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Sample records for function metabolic control

  1. Circadian Clock Control of Liver Metabolic Functions.

    PubMed

    Reinke, Hans; Asher, Gad

    2016-03-01

    The circadian clock is an endogenous biological timekeeping system that synchronizes physiology and behavior to day/night cycles. A wide variety of processes throughout the entire gastrointestinal tract and notably the liver appear to be under circadian control. These include various metabolic functions such as nutrient uptake, processing, and detoxification, which align organ function to cycle with nutrient supply and demand. Remarkably, genetic or environmental disruption of the circadian clock can cause metabolic diseases or exacerbate pathological states. In addition, modern lifestyles force more and more people worldwide into asynchrony between the external time and their circadian clock, resulting in a constant state of social jetlag. Recent evidence indicates that interactions between altered energy metabolism and disruptions in the circadian clock create a downward spiral that can lead to diabetes and other metabolic diseases. In this review, we provide an overview of rhythmic processes in the liver and highlight the functions of circadian clock genes under physiological and pathological conditions; we focus on their roles in regulation of hepatic glucose as well as lipid and bile acid metabolism and detoxification and their potential effects on the development of fatty liver and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

  2. Metabolically active functional food ingredients for weight control.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, E M R; Mela, D J

    2006-02-01

    The scale of the obesity epidemic creates a pressing consumer need as well as an enormous business opportunity for successful development and marketing of food products with added benefits for weight control. A number of proposed functional food ingredients have been shown to act post-absorptively to influence substrate utilization or thermogenesis. Characteristics and supporting data on conjugated linoleic acid, diglycerides, medium-chain triglycerides, green tea, ephedrine, caffeine, capsaicin and calcium, are reviewed here, giving examples of how these could act to alter energy expenditure or appetite control. Consideration is also given to other factors, in addition to efficacy, which must be satisfied to get such ingredients into foods. We conclude that, for each of the safe, putatively metabolically active agents, there remain gaps in clinical evidence or knowledge of mechanisms, which need to be addressed in order to specify the dietary conditions and food product compositions where these ingredients could be of most benefit for weight control. PMID:16436103

  3. Metabolic Control of Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Pietrocola, Federico; Levine, Beth; Kroemer, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Macroautophagy (herein referred to as autophagy) is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of adaptation to adverse microenvironmental conditions, including limited nutrient supplies. Several sensors interacting with the autophagic machinery have evolved to detect fluctuations in key metabolic parameters. The signal transduction cascades operating downstream of these sensors are highly interconnected to control a spatially and chronologically coordinated autophagic response that maintains the health and function of individual cells while preserving organismal homeostasis. Here, we discuss the physiological regulation of autophagy by metabolic circuitries, as well as alterations of such control in disease. PMID:25480292

  4. The Deubiquitylase MATH-33 Controls DAF-16 Stability and Function in Metabolism and Longevity

    PubMed Central

    Heimbucher, Thomas; Liu, Zheng; Bossard, Carine; McCloskey, Richard; Carrano, Andrea C.; Riedel, Christian G.; Tanasa, Bogdan; Klammt, Christian; Fonslow, Bryan R.; Riera, Celine E.; Lillemeier, Bjorn F.; Kemphues, Kenneth; Yates, John R.; O'Shea, Clodagh; Hunter, Tony; Dillin, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY One of the major determinants of aging in organisms ranging from worms to man are FOXO family transcription factors, which are downstream effectors of Insulin/IGF-1 signaling (IIS). The molecular mechanisms that actively promote DAF16/FOXO stability and function are unknown. Here we identify the deubiquitylating enzyme MATH-33 as an essential DAF-16 regulator in IIS, which stabilizes active DAF-16 protein levels and, as a consequence, influences DAF-16 functions, such as metabolism, stress response and longevity in C. elegans. MATH-33 associates with DAF-16 in cellulo and in vitro. MATH-33 functions as a deubiquitylase by actively removing ubiquitin moieties from DAF-16, thus counteracting the action of the RLE-1 E3-ubiquitin ligase. Our findings support a model in which MATH-33 promotes DAF-16 stability in response to decreased IIS by directly modulating its ubiquitylation state, suggesting that regulated oscillations in the stability of DAF-16 protein play an integral role in controlling processes such as metabolism and longevity. PMID:26154057

  5. Interferon Regulatory Factor 4 controls TH1 cell effector function and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mahnke, Justus; Schumacher, Valéa; Ahrens, Stefanie; Käding, Nadja; Feldhoff, Lea Marie; Huber, Magdalena; Rupp, Jan; Raczkowski, Friederike; Mittrücker, Hans-Willi

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor Interferon Regulatory Factor 4 (IRF4) is essential for TH2 and TH17 cell formation and controls peripheral CD8+ T cell differentiation. We used Listeria monocytogenes infection to characterize the function of IRF4 in TH1 responses. IRF4−/− mice generated only marginal numbers of listeria-specific TH1 cells. After transfer into infected mice, IRF4−/− CD4+ T cells failed to differentiate into TH1 cells as indicated by reduced T-bet and IFN-γ expression, and showed limited proliferation. Activated IRF4−/− CD4+ T cells exhibited diminished uptake of the glucose analog 2-NBDG, limited oxidative phosphorylation and strongly reduced aerobic glycolysis. Insufficient metabolic adaptation contributed to the limited proliferation and TH1 differentiation of IRF4−/− CD4+ T cells. Our study identifies IRF4 as central regulator of TH1 responses and cellular metabolism. We propose that this function of IRF4 is fundamental for the initiation and maintenance of all TH cell responses. PMID:27762344

  6. Glutathione revisited: a vital function in iron metabolism and ancillary role in thiol-redox control

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Chitranshu; Igbaria, Aeid; D'Autreaux, Benoît; Planson, Anne-Gaëlle; Junot, Christophe; Godat, Emmanuel; Bachhawat, Anand K; Delaunay-Moisan, Agnès; Toledano, Michel B

    2011-01-01

    Glutathione contributes to thiol-redox control and to extra-mitochondrial iron–sulphur cluster (ISC) maturation. To determine the physiological importance of these functions and sort out those that account for the GSH requirement for viability, we performed a comprehensive analysis of yeast cells depleted of or containing toxic levels of GSH. Both conditions triggered an intense iron starvation-like response and impaired the activity of extra-mitochondrial ISC enzymes but did not impact thiol-redox maintenance, except for high glutathione levels that altered oxidative protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum. While iron partially rescued the ISC maturation and growth defects of GSH-depleted cells, genetic experiments indicated that unlike thioredoxin, glutathione could not support by itself the thiol-redox duties of the cell. We propose that glutathione is essential by its requirement in ISC assembly, but only serves as a thioredoxin backup in cytosolic thiol-redox maintenance. Glutathione-high physiological levels are thus meant to insulate its cytosolic function in iron metabolism from variations of its concentration during redox stresses, a model challenging the traditional view of it as prime actor in thiol-redox control. PMID:21478822

  7. Structural Control of Metabolic Flux

    PubMed Central

    Sajitz-Hermstein, Max; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2013-01-01

    Organisms have to continuously adapt to changing environmental conditions or undergo developmental transitions. To meet the accompanying change in metabolic demands, the molecular mechanisms of adaptation involve concerted interactions which ultimately induce a modification of the metabolic state, which is characterized by reaction fluxes and metabolite concentrations. These state transitions are the effect of simultaneously manipulating fluxes through several reactions. While metabolic control analysis has provided a powerful framework for elucidating the principles governing this orchestrated action to understand metabolic control, its applications are restricted by the limited availability of kinetic information. Here, we introduce structural metabolic control as a framework to examine individual reactions' potential to control metabolic functions, such as biomass production, based on structural modeling. The capability to carry out a metabolic function is determined using flux balance analysis (FBA). We examine structural metabolic control on the example of the central carbon metabolism of Escherichia coli by the recently introduced framework of functional centrality (FC). This framework is based on the Shapley value from cooperative game theory and FBA, and we demonstrate its superior ability to assign “share of control” to individual reactions with respect to metabolic functions and environmental conditions. A comparative analysis of various scenarios illustrates the usefulness of FC and its relations to other structural approaches pertaining to metabolic control. We propose a Monte Carlo algorithm to estimate FCs for large networks, based on the enumeration of elementary flux modes. We further give detailed biological interpretation of FCs for production of lactate and ATP under various respiratory conditions. PMID:24367246

  8. Metabolic control of neuronal pacemaker activity and the rhythmic organization of central nervous functions.

    PubMed

    Chaplain, R A

    1979-08-01

    The endogenous rhythmic activity of isolated pacemaker neurones of Aplysia californica appears to be controlled by the operation of a substrate cycle. The recycling of fructose-6-phosphate is mediated by two membrane-bound enzymes: phosphofructokinase (PFK) and fructose-1,6-diphosphatase (FDPase). Allosteric effectors which promote the PFK-FDPase system either increase the regular beating activity or induce bursting discharges, while inhibitory effectors reduce pacemaker activity. Associated with the PFK-FDPase cycle are slow oscillations in membrane potential, the postulate being that changes in amplitude and time period of the waves are brought about by the cyclic fluctuations of H+ ions and ATP in the immediate vicinity of the membrane. Other enzyme reactions which affect the concentrations of gluconeogenic substrates or PFK effectors can modulate the oscillatory driving input, a good example being the neurogenic amino acid glutamate. Modifiers of FDPase and PFK are equally effective in changing pacemaker activity within the intact neuronal network and, hence, the rhythmic body function connected to this network. This has been demonstrated with pacemaker neurones governing cardiovascular activity in Apylsia, blood pressure or heart beat in the cat, and respiration or thermoregulation in the rabbit. Nature appears to have achieved a functional differentiation between different pacemaker neurones by altering their response to at least one or two of the PFK and FDPase effectors. New periodicities can be entrained by current stimuli on the pre-existing rhythms of isolated Aplysia pacemaker neurones. Stimulus-induced resetting of the discharges is in fact accompanied by a redistribution between two kinetically distinct forms of PRK, and modifiers of this enzyme can stabilize the new periodicities or facilitate the conditioning effect of a stimulus. Memory facilitation and consolidation under PFK modifiers could also be demonstrated in avoidance and discrimination

  9. Engineering of metabolic control

    DOEpatents

    Liao, James C.

    2006-10-17

    The invention features a method of producing heterologous molecules in cells under the regulatory control of a metabolite and metabolic flux. The method can enhance the synthesis of heterologous polypeptides and metabolites.

  10. Engineering of metabolic control

    DOEpatents

    Liao, James C.

    2004-03-16

    The invention features a method of producing heterologous molecules in cells under the regulatory control of a metabolite and metabolic flux. The method can enhance the synthesis of heterologous polypeptides and metabolites.

  11. Metabolic Plasticity in Cancer Cells: Reconnecting Mitochondrial Function to Cancer Control

    PubMed Central

    Ramanujan, V. Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    Anomalous increase in glycolytic activity defines one of the key metabolic alterations in cancer cells. A realization of this feature has led to critical advancements in cancer detection techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) as well as a number of therapeutic avenues targeting the key glycolytic steps within a cancer cell. A normal healthy cell’s survival relies on a sensitive balance between the primordial glycolysis and a more regulated mitochondrial bioenergetics. The salient difference between these two bioenergetics pathways is that oxygen availability is an obligatory requirement for mitochondrial pathway while glycolysis can function without oxygen. Early observations that some cancer cells up-regulate glycolytic activity even in the presence of oxygen (aerobic glycolysis) led to a hypothesis that such an altered cancer cell metabolism stems from inherent mitochondrial dysfunction. While a general validity of this hypothesis is still being debated, a number of recent research efforts have yielded clarity on the physiological origins of this aerobic glycolysis phenotype in cancer cells. Building on these recent studies, we present a generalized scheme of cancer cell metabolism and propose a novel hypothesis that might rationalize new avenues of cancer intervention. PMID:26457230

  12. Small RNA-dependent expression of secondary metabolism is controlled by Krebs cycle function in Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Kasumi; Kiefer, Patrick; Reimmann, Cornelia; Keel, Christoph; Dubuis, Christophe; Rolli, Joëlle; Vorholt, Julia A; Haas, Dieter

    2009-12-11

    Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0, an antagonist of phytopathogenic fungi in the rhizosphere of crop plants, elaborates and excretes several secondary metabolites with antibiotic properties. Their synthesis depends on three small RNAs (RsmX, RsmY, and RsmZ), whose expression is positively controlled by the GacS-GacA two-component system at high cell population densities. To find regulatory links between primary and secondary metabolism in P. fluorescens and in the related species Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we searched for null mutations that affected central carbon metabolism as well as the expression of rsmY-gfp and rsmZ-gfp reporter constructs but without slowing down the growth rate in rich media. Mutation in the pycAB genes (for pyruvate carboxylase) led to down-regulation of rsmXYZ and secondary metabolism, whereas mutation in fumA (for a fumarase isoenzyme) resulted in up-regulation of the three small RNAs and secondary metabolism in the absence of detectable nutrient limitation. These effects required the GacS sensor kinase but not the accessory sensors RetS and LadS. An analysis of intracellular metabolites in P. fluorescens revealed a strong positive correlation between small RNA expression and the pools of 2-oxoglutarate, succinate, and fumarate. We conclude that Krebs cycle intermediates (already known to control GacA-dependent virulence factors in P. aeruginosa) exert a critical trigger function in secondary metabolism via the expression of GacA-dependent small RNAs.

  13. Sleep and metabolic function

    PubMed Central

    Morselli, Lisa L.; Guyon, Aurore; Spiegel, Karine

    2012-01-01

    Evidence for the role of sleep on metabolic and endocrine function has been reported more than four decades ago. In the past 30 years, the prevalence of obesity and diabetes has greatly increased in industrialized countries, and self-imposed sleep curtailment, now very common, is starting to be recognized as a contributing factor, alongside with increased caloric intake and decreased physical activity. Furthermore, obstructive sleep apnea, a chronic condition characterized by recurrent upper airway obstruction leading to intermittent hypoxemia and sleep fragmentation, has also become highly prevalent as a consequence of the epidemic of obesity and has been shown to contribute, in a vicious circle, to the metabolic disturbances observed in obese patients. In this article, we summarize the current data supporting the role of sleep in the regulation of glucose homeostasis and the hormones involved in the regulation of appetite. We also review the results of the epidemiologic and laboratory studies that investigated the impact of sleep duration and quality on the risk of developing diabetes and obesity, as well as the mechanisms underlying this increased risk. Finally, we discuss how obstructive sleep apnea affects glucose metabolism and the beneficial impact of its treatment, the continuous positive airway pressure. In conclusion, the data available in the literature highlight the importance of getting enough good sleep for metabolic health. PMID:22101912

  14. Long-term benefits in lung function and nutritional status of strict metabolic control of cystic fibrosis-related diabetes.

    PubMed

    Martín-Frías, María; Máiz, Luis; Carcavilla, Atilano; Barrio, Raquel

    2011-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis related diabetes (CFRD) is a strong determinant for lung function decline and increased mortality. Insulin treatment of CFRD is reportedly beneficial for this situation. We report on the long-term impact of insulin treatment of CFRD on pulmonary function and nutritional status in a CF male patient since diagnosis of diabetes. We report the case of a patient diagnosed with CF at the age of 16. Two years later, he experienced a rapidly evolving decrease in pulmonary function, some months later criteria were met warranting lung transplantation. Concomitantly, he was diagnosed with CFRD and insulin therapy was started. Lung function (spirometry), nutritional status (body mass index) and metabolic control (HbA(1c)) were determined every 3 months. After the introduction of insulin treatment, pulmonary function and nutritional status progressively improved and good glycemic control was achieved. The significant and sustained improvement in pulmonary function allowed for the patient's withdrawal from the lung transplantation program within 4 months, a situation which has been maintained until now, 8 years later. The long follow-up of our patient documents the rapid and prolonged beneficial effect of proper metabolic control of CFRD on the respiratory deterioration in CF.

  15. Nutritional control of immunity: Balancing the metabolic requirements with an appropriate immune function.

    PubMed

    De Rosa, Veronica; Galgani, Mario; Santopaolo, Marianna; Colamatteo, Alessandra; Laccetti, Roberta; Matarese, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    The immune system is a highly integrated network of cells sensitive to a number of environmental factors. Interestingly, recent years have seen a dramatic increase in our understanding of how diet makes a crucial contribution to human health, affecting the immune system, secretion of adipocytokines and metabolic pathways. Recent experimental evidence indicates that diet and its components are able to profoundly influence immune responses, thus affecting the development of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. This review aims to discuss some of the main topics concerning the impact of nutrients and their relative composition on immune cell development and function that may be particularly important for regulating the balance between inflammatory and tolerogenic processes. We also highlight the effects of diet on commensal bacteria and how changes in the composition of the microbiota alter intestinal and systemic immune homeostasis. Finally, we summarize the effects of dietary compounds on epigenetic mechanisms involved in the regulation of several immune related genes.

  16. Prenatal malnutrition leads to deficits in attentional set shifting and decreases metabolic activity in prefrontal subregions that control executive function.

    PubMed

    McGaughy, Jill A; Amaral, Ana C; Rushmore, R Jarrett; Mokler, David J; Morgane, Peter J; Rosene, Douglas L; Galler, Janina R

    2014-01-01

    Globally, over 25% of all children under the age of 5 years experience malnutrition leading to cognitive and emotional impairments that can persist into adulthood and beyond. We use a rodent model to determine the impact of prenatal protein malnutrition on executive functions in an attentional set-shifting task and metabolic activity in prefrontal cortex (PFC) subregions critical to these behaviors. Long-Evans dams were provided with a low (6% casein) or adequate (25% casein) protein diet 5 weeks before mating and during pregnancy. At birth, the litters were culled to 8 pups and fostered to control dams on the 25% casein diet. At postnatal day 90, prenatally malnourished rats were less able to shift attentional set and reverse reward contingencies than controls, demonstrating cognitive rigidity. Naive same-sexed littermates were assessed for regional brain activity using the metabolic marker (14)C-2-deoxyglucose (2DG). The prenatally malnourished rats had lower metabolic activity than controls in prelimbic, infralimbic, anterior cingulate, and orbitofrontal cortices, but had comparable activity in the nearby piriform cortex and superior colliculus. This study demonstrates that prenatal protein malnutrition in a well-described animal model produces cognitive deficits in tests of attentional set shifting and reversal learning, similar to findings of cognitive inflexibility reported in humans exposed to early childhood malnutrition. PMID:25342495

  17. Acylation of Biomolecules in Prokaryotes: a Widespread Strategy for the Control of Biological Function and Metabolic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Hentchel, Kristy L.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Acylation of biomolecules (e.g., proteins and small molecules) is a process that occurs in cells of all domains of life and has emerged as a critical mechanism for the control of many aspects of cellular physiology, including chromatin maintenance, transcriptional regulation, primary metabolism, cell structure, and likely other cellular processes. Although this review focuses on the use of acetyl moieties to modify a protein or small molecule, it is clear that cells can use many weak organic acids (e.g., short-, medium-, and long-chain mono- and dicarboxylic aliphatics and aromatics) to modify a large suite of targets. Acetylation of biomolecules has been studied for decades within the context of histone-dependent regulation of gene expression and antibiotic resistance. It was not until the early 2000s that the connection between metabolism, physiology, and protein acetylation was reported. This was the first instance of a metabolic enzyme (acetyl coenzyme A [acetyl-CoA] synthetase) whose activity was controlled by acetylation via a regulatory system responsive to physiological cues. The above-mentioned system was comprised of an acyltransferase and a partner deacylase. Given the reversibility of the acylation process, this system is also referred to as reversible lysine acylation (RLA). A wealth of information has been obtained since the discovery of RLA in prokaryotes, and we are just beginning to visualize the extent of the impact that this regulatory system has on cell function. PMID:26179745

  18. Effects of intensified metabolic control on CNS function in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Cooray, Gerald; Nilsson, Erik; Wahlin, Ake; Laukka, Erika J; Brismar, Kerstin; Brismar, Tom

    2011-01-01

    The mild cognitive decline associated with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) has been suggested to be reversible with improved glycemic control. In order to characterise this cognitive decline and study the effects of improved glycemic control we have studied patients with T2DM (N=28) and healthy control subjects (N=21). One group of patients with diabetes (N=15) were given a 2-month treatment of intensified glycemic control, whereas the other group (N=13) maintained their regular treatment. Cognitive function in four different domains, auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) and resting EEG power spectrum were studied in the two groups of patients and in healthy control subjects before and after the 2-month trial period. There were significant differences at baseline (p<0.02) between patients with T2DM and controls. Patients had lower scores in two cognitive domains: verbal fluency (p<0.01) and visuospatial ability (p<0.03). T2DM also affected ERP with a decrease in N100 amplitude (p<0.04) and an increase in P300 latency (p<0.03). Furthermore, resting EEG activity in the beta band (13-30Hz) was reduced (p<0.04). The change between 1st and 2nd investigation was significantly different in the three groups of patients/subjects (p<0.03). Patients receiving intensified treatment for glycemic control had an improvement of cognitive ability in visuospatial ability (p<0.02) and semantic memory performance (p<0.04) together with increased resting EEG activity in the alpha band (8-13Hz, p<0.02) and connectivity in the theta (4-8Hz, p<0.03) and alpha bands (p<0.03) over central and lateral regions. Furthermore, there was an increase in the connectivity in the beta band (p<0.04) over the central regions of the scalp. In conclusion, subjects with T2DM had a similar type of cognitive function impairment and EEG/ERP abnormality as previously demonstrated for subjects with type 1 diabetes (T1DM). Intensified therapy showed cognitive improvement not shown for regular treatment, suggesting

  19. Metabolic control of signalling pathways and metabolic auto-regulation.

    PubMed

    Lorendeau, Doriane; Christen, Stefan; Rinaldi, Gianmarco; Fendt, Sarah-Maria

    2015-08-01

    Metabolic alterations have emerged as an important hallmark in the development of various diseases. Thus, understanding the complex interplay of metabolism with other cellular processes such as cell signalling is critical to rationally control and modulate cellular physiology. Here, we review in the context of mammalian target of rapamycin, AMP-activated protein kinase and p53, the orchestrated interplay between metabolism and cellular signalling as well as transcriptional regulation. Moreover, we discuss recent discoveries in auto-regulation of metabolism (i.e. how metabolic parameters such as metabolite levels activate or inhibit enzymes and thus metabolic pathways). Finally, we review functional consequences of post-translational modification on metabolic enzyme abundance and/or activities.

  20. Control and Regulation of Integrated Mitochondrial Function in Metabolic and Transport Networks

    PubMed Central

    Cortassa, Sonia; O’Rourke, Brian; Winslow, Raimond L.; Aon, Miguel A.

    2009-01-01

    The pattern of flux and concentration control coefficients in an integrated mitochondrial energetics model is examined by applying a generalized matrix method of control analysis to calculate control coefficients, as well as response coefficients The computational model of Cortassa et al. encompasses oxidative phosphorylation, the TCA cycle, and Ca2+ dynamics. Control of ATP synthesis, TCA cycle, and ANT fluxes were found to be distributed among various mitochondrial processes. Control is shared by processes associated with ATP/ADP production and transport, as well as by Ca2+ dynamics. The calculation also analyzed the control of the concentrations of key regulatory ions and metabolites (Ca2+, NADH, ADP). The approach we have used demonstrates how properties of integrated systems may be understood through applications of computational modeling and control analysis. PMID:19468321

  1. Functional Roles of FgLaeA in Controlling Secondary Metabolism, Sexual Development, and Virulence in Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Seong-Mi; McCormick, Susan P.; Butchko, Robert A. E.; Proctor, Robert H.; Yun, Sung-Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Fusarium graminearum, the causal agent of Fusarium head blight in cereal crops, produces mycotoxins such as trichothecenes and zearalenone in infected plants. Here, we focused on the function of FgLaeA in F. graminearum, a homolog of Aspergillus nidulans LaeA encoding the global regulator for both secondary metabolism and sexual development. Prior to gene analysis, we constructed a novel luciferase reporter system consisting of a transgenic F. graminearum strain expressing a firefly luciferase gene under control of the promoter for either TRI6 or ZEB2 controlling the biosynthesis of these mycotoxins. Targeted deletion of FgLaeA led to a dramatic reduction of luminescence in reporter strains, indicating that FgLaeA controls the expression of these transcription factors in F. graminearum; reduced toxin accumulation was further confirmed by GC-MS analysis. Overexpression of FgLaeA caused the increased production of trichothecenes and additional metabolites. RNA seq-analysis revealed that gene member(s) belonging to ∼70% of total tentative gene clusters, which were previously proposed, were differentially expressed in the ΔFgLaeA strain. In addition, ΔFgLaeA strains exhibited an earlier induction of sexual fruiting body (perithecia) formation and drastically reduced disease symptoms in wheat, indicating that FgLaeA seems to negatively control perithecial induction, but positively control virulence toward the host plant. FgLaeA was constitutively expressed under both mycotoxin production and sexual development conditions. Overexpression of a GFP-FgLaeA fusion construct in the ΔFgLaeA strain restored all phenotypic changes to wild-type levels and led to constitutive expression of GFP in both nuclei and cytoplasm at different developmental stages. A split luciferase assay demonstrated that FgLaeA was able to interact with FgVeA, a homolog of A. nidulans veA. Taken together, these results demonstrate that FgLaeA, a member of putative FgVeA complex, controls secondary

  2. Kupffer Cell Metabolism and Function

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen-Lefebvre, Anh Thu; Horuzsko, Anatolij

    2015-01-01

    Kupffer cells are resident liver macrophages and play a critical role in maintaining liver functions. Under physiological conditions, they are the first innate immune cells and protect the liver from bacterial infections. Under pathological conditions, they are activated by different components and can differentiate into M1-like (classical) or M2-like (alternative) macrophages. The metabolism of classical or alternative activated Kupffer cells will determine their functions in liver damage. Special functions and metabolism of Kupffer cells suggest that they are an attractive target for therapy of liver inflammation and related diseases, including cancer and infectious diseases. Here we review the different types of Kupffer cells and their metabolism and functions in physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:26937490

  3. Effect of pioglitazone on systemic inflammation is independent of metabolic control and cardiac autonomic function in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Nerla, Roberto; Pitocco, Dario; Zaccardi, Francesco; Scalone, Giancarla; Coviello, Ilaria; Mollo, Roberto; Ghirlanda, Giovanni; Lanza, Gaetano A; Crea, Filippo

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this article is to investigate the relation of the anti-inflammatory effect of pioglitazone with cardiac autonomic function and metabolic control in diabetic patients. In this prospective open label trial, 36 type 2 diabetic patients (age 60 ± 10, 20 M) without overt cardiovascular disease were randomized to add pioglitazone (30 mg) to their therapy or to continue standard therapy. C-reactive protein (CRP) serum levels, metabolic parameters and cardiac autonomic function (assessed by heart rate variability [HRV] on 24-h ECG Holter monitoring) were measured at baseline and after 3 months. Clinical and laboratory variables were similar in the two groups. No significant changes were observed after 3 months for metabolic and anthropometric parameters, except for a mild increase in HDL levels in the pioglitazone group only (P = 0.04 vs. controls). CRP levels decreased significantly at follow-up in the pioglitazone group (3.2 ± 1.97 vs. 2.37 ± 1.56 mg/l) but not in the control group (3.0 ± 1.92 vs. 3.93 ± 2.14 mg/l; P = 0.003). No differences were found in basal and follow-up HRV variables between the two groups. In type 2 diabetic patients pioglitazone exerts favourable effects on inflammation even after short-term therapy. This effect precedes those on metabolic and anthropometric parameters and is not associated with changes in cardiac autonomic function.

  4. Blueberries improve endothelial function, but not blood pressure, in adults with metabolic syndrome: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Stull, April J; Cash, Katherine C; Champagne, Catherine M; Gupta, Alok K; Boston, Raymond; Beyl, Robbie A; Johnson, William D; Cefalu, William T

    2015-05-27

    Blueberry consumption has been shown to have various health benefits in humans. However, little is known about the effect of blueberry consumption on blood pressure, endothelial function and insulin sensitivity in humans. The present study investigated the role of blueberry consumption on modifying blood pressure in subjects with metabolic syndrome. In addition, endothelial function and insulin sensitivity (secondary measurements) were also assessed. A double-blind and placebo-controlled study was conducted in 44 adults (blueberry, n = 23; and placebo, n = 21). They were randomized to receive a blueberry or placebo smoothie twice daily for six weeks. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory blood pressure, endothelial function and insulin sensitivity were assessed pre- and post-intervention. The blood pressure and insulin sensitivity did not differ between the blueberry and placebo groups. However, the mean change in resting endothelial function, expressed as reactive hyperemia index (RHI), was improved significantly more in the group consuming the blueberries versus the placebo group (p = 0.024). Even after adjusting for confounding factors, i.e., the percent body fat and gender, the blueberry group still had a greater improvement in endothelial function when compared to their counterpart (RHI; 0.32 ± 0.13 versus -0.33 ± 0.14; p = 0.0023). In conclusion, daily dietary consumption of blueberries did not improve blood pressure, but improved (i.e., increased) endothelial function over six weeks in subjects with metabolic syndrome.

  5. Blueberries Improve Endothelial Function, but Not Blood Pressure, in Adults with Metabolic Syndrome: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Stull, April J.; Cash, Katherine C.; Champagne, Catherine M.; Gupta, Alok K.; Boston, Raymond; Beyl, Robbie A.; Johnson, William D.; Cefalu, William T.

    2015-01-01

    Blueberry consumption has been shown to have various health benefits in humans. However, little is known about the effect of blueberry consumption on blood pressure, endothelial function and insulin sensitivity in humans. The present study investigated the role of blueberry consumption on modifying blood pressure in subjects with metabolic syndrome. In addition, endothelial function and insulin sensitivity (secondary measurements) were also assessed. A double-blind and placebo-controlled study was conducted in 44 adults (blueberry, n = 23; and placebo, n = 21). They were randomized to receive a blueberry or placebo smoothie twice daily for six weeks. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory blood pressure, endothelial function and insulin sensitivity were assessed pre- and post-intervention. The blood pressure and insulin sensitivity did not differ between the blueberry and placebo groups. However, the mean change in resting endothelial function, expressed as reactive hyperemia index (RHI), was improved significantly more in the group consuming the blueberries versus the placebo group (p = 0.024). Even after adjusting for confounding factors, i.e., the percent body fat and gender, the blueberry group still had a greater improvement in endothelial function when compared to their counterpart (RHI; 0.32 ± 0.13 versus −0.33 ± 0.14; p = 0.0023). In conclusion, daily dietary consumption of blueberries did not improve blood pressure, but improved (i.e., increased) endothelial function over six weeks in subjects with metabolic syndrome. PMID:26024297

  6. Cell biology. Metabolic control of cell death.

    PubMed

    Green, Douglas R; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-09-19

    Beyond their contribution to basic metabolism, the major cellular organelles, in particular mitochondria, can determine whether cells respond to stress in an adaptive or suicidal manner. Thus, mitochondria can continuously adapt their shape to changing bioenergetic demands as they are subjected to quality control by autophagy, or they can undergo a lethal permeabilization process that initiates apoptosis. Along similar lines, multiple proteins involved in metabolic circuitries, including oxidative phosphorylation and transport of metabolites across membranes, may participate in the regulated or catastrophic dismantling of organelles. Many factors that were initially characterized as cell death regulators are now known to physically or functionally interact with metabolic enzymes. Thus, several metabolic cues regulate the propensity of cells to activate self-destructive programs, in part by acting on nutrient sensors. This suggests the existence of "metabolic checkpoints" that dictate cell fate in response to metabolic fluctuations. Here, we discuss recent insights into the intersection between metabolism and cell death regulation that have major implications for the comprehension and manipulation of unwarranted cell loss.

  7. Mammalian aquaglyceroporin function in metabolism.

    PubMed

    Laforenza, Umberto; Bottino, Cinzia; Gastaldi, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Aquaglyceroporins are integral membrane proteins that are permeable to glycerol as well as water. The movement of glycerol from a tissue/organ to the plasma and vice versa requires the presence of different aquaglyceroporins that can regulate the entrance or the exit of glycerol across the plasma membrane. Actually, different aquaglyceroporins have been discovered in the adipose tissue, small intestine, liver, kidney, heart, skeletal muscle, endocrine pancreas and capillary endothelium, and their differential expression could be related to obesity and the type 2 diabetes. Here we describe the expression and function of different aquaglyceroporins in physiological condition and in obesity and type 2 diabetes, suggesting they are potential therapeutic targets for metabolic disorders. PMID:26456554

  8. Metabolic Control of Redox and Redox Control of Metabolism in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Reduction-oxidation (Redox) status operates as a major integrator of subcellular and extracellular metabolism and is simultaneously itself regulated by metabolic processes. Redox status not only dominates cellular metabolism due to the prominence of NAD(H) and NADP(H) couples in myriad metabolic reactions but also acts as an effective signal that informs the cell of the prevailing environmental conditions. After relay of this information, the cell is able to appropriately respond via a range of mechanisms, including directly affecting cellular functioning and reprogramming nuclear gene expression. Recent Advances: The facile accession of Arabidopsis knockout mutants alongside the adoption of broad-scale post-genomic approaches, which are able to provide transcriptomic-, proteomic-, and metabolomic-level information alongside traditional biochemical and emerging cell biological techniques, has dramatically advanced our understanding of redox status control. This review summarizes redox status control of metabolism and the metabolic control of redox status at both cellular and subcellular levels. Critical Issues: It is becoming apparent that plastid, mitochondria, and peroxisome functions influence a wide range of processes outside of the organelles themselves. While knowledge of the network of metabolic pathways and their intraorganellar redox status regulation has increased in the last years, little is known about the interorganellar redox signals coordinating these networks. A current challenge is, therefore, synthesizing our knowledge and planning experiments that tackle redox status regulation at both inter- and intracellular levels. Future Directions: Emerging tools are enabling ever-increasing spatiotemporal resolution of metabolism and imaging of redox status components. Broader application of these tools will likely greatly enhance our understanding of the interplay of redox status and metabolism as well as elucidating and

  9. MtsR is a dual regulator that controls virulence genes and metabolic functions in addition to metal homeostasis in the group A streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Toukoki, Chadia; Gold, Kathryn M; McIver, Kevin S; Eichenbaum, Zehava

    2010-05-01

    MtsR is a metal-dependent regulator in the group A streptococcus (GAS) that directly represses the transcription of genes involved in haem and metal uptake. While MtsR has been implicated in GAS virulence, the DNA recognition and full regulatory scope exerted by the protein are unknown. In this study we identified the shr promoter (P(shr)) and mapped MtsR binding to a 69 bp segment in P(shr) that overlaps the core promoter elements. A global transcriptional analysis demonstrated that MtsR modulates the expression of 64 genes in GAS, 44 of which were upregulated and 20 were downregulated in the mtsR mutant. MtsR controls genes with diverse functions including metal homeostasis, nucleic acid and amino acid metabolism, and protein fate. Importantly, the MtsR regulon includes mga, emm49 and ska, which are central for GAS pathogenesis. MtsR binding to the promoter region of both negatively and positively regulated genes demonstrates that it functions as a dual regulator. MtsR footprints are large (47-130 bp) and vary between target promoters. A 16 bp motif that consists of an interrupted palindrome is implicated in the DNA recognition by the metalloregulator. In conclusion, we report here that MtsR is a global regulator in GAS that shapes the expression of vital virulence factors and genes involved in metabolic functions and metal transport, and we discuss the implications for the GAS disease process.

  10. Cellular metabolism and macrophage functional polarization.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Linnan; Zhao, Qingjie; Yang, Tao; Ding, Wenjun; Zhao, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are a functionally heterogeneous cell population that is mainly shaped by a variety of microenvironmental stimuli. Interferon γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induce a classical activation of macrophages (M1), whereas IL-4 and IL-13 induce an alternative activation program in macrophages (M2). Reprogramming of intracellular metabolisms is required for the proper polarization and functions of activated macrophages. Similar to the Warburg effect observed in tumor cells, M1 macrophages increase glucose consumption and lactate release and decreased oxygen consumption rate. In comparison, M2 macrophages mainly employ oxidative glucose metabolism pathways. In addition, fatty acids, vitamins, and iron metabolisms are also related to macrophage polarization. However, detailed metabolic pathways involved in macrophages have remained elusive. Understanding the bidirectional interactions between cellular metabolism and macrophage functions in physiological and pathological situations and the regulatory pathways involved may offer novel therapies for macrophage-associated diseases.

  11. Autophagy in cardiac metabolic control: Novel mechanisms for cardiovascular disorders.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yufei; Zhao, Cong; Yang, Pingzhen; Wang, Xianbao; Wang, Lizi; Chen, Aihua

    2016-09-01

    As an extensively studied quality control system, autophagy is responsible for clearance of dysfunctional organelles and damaged marcomolecules in cells. In addition to its biological recycling function, autophagy plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndromes such as obesity and diabetes. In particular, metabolic disorders contribute to cardiovascular disease development. As energy required to maintain cardiac cells functional is immense, disturbances in the balance between anabolic and catabolic metabolism possibly contribute to cardiovascular disorders. Therefore, an urgent need to expand our knowledge on the role of autophagy on the metabolic regulation of hearts emerges. In this review, the potential relationship between autophagic activity and cardiac metabolism is explored and we also discuss how dysregulated autophagy leads to severe cardiac disorders from the perspective of metabolic control. PMID:27191043

  12. Cellular metabolic and autophagic pathways: traffic control by redox signaling.

    PubMed

    Dodson, Matthew; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Zhang, Jianhua

    2013-10-01

    It has been established that the key metabolic pathways of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation are intimately related to redox biology through control of cell signaling. Under physiological conditions glucose metabolism is linked to control of the NADH/NAD redox couple, as well as providing the major reductant, NADPH, for thiol-dependent antioxidant defenses. Retrograde signaling from the mitochondrion to the nucleus or cytosol controls cell growth and differentiation. Under pathological conditions mitochondria are targets for reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and are critical in controlling apoptotic cell death. At the interface of these metabolic pathways, the autophagy-lysosomal pathway functions to maintain mitochondrial quality and generally serves an important cytoprotective function. In this review we will discuss the autophagic response to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species that are generated from perturbations of cellular glucose metabolism and bioenergetic function.

  13. Pericellular pH homeostasis is a primary function of the Warburg effect; Inversion of metabolic systems to control lactate steady state in tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Mazzio, Elizabeth A; Boukli, Nawal; Rivera, Nery; Soliman, Karam F. A.

    2012-01-01

    2.0 Summary The Warburg effect describes a heightened propensity of tumor cells to produce lactic acid in the presence or absence of O2. Currently, a generally held notion is that the Warburg effect is related to energy. Using whole-genome, proteomic MALDI-TOF-MS and metabolite analysis, we investigate the Warburg effect in malignant N2a cells. The findings show that the Warburg effect serves a functional role in regulating acidic pericellular pH (pHe), which is mediated by metabolic inversion or a fluctuating dominance between glycolytic-rate-substrate level phosphorylation (SLP) and mitochondrial (mt) oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) to control lactic acid. Alkaline pHe elevated SLP/OXPHOS ratio (approximately 98% SLP/OXPHOS); vs. neutral (approximately 56% SLP/OXPHOS) or acidic (approximately 93 % OXPHOS/SLP). Acidic pHe paralleled greater expression of mitochondrial biogenesis and OXPHOS genes, such as complex III–V (Uqcr10, Atp5, and Cox7c), mt Fmc1, Romo1, Tmem 173, Tomm6, aldehyde dehydrogenase, mt Sod2 adjunct to loss of mt fission (Mff) and mt biogenesis component PPAR-γ co-activator 1. Moreover, acidic pHe corresponded to metabolic efficiency evidenced by a rise in mTOR nutrient sensor GßL, its downstream target (Eif4ebp1), insulin modulators (Trib3,Fetub) and loss of catabolic (Hadhb,Bdh1,Pygl) / glycolytic processes (aldolase C, pyruvate kinase, Nampt and aldose-reductase). In contrast, alkaline pHe initiated loss of mitofusin 2, complex II-IV (Sdhaf1,Uqcrq,Cox4i2,Aldh1l2), aconitase, mitochondrial carrier triple repeat 1 and mt biosynthetic (Coq2,Coq5,Coq9). In conclusion, the Warburg effect may serve as negative feed-back loop which regulates the pHe toward a broad acidic range by altering lactic acid production through inversion of metabolic systems. These effects were independent of change in O2 concentration or glucose supply. PMID:22320183

  14. Pericellular pH homeostasis is a primary function of the Warburg effect: inversion of metabolic systems to control lactate steady state in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Mazzio, Elizabeth A; Boukli, Nawal; Rivera, Nery; Soliman, Karam F A

    2012-03-01

    The Warburg effect describes a heightened propensity of tumor cells to produce lactic acid in the presence or absence of O(2) . A generally held notion is that the Warburg effect is related to energy. Using whole-genome, proteomic MALDI-TOF-MS and metabolite analysis, we investigated the Warburg effect in malignant neuroblastoma N2a cells. The findings show that the Warburg effect serves a functional role in regulating acidic pericellular pH (pHe), which is mediated by metabolic inversion or a fluctuating dominance between glycolytic-rate substrate level phosphorylation (SLP) and mitochondrial (mt) oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) to control lactic acid production. The results also show that an alkaline pHe caused an elevation in SLP/OXPHOS ratio (approximately 98% SLP/OXPHOS); while the ratio was approximately 56% at neutral pHe and approximately 93% in acidic pHe. Acidic pHe paralleled greater expression of mitochondrial biogenesis and OXPHOS genes, such as complex III-V (Uqcr10, Atp5 and Cox7c), mt Fmc1, Romo1, Tmem 173, Tomm6, aldehyde dehydrogenase, mt Sod2 mt biogenesis component PPAR-γ co-activator 1 adjunct to loss of mt fission (Mff). Moreover, acidic pHe corresponded to metabolic efficiency evidenced by a rise in mTOR nutrient sensor GβL, its downstream target (Eif4ebp1), insulin modulators (Trib3 and Fetub) and loss of catabolic (Hadhb, Bdh1 and Pygl)/glycolytic processes (aldolase C, pyruvate kinase, Nampt and aldose-reductase). In contrast, alkaline pHe initiated loss of mitofusin 2, complex II-IV (Sdhaf1, Uqcrq, Cox4i2 and Aldh1l2), aconitase, mitochondrial carrier triple repeat 1 and mt biosynthetic (Coq2, Coq5 and Coq9). In conclusion, the Warburg effect might serve as a negative feedback loop that regulates the pHe toward a broad acidic range by altering lactic acid production through inversion of metabolic systems. These effects were independent of changes in O(2) concentration or glucose supply. PMID:22320183

  15. Dynamic metabolic control theory. A methodology for investigating metabolic regulation using transient metabolic data.

    PubMed

    Liao, J C; Delgado, J

    1992-10-13

    The purposes of the dynamic metabolic control theory are to provide a theoretical basis for estimating the control coefficients using the transient metabolic responses and to gain insights into the metabolic regulation in the transient states. The numerical application of this theory is relatively straightforward: it involves a standard linear regression and a matrix multiplication. Although the equations are exact only for linear kinetics, they yield relatively good estimates of the control coefficients for nonlinear systems. PMID:1416609

  16. Metabolic control of the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Kalucka, Joanna; Missiaen, Rindert; Georgiadou, Maria; Schoors, Sandra; Lange, Christian; De Bock, Katrien; Dewerchin, Mieke; Carmeliet, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Cell division is a metabolically demanding process, requiring the production of large amounts of energy and biomass. Not surprisingly therefore, a cell's decision to initiate division is co-determined by its metabolic status and the availability of nutrients. Emerging evidence reveals that metabolism is not only undergoing substantial changes during the cell cycle, but it is becoming equally clear that metabolism regulates cell cycle progression. Here, we overview the emerging role of those metabolic pathways that have been best characterized to change during or influence cell cycle progression. We then studied how Notch signaling, a key angiogenic pathway that inhibits endothelial cell (EC) proliferation, controls EC metabolism (glycolysis) during the cell cycle. PMID:26431254

  17. Metabolic hormones in saliva: origins and functions

    PubMed Central

    Zolotukhin, S.

    2012-01-01

    The salivary proteome consists of thousands of proteins, which include, among others, hormonal modulators of energy intake and output. Although the functions of this prominent category of hormones in whole body energy metabolism are well characterized, their functions in the oral cavity, whether as a salivary component, or when expressed in taste cells, are less studied and poorly understood. The respective receptors for the majority of salivary metabolic hormones have been also shown to be expressed in salivary glands, taste cells, or other cells in the oral mucosa. This review provides a comprehensive account of the gastrointestinal hormones, adipokines, and neuropeptides identified in saliva, salivary glands, or lingual epithelium, as well as their respective cognate receptors expressed in the oral cavity. Surprisingly, few functions are assigned to salivary metabolic hormones, and these functions are mostly associated with the modulation of taste perception. Because of the well-characterized correlation between impaired oral nutrient sensing and increased energy intake and body mass index, a conceptually provocative point of view is introduced, whereupon it is argued that targeted changes in the composition of saliva could affect whole body metabolism in response to the activation of cognate receptors expressed locally in the oral mucosa. PMID:22994880

  18. Control of fluxes in metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Basler, Georg; Nikoloski, Zoran; Larhlimi, Abdelhalim; Barabási, Albert-László; Liu, Yang-Yu

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the control of large-scale metabolic networks is central to biology and medicine. However, existing approaches either require specifying a cellular objective or can only be used for small networks. We introduce new coupling types describing the relations between reaction activities, and develop an efficient computational framework, which does not require any cellular objective for systematic studies of large-scale metabolism. We identify the driver reactions facilitating control of 23 metabolic networks from all kingdoms of life. We find that unicellular organisms require a smaller degree of control than multicellular organisms. Driver reactions are under complex cellular regulation in Escherichia coli, indicating their preeminent role in facilitating cellular control. In human cancer cells, driver reactions play pivotal roles in malignancy and represent potential therapeutic targets. The developed framework helps us gain insights into regulatory principles of diseases and facilitates design of engineering strategies at the interface of gene regulation, signaling, and metabolism. PMID:27197218

  19. On Functional Module Detection in Metabolic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Ina; Ackermann, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Functional modules of metabolic networks are essential for understanding the metabolism of an organism as a whole. With the vast amount of experimental data and the construction of complex and large-scale, often genome-wide, models, the computer-aided identification of functional modules becomes more and more important. Since steady states play a key role in biology, many methods have been developed in that context, for example, elementary flux modes, extreme pathways, transition invariants and place invariants. Metabolic networks can be studied also from the point of view of graph theory, and algorithms for graph decomposition have been applied for the identification of functional modules. A prominent and currently intensively discussed field of methods in graph theory addresses the Q-modularity. In this paper, we recall known concepts of module detection based on the steady-state assumption, focusing on transition-invariants (elementary modes) and their computation as minimal solutions of systems of Diophantine equations. We present the Fourier-Motzkin algorithm in detail. Afterwards, we introduce the Q-modularity as an example for a useful non-steady-state method and its application to metabolic networks. To illustrate and discuss the concepts of invariants and Q-modularity, we apply a part of the central carbon metabolism in potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum) as running example. The intention of the paper is to give a compact presentation of known steady-state concepts from a graph-theoretical viewpoint in the context of network decomposition and reduction and to introduce the application of Q-modularity to metabolic Petri net models. PMID:24958145

  20. On functional module detection in metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Koch, Ina; Ackermann, Jörg

    2013-08-12

    Functional modules of metabolic networks are essential for understanding the metabolism of an organism as a whole. With the vast amount of experimental data and the construction of complex and large-scale, often genome-wide, models, the computer-aided identification of functional modules becomes more and more important. Since steady states play a key role in biology, many methods have been developed in that context, for example, elementary flux modes, extreme pathways, transition invariants and place invariants. Metabolic networks can be studied also from the point of view of graph theory, and algorithms for graph decomposition have been applied for the identification of functional modules. A prominent and currently intensively discussed field of methods in graph theory addresses the Q-modularity. In this paper, we recall known concepts of module detection based on the steady-state assumption, focusing on transition-invariants (elementary modes) and their computation as minimal solutions of systems of Diophantine equations. We present the Fourier-Motzkin algorithm in detail. Afterwards, we introduce the Q-modularity as an example for a useful non-steady-state method and its application to metabolic networks. To illustrate and discuss the concepts of invariants and Q-modularity, we apply a part of the central carbon metabolism in potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum) as running example. The intention of the paper is to give a compact presentation of known steady-state concepts from a graph-theoretical viewpoint in the context of network decomposition and reduction and to introduce the application of Q-modularity to metabolic Petri net models.

  1. On functional module detection in metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Koch, Ina; Ackermann, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Functional modules of metabolic networks are essential for understanding the metabolism of an organism as a whole. With the vast amount of experimental data and the construction of complex and large-scale, often genome-wide, models, the computer-aided identification of functional modules becomes more and more important. Since steady states play a key role in biology, many methods have been developed in that context, for example, elementary flux modes, extreme pathways, transition invariants and place invariants. Metabolic networks can be studied also from the point of view of graph theory, and algorithms for graph decomposition have been applied for the identification of functional modules. A prominent and currently intensively discussed field of methods in graph theory addresses the Q-modularity. In this paper, we recall known concepts of module detection based on the steady-state assumption, focusing on transition-invariants (elementary modes) and their computation as minimal solutions of systems of Diophantine equations. We present the Fourier-Motzkin algorithm in detail. Afterwards, we introduce the Q-modularity as an example for a useful non-steady-state method and its application to metabolic networks. To illustrate and discuss the concepts of invariants and Q-modularity, we apply a part of the central carbon metabolism in potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum) as running example. The intention of the paper is to give a compact presentation of known steady-state concepts from a graph-theoretical viewpoint in the context of network decomposition and reduction and to introduce the application of Q-modularity to metabolic Petri net models. PMID:24958145

  2. Serine in plants: biosynthesis, metabolism, and functions.

    PubMed

    Ros, Roc; Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Krueger, Stephan

    2014-09-01

    Serine (Ser) has a fundamental role in metabolism and signaling in living organisms. In plants, the existence of different pathways of Ser biosynthesis has complicated our understanding of this amino acid homeostasis. The photorespiratory glycolate pathway has been considered to be of major importance, whereas the nonphotorespiratory phosphorylated pathway has been relatively neglected. Recent advances indicate that the phosphorylated pathway has an important function in plant metabolism and development. Plants deficient in this pathway display developmental defects in embryos, male gametophytes, and roots. We propose that the phosphorylated pathway is more important than was initially thought because it is the only Ser source for specific cell types involved in developmental events. Here, we discuss its importance as a link between metabolism and development in plants.

  3. A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing the Effects of Sitagliptin and Glimepiride on Endothelial Function and Metabolic Parameters: Sapporo Athero-Incretin Study 1 (SAIS1)

    PubMed Central

    Nomoto, Hiroshi; Miyoshi, Hideaki; Furumoto, Tomoo; Oba, Koji; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Atsushi; Atsumi, Tatsuya; Manda, Naoki; Kurihara, Yoshio; Aoki, Shin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The DPP-4 inhibitors are incretin-related drugs that improve hyperglycemia in a glucose-dependent manner and have been reported to exert favorable effects on atherosclerosis. However, it has not been fully elucidated whether DPP-4 inhibitors are able to improve endothelial function in patients with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, we investigated the efficacy of sitagliptin, a DPP-4 inhibitor, on endothelial function and glycemic metabolism compared with that of the sulfonylurea glimepiride. Materials and Methods In this multicenter, prospective, randomized parallel-group comparison study, 103 outpatients with type 2 diabetes (aged 59.9 ± 9.9 years with HbA1c levels of 7.5 ± 0.4%) with dietary cure only and/or current metformin treatment were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive sitagliptin or glimepiride therapy once daily for 26 weeks. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD), a comprehensive panel of hemodynamic parameters (Task Force® Monitor), and serum metabolic markers were assessed before and after the treatment. Results During the study period, no statistically significant change in %FMD was seen in both groups (sitagliptin, 5.6 to 5.6%; glimepiride, 5.6 to 6.0%). Secretory units of islets in transplantation, TNF-α, adiponectin and biological antioxidant potential significantly improved in the sitagliptin group, and superoxide dismutase also tended to improve in the sitagliptin group, while improvements in HbA1c levels were similar between groups. Cardiac index, blood pressure and most other metabolic parameters were not different. Conclusions Regardless of glycemic improvement, early sitagliptin therapy did not affect endothelial function but may provide favorable effects on beta-cell function and on inflammatory and oxidative stress in patients with type 2 diabetes without advanced atherosclerosis. Trial Registration UMIN Clinical Trials Registry System UMIN 000004955 PMID:27711199

  4. [Metabolic control of seed germination].

    PubMed

    Catusse, Julie; Strub, Jean-Marc; Job, Claudette; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Job, Dominique

    2008-01-01

    We have used proteomics to better characterize germination and early seedling vigor in sugarbeet. Our strategy includes (1) construction of proteome reference maps for dry and germinating seeds of a high-vigor reference seed lot; (2) investigation of the specific tissue accumulation of proteins (root, cotyledon, perisperm); (3) investigation of changes in protein expression profiles detected in the reference seed lot subjected to different vigor-modifying treatments, e.g. aging and/or priming. More than 1 000 sugarbeet seed proteins have been identified by LC/MS-MS mass spectrometry (albumins, globulins and glutelins have been analyzed separately). Due to the conservation of protein sequences and the quality of MS sequencing (more than 10 000 peptide sequences have been obtained), the success rate of protein identification was on the average of 80%. This is to our knowledge the best detailed proteome analysis ever carried out in seeds. The data allowed us to build a detailed metabolic chart of the sugarbeet seed, generating new insights into the molecular mechanisms determining the development of a new seedling. Also, the proteome of a seed-storage tissue as the perisperm is described for the first time.

  5. Protein Quality Control and Metabolism: Bidirectional Control in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhao V.; Hill, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of heart disease, especially heart failure, continues to increase, and cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide. As cardiomyocytes are essentially irreplaceable, protein quality control is pivotal to cellular homeostasis and, ultimately, cardiac performance. Three evolutionarily conserved mechanisms – autophagy, the unfolded protein response, and the ubiquitin-proteasome system– act in concert to degrade misfolded proteins and eliminate defective organelles. Recent advances have revealed that these mechanisms are intimately associated with cellular metabolism. Going forward, comprehensive understanding of the role of protein quality control mechanisms in cardiac pathology will require integration of metabolic pathways and metabolic control. PMID:25651176

  6. The Effects of Legumes on Metabolic Features, Insulin Resistance and Hepatic Function Tests in Women with Central Obesity: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Mohammad; Gharaaghaji, Rasool; Gargari, Bahram Pourghassem

    2014-01-01

    Background: The effect of high-legume hypocaloric diet on metabolic features in women is unclear. This study provided an opportunity to find effects of high-legume diet on metabolic features in women who consumed high legumes at pre-study period. Methods: In this randomized controlled trial after 2 weeks of a run-in period on an isocaloric diet, 42 premenopausal women with central obesity were randomly assigned into two groups: (1) Hypocaloric diet enriched in legumes (HDEL) and (2) hypocaloric diet without legumes (HDWL) for 6 weeks. The following variables were assessed before intervention and 3 and 6 weeks after its beginning: Waist circumference (WC), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), fasting serum concentrations of triglyceride (TG), high density lipoprotein cholesterol, fasting blood sugar (FBS), insulin, homeostasis model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST). We used multifactor model of nested multivariate analysis of variance repeated measurements and t-test for statistical analysis. Results: HDEL and HDWL significantly reduced the WC. HDEL significantly reduced the SBP and TG. Both HDEL and HDWL significantly increased fasting concentration of insulin and HOMA-IR after 3 weeks, but their significant effects on insulin disappeared after 6 weeks and HDEL returned HOMA-IR to basal levels in the subsequent 3 weeks. In HDEL group percent of decrease in AST and ALT between 3rd and 6th weeks was significant. In HDWL group percent of increase in SBP, DBP, FBS and TG between 3rd and 6th weeks was significant. Conclusions: The study indicated beneficial effects of hypocaloric legumes on metabolic features. PMID:25013690

  7. Metabolic Functions of the Lung, Disorders and Associated Pathologies.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Alcibey; Arce, Isabel

    2016-10-01

    The primary function of the lungs is gas exchange. Approximately 400 million years ago, the Earth's atmosphere gained enough oxygen in the gas phase for the animals that emerged from the sea to breathe air. The first lungs were merely primitive air sacs with a few vessels in the walls that served as accessory organs of gas exchange to supplement the gills. Eons later, as animals grew accustomed to a solely terrestrial life, the lungs became highly compartmentalized to provide the vast air-blood surface necessary for O2 uptake and CO2 elimination, and a respiratory control system was developed to regulate breathing in accordance with metabolic demands and other needs. With the evolution and phylogenetic development, lungs were taking a variety of other specialized functions to maintain homeostasis, which we will call the non-respiratory functions of the lung and that often, and by mistake, are believed to have little or no connection with the replacement gas. In this review, we focus on the metabolic functions of the lung, perhaps the least known, and mainly, in the lipid metabolism and blood-adult lung vascular endothelium interaction. When these functions are altered, respiratory disorders or diseases appear, which are discussed concisely, emphasizing how they impact the most important function of the lungs: external respiration. PMID:27635172

  8. Metabolic Functions of the Lung, Disorders and Associated Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado, Alcibey; Arce, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    The primary function of the lungs is gas exchange. Approximately 400 million years ago, the Earth’s atmosphere gained enough oxygen in the gas phase for the animals that emerged from the sea to breathe air. The first lungs were merely primitive air sacs with a few vessels in the walls that served as accessory organs of gas exchange to supplement the gills. Eons later, as animals grew accustomed to a solely terrestrial life, the lungs became highly compartmentalized to provide the vast air-blood surface necessary for O2 uptake and CO2 elimination, and a respiratory control system was developed to regulate breathing in accordance with metabolic demands and other needs. With the evolution and phylogenetic development, lungs were taking a variety of other specialized functions to maintain homeostasis, which we will call the non-respiratory functions of the lung and that often, and by mistake, are believed to have little or no connection with the replacement gas. In this review, we focus on the metabolic functions of the lung, perhaps the least known, and mainly, in the lipid metabolism and blood-adult lung vascular endothelium interaction. When these functions are altered, respiratory disorders or diseases appear, which are discussed concisely, emphasizing how they impact the most important function of the lungs: external respiration.

  9. Metabolic Functions of the Lung, Disorders and Associated Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado, Alcibey; Arce, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    The primary function of the lungs is gas exchange. Approximately 400 million years ago, the Earth’s atmosphere gained enough oxygen in the gas phase for the animals that emerged from the sea to breathe air. The first lungs were merely primitive air sacs with a few vessels in the walls that served as accessory organs of gas exchange to supplement the gills. Eons later, as animals grew accustomed to a solely terrestrial life, the lungs became highly compartmentalized to provide the vast air-blood surface necessary for O2 uptake and CO2 elimination, and a respiratory control system was developed to regulate breathing in accordance with metabolic demands and other needs. With the evolution and phylogenetic development, lungs were taking a variety of other specialized functions to maintain homeostasis, which we will call the non-respiratory functions of the lung and that often, and by mistake, are believed to have little or no connection with the replacement gas. In this review, we focus on the metabolic functions of the lung, perhaps the least known, and mainly, in the lipid metabolism and blood-adult lung vascular endothelium interaction. When these functions are altered, respiratory disorders or diseases appear, which are discussed concisely, emphasizing how they impact the most important function of the lungs: external respiration. PMID:27635172

  10. Mitochondrial Dynamics Controls T Cell Fate through Metabolic Programming.

    PubMed

    Buck, Michael D; O'Sullivan, David; Klein Geltink, Ramon I; Curtis, Jonathan D; Chang, Chih-Hao; Sanin, David E; Qiu, Jing; Kretz, Oliver; Braas, Daniel; van der Windt, Gerritje J W; Chen, Qiongyu; Huang, Stanley Ching-Cheng; O'Neill, Christina M; Edelson, Brian T; Pearce, Edward J; Sesaki, Hiromi; Huber, Tobias B; Rambold, Angelika S; Pearce, Erika L

    2016-06-30

    Activated effector T (TE) cells augment anabolic pathways of metabolism, such as aerobic glycolysis, while memory T (TM) cells engage catabolic pathways, like fatty acid oxidation (FAO). However, signals that drive these differences remain unclear. Mitochondria are metabolic organelles that actively transform their ultrastructure. Therefore, we questioned whether mitochondrial dynamics controls T cell metabolism. We show that TE cells have punctate mitochondria, while TM cells maintain fused networks. The fusion protein Opa1 is required for TM, but not TE cells after infection, and enforcing fusion in TE cells imposes TM cell characteristics and enhances antitumor function. Our data suggest that, by altering cristae morphology, fusion in TM cells configures electron transport chain (ETC) complex associations favoring oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and FAO, while fission in TE cells leads to cristae expansion, reducing ETC efficiency and promoting aerobic glycolysis. Thus, mitochondrial remodeling is a signaling mechanism that instructs T cell metabolic programming.

  11. Mitochondrial Dynamics Controls T Cell Fate through Metabolic Programming.

    PubMed

    Buck, Michael D; O'Sullivan, David; Klein Geltink, Ramon I; Curtis, Jonathan D; Chang, Chih-Hao; Sanin, David E; Qiu, Jing; Kretz, Oliver; Braas, Daniel; van der Windt, Gerritje J W; Chen, Qiongyu; Huang, Stanley Ching-Cheng; O'Neill, Christina M; Edelson, Brian T; Pearce, Edward J; Sesaki, Hiromi; Huber, Tobias B; Rambold, Angelika S; Pearce, Erika L

    2016-06-30

    Activated effector T (TE) cells augment anabolic pathways of metabolism, such as aerobic glycolysis, while memory T (TM) cells engage catabolic pathways, like fatty acid oxidation (FAO). However, signals that drive these differences remain unclear. Mitochondria are metabolic organelles that actively transform their ultrastructure. Therefore, we questioned whether mitochondrial dynamics controls T cell metabolism. We show that TE cells have punctate mitochondria, while TM cells maintain fused networks. The fusion protein Opa1 is required for TM, but not TE cells after infection, and enforcing fusion in TE cells imposes TM cell characteristics and enhances antitumor function. Our data suggest that, by altering cristae morphology, fusion in TM cells configures electron transport chain (ETC) complex associations favoring oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and FAO, while fission in TE cells leads to cristae expansion, reducing ETC efficiency and promoting aerobic glycolysis. Thus, mitochondrial remodeling is a signaling mechanism that instructs T cell metabolic programming. PMID:27293185

  12. Thiamin function, metabolism, uptake, and transport.

    PubMed

    Manzetti, Sergio; Zhang, Jin; van der Spoel, David

    2014-02-11

    Vitamins are crucial components in the diet of animals and many other living organisms. One of these essential nutrients, thiamin, is known to be involved in several cell functions, including energy metabolism and the degradation of sugars and carbon skeletons. Other roles that are connected to this vitamin are neuronal communication, immune system activation, signaling and maintenance processes in cells and tissues, and cell-membrane dynamics. Because of the key functions of thiamin, uptake and transport through the body are crucial. Its uptake route is relatively complex, encompassing a variety of protein families, including the solute carrier anion transporters, the alkaline phosphatase transport system, and the human extraneuronal monoamine transporter family, some of which are multispecific proteins. There are two known structures of protein (subunits) involved in thiamin uptake in prokaryotes. Binding of thiamin to these proteins is strongly guided by electrostatic interactions. The lack of structural information about thiamin binding proteins for higher organisms remains a bottleneck for understanding the uptake process of thiamin in atomic detail. This review includes recent data on thiamin metabolism, related deficiencies and pathologies, and the latest findings on thiamin binding transporters.

  13. Metabolism and functions of copper in brain.

    PubMed

    Scheiber, Ivo F; Mercer, Julian F B; Dringen, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    Copper is an important trace element that is required for essential enzymes. However, due to its redox activity, copper can also lead to the generation of toxic reactive oxygen species. Therefore, cellular uptake, storage as well as export of copper have to be tightly regulated in order to guarantee sufficient copper supply for the synthesis of copper-containing enzymes but also to prevent copper-induced oxidative stress. In brain, copper is of importance for normal development. In addition, both copper deficiency as well as excess of copper can seriously affect brain functions. Therefore, this organ possesses ample mechanisms to regulate its copper metabolism. In brain, astrocytes are considered as important regulators of copper homeostasis. Impairments of homeostatic mechanisms in brain copper metabolism have been associated with neurodegeneration in human disorders such as Menkes disease, Wilson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. This review article will summarize the biological functions of copper in the brain and will describe the current knowledge on the mechanisms involved in copper transport, storage and export of brain cells. The role of copper in diseases that have been connected with disturbances in brain copper homeostasis will also be discussed.

  14. Control of lipid metabolism by Tachykinin in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wei; Veenstra, Jan A.; Perrimon, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Summary The intestine is a key organ for lipid uptake and distribution, and abnormal intestinal lipid metabolism is associated with obesity and hyperlipidemia. Although multiple regulatory gut hormones secreted from enteroendocrine cells (EEs) regulate systemic lipid homeostasis, such as appetite control and energy balance in adipose tissue, their respective roles regarding lipid metabolism in the intestine are not well understood. We demonstrate that Tachykinins (TKs), one of the most abundant secreted peptides expressed in midgut EEs, regulate intestinal lipid production and subsequently control systemic lipid homeostasis in Drosophila, and that TKs repress lipogenesis in enterocytes (ECs) associated with the TKR99D receptor and PKA signaling. Interestingly, nutrient deprivation enhances the production of TKs in the midgut. Finally, unlike the physiological roles of TKs produced from the brain, gut-derived TKs do not affect behavior, thus demonstrating that gut TK hormones specifically regulate intestinal lipid metabolism without affecting neuronal functions. PMID:25263556

  15. Irisin levels in relation to metabolic and liver functions in Egyptian patients with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Fatma H; Elshweikh, Samah A; Abd El-Naby, Amira Y

    2016-04-01

    Irisin is a new myokine that is suspected to influence metabolic syndrome (MetS). However, there is a great controversy with respect to its level in cases of MetS and its correlation with different metabolic parameters. The present study assesses irisin levels in MetS patients and studies its relationship to metabolic and liver functions to evaluate the possible role of the liver in regulation of this level. Sixty subjects were included in this experiment, who were divided into 3 groups: group I (normal control), group II (MetS patients with normal liver enzymes), and group III (MetS with elevated liver enzymes and fatty liver disease). Serum irisin levels showed significant increases in groups II and III compared with group I, and significant increases in group III compared with group II. Also, irisin levels were positively correlated with body mass index, serum triglycerides, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR), and liver enzymes. We concluded that serum irisin levels increased in patients with MetS, especially those with elevated liver enzymes, and had a positive correlation with parameters of lipid metabolism and glucose homeostasis with the possibility of hepatic clearance to irisin.

  16. β-cell function is associated with metabolic syndrome in Mexican subjects

    PubMed Central

    Baez-Duarte, Blanca G; Sánchez-Guillén, María Del Carmen; Pérez-Fuentes, Ricardo; Zamora-Ginez, Irma; Leon-Chavez, Bertha Alicia; Revilla-Monsalve, Cristina; Islas-Andrade, Sergio

    2010-01-01

    Aims The clinical diagnosis of metabolic syndrome does not find any parameters to evaluate the insulin sensitivity (IS) or β-cell function. The evaluation of these parameters would detect early risk of developing metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study is to determine the relationship between β-cell function and presence of metabolic syndrome in Mexican subjects. Material and methods This study is part of the Mexican Survey on the Prevention of Diabetes (MexDiab Study) with headquarters in the city of Puebla, Mexico. The study comprised of 444 subjects of both genders, aged between 18 and 60 years and allocated into two study groups: (1) control group of individuals at metabolic balance without metabolic syndrome and (2) group composed of subjects with metabolic syndrome and diagnosed according to the criteria of the Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel on Defection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults. Anthropometric, biochemical, and clinical assessments were carried out. Results Average age of the subjects in the control group (n = 254) was 35.7 ± 11.5 years and 42.0 ± 10.7 years for subjects in the metabolic syndrome group (n = 190). Subjects at metabolic balance without metabolic syndrome showed decreased IS, increased insulin resistance (IR), and altered β-cell function. Individuals with metabolic syndrome showed a high prevalence (P ≤ 0.05) of family history of type 2 diabetes (T2D). This group also showed a significant metabolic imbalance with glucose and insulin levels and lipid profile outside the ranges considered safe to prevent the development of cardiovascular disease and T2D. Conclusion The main finding in this study was the detection of altered β-cell function, decreased IS, an increased IR in subjects at metabolic balance, and the progressive deterioration of β-cell function and IS in subjects with metabolic syndrome as the number of features of metabolic syndrome increases

  17. Hepatic Heme Metabolism and Its Control

    PubMed Central

    Bonkowsky, Herbert L.; Sinclair, Peter R.; Sinclair, Jacqueline F.

    1979-01-01

    This review summarizes heme metabolism and focuses especially upon the control of hepatic heme biosynthesis. Activity of δ-aminolevulinic acid synthetase, the first enzyme of heme biosynthesis, is of primary importance in controlling the overall activity of this biosynthetic pathway. Δ-aminolevulinic acid synthetase is subject to inhibition and repression by heme, and numerous basic and clinical studies support the concept that there exists within hepatocytes a “regulatory” heme pool which controls activity of δ-aminolevulinic acid synthetase. In addition, activity of this enzyme is repressed by feeding, especially by ingestion of carbohydrates (the so-called “glucose effect”). Studies pertaining to the mechanisms underlying this effect are also reviewed. The “glucose effect” appears to be mediated by glucose or perhaps by glucose-6-phosphate or uridine diphosphate glucose, rather than by metabolites further removed from glucose itself. Unlike the situation in E. coli, the “glucose effect” in liver of higher organisms is not mediated by alterations in intracellular concentrations of cyclic AMP. Effects of heavy metals, especially iron, on hepatic heme metabolism are also considered. Iron has been found to inhibit formation and utilization of uroporphyrinogen III and to lead to decreased concentrations of microsomal heme and cytochrome P-450. Administration of large amounts of iron is also associated with an increase in activity of heme oxygenase, a property shared by several other metal ions, most notably cobalt. This effect of iron or cobalt administration is similar to the effect of heme administration in increasing heme oxygenase activity; however, we believe it is unlikely that iron, rather than heme itself, is a physiologic regulator of hepatic heme metabolism, although this hypothesis has lately been proposed. PMID:222077

  18. Molecular, metabolic, and genetic control: An introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyson, John J.; Mackey, Michael C.

    2001-03-01

    The living cell is a miniature, self-reproducing, biochemical machine. Like all machines, it has a power supply, a set of working components that carry out its necessary tasks, and control systems that ensure the proper coordination of these tasks. In this Special Issue, we focus on the molecular regulatory systems that control cell metabolism, gene expression, environmental responses, development, and reproduction. As for the control systems in human-engineered machines, these regulatory networks can be described by nonlinear dynamical equations, for example, ordinary differential equations, reaction-diffusion equations, stochastic differential equations, or cellular automata. The articles collected here illustrate (i) a range of theoretical problems presented by modern concepts of cellular regulation, (ii) some strategies for converting molecular mechanisms into dynamical systems, (iii) some useful mathematical tools for analyzing and simulating these systems, and (iv) the sort of results that derive from serious interplay between theory and experiment.

  19. Neuroendocrine control by kisspeptins: role in metabolic regulation of fertility.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Victor M; Tena-Sempere, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    The neurohormonal control of reproduction involves a hierarchical network of central and peripheral signals in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. Development and function of this neuroendocrine system is the result of a lifelong delicate balance between endogenous regulators and environmental cues, including nutritional and metabolic factors. Kisspeptins are the peptide products of KISS1, which operate via the G-protein-coupled receptor GPR54 (also known as Kiss1R). These peptides have emerged as essential upstream regulators of neurons secreting gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), the major hypothalamic node for the stimulatory control of the HPG axis. They are potent elicitors of gonadotropin secretion in various species and physiological settings. Moreover, Kiss1 neurons in the hypothalamus participate in crucial features of reproductive maturation and function, such as brain-level sex differentiation, puberty onset and the neuroendocrine regulation of gonadotropin secretion and ovulation. Cotransmitters of Kiss1 neurons, such as neurokinin B, with roles in controlling the HPG axis have been identified by genetic, neuroanatomical and physiological studies. In addition, a putative role has been proposed for Kiss1 neurons in transmitting metabolic information to GnRH neurons, although the precise mechanisms are as yet unclear. In this Review, we present the major reproductive features of kisspeptins, especially their interplay with neurokinin B and potential roles in the metabolic control of puberty and fertility, and suggest new avenues for research.

