by controlling lipid metabolism and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jeong-Hee; Na, Hyun Sik; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Seung Hoon; Jung, KyungAh; Min, Jun-Ki; Cho, Mi-La

    2017-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by the accumulation of excess lipid in the aorta and the severity is regulated by T lymphocytes subsets. Rebamipide has therapeutic activity in collagen induced arthritis (CIA) by controlling the balance between T helper (Th) 17 and regulatory T (Treg) cells. In this study, we aimed to determine whether rebamipide reduces the development of atherosclerosis. To investigate the therapeutic effect of rebamipide, ApoE-KO mice fed a western diet were administered rebamipide orally for 8 weeks. Mice were sacrificed followed by the evaluation of plaque formation in the aorta or immunohistochemistry for IL-17 and Foxp3. Serum was also prepared to determine the pro-inflammatory cytokine levels. The ability of rebamipide to regulate lipid metabolism or inflammation was confirmed ex vivo. Results The oral administration of rebamipide decreased plaque formation in atherosclerotic lesions as well as the markers of metabolic disorder in ApoE-deficient mice with atherosclerosis. Pro-inflammatory cytokines were also suppressed by rebamapide. In addition, the population of Th17 was decreased, whereas Treg was increased in the spleen of rebamipide-treated ApoE deficient mice. Rebamipide also ameliorated the severity of obese arthritis and has the capability to reduce the development of atherosclerosis by controlling the balance between Th17 and Treg cells. Thus, rebamipide could be a therapeutic agent to improve the progression of inflammation in metabolic diseases. PMID:28241014

  4. Sense and Nonsense in Metabolic Control of Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Jill E.; Klingerman, Candice M.; Abdulhay, Amir

    2012-01-01

    An exciting synergistic interaction occurs among researchers working at the interface of reproductive biology and energy homeostasis. Reproductive biologists benefit from the theories, experimental designs, and methodologies used by experts on energy homeostasis while they bring context and meaning to the study of energy homeostasis. There is a growing recognition that identification of candidate genes for obesity is little more than meaningless reductionism unless those genes and their expression are placed in a developmental, environmental, and evolutionary context. Reproductive biology provides this context because metabolic energy is the most important factor that controls reproductive success and gonadal hormones affect energy intake, storage, and expenditure. Reproductive hormone secretion changes during development, and reproductive success is key to evolutionary adaptation, the process that most likely molded the mechanisms that control energy balance. It is likely that by viewing energy intake, storage, and expenditure in the context of reproductive success, we will gain insight into human obesity, eating disorders, diabetes, and other pathologies related to fuel homeostasis. This review emphasizes the metabolic hypothesis: a sensory system monitors the availability of oxidizable metabolic fuels and orchestrates behavioral motivation to optimize reproductive success in environments where energy availability fluctuates or is unpredictable. PMID:22649413

  5. Sense and nonsense in metabolic control of reproduction.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jill E; Klingerman, Candice M; Abdulhay, Amir

    2012-01-01

    An exciting synergistic interaction occurs among researchers working at the interface of reproductive biology and energy homeostasis. Reproductive biologists benefit from the theories, experimental designs, and methodologies used by experts on energy homeostasis while they bring context and meaning to the study of energy homeostasis. There is a growing recognition that identification of candidate genes for obesity is little more than meaningless reductionism unless those genes and their expression are placed in a developmental, environmental, and evolutionary context. Reproductive biology provides this context because metabolic energy is the most important factor that controls reproductive success and gonadal hormones affect energy intake, storage, and expenditure. Reproductive hormone secretion changes during development, and reproductive success is key to evolutionary adaptation, the process that most likely molded the mechanisms that control energy balance. It is likely that by viewing energy intake, storage, and expenditure in the context of reproductive success, we will gain insight into human obesity, eating disorders, diabetes, and other pathologies related to fuel homeostasis. This review emphasizes the metabolic hypothesis: a sensory system monitors the availability of oxidizable metabolic fuels and orchestrates behavioral motivation to optimize reproductive success in environments where energy availability fluctuates or is unpredictable.

  6. Autonomous mathematical models: constructing theories of metabolic control.

    PubMed

    Donaghy, Josephine

    2013-01-01

    This paper considers how the relationship between mathematical models and theories in biology may change over time, on the basis of a historical analysis of the development of a mathematical model of metabolism, metabolic control analysis, and its relationship to theories of metabolic control. I argue that one can distinguish two ways of characterising the relationship between models and theories, depending on the stage of model and/or theory development that one is considering: partial independence and autonomy. Partial independence describes a model's relationship with existing theory, thus referring to relationships that have already been established between model and theory during model construction. By contrast, autonomy is a feature of relationships which may become established between model and theory in the future, and is expressed by a model's open ended role in constructing emerging theory. These characteristics have often been conflated by existing philosophical accounts, partly because they can only be identified and analysed when adopting a historical perspective on scientific research. Adopting a clear distinction between partial independence and autonomy improves philosophical insight into the changing relationship between models and theories.

  7. Glycogen metabolism protects against metabolic insult to preserve carotid body function during glucose deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Andrew P; Turner, Philip J; Carter, Paul; Leadbeater, Wendy; Ray, Clare J; Hauton, David; Buckler, Keith J; Kumar, Prem

    2014-01-01

    The view that the carotid body (CB) type I cells are direct physiological sensors of hypoglycaemia is challenged by the finding that the basal sensory neuronal outflow from the whole organ is unchanged in response to low glucose. The reason for this difference in viewpoint and how the whole CB maintains its metabolic integrity when exposed to low glucose is unknown. Here we show that, in the intact superfused rat CB, basal sensory neuronal activity was sustained during glucose deprivation for 29.1 ± 1.2 min, before irreversible failure following a brief period of excitation. Graded increases in the basal discharge induced by reducing the superfusate led to proportional decreases in the time to the pre-failure excitation during glucose deprivation which was dependent on a complete run-down in glycolysis and a fall in cellular energy status. A similar ability to withstand prolonged glucose deprivation was observed in isolated type I cells. Electron micrographs and immunofluorescence staining of rat CB sections revealed the presence of glycogen granules and the glycogen conversion enzymes glycogen synthase I and glycogen phosphorylase BB, dispersed throughout the type I cell cytoplasm. Furthermore, pharmacological attenuation of glycogenolysis and functional depletion of glycogen both significantly reduced the time to glycolytic run-down by ∼33 and 65%, respectively. These findings suggest that type I cell glycogen metabolism allows for the continuation of glycolysis and the maintenance of CB sensory neuronal output in periods of restricted glucose delivery and this may act as a key protective mechanism for the organ during hypoglycaemia. The ability, or otherwise, to preserve energetic status may thus account for variation in the reported capacity of the CB to sense physiological glucose concentrations and may even underlie its function during pathological states associated with augmented CB discharge. PMID:25063821

  8. Glycogen metabolism protects against metabolic insult to preserve carotid body function during glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Andrew P; Turner, Philip J; Carter, Paul; Leadbeater, Wendy; Ray, Clare J; Hauton, David; Buckler, Keith J; Kumar, Prem

    2014-10-15

    The view that the carotid body (CB) type I cells are direct physiological sensors of hypoglycaemia is challenged by the finding that the basal sensory neuronal outflow from the whole organ is unchanged in response to low glucose. The reason for this difference in viewpoint and how the whole CB maintains its metabolic integrity when exposed to low glucose is unknown. Here we show that, in the intact superfused rat CB, basal sensory neuronal activity was sustained during glucose deprivation for 29.1 ± 1.2 min, before irreversible failure following a brief period of excitation. Graded increases in the basal discharge induced by reducing the superfusate PO2 led to proportional decreases in the time to the pre-failure excitation during glucose deprivation which was dependent on a complete run-down in glycolysis and a fall in cellular energy status. A similar ability to withstand prolonged glucose deprivation was observed in isolated type I cells. Electron micrographs and immunofluorescence staining of rat CB sections revealed the presence of glycogen granules and the glycogen conversion enzymes glycogen synthase I and glycogen phosphorylase BB, dispersed throughout the type I cell cytoplasm. Furthermore, pharmacological attenuation of glycogenolysis and functional depletion of glycogen both significantly reduced the time to glycolytic run-down by ∼33 and 65%, respectively. These findings suggest that type I cell glycogen metabolism allows for the continuation of glycolysis and the maintenance of CB sensory neuronal output in periods of restricted glucose delivery and this may act as a key protective mechanism for the organ during hypoglycaemia. The ability, or otherwise, to preserve energetic status may thus account for variation in the reported capacity of the CB to sense physiological glucose concentrations and may even underlie its function during pathological states associated with augmented CB discharge.

  9. Sphingolipid Metabolism, Oxidant Signaling, and Contractile Function of Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Nikolova-Karakashian, Mariana N.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Significance Sphingolipids are a class of bioactive lipids that regulate diverse cell functions. Ceramide, sphingosine, and sphingosine-1-phosphate accumulate in tissues such as liver, brain, and lung under conditions of cellular stress, including oxidative stress. The activity of some sphingolipid metabolizing enzymes, chiefly the sphingomyelinases, is stimulated during inflammation and in response to oxidative stress. Ceramide, the sphingomyelinase product, as well as the ceramide metabolite, sphingosine-1-phosphate, can induce the generation of more reactive oxygen species, propagating further inflammation. Recent Advances This review article summarizes information on sphingolipid biochemistry and signaling pertinent to skeletal muscle and describes the potential influence of sphingolipids on contractile function. Critical Issues It encompasses topics related to (1) the pathways for complex sphingolipid biosynthesis and degradation, emphasizing sphingolipid regulation in various muscle fiber types and subcellular compartments; (2) the emerging evidence that implicates ceramide, sphingosine, and sphingosine-1-phosphate as regulators of muscle oxidant activity, and (3) sphingolipid effects on contractile function and fatigue. Future Directions We propose that prolonged inflammatory conditions alter ceramide, sphingosine, and sphingosine-1-phosphate levels in skeletal muscle and that these changes promote the weakness, premature fatigue, and cachexia that plague individuals with heart failure, cancer, diabetes, and other chronic inflammatory diseases. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 2501–2517. PMID:21453197

  10. Executive Functioning and the Metabolic Syndrome: A Project FRONTIER Study

    PubMed Central

    Falkowski, Jed; Atchison, Timothy; DeButte-Smith, Maxine; Weiner, Myron F.; O'Bryant, Sid

    2014-01-01

    Decrements in cognitive functioning have been linked to the metabolic syndrome (MetS), a risk factor for cardiovascular disease defined by the presence of three of the following: elevated blood pressure, increased waist circumference, elevated blood glucose, elevated triglycerides, and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. We examined the relationship between four measures of executive functioning (EF) and MetS as diagnosed by National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-American Heart Association criteria. MetS was examined in a rural population of 395 persons with a mean age of 61.3 years, 71.4% women, 37.0% Hispanic, 53.7% White non-Hispanic. There was a 61.0% prevalence of MetS. We derived a factor score from the four executive function measures which was used to compare those with and without the syndrome, as well as any additive effects of components of the syndrome. Those with MetS exhibited significantly poorer performance than those without the syndrome. However, there was no additive effect, having more components of the syndrome was not related to lower performance. The presence of MetS was associated with poorer EF in this rural cohort of community dwelling volunteers. PMID:24152591

  11. Role of glycolytic intermediate in regulation: Improving lycopene production in Escherichia coli by engineering metabolic control

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, W.R.; Liao, J.C.

    2001-06-01

    Metabolic engineering in the postgenomic era is expected to benefit from a full understanding of the biosynthetic capability of microorganisms as a result of the progress being made in bioinformatics and functional genomics. The immediate advantage of such information is to allow the rational design of novel pathways and the elimination of native reactions that are detrimental or unnecessary for the desired purpose. However, with the ability to manipulate metabolic pathways becoming more effective, metabolic engineering will need to face a new challenge: the reengineering of the regulatory hierarchy that controls gene expression in those pathways. In addition to constructing the genetic composition of a metabolic pathway, they propose that it will become just as important to consider the dynamics of pathways gene expression. It has been widely observed that high-level induction of a recombinant protein or pathway leads to growth retardation and reduced metabolic activity. These phenotypic characteristics result from the fact that the constant demands of production placed upon the cell interfere with its changing requirements for growth. They believe that this common situation in metabolic engineering can be alleviated by designing a dynamic controller that is able to sense the metabolic state of the cell and regulate the expression of the recombinant pathway accordingly. This approach, which is termed metabolic control engineering, involves redesigning the native regulatory circuits and applying them to the recombinant pathway. The general goal of such an effort will be to control the flux to the recombinant pathway adaptively according to the cell's metabolic state. The dynamically controlled recombinant pathway can potentially lead to enhanced production, minimized growth retardation, and reduced toxic by-product formation. The regulation of gene expression in response to the physiological state is also essential to the success of gene therapy. Here they

  12. Arginase 1 is an innate lymphoid-cell-intrinsic metabolic checkpoint controlling type 2 inflammation.

    PubMed

    Monticelli, Laurel A; Buck, Michael D; Flamar, Anne-Laure; Saenz, Steven A; Tait Wojno, Elia D; Yudanin, Naomi A; Osborne, Lisa C; Hepworth, Matthew R; Tran, Sara V; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Shah, Hardik; Cross, Justin R; Diamond, Joshua M; Cantu, Edward; Christie, Jason D; Pearce, Erika L; Artis, David

    2016-06-01

    Group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) regulate tissue inflammation and repair after activation by cell-extrinsic factors such as host-derived cytokines. However, the cell-intrinsic metabolic pathways that control ILC2 function are undefined. Here we demonstrate that expression of the enzyme arginase-1 (Arg1) during acute or chronic lung inflammation is a conserved trait of mouse and human ILC2s. Deletion of mouse ILC-intrinsic Arg1 abrogated type 2 lung inflammation by restraining ILC2 proliferation and dampening cytokine production. Mechanistically, inhibition of Arg1 enzymatic activity disrupted multiple components of ILC2 metabolic programming by altering arginine catabolism, impairing polyamine biosynthesis and reducing aerobic glycolysis. These data identify Arg1 as a key regulator of ILC2 bioenergetics that controls proliferative capacity and proinflammatory functions promoting type 2 inflammation.

  13. Arginase 1 is an innate lymphoid cell-intrinsic metabolic checkpoint controlling type 2 inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Monticelli, Laurel A; Buck, Michael D; Flamar, Anne-Laure; Saenz, Steven A; Wojno, Elia D Tait; Yudanin, Naomi A; Osborne, Lisa C; Hepworth, Matthew R; Tran, Sara V; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Shah, Hardik; Cross, Justin R; Diamond, Joshua M; Cantu, Edward; Christie, Jason D; Pearce, Erika L; Artis, David

    2016-01-01

    Group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) regulate tissue inflammation and repair following activation by cell-extrinsic factors including host-derived cytokines. However, the cell-intrinsic metabolic pathways that control ILC2 function are undefined. Here we demonstrate that expression of the enzyme Arginase 1 (Arg1) is a conserved trait of murine and human ILC2s during acute or chronic lung inflammation. Deletion of murine ILC-intrinsic Arg1 abrogated type 2 lung inflammation by restraining ILC2 proliferation and dampening cytokine production. Mechanistically, inhibition of Arg1 enzymatic activity disrupted multiple components of ILC2 metabolic programming by altering arginine catabolism, impairing polyamine biosynthesis and reducing aerobic glycolysis. These data identify Arg1 as a key regulator of ILC2 bioenergetics, controlling proliferative capacity and pro-inflammatory functions that promote type 2 inflammation. PMID:27043409

  14. Strain/strain rate imaging of impaired left atrial function in patients with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ning-Ning; Sui, Dong-Xin; Yu, Jin-Gui; Gong, Hui-Ping; Zhong, Ming; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Wei

    2015-11-01

    Left ventricular (LV) dysfunction has been demonstrated in patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS). However, alterations in left atrial (LA) function in MetS are unknown. We aimed to use strain/strain rate (SR) imaging to investigate the effect of MetS on LA function. A total of 177 MetS patients and 156 normal subjects underwent echocardiography. Strain and SR tissue Doppler imaging values were used to evaluate LA function. Partial correlation and multiple stepwise regression analyses were used to determine the risk factors for impaired LA function. Compared with the controls, the MetS patients showed significantly lower levels of mean strain, mean peak systolic SR and mean peak early diastolic SR (P<0.001 for all), with no difference in the mean peak late diastolic SR. Central obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia and LV diastolic abnormality were independent risk factors for impaired LA function. LA function was impaired in patients with MetS as a result of metabolic disturbance and LV diastolic abnormality. SR imaging is reliable in assessing LA function in MetS patients.

  15. Metabolite Valves: Dynamic Control of Metabolic Flux for Pathway Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, Kristala

    2015-03-01

    Microbial strains have been successfully engineered to produce a wide variety of chemical compounds, several of which have been commercialized. As new products are targeted for biological synthesis, yield is frequently considered a primary driver towards determining feasibility. Theoretical yields can be calculated, establishing an upper limit on the potential conversion of starting substrates to target compounds. Such yields typically ignore loss of substrate to byproducts, with the assumption that competing reactions can be eliminated, usually by deleting the genes encoding the corresponding enzymes. However, when an enzyme encodes an essential gene, especially one involved in primary metabolism, deletion is not a viable option. Reducing gene expression in a static fashion is possible, but this solution ignores the metabolic demand needed for synthesis of the enzymes required for the desired pathway. We have developed Metabolite valves to address this challenge. The valves are designed to allow high flux through the essential enzyme during an initial period where growth is favored. Following an external perturbation, enzyme activity is then reduced, enabling a higher precursor pool to be diverted towards the pathway of interest. We have designed valves with control at both the transcriptional and post-translational levels. In both cases, key enzymes in glucose metabolism are regulated, and two different compounds are targeted for heterologous production. We have measured increased concentrations of intracellular metabolites once the valve is closed, and have demonstrated that these increased pools lead to increased product yields. These metabolite valves should prove broadly useful for dynamic control of metabolic flux, resulting in improvements in product yields.

  16. Metabolic control by target of rapamycin and autophagy during ageing - a mini-review.

    PubMed

    Markaki, Maria; Tavernarakis, Nektarios

    2013-01-01

    The conserved target of rapamycin (TOR) pathway integrates signals from nutrient and energy availability, growth factors and stress to regulate cell growth and proliferation, development and metabolism. Growing evidence suggests that TOR signalling controls the rate at which cells and tissues age, thereby contributing to whole-organism ageing. Although significant progress has been made in the last decades towards understanding fundamental aspects of the ageing process, the precise mechanisms underlying the age-related effects of TOR are still not fully understood. TOR interfaces with several cellular processes, such as DNA transcription, mRNA translation, protein turnover and autophagy, among others. Interestingly, TOR regulates various aspects of metabolism including mitochondrial function and lipid metabolism. Inhibition of TOR activity stimulates autophagy, a conserved lysosomal catabolic pathway that controls the degradation and turnover of macromolecules and organelles. Autophagy also has an important role in maintaining metabolic homeostasis at both the cellular and whole-organism level. Ageing in diverse organisms ranging from yeast to mammals appears to be associated with insufficient autophagy. Here, we summarize recent developments that outline how TOR and autophagy modulate the ageing process, with special emphasis on their role in the regulation of metabolism. A better understanding of the complex interplay between TOR, autophagy and ageing will pave the way for the development of novel therapeutic strategies to treat age-related pathologies.

  17. Understanding the control of acyl flux through the lipid metabolic network of plant oil biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Bates, Philip D

    2016-09-01

    Plant oil biosynthesis involves a complex metabolic network with multiple subcellular compartments, parallel pathways, cycles, and pathways that have a dual function to produce essential membrane lipids and triacylglycerol. Modern molecular biology techniques provide tools to alter plant oil compositions through bioengineering, however with few exceptions the final composition of triacylglycerol cannot be predicted. One reason for limited success in oilseed bioengineering is the inadequate understanding of how to control the flux of fatty acids through various fatty acid modification, and triacylglycerol assembly pathways of the lipid metabolic network. This review focuses on the mechanisms of acyl flux through the lipid metabolic network, and highlights where uncertainty resides in our understanding of seed oil biosynthesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Lipid Biology edited by Kent D. Chapman and Ivo Feussner.

  18. Longitudinal trajectories of metabolic control across adolescence: associations with parental involvement, adolescents' psychosocial maturity, and health care utilization.

    PubMed

    King, Pamela S; Berg, Cynthia A; Butner, Jonathan; Drew, Linda M; Foster, Carol; Donaldson, David; Murray, Mary; Swinyard, Michael; Wiebe, Deborah J

    2012-05-01

    To predict trajectories of metabolic control across adolescence from parental involvement and adolescent psychosocial maturity, and to link metabolic control trajectories to health care utilization. Two hundred fifty-two adolescents (M age at study initiation = 12.5 years, SD = 1.5, range = 10-14 years) with type 1 diabetes (54.4% female, 92.8% Caucasian, length of diagnosis M = 4.7 years, SD = 3.0, range = 1-12 years) participated in a 2-year longitudinal study. Metabolic control was gathered from medical records every 3 months. Adolescents completed measures of self-reliance (functional autonomy and extreme peer orientation), self-control (self-control and externalizing behavior), and parental involvement in diabetes care (acceptance, monitoring, and frequency of help). At the end of the study, mothers reported health care utilization (diabetes-related emergency room visits and hospitalizations) over the past 6 months. Latent class growth analyses indicated two distinct trajectories of metabolic control across adolescence: moderate control with slight deterioration (92% of the sample; average HbA1c = 8.18%) and poor control with rapid deterioration (8% of the sample; average HbA1c of 12.09%). Adolescents with poor and rapidly deteriorating metabolic control reported lower paternal monitoring and frequency of help with diabetes management, lower functional autonomy, and lower self-control than others. Those with poor and rapidly deteriorating metabolic control were 6.4 times more likely to report diabetes-related emergency room visits, and 9.3 times more likely to report diabetes-related hospitalizations near the end of the study. Parental involvement and adolescents' psychosocial maturity predict patterns of deteriorating metabolic control across adolescence and could be targeted for intervention. Copyright © 2012 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Minireview: Nuclear Receptor-Controlled Steroid Hormone Synthesis and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    He, Jinhan; Cheng, Qiuqiong; Xie, Wen

    2010-01-01

    Steroid hormones are essential in normal physiology whereas disruptions in hormonal homeostasis represent an important etiological factor for many human diseases. Steroid hormones exert most of their functions through the binding and activation of nuclear hormone receptors (NRs or NHRs), a superfamily of DNA-binding and often ligand-dependent transcription factors. In recent years, accumulating evidence has suggested that NRs can also regulate the biosynthesis and metabolism of steroid hormones. This review will focus on the recent progress in our understanding of the regulatory role of NRs in hormonal homeostasis and the implications of this regulation in physiology and diseases. PMID:19762543

  20. [Excretion and metabolism of dopamine in patients with functional dyspepsia].

    PubMed

    Wachowska-Kelly, Patrycja; Stępień, Agnieszka; Romanowski, Marek; Chojnacki, Cezary

    2016-04-01

    Dopamine is one of major neurotransmitter in the central and peripheral nervous system. A significant amount of dopamine is also produced in the visceral nervous system and in gastrointestinal tract, where exhibits inhibitory activity on motility. The aim of the study was to assess the parameters of dopamine secretion and metabolism in patients with functional dyspepsia. The study was conducted in a group of 30 healthy subjects and 60 patients with functional dyspepsia (FD), that met the Rome Criteria III, for epigastric pain syndrome (EPS) and postprandial distress syndrome (PDS). The severity of dyspeptic symptoms was determined using a 10-point Visual-Analogue Scale (VAS). Fasting plasma concentration of dopamine (DA) and the contents of homovanillic acid (HVA) in the urine collection were determined by ELISA. DA concentration in plasma was similar in both clinical forms FD (EPS - 55.6 pg/ml, in patients with PDS - 63.5 pg/ml, p>0.05). Urine excretion of HVA in patients with PDS - 6.63 mg/24 h (p<0.05) was higher than in heathy subjects - 5.65 mg/24 h (p<0.05) and those with EPS - 5.07 mg/24 h (p<0.001). In the group with PDS severity of dyspeptic symptoms showed a positive correlation with the DA concentration in plasma and HVA excretion in the urine. Increased secretion of DA may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of PDS. © 2016 MEDPRESS.

  1. Metabolic syndrome and sexual function in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Dombek, Kathiussa; Capistrano, Emille Joana Medeiros; Costa, Ana Carolina Carioca; Marinheiro, Lizanka Paola Figueiredo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether female sexual dysfunction (FSD) is associated with metabolic syndrome (MS) and to identify factors that contribute to FSD in postmenopausal women. This was a cross-sectional study in 111 sexually active women aged 45-65 years. We applied the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) to evaluate the participant's sexual function and a structured questionnaire to collect demographic, socioeconomic, clinical, anthropometric, and laboratory data. The prevalences of MS and FSD were 68.5% and 70.3%, respectively. After logistic regression analysis, we identified the following variables associated with FSD: married status (prevalence ratio [PR] 1.69, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.16-2.47, p < 0.01), 6-10 years elapsed since menopause (PR 1.60, 95% CI 1.22-2.09, p < 0.01), occurrence of climacteric symptoms (PR 1.01, 95% CI 1.00-1.02, p = 0.03), and history of sexual abuse (PR 1.40, 95% CI 1.12-1.73, p < 0.01). We found a high prevalence of MS and FSD, but no association between both. Married status, time elapsed since menopause, climacteric symptoms, and history of sexual abuse emerged as factors associated with FSD on multivariate analysis.

  2. Yeast diversity of sourdoughs and associated metabolic properties and functionalities.

    PubMed

    De Vuyst, Luc; Harth, Henning; Van Kerrebroeck, Simon; Leroy, Frédéric

    2016-12-19

    Together with acidifying lactic acid bacteria, yeasts play a key role in the production process of sourdough, where they are either naturally present or added as a starter culture. Worldwide, a diversity of yeast species is encountered, with Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida humilis, Kazachstania exigua, Pichia kudriavzevii, Wickerhamomyces anomalus, and Torulaspora delbrueckii among the most common ones. Sourdough-adapted yeasts are able to withstand the stress conditions encountered during their growth, including nutrient starvation as well as the effects of acidic, oxidative, thermal, and osmotic stresses. From a technological point of view, their metabolism primarily contributes to the leavening and flavour of sourdough products. Besides ethanol and carbon dioxide, yeasts can produce metabolites that specifically affect flavour, such as organic acids, diacetyl, higher alcohols from branched-chain amino acids, and esters derived thereof. Additionally, several yeast strains possess functional properties that can potentially lead to nutritional and safety advantages. These properties encompass the production of vitamins, an improvement of the bioavailability of phenolic compounds, the dephosphorylation of phytic acid, the presence of probiotic potential, and the inhibition of fungi and their mycotoxin production. Strains of diverse species are new candidate functional starter cultures, offering opportunities beyond the conventional use of baker's yeast.

  3. Metabolism and Ovarian Function in PCOS Women: A Therapeutic Approach with Inositols

    PubMed Central

    Rossetti, Paola; Buscema, Massimo; Condorelli, Rosita Angela; Gullo, Giuseppe; Triolo, Onofrio

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is characterized by chronical anovulation and hyperandrogenism which may be present in a different degree of severity. Insulin-resistance and hyperinsulinemia are the main physiopathological basis of this syndrome and the failure of inositol-mediated signaling may concur to them. Myo (MI) and D-chiro-inositol (DCI), the most studied inositol isoforms, are classified as insulin sensitizers. In form of glycans, DCI-phosphoglycan and MI-phosphoglycan control key enzymes were involved in glucose and lipid metabolism. In form of phosphoinositides, they play an important role as second messengers in several cellular biological functions. Considering the key role played by insulin-resistance and androgen excess in PCOS patients, the insulin-sensitizing effects of both MI and DCI were tested in order to ameliorate symptoms and signs of this syndrome, including the possibility to restore patients' fertility. Accumulating evidence suggests that both isoforms of inositol are effective in improving ovarian function and metabolism in patients with PCOS, although MI showed the most marked effect on the metabolic profile, whereas DCI reduced hyperandrogenism better. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on inositol signaling and correlate data on biological functions of these multifaceted molecules, in view of a rational use for the therapy in women with PCOS. PMID:27579037

  4. Effect of metabolic syndrome on sexual function in pre- and postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Otunctemur, Alper; Dursun, Murat; Ozbek, Emin; Sahin, Suleyman; Besiroglu, Huseyin; Koklu, Ismail; Polat, Emre Can; Erkoc, Mustafa; Danis, Eyyup; Bozkurt, Muammer

    2015-01-01

    Female sexual dysfunction is a prevalent and multidimensional disorder related to many biological, psychological, and social determinants. The authors assessed the effect of one of the many factors affect sexual function-metabolic syndrome-on female sexual function. They equally divided 400 women participants among 4 groups: (a) premenopausal with metabolic syndrome, (b) premenopausal without metabolic syndrome, (c) postmenopausal with metabolic syndrome, and (d) postmenopausal without metabolic syndrome. The authors used the Female Sexual Function Index to assess women's sexual function. Female sexual dysfunction was found more often in both pre- and postmenopausal women with metabolic syndrome (p =.001). Overall Female Sexual Function Index score and satisfaction, pain, and desire domain scores independently of the menopause status showed statistically significant differences across women with metabolic syndrome in comparison with participants with no metabolic syndrome (p <.05). The authors also evaluated the associations among 5 components of metabolic syndrome and Female Sexual Function Index scores. Higher fasting glucose levels were significantly associated with the Female Sexual Function Index score (p <.05). This study shows that sexual dysfunction is more prevalent in pre- and postmenopausal women with the metabolic syndrome.

