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Sample records for functional il-2 receptor

  1. The expression of functional IL-2 receptor on activated macrophages depends on the stimulus applied.

    PubMed Central

    Valitutti, S; Carbone, A; Castellino, F; Maggiano, N; Ricci, R; Larocca, L M; Musiani, P

    1989-01-01

    Human peripheral blood monocytes (Mo) synthesize prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) when activated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). This production is strongly enhanced by the addition of supernatant from phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-activated T cells. To evaluate the factor(s) responsible for this enhancement we studied the effect of several cytokines on the PGE2 metabolism. Recombinant interleukin-1 (IL-1) or recombinant IL-2 strongly enhanced PGE2 synthesis in LPS-stimulated Mo cultures, whereas recombinant interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) partially inhibited its production. To see whether the effect of IL-2 on Mo was due to the presence of IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) on the cell surface, flow cytometric analysis and electron microscopy were used to investigate IL-2R expression in unstimulated and stimulated Mo. Stimulated, but not resting, Mo displayed the p55 IL-2R chain on their cellular surface and associated with the polyribosomes of the rough endoplasmic reticulum in the cytoplasm. This finding strongly suggested that the p55 chain of the IL-2R was synthesized by activated Mo. To confirm this result, 125I-labelled IL-2 was bound under high- and low-affinity conditions and cross-linked to Mo cultured in the presence of LPS, IFN-gamma or IL-1. The cross-linked 125I-IL-2/IL-2R complexes were analysed by SDS-PAGE. Mo cultured with LPS, IFN-gamma and IL-1 expressed the p55 protein detected by low-affinity cross-linking, whereas only LPS-stimulated Mo displayed a barely detectable band with an apparent MW of 70,000 under high-affinity binding conditions. In addition, stimulated Mo were found capable of producing the soluble form of IL-2R. Finally, LPS-activated Mo only responded to the addition of IL-2 by an increase in PGE2 production, suggesting that the function of IL-2R on activated Mo is linked to the stimulus applied. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2661416

  2. Biological significance of soluble IL-2 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Candore, Giuseppina; Cigna, Diego; Colucci, Antonio Tobia; Modica, Maria Assunta

    1993-01-01

    A NUMBER of receptors for growth factors and differentiation antigens have been found to be secreted or released by cells. Following mononuclear cell (MNC) activation and interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) expression, a soluble form of the Alpha;-chain of IL-2R (sIL-2R) is released. The sIL-2R has been shown to be present in the culture supernatants of activated MNCs as well as in normal sera and, in higher amounts, in sera from subjects affected by several diseases including neoplastic, infectious and autoimmune ones, and in sera from transplanted patients suffering allograft rejection. The blood sIL-2R levels depend on the number of producing cells and the number of molecules per cell, so that sIL-2R blood values may represent an index of the number and the functional state of producing cells, both normal and neoplastic. Thus, monitoring of the immune system, mostly T-cells and haematological malignancies might be targets for the measurement of sIL-2R. Since many conditions may influence sIL-2R production, little diagnostic use may result from these measurements. However, since blood sIL-2R levels may correlate with disease progression and/or response to therapy, their measurement may be a useful index of activity and extent of disease. The precise biological role of the soluble form of the IL-2R is still a matter of debate. However, we know that increased sIL-2R levels may be observed in association with several immunological abnormalities and that sIL-2R is able to bind IL-2. It is conceivable then that in these conditions the excess sIL-2R released in vivo by activated lymphoid cells or by neoplastic cells may somehow regulate IL-2-dependent processes. On the other hand, it cannot exclude that sIL-2R is a by-product without biological significance. Finally, it is puzzling that in many conditions in which an increase of blood sIL-2R values has been observed, MNCs display a decreased in vitro capacity to produce sIL-2R. These seemingly contrasting findings are

  3. IL-4 function can be transferred to the IL-2 receptor by tyrosine containing sequences found in the IL-4 receptor alpha chain.

    PubMed

    Wang, H Y; Paul, W E; Keegan, A D

    1996-02-01

    IL-4 binds to a cell surface receptor complex that consists of the IL-4 binding protein (IL-4R alpha) and the gamma chain of the IL-2 receptor complex (gamma c). The receptors for IL-4 and IL-2 have several features in common; both use the gamma c as a receptor component, and both activate the Janus kinases JAK-1 and JAK-3. In spite of these similarities, IL-4 evokes specific responses, including the tyrosine phosphorylation of 4PS/IRS-2 and the induction of CD23. To determine whether sequences within the cytoplasmic domain of the IL-4R alpha specify these IL-4-specific responses, we transplanted the insulin IL-4 receptor motif (I4R motif) of the huIL-4R alpha to the cytoplasmic domain of a truncated IL-2R beta. In addition, we transplanted a region that contains peptide sequences shown to block Stat6 binding to DNA. We analyzed the ability of cells expressing these IL-2R-IL-4R chimeric constructs to respond to IL-2. We found that IL-4 function could be transplanted to the IL-2 receptor by these regions and that proliferative and differentiative functions can be induced by different receptor sequences.

  4. Cleavage of functional IL-2 receptor alpha chain (CD25) from murine corneal and conjunctival epithelia by MMP-9

    PubMed Central

    De Paiva, Cintia S; Yoon, Kyung-Chul; Pangelinan, Solherny B; Pham, Sapa; Puthenparambil, Larry M; Chuang, Eliseu Y; Farley, William J; Stern, Michael E; Li, De-Quan; Pflugfelder, Stephen C

    2009-01-01

    Background IL-2 has classically been considered a cytokine that regulates T cell proliferation and differentiation, signaling through its heterotrimeric receptor (IL-2R) consisting of α (CD25), β (CD122), γ chains (CD132). Expression of IL-2R has also been detected in mucosal epithelial cells. Soluble IL-2Rα (CD25) has been reported as an inflammatory marker. We evaluated the expression of CD25 and CD122 in the ocular surface epithelium and investigated the mechanism of proteolytic cleavage of CD25 from these cells. Methods Desiccating stress (DS) was used as an inducer of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). DS was created by subjecting C57BL/6 and MMP-9 knockout (BKO) mice and their wild-type littermates (WT) mice to a low humidity and drafty environment for 5 days (DS5). A separate group of C57BL/6 mice was subjected to DS5 and treatment with topical 0.025% doxycycline, a MMP inhibitor, administered QID. The expression of CD25 and CD122 was evaluated in cryosections by dual-label laser scanning confocal microscopy. Western blot was used to measure relative levels of CD25 in epithelial lysates. Gelatinase activity was evaluated by in situ zymography. Soluble CD25 in tear fluid was measured by an immunobead assay. Results CD25 and CD122 were abundantly expressed in cornea (all layers) and conjunctiva epithelia (apical and subapical layers) in nonstressed control mice. After desiccating stress, we found that immunoreactivity to CD25, but not CD122, decreased by the ocular surface epithelia and concentration of soluble CD25 in tears increased as MMP-9 staining increased. CD25 was preserved in C57BL/6 mice topically treated with an MMP-9 inhibitor and in MMP-9 knock-out mice. MMP-9 treatment of human cultured corneal epithelial cells decreased levels of CD25 protein in a concentration dependent fashion. Conclusion Our results indicate that functional IL-2R is produced by the ocular surface epithelia and that CD25 is proteolytic cleaved to its soluble form by MMP-9

  5. Dissection of signals controlling T cell function and activation: H7, an inhibitor of protein kinase C, blocks induction of primary T cell proliferation by suppressing interleukin (IL)2 receptor expression without affecting IL2 production.

    PubMed

    Hengel, H; Allig, B; Wagner, H; Heeg, K

    1991-07-01

    T cell activation induced via cross-linking of the T cell receptor (TcR) stimulates hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol to the second messengers diacylglycerol (DAG) and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3). DAG is necessary for the activation and function of protein kinase C (PKC) which is suggested to play a key role in the cascade of signal transduction when translocated from the cytosol to the cell membrane. In this report, we investigated responses of resting vs. activated Ly-2+ and L3T4+ T lymphocytes in the presence of the PKC inhibitor H7 [1-(5-isoquinolinylsulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine]. H7 inhibited the induction of primary T cell proliferation, while interleukin 2 (IL 2) production was fully retained. The effect of the PKC inhibitor on primary T cells depended on the type of ligand interacting with the TcR: increasing doses of concanavalin A or of immobilized anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (mAb), but not of anti-V beta 8 or of anti-TcR alpha/beta mAb, partly overcame the blockade, indicating a differential signaling compared to the former stimuli. The blockade of T cell proliferation by H7 was not due to an inhibition of PKC translocation, but occurred even 4-8 h after T cell induction and correlated with a significant reduction of IL 2 receptor (IL 2R) expression. In contrast, the mRNA levels of IL 2R and the cellular proto-oncogenes c-fos and c-myc were not affected. On activated T cells, H7 neither blocked proliferation nor IL2R expression. Consequently, H7 dissects the signal resulting in T cell proliferation from those governing the triggering of other T cell functions, i.e. IL 2 production, during primary responses of Ly-2+ or L3T4+ murine T lymphocytes.

  6. Curcumin blocks interleukin (IL)-2 signaling in T-lymphocytes by inhibiting IL-2 synthesis, CD25 expression, and IL-2 receptor signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Forward, Nicholas A.; Conrad, David M.; Power Coombs, Melanie R.; Doucette, Carolyn D.; Furlong, Suzanne J.; Lin, Tong-Jun; Hoskin, David W.

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} Curcumin inhibits CD4{sup +} T-lymphocyte proliferation. {yields} Curcumin inhibits interleukin-2 (IL-2) synthesis and CD25 expression by CD4{sup +} T-lymphocytes. {yields} Curcumin interferes with IL-2 receptor signaling by inhibiting JAK3 and STAT5 phosphorylation. {yields} IL-2-dependent regulatory T-lymphocyte function and Foxp3 expression is downregulated by curcumin. -- Abstract: Curcumin (diferulomethane) is the principal curcuminoid in the spice tumeric and a potent inhibitor of activation-induced T-lymphocyte proliferation; however, the molecular basis of this immunosuppressive effect has not been well studied. Here we show that micromolar concentrations of curcumin inhibited DNA synthesis by mouse CD4{sup +} T-lymphocytes, as well as interleukin-2 (IL-2) and CD25 ({alpha} chain of the high affinity IL-2 receptor) expression in response to antibody-mediated cross-linking of CD3 and CD28. Curcumin acted downstream of protein kinase C activation and intracellular Ca{sup 2+} release to inhibit I{kappa}B phosphorylation, which is required for nuclear translocation of the transcription factor NF{kappa}B. In addition, IL-2-dependent DNA synthesis by mouse CTLL-2 cells, but not constitutive CD25 expression, was impaired in the presence of curcumin, which demonstrated an inhibitory effect on IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) signaling. IL-2-induced phosphorylation of STAT5A and JAK3, but not JAK1, was diminished in the presence of curcumin, indicating inhibition of critical proximal events in IL-2R signaling. In line with the inhibitory action of curcumin on IL-2R signaling, pretreatment of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +} regulatory T-cells with curcumin downregulated suppressor function, as well as forkhead box p3 (Foxp3) expression. We conclude that curcumin inhibits IL-2 signaling by reducing available IL-2 and high affinity IL-2R, as well as interfering with IL-2R signaling.

  7. Early immune response and regulation of IL-2 receptor subunits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, Millie; Sugano, Eiko; Schopper, Thomas; Li, Chai-Fei; Boonyaratanakornkit, J. B.; Cogoli, Augusto

    2005-01-01

    Affymetrix oligonucleotide arrays were used to monitor expression of 8796 genes and probe sets in activated T-cells; analysis revealed that 217 genes were significantly upregulated within 4 h. Induced genes included transcription factors, cytokines and their receptor genes. Analysis by semi-quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the significant induction of IL-2, IL-2R(gamma) and IL-2R(alpha). Forty-eight of the 217 induced genes are known to or predicted to be regulated by a CRE promoter/enhancer. We found that T-cell activation caused a significant increase in CREB phosphorylation furthermore, inhibition of the PKC pathway by GF109203 reduced CREB activation by 50% and inhibition of the PKA pathway caused a total block of CREB phosphorylation and significantly reduced IFN(gamma), IL-2 and IL-2R(alpha) gene expression by approximately 40% (p<0.001). PKC(theta) plays a major role in T-cell activation: inhibition of PKC significantly reduced the expression of IFN(gamma), IL-2 and IL-2R(alpha). Since PKC blocked activation of CREB, we studied potential cross-talk between the PKC and the PKA/MAPK pathways, PMA-stimulated Jurkat cells were studied with specific signal pathway inhibitors. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase-2 (ERK2) pathway was found to be significantly activated greater than seven-fold within 30 min; however, there was little activation of ERK-1 and no activation of JNK or p38 MAPK. Inhibition of the PKA pathway, but not the PKC pathway, resulted in inhibition of ERK1/2 activation at all time points, inhibition of MEK1 and 2 significantly blocked expression of IL-2 and IL-2R(alpha). Gene expression of IL-2R(alpha) and IFN(gamma) was dependent on PKA in S49 wt cells but not in kin- mutants. Using gel shift analysis, we found that forskolin activation of T-cells resulted in activation of AP1 sites; this increase in nuclear extract AP1 was significantly blocked by MEK1 inhibitor U0126. Taken together, these results suggest that the PKA in addition to PKC and

  8. Interleukin 2 (IL 2) inhibitor in rheumatoid synovial fluid: Correlation with prognosis and soluble IL 2 receptor levels

    SciTech Connect

    Miossec, P.; Elhamiani, M.; Chichehian, B.; D'Angeac, A.D.; Sany, J.; Hirn, M. )

    1990-03-01

    A soluble activity inhibiting over 50% of the CTLL-2 cell line response to recombinant human interleukin 2 (IL 2) was found in 17 of 29 (59%) rheumatoid synovial fluids. To study the prognosis value of this activity, 16 rheumatoid synovial fluids were collected before a radiation synovectomy of the knee with 7 mCi of 90Y. Patients with a good clinical result after the synovectomy had a lower IL 2 inhibitory activity than those with a bad or incomplete result (P less than 0.01). Levels of inhibitory activity and of soluble IL 2 receptors were correlated with each other and with the response of the synovitis to the radiation synovectomy. These results extend the clinical usefulness of soluble IL 2 receptor measurements and indicate a correlation between the immune activation of the rheumatoid synovitis and its clinical activity.

  9. Differential regulation of human T lymphoblast functions by IL-2 and IL-15.

    PubMed

    Bulfone-Paus, S; Dürkop, H; Paus, R; Krause, H; Pohl, T; Onu, A

    1997-07-01

    Interleukin 15 (IL-15) shares many functional properties with interleukin 2 (IL-2), although both cytokines probably also exert distinct functions. In order to screen for functional differences between IL-2 and IL-15 with respect to the control of T cell functions, we have stimulated human T lymphoblasts (hTBl) with IL-2 and/or IL-15 and have assessed the resulting changes in the following parameters: T cell proliferation; expression of various relevant surface markers; cytokine and receptor (alpha-chain) transcription; and IL-2 and IL-15 activity. Both cytokines equally upregulate standard activation markers such as CD25 and CD95 and downregulate CD27. However, IL-2 upregulates CD30, TNF receptor type II and CD40L expression significantly stronger than IL-15. IL-15 potentiates Con A-induced IL-2 secretion. Even though hTBl transcribe the IL-15 gene, they do not secrete IL-15 activity. These observations suggest that both cytokines can differentially regulate T cells, e.g. T cell functions relevant to the control of cell cycle progression and apoptosis, and/or that they can stimulate different T cell subsets. Moreover, IL-15 may potentiate IL-2-driven T cell responses.

  10. In-vitro characterization of novel and functional regulatory SNPs in the promoter region of IL2 and IL2R alpha in a Gabonese population

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The selection pressure imposed by the parasite has a functional consequence on the immune genes, leading to altered immune function in which regulatory T cells (Tregs) induced by parasites during infectious challenges modulate or thwart T effector cell mechanism. Methods We identified and investigated regulatory polymorphisms in the immune gene IL2 and its receptor IL2R alpha (also known as CD25) in Gabonese individuals exposed to plentiful parasitic infections. Results We identified two reported variants each for IL2 and its receptor IL2R alpha gene loci. Also identified were two novel variants, -83 /-84 CT deletions (ss410961576) for IL2 and -409C/T (ss410961577) for IL2R alpha. We further validated all identified promoter variants for their allelic gene expression using transient transfection assays. Three promoter variants of the IL2 locus revealed no significant expression of the reporter gene. The identified novel variant (ss410961577C/T) of the IL2R alpha revealed a significant higher expression of the reporter gene in comparison to the major allele (P<0.05). In addition, the rs12722616C/T variant of the IL2R alpha locus altered the transcription factor binding site TBP (TATA box binding protein) and C/EBP beta (CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta) that are believed to regulate the Treg function. Conclusions The identification and validation of such regulatory polymorphisms in the immune genes may provide a basis for future studies on parasite susceptibility in a population where T cell functions are compromised. PMID:23217119

  11. NMR characterization of interleukin-2 in complexes with the IL-2receptor component, and with low molecular weight compounds that inhibit the IL-2/IL-Rα interaction

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, S. Donald; Palermo, Robert; Liu, Chao-Min; Tilley, Jefferson W.; Chen, Li; Danho, Waleed; Madison, Vincent S.; Greeley, David N.; Ju, Grace; Fry, David C.

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods were employed to study the interaction of the cytokine Interleukin-2 (IL-2) with the α-subunit of its receptor (IL-2Rα), and to help understand the behavior of small molecule inhibitors of this interaction. Heteronuclear 1H-15N HSQC experiments were used to identify the interaction surface of 15N-enriched Interleukin-2 (15N-IL-2) in complex with human IL-2Rα. In these experiments, chemical shift and line width changes in the heteronuclear single-quantum coherence (HSQC) spectra upon binding of 15N-IL-2 enabled classification of NH atoms as either near to, or far from, the IL-2Rα interaction surface. These data were complemented by hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange measurements, which illustrated enhanced protection of slowly-exchanging IL-2 NH protons near the site of interaction with IL-2Rα. The interaction surface defined by NMR compared well with the IL-2Rα binding site identified previously using mutagenesis of human and murine IL-2. Two low molecular weight inhibitors of the IL-2/IL-2Rα interaction were studied: one (a cyclic peptide derivative) was found to mimic a part of the cytokine and bind to IL-2Rα; the other (an acylphenylalanine derivative) was found to bind to IL-2. For the interaction between IL-2 and the acylphenylalanine, chemical shift perturbations of 15N and 15NH backbone resonances were tracked as a function of ligand concentration. The perturbation pattern observed for this complex revealed that the acylphenylalanine is a competitive inhibitor—it binds to the same site on IL-2 that interacts with IL-2Rα. PMID:12649439

  12. Green tea EGCG suppresses T cell proliferation through impairment of IL-2/IL-2 receptor signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies have suggested a benefit of consuming green tea in promoting general health and reducing the risk of certain diseases. However, little is known about the effect of green tea on immune function. In this study we determined the effect of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the major active comp...

  13. Association study of schizophrenia and IL-2 receptor {beta} chain gene

    SciTech Connect

    Nimgaonkar, V.L.; Yang, Z.W.; Zhang, X.R.; Brar, J.S.

    1995-10-09

    A case-control association study was conducted in Caucasian patients with schizophrenia (DSM-III-R, n = 42) and unaffected controls (n = 47) matched for ethnicity and area of residence. Serum interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) concentrations, as well as a dinucleotide repeat polymorphism in the IL-2RP chain gene, were examined in both groups. No significant differences in IL-2R concentrations or in the distribution of the polymorphism were noted. This study does not support an association between schizophrenia and the IL-2RP gene locus, contrary to the suggestive evidence from linkage analysis in multicase families. 17 refs., 2 tabs.

  14. Interaction of interleukin-2 (IL-2) mutant proteins with interleukin-2 receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, S.M.; Lee, N.; Chollet, A.

    1987-05-01

    The authors have previously produced several human IL-2 mutant proteins by site specific mutagenesis. Deletion or substitution of alanine for cysteine at positions 58 and 105 results in the decrease of biological activities. Substitution of serine for cysteine at position 125 does not affect the activity, however, deletion of this cysteine or amino acids in its vicinity causes a dramatic loss of activity. In this study, the interaction of these mutant proteins with IL-2 receptors has been analyzed by evaluating the competition between these mutant proteins and recombinant DNA derived IL-2 (rIL-2) for the binding to murine CTLL-2, an IL-2 dependent cell line. Addition of unlabeled rIL-2 (1 x 10/sup -11/ to 10/sup -7/M) inhibited the binding of I/sup 125/-labeled rIL-2 (1 x 10/sup -10/M, specific activity 39.6 uCi/mg) to CTLL-2 cells in a concentration dependent manner. Mutant proteins with substitution of alanine for cysteine at position 58 (Ala 58) or deletion of cysteine at position 125 (Des-Cys 125) required a 100-fold higher concentration than rIL-2 to reach 50% inhibition. These results indicate that the decrease of biological activity in mutant proteins is partly, if not primarily, due to the attenuation in their abilities to bind IL-2 receptors.

  15. Developmental Expression of IL-2-Receptor Light Chain (CD25) in the Chicken Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Fedecka-Bruner, Barbara; Penninger, Josef; Vaigot, Pierre; Lehmann, Anne; Martínez-A., Carlos

    1991-01-01

    Thymocyte differentiation obeys the same fundamental principles in mammals as in avian species. This parallelism does not only affect the developmentally controlled acquisition of CD3, 4, 8, and TcR isotype expression, but also concerns CD25, the light chain of the interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R). On chicken thymocytes, surface CD25, which is recognized by the monoclonal antibody INN Ch16, is first observed during day 11 of embryonic life, and peaks at day 14, when it is expressed by about one-third of all lymphoid cells. CD25 is found on subsets of all ,thymocyte populations as defined by TcRαβ, TcRγδ, 2, CD4, and CD8 expression, cortical or medullary localization, and is also present on a subset of intrathymic nurse-cell lymphocytes. These findings suggest phylogenetic conservation of the IL-2/IL-2R-triggered differentiation pathway previously described for mammalian species, thus under-lining its probable functional importance. PMID:1840381

  16. Qualitatively Different T Cell Phenotypic Responses to IL-2 versus IL-15 are Unified by Identical Dependences on Receptor Signal Strength and Duration

    PubMed Central

    Arneja, Abhinav; Johnson, Hannah; Gabrovsek, Laura; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; White, Forest M.

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin 2 (IL-2) and Interleukin 15 (IL-15) are common γ-chain family cytokines involved in regulation of T cell differentiation and homeostasis. Despite signaling through the same receptors, IL-2 and IL-15 have non-redundant roles in T cell biology, both physiologically and at the cellular level. The mechanisms by which IL-2 and IL-15 trigger distinct phenotypes in T cells remain elusive. To elucidate these mechanisms, we performed a quantitative comparison of the phosphotyrosine signaling network and resulting phenotypes triggered by IL-2 and IL-15. This study revealed that the signaling networks activated by IL-2 or IL-15 are highly similar and that T cell proliferation and metabolism are controlled in a quantitatively distinct manner through IL-2/15 receptor signal strength independent of the cytokine identity. Distinct phenotypes associated with IL-2 or IL-15 stimulation therefore arise through differential regulation of IL-2/15R signal strength and duration due to differences in cytokine-receptor binding affinity, receptor expression levels, physiological cytokine levels, and cytokine-receptor intracellular trafficking kinetics. These results provide important insights into the function of other shared cytokine and growth factor receptors, quantitative regulation of cell proliferation and metabolism through signal transduction, and improved design of cytokine based clinical immunomodulatory therapies for cancer and infectious diseases. PMID:24298013

  17. Mechanism of action of interleukin-2 (IL-2)-Bax, an apoptosis-inducing chimaeric protein targeted against cells expressing the IL-2 receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Aqeilan, Rami; Kedar, Rotem; Ben-Yehudah, Ahmi; Lorberboum-Galski, Haya

    2003-01-01

    The chimaeric protein interleukin-2 (IL-2)-Bax was designed to target and kill specific cell populations expressing the IL-2 receptor. However, it is not well understood how IL-2-Bax causes target cells to die. In the present study, we investigated the pathway of apoptosis evoked by IL-2-Bax and the possible involvement of endogenous Bax in this process. We report here that, upon internalization of IL-2-Bax into target cells, it is localized first mainly in the nucleus, and only later is it translocated to the mitochondria. Similarly, endogenous Bax is also partially localized in the nucleus, and accumulates mainly in this compartment soon after physiological triggering of apoptosis. Despite the fact that Bax has no nuclear localization sequence, our data suggest that Bax has one or more physiological roles and/or substrates within the nucleus. Indeed, a dramatic repression of nuclear Tax protein expression was induced following treatment of HUT-102 cells with IL-2-Bax, similar to what occurs following serum deprivation of these cells. Unexpectedly, induction of apoptosis using IL-2-Bax was preceded by enhanced expression of newly synthesized Bax protein and suppression of Bcl-2. This imbalance between the pro- and anti-apoptotic genes was associated with p53 induction, although IL-2-Bax activity was also evident in cells lacking p53 expression. By studying the mechanism of action of IL-2-Bax, we were able to follow the intrinsic events and their cascade that culminates in cell death. We have shown that the ability of IL-2-Bax to affect the intracellular apoptotic machinery within the target cells, and to cause the cells to die, uses a mechanism similar to that induced following a normal apoptotic signal. PMID:12405905

  18. Tumor recognition and lytic competence of IL-2-activated lymphocytes: regulation of both antibody-independent and -dependent cellular cytotoxicity via P75 IL-2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Lagoo-Deenadayalan, S; Lagoo, A S; Hardy, K J; Grimm, E A

    1992-08-01

    Fc receptor-positive lymphocytes (FcR+) contain lymphokine-activated killer cell (LAK) precursors that in response to IL-2 develop potent antitumor cytotoxicity. These FcR+ cells are also capable of antibody-dependent cytotoxicity (ADCC), which can be detected using fresh human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) directed to murine targets, however, PBL-mediated ADCC to human tumors usually is very low, requiring a stimulation of the PBL, which also can be accomplished with IL-2. Using human melanoma tumor target cells, with and without the 14G2a monoclonal antibody, we examined in parallel the role of p75 IL-2 receptor for regulation of the induction of both LAK and ADCC forms of antitumor cytotoxicity. Enrichment of FcR+ cells from fresh peripheral blood by elutriation and flow cytometry, followed by varying periods of IL-2 culture, revealed a differential kinetics of activation. ADCC was detectable after PBL exposure to IL-2 for as short as the 4 h cytotoxicity assay, while LAK activation required more than 24 h of exposure. Elimination of the FcR+ cells by magnetic bead depletion from large granular lymphocyte populations (LGL) resulted in a loss of both LAK and ADCC. Addition of antibody known to block the binding of IL-2 to the p75 molecule of the IL-2 receptor complex (Mik-beta 1) to activation cultures at zero time resulted in abrogation of both cytotoxicities. These results suggest that differentiation and maturation of the ADCC effectors occurs in response to IL-2 via the p75 molecule, as also does LAK activation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1420599

  19. 4-1BB Signaling Enhances Primary and Secondary Population Expansion of CD8+ T Cells by Maximizing Autocrine IL-2/IL-2 Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ho S; Choi, Beom K; Kim, Young H; Lee, Don G; Hwang, Sunhee; Lee, Myoung J; Park, Sang H; Bae, Yong-Soo; Kwon, Byoung S

    2015-01-01

    4-1BB (CD137), a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF), is primarily expressed on activated T cells and is known to enhance proliferation of T cells, prevent activation-induced cell death, and promote memory formation of CD8+ T cells. In particular, it is well acknowledged that 4-1BB triggering preferentially enhances the expansion of CD8+ T cells rather than CD4+ T cells, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we found that 4-1BB triggering markedly increased IL-2Rα (CD25) and IL-2 expressions of CD8+ T cells but minimally for CD4+ T cells. Proliferation of CD8+ T cells was moderately enhanced by direct 4-1BB triggering in the absence of signaling through IL-2Rα/IL-2 interactions, but further promoted in the presence of IL-2Rα/IL-2 interactions. Among the TNFRSF members including OX40, GITR, CD30, and CD27, 4-1BB was superior in the ability to induce IL-2Rα expression on CD8+ T cells. When the primary and secondary expansions of CD8+ T cells in vivo were examined by adoptively transferring OVA-specific CD8+ T cells along with the treatment with agonistic anti-4-1BB and/or antagonistic anti-CD25 F(ab')2 mAb, 4-1BB triggering enhanced both primary and secondary expansion of CD8+ T cells in vivo, and the 4-1BB effects were moderately suppressed in primary expansion while completely abolished in secondary expansion of OVA-specific CD8+ T cells by blocking IL-2Rα. These results suggest that 4-1BB-mediated increases of IL-2Rα and IL-2 prolong the effects of transient TCR- and 4-1BB-mediated signaling in CD8+ T cells, and that 4-1BB triggering preferentially enhances the expansion of CD8+ T cells through the amplification of autocrine IL-2/IL-2R signaling loop. PMID:25962156

  20. 4-1BB Signaling Enhances Primary and Secondary Population Expansion of CD8+ T Cells by Maximizing Autocrine IL-2/IL-2 Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Ho S.; Choi, Beom K.; Kim, Young H.; Lee, Don G.; Hwang, Sunhee; Lee, Myoung J.; Park, Sang H.; Bae, Yong-Soo; Kwon, Byoung S.

    2015-01-01

    4-1BB (CD137), a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF), is primarily expressed on activated T cells and is known to enhance proliferation of T cells, prevent activation-induced cell death, and promote memory formation of CD8+ T cells. In particular, it is well acknowledged that 4-1BB triggering preferentially enhances the expansion of CD8+ T cells rather than CD4+ T cells, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we found that 4-1BB triggering markedly increased IL-2Rα (CD25) and IL-2 expressions of CD8+ T cells but minimally for CD4+ T cells. Proliferation of CD8+ T cells was moderately enhanced by direct 4-1BB triggering in the absence of signaling through IL-2Rα/IL-2 interactions, but further promoted in the presence of IL-2Rα/IL-2 interactions. Among the TNFRSF members including OX40, GITR, CD30, and CD27, 4-1BB was superior in the ability to induce IL-2Rα expression on CD8+ T cells. When the primary and secondary expansions of CD8+ T cells in vivo were examined by adoptively transferring OVA-specific CD8+ T cells along with the treatment with agonistic anti-4-1BB and/or antagonistic anti-CD25 F(ab’)2 mAb, 4-1BB triggering enhanced both primary and secondary expansion of CD8+ T cells in vivo, and the 4-1BB effects were moderately suppressed in primary expansion while completely abolished in secondary expansion of OVA-specific CD8+ T cells by blocking IL-2Rα. These results suggest that 4-1BB-mediated increases of IL-2Rα and IL-2 prolong the effects of transient TCR- and 4-1BB-mediated signaling in CD8+ T cells, and that 4-1BB triggering preferentially enhances the expansion of CD8+ T cells through the amplification of autocrine IL-2/IL-2R signaling loop. PMID:25962156

  1. The significance of serum soluble IL-2 receptor as a marker for active visceral leishmaniasis in Sicilian patients.

    PubMed Central

    Vitale, G; Reina, G; Mansueto, S; Malta, R; Gambino, G; Mocciaro, C; D'Agostino, R; Dieli, M; Cillari, E

    1992-01-01

    Sera from nine Sicilian patients with confirmed visceral leishmaniasis (Leishmania donovani infantum; VL), at the moment of the diagnosis, during the course of the disease and after clinical recovery, were analysed for the concentration of soluble IL-2 receptor (sIL-2R). The results show that sIL-2R is a marker of disease activity, since it is in high concentration at the beginning of infection and returns to the normal range following successful chemotherapy. At the same time of serum analysis for sIL-2R, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of VL patients were stimulated with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) or antigen and supernatant tested for IL-2 and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) production. Data demonstrate that there is an inverse relation between concentration of IL-2 and IFN-gamma in the supernatants and sIL-2R secretion in the sera. PMID:1424277

  2. Activation of the IL-2 Receptor in Podocytes: A Potential Mechanism for Podocyte Injury in Idiopathic Nephrotic Syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Zea, Arnold H.; Stewart, Tyrus; Ascani, Jeannine; Tate, David J.; Finkel-Jimenez, Beatriz; Wilk, Anna; Reiss, Krzysztof; Smoyer, William E.; Aviles, Diego H.

    2016-01-01

    The renal podocyte plays an important role in maintaining the structural integrity of the glomerular basement membrane. We have previously reported that patients with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (INS) have increased IL-2 production. We hypothesized that podocytes express an IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) and signaling through this receptor can result in podocyte injury. To confirm the presence of the IL-2R, we tested a conditionally immortalized murine podocyte cell line by flow cytometry, qPCR, and Western blot. To test for the presence of the IL-2R in vivo, immunohistochemical staining was performed on human renal biopsies in children with FSGS and control. Podocytes were stimulated with IL-2 in vitro, to study signaling events via the JAK/STAT pathway. The results showed that stimulation with IL-2 resulted in increased mRNA and protein expression of STAT 5a, phosphorylated STAT 5, JAK 3, and phosphorylated JAK 3. We then investigated for signs of cellular injury and the data showed that pro-apoptotic markers Bax and cFLIP were significantly increased following IL-2 exposure, whereas LC3 II was decreased. Furthermore, mitochondrial depolarization and apoptosis were both significantly increased following activation of the IL-2R. We used a paracellular permeability assay to monitor the structural integrity of a podocyte monolayer following IL-2 exposure. The results showed that podocytes exposed to IL-2 have increased albumin leakage across the monolayer. We conclude that murine podocytes express the IL-2R, and that activation through the IL-2R results in podocyte injury. PMID:27389192

  3. Essential biphasic role for JAK3 catalytic activity in IL-2 receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Geoffrey A.; Uchida, Kenji; Weiss, Arthur; Taunton, Jack

    2016-01-01

    To drive lymphocyte proliferation and differentiation, common γ-chain (γc) cytokine receptors require hours to days of sustained stimulation. While JAK1 and JAK3 kinases are found together in all γc-receptor complexes, it is not known how their respective catalytic activities contribute to signaling over time. Here, we dissect the temporal requirements for JAK3 kinase activity with a selective covalent inhibitor (JAK3i). By monitoring STAT5 phosphorylation over 20 hours in IL-2-stimulated CD4+ T cells, we document a previously unappreciated second wave of signaling that is much more sensitive to JAK3i than the first wave. Selective inhibition of this second wave is sufficient to block cyclin expression and S-phase entry. An inhibitor-resistant JAK3 mutant (Cys905Ser) rescued all effects of JAK3i in isolated T cells and in mice. Our chemical genetic toolkit elucidates a biphasic requirement for JAK3 kinase activity in IL-2-driven T-cell proliferation and will find broad utility in studies of γc-receptor signaling. PMID:27018889

  4. Effect of IL-2-Bax, a novel interleukin-2-receptor-targeted chimeric protein, on bleomycin lung injury1

    PubMed Central

    Segel, Michael J; Aqeilan, Rami; Zilka, Keren; Lorberboum-Galski, Haya; Wallach-Dayan, Shulamit B; Conner, Michael W; Christensen, Thomas G; Breuer, Raphael

    2005-01-01

    The role of lymphocytes in the pathogenesis of lung fibrosis is not clear, but the weight of the evidence supports a pro-fibrotic effect for lymphocytes. The high-affinity interleukin-2 receptor (haIL-2R) is expressed on activated, but not quiescent, T lymphocytes. This selective expression of haIL-2R provides the basis for therapeutic strategies that target IL-2R-expressing cells. We hypothesized that elimination of activated lymphocytes by IL-2R-targeted chimeric proteins might ameliorate lung fibrosis. We investigated the effects of IL-2-Bax, a novel apoptosis-inducing IL-2R-targeted chimeric protein, on bleomycin-induced lung injury in mice. Treatment groups included (i) a single intratracheal instillation of bleomycin and twice-daily intraperitoneal injections of IL-2-Bax; (ii) intratracheal bleomycin and intraperitoneal IL-2-PE664Glu, an older-generation chimeric protein; (iii) intratracheal bleomycin/intraperitoneal PBS; (iv) intratracheal saline/intraperitoneal PBS. Lung injury was evaluated 14 days after intratracheal instillation by cell count in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, semi-quantitative and quantitative histomorphological measurements and by biochemical analysis of lung hydroxyproline. Bleomycin induced a BAL lymphocytosis that was significantly attenuated by IL-2-Bax and IL-2-PE664Glu. However, morphometric parameters and lung hydroxyproline were unaffected by the chimeric proteins. These results show that IL-2-Bax reduces the lymphocytic infiltration of the lungs in response to bleomycin, but this effect is not accompanied by a decrease in lung fibrosis. PMID:16191100

  5. In vitro activation of T lymphocytes from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-seropositive blood donors. I. Soluble interleukin 2 receptor (IL2R) production parallels cellular IL2R expression and DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Prince, H E; Kleinman, S H; Maino, V C; Jackson, A L

    1988-03-01

    We investigated the relationship of soluble interleukin 2 receptor (sIL2R) production to cellular IL2R expression and DNA synthesis by mitogen-stimulated mononuclear cells from blood donors seropositive for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). SIL2R was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay which employed 2 anti-IL2R monoclonal antibodies recognizing distinct IL2R epitopes. Decreased phytohemagglutinin-induced DNA synthesis and cellular IL2R expression were accompanied by decreased levels of sIL2R in cell culture supernatants. Similar findings were observed for pokeweed mitogen-induced responses. There was no detectable spontaneous secretion of sIL2R into culture supernatants by unstimulated mononuclear cells from either HIV-seropositive or control seronegative donors. These findings indicate that the in vitro T-cell activation defects which characterize HIV infection include decreased sIL2R production, as well as decreased cellular IL2R expression and DNA synthesis. Further, they show that assessment of supernatant sIL2R levels can be used as a valid, reliable assay for T-cell activation.

  6. Preassembly of interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptor subunits on resting Kit 225 K6 T cells and their modulation by IL-2, IL-7, and IL-15: a fluorescence resonance energy transfer study.

    PubMed

    Damjanovich, S; Bene, L; Matkó, J; Alileche, A; Goldman, C K; Sharrow, S; Waldmann, T A

    1997-11-25

    Assembly and mutual proximities of alpha, beta, and gamma(c) subunits of the interleukin 2 receptors (IL-2R) in plasma membranes of Kit 225 K6 T lymphoma cells were investigated by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) using fluorescein isothiocyanate- and Cy3-conjugated monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that were directed against the IL-2R alpha, IL-2R beta, and gamma(c) subunits of IL-2R. The cell-surface distribution of subunits was analyzed at the nanometer scale (2-10 nm) by FRET on a cell-by-cell basis. The cells were probed in resting phase and after coculture with saturating concentrations of IL-2, IL-7, and IL-15. FRET data from donor- and acceptor-labeled IL-2R beta-alpha, gamma-alpha, and gamma-beta pairs demonstrated close proximity of all subunits to each other in the plasma membrane of resting T cells. These mutual proximities do not appear to represent mAb-induced microaggregation, because FRET measurements with Fab fragments of the mAbs gave similar results. The relative proximities were meaningfully modulated by binding of IL-2, IL-7, and IL-15. Based on FRET analysis the topology of the three subunits at the surface of resting cells can be best described by a "triangular model" in the absence of added interleukins. IL-2 strengthens the bridges between the subunits, making the triangle more compact. IL-7 and IL-15 act in the opposite direction by opening the triangle possibly because they associate their private specific alpha receptors with the beta and/or gamma(c) subunits of the IL-2R complex. These data suggest that IL-2R subunits are already colocalized in resting T cells and do not require cytokine-induced redistribution. This colocalization is significantly modulated by binding of relevant interleukins in a cytokine-specific manner.

  7. Cell surface-expressed moesin-like receptor regulates T cell interactions with tissue components and binds an adhesion-modulating IL-2 peptide generated by elastase.

    PubMed

    Ariel, A; Hershkoviz, R; Altbaum-Weiss, I; Ganor, S; Lider, O

    2001-03-01

    The adhesion of leukocytes to the extracellular matrix (ECM) depends on their responses to variations in the chemotactic signals in their milieu, as well as on the functioning of cytoskeletal and context-specific receptors. Ezrin, radixin, and moesin constitute a family of proteins that link the plasma membrane to the actin cytoskeleton. The surface expression of moesin on T cells and its role in cell adhesion has not been fully elucidated. Recently, we found that IL-2 peptides generated by elastase modified the adhesion of activated T cells to ECM ligands. Here, we further examined the adhesion regulatory effects of EFLNRWIT, one of the IL-2 peptides, as well as the existence and putative function of its receptor on T cells. We found that when presented to T cells in the absence of another activator, the EFLNRWIT peptide induced cell adhesion to vessel wall and ECM components. Binding of a radiolabeled peptide to T cells, precipitation with the immobilized peptide, and amino acid sequencing of the precipitated protein revealed that EFLNRWIT exerts its function via a cell surface-expressed moesin-like moiety, whose constitutive expression on T cells was increased after activation. This notion was further supported by our findings that: 1) anti-moesin mAb inhibited the binding of T cells to the immobilized EFLNRWIT peptide, 2) immobilized recombinant moesin bound the IL-2 peptide, and 3) soluble moesin inhibited the EFLNRWIT-induced T cell adhesion to fibronectin. Interestingly, moesin appears to be generally involved in T cell responses to adhesion-regulating signals. Thus, the IL-2 peptide EFLNRWIT appears to exert its modulating capacities via an adhesion-regulating moesin-like receptor. PMID:11207255

  8. Shockwaves increase T-cell proliferation and IL-2 expression through ATP release, P2X7 receptors, and FAK activation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tiecheng; Junger, Wolfgang G; Yuan, Changji; Jin, An; Zhao, Yi; Zheng, Xueqing; Zeng, Yanjun; Liu, Jianguo

    2010-03-01

    Shockwaves elicited by transient pressure disturbances are used to treat musculoskeletal disorders. Previous research has shown that shockwave treatment affects T-cell function, enhancing T-cell proliferation and IL-2 expression by activating p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Here we investigated the signaling pathway by which shockwaves mediate p38 MAPK phosphorylation. We found that shockwaves at an intensity of 0.18 mJ/mm(2) induce the release of extracellular ATP from human Jurkat T-cells at least in part by affecting cell viability. ATP released into the extracellular space stimulates P2X7-type purinergic receptors that induce the activation of p38 MAPK and of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) by phosphorylation on residues Tyr397 and Tyr576/577. Elimination of released ATP with apyrase or inhibition of P2X7 receptors with the antagonists KN-62 or suramin significantly weakens FAK phosphorylation, p38 MAPK activation, IL-2 expression, and T-cell proliferation. Conversely, addition of exogenous ATP causes phosphorylation of FAK and p38 MAPK. Silencing of FAK expression also reduces these cell responses to shockwave treatment. We conclude that shockwaves enhance p38 MAPK activation, IL-2 expression, and T-cell proliferation via the release of cellular ATP and feedback mechanisms that involve P2X7 receptor activation and FAK phosphorylation.

  9. Celecoxib offsets the negative renal influences of cyclosporine via modulation of the TGF-β1/IL-2/COX-2/endothelin ET{sub B} receptor cascade

    SciTech Connect

    El-Gowelli, Hanan M.; Helmy, Maged W.; Ali, Rabab M.; El-Mas, Mahmoud M.

    2014-03-01

    Endothelin (ET) signaling provokes nephrotoxicity induced by the immunosuppressant drug cyclosporine A (CSA). We tested the hypotheses that (i): celecoxib, a selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor, counterbalances renal derangements caused by CSA in rats and (ii) the COX-2/endothelin ET{sub B} receptor signaling mediates the CSA-celecoxib interaction. Ten-day treatment with CSA (20 mg/kg/day) significantly increased biochemical indices of renal function (serum urea, creatinine), inflammation (interleukin-2, IL-2) and fibrosis (transforming growth factor-β{sub 1}, TGF-β{sub 1}). Histologically, CSA caused renal tubular atrophy along with interstitial fibrosis. These detrimental renal effects of CSA were largely reduced in rats treated concurrently with celecoxib (10 mg/kg/day). We also report that cortical glomerular and medullary tubular protein expressions of COX-2 and ET{sub B} receptors were reduced by CSA and restored to near-control values in rats treated simultaneously with celecoxib. The importance of ET{sub B} receptors in renal control and in the CSA-celecoxib interaction was further verified by the findings (i) most of the adverse biochemical, inflammatory, and histopathological profiles of CSA were replicated in rats treated with the endothelin ET{sub B} receptor antagonist BQ788 (0.1 mg/kg/day, 10 days), and (ii) the BQ788 effects, like those of CSA, were alleviated in rats treated concurrently with celecoxib. Together, the data suggest that the facilitation of the interplay between the TGF-β1/IL-2/COX-2 pathway and the endothelin ET{sub B} receptors constitutes the cellular mechanism by which celecoxib ameliorates the nephrotoxic manifestations of CSA in rats. - Highlights: • Celecoxib abolishes nephrotoxic manifestations of CSA in rats. • Blockade of ETB receptors by BQ788 mimicked the nephrotoxic effects of CSA. • CSA or BQ788 reduces renal protein expression of COX-2 and endothelin ETB receptors. • Enhanced TGFβ1/IL-2/COX2/ETB

  10. Celecoxib offsets the negative renal influences of cyclosporine via modulation of the TGF-β1/IL-2/COX-2/endothelin ET(B) receptor cascade.

    PubMed

    El-Gowelli, Hanan M; Helmy, Maged W; Ali, Rabab M; El-Mas, Mahmoud M

    2014-03-01

    Endothelin (ET) signaling provokes nephrotoxicity induced by the immunosuppressant drug cyclosporine A (CSA). We tested the hypotheses that (i): celecoxib, a selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor, counterbalances renal derangements caused by CSA in rats and (ii) the COX-2/endothelin ET(B) receptor signaling mediates the CSA-celecoxib interaction. Ten-day treatment with CSA (20 mg/kg/day) significantly increased biochemical indices of renal function (serum urea, creatinine), inflammation (interleukin-2, IL-2) and fibrosis (transforming growth factor-β₁, TGF-β₁). Histologically, CSA caused renal tubular atrophy along with interstitial fibrosis. These detrimental renal effects of CSA were largely reduced in rats treated concurrently with celecoxib (10 mg/kg/day). We also report that cortical glomerular and medullary tubular protein expressions of COX-2 and ET(B) receptors were reduced by CSA and restored to near-control values in rats treated simultaneously with celecoxib. The importance of ET(B) receptors in renal control and in the CSA-celecoxib interaction was further verified by the findings (i) most of the adverse biochemical, inflammatory, and histopathological profiles of CSA were replicated in rats treated with the endothelin ETB receptor antagonist BQ788 (0.1 mg/kg/day, 10 days), and (ii) the BQ788 effects, like those of CSA, were alleviated in rats treated concurrently with celecoxib. Together, the data suggest that the facilitation of the interplay between the TGF-β1/IL-2/COX-2 pathway and the endothelin ET(B) receptors constitutes the cellular mechanism by which celecoxib ameliorates the nephrotoxic manifestations of CSA in rats.

  11. Combined stimulation of IL-2 and 4-1BB receptors augments the antitumor activity of E7 DNA vaccines by increasing Ag-specific CTL responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ha; Kwon, Byungsuk; Sin, Jeong-Im

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a major cause of cervical cancer. Here, we investigate whether concurrent therapy using HPV E7 DNA vaccines (pE7) plus IL-2 vs. IL-15 cDNA and anti-4-1BB Abs might augment antitumor activity against established tumors. IL-2 cDNA was slightly better than IL-15 cDNA as a pE7 adjuvant. Co-delivery of pE7+IL-2 cDNA increased tumor cure rates from 7% to 27%, whereas co-delivery of pE7+IL-2 cDNA with anti-4-1BB Abs increased tumor cure rates from 27% to 67% and elicited long-term memory responses. This increased activity was concomitant with increased induction of Ag-specific CTL activity and IFN-γ responses, but not with Ag-specific IgG production. Moreover, the combined stimulation of IL-2 and 4-1BB receptors with rIL-2 and anti-4-1BB Abs resulted in enhanced production of IFN-γ from Ag-specific CD8+ T cells. However, this effect was abolished by treatment with anti-IL-2 Abs and 4-1BB-Fc, suggesting that the observed effect was IL-2- and anti-4-1BB Ab-specific. A similar result was also obtained for Ag-specific CTL activity. Thus, these studies demonstrate that combined stimulation through the IL-2 and 4-1BB receptors augments the Ag-specific CD8+ CTL responses induced by pE7, increasing tumor cure rates and long-term antitumor immune memory. These findings may have implications for the design of DNA-based therapeutic vaccines against cancer. PMID:24391824

  12. IL-2-driven regulation of NK cell receptors with regard to the distribution of CD16+ and CD16- subpopulations and in vivo influence after haploidentical NK cell infusion.

    PubMed

    Huenecke, Sabine; Zimmermann, Stefanie Yvonne; Kloess, Stephan; Esser, Ruth; Brinkmann, Andrea; Tramsen, Lars; Koenig, Melanie; Erben, Stephanie; Seidl, Christian; Tonn, Torsten; Eggert, Angelika; Schramm, Alexander; Bader, Peter; Klingebiel, Thomas; Lehrnbecher, Thomas; Passweg, Jakob Robert; Soerensen, Jan; Schwabe, Dirk; Koehl, Ulrike

    2010-01-01

    To characterize natural killer (NK) cell subpopulations during activation, we analyzed the NK cell receptor repertoire and functionality of purified clinical scale CD56CD3 donor NK cells during stimulation with 1000 U/mL interleukin (IL)-2 for up to 14 days. In a phase I/II trial, we investigated the efficacy and feasibility of nonidentical NK cell infusion in patients with neuroblastoma after haploidentical stem cell transplantation. After IL-2 stimulation, large differences in the distribution of CD16 and CD16 subpopulations were found in 12 donors. Thereby, surface expression for all natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCRs) and NKG2D increased. In addition, killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) NK cells were overgrown by KIR proportion and the homing receptor CD62L was lost during stimulation. NK cell cytotoxicity against K562 and neuroblastoma cells increased and significantly higher cytokine secretion (eg, interferon-gamma, tumor necrosis factor-beta, macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha, macrophage inflammatory protein-1beta) was observed after IL-2 stimulation compared with freshly isolated NK cells. However, NK cells of donors showing an initially enhanced cytotoxicity combined with NCR and CD69 expression, seemed to be exhausted and did not favor a stimulation period over 9 days. When IL-2-stimulated NK cells were given to transplant recipients, they induced a decrease of peripheral blood NK, in particular of CD56-NK cells. Our data indicate that IL-2 stimulation increases the expression of activating receptors and emphasizes mechanisms beside KIR/human leukocyte antigen. Furthermore, the results suggest that the expansion period of purified NK cells has to be individualized to optimize NK cell immunotherapy.

  13. New Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Tolerance: Tolerogenic Actions of IL-2.

    PubMed

    Pérol, Louis; Piaggio, Eliane

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is an old molecule with brand new functions. Indeed, IL-2 has been first described as a T-cell growth factor but recent data pointed out that its main function in vivo is the maintenance of immune tolerance. Mechanistically, IL-2 is essential for the development and function of CD4(+) Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg cells) that are essential players in the control of immune responded to self, tumors, microbes and grafts. Treg cells are exquisitely sensitive to IL-2 due to their constitutive expression of the high affinity IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) and the new paradigm suggests that low-doses of IL-2 could selectively boost Treg cells in vivo. Consequently, a growing body of clinical research is aiming at using IL-2 at low doses as a tolerogenic drug to boost endogenous Treg cells in patients suffering from autoimmune or inflammatory conditions. In this manuscript, we briefly review IL-2/IL-2R biology and the role of IL-2 in the development, maintenance, and function of Treg cells; and also its effects on other immune cell populations such as CD4(+) T helper cells and CD8(+) memory T cells. Then, focusing on type 1 diabetes, we review the preclinical studies and clinical trials supporting the use of low-doses IL-2 as a tolerogenic immunotherapy. Finally, we discuss the limitations and future directions for IL-2 based immunotherapy. PMID:26530792

  14. Two CpG mutational hot spots in the X-linked interleukin-2 receptor gamma chain gene (IL2RG) may cause 15% of all human severe combined immunodeficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Pepper, A.E.; Puck, J.M.; Liu, X.

    1994-09-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), a syndrome of profoundly impaired cellular and humoral immune function, is caused by various autosomal gene defects, including adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency, as well as mutations in the X-linked IL2RG gene encoding the gamma chain of the lymphocyte receptor for IL-2. Mutational analysis of IL2RG was performed using genomic DNA from males with SCID referred from genetics and immunology centers. Single strand conformation polymorphisms (SSCP) were sought by PCR amplification of each of the 8 IL2RG exons using labelled flanking primers. Sequence of exons with aberrant SSCP detected a majority of unique deleterious IL2RG mutations in 30 unrelated SCID patients. However, multiple mutations were seen at CpG dinucleotides, known to be C{yields}T transversion sites. cDNA 690-691 in exon 5 was mutated in 4 patients, 1 patient with each of the C{sub 690}{yields}T causing an Arg{yields}Cys substitution, and 1 with G{sub 691}{yields}A causing Arg{yields}His. Two other patients had SCID caused by a single mutation in IL2RG exon 7. This C{sub 879}{yields}T, also in a CpG, changed an Arg to STOP, resulting in loss of the SH2-related intracellular domain. In addition to our patients, 1 patient with each of the C{sub 690} and the C{sub 879} mutations have been reported by others, giving an overall incidence of 20% from our lab and 21% from all reported IL2RG SCID mutations. While ADA defects account for approximately 15% of SCID, a striking male SCID predominance suggest up to 70% of the cases are X-linked, due to IL2RG mutation. Thus, screening for mutations at the 2 CpG hot spots we have found in IL2RG can identify the genotype of as many SCID cases as are found by ADA testing.

  15. Two unique mutations in the interleukin-2 receptor gamma chain gene (IL2RG) cause X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency arising in opposite parental germ lines

    SciTech Connect

    Puck, J.M.; Pepper, A.E.

    1994-09-01

    The gene encoding the gamma chain of the lymphocyte receptor for IL-2 lies in human X13.1 and is mutated in males with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). 27 X-linked SCID mutations have been found in our laboratory. Single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of genomic DNA using primers flanking each of the 8 exons was followed by direct sequencing of abnormally migrating fragments from SCID patients and family members. A 9 bp in-frame duplication insertion was found in IL2RG exon 5 of a patient from a large X-linked SCID pedigree; the resulting duplication of 3 extracellular amino acids, including the first tryptophan of the {open_quotes}WSXWS{close_quotes} cytokine binding motif, is predicted to disrupt interaction of the cytokine receptor chain with its ligand. Genetic linkage studies demonstrated that the grandmaternal X chromosome associated with SCID was contributed to 3 daughters, 2 obligate carriers and 1 woman of unknown status. However, this grandmother`s genomic DNA did not contain the insertion mutation, nor did she have skewed X-chromosome inactivation in her lymphocytes. That both obligate carrier daughters, but not the third daughter, had the insertion proved the grandmother to be a germline mosaic. A second proband had X-linked SCID with a branch point mutation due to substitution of T for A 15 bp 5{prime} of the start of IL2RG exon 3. This mutation resulted in undetectable IL2RG mRNA by Northern blot. Linkage analysis and sequencing of IL2RG DNA in this family proved the mutation to have originated in the germline of the proband`s grandfather, an immunocompetent individual who contributed an X chromosome with normal IL2RG to one daughter and a mutated X to the another.