  20. Metabolic control analysis of respiration in human cancer tissue.

    PubMed

    Kaambre, Tuuli; Chekulayev, Vladimir; Shevchuk, Igor; Tepp, Kersti; Timohhina, Natalja; Varikmaa, Minna; Bagur, Rafaela; Klepinin, Aleksandr; Anmann, Tiia; Koit, Andre; Kaldma, Andrus; Guzun, Rita; Valvere, Vahur; Saks, Valdur

    2013-01-01

    Bioenergetic profiling of cancer cells is of great potential because it can bring forward new and effective therapeutic strategies along with early diagnosis. Metabolic Control Analysis (MCA) is a methodology that enables quantification of the flux control exerted by different enzymatic steps in a metabolic network thus assessing their contribution to the system's function. Our main goal is to demonstrate the applicability of MCA for in situ studies of energy metabolism in human breast and colorectal cancer cells as well as in normal tissues. We seek to determine the metabolic conditions leading to energy flux redirection in cancer cells. A main result obtained is that the adenine nucleotide translocator exhibits the highest control of respiration in human breast cancer thus becoming a prospective therapeutic target. Additionally, we present evidence suggesting the existence of mitochondrial respiratory supercomplexes that may represent a way by which cancer cells avoid apoptosis. The data obtained show that MCA applied in situ can be insightful in cancer cell energetic research.

  1. Regulation of cardiac metabolism and function by lipogenic factors.

    PubMed

    Bednarski, Tomasz; Pyrkowska, Aleksandra; Opasińska, Agnieszka; Dobrzyń, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    The heart has a limited capacity for lipogenesis and de novo lipid synthesis. However, expression of lipogenic genes in cardiomyocytes is unexpectedly high. Recent studies showed that lipogenic genes are important factors regulating cardiac metabolism and function. Long chain fatty acids are a major source of ATP required for proper heart function, and under aerobic conditions, the heart derives 60-90% of the energy necessary for contractile function from fatty acid oxidation. On the other hand, cardiac lipid over-accumulation (e.g. ceramides, diacylglycerols) leads to heart dysfunction. Downregulation of the lipogenic genes' expression (e.g. sterol regulatory element binding protein 1, stearoyl-CoA desaturase, acetyl-CoA kwacarboxylase) decreased heart steatosis and cardiomyocyte apoptosis, improving systolic and diastolic function of the left ventricle. Lipogenic factors also regulate fatty acids and glucose utilization in the heart, underlining their important role in maintaining energetic homeostasis in pathological states. Fatty acid synthase, the enzyme catalyzing fatty acids de novo synthesis, affects cardiac calcium signaling through regulation of L-type calcium channel activity. Thus, a growing body of evidence suggests that the role of lipogenic genes in cardiomyocytes may be distinct from other tissues. Here, we review recent advances made in understanding the role of lipogenic genes in the control of heart metabolism and its involvement in the pathogenesis of lipotoxic cardiomyopathy. PMID:27333934

  2. Small RNA functions in carbon metabolism and virulence of enteric pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Papenfort, Kai; Vogel, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Enteric pathogens often cycle between virulent and saprophytic lifestyles. To endure these frequent changes in nutrient availability and composition bacteria possess an arsenal of regulatory and metabolic genes allowing rapid adaptation and high flexibility. While numerous proteins have been characterized with regard to metabolic control in pathogenic bacteria, small non-coding RNAs have emerged as additional regulators of metabolism. Recent advances in sequencing technology have vastly increased the number of candidate regulatory RNAs and several of them have been found to act at the interface of bacterial metabolism and virulence factor expression. Importantly, studying these riboregulators has not only provided insight into their metabolic control functions but also revealed new mechanisms of post-transcriptional gene control. This review will focus on the recent advances in this area of host-microbe interaction and discuss how regulatory small RNAs may help coordinate metabolism and virulence of enteric pathogens. PMID:25077072

  3. Role and function of short chain fatty acids in rumen epithelial metabolism, development and importance of the rumen epithelium in understanding control of transcriptome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The epithelial lining of the rumen is uniquely placed to have impact on the nutrient metabolism of the animal. The symbiotic relationship with the microbial populations that inhabit the rumen, serves to provide a constant supply of nutrients from roughage that would otherwise be unusable. Metaboli...

  4. Sucrose metabolism gene families and their biological functions.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shu-Ye; Chi, Yun-Hua; Wang, Ji-Zhou; Zhou, Jun-Xia; Cheng, Yan-Song; Zhang, Bao-Lan; Ma, Ali; Vanitha, Jeevanandam; Ramachandran, Srinivasan

    2015-11-30

    Sucrose, as the main product of photosynthesis, plays crucial roles in plant development. Although studies on general metabolism pathway were well documented, less information is available on the genome-wide identification of these genes, their expansion and evolutionary history as well as their biological functions. We focused on four sucrose metabolism related gene families including sucrose synthase, sucrose phosphate synthase, sucrose phosphate phosphatase and UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. These gene families exhibited different expansion and evolutionary history as their host genomes experienced differentiated rates of the whole genome duplication, tandem and segmental duplication, or mobile element mediated gene gain and loss. They were evolutionarily conserved under purifying selection among species and expression divergence played important roles for gene survival after expansion. However, we have detected recent positive selection during intra-species divergence. Overexpression of 15 sorghum genes in Arabidopsis revealed their roles in biomass accumulation, flowering time control, seed germination and response to high salinity and sugar stresses. Our studies uncovered the molecular mechanisms of gene expansion and evolution and also provided new insight into the role of positive selection in intra-species divergence. Overexpression data revealed novel biological functions of these genes in flowering time control and seed germination under normal and stress conditions.

  5. Sucrose metabolism gene families and their biological functions

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shu-Ye; Chi, Yun-Hua; Wang, Ji-Zhou; Zhou, Jun-Xia; Cheng, Yan-Song; Zhang, Bao-Lan; Ma, Ali; Vanitha, Jeevanandam; Ramachandran, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Sucrose, as the main product of photosynthesis, plays crucial roles in plant development. Although studies on general metabolism pathway were well documented, less information is available on the genome-wide identification of these genes, their expansion and evolutionary history as well as their biological functions. We focused on four sucrose metabolism related gene families including sucrose synthase, sucrose phosphate synthase, sucrose phosphate phosphatase and UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. These gene families exhibited different expansion and evolutionary history as their host genomes experienced differentiated rates of the whole genome duplication, tandem and segmental duplication, or mobile element mediated gene gain and loss. They were evolutionarily conserved under purifying selection among species and expression divergence played important roles for gene survival after expansion. However, we have detected recent positive selection during intra-species divergence. Overexpression of 15 sorghum genes in Arabidopsis revealed their roles in biomass accumulation, flowering time control, seed germination and response to high salinity and sugar stresses. Our studies uncovered the molecular mechanisms of gene expansion and evolution and also provided new insight into the role of positive selection in intra-species divergence. Overexpression data revealed novel biological functions of these genes in flowering time control and seed germination under normal and stress conditions. PMID:26616172

  6. Metabolic regulation of stem cell function in tissue homeostasis and organismal ageing.

    PubMed

    Chandel, Navdeep S; Jasper, Heinrich; Ho, Theodore T; Passegué, Emmanuelle

    2016-08-01

    Many tissues and organ systems in metazoans have the intrinsic capacity to regenerate, which is driven and maintained largely by tissue-resident somatic stem cell populations. Ageing is accompanied by a deregulation of stem cell function and a decline in regenerative capacity, often resulting in degenerative diseases. The identification of strategies to maintain stem cell function and regulation is therefore a promising avenue to allay a wide range of age-related diseases. Studies in various organisms have revealed a central role for metabolic pathways in the regulation of stem cell function. Ageing is associated with extensive metabolic changes, and interventions that influence cellular metabolism have long been recognized as robust lifespan-extending measures. In this Review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the metabolic control of stem cell function, and how stem cell metabolism relates to homeostasis and ageing. PMID:27428307

  7. Linking community size structure and ecosystem functioning using metabolic theory

    PubMed Central

    Yvon-Durocher, Gabriel; Allen, Andrew P.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how biogeochemical cycles relate to the structure of ecological communities is a central research question in ecology. Here we approach this problem by focusing on body size, which is an easily measured species trait that has a pervasive influence on multiple aspects of community structure and ecosystem functioning. We test the predictions of a model derived from metabolic theory using data on ecosystem metabolism and community size structure. These data were collected as part of an aquatic mesocosm experiment that was designed to simulate future environmental warming. Our analyses demonstrate significant linkages between community size structure and ecosystem functioning, and the effects of warming on these links. Specifically, we show that carbon fluxes were significantly influenced by seasonal variation in temperature, and yielded activation energies remarkably similar to those predicted based on the temperature dependencies of individual-level photosynthesis and respiration. We also show that community size structure significantly influenced fluxes of ecosystem respiration and gross primary production, particularly at the annual time-scale. Assessing size structure and the factors that control it, both empirically and theoretically, therefore promises to aid in understanding links between individual organisms and biogeochemical cycles, and in predicting the responses of key ecosystem functions to future environmental change. PMID:23007088

  8. Estrogen and mitochondria function in cardiorenal metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jia, Guanghong; Aroor, Annayya R; Sowers, James R

    2014-01-01

    The cardiorenal metabolic syndrome (CRS) consists of a constellation of cardiac, renal, and metabolic disorders including insulin resistance (IR), obesity, metabolic dyslipidemia, high-blood pressure, and evidence of early cardiac and renal disease. Mitochondria dysfunction often occurs in the CRS, and this dysfunction is promoted by excess reactive oxygen species, genetic factors, IR, aging, and altered mitochondrial biogenesis. Recently, it has been shown that there are important sex-related differences in mitochondria function and metabolic, cardiovascular, and renal components. Sex differences in the CRS have mainly been attributed to the estrogen's effects that are mainly mediated by estrogen receptor (ER) α, ERβ, and G-protein coupled receptor 30. In this review, we discuss the effects of estrogen on the mitochondrial function, insulin metabolic signaling, glucose transport, lipid metabolism, and inflammatory responses from liver, pancreatic β cells, adipocytes, skeletal muscle, and cardiovascular tissue.

  9. Calcitonin control of calcium metabolism during weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soliman, Karam F. A.

    1993-01-01

    The main objective of this proposal is to elucidate calcitonin role in calcium homeostasis during weightlessness. In this investigation our objectives are to study: the effect of weightlessness on thyroid and serum calcitonin, the effect of weightlessness on the circadian variation of calcitonin in serum and the thyroid gland, the role of light as zeitgeber for calcitonin circadian rhythm, the circadian pattern of thyroid sensitivity to release calcitonin in response to calcium load, and the role of serotonin and norepinephrine in the control of calcitonin release. The main objective of this research/proposal is to establish the role of calcitonin in calcium metabolism during weightlessness condition. Understanding the mechanism of these abnormalities will help in developing therapeutic means to counter calcium imbalance in spaceflights.

  10. On the Evolution of New Metabolic Functions in Diploid Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Barry G.

    1980-01-01

    Evolution of lactose utilization via the ebg system of Escherichia coli requires both structural gene (ebgA) and regulatory gene (ebgR) mutations. Because evolution of new metabolic functions in diploids might be subject to constraints not present in haploid organisms, merodiploid strains carrying a wild-type and an evolved ebgA allele, or a wild-type and an evolved ebgR allele were constructed. I show that heterozygosity at ebgA does not significantly affect the selective advantage of the evolved ebgA allele; whereas heterozygosity at ebgR eliminates the selective advantage of the evolved ebgR allele. It is suggested that, in diploid organisms, evolution of new functions for systems under negative control would be very difficult. PMID:6790336

  11. 2011 Plant Lipids: Structure, Metabolism, & Function Gordon Research Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Benning

    2011-02-04

    This is the second Gordon Research Conference on 'Plant Lipids: Structure, Metabolism & Function'. It covers current topics in lipid structure, metabolism and function in eukaryotic photosynthetic organisms including seed plants, algae, mosses and ferns. Work in photosynthetic bacteria is considered as well as it serves the understanding of specific aspects of lipid metabolism in plants. Breakthroughs are discussed in research on plant lipids as diverse as glycerolipids, sphingolipids, lipids of the cell surface, isoprenoids, fatty acids and their derivatives. The program covers nine concepts at the forefront of research under which afore mentioned plant lipid classes are discussed. The goal is to integrate areas such as lipid signaling, basic lipid metabolism, membrane function, lipid analysis, and lipid engineering to achieve a high level of stimulating interaction among diverse researchers with interests in plant lipids. One Emphasis is on the dynamics and regulation of lipid metabolism during plant cell development and in response to environmental factors.

  12. Metabolic Control of Vesicular Glutamate Transport and Release

    PubMed Central

    Juge, Narinobu; Gray, John A.; Omote, Hiroshi; Miyaji, Takaaki; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Hara, Chiaki; Uneyama, Hisayuki; Edwards, Robert H.; Nicoll, Roger A.; Moriyama, Yoshinori

    2010-01-01

    Fasting has been used to control epilepsy since antiquity, but the mechanism of coupling between metabolic state and excitatory neurotransmission remains unknown. Previous work has shown that the vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) required for exocytotic release of glutamate undergo an unusual form of regulation by Cl−. Using functional reconstitution of the purified VGLUTs into proteoliposomes, we now show that Cl− acts as an allosteric activator, and the ketone bodies that increase with fasting inhibit glutamate release by competing with Cl− at the site of allosteric regulation. Consistent with these observations, acetoacetate reduced quantal size at hippocampal synapses, and suppresses glutamate release and seizures evoked with 4-aminopyridine in the brain. The results indicate an unsuspected link between metabolic state and excitatory neurotransmission through anion-dependent regulation of VGLUT activity. PMID:20920794

  13. Estrogen-Related Receptor α (ERRα) and ERRγ Are Essential Coordinators of Cardiac Metabolism and Function

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; McDonald, Caitlin; Petrenko, Nataliya B.; Leblanc, Mathias; Wang, Tao; Giguere, Vincent; Evans, Ronald M.; Patel, Vickas V.

    2015-01-01

    Almost all cellular functions are powered by a continuous energy supply derived from cellular metabolism. However, it is little understood how cellular energy production is coordinated with diverse energy-consuming cellular functions. Here, using the cardiac muscle system, we demonstrate that nuclear receptors estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα) and ERRγ are essential transcriptional coordinators of cardiac energy production and consumption. On the one hand, ERRα and ERRγ together are vital for intact cardiomyocyte metabolism by directly controlling expression of genes important for mitochondrial functions and dynamics. On the other hand, ERRα and ERRγ influence major cardiomyocyte energy consumption functions through direct transcriptional regulation of key contraction, calcium homeostasis, and conduction genes. Mice lacking both ERRα and cardiac ERRγ develop severe bradycardia, lethal cardiomyopathy, and heart failure featuring metabolic, contractile, and conduction dysfunctions. These results illustrate that the ERR transcriptional pathway is essential to couple cellular energy metabolism with energy consumption processes in order to maintain normal cardiac function. PMID:25624346

  14. Calcium metabolism and cardiovascular function after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatton, Daniel C.; Yue, Qi; Dierickx, Jacqueline; Roullet, Chantal; Otsuka, Keiichi; Watanabe, Mitsuaki; Coste, Sarah; Roullet, Jean Baptiste; Phanouvang, Thongchan; Orwoll, Eric; Orwoll, Shiela; McCarron, David A.

    2002-01-01

    To determine the influence of dietary calcium on spaceflight-induced alterations in calcium metabolism and blood pressure (BP), 9-wk-old spontaneously hypertensive rats, fed either high- (2%) or low-calcium (0.02%) diets, were flown on an 18-day shuttle flight. On landing, flight animals had increased ionized calcium (P < 0.001), elevated parathyroid hormone levels (P < 0.001), reduced calcitonin levels (P < 0.05), unchanged 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) levels, and elevated skull (P < 0.01) and reduced femur bone mineral density. Basal and thrombin-stimulated platelet free calcium (intracellular calcium concentration) were also reduced (P < 0.05). There was a tendency for indirect systolic BP to be reduced in conscious flight animals (P = 0.057). However, mean arterial pressure was elevated (P < 0.001) after anesthesia. Dietary calcium altered all aspects of calcium metabolism (P < 0.001), as well as BP (P < 0.001), but the only interaction with flight was a relatively greater increase in ionized calcium in flight animals fed low- compared with high-calcium diets (P < 0.05). The results indicate that 1) flight-induced disruptions of calcium metabolism are relatively impervious to dietary calcium in the short term, 2) increased ionized calcium did not normalize low-calcium-induced elevations of BP, and 3) parathyroid hormone was paradoxically increased in the high-calcium-fed flight animals after landing.

  15. The Edinburgh human metabolic network reconstruction and its functional analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hongwu; Sorokin, Anatoly; Mazein, Alexander; Selkov, Alex; Selkov, Evgeni; Demin, Oleg; Goryanin, Igor

    2007-01-01

    A better understanding of human metabolism and its relationship with diseases is an important task in human systems biology studies. In this paper, we present a high-quality human metabolic network manually reconstructed by integrating genome annotation information from different databases and metabolic reaction information from literature. The network contains nearly 3000 metabolic reactions, which were reorganized into about 70 human-specific metabolic pathways according to their functional relationships. By analysis of the functional connectivity of the metabolites in the network, the bow-tie structure, which was found previously by structure analysis, is reconfirmed. Furthermore, the distribution of the disease related genes in the network suggests that the IN (substrates) subset of the bow-tie structure has more flexibility than other parts. PMID:17882155

  16. Mitochondrial quality control pathways as determinants of metabolic health

    PubMed Central

    Held, Ntsiki M.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial function is key for maintaining cellular health, while mitochondrial failure is associated with various pathologies, including inherited metabolic disorders and age‐related diseases. In order to maintain mitochondrial quality, several pathways of mitochondrial quality control have evolved. These systems monitor mitochondrial integrity through antioxidants, DNA repair systems, and chaperones and proteases involved in the mitochondrial unfolded protein response. Additional regulation of mitochondrial function involves dynamic exchange of components through mitochondrial fusion and fission. Sustained stress induces a selective autophagy – termed mitophagy – and ultimately leads to apoptosis. Together, these systems form a network that acts on the molecular, organellar, and cellular level. In this review, we highlight how these systems are regulated in an integrated context‐ and time‐dependent network of mitochondrial quality control that is implicated in healthy aging. PMID:26010263

  17. Thiamine in plants: aspects of its metabolism and functions.

    PubMed

    Goyer, Aymeric

    2010-10-01

    Thiamine diphosphate (vitamin B(1)) plays a fundamental role as an enzymatic cofactor in universal metabolic pathways including glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. In addition, thiamine diphosphate has recently been shown to have functions other than as a cofactor in response to abiotic and biotic stress in plants. Recently, several steps of the plant thiamine biosynthetic pathway have been characterized, and a mechanism of feedback regulation of thiamine biosynthesis via riboswitch has been unraveled. This review focuses on these most recent advances made in our understanding of thiamine metabolism and functions in plants. Phenotypes of plant mutants affected in thiamine biosynthesis are described, and genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics data that have increased further our knowledge of plant thiamine metabolic pathways and functions are summarized. Aspects of thiamine metabolism such as catabolism, salvage, and transport in plants are discussed.

  18. Microalgal Metabolic Network Model Refinement through High-Throughput Functional Metabolic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Chaiboonchoe, Amphun; Dohai, Bushra Saeed; Cai, Hong; Nelson, David R.; Jijakli, Kenan; Salehi-Ashtiani, Kourosh

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic modeling provides the means to define metabolic processes at a systems level; however, genome-scale metabolic models often remain incomplete in their description of metabolic networks and may include reactions that are experimentally unverified. This shortcoming is exacerbated in reconstructed models of newly isolated algal species, as there may be little to no biochemical evidence available for the metabolism of such isolates. The phenotype microarray (PM) technology (Biolog, Hayward, CA, USA) provides an efficient, high-throughput method to functionally define cellular metabolic activities in response to a large array of entry metabolites. The platform can experimentally verify many of the unverified reactions in a network model as well as identify missing or new reactions in the reconstructed metabolic model. The PM technology has been used for metabolic phenotyping of non-photosynthetic bacteria and fungi, but it has not been reported for the phenotyping of microalgae. Here, we introduce the use of PM assays in a systematic way to the study of microalgae, applying it specifically to the green microalgal model species Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The results obtained in this study validate a number of existing annotated metabolic reactions and identify a number of novel and unexpected metabolites. The obtained information was used to expand and refine the existing COBRA-based C. reinhardtii metabolic network model iRC1080. Over 254 reactions were added to the network, and the effects of these additions on flux distribution within the network are described. The novel reactions include the support of metabolism by a number of d-amino acids, l-dipeptides, and l-tripeptides as nitrogen sources, as well as support of cellular respiration by cysteamine-S-phosphate as a phosphorus source. The protocol developed here can be used as a foundation to functionally profile other microalgae such as known microalgae mutants and novel isolates. PMID:25540776

  19. Cerebral Vascular Control and Metabolism in Heat Stress.

    PubMed

    Bain, Anthony R; Nybo, Lars; Ainslie, Philip N

    2015-07-01

    This review provides an in-depth update on the impact of heat stress on cerebrovascular functioning. The regulation of cerebral temperature, blood flow, and metabolism are discussed. We further provide an overview of vascular permeability, the neurocognitive changes, and the key clinical implications and pathologies known to confound cerebral functioning during hyperthermia. A reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF), derived primarily from a respiratory-induced alkalosis, underscores the cerebrovascular changes to hyperthermia. Arterial pressures may also become compromised because of reduced peripheral resistance secondary to skin vasodilatation. Therefore, when hyperthermia is combined with conditions that increase cardiovascular strain, for example, orthostasis or dehydration, the inability to preserve cerebral perfusion pressure further reduces CBF. A reduced cerebral perfusion pressure is in turn the primary mechanism for impaired tolerance to orthostatic challenges. Any reduction in CBF attenuates the brain's convective heat loss, while the hyperthermic-induced increase in metabolic rate increases the cerebral heat gain. This paradoxical uncoupling of CBF to metabolism increases brain temperature, and potentiates a condition whereby cerebral oxygenation may be compromised. With levels of experimentally viable passive hyperthermia (up to 39.5-40.0 °C core temperature), the associated reduction in CBF (∼ 30%) and increase in cerebral metabolic demand (∼ 10%) is likely compensated by increases in cerebral oxygen extraction. However, severe increases in whole-body and brain temperature may increase blood-brain barrier permeability, potentially leading to cerebral vasogenic edema. The cerebrovascular challenges associated with hyperthermia are of paramount importance for populations with compromised thermoregulatory control--for example, spinal cord injury, elderly, and those with preexisting cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26140721

  20. Insulin Control of Glucose Metabolism in Man

    PubMed Central

    Insel, Paul A.; Liljenquist, John E.; Tobin, Jordan D.; Sherwin, Robert S.; Watkins, Paul; Andres, Reubin; Berman, Mones

    1975-01-01

    Analyses of the control of glucose metabolism by insulin have been hampered by changes in bloog glucose concentration induced by insulin administration with resultant activation of hypoglycemic counterregulatory mechanisms. To eliminate such mechanisms, we have employed the glucose clamp technique which allows maintenance of fasting blood glucose concentration during and after the administration of insulin. Analyses of six studies performed in young healthy men in the postabsorptive state utilizing the concurrent administration of [14C]glucose and 1 mU/kg per min (40 mU/m2 per min) porcine insulin led to the development of kinetic models for insulin and for glucose. These models account quantitatively for the control of insulin on glucose utilization and on endogenous glucose production during nonsteady states. The glucose model, a parallel three-compartment model, has a central compartment (mass = 68±7 mg/kg; space of distribution = blood water volume) in rapid equilibrium with a smaller compartment (50±17 mg/kg) and in slow equilibrium with a larger compartment (96±21 mg/kg). The total plasma equivalent space for the glucose system averaged 15.8 liters or 20.3% body weight. Two modes of glucose loss are introduced in the model. One is a zero-order loss (insulin and glucose independent) from blood to the central nervous system; its magnitude was estimated from published data. The other is an insulin-dependent loss, occurring from the rapidly equilibrating compartment and, in the basal period, is smaller than the insulin-independent loss. Endogenous glucose production averaged 1.74 mg/kg per min in the basal state and enters the central compartment directly. During the glucose clamp experiments plasma insulin levels reached a plateau of 95±8 μU/ml. Over the entire range of insulin levels studied, glucose losses were best correlated with levels of insulin in a slowly equilibrating insulin compartment of a three-compartment insulin model. A proportional control

  1. Metabolic Determinants of Mitochondrial Function in Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Seidler, Emily A; Moley, Kelle H

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial production of cellular energy is essential to oocyte function, zygote development and successful continuation of pregnancy. This review focuses on several key functions of healthy oocyte mitochondria and the effect of pathologic states such as aging, oxidative stress and apoptosis on these functions. The effect of these abnormal conditions is presented in terms of clinical presentations, specifically maternal obesity, diminished ovarian reserve and assisted reproductive technologies.

  2. Carbon metabolism and the sign of control coefficients in metabolic adaptations underlying K-ras transformation.

    PubMed

    de Atauri, Pedro; Benito, Adrian; Vizán, Pedro; Zanuy, Miriam; Mangues, Ramón; Marín, Silvia; Cascante, Marta

    2011-06-01

    Metabolic adaptations are associated with changes in enzyme activities. These adaptations are characterized by patterns of positive and negative changes in metabolic fluxes and concentrations of intermediate metabolites. Knowledge of the mechanism and parameters governing enzyme kinetics is rarely available. However, the signs-increases or decreases-of many of these changes can be predicted using the signs of metabolic control coefficients. These signs require the only knowledge of the structure of the metabolic network and a limited qualitative knowledge of the regulatory dependences, which is widely available for carbon metabolism. Here, as a case study, we identified control coefficients with fixed signs in order to predict the pattern of changes in key enzyme activities which can explain the observed changes in fluxes and concentrations underlying the metabolic adaptations in oncogenic K-ras transformation in NIH-3T3 cells. The fixed signs of control coefficients indicate that metabolic changes following the oncogenic transformation-increased glycolysis and oxidative branch of the pentose-phosphate pathway, and decreased concentration in sugar-phosphates-could be associated with increases in activity for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, pyruvate kinase and lactate dehydrogenase, and decrease for transketolase. These predictions were validated experimentally by measuring specific activities. We conclude that predictions based on fixed signs of control coefficients are a very robust tool for the identification of changes in enzyme activities that can explain observed metabolic adaptations in carbon metabolism.

  3. Fatty acid metabolism in the regulation of T cell function.

    PubMed

    Lochner, Matthias; Berod, Luciana; Sparwasser, Tim

    2015-02-01

    The specific regulation of cellular metabolic processes is of major importance for directing immune cell differentiation and function. We review recent evidence indicating that changes in basic cellular lipid metabolism have critical effects on T cell proliferation and cell fate decisions. While induction of de novo fatty acid (FA) synthesis is essential for activation-induced proliferation and differentiation of effector T cells, FA catabolism via β-oxidation is important for the development of CD8(+) T cell memory as well as for the differentiation of CD4(+) regulatory T cells. We consider the influence of lipid metabolism and metabolic intermediates on the regulation of signaling and transcriptional pathways via post-translational modifications, and discuss how an improved understanding of FA metabolism may reveal strategies for manipulating immune responses towards therapeutic outcomes. PMID:25592731

  4. mTORC1-dependent metabolic reprogramming is a prerequisite for Natural Killer cell effector function

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Raymond P.; Loftus, Róisín M.; Keating, Sinéad E.; Liou, Kevin T.; Biron, Christine A.; Gardiner, Clair M.; Finlay, David K.

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamcyin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a key regulator of cellular metabolism and also has fundamental roles in controlling immune responses. Emerging evidence suggests that these two functions of mTORC1 are integrally linked. However, little is known regarding mTORC1 function in controlling the metabolism and function of natural killer (NK) cells, lymphocytes that play key roles in anti-viral and anti-tumour immunity. This study investigated the hypothesis that mTORC1-controlled metabolism underpins normal NK cell pro-inflammatory function. We demonstrate that mTORC1 is robustly stimulated in NK cells activated in vivo and in vitro. This mTORC1 activity is required for the production of the key NK cell effector molecules IFNγ, important in delivering antimicrobial and immunoregulatory functions, and granzyme B, a critical component of NK cell cytotoxic granules. The data reveal that NK cells undergo dramatic metabolic reprogramming upon activation, up-regulating rates of glucose uptake and glycolysis, and that mTORC1 activity is essential for attaining this elevated glycolytic state. Directly limiting the rate of glycolysis is sufficient to inhibit IFNγ production and granzyme B expression. This study provides the highly novel insight that mTORC1-mediated metabolic reprogramming of NK cells is a prerequisite for the acquisition of normal effector functions. PMID:25261477

  5. Precision Metabolic Engineering: the Design of Responsive, Selective, and Controllable Metabolic Systems

    PubMed Central

    McNerney, Monica P.; Watstein, Daniel M.; Styczynski, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic engineering is generally focused on static optimization of cells to maximize production of a desired product, though recently dynamic metabolic engineering has explored how metabolic programs can be varied over time to improve titer. However, these are not the only types of applications where metabolic engineering could make a significant impact. Here, we discuss a new conceptual framework, termed “precision metabolic engineering,” involving the design and engineering of systems that make different products in response to different signals. Rather than focusing on maximizing titer, these types of applications typically have three hallmarks: sensing signals that determine the desired metabolic target, completely directing metabolic flux in response to those signals, and producing sharp responses at specific signal thresholds. In this review, we will first discuss and provide examples of precision metabolic engineering. We will then discuss each of these hallmarks and identify which existing metabolic engineering methods can be applied to accomplish those tasks, as well as some of their shortcomings. Ultimately, precise control of metabolic systems has the potential to enable a host of new metabolic engineering and synthetic biology applications for any problem where flexibility of response to an external signal could be useful. PMID:26189665

  6. Precision metabolic engineering: The design of responsive, selective, and controllable metabolic systems.

    PubMed

    McNerney, Monica P; Watstein, Daniel M; Styczynski, Mark P

    2015-09-01

    Metabolic engineering is generally focused on static optimization of cells to maximize production of a desired product, though recently dynamic metabolic engineering has explored how metabolic programs can be varied over time to improve titer. However, these are not the only types of applications where metabolic engineering could make a significant impact. Here, we discuss a new conceptual framework, termed "precision metabolic engineering," involving the design and engineering of systems that make different products in response to different signals. Rather than focusing on maximizing titer, these types of applications typically have three hallmarks: sensing signals that determine the desired metabolic target, completely directing metabolic flux in response to those signals, and producing sharp responses at specific signal thresholds. In this review, we will first discuss and provide examples of precision metabolic engineering. We will then discuss each of these hallmarks and identify which existing metabolic engineering methods can be applied to accomplish those tasks, as well as some of their shortcomings. Ultimately, precise control of metabolic systems has the potential to enable a host of new metabolic engineering and synthetic biology applications for any problem where flexibility of response to an external signal could be useful.

  7. Restricted cooperative games on metabolic networks reveal functionally important reactions.

    PubMed

    Sajitz-Hermstein, Max; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the emerging properties of complex biological systems is in the crux of systems biology studies. Computational methods for elucidating the role of each component in the synergetic interplay can be used to identify targets for genetic and metabolic engineering. In particular, we aim at determining the importance of reactions in a metabolic network with respect to a specific biological function. Therefore, we propose a novel game-theoretic framework which integrates restricted cooperative games with the outcome of flux balance analysis. We define productivity games on metabolic networks and present an analysis of their unrestricted and restricted variants based on the game-theoretic solution concept of the Shapley value. Correspondingly, this concept provides a characterization of the robustness and functional centrality for each enzyme involved in a given metabolic network. Furthermore, the comparison of two different environments - feast and famine - demonstrates the dependence of the results on the imposed flux capacities.

  8. Diverse Activities of Histone Acylations Connect Metabolism to Chromatin Function.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Arnob; Abmayr, Susan M; Workman, Jerry L

    2016-08-18

    Modifications of histones play important roles in balancing transcriptional output. The discovery of acyl marks, besides histone acetylation, has added to the functional diversity of histone modifications. Since all modifications use metabolic intermediates as substrates for chromatin-modifying enzymes, the prevalent landscape of histone modifications in any cell type is a snapshot of its metabolic status. Here, we review some of the current findings of how differential use of histone acylations regulates gene expression as response to metabolic changes and differentiation programs. PMID:27540855

  9. Pathways and functions of gut microbiota metabolism impacting host physiology.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Smitha; Alden, Nicholas; Lee, Kyongbum

    2015-12-01

    The bacterial populations in the human intestine impact host physiological functions through their metabolic activity. In addition to performing essential catabolic and biotransformation functions, the gut microbiota produces bioactive small molecules that mediate interactions with the host and contribute to the neurohumoral axes connecting the intestine with other parts of the body. This review discusses recent progress in characterizing the metabolic products of the gut microbiota and their biological functions, focusing on studies that investigate the responsible bacterial pathways and cognate host receptors. Several key areas are highlighted for future development: context-based analysis targeting pathways; integration of analytical approaches; metabolic modeling; and synthetic systems for in vivo manipulation of microbiota functions. Prospectively, these developments could further our mechanistic understanding of host-microbiota interactions.

  10. Insulin action in brain regulates systemic metabolism and brain function.

    PubMed

    Kleinridders, André; Ferris, Heather A; Cai, Weikang; Kahn, C Ronald

    2014-07-01

    Insulin receptors, as well as IGF-1 receptors and their postreceptor signaling partners, are distributed throughout the brain. Insulin acts on these receptors to modulate peripheral metabolism, including regulation of appetite, reproductive function, body temperature, white fat mass, hepatic glucose output, and response to hypoglycemia. Insulin signaling also modulates neurotransmitter channel activity, brain cholesterol synthesis, and mitochondrial function. Disruption of insulin action in the brain leads to impairment of neuronal function and synaptogenesis. In addition, insulin signaling modulates phosphorylation of tau protein, an early component in the development of Alzheimer disease. Thus, alterations in insulin action in the brain can contribute to metabolic syndrome, and the development of mood disorders and neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate: metabolism and cellular functions.

    PubMed

    Michell, Robert H; Heath, Victoria L; Lemmon, Mark A; Dove, Stephen K

    2006-01-01

    Polyphosphoinositides (PPIn) are low-abundance membrane phospholipids that each bind to a distinctive set of effector proteins and, thereby, regulate a characteristic suite of cellular processes. Major functions of phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(3,5)P(2)] are in membrane and protein trafficking, and in pH control in the endosome-lysosome axis. Recently identified PtdIns(3,5)P(2) effectors include a family of novel beta-propeller proteins, for which we propose the name PROPPINs [for beta-propeller(s) that binds PPIn], and possibly proteins of the epsin and CHMP (charged multi-vesicular body proteins) families. All eukaryotes, with the exception of some pathogenic protists and microsporidians, possess proteins needed for the formation, metabolism and functions of PtdIns(3,5)P(2). The importance of PtdIns(3,5)P(2) for normal cell function is underscored by recent evidence for its involvement in mammalian cell responses to insulin and for PtdIns(3,5)P(2) dysfunction in the human genetic conditions X-linked myotubular myopathy, Type-4B Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease and fleck corneal dystrophy.

  12. Metabolic Assessment of Suited Mobility Using Functional Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norcross, J. R.; McFarland, S. M.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Existing methods for evaluating extravehicular activity (EVA) suit mobility have typically focused on isolated joint range of motion or torque, but these techniques have little to do with how well a crewmember functionally performs in an EVA suit. To evaluate suited mobility at the system level through measuring metabolic cost (MC) of functional tasks.

  13. Space Station CMIF extended duration metabolic control test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schunk, Richard G.; Bagdigian, Robert M.; Carrasquillo, Robyn L.; Ogle, Kathryn Y.; Wieland, Paul O.

    1989-01-01

    The Space Station Extended Duration Metabolic Control Test (EMCT) was conducted at the MSFC Core Module Integration Facility. The primary objective of the EMCT was to gather performance data from a partially-closed regenerative Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) system functioning under steady-state conditions. Included is a description of the EMCT configuration, a summary of events, a discussion of anomalies that occurred during the test, and detailed results and analysis from individual measurements of water and gas samples taken during the test. A comparison of the physical, chemical, and microbiological methods used in the post test laboratory analyses of the water samples is included. The preprototype ECLS hardware used in the test, providing an overall process description and theory of operation for each hardware item. Analytical results pertaining to a system level mass balance and selected system power estimates are also included.

  14. Thermodynamic-based computational profiling of cellular regulatory control in hepatocyte metabolism.

    PubMed

    Beard, Daniel A; Qian, Hong

    2005-03-01

    Thermodynamic-based constraints on biochemical fluxes and concentrations are applied in concert with mass balance of fluxes in glycogenesis and glycogenolysis in a model of hepatic cell metabolism. Constraint-based modeling methods that facilitate predictions of reactant concentrations, reaction potentials, and enzyme activities are introduced to identify putative regulatory and control sites in biological networks by computing the minimal control scheme necessary to switch between metabolic modes. Computational predictions of control sites in glycogenic and glycogenolytic operational modes in the hepatocyte network compare favorably with known regulatory mechanisms. The developed hepatic metabolic model is used to computationally analyze the impairment of glucose production in von Gierke's and Hers' diseases, two metabolic diseases impacting glycogen metabolism. The computational methodology introduced here can be generalized to identify downstream targets of agonists, to systematically probe possible drug targets, and to predict the effects of specific inhibitors (or activators) on integrated network function. PMID:15507536

  15. Socio-economic characteristics and quality of life in diabetes mellitus--relation to metabolic control.

    PubMed

    Larsson, D; Lager, I; Nilsson, P M

    1999-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disease with wide implications for well-being and social life. The aim of this cross-sectional, observational study was to describe possible differences in clinical characteristics, socio-economic factors and quality of life between diabetes patients in poor and good/acceptable metabolic control, as defined by levels of glycated haemoglobin A1c. From a population-based register of diabetes patients at a clinical chemistry department, we selected 96 subjects in poor metabolic control (HbA1c > 10%), and 96 subjects in good/acceptable (HbA1c 6.5-7.5%) metabolic control, matched for sex, age and duration of diabetes. Each participant was sent a self-administered questionnaire regarding medical history, family situation and socio-economic background, as well as self-rated health based on a validated instrument (SF-36). The diabetes patients in poor metabolic control reported more retinopathy, vascular complications and nervous problems than did the patients in acceptable metabolic control. Furthermore, the group in poor metabolic control was also characterized by a lower educational level, a higher number of sick leave days or disability pension and a lower degree of physical activity. Both of the diabetic groups reported lower scorings for physical functioning, general health, vitality and mental health, than did a comparable non-diabetic group from another study. In summary, diabetic patients in poor metabolic control have a lower educational level and report more complications, nervous problems, sick leave days and disability pensions than patients in good/acceptable metabolic control. The lower degree of physical activity adds to the problems of the first group and should be the target for intervention to achieve better metabolic control.

  16. Circadian rhythms in myocardial metabolism and function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Circadian rhythms in myocardial function and dysfunction are firmly established in both animal models and humans. For example, the incidence of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death increases when organisms awaken. Such observations have classically been explained by circadian rhythms in neurohumoral...

  17. Effect of Meditation on Endothelial Function in Black Americans with Metabolic Syndrome: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Vaccarino, Viola; Kondwani, Kofi A.; Kelley, Mary E.; Murrah, Nancy V.; Boyd, Linda; Ahmed, Yusuf; Meng, Yuan X.; Gibbons, Gary H.; Hooper, W. Craig; De Staercke, Christine; Quyyumi, Arshed A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Psychological stress may play a role in metabolic syndrome. A consequence of metabolic syndrome is endothelial dysfunction, which is also influenced by psychological stress. We sought to compare the effect of consciously resting meditation (CRM), a sound (mantra)-based meditation, with a control intervention of health education (HE) on endothelial function in the setting of metabolic syndrome. Methods Sixty-eight black Americans with metabolic system risk factors (age 30 to 65 years) were randomized to either CRM (N=33), or to HE (N=35); interventions were matched for frequency and duration of sessions and lasted 12 months. Endothelial function was assessed by brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD%) at baseline, 6 and 12 months. Arterial elasticity, metabolic risk factors, psychosocial and behavioral variables were secondary endpoints. Results Although FMD % improved in the CRM group over 12 months, this increase was not significantly higher than in the HE group (p=0.51 for the interaction between group and time). Non-endothelium dependent dilation and arterial elasticity did not change in either group. Most metabolic syndrome risk factors showed beneficial trends in the CRM group only. A risk factor score counting the number of metabolic syndrome components decreased in the CRM group but not in the control HE group (p=0.049 for the interaction between treatment group and time). Conclusions Among black Americans with metabolic syndrome risk factors, CRM, a sound-based meditation, did not improve endothelial function significantly more than a control intervention of health education. CRM resulted in favorable trends in metabolic syndrome risk factors which were examined as secondary outcomes. PMID:23788695

  18. Metabolism control by the circadian clock and vice versa

    PubMed Central

    Eckel-Mahan, Kristin; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms govern a wide variety of physiological and metabolic functions in most organisms. At the heart of these regulatory pathways in mammals is the clock machinery, a remarkably coordinated transcription-translation system that relies on dynamic changes in chromatin states. Recent findings indicate that regulation also goes the other way, as specific elements of the clock can sense changes in the cellular metabolism. Understanding in full detail the intimate links between cellular metabolism and the circadian clock machinery will provide not only crucial insights into system physiology but also new avenues toward pharmacological intervention of metabolic disorders. PMID:19421159

  19. Angiogenesis and vascular functions in modulation of obesity, adipose metabolism, and insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yihai

    2013-10-01

    White and brown adipose tissues are hypervascularized and the adipose vasculature displays phenotypic and functional plasticity to coordinate with metabolic demands of adipocytes. Blood vessels not only supply nutrients and oxygen to nourish adipocytes, they also serve as a cellular reservoir to provide adipose precursor and stem cells that control adipose tissue mass and function. Multiple signaling molecules modulate the complex interplay between the vascular system and the adipocytes. Understanding fundamental mechanisms by which angiogenesis and vasculatures modulate adipocyte functions may provide new therapeutic options for treatment of obesity and metabolic disorders by targeting the adipose vasculature.

  20. Diabetes, insulin-mediated glucose metabolism and Sertoli/blood-testis barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Marco G.; Martins, Ana D.; Cavaco, José E.; Socorro, Sílvia; Oliveira, Pedro F.

    2013-01-01

    Blood testis barrier (BTB) is one of the tightest blood-barriers controlling the entry of substances into the intratubular fluid. Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is an epidemic metabolic disease concurrent with falling fertility rates, which provokes severe detrimental BTB alterations. It induces testicular alterations, disrupting the metabolic cooperation between the cellular constituents of BTB, with dramatic consequences on sperm quality and fertility. As Sertoli cells are involved in the regulation of spermatogenesis, providing nutritional support for germ cells, any metabolic alteration in these cells derived from DM may be responsible for spermatogenesis disruption, playing a crucial role in fertility/subfertility associated with this pathology. These cells have a glucose sensing machinery that reacts to hormonal fluctuations and several mechanisms to counteract hyper/hypoglycemic events. The role of DM on Sertoli/BTB glucose metabolism dynamics and the metabolic molecular mechanisms through which DM and insulin deregulation alter its functioning, affecting male reproductive potential will be discussed. PMID:24665384

  1. Preserved pontine glucose metabolism in Alzheimer disease: A reference region for functional brain image (PET) analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Minoshima, Satoshi; Frey, K.A.; Foster, N.L.; Kuhl, D.W.

    1995-07-01

    Our goal was to examine regional preservation of energy metabolism in Alzheimer disease (AD) and to evaluate effects of PET data normalization to reference regions. Regional metabolic rates in the pons, thalamus, putamen, sensorimotor cortex, visual cortex, and cerebellum (reference regions) were determined stereotaxically and examined in 37 patients with probable AD and 22 normal controls based on quantitative {sup 18}FDG-PET measurements. Following normalization of metabolic rates of the parietotemporal association cortex and whole brain to each reference region, distinctions of the two groups were assessed. The pons showed the best preservation of glucose metabolism in AD. Other reference regions showed relatively preserved metabolism compared with the parietotemporal association cortex and whole brain, but had significant metabolic reduction. Data normalization to the pons not only enhanced statistical significance of metabolic reduction in the parietotemporal association cortex, but also preserved the presence of global cerebral metabolic reduction indicated in analysis of the quantitative data. Energy metabolism in the pons in probable AD is well preserved. The pons is a reliable reference for data normalization and will enhance diagnostic accuracy and efficiency of quantitative and nonquantitative functional brain imaging. 39 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. [Basic mechanisms: structure, function and metabolism of plasma lipoproteins].

    PubMed

    Errico, Teresa L; Chen, Xiangyu; Martin Campos, Jesús M; Julve, Josep; Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to present basic information on the lipoprotein physiology. The protein fraction of lipoproteins consists of several apolipoproteins and enzymes whose functions are lipid transport and metabolism. Classification of lipoproteins is based on their density. Chylomicrons, VLDL, IDL, LDL and HDL can be isolated by ultracentrifugation. Both chylomicrons- and VLDL-triglycerides are transported from the intestine and liver, respectively, to the peripheral tissues. The metabolism of VLDL originates IDL and LDL. LDL is the main transporter of cholesterol to extrahepatic tissues. HDL mobilizes cholesterol from peripheral tissues to the liver where it is secreted to bile as free cholesterol or bile salts, a process termed reverse cholesterol transport. Lipoprotein metabolism can be regulated by nuclear receptors that regulate the expression of genes involved in triglyceride and apolipoprotein metabolism. PMID:23769508

  3. [Basic mechanisms: structure, function and metabolism of plasma lipoproteins].

    PubMed

    Errico, Teresa L; Chen, Xiangyu; Martin Campos, Jesús M; Julve, Josep; Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to present basic information on the lipoprotein physiology. The protein fraction of lipoproteins consists of several apolipoproteins and enzymes whose functions are lipid transport and metabolism. Classification of lipoproteins is based on their density. Chylomicrons, VLDL, IDL, LDL and HDL can be isolated by ultracentrifugation. Both chylomicrons- and VLDL-triglycerides are transported from the intestine and liver, respectively, to the peripheral tissues. The metabolism of VLDL originates IDL and LDL. LDL is the main transporter of cholesterol to extrahepatic tissues. HDL mobilizes cholesterol from peripheral tissues to the liver where it is secreted to bile as free cholesterol or bile salts, a process termed reverse cholesterol transport. Lipoprotein metabolism can be regulated by nuclear receptors that regulate the expression of genes involved in triglyceride and apolipoprotein metabolism.

  4. Metabolism Is Central to Tolerogenic Dendritic Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Wen Jing; Ahl, Patricia Jennifer; Connolly, John Edward

    2016-01-01

    Immunological tolerance is a fundamental tenant of immune homeostasis and overall health. Self-tolerance is a critical component of the immune system that allows for the recognition of self, resulting in hyporeactivity instead of immunogenicity. Dendritic cells are central to the establishment of dominant immune tolerance through the secretion of immunosuppressive cytokines and regulatory polarization of T cells. Cellular metabolism holds the key to determining DC immunogenic or tolerogenic cell fate. Recent studies have demonstrated that dendritic cell maturation leads to a shift toward a glycolytic metabolic state and preferred use of glucose as a carbon source. In contrast, tolerogenic dendritic cells favor oxidative phosphorylation and fatty acid oxidation. This dichotomous metabolic reprogramming of dendritic cells drives differential cellular function and plays a role in pathologies, such as autoimmune disease. Pharmacological alterations in metabolism have promising therapeutic potential. PMID:26980944

  5. Phosphatidylserine in the brain: metabolism and function.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Yong; Huang, Bill X; Spector, Arthur A

    2014-10-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) is the major anionic phospholipid class particularly enriched in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane in neural tissues. PS is synthesized from phosphatidylcholine or phosphatidylethanolamine by exchanging the base head group with serine, and this reaction is catalyzed by phosphatidylserine synthase 1 and phosphatidylserine synthase 2 located in the endoplasmic reticulum. Activation of Akt, Raf-1 and protein kinase C signaling, which supports neuronal survival and differentiation, requires interaction of these proteins with PS localized in the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane. Furthermore, neurotransmitter release by exocytosis and a number of synaptic receptors and proteins are modulated by PS present in the neuronal membranes. Brain is highly enriched with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and brain PS has a high DHA content. By promoting PS synthesis, DHA can uniquely expand the PS pool in neuronal membranes and thereby influence PS-dependent signaling and protein function. Ethanol decreases DHA-promoted PS synthesis and accumulation in neurons, which may contribute to the deleterious effects of ethanol intake. Improvement of some memory functions has been observed in cognitively impaired subjects as a result of PS supplementation, but the mechanism is unclear.

  6. Vitamin D metabolism, sex hormones, and male reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Blomberg Jensen, Martin

    2012-08-01

    The spectrum of vitamin D (VD)-mediated effects has expanded in recent years, and VD is now recognized as a versatile signaling molecule rather than being solely a regulator of bone health and calcium homeostasis. One of the recently identified target areas of VD is male reproductive function. The VD receptor (VDR) and the VD metabolizing enzyme expression studies documented the presence of this system in the testes, mature spermatozoa, and ejaculatory tract, suggesting that both systemic and local VD metabolism may influence male reproductive function. However, it is still debated which cell is the main VD target in the testis and to what extent VD is important for sex hormone production and function of spermatozoa. This review summarizes descriptive studies on testicular VD metabolism and spatial distribution of VDR and the VD metabolizing enzymes in the mammalian testes and discusses mechanistic and association studies conducted in animals and humans. The reviewed evidence suggests some effects of VD on estrogen and testosterone biosynthesis and implicates involvement of both systemic and local VD metabolism in the regulation of male fertility potential.

  7. Contribution of Metabolic Reprogramming to Macrophage Plasticity and Function

    PubMed Central

    El Kasmi, Karim C.; Stenmark, Kurt R.

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages display a spectrum of functional activation phenotypes depending on the composition of the microenvironment they reside in, including type of tissue/organ and character of injurious challenge they are exposed to. Our understanding of how macrophage plasticity is regulated by the local microenvironment is still limited. Here we review and discuss the recent literature regarding the contribution of cellular metabolic pathways to the ability of the macrophage to sense the microenvironment and to alter its function. We propose that distinct alterations in the microenvironment induce a spectrum of inducible and reversible metabolic programs that might form the basis of the inducible and reversible spectrum of functional macrophage activation/polarization phenotypes. We highlight that metabolic pathways in the bidirectional communication between macrophages and stromals cells are an important component of chronic inflammatory conditions. Recent work demonstrates that inflammatory macrophage activation is tightly associated with metabolic reprogramming to aerobic glycolysis, an altered TCA cycle, and reduced mitochondrial respiration. We review cytosolic and mitochondrial mechanisms that promote initiation and maintenance of macrophage activation as they relate to increased aerobic glycolysis and highlight potential pathways through which anti-inflammatory IL-10 could promote macrophage deactivation. Finally, we propose that in addition to their role in energy generation and regulation of apoptosis, mitochondria reprogram their metabolism to also participate regulating macrophage activation and plasticity. PMID:26454572

  8. Metabolism and functions of lipids in myelin.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Sebastian; Castelvetri, Ludovici Cantuti; Simons, Mikael

    2015-08-01

    Rapid conduction of nerve impulses requires coating of axons by myelin sheaths, which are lipid-rich and multilamellar membrane stacks. The lipid composition of myelin varies significantly from other biological membranes. Studies in mutant mice targeting various lipid biosynthesis pathways have shown that myelinating glia have a remarkable capacity to compensate the lack of individual lipids. However, compensation fails when it comes to maintaining long-term stability of myelin. Here, we summarize how lipids function in myelin biogenesis, axon-glia communication and in supporting long-term maintenance of myelin. We postulate that change in myelin lipid composition might be relevant for our understanding of aging and demyelinating diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue titled Brain Lipids.

  9. Psychosocial and metabolic function by smoking status in individuals with binge eating disorder and obesity.

    PubMed

    Udo, Tomoko; White, Marney A; Barnes, Rachel D; Ivezaj, Valentina; Morgan, Peter; Masheb, Robin M; Grilo, Carlos M

    2016-02-01

    Individuals with binge eating disorder (BED) report smoking to control appetite and weight. Smoking in BED is associated with increased risk for comorbid psychiatric disorders, but its impact on psychosocial functioning and metabolic function has not been evaluated. Participants were 429 treatment-seeking adults (72.4% women; mean age 46.2±11.0years old) with BED comorbid with obesity. Participants were categorized into current smokers (n=66), former smokers (n=145), and never smokers (n=218). Smoking status was unrelated to most historical eating/weight variables and to current eating disorder psychopathology. Smoking status was associated with psychiatric, psychosocial, and metabolic functioning. Compared with never smokers, current smokers were more likely to meet lifetime diagnostic criteria for alcohol (OR=5.51 [95% CI=2.46-12.33]) and substance use disorders (OR=7.05 [95% CI=3.37-14.72]), poorer current physical quality of life, and increased risk for metabolic syndrome (OR=1.80 [95% CI=0.97-3.35]) and related metabolic risks (reduced HDL, elevated total cholesterol). On the other hand, the odds of meeting criteria for lifetime psychiatric comorbidity or metabolic abnormalities were not significantly greater in former smokers, relative to never smokers. Our findings suggest the importance of promoting smoking cessation in treatment-seeking patients with BED and obesity for its potential long-term implications for psychiatric and metabolic functioning.

  10. Architecture of conference control functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kausar, Nadia; Crowcroft, Jon

    1999-11-01

    Conference control is an integral part in many-to-many communications that is used to manage and co-ordinate multiple users in conferences. There are different types of conferences which require different types of control. Some of the features of conference control may be user invoked while others are for internal management of a conference. In recent years, ITU (International Telecommunication Union) and IETF (Internet Engineering Task Force) have standardized two main models of conferencing, each system providing a set of conference control functionalities that are not easily provided in the other one. This paper analyzes the main activities appropriate for different types of conferences and presents an architecture for conference control called GCCP (Generic Conference Control Protocol). GCCP interworks different types of conferencing and provides a set of conference control functions that can be invoked by users directly. As an example of interworking, interoperation of IETF's SIP and ITU's H.323 call control functions have been examined here. This paper shows that a careful analysis of a conferencing architecture can provide a set of control functions essential for any group communication model that can be extensible if needed.

  11. Metabolic functions of FABPs— mechanisms and therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Hotamisligil, Gökhan S.; Bernlohr, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular and extracellular interactions with proteins enables the functional and mechanistic diversity of lipids. Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) were originally described as intracellular proteins that can affect lipid fluxes, metabolism and signalling within cells. As the functions of this protein family have been further elucidated, it has become evident that they are critical mediators of metabolism and inflammatory processes, both locally and systemically, and therefore are potential therapeutic targets for immunometabolic diseases. In particular, genetic deficiency and small molecule-mediated inhibition of FABP4 (also known as aP2) and FABP5 can potently improve glucose homeostasis and reduce atherosclerosis in mouse models. Further research has shown that in addition to their intracellular roles, some FABPs are found outside the cells, and FABP4 undergoes regulated, vesicular secretion. The circulating form of FABP4 has crucial hormonal functions in systemic metabolism. In this Review we discuss the roles and regulation of both intracellular and extracellular FABP actions, highlighting new insights that might direct drug discovery efforts and opportunities for management of chronic metabolic diseases. PMID:26260145

  12. Cocoa flavanol consumption improves cognitive function, blood pressure control, and metabolic profile in elderly subjects: the Cocoa, Cognition, and Aging (CoCoA) Study—a randomized controlled trial1234

    PubMed Central

    Mastroiacovo, Daniela; Kwik-Uribe, Catherine; Grassi, Davide; Necozione, Stefano; Raffaele, Angelo; Pistacchio, Luana; Righetti, Roberta; Bocale, Raffaella; Lechiara, Maria Carmela; Marini, Carmine; Ferri, Claudio; Desideri, Giovambattista

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent evidence has indicated that flavanol consumption may have many health benefits in humans, including improved cognitive activities. Objective: The aim was to evaluate the effect of flavanol consumption on cognitive performance in cognitively intact elderly subjects. Design: This was a double-blind, controlled, parallel-arm study conducted in 90 elderly individuals without clinical evidence of cognitive dysfunction who were randomly assigned to consume daily for 8 wk a drink containing 993 mg [high flavanol (HF)], 520 mg [intermediate flavanol (IF)], or 48 mg [low flavanol (LF)] cocoa flavanols (CFs). Cognitive function was assessed at baseline and after 8 wk by using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), the Trail Making Test (TMT) A and B, and the Verbal Fluency Test (VFT). Results: The changes in MMSE score in response to the 3 different treatments were not different. In contrast, there was a positive impact of the intervention on specific aspects of cognitive function. Mean changes (±SEs) in the time required to complete the TMT A and B after consumption of the HF (−8.6 ± 0.4 and −16.5 ± 0.8 s, respectively) and IF (−6.7 ± 0.5 and −14.2 ± 0.5 s, respectively) drinks significantly (P < 0.0001) differed from that after consumption of the LF drinks (−0.8 ± 1.6 and −1.1 ± 0.7 s, respectively). Similarly, VFT scores significantly improved among all treatment groups, but the magnitude of improvement in the VFT score was significantly (P < 0.0001) greater in the HF group (7.7 ± 1.1 words/60 s) than in the IF (3.6 ± 1.2 words/60 s) and LF (1.3 ± 0.5 words/60 s) groups. Significantly different improvements in insulin resistance (P < 0.0001), blood pressure (P < 0.0001), and lipid peroxidation (P = 0.001) were also observed for the HF and IF groups in comparison with the LF group. Changes in insulin resistance explained ∼17% of changes in composite z score (partial r2 = 0.1703, P < 0.0001). Conclusions: This dietary

  13. Dynamics and Control of the Central Carbon Metabolism in Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The liver plays a major role in metabolism and performs a number of vital functions in the body. Therefore, the determination of hepatic metabolite dynamics and the analysis of the control of the respective biochemical pathways are of great pharmacological and medical importance. Extra- and intracellular time-series data from stimulus-response experiments are gaining in importance in the identification of in vivo metabolite dynamics, while dynamic network models are excellent tools for analyzing complex metabolic control patterns. This is the first study that has been undertaken on the data-driven identification of a dynamic liver central carbon metabolism model and its application in the analysis of the distribution of metabolic control in hepatoma cells. Results Dynamic metabolite data were collected from HepG2 cells after they had been deprived of extracellular glucose. The concentration of 25 extra- and intracellular intermediates was quantified using HPLC, LC-MS-MS, and GC-MS. The in silico metabolite dynamics were in accordance with the experimental data. The central carbon metabolism of hepatomas was further analyzed with a particular focus on the control of metabolite concentrations and metabolic fluxes. It was observed that the enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase exerted substantial negative control over the glycolytic flux, whereas oxidative phosphorylation had a significant positive control. The control over the rate of NADPH consumption was found to be shared between the NADPH-demand itself (0.65) and the NADPH supply (0.38). Conclusions Based on time-series data, a dynamic central carbon metabolism model was developed for the investigation of new and complex metabolic control patterns in hepatoma cells. The control patterns found support the hypotheses that the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and the Warburg effect are promising targets for tumor treatment. The systems-oriented identification of metabolite dynamics is a first step

  14. Insulin Action in Brain Regulates Systemic Metabolism and Brain Function

    PubMed Central

    Kleinridders, André; Ferris, Heather A.; Cai, Weikang

    2014-01-01

    Insulin receptors, as well as IGF-1 receptors and their postreceptor signaling partners, are distributed throughout the brain. Insulin acts on these receptors to modulate peripheral metabolism, including regulation of appetite, reproductive function, body temperature, white fat mass, hepatic glucose output, and response to hypoglycemia. Insulin signaling also modulates neurotransmitter channel activity, brain cholesterol synthesis, and mitochondrial function. Disruption of insulin action in the brain leads to impairment of neuronal function and synaptogenesis. In addition, insulin signaling modulates phosphorylation of tau protein, an early component in the development of Alzheimer disease. Thus, alterations in insulin action in the brain can contribute to metabolic syndrome, and the development of mood disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24931034

  15. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and skeletal muscle metabolic function.

    PubMed

    Phielix, Esther; Mensink, Marco

    2008-05-23

    Type 2 diabetic patients are characterized by a decreased fat oxidative capacity and high levels of circulating free fatty acids (FFAs). The latter is known to cause insulin resistance, in particularly in skeletal muscle, by reducing insulin stimulated glucose uptake, most likely via accumulation of lipid inside the muscle cell. A reduced skeletal muscle oxidative capacity can exaggerate this. Furthermore, type 2 diabetes is associated with impaired metabolic flexibility, i.e. an impaired switching from fatty acid to glucose oxidation in response to insulin. Thus, a reduced fat oxidative capacity and metabolic inflexibility are important components of skeletal muscle insulin resistance. The cause of these derangements in skeletal muscle of type 2 diabetic patients remains to be elucidated. An impaired mitochondrial function is a likely candidate. Evidence from both in vivo and ex vivo studies supports the idea that an impaired skeletal muscle mitochondrial function is related to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. A decreased mitochondrial oxidative capacity in skeletal muscle was revealed in diabetic patients, using in vivo 31-Phosphorus Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (31P-MRS). However, quantification of mitochondrial function using ex vivo high-resolution respirometry revealed opposite results. Future (human) studies should challenge this concept of impaired mitochondrial function underlying metabolic defects and prove if mitochondria are truly functional impaired in insulin resistance, or low in number, and whether it represents the primary starting point of pathogenesis of insulin resistance, or is just an other feature of the insulin resistant state. PMID:18342897

  16. You Are What You Eat: Metabolic Control of Bacterial Division.

    PubMed

    Monahan, Leigh G; Harry, Elizabeth J

    2016-03-01

    Fluctuations in nutrient availability are a fact of life for bacterial cells in the 'wild'. To survive and compete, bacteria must rapidly modulate cell-cycle processes to accommodate changing nutritional conditions and concomitant changes in cell growth. Our understanding of how this is achieved has been transformed in recent years, with cellular metabolism emerging as a central player. Several metabolic enzymes, in addition to their normal catalytic functions, have been shown to directly modulate cell-cycle processes in response to changing nutrient levels. Here we focus on cell division, the final event in the bacterial cell cycle, and discuss recent compelling evidence connecting division regulation to nutritional status and metabolic activity.

  17. Physiological Interactions of Nanoparticles in Energy Metabolism, Immune Function and Their Biosafety: A Review.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Antony; Sengupta, Jayeeta; Datta, Poulami; Ghosh, Sourav; Gomes, Aparna

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles owing to their unique physico-chemical properties have found its application in various biological processes, including metabolic pathways taking place within the body. This review tried to focus the involvement of nanoparticles in metabolic pathways and its influence in the energy metabolism, a fundamental criteria for the survival and physiological activity of living beings. The human body utilizes energy derived from food resources through a series of biochemical reactions involving several enzymes, co-factors (metals, non-metals, vitamins etc.) through the metabolic pathways (glycolysis, tri carboxylic acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, electron transport chain, etc.) in cellular system. Energy metabolism is also involved in the immune networking of the body for self defence and against pathophysiology. The immune system comprises of different cells and tissues, bioactive molecules for self defence and to fight against diseases. In the recent times, it has been reported through in vivo and in vitro studies that nanoparticles have direct influence on body's immune functions, and can modulate immunity by either suppressing or enhancing it. A comprehensive overview of nanoparticles and its involvement in immune function of the body in normal and pathophysiological conditions has been discussed. Considering these perspectives on nanoparticle interaction another important area which has been highlighted is the biosafety issues which are necessary before therapeutic applications. It is expected that development of physiologically compatible nanoparticles controlling energy metabolic processes, immune functions may show new dimension in the pathophysiology linked with energy and immunity.

  18. Physiological Interactions of Nanoparticles in Energy Metabolism, Immune Function and Their Biosafety: A Review.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Antony; Sengupta, Jayeeta; Datta, Poulami; Ghosh, Sourav; Gomes, Aparna

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles owing to their unique physico-chemical properties have found its application in various biological processes, including metabolic pathways taking place within the body. This review tried to focus the involvement of nanoparticles in metabolic pathways and its influence in the energy metabolism, a fundamental criteria for the survival and physiological activity of living beings. The human body utilizes energy derived from food resources through a series of biochemical reactions involving several enzymes, co-factors (metals, non-metals, vitamins etc.) through the metabolic pathways (glycolysis, tri carboxylic acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, electron transport chain, etc.) in cellular system. Energy metabolism is also involved in the immune networking of the body for self defence and against pathophysiology. The immune system comprises of different cells and tissues, bioactive molecules for self defence and to fight against diseases. In the recent times, it has been reported through in vivo and in vitro studies that nanoparticles have direct influence on body's immune functions, and can modulate immunity by either suppressing or enhancing it. A comprehensive overview of nanoparticles and its involvement in immune function of the body in normal and pathophysiological conditions has been discussed. Considering these perspectives on nanoparticle interaction another important area which has been highlighted is the biosafety issues which are necessary before therapeutic applications. It is expected that development of physiologically compatible nanoparticles controlling energy metabolic processes, immune functions may show new dimension in the pathophysiology linked with energy and immunity. PMID:27398436

  19. Thyroid function and metabolic state in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Spector, D A; Davis, P J; Helderman, J H; Bell, B; Utiger, R D

    1976-12-01

    Thirty-eight patients with chronic renal insufficiency who were in a dialysis program underwent studies of thyroid function and metabolic status. Mean values for serum total and free thyroxine (T4) concentrations and thyroxine-binding globulin capacity were within normal limits. Although mean serum total triiodothyronine (T3) concentration was normal, 43% of the group had low serum T3 and 54% had low serum free T3 concentrations. Serum thyrotrophin (TSH) concentrations were normal in all but four subjects who had very slight elevations. Metabolic status was assessed by various metabolic tests; mean values for each of these tests were normal, and the clinical index scores indicated that all patients were euthyroid. Results of metabolic testing were similar in patients with low and those with normal serum T3 concentrations. Low serum T3 measurements did not accurately reflect metabolic state in patients with chronic renal failure, whereas serum free T4 and TSH concentrations were reliable indicators of thyroid state.

  20. Metabolic control of puberty onset: new players, new mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Roa, Juan; García-Galiano, David; Castellano, Juan M; Gaytan, Francisco; Pinilla, Leonor; Tena-Sempere, Manuel

    2010-08-01

    Puberty, as the end-point of a complex series of maturational events affecting the components of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, is gated by the state of body energy reserves and sensitive to different metabolic cues; conditions of severe metabolic stress and energy unbalance (from anorexia to morbid obesity) being commonly linked to perturbation of the onset of puberty. In the last two decades, the neuroendocrine mechanisms responsible for the tight coupling between energy homeostasis and puberty onset have begun to be deciphered. These seemingly involve a plethora of metabolic hormones and neuropeptides, which impinge and integrate (mostly) at the hypothalamic centers governing reproduction. Yet, characterization of the mechanisms of action of such regulators (and even their nature and physiological relevance) still remains incomplete. In this review, we will summarize some recent developments in our knowledge of the effects and mechanisms of action of two key metabolic hormones, leptin and ghrelin, in the control of puberty onset. In addition, the roles of the hypothalamic Kiss1 system in the metabolic gating of puberty will be reviewed, with special attention to its regulation by leptin and the recent identification of the putative roles of Crtc1 and mTOR signaling as molecular conduits for the metabolic control of Kiss1 expression. Elucidation of these novel players and regulatory mechanisms will help for a better understanding of the determinants of the timing of puberty, and its eventual alterations in adverse metabolic conditions.

  1. Biological functions of histidine-dipeptides and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Song, Byeng Chun; Joo, Nam-Seok; Aldini, Giancarlo; Yeum, Kyung-Jin

    2014-02-01

    The rapid increase in the prevalence of metabolic syndrome, which is associated with a state of elevated systemic oxidative stress and inflammation, is expected to cause future increases in the prevalence of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids and sugars produces reactive carbonyl species, which, due to their electrophilic nature, react with the nucleophilic sites of certain amino acids. This leads to formation of protein adducts such as advanced glycoxidation/lipoxidation end products (AGEs/ALEs), resulting in cellular dysfunction. Therefore, an effective reactive carbonyl species and AGEs/ALEs sequestering agent may be able to prevent such cellular dysfunction. There is accumulating evidence that histidine containing dipeptides such as carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) and anserine (β-alanyl-methyl-L-histidine) detoxify cytotoxic reactive carbonyls by forming unreactive adducts and are able to reverse glycated protein. In this review, 1) reaction mechanism of oxidative stress and certain chronic diseases, 2) interrelation between oxidative stress and inflammation, 3) effective reactive carbonyl species and AGEs/ALEs sequestering actions of histidine-dipeptides and their metabolism, 4) effects of carnosinase encoding gene on the effectiveness of histidine-dipeptides, and 5) protective effects of histidine-dipeptides against progression of metabolic syndrome are discussed. Overall, this review highlights the potential beneficial effects of histidine-dipeptides against metabolic syndrome. Randomized controlled human studies may provide essential information regarding whether histidine-dipeptides attenuate metabolic syndrome in humans. PMID:24611099

  2. The Tacrolimus Metabolism Rate Influences Renal Function after Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Thölking, Gerold; Fortmann, Christian; Koch, Raphael; Gerth, Hans Ulrich; Pabst, Dirk; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Kabar, Iyad; Hüsing, Anna; Wolters, Heiner

    2014-01-01

    The effective calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) tacrolimus (Tac) is an integral part of the standard immunosuppressive regimen after renal transplantation (RTx). However, as a potent CNI it has nephrotoxic potential leading to impaired renal function in some cases. Therefore, it is of high clinical impact to identify factors which can predict who is endangered to develop CNI toxicity. We hypothesized that the Tac metabolism rate expressed as the blood concentration normalized by the dose (C/D ratio) is such a simple predictor. Therefore, we analyzed the impact of the C/D ratio on kidney function after RTx. Renal function was analyzed 1, 2, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after RTx in 248 patients with an immunosuppressive regimen including basiliximab, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone. According to keep the approach simple, patients were split into three C/D groups: fast, intermediate and slow metabolizers. Notably, compared with slow metabolizers fast metabolizers of Tac showed significantly lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) values at all the time points analyzed. Moreover, fast metabolizers underwent more indication renal biopsies (p = 0.006) which revealed a higher incidence of CNI nephrotoxicity (p = 0.015) and BK nephropathy (p = 0.024) in this group. We herein identified the C/D ratio as an easy calculable risk factor for the development of CNI nephrotoxicity and BK nephropathy after RTx. We propose that the simple C/D ratio should be taken into account early in patient’s risk management strategies. PMID:25340655

  3. The tacrolimus metabolism rate influences renal function after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Thölking, Gerold; Fortmann, Christian; Koch, Raphael; Gerth, Hans Ulrich; Pabst, Dirk; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Kabar, Iyad; Hüsing, Anna; Wolters, Heiner; Reuter, Stefan; Suwelack, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The effective calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) tacrolimus (Tac) is an integral part of the standard immunosuppressive regimen after renal transplantation (RTx). However, as a potent CNI it has nephrotoxic potential leading to impaired renal function in some cases. Therefore, it is of high clinical impact to identify factors which can predict who is endangered to develop CNI toxicity. We hypothesized that the Tac metabolism rate expressed as the blood concentration normalized by the dose (C/D ratio) is such a simple predictor. Therefore, we analyzed the impact of the C/D ratio on kidney function after RTx. Renal function was analyzed 1, 2, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after RTx in 248 patients with an immunosuppressive regimen including basiliximab, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone. According to keep the approach simple, patients were split into three C/D groups: fast, intermediate and slow metabolizers. Notably, compared with slow metabolizers fast metabolizers of Tac showed significantly lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) values at all the time points analyzed. Moreover, fast metabolizers underwent more indication renal biopsies (p = 0.006) which revealed a higher incidence of CNI nephrotoxicity (p = 0.015) and BK nephropathy (p = 0.024) in this group. We herein identified the C/D ratio as an easy calculable risk factor for the development of CNI nephrotoxicity and BK nephropathy after RTx. We propose that the simple C/D ratio should be taken into account early in patient's risk management strategies. PMID:25340655

  4. Dependence of Hippocampal Function on ERRγ Regulated Mitochondrial Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Liming; Mu, Yangling; Leblanc, Mathias; Alaynick, William; Barish, Grant D.; Pankratz, Matthew; Tseng, Tiffany W.; Kaufman, Samantha; Liddle, Christopher; Yu, Ruth T.; Downes, Michael; Pfaff, Samuel L.; Auwerx, Johan; Gage, Fred H.; Evans, Ronald M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Neurons utilize mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) to generate energy essential for survival, function and behavioral output. Unlike most cells that burn both fat and sugar, neurons only burn sugar. Despite its importance, how neurons meet the increased energy demands of complex behaviors such as learning and memory is poorly understood. Here we show that the estrogen related receptor gamma (ERRγ) orchestrates the expression of a distinct neural gene network promoting mitochondrial oxidative metabolism that reflects the extraordinary neuronal dependence on glucose. ERRγ−/− neurons exhibit decreased metabolic capacity. Impairment of long-term potentiation (LTP) in ERRγ−/− hippocampal slices can be fully rescued by the mitochondrial OxPhos substrate pyruvate, functionally linking the ERRγ knockout metabolic phenotype and memory formation. Consistent with this notion, mice lacking neuronal ERRγ in cerebral cortex and hippocampus exhibit defects in spatial learning and memory. These findings implicate neuronal ERRγ in the metabolic adaptations required for memory formation. PMID:25863252

  5. Magnetic resonance and the human brain: anatomy, function and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Talos, I-F; Mian, A Z; Zou, K H; Hsu, L; Goldberg-Zimring, D; Haker, S; Bhagwat, J G; Mulkern, R V

    2006-05-01

    The introduction and development, over the last three decades, of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and MR spectroscopy technology for in vivo studies of the human brain represents a truly remarkable achievement, with enormous scientific and clinical ramifications. These effectively non-invasive techniques allow for studies of the anatomy, the function and the metabolism of the living human brain. They have allowed for new understandings of how the healthy brain works and have provided insights into the mechanisms underlying multiple disease processes which affect the brain. Different MR techniques have been developed for studying anatomy, function and metabolism. The primary focus of this review is to describe these different methodologies and to briefly review how they are being employed to more fully appreciate the intricacies associated with the organ, which most distinctly differentiates the human species from the other animal forms on earth.