  5. Exercise reveals impairments in left ventricular systolic function in patients with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Sara B; Reger, Brian L; Donley, David A; Bonner, Daniel E; Warden, Bradford E; Gharib, Wissam; Failinger, Conard F; Olfert, Melissa D; Frisbee, Jefferson C; Olfert, I Mark; Chantler, Paul D

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is the manifestation of a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors and is associated with a threefold increase in the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, which is suggested to be mediated, in part, by resting left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction. However, to what extent resting LV systolic function is impaired in MetS is controversial, and there are no data indicating whether LV systolic function is impaired during exercise. Accordingly, the objective of this study was to examine comprehensively the LV and arterial responses to exercise in individuals with MetS without diabetes and/or overt cardiovascular disease in comparison to a healthy control population. Cardiovascular function was characterized using Doppler echocardiography and gas exchange in individuals with MetS (n = 27) versus healthy control subjects (n = 20) at rest and during peak exercise. At rest, individuals with MetS displayed normal LV systolic function but reduced LV diastolic function compared with healthy control subjects. During peak exercise, individuals with MetS had impaired contractility, pump performance and vasodilator reserve capacity versus control subjects. A blunted contractile reserve response resulted in diminished arterial-ventricular coupling reserve and limited aerobic capacity in individuals with MetS versus control subjects. These findings are of clinical importance, because they provide insight into the pathophysiological changes in MetS that may predispose this population of individuals to an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  6. ERRα metabolic nuclear receptor controls growth of colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bernatchez, Gérald; Giroux, Véronique; Lassalle, Thomas; Carpentier, André C; Rivard, Nathalie; Carrier, Julie C

    2013-10-01

    The estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRα) is a nuclear receptor that acts primarily as a regulator of metabolic processes, particularly in tissues subjected to high-energy demand. In addition to its control of energy metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis, ERRα has recently been associated with cancer progression. Notably, increased expression of ERRα has been shown in several cancerous tissues, including breast, ovary and colon. However, additional studies are required to gain insight into the action of ERRα in cancer biology, particularly in non-endocrine-related cancers. Therefore, using a short hairpin RNA-mediated approach, we investigated whether ERRα is required for the rapid growth of colon cancer cells and to maintain their neoplastic metabolic state. Results show that silencing ERRα significantly impaired colon cancer cell proliferation and colony formation in vitro as well as their in vivo tumorigenic capacity. A pronounced delay in G1-to-S cell cycle phase transition was observed in ERRα-depleted cells in association with reduced cyclin-dependent kinase 2 activity and hyperphosphorylated state of the retinoblastoma protein along with disturbed expression of several cell cycle regulators, including p15 and p27. Interestingly, ERRα-depleted HCT116 cells also displayed significant reduction in expression of a large set of key genes to glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle and lipid synthesis. Furthermore, using (14)C isotope tracer analysis, ERRα depletion in colon cancer cells resulted in reduced glucose incorporation and glucose-mediated lipogenesis in these cells. These findings suggest that ERRα coordinates colon cancer cell proliferation and tumorigenic capacity with energy metabolism. Thus, ERRα could represent a promising therapeutic target in colon cancer.

  7. Metabolic footprinting in microbiology: methods and applications in functional genomics and biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Mapelli, Valeria; Olsson, Lisbeth; Nielsen, Jens

    2008-09-01

    Metabolomics embraces several strategies that aim to quantify cell metabolites in order to increase our understanding of how metabolite levels and interactions influence phenotypes. Metabolic footprinting represents a niche within metabolomics, because it focuses on the analysis of extracellular metabolites. Although metabolic footprinting represents only a fraction of the entire metabolome, it provides important information for functional genomics and strain characterization, and it can also provide scientists with a key understanding of cell communication mechanisms, metabolic engineering and industrial biotechnological processes. Due to the tight and convoluted relationship between intracellular metabolism and metabolic footprinting, metabolic footprinting can provide precious information about the intracellular metabolic status. Hereby, we state that integrative information from metabolic footprinting can assist in further interpretation of metabolic networks.

  8. Predicting epistasis: an experimental test of metabolic control theory with bacterial transcription and translation.

    PubMed

    MacLean, R C

    2010-03-01

    Epistatic interactions between mutations are thought to play a crucial role in a number of evolutionary processes, including adaptation and sex. Evidence for epistasis is abundant, but tests of general theoretical models that can predict epistasis are lacking. In this study, I test the ability of metabolic control theory to predict epistasis using a novel experimental approach that combines phenotypic and genetic perturbations of enzymes involved in gene expression and protein synthesis in the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These experiments provide experimental support for two key predictions of metabolic control theory: (i) epistasis between genes involved in the same pathway is antagonistic; (ii) epistasis becomes increasingly antagonistic as mutational severity increases. Metabolic control theory is a general theory that applies to any set of genes that are involved in the same linear processing chain, not just metabolic pathways, and I argue that this theory is likely to have important implications for predicting epistasis between functionally coupled genes, such as those involved in antibiotic resistance. Finally, this study highlights the fact that phenotypic manipulations of gene activity provide a powerful method for studying epistasis that complements existing genetic methods.

  9. miR-125b controls monocyte adaptation to inflammation through mitochondrial metabolism and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Duroux-Richard, Isabelle; Roubert, Christine; Ammari, Meryem; Présumey, Jessy; Grün, Joachim R.; Häupl, Thomas; Grützkau, Andreas; Lecellier, Charles-Henri; Boitez, Valérie; Codogno, Patrice; Escoubet, Johanna; Pers, Yves-Marie; Jorgensen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic changes drive monocyte differentiation and fate. Although abnormal mitochondria metabolism and innate immune responses participate in the pathogenesis of many inflammatory disorders, molecular events regulating mitochondrial activity to control life and death in monocytes remain poorly understood. We show here that, in human monocytes, microRNA-125b (miR-125b) attenuates the mitochondrial respiration through the silencing of the BH3-only proapoptotic protein BIK and promotes the elongation of the mitochondrial network through the targeting of the mitochondrial fission process 1 protein MTP18, leading to apoptosis. Proinflammatory activation of monocyte-derived macrophages is associated with a concomitant increase in miR-125b expression and decrease in BIK and MTP18 expression, which lead to reduced oxidative phosphorylation and enhanced mitochondrial fusion. In a chronic inflammatory systemic disorder, CD14+ blood monocytes display reduced miR-125b expression as compared with healthy controls, inversely correlated with BIK and MTP18 messenger RNA expression. Our findings not only identify BIK and MTP18 as novel targets for miR-125b that control mitochondrial metabolism and dynamics, respectively, but also reveal a novel function for miR-125b in regulating metabolic adaptation of monocytes to inflammation. Together, these data unravel new molecular mechanisms for a proapoptotic role of miR-125b in monocytes and identify potential targets for interfering with excessive inflammatory activation of monocytes in inflammatory disorders. PMID:27702798

  10. The Secret Life of NAD+: An Old Metabolite Controlling New Metabolic Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Houtkooper, Riekelt H.; Cantó, Carles; Wanders, Ronald J.; Auwerx, Johan

    2010-01-01

    A century after the identification of a coenzymatic activity for NAD+, NAD+ metabolism has come into the spotlight again due to the potential therapeutic relevance of a set of enzymes whose activity is tightly regulated by the balance between the oxidized and reduced forms of this metabolite. In fact, the actions of NAD+ have been extended from being an oxidoreductase cofactor for single enzymatic activities to acting as substrate for a wide range of proteins. These include NAD+-dependent protein deacetylases, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases, and transcription factors that affect a large array of cellular functions. Through these effects, NAD+ provides a direct link between the cellular redox status and the control of signaling and transcriptional events. Of particular interest within the metabolic/endocrine arena are the recent results, which indicate that the regulation of these NAD+-dependent pathways may have a major contribution to oxidative metabolism and life span extension. In this review, we will provide an integrated view on: 1) the pathways that control NAD+ production and cycling, as well as its cellular compartmentalization; 2) the signaling and transcriptional pathways controlled by NAD+; and 3) novel data that show how modulation of NAD+-producing and -consuming pathways have a major physiological impact and hold promise for the prevention and treatment of metabolic disease. PMID:20007326

  11. Lifestyle Intervention on Metabolic Syndrome and its Impact on Quality of Life: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Saboya, Patrícia Pozas; Bodanese, Luiz Carlos; Zimmermann, Paulo Roberto; Gustavo, Andreia da Silva; Macagnan, Fabricio Edler; Feoli, Ana Pandolfo; Oliveira, Margareth da Silva

    2017-01-01

    Background Lifestyle intervention programs can reduce the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and, therefore, reduce the risk for cardiac disease, one of the main public health problems nowadays. Objective The aim of this study was to compare the effects of three types of approach for lifestyle change programs in the reduction of metabolic parameters, and to identify its impact on the quality of life (QOL) of individuals with MetS. Methods A randomized controlled trial included 72 individuals with MetS aged 30-59 years. Individuals were randomized into three groups of multidisciplinary intervention [Standard Intervention (SI) - control group; Group Intervention (GI); and Individual Intervention (II)] during 12 weeks. The primary outcome was change in the metabolic parameters, and secondarily, the improvement in QOL measures at three moments: baseline, 3 and 9 months. Results Group and individual interventions resulted in a significant reduction in body mass index, waist circumference, systolic blood pressure at 3 months and the improvement of QOL, although it was significantly associated with the physical functioning domain. However, these changes did not remain 6 months after the end of intervention. Depression and anxiety were significantly associated with worse QOL, although they showed no effect on the response to intervention. Conclusion Multidisciplinary intervention, especially in a group, might be an effective and economically feasible strategy in the control of metabolic parameters of MetS and improvement of QOL compared to SI, even in a dose-effect relationship. PMID:27982160

  12. Metabolic profiling of Lolium perenne shows functional integration of metabolic responses to diverse subtoxic conditions of chemical stress.

    PubMed

    Serra, Anne-Antonella; Couée, Ivan; Renault, David; Gouesbet, Gwenola; Sulmon, Cécile

    2015-04-01

    Plant communities are confronted with a great variety of environmental chemical stresses. Characterization of chemical stress in higher plants has often been focused on single or closely related stressors under acute exposure, or restricted to a selective number of molecular targets. In order to understand plant functioning under chemical stress conditions close to environmental pollution conditions, the C3 grass Lolium perenne was subjected to a panel of different chemical stressors (pesticide, pesticide degradation compound, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, and heavy metal) under conditions of seed-level or root-level subtoxic exposure. Physiological and metabolic profiling analysis on roots and shoots revealed that all of these subtoxic chemical stresses resulted in discrete physiological perturbations and complex metabolic shifts. These metabolic shifts involved stressor-specific effects, indicating multilevel mechanisms of action, such as the effects of glyphosate and its degradation product aminomethylphosphonic acid on quinate levels. They also involved major generic effects that linked all of the subtoxic chemical stresses with major modifications of nitrogen metabolism, especially affecting asparagine, and of photorespiration, especially affecting alanine and glycerate. Stress-related physiological effects and metabolic adjustments were shown to be integrated through a complex network of metabolic correlations converging on Asn, Leu, Ser, and glucose-6-phosphate, which could potentially be modulated by differential dynamics and interconversion of soluble sugars (sucrose, trehalose, fructose, and glucose). Underlying metabolic, regulatory, and signalling mechanisms linking these subtoxic chemical stresses with a generic impact on nitrogen metabolism and photorespiration are discussed in relation to carbohydrate and low-energy sensing.

  13. Relation Between Obesity, Metabolic Syndrome, Successful Long-Term Weight Reduction, and Right Ventricular Function.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Judith; Strack, Christina; Fenk, Sabine; Mohr, Margareta; Loew, Thomas; Schmitz, Gerd; Maier, Lars; Fischer, Marcus; Baessler, Andrea

    2016-07-27

    This study sought to examine the relationships between right ventricular (RV) function and geometry, morbid obesity with and without the metabolic syndrome, and the effect of long-term weight loss. Obese (n = 153, BMI 41.2 ± 8.7 kg/m(2)) and healthy non-obese control subjects (n = 38, BMI 25.5 ± 3.3 kg/m(2)) of similar age and gender distribution were prospectively studied during the course of a 1-year weight reduction program with echocardiography at baseline and after one year of follow up. Function and geometry of the right heart were evaluated by tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE), tricuspid annular systolic velocity (TDI S'), RV myocardial performance index (TEI), RV end-diastolic (RVEDD) and end-systolic diameter (RVESD), area of the right atrium (RAA), and systolic pulmonary artery pressure (PAP). Whereas parameters of systolic and diastolic LV function were significantly worse in the obese subjects than those in the non-obese subjects (EF 66 ± 6 versus 69 ± 6%, P = 0.004; E/E' 7.4 ± 2.5 versus 6.3 ± 2.6, P = 0.010), parameters of RV function (TAPSE 25.6 ± 4.5 versus 25.1 ± 3.5 mm, P = 0.528; TDI S' 13.5 ± 2.9 versus 13.8 ± 2.9 mm/second, P = 0.553; TEI 0.25 ± 0.13 versus 0.28 ± 0.09, P = 0.283) as well as geometry measurements were comparable between the obese and non-obese participants and also in obese subjects with full blown metabolic syndrome. Additionally, successful weight reduction did not alter the RV parameters. Nevertheless, in the few obese subjects with RV dysfunction (n = 7), metabolic syndrome parameters were more pronounced than in obese with normal RV function.Morbid obesity with and without the metabolic syndrome is accompanied by an impaired LV systolic and diastolic function. In contrast, RV function appears to be less affected by obesity independent of the presence of the metabolic syndrome.

  14. Dietary fiber supplements: effects in obesity and metabolic syndrome and relationship to gastrointestinal functions.

    PubMed

    Papathanasopoulos, Athanasios; Camilleri, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Dietary fiber is a term that reflects a heterogeneous group of natural food sources, processed grains, and commercial supplements. Several forms of dietary fiber have been used as complementary or alternative agents in the management of manifestations of the metabolic syndrome, including obesity. Not surprisingly, there is a great variation in the biological efficacy of dietary fiber in the metabolic syndrome and body weight control. Diverse factors and mechanisms have been reported as mediators of the effects of dietary fiber on the metabolic syndrome and obesity. Among this array of mechanisms, the modulation of gastric sensorimotor influences appears to be crucial for the effects of dietary fiber but also quite variable. This report focuses on the role, mechanism of action, and benefits of different forms of fiber and supplements on obesity and the metabolic syndrome, glycemia, dyslipidemia, and cardiovascular risk and explores the effects of dietary fiber on gastric sensorimotor function and satiety in mediating these actions of dietary fiber. Copyright 2010 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Kidney function in obese adolescents with or without metabolic syndrome in a nationally-representative sample of pediatric population: First report from the Middle East and North Africa: The CASPIAN-III Study: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Kelishadi, Roya; Gheissari, Alaleh; Bazookar, Neda; Motlagh, Mohammad Esmaeil; Taslimi, Mahnaz; Ardalan, Gelayol

    2013-01-01

    Background: Obesity in accordance with metabolic syndrome (MetS) confronts populations at the higher risk of morbidity and mortality of chronic diseases including, chronic kidney diseases (CKD). The renal complication of obesity and MetS has been less debated in young adolescents. The objective of this study was to assess the kidney function in obese adolescents with or without MetS. Materials and Methods: The data used in this study were collected as part of a national study entitled Childhood and Adolescence Surveillance and Prevention of Adult Non-communicable disease Study. The present study was conducted on a sub-sample of 113 obese adolescents (body mass index >95th percentile) aged between 10 years and 16 years selected by convenient sampling from the whole population studied. Anthropometric indexes and blood pressure were examined. A 12-h fasting serum was obtained for each participant to measure blood glucose, lipid profile, quantitative C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), Cystatin-c, urea, and creatinine. Fasting spot urine was collected to determine microalbumin and creatinine. Based on the study findings, participants were assigned into two groups with and without MetS. Results: The mean of microalbuminuria was in similar ranges in two groups and while the mean glomerular filtration rate (GFR) calculated by Bokenkamp's, updated and combined Schwartz's formulas were significantly lower in MetS + obese group in comparison with obese group. The similar result was not achieved by Filler's formula. Among MetS components, waist circumference had a correlation with hs-CRP (P = 0.04; r = 0.15). GFR was calculated based on the Schwartz formula and Cystatin-c formulas had no significant correlation with any MetS components. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that MetS can increase the risk of kidney dysfunction in obese adolescents. More studies are suggested in this regard in the pediatric population. PMID:23930111

  16. Metabolic gatekeeper function of B-lymphoid transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Chan, Lai N; Chen, Zhengshan; Braas, Daniel; Lee, Jae-Woong; Xiao, Gang; Geng, Huimin; Cosgun, Kadriye Nehir; Hurtz, Christian; Shojaee, Seyedmehdi; Cazzaniga, Valeria; Schjerven, Hilde; Ernst, Thomas; Hochhaus, Andreas; Kornblau, Steven M; Konopleva, Marina; Pufall, Miles A; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Liu, Grace J; Milne, Thomas A; Koeffler, H Phillip; Ross, Theodora S; Sánchez-García, Isidro; Borkhardt, Arndt; Yamamoto, Keith R; Dickins, Ross A; Graeber, Thomas G; Müschen, Markus

    2017-02-23

    B-lymphoid transcription factors, such as PAX5 and IKZF1, are critical for early B-cell development, yet lesions of the genes encoding these transcription factors occur in over 80% of cases of pre-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). The importance of these lesions in ALL has, until now, remained unclear. Here, by combining studies using chromatin immunoprecipitation with sequencing and RNA sequencing, we identify a novel B-lymphoid program for transcriptional repression of glucose and energy supply. Our metabolic analyses revealed that PAX5 and IKZF1 enforce a state of chronic energy deprivation, resulting in constitutive activation of the energy-stress sensor AMPK. Dominant-negative mutants of PAX5 and IKZF1, however, relieved this glucose and energy restriction. In a transgenic pre-B ALL mouse model, the heterozygous deletion of Pax5 increased glucose uptake and ATP levels by more than 25-fold. Reconstitution of PAX5 and IKZF1 in samples from patients with pre-B ALL restored a non-permissive state and induced energy crisis and cell death. A CRISPR/Cas9-based screen of PAX5 and IKZF1 transcriptional targets identified the products of NR3C1 (encoding the glucocorticoid receptor), TXNIP (encoding a glucose-feedback sensor) and CNR2 (encoding a cannabinoid receptor) as central effectors of B-lymphoid restriction of glucose and energy supply. Notably, transport-independent lipophilic methyl-conjugates of pyruvate and tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolites bypassed the gatekeeper function of PAX5 and IKZF1 and readily enabled leukaemic transformation. Conversely, pharmacological TXNIP and CNR2 agonists and a small-molecule AMPK inhibitor strongly synergized with glucocorticoids, identifying TXNIP, CNR2 and AMPK as potential therapeutic targets. Furthermore, our results provide a mechanistic explanation for the empirical finding that glucocorticoids are effective in the treatment of B-lymphoid but not myeloid malignancies. Thus, B-lymphoid transcription factors

  17. Association of Metabolic Syndrome With Kidney Function and Histology in Living Kidney Donors

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Y.; Thomas, G.; Nurko, S.; Stephany, B.; Fatica, R.; Chiesa, A.; Rule, A. D.; Srinivas, T.; Schold, J. D.; Navaneethan, S. D.; Poggio, E. D.

    2013-01-01

    The selection of living kidney donors is based on a formal evaluation of the state of health. However, this spectrum of health includes subtle metabolic derangements that can cluster as metabolic syndrome. We studied the association of metabolic syndrome with kidney function and histology in 410 donors from 2005 to 2012, of whom 178 donors were systematically followed after donation since 2009. Metabolic syndrome was defined as per the NCEP ATPIII criteria, but using a BMI > 25 kg/m2 instead of waist circumference. Following donation, donors received counseling on lifestyle modification. Metabolic syndrome was present in 50 (12.2%) donors. Donors with metabolic syndrome were more likely to have chronic histological changes on implant biopsies than donors with no metabolic syndrome (29.0% vs. 9.3%, p < 0.001). This finding was associated with impaired kidney function recovery following donation. At last follow-up, reversal of metabolic syndrome was observed in 57.1% of donors with predonation metabolic syndrome, while only 10.8% of donors developed de novo metabolic syndrome (p < 0.001). In conclusion, metabolic syndrome in donors is associated with chronic histological changes, and nephrectomy in these donors was associated with subsequent protracted recovery of kidney function. Importantly, weight loss led to improvement of most abnormalities that define metabolic syndrome. PMID:23865821

  18. How aneuploidy affects metabolic control and causes cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Rasnick, D; Duesberg, P H

    1999-01-01

    The complexity and diversity of cancer-specific phenotypes, including de-differentiation, invasiveness, metastasis, abnormal morphology and metabolism, genetic instability and progression to malignancy, have so far eluded explanation by a simple, coherent hypothesis. However, an adaptation of Metabolic Control Analysis supports the 100-year-old hypothesis that aneuploidy, an abnormal number of chromosomes, is the cause of cancer. The results demonstrate the currently counter-intuitive principle that it is the fraction of the genome undergoing differential expression, not the magnitude of the differential expression, that controls phenotypic transformation. Transforming the robust normal phenotype into cancer requires a twofold increase in the expression of thousands of normal gene products. The massive change in gene dose produces highly non-linear (i.e. qualitative) changes in the physiology and metabolism of cells and tissues. Since aneuploidy disrupts the natural balance of mitosis proteins, it also explains the notorious genetic instability of cancer cells as a consequence of the perpetual regrouping of chromosomes. In view of this and the existence of non-cancerous aneuploidy, we propose that cancer is the phenotype of cells above a certain threshold of aneuploidy. This threshold is reached either by the gradual, stepwise increase in the level of aneuploidy as a consequence of the autocatalysed genetic instability of aneuploid cells or by tetraploidization followed by a gradual loss of chromosomes. Thus the initiation step of carcinogenesis produces aneuploidy below the threshold for cancer, and the promotion step increases the level of aneuploidy above this threshold. We conclude that aneuploidy offers a simple and coherent explanation for all the cancer-specific phenotypes. Accordingly, the gross biochemical abnormalities, abnormal cellular size and morphology, the appearance of tumour-associated antigens, the high levels of secreted proteins responsible for

  19. Mitochondrial metabolism, reactive oxygen species, and macrophage function-fishing for insights.

    PubMed

    Hall, Christopher J; Sanderson, Leslie E; Crosier, Kathryn E; Crosier, Philip S

    2014-11-01

    Metabolism and defense mechanisms that protect against pathogens are two fundamental requirements for the survival of multicellular organisms. Research into metabolic disease has revealed these core mechanisms are highly co-dependent. This emerging field of research, termed immunometabolism, focuses on understanding how metabolism influences immunological processes and vice versa. It is now accepted that obesity influences the immune system and that obesity-driven inflammation contributes to many diseases including type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and Alzheimer's disease. The immune response requires the reallocation of nutrients within immune cells to different metabolic pathways to satisfy energy demands and the production of necessary macromolecules. One aspect of immunometabolic research is understanding how these metabolic changes help regulate specific immune cell functions. It is hoped that further understanding of the pathways involved in managing this immunological-metabolic interface will reveal new ways to treat metabolic disease. Given their growing status as principle drivers of obesity-associated inflammation, monocytes/macrophages have received much attention when studying the consequences of inflammation within adipose tissue. Less is known regarding how metabolic changes within macrophages (metabolic reprogramming) influence their immune cell function. In this review, we focus on our current understanding of how monocytes/macrophages alter their intracellular metabolism during the immune response and how these changes dictate specific effector functions. In particular, the immunomodulatory functions of mitochondrial metabolism and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species. We also highlight how the attributes of the zebrafish model system can be exploited to reveal new mechanistic insights into immunometabolic processes.

  20. A Modeling and Simulation Approach to the Study of Metabolic Control Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez-Caso, Carlos; Sanchez-Jimenez, Francisca; Medina, Miguel Angel

    2002-01-01

    Metabolic control analysis has contributed to the rapid advance in our understanding of metabolic regulation. However, up to now this topic has not been covered properly in biochemistry courses. This work reports the development and implementation of a practical lesson on metabolic control analysis (MCA) using modeling and simulation. The…

  1. A Modeling and Simulation Approach to the Study of Metabolic Control Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez-Caso, Carlos; Sanchez-Jimenez, Francisca; Medina, Miguel Angel

    2002-01-01

    Metabolic control analysis has contributed to the rapid advance in our understanding of metabolic regulation. However, up to now this topic has not been covered properly in biochemistry courses. This work reports the development and implementation of a practical lesson on metabolic control analysis (MCA) using modeling and simulation. The…

  2. Liver disease alters high-density lipoprotein composition, metabolism and function.

    PubMed

    Trieb, Markus; Horvath, Angela; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Spindelboeck, Walter; Stadlbauer, Vanessa; Taschler, Ulrike; Curcic, Sanja; Stauber, Rudolf E; Holzer, Michael; Pasterk, Lisa; Heinemann, Akos; Marsche, Gunther

    2016-07-01

    High-density lipoproteins (HDL) are important endogenous inhibitors of inflammatory responses. Functional impairment of HDL might contribute to the excess mortality experienced by patients with liver disease, but the effect of cirrhosis on HDL metabolism and function remain elusive. To get an integrated measure of HDL quantity and quality, we assessed several metrics of HDL function using apolipoprotein (apo) B-depleted sera from patients with compensated cirrhosis, patients with acutely decompensated cirrhosis and healthy controls. We observed that sera of cirrhotic patients showed reduced levels of HDL-cholesterol and profoundly suppressed activities of several enzymes involved in HDL maturation and metabolism. Native gel electrophoresis analyses revealed that cirrhotic serum HDL shifts towards the larger HDL2 subclass. Proteomic assessment of isolated HDL identified several proteins, including apoA-I, apoC-III, apoE, paraoxonase 1 and acute phase serum amyloid A to be significantly altered in cirrhotic patients. With regard to function, these alterations in levels, composition and structure of HDL were strongly associated with metrics of function of apoB-depleted sera, including cholesterol efflux capability, paraoxonase activity, the ability to inhibit monocyte production of cytokines and endothelial regenerative activities. Of particular interest, cholesterol efflux capacity appeared to be strongly associated with liver disease mortality. Our findings may be clinically relevant and improve our ability to monitor cirrhotic patients at high risk.

  3. Functional, structural, and metabolic abnormalities of the hippocampal formation in Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Mervis, Carolyn B; Sarpal, Deepak; Koch, Paul; Steele, Sonya; Kohn, Philip; Marenco, Stefano; Morris, Colleen A; Das, Saumitra; Kippenhan, Shane; Mattay, Venkata S; Weinberger, Daniel R; Berman, Karen Faith

    2005-07-01

    Williams syndrome (WS), caused by microdeletion of some 21 genes on chromosome 7q11.23, is characterized by dysmorphic features, mental retardation or learning difficulties, elastin arteriopathy, and striking neurocognitive and social-behavioral abnormalities. Recent studies of murine knockouts of key genes in the microdeleted region, LIM kinase 1 (LIMK1) and cytoplasmatic linker protein 2 (CYLN2), demonstrated significant functional and metabolic abnormalities, but grossly normal structure, in the hippocampal formation (HF). Furthermore, deficits in spatial navigation and long-term memory, major cognitive domains dependent on hippocampal function, have been described in WS. We used multimodal neuroimaging to characterize hippocampal structure, function, and metabolic integrity in 12 participants with WS and 12 age-, sex-, and IQ-matched healthy controls. PET and functional MRI studies showed profound reduction in resting blood flow and absent differential response to visual stimuli in the anterior HF in WS. Spectroscopic measures of N-acetyl aspartate, considered a marker of synaptic activity, were reduced. Hippocampal size was preserved, but subtle alterations in shape were present. These data demonstrate abnormalities in HF in WS in agreement with murine models, implicate LIMK1 and CYLN2 in human hippocampal function, and suggest that hippocampal dysfunction may contribute to neurocognitive abnormalities in WS.

  4. Functional, structural, and metabolic abnormalities of the hippocampal formation in Williams syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Mervis, Carolyn B.; Sarpal, Deepak; Koch, Paul; Steele, Sonya; Kohn, Philip; Marenco, Stefano; Morris, Colleen A.; Das, Saumitra; Kippenhan, Shane; Mattay, Venkata S.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Berman, Karen Faith

    2005-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS), caused by microdeletion of some 21 genes on chromosome 7q11.23, is characterized by dysmorphic features, mental retardation or learning difficulties, elastin arteriopathy, and striking neurocognitive and social-behavioral abnormalities. Recent studies of murine knockouts of key genes in the microdeleted region, LIM kinase 1 (LIMK1) and cytoplasmatic linker protein 2 (CYLN2), demonstrated significant functional and metabolic abnormalities, but grossly normal structure, in the hippocampal formation (HF). Furthermore, deficits in spatial navigation and long-term memory, major cognitive domains dependent on hippocampal function, have been described in WS. We used multimodal neuroimaging to characterize hippocampal structure, function, and metabolic integrity in 12 participants with WS and 12 age-, sex-, and IQ-matched healthy controls. PET and functional MRI studies showed profound reduction in resting blood flow and absent differential response to visual stimuli in the anterior HF in WS. Spectroscopic measures of N-acetyl aspartate, considered a marker of synaptic activity, were reduced. Hippocampal size was preserved, but subtle alterations in shape were present. These data demonstrate abnormalities in HF in WS in agreement with murine models, implicate LIMK1 and CYLN2 in human hippocampal function, and suggest that hippocampal dysfunction may contribute to neurocognitive abnormalities in WS. PMID:15951840

  5. (Physiology and genetics of metabolic flux control in Zymomonas mobilis)

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, T.

    1992-01-01

    The funded research deals with the physiology and genetics of glycolytic flux control in Zymomonas mobilis. Two fundamental biological questions are begin addressed: First, how do the enzymes of glycolytic pathways act in concert to regulate metabolic flux Second, what is the role of gene expression in regulating high level synthesis of the glycolytic enzymes in a balance that allows proper glycolytic flux control The specific objectives of the grant are as follows: 1. To clone the structural and regulatory regions of the Z. mobilis genes encoding glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, phosphoglucose isomerase, enolase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydratase, 2- keto-3-deoxy- 6-phosphogluconate aldolase, glucokinase and fructokinase. 2. To characterize the structure of these genes with respect to nucleotide sequence, transcriptional initiation sites promoter location, evolutionary relatedness to similar genes from other organisms, and organization of these genes on the genome. 3. To investigate the effects of genetically engineered alterations in the levels of the cloned enzymes on metabolic flux and cell growth. 4. To study transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of the genes encoding the enzymes of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway. The first two specific objectives have now been fully completed. Significant progress has been made on the fourth objective and work on the third objective is well underway.

  6. Functional compartmentalization of oxidative and glycolytic metabolism in frog skin

    SciTech Connect

    Skul'skii, I.A.; Lapin, A.V.

    1985-07-01

    One of the basic functions of the epithelial cells of the skin of amphibians is unidirectional transport of Na/sup +/ from the environment into the blood. This transport is carried out in two stages. First, Na/sup +/ is absorbed from the environment by the epithelial cells through their apical membranes. Next, Na/sup +/ is actively drawn into the blood stream with the help of Na-K pumps which are located on the basolateral membranes. Huf, as early as 1957, proposed that ionic homeostasis of Na-transporting epithelial cells may be maintained at the expense of glycolysis, whereas the unidirectional transport of Na/sup +/ requires exclusively energy from oxidative metabolism. At that time, however, little was known about the nature of the Na-K pump and there were no isotopic data on permeability of epithelial cells to Na/sup +/ and K/sup +/. The authors confirm and update Huf's hypothesis in accordance with current knowledge. It was shown that anaerobic conditions (argon atmosphere) and various respiration inhibitors (rotenone, thallium) selectively inhibit unidirectional transport of Na/sup +/, as measured with the help of /sup 22/Na or short-circuit current, without influencing the concentration of sodium and potassium in the cells. The rate of penetration of Na/sup +/ through the apical membrane decrease by at least twice, but, irrespective of a significant flow of Na/sup +/ through the epithelial layer disappears.