  16. Pleiotropic Effects of IL-2 on Cancer: Its Role in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Valle-Mendiola, Arturo; Gutiérrez-Hoya, Adriana; Lagunas-Cruz, María del Carmen; Weiss-Steider, Benny; Soto-Cruz, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) signalling is critical for normal lymphocyte proliferation, but its role in cervical cancer is not fully understood. The receptor is composed of three chains: IL-2α, IL-2β, and IL-2γ. Intracellular signalling is initiated by ligand-induced heterodimerization of the IL-2β and IL-2γ chains, resulting in the activation of multiple intracellular kinases. Recently, IL-2R was shown to be expressed on nonhaematopoietic cells, especially on several types of tumour cells. However, the function of this receptor on malignant cells has not been clearly defined. The expression of IL-2R and the production of IL-2 in cervical cancer cells have been documented as well as expression of molecules of the JAK-STAT pathway. In the current review we have highlighted the differences in the responses of molecules downstream from the IL-2R in normal lymphocytes and tumour cells that could explain the presence of tumour cells in an environment in which cytotoxic lymphocytes also exist and compete and also the effect of different concentrations of IL-2 that could activate effector cells of the immune system cells, which favour the elimination of tumour cells, or concentrations that may promote a regulatory microenvironment in which tumour cells can easily grow. PMID:27293315

  17. A systemic defect in Toll-like receptor 4 signaling increases lipopolysaccharide-induced suppression of IL-2-dependent T-cell proliferation in COPD.

    PubMed

    Knobloch, Jürgen; Chikosi, Sarah-Jane; Yanik, Sarah; Rupp, Jan; Jungck, David; Koch, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The susceptibility to bacterial infections is increased in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This promotes exacerbations. IL-2 triggers CD4(+)/Th1-cell proliferation, which is important for infection defense. Bacterial endotoxin (LPS) activates MyD88/IRAK and TRIF/IKKε/TBK1 pathways via Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) in Th1 cells. Systemic defects in TLR pathways in CD4(+)/Th1 cells cause an impairment of IL-2-dependent immune responses to bacterial infections in COPD. Peripheral blood CD4(+) T cells of never smokers, smokers without COPD, and smokers with COPD (each n = 10) were ex vivo activated towards Th1 and stimulated with LPS. IL-2, MyD88, and TRIF expression, and cell proliferation was analyzed by ELISA, quantitative RT-PCR, and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and trypan blue staining comparative among the cohorts. IL-2 release from activated T cells was increased in COPD vs. smokers and never smokers. LPS reduced IL-2 expression and T-cell proliferation. These effects were increased in COPD vs. never smokers and inversely correlated with FEV1 (%predicted). The MyD88/TRIF ratio was decreased in Th1 cells of COPD. The suppression of IL-2 by LPS was abolished by MyD88/IRAK blockade in never smokers but by TRIF/IKKε/TBK1 blockade in COPD. Moxifloxacin restored IL-2 expression and T-cell proliferation in the presence of LPS by blocking p38 MAPK. The increased IL-2 release from Th1 cells in COPD might contribute to airway inflammation in disease exacerbations. A switch from MyD88/IRAK to TRIF/IKKε/TBK1 signaling amplifies the suppression of IL-2-dependent proliferation of CD4(+) T cells by LPS in COPD. This molecular pathology is of systemic origin, might impair adaptive immune responses, and could explain the increased susceptibility to bacterial infections in COPD. Targeting TLR4-downstream signaling, for example, with moxifloxacin, might reduce exacerbation rates. PMID:26498252

  18. Phenotypic and Functional Dysregulated Blood NK Cells in Colorectal Cancer Patients Can Be Activated by Cetuximab Plus IL-2 or IL-15

    PubMed Central

    Rocca, Yamila Sol; Roberti, María Paula; Juliá, Estefanía Paula; Pampena, María Betina; Bruno, Luisina; Rivero, Sergio; Huertas, Eduardo; Sánchez Loria, Fernando; Pairola, Alejandro; Caignard, Anne; Mordoh, José; Levy, Estrella Mariel

    2016-01-01

    The clinical outcome of colorectal cancer (CRC) is associated with the immune response; thus, these tumors could be responsive to different immune therapy approaches. Natural killer (NK) cells are key antitumor primary effectors that can eliminate CRC cells without prior immunization. We previously determined that NK cells from the local tumor environment of CRC tumors display a profoundly altered phenotype compared with circulating NK cells from healthy donors (HD). In this study, we evaluated peripheral blood NK cells from untreated patients and their possible role in metastasis progression. We observed profound deregulation in receptor expression even in early stages of disease compared with HD. CRC-NK cells displayed underexpression of CD16, NKG2D, DNAM-1, CD161, NKp46, and NKp30 activating receptors, while inhibitory receptors CD85j and NKG2A were overexpressed. This inhibited phenotype affected cytotoxic functionality against CRC cells and interferon-γ production. We also determined that NKp30 and NKp46 are the key receptors involved in detriment of CRC-NK cells’ antitumor activity. Moreover, NKp46 expression correlated with relapse-free survival of CRC patients with a maximum follow-up of 71 months. CRC-NK cells also exhibited altered antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity function responding poorly to cetuximab. IL-2 and IL-15 in combination with cetuximab stimulated NK cell, improving cytotoxicity. These results show potential strategies to enhance CRC-NK cell activity. PMID:27777574

  19. Genotypes of NK cell KIR receptors, their ligands, and Fcγ receptors in the response of neuroblastoma patients to Hu14.18-IL2 immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Delgado, David C; Hank, Jacquelyn A; Kolesar, Jill; Lorentzen, David; Gan, Jacek; Seo, Songwon; Kim, Kyungmann; Shusterman, Suzanne; Gillies, Stephen D; Reisfeld, Ralph A; Yang, Richard; Gadbaw, Brian; DeSantes, Kenneth B; London, Wendy B; Seeger, Robert C; Maris, John M; Sondel, Paul M

    2010-12-01

    Response to immunocytokine (IC) therapy is dependent on natural killer cells in murine neuroblastoma (NBL) models. Furthermore, killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR)/KIR-ligand mismatch is associated with improved outcome to autologous stem cell transplant for NBL. Additionally, clinical antitumor response to monoclonal antibodies has been associated with specific polymorphic-FcγR alleles. Relapsed/refractory NBL patients received the hu14.18-IL2 IC (humanized anti-GD2 monoclonal antibody linked to human IL2) in a Children's Oncology Group phase II trial. In this report, these patients were genotyped for KIR, HLA, and FcR alleles to determine whether KIR receptor-ligand mismatch or specific FcγR alleles were associated with antitumor response. DNA samples were available for 38 of 39 patients enrolled: 24 were found to have autologous KIR/KIR-ligand mismatch; 14 were matched. Of the 24 mismatched patients, 7 experienced either complete response or improvement of their disease after IC therapy. There was no response or comparable improvement of disease in patients who were matched. Thus KIR/KIR-ligand mismatch was associated with response/improvement to IC (P = 0.03). There was a trend toward patients with the FcγR2A 131-H/H genotype showing a higher response rate than other FcγR2A genotypes (P = 0.06). These analyses indicate that response or improvement of relapsed/refractory NBL patients after IC treatment is associated with autologous KIR/KIR-ligand mismatch, consistent with a role for natural killer cells in this clinical response.

  20. The IL-2/IL-2R system: from basic science to therapeutic applications to enhance immune regulation

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, Allison L.; Pugliese, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    IL-2 plays a critical role in the normal function of the immune system. A trophic factor for lymphocytes, IL-2 is required for mounting and sustaining adaptive T cell responses; however, IL-2 is also critical for immune regulation via its effects on regulatory T cells (Treg cells). Over the years, we have contributed to the understanding of the biology of IL-2 and its signaling through the IL-2 receptor and helped define the key role played by IL-2 in Treg development and function. Our data show that Treg cells have a heightened sensitivity to IL-2, which may create a therapeutic window to promote immune regulation by selective stimulation of Treg cells. We are now developing new efforts to translate this knowledge to the clinical arena, through our focused interest in Type 1 diabetes as a prototypic autoimmune disease. Specifically, we aim at developing IL-2-based therapeutic regimens and incorporate means to enhance antigen-specific Treg responses, for improved and more selective regulation of islet autoimmunity. In parallel, we are pursuing studies in preclinical models of autoimmunity and transplantation to define critical factors for successful adoptive Treg therapy and develop clinically applicable therapeutic protocols. PMID:24214027

  1. Identification of contact and respiratory sensitizers according to IL-4 receptor α expression and IL-2 production

    SciTech Connect

    Goutet, Michèle Pépin, Elsa; Langonné, Isabelle; Huguet, Nelly; Ban, Masarin

    2012-04-15

    Identification of allergenic chemicals is an important occupational safety issue. While several methods exist to identify contact sensitizers, there is currently no validated model to predict the potential of chemicals to act as respiratory sensitizers. Previously, we reported that cytometry analysis of the local immune responses induced in mice dermally exposed to the respiratory sensitizer trimellitic anhydride (TMA 10%) and contact sensitizer dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB 1%) could identify divergent expression of several immune parameters. The present study confirms, first, that IgE-positive B cells, MHC class II molecules, interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4 and IL-4Rα can differentiate the allergic reactions caused by high doses of strong respiratory (TMA, phthalic anhydride and toluene diisocyanate) and contact sensitizers (DNCB, dinitrofluorobenzene and oxazolone). The second part of the study was designed to test the robustness of these markers when classing the weakly immunogenic chemicals most often encountered. Six respiratory allergens, including TMA (2.5%), five contact allergens, including DNCB (0.25%), and two irritants were compared at doses of equivalent immunogenicity. The results indicated that IL-4Rα and IL-2 can be reliably used to discriminate sensitizers. Respiratory sensitizers induced markedly higher IL-4Rα levels than contact allergens, while irritants had no effect on this parameter. Inversely, contact allergens tended to induce higher percentages of IL-2{sup +}CD8{sup +} cells than respiratory allergens. In contrast, the markers MHC-II, IgE and IL-4 were not able to classify chemicals with low immunogenic potential. In conclusion, IL-4Rα and IL-2 have the potential to be used in classifying a variety of chemical allergens. -- Highlights: ► Identification of chemical allergens is an important occupational safety issue. ► There is currently no model to predict the potential of chemicals to induce asthma. ► We analyze immune responses induced

  2. Expression of NKp30, NKp46 and DNAM-1 activating receptors on resting and IL-2 activated NK cells from healthy donors according to CMV-serostatus and age.

    PubMed

    Campos, Carmen; López, Nelson; Pera, Alejandra; Gordillo, Juan J; Hassouneh, Fakhri; Tarazona, Raquel; Solana, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    Human natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphoid cells with capacity to kill tumor cells and virus-infected cells. According to the expression of CD56 and CD16 several NK cell subsets have been identified, a major CD56dimCD16+ subpopulation characterized by higher cytotoxic capacity, two CD56bright subsets (CD16-and CD16+) that represent different maturation stages and the fourth CD56-CD16+ subset that correspond to activated dysfunctional NK cells. Previous studies have shown quantitative changes in the frequency, phenotype and distribution of NK cell subsets depending on CMV-serostatus and age. We have analyzed the expression of NKp30, NKp46 and DNAM-1 NK activating receptors on resting and IL-2 activated NK cells from CMV-seronegative and seropositive healthy young donors and from CMV-seropositive elderly individuals. Our results showed that CMV-serostatus of healthy young donors is associated with phenotypic differences on both CD56bright and CD56dim NK cells with an increase of NKp46 and a decrease of NKp30 expression respectively. A reduced expression of DNAM-1 related to ageing and a lower NKp30 expression associated with CMV-seropositivity were observed. The expression of NKp46 and NKp30 was lower in CD57+ NK cells while the expression of DNAM-1 was increased. In vitro NK cell activation by IL-2 increased the expression of NKp46 and NKp30. In summary, both age and CMV-serostatus influence the expression of these cytotoxicity activating receptors that will have functional consequences. In elderly donors is difficult to isolate age from the effect of chronic CMV infection since in our study all elderly donors were CMV-seropositive. The possibility of modulating the expression of these activating receptors by cytokines such as IL-2 may open new opportunities for improving age-associated deterioration of NK cell function.

  3. Identification and comparative expression analysis of interleukin 2/15 receptor B chain in chickens infected with E. tenella

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Interleukin (IL) 2 and IL15 receptor beta chain (IL2/15Receptor beta, CD122) play critical roles in signal transduction for the biological activities of IL2 and IL15. Increased knowledge of non-mammalian IL2/15Receptor beta will enhance the understanding of IL2 and IL15 functions. Meth...

  4. Mechanism of accessory cell requirement in inducing IL 2 responsiveness by human T4 lymphocytes that generate colonies under PHA stimulation.

    PubMed

    Oudrhiri, N; Farcet, J P; Gourdin, M F; Divine, M; Bouguet, J; Fradelizi, D; Reyes, F

    1985-09-01

    PHA-driven monoclonal colony formation by low concentrations of resting T4 lymphocytes in agar culture requires the presence of interleukin 2 (IL 2) and accessory cells. Using recombinant IL 2 and anti-Tac monoclonal antibody as a probe for the IL 2 receptor, we demonstrate that the requirement of accessory cells (here an irradiated B cell line) in inducing IL 2 responsiveness relies on their enhancing effect in functional IL 2 receptor expression by the T colony progenitors. Furthermore, it is shown that cell to cell interaction between accessory cells and colony progenitors results in IL 2 response, i.e., colony formation, when the IL 2 receptor density reaches a critical threshold. The asynchronism in IL 2 responsiveness expression by the T colony progenitors upon activation and the short-lived T cell-accessory cell interaction, due to accessory cell death, determine the 10% colony efficiency of the culture system. In addition, we demonstrate that the accessory function in IL 2 receptor and IL 2 responsiveness expression by the T colony progenitors can be supported by irradiated T lymphocytes as well as B cells. The absence of lineage restriction of the signal delivered by accessory cells, and the requirement of physical interaction between T colony progenitors and accessory cells, emphasize the necessity of cross-linking the activation-signal receptors in inducing IL 2 responsiveness by resting T4 cells. PMID:3926884

  5. [Agonists of µ- and δ-Opioid Receptors in the Regulation of IL-2, IL-4 and IFN-γ Production by Peripheral Blood Cells in vitro].

    PubMed

    Gein, S V; Tendryakova, S P

    2015-01-01

    It was found that β-endorphin stimulates the PHA (phytohemagglutinin)-induced production of interleukin-4 and has no affect on the production of interferon-gamma in unfractionated leukocytic suspension. In the culture of purified CD4+ T cells, β-endorphin does not affect the concentration of IL-2, IL-4, and IFN-γ, but stimulates the production of IL-4 and inhibits the production of IFN-γ when adding monocytes to the culture. Selective δ-agonist DADLE enhances the PHA-induced production of IL-4 in unfractionated leukocytic suspension and in CD4+ lymphocytes+monocytes system. The synthesis of IFN-γ by purified CD4+ lymphocytes is not afected by the presence of DADLE, DAGO ad Deltorphin II; but when adding monocytes to the culture, the synthesis rate decreases. β-endorphin and selective μ-agonist DAGO enhance the production of IFN-γ by stimulated neutrophils. The production of IFN-γ in CD8+ lymphocytes is not affected by β-endorphin. Thus, opioid peptides have a predominantly Th2 polarizing effect, which is monocyte-mediated, hindering the development of cell response by inhibiting IFN-γ, and stimulating the production of I L-4 by activating δ-receptor. On the other hand, neutrophils can enhance the production of IFN-γ by stimulating μ-receptor. PMID:26237955

  6. Cell-autonomous role of TGFβ and IL-2 receptors in CD4+ and CD8+ inducible regulatory T-cell generation during GVHD.

    PubMed

    Sawamukai, Norifumi; Satake, Atsushi; Schmidt, Amanda M; Lamborn, Ian T; Ojha, Priti; Tanaka, Yoshiya; Kambayashi, Taku

    2012-06-01

    FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) suppress GVHD while preserving graft-versus-tumor effects, making them an attractive target for GVHD therapy. The donor-derived Treg pool can potentially be derived from the expansion of preexisting natural Tregs (nTregs) or from de novo generation of inducible Tregs (iTregs) from donor Tconvs in the transplantation recipient. Using an MHC-mismatched model of acute GVHD, in the present study we found that the Treg pool was comprised equally of donor-derived nTregs and iTregs. Experiments using various combinations of T cells from wild-type and FoxP3-deficient mice suggested that both preexisting donor nTregs and the generation of iTregs in the recipient mice contribute to protection against GVHD. Surprisingly, CD8(+)FoxP3(+) T cells represented approximately 70% of the iTreg pool. These CD8(+)FoxP3(+) T cells shared phenotypic markers with their CD4(+) counterparts and displayed suppressive activity, suggesting that they were bona fide iTregs. Both CD4(+) and CD8(+) Tregs appeared to be protective against GVHD-induced lethality and required IL-2 and TGFβ receptor expression for their generation. These data illustrate the complex makeup of the donor-derived FoxP3(+) Treg pool in allogeneic recipients and their potential role in protection against GVHD.

  7. Cell-autonomous role of TGFβ and IL-2 receptors in CD4+ and CD8+ inducible regulatory T-cell generation during GVHD

    PubMed Central

    Sawamukai, Norifumi; Satake, Atsushi; Schmidt, Amanda M.; Lamborn, Ian T.; Ojha, Priti; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2012-01-01

    FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) suppress GVHD while preserving graft-versus-tumor effects, making them an attractive target for GVHD therapy. The donor-derived Treg pool can potentially be derived from the expansion of preexisting natural Tregs (nTregs) or from de novo generation of inducible Tregs (iTregs) from donor Tconvs in the transplantation recipient. Using an MHC-mismatched model of acute GVHD, in the present study we found that the Treg pool was comprised equally of donor-derived nTregs and iTregs. Experiments using various combinations of T cells from wild-type and FoxP3-deficient mice suggested that both preexisting donor nTregs and the generation of iTregs in the recipient mice contribute to protection against GVHD. Surprisingly, CD8+FoxP3+ T cells represented approximately 70% of the iTreg pool. These CD8+FoxP3+ T cells shared phenotypic markers with their CD4+ counterparts and displayed suppressive activity, suggesting that they were bona fide iTregs. Both CD4+ and CD8+ Tregs appeared to be protective against GVHD-induced lethality and required IL-2 and TGFβ receptor expression for their generation. These data illustrate the complex makeup of the donor-derived FoxP3+ Treg pool in allogeneic recipients and their potential role in protection against GVHD. PMID:22496155

  8. Impaired IL-2 expression in latent HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Shin, YoungHyun; Yoon, Cheol-Hee; Lim, Hoyong; Park, Jihwan; Roh, Tae-Young; Kang, Chun; Choi, Byeong-Sun

    2015-08-01

    Regarding the T cell function in HIV-1 infection, activation of T cells is enhanced in acutely HIV-1-infected T cells upon stimuli. However, T cell immune responses underlying the activation of T cell receptor (TCR) signaling molecules and interleukin (IL)-2 production in latently HIV-1-infected cells are poorly understood. The expression and activation of TCR components and its downstream molecules in acutely and latently HIV-1-infected T cells were compared using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for mRNA expression and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for levels of IL-2 in phytohemagglutinin M (PHA-M). The levels of T cell surface molecules and TCR signaling molecules in latently HIV-1-infected cells were greatly decreased without changes in their mRNA levels. In addition, downstream TCR-signaling molecules in latently HIV-1-infected cells were not activated even in the presence of PHA-M. The phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in the presence of PHA-M was weakly induced in latently HIV-1-infected cells but was greater in acutely HIVNL4-3-infected cells. Finally, the production of IL-2 was significantly decreased in latently HIV-1-infected cells compared with uninfected parent cells. Thus, IL-2-related immunological functions in latently HIV-1-infected T cells were markedly impaired even in the presence of stimuli.

  9. Diphtheria toxin-based bivalent human IL-2 fusion toxin with improved efficacy for targeting human CD25(+) cells.

    PubMed

    Peraino, Jaclyn Stromp; Zhang, Huiping; Rajasekera, Priyani V; Wei, Min; Madsen, Joren C; Sachs, David H; Huang, Christene A; Wang, Zhirui

    2014-03-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) constitute a major inhibitory cell population which suppresses immune responses. Thus, Treg have proven to be key players in the induction of transplantation tolerance, protection from autoimmune disease and prevention of the development of effective anti-tumor immune reactions. Treg express high levels of the high affinity interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) consisting of IL-2Rα (CD25) together with IL-2Rβ (CD122) and the common γ-chain (CD132). An effective reagent capable of depleting Treg in vivo would facilitate better cancer treatment and allow mechanistic studies of the role of Treg in transplantation tolerance and the development of autoimmune disease. In this study, we have developed a novel bivalent human IL-2 fusion toxin along with an Ontak®-like monovalent human IL-2 fusion toxin and compared the functional ability of these reagents in vitro. Here we show that genetically linking two human IL-2 domains in tandem, thereby generating a bivalent fusion toxin, results in significantly improved capacity in targeting human CD25(+) cells in vitro. Binding analysis by flow cytometry showed that the bivalent human IL-2 fusion toxin has notably increased affinity for human CD25(+) cells. In vitro functional analysis demonstrated that the bivalent isoform has an increased potency of approximately 2 logs in inhibiting cellular proliferation and protein synthesis in human CD25(+) cells compared to the monovalent human IL-2 fusion toxin. Additionally, we performed two inhibition assays in order to verify that the fusion toxins target the cells specifically through binding of the human IL-2 domain of the fusion toxin to the human IL-2 receptor on the cell surface. These results demonstrated that 1) both monovalent and bivalent human IL-2 fusion toxins are capable of blocking the binding of biotinylated human IL-2 to human CD25 by flow cytometry; and 2) human IL-2 blocked the fusion toxins from inhibiting protein synthesis and cellular

  10. Immunosuppressive effect of the anti-IL-2-receptor monoclonal antibody, AMT-13, on organ-cultured fetal pancreas allograft survival

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhardt, K.; Loughnan, M.S.; Diamantstein, T.; Mandel, T.E.

    1988-11-01

    Recently, prolongation of cardiac allograft survival in mice was reported using a rat anti-IL-2R mAb (AMT-13). However, its immunosuppressive action in vivo, alone and in combination with other immunosuppressants, and its effect on other organ transplants has not been extensively studied. We grafted cultured fetal pancreas from CBA (H-2k) donors to Balb/c (H-2d) mice. Recipients were treated with 10 consecutive daily injections each of 20 micrograms AMT-13 only, or with an additional mild immunosuppression of 350 rads irradiation. Control groups received rat immunoglobulin or 350 rads irradiation. Graft survival and the phenotype of infiltrating cells were assessed histologically and immunocytochemically on days 12, 17, and 21, and soluble IL-2R levels were measured in the serum with a quantitative ELISA in all recipients. Two of five grafts in the AMT-13-treated group had islets on day 12 posttransplantation despite lymphocytic infiltration in all grafts, while at this time all grafts of rat Ig treated control mice were completely rejected with only scar tissue and a few lymphocytes remaining. Additional immunosuppression with 350 rads irradiation had a marked additive effect with AMT-13. Soluble IL-2R levels in the serum of untreated recipients were not elevated compared with normal serum levels, but recipients injected with AMT-13 had multifold increased soluble IL-2R levels. The percentage of IL-2R+ cells in the grafts of AMT-13-treated animals was either normal (less than 5%) or increased (20%) in the additionally irradiated mice, providing strong evidence that the immunosuppressive effect of AMT-13 is not due to a depletion of activated IL-2R+ lymphocytes.

  11. Systemic radioimmunotherapy using a monoclonal antibody, anti-Tac directed toward the alpha subunit of the IL-2 receptor armed with the alpha-emitting radionuclides (212)Bi or (211)At.

    PubMed

    Wesley, Jon N; McGee, Edwin C; Garmestani, Kayhan; Brechbiel, Martin W; Yordanov, Alexander T; Wu, Chuanchu; Gansow, Otto A; Eckelman, William C; Bacher, John D; Flynn, Michael; Goldman, Carolyn K; MacLin, Melvin; Schwartz, Uwe P; Jackson-White, Terri; Phillip, Celeste M; Decker, Jean; Waldmann, Thomas A

    2004-04-01

    To exploit the fact that IL-2 receptors are expressed by T-cells responding to foreign antigens but not by resting T-cells, humanized anti-Tac (HAT) armed with alpha-emitting radionuclides (212)Bi and (211)At was evaluated in a cynomolgus cardiac allograft model. Control graft survival was 8.2+/- 0.5 days compared with 14.0+/-1.3 days (p<0.01) survival for monkeys treated with (212)Bi labeled HAT and 26.7+/-2.4 days survival (p<0.001 versus controls) with (211)At labeled HAT. Thus, (211)At labeled HAT may have application in organ transplantation and in treatment of IL-2 receptor expressing T-cell leukemia. PMID:15028248

  12. Dendritic cell derived IL-2 inhibits survival of terminally mature cells via an autocrine signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Balachander, Akhila; Nabti, Sabrina; Sobota, Radoslaw M; Foo, Shihui; Zolezzi, Francesca; Lee, Bernett T K; Poidinger, Michael; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola

    2015-05-01

    DCs are crucial for sensing pathogens and triggering immune response. Upon activation by pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) ligands, GM-CSF myeloid DCs (GM-DCs) secrete several cytokines, including IL-2. DC IL-2 has been shown to be important for innate and adaptive immune responses; however, IL-2 importance in DC physiology has never been demonstrated. Here, we show that autocrine IL-2 signaling is functional in murine GM-DCs in an early time window after PAMPs stimulation. IL-2 signaling selectively activates the JAK/STAT5 pathway by assembling holo-receptor complexes at the cell surface. Using the sensitivity of targeted mass spectrometry, we show conclusively that GM-DCs express CD122, the IL-2 receptor β-chain, at steady state. In myeloid DCs, this cytokine pathway inhibits survival of PAMP-matured GM-DCs which is crucial for maintaining immune tolerance and preventing autoimmunity. Our findings suggest that immune regulation by this novel autocrine signaling pathway can potentially be used in DC immunotherapy. PMID:25652593

  13. Clinical Significance of sIL-2R Levels in B-Cell Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Noriaki; Oda, Miyo; Kuroda, Yoshiaki; Katayama, Yuta; Okikawa, Yoshiko; Masunari, Taro; Fujiwara, Megumu; Nishisaka, Takashi; Sasaki, Naomi; Sadahira, Yoshito; Mihara, Keichiro; Asaoku, Hideki; Matsui, Hirotaka; Seto, Masao; Kimura, Akiro; Arihiro, Koji; Sakai, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Elevated soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sIL-2R) in sera is observed in patients with malignant lymphoma (ML). Therefore, sIL-2R is commonly used as a diagnostic and prognostic marker for ML, but the mechanisms responsible for the increase in sIL-2R levels in patients with B-cell lymphomas have not yet been elucidated. We first hypothesized that lymphoma cells expressing IL-2R and some proteinases such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the tumor microenvironment can give rise to increased sIL-2R in sera. However, flow cytometric studies revealed that few lymphoma cells expressed IL-2R α chain (CD25) in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and follicular lymphoma (FL), and most CD25-expressing cells in the tumor were T-cells. Distinct correlations between CD25 expression on B-lymphoma cells and sIL-2R levels were not observed. We then confirmed that MMP-9 plays an important role in producing sIL-2R in functional studies. Immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis also revealed that MMP-9 is mainly derived from tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). We therefore evaluated the number of CD68 and CD163 positive macrophages in the tumor microenvironment using IHC analysis. A positive correlation between the levels of sIL-2R in sera and the numbers of CD68 positive macrophages in the tumor microenvironment was confirmed in FL and extranodal DLBCL. These results may be useful in understanding the pathophysiology of B-cell lymphomas. PMID:24236041

  14. Development of mature and functional human myeloid subsets in HSC engrafted NOD/SCID/IL2rγKO mice

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Saito, Yoriko; Kunisawa, Jun; Kurashima, Yosuke; Wake, Taichi; Suzuki, Nahoko; Shultz, Leonard D.; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Fumihiko

    2012-01-01

    While physiological development of human lymphoid subsets has become well documented in humanized mice, in vivo development of human myeloid subsets in a xenotransplantation setting has remained unevaluated. Therefore, we investigated in vivo differentiation and function of human myeloid subsets in NOD/SCID/IL2rγnull (NSG) mouse recipients transplanted with purified lineage−CD34+CD38− cord blood hematopoietic stem cells. At four to six months post-transplantation, we identified the development of human neutrophils, basophils, mast cells, monocytes, as well as conventional and plasmacytoid dendritic cells in the recipient hematopoietic organs. The tissue distribution and morphology of these human myeloid cells were similar to those identified in humans. Following cytokine stimulation in vitro, phosphorylation of STAT molecules was observed in neutrophils and monocytes. In vivo administration of human G-CSF resulted in the recruitment of human myeloid cells into the recipient circulation. Flow cytometry and confocal imaging demonstrated that human bone marrow monocytes and alveolar macrophages in the recipients displayed intact phagocytic function. Human BM-derived monocytes/macrophages were further confirmed to exhibit phagocytosis and killing of Salmonella Typhimurium upon the IFN-γ stimulation. These findings demonstrate the development of mature and functionally intact human myeloid subsets in vivo in the NSG recipients. In vivo human myelopoiesis established in the NSG humanized mouse system may facilitate the investigation of human myeloid cell biology including in vivo analyses of infectious diseases and therapeutic interventions. PMID:22611244

  15. Eos is redundant for T regulatory cell function, but plays an important role in IL-2 and Th17 production by CD4+ T conventional cells

    PubMed Central

    Rieder, Sadiye Amcaoglu; Metidji, Amina; Glass, Deborah Dacek; Thornton, Angela M.; Ikeda, Tohru; Morgan, Bruce A.; Shevach, Ethan M.

    2015-01-01

    Eos is a transcription factor that belongs to the Ikaros family of transcription factors. Eos has been reported to be a T regulatory cell (Treg) signature gene, to play a critical role in Treg suppressor functions, and to maintain Treg stability. We have utilized mice with a global deficiency of Eos to re-examine the role of Eos expression in both Treg and T conventional (Tconv) cells. Treg from Eos deficient (Eos−/−) mice developed normally, displayed a normal Treg phenotype, and exhibited normal suppressor function in vitro. Eos−/− Treg were as effective as Treg from wild type (WT) mice in suppression of inflammation in a model of inflammatory bowel disease. Bone marrow (BM) from Eos−/− mice was as effective as BM from WT mice in controlling T cell activation when used to reconstitute immunodeficient mice in the presence of Scurfy fetal liver cells. Surprisingly, Eos was expressed in activated Tconv cells and was required for IL-2 production, CD25 expression and proliferation in vitro by CD4+ Tconv cells. Eos−/− mice developed more severe Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis than WT mice, displayed increased numbers of effector T cells in the periphery and CNS, and amplified IL-17 production. In conclusion, our studies are not consistent with a role for Eos in Treg development and function, but demonstrate that Eos plays an important role in the activation and differentiation of Tconv cells. PMID:26062998

  16. Functional RNAi screen targeting cytokine and growth factor receptors reveals oncorequisite role for interleukin-2 gamma receptor in JAK3 mutation-positive leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Anupriya; MacKenzie, Ryan J.; Eide, Christopher A.; Davare, Monika A.; Watanabe-Smith, Kevin; Tognon, Cristina E.; Mongoue-Tchokote, Solange; Park, Byung; Braziel, Rita M.; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Druker, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    To understand the role for cytokine and growth factor receptor-mediated signaling in leukemia pathogenesis we designed a functional RNAi screen targeting 188 cytokine and growth factor receptors that we found highly expressed in primary leukemia specimens. Using this screen we identified interleukin-2 gamma receptor (IL2Rγ) as a critical growth determinant for the JAK3A572V mutation-positive AML cell line. We observed that knockdown of IL2Rγ abrogates phosphorylation of JAK3 and downstream signaling molecules, JAK1, STAT5, MAPK and pS6 ribosomal protein. Overexpression of IL2Rγ in murine cells increased the transforming potential of activating JAK3 mutations, whereas absence of IL2Rγ completely abrogated the clonogenic potential of JAK3A572V as well as the transforming potential of additional JAK3 activating mutations such as JAK3M511I. In addition, mutation at the IL2Rγ interaction site in the FERM domain of JAK3 (Y100C) completely abrogated JAK3-mediated leukemic transformation. Mechanistically, we found IL2Rγ contributes to constitutive JAK3 mutant signaling by increasing JAK3 expression and phosphorylation. Conversely, we found that mutant but not wild type JAK3 increased the expression of IL2Rγ, indicating IL2Rγ and JAK3 contribute to constitutive JAK/STAT signaling through their reciprocal regulation. Overall we demonstrate a novel role for IL2Rγ in potentiating oncogenesis in the setting of JAK3-mutation positive leukemia. Additionally, our study highlights an RNAi-based functional assay that can be used to facilitate the identification of non-kinase cytokine and growth factor receptor targets for inhibiting leukemic cell growth. PMID:25109334

  17. Development of a diphtheria toxin-based recombinant porcine IL-2 fusion toxin for depleting porcine CD25+ cells.

    PubMed

    Peraino, Jaclyn Stromp; Schenk, Marian; Li, Guoying; Zhang, Huiping; Farkash, Evan A; Sachs, David H; Huang, Christene A; Duran-Struuck, Raimon; Wang, Zhirui

    2013-12-15

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been widely recognized as crucial players in controlling immune responses. Because their major role is to ensure that the immune system is not over reactive, Tregs have been the focus of multiple research studies including those investigating transplantation tolerance, autoimmunity and cancer treatment. On their surface Tregs constitutively express CD25, a high affinity receptor for the cytokine interleukin-2 (IL-2). The reagents constructed in this study were generated by genetically linking porcine IL-2 to the truncated diphtheria toxin (DT390). This reagent functions by first binding to the cell surface via the porcine IL-2/porcine CD25 interaction then the DT390 domain facilitates internalization followed by inhibition of protein synthesis resulting in cell death. Four versions of the porcine IL-2 fusion toxin were designed in an interest to find the most effective isoform: 1) monovalent glycosylated porcine IL-2 fusion toxin (Gly); 2) monovalent non-N-glycosylated porcine IL-2 fusion toxin (NonGly); 3) bivalent glycosylated porcine IL-2 fusion toxin (Bi-Gly); 4) bivalent non-N-glycosylated porcine IL-2 fusion toxin (Bi-NonGly). Using a porcine CD25(+) B cell lymphoma cell line (LCL13271) in vitro analysis of the fusion toxins' ability to inhibit protein synthesis demonstrated that the Bi-NonGly fusion toxin is the most efficient reagent. These in vitro results are consistent with binding affinity as the Bi-NonGly fusion toxin binds strongest to CD25 on the same LCL13271 cells. The Bi-Gly fusion toxin significantly prolonged the survival (p=0.028) of tumor-bearing NOD/SCID IL-2 receptor γ(-/-) (NSG) mice injected with LCL13271 cells compared with untreated controls. This recombinant protein has great potential to function as a useful tool for in vivo depletion of porcine CD25(+) cells for studying immune regulation. PMID:24055128

  18. Ab-IL2 fusion proteins mediate NK cell immune synapse formation by polarizing CD25 to the target cell-effector cell interface.

    PubMed

    Gubbels, Jennifer A A; Gadbaw, Brian; Buhtoiarov, Ilia N; Horibata, Sachi; Kapur, Arvinder K; Patel, Dhara; Hank, Jacquelyn A; Gillies, Stephen D; Sondel, Paul M; Patankar, Manish S; Connor, Joseph

    2011-12-01

    The huKS-IL2 immunocytokine (IC) consists of IL2 fused to a mAb against EpCAM, while the hu14.18-IL2 IC recognizes the GD2 disialoganglioside. They are under evaluation for treatment of EpCAM(+) (ovarian) and GD2(+) (neuroblastoma and melanoma) malignancies because of their proven ability to enhance tumor cell killing by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and by antitumor cytotoxic T cells. Here, we demonstrate that huKS-IL2 and hu14.18-IL2 bind to tumor cells via their antibody components and increase adhesion and activating immune synapse (AIS) formation with NK cells by engaging the immune cells' IL-2 receptors (IL2R). The NK leukemia cell line, NKL (which expresses high affinity IL2Rs), shows fivefold increase in binding to tumor targets when treated with IC compared to matching controls. This increase in binding is effectively inhibited by blocking antibodies against CD25, the α-chain of the IL2R. NK cells isolated from the peritoneal environment of ovarian cancer patients, known to be impaired in mediating ADCC, bind to huKS-IL2 via CD25. The increased binding between tumor and effector cells via ICs is due to the formation of AIS that are characterized by the simultaneous polarization of LFA-1, CD2 and F-actin at the cellular interface. AIS formation of peritoneal NK and NKL cells is inhibited by anti-CD25 blocking antibody and is 50-200% higher with IC versus the parent antibody. These findings demonstrate that the IL-2 component of the IC allows IL2Rs to function not only as receptors for this cytokine but also as facilitators of peritoneal NK cell binding to IC-coated tumor cells.

  19. Transcriptional regulation of IL-2 in health and autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Crispín, José C.; Tsokos, George C.

    2009-01-01

    The regulation of IL-2 production is central to our understanding of the immune system. Key during T cell activation, it also plays an essential role in the regulation of the immune response. This review discusses the function of recently described factors that modulate transcription and chromatin remodeling at the IL2 promoter. Also, it addresses the role of FoxP3 as a transcriptional regulator in conventional T cells and regulatory T cells, and the mechanisms whereby CD28 stabilizes IL2 transcription and translation. Finally, the alterations that prevent T cells from SLE patients from producing normal amounts of IL-2 upon stimulation are described. PMID:18723131

  20. NKG2D is a Key Receptor for Recognition of Bladder Cancer Cells by IL-2-Activated NK Cells and BCG Promotes NK Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    García-Cuesta, Eva María; López-Cobo, Sheila; Álvarez-Maestro, Mario; Esteso, Gloria; Romera-Cárdenas, Gema; Rey, Mercedes; Cassady-Cain, Robin L.; Linares, Ana; Valés-Gómez, Alejandro; Reyburn, Hugh Thomson; Martínez-Piñeiro, Luis; Valés-Gómez, Mar

    2015-01-01

    Intravesical instillation of bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) is used to treat superficial bladder cancer, either papillary tumors (after transurethral resection) or high-grade flat carcinomas (carcinoma in situ), reducing recurrence in about 70% of patients. Initially, BCG was proposed to work through an inflammatory response, mediated by phagocytic uptake of mycobacterial antigens and cytokine release. More recently, other immune effectors such as monocytes, natural killer (NK), and NKT cells have been suggested to play a role in this immune response. Here, we provide a comprehensive study of multiple bladder cancer cell lines as putative targets for immune cells and evaluated their recognition by NK cells in the presence and absence of BCG. We describe that different bladder cancer cells can express multiple activating and inhibitory ligands for NK cells. Recognition of bladder cancer cells depended mainly on NKG2D, with a contribution from NKp46. Surprisingly, exposure to BCG did not affect the immune phenotype of bladder cells nor increased NK cell recognition of purified IL-2-activated cell lines. However, NK cells were activated efficiently when BCG was included in mixed lymphocyte cultures, suggesting that NK activation after mycobacteria treatment requires the collaboration of various immune cells. We also analyzed the percentage of NK cells in peripheral blood of a cohort of bladder cancer patients treated with BCG. The total numbers of NK cells did not vary during treatment, indicating that a more detailed study of NK cell activation in the tumor site will be required to evaluate the response in each patient. PMID:26106390

  1. Local administration of cells containing an inserted IL-2 gene and producing IL-2 inhibits growth of human tumours in nu/nu mice.

    PubMed

    Bubenik, J; Voitenok, N N; Kieler, J; Prassolov, V S; Chumakov, P M; Bubenikova, D; Simova, J; Jandlova, T

    1988-12-01

    We have prepared a retroviral expression construct, pPS-IL-2, in which human IL-2 cDNA has been inserted into the polylinker region, and have used the retroviral vector to introduce the functional IL-2 gene into a fibroblast cell line, RAT-1. Peritumoral administration of IL-2-producing RAT-1 cells into congenitally athymic (nu/nu) mice carrying subcutaneous transplants of human carcinoma cells inhibited the growth of the human tumour xenografts.

  2. IL-2R{gamma} gene microdeletion demonstrates that canine X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency is a homologue of the human disease

    SciTech Connect

    Henthorn, P.S.; Fimiani, V.M.; Patterson, D.F.

    1994-09-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is characterized by profound defects in cellular and humoral immunity and, in humans, is associated with mutations in the gene for the {gamma} chain of the IL-2 receptor (IL-2R{gamma}). We have examined this gene in a colony of dogs established from a single X-linked SCID carrier female. Affected dogs have a 4-bp deletion in the first exon of the IL-2R{gamma} gene, which precludes the production of a functional protein, demonstrating that the canine disease is a true homologue of human X-linked SCID. 37 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Transplantation of human spleen into immunodeficient NOD/SCID IL2Rγ(null) mice generates humanized mice that improve functional B cell development.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yun Shin; Son, Jin Kyung; Choi, Bongkum; Park, Jae Berm; Chang, Jun; Kim, Sung Joo

    2015-12-01

    We previously generated humanized TB34N mice that received human fetal thymus (T), bone tissue (B) and fetal liver-derived (FL)-CD34(+) cells (34) in immunodeficient, NOD/SCID IL2Rγ(null) (N) mice. Although humanized TB34N mice had excellent hematopoiesis, here, we sought to further improve this model by additional transplantation of human spleen tissue (S) as a secondary hematopoietic tissue (TBS34N). The human spleen grafts were enlarged and differentiated into a similar morphology of adult humans, including follicular lymphoid structures with T- and B-cells. The TBS34N mice mimicked mature human immune system (HIS): mature T- and B-cells and follicular dendritic cells; activated germinal center B-cells expressing CD71, BR3(+) cells, memory B-cells and activation-induced cytidine deaminase(+) B-cells; CD138(+) plasma cells were enriched in the mouse spleen. HBsAg-specific hIgG antibodies were secreted into the sera of all TBS34N mice upon immunization with HBsAg. Taken together, the humanized TBS34N mice improved mature HIS and achieved adaptive antibody responses. PMID:26360254

  4. Transplantation of human spleen into immunodeficient NOD/SCID IL2Rγ(null) mice generates humanized mice that improve functional B cell development.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yun Shin; Son, Jin Kyung; Choi, Bongkum; Park, Jae Berm; Chang, Jun; Kim, Sung Joo

    2015-12-01

    We previously generated humanized TB34N mice that received human fetal thymus (T), bone tissue (B) and fetal liver-derived (FL)-CD34(+) cells (34) in immunodeficient, NOD/SCID IL2Rγ(null) (N) mice. Although humanized TB34N mice had excellent hematopoiesis, here, we sought to further improve this model by additional transplantation of human spleen tissue (S) as a secondary hematopoietic tissue (TBS34N). The human spleen grafts were enlarged and differentiated into a similar morphology of adult humans, including follicular lymphoid structures with T- and B-cells. The TBS34N mice mimicked mature human immune system (HIS): mature T- and B-cells and follicular dendritic cells; activated germinal center B-cells expressing CD71, BR3(+) cells, memory B-cells and activation-induced cytidine deaminase(+) B-cells; CD138(+) plasma cells were enriched in the mouse spleen. HBsAg-specific hIgG antibodies were secreted into the sera of all TBS34N mice upon immunization with HBsAg. Taken together, the humanized TBS34N mice improved mature HIS and achieved adaptive antibody responses.

  5. EBI2 augments Tfh cell fate by promoting interaction with IL-2-quenching dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianhua; Lu, Erick; Yi, Tangsheng; Cyster, Jason G

    2016-05-01

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells are a subset of T cells carrying the CD4 antigen; they are important in supporting plasma cell and germinal centre responses. The initial induction of Tfh cell properties occurs within the first few days after activation by antigen recognition on dendritic cells, although how dendritic cells promote this cell-fate decision is not fully understood. Moreover, although Tfh cells are uniquely defined by expression of the follicle-homing receptor CXCR5 (refs 1, 2), the guidance receptor promoting the earlier localization of activated T cells at the interface of the B-cell follicle and T zone has been unclear. Here we show that the G-protein-coupled receptor EBI2 (GPR183) and its ligand 7α,25-dihydroxycholesterol mediate positioning of activated CD4 T cells at the interface of the follicle and T zone. In this location they interact with activated dendritic cells and are exposed to Tfh-cell-promoting inducible co-stimulator (ICOS) ligand. Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a cytokine that has multiple influences on T-cell fate, including negative regulation of Tfh cell differentiation. We demonstrate that activated dendritic cells in the outer T zone further augment Tfh cell differentiation by producing membrane and soluble forms of CD25, the IL-2 receptor α-chain, and quenching T-cell-derived IL-2. Mice lacking EBI2 in T cells or CD25 in dendritic cells have reduced Tfh cells and mount defective T-cell-dependent plasma cell and germinal centre responses. These findings demonstrate that distinct niches within the lymphoid organ T zone support distinct cell fate decisions, and they establish a function for dendritic-cell-derived CD25 in controlling IL-2 availability and T-cell differentiation.

  6. Polymorphisms in the IL2, IL2RA and IL2RB genes in multiple sclerosis risk

    PubMed Central

    Cavanillas, María L; Alcina, Antonio; Núñez, Concepción; de las Heras, Virginia; Fernández-Arquero, Miguel; Bartolomé, Manuel; de la Concha, Emilio G; Fernández, Oscar; Arroyo, Rafael; Matesanz, Fuencisla; Urcelay, Elena

    2010-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-2/IL-2R signalling promotes proliferation and survival of activated T cells and has an essential non-redundant role in the production of regulatory T cells. Associations with different autoimmune diseases of polymorphisms in a linkage disequilibrium block in which the IL2/IL21 genes map (4q27), and also in genes encoding the IL2RA and IL2RB subunits (located in 10p15 and 22q13, respectively), were identified through genome-wide studies. Polymorphisms in these three genes were studied in 430 multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and in 550 ethnically matched controls from Madrid (Spain). Replication and meta-analysis with results from an independent cohort of 771 MS patients and 759 controls from Andalucía (Spain) confirmed the association of polymorphisms in the IL2RA gene (PMantel–Haenszel, odds ratio (OR)M–H (95% confidence interval, CI) for rs2104286: 0.0001, 0.75 (0.65–0.87); for rs11594656/rs35285258: 0.004, 1.19 (1.06–1.34); for rs41295061: 0.03, 0.77 (0.60–0.98)); showed a trend for association of the IL2/IL21 rs6822844 (PM–H=0.07, ORM–H (95% CI)=0.86 (0.73–1.01)), but did not corroborate the association for IL2RB. Regression analyses of the combined Spanish cohort revealed the independence of two IL2RA association signals: rs2104286 and rs11594656/rs35285258. The relevant role of the IL2RA gene on MS susceptibility adds support to its common effect on autoimmune risk and the suggestive association of IL2/IL21 warrants further investigation. PMID:20179739

  7. Neuroendocrine changes in colon of mice with a disrupted IL-2 gene.

    PubMed

    Qian, B F; El-Salhy, M; Melgar, S; Hammarström, M L; Danielsson, A

    2000-06-01

    Neuroendocrine peptides have a variety of physiological functions in the gastrointestinal tract. This study was carried out to investigate the impact of IL-2 deficiency on the neuroendocrine system in normal colon, and the neuroendocrine changes during colonic inflammation. Mice with homozygous disrupted IL-2 gene (IL-2-/-) spontaneously developed a bowel disease with similarities to human ulcerative colitis. Different types of colonic endocrine cells and myenteric nerves were analysed in the IL-2-/- mice using immunomorphometry. The neuropeptide contents in the colonic tissues were determined by radioimmunoassay. Age-matched healthy IL-2+/- and IL-2+/+ mice served as controls and the colonic IL-2 levels were compared between these two groups of mice by ELISA. Our data showed that less than half the amount of IL-2 was synthesized in the colon of IL-2+/- mice compared with the IL-2+/+ wild-type mice. Two major differences in the neuroendocrine colon were found between the mice with an intact and disrupted IL-2 gene. One was age-related. The frequencies of various endocrine cells and myenteric nerves increased with age in the IL-2+/+ mice. However, no such increases were seen in the mice with a disrupted IL-2 gene. Instead, the volume densities of enteroglucagon, serotonin cells and substance P (SP), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and total myenteric nerves were lower in the older IL-2+/- and IL-2-/- mice compared with the wild type. The other was disease-related. Polypeptide YY (PYY) cells and tissue levels of PYY, SP and VIP were significantly decreased in the IL-2-/- mice during the course of bowel inflammation compared with the healthy IL-2+/- and IL-2+/+ controls. These findings indicate that colonic neuroendocrine alterations did occur in the mice with a disrupted IL-2 gene and diminished local IL-2 level, suggesting a role of IL-2 in the regulation of the neuroendocrine system and a prevalent interaction between the immune and neuroendocrine systems

  8. Single-cell quantification of IL-2 response by effector and regulatory T cells reveals critical plasticity in immune response

    PubMed Central

    Feinerman, Ofer; Jentsch, Garrit; Tkach, Karen E; Coward, Jesse W; Hathorn, Matthew M; Sneddon, Michael W; Emonet, Thierry; Smith, Kendall A; Altan-Bonnet, Grégoire

    2010-01-01

    Understanding how the immune system decides between tolerance and activation by antigens requires addressing cytokine regulation as a highly dynamic process. We quantified the dynamics of interleukin-2 (IL-2) signaling in a population of T cells during an immune response by combining in silico modeling and single-cell measurements in vitro. We demonstrate that IL-2 receptor expression levels vary widely among T cells creating a large variability in the ability of the individual cells to consume, produce and participate in IL-2 signaling within the population. Our model reveals that at the population level, these heterogeneous cells are engaged in a tug-of-war for IL-2 between regulatory (Treg) and effector (Teff) T cells, whereby access to IL-2 can either increase the survival of Teff cells or the suppressive capacity of Treg cells. This tug-of-war is the mechanism enforcing, at the systems level, a core function of Treg cells, namely the specific suppression of survival signals for weakly activated Teff cells but not for strongly activated cells. Our integrated model yields quantitative, experimentally validated predictions for the manipulation of Treg suppression. PMID:21119631

  9. Strikingly higher interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β and soluble interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (sIL-1RA) but similar IL-2, sIL-2R, IL-3, IL-4, IL-6, sIL-6R, IL-10, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β2 and interferon IFN-γ urine levels in healthy females compared to healthy males: protection against urinary tract injury?

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, M; Daniel, V; Naujokat, C; Weimer, R; Opelz, G

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to examine gender-related differences of cytokines in the plasma and urine of healthy individuals that might provide a clue concerning the lower rate of chronic renal diseases in females. Soluble interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (sIL-1RA), interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, sIL-2R, IL-3, IL-4, IL-6, sIL-6R, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β2 and interferon (IFN)-γ were determined using standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cytokine levels were determined in simultaneously obtained plasma and urine samples of 18 male and 28 female healthy members of our laboratory staff. Urine cytokine levels were studied three times at 1-month intervals. All individuals had a negative urine nitrite test and showed no symptoms of urinary tract infection (UTI). Plasma levels of all studied cytokines were similar in males and females (P = n.s.). However, females had significantly higher urine IL-1α (P < 0·0001; P < 0·0001; P < 0·0001) and sIL-1RA (P = 0·0001; P = 0·0003; P = 0·0002) than males at three and higher IL-1β at one of the three investigations (P = 0·098; P = 0·003; P = 0·073). Urine levels of the other cytokines were similar in males and females. Higher urine levels of IL-1α, IL-1β and sIL-1RA in females may result from stimulation of cells in the urinary tract. Increased sIL-1RA might block T lymphocyte activation. The elevated cytokines may play a role in the protection of the female urinary tract from certain renal diseases, such as pyelonephritis and other inflammatory and sclerotic kidney diseases. PMID:16232218

  10. Analysis of IL-2-like factor in lymphocyte culture supernatant of olive flounder, Paralichthys oliveaceus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Riqin; Zhang, Peijun; Li, Jun; Xu, Yongli

    2005-03-01

    To study immune mechanism of fish lymphocyte we performed a proliferation assay and ELISA using monoclonal antibody against human IL-2. The result showed that an interleukin-2 (IL-2)-like factor was detected in the supernatant of plant haemoglutinin (PHA)-stimulated lymphocyte culture from peripheral blood, spleen and head kidney of olive flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus. The quantities of IL-2-like factor in the supernatant from different lymphoid tissues were quite different. The IL-2 like factor in the supernatant from cultured head kidney lymphocytes was much higher than those of peripheral blood lymphocytes and spleen lymphocytes ( P<0.01). The IL-2 activity was found in either mouse thymocyte proliferation assay or flounder head kidney lymphocyte proliferation assay and shown to have obvious enhancing effect on proliferation of the above two types of cell. The recombinant human IL-2, (rhIL-2) was able to stimulate flounder thymocyte proliferation and used to detect the IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) on the surface of flounder lymphocyte. The cross-reaction between the lymphocytes of flounder peripheral blood and CD25(IL-2R) was detected with flow cytometry and shown that the percentage of CD25-positive cell in peripheral blood was 7.74±0.67%.

  11. Forecasting the cytokine storm following systemic interleukin (IL)-2 administration

    PubMed Central

    Panelli, Monica C; White, Richard; Foster, Mareva; Martin, Brian; Wang, Ena; Smith, Kina; Marincola, Francesco M

    2004-01-01

    Extensive clinical experience has shown that systemic interleukin (IL)-2 administration can induce complete or partial regression of renal cell cancer (RCC) metastases in 15 to 20 % of patients. Since IL-2 has no direct anti-cancer effects, it is believed that cancer regression is mediated either by a direct modulation of immune cell effector functions or through the mediation of soluble factors released as a result of IL-2 administration. We previously observed that transcriptional and protein changes induced by systemic IL-2 administration affect predominantly mononuclear phagocytes with little effect, particularly within the tumor microenvironment, on T cell activation, localization and proliferation. It further appeared that mononuclear phagocyte activation could be best explained by the indirect mediation of a secondary release of cytokines by IL-2 responsive cells either in the circulation or in peripheral tissues. To better characterize the cytokine outburst that follows systemic IL-2 administration we followed the serum levels of 68 soluble factors in ten patients with RCC undergoing high dose (720,000 IU/kg intravenously every 8 hours) IL-2 therapy. Serum was collected before therapy, 3 hours after the 1st and 4th dose and assayed on a multiplexed protein array platform. This study demonstrated that 1) the serum concentration of more than half the soluble factors studied changed significantly during therapy; 2) changes became more dramatic with increasing doses; 3) subclasses of soluble factors displayed different kinetics and 4) cytokine patterns varied quantitatively among patients. This study shows that the cytokine storm that follows systemic IL-2 administration is complex and far-reaching inclusive of soluble factors with disparate, partly redundant and partly contrasting effects on immune function. Therefore comparing in parallel large number of soluble factors, it sets a comprehensive foundation for further elucidation of "cytokine storm" in larger

  12. Infection by mink cell focus-forming viruses confers interleukin 2 (IL-2) independence to an IL-2-dependent rat T-cell lymphoma line.