  6. Magnetic resonance and the human brain: anatomy, function and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Talos, I-F; Mian, A Z; Zou, K H; Hsu, L; Goldberg-Zimring, D; Haker, S; Bhagwat, J G; Mulkern, R V

    2006-05-01

    The introduction and development, over the last three decades, of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and MR spectroscopy technology for in vivo studies of the human brain represents a truly remarkable achievement, with enormous scientific and clinical ramifications. These effectively non-invasive techniques allow for studies of the anatomy, the function and the metabolism of the living human brain. They have allowed for new understandings of how the healthy brain works and have provided insights into the mechanisms underlying multiple disease processes which affect the brain. Different MR techniques have been developed for studying anatomy, function and metabolism. The primary focus of this review is to describe these different methodologies and to briefly review how they are being employed to more fully appreciate the intricacies associated with the organ, which most distinctly differentiates the human species from the other animal forms on earth. PMID:16568243

  7. A Comparison of the Effects of the GLP-1 Analogue Liraglutide and Insulin Glargine on Endothelial Function and Metabolic Parameters: A Randomized, Controlled Trial Sapporo Athero-Incretin Study 2 (SAIS2)

    PubMed Central

    Nomoto, Hiroshi; Miyoshi, Hideaki; Furumoto, Tomoo; Oba, Koji; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki; Miyoshi, Arina; Kondo, Takuma; Tsuchida, Kenichi; Atsumi, Tatsuya; Manda, Naoki; Kurihara, Yoshio; Aoki, Shin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives GLP-1 improves hyperglycemia, and it has been reported to have favorable effects on atherosclerosis. However, it has not been fully elucidated whether GLP-1 is able to improve endothelial function in patients with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, we investigated the efficacy of the GLP-1 analogue, liraglutide on endothelial function and glycemic metabolism compared with insulin glargine therapy. Materials and Methods In this multicenter, prospective randomized parallel-group comparison study, 31 diabetic outpatients (aged 60.3 ± 10.3 years with HbA1c levels of 8.6 ± 0.8%) with current metformin and/or sulfonylurea treatment were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive liraglutide or glargine therapy once daily for 14 weeks. Flow mediated dilation (FMD), a comprehensive panel of hemodynamic parameters (Task Force Monitor), and serum metabolic markers were assessed before and after the treatment period. Results A greater reduction (worsening) in %FMD was observed in the glargine group, although this change was not statistically different from the liraglutide group (liraglutide; 5.7 to 5.4%, glargine 6.7 to 5.7%). The augmentation index, C-peptide index, derivatives of reactive oxygen metabolites and BMI were significantly improved in the liraglutide group. Central systolic blood pressure and NT-proBNP also tended to be improved in the liraglutide-treated group, while improvements in HbA1c levels were similar between groups. Cardiac index, blood pressure and most other metabolic parameters were not different. Conclusions Regardless of glycemic improvement, early liraglutide therapy did not affect endothelial function but may provide favorable effects on beta-cell function and cardioprotection in type 2 diabetics without advanced atherosclerosis. Trial Registration UMIN Clinical Trials Registry System as trial ID UMIN000005331. PMID:26284918

  8. Controllability in cancer metabolic networks according to drug targets as driver nodes.

    PubMed

    Asgari, Yazdan; Salehzadeh-Yazdi, Ali; Schreiber, Falk; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Networks are employed to represent many nonlinear complex systems in the real world. The topological aspects and relationships between the structure and function of biological networks have been widely studied in the past few decades. However dynamic and control features of complex networks have not been widely researched, in comparison to topological network features. In this study, we explore the relationship between network controllability, topological parameters, and network medicine (metabolic drug targets). Considering the assumption that targets of approved anticancer metabolic drugs are driver nodes (which control cancer metabolic networks), we have applied topological analysis to genome-scale metabolic models of 15 normal and corresponding cancer cell types. The results show that besides primary network parameters, more complex network metrics such as motifs and clusters may also be appropriate for controlling the systems providing the controllability relationship between topological parameters and drug targets. Consequently, this study reveals the possibilities of following a set of driver nodes in network clusters instead of considering them individually according to their centralities. This outcome suggests considering distributed control systems instead of nodal control for cancer metabolic networks, leading to a new strategy in the field of network medicine.

  9. Controllability in Cancer Metabolic Networks According to Drug Targets as Driver Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Asgari, Yazdan; Salehzadeh-Yazdi, Ali; Schreiber, Falk; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Networks are employed to represent many nonlinear complex systems in the real world. The topological aspects and relationships between the structure and function of biological networks have been widely studied in the past few decades. However dynamic and control features of complex networks have not been widely researched, in comparison to topological network features. In this study, we explore the relationship between network controllability, topological parameters, and network medicine (metabolic drug targets). Considering the assumption that targets of approved anticancer metabolic drugs are driver nodes (which control cancer metabolic networks), we have applied topological analysis to genome-scale metabolic models of 15 normal and corresponding cancer cell types. The results show that besides primary network parameters, more complex network metrics such as motifs and clusters may also be appropriate for controlling the systems providing the controllability relationship between topological parameters and drug targets. Consequently, this study reveals the possibilities of following a set of driver nodes in network clusters instead of considering them individually according to their centralities. This outcome suggests considering distributed control systems instead of nodal control for cancer metabolic networks, leading to a new strategy in the field of network medicine. PMID:24282504

  10. Detection of driver metabolites in the human liver metabolic network using structural controllability analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Abnormal states in human liver metabolism are major causes of human liver diseases ranging from hepatitis to hepatic tumor. The accumulation in relevant data makes it feasible to derive a large-scale human liver metabolic network (HLMN) and to discover important biological principles or drug-targets based on network analysis. Some studies have shown that interesting biological phenomenon and drug-targets could be discovered by applying structural controllability analysis (which is a newly prevailed concept in networks) to biological networks. The exploration on the connections between structural controllability theory and the HLMN could be used to uncover valuable information on the human liver metabolism from a fresh perspective. Results We applied structural controllability analysis to the HLMN and detected driver metabolites. The driver metabolites tend to have strong ability to influence the states of other metabolites and weak susceptibility to be influenced by the states of others. In addition, the metabolites were classified into three classes: critical, high-frequency and low-frequency driver metabolites. Among the identified 36 critical driver metabolites, 27 metabolites were found to be essential; the high-frequency driver metabolites tend to participate in different metabolic pathways, which are important in regulating the whole metabolic systems. Moreover, we explored some other possible connections between the structural controllability theory and the HLMN, and find that transport reactions and the environment play important roles in the human liver metabolism. Conclusion There are interesting connections between the structural controllability theory and the human liver metabolism: driver metabolites have essential biological functions; the crucial role of extracellular metabolites and transport reactions in controlling the HLMN highlights the importance of the environment in the health of human liver metabolism. PMID:24885538

  11. New insights on glucosylated lipids: metabolism and functions.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Yohei; Kohyama-Koganeya, Ayako; Hirabayashi, Yoshio

    2013-09-01

    Ceramide, cholesterol, and phosphatidic acid are major basic structures for cell membrane lipids. These lipids are modified with glucose to generate glucosylceramide (GlcCer), cholesterylglucoside (ChlGlc), and phosphatidylglucoside (PtdGlc), respectively. Glucosylation dramatically changes the functional properties of lipids. For instance, ceramide acts as a strong tumor suppressor that causes apoptosis and cell cycle arrest, while GlcCer has an opposite effect, downregulating ceramide activities. All glucosylated lipids are enriched in lipid rafts or microdomains and play fundamental roles in a variety of cellular processes. In this review, we discuss the biological functions and metabolism of these three glucosylated lipids. PMID:23770033

  12. Improvement of erectile function by Korean red ginseng (Panax ginseng) in a male rat model of metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Dae; Kim, Young-Joo; Huh, Jung-Sik; Kim, Sae-Woong; Sohn, Dong-Wan

    2013-01-01

    The seriousness of metabolic syndrome is not due to the disease itself but its promotion of other diseases, such as erectile dysfunction and cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. We investigated the effects of Korean red ginseng (KRG, Panax ginseng) extract on erectile function in a rat model of metabolic syndrome. We divided the rats into three groups: control, metabolic syndrome+normal saline (N/S) and metabolic syndrome+KRG. To determine the occurrence of metabolic syndrome in all groups, body weight and various biochemical parameters (e.g., blood glucose, insulin, cholesterol) were measured, and the intra-abdominal glucose tolerance test was performed. To investigate penile erection, the peak intracavernosal pressure (ICP), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and Masson's trichrome stain were evaluated. Erectile function was also investigated by measuring the cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels of the corpus cavernosum. We found that the various biochemical parameters and body weight were similar in the metabolic syndrome+KRG group and the control group, although the values were slightly higher. The peak ICP/MAP ratio of the metabolic syndrome+N/S group was markedly decreased compared to the other groups. The cGMP level of the corpus cavernosum in the metabolic syndrome+N/S group was significantly lower than that of the other groups. As demonstrated in this model of metabolic syndrome with erectile dysfunction, KRG may improve erectile function. PMID:23377529

  13. [Glucose Metabolism: Stress Hyperglycemia and Glucose Control].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Katsuya; Tsutsumi, Yasuo M

    2016-05-01

    It is important for the anesthesiologists to understand pathophysiology of perioperative stress hyperglycemia, because it offers strategies for treatment of stress hyperglycemia. The effect of glucose tolerance is different in the choice of the anesthetic agent used in daily clinical setting. Specifically, the volatile anesthetics inhibit insulin secretion after glucose load and affects glucose tolerance. During minor surgery by the remifentanil anesthesia, the stress reaction is hard to be induced, suggesting that we should consider low-dose glucose load. Finally it is necessary to perform the glycemic control of the patients who fell into stress hyperglycemia depending on the individual patient. However, there are a lot of questions to be answered in the future. The prognosis of the perioperative patients is more likely to be greatly improved if we can control stress hyperglycemia.

  14. [Glucose Metabolism: Stress Hyperglycemia and Glucose Control].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Katsuya; Tsutsumi, Yasuo M

    2016-05-01

    It is important for the anesthesiologists to understand pathophysiology of perioperative stress hyperglycemia, because it offers strategies for treatment of stress hyperglycemia. The effect of glucose tolerance is different in the choice of the anesthetic agent used in daily clinical setting. Specifically, the volatile anesthetics inhibit insulin secretion after glucose load and affects glucose tolerance. During minor surgery by the remifentanil anesthesia, the stress reaction is hard to be induced, suggesting that we should consider low-dose glucose load. Finally it is necessary to perform the glycemic control of the patients who fell into stress hyperglycemia depending on the individual patient. However, there are a lot of questions to be answered in the future. The prognosis of the perioperative patients is more likely to be greatly improved if we can control stress hyperglycemia. PMID:27319094

  15. Metabolic control in a state of decreased activation: modulation of red cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Jevning, R; Wilson, A F; Pirkle, H; O'Halloran, J P; Walsh, R N

    1983-11-01

    Very little is known in depth of the biochemical and physiological changes induced at the cellular level by human behavioral states. For study of the physiology of behavior at this level, the erythrocyte may be useful, because it is readily available and its metabolism and metabolic control are comparatively well understood. In this report we describe a marked decline of red cell glycolytic rate induced by the transcendental meditation technique (TM). This decline was significantly correlated with decreased plasma lactate concentration and with relaxation as indicated by electrodermal response. The occurrence of sleep was not correlated with the metabolic changes. The observed lack of variation of blood pH, blood gases, glucose, and hematocrit in this behavior implies that the decrease of erythrocyte metabolism is not an epiphenomenon of respiratory change or substrate availability. Based upon further measurements indicating persisting alteration of the red blood cell, we suggest the possibility of attachment of a humoral agent(s) to the cell in the mechanism of this effect. This behavioral effect is unique, and the effector(s) responsible may increase our understanding of metabolic control of the erythrocyte and of TM.

  16. Sialic acid metabolism and sialyltransferases: natural functions and applications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanhong

    2012-01-01

    Sialic acids are a family of negatively charged monosaccharides which are commonly presented as the terminal residues in glycans of the glycoconjugates on eukaryotic cell surface or as components of capsular polysaccharides or lipooligosaccharides of some pathogenic bacteria. Due to their important biological and pathological functions, the biosynthesis, activation, transfer, breaking down, and recycle of sialic acids are attracting increasing attention. The understanding of the sialic acid metabolism in eukaryotes and bacteria leads to the development of metabolic engineering approaches for elucidating the important functions of sialic acid in mammalian systems and for large-scale production of sialosides using engineered bacterial cells. As the key enzymes in biosynthesis of sialylated structures, sialyltransferases have been continuously identified from various sources and characterized. Protein crystal structures of seven sialyltransferases have been reported. Wild-type sialyltransferases and their mutants have been applied with or without other sialoside biosynthetic enzymes for producing complex sialic acid-containing oligosaccharides and glycoconjugates. This mini-review focuses on current understanding and applications of sialic acid metabolism and sialyltransferases. PMID:22526796

  17. Sphingosine 1-phosphate in blood: function, metabolism, and fate.

    PubMed

    Thuy, Andreas V; Reimann, Christina-Maria; Hemdan, Nasr Y A; Gräler, Markus H

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a lipid metabolite and a ligand of five G protein-coupled cell surface receptors S1PR1 to S1PR5. These receptors are expressed on various cells and cell types of the immune, cardiovascular, respiratory, hepatic, reproductive, and neurologic systems, and S1P has an impact on many different pathophysiological conditions including autoimmune, cardiovascular, and neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, deafness, osteogenesis, and reproduction. While these diverse signalling properties of S1P have been extensively reviewed, the particular role of S1P in blood is still a matter of debate. Blood contains the highest S1P concentration of all body compartments, and several questions are still not sufficiently answered: Where does it come from and how is it metabolized? Why is the concentration of S1P in blood so high? Are minor changes of the high blood S1P concentrations physiologically relevant? Do blood cells and vascular endothelial cells that are constantly exposed to high blood S1P levels still respond to S1P via S1P receptors? Recent data reveal new insights into the functional role and the metabolic fate of blood-borne S1P. This review aims to summarize our current knowledge regarding the source, secretion, transportation, function, metabolism, and fate of S1P in blood. PMID:24977489

  18. Brain glycogen—new perspectives on its metabolic function and regulation at the subcellular level

    PubMed Central

    Obel, Linea F.; Müller, Margit S.; Walls, Anne B.; Sickmann, Helle M.; Bak, Lasse K.; Waagepetersen, Helle S.; Schousboe, Arne

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen is a complex glucose polymer found in a variety of tissues, including brain, where it is localized primarily in astrocytes. The small quantity found in brain compared to e.g., liver has led to the understanding that brain glycogen is merely used during hypoglycemia or ischemia. In this review evidence is brought forward highlighting what has been an emerging understanding in brain energy metabolism: that glycogen is more than just a convenient way to store energy for use in emergencies—it is a highly dynamic molecule with versatile implications in brain function, i.e., synaptic activity and memory formation. In line with the great spatiotemporal complexity of the brain and thereof derived focus on the basis for ensuring the availability of the right amount of energy at the right time and place, we here encourage a closer look into the molecular and subcellular mechanisms underlying glycogen metabolism. Based on (1) the compartmentation of the interconnected second messenger pathways controlling glycogen metabolism (calcium and cAMP), (2) alterations in the subcellular location of glycogen-associated enzymes and proteins induced by the metabolic status and (3) a sequential component in the intermolecular mechanisms of glycogen metabolism, we suggest that glycogen metabolism in astrocytes is compartmentalized at the subcellular level. As a consequence, the meaning and importance of conventional terms used to describe glycogen metabolism (e.g., turnover) is challenged. Overall, this review represents an overview of contemporary knowledge about brain glycogen and its metabolism and function. However, it also has a sharp focus on what we do not know, which is perhaps even more important for the future quest of uncovering the roles of glycogen in brain physiology and pathology. PMID:22403540

  19. Brain glycogen-new perspectives on its metabolic function and regulation at the subcellular level.

    PubMed

    Obel, Linea F; Müller, Margit S; Walls, Anne B; Sickmann, Helle M; Bak, Lasse K; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Schousboe, Arne

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen is a complex glucose polymer found in a variety of tissues, including brain, where it is localized primarily in astrocytes. The small quantity found in brain compared to e.g., liver has led to the understanding that brain glycogen is merely used during hypoglycemia or ischemia. In this review evidence is brought forward highlighting what has been an emerging understanding in brain energy metabolism: that glycogen is more than just a convenient way to store energy for use in emergencies-it is a highly dynamic molecule with versatile implications in brain function, i.e., synaptic activity and memory formation. In line with the great spatiotemporal complexity of the brain and thereof derived focus on the basis for ensuring the availability of the right amount of energy at the right time and place, we here encourage a closer look into the molecular and subcellular mechanisms underlying glycogen metabolism. Based on (1) the compartmentation of the interconnected second messenger pathways controlling glycogen metabolism (calcium and cAMP), (2) alterations in the subcellular location of glycogen-associated enzymes and proteins induced by the metabolic status and (3) a sequential component in the intermolecular mechanisms of glycogen metabolism, we suggest that glycogen metabolism in astrocytes is compartmentalized at the subcellular level. As a consequence, the meaning and importance of conventional terms used to describe glycogen metabolism (e.g., turnover) is challenged. Overall, this review represents an overview of contemporary knowledge about brain glycogen and its metabolism and function. However, it also has a sharp focus on what we do not know, which is perhaps even more important for the future quest of uncovering the roles of glycogen in brain physiology and pathology.

  20. Functional foods as potential therapeutic options for metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brown, L; Poudyal, H; Panchal, S K

    2015-11-01

    Obesity as part of metabolic syndrome is a major lifestyle disorder throughout the world. Current drug treatments for obesity produce small and usually unsustainable decreases in body weight with the risk of major adverse effects. Surgery has been the only treatment producing successful long-term weight loss. As a different but complementary approach, lifestyle modification including the use of functional foods could produce a reliable decrease in obesity with decreased comorbidities. Functional foods may include fruits such as berries, vegetables, fibre-enriched grains and beverages such as tea and coffee. Although health improvements continue to be reported for these functional foods in rodent studies, further evidence showing the translation of these results into humans is required. Thus, the concept that these fruits and vegetables will act as functional foods in humans to reduce obesity and thereby improve health remains intuitive and possible rather than proven. PMID:26345360

  1. Functional foods as potential therapeutic options for metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brown, L; Poudyal, H; Panchal, S K

    2015-11-01

    Obesity as part of metabolic syndrome is a major lifestyle disorder throughout the world. Current drug treatments for obesity produce small and usually unsustainable decreases in body weight with the risk of major adverse effects. Surgery has been the only treatment producing successful long-term weight loss. As a different but complementary approach, lifestyle modification including the use of functional foods could produce a reliable decrease in obesity with decreased comorbidities. Functional foods may include fruits such as berries, vegetables, fibre-enriched grains and beverages such as tea and coffee. Although health improvements continue to be reported for these functional foods in rodent studies, further evidence showing the translation of these results into humans is required. Thus, the concept that these fruits and vegetables will act as functional foods in humans to reduce obesity and thereby improve health remains intuitive and possible rather than proven.

  2. Triacylglycerol Metabolism, Function, and Accumulation in Plant Vegetative Tissues.

    PubMed

    Xu, Changcheng; Shanklin, John

    2016-04-29

    Oils in the form of triacylglycerols are the most abundant energy-dense storage compounds in eukaryotes, and their metabolism plays a key role in cellular energy balance, lipid homeostasis, growth, and maintenance. Plants accumulate oils primarily in seeds and fruits. Plant oils are used for food and feed and, increasingly, as feedstocks for biodiesel and industrial chemicals. Although plant vegetative tissues do not accumulate significant levels of triacylglycerols, they possess a high capacity for their synthesis, storage, and metabolism. The development of plants that accumulate oil in vegetative tissues presents an opportunity for expanded production of triacylglycerols as a renewable and sustainable bioenergy source. Here, we review recent progress in the understanding of triacylglycerol synthesis, turnover, storage, and function in leaves and discuss emerging genetic engineering strategies targeted at enhancing triacylglycerol accumulation in biomass crops. Such plants could potentially be modified to produce oleochemical feedstocks or nutraceuticals. PMID:26845499

  3. The human NAD metabolome: Functions, metabolism and compartmentalization

    PubMed Central

    Nikiforov, Andrey; Kulikova, Veronika; Ziegler, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The metabolism of NAD has emerged as a key regulator of cellular and organismal homeostasis. Being a major component of both bioenergetic and signaling pathways, the molecule is ideally suited to regulate metabolism and major cellular events. In humans, NAD is synthesized from vitamin B3 precursors, most prominently from nicotinamide, which is the degradation product of all NAD-dependent signaling reactions. The scope of NAD-mediated regulatory processes is wide including enzyme regulation, control of gene expression and health span, DNA repair, cell cycle regulation and calcium signaling. In these processes, nicotinamide is cleaved from NAD+ and the remaining ADP-ribosyl moiety used to modify proteins (deacetylation by sirtuins or ADP-ribosylation) or to generate calcium-mobilizing agents such as cyclic ADP-ribose. This review will also emphasize the role of the intermediates in the NAD metabolome, their intra- and extra-cellular conversions and potential contributions to subcellular compartmentalization of NAD pools. PMID:25837229

  4. Physiology and genetics of metabolic flux control in Zymomonas mobilis

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, T.

    1992-01-01

    This work seeks to understand the role of gene expression in regulating glycolytic enzyme synthesis in a balance that allows proper glycoltic flux control. The seven genes targeted for study in this laboratory have been cloned and sequenced, and molecular details of regulation have been investigated. Clear that glycolytic enzyme synthesis is coordinated to prevent the build up of toxic metabolic intermediates. The genetic mechanisms responsible for regulating balanced expression of the EntnerDoudoroff and glycolytic genes in Z. mobilis are beginning to be understood. Several layers of genetic control, perhaps in a hierarchal arrangement act in concert to determine the relative abundance of the glycolytic enzymes. These genetic controls involve differential translational efficiency, highly conserved promoter sequences, transcription factors, differential mRNA stabilities, and nucleolytic mRNA processing. The serendipitous cloning of the glucose facilitator, glf, as a result of linkage to several other genes of interest will have a significant impact on the study of Z. mobilis metabolism. The glucose facilitator is being characterized in a genetically reconstituted system in E. coli. Molecular genetic studies indicate that the ratio of glf expression to that of glk, zmf, and edd is carefully regulated, and suggests a critical role in metabolic control. Regulation of glycolytic gene expression is now sufficiently well understood to allow use of the glycolytic genes as tools to manipulate specified enzyme levels for the purpose of analyzing metabolic flux control. The critical genes have been subcloned for stable expression in Z. mobilis and placed under control of a regulated promoter system involving the tac promoter, the lacI repressor, and gene induction in by IPTG. HPLC methods have been developed that allow quantitation of virtually all of the metabolic intermediates in the cell pool.

  5. Akt-mTORC1 signaling regulates Acly to integrate metabolic input to control of macrophage activation

    PubMed Central

    Covarrubias, Anthony J; Aksoylar, Halil Ibrahim; Yu, Jiujiu; Snyder, Nathaniel W; Worth, Andrew J; Iyer, Shankar S; Wang, Jiawei; Ben-Sahra, Issam; Byles, Vanessa; Polynne-Stapornkul, Tiffany; Espinosa, Erika C; Lamming, Dudley; Manning, Brendan D; Zhang, Yijing; Blair, Ian A; Horng, Tiffany

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage activation/polarization to distinct functional states is critically supported by metabolic shifts. How polarizing signals coordinate metabolic and functional reprogramming, and the potential implications for control of macrophage activation, remains poorly understood. Here we show that IL-4 signaling co-opts the Akt-mTORC1 pathway to regulate Acly, a key enzyme in Ac-CoA synthesis, leading to increased histone acetylation and M2 gene induction. Only a subset of M2 genes is controlled in this way, including those regulating cellular proliferation and chemokine production. Moreover, metabolic signals impinge on the Akt-mTORC1 axis for such control of M2 activation. We propose that Akt-mTORC1 signaling calibrates metabolic state to energetically demanding aspects of M2 activation, which may define a new role for metabolism in supporting macrophage activation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11612.001 PMID:26894960

  6. Metabolic Control Analysis: A Tool for Designing Strategies to Manipulate Metabolic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Saavedra, Emma; Rodríguez-Enríquez, Sara; Olín-Sandoval, Viridiana

    2008-01-01

    The traditional experimental approaches used for changing the flux or the concentration of a particular metabolite of a metabolic pathway have been mostly based on the inhibition or over-expression of the presumed rate-limiting step. However, the attempts to manipulate a metabolic pathway by following such approach have proved to be unsuccessful. Metabolic Control Analysis (MCA) establishes how to determine, quantitatively, the degree of control that a given enzyme exerts on flux and on the concentration of metabolites, thus substituting the intuitive, qualitative concept of rate limiting step. Moreover, MCA helps to understand (i) the underlying mechanisms by which a given enzyme exerts high or low control and (ii) why the control of the pathway is shared by several pathway enzymes and transporters. By applying MCA it is possible to identify the steps that should be modified to achieve a successful alteration of flux or metabolite concentration in pathways of biotechnological (e.g., large scale metabolite production) or clinical relevance (e.g., drug therapy). The different MCA experimental approaches developed for the determination of the flux-control distribution in several pathways are described. Full understanding of the pathway properties when is working under a variety of conditions can help to attain a successful manipulation of flux and metabolite concentration. PMID:18629230

  7. From Elements to Metabolism: Linking Organismal Stoichiometry to Ecosystem Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, M. J.; Nifong, R. L.

    2014-12-01

    Metabolism is an integrative metric of ecosystem function and energetics, synthesizing the relative contributions of multiple inputs, processes, and interactions. Stoichiometry is a framework based on elemental ratios for understanding how organisms interact within ecosystems. Linking the two has the potential to yield fresh insight about how ecosystems utilize elements and energy. We sought to quantify the link between the stoichiometry of ecosystem metabolism, specifically the C:N:P ratios of integrated autotrophic assimilation, and the stoichiometric tissue ratios observed in the dominant autotrophs. Using high frequency in situ nutrient sensors we estimated the assimilatory fluxes of C, N, and P in multiple spring-fed rivers of varying autotrophic species composition. We measured autotroph cover in each spring river, collected composite vegetation samples, and evaluated tissue stoichiometry; as expected, we observed large differences in C:N and N:P between algal and vascular plant taxa. We observed associations between measured tissue stoichiometry and elemental ratios at the ecosystem scale, suggesting that aggregated assimilatory fluxes may be useful for partitioning primary production and linking organismal nutrient content to the stoichiometry of ecosystem metabolism.

  8. Ongoing resolution of duplicate gene functions shapes the diversification of a metabolic network

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Meihua Christina; Hutchins, Paul D; Russell, Jason D; Coon, Joshua J; Hittinger, Chris Todd

    2016-01-01

    The evolutionary mechanisms leading to duplicate gene retention are well understood, but the long-term impacts of paralog differentiation on the regulation of metabolism remain underappreciated. Here we experimentally dissect the functions of two pairs of ancient paralogs of the GALactose sugar utilization network in two yeast species. We show that the Saccharomyces uvarum network is more active, even as over-induction is prevented by a second co-repressor that the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacks. Surprisingly, removal of this repression system leads to a strong growth arrest, likely due to overly rapid galactose catabolism and metabolic overload. Alternative sugars, such as fructose, circumvent metabolic control systems and exacerbate this phenotype. We further show that S. cerevisiae experiences homologous metabolic constraints that are subtler due to how the paralogs have diversified. These results show how the functional differentiation of paralogs continues to shape regulatory network architectures and metabolic strategies long after initial preservation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19027.001 PMID:27690225

  9. Discrete Functions of Nuclear Receptor Rev-erbα Couple Metabolism to the Clock

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuxiang; Fang, Bin; Emmett, Matthew J.; Damle, Manashree; Sun, Zheng; Feng, Dan; Armour, Sean M.; Remsberg, Jarrett R.; Jager, Jennifer; Soccio, Raymond E.; Steger, David J.; Lazar, Mitchell A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Circadian and metabolic physiology are intricately intertwined, as illustrated by Rev-erbα, a transcription factor (TF) that functions both as a core repressive component of the cell autonomous clock and as a regulator of metabolic genes. Here we show that Rev-erbα modulates the clock and metabolism by different genomic mechanisms. Clock control requires Rev-erbα to bind directly to the genome at its cognate sites, where it competes with activating ROR TFs. By contrast, Rev-erbα regulates metabolic genes primarily by recruiting the HDAC3 corepressor to sites to which it is tethered by cell type-specific transcription factors. Thus, direct competition between Rev-erbα and ROR TFs provides a universal mechanism for self-sustained control of molecular clock across all tissues, whereas Rev-erbα utilizes lineage-determining factors to convey a tissue-specific epigenomic rhythm that regulates metabolism tailored to the specific need of that tissue. PMID:26044300

  10. Feed Your Head: Neurodevelopmental Control of Feeding and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Daniel A.; Blackshaw, Seth

    2014-01-01

    During critical periods of development early in life, excessive or scarce nutritional environments can disrupt the development of central feeding and metabolic neural circuitry, leading to obesity and metabolic disorders in adulthood. A better understanding of the genetic networks that control the development of feeding and metabolic neural circuits, along with knowledge of how and where dietary signals disrupt this process, can serve as the basis for future therapies aimed at reversing the public health crisis that is now building as a result of the global obesity epidemic. This review of animal and human studies highlights recent insights into the molecular mechanisms that regulate the development of central feeding circuitries, the mechanisms by which gestational and early postnatal nutritional status affects this process, and approaches aimed at counteracting the deleterious effects of early over- and underfeeding. PMID:24274739

  11. Metabolic control of the Treg/Th17 axis

    PubMed Central

    Barbi, Joseph; Pardoll, Drew; Pan, Fan

    2012-01-01

    Summary The interplay of the immune system with other aspects of physiology is continually being revealed and in some cases studied in considerable mechanistic detail. A prime example is the influence of metabolic cues on immune responses. It is well appreciated that upon activation, T cells take on a metabolic profile profoundly distinct from that of their quiescent and anergic counterparts; however, a number of recent breakthroughs have greatly expanded our knowledge of how aspects of cellular metabolism can shape a T-cell response. Particularly important are findings that certain environmental cues can tilt the delicate balance between inflammation and immune tolerance by skewing T-cell fate decisions toward either the T-helper 17 (Th17) or T-regulatory (Treg) cell lineage. Recognizing the unappreciated immune modifying potential of metabolic factors and particularly those involved in the generation of these functionally opposing T-cell subsets will likely add new and potent therapies to our repertoire for treating immune mediated pathologies. In this review, we summarize and discuss recent findings linking certain metabolic pathways, enzymes, and byproducts to shifts in the balance between Th17 and Treg cell populations. These advances highlight numerous opportunities for immune modulation. PMID:23405895

  12. The effect of ozone inhalation on metabolic functioning of vascular endothelium and on ventilatory function

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, K.B.; White, H.J.; Sargent, N.E. )

    1991-06-15

    The primary purpose of this research was to determine the effect of ozone inhalation on pulmonary vascular endothelium. Male Fischer-344 rats were exposed to 0.5 or 0.7 ppm ozone, 20 hr/day for 7 days. Lungs were excised and perfused with Krebs medium containing (14C)serotonin or (14C)hippurylhistidylleucine (HHL). When compared to controls, the animals exposed to the lower ozone concentration showed no statistically significant changes in serotonin removal. In contrast, the higher ozone concentration resulted in a 32% decrease (p less than 0.0001) in serotonin removal, but had no effect on HHL. Rats similarly exposed to 0.7 ppm ozone but allowed to recover for 14 days in clean air showed no decrease in serotonin removal compared to their controls. Animals exposed sequentially to 0.5 ppm ozone for 7 days and then to 0.7 ppm for 7 days showed no alteration in serotonin metabolism, suggesting the development of tolerance initiated by the lower dose. After 7 days exposure to 0.7 ppm ozone, lung ventilatory function measurements revealed small though significant decreases in several parameters. Electron microscopic evaluation of lung capillary endothelium from animals exposed to the 0.7 ppm ozone showed no changes. Positive control animals exposed to greater than 95% oxygen, 20 hr/day for 2 days showed a 23% decrease in serotonin removal (p less than 0.03) and a 12% decrease in HHL removal (p less than 0.017). These studies indicate that inhalation of ozone can induce functional alterations in the lung endothelium, and that this effect occurs at a dosage of ozone that produces minimal ventilatory changes and no observable endothelial ultrastructural changes.

  13. mTOR, metabolism, and the regulation of T-cell differentiation and function

    PubMed Central

    Waickman, Adam T; Powell, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Upon antigen recognition, naive T cells undergo rapid expansion and activation. The energy requirements for this expansion are formidable, and T-cell activation is accompanied by dramatic changes in cellular metabolism. Furthermore, the outcome of antigen engagement is guided by multiple cues derived from the immune microenvironment. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is emerging as a central integrator of these signals playing a critical role in driving T-cell differentiation and function. Indeed, multiple metabolic programs are controlled by mTOR signaling. In this review, we discuss the role of mTOR in regulating metabolism and how these pathways intersect with the ability of mTOR to integrate cues that guide the outcome of T-cell receptor engagement. PMID:22889214

  14. The Role of Metabolic Surgery on Blood Pressure Control.

    PubMed

    Schiavon, Carlos Aurelio; Drager, Luciano F; Bortolotto, Luiz A; Amodeo, Celso; Ikeoka, Dimas; Berwanger, Otávio; Cohen, Ricardo Vitor

    2016-08-01

    Obesity and hypertension are growing epidemics in the modern world. Lifestyle changes and medical treatment for obesity have disappointing long-term results and albeit drugs for hypertension are usually very effective, the necessity of multiple pills and frequent side effects make the adherence to treatment a huge challenge for healthcare systems. Bariatric/metabolic surgery is a very effective treatment and an exponential number of studies have been showing its positive impact beyond weight loss, mainly on type 2 diabetes. There is also growing evidence suggesting that bariatric/metabolic surgery is associated with reduced incidence of cardiovascular events, but the impact on hypertension and other components of metabolic syndrome usually derive from trials' secondary end points. Taking this limitation in mind, bariatric/metabolic surgery action on blood pressure is reaching a significant proportion of hypertension resolution or improvement. In this review, we discussed the current evidence on the impact of bariatric/metabolic surgery on blood pressure control and pointed out perspectives in this research area. PMID:27324638

  15. Control of Metabolic Homeostasis by Stress Signaling Is Mediated by the Lipocalin NLaz

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Diego; Walker, David W.; Benzer, Seymour; Ganfornina, Maria D.; Jasper, Heinrich

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic homeostasis in metazoans is regulated by endocrine control of insulin/IGF signaling (IIS) activity. Stress and inflammatory signaling pathways—such as Jun-N-terminal Kinase (JNK) signaling—repress IIS, curtailing anabolic processes to promote stress tolerance and extend lifespan. While this interaction constitutes an adaptive response that allows managing energy resources under stress conditions, excessive JNK activity in adipose tissue of vertebrates has been found to cause insulin resistance, promoting type II diabetes. Thus, the interaction between JNK and IIS has to be tightly regulated to ensure proper metabolic adaptation to environmental challenges. Here, we identify a new regulatory mechanism by which JNK influences metabolism systemically. We show that JNK signaling is required for metabolic homeostasis in flies and that this function is mediated by the Drosophila Lipocalin family member Neural Lazarillo (NLaz), a homologue of vertebrate Apolipoprotein D (ApoD) and Retinol Binding Protein 4 (RBP4). Lipocalins are emerging as central regulators of peripheral insulin sensitivity and have been implicated in metabolic diseases. NLaz is transcriptionally regulated by JNK signaling and is required for JNK-mediated stress and starvation tolerance. Loss of NLaz function reduces stress resistance and lifespan, while its over-expression represses growth, promotes stress tolerance and extends lifespan—phenotypes that are consistent with reduced IIS activity. Accordingly, we find that NLaz represses IIS activity in larvae and adult flies. Our results show that JNK-NLaz signaling antagonizes IIS and is critical for metabolic adaptation of the organism to environmental challenges. The JNK pathway and Lipocalins are structurally and functionally conserved, suggesting that similar interactions represent an evolutionarily conserved system for the control of metabolic homeostasis. PMID:19390610

  16. Control of metabolic homeostasis by stress signaling is mediated by the lipocalin NLaz.

    PubMed

    Hull-Thompson, Julie; Muffat, Julien; Sanchez, Diego; Walker, David W; Benzer, Seymour; Ganfornina, Maria D; Jasper, Heinrich

    2009-04-01

    Metabolic homeostasis in metazoans is regulated by endocrine control of insulin/IGF signaling (IIS) activity. Stress and inflammatory signaling pathways--such as Jun-N-terminal Kinase (JNK) signaling--repress IIS, curtailing anabolic processes to promote stress tolerance and extend lifespan. While this interaction constitutes an adaptive response that allows managing energy resources under stress conditions, excessive JNK activity in adipose tissue of vertebrates has been found to cause insulin resistance, promoting type II diabetes. Thus, the interaction between JNK and IIS has to be tightly regulated to ensure proper metabolic adaptation to environmental challenges. Here, we identify a new regulatory mechanism by which JNK influences metabolism systemically. We show that JNK signaling is required for metabolic homeostasis in flies and that this function is mediated by the Drosophila Lipocalin family member Neural Lazarillo (NLaz), a homologue of vertebrate Apolipoprotein D (ApoD) and Retinol Binding Protein 4 (RBP4). Lipocalins are emerging as central regulators of peripheral insulin sensitivity and have been implicated in metabolic diseases. NLaz is transcriptionally regulated by JNK signaling and is required for JNK-mediated stress and starvation tolerance. Loss of NLaz function reduces stress resistance and lifespan, while its over-expression represses growth, promotes stress tolerance and extends lifespan--phenotypes that are consistent with reduced IIS activity. Accordingly, we find that NLaz represses IIS activity in larvae and adult flies. Our results show that JNK-NLaz signaling antagonizes IIS and is critical for metabolic adaptation of the organism to environmental challenges. The JNK pathway and Lipocalins are structurally and functionally conserved, suggesting that similar interactions represent an evolutionarily conserved system for the control of metabolic homeostasis.

  17. Physical, metabolic and developmental functions of the seed coat

    PubMed Central

    Radchuk, Volodymyr; Borisjuk, Ljudmilla

    2014-01-01

    The conventional understanding of the role of the seed coat is that it provides a protective layer for the developing zygote. Recent data show that the picture is more nuanced. The seed coat certainly represents a first line of defense against adverse external factors, but it also acts as channel for transmitting environmental cues to the interior of the seed. The latter function primes the seed to adjust its metabolism in response to changes in its external environment. The purpose of this review is to provide the reader with a comprehensive view of the structure and functionality of the seed coat, and to expose its hidden interaction with both the endosperm and embryo. Any breeding and/or biotechnology intervention seeking to increase seed size or modify seed features will have to consider the implications on this tripartite interaction. PMID:25346737

  18. Artificial cells for replacement of metabolic organ functions.

    PubMed

    Chang, Thomas Ming Swi

    2003-05-01

    Artificial cells are being actively investigated for use in the replacement of cell and organ functions, especially related to metabolic functions. The earliest routine clinical use of artificial cells is in the form of coated activated charcoal for hemoperfusion. Implantation of encapsulated cells are being studied for the treatment of diabetes, liver failure, kidney failure and the use of encapsulated genetically engineered cells for gene therapy. Blood substitutes based on modified hemoglobin are already in Phase III clinical trials in patients with as much as 20 units infused into each patient during trauma surgery. Artificial cells containing enzymes are being developed for clinical trial in hereditary enzyme deficiency diseases and other diseases. Artificial cell is also being investigated for drug delivery and for other uses in biotechnology, chemical engineering and medicine.

  19. Aflatoxicosis alters avian renal function, calcium, and vitamin D metabolism.

    PubMed

    Glahn, R P; Beers, K W; Bottje, W G; Wideman, R F; Huff, W E; Thomas, W

    1991-11-01

    Experiments were designed to determine the effects of aflatoxicosis on avian renal function, calcium (CA), inorganic phosphorous (Pi), and vitamin D metabolism, and to determine if the effects of aflatoxin are reversible upon discontinuation of toxin administration. Three-week-old male broiler chickens (n = 12 per treatment) received aflatoxin (AF; 2 mg/kg po) or an equal volume of corn oil, the AF carrier vehicle, for 10 consecutive days. After 10 d of treatment, half of the birds from each treatment group were anesthetized and prepared for renal function analysis, which included a 2-h phosphate loading period. Ten days after discontinuation of AF treatment, the remaining birds in each treatment group were anesthetized and prepared for renal function analysis. AF decreased plasma 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D] and 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D [1,25(OH)2D] levels after 5 d of treatment. After 10 d of treatment, urine flow rate (V), fractional sodium excretion (FENa), and fractional potassium excretion (FEK) were lower in AF-treated birds. In addition, total plasma Ca tended to be lower (p = .10) and fractional Ca excretion (FECa) tended to be higher (p = .10) in the AF-treated birds. Intravenous phosphate loading produced a sharp increase in urine hydrogen ion concentration ([H+]) in the AF-treated birds. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was reduced and plasma osmolality was increased in AF-treated birds 10 d after discontinuation of toxin administration. The results indicate that AF directly or indirectly affects Ca and Pi metabolism in avians. At the present time, the effects may be related to altered vitamin D and parathyroid hormone (PTH) metabolism. Aflatoxicosis may decrease endogenous PTH synthesis and the renal sensitivity to PTH. The AF-related increase in urine [H+] during phosphate loading is probably due to increased Na+/H+ counterport, suggesting that AF stimulates sodium reabsorption. Also, the decrease in GFR exhibited 10 d after toxin removal indicates

  20. Intraspecific variation in flight metabolic rate in the bumblebee Bombus impatiens: repeatability and functional determinants in workers and drones.

    PubMed

    Darveau, Charles-A; Billardon, Fannie; Bélanger, Kasandra

    2014-02-15

    The evolution of flight energetics requires that phenotypes be variable, repeatable and heritable. We studied intraspecific variation in flight energetics in order to assess the repeatability of flight metabolic rate and wingbeat frequency, as well as the functional basis of phenotypic variation in workers and drones of the bumblebee species Bombus impatiens. We showed that flight metabolic rate and wingbeat frequency were highly repeatable in workers, even when controlling for body mass variation using residual analysis. We did not detect significant repeatability in drones, but a smaller range of variation might have prevented us from finding significant values in our sample. Based on our results and previous findings, we associated the high repeatability of flight phenotypes in workers to the functional links between body mass, thorax mass, wing size, wingbeat frequency and metabolic rate. Moreover, differences between workers and drones were as predicted from these functional associations, where drones had larger wings for their size, lower wingbeat frequency and lower flight metabolic rate. We also investigated thoracic muscle metabolic phenotypes by measuring the activity of carbohydrate metabolism enzymes, and we found positive correlations between mass-independent metabolic rate and the activity of all enzymes measured, but in workers only. When comparing workers and drones that differ in flight metabolic rate, only the activity of the enzymes hexokinase and trehalase showed the predicted differences. Overall, our study indicates that there should be correlated evolution among physiological phenotypes at multiple levels of organization and morphological traits associated with flight.

  1. Intraspecific variation in flight metabolic rate in the bumblebee Bombus impatiens: repeatability and functional determinants in workers and drones.

    PubMed

    Darveau, Charles-A; Billardon, Fannie; Bélanger, Kasandra

    2014-02-15

    The evolution of flight energetics requires that phenotypes be variable, repeatable and heritable. We studied intraspecific variation in flight energetics in order to assess the repeatability of flight metabolic rate and wingbeat frequency, as well as the functional basis of phenotypic variation in workers and drones of the bumblebee species Bombus impatiens. We showed that flight metabolic rate and wingbeat frequency were highly repeatable in workers, even when controlling for body mass variation using residual analysis. We did not detect significant repeatability in drones, but a smaller range of variation might have prevented us from finding significant values in our sample. Based on our results and previous findings, we associated the high repeatability of flight phenotypes in workers to the functional links between body mass, thorax mass, wing size, wingbeat frequency and metabolic rate. Moreover, differences between workers and drones were as predicted from these functional associations, where drones had larger wings for their size, lower wingbeat frequency and lower flight metabolic rate. We also investigated thoracic muscle metabolic phenotypes by measuring the activity of carbohydrate metabolism enzymes, and we found positive correlations between mass-independent metabolic rate and the activity of all enzymes measured, but in workers only. When comparing workers and drones that differ in flight metabolic rate, only the activity of the enzymes hexokinase and trehalase showed the predicted differences. Overall, our study indicates that there should be correlated evolution among physiological phenotypes at multiple levels of organization and morphological traits associated with flight. PMID:24198266

  2. Sequence- and Structure-Based Functional Annotation and Assessment of Metabolic Transporters in Aspergillus oryzae: A Representative Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Raethong, Nachon; Wong-ekkabut, Jirasak; Laoteng, Kobkul; Vongsangnak, Wanwipa

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus oryzae is widely used for the industrial production of enzymes. In A. oryzae metabolism, transporters appear to play crucial roles in controlling the flux of molecules for energy generation, nutrients delivery, and waste elimination in the cell. While the A. oryzae genome sequence is available, transporter annotation remains limited and thus the connectivity of metabolic networks is incomplete. In this study, we developed a metabolic annotation strategy to understand the relationship between the sequence, structure, and function for annotation of A. oryzae metabolic transporters. Sequence-based analysis with manual curation showed that 58 genes of 12,096 total genes in the A. oryzae genome encoded metabolic transporters. Under consensus integrative databases, 55 unambiguous metabolic transporter genes were distributed into channels and pores (7 genes), electrochemical potential-driven transporters (33 genes), and primary active transporters (15 genes). To reveal the transporter functional role, a combination of homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulation was implemented to assess the relationship between sequence to structure and structure to function. As in the energy metabolism of A. oryzae, the H+-ATPase encoded by the AO090005000842 gene was selected as a representative case study of multilevel linkage annotation. Our developed strategy can be used for enhancing metabolic network reconstruction. PMID:27274991

  3. Muscle metabolic function and free-living physical activity.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Gary R; Larson-Meyer, D Enette; Sirikul, Bovorn; Newcomer, Bradley R

    2006-11-01

    We have previously shown that muscle metabolic function measured during exercise is related to exercise performance and subsequent 1-yr weight gain. Because it is well established that physical activity is important in weight maintenance, we examined muscle function relationships with free-living energy expenditure and physical activity. Subjects were 71 premenopausal black and white women. Muscle metabolism was evaluated by (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy during 90-s isometric plantar flexion contractions (45% maximum). Free-living energy expenditure (TEE) was measured using doubly labeled water, activity-related energy expenditure (AEE) was calculated as 0.9 x TEE - sleeping energy expenditure from room calorimetry, and free-living physical activity (ARTE) was calculated by dividing AEE by energy cost of standard physical activities. At the end of exercise, anaerobic glycolytic rate (ANGLY) and muscle concentration of phosphomonoesters (PME) were negatively related to TEE, AEE, and ARTE (P < 0.05). Multiple regression analysis showed that both PME (partial r = -0.29, <0.02) and ANGLY (partial r = -0.24, P < 0.04) were independently related to ARTE. PME, primarily glucose-6-phosphate and fructose-6-phosphate, was significantly related to ratings of perceived exertion (r = 0.21, P < or = 0.05) during a maximal treadmill test. PME was not related to ARTE after inclusion of RPE in the multiple regression model, suggesting that PME may be obtaining its relationship with ARTE through an increased perception of effort during physical activity. In conclusion, physically inactive individuals tend to be more dependent on anaerobic glycolysis during exercise while relying on a glycolytic pathway that may not be functioning optimally. PMID:16825516

  4. Muscle metabolic function and free-living physical activity.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Gary R; Larson-Meyer, D Enette; Sirikul, Bovorn; Newcomer, Bradley R

    2006-11-01

    We have previously shown that muscle metabolic function measured during exercise is related to exercise performance and subsequent 1-yr weight gain. Because it is well established that physical activity is important in weight maintenance, we examined muscle function relationships with free-living energy expenditure and physical activity. Subjects were 71 premenopausal black and white women. Muscle metabolism was evaluated by (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy during 90-s isometric plantar flexion contractions (45% maximum). Free-living energy expenditure (TEE) was measured using doubly labeled water, activity-related energy expenditure (AEE) was calculated as 0.9 x TEE - sleeping energy expenditure from room calorimetry, and free-living physical activity (ARTE) was calculated by dividing AEE by energy cost of standard physical activities. At the end of exercise, anaerobic glycolytic rate (ANGLY) and muscle concentration of phosphomonoesters (PME) were negatively related to TEE, AEE, and ARTE (P < 0.05). Multiple regression analysis showed that both PME (partial r = -0.29, <0.02) and ANGLY (partial r = -0.24, P < 0.04) were independently related to ARTE. PME, primarily glucose-6-phosphate and fructose-6-phosphate, was significantly related to ratings of perceived exertion (r = 0.21, P < or = 0.05) during a maximal treadmill test. PME was not related to ARTE after inclusion of RPE in the multiple regression model, suggesting that PME may be obtaining its relationship with ARTE through an increased perception of effort during physical activity. In conclusion, physically inactive individuals tend to be more dependent on anaerobic glycolysis during exercise while relying on a glycolytic pathway that may not be functioning optimally.

  5. The functional neuroanatomy of Tourette's syndrome: an FDG PET study III: functional coupling of regional cerebral metabolic rates.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, K J; Schooler, C; Schoenbach, C; Herscovitch, P; Chase, T N; Braun, A R

    2002-07-01

    Functional coupling of regional cerebral metabolic rates for glucose measured with [18F]-Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose PET was compared in 18 drug-free patients with Tourette's Syndrome (TS) and 16 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Pearson product-moment correlation matrices containing correlations between metabolic rates in regions sampled throughout the brain were generated independently for TS patients and controls and compared. Significant differences between Z-transformed correlation coefficients were used to identify group differences, and revealed that the connectivity of the ventral striatum was most severely affected in TS. Changes in the coupling of other brain areas-primary motor areas, somatosensory association areas, and insula-also appeared to differentiate TS patients and controls. Evaluation of interrelationships between cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuits revealed the existence of functional connections between the motor and lateral orbitofrontal circuits in both groups, however, a reversal in the pattern of these interactions differentiated TS patients and controls. In controls, activity in these circuits appeared to be negatively correlated-i.e. increased activity in one is associated with relative inactivity the other. In TS patients, on the other hand, activity in the motor and lateral orbitofrontal circuits appears to be positively coupled. These results lend further credence to the hypothesis that altered limbic-motor interactions represent a pathophysiological hallmark of this disease.

  6. Exploring Metabolic Pathways and Regulation through Functional Chemoproteomic and Metabolomic Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Cleghorn, Daniel; Nomura, Daniel K.

    2014-01-01

    Genome sequencing efforts have revealed a strikingly large number of uncharacterized genes, including poorly or uncharacterized metabolic enzymes, metabolites, and metabolic networks that operate in normal physiology, and also those enzymes and pathways that may be rewired under pathological conditions. Though deciphering the functions of the uncharacterized metabolic genome is a challenging prospect, it also presents an opportunity for identifying novel metabolic nodes that may be important in disease therapy. In this review, we will discuss the chemoproteomic and metabolomic platforms employed in identifying, characterizing, and targeting nodal metabolic pathways important in physiology and disease, describing an integrated workflow for functional mapping of metabolic enzymes. PMID:25237861

  7. Effects of metabolic syndrome on language functions in aging.

    PubMed

    Cahana-Amitay, Dalia; Spiro, Avron; Cohen, Jason A; Oveis, Abigail C; Ojo, Emmanuel A; Sayers, Jesse T; Obler, Loraine K; Albert, Martin L

    2015-02-01

    This study explored effects of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) on language in aging. MetS is a constellation of five vascular and metabolic risk factors associated with the development of chronic diseases and increased risk of mortality, as well as brain and cognitive impairments. We tested 281 English-speaking older adults aged 55-84, free of stroke and dementia. Presence of MetS was based on the harmonized criteria (Alberti et al., 2009). Language performance was assessed by measures of accuracy and reaction time on two tasks of lexical retrieval and two tasks of sentence processing. Regression analyses, adjusted for age, education, gender, diabetes, hypertension, and heart disease, demonstrated that participants with MetS had significantly lower accuracy on measures of lexical retrieval (action naming) and sentence processing (embedded sentences, both subject and object relative clauses). Reaction time was slightly faster on the test of embedded sentences among those with MetS. MetS adversely affects the language performance of older adults, impairing accuracy of both lexical retrieval and sentence processing. This finding reinforces and extends results of earlier research documenting the negative influence of potentially treatable medical conditions (diabetes, hypertension) on language performance in aging. The unanticipated finding that persons with MetS were faster in processing embedded sentences may represent an impairment of timing functions among older individuals with MetS.

  8. Surfactant phosphatidylcholine metabolism and surfactant function in preterm, ventilated lambs

    SciTech Connect

    Jobe, A.H.; Ikegami, M.; Seidner, S.R.; Pettenazzo, A.; Ruffini, L.

    1989-02-01

    Preterm lambs were delivered at 138 days gestational age and ventilated for periods up to 24 h in order to study surfactant metabolism and surfactant function. The surfactant-saturated phosphatidylcholine pool in the alveolar wash was 13 +/- 4 mumol/kg and did not change from 10 min to 24 h after birth. Trace amounts of labeled natural sheep surfactant were mixed with fetal lung fluid at birth. By 24 h, 80% of the label had become lung-tissue-associated, yet there was no loss of label from phosphatidylcholine in the lungs when calculated as the sum of the lung tissue plus alveolar wash. De novo synthesized phosphatidylcholine was labeled with choline given by intravascular injection at 1 h of age. Labeled phosphatidylcholine accumulated in the lung tissue linearly to 24 h, and the labeled phosphatidylcholine moved through lamellar body to alveolar pools. The turnover time for alveolar phosphatidylcholine was estimated to be about 13 h, indicating an active metabolic pool. A less surface-active surfactant fraction recovered as a supernatant after centrifugation of the alveolar washes at 40,000 x g increased from birth to 10 min of ventilation, but no subsequent changes in the distribution of surfactant phosphatidylcholine in surfactant fractions occurred. The results were consistent with recycling pathway(s) that maintained surface-active surfactant pools in preterm ventilated lambs.

  9. Silibinin Regulates Lipid Metabolism and Differentiation in Functional Human Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Barbagallo, Ignazio; Vanella, Luca; Cambria, Maria T.; Tibullo, Daniele; Godos, Justyna; Guarnaccia, Laura; Zappalà, Agata; Galvano, Fabio; Li Volti, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Silibinin, a natural plant flavonolignan is the main active constituent found in milk thistle (Silybum marianum). It is known to have hepatoprotective, anti-neoplastic effect, and suppresses lipid accumulation in adipocytes. Objective of this study was to investigate the effect of silibinin on adipogenic differentiation and thermogenic capacity of human adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells. Silibinin (10 μM) treatment, either at the beginning or at the end of adipogenic differentiation, resulted in an increase of SIRT-1, PPARα, Pgc-1α, and UCPs gene expression. Moreover, silibinin administration resulted in a decrease of PPARγ, FABP4, FAS, and MEST/PEG1 gene expression during the differentiation, confirming that this compound is able to reduce fatty acid accumulation and adipocyte size. Our data showed that silibinin regulated adipocyte lipid metabolism, inducing thermogenesis and promoting a brown remodeling in adipocyte. Taken together, our findings suggest that silibinin increases UCPs expression by stimulation of SIRT1, PPARα, and Pgc-1α, improved metabolic parameters, decreased lipid mass leading to the formation of functional adipocytes. PMID:26834634

  10. Moonlighting transcriptional activation function of a fungal sulfur metabolism enzyme.

    PubMed

    Levati, Elisabetta; Sartini, Sara; Bolchi, Angelo; Ottonello, Simone; Montanini, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Moonlighting proteins, including metabolic enzymes acting as transcription factors (TF), are present in a variety of organisms but have not been described in higher fungi so far. In a previous genome-wide analysis of the TF repertoire of the plant-symbiotic fungus Tuber melanosporum, we identified various enzymes, including the sulfur-assimilation enzyme phosphoadenosine-phosphosulfate reductase (PAPS-red), as potential transcriptional activators. A functional analysis performed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, now demonstrates that a specific variant of this enzyme, PAPS-red A, localizes to the nucleus and is capable of transcriptional activation. TF moonlighting, which is not present in the other enzyme variant (PAPS-red B) encoded by the T. melanosporum genome, relies on a transplantable C-terminal polypeptide containing an alternating hydrophobic/hydrophilic amino acid motif. A similar moonlighting activity was demonstrated for six additional proteins, suggesting that multitasking is a relatively frequent event. PAPS-red A is sulfur-state-responsive and highly expressed, especially in fruitbodies, and likely acts as a recruiter of transcription components involved in S-metabolism gene network activation. PAPS-red B, instead, is expressed at low levels and localizes to a highly methylated and silenced region of the genome, hinting at an evolutionary mechanism based on gene duplication, followed by epigenetic silencing of this non-moonlighting gene variant. PMID:27121330

  11. Moonlighting transcriptional activation function of a fungal sulfur metabolism enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Levati, Elisabetta; Sartini, Sara; Bolchi, Angelo; Ottonello, Simone; Montanini, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Moonlighting proteins, including metabolic enzymes acting as transcription factors (TF), are present in a variety of organisms but have not been described in higher fungi so far. In a previous genome-wide analysis of the TF repertoire of the plant-symbiotic fungus Tuber melanosporum, we identified various enzymes, including the sulfur-assimilation enzyme phosphoadenosine-phosphosulfate reductase (PAPS-red), as potential transcriptional activators. A functional analysis performed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, now demonstrates that a specific variant of this enzyme, PAPS-red A, localizes to the nucleus and is capable of transcriptional activation. TF moonlighting, which is not present in the other enzyme variant (PAPS-red B) encoded by the T. melanosporum genome, relies on a transplantable C-terminal polypeptide containing an alternating hydrophobic/hydrophilic amino acid motif. A similar moonlighting activity was demonstrated for six additional proteins, suggesting that multitasking is a relatively frequent event. PAPS-red A is sulfur-state-responsive and highly expressed, especially in fruitbodies, and likely acts as a recruiter of transcription components involved in S-metabolism gene network activation. PAPS-red B, instead, is expressed at low levels and localizes to a highly methylated and silenced region of the genome, hinting at an evolutionary mechanism based on gene duplication, followed by epigenetic silencing of this non-moonlighting gene variant. PMID:27121330

  12. Overexpressing superoxide dismutase 2 induces a supernormal cardiac function by enhancing redox-dependent mitochondrial function and metabolic dilation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Patrick T; Chen, Chwen-Lih; Ohanyan, Vahagn; Luther, Daniel J; Meszaros, J Gary; Chilian, William M; Chen, Yeong-Renn

    2015-11-01

    During heightened cardiac work, O2 consumption by the heart benefits energy production via mitochondria. However, some electrons leak from the respiratory chain and yield superoxide, which is rapidly metabolized into H2O2 by SOD2. To understand the systemic effects of the metabolic dilator, H2O2, we studied mice with cardiac-specific SOD2 overexpression (SOD2-tg), which increases the H2O2 produced by cardiac mitochondria. Contrast echocardiography was employed to evaluate cardiac function, indicating that SOD2-tg had a significantly greater ejection fraction and a lower mean arterial pressure (MAP) that was partially normalized by intravenous injection of catalase. Norepinephrine-mediated myocardial blood flow (MBF) was significantly enhanced in SOD2-tg mice. Coupling of MBF to the double product (Heart Rate×MAP) was increased in SOD2-tg mice, indicating that the metabolic dilator, "spilled" over, inducing systemic vasodilation. The hypothesis that SOD2 overexpression effectively enhances mitochondrial function was further evaluated. Mitochondria of SOD2-tg mice had a decreased state 3 oxygen consumption rate, but maintained the same ATP production flux under the basal and L-NAME treatment conditions, indicating a higher bioenergetic efficiency. SOD2-tg mitochondria produced less superoxide, and had lower redox activity in converting cyclic hydroxylamine to stable nitroxide, and a lower GSSG concentration. EPR analysis of the isolated mitochondria showed a significant decrease in semiquinones at the SOD2-tg Qi site. These results support a more reductive physiological setting in the SOD2-tg murine heart. Cardiac mitochondria exhibited no significant differences in the respiratory control index between WT and SOD2-tg. We conclude that SOD2 overexpression in myocytes enhances mitochondrial function and metabolic vasodilation, leading to a phenotype of supernormal cardiac function.

  13. Maternal blood metal levels and fetal markers of metabolic function

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley-Martin, Jillian; Dodds, Linda; Arbuckle, Tye E.; Ettinger, Adrienne S.; Shapiro, Gabriel D.; Fisher, Mandy; Taback, Shayne; Bouchard, Maryse F.; Monnier, Patricia; Dallaire, Renee; Fraser, William D.

    2015-01-15

    Exposure to metals commonly found in the environment has been hypothesized to be associated with measures of fetal growth but the epidemiological literature is limited. The Maternal–Infant Research on Environmental Chemicals (MIREC) study recruited 2001 women during the first trimester of pregnancy from 10 Canadian sites. Our objective was to assess the association between prenatal exposure to metals (lead, arsenic, cadmium, and mercury) and fetal metabolic function. Average maternal metal concentrations in 1st and 3rd trimester blood samples were used to represent prenatal metals exposure. Leptin and adiponectin were measured in 1363 cord blood samples and served as markers of fetal metabolic function. Polytomous logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between metals and both high (≥90%) and low (≤10%) fetal adiponectin and leptin levels. Leptin levels were significantly higher in female infants compared to males. A significant relationship between maternal blood cadmium and odds of high leptin was observed among males but not females in adjusted models. When adjusting for birth weight z-score, lead was associated with an increased odd of high leptin. No other significant associations were found at the top or bottom 10th percentile in either leptin or adiponectin models. This study supports the proposition that maternal levels of cadmium influence cord blood adipokine levels in a sex-dependent manner. Further investigation is required to confirm these findings and to determine how such findings at birth will translate into childhood anthropometric measures. - Highlights: • We determined relationships between maternal metal levels and cord blood adipokines. • Cord blood leptin levels were higher among female than male infants. • Maternal cadmium was associated with elevated leptin in male, not female infants. • No significant associations were observed between metals and

  14. Glycogen metabolism protects against metabolic insult to preserve carotid body function during glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Andrew P; Turner, Philip J; Carter, Paul; Leadbeater, Wendy; Ray, Clare J; Hauton, David; Buckler, Keith J; Kumar, Prem

    2014-10-15

    The view that the carotid body (CB) type I cells are direct physiological sensors of hypoglycaemia is challenged by the finding that the basal sensory neuronal outflow from the whole organ is unchanged in response to low glucose. The reason for this difference in viewpoint and how the whole CB maintains its metabolic integrity when exposed to low glucose is unknown. Here we show that, in the intact superfused rat CB, basal sensory neuronal activity was sustained during glucose deprivation for 29.1 ± 1.2 min, before irreversible failure following a brief period of excitation. Graded increases in the basal discharge induced by reducing the superfusate PO2 led to proportional decreases in the time to the pre-failure excitation during glucose deprivation which was dependent on a complete run-down in glycolysis and a fall in cellular energy status. A similar ability to withstand prolonged glucose deprivation was observed in isolated type I cells. Electron micrographs and immunofluorescence staining of rat CB sections revealed the presence of glycogen granules and the glycogen conversion enzymes glycogen synthase I and glycogen phosphorylase BB, dispersed throughout the type I cell cytoplasm. Furthermore, pharmacological attenuation of glycogenolysis and functional depletion of glycogen both significantly reduced the time to glycolytic run-down by ∼33 and 65%, respectively. These findings suggest that type I cell glycogen metabolism allows for the continuation of glycolysis and the maintenance of CB sensory neuronal output in periods of restricted glucose delivery and this may act as a key protective mechanism for the organ during hypoglycaemia. The ability, or otherwise, to preserve energetic status may thus account for variation in the reported capacity of the CB to sense physiological glucose concentrations and may even underlie its function during pathological states associated with augmented CB discharge.

  15. Sense and Nonsense in Metabolic Control of Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Jill E.; Klingerman, Candice M.; Abdulhay, Amir

    2012-01-01

    An exciting synergistic interaction occurs among researchers working at the interface of reproductive biology and energy homeostasis. Reproductive biologists benefit from the theories, experimental designs, and methodologies used by experts on energy homeostasis while they bring context and meaning to the study of energy homeostasis. There is a growing recognition that identification of candidate genes for obesity is little more than meaningless reductionism unless those genes and their expression are placed in a developmental, environmental, and evolutionary context. Reproductive biology provides this context because metabolic energy is the most important factor that controls reproductive success and gonadal hormones affect energy intake, storage, and expenditure. Reproductive hormone secretion changes during development, and reproductive success is key to evolutionary adaptation, the process that most likely molded the mechanisms that control energy balance. It is likely that by viewing energy intake, storage, and expenditure in the context of reproductive success, we will gain insight into human obesity, eating disorders, diabetes, and other pathologies related to fuel homeostasis. This review emphasizes the metabolic hypothesis: a sensory system monitors the availability of oxidizable metabolic fuels and orchestrates behavioral motivation to optimize reproductive success in environments where energy availability fluctuates or is unpredictable. PMID:22649413

  16. Metabolite Valves: Dynamic Control of Metabolic Flux for Pathway Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, Kristala

    2015-03-01

    Microbial strains have been successfully engineered to produce a wide variety of chemical compounds, several of which have been commercialized. As new products are targeted for biological synthesis, yield is frequently considered a primary driver towards determining feasibility. Theoretical yields can be calculated, establishing an upper limit on the potential conversion of starting substrates to target compounds. Such yields typically ignore loss of substrate to byproducts, with the assumption that competing reactions can be eliminated, usually by deleting the genes encoding the corresponding enzymes. However, when an enzyme encodes an essential gene, especially one involved in primary metabolism, deletion is not a viable option. Reducing gene expression in a static fashion is possible, but this solution ignores the metabolic demand needed for synthesis of the enzymes required for the desired pathway. We have developed Metabolite valves to address this challenge. The valves are designed to allow high flux through the essential enzyme during an initial period where growth is favored. Following an external perturbation, enzyme activity is then reduced, enabling a higher precursor pool to be diverted towards the pathway of interest. We have designed valves with control at both the transcriptional and post-translational levels. In both cases, key enzymes in glucose metabolism are regulated, and two different compounds are targeted for heterologous production. We have measured increased concentrations of intracellular metabolites once the valve is closed, and have demonstrated that these increased pools lead to increased product yields. These metabolite valves should prove broadly useful for dynamic control of metabolic flux, resulting in improvements in product yields.

  17. Metabolic regulation of T cell differentiation and function

    PubMed Central

    Park, Benjamin V.; Pan, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Upon encountering pathogens, T cells mount immune responses by proliferating, increasing cellular mass and differentiating. These cellular changes impose significant energetic challenges on T cells. It was believed that TCR and cytokine-mediated signaling are dominant dictators of T cell-mediated immune responses. Recently, it was recognized that T cells utilize metabolic transporters and metabolic sensors that allow them to rapidly respond to nutrient-limiting inflammatory environments. Metabolic sensors allow T cells to find a balance between energy consumption (anabolic metabolism) and production (catabolic metabolism) in order to mount effective immune responses. Also, metabolic regulators interact with cytokine-dependent transcriptional regulators, suggesting a more integrative and advanced model of T cell activation and differentiation. In this review, we will discuss recent discoveries regarding the roles of metabolic regulators in effector and memory T cell development and their interaction with canonical transcription factors. PMID:26277275

  18. Metabolism and Ovarian Function in PCOS Women: A Therapeutic Approach with Inositols.

    PubMed

    Laganà, Antonio Simone; Rossetti, Paola; Buscema, Massimo; La Vignera, Sandro; Condorelli, Rosita Angela; Gullo, Giuseppe; Granese, Roberta; Triolo, Onofrio

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is characterized by chronical anovulation and hyperandrogenism which may be present in a different degree of severity. Insulin-resistance and hyperinsulinemia are the main physiopathological basis of this syndrome and the failure of inositol-mediated signaling may concur to them. Myo (MI) and D-chiro-inositol (DCI), the most studied inositol isoforms, are classified as insulin sensitizers. In form of glycans, DCI-phosphoglycan and MI-phosphoglycan control key enzymes were involved in glucose and lipid metabolism. In form of phosphoinositides, they play an important role as second messengers in several cellular biological functions. Considering the key role played by insulin-resistance and androgen excess in PCOS patients, the insulin-sensitizing effects of both MI and DCI were tested in order to ameliorate symptoms and signs of this syndrome, including the possibility to restore patients' fertility. Accumulating evidence suggests that both isoforms of inositol are effective in improving ovarian function and metabolism in patients with PCOS, although MI showed the most marked effect on the metabolic profile, whereas DCI reduced hyperandrogenism better. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on inositol signaling and correlate data on biological functions of these multifaceted molecules, in view of a rational use for the therapy in women with PCOS. PMID:27579037

  19. Metabolism and Ovarian Function in PCOS Women: A Therapeutic Approach with Inositols

    PubMed Central

    Rossetti, Paola; Buscema, Massimo; Condorelli, Rosita Angela; Gullo, Giuseppe; Triolo, Onofrio

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is characterized by chronical anovulation and hyperandrogenism which may be present in a different degree of severity. Insulin-resistance and hyperinsulinemia are the main physiopathological basis of this syndrome and the failure of inositol-mediated signaling may concur to them. Myo (MI) and D-chiro-inositol (DCI), the most studied inositol isoforms, are classified as insulin sensitizers. In form of glycans, DCI-phosphoglycan and MI-phosphoglycan control key enzymes were involved in glucose and lipid metabolism. In form of phosphoinositides, they play an important role as second messengers in several cellular biological functions. Considering the key role played by insulin-resistance and androgen excess in PCOS patients, the insulin-sensitizing effects of both MI and DCI were tested in order to ameliorate symptoms and signs of this syndrome, including the possibility to restore patients' fertility. Accumulating evidence suggests that both isoforms of inositol are effective in improving ovarian function and metabolism in patients with PCOS, although MI showed the most marked effect on the metabolic profile, whereas DCI reduced hyperandrogenism better. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on inositol signaling and correlate data on biological functions of these multifaceted molecules, in view of a rational use for the therapy in women with PCOS. PMID:27579037

  20. Metabolic engineering of lactic acid bacteria, the combined approach: kinetic modelling, metabolic control and experimental analysis.

    PubMed

    Hoefnagel, Marcel H N; Starrenburg, Marjo J C; Martens, Dirk E; Hugenholtz, Jeroen; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Van Swam, Iris I; Bongers, Roger; Westerhoff, Hans V; Snoep, Jacky L

    2002-04-01

    Everyone who has ever tried to radically change metabolic fluxes knows that it is often harder to determine which enzymes have to be modified than it is to actually implement these changes. In the more traditional genetic engineering approaches 'bottle-necks' are pinpointed using qualitative, intuitive approaches, but the alleviation of suspected 'rate-limiting' steps has not often been successful. Here the authors demonstrate that a model of pyruvate distribution in Lactococcus lactis based on enzyme kinetics in combination with metabolic control analysis clearly indicates the key control points in the flux to acetoin and diacetyl, important flavour compounds. The model presented here (available at http://jjj.biochem.sun.ac.za/wcfs.html) showed that the enzymes with the greatest effect on this flux resided outside the acetolactate synthase branch itself. Experiments confirmed the predictions of the model, i.e. knocking out lactate dehydrogenase and overexpressing NADH oxidase increased the flux through the acetolactate synthase branch from 0 to 75% of measured product formation rates.