  7. Updated knowledge about polyphenols: functions, bioavailability, metabolism, and health.

    PubMed

    Landete, J M

    2012-01-01

    Polyphenols are important constituents of food products of plant origin. Fruits, vegetables, and beverages are the main sources of phenolic compounds in the human diet. These compounds are directly related to sensory characteristics of foods such as flavor, astringency and color. Polyphenols are extensively metabolized both in tissues and by the colonic microbiota. Normally, the circulating polyphenols are glucuronidated and/or sulphated and no free aglycones are found in plasma. The presence of phenolic compounds in the diet is beneficial to health due to their antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and vasodilating properties. The health effects of polyphenols depend on the amount consumed and their bioavailability. Moreover, polyphenols are able to kill or inhibit the growth of microorganisms such as bacteria, fungi, or protozoans. Some dietary polyphenols may have significant effects on the colonic flora providing a type of prebiotic effect. The anti-nutrient properties of polyphenols are also discussed in this paper. The antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, vasodilating, and prebiotic properties of polyphenols make them potential functional foods.

  8. Functions of autophagy in plant carbon and nitrogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ren, Chenxia; Liu, Jingfang; Gong, Qingqiu

    2014-01-01

    Carbon and nitrogen are essential components for plant growth. Although models of plant carbon and nitrogen metabolisms have long been established, certain gaps remain unfilled, such as how plants are able to maintain a flexible nocturnal starch turnover capacity over various light cycles, or how nitrogen remobilization is achieved during the reproductive growth stage. Recent advances in plant autophagy have shed light on such questions. Not only does autophagy contribute to starch degradation at night, but it participates in the degradation of chloroplast proteins and even chloroplasts after prolonged carbon starvation, thus help maintain the free amino acid pool and provide substrate for respiration. The induction of autophagy under these conditions may involve transcriptional regulation. Large-scale transcriptome analyses revealed that ATG8e belongs to a core carbon signaling response shared by Arabidopsis accessions, and the transcription of Arabidopsis ATG7 is tightly co-regulated with genes functioning in chlorophyll degradation and leaf senescence. In the reproductive phase, autophagy is essential for bulk degradation of leaf proteins, thus contributes to nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) both under normal and low-nitrogen conditions.

  9. Functional Characterization of Yersinia pestis Aerobic Glycerol Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Willias, Stephan P.; Chauhan, Sadhana; Motin, Vladimir L.

    2014-01-01

    Yersinia pestis biovar Orientalis isolates have lost the capacity to ferment glycerol. Herein we provide experimental validation that a 93 bp in-frame deletion within the glpD gene encoding the glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase present in all biovar Orientalis strains is sufficient to disrupt aerobic glycerol fermentation. Furthermore, the inability to ferment glycerol is often insured by a variety of additional mutations within the glpFKX operon which prevents glycerol internalization and conversion to glycerol-3-phosphate. The physiological impact of functional glpFKX in the presence of dysfunctional glpD was assessed. Results demonstrate no change in growth kinetics at 26°C and 37°C. Mutants deficient in glpD displayed decreased intracellular accumulation of glycerol-3-phosphate, a characterized inhibitor of cAMP receptor protein (CRP) activation. Since CRP is rigorously involved in global regulation Y. pestis virulence, we tested a possible influence of a single glpD mutation on virulence. Nonetheless, subcutaneous and intranasal murine challenge was not impacted by glycerol metabolism. As quantified by crystal violet assay, biofilm formation of the glpD-deficient KIM6+ mutant was mildly repressed; whereas, chromosomal restoration of glpD in CO92 resulted in a significant increase in biofilm formation. PMID:25220241

  10. Insulin Enhances Endothelial Function Throughout the Arterial Tree in Healthy But Not Metabolic Syndrome Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Jahn, Linda A.; Hartline, Lee; Rao, Nagashree; Logan, Brent; Kim, Justin J.; Aylor, Kevin; Gan, Li-Ming; Westergren, Helena U.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Insulin reportedly impairs endothelial function in conduit arteries but improves it in resistance and microvascular arterioles in healthy humans. No studies have assessed endothelial function at three arterial levels in healthy or metabolic syndrome (METSYN) subjects. Objective: The objective of the study was to compare endothelial responsiveness of conduit arteries, resistance, and microvascular arterioles to insulin in healthy and METSYN subjects. Design: We assessed conduit, resistance, and microvascular arterial function in the postabsorptive and postprandial states and during euglycemic hyperinsulinemia (insulin clamp). Setting: The study was conducted at a clinical research unit. Participants: Age-matched healthy and METSYN subjects participated in the study. Interventions: We used brachial flow-mediated dilation, forearm postischemic flow velocity, and contrast-enhanced ultrasound to assess the conduit artery, resistance arteriole, and microvascular arteriolar endothelial function, respectively. We also assessed the conduit artery stiffness (pulse wave velocity and augmentation index) and measured the plasma concentrations of 92 cardiovascular disease biomarkers at baseline and after the clamp. Results: Postabsorptive and postprandial endothelial function was similar in controls and METSYN in all tested vessels. METSYN subjects were metabolically insulin resistant (P < .005). In controls, but not METSYN subjects, during euglycemic hyperinsulinemia, endothelial function improved at each level of arterial vasculature (P < .05 or less for each). Conduit vessel stiffness (pulse wave velocity) was increased in the METSYN group. Twelve of 92 biomarkers differed at baseline (P < .001) and remained different at the end of the insulin clamp. Conclusions: We conclude that insulin enhances arterial endothelial function in health but not in METSYN, and this vascular insulin resistance may underlie its increased cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:26756115

  11. A MED13-dependent skeletal muscle gene program controls systemic glucose homeostasis and hepatic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Amoasii, Leonela; Holland, William; Sanchez-Ortiz, Efrain; Baskin, Kedryn K; Pearson, Mackenzie; Burgess, Shawn C; Nelson, Benjamin R; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N

    2016-02-15

    The Mediator complex governs gene expression by linking upstream signaling pathways with the basal transcriptional machinery. However, how individual Mediator subunits may function in different tissues remains to be investigated. Through skeletal muscle-specific deletion of the Mediator subunit MED13 in mice, we discovered a gene regulatory mechanism by which skeletal muscle modulates the response of the liver to a high-fat diet. Skeletal muscle-specific deletion of MED13 in mice conferred resistance to hepatic steatosis by activating a metabolic gene program that enhances muscle glucose uptake and storage as glycogen. The consequent insulin-sensitizing effect within skeletal muscle lowered systemic glucose and insulin levels independently of weight gain and adiposity and prevented hepatic lipid accumulation. MED13 suppressed the expression of genes involved in glucose uptake and metabolism in skeletal muscle by inhibiting the nuclear receptor NURR1 and the MEF2 transcription factor. These findings reveal a fundamental molecular mechanism for the governance of glucose metabolism and the control of hepatic lipid accumulation by skeletal muscle. Intriguingly, MED13 exerts opposing metabolic actions in skeletal muscle and the heart, highlighting the customized, tissue-specific functions of the Mediator complex.

  12. A MED13-dependent skeletal muscle gene program controls systemic glucose homeostasis and hepatic metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Amoasii, Leonela; Holland, William; Sanchez-Ortiz, Efrain; Baskin, Kedryn K.; Pearson, Mackenzie; Burgess, Shawn C.; Nelson, Benjamin R.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.

    2016-01-01

    The Mediator complex governs gene expression by linking upstream signaling pathways with the basal transcriptional machinery. However, how individual Mediator subunits may function in different tissues remains to be investigated. Through skeletal muscle-specific deletion of the Mediator subunit MED13 in mice, we discovered a gene regulatory mechanism by which skeletal muscle modulates the response of the liver to a high-fat diet. Skeletal muscle-specific deletion of MED13 in mice conferred resistance to hepatic steatosis by activating a metabolic gene program that enhances muscle glucose uptake and storage as glycogen. The consequent insulin-sensitizing effect within skeletal muscle lowered systemic glucose and insulin levels independently of weight gain and adiposity and prevented hepatic lipid accumulation. MED13 suppressed the expression of genes involved in glucose uptake and metabolism in skeletal muscle by inhibiting the nuclear receptor NURR1 and the MEF2 transcription factor. These findings reveal a fundamental molecular mechanism for the governance of glucose metabolism and the control of hepatic lipid accumulation by skeletal muscle. Intriguingly, MED13 exerts opposing metabolic actions in skeletal muscle and the heart, highlighting the customized, tissue-specific functions of the Mediator complex. PMID:26883362

  13. Mitochondrial metabolism in hematopoietic stem cells requires functional FOXO3

    PubMed Central

    Rimmelé, Pauline; Liang, Raymond; Bigarella, Carolina L; Kocabas, Fatih; Xie, Jingjing; Serasinghe, Madhavika N; Chipuk, Jerry; Sadek, Hesham; Zhang, Cheng Cheng; Ghaffari, Saghi

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are primarily dormant but have the potential to become highly active on demand to reconstitute blood. This requires a swift metabolic switch from glycolysis to mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Maintenance of low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), a by-product of mitochondrial metabolism, is also necessary for sustaining HSC dormancy. Little is known about mechanisms that integrate energy metabolism with hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis. Here, we identify the transcription factor FOXO3 as a new regulator of metabolic adaptation of HSC. ROS are elevated in Foxo3−/− HSC that are defective in their activity. We show that Foxo3−/− HSC are impaired in mitochondrial metabolism independent of ROS levels. These defects are associated with altered expression of mitochondrial/metabolic genes in Foxo3−/− hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). We further show that defects of Foxo3−/− HSC long-term repopulation activity are independent of ROS or mTOR signaling. Our results point to FOXO3 as a potential node that couples mitochondrial metabolism with HSC homeostasis. These findings have critical implications for mechanisms that promote malignant transformation and aging of blood stem and progenitor cells. PMID:26209246

  14. Metabolic transistor strategy for controlling electron transfer chain activity in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hui; Tuli, Leepika; Bennett, George N.; San, Ka-Yiu

    2015-01-01

    A novel strategy to finely control a large metabolic flux by using a “metabolic transistor” approach was established. In this approach a small change in the level or availability of an essential component for the process is controlled by adding a competitive reaction that affects a precursor or an intermediate in its biosynthetic pathway. The change of the basal level of the essential component, considered as a base current in a transistor, has a large effect on the flux through the major pathway. In this way, the fine-tuning of a large flux can be accomplished. The “metabolic transistor” strategy was applied to controlling electron transfer chain function by manipulation of the quinone synthesis pathway in Escherichia coli. The achievement of a theoretical yield of lactate production under aerobic conditions via this strategy upon manipulation of the biosynthetic pathway of the key participant, ubiquinone-8 (Q8), in an E. coli strain provides an in vivo, genetically tunable means to control the activity of the electron transfer chain and manipulate the production of reduced products while limiting consumption of oxygen to a defined amount. PMID:25596510

  15. Metabolic transistor strategy for controlling electron transfer chain activity in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui; Tuli, Leepika; Bennett, George N; San, Ka-Yiu

    2015-03-01

    A novel strategy to finely control a large metabolic flux by using a "metabolic transistor" approach was established. In this approach a small change in the level or availability of an essential component for the process is controlled by adding a competitive reaction that affects a precursor or an intermediate in its biosynthetic pathway. The change of the basal level of the essential component, considered as a base current in a transistor, has a large effect on the flux through the major pathway. In this way, the fine-tuning of a large flux can be accomplished. The "metabolic transistor" strategy was applied to control electron transfer chain function by manipulation of the quinone synthesis pathway in Escherichia coli. The achievement of a theoretical yield of lactate production under aerobic conditions via this strategy upon manipulation of the biosynthetic pathway of the key participant, ubiquinone-8 (Q8), in an E. coli strain provides an in vivo, genetically tunable means to control the activity of the electron transfer chain and manipulate the production of reduced products while limiting consumption of oxygen to a defined amount.

  16. Genome-Scale Metabolic Modeling of Archaea Lends Insight into Diversity of Metabolic Function

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Decades of biochemical, bioinformatic, and sequencing data are currently being systematically compiled into genome-scale metabolic reconstructions (GEMs). Such reconstructions are knowledge-bases useful for engineering, modeling, and comparative analysis. Here we review the fifteen GEMs of archaeal species that have been constructed to date. They represent primarily members of the Euryarchaeota with three-quarters comprising representative of methanogens. Unlike other reviews on GEMs, we specially focus on archaea. We briefly review the GEM construction process and the genealogy of the archaeal models. The major insights gained during the construction of these models are then reviewed with specific focus on novel metabolic pathway predictions and growth characteristics. Metabolic pathway usage is discussed in the context of the composition of each organism's biomass and their specific energy and growth requirements. We show how the metabolic models can be used to study the evolution of metabolism in archaea. Conservation of particular metabolic pathways can be studied by comparing reactions using the genes associated with their enzymes. This demonstrates the utility of GEMs to evolutionary studies, far beyond their original purpose of metabolic modeling; however, much needs to be done before archaeal models are as extensively complete as those for bacteria. PMID:28133437

  17. Pharmaceutically controlled designer circuit for the treatment of the metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Haifeng; Charpin-El Hamri, Ghislaine; Zwicky, Katharina; Christen, Matthias; Folcher, Marc; Fussenegger, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic biology has significantly advanced the design of genetic devices that can reprogram cellular activities and provide novel treatment strategies for future gene- and cell-based therapies. However, many metabolic disorders are functionally linked while developing distinct diseases that are difficult to treat using a classic one-drug-one-disease intervention scheme. For example, hypertension, hyperglycemia, obesity, and dyslipidemia are interdependent pathologies that are collectively known as the metabolic syndrome, the prime epidemic of the 21st century. We have designed a unique therapeutic strategy in which the clinically licensed antihypertensive drug guanabenz (Wytensin) activates a synthetic signal cascade that stimulates the secretion of metabolically active peptides GLP-1 and leptin. Therefore, the signal transduction of a chimeric trace-amine–associated receptor 1 (cTAAR1) was functionally rewired via cAMP and cAMP-dependent phosphokinase A (PKA)-mediated activation of the cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB1) to transcription of synthetic promoters containing CREB1-specific cAMP response elements. Based on this designer signaling cascade, it was possible to use guanabenz to dose-dependently control expression of GLP-1-FcmIgG-Leptin, a bifunctional therapeutic peptide hormone that combines the glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and leptin via an IgG-Fc linker. In mice developing symptoms of the metabolic syndrome, this three-in-one treatment strategy was able to simultaneously attenuate hypertension and hyperglycemia as well as obesity and dyslipidemia. Using a clinically licensed drug to coordinate expression of therapeutic transgenes combines drug- and gene-based therapies for coordinated treatment of functionally related metabolic disorders. PMID:23248313

  18. Correlating Structure and Function of Drug-Metabolizing Enzymes: Progress and Ongoing Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Eric F.; Connick, J. Patrick; Reed, James R.; Backes, Wayne L.; Desai, Manoj C.; Xu, Lianhong; Estrada, D. Fernando; Laurence, Jennifer S.

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes a symposium sponsored by the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics at Experimental Biology held April 20-24 in Boston, MA. Presentations discussed the status of cytochrome P450 (P450) knowledge, emphasizing advances and challenges in relating structure with function and in applying this information to drug design. First, at least one structure of most major human drug-metabolizing P450 enzymes is known. However, the flexibility of these active sites can limit the predictive value of one structure for other ligands. A second limitation is our coarse-grain understanding of P450 interactions with membranes, other P450 enzymes, NADPH–cytochrome P450 reductase, and cytochrome b5. Recent work has examined differential P450 interactions with reductase in mixed P450 systems and P450:P450 complexes in reconstituted systems and cells, suggesting another level of functional control. In addition, protein nuclear magnetic resonance is a new approach to probe these protein/protein interactions, identifying interacting b5 and P450 surfaces, showing that b5 and reductase binding are mutually exclusive, and demonstrating ligand modulation of CYP17A1/b5 interactions. One desired outcome is the application of such information to control drug metabolism and/or design selective P450 inhibitors. A final presentation highlighted development of a CYP3A4 inhibitor that slows clearance of human immunodeficiency virus drugs otherwise rapidly metabolized by CYP3A4. Although understanding P450 structure/function relationships is an ongoing challenge, translational advances will benefit from continued integration of existing and new biophysical approaches. PMID:24130370

  19. Erosive esophagitis associated with metabolic syndrome, impaired liver function, and dyslipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Loke, Song-Seng; Yang, Kuender D; Chen, Kuang-Den; Chen, Jung-Fu

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether erosive esophagitis is correlated with metabolic syndrome and its components, abnormal liver function, and lipoprotein profiles. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional, case control study of subjects who underwent upper endoscopy during a health examination at the Health Management and Evaluation Center of a tertiary medical care facility located in Southern Taiwan. Metabolic syndrome components, body mass index (BMI), liver function, dyslipidemia, and cardiovascular risk factors, as defined by the ratio of total cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and the ratio of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol to HDL-C were compared between individuals with and without erosive esophagitis. Risk factors for erosive esophagitis were evaluated by multivariate logistic regression. RESULTS: Erosive esophagitis was diagnosed in 507 of 5015 subjects who were individually age and sex matched to 507 esophagitis-free control subjects. In patients with erosive esophagitis, BMI, waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, triglyceride levels, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, the ratio of total cholesterol to HDL-C, and the ratio of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol to HDL-C were significantly higher and HDL-C was significantly lower compared to patients without erosive esophagitis (all P < 0.05). In a multivariate analysis, central obesity (OR = 1.38; 95%CI: 1.0-1.86), hypertension (OR = 1.35; 95%CI: 1.04-1.76), hypertriglyceridemia (OR = 1.34; 95%CI: 1.02-1.76), cardiovascular risk factors as defined by a ratio of total cholesterol to HDL-C > 5 (OR = 1.45; 95%CI: 1.06-1.97), and aspartate aminotransferase (OR = 1.59; 95%CI: 1.08-2.34) were significantly associated with erosive esophagitis. CONCLUSION: Metabolic syndrome, impaired liver function, and a higher ratio of total cholesterol to HDL-C were associated with erosive esophagitis. PMID:24124334

  20. Correlating structure and function of drug-metabolizing enzymes: progress and ongoing challenges.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Eric F; Connick, J Patrick; Reed, James R; Backes, Wayne L; Desai, Manoj C; Xu, Lianhong; Estrada, D Fernando; Laurence, Jennifer S; Scott, Emily E

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes a symposium sponsored by the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics at Experimental Biology held April 20-24 in Boston, MA. Presentations discussed the status of cytochrome P450 (P450) knowledge, emphasizing advances and challenges in relating structure with function and in applying this information to drug design. First, at least one structure of most major human drug-metabolizing P450 enzymes is known. However, the flexibility of these active sites can limit the predictive value of one structure for other ligands. A second limitation is our coarse-grain understanding of P450 interactions with membranes, other P450 enzymes, NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase, and cytochrome b5. Recent work has examined differential P450 interactions with reductase in mixed P450 systems and P450:P450 complexes in reconstituted systems and cells, suggesting another level of functional control. In addition, protein nuclear magnetic resonance is a new approach to probe these protein/protein interactions, identifying interacting b5 and P450 surfaces, showing that b5 and reductase binding are mutually exclusive, and demonstrating ligand modulation of CYP17A1/b5 interactions. One desired outcome is the application of such information to control drug metabolism and/or design selective P450 inhibitors. A final presentation highlighted development of a CYP3A4 inhibitor that slows clearance of human immunodeficiency virus drugs otherwise rapidly metabolized by CYP3A4. Although understanding P450 structure/function relationships is an ongoing challenge, translational advances will benefit from continued integration of existing and new biophysical approaches.

  1. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism refers to all the physical and chemical processes in the body that convert or use energy, ... Tortora GJ, Derrickson BH. Metabolism. In: Tortora GJ, Derrickson ... Physiology . 14th ed. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons; 2014:chap ...

  2. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... El metabolismo Metabolism Basics Our bodies get the energy they need from food through metabolism, the chemical ... that convert the fuel from food into the energy needed to do everything from moving to thinking ...

  3. Metabolic Control of Tobacco Pollination by Sugars and Invertases.

    PubMed

    Goetz, Marc; Guivarćh, Anne; Hirsche, Jörg; Bauerfeind, Martin Andreas; González, María-Cruz; Hyun, Tae Kyung; Eom, Seung Hee; Chriqui, Dominique; Engelke, Thomas; Großkinsky, Dominik K; Roitsch, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    Pollination in flowering plants is initiated by germination of pollen grains on stigmas followed by fast growth of pollen tubes representing highly energy-consuming processes. The symplastic isolation of pollen grains and tubes requires import of Suc available in the apoplast. We show that the functional coupling of Suc cleavage by invertases and uptake of the released hexoses by monosaccharide transporters are critical for pollination in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). Transcript profiling, in situ hybridization, and immunolocalization of extracellular invertases and two monosaccharide transporters in vitro and in vivo support the functional coupling in supplying carbohydrates for pollen germination and tube growth evidenced by spatiotemporally coordinated expression. Detection of vacuolar invertases in maternal tissues by these approaches revealed metabolic cross talk between male and female tissues and supported the requirement for carbohydrate supply in transmitting tissue during pollination. Tissue-specific expression of an invertase inhibitor and addition of the chemical invertase inhibitor miglitol strongly reduced extracellular invertase activity and impaired pollen germination. Measurements of (competitive) uptake of labeled sugars identified two import pathways for exogenously available Suc into the germinating pollen operating in parallel: direct Suc uptake and via the hexoses after cleavage by extracellular invertase. Reduction of extracellular invertase activity in pollen decreases Suc uptake and severely compromises pollen germination. We further demonstrate that Glc as sole carbon source is sufficient for pollen germination, whereas Suc is supporting tube growth, revealing an important regulatory role of both the invertase substrate and products contributing to a potential metabolic and signaling-based multilayer regulation of pollination by carbohydrates. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  4. The function of oxalic acid in the human metabolism.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Daniel Stewart

    2011-09-01

    Biochemical reactions in cells which involve oxalic acid are described. It is shown that this compound is required for the formation of uracil and orotic acid. The former is a component of RNA which is common to all cells in the human metabolism. On the basis of the biochemical reactions described a possible treatment to relieve the effects of calcium oxalate renal calculi whose origin is related to the metabolic concentration of oxalic acid is proposed.

  5. Improving glycaemic control in a metabolically stressed patient in ICU.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Claire

    2004-06-10

    This article describes a clinical experience where the careful application of problem-solving skills has resulted in positive changes in glycaemic care in a critical care environment. The metabolic stress response to trauma injuries leads to episodes of hyperglycaemia. The application of a problem-solving process has resulted in greater understanding of best practice of the management of this problem. The importance of strict control of blood glucose levels in the critically ill patient is highlighted. Although the practice areas in this article is a specialized intensive care environment, in light of recent government-led recognition that many patients in hospital are increasingly ill (Department of Health (DoH), 1998a), this situation may arise in many ward environments.

  6. Pyruvate kinase triggers a metabolic feedback loop that controls redox metabolism in respiring cells.

    PubMed

    Grüning, Nana-Maria; Rinnerthaler, Mark; Bluemlein, Katharina; Mülleder, Michael; Wamelink, Mirjam M C; Lehrach, Hans; Jakobs, Cornelis; Breitenbach, Michael; Ralser, Markus

    2011-09-07

    In proliferating cells, a transition from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism is known as the Warburg effect, whose reversal inhibits cancer cell proliferation. Studying its regulator pyruvate kinase (PYK) in yeast, we discovered that central metabolism is self-adapting to synchronize redox metabolism when respiration is activated. Low PYK activity activated yeast respiration. However, levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) did not increase, and cells gained resistance to oxidants. This adaptation was attributable to accumulation of the PYK substrate phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). PEP acted as feedback inhibitor of the glycolytic enzyme triosephosphate isomerase (TPI). TPI inhibition stimulated the pentose phosphate pathway, increased antioxidative metabolism, and prevented ROS accumulation. Thus, a metabolic feedback loop, initiated by PYK, mediated by its substrate and acting on TPI, stimulates redox metabolism in respiring cells. Originating from a single catalytic step, this autonomous reconfiguration of central carbon metabolism prevents oxidative stress upon shifts between fermentation and respiration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A regulatory framework for shoot stem cell control integrating metabolic, transcriptional, and phytohormone signals.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Christoph; Gaillochet, Christophe; Medzihradszky, Anna; Busch, Wolfgang; Daum, Gabor; Krebs, Melanie; Kehle, Andreas; Lohmann, Jan U

    2014-02-24

    Plants continuously maintain pluripotent stem cells embedded in specialized tissues called meristems, which drive long-term growth and organogenesis. Stem cell fate in the shoot apical meristem (SAM) is controlled by the homeodomain transcription factor WUSCHEL (WUS) expressed in the niche adjacent to the stem cells. Here, we demonstrate that the bHLH transcription factor HECATE1 (HEC1) is a target of WUS and that it contributes to SAM function by promoting stem cell proliferation, while antagonizing niche cell activity. HEC1 represses the stem cell regulators WUS and CLAVATA3 (CLV3) and, like WUS, controls genes with functions in metabolism and hormone signaling. Among the targets shared by HEC1 and WUS are phytohormone response regulators, which we show to act as mobile signals in a universal feedback system. Thus, our work sheds light on the mechanisms guiding meristem function and suggests that the underlying regulatory system is far more complex than previously anticipated.

  8. Using cheminformatics for the identification of biological functions of small molecules in metabolic pathway.

    PubMed

    Niu, Bing; Lu, Wencong

    2013-01-01

    Small molecules are involved in metabolic pathways responsible for many biological activities. Therefore it is essential to study them to uncover the unknown biological function of highly complex living systems. It is a crucial step in modern drug discovery to correctly and effectively discover small molecules' biological function since small molecules are related to many protein functions and biological processes. This paper presents the application of cheminformatics approaches in predicting small molecule's (ligand's) biological function in metabolic pathway. Many examples of success in identification and prediction in the area of small molecule metabolic pathway mapping and small molecule-protein interaction prediction have been discussed.

  9. [Life style and metabolic control in DiabetIMSS program].

    PubMed

    Figueroa-Suárez, María Eugenia; Cruz-Toledo, Jairo Enoc; Ortiz-Aguirre, Alma Rosa; Lagunes-Espinosa, Alma Luisa; Jiménez-Luna, Jorge; Rodríguez-Moctezuma, José Raymundo

    2014-01-01

    To compare the lifestyle and metabolic control of diabetes patients included and not included in the DiabetIMSS program. Subjects with diabetes in the DiabetIMSS program and the general clinic were divided into three groups: group 1 first attended the program, group 2 were enrolled during the study, and group 3 had not been included the program. Demographic and clinical aspects were measured and the IMEVID instrument was applied. We included 539 type-2 diabetes patients, predominantly females (73.3%), mainly of primary school level, and more frequently on double-drug therapy. There were clinical differences between the three groups for program leavers in terms of weight, waist, blood pressure, fasting glucose, HbA1c, triglycerides, and IMEVID qualification, all p < 0.05; correlation analysis of the variables with the qualification of IMEVID was significant at p < 0.05. The higher number of variable control targets was for leavers (71% of group); those who were enrolled in the study was 32%, and who had not was 17.2%. There are significant differences in lifestyle and control target parameters in subjects who completed the DiabetIMSS program.

  10. Control of sugar transport and metabolism in Zymomonas mobilis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, T.

    1995-09-01

    This research deals with the physiology and genetics of sugar transport and metabolic control in Zymomonas mobilis. The specific objectives of the grant as as follows: First, the complex interactions of transcriptional, post-transcriptional and translational control mechanisms on regulation of the glf operon will be investigated. Second, the structure and function of the unique glucose facilitator will be examined by a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches, making use of the genetically reconstituted system in E. coli. Third, the possibility that physical association or indirect interactions between the glucose facilitator and glucokinase are involved in metabolic control will be analyzed. Fourth, the Z. mobilis glucose transport and phosphorylation system will be utilized to metabolically engineer recombinant E. coli with altered cell pool metabolite profiles. Work on the third and fourth objectives is complete, work on the first and second objectives is progressing nicely. Publication of this work has been admittedly slow, due primarily to a change n location of the research program from the University of Nebraska to The Ohio State University. However, it should be noted that much of the unpublished data outlined below represented completed studies, and are contained in graduate student theses which are being prepared for submission this summer. Since a full year remains in the current funding period, and the new laboratory is now up and running, we fully expect to make reasonable progress on the remaining objectives and to publish the results in a timely fashion.

  11. Storage reserve accumulation in Arabidopsis: metabolic and developmental control of seed filling.

    PubMed

    Baud, Sébastien; Dubreucq, Bertrand; Miquel, Martine; Rochat, Christine; Lepiniec, Loïc

    2008-01-01

    In the life cycle of higher plants, seed development is a key process connecting two distinct sporophytic generations. Seed development can be divided into embryo morphogenesis and seed maturation. An essential metabolic function of maturing seeds is the deposition of storage compounds that are mobilised to fuel post-germinative seedling growth. Given the importance of seeds for food and animal feed and considering the tremendous interest in using seed storage products as sustainable industrial feedstocks to replace diminishing fossil reserves, understanding the metabolic and developmental control of seed filling constitutes a major focus of plant research. Arabidopsis thaliana is an oilseed species closely related to the agronomically important Brassica oilseed crops. The main storage compounds accumulated in seeds of A. thaliana consist of oil stored as triacylglycerols (TAGs) and seed storage proteins (SSPs). Extensive tools developed for the molecular dissection of A. thaliana development and metabolism together with analytical and cytological procedures adapted for very small seeds have led to a good description of the biochemical pathways producing storage compounds. In recent years, studies using these tools have shed new light on the intricate regulatory network controlling the seed maturation process. This network involves sugar and hormone signalling together with a set of developmentally regulated transcription factors. Although much remains to be elucidated, the framework of the regulatory system controlling seed filling is coming into focus.