    PubMed Central

    Tsichlis, P N; Bear, S E

    1991-01-01

    The development of T-cell lymphomas in rodents infected with type C retroviruses has been linked to the generation of a class of envelope (env) recombinant viruses called mink cell focus-forming viruses (MCF viruses) in the preleukemic thymus. To determine whether infection by MCF viruses altered the growth phenotype of retrovirus-induced T-cell lymphomas, a Moloney murine leukemia virus-induced interleukin-2 (IL-2)-dependent rat T-cell lymphoma line (4437A) was infected with MCF-247, modified MCF-V33 (mMCF-V33), or NZB-xenotropic (NZB-X) virus. The effects of virus infection on the IL-2 dependence of these cells was examined by cultivating them in the absence of IL-2. After IL-2 withdrawal, the uninfected and NZB-X-infected cells went through a crisis period characterized by massive death. All the independently maintained cultures of MCF- and mMCF-V33-infected cells, on the other hand, became IL-2 independent without a crisis. All the polytropic virus-infected IL-2-independent cultures contained a population of cells that was polyclonal with regard to polytropic provirus integration. Over this polyclonal background each culture produced multiple clones of cells that were selected rapidly after IL-2 withdrawal. Furthermore, the resulting MCF- or mMCF-V33-infected IL-2-independent cells retained the expression of IL-2 receptor. These data show that MCF and mMCF-V33 viruses may alter the growth phenotype of a T-cell lymphoma line and suggest that their effect on cell growth may be due to the direct interaction of the MCF envelope glycoprotein with cellular components, perhaps the IL-2 receptor. Images PMID:2052545

  13. Influence of In Vitro IL-2 or IL-15 Alone or in Combination with Hsp 70 Derived 14-Mer Peptide (TKD) on the Expression of NK Cell Activatory and Inhibitory Receptors on Peripheral Blood T Cells, B Cells and NKT Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hromadnikova, Ilona; Li, Shuang; Kotlabova, Katerina; Dickinson, Anne M.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies from Multhoff and colleagues reported that plasma membrane Hsp70 acts as a tumour-specific recognition structure for activated NK cells, and that the incubation of NK cells with Hsp70 and/or a 14-mer peptide derived from the N-terminal sequence of Hsp70 (TKDNNLLGRFELSG, TKD, aa 450–463) plus a low dose of IL-2 triggers NK cell proliferation and migration, and their capacity to kill cancer cells expressing membrane Hsp70. Herein, we have used flow cytometry to determine the influence of in vitro stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy individuals with IL-2 or IL-15, either alone or in combination with TKD peptide on the cell surface expression of CD94, NK cell activatory receptors (CD16, NK2D, NKG2C, NKp30, NKp44, NKp46, NKp80, KIR2DL4, DNAM-1 and LAMP1) and NK cell inhibitory receptors (NKG2A, KIR2DL2/L3, LIR1/ILT-2 and NKR-P1A) by CD3+CD56+ (NKT), CD3+CD4+, CD3+CD8+ and CD19+ populations. NKG2D, DNAM-1, LAMP1 and NKR-P1A expression was upregulated after the stimulation with IL-2 or IL-15 alone or in combination with TKD in NKT, CD8+ T cells and B cells. CD94 was upregulated in NKT and CD8+ T cells. Concurrently, an increase in a number of CD8+ T cells expressing LIR1/ILT-2 and CD4+ T cells positive for NKR-P1A was observed. The proportion of CD8+ T cells that expressed NKG2D was higher after IL-2/TKD treatment, when compared with IL-2 treatment alone. In comparison with IL-15 alone, IL-15/TKD treatment increased the proportion of NKT cells that were positive for CD94, LAMP1 and NKRP-1A. The more potent effect of IL-15/TKD on cell surface expression of NKG2D, LIR1/ILT-2 and NKRP-1A was observed in B cells compared with IL-15 alone. However, this increase was not of statistical significance. IL-2/TKD induced significant upregulation of LAMP1 in CD8+ T cells compared with IL-2 alone. Besides NK cells, other immunocompetent cells present within the fraction of peripheral blood mononuclear cells were influenced by the treatment

  14. Influence of In Vitro IL-2 or IL-15 Alone or in Combination with Hsp 70 Derived 14-Mer Peptide (TKD) on the Expression of NK Cell Activatory and Inhibitory Receptors on Peripheral Blood T Cells, B Cells and NKT Cells.

    PubMed

    Hromadnikova, Ilona; Li, Shuang; Kotlabova, Katerina; Dickinson, Anne M

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies from Multhoff and colleagues reported that plasma membrane Hsp70 acts as a tumour-specific recognition structure for activated NK cells, and that the incubation of NK cells with Hsp70 and/or a 14-mer peptide derived from the N-terminal sequence of Hsp70 (TKDNNLLGRFELSG, TKD, aa 450-463) plus a low dose of IL-2 triggers NK cell proliferation and migration, and their capacity to kill cancer cells expressing membrane Hsp70. Herein, we have used flow cytometry to determine the influence of in vitro stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy individuals with IL-2 or IL-15, either alone or in combination with TKD peptide on the cell surface expression of CD94, NK cell activatory receptors (CD16, NK2D, NKG2C, NKp30, NKp44, NKp46, NKp80, KIR2DL4, DNAM-1 and LAMP1) and NK cell inhibitory receptors (NKG2A, KIR2DL2/L3, LIR1/ILT-2 and NKR-P1A) by CD3+CD56+ (NKT), CD3+CD4+, CD3+CD8+ and CD19+ populations. NKG2D, DNAM-1, LAMP1 and NKR-P1A expression was upregulated after the stimulation with IL-2 or IL-15 alone or in combination with TKD in NKT, CD8+ T cells and B cells. CD94 was upregulated in NKT and CD8+ T cells. Concurrently, an increase in a number of CD8+ T cells expressing LIR1/ILT-2 and CD4+ T cells positive for NKR-P1A was observed. The proportion of CD8+ T cells that expressed NKG2D was higher after IL-2/TKD treatment, when compared with IL-2 treatment alone. In comparison with IL-15 alone, IL-15/TKD treatment increased the proportion of NKT cells that were positive for CD94, LAMP1 and NKRP-1A. The more potent effect of IL-15/TKD on cell surface expression of NKG2D, LIR1/ILT-2 and NKRP-1A was observed in B cells compared with IL-15 alone. However, this increase was not of statistical significance. IL-2/TKD induced significant upregulation of LAMP1 in CD8+ T cells compared with IL-2 alone. Besides NK cells, other immunocompetent cells present within the fraction of peripheral blood mononuclear cells were influenced by the treatment

  15. Role of IL-2 in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Zhou, Caicun; Ren, Shengxiang

    2016-06-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is one of the key cytokines with pleiotropic effects on immune system. It has been approved for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma and metastatic melanoma. Recent progress has been made in our understanding of IL-2 in regulating lymphocytes that has led to exciting new directions for cancer immunotherapy. While improved IL-2 formulations might be used as monotherapies, their combination with other anticancer immunotherapies, such as adoptive cell transfer regimens, antigen-specific vaccination, and blockade of immune checkpoint inhibitory molecules, for example cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed death 1 (PD-1) mono-antibodies, would held the promise of treating metastatic cancer. Despite the comprehensive studies of IL-2 on immune system have established the application of IL-2 for cancer immunotherapy, a number of poignant obstacles remain for future research. In the present review, we will focus on the key biological features of IL-2, current applications, limitations, and future directions of IL-2 in cancer immunotherapy.

  16. IL-2 induces T cell adherence to extracellular matrix: inhibition of adherence and migration by IL-2 peptides generated by leukocyte elastase.

    PubMed

    Ariel, A; Yavin, E J; Hershkoviz, R; Avron, A; Franitza, S; Hardan, I; Cahalon, L; Fridkin, M; Lider, O

    1998-09-01

    Migration of inflammatory cells requires cell adhesion and their subsequent detachment from the extracellular matrix (ECM). Leukocyte activation and migration must be terminated to stop inflammation. Here, we report that IL-2 enhances human T cell adherence to laminin, collagen type IV, and fibronectin (FN). In contrast, neutrophil elastase, an enzyme activated during inflammation, degrades IL-2 to yield IL-2 fractions that inhibit IL-2-induced T cell adhesion to FN. The amino acid composition of two of these IL-2 fractions, which appear to block T cell adherence to FN, were analyzed, and three peptides were consequently synthesized. The three peptides IVL, RMLT, and EFLNRWIT, but not the corresponding inversely synthesized peptides, inhibited T cell adhesion to FN induced by a variety of activators: IL-2, IL-7, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1beta, and PMA, as well as anti-CD3 and anti-beta1 integrin-activating mAb. Moreover, these IL-2 peptides inhibited T cell chemotaxis via FN-coated membranes induced by IL-2 and MIP-1beta. Inhibition of T cell adherence and migration apparently involves abrogation of the rearrangement of the T cell actin cytoskeleton. Thus, the migrating immune cells, the cytokines, and the ECM can create a functional relationship in which both inflammation-inducing signals and inhibitory molecules of immune responses can coexist; the enzymatic products of IL-2 may serve as natural feedback inhibitors of inflammation. PMID:9725245

  17. What to do with targeted IL-2.

    PubMed

    Lode, H N; Xiang, R; Perri, P; Pertl, U; Lode, A; Gillies, S D; Reisfeld, R A

    2000-05-01

    A common strategy in immunotherapy of cancer is the induction of an increased immunogenicity of syngeneic malignancies. A novel approach to achieve this goal is the targeting of cytokines into the tumor microenvironment with antibody-cytokine fusion proteins, called immunocytokines. This report summarizes therapeutic efficacy and immune mechanisms involved in targeting IL-2 to syngeneic tumors and describes their extended use as a synergistic treatment modality for cancer vaccines and antiangiogenesis. Treatment of established melanoma and colon carcinoma metastases with IL-2 immunocytokines resulted in eradication of disease, followed by a vaccination effect protecting mice from lethal challenges with wild-type tumor cells. In a syngeneic neuroblastoma model, targeted IL-2 elicited effective antitumor responses mediated by NK cells in the absence of a T-cell memory. Interestingly, targeted IL-2 was effective in amplification of memory immune responses previously induced by cancer vaccines. Furthermore, a synergistic effect achieved by combining targeted IL-2-immunotherapy with an antiangiogenic inhibitor of integrin alpha(v)beta(3) extends the potential of this immunotherapeutic strategy in combination with antiangiogenesis as demonstrated in three syngeneic tumor models. Based on these findings, targeted IL-2 may provide an effective tool for the adjuvant treatment of cancer either applied as a single strategy or in combination with cancer vaccines and antiangiogenic strategies.

  18. Tuning IL-2 signaling by ADP-ribosylation of CD25

    PubMed Central

    Teege, Sophie; Hann, Alexander; Miksiewicz, Maria; MacMillan, Cary; Rissiek, Björn; Buck, Friedrich; Menzel, Stephan; Nissen, Marion; Bannas, Peter; Haag, Friedrich; Boyer, Olivier; Seman, Michel; Adriouch, Sahil; Koch-Nolte, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    Control of immunologic tolerance and homeostasis rely on Foxp3+CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) that constitutively express the high affinity receptor for Interleukin-2, CD25. Tregs proliferate in response to injections of IL-2/anti-IL-2 antibody complexes or low doses of IL-2. However, little is known about endogenous mechanisms that regulate the sensitivity of CD25 to signaling by IL-2. Here we demonstrate that CD25 is ADP-ribosylated at Arg35 in the IL-2 binding site by ecto-ADP-ribosyltransferase ARTC2.2, a toxin-related GPI-anchored ecto-enzyme. ADP-ribosylation inhibits binding of IL-2 by CD25, IL-2- induced phosphorylation of STAT5, and IL-2-dependent cell proliferation. Our study elucidates an as-yet-unrecognized mechanism to tune IL-2 signaling. This newly found mechanism might thwart Tregs at sites of inflammation and thereby permit a more potent response of activated effector T cells. PMID:25753532

  19. Selective targeting of IL-2 to NKG2D bearing cells for improved immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Reza; Lazear, Eric; Wang, Xiaoli; Arefanian, Saeed; Zheleznyak, Alexander; Carreno, Beatriz M.; Higashikubo, Ryuji; Gelman, Andrew E.; Kreisel, Daniel; Fremont, Daved H.; Krupnick, Alexander Sasha

    2016-01-01

    Despite over 20 years of clinical use, IL-2 has not fulfilled expectations as a safe and effective form of tumour immunotherapy. Expression of the high affinity IL-2Rα chain on regulatory T cells mitigates the anti-tumour immune response and its expression on vascular endothelium is responsible for life threatening complications such as diffuse capillary leak and pulmonary oedema. Here we describe the development of a recombinant fusion protein comprised of a cowpox virus encoded NKG2D binding protein (OMCP) and a mutated form of IL-2 with poor affinity for IL-2Rα. This fusion protein (OMCP-mutIL-2) potently and selectively activates IL-2 signalling only on NKG2D-bearing cells, such as natural killer (NK) cells, without broadly activating IL-2Rα-bearing cells. OMCP-mutIL-2 provides superior tumour control in several mouse models of malignancy and is not limited by mouse strain-specific variability of NK function. In addition, OMCP-mutIL-2 lacks the toxicity and vascular complications associated with parental wild-type IL-2. PMID:27650575

  20. Selective targeting of IL-2 to NKG2D bearing cells for improved immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Reza; Lazear, Eric; Wang, Xiaoli; Arefanian, Saeed; Zheleznyak, Alexander; Carreno, Beatriz M; Higashikubo, Ryuji; Gelman, Andrew E; Kreisel, Daniel; Fremont, Daved H; Krupnick, Alexander Sasha

    2016-01-01

    Despite over 20 years of clinical use, IL-2 has not fulfilled expectations as a safe and effective form of tumour immunotherapy. Expression of the high affinity IL-2Rα chain on regulatory T cells mitigates the anti-tumour immune response and its expression on vascular endothelium is responsible for life threatening complications such as diffuse capillary leak and pulmonary oedema. Here we describe the development of a recombinant fusion protein comprised of a cowpox virus encoded NKG2D binding protein (OMCP) and a mutated form of IL-2 with poor affinity for IL-2Rα. This fusion protein (OMCP-mutIL-2) potently and selectively activates IL-2 signalling only on NKG2D-bearing cells, such as natural killer (NK) cells, without broadly activating IL-2Rα-bearing cells. OMCP-mutIL-2 provides superior tumour control in several mouse models of malignancy and is not limited by mouse strain-specific variability of NK function. In addition, OMCP-mutIL-2 lacks the toxicity and vascular complications associated with parental wild-type IL-2. PMID:27650575

  1. Interleukin-2 receptor signaling: at the interface between tolerance and immunity.

    PubMed

    Malek, Thomas R; Castro, Iris

    2010-08-27

    Interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) signaling regulates tolerance and immunity. Here, we review recent work concerning the structure, signaling, and function of the IL-2R, emphasizing the contribution of IL-2 for T cell-dependent activity in vivo. IL-2R signaling influences two discrete aspects of immune responses by CD8(+) T cells, terminal differentiation of effector cells in primary responses, and aspects of memory recall responses. IL-2 also delivers essential signals for thymic development of regulatory T (Treg) cells and later to promote their homeostasis and function. Each of these outcomes on T effector and Treg cells requires distinct amounts of IL-2R signaling, with low IL-2R signaling sufficient for many key aspects of Treg cells. Thus, tolerance is readily maintained and favored with limited IL-2.

  2. Interleukin-2 Receptor Signaling: At the Interface between Tolerance and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Malek, Thomas R.; Castro, Iris

    2010-01-01

    Interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) signaling regulates tolerance and immunity. Here, we review recent work concerning the structure, signaling, and function of the IL-2R, emphasizing the contribution of IL-2 for T cell-dependent activity in vivo. IL-2R signaling influences two discrete aspects of immune responses by CD8+ T cells, terminal differentiation of effector cells in primary responses, and aspects of memory recall responses. IL-2 also delivers essential signals for thymic development of regulatory T (Treg) cells and later to promote their homeostasis and function. Each of these outcomes on T effector and Treg cells requires distinct amounts of IL-2R signaling, with low IL-2R signaling sufficient for many key aspects of Treg cells. Thus, tolerance is readily maintained and favored with limited IL-2. PMID:20732639

  3. Inflammation Enhances IL-2 Driven Differentiation of Cytolytic CD4 T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Workman, Aspen M.; Jacobs, Ashley K.; Vogel, Alexander J.; Condon, Shirley; Brown, Deborah M.

    2014-01-01

    Cytolytic CD4 T cells (CD4 CTL) have been identified in vivo in response to viral infections; however, the factors necessary for driving the cytolytic phenotype have not been fully elucidated. Our previously published work suggests IL-2 may be the master regulator of perforin-mediated cytotoxicity in CD4 effectors. To further dissect the role of IL-2 in CD4 CTL generation, T cell receptor transgenic mice deficient in the ability to produce IL-2 or the high affinity IL-2 receptor (IL-2Rα, CD25) were used. Increasing concentrations of IL-2 were necessary to drive perforin (Prf) expression and maximal cytotoxicity. Granzyme B (GrB) expression and killing correlated with STAT5 activation and CD25 expression in vitro, suggesting that signaling through the high affinity IL-2R is critical for full cytotoxicity. IL-2 signaling was also necessary in vivo for inducing the Th1 phenotype and IFN-γ expression in CD4 T cells during influenza A (IAV) infection. In addition, GrB expression, as measured by mean fluorescent intensity, was decreased in CD25 deficient cells; however, the frequency of CD4 cells expressing GrB was unchanged. Similarly, analysis of cytolytic markers such as CD107a/b and Eomesodermin indicate high IL-2Rα expression is not necessary to drive the CD4 CTL phenotype during IAV infection. Thus, inflammatory signals induced by viral infection may overcome the need for strong IL-2 signals in driving cytotoxicity in CD4 cells. PMID:24586481

  4. Inhibition of Gαs/cAMP Signaling Decreases TCR-Stimulated IL-2 transcription in CD4+ T Helper Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hynes, Thomas R.; Yost, Evan A.; Yost, Stacy M.; Hartle, Cassandra M.; Ott, Braden J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The role of cAMP in regulating T cell activation and function has been controversial. cAMP is generally known as an immunosuppressant, but it is also required for generating optimal immune responses. As the effect of cAMP is likely to depend on its cellular context, the current study investigated whether the mechanism of activation of Gαs and adenylyl cyclase influences their effect on T cell receptor (TCR)-stimulated interleukin-2 (IL-2) mRNA levels. Methods: The effect of blocking Gs-coupled receptor (GsPCR)-mediated Gs activation on TCR-stimulated IL-2 mRNA levels in CD4+ T cells was compared with that of knocking down Gαs expression or inhibiting adenylyl cyclase activity. The effect of knocking down Gαs expression on TCR-stimulated cAMP accumulation was compared with that of blocking GsPCR signaling. Results: ZM-241385, an antagonist to the Gs-coupled A2A adenosine receptor (A2AR), enhanced TCR-stimulated IL-2 mRNA levels in primary human CD4+ T helper cells and in Jurkat T cells. A dominant negative Gαs construct, GαsDN3, also enhanced TCR-stimulated IL-2 mRNA levels. Similar to GsPCR antagonists, GαsDN3 blocked GsPCR-dependent activation of both Gαs and Gβγ. In contrast, Gαs siRNA and 2’,5’-dideoxyadenosine (ddA), an adenylyl cyclase inhibitor, decreased TCR-stimulated IL-2 mRNA levels. Gαs siRNA, but not GαsDN3, decreased TCR-stimulated cAMP synthesis. Potentiation of IL-2 mRNA levels by ZM-241385 required at least two days of TCR stimulation, and addition of ddA after three days of TCR stimulation enhanced IL-2 mRNA levels. Conclusions: GsPCRs play an inhibitory role in the regulation of TCR-stimulated IL-2 mRNA levels whereas Gαs and cAMP can play a stimulatory one. Additionally, TCR-dependent activation of Gαs does not appear to involve GsPCRs. These results suggest that the context of Gαs/cAMP activation and the stage of T cell activation and differentiation determine the effect on TCR-stimulated IL-2 mRNA levels. PMID

  5. Association of the IL2RA/CD25 Gene With Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hinks, Anne; Ke, Xiayi; Barton, Anne; Eyre, Steve; Bowes, John; Worthington, Jane; Thompson, Susan D; Langefeld, Carl D; Glass, David N; Thomson, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    Objective IL2RA/CD25, the gene for interleukin-2 receptor α, is emerging as a general susceptibility gene for autoimmune diseases because of its role in the development and function of regulatory T cells and the association of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within this gene with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM), Graves' disease, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and multiple sclerosis (MS). The aim of this study was to determine whether SNPs within the IL2RA/CD25 gene are associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods Three SNPs within the IL2RA/CD25 gene, that previously showed evidence of an association with either RA, MS, or type 1 DM, were selected for genotyping in UK JIA cases (n = 654) and controls (n = 3,849). Data for 1 SNP (rs2104286) were also available from North American JIA cases (n = 747) and controls (n = 1,161). Association analyses were performed using Plink software. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated. Results SNP rs2104286 within the IL2RA/CD25 gene was significantly associated with UK JIA cases (OR for the allele 0.76 [95% CI 0.66–0.88], P for trend = 0.0002). A second SNP (rs41295061) also showed modest evidence for association with JIA (OR 0.80 [95% CI 0.63–1.0], P = 0.05). Association with rs2104286 was convincingly replicated in the North American JIA cohort (OR 0.84 [95% CI 0.65–0.99], P for trend = 0.05). Meta-analysis of the 2 cohorts yielded highly significant evidence of association with JIA (OR 0.76 [95% CI 0.62–0.88], P = 4.9 × 10−5). Conclusion These results provide strong evidence that the IL2RA/CD25 gene represents a JIA susceptibility locus. Further investigation of the gene using both genetic and functional approaches is now required. PMID:19116909

  6. Low-dose IL-2 selectively activates subsets of CD4+ Tregs and NK cells

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Masahiro; Matos, Tiago; Liu, Hongye; Koreth, John; Kim, Haesook T.; Paul, Nicole E.; Murase, Kazuyuki; Whangbo, Jennifer; Alho, Ana C.; Nikiforow, Sarah; Cutler, Corey; Ho, Vincent T.; Armand, Philippe; Alyea, Edwin P.; Antin, Joseph H.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Lacerda, Joao F.; Soiffer, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ regulatory T cells (CD4Tregs) play a critical role in the maintenance of immune tolerance and prevention of chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. IL-2 supports the proliferation and survival of CD4Tregs and previous studies have demonstrated that IL-2 induces selective expansion of CD4Tregs and improves clinical manifestations of chronic GVHD. However, mechanisms for selective activation of CD4Tregs and the effects of low-dose IL-2 on other immune cells are not well understood. Using mass cytometry, we demonstrate that low concentrations of IL-2 selectively induce STAT5 phosphorylation in Helios+ CD4Tregs and CD56brightCD16– NK cells in vitro. Preferential activation and expansion of Helios+ CD4Tregs and CD56brightCD16– NK cells was also demonstrated in patients with chronic GVHD receiving low-dose IL-2. With prolonged IL-2 treatment for 48 weeks, phenotypic changes were also observed in Helios– CD4Tregs. The effects of low-dose IL-2 therapy on conventional CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells were limited to increased expression of PD-1 on effector memory T cells. These studies reveal the selective effects of low-dose IL-2 therapy on Helios+ CD4Tregs and CD56bright NK cells that constitutively express high-affinity IL-2 receptors as well as the indirect effects of prolonged exposure to low concentrations of IL-2 in vivo. PMID:27812545

  7. Evaluation of the IL2/IL21, IL2RA and IL2RB genetic variants influence on the endogenous non-anterior uveitis genetic predisposition

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recently, different genetic variants located within the IL2/IL21 genetic region as well as within both IL2RA and IL2RB loci have been associated to multiple autoimmune disorders. We aimed to investigate for the first time the potential influence of the IL2/IL21, IL2RA and IL2RB most associated polymorphisms with autoimmunity on the endogenous non-anterior uveitis genetic predisposition. Methods A total of 196 patients with endogenous non-anterior uveitis and 760 healthy controls, all of them from Caucasian population, were included in the current study. The IL2/IL21 (rs2069762, rs6822844 and rs907715), IL2RA (2104286, rs11594656 and rs12722495) and IL2RB (rs743777) genetic variants were genotyped using TaqMan® allelic discrimination assays. Results A statistically significant difference was found for the rs6822844 (IL2/IL21 region) minor allele frequency in the group of uveitis patients compared with controls (P-value=0.02, OR=0.64 CI 95%=0.43-0.94) although the significance was lost after multiple testing correction. Furthermore, no evidence of association with uveitis was detected for the analyzed genetic variants of the IL2RA or IL2RB loci. Conclusion Our results indicate that analyzed IL2/IL21, IL2RA and IL2RB polymorphisms do not seem to play a significant role on the non-anterior uveitis genetic predisposition although further studies are needed in order to clear up the influence of these loci on the non-anterior uveitis susceptibility. PMID:23676143

  8. IL-2 / α-IL-2 Complex Treatment Cannot Be Substituted for the Adoptive Transfer of Regulatory T cells to Promote Bone Marrow Engraftment

    PubMed Central

    Mahr, Benedikt; Unger, Lukas; Hock, Karin; Pilat, Nina; Baranyi, Ulrike; Schwarz, Christoph; Maschke, Svenja; Farkas, Andreas Michael; Wekerle, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Cell therapy with recipient Tregs achieves engraftment of allogeneic bone marrow (BM) without the need for cytoreductive conditioning (i.e., without irradiation or cytotoxic drugs). Thereby mixed chimerism and transplantation tolerance are established in recipients conditioned solely with costimulation blockade and rapamycin. However, clinical translation would be substantially facilitated if Treg-stimulating pharmaceutical agents could be used instead of individualized cell therapy. Recently, it was shown that interleukin-2 (IL-2) complexed with a monoclonal antibody (mAb) (clone JES6-1A12) against IL-2 (IL-2 complexes) potently expands and activates Tregs in vivo. Therefore, we investigated whether IL-2 complexes can replace Treg therapy in a costimulation blockade-based and irradiation-free BM transplantation (BMT) model. Unexpectedly, the administration of IL-2 complexes at the time of BMT (instead of Tregs) failed to induce BM engraftment in non-irradiated recipients (0/6 with IL-2 complexes vs. 3/4 with Tregs, p<0.05). Adding IL-2 complexes to an otherwise effective regimen involving recipient irradiation (1Gy) but no Treg transfer indeed actively triggered donor BM rejection at higher doses (0/8 with IL-2 complexes vs. 9/11 without, p<0.01) and had no detectable effect at two lower doses (3/5 vs. 9/11, p>0.05). CD8 T cells and NK cells of IL-2 complex-treated naïve mice showed an enhanced proliferative response towards donor antigens in vitro despite the marked expansion of Tregs. However, IL-2 complexes also expanded conventional CD4 T cells, CD8 T cells, NK cells, NKT cells and notably even B cells, albeit to a lesser extent. Notably, IL-2 complex expanded Tregs featured less potent suppressive functions than in vitro activated Tregs in terms of T cell suppression in vitro and BM engraftment in vivo. In conclusion, these data suggest that IL-2 complexes are less effective than recipient Tregs in promoting BM engraftment and in contrast actually trigger BM

  9. IL-2/α-IL-2 Complex Treatment Cannot Be Substituted for the Adoptive Transfer of Regulatory T cells to Promote Bone Marrow Engraftment.

    PubMed

    Mahr, Benedikt; Unger, Lukas; Hock, Karin; Pilat, Nina; Baranyi, Ulrike; Schwarz, Christoph; Maschke, Svenja; Farkas, Andreas Michael; Wekerle, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Cell therapy with recipient Tregs achieves engraftment of allogeneic bone marrow (BM) without the need for cytoreductive conditioning (i.e., without irradiation or cytotoxic drugs). Thereby mixed chimerism and transplantation tolerance are established in recipients conditioned solely with costimulation blockade and rapamycin. However, clinical translation would be substantially facilitated if Treg-stimulating pharmaceutical agents could be used instead of individualized cell therapy. Recently, it was shown that interleukin-2 (IL-2) complexed with a monoclonal antibody (mAb) (clone JES6-1A12) against IL-2 (IL-2 complexes) potently expands and activates Tregs in vivo. Therefore, we investigated whether IL-2 complexes can replace Treg therapy in a costimulation blockade-based and irradiation-free BM transplantation (BMT) model. Unexpectedly, the administration of IL-2 complexes at the time of BMT (instead of Tregs) failed to induce BM engraftment in non-irradiated recipients (0/6 with IL-2 complexes vs. 3/4 with Tregs, p<0.05). Adding IL-2 complexes to an otherwise effective regimen involving recipient irradiation (1Gy) but no Treg transfer indeed actively triggered donor BM rejection at higher doses (0/8 with IL-2 complexes vs. 9/11 without, p<0.01) and had no detectable effect at two lower doses (3/5 vs. 9/11, p>0.05). CD8 T cells and NK cells of IL-2 complex-treated naïve mice showed an enhanced proliferative response towards donor antigens in vitro despite the marked expansion of Tregs. However, IL-2 complexes also expanded conventional CD4 T cells, CD8 T cells, NK cells, NKT cells and notably even B cells, albeit to a lesser extent. Notably, IL-2 complex expanded Tregs featured less potent suppressive functions than in vitro activated Tregs in terms of T cell suppression in vitro and BM engraftment in vivo. In conclusion, these data suggest that IL-2 complexes are less effective than recipient Tregs in promoting BM engraftment and in contrast actually trigger BM

  10. In vitro ozone exposure inhibits mitogen-induced lymphocyte proliferation and IL-2 production

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, S.; Jordan, R.L.; Orlando, G.S.; Koren, H.S.

    1989-01-01

    Human blood mononuclear cells were exposed to ozone in vitro and thereafter analyzed for competence in mitogen-induced proliferation as well as IL-1 and IL-2 production. Proliferative responses induced by phytohemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (Con A), and pokeweed mitogen (PWM) were all depressed in lymphocytes exposed to an ozone concentration of 1 ppm for 4-6 h. The response to PWM was most sensitive to the ozone effect (38% suppression); responses to Con A and PHA were suppressed to a lesser extent, 23% and 18%, respectively, and were not significantly different from each other. PWM responses were affected at an ozone concentration as low as 0.1 ppm; however, no suppression of Con A-induced proliferation was seen below 0.18 ppm or of PHA-induced proliferation below 0.5 ppm. When lymphocytes and monocytes were exposed separately to ozone and then mixed back with control air-exposed monocytes or lymphocytes, both cell types appeared to be affected and the functional defects caused by the pollutant were additive. Monocyte IL-1 production induced by endotoxin was not affected by ozone exposure, while surface expression of HLA-DR on exposed monocytes was reduced by 40% 24 h after exposure. Moreover, lymphocytes exposed to ozone produced 46% less IL-2 while expressing similar surface density of IL-2 receptors. Taken together, these results show that exposure to ozone has distinct adverse effects on lymphocytes and monocytes, both of which are important in local immune defenses in the lung.

  11. IL-2 gene-modified tumour vaccines: monitoring of IL-2 levels in serum and peritoneal cavity of vaccinated mice.

    PubMed

    Indrová, M; Pajtasz-Piasecka, E; Jandlová, T; Símová, J; Bubeník, J; Radzikowski, C

    1999-01-01

    IL-2 kinetics was assessed in mice vaccinated with irradiated syngeneic tumour vaccines carrying an inserted IL-2 gene and producing constitutively IL-2. For comparison, the kinetics of i.v. administered recombinant IL-2 was also examined. During regular time intervals after the vaccination or administration of recombinant IL-2, samples of serum and peritoneal fluid were collected and examined, using CTLL bioassay or its MTT modification. After i.p. administration of irradiated IL-2-producing plasmacytoma (X63-m-IL-2) vaccine, the levels of IL-2 were substantially higher in the peritoneal fluid than in the serum. Both in the peritoneal fluid and in the serum, the IL-2 level was increasing up to 60 min after administration and then it gradually decreased. The last time point when IL-2 was still detectable both in the peritoneal fluid and in the serum was 30 h. Almost identical results were obtained when the IL-2 levels were detected by the conventional CTLL assay, in which DNA synthesis was monitored by 3H-thymidine labeling, and by the isotope-free MTT modification of the CTLL assay, in which the DNA synthesis was monitored by staining. The MTT modification has the advantage of an isotope-free method. Comparison of two different IL-2-producing vaccines, a murine plasmacytoma X63-m-IL-2, with high IL-2 production, and murine sarcoma MC12-IL-2, with low IL-2 production, revealed that whereas after i.p. administration of the high producers, the peak of IL-2 was reached both in the peritoneal fluid and in the serum after 1 h, the administration of low producers gave the peak level of IL-2 later, 5 h after i.p. administration. Comparison of IL-2 levels obtained after i.p. administration of live and irradiated X63-m-IL-2 vaccine revealed that the irradiated vaccine produced both in vitro and in vivo higher amounts of IL-2. As compared to i.p. administration, the kinetics after i.v. administration of the X63-m-IL-2 vaccine was different. The maximum level of recombinant

  12. Diversification of TAM receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Zagórska, Anna; Través, Paqui G.; Lew, Erin D.; Dransfield, Ian; Lemke, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Apoptotic cell clearance is critical for both tissue homeostasis and the resolution of inflammation. We found that the TAM receptor tyrosine kinases Axl and Mer played distinct roles as phagocytic receptors in these two settings, where they exhibited divergent expression, regulation, and activity. Mer acted as a tolerogenic receptor in resting macrophages and in settings of immune suppression. Conversely, Axl was an inflammatory response receptor whose expression was induced by pro-inflammatory stimuli. Axl and Mer displayed distinct ligand specificities, ligand-receptor complex formation in tissues, and receptor shedding upon activation. These differences notwithstanding, phagocytosis by either protein was strictly dependent on receptor activation that was triggered by bridging TAM receptor–ligand complexes to the ‘eat-me’ signal phosphatidylserine on apoptotic cell surfaces. PMID:25194421

  13. Structure, function, and regulation of adrenergic receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Strosberg, A. D.

    1993-01-01

    Adrenergic receptors for adrenaline and noradrenaline belong to the large multigenic family of receptors coupled to GTP-binding proteins. Three pharmacologic types have been identified: alpha 1-, alpha 2-, and beta-adrenergic receptors. Each of these has three subtypes, characterized by both structural and functional differences. The alpha 2 and beta receptors are coupled negatively and positively, respectively, to adenylyl cyclase via Gi or Gs regulatory proteins, and the alpha 1 receptors modulate phospholipase C via the Go protein. Subtype expression is regulated at the level of the gene, the mRNA, and the protein through various transcriptional and postsynthetic mechanisms. Adrenergic receptors constitute, after rhodopsin, one of the best studied models for the other receptors coupled to G proteins that are likely to display similar structural and functional properties. PMID:8401205

  14. Low-Dose IL-2 Induces Regulatory T Cell-Mediated Control of Experimental Food Allergy.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Benjamin; Vigneron, James; Levacher, Béatrice; Vazquez, Thomas; Pitoiset, Fabien; Brimaud, Faustine; Churlaud, Guillaume; Klatzmann, David; Bellier, Bertrand

    2016-07-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are pivotal for maintenance of immune self-tolerance and also regulate immune responses to exogenous Ags, including allergens. Both decreased Treg number and function have been reported in allergic patients, offering new therapeutic perspectives. We previously demonstrated that Tregs can be selectively expanded and activated by low doses of IL-2 (ld-IL-2) inducing immunoregulation without immunosuppression and established its protective effect in autoimmune diseases. In this study, we evaluated the ability of ld-IL-2 to control allergy in an experimental model of food allergy. Ld-IL-2 induced Treg expansion and activation that elicited protection against clinical manifestations of food allergy in two mouse models with OVA and peanut. This clinical effect was lost in Treg-depleted mice, demonstrating the major contribution of Tregs in ld-IL-2 efficacy. Mechanistic studies further indicated that protection from allergy could be explained by a Treg-dependent local modification of the Th1/Th2 balance and an inhibition of mast cell recruitment and activation. Preventive and therapeutic effects of ld-IL-2 were observed over a 7-mo-period, highlighting its long-term efficacy. This study demonstrated that ld-IL-2 is efficient to prevent and to treat allergic immune responses, and thus represents a promising therapeutic strategy for managing allergic diseases. PMID:27259854

  15. Interaction of JAK with steroid receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nibedita; Mayer, Doris

    2013-01-01

    The function of steroid receptors is not only regulated by steroid hormones, but also by multiple cellular signaling cascades activated by membrane-bound receptors which are stimulated by growth factors or cytokines. Cross-talk between JAK and steroid receptors plays a central role in the regulation of a multitude of physiological processes and aberrant signaling is involved in the development of numerous diseases including cancer. In this review we provide a brief summary of the knowledge of interactions between JAK and the function of steroid receptors in normal cells and tissues and in diseases. PMID:24416641

  16. Nuclear Phosphoproteomic Screen Uncovers ACLY as Mediator of IL-2-induced Proliferation of CD4+ T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Osinalde, Nerea; Mitxelena, Jone; Sánchez-Quiles, Virginia; Akimov, Vyacheslav; Aloria, Kerman; Arizmendi, Jesus M; Zubiaga, Ana M; Blagoev, Blagoy; Kratchmarova, Irina

    2016-06-01

    Anti-cancer immunotherapies commonly rely on the use of interleukin-2 (IL-2) to promote the expansion of T lymphocytes. IL-2- dependent proliferation is the culmination of a complex network of phosphorylation-driven signaling events that impact on gene transcription through mechanisms that are not clearly understood. To study the role of IL-2 in the regulation of nuclear protein function we have performed an unbiased mass spectrometry-based study of the nuclear phosphoproteome of resting and IL-2-treated CD4(+) T lymphocytes. We detected 8521distinct phosphosites including many that are not yet reported in curated phosphorylation databases. Although most phosphorylation sites remained unaffected upon IL-2 treatment, 391 sites corresponding to 288 gene products showed robust IL-2-dependent regulation. Importantly, we show that ATP-citrate lyase (ACLY) is a key phosphoprotein effector of IL-2-mediated T-cell responses. ACLY becomes phosphorylated on serine 455 in T lymphocytes upon IL-2-driven activation of AKT, and depletion or inactivation of ACLY compromises IL-2-promoted T-cell growth. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that ACLY is required for enhancing histone acetylation levels and inducing the expression of cell cycle regulating genes in response to IL-2. Thus, the metabolic enzyme ACLY emerges as a bridge between cytokine signaling and proliferation of T lymphocytes, and may be an attractive candidate target for the development of more efficient anti-cancer immunotherapies.

  17. Hypertonic stress regulates T cell function via pannexin-1 hemichannels and P2X receptors

    PubMed Central

    Woehrle, Tobias; Yip, Linda; Manohar, Monali; Sumi, Yuka; Yao, Yongli; Chen, Yu; Junger, Wolfgang G.

    2010-01-01

    Hypertonic saline (HS) resuscitation increases T cell function and inhibits posttraumatic T cell anergy, which can reduce immunosuppression and sepsis in trauma patients. We have previously shown that HS induces the release of cellular ATP and enhances T cell function. However, the mechanism by which HS induces ATP release and the subsequent regulation of T cell function by ATP remain poorly understood. In the present study, we show that inhibition of the gap junction hemichannel pannexin-1 (Panx1) blocks ATP release in response to HS, and HS exposure triggers significant changes in the expression of all P2X-type ATP receptors in Jurkat T cells. Blocking or silencing of Panx1 or of P2X1, P2X4, or P2X7 receptors blunts HS-induced p38 MAPK activation and the stimulatory effects of HS on TCR/CD28-induced IL-2 gene transcription. Moreover, treatment with HS or agonists of P2X receptors overcomes T cell suppression induced by the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. These findings indicate that Panx1 hemichannels facilitate ATP release in response to hypertonic stress and that P2X1, P2X4, and P2X7 receptor activation enhances T cell function. We conclude that HS and P2 receptor agonists promote T cell function and thus, could be used to improve T cell function in trauma patients. PMID:20884646

  18. Construction of self-recognizing regulatory T cells from conventional T cells by controlling CTLA-4 and IL-2 expression.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Kishi, Ayumi; Osaki, Motonao; Morikawa, Hiromasa; Prieto-Martin, Paz; Wing, Kajsa; Saito, Takashi; Sakaguchi, Shimon

    2013-06-01

    Thymus-produced CD4(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells, which specifically express the transcription factor forkhead box p3, are potently immunosuppressive and characteristically possess a self-reactive T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire. To determine the molecular basis of Treg suppressive activity and their self-skewed TCR repertoire formation, we attempted to reconstruct these Treg-specific properties in conventional T (Tconv) cells by genetic manipulation. We show that Tconv cells rendered IL-2 deficient and constitutively expressing transgenic cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) were potently suppressive in vitro when they were preactivated by antigenic stimulation. They also suppressed in vivo inflammatory bowel disease and systemic autoimmunity/inflammation produced by Treg deficiency. In addition, in the thymus, transgenic CTLA-4 expression in developing Tconv cells skewed their TCR repertoire toward higher self-reactivity, whereas CTLA-4 deficiency specifically in developing thymic Treg cells cancelled their physiological TCR self-skewing. The extracellular portion of CTLA-4 was sufficient for the suppression and repertoire shifting. It interfered with CD28 signaling to responder Tconv cells via outcompeting CD28 for binding to CD80 and CD86,or modulating CD80/CD86 expression on antigen-presenting cells. Thus, a triad of IL-2 repression, CTLA-4 expression, and antigenic stimulation is a minimalistic requirement for conferring Treg-like suppressive activity on Tconv cells, in accordance with the function of forkhead box p3 to strongly repress IL-2 and maintain CTLA-4 expression in natural Treg cells. Moreover, CTLA-4 expression is a key element for the formation of a self-reactive TCR repertoire in natural Treg cells. These findings can be exploited to control immune responses by targeting IL-2 and CTLA-4 in Treg and Tconv cells.

  19. Comparison of immunological changes between subcutaneous and intravenous route of administration of IL-2 in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Nouri, A M; Lowdell, M; Entazami, Z; Tezabwala, B U; Goode, A; Oliver, R T

    1996-01-01

    The effects of the route of administration of interleukin 2 (IL-2) on the immunological parameters of patients with various malignancies were investigated. The percent mean values for IL-2 receptor (Tac) positive cells among mononuclear cells in patients receiving IL-2 subcutaneously (5 cases) or intravenously (6 cases) were 7 and 7%, respectively. The corresponding values of post-IL-2 treatment peak were 18 and 16%. Similarly, the values for class II antigen expressing cells were 12 and 16% and 25 and 26%. In no case the difference between the values for the subcutaneous or the intravenous route reached significance. Using the 51Cr release assay, the mean percent killing activity of IL-2-activated mononuclear cells against Daudi tumour target cells for the subcutaneously and the intravenously treated groups were 27 and 14% and the corresponding values for the post-IL-2 treatment peak were 59% (p > 0.05) and 69% (p > 0.05), respectively. The similar values using K562 tumour as target were 17 and 8%, and the corresponding values for post-treatment peak were 55% (p > 0.05) and 23% (p > 0.05). In all cases the cytotoxic values for the post-IL-2 treatment were significantly greater than the pre-IL-2 values. The mean (+/- SD) values for serum beta2-m levels for 6 subcutaneously and 5 intravenously IL-2-treated patients were 6.5 +/- 4.6 and 5.7 +/- 3.4 mg/l (p > 0.05). The corresponding values for post-IL-2 (15 days) were 9.1 +/- 3.4 and 9.9 +/- 5.1 mg/1, respectively. These results demonstrate that there is no significant difference in the immunological parameters in cancer patients receiving IL-2 via subcutaneous or intravenous routes and provide further support for the current trend for clinical trials to concentrate on outpatients subcutaneous administration.

  20. IL-2 in the tumor microenvironment is necessary for Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein deficient NK cells to respond to tumors in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kritikou, Joanna S.; Dahlberg, Carin I. M.; Baptista, Marisa A. P.; Wagner, Arnika K.; Banerjee, Pinaki P.; Gwalani, Lavesh Amar; Poli, Cecilia; Panda, Sudeepta K.; Kärre, Klas; Kaech, Susan M.; Wermeling, Fredrik; Andersson, John; Orange, Jordan S.; Brauner, Hanna; Westerberg, Lisa S.

    2016-01-01

    To kill target cells, natural killer (NK) cells organize signaling from activating and inhibitory receptors to form a lytic synapse. Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) patients have loss-of-function mutations in the actin regulator WASp and suffer from immunodeficiency with increased risk to develop lymphoreticular malignancies. NK cells from WAS patients fail to form lytic synapses, however, the functional outcome in vivo remains unknown. Here, we show that WASp KO NK cells had decreased capacity to degranulate and produce IFNγ upon NKp46 stimulation and this was associated with reduced capacity to kill MHC class I-deficient hematopoietic grafts. Pre-treatment of WASp KO NK cells with IL-2 ex vivo restored degranulation, IFNγ production, and killing of MHC class I negative hematopoietic grafts. Moreover, WASp KO mice controlled growth of A20 lymphoma cells that naturally produced IL-2. WASp KO NK cells showed increased expression of DNAM-1, LAG-3, and KLRG1, all receptors associated with cellular exhaustion and NK cell memory. NK cells isolated from WAS patient spleen cells showed increased expression of DNAM-1 and had low to negative expression of CD56, a phenotype associated with NK cells exhaustion. Finally, in a cohort of neuroblastoma patients we identified a strong correlation between WASp, IL-2, and patient survival. PMID:27477778

  1. IL-2 in the tumor microenvironment is necessary for Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein deficient NK cells to respond to tumors in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kritikou, Joanna S; Dahlberg, Carin I M; Baptista, Marisa A P; Wagner, Arnika K; Banerjee, Pinaki P; Gwalani, Lavesh Amar; Poli, Cecilia; Panda, Sudeepta K; Kärre, Klas; Kaech, Susan M; Wermeling, Fredrik; Andersson, John; Orange, Jordan S; Brauner, Hanna; Westerberg, Lisa S

    2016-01-01

    To kill target cells, natural killer (NK) cells organize signaling from activating and inhibitory receptors to form a lytic synapse. Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) patients have loss-of-function mutations in the actin regulator WASp and suffer from immunodeficiency with increased risk to develop lymphoreticular malignancies. NK cells from WAS patients fail to form lytic synapses, however, the functional outcome in vivo remains unknown. Here, we show that WASp KO NK cells had decreased capacity to degranulate and produce IFNγ upon NKp46 stimulation and this was associated with reduced capacity to kill MHC class I-deficient hematopoietic grafts. Pre-treatment of WASp KO NK cells with IL-2 ex vivo restored degranulation, IFNγ production, and killing of MHC class I negative hematopoietic grafts. Moreover, WASp KO mice controlled growth of A20 lymphoma cells that naturally produced IL-2. WASp KO NK cells showed increased expression of DNAM-1, LAG-3, and KLRG1, all receptors associated with cellular exhaustion and NK cell memory. NK cells isolated from WAS patient spleen cells showed increased expression of DNAM-1 and had low to negative expression of CD56, a phenotype associated with NK cells exhaustion. Finally, in a cohort of neuroblastoma patients we identified a strong correlation between WASp, IL-2, and patient survival. PMID:27477778

  2. Retroviral-mediated IL-2 gene transfer into murine neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Cho, H S; Song, J Y; Park, C Y; Lyu, C J; Kim, B S; Kim, K Y

    2000-02-01

    We used retroviral-mediated gene transfer of the human interleukin (IL)-2 gene into murine neuroblastoma cells to investigate whether locally-secreted IL-2 is able to influence the generation of anti-tumor immune responses. Supernatant obtained from cultures of approximately 1 x 10(6) IL-2 gene-transduced, G-418 selected neuro-2a cells was assayed for human IL-2 production by ELISA kit. First, to estimate whether the local secretion of IL-2 from the genetically-modified tumor cells would affect their tumorigenicity in vivo, IL-2-secreting neuro-2a cells were s.c. injected into A/J mice and tumor growth was measured weekly. And to estimate whether IL-2 transfected neuroblastoma cells protect mice from tumor development after wild-type tumor cell challenge, IL-2-secreting neuro-2a cells were s.c. injected into A/J mice. Seven days after IL-2 gene-transfected neuroblastoma cell injection, unmodified neuro-2a cells were s.c. injected into the contralateral site of A/J mice and tumor growth was measured weekly. Finally, to estimate IL-2 effect on pre-established large tumor burdens, IL-2-secreting neuro-2a cells were s.c. injected into A/J mice with established tumor and its growth was measured weekly. The IL-2 gene-transduced neuro-2a clones secreted 120.25-177.3 IU of IL-2 per ml per 10(6) cells during 24 hr. None of the mice injected with IL-2-secreting neuro-2a cells developed tumors within 6 weeks, while all of the mice injected with wild-type neuro-2a cells developed tumors. Immunization of mice with IL-2 gene-transfected, irradiated neuro-2a cells protected these animals against a subsequent challenge with wild-type tumor cells. Finally, the size of large neuroblastomas decreased after IL-2-secreting neuro-2a cell injection into mice. Local secretion of IL-2 gene-transduced tumor cells abrogates their tumorigenicity and induces protective immunity and may inhibit the growth of neuroblastoma.

  3. Ets-1 facilitates nuclear entry of NFAT proteins and their recruitment to the IL-2 promoter.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Hsiao-Wei; Tai, Tzong-Shyuan; Tseng, William; Chang, Hui-Hsin; Grenningloh, Roland; Miaw, Shi-Chuen; Ho, I-Cheng

    2013-09-24

    E26 transformation-specific sequence 1 (Ets-1), the prototype of the ETS family of transcription factors, is critical for the expression of IL-2 by murine Th cells; however, its mechanism of action is still unclear. Here we show that Ets-1 is also essential for optimal production of IL-2 by primary human Th cells. Although Ets-1 negatively regulates the expression of Blimp1, a known suppressor of IL-2 expression, ablation of B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp1) does not rescue the expression of IL-2 by Ets-1-deficient Th cells. Instead, Ets-1 physically and functionally interacts with the nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) and is required for the recruitment of NFAT to the IL-2 promoter. In addition, Ets-1 is located in both the nucleus and cytoplasm of resting Th cells. Nuclear Ets-1 quickly exits the nucleus in response to calcium-dependent signals and competes with NFAT proteins for binding to protein components of noncoding RNA repressor of NFAT complex (NRON), which serves as a cytoplasmic trap for phosphorylated NFAT proteins. This nuclear exit of Ets-1 precedes rapid nuclear entry of NFAT and Ets-1 deficiency results in impaired nuclear entry, but not dephosphorylation, of NFAT proteins. Thus, Ets-1 promotes the expression of IL-2 by modulating the activity of NFAT.

  4. Rac1 Protein Regulates Glycogen Phosphorylase Activation and Controls Interleukin (IL)-2-dependent T Cell Proliferation*

    PubMed Central

    Arrizabalaga, Onetsine; Lacerda, Hadriano M.; Zubiaga, Ana M.; Zugaza, José L.

    2012-01-01

    Small GTPases of the Rho family have been implicated in important cellular processes such as cell migration and adhesion, protein secretion, and/or gene transcription. In the lymphoid system, these GTPases participate in the signaling cascades that are activated after engagement of antigen receptors. However, little is known about the role that Rho GTPases play in IL-2-mediated responses. Here, we show that IL-2 induces Rac1 activation in Kit 225 T cells. We identified by mass spectrometry the muscle isoform of glycogen phosphorylase (PYGM) as a novel Rac1 effector molecule in IL-2-stimulated cells. The interaction between the active form of Rac1 (Rac1-GTP) and PYGM was established directly through a domain comprising amino acids 191–270 of PYGM that exhibits significant homology with the Rac binding domain of PAK1. The integrity of this region was crucial for PYGM activation. Importantly, IL-2-dependent cellular proliferation was inhibited upon blocking both the activation of Rac1 and the activity of PYGM. These results reveal a new role for Rac1 in cell signaling, showing that this GTPase triggers T cell proliferation upon IL-2 stimulation by associating with PYGM and modulating its enzymatic activity. PMID:22337875

  5. Cord Blood Mononuclear Cells Have a Potential to Produce NK Cells Using IL2Rg Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Khaziri, Nahid; Mohammadi, Momeneh; Aliyari, Zeinab; Soleimani Rad, Jafar; Tayefi Nasrabadi, Hamid; Nozad Charoudeh, Hojjatollah

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Although bone marrow represents the main site for NK cell development and also distinct thymic-dependentNK cell pathway was identified, the cytokines effect on the NK cell generation from cord blood is unclear. Studies were identified the role of cytokines in the regulation of bone marrow and thymic NK cells. Previous studies reported that IL15 are critical for bone marrow dependent and IL7 is important for thymic NK cells. It is remain unclear the cytokines influence on the expantion of NK cells in cord blood mononuclear cells. Methods: We evaluated cultured cord blood mononuclear cells suplememnted with combinations of cytokines using FACS in distinct time points. In this study, we presented the role of IL2, IL7 and IL15 as members of the common gamma receptor -chain (Il2rg) on the expansion NK cells from cord blood cells. Results: By investigating cord blood mononuclear cells in vitro , we demonstrated that IL2 and IL15 are important for expansion of NK cells. IL2 in comparision with IL15 has more influences in NK cell expansion. In contrast IL-7 is dispensable for NK cell generation in cord blood. Conclusion: Thus,IL-2Rg cytokines play complementary roles and are indispensable for homeostasis of NK cell development in cord blood. Probably these cytokines could help to use NK beneficials in engrafment of transplanted cells and Anti tumor activity of NK cells. PMID:27123412

  6. Soluble interleukin 2 receptors are released from activated human lymphoid cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, L.A.; Kurman, C.C.; Fritz, M.E.; Biddison, W.E.; Boutin, B.; Yarchoan, R.; Nelson, D.L.

    1985-11-01

    With the use of an enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay to measure soluble human interleukin 2 receptors (IL 2R), certain human T cell leukemia virus I (HTLV I)-positive T cell lines were found to spontaneously release large quantities of IL 2R into culture supernatants. This was not found with HTLV I-negative and IL 2 independent T cell lines, and only one of seven B cell-derived lines examined produced small amounts of IL 2R. In addition to this constitutive production of soluble IL 2R by certain cell lines, normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) could be induced to release soluble IL 2R by plant lectins, the murine monoclonal antibody OKT3, tetanus toxoid, and allogeneic cells. Such activated cells also expressed cellular IL 2R measurable in detergent solubilized cell extracts. The generation of cellular and supernatant IL 2R was: dependent on cellular activation, rapid, radioresistant (3000 rad), and inhibited by cycloheximide treatment. NaDodSO4-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of soluble IL 2R demonstrated molecules of apparent Mr = 35,000 to 40,000, and 45,000 to 50,000, respectively, somewhat smaller than the mature surface receptor on these cells. The release of soluble IL 2R appears to be a characteristic marker of T lymphocyte activation and might serve an immunoregulatory function during both normal and abnormal cell growth and differentiation.