  1. Association of metabolic syndrome with kidney function and histology in living kidney donors.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Y; Thomas, G; Nurko, S; Stephany, B; Fatica, R; Chiesa, A; Rule, A D; Srinivas, T; Schold, J D; Navaneethan, S D; Poggio, E D

    2013-09-01

    The selection of living kidney donors is based on a formal evaluation of the state of health. However, this spectrum of health includes subtle metabolic derangements that can cluster as metabolic syndrome. We studied the association of metabolic syndrome with kidney function and histology in 410 donors from 2005 to 2012, of whom 178 donors were systematically followed after donation since 2009. Metabolic syndrome was defined as per the NCEP ATPIII criteria, but using a BMI > 25 kg/m(2) instead of waist circumference. Following donation, donors received counseling on lifestyle modification. Metabolic syndrome was present in 50 (12.2%) donors. Donors with metabolic syndrome were more likely to have chronic histological changes on implant biopsies than donors with no metabolic syndrome (29.0% vs. 9.3%, p < 0.001). This finding was associated with impaired kidney function recovery following donation. At last follow-up, reversal of metabolic syndrome was observed in 57.1% of donors with predonation metabolic syndrome, while only 10.8% of donors developed de novo metabolic syndrome (p < 0.001). In conclusion, metabolic syndrome in donors is associated with chronic histological changes, and nephrectomy in these donors was associated with subsequent protracted recovery of kidney function. Importantly, weight loss led to improvement of most abnormalities that define metabolic syndrome.

  2. Moderate exercise increases the metabolism and immune function of lymphocytes in rats.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Francisco; Bacurau, Aline Villa Nova; Pereira, Guilherme Borges; Araújo, Ronaldo Carvalho; Almeida, Sandro Soares; Moraes, Milton Rocha; Uchida, Marco Carlos; Costa Rosa, Luis Fernando Bicudo Pereira; Navalta, James; Prestes, Jonato; Bacurau, Reury Frank Pereira

    2013-05-01

    Exercise modulates both glucose and glutamine metabolism which influences lymphocyte function. We investigated the influence of chronic moderate exercise on glucose and glutamine metabolism in lymphocytes, the associated influence on proliferation, and cytokine and immunoglobulin production. Male Wistar rats (8 weeks old) were placed in an exercise training group (N = 15, 1 h day(-1) at 60 % VO₂max, 5 days week(-1)) for 8 weeks of exercise, or a sedentary control group. Twenty-four hours following the final training session, lymphocytes were separated, and the incorporation of [U-14C]-glucose, [U-14C]-glutamine, and [2-14C]-thymidine from the supernatant was measured. The activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, hexokinase, and glutaminase was measured. Lymphocytes were stimulated with ConA and LPS and incubated with the Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine and plasma IgG and IgE were measured. Glutamine metabolism increased in both T and B lymphocytes in the trained group. In the trained group, proliferative capacity increased T lymphocytes under ConA stimulation, and increased B lymphocytes with LPS. There was a significant increase in IL-2 production and decrease in IL-4 in the trained group compared with sedentary controls. IL-2R and TNFR increased in trained rats while IL-4R decreased and were more pronounced in T lymphocytes compared with B lymphocytes. In both lymphocyte subsets, exercise training significantly increased the expression of CD54+ and CD30+ cell markers. Exercise training increased plasma IgG compared with the sedentary group. In conclusion, moderate exercise training improves immune function and metabolism in T and B lymphocytes, reflecting an increased ability to respond to immune challenges. PMID:23212119

  3. How aneuploidy affects metabolic control and causes cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Rasnick, D; Duesberg, P H

    1999-01-01

    The complexity and diversity of cancer-specific phenotypes, including de-differentiation, invasiveness, metastasis, abnormal morphology and metabolism, genetic instability and progression to malignancy, have so far eluded explanation by a simple, coherent hypothesis. However, an adaptation of Metabolic Control Analysis supports the 100-year-old hypothesis that aneuploidy, an abnormal number of chromosomes, is the cause of cancer. The results demonstrate the currently counter-intuitive principle that it is the fraction of the genome undergoing differential expression, not the magnitude of the differential expression, that controls phenotypic transformation. Transforming the robust normal phenotype into cancer requires a twofold increase in the expression of thousands of normal gene products. The massive change in gene dose produces highly non-linear (i.e. qualitative) changes in the physiology and metabolism of cells and tissues. Since aneuploidy disrupts the natural balance of mitosis proteins, it also explains the notorious genetic instability of cancer cells as a consequence of the perpetual regrouping of chromosomes. In view of this and the existence of non-cancerous aneuploidy, we propose that cancer is the phenotype of cells above a certain threshold of aneuploidy. This threshold is reached either by the gradual, stepwise increase in the level of aneuploidy as a consequence of the autocatalysed genetic instability of aneuploid cells or by tetraploidization followed by a gradual loss of chromosomes. Thus the initiation step of carcinogenesis produces aneuploidy below the threshold for cancer, and the promotion step increases the level of aneuploidy above this threshold. We conclude that aneuploidy offers a simple and coherent explanation for all the cancer-specific phenotypes. Accordingly, the gross biochemical abnormalities, abnormal cellular size and morphology, the appearance of tumour-associated antigens, the high levels of secreted proteins responsible for

  4. Liver disease alters high-density lipoprotein composition, metabolism and function.

    PubMed

    Trieb, Markus; Horvath, Angela; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Spindelboeck, Walter; Stadlbauer, Vanessa; Taschler, Ulrike; Curcic, Sanja; Stauber, Rudolf E; Holzer, Michael; Pasterk, Lisa; Heinemann, Akos; Marsche, Gunther

    2016-07-01

    High-density lipoproteins (HDL) are important endogenous inhibitors of inflammatory responses. Functional impairment of HDL might contribute to the excess mortality experienced by patients with liver disease, but the effect of cirrhosis on HDL metabolism and function remain elusive. To get an integrated measure of HDL quantity and quality, we assessed several metrics of HDL function using apolipoprotein (apo) B-depleted sera from patients with compensated cirrhosis, patients with acutely decompensated cirrhosis and healthy controls. We observed that sera of cirrhotic patients showed reduced levels of HDL-cholesterol and profoundly suppressed activities of several enzymes involved in HDL maturation and metabolism. Native gel electrophoresis analyses revealed that cirrhotic serum HDL shifts towards the larger HDL2 subclass. Proteomic assessment of isolated HDL identified several proteins, including apoA-I, apoC-III, apoE, paraoxonase 1 and acute phase serum amyloid A to be significantly altered in cirrhotic patients. With regard to function, these alterations in levels, composition and structure of HDL were strongly associated with metrics of function of apoB-depleted sera, including cholesterol efflux capability, paraoxonase activity, the ability to inhibit monocyte production of cytokines and endothelial regenerative activities. Of particular interest, cholesterol efflux capacity appeared to be strongly associated with liver disease mortality. Our findings may be clinically relevant and improve our ability to monitor cirrhotic patients at high risk. PMID:27106140

  5. Liver disease alters high-density lipoprotein composition, metabolism and function.

    PubMed

    Trieb, Markus; Horvath, Angela; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Spindelboeck, Walter; Stadlbauer, Vanessa; Taschler, Ulrike; Curcic, Sanja; Stauber, Rudolf E; Holzer, Michael; Pasterk, Lisa; Heinemann, Akos; Marsche, Gunther

    2016-07-01

    High-density lipoproteins (HDL) are important endogenous inhibitors of inflammatory responses. Functional impairment of HDL might contribute to the excess mortality experienced by patients with liver disease, but the effect of cirrhosis on HDL metabolism and function remain elusive. To get an integrated measure of HDL quantity and quality, we assessed several metrics of HDL function using apolipoprotein (apo) B-depleted sera from patients with compensated cirrhosis, patients with acutely decompensated cirrhosis and healthy controls. We observed that sera of cirrhotic patients showed reduced levels of HDL-cholesterol and profoundly suppressed activities of several enzymes involved in HDL maturation and metabolism. Native gel electrophoresis analyses revealed that cirrhotic serum HDL shifts towards the larger HDL2 subclass. Proteomic assessment of isolated HDL identified several proteins, including apoA-I, apoC-III, apoE, paraoxonase 1 and acute phase serum amyloid A to be significantly altered in cirrhotic patients. With regard to function, these alterations in levels, composition and structure of HDL were strongly associated with metrics of function of apoB-depleted sera, including cholesterol efflux capability, paraoxonase activity, the ability to inhibit monocyte production of cytokines and endothelial regenerative activities. Of particular interest, cholesterol efflux capacity appeared to be strongly associated with liver disease mortality. Our findings may be clinically relevant and improve our ability to monitor cirrhotic patients at high risk.

  6. A Modeling and Simulation Approach to the Study of Metabolic Control Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez-Caso, Carlos; Sanchez-Jimenez, Francisca; Medina, Miguel Angel

    2002-01-01

    Metabolic control analysis has contributed to the rapid advance in our understanding of metabolic regulation. However, up to now this topic has not been covered properly in biochemistry courses. This work reports the development and implementation of a practical lesson on metabolic control analysis (MCA) using modeling and simulation. The…

  7. Metabolic programming and PDHK1 control CD4+ T cell subsets and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Gerriets, Valerie A; Kishton, Rigel J; Nichols, Amanda G; Macintyre, Andrew N; Inoue, Makoto; Ilkayeva, Olga; Winter, Peter S; Liu, Xiaojing; Priyadharshini, Bhavana; Slawinska, Marta E; Haeberli, Lea; Huck, Catherine; Turka, Laurence A; Wood, Kris C; Hale, Laura P; Smith, Paul A; Schneider, Martin A; MacIver, Nancie J; Locasale, Jason W; Newgard, Christopher B; Shinohara, Mari L; Rathmell, Jeffrey C

    2015-01-01

    Activation of CD4+ T cells results in rapid proliferation and differentiation into effector and regulatory subsets. CD4+ effector T cell (Teff) (Th1 and Th17) and Treg subsets are metabolically distinct, yet the specific metabolic differences that modify T cell populations are uncertain. Here, we evaluated CD4+ T cell populations in murine models and determined that inflammatory Teffs maintain high expression of glycolytic genes and rely on high glycolytic rates, while Tregs are oxidative and require mitochondrial electron transport to proliferate, differentiate, and survive. Metabolic profiling revealed that pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) is a key bifurcation point between T cell glycolytic and oxidative metabolism. PDH function is inhibited by PDH kinases (PDHKs). PDHK1 was expressed in Th17 cells, but not Th1 cells, and at low levels in Tregs, and inhibition or knockdown of PDHK1 selectively suppressed Th17 cells and increased Tregs. This alteration in the CD4+ T cell populations was mediated in part through ROS, as N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) treatment restored Th17 cell generation. Moreover, inhibition of PDHK1 modulated immunity and protected animals against experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, decreasing Th17 cells and increasing Tregs. Together, these data show that CD4+ subsets utilize and require distinct metabolic programs that can be targeted to control specific T cell populations in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases.

  8. Functional characterization of Yersinia pestis aerobic glycerol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Willias, Stephan P; Chauhan, Sadhana; Motin, Vladimir L

    2014-11-01

    Yersinia pestis biovar Orientalis isolates have lost the capacity to ferment glycerol. Herein we provide experimental validation that a 93 bp in-frame deletion within the glpD gene encoding the glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase present in all biovar Orientalis strains is sufficient to disrupt aerobic glycerol fermentation. Furthermore, the inability to ferment glycerol is often insured by a variety of additional mutations within the glpFKX operon which prevents glycerol internalization and conversion to glycerol-3-phosphate. The physiological impact of functional glpFKX in the presence of dysfunctional glpD was assessed. Results demonstrate no change in growth kinetics at 26 °C and 37 °C. Mutants deficient in glpD displayed decreased intracellular accumulation of glycerol-3-phosphate, a characterized inhibitor of cAMP receptor protein (CRP) activation. Since CRP is rigorously involved in global regulation Y. pestis virulence, we tested a possible influence of a single glpD mutation on virulence. Nonetheless, subcutaneous and intranasal murine challenge was not impacted by glycerol metabolism. As quantified by crystal violet assay, biofilm formation of the glpD-deficient KIM6+ mutant was mildly repressed; whereas, chromosomal restoration of glpD in CO92 resulted in a significant increase in biofilm formation. PMID:25220241

  9. Functional compartmentalization of oxidative and glycolytic metabolism in frog skin

    SciTech Connect

    Skul'skii, I.A.; Lapin, A.V.

    1985-07-01

    One of the basic functions of the epithelial cells of the skin of amphibians is unidirectional transport of Na/sup +/ from the environment into the blood. This transport is carried out in two stages. First, Na/sup +/ is absorbed from the environment by the epithelial cells through their apical membranes. Next, Na/sup +/ is actively drawn into the blood stream with the help of Na-K pumps which are located on the basolateral membranes. Huf, as early as 1957, proposed that ionic homeostasis of Na-transporting epithelial cells may be maintained at the expense of glycolysis, whereas the unidirectional transport of Na/sup +/ requires exclusively energy from oxidative metabolism. At that time, however, little was known about the nature of the Na-K pump and there were no isotopic data on permeability of epithelial cells to Na/sup +/ and K/sup +/. The authors confirm and update Huf's hypothesis in accordance with current knowledge. It was shown that anaerobic conditions (argon atmosphere) and various respiration inhibitors (rotenone, thallium) selectively inhibit unidirectional transport of Na/sup +/, as measured with the help of /sup 22/Na or short-circuit current, without influencing the concentration of sodium and potassium in the cells. The rate of penetration of Na/sup +/ through the apical membrane decrease by at least twice, but, irrespective of a significant flow of Na/sup +/ through the epithelial layer disappears.

  10. (Physiology and genetics of metabolic flux control in Zymomonas mobilis)

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, T.

    1992-01-01

    The funded research deals with the physiology and genetics of glycolytic flux control in Zymomonas mobilis. Two fundamental biological questions are begin addressed: First, how do the enzymes of glycolytic pathways act in concert to regulate metabolic flux Second, what is the role of gene expression in regulating high level synthesis of the glycolytic enzymes in a balance that allows proper glycolytic flux control The specific objectives of the grant are as follows: 1. To clone the structural and regulatory regions of the Z. mobilis genes encoding glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, phosphoglucose isomerase, enolase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydratase, 2- keto-3-deoxy- 6-phosphogluconate aldolase, glucokinase and fructokinase. 2. To characterize the structure of these genes with respect to nucleotide sequence, transcriptional initiation sites promoter location, evolutionary relatedness to similar genes from other organisms, and organization of these genes on the genome. 3. To investigate the effects of genetically engineered alterations in the levels of the cloned enzymes on metabolic flux and cell growth. 4. To study transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of the genes encoding the enzymes of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway. The first two specific objectives have now been fully completed. Significant progress has been made on the fourth objective and work on the third objective is well underway.

  11. Comparative genomics of metabolic capacities of regulons controlled by cis-regulatory RNA motifs in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In silico comparative genomics approaches have been efficiently used for functional prediction and reconstruction of metabolic and regulatory networks. Riboswitches are metabolite-sensing structures often found in bacterial mRNA leaders controlling gene expression on transcriptional or translational levels. An increasing number of riboswitches and other cis-regulatory RNAs have been recently classified into numerous RNA families in the Rfam database. High conservation of these RNA motifs provides a unique advantage for their genomic identification and comparative analysis. Results A comparative genomics approach implemented in the RegPredict tool was used for reconstruction and functional annotation of regulons controlled by RNAs from 43 Rfam families in diverse taxonomic groups of Bacteria. The inferred regulons include ~5200 cis-regulatory RNAs and more than 12000 target genes in 255 microbial genomes. All predicted RNA-regulated genes were classified into specific and overall functional categories. Analysis of taxonomic distribution of these categories allowed us to establish major functional preferences for each analyzed cis-regulatory RNA motif family. Overall, most RNA motif regulons showed predictable functional content in accordance with their experimentally established effector ligands. Our results suggest that some RNA motifs (including thiamin pyrophosphate and cobalamin riboswitches that control the cofactor metabolism) are widespread and likely originated from the last common ancestor of all bacteria. However, many more analyzed RNA motifs are restricted to a narrow taxonomic group of bacteria and likely represent more recent evolutionary innovations. Conclusions The reconstructed regulatory networks for major known RNA motifs substantially expand the existing knowledge of transcriptional regulation in bacteria. The inferred regulons can be used for genetic experiments, functional annotations of genes, metabolic reconstruction and

  12. Vacuole membrane contact sites and domains: emerging hubs to coordinate organelle function with cellular metabolism.

    PubMed

    Malia, Pedro Carpio; Ungermann, Christian

    2016-04-15

    Eukaryotic cells rely on a set of membrane-enclosed organelles to perform highly efficient reactions in an optimized environment. Trafficking of molecules via vesicular carriers and membrane contact sites (MCS) allow the coordination between these compartments, though the precise mechanisms are still enigmatic. Among the cellular organelles, the lysosome/vacuole stands out as a central hub, where multiple pathways merge. Importantly, the delivered material is degraded and the monomers are recycled for further usage, which explains its wide variety of roles in controlling cellular metabolism. We will highlight recent advances in the field by focusing on the yeast vacuole as a model system to understand lysosomal function in general.

  13. [Function of pancreas transplants in increased metabolic stress].

    PubMed

    Teuscher, A U; Seaquist, E R; Barrou, Z; Kendall, D M; Robertson, R P

    1995-01-01

    Patients undergoing successful pancreas transplantation have normal glucose levels in the fasting and fed states and normal levels of hemoglobin A1c without use of exogenous inulin or any other medications for diabetes. In some of these patients, these measures have remained stable for more than 10 years. Additionally pancreas transplant recipients recover from short-term hypoglycemia produced by an intravenous pulse of insulin. However, metabolic success has been determined by relatively routine, unsophisticated tests such as oral and intravenous glucose tolerance tests or stimulation with intravenous arginine. These tests may not provide measures of the functional reserve of the pancreas, which is called on during periods of maximal stress. Consequently, we designed studies to ascertain beta and alpha cell performance in recipients of whole pancreas transplants and recipients of a segment of a living related donor. All recipients were recruited from the University of Minnesota Transplant Registry, Minneapolis, Minnesota. Successfully transplanted recipients were subjected to prolonged hyperglycemia to assess insulin secretory reserve using the method of glucose potentiation of arginine induced insulin secretion and to prolonged hypoglycemia to assess glucagon responsiveness and hepatic glucose production using the technique of the hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemic clamp. Our studies show that pancreas transplant recipients have markedly diminished insulin secretory reserve, a defect not evident with conventional tests of beta-cell function. No difference was found between the whole graft and segmental graft recipients. Pancreas transplantation restores the defective glucagon secretory response and enhances hepatic glucose production during prolonged hypoglycemia in subjects with type I diabetes. We conclude that pancreas transplantation does not completely restore beta-cell secretory reserve. This defect might be probably caused in part by cyclosporine and by the

  14. Effects of melatonin on water metabolism and renal function in male Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus).

    PubMed

    Richardson, B A; Studier, E H; Stallone, J N; Kennedy, C M

    1992-09-01

    The pineal indoleamine, melatonin, has been shown to influence many physiological systems within the mammalian body. Few studies, however, have examined the influence of melatonin on renal function. This study investigated the effects of melatonin on water metabolism and renal function. Young adult male Syrian hamsters were maintained on a long photoperiod (LD 14:10) in metabolic cages. The animals received daily (1700) injections of either control vehicle or 25 micrograms of melatonin for 85 consecutive days. Melatonin administration resulted in significant increases in water consumption and urine production. Water budgets were also significantly influenced by melatonin, as were urinary osmolality, urinary sodium, and potassium concentrations, but urinary calcium concentrations were essentially unaltered. When excretion rates for sodium, potassium, and calcium were calculated, no differences were observed between the vehicle control and melatonin-treated groups. Injections of melatonin also significantly decreased plasma antidiuretic hormone (ADH). These results demonstrate that afternoon injections of melatonin can alter renal function, which may involve direct (i.e., on ADH secretion and/or thirst mechanisms) or indirect (i.e., behavioral) effects. PMID:1453309

  15. Effects of melatonin on water metabolism and renal function in male Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus).

    PubMed

    Richardson, B A; Studier, E H; Stallone, J N; Kennedy, C M

    1992-09-01

    The pineal indoleamine, melatonin, has been shown to influence many physiological systems within the mammalian body. Few studies, however, have examined the influence of melatonin on renal function. This study investigated the effects of melatonin on water metabolism and renal function. Young adult male Syrian hamsters were maintained on a long photoperiod (LD 14:10) in metabolic cages. The animals received daily (1700) injections of either control vehicle or 25 micrograms of melatonin for 85 consecutive days. Melatonin administration resulted in significant increases in water consumption and urine production. Water budgets were also significantly influenced by melatonin, as were urinary osmolality, urinary sodium, and potassium concentrations, but urinary calcium concentrations were essentially unaltered. When excretion rates for sodium, potassium, and calcium were calculated, no differences were observed between the vehicle control and melatonin-treated groups. Injections of melatonin also significantly decreased plasma antidiuretic hormone (ADH). These results demonstrate that afternoon injections of melatonin can alter renal function, which may involve direct (i.e., on ADH secretion and/or thirst mechanisms) or indirect (i.e., behavioral) effects.

  16. Development of baked and extruded functional foods from metabolic syndrome specific ingredient mix.

    PubMed

    Miglani, Neetu; Bains, Kiran; Kaur, Harpreet

    2015-09-01

    The study was aimed to develop baked and extruded functional foods from Metabolic Syndrome (MS) specific designed ingredient mixes with optimum amino acid makeup using key food ingredients with functional properties such as whole cereals, legumes, skimmed milk powder, along with flaxseeds and fenugreek seeds. Two cereals viz. barley and oats and four pulses viz. mung bean, cowpea, bengal gram and soybean were blended in different proportions in order to balance the limiting amino acid lysine in the wheat flour. Three products namely bread, extruded snack and noodles prepared from twenty five ingredient mixes. Six ingredient mixes of breads and four ingredient mixes each of extruded snack and noodles specifically designed for MS patients were organoleptically at par with control wheat flour products. The acceptable products had significantly (p ≤ 0.05) higher lysine, crude protein, ash and fibre and low carbohydrates in compare control whole wheat flour products, hence appropriate for MS patients. PMID:26345000

  17. A MED13-dependent skeletal muscle gene program controls systemic glucose homeostasis and hepatic metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Amoasii, Leonela; Holland, William; Sanchez-Ortiz, Efrain; Baskin, Kedryn K.; Pearson, Mackenzie; Burgess, Shawn C.; Nelson, Benjamin R.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.

    2016-01-01

    The Mediator complex governs gene expression by linking upstream signaling pathways with the basal transcriptional machinery. However, how individual Mediator subunits may function in different tissues remains to be investigated. Through skeletal muscle-specific deletion of the Mediator subunit MED13 in mice, we discovered a gene regulatory mechanism by which skeletal muscle modulates the response of the liver to a high-fat diet. Skeletal muscle-specific deletion of MED13 in mice conferred resistance to hepatic steatosis by activating a metabolic gene program that enhances muscle glucose uptake and storage as glycogen. The consequent insulin-sensitizing effect within skeletal muscle lowered systemic glucose and insulin levels independently of weight gain and adiposity and prevented hepatic lipid accumulation. MED13 suppressed the expression of genes involved in glucose uptake and metabolism in skeletal muscle by inhibiting the nuclear receptor NURR1 and the MEF2 transcription factor. These findings reveal a fundamental molecular mechanism for the governance of glucose metabolism and the control of hepatic lipid accumulation by skeletal muscle. Intriguingly, MED13 exerts opposing metabolic actions in skeletal muscle and the heart, highlighting the customized, tissue-specific functions of the Mediator complex. PMID:26883362

  18. Mitochondrial metabolism in hematopoietic stem cells requires functional FOXO3

    PubMed Central

    Rimmelé, Pauline; Liang, Raymond; Bigarella, Carolina L; Kocabas, Fatih; Xie, Jingjing; Serasinghe, Madhavika N; Chipuk, Jerry; Sadek, Hesham; Zhang, Cheng Cheng; Ghaffari, Saghi

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are primarily dormant but have the potential to become highly active on demand to reconstitute blood. This requires a swift metabolic switch from glycolysis to mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Maintenance of low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), a by-product of mitochondrial metabolism, is also necessary for sustaining HSC dormancy. Little is known about mechanisms that integrate energy metabolism with hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis. Here, we identify the transcription factor FOXO3 as a new regulator of metabolic adaptation of HSC. ROS are elevated in Foxo3−/− HSC that are defective in their activity. We show that Foxo3−/− HSC are impaired in mitochondrial metabolism independent of ROS levels. These defects are associated with altered expression of mitochondrial/metabolic genes in Foxo3−/− hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). We further show that defects of Foxo3−/− HSC long-term repopulation activity are independent of ROS or mTOR signaling. Our results point to FOXO3 as a potential node that couples mitochondrial metabolism with HSC homeostasis. These findings have critical implications for mechanisms that promote malignant transformation and aging of blood stem and progenitor cells. PMID:26209246

  19. Adipocyte Versus Somatotrope Leptin: Regulation of Metabolic Functions in the Mouse.

    PubMed

    Odle, Angela Katherine; Allensworth-James, Melody; Haney, Anessa; Akhter, Noor; Syed, Mohsin; Childs, Gwen V

    2016-04-01

    Leptin regulates food intake and energy expenditure (EE) and is produced in adipocytes, the pituitary, and several other tissues. Animals that are leptin or leptin receptor deficient have major metabolic complications, including obesity. This study tests the hypothesis that the pituitary somatotrope may contribute a source of leptin that maintains some of these metabolic functions. We created 2 different tissue-specific leptin knockout animals: a Somatotrope-Lep-null model and an Adipocyte-Lep-null model. Metabolic analysis of both models, along with a global deletion model, was performed. The Somatotrope-Lep-null animals had fewer somatotropes, and females had a 76% decrease in serum prolactin. During the dark (feeding) phase, females had a 35% increase in ambulation coupled with a 4% increase in EE. Mutants showed no change in food intake or weight gain and EE was unchanged in males. During the light (sleep) phase, Somatotrope-Lep-null mutant males had lower EE and females continued to have higher EE. The respiratory quotients (RQs) of mutants and littermate controls were decreased in males and increased in females; all were within the range that indicates predominant carbohydrate burning. The massively obese Adipocyte-Lep-null animals, however, had significant increases in food intake, sleep, and increased EE, with decreased activity. Changes in RQ were sexually dimorphic, with female mutants having higher RQ and males having decreased RQ. We conclude that both adipocyte and somatotrope leptin contribute to the metabolic homeostasis of the mouse, and that extraadipocyte sources of leptin cannot overcome the major metabolic challenges seen in these animals.

  20. Metabolic transistor strategy for controlling electron transfer chain activity in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui; Tuli, Leepika; Bennett, George N; San, Ka-Yiu

    2015-03-01

    A novel strategy to finely control a large metabolic flux by using a "metabolic transistor" approach was established. In this approach a small change in the level or availability of an essential component for the process is controlled by adding a competitive reaction that affects a precursor or an intermediate in its biosynthetic pathway. The change of the basal level of the essential component, considered as a base current in a transistor, has a large effect on the flux through the major pathway. In this way, the fine-tuning of a large flux can be accomplished. The "metabolic transistor" strategy was applied to control electron transfer chain function by manipulation of the quinone synthesis pathway in Escherichia coli. The achievement of a theoretical yield of lactate production under aerobic conditions via this strategy upon manipulation of the biosynthetic pathway of the key participant, ubiquinone-8 (Q8), in an E. coli strain provides an in vivo, genetically tunable means to control the activity of the electron transfer chain and manipulate the production of reduced products while limiting consumption of oxygen to a defined amount.

  1. Correlating Structure and Function of Drug-Metabolizing Enzymes: Progress and Ongoing Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Eric F.; Connick, J. Patrick; Reed, James R.; Backes, Wayne L.; Desai, Manoj C.; Xu, Lianhong; Estrada, D. Fernando; Laurence, Jennifer S.

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes a symposium sponsored by the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics at Experimental Biology held April 20-24 in Boston, MA. Presentations discussed the status of cytochrome P450 (P450) knowledge, emphasizing advances and challenges in relating structure with function and in applying this information to drug design. First, at least one structure of most major human drug-metabolizing P450 enzymes is known. However, the flexibility of these active sites can limit the predictive value of one structure for other ligands. A second limitation is our coarse-grain understanding of P450 interactions with membranes, other P450 enzymes, NADPH–cytochrome P450 reductase, and cytochrome b5. Recent work has examined differential P450 interactions with reductase in mixed P450 systems and P450:P450 complexes in reconstituted systems and cells, suggesting another level of functional control. In addition, protein nuclear magnetic resonance is a new approach to probe these protein/protein interactions, identifying interacting b5 and P450 surfaces, showing that b5 and reductase binding are mutually exclusive, and demonstrating ligand modulation of CYP17A1/b5 interactions. One desired outcome is the application of such information to control drug metabolism and/or design selective P450 inhibitors. A final presentation highlighted development of a CYP3A4 inhibitor that slows clearance of human immunodeficiency virus drugs otherwise rapidly metabolized by CYP3A4. Although understanding P450 structure/function relationships is an ongoing challenge, translational advances will benefit from continued integration of existing and new biophysical approaches. PMID:24130370

  2. Correlating structure and function of drug-metabolizing enzymes: progress and ongoing challenges.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Eric F; Connick, J Patrick; Reed, James R; Backes, Wayne L; Desai, Manoj C; Xu, Lianhong; Estrada, D Fernando; Laurence, Jennifer S; Scott, Emily E

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes a symposium sponsored by the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics at Experimental Biology held April 20-24 in Boston, MA. Presentations discussed the status of cytochrome P450 (P450) knowledge, emphasizing advances and challenges in relating structure with function and in applying this information to drug design. First, at least one structure of most major human drug-metabolizing P450 enzymes is known. However, the flexibility of these active sites can limit the predictive value of one structure for other ligands. A second limitation is our coarse-grain understanding of P450 interactions with membranes, other P450 enzymes, NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase, and cytochrome b5. Recent work has examined differential P450 interactions with reductase in mixed P450 systems and P450:P450 complexes in reconstituted systems and cells, suggesting another level of functional control. In addition, protein nuclear magnetic resonance is a new approach to probe these protein/protein interactions, identifying interacting b5 and P450 surfaces, showing that b5 and reductase binding are mutually exclusive, and demonstrating ligand modulation of CYP17A1/b5 interactions. One desired outcome is the application of such information to control drug metabolism and/or design selective P450 inhibitors. A final presentation highlighted development of a CYP3A4 inhibitor that slows clearance of human immunodeficiency virus drugs otherwise rapidly metabolized by CYP3A4. Although understanding P450 structure/function relationships is an ongoing challenge, translational advances will benefit from continued integration of existing and new biophysical approaches.

  3. Control of functional differential equations with function space boundary conditions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.

    1972-01-01

    The results of various authors dealing with problems involving functional differential equations with terminal conditions in function space are reviewed. The review includes not only very recent results, but also some little known results of Soviet mathematicians prior to 1970. Particular attention is given to results concerning controllability, existence of optimal controls, and necessary and sufficient conditions for optimality.

  4. Glucose ameliorates the metabolic profile and mitochondrial function of platelet concentrates during storage in autologous plasma

    PubMed Central

    Amorini, Angela M.; Tuttobene, Michele; Tomasello, Flora M.; Biazzo, Filomena; Gullotta, Stefano; De Pinto, Vito; Lazzarino, Giuseppe; Tavazzi, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Background It is essential that the quality of platelet metabolism and function remains high during storage in order to ensure the clinical effectiveness of a platelet transfusion. New storage conditions and additives are constantly evaluated in order to achieve this. Using glucose as a substrate is controversial because of its potential connection with increased lactate production and decreased pH, both parameters triggering the platelet lesion during storage. Materials and methods In this study, we analysed the morphological status and metabolic profile of platelets stored for various periods in autologous plasma enriched with increasing glucose concentrations (13.75, 27.5 and 55 mM). After 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 days, high energy phosphates (ATP, GTP, ADP, AMP), oxypurines (hypoxanthine, xanthine, uric acid), lactate, pH, mitochondrial function, cell lysis and morphology, were evaluated. Results The data showed a significant dose-dependent improvement of the different parameters in platelets stored with increasing glucose, compared to what detected in controls. Interestingly, this phenomenon was more marked at the highest level of glucose tested and in the period of time generally used for platelet transfusion (0–6 days). Conclusion These results indicate that the addition of glucose during platelet storage ameliorates, in a dose-dependent manner, the biochemical parameters related to energy metabolism and mitochondrial function. Since there was no correspondence between glucose addition, lactate increase and pH decrease in our experiments, it is conceivable that platelet derangement during storage is not directly caused by glucose through an increase of anaerobic glycolysis, but rather to a loss of mitochondrial functions caused by reduced substrate availability. PMID:22682337

  5. Who controls the ATP supply in cancer cells? Biochemistry lessons to understand cancer energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Marín-Hernández, Alvaro; Saavedra, Emma; Pardo, Juan P; Ralph, Stephen J; Rodríguez-Enríquez, Sara

    2014-05-01

    Applying basic biochemical principles, this review analyzes data that contrasts with the Warburg hypothesis that glycolysis is the exclusive ATP provider in cancer cells. Although disregarded for many years, there is increasing experimental evidence demonstrating that oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) makes a significant contribution to ATP supply in many cancer cell types and under a variety of conditions. Substrates oxidized by normal mitochondria such as amino acids and fatty acids are also avidly consumed by cancer cells. In this regard, the proposal that cancer cells metabolize glutamine for anabolic purposes without the need for a functional respiratory chain and OxPhos is analyzed considering thermodynamic and kinetic aspects for the reductive carboxylation of 2-oxoglutarate catalyzed by isocitrate dehydrogenase. In addition, metabolic control analysis (MCA) studies applied to energy metabolism of cancer cells are reevaluated. Regardless of the experimental/environmental conditions and the rate of lactate production, the flux-control of cancer glycolysis is robust in the sense that it involves the same steps: glucose transport, hexokinase, hexosephosphate isomerase and glycogen degradation, all at the beginning of the pathway; these steps together with phosphofructokinase 1 also control glycolysis in normal cells. The respiratory chain complexes exert significantly higher flux-control on OxPhos in cancer cells than in normal cells. Thus, determination of the contribution of each pathway to ATP supply and/or the flux-control distribution of both pathways in cancer cells is necessary in order to identify differences from normal cells which may lead to the design of rational alternative therapies that selectively target cancer energy metabolism.

  6. Who controls the ATP supply in cancer cells? Biochemistry lessons to understand cancer energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Marín-Hernández, Alvaro; Saavedra, Emma; Pardo, Juan P; Ralph, Stephen J; Rodríguez-Enríquez, Sara

    2014-05-01

    Applying basic biochemical principles, this review analyzes data that contrasts with the Warburg hypothesis that glycolysis is the exclusive ATP provider in cancer cells. Although disregarded for many years, there is increasing experimental evidence demonstrating that oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) makes a significant contribution to ATP supply in many cancer cell types and under a variety of conditions. Substrates oxidized by normal mitochondria such as amino acids and fatty acids are also avidly consumed by cancer cells. In this regard, the proposal that cancer cells metabolize glutamine for anabolic purposes without the need for a functional respiratory chain and OxPhos is analyzed considering thermodynamic and kinetic aspects for the reductive carboxylation of 2-oxoglutarate catalyzed by isocitrate dehydrogenase. In addition, metabolic control analysis (MCA) studies applied to energy metabolism of cancer cells are reevaluated. Regardless of the experimental/environmental conditions and the rate of lactate production, the flux-control of cancer glycolysis is robust in the sense that it involves the same steps: glucose transport, hexokinase, hexosephosphate isomerase and glycogen degradation, all at the beginning of the pathway; these steps together with phosphofructokinase 1 also control glycolysis in normal cells. The respiratory chain complexes exert significantly higher flux-control on OxPhos in cancer cells than in normal cells. Thus, determination of the contribution of each pathway to ATP supply and/or the flux-control distribution of both pathways in cancer cells is necessary in order to identify differences from normal cells which may lead to the design of rational alternative therapies that selectively target cancer energy metabolism. PMID:24513530

  7. Integrative functional genomic analysis unveils the differing dysregulated metabolic processes across hepatocellular carcinoma stages.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Vignesh; Ganesan, Kumaresan

    2016-08-15

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a highly heterogeneous disease and the development of targeted therapeutics is still at an early stage. The 'omics' based genome-wide profiling comprising the transcriptome, miRNome and proteome are highly useful in identifying the deregulated molecular processes involved in hepatocarcinogenesis. One of the end products and processes of the central dogma being the metabolites and metabolic processes mediate the cellular functions. In recent years, metabolomics based investigations have revealed the major deregulated metabolic processes involved in carcinogenesis. However, the integrative analysis of the holistic metabolic processes with genomics is at an early stage. Since the gene-sets are highly useful in assessing the biological processes and pathways, we made an attempt to infer the deregulated cellular metabolic processes involved in HCC by employing metabolism associated gene-set enrichment analysis. Further, the metabolic process enrichment scores were integrated with the transcriptome profiles of HCC. Integrative analysis shows three distinct metabolic deregulations: i) hepatocyte function related molecular processes involving lipid/fatty acid/bile acid synthesis, ii) inflammatory processes with cytokine, sphingolipid & chondriotin sulphate metabolism and iii) enriched nucleotide metabolic process involving purine/pyrimidine & glucose mediated catabolic process, in hepatocarcinogenesis. The three distinct metabolic processes were found to occur both in tumor and liver cancer cell line profiles. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of the metabolic processes along with clinical sample information has identified two major clusters based on AFP (alpha-fetoprotein) and metastasis. The study reveals the three major regulatory processes involved in HCC stages. PMID:27107678

  8. Integrative functional genomic analysis unveils the differing dysregulated metabolic processes across hepatocellular carcinoma stages.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Vignesh; Ganesan, Kumaresan

    2016-08-15

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a highly heterogeneous disease and the development of targeted therapeutics is still at an early stage. The 'omics' based genome-wide profiling comprising the transcriptome, miRNome and proteome are highly useful in identifying the deregulated molecular processes involved in hepatocarcinogenesis. One of the end products and processes of the central dogma being the metabolites and metabolic processes mediate the cellular functions. In recent years, metabolomics based investigations have revealed the major deregulated metabolic processes involved in carcinogenesis. However, the integrative analysis of the holistic metabolic processes with genomics is at an early stage. Since the gene-sets are highly useful in assessing the biological processes and pathways, we made an attempt to infer the deregulated cellular metabolic processes involved in HCC by employing metabolism associated gene-set enrichment analysis. Further, the metabolic process enrichment scores were integrated with the transcriptome profiles of HCC. Integrative analysis shows three distinct metabolic deregulations: i) hepatocyte function related molecular processes involving lipid/fatty acid/bile acid synthesis, ii) inflammatory processes with cytokine, sphingolipid & chondriotin sulphate metabolism and iii) enriched nucleotide metabolic process involving purine/pyrimidine & glucose mediated catabolic process, in hepatocarcinogenesis. The three distinct metabolic processes were found to occur both in tumor and liver cancer cell line profiles. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of the metabolic processes along with clinical sample information has identified two major clusters based on AFP (alpha-fetoprotein) and metastasis. The study reveals the three major regulatory processes involved in HCC stages.

  9. Pyruvate kinase triggers a metabolic feedback loop that controls redox metabolism in respiring cells.

    PubMed

    Grüning, Nana-Maria; Rinnerthaler, Mark; Bluemlein, Katharina; Mülleder, Michael; Wamelink, Mirjam M C; Lehrach, Hans; Jakobs, Cornelis; Breitenbach, Michael; Ralser, Markus

    2011-09-01

    In proliferating cells, a transition from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism is known as the Warburg effect, whose reversal inhibits cancer cell proliferation. Studying its regulator pyruvate kinase (PYK) in yeast, we discovered that central metabolism is self-adapting to synchronize redox metabolism when respiration is activated. Low PYK activity activated yeast respiration. However, levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) did not increase, and cells gained resistance to oxidants. This adaptation was attributable to accumulation of the PYK substrate phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). PEP acted as feedback inhibitor of the glycolytic enzyme triosephosphate isomerase (TPI). TPI inhibition stimulated the pentose phosphate pathway, increased antioxidative metabolism, and prevented ROS accumulation. Thus, a metabolic feedback loop, initiated by PYK, mediated by its substrate and acting on TPI, stimulates redox metabolism in respiring cells. Originating from a single catalytic step, this autonomous reconfiguration of central carbon metabolism prevents oxidative stress upon shifts between fermentation and respiration.

  10. Decoding Lamarck-transgenerational control of metabolism by noncoding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Elena; Kornfeld, Jan-Wilhelm

    2016-06-01

    The concept of epigenetic transgenerational inheritance (ETI) posits that lifetime experiences in parents, particularly fathers, alter the phenotypic trajectory of their progeny independently of Mendelian genetics. Based on evidence from population studies and laboratory-controlled studies in syngenic animals, this long-term discredited so-called Lamarckian inheritance gained prominent attention. This article aims to summarize the current knowledge about ETI in lower and in higher organisms as well as in human cohorts and elaborates on epigenetic principles potentially underlying this nongenetic mode of heredity. Special attention is given to-small and long-noncoding RNAs in male gametes that recently emerged as a molecular sensor of organismal metabolic states which can ultimately relay information across the germline barrier by translating environmental cues into (epigenetic) changes in zygotic gene expression. PMID:26957289

  11. Decoding Lamarck-transgenerational control of metabolism by noncoding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Elena; Kornfeld, Jan-Wilhelm

    2016-06-01

    The concept of epigenetic transgenerational inheritance (ETI) posits that lifetime experiences in parents, particularly fathers, alter the phenotypic trajectory of their progeny independently of Mendelian genetics. Based on evidence from population studies and laboratory-controlled studies in syngenic animals, this long-term discredited so-called Lamarckian inheritance gained prominent attention. This article aims to summarize the current knowledge about ETI in lower and in higher organisms as well as in human cohorts and elaborates on epigenetic principles potentially underlying this nongenetic mode of heredity. Special attention is given to-small and long-noncoding RNAs in male gametes that recently emerged as a molecular sensor of organismal metabolic states which can ultimately relay information across the germline barrier by translating environmental cues into (epigenetic) changes in zygotic gene expression.

  12. Drosophila Adiponectin Receptor in Insulin Producing Cells Regulates Glucose and Lipid Metabolism by Controlling Insulin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Su-Jin; Hong, Seung-Hyun; Bajracharya, Rijan; Yang, Se-Yeol; Lee, Kyu-Sun; Yu, Kweon

    2013-01-01

    Adipokines secreted from adipose tissue are key regulators of metabolism in animals. Adiponectin, one of the adipokines, modulates pancreatic beta cell function to maintain energy homeostasis. Recently, significant conservation between Drosophila melanogaster and mammalian metabolism has been discovered. Drosophila insulin like peptides (Dilps) regulate energy metabolism similarly to mammalian insulin. However, in Drosophila, the regulatory mechanism of insulin producing cells (IPCs) by adipokine signaling is largely unknown. Here, we describe the discovery of the Drosophila adiponectin receptor and its function in IPCs. Drosophila adiponectin receptor (dAdipoR) has high homology with the human adiponectin receptor 1. The dAdipoR antibody staining revealed that dAdipoR was expressed in IPCs of larval and adult brains. IPC- specific dAdipoR inhibition (Dilp2>dAdipoR-Ri) showed the increased sugar level in the hemolymph and the elevated triglyceride level in whole body. Dilps mRNA levels in the Dilp2>dAdipoR-Ri flies were similar with those of controls. However, in the Dilp2>dAdipoR-Ri flies, Dilp2 protein was accumulated in IPCs, the level of circulating Dilp2 was decreased, and insulin signaling was reduced in the fat body. In ex vivo fly brain culture with the human adiponectin, Dilp2 was secreted from IPCs. These results indicate that adiponectin receptor in insulin producing cells regulates insulin secretion and controls glucose and lipid metabolism in Drosophila melanogaster. This study demonstrates a new adipokine signaling in Drosophila and provides insights for the mammalian adiponectin receptor function in pancreatic beta cells, which could be useful for therapeutic application. PMID:23874700

  13. A regulatory framework for shoot stem cell control integrating metabolic, transcriptional, and phytohormone signals.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Christoph; Gaillochet, Christophe; Medzihradszky, Anna; Busch, Wolfgang; Daum, Gabor; Krebs, Melanie; Kehle, Andreas; Lohmann, Jan U

    2014-02-24

    Plants continuously maintain pluripotent stem cells embedded in specialized tissues called meristems, which drive long-term growth and organogenesis. Stem cell fate in the shoot apical meristem (SAM) is controlled by the homeodomain transcription factor WUSCHEL (WUS) expressed in the niche adjacent to the stem cells. Here, we demonstrate that the bHLH transcription factor HECATE1 (HEC1) is a target of WUS and that it contributes to SAM function by promoting stem cell proliferation, while antagonizing niche cell activity. HEC1 represses the stem cell regulators WUS and CLAVATA3 (CLV3) and, like WUS, controls genes with functions in metabolism and hormone signaling. Among the targets shared by HEC1 and WUS are phytohormone response regulators, which we show to act as mobile signals in a universal feedback system. Thus, our work sheds light on the mechanisms guiding meristem function and suggests that the underlying regulatory system is far more complex than previously anticipated.

  14. Metabolic profiling of Lolium perenne shows functional integration of metabolic responses to diverse subtoxic conditions of chemical stress

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Anne-Antonella; Couée, Ivan; Renault, David; Gouesbet, Gwenola; Sulmon, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Plant communities are confronted with a great variety of environmental chemical stresses. Characterization of chemical stress in higher plants has often been focused on single or closely related stressors under acute exposure, or restricted to a selective number of molecular targets. In order to understand plant functioning under chemical stress conditions close to environmental pollution conditions, the C3 grass Lolium perenne was subjected to a panel of different chemical stressors (pesticide, pesticide degradation compound, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, and heavy metal) under conditions of seed-level or root-level subtoxic exposure. Physiological and metabolic profiling analysis on roots and shoots revealed that all of these subtoxic chemical stresses resulted in discrete physiological perturbations and complex metabolic shifts. These metabolic shifts involved stressor-specific effects, indicating multilevel mechanisms of action, such as the effects of glyphosate and its degradation product aminomethylphosphonic acid on quinate levels. They also involved major generic effects that linked all of the subtoxic chemical stresses with major modifications of nitrogen metabolism, especially affecting asparagine, and of photorespiration, especially affecting alanine and glycerate. Stress-related physiological effects and metabolic adjustments were shown to be integrated through a complex network of metabolic correlations converging on Asn, Leu, Ser, and glucose-6-phosphate, which could potentially be modulated by differential dynamics and interconversion of soluble sugars (sucrose, trehalose, fructose, and glucose). Underlying metabolic, regulatory, and signalling mechanisms linking these subtoxic chemical stresses with a generic impact on nitrogen metabolism and photorespiration are discussed in relation to carbohydrate and low-energy sensing. PMID:25618145

  15. Tributyltin chloride leads to adiposity and impairs metabolic functions in the rat liver and pancreas.

    PubMed

    Bertuloso, Bruno D; Podratz, Priscila L; Merlo, Eduardo; de Araújo, Julia F P; Lima, Leandro C F; de Miguel, Emilio C; de Souza, Leticia N; Gava, Agata L; de Oliveira, Miriane; Miranda-Alves, Leandro; Carneiro, Maria T W D; Nogueira, Celia R; Graceli, Jones B

    2015-05-19

    Tributyltin chloride (TBT) is an environmental contaminant used in antifouling paints of boats. Endocrine disruptor effects of TBT are well established in animal models. However, the adverse effects on metabolism are less well understood. The toxicity of TBT in the white adipose tissue (WAT), liver and pancreas of female rats were assessed. Animals were divided into control and TBT (0.1 μg/kg/day) groups. TBT induced an increase in the body weight of the rats by the 15th day of oral exposure. The weight gain was associated with high parametrial (PR) and retroperitoneal (RP) WAT weights. TBT-treatment increased the adiposity, inflammation and expression of ERα and PPARγ proteins in both RP and PR WAT. In 3T3-L1 cells, estrogen treatment reduced lipid droplets accumulation, however increased the ERα protein expression. In contrast, TBT-treatment increased the lipid accumulation and reduced the ERα expression. WAT metabolic changes led to hepatic inflammation, lipid accumulation, increase of PPARγ and reduction of ERα protein expression. Accordingly, there were increases in the glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity tests with increases in the number of pancreatic islets and insulin levels. These findings suggest that TBT leads to adiposity in WAT specifically, impairing the metabolic functions of the liver and pancreas.

  16. Control of sugar transport and metabolism in Zymomonas mobilis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, T.

    1995-09-01

    This research deals with the physiology and genetics of sugar transport and metabolic control in Zymomonas mobilis. The specific objectives of the grant as as follows: First, the complex interactions of transcriptional, post-transcriptional and translational control mechanisms on regulation of the glf operon will be investigated. Second, the structure and function of the unique glucose facilitator will be examined by a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches, making use of the genetically reconstituted system in E. coli. Third, the possibility that physical association or indirect interactions between the glucose facilitator and glucokinase are involved in metabolic control will be analyzed. Fourth, the Z. mobilis glucose transport and phosphorylation system will be utilized to metabolically engineer recombinant E. coli with altered cell pool metabolite profiles. Work on the third and fourth objectives is complete, work on the first and second objectives is progressing nicely. Publication of this work has been admittedly slow, due primarily to a change n location of the research program from the University of Nebraska to The Ohio State University. However, it should be noted that much of the unpublished data outlined below represented completed studies, and are contained in graduate student theses which are being prepared for submission this summer. Since a full year remains in the current funding period, and the new laboratory is now up and running, we fully expect to make reasonable progress on the remaining objectives and to publish the results in a timely fashion.

  17. Storage reserve accumulation in Arabidopsis: metabolic and developmental control of seed filling.

    PubMed

    Baud, Sébastien; Dubreucq, Bertrand; Miquel, Martine; Rochat, Christine; Lepiniec, Loïc

    2008-01-01

    In the life cycle of higher plants, seed development is a key process connecting two distinct sporophytic generations. Seed development can be divided into embryo morphogenesis and seed maturation. An essential metabolic function of maturing seeds is the deposition of storage compounds that are mobilised to fuel post-germinative seedling growth. Given the importance of seeds for food and animal feed and considering the tremendous interest in using seed storage products as sustainable industrial feedstocks to replace diminishing fossil reserves, understanding the metabolic and developmental control of seed filling constitutes a major focus of plant research. Arabidopsis thaliana is an oilseed species closely related to the agronomically important Brassica oilseed crops. The main storage compounds accumulated in seeds of A. thaliana consist of oil stored as triacylglycerols (TAGs) and seed storage proteins (SSPs). Extensive tools developed for the molecular dissection of A. thaliana development and metabolism together with analytical and cytological procedures adapted for very small seeds have led to a good description of the biochemical pathways producing storage compounds. In recent years, studies using these tools have shed new light on the intricate regulatory network controlling the seed maturation process. This network involves sugar and hormone signalling together with a set of developmentally regulated transcription factors. Although much remains to be elucidated, the framework of the regulatory system controlling seed filling is coming into focus.

  18. Storage Reserve Accumulation in Arabidopsis: Metabolic and Developmental Control of Seed Filling

    PubMed Central

    Baud, Sébastien; Dubreucq, Bertrand; Miquel, Martine; Rochat, Christine; Lepiniec, Loïc

    2008-01-01

    In the life cycle of higher plants, seed development is a key process connecting two distinct sporophytic generations. Seed development can be divided into embryo morphogenesis and seed maturation. An essential metabolic function of maturing seeds is the deposition of storage compounds that are mobilised to fuel post-germinative seedling growth. Given the importance of seeds for food and animal feed and considering the tremendous interest in using seed storage products as sustainable industrial feedstocks to replace diminishing fossil reserves, understanding the metabolic and developmental control of seed filling constitutes a major focus of plant research. Arabidopsis thaliana is an oilseed species closely related to the agronomically important Brassica oilseed crops. The main storage compounds accumulated in seeds of A. thaliana consist of oil stored as triacylglycerols (TAGs) and seed storage proteins (SSPs). Extensive tools developed for the molecular dissection of A. thaliana development and metabolism together with analytical and cytological procedures adapted for very small seeds have led to a good description of the biochemical pathways producing storage compounds. In recent years, studies using these tools have shed new light on the intricate regulatory network controlling the seed maturation process. This network involves sugar and hormone signalling together with a set of developmentally regulated transcription factors. Although much remains to be elucidated, the framework of the regulatory system controlling seed filling is coming into focus. PMID:22303238

  19. Mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenases: structure/function, genetic polymorphisms and role in drug metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Sharon K.; Williams, David E.

    2005-01-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) oxygenates drugs and xenobiotics containing a “soft-nucleophile”, usually nitrogen or sulfur. FMO, like cytochrome P450 (CYP), is a monooxygenase, utilizing the reducing equivalents of NADPH to reduce 1 atom of molecular oxygen to water, while the other atom is used to oxidize the substrate. FMO and CYP also exhibit similar tissue and cellular location, molecular weight, substrate specificity, and exist as multiple enzymes under developmental control. The human FMO functional gene family is much smaller (5 families each with a single member) than CYP. FMO does not require a reductase to transfer electrons from NADPH and the catalytic cycle of the 2 monooxygenases is strikingly different. Another distinction is the lack of induction of FMOs by xenobiotics. In general, CYP is the major contributor to oxidative xenobiotic metabolism. However, FMO activity may be of significance in a number of cases and should not be overlooked. FMO and CYP have overlapping substrate specificities, but often yield distinct metabolites with potentially significant toxicological/pharmacological consequences. The physiological function(s) of FMO are poorly understood. Three of the 5 expressed human FMO genes, FMO1, FMO2 and FMO3, exhibit genetic polymorphisms. The most studied of these is FMO3 (adult human liver) in which mutant alleles contribute to the disease known as trimethylaminuria. The consequences of these FMO genetic polymorphisms in drug metabolism and human health are areas of research requiring further exploration. PMID:15922018

  20. Identification of Functional Differences in Metabolic Networks Using Comparative Genomics and Constraint-Based Models

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Joshua J.; Reed, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Genome-scale network reconstructions are useful tools for understanding cellular metabolism, and comparisons of such reconstructions can provide insight into metabolic differences between organisms. Recent efforts toward comparing genome-scale models have focused primarily on aligning metabolic networks at the reaction level and then looking at differences and similarities in reaction and gene content. However, these reaction comparison approaches are time-consuming and do not identify the effect network differences have on the functional states of the network. We have developed a bilevel mixed-integer programming approach, CONGA, to identify functional differences between metabolic networks by comparing network reconstructions aligned at the gene level. We first identify orthologous genes across two reconstructions and then use CONGA to identify conditions under which differences in gene content give rise to differences in metabolic capabilities. By seeking genes whose deletion in one or both models disproportionately changes flux through a selected reaction (e.g., growth or by-product secretion) in one model over another, we are able to identify structural metabolic network differences enabling unique metabolic capabilities. Using CONGA, we explore functional differences between two metabolic reconstructions of Escherichia coli and identify a set of reactions responsible for chemical production differences between the two models. We also use this approach to aid in the development of a genome-scale model of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Finally, we propose potential antimicrobial targets in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Staphylococcus aureus based on differences in their metabolic capabilities. Through these examples, we demonstrate that a gene-centric approach to comparing metabolic networks allows for a rapid comparison of metabolic models at a functional level. Using CONGA, we can identify differences in reaction and gene content which give rise to different

  1. Autonomic control of adrenal function.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, A V; Jones, C T

    1993-01-01

    Recent studies of adrenal function in conscious calves are reviewed. These have involved collecting the whole of the adrenal effluent blood from the right adrenal gland at intervals and, where necessary, prior functional hypophysectomy by destruction of the pituitary stalk under general halothane anaesthesia 3 d previously. The adrenal medulla was found to release numerous neuropeptides, in addition to catecholamines, in response to stimulation of the peripheral end of the right splanchnic nerve, which was carried out below behavioural threshold. Many of these responses were enhanced by stimulating intermittently at a relatively high frequency. Intra-aortic infusions of a relatively low dose of acetylcholine (4.5 nmol min-1 kg-1) elicited similar responses. In the adrenal cortex, agonists which either potentiated the steroidogenic response to ACTH or exerted a direct steroidogenic action included VIP, CGRP, CRF and ACh acting via muscarinic receptors. Stimulation of the peripheral end of the right splanchnic nerve strongly potentiated the steroidogenic response to ACTH and there is compelling evidence that the innervation normally plays an important part in cortisol secretion. PMID:8300417

  2. Butyrate alleviates metabolic impairments and protects pancreatic β cell function in pregnant mice with obesity.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua-Ping; Chen, Xuan; Li, Ming-Qing

    2013-01-01

    The relative or absolute deficiency of pancreatic β-cell mass function underlies the pathogenesis of diabetes. It is necessary to alleviate the metabolic stress and reduce the demand for insulin to decrease the effects of mutations affecting β-cell expansion. Butyrate is a natural nutrient existed in food and can also be produced physiologically through the intestinal fermentation of fiber. Pregnancy and obesity model would be helpful for understanding how β-cell adapt to insulin resistance and how butyrate alleviate the metabolic impairment and protect pancreatic β cell function in pregnant mice with obesity. C57BL/6J female mice were divided into three groups and fed with high fat food (HF group, 40% energy from fat), high fat with sodium butyrate food (HSF group, 95% HF with 5% butyrate), or control food (CF group, 14% energy from fat), respectively. The feeding would last for 14 weeks before mating and throughout the gestation period. A subset of dams were sacrificed at gestational day (GD) 14.5 to evaluate the changes of metabolism and β-cell function, mass, proliferation and apoptosis, inflammatory reaction of islet from different diet. Pancreases were double immuno-labeled to assess the islet morphology, insulin expression, expression of proliferation gene PCNA and anti-apoptosis gene bcl-2. Moreover, we detected the expression of NF-κB, phosphorylated NF-κB (pNF-κB) to evaluate the islet inflammatory response with immunohistochemistry. Mice fed with HSF showed obviously changes including the decreased values of weight gain, glucose, insulin, triglyceride and total cholesterol level of blood compared with high fat diet group, and the reduced circulating maternal pro-inflammation factors at GD14.5. Mice fed with HF displayed β-cell hyperplasia with a greater β-cell size and β-cell area in pancreas. Furthermore, the higher ratio of apoptosis and inflammatory response were found in HF group compared with HSF and CF group, while the proliferation

  3. A Strategy for Functional Interpretation of Metabolomic Time Series Data in Context of Metabolic Network Information

    PubMed Central

    Nägele, Thomas; Fürtauer, Lisa; Nagler, Matthias; Weiszmann, Jakob; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    The functional connection of experimental metabolic time series data with biochemical network information is an important, yet complex, issue in systems biology. Frequently, experimental analysis of diurnal, circadian, or developmental dynamics of metabolism results in a comprehensive and multidimensional data matrix comprising information about metabolite concentrations, protein levels, and/or enzyme activities. While, irrespective of the type of organism, the experimental high-throughput analysis of the transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome has become a common part of many systems biological studies, functional data integration in a biochemical and physiological context is still challenging. Here, an approach is presented which addresses the functional connection of experimental time series data with biochemical network information which can be inferred, for example, from a metabolic network reconstruction. Based on a time-continuous and variance-weighted regression analysis of experimental data, metabolic functions, i.e., first-order derivatives of metabolite concentrations, were related to time-dependent changes in other biochemically relevant metabolic functions, i.e., second-order derivatives of metabolite concentrations. This finally revealed time points of perturbed dependencies in metabolic functions indicating a modified biochemical interaction. The approach was validated using previously published experimental data on a diurnal time course of metabolite levels, enzyme activities, and metabolic flux simulations. To support and ease the presented approach of functional time series analysis, a graphical user interface including a test data set and a manual is provided which can be run within the numerical software environment Matlab®. PMID:27014700

  4. A Strategy for Functional Interpretation of Metabolomic Time Series Data in Context of Metabolic Network Information.

    PubMed

    Nägele, Thomas; Fürtauer, Lisa; Nagler, Matthias; Weiszmann, Jakob; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    The functional connection of experimental metabolic time series data with biochemical network information is an important, yet complex, issue in systems biology. Frequently, experimental analysis of diurnal, circadian, or developmental dynamics of metabolism results in a comprehensive and multidimensional data matrix comprising information about metabolite concentrations, protein levels, and/or enzyme activities. While, irrespective of the type of organism, the experimental high-throughput analysis of the transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome has become a common part of many systems biological studies, functional data integration in a biochemical and physiological context is still challenging. Here, an approach is presented which addresses the functional connection of experimental time series data with biochemical network information which can be inferred, for example, from a metabolic network reconstruction. Based on a time-continuous and variance-weighted regression analysis of experimental data, metabolic functions, i.e., first-order derivatives of metabolite concentrations, were related to time-dependent changes in other biochemically relevant metabolic functions, i.e., second-order derivatives of metabolite concentrations. This finally revealed time points of perturbed dependencies in metabolic functions indicating a modified biochemical interaction. The approach was validated using previously published experimental data on a diurnal time course of metabolite levels, enzyme activities, and metabolic flux simulations. To support and ease the presented approach of functional time series analysis, a graphical user interface including a test data set and a manual is provided which can be run within the numerical software environment Matlab®.

  5. Posttranscriptional Control of T Cell Effector Function by Aerobic Glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chih-Hao; Curtis, Jonathan D.; Maggi, Leonard B.; Faubert, Brandon; Villarino, Alejandro V.; O’Sullivan, David; Huang, Stanley Ching-Cheng; van der Windt, Gerritje J.W.; Blagih, Julianna; Qiu, Jing; Weber, Jason D.; Pearce, Edward J.; Jones, Russell G.; Pearce, Erika L.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY A “switch” from oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) to aerobic glycolysis is a hallmark of T cell activation and is thought to be required to meet the metabolic demands of proliferation. However, why proliferating cells adopt this less efficient metabolism, especially in an oxygen-replete environment, remains incompletely understood. We show here that aerobic glycolysis is specifically required for effector function in T cells but that this pathway is not necessary for proliferation or survival. When activated T cells are provided with costimulation and growth factors but are blocked from engaging glycolysis, their ability to produce IFN-γ is markedly compromised. This defect is translational and is regulated by the binding of the glycolysis enzyme GAPDH to AU-rich elements within the 3′ UTR of IFN-γ mRNA. GAPDH, by engaging/disengaging glycolysis and through fluctuations in its expression, controls effector cytokine production. Thus, aerobic glycolysis is a metabolically regulated signaling mechanism needed to control cellular function. PMID:23746840

  6. Controller Chips Preserve Microprocessor Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    Above the Atlantic Ocean, off the coast of Brazil, there is a dip in the Earth s surrounding magnetic field called the South Atlantic Anomaly. Here, space radiation can reach into Earth s upper atmosphere to interfere with the functioning of satellites, aircraft, and even the International Space Station. "The South Atlantic Anomaly is a hot spot of radiation that the space station goes through at a certain point in orbit," Miria Finckenor, a physicist at Marshall Space Flight Center, describes, "If there s going to be a problem with the electronics, 90 percent of that time, it is going to be in that spot." Space radiation can cause physical damage to microchips and can actually change the software commands in computers. When high-energy particles penetrate a satellite or other spacecraft, the electrical components can absorb the energy and temporarily switch off. If the energy is high enough, it can cause the device to enter a hung state, which can only be addressed by restarting the system. When space radiation affects the operational status of microprocessors, the occurrence is called single event functional interrupt (SEFI). SEFI happens not only to the computers onboard spacecraft in Earth orbit, but to the computers on spacecraft throughout the solar system. "One of the Mars rovers had this problem in the radiation environment and was rebooting itself several times a day. On one occasion, it rebooted 40 times in one day," Finckenor says. "It s hard to obtain any data when you have to constantly reboot and start over."

  7. Distinct metabolic network states manifest in the gene expression profiles of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease patients and controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knecht, Carolin; Fretter, Christoph; Rosenstiel, Philip; Krawczak, Michael; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2016-09-01

    Information on biological networks can greatly facilitate the function-orientated interpretation of high-throughput molecular data. Genome-wide metabolic network models of human cells, in particular, can be employed to contextualize gene expression profiles of patients with the goal of both, a better understanding of individual etiologies and an educated reclassification of (clinically defined) phenotypes. We analyzed publicly available expression profiles of intestinal tissues from treatment-naive pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients and age-matched control individuals, using a reaction-centric metabolic network derived from the Recon2 model. By way of defining a measure of ‘coherence’, we quantified how well individual patterns of expression changes matched the metabolic network. We observed a bimodal distribution of metabolic network coherence in both patients and controls, albeit at notably different mixture probabilities. Multidimensional scaling analysis revealed a bisectional pattern as well that overlapped widely with the metabolic network-based results. Expression differences driving the observed bimodality were related to cellular transport of thiamine and bile acid metabolism, thereby highlighting the crosstalk between metabolism and other vital pathways. We demonstrated how classical data mining and network analysis can jointly identify biologically meaningful patterns in gene expression data.

  8. Distinct metabolic network states manifest in the gene expression profiles of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Knecht, Carolin; Fretter, Christoph; Rosenstiel, Philip; Krawczak, Michael; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2016-09-02

    Information on biological networks can greatly facilitate the function-orientated interpretation of high-throughput molecular data. Genome-wide metabolic network models of human cells, in particular, can be employed to contextualize gene expression profiles of patients with the goal of both, a better understanding of individual etiologies and an educated reclassification of (clinically defined) phenotypes. We analyzed publicly available expression profiles of intestinal tissues from treatment-naive pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients and age-matched control individuals, using a reaction-centric metabolic network derived from the Recon2 model. By way of defining a measure of 'coherence', we quantified how well individual patterns of expression changes matched the metabolic network. We observed a bimodal distribution of metabolic network coherence in both patients and controls, albeit at notably different mixture probabilities. Multidimensional scaling analysis revealed a bisectional pattern as well that overlapped widely with the metabolic network-based results. Expression differences driving the observed bimodality were related to cellular transport of thiamine and bile acid metabolism, thereby highlighting the crosstalk between metabolism and other vital pathways. We demonstrated how classical data mining and network analysis can jointly identify biologically meaningful patterns in gene expression data.

  9. Distinct metabolic network states manifest in the gene expression profiles of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Knecht, Carolin; Fretter, Christoph; Rosenstiel, Philip; Krawczak, Michael; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Information on biological networks can greatly facilitate the function-orientated interpretation of high-throughput molecular data. Genome-wide metabolic network models of human cells, in particular, can be employed to contextualize gene expression profiles of patients with the goal of both, a better understanding of individual etiologies and an educated reclassification of (clinically defined) phenotypes. We analyzed publicly available expression profiles of intestinal tissues from treatment-naive pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients and age-matched control individuals, using a reaction-centric metabolic network derived from the Recon2 model. By way of defining a measure of 'coherence', we quantified how well individual patterns of expression changes matched the metabolic network. We observed a bimodal distribution of metabolic network coherence in both patients and controls, albeit at notably different mixture probabilities. Multidimensional scaling analysis revealed a bisectional pattern as well that overlapped widely with the metabolic network-based results. Expression differences driving the observed bimodality were related to cellular transport of thiamine and bile acid metabolism, thereby highlighting the crosstalk between metabolism and other vital pathways. We demonstrated how classical data mining and network analysis can jointly identify biologically meaningful patterns in gene expression data. PMID:27585741

  10. Distinct metabolic network states manifest in the gene expression profiles of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease patients and controls

    PubMed Central

    Knecht, Carolin; Fretter, Christoph; Rosenstiel, Philip; Krawczak, Michael; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Information on biological networks can greatly facilitate the function-orientated interpretation of high-throughput molecular data. Genome-wide metabolic network models of human cells, in particular, can be employed to contextualize gene expression profiles of patients with the goal of both, a better understanding of individual etiologies and an educated reclassification of (clinically defined) phenotypes. We analyzed publicly available expression profiles of intestinal tissues from treatment-naive pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients and age-matched control individuals, using a reaction-centric metabolic network derived from the Recon2 model. By way of defining a measure of ‘coherence’, we quantified how well individual patterns of expression changes matched the metabolic network. We observed a bimodal distribution of metabolic network coherence in both patients and controls, albeit at notably different mixture probabilities. Multidimensional scaling analysis revealed a bisectional pattern as well that overlapped widely with the metabolic network-based results. Expression differences driving the observed bimodality were related to cellular transport of thiamine and bile acid metabolism, thereby highlighting the crosstalk between metabolism and other vital pathways. We demonstrated how classical data mining and network analysis can jointly identify biologically meaningful patterns in gene expression data. PMID:27585741

  11. Selection for increased mass-independent maximal metabolic rate suppresses innate but not adaptive immune function

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Cynthia J.; Brown, Jessi L.; Wone, Bernard; Donovan, Edward R.; Hunter, Kenneth; Hayes, Jack P.

    2013-01-01

    Both appropriate metabolic rates and sufficient immune function are essential for survival. Consequently, eco-immunologists have hypothesized that animals may experience trade-offs between metabolic rates and immune function. Previous work has focused on how basal metabolic rate (BMR) may trade-off with immune function, but maximal metabolic rate (MMR), the upper limit to aerobic activity, might also trade-off with immune function. We used mice artificially selected for high mass-independent MMR to test for trade-offs with immune function. We assessed (i) innate immune function by quantifying cytokine production in response to injection with lipopolysaccharide and (ii) adaptive immune function by measuring antibody production in response to injection with keyhole limpet haemocyanin. Selection for high mass-independent MMR suppressed innate immune function, but not adaptive immune function. However, analyses at the individual level also indicate a negative correlation between MMR and adaptive immune function. By contrast BMR did not affect immune function. Evolutionarily, natural selection may favour increasing MMR to enhance aerobic performance and endurance, but the benefits of high MMR may be offset by impaired immune function. This result could be important in understanding the selective factors acting on the evolution of metabolic rates. PMID:23303541

  12. The ZONE Diet and Metabolic Control in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Stulnig, Thomas M

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is associated with chronic inflammation of the adipose tissue, which contributes to obesity-associated complications such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. The increased inflammatory response seems to be directly related to modern nutrition, particularly aspects of fat quality and macronutrient composition. We have recently published an observational study investigating the practicability and effects of a combined dietary intervention with increased relative protein content and low-glycemic-index carbohydrates, supplemented with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), on metabolic control and inflammatory parameters in real-life situations in patients with type 2 diabetes. The primary efficacy parameter was the change in HbA1c, and secondary parameters included change in systemic inflammation (measured by ultrasensitive C-reactive protein), body weight, waist circumference, fat mass, and homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance. Counseling a protein-enriched and low-glycemic-index diet supplemented with long-chain omega-3 PUFAs in a real-life clinical setting improved glycemic control, waist circumference, and silent inflammation in overweight or obese patients with type 2 diabetes.

  13. Spatial memory extinction differentially affects dorsal and ventral hippocampal metabolic activity and associated functional brain networks.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Couz, Marta; González-Pardo, Héctor; Vallejo, Guillermo; Arias, Jorge L; Conejo, Nélida M

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies showed the involvement of brain regions associated with both spatial learning and associative learning in spatial memory extinction, although the specific role of the dorsal and ventral hippocampus and the extended hippocampal system including the mammillary body in the process is still controversial. The present study aimed to identify the involvement of the dorsal and ventral hippocampus, together with cortical regions, the amygdaloid nuclei, and the mammillary bodies in the extinction of a spatial memory task. To address these issues, quantitative cytochrome c oxidase histochemistry was applied as a metabolic brain mapping method. Rats were trained in a reference memory task using the Morris water maze, followed by an extinction procedure of the previously acquired memory task. Results show that rats learned successfully the spatial memory task as shown by the progressive decrease in measured latencies to reach the escape platform and the results obtained in the probe test. Spatial memory was subsequently extinguished as shown by the descending preference for the previously reinforced location. A control naïve group was added to ensure that brain metabolic changes were specifically related with performance in the spatial memory extinction task. Extinction of the original spatial learning task significantly modified the metabolic activity in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus, the amygdala and the mammillary bodies. Moreover, the ventral hippocampus, the lateral mammillary body and the retrosplenial cortex were differentially recruited in the spatial memory extinction task, as shown by group differences in brain metabolic networks. These findings provide new insights on the brain regions and functional brain networks underlying spatial memory, and specifically spatial memory extinction. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Spatial memory extinction differentially affects dorsal and ventral hippocampal metabolic activity and associated functional brain networks.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Couz, Marta; González-Pardo, Héctor; Vallejo, Guillermo; Arias, Jorge L; Conejo, Nélida M

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies showed the involvement of brain regions associated with both spatial learning and associative learning in spatial memory extinction, although the specific role of the dorsal and ventral hippocampus and the extended hippocampal system including the mammillary body in the process is still controversial. The present study aimed to identify the involvement of the dorsal and ventral hippocampus, together with cortical regions, the amygdaloid nuclei, and the mammillary bodies in the extinction of a spatial memory task. To address these issues, quantitative cytochrome c oxidase histochemistry was applied as a metabolic brain mapping method. Rats were trained in a reference memory task using the Morris water maze, followed by an extinction procedure of the previously acquired memory task. Results show that rats learned successfully the spatial memory task as shown by the progressive decrease in measured latencies to reach the escape platform and the results obtained in the probe test. Spatial memory was subsequently extinguished as shown by the descending preference for the previously reinforced location. A control naïve group was added to ensure that brain metabolic changes were specifically related with performance in the spatial memory extinction task. Extinction of the original spatial learning task significantly modified the metabolic activity in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus, the amygdala and the mammillary bodies. Moreover, the ventral hippocampus, the lateral mammillary body and the retrosplenial cortex were differentially recruited in the spatial memory extinction task, as shown by group differences in brain metabolic networks. These findings provide new insights on the brain regions and functional brain networks underlying spatial memory, and specifically spatial memory extinction. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27102086

  15. Functional genomics tools applied to plant metabolism: a survey on plant respiration, its connections and the annotation of complex gene functions

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Wagner L.; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Williams, Thomas C. R.