  12. Storage Reserve Accumulation in Arabidopsis: Metabolic and Developmental Control of Seed Filling

    PubMed Central

    Baud, Sébastien; Dubreucq, Bertrand; Miquel, Martine; Rochat, Christine; Lepiniec, Loïc

    2008-01-01

    In the life cycle of higher plants, seed development is a key process connecting two distinct sporophytic generations. Seed development can be divided into embryo morphogenesis and seed maturation. An essential metabolic function of maturing seeds is the deposition of storage compounds that are mobilised to fuel post-germinative seedling growth. Given the importance of seeds for food and animal feed and considering the tremendous interest in using seed storage products as sustainable industrial feedstocks to replace diminishing fossil reserves, understanding the metabolic and developmental control of seed filling constitutes a major focus of plant research. Arabidopsis thaliana is an oilseed species closely related to the agronomically important Brassica oilseed crops. The main storage compounds accumulated in seeds of A. thaliana consist of oil stored as triacylglycerols (TAGs) and seed storage proteins (SSPs). Extensive tools developed for the molecular dissection of A. thaliana development and metabolism together with analytical and cytological procedures adapted for very small seeds have led to a good description of the biochemical pathways producing storage compounds. In recent years, studies using these tools have shed new light on the intricate regulatory network controlling the seed maturation process. This network involves sugar and hormone signalling together with a set of developmentally regulated transcription factors. Although much remains to be elucidated, the framework of the regulatory system controlling seed filling is coming into focus. PMID:22303238

  13. Metabolic profiling of Lolium perenne shows functional integration of metabolic responses to diverse subtoxic conditions of chemical stress

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Anne-Antonella; Couée, Ivan; Renault, David; Gouesbet, Gwenola; Sulmon, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Plant communities are confronted with a great variety of environmental chemical stresses. Characterization of chemical stress in higher plants has often been focused on single or closely related stressors under acute exposure, or restricted to a selective number of molecular targets. In order to understand plant functioning under chemical stress conditions close to environmental pollution conditions, the C3 grass Lolium perenne was subjected to a panel of different chemical stressors (pesticide, pesticide degradation compound, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, and heavy metal) under conditions of seed-level or root-level subtoxic exposure. Physiological and metabolic profiling analysis on roots and shoots revealed that all of these subtoxic chemical stresses resulted in discrete physiological perturbations and complex metabolic shifts. These metabolic shifts involved stressor-specific effects, indicating multilevel mechanisms of action, such as the effects of glyphosate and its degradation product aminomethylphosphonic acid on quinate levels. They also involved major generic effects that linked all of the subtoxic chemical stresses with major modifications of nitrogen metabolism, especially affecting asparagine, and of photorespiration, especially affecting alanine and glycerate. Stress-related physiological effects and metabolic adjustments were shown to be integrated through a complex network of metabolic correlations converging on Asn, Leu, Ser, and glucose-6-phosphate, which could potentially be modulated by differential dynamics and interconversion of soluble sugars (sucrose, trehalose, fructose, and glucose). Underlying metabolic, regulatory, and signalling mechanisms linking these subtoxic chemical stresses with a generic impact on nitrogen metabolism and photorespiration are discussed in relation to carbohydrate and low-energy sensing. PMID:25618145

  14. Mitochondrial function, fatty acid metabolism, and immune system are relevant features of pig adipose tissue development.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Annie; Louveau, Isabelle; Gondret, Florence; Lebret, Bénédicte; Damon, Marie

    2012-11-15

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the genetic control of fat development in humans and livestock species still require characterization. To gain insights on gene expression patterns associated with genetic propensity for adiposity, we compared subcutaneous adipose tissue (SCAT) transcriptomics profiles from two contrasted pig breeds for body fatness. Samples were obtained from Large White (LW; lean phenotype) and Basque pigs (B; low growth and high fat content) at 35 kg (n = 5 per breed) or 145 kg body weight (n = 10 per breed). Using a custom adipose tissue microarray, we found 271 genes to be differentially expressed between the two breeds at both stages, out of which 123 were highly expressed in LW pigs and 148 genes were highly expressed in B pigs. Functional enrichment analysis based on gene ontology (GO) terms highlighted gene groups corresponding to the mitochondrial energy metabolism in LW pigs, whereas immune response was found significantly enriched in B pigs. Genes associated with lipid metabolism, such as ELOVL6, a gene involved in fatty acid elongation, had a lower expression in B compared with LW pigs. Furthermore, despite enlarged adipocyte diameters and higher plasma leptin concentration, B pigs displayed reduced lipogenic enzyme activities compared with LW pigs at 145 kg. Altogether, our results suggest that the development of adiposity was associated with a progressive worsening of the metabolic status, leading to a low-grade inflammatory state, and may thus be of significant interest for both livestock production and human health.

  15. Mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenases: structure/function, genetic polymorphisms and role in drug metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Sharon K.; Williams, David E.

    2005-01-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) oxygenates drugs and xenobiotics containing a “soft-nucleophile”, usually nitrogen or sulfur. FMO, like cytochrome P450 (CYP), is a monooxygenase, utilizing the reducing equivalents of NADPH to reduce 1 atom of molecular oxygen to water, while the other atom is used to oxidize the substrate. FMO and CYP also exhibit similar tissue and cellular location, molecular weight, substrate specificity, and exist as multiple enzymes under developmental control. The human FMO functional gene family is much smaller (5 families each with a single member) than CYP. FMO does not require a reductase to transfer electrons from NADPH and the catalytic cycle of the 2 monooxygenases is strikingly different. Another distinction is the lack of induction of FMOs by xenobiotics. In general, CYP is the major contributor to oxidative xenobiotic metabolism. However, FMO activity may be of significance in a number of cases and should not be overlooked. FMO and CYP have overlapping substrate specificities, but often yield distinct metabolites with potentially significant toxicological/pharmacological consequences. The physiological function(s) of FMO are poorly understood. Three of the 5 expressed human FMO genes, FMO1, FMO2 and FMO3, exhibit genetic polymorphisms. The most studied of these is FMO3 (adult human liver) in which mutant alleles contribute to the disease known as trimethylaminuria. The consequences of these FMO genetic polymorphisms in drug metabolism and human health are areas of research requiring further exploration. PMID:15922018

  16. Identification of functional differences in metabolic networks using comparative genomics and constraint-based models.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Joshua J; Reed, Jennifer L

    2012-01-01

    Genome-scale network reconstructions are useful tools for understanding cellular metabolism, and comparisons of such reconstructions can provide insight into metabolic differences between organisms. Recent efforts toward comparing genome-scale models have focused primarily on aligning metabolic networks at the reaction level and then looking at differences and similarities in reaction and gene content. However, these reaction comparison approaches are time-consuming and do not identify the effect network differences have on the functional states of the network. We have developed a bilevel mixed-integer programming approach, CONGA, to identify functional differences between metabolic networks by comparing network reconstructions aligned at the gene level. We first identify orthologous genes across two reconstructions and then use CONGA to identify conditions under which differences in gene content give rise to differences in metabolic capabilities. By seeking genes whose deletion in one or both models disproportionately changes flux through a selected reaction (e.g., growth or by-product secretion) in one model over another, we are able to identify structural metabolic network differences enabling unique metabolic capabilities. Using CONGA, we explore functional differences between two metabolic reconstructions of Escherichia coli and identify a set of reactions responsible for chemical production differences between the two models. We also use this approach to aid in the development of a genome-scale model of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Finally, we propose potential antimicrobial targets in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Staphylococcus aureus based on differences in their metabolic capabilities. Through these examples, we demonstrate that a gene-centric approach to comparing metabolic networks allows for a rapid comparison of metabolic models at a functional level. Using CONGA, we can identify differences in reaction and gene content which give rise to different

  17. Identification of Functional Differences in Metabolic Networks Using Comparative Genomics and Constraint-Based Models

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Joshua J.; Reed, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Genome-scale network reconstructions are useful tools for understanding cellular metabolism, and comparisons of such reconstructions can provide insight into metabolic differences between organisms. Recent efforts toward comparing genome-scale models have focused primarily on aligning metabolic networks at the reaction level and then looking at differences and similarities in reaction and gene content. However, these reaction comparison approaches are time-consuming and do not identify the effect network differences have on the functional states of the network. We have developed a bilevel mixed-integer programming approach, CONGA, to identify functional differences between metabolic networks by comparing network reconstructions aligned at the gene level. We first identify orthologous genes across two reconstructions and then use CONGA to identify conditions under which differences in gene content give rise to differences in metabolic capabilities. By seeking genes whose deletion in one or both models disproportionately changes flux through a selected reaction (e.g., growth or by-product secretion) in one model over another, we are able to identify structural metabolic network differences enabling unique metabolic capabilities. Using CONGA, we explore functional differences between two metabolic reconstructions of Escherichia coli and identify a set of reactions responsible for chemical production differences between the two models. We also use this approach to aid in the development of a genome-scale model of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Finally, we propose potential antimicrobial targets in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Staphylococcus aureus based on differences in their metabolic capabilities. Through these examples, we demonstrate that a gene-centric approach to comparing metabolic networks allows for a rapid comparison of metabolic models at a functional level. Using CONGA, we can identify differences in reaction and gene content which give rise to different

  18. Controller Chips Preserve Microprocessor Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    Above the Atlantic Ocean, off the coast of Brazil, there is a dip in the Earth s surrounding magnetic field called the South Atlantic Anomaly. Here, space radiation can reach into Earth s upper atmosphere to interfere with the functioning of satellites, aircraft, and even the International Space Station. "The South Atlantic Anomaly is a hot spot of radiation that the space station goes through at a certain point in orbit," Miria Finckenor, a physicist at Marshall Space Flight Center, describes, "If there s going to be a problem with the electronics, 90 percent of that time, it is going to be in that spot." Space radiation can cause physical damage to microchips and can actually change the software commands in computers. When high-energy particles penetrate a satellite or other spacecraft, the electrical components can absorb the energy and temporarily switch off. If the energy is high enough, it can cause the device to enter a hung state, which can only be addressed by restarting the system. When space radiation affects the operational status of microprocessors, the occurrence is called single event functional interrupt (SEFI). SEFI happens not only to the computers onboard spacecraft in Earth orbit, but to the computers on spacecraft throughout the solar system. "One of the Mars rovers had this problem in the radiation environment and was rebooting itself several times a day. On one occasion, it rebooted 40 times in one day," Finckenor says. "It s hard to obtain any data when you have to constantly reboot and start over."

  19. Neural control of renal function.

    PubMed

    Johns, Edward J; Kopp, Ulla C; DiBona, Gerald F

    2011-04-01

    The kidney is innervated with efferent sympathetic nerve fibers that directly contact the vasculature, the renal tubules, and the juxtaglomerular granular cells. Via specific adrenoceptors, increased efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity decreases renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate, increases renal tubular sodium and water reabsorption, and increases renin release. Decreased efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity produces opposite functional responses. This integrated system contributes importantly to homeostatic regulation of sodium and water balance under physiological conditions and to pathological alterations in sodium and water balance in disease. The kidney contains afferent sensory nerve fibers that are located primarily in the renal pelvic wall where they sense stretch. Stretch activation of these afferent sensory nerve fibers elicits an inhibitory renorenal reflex response wherein the contralateral kidney exhibits a compensatory natriuresis and diuresis due to diminished efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity. The renorenal reflex coordinates the excretory function of the two kidneys so as to facilitate homeostatic regulation of sodium and water balance. There is a negative feedback loop in which efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity facilitates increases in afferent renal nerve activity that in turn inhibit efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity so as to avoid excess renal sodium retention. In states of renal disease or injury, there is activation of afferent sensory nerve fibers that are excitatory, leading to increased peripheral sympathetic nerve activity, vasoconstriction, and increased arterial pressure. Proof of principle studies in essential hypertensive patients demonstrate that renal denervation produces sustained decreases in arterial pressure. © 2011 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 1:699-729, 2011.

  20. Posttranscriptional Control of T Cell Effector Function by Aerobic Glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chih-Hao; Curtis, Jonathan D.; Maggi, Leonard B.; Faubert, Brandon; Villarino, Alejandro V.; O’Sullivan, David; Huang, Stanley Ching-Cheng; van der Windt, Gerritje J.W.; Blagih, Julianna; Qiu, Jing; Weber, Jason D.; Pearce, Edward J.; Jones, Russell G.; Pearce, Erika L.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY A “switch” from oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) to aerobic glycolysis is a hallmark of T cell activation and is thought to be required to meet the metabolic demands of proliferation. However, why proliferating cells adopt this less efficient metabolism, especially in an oxygen-replete environment, remains incompletely understood. We show here that aerobic glycolysis is specifically required for effector function in T cells but that this pathway is not necessary for proliferation or survival. When activated T cells are provided with costimulation and growth factors but are blocked from engaging glycolysis, their ability to produce IFN-γ is markedly compromised. This defect is translational and is regulated by the binding of the glycolysis enzyme GAPDH to AU-rich elements within the 3′ UTR of IFN-γ mRNA. GAPDH, by engaging/disengaging glycolysis and through fluctuations in its expression, controls effector cytokine production. Thus, aerobic glycolysis is a metabolically regulated signaling mechanism needed to control cellular function. PMID:23746840

  1. A Strategy for Functional Interpretation of Metabolomic Time Series Data in Context of Metabolic Network Information

    PubMed Central

    Nägele, Thomas; Fürtauer, Lisa; Nagler, Matthias; Weiszmann, Jakob; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    The functional connection of experimental metabolic time series data with biochemical network information is an important, yet complex, issue in systems biology. Frequently, experimental analysis of diurnal, circadian, or developmental dynamics of metabolism results in a comprehensive and multidimensional data matrix comprising information about metabolite concentrations, protein levels, and/or enzyme activities. While, irrespective of the type of organism, the experimental high-throughput analysis of the transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome has become a common part of many systems biological studies, functional data integration in a biochemical and physiological context is still challenging. Here, an approach is presented which addresses the functional connection of experimental time series data with biochemical network information which can be inferred, for example, from a metabolic network reconstruction. Based on a time-continuous and variance-weighted regression analysis of experimental data, metabolic functions, i.e., first-order derivatives of metabolite concentrations, were related to time-dependent changes in other biochemically relevant metabolic functions, i.e., second-order derivatives of metabolite concentrations. This finally revealed time points of perturbed dependencies in metabolic functions indicating a modified biochemical interaction. The approach was validated using previously published experimental data on a diurnal time course of metabolite levels, enzyme activities, and metabolic flux simulations. To support and ease the presented approach of functional time series analysis, a graphical user interface including a test data set and a manual is provided which can be run within the numerical software environment Matlab®. PMID:27014700

  2. A Strategy for Functional Interpretation of Metabolomic Time Series Data in Context of Metabolic Network Information.

    PubMed

    Nägele, Thomas; Fürtauer, Lisa; Nagler, Matthias; Weiszmann, Jakob; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    The functional connection of experimental metabolic time series data with biochemical network information is an important, yet complex, issue in systems biology. Frequently, experimental analysis of diurnal, circadian, or developmental dynamics of metabolism results in a comprehensive and multidimensional data matrix comprising information about metabolite concentrations, protein levels, and/or enzyme activities. While, irrespective of the type of organism, the experimental high-throughput analysis of the transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome has become a common part of many systems biological studies, functional data integration in a biochemical and physiological context is still challenging. Here, an approach is presented which addresses the functional connection of experimental time series data with biochemical network information which can be inferred, for example, from a metabolic network reconstruction. Based on a time-continuous and variance-weighted regression analysis of experimental data, metabolic functions, i.e., first-order derivatives of metabolite concentrations, were related to time-dependent changes in other biochemically relevant metabolic functions, i.e., second-order derivatives of metabolite concentrations. This finally revealed time points of perturbed dependencies in metabolic functions indicating a modified biochemical interaction. The approach was validated using previously published experimental data on a diurnal time course of metabolite levels, enzyme activities, and metabolic flux simulations. To support and ease the presented approach of functional time series analysis, a graphical user interface including a test data set and a manual is provided which can be run within the numerical software environment Matlab®.

  3. A spectroscopic approach toward depression diagnosis: local metabolism meets functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Demenescu, Liliana Ramona; Colic, Lejla; Li, Meng; Safron, Adam; Biswal, B; Metzger, Coraline Danielle; Li, Shijia; Walter, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Abnormal anterior insula (AI) response and functional connectivity (FC) is associated with depression. In addition to clinical features, such as severity, AI FC and its metabolism further predicted therapeutic response. Abnormal FC between anterior cingulate and AI covaried with reduced glutamate level within cingulate cortex. Recently, deficient glial glutamate conversion was found in AI in major depression disorder (MDD). We therefore postulate a local glutamatergic mechanism in insula cortex of depressive patients, which is correlated with symptoms severity and itself influences AI's network connectivity in MDD. Twenty-five MDD patients and 25 healthy controls (HC) matched on age and sex underwent resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy scans. To determine the role of local glutamate-glutamine complex (Glx) ratio on whole brain AI FC, we conducted regression analysis with Glx relative to creatine (Cr) ratio as factor of interest and age, sex, and voxel tissue composition as nuisance factors. We found that in MDD, but not in HC, AI Glx/Cr ratio correlated positively with AI FC to right supramarginal gyrus and negatively with AI FC toward left occipital cortex (p < 0.05 family wise error). AI Glx/Cr level was negatively correlated with HAMD score (p < 0.05) in MDD patients. We showed that the local AI ratio of glutamatergic-creatine metabolism is an underlying candidate subserving functional network disintegration of insula toward low level and supramodal integration areas, in MDD. While causality cannot directly be inferred from such correlation, our finding helps to define a multilevel network of response-predicting regions based on local metabolism and connectivity strength.

  4. Obesity and metabolic dysfunction severely influence prostate cell function: role of insulin and IGF1.

    PubMed

    L-López, Fernando; Sarmento-Cabral, André; Herrero-Aguayo, Vicente; Gahete, Manuel D; Castaño, Justo P; Luque, Raúl M

    2017-09-01

    Obesity is a major health problem that courses with severe comorbidities and a drastic impairment of homeostasis and function of several organs, including the prostate gland (PG). The endocrine-metabolic regulatory axis comprising growth hormone (GH), insulin and IGF1, which is drastically altered under extreme metabolic conditions such as obesity, also plays relevant roles in the development, modulation and homeostasis of the PG. However, its implication in the pathophysiological interplay between obesity and prostate function is still to be elucidated. To explore this association, we used a high fat-diet obese mouse model, as well as in vitro primary cultures of normal-mouse PG cells and human prostate cancer cell lines. This approach revealed that most of the components of the GH/insulin/IGF1 regulatory axis are present in PGs, where their expression pattern is altered under obesity conditions and after an acute insulin treatment (e.g. Igfbp3), which might have some pathophysiological implications. Moreover, our results demonstrate, for the first time, that the PG becomes severely insulin resistant under diet-induced obesity in mice. Finally, use of in vitro approaches served to confirm and expand the conception that insulin and IGF1 play a direct, relevant role in the control of normal and pathological PG cell function. Altogether, these results uncover a fine, germane crosstalk between the endocrine-metabolic status and the development and homeostasis of the PG, wherein key components of the GH, insulin and IGF1 axes could play a relevant pathophysiological role. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  5. Mobile health, exercise and metabolic risk: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Petrella, Robert J; Stuckey, Melanie I; Shapiro, Sheree; Gill, Dawn P

    2014-10-18

    It was hypothesized that a mobile health (mHealth) intervention would elicit greater improvements in systolic blood pressure and other cardiometabolic risk factors at 12 weeks, which would be better maintained over 52 weeks, compared to the active control intervention. Eligible participants (≥2 metabolic syndrome risk factors) were randomized to the mHealth intervention (n = 75) or the active control group (n = 74). Blood pressure and other cardiometabolic risk factors were measured at baseline and at 12, 24 and 52 weeks. Both groups received an individualized exercise prescription and the intervention group additionally received a technology kit for home monitoring of biometrics and physical activity. Analyses were conducted on 67 participants in the intervention group (aged 56.7 ± 9.7 years; 71.6% female) and 60 participants in the active control group (aged 59.1 ± 8.4 years; 76.7% female). At 12 weeks, baseline adjusted mean change in systolic blood pressure (primary outcome) was greater in the active control group compared to the intervention group (-5.68 mmHg; 95% CI -10.86 to -0.50 mmHg; p = 0.03), but there were no differences between groups in mean change for secondary outcomes. Over 52-weeks, the difference in mean change for systolic blood pressure was no longer apparent between groups, but remained significant across the entire population (time: p < 0.001). In participants with increased cardiometabolic risk, exercise prescription alone had greater short-term improvements in systolic blood pressure compared to the mHealth intervention, though over 52 weeks, improvements were equal between interventions. ClinicalTrials.gov http://NCT01944124.

  6. The ZONE Diet and Metabolic Control in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Stulnig, Thomas M

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is associated with chronic inflammation of the adipose tissue, which contributes to obesity-associated complications such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. The increased inflammatory response seems to be directly related to modern nutrition, particularly aspects of fat quality and macronutrient composition. We have recently published an observational study investigating the practicability and effects of a combined dietary intervention with increased relative protein content and low-glycemic-index carbohydrates, supplemented with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), on metabolic control and inflammatory parameters in real-life situations in patients with type 2 diabetes. The primary efficacy parameter was the change in HbA1c, and secondary parameters included change in systemic inflammation (measured by ultrasensitive C-reactive protein), body weight, waist circumference, fat mass, and homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance. Counseling a protein-enriched and low-glycemic-index diet supplemented with long-chain omega-3 PUFAs in a real-life clinical setting improved glycemic control, waist circumference, and silent inflammation in overweight or obese patients with type 2 diabetes.

  7. Effects of magnesium supplements on blood pressure, endothelial function and metabolic parameters in healthy young men with a family history of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cosaro, E; Bonafini, S; Montagnana, M; Danese, E; Trettene, M S; Minuz, P; Delva, P; Fava, C

    2014-11-01

    Magnesium plays an important role in the modulation of vascular tone and endothelial function and can regulate glucose and lipid metabolism. Patients with hypertension, metabolic syndrome (MetS) and diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have low body magnesium content; indeed, magnesium supplementation has been shown to have a positive effect on blood pressure (BP) and gluco-metabolic parameters. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of magnesium supplements on hemodynamic and metabolic parameters in healthy men with a positive family history of MetS or T2DM. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled 8-week crossover trial with a 4 week wash-out period, oral supplements of 8.1 mmol of magnesium-pidolate or placebo were administered twice a day to 14 healthy normomagnesemic participants, aged 23-33 years. The primary endpoint was office BP, measured with a semiautomatic oscillometric device. Secondary endpoints included characteristics of the MetS, namely endothelial function, arterial stiffness and inflammation. Plasma and urinary magnesium were measured in all participants while free intracellular magnesium was measured only in a subsample. There was no significant difference in either systolic and diastolic BP in participants post-magnesium supplementation and post-placebo treatment when compared to baseline BP measurements. Further, the metabolic, inflammatory and hemodynamic parameters did not vary significantly during the study. Our study showed no beneficial effect of magnesium supplements on BP, vascular function and glycolipid profile in young men with a family history of MetS/T2DM (trial registration at clinicaltrial.gov ID: NCT01181830; 12th of Aug 2010). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A computer program for the algebraic determination of control coefficients in Metabolic Control Analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, S; Fell, D A

    1993-01-01

    A computer program (MetaCon) is described for the evaluation of flux control, concentration control and branch-point distribution control coefficients of a metabolic pathway. Requiring only the reaction scheme as input, the program produces algebraic expressions for the control coefficients in terms of elasticity coefficients, metabolite concentrations and pathway fluxes. Any of these variables can be substituted by numeric or simple algebraic expressions; the expressions will then be automatically rearranged in terms of the remaining unknown variables. When all variables have been substituted, numeric values will be obtained for the control coefficients. The program is a computerized implementation of the matrix method for the determination of control coefficients. The features of MetaCon are compared with those of other programs available to workers in Metabolic Control Analysis. Potential benefits of, and methods of using, MetaCon are discussed. The mathematical background and validity of the matrix method rules are discussed, and the algorithm used by MetaCon is described. The matrix method is shown to be a specific case of a previously described general formalism for calculating control coefficients. PMID:8503870

  9. Control of human trophoblast function

    PubMed Central

    Lunghi, Laura; Ferretti, Maria E; Medici, Silvia; Biondi, Carla; Vesce, Fortunato

    2007-01-01

    The trophoblast, i.e. the peripheral part of the human conceptus, exerts a crucial role in implantation and placentation. Both processes properly occur as a consequence of an intimate dialogue between fetal and maternal tissues, fulfilled by membrane ligands and receptors, as well as by hormone and local factor release. During blastocyst implantation, generation of distinct trophoblast cell types begins, namely the villous and the extravillous trophoblast, the former of which is devoted to fetal-maternal exchanges and the latter binds the placental body to the uterine wall. Physiological placentation is characterized by the invasion of the uterine spiral arteries by extravillous trophoblast cells arising from anchoring villi. Due to this invasion, the arterial structure is replaced by amorphous fibrinoid material and endovascular trophoblastic cells. This transformation establishes a low-resistance, high-capacity perfusion system from the radial arteries to the intervillous space, in which the villous tree is embedded. The physiology of pregnancy depends upon the orderly progress of structural and functional changes of villous and extravillous trophoblast, whereas a derangement of such processes can lead to different types of complications of varying degrees of gravity, including possible pregnancy loss and maternal life-threatening diseases. In this review we describe the mechanisms which regulate trophoblast differentiation, proliferation, migration and invasiveness, and the alterations in these mechanisms which lead to pathological conditions. Furthermore, based on the growing evidence that proper inflammatory changes and oxidative balance are needed for successful gestation, we explain the mechanisms by which agents able to influence such processes may be useful in the prevention and treatment of pregnancy disorders. PMID:17288592

  10. Distinct metabolic network states manifest in the gene expression profiles of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease patients and controls

    PubMed Central

    Knecht, Carolin; Fretter, Christoph; Rosenstiel, Philip; Krawczak, Michael; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Information on biological networks can greatly facilitate the function-orientated interpretation of high-throughput molecular data. Genome-wide metabolic network models of human cells, in particular, can be employed to contextualize gene expression profiles of patients with the goal of both, a better understanding of individual etiologies and an educated reclassification of (clinically defined) phenotypes. We analyzed publicly available expression profiles of intestinal tissues from treatment-naive pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients and age-matched control individuals, using a reaction-centric metabolic network derived from the Recon2 model. By way of defining a measure of ‘coherence’, we quantified how well individual patterns of expression changes matched the metabolic network. We observed a bimodal distribution of metabolic network coherence in both patients and controls, albeit at notably different mixture probabilities. Multidimensional scaling analysis revealed a bisectional pattern as well that overlapped widely with the metabolic network-based results. Expression differences driving the observed bimodality were related to cellular transport of thiamine and bile acid metabolism, thereby highlighting the crosstalk between metabolism and other vital pathways. We demonstrated how classical data mining and network analysis can jointly identify biologically meaningful patterns in gene expression data. PMID:27585741

  11. MIRAGE: a functional genomics-based approach for metabolic network model reconstruction and its application to cyanobacteria networks.

    PubMed

    Vitkin, Edward; Shlomi, Tomer

    2012-11-29

    Genome-scale metabolic network reconstructions are considered a key step in quantifying the genotype-phenotype relationship. We present a novel gap-filling approach, MetabolIc Reconstruction via functionAl GEnomics (MIRAGE), which identifies missing network reactions by integrating metabolic flux analysis and functional genomics data. MIRAGE's performance is demonstrated on the reconstruction of metabolic network models of E. coli and Synechocystis sp. and validated via existing networks for these species. Then, it is applied to reconstruct genome-scale metabolic network models for 36 sequenced cyanobacteria amenable for constraint-based modeling analysis and specifically for metabolic engineering. The reconstructed network models are supplied via standard SBML files.

  12. Contextual Control by Function and form of Transfer of Functions

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, David R; Dougher, Michael J; Greenway, David E

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated conditions leading to contextual control by stimulus topography over transfer of functions. Three 4-member stimulus equivalence classes, each consisting of four (A, B, C, D) topographically distinct visual stimuli, were established for 5 college students. Across classes, designated A stimuli were open-ended linear figures, B stimuli were circular, C stimuli three-sided, and D stimuli four-sided. Three different computer tasks then were trained with the B stimuli. Differential reinforcement and punishment procedures were then used to establish control over function transfer by the topography of the class members. For Task 1, function transfer, responding to C and D stimuli as subjects had to B stimuli, was reinforced. For Task 2, function transfer was reinforced for C stimuli but punished for D stimuli. For Task 3, function transfer was punished for both C and D stimuli. New equivalence classes were then established and tests for generalized contextual control were presented. All 5 subjects showed generalized contextual control of transfer of functions by stimulus topography. Implications of contextual control over function transfer in natural settings are discussed. PMID:17725053

  13. Contextual control by function and form of transfer of functions.

    PubMed

    Perkins, David R; Dougher, Michael J; Greenway, David E

    2007-07-01

    This study investigated conditions leading to contextual control by stimulus topography over transfer of functions. Three 4-member stimulus equivalence classes, each consisting of four (A, B, C, D) topographically distinct visual stimuli, were established for 5 college students. Across classes, designated A stimuli were open-ended linear figures, B stimuli were circular, C stimuli three-sided, and D stimuli four-sided. Three different computer tasks then were trained with the B stimuli. Differential reinforcement and punishment procedures were then used to establish control over function transfer by the topography of the class members. For Task 1, function transfer, responding to C and D stimuli as subjects had to B stimuli, was reinforced. For Task 2, function transfer was reinforced for C stimuli but punished for D stimuli. For Task 3, function transfer was punished for both C and D stimuli. New equivalence classes were then established and tests for generalized contextual control were presented. All 5 subjects showed generalized contextual control of transfer of functions by stimulus topography. Implications of contextual control over function transfer in natural settings are discussed.

  14. Thyroid function in childhood obesity and metabolic comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Pacifico, Lucia; Anania, Caterina; Ferraro, Flavia; Andreoli, Gian Marco; Chiesa, Claudio

    2012-02-18

    Childhood obesity is a worldwide health problem and its prevalence is increasing steadily and dramatically all over the world. Obese subjects have a much greater likelihood than normal-weight children of acquiring dyslipidemia, elevated blood pressure, and impaired glucose metabolism, which significantly increase their risk of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Elevated TSH concentrations in association with normal or slightly elevated free T4 and/or free T3 levels have been consistently found in obese subjects, but the mechanisms underlying these thyroid hormonal changes are still unclear. Whether higher TSH in childhood obesity is adaptive, increasing metabolic rate in an attempt to reduce further weight gain, or indicates subclinical hypothyroidism or resistance and thereby contributes to lipid and/or glucose dysmetabolism, remains controversial. This review highlights current evidence on thyroid involvement in obese children and discusses the current controversy regarding the relationship between thyroid hormonal derangements and obesity-related metabolic changes (hypertension, dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia and insulin resistance, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease) in such population. Moreover, the possible mechanisms linking thyroid dysfunction and pediatric obesity are reviewed. Finally, the potential role of lifestyle intervention as well as of therapy with thyroid hormone in the treatment of thyroid abnormalities in childhood obesity is discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Metabolic fate and function of dietary glutamate in the gut

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Glutamate is a major constituent of dietary protein and is also consumed in many prepared foods as an additive in the form of monosodium glutamate. Evidence from human and animal studies indicates that glutamate is a major oxidative fuel for the gut and that dietary glutamate is extensively metabol...