  7. Autophagy is required for IL-2-mediated fibroblast growth

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Rui; Tang, Daolin; Lotze, Michael T.; Zeh III, Herbert J.

    2013-02-15

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved pathway responsible for delivery of cytoplasmic material into the lysosomal degradation pathway to enable vesicular exocytosis. Interleukin (IL)-2 is produced by T-cells and its activity is important for immunoregulation. Fibroblasts are an immune competent cell type, playing a critical role in wound healing, chronic inflammation, and tumor development. Although autophagy plays an important role in each of these processes, whether it regulates IL-2 activity in fibroblasts is unknown. Here, we show that autophagy is required for IL-2-induced cell growth in fibroblasts. IL-2 significantly induced autophagy in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and primary lung fibroblasts. Autophagy inhibitors (e.g., 3-methylamphetamine and bafilomycin A1) or knockdown of ATG5 and beclin 1 blocked clinical grade IL-2-induced autophagy. Moreover, IL-2 induced HMGB1 cytoplasmic translocation in MEFs and promoted interaction between HMGB1 and beclin1, which is required for autophagy induction. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of autophagy inhibited IL-2-induced cell proliferation and enhanced IL-2-induced apoptosis. These findings suggest that autophagy is an important pro-survival regulator for IL-2-induced cell growth in fibroblasts.

  8. Intracytoplasmic phosphorylation sites of Tac antigen (p55) are not essential for the conformation, function, and regulation of the human interleukin 2 receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Hatakeyama, M; Minamoto, S; Taniguchi, T

    1986-01-01

    Tac antigen, the receptor for human interleukin 2 (IL-2), contains in its intracytoplasmic region a serine residue (Ser-247) that is seemingly the predominant site of protein kinase C-mediated phosphorylation. A number of studies on growth factor receptors have suggested the importance of phosphorylation in receptor structure, function, and regulation. In this study, we generated site-directed mutations in the Tac antigen cDNA to generate mutant receptors in which Ser-247 or Thr-250, a probable site of minor phosphorylation, was replaced with another amino acid that is not accessible to phosphorylation. Study of the expression of these mutant genes in a T-lymphoid cell line has provided no evidence as to the essential role of the above-mentioned residues in determining the degree of receptor affinity, its ability for signal transduction, and phorbol ester-mediated regulation of the receptor. Our results strongly suggest the existence of an IL-2 receptor "complex" in which the Tac antigen is associated with another molecule(s) that is involved in receptor structure, function, and regulation. PMID:3099287

  9. Functional properties of Drosophila inositol trisphosphate receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Swatton, J E; Morris, S A; Wissing, F; Taylor, C W

    2001-01-01

    The functional properties of the only inositol trisphosphate (IP(3)) receptor subtype expressed in Drosophila were examined in permeabilized S2 cells. The IP(3) receptors of S2 cells bound (1,4,5)IP(3) with high affinity (K(d)=8.5+/-1.1 nM), mediated positively co-operative Ca(2+) release from a thapsigargin-sensitive Ca(2+) store (EC(50)=75+/-4 nM, Hill coefficient=2.1+/-0.2), and they were recognized by an antiserum to a peptide conserved in all IP(3) receptor subtypes in the same way as mammalian IP(3) receptors. As with mammalian IP(3) receptors, (2,4,5)IP(3) (EC(50)=2.3+/-0.3 microM) and (4,5)IP(2) (EC(50) approx. 10 microM) were approx. 20- and 100-fold less potent than (1,4,5)IP(3). Adenophostin A, which is typically approx. 10-fold more potent than IP(3) at mammalian IP(3) receptors, was 46-fold more potent than IP(3) in S2 cells (EC(50)=1.67+/-0.07 nM). Responses to submaximal concentrations of IP(3) were quantal and IP(3)-evoked Ca(2+) release was biphasically regulated by cytosolic Ca(2+). Using rapid superfusion to examine the kinetics of IP(3)-evoked Ca(2+) release from S2 cells, we established that IP(3) (10 microM) maximally activated Drosophila IP(3) receptors within 400 ms. The activity of the receptors then slowly decayed (t(1/2)=2.03+/-0.07 s) to a stable state which had 47+/-1% of the activity of the maximally active state. We conclude that the single subtype of IP(3) receptor expressed in Drosophila has similar functional properties to mammalian IP(3) receptors and that analyses of IP(3) receptor function in this genetically tractable organism are therefore likely to contribute to understanding the roles of mammalian IP(3) receptors. PMID:11583592

  10. Local therapy of cancer with free IL-2

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, John J. L.; Battermann, Jan J.; Hordijk, Gerrit Jan; Krastev, Zachary; Moiseeva, Ekaterina V.; Stewart, Rachel J. E.; Ziekman, Paul G. P. M.; Koten, Jan Willem

    2008-01-01

    This is a position paper about the therapeutic effects of locally applied free IL-2 in the treatment of cancer. Local therapy: IL-2 therapy of cancer was originally introduced as a systemic therapy. This therapy led to about 20% objective responses. Systemic therapy however was very toxic due to the vascular leakage syndrome. Nevertheless, this treatment was a break-through in cancer immunotherapy and stimulated some interesting questions: Supposing that the mechanism of IL-2 treatment is both proliferation and tumoricidal activity of the tumor infiltrating cells, then locally applied IL-2 should result in a much higher local IL-2 concentration than systemic IL-2 application. Consequently a greater beneficial effect could be expected after local IL-2 application (peritumoral = juxtatumoral, intratumoral, intra-arterial, intracavitary, or intratracheal = inhalation). Free IL-2: Many groups have tried to prepare a more effective IL-2 formulation than free IL-2. Examples are slow release systems, insertion of the IL-2 gene into a tumor cell causing prolonged IL-2 release. However, logistically free IL-2 is much easier to apply; hence we concentrated in this review and in most of our experiments on the use of free IL-2. Local therapy with free IL-2 may be effective against transplanted tumors in experimental animals, and against various spontaneous carcinomas, sarcomas, and melanoma in veterinary and human cancer patients. It may induce rejection of very large, metastasized tumor loads, for instance advanced clinical tumors. The effects of even a single IL-2 application may be impressive. Not each tumor or tumor type is sensitive to local IL-2 application. For instance transplanted EL4 lymphoma or TLX9 lymphoma were not sensitive in our hands. Also the extent of sensitivity differs: In Bovine Ocular Squamous Cell Carcinoma (BOSCC) often a complete regression is obtained, whereas with the Bovine Vulval Papilloma and Carcinoma Complex (BVPCC) mainly stable disease is

  11. Augmentation by transferrin of IL-2-inducible killer activity and perforin production of human CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, A; Sone, S; Nabioullin, R; Sugihara, K; Munekata, M; Nishioka, Y; Nii, A; Ogura, T

    1993-01-01

    The effects of human transferrin (Tf) on lymphokine (IL-2)-activated killer (LAK) induction from blood lymphocytes of healthy donors was examined. LAK cells were induced by 6-day incubation in medium with recombinant human IL-2 of lymphocytes, and their cytotoxic activity was assessed by measuring 51Cr release from NK-resistant Daudi cells. Tf alone did not induce any LAK activity, but in combination with IL-2, it augmented LAK induction dose- and time-dependently. This augmenting effect was completely abolished by pretreatment with anti-Tf antiserum. Tf augmented the proliferative response of lymphocytes to IL-2 and their expressions of receptors for IL-2 and Tf. CD8+ T cells were isolated from purified blood lymphocytes using antibody-bound magnetic beads. Addition of Tf to cultures of CD8+ cells resulted in significant augmentation of killer cell induction and perforin (PFP) production after 4 days stimulation with IL-2. These results indicate that Tf is important in generation of IL-2-inducible killer properties and PFP activity of human CD8+ T cells. PMID:8467561

  12. Thymic regulatory T cell niche size is dictated by limiting IL-2 from antigen-bearing dendritic cells and feedback competition.

    PubMed

    Weist, Brian M; Kurd, Nadia; Boussier, Jeremy; Chan, Shiao Wei; Robey, Ellen A

    2015-06-01

    The thymic production of regulatory T cells (Treg cells) requires interleukin 2 (IL-2) and agonist T cell antigen receptor (TCR) ligands and is controlled by competition for a limited developmental niche, but the thymic sources of IL-2 and the factors that limit access to the niche are poorly understood. Here we found that IL-2 produced by antigen-bearing dendritic cells (DCs) had a key role in Treg cell development and that existing Treg cells limited new development of Treg cells by competing for IL-2. Our data suggest that antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that can provide both IL-2 and a TCR ligand constitute the thymic niche and that competition by existing Treg cells for a limited supply of IL-2 provides negative feedback for new production of Treg cells. PMID:25939026

  13. Pharmacology and function of melatonin receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Dubocovich, M.L.

    1988-09-01

    The hormone melatonin is secreted primarily from the pineal gland, with highest levels occurring during the dark period of a circadian cycle. This hormone, through an action in the brain, appears to be involved in the regulation of various neural and endocrine processes that are cued by the daily change in photoperiod. This article reviews the pharmacological characteristics and function of melatonin receptors in the central nervous system, and the role of melatonin in mediating physiological functions in mammals. Melatonin and melatonin agonists, at picomolar concentrations, inhibit the release of dopamine from retina through activation of a site that is pharmacologically different from a serotonin receptor. These inhibitory effects are antagonized by the novel melatonin receptor antagonist luzindole (N-0774), which suggests that melatonin activates a presynaptic melatonin receptor. In chicken and rabbit retina, the pharmacological characteristics of the presynaptic melatonin receptor and the site labeled by 2-(125I)iodomelatonin are identical. It is proposed that 2-(125I)iodomelatonin binding sites (e.g., chicken brain) that possess the pharmacological characteristics of the retinal melatonin receptor site (order of affinities: 2-iodomelatonin greater than 6-chloromelatonin greater than or equal to melatonin greater than or equal to 6,7-di-chloro-2-methylmelatonin greater than 6-hydroxymelatonin greater than or equal to 6-methoxymelatonin greater than N-acetyltryptamine greater than or equal to luzindole greater than N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine greater than 5-methoxytryptamine much greater than 5-hydroxytryptamine) be classified as ML-1 (melatonin 1). The 2-(125I)iodomelatonin binding site of hamster brain membranes possesses different binding and pharmacological characteristics from the retinal melatonin receptor site and should be classified as ML-2. 64 references.

  14. NKG2D functions as an activating receptor on natural killer cells in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masamichi; Kudo, Yohei; Kawano, Mitsuko; Nakayama, Masafumi; Nakamura, Kyohei; Kameda, Mai; Ebara, Masamune; Sato, Takeki; Nakamura, Marina; Omine, Kaito; Kametani, Yoshie; Suzuki, Ryuji; Ogasawara, Kouetsu

    2014-11-01

    The natural killer group 2 membrane D (NKG2D) receptor is an NK-activating receptor that plays an important role in host defense against tumors and viral infections. Although the marmoset is an important and reliable animal model, especially for the study of human-specific viral infections, functional characterization of NKG2D on marmoset NK cells has not previously been conducted. In the present study, we investigated a subpopulation of marmoset NK cells that express NKG2D and exhibit cytolytic potential. On the basis of their CD16 and CD56 expression patterns, marmoset NK cells can be classified into three subpopulations: CD16(+) CD56(-), CD16(-) CD56(+) and CD16(-) CD56(-) cells. NKG2D expression on marmoset CD16(+) CD56(-) and CD16(-) CD56(+) splenocytes was confirmed using an NKG2D ligand composed of an MHC class I chain-related molecule A (MICA)-Fc fusion protein. When marmoset splenocytes were cultured with IL-2 for 4 days, NKG2D expression was retained on CD16(+) CD56(-) and CD16(-) CD56(+). In addition, CD16(+) CD56(+) cells within the marmoset NK population appeared which expressed NKG2D after IL-2 stimulation. IL-2-activated marmoset NK cells showed strong cytolytic activity against K562 target cells and target cells stably expressing MICA. Further, the cytolytic activity of marmoset splenocytes was significantly reduced after addition of MICA-Fc fusion protein. Thus, NKG2D functions as an activating receptor on marmoset NK cells that possesses cytotoxic potential, and phenotypic profiles of marmoset NK cell subpopulations are similar to those seen in humans. PMID:24860119

  15. Subunit Arrangement and Function in NMDA Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa,H.; Singh, S.; Mancusso, R.; Gouaux, E.

    2005-01-01

    Excitatory neurotransmission mediated by NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptors is fundamental to the physiology of the mammalian central nervous system. These receptors are heteromeric ion channels that for activation require binding of glycine and glutamate to the NR1 and NR2 subunits, respectively. NMDA receptor function is characterized by slow channel opening and deactivation, and the resulting influx of cations initiates signal transduction cascades that are crucial to higher functions including learning and memory. Here we report crystal structures of the ligand-binding core of NR2A with glutamate and that of the NR1-NR2A heterodimer with glutamate and glycine. The NR2A-glutamate complex defines the determinants of glutamate and NMDA recognition, and the NR1-NR2A heterodimer suggests a mechanism for ligand-induced ion channel opening. Analysis of the heterodimer interface, together with biochemical and electrophysiological experiments, confirms that the NR1-NR2A heterodimer is the functional unit in tetrameric NMDA receptors and that tyrosine 535 of NR1, located in the subunit interface, modulates the rate of ion channel deactivation.

  16. Elevation in liver enzymes is associated with increased IL-2 and predicts severe outcomes in clinically apparent dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Senaratne, Thamarasi; Carr, Jillian; Noordeen, Faseeha

    2016-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess the circulating TNF-α and IL-2 levels in dengue virus (DENV) infected patients and to correlate these with clinical severity of DENV infections. A single analyte quantitative immunoassay was used to detect TNF-α and IL-2 in 24 dengue fever (DF) and 43 dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) patients, 15 healthy adults and 6 typhoid patients. The mean TNF-α and IL-2 levels of DENV- infected patients were higher than that of healthy adults and typhoid patients. No significant difference in TNF-α levels was noted between DF and DHF patients (p=0.5) but a significant increase in IL-2 levels was observed in DHF compared with DF patients (mean of DF=59.7pg/mL, mean of DHF=166.9pg/mL; p=0.02). No significant association of TNF-α or IL-2 levels was noted with packed cell volume (>45), thrombocytopenia, leucopenia or the presence of viraemia. The liver function tests measuring AST (aspartate aminotransferase) (p=0.01) and ALT (alanine aminotransferase) (p=0.02) levels were significantly elevated in DENV-infected patients. AST:ALT was significantly elevated in DHF/DSS (dengue shock syndrome) compared with DF patients. A significant positive linear correlation was noted between AST and IL-2 (r=0.31; p=0.01) and ALT and IL-2 elevations (r=0.2; p=0.02). Thus, AST and ALT levels correlate with both disease severity and circulating IL-2 levels. We suggest a role for circulating IL-2 in liver dysfunction and propose that a combined assessment of AST/ALT in conjunction with IL-2 at the early stages of symptomatic DENV infection may be useful to predict the severe forms of dengue. PMID:27155816

  17. Itk is required for Th9 differentiation via TCR-mediated induction of IL-2 and IRF4.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Rodriguez, Julio; Meylan, Françoise; Handon, Robin; Hayes, Erika T; Anderson, Stacie M; Kirby, Martha R; Siegel, Richard M; Schwartzberg, Pamela L

    2016-01-01

    Th9 cells produce interleukin (IL)-9, a cytokine implicated in allergic asthma and autoimmunity. Here we show that Itk, a mediator of T cell receptor signalling required for Th2 immune responses and the development of asthma, is a positive regulator of Th9 differentiation. In a model of allergic lung disease, Itk-deficient mice show reduced pulmonary inflammation and IL-9 production by T cells and innate lymphoid type 2 cells (ILC2), despite normal early induction of ILC2s. In vitro, Itk(-/-) CD4(+) T cells do not produce IL-9 and have reduced levels of IRF4 (Interferon Regulator Factor 4), a critical transcription factor for effector T cell function. Both IL-9 and IRF4 expression are rescued by either IL-2 or constitutively active STAT5, but not NFATc1. STAT5 binds the Irf4 promoter, demonstrating one mechanism by which IL-2 rescues weakly activated T cells. Itk inhibition also reduces IL-9 expression by human T cells, implicating ITK as a key regulator of Th9 induction. PMID:26936133

  18. Itk is required for Th9 differentiation via TCR-mediated induction of IL-2 and IRF4

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Rodriguez, Julio; Meylan, Françoise; Handon, Robin; Hayes, Erika T.; Anderson, Stacie M.; Kirby, Martha R.; Siegel, Richard M.; Schwartzberg, Pamela L.

    2016-01-01

    Th9 cells produce interleukin (IL)-9, a cytokine implicated in allergic asthma and autoimmunity. Here we show that Itk, a mediator of T cell receptor signalling required for Th2 immune responses and the development of asthma, is a positive regulator of Th9 differentiation. In a model of allergic lung disease, Itk-deficient mice show reduced pulmonary inflammation and IL-9 production by T cells and innate lymphoid type 2 cells (ILC2), despite normal early induction of ILC2s. In vitro, Itk−/− CD4+ T cells do not produce IL-9 and have reduced levels of IRF4 (Interferon Regulator Factor 4), a critical transcription factor for effector T cell function. Both IL-9 and IRF4 expression are rescued by either IL-2 or constitutively active STAT5, but not NFATc1. STAT5 binds the Irf4 promoter, demonstrating one mechanism by which IL-2 rescues weakly activated T cells. Itk inhibition also reduces IL-9 expression by human T cells, implicating ITK as a key regulator of Th9 induction. PMID:26936133

  19. Functional Significance of Serotonin Receptor Dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Herrick-Davis, Katharine

    2013-01-01

    The original model of G protein activation by a single G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) is giving way to a new model wherein two protomers of a GPCR dimer interact with a single G protein. This article will review the evidence suggesting that 5-HT receptors form dimers/oligomers and will compare the findings with results obtained from studies with other biogenic amine receptors. Topics to be covered include the origin or biogenesis of dimer formation, potential dimer interface(s), and oligomer size (dimer versus tetramer or higher order). The functional significance will be discussed in terms of G-protein activation following ligand binding to one or two protomers in a dimeric structure, the formation of heterodimers and the development of bivalent ligands. PMID:23811735

  20. Astrocytes as Gatekeepers of GABAB Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Beenhakker, Mark P.; Huguenard, John R.

    2010-01-01

    The long-lasting actions of the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) result from the activation of metabotropic GABAB receptors. Enhanced GABAB-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) are critical for the generation of generalized thalamocortical seizures. Here, we demonstrate that GABAB-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) recorded in the thalamus are largely defined by GABA diffusion and activation of distal extrasynaptic receptors potentially up to tens of μm from synapses. We also show that this diffusion is differentially regulated by two astrocytic GABA transporters, GAT1 and GAT3, which are localized near and far from synapses, respectively. A biologically constrained model of GABA diffusion and uptake shows how the two GATs differentially modulate amplitude and duration of GABAB IPSCs. Specifically, the perisynaptic expression of GAT1 enables it to regulate GABA levels near synapses and selectively modulate peak IPSC amplitude, which is largely dependent on perisynaptic receptor occupancy. GAT3 expression, on the other hand, is broader and includes distal extrasynaptic regions. As such, GAT3 acts as a gatekeeper to prevent diffusion of GABA away from synapses towards extrasynaptic regions that contain a potentially enormous pool of GABAB receptors. Targeting this gatekeeper function may provide new pharmacotherapeutic opportunities to prevent the excessive GABAB receptor activation that appears necessary for thalamic seizure generation. PMID:21068331

  1. IL2Rβ-dependent signals drive terminal exhaustion and suppress memory development during chronic viral infection.

    PubMed

    Beltra, Jean-Christophe; Bourbonnais, Sara; Bédard, Nathalie; Charpentier, Tania; Boulangé, Moana; Michaud, Eva; Boufaied, Ines; Bruneau, Julie; Shoukry, Naglaa H; Lamarre, Alain; Decaluwe, Hélène

    2016-09-13

    Exhaustion of CD8(+) T cells severely impedes the adaptive immune response to chronic viral infections. Despite major advances in our understanding of the molecular regulation of exhaustion, the cytokines that directly control this process during chronicity remain unknown. We demonstrate a direct impact of IL-2 and IL-15, two common gamma-chain-dependent cytokines, on CD8(+) T-cell exhaustion. Common to both cytokine receptors, the IL-2 receptor β (IL2Rβ) chain is selectively maintained on CD8(+) T cells during chronic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus and hepatitis C virus infections. Its expression correlates with exhaustion severity and identifies terminally exhausted CD8(+) T cells both in mice and humans. Genetic ablation of the IL2Rβ chain on CD8(+) T cells restrains inhibitory receptor induction, in particular 2B4 and Tim-3; precludes terminal differentiation of highly defective PD-1(hi) effectors; and rescues memory T-cell development and responsiveness to IL-7-dependent signals. Together, we ascribe a previously unexpected role to IL-2 and IL-15 as instigators of CD8(+) T-cell exhaustion during chronic viral infection.

  2. IL2Rβ-dependent signals drive terminal exhaustion and suppress memory development during chronic viral infection.

    PubMed

    Beltra, Jean-Christophe; Bourbonnais, Sara; Bédard, Nathalie; Charpentier, Tania; Boulangé, Moana; Michaud, Eva; Boufaied, Ines; Bruneau, Julie; Shoukry, Naglaa H; Lamarre, Alain; Decaluwe, Hélène

    2016-09-13

    Exhaustion of CD8(+) T cells severely impedes the adaptive immune response to chronic viral infections. Despite major advances in our understanding of the molecular regulation of exhaustion, the cytokines that directly control this process during chronicity remain unknown. We demonstrate a direct impact of IL-2 and IL-15, two common gamma-chain-dependent cytokines, on CD8(+) T-cell exhaustion. Common to both cytokine receptors, the IL-2 receptor β (IL2Rβ) chain is selectively maintained on CD8(+) T cells during chronic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus and hepatitis C virus infections. Its expression correlates with exhaustion severity and identifies terminally exhausted CD8(+) T cells both in mice and humans. Genetic ablation of the IL2Rβ chain on CD8(+) T cells restrains inhibitory receptor induction, in particular 2B4 and Tim-3; precludes terminal differentiation of highly defective PD-1(hi) effectors; and rescues memory T-cell development and responsiveness to IL-7-dependent signals. Together, we ascribe a previously unexpected role to IL-2 and IL-15 as instigators of CD8(+) T-cell exhaustion during chronic viral infection. PMID:27573835

  3. Brain immune interactions and air pollution: macrophage inhibitory factor (MIF), prion cellular protein (PrP(C)), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), and interleukin-2 (IL-2) in cerebrospinal fluid and MIF in serum differentiate urban children exposed to severe vs. low air pollution.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Cross, Janet V; Franco-Lira, Maricela; Aragón-Flores, Mariana; Kavanaugh, Michael; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Chao, Chih-Kai; Thompson, Charles; Chang, Jing; Zhu, Hongtu; D'Angiulli, Amedeo

    2013-01-01

    Mexico City Metropolitan Area children chronically exposed to high concentrations of air pollutants exhibit an early brain imbalance in genes involved in oxidative stress, inflammation, innate and adaptive immune responses along with accumulation of misfolded proteins observed in the early stages of Alzheimer and Parkinson's diseases. A complex modulation of serum cytokines and chemokines influences children's brain structural and gray/white matter volumetric responses to air pollution. The search for biomarkers associating systemic and CNS inflammation to brain growth and cognitive deficits in the short term and neurodegeneration in the long-term is our principal aim. We explored and compared a profile of cytokines, chemokines (Multiplexing LASER Bead Technology) and Cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) in normal cerebro-spinal-fluid (CSF) of urban children with high vs. low air pollution exposures. PrP(C) and macrophage inhibitory factor (MIF) were also measured in serum. Samples from 139 children ages 11.91 ± 4.2 years were measured. Highly exposed children exhibited significant increases in CSF MIF (p = 0.002), IL6 (p = 0.006), IL1ra (p = 0.014), IL-2 (p = 0.04), and PrP(C) (p = 0.039) vs. controls. MIF serum concentrations were higher in exposed children (p = 0.009). Our results suggest CSF as a MIF, IL6, IL1Ra, IL-2, and PrP(C) compartment that can possibly differentiate air pollution exposures in children. MIF, a key neuro-immune mediator, is a potential biomarker bridge to identify children with CNS inflammation. Fine tuning of immune-to-brain communication is crucial to neural networks appropriate functioning, thus the short and long term effects of systemic inflammation and dysregulated neural immune responses are of deep concern for millions of exposed children. Defining the linkage and the health consequences of the brain / immune system interactions in the developing brain chronically exposed to air pollutants ought to be of pressing importance for public

  4. Brain immune interactions and air pollution: macrophage inhibitory factor (MIF), prion cellular protein (PrP(C)), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), and interleukin-2 (IL-2) in cerebrospinal fluid and MIF in serum differentiate urban children exposed to severe vs. low air pollution.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Cross, Janet V; Franco-Lira, Maricela; Aragón-Flores, Mariana; Kavanaugh, Michael; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Chao, Chih-Kai; Thompson, Charles; Chang, Jing; Zhu, Hongtu; D'Angiulli, Amedeo

    2013-01-01

    Mexico City Metropolitan Area children chronically exposed to high concentrations of air pollutants exhibit an early brain imbalance in genes involved in oxidative stress, inflammation, innate and adaptive immune responses along with accumulation of misfolded proteins observed in the early stages of Alzheimer and Parkinson's diseases. A complex modulation of serum cytokines and chemokines influences children's brain structural and gray/white matter volumetric responses to air pollution. The search for biomarkers associating systemic and CNS inflammation to brain growth and cognitive deficits in the short term and neurodegeneration in the long-term is our principal aim. We explored and compared a profile of cytokines, chemokines (Multiplexing LASER Bead Technology) and Cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) in normal cerebro-spinal-fluid (CSF) of urban children with high vs. low air pollution exposures. PrP(C) and macrophage inhibitory factor (MIF) were also measured in serum. Samples from 139 children ages 11.91 ± 4.2 years were measured. Highly exposed children exhibited significant increases in CSF MIF (p = 0.002), IL6 (p = 0.006), IL1ra (p = 0.014), IL-2 (p = 0.04), and PrP(C) (p = 0.039) vs. controls. MIF serum concentrations were higher in exposed children (p = 0.009). Our results suggest CSF as a MIF, IL6, IL1Ra, IL-2, and PrP(C) compartment that can possibly differentiate air pollution exposures in children. MIF, a key neuro-immune mediator, is a potential biomarker bridge to identify children with CNS inflammation. Fine tuning of immune-to-brain communication is crucial to neural networks appropriate functioning, thus the short and long term effects of systemic inflammation and dysregulated neural immune responses are of deep concern for millions of exposed children. Defining the linkage and the health consequences of the brain / immune system interactions in the developing brain chronically exposed to air pollutants ought to be of pressing importance for public

  5. Diphtheria toxin-based recombinant murine IL-2 fusion toxin for depleting murine regulatory T cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wei, Min; Marino, Jose; Trowell, Aaron; Zhang, Huiping; Stromp Peraino, Jaclyn; Rajasekera, Priyani V; Madsen, Joren C; Sachs, David H; Huang, Christene A; Benichou, Gilles; Wang, Zhirui

    2014-09-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a subpopulation of CD4(+) T cells which suppress immune responses of effector cells and are known to play a very important role in protection against autoimmune disease development, induction of transplantation tolerance and suppression of effective immune response against tumor cells. An effective in vivo Treg depletion agent would facilitate Treg-associated studies across many research areas. In this study, we have developed diphtheria toxin-based monovalent and bivalent murine IL-2 fusion toxins for depleting murine IL-2 receptor positive cells including CD25(+) Treg in vivo. Their potencies were assessed by in vitro protein synthesis inhibition and cell proliferation inhibition assays using a murine CD25(+) CTLL-2 cell line. Surprisingly, in contrast to our previously developed recombinant fusion toxins, the monovalent isoform (DT390-mIL-2) was approximately 4-fold more potent than its bivalent counterpart (DT390-bi-mIL-2). Binding analysis by flow cytometry demonstrated that the monovalent isoform bound stronger than the bivalent version. In vivo Treg depletion with the monovalent murine IL-2 fusion toxin was performed using C57BL/6J (B6) mice. Spleen Treg were significantly depleted with a maximum reduction of ∼70% and detectable as early as 12 h after the last injection. The spleen Treg numbers were reduced until Day 3 and returned to control levels by Day 7. We believe that this monovalent murine IL-2 fusion toxin will be an effective in vivo murine Treg depleter. PMID:25147093

  6. Only high-affinity receptors for interleukin 2 mediate internalization of ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Weissman, A.M.; Harford, J.B.; Svetlik, P.B.; Leonard, W.L.; Depper, J.M.; Waldmann, T.A.; Greene, W.C.; Klausner, R.D.

    1986-03-01

    Interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptors are expressed on activated T cells and in select T-cell leukemias. Recently, it has been demonstrated that at least two classes of receptor for IL-2 exist with markedly different affinities for ligand. All known biological actions of IL-2 have been correlated with occupancy of high-affinity sites; the function of the low-affinity sites remains unknown. Receptor-mediated endocytosis is the primary means of internalization of cell-surface receptors and their ligands. The internalization of IL-2 bound to high- and low-affinity receptor sites was studied in a human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-infected human T-cell leukemia cell line and in a cloned murine cytotoxic T-cell line (CTLL). Internalization of IL-2 occurred only when bound to high-affinity sites. In addition, an anti-receptor antibody (anti-Tac), which binds equally well to high- and low-affinity sites, demonstrated no detectable internalization. The implications of these findings as they relate to IL-2 receptor structure and function are discussed.

  7. Progesterone Receptors: Form and Function in Brain

    PubMed Central

    Brinton, Roberta Diaz; Thompson, Richard F.; Foy, Michael R.; Baudry, Michel; Wang, JunMing; Finch, Caleb E; Morgan, Todd E.; Stanczyk, Frank Z.; Pike, Christian J.; Nilsen, Jon

    2008-01-01

    Emerging data indicate that progesterone has multiple non-reproductive functions in the central nervous system to regulate cognition, mood, inflammation, mitochondrial function, neurogenesis and regeneration, myelination and recovery from traumatic brain injury. Progesterone-regulated neural responses are mediated by an array of progesterone receptors (PR) that include the classic nuclear PRA and PRB receptors and splice variants of each, the seven transmembrane domain 7TMPRβ and the membrane-associated 25-Dx PR (PGRMC1). These PRs induce classic regulation of gene expression while also transducing signaling cascades that originate at the cell membrane and ultimately activate transcription factors. Remarkably, PRs are broadly expressed throughout the brain and can be detected in every neural cell type. The distribution of PRs beyond hypothalamic borders, suggests a much broader role of progesterone in regulating neural function. Despite the large body of evidence regarding progesterone regulation of reproductive behaviors and estrogen-inducible responses as well as effects of progesterone metabolite neurosteroids, much remains to be discovered regarding the functional outcomes resulting from activation of the complex array of PRs in brain by gonadally and / or glial derived progesterone. Moreover, the impact of clinically used progestogens and developing selective PR modulators for targeted outcomes in brain is a critical avenue of investigation as the non-reproductive functions of PRs have far-reaching implications for hormone therapy to maintain neurological health and function throughout menopausal aging. PMID:18374402

  8. Functional architecture of olfactory ionotropic glutamate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Abuin, Liliane; Bargeton, Benoîte; Ulbrich, Maximilian H.; Isacoff, Ehud Y.; Kellenberger, Stephan; Benton, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) are ligand-gated ion channels that mediate chemical communication between neurons at synapses. A variant iGluR subfamily, the Ionotropic Receptors (IRs), was recently proposed to detect environmental volatile chemicals in olfactory cilia. Here we elucidate how these peripheral chemosensors have evolved mechanistically from their iGluR ancestors. Using a Drosophila model, we demonstrate that IRs act in combinations of up to three subunits, comprising individual odor-specific receptors and one or two broadly expressed co-receptors. Heteromeric IR complex formation is necessary and sufficient for trafficking to cilia and mediating odor-evoked electrophysiological responses in vivo and in vitro. IRs display heterogeneous ion conduction specificities related to their variable pore sequences, and divergent ligand-binding domains function in odor recognition and cilia localization. Our results provide insights into the conserved and distinct architecture of these olfactory and synaptic ion channels and offer perspectives into use of IRs as genetically encoded chemical sensors. PMID:21220098

  9. Pregnancy reduces brain sigma receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, Richard; de Montigny, Claude; Debonnel, Guy

    1999-01-01

    Sigma (σ) receptors have recently been cloned, though their endogenous ligand(s) remain unidentified. However, some neuroactive steroids, such as progesterone, have a high affinity for these receptors. Some σ ligands, such as DTG, (+)-pentazocine and DHEA, act as σ ‘agonists' by potentiating the neuronal response to NMDA. Others, such as haloperidol, NE-100 and progesterone, act as σ ‘antagonists' by reversing the potentiations induced by σ ‘agonists'.We compared the effects of σ ‘agonists' in four series of female rats: in controls, at day 18 of pregnancy, at day 5 post-partum, and in ovariectomized rats following a 3-week treatment with a high dose of progesterone.In pregnant rats and following a 3-week treatment with progesterone, 10 fold higher doses of DTG, (+)-pentazocine and DHEA were required to elicit a selective potentiation of the NMDA response comparable to that obtained in control females. Conversely, at day 5 post-partum and following the 3-week treatment with a progesterone and after a 5-day washout, the potentiation of the NMDA response induced by the σ ‘agonist' DTG was greater than in control females.The present data suggest that endogenous progesterone acts as an ‘antagonist' at σ receptors. The resulting changes in the function of σ receptors during pregnancy and post-partum may be implicated in emotional phenomena occurring during these periods. PMID:10482906

  10. Human IL2RA null mutation mediates immunodeficiency with lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Goudy, Kevin; Aydin, Didem; Barzaghi, Federica; Gambineri, Eleonora; Vignoli, Marina; Mannurita, Sara Ciullini; Doglioni, Claudio; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Cicalese, Maria Pia; Assanelli, Andrea; Tommasini, Alberto; Brigida, Immacolata; Dellepiane, Rosa Maria; Martino, Silvana; Olek, Sven; Aiuti, Alessandro; Ciceri, Fabio; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Bacchetta, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    Cell-surface CD25 expression is critical for maintaining immune function and homeostasis. As in few reported cases, CD25 deficiency manifests with severe autoimmune enteritis and viral infections. To dissect the underlying immunological mechanisms driving these symptoms, we analyzed the regulatory and effector T cell functions in a CD25 deficient patient harboring a novel IL2RA mutation. Pronounced lymphoproliferation, mainly of the CD8+ T cells, was detected together with an increase in T cell activation markers and elevated serum cytokines. However, Ag-specific responses were impaired in vivo and in vitro. Activated CD8+STAT5+ T cells with lytic potential infiltrated the skin, even though FOXP3+ Tregs were present and maintained a higher capacity to respond to IL-2 compared to other T-cell subsets. Thus, the complex pathogenesis of CD25 deficiency provides invaluable insight into the role of IL2/IL-2RA-dependent regulation in autoimmunity and inflammatory diseases. PMID:23416241

  11. Functional evolution of the pregnane X receptor

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Manisha; Reschly, Erica J.; Krasowski, Matthew D.

    2008-01-01

    The pregnane X receptor (PXR; NR1I2) is a nuclear hormone receptor (NR) that transcriptionally regulates genes encoding transporters and drug-metabolizing enzymes in the liver and intestine. PXR activation leads to enhanced metabolism and elimination of xenobiotics and endogenous compounds such as hormones and bile salts. Relative to other vertebrate NRs, PXR has the broadest specificity for ligand activators by virtue of a large, flexible ligand-binding cavity. In addition, PXR has the most extensive sequence diversity across vertebrate species in the ligand-binding domain of any NR, with significant pharmacologic differences between humans and rodent PXRs and especially marked divergence between mammalian and non-mammalian PXRs. The unusual properties of PXR complicate the use of in silico and animal models to predict in vivo human PXR pharmacology. Research into the evolutionary history of the PXR gene has also provided insight into the function of PXR in humans and other animals. PMID:16863441

  12. Survival of activated human T lymphocytes is promoted by retinoic acid via induction of IL-2.

    PubMed

    Engedal, Nikolai; Ertesvag, Aase; Blomhoff, Heidi Kiil

    2004-03-01

    At the end of an immune response, most activated T cells spontaneously undergo programmed cell death (apoptosis). In the present study we show that all-trans retinoic acid (atRA), a major vitamin A metabolite, can inhibit the spontaneous apoptosis of activated human T lymphocytes in vitro. Isolated peripheral blood T lymphocytes were activated by 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol 13-acetate and cultured for up to 11 days without any further stimuli. With time, a gradual increase in cell death was observed. This spontaneous death of activated T cells was apoptotic, as demonstrated by cell shrinkage, DNA fragmentation and depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane. In the presence of physiological concentrations of atRA, the percentage of T cells exhibiting these apoptotic features was significantly reduced. After 5 days of stimulation, the percentage of TUNEL+ T cells decreased from 28 to 12% in the presence of atRA. The anti-apoptotic effect of atRA was mimicked by the retinoic acid receptor (RAR)-selective agonists 4-[(E)-2-(5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-5,5,8,8-tetramethyl-2-naphthalenyl)-1-propenyl]benzoic acid and AM-580, and totally abrogated by the RAR-selective antagonist Ro 41-5253. Cytokines of the IL-2 family have been shown to improve the survival of activated T cells. Strikingly, we found that the ability of atRA to inhibit apoptosis was significantly correlated with its ability to increase the production of IL-2. Furthermore, a blocking anti-IL-2 receptor antibody completely abrogated the anti-apoptotic effect of atRA. Together, these results suggest that retinoic acid inhibits spontaneous apoptosis of activated T lymphocytes through a RAR-dependent increase in IL-2 production.

  13. PGC-1α-Dependent Mitochondrial Adaptation Is Necessary to Sustain IL-2-Induced Activities in Human NK Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jara, Claudia; Ibañez, Jorge; Ahumada, Viviana; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Martin, Adrian; Córdova, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Human Natural Killer (NK) cells are a specialized heterogeneous subpopulation of lymphocytes involved in antitumor defense reactions. NK cell effector functions are critically dependent on cytokines and metabolic activity. Among various cytokines modulating NK cell function, interleukin-2 (IL-2) can induce a more potent cytotoxic activity defined as lymphokine activated killer activity (LAK). Our aim was to determine if IL-2 induces changes at the mitochondrial level in NK cells to support the bioenergetic demand for performing this enhanced cytotoxic activity more efficiently. Purified human NK cells were cultured with high IL-2 concentrations to develop LAK activity, which was assessed by the ability of NK cells to lyse NK-resistant Daudi cells. Here we show that, after 72 h of culture of purified human NK cells with enough IL-2 to induce LAK activity, both the mitochondrial mass and the mitochondrial membrane potential increased in a PGC-1α-dependent manner. In addition, oligomycin, an inhibitor of ATP synthase, inhibited IL-2-induced LAK activity at 48 and 72 h of culture. Moreover, the secretion of IFN-γ from NK cells with LAK activity was also partially dependent on PGC-1α expression. These results indicate that PGC-1α plays a crucial role in regulating mitochondrial function involved in the maintenance of LAK activity in human NK cells stimulated with IL-2. PMID:27413259

  14. Melanocortin 1 Receptor: Structure, Function, and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Wolf Horrell, Erin M.; Boulanger, Mary C.; D’Orazio, John A.

    2016-01-01

    The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) is a melanocytic Gs protein coupled receptor that regulates skin pigmentation, UV responses, and melanoma risk. It is a highly polymorphic gene, and loss of function correlates with a fair, UV-sensitive, and melanoma-prone phenotype due to defective epidermal melanization and sub-optimal DNA repair. MC1R signaling, achieved through adenylyl cyclase activation and generation of the second messenger cAMP, is hormonally controlled by the positive agonist melanocortin, the negative agonist agouti signaling protein, and the neutral antagonist β-defensin 3. Activation of cAMP signaling up-regulates melanin production and deposition in the epidermis which functions to limit UV penetration into the skin and enhances nucleotide excision repair (NER), the genomic stability pathway responsible for clearing UV photolesions from DNA to avoid mutagenesis. Herein we review MC1R structure and function and summarize our laboratory’s findings on the molecular mechanisms by which MC1R signaling impacts NER. PMID:27303435

  15. Implication of IL-2/IL-21 region in systemic sclerosis genetic susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Gallo, Lina-Marcela; Simeon, Carmen P; Broen, Jasper C; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Beretta, Lorenzo; Vonk, Madelon C; Carreira, Patricia E; Vargas, Sofia; Román-Ivorra, José Andrés; González-Gay, Miguel A; Tolosa, Carlos; López-Longo, Francisco Javier; Espinosa, Gerard; Vicente, Esther F; Hesselstrand, Roger; Riemekasten, Gabriela; Witte, Torsten; Distler, Jörg H W; Voskuyl, Alexandre E; Schuerwegh, Annemie J; Shiels, Paul G; Nordin, Annika; Padyukov, Leonid; Hoffmann-Vold, Anna-Maria; Scorza, Raffaella; Lunardi, Claudio; Airo, Paolo; van Laar, Jacob M; Hunzelmann, Nicolas; Gathof, Birgit S; Kreuter, Alexander; Herrick, Ariane; Worthington, Jane; Denton, Christopher P; Zhou, Xiaodong; Arnett, Frank C; Fonseca, Carmen; Koeleman, Bobby PC; Assasi, Shervin; Radstake, Timothy R D J; Mayes, Maureen D; Martín, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Objective The interleukin 2 (IL-2) and interleukin 21 (IL-21) locus at chromosome 4q27 has been associated with several autoimmune diseases, and both genes are related to immune system functions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of the IL-2/IL-21 locus in systemic sclerosis (SSc). Patients and methods The case control study included 4493 SSc Caucasian patients and 5856 healthy controls from eight Caucasian populations (Spain, Germany, The Netherlands, USA, Italy, Sweden, UK and Norway). Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs2069762, rs6822844, rs6835457 and rs907715) were genotyped using TaqMan allelic discrimination assays. Results We observed evidence of association of the rs6822844 and rs907715 variants with global SSc (pc=6.6E-4 and pc=7.2E-3, respectively). Similar statistically significant associations were observed for the limited cutaneous form of the disease. The conditional regression analysis suggested that the most likely genetic variation responsible for the association was the rs6822844 polymorphism. Consistently, the rs2069762A-rs6822844T-rs6835457G-rs907715T allelic combination showed evidence of association with SSc and limited cutaneous SSc subtype (pc=1.7E-03 and pc=8E-4, respectively). Conclusions These results suggested that the IL-2/IL-21 locus influences the genetic susceptibility to SSc. Moreover, this study provided further support for the IL-2/IL-21 locus as a common genetic factor in autoimmune diseases. PMID:23172754

  16. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and endothelial function

    PubMed Central

    Maron, Bradley A.; Leopold, Jane A.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperaldosteronism has been associated with endothelial dysfunction and impaired vascular reactivity in patients with hypertension or congestive heart failure. The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists spironolactone and eplerenone have been shown to reduce morbidity and mortality, in part, by ameliorating the adverse effects of aldosterone on vascular function. Although spironolactone and eplerenone are increasingly utilized in patients with cardiovascular disease, widespread clinical use is limited by the development of gynecomastia with spironolactone and hyperkalemia with both agents. This suggests that the development of newer agents with favorable side effect profiles is warranted. PMID:18729003

  17. In Vivo Expansion of Regulatory T cells With IL-2/IL-2 mAb Complexes Prevents Anti-factor VIII Immune Responses in Hemophilia A Mice Treated With Factor VIII Plasmid-mediated Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao-Lien; Ye, Peiqing; Yen, Benjamin C; Miao, Carol H

    2011-01-01

    Generation of transgene-specific immune responses can constitute a major complication following gene therapy treatment. An in vivo approach to inducing selective expansion of Regulatory T (Treg) cells by injecting interleukin-2 (IL-2) mixed with a specific IL-2 monoclonal antibody (JES6-1) was adopted to modulate anti-factor VIII (anti-FVIII) immune responses. Three consecutive IL-2 complexes treatments combined with FVIII plasmid injection prevented anti-FVIII formation and achieved persistent, therapeutic-level of FVIII expression in hemophilia A (HemA) mice. The IL-2 complexes treatment expanded CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells five- to sevenfold on peak day, and they gradually returned to normal levels within 7–14 days without changing other lymphocyte populations. The transiently expanded Treg cells are highly activated and display suppressive function in vitro. Adoptive transfer of the expanded Treg cells protected recipient mice from generation of high-titer antibodies following FVIII plasmid challenge. Repeated plasmid transfer is applicable in tolerized mice without eliciting immune responses. Mice treated with IL-2 complexes mounted immune responses against both T-dependent and T-independent neoantigens, indicating that IL-2 complexes did not hamper the immune system for long. These results demonstrate the important role of Treg cells in suppressing anti-FVIII immune responses and the potential of developing Treg cell expansion therapies that induce long-term tolerance to FVIII. PMID:21468007

  18. TIM-3 Suppresses Anti-CD3/CD28-Induced TCR Activation and IL-2 Expression through the NFAT Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Tomkowicz, Brian; Walsh, Eileen; Cotty, Adam; Verona, Raluca; Sabins, Nina; Kaplan, Fred; Santulli-Marotto, Sandy; Chin, Chen-Ni; Mooney, Jill; Lingham, Russell B; Naso, Michael; McCabe, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    TIM-3 (T cell immunoglobulin and mucin-domain containing protein 3) is a member of the TIM family of proteins that is preferentially expressed on Th1 polarized CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Recent studies indicate that TIM-3 serves as a negative regulator of T cell function (i.e. T cell dependent immune responses, proliferation, tolerance, and exhaustion). Despite having no recognizable inhibitory signaling motifs, the intracellular tail of TIM-3 is apparently indispensable for function. Specifically, the conserved residues Y265/Y272 and surrounding amino acids appear to be critical for function. Mechanistically, several studies suggest that TIM-3 can associate with interleukin inducible T cell kinase (ITK), the Src kinases Fyn and Lck, and the p85 phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) adaptor protein to positively or negatively regulate IL-2 production via NF-κB/NFAT signaling pathways. To begin to address this discrepancy, we examined the effect of TIM-3 in two model systems. First, we generated several Jurkat T cell lines stably expressing human TIM-3 or murine CD28-ECD/human TIM-3 intracellular tail chimeras and examined the effects that TIM-3 exerts on T cell Receptor (TCR)-mediated activation, cytokine secretion, promoter activity, and protein kinase association. In this model, our results demonstrate that TIM-3 inhibits several TCR-mediated phenotypes: i) NF-kB/NFAT activation, ii) CD69 expression, and iii) suppression of IL-2 secretion. To confirm our Jurkat cell observations we developed a primary human CD8+ cell system that expresses endogenous levels of TIM-3. Upon TCR ligation, we observed the loss of NFAT reporter activity and IL-2 secretion, and identified the association of Src kinase Lck, and PLC-γ with TIM-3. Taken together, our results support the conclusion that TIM-3 is a negative regulator of TCR-function by attenuating activation signals mediated by CD3/CD28 co-stimulation.

  19. TIM-3 Suppresses Anti-CD3/CD28-Induced TCR Activation and IL-2 Expression through the NFAT Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tomkowicz, Brian; Walsh, Eileen; Cotty, Adam; Verona, Raluca; Sabins, Nina; Kaplan, Fred; Santulli-Marotto, Sandy; Chin, Chen-Ni; Mooney, Jill; Lingham, Russell B.; Naso, Michael; McCabe, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    TIM-3 (T cell immunoglobulin and mucin-domain containing protein 3) is a member of the TIM family of proteins that is preferentially expressed on Th1 polarized CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Recent studies indicate that TIM-3 serves as a negative regulator of T cell function (i.e. T cell dependent immune responses, proliferation, tolerance, and exhaustion). Despite having no recognizable inhibitory signaling motifs, the intracellular tail of TIM-3 is apparently indispensable for function. Specifically, the conserved residues Y265/Y272 and surrounding amino acids appear to be critical for function. Mechanistically, several studies suggest that TIM-3 can associate with interleukin inducible T cell kinase (ITK), the Src kinases Fyn and Lck, and the p85 phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) adaptor protein to positively or negatively regulate IL-2 production via NF-κB/NFAT signaling pathways. To begin to address this discrepancy, we examined the effect of TIM-3 in two model systems. First, we generated several Jurkat T cell lines stably expressing human TIM-3 or murine CD28-ECD/human TIM-3 intracellular tail chimeras and examined the effects that TIM-3 exerts on T cell Receptor (TCR)-mediated activation, cytokine secretion, promoter activity, and protein kinase association. In this model, our results demonstrate that TIM-3 inhibits several TCR-mediated phenotypes: i) NF-kB/NFAT activation, ii) CD69 expression, and iii) suppression of IL-2 secretion. To confirm our Jurkat cell observations we developed a primary human CD8+ cell system that expresses endogenous levels of TIM-3. Upon TCR ligation, we observed the loss of NFAT reporter activity and IL-2 secretion, and identified the association of Src kinase Lck, and PLC-γ with TIM-3. Taken together, our results support the conclusion that TIM-3 is a negative regulator of TCR-function by attenuating activation signals mediated by CD3/CD28 co-stimulation. PMID:26492563

  20. Antigen-Specific Regulatory T Cells and Low Dose of IL-2 in Treatment of Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pham, Minh N; von Herrath, Matthias G; Vela, Jose Luis

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an important role in preventing effector T-cell (Teff) targeting of self-antigens that can lead to tissue destruction in autoimmune settings, including type 1 diabetes (T1D). Autoimmunity is caused in part by an imbalance between Teff and Tregs. Early attempts to treat with immunosuppressive agents have led to serious side effects, thus requiring a more targeted approach. Low-dose IL-2 (LD IL-2) can provide immunoregulation with few side effects by preferentially acting on Tregs to drive tolerance. The concept of LD IL-2 as a therapeutic approach is supported by data in mouse models where autoimmunity is cured and further strengthened by success in human clinical studies in hepatitis C virus-induced vasculitis, chronic graft-versus-host disease, and Alopecia areata. Treatment will require identification of a safe therapeutic window, which is a difficult task given that patients are reported to have deficient or defective IL-2 production or signaling and have experienced mild activation of NK cells and eosinophils with LD IL-2 therapy. In T1D, an LD IL-2 clinical trial concluded that Tregs can be safely expanded in humans; however, the study was not designed to address efficacy. Antigen-specific therapies have also aimed at regulation of the autoimmune response but have been filled with disappointment despite an extensive list of diverse islet antigens tested in humans. This approach could be enhanced through the addition of LD IL-2 to the antigenic treatment regimen to improve the frequency and function of antigen-specific Tregs, without global immunosuppression. Here, we will discuss the use of LD IL-2 and islet antigen to enhance antigen-specific Tregs in T1D and focus on what is known about their immunological impact, their safety, and potential efficacy, and need for better methods to identify therapeutic effectiveness. PMID:26793191

  1. Immunodeficient NOD-scid IL-2Rγ(null) mice do not display T and B cell leakiness.

    PubMed

    Katano, Ikumi; Ito, Ryoji; Eto, Tomoo; Aiso, Sadakazu; Ito, Mamoru

    2011-01-01

    NOD/Shi-scid IL-2Rγ(null) (NOG) mice established by introducing the IL-2Rγ(null) gene of IL-2Rγ KO mice into NOD/Shi-scid mice by backcross-mating show a high xenograft engraftment level and are therefore well suited as a humanized mouse model. SCID mice bearing the Prkdc(scid) gene show a high incidence of thymic lymphoma and a leaky phenomenon in which a few clonal T and B cells develop in aged mice. In the present study, NOG mice were assessed for the presence of a leaky phenomenon such as the one observed in C.B-17-scid and NOD-scid mice. Serum immunoglobulin analysis did not detect IgG or IgM in NOG mice, unlike the findings in C.B-17-scid and NOD-scid mice. Flow cytometry analysis revealed the absence of T and B cells in the peripheral blood and spleens of NOG mice. These results reflect the suppression of the leaky phenomenon in NOG mice through the inactivation of the IL-2Rγ gene, which is commonly expressed in T and B cell growth factor receptors to IL-2, IL-4 and IL-7.

  2. [Glutamate Metabotropic Receptors: Structure, Localisation, Functions].