    2012-01-01

    The application of post-genomic techniques in plant respiration studies has greatly improved our ability to assign functions to gene products. In addition it has also revealed previously unappreciated interactions between distal elements of metabolism. Such results have reinforced the need to consider plant respiratory metabolism as part of a complex network and making sense of such interactions will ultimately require the construction of predictive and mechanistic models. Transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and the quantification of metabolic flux will be of great value in creating such models both by facilitating the annotation of complex gene function, determining their structure and by furnishing the quantitative data required to test them. In this review, we highlight how these experimental approaches have contributed to our current understanding of plant respiratory metabolism and its interplay with associated process (e.g., photosynthesis, photorespiration, and nitrogen metabolism). We also discuss how data from these techniques may be integrated, with the ultimate aim of identifying mechanisms that control and regulate plant respiration and discovering novel gene functions with potential biotechnological implications. PMID:22973288

  16. Controlling the Cyanobacterial Clock by Synthetically Rewiring Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Pattanayak, Gopal K.; Lambert, Guillaume; Bernat, Kevin; Rust, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Circadian clocks are oscillatory systems and allow organisms to anticipate rhythmic changes in the environment. Several studies have shown that circadian clocks are connected to metabolism, but it is not generally clear whether metabolic signaling is one voice among many that influence the clock, or whether metabolic cycling is the major clock synchronizer. To address this question in cyanobacteria, we used a synthetic biology approach to make normally autotrophic cells capable of growth on exogenous sugar. This allowed us to manipulate metabolism independently from the light and dark. We found that feeding sugar to cultures blocked the clock-resetting effect of a dark pulse. Further, in the absence of light, the clock efficiently synchronizes to metabolic cycles driven by rhythmic feeding. We conclude that metabolic activity, independent of its source, is the primary clock driver in cyanobacteria. PMID:26686627

  17. Perspectives in metabolic engineering: understanding cellular regulation towards the control of metabolic routes.

    PubMed

    Zadran, Sohila; Levine, Raphael D

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic engineering seeks to redirect metabolic pathways through the modification of specific biochemical reactions or the introduction of new ones with the use of recombinant technology. Many of the chemicals synthesized via introduction of product-specific enzymes or the reconstruction of entire metabolic pathways into engineered hosts that can sustain production and can synthesize high yields of the desired product as yields of natural product-derived compounds are frequently low, and chemical processes can be both energy and material expensive; current endeavors have focused on using biologically derived processes as alternatives to chemical synthesis. Such economically favorable manufacturing processes pursue goals related to sustainable development and "green chemistry". Metabolic engineering is a multidisciplinary approach, involving chemical engineering, molecular biology, biochemistry, and analytical chemistry. Recent advances in molecular biology, genome-scale models, theoretical understanding, and kinetic modeling has increased interest in using metabolic engineering to redirect metabolic fluxes for industrial and therapeutic purposes. The use of metabolic engineering has increased the productivity of industrially pertinent small molecules, alcohol-based biofuels, and biodiesel. Here, we highlight developments in the practical and theoretical strategies and technologies available for the metabolic engineering of simple systems and address current limitations.

  18. Metformin, arterial function, intima-media thickness and nitroxidation in metabolic syndrome: the mefisto study.

    PubMed

    Meaney, Eduardo; Vela, Agustín; Samaniego, Virginia; Meaney, Alejandra; Asbún, Juan; Zempoalteca, Juan-Carlos; Elisa, Zárate N; Emma, Mendoza N; Guzman, Martin; Hicks, Juan; Ceballos, Guillermo

    2008-08-01

    1. Metabolic syndrome (MS) is one of the greatest public health problems in Mexico, where more than 75% of adults in urban populations are overweight or obese. Metabolic syndrome has several comorbidities, which result in a high cardiometabolic risk. 2. Some of the vasopathogenic phenomena in MS are caused by nitroxidant stress, secondary to cardiometabolic dysfunction. 3. The action of metformin to diminish or control MS remains a matter of debate. 4. In the present study, 60 patients with at least three diagnostic criteria for MS were divided into two groups. Both groups received similar dietary counselling, but one group was given 850 mg metformin daily. 5. The variables assessed were body mass index, waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressures (SBP and DBP, respectively), total cholesterol (TC), high- and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, triglycerides (TG), fasting glucose, nitroxidant metabolites (free carbonyls, malondialdehyde, dityrosines and advanced oxidative protein products (AOPP)), nitric oxide (NO), carotid vascular stiffness, carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and C-reactive protein (CRP). 6. After 1 year follow up, both groups reported weight loss, as well as decreases in waist circumference, SBP and DBP. 7. Patients on metformin exhibited reductions in TC and IMT and there were marked changes in nitroxidation: levels of carbonyls, dityrosines and AOPP were reduced, whereas those of NO were increased, indicating better endothelial function. In addition, in patients given metformin, CRP levels decreased. 8. In conclusion, metformin has a considerable beneficial effect on nitroxidation, endothelial function and IMT in patients with MS.

  19. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism refers to all the physical and chemical processes in the body that convert or use energy, ... Tortora GJ, Derrickson BH. Metabolism. In: Tortora GJ, Derrickson BH. Principles of Anatomy and Physiology . 14th ed. Hoboken, NJ: John H Wiley and Sons; 2013: ...

  20. Detecting Functional Groups of Arabidopsis Mutants by Metabolic Profiling and Evaluation of Pleiotropic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Jörg; Börnke, Frederik; Schmiedl, Alfred; Kleine, Tatjana; Sonnewald, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic profiles and fingerprints of Arabidopsis thaliana plants with various defects in plastidic sugar metabolism or photosynthesis were analyzed to elucidate if the genetic mutations can be traced by comparing their metabolic status. Using a platform of chromatographic and spectrometric tools data from untargeted full MS scans as well as from selected metabolites including major carbohydrates, phosphorylated intermediates, carboxylates, free amino acids, major antioxidants, and plastidic pigments were evaluated. Our key observations are that by multivariate statistical analysis each mutant can be separated by a unique metabolic signature. Closely related mutants come close. Thus metabolic profiles of sugar mutants are different but more similar than those of photosynthesis mutants. All mutants show pleiotropic responses mirrored in their metabolic status. These pleiotropic responses are typical and can be used for separating and grouping of the mutants. Our findings show that metabolite fingerprints can be taken to classify mutants and hence may be used to sort genes into functional groups. PMID:22639613

  1. The brown fat secretome: metabolic functions beyond thermogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guo-Xiao; Zhao, Xu-Yun; Lin, Jiandie D.

    2015-01-01

    Brown fat is highly active in fuel oxidation and dissipates chemical energy through uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1)-mediated heat production. Activation of brown fat leads to increased energy expenditure, reduced adiposity, and lower plasma glucose and lipid levels, thus contributing to better homeostasis. Uncoupled respiration and thermogenesis have been considered to be responsible for the metabolic benefits of brown adipose tissue. Recent studies have demonstrated that brown adipocytes also secrete factors that act locally and systemically to influence fuel and energy metabolism. This review discusses the evidence supporting a thermogenesis-independent role of brown fat, particularly through its release of secreted factors, and their implications in physiology and therapeutic development. PMID:25843910

  2. The Amyloid Precursor Protein Controls PIKfyve Function

    PubMed Central

    Balklava, Zita; Niehage, Christian; Currinn, Heather; Mellor, Laura; Guscott, Benjamin; Poulin, Gino; Hoflack, Bernard; Wassmer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    While the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) plays a central role in Alzheimer’s disease, its cellular function still remains largely unclear. It was our goal to establish APP function which will provide insights into APP's implication in Alzheimer's disease. Using our recently developed proteo-liposome assay we established the interactome of APP's intracellular domain (known as AICD), thereby identifying novel APP interactors that provide mechanistic insights into APP function. By combining biochemical, cell biological and genetic approaches we validated the functional significance of one of these novel interactors. Here we show that APP binds the PIKfyve complex, an essential kinase for the synthesis of the endosomal phosphoinositide phosphatidylinositol-3,5-bisphosphate. This signalling lipid plays a crucial role in endosomal homeostasis and receptor sorting. Loss of PIKfyve function by mutation causes profound neurodegeneration in mammals. Using C. elegans genetics we demonstrate that APP functionally cooperates with PIKfyve in vivo. This regulation is required for maintaining endosomal and neuronal function. Our findings establish an unexpected role for APP in the regulation of endosomal phosphoinositide metabolism with dramatic consequences for endosomal biology and important implications for our understanding of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26125944

  3. The Amyloid Precursor Protein Controls PIKfyve Function.

    PubMed

    Balklava, Zita; Niehage, Christian; Currinn, Heather; Mellor, Laura; Guscott, Benjamin; Poulin, Gino; Hoflack, Bernard; Wassmer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    While the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) plays a central role in Alzheimer's disease, its cellular function still remains largely unclear. It was our goal to establish APP function which will provide insights into APP's implication in Alzheimer's disease. Using our recently developed proteo-liposome assay we established the interactome of APP's intracellular domain (known as AICD), thereby identifying novel APP interactors that provide mechanistic insights into APP function. By combining biochemical, cell biological and genetic approaches we validated the functional significance of one of these novel interactors. Here we show that APP binds the PIKfyve complex, an essential kinase for the synthesis of the endosomal phosphoinositide phosphatidylinositol-3,5-bisphosphate. This signalling lipid plays a crucial role in endosomal homeostasis and receptor sorting. Loss of PIKfyve function by mutation causes profound neurodegeneration in mammals. Using C. elegans genetics we demonstrate that APP functionally cooperates with PIKfyve in vivo. This regulation is required for maintaining endosomal and neuronal function. Our findings establish an unexpected role for APP in the regulation of endosomal phosphoinositide metabolism with dramatic consequences for endosomal biology and important implications for our understanding of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26125944

  4. Metabolic Management during Critical Illness: Glycemic Control in the ICU.

    PubMed

    Honiden, Shyoko; Inzucchi, Silvio E

    2015-12-01

    Hyperglycemia is a commonly encountered metabolic derangement in the ICU. Important cellular pathways, such as those related to oxidant stress, immunity, and cellular homeostasis, can become deranged with prolonged and uncontrolled hyperglycemia. There is additionally a complex interplay between nutritional status, ambient glucose concentrations, and protein catabolism. While the nuances of glucose management in the ICU have been debated, results from landmark studies support the notion that for most critically ill patients moderate glycemic control is appropriate, as reflected by recent guidelines. Beyond the target population and optimal glucose range, additional factors such as hypoglycemia and glucose variability are important metrics to follow. In this regard, new technologies such as continuous glucose sensors may help alleviate the risks associated with such glucose fluctuations in the ICU. In this review, we will explore the impact of hyperglycemia upon critical cellular pathways and how nutrition provided in the ICU affects blood glucose. Additionally, important clinical trials to date will be summarized. A practical and comprehensive approach to glucose management in the ICU will be outlined, touching upon important issues such as glucose variability, target population, and hypoglycemia. PMID:26595046

  5. Factors controlling carbon metabolism and humification in different soil agroecosystems.

    PubMed

    Doni, S; Macci, C; Peruzzi, E; Ceccanti, B; Masciandaro, G

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the processes that control humic carbon sequestration in soil. Three experimental sites differing in terms of management system and climate were selected: (i) Abanilla-Spain, soil treated with municipal solid wastes in Mediterranean semiarid climate; (ii) Puch-Germany, soil under intensive tillage and conventional agriculture in continental climate; and (iii) Alberese-Italy, soil under organic and conventional agriculture in Mediterranean subarid climate. The chemical-structural and biochemical soil properties at the initial sampling time and one year later were evaluated. The soils under organic (Alberese, soil cultivated with Triticum durum Desf.) and nonintensive management practices (Puch, soil cultivated with Triticum aestivum L. and Avena sativa L.) showed higher enzymatically active humic carbon, total organic carbon, humification index (B/E(3)s), and metabolic potential (dehydrogenase activity/water soluble carbon) if compared with conventional agriculture and plough-based tillage, respectively. In Abanilla, the application of municipal solid wastes stimulated the specific β-glucosidase activity (extracellular β-glucosidase activity/extractable humic carbon) and promoted the increase of humic substances with respect to untreated soil. The evolution of the chemical and biochemical status of the soils along a climatic gradient suggested that the adoption of certain management practices could be very promising in increasing SOC sequestration potential.

  6. Factors Controlling Carbon Metabolism and Humification in Different Soil Agroecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Doni, S.; Macci, C.; Peruzzi, E.; Ceccanti, B.; Masciandaro, G.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the processes that control humic carbon sequestration in soil. Three experimental sites differing in terms of management system and climate were selected: (i) Abanilla-Spain, soil treated with municipal solid wastes in Mediterranean semiarid climate; (ii) Puch-Germany, soil under intensive tillage and conventional agriculture in continental climate; and (iii) Alberese-Italy, soil under organic and conventional agriculture in Mediterranean subarid climate. The chemical-structural and biochemical soil properties at the initial sampling time and one year later were evaluated. The soils under organic (Alberese, soil cultivated with Triticum durum Desf.) and nonintensive management practices (Puch, soil cultivated with Triticum aestivum L. and Avena sativa L.) showed higher enzymatically active humic carbon, total organic carbon, humification index (B/E3s), and metabolic potential (dehydrogenase activity/water soluble carbon) if compared with conventional agriculture and plough-based tillage, respectively. In Abanilla, the application of municipal solid wastes stimulated the specific β-glucosidase activity (extracellular β-glucosidase activity/extractable humic carbon) and promoted the increase of humic substances with respect to untreated soil. The evolution of the chemical and biochemical status of the soils along a climatic gradient suggested that the adoption of certain management practices could be very promising in increasing SOC sequestration potential. PMID:25614887

  7. Natural Products as Tools for Defining How Cellular Metabolism Influences Cellular Immune and Inflammatory Function during Chronic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lovelace, Erica S.; Polyak, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic viral infections like those caused by hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) cause disease that establishes an ongoing state of chronic inflammation. While there have been tremendous improvements towards curing HCV with directly acting antiviral agents (DAA) and keeping HIV viral loads below detection with antiretroviral therapy (ART), there is still a need to control inflammation in these diseases. Recent studies indicate that many natural products like curcumin, resveratrol and silymarin alter cellular metabolism and signal transduction pathways via enzymes such as adenosine monophosphate kinase (AMPK) and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), and these pathways directly influence cellular inflammatory status (such as NF-κB) and immune function. Natural products represent a vast toolkit to dissect and define how cellular metabolism controls cellular immune and inflammatory function. PMID:26633463

  8. Transfer Function Control for Biometric Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chmiel, Alan J. (Inventor); Humphreys, Bradley T. (Inventor); Grodinsky, Carlos M. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A modular apparatus for acquiring biometric data may include circuitry operative to receive an input signal indicative of a biometric condition, the circuitry being configured to process the input signal according to a transfer function thereof and to provide a corresponding processed input signal. A controller is configured to provide at least one control signal to the circuitry to programmatically modify the transfer function of the modular system to facilitate acquisition of the biometric data.

  9. Design of pathway-level bioprocess monitoring and control strategies supported by metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Isidro, Inês A; Ferreira, Ana R; Clemente, João J; Cunha, António E; Dias, João M L; Oliveira, Rui

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter we explore the basic tools for the design of bioprocess monitoring, optimization, and control algorithms that incorporate a priori knowledge of metabolic networks. The main advantage is that this ultimately enables the targeting of intracellular control variables such as metabolic reactions or metabolic pathways directly linked with productivity and product quality. We analyze in particular design methods that target elementary modes of metabolic networks. The topics covered include the analysis of the structure of metabolic networks, computation and reduction of elementary modes, measurement methods for the envirome, envirome-guided metabolic reconstruction, and macroscopic dynamic modeling and control. These topics are illustrated with applications to a cultivation process of a recombinant Pichia pastoris X33 strain expressing a single-chain antibody fragment (scFv).

  10. Effects of nutritional restriction on metabolic, endocrine, and ovarian function in llamas (Lama glama).

    PubMed

    Norambuena, M C; Silva, M; Urra, F; Ulloa-Leal, C; Fernández, A; Adams, G P; Huanca, W; Ratto, M H

    2013-05-01

    The objectives of the study were to determine the effects of nutritional restriction on ovarian function in llamas. Mature female llamas were assigned randomly to a Control group, fed 100% of maintenance energy requirements (MER) (n=8), or a Restricted group (n=8) fed from 70% to 40% of MER until a body condition score of 2.5 was attained. Blood samples were taken every-other-day to determine plasma concentrations of LH, estradiol, leptin and metabolic markers, and follicular dynamics were monitored daily by ultrasonography for 30 days (Experiment 1). Llamas were then treated with GnRH to compare the ovulatory response and corpus luteus (CL) development between groups (Experiment 2). Blood samples were taken to measure LH, leptin, progesterone and metabolic markers and ovarian structures were assessed as in Experiment 1. Llamas in the Restricted group had lower body mass and body condition scores than those in the Control group (P<0.001). Plasma concentrations of cholesterol, non-esterified fatty acids, triglycerides, and urea were higher in the Restricted group (P<0.05) than in the Control group. The day-to-day diameter profiles of the dominant follicles were smaller (P<0.05) in the Restricted group than in the Control group but plasma estradiol concentration did not differ. The ovulation rate and LH secretion in response to GnRH did not differ. Day-to-day profiles of CL diameter, plasma progesterone and leptin concentrations were smaller (P<0.01) in the Restricted group. In conclusion, nutritional restriction in llamas was associated with suppressed follicle and CL development, and lower plasma concentrations of progesterone and leptin.

  11. Functional characterization of an invertase inhibitor gene involved in sucrose metabolism in tomato fruit*

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, Ning; JIANG, Jing; YANG, Yan-li; WANG, Zhi-he

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we produced tomato plants overexpressing an invertase inhibitor gene (Sly-INH) from tomato, using a simple and efficient transient transformation system. Compared with control plants, the expression of Sly-INH was highly upregulated in Sly-INH overexpressing plants, as indicated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Physiological analysis revealed that Sly-INH inhibited the activity of cell wall invertase (CWIN), which increased sugar accumulation in tomato fruit. Furthermore, Sly-INH mediated sucrose metabolism by regulating CWIN activity. Our results suggest that invertase activity is potentially regulated by the Sly-INH inhibitor at the post-translational level, and they demonstrate that the transient transformation system is an effective method for determining the functions of genes in tomato. PMID:26465132

  12. Functional characterization of an invertase inhibitor gene involved in sucrose metabolism in tomato fruit.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Jiang, Jing; Yang, Yan-li; Wang, Zhi-he

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we produced tomato plants overexpressing an invertase inhibitor gene (Sly-INH) from tomato, using a simple and efficient transient transformation system. Compared with control plants, the expression of Sly-INH was highly upregulated in Sly-INH overexpressing plants, as indicated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Physiological analysis revealed that Sly-INH inhibited the activity of cell wall invertase (CWIN), which increased sugar accumulation in tomato fruit. Furthermore, Sly-INH mediated sucrose metabolism by regulating CWIN activity. Our results suggest that invertase activity is potentially regulated by the Sly-INH inhibitor at the post-translational level, and they demonstrate that the transient transformation system is an effective method for determining the functions of genes in tomato. PMID:26465132

  13. High density lipoprotein and metabolic disease: Potential benefits of restoring its functional properties

    PubMed Central

    Klancic, Teja; Woodward, Lavinia; Hofmann, Susanna M.; Fisher, Edward A.

    2016-01-01

    Background High density lipoproteins (HDLs) are thought to be atheroprotective and to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Besides their antioxidant, antithrombotic, anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic properties in the vasculature, HDLs also improve glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle. Scope of the review Herein, we review the functional role of HDLs to improve metabolic disorders, especially those involving insulin resistance and to induce regression of CVD with a particular focus on current pharmacological treatment options as well as lifestyle interventions, particularly exercise. Major conclusions Functional properties of HDLs continue to be considered important mediators to reverse metabolic dysfunction and to regress atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Lifestyle changes are often recommended to reduce the risk of CVD, with exercise being one of the most important of these. Understanding how exercise improves HDL function will likely lead to new approaches to battle the expanding burden of obesity and the metabolic syndrome. PMID:27110484

  14. Role of mitochondrial function in cell death and body metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung-Shik

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are the key players in apoptosis and necrosis. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-depleted r0 cells were resistant to diverse apoptosis inducers such as TNF-alpha, TNFSF10, staurosporine and p53. Apoptosis resistance was accompanied by the absence of mitochondrial potential loss or cytochrome c translocation. r0 cells were also resistant to necrosis induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) donors due to upregulation of antioxidant enzymes such as manganese superoxide dismutase. Mitochondria also has a close relationship with autophagy that plays a critical role in the turnover of senescent organelles or dysfunctional proteins and may be included in 'cell death' category. It was demonstrated that autophagy deficiency in insulin target tissues such as skeletal muscle induces mitochondrial stress response, which leads to the induction of FGF21 as a 'mitokine' and affects the whole body metabolism. These results show that mitochondria are not simply the power plants of cells generating ATP, but are closely related to several types of cell death and autophagy. Mitochondria affect various pathophysiological events related to diverse disorders such as cancer, metabolic disorders and aging. PMID:27100503

  15. Perilipin A and the control of triacylglycerol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Brasaemle, Dawn L; Subramanian, Vidya; Garcia, Anne; Marcinkiewicz, Amy; Rothenberg, Alexis

    2009-06-01

    Perilipin A is the most abundant protein associated with the lipid droplets of adipocytes and functions to control both basal and stimulated lipolysis. Under basal or fed conditions, perilipin A shields stored triacylglycerols from cytosolic lipases, thus promoting triacylglycerol storage. When catecholamines bind to cell surface receptors to initiate signals that activate cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), phosphorylated perilipin A facilitates maximal lipolysis. Mutagenesis studies have revealed that central sequences of moderately hydrophobic amino acids are required to target nascent perilipin A to lipid droplets and provide an anchor into the hydrophobic environment of lipid droplets. Sequences of amino acids in the unique carboxyl terminus of perilipin A and those in amino terminal sequences flanking the first hydrophobic stretch are required for the barrier function of perilipin A in promoting triacylglycerol storage. Site-directed mutagenesis studies of serine residues within six PKA consensus sites of perilipin A reveal functions for phosphorylation of at least three of the sites. Phosphorylation of one or more of the serines within three amino terminal PKA sites is required to facilitate hormone-sensitive lipase access to lipid substrates. Phosphorylation of serines within two carboxyl terminal sites is also required for maximal lipolysis. Phosphorylation of serine 492 (site 5) triggers a massive remodeling of lipid droplets, whereby large peri-nuclear lipid droplets fragment into myriad lipid micro-droplets that scatter throughout the cytoplasm. We hypothesize that perilipin A binds accessory proteins to provide assistance in carrying out these functions. PMID:19116774

  16. [Effects of exogenous NO3- on cherry root function and enzyme activities related to nitrogen metabolism under hypoxia stress].

    PubMed

    Feng, Li-guo; Sheng, Li-xi; Shu, Huai-rui

    2010-12-01

    A water culture experiment with controlled dissolved oxygen concentration was conducted to explore the effects of exogenous NO3- on the root function and enzyme activities related to nitrogen metabolism of cherry (Prunun cerasus x P. canescens) seedlings under hypoxia stress. Comparing with the control (7.5 mmol NO3- x L(-1)), treatments 15 and 22.5 mmol NO3- x L(-1) made the materials for plant metabolism abundant, ensured the synthesis of enzyme proteins, increased root activity, maintained root respiration, improved the activities of enzymes related to nitrogen metabolism, such as nitrate reductase (NR), glutamine synthethase (GS), and glutamate dehydrogenase (NADH-GDH) in roots, and thereby, supplied enough energy for root respiration and NAD+ to glycolytic pathway, ensured electron transfer, and avoid ammonium toxicity under hypoxia stress. As a result, the injury of hypoxia stress to cherry plant was alleviated. Applying NO3- at the concentration of 22.5 mmol x L(-1) was more advisable. However, NO3- deficiency (0 mmol x L(-1)) showed opposite results. The above results suggested that applying exogenous NO3- to growth medium could regulate cherry root function and nitrogen metabolism, and antagonize the damage of hypoxia stress on cherry roots. PMID:21443020

  17. Commodity specific rates of temporal discounting: does metabolic function underlie differences in rates of discounting?

    PubMed

    Charlton, Shawn R; Fantino, Edmund

    2008-03-01

    Discounting rates vary as a function of commodity type. Previous studies suggest five potential characteristics of the commodity that could explain these differences: type of reinforcer (primary or secondary), if the commodity is perishable, if the commodity is satiable, if the commodity can be directly consumed, and immediacy of consumption. This paper suggests that these characteristics may best be viewed as related to a more fundamental characteristic: metabolic processing. In order to explore the possibility that metabolic processing underlies changes in discount rates, the difference in discounting between food, money, music CDs, DVDs, and books are compared. Music CDs, DVDs, and books share many characteristics in common with food, including gaining value through a physiological process, but are not directly metabolized. Results are consistent with previous findings of commodity specific discount rates and show that metabolic function plays a role in determining discount rates with those commodities that are metabolized being discounted at a higher rate. These results are interpreted as evidence that the discount rate for different commodities lies along a continuum with those that serve an exchange function rather than a direct function (money) anchoring the low end and those that serve a direct metabolic function capping the high end (food, alcohol, drugs). PMID:17919848

  18. A Transcript-Specific eIF3 Complex Mediates Global Translational Control of Energy Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Shah, Meera; Su, Dan; Scheliga, Judith S; Pluskal, Tomáš; Boronat, Susanna; Motamedchaboki, Khatereh; Campos, Alexandre Rosa; Qi, Feng; Hidalgo, Elena; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro; Wolf, Dieter A

    2016-08-16

    The multi-subunit eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF3 is thought to assist in the recruitment of ribosomes to mRNA. The expression of eIF3 subunits is frequently disrupted in human cancers, but the specific roles of individual subunits in mRNA translation and cancer remain elusive. Using global transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic profiling, we found a striking failure of Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells lacking eIF3e and eIF3d to synthesize components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, leading to a defect in respiration, endogenous oxidative stress, and premature aging. Energy balance was maintained, however, by a switch to glycolysis with increased glucose uptake, upregulation of glycolytic enzymes, and strict dependence on a fermentable carbon source. This metabolic regulatory function appears to be conserved in human cells where eIF3e binds metabolic mRNAs and promotes their translation. Thus, via its eIF3d-eIF3e module, eIF3 orchestrates an mRNA-specific translational mechanism controlling energy metabolism that may be disrupted in cancer. PMID:27477275

  19. Emerging roles of NUCB2/nesfatin-1 in the metabolic control of reproduction.

    PubMed

    García-Galiano, David; Tena-Sempere, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Nesfatin-1, derived from the precursor NEFA/nucleobindin2 (NUCB2), was initially identified as a feeding-suppressing neuropeptide, acting at central (mainly, hypothalamic) levels in a leptin-independent manner. However, recent experimental evidence strongly suggests that, rather than being a simple anorectic hypothalamic signal, nesfatin-1 operates at different tissues as an integral regulator of energy homeostasis and closely related neuroendocrine functions. On the latter, growing, albeit as yet fragmentary, evidence has pointed out recently that NUCB2/ nesfatin-1 is involved in the regulation of different aspects of reproductive maturation and function, by acting probably at different levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. As documented by rodent studies, the reproductive facet of nesfatin-1 likely includes (i) a permissive role in (female) pubertal maturation, (ii) stimulatory effects on the gonadotropic axis, whose magnitude, in terms of LH responses, varies depending on the maturational stage and probably the sex and species, and (iii) direct expression and actions in the gonads. These features, together with the proven expression of NUCB2/nesfatin-1 in tissues with essential roles in the metabolic control of reproduction, such as the hypothalamus, adipose and pancreas, support a putative role of nesfatin-1 as neurohormonal signal linking body metabolic status, puberty and fertility. Curiously enough, although its reproductive dimension seems to be conserved in non-mammalian vertebrates, recent studies in goldfish have surfaced predominant inhibitory actions of nesfatin-1 at different levels of the HPG axis in fish. These findings illustrate our as yet limited understanding of this aspect of nesfatin-1 physiology, whose relevance in the joint control of metabolism and reproduction in health and disease warrants further investigation.

  20. Microbial community assembly and metabolic function during mammalian corpse decomposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metcalf, Jessica L; Xu, Zhenjiang Zech; Weiss, Sophie; Lax, Simon; Van Treuren, Will; Hyde, Embriette R.; Song, Se Jin; Amir, Amnon; Larsen, Peter; Sangwan, Naseer; Haarmann, Daniel; Humphrey, Greg C; Ackermann, Gail; Thompson, Luke R; Lauber, Christian; Bibat, Alexander; Nicholas, Catherine; Gebert, Matthew J; Petrosino, Joseph F; Reed, Sasha C.; Gilbert, Jack A; Lynne, Aaron M; Bucheli, Sibyl R; Carter, David O; Knight, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Vertebrate corpse decomposition provides an important stage in nutrient cycling in most terrestrial habitats, yet microbially mediated processes are poorly understood. Here we combine deep microbial community characterization, community-level metabolic reconstruction, and soil biogeochemical assessment to understand the principles governing microbial community assembly during decomposition of mouse and human corpses on different soil substrates. We find a suite of bacterial and fungal groups that contribute to nitrogen cycling and a reproducible network of decomposers that emerge on predictable time scales. Our results show that this decomposer community is derived primarily from bulk soil, but key decomposers are ubiquitous in low abundance. Soil type was not a dominant factor driving community development, and the process of decomposition is sufficiently reproducible to offer new opportunities for forensic investigations.

  1. Microbial community assembly and metabolic function during mammalian corpse decomposition.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Jessica L; Xu, Zhenjiang Zech; Weiss, Sophie; Lax, Simon; Van Treuren, Will; Hyde, Embriette R; Song, Se Jin; Amir, Amnon; Larsen, Peter; Sangwan, Naseer; Haarmann, Daniel; Humphrey, Greg C; Ackermann, Gail; Thompson, Luke R; Lauber, Christian; Bibat, Alexander; Nicholas, Catherine; Gebert, Matthew J; Petrosino, Joseph F; Reed, Sasha C; Gilbert, Jack A; Lynne, Aaron M; Bucheli, Sibyl R; Carter, David O; Knight, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Vertebrate corpse decomposition provides an important stage in nutrient cycling in most terrestrial habitats, yet microbially mediated processes are poorly understood. Here we combine deep microbial community characterization, community-level metabolic reconstruction, and soil biogeochemical assessment to understand the principles governing microbial community assembly during decomposition of mouse and human corpses on different soil substrates. We find a suite of bacterial and fungal groups that contribute to nitrogen cycling and a reproducible network of decomposers that emerge on predictable time scales. Our results show that this decomposer community is derived primarily from bulk soil, but key decomposers are ubiquitous in low abundance. Soil type was not a dominant factor driving community development, and the process of decomposition is sufficiently reproducible to offer new opportunities for forensic investigations.

  2. Microbial community assembly and metabolic function during mammalian corpse decomposition.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Jessica L; Xu, Zhenjiang Zech; Weiss, Sophie; Lax, Simon; Van Treuren, Will; Hyde, Embriette R; Song, Se Jin; Amir, Amnon; Larsen, Peter; Sangwan, Naseer; Haarmann, Daniel; Humphrey, Greg C; Ackermann, Gail; Thompson, Luke R; Lauber, Christian; Bibat, Alexander; Nicholas, Catherine; Gebert, Matthew J; Petrosino, Joseph F; Reed, Sasha C; Gilbert, Jack A; Lynne, Aaron M; Bucheli, Sibyl R; Carter, David O; Knight, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Vertebrate corpse decomposition provides an important stage in nutrient cycling in most terrestrial habitats, yet microbially mediated processes are poorly understood. Here we combine deep microbial community characterization, community-level metabolic reconstruction, and soil biogeochemical assessment to understand the principles governing microbial community assembly during decomposition of mouse and human corpses on different soil substrates. We find a suite of bacterial and fungal groups that contribute to nitrogen cycling and a reproducible network of decomposers that emerge on predictable time scales. Our results show that this decomposer community is derived primarily from bulk soil, but key decomposers are ubiquitous in low abundance. Soil type was not a dominant factor driving community development, and the process of decomposition is sufficiently reproducible to offer new opportunities for forensic investigations. PMID:26657285

  3. Estrogen-related receptor α, the molecular clock, and transcriptional control of metabolic outputs.

    PubMed

    Giguère, V; Dufour, C R; Eichner, L J; Deblois, G; Cermakian, N

    2011-01-01

    Metabolism and circadian rhythms must be closely integrated to support the energetic needs of the organism linked to the daily timing of physiological and behavioral processes. Although components of the molecular clock can directly target some metabolic genes, the control of metabolic clock output is believed to be mediated mostly through the action of transcription factors whose patterns of expression are rhythmic in metabolic tissues. Our recent work has identified the orphan nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα), a potent effector of metabolic gene networks, as a direct regulator of the molecular clock. Thus, by acting both upstream of and downstream from the molecular clock, ERRα serves as a key transcription factor linking the clock with metabolic control.

  4. Contextual Control by Function and Form of Transfer of Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, David R.; Dougher, Michael J.; Greenway, David E.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated conditions leading to contextual control by stimulus topography over transfer of functions. Three 4-member stimulus equivalence classes, each consisting of four (A, B, C, D) topographically distinct visual stimuli, were established for 5 college students. Across classes, designated A stimuli were open-ended linear figures,…

  5. Chronic Alcohol Ingestion in Rats Alters Lung Metabolism, Promotes Lipid Accumulation, and Impairs Alveolar Macrophage Functions

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Freddy; Shah, Dilip; Duong, Michelle; Stafstrom, William; Hoek, Jan B.; Kallen, Caleb B.; Lang, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic alcoholism impairs pulmonary immune homeostasis and predisposes to inflammatory lung diseases, including infectious pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Although alcoholism has been shown to alter hepatic metabolism, leading to lipid accumulation, hepatitis, and, eventually, cirrhosis, the effects of alcohol on pulmonary metabolism remain largely unknown. Because both the lung and the liver actively engage in lipid synthesis, we hypothesized that chronic alcoholism would impair pulmonary metabolic homeostasis in ways similar to its effects in the liver. We reasoned that perturbations in lipid metabolism might contribute to the impaired pulmonary immunity observed in people who chronically consume alcohol. We studied the metabolic consequences of chronic alcohol consumption in rat lungs in vivo and in alveolar epithelial type II cells and alveolar macrophages (AMs) in vitro. We found that chronic alcohol ingestion significantly alters lung metabolic homeostasis, inhibiting AMP-activated protein kinase, increasing lipid synthesis, and suppressing the expression of genes essential to metabolizing fatty acids (FAs). Furthermore, we show that these metabolic alterations promoted a lung phenotype that is reminiscent of alcoholic fatty liver and is characterized by marked accumulation of triglycerides and free FAs within distal airspaces, AMs, and, to a lesser extent, alveolar epithelial type II cells. We provide evidence that the metabolic alterations in alcohol-exposed rats are mechanistically linked to immune impairments in the alcoholic lung: the elevations in FAs alter AM phenotypes and suppress both phagocytic functions and agonist-induced inflammatory responses. In summary, our work demonstrates that chronic alcohol ingestion impairs lung metabolic homeostasis and promotes pulmonary immune dysfunction. These findings suggest that therapies aimed at reversing alcohol-related metabolic alterations might be effective for preventing and

  6. Systems mapping of metabolic genes through control theory.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guodong; Kong, Lan; Wang, Zhong; Wang, Chenguang; Wu, Rongling

    2013-06-30

    The formation of any complex phenotype involves a web of metabolic pathways in which one chemical is transformed through the catalysis of enzymes into another. Traditional approaches for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs) are based on a direct association analysis between DNA marker genotypes and end-point phenotypes, neglecting the mechanistic processes of how a phenotype is formed biochemically. Here, we propose a new dynamic framework for mapping metabolic QTLs (mQTLs) responsible for phenotypic formation. By treating metabolic pathways as a biological system, robust differential equations have proven to be a powerful means of studying and predicting the dynamic behavior of biochemical reactions that cause a high-order phenotype. The new framework integrates these differential equations into a statistical mixture model for QTL mapping. Since the mathematical parameters that define the emergent properties of the metabolic system can be estimated and tested for different mQTL genotypes, the framework allows the dynamic pattern of genetic effects to be quantified on metabolic capacity and efficacy across a time-space scale. Based on a recent study of glycolysis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we design and perform a series of simulation studies to investigate the statistical properties of the framework and validate its usefulness and utilization in practice. This framework can be generalized to mapping QTLs for any other dynamic systems and may stimulate pharmacogenetic research toward personalized drug and treatment intervention. PMID:23603209

  7. Locomotor Adaptation Improves Balance Control, Multitasking Ability and Reduces the Metabolic Cost of Postural Instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomberg, J. J.; Peters, B. T.; Mulavara, A. P.; Brady, R. A.; Batson, C. D.; Miller, C. A.; Ploutz-Snyder, R. J.; Guined, J. R.; Buxton, R. E.; Cohen, H. S.

    2011-01-01

    During exploration-class missions, sensorimotor disturbances may lead to disruption in the ability to ambulate and perform functional tasks during the initial introduction to a novel gravitational environment following a landing on a planetary surface. The overall goal of our current project is to develop a sensorimotor adaptability training program to facilitate rapid adaptation to these environments. We have developed a unique training system comprised of a treadmill placed on a motion-base facing a virtual visual scene. It provides an unstable walking surface combined with incongruent visual flow designed to enhance sensorimotor adaptability. Greater metabolic cost incurred during balance instability means more physical work is required during adaptation to new environments possibly affecting crewmembers? ability to perform mission critical tasks during early surface operations on planetary expeditions. The goal of this study was to characterize adaptation to a discordant sensory challenge across a number of performance modalities including locomotor stability, multi-tasking ability and metabolic cost. METHODS: Subjects (n=15) walked (4.0 km/h) on a treadmill for an 8 -minute baseline walking period followed by 20-minutes of walking (4.0 km/h) with support surface motion (0.3 Hz, sinusoidal lateral motion, peak amplitude 25.4 cm) provided by the treadmill/motion-base system. Stride frequency and auditory reaction time were collected as measures of locomotor stability and multi-tasking ability, respectively. Metabolic data (VO2) were collected via a portable metabolic gas analysis system. RESULTS: At the onset of lateral support surface motion, subj ects walking on our treadmill showed an increase in stride frequency and auditory reaction time indicating initial balance and multi-tasking disturbances. During the 20-minute adaptation period, balance control and multi-tasking performance improved. Similarly, throughout the 20-minute adaptation period, VO2 gradually

  8. A worm of one's own: how helminths modulate host adipose tissue function and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Guigas, Bruno; Molofsky, Ari B

    2015-09-01

    Parasitic helminths have coexisted with human beings throughout time. Success in eradicating helminths has limited helminth-induced morbidity and mortality but is also correlated with increasing rates of 'western' diseases, including metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Recent studies in mice describe how type 2 immune cells, traditionally associated with helminth infection, maintain adipose tissue homeostasis and promote adipose tissue beiging, protecting against obesity and metabolic dysfunction. Here, we review these studies and discuss how helminths and helminth-derived molecules may modulate these physiologic pathways to improve metabolic functions in specific tissues, such as adipose and liver, as well as at the whole-organism level.

  9. Astrocytes Control Synapse Formation, Function, and Elimination

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Won-Suk; Allen, Nicola J.; Eroglu, Cagla

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes, through their close associations with synapses, can monitor and alter synaptic function, thus actively controlling synaptic transmission in the adult brain. Besides their important role at adult synapses, in the last three decades a number of critical findings have highlighted the importance of astrocytes in the establishment of synaptic connectivity in the developing brain. In this article, we will review the key findings on astrocytic control of synapse formation, function, and elimination. First, we will summarize our current structural and functional understanding of astrocytes at the synapse. Then, we will discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms through which developing and mature astrocytes instruct the formation, maturation, and refinement of synapses. Our aim is to provide an overview of astrocytes as important players in the establishment of a functional nervous system. PMID:25663667

  10. PTENα, a PTEN isoform translated through alternative initiation, regulates mitochondrial function and energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hui; He, Shiming; Yang, Jingyi; Jia, Xinying; Wang, Pan; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Zhong; Zou, Xiajuan; McNutt, Michael A; Shen, Wen Hong; Yin, Yuxin

    2014-05-01

    PTEN is one of the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer. It is known that PTEN has a wide range of biological functions beyond tumor suppression. Here, we report that PTENα, an N-terminally extended form of PTEN, functions in mitochondrial metabolism. Translation of PTENα is initiated from a CUG codon upstream of and in-frame with the coding region of canonical PTEN. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2A (eIF2A) controls PTENα translation, which requires a CUG-centered palindromic motif. We show that PTENα induces cytochrome c oxidase activity and ATP production in mitochondria. TALEN-mediated somatic deletion of PTENα impairs mitochondrial respiratory chain function. PTENα interacts with canonical PTEN to increase PINK1 protein levels and promote energy production. Our studies demonstrate the importance of eIF2A-mediated alternative translation for generation of protein diversity in eukaryotic systems and provide insights into the mechanism by which the PTEN family is involved in multiple cellular processes.

  11. Phosphoinositide Control of Membrane Protein Function

    PubMed Central

    Logothetis, Diomedes E.; Petrou, Vasileios I.; Zhang, Miao; Mahajan, Rahul; Meng, Xuan-Yu; Adney, Scott K.; Cui, Meng; Baki, Lia

    2015-01-01

    Anionic phospholipids are critical constituents of the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane, ensuring appropriate membrane topology of transmembrane proteins. Additionally, in eukaryotes, the negatively charged phosphoinositides serve as key signals not only through their hydrolysis products but also through direct control of transmembrane protein function. Direct phosphoinositide control of the activity of ion channels and transporters has been the most convincing case of the critical importance of phospholipid-protein interactions in the functional control of membrane proteins. Furthermore, second messengers, such as [Ca2+]i, or posttranslational modifications, such as phosphorylation, can directly or allosterically fine-tune phospholipid-protein interactions and modulate activity. Recent advances in structure determination of membrane proteins have allowed investigators to obtain complexes of ion channels with phosphoinositides and to use computational and experimental approaches to probe the dynamic mechanisms by which lipid-protein interactions control active and inactive protein states. PMID:25293526

  12. Molecular changes in hepatic metabolism and transport in cirrhosis and their functional importance

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Christoph G; Götze, Oliver; Geier, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is the common endpoint of many hepatic diseases and represents a relevant risk for liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma. The progress of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis is accompanied by deteriorating liver function. This review summarizes the regulatory and functional changes in phase I and phase II metabolic enzymes as well as transport proteins and provides an overview regarding lipid and glucose metabolism in cirrhotic patients. Interestingly, phase I enzymes are generally downregulated transcriptionally, while phase II enzymes are mostly preserved transcriptionally but are reduced in their function. Transport proteins are regulated in a specific way that resembles the molecular changes observed in obstructive cholestasis. Lipid and glucose metabolism are characterized by insulin resistance and catabolism, leading to the disturbance of energy expenditure and wasting. Possible non-invasive tests, especially breath tests, for components of liver metabolism are discussed. The heterogeneity and complexity of changes in hepatic metabolism complicate the assessment of liver function in individual patients. Additionally, studies in humans are rare, and species differences preclude the transferability of data from rodents to humans. In clinical practice, some established global scores or criteria form the basis for the functional evaluation of patients with liver cirrhosis, but difficult treatment decisions such as selection for transplantation or resection require further research regarding the application of existing non-invasive tests and the development of more specific tests. PMID:26755861

  13. Imaging control functions of optical scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishinaga, Hisashi; Hirayama, Toru; Fujii, Daiyu; Yamamoto, Hajime; Irihama, Hiroshi; Ogata, Taro; Koizumi, Yukio; Suzuki, Kenta; Fujishima, Yohei; Matsuyama, Tomoyuki; Kawaguchi, Ryoichi

    2014-03-01

    For future printing based on multiple patterning and directed self-assembly, critical dimension and overlay requirements become tighter for immersion lithography. Thermal impact of exposure to both the projection lens and reticle expansion becomes the dominant factor for high volume production. A new procedure to tune the thermal control function is needed to maintain the tool conditions to obtain high productivity and accuracy. Additionally, new functions of both hardware and software are used to improve the imaging performance even during exposure with high-dose conditions. In this paper, we describe the procedure to tune the thermal control parameters which indicate the response of projection lens aberration and reticle expansion separately. As new functionalities to control the thermal lens aberration, wavefront-based lens control software and reticle bending hardware are introduced. By applying these functions, thermal focus control can be improved drastically. Further, the capability of prediction of reticle expansion is discussed, including experimental data from overlay exposure and aerial image sensor results.

  14. The preprotein translocase YidC controls respiratory metabolism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Preeti; Gantasala, Nagavara Prasad; Choudhary, Eira; Singh, Nirpendra; Abdin, Malik Zainul; Agarwal, Nisheeth

    2016-01-01

    The YidC–Oxa1–Alb3 preprotein translocases play a vital role in membrane insertion of proteins in eukaryotes and bacteria. In a recent study we observed that Rv3921c, which encodes putative YidC translocase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), is essential for in vitro growth of bacteria. However, the exact function of this particular protein remains to identify in mycobacterial pathogens. By performing a systematic study here we show that YidC of Mtb is an envelope protein, which is required for production of ATP and maintenance of cellular redox balance. Drastic effects of depletion of Rv3921c on the expression of hypoxic genes, ATP synthases, and many proteins of central metabolic and respiratory pathways shed a significant light on the function of YidC towards controlling respiratory metabolism in Mtb. Association of YidC with proteins such as succinate dehydrogenases and ubiquinol-cytochrome C reductase further confirms its role in respiration. Finally we demonstrate that YidC is required for the intracellular survival of Mtb in human macrophages. PMID:27166092

  15. Exercise-stimulated interleukin-15 is controlled by AMPK and regulates skin metabolism and aging.

    PubMed

    Crane, Justin D; MacNeil, Lauren G; Lally, James S; Ford, Rebecca J; Bujak, Adam L; Brar, Ikdip K; Kemp, Bruce E; Raha, Sandeep; Steinberg, Gregory R; Tarnopolsky, Mark A

    2015-08-01

    Aging is commonly associated with a structural deterioration of skin that compromises its barrier function, healing, and susceptibility to disease. Several lines of evidence show that these changes are driven largely by impaired tissue mitochondrial metabolism. While exercise is associated with numerous health benefits, there is no evidence that it affects skin tissue or that endocrine muscle-to-skin signaling occurs. We demonstrate that endurance exercise attenuates age-associated changes to skin in humans and mice and identify exercise-induced IL-15 as a novel regulator of mitochondrial function in aging skin. We show that exercise controls IL-15 expression in part through skeletal muscle AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a central regulator of metabolism, and that the elimination of muscle AMPK causes a deterioration of skin structure. Finally, we establish that daily IL-15 therapy mimics some of the anti-aging effects of exercise on muscle and skin in mice. Thus, we elucidate a mechanism by which exercise confers health benefits to skin and suggest that low-dose IL-15 therapy may prove to be a beneficial strategy to attenuate skin aging.

  16. Proteomics-Based Metabolic Modeling Reveals That Fatty Acid Oxidation (FAO) Controls Endothelial Cell (EC) Permeability*

    PubMed Central

    Patella, Francesca; Schug, Zachary T.; Persi, Erez; Neilson, Lisa J.; Erami, Zahra; Avanzato, Daniele; Maione, Federica; Hernandez-Fernaud, Juan R.; Mackay, Gillian; Zheng, Liang; Reid, Steven; Frezza, Christian; Giraudo, Enrico; Fiorio Pla, Alessandra; Anderson, Kurt; Ruppin, Eytan; Gottlieb, Eyal; Zanivan, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) play a key role to maintain the functionality of blood vessels. Altered EC permeability causes severe impairment in vessel stability and is a hallmark of pathologies such as cancer and thrombosis. Integrating label-free quantitative proteomics data into genome-wide metabolic modeling, we built up a model that predicts the metabolic fluxes in ECs when cultured on a tridimensional matrix and organize into a vascular-like network. We discovered how fatty acid oxidation increases when ECs are assembled into a fully formed network that can be disrupted by inhibiting CPT1A, the fatty acid oxidation rate-limiting enzyme. Acute CPT1A inhibition reduces cellular ATP levels and oxygen consumption, which are restored by replenishing the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Remarkably, global phosphoproteomic changes measured upon acute CPT1A inhibition pinpointed altered calcium signaling. Indeed, CPT1A inhibition increases intracellular calcium oscillations. Finally, inhibiting CPT1A induces hyperpermeability in vitro and leakage of blood vessel in vivo, which were restored blocking calcium influx or replenishing the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Fatty acid oxidation emerges as central regulator of endothelial functions and blood vessel stability and druggable pathway to control pathological vascular permeability. PMID:25573745

  17. Sensitive cells: enabling tools for static and dynamic control of microbial metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Cress, Brady F; Trantas, Emmanouil A; Ververidis, Filippos; Linhardt, Robert J; Koffas, Mattheos Ag

    2015-12-01

    Natural metabolic pathways are dynamically regulated at the transcriptional, translational, and protein levels. Despite this, traditional pathway engineering has relied on static control strategies to engender changes in metabolism, most likely due to ease of implementation and perceived predictability of design outcome. Increasingly in recent years, however, metabolic engineers have drawn inspiration from natural systems and have begun to harness dynamically controlled regulatory machinery to improve design of engineered microorganisms for production of specialty and commodity chemicals. Here, we review recent enabling technologies for engineering static control over pathway expression levels, and we discuss state-of-the-art dynamic control strategies that have yielded improved outcomes in the field of microbial metabolic engineering. Furthermore, we emphasize design of a novel class of genetically encoded controllers that will facilitate automatic, transient tuning of synthetic and endogenous pathways.

  18. Embryonic MicroRNA-369 Controls Metabolic Splicing Factors and Urges Cellular Reprograming.

    PubMed

    Konno, Masamitsu; Koseki, Jun; Kawamoto, Koichi; Nishida, Naohiro; Matsui, Hidetoshi; Dewi, Dyah Laksmi; Ozaki, Miyuki; Noguchi, Yuko; Mimori, Koshi; Gotoh, Noriko; Tanuma, Nobuhiro; Shima, Hiroshi; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki; Ishii, Hideshi

    2015-01-01

    Noncoding microRNAs inhibit translation and lower the transcript stability of coding mRNA, however miR-369 s, in aberrant silencing genomic regions, stabilizes target proteins under cellular stress. We found that in vitro differentiation of embryonic stem cells led to chromatin methylation of histone H3K4 at the miR-369 region on chromosome 12qF in mice, which is expressed in embryonic cells and is critical for pluripotency. Proteomic analyses revealed that miR-369 stabilized translation of pyruvate kinase (Pkm2) splicing factors such as HNRNPA2B1. Overexpression of miR-369 stimulated Pkm2 splicing and enhanced induction of cellular reprogramming by induced pluripotent stem cell factors, whereas miR-369 knockdown resulted in suppression. Furthermore, immunoprecipitation analysis showed that the Argonaute complex contained the fragile X mental retardation-related protein 1 and HNRNPA2B1 in a miR-369-depedent manner. Our findings demonstrate a unique role of the embryonic miR-369-HNRNPA2B1 axis in controlling metabolic enzyme function, and suggest a novel pathway linking epigenetic, transcriptional, and metabolic control in cell reprogramming. PMID:26176628

  19. Embryonic MicroRNA-369 Controls Metabolic Splicing Factors and Urges Cellular Reprograming

    PubMed Central

    Konno, Masamitsu; Koseki, Jun; Kawamoto, Koichi; Nishida, Naohiro; Matsui, Hidetoshi; Dewi, Dyah Laksmi; Ozaki, Miyuki; Noguchi, Yuko; Mimori, Koshi; Gotoh, Noriko; Tanuma, Nobuhiro; Shima, Hiroshi; Doki, Yuichiro

    2015-01-01

    Noncoding microRNAs inhibit translation and lower the transcript stability of coding mRNA, however miR-369 s, in aberrant silencing genomic regions, stabilizes target proteins under cellular stress. We found that in vitro differentiation of embryonic stem cells led to chromatin methylation of histone H3K4 at the miR-369 region on chromosome 12qF in mice, which is expressed in embryonic cells and is critical for pluripotency. Proteomic analyses revealed that miR-369 stabilized translation of pyruvate kinase (Pkm2) splicing factors such as HNRNPA2B1. Overexpression of miR-369 stimulated Pkm2 splicing and enhanced induction of cellular reprogramming by induced pluripotent stem cell factors, whereas miR-369 knockdown resulted in suppression. Furthermore, immunoprecipitation analysis showed that the Argonaute complex contained the fragile X mental retardation-related protein 1 and HNRNPA2B1 in a miR-369-depedent manner. Our findings demonstrate a unique role of the embryonic miR-369-HNRNPA2B1 axis in controlling metabolic enzyme function, and suggest a novel pathway linking epigenetic, transcriptional, and metabolic control in cell reprogramming. PMID:26176628

  20. Controlled functionalization of nanoparticles & practical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashwan, Khaled

    With the increasing use of nanoparticles in both science and industry, their chemical modification became a significant part of nanotechnology. Unfortunately, most commonly used procedures provide just randomly functionalized materials. The long-term objective of our work is site- and stoichiometrically-controlled functionalization of nanoparticles with the utilization of solid supports and other nanostructures. On the examples of silica nanoparticles and titanium dioxide nanorods, we have obtained results on the solid-phase chemistry, method development, and modeling, which advanced us toward this goal. At the same time, we explored several applications of nanoparticles that will benefit from the controlled functionalization: imaging of titanium-dioxide-based photocatalysts, bioimaging by fluorescent nanoparticles, drug delivery, assembling of bone implants, and dental compositions. Titanium dioxide-based catalysts are known for their catalytic activity and their application in solar energy utilization such as photosplitting of water. Functionalization of titanium dioxide is essential for enhancing bone-titanium dioxide nanotube adhesion, and, therefore, for its application as an interface between titanium implants and bones. Controlled functionalization of nanoparticles should enhance sensitivity and selectivity of nanoassemblies for imaging and drug delivery applications. Along those lines, we studied the relationship between morphology and surface chemistry of nanoparticles, and their affinity to organic molecules (salicylic and caffeic acid) using Langmuir adsorption isotherms, and toward material surfaces using SEM- and TEM-imaging. We focused on commercial samples of titanium dioxide, titanium dioxide nanorods with and without oleic acid ligands, and differently functionalized silica nanoparticles. My work included synthesis, functionalization, and characterization of several types of nanoparticles, exploring their application in imaging, dentistry, and bone

  1. Emergence of Complexity in Protein Functions and Metabolic Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andzej

    2009-01-01

    In modern organisms proteins perform a majority of cellular functions, such as chemical catalysis, energy transduction and transport of material across cell walls. Although great strides have been made towards understanding protein evolution, a meaningful extrapolation from contemporary proteins to their earliest ancestors is virtually impossible. In an alternative approach, the origin of water-soluble proteins was probed through the synthesis of very large libraries of random amino acid sequences and subsequently subjecting them to in vitro evolution. In combination with computer modeling and simulations, these experiments allow us to address a number of fundamental questions about the origins of proteins. Can functionality emerge from random sequences of proteins? How did the initial repertoire of functional proteins diversify to facilitate new functions? Did this diversification proceed primarily through drawing novel functionalities from random sequences or through evolution of already existing proto-enzymes? Did protein evolution start from a pool of proteins defined by a frozen accident and other collections of proteins could start a different evolutionary pathway? Although we do not have definitive answers to these questions, important clues have been uncovered. Considerable progress has been also achieved in understanding the origins of membrane proteins. We will address this issue in the example of ion channels - proteins that mediate transport of ions across cell walls. Remarkably, despite overall complexity of these proteins in contemporary cells, their structural motifs are quite simple, with -helices being most common. By combining results of experimental and computer simulation studies on synthetic models and simple, natural channels, I will show that, even though architectures of membrane proteins are not nearly as diverse as those of water-soluble proteins, they are sufficiently flexible to adapt readily to the functional demands arising during

  2. Genome-wide functional annotation and structural verification of metabolic ORFeome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent advances in the field of metabolic engineering have been expedited by the availability of genome sequences and metabolic modelling approaches. The complete sequencing of the C. reinhardtii genome has made this unicellular alga a good candidate for metabolic engineering studies; however, the annotation of the relevant genes has not been validated and the much-needed metabolic ORFeome is currently unavailable. We describe our efforts on the functional annotation of the ORF models released by the Joint Genome Institute (JGI), prediction of their subcellular localizations, and experimental verification of their structural annotation at the genome scale. Results We assigned enzymatic functions to the translated JGI ORF models of C. reinhardtii by reciprocal BLAST searches of the putative proteome against the UniProt and AraCyc enzyme databases. The best match for each translated ORF was identified and the EC numbers were transferred onto the ORF models. Enzymatic functional assignment was extended to the paralogs of the ORFs by clustering ORFs using BLASTCLUST. In total, we assigned 911 enzymatic functions, including 886 EC numbers, to 1,427 transcripts. We further annotated the enzymatic ORFs by prediction of their subcellular localization. The majority of the ORFs are predicted to be compartmentalized in the cytosol and chloroplast. We verified the structure of the metabolism-related ORF models by reverse transcription-PCR of the functionally annotated ORFs. Following amplification and cloning, we carried out 454FLX and Sanger sequencing of the ORFs. Based on alignment of the 454FLX reads to the ORF predicted sequences, we obtained more than 90% coverage for more than 80% of the ORFs. In total, 1,087 ORF models were verified by 454 and Sanger sequencing methods. We obtained expression evidence for 98% of the metabolic ORFs in the algal cells grown under constant light in the presence of acetate. Conclusions We functionally annotated approximately 1

  3. Endocannabinoid functions controlling neuronal specification during brain development.

    PubMed

    Harkany, Tibor; Keimpema, Erik; Barabás, Klaudia; Mulder, Jan

    2008-04-16

    Endocannabinoids (eCBs) regulate a broad range of physiological functions in the postnatal brain and are implicated in the neuropathogenesis of psychiatric and metabolic diseases. Accumulating evidence indicates that eCB signaling also serves key functions during neurodevelopment; and is inherently involved in the control of neurogenesis, neural progenitor proliferation, lineage segregation, and the migration and phenotypic specification of immature neurons. Recent advances in developmental biology define fundamental eCB-driven cellular mechanisms that also contribute to our understanding of the molecular substrates of prenatal drug, in particular cannabis, actions. Here, we summarize known organizing principles of eCB-signaling systems in the developing telencephalon, and outline the sequence of decision points and underlying signaling pathways upon CB1 cannabinoid receptor activation that contribute to neuronal diversification in the developing brain. Finally, we discuss how these novel principles affect the formation of complex neuronal networks.

  4. Engineering a Lysine-ON Riboswitch for Metabolic Control of Lysine Production in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li-Bang; Zeng, An-Ping

    2015-12-18

    Riboswitches are natural RNA elements that regulate gene expression by binding a ligand. Here, we demonstrate the possibility of altering a natural lysine-OFF riboswitch from Eschericia coli (ECRS) to a synthetic lysine-ON riboswitch and using it for metabolic control. To this end, a lysine-ON riboswitch library was constructed using tetA-based dual genetic selection. After screening the library, the functionality of the selected lysine-ON riboswitches was examined using a report gene, lacZ. Selected lysine-ON riboswitches were introduced into the lysE gene (encoding a lysine transport protein) of Corynebacterium glutamicum and used to achieve dynamic control of lysine transport in a recombinant lysine-producing strain, C. glutamicum LPECRS, which bears a deregulated aspartokinase and a lysine-OFF riboswitch for dynamic control of the enzyme citrate synthase. Batch fermentation results of the strains showed that the C. glutamicum LPECRS strain with an additional lysine-ON riboswitch for the control of lysE achieved a 21% increase in the yield of lysine compared to that of the C. glutamicum LPECRS strain and even a 89% increase in yield compared to that of the strain with deregulated aspartokinase. This work provides a useful approach to generate lysine-ON riboswitches for C. glutamicum metabolic engineering and demonstrates for the first time a synergetic effect of lysine-ON and -OFF riboswitches for improving lysine production in this industrially important microorganism. The approach can be used to dynamically control other genes and can be applied to other microorganisms. PMID:26300047

  5. Metabolic Design and Control for Production in Prokaryotes

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabra, Swapnil R.; Keasling, J.D.

    2010-11-10

    Prokaryotic life on earth is manifested by its diversity and omnipresence. These microbes serve as natural sources of a large variety of compounds with the potential to serve the ever growing, medicinal, chemical and transportation needs of the human population. However, commercially viable production of these compounds can be realized only through significant improvement of the native production capacity of natural isolates. The most favorable way to achieve this goal is through the genetic manipulation of metabolic pathways that direct the production of these molecules. While random mutagenesis and screening have dominated the industrial production of such compounds in the past our increased understanding of microbial physiology over the last five decades has shifted this trend towards rational approaches for metabolic design. Major drivers of this trend include recombinant DNA technology, high throughput characterization of macromolecular cellular components, quantitative modeling for metabolic engine ring, targeted combinatorial engineering and synthetic biology. In this chapter we track the evolution of microbial engineering technologies from the black box era of random mutagenesis to the science and engineering-driven era of metabolic design.

  6. Hormonal control of metabolic substrate use by birds and reptiles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The differential use of metabolic substrates by birds is not well understood. Therefore, to clarify which substrates are preferentially utilized, studies were conducted on birds with divergent dietary habits and on a close non-avian relative of birds, alligators. Fasting plasma substrate and hormone...

  7. Bidirectional electromagnetic control of the hypothalamus regulates feeding and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Sarah A; Kelly, Leah; Latcha, Kaamashri N; Schmidt, Sarah F; Yu, Xiaofei; Nectow, Alexander R; Sauer, Jeremy; Dyke, Jonathan P; Dordick, Jonathan S; Friedman, Jeffrey M

    2016-03-31

    Targeted, temporally regulated neural modulation is invaluable in determining the physiological roles of specific neural populations or circuits. Here we describe a system for non-invasive, temporal activation or inhibition of neuronal activity in vivo and its use to study central nervous system control of glucose homeostasis and feeding in mice. We are able to induce neuronal activation remotely using radio waves or magnetic fields via Cre-dependent expression of a GFP-tagged ferritin fusion protein tethered to the cation-conducting transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) by a camelid anti-GFP antibody (anti-GFP-TRPV1). Neuronal inhibition via the same stimuli is achieved by mutating the TRPV1 pore, rendering the channel chloride-permeable. These constructs were targeted to glucose-sensing neurons in the ventromedial hypothalamus in glucokinase-Cre mice, which express Cre in glucose-sensing neurons. Acute activation of glucose-sensing neurons in this region increases plasma glucose and glucagon, lowers insulin levels and stimulates feeding, while inhibition reduces blood glucose, raises insulin levels and suppresses feeding. These results suggest that pancreatic hormones function as an effector mechanism of central nervous system circuits controlling blood glucose and behaviour. The method we employ obviates the need for permanent implants and could potentially be applied to study other neural processes or used to regulate other, even dispersed, cell types. PMID:27007848

  8. Bidirectional electromagnetic control of the hypothalamus regulates feeding and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Sarah A.; Kelly, Leah; Latcha, Kaamashri N.; Schmidt, Sarah F.; Yu, Xiaofei; Nectow, Alexander R.; Sauer, Jeremy; Dyke, Jonathan P.; Dordick, Jonathan S.; Friedman, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    Targeted, temporally regulated neural modulation is invaluable in determining the physiological roles of specific neural populations or circuits. Here we describe a system for non-invasive, temporal activation or inhibition of neuronal activity in vivo and its use to study central nervous system control of glucose homeostasis and feeding in mice. We are able to induce neuronal activation remotely using radio waves or magnetic fields via Cre-dependent expression of a GFP-tagged ferritin fusion protein tethered to the cation-conducting transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) by a camelid anti-GFP antibody (anti-GFP–TRPV1)1. Neuronal inhibition via the same stimuli is achieved by mutating the TRPV1 pore, rendering the channel chloride-permeable. These constructs were targeted to glucose-sensing neurons in the ventromedial hypothalamus in glucokinase–Cre mice, which express Cre in glucose-sensing neurons2. Acute activation of glucose-sensing neurons in this region increases plasma glucose and glucagon, lowers insulin levels and stimulates feeding, while inhibition reduces blood glucose, raises insulin levels and suppresses feeding. These results suggest that pancreatic hormones function as an effector mechanism of central nervous system circuits controlling blood glucose and behaviour. The method we employ obviates the need for permanent implants and could potentially be applied to study other neural processes or used to regulate other, even dispersed, cell types. PMID:27007848

  9. Steroid Receptor Coactivators: Servants and Masters for Control of Systems Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Stashi, Erin; York, Brian; O’Malley, Bert W.

    2014-01-01

    Coregulator recruitment to nuclear receptors (NRs) and other transcription factors is essential for proper metabolic gene regulation with coactivators enhancing and corepressors attenuating gene transcription. The Steroid Receptor Coactivator (SRC) family is composed of three homologous members (SRC-1, SRC-2, and SRC-3), which are uniquely important for mediating steroid hormone and mitogenic actions. An accumulating body of work highlights the diverse array of metabolic functions regulated by the SRCs, including systemic metabolite homeostasis, inflammation, and energy regulation. Here we discuss the cooperative and unique functions among the SRCs to provide a comprehensive atlas of systemic SRC metabolic regulation. Deciphering the fractional and synergistic contributions of the SRCs to metabolic homeostasis is critical to fully understand the networks underlying metabolic transcriptional regulation. PMID:24953190

  10. Deep networks for motor control functions

    PubMed Central

    Berniker, Max; Kording, Konrad P.

    2015-01-01

    The motor system generates time-varying commands to move our limbs and body. Conventional descriptions of motor control and learning rely on dynamical representations of our body's state (forward and inverse models), and control policies that must be integrated forward to generate feedforward time-varying commands; thus these are representations across space, but not time. Here we examine a new approach that directly represents both time-varying commands and the resulting state trajectories with a function; a representation across space and time. Since the output of this function includes time, it necessarily requires more parameters than a typical dynamical model. To avoid the problems of local minima these extra parameters introduce, we exploit recent advances in machine learning to build our function using a stacked autoencoder, or deep network. With initial and target states as inputs, this deep network can be trained to output an accurate temporal profile of the optimal command and state trajectory for a point-to-point reach of a non-linear limb model, even when influenced by varying force fields. In a manner that mirrors motor babble, the network can also teach itself to learn through trial and error. Lastly, we demonstrate how this network can learn to optimize a cost objective. This functional approach to motor control is a sharp departure from the standard dynamical approach, and may offer new insights into the neural implementation of motor control. PMID:25852530

  11. Investigating neuronal function with optically controllable proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin X.; Pan, Michael; Lin, Michael Z.

    2015-01-01

    In the nervous system, protein activities are highly regulated in space and time. This regulation allows for fine modulation of neuronal structure and function during development and adaptive responses. For example, neurite extension and synaptogenesis both involve localized and transient activation of cytoskeletal and signaling proteins, allowing changes in microarchitecture to occur rapidly and in a localized manner. To investigate the role of specific protein regulation events in these processes, methods to optically control the activity of specific proteins have been developed. In this review, we focus on how photosensory domains enable optical control over protein activity and have been used in neuroscience applications. These tools have demonstrated versatility in controlling various proteins and thereby cellular functions, and possess enormous potential for future applications in nervous systems. Just as optogenetic control of neuronal firing using opsins has changed how we investigate the function of cellular circuits in vivo, optical control may yet yield another revolution in how we study the circuitry of intracellular signaling in the brain. PMID:26257603

  12. Functional genomics and SNP analysis of human genes encoding proline metabolic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Williams, D. Bart; Zhaorigetu, Siqin; Khalil, Shadi; Wan, Guanghua; Valle, David

    2009-01-01

    Proline metabolism in mammals involves two other amino acids, glutamate and ornithine, and five enzymatic activities, Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) reductase (P5CR), proline oxidase, P5C dehydrogenase, P5C synthase and ornithine-δ-aminotransferase (OAT). With the exception of OAT, which catalyzes a reversible reaction, the other 4 enzymes are unidirectional, suggesting that proline metabolism is purpose-driven, tightly regulated, and compartmentalized. In addition, this tri-amino-acid system also links with three other pivotal metabolic systems, namely the TCA cycle, urea cycle, and pentose phosphate pathway. Abnormalities in proline metabolism are relevant in several diseases: six monogenic inborn errors involving metabolism and/or transport of proline and its immediate metabolites have been described. Recent advances in the Human Genome Project, in silico database mining techniques, and research in dissecting the molecular basis of proline metabolism prompted us to utilize functional genomic approaches to analyze human genes which encode proline metabolic enzymes in the context of gene structure, regulation of gene expression, mRNA variants, protein isoforms, and single nucleotide polymorphisms. PMID:18506409

  13. Translating the basic knowledge of mitochondrial functions to metabolic therapy: role of L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    Marcovina, Santica M; Sirtori, Cesare; Peracino, Andrea; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Borum, Peggy; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Ardehali, Hossein

    2013-02-01

    Mitochondria play important roles in human physiological processes, and therefore, their dysfunction can lead to a constellation of metabolic and nonmetabolic abnormalities such as a defect in mitochondrial gene expression, imbalance in fuel and energy homeostasis, impairment in oxidative phosphorylation, enhancement of insulin resistance, and abnormalities in fatty acid metabolism. As a consequence, mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the pathophysiology of insulin resistance, obesity, diabetes, vascular disease, and chronic heart failure. The increased knowledge on mitochondria and their role in cellular metabolism is providing new evidence that these disorders may benefit from mitochondrial-targeted therapies. We review the current knowledge of the contribution of mitochondrial dysfunction to chronic diseases, the outcomes of experimental studies on mitochondrial-targeted therapies, and explore the potential of metabolic modulators in the treatment of selected chronic conditions. As an example of such modulators, we evaluate the efficacy of the administration of L-carnitine and its analogues acetyl and propionyl L-carnitine in several chronic diseases. L-carnitine is intrinsically involved in mitochondrial metabolism and function as it plays a key role in fatty acid oxidation and energy metabolism. In addition to the transportation of free fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane, L-carnitine modulates their oxidation rate and is involved in the regulation of vital cellular functions such as apoptosis. Thus, L-carnitine and its derivatives show promise in the treatment of chronic conditions and diseases associated with mitochondrial dysfunction but further translational studies are needed to fully explore their potential. PMID:23138103

  14. Evidence for compromised metabolic function and limited glucose uptake in spermatozoa from the teratospermic domestic cat (Felis catus) and cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus).

    PubMed

    Terrell, Kimberly A; Wildt, David E; Anthony, Nicola M; Bavister, Barry D; Leibo, Stanley P; Penfold, Linda M; Marker, Laurie L; Crosier, Adrienne E

    2010-11-01

    Cheetahs and certain other felids consistently ejaculate high proportions (≥ 60%) of malformed spermatozoa, a condition known as teratospermia, which is prevalent in humans. Even seemingly normal spermatozoa from domestic cat teratospermic ejaculates have reduced fertilizing capacity. To understand the role of sperm metabolism in this phenomenon, we conducted a comparative study in the normospermic domestic cat versus the teratospermic cat and cheetah with the general hypothesis that sperm metabolic function is impaired in males producing predominantly pleiomorphic spermatozoa. Washed ejaculates were incubated in chemically defined medium containing glucose and pyruvate. Uptake of glucose and pyruvate and production of lactate were assessed using enzyme-linked fluorescence assays. Spermatozoa from domestic cats and cheetahs exhibited similar metabolic profiles, with minimal glucose metabolism and approximately equimolar rates of pyruvate uptake and lactate production. Compared to normospermic counterparts, pyruvate and lactate metabolism were reduced in teratospermic cat and cheetah ejaculates, even when controlling for sperm motility. Rates of pyruvate and lactate (but not glucose) metabolism were correlated positively with sperm motility, acrosomal integrity, and normal morphology. Collectively, our findings reveal that pyruvate uptake and lactate production are reliable, quantitative indicators of sperm quality in these two felid species and that metabolic function is impaired in teratospermic ejaculates. Furthermore, patterns of substrate utilization are conserved between these species, including the unexpected lack of exogenous glucose metabolism. Because glycolysis is required to support sperm motility and capacitation in certain other mammals (including dogs), the activity of this pathway in felid spermatozoa is a target for future investigation.