  16. Functional genomics tools applied to plant metabolism: a survey on plant respiration, its connections and the annotation of complex gene functions

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Wagner L.; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Williams, Thomas C. R.

    2012-01-01

    The application of post-genomic techniques in plant respiration studies has greatly improved our ability to assign functions to gene products. In addition it has also revealed previously unappreciated interactions between distal elements of metabolism. Such results have reinforced the need to consider plant respiratory metabolism as part of a complex network and making sense of such interactions will ultimately require the construction of predictive and mechanistic models. Transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and the quantification of metabolic flux will be of great value in creating such models both by facilitating the annotation of complex gene function, determining their structure and by furnishing the quantitative data required to test them. In this review, we highlight how these experimental approaches have contributed to our current understanding of plant respiratory metabolism and its interplay with associated process (e.g., photosynthesis, photorespiration, and nitrogen metabolism). We also discuss how data from these techniques may be integrated, with the ultimate aim of identifying mechanisms that control and regulate plant respiration and discovering novel gene functions with potential biotechnological implications. PMID:22973288

  17. Perspectives in metabolic engineering: understanding cellular regulation towards the control of metabolic routes.

    PubMed

    Zadran, Sohila; Levine, Raphael D

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic engineering seeks to redirect metabolic pathways through the modification of specific biochemical reactions or the introduction of new ones with the use of recombinant technology. Many of the chemicals synthesized via introduction of product-specific enzymes or the reconstruction of entire metabolic pathways into engineered hosts that can sustain production and can synthesize high yields of the desired product as yields of natural product-derived compounds are frequently low, and chemical processes can be both energy and material expensive; current endeavors have focused on using biologically derived processes as alternatives to chemical synthesis. Such economically favorable manufacturing processes pursue goals related to sustainable development and "green chemistry". Metabolic engineering is a multidisciplinary approach, involving chemical engineering, molecular biology, biochemistry, and analytical chemistry. Recent advances in molecular biology, genome-scale models, theoretical understanding, and kinetic modeling has increased interest in using metabolic engineering to redirect metabolic fluxes for industrial and therapeutic purposes. The use of metabolic engineering has increased the productivity of industrially pertinent small molecules, alcohol-based biofuels, and biodiesel. Here, we highlight developments in the practical and theoretical strategies and technologies available for the metabolic engineering of simple systems and address current limitations.

  18. Environmental control of biological rhythms: effects on development, fertility and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Amaral, F G; Castrucci, A M; Cipolla-Neto, J; Poletini, M O; Mendez, N; Richter, H G; Sellix, M T

    2014-09-01

    Internal temporal organisation properly synchronised to the environment is crucial for health maintenance. This organisation is provided at the cellular level by the molecular clock, a macromolecular transcription-based oscillator formed by the clock and the clock-controlled genes that is present in both central and peripheral tissues. In mammals, melanopsin in light-sensitive retinal ganglion cells plays a considerable role in the synchronisation of the circadian timing system to the daily light/dark cycle. Melatonin, a hormone synthesised in the pineal gland exclusively at night and an output of the central clock, has a fundamental role in regulating/timing several physiological functions, including glucose homeostasis, insulin secretion and energy metabolism. As such, metabolism is severely impaired after a reduction in melatonin production. Furthermore, light pollution during the night and shift work schedules can abrogate melatonin synthesis and impair homeostasis. Chronodisruption during pregnancy has deleterious effects on the health of progeny, including metabolic, cardiovascular and cognitive dysfunction. Developmental programming by steroids or steroid-mimetic compounds also produces internal circadian disorganisation that may be a significant factor in the aetiology of fertility disorders such as polycystic ovary syndrome. Thus, both early and late in life, pernicious alterations of the endogenous temporal order by environmental factors can disrupt the homeostatic function of the circadian timing system, leading to pathophysiology and/or disease. © 2014 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  19. SMART: physical activity and cerebral metabolism in older people: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Fleckenstein, Johannes; Matura, Silke; Engeroff, Tobias; Füzéki, Eszter; Tesky, Valentina A; Pilatus, Ulrich; Hattingen, Elke; Deichmann, Ralf; Vogt, Lutz; Banzer, Winfried; Pantel, Johannes

    2015-04-11

    Physical activity exerts a variety of long-term health benefits in older adults. In particular, it is assumed to be a protective factor against cognitive decline and dementia. Randomised controlled assessor blinded 2-armed trial (n = 60) to explore the exercise- induced neuroprotective and metabolic effects on the brain in cognitively healthy older adults. Participants (age ≥ 65), recruited within the setting of assisted living facilities and newspaper advertisements are allocated to a 12-week individualised aerobic exercise programme intervention or a 12-week waiting control group. Total follow-up is 24 weeks. The main outcome is the change in cerebral metabolism as assessed with Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging reflecting changes of cerebral N-acetyl-aspartate and of markers of neuronal energy reserve. Imaging also measures changes in cortical grey matter volume. Secondary outcomes include a broad range of psychometric (cognition) and movement-related parameters such as nutrition, history of physical activity, history of pain and functional diagnostics. Participants are allocated to either the intervention or control group using a computer-generated randomisation sequence. The exercise physiologist in charge of training opens sealed and opaque envelopes and informs participants about group allocation. For organisational reasons, he schedules the participants for upcoming assessments and exercise in groups of five. All assessors and study personal other than exercise physiologists are blinded. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging gives a deeper insight into mechanisms of exercise-induced changes in brain metabolism. As follow-up lasts for 6 months, this study is able to explore the mid-term cerebral metabolic effects of physical activity assuming that an individually tailored aerobic ergometer training has the potential to counteract brain ageing. NCT02343029 (clinicaltrials.gov; 12 January 2015).

  20. Hemodynamic flow improves rat hepatocyte morphology, function, and metabolic activity in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Simmers, M. B.; Deering, T. G.; Berry, D. J.; Feaver, R. E.; Hastings, N. E.; Pruett, T. L.; LeCluyse, E. L.; Blackman, B. R.; Wamhoff, B. R.

    2013-01-01

    In vitro primary hepatocyte systems typically elicit drug induction and toxicity responses at concentrations much higher than corresponding in vivo or clinical plasma Cmax levels, contributing to poor in vitro-in vivo correlations. This may be partly due to the absence of physiological parameters that maintain metabolic phenotype in vivo. We hypothesized that restoring hemodynamics and media transport would improve hepatocyte architecture and metabolic function in vitro compared with nonflow cultures. Rat hepatocytes were cultured for 2 wk either in nonflow collagen gel sandwiches with 48-h media changes or under controlled hemodynamics mimicking sinusoidal circulation within a perfused Transwell device. Phenotypic, functional, and metabolic parameters were assessed at multiple times. Hepatocytes in the devices exhibited polarized morphology, retention of differentiation markers [E-cadherin and hepatocyte nuclear factor-4α (HNF-4α)], the canalicular transporter [multidrug-resistant protein-2 (Mrp-2)], and significantly higher levels of liver function compared with nonflow cultures over 2 wk (albumin ∼4-fold and urea ∼5-fold). Gene expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes was significantly higher (fold increase over nonflow: CYP1A1: 53.5 ± 10.3; CYP1A2: 64.0 ± 15.1; CYP2B1: 15.2 ± 2.9; CYP2B2: 2.7 ± 0.8; CYP3A2: 4.0 ± 1.4) and translated to significantly higher basal enzyme activity (device vs. nonflow: CYP1A: 6.26 ± 2.41 vs. 0.42 ± 0.015; CYP1B: 3.47 ± 1.66 vs. 0.4 ± 0.09; CYP3A: 11.65 ± 4.70 vs. 2.43 ± 0.56) while retaining inducibility by 3-methylcholanthrene and dexamethasone (fold increase over DMSO: CYP1A = 27.33 and CYP3A = 4.94). These responses were observed at concentrations closer to plasma levels documented in vivo in rats. The retention of in vivo-like hepatocyte phenotype and metabolic function coupled with drug response at more physiological concentrations emphasizes the importance of restoring in vivo physiological transport

  1. Different sympathetic pathways control the metabolism of distinct bone envelopes.

    PubMed

    Bataille, Caroline; Mauprivez, Cédric; Haÿ, Eric; Baroukh, Brigitte; Brun, Adrian; Chaussain, Catherine; Marie, Pierre J; Saffar, Jean-Louis; Cherruau, Marc

    2012-05-01

    Bone remodeling, the mechanism that modulates bone mass adaptation, is controlled by the sympathetic nervous system through the catecholaminergic pathway. However, resorption in the mandible periosteum envelope is associated with cholinergic Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VIP)-positive nerve fibers sensitive to sympathetic neurotoxics, suggesting that different sympathetic pathways may control distinct bone envelopes. In this study, we assessed the role of distinct sympathetic pathways on rat femur and mandible envelopes. To this goal, adult male Wistar rats were chemically sympathectomized or treated with agonists/antagonists of the catecholaminergic and cholinergic pathways; femora and mandibles were sampled. Histomorphometric analysis showed that sympathectomy decreased the number of preosteoclasts and RANKL-expressing osteoblasts in mandible periosteum but had no effect on femur trabecular bone. In contrast, pharmacological stimulation or repression of the catecholaminergic cell receptors impacted the femur trabecular bone and mandible endosteal retromolar zone. VIP treatment of sympathectomized rats rescued the disturbances of the mandible periosteum and alveolar wall whereas the cholinergic pathway had no effect on the catecholaminergic-dependent envelopes. We also found that VIP receptor-1 was weakly expressed in periosteal osteoblasts in the mandible and was increased by VIP treatment, whereas osteoblasts of the retromolar envelope that was innervated only by tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive fibers, constitutively expressed beta-2 adrenergic receptors. These data highlight the complexity of the sympathetic control of bone metabolism. Both the embryological origin of the bone (endochondral for the femur, membranous for the mandibular periosteum and the socket wall) and environmental factors specific to the innervated envelope may influence the phenotype of the sympathetic innervation. We suggest that an origin-dependent imprint of bone cells through

  2. Relationships among HIV infection, metabolic risk factors, and left ventricular structure and function.

    PubMed

    Cade, William Todd; Overton, Edgar Turner; Mondy, Kristin; de las Fuentes, Lisa; Davila-Roman, Victor G; Waggoner, Alan D; Reeds, Dominic N; Lassa-Claxton, Sherry; Krauss, Melissa J; Peterson, Linda R; Yarasheski, Kevin E

    2013-08-01

    Our objective was to determine if the presence of metabolic complications (MC) conveyed an additional risk for left ventricular (LV) dysfunction in people with HIV. HIV⁺ and HIV⁻ men and women were categorized into four groups: (1) HIV⁺ with MC (43±7 years, n=64), (2) HIV⁺ without MC (42±7 years, n=59), (3) HIV⁻ with MC (44±8 years, n=37), or (4) HIV⁻ controls without MC (42±8 years, n=41). All participants underwent two-dimensional (2-D), Doppler, and tissue Doppler echocardiography. Overall, the prevalence of systolic dysfunction (15 vs. 4%, p=0.02) and LV hypertrophy (9 vs. 1%, p=0.03) was greater in HIV⁺ than in HIV⁻ participants. Participants with MC had a greater prevalence of LV hypertrophy (10% vs. 1%). Early mitral annular velocity during diastole was significantly (p<0.005) lower in groups with MC (HIV⁺/MC⁺: 11.6±2.3, HIV⁻/MC⁺: 12.0±2.3 vs. HIV⁺/MC⁻: 12.4±2.3, HIV⁻/MC⁻: 13.1±2.4 cm/s) and tended to be lower in groups with HIV (p=0.10). However, there was no interaction effect of HIV and MC for any systolic or diastolic variable. Regardless of HIV status, participants with MC had reduced LV diastolic function. Although both the presence of MC and HIV infection were associated with lower diastolic function, there was no additive negative effect of HIV on diastolic function beyond the effect of MC. Also, HIV was independently associated with lower systolic function. Clinical monitoring of LV function in individuals with metabolic risk factors, regardless of HIV status, is warranted.

  3. Carbon monoxide improves cardiac function and mitochondrial population quality in a mouse model of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lancel, Steve; Montaigne, David; Marechal, Xavier; Marciniak, Camille; Hassoun, Sidi Mohamed; Decoster, Brigitte; Ballot, Caroline; Blazejewski, Caroline; Corseaux, Delphine; Lescure, Bernadette; Motterlini, Roberto; Neviere, Remi

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome induces cardiac dysfunction associated with mitochondria abnormalities. As low levels of carbon monoxide (CO) may improve myocardial and mitochondrial activities, we tested whether a CO-releasing molecule (CORM-3) reverses metabolic syndrome-induced cardiac alteration through changes in mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics and autophagy. Mice were fed with normal diet (ND) or high-fat diet (HFD) for twelve weeks. Then, mice received two intraperitoneal injections of CORM-3 (10 mg x kg(-1)), with the second one given 16 hours after the first. Contractile function in isolated hearts and mitochondrial parameters were evaluated 24 hours after the last injection. Mitochondrial population was explored by electron microscopy. Changes in mitochondrial dynamics, biogenesis and autophagy were assessed by western-blot and RT-qPCR. Left ventricular developed pressure was reduced in HFD hearts. Mitochondria from HFD hearts presented reduced membrane potential and diminished ADP-coupled respiration. CORM-3 restored both cardiac and mitochondrial functions. Size and number of mitochondria increased in the HFD hearts but not in the CORM-3-treated HFD group. CORM-3 modulated HFD-activated mitochondrial fusion and biogenesis signalling. While autophagy was not activated in the HFD group, CORM-3 increased the autophagy marker LC3-II. Finally, ex vivo experiments demonstrated that autophagy inhibition by 3-methyladenine abolished the cardioprotective effects of CORM-3. CORM-3 may modulate pathways controlling mitochondrial quality, thus leading to improvements of mitochondrial efficiency and HFD-induced cardiac dysfunction.

  4. Carbon Monoxide Improves Cardiac Function and Mitochondrial Population Quality in a Mouse Model of Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lancel, Steve; Montaigne, David; Marechal, Xavier; Marciniak, Camille; Hassoun, Sidi Mohamed; Decoster, Brigitte; Ballot, Caroline; Blazejewski, Caroline; Corseaux, Delphine; Lescure, Bernadette; Motterlini, Roberto; Neviere, Remi

    2012-01-01

    Aims Metabolic syndrome induces cardiac dysfunction associated with mitochondria abnormalities. As low levels of carbon monoxide (CO) may improve myocardial and mitochondrial activities, we tested whether a CO-releasing molecule (CORM-3) reverses metabolic syndrome-induced cardiac alteration through changes in mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics and autophagy. Methods and Results Mice were fed with normal diet (ND) or high-fat diet (HFD) for twelve weeks. Then, mice received two intraperitoneal injections of CORM-3 (10 mg.kg−1), with the second one given 16 hours after the first. Contractile function in isolated hearts and mitochondrial parameters were evaluated 24 hours after the last injection. Mitochondrial population was explored by electron microscopy. Changes in mitochondrial dynamics, biogenesis and autophagy were assessed by western-blot and RT-qPCR. Left ventricular developed pressure was reduced in HFD hearts. Mitochondria from HFD hearts presented reduced membrane potential and diminished ADP-coupled respiration. CORM-3 restored both cardiac and mitochondrial functions. Size and number of mitochondria increased in the HFD hearts but not in the CORM-3–treated HFD group. CORM-3 modulated HFD-activated mitochondrial fusion and biogenesis signalling. While autophagy was not activated in the HFD group, CORM-3 increased the autophagy marker LC3-II. Finally, ex vivo experiments demonstrated that autophagy inhibition by 3-methyladenine abolished the cardioprotective effects of CORM-3. Conclusion CORM-3 may modulate pathways controlling mitochondrial quality, thus leading to improvements of mitochondrial efficiency and HFD-induced cardiac dysfunction. PMID:22870253

  5. Overexpression of SIRT1 in Mouse Forebrain Impairs Lipid/Glucose Metabolism and Motor Function

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dongmei; Qiu, Yifu; Gao, Xiang; Yuan, Xiao-Bing; Zhai, Qiwei

    2011-01-01

    SIRT1 plays crucial roles in glucose and lipid metabolism, and has various functions in different tissues including brain. The brain-specific SIRT1 knockout mice display defects in somatotropic signaling, memory and synaptic plasticity. And the female mice without SIRT1 in POMC neuron are more sensitive to diet-induced obesity. Here we created transgenic mice overexpressing SIRT1 in striatum and hippocampus under the control of CaMKIIα promoter. These mice, especially females, exhibited increased fat accumulation accompanied by significant upregulation of adipogenic genes in white adipose tissue. Glucose tolerance of the mice was also impaired with decreased Glut4 mRNA levels in muscle. Moreover, the SIRT1 overexpressing mice showed decreased energy expenditure, and concomitantly mitochondria-related genes were decreased in muscle. In addition, these mice showed unusual spontaneous physical activity pattern, decreased activity in open field and rotarod performance. Further studies demonstrated that SIRT1 deacetylated IRS-2, and upregulated phosphorylation level of IRS-2 and ERK1/2 in striatum. Meanwhile, the neurotransmitter signaling in striatum and the expression of endocrine hormones in hypothalamus and serum T3, T4 levels were altered. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that SIRT1 in forebrain regulates lipid/glucose metabolism and motor function. PMID:21738790

  6. The Amyloid Precursor Protein Controls PIKfyve Function.

    PubMed

    Balklava, Zita; Niehage, Christian; Currinn, Heather; Mellor, Laura; Guscott, Benjamin; Poulin, Gino; Hoflack, Bernard; Wassmer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    While the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) plays a central role in Alzheimer's disease, its cellular function still remains largely unclear. It was our goal to establish APP function which will provide insights into APP's implication in Alzheimer's disease. Using our recently developed proteo-liposome assay we established the interactome of APP's intracellular domain (known as AICD), thereby identifying novel APP interactors that provide mechanistic insights into APP function. By combining biochemical, cell biological and genetic approaches we validated the functional significance of one of these novel interactors. Here we show that APP binds the PIKfyve complex, an essential kinase for the synthesis of the endosomal phosphoinositide phosphatidylinositol-3,5-bisphosphate. This signalling lipid plays a crucial role in endosomal homeostasis and receptor sorting. Loss of PIKfyve function by mutation causes profound neurodegeneration in mammals. Using C. elegans genetics we demonstrate that APP functionally cooperates with PIKfyve in vivo. This regulation is required for maintaining endosomal and neuronal function. Our findings establish an unexpected role for APP in the regulation of endosomal phosphoinositide metabolism with dramatic consequences for endosomal biology and important implications for our understanding of Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Metabolic network structure and function in bacteria goes beyond conserved enzyme components

    PubMed Central

    Bazurto, Jannell V.; Downs, Diana M.

    2016-01-01

    For decades, experimental work has laid the foundation for our understanding of the linear and branched pathways that are integrated to form the metabolic networks on which life is built. Genetic and biochemical approaches applied in model organisms generate empirical data that correlate genes, gene products and their biological activities. In the post-genomic era, these results have served as the basis for the genome annotation that is routinely used to infer the metabolic capabilities of an organism and mathematically model the presumed metabolic network structure. At large, genome annotation and metabolic network reconstructions have demystified genomic content of non-culturable microorganisms and allowed researchers to explore the breadth of metabolisms in silico. Mis-annotation aside, it is unclear whether in silico reconstructions of metabolic structure from component parts accurately captures the higher levels of network organization and flux distribution. For this approach to provide accurate predictions, one must assume that the conservation of metabolic components leads to conservation of metabolic network architecture and function. This assumption has not been rigorously tested. Here we describe the implications of a recent study (MBio 5;7(1): e01840-15), which demonstrated that conservation of metabolic components was not sufficient to predict network structure and function. PMID:28357363

  8. The Effects of an Exercise Program on Anxiety Levels and Metabolic Functions in Patients With Anxiety Disorders.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wei-Fen; Wu, Po-Lun; Su, Chia-Hsien; Yang, Tzu-Ching

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a home-based (HB) exercise program on anxiety levels and metabolic functions in patients with anxiety disorders in Taiwan. Purposive sampling was used to recruit 86 participants for this randomized, experimental study. Participants were asked to complete a pretest before the 3-month exercise program, a posttest at 1 week, and a follow-up test at 3 months after the exercise program. Study measures included four Self-Report Scales and biophysical assessments to collect and assess personal data, lifestyle behaviors, anxiety levels, and metabolic control functions. Of the 86 study participants, 83 completed the posttest and the 3-month follow-up test, including 41 in the experimental group and 42 in the control group. Participants in the experimental group showed significant improvements in body mass index, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, and the level of moderate exercise after the program relative to the control group, as analyzed by generalized estimating equations mixed-model repeated measures. State and trait anxiety levels were also significantly improved from pretest to follow-up test in the experimental group. Finally, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome declined for participants in the experimental group. The HB exercise program produced positive effects on the metabolic indicators and anxiety levels of Taiwanese adults with anxiety disorders. Health providers should consider using similar HB exercise programs to help improve the mental and physical health of patients with anxiety disorders in their communities.

  9. Complex pectin metabolism by gut bacteria reveals novel catalytic functions.

    PubMed

    Ndeh, Didier; Rogowski, Artur; Cartmell, Alan; Luis, Ana S; Baslé, Arnaud; Gray, Joseph; Venditto, Immacolata; Briggs, Jonathon; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Labourel, Aurore; Terrapon, Nicolas; Buffetto, Fanny; Nepogodiev, Sergey; Xiao, Yao; Field, Robert A; Zhu, Yanping; O'Neill, Malcolm A; Urbanowicz, Breeanna R; York, William S; Davies, Gideon J; Abbott, D Wade; Ralet, Marie-Christine; Martens, Eric C; Henrissat, Bernard; Gilbert, Harry J

    2017-03-22

    The metabolism of carbohydrate polymers drives microbial diversity in the human gut microbiota. It is unclear, however, whether bacterial consortia or single organisms are required to depolymerize highly complex glycans. Here we show that the gut bacterium Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron uses the most structurally complex glycan known: the plant pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan-II, cleaving all but 1 of its 21 distinct glycosidic linkages. The deconstruction of rhamnogalacturonan-II side chains and backbone are coordinated to overcome steric constraints, and the degradation involves previously undiscovered enzyme families and catalytic activities. The degradation system informs revision of the current structural model of rhamnogalacturonan-II and highlights how individual gut bacteria orchestrate manifold enzymes to metabolize the most challenging glycan in the human diet.

  10. Factors Controlling Carbon Metabolism and Humification in Different Soil Agroecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Doni, S.; Macci, C.; Peruzzi, E.; Ceccanti, B.; Masciandaro, G.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the processes that control humic carbon sequestration in soil. Three experimental sites differing in terms of management system and climate were selected: (i) Abanilla-Spain, soil treated with municipal solid wastes in Mediterranean semiarid climate; (ii) Puch-Germany, soil under intensive tillage and conventional agriculture in continental climate; and (iii) Alberese-Italy, soil under organic and conventional agriculture in Mediterranean subarid climate. The chemical-structural and biochemical soil properties at the initial sampling time and one year later were evaluated. The soils under organic (Alberese, soil cultivated with Triticum durum Desf.) and nonintensive management practices (Puch, soil cultivated with Triticum aestivum L. and Avena sativa L.) showed higher enzymatically active humic carbon, total organic carbon, humification index (B/E3s), and metabolic potential (dehydrogenase activity/water soluble carbon) if compared with conventional agriculture and plough-based tillage, respectively. In Abanilla, the application of municipal solid wastes stimulated the specific β-glucosidase activity (extracellular β-glucosidase activity/extractable humic carbon) and promoted the increase of humic substances with respect to untreated soil. The evolution of the chemical and biochemical status of the soils along a climatic gradient suggested that the adoption of certain management practices could be very promising in increasing SOC sequestration potential. PMID:25614887

  11. Factors controlling carbon metabolism and humification in different soil agroecosystems.

    PubMed

    Doni, S; Macci, C; Peruzzi, E; Ceccanti, B; Masciandaro, G

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the processes that control humic carbon sequestration in soil. Three experimental sites differing in terms of management system and climate were selected: (i) Abanilla-Spain, soil treated with municipal solid wastes in Mediterranean semiarid climate; (ii) Puch-Germany, soil under intensive tillage and conventional agriculture in continental climate; and (iii) Alberese-Italy, soil under organic and conventional agriculture in Mediterranean subarid climate. The chemical-structural and biochemical soil properties at the initial sampling time and one year later were evaluated. The soils under organic (Alberese, soil cultivated with Triticum durum Desf.) and nonintensive management practices (Puch, soil cultivated with Triticum aestivum L. and Avena sativa L.) showed higher enzymatically active humic carbon, total organic carbon, humification index (B/E(3)s), and metabolic potential (dehydrogenase activity/water soluble carbon) if compared with conventional agriculture and plough-based tillage, respectively. In Abanilla, the application of municipal solid wastes stimulated the specific β-glucosidase activity (extracellular β-glucosidase activity/extractable humic carbon) and promoted the increase of humic substances with respect to untreated soil. The evolution of the chemical and biochemical status of the soils along a climatic gradient suggested that the adoption of certain management practices could be very promising in increasing SOC sequestration potential.

  12. Glycolate Metabolism Is Under Nitrogen Control in Chlorella1

    PubMed Central

    Beudeker, Rob F.; Tabita, F. Robert

    1984-01-01

    The utilization of nitrate and ammonia as nitrogen sources had different effects on the metabolism of glycolate in Cholorella sorokiniana. During photolithotrophic growth with nitrate as nitrogen source, glycolate was metabolized via the glycine-serine pathway. Ammonia, produced as a result of glycolate metabolism, was reassimilated by glutamine synthetase. Two isoforms of this enzyme were present at different relative abundance in C. sorokiniana wild type and in a mutant with an increased capacity for the metabolism of glycolate (strain OR). During photolithotrophic growth in the presence of ammonia as sole nitrogen source, several lines of evidence indicated that glycolate was metabolized to malate, pyruvate, tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates and related amino acids in C. sorokiniana wild-type cells. Malate synthase was induced and glycine decarboxylase and serine-glyoxylate aminotransferase were repressed in cells grown with ammonia. An inverse correlation was observed between aminating NADPH-glutamate dehydrogenase and the in vivo glycine decarboxylation rate. PMID:16663657

  13. Relationship between baseline brain metabolism measured using [¹⁸F]FDG PET and memory and executive function in prodromal and early Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Habeck, Christian; Risacher, Shannon; Lee, Grace J; Glymour, M Maria; Mormino, Elizabeth; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Kim, Sungeun; Nho, Kwangsik; DeCarli, Charles; Saykin, Andrew J; Crane, Paul K

    2012-12-01

    Differences in brain metabolism as measured by FDG-PET in prodromal and early Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been consistently observed, with a characteristic parietotemporal hypometabolic pattern. However, exploration of brain metabolic correlates of more nuanced measures of cognitive function has been rare, particularly in larger samples. We analyzed the relationship between resting brain metabolism and memory and executive functioning within diagnostic group on a voxel-wise basis in 86 people with AD, 185 people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 86 healthy controls (HC) from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). We found positive associations within AD and MCI but not in HC. For MCI and AD, impaired executive functioning was associated with reduced parietotemporal metabolism, suggesting a pattern consistent with known AD-related hypometabolism. These associations suggest that decreased metabolic activity in the parietal and temporal lobes may underlie the executive function deficits in AD and MCI. For memory, hypometabolism in similar regions of the parietal and temporal lobes were significantly associated with reduced performance in the MCI group. However, for the AD group, memory performance was significantly associated with metabolism in frontal and orbitofrontal areas, suggesting the possibility of compensatory metabolic activity in these areas. Overall, the associations between brain metabolism and cognition in this study suggest the importance of parietal and temporal lobar regions in memory and executive function in the early stages of disease and an increased importance of frontal regions for memory with increasing impairment.

  14. Transfer Function Control for Biometric Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chmiel, Alan J. (Inventor); Humphreys, Bradley T. (Inventor); Grodinsky, Carlos M. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A modular apparatus for acquiring biometric data may include circuitry operative to receive an input signal indicative of a biometric condition, the circuitry being configured to process the input signal according to a transfer function thereof and to provide a corresponding processed input signal. A controller is configured to provide at least one control signal to the circuitry to programmatically modify the transfer function of the modular system to facilitate acquisition of the biometric data.

  15. How Energy Metabolism Supports Cerebral Function: Insights from 13C Magnetic Resonance Studies In vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sonnay, Sarah; Gruetter, Rolf; Duarte, João M. N.