    PubMed

    Perfilova, V N; Tyurenkov, I N

    2016-01-01

    The data on the structure, location and functions of the metabotropic glutamate receptor is shown. The family consists of 8 mGluRs subtypes and is divided into three groups: I group--mGluRs1/mGluRs5, II group--mGluRs2/mGluRs3, III group--mGluRs4/mGluRs6/mGluRs7/mGluRs8. They are associated with G-protein; signaling in the cells is carried out by IP3 or adenylate cyclase signaling pathways, in the result of which, mGluRs modify glial and neuronal excitability. Receptors are localized in the CNS and periphery in non-neuronal tissues: bone, heart, kidney, pancreas pod and platelets, the gastrointestinal tract, immune system. Their participation in the mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases, mental and cognitive disorders, autoimmune processes, etc. is displayed. Agonists, antagonists, allosteric modulators of mGluRs are considered as potential medicines for treatment of mental diseases, including depression, fragile X syndrome, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorders, Parkinson's disease, etc. PMID:27530046

  3. Novel lysophosphoplipid receptors: their structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Makide, Kumiko; Uwamizu, Akiharu; Shinjo, Yuji; Ishiguro, Jun; Okutani, Michiyo; Inoue, Asuka; Aoki, Junken

    2014-01-01

    It is now accepted that lysophospholipids (LysoGPs) have a wide variety of functions as lipid mediators that are exerted through G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) specific to each lysophospholipid. While the roles of some LysoGPs, such as lysophosphatidic acid and sphingosine 1-phosphate, have been thoroughly examined, little is known about the roles of several other LysoGPs, such as lysophosphatidylserine (LysoPS), lysophosphatidylthreonine, lysophosphatidylethanolamine, lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI), and lysophosphatidylglycerol. Recently, a GPCR was found for LPI (GPR55) and three GPCRs (GPR34/LPS1, P2Y10/LPS2, and GPR174/LPS3) were found for LysoPS. In this review, we focus on these newly identified GPCRs and summarize the actions of LysoPS and LPI as lipid mediators. PMID:24891334

  4. Novel lysophosphoplipid receptors: their structure and function.

    PubMed

    Makide, Kumiko; Uwamizu, Akiharu; Shinjo, Yuji; Ishiguro, Jun; Okutani, Michiyo; Inoue, Asuka; Aoki, Junken

    2014-10-01

    It is now accepted that lysophospholipids (LysoGPs) have a wide variety of functions as lipid mediators that are exerted through G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) specific to each lysophospholipid. While the roles of some LysoGPs, such as lysophosphatidic acid and sphingosine 1-phosphate, have been thoroughly examined, little is known about the roles of several other LysoGPs, such as lysophosphatidylserine (LysoPS), lysophosphatidylthreonine, lysophosphatidylethanolamine, lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI), and lysophosphatidylglycerol. Recently, a GPCR was found for LPI (GPR55) and three GPCRs (GPR34/LPS1, P2Y10/LPS2, and GPR174/LPS3) were found for LysoPS. In this review, we focus on these newly identified GPCRs and summarize the actions of LysoPS and LPI as lipid mediators. PMID:24891334

  5. Adenosine Receptors: Expression, Function and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Sheth, Sandeep; Brito, Rafael; Mukherjea, Debashree; Rybak, Leonard P.; Ramkumar, Vickram

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine receptors (ARs) comprise a group of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) which mediate the physiological actions of adenosine. To date, four AR subtypes have been cloned and identified in different tissues. These receptors have distinct localization, signal transduction pathways and different means of regulation upon exposure to agonists. This review will describe the biochemical characteristics and signaling cascade associated with each receptor and provide insight into how these receptors are regulated in response to agonists. A key property of some of these receptors is their ability to serve as sensors of cellular oxidative stress, which is transmitted by transcription factors, such as nuclear factor (NF)-κB, to regulate the expression of ARs. Recent observations of oligomerization of these receptors into homo- and heterodimers will be discussed. In addition, the importance of these receptors in the regulation of normal and pathological processes such as sleep, the development of cancers and in protection against hearing loss will be examined. PMID:24477263

  6. The Transmembrane Domain C of AMPA Receptors is Critically Involved in Receptor Function and Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Terhag, Jan; Gottschling, Kevin; Hollmann, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors are major players in synaptic transmission and are critically involved in many cognitive events. Although receptors of different subfamilies serve different functions, they all show a conserved domain topology. For most of these domains, structure–function relationships have been established and are well understood. However, up to date the role of the transmembrane domain C in receptor function has been investigated only poorly. We have constructed a series of receptor chimeras and point mutants designed to shed light on the structural and/or functional importance of this domain. We here present evidence that the role of transmembrane domain C exceeds that of a mere scaffolding domain and that several amino acid residues located within the domain are crucial for receptor gating and desensitization. Furthermore, our data suggest that the domain may be involved in receptor interaction with transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins. PMID:21206529

  7. Functional selectivity of dopamine D1 receptor agonists in regulating the fate of internalized receptors *

    PubMed Central

    Ryman-Rasmussen, Jessica P.; Griffith, Adam; Oloff, Scott; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Brown, Justin T.; Goddard, William A.; Mailman, Richard B.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that D1 agonists can cause functionally selective effects when the endpoints of receptor internalization and adenylate cyclase activation are compared. The present study was designed to probe the phenomenon of functional selectivity at the D1 receptor further by testing the hypothesis that structurally dissimilar agonists with efficacies at these endpoints that equal or exceed those of dopamine would differ in ability to influence receptor fate after internalization, a functional endpoint largely unexplored for the D1 receptor. We selected two novel agonists of therapeutic interest that meet these criteria (the isochroman A-77636, and the isoquinoline dinapsoline), and compared the fates of the D1 receptor after internalization in response to these two compounds with that of dopamine. We found that dopamine caused the receptor to be rapidly recycled to the cell surface within 1 h of removal. Conversely, A-77636 caused the receptor to be retained intracellularly up to 48 h after agonist removal. Most surprisingly, the D1 receptor recovered to the cell surface 48 h after removal of dinapsoline. Taken together, these data indicate that these agonists target the D1 receptor to different intracellular trafficking pathways, demonstrating that the phenomenon of functional selectivity at the D1 receptor is operative for cellular events that are temporally downstream of immediate receptor activation. We hypothesize that these differential effects result from interactions of the synthetic ligands with aspects of the D1 receptor that are distal from the ligand binding domain. PMID:17067639

  8. IL-2 and IL-15 regulate CD8+ memory T-cell differentiation but are dispensable for protective recall responses.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Cédric; Beltra, Jean-Christophe; Charpentier, Tania; Bourbonnais, Sara; Di Santo, James P; Lamarre, Alain; Decaluwe, Hélène

    2015-12-01

    The ability to mount effective secondary responses is a cardinal feature of memory CD8(+) T cells. An understanding of the factors that regulate the generation and recall capacities of memory T cells remains to be ascertained. Several cues indicate that two highly related cytokines, IL-2 and IL-15, share redundant functions in this process. To establish their combined roles in memory CD8(+) T-cell development, maintenance, and secondary responses, we compared the outcome of adoptively transferred IL2Rβ(+/-) or IL2Rβ(-/-) CD8(+) T cells after an acute viral infection in mice. Our results demonstrate that both IL-2 and IL-15 signals condition the differentiation of primary and secondary short-lived effector cells by altering the transcriptional network governing lineage choices. These two cytokines also regulate the homeostasis of the memory T-cell pool, with effector memory CD8(+) T cells being the most sensitive to these two interleukins. Noticeably, the inability to respond to both cytokines limits the proliferation and survival of primary and secondary effectors cells, whereas it does not preclude potent cytotoxic functions and viral control either initially or upon rechallenge. Globally, these results indicate that lack of IL-2 and IL-15 signaling modulates the CD8(+) T-cell differentiation program but does not impede adequate effector functions.

  9. A second trigeminal CGRP receptor: function and expression of the AMY1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Christopher S; Eftekhari, Sajedeh; Bower, Rebekah L; Wilderman, Andrea; Insel, Paul A; Edvinsson, Lars; Waldvogel, Henry J; Jamaluddin, Muhammad A; Russo, Andrew F; Hay, Debbie L

    2015-01-01

    Objective The trigeminovascular system plays a central role in migraine, a condition in need of new treatments. The neuropeptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), is proposed as causative in migraine and is the subject of intensive drug discovery efforts. This study explores the expression and functionality of two CGRP receptor candidates in the sensory trigeminal system. Methods Receptor expression was determined using Taqman G protein-coupled receptor arrays and immunohistochemistry in trigeminal ganglia (TG) and the spinal trigeminal complex of the brainstem in rat and human. Receptor pharmacology was quantified using sensitive signaling assays in primary rat TG neurons. Results mRNA and histological expression analysis in rat and human samples revealed the presence of two CGRP-responsive receptors (AMY1: calcitonin receptor/receptor activity-modifying protein 1 [RAMP1]) and the CGRP receptor (calcitonin receptor-like receptor/RAMP1). In support of this finding, quantification of agonist and antagonist potencies revealed a dual population of functional CGRP-responsive receptors in primary rat TG neurons. Interpretation The unexpected presence of a functional non-canonical CGRP receptor (AMY1) at neural sites important for craniofacial pain has important implications for targeting the CGRP axis in migraine. PMID:26125036

  10. HIV-1 Infection-Induced Suppression of the Let-7i/IL-2 Axis Contributes to CD4+ T Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yijun; Yin, Yue; Zhang, Shaoying; Luo, Haihua; Zhang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying HIV-1-mediated CD4+ T cell depletion are highly complicated. Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a key cytokine that maintains the survival and proliferation of activated CD4+ T cells. IL-2 levels are disturbed during HIV-1 infection, but the underlying mechanism(s) requires further investigation. We have reported that cellular microRNA (miRNA) let-7i upregulates IL-2 expression by targeting the promoter TATA-box region, which functions as a positive regulator. In this study, we found that HIV-1 infection decreases the expression of let-7i in CD4+ T cells by attenuating its promoter activity. The reduced let-7i miRNA expression led to a decline in IL-2 levels. A let-7i mimic increased IL-2 expression and subsequently enhanced the resistance of CD4+ T cells to HIV-1-induced apoptosis. By contrast, the blockage of let-7i with a specific inhibitor resulted in elevated CD4+ T cell apoptosis during HIV-1 infection. Furthermore, by knocking down the expression of IL-2, we found that the let-7i-mediated CD4+ T cell resistance to apoptosis during HIV-1 infection was dependent on IL-2 signaling rather than an alternative CD95-mediated cell-death pathway. Taken together, our findings reveal a novel pathway for HIV-1-induced dysregulation of IL-2 cytokines and depletion of CD4+ T-lymphocytes. PMID:27145859

  11. Angiotensin Receptors: Structure, Function, Signaling and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Khuraijam Dhanachandra; Karnik, Sadashiva S

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensinogen – a serpin family protein predominantly produced by the liver is systematically processed by proteases of the Renin Angiotensin system (RAS) generating hormone peptides. Specific cell surface receptors for at least three distinct angiotensin peptides produce distinct cellular signals that regulate system-wide physiological response to RAS. Two well characterized receptors are angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1 receptor) and type 2 receptor (AT2 receptor). They respond to the octapeptide hormone angiotensin II. The oncogene product MAS is a putative receptor for Ang (1–7). While these are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), the in vivo angiotensin IV binding sites may be type 2 transmembrane proteins. These four receptors together regulate cardiovascular, hemodynamic, neurological, renal, and endothelial functions; as well as cell proliferation, survival, matrix-cell interactions and inflammation. Angiotensin receptors are important therapeutic targets for several diseases. Thus, researchers and pharmaceutical companies are focusing on drugs targeting AT1 receptor than AT2 receptor, MAS and AngIV binding sites. AT1 receptor blockers are the cornerstone of current treatment for hypertension, heart failure, renal failure and many types of vascular diseases including atherosclerosis, aortic aneurism and Marfan syndrome. PMID:27512731

  12. Costimulation of IL-2 Production through CD28 Is Dependent on the Size of Its Ligand

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hong-Sheng; Cordoba, Shaun-Paul; Dushek, Omer; Goyette, Jesse; Taylor, Alison; Rudd, Christopher E.

    2015-01-01

    Optimal T cell activation typically requires engagement of both the TCR and costimulatory receptors, such as CD28. Engagement of CD28 leads to tyrosine phosphorylation of its cytoplasmic region and recruitment of cytoplasmic signaling proteins. Although the exact mechanism of CD28 signal transduction is unknown, CD28 triggering has similarities to the TCR, which was proposed to use the kinetic-segregation (KS) mechanism. The KS model postulates that, when small receptors engage their ligands within areas of close (∼15 nm) contact in the T cell/APC interface, this facilitates phosphorylation by segregating the engaged receptor/ligand complex from receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases with large ectodomains, such as CD45. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effect of elongating the extracellular region of the CD28 ligand, CD80, on its ability to costimulate IL-2 production by primary T cells. CD80 elongation reduced its costimulatory effect without abrogating CD28 binding. Confocal microscopy revealed that elongated CD80 molecules were less well segregated from CD45 at the T cell/APC interface. T cells expressing CD28 harboring a key tyrosine-170 mutation were less sensitive to CD80 elongation. In summary, the effectiveness of CD28 costimulation is inversely proportional to the dimensions of the CD28-CD80 complex. Small CD28-CD80 complex dimensions are required for optimal costimulation by segregation from large inhibitory tyrosine phosphatases. These results demonstrate the importance of ligand dimensions for optimal costimulation of IL-2 production by T cells and suggest that the KS mechanism contributes to CD28 signaling. PMID:26500347

  13. Costimulation of IL-2 Production through CD28 Is Dependent on the Size of Its Ligand.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hong-Sheng; Cordoba, Shaun-Paul; Dushek, Omer; Goyette, Jesse; Taylor, Alison; Rudd, Christopher E; van der Merwe, P Anton

    2015-12-01

    Optimal T cell activation typically requires engagement of both the TCR and costimulatory receptors, such as CD28. Engagement of CD28 leads to tyrosine phosphorylation of its cytoplasmic region and recruitment of cytoplasmic signaling proteins. Although the exact mechanism of CD28 signal transduction is unknown, CD28 triggering has similarities to the TCR, which was proposed to use the kinetic-segregation (KS) mechanism. The KS model postulates that, when small receptors engage their ligands within areas of close (∼15 nm) contact in the T cell/APC interface, this facilitates phosphorylation by segregating the engaged receptor/ligand complex from receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases with large ectodomains, such as CD45. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effect of elongating the extracellular region of the CD28 ligand, CD80, on its ability to costimulate IL-2 production by primary T cells. CD80 elongation reduced its costimulatory effect without abrogating CD28 binding. Confocal microscopy revealed that elongated CD80 molecules were less well segregated from CD45 at the T cell/APC interface. T cells expressing CD28 harboring a key tyrosine-170 mutation were less sensitive to CD80 elongation. In summary, the effectiveness of CD28 costimulation is inversely proportional to the dimensions of the CD28-CD80 complex. Small CD28-CD80 complex dimensions are required for optimal costimulation by segregation from large inhibitory tyrosine phosphatases. These results demonstrate the importance of ligand dimensions for optimal costimulation of IL-2 production by T cells and suggest that the KS mechanism contributes to CD28 signaling.

  14. NMDA Receptor Function During Senescence: Implication on Cognitive Performance

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, a family of L-glutamate receptors, play an important role in learning and memory, and are critical for spatial memory. These receptors are tetrameric ion channels composed of a family of related subunits. One of the hallmarks of the aging human population is a decline in cognitive function; studies in the past couple of years have demonstrated deterioration in NMDA receptor subunit expression and function with advancing age. However, a direct relationship between impaired memory function and a decline in NMDA receptors is still ambiguous. Recent studies indicate a link between an age-associated NMDA receptor hypofunction and memory impairment and provide evidence that age-associated enhanced oxidative stress might be contributing to the alterations associated with senescence. However, clear evidence is still deficient in demonstrating the underlying mechanisms and a relationship between age-associated impaired cognitive faculties and NMDA receptor hypofunction. The current review intends to present an overview of the research findings regarding changes in expression of various NMDA receptor subunits and deficits in NMDA receptor function during senescence and its implication in age-associated impaired hippocampal-dependent memory function. PMID:26732087

  15. Functional and pharmacological properties of GABArho1delta51 receptors.

    PubMed

    Demuro, A; Martínez-Torres, A; Miledi, R

    2000-02-01

    Gamma-aminobutyrate is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the vertebrate brain, and the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor subunit GABArho1delta51 is an alternatively spliced form of the GABArho1 receptor that was recently isolated from human retina cDNA libraries. The rho1delta51 receptor subunit lacks 17 amino acids in the extracellular N-terminal domain and, when expressed in Xenopus oocytes, forms functional homomeric GABA receptors. Unexpectedly, even after a such a big deletion, the fundamental properties of the deleted variant receptors are very similar to those of the complete GABArho1 receptors. For example, both types of receptors are bicuculline resistant, desensitize very little, and are negatively modulated by Zn2+ and positively modulated by La3+. In spite of such similarities, the GABArho1delta51 receptors are more sensitive to GABA, to the specific GABA(C) antagonist (1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridine-4-yl)methylphosphinic acid and to Zn2+, than the complete GABArho1 receptors. The GABArho1delta51 receptors extend the variety of inhibitory receptors in the retina. Their functional significance still remains to be determined.

  16. Involvement of KRAS G12A mutation in the IL-2-independent growth of a human T-LGL leukemia cell line, PLT-2.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Naoki; Ito, Hiromi; Hagiwara, Kazumi; Kobayashi, Misa; Hoshikawa, Asuka; Nishida, Yayoi; Takagi, Akira; Kojima, Tetsuhito; Suzuki, Motoshi; Osawa, Yosuke; Ohnishi, Kazunori; Daibata, Masanori; Murate, Takashi

    2012-08-01

    Cytokine-dependent cell lines have been used to analyze the cytokine-induced cellular signaling and the mechanism of oncogenesis. In the current study, we analyzed MOTN-1 and PLT-2 cell lines established from different stages of a T-cell large granular lymphocyte leukemia patient (Daibata et al. 2004). MOTN-1 is IL-2-dependent derived from the chronic phase, whereas IL-2-independent PLT-2 is from the aggressive and terminal stage. They shared considerable chromosome abnormalities and the pattern of T-cell receptor rearrangement, presuming that the cytokine independence of PLT-2 was due to the additive genetic abnormality. Besides IL-2, IL-15 supported MOTN-1 cell growth, because these receptors share beta- and gamma-subunits. IL-2 activated ERK, AKT and STAT pathway of MOTN-1. STAT3 pathway of PLT-2 was also activated by IL-2, suggesting intact IL-2 induces signal transduction of PLT-2. However, ERK1/2 but not AKT, was continuously activated in PLT-2, consistent with the increased Ras-activity of PLT-2. Sequence analysis revealed KRAS G12A mutation but not NRAS and HRAS mutation of PLT-2 but not MOTN-1. Another signaling molecule affecting Ras-signaling pathway, SHP2, which has been frequently mutated in juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML), did not show mutation. Moreover, MEK inhibitor, PD98059, as well as farnesylation inhibitor inhibited PLT-2 cell growth. Using NIH3T3 and MOTN-1, ERK activation, increased cell proliferation and survival by KRAS G12A were shown, suggesting the important role of KRAS G12A in IL-2-independent growth of PLT-2. Taken together, KRAS G12A is important for IL-2-independent growth of PLT-2 cells and suggests the possibility of involvement of KRAS mutation with disease progression.

  17. Functional roles of plasma membrane localized estrogen receptors.

    PubMed

    Sreeja, S; Thampan, RaghavaVarman

    2003-07-01

    A series of emerging data supports the existence and importance of plasma membrane localized estrogen receptors in a variety of cells that are targets for the steroid hormone action. When estradiol (E2) binds to the cell surface protein, the ensuing signal transduction event triggers downstream signaling cascades that contribute to important biological functions. Aside from the classical signaling through nuclear estrogen receptors, we have provided evidence for the functional roles of an estrogen receptor localized in the plasma membrane. This review highlights some of the recent advances made in the understanding of the genomic/non-genomic actions of plasma membrane localized estrogen receptors. PMID:15255376

  18. Selectively increased expression and functions of chemokine receptor CCR9 on CD4+ T cells from patients with T-cell lineage acute lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Qiuping, Zhang; Qun, Li; Chunsong, Hu; Xiaolian, Zhang; Baojun, Huang; Mingzhen, Yang; Chengming, Lao; Jinshen, He; Qingping, Gao; Kejian, Zhang; Zhimin, Sun; Xuejun, Zhang; Junyan, Liu; Jinquan, Tan

    2003-10-01

    In a total of 38 typical T-cell lineage acute lymphocytic leukemia (T-ALL) and T-cell lineage chronic lymphocytic leukemia (T-CLL) cases investigated, we found that CC chemokine receptor CCR9 was selectively and frequently expressed on T-ALL CD4+ T cells, was moderately expressed on T-CLL CD4+ T cells, and was rarely expressed on normal CD4+ T cells. These findings were demonstrated at protein and mRNA levels using flow cytometry and real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR technique and were verified by digital confocal microscopy and Northern blotting. Thymus-expressed chemokine, a ligand for CCR9, selectively induced T-ALL CD4+ T-cell chemotaxis and adhesion. Interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-4, together, down-regulated the expression and functions of CCR9 in T-ALL CD4+ T cells including chemotaxis and adhesion. It was also demonstrated that IL-2 and IL-4, together, internalized CCR9 on T-ALL CD4+ T cells and subsequently inhibited functions of CCR9 in these cells. Thymus-expressed chemokine mRNA was highly expressed in CD4+ T cells, involving lymph node and skin in T-ALL patients, and was expressed at moderate levels in lymph node and skin tissues in T-CLL patients. Our findings may provide new clues to understanding various aspects of T-ALL CD4+ T cells, such as functional expression of CCR9-thymus-expressed chemokine receptor-ligand pairs as well as the effects of IL-2 and IL-4, which may be especially important in cytokine/chemokine environment for the pathophysiological events of T-ALL CD4+ T-cell trafficking. PMID:14559839

  19. Protocol of the adaptive study of IL-2 dose frequency on regulatory T cells in type 1 diabetes (DILfrequency): a mechanistic, non-randomised, repeat dose, open-label, response-adaptive study

    PubMed Central

    Truman, Lucy A; Pekalski, Marcin L; Kareclas, Paula; Evangelou, Marina; Walker, Neil M; Howlett, James; Mander, Adrian P; Kennet, Jane; Wicker, Linda S; Bond, Simon; Todd, John A; Waldron-Lynch, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is caused by autoimmune destruction of the insulin-producing β cells in the pancreatic islets, leading to insulinopenia and hyperglycaemia. Genetic analyses indicate that alterations of the interleukin-2 (IL-2) pathway mediating immune activation and tolerance predispose to T1D, specifically the polymorphic expression of the IL-2 receptor-α chain (CD25) on T lymphocytes. Replacement of physiological doses of IL-2 could restore self-tolerance and prevent further autoimmunity by enhancing the function of CD4+ T regulatory cells (Tregs) to limit the activation of auto reactive T effector cells (Teffs). In this experimental medicine study, we use an adaptive trial design to determine the optimal dosing regimen for IL-2 to improve Treg function while limiting activation of Teffs in participants with T1D. Methods and analysis The Adaptive study of IL-2 dose frequency on Tregs in type 1 diabetes(DILfrequency) is a mechanistic, non-randomised, repeat dose open-label, response-adaptive study of 36 participants with T1D. The objective is to establish the optimal dose and frequency of ultra-low dose IL-2: to increase Treg frequency within the physiological range, to increase CD25 expression on Tregs, without increasing CD4+ Teffs. DILfrequency has an initial learning phase where 12 participants are allocated to six different doses and frequencies followed by an interim statistical analysis. After analysis of the learning phase, the Dose and Frequency Committee will select the optimal targets for Treg frequency, Treg CD25 expression and Teff frequency. Three groups of eight participants will be treated consecutively in the confirming phase. Each dose and frequency selected will be based on statistical analysis of all data collected from the previous groups. Ethics Ethical approval for DILfrequency was granted on 12 August 2014. Results The results of this study will be reported, through peer-reviewed journals, conference presentations and

  20. Human T lymphocytes express N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors functionally active in controlling T cell activation

    SciTech Connect

    Miglio, Gianluca; Varsaldi, Federica; Lombardi, Grazia . E-mail: lombardi@pharm.unipmn.it

    2005-12-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate the expression and the functional role of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in human T cells. RT-PCR analysis showed that human resting peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and Jurkat T cells express genes encoding for both NR1 and NR2B subunits: phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-activated PBL also expresses both these genes and the NR2A and NR2D genes. Cytofluorimetric analysis showed that NR1 expression increases as a consequence of PHA (10 {mu}g/ml) treatment. D-(-)-2-Amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (D-AP5), and (+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine [(+)-MK 801], competitive and non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonists, respectively, inhibited PHA-induced T cell proliferation, whereas they did not affect IL-2 (10 U/ml)-induced proliferation of PHA blasts. These effects were due to the prevention of T cell activation (inhibition of cell aggregate formation and CD25 expression), but not to cell cycle arrest or death. These results demonstrate that human T lymphocytes express NMDA receptors, which are functionally active in controlling cell activation.

  1. G-Protein Coupled Receptor Resensitization – Appreciating the Balancing Act of Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Maradumane L.; Vasudevan, Neelakantan T.; Gupta, Manveen K.; Martelli, Elizabeth E.; Prasad, Sathyamangla V. Naga

    2015-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven transmembrane receptors that are pivotal regulators of cellular responses including vision, cardiac contractility, olfaction, and platelet activation. GPCRs have been a major target for drug discovery due to their role in regulating a broad range of physiological and pathological responses. GPCRs mediate these responses through a cyclical process of receptor activation (initiation of downstream signals), desensitization (inactivation that results in diminution of downstream signals), and resensitization (receptor reactivation for next wave of activation). Although these steps may be of equal importance in regulating receptor function, significant advances have been made in understanding activation and desensitization with limited effort towards resensitization. Inadequate importance has been given to resensitization due to the understanding that resensitization is a homeostasis maintaining process and is not acutely regulated. Evidence indicates that resensitization is a critical step in regulating GPCR function and may contribute towards receptor signaling and cellular responses. In light of these observations, it is imperative to discuss resensitization as a dynamic and mechanistic regulator of GPCR function. In this review we discuss components regulating GPCR function like activation, desensitization, and internalization with special emphasis on resensitization. Although we have used β-adrenergic receptor as a proto-type GPCR to discuss mechanisms regulating receptor function, other GPCRs are also described to put forth a view point on the universality of such mechanisms. PMID:22697395

  2. IL-2R common gamma-chain is epigenetically silenced by nucleophosphin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK) and acts as a tumor suppressor by targeting NPM-ALK.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Wang, Hong Yi; Liu, Xiaobin; Bhutani, Gauri; Kantekure, Kanchan; Wasik, Mariusz

    2011-07-19

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), physiologically expressed only by certain neural cells, becomes highly oncogenic, when aberrantly expressed in nonneural tissues as a fusion protein with nucleophosphin (NPM) and other partners. The reason why NPM-ALK succeeds in transforming specifically CD4(+) T lymphocytes remains unknown. The IL-2R common γ-chain (IL-2Rγ) is shared by receptors for several cytokines that play key roles in the maturation and growth of normal CD4(+) T lymphocytes and other immune cells. We show that IL-2Rγ expression is inhibited in T-cell lymphoma cells expressing NPM-ALK kinase as a result of DNA methylation of the IL-2Rγ gene promoter. IL-2Rγ promoter methylation is induced in malignant T cells by NPM-ALK. NPM-ALK acts through STAT3, a transcription factor that binds to the IL-2Rγ gene promoter and enhances binding of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) to the promoter. In addition, STAT3 suppresses expression of miR-21, which selectively inhibits DNMT1 mRNA expression. Reconstitution of IL-2Rγ expression leads to loss of the NPM-ALK protein and, consequently, apoptotic cell death of the lymphoma cells. These results demonstrate that the oncogenic tyrosine kinase NPM-ALK induces epigenetic silencing of the IL-2Rγ gene and that IL-2Rγ acts as a tumor suppressor by reciprocally inhibiting expression of NPM-ALK.

  3. Soluble interleukin-2 receptor in patients with glomerular diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, H. S.; Wu, M. S.; Yen, T. S.; Chen, W. Y.

    1995-01-01

    In this study, we measured the soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sIL-2R) level to evaluate the cellular immune status in 61 patients with different types of glomerular diseases; 40 healthy volunteers were used as control. All patients with glomerular diseases had levels of serum sIL-2R significantly higher than those of the controls (766 +/- 59 vs 280 +/- 23 U/ml; p < 0.05). Even patients with normal renal function still had higher serum sIL-2R levels than the controls, no matter to which subgroups they belonged (primary glomerulonephritis, lupus nephritis or diabetic nephropathy). Serum sIL-2R levels were similar among the three subgroups. The serum levels of sIL-2R correlated well with age and were significantly higher in older patients, although this was not observed in the control group. Serum sIL-2R levels were significantly higher in patients with active urinary sediment and in patients with impaired renal function and showed a significant negative correlation with creatinine clearance (r = -0.56; p < 0.05). Although urinary and serum sIL-2R levels were quite well correlated, (r = 0.35; p < 0.05), the urinary levels of sIL-2R did not differ in patients with different disease activity or different renal functions although they had a significant correlation with 24-hour urinary protein (r = 0.39; p < 0.05). Patients with nephrotic syndrome also had higher urinary sIL-2R levels than other patients (529 +/- 106 vs 280 +/- 31 U/ml; p < 0.05). We conclude that greater T-cell activation might contribute to the pathogenesis of different glomerulonephritis entities, and serum levels of sIL-2R can serve as a useful clinical marker of glomerulonephritis activity. Renal function influenced the serum levels of sIL-2R significantly. This factor must be considered when we interpret the data. Urinary sIL-2R levels did not reflect the disease activity as well. This might be due to the secondary influence of the extent of the glomerular protein leak. Further investigation is

  4. Melatonin membrane receptors in peripheral tissues: Distribution and functions

    PubMed Central

    Slominski, Radomir M.; Reiter, Russel J.; Schlabritz-Loutsevitch, Natalia; Ostrom, Rennolds S.; Slominski, Andrzej T.

    2012-01-01

    Many of melatonin’s actions are mediated through interaction with the G-protein coupled membrane bound melatonin receptors type 1 and type 2 (MT1 and MT2, respectively) or, indirectly with nuclear orphan receptors from the RORα/RZR family. Melatonin also binds to the quinone reductase II enzyme, previously defined the MT3 receptor. Melatonin receptors are widely distributed in the body; herein we summarize their expression and actions in non-neural tissues. Several controversies still exist regarding, for example, whether melatonin binds the RORα/RZR family. Studies of the peripheral distribution of melatonin receptors are important since they are attractive targets for immunomodulation, regulation of endocrine, reproductive and cardiovascular functions, modulation of skin pigmentation, hair growth, cancerogenesis, and aging. Melatonin receptor agonists and antagonists have an exciting future since they could define multiple mechanisms by which melatonin modulates the complexity of such a wide variety of physiological and pathological processes. PMID:22245784

  5. Functional domains of the poliovirus receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, Satoshi; Ise, Iku; Nomoto, Akio )

    1991-05-15

    A number of mutant cDNAs of the human poliovirus receptor were constructed to identify essential regions of the molecule as the receptor. All mutant cDNAs carrying the sequence coding for the entire N-terminal immunoglobulin-like domain (domain I) confer permissiveness for poliovirus to mouse L cells, but a mutant cDNA lacking the sequence for domain I does not. The transformants permissive for poliovirus were able to bind the virus and were also recognized by monoclonal antibody D171, which competes with poliovirus for the cellular receptor. These results strongly suggest that the poliovirus binding site resides in domain I of the receptor. Mutant cDNAs for the sequence encoding the intracellular peptide were also constructed and expressed in mouse L cells. Susceptibility of these cells to poliovirus revealed that the entire putative cytoplasmic domain is not essential for virus infection. Thus, the cytoplasmic domain of the molecule appears not to play a role in the penetration of poliovirus.

  6. Combined CD4+ Donor Lymphocyte Infusion and Low-Dose Recombinant IL-2 Expand FOXP3+ Regulatory T Cells following Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zorn, Emmanuel; Mohseni, Mehrdad; Kim, Haesook; Porcheray, Fabrice; Lynch, Allison; Bellucci, Roberto; Canning, Christine; Alyea, Edwin P.; Soiffer, Robert J.; Ritz, Jerome

    2009-01-01

    CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Treg) successfully control graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) in animal models. In humans, incomplete reconstitution of Treg after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been associated with chronic GVHD. Recent studies have demonstrated that IL-2 infusions expand Treg in vivo. However, the effectiveness of this therapy depends on the number of cells capable of responding to IL-2. We examined the effect of low-dose IL-2 infusions on Treg populations after HSCT in patients who also received infusions of donor CD4+ lymphocytes. Utilizing FOXP3 as a Treg marker, we found that patients who received CD4+DLI concomitantly with IL-2 had greater expansion of Treg compared to patients who received IL-2 (p=0.03) or CD4+DLI alone (p=0.001). FOXP3 expression correlated with absolute CD4+CD25+ cell counts. Moreover, expanded CD4+CD25+ T cells displayed normal suppressive function and treatment with CD4+DLI and IL-2 was not associated with GVHD. This study suggests that administration of low-dose IL-2 combined with adoptive CD4+ cellular therapy may provide a mechanism to expand Treg in vivo. PMID:19203731

  7. Functional characterization of human bitter taste receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sainz, Eduardo; Cavenagh, Margaret M.; Gutierrez, Joanne; Battey, James F.; Northup, John K.; Sullivan, Susan L.

    2007-01-01

    The T2Rs belong to a multi-gene family of G-protein-coupled receptors responsible for the detection of ingested bitter-tasting compounds. The T2Rs are conserved among mammals with the human and mouse gene families consisting of about 25 members. In the present study we address the signalling properties of human and mouse T2Rs using an in vitro reconstitution system in which both the ligands and G-proteins being assayed can be manipulated independently and quantitatively assessed. We confirm that the mT2R5, hT2R43 and hT2R47 receptors respond selectively to micromolar concentrations of cycloheximide, aristolochic acid and denatonium respectively. We also demonstrate that hT2R14 is a receptor for aristolochic acid and report the first characterization of the ligand specificities of hT2R7, which is a broadly tuned receptor responding to strychnine, quinacrine, chloroquine and papaverine. Using these defined ligand–receptor interactions, we assayed the ability of the ligand-activated T2Rs to catalyse GTP binding on divergent members of the Gα family including three members of the Gαi subfamily (transducin, Gαi1 and Gαo) as well as Gαs and Gαq. The T2Rs coupled with each of the three Gαi members tested. However, none of the T2Rs coupled to either Gαs or Gαq, suggesting the T2Rs signal primarily through Gαi-mediated signal transduction pathways. Furthermore, we observed different G-protein selectivities among the T2Rs with respect to both Gαi subunits and Gβγ dimers, suggesting that bitter taste is transduced by multiple G-proteins that may differ among the T2Rs. PMID:17253962

  8. Steroid receptors and their ligands: Effects on male gamete functions

    SciTech Connect

    Aquila, Saveria; De Amicis, Francesca

    2014-11-01

    In recent years a new picture of human sperm biology is emerging. It is now widely recognized that sperm contain nuclear encoded mRNA, mitochondrial encoded RNA and different transcription factors including steroid receptors, while in the past sperm were considered incapable of transcription and translation. One of the main targets of steroid hormones and their receptors is reproductive function. Expression studies on Progesterone Receptor, estrogen receptor, androgen receptor and their specific ligands, demonstrate the presence of these systems in mature spermatozoa as surface but also as nuclear conventional receptors, suggesting that both systemic and local steroid hormones, through sperm receptors, may influence male reproduction. However, the relationship between the signaling events modulated by steroid hormones and sperm fertilization potential as well as the possible involvement of the specific receptors are still controversial issues. The main line of this review highlights the current research in human sperm biology examining new molecular systems of response to the hormones as well as specific regulatory pathways controlling sperm cell fate and biological functions. Most significant studies regarding the identification of steroid receptors are reported and the mechanistic insights relative to signaling pathways, together with the change in sperm metabolism energy influenced by steroid hormones are discussed.The reviewed evidences suggest important effects of Progesterone, Estrogen and Testosterone and their receptors on spermatozoa and implicate the involvement of both systemic and local steroid action in the regulation of male fertility potential. - Highlights: • One of the main targets of steroid hormones and their receptors is reproductive function. • Pg/PR co-work to stimulate enzymatic activities to sustain a capacitation process. • E2/ERs regulate sperm motility, capacitation and acrosome reaction and act as survival factors. • Androgens

  9. Nature and regulation of the insulin receptor: structure and function

    SciTech Connect

    Czech, M.P.

    1985-01-01

    Native, cell-surface insulin receptor consists of two glycoprotein subunit types with apparent masses of about 125,000 daltons (alpha subunit) and 90,000 daltons (beta subunit). The alpha and beta insulin-receptor subunits seem to have distinct functions such that alpha appears to bind hormone whereas beta appears to possess intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity. In detergent extracts, insulin activates receptor autophosphorylation of tyrosine residues on its beta subunit, whereas in the presence of reductant, the alpha subunit is also phosphorylated. In intact cells, insulin activates serine/threonine phosphorylation of insulin receptor beta subunit as well as tyrosine phosphorylation. The biological role of the receptor-associated tyrosine kinase is not known. The insulin receptor kinase is regulated by beta-adrenergic agonists and other agents that elevate cAMP in adipocytes, presumably via the cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Such agents decrease receptor affinity for insulin and partially uncouple receptor tyrosine kinase activity from activation by insulin. These effects appear to contribute to the biological antagonism between insulin and beta-agonists. These data suggest the hypothesis that a complex network of tyrosine and serine/threonine phosphorylations on the insulin receptor modulate its binding and kinase activities in an antagonistic manner.

  10. Structural Features for Functional Selectivity at Serotonin Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wacker, Daniel; Wang, Chong; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Huang, Xi-Ping; Vardy, Eyal; McCorvy, John D.; Jiang, Yi; Chu, Meihua; Siu, Fai Yiu; Liu, Wei; Xu, H. Eric; Cherezov, Vadim; Roth, Bryan L.; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2013-01-01

    Drugs active at G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) can differentially modulate either canonical or non-canonical signaling pathways via a phenomenon known as functional selectivity or biased signaling. We report biochemical studies that show that the hallucinogen lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), its precursor ergotamine (ERG) and related ergolines display strong functional selectivity for β-arrestin signaling at the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor 5-HT2B, while being relatively unbiased at the 5-HT1B receptor. To investigate the structural basis for biased signaling, we determined the crystal structure of the human 5-HT2B receptor bound to ERG, and compared it with the 5-HT1B/ERG structure. Given the relatively poor understanding of GPCR structure-function to date, insight into different GPCR signaling pathways are important to better understand both adverse and favorable therapeutic activities. PMID:23519215

  11. Interleukin 2 receptor beta chain expressed in an oligodendroglioma line binds interleukin 2 and delivers growth signal.

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Y; Minamoto, S; Shimizu, K; Mogami, H; Taniguchi, T

    1990-01-01

    Interleukin 2 (IL-2) is a potent growth factor for T lymphocytes, playing a crucial role in the immune response. In view of the considerable evidence that the immunoregulatory cytokines (or lymphokines) also play a role in the growth and differentiation of cells in the central nervous system (CNS), we examined the operation of the IL-2 system in a cell line of CNS origin by expressing a cDNA encoding the beta chain of the human IL-2 receptor (IL-2R beta, a 75-kDa protein). When the cDNA was expressed in a human oligodendroglioma cell line, ONS-21, the IL-2R beta bound IL-2 with an affinity similar to that in lymphoid cells (Kd, approximately 2 nM). Furthermore, cell proliferation ([3H]thymidine incorporation) was stimulated by IL-2. These results demonstrate that the same cytokine receptor is functional in cells of the immune system and CNS and point to a molecular mechanism that is similar for growth-signal transduction between lymphoid and neural cells but that may be different in other cells, such as fibroblasts. Images PMID:2395860

  12. Comparative analysis and anatomic distribution of ras p21, IL-2R, and MEL-14 in malignant and hyperplastic murine thymus.

    PubMed Central

    Newcomb, E. W.; Pellicer, A.; Cordon, C.

    1990-01-01

    The distribution and localization of thymocytes positive for p21 ras, the lymphocyte homing receptor antigen MEL-14, and IL-2 receptors were studied by immunohistology and flow cytometry. Comparisons were made between age-matched normal mice, carcinogen-treated mice at early (stage II) and late (stage III) stages of disease, and cortisone-treated mice. In normal thymus, the majority of cortical and medullary thymocytes are p21 ras positive. MEL-14hi- and IL-2R-positive cells are located in the cortex and comprise less than 5% of the thymus population. Stage II carcinogen-treated animals consistently show increased numbers of MEL-14hi cells in the thymus, with fewer animals having increased numbers of IL-2R positive cells. These populations appear to be different from one another. All stage III animals have MEL-14hi-positive tumor cells, which in 70% of the cases also express IL-2R. Cortisone treatment was used to study non-malignant proliferation. After cortisone treatment there is a marked increase of p21 ras staining in both the cortex and medulla during the first 72-hour interval. Within 24 hours, 50% of the thymocytes are IL-2R positive, but MEL-14hi cells are not detected. By 48 hours, 90% of the thymus population expresses IL-2R and 50% of the cells are MEL-14hi positive, and this results in a substantial population of cells positive for both IL-2R positive:MEL-14hi markers. This population rapidly disappears by 72 hours, leaving 90% of the cells MEL-14hi positive and less than 10% IL-2R positive. The staining of p21 ras at 72 hours is unusual, showing a speckled, cytoplasmic pattern. In light of our findings, we propose that the first step in thymic lymphomagenesis in carcinogen-treated C57BL/6 mice involves the rare cortical MEL-14hi subpopulation and is thymic dependent. A late stage involves expression of IL-2 receptors by a subset of MEL-14hi cells, thus conferring the potential for autonomous growth and malignancy. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2407123

  13. Aberrant expression and function of death receptor-3 and death decoy receptor-3 in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    GE, ZHICHENG; SANDERS, ANDREW J.; YE, LIN; JIANG, WEN G.

    2011-01-01

    Death receptor-3 (DR3) and death decoy receptor-3 (DcR3) are both members of the tumour necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily. The TNFR superfamily contains eight death domain-containing receptors, including TNFR1 (also called DR1), Fas (also called DR2), DR3, DR4, DR5, DR6, NGFR and EDAR. Upon the binding of these receptors with their corresponding ligands, the death domain recruits various proteins that mediate both the death and proliferation of cells. Receptor function is negatively regulated by decoy receptors (DcR1, DcR2, DcR3 and OPG). DR3/DcR3 are a pair of positive and negative players with which vascular endothelial growth inhibitor (VEGI) interacts. VEGI has been suggested to be a potential tumour suppressor. The inhibitory effects of VEGI on cancer are manifested in three main areas: a direct effect on cancer cells, an anti-angiogenic effect on endothelial cells, and the stimulation of dendritic cell maturation. A recent study indicated that DR3 may be a new receptor for E-selectin, which has been reported to be associated with cancer metastasis. DcR3 is a soluble receptor, highly expressed in various tumours, which lacks an apparent transmembrane segment, prevents cytokine response through ligand binding and neutralization, and is an inhibitor of apoptosis. DcR3 serves as a decoy receptor for FasL, LIGHT and VEGI. The cytokine LIGHT activates various anti-tumour functions and is expected to be a promising candidate for cancer therapy. Certain tumours may escape FasL-dependent immune-cytotoxic attack by expressing DcR3, which blocks FasL function. DR3/DcR3 play profound roles in regulating cell death and proliferation in cancer. The present review briefly discusses DR3/DcR3 and attempts to elucidate the role of these negative and positive players in cancer. PMID:22977485

  14. NK cells and CD1d-restricted NKT cells respond in different ways with divergent kinetics to IL-2 treatment in primary HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Kuylenstierna, C; Snyder-Cappione, J E; Loo, C P; Long, B R; Gonzalez, V D; Michaëlsson, J; Moll, M; Spotts, G; Hecht, F M; Nixon, D F; Sandberg, J K

    2011-02-01

    Cytokine immunotherapy is being evaluated as adjunct treatment in infectious diseases. The effects on innate and adaptive immunity in vivo are insufficiently known. Here, we investigate whether combination treatment with antiretroviral therapy (ART) and Interleukin-2 (IL-2) of patients with primary HIV-1 infection induces sustained increases in circulating NKT cell and NK cell numbers and effector functions and investigate how changes are coordinated in the two compartments. Patients with primary HIV-1 infection starting ART were analyzed for numbers, phenotype and function of NKT cells, NK cells and dendritic cells (DC) in peripheral blood before, during and after IL-2 treatment. NKT cells expanded during IL-2 treatment as expected from previous studies. However, their response to α-galactosyl ceramide antigen were retained but not boosted. Myeloid DC did not change their numbers or CD1d-expression during treatment. In contrast, the NK cell compartment responded with rapid expansion of the CD56(dim) effector subset and enhanced IFNγ production. Expansions of NKT cells and NK cells retracted back towards baseline values at 12 months after IL-2 treatment ended. In summary, NKT cells and NK cells respond to IL-2 treatment with different kinetics. Effects on cellular function are distinct between the cell types and the effects appear not to be sustained after IL-2 treatment ends. These results improve our understanding of the effects of cytokine immunotherapy on innate cellular immunity in early HIV-1 infection.

  15. Receptor signaling in immune cell development and function

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jinwook; Gorentla, Balachandra K.; O’Brien, Tommy; Srivatsan, Sruti; Xu, Li; Chen, Yong; Xie, Danli; Pan, Hongjie

    2011-01-01

    Immune cell development and function must be tightly regulated through cell surface receptors to ensure proper responses to pathogen and tolerance to self. In T cells, the signal from the T-cell receptor is essential for T-cell maturation, homeostasis, and activation. In mast cells, the high-affinity receptor for IgE transduces signal that promotes mast cell survival and induces mast cell activation. In dendritic cells and macrophages, the toll-like receptors recognize microbial pathogens and play critical roles for both innate and adaptive immunity against pathogens. Our research explores how signaling from these receptors is transduced and regulated to better understand these immune cells. Our recent studies have revealed diacylglycerol kinases and TSC1/2-mTOR as critical signaling molecules/regulators in T cells, mast cells, dendritic cells, and macrophages. PMID:21128010

  16. Beyond the cell surface: new mechanisms of receptor function.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez, Carlos F

    2010-05-21

    The text book view of cell surface receptors depicts them at the top of a vertical chain of command that starts with ligand binding and proceeds in a lineal fashion towards the cell nucleus. Although pedagogically useful, this view is incomplete and recent findings suggest that the extracellular domain of cell surface receptors can be a transmitter as much as a receiver in intercellular communication. GFRalpha1 is a GPI-anchored receptor for GDNF (glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor), a neuronal growth factor with widespread functions in the developing and adult nervous system. GFRalpha1 partners with transmembrane proteins, such as the receptor tyrosine kinase RET or the cell adhesion molecule NCAM, for intracellular transmission of the GDNF signal. In addition to this canonical role, GFRalpha1 can also engage in horizontal interactions and thereby modify the function of other cell surface components. GFRalpha1 can also function as a ligand-induced adhesion cell molecule, mediating homophilic cell-cell interactions in response to GDNF. Finally, GFRalpha1 can also be released from the cell surface and act at a distance as a soluble factor together with its ligand. This plethora of unconventional mechanisms is likely to be a feature common to several other receptors and considerably expands our view of cell surface receptor function. PMID:20494105

  17. IL-1, IL-2 and IFN-gamma production by Theiler's virus-induced encephalomyelitic SJL/J mice.

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, N; Torres, C

    1991-01-01

    Interleukins have been postulated to exert an important modulatory and recruiting role in the Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV)-induced demyelination of the central nervous system (CNS) in SJL/J mice. Using bio- and radioimmunoassays, we have detected and quantified some of the interleukins suspected to play a role in this immune-mediated process. The interleukins 1 and 2 (IL-1, IL-2) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) have been measured in homogenates from the CNS and sera from infected animals, as well as in supernatants from antigen-specific in vitro-stimulated spleen and meningeal cells. IL-1 was detected both in CNS tissue homogenates (approximately 20-40 fmol/ml) and in splenic cultures (200 U/ml). IL-2 was detected only after TMEV-specific antigenic stimulation in spleen cultures (approximately 120 U/ml). In vitro, IL-2 and IL-1 synthesis appear in a dose- and time-dependent manner. IFN-gamma could not be found in any case. The precise nature of IL-1 and IL-2 activity was further assessed by HPLC. The above results strongly indicate the presence of functionally active macrophages in the CNS infiltrates of cells triggering this autoaggressive immune process. In addition, we propose a central role for IL-1 in augmenting the intracerebral immune response leading to the inflammatory demyelination induced by TMEV. PMID:1748475

  18. IL-1, IL-2 and IFN-gamma production by Theiler's virus-induced encephalomyelitic SJL/J mice.

    PubMed

    Rubio, N; Torres, C

    1991-10-01

    Interleukins have been postulated to exert an important modulatory and recruiting role in the Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV)-induced demyelination of the central nervous system (CNS) in SJL/J mice. Using bio- and radioimmunoassays, we have detected and quantified some of the interleukins suspected to play a role in this immune-mediated process. The interleukins 1 and 2 (IL-1, IL-2) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) have been measured in homogenates from the CNS and sera from infected animals, as well as in supernatants from antigen-specific in vitro-stimulated spleen and meningeal cells. IL-1 was detected both in CNS tissue homogenates (approximately 20-40 fmol/ml) and in splenic cultures (200 U/ml). IL-2 was detected only after TMEV-specific antigenic stimulation in spleen cultures (approximately 120 U/ml). In vitro, IL-2 and IL-1 synthesis appear in a dose- and time-dependent manner. IFN-gamma could not be found in any case. The precise nature of IL-1 and IL-2 activity was further assessed by HPLC. The above results strongly indicate the presence of functionally active macrophages in the CNS infiltrates of cells triggering this autoaggressive immune process. In addition, we propose a central role for IL-1 in augmenting the intracerebral immune response leading to the inflammatory demyelination induced by TMEV.

  19. Hairless is a nuclear receptor corepressor essential for skin function

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Catherine C.

    2009-01-01

    The activity of nuclear receptors is modulated by numerous coregulatory factors. Corepressors can either mediate the ability of nuclear receptors to repress transcription, or can inhibit transactivation by nuclear receptors. As we learn more about the mechanisms of transcriptional repression, the importance of repression by nuclear receptors in development and disease has become clear. The protein encoded by the mammalian Hairless (Hr) gene was shown to be a corepressor by virtue of its functional similarity to the well-established corepressors N-CoR and SMRT. Mutation of the Hr gene results in congenital hair loss in both mice and men. Investigation of Hairless function both in vitro and in mouse models in vivo has revealed a critical role in maintaining skin and hair by regulating the differentiation of epithelial stem cells, as well as a putative role in regulating gene expression via chromatin remodeling. PMID:20087431

  20. Functional expression of purinergic P2 receptors and transient receptor potential channels by the human urothelium

    PubMed Central

    Shabir, Saqib; Cross, William; Kirkwood, Lisa A.; Pearson, Joanna F.; Appleby, Peter A.; Walker, Dawn; Eardley, Ian

    2013-01-01

    In addition to its role as a physical barrier, the urothelium is considered to play an active role in mechanosensation. A key mechanism is the release of transient mediators that activate purinergic P2 receptors and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels to effect changes in intracellular Ca2+. Despite the implied importance of these receptors and channels in urothelial tissue homeostasis and dysfunctional bladder disease, little is known about their functional expression by the human urothelium. To evaluate the expression and function of P2X and P2Y receptors and TRP channels, the human ureter and bladder were used to separate urothelial and stromal tissues for RNA isolation and cell culture. RT-PCR using stringently designed primer sets was used to establish which P2 and TRP species were expressed at the transcript level, and selective agonists/antagonists were used to confirm functional expression by monitoring changes in intracellular Ca2+ and in a scratch repair assay. The results confirmed the functional expression of P2Y4 receptors and excluded nonexpressed receptors/channels (P2X1, P2X3, P2X6, P2Y6, P2Y11, TRPV5, and TRPM8), while a dearth of specific agonists confounded the functional validation of expressed P2X2, P2X4, P2Y1, P2Y2, TRPV2, TRPV3, TRPV6 and TRPM7 receptors/channels. Although a conventional response was elicited in control stromal-derived cells, the urothelial cell response to well-characterized TRPV1 and TRPV4 agonists/antagonists revealed unexpected anomalies. In addition, agonists that invoked an increase in intracellular Ca2+ promoted urothelial scratch repair, presumably through the release of ATP. The study raises important questions about the ligand selectivity of receptor/channel targets expressed by the urothelium. These pathways are important in urothelial tissue homeostasis, and this opens the possibility of selective drug targeting. PMID:23720349

  1. Insights from the Study of Animals Lacking Functional Estrogen Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korach, Kenneth S.

    1994-12-01

    Estrogen hormones produce physiological actions within a variety of target sites in the body and during development by activating a specific receptor protein. Hormone responsiveness for the estrogen receptor protein was investigated at different stages of development with the use of gene knockout techniques because no natural genetic mutants have been described. A mutant mouse line without a functional estrogen receptor was created and is being used to assess estrogen responsiveness. Both sexes of these mutant animals are infertile and show a variety of phenotypic changes, some of which are associated with the gonads, mammary glands, reproductive tracts, and skeletal tissues.

  2. A structural biology perspective on NMDA receptor pharmacology and function.

    PubMed

    Regan, Michael C; Romero-Hernandez, Annabel; Furukawa, Hiro

    2015-08-01

    N-methyld-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) belong to the large family of ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs), which are critically involved in basic brain functions as well as multiple neurological diseases and disorders. The NMDARs are large heterotetrameric membrane protein complexes. The extensive extracellular domains recognize neurotransmitter ligands and allosteric compounds and translate the binding information to regulate activity of the transmembrane ion channel. Here, we review recent advances in the structural biology of NMDARs with a focus on pharmacology and function. Structural analysis of the isolated extracellular domains in combination with the intact heterotetrameric NMDAR structure provides important insights into how this sophisticated ligand-gated ion channel may function.

  3. Dissecting the effects of endogenous brain IL-2 and normal versus autoreactive T lymphocytes on microglial responsiveness and T cell trafficking in response to axonal injury.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhi; Meola, Danielle; Petitto, John M

    2012-09-27

    IL-2 is essential for T-helper regulatory (Treg) cell function and self-tolerance, and dysregulation of both endogenous brain and peripheral IL-2 gene expression may have important implications for neuronal injury and repair. We used an experimental approach combining mouse congenic breeding and immune reconstitution to test the hypothesis that the response of motoneurons to injury is modulated by the combined effects of IL2-mediated processes in the brain that modulate its endogenous neuroimmunological milieu, and IL2-mediated processes in the peripheral immune system that regulate T cell function (i.e., normal versus autoreactive Treg-deficient T cells). This experimental strategy enabled us to test our hypothesis by disentangling the effect of normal versus autoreactive T lymphocytes from the effect of endogenous brain IL-2 on microglial responsiveness (microglial phagocytic clusters normally associated with dead motoneurons and MHC2(+) activated microglia) and T cell trafficking, using the facial nerve axotomy model of injury. The results demonstrate that the loss of both brain and peripheral IL-2 had an additive effect on numbers of microglial phagocytic clusters at day 14 following injury, whereas the autoreactive status of peripheral T cells was the primary factor that determined the degree to which T cells entered the injured brain and contributed to increased microglial phagocytic clusters. Changes in activated MHC2(+) microglial in the injured FMN were associated with loss of endogenous brain IL-2 and/or peripheral IL-2. This model may provide greater understanding of the mechanisms involved in determining if T cells entering the injured central nervous system (CNS) have damaging or proregenerative effects.