  15. Altered mitochondrial function and metabolic inflexibility associated with loss of caveolin-1.

    PubMed

    Asterholm, Ingrid Wernstedt; Mundy, Dorothy I; Weng, Jian; Anderson, Richard G W; Scherer, Philipp E

    2012-02-01

    Caveolin-1 is a major structural component of raft structures within the plasma membrane and has been implicated as a regulator of cellular signal transduction with prominent expression in adipocytes. Here, we embarked on a comprehensive characterization of the metabolic pathways dysregulated in caveolin-1 null mice. We found that these mice display decreased circulating levels of total and high molecular weight adiponectin and a reduced ability to change substrate use in response to feeding/fasting conditions. Caveolin-1 null mice are extremely lean but retain muscle mass despite lipodystrophy and massive metabolic dysfunction. Hepatic gluconeogenesis is chronically elevated, while hepatic steatosis is reduced. Our data suggest that the complex phenotype of the caveolin-1 null mouse is caused by altered metabolic and mitochondrial function in adipose tissue with a subsequent compensatory response driven mostly by the liver. This mouse model highlights the central contributions of adipose tissue for system-wide preservation of metabolic flexibility. PMID:22326219

  16. Altered Mitochondrial Function and Metabolic Inflexibility Associated with Loss of Caveolin-1

    PubMed Central

    Asterholm, Ingrid Wernstedt; Mundy, Dorothy I.; Weng, Jian; Anderson, Richard G. W.; Scherer, Philipp E.

    2012-01-01

    Caveolin-1 is a major structural component of raft structures within the plasma membrane and has been implicated as a regulator of cellular signal transduction with prominent expression in adipocytes. Here, we embarked on a comprehensive characterization of the metabolic pathways dysregulated in caveolin-1 null mice. We found that these mice display decreased circulating levels of total and high molecular weight adiponectin and a reduced ability to change substrate use in response to feeding/fasting conditions. Caveolin-1 null mice are extremely lean, but retain muscle mass despite lipodystrophy and massive metabolic dysfunction. Hepatic gluconeogenesis is chronically elevated, while hepatic steatosis is reduced. Our data suggest that the complex phenotype of the caveolin-1 null mouse is caused by altered metabolic and mitochondrial function in adipose tissue with a subsequent compensatory response driven mostly by the liver. This mouse model highlights the central contributions of adipose tissue for system-wide preservation of metabolic flexibility. PMID:22326219

  17. Glycosyltransferases in secondary plant metabolism: tranquilizers and stimulant controllers.

    PubMed

    Jones, P; Vogt, T

    2001-06-01

    Plants are exposed to a wide range of toxic and bioactive low-molecular-weight molecules from both exogenous and endogenous sources. Glycosylation is one of the primary sedative mechanisms that plants utilise in order to maintain metabolic homeostasis. Recently, a range of glycosyltransferases has been characterized in detail with regard to substrate specificity. The next step in increasing our understanding of the biology of glycosylation will require information regarding the exact role of individual glycosyltransferases in planta, as well as an insight into their potential involvement in metabolon-complexes. Hopefully, this will answer how a large number of glycosyltransferases with broad, rather than narrow, substrate specificity can be constrained in order to avoid interfering with other pathways of primary and secondary metabolism. These and other topics are discussed. PMID:11469580

  18. AMP-activated protein kinase and metabolic control

    PubMed Central

    Viollet, Benoit; Andreelli, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a phylogenetically conserved serine/threonine protein kinase, is a major regulator of cellular and whole-body energy homeostasis that coordinates metabolic pathways in order to balance nutrient supply with energy demand. It is now recognized that pharmacological activation of AMPK improves blood glucose homeostasis, lipid profile and blood pressure in insulin-resistant rodents. Indeed, AMPK activation mimics the beneficial effects of physical activity or those of calorie restriction by acting on multiple cellular targets. In addition it is now demonstrated that AMPK is one of the probable (albeit indirect) targets of major antidiabetic drugs including, the biguanides (metformin) and thiazolidinediones, as well as of insulin sensitizing adipokines (e.g., adiponectin). Taken together, such findings highlight the logic underlying the concept of targeting the AMPK pathway for the treatment of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. PMID:21484577

  19. Retinoic Acid-Related Orphan Receptors (RORs): Regulatory Functions in Immunity, Development, Circadian Rhythm, and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Donald N.; Kang, Hong Soon; Jetten, Anton M.

    2015-01-01

    In this overview, we provide an update on recent progress made in understanding the mechanisms of action, physiological functions, and roles in disease of retinoic acid related orphan receptors (RORs). We are particularly focusing on their roles in the regulation of adaptive and innate immunity, brain function, retinal development, cancer, glucose and lipid metabolism, circadian rhythm, metabolic and inflammatory diseases and neuropsychiatric disorders. We also summarize the current status of ROR agonists and inverse agonists, including their regulation of ROR activity and their therapeutic potential for management of various diseases in which RORs have been implicated. PMID:26878025

  20. Hormonal control of the metabolic machinery of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wong, Carmen Chak-Lui; Wong, Chun-Ming; Ng, Irene Oi-Lin

    2016-06-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most fatal malignancies worldwide. It is an aggressive cancer with low cure rate, frequent metastasis, and highly resistant to conventional chemotherapies. Better knowledge regarding the molecular and metabolic alterations in HCC will be instrumental to the development of novel therapeutic interventions against HCC. In the August 2015 issue of Hepatology, Nie et al. reports an important molecular pathway that contributes to the Warburg Effect in HCC. They have beautifully demonstrated that the loss of a component of a hormonal system, the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), reprogrammed the metabolic machinery of HCC cells to aerobic glycolysis through the miR-338-3p-PKL/R axis. The implication could be that in addition to drugs that directly target the metabolic enzymes in cancer cells, more translational efforts could be focused on the development of drugs that involve the activation of the MR-aldosterone system or other hormonal systems to target the Warburg effect. PMID:27275458

  1. Hormonal control of the metabolic machinery of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Carmen Chak-Lui; Wong, Chun-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most fatal malignancies worldwide. It is an aggressive cancer with low cure rate, frequent metastasis, and highly resistant to conventional chemotherapies. Better knowledge regarding the molecular and metabolic alterations in HCC will be instrumental to the development of novel therapeutic interventions against HCC. In the August 2015 issue of Hepatology, Nie et al. reports an important molecular pathway that contributes to the Warburg Effect in HCC. They have beautifully demonstrated that the loss of a component of a hormonal system, the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), reprogrammed the metabolic machinery of HCC cells to aerobic glycolysis through the miR-338-3p-PKL/R axis. The implication could be that in addition to drugs that directly target the metabolic enzymes in cancer cells, more translational efforts could be focused on the development of drugs that involve the activation of the MR-aldosterone system or other hormonal systems to target the Warburg effect. PMID:27275458

  2. Mitotic Checkpoint Regulators Control Insulin Signaling and Metabolic Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eunhee; Zhang, Xiangli; Xing, Chao; Yu, Hongtao

    2016-07-28

    Insulin signaling regulates many facets of animal physiology. Its dysregulation causes diabetes and other metabolic disorders. The spindle checkpoint proteins MAD2 and BUBR1 prevent precocious chromosome segregation and suppress aneuploidy. The MAD2 inhibitory protein p31(comet) promotes checkpoint inactivation and timely chromosome segregation. Here, we show that whole-body p31(comet) knockout mice die soon after birth and have reduced hepatic glycogen. Liver-specific ablation of p31(comet) causes insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, and hyperglycemia and diminishes the plasma membrane localization of the insulin receptor (IR) in hepatocytes. MAD2 directly binds to IR and facilitates BUBR1-dependent recruitment of the clathrin adaptor AP2 to IR. p31(comet) blocks the MAD2-BUBR1 interaction and prevents spontaneous clathrin-mediated IR endocytosis. BUBR1 deficiency enhances insulin sensitivity in mice. BUBR1 depletion in hepatocytes or the expression of MAD2-binding-deficient IR suppresses the metabolic phenotypes of p31(comet) ablation. Our findings establish a major IR regulatory mechanism and link guardians of chromosome stability to nutrient metabolism. PMID:27374329

  3. Functional Operons in Secondary Metabolic Gene Clusters in Glarea lozoyensis (Fungi, Ascomycota, Leotiomycetes)

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Qun; Chen, Li; Li, Yan; Bills, Gerald F.; Zhang, Xinyu; Xiang, Meichun; Li, Shaojie; Che, Yongsheng; Niu, Xuemei

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Operons are multigene transcriptional units which occur mostly in prokaryotes but rarely in eukaryotes. Protein-coding operons have not been reported in the Fungi even though they represent a very diverse kingdom of organisms. Here, we report a functional operon involved in the secondary metabolism of the fungus Glarea lozoyensis belonging to Leotiomycetes (Ascomycota). Two contiguous genes, glpks3 and glnrps7, encoding polyketide synthase and nonribosomal peptide synthetase, respectively, are cotranscribed into one dicistronic mRNA under the control of the same promoter, and the mRNA is then translated into two individual proteins, GLPKS3 and GLNRPS7. Heterologous expression in Aspergillus nidulans shows that the GLPKS3-GLNRPS7 enzyme complex catalyzes the biosynthesis of a novel pyrrolidinedione-containing compound, xenolozoyenone (compound 1), which indicates the operon is functional. Although it is structurally similar to prokaryotic operons, the glpks3-glnrps7 operon locus has a monophylogenic origin from fungi rather than having been horizontally transferred from prokaryotes. Moreover, two additional operons, glpks28-glnrps8 and glpks29-glnrps9, were verified at the transcriptional level in the same fungus. This is the first report of protein-coding operons in a member of the Fungi. PMID:26081635

  4. Metabolic modeling of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the optimal control of homeostasis: a cybernetic model definition.

    PubMed

    Giuseppin, M L; van Riel, N A

    2000-01-01

    A model is presented to describe the observed behavior of microorganisms that aim at metabolic homeostasis while growing and adapting to their environment in an optimal way. The cellular metabolism is seen as a network with a multiple controller system with both feedback and feedforward control, i.e., a model based on a dynamic optimal metabolic control. The dynamic network consists of aggregated pathways, each having a control setpoint for the metabolic states at a given growth rate. This set of strategies of the cell forms a true cybernetic model with a minimal number of assumptions. The cellular strategies and constraints were derived from metabolic flux analysis using an identified, biochemically relevant, stoichiometry matrix derived from experimental data on the cellular composition of continuous cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Based on these data a cybernetic model was developed to study its dynamic behavior. The growth rate of the cell is determined by the structural compounds and fluxes of compounds related to central metabolism. In contrast to many other cybernetic models, the minimal model does not consist of any assumed internal kinetic parameters or interactions. This necessitates the use of a stepwise integration with an optimization of the fluxes at every time interval. Some examples of the behavior of this model are given with respect to steady states and pulse responses. This model is very suitable for describing semiquantitatively dynamics of global cellular metabolism and may form a useful framework for including structured and more detailed kinetic models. PMID:10935932

  5. Calcium and ATP control multiple vital functions

    PubMed Central

    Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2016-01-01

    Life on Planet Earth, as we know it, revolves around adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as a universal energy storing molecule. The metabolism of ATP requires a low cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, and hence tethers these two molecules together. The exceedingly low cytosolic Ca2+ concentration (which in all life forms is kept around 50–100 nM) forms the basis for a universal intracellular signalling system in which Ca2+ acts as a second messenger. Maintenance of transmembrane Ca2+ gradients, in turn, requires ATP-dependent Ca2+ transport, thus further emphasizing the inseparable links between these two substances. Ca2+ signalling controls the most fundamental processes in the living organism, from heartbeat and neurotransmission to cell energetics and secretion. The versatility and plasticity of Ca2+ signalling relies on cell specific Ca2+ signalling toolkits, remodelling of which underlies adaptive cellular responses. Alterations of these Ca2+ signalling toolkits lead to aberrant Ca2+ signalling which is fundamental for the pathophysiology of numerous diseases from acute pancreatitis to neurodegeneration. This paper introduces a theme issue on this topic, which arose from a Royal Society Theo Murphy scientific meeting held in March 2016. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Evolution brings Ca2+ and ATP together to control life and death’. PMID:27377728

  6. The Chromatin Remodeling Complex Chd4/NuRD Controls Striated Muscle Identity and Metabolic Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Del Arco, Pablo; Perdiguero, Eusebio; Yunes-Leites, Paula Sofia; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Zeini, Miriam; Garcia-Gomez, Antonio; Sreenivasan, Krishnamoorthy; Jiménez-Alcázar, Miguel; Segalés, Jessica; López-Maderuelo, Dolores; Ornés, Beatriz; Jiménez-Borreguero, Luis Jesús; D'Amato, Gaetano; Enshell-Seijffers, David; Morgan, Bruce; Georgopoulos, Katia; Islam, Abul B M M K; Braun, Thomas; de la Pompa, José Luis; Kim, Johnny; Enriquez, José A; Ballestar, Esteban; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura; Redondo, Juan Miguel

    2016-05-10

    Heart muscle maintains blood circulation, while skeletal muscle powers skeletal movement. Despite having similar myofibrilar sarcomeric structures, these striated muscles differentially express specific sarcomere components to meet their distinct contractile requirements. The mechanism responsible is still unclear. We show here that preservation of the identity of the two striated muscle types depends on epigenetic repression of the alternate lineage gene program by the chromatin remodeling complex Chd4/NuRD. Loss of Chd4 in the heart triggers aberrant expression of the skeletal muscle program, causing severe cardiomyopathy and sudden death. Conversely, genetic depletion of Chd4 in skeletal muscle causes inappropriate expression of cardiac genes and myopathy. In both striated tissues, mitochondrial function was also dependent on the Chd4/NuRD complex. We conclude that an epigenetic mechanism controls cardiac and skeletal muscle structural and metabolic identities and that loss of this regulation leads to hybrid striated muscle tissues incompatible with life.

  7. When "altering brain function" becomes "mind control".

    PubMed

    Koivuniemi, Andrew; Otto, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Functional neurosurgery has seen a resurgence of interest in surgical treatments for psychiatric illness. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) technology is the preferred tool in the current wave of clinical experiments because it allows clinicians to directly alter the functions of targeted brain regions, in a reversible manner, with the intent of correcting diseases of the mind, such as depression, addiction, anorexia nervosa, dementia, and obsessive compulsive disorder. These promising treatments raise a critical philosophical and humanitarian question. "Under what conditions does 'altering brain function' qualify as 'mind control'?" In order to answer this question one needs a definition of mind control. To this end, we reviewed the relevant philosophical, ethical, and neurosurgical literature in order to create a set of criteria for what constitutes mind control in the context of DBS. We also outline clinical implications of these criteria. Finally, we demonstrate the relevance of the proposed criteria by focusing especially on serendipitous treatments involving DBS, i.e., cases in which an unintended therapeutic benefit occurred. These cases highlight the importance of gaining the consent of the subject for the new therapy in order to avoid committing an act of mind control.

  8. T Cell Receptor Signaling in the Control of Regulatory T Cell Differentiation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming O.; Rudensky, Alexander Y.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (TReg cells), a specialized T cell lineage, have a pivotal function in the control of self-tolerance and inflammatory responses. Recent studies have revealed a discrete mode of TCR signaling that regulates Treg cell differentiation, maintenance and function and that impacts on gene expression, metabolism, cell adhesion and migration of these cells. Here, we discuss the emerging understanding of TCR-guided differentiation of Treg cells in the context of their function in health and disease. PMID:27026074

  9. Absorption, metabolism, and functions of β-cryptoxanthin.

    PubMed

    Burri, Betty J; La Frano, Michael R; Zhu, Chenghao

    2016-02-01

    β-Cryptoxanthin, a carotenoid found in fruits and vegetables such as tangerines, red peppers, and pumpkin, has several functions important for human health. Most evidence from observational, in vitro, animal model, and human studies suggests that β-cryptoxanthin has relatively high bioavailability from its common food sources, to the extent that some β-cryptoxanthin-rich foods might be equivalent to β-carotene-rich foods as sources of retinol. β-Cryptoxanthin is an antioxidant in vitro and appears to be associated with decreased risk of some cancers and degenerative diseases. In addition, many in vitro, animal model, and human studies suggest that β-cryptoxanthin-rich foods may have an anabolic effect on bone and, thus, may help delay osteoporosis. PMID:26747887

  10. The post-transcriptional regulatory system CSR controls the balance of metabolic pools in upper glycolysis of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Morin, Manon; Ropers, Delphine; Letisse, Fabien; Laguerre, Sandrine; Portais, Jean-Charles; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel; Enjalbert, Brice

    2016-05-01

    Metabolic control in Escherichia coli is a complex process involving multilevel regulatory systems but the involvement of post-transcriptional regulation is uncertain. The post-transcriptional factor CsrA is stated as being the only regulator essential for the use of glycolytic substrates. A dozen enzymes in the central carbon metabolism (CCM) have been reported as potentially controlled by CsrA, but its impact on the CCM functioning has not been demonstrated. Here, a multiscale analysis was performed in a wild-type strain and its isogenic mutant attenuated for CsrA (including growth parameters, gene expression levels, metabolite pools, abundance of enzymes and fluxes). Data integration and regulation analysis showed a coordinated control of the expression of glycolytic enzymes. This also revealed the imbalance of metabolite pools in the csrA mutant upper glycolysis, before the phosphofructokinase PfkA step. This imbalance is associated with a glucose-phosphate stress. Restoring PfkA activity in the csrA mutant strain suppressed this stress and increased the mutant growth rate on glucose. Thus, the carbon storage regulator system is essential for the effective functioning of the upper glycolysis mainly through its control of PfkA. This work demonstrates the pivotal role of post-transcriptional regulation to shape the carbon metabolism.

  11. Intrinsic and Tumor Microenvironment-Induced Metabolism Adaptations of T Cells and Impact on Their Differentiation and Function.

    PubMed

    Kouidhi, Soumaya; Noman, Muhammad Zaeem; Kieda, Claudine; Elgaaied, Amel Benammar; Chouaib, Salem

    2016-01-01

    It is well recognized that the immune system and metabolism are highly integrated. In this context, multilevel interactions between metabolic system and T lymphocyte signaling and fate exist. This review will discuss different potential cell metabolism pathways involved in shaping T lymphocyte function and differentiation. We will also provide a general framework for understanding how tumor microenvironmental metabolism, associated with hypoxic stress, interferes with T-cell priming and expansion. How T-cell metabolism drives T-cell-mediated immunity and how the manipulation of metabolic programing for therapeutic purposes will be also discussed. PMID:27066006

  12. MicroRNAs and oncogenic transcriptional regulatory networks controlling metabolic reprogramming in cancers.

    PubMed

    Pinweha, Pannapa; Rattanapornsompong, Khanti; Charoensawan, Varodom; Jitrapakdee, Sarawut

    2016-01-01

    Altered cellular metabolism is a fundamental adaptation of cancer during rapid proliferation as a result of growth factor overstimulation. We review different pathways involving metabolic alterations in cancers including aerobic glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, de novo fatty acid synthesis, and serine and glycine metabolism. Although oncoproteins, c-MYC, HIF1α and p53 are the major drivers of this metabolic reprogramming, post-transcriptional regulation by microRNAs (miR) also plays an important role in finely adjusting the requirement of the key metabolic enzymes underlying this metabolic reprogramming. We also combine the literature data on the miRNAs that potentially regulate 40 metabolic enzymes responsible for metabolic reprogramming in cancers, with additional miRs from computational prediction. Our analyses show that: (1) a metabolic enzyme is frequently regulated by multiple miRs, (2) confidence scores from prediction algorithms might be useful to help narrow down functional miR-mRNA interaction, which might be worth further experimental validation. By combining known and predicted interactions of oncogenic transcription factors (TFs) (c-MYC, HIF1α and p53), sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP1), 40 metabolic enzymes, and regulatory miRs we have established one of the first reference maps for miRs and oncogenic TFs that regulate metabolic reprogramming in cancers. The combined network shows that glycolytic enzymes are linked to miRs via p53, c-MYC, HIF1α, whereas the genes in serine, glycine and one carbon metabolism are regulated via the c-MYC, as well as other regulatory organization that cannot be observed by investigating individual miRs, TFs, and target genes. PMID:27358718

  13. Dietary Proteins as Determinants of Metabolic and Physiologic Functions of the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Jahan-Mihan, Alireza; Luhovyy, Bohdan L.; Khoury, Dalia El; Anderson, G. Harvey

    2011-01-01

    Dietary proteins elicit a wide range of nutritional and biological functions. Beyond their nutritional role as the source of amino acids for protein synthesis, they are instrumental in the regulation of food intake, glucose and lipid metabolism, blood pressure, bone metabolism and immune function. The interaction of dietary proteins and their products of digestion with the regulatory functions of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract plays a dominant role in determining the physiological properties of proteins. The site of interaction is widespread, from the oral cavity to the colon. The characteristics of proteins that influence their interaction with the GI tract in a source-dependent manner include their physico-chemical properties, their amino acid composition and sequence, their bioactive peptides, their digestion kinetics and also the non-protein bioactive components conjugated with them. Within the GI tract, these products affect several regulatory functions by interacting with receptors releasing hormones, affecting stomach emptying and GI transport and absorption, transmitting neural signals to the brain, and modifying the microflora. This review discusses the interaction of dietary proteins during digestion and absorption with the physiological and metabolic functions of the GI tract, and illustrates the importance of this interaction in the regulation of amino acid, glucose, lipid metabolism, and food intake. PMID:22254112

  14. Dynamic QTLs for sugars and enzyme activities provide an overview of genetic control of sugar metabolism during peach fruit development

    PubMed Central

    Desnoues, Elsa; Baldazzi, Valentina; Génard, Michel; Mauroux, Jehan-Baptiste; Lambert, Patrick; Confolent, Carole; Quilot-Turion, Bénédicte

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the genetic control of sugar metabolism is essential to enhance fruit quality and promote fruit consumption. The sugar content and composition of fruits varies with species, cultivar and stage of development, and is controlled by multiple enzymes. A QTL (quantitative trait locus) study was performed on peach fruit [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch], the model species for Prunus. Progeny derived from an interspecific cross between P. persica cultivars and P. davidiana was used. Dynamic QTLs for fresh weight, sugars, acids, and enzyme activities related to sugar metabolism were detected at different stages during fruit development. Changing effects of alleles during fruit growth were observed, including inversions close to maturity. This QTL analysis was supplemented by the identification of genes annotated on the peach genome as enzymes linked to sugar metabolism or sugar transporters. Several cases of co-locations between annotated genes, QTLs for enzyme activities and QTLs controlling metabolite concentrations were observed and discussed. These co-locations raise hypotheses regarding the functional regulation of sugar metabolism and pave the way for further analyses to enable the identification of the underlying genes. In conclusion, we identified the potential impact on fruit breeding of the modification of QTL effect close to maturity. PMID:27117339

  15. Thyroid function, metabolic indices and growth performance in pigs fed 00-rapeseed meal.

    PubMed

    Svetina, A; Jerković, I; Vrabac, Ljiljana; Curić, S

    2003-01-01

    Thyroid function and morphology, liver morphology, some metabolic indices, haematological parameters and growth performance of fattening pigs fed 00-rapeseed meal (00-RPM) were examined. The control group was fed on a standard diet containing 6% sunflower seed meal (SM) during the growing period and 8% during the finishing period. The first experimental group was fed a diet in which SM was replaced by equal (6% and 8%) amounts of 00-RPM. The second experimental group was fed with a higher (8% and 10%) amount of 00-RPM. There were no significant differences between the control and experimental groups in the serum concentrations of triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4). Thyroid gland and liver weights were significantly (P < 0.01) higher in both groups fed 00-RPM than in the group fed SM. The epithelium of the thyroid gland was cuboidal or columnar and the follicular area was moderately enlarged in pigs fed 00-RPM. Marked changes in liver histology were not observed. The 00-RPM diet increased (P < 0.01) the serum values of total proteins in the first fattening period. At the end of fattening both groups fed 00-RPM had higher (P < 0.05; P < 0.01) concentrations of plasma glucose than the control group. The inclusion of 10% of 00-RPM during the finishing period increased (P < 0.05) the serum values of insulin. Daily weight gain during the growing and the finishing period was higher (P < 0.05) in the experimental groups than in the control group. The results suggest that 6-10% 00-RPM can be used as a protein source in the diet of fattening pigs without poisonous side effects.

  16. Divergent Expression and Metabolic Functions of Human Glucuronosyltransferases through Alternative Splicing.

    PubMed

    Rouleau, Michèle; Tourancheau, Alan; Girard-Bock, Camille; Villeneuve, Lyne; Vaucher, Jonathan; Duperré, Anne-Marie; Audet-Delage, Yannick; Gilbert, Isabelle; Popa, Ion; Droit, Arnaud; Guillemette, Chantal

    2016-09-27

    Maintenance of cellular homeostasis and xenobiotic detoxification is mediated by 19 human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase enzymes (UGTs) encoded by ten genes that comprise the glucuronidation pathway. Deep RNA sequencing of major metabolic organs exposes a substantial expansion of the UGT transcriptome by alternative splicing, with variants representing 20% to 60% of canonical transcript expression. Nearly a fifth of expressed variants comprise in-frame sequences that may create distinct structural and functional features. Follow-up cell-based assays reveal biological functions for these alternative UGT proteins. Some isoforms were found to inhibit or induce inactivation of drugs and steroids in addition to perturbing global cell metabolism (energy, amino acids, nucleotides), cell adhesion, and proliferation. This work highlights the biological relevance of alternative UGT expression, which we propose increases protein diversity through the evolution of metabolic regulators from specific enzymes. PMID:27681425

  17. The essential functions of endoplasmic reticulum chaperones in hepatic lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, LiChun; Wang, Hong-Hui

    2016-07-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an essential organelle for protein and lipid synthesis in hepatocytes. ER homeostasis is vital to maintain normal hepatocyte physiology. Perturbed ER functions causes ER stress associated with accumulation of unfolded protein in the ER that activates a series of adaptive signalling pathways, termed unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR regulates ER chaperone levels to preserve ER protein-folding environment to protect the cell from ER stress. Recent findings reveal an array of ER chaperones that alter the protein-folding environment in the ER of hepatocytes and contribute to dysregulation of hepatocyte lipid metabolism and liver disease. In this review, we will discuss the specific functions of these chaperones in regulation of lipid metabolism, especially de novo lipogenesis and lipid transport and demonstrate their homeostatic role not only for ER-protein synthesis but also for lipid metabolism in hepatocyte. PMID:27133206

  18. Divergent Expression and Metabolic Functions of Human Glucuronosyltransferases through Alternative Splicing.

    PubMed

    Rouleau, Michèle; Tourancheau, Alan; Girard-Bock, Camille; Villeneuve, Lyne; Vaucher, Jonathan; Duperré, Anne-Marie; Audet-Delage, Yannick; Gilbert, Isabelle; Popa, Ion; Droit, Arnaud; Guillemette, Chantal

    2016-09-27

    Maintenance of cellular homeostasis and xenobiotic detoxification is mediated by 19 human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase enzymes (UGTs) encoded by ten genes that comprise the glucuronidation pathway. Deep RNA sequencing of major metabolic organs exposes a substantial expansion of the UGT transcriptome by alternative splicing, with variants representing 20% to 60% of canonical transcript expression. Nearly a fifth of expressed variants comprise in-frame sequences that may create distinct structural and functional features. Follow-up cell-based assays reveal biological functions for these alternative UGT proteins. Some isoforms were found to inhibit or induce inactivation of drugs and steroids in addition to perturbing global cell metabolism (energy, amino acids, nucleotides), cell adhesion, and proliferation. This work highlights the biological relevance of alternative UGT expression, which we propose increases protein diversity through the evolution of metabolic regulators from specific enzymes.

  19. Working memory dysfunction associated with brain functional deficits and cellular metabolic changes in patients with generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Moon, Chung-Man; Sundaram, Thirunavukkarasu; Choi, Nam-Gil; Jeong, Gwang-Woo

    2016-08-30

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is associated with brain functional and morphological changes in connected with emotional dysregulation and cognitive deficit. This study dealt with the neural functional deficits and metabolic abnormalities in working memory (WM) task with emotion-inducing distractors in patients with GAD. Fourteen patients with GAD and 14 healthy controls underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) at 3T. In response to the emotional distractors in WM tasks, the patients concurrently showed higher activity in the hippocampus and lower activities in the superior occipital gyrus, superior parietal gyrus, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and precentral gyrus compared to the controls. MRS revealed significantly lower choline/creatine (Cho/Cr) and choline/N-acetylaspartate (Cho/NAA) ratios in the DLPFC. In particular, the Cho ratios were positively correlated with the brain activities based on blood oxygenation level-dependent signal change in the DLPFC. This study provides the first evidence for the association between the metabolic alterations and functional deficit in WM processing with emotion-inducing distractors in GAD. These findings will be helpful to understand the neural dysfunction in connection with WM impairment in GAD. PMID:27442922

  20. Working memory dysfunction associated with brain functional deficits and cellular metabolic changes in patients with generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Moon, Chung-Man; Sundaram, Thirunavukkarasu; Choi, Nam-Gil; Jeong, Gwang-Woo

    2016-08-30

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is associated with brain functional and morphological changes in connected with emotional dysregulation and cognitive deficit. This study dealt with the neural functional deficits and metabolic abnormalities in working memory (WM) task with emotion-inducing distractors in patients with GAD. Fourteen patients with GAD and 14 healthy controls underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) at 3T. In response to the emotional distractors in WM tasks, the patients concurrently showed higher activity in the hippocampus and lower activities in the superior occipital gyrus, superior parietal gyrus, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and precentral gyrus compared to the controls. MRS revealed significantly lower choline/creatine (Cho/Cr) and choline/N-acetylaspartate (Cho/NAA) ratios in the DLPFC. In particular, the Cho ratios were positively correlated with the brain activities based on blood oxygenation level-dependent signal change in the DLPFC. This study provides the first evidence for the association between the metabolic alterations and functional deficit in WM processing with emotion-inducing distractors in GAD. These findings will be helpful to understand the neural dysfunction in connection with WM impairment in GAD.

  1. MIRAGE: a functional genomics-based approach for metabolic network model reconstruction and its application to cyanobacteria networks.

    PubMed

    Vitkin, Edward; Shlomi, Tomer

    2012-01-01

    Genome-scale metabolic network reconstructions are considered a key step in quantifying the genotype-phenotype relationship. We present a novel gap-filling approach, MetabolIc Reconstruction via functionAl GEnomics (MIRAGE), which identifies missing network reactions by integrating metabolic flux analysis and functional genomics data. MIRAGE's performance is demonstrated on the reconstruction of metabolic network models of E. coli and Synechocystis sp. and validated via existing networks for these species. Then, it is applied to reconstruct genome-scale metabolic network models for 36 sequenced cyanobacteria amenable for constraint-based modeling analysis and specifically for metabolic engineering. The reconstructed network models are supplied via standard SBML files. PMID:23194418

  2. Towards stable kinetics of large metabolic networks: Nonequilibrium potential function approach.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong-Cong; Yuan, Ruo-Shi; Ao, Ping; Xu, Min-Juan; Zhu, Xiao-Mei

    2016-06-01

    While the biochemistry of metabolism in many organisms is well studied, details of the metabolic dynamics are not fully explored yet. Acquiring adequate in vivo kinetic parameters experimentally has always been an obstacle. Unless the parameters of a vast number of enzyme-catalyzed reactions happened to fall into very special ranges, a kinetic model for a large metabolic network would fail to reach a steady state. In this work we show that a stable metabolic network can be systematically established via a biologically motivated regulatory process. The regulation is constructed in terms of a potential landscape description of stochastic and nongradient systems. The constructed process draws enzymatic parameters towards stable metabolism by reducing the change in the Lyapunov function tied to the stochastic fluctuations. Biologically it can be viewed as interplay between the flux balance and the spread of workloads on the network. Our approach allows further constraints such as thermodynamics and optimal efficiency. We choose the central metabolism of Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 as a case study to demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach. Growth efficiency on carbon conversion rate versus cell viability and futile cycles is investigated in depth. PMID:27415300

  3. Direct visualization of functional heterogeneity in hepatobiliary metabolism using 6-CFDA as model compound

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chih-Ju; Li, Feng-Chieh; Lee, Yu-Yang; Tseng, Te-Yu; Chen, Wei-Liang; Hovhannisyan, Vladimir; Kang, Ning; Horton, Nicholas G.; Chiang, Shu-Jen; Xu, Chris; Lee, Hsuan-Shu; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Hepatobiliary metabolism is one of the major functions of the liver. However, little is known of the relationship between the physiological location of the hepatocytes and their metabolic potential. By the combination of time-lapse multiphoton microscopy and first order kinetic constant image analysis, the hepatocellular metabolic rate of the model compound 6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate (6-CFDA) is quantified at the single cell level. We found that the mouse liver can be divided into three zones, each with distinct metabolic rate constants. The sinusoidal uptake coefficients k1 of Zones 1, 2, and 3 are respectively 0.239 ± 0.077, 0.295 ± 0.087, and 0.338 ± 0.133 min−1, the apical excreting coefficients k2 of Zones 1, 2, and 3 are 0.0117 ± 0.0052, 0.0175 ± 0.0052, and 0.0332 ± 0.0195 min−1, respectively. Our results show not only the existence of heterogeneities in hepatobiliary metabolism, but they also show that Zone 3 is the main area of metabolism. PMID:27699121

  4. Direct visualization of functional heterogeneity in hepatobiliary metabolism using 6-CFDA as model compound

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chih-Ju; Li, Feng-Chieh; Lee, Yu-Yang; Tseng, Te-Yu; Chen, Wei-Liang; Hovhannisyan, Vladimir; Kang, Ning; Horton, Nicholas G.; Chiang, Shu-Jen; Xu, Chris; Lee, Hsuan-Shu; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Hepatobiliary metabolism is one of the major functions of the liver. However, little is known of the relationship between the physiological location of the hepatocytes and their metabolic potential. By the combination of time-lapse multiphoton microscopy and first order kinetic constant image analysis, the hepatocellular metabolic rate of the model compound 6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate (6-CFDA) is quantified at the single cell level. We found that the mouse liver can be divided into three zones, each with distinct metabolic rate constants. The sinusoidal uptake coefficients k1 of Zones 1, 2, and 3 are respectively 0.239 ± 0.077, 0.295 ± 0.087, and 0.338 ± 0.133 min−1, the apical excreting coefficients k2 of Zones 1, 2, and 3 are 0.0117 ± 0.0052, 0.0175 ± 0.0052, and 0.0332 ± 0.0195 min−1, respectively. Our results show not only the existence of heterogeneities in hepatobiliary metabolism, but they also show that Zone 3 is the main area of metabolism.

  5. Towards stable kinetics of large metabolic networks: Nonequilibrium potential function approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yong-Cong; Yuan, Ruo-Shi; Ao, Ping; Xu, Min-Juan; Zhu, Xiao-Mei

    2016-06-01

    While the biochemistry of metabolism in many organisms is well studied, details of the metabolic dynamics are not fully explored yet. Acquiring adequate in vivo kinetic parameters experimentally has always been an obstacle. Unless the parameters of a vast number of enzyme-catalyzed reactions happened to fall into very special ranges, a kinetic model for a large metabolic network would fail to reach a steady state. In this work we show that a stable metabolic network can be systematically established via a biologically motivated regulatory process. The regulation is constructed in terms of a potential landscape description of stochastic and nongradient systems. The constructed process draws enzymatic parameters towards stable metabolism by reducing the change in the Lyapunov function tied to the stochastic fluctuations. Biologically it can be viewed as interplay between the flux balance and the spread of workloads on the network. Our approach allows further constraints such as thermodynamics and optimal efficiency. We choose the central metabolism of Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 as a case study to demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach. Growth efficiency on carbon conversion rate versus cell viability and futile cycles is investigated in depth.

  6. Functional genomics identifies negative regulatory nodes controlling phagocyte oxidative burst.

    PubMed

    Graham, Daniel B; Becker, Christine E; Doan, Aivi; Goel, Gautam; Villablanca, Eduardo J; Knights, Dan; Mok, Amanda; Ng, Aylwin C Y; Doench, John G; Root, David E; Clish, Clary B; Xavier, Ramnik J

    2015-07-21

    The phagocyte oxidative burst, mediated by Nox2 NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species, confers host defense against a broad spectrum of bacterial and fungal pathogens. Loss-of-function mutations that impair function of the Nox2 complex result in a life-threatening immunodeficiency, and genetic variants of Nox2 subunits have been implicated in pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Thus, alterations in the oxidative burst can profoundly impact host defense, yet little is known about regulatory mechanisms that fine-tune this response. Here we report the discovery of regulatory nodes controlling oxidative burst by functional screening of genes within loci linked to human inflammatory disease. Implementing a multi-omics approach, we define transcriptional, metabolic and ubiquitin-cycling nodes controlled by Rbpj, Pfkl and Rnf145, respectively. Furthermore, we implicate Rnf145 in proteostasis of the Nox2 complex by endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation. Consequently, ablation of Rnf145 in murine macrophages enhances bacterial clearance, and rescues the oxidative burst defects associated with Ncf4 haploinsufficiency.

  7. Functional genomics identifies negative regulatory nodes controlling phagocyte oxidative burst

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Daniel B.; Becker, Christine E.; Doan, Aivi; Goel, Gautam; Villablanca, Eduardo J.; Knights, Dan; Mok, Amanda; Ng, Aylwin C.Y.; Doench, John G.; Root, David E.; Clish, Clary B.; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    2015-01-01

    The phagocyte oxidative burst, mediated by Nox2 NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species, confers host defense against a broad spectrum of bacterial and fungal pathogens. Loss-of-function mutations that impair function of the Nox2 complex result in a life-threatening immunodeficiency, and genetic variants of Nox2 subunits have been implicated in pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Thus, alterations in the oxidative burst can profoundly impact host defense, yet little is known about regulatory mechanisms that fine-tune this response. Here we report the discovery of regulatory nodes controlling oxidative burst by functional screening of genes within loci linked to human inflammatory disease. Implementing a multi-omics approach, we define transcriptional, metabolic and ubiquitin-cycling nodes controlled by Rbpj, Pfkl and Rnf145, respectively. Furthermore, we implicate Rnf145 in proteostasis of the Nox2 complex by endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation. Consequently, ablation of Rnf145 in murine macrophages enhances bacterial clearance, and rescues the oxidative burst defects associated with Ncf4 haploinsufficiency. PMID:26194095

  8. Genomic islands link secondary metabolism to functional adaptation in marine Actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Penn, Kevin; Jenkins, Caroline; Nett, Markus; Udwary, Daniel W; Gontang, Erin A; McGlinchey, Ryan P; Foster, Brian; Lapidus, Alla; Podell, Sheila; Allen, Eric E; Moore, Bradley S; Jensen, Paul R

    2009-10-01

    Genomic islands have been shown to harbor functional traits that differentiate ecologically distinct populations of environmental bacteria. A comparative analysis of the complete genome sequences of the marine Actinobacteria Salinispora tropica and Salinispora arenicola reveals that 75% of the species-specific genes are located in 21 genomic islands. These islands are enriched in genes associated with secondary metabolite biosynthesis providing evidence that secondary metabolism is linked to functional adaptation. Secondary metabolism accounts for 8.8% and 10.9% of the genes in the S. tropica and S. arenicola genomes, respectively, and represents the major functional category of annotated genes that differentiates the two species. Genomic islands harbor all 25 of the species-specific biosynthetic pathways, the majority of which occur in S. arenicola and may contribute to the cosmopolitan distribution of this species. Genome evolution is dominated by gene duplication and acquisition, which in the case of secondary metabolism provide immediate opportunities for the production of new bioactive products. Evidence that secondary metabolic pathways are exchanged horizontally, coupled with earlier evidence for fixation among globally distributed populations, supports a functional role and suggests that the acquisition of natural product biosynthetic gene clusters represents a previously unrecognized force driving bacterial diversification. Species-specific differences observed in clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat sequences suggest that S. arenicola may possess a higher level of phage immunity, whereas a highly duplicated family of polymorphic membrane proteins provides evidence for a new mechanism of marine adaptation in Gram-positive bacteria.

  9. Metabolic status, gonadotropin secretion, and ovarian function during acute nutrient restriction of beef heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of acute nutritional restriction on metabolic status, gonadotropin secretion, and ovarian function of heifers was determined in 2 experiments. In Exp. 1, 14-mo-old heifers were fed a diet supplying 1.2 × maintenance energy requirements (1.2M). After 10 d, heifers were fed 1.2M or were res...

  10. The Functional Connectome of Speech Control.

    PubMed

    Fuertinger, Stefan; Horwitz, Barry; Simonyan, Kristina

    2015-07-01

    In the past few years, several studies have been directed to understanding the complexity of functional interactions between different brain regions during various human behaviors. Among these, neuroimaging research installed the notion that speech and language require an orchestration of brain regions for comprehension, planning, and integration of a heard sound with a spoken word. However, these studies have been largely limited to mapping the neural correlates of separate speech elements and examining distinct cortical or subcortical circuits involved in different aspects of speech control. As a result, the complexity of the brain network machinery controlling speech and language remained largely unknown. Using graph theoretical analysis of functional MRI (fMRI) data in healthy subjects, we quantified the large-scale speech network topology by constructing functional brain networks of increasing hierarchy from the resting state to motor output of meaningless syllables to complex production of real-life speech as well as compared to non-speech-related sequential finger tapping and pure tone discrimination networks. We identified a segregated network of highly connected local neural communities (hubs) in the primary sensorimotor and parietal regions, which formed a commonly shared core hub network across the examined conditions, with the left area 4p playing an important role in speech network organization. These sensorimotor core hubs exhibited features of flexible hubs based on their participation in several functional domains across different networks and ability to adaptively switch long-range functional connectivity depending on task content, resulting in a distinct community structure of each examined network. Specifically, compared to other tasks, speech production was characterized by the formation of six distinct neural communities with specialized recruitment of the prefrontal cortex, insula, putamen, and thalamus, which collectively forged the formation

  11. The Functional Connectome of Speech Control

    PubMed Central

    Fuertinger, Stefan; Horwitz, Barry; Simonyan, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    In the past few years, several studies have been directed to understanding the complexity of functional interactions between different brain regions during various human behaviors. Among these, neuroimaging research installed the notion that speech and language require an orchestration of brain regions for comprehension, planning, and integration of a heard sound with a spoken word. However, these studies have been largely limited to mapping the neural correlates of separate speech elements and examining distinct cortical or subcortical circuits involved in different aspects of speech control. As a result, the complexity of the brain network machinery controlling speech and language remained largely unknown. Using graph theoretical analysis of functional MRI (fMRI) data in healthy subjects, we quantified the large-scale speech network topology by constructing functional brain networks of increasing hierarchy from the resting state to motor output of meaningless syllables to complex production of real-life speech as well as compared to non-speech-related sequential finger tapping and pure tone discrimination networks. We identified a segregated network of highly connected local neural communities (hubs) in the primary sensorimotor and parietal regions, which formed a commonly shared core hub network across the examined conditions, with the left area 4p playing an important role in speech network organization. These sensorimotor core hubs exhibited features of flexible hubs based on their participation in several functional domains across different networks and ability to adaptively switch long-range functional connectivity depending on task content, resulting in a distinct community structure of each examined network. Specifically, compared to other tasks, speech production was characterized by the formation of six distinct neural communities with specialized recruitment of the prefrontal cortex, insula, putamen, and thalamus, which collectively forged the formation

  12. Hydrodynamics-Based Functional Forms of Activity Metabolism: A Case for the Power-Law Polynomial Function in Animal Swimming Energetics

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulos, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    The first-degree power-law polynomial function is frequently used to describe activity metabolism for steady swimming animals. This function has been used in hydrodynamics-based metabolic studies to evaluate important parameters of energetic costs, such as the standard metabolic rate and the drag power indices. In theory, however, the power-law polynomial function of any degree greater than one can be used to describe activity metabolism for steady swimming animals. In fact, activity metabolism has been described by the conventional exponential function and the cubic polynomial function, although only the power-law polynomial function models drag power since it conforms to hydrodynamic laws. Consequently, the first-degree power-law polynomial function yields incorrect parameter values of energetic costs if activity metabolism is governed by the power-law polynomial function of any degree greater than one. This issue is important in bioenergetics because correct comparisons of energetic costs among different steady swimming animals cannot be made unless the degree of the power-law polynomial function derives from activity metabolism. In other words, a hydrodynamics-based functional form of activity metabolism is a power-law polynomial function of any degree greater than or equal to one. Therefore, the degree of the power-law polynomial function should be treated as a parameter, not as a constant. This new treatment not only conforms to hydrodynamic laws, but also ensures correct comparisons of energetic costs among different steady swimming animals. Furthermore, the exponential power-law function, which is a new hydrodynamics-based functional form of activity metabolism, is a special case of the power-law polynomial function. Hence, the link between the hydrodynamics of steady swimming and the exponential-based metabolic model is defined. PMID:19333397

  13. Autonomous benthic algal cultivator under feedback control of ecosystem metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An autonomous and internally-controlled techno-ecological hybrid was developed that controls primary production of algae in a laboratory-scale cultivator. The technoecosystem is based on an algal turf scrubber (ATS) system that combines engineered feedback control programming with internal feedback...

  14. Integrating gene and protein expression data with genome-scale metabolic networks to infer functional pathways

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The study of cellular metabolism in the context of high-throughput -omics data has allowed us to decipher novel mechanisms of importance in biotechnology and health. To continue with this progress, it is essential to efficiently integrate experimental data into metabolic modeling. Results We present here an in-silico framework to infer relevant metabolic pathways for a particular phenotype under study based on its gene/protein expression data. This framework is based on the Carbon Flux Path (CFP) approach, a mixed-integer linear program that expands classical path finding techniques by considering additional biophysical constraints. In particular, the objective function of the CFP approach is amended to account for gene/protein expression data and influence obtained paths. This approach is termed integrative Carbon Flux Path (iCFP). We show that gene/protein expression data also influences the stoichiometric balancing of CFPs, which provides a more accurate picture of active metabolic pathways. This is illustrated in both a theoretical and real scenario. Finally, we apply this approach to find novel pathways relevant in the regulation of acetate overflow metabolism in Escherichia coli. As a result, several targets which could be relevant for better understanding of the phenomenon leading to impaired acetate overflow are proposed. Conclusions A novel mathematical framework that determines functional pathways based on gene/protein expression data is presented and validated. We show that our approach is able to provide new insights into complex biological scenarios such as acetate overflow in Escherichia coli. PMID:24314206

  15. Proteomic analysis uncovers a metabolic phenotype in C. elegans after nhr-40 reduction of function

    SciTech Connect

    Pohludka, Michal; Simeckova, Katerina; Vohanka, Jaroslav; Yilma, Petr; Novak, Petr; Krause, Michael W.; Kostrouchova, Marta; Kostrouch, Zdenek

    2008-09-12

    Caenorhabditis elegans has an unexpectedly large number (284) of genes encoding nuclear hormone receptors, most of which are nematode-specific and are of unknown function. We have exploited comparative two-dimensional chromatography of synchronized cultures of wild type C. elegans larvae and a mutant in nhr-40 to determine if proteomic approaches will provide additional insight into gene function. Chromatofocusing, followed by reversed-phase chromatography and mass spectrometry, identified altered chromatographic patterns for a set of proteins, many of which function in muscle and metabolism. Prompted by the proteomic analysis, we find that the penetrance of the developmental phenotypes in the mutant is enhanced at low temperatures and by food restriction. The combination of our phenotypic and proteomic analysis strongly suggests that NHR-40 provides a link between metabolism and muscle development. Our results highlight the utility of comparative two-dimensional chromatography to provide a relatively rapid method to gain insight into gene function.

  16. Investigation into the role of catabolite control protein A in the metabolic regulation of Streptococcus suis serotype 2 using gene expression profile analysis

    PubMed Central

    LANG, XULONG; WAN, ZHONGHAI; PAN, YING; WANG, XIURAN; WANG, XIAOXU; BU, ZHAOYANG; QIAN, JING; ZENG, HUAZONG; WANG, XINGLONG

    2015-01-01

    Catabolite control protein A (CcpA) serves a key function in the catabolism of Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (S. suis 2) by affecting the biological function and metabolic regulatory mechanisms of this bacterium. The aim of the present study was to identify variations in CcpA expression in S. suis 2 using gene expression profile analysis. Using sequencing and functional analysis, CcpA was demonstrated to play a regulatory role in the expression and regulation of virulence genes, carbon metabolism and immunoregulation in S. suis 2. Gene Ontology and Kyto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analyses indicated that CcpA in S. suis 2 is involved in the regulation of multiple metabolic processes. Furthermore, combined analysis of the transcriptome and metabolite data suggested that metabolites varied due to the modulation of gene expression levels under the influence of CcpA regulation. In addition, metabolic network analysis indicated that CcpA impacted carbon metabolism to a certain extent. Therefore, the present study has provided a more comprehensive analysis of the role of CcpA in the metabolic regulation of S. suis 2, which may facilitate future investigation into this mechanism. Furthermore, the results of the present study provide a foundation for further research into the regulatory function of CcpA and associated metabolic pathways in S. suis 2. PMID:26170923

  17. Multiple controls of oxidative metabolism in living tissues as studied by phosphorus magnetic resonance.

    PubMed Central

    Chance, B; Leigh, J S; Kent, J; McCully, K; Nioka, S; Clark, B J; Maris, J M; Graham, T

    1986-01-01

    Three types of metabolic control of oxidative metabolism are observed in the various tissues that have been studied by phosphorous magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The principal control of oxidative metabolism in skeletal muscle is by ADP (or Pi/phosphocreatine). This conclusion is based upon studies of arm muscles of humans during steady-state exercise. A work-cost (Vm vs. Pi/phosphocreatine) relationship follows a Michaelis-Menten rectangular hyperbola, where Km values from 0.5 to 0.6 and Vmax values from 50 to 200 (at nearly constant pH) are found in linearized plots of the equation V/Vmax = 1/(1 + 0.6 phosphocreatine/Pi) where V is work level (which is equal to the velocity of the enzymatic reaction) and Vmax is the maximal work capacity that is a measure of the enzyme activity (E) of oxidative metabolism. Adaptation to exercise enhances the slope of the work-cost relationship and causes large changes in Vmax or E. A second metabolic control may enhance the slope of the work-cost relationship but not Vmax. For example, the initiation of exercise can lead to an improved characteristic that can be explained by 2-fold increased substrate delivery, for example, increased oxygen delivery by microcirculatory control. Cardiac tissue of the adult dog affords an example of optimal endurance performance adaptation and exhibits the steepest work-cost relationship observed and is attributed to a coordinated control of substrate delivery that may involve Ca2+ and inorganic phosphate control of NADH; control of O2 delivery may also be involved. The calculated work-cost relationship is similar to that observed in the beagle heart. The theoretical curve illustrates that the liability of multiple controls is a sharp break point in metabolic control at the end of the multiple control range--a possible cause of instability of cardiac performance at high V/Vmax. PMID:3467315

  18. Orphan Nuclear Receptor ERRα Controls Macrophage Metabolic Signaling and A20 Expression to Negatively Regulate TLR-Induced Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Yuk, Jae-Min; Kim, Tae Sung; Kim, Soo Yeon; Lee, Hye-Mi; Han, Jeongsu; Dufour, Catherine Rosa; Kim, Jin Kyung; Jin, Hyo Sun; Yang, Chul-Su; Park, Ki-Sun; Lee, Chul-Ho; Kim, Jin-Man; Kweon, Gi Ryang; Choi, Hueng-Sik; Vanacker, Jean-Marc; Moore, David D; Giguère, Vincent; Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2015-07-21

    The orphan nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα; NR3B1) is a key metabolic regulator, but its function in regulating inflammation remains largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that ERRα negatively regulates Toll-like receptor (TLR)-induced inflammation by promoting Tnfaip3 transcription and fine-tuning of metabolic reprogramming in macrophages. ERRα-deficient (Esrra(-/-)) mice showed increased susceptibility to endotoxin-induced septic shock, leading to more severe pro-inflammatory responses than control mice. ERRα regulated macrophage inflammatory responses by directly binding the promoter region of Tnfaip3, a deubiquitinating enzyme in TLR signaling. In addition, Esrra(-/-) macrophages showed an increased glycolysis, but impaired mitochondrial respiratory function and biogenesis. Further, ERRα was required for the regulation of NF-κB signaling by controlling p65 acetylation via maintenance of NAD(+) levels and sirtuin 1 activation. These findings unravel a previously unappreciated role for ERRα as a negative regulator of TLR-induced inflammatory responses through inducing Tnfaip3 transcription and controlling the metabolic reprogramming.

  19. [Use of indicators of anaerobic metabolism in the evaluation of the functional reserve of the cardiovascular system in patients operated on in the past for congenital heart defects].

    PubMed

    Mochalov, O Iu; Gritsenko, V V; Gavrilenkov, V I

    1984-05-01

    The correlation of most important parameters of the central hemodynamics with the intensity of anaerobic metabolism was studied in 65 patients operated on having congenital heart diseases and in 37 healthy patients under increased physical exercise. A mild decrease of the functional reserve of the cardiovascular system (by 7-15%) was revealed in the patients as compared with the control group.

  20. [Use of indicators of anaerobic metabolism in the evaluation of the functional reserve of the cardiovascular system in patients operated on in the past for congenital heart defects].

    PubMed

    Mochalov, O Iu; Gritsenko, V V; Gavrilenkov, V I

    1984-05-01

    The correlation of most important parameters of the central hemodynamics with the intensity of anaerobic metabolism was studied in 65 patients operated on having congenital heart diseases and in 37 healthy patients under increased physical exercise. A mild decrease of the functional reserve of the cardiovascular system (by 7-15%) was revealed in the patients as compared with the control group. PMID:6464264

  1. NF-κB controls energy homeostasis and metabolic adaptation by upregulating mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Mauro, Claudio; Leow, Shi Chi; Anso, Elena; Rocha, Sonia; Thotakura, Anil K; Tornatore, Laura; Moretti, Marta; De Smaele, Enrico; Beg, Amer A; Tergaonkar, Vinay; Chandel, Navdeep S; Franzoso, Guido

    2011-10-01

    Cell proliferation is a metabolically demanding process. It requires active reprogramming of cellular bioenergetic pathways towards glucose metabolism to support anabolic growth. NF-κB/Rel transcription factors coordinate many of the signals that drive proliferation during immunity, inflammation and oncogenesis, but whether NF-κB regulates the metabolic reprogramming required for cell division during these processes is unknown. Here, we report that NF-κB organizes energy metabolism networks by controlling the balance between the utilization of glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration. NF-κB inhibition causes cellular reprogramming to aerobic glycolysis under basal conditions and induces necrosis on glucose starvation. The metabolic reorganization that results from NF-κB inhibition overcomes the requirement for tumour suppressor mutation in oncogenic transformation and impairs metabolic adaptation in cancer in vivo. This NF-κB-dependent metabolic pathway involves stimulation of oxidative phosphorylation through upregulation of mitochondrial synthesis of cytochrome c oxidase 2 (SCO2; ref. ). Our findings identify NF-κB as a physiological regulator of mitochondrial respiration and establish a role for NF-κB in metabolic adaptation in normal cells and cancer. PMID:21968997

  2. Mammalian iron metabolism and its control by iron regulatory proteins☆

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Cole P.; Shen, Lacy; Eisenstein, Richard S.; Leibold, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Cellular iron homeostasis is maintained by iron regulatory proteins 1 and 2 (IRP1 and IRP2). IRPs bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs) located in the untranslated regions of mRNAs encoding protein involved in iron uptake, storage, utilization and export. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made in understanding how IRPs are regulated by iron-dependent and iron-independent mechanisms and the pathological consequences of IRP2 deficiency in mice. The identification of novel IREs involved in diverse cellular pathways has revealed that the IRP–IRE network extends to processes other than iron homeostasis. A mechanistic understanding of IRP regulation will likely yield important insights into the basis of disorders of iron metabolism. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cell Biology of Metals. PMID:22610083

  3. Sex steroids do not affect muscle weight, oxidative metabolism or cytosolic androgen reception binding of functionally overloaded rat Plantaris muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, S. R.; Rance, N.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of sex steroids on muscle weight and oxidative capacity of rat planaris muscles subjected to functional overload by removal of synergistic muscles were investigated. Ten weeks after bilateral synergist removal, plantaris muscles were significantly hypertrophic compared with unoperated controls. After this period, the ability of the muscles to oxide three substrates of oxidative metabolism was assessed. Experimental procedures are discussed and results are presented herein. Results suggest a lack of beneficial effect of sex hormone status on the process of hypertrophy and on biochemical changes in overloaded muscle. Such findings are not consistent with the idea of synergistic effects of sex steroids and muscle usage.

  4. Heart over mind: metabolic control of white adipose tissue and liver.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Michinari; Sadoshima, Junichi

    2014-12-03

    Increasing evidence suggests that the heart controls the metabolism of peripheral organs. Olson and colleagues previously demonstrated that miR‐208a controls systemic energy homeostasis through the regulation of MED13 in cardiomyocytes (Grueter et al, 2012). In their follow‐up study in this issue of EMBO Molecular Medicine, white adipose tissue (WAT) and liver are identified as the physiological targets of cardiac MED13 signaling, most likely through cardiac‐derived circulating factors, which boost energy consumption by upregulating metabolic gene expression and increasing mitochondrial numbers (Baskin et al, 2014). In turn, increased energy expenditure in WAT and the liver confers leanness. These findings strengthen the evidence of metabolic crosstalk between the heart and peripheral tissues through cardiokines and also set the stage for the development of novel treatments for metabolic syndrome.

  5. Phylogenetic and Functional Analysis of Metagenome Sequence from High-Temperature Archaeal Habitats Demonstrate Linkages between Metabolic Potential and Geochemistry.

    PubMed

    Inskeep, William P; Jay, Zackary J; Herrgard, Markus J; Kozubal, Mark A; Rusch, Douglas B; Tringe, Susannah G; Macur, Richard E; Jennings, Ryan deM; Boyd, Eric S; Spear, John R; Roberto, Francisco F

    2013-01-01

    Geothermal habitats in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) provide an unparalleled opportunity to understand the environmental factors that control the distribution of archaea in thermal habitats. Here we describe, analyze, and synthesize metagenomic and geochemical data collected from seven high-temperature sites that contain microbial communities dominated by archaea relative to bacteria. The specific objectives of the study were to use metagenome sequencing to determine the structure and functional capacity of thermophilic archaeal-dominated microbial communities across a pH range from 2.5 to 6.4 and to discuss specific examples where the metabolic potential correlated with measured environmental parameters and geochemical processes occurring in situ. Random shotgun metagenome sequence (∼40-45 Mb Sanger sequencing per site) was obtained from environmental DNA extracted from high-temperature sediments and/or microbial mats and subjected to numerous phylogenetic and functional analyses. Analysis of individual sequences (e.g., MEGAN and G + C content) and assemblies from each habitat type revealed the presence of dominant archaeal populations in all environments, 10 of whose genomes were largely reconstructed from the sequence data. Analysis of protein family occurrence, particularly of those involved in energy conservation, electron transport, and autotrophic metabolism, revealed significant differences in metabolic strategies across sites consistent with differences in major geochemical attributes (e.g., sulfide, oxygen, pH). These observations provide an ecological basis for understanding the distribution of indigenous archaeal lineages across high-temperature systems of YNP.

  6. Phylogenetic and Functional Analysis of Metagenome Sequence from High-Temperature Archaeal Habitats Demonstrate Linkages between Metabolic Potential and Geochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Inskeep, William P.; Jay, Zackary J.; Herrgard, Markus J.; Kozubal, Mark A.; Rusch, Douglas B.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Macur, Richard E.; Jennings, Ryan deM.; Boyd, Eric S.; Spear, John R.; Roberto, Francisco F.

    2013-01-01

    Geothermal habitats in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) provide an unparalleled opportunity to understand the environmental factors that control the distribution of archaea in thermal habitats. Here we describe, analyze, and synthesize metagenomic and geochemical data collected from seven high-temperature sites that contain microbial communities dominated by archaea relative to bacteria. The specific objectives of the study were to use metagenome sequencing to determine the structure and functional capacity of thermophilic archaeal-dominated microbial communities across a pH range from 2.5 to 6.4 and to discuss specific examples where the metabolic potential correlated with measured environmental parameters and geochemical processes occurring in situ. Random shotgun metagenome sequence (∼40–45 Mb Sanger sequencing per site) was obtained from environmental DNA extracted from high-temperature sediments and/or microbial mats and subjected to numerous phylogenetic and functional analyses. Analysis of individual sequences (e.g., MEGAN and G + C content) and assemblies from each habitat type revealed the presence of dominant archaeal populations in all environments, 10 of whose genomes were largely reconstructed from the sequence data. Analysis of protein family occurrence, particularly of those involved in energy conservation, electron transport, and autotrophic metabolism, revealed significant differences in metabolic strategies across sites consistent with differences in major geochemical attributes (e.g., sulfide, oxygen, pH). These observations provide an ecological basis for understanding the distribution of indigenous archaeal lineages across high-temperature systems of YNP. PMID:23720654

  7. Phylogenetic and Functional Analysis of Metagenome Sequence from High-Temperature Archaeal Habitats Demonstrate Linkages between Metabolic Potential and Geochemistry.

    PubMed

    Inskeep, William P; Jay, Zackary J; Herrgard, Markus J; Kozubal, Mark A; Rusch, Douglas B; Tringe, Susannah G; Macur, Richard E; Jennings, Ryan deM; Boyd, Eric S; Spear, John R; Roberto, Francisco F

    2013-01-01

    Geothermal habitats in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) provide an unparalleled opportunity to understand the environmental factors that control the distribution of archaea in thermal habitats. Here we describe, analyze, and synthesize metagenomic and geochemical data collected from seven high-temperature sites that contain microbial communities dominated by archaea relative to bacteria. The specific objectives of the study were to use metagenome sequencing to determine the structure and functional capacity of thermophilic archaeal-dominated microbial communities across a pH range from 2.5 to 6.4 and to discuss specific examples where the metabolic potential correlated with measured environmental parameters and geochemical processes occurring in situ. Random shotgun metagenome sequence (∼40-45 Mb Sanger sequencing per site) was obtained from environmental DNA extracted from high-temperature sediments and/or microbial mats and subjected to numerous phylogenetic and functional analyses. Analysis of individual sequences (e.g., MEGAN and G + C content) and assemblies from each habitat type revealed the presence of dominant archaeal populations in all environments, 10 of whose genomes were largely reconstructed from the sequence data. Analysis of protein family occurrence, particularly of those involved in energy conservation, electron transport, and autotrophic metabolism, revealed significant differences in metabolic strategies across sites consistent with differences in major geochemical attributes (e.g., sulfide, oxygen, pH). These observations provide an ecological basis for understanding the distribution of indigenous archaeal lineages across high-temperature systems of YNP. PMID:23720654

  8. Exercise prevents the effects of experimental arthritis on the metabolism and function of immune cells.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Francisco; Bacurau, Aline V N; Almeida, Sandro S; Barros, Carlos C; Moraes, Milton R; Pesquero, Jorge L; Ribeiro, Sandra M L; Araújo, Ronaldo C; Costa Rosa, Luis F B P; Bacurau, Reury F P

    2010-06-01

    Active lymphocytes (LY) and macrophages (MPhi) are involved in the pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Due to its anti-inflammatory effect, physical exercise may be beneficial in RA by acting on the immune system (IS). Thus, female Wistar rats with type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) were submitted to swimming training (6 weeks, 5 days/week, 60 min/day) and some biochemical and immune parameters, such as the metabolism of glucose and glutamine and function of LY and MPhi, were evaluated. In addition, plasma levels of some hormones and of interleukin-2 (IL-2) were also determined. Results demonstrate that CIA increased lymphocyte proliferation (1.9- and 1.7-fold, respectively, in response to concanavalin A (ConA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)), as well as macrophage H(2)O(2) production (1.6-fold), in comparison to control. Exercise training prevented the activation of immune cells, induced by CIA, and established a pattern of substrate utilization similar to that described as normal for these cells. Exercise also promoted an elevation of plasma levels of corticosterone (22.2%), progesterone (1.7-fold) and IL-2 (2.6-fold). Our data suggest that chronic exercise is able to counterbalance the effects of CIA on cells of the IS, reinforcing the proposal that the benefits of exercise may not be restricted to aerobic capacity and/or strength improvement. PMID:20517889

  9. Rbfox2 function in RNA metabolism is impaired in hypoplastic left heart syndrome patient hearts

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Sunil K.; Deshmukh, Vaibhav; Nutter, Curtis A.; Jaworski, Elizabeth; Jin, Wenhao; Wadhwa, Lalita; Abata, Joshua; Ricci, Marco; Lincoln, Joy; Martin, James F.; Yeo, Gene W.; Kuyumcu-Martinez, Muge N.

    2016-01-01

    Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) is a fatal congenital heart disease in which the left side of the heart is underdeveloped, impairing the systemic circulation. Underdeveloped left ventricle exerts biomechanical stress on the right ventricle that can progress into heart failure. Genome-wide transcriptome changes have been identified at early stages in the right ventricle (RV) of infants with HLHS, although the molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the RNA binding protein Rbfox2, which is mutated in HLHS patients, is a contributor to transcriptome changes in HLHS patient RVs. Our results indicate that majority of transcripts differentially expressed in HLHS patient hearts have validated Rbfox2 binding sites. We show that Rbfox2 regulates mRNA levels of targets with 3’UTR binding sites contributing to aberrant gene expression in HLHS patients. Strikingly, the Rbfox2 nonsense mutation identified in HLHS patients truncates the protein, impairs its subcellular distribution and adversely affects its function in RNA metabolism. Overall, our findings uncover a novel role for Rbfox2 in controlling transcriptome in HLHS. PMID:27485310

  10. The effects of chronic exercise on metabolic and reproductive functions in male rats.

    PubMed

    Woody, C J; Weber, S L; Laubach, H E; Ingram-Willey, V; Amini-Alashti, P; Sturbaum, B A

    1998-01-01

    Previous studies concerning the effects of swimming on various endocrine gland functions have been performed. Our study was thus designed to analyze the effects of chronic exercise (swimming) on the resting metabolic rates (RMR) of adult rats. Most of the protocols used a water temperature of 33 C. It is our contention that such a protocol is not exclusively an exercise stress, but also a hypothermic stress. The protocol of our study was designed in a way that hypothermic stress was not part of the exercise stress. Male rats were swam in 36 C water for 3 hours a day, 5 days a week for 4 months. RMR of the animals were determined 24 h after the next to last swim session. Plasma hormone levels and epididymal sperm concentrations were determined in animals sacrificed 24 h after the last swim period. Exercising animals had a RMR 16% greater than that of control animals (p < 0.02), yet total and free thyroxine and total and free triiodothyronine were not significantly elevated. Neither plasma testosterone nor epididymal sperm counts were significantly reduced in the exercising animals. It appears that chronic exercise produces an elevation in RMR which is unrelated to thyroid gland activity and does not suppress the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

  11. Crosstalk between inflammation, iron metabolism and endothelial function in Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Rita; Napoleão, Patricia; Banha, João; Paixão, Eleonora; Bettencourt, Andreia; da Silva, Berta Martins; Pereira, Dina; Barcelos, Filipe; Teixeira, Ana; Patto, José Vaz; Viegas-Crespo, Ana Maria; Costa, Luciana

    2014-01-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a rare chronic vasculitis of unclear etiology. It has been suggested that inflammatory response has an important role in BD pathophysiology. Herein, we aimed to study the interplay between inflammation, iron metabolism and endothelial function in BD and search for its putative association with disease activity. Twenty five patients clinically diagnosed with BD were selected and twenty four healthy age-sex matched individuals participated as controls. Results showed an increase of total number of circulating white blood cells and neutrophils, serum transferrin, total iron binding capacity, mieloperoxidase (MPO), ceruloplasmin (Cp), C reactive protein, β2 microglobulin and Cp surface expression in peripheral blood monocytes in BD patients comparatively to healthy individuals (p < 0,05). Of notice, the alterations observed were associated to disease activity status. No significant differences between the two groups were found in serum nitric oxide concentration. The results obtained suggest an important contribution from innate immunity in the pathogenesis of this disease. In particular, surface expression of leukocyte-derived Cp may constitute a new and relevant biomarker to understand BD etiology.

  12. 2009 Plant Lipids: Structure, Metabolism & Function Gordon Research Conference - February 1- 6 ,2009

    SciTech Connect

    Kent D. Chapman

    2009-02-06

    The Gordon Research Conference on 'Plant Lipids: Structure, Metabolism and Function' has been instituted to accelerate research productivity in the field of plant lipids. This conference will facilitate wide dissemination of research breakthroughs, support recruitment of young scientists to the field of plant lipid metabolism and encourage broad participation of the plant lipid community in guiding future directions for research in plant lipids. This conference will build upon the strengths of the successful, previous biannual meetings of the National Plant Lipid Cooperative (www.plantlipids.org) that began in 1993, but will reflect a broader scope of topics to include the biochemistry, cell biology, metabolic regulation, and signaling functions of plant acyl lipids. Most importantly, this conference also will serve as a physical focal point for the interaction of the plant lipid research community. Applications to attend this conference will be open to all researchers interested in plant lipids and will provide a venue for the presentation of the latest research results, networking opportunities for young scientists, and a forum for the development and exchange of useful lipid resources and new ideas. By bringing together senior- and junior-level scientists involved in plant lipid metabolism, a broad range of insights will be shared and the community of plant lipid researchers will function more as a network of vested partners. This is important for the vitality of the research community and for the perceived value that will encourage conference attendance into the future.

  13. Fatty Aldehyde and Fatty Alcohol Metabolism: Review and Importance for Epidermal Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, William B.