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral function is associated with exceptionally high metabolic activity, and requires continuous supply of oxygen and nutrients from the blood stream. Since the mid-twentieth century the idea that brain energy metabolism is coupled to neuronal activity has emerged, and a number of studies supported this hypothesis. Moreover, brain energy metabolism was demonstrated to be compartmentalized in neurons and astrocytes, and astrocytic glycolysis was proposed to serve the energetic demands of glutamatergic activity. Shedding light on the role of astrocytes in brain metabolism, the earlier picture of astrocytes being restricted to a scaffold-associated function in the brain is now out of date. With the development and optimization of non-invasive techniques, such as nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), several groups have worked on assessing cerebral metabolism in vivo. In this context, 1H MRS has allowed the measurements of energy metabolism-related compounds, whose concentrations can vary under different brain activation states. 1H-[13C] MRS, i.e., indirect detection of signals from 13C-coupled 1H, together with infusion of 13C-enriched glucose has provided insights into the coupling between neurotransmission and glucose oxidation. Although these techniques tackle the coupling between neuronal activity and metabolism, they lack chemical specificity and fail in providing information on neuronal and glial metabolic pathways underlying those processes. Currently, the improvement of detection modalities (i.e., direct detection of 13C isotopomers), the progress in building adequate mathematical models along with the increase in magnetic field strength now available render possible detailed compartmentalized metabolic flux characterization. In particular, direct 13C MRS offers more detailed dataset acquisitions and provides information on metabolic interactions between neurons and astrocytes, and their role in supporting neurotransmission. Here, we review state

  16. How Energy Metabolism Supports Cerebral Function: Insights from (13)C Magnetic Resonance Studies In vivo.

    PubMed

    Sonnay, Sarah; Gruetter, Rolf; Duarte, João M N

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral function is associated with exceptionally high metabolic activity, and requires continuous supply of oxygen and nutrients from the blood stream. Since the mid-twentieth century the idea that brain energy metabolism is coupled to neuronal activity has emerged, and a number of studies supported this hypothesis. Moreover, brain energy metabolism was demonstrated to be compartmentalized in neurons and astrocytes, and astrocytic glycolysis was proposed to serve the energetic demands of glutamatergic activity. Shedding light on the role of astrocytes in brain metabolism, the earlier picture of astrocytes being restricted to a scaffold-associated function in the brain is now out of date. With the development and optimization of non-invasive techniques, such as nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), several groups have worked on assessing cerebral metabolism in vivo. In this context, (1)H MRS has allowed the measurements of energy metabolism-related compounds, whose concentrations can vary under different brain activation states. (1)H-[(13)C] MRS, i.e., indirect detection of signals from (13)C-coupled (1)H, together with infusion of (13)C-enriched glucose has provided insights into the coupling between neurotransmission and glucose oxidation. Although these techniques tackle the coupling between neuronal activity and metabolism, they lack chemical specificity and fail in providing information on neuronal and glial metabolic pathways underlying those processes. Currently, the improvement of detection modalities (i.e., direct detection of (13)C isotopomers), the progress in building adequate mathematical models along with the increase in magnetic field strength now available render possible detailed compartmentalized metabolic flux characterization. In particular, direct (13)C MRS offers more detailed dataset acquisitions and provides information on metabolic interactions between neurons and astrocytes, and their role in supporting neurotransmission. Here

  17. The Mitochondrial Permeability Transition Pore Regulator Cyclophilin D Exhibits Tissue-Specific Control of Metabolic Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Laker, Rhianna C.; Taddeo, Evan P.; Akhtar, Yasir N.; Zhang, Mei; Hoehn, Kyle L.; Yan, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) is a key regulator of mitochondrial function that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of metabolic disease. Cyclophilin D (CypD) is a critical regulator that directly binds to mPTP constituents to facilitate the pore opening. We previously found that global CypD knockout mice (KO) are protected from diet-induced glucose intolerance; however, the tissue-specific function of CypD and mPTP, particularly in the control of glucose homeostasis, has not been ascertained. To this end, we performed calcium retention capacity (CRC) assay to compare the importance of CypD in the liver versus skeletal muscle. We found that liver mitochondria are more dependent on CypD for mPTP opening than skeletal muscle mitochondria. To ascertain the tissue-specific role of CypD in metabolic homeostasis, we generated liver-specific and muscle-specific CypD knockout mice (LKO and MKO, respectively) and fed them either a chow diet or 45% high-fat diet (HFD) for 14 weeks. MKO mice displayed similar body weight gain and glucose intolerance compared with wild type littermates (WT), whereas LKO mice developed greater visceral obesity, glucose intolerance and pyruvate intolerance compared with WT mice. These findings demonstrate that loss of muscle CypD is not sufficient to alter whole body glucose metabolism, while the loss of liver CypD exacerbates obesity and whole-body metabolic dysfunction in mice fed HFD. PMID:28005946

  18. Metabolic benefits of dietary prebiotics in human subjects: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Kellow, Nicole J; Coughlan, Melinda T; Reid, Christopher M

    2014-04-14

    Complex relationships exist between the gut microflora and their human hosts. Emerging evidence suggests that bacterial dysbiosis within the colon may be involved in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and CVD. The use of dietary prebiotic supplements to restore an optimal balance of intestinal flora may positively affect host metabolism, representing a potential treatment strategy for individuals with cardiometabolic disorders. The present review aimed to examine the current evidence supporting that dietary prebiotic supplementation in adults has beneficial effects on biochemical parameters associated with the development of metabolic abnormalities including obesity, glucose intolerance, dyslipidaemia, hepatic steatosis and low-grade chronic inflammation. Between January 2000 and September 2013, eight computer databases were searched for randomised controlled trials published in English. Human trials were included if at least one group received a dietary prebiotic intervention. In the present review, twenty-six randomised controlled trials involving 831 participants were included. Evidence indicated that dietary prebiotic supplementation increased self-reported feelings of satiety in healthy adults (standardised mean difference -0.57, 95% CI -1.13, -0.01). Prebiotic supplementation also significantly reduced postprandial glucose (-0.76, 95% CI -1.41, -0.12) and insulin (-0.77, 95% CI -1.50, -0.04) concentrations. The effects of dietary prebiotics on total energy intake, body weight, peptide YY and glucagon-like peptide-1 concentrations, gastric emptying times, insulin sensitivity, lipids, inflammatory markers and immune function were contradictory. Dietary prebiotic consumption was found to be associated with subjective improvements in satiety and reductions in postprandial glucose and insulin concentrations. Additional evidence is required before recommending prebiotic supplements to individuals with metabolic abnormalities. Large

  19. Control of methionine metabolism by the SahR transcriptional regulator in Proteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Novichkov, Pavel S; Li, Xiaoqing; Kuehl, Jennifer V; Deutschbauer, Adam M; Arkin, Adam P; Price, Morgan N; Rodionov, Dmitry A

    2014-01-01

    Sulphur is an essential element in the metabolism. The sulphur-containing amino acid methionine is a metabolic precursor for S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), which serves as a coenzyme for ubiquitous methyltrtansferases. Recycling of organic sulphur compounds, e.g. via the SAM cycle, is an important metabolic process that needs to be tightly regulated. Knowledge about transcriptional regulation of these processes is still limited for many free-living bacteria. We identified a novel transcription factor SahR from the ArsR family that controls the SAM cycle genes in diverse microorganisms from soil and aquatic ecosystems. By using comparative genomics, we predicted SahR-binding DNA motifs and reconstructed SahR regulons in the genomes of 62 Proteobacteria. The conserved core of SahR regulons includes all enzymes required for the SAM cycle: the SAH hydrolase AhcY, the methionine biosynthesis enzymes MetE/MetH and MetF, and the SAM synthetase MetK. By using a combination of experimental techniques, we validated the SahR regulon in the sulphate-reducing Deltaproteobacterium Desulfovibrio alaskensis. SahR functions as a negative regulator that responds to the S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH). The elevated SAH level in the cell dissociates SahR from its DNA operators and induces the expression of SAM cycle genes. The effector-sensing domain in SahR is related to SAM-dependent methylases that are able to tightly bind SAH. SahR represents a novel type of transcriptional regulators for the control of sulphur amino acid metabolism. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Targeting polyamine metabolism and function in cancer and other hyperproliferative diseases.

    PubMed

    Casero, Robert A; Marton, Laurence J

    2007-05-01

    The polyamines spermidine and spermine and their diamine precursor putrescine are naturally occurring, polycationic alkylamines that are essential for eukaryotic cell growth. The requirement for and the metabolism of polyamines are frequently dysregulated in cancer and other hyperproliferative diseases, thus making polyamine function and metabolism attractive targets for therapeutic intervention. Recent advances in our understanding of polyamine function, metabolic regulation, and differences between normal cells and tumour cells with respect to polyamine biology, have reinforced the interest in this target-rich pathway for drug development.

  1. Design of pathway-level bioprocess monitoring and control strategies supported by metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Isidro, Inês A; Ferreira, Ana R; Clemente, João J; Cunha, António E; Dias, João M L; Oliveira, Rui

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter we explore the basic tools for the design of bioprocess monitoring, optimization, and control algorithms that incorporate a priori knowledge of metabolic networks. The main advantage is that this ultimately enables the targeting of intracellular control variables such as metabolic reactions or metabolic pathways directly linked with productivity and product quality. We analyze in particular design methods that target elementary modes of metabolic networks. The topics covered include the analysis of the structure of metabolic networks, computation and reduction of elementary modes, measurement methods for the envirome, envirome-guided metabolic reconstruction, and macroscopic dynamic modeling and control. These topics are illustrated with applications to a cultivation process of a recombinant Pichia pastoris X33 strain expressing a single-chain antibody fragment (scFv).

  2. Natural Products as Tools for Defining How Cellular Metabolism Influences Cellular Immune and Inflammatory Function during Chronic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lovelace, Erica S.; Polyak, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic viral infections like those caused by hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) cause disease that establishes an ongoing state of chronic inflammation. While there have been tremendous improvements towards curing HCV with directly acting antiviral agents (DAA) and keeping HIV viral loads below detection with antiretroviral therapy (ART), there is still a need to control inflammation in these diseases. Recent studies indicate that many natural products like curcumin, resveratrol and silymarin alter cellular metabolism and signal transduction pathways via enzymes such as adenosine monophosphate kinase (AMPK) and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), and these pathways directly influence cellular inflammatory status (such as NF-κB) and immune function. Natural products represent a vast toolkit to dissect and define how cellular metabolism controls cellular immune and inflammatory function. PMID:26633463

  3. Natural Products as Tools for Defining How Cellular Metabolism Influences Cellular Immune and Inflammatory Function during Chronic Infection.

    PubMed

    Lovelace, Erica S; Polyak, Stephen J

    2015-11-30

    Chronic viral infections like those caused by hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) cause disease that establishes an ongoing state of chronic inflammation. While there have been tremendous improvements towards curing HCV with directly acting antiviral agents (DAA) and keeping HIV viral loads below detection with antiretroviral therapy (ART), there is still a need to control inflammation in these diseases. Recent studies indicate that many natural products like curcumin, resveratrol and silymarin alter cellular metabolism and signal transduction pathways via enzymes such as adenosine monophosphate kinase (AMPK) and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), and these pathways directly influence cellular inflammatory status (such as NF-κB) and immune function. Natural products represent a vast toolkit to dissect and define how cellular metabolism controls cellular immune and inflammatory function.

  4. Functional Role of PPARs in Ruminants: Potential Targets for Fine-Tuning Metabolism during Growth and Lactation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuowen; Khan, Muhammad J.; Loor, Juan J.

    2013-01-01

    Characterization and biological roles of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) isotypes are well known in monogastrics, but not in ruminants. However, a wealth of information has accumulated in little more than a decade on ruminant PPARs including isotype tissue distribution, response to synthetic and natural agonists, gene targets, and factors affecting their expression. Functional characterization demonstrated that, as in monogastrics, the PPAR isotypes control expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism, anti-inflammatory response, development, and growth. Contrary to mouse, however, the PPARγ gene network appears to controls milk fat synthesis in lactating ruminants. As in monogastrics, PPAR isotypes in ruminants are activated by long-chain fatty acids, therefore, making them ideal candidates for fine-tuning metabolism in this species via nutrients. In this regard, using information accumulated in ruminants and monogastrics, we propose a model of PPAR isotype-driven biological functions encompassing key tissues during the peripartal period in dairy cattle. PMID:23737762

  5. Relative associations of polycystic ovarian syndrome vs metabolic syndrome with thyroid function, volume, nodularity and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Anaforoglu, I; Topbas, M; Algun, E

    2011-10-01

    The relative associations of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) and metabolic syndrome (MS) with the risk for thyroid disease (thyroid function, volume, nodularity and autoimmunity) are unknown.We compared thyroid features and function in patients with PCOS and control subjects by the presence of MS. We recruited 84 women with PCOS and 81 age-matched healthy controls. PCOS was defined according to the Rotterdam criteria. Thyroid ultrasound and function tests were performed in all. Although thyroid disease was more prevalent in women with PCOS, ovarian disease was not significantly associated with the risk for thyroid disease. Thyroid volume did not differ between women with PCOS and control subjects (13.7±8.6 vs 12.4±4.4 ml, respectively; p=0.2); however, it differed significantly between subjects with and without MS (regardless of PCOS status): 19.1±14.8 vs 12.4±4.9 ml, respectively; p=0.001). Antithyroglobulin and antithyroid peroxidase antibody levels also were significantly higher in subjects with MS, but not in participants with PCOS vs control subjects. Overall, TSH level correlated significantly with body mass index (BMI), weight, waist circumference, diastolic blood pressure, and levels of LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and HDL cholesterol. Thyroid volume correlated significantly with age, weight, BMI, waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, 120-min postprandial glucose and HDL level. PCOS alone was not associated with thyroid disease in our population. However, MS and some of its components appear to be related to thyroid volume, function, and antithyroid antibody levels.

  6. High-fat diet decreases energy expenditure and expression of genes controlling lipid metabolism, mitochondrial function and skeletal system development in the adipose tissue, along with increased expression of extracellular matrix remodelling- and inflammation-related genes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Myung-Sook; Kim, Young-Je; Kwon, Eun-Young; Ryoo, Jae Young; Kim, Sang Ryong; Jung, Un Ju

    2015-03-28

    The aim of the present study was to identify the genes differentially expressed in the visceral adipose tissue in a well-characterised mouse model of high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. Male C57BL/6J mice (n 20) were fed either HFD (189 % of energy from fat) or low-fat diet (LFD, 42 % of energy from fat) for 16 weeks. HFD-fed mice exhibited obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia and adipose collagen accumulation, along with higher levels of plasma leptin, resistin and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1, although there were no significant differences in plasma cytokine levels. Energy intake was similar in the two diet groups owing to lower food intake in the HFD group; however, energy expenditure was also lower in the HFD group than in the LFD group. Microarray analysis revealed that genes related to lipolysis, fatty acid metabolism, mitochondrial energy transduction, oxidation-reduction, insulin sensitivity and skeletal system development were down-regulated in HFD-fed mice, and genes associated with extracellular matrix (ECM) components, ECM remodelling and inflammation were up-regulated. The top ten up- or down-regulated genes include Acsm3, mt-Nd6, Fam13a, Cyp2e1, Rgs1 and Gpnmb, whose roles in the deterioration of obesity-associated adipose tissue are poorly understood. In conclusion, the genes identified here provide new therapeutic opportunities for prevention and treatment of diet-induced obesity.

  7. Effects of nutritional restriction on metabolic, endocrine, and ovarian function in llamas (Lama glama).

    PubMed

    Norambuena, M C; Silva, M; Urra, F; Ulloa-Leal, C; Fernández, A; Adams, G P; Huanca, W; Ratto, M H

    2013-05-01

    The objectives of the study were to determine the effects of nutritional restriction on ovarian function in llamas. Mature female llamas were assigned randomly to a Control group, fed 100% of maintenance energy requirements (MER) (n=8), or a Restricted group (n=8) fed from 70% to 40% of MER until a body condition score of 2.5 was attained. Blood samples were taken every-other-day to determine plasma concentrations of LH, estradiol, leptin and metabolic markers, and follicular dynamics were monitored daily by ultrasonography for 30 days (Experiment 1). Llamas were then treated with GnRH to compare the ovulatory response and corpus luteus (CL) development between groups (Experiment 2). Blood samples were taken to measure LH, leptin, progesterone and metabolic markers and ovarian structures were assessed as in Experiment 1. Llamas in the Restricted group had lower body mass and body condition scores than those in the Control group (P<0.001). Plasma concentrations of cholesterol, non-esterified fatty acids, triglycerides, and urea were higher in the Restricted group (P<0.05) than in the Control group. The day-to-day diameter profiles of the dominant follicles were smaller (P<0.05) in the Restricted group than in the Control group but plasma estradiol concentration did not differ. The ovulation rate and LH secretion in response to GnRH did not differ. Day-to-day profiles of CL diameter, plasma progesterone and leptin concentrations were smaller (P<0.01) in the Restricted group. In conclusion, nutritional restriction in llamas was associated with suppressed follicle and CL development, and lower plasma concentrations of progesterone and leptin.

  8. Analysis of clock-regulated genes in Neurospora reveals widespread posttranscriptional control of metabolic potential.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Jennifer M; Dasgupta, Arko; Emerson, Jillian M; Zhou, Xiaoying; Ringelberg, Carol S; Knabe, Nicole; Lipzen, Anna M; Lindquist, Erika A; Daum, Christopher G; Barry, Kerrie W; Grigoriev, Igor V; Smith, Kristina M; Galagan, James E; Bell-Pedersen, Deborah; Freitag, Michael; Cheng, Chao; Loros, Jennifer J; Dunlap, Jay C

    2014-12-02

    Neurospora crassa has been for decades a principal model for filamentous fungal genetics and physiology as well as for understanding the mechanism of circadian clocks. Eukaryotic fungal and animal clocks comprise transcription-translation-based feedback loops that control rhythmic transcription of a substantial fraction of these transcriptomes, yielding the changes in protein abundance that mediate circadian regulation of physiology and metabolism: Understanding circadian control of gene expression is key to understanding eukaryotic, including fungal, physiology. Indeed, the isolation of clock-controlled genes (ccgs) was pioneered in Neurospora where circadian output begins with binding of the core circadian transcription factor WCC to a subset of ccg promoters, including those of many transcription factors. High temporal resolution (2-h) sampling over 48 h using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) identified circadianly expressed genes in Neurospora, revealing that from ∼10% to as much 40% of the transcriptome can be expressed under circadian control. Functional classifications of these genes revealed strong enrichment in pathways involving metabolism, protein synthesis, and stress responses; in broad terms, daytime metabolic potential favors catabolism, energy production, and precursor assembly, whereas night activities favor biosynthesis of cellular components and growth. Discriminative regular expression motif elicitation (DREME) identified key promoter motifs highly correlated with the temporal regulation of ccgs. Correlations between ccg abundance from RNA-Seq, the degree of ccg-promoter activation as reported by ccg-promoter-luciferase fusions, and binding of WCC as measured by ChIP-Seq, are not strong. Therefore, although circadian activation is critical to ccg rhythmicity, posttranscriptional regulation plays a major role in determining rhythmicity at the mRNA level.

  9. Fetuin-A function in systemic mineral metabolism.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Marietta; Kinkeldey, Anne; Jahnen-Dechent, Willi

    2012-11-01

    Fetuin-A is a liver-derived plasma protein involved in calcified matrix metabolism. Fetuin-A mediates the formation and stabilization of calciprotein particles (CPPs), soluble colloids made of fetuin-A, further serum proteins, and calcium phosphate mineral. CPP formation ensures mineral solubilization and rapid clearance from circulation by macrophages of the mononuclear phagocyte system, thus preventing pathological calcification. Accordingly, low levels of free serum fetuin-A and high serum CPPs are associated with pathological calcification in patients suffering from chronic kidney disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Improvement of mitochondrial function and dynamics by the metabolic enhancer piracetam.

    PubMed

    Stockburger, Carola; Kurz, Christopher; Koch, Konrad A; Eckert, Schamim H; Leuner, Kristina; Müller, Walter E

    2013-10-01

    The metabolic enhancer piracetam is used in many countries to treat cognitive impairment in aging, brain injuries, as well as dementia such as AD (Alzheimer's disease). As a specific feature of piracetam, beneficial effects are usually associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. In previous studies we were able to show that piracetam enhanced ATP production, mitochondrial membrane potential as well as neurite outgrowth in cell and animal models for aging and AD. To investigate further the effects of piracetam on mitochondrial function, especially mitochondrial fission and fusion events, we decided to assess mitochondrial morphology. Human neuroblastoma cells were treated with the drug under normal conditions and under conditions imitating aging and the occurrence of ROS (reactive oxygen species) as well as in stably transfected cells with the human wild-type APP (amyloid precursor protein) gene. This AD model is characterized by expressing only 2-fold more human Aβ (amyloid β-peptide) compared with control cells and therefore representing very early stages of AD when Aβ levels gradually increase over decades. Interestingly, these cells exhibit an impaired mitochondrial function and morphology under baseline conditions. Piracetam is able to restore this impairment and shifts mitochondrial morphology back to elongated forms, whereas there is no effect in control cells. After addition of a complex I inhibitor, mitochondrial morphology is distinctly shifted to punctate forms in both cell lines. Under these conditions piracetam is able to ameliorate morphology in cells suffering from the mild Aβ load, as well as mitochondrial dynamics in control cells.

  11. Effect of the Aged Garlic Extract on Cardiovascular Function in Metabolic Syndrome Rats.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Torres, Israel; Torres-Narváez, Juan Carlos; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Rubio-Ruiz, María Esther; Díaz-Díaz, Eulises; Del Valle-Mondragón, Leonardo; Martínez-Memije, Raúl; Varela López, Elvira; Guarner-Lans, Verónica

    2016-10-26

    The antioxidant properties of aged garlic extract (AGE) on cardiovascular functioning (CF) in metabolic syndrome (MS) remains poorly studied. Here we study the AGE effects on CF in a rat model of MS. Control rats plus saline solution (C + SS), MS rats (30% sucrose in drinking water from weaning) plus saline solution (MS + SS), control rats receiving AGE (C + AGE 125 mg/Kg/12 h) and MS rats with AGE (MS + AGE) were studied. MS + SS had increased triglycerides, systolic blood pressure, insulin, leptin, HOMA index, and advanced glycation end products. AGE returned their levels to control values (p < 0.01). Cholesterol was decreased by AGE (p = 0.05). Glutathion and GPx activity were reduced in MS + SS rats and increased with AGE (p = 0.05). Lipid peroxidation was increased in MS + SS and AGE reduced it (p = 0.001). Vascular functioning was deteriorated by MS (increased vasocontraction and reduced vasodilation) and AGE improved it (p = 0.001). Coronary vascular resistance was increased in MS rats and AGE decreased it (p = 0.001). Cardiac performance was not modified by MS but AGE increased it. NO measured in the perfusate liquid from the heart and serum citrulline, nitrites/nitrates were decreased in MS and AGE increased them (p < 0.01). In conclusion, AGE reduces MS-induced cardiovascular risk, through its anti-oxidant properties.

  12. Resting metabolic rate, pulmonary functions, and body composition parameters in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Alpaslan, Ahmet Hamdi; Ucok, Kagan; Coşkun, Kerem Şenol; Genc, Abdurrahman; Karabacak, Hatice; Guzel, Halil Ibrahim

    2017-03-01

    Several studies of school-aged children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have found a higher prevalence of overweight/obesity compared with the general population. However, the scientific literature contains insufficient evidence to establish clear conclusions on pulmonary functions, resting metabolic rate (RMR), and body composition in children with ADHD. This study therefore investigates the pulmonary functions tests (PFTs), RMR, and body composition parameters in children with ADHD and evaluates their quality of life. Forty children with ADHD and 40 healthy controls participated in the study. The children's parents completed Conners' parent rating scale (CPRS) and the pediatric quality of life (PedsQL), and their teachers completed Conners' Teacher rating scale (CTRS). The child participants also completed the PedsQL. RMR, PFTs, and body composition parameters were investigated. No significant differences in age, gender, and socioeconomic level were found. All CPRS subscales, except anxiety and psychosomatic conditions, were significantly different (p < 0.05). According to the CTRS, inattentiveness, hyperactivity, and conduct problems were significantly higher in the ADHD group. The results showed that the ADHD group's quality of life is worse than the control group. Body mass index, body composition parameters, RMR, and PFTs were not statistically different between the children with ADHD and the healthy controls. Further studies with complex designs are needed to confirm the results.

  13. Association between worse metabolic control and increased thyroid volume and nodular disease in elderly adults with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Evelyn; Ponce, Cecilia; Brodschi, Dafne; Nepote, Alejandra; Barreto, Adriana; Schnitman, Marta; Fossati, Pia; Salgado, Pablo; Cejas, Claudia; Faingold, Cristina; Musso, Carla; Brenta, Gabriela

    2015-06-01

    Metabolic syndrome has been associated with nodular goiter. Our aim was to evaluate which metabolic parameters in elderly patients with metabolic syndrome are associated with thyroid enlargement or increased prevalence of thyroid nodules. In this cross-sectional study, 77 patients >65 years of age with metabolic syndrome were included. We evaluated the presence of thyroid nodules and thyroid volume by ultrasonography and several biochemical, metabolic and anthropometric parameters. Only patients with thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone, TSH) levels between 0.3 and 6 mU/L were included. We further divided subjects into two groups-type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and non-T2DM and established comparisons between them. Among all parameters analyzed we found a significant correlation between glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and volume (r=0.261, P=0.027) or number of nodules (r=0.266, P=0.023). Neither sex, age, body mass index (BMI), metformin, nor levothyroxine use were associated with thyroid volume or nodularity. Within the whole cohort, those patients with T2DM had larger thyroid volumes compared to non-T2DM [median (confidence interval, CI) 6.976 (5.220-10.789) vs. 5.034 (3.796-6.034) mL, P<0.008). Furthermore, a larger proportion of T2DM patients presented thyroid volumes >5.8 mL [69 vs. 23%, P<0.001; odds ratio=7.25 (CI 2.04-25.56)]. In elderly patients with metabolic syndrome, worse metabolic control, represented by higher HbA1c levels, was found associated to increased prevalence of thyroid nodules and larger thyroid volume. Moreover, within the whole metabolic syndrome group, patients with T2DM had the largest thyroid volumes.

  14. A trehalose metabolic enzyme controls inflorescence architecture in maize.

    PubMed

    Satoh-Nagasawa, Namiko; Nagasawa, Nobuhiro; Malcomber, Simon; Sakai, Hajime; Jackson, David

    2006-05-11

    Inflorescence branching is a major yield trait in crop plants controlled by the developmental fate of axillary shoot meristems. Variations in branching patterns lead to diversity in flower-bearing architectures (inflorescences) and affect crop yield by influencing seed number or harvesting ability. Several growth regulators such as auxins, cytokinins and carotenoid derivatives regulate branching architectures. Inflorescence branching in maize is regulated by three RAMOSA genes. Here we show that one of these genes, RAMOSA3 (RA3), encodes a trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase expressed in discrete domains subtending axillary inflorescence meristems. Genetic and molecular data indicate that RA3 functions through the predicted transcriptional regulator RAMOSA1 (RA1). We propose that RA3 regulates inflorescence branching by modification of a sugar signal that moves into axillary meristems. Alternatively, the fact that RA3 acts upstream of RA1 supports a hypothesis that RA3 itself may have a transcriptional regulatory function.

  15. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms. Metabolic diseases and conditions include: Hyperthyroidism (pronounced: hi-per-THIGH-roy-dih-zum). Hyperthyroidism is caused ... or through surgery or radiation treatments. Hypothyroidism (pronounced: hi-po-THIGH-roy-dih-zum). Hypothyroidism is caused ...

  16. Functional characterization of an invertase inhibitor gene involved in sucrose metabolism in tomato fruit.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Jiang, Jing; Yang, Yan-li; Wang, Zhi-he

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we produced tomato plants overexpressing an invertase inhibitor gene (Sly-INH) from tomato, using a simple and efficient transient transformation system. Compared with control plants, the expression of Sly-INH was highly upregulated in Sly-INH overexpressing plants, as indicated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Physiological analysis revealed that Sly-INH inhibited the activity of cell wall invertase (CWIN), which increased sugar accumulation in tomato fruit. Furthermore, Sly-INH mediated sucrose metabolism by regulating CWIN activity. Our results suggest that invertase activity is potentially regulated by the Sly-INH inhibitor at the post-translational level, and they demonstrate that the transient transformation system is an effective method for determining the functions of genes in tomato.

  17. Rodent Models for the Analysis of Tissue Clock Function in Metabolic Rhythms Research

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Anthony H.; Astiz, Mariana; Leinweber, Brinja; Oster, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    The circadian timing system consists on a distributed network of cellular clocks that together coordinate 24-h rhythms of physiology and behavior. Clock function and metabolism are tightly coupled, from the cellular to the organismal level. Genetic and non-genetic approaches in rodents have been employed to study circadian clock function in the living organism. Due to the ubiquitous expression of clock genes and the intricate interaction between the circadian system and energy metabolism, genetic approaches targeting specific tissue clocks have been used to assess their contribution in systemic metabolic processes. However, special requirements regarding specificity and efficiency have to be met to allow for valid conclusions from such studies. In this review, we provide a brief summary of different approaches developed for dissecting tissue clock function in the metabolic context in rodents, compare their strengths and weaknesses, and suggest new strategies in assessing tissue clock output and the consequences of circadian clock disruption in vivo. PMID:28243224

  18. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease candidate gene prioritization based on metabolic networks and functional information.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinyan; Li, Wan; Zhang, Yihua; Feng, Yuyan; Zhao, Xilei; He, Yuehan; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Lina

    2017-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a multi-factor disease, in which metabolic disturbances played important roles. In this paper, functional information was integrated into a COPD-related metabolic network to assess similarity between genes. Then a gene prioritization method was applied to the COPD-related metabolic network to prioritize COPD candidate genes. The gene prioritization method was superior to ToppGene and ToppNet in both literature validation and functional enrichment analysis. Top-ranked genes prioritized from the metabolic perspective with functional information could promote the better understanding about the molecular mechanism of this disease. Top 100 genes might be potential markers for diagnostic and effective therapies.

  19. High density lipoprotein and metabolic disease: Potential benefits of restoring its functional properties

    PubMed Central

    Klancic, Teja; Woodward, Lavinia; Hofmann, Susanna M.; Fisher, Edward A.

    2016-01-01

    Background High density lipoproteins (HDLs) are thought to be atheroprotective and to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Besides their antioxidant, antithrombotic, anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic properties in the vasculature, HDLs also improve glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle. Scope of the review Herein, we review the functional role of HDLs to improve metabolic disorders, especially those involving insulin resistance and to induce regression of CVD with a particular focus on current pharmacological treatment options as well as lifestyle interventions, particularly exercise. Major conclusions Functional properties of HDLs continue to be considered important mediators to reverse metabolic dysfunction and to regress atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Lifestyle changes are often recommended to reduce the risk of CVD, with exercise being one of the most important of these. Understanding how exercise improves HDL function will likely lead to new approaches to battle the expanding burden of obesity and the metabolic syndrome. PMID:27110484

  20. The effects of allopurinol on metabolic acidosis and endothelial functions in chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Dilara; Tuğrul Sezer, M; İnal, Salih; Altuntaş, Atila; Kıdır, Veysel; Orhan, Hikmet

    2015-06-01

    Hyperuricemia and metabolic acidosis have emerged as important risk factors for progression of kidney disease. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of allopurinol on metabolic acidosis and endothelial functions in hyperuricemic stage 2-4 chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Thirty patients with stage 2-4 CKD and serum uric acid levels over 5.5 mg/dl were included in the study group. They were prescribed 300 mg/day per oral allopurinol treatment for three months. Age- and gender-matched CKD patients (n = 30) with similar clinical characteristics were taken as the control group and were not given allopurinol treatment. Endothelial functions were measured via flow-mediated dilatation (∆FMD %) over the forearm. pH and HCO3 levels in venous blood, Cr clearance and proteinuria levels were calculated in all patients at baseline and in the third month. Serum uric acid levels significantly decreased in the study group from 7.9 ± 1.6 to 6.4 ± 1.7 (p < 0.001). Cr clearance (from 43.4 ± 20.1 to 51.4 ± 24.9, p = 0.011), serum bicarbonate levels (from 21.4 ± 3.4 to 23.0 ± 3.4, p = 0.007) and ΔFMD % values (from 5.8 ± 2.5 to 6.2 ± 2.7, p = 0.006) increased significantly in the allopurinol group. There were no significant changes except for ∆FMD % values (decreased from 6.27 ± 1.62 to 5.71 ± 1.90, p = 0.005) in the control group. ∆FMD % variations within the two groups were clearly significant in the repeated ANOVA general linear model. We assume that decreasing uric acid levels with allopurinol treatment seems to be helpful in restoring endothelial functions, preventing metabolic acidosis and slowing down the progression of CKD.