  4. Desensitization of G protein-coupled receptors and neuronal functions.

    PubMed

    Gainetdinov, Raul R; Premont, Richard T; Bohn, Laura M; Lefkowitz, Robert J; Caron, Marc G

    2004-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have proven to be the most highly favorable class of drug targets in modern pharmacology. Over 90% of nonsensory GPCRs are expressed in the brain, where they play important roles in numerous neuronal functions. GPCRs can be desensitized following activation by agonists by becoming phosphorylated by members of the family of G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs). Phosphorylated receptors are then bound by arrestins, which prevent further stimulation of G proteins and downstream signaling pathways. Discussed in this review are recent progress in understanding basics of GPCR desensitization, novel functional roles, patterns of brain expression, and receptor specificity of GRKs and beta arrestins in major brain functions. In particular, screening of genetically modified mice lacking individual GRKs or beta arrestins for alterations in behavioral and biochemical responses to cocaine and morphine has revealed a functional specificity in dopamine and mu-opioid receptor regulation of locomotion and analgesia. An important and specific role of GRKs and beta arrestins in regulating physiological responsiveness to psychostimulants and morphine suggests potential involvement of these molecules in certain brain disorders, such as addiction, Parkinson's disease, mood disorders, and schizophrenia. Furthermore, the utility of a pharmacological strategy aimed at targeting this GPCR desensitization machinery to regulate brain functions can be envisaged. PMID:15217328

  5. Human gammadelta T lymphocytes exert natural and IL-2-induced cytotoxicity to neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Schilbach, K E; Geiselhart, A; Wessels, J T; Niethammer, D; Handgretinger, R

    2000-01-01

    Human gammadelta T lymphocytes play an important role in nonadaptive reactions to infection and early tumor defense. This is the first report that freshly isolated, native gammadelta T cells of some healthy donors can kill human neuroblastoma cells to varying degrees. Their killing ability was increased and maintained during expansion and cultivation with interleukin-2 (IL-2; 400 IU/mL) for as long as 30 days (100% specific lysis at an effector-to-target cell (E:T) ratio of 20:1). gammadelta T lymphocytes without this spontaneous killing ability gained a specific cytolytic activity of 81% +/- 10.4% SD after stimulation with IL-2 for 24 hours. gammadelta cells were isolated from peripheral blood by positive enrichment (using a magnetic cell sorting system; purity, 95.2% +/- 3.2% SD, n = 21). High natural cytotoxic activity against human neuroblastoma cell lines (>50% specific lysis at an E:T ratio of 20:1) was exhibited by one of 11 donors, whereas two of 11 showed medium cytotoxicity (30% to 50% specific lysis). Eight of 11 donors showed very slight or no lytic activity against human neuroblastoma cells (<30% specific lysis). gammadelta T cells were also cytotoxic against Daudi (32.7% specific lysis at an E:T ratio of 20:1), Raji (10.3%), Colo 205 (23.1%), A 204 (54%), K 562 (100%), and SK-N-MC (100%) cells. Isolated gammadelta T cells were grown in Iscove modified Dulbecco medium with IL-2 (400 IU/mL). Increased cell proliferation (38.5% to 182%) was induced with phytohemagglutinin, IL-15, Clodronat, OKT3, or various combinations of these. Results of cold target inhibition assays suggest a natural killer-like activity of the gammadelta T-cell killing mechanism. Peptidase or papain render neuroblastoma cells unsusceptible to gammadelta T-cell killing, suggesting the involvement of antigen peptide(s) in the process of neuroblastoma cell killing. Treatment with acid phosphatase reduced specific lysis by 66.5% +/- 34.1% SD, which suggests a binding to phosphorylated

  6. Repeated Injections of IL-2 Break Renal Allograft Tolerance Induced via Mixed Hematopoietic Chimerism in Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Y; Nadazdin, O; Boskovic, S; Lee, S; Zorn, E; Smith, R N; Colvin, R B; Madsen, J C; Cosimi, A B; Kawai, T; Benichou, G

    2015-12-01

    Tolerance of allografts achieved in mice via stable mixed hematopoietic chimerism relies essentially on continuous elimination of developing alloreactive T cells in the thymus (central deletion). Conversely, while only transient mixed chimerism is observed in nonhuman primates and patients, it is sufficient to ensure tolerance of kidney allografts. In this setting, it is likely that tolerance depends on peripheral regulatory mechanisms rather than thymic deletion. This implies that, in primates, upsetting the balance between inflammatory and regulatory alloimmunity could abolish tolerance and trigger the rejection of previously accepted renal allografts. In this study, six monkeys that were treated with a mixed chimerism protocol and had accepted a kidney allograft for periods of 1-10 years after withdrawal of immunosuppression received subcutaneous injections of IL-2 cytokine (0.6-3 × 10(6) IU/m(2) ). This resulted in rapid rejection of previously tolerated renal transplants and was associated with an expansion and reactivation of alloreactive pro-inflammatory memory T cells in the host's lymphoid organs and in the graft. This phenomenon was prevented by anti-CD8 antibody treatment. Finally, this process was reversible in that cessation of IL-2 administration aborted the rejection process and restored normal kidney graft function.

  7. Mutation analyses and prenatal diagnosis in families of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency caused by IL2Rγ gene novel mutation.

    PubMed

    Bai, Q L; Liu, N; Kong, X D; Xu, X J; Zhao, Z H

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the feasibility of interleukin-2 receptor gamma (IL2Rγ) gene based on gene mutation analysis and pre-natal diagnosis of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (X-SCID). Blood samples of patients and their parents of X-SCID (family 1) and X-SCID (family 2) were collected. IL2Rγ gene sequences of the 2 families were analyzed using bi-directional direct sequencing by polymerase chain reaction. DNA sequence changes in the IL2Rγ gene exon region and shear zone were also analyzed. We also sequenced the IL2Rγ gene in 100 healthy individuals. Prenatal genetic diagnoses for a high-risk fetus in family 1 were performed by chorionic villus sampling after determining each family's genotypes. The suspect fe-male in family 1 underwent carrier detection. Two novel mutations of IL2Rγ gene were identified, including c.361-363delGAG (p.E121del) in the patient and his mother in family 1, and c.510-511insGAACT (p.W173X) heterozygous mutation in the proband's mother in family 2. These mutations were absent in the 100 controls. Prenatal diagnosis of early pregnancy in the female fetus of family 1 was performed; the fetus was heterozygous, which was confirmed at postnatal follow-up. The suspect female in family 1 showed no mutation in carrier detection. The novel p.E121del and p.W173X mutations in IL2Rγ may have been the primary causes of disease in 2 families with X-SCID. In couples with an X-SCID reproductive history, prenatal gene mutation analysis of IL2Rγ can effectively prevent the birth of children with X-SCID and carrier detection for suspected females. PMID:26125817

  8. Differential regulation of CD3- and CD28-induced IL-2 and IFN-gamma production by a novel tyrosine kinase inhibitor XR774 from Cladosporium cf. cladosporioides.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, R; Depledge, P; Rawlins, P; Dhanjal, N; Manic, A; Wrigley, S; Foxwell, B; Moore, M

    2001-01-01

    Inhibition of CD28 signalling after an immune response impedes T cell activation and can lead to immunosuppression. To identify inhibitors of anti-CD28 induced IL-2 production, a library of fungal metabolites was screened in a cell-based, high throughput assay. A reduced novel benzofluoranthene, tentatively named as (6bS, 7R, 8S)-7-methoxy-4, 8, 9-trihydroxy-1, 6b, 7, 8-tetrahydro-2H-benzo[j] fluoranthen-3-one (XR774), from Cladosporium cf. cladosporioides, was isolated. XR774 inhibited IL-2 mRNA and protein expression induced by anti-CD28 and anti-CD3 but had no effect on IL-2 induction by PMA and ionomycin. Moreover, XR774 inhibited the activity of the tyrosine kinases, Fyn, Lck, Abl and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with nanomolar activity, whereas micromolar concentrations of XR774 were ineffective on the serine-threonine kinase, PKA. Kinetic analysis of Fyn kinase inhibition was consistent with XR774 as a competitive inhibitor with respect to ATP. In peripheral blood, mononuclear cells (PBMC), XR774 inhibited anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 induced IL-2 and IL-2R alpha chain (CD25) expression but was consistently less active for inhibition of IFN-gamma production. On stimulation with PMA and anti-CD28, XR774 inhibited IL-2 production but had no effect on CD25 expression and enhanced IFN-gamma production. In contrast, the ansamycin, geldanamycin, inhibited both IL-2 and IFN-gamma production induced by anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 or PMA and anti-CD28. No significant associated cytotoxicity or inhibition of protein synthesis was observed at concentrations up to 14 microM. Thus, XR774 represents a novel class of pharmacological agent with selective biological activities that distinguish it from other natural product inhibitors, such as the ansamycins.

  9. Nuclear receptor corepressor complexes in cancer: mechanism, function and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Madeline M; Guo, Chun; Zhang, Jinsong

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear receptor corepressor (NCoR) and silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid hormone receptors (SMRT) function as corepressors for diverse transcription factors including nuclear receptors such as estrogen receptors and androgen receptors. Deregulated functions of NCoR and SMRT have been observed in many types of cancers and leukemias. NCoR and SMRT directly bind to transcription factors and nucleate the formation of stable complexes that include histone deacetylase 3, transducin b-like protein 1/TBL1-related protein 1, and G-protein pathway suppressor 2. These NCoR/SMRT-interacting proteins also show deregulated functions in cancers. In this review, we summarize the literature on the mechanism, regulation, and function of the core components of NCoR/SMRT complexes in the context of their involvement in cancers and leukemias. While the current studies support the view that the corepressors are promising targets for cancer treatment, elucidation of the mechanisms of corepressors involved in individual types of cancers is likely required for effective therapy. PMID:25374920

  10. MOLECULAR MECHANISMS INVOLVED IN PROGESTERONE RECEPTOR REGULATION OF UTERINE FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Lee, K.; Jeong, J.; Tsai, M.-J.; Tsai, S.; Lydon, J. P.; DeMayo, F. J.

    2007-01-01

    The ovarian steroid hormone progesterone is a major regulator of uterine function. The actions of this hormone is mediated through its cognate receptor, the progesterone receptor, Pgr. Ablation of the Pgr has shown that this receptor is critical for all female reproductive functions including the ability of the uterus to support and maintain the development of the implanting mouse embryo. High density DNA microarray analysis has identified direct and indirect targets of Pgr action. One of the targets of Pgr action is a member of the Hedgehog morphogen Indian hedgehog, Ihh. Ihh and members of the Hh signaling cascade show a coordinate expression pattern in the mouse uterus during the preimplantation period of pregnancy. The expression of Ihh and its receptor Patched-1, Ptc1, as well as, down stream targets of Ihh-Ptch1 signaling, such as the orphan nuclear receptor COUP-TF II show that this morphogen pathway mediates communication between the uterine epithelial and stromal compartments. The members of the Ihh signaling axis may function to coordinate the proliferation, vascularization and differentiation of the uterine stroma during pregnancy. This analysis demonstrates that progesterone regulates uterine function in the mouse by coordinating the signals from the uterine epithelium to stroma in the preimplantation mouse uterus. PMID:17067792

  11. The Oncogenic Functions of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are ion channels that are expressed in the cell membrane of all mammalian cells, including cancer cells. Recent findings suggest that nAChRs not only mediate nicotine addiction in the brain but also contribute to the development and progression of cancers directly induced by nicotine and its derived carcinogenic nitrosamines whereas deregulation of the nAChRs is observed in many cancers, and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) indicate that SNPs nAChRs associate with risks of lung cancers and nicotine addiction. Emerging evidences suggest nAChRs are posited at the central regulatory loops of numerous cell growth and prosurvival signal pathways and also mediate the synthesis and release of stimulatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters induced by their agonists. Thus nAChRs mediated cell signaling plays an important role in stimulating the growth and angiogenic and neurogenic factors and mediating oncogenic signal transduction during cancer development in a cell type specific manner. In this review, we provide an integrated view of nAChRs signaling in cancer, heightening on the oncogenic properties of nAChRs that may be targeted for cancer treatment. PMID:26981122

  12. The Oncogenic Functions of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are ion channels that are expressed in the cell membrane of all mammalian cells, including cancer cells. Recent findings suggest that nAChRs not only mediate nicotine addiction in the brain but also contribute to the development and progression of cancers directly induced by nicotine and its derived carcinogenic nitrosamines whereas deregulation of the nAChRs is observed in many cancers, and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) indicate that SNPs nAChRs associate with risks of lung cancers and nicotine addiction. Emerging evidences suggest nAChRs are posited at the central regulatory loops of numerous cell growth and prosurvival signal pathways and also mediate the synthesis and release of stimulatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters induced by their agonists. Thus nAChRs mediated cell signaling plays an important role in stimulating the growth and angiogenic and neurogenic factors and mediating oncogenic signal transduction during cancer development in a cell type specific manner. In this review, we provide an integrated view of nAChRs signaling in cancer, heightening on the oncogenic properties of nAChRs that may be targeted for cancer treatment. PMID:26981122

  13. Glutamate Receptor Ion Channels: Structure, Regulation, and Function

    PubMed Central

    Wollmuth, Lonnie P.; McBain, Chris J.; Menniti, Frank S.; Vance, Katie M.; Ogden, Kevin K.; Hansen, Kasper B.; Yuan, Hongjie; Myers, Scott J.; Dingledine, Ray

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian ionotropic glutamate receptor family encodes 18 gene products that coassemble to form ligand-gated ion channels containing an agonist recognition site, a transmembrane ion permeation pathway, and gating elements that couple agonist-induced conformational changes to the opening or closing of the permeation pore. Glutamate receptors mediate fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system and are localized on neuronal and non-neuronal cells. These receptors regulate a broad spectrum of processes in the brain, spinal cord, retina, and peripheral nervous system. Glutamate receptors are postulated to play important roles in numerous neurological diseases and have attracted intense scrutiny. The description of glutamate receptor structure, including its transmembrane elements, reveals a complex assembly of multiple semiautonomous extracellular domains linked to a pore-forming element with striking resemblance to an inverted potassium channel. In this review we discuss International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology glutamate receptor nomenclature, structure, assembly, accessory subunits, interacting proteins, gene expression and translation, post-translational modifications, agonist and antagonist pharmacology, allosteric modulation, mechanisms of gating and permeation, roles in normal physiological function, as well as the potential therapeutic use of pharmacological agents acting at glutamate receptors. PMID:20716669

  14. Dynamic Regulation of the GABAA Receptor Function by Redox Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Daniel J; González, Andrea N Beltrán

    2016-09-01

    Oxidizing and reducing agents, which are currently involved in cell metabolism and signaling pathways, can regulate fast inhibitory neurotransmission mediated by GABA receptors in the nervous system. A number of in vitro studies have shown that diverse redox compounds, including redox metabolites and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, modulate phasic and tonic responses mediated by neuronal GABAA receptors through both presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms. We review experimental data showing that many redox agents, which are normally present in neurons and glia or are endogenously generated in these cells under physiologic states or during oxidative stress (e.g., hydrogen peroxide, superoxide and hydroxyl radicals, nitric oxide, ascorbic acid, and glutathione), induce potentiating or inhibiting actions on different native and recombinant GABAA receptor subtypes. Based on these results, it is thought that redox signaling might represent a homeostatic mechanism that regulates the function of synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAA receptors in physiologic and pathologic conditions.

  15. Inhibition of androgen receptor (AR) function by the reproductive orphan nuclear receptor DAX-1.

    PubMed

    Holter, Elin; Kotaja, Noora; Mäkela, Sari; Strauss, Leena; Kietz, Silke; Jänne, Olli A; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake; Palvimo, Jorma J; Treuter, Eckardt

    2002-03-01

    DAX-1 (NROB1) is an atypical member of the nuclear receptor family that is predominantly expressed in mammalian reproductive tissues. While a receptor function of DAX-1 remains enigmatic, previous work has indicated that DAX-1 inhibits the activity of the orphan receptor steroidogenic factor 1 and the estrogen receptors (ERs), presumably via direct occupation of the coactivator-binding surface and subsequent recruitment of additional corepressors. In vivo evidence points at a particular role of DAX-1 for the development and maintenance of male reproductive functions. In this study, we have identified the androgen receptor (AR) NR3C4 as a novel target for DAX-1. We show that DAX-1 potently inhibits ligand-dependent transcriptional activation as well as the interaction between the N- and C-terminal activation domains of AR. We provide evidence for direct interactions of the two receptors that involve the N-terminal repeat domain of DAX-1 and the C-terminal ligand-binding and activation domain of AR. Moreover, DAX-1, known to shuttle between the cytoplasm and the nucleus, is capable of relocalizing AR in both cellular compartments, suggesting that intracellular tethering is associated with DAX-1 inhibition. These results implicate novel inhibitory mechanisms of DAX-1 action with particular relevance for the modulation of androgen-dependent gene transcription in the male reproductive system. PMID:11875111

  16. Membrane protrusion powers clathrin-independent endocytosis of interleukin-2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Basquin, Cyril; Trichet, Michaël; Vihinen, Helena; Malardé, Valérie; Lagache, Thibault; Ripoll, Léa; Jokitalo, Eija; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Gautreau, Alexis; Sauvonnet, Nathalie

    2015-08-13

    Endocytosis controls many functions including nutrient uptake, cell division, migration and signal transduction. A clathrin- and caveolin-independent endocytosis pathway is used by important physiological cargos, including interleukin-2 receptors (IL-2R). However, this process lacks morphological and dynamic data. Our electron microscopy (EM) and tomography studies reveal that IL-2R-pits and vesicles are initiated at the base of protrusions. We identify the WAVE complex as a specific endocytic actor. The WAVE complex interacts with IL-2R, via a WAVE-interacting receptor sequence (WIRS) present in the receptor polypeptide, and allows for receptor clustering close to membrane protrusions. In addition, using total internal reflection fluorescent microscopy (TIRF) and automated analysis we demonstrate that two timely distinct bursts of actin polymerization are required during IL-2R uptake, promoted first by the WAVE complex and then by N-WASP. Finally, our data reveal that dynamin acts as a transition controller for the recruitment of Arp2/3 activators required for IL-2R endocytosis. Altogether, our work identifies the spatio-temporal specific role of factors initiating clathrin-independent endocytosis by a unique mechanism that does not depend on the deformation of a flat membrane, but rather on that of membrane protrusions.

  17. Membrane protrusion powers clathrin-independent endocytosis of interleukin-2 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Basquin, Cyril; Trichet, Michaël; Vihinen, Helena; Malardé, Valérie; Lagache, Thibault; Ripoll, Léa; Jokitalo, Eija; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Gautreau, Alexis; Sauvonnet, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Endocytosis controls many functions including nutrient uptake, cell division, migration and signal transduction. A clathrin- and caveolin-independent endocytosis pathway is used by important physiological cargos, including interleukin-2 receptors (IL-2R). However, this process lacks morphological and dynamic data. Our electron microscopy (EM) and tomography studies reveal that IL-2R-pits and vesicles are initiated at the base of protrusions. We identify the WAVE complex as a specific endocytic actor. The WAVE complex interacts with IL-2R, via a WAVE-interacting receptor sequence (WIRS) present in the receptor polypeptide, and allows for receptor clustering close to membrane protrusions. In addition, using total internal reflection fluorescent microscopy (TIRF) and automated analysis we demonstrate that two timely distinct bursts of actin polymerization are required during IL-2R uptake, promoted first by the WAVE complex and then by N-WASP. Finally, our data reveal that dynamin acts as a transition controller for the recruitment of Arp2/3 activators required for IL-2R endocytosis. Altogether, our work identifies the spatio-temporal specific role of factors initiating clathrin-independent endocytosis by a unique mechanism that does not depend on the deformation of a flat membrane, but rather on that of membrane protrusions. PMID:26124312

  18. Scavenger Receptor Structure and Function in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Zani, Izma; Stephen, Sam L.; Mughal, Nadeem A.; Russell, David; Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi; Wheatcroft, Stephen B.; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2015-01-01

    Scavenger receptors (SRs) are a ‘superfamily’ of membrane-bound receptors that were initially thought to bind and internalize modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL), though it is currently known to bind to a variety of ligands including endogenous proteins and pathogens. New family of SRs and their properties have been identified in recent years, and have now been classified into 10 eukaryote families, defined as Classes A-J. These receptors are classified according to their sequences, although in each class they are further classified based in the variations of the sequence. Their ability to bind a range of ligands is reflected on the biological functions such as clearance of modified lipoproteins and pathogens. SR members regulate pathophysiological states including atherosclerosis, pathogen infections, immune surveillance, and cancer. Here, we review our current understanding of SR structure and function implicated in health and disease. PMID:26010753

  19. Functional genomics of the human HDL receptor scavenger receptor BI: An old dog with new tricks

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Alexandra C.; Sahoo, Daisy

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review The athero-protective role of scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) is primarily attributed to its ability to selectively transfer cholesteryl esters from high density lipoproteins (HDL) to the liver during reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). In this review, we highlight recent findings that reveal the impact of SR-BI on lipid levels and cardiovascular disease in humans. Moreover, additional responsibilities of SR-BI in modulating adrenal and platelet function, as well as female fertility in humans, are discussed. Recent findings Heterozygote carriers of P297S-, S112F- and T175A- mutant SR-BI receptors were identified in patients with high HDL-cholesterol levels. HDL from P297S-SR-BI carriers was unable to mediate macrophage cholesterol efflux, while hepatocytes expressing P297S-SR-BI were unable to mediate the selective uptake of HDL-cholesteryl esters. S112F- and T175A-mutant receptors exhibited similar impaired cholesterol transport functions in vitro. Reduced SR-BI function in P297S carriers was also associated with decreased steroidogenesis and altered platelet function. Further, human population studies identified SCARB1 variants associated with female infertility. Summary Identification of SR-BI variants confirms the key role of this receptor in influencing lipid levels and RCT in humans. Deeper understanding of the contributions of SR-BI to steroidogenesis, platelet function and fertility is required in light of exploration of HDL-raising therapies aimed at reducing cardiovascular risk. PMID:23403740

  20. Effect of dietary vanadium on cecal tonsil T cell subsets and IL-2 contents in broilers.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yuanxin; Cui, Hengmin; Peng, Xi; Fang, Jing; Wang, Kangping; Cui, Wei; Liu, Xiaodong

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this 42-day study was to investigate the effects of dietary excess vanadium on intestinal immune function by histopathological observation of cecal tonsil and changes of the cecal tonsil T cell subsets by method of flow cytometry. Four hundred twenty 1-day-old avian broilers were divided into six groups and fed on a corn-soybean basal diet as control diet or the same diet amended to contain 5, 15, 30, 45, and 60 mg/kg vanadium supplied as ammonium metavanadate. In comparison with those of control group, lymphocytes in the lymphatic nodule of cecal tonsil were apparently decreased in 45 and 60 mg/kg groups. The percentage of CD(3)(+) T cells was decreased (p < 0.05) in 45 mg/kg group at 28 and 42 days of age and significantly decreased (p < 0.01) in 60 mg/kg group at 28 and 42 days of age. The percentages of CD(3)(+)CD(4)(+) and CD(3)(+)CD(8)(+) T cells were markedly decreased (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01) in 60 mg/kg group from 14 to 28 days of age and were decreased (p < 0.05) in 45 mg/kg group at 28 and 42 days of age. However, changes of the CD(4)(+)/CD(8)(+) ratio were not significant. Meanwhile, the cecal tonsil interleukin-2 (IL-2) contents were decreased (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01) in 45 and 60 mg/kg groups from 14 to 42 days of age. It was concluded that dietary vanadium in excess of 30 mg/kg reduced the percentages of cecal tonsil T cells subsets and IL-2 contents, and caused cecal tonsil lesions, which impaired cecal tonsil function and impacted the local mucosal immune function of the intestines in broilers.

  1. TAAR1 Modulates Cortical Glutamate NMDA Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, Stefano; Lignani, Gabriele; Caffino, Lucia; Maggi, Silvia; Sukhanov, Ilya; Leo, Damiana; Mus, Liudmila; Emanuele, Marco; Ronzitti, Giuseppe; Harmeier, Anja; Medrihan, Lucian; Sotnikova, Tatyana D; Chieregatti, Evelina; Hoener, Marius C; Benfenati, Fabio; Tucci, Valter; Fumagalli, Fabio; Gainetdinov, Raul R

    2015-01-01

    Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1 (TAAR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor expressed in the mammalian brain and known to influence subcortical monoaminergic transmission. Monoamines, such as dopamine, also play an important role within the prefrontal cortex (PFC) circuitry, which is critically involved in high-o5rder cognitive processes. TAAR1-selective ligands have shown potential antipsychotic, antidepressant, and pro-cognitive effects in experimental animal models; however, it remains unclear whether TAAR1 can affect PFC-related processes and functions. In this study, we document a distinct pattern of expression of TAAR1 in the PFC, as well as altered subunit composition and deficient functionality of the glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the pyramidal neurons of layer V of PFC in mice lacking TAAR1. The dysregulated cortical glutamate transmission in TAAR1-KO mice was associated with aberrant behaviors in several tests, indicating a perseverative and impulsive phenotype of mutants. Conversely, pharmacological activation of TAAR1 with selective agonists reduced premature impulsive responses observed in the fixed-interval conditioning schedule in normal mice. Our study indicates that TAAR1 plays an important role in the modulation of NMDA receptor-mediated glutamate transmission in the PFC and related functions. Furthermore, these data suggest that the development of TAAR1-based drugs could provide a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of disorders related to aberrant cortical functions. PMID:25749299

  2. Structural and Functional Diversity of Estrogen Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Farooq, Amjad

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen receptors, comprised of ERα and ERβ isoforms in mammals, act as ligand-modulated transcription factors and orchestrate a plethora of cellular functions from sexual development and reproduction to metabolic homeostasis. Herein, I revisit the structural basis of the binding of ERα to DNA and estradiol in light of the recent discoveries and emerging trends in the field of nuclear receptors. A particular emphasis of this review is on the chemical and structural diversity of an ever-increasing repertoire of physiological, environmental and synthetic ligands of estrogen receptors that ultimately modulate their interactions with cognate DNA located within the promoters of estrogen-responsive genes. In particular, modulation of estrogen receptors by small molecule ligands represents an important therapeutic goal toward the treatment of a wide variety of human pathologies including breast cancer, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and obesity. Collectively, this article provides an overview of a wide array of small organic and inorganic molecules that can fine-tune the physiological function of estrogen receptors, thereby bearing a direct impact on human health and disease. PMID:25866274

  3. Glycine receptors are functionally expressed on bullfrog retinal cone photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Ge, L-H; Lee, S-C; Liu, J; Yang, X-L

    2007-04-25

    Using immunocytochemical and whole cell recording techniques, we examined expression of glycine receptors on bullfrog retinal cone photoreceptors. Immunofluorescence double labeling experiments conducted on retinal sections and isolated cell preparations showed that terminals and inner segments of cones were immunoreactive to both alpha1 and beta subunits of glycine receptors. Moreover, application of glycine induced a sustained inward current from isolated cones, which increased in amplitude in a dose-dependent manner, with an EC50 (concentration of glycine producing half-maximal response) of 67.3+/-4.9 microM, and the current was blocked by the glycine receptor antagonist strychnine, but not 5,7-dichlorokynurenic acid (DCKA) of 200 microM, a blocker of the glycine recognition site at the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. The glycine-induced current reversed in polarity at a potential close to the calculated chloride equilibrium potential, and the reversal potential was changed as a function of the extracellular chloride concentration. These results suggest that strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors are functionally expressed in bullfrog cones, which may mediate signal feedback from glycinergic interplexiform cells to cones in the outer retina. PMID:17346892

  4. Structure and Function of Serotonin G protein Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    McCorvy, John D.; Roth, Bryan L.

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin receptors are prevalent throughout the nervous system and the periphery, and remain one of the most lucrative and promising drug discovery targets for disorders ranging from migraine headaches to neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression. There are 14 distinct serotonin receptors, of which 13 are G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are targets for approximately 40% of the approved medicines. Recent crystallographic and biochemical evidence has provided a converging understanding of the basic structure and functional mechanics of GPCR activation. Currently, two GPCR crystal structures exist for the serotonin family, the 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B receptor, with the antimigraine and valvulopathic drug ergotamine bound. The first serotonin crystal structures not only provide the first evidence of serotonin receptor topography but also provide mechanistic explanations into functional selectivity or biased agonism. This review will detail the findings of these crystal structures from a molecular and mutagenesis perspective for driving rational drug design for novel therapeutics incorporating biased signaling. PMID:25601315

  5. Inhibition of Anopheles gambiae Odorant Receptor Function by Mosquito Repellents*

    PubMed Central

    Tsitoura, Panagiota; Koussis, Konstantinos; Iatrou, Kostas

    2015-01-01

    The identification of molecular targets of insect repellents has been a challenging task, with their effects on odorant receptors (ORs) remaining a debatable issue. Here, we describe a study on the effects of selected mosquito repellents, including the widely used repellent N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide (DEET), on the function of specific ORs of the African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. This study, which has been based on quantitative measurements of a Ca2+-activated photoprotein biosensor of recombinant OR function in an insect cell-based expression platform and a sequential compound addition protocol, revealed that heteromeric OR (ORx/Orco) function was susceptible to strong inhibition by all tested mosquito repellents except DEET. Moreover, our results demonstrated that the observed inhibition was due to efficient blocking of Orco (olfactory receptor coreceptor) function. This mechanism of repellent action, which is reported for the first time, is distinct from the mode of action of other characterized insect repellents including DEET. PMID:25657000

  6. Inhibition of Anopheles gambiae odorant receptor function by mosquito repellents.

    PubMed

    Tsitoura, Panagiota; Koussis, Konstantinos; Iatrou, Kostas

    2015-03-20

    The identification of molecular targets of insect repellents has been a challenging task, with their effects on odorant receptors (ORs) remaining a debatable issue. Here, we describe a study on the effects of selected mosquito repellents, including the widely used repellent N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide (DEET), on the function of specific ORs of the African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. This study, which has been based on quantitative measurements of a Ca(2+)-activated photoprotein biosensor of recombinant OR function in an insect cell-based expression platform and a sequential compound addition protocol, revealed that heteromeric OR (ORx/Orco) function was susceptible to strong inhibition by all tested mosquito repellents except DEET. Moreover, our results demonstrated that the observed inhibition was due to efficient blocking of Orco (olfactory receptor coreceptor) function. This mechanism of repellent action, which is reported for the first time, is distinct from the mode of action of other characterized insect repellents including DEET. PMID:25657000

  7. Solution assembly of cytokine receptor ectodomain complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zining; Ciardelli, T.L.; Johnson, K.W.

    1995-09-01

    For the majority of single transmembrane-spanning cell surface receptors, signal transmission across the lipid bilayer barrier involves several discrete components of molecular recognition. The interaction between ligand and the extracellular segment of its cognate receptor (ectodomain) initiates either homomeric or heteromeric association of receptor subunits. Specific recognition among these subunits may then occur between ectodomain regions, within the membrane by interhelical contact or inside the cell between cytoplasmic domains. Any or all of these interactions may contribute to the stability of the signaling complex. It is the characteristics of ligand binding by the ectodomains of these receptors that controls the heteromeric or homomeric nature and the stoichiometry of the complex. Cytokines and their receptors belong to a growing family of macromolecular systems that exhibit these functional features and share many structural similarities as well. Interleukin-2 is a multifunctional cytokine that represents, perhaps, the most complex example to date of ligand recognition among the hematopoietin receptor family. It is the cooperative binding of IL-2 by all three proteins on the surface of activated T-lymphocytes, however, that ultimately results in crosslinking of the {beta}- and {gamma}-subunits and signaling via association of their cytoplasmic domains. Although the high-affinity IL-2R functions as a heterotrimer, heterodimers of the receptor subunits are also physiologically important. The {alpha}/{beta} heterodimer or {open_quotes}pseudo-high affinity{close_quotes} receptor captures IL-2 as a preformed cell surface complex while the {beta}/{gamma} intermediate affinity site exists, in the absence of the {alpha} subunit, on the majority of natural killer cells. We have begun to study stable complexes of cytokine receptor ectodomains of defined composition and that mimic the ligand binding characteristics of the equivalent cell surface receptor sites.

  8. Functionalized Congeners of P2Y1 Receptor Antagonists:

    SciTech Connect

    de Castro, Sonia; Maruoka, Hiroshi; Hong, Kunlun; Kilbey, II, S Michael; Costanzi, Stefano; Hechler, Béatrice; Gachet, Christian; Harden, T. Kendall; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2010-01-01

    The P2Y{sub 1} receptor is a prothrombotic G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activated by ADP. Preference for the North (N) ring conformation of the ribose moiety of adenine nucleotide 3',5'-bisphosphate antagonists of the P2Y{sub 1} receptor was established by using a ring-constrained methanocarba (a bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane) ring as a ribose substitute. A series of covalently linkable N{sup 6}-methyl-(N)-methanocarba-2'-deoxyadenosine-3',5'-bisphosphates containing extended 2-alkynyl chains was designed, and binding affinity at the human (h) P2Y{sub 1} receptor determined. The chain of these functionalized congeners contained hydrophilic moieties, a reactive substituent, or biotin, linked via an amide. Variation of the chain length and position of an intermediate amide group revealed high affinity of carboxylic congener 8 (K{sub i} 23 nM) and extended amine congener 15 (K{sub i} 132 nM), both having a 2-(1-pentynoyl) group. A biotin conjugate 18 containing an extended {epsilon}-aminocaproyl spacer chain exhibited higher affinity than a shorter biotinylated analogue. Alternatively, click coupling of terminal alkynes of homologous 2-dialkynyl nucleotide derivatives to alkyl azido groups produced triazole derivatives that bound to the P2Y{sub 1} receptor following deprotection of the bisphosphate groups. The preservation of receptor affinity of the functionalized congeners was consistent with new P2Y{sub 1} receptor modeling and ligand docking. Attempted P2Y{sub 1} antagonist conjugation to PAMAM dendrimer carriers by amide formation or palladium-catalyzed reaction between an alkyne on the dendrimer and a 2-iodopurine-derivatized nucleotide was unsuccessful. A dialkynyl intermediate containing the chain length favored in receptor binding was conjugated to an azide-derivatized dendrimer, and the conjugate inhibited ADP-promoted human platelet aggregation. This is the first example of attaching a strategically functionalized P2Y receptor antagonist to a PAMAM dendrimer to

  9. From IL-2 to IL-37: the expanding spectrum of anti-inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Banchereau, Jacques; Pascual, Virginia; O'Garra, Anne

    2012-10-01

    Feedback regulatory circuits provided by regulatory T cells (T(reg) cells) and suppressive cytokines are an intrinsic part of the immune system, along with effector functions. Here we discuss some of the regulatory cytokines that have evolved to permit tolerance to components of self as well as the eradication of pathogens with minimal collateral damage to the host. Interleukin 2 (IL-2), IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) are well characterized, whereas IL-27, IL-35 and IL-37 represent newcomers to the spectrum of anti-inflammatory cytokines. We also emphasize how information accumulated through in vitro as well as in vivo studies of genetically engineered mice can help in the understanding and treatment of human diseases.

  10. Mast Cell Adenosine Receptors Function: A Focus on the A3 Adenosine Receptor and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Rudich, Noam; Ravid, Katya; Sagi-Eisenberg, Ronit

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine is a metabolite, which has long been implicated in a variety of inflammatory processes. Inhaled adenosine provokes bronchoconstriction in asthmatics or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients, but not in non-asthmatics. This hyper responsiveness to adenosine appears to be mediated by mast cell activation. These observations have marked the receptor that mediates the bronchoconstrictor effect of adenosine on mast cells (MCs), as an attractive drug candidate. Four subtypes (A1, A2a, A2b, and A3) of adenosine receptors have been cloned and shown to display distinct tissue distributions and functions. Animal models have firmly established the ultimate role of the A3 adenosine receptor (A3R) in mediating hyper responsiveness to adenosine in MCs, although the influence of the A2b adenosine receptor was confirmed as well. In contrast, studies of the A3R in humans have been controversial. In this review, we summarize data on the role of different adenosine receptors in mast cell regulation of inflammation and pathology, with a focus on the common and distinct functions of the A3R in rodent and human MCs. The relevance of mouse studies to the human is discussed. PMID:22675325

  11. A 33D1+ Dendritic Cell/Autoreactive CD4+ T Cell Circuit Maintains IL-2-Dependent Regulatory T Cells in the Spleen.

    PubMed

    Stolley, J Michael; Campbell, Daniel J

    2016-10-01

    Phenotypically and functionally diverse regulatory T (Tr) cell subsets populate lymphoid and nonlymphoid tissues, where their maintenance and function are governed by unique homeostatic signals. Whereas Tr cells resident in nonlymphoid tissues depend on continual TCR signaling for their survival and function, phenotypically naive Tr cells occupying secondary lymphoid organs are largely supported by paracrine IL-2 signaling. Crucially, the absence of either of these distinct Tr cell subsets results in pathogenic autoimmunity, underscoring their nonredundant roles in the preservation of self-tolerance. However, the cellular and molecular factors precipitating IL-2 release and subsequent maintenance of secondary lymphoid organ-resident Tr cells are still poorly understood. In this study, we report that IL-2-dependent Tr cells in the spleen compete for a limiting supply of paracrine IL-2 generated by autoreactive CD4(+) T cells in response to MHC class II-restricted autoantigen activation by 33D1(+)CD11b(int) dendritic cells. Manipulating this cellular circuit culminating in IL-2 production could have clinical benefits in settings in which diminished Tr cell abundance is desired.

  12. Anticancer Cytokines: Biology and Clinical Effects of IFN-α2, IL-2, IL-15, IL-21, and IL-12

    PubMed Central

    Floros, Theofanis; Tarhini, Ahmad A.

    2015-01-01

    Efforts over nearly four decades have focused on ways to use cytokines to manipulate the host immune response towards cancer cell recognition and eradication. Significant advances were achieved with interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-α (IFN-α), primarily in the treatment of patients with melanoma and renal cell carcinoma. However, the utility of other cytokines showing promise in the preclinical setting has not been established largely because of toxicity, the complex functionality of each cytokine and the difficulty mimicking in preclinical models the human environment. In this paper we will review the basic biology and the clinical experiences with IFN-α, IL-2, IL-15, IL-21 and IL-12. We will also review ongoing clinical trials and discuss future directions including potential use of cytokines in combination with other effective immunotherapy approaches which have come of age in recent years. PMID:26320059

  13. Cdk5 controls IL-2 gene expression via repression of the mSin3a-HDAC complex.

    PubMed

    Lam, Eric; Pareek, Tej K; Letterio, John J

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a unique member of a family of serine/threonine cyclin-dependent protein kinases. We previously demonstrated disruption of Cdk5 gene expression in mice impairs T-cell function and ameliorates T-cell-mediated neuroinflammation. Here, we show Cdk5 modulates gene expression during T-cell activation by impairing the repression of gene transcription by histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) through specific phosphorylation of the mSin3a protein at serine residue 861. Disruption of Cdk5 activity in T-cells enhances HDAC activity and binding of the HDAC1/mSin3a complex to the IL-2 promoter, leading to suppression of IL-2 gene expression. These data point to essential roles for Cdk5 in regulating gene expression in T-cells and transcriptional regulation by the co-repressor mSin3a. PMID:25785643

  14. Fractalkine gene therapy for neuroblastoma is more effective in combination with targeted IL-2.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yan; Jiang, Jikai; Huebener, Nicole; Wenkel, Jens; Gaedicke, Gerhard; Xiang, Rong; Lode, Holger N

    2005-10-18

    The induction of tumor protective immunity against neuroblastoma remains a major challenge for active immunotherapy. Fractalkine is a unique Th1 CX3C chemokine known to induce adhesion and migration of leukocytes mediated by both, a membrane-bound and soluble form, respectively. Here, we tested the hypothesis that chemokine gene therapy with fractalkine (FKN) induces an effective anti-neuroblastoma immune response amplified by targeted IL-2 using the anti-GD2 antibody ch14.18 fused with IL-2 (ch14.18-IL-2). For this purpose, NXS2 cells were genetically engineered to stably produce murine FKN (NXS2-FKN). Transcription and expression of the mFKN gene in tumor tissue of mice inoculated with NXS2-FKN cells were demonstrated in vivo. Importantly, mFKN exhibited a reduction in primary tumor growth and spontaneous liver metastases in syngenic A/J mice. This effect was boosted by targeted IL-2 using small non-curative doses of ch14-18-IL-2. The amplification of the FKN induced immune response was specific, since a non-specific antibody-IL-2 fusion protein ch225-IL-2 was ineffective. In summary, we demonstrated for the first time that chemokine gene therapy is amplified by targeted IL-2 suggesting a combination of both strategies as an adjuvant therapy for neuroblastoma.

  15. N-glycans of growth factor receptors: their role in receptor function and disease implications.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Motoko; Hasegawa, Yoshihiro; Gao, Congxiao; Kuroki, Yoshio; Taniguchi, Naoyuki

    2016-10-01

    Numerous signal-transduction-related molecules are secreted proteins or membrane proteins, and the mechanism by which these molecules are regulated by glycan chains is a very important issue for developing an understanding of the cellular events that transpire. This review covers the functional regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), ErbB3 and the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) receptor by N-glycans. This review shows that the N-glycans play important roles in regulating protein conformation and interactions with carbohydrate recognition molecules. These results point to the possibility of a novel strategy for controlling cell signalling and developing novel glycan-based therapeutics. PMID:27612953

  16. Alcohol Related Changes in Regulation of NMDA Receptor Functions

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, József

    2008-01-01

    Long-term alcohol exposure may lead to development of alcohol dependence in consequence of altered neurotransmitter functions. Accumulating evidence suggests that the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) type of glutamate receptors is a particularly important site of ethanol’s action. Several studies showed that ethanol potently inhibits NMDA receptors (NMDARs) and prolonged ethanol exposition leads to a compensatory “up-regulation” of NMDAR mediated functions. Therefore, alterations in NMDAR function are supposed to contribute to the development of ethanol tolerance, dependence as well as to the acute and late signs of ethanol withdrawal. A number of publications report alterations in the expression and phosphorylation states of NMDAR subunits, in their interaction with scaffolding proteins or other receptors in consequence of chronic ethanol treatment. Our knowledge on the regulatory processes, which modulate NMDAR functions including factors altering transcription, protein expression and post-translational modifications of NMDAR subunits, as well as those influencing their interactions with different regulatory proteins or other downstream signaling elements are incessantly increasing. The aim of this review is to summarize the complex chain of events supposedly playing a role in the up-regulation of NMDAR functions in consequence of chronic ethanol exposure. PMID:19305787

  17. Elevated copper impairs hepatic nuclear receptor function in Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wooton-Kee, Clavia Ruth; Jain, Ajay K; Wagner, Martin; Grusak, Michael A; Finegold, Milton J; Lutsenko, Svetlana; Moore, David D

    2015-09-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive disorder that results in accumulation of copper in the liver as a consequence of mutations in the gene encoding the copper-transporting P-type ATPase (ATP7B). WD is a chronic liver disorder, and individuals with the disease present with a variety of complications, including steatosis, cholestasis, cirrhosis, and liver failure. Similar to patients with WD, Atp7b⁻/⁻ mice have markedly elevated levels of hepatic copper and liver pathology. Previous studies have demonstrated that replacement of zinc in the DNA-binding domain of the estrogen receptor (ER) with copper disrupts specific binding to DNA response elements. Here, we found decreased binding of the nuclear receptors FXR, RXR, HNF4α, and LRH-1 to promoter response elements and decreased mRNA expression of nuclear receptor target genes in Atp7b⁻/⁻ mice, as well as in adult and pediatric WD patients. Excessive hepatic copper has been described in progressive familial cholestasis (PFIC), and we found that similar to individuals with WD, patients with PFIC2 or PFIC3 who have clinically elevated hepatic copper levels exhibit impaired nuclear receptor activity. Together, these data demonstrate that copper-mediated nuclear receptor dysfunction disrupts liver function in WD and potentially in other disorders associated with increased hepatic copper levels.

  18. Functional role of cannabinoid receptors in urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Pradeep; Tyagi, Vikas; Yoshimura, Naoki; Chancellor, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Cannabinoids, the active components of Cannabis sativa (maijuana), and their derivatives produce a wide spectrum of central and peripheral effects, some of which may have clinical applications. The discovery of specific cannabinoid receptors and a family of endogenous ligands of those receptors has attracted much attention to the general cannabinoid pharmacology. In recent years, studies on the functional role of cannabinoid receptors in bladder have been motivated by the therapeutic effects of cannabinoids on voiding dysfunction in multiple sclerosis patients. In this review, we shall summarize the literature on the expression of cannabinoid receptors in urinary bladder and the peripheral influence of locally and systemically administered cannabinoids in the bladder. The ongoing search for cannabinoid-based therapeutic strategies devoid of psychotropic effects can be complemented with local delivery into bladder by the intravesical route. A greater understanding of the role of the peripheral CB(1) and CB(2) receptor system in lower urinary tract is necessary to allow the development of new treatment for pelvic disorders.

  19. Glycine Potentiates AMPA Receptor Function through Metabotropic Activation of GluN2A-Containing NMDA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li-Jun; Hu, Rong; Lujan, Brendan; Chen, Juan; Zhang, Jian-Jian; Nakano, Yasuko; Cui, Tian-Yuan; Liao, Ming-Xia; Chen, Jin-Cao; Man, Heng-Ye; Feng, Hua; Wan, Qi

    2016-01-01

    NMDA receptors are Ca2+-permeable ion channels. The activation of NMDA receptors requires agonist glutamate and co-agonist glycine. Recent evidence indicates that NMDA receptor also has metabotropic function. Here we report that in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons, glycine increases AMPA receptor-mediated currents independent of the channel activity of NMDA receptors and the activation of glycine receptors. The potentiation of AMPA receptor function by glycine is antagonized by the inhibition of ERK1/2. In the hippocampal neurons and in the HEK293 cells transfected with different combinations of NMDA receptors, glycine preferentially acts on GluN2A-containing NMDA receptors (GluN2ARs), but not GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors (GluN2BRs), to enhance ERK1/2 phosphorylation independent of the channel activity of GluN2ARs. Without requiring the channel activity of GluN2ARs, glycine increases AMPA receptor-mediated currents through GluN2ARs. Thus, these results reveal a metabotropic function of GluN2ARs in mediating glycine-induced potentiation of AMPA receptor function via ERK1/2 activation. PMID:27807405

  20. Selective modulation of wild type receptor functions by mutants of G-protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Le Gouill, C; Parent, J L; Caron, C A; Gaudreau, R; Volkov, L; Rola-Pleszczynski, M; Stanková, J

    1999-04-30

    Members of the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family are involved in most aspects of higher eukaryote biology, and mutations in their coding sequence have been linked to several diseases. In the present study, we report that mutant GPCR can affect the functional properties of the co-expressed wild type (WT) receptor. Mutants of the human platelet-activating factor receptor that fail to show any detectable ligand binding (N285I and K298stop) or coupling to a G-protein (D63N, D289A, and Y293A) were co-expressed with the WT receptor in Chinese hamster ovary and COS-7 cells. In this context, N285I and K298stop mutant receptors inhibited 3H-WEB2086 binding and surface expression. Co-transfection with D63N resulted in a constitutively active receptor phenotype. Platelet-activating factor-induced inositol phosphate production in cells transfected with a 1:1 ratio of WT:D63N was higher than with the WT cDNA alone but was abolished with a 1:3 ratio. We confirmed that these findings could be extended to other GPCRs by showing that co-expression of the WT C-C chemokine receptor 2b with a carboxyl-terminal deletion mutant (K311stop), resulted in a decreased affinity and responsiveness to MCP-1. A better understanding of this phenomenon could lead to important tools for the prevention or treatment of certain diseases. PMID:10212233

  1. Bisphenol A affects androgen receptor function via multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Teng, Christina; Goodwin, Bonnie; Shockley, Keith; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Norris, John; Merrick, B Alex; Jetten, Anton M; Austin, Christopher P; Tice, Raymond R

    2013-05-25

    Bisphenol A (BPA), is a well-known endocrine disruptor compound (EDC) that affects the normal development and function of the female and male reproductive system, however the mechanisms of action remain unclear. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of how BPA may affect ten different nuclear receptors, stable cell lines containing individual nuclear receptor ligand binding domain (LBD)-linked to the β-Gal reporter were examined by a quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) format in the Tox21 Screening Program of the NIH. The results showed that two receptors, estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and androgen receptor (AR), are affected by BPA in opposite direction. To confirm the observed effects of BPA on ERα and AR, we performed transient transfection experiments with full-length receptors and their corresponding response elements linked to luciferase reporters. We also included in this study two BPA analogs, bisphenol AF (BPAF) and bisphenol S (BPS). As seen in African green monkey kidney CV1 cells, the present study confirmed that BPA and BPAF act as ERα agonists (half maximal effective concentration EC50 of 10-100 nM) and as AR antagonists (half maximal inhibitory concentration IC50 of 1-2 μM). Both BPA and BPAF antagonized AR function via competitive inhibition of the action of synthetic androgen R1881. BPS with lower estrogenic activity (EC50 of 2.2 μM), did not compete with R1881 for AR binding, when tested at 30 μM. Finally, the effects of BPA were also evaluated in a nuclear translocation assays using EGPF-tagged receptors. Similar to 17β-estradiol (E2) which was used as control, BPA was able to enhance ERα nuclear foci formation but at a 100-fold higher concentration. Although BPA was able to bind AR, the nuclear translocation was reduced. Furthermore, BPA was unable to induce functional foci in the nuclei and is consistent with the transient transfection study that BPA is unable to activate AR.

  2. Bisphenol A affects androgen receptor function via multiple mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Christina; Goodwin, Bonnie; Shockley, Keith; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Norris, John; Merrick, B. Alex; Jetten, Anton M.; Austin, Christopher, P.; Tice, Raymond R.

    2013-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), is a well-known endocrine disruptor compound (EDC) that affects the normal development and function of the female and male reproductive system, however the mechanisms of action remain unclear. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of how BPA may affect ten different nuclear receptors, stable cell lines containing individual nuclear receptor ligand binding domain (LBD)-linked to the β-Gal reporter were examined by a quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) format in the Tox21 Screening Program of the NIH. The results showed that two receptors, estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and androgen receptor (AR), are affected by BPA in opposite direction. To confirm the observed effects of BPA on ERα and AR, we performed transient transfection experiments with full-length receptors and their corresponding response elements linked to luciferase reporters. We also included in this study two BPA analogs, bisphenol AF (BPAF) and bisphenol S (BPS). As seen in African green monkey kidney CV1 cells, the present study confirmed that BPA and BPAF act as ERα agonists (half maximal effective concentration EC50 of 10-100 nM) and as AR antagonists (half maximal inhibitory concentration IC50 of 1-2 μM). Both BPA and BPAF antagonized AR function via competitive inhibition of the action of synthetic androgen R1881. BPS with lower estrogenic activity (EC50 of 2.2 μM), did not compete with R1881 for AR binding, when tested at 30 μM. Finally, the effects of BPA were also evaluated in a nuclear translocation assays using EGPF-tagged receptors. Similar to 17β-estradiol (E2) which was used as control, BPA was able to enhance ERα nuclear foci formation but at a 100-fold higher concentration. Although BPA was able to bind AR, the nuclear translocation was reduced. Furthermore, BPA was unable to induce functional foci in the nuclei and is consistent with the transient transfection study that BPA is unable to activate AR. PMID:23562765

  3. Natural cytotoxic activity in multiple sclerosis patients: defects in IL-2/interferon gamma-regulatory circuit.

    PubMed

    Braakman, E; van Tunen, A; Meager, A; Lucas, C J

    1986-11-01

    In order to determine the factors underlying the impaired natural cytotoxic (NC) activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, we have analysed the interleukin 2 (IL-2)-interferon gamma-(IFN gamma)-NC activity regulatory circuit in 40 MS patients and 40 matched healthy controls. Exogenous recombinant IFN gamma (rIFN gamma) enhanced NC activity in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) derived from MS patients and controls equally well. In contrast, PBL from MS patients showed a significantly lower increase of NC activity in response to IL-2 than healthy controls. This defect in responsiveness was independent of the dose of IL-2. Even at the highest dose of rIL-2 (1000 U/ml), MS patients showed a decreased response. PBL from MS patients required a 2 to 10 times higher dose of IL-2 to reach NC activity levels comparable to controls. In healthy individuals IL-2 can act upon both Fc gamma R+ and Fc gamma R- NC precursor cells. The decreased responsiveness to IL-2 is not confined to one subpopulation of IL-2-responsive precursor cells because depletion of Fc gamma R+ cells before culture in the presence of IL-2 revealed no significant differences in the contribution of Fc gamma R+ precursor cells to the IL-2 enhanced NC activity between MS patients and controls. Also the number of IL-2-responsive precursor cells appeared to be normal since the number of Fc gamma R+ cells in MS patients and controls was comparable. PBL from MS patients produced significantly lower amounts of IFN gamma upon stimulation with IL-2. Analysis of the different parameters of the regulatory circuit at the population level showed, both for patients and controls, a significant correlation between IFN gamma production and increase of NC activity induced by IL-2. Also the endogenous NC activity and IFN gamma production, both in patients and controls, were correlated. At the individual level, defects in NC activity could not be linked to another parameter of the regulatory circuit.

  4. Association of the AFF3 gene and IL2/IL21 gene region with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hinks, A; Eyre, S; Ke, X; Barton, A; Martin, P; Flynn, E; Packham, J; Worthington, J; Thomson, W

    2010-03-01

    Recent genetic studies have led to identification of numerous loci that are associated with susceptibility to autoimmune diseases. The strategy of using information from these studies has facilitated the identification of novel juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) susceptibility loci, specifically, PTPN22 and IL2RA. Several novel autoimmune susceptibility loci have recently been identified, and we hypothesise that single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within these genes may also be JIA susceptibility loci. Five SNPs within the genes AFF3, IL2/IL21, IL7R, CTLA4 and CD226, previously associated with multiple autoimmune diseases were genotyped, in a large data set of Caucasian JIA patients and controls, and tested for association with JIA. We identified two susceptibility loci for JIA, AFF3 and the IL2/IL21 region and additional weak evidence supporting an association with the CTLA4 and IL7R genes, which warrant further investigation. All results require validation in independent JIA data sets. Further characterisation of the specific causal variants will be required before functional studies can be performed. PMID:20072139

  5. Memory regulatory T cells require IL-7 and not IL-2 for their maintenance in peripheral tissues1

    PubMed Central

    Gratz, Iris K.; Truong, Hong-An; Yang, Sara Hsin-Yi; Maurano, Megan M.; Lee, Karim; Abbas, Abul K.; Rosenblum, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Thymic Foxp3-expressing regulatory T cells are activated by peripheral self antigen to increase their suppressive function, and a fraction of these cells survive as memory Tregs (mTregs). Memory Tregs persist in non-lymphoid tissue after cessation of antigen expression and have enhanced capacity to suppress tissue-specific autoimmunity. Here, we show that murine mTregs express specific effector memory T cell markers and localize preferentially to hair follicles in skin. Memory Tregs express high levels of both IL-2Rα and IL-7Rα. Using a genetic deletion approach, we show that IL-2 is required to generate mTregs from naive CD4+ T cell precursors in vivo. However, IL-2 is not required to maintain these cells in the skin and skin-draining lymph nodes. Conversely, IL-7 is essential for maintaining mTregs in skin in the steady state. These results elucidate the fundamental biology of mTregs and show that IL-7 plays an important role in their survival in skin. PMID:23543753

  6. Association of the AFF3 gene and IL2/IL21 gene region with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hinks, A; Eyre, S; Ke, X; Barton, A; Martin, P; Flynn, E; Packham, J; Worthington, J; Thomson, W

    2010-01-01

    Recent genetic studies have led to identification of numerous loci that are associated with susceptibility to autoimmune diseases. The strategy of using information from these studies has facilitated the identification of novel juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) susceptibility loci, specifically, PTPN22 and IL2RA. Several novel autoimmune susceptibility loci have recently been identified, and we hypothesise that single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within these genes may also be JIA susceptibility loci. Five SNPs within the genes AFF3, IL2/IL21, IL7R, CTLA4 and CD226, previously associated with multiple autoimmune diseases were genotyped, in a large data set of Caucasian JIA patients and controls, and tested for association with JIA. We identified two susceptibility loci for JIA, AFF3 and the IL2/IL21 region and additional weak evidence supporting an association with the CTLA4 and IL7R genes, which warrant further investigation. All results require validation in independent JIA data sets. Further characterisation of the specific causal variants will be required before functional studies can be performed. PMID:20072139

  7. The effects of polymorphisms in IL-2, IFN-γ, TGF-β2, IgL, TLR-4, MD-2, and iNOS genes on resistance to Salmonella enteritidis in indigenous chickens.