    2014-01-01

    Normal fatty aldehyde and alcohol metabolism is essential for epidermal differentiation and function. Long-chain aldehydes are produced by catabolism of several lipids including fatty alcohols, sphingolipids, ether glycerolipids, isoprenoid alcohols and certain aliphatic lipids that undergo α- or ω-oxidation. The fatty aldehyde generated by these pathways is chiefly metabolized to fatty acid by fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase (FALDH, alternately known as ALDH3A2), which also functions to oxidize fatty alcohols as a component of the fatty alcohol:NAD oxidoreductase (FAO) enzyme complex. Genetic deficiency of FALDH/FAO in patients with Sjögren-Larsson syndrome (SLS) results in accumulation of fatty aldehydes, fatty alcohols and related lipids (ether glycerolipids, wax esters) in cultured keratinocytes. These biochemical changes are associated with abnormalities in formation of lamellar bodies in the stratum granulosum and impaired delivery of their precursor membranes to the stratum corneum (SC). The defective extracellular SC membranes are responsible for a leaky epidermal water barrier and ichthyosis. Although lamellar bodies appear to be the pathogenic target for abnormal fatty aldehyde/alcohol metabolism in SLS, the precise biochemical mechanisms are yet to be elucidated. Nevertheless, studies in SLS highlight the critical importance of FALDH and normal fatty aldehyde/alcohol metabolism for epidermal function. PMID:24036493

  14. A coherent neurobiological framework for functional neuroimaging provided by a model integrating compartmentalized energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Aubert, Agnès; Pellerin, Luc; Magistretti, Pierre J; Costalat, Robert

    2007-03-01

    Functional neuroimaging has undergone spectacular developments in recent years. Paradoxically, its neurobiological bases have remained elusive, resulting in an intense debate around the cellular mechanisms taking place upon activation that could contribute to the signals measured. Taking advantage of a modeling approach, we propose here a coherent neurobiological framework that not only explains several in vitro and in vivo observations but also provides a physiological basis to interpret imaging signals. First, based on a model of compartmentalized energy metabolism, we show that complex kinetics of NADH changes observed in vitro can be accounted for by distinct metabolic responses in two cell populations reminiscent of neurons and astrocytes. Second, extended application of the model to an in vivo situation allowed us to reproduce the evolution of intraparenchymal oxygen levels upon activation as measured experimentally without substantially altering the initial parameter values. Finally, applying the same model to functional neuroimaging in humans, we were able to determine that the early negative component of the blood oxygenation level-dependent response recorded with functional MRI, known as the initial dip, critically depends on the oxidative response of neurons, whereas the late aspects of the signal correspond to a combination of responses from cell types with two distinct metabolic profiles that could be neurons and astrocytes. In summary, our results, obtained with such a modeling approach, support the concept that both neuronal and glial metabolic responses form essential components of neuroimaging signals. PMID:17360498

  15. Pregnancy and Lactation Alter Biomarkers of Biotin Metabolism in Women Consuming a Controlled Diet123

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Cydne A; West, Allyson A; Gayle, Antoinette; Lucas, Lauren K; Yan, Jian; Jiang, Xinyin; Malysheva, Olga; Caudill, Marie A

    2014-01-01

    Background: Biotin functions as a cofactor for several carboxylase enzymes with key roles in metabolism. At present, the dietary requirement for biotin is unknown and intake recommendations are provided as Adequate Intakes (AIs). The biotin AI for adults and pregnant women is 30 μg/d, whereas 35 μg/d is recommended for lactating women. However, pregnant and lactating women may require more biotin to meet the demands of these reproductive states. Objective: The current study sought to quantify the impact of reproductive state on biotin status response to a known dietary intake of biotin. Methods: To achieve this aim, we measured a panel of biotin biomarkers among pregnant (gestational week 27 at study entry; n = 26), lactating (postnatal week 5 at study entry; n = 28), and control (n = 21) women who participated in a 10- to 12-wk feeding study providing 57 μg of dietary biotin/d as part of a mixed diet. Results: Over the course of the study, pregnant women excreted 69% more (vs. control; P < 0.001) 3-hydroxyisovaleric acid (3-HIA), a metabolite that accumulates during the catabolism of leucine when the activity of biotin-dependent methylcrotonyl–coenzyme A carboxylase is impaired. Interestingly, urinary excretion of 3-hydroxyisovaleryl-carnitine (3-HIA-carnitine), a downstream metabolite of 3-HIA, was 27% lower (P = 0.05) among pregnant (vs. control) women, a finding that may arise from carnitine inadequacy during gestation. No differences (P > 0.05) were detected in plasma biotin, urinary biotin, or urinary bisnorbiotin between pregnant and control women. Lactating women excreted 76% more (vs. control; P = 0.001) of the biotin catabolite bisnorbiotin, indicating that lactation accelerates biotin turnover and loss. Notably, with respect to control women, lactating women excreted 23% less (P = 0.04) urinary 3-HIA and 26% less (P = 0.05) urinary 3-HIA-carnitine, suggesting that lactation reduces leucine catabolism and that these metabolites may not be useful

  16. The Changes of Energy Interactions between Nucleus Function and Mitochondria Functions Causing Transmutation of Chronic Inflammation into Cancer Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ponizovskiy, Michail R

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between nucleus and mitochondria functions induce the mechanism of maintenance stability of cellular internal energy according to the first law of thermodynamics in able-bodied cells and changes the mechanisms of maintenance stability of cellular internal energy creating a transition stationary state of ablebodied cells into quasi-stationary pathologic states of acute inflammation transiting then into chronic inflammation and then transmuting into cancer metabolism. The mechanisms' influences of intruding etiologic pathologic agents (microbe, virus, etc.) lead to these changes of energy interactions between nucleus and mitochondria functions causing general acute inflammation, then passing into local chronic inflammation, and reversing into cancer metabolism transmutation. Interactions between biochemical processes and biophysical processes of cellular capacitors' operations create a supplementary mechanism of maintenance stability of cellular internal energy in the norm and in pathology. Discussion of some scientific works eliminates doubts of the authors of these works. PMID:27480780

  17. Metabolic control of type 1 regulatory (Tr1) cell differentiation by AHR and HIF1-α

    PubMed Central

    Mascanfroni, Ivan D.; Takenaka, Maisa C.; Yeste, Ada; Patel, Bonny; Wu, Yan; Kenison, Jessica E.; Siddiqui, Shafiuddin; Basso, Alexandre S.; Otterbein, Leo E.; Pardoll, Drew M.; Pan, Fan; Priel, Avner; Clish, Clary B.; Robson, Simon C.; Quintana, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of the pathways that regulate lymphocyte metabolism, as well as the effects of metabolism and its products on the immune response, is still limited. We report that a metabolic program controlled by the transcription factors hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF1-α) and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) supports the differentiation of type 1 regulatory (Tr1) cells. HIF1-α controls the early metabolic reprograming of Tr1 cells. At later time points, AHR promotes HIF1-α degradation and takes control of Tr1 cell metabolism. Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (eATP) and hypoxia, linked to inflammation, trigger AHR inactivation by HIF1-α and inhibit Tr1 cell differentiation. Conversely, CD39 promotes Tr1 cell differentiation by depleting eATP. CD39 also contributes to Tr1 suppressive activity by generating adenosine in cooperation with CD73 expressed by responder T cells and antigen presenting cells. These results suggest that HIF1-α and AHR integrate immunological, metabolic and environmental signals to regulate the immune response. PMID:26005855

  18. Octopamine controls starvation resistance, life span and metabolic traits in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong; Hoffmann, Julia; Li, Yang; Stephano, Flora; Bruchhaus, Iris; Fink, Christine; Roeder, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The monoamines octopamine (OA) and tyramine (TA) modulate numerous behaviours and physiological processes in invertebrates. Nevertheless, it is not clear whether these invertebrate counterparts of norepinephrine are important regulators of metabolic and life history traits. We show that flies (Drosophila melanogaster) lacking OA are more resistant to starvation, while their overall life span is substantially reduced compared with control flies. In addition, these animals have increased body fat deposits, reduced physical activity and a reduced metabolic resting rate. Increasing the release of OA from internal stores induced the opposite effects. Flies devoid of both OA and TA had normal body fat and metabolic rates, suggesting that OA and TA act antagonistically. Moreover, OA-deficient flies show increased insulin release rates. We inferred that the OA-mediated control of insulin release accounts for a substantial proportion of the alterations observed in these flies. Apparently, OA levels control the balance between thrifty and expenditure metabolic modes. Thus, changes in OA levels in response to external and internal signals orchestrate behaviour and metabolic processes to meet physiological needs. Moreover, chronic deregulation of the corresponding signalling systems in humans may be associated with metabolic disorders, such as obesity or diabetes. PMID:27759117

  19. Metabolomic strategies for the identification of new enzyme functions and metabolic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, Gareth A; Larrouy-Maumus, Gerald; de Carvalho, Luiz Pedro S

    2014-01-01

    Recent technological advances in accurate mass spectrometry and data analysis have revolutionized metabolomics experimentation. Activity-based and global metabolomic profiling methods allow simultaneous and rapid screening of hundreds of metabolites from a variety of chemical classes, making them useful tools for the discovery of novel enzymatic activities and metabolic pathways. By using the metabolome of the relevant organism or close species, these methods capitalize on biological relevance, avoiding the assignment of artificial and non-physiological functions. This review discusses state-of-the-art metabolomic approaches and highlights recent examples of their use for enzyme annotation, discovery of new metabolic pathways, and gene assignment of orphan metabolic activities across diverse biological sources. PMID:24829223

  20. Mitochondrial function, zinc, and intermediary metabolism relationships in normal prostate and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Costello, L C; Franklin, R B; Feng, Pei

    2005-06-01

    Human prostate secretory epithelial cells have the uniquely specialized function of accumulating and secreting extremely high levels of citrate. This is achieved by their ability to accumulate high cellular levels of zinc that inhibit citrate oxidation. This process of net citrate production requires unique metabolic/bioenergetic mitochondrial relationships. In prostate cancer, the malignant cells undergo a metabolic transformation from zinc-accumulating citrate-producing sane cells to citrate-oxidizing malignant cells that lost the ability to accumulate zinc. This review describes the metabolic/bioenergetic, zinc and mitochondrial relationships involved in normal and malignant prostate. Hopefully, this report will generate much needed interest and research in this neglected, but critically important, area of investigation. PMID:16050980

  1. Metabolomic strategies for the identification of new enzyme functions and metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Prosser, Gareth A; Larrouy-Maumus, Gerald; de Carvalho, Luiz Pedro S

    2014-06-01

    Recent technological advances in accurate mass spectrometry and data analysis have revolutionized metabolomics experimentation. Activity-based and global metabolomic profiling methods allow simultaneous and rapid screening of hundreds of metabolites from a variety of chemical classes, making them useful tools for the discovery of novel enzymatic activities and metabolic pathways. By using the metabolome of the relevant organism or close species, these methods capitalize on biological relevance, avoiding the assignment of artificial and non-physiological functions. This review discusses state-of-the-art metabolomic approaches and highlights recent examples of their use for enzyme annotation, discovery of new metabolic pathways, and gene assignment of orphan metabolic activities across diverse biological sources.

  2. Autophagy enforces functional integrity of regulatory T cells by coupling environmental cues and metabolic homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jun; Long, Lingyun; Yang, Kai; Guy, Cliff; Shrestha, Sharad; Chen, Zuojia; Wu, Chuan; Vogel, Peter; Neale, Geoffrey; Green, Douglas R; Chi, Hongbo

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells respond to immune and inflammatory signals to mediate immunosuppression, but how functional integrity of Treg cells is maintained under activating environments remains elusive. Here we found that autophagy was active in Treg cells and supported their lineage stability and survival fitness. Treg cell-specific deletion of the essential autophagy gene Atg7 or Atg5 led to loss of Treg cells, increased tumor resistance, and development of inflammatory disorders. Atg7-deficient Treg cells had increased apoptosis and readily lost Foxp3 expression, especially after activation. Mechanistically, autophagy deficiency upregulated mTORC1 and c-Myc function and glycolytic metabolism that contributed to defective Treg function. Therefore, autophagy couples environmental signals and metabolic homeostasis to protect lineage and survival integrity of Treg cells in activating contexts. PMID:26808230

  3. Background, quality of life and metabolic control in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Wikby, A; Hörnquist, J O; Andersson, P O

    1991-08-01

    The interference of background characteristics with quality of life and metabolic control in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) were examined. Seventy-three consecutive outpatients who switched from syringe injections to multiple pen-injection treatment comprised the study group. Perceived status as well as retrospective changes in quality of life, attributed to the new treatment modality, were assessed at follow-up after 9-13 months. Data on metabolic control (HbA1C) were collected at base-line and follow-up. Sub-group comparisons in life quality and metabolic control were performed with regard to differences in sex, age, cohabitation, onset and duration of IDDM. Most of the background characteristics had no or just minor significance for status and change in the life quality and metabolic control of the patients. Cohabitation, however, was linked to a better life quality status pertaining to different domains and a tendency to better metabolic control. In addition, females reported a slightly better health status and a more healthy life style (i.e. eating, drinking and smoking habits) than did males. Extra treatment attention may therefore be justified for non-cohabiting males.

  4. Bridging Between Proline Structure, Functions, Metabolism, and Involvement in Organism Physiology.

    PubMed

    Saibi, Walid; Feki, Kaouthar; Yacoubi, Ines; Brini, Faiçal

    2015-08-01

    Much is now known about proline multifunctionality and metabolism; some aspects of its biological functions are still unclear. Here, we discuss some cases in the proline, structure, definition, metabolism, compartmentalization, accumulation, plausible functions and also its implication in homeostasis and organism physiology. Indeed, we report the role of proline in cellular homeostasis, including redox balance and energy status and their implication as biocatalyst for aldolase activity. Proline can act as a signaling molecule to modulate mitochondrial functions, influence cell proliferation or cell death, and trigger specific gene expression, which can be essential for plant recovery from stresses. Although, the regulation and the function of proline accumulation, during abiotic stresses, are not yet completely understood. The engineering of proline metabolism could lead to new opportunities to improve plant tolerance against environmental stresses. This atypical amino acid has a potential role in the toxicity during growth of some microorganism, vegetal, and mammalian species. Furthermore, we note that the purpose through the work is to provide a rich, concise, and mostly cohesive source on proline, considered as a platform and an anchor between several disciplines and biological functions.

  5. Black Beans, Fiber, and Antioxidant Capacity Pilot Study: Examination of Whole Foods vs. Functional Components on Postprandial Metabolic, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammation in Adults with Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Reverri, Elizabeth J; Randolph, Jody M; Steinberg, Francene M; Kappagoda, C Tissa; Edirisinghe, Indika; Burton-Freeman, Britt M

    2015-08-01

    Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) contain bioactive components with functional properties that may modify cardiovascular risk. The aims of this pilot study were to evaluate the ability of black beans to attenuate postprandial metabolic, oxidative stress, and inflammatory responses and determine relative contribution of dietary fiber and antioxidant capacity of beans to the overall effect. In this randomized, controlled, crossover trial, 12 adults with metabolic syndrome (MetS) consumed one of three meals (black bean (BB), fiber matched (FM), and antioxidant capacity matched (AM)) on three occasions that included blood collection before (fasting) and five hours postprandially. Insulin was lower after the BB meal, compared to the FM or AM meals (p < 0.0001). A significant meal × time interaction was observed for plasma antioxidant capacity (p = 0.002) revealing differences over time: AM > BB > FM. Oxidized LDL (oxLDL) was not different by meal, although a trend for declining oxLDL was observed after the BB and AM meals at five hours compared to the FM meal. Triglycerides and interleukin-6 (IL-6) increased in response to meals (p < 0.0001). Inclusion of black beans with a typical Western-style meal attenuates postprandial insulin and moderately enhances postprandial antioxidant endpoints in adults with MetS, which could only be partly explained by fiber content and properties of antioxidant capacity. PMID:26225995

  6. Black Beans, Fiber, and Antioxidant Capacity Pilot Study: Examination of Whole Foods vs. Functional Components on Postprandial Metabolic, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammation in Adults with Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Reverri, Elizabeth J.; Randolph, Jody M.; Steinberg, Francene M.; Kappagoda, C. Tissa; Edirisinghe, Indika; Burton-Freeman, Britt M.

    2015-01-01

    Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) contain bioactive components with functional properties that may modify cardiovascular risk. The aims of this pilot study were to evaluate the ability of black beans to attenuate postprandial metabolic, oxidative stress, and inflammatory responses and determine relative contribution of dietary fiber and antioxidant capacity of beans to the overall effect. In this randomized, controlled, crossover trial, 12 adults with metabolic syndrome (MetS) consumed one of three meals (black bean (BB), fiber matched (FM), and antioxidant capacity matched (AM)) on three occasions that included blood collection before (fasting) and five hours postprandially. Insulin was lower after the BB meal, compared to the FM or AM meals (p < 0.0001). A significant meal × time interaction was observed for plasma antioxidant capacity (p = 0.002) revealing differences over time: AM > BB > FM. Oxidized LDL (oxLDL) was not different by meal, although a trend for declining oxLDL was observed after the BB and AM meals at five hours compared to the FM meal. Triglycerides and interleukin-6 (IL-6) increased in response to meals (p < 0.0001). Inclusion of black beans with a typical Western-style meal attenuates postprandial insulin and moderately enhances postprandial antioxidant endpoints in adults with MetS, which could only be partly explained by fiber content and properties of antioxidant capacity. PMID:26225995

  7. Black Beans, Fiber, and Antioxidant Capacity Pilot Study: Examination of Whole Foods vs. Functional Components on Postprandial Metabolic, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammation in Adults with Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Reverri, Elizabeth J; Randolph, Jody M; Steinberg, Francene M; Kappagoda, C Tissa; Edirisinghe, Indika; Burton-Freeman, Britt M

    2015-07-27

    Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) contain bioactive components with functional properties that may modify cardiovascular risk. The aims of this pilot study were to evaluate the ability of black beans to attenuate postprandial metabolic, oxidative stress, and inflammatory responses and determine relative contribution of dietary fiber and antioxidant capacity of beans to the overall effect. In this randomized, controlled, crossover trial, 12 adults with metabolic syndrome (MetS) consumed one of three meals (black bean (BB), fiber matched (FM), and antioxidant capacity matched (AM)) on three occasions that included blood collection before (fasting) and five hours postprandially. Insulin was lower after the BB meal, compared to the FM or AM meals (p < 0.0001). A significant meal × time interaction was observed for plasma antioxidant capacity (p = 0.002) revealing differences over time: AM > BB > FM. Oxidized LDL (oxLDL) was not different by meal, although a trend for declining oxLDL was observed after the BB and AM meals at five hours compared to the FM meal. Triglycerides and interleukin-6 (IL-6) increased in response to meals (p < 0.0001). Inclusion of black beans with a typical Western-style meal attenuates postprandial insulin and moderately enhances postprandial antioxidant endpoints in adults with MetS, which could only be partly explained by fiber content and properties of antioxidant capacity.

  8. Multiple genetic imaging study of the association between cholesterol metabolism and brain functional alterations in individuals with risk factors for Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Feng; Yuan, Yonggui; Shi, Yongmei; Zhang, Zhijun

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous neurodegenerative disease. Genes involved in cholesterol metabolism may play a role in the pathological changes of AD. However, the imaging genetics-based endophenotypes derived from polymorphisms in multiple functionally related genes are unclear in individuals with risk factors for AD. Forty-three amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) subjects and 30 healthy controls underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measurements of brain topological organization. Thirty-three previously suggested tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 12 candidate genes in the cholesterol metabolism pathway were further investigated. A cholesterol metabolism pathway gene-based imaging genetics approach was then utilized to investigate disease-related differences between the groups based on genotype-by-aMCI interactions. The cholesterol metabolism pathway genes exerted widespread effects on the cortico-subcortical-cerebellar spontaneous brain activity. Meanwhile, left lateralization of global brain connectivity was associated with cholesterol metabolism pathway genes. The APOE rs429358 variation significantly influenced the brain network characteristics, affecting the activation of nodes as well as the connectivity of edges in aMCI subjects. The cholesterol metabolism pathway gene-based imaging genetics approach may provide new opportunities to understand the mechanisms underlying AD and suggested that APOE rs429358 is a core genetic variation that is associated with disease-related differences in brain function. PMID:26985771

  9. Central circadian control of female reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Miller, Brooke H; Takahashi, Joseph S

    2013-01-01

    Over the past two decades, it has become clear just how much of our physiology is under the control of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and the cell-intrinsic molecular clock that ticks with a periodicity of approximately 24 h. The SCN prepares our digestive system for meals, our adrenal axis for the stress of waking up in the morning, and the genes expressed in our muscles when we prepare to exercise. Long before molecular studies of genes such as Clock, Bmal1, and the Per homologs were possible, it was obvious that female reproductive function was under strict circadian control at every level of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and in the establishment and successful maintenance of pregnancy. This review highlights our current understanding of the role that the SCN plays in regulating female reproductive physiology, with a special emphasis on the advances made possible through the use of circadian mutant mice.

  10. Central Circadian Control of Female Reproductive Function

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Brooke H.; Takahashi, Joseph S.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past two decades, it has become clear just how much of our physiology is under the control of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and the cell-intrinsic molecular clock that ticks with a periodicity of approximately 24 h. The SCN prepares our digestive system for meals, our adrenal axis for the stress of waking up in the morning, and the genes expressed in our muscles when we prepare to exercise. Long before molecular studies of genes such as Clock, Bmal1, and the Per homologs were possible, it was obvious that female reproductive function was under strict circadian control at every level of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and in the establishment and successful maintenance of pregnancy. This review highlights our current understanding of the role that the SCN plays in regulating female reproductive physiology, with a special emphasis on the advances made possible through the use of circadian mutant mice. PMID:24478756

  11. Control and Functions of Fixational Eye Movements

    PubMed Central

    Rucci, Michele; Poletti, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Humans and other species explore a visual scene by rapidly shifting their gaze 2-3 times every second. Although the eyes may appear immobile in the brief intervals in between saccades, microscopic (fixational) eye movements are always present, even when attending to a single point. These movements occur during the very periods in which visual information is acquired and processed and their functions have long been debated. Recent technical advances in controlling retinal stimulation during normal oculomotor activity have shed new light on the visual contributions of fixational eye movements and their degree of control. The emerging body of evidence, reviewed in this article, indicates that fixational eye movements are important components of the strategy by which the visual system processes fine spatial details, enabling both precise positioning of the stimulus on the retina and encoding of spatial information into the joint space-time domain.

  12. Changes in functional metabolism in the rat central nervous system following spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murakami, D. M.; Miller, J. D.; Fuller, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    The neuronal metabolism and soma size of neurons within the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and the supraoptic nucleus of rats are analyzed. Five male Sprague-Dawley rats were flown on Spacelab 3 for 7 days under a 12:12 light/dark cycle and unlimited food and water, and a control group was kept on the ground under similar conditions. The preparation of the hypothalamus of the rats for microscopic examination using thionin or the cytochrome oxidase (CYOX) technique is described. CYOX activity and soma size within the PVN are evaluated. The effects of water drinking pattern and space flight on CYOX activity and soma size are investigated. The data reveal that the flight rats with normal drinking patterns display a decrease in neuronal metabolism within the vasopressin-containing neurons of the hypothalamus and this metabolic change may reflect fluid shifts caused by microgravity.

  13. Proposed physiologic functions of boron in plants pertinent to animal and human metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Blevins, D G; Lukaszewski, K M

    1994-01-01

    Boron has been recognized since 1923 as an essential micronutrient element for higher plants. Over the years, many roles for boron in plants have been proposed, including functions in sugar transport, cell wall synthesis and lignification, cell wall structure, carbohydrate metabolism, RNA metabolism, respiration, indole acetic acid metabolism, phenol metabolism and membrane transport. However, the mechanism of boron involvement in each case remains unclear. Recent work has focused on two major plant-cell components: cell walls and membranes. In both, boron could play a structural role by bridging hydroxyl groups. In membranes, it could also be involved in ion transport and redox reactions by stimulating enzymes like nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and reduced (NADH) oxidase. There is a very narrow window between the levels of boron required by and toxic to plants. The mechanisms of boron toxicity are also unknown. In nitrogen-fixing leguminous plants, foliarly applied boron causes up to a 1000% increase in the concentration of allantoic acid in leaves. In vitro studies show that boron inhibits the manganese-dependent allantoate amidohydrolase, and foliar application of manganese prior to application of boron eliminates allantoic acid accumulation in leaves. Interaction between borate and divalent cations like manganese may alter metabolic pathways, which could explain why higher concentrations of boron can be toxic to plants. PMID:7889877

  14. The function of the aerenchyma in arborescent lycopsids: evidence of an unfamiliar metabolic strategy.

    PubMed

    Green, W A

    2010-08-01

    Most species of the modern family Isoëtaceae (Quillworts) some other modern hydrophytes, use a metabolic pathway for carbon fixation that involves uptake of sedimentary carbon and enrichment of CO(2) in internal gas spaces as a carbon-concentrating mechanism. This metabolism, which is related to 'aquatic CAM', is characterized by morphological, physiological and biochemical adaptations for decreasing photorespirative loss, aerating roots and maintaining high growth rates in anoxic, oligotrophic, stressed environments. Some of the closest relatives of the Isoëtaceae were the 'arborescent lycopsids', which were among the dominant taxa in the coal swamps found in lowland ecosystems during the Carboniferous and Permian periods (approx. 300 Ma). Morphological, ecological and geochemical evidence supports the hypothesis that the arborescent lycopsids had an unusual metabolism similar to that of modern Isoëtaceae and processed a biogeochemically significant proportion of organically fixed carbon over a period of about 100 million years in the late Palaeozoic. The temporal coincidence between the dominance of plants with this metabolism and an anomalous global atmosphere (high O(2); low CO(2)) supports the idea that biosphere feedbacks are important in regulating global climatic homeostasis. The potential influence of this metabolism on the global carbon cycle and its specific adaptive function suggest that it should perhaps be considered a fourth major photosynthetic pathway.

  15. PPARs, Cardiovascular Metabolism, and Function: Near- or Far-from-Equilibrium Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lecarpentier, Yves; Claes, Victor; Hébert, Jean-Louis

    2010-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR α, β/δ and γ) play a key role in metabolic regulatory processes and gene regulation of cellular metabolism, particularly in the cardiovascular system. Moreover, PPARs have various extra metabolic roles, in circadian rhythms, inflammation and oxidative stress. In this review, we focus mainly on the effects of PPARs on some thermodynamic processes, which can behave either near equilibrium, or far-from-equilibrium. New functions of PPARs are reported in the arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, a human genetic heart disease. It is now possible to link the genetic desmosomal abnormalitiy to the presence of fat in the right ventricle, partly due to an overexpression of PPARγ. Moreover, PPARs are directly or indirectly involved in cellular oscillatory processes such as the Wnt-b-catenin pathway, circadian rhythms of arterial blood pressure and cardiac frequency and glycolysis metabolic pathway. Dysfunction of clock genes and PPARγ may lead to hyperphagia, obesity, metabolic syndrome, myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death, In pathological conditions, regulatory processes of the cardiovascular system may bifurcate towards new states, such as those encountered in hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and heart failure. Numerous of these oscillatory mechanisms, organized in time and space, behave far from equilibrium and are “dissipative structures”. PMID:20706650

  16. Functional Metabolic Map of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, a Beneficial Human Gut Microbe

    PubMed Central

    Heinken, Almut; Khan, M. Tanweer; Paglia, Giuseppe; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.

    2014-01-01

    The human gut microbiota plays a central role in human well-being and disease. In this study, we present an integrated, iterative approach of computational modeling, in vitro experiments, metabolomics, and genomic analysis to accelerate the identification of metabolic capabilities for poorly characterized (anaerobic) microorganisms. We demonstrate this approach for the beneficial human gut microbe Faecalibacterium prausnitzii strain A2-165. We generated an automated draft reconstruction, which we curated against the limited biochemical data. This reconstruction modeling was used to develop in silico and in vitro a chemically defined medium (CDM), which was validated experimentally. Subsequent metabolomic analysis of the spent medium for growth on CDM was performed. We refined our metabolic reconstruction according to in vitro observed metabolite consumption and secretion and propose improvements to the current genome annotation of F. prausnitzii A2-165. We then used the reconstruction to systematically characterize its metabolic properties. Novel carbon source utilization capabilities and inabilities were predicted based on metabolic modeling and validated experimentally. This study resulted in a functional metabolic map of F. prausnitzii, which is available for further applications. The presented workflow can be readily extended to other poorly characterized and uncharacterized organisms to yield novel biochemical insights about the target organism. PMID:25002542

  17. The function of the aerenchyma in arborescent lycopsids: evidence of an unfamiliar metabolic strategy.

    PubMed

    Green, W A

    2010-08-01

    Most species of the modern family Isoëtaceae (Quillworts) some other modern hydrophytes, use a metabolic pathway for carbon fixation that involves uptake of sedimentary carbon and enrichment of CO(2) in internal gas spaces as a carbon-concentrating mechanism. This metabolism, which is related to 'aquatic CAM', is characterized by morphological, physiological and biochemical adaptations for decreasing photorespirative loss, aerating roots and maintaining high growth rates in anoxic, oligotrophic, stressed environments. Some of the closest relatives of the Isoëtaceae were the 'arborescent lycopsids', which were among the dominant taxa in the coal swamps found in lowland ecosystems during the Carboniferous and Permian periods (approx. 300 Ma). Morphological, ecological and geochemical evidence supports the hypothesis that the arborescent lycopsids had an unusual metabolism similar to that of modern Isoëtaceae and processed a biogeochemically significant proportion of organically fixed carbon over a period of about 100 million years in the late Palaeozoic. The temporal coincidence between the dominance of plants with this metabolism and an anomalous global atmosphere (high O(2); low CO(2)) supports the idea that biosphere feedbacks are important in regulating global climatic homeostasis. The potential influence of this metabolism on the global carbon cycle and its specific adaptive function suggest that it should perhaps be considered a fourth major photosynthetic pathway. PMID:20356894

  18. Functional metabolic map of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, a beneficial human gut microbe.

    PubMed

    Heinken, Almut; Khan, M Tanweer; Paglia, Giuseppe; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Harmsen, Hermie J M; Thiele, Ines

    2014-09-01

    The human gut microbiota plays a central role in human well-being and disease. In this study, we present an integrated, iterative approach of computational modeling, in vitro experiments, metabolomics, and genomic analysis to accelerate the identification of metabolic capabilities for poorly characterized (anaerobic) microorganisms. We demonstrate this approach for the beneficial human gut microbe Faecalibacterium prausnitzii strain A2-165. We generated an automated draft reconstruction, which we curated against the limited biochemical data. This reconstruction modeling was used to develop in silico and in vitro a chemically defined medium (CDM), which was validated experimentally. Subsequent metabolomic analysis of the spent medium for growth on CDM was performed. We refined our metabolic reconstruction according to in vitro observed metabolite consumption and secretion and propose improvements to the current genome annotation of F. prausnitzii A2-165. We then used the reconstruction to systematically characterize its metabolic properties. Novel carbon source utilization capabilities and inabilities were predicted based on metabolic modeling and validated experimentally. This study resulted in a functional metabolic map of F. prausnitzii, which is available for further applications. The presented workflow can be readily extended to other poorly characterized and uncharacterized organisms to yield novel biochemical insights about the target organism.

  19. μ-Crystallin controls muscle function through thyroid hormone action.

    PubMed

    Seko, Daiki; Ogawa, Shizuka; Li, Tao-Sheng; Taimura, Akihiro; Ono, Yusuke

    2016-05-01

    μ-Crystallin (Crym), a thyroid hormone-binding protein, is abnormally up-regulated in the muscles of patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy, a dominantly inherited progressive myopathy. However, the physiologic function of Crym in skeletal muscle remains to be elucidated. In this study, Crym was preferentially expressed in skeletal muscle throughout the body. Crym-knockout mice exhibited a significant hypertrophy of fast-twitch glycolytic type IIb fibers, causing an increase in grip strength and high intensity running ability in Crym-null mice. Genetic inactivation of Crym or blockade of Crym by siRNA-mediated knockdown up-regulated the gene expression of fast-glycolytic contractile fibers in satellite cell-derived myotubes in vitro These alterations in Crym-inactivated muscle were rescued by inhibition of thyroid hormone, even though Crym is a positive regulator of thyroid hormone action in nonmuscle cells. The results demonstrated that Crym is a crucial regulator of muscle plasticity, controlling metabolic and contractile properties of myofibers, and thus the selective inactivation of Crym may be a potential therapeutic target for muscle-wasting diseases, such as muscular dystrophies and age-related sarcopenia.-Seko, D., Ogawa, S., Li, T.-S., Taimura, A., Ono, Y. μ-Crystallin controls muscle function through thyroid hormone action. PMID:26718889

  20. Dietary iron controls circadian hepatic glucose metabolism through heme synthesis.

    PubMed

    Simcox, Judith A; Mitchell, Thomas Creighton; Gao, Yan; Just, Steven F; Cooksey, Robert; Cox, James; Ajioka, Richard; Jones, Deborah; Lee, Soh-Hyun; King, Daniel; Huang, Jingyu; McClain, Donald A

    2015-04-01

    The circadian rhythm of the liver maintains glucose homeostasis, and disruption of this rhythm is associated with type 2 diabetes. Feeding is one factor that sets the circadian clock in peripheral tissues, but relatively little is known about the role of specific dietary components in that regard. We assessed the effects of dietary iron on circadian gluconeogenesis. Dietary iron affects circadian glucose metabolism through heme-mediated regulation of the interaction of nuclear receptor subfamily 1 group d member 1 (Rev-Erbα) with its cosuppressor nuclear receptor corepressor 1 (NCOR). Loss of regulated heme synthesis was achieved by aminolevulinic acid (ALA) treatment of mice or cultured cells to bypass the rate-limiting enzyme in hepatic heme synthesis, ALA synthase 1 (ALAS1). ALA treatment abolishes differences in hepatic glucose production and in the expression of gluconeogenic enzymes seen with variation of dietary iron. The differences among diets are also lost with inhibition of heme synthesis with isonicotinylhydrazine. Dietary iron modulates levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), a transcriptional activator of ALAS1, to affect hepatic heme. Treatment of mice with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine diminishes PGC-1α variation observed among the iron diets, suggesting that iron is acting through reactive oxygen species signaling.

  1. Postnatal overnutrition programs the thyroid hormone metabolism and function in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Lisboa, Patricia C; Conceição, Ellen P S; de Oliveira, Elaine; Moura, Egberto G

    2015-09-01

    Early overnutrition (EO) during lactation leads to obesity, leptin resistance and lower thyroid hormone (TH) levels during adulthood. To better understand the biological significance of this thyroid hypofunction, we studied the long-term effects of postnatal EO on both the function of hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis and the metabolism and action of TH. To induce EO, the litter size was reduced to three pups per litter (small litter (SL) group) on the third day of lactation. In the controls (normal litter group), litter size was adjusted to 10 pups per litter. Rats were killed at PN180. TRH content and in vitro TSH were evaluated. Iodothyronine deiodinase (D1 and D2) activities were measured in different tissues. Mitochondrial α-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (mGPD), uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) and TH receptor (TRβ1) were evaluated to assess TH action. The SL group presented lower TRH, intra-pituitary and released TSH levels, despite unchanged plasma TSH. They presented lower D1 activity in thyroid, muscle and white adipose tissue (WAT) and higher D2 activity in the hypothalamus, pituitary, brown adipose tissue (BAT) and WAT, which confirmed the hypothyroidism. UCP1 in BAT and TRβ1 in WAT were decreased, which can contribute to a lower catabolic status. Despite the lower TH, the D2 activity in the thyroid, heart and testes was unchanged. Hepatic D1, mGPD and TRβ1 were also unchanged in SL rats, suggesting that the TH conversion and action were preserved in the liver, even with lower TH. Thus, this model indicates that postnatal EO changes thyroid function in adult life in a tissue-specific way, which can help in the understanding of obesogenesis. PMID:26203167

  2. Self-healing of optical functions by molecular metabolism in a swollen elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Mitsunori; Nishimura, Tatsuya; Sakiyama, Kohei; Inagaki, Sota

    2012-12-01

    Optical functions of organic dyes, e.g., fluorescence or photochromism, tend to degrade by light irradiation, which causes a short lifetime of photonic devices. Self-healing of optical functions is attainable by metabolizing bleached molecules with nonirradiated ones. A polydimethylsiloxane elastomer provides a useful matrix for dye molecules, since its flexible structure with nano-sized intermolecular spaces allows dye diffusion from a reservoir to an operation region. Swelling the elastomer with a suitable solvent promotes both dissolution and diffusion of dye molecules. This self-healing function was demonstrated by an experiment in which a photochromic elastomer exhibited improved durability against a repeated coloring-decoloring process.

  3. Geometry and Force Control of Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Freytes, Donald O.; Wan, Leo Q.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2009-01-01

    Tissue engineering is becoming increasingly ambitious in its efforts to create functional human tissues, and to provide stem cell scientists with culture systems of high biological fidelity. Novel engineering designs are being guided by biological principles, in an attempt to recapitulate more faithfully the complexities of native cellular milieu. Three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds are being designed to mimic native-like cell environments and thereby elicit native-like cell responses. Also, the traditional focus on molecular regulatory factors is shifting towards the combined application of molecular and physical factors. Finally, methods are becoming available for the coordinated presentation of molecular and physical factors in the form of controllable spatial and temporal gradients. Taken together, these recent developments enable the interrogation of cellular behavior within dynamic culture settings designed to mimic some aspects of native tissue development, disease, or regeneration. We discuss here these advanced cell culture environments, with emphasis on the derivation of design principles from the development (the biomimetic paradigm) and the geometry-force control of cell function (the biophysical regulation paradigm). PMID:19795385

  4. Leptin's metabolic and immune functions can be uncoupled at the ligand/receptor interaction level.

    PubMed

    Zabeau, Lennart; Jensen, Cathy J; Seeuws, Sylvie; Venken, Koen; Verhee, Annick; Catteeuw, Dominiek; van Loo, Geert; Chen, Hui; Walder, Ken; Hollis, Jacob; Foote, Simon; Morris, Margaret J; Van der Heyden, José; Peelman, Frank; Oldfield, Brian J; Rubio, Justin P; Elewaut, Dirk; Tavernier, Jan

    2015-02-01

    The adipocyte-derived cytokine leptin acts as a metabolic switch, connecting the body's metabolism to high-energy consuming processes such as reproduction and immune responses. We here provide genetic and biochemical evidence that the metabolic and immune functions of leptin can be uncoupled at the receptor level. First, homozygous mutant fatt/fatt mice carry a spontaneous splice mutation causing deletion of the leptin receptor (LR) immunoglobulin-like domain (IGD) in all LR isoforms. These mice are hyperphagic and morbidly obese, but display only minimal changes in size and cellularity of the thymus, and cellular immune responses are unaffected. These animals also displayed liver damage in response to concavalin A comparable to wild-type and heterozygous littermates. Second, treatment of healthy mice with a neutralizing nanobody targeting IGD induced weight gain and hyperinsulinaemia, but completely failed to block development of experimentally induced autoimmune diseases. These data indicate that leptin receptor deficiency or antagonism profoundly affects metabolism, with little concomitant effects on immune functions. PMID:25098352

  5. Functional consequences of perturbing polyamine metabolism in the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Clark, K; Niemand, J; Reeksting, S; Smit, S; van Brummelen, A C; Williams, M; Louw, A I; Birkholtz, L

    2010-02-01

    Inhibition of polyamine biosynthesis and/or the perturbation of polyamine functionality have been exploited with success against parasitic diseases such as Trypanosoma infections. However, when the classical polyamine biosynthesis inhibitor, alpha-difluoromethylornithine, is used against the human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, it results in only a cytostatic growth arrest. Polyamine metabolism in this parasite has unique properties not shared by any other organism. These include the bifunctional arrangement of the catalytic decarboxylases and an apparent absence of the typical polyamine interconversion pathways implying different mechanisms for the regulation of polyamine homeostasis that includes the uptake of exogenous polyamines at least in vitro. These properties make polyamine metabolism an enticing drug target in P. falciparum provided that the physiological and functional consequences of polyamine metabolism perturbation are understood. This review highlights our current understanding of the biological consequences of inhibition of the biosynthetic enzymes in the polyamine pathway in P. falciparum as revealed by several global analytical approaches. Ultimately, the evidence suggests that polyamine metabolism in P. falciparum is a validated drug target worth exploiting. PMID:19997948

  6. Microbial structures, functions, and metabolic pathways in wastewater treatment bioreactors revealed using high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lin; Zhang, Tong; Wang, Taitao; Fang, Zhiwei

    2012-12-18

    The objective of this study was to explore microbial community structures, functional profiles, and metabolic pathways in a lab-scale and a full-scale wastewater treatment bioreactors. In order to do this, over 12 gigabases of metagenomic sequence data and 600,000 paired-end sequences of bacterial 16S rRNA gene were generated with the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform, using DNA extracted from activated sludge in the two bioreactors. Three kinds of sequences (16S rRNA gene amplicons, 16S rRNA gene sequences obtained from metagenomic sequencing, and predicted proteins) were used to conduct taxonomic assignments. Specially, relative abundances of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) were analyzed. Compared with quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), metagenomic sequencing was demonstrated to be a better approach to quantify AOA and AOB in activated sludge samples. It was found that AOB were more abundant than AOA in both reactors. Furthermore, the analysis of the metabolic profiles indicated that the overall patterns of metabolic pathways in the two reactors were quite similar (73.3% of functions shared). However, for some pathways (such as carbohydrate metabolism and membrane transport), the two reactors differed in the number of pathway-specific genes.

  7. Microbial structures, functions, and metabolic pathways in wastewater treatment bioreactors revealed using high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lin; Zhang, Tong; Wang, Taitao; Fang, Zhiwei

    2012-12-18

    The objective of this study was to explore microbial community structures, functional profiles, and metabolic pathways in a lab-scale and a full-scale wastewater treatment bioreactors. In order to do this, over 12 gigabases of metagenomic sequence data and 600,000 paired-end sequences of bacterial 16S rRNA gene were generated with the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform, using DNA extracted from activated sludge in the two bioreactors. Three kinds of sequences (16S rRNA gene amplicons, 16S rRNA gene sequences obtained from metagenomic sequencing, and predicted proteins) were used to conduct taxonomic assignments. Specially, relative abundances of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) were analyzed. Compared with quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), metagenomic sequencing was demonstrated to be a better approach to quantify AOA and AOB in activated sludge samples. It was found that AOB were more abundant than AOA in both reactors. Furthermore, the analysis of the metabolic profiles indicated that the overall patterns of metabolic pathways in the two reactors were quite similar (73.3% of functions shared). However, for some pathways (such as carbohydrate metabolism and membrane transport), the two reactors differed in the number of pathway-specific genes. PMID:23151157

  8. Respiratory, metabolic and cardiac functions are altered by disinhibition of subregions of the medial prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Sarah F; Cornish, Jennifer L; Goodchild, Ann K

    2013-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is referred to as the visceral motor cortex; however, little is known about whether this region influences respiratory or metabolic outflows. The aim of this study was to describe simultaneous changes in respiratory, metabolic and cardiovascular functions evoked by disinhibition of the medial PFC (mPFC) and adjacent lateral septal nucleus (LSN). In urethane-anaesthetized rats, bicuculline methiodide was microinjected (2 mm; GABA-A receptor antagonist) into 90 sites in the mPFC at 0.72–4.00 mm from bregma. Phrenic nerve amplitude and frequency, arterial pressure, heart rate, splanchnic and lumbar sympathetic nerve activities (SNA), expired CO2, and core and brown adipose tissue temperatures were measured. Novel findings included disturbances to respiratory rhythm evoked from all subregions of the mPFC. Injections into the cingulate cortex evoked reductions in central respiratory function exclusively, whereas in ventral sites, particularly the infralimbic region, increases in respiratory drive and frequency, and metabolic and cardiac outflows were evoked. Disinhibition of sites in surrounding regions revealed that the LSN could evoke cardiovascular changes accompanied by distinct oscillations in SNA, as well as increases in respiratory amplitude. We show that activation of neurons within the mPFC and LSN influence respiratory, metabolic and cardiac outflows in a site-dependent manner. This study has implications with respect to the altered PFC neuronal activity seen in stress-related and mental health disorders, and suggests how basic physiological systems may be affected. PMID:24042503

  9. Relationships between brain metabolism decrease in normal aging and changes in structural and functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Chételat, Gaël; Landeau, Brigitte; Salmon, Eric; Yakushev, Igor; Bahri, Mohamed Ali; Mézenge, Florence; Perrotin, Audrey; Bastin, Christine; Manrique, Alain; Scheurich, Armin; Scheckenberger, Mathias; Desgranges, Béatrice; Eustache, Francis; Fellgiebel, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    Normal aging is characterized by brain glucose metabolism decline predominantly in the prefrontal cortex. The goal of the present study was to assess whether this change was associated with age-related alteration of white matter (WM) structural integrity and/or functional connectivity. FDG-PET data from 40 young and 57 elderly healthy participants from two research centers (n=49/48 in Center 1/2) were analyzed. WM volume from T1-weighted MRI (Center 1), fractional anisotropy from diffusion-tensor imaging (Center 2), and resting-state fMRI data (Center 1) were also obtained. Group comparisons were performed within each imaging modality. Then, positive correlations were assessed, within the elderly, between metabolism in the most affected region and the other neuroimaging modalities. Metabolism decline in the elderly predominated in the left inferior frontal junction (LIFJ). LIFJ hypometabolism was significantly associated with macrostructural and microstructural WM disturbances in long association fronto-temporo-occipital fibers, while no relationship was found with functional connectivity. The findings offer new perspectives to understand normal aging processes and open avenues for future studies to explore causality between age-related metabolism and connectivity changes. PMID:23518010

  10. Comparison of metabolic control among diabetic subjects at two clinics.

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, P J; Fragneto, R; Coulehan, J; Crabtree, B F

    1989-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate whether glucose control in 20 non-insulin-dependent diabetic subjects seen at a remote rural clinic was comparable to control achieved in 66 diabetic subjects seen at the regional hospital clinic. Sampling was done to assure that study subjects were representative of all care-seeking, diagnosed diabetics in a well-defined Navajo community. The two groups of patients were comparable in terms of age, sex, and duration of diabetes from time of diagnosis. Compliance with care, hospitalization rates, and complication rates were similar in each group. Results showed no significant differences in glycemic control between the rural clinic (mean fasting plasma glucose = 177, mean random plasma glucose = 227) and the regional hospital clinic (mean fasting plasma glucose = 187, mean random plasma glucose = 249). The percentages of diabetics under "acceptable" control by American Diabetes Association guidelines was 40 percent at the rural clinic and 29 percent at the hospital clinic (P greater than .05). The authors conclude that adequacy of glycemic control in diabetics is not compromised by providing care at a remote rural clinic. PMID:2508176

  11. Early life origins of metabolic disease: Developmental programming of hypothalamic pathways controlling energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Dearden, Laura; Ozanne, Susan E

    2015-10-01

    A wealth of animal and human studies demonstrate that perinatal exposure to adverse metabolic conditions - be it maternal obesity, diabetes or under-nutrition - results in predisposition of offspring to develop obesity later in life. This mechanism is a contributing factor to the exponential rise in obesity rates. Increased weight gain in offspring exposed to maternal obesity is usually associated with hyperphagia, implicating altered central regulation of energy homeostasis as an underlying cause. Perinatal development of the hypothalamus (a brain region key to metabolic regulation) is plastic and sensitive to metabolic signals during this critical time window. Recent research in non-human primate and rodent models has demonstrated that exposure to adverse maternal environments impairs the development of hypothalamic structure and consequently function, potentially underpinning metabolic phenotypes in later life. This review summarizes our current knowledge of how adverse perinatal environments program hypothalamic development and explores the mechanisms that could mediate these effects.

  12. The effect of metal oxide nanoparticles on functional bacteria and metabolic profiles in agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Chai, Hankui; Yao, Jun; Sun, Jingjing; Zhang, Chi; Liu, Wenjuan; Zhu, Mijia; Ceccanti, Brunello

    2015-04-01

    A significant knowledge gap in nanotechnology is the absence of standardized protocols for examining the effect of engineered nanoparticles on soil microorganisms. In this study, agricultural soil was exposed to ZnO, SiO2, TiO2 and CeO2 nanoparticles at 1 mg g(-1). The toxicity effect was evaluated by thermal metabolism, the abundance of functional bacteria and enzymatic activity. ZnO and CeO2 nanoparticles were observed to hinder thermogenic metabolism, reduce numbers of soil Azotobacter, P-solubilizing and K-solubilizing bacteria and inhibit enzymatic activities. TiO2 nanoparticles reduced the abundance of functional bacteria and enzymatic activity. SiO2 nanoparticles slightly boosted the soil microbial activity. Pearson's correlation analysis showed that thermodynamic parameters had a strong correlation with abundance of functional bacteria and enzymatic activity. These findings demonstrated that the combined approach of monitoring thermal metabolism, functional bacteria and enzymatic activity is feasible for testing the ecotoxicity of nanoparticles on agricultural soil.

  13. Designing RNA-based genetic control systems for efficient production from engineered metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Jason T; Carothers, James M

    2015-02-20

    Engineered metabolic pathways can be augmented with dynamic regulatory controllers to increase production titers by minimizing toxicity and helping cells maintain homeostasis. We investigated the potential for dynamic RNA-based genetic control systems to increase production through simulation analysis of an engineered p-aminostyrene (p-AS) pathway in E. coli. To map the entire design space, we formulated 729 unique mechanistic models corresponding to all of the possible control topologies and mechanistic implementations in the system under study. Two thousand sampled simulations were performed for each of the 729 system designs to relate the potential effects of dynamic control to increases in p-AS production (total of 3 × 10(6) simulations). Our analysis indicates that dynamic control strategies employing aptazyme-regulated expression devices (aREDs) can yield >10-fold improvements over static control. We uncovered generalizable trends in successful control architectures and found that highly performing RNA-based control systems are experimentally tractable. Analyzing the metabolic control state space to predict optimal genetic control strategies promises to enhance the design of metabolic pathways. PMID:25314371

  14. TFEB controls cellular lipid metabolism through a starvation-induced autoregulatory loop.

    PubMed

    Settembre, Carmine; De Cegli, Rossella; Mansueto, Gelsomina; Saha, Pradip K; Vetrini, Francesco; Visvikis, Orane; Huynh, Tuong; Carissimo, Annamaria; Palmer, Donna; Klisch, Tiemo Jürgen; Wollenberg, Amanda C; Di Bernardo, Diego; Chan, Lawrence; Irazoqui, Javier E; Ballabio, Andrea

    2013-06-01

    The lysosomal-autophagic pathway is activated by starvation and plays an important role in both cellular clearance and lipid catabolism. However, the transcriptional regulation of this pathway in response to metabolic cues is uncharacterized. Here we show that the transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis and autophagy, is induced by starvation through an autoregulatory feedback loop and exerts a global transcriptional control on lipid catabolism via Ppargc1α and Ppar1α. Thus, during starvation a transcriptional mechanism links the autophagic pathway to cellular energy metabolism. The conservation of this mechanism in Caenorhabditis elegans suggests a fundamental role for TFEB in the evolution of the adaptive response to food deprivation. Viral delivery of TFEB to the liver prevented weight gain and metabolic syndrome in both diet-induced and genetic mouse models of obesity, suggesting a new therapeutic strategy for disorders of lipid metabolism.

  15. Purine-Metabolizing Ectoenzymes Control IL-8 Production in Human Colon HT-29 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kukulski, Filip; Tremblay, Alain; Pelletier, Julie; Rockenbach, Liliana; Sévigny, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-8 (IL-8) plays key roles in both chronic inflammatory diseases and tumor modulation. We previously observed that IL-8 secretion and function can be modulated by nucleotide (P2) receptors. Here we investigated whether IL-8 release by intestinal epithelial HT-29 cells, a cancer cell line, is modulated by extracellular nucleotide metabolism. We first identified that HT-29 cells regulated adenosine and adenine nucleotide concentration at their surface by the expression of the ectoenzymes NTPDase2, ecto-5′-nucleotidase, and adenylate kinase. The expression of the ectoenzymes was evaluated by RT-PCR, qPCR, and immunoblotting, and their activity was analyzed by RP-HPLC of the products and by detection of Pi produced from the hydrolysis of ATP, ADP, and AMP. In response to poly (I:C), with or without ATP and/or ADP, HT-29 cells released IL-8 and this secretion was modulated by the presence of NTPDase2 and adenylate kinase. Taken together, these results demonstrate the presence of 3 ectoenzymes at the surface of HT-29 cells that control nucleotide levels and adenosine production (NTPDase2, ecto-5′-nucleotidase and adenylate kinase) and that P2 receptor-mediated signaling controls IL-8 release in HT-29 cells which is modulated by the presence of NTPDase2 and adenylate kinase. PMID:25242873

  16. Effects of a New Metabolic Conditioning Supplement on Perioperative Metabolic Stress and Clinical Outcomes: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Akbarzadeh, Marzieh; Eftekhari, Mohammad Hassan; Shafa, Masih; Alipour, Shohreh; Hassanzadeh, Jafar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Insulin resistance is a measure of metabolic stress in the perioperative period. Before now, no clinical trial has determined the summative effects of glutamine, L-carnitine, and antioxidants as metabolic conditioning supplements in the perioperative period. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a new conditioning supplement on perioperative metabolic stress and clinical outcomes in non-diabetic patients. Patients and Methods: In this randomized controlled trial, 89 non-diabetic patients scheduled for coronary artery bypass grafting, with ejection fractions above 30%, were selected. Using the balanced block randomization method, the patients were allocated to one of four study arms: 1) SP (supplement/placebo): supplement seven days before and placebo 30 days after the surgery; 2) PS: placebo before and supplement after the surgery; 3) SS: supplement before and after the surgery; and 4) PP: placebo before and after the surgery. The supplement was composed of glutamine, L-carnitine, vitamin C, vitamin E, and selenium, which was manufactured for the first time by this research team. Five blood samples were drawn: seven days preoperatively, at the entrance to the operating room, while leaving the operating room, seven days postoperatively, and 30 days postoperatively. Levels of glucose, insulin, and HbA1c were measured in blood samples. Insulin resistance and sensitivity were calculated using a formula. Surgical complications were assessed 30 days postoperatively. Data analysis was done using one-way ANOVA, the Chi-square test, and a general linear model repeated-measures analysis with Bonferroni adjustment. Results: Blood glucose levels were increased postoperatively in the four groups (< 0.001), but a significantly higher increase occurred in the PP group compared to the SP (0.027), PS (0.026), and SS (0.004) groups. The superficial wound infection rate was significantly different between the four groups (0.021): 26.08% in

  17. Metabolic Control and Illness Perceptions in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wisting, Line; Bang, Lasse; Natvig, Henrik; Skrivarhaug, Torild; Dahl-Jørgensen, Knut; Lask, Bryan; Rø, Øyvind

    2016-01-01

    Background. Disturbed eating behavior and psychosocial variables have been found to influence metabolic control, but little is known about how these variables interact or how they influence metabolic control, separately and combined. Objective. To explore associations between metabolic control (measured by HbA1c) and eating disorder psychopathology, coping strategies, illness perceptions, and insulin beliefs in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Methods. A total of 105 patients (41.9% males) with type 1 diabetes (12–20 years) were interviewed with the Child Eating Disorder Examination. In addition, self-report psychosocial questionnaires were completed. Clinical data, including HbA1c, was obtained from the Norwegian Childhood Diabetes Registry. Results. Significant gender differences were demonstrated. Among females, HbA1c correlated significantly with eating restriction (.29, p < .05), the illness perception dimensions consequences, personal control, coherence, and concern (ranging from .33 to .48), and the coping strategy ventilating negative feelings (−.26, p < .05). Illness perception personal control contributed significantly to HbA1c in a regression model, explaining 23% of the variance among females (β .48, p < .001). None of the variables were significantly associated with HbA1c among males. Conclusions. Illness perceptions appear to be important contributors to metabolic control in females, but not males, with type 1 diabetes. PMID:26682231

  18. Diet and Gut Microbial Function in Metabolic and Cardiovascular Disease Risk.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Katie A; Bennett, Brian J

    2016-10-01

    Over the past decade, the gut microbiome has emerged as a novel and largely unexplored source of variability for metabolic and cardiovascular disease risk, including diabetes. Animal and human studies support several possible pathways through which the gut microbiome may impact health, including the production of health-related metabolites from dietary sources. Diet is considered important to shaping the gut microbiota; in addition, gut microbiota influence the metabolism of many dietary components. In the present paper, we address the distinction between compositional and functional analysis of the gut microbiota. We focus on literature that highlights the value of moving beyond surveys of microbial composition to measuring gut microbial functioning to delineate mechanisms related to the interplay between diet and gut microbiota in cardiometabolic health. PMID:27541295

  19. Dynamics of Panax ginseng Rhizospheric Soil Microbial Community and Their Metabolic Function

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong; Ying, YiXin; Ding, WanLong

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial communities of 1- to 6-year ginseng rhizosphere soils were characterized by culture-independent approaches, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), and amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA). Culture-dependent method (Biolog) was used to investigate the metabolic function variance of microbe living in rhizosphere soil. Results showed that significant genetic and metabolic function variance were detected among soils, and, with the increasing of cultivating years, genetic diversity of bacterial communities in ginseng rhizosphere soil tended to be decreased. Also we found that Verrucomicrobia, Acidobacteria, and Proteobacteria were the dominants in rhizosphere soils, but, with the increasing of cultivating years, plant disease prevention or plant growth promoting bacteria, such as Pseudomonas, Burkholderia, and Bacillus, tended to be rare. PMID:25214872

  20. Dynamics of Panax ginseng Rhizospheric Soil Microbial Community and Their Metabolic Function.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Ying, YiXin; Ding, WanLong

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial communities of 1- to 6-year ginseng rhizosphere soils were characterized by culture-independent approaches, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), and amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA). Culture-dependent method (Biolog) was used to investigate the metabolic function variance of microbe living in rhizosphere soil. Results showed that significant genetic and metabolic function variance were detected among soils, and, with the increasing of cultivating years, genetic diversity of bacterial communities in ginseng rhizosphere soil tended to be decreased. Also we found that Verrucomicrobia, Acidobacteria, and Proteobacteria were the dominants in rhizosphere soils, but, with the increasing of cultivating years, plant disease prevention or plant growth promoting bacteria, such as Pseudomonas, Burkholderia, and Bacillus, tended to be rare.

  1. Control of Hepatic Glucose Metabolism by Islet and Brain

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Jennifer M.; Schwartz, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulation of hepatic glucose uptake (HGU) and inability of insulin to suppress hepatic glucose production (HGP), both contribute to hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Growing evidence suggests that insulin can inhibit HGP not only through a direct effect on the liver, but also via a mechanism involving the brain. Yet the notion that insulin action in the brain plays a physiological role in the control of HGP continues to be controversial. Although studies in dogs suggest that the direct hepatic effect of insulin is sufficient to explain day-to-day control of HGP, a surprising outcome has been revealed by recent studies in mice investigating whether the direct hepatic action of insulin is necessary for normal HGP: when hepatic insulin signaling pathway was genetically disrupted, HGP was maintained normally even in the absence of direct input from insulin. Here we present evidence that points to a potentially important role of the brain in the physiological control of both HGU and HGP in response to input from insulin as well as other hormones and nutrients. PMID:25200294

  2. [The effects of programmed jogging on metabolism and cardio-pulmonary function of type II diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Jun, J Y

    1994-01-01

    This study was done for the purpose of testing effects of programmed jogging as one of the self care activities on glucose and lipid metabolism and cardio-pulmonary function in type II diabetic patients. Research design was a repeated measure as non-equivalent control group pre-post test quasi-experimental design. Thirty type II diabetic patients who received follow-up care regularly at the out patient department of internal medicine in two general hospitals which had diabetic clinic were studied. Fourteen were assigned to the experimental group and sixteen to the control group. The experimental group participated in the programmed jogging 3 times per week for 4 weeks and the control group didn't have the programmed jogging. The programmed was developed from a review of the literature done by the researcher. Data were analyzed by X2-test, t-test, paired t-test and MANOVA using SPSS/PC The results are summarized as follows; 1. There were no significant difference between the experimental group and the control group for general characteristics and the pre-test of metabolism and cardiopulmonary function. 2. Hypothesis 1) that type II diabetic patients who participate in the programmed jogging will have a higher level of glucose metabolism than type II diabetic patients who don't do programmed jogging was partly supported(FBS; between groups F = 9.57, p < .05, time within the experimental group F = 24.28, p < .001, .05, HbA1C; between groups t = 1.09, p > .05, time within the experimental group t = 2.32, p < .05). 3. Hypothesis 2) that type II diabetic patients who participate in the programmed jogging will have a higher level of lipid metabolism than type II diabetic patients who don't do programmed jogging was rejected(triglyceride; between groups F = .85, p > .05, time within the experimental group F = 7.87, p < .05, total cholesterol; between groups F = 4.07, p > .05, time within the experimental group F = .02, p > .05, HDL cholesterol; between groups F = 2.72, p

  3. Metabolic activity and functional diversity changes in sediment prokaryotic communities organically enriched with mussel biodeposits.

    PubMed

    Pollet, Thomas; Cloutier, Olivier; Nozais, Christian; McKindsey, Christopher W; Archambault, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    This experimental microcosm study reports the influence of organic enrichments by mussel biodeposits on the metabolic activity and functional diversity of benthic prokaryotic communities. The different biodeposit enrichment regimes created, which mimicked the quantity of faeces and pseudo-faeces potentially deposited below mussel farms, show a clear stimulatory effect of this organic enrichment on prokaryotic metabolic activity. This effect was detected once a certain level of biodeposition was attained with a tipping point estimated between 3.25 and 10 g day-1 m-2. Prokaryotic communities recovered their initial metabolic activity by 11 days after the cessation of biodeposit additions. However, their functional diversity remained greater than prior to the disturbance suggesting that mussel biodeposit enrichment may disturb the functioning and perhaps the role of prokaryotic communities in benthic ecosystems. This manipulative approach provided new information on the influence of mussel biodeposition on benthic prokaryotic communities and dose-response relationships and may support the development of carrying capacity models for bivalve culture.

  4. Functional Analysis of Free Fatty Acid Receptor GPR120 in Human Eosinophils: Implications in Metabolic Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Konno, Yasunori; Ueki, Shigeharu; Takeda, Masahide; Kobayashi, Yoshiki; Tamaki, Mami; Moritoki, Yuki; Oyamada, Hajime; Itoga, Masamichi; Kayaba, Hiroyuki; Omokawa, Ayumi; Hirokawa, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has shown that eosinophils play an important role in metabolic homeostasis through Th2 cytokine production. GPR120 (FFA4) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) for long-chain fatty acids that functions as a regulator of physiological energy metabolism. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether human eosinophils express GPR120 and, if present, whether it possesses a functional capacity on eosinophils. Eosinophils isolated from peripheral venous blood expressed GPR120 at both the mRNA and protein levels. Stimulation with a synthetic GPR120 agonist, GW9508, induced rapid down-regulation of cell surface expression of GPR120, suggesting ligand-dependent receptor internalization. Although GPR120 activation did not induce eosinophil chemotactic response and degranulation, we found that GW9508 inhibited eosinophil spontaneous apoptosis and Fas receptor expression. The anti-apoptotic effect was attenuated by phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors and was associated with inhibition of caspase-3 activity. Eosinophil response investigated using ELISpot assay indicated that stimulation with a GPR120 agonist induced IL-4 secretion. These findings demonstrate the novel functional properties of fatty acid sensor GPR120 on human eosinophils and indicate the previously unrecognized link between nutrient metabolism and the immune system. PMID:25790291

  5. Metabolic Activity and Functional Diversity Changes in Sediment Prokaryotic Communities Organically Enriched with Mussel Biodeposits

    PubMed Central

    Pollet, Thomas; Cloutier, Olivier; Nozais, Christian; McKindsey, Christopher W.; Archambault, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    This experimental microcosm study reports the influence of organic enrichments by mussel biodeposits on the metabolic activity and functional diversity of benthic prokaryotic communities. The different biodeposit enrichment regimes created, which mimicked the quantity of faeces and pseudo-faeces potentially deposited below mussel farms, show a clear stimulatory effect of this organic enrichment on prokaryotic metabolic activity. This effect was detected once a certain level of biodeposition was attained with a tipping point estimated between 3.25 and 10 g day-1 m-2. Prokaryotic communities recovered their initial metabolic activity by 11 days after the cessation of biodeposit additions. However, their functional diversity remained greater than prior to the disturbance suggesting that mussel biodeposit enrichment may disturb the functioning and perhaps the role of prokaryotic communities in benthic ecosystems. This manipulative approach provided new information on the influence of mussel biodeposition on benthic prokaryotic communities and dose-response relationships and may support the development of carrying capacity models for bivalve culture. PMID:25923715

  6. Air Pollution Exposure During Pregnancy and Fetal Markers of Metabolic function: The MIREC Study.

    PubMed

    Lavigne, Eric; Ashley-Martin, Jillian; Dodds, Linda; Arbuckle, Tye E; Hystad, Perry; Johnson, Markey; Crouse, Dan L; Ettinger, Adrienne S; Shapiro, Gabriel D; Fisher, Mandy; Morisset, Anne-Sophie; Taback, Shayne; Bouchard, Maryse F; Sun, Liu; Monnier, Patricia; Dallaire, Renée; Fraser, William D

    2016-05-01

    Previous evidence suggests that exposure to outdoor air pollution during pregnancy could alter fetal metabolic function, which could increase the risk of obesity in childhood. However, to our knowledge, no epidemiologic study has investigated the association between prenatal exposure to air pollution and indicators of fetal metabolic function. We investigated the association between maternal exposure to nitrogen dioxide and fine particulate matter (aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 µm) and umbilical cord blood leptin and adiponectin levels with mixed-effects linear regression models among 1,257 mother-infant pairs from the Maternal-Infant Research on Environmental Chemicals (MIREC) Study, conducted in Canada (2008-2011). We observed that an interquartile-range increase in average exposure to fine particulate matter (3.2 µg/m(3)) during pregnancy was associated with an 11% (95% confidence interval: 4, 17) increase in adiponectin levels. We also observed 13% (95% confidence interval: 6, 20) higher adiponectin levels per interquartile-range increase in average exposure to nitrogen dioxide (13.6 parts per billion) during pregnancy. Significant associations were seen between air pollution markers and cord blood leptin levels in models that adjusted for birth weight z score but not in models that did not adjust for birth weight z score. The roles of prenatal exposure to air pollution and fetal metabolic function in the potential development of childhood obesity should be further explored.

  7. Diurnal Changes in Mitochondrial Function Reveal Daily Optimization of Light and Dark Respiratory Metabolism in Arabidopsis*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chun Pong; Eubel, Holger; Millar, A. Harvey

    2010-01-01

    Biomass production by plants is often negatively correlated with respiratory rate, but the value of this rate changes dramatically during diurnal cycles, and hence, biomass is the cumulative result of complex environment-dependent metabolic processes. Mitochondria in photosynthetic plant tissues undertake substantially different metabolic roles during light and dark periods that are dictated by substrate availability and the functional capacity of mitochondria defined by their protein composition. We surveyed the heterogeneity of the mitochondrial proteome and its function during a typical night and day cycle in Arabidopsis shoots. This used a staged, quantitative analysis of the proteome across 10 time points covering 24 h of the life of 3-week-old Arabidopsis shoots grown under 12-h dark and 12-h light conditions. Detailed analysis of enzyme capacities and substrate-dependent respiratory processes of isolated mitochondria were also undertaken during the same time course. Together these data reveal a range of dynamic changes in mitochondrial capacity and uncover day- and night-enhanced protein components. Clear diurnal changes were evident in mitochondrial capacities to drive the TCA cycle and to undertake functions associated with nitrogen and sulfur metabolism, redox poise, and mitochondrial antioxidant defense. These data quantify the nature and nuances of a daily rhythm in Arabidopsis mitochondrial respiratory capacity. PMID:20601493

  8. Large-scale functional analysis of the roles of phosphorylation in yeast metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Juliane Caroline; Zampieri, Mattia; Wanka, Stefanie; von Mering, Christian; Sauer, Uwe

    2014-11-25

    Protein phosphorylation is a widespread posttranslational modification that regulates almost all cellular functions. To investigate the large number of phosphorylation events with unknown functions, we monitored the concentrations of several hundred intracellular metabolites in Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains with deletions of 118 kinases or phosphatases. Whereas most deletion strains had no detectable difference in growth compared to wild-type yeast, two-thirds of deletion strains had alterations in metabolic profiles. For about half of the kinases and phosphatases encoded by the deleted genes, we inferred specific regulatory roles on the basis of knowledge about the affected metabolic pathways. We demonstrated that the phosphatase Ppq1 was required for metal homeostasis. Combining metabolomic data with published phosphoproteomic data in a stoichiometric model enabled us to predict functions for phosphorylation in the regulation of 47 enzymes. Overall, we provided insights and testable predictions covering greater than twice the number of known phosphorylated enzymes in yeast, suggesting extensive phosphorylation-dependent regulation of yeast metabolism.

  9. The role of ANGPTL3 in controlling lipoprotein metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tikka, Anna; Jauhiainen, Matti

    2016-05-01

    Angiopoietin-like protein 3 (ANGPTL3) is a secretory protein regulating plasma lipid levels via affecting lipoprotein lipase- and endothelial lipase-mediated hydrolysis of triglycerides and phospholipids. ANGPTL3-deficiency due to loss-of-function mutations in the ANGPTL3 gene causes familial combined hypobetalipoproteinemia (FHBL2, OMIM # 605019), a phenotype characterized by low concentration of all major lipoprotein classes in circulation. ANGPTL3 is therefore a potential therapeutic target to treat combined hyperlipidemia, a major risk factor for atherosclerotic coronary heart disease. This review focuses on the mechanisms behind ANGPTL3-deficiency induced FHBL2. PMID:26754661

  10. The functional gene composition and metabolic potential of coral-associated microbial communities

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanying; Ling, Juan; Yang, Qingsong; Wen, Chongqing; Yan, Qingyun; Sun, Hongyan; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Shi, Zhou; Zhou, Jizhong; Dong, Junde

    2015-01-01

    The phylogenetic diversity of coral-associated microbes has been extensively examined, but some contention remains regarding whether coral-associated microbial communities are species-specific or site-specific. It is suggested that corals may associate with microbes in terms of function, although little is known about the differences in coral-associated microbial functional gene composition and metabolic potential among coral species. Here, 16S rRNA Illumina sequencing and functional gene array (GeoChip 5.0) were used to assess coral-associated microbial communities. Our results indicate that both host species and environmental variables significantly correlate with shifts in the microbial community structure and functional potential. Functional genes related to key biogeochemical cycles including carbon, nitrogen, sulfur and phosphorus cycling, metal homeostasis, organic remediation, antibiotic resistance and secondary metabolism were shown to significantly vary between and among the four study corals (Galaxea astreata, Porites lutea, Porites andrewsi and Pavona decussata). Genes specific for anammox were also detected for the first time in the coral holobiont and positively correlated with ammonium. This study reveals that variability in the functional potential of coral-associated microbial communities is largely driven by changes in environmental factors and further demonstrates the importance of linking environmental parameters with genomic data in complex environmental systems. PMID:26536917

  11. The Circadian Clock Maintains Cardiac Function by Regulating Mitochondrial Metabolism in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kohsaka, Akira; Das, Partha; Hashimoto, Izumi; Nakao, Tomomi; Deguchi, Yoko; Gouraud, Sabine S.; Waki, Hidefumi; Muragaki, Yasuteru; Maeda, Masanobu

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac function is highly dependent on oxidative energy, which is produced by mitochondrial respiration. Defects in mitochondrial function are associated with both structural and functional abnormalities in the heart. Here, we show that heart-specific ablation of the circadian clock gene Bmal1 results in cardiac mitochondrial defects that include morphological changes and functional abnormalities, such as reduced enzymatic activities within the respiratory complex. Mice without cardiac Bmal1 function show a significant decrease in the expression of genes associated with the fatty acid oxidative pathway, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and the mitochondrial respiratory chain in the heart and develop severe progressive heart failure with age. Importantly, similar changes in gene expression related to mitochondrial oxidative metabolism are also observed in C57BL/6J mice subjected to chronic reversal of the light-dark cycle; thus, they show disrupted circadian rhythmicity. These findings indicate that the circadian clock system plays an important role in regulating mitochondrial metabolism and thereby maintains cardiac function. PMID:25389966

  12. The functional gene composition and metabolic potential of coral-associated microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanying; Ling, Juan; Yang, Qingsong; Wen, Chongqing; Yan, Qingyun; Sun, Hongyan; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Shi, Zhou; Zhou, Jizhong; Dong, Junde

    2015-01-01

    The phylogenetic diversity of coral-associated microbes has been extensively examined, but some contention remains regarding whether coral-associated microbial communities are species-specific or site-specific. It is suggested that corals may associate with microbes in terms of function, although little is known about the differences in coral-associated microbial functional gene composition and metabolic potential among coral species. Here, 16S rRNA Illumina sequencing and functional gene array (GeoChip 5.0) were used to assess coral-associated microbial communities. Our results indicate that both host species and environmental variables significantly correlate with shifts in the microbial community structure and functional potential. Functional genes related to key biogeochemical cycles including carbon, nitrogen, sulfur and phosphorus cycling, metal homeostasis, organic remediation, antibiotic resistance and secondary metabolism were shown to significantly vary between and among the four study corals (Galaxea astreata, Porites lutea, Porites andrewsi and Pavona decussata). Genes specific for anammox were also detected for the first time in the coral holobiont and positively correlated with ammonium. This study reveals that variability in the functional potential of coral-associated microbial communities is largely driven by changes in environmental factors and further demonstrates the importance of linking environmental parameters with genomic data in complex environmental systems.

  13. Role of zinc in maintenance of metabolic control in juvenile diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Molnar, I.G.; Jackson, R.L.; Logan, J.; Bleich, D.

    1986-03-01

    Skin and its outgrowth are sensitive to differences in trace element nutrition. However, an inert metabolic substance appears to have an ideal structure in determining trace element nutritional status as a reflection of dietary intake over a period of time. A previous study had indicated normal hair zinc levels were associated with fair to good metabolic control in diabetic children. The present study aimed to determine if a relationship exists between hair zinc concentration and degree of metabolic control. Subjects ranged in age from 3.5 to 13.5 years and had been diabetic from 0.25 to 5.5 years. Biochemical variables considered as indices of control were: insulin required (U/kg) and blood glucose, HbA/sub 1/C and glucagon levels. Growth ratings and caloric intake wee also considered. Hair samples from 25 diabetic children showed that lower levels of zinc (< 100 ..mu..g/ml) were associated with elevated HbA/sub 1/C (> 7.5%) and fair to poor overall control rating. Data support a possible role for zinc in maintenance of metabolic control in diabetic children and indicate the need for further experimental studies of the beneficial effect of dietary zinc supplementation.

  14. Diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance, and metabolic biomarkers in individuals with normal glucose tolerance are inversely associated with lung function: the Jackson Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Hickson, DeMarc A; Burchfiel, Cecil M; Liu, Jiankang; Petrini, Marcy F; Harrison, Kimystian; White, Wendy B; Sarpong, Daniel F

    2011-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to test the hypothesis that diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), diabetes control and diabetes duration, and metabolic biomarkers in adults with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) are inversely associated with spirometry-measured lung function. We conducted a cross-sectional observational cohort study that included nonsmoking African American adults (n = 2,945; mean age = 52.5 ± 12.6 years; 69.2% female), who were free of cardiovascular disease, from the Jackson Heart Study. The interventions were diabetes, metabolic biomarkers and lung function. We measured the associations of glycemia with forced expiratory volume (FEV) in 1 s, FEV in 6 s, and vital capacity. Multivariable adjusted mean lung function values were lower among adults with diabetes and IGT (in women only, but not after adjustment for waist circumference) than adults with NGT. Among adults with diabetes, no associations were observed between lung function and diabetes control or duration. In women with NGT, lower lung function was consistently associated with higher glucose levels and less consistently with higher insulin levels and insulin resistance. Lower lung function was consistently associated with higher insulin levels and insulin resistance and less consistently associated with insulin and hemoglobin A1c in men with NGT. Overall, our findings generally support the hypothesis that diabetes, IGT, and increased levels of metabolic biomarkers in individuals with NGT are inversely associated with lung function in African Americans, independent of adiposity.