  1. Commodity specific rates of temporal discounting: does metabolic function underlie differences in rates of discounting?

    PubMed

    Charlton, Shawn R; Fantino, Edmund

    2008-03-01

    Discounting rates vary as a function of commodity type. Previous studies suggest five potential characteristics of the commodity that could explain these differences: type of reinforcer (primary or secondary), if the commodity is perishable, if the commodity is satiable, if the commodity can be directly consumed, and immediacy of consumption. This paper suggests that these characteristics may best be viewed as related to a more fundamental characteristic: metabolic processing. In order to explore the possibility that metabolic processing underlies changes in discount rates, the difference in discounting between food, money, music CDs, DVDs, and books are compared. Music CDs, DVDs, and books share many characteristics in common with food, including gaining value through a physiological process, but are not directly metabolized. Results are consistent with previous findings of commodity specific discount rates and show that metabolic function plays a role in determining discount rates with those commodities that are metabolized being discounted at a higher rate. These results are interpreted as evidence that the discount rate for different commodities lies along a continuum with those that serve an exchange function rather than a direct function (money) anchoring the low end and those that serve a direct metabolic function capping the high end (food, alcohol, drugs).

  2. [Effects of exogenous NO3- on cherry root function and enzyme activities related to nitrogen metabolism under hypoxia stress].

    PubMed

    Feng, Li-guo; Sheng, Li-xi; Shu, Huai-rui

    2010-12-01

    A water culture experiment with controlled dissolved oxygen concentration was conducted to explore the effects of exogenous NO3- on the root function and enzyme activities related to nitrogen metabolism of cherry (Prunun cerasus x P. canescens) seedlings under hypoxia stress. Comparing with the control (7.5 mmol NO3- x L(-1)), treatments 15 and 22.5 mmol NO3- x L(-1) made the materials for plant metabolism abundant, ensured the synthesis of enzyme proteins, increased root activity, maintained root respiration, improved the activities of enzymes related to nitrogen metabolism, such as nitrate reductase (NR), glutamine synthethase (GS), and glutamate dehydrogenase (NADH-GDH) in roots, and thereby, supplied enough energy for root respiration and NAD+ to glycolytic pathway, ensured electron transfer, and avoid ammonium toxicity under hypoxia stress. As a result, the injury of hypoxia stress to cherry plant was alleviated. Applying NO3- at the concentration of 22.5 mmol x L(-1) was more advisable. However, NO3- deficiency (0 mmol x L(-1)) showed opposite results. The above results suggested that applying exogenous NO3- to growth medium could regulate cherry root function and nitrogen metabolism, and antagonize the damage of hypoxia stress on cherry roots.

  3. Red Blood Cell Function and Dysfunction: Redox Regulation, Nitric Oxide Metabolism, Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Viktoria; Diederich, Lukas; Keller, T.C. Stevenson; Kramer, Christian M.; Lückstädt, Wiebke; Panknin, Christina; Suvorava, Tatsiana; Isakson, Brant E.; Kelm, Malte

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Recent clinical evidence identified anemia to be correlated with severe complications of cardiovascular disease (CVD) such as bleeding, thromboembolic events, stroke, hypertension, arrhythmias, and inflammation, particularly in elderly patients. The underlying mechanisms of these complications are largely unidentified. Recent Advances: Previously, red blood cells (RBCs) were considered exclusively as transporters of oxygen and nutrients to the tissues. More recent experimental evidence indicates that RBCs are important interorgan communication systems with additional functions, including participation in control of systemic nitric oxide metabolism, redox regulation, blood rheology, and viscosity. In this article, we aim to revise and discuss the potential impact of these noncanonical functions of RBCs and their dysfunction in the cardiovascular system and in anemia. Critical Issues: The mechanistic links between changes of RBC functional properties and cardiovascular complications related to anemia have not been untangled so far. Future Directions: To allow a better understanding of the complications associated with anemia in CVD, basic and translational science studies should be focused on identifying the role of noncanonical functions of RBCs in the cardiovascular system and on defining intrinsic and/or systemic dysfunction of RBCs in anemia and its relationship to CVD both in animal models and clinical settings. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 26, 718–742. PMID:27889956

  4. Protein Kinase B Controls Transcriptional Programs that Direct Cytotoxic T Cell Fate but Is Dispensable for T Cell Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Macintyre, Andrew N.; Finlay, David; Preston, Gavin; Sinclair, Linda V.; Waugh, Caryll M.; Tamas, Peter; Feijoo, Carmen; Okkenhaug, Klaus; Cantrell, Doreen A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary In cytotoxic T cells (CTL), Akt, also known as protein kinase B, is activated by the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) and the cytokine interleukin 2 (IL-2). Akt can control cell metabolism in many cell types but whether this role is important for CTL function has not been determined. Here we have shown that Akt does not mediate IL-2- or TCR-induced cell metabolic responses; rather, this role is assumed by other Akt-related kinases. There is, however, a nonredundant role for sustained and strong activation of Akt in CTL to coordinate the TCR- and IL-2-induced transcriptional programs that control expression of key cytolytic effector molecules, adhesion molecules, and cytokine and chemokine receptors that distinguish effector versus memory and naive T cells. Akt is thus dispensable for metabolism, but the strength and duration of Akt activity dictates the CTL transcriptional program and determines CTL fate. PMID:21295499

  5. Mitochondrial metabolism and the control of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Chiong, Mario; Cartes-Saavedra, Benjamín; Norambuena-Soto, Ignacio; Mondaca-Ruff, David; Morales, Pablo E; García-Miguel, Marina; Mellado, Rosemarie

    2014-01-01

    Differentiation and dedifferentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) are essential processes of vascular development. VSMC have biosynthetic, proliferative, and contractile roles in the vessel wall. Alterations in the differentiated state of the VSMC play a critical role in the pathogenesis of a variety of cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, hypertension, and vascular stenosis. This review provides an overview of the current state of knowledge of molecular mechanisms involved in the control of VSMC proliferation, with particular focus on mitochondrial metabolism. Mitochondrial activity can be controlled by regulating mitochondrial dynamics, i.e., mitochondrial fusion and fission, and by regulating mitochondrial calcium handling through the interaction with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Alterations in both VSMC proliferation and mitochondrial function can be triggered by dysregulation of mitofusin-2, a small GTPase associated with mitochondrial fusion and mitochondrial-ER interaction. Several lines of evidence highlight the relevance of mitochondrial metabolism in the control of VSMC proliferation, indicating a new area to be explored in the treatment of vascular diseases.

  6. Metabolic and Demographic Feedbacks Shape the Emergent Spatial Structure and Function of Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Estrela, Sylvie; Brown, Sam P.

    2013-01-01

    Microbes are predominantly found in surface-attached and spatially structured polymicrobial communities. Within these communities, microbial cells excrete a wide range of metabolites, setting the stage for interspecific metabolic interactions. The links, however, between metabolic and ecological interactions (functional relationships), and species spatial organization (structural relationships) are still poorly understood. Here, we use an individual-based modelling framework to simulate the growth of a two-species surface-attached community where food (resource) is traded for detoxification (service) and investigate how metabolic constraints of individual species shape the emergent structural and functional relationships of the community. We show that strong metabolic interdependence drives the emergence of mutualism, robust interspecific mixing, and increased community productivity. Specifically, we observed a striking and highly stable emergent lineage branching pattern, generating a persistent lineage mixing that was absent when the metabolic exchange was removed. These emergent community properties are driven by demographic feedbacks, such that aid from neighbouring cells directly enhances focal cell growth, which in turn feeds back to neighbour fecundity. In contrast, weak metabolic interdependence drives conflict (exploitation or competition), and in turn greater interspecific segregation. Together, these results support the idea that species structural and functional relationships represent the net balance of metabolic interdependencies. PMID:24385891

  7. A gut–brain neural circuit controlled by intestinal gluconeogenesis is crucial in metabolic health

    PubMed Central

    Soty, Maud; Penhoat, Armelle; Amigo-Correig, Marta; Vinera, Jennifer; Sardella, Anne; Vullin-Bouilloux, Fanny; Zitoun, Carine; Houberdon, Isabelle; Mithieux, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Certain nutrients positively regulate energy homeostasis via intestinal gluconeogenesis (IGN). The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of a deficient IGN in glucose control independently of nutritional environment. Methods We used mice deficient in the intestine glucose-6 phosphatase catalytic unit, the key enzyme of IGN (I-G6pc−/− mice). We evaluated a number of parameters involved in energy homeostasis, including insulin sensitivity (hyperinsulinemic euglycaemic clamp), the pancreatic function (insulin secretion in vivo and in isolated islets) and the hypothalamic homeostatic function (leptin sensitivity). Results Intestinal-G6pc−/− mice exhibit slight fasting hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance and a deteriorated pancreatic function, despite normal diet with no change in body weight. These defects evoking type 2 diabetes (T2D) derive from the basal activation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). They are corrected by treatment with an inhibitor of α-2 adrenergic receptors. Deregulation in a key target of IGN, the homeostatic hypothalamic function (highlighted here through leptin resistance) is a mechanistic link. Hence the leptin resistance and metabolic disorders in I-G6pc−/− mice are corrected by rescuing IGN by portal glucose infusion. Finally, I-G6pc−/− mice develop the hyperglycaemia characteristic of T2D more rapidly under high fat/high sucrose diet. Conclusions Intestinal gluconeogenesis is a mandatory function for the healthy neural control of glucose homeostasis. PMID:25685698

  8. Functional genomics reveals that Clostridium difficile Spo0A coordinates sporulation, virulence and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Laura J; Browne, Hilary P; Yu, Lu; Smits, Wiep Klaas; Fagan, Robert P; Barquist, Lars; Martin, Melissa J; Goulding, David; Duncan, Sylvia H; Flint, Harry J; Dougan, Gordon; Choudhary, Jyoti S; Lawley, Trevor D

    2014-02-25

    Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic, Gram-positive bacterium that can reside as a commensal within the intestinal microbiota of healthy individuals or cause life-threatening antibiotic-associated diarrhea in immunocompromised hosts. C. difficile can also form highly resistant spores that are excreted facilitating host-to-host transmission. The C. difficile spo0A gene encodes a highly conserved transcriptional regulator of sporulation that is required for relapsing disease and transmission in mice. Here we describe a genome-wide approach using a combined transcriptomic and proteomic analysis to identify Spo0A regulated genes. Our results validate Spo0A as a positive regulator of putative and novel sporulation genes as well as components of the mature spore proteome. We also show that Spo0A regulates a number of virulence-associated factors such as flagella and metabolic pathways including glucose fermentation leading to butyrate production. The C. difficile spo0A gene is a global transcriptional regulator that controls diverse sporulation, virulence and metabolic phenotypes coordinating pathogen adaptation to a wide range of host interactions. Additionally, the rich breadth of functional data allowed us to significantly update the annotation of the C. difficile 630 reference genome which will facilitate basic and applied research on this emerging pathogen.

  9. Functional genomics reveals that Clostridium difficile Spo0A coordinates sporulation, virulence and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic, Gram-positive bacterium that can reside as a commensal within the intestinal microbiota of healthy individuals or cause life-threatening antibiotic-associated diarrhea in immunocompromised hosts. C. difficile can also form highly resistant spores that are excreted facilitating host-to-host transmission. The C. difficile spo0A gene encodes a highly conserved transcriptional regulator of sporulation that is required for relapsing disease and transmission in mice. Results Here we describe a genome-wide approach using a combined transcriptomic and proteomic analysis to identify Spo0A regulated genes. Our results validate Spo0A as a positive regulator of putative and novel sporulation genes as well as components of the mature spore proteome. We also show that Spo0A regulates a number of virulence-associated factors such as flagella and metabolic pathways including glucose fermentation leading to butyrate production. Conclusions The C. difficile spo0A gene is a global transcriptional regulator that controls diverse sporulation, virulence and metabolic phenotypes coordinating pathogen adaptation to a wide range of host interactions. Additionally, the rich breadth of functional data allowed us to significantly update the annotation of the C. difficile 630 reference genome which will facilitate basic and applied research on this emerging pathogen. PMID:24568651

  10. Pulmonary metabolic function in the awake lamb: effect of development and hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Pitt, B R; Lister, G

    1983-08-01

    The effect of postnatal development and acute alveolar hypoxia on pulmonary metabolic function was studied in conscious newborn lambs. Measurements of the ability of the lungs of these animals to metabolize [3H]benzoyl-L-phenyl-alanyl-L-alanyl-L-proline ([3H]BPAP; a synthetic substrate for angiotensin-converting enzyme, ACE) and to remove 5-hydroxy-[14C]tryptamine (5-[14C]HT) were made by modified indicator-dilution techniques during normoxic and hypoxic (fraction of inspired O2 = 0.10) conditions at 1 day, 1 wk, and 1 mo of age. Six additional sheep (8-23 wk old) were studied acutely as "adult" controls. BPAP metabolism in the 1-day-old group was 48 +/- 3% and increased slowly to 57 +/- 1% (P less than 0.05) at 1 mo of age and to 79 +/- 3% (P less than 0.01) by 23 wk of age. Pulmonary 5-[14C]HT removal was adultlike at birth (69 +/- 2%). Alveolar hypoxia significantly decreased BPAP only in the 1-day-old group (41 +/- 3%; P less than 0.05) and had no significant effect on 5-[14C]HT removal over the range of ages studied. These data demonstrate a selective and gradual postnatal development of pulmonary ACE which could be due to alterations in either the affinity or maximal capacity of pulmonary ACE, or increased endothelial cell surface area secondary to rapid growth of small blood vessels in this period. Alveolar hypoxia does not appear to closely regulate either ACE activity or 5-HT removal in conscious lambs greater than 1 day old when trace amounts of substrate are used.

  11. Acetylation control of cardiac fatty acid β-oxidation and energy metabolism in obesity, diabetes, and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Arata; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2016-12-01

    Alterations in cardiac energy metabolism are an important contributor to the cardiac pathology associated with obesity, diabetes, and heart failure. High rates of fatty acid β-oxidation with cardiac insulin resistance represent a cardiac metabolic hallmark of diabetes and obesity, while a marginal decrease in fatty acid oxidation and a prominent decrease in insulin-stimulated glucose oxidation are commonly seen in the early stages of heart failure. Alterations in post-translational control of energy metabolic processes have recently been identified as an important contributor to these metabolic changes. In particular, lysine acetylation of non-histone proteins, which controls a diverse family of mitochondrial metabolic pathways, contributes to the cardiac energy derangements seen in obesity, diabetes, and heart failure. Lysine acetylation is controlled both via acetyltransferases and deacetylases (sirtuins), as well as by non-enzymatic lysine acetylation due to increased acetyl CoA pool size or dysregulated nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) metabolism (which stimulates sirtuin activity). One of the important mitochondrial acetylation targets are the fatty acid β-oxidation enzymes, which contributes to alterations in cardiac substrate preference during the course of obesity, diabetes, and heart failure, and can ultimately lead to cardiac dysfunction in these disease states. This review will summarize the role of lysine acetylation and its regulatory control in the context of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation. The functional contribution of cardiac protein lysine acetylation to the shift in cardiac energy substrate preference that occurs in obesity, diabetes, and especially in the early stages of heart failure will also be reviewed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The role of post-translational protein modifications on heart and vascular metabolism edited by Jason R.B. Dyck & Jan F.C. Glatz.

  12. Contextual Control by Function and Form of Transfer of Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, David R.; Dougher, Michael J.; Greenway, David E.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated conditions leading to contextual control by stimulus topography over transfer of functions. Three 4-member stimulus equivalence classes, each consisting of four (A, B, C, D) topographically distinct visual stimuli, were established for 5 college students. Across classes, designated A stimuli were open-ended linear figures,…

  13. Contextual Control by Function and Form of Transfer of Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, David R.; Dougher, Michael J.; Greenway, David E.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated conditions leading to contextual control by stimulus topography over transfer of functions. Three 4-member stimulus equivalence classes, each consisting of four (A, B, C, D) topographically distinct visual stimuli, were established for 5 college students. Across classes, designated A stimuli were open-ended linear figures,…

  14. Estrogen-related receptor α, the molecular clock, and transcriptional control of metabolic outputs.

    PubMed

    Giguère, V; Dufour, C R; Eichner, L J; Deblois, G; Cermakian, N

    2011-01-01

    Metabolism and circadian rhythms must be closely integrated to support the energetic needs of the organism linked to the daily timing of physiological and behavioral processes. Although components of the molecular clock can directly target some metabolic genes, the control of metabolic clock output is believed to be mediated mostly through the action of transcription factors whose patterns of expression are rhythmic in metabolic tissues. Our recent work has identified the orphan nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα), a potent effector of metabolic gene networks, as a direct regulator of the molecular clock. Thus, by acting both upstream of and downstream from the molecular clock, ERRα serves as a key transcription factor linking the clock with metabolic control.

  15. Drosophila Insulin Pathway Mutants Affect Visual Physiology and Brain Function Besides Growth, Lipid, and Carbohydrate Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Murillo-Maldonado, Juan M.; Sánchez-Chávez, Gustavo; Salgado, Luis M.; Salceda, Rocío; Riesgo-Escovar, Juan R.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes worldwide. Some of its complications, such as retinopathy and neuropathy, are long-term and protracted, with an unclear etiology. Given this problem, genetic model systems, such as in flies where type 2 diabetes can be modeled and studied, offer distinct advantages. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We used individual flies in experiments: control and mutant individuals with partial loss-of-function insulin pathway genes. We measured wing size and tested body weight for growth phenotypes, the latter by means of a microbalance. We studied total lipid and carbohydrate content, lipids by a reaction in single fly homogenates with vanillin-phosphoric acid, and carbohydrates with an anthrone-sulfuric acid reaction. Cholinesterase activity was measured using the Ellman method in head homogenates from pooled fly heads, and electroretinograms with glass capillary microelectrodes to assess performance of central brain activity and retinal function. RESULTS Flies with partial loss-of-function of insulin pathway genes have significantly reduced body weight, higher total lipid content, and sometimes elevated carbohydrate levels. Brain function is impaired, as is retinal function, but no clear correlation can be drawn from nervous system function and metabolic state. CONCLUSIONS These studies show that flies can be models of type 2 diabetes. They weigh less but have significant lipid gains (obese); some also have carbohydrate gains and compromised brain and retinal functions. This is significant because flies have an open circulatory system without microvasculature and can be studied without the complications of vascular defects. PMID:21464442

  16. Microbial community assembly and metabolic function during mammalian corpse decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalf, J. L.; Xu, Z. Z.; Weiss, S.; Lax, S.; Van Treuren, W.; Hyde, E. R.; Song, S. J.; Amir, A.; Larsen, P.; Sangwan, N.; Haarmann, D.; Humphrey, G. C.; Ackermann, G.; Thompson, L. R.; Lauber, C.; Bibat, A.; Nicholas, C.; Gebert, M. J.; Petrosino, J. F.; Reed, S. C.; Gilbert, J. A.; Lynne, A. M.; Bucheli, S. R.; Carter, D. O.; Knight, R.

    2015-12-10

    Vertebrate corpse decomposition provides an important stage in nutrient cycling in most terrestrial habitats, yet microbially mediated processes are poorly understood. Here we combine deep microbial community characterization, community-level metabolic reconstruction, and soil biogeochemical assessment to understand the principles governing microbial community assembly during decomposition of mouse and human corpses on different soil substrates. We find a suite of bacterial and fungal groups that contribute to nitrogen cycling and a reproducible network of decomposers that emerge on predictable time scales. Our results show that this decomposer community is derived primarily from bulk soil, but key decomposers are ubiquitous in low abundance. Soil type was not a dominant factor driving community development, and the process of decomposition is sufficiently reproducible to offer new opportunities for forensic investigations.

  17. Biosynthesis, function and metabolic engineering of plant volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Dudareva, Natalia; Klempien, Antje; Muhlemann, Joëlle K; Kaplan, Ian

    2013-04-01

    Plants synthesize an amazing diversity of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that facilitate interactions with their environment, from attracting pollinators and seed dispersers to protecting themselves from pathogens, parasites and herbivores. Recent progress in -omics technologies resulted in the isolation of genes encoding enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of many volatiles and contributed to our understanding of regulatory mechanisms involved in VOC formation. In this review, we largely focus on the biosynthesis and regulation of plant volatiles, the involvement of floral volatiles in plant reproduction as well as their contribution to plant biodiversity and applications in agriculture via crop-pollinator interactions. In addition, metabolic engineering approaches for both the improvement of plant defense and pollinator attraction are discussed in light of methodological constraints and ecological complications that limit the transition of crops with modified volatile profiles from research laboratories to real-world implementation.

  18. Complex pectin metabolism by gut bacteria reveals novel catalytic functions

    PubMed Central

    Baslé, Arnaud; Gray, Joseph; Venditto, Immacolata; Briggs, Jonathon; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Labourel, Aurore; Terrapon, Nicolas; Buffetto, Fanny; Nepogodiev, Sergey; Xiao, Yao; Field, Robert A.; Zhu, Yanping; O’Neil, Malcolm A.; Urbanowicz, Breeana R.; York, William S.; Davies, Gideon J.; Abbott, D. Wade; Ralet, Marie-Christine; Martens, Eric C.; Henrissat, Bernard; Gilbert, Harry J.

    2017-01-01

    Carbohydrate polymers drive microbial diversity in the human gut microbiota. It is unclear, however, whether bacterial consortia or single organisms are required to depolymerize highly complex glycans. Here we show that the gut bacterium Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron utilizes the most structurally complex glycan known; the plant pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan-II, cleaving all but one of its 21 distinct glycosidic linkages. We show that rhamnogalacturonan-II side-chain and backbone deconstruction are coordinated, to overcome steric constraints, and that degradation reveals previously undiscovered enzyme families and novel catalytic activities. The degradome informs revision of the current structural model of RG-II and highlights how individual gut bacteria orchestrate manifold enzymes to metabolize the most challenging glycans in the human diet. PMID:28329766

  19. Microbial community assembly and metabolic function during mammalian corpse decomposition.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Jessica L; Xu, Zhenjiang Zech; Weiss, Sophie; Lax, Simon; Van Treuren, Will; Hyde, Embriette R; Song, Se Jin; Amir, Amnon; Larsen, Peter; Sangwan, Naseer; Haarmann, Daniel; Humphrey, Greg C; Ackermann, Gail; Thompson, Luke R; Lauber, Christian; Bibat, Alexander; Nicholas, Catherine; Gebert, Matthew J; Petrosino, Joseph F; Reed, Sasha C; Gilbert, Jack A; Lynne, Aaron M; Bucheli, Sibyl R; Carter, David O; Knight, Rob

    2016-01-08

    Vertebrate corpse decomposition provides an important stage in nutrient cycling in most terrestrial habitats, yet microbially mediated processes are poorly understood. Here we combine deep microbial community characterization, community-level metabolic reconstruction, and soil biogeochemical assessment to understand the principles governing microbial community assembly during decomposition of mouse and human corpses on different soil substrates. We find a suite of bacterial and fungal groups that contribute to nitrogen cycling and a reproducible network of decomposers that emerge on predictable time scales. Our results show that this decomposer community is derived primarily from bulk soil, but key decomposers are ubiquitous in low abundance. Soil type was not a dominant factor driving community development, and the process of decomposition is sufficiently reproducible to offer new opportunities for forensic investigations.

  20. Microbial community assembly and metabolic function during mammalian corpse decomposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metcalf, Jessica L; Xu, Zhenjiang Zech; Weiss, Sophie; Lax, Simon; Van Treuren, Will; Hyde, Embriette R.; Song, Se Jin; Amir, Amnon; Larsen, Peter; Sangwan, Naseer; Haarmann, Daniel; Humphrey, Greg C; Ackermann, Gail; Thompson, Luke R; Lauber, Christian; Bibat, Alexander; Nicholas, Catherine; Gebert, Matthew J; Petrosino, Joseph F; Reed, Sasha C.; Gilbert, Jack A; Lynne, Aaron M; Bucheli, Sibyl R; Carter, David O; Knight, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Vertebrate corpse decomposition provides an important stage in nutrient cycling in most terrestrial habitats, yet microbially mediated processes are poorly understood. Here we combine deep microbial community characterization, community-level metabolic reconstruction, and soil biogeochemical assessment to understand the principles governing microbial community assembly during decomposition of mouse and human corpses on different soil substrates. We find a suite of bacterial and fungal groups that contribute to nitrogen cycling and a reproducible network of decomposers that emerge on predictable time scales. Our results show that this decomposer community is derived primarily from bulk soil, but key decomposers are ubiquitous in low abundance. Soil type was not a dominant factor driving community development, and the process of decomposition is sufficiently reproducible to offer new opportunities for forensic investigations.

  1. Contribution of voltage-dependent K+ channels to metabolic control of coronary blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Berwick, Zachary C.; Dick, Gregory M.; Moberly, Steven P.; Kohr, Meredith C.; Sturek, Michael; Tune, Johnathan D.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that KV channels contribute to metabolic control of coronary blood flow and that decreases in KV channel function and/or expression significantly attenuate myocardial oxygen supply-demand balance in the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Experiments were conducted in conscious, chronically instrumented Ossabaw swine fed either a normal maintenance diet or an excess calorie atherogenic diet that produces the clinical phenotype of early MetS. Data were obtained under resting conditions and during graded treadmill exercise before and after inhibition of KV channels with 4-aminopyridine (4-AP, 0.3 mg/kg, i.v.). In lean-control swine, 4-AP reduced coronary blood flow ~15% at rest and ~20% during exercise. Inhibition of KV channels also increased aortic pressure (P < 0.01) while reducing coronary venous Po2 (P < 0.01) at a given level of myocardial oxygen consumption (MVo2). Administration of 4-AP had no effect on coronary blood flow, aortic pressure, or coronary venous Po2 in swine with MetS. The lack of response to 4-AP in MetS swine was associated with a ~20% reduction in coronary KV current (P < 0.01) and decreased expression of KV1.5 channels in coronary arteries (P < 0.01). Together, these data demonstrate that KV channels play an important role in balancing myocardial oxygen delivery with metabolism at rest and during exercise-induced increases in MVo2. Our findings also indicate that decreases in KV channel current and expression contribute to impaired control of coronary blood flow in the MetS. PMID:21771599

  2. Dynamics and Design Principles of a Basic Regulatory Architecture Controlling Metabolic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Jolly, Emmitt R; DeRisi, Joe; Li, Hao

    2008-01-01

    The dynamic features of a genetic network's response to environmental fluctuations represent essential functional specifications and thus may constrain the possible choices of network architecture and kinetic parameters. To explore the connection between dynamics and network design, we have analyzed a general regulatory architecture that is commonly found in many metabolic pathways. Such architecture is characterized by a dual control mechanism, with end product feedback inhibition and transcriptional regulation mediated by an intermediate metabolite. As a case study, we measured with high temporal resolution the induction profiles of the enzymes in the leucine biosynthetic pathway in response to leucine depletion, using an automated system for monitoring protein expression levels in single cells. All the genes in the pathway are known to be coregulated by the same transcription factors, but we observed drastically different dynamic responses for enzymes upstream and immediately downstream of the key control point—the intermediate metabolite α-isopropylmalate (αIPM), which couples metabolic activity to transcriptional regulation. Analysis based on genetic perturbations suggests that the observed dynamics are due to differential regulation by the leucine branch-specific transcription factor Leu3, and that the downstream enzymes are strictly controlled and highly expressed only when αIPM is available. These observations allow us to build a simplified mathematical model that accounts for the observed dynamics and can correctly predict the pathway's response to new perturbations. Our model also suggests that transient dynamics and steady state can be separately tuned and that the high induction levels of the downstream enzymes are necessary for fast leucine recovery. It is likely that principles emerging from this work can reveal how gene regulation has evolved to optimize performance in other metabolic pathways with similar architecture. PMID:18563967

  3. [Control of bone remodeling by nervous system. Regulation of bone metabolism by appetite regulating neuropeptides].

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Toru; Takeda, Shu

    2010-12-01

    The traditional view of bone metabolism as a primarily endocrine activity has been expanded in recent years following the identification of nervous system controlling bone metabolism by leptin studies. Especially, hypothalamic appetite regulating-peptides, such as NPY, CART and NMU have been demonstrated to be bone-regulating neuropeptides. Recently, other neuropeptides, such as serotonin and oxytocin, are reported to be associated with bone metabolism.

  4. Systems mapping of metabolic genes through control theory.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guodong; Kong, Lan; Wang, Zhong; Wang, Chenguang; Wu, Rongling

    2013-06-30

    The formation of any complex phenotype involves a web of metabolic pathways in which one chemical is transformed through the catalysis of enzymes into another. Traditional approaches for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs) are based on a direct association analysis between DNA marker genotypes and end-point phenotypes, neglecting the mechanistic processes of how a phenotype is formed biochemically. Here, we propose a new dynamic framework for mapping metabolic QTLs (mQTLs) responsible for phenotypic formation. By treating metabolic pathways as a biological system, robust differential equations have proven to be a powerful means of studying and predicting the dynamic behavior of biochemical reactions that cause a high-order phenotype. The new framework integrates these differential equations into a statistical mixture model for QTL mapping. Since the mathematical parameters that define the emergent properties of the metabolic system can be estimated and tested for different mQTL genotypes, the framework allows the dynamic pattern of genetic effects to be quantified on metabolic capacity and efficacy across a time-space scale. Based on a recent study of glycolysis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we design and perform a series of simulation studies to investigate the statistical properties of the framework and validate its usefulness and utilization in practice. This framework can be generalized to mapping QTLs for any other dynamic systems and may stimulate pharmacogenetic research toward personalized drug and treatment intervention.