    PubMed

    Tohidi, Reza; Idris, Ismail Bin; Panandam, Jothi Malar; Bejo, Mohd Hair

    2012-12-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis is a major cause of food poisoning worldwide, and poultry products are the main source of S. Enteritidis contamination for humans. Among the numerous strategies for disease control, improving genetic resistance to S. Enteritidis has been the most effective approach. We investigated the association between S. Enteritidis burden in the caecum, spleen, and liver of young indigenous chickens and seven candidate genes, selected on the basis of their critical roles in immunological functions. The genes included those encoding interleukin 2 (IL-2), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), transforming growth factor β2 (TGF-β2), immunoglobulin light chain (IgL), toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4), myeloid differentiation protein 2 (MD-2), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Two Malaysian indigenous chicken breeds were used as sustainable genetic sources of alleles that are resistant to salmonellosis. The polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment-length polymorphism technique was used to genotype the candidate genes. Three different genotypes were observed in all of the candidate genes, except for MD-2. All of the candidate genes showed the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for the two populations. The IL-2-MnlI polymorphism was associated with S. Enteritidis burden in the caecum and spleen. The TGF-β2-RsaI, TLR-4-Sau 96I, and iNOS-AluI polymorphisms were associated with the caecum S. Enteritidis load. The other candidate genes were not associated with S. Enteritidis load in any organ. The results indicate that the IL-2, TGF-β2, TLR-4, and iNOS genes are potential candidates for use in selection programmes for increasing genetic resistance against S. Enteritidis in Malaysian indigenous chickens.

  8. The Emergence of NMDA Receptor Metabotropic Function: Insights from Imaging.

    PubMed

    Dore, Kim; Aow, Jonathan; Malinow, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The NMDA receptor (R) participates in many important physiological and pathological processes. For example, its activation is required for both long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) of synaptic transmission, cellular models of learning and memory. Furthermore, it may play a role in the actions of amyloid-beta on synapses as well as in the signaling leading to cell death following stroke. Until recently, these processes were thought to be mediated by ion-flux through the receptor. Using a combination of imaging and electrophysiological approaches, ion-flux independent functions of the NMDAR were recently examined. In this review, we will discuss the role of metabotropic NMDAR function in LTD and synaptic dysfunction. PMID:27516738

  9. Structure and function of glutamate receptor ion channels.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Mark L; Armstrong, Neali

    2004-01-01

    A vast number of proteins are involved in synaptic function. Many have been cloned and their functional role defined with varying degrees of success, but their number and complexity currently defy any molecular understanding of the physiology of synapses. A beacon of success in this medieval era of synaptic biology is an emerging understanding of the mechanisms underlying the activity of the neurotransmitter receptors for glutamate. Largely as a result of structural studies performed in the past three years we now have a mechanistic explanation for the activation of channel gating by agonists and partial agonists; the process of desensitization, and its block by allosteric modulators, is also mostly explained; and the basis of receptor subtype selectivity is emerging with clarity as more and more structures are solved. In the space of months we have gone from cartoons of postulated mechanisms to hard fact. It is anticipated that this level of understanding will emerge for other synaptic proteins in the coming decade.

  10. The Emergence of NMDA Receptor Metabotropic Function: Insights from Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dore, Kim; Aow, Jonathan; Malinow, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The NMDA receptor (R) participates in many important physiological and pathological processes. For example, its activation is required for both long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) of synaptic transmission, cellular models of learning and memory. Furthermore, it may play a role in the actions of amyloid-beta on synapses as well as in the signaling leading to cell death following stroke. Until recently, these processes were thought to be mediated by ion-flux through the receptor. Using a combination of imaging and electrophysiological approaches, ion-flux independent functions of the NMDAR were recently examined. In this review, we will discuss the role of metabotropic NMDAR function in LTD and synaptic dysfunction. PMID:27516738

  11. Receptor, Ligand and Transducer Contributions to Dopamine D2 Receptor Functional Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Sean M.; Pack, Thomas F.; Caron, Marc G.

    2015-01-01

    Functional selectivity (or biased agonism) is a property exhibited by some G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligands, which results in the modulation of a subset of a receptor’s signaling capabilities and more precise control over complex biological processes. The dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) exhibits pleiotropic responses to the biogenic amine dopamine (DA) to mediate complex central nervous system functions through activation of G proteins and β-arrestins. D2R is a prominent therapeutic target for psychological and neurological disorders in which DA biology is dysregulated and targeting D2R with functionally selective drugs could provide a means by which pharmacotherapies could be developed. However, factors that determine GPCR functional selectivity in vivo may be multiple with receptors, ligands and transducers contributing to the process. We have recently described a mutagenesis approach to engineer biased D2R mutants in which G protein-dependent ([Gprot]D2R) and β-arrestin-dependent signaling ([βarr]D2R) were successfully separated (Peterson, et al. PNAS, 2015). Here, permutations of these mutants were used to identify critical determinants of the D2R signaling complex that impart signaling bias in response to the natural or synthetic ligands. Critical residues identified in generating [Gprot]D2R and [βarr]D2R conferred control of partial agonism at G protein and/or β-arrestin activity. Another set of mutations that result in G protein bias was identified that demonstrated that full agonists can impart unique activation patterns, and provided further credence to the concept of ligand texture. Finally, the contributions and interplay between different transducers indicated that G proteins are not aberrantly activated, and that receptor kinase and β-arrestin activities are inextricably linked. These data provide a thorough elucidation of the feasibility and malleability of D2R functional selectivity and point to means by which novel in vivo therapies

  12. Potential biological functions emerging from the different estrogen receptors.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Karen D; Korach, Kenneth S

    2006-12-01

    Technological advances and new tools have brought about tremendous advances in elucidating the roles of estradiol and the estrogen receptors (ERs) in biological processes, especially within the female reproductive system. Development and analysis of multiple genetic models have provided insight into the particular functions of each of the ERs. This article reviews the insights into ER biology in female reproduction gained from the development and use of new types of experimental models.

  13. Interleukin-2 signalling is modulated by a labile disulfide bond in the CD132 chain of its receptor

    PubMed Central

    Metcalfe, Clive; Cresswell, Peter; Barclay, A. Neil

    2012-01-01

    Certain disulfide bonds present in leucocyte membrane proteins are labile and can be reduced in inflammation. This can cause structural changes that result in downstream functional effects, for example, in integrin activation. Recent studies have shown that a wide range of membrane proteins have labile disulfide bonds including CD132, the common gamma chain of the receptors for several cytokines including interleukin-2 and interleukin-4 (IL-2 and IL-4). The Cys183–Cys232 disulfide bond in mouse CD132 is susceptible to reduction by enzymes such as thioredoxin (TRX), gamma interferon-inducible lysosomal thiolreductase and protein disulfide isomerase, which are commonly secreted during immune activation. The Cys183–Cys232 disulfide bond is also reduced in an in vivo lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute model of inflammation. Conditions that lead to the reduction of the Cys183–Cys232 disulfide bond in CD132 inhibit proliferation of an IL-2-dependent T cell clone and concomitant inhibition of the STAT-5 signalling pathway. The same reducing conditions had no effect on the proliferation of an IL-2-independent T cell clone, nor did they reduce disulfide bonds in IL-2 itself. We postulate that reduction of the Cys183–Cys232 disulfide in CD132 inhibits IL-2 binding to the receptor complex. Published data show that the Cys183–Cys232 disulfide bond is exposed at the surface of CD132 and in close contact with IL-2 and IL-4 in their respective receptor complexes. In addition, mutants in these Cys residues in human CD132 lead to immunodeficiency and loss of IL-2 binding. These results have wider implications for the regulation of cytokine receptors in general, as their activity can be modulated by a ‘redox regulator’ mechanism caused by the changes in the redox environment that occur during inflammation and activation of the immune system. PMID:22645657

  14. Integrating TRPV1 Receptor Function with Capsaicin Psychophysics

    PubMed Central

    Smutzer, Gregory; Devassy, Roni K.

    2016-01-01

    Capsaicin is a naturally occurring vanilloid that causes a hot, pungent sensation in the human oral cavity. This trigeminal stimulus activates TRPV1 receptors and stimulates an influx of cations into sensory cells. TRPV1 receptors function as homotetramers that also respond to heat, proinflammatory substances, lipoxygenase products, resiniferatoxin, endocannabinoids, protons, and peptide toxins. Kinase-mediated phosphorylation of TRPV1 leads to increased sensitivity to both chemical and thermal stimuli. In contrast, desensitization occurs via a calcium-dependent mechanism that results in receptor dephosphorylation. Human psychophysical studies have shown that capsaicin is detected at nanomole amounts and causes desensitization in the oral cavity. Psychophysical studies further indicate that desensitization can be temporarily reversed in the oral cavity if stimulation with capsaicin is resumed at short interstimulus intervals. Pretreatment of lingual epithelium with capsaicin modulates the perception of several primary taste qualities. Also, sweet taste stimuli may decrease the intensity of capsaicin perception in the oral cavity. In addition, capsaicin perception and hedonic responses may be modified by diet. Psychophysical studies with capsaicin are consistent with recent findings that have identified TRPV1 channel modulation by phosphorylation and interactions with membrane inositol phospholipids. Future studies will further clarify the importance of capsaicin and its receptor in human health and nutrition. PMID:26884754

  15. Integrating TRPV1 Receptor Function with Capsaicin Psychophysics.

    PubMed

    Smutzer, Gregory; Devassy, Roni K

    2016-01-01

    Capsaicin is a naturally occurring vanilloid that causes a hot, pungent sensation in the human oral cavity. This trigeminal stimulus activates TRPV1 receptors and stimulates an influx of cations into sensory cells. TRPV1 receptors function as homotetramers that also respond to heat, proinflammatory substances, lipoxygenase products, resiniferatoxin, endocannabinoids, protons, and peptide toxins. Kinase-mediated phosphorylation of TRPV1 leads to increased sensitivity to both chemical and thermal stimuli. In contrast, desensitization occurs via a calcium-dependent mechanism that results in receptor dephosphorylation. Human psychophysical studies have shown that capsaicin is detected at nanomole amounts and causes desensitization in the oral cavity. Psychophysical studies further indicate that desensitization can be temporarily reversed in the oral cavity if stimulation with capsaicin is resumed at short interstimulus intervals. Pretreatment of lingual epithelium with capsaicin modulates the perception of several primary taste qualities. Also, sweet taste stimuli may decrease the intensity of capsaicin perception in the oral cavity. In addition, capsaicin perception and hedonic responses may be modified by diet. Psychophysical studies with capsaicin are consistent with recent findings that have identified TRPV1 channel modulation by phosphorylation and interactions with membrane inositol phospholipids. Future studies will further clarify the importance of capsaicin and its receptor in human health and nutrition.

  16. Integrating TRPV1 Receptor Function with Capsaicin Psychophysics.

    PubMed

    Smutzer, Gregory; Devassy, Roni K

    2016-01-01

    Capsaicin is a naturally occurring vanilloid that causes a hot, pungent sensation in the human oral cavity. This trigeminal stimulus activates TRPV1 receptors and stimulates an influx of cations into sensory cells. TRPV1 receptors function as homotetramers that also respond to heat, proinflammatory substances, lipoxygenase products, resiniferatoxin, endocannabinoids, protons, and peptide toxins. Kinase-mediated phosphorylation of TRPV1 leads to increased sensitivity to both chemical and thermal stimuli. In contrast, desensitization occurs via a calcium-dependent mechanism that results in receptor dephosphorylation. Human psychophysical studies have shown that capsaicin is detected at nanomole amounts and causes desensitization in the oral cavity. Psychophysical studies further indicate that desensitization can be temporarily reversed in the oral cavity if stimulation with capsaicin is resumed at short interstimulus intervals. Pretreatment of lingual epithelium with capsaicin modulates the perception of several primary taste qualities. Also, sweet taste stimuli may decrease the intensity of capsaicin perception in the oral cavity. In addition, capsaicin perception and hedonic responses may be modified by diet. Psychophysical studies with capsaicin are consistent with recent findings that have identified TRPV1 channel modulation by phosphorylation and interactions with membrane inositol phospholipids. Future studies will further clarify the importance of capsaicin and its receptor in human health and nutrition. PMID:26884754

  17. Manipulating Memory CD8 T Cell Numbers by Timed Enhancement of IL-2 Signals.

    PubMed

    Kim, Marie T; Kurup, Samarchith P; Starbeck-Miller, Gabriel R; Harty, John T

    2016-09-01

    As a result of the growing burden of tumors and chronic infections, manipulating CD8 T cell responses for clinical use has become an important goal for immunologists. In this article, we show that dendritic cell (DC) immunization coupled with relatively early (days 1-3) or late (days 4-6) administration of enhanced IL-2 signals increase peak effector CD8 T cell numbers, but only early IL-2 signals enhance memory numbers. IL-2 signals delivered at relatively late time points drive terminal differentiation and marked Bim-mediated contraction and do not increase memory T cell numbers. In contrast, early IL-2 signals induce effector cell metabolic profiles that are more conducive to memory formation. Of note, downregulation of CD80 and CD86 was observed on DCs in vivo following early IL-2 treatment. Mechanistically, early IL-2 treatment enhanced CTLA-4 expression on regulatory T cells, and CTLA-4 blockade alongside IL-2 treatment in vivo prevented the decrease in CD80 and CD86, supporting a cell-extrinsic role for CTLA-4 in downregulating B7 ligand expression on DCs. Finally, DC immunization followed by early IL-2 treatment and anti-CTLA-4 blockade resulted in lower memory CD8 T cell numbers compared with the DC+early IL-2 treatment group. These data suggest that curtailed signaling through the B7-CD28 costimulatory axis during CD8 T cell activation limits terminal differentiation and preserves memory CD8 T cell formation; thus, it should be considered in future T cell-vaccination strategies. PMID:27439516

  18. Chemokine (C-X-C Motif) Receptor 4 and Atypical Chemokine Receptor 3 Regulate Vascular α1-Adrenergic Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Harold H; Wong, Yee M; Tripathi, Abhishek; Nevins, Amanda M; Gamelli, Richard L; Volkman, Brian F; Byron, Kenneth L; Majetschak, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor (CXCR) 4 and atypical chemokine receptor (ACKR) 3 ligands have been reported to modulate cardiovascular function in various disease models. The underlying mechanisms, however, remain unknown. Thus, it was the aim of the present study to determine how pharmacological modulation of CXCR4 and ACKR3 regulate cardiovascular function. In vivo administration of TC14012, a CXCR4 antagonist and ACKR3 agonist, caused cardiovascular collapse in normal animals. During the cardiovascular stress response to hemorrhagic shock, ubiquitin, a CXCR4 agonist, stabilized blood pressure, whereas coactivation of CXCR4 and ACKR3 with CXC chemokine ligand 12 (CXCL12), or blockade of CXCR4 with AMD3100 showed opposite effects. While CXCR4 and ACKR3 ligands did not affect myocardial function, they selectively altered vascular reactivity upon α1-adrenergic receptor (AR) activation in pressure myography experiments. CXCR4 activation with ubiquitin enhanced α1-AR-mediated vasoconstriction, whereas ACKR3 activation with various natural and synthetic ligands antagonized α1-AR-mediated vasoconstriction. The opposing effects of CXCR4 and ACKR3 activation by CXCL12 could be dissected pharmacologically. CXCR4 and ACKR3 ligands did not affect vasoconstriction upon activation of voltage-operated Ca2+ channels or endothelin receptors. Effects of CXCR4 and ACKR3 agonists on vascular α1-AR responsiveness were independent of the endothelium. These findings suggest that CXCR4 and ACKR3 modulate α1-AR reactivity in vascular smooth muscle and regulate hemodynamics in normal and pathological conditions. Our observations point toward CXCR4 and ACKR3 as new pharmacological targets to control vasoreactivity and blood pressure. PMID:25032954

  19. Molecular and Physiological Mechanisms of Membrane Receptor Systems Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Severin, E.S.; Savvateeva, M.V.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular physiology is a new interdisciplinary field of knowledge that looks into how complicated biological systems function. The living cell is a relatively simple, but at the same time very sophisticated biological system. After the sequencing of the human genome, molecular physiology has endeavored to investigate the systems of cellular interactions at a completely new level based on knowledge of the spatial organization and functions of receptors, their ligands, and protein-protein interactions. In recent years, the achievements in molecular physiology have centered on the study of sensor reception mechanisms and intercellular data transfer, as well as the immune system physiology, amongst other processes. PMID:22649671

  20. Integrated mRNA-MicroRNA Profiling of Human NK Cell Differentiation Identifies MiR-583 as a Negative Regulator of IL2Rγ Expression

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Min; Lee, Hyun-Jun; Song, Hae Young; Kim, Young Kyeung; Jung, Haiyoung; Park, Young-Jun; Yoon, Suk Ran; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Kim, Tae-Don; Choi, Inpyo

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate immune effector cells that protect against cancer and some viral infections. Until recently, most studies have investigated the molecular signatures of human or mouse NK cells to identify genes that are specifically expressed during NK cell development. However, the mechanism regulating NK cell development remains unclear. Here, we report a regulatory network of potential interactions during in vitro differentiation of human NK cells, identified using genome-wide mRNA and miRNA databases through hierarchical clustering analysis, gene ontology analysis and a miRNA target prediction program. The microRNA (miR)-583, which demonstrated the largest ratio change in mature NK cells, was highly correlated with IL2 receptor gamma (IL2Rγ) expression. The overexpression of miR-583 had an inhibitory effect on NK cell differentiation. In a reporter assay, the suppressive effect of miR-583 was ablated by mutating the putative miR-583 binding site of the IL2Rγ 3′ UTR. Therefore, we show that miR-583 acts as a negative regulator of NK cell differentiation by silencing IL2Rγ. Additionally, we provide a comprehensive database of genome-wide mRNA and miRNA expression during human NK cell differentiation, offering a better understanding of basic human NK cell biology for the application of human NK cells in immunotherapy. PMID:25313504

  1. Intracellular glycine receptor function facilitates glioma formation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Förstera, Benjamin; a Dzaye, Omar Dildar; Winkelmann, Aline; Semtner, Marcus; Benedetti, Bruno; Markovic, Darko S; Synowitz, Michael; Wend, Peter; Fähling, Michael; Junier, Marie-Pierre; Glass, Rainer; Kettenmann, Helmut; Meier, Jochen C

    2014-09-01

    The neuronal function of Cys-loop neurotransmitter receptors is established; however, their role in non-neuronal cells is poorly defined. As brain tumors are enriched in the neurotransmitter glycine, we studied the expression and function of glycine receptors (GlyRs) in glioma cells. Human brain tumor biopsies selectively expressed the GlyR α1 and α3 subunits, which have nuclear localization signals (NLSs). The mouse glioma cell line GL261 expressed GlyR α1, and knockdown of GlyR α1 protein expression impaired the self-renewal capacity and tumorigenicity of GL261 glioma cells, as shown by a neurosphere assay and GL261 cell inoculation in vivo, respectively. We furthermore showed that the pronounced tumorigenic effect of GlyR α1 relies on a new intracellular signaling function that depends on the NLS region in the large cytosolic loop and impacts on GL261 glioma cell gene regulation. Stable expression of GlyR α1 and α3 loops rescued the self-renewal capacity of GlyR α1 knockdown cells, which demonstrates their functional equivalence. The new intracellular signaling function identified here goes beyond the well-established role of GlyRs as neuronal ligand-gated ion channels and defines NLS-containing GlyRs as new potential targets for brain tumor therapies.

  2. Loss of Olfactory Receptor Function in Hominin Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Graham M.; Teeling, Emma C.; Higgins, Desmond G.

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian sense of smell is governed by the largest gene family, which encodes the olfactory receptors (ORs). The gain and loss of OR genes is typically correlated with adaptations to various ecological niches. Modern humans have 853 OR genes but 55% of these have lost their function. Here we show evidence of additional OR loss of function in the Neanderthal and Denisovan hominin genomes using comparative genomic methodologies. Ten Neanderthal and 8 Denisovan ORs show evidence of loss of function that differ from the reference modern human OR genome. Some of these losses are also present in a subset of modern humans, while some are unique to each lineage. Morphological changes in the cranium of Neanderthals suggest different sensory arrangements to that of modern humans. We identify differences in functional olfactory receptor genes among modern humans, Neanderthals and Denisovans, suggesting varied loss of function across all three taxa and we highlight the utility of using genomic information to elucidate the sensory niches of extinct species. PMID:24392153

  3. Loss of olfactory receptor function in hominin evolution.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Graham M; Teeling, Emma C; Higgins, Desmond G

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian sense of smell is governed by the largest gene family, which encodes the olfactory receptors (ORs). The gain and loss of OR genes is typically correlated with adaptations to various ecological niches. Modern humans have 853 OR genes but 55% of these have lost their function. Here we show evidence of additional OR loss of function in the Neanderthal and Denisovan hominin genomes using comparative genomic methodologies. Ten Neanderthal and 8 Denisovan ORs show evidence of loss of function that differ from the reference modern human OR genome. Some of these losses are also present in a subset of modern humans, while some are unique to each lineage. Morphological changes in the cranium of Neanderthals suggest different sensory arrangements to that of modern humans. We identify differences in functional olfactory receptor genes among modern humans, Neanderthals and Denisovans, suggesting varied loss of function across all three taxa and we highlight the utility of using genomic information to elucidate the sensory niches of extinct species.

  4. Functional interaction of nuclear receptor coactivator 4 with aryl hydrocarbon receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kollara, Alexandra; Brown, Theodore J. . E-mail: brown@mshri.on.ca

    2006-07-28

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) transcriptional activity is enhanced by interaction with p160 coactivators. We demonstrate here that NcoA4, a nuclear receptor coactivator, interacts with and amplifies AhR action. NcoA4-AhR and NcoA4-ARNT interactions were demonstrated by immunoprecipitation in T47D breast cancer and COS cells and was independent of ligand. Overexpression of NcoA4 enhanced AhR transcriptional activity 3.2-fold in the presence of dioxin, whereas overexpression of a splice variant, NcoA4{beta}, as well as a variant lacking the C-terminal region enhanced AhR transcriptional activity by only 1.6-fold. Enhanced AhR signaling by NcoA4 was independent of the LXXLL and FXXLF motifs or of the activation domain. NcoA4 protein localized to cytoplasm in the absence of dioxin and in both the cytoplasm and nucleus following dioxin treatment. NcoA4-facilitation of AhR activity was abolished by overexpression of androgen receptor, suggesting a potential competition of AhR and androgen receptor for NcoA4. These findings thus demonstrate a functional interaction between NcoA4 and AhR that may alter AhR activity to affect disease development and progression.

  5. Glutamate Receptor Homologs in Plants: Functions and Evolutionary Origins

    PubMed Central

    Price, Michelle Beth; Jelesko, John; Okumoto, Sakiko

    2012-01-01

    The plant glutamate-like receptor homologs (GLRs) are homologs of mammalian ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) which were discovered more than 10 years ago, and are hypothesized to be potential amino acid sensors in plants. Although initial progress on this gene family has been hampered by gene redundancy and technical issues such as gene toxicity; genetic, pharmacological, and electrophysiological approaches are starting to uncover the functions of this protein family. In parallel, there has been tremendous progress in elucidating the structure of animal glutamate receptors (iGluRs), which in turn will help understanding of the molecular mechanisms of plant GLR functions. In this review, we will summarize recent progress on the plant GLRs. Emerging evidence implicates plant GLRs in various biological processes in and beyond N sensing, and implies that there is some overlap in the signaling mechanisms of amino acids between plants and animals. Phylogenetic analysis using iGluRs from metazoans, plants, and bacteria showed that the plant GLRs are no more closely related to metazoan iGluRs as they are to bacterial iGluRs, indicating the separation of plant, other eukaryotic, and bacterial GLRs might have happened as early on as the last universal common ancestor. Structural similarities and differences with animal iGluRs, and the implication thereof, are also discussed. PMID:23115559

  6. Genetic Models for the Study of Luteinizing Hormone Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Prema

    2015-01-01

    The luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin receptor (LHCGR) is essential for fertility in men and women. LHCGR binds luteinizing hormone (LH) as well as the highly homologous chorionic gonadotropin. Signaling from LHCGR is required for steroidogenesis and gametogenesis in males and females and for sexual differentiation in the male. The importance of LHCGR in reproductive physiology is underscored by the large number of naturally occurring inactivating and activating mutations in the receptor that result in reproductive disorders. Consequently, several genetically modified mouse models have been developed for the study of LHCGR function. They include targeted deletion of LH and LHCGR that mimic inactivating mutations in hormone and receptor, expression of a constitutively active mutant in LHCGR that mimics activating mutations associated with familial male-limited precocious puberty and transgenic models of LH and hCG overexpression. This review summarizes the salient findings from these models and their utility in understanding the physiological and pathological consequences of loss and gain of function in LHCGR signaling. PMID:26483755

  7. Computational design of receptor and sensor proteins with novel functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Looger, Loren L.; Dwyer, Mary A.; Smith, James J.; Hellinga, Homme W.

    2003-05-01

    The formation of complexes between proteins and ligands is fundamental to biological processes at the molecular level. Manipulation of molecular recognition between ligands and proteins is therefore important for basic biological studies and has many biotechnological applications, including the construction of enzymes, biosensors, genetic circuits, signal transduction pathways and chiral separations. The systematic manipulation of binding sites remains a major challenge. Computational design offers enormous generality for engineering protein structure and function. Here we present a structure-based computational method that can drastically redesign protein ligand-binding specificities. This method was used to construct soluble receptors that bind trinitrotoluene, L-lactate or serotonin with high selectivity and affinity. These engineered receptors can function as biosensors for their new ligands; we also incorporated them into synthetic bacterial signal transduction pathways, regulating gene expression in response to extracellular trinitrotoluene or L-lactate. The use of various ligands and proteins shows that a high degree of control over biomolecular recognition has been established computationally. The biological and biosensing activities of the designed receptors illustrate potential applications of computational design.

  8. Orphan nuclear receptor NR2F6 acts as an essential gatekeeper of Th17 CD4+ T cell effector functions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Members of the evolutionarily conserved family of the chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor NR2F/COUP-TF orphan receptors have been implicated in lymphocyte biology, ranging from activation to differentiation and elicitation of immune effector functions. In particular, a CD4+ T cell intrinsic and non-redundant function of NR2F6 as a potent and selective repressor of the transcription of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (Il) 2, interferon y (ifng) and consequently of T helper (Th)17 CD4+ T cell-mediated autoimmune disorders has been discovered. NR2F6 serves as an antigen receptor signaling threshold-regulated barrier against autoimmunity where NR2F6 is part of a negative feedback loop that limits inflammatory tissue damage induced by weakly immunogenic antigens such as self-antigens. Under such low affinity antigen receptor stimulation, NR2F6 appears as a prototypical repressor that functions to “lock out” harmful Th17 lineage effector transcription. Mechanistically, only sustained high affinity antigen receptor-induced protein kinase C (PKC)-mediated phosphorylation has been shown to inactivate NR2F6, thereby displacing pre-bound NR2F6 from the DNA and, subsequently, allowing for robust NFAT/AP-1- and RORγt-mediated cytokine transcription. The NR2F6 target gene repertoire thus identifies a general anti-inflammatory gatekeeper role for this orphan receptor. Investigating these signaling pathway(s) will enable a greater knowledge of the genetic, immune, and environmental mechanisms that lead to chronic inflammation and of certain autoimmune disorders in a given individual. PMID:24919548

  9. MMP-7 cleaves the NR1 NMDA receptor subunit and modifies NMDA receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Szklarczyk, Arek; Ewaleifoh, Osefame; Beique, Jean-Claude; Wang, Yue; Knorr, David; Haughey, Norman; Malpica, Tanya; Mattson, Mark P.; Huganir, Richard; Conant, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are zinc-dependent enzymes that play a role in the inflammatory response. These enzymes have been well studied in the context of cancer biology and inflammation. Recent studies, however, suggest that these enzymes also play roles in brain development and neurodegenerative disease. Select MMPs can target proteins critical to synaptic structure and neuronal survival, including integrins and cadherins. Here, we show that one member of the MMP family, MMP-7, which may be released from cells, including microglia, can target a protein critical to synaptic function. Through analysis of extracts from murine cortical slice preparations, we show that MMP-7 cleaves the NR1 subunit of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor to generate an N-terminal fragment of ∼65 kDa. Moreover, studies with recombinant protein show that MMP-7-mediated cleavage of NR1 occurs at amino acid 517, which is extracellular and just distal to the first transmembrane domain. Data suggest that NR2A, which shares sequence homology with NR1, is also cleaved following treatment of slices with MMP-7, while select AMPA receptor subunits are not. Consistent with a potential effect of MMP-7 on ligand binding, additional experiments demonstrate that NMDA-mediated calcium flux is significantly diminished by MMP-7 pretreatment of cultures. In addition, the AMPA/NMDA ratio is increased by MMP-7 pretreatment. These data suggest that synaptic function may be altered in neurological conditions associated with increased levels of MMP-7.—Szklarczyk, A., Ewaleifoh, O., Beique, J.-C., Wang, Y., Knorr, D., Haughey, N., Malpica, T., Mattson, M. P., Huganir, R., Conant, K. MMP-7 cleaves the NR1 NMDA receptor subunit and modifies NMDA receptor function. PMID:18644839

  10. [Regulatory T-cells in systemic lupus erythematosus. IL-2 is decisive for loss of tolerance].

    PubMed

    Ohl, K; Tenbrock, K

    2016-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) results from loss of immunological tolerance. Regulatory T‑cells (Treg) are major gatekeepers of peripheral tolerance by suppression of autoreactive lymphocytes. Defects in Treg function are therefore possible pathogenetic mechanisms of SLE. Despite this fact published work about numbers and functions of Tregs in SLE are contradictory and the definitive role of Treg in SLE remains unclear. In this review we summarize the current literature about Treg subtypes and the phenotypic markers in human SLE. We also discuss data from mouse models and ex vivo experiments, which provide indications for possible mechanisms that contribute to loss of tolerance. We also discuss the role of interleukin 2 (IL-2), which is decisive for the function of Treg and has been used therapeutically in preliminary trials in human SLE. The identification of novel Treg markers and the development of novel therapeutic approaches, which restore the balance between Treg and autoreactive T‑cells are future goals for research in SLE. PMID:26975190

  11. Loss of immune tolerance to IL-2 in type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Pérol, Louis; Lindner, John M.; Caudana, Pamela; Nunez, Nicolas Gonzalo; Baeyens, Audrey; Valle, Andrea; Sedlik, Christine; Loirat, Delphine; Boyer, Olivier; Créange, Alain; Cohen, José Laurent; Rogner, Ute Christine; Yamanouchi, Jun; Marchant, Martine; Leber, Xavier Charles; Scharenberg, Meike; Gagnerault, Marie-Claude; Mallone, Roberto; Battaglia, Manuela; Santamaria, Pere; Hartemann, Agnès; Traggiai, Elisabetta; Piaggio, Eliane

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is characterized by a chronic, progressive autoimmune attack against pancreas-specific antigens, effecting the destruction of insulin-producing β-cells. Here we show interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a non-pancreatic autoimmune target in T1D. Anti-IL-2 autoantibodies, as well as T cells specific for a single orthologous epitope of IL-2, are present in the peripheral blood of non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice and patients with T1D. In NOD mice, the generation of anti-IL-2 autoantibodies is genetically determined and their titre increases with age and disease onset. In T1D patients, circulating IgG memory B cells specific for IL-2 or insulin are present at similar frequencies. Anti-IL-2 autoantibodies cloned from T1D patients demonstrate clonality, a high degree of somatic hypermutation and nanomolar affinities, indicating a germinal centre origin and underscoring the synergy between cognate autoreactive T and B cells leading to defective immune tolerance. PMID:27708334

  12. Structural and Functional Profiling of Environmental Ligands for Estrogen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Delfosse, Vanessa; Grimaldi, Marina; Cavaillès, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Background: Individuals are exposed daily to environmental pollutants that may act as endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), causing a range of developmental, reproductive, metabolic, or neoplastic diseases. With their mostly hydrophobic pocket that serves as a docking site for endogenous and exogenous ligands, nuclear receptors (NRs) can be primary targets of small molecule environmental contaminants. However, most of these compounds are chemically unrelated to natural hormones, so their binding modes and associated hormonal activities are hardly predictable. Objectives: We conducted a correlative analysis of structural and functional data to gain insight into the mechanisms by which 12 members of representative families of pollutants bind to and activate the estrogen receptors ERα and ERβ. Methods: We used a battery of biochemical, structural, biophysical, and cell-based approaches to characterize the interaction between ERs and their environmental ligands. Results: Our study revealed that the chemically diverse compounds bound to ERs via varied sets of protein–ligand interactions, reflecting their differential activities, binding affinities, and specificities. We observed xenoestrogens binding to both ERs—with affinities ranging from subnanomolar to micromolar values—and acting in a subtype-dependent fashion as full agonists or partial agonists/antagonists by using different combinations of the activation functions 1 and 2 of ERα and ERβ. Conclusions: The precise characterization of the interactions between major environmental pollutants and two of their primary biological targets provides rational guidelines for the design of safer chemicals, and will increase the accuracy and usefulness of structure-based computational methods, allowing for activity prediction of chemicals in risk assessment. Citation: Delfosse V, Grimaldi M, Cavaillès V, Balaguer P, Bourguet W. 2014. Structural and functional profiling of environmental ligands for estrogen

  13. Cardiac microvascular endothelial cells express a functional Ca+ -sensing receptor.

    PubMed

    Berra Romani, Roberto; Raqeeb, Abdul; Laforenza, Umberto; Scaffino, Manuela Federica; Moccia, Francesco; Avelino-Cruz, Josè Everardo; Oldani, Amanda; Coltrini, Daniela; Milesi, Veronica; Taglietti, Vanni; Tanzi, Franco

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism whereby extracellular Ca(2+) exerts the endothelium-dependent control of vascular tone is still unclear. In this study, we assessed whether cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (CMEC) express a functional extracellular Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CaSR) using a variety of techniques. CaSR mRNA was detected using RT-PCR, and CaSR protein was identified by immunocytochemical analysis. In order to assess the functionality of the receptor, CMEC were loaded with the Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorochrome, Fura-2/AM. A number of CaSR agonists, such as spermine, Gd(3+), La(3+) and neomycin, elicited a heterogeneous intracellular Ca(2+) signal, which was abolished by disruption of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP(3)) signaling and by depletion of intracellular stores with cyclopiazonic acid. The inhibition of the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger upon substitution of extracellular Na(+) unmasked the Ca(2+) signal triggered by an increase in extracellular Ca(2+) levels. Finally, aromatic amino acids, which function as allosteric activators of CaSR, potentiated the Ca(2+) response to the CaSR agonist La(3+). These data provide evidence that CMEC express CaSR, which is able to respond to physiological agonists by mobilizing Ca(2+) from intracellular InsP(3)-sensitive stores.

  14. [Hypothesis on the function of olfactory receptor cells].

    PubMed

    Smirnov, A A

    1995-01-01

    The scientific studies of sensory systems (including olfactory organs) are carried out during a century. Usually a preliminary theory of object is suggested and detailed in accordance with the new data. However only the strong criticized theories of smell reception more than thirty) are now in the theoretical part of the olfactory organ physiology. The theory is necessary for planning the further investigations of olfactory organ; revealing the mystery of the biological sensors to improve the artificial ones; the improvement of the methods to obtain new biological active substances (perfume, drugs, insecticides). These circumstances justify the attempt to suggest the theory of the olfactory receptor cell functioning.

  15. kappa-Opioid receptor signaling and brain reward function.

    PubMed

    Bruijnzeel, Adrie W

    2009-12-11

    The dynorphin-like peptides have profound effects on the state of the brain reward system and human and animal behavior. The dynorphin-like peptides affect locomotor activity, food intake, sexual behavior, anxiety-like behavior, and drug intake. Stimulation of kappa-opioid receptors, the endogenous receptor for the dynorphin-like peptides, inhibits dopamine release in the striatum (nucleus accumbens and caudate putamen) and induces a negative mood state in humans and animals. The administration of drugs of abuse increases the release of dopamine in the striatum and mediates the concomitant release of dynorphin-like peptides in this brain region. The reviewed studies suggest that chronic drug intake leads to an upregulation of the brain dynorphin system in the striatum and in particular in the dorsal part of the striatum/caudate putamen. This might inhibit drug-induced dopamine release and provide protection against the neurotoxic effects of high dopamine levels. After the discontinuation of chronic drug intake these neuroadaptations remain unopposed which has been suggested to contribute to the negative emotional state associated with drug withdrawal and increased drug intake. kappa-Opioid receptor agonists have also been shown to inhibit calcium channels. Calcium channel inhibitors have antidepressant-like effects and inhibit the release of norepinephrine. This might explain that in some studies kappa-opioid receptor agonists attenuate nicotine and opioid withdrawal symptomatology. A better understanding of the role of dynorphins in the regulation of brain reward function might contribute to the development of novel treatments for mood disorders and other disorders that stem from a dysregulation of the brain reward system.

  16. Dopamine Receptors in Human Adipocytes: Expression and Functions

    PubMed Central

    Borcherding, Dana C.; Hugo, Eric R.; Idelman, Gila; De Silva, Anuradha; Richtand, Nathan W.; Loftus, Jean; Ben-Jonathan, Nira

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Dopamine (DA) binds to five receptors (DAR), classified by their ability to increase (D1R-like) or decrease (D2R-like) cAMP. In humans, most DA circulates as dopamine sulfate (DA-S), which can be de-conjugated to bioactive DA by arylsulfatase A (ARSA). The objective was to examine expression of DAR and ARSA in human adipose tissue and determine whether DA regulates prolactin (PRL) and adipokine expression and release. Methods DAR were analyzed by RT-PCR and Western blotting in explants, primary adipocytes and two human adipocyte cell lines, LS14 and SW872. ARSA expression and activity were determined by qPCR and enzymatic assay. PRL expression and release were determined by luciferase reporter and Nb2 bioassay. Analysis of cAMP, cGMP, leptin, adiponectin and interleukin 6 (IL-6) was done by ELISA. Activation of MAPK and PI3 kinase/Akt was determined by Western blotting. Results DAR are variably expressed at the mRNA and protein levels in adipose tissue and adipocytes during adipogenesis. ARSA activity in adipocyte increases after differentiation. DA at nM concentrations suppresses cAMP, stimulates cGMP, and activates MAPK in adipocytes. Acting via D2R-like receptors, DA and DA-S inhibit PRL gene expression and release. Acting via D1R/D5R receptors, DA suppresses leptin and stimulates adiponectin and IL-6 release. Conclusions This is the first report that human adipocytes express functional DAR and ARSA, suggesting a regulatory role for peripheral DA in adipose functions. We speculate that the propensity of some DAR-activating antipsychotics to increase weight and alter metabolic homeostasis is due, in part, to their direct action on adipose tissue. PMID:21966540

  17. Lysis of pig endothelium by IL-2 activated human natural killer cells is inhibited by swine and human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I gene products.

    PubMed

    Itescu, S; Artrip, J H; Kwiatkowski, P A; Wang, S F; Minanov, O P; Morgenthau, A S; Michler, R E

    1997-01-01

    We have previously described a form of xenograft rejection, mediated by natural killer (NK) cells, occurring in pig-to-primate organ transplants beyond the period of antibody-mediated hyperacute rejection. In this study, two distinct NK activation pathways were identified as mechanisms of pig aortic endotheliual cell (PAEC) lysis by human NK cells. Using an antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) assay, a progressive increase in human NK lysis of PAEC was observed following incubation with human IgG at increasing serum titer. In the absence of IgG, a second mechanism of PAEC lysis by human NK cells was observed following activation with IL-2. IL-2 activation of human NK cells increased lysis of PAEC by over 3-fold compared with ADCC. These results indicate that IL-2 activation of human NK cells induces significantly higher levels of lytic activity than does conventional ADCC involving IgG and FcRIII. We next investigated the role of MHC class I molecules in the regulation of NK lysis following IL-2 activation. PAEC expression of SLA class I molecules was increased by up to 75% by treatment with human TNFa. Following treatment with TNFa at 1 u/ml, IL-2 activated human NK lysis of PAEC was inhibited at every effector:target (E:T) ratio tested. Maximal effect occurred at an E:T ratio of 10:1, with TNFa inhibiting specific lysis by 59% (p < 0.01). Incubation with an anti-SLA class I Mab, but not IgG isotype control, abrogated the protective effects of TNFa on NK lysis of PAEC, suggesting direct inhibitory effects of SLA class I molecules on human NK function. To investigate whether human MHC class I molecules might have similar effects on human NK lysis of PAEC, further experiments were performed using a soluble peptide derived from the alpha-helical region of HLA-B7. Incubation with the HLA-B7 derived peptide significantly reduced the IL-2 activated NK lytic activity against PAEC in a dose-dependent fashion. Maximal effect occurred at a concentration of 10 mg

  18. Flow cytometric analysis of expression of interleukin-2 receptor beta chain (p70-75) on various leukemic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshino, S.; Oshimi, K.; Tsudo, M.; Miyasaka, M.; Teramura, M.; Masuda, M.; Motoji, T.; Mizoguchi, H. )

    1990-08-15

    We analyzed the expression of the interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) beta chain (p70-75) on various leukemic cells from 44 patients by flow cytometric analysis using the IL-2R beta chain-specific monoclonal antibody, designated Mik-beta 1. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated the expression of the IL-2R beta chain on granular lymphocytes (GLs) from all eight patients with granular lymphocyte proliferative disorders (GLPDs), on adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) cells from all three patients with ATL, and on T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells from one of three patients with T-ALL. Although GLs from all the GLPD patients expressed the IL-2R beta chain alone and not the IL-2R alpha chain (Tac-antigen: p55), ATL and T-ALL cells expressing the beta chain coexpressed the alpha chain. In two of seven patients with common ALL (cALL) and in both patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, the leukemic cells expressed the alpha chain alone. Neither the alpha chain nor the beta chain was expressed on leukemic cells from the remaining 28 patients, including all 18 patients with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, five of seven patients with cALL, all three patients with multiple myeloma, and two of three patients with T-ALL. These results indicate that three different forms of IL-2R chain expression exist on leukemic cells: the alpha chain alone; the beta chain alone; and both the alpha and beta chains. To examine whether the results obtained by flow cytometric analysis actually reflect functional aspects of the expressed IL-2Rs, we studied the specific binding of 125I-labeled IL-2 (125I-IL-2) to leukemic cells in 18 of the 44 patients. In addition, we performed 125I-IL-2 crosslinking studies in seven patients. The results of IL-2R expression of both 125I-IL-2 binding assay and crosslinking studies were in agreement with those obtained by flow cytometric analysis.

  19. Mammalian Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors: From Structure to Function

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque, Edson X.; Pereira, Edna F. R.; Alkondon, Manickavasagom; Rogers, Scott W.

    2009-01-01

    The classical studies of nicotine by Langley at the turn of the 20th century introduced the concept of a “receptive substance,” from which the idea of a “receptor” came to light. Subsequent studies aided by the Torpedo electric organ, a rich source of muscle-type nicotinic receptors (nAChRs), and the discovery of α-bungarotoxin, a snake toxin that binds pseudo-irreversibly to the muscle nAChR, resulted in the muscle nAChR being the best characterized ligand-gated ion channel hitherto. With the advancement of functional and genetic studies in the late 1980s, the existence of nAChRs in the mammalian brain was confirmed and the realization that the numerous nAChR subtypes contribute to the psychoactive properties of nicotine and other drugs of abuse and to the neuropathology of various diseases, including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and schizophrenia, has since emerged. This review provides a comprehensive overview of these findings and the more recent revelations of the impact that the rich diversity in function and expression of this receptor family has on neuronal and nonneuronal cells throughout the body. Despite these numerous developments, our understanding of the contributions of specific neuronal nAChR subtypes to the many facets of physiology throughout the body remains in its infancy. PMID:19126755

  20. Functional interaction between Lypd6 and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Arvaniti, Maria; Jensen, Majbrit M; Soni, Neeraj; Wang, Hong; Klein, Anders B; Thiriet, Nathalie; Pinborg, Lars H; Muldoon, Pretal P; Wienecke, Jacob; Imad Damaj, M; Kohlmeier, Kristi A; Gondré-Lewis, Marjorie C; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Thomsen, Morten S

    2016-09-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) affect multiple physiological functions in the brain and their functions are modulated by regulatory proteins of the Lynx family. Here, we report for the first time a direct interaction of the Lynx protein LY6/PLAUR domain-containing 6 (Lypd6) with nAChRs in human brain extracts, identifying Lypd6 as a novel regulator of nAChR function. Using protein cross-linking and affinity purification from human temporal cortical extracts, we demonstrate that Lypd6 is a synaptically enriched membrane-bound protein that binds to multiple nAChR subtypes in the human brain. Additionally, soluble recombinant Lypd6 protein attenuates nicotine-induced hippocampal inward currents in rat brain slices and decreases nicotine-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation in PC12 cells, suggesting that binding of Lypd6 is sufficient to inhibit nAChR-mediated intracellular signaling. We further show that perinatal nicotine exposure in rats (4 mg/kg/day through minipumps to dams from embryonic day 7 to post-natal day 21) significantly increases Lypd6 protein levels in the hippocampus in adulthood, which did not occur after exposure to nicotine in adulthood only. Our findings suggest that Lypd6 is a versatile inhibitor of cholinergic signaling in the brain, and that Lypd6 is dysregulated by nicotine exposure during early development. Regulatory proteins of the Lynx family modulate the function of nicotinic receptors (nAChRs). We report for the first time that the Lynx protein Lypd6 binds to nAChRs in human brain extracts, and that recombinant Lypd6 decreases nicotine-induced ERK phosphorylation and attenuates nicotine-induced hippocampal inward currents. Our findings suggest that Lypd6 is a versatile inhibitor of cholinergic signaling in the brain. PMID:27344019

  1. The development of antibody-IL-2 based immunotherapy with hu14.18-IL2 (EMD-273063) in melanoma and neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Brett H; Hank, Jacquelyn A; Albertini, Mark R; Sondel, Paul M

    2009-07-01

    Patients with high risk melanoma and neuroblastoma frequently experience recurrence despite surgical resection and appropriate adjuvant therapies. Immunotherapy with the immunocytokine hu14.18-IL2 (EMD-273063) was developed by means of fusion of two molecules of IL-2 to the monoclonal antibody, 14.18, that recognizes GD2, expressed on the earlier mentioned malignancies. This article will discuss the results of preclinical work using EMD-273063 therapy, including data suggesting that intratumoral therapy may have enhanced antitumor benefit compared with intravenous therapy. Initial clinical trials in adult melanoma and pediatric neuroblastoma have demonstrated acceptable toxicity profiles in dosing that induces immune activation. Preclinical and initial clinical data suggest greater efficacy in the setting of minimal residual disease; therefore, future clinical testing is planned to test the benefit of EMD-273063 in this setting.

  2. Differential Expression of Functional Fc-Receptors and Additional Immune Complex Receptors on Mouse Kidney Cells

    PubMed Central

    Suwanichkul, Adisak; Wenderfer, Scott E.

    2013-01-01

    The precise mechanisms by which circulating immune complexes accumulate in the kidney to form deposits in glomerulonephritis are not well understood. In particular, the role of resident cells within glomeruli of the kidney has been widely debated. Immune complexes have been shown to bind one glomerular cell type (mesangial cells) leading to functional responses such as pro-inflammatory cytokine production. To further assess the presence of functional immunoreceptors on resident glomerular cells, cultured mouse renal epithelial, endothelial, and mesangial cells were treated with heat-aggregated mouse IgG or preformed murine immune complexes. Mesangial and renal endothelial cells were found to bind IgG complexes, whereas glomerular epithelial cell binding was minimal. A blocking antibody for Fc-gamma receptors reduced binding to mesangial cells but not renal endothelial cells, suggesting differential immunoreceptor utilization. RT-PCR and immunostaining based screening of cultured renal endothelial cells showed limited low-level expression of known Fc-receptors and Igbinding proteins. The interaction between mesangial cells and renal endothelial cells and immune complexes resulted in distinct, cell-specific patterns of chemokine and cytokine production. This novel pathway involving renal endothelial cells likely contributes to the predilection of circulating immune complex accumulation within the kidney and to the inflammatory responses that drive kidney injury. PMID:23911392

  3. Functional rundown of GABAA receptors in human hypothalamic hamartomas

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guohui; Yang, Kechun; Zheng, Chao; Liu, Qiang; Chang, Yongchang; Kerrigan, John F.; Wu, Jie

    2010-01-01

    Objective Human hypothalamic hamartomas (HH) are highly associated with treatment-resistant gelastic seizures. HH are intrinsically epileptogenic, although the basic cellular mechanisms responsible for seizure activity are unknown. Altered gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) function can contribute to epileptogenesis in humans and animal models. Recently, functional GABAA receptor (GABAAR) rundown has been described in surgically-resected human temporal lobe epilepsy tissue. We asked whether functional GABAAR rundown also occurs in human HH neurons. Methods GABAAR-mediated currents were measured using perforated patch-clamp recordings in single neurons acutely dissociated from surgically-resected HH tissue. In addition, functional GABAARs were expressed in Xenopus oocytes after microinjection with membrane fractions from either HH or control hypothalamus, and were studied with two-electrode voltage-clamp recordings. Results Perforated patch-clamp recordings in dissociated HH neurons showed that repetitive exposure to GABA (5 consecutive exposures to 0.1 mM GABA with 1 sec duration and at 20 sec intervals) induced a time-dependent rundown of whole-cell currents in small HH neurons, while large HH neurons showed much less rundown using the same protocol. Functional rundown was not observed in HH neurons with repetitive exposure to glycine or glutamate. Two-electrode voltage-clamp recordings (6 consecutive exposures to 1 mM GABA with 10 sec duration and at 40 sec intervals) induced GABA-current rundown in Xenopus oocytes microinjected with HH membrane proteins, but not in the oocytes expressing hypothalamic membrane proteins derived from human autopsy controls. Functional rundown of GABA-currents was significantly attenuated by intracellular application of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) or the non-specific phosphatase inhibitor, okadaic acid. Interpretation Neurons from surgically-resected human HH demonstrate functional rundown of GABAAR-mediated transmembrane currents in

  4. Interleukin 9 and its receptor: an overview of structure and function.

    PubMed

    Demoulin, J B; Renauld, J C

    1998-01-01

    Interleukin-9 (IL-9) is a multifunctional cytokine produced by activated TH2 clones in vitro and during TH2-like T cell responses in vivo. Although IL-9 was initially described as a T cell growth factor, its role in T cell responses is still unclear. While freshly isolated normal T cells do not respond to IL-9, this cytokine induces the proliferation of murine T cell lymphomas in vitro, and in vivo overexpression of IL-9 results in the development of thymic lymphomas. In the human, the existence of an IL-9 mediated autocrine loop has been suggested for some malignancies such as Hodgkin's disease. Various observations indicate that IL-9 is actively involved in mast cells responses by inducing the proliferation and differentiation of these cells. Other potential biological targets for IL-9 include B lymphocytes, and hematopoietic progenitors, for which higher responses were observed with foetal or transformed cells as compared to normal adult progenitors. The IL-9 receptor is a member of the hemopoietin receptor superfamily and interacts with the gamma chain of the IL-2 receptor for signaling. Signal transduction studies have stressed the role of the Jak-STAT pathway in various IL-9 bioactivities, whereas the 4PS/IRS2 adaptor protein might also play a significant role in IL-9 signaling.

  5. Secretion of both IL-2 and IL-4 by tumor cells results in rejection and immunity.

    PubMed

    Strome, S E; Chang, A E; Shu, S; Krauss, J C

    1996-01-01

    The generation of a therapeutic immune response to malignancy is critically dependent on the inherent immunogenicity of the tumor. Our study demonstrates that secretion of both interleukin-2 (IL-2) and IL-4 by a seemingly nonimmunogenic tumor abrogates tumorigenicity, and mice that have rejected the genetically modified tumor are immune to challenges with the parental tumor. The induction of immunity by the IL-2/IL-4-secreting tumor was significantly better than that achieved with the admixture of tumor cells and the classic adjuvant, Corynebacterium parvum. To elicit a primary immune response, the majority of cells needed to secrete both cytokines. Ad-mixture of IL-2-secreting cells with IL-4-secreting cells did not result in tumor cell rejection. The IL-2/IL-4-secreting tumor cells were efficiently rejected in animals immunosuppressed by total body irradiation. Depletion of CD4+ or CD8+ T cells did not abrogate rejection of the tumor cells, but the animals depleted of CD4 cells failed to generate protective immunity. Our study demonstrates that secretion of the combination of IL-2 and IL-4 significantly enhances tumor immunogenicity. The requirement of cells secreting both cytokines suggests an intricate mechanism different from the mere presence of both cytokines at the tumor-inoculation site. PMID:9147701

  6. Interspecies variations in Bordetella catecholamine receptor gene regulation and function.

    PubMed

    Brickman, Timothy J; Suhadolc, Ryan J; Armstrong, Sandra K

    2015-12-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica can use catecholamines to obtain iron from transferrin and lactoferrin via uptake pathways involving the BfrA, BfrD, and BfrE outer membrane receptor proteins, and although Bordetella pertussis has the bfrD and bfrE genes, the role of these genes in iron uptake has not been demonstrated. In this study, the bfrD and bfrE genes of B. pertussis were shown to be functional in B. bronchiseptica, but neither B. bronchiseptica bfrD nor bfrE imparted catecholamine utilization to B. pertussis. Gene fusion analyses found that expression of B. bronchiseptica bfrA was increased during iron starvation, as is common for iron receptor genes, but that expression of the bfrD and bfrE genes of both species was decreased during iron limitation. As shown previously for B. pertussis, bfrD expression in B. bronchiseptica was also dependent on the BvgAS virulence regulatory system; however, in contrast to the case in B. pertussis, the known modulators nicotinic acid and sulfate, which silence Bvg-activated genes, did not silence expression of bfrD in B. bronchiseptica. Further studies using a B. bronchiseptica bvgAS mutant expressing the B. pertussis bvgAS genes revealed that the interspecies differences in bfrD modulation are partly due to BvgAS differences. Mouse respiratory infection experiments determined that catecholamine utilization contributes to the in vivo fitness of B. bronchiseptica and B. pertussis. Additional evidence of the in vivo importance of the B. pertussis receptors was obtained from serologic studies demonstrating pertussis patient serum reactivity with the B. pertussis BfrD and BfrE proteins. PMID:26371128

  7. Interspecies Variations in Bordetella Catecholamine Receptor Gene Regulation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Brickman, Timothy J.; Suhadolc, Ryan J.