  15. Canonical and non-canonical Hedgehog signalling and the control of metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Teperino, Raffaele; Aberger, Fritz; Esterbauer, Harald; Riobo, Natalia; Pospisilik, John Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and diabetes represent key healthcare challenges of our day, affecting upwards of one billion people worldwide. These individuals are at higher risk for cancer, stroke, blindness, heart and cardiovascular disease, and to date, have no effective long-term treatment options available. Recent and accumulating evidence has implicated the developmental morphogen Hedgehog and its downstream signalling in metabolic control. Generally thought to be quiescent in adults, Hedgehog is associated with several human cancers, and as such, has already emerged as a therapeutic target in oncology. Here, we attempt to give a comprehensive overview of the key signalling events associated with both canonical and non-canonical Hedgehog signalling, and highlight the increasingly complex regulatory modalities that appear to link Hedgehog and control metabolism. We highlight these key findings and discuss their impact for therapeutic development, cancer and metabolic disease. PMID:24862854

  16. A dual control mechanism synchronizes riboflavin and sulphur metabolism in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Pedrolli, Danielle Biscaro; Kühm, Christian; Sévin, Daniel C; Vockenhuber, Michael P; Sauer, Uwe; Suess, Beatrix; Mack, Matthias

    2015-11-10

    Flavin mononucleotide (FMN) riboswitches are genetic elements, which in many bacteria control genes responsible for biosynthesis and/or transport of riboflavin (rib genes). Cytoplasmic riboflavin is rapidly and almost completely converted to FMN by flavokinases. When cytoplasmic levels of FMN are sufficient ("high levels"), FMN binding to FMN riboswitches leads to a reduction of rib gene expression. We report here that the protein RibR counteracts the FMN-induced "turn-off" activities of both FMN riboswitches in Bacillus subtilis, allowing rib gene expression even in the presence of high levels of FMN. The reason for this secondary metabolic control by RibR is to couple sulfur metabolism with riboflavin metabolism.

  17. Mitochondrial Localization of Telomeric Protein TIN2 Links Telomere Regulation to Metabolic Control

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liuh-Yow; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Qinfen; Li, Hongzhi; Luo, Zhenhua; Fang, Hezhi; Kim, Sok Ho; Qin, Li; Yotnda, Patricia; Xu, Jianmin; Tu, Benjamin P.; Bai, Yidong; Songyang, Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Summary Both mitochondria, which are metabolic powerhouses, and telomeres, which help maintain genomic stability, have been implicated in cancer and aging. However, the signaling events that connect these two cellular structures remain poorly understood. Here we report that the canonical telomeric protein TIN2 is also a regulator of metabolism. TIN2 is recruited to telomeres and associates with multiple telomere regulators including TPP1. TPP1 interacts with TIN2 N-terminus, which contains overlapping mitochondrial and telomeric targeting sequences, and controls TIN2 localization. We have found that TIN2 is post-translationally processed in mitochondria, and regulates mitochondria oxidative phosphorylation. Reducing TIN2 expression by RNAi knockdown inhibited glycolysis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) and production, and enhanced ATP levels and oxygen consumption in cancer cells. These results suggest a link between telomeric proteins and metabolic control, providing an additional mechanism by which telomeric proteins regulate cancer and aging. PMID:22885005

  18. Metabolic functions of Pseudomonas fluorescens strains from Populus deltoides depend on rhizosphere or endosphere isolation compartment

    PubMed Central

    Timm, Collin M.; Campbell, Alisha G.; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Jun, Se-Ran; Parales, Rebecca E.; Tan, Watumesa A.; Robeson, Michael S.; Lu, Tse-Yuan S.; Jawdy, Sara; Brown, Steven D.; Ussery, David W.; Schadt, Christopher W.; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Weston, David J.; Pelletier, Dale A.

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial microbiota of plants is diverse, with 1000s of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) associated with any individual plant. In this work, we used phenotypic analysis, comparative genomics, and metabolic models to investigate the differences between 19 sequenced Pseudomonas fluorescens strains. These isolates represent a single OTU and were collected from the rhizosphere and endosphere of Populus deltoides. While no traits were exclusive to either endosphere or rhizosphere P. fluorescens isolates, multiple pathways relevant for plant-bacterial interactions are enriched in endosphere isolate genomes. Further, growth phenotypes such as phosphate solubilization, protease activity, denitrification and root growth promotion are biased toward endosphere isolates. Endosphere isolates have significantly more metabolic pathways for plant signaling compounds and an increased metabolic range that includes utilization of energy rich nucleotides and sugars, consistent with endosphere colonization. Rhizosphere P. fluorescens have fewer pathways representative of plant-bacterial interactions but show metabolic bias toward chemical substrates often found in root exudates. This work reveals the diverse functions that may contribute to colonization of the endosphere by bacteria and are enriched among closely related isolates. PMID:26528266

  19. Calorie Restriction Prevents Metabolic Aging Caused by Abnormal SIRT1 Function in Adipose Tissues.

    PubMed

    Xu, Cheng; Cai, Yu; Fan, Pengcheng; Bai, Bo; Chen, Jie; Deng, Han-Bing; Che, Chi-Ming; Xu, Aimin; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Wang, Yu

    2015-05-01

    Adipose tissue is a pivotal organ determining longevity, due largely to its role in maintaining whole-body energy homeostasis and insulin sensitivity. SIRT1 is a NAD-dependent protein deacetylase possessing antiaging activities in a wide range of organisms. The current study demonstrates that mice with adipose tissue-selective overexpression of hSIRT1(H363Y), a dominant-negative mutant that disrupts endogenous SIRT1 activity, show accelerated development of metabolic aging. These mice, referred to as Adipo-H363Y, exhibit hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, ectopic lipid deposition, insulin resistance, and glucose intolerance at a much younger age than their wild-type littermates. The metabolic defects of Adipo-H363Y are associated with abnormal epigenetic modifications and chromatin remodeling in their adipose tissues, as a result of excess accumulation of biotin, which inhibits endogenous SIRT1 activity, leading to increased inflammation, cellularity, and collagen deposition. The enzyme acetyl-CoA carboxylase 2 plays an important role in biotin accumulation within adipose tissues of Adipo-H363Y. Calorie restriction prevents biotin accumulation, abolishes abnormal histone biotinylation, and completely restores the metabolic and adipose functions of Adipo-H363Y. The effects are mimicked by short-term restriction of biotin intake, an approach potentially translatable to humans for maintaining the epigenetic and chromatin remodeling capacity of adipose tissues and preventing aging-associated metabolic disorders.

  20. Metabolic functions of Pseudomonas fluorescens strains from Populus deltoides depend on rhizosphere or endosphere isolation compartment

    SciTech Connect

    Timm, Collin M.; Campbell, Alicia G.; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Jun, Se Ran; Parales, Rebecca E.; Tan, Mesa; Robeson, Michael S.; Lu, Tse-Yuan S.; Jawdy, Sara; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Weston, David; Pelletier, Dale A.

    2015-10-14

    The bacterial microbiota of plants is diverse, with ~1000s of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) associated with any individual plant. In this work we investigate how 19 sequenced Pseudomonas fluorescens strains representing a single OTU isolated from Populus deltoides rhizosphere and endosphere differ using phenotypic analysis, comparative genomics, and metabolic models. While no traits were exclusive to either endosphere or rhizosphere P. fluorescens isolates, multiple pathways relevant for bacterial-plant interactions are enriched in endosphere isolate genomes and growth phenotypes such as phosphate solubilization, protease activity, denitrification and root growth promotion are biased towards endosphere isolates. Endosphere isolates have more metabolic pathways for plant signaling compounds and an increased metabolic range that includes utilization of energy rich nucleotides and sugars, consistent with endosphere colonization. Rhizosphere P. fluorescens have fewer pathways important for bacterial-plant interactions but show metabolic bias towards chemical substrates often found in root exudates. This work reveals the diverse functions that may contribute to colonization of the endosphere by bacteria that are enriched in event he most closely related isolates.

  1. Metabolic functions of Pseudomonas fluorescens strains from Populus deltoides depend on rhizosphere or endosphere isolation compartment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Timm, Collin M.; Campbell, Alicia G.; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Jun, Se Ran; Parales, Rebecca E.; Tan, Mesa; Robeson, Michael S.; Lu, Tse-Yuan S.; Jawdy, Sara; Schadt, Christopher Warren; et al

    2015-10-14

    The bacterial microbiota of plants is diverse, with ~1000s of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) associated with any individual plant. In this work we investigate how 19 sequenced Pseudomonas fluorescens strains representing a single OTU isolated from Populus deltoides rhizosphere and endosphere differ using phenotypic analysis, comparative genomics, and metabolic models. While no traits were exclusive to either endosphere or rhizosphere P. fluorescens isolates, multiple pathways relevant for bacterial-plant interactions are enriched in endosphere isolate genomes and growth phenotypes such as phosphate solubilization, protease activity, denitrification and root growth promotion are biased towards endosphere isolates. Endosphere isolates have more metabolic pathwaysmore » for plant signaling compounds and an increased metabolic range that includes utilization of energy rich nucleotides and sugars, consistent with endosphere colonization. Rhizosphere P. fluorescens have fewer pathways important for bacterial-plant interactions but show metabolic bias towards chemical substrates often found in root exudates. This work reveals the diverse functions that may contribute to colonization of the endosphere by bacteria that are enriched in event he most closely related isolates.« less

  2. Metabolic functions of Pseudomonas fluorescens strains from Populus deltoides depend on rhizosphere or endosphere isolation compartment.

    PubMed

    Timm, Collin M; Campbell, Alisha G; Utturkar, Sagar M; Jun, Se-Ran; Parales, Rebecca E; Tan, Watumesa A; Robeson, Michael S; Lu, Tse-Yuan S; Jawdy, Sara; Brown, Steven D; Ussery, David W; Schadt, Christopher W; Tuskan, Gerald A; Doktycz, Mitchel J; Weston, David J; Pelletier, Dale A

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial microbiota of plants is diverse, with 1000s of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) associated with any individual plant. In this work, we used phenotypic analysis, comparative genomics, and metabolic models to investigate the differences between 19 sequenced Pseudomonas fluorescens strains. These isolates represent a single OTU and were collected from the rhizosphere and endosphere of Populus deltoides. While no traits were exclusive to either endosphere or rhizosphere P. fluorescens isolates, multiple pathways relevant for plant-bacterial interactions are enriched in endosphere isolate genomes. Further, growth phenotypes such as phosphate solubilization, protease activity, denitrification and root growth promotion are biased toward endosphere isolates. Endosphere isolates have significantly more metabolic pathways for plant signaling compounds and an increased metabolic range that includes utilization of energy rich nucleotides and sugars, consistent with endosphere colonization. Rhizosphere P. fluorescens have fewer pathways representative of plant-bacterial interactions but show metabolic bias toward chemical substrates often found in root exudates. This work reveals the diverse functions that may contribute to colonization of the endosphere by bacteria and are enriched among closely related isolates. PMID:26528266

  3. Development of an Objective Space Suit Mobility Performance Metric Using Metabolic Cost and Functional Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFarland, Shane M.; Norcross, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Existing methods for evaluating EVA suit performance and mobility have historically concentrated on isolated joint range of motion and torque. However, these techniques do little to evaluate how well a suited crewmember can actually perform during an EVA. An alternative method of characterizing suited mobility through measurement of metabolic cost to the wearer has been evaluated at Johnson Space Center over the past several years. The most recent study involved six test subjects completing multiple trials of various functional tasks in each of three different space suits; the results indicated it was often possible to discern between different suit designs on the basis of metabolic cost alone. However, other variables may have an effect on real-world suited performance; namely, completion time of the task, the gravity field in which the task is completed, etc. While previous results have analyzed completion time, metabolic cost, and metabolic cost normalized to system mass individually, it is desirable to develop a single metric comprising these (and potentially other) performance metrics. This paper outlines the background upon which this single-score metric is determined to be feasible, and initial efforts to develop such a metric. Forward work includes variable coefficient determination and verification of the metric through repeated testing.

  4. Urea and Ammonia Metabolism and the Control of Renal Nitrogen Excretion.

    PubMed

    Weiner, I David; Mitch, William E; Sands, Jeff M

    2015-08-01

    Renal nitrogen metabolism primarily involves urea and ammonia metabolism, and is essential to normal health. Urea is the largest circulating pool of nitrogen, excluding nitrogen in circulating proteins, and its production changes in parallel to the degradation of dietary and endogenous proteins. In addition to serving as a way to excrete nitrogen, urea transport, mediated through specific urea transport proteins, mediates a central role in the urine concentrating mechanism. Renal ammonia excretion, although often considered only in the context of acid-base homeostasis, accounts for approximately 10% of total renal nitrogen excretion under basal conditions, but can increase substantially in a variety of clinical conditions. Because renal ammonia metabolism requires intrarenal ammoniagenesis from glutamine, changes in factors regulating renal ammonia metabolism can have important effects on glutamine in addition to nitrogen balance. This review covers aspects of protein metabolism and the control of the two major molecules involved in renal nitrogen excretion: urea and ammonia. Both urea and ammonia transport can be altered by glucocorticoids and hypokalemia, two conditions that also affect protein metabolism. Clinical conditions associated with altered urine concentrating ability or water homeostasis can result in changes in urea excretion and urea transporters. Clinical conditions associated with altered ammonia excretion can have important effects on nitrogen balance.

  5. Effects of maternal nicotine exposure on thyroid hormone metabolism and function in adult rat progeny.

    PubMed

    Lisboa, P C; de Oliveira, E; Manhães, A C; Santos-Silva, A P; Pinheiro, C R; Younes-Rapozo, V; Faustino, L C; Ortiga-Carvalho, T M; Moura, E G

    2015-03-01

    Postnatal nicotine exposure leads to obesity and hypothyroidism in adulthood. We studied the effects of maternal nicotine exposure during lactation on thyroid hormone (TH) metabolism and function in adult offspring. Lactating rats received implants of osmotic minipumps releasing nicotine (NIC, 6 mg/kg per day s.c.) or saline (control) from postnatal days 2 to 16. Offspring were killed at 180 days. We measured types 1 and 2 deiodinase activity and mRNA, mitochondrial α-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (mGPD) activity, TH receptor (TR), uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), hypothalamic TRH, pituitary TSH, and in vitro TRH-stimulated TSH secretion. Expression of deiodinase mRNAs followed the same profile as that of the enzymatic activity. NIC exposure caused lower 5'-D1 and mGPD activities; lower TRβ1 content in liver as well as lower 5'-D1 activity in muscle; and higher 5'-D2 activity in brown adipose tissue (BAT), heart, and testis, which are in accordance with hypothyroidism. Although deiodinase activities were not changed in the hypothalamus, pituitary, and thyroid of NIC offspring, UCP1 expression was lower in BAT. Levels of both TRH and TSH were lower in offspring exposed to NIC, which presented higher basal in vitro TSH secretion, which was not increased in response to TRH. Thus, the hypothyroidism in NIC offspring at adulthood was caused, in part, by in vivo TRH-TSH suppression and lower sensitivity to TRH. Despite the hypothyroid status of peripheral tissues, these animals seem to develop an adaptive mechanism to preserve thyroxine to triiodothyronine conversion in central tissues. PMID:25653393

  6. A Hypertension-Associated tRNAAla Mutation Alters tRNA Metabolism and Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Pingping; Wang, Meng; Xue, Ling; Xiao, Yun; Yu, Jialing; Wang, Hui; Yao, Juan; Liu, Hao; Peng, Yanyan; Liu, Hanqing; Li, Haiying; Chen, Ye

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we investigated the pathophysiology of a novel hypertension-associated mitochondrial tRNAAla 5655A → G (m.5655A → G) mutation. The destabilization of a highly conserved base pairing (A1-U72) at the aminoacyl acceptor stem by an m.5655A → G mutation altered the tRNAAla function. An in vitro processing analysis showed that the m.5655A → G mutation reduced the efficiency of tRNAAla precursor 5′ end cleavage catalyzed by RNase P. By using cybrids constructed by transferring mitochondria from lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from a Chinese family into mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-less (ρo) cells, we showed a 41% reduction in the steady-state level of tRNAAla in mutant cybrids. The mutation caused an improperly aminoacylated tRNAAla, as suggested by aberrantly aminoacylated tRNAAla and slower electrophoretic mobility of mutated tRNA. A failure in tRNAAla metabolism contributed to variable reductions in six mtDNA-encoded polypeptides in mutant cells, ranging from 21% to 37.5%, with an average of a 29.1% reduction, compared to levels of the controls. The impaired translation caused reduced activities of mitochondrial respiration chains. Furthermore, marked decreases in the levels of mitochondrial ATP and membrane potential were observed in mutant cells. These caused increases in the production of reactive oxygen species in the mutant cybrids. The data provide evidence for the association of the tRNAAla 5655A → G mutation with hypertension. PMID:27161322

  7. Beneficial effects of herbs, spices and medicinal plants on the metabolic syndrome, brain and cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Panickar, Kiran S

    2013-03-01

    Herbs and spices have been used since ancient times to not only improve the flavor of edible food but also to prevent and treat chronic health maladies. While the scientific evidence for the use of such common herbs and medicinal plants then had been scarce or lacking, the beneficial effects observed from such use were generally encouraging. It is, therefore, not surprising that the tradition of using such herbs, perhaps even after the advent of modern medicine, has continued. More recently, due to an increased interest in understanding the nutritional effects of herbs/spices more comprehensively, several studies have examined the cellular and molecular modes of action of the active chemical components in herbs and their biological properties. Beneficial actions of herbs/spices include anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-hypertensive, gluco-regulatory, and anti-thrombotic effects. One major component of herbs and spices is the polyphenols. Some of the aforementioned properties are attributed to the polyphenols and they are associated with attenuating the metabolic syndrome. Detrimental changes associated with the metabolic syndrome over time affect brain and cognitive function. Metabolic syndrome and type-2 diabetes are also risk factors for Alzheimer's disease and stroke. In addition, the neuroprotective effects of herbs and spices have been demonstrated and, whether directly or indirectly, such beneficial effects may also contribute to an improvement in cognitive function. This review evaluates the current evidence available for herbs/spices in potentially improving the metabolic syndrome, as well as their neuroprotective effects on the brain, and cognitive function in animal and human studies.

  8. Systems Level Analyses Reveal Multiple Regulatory Activities of CodY Controlling Metabolism, Motility and Virulence in Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Lobel, Lior; Herskovits, Anat A

    2016-02-01

    Bacteria sense and respond to many environmental cues, rewiring their regulatory network to facilitate adaptation to new conditions/niches. Global transcription factors that co-regulate multiple pathways simultaneously are essential to this regulatory rewiring. CodY is one such global regulator, controlling expression of both metabolic and virulence genes in Gram-positive bacteria. Branch chained amino acids (BCAAs) serve as a ligand for CodY and modulate its activity. Classically, CodY was considered to function primarily as a repressor under rich growth conditions. However, our previous studies of the bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes revealed that CodY is active also when the bacteria are starved for BCAAs. Under these conditions, CodY loses the ability to repress genes (e.g., metabolic genes) and functions as a direct activator of the master virulence regulator gene, prfA. This observation raised the possibility that CodY possesses multiple functions that allow it to coordinate gene expression across a wide spectrum of metabolic growth conditions, and thus better adapt bacteria to the mammalian niche. To gain a deeper understanding of CodY's regulatory repertoire and identify direct target genes, we performed a genome wide analysis of the CodY regulon and DNA binding under both rich and minimal growth conditions, using RNA-Seq and ChIP-Seq techniques. We demonstrate here that CodY is indeed active (i.e., binds DNA) under both conditions, serving as a repressor and activator of different genes. Further, we identified new genes and pathways that are directly regulated by CodY (e.g., sigB, arg, his, actA, glpF, gadG, gdhA, poxB, glnR and fla genes), integrating metabolism, stress responses, motility and virulence in L. monocytogenes. This study establishes CodY as a multifaceted factor regulating L. monocytogenes physiology in a highly versatile manner. PMID:26895237

  9. Systems Level Analyses Reveal Multiple Regulatory Activities of CodY Controlling Metabolism, Motility and Virulence in Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Lobel, Lior; Herskovits, Anat A.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria sense and respond to many environmental cues, rewiring their regulatory network to facilitate adaptation to new conditions/niches. Global transcription factors that co-regulate multiple pathways simultaneously are essential to this regulatory rewiring. CodY is one such global regulator, controlling expression of both metabolic and virulence genes in Gram-positive bacteria. Branch chained amino acids (BCAAs) serve as a ligand for CodY and modulate its activity. Classically, CodY was considered to function primarily as a repressor under rich growth conditions. However, our previous studies of the bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes revealed that CodY is active also when the bacteria are starved for BCAAs. Under these conditions, CodY loses the ability to repress genes (e.g., metabolic genes) and functions as a direct activator of the master virulence regulator gene, prfA. This observation raised the possibility that CodY possesses multiple functions that allow it to coordinate gene expression across a wide spectrum of metabolic growth conditions, and thus better adapt bacteria to the mammalian niche. To gain a deeper understanding of CodY’s regulatory repertoire and identify direct target genes, we performed a genome wide analysis of the CodY regulon and DNA binding under both rich and minimal growth conditions, using RNA-Seq and ChIP-Seq techniques. We demonstrate here that CodY is indeed active (i.e., binds DNA) under both conditions, serving as a repressor and activator of different genes. Further, we identified new genes and pathways that are directly regulated by CodY (e.g., sigB, arg, his, actA, glpF, gadG, gdhA, poxB, glnR and fla genes), integrating metabolism, stress responses, motility and virulence in L. monocytogenes. This study establishes CodY as a multifaceted factor regulating L. monocytogenes physiology in a highly versatile manner. PMID:26895237

  10. C1 metabolism and the Calvin cycle function simultaneously and independently during HCHO metabolism and detoxification in Arabidopsis thaliana treated with HCHO solutions.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhong-Bang; Xiao, Su-Qin; You, Lan; Wang, Sha-Sha; Tan, Hao; Li, Kun-Zhi; Chen, Li-Mei

    2013-08-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is suggested to be detoxified through one-carbon (C1) metabolism or assimilated by the Calvin cycle in plants. To further understand the function of the Calvin cycle and C1 metabolism in HCHO metabolism in plants, HCHO elimination and metabolism by Arabidopsis thaliana in HCHO solutions was investigated in this study. Results verified that Arabidopsis could completely eliminate aqueous HCHO from the HCHO solutions. Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance ((13)C-NMR) analysis showed that H(13)CHO absorbed by Arabidopsis was first oxidized to H(13)COOH. Subsequently, a clear increase in [U-(13)C]Gluc peaks accompanied by a strong enhancement in peaks of [2-(13)C]Ser and [3-(13)C]Ser appeared in Arabidopsis. Pretreatment with cyclosporin A or L-carnitine, which might inhibit the transport of (13)C-enriched compounds into chloroplasts and mitochondria, caused a remarkable decline in yields of both [U-(13)C]Gluc and [3-(13)C]Ser in H(13)CHO-treated Arabidopsis. These results suggested that both the Calvin cycle and the C1 metabolism functioned simultaneously during HCHO detoxification. Moreover, both functioned more quickly under high H(13)CHO stress than low H(13)CHO stress. When a photorespiration mutant was treated in 6 mm H(13)CHO solution, formation of [U-(13)C]Gluc and [2-(13)C]Ser was completely inhibited, but generation of [3-(13)C]Ser was not significantly affected. This evidence suggested that the Calvin cycle and C1 metabolism functioned independently in Arabidopsis during HCHO metabolism.

  11. Control of metabolic rate is a hidden variable in the allometric scaling of homeotherms.

    PubMed

    Chaui-Berlinck, José Guilherme; Navas, Carlos Arturo; Monteiro, Luiz Henrique Alves; Bicudo, José Eduardo Pereira Wilken

    2005-05-01

    The allometric scaling exponent of the relationship between standard metabolic rate (SMR) and body mass for homeotherms has a long history and has been subject to much debate. Provided the external and internal conditions required to measure SMR are met, it is tacitly assumed that the metabolic rate (B) converges to SMR. If SMR does indeed represent a local minimum, then short-term regulatory control mechanisms should not operate to sustain it. This is a hidden assumption in many published articles aiming to explain the scaling exponent in terms of physical and morphological constraints. This paper discusses the findings of a minimalist body temperature (Tb) control model in which short-term controlling operations, related to the difference between Tb and the set-point temperatures by specific gains and time delays in the control loops, are described by a system of differential equations of Tb, B and thermal conductance. We found that because the gains in the control loops tend to increase as body size decreases (i.e. changes in B and thermal conductance are speeded-up in small homeotherms), the equilibrium point of the system potentially changes from asymptotically stable to a centre, transforming B and Tb in oscillating variables. Under these specific circumstances the very concept of SMR no longer makes sense. A series of empirical reports of metabolic rate in very small homeotherms supports this theoretical prediction, because in these animals B seems not to converge to a SMR value. We conclude that the unrestricted use of allometric equations to relate metabolic rate to body size might be misleading because metabolic control itself experiences size effects that are overlooked in ordinary allometric analysis.

  12. Physiology and genetics of metabolic flux control in Zymomonas mobilis. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, T.

    1992-08-01

    This work seeks to understand the role of gene expression in regulating glycolytic enzyme synthesis in a balance that allows proper glycoltic flux control. The seven genes targeted for study in this laboratory have been cloned and sequenced, and molecular details of regulation have been investigated. Clear that glycolytic enzyme synthesis is coordinated to prevent the build up of toxic metabolic intermediates. The genetic mechanisms responsible for regulating balanced expression of the EntnerDoudoroff and glycolytic genes in Z. mobilis are beginning to be understood. Several layers of genetic control, perhaps in a hierarchal arrangement act in concert to determine the relative abundance of the glycolytic enzymes. These genetic controls involve differential translational efficiency, highly conserved promoter sequences, transcription factors, differential mRNA stabilities, and nucleolytic mRNA processing. The serendipitous cloning of the glucose facilitator, glf, as a result of linkage to several other genes of interest will have a significant impact on the study of Z. mobilis metabolism. The glucose facilitator is being characterized in a genetically reconstituted system in E. coli. Molecular genetic studies indicate that the ratio of glf expression to that of glk, zmf, and edd is carefully regulated, and suggests a critical role in metabolic control. Regulation of glycolytic gene expression is now sufficiently well understood to allow use of the glycolytic genes as tools to manipulate specified enzyme levels for the purpose of analyzing metabolic flux control. The critical genes have been subcloned for stable expression in Z. mobilis and placed under control of a regulated promoter system involving the tac promoter, the lacI repressor, and gene induction in by IPTG. HPLC methods have been developed that allow quantitation of virtually all of the metabolic intermediates in the cell pool.

  13. [Stages of grief in diabetes and metabolic control].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Moctezuma, José Raymundo; López-Delgado, María Elisa; Ortiz-Aguirre, Alma Rosa; Jiménez-Luna, Jorge; López-Ocaña, Luis Rafael; Chacón-Sánchez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Introducción: el objetivo de este artículo es identificar las etapas del duelo y su asociación con el control metabólico en pacientes diabéticos tipo 2. Métodos: se incluyeron 186 sujetos diabéticos, de ambos sexos, sin pérdida reciente de un ser querido ni enfermedades terminales. Se les aplicó un instrumento validado que exploró las etapas del duelo (negación, ira/incredulidad, negociación, depresión, y aceptación). Se midió: IMC, perímetro de cintura, niveles promedio de glucosa, colesterol y triglicéridos en los últimos 6 meses. Resultados: las asociaciones entre las etapas del duelo y las variables clínicas mostraron que en la negación, el IMC es mayor 33.1 ± 6.2 contra 28.9 ± 4.6 con p = 0.001; en etapa de incredulidad, la glucemia es mayor 190 ± 67 frente a 16 ± 51 con p < 0.05; la etapa de negociación se asocia a mayor edad 65.6 ± 10 contra 59.1 ± 11 años con p = 0.001 y con nivel de colesterol mayor de 229.4 ± 39.1 frente a 206.6 ± 40 con p < 0.05; la etapa de depresión se asoció con mayor tiempo de diagnóstico 13.3 ± 8.9 frente a 9.4 ± 7.1 años, con p < 0.05 y con el nivel de glucemia de 198.9 ± 60 frente a 164 ± 51 mg/dL con p = 0.001. Conclusiones: existen asociaciones lógicas entre variables clínicas y etapas del duelo. Se debe identificar el duelo como un elemento adicional en la evaluación de pacientes con diabetes y establecer estrategias que mejoren la adherencia al tratamiento y el control metabólico.

  14. Early maternal undernutrition programs increased feed intake, altered glucose metabolism and insulin secretion, and liver function in aged female offspring

    PubMed Central

    George, Lindsey A.; Zhang, Liren; Tuersunjiang, Nuermaimaiti; Ma, Yan; Long, Nathan M.; Uthlaut, Adam B.; Smith, Derek T.; Nathanielsz, Peter W.

    2012-01-01

    Insulin resistance and obesity are components of the metabolic syndrome that includes development of cardiovascular disease and diabetes with advancing age. The thrifty phenotype hypothesis suggests that offspring of poorly nourished mothers are predisposed to the various components of the metabolic syndrome due to adaptations made during fetal development. We assessed the effects of maternal nutrient restriction in early gestation on feeding behavior, insulin and glucose dynamics, body composition, and liver function in aged female offspring of ewes fed either a nutrient-restricted [NR 50% National Research Council (NRC) recommendations] or control (C: 100% NRC) diet from 28 to 78 days of gestation, after which both groups were fed at 100% of NRC from day 79 to lambing and through lactation. Female lambs born to NR and C dams were reared as a single group from weaning, and thereafter, they were fed 100% NRC recommendations until assigned to this study at 6 yr of age. These female offspring were evaluated by a frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test, followed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry for body composition analysis prior to and after ad libitum feeding of a highly palatable pelleted diet for 11 wk with automated monitoring of feed intake (GrowSafe Systems). Aged female offspring born to NR ewes demonstrated greater and more rapid feed intake, greater body weight gain, and efficiency of gain, lower insulin sensitivity, higher insulin secretion, and greater hepatic lipid and glycogen content than offspring from C ewes. These data confirm an increased metabolic “thriftiness” of offspring born to NR mothers, which continues into advanced age, possibly predisposing these offspring to metabolic disease. PMID:22277936

  15. Early maternal undernutrition programs increased feed intake, altered glucose metabolism and insulin secretion, and liver function in aged female offspring.

    PubMed

    George, Lindsey A; Zhang, Liren; Tuersunjiang, Nuermaimaiti; Ma, Yan; Long, Nathan M; Uthlaut, Adam B; Smith, Derek T; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Ford, Stephen P

    2012-04-01

    Insulin resistance and obesity are components of the metabolic syndrome that includes development of cardiovascular disease and diabetes with advancing age. The thrifty phenotype hypothesis suggests that offspring of poorly nourished mothers are predisposed to the various components of the metabolic syndrome due to adaptations made during fetal development. We assessed the effects of maternal nutrient restriction in early gestation on feeding behavior, insulin and glucose dynamics, body composition, and liver function in aged female offspring of ewes fed either a nutrient-restricted [NR 50% National Research Council (NRC) recommendations] or control (C: 100% NRC) diet from 28 to 78 days of gestation, after which both groups were fed at 100% of NRC from day 79 to lambing and through lactation. Female lambs born to NR and C dams were reared as a single group from weaning, and thereafter, they were fed 100% NRC recommendations until assigned to this study at 6 yr of age. These female offspring were evaluated by a frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test, followed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry for body composition analysis prior to and after ad libitum feeding of a highly palatable pelleted diet for 11 wk with automated monitoring of feed intake (GrowSafe Systems). Aged female offspring born to NR ewes demonstrated greater and more rapid feed intake, greater body weight gain, and efficiency of gain, lower insulin sensitivity, higher insulin secretion, and greater hepatic lipid and glycogen content than offspring from C ewes. These data confirm an increased metabolic "thriftiness" of offspring born to NR mothers, which continues into advanced age, possibly predisposing these offspring to metabolic disease. PMID:22277936

  16. Reduced Mitochondrial Function in Human Huntington Disease Lymphoblasts is Not Due to Alterations in Cardiolipin Metabolism or Mitochondrial Supercomplex Assembly.

    PubMed

    Mejia, Edgard M; Chau, Sarah; Sparagna, Genevieve C; Sipione, Simonetta; Hatch, Grant M

    2016-05-01

    Huntington's Disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant disease that occurs as a result of expansion of the trinucleotide repeat CAG (glutamine) on the HTT gene. HD patients exhibit various forms of mitochondrial dysfunction within neurons and peripheral tissues. Cardiolipin (Ptd2Gro) is a polyglycerophospholipid found exclusively in mitochondria and is important for maintaining mitochondrial function. We examined if altered Ptd2Gro metabolism was involved in the mitochondrial dysfunction associated with HD. Mitochondrial basal respiration, spare respiratory capacity, ATP coupling efficiency and rate of glycolysis were markedly diminished in Epstein-Barr virus transformed HD lymphoblasts compared to controls (CTRL). Mitochondrial supercomplex formation and Complex I activity within these supercomplexes did not vary between HD patients with different length of CAG repeats and appeared unaltered compared to CTRL. In contrast, in vitro Complex I enzyme activity in mitochondrial enriched samples was reduced in HD lymphoblasts compared to CTRL. The total cellular pool size of Ptd2Gro and its synthesis/remodeling from [(3)H]acetate/[(14)C]oleate were unaltered in HD lymphoblasts compared to CTRL. In addition, the molecular species of Ptd2Gro were essentially unaltered in HD lymphoblasts compared to CTRL. We conclude that compared to CTRL lymphoblasts, HD lymphoblasts display impaired mitochondrial basal respiration, spare respiratory capacity, ATP coupling efficiency and rate of glycolysis with any pathological CAG repeat length, but this is not due to alterations in Ptd2Gro metabolism. We suggest that HD patient lymphoblasts may be a useful model to study defective energy metabolism that does not involve alterations in Ptd2Gro metabolism. PMID:26846325

  17. Cognitive Maturity, Stressful Events and Metabolic Control in Adolescents with Diabetes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingersoll, Gary M.; And Others

    Management of insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is a complex task that requires the adolescent with IDDM recognize the interaction between diet, exercise, stress, emotions, and insulin dosage. With regularity, however, adolescents with IDDM are shown to be in less good metabolic control than younger children or young adults. The study…

  18. Herbal Medicines for Treating Metabolic Syndrome: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Youme; Sasaki, Yui; Hwang, Eui-Hyoung; Song, Yun-Kyung; Shin, Yong-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of herbal medicines in the management of metabolic syndrome. Materials and Methods. On December 9, 2015, we searched PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, SCOPUS, AMED, CNKI, KoreaMed, KMBASE, OASIS, and J-STAGE with no restriction on language or published year. We selected randomized controlled trials that involved patients with metabolic syndrome being treated with herbal medicines as intervention. The main keywords were “Chinese herbal medicines”, “metabolic syndrome”, and “randomized controlled trials”. Herbal substances which were not based on East Asian medical theory, combination therapy with western medicines, and concurrent diseases other than metabolic syndrome were excluded. The risk of bias was assessed by Cochrane's “Risk of Bias” tool. The protocol or review was registered in PROSPERO (an international prospective register of systematic reviews) (CRD42014006842). Results. From 1,098 articles, 12 RCTs were included in this review: five trials studied herbal medicines versus a placebo or no treatment, and seven trials studied herbal medicines versus western medicines. Herbal medicines were effective on decreasing waist circumference, blood glucose, blood lipids, and blood pressure. Conclusion. This study suggests the possibility that herbal medicines can be complementary and alternative medicines for metabolic syndrome. PMID:27413388

  19. Herbal Medicines for Treating Metabolic Syndrome: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Jang, Soobin; Jang, Bo-Hyoung; Ko, Youme; Sasaki, Yui; Park, Jeong-Su; Hwang, Eui-Hyoung; Song, Yun-Kyung; Shin, Yong-Cheol; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of herbal medicines in the management of metabolic syndrome. Materials and Methods. On December 9, 2015, we searched PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, SCOPUS, AMED, CNKI, KoreaMed, KMBASE, OASIS, and J-STAGE with no restriction on language or published year. We selected randomized controlled trials that involved patients with metabolic syndrome being treated with herbal medicines as intervention. The main keywords were "Chinese herbal medicines", "metabolic syndrome", and "randomized controlled trials". Herbal substances which were not based on East Asian medical theory, combination therapy with western medicines, and concurrent diseases other than metabolic syndrome were excluded. The risk of bias was assessed by Cochrane's "Risk of Bias" tool. The protocol or review was registered in PROSPERO (an international prospective register of systematic reviews) (CRD42014006842). Results. From 1,098 articles, 12 RCTs were included in this review: five trials studied herbal medicines versus a placebo or no treatment, and seven trials studied herbal medicines versus western medicines. Herbal medicines were effective on decreasing waist circumference, blood glucose, blood lipids, and blood pressure. Conclusion. This study suggests the possibility that herbal medicines can be complementary and alternative medicines for metabolic syndrome. PMID:27413388

  20. Uranyl Precipitation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa via Controlled Polyphosphate Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Renninger, Neil; Knopp, Roger; Nitsche, Heino; Clark, Douglas S.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2004-01-01

    The polyphosphate kinase gene from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was overexpressed in its native host, resulting in the accumulation of 100 times the polyphosphate seen with control strains. Degradation of this polyphosphate was induced by carbon starvation conditions, resulting in phosphate release into the medium. The mechanism of polyphosphate degradation is not clearly understood, but it appears to be associated with glycogen degradation. Upon suspension of the cells in 1 mM uranyl nitrate, nearly all polyphosphate that had accumulated was degraded within 48 h, resulting in the removal of nearly 80% of the uranyl ion and >95% of lesser-concentrated solutions. Electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) suggest that this removal was due to the precipitation of uranyl phosphate at the cell membrane. TRLFS also indicated that uranyl was initially sorbed to the cell as uranyl hydroxide and was then precipitated as uranyl phosphate as phosphate was released from the cell. Lethal doses of radiation did not halt phosphate secretion from polyphosphate-filled cells under carbon starvation conditions. PMID:15574942

  1. Plasticity of muscle function in a thermoregulating ectotherm (Crocodylus porosus): biomechanics and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Seebacher, Frank; James, Rob S

    2008-03-01

    Thermoregulation and thermal sensitivity of performance are thought to have coevolved so that performance is optimized within the selected body temperature range. However, locomotor performance in thermoregulating crocodiles (Crocodylus porosus) is plastic and maxima shift to different selected body temperatures in different thermal environments. Here we test the hypothesis that muscle metabolic and biomechanical parameters are optimized at the body temperatures selected in different thermal environments. Hence, we related indices of anaerobic (lactate dehydrogenase) and aerobic (cytochrome c oxidase) metabolic capacities and myofibrillar ATPase activity to the biomechanics of isometric and work loop caudofemoralis muscle function. Maximal isometric stress (force per muscle cross-sectional area) did not change with thermal acclimation, but muscle work loop power output increased with cold acclimation as a result of shorter activation and relaxation times. The thermal sensitivity of myofibrillar ATPase activity decreased with cold acclimation in caudofemoralis muscle. Neither aerobic nor anaerobic metabolic capacities were directly linked to changes in muscle performance during thermal acclimation, although there was a negative relationship between anaerobic capacity and isometric twitch stress in cold-acclimated animals. We conclude that by combining thermoregulation with plasticity in biomechanical function, crocodiles maximize performance in environments with highly variable thermal properties.

  2. Expression and functional studies of genes involved in transport and metabolism of glycerol in Pachysolen tannophilus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pachysolen tannophilus is a non-conventional yeast, which can metabolize many of the carbon sources found in low cost feedstocks including glycerol and xylose. The xylose utilisation pathways have been extensively studied in this organism. However, the mechanism behind glycerol metabolism is poorly understood. Using the recently published genome sequence of P. tannophilus CBS4044, we searched for genes with functions in glycerol transport and metabolism by performing a BLAST search using the sequences of the relevant genes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae as queries. Results Quantitative real-time PCR was performed to unveil the expression patterns of these genes during growth of P. tannophilus on glycerol and glucose as sole carbon sources. The genes predicted to be involved in glycerol transport in P. tannophilus were expressed in S. cerevisiae to validate their function. The S. cerevisiae strains transformed with heterologous genes showed improved growth and glycerol consumption rates with glycerol as the sole carbon source. Conclusions P. tannophilus has characteristics relevant for a microbial cell factory to be applied in a biorefinery setting, i.e. its ability to utilise the carbon sources such as xylose and glycerol. However, the strain is not currently amenable to genetic modification and transformation. Heterologous expression of the glycerol transporters from P. tannophilus, which has a relatively high growth rate on glycerol, could be used as an approach for improving the efficiency of glycerol assimilation in other well characterized and applied cell factories such as S. cerevisiae. PMID:23514356

  3. Alterations in mitochondrial respiratory functions, redox metabolism and apoptosis by oxidant 4-hydroxynonenal and antioxidants curcumin and melatonin in PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Raza, Haider John, Annie; Brown, Eric M.; Benedict, Sheela; Kambal, Amr

    2008-01-15

    Cellular oxidative stress and alterations in redox metabolisms have been implicated in the etiology and pathology of many diseases including cancer. Antioxidant treatments have been proven beneficial in controlling these diseases. We have recently shown that 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), a by-product of lipid peroxidation, induces oxidative stress in PC12 cells by compromising the mitochondrial redox metabolism. In this study, we have further investigated the deleterious effects of 4-HNE on mitochondrial respiratory functions and apoptosis using the same cell line. In addition, we have also compared the effects of two antioxidants, curcumin and melatonin, used as chemopreventive agents, on mitochondrial redox metabolism and respiratory functions in these cells. 4-HNE treatment has been shown to cause a reduction in glutathione (GSH) pool, an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), protein carbonylation and apoptosis. A marked inhibition in the activities of the mitochondrial respiratory enzymes, cytochrome c oxidase and aconitase was observed after 4-HNE treatment. Increased nuclear translocation of NF-kB/p65 protein was also observed after 4-HNE treatment. Curcumin and melatonin treatments, on the other hand, maintained the mitochondrial redox and respiratory functions without a marked effect on ROS production and cell viability. These results suggest that 4-HNE-induced cytotoxicity may be associated, at least in part, with the altered mitochondrial redox and respiratory functions. The alterations in mitochondrial energy metabolism and redox functions may therefore be critical in determining the difference between cell death and survival.

  4. Alterations in mitochondrial respiratory functions, redox metabolism and apoptosis by oxidant 4-hydroxynonenal and antioxidants curcumin and melatonin in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Raza, Haider; John, Annie; Brown, Eric M; Benedict, Sheela; Kambal, Amr

    2008-01-15

    Cellular oxidative stress and alterations in redox metabolisms have been implicated in the etiology and pathology of many diseases including cancer. Antioxidant treatments have been proven beneficial in controlling these diseases. We have recently shown that 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), a by-product of lipid peroxidation, induces oxidative stress in PC12 cells by compromising the mitochondrial redox metabolism. In this study, we have further investigated the deleterious effects of 4-HNE on mitochondrial respiratory functions and apoptosis using the same cell line. In addition, we have also compared the effects of two antioxidants, curcumin and melatonin, used as chemopreventive agents, on mitochondrial redox metabolism and respiratory functions in these cells. 4-HNE treatment has been shown to cause a reduction in glutathione (GSH) pool, an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), protein carbonylation and apoptosis. A marked inhibition in the activities of the mitochondrial respiratory enzymes, cytochrome c oxidase and aconitase was observed after 4-HNE treatment. Increased nuclear translocation of NF-kB/p65 protein was also observed after 4-HNE treatment. Curcumin and melatonin treatments, on the other hand, maintained the mitochondrial redox and respiratory functions without a marked effect on ROS production and cell viability. These results suggest that 4-HNE-induced cytotoxicity may be associated, at least in part, with the altered mitochondrial redox and respiratory functions. The alterations in mitochondrial energy metabolism and redox functions may therefore be critical in determining the difference between cell death and survival. PMID:17935746

  5. Apolipoprotein D in Lipid Metabolism and Its Functional Implication in Atherosclerosis and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Perdomo, German; Dong, H. Henry

    2009-01-01

    Dyslipidemia is characterized by increased triglyceride and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels, and decreased high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels. Such an atherogenic lipid profile often predisposes an at risk individual to coronary artery disease with incompletely understood mechanisms. Apolipoprotein D (apoD) is an atypical apolipoprotein. Unlike canonical apolipoproteins that are produced mainly in liver and intestine, apoD is expressed widely in mammalian tissues. ApoD does not share significant degrees of homology in amino acid sequence with other apolipoproteins. Instead, apoD is structurally similar to lipocalins, a diverse family of lipid-binding proteins that are responsible for transporting lipids and other small hydrophobic molecules for metabolism. Plasma ApoD is present mainly in HDL and to a lesser extent in low density lipoproteins (LDL) and very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL). Genetic variants of apoD are associated with abnormal lipid metabolism and increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome. Increased apoD deposition is detectable in atherosclerotic lesions of humans with established cardiovascular disease as well as mice with premature atherosclerosis. Moreover, apoD is associated with anti-oxidation and anti-stress activities, contributing to lifespan expansion in fruit flies. Elderly subjects and patients with Alzheimer exhibit markedly elevated apoD production in the brain. Thus, apoD is emerged as a significant player in lipid metabolism and aging. Here we focus our review on recent advances toward our understanding of apoD in lipid metabolism and address whether apoD dysregulation contributes to the pathogenesis of dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis. We will also discuss the functional implication of apoD in aging. PMID:19946382

  6. Glucosinolate metabolism, functionality and breeding for the improvement of Brassicaceae vegetables.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Masahiko; Hara, Masakazu; Fukino, Nobuko; Kakizaki, Tomohiro; Morimitsu, Yasujiro

    2014-05-01

    Unique secondary metabolites, glucosinolates (S-glucopyranosyl thiohydroximates), are naturally occurring S-linked glucosides found mainly in Brassicaceae plants. They are enzymatically hydrolyzed to produce sulfate ions, D-glucose, and characteristic degradation products such as isothiocyanates. The functions of glucosinolates in the plants remain unclear, but isothiocyanates possessing a pungent or irritating taste and odor might be associated with plant defense from microbes. Isothiocyanates have been studied extensively in experimental in vitro and in vivo carcinogenesis models for their cancer chemopreventive properties. The beneficial isothiocyanates, glucosinolates that are functional for supporting human health, have received attention from many scientists studying plant breeding, plant physiology, plant genetics, and food functionality. This review presents a summary of recent topics related with glucosinolates in the Brassica family, along with a summary of the chemicals, metabolism, and genes of glucosinolates in Brassicaceae. The bioavailabilities of isothiocyanates from certain functional glucosinolates and the importance of breeding will be described with emphasis on glucosinolates.

  7. Glucosinolate metabolism, functionality and breeding for the improvement of Brassicaceae vegetables

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Masahiko; Hara, Masakazu; Fukino, Nobuko; Kakizaki, Tomohiro; Morimitsu, Yasujiro

    2014-01-01

    Unique secondary metabolites, glucosinolates (S-glucopyranosyl thiohydroximates), are naturally occurring S-linked glucosides found mainly in Brassicaceae plants. They are enzymatically hydrolyzed to produce sulfate ions, D-glucose, and characteristic degradation products such as isothiocyanates. The functions of glucosinolates in the plants remain unclear, but isothiocyanates possessing a pungent or irritating taste and odor might be associated with plant defense from microbes. Isothiocyanates have been studied extensively in experimental in vitro and in vivo carcinogenesis models for their cancer chemopreventive properties. The beneficial isothiocyanates, glucosinolates that are functional for supporting human health, have received attention from many scientists studying plant breeding, plant physiology, plant genetics, and food functionality. This review presents a summary of recent topics related with glucosinolates in the Brassica family, along with a summary of the chemicals, metabolism, and genes of glucosinolates in Brassicaceae. The bioavailabilities of isothiocyanates from certain functional glucosinolates and the importance of breeding will be described with emphasis on glucosinolates. PMID:24987290

  8. Glucosinolate metabolism, functionality and breeding for the improvement of Brassicaceae vegetables.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Masahiko; Hara, Masakazu; Fukino, Nobuko; Kakizaki, Tomohiro; Morimitsu, Yasujiro

    2014-05-01

    Unique secondary metabolites, glucosinolates (S-glucopyranosyl thiohydroximates), are naturally occurring S-linked glucosides found mainly in Brassicaceae plants. They are enzymatically hydrolyzed to produce sulfate ions, D-glucose, and characteristic degradation products such as isothiocyanates. The functions of glucosinolates in the plants remain unclear, but isothiocyanates possessing a pungent or irritating taste and odor might be associated with plant defense from microbes. Isothiocyanates have been studied extensively in experimental in vitro and in vivo carcinogenesis models for their cancer chemopreventive properties. The beneficial isothiocyanates, glucosinolates that are functional for supporting human health, have received attention from many scientists studying plant breeding, plant physiology, plant genetics, and food functionality. This review presents a summary of recent topics related with glucosinolates in the Brassica family, along with a summary of the chemicals, metabolism, and genes of glucosinolates in Brassicaceae. The bioavailabilities of isothiocyanates from certain functional glucosinolates and the importance of breeding will be described with emphasis on glucosinolates. PMID:24987290

  9. Vascular endothelial growth factors: multitasking functionality in metabolism, health and disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gina A; Fearnley, Gareth W; Harrison, Michael A; Tomlinson, Darren C; Wheatcroft, Stephen B; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2015-07-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) bind to VEGF receptor tyrosine kinases (VEGFRs). The VEGF and VEGFR gene products regulate diverse regulatory pathways in mammalian development, health and disease. The interaction between a particular VEGF and its cognate VEGFR activates multiple signal transduction pathways which regulate different cellular responses including metabolism, gene expression, proliferation, migration, and survival. The family of VEGF isoforms regulate vascular physiology and promote tissue homeostasis. VEGF dysfunction is implicated in major chronic disease states including atherosclerosis, diabetes, and cancer. More recent studies implicate a strong link between response to VEGF and regulation of vascular metabolism. Understanding how this family of multitasking cytokines regulates cell and animal function has implications for treating many different diseases.

  10. D-Lactate production as a function of glucose metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Benjamin J; Navid, Ali; Kulp, Kristen S; Knaack, Jennifer L S; Bench, Graham

    2013-02-01

    Methylglyoxal, a reactive, toxic dicarbonyl, is generated by the spontaneous degradation of glycolytic intermediates. Methylglyoxal can form covalent adducts with cellular macromolecules, potentially disrupting cellular function. We performed experiments using the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae, grown in media containing low, moderate and high glucose concentrations, to determine the relationship between glucose consumption and methylglyoxal metabolism. Normal growth experiments and glutathione depletion experiments showed that metabolism of methylglyoxal by log-phase yeast cultured aerobically occurred primarily through the glyoxalase pathway. Growth in high-glucose media resulted in increased generation of the methylglyoxal metabolite D-lactate and overall lower efficiency of glucose utilization as measured by growth rates. Cells grown in high-glucose media maintained higher glucose uptake flux than cells grown in moderate-glucose or low-glucose media. Computational modelling showed that increased glucose consumption may impair catabolism of triose phosphates as a result of an altered NAD⁺:NADH ratio.

  11. D-Lactate Production as a Function of Glucose Metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Benjamin J.; Navid, Ali; Kulp, Kristen S.; Knaack, Jennifer L. S.; Bench, Graham

    2013-01-01

    Methylglyoxal, a reactive, toxic dicarbonyl, is generated by the spontaneous degradation of glycolytic intermediates. Methylglyoxal can form covalent adducts with cellular macromolecules, potentially disrupting cellular function. We performed experiments using the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown in media containing low, moderate, and high glucose concentrations to determine the relationship between glucose consumption and methylglyoxal metabolism. Normal growth experiments and glutathione depletion experiments showed that metabolism of methylglyoxal by log-phase yeast cultured aerobically occurred primarily through the glyoxalase pathway. Growth in high-glucose media resulted in increased generation of the methylglyoxal metabolite D-lactate and overall lower efficiency of glucose utilization as measured by growth rates. Cells grown in high-glucose media maintained higher glucose uptake flux than cells grown in moderate-glucose or low-glucose media. Computational modeling showed that increased glucose consumption may impair catabolism of triose phosphates as a result of an altered NAD+/NADH ratio. PMID:23361949

  12. Mitochondrial Functional Impairment in Response to Environmental Toxins in the Cardiorenal Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Guanghong; Aroor, Annayya R.; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A.; Sowers, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental toxins can promote cardiovascular, metabolic and renal abnormalities, which characterize the cardiorenal metabolic syndrome (CRS). Heavy metals, such as mercury and arsenic, represent two of the most toxic pollutants. Exposure to these toxins is increasing due to increased industrialization throughout much of the world. Studies conducted to understand the impact of environmental toxins have shown a major impact on mitochondrial structure and function. The maladaptive adaptive stress products caused by these toxins, including aggregated proteins, damaged organelles, and intracellular pathogens, can be removed through autophagy, which is also known as mitophagy in mitochondria. Although the underlying mechanisms involved in the regulation of mitophagy in response to pollution are not well understood, accumulating evidence supports a role for maladaptive mitochondrial responses to environmental pollution in the pathogenesis of the CRS. In this review, we discuss ongoing research, which explores the mechanisms by which these toxins promote abnormalities in mitophagy and associated mitochondrial dysfunction and the CRS. PMID:25559775

  13. Vascular endothelial growth factors: multitasking functionality in metabolism, health and disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gina A; Fearnley, Gareth W; Harrison, Michael A; Tomlinson, Darren C; Wheatcroft, Stephen B; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2015-07-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) bind to VEGF receptor tyrosine kinases (VEGFRs). The VEGF and VEGFR gene products regulate diverse regulatory pathways in mammalian development, health and disease. The interaction between a particular VEGF and its cognate VEGFR activates multiple signal transduction pathways which regulate different cellular responses including metabolism, gene expression, proliferation, migration, and survival. The family of VEGF isoforms regulate vascular physiology and promote tissue homeostasis. VEGF dysfunction is implicated in major chronic disease states including atherosclerosis, diabetes, and cancer. More recent studies implicate a strong link between response to VEGF and regulation of vascular metabolism. Understanding how this family of multitasking cytokines regulates cell and animal function has implications for treating many different diseases. PMID:25868665

  14. Metabolic rate of carrying added mass: a function of walking speed, carried mass and mass location.

    PubMed

    Schertzer, Eliran; Riemer, Raziel

    2014-11-01

    The effort of carrying additional mass at different body locations is important in ergonomics and in designing wearable robotics. We investigate the metabolic rate of carrying a load as a function of its mass, its location on the body and the subject's walking speed. Novel metabolic rate prediction equations for walking while carrying loads at the ankle, knees and back were developed based on experiments where subjects walked on a treadmill at 4, 5 or 6km/h bearing different amounts of added mass (up to 2kg per leg and 22kg for back). Compared to previously reported equations, ours are 7-69% more accurate. Results also show that relative cost for carrying a mass at a distal versus a proximal location changes with speed and mass. Contrary to mass carried on the back, mass attached to the leg cannot be modeled as an increase in body mass. PMID:24793822

  15. New inducible genetic method reveals critical roles of GABA in the control of feeding and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fantao; Han, Yong; Srisai, Dollada; Belakhov, Valery; Farias, Monica; Xu, Yong; Palmiter, Richard D.; Baasov, Timor; Wu, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Currently available inducible Cre/loxP systems, despite their considerable utility in gene manipulation, have pitfalls in certain scenarios, such as unsatisfactory recombination rates and deleterious effects on physiology and behavior. To overcome these limitations, we designed a new, inducible gene-targeting system by introducing an in-frame nonsense mutation into the coding sequence of Cre recombinase (nsCre). Mutant mRNAs transcribed from nsCre transgene can be efficiently translated into full-length, functional Cre recombinase in the presence of nonsense suppressors such as aminoglycosides. In a proof-of-concept model, GABA signaling from hypothalamic neurons expressing agouti-related peptide (AgRP) was genetically inactivated within 4 d after treatment with a synthetic aminoglycoside. Disruption of GABA synthesis in AgRP neurons in young adult mice led to a dramatic loss of body weight due to reduced food intake and elevated energy expenditure; they also manifested glucose intolerance. In contrast, older mice with genetic inactivation of GABA signaling by AgRP neurons had only transient reduction of feeding and body weight; their energy expenditure and glucose tolerance were unaffected. These results indicate that GABAergic signaling from AgRP neurons plays a key role in the control of feeding and metabolism through an age-dependent mechanism. This new genetic technique will augment current tools used to elucidate mechanisms underlying many physiological and neurological processes. PMID:26976589

  16. Genome-Enabled Modeling of Biogeochemical Processes Predicts Metabolic Dependencies that Connect the Relative Fitness of Microbial Functional Guilds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodie, E.; King, E.; Molins, S.; Karaoz, U.; Steefel, C. I.; Banfield, J. F.; Beller, H. R.; Anantharaman, K.; Ligocki, T. J.; Trebotich, D.

    2015-12-01

    Pore-scale processes mediated by microorganisms underlie a range of critical ecosystem services, regulating carbon stability, nutrient flux, and the purification of water. Advances in cultivation-independent approaches now provide us with the ability to reconstruct thousands of genomes from microbial populations from which functional roles may be assigned. With this capability to reveal microbial metabolic potential, the next step is to put these microbes back where they belong to interact with their natural environment, i.e. the pore scale. At this scale, microorganisms communicate, cooperate and compete across their fitness landscapes with communities emerging that feedback on the physical and chemical properties of their environment, ultimately altering the fitness landscape and selecting for new microbial communities with new properties and so on. We have developed a trait-based model of microbial activity that simulates coupled functional guilds that are parameterized with unique combinations of traits that govern fitness under dynamic conditions. Using a reactive transport framework, we simulate the thermodynamics of coupled electron donor-acceptor reactions to predict energy available for cellular maintenance, respiration, biomass development, and enzyme production. From metagenomics, we directly estimate some trait values related to growth and identify the linkage of key traits associated with respiration and fermentation, macromolecule depolymerizing enzymes, and other key functions such as nitrogen fixation. Our simulations were carried out to explore abiotic controls on community emergence such as seasonally fluctuating water table regimes across floodplain organic matter hotspots. Simulations and metagenomic/metatranscriptomic observations highlighted the many dependencies connecting the relative fitness of functional guilds and the importance of chemolithoautotrophic lifestyles. Using an X-Ray microCT-derived soil microaggregate physical model combined

  17. Systematic analysis of the regulatory functions of microRNAs in chicken hepatic lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Ma, Zheng; Jia, Lijuan; Li, Yanmin; Xu, Chunlin; Wang, Taian; Han, Ruili; Jiang, Ruirui; Li, Zhuanjian; Sun, Guirong; Kang, Xiangtao; Liu, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Laying performance is an important economic trait in hens, and this physiological process is largely influenced by the liver function. The livers of hens at 20- and 30-week-old stages were investigated using the next generation sequencing to identify the differences of microRNA expression profiles. Compared with the 20-week-old hens, 67 down- and 13 up-regulated microRNAs were verified to be significant differentially expressed (false discovery rate, FDR ≤ 0.05) (SDE) in the 30-week-old. We also identified 13 down- and 6 up-regulated novel differentially expressed (DE) microRNAs. miR-22-3p and miR-146b-5p, which exhibit critical roles in mammalian lipid metabolism, showed the most abundant expression and the highest fold-change, respectively. A total of 648 potential target genes of the SDE microRNAs were identified through an integrated analysis of microRNAs and the DE genes obtained in previous RNA-sequencing, including FADS1, FADS2, ELOVL6 and ACSL5, which are critical lipid metabolism-related regulators. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that target genes were mainly enriched in lipid-related metabolism processes. This work provides the first study of the expression patterns of hepatic microRNAs between 20- and 30-week old hens. The findings may serve as a fundamental resource for understanding the detailed functions of microRNAs in the molecular regulatory systems of lipid metabolism. PMID:27535581

  18. Circadian clock control of hepatic lipid metabolism: role of small heterodimer partner (Shp).

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Liangpunsakul, Suthat

    2016-10-01

    Hepatic steatosis, the accumulation of triglyceride droplets in the hepatocytes, is a common hepatic pathology seen in subjects with obesity/metabolic syndrome and those with excessive alcohol use. The pathogenesis underlying hepatic steatosis is complex. Recent studies have shown the specific role played by the molecular clock mechanism in the control of lipid metabolism and that the disruption of these tissue clocks may lead to the disturbances in lipid homeostasis. This review reports a novel role of small heterodimer partner in maintaining triglyceride and lipoprotein homeostasis through neuronal PAS domain protein 2. PMID:27473715

  19. Metabolic control of cell division in α-proteobacteria by a NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Beaufay, François; De Bolle, Xavier; Hallez, Régis

    2016-01-01

    Prior to initiate energy-consuming processes, such as DNA replication or cell division, cells need to evaluate their metabolic status. We have recently identified and characterized a new connection between metabolism and cell division in the α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus. We showed that an NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GdhZ) coordinates growth with cell division according to its enzymatic activity. Here we report the conserved role of GdhZ in controlling cell division in another α-proteobacterium, the facultative intracellular pathogen Brucella abortus. We also discuss the importance of amino acids as a main carbon source for α-proteobacteria.

  20. [Bone metabolism and cardiovascular function update. Nerve system and mutual interaction between bone and blood vessel].

    PubMed

    Ochi, Hiroki; Takeda, Shu

    2014-07-01

    The identification that nervous system controls bone metabolism through leptin deficient mice studies opened a new field in bone biology. Notably, sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve system regulate bone metabolism. In addition, sensory nerve system also has been shown to be involved in the regulation of bone homeostasis. On the other hand, traditionally, it is well known that invasion of vessels into cartilage during the skeletal development is important for normal bone formation. And, the decrease of angiogenesis with aging leads to low bone mass and delaying of fracture healing. Although these indicate that blood vessel activity is closely related to bone remodeling, its molecular mechanism is still unknown. Most recently, the mechanism of coupling of angiogenesis and osteogenesis by a specific vessel subtype in bone was reported.

  1. The lysosome as a command-and-control center for cellular metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chun-Yan; Zoncu, Roberto

    2016-09-12

    Lysosomes are membrane-bound organelles found in every eukaryotic cell. They are widely known as terminal catabolic stations that rid cells of waste products and scavenge metabolic building blocks that sustain essential biosynthetic reactions during starvation. In recent years, this classical view has been dramatically expanded by the discovery of new roles of the lysosome in nutrient sensing, transcriptional regulation, and metabolic homeostasis. These discoveries have elevated the lysosome to a decision-making center involved in the control of cellular growth and survival. Here we review these recently discovered properties of the lysosome, with a focus on how lysosomal signaling pathways respond to external and internal cues and how they ultimately enable metabolic homeostasis and cellular adaptation. PMID:27621362

  2. Autonomic control of neuronal-astrocytic interactions, regulating metabolic activities, and ion fluxes in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Hertz, L

    1992-01-01

    It is generally assumed that the brain, in contrast to all other organs, is not equipped with an autonomic nervous system, regulating blood supply, and cellular activities. This may be because systemic administration of most drugs acting on monoaminergic or cholinergic receptors have little or no effect on cerebral blood flow and metabolism. However, intrathecal administration of noradrenaline does, indeed, influence both blood flow and energy metabolism in the brain. The present review focuses on effects of noradrenaline or serotonin on energy metabolism, turnover of amino acid transmitters and ion homeostasis, with special emphasis on the cellular localization. Noradrenergic agonists stimulate brain metabolism in vivo as well as many aspects of energy metabolism, Na+,K(+)-ATPase activity and uptake of transmitter amino acids in astrocytes in primary cultures, with little or no effect on corresponding preparations of neurons. Serotonin acts differently, decreasing potassium-induced release of glutamate from both neurons and astrocytes. Little is known about the effects of acetylcholine. The functional significance of these effects is discussed. PMID:1393603

  3. Alcohol decreases baseline brain glucose metabolism more in heavy drinkers than controls but has no effect on stimulation-induced metabolic increases

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Volkow, Nora D.; Fowler, Joanna S.; Wang, Gene-Jack; Kojori, Eshan Shokri; Benveniste, Helene; Tomasi, Dardo

    2015-02-18

    During alcohol intoxication the human brain increases metabolism of acetate and decreases metabolism of glucose as energy substrate. Here we hypothesized that chronic heavy drinking facilitates this energy substrate shift both for baseline and stimulation conditions. To test this hypothesis we compared the effects of alcohol intoxication (0.75g/kg alcohol versus placebo) on brain glucose metabolism during video-stimulation (VS) versus when given with no-stimulation (NS), in 25 heavy drinkers (HD) and 23 healthy controls each of whom underwent four PET-¹⁸FDG scans. We showed that resting whole-brain glucose metabolism (placebo-NS) was lower in HD than controls (13%, p=0.04); that alcohol (compared tomore » placebo) decreased metabolism more in HD (20±13%) than controls (9±11%, p=0.005) and in proportion to daily alcohol consumption (r=0.36, p=0.01) but found that alcohol did not reduce the metabolic increases in visual cortex from VS in either group. Instead, VS reduced alcohol-induced decreases in whole-brain glucose metabolism (10±12%) compared to NS in both groups (15±13%, p=0.04), consistent with stimulation-related glucose metabolism enhancement. These findings corroborate our hypothesis that heavy alcohol consumption facilitates use of alternative energy substrates (i.e. acetate) for resting activity during intoxication, which might persist through early sobriety, but indicate that glucose is still favored as energy substrate during brain stimulation. Our findings are consistent with reduced reliance on glucose as the main energy substrate for resting brain metabolism during intoxication (presumably shifting to acetate or other ketones) and a priming of this shift in heavy drinkers, which might make them vulnerable to energy deficits during withdrawal.« less

  4. Alcohol decreases baseline brain glucose metabolism more in heavy drinkers than controls but has no effect on stimulation-induced metabolic increases.

    PubMed

    Volkow, Nora D; Wang, Gene-Jack; Shokri Kojori, Ehsan; Fowler, Joanna S; Benveniste, Helene; Tomasi, Dardo

    2015-02-18

    During alcohol intoxication, the human brain increases metabolism of acetate and decreases metabolism of glucose as energy substrate. Here we hypothesized that chronic heavy drinking facilitates this energy substrate shift both for baseline and stimulation conditions. To test this hypothesis, we compared the effects of alcohol intoxication (0.75 g/kg alcohol vs placebo) on brain glucose metabolism during video stimulation (VS) versus when given with no stimulation (NS), in 25 heavy drinkers (HDs) and 23 healthy controls, each of whom underwent four PET-(18)FDG scans. We showed that resting whole-brain glucose metabolism (placebo-NS) was lower in HD than controls (13%, p = 0.04); that alcohol (compared with placebo) decreased metabolism more in HD (20 ± 13%) than controls (9 ± 11%, p = 0.005) and in proportion to daily alcohol consumption (r = 0.36, p = 0.01) but found that alcohol did not reduce the metabolic increases in visual cortex from VS in either group. Instead, VS reduced alcohol-induced decreases in whole-brain glucose metabolism (10 ± 12%) compared with NS in both groups (15 ± 13%, p = 0.04), consistent with stimulation-related glucose metabolism enhancement. These findings corroborate our hypothesis that heavy alcohol consumption facilitates use of alternative energy substrates (i.e., acetate) for resting activity during intoxication, which might persist through early sobriety, but indicate that glucose is still favored as energy substrate during brain stimulation. Our findings are consistent with reduced reliance on glucose as the main energy substrate for resting brain metabolism during intoxication (presumably shifting to acetate or other ketones) and a priming of this shift in HDs, which might make them vulnerable to energy deficits during withdrawal.

  5. Alcohol decreases baseline brain glucose metabolism more in heavy drinkers than controls but has no effect on stimulation-induced metabolic increases

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, Nora D.; Fowler, Joanna S.; Wang, Gene-Jack; Kojori, Eshan Shokri; Benveniste, Helene; Tomasi, Dardo

    2015-02-18

    During alcohol intoxication the human brain increases metabolism of acetate and decreases metabolism of glucose as energy substrate. Here we hypothesized that chronic heavy drinking facilitates this energy substrate shift both for baseline and stimulation conditions. To test this hypothesis we compared the effects of alcohol intoxication (0.75g/kg alcohol versus placebo) on brain glucose metabolism during video-stimulation (VS) versus when given with no-stimulation (NS), in 25 heavy drinkers (HD) and 23 healthy controls each of whom underwent four PET-¹⁸FDG scans. We showed that resting whole-brain glucose metabolism (placebo-NS) was lower in HD than controls (13%, p=0.04); that alcohol (compared to placebo) decreased metabolism more in HD (20±13%) than controls (9±11%, p=0.005) and in proportion to daily alcohol consumption (r=0.36, p=0.01) but found that alcohol did not reduce the metabolic increases in visual cortex from VS in either group. Instead, VS reduced alcohol-induced decreases in whole-brain glucose metabolism (10±12%) compared to NS in both groups (15±13%, p=0.04), consistent with stimulation-related glucose metabolism enhancement. These findings corroborate our hypothesis that heavy alcohol consumption facilitates use of alternative energy substrates (i.e. acetate) for resting activity during intoxication, which might persist through early sobriety, but indicate that glucose is still favored as energy substrate during brain stimulation. Our findings are consistent with reduced reliance on glucose as the main energy substrate for resting brain metabolism during intoxication (presumably shifting to acetate or other ketones) and a priming of this shift in heavy drinkers, which might make them vulnerable to energy deficits during withdrawal.

  6. Alcohol Decreases Baseline Brain Glucose Metabolism More in Heavy Drinkers Than Controls But Has No Effect on Stimulation-Induced Metabolic Increases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gene-Jack; Shokri Kojori, Ehsan; Fowler, Joanna S.; Benveniste, Helene; Tomasi, Dardo

    2015-01-01

    During alcohol intoxication, the human brain increases metabolism of acetate and decreases metabolism of glucose as energy substrate. Here we hypothesized that chronic heavy drinking facilitates this energy substrate shift both for baseline and stimulation conditions. To test this hypothesis, we compared the effects of alcohol intoxication (0.75 g/kg alcohol vs placebo) on brain glucose metabolism during video stimulation (VS) versus when given with no stimulation (NS), in 25 heavy drinkers (HDs) and 23 healthy controls, each of whom underwent four PET-18FDG scans. We showed that resting whole-brain glucose metabolism (placebo-NS) was lower in HD than controls (13%, p = 0.04); that alcohol (compared with placebo) decreased metabolism more in HD (20 ± 13%) than controls (9 ± 11%, p = 0.005) and in proportion to daily alcohol consumption (r = 0.36, p = 0.01) but found that alcohol did not reduce the metabolic increases in visual cortex from VS in either group. Instead, VS reduced alcohol-induced decreases in whole-brain glucose metabolism (10 ± 12%) compared with NS in both groups (15 ± 13%, p = 0.04), consistent with stimulation-related glucose metabolism enhancement. These findings corroborate our hypothesis that heavy alcohol consumption facilitates use of alternative energy substrates (i.e., acetate) for resting activity during intoxication, which might persist through early sobriety, but indicate that glucose is still favored as energy substrate during brain stimulation. Our findings are consistent with reduced reliance on glucose as the main energy substrate for resting brain metabolism during intoxication (presumably shifting to acetate or other ketones) and a priming of this shift in HDs, which might make them vulnerable to energy deficits during withdrawal. PMID:25698759

  7. Estrogen receptor alpha activation enhances mitochondrial function and systemic metabolism in high-fat-fed ovariectomized mice.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Dale J; Minze, Laurie J; Kumar, Tanvi; Cao, Tram N; Lyon, Christopher J; Geiger, Paige C; Hsueh, Willa A; Gupte, Anisha A

    2016-09-01

    Estrogen impacts insulin action and cardiac metabolism, and menopause dramatically increases cardiometabolic risk in women. However, the mechanism(s) of cardiometabolic protection by estrogen remain incompletely understood. Here, we tested the effects of selective activation of E2 receptor alpha (ERα) on systemic metabolism, insulin action, and cardiac mitochondrial function in a mouse model of metabolic dysfunction (ovariectomy [OVX], insulin resistance, hyperlipidemia, and advanced age). Middle-aged (12-month-old) female low-density lipoprotein receptor (Ldlr)(-/-) mice were subjected to OVX or sham surgery and fed "western" high-fat diet (WHFD) for 3 months. Selective ERα activation with 4,4',4″-(4-Propyl-[1H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl) (PPT), prevented weight gain, improved insulin action, and reduced visceral fat accumulation in WHFD-fed OVX mice. PPT treatment also elevated systemic metabolism, increasing oxygen consumption and core body temperature, induced expression of several metabolic genes such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, coactivator 1 alpha, and nuclear respiratory factor 1 in heart, liver, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue, and increased cardiac mitochondrial function. Taken together, selective activation of ERα with PPT enhances metabolic effects including insulin resistance, whole body energy metabolism,