  5. Systems mapping of metabolic genes through control theory☆

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guodong; Kong, Lan; Wang, Zhong; Wang, Chenguang; Wu, Rongling

    2014-01-01

    The formation of any complex phenotype involves a web of metabolic pathways in which one chemical is transformed through the catalysis of enzymes into another. Traditional approaches for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs) are based on a direct association analysis between DNA marker genotypes and end-point phenotypes, neglecting the mechanistic processes of how a phenotype is formed biochemically. Here, we propose a new dynamic framework for mapping metabolic QTLs (mQTLs) responsible for phenotypic formation. By treating metabolic pathways as a biological system, robust differential equations have proven to be a powerful means of studying and predicting the dynamic behavior of biochemical reactions that cause a high-order phenotype. The new framework integrates these differential equations into a statistical mixture model for QTL mapping. Since the mathematical parameters that define the emergent properties of the metabolic system can be estimated and tested for different mQTL genotypes, the framework allows the dynamic pattern of genetic effects to be quantified on metabolic capacity and efficacy across a time-space scale. Based on a recent study of glycolysis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we design and perform a series of simulation studies to investigate the statistical properties of the framework and validate its usefulness and utilization in practice. This framework can be generalized to mapping QTLs for any other dynamic systems and may stimulate pharmacogenetic research toward personalized drug and treatment intervention. PMID:23603209

  6. Is self-reported physical functioning associated with incident cardiometabolic abnormalities or the metabolic syndrome?

    PubMed

    Ylitalo, Kelly R; Karvonen-Gutierrez, Carrie; McClure, Candace; El Khoudary, Samar R; Jackson, Elizabeth A; Sternfeld, Barbara; Harlow, Siobán D

    2016-05-01

    Physical functioning may be an important pre-clinical marker of chronic disease, used as a tool to identify patients at risk for future cardiometabolic abnormalities. This study evaluated if self-reported physical functioning was associated with the development of cardiometabolic abnormalities or their clustering (metabolic syndrome) over time. Participants (n = 2,254) from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation who reported physical functioning on the Short Form health survey and had a metabolic syndrome assessment (elevated fasting glucose, blood pressure, triglycerides and waist circumference; reduced HDL cholesterol) in 2000 were included. Discrete survival analysis was used to assess the 10-year risk of developing metabolic syndrome or a syndrome component through 2010. At baseline, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 22.0%. Women with substantial limitations (OR = 1.60; 95% CI: 1.12, 2.29) in physical functioning were significantly more likely to develop the metabolic syndrome compared with women reporting no limitations. Self-reported physical functioning was significantly associated with incident hypertension and increased waist circumference. Simple screening tools for cardiometabolic risk in clinical settings are needed. Self-reported physical functioning assessments are simple tools that may allow healthcare providers to more accurately predict the course of chronic conditions. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Astrocytes Control Synapse Formation, Function, and Elimination

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Won-Suk; Allen, Nicola J.; Eroglu, Cagla

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes, through their close associations with synapses, can monitor and alter synaptic function, thus actively controlling synaptic transmission in the adult brain. Besides their important role at adult synapses, in the last three decades a number of critical findings have highlighted the importance of astrocytes in the establishment of synaptic connectivity in the developing brain. In this article, we will review the key findings on astrocytic control of synapse formation, function, and elimination. First, we will summarize our current structural and functional understanding of astrocytes at the synapse. Then, we will discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms through which developing and mature astrocytes instruct the formation, maturation, and refinement of synapses. Our aim is to provide an overview of astrocytes as important players in the establishment of a functional nervous system. PMID:25663667

  8. Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome Affect the Cholinergic Transmission a nd Cognitive Functions.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Ilenia; Tomassoni, Daniele; Moruzzi, Michele; Traini, Enea; Amenta, Francesco; Tayebati, Seyed Khosrow

    2017-01-01

    Worldwide, at least 2.8 million people die each year as a result of being overweight or obese. Obesity leads to metabolic syndrome, a pathological condition characterized by adverse metabolic effects on blood pressure, cholesterol, triglycerides and insulin resistance. Population- based investigations have suggested that obesity and metabolic syndrome may be associated with poorer cognitive performance. A structured search of bibliographic source (PubMed) was undertaken. The following terms "inflammation and obesity and brain", "cholinergic system and obesity", "cholinergic system and metabolic syndrome", "Cognitive impairment and obesity" and "metabolic syndrome and brain" were used as search strings. Over 200 papers, mainly published in the past 10 years were analysed. The major results regarded keyword "metabolic syndrome and brain" followed by, "Cognitive impairment and obesity", "inflammation and obesity and brain", "cholinergic system and obesity" and "cholinergic system and metabolic syndrome". Most papers were pre-clinical but, in general, they were inhomogeneous. Therefore, the results were cited according their contribution to clarify the molecular involvement of obesity and/or metabolic syndrome in cholinergic impairment. This review focuses on the correlation between brain cholinergic system alterations and high-fat diet, describing the involvement of cholinergic system in inflammatory processes related to metabolic syndrome and obesity, which may lead to cognitive decline. Metabolic syndrome has been suggested as a risk factor for cerebrovascular diseases and has been associated with cognitive impairment in different functional brain domains. Preclinical and clinical studies have identified the cholinergic system as a specific target of metabolic syndrome and obesity. The modifications of cholinergic neurotransmission and its involvement in neuro-inflammation may be related to cognitive impairment that affects obese patients. Copyright© Bentham

  9. Chronic Alcohol Ingestion in Rats Alters Lung Metabolism, Promotes Lipid Accumulation, and Impairs Alveolar Macrophage Functions

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Freddy; Shah, Dilip; Duong, Michelle; Stafstrom, William; Hoek, Jan B.; Kallen, Caleb B.; Lang, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic alcoholism impairs pulmonary immune homeostasis and predisposes to inflammatory lung diseases, including infectious pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Although alcoholism has been shown to alter hepatic metabolism, leading to lipid accumulation, hepatitis, and, eventually, cirrhosis, the effects of alcohol on pulmonary metabolism remain largely unknown. Because both the lung and the liver actively engage in lipid synthesis, we hypothesized that chronic alcoholism would impair pulmonary metabolic homeostasis in ways similar to its effects in the liver. We reasoned that perturbations in lipid metabolism might contribute to the impaired pulmonary immunity observed in people who chronically consume alcohol. We studied the metabolic consequences of chronic alcohol consumption in rat lungs in vivo and in alveolar epithelial type II cells and alveolar macrophages (AMs) in vitro. We found that chronic alcohol ingestion significantly alters lung metabolic homeostasis, inhibiting AMP-activated protein kinase, increasing lipid synthesis, and suppressing the expression of genes essential to metabolizing fatty acids (FAs). Furthermore, we show that these metabolic alterations promoted a lung phenotype that is reminiscent of alcoholic fatty liver and is characterized by marked accumulation of triglycerides and free FAs within distal airspaces, AMs, and, to a lesser extent, alveolar epithelial type II cells. We provide evidence that the metabolic alterations in alcohol-exposed rats are mechanistically linked to immune impairments in the alcoholic lung: the elevations in FAs alter AM phenotypes and suppress both phagocytic functions and agonist-induced inflammatory responses. In summary, our work demonstrates that chronic alcohol ingestion impairs lung metabolic homeostasis and promotes pulmonary immune dysfunction. These findings suggest that therapies aimed at reversing alcohol-related metabolic alterations might be effective for preventing and

  10. Regional Cerebral Glucose Metabolism and its Association with Phenotype and Cognitive Functioning in Patients with Autism

    PubMed Central

    Anil Kumar, B. N.; Malhotra, Savita; Bhattacharya, Anish; Grover, Sandeep; Batra, Y. K.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: In spite of three decades of neuroimaging, we are unable to find consistent and coherent anatomical or pathophysiological basis for autism as changes are subtle and there are no studies from India. Aim: To study the regional cerebral glucose metabolism in children with autism using positron emission tomography (PET) scan and to study the behavior and cognitive functioning among them. Materials and Methods: Ten subjects (8–19 years) meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria for autism were evaluated on Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS), trail making test (TMT) A and B, Wisconsin card sorting test, Raven's progressive matrices, and PET scan. A control group of 15 matched subjects without any brain pathology or neurological disorder was similarly studied. Results: Four out of the ten patients with autism had abnormal PET scan findings, and in contrast, none of the patients in the control group had abnormal PET scan. Of the four patients with abnormality in the PET scan, two patients had findings suggestive of hypometabolism in cerebellum bilaterally; one patient showed bilateral hypometabolism in anterior temporal cortices and cerebellum, and the fourth patient had hypermetabolism in the bilateral frontal cortices and medial occipital cortices. Subjects with autism performed poorly on neuropsychological testing. Patients with abnormal PET scan findings had significantly higher scores on the “body use” domain of CARS indicating more stereotypy. Conclusion: Findings of this study support the view of altered brain functioning in subjects with autism. PMID:28615758

  11. Ghrelin in the control of energy, lipid, and glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Heppner, Kristy M; Müller, Timo D; Tong, Jenny; Tschöp, Matthias H

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of ghrelin as the endogenous ligand for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) led to subsequent studies characterizing the endogenous action of this gastrointestinal hormone. Accordingly, exogenous administration of ghrelin was found to increase food intake and adiposity in a variety of species, including rodents, nonhuman primates, and humans. Later work supported these findings and confirmed that ghrelin acts through hypothalamic neurons to mediate its effects on energy metabolism. Ghrelin acts specifically through GHS-R to promote a positive energy balance as demonstrated by loss of ghrelin action after pharmacological blockade or genetic deletion of GHS-R. More recently, ghrelin was found to be a mediator of glucose metabolism and acts to inhibit insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells. Together, the literature highlights a predominant role of ghrelin in regulating energy and glucose metabolism. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Locomotor Adaptation Improves Balance Control, Multitasking Ability and Reduces the Metabolic Cost of Postural Instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomberg, J. J.; Peters, B. T.; Mulavara, A. P.; Brady, R. A.; Batson, C. D.; Miller, C. A.; Ploutz-Snyder, R. J.; Guined, J. R.; Buxton, R. E.; Cohen, H. S.

    2011-01-01

    During exploration-class missions, sensorimotor disturbances may lead to disruption in the ability to ambulate and perform functional tasks during the initial introduction to a novel gravitational environment following a landing on a planetary surface. The overall goal of our current project is to develop a sensorimotor adaptability training program to facilitate rapid adaptation to these environments. We have developed a unique training system comprised of a treadmill placed on a motion-base facing a virtual visual scene. It provides an unstable walking surface combined with incongruent visual flow designed to enhance sensorimotor adaptability. Greater metabolic cost incurred during balance instability means more physical work is required during adaptation to new environments possibly affecting crewmembers? ability to perform mission critical tasks during early surface operations on planetary expeditions. The goal of this study was to characterize adaptation to a discordant sensory challenge across a number of performance modalities including locomotor stability, multi-tasking ability and metabolic cost. METHODS: Subjects (n=15) walked (4.0 km/h) on a treadmill for an 8 -minute baseline walking period followed by 20-minutes of walking (4.0 km/h) with support surface motion (0.3 Hz, sinusoidal lateral motion, peak amplitude 25.4 cm) provided by the treadmill/motion-base system. Stride frequency and auditory reaction time were collected as measures of locomotor stability and multi-tasking ability, respectively. Metabolic data (VO2) were collected via a portable metabolic gas analysis system. RESULTS: At the onset of lateral support surface motion, subj ects walking on our treadmill showed an increase in stride frequency and auditory reaction time indicating initial balance and multi-tasking disturbances. During the 20-minute adaptation period, balance control and multi-tasking performance improved. Similarly, throughout the 20-minute adaptation period, VO2 gradually

  13. Macrophages and Mitochondria: A Critical Interplay Between Metabolism, Signaling, and the Functional Activity.

    PubMed

    Tur, J; Vico, T; Lloberas, J; Zorzano, A; Celada, A

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages are phagocytic cells that participate in a broad range of cellular functions and they are key regulators of innate immune responses and inflammation. Mitochondria are highly dynamic endosymbiotic organelles that play key roles in cellular metabolism and apoptosis. Mounting evidence suggests that mitochondria are involved in the interplay between metabolism and innate immune responses. The ability of these organelles to alter the metabolic profile of a cell, thereby allowing an appropriate response to each situation, is crucial for the correct establishment of immune responses. Furthermore, mitochondria act as scaffolds for many proteins involved in immune signaling pathways and as such they are able to modulate the function of these proteins. Finally, mitochondria release molecules, such as reactive oxygen species, which directly regulate the immune response. In summary, mitochondria can be considered as core components in the regulation of innate immune signaling. Here we discuss the intricate relationship between mitochondria, metabolism, intracellular signaling, and innate immune responses in macrophages.

  14. Intestinal microbiota in metabolic diseases: from bacterial community structure and functions to species of pathophysiological relevance.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Thomas; Desmarchelier, Charles; Haller, Dirk; Gérard, Philippe; Rohn, Sascha; Lepage, Patricia; Daniel, Hannelore

    2014-07-01

    The trillions of bacterial cells that colonize the mammalian digestive tract influence both host physiology and the fate of dietary compounds. Gnotobionts and fecal transplantation have been instrumental in revealing the causal role of intestinal bacteria in energy homeostasis and metabolic dysfunctions such as type-2 diabetes. However, the exact contribution of gut bacterial metabolism to host energy balance is still unclear and knowledge about underlying molecular mechanisms is scant. We have previously characterized cecal bacterial community functions and host responses in diet-induced obese mice using omics approaches. Based on these studies, we here discuss issues on the relevance of mouse models, give evidence that the metabolism of cholesterol-derived compounds by gut bacteria is of particular importance in the context of metabolic disorders and that dominant species of the family Coriobacteriaceae are good models to study these functions.

  15. Regulation of cellular gas exchange, oxygen sensing, and metabolic control.

    PubMed

    Clanton, T L; Hogan, M C; Gladden, L B

    2013-07-01

    Cells must continuously monitor and couple their metabolic requirements for ATP utilization with their ability to take up O2 for mitochondrial respiration. When O2 uptake and delivery move out of homeostasis, cells have elaborate and diverse sensing and response systems to compensate. In this review, we explore the biophysics of O2 and gas diffusion in the cell, how intracellular O2 is regulated, how intracellular O2 levels are sensed and how sensing systems impact mitochondrial respiration and shifts in metabolic pathways. Particular attention is paid to how O2 affects the redox state of the cell, as well as the NO, H2S, and CO concentrations. We also explore how these agents can affect various aspects of gas exchange and activate acute signaling pathways that promote survival. Two kinds of challenges to gas exchange are also discussed in detail: when insufficient O2 is available for respiration (hypoxia) and when metabolic requirements test the limits of gas exchange (exercising skeletal muscle). This review also focuses on responses to acute hypoxia in the context of the original "unifying theory of hypoxia tolerance" as expressed by Hochachka and colleagues. It includes discourse on the regulation of mitochondrial electron transport, metabolic suppression, shifts in metabolic pathways, and recruitment of cell survival pathways preventing collapse of membrane potential and nuclear apoptosis. Regarding exercise, the issues discussed relate to the O2 sensitivity of metabolic rate, O2 kinetics in exercise, and influences of available O2 on glycolysis and lactate production. © 2013 American Physiological Society.

  16. [L-carnitine: metabolism, functions and value in pathology].

    PubMed

    Jacob, C; Belleville, F

    1992-11-01

    Although L-carnitine is not considered as an essential nutrient, endogenous synthesis may fail to ensure adequate L-carnitine levels in neonates, especially those born prematurely. Free L-carnitine is found in many foods, mainly those from animal sources. Absorption of free L-carnitine is virtually complete. Lysine and methionine are necessary ingredients for the biosynthesis of L-carnitine. All tissues in the body can produce deoxy-carnitine but, in humans, the enzyme that enables hydroxylation of deoxy-carnitine to carnitine is found only in the liver, brain and kidneys. Complex exchanges of carnitine and its precursors occur between tissues. Muscles take up carnitine from the bloodstream and contain most of the body carnitine stores. L-carnitine and L-carnitine esters are eliminated mainly through the kidneys, which may play a central role in the homeostasis of this compound. Thyroid hormones adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH), and diet all influence urinary excretion of L-carnitine. Free L-carnitine can be assayed in plasma and urine and is occasionally measured in muscle biopsy specimens. Plasma L-carnitine levels may not accurately reflect L-carnitine body stores. L-carnitine ensures transfer of fatty acids to the mitochondria where they undergo oxidation. This process is associated with production of short-chain acylcarnitine which exit from the mitochondria or peroxisomes. L-carnitine ensures regeneration of coenzyme A and is thus involved in energy metabolism. L-carnitine also ensures elimination of xenobiotic substances. Carnitine deficiencies are common. Currently, these deficiencies are classified into two groups. In deficiencies with myopathy, only the muscles are deficient in L-carnitine, perhaps as a result of a primary anomaly of the L-carnitine transport system in muscles. In systemic deficiencies, L-carnitine levels are low in the plasma and in all body tissues. Systemic L-carnitine deficiencies are usually the result of a variety of disease states

  17. A worm of one's own: how helminths modulate host adipose tissue function and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Guigas, Bruno; Molofsky, Ari B

    2015-09-01

    Parasitic helminths have coexisted with human beings throughout time. Success in eradicating helminths has limited helminth-induced morbidity and mortality but is also correlated with increasing rates of 'western' diseases, including metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Recent studies in mice describe how type 2 immune cells, traditionally associated with helminth infection, maintain adipose tissue homeostasis and promote adipose tissue beiging, protecting against obesity and metabolic dysfunction. Here, we review these studies and discuss how helminths and helminth-derived molecules may modulate these physiologic pathways to improve metabolic functions in specific tissues, such as adipose and liver, as well as at the whole-organism level.

  18. Controlled functionalization of nanoparticles & practical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashwan, Khaled

    With the increasing use of nanoparticles in both science and industry, their chemical modification became a significant part of nanotechnology. Unfortunately, most commonly used procedures provide just randomly functionalized materials. The long-term objective of our work is site- and stoichiometrically-controlled functionalization of nanoparticles with the utilization of solid supports and other nanostructures. On the examples of silica nanoparticles and titanium dioxide nanorods, we have obtained results on the solid-phase chemistry, method development, and modeling, which advanced us toward this goal. At the same time, we explored several applications of nanoparticles that will benefit from the controlled functionalization: imaging of titanium-dioxide-based photocatalysts, bioimaging by fluorescent nanoparticles, drug delivery, assembling of bone implants, and dental compositions. Titanium dioxide-based catalysts are known for their catalytic activity and their application in solar energy utilization such as photosplitting of water. Functionalization of titanium dioxide is essential for enhancing bone-titanium dioxide nanotube adhesion, and, therefore, for its application as an interface between titanium implants and bones. Controlled functionalization of nanoparticles should enhance sensitivity and selectivity of nanoassemblies for imaging and drug delivery applications. Along those lines, we studied the relationship between morphology and surface chemistry of nanoparticles, and their affinity to organic molecules (salicylic and caffeic acid) using Langmuir adsorption isotherms, and toward material surfaces using SEM- and TEM-imaging. We focused on commercial samples of titanium dioxide, titanium dioxide nanorods with and without oleic acid ligands, and differently functionalized silica nanoparticles. My work included synthesis, functionalization, and characterization of several types of nanoparticles, exploring their application in imaging, dentistry, and bone

  19. Circadian rhythms and the regulation of metabolic tissue function and energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Zvonic, Sanjin; Floyd, Z Elizabeth; Mynatt, Randall L; Gimble, Jeffrey M

    2007-03-01

    Circadian oscillators play an indispensable role in the coordination of physiological processes with the cyclic changes in the physical environment. A significant number of recent clinical and molecular studies suggest that circadian biology may play an important role in the regulation of adipose and other metabolic tissue functions. In this discussion, we present the hypothesis that circadian dysfunction may be involved in the pathogenesis of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and the metabolic syndrome.

  20. PTENα, a PTEN isoform translated through alternative initiation, regulates mitochondrial function and energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hui; He, Shiming; Yang, Jingyi; Jia, Xinying; Wang, Pan; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Zhong; Zou, Xiajuan; McNutt, Michael A; Shen, Wen Hong; Yin, Yuxin

    2014-05-06

    PTEN is one of the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer. It is known that PTEN has a wide range of biological functions beyond tumor suppression. Here, we report that PTENα, an N-terminally extended form of PTEN, functions in mitochondrial metabolism. Translation of PTENα is initiated from a CUG codon upstream of and in-frame with the coding region of canonical PTEN. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2A (eIF2A) controls PTENα translation, which requires a CUG-centered palindromic motif. We show that PTENα induces cytochrome c oxidase activity and ATP production in mitochondria. TALEN-mediated somatic deletion of PTENα impairs mitochondrial respiratory chain function. PTENα interacts with canonical PTEN to increase PINK1 protein levels and promote energy production. Our studies demonstrate the importance of eIF2A-mediated alternative translation for generation of protein diversity in eukaryotic systems and provide insights into the mechanism by which the PTEN family is involved in multiple cellular processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A Multifunctional Bread Rich in Beta Glucans and Low in Starch Improves Metabolic Control in Type 2 Diabetes: A Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Tessari, Paolo; Lante, Anna

    2017-03-17

    Functional foods may be useful for people with diabetes. The soluble fibers beta glucans can modify starch digestion and improve postprandial glucose response. We analyzed the metabolic effects of a specifically designed 'functional' bread, low in starch, rich in fibers (7 g/100 g), with a beta glucan/starch ratio of (7.6:100, g/g), in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: Clinical and metabolic data from two groups of age-, sex- and glycated hemoglobin-matched diabetic subjects, taking either the functional bread or regular white bread, over a roughly six-month observation period, were retrieved. Bread intake did not change during the trial. The functional bread reduced glycated hemoglobin by ~0.5% (absolute units) vs. pre-treatment values (p = 0.028), and by ~0.6% vs. the control group (p = 0.027). Post-prandial and mean plasma glucose was decreased in the treatment group too. Body weight, blood pressure and plasma lipids did not change. The acceptance of the functional bread was good in the majority of subjects, except for taste. A starch-restricted, fiber-rich functional bread, with an increased beta glucan/starch ratio, improved long term metabolic control, and may be indicated in the dietary treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  2. Proteomics-based metabolic modeling reveals that fatty acid oxidation (FAO) controls endothelial cell (EC) permeability.

    PubMed

    Patella, Francesca; Schug, Zachary T; Persi, Erez; Neilson, Lisa J; Erami, Zahra; Avanzato, Daniele; Maione, Federica; Hernandez-Fernaud, Juan R; Mackay, Gillian; Zheng, Liang; Reid, Steven; Frezza, Christian; Giraudo, Enrico; Fiorio Pla, Alessandra; Anderson, Kurt; Ruppin, Eytan; Gottlieb, Eyal; Zanivan, Sara

    2015-03-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) play a key role to maintain the functionality of blood vessels. Altered EC permeability causes severe impairment in vessel stability and is a hallmark of pathologies such as cancer and thrombosis. Integrating label-free quantitative proteomics data into genome-wide metabolic modeling, we built up a model that predicts the metabolic fluxes in ECs when cultured on a tridimensional matrix and organize into a vascular-like network. We discovered how fatty acid oxidation increases when ECs are assembled into a fully formed network that can be disrupted by inhibiting CPT1A, the fatty acid oxidation rate-limiting enzyme. Acute CPT1A inhibition reduces cellular ATP levels and oxygen consumption, which are restored by replenishing the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Remarkably, global phosphoproteomic changes measured upon acute CPT1A inhibition pinpointed altered calcium signaling. Indeed, CPT1A inhibition increases intracellular calcium oscillations. Finally, inhibiting CPT1A induces hyperpermeability in vitro and leakage of blood vessel in vivo, which were restored blocking calcium influx or replenishing the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Fatty acid oxidation emerges as central regulator of endothelial functions and blood vessel stability and druggable pathway to control pathological vascular permeability.

  3. Exercise-stimulated interleukin-15 is controlled by AMPK and regulates skin metabolism and aging

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Justin D; MacNeil, Lauren G; Lally, James S; Ford, Rebecca J; Bujak, Adam L; Brar, Ikdip K; Kemp, Bruce E; Raha, Sandeep; Steinberg, Gregory R; Tarnopolsky, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Aging is commonly associated with a structural deterioration of skin that compromises its barrier function, healing, and susceptibility to disease. Several lines of evidence show that these changes are driven largely by impaired tissue mitochondrial metabolism. While exercise is associated with numerous health benefits, there is no evidence that it affects skin tissue or that endocrine muscle-to-skin signaling occurs. We demonstrate that endurance exercise attenuates age-associated changes to skin in humans and mice and identify exercise-induced IL-15 as a novel regulator of mitochondrial function in aging skin. We show that exercise controls IL-15 expression in part through skeletal muscle AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a central regulator of metabolism, and that the elimination of muscle AMPK causes a deterioration of skin structure. Finally, we establish that daily IL-15 therapy mimics some of the anti-aging effects of exercise on muscle and skin in mice. Thus, we elucidate a mechanism by which exercise confers health benefits to skin and suggest that low-dose IL-15 therapy may prove to be a beneficial strategy to attenuate skin aging. PMID:25902870

  4. Exercise-stimulated interleukin-15 is controlled by AMPK and regulates skin metabolism and aging.

    PubMed

    Crane, Justin D; MacNeil, Lauren G; Lally, James S; Ford, Rebecca J; Bujak, Adam L; Brar, Ikdip K; Kemp, Bruce E; Raha, Sandeep; Steinberg, Gregory R; Tarnopolsky, Mark A

    2015-08-01

    Aging is commonly associated with a structural deterioration of skin that compromises its barrier function, healing, and susceptibility to disease. Several lines of evidence show that these changes are driven largely by impaired tissue mitochondrial metabolism. While exercise is associated with numerous health benefits, there is no evidence that it affects skin tissue or that endocrine muscle-to-skin signaling occurs. We demonstrate that endurance exercise attenuates age-associated changes to skin in humans and mice and identify exercise-induced IL-15 as a novel regulator of mitochondrial function in aging skin. We show that exercise controls IL-15 expression in part through skeletal muscle AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a central regulator of metabolism, and that the elimination of muscle AMPK causes a deterioration of skin structure. Finally, we establish that daily IL-15 therapy mimics some of the anti-aging effects of exercise on muscle and skin in mice. Thus, we elucidate a mechanism by which exercise confers health benefits to skin and suggest that low-dose IL-15 therapy may prove to be a beneficial strategy to attenuate skin aging.

  5. Psychological and metabolic improvement after an outpatient teaching program for functional intensified insulin therapy (FIT).

    PubMed

    Langewitz, W; Wössmer, B; Iseli, J; Berger, W

    1997-09-01

    To be the master of their disease and not its slave is the ultimate goal of many patients with diabetes. Intensified functional insulin therapy (FIT) helps to establish this goal by an intensive patient education: each patient learns in five small-group sessions how s/he reacts to standardized challenges of glucose homeostasis (e.g. 24 h fasting; physical exercise; various carbohydrate loads). We investigated in 43 patients with long-standing diabetes type 1 (mean age: 33 +/- 10 years; mean duration of diabetes: 15 +/- 10 years) whether FIT improves quality of life, influences metabolic control and doctor-patient relationship. The following instruments were used: diabetes specific quality of life questionnaire (DQOL), hierarchical distance and cohesion between doctor and patient (FAST), anxiety and depression (HAD). Pre and post intervention values were compared with paired t-tests. HbA1c and number of hypoglycaemic episodes were also assessed 1 year after FIT and 1 year prior to FIT. Metabolic control was improved: HbA1c in the year before FIT: 6.72 +/- 1.35; 4 months before FIT: 6.61 +/- 1.46; 4 months after FIT: 6.29 +/- 1.09 (P < 0.05 compared to 4 months before FIT); 1 year after FIT: 6.46 +/- 1.12 (n.s. compared to 1 year before FIT). Dissatisfaction with life decreases from 33.3 +/- 8.0 to 28.5 +/- 7.7 (P < 0.001). Moments free of disease-specific strain increase from 74.3 +/- 13.9 to 78.1 +/- 16.1 (P = 0.07). Hierarchical distance between doctor and patient decreases from 1.1 +/- to 0.6 +/- 0.8 (P < 0.001), cohesion increases from 9.3 +/- 1.5 to 9.9 +/- 1.1 (P < 0.001). Anxiety and depression both decreases significantly: anxiety, 6.5 +/- 3.3-->4.6 +/- 3.2 (P < 0.001); depression, 2.7 +/- 2.5-->1.5 +/- 1.6 (P < 0.001). The number of patients with severe hypoglycaemic episodes (level 4) decreases from five (11.6%) to one (2.3%) after intervention (P < 0.05). In conclusion, FIT enhances quality of life in diabetic individuals. It helps to establish a less

  6. [Effectiveness of oral hypoglycemic drugs in the metabolic control of patients with gestational diabetes].

    PubMed

    Valdés R, Enrique; Soto-Chacón, Emiliano; Lahsen M, Rodolfo; Barrera H, Carlos; Candía P, Paula

    2008-07-01

    Gestational Diabetes is characterized by different degrees of glucose intolerance that produce a series of fetal and perinatal alterations. During many years, in those cases of gestational diabetes that did not respond to nutritional interventions, the use of insulin was a proven treatment to achieve metabolic control and thus a better perinatal outcome. At present, some new oral hypoglycemic drugs, from the family of sulfonylureas and biguanides, have been shown to be safe, of low cost, and apparently effective in the metabolic control of this disease. We review the publications that propose the use of oral hypoglycemic drugs for the metabolic control of gestational diabetes that does not respond to nutritional measures.

  7. Simulated microgravity enhances oligodendrocyte mitochondrial function and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Jeffrey, Araceli; Nguyen, Kevin; Kumar, Shalini; Toshimasa, Ochiai; Hirose, Ryuji; Reue, Karen; Vergnes, Laurent; Kinchen, Jason; Vellis, Jean de

    2016-12-01

    The primary energy sources of mammalian cells are proteins, fats, and sugars that are processed by well-known biochemical mechanisms that have been discovered and studied in 1G (terrestrial gravity). Here we sought to determine how simulated microgravity (sim-µG) impacts both energy and lipid metabolism in oligodendrocytes (OLs), the myelin-forming cells in the central nervous system. We report increased mitochondrial respiration and increased glycolysis 24 hr after exposure to sim-µG. Moreover, examination of the secretome after 3 days' exposure of OLs to sim-µG increased the Krebs cycle (Krebs and Weitzman, ) flux in sim-µG. The secretome study also revealed a significant increase in the synthesis of fatty acids and complex lipids such as 1,2-dipalmitoyl-GPC (5.67); lysolipids like 1-oleoyl-GPE (4.48) were also increased by microgravity. Although longer-chain lipids were not observed in this study, it is possible that at longer time points OLs would have continued moving forward toward the synthesis of lipids that constitute myelin. For centuries, basic developmental biology research has been the pillar of an array of discoveries that have led t