    2015-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica can use catecholamines to obtain iron from transferrin and lactoferrin via uptake pathways involving the BfrA, BfrD, and BfrE outer membrane receptor proteins, and although Bordetella pertussis has the bfrD and bfrE genes, the role of these genes in iron uptake has not been demonstrated. In this study, the bfrD and bfrE genes of B. pertussis were shown to be functional in B. bronchiseptica, but neither B. bronchiseptica bfrD nor bfrE imparted catecholamine utilization to B. pertussis. Gene fusion analyses found that expression of B. bronchiseptica bfrA was increased during iron starvation, as is common for iron receptor genes, but that expression of the bfrD and bfrE genes of both species was decreased during iron limitation. As shown previously for B. pertussis, bfrD expression in B. bronchiseptica was also dependent on the BvgAS virulence regulatory system; however, in contrast to the case in B. pertussis, the known modulators nicotinic acid and sulfate, which silence Bvg-activated genes, did not silence expression of bfrD in B. bronchiseptica. Further studies using a B. bronchiseptica bvgAS mutant expressing the B. pertussis bvgAS genes revealed that the interspecies differences in bfrD modulation are partly due to BvgAS differences. Mouse respiratory infection experiments determined that catecholamine utilization contributes to the in vivo fitness of B. bronchiseptica and B. pertussis. Additional evidence of the in vivo importance of the B. pertussis receptors was obtained from serologic studies demonstrating pertussis patient serum reactivity with the B. pertussis BfrD and BfrE proteins. PMID:26371128

  8. Interspecies variations in Bordetella catecholamine receptor gene regulation and function.

    PubMed

    Brickman, Timothy J; Suhadolc, Ryan J; Armstrong, Sandra K

    2015-12-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica can use catecholamines to obtain iron from transferrin and lactoferrin via uptake pathways involving the BfrA, BfrD, and BfrE outer membrane receptor proteins, and although Bordetella pertussis has the bfrD and bfrE genes, the role of these genes in iron uptake has not been demonstrated. In this study, the bfrD and bfrE genes of B. pertussis were shown to be functional in B. bronchiseptica, but neither B. bronchiseptica bfrD nor bfrE imparted catecholamine utilization to B. pertussis. Gene fusion analyses found that expression of B. bronchiseptica bfrA was increased during iron starvation, as is common for iron receptor genes, but that expression of the bfrD and bfrE genes of both species was decreased during iron limitation. As shown previously for B. pertussis, bfrD expression in B. bronchiseptica was also dependent on the BvgAS virulence regulatory system; however, in contrast to the case in B. pertussis, the known modulators nicotinic acid and sulfate, which silence Bvg-activated genes, did not silence expression of bfrD in B. bronchiseptica. Further studies using a B. bronchiseptica bvgAS mutant expressing the B. pertussis bvgAS genes revealed that the interspecies differences in bfrD modulation are partly due to BvgAS differences. Mouse respiratory infection experiments determined that catecholamine utilization contributes to the in vivo fitness of B. bronchiseptica and B. pertussis. Additional evidence of the in vivo importance of the B. pertussis receptors was obtained from serologic studies demonstrating pertussis patient serum reactivity with the B. pertussis BfrD and BfrE proteins.

  9. Functional Analyses of Bitter Taste Receptors in Domestic Cats (Felis catus)

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Weiwei; Ravoninjohary, Aurore; Li, Xia; Margolskee, Robert F.; Reed, Danielle R.; Beauchamp, Gary K.; Jiang, Peihua

    2015-01-01

    Cats are obligate carnivores and under most circumstances eat only animal products. Owing to the pseudogenization of one of two subunits of the sweet receptor gene, they are indifferent to sweeteners, presumably having no need to detect plant-based sugars in their diet. Following this reasoning and a recent report of a positive correlation between the proportion of dietary plants and the number of Tas2r (bitter receptor) genes in vertebrate species, we tested the hypothesis that if bitter perception exists primarily to protect animals from poisonous plant compounds, the genome of the domestic cat (Felis catus) should have lost functional bitter receptors and they should also have reduced bitter receptor function. To test functionality of cat bitter receptors, we expressed cat Tas2R receptors in cell-based assays. We found that they have at least 7 functional receptors with distinct receptive ranges, showing many similarities, along with some differences, with human bitter receptors. To provide a comparative perspective, we compared the cat repertoire of intact receptors with those of a restricted number of members of the order Carnivora, with a range of dietary habits as reported in the literature. The numbers of functional bitter receptors in the terrestrial Carnivora we examined, including omnivorous and herbivorous species, were roughly comparable to that of cats thereby providing no strong support for the hypothesis that a strict meat diet influences bitter receptor number or function. Maintenance of bitter receptor function in terrestrial obligate carnivores may be due to the presence of bitter compounds in vertebrate and invertebrate prey, to the necessary role these receptors play in non-oral perception, or to other unknown factors. We also found that the two aquatic Carnivora species examined had fewer intact bitter receptors. Further comparative studies of factors driving numbers and functions of bitter taste receptors will aid in understanding the forces

  10. Functional Analyses of Bitter Taste Receptors in Domestic Cats (Felis catus).

    PubMed

    Lei, Weiwei; Ravoninjohary, Aurore; Li, Xia; Margolskee, Robert F; Reed, Danielle R; Beauchamp, Gary K; Jiang, Peihua

    2015-01-01

    Cats are obligate carnivores and under most circumstances eat only animal products. Owing to the pseudogenization of one of two subunits of the sweet receptor gene, they are indifferent to sweeteners, presumably having no need to detect plant-based sugars in their diet. Following this reasoning and a recent report of a positive correlation between the proportion of dietary plants and the number of Tas2r (bitter receptor) genes in vertebrate species, we tested the hypothesis that if bitter perception exists primarily to protect animals from poisonous plant compounds, the genome of the domestic cat (Felis catus) should have lost functional bitter receptors and they should also have reduced bitter receptor function. To test functionality of cat bitter receptors, we expressed cat Tas2R receptors in cell-based assays. We found that they have at least 7 functional receptors with distinct receptive ranges, showing many similarities, along with some differences, with human bitter receptors. To provide a comparative perspective, we compared the cat repertoire of intact receptors with those of a restricted number of members of the order Carnivora, with a range of dietary habits as reported in the literature. The numbers of functional bitter receptors in the terrestrial Carnivora we examined, including omnivorous and herbivorous species, were roughly comparable to that of cats thereby providing no strong support for the hypothesis that a strict meat diet influences bitter receptor number or function. Maintenance of bitter receptor function in terrestrial obligate carnivores may be due to the presence of bitter compounds in vertebrate and invertebrate prey, to the necessary role these receptors play in non-oral perception, or to other unknown factors. We also found that the two aquatic Carnivora species examined had fewer intact bitter receptors. Further comparative studies of factors driving numbers and functions of bitter taste receptors will aid in understanding the forces

  11. Moesin Functions as a Lipopolysaccharide Receptor on Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tohme, Ziad N.; Amar, Salomon; Van Dyke, Thomas E.

    1999-01-01

    Bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]), a glycolipid found in the outer membranes of gram-negative bacteria, induces the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 (IL-1), and IL-6 by monocytes/macrophages. The secretion of these biologically active compounds leads to multiple pathological conditions, such as septic shock. There is substantial evidence that chronic exposure to LPS mediates, at least in part, the tissue destruction associated with gram-negative infection. CD14, a 55-kDa protein, has been identified as an LPS receptor. In conjunction with a serum protein, LPS binding protein (LBP), LPS-CD14 interactions mediate many LPS functions in the inflammatory response. However, CD14 lacks a cytoplasmic domain, or any known signal transduction sequence motif, suggesting the existence of another cell surface domain capable of transducing signals. In this paper, we report a second, CD14-independent LPS binding site, which, based on biological activity, appears to be a functional LPS receptor. Cross-linking experiments were performed to identify LPS binding sites. Two molecules were identified: a 55-kDa protein (CD14) and a second, 78-kDa band. Sequencing of the 78-kDa protein by mass spectroscopic analysis revealed 100% homology with moesin (membrane-organizing extension spike protein). Antibody to CD14 induced partial blocking of the LPS response. However, antimoesin monoclonal antibody completely blocked the LPS-induced TNF-α response in human monocytes, without blocking CD14 binding of LPS. Irrelevant isotype controls had no effect. Additional experiments were performed to evaluate the specificity of the antimoesin blocking. Separate experiments evaluated antimoesin effects on monocyte chemotaxis, IL-1 production in response to IL-1 stimulation, and TNF-α secretion in response to Staphylococcus aureus stimulation. Antimoesin blocked only LPS-mediated events. The data suggest that moesin

  12. Ryanodine receptors: physiological function and deregulation in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Del Prete, Dolores; Checler, Frédéric; Chami, Mounia

    2014-06-05

    Perturbed Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis emerges as a central player in Alzheimer disease (AD). Accordingly, different studies have reported alterations of the expression and the function of Ryanodine Receptors (RyR) in human AD-affected brains, in cells expressing familial AD-linked mutations on the β amyloid precursor protein (βAPP) and presenilins (the catalytic core in γ-secretase complexes cleaving the βAPP, thereby generating amyloid β (Aβ) peptides), as well as in the brain of various transgenic AD mice models. Data converge to suggest that RyR expression and function alteration are associated to AD pathogenesis through the control of: i) βAPP processing and Aβ peptide production, ii) neuronal death; iii) synaptic function; and iv) memory and learning abilities. In this review, we document the network of evidences suggesting that RyR could play a complex dual "compensatory/protective versus pathogenic" role contributing to the setting of histopathological lesions and synaptic deficits that are associated with the disease stages. We also discuss the possible mechanisms underlying RyR expression and function alterations in AD. Finally, we review recent publications showing that drug-targeting blockade of RyR and genetic manipulation of RyR reduces Aβ production, stabilizes synaptic transmission, and prevents learning and memory deficits in various AD mouse models. Chemically-designed RyR "modulators" could therefore be envisioned as new therapeutic compounds able to delay or block the progression of AD.

  13. Androgen Receptor Structure, Function and Biology: From Bench to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Rachel A; Grossmann, Mathis

    2016-01-01

    The actions of androgens such as testosterone and dihydrotestosterone are mediated via the androgen receptor (AR), a ligand-dependent nuclear transcription factor and member of the steroid hormone nuclear receptor family. Given its widespread expression in many cells and tissues, the AR has a diverse range of biological actions including important roles in the development and maintenance of the reproductive, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, immune, neural and haemopoietic systems. AR signalling may also be involved in the development of tumours in the prostate, bladder, liver, kidney and lung. Androgens can exert their actions via the AR in a DNA binding-dependent manner to regulate target gene transcription, or in a non-DNA binding-dependent manner to initiate rapid, cellular events such as the phosphorylation of 2nd messenger signalling cascades. More recently, ligand-independent actions of the AR have also been identified. Given the large volume of studies relating to androgens and the AR, this review is not intended as an extensive review of all studies investigating the AR, but rather as an overview of the structure, function, signalling pathways and biology of the AR as well as its important role in clinical medicine, with emphasis on recent developments in this field. PMID:27057074

  14. Constitutive release of IFNγ and IL2 from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) infected with simian T-lymphotropic virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Yee, JoAnn L; Montiel, Nestor A; Ardeshir, Amir; Ardeshr, Amir; Lerche, Nicholas W

    2013-01-01

    Simian T-cell lymphotropic viruses (STLV), the nonhuman primate counterparts of human T-cell lymphotropic viruses (HTLV), are endemic in many populations of African and Asian monkeys and apes. Although an etiologic link between STLV1 infection and lymphoproliferative disorders such as malignant lymphomas has been suggested in some nonhuman primate species, most STLV infections are inapparent, and infected animals remain clinically healthy. The retroviral transactivator, tax, is well known to increase transcription of viral and cellular genes, resulting in altered cytokine profiles. This study compared the cytokine profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures from 25 STLV1-seropositive rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) with those of age- and sex-matched seronegative controls. IFNγ, TNFα, IL10, and IL2 levels in unstimulated PBMC culture supernatants were measured at 24, 48, and 72 h by using enzyme immunoassays. IFNγ concentrations were found significantly higher in the supernatants of PBMC cultures of seropositive monkeys as compared with seronegative controls. In addition, although IL2 concentrations were not significantly elevated in the supernatants of PBMC cultures of all seropositive monkeys as compared with all seronegative controls, IL2 levels were increased in a subset of 5 pairs. Increased constitutive cytokine release occurred in the absence of spontaneous proliferation. The increased constitutive release of IFNγ and IL2 suggests that STLV1 alters immune functions in infected but clinically healthy rhesus macaques and further characterizes STLV1 infection of rhesus macaques as a potential model for human HTLV1 infection. PMID:24326227

  15. Constitutive Release of IFNγ and IL2 from Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta) Infected with Simian T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Yee, JoAnn L; Montiel, Nestor A; Ardeshr, Amir; Lerche, Nicholas W

    2013-01-01

    Simian T-cell lymphotropic viruses (STLV), the nonhuman primate counterparts of human T-cell lymphotropic viruses (HTLV), are endemic in many populations of African and Asian monkeys and apes. Although an etiologic link between STLV1 infection and lymphoproliferative disorders such as malignant lymphomas has been suggested in some nonhuman primate species, most STLV infections are inapparent, and infected animals remain clinically healthy. The retroviral transactivator, tax, is well known to increase transcription of viral and cellular genes, resulting in altered cytokine profiles. This study compared the cytokine profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures from 25 STLV1-seropositive rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) with those of age- and sex-matched seronegative controls. IFNγ, TNFα, IL10, and IL2 levels in unstimulated PBMC culture supernatants were measured at 24, 48, and 72 h by using enzyme immunoassays. IFNγ concentrations were found significantly higher in the supernatants of PBMC cultures of seropositive monkeys as compared with seronegative controls. In addition, although IL2 concentrations were not significantly elevated in the supernatants of PBMC cultures of all seropositive monkeys as compared with all seronegative controls, IL2 levels were increased in a subset of 5 pairs. Increased constitutive cytokine release occurred in the absence of spontaneous proliferation. The increased constitutive release of IFNγ and IL2 suggests that STLV1 alters immune functions in infected but clinically healthy rhesus macaques and further characterizes STLV1 infection of rhesus macaques as a potential model for human HTLV1 infection. PMID:24326227

  16. Anticancer agent xanthohumol inhibits IL-2 induced signaling pathways involved in T cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongbo; Gao, Xiaohua; Deeb, Dorrah; Arbab, Ali S; Dulchavsky, Scott A; Gautam, Subhash C

    2012-01-01

    Xanthohumol (XN), a prenylated chalcone present in hops exhibits anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anticancer activity. In the present study we show that XN inhibits the proliferation of mouse lymphoma cells and IL-2 induced proliferation and cell cycle progression in mouse splenic T cells. The suppression of T cell proliferation by XN was due to the inhibition of IL-2 induced Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (Jak/STAT) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (Erk1/2) signaling pathways. XN also inhibited proliferation-related cellular proteins such as c-Myc, c-Fos and NF-kappaB and cyclin D1. Thus, understanding of IL-2 induced cell signaling pathways in normal T cells, which are constitutively turned on in T cell lymphomas may facilitate development of XN for the treatment of hematologic cancers. PMID:22946339

  17. Anticancer agent xanthohumol inhibits IL-2 induced signaling pathways involved in T cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yongbo; Gao, Xiaohua; Deeb, Dorrah; Arbab, Ali S.; Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Gautam, Subhash C.

    2013-01-01

    Xanthohumol (XN), a prenylated chalcone present in hops exhibits anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anticancer activity. In the present study we show that XN inhibits the proliferation of mouse lymphoma cells and IL-2 induced proliferation and cell cycle progression in mouse splenic T cells. The suppression of T cell proliferation by XN was due to the inhibition of IL-2 induced Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (Jak/STAT) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (Erk1/2) signaling pathways. XN also inhibited proliferation-related cellular proteins such as c-Myc, c-Fos and NF-κB and cyclin D1. Thus, understanding of IL-2 induced cell signaling pathways in normal T cells, which are constitutively turned on in T cell lymphomas may facilitate development of XN for the treatment of hematologic cancers. PMID:22946339

  18. 3′-Functionalized Adamantyl Cannabinoid Receptor Probes

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Go; Tius, Marcus A.; Zhou, Han; Nikas, Spyros P.; Halikhedkar, Aneetha; Mallipeddi, Srikrishnan; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2015-01-01

    The aliphatic side chain plays a pivotal role in determining the cannabinergic potency of tricyclic classical cannabinoids, and we have previously shown that this chain could be substituted successfully by adamantyl or other polycyclic groups. In an effort to explore the pharmacophoric features of these conformationally fixed groups, we have synthesized a series of analogues in which the C3 position is substituted directly with an adamantyl group bearing functionality at one of the tertiary carbon atoms. These substituents included the electrophilic isothiocyanate and photoactivatable azido groups, both of which are capable of covalent attachment with the target protein. Our results show that substitution at the 3′-adamantyl position can lead to ligands with improved affinities and CB1/CB2 selectivities. Our work has also led to the development of two successful covalent probes with high affinities for both cannabinoid receptors, namely, the electrophilic isothiocyanate AM994 and the photoactivatable aliphatic azido AM993 analogues. PMID:25760146

  19. Human native kappa opioid receptor functions not predicted by recombinant receptors: Implications for drug design

    PubMed Central

    Broad, John; Maurel, Damien; Kung, Victor W. S.; Hicks, Gareth A.; Schemann, Michael; Barnes, Michael R.; Kenakin, Terrence P.; Granier, Sébastien; Sanger, Gareth J.

    2016-01-01

    If activation of recombinant G protein-coupled receptors in host cells (by drugs or other ligands) has predictive value, similar data must be obtained with native receptors naturally expressed in tissues. Using mouse and human recombinant κ opioid receptors transfected into a host cell, two selectively-acting compounds (ICI204448, asimadoline) equi-effectively activated both receptors, assessed by measuring two different cell signalling pathways which were equally affected without evidence of bias. In mouse intestine, naturally expressing κ receptors within its nervous system, both compounds also equi-effectively activated the receptor, inhibiting nerve-mediated muscle contraction. However, whereas ICI204448 acted similarly in human intestine, where κ receptors are again expressed within its nervous system, asimadoline was inhibitory only at very high concentrations; instead, low concentrations of asimadoline reduced the activity of ICI204448. This demonstration of species-dependence in activation of native, not recombinant κ receptors may be explained by different mouse/human receptor structures affecting receptor expression and/or interactions with intracellular signalling pathways in native environments, to reveal differences in intrinsic efficacy between receptor agonists. These results have profound implications in drug design for κ and perhaps other receptors, in terms of recombinant-to-native receptor translation, species-dependency and possibly, a need to use human, therapeutically-relevant, not surrogate tissues. PMID:27492592

  20. Human native kappa opioid receptor functions not predicted by recombinant receptors: Implications for drug design.

    PubMed

    Broad, John; Maurel, Damien; Kung, Victor W S; Hicks, Gareth A; Schemann, Michael; Barnes, Michael R; Kenakin, Terrence P; Granier, Sébastien; Sanger, Gareth J

    2016-01-01

    If activation of recombinant G protein-coupled receptors in host cells (by drugs or other ligands) has predictive value, similar data must be obtained with native receptors naturally expressed in tissues. Using mouse and human recombinant κ opioid receptors transfected into a host cell, two selectively-acting compounds (ICI204448, asimadoline) equi-effectively activated both receptors, assessed by measuring two different cell signalling pathways which were equally affected without evidence of bias. In mouse intestine, naturally expressing κ receptors within its nervous system, both compounds also equi-effectively activated the receptor, inhibiting nerve-mediated muscle contraction. However, whereas ICI204448 acted similarly in human intestine, where κ receptors are again expressed within its nervous system, asimadoline was inhibitory only at very high concentrations; instead, low concentrations of asimadoline reduced the activity of ICI204448. This demonstration of species-dependence in activation of native, not recombinant κ receptors may be explained by different mouse/human receptor structures affecting receptor expression and/or interactions with intracellular signalling pathways in native environments, to reveal differences in intrinsic efficacy between receptor agonists. These results have profound implications in drug design for κ and perhaps other receptors, in terms of recombinant-to-native receptor translation, species-dependency and possibly, a need to use human, therapeutically-relevant, not surrogate tissues. PMID:27492592

  1. Mineralocorticoid Receptors Modulate Vascular Endothelial Function in Human Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Moon-Hyon; Yoo, Jeung-Ki; Luttrell, Meredith; Kim, Han-Kyul; Meade, Thomas H.; English, Mark; Segal, Mark S.; Christou, Demetra D.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity increases linearly with age and is associated with impaired vascular endothelial function and increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) contribute to impaired vascular endothelial function in cardiovascular disease; however, their role in uncomplicated human obesity is unknown. Because plasma aldosterone levels are elevated in obesity and adipocytes may be a source of aldosterone, we hypothesized that MR modulate vascular endothelial function in older adults in an adiposity-dependent manner. To test this hypothesis, we administered MR blockade (Eplerenone; 100 mg/day) for 1 month in a balanced, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study to 22 older adults (10 men, 55–79 years) varying widely in adiposity (body mass index: 20–45 kg/m2) but who were free from overt cardiovascular disease. We evaluated vascular endothelial function (brachial artery flow-mediated dilation [FMD] via ultrasonography) and oxidative stress (plasma F2-isoprostanes and vascular endothelial cell protein expression of nitrotyrosine and NADPH oxidase p47phox) during placebo and MR blockade. In the whole group, oxidative stress (P>0.05) and FMD did not change with MR blockade (6.39±0.67 vs. 6.23±0.73 %, P=0.7, placebo vs. Eplerenone). However, individual improvements in FMD in response to Eplerenone were associated with higher total body fat (body mass index: r=0.45, P=0.02 and DXA-derived % body fat: r=0.50, P=0.009) and abdominal fat (total: r=0.61, P=0.005, visceral: r=0.67, P=0.002 and subcutaneous: r=0.48, P=0.03). In addition, greater improvements in FMD with Eplerenone were related with higher baseline fasting glucose (r=0.53, P=0.01). MR influence vascular endothelial function in an adiposity-dependent manner in healthy older adults. PMID:23786536

  2. In vivo gene therapy of murine melanoma mediated by recombinant vaccinia virus encoding human IL-2 gene.

    PubMed

    Wan, T; Cao, X; Ju, D; Aces, B

    1997-04-01

    Direct gene transfer into somatic tissue iii vivo is a developing technology with potential application for cancer gene therapy. In this study, recombinant vaccinia virus encoding human IL-2 gene (rVV-IL-2) was used as a candidate vector in mediating iii vivo gene therapy. After rVV-IL-2 was expanded in VERO cells for 72 h, high titer (10(8)-10(10) PFU/ml) rVV-IL-2 were harvested. When 10(6) murine melanoma cells (F16-F10) were infected with rVV-IL-2, about 200 U/ml IL-2 activity was detected in the supernatants at 8 h, and the up-regulation of ICAM-1 and MHC-I expressions on the melanoma cells were observed. The treatment of murine melanoma model by local injection of rVV-IL-2 into the tumor site showed that rVV-IL-2 transfection significantly inhibited the tumor growth and prolonged the survival time of tumor-bearing mice. The splenocytes from rVV-IL-2 treated mice showed higher cytotoxicities of NK, LAK and CTL in comparison with those from the controls. These results suggest that in vivo transfection mediated by rVV-IL-2 has potential effectiveness in enhancing host immunity and would be a useful approach to cancer gene therapy. PMID:21533434

  3. Effects of Intermittent IL-2 Alone or with Peri-Cycle Antiretroviral Therapy in Early HIV Infection: The STALWART Study

    PubMed Central

    Tavel, Jorge A.

    2010-01-01

    Background The Study of Aldesleukin with and without antiretroviral therapy (STALWART) evaluated whether intermittent interleukin-2 (IL-2) alone or with antiretroviral therapy (ART) around IL-2 cycles increased CD4+ counts compared to no therapy. Methodology Participants not on continuous ART with ≥300 CD4+ cells/mm3 were randomized to: no treatment; IL-2 for 5 consecutive days every 8 weeks for 3 cycles; or the same IL-2 regimen with 10 days of ART administered around each IL-2 cycle. CD4+ counts, HIV RNA, and HIV progression events were collected monthly. Principal Findings A total of 267 participants were randomized. At week 32, the mean CD4+ count was 134 cells greater in the IL-2 alone group (p<0.001), and 133 cells greater in the IL-2 plus ART group (p<0.001) compared to the no therapy group. Twelve participants in the IL-2 groups compared to 1 participant in the group assigned to no therapy experienced an opportunistic event or died (HR 5.84, CI: 0.59 to 43.57; p = 0.009). Conclusions IL-2 alone or with peri-cycle HAART increases CD4+ counts but was associated with a greater number of opportunistic events or deaths compared to no therapy. These results call into question the immunoprotective significance of IL-2-induced CD4+ cells. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00110812 PMID:20186278

  4. Estrogen receptor beta in the brain: from form to function.

    PubMed

    Weiser, Michael J; Foradori, Chad D; Handa, Robert J

    2008-03-01

    Estrogens have numerous effects on the brain, both in adulthood and during development. These actions of estrogen are mediated by two distinct estrogen receptor (ER) systems, ER alpha (ERalpha) and ER beta (ERbeta). In brain, ERalpha plays a critical role in regulating reproductive neuroendocrine function and behavior, however, a definitive role for ERbeta in any neurobiological function has been slow in forthcoming. Clues to the function of ERbeta in the central nervous system can be gleaned from the neuroanatomical distribution of ERbeta and the phenotypes of neurons that express ERbeta. ERbeta immunoreactivity has been found in populations of GnRH, CRH, vasopressin, oxytocin and prolactin containing neurons in the hypothalamus. Utilizing subtype-selective estrogen receptor agonists can help determine the roles for ERbeta in non-reproductive behaviors in rat models. ERbeta-selective agonists exert potent anxiolytic activity when animals were tested in a number of behavioral paradigms. Consistent with this, ERbeta-selective agonists also inhibited the ACTH and corticosterone response to stress. In contrast, ERalpha selective agonists were found to be anxiogenic and correspondingly increased the hormonal stress response. Taken together, our studies implicate ERbeta as an important modulator of some non-reproductive neurobiological systems. The molecular and neuroanatomical targets of estrogen that are mediated by ERbeta remain to be determined. A number of splice variants of ERbeta mRNA have been reported in brain tissue. Imaging of eGFP labeled chimeric receptor proteins transfected into cell lines shows that ERbeta splice variation can alter trafficking patterns and function. The originally described ERbeta (herein termed ERbeta1) is characterized by possessing a high affinity for estradiol. Similar to ERalpha, it is localized in the nucleus and is trafficked to nuclear sites termed "hyperspeckles" following ligand binding. In contrast, ERbeta2 contains an 18

  5. Development of novel major histocompatibility complex class I and class II-deficient NOD-SCID IL2R gamma chain knockout mice for modeling human xenogeneic graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Pino, Steve; Brehm, Michael A; Covassin-Barberis, Laurence; King, Marie; Gott, Bruce; Chase, Thomas H; Wagner, Jennifer; Burzenski, Lisa; Foreman, Oded; Greiner, Dale L; Shultz, Leonard D

    2010-01-01

    Immunodeficient mice have been used as recipients of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) for in vivo analyses of human xeno-graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). This xeno-GVHD model system in many ways mimics the human disease. The model system is established by intravenous or intraperitoneal injection of human PBMC or spleen cells into unconditioned or irradiated immunodeficient recipient mice. Recently, the development of several stocks of immunodeficient Prkdc ( scid ) (scid) and recombination activating 1 or 2 gene (Rag1 or Rag2) knockout mice bearing a targeted mutation in the gene encoding the IL2 receptor gamma chain (IL2rgamma) have been reported. The addition of the mutated IL2rgamma gene onto an immunodeficient mouse stock facilitates heightened engraftment with human PBMC. Stocks of mice with mutations in the IL2rgamma gene have been studied in several laboratories on NOD-scid, NOD-Rag1 ( null ), BALB/c-Rag1 ( null ), BALB/c-Rag2 ( null ), and Stock-H2(d)-Rag2 ( null ) strain backgrounds. Parameters to induce human xeno-GVHD in H2(d)-Rag2 ( null ) IL2rgamma ( null ) mice have been published, but variability in the frequency of disease and kinetics of GVHD were observed. The availability of the NOD-scid IL2rgamma ( null ) stock that engrafts more readily with human PBMC than does the Stock-H2(d)-Rag2 ( null ) IL2rgamma ( null ) stock should lead to a more reproducible humanized mouse model of GVHD and for the use in drug evaluation and validation. Furthermore, GVHD in human PBMC-engrafted scid mice has been postulated to result predominately from a human anti-mouse major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II reactivity. Our recent development of NOD-scid IL2rgamma ( null ) beta2m ( null ) and NOD-scid IL2rgamma ( null ) Ab ( null ) stocks of mice now make it possible to investigate directly the role of host MHC class I and class II in the pathogenesis of GVHD in humanized mice using NOD-scid IL2rgamma ( null ) stocks that engraft at high

  6. Functional expression of bradykinin B1 and B2 receptors in neonatal rat trigeminal ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Aya; Sato, Masaki; Kimura, Maki; Yamazaki, Takaki; Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Tazaki, Masakazu; Ichinohe, Tatsuya; Shibukawa, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Bradykinin (BK) and its receptors (B1 and B2 receptors) play important roles in inflammatory nociception. However, the patterns of expression and physiological/pathological functions of B1 and B2 receptors in trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons remain to be fully elucidated. We investigated the functional expression of BK receptors in rat TG neurons. We observed intense immunoreactivity of B2 receptors in TG neurons, while B1 receptors showed weak immunoreactivity. Expression of the B2 receptor colocalized with immunoreactivities against the pan-neuronal marker, neurofilament H, substance P, isolectin B4, and tropomyosin receptor kinase A antibodies. Both in the presence and absence of extracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]o), BK application increased the concentration of intracellular free Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i). The amplitudes of BK-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase in the absence of [Ca(2+)]o were significantly smaller than those in the presence of Ca(2+). In the absence of [Ca(2+)]o, BK-induced [Ca(2+)]i increases were sensitive to B2 receptor antagonists, but not to a B1 receptor antagonist. However, B1 receptor agonist, Lys-[Des-Arg(9)]BK, transiently increased [Ca(2+)]i in primary cultured TG neurons, and these increases were sensitive to a B1 receptor antagonist in the presence of [Ca(2+)]o. These results indicated that B2 receptors were constitutively expressed and their activation induced the mobilization of [Ca(2+)]i from intracellular stores with partial Ca(2+) influx by BK. Although constitutive B1 receptor expression could not be clearly observed immunohistochemically in the TG cryosection, cultured TG neurons functionally expressed B1 receptors, suggesting that both B1 and B2 receptors involve pathological and physiological nociceptive functions.

  7. The heat shock protein 70 cochaperone hip enhances functional maturation of glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Gregory M; Prapapanich, Viravan; Carrigan, Patricia E; Roberts, Patricia J; Riggs, Daniel L; Smith, David F

    2004-07-01

    Multiple molecular chaperones interact with steroid receptors to promote functional maturation and stability of receptor complexes. The heat shock protein (Hsp)70 cochaperone Hip has been identified in conjunction with Hsp70, Hsp90, and the Hsp70/Hsp90 cochaperone Hop/Sti1p in receptor complexes during an intermediate stage of receptor assembly, but a functional requirement for Hip in the receptor assembly process has not been established. Because the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains orthologs for most of the receptor-associated chaperones yet lacks an orthologous Hip gene, we exploited the well-established yeast model for steroid receptor function to ask whether Hip can alter steroid receptor function in vivo. Introducing human Hip into yeast enhances hormone-dependent activation of a reporter gene by glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Because Hip does not similarly enhance signaling by mineralocorticoid, progesterone, or estrogen receptors, a general effect on transcription can be excluded. Instead, Hip promotes functional maturation of GR without increasing steady-state levels of GR protein. Unexpectedly, Hip binding to Hsp70 is not critical for boosting GR responsiveness to hormone. In conclusion, Hip functions by a previously unrecognized mechanism to promote the efficiency of GR maturation in cells.

  8. Ryanodine receptors: physiological function and deregulation in Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Perturbed Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis emerges as a central player in Alzheimer disease (AD). Accordingly, different studies have reported alterations of the expression and the function of Ryanodine Receptors (RyR) in human AD-affected brains, in cells expressing familial AD-linked mutations on the β amyloid precursor protein (βAPP) and presenilins (the catalytic core in γ-secretase complexes cleaving the βAPP, thereby generating amyloid β (Aβ) peptides), as well as in the brain of various transgenic AD mice models. Data converge to suggest that RyR expression and function alteration are associated to AD pathogenesis through the control of: i) βAPP processing and Aβ peptide production, ii) neuronal death; iii) synaptic function; and iv) memory and learning abilities. In this review, we document the network of evidences suggesting that RyR could play a complex dual “compensatory/protective versus pathogenic” role contributing to the setting of histopathological lesions and synaptic deficits that are associated with the disease stages. We also discuss the possible mechanisms underlying RyR expression and function alterations in AD. Finally, we review recent publications showing that drug-targeting blockade of RyR and genetic manipulation of RyR reduces Aβ production, stabilizes synaptic transmission, and prevents learning and memory deficits in various AD mouse models. Chemically-designed RyR “modulators” could therefore be envisioned as new therapeutic compounds able to delay or block the progression of AD. PMID:24902695

  9. Expression of functional leptin receptors in rodent Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Caprio, M; Isidori, A M; Carta, A R; Moretti, C; Dufau, M L; Fabbri, A

    1999-11-01

    Several studies indicate that the size of body fat stores and the circulating levels of the adipocyte-derived hormone leptin are able to influence the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. The leptin-hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal interactions have been mainly studied at the level of the central nervous system. In this study, we investigated the possibility that leptin may have direct effects on the rodent Leydig cell function. To probe this hypothesis, we first analyzed the expression of leptin receptors (OB-R) in rodent Leydig cells in culture. RT-PCR studies showed that rat Leydig cells express both the long (OB-Rb) and short isoform (OB-Ra) of leptin receptor, whereas MLTC-1 cells (a murine Leydig tumor cell line) express only the long isoform. Short-term (30-90 min) incubation of rat Leydig cells with increasing concentrations ofleptin (2-500 ng/ml) led to a significant and dose-dependent inhibition of human (h)CG-stimulated testosterone (T) production (approximately 60% reduction, IC50 = 20 ng/ml) but no change in basal androgen release. Also, leptin (150 ng/ml) amplified hCG-induced intracellular cAMP formation (1- to 2-fold) without modifying basal cAMP levels. Subsequent experiments showed that leptin inhibited 8Br-cAMP-stimulated T production, indicating that leptin's effect is exerted beyond cAMP. The inhibitory effect of leptin on hCG-induced T secretion was accompanied by a significant reduction of androstenedione and a concomitant rise of the precursor metabolites pregnenolone, progesterone, and 17-OH-progesterone, conceivable with a leptin-induced lesion of 17,20 lyase activity. Separate experiments performed with the MLTC-1 cells (not expressing cytochrome P450-17alpha) showed that leptin, though amplifying hCG-stimulated cAMP production, did not modify hCG-stimulated pregnenolone and progesterone release. These results further indicate that leptin action on steroidogenesis occurs downstream of progesterone synthesis. Northern Blot

  10. Functional differences between neurotransmitter binding sites of muscle acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Tapan K; Bruhova, Iva; Chakraborty, Srirupa; Gupta, Shaweta; Zheng, Wenjun; Auerbach, Anthony

    2014-12-01

    A muscle acetylcholine receptor (AChR) has two neurotransmitter binding sites located in the extracellular domain, at αδ and either αε (adult) or αγ (fetal) subunit interfaces. We used single-channel electrophysiology to measure the effects of mutations of five conserved aromatic residues at each site with regard to their contribution to the difference in free energy of agonist binding to active versus resting receptors (ΔGB1). The two binding sites behave independently in both adult and fetal AChRs. For four different agonists, including ACh and choline, ΔGB1 is ∼-2 kcal/mol more favorable at αγ compared with at αε and αδ. Only three of the aromatics contribute significantly to ΔGB1 at the adult sites (αY190, αY198, and αW149), but all five do so at αγ (as well as αY93 and γW55). γW55 makes a particularly large contribution only at αγ that is coupled energetically to those contributions of some of the α-subunit aromatics. The hydroxyl and benzene groups of loop C residues αY190 and αY198 behave similarly with regard to ΔGB1 at all three kinds of site. ACh binding energies estimated from molecular dynamics simulations are consistent with experimental values from electrophysiology and suggest that the αγ site is more compact, better organized, and less dynamic than αε and αδ. We speculate that the different sensitivities of the fetal αγ site versus the adult αε and αδ sites to choline and ACh are important for the proper maturation and function of the neuromuscular synapse. PMID:25422413

  11. Beta 2-adrenergic receptors on eosinophils. Binding and functional studies

    SciTech Connect

    Yukawa, T.; Ukena, D.; Kroegel, C.; Chanez, P.; Dent, G.; Chung, K.F.; Barnes, P.J. )

    1990-06-01

    We have studied the binding characteristics and functional effects of beta-adrenoceptors on human and guinea pig eosinophils. We determined the binding of the beta-antagonist radioligand (125I)pindolol (IPIN) to intact eosinophils obtained from the peritoneal cavity of guinea pigs and from blood of patients with eosinophilia. Specific binding was saturable, and Scatchard analysis showed a single binding site with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 24.6 pM and maximal number of binding sites (Bmax) of 7,166 per cell. ICI 118,551, a beta 2-selective antagonist, inhibited IPIN binding with a Ki value of 0.28 nM and was approximately 5,000-fold more effective than the beta 1-selective antagonist, atenolol. Isoproterenol increased cAMP levels about 5.5-fold above basal levels (EC50 = 25 microM); albuterol, a beta 2-agonist, behaved as a partial agonist with a maximal stimulation of 80%. Binding to human eosinophils gave similar results with a Kd of 25.3 pM and a Bmax corresponding to 4,333 sites per cell. Incubation of both human and guinea pig eosinophils with opsonized zymosan (2 mg/ml) or with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) (10(-8) and 10(-6) M) resulted in superoxide anion generation and the release of eosinophil peroxidase; albuterol (10(-7) to 10(-5) M) had no inhibitory effect on the release of these products. Thus, eosinophils from patients with eosinophilia and from the peritoneal cavity of guinea pigs possess beta-receptors of the beta 2-subtype that are coupled to adenylate cyclase; however, these receptors do not modulate oxidative metabolism or degranulation. The possible therapeutic consequences of these observations to asthma are discussed.

  12. Growth hormone receptor/binding protein: Physiology and function

    SciTech Connect

    Herington, A.C.; Ymer, S.I.; Stevenson, J.L.; Roupas, P.

    1994-12-31

    Soluble truncated forms of the growth hormone receptor (GHR) are present in the circulation of many species and are also produced by many tissues/cell types. The major high-affinity forms of these GH-binding proteins (GHBP) are derived by alternative splicing of GHR mRNA in rodents, but probably by proteolytic cleavage in other species. Questions still remain with respect to the origins, native molecular forms(s), physiology, and function of the GHBPs, however. The observation that GH induces dimerization of the soluble GHBP and a membrane GHR, and that dimerization of GHR appears to be critical for GH bioactivity suggests that the presentation of GH to target cells, in an unbound form or as a monomeric or dimeric complex with GHBP, may have significant implications for the ability of GH to activate specific postreceptor signaling pathways (tyrosine kinase, protein kinase C, G-protein pathways) known to be utilized by GH for its diverse biological effects. This minireview addresses some of these aspects and highlights several new questions which have arisen as a result of recent advances in our understanding of the structure, function, and signaling mechanisms of the membrane bound GHR. 43 refs.

  13. Improved antitumour immunity in murine neuroblastoma using a combination of IL-2 and IL-12.

    PubMed

    Siapati, K E; Barker, S; Kinnon, C; Michalski, A; Anderson, R; Brickell, P; Thrasher, A J; Hart, S L

    2003-05-19

    Neuroblastoma immunotherapy using cytokine-modified tumour cells has been tested in clinical trials. However, because of the complex nature of antitumour immune responses, a number of therapies may be required for complete tumour eradication and generation of systemic immunity. We report here the improved antitumour effect of two cytokines, interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interleukin-12 (IL-12), when coexpressed by neuroblastoma cell lines. Initially, transfection of human and mouse neuroblastoma cell lines resulted in high expression levels of biologically active IL-2 and IL-12 in vitro. These cytokines when expressed by transfected Neuro-2A cells completely abolished their in vivo tumorigenicity in a syngeneic neuroblastoma model. Vaccination of established tumours with IL-12-producing cells exhibited a clear effect with reduced tumour growth in the presence of IL-2. In vivo depletion studies showed that CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells mediate the response against cytokine-producing cells. These results suggest that IL-2 and IL-12, when cotransfected in tumour cells, are effective against established disease and provide a promising immunotherapeutic approach for the treatment of neuroblastoma.

  14. The neuroendocrine functions of the parathyroid hormone 2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Dobolyi, Arpád; Dimitrov, Eugene; Palkovits, Miklós; Usdin, Ted B

    2012-01-01

    The G-protein coupled parathyroid hormone 2 receptor (PTH2R) is concentrated in endocrine and limbic regions in the forebrain. Its endogenous ligand, tuberoinfundibular peptide of 39 residues (TIP39), is synthesized in only two brain regions, within the posterior thalamus and the lateral pons. TIP39-expressing neurons have a widespread projection pattern, which matches the PTH2R distribution in the brain. Neuroendocrine centers including the preoptic area, the periventricular, paraventricular, and arcuate nuclei contain the highest density of PTH2R-positive networks. The administration of TIP39 and an antagonist of the PTH2R as well as the investigation of mice that lack functional TIP39 and PTH2R revealed the involvement of the PTH2R in a variety of neural and neuroendocrine functions. TIP39 acting via the PTH2R modulates several aspects of the stress response. It evokes corticosterone release by activating corticotropin-releasing hormone-containing neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. Block of TIP39 signaling elevates the anxiety state of animals and their fear response, and increases stress-induced analgesia. TIP39 has also been suggested to affect the release of additional pituitary hormones including arginine-vasopressin and growth hormone. A role of the TIP39-PTH2R system in thermoregulation was also identified. TIP39 may play a role in maintaining body temperature in a cold environment via descending excitatory pathways from the preoptic area. Anatomical and functional studies also implicated the TIP39-PTH2R system in nociceptive information processing. Finally, TIP39 induced in postpartum dams may play a role in the release of prolactin during lactation. Potential mechanisms leading to the activation of TIP39 neurons and how they influence the neuroendocrine system are also described. The unique TIP39-PTH2R neuromodulator system provides the possibility for developing drugs with a novel mechanism of action to control neuroendocrine disorders.

  15. The Neuroendocrine Functions of the Parathyroid Hormone 2 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Dobolyi, Arpád; Dimitrov, Eugene; Palkovits, Miklós; Usdin, Ted B.

    2012-01-01

    The G-protein coupled parathyroid hormone 2 receptor (PTH2R) is concentrated in endocrine and limbic regions in the forebrain. Its endogenous ligand, tuberoinfundibular peptide of 39 residues (TIP39), is synthesized in only two brain regions, within the posterior thalamus and the lateral pons. TIP39-expressing neurons have a widespread projection pattern, which matches the PTH2R distribution in the brain. Neuroendocrine centers including the preoptic area, the periventricular, paraventricular, and arcuate nuclei contain the highest density of PTH2R-positive networks. The administration of TIP39 and an antagonist of the PTH2R as well as the investigation of mice that lack functional TIP39 and PTH2R revealed the involvement of the PTH2R in a variety of neural and neuroendocrine functions. TIP39 acting via the PTH2R modulates several aspects of the stress response. It evokes corticosterone release by activating corticotropin-releasing hormone-containing neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. Block of TIP39 signaling elevates the anxiety state of animals and their fear response, and increases stress-induced analgesia. TIP39 has also been suggested to affect the release of additional pituitary hormones including arginine-vasopressin and growth hormone. A role of the TIP39-PTH2R system in thermoregulation was also identified. TIP39 may play a role in maintaining body temperature in a cold environment via descending excitatory pathways from the preoptic area. Anatomical and functional studies also implicated the TIP39-PTH2R system in nociceptive information processing. Finally, TIP39 induced in postpartum dams may play a role in the release of prolactin during lactation. Potential mechanisms leading to the activation of TIP39 neurons and how they influence the neuroendocrine system are also described. The unique TIP39-PTH2R neuromodulator system provides the possibility for developing drugs with a novel mechanism of action to control neuroendocrine disorders

  16. Using Mutant Cycle Analysis to Elucidate Long-Range Functional Coupling in Allosteric Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Shanata, Jai A. P.; Frazier, Shawnalea J.; Lester, Henry A.; Dougherty, Dennis A.

    2014-01-01

    The functional coupling of residues that are far apart in space is the quintessential property of allosteric receptors. Data from functional studies of allosteric receptors, such as whole-cell dose-response relations, can be used to determine if mutation to a receptor significantly impacts agonist potency. However, the classification of perturbations as primarily impacting binding or allosteric function is more challenging, often requiring detailed kinetic studies. This protocol describes a simple strategy, derived from mutant cycle analysis, for elucidating long-range functional coupling in allosteric receptors (ELFCAR). Introduction of a gain-of-function reporter mutation, followed by a mutant cycle analysis of the readily-measured macroscopic EC50 values can provide insight into the role of many physically distant targets. This new method should find broad application in determining the functional roles of residues in allosteric receptors. PMID:22052487

  17. Therapeutic efficacy of sequential therapy with OK-432, cyclophosphamide, IL2-cultured lymphocytes and in vivo IL2 against advanced murine plasmacytoma.

    PubMed

    Kan, N; Okino, T; Nakanishi, M; Sato, K; Mise, K; Yamasaki, S; Teramura, Y; Ohgaki, K; Tobe, T

    1989-01-01

    BALB/c mice inoculated IP with a syngeneic plasmacytoma MOPC104E were treated with a combination of a streptococcal preparation, OK-432 (1 KE, 0.1 mg/mouse), low-dose of cyclophosphamide (CPA, 1 mg/kg) and adoptive transfer of tumor-bearer-spleen cells (2 x 10(7) cells) cultured with IL2 and sonicated tumor extract (adoptive immunotherapy; AIT). The consecutive protocol of OK-432 (day 8, 9 post inoculation) - CPA (day 10) - AIT (day 11) was the most effective. Rate of complete remission was highest when recombinant (r-) IL2 was injected to the mice after AIT. Moreover, another bacterial preparation, Nocardia rubra cell wall skeleton and another low-dose chemotherapy, Mitomycin C could be used successfully instead of OK-432 or CPA. Transfer test of intraperitoneal cells (tumor cells plus host cells) of mice on day 11 post inoculation (on the day of AIT) revealed that OK-432 augmented the susceptibility of peritoneal cells to cultured lymphocytes in inhibition of transplantability, and that CPA after OK-432 augmented the anti-tumor effect of tumor-bearer-spleen cells which act synergistically with cultured lymphocytes. This therapy schedule seems to be the best model to augment the effect of AIT with minimal side effect.

  18. Different functional roles of T1R subunits in the heteromeric taste receptors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong; Staszewski, Lena; Tang, Huixian; Adler, Elliot; Zoller, Mark; Li, Xiaodong

    2004-09-28

    The T1R receptors, a family of taste-specific class C G protein-coupled receptors, mediate mammalian sweet and umami tastes. The structure-function relationships of T1R receptors remain largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate the different functional roles of T1R extracellular and transmembrane domains in ligand recognition and G protein coupling. Similar to other family C G protein-coupled receptors, the N-terminal Venus flytrap domain of T1R2 is required for recognizing sweeteners, such as aspartame and neotame. The G protein coupling requires the transmembrane domain of T1R2. Surprisingly, the C-terminal transmembrane domain of T1R3 is required for recognizing sweetener cyclamate and sweet taste inhibitor lactisole. Because T1R3 is the common subunit in the sweet taste receptor and the umami taste receptor, we tested the interaction of lactisole and cyclamate with the umami taste receptor. Lactisole inhibits the activity of the human T1R1/T1R3 receptor, and, as predicted, blocked the umami taste of l-glutamate in human taste tests. Cyclamate does not activate the T1R1/T1R3 receptor by itself, but potentiates the receptor's response to l-glutamate. Taken together, these findings demonstrate the different functional roles of T1R3 and T1R2 and the presence of multiple ligand binding sites on the sweet taste receptor. PMID:15353592

  19. Different functional roles of T1R subunits in the heteromeric taste receptors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong; Staszewski, Lena; Tang, Huixian; Adler, Elliot; Zoller, Mark; Li, Xiaodong

    2004-09-28

    The T1R receptors, a family of taste-specific class C G protein-coupled receptors, mediate mammalian sweet and umami tastes. The structure-function relationships of T1R receptors remain largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate the different functional roles of T1R extracellular and transmembrane domains in ligand recognition and G protein coupling. Similar to other family C G protein-coupled receptors, the N-terminal Venus flytrap domain of T1R2 is required for recognizing sweeteners, such as aspartame and neotame. The G protein coupling requires the transmembrane domain of T1R2. Surprisingly, the C-terminal transmembrane domain of T1R3 is required for recognizing sweetener cyclamate and sweet taste inhibitor lactisole. Because T1R3 is the common subunit in the sweet taste receptor and the umami taste receptor, we tested the interaction of lactisole and cyclamate with the umami taste receptor. Lactisole inhibits the activity of the human T1R1/T1R3 receptor, and, as predicted, blocked the umami taste of l-glutamate in human taste tests. Cyclamate does not activate the T1R1/T1R3 receptor by itself, but potentiates the receptor's response to l-glutamate. Taken together, these findings demonstrate the different functional roles of T1R3 and T1R2 and the presence of multiple ligand binding sites on the sweet taste receptor.

  20. Rising stars: modulation of brain functions by astroglial type-1 cannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Metna-Laurent, Mathilde; Marsicano, Giovanni

    2015-03-01

    The type-1-cannabinoid (CB1 ) receptor is amongst the most widely expressed G protein-coupled receptors in the brain. In few decades, CB1 receptors have been shown to regulate a large array of functions from brain cell development and survival to complex cognitive processes. Understanding the cellular mechanisms underlying these functions of CB1 is complex due to the heterogeneity of the brain cell types on which the receptor is expressed. Although the large majority of CB1 receptors act on neurons, early studies pointed to a direct control of CB1 receptors over astroglial functions including brain energy supply and neuroprotection. In line with the growing concept of the tripartite synapse highlighting astrocytes as direct players in synaptic plasticity, astroglial CB1 receptor signaling recently emerged as the mediator of several forms of synaptic plasticity associated to important cognitive functions. Here, we shortly review the current knowledge on CB1 receptor-mediated astroglial functions. This functional spectrum is large and most of the mechanisms by which CB1 receptors control astrocytes, as well as their consequences in vivo, are still unknown, requiring innovative approaches to improve this new cannabinoid research field.

  1. Minoxidil may suppress androgen receptor-related functions.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Liu, Jai-Shin; Lin, An-Chi; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Chung, Wen-Hung; Wu, Wen-Guey

    2014-04-30

    Although minoxidil has been used for more than two decades to treat androgenetic alopecia (AGA), an androgen-androgen receptor (AR) pathway-dominant disease, its precise mechanism of action remains elusive. We hypothesized that minoxidil may influence the AR or its downstream signaling. These tests revealed that minoxidil suppressed AR-related functions, decreasing AR transcriptional activity in reporter assays, reducing expression of AR targets at the protein level, and suppressing AR-positive LNCaP cell growth. Dissecting the underlying mechanisms, we found that minoxidil interfered with AR-peptide, AR-coregulator, and AR N/C-terminal interactions, as well as AR protein stability. Furthermore, a crystallographic analysis using the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD) revealed direct binding of minoxidil to the AR in a minoxidil-AR-LBD co-crystal model, and surface plasmon resonance assays demonstrated that minoxidil directly bound the AR with a K(d) value of 2.6 µM. Minoxidil also suppressed AR-responsive reporter activity and decreased AR protein stability in human hair dermal papilla cells. The current findings provide evidence that minoxidil could be used to treat both cancer and age-related disease, and open a new avenue for applications of minoxidil in treating androgen-AR pathway-related diseases. PMID:24742982

  2. Minoxidil may suppress androgen receptor-related functions

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Liu, Jai-Shin; Lin, An-Chi; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Chung, Wen-Hung; Wu, Wen-Guey

    2014-01-01

    Although minoxidil has been used for more than two decades to treat androgenetic alopecia (AGA), an androgen-androgen receptor (AR) pathway-dominant disease, its precise mechanism of action remains elusive. We hypothesized that minoxidil may influence the AR or its downstream signaling. These tests revealed that minoxidil suppressed AR-related functions, decreasing AR transcriptional activity in reporter assays, reducing expression of AR targets at the protein level, and suppressing AR-positive LNCaP cell growth. Dissecting the underlying mechanisms, we found that minoxidil interfered with AR-peptide, AR-coregulator, and AR N/C-terminal interactions, as well as AR protein stability. Furthermore, a crystallographic analysis using the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD) revealed direct binding of minoxidil to the AR in a minoxidil-AR-LBD co-crystal model, and surface plasmon resonance assays demonstrated that minoxidil directly bound the AR with a Kd value of 2.6 μM. Minoxidil also suppressed AR-responsive reporter activity and decreased AR protein stability in human hair dermal papilla cells. The current findings provide evidence that minoxidil could be used to treat both cancer and age-related disease, and open a new avenue for applications of minoxidil in treating androgen-AR pathway-related diseases. PMID:24742982

  3. Functional ryanodine receptor channels in flatworm muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Day, T A; Haithcock, J; Kimber, M; Maule, A G

    2000-04-01

    Caffeine, which stimulates intracellular Ca2+ release channels known as ryanodine receptor (RyR) channels, induces contraction of individual muscle fibres dissociated from the trematode Schistosoma mansoni, and the turbellarians Dugesia tigrina and Procerodes littoralis. Caffeine is much more potent on S. mansoni fibres (EC50 0.7 mM) than those from D. tigrina or P. littoralis (3.2 mM and 4.6 mM, respectively). These caffeine-induced contractions are blocked by ryanodine, confirming the presence of functional RyR channels in these flatworm muscles. However, the contractions are not blocked by typical RyR channel blockers ruthenium red or neomycin, indicating that there may be important pharmacological differences between the RyR channels in this early-diverging phylum and those of later animals. These studies demonstrate that RyR channels are present in the muscle of these flatworms, and that the sarcoplasmic reticulum stores sufficient Ca2+ to support contraction.

  4. Vascular Effects of Endothelin Receptor Antagonists Depends on Their Selectivity for ETA Versus ETB Receptors and on the Functionality of Endothelial ETB Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Pauline; Wanner, Daniel; Rey, Markus; Hess, Patrick; Clozel, Martine

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The goal of this study was to characterize the role of Endothelin (ET) type B receptors (ETB) on vascular function in healthy and diseased conditions and demonstrate how it affects the pharmacological activity of ET receptor antagonists (ERAs). Methods: The contribution of the ETB receptor to vascular relaxation or constriction was characterized in isolated arteries from healthy and diseased rats with systemic (Dahl-S) or pulmonary hypertension (monocrotaline). Because the role of ETB receptors is different in pathological vis-à-vis normal conditions, we compared the efficacy of ETA-selective and dual ETA/ETB ERAs on blood pressure in hypertensive rats equipped with telemetry. Results: In healthy vessels, ETB receptors stimulation with sarafotoxin S6c induced vasorelaxation and no vasoconstriction. In contrast, in arteries of rats with systemic or pulmonary hypertension, endothelial ETB-mediated relaxation was lost while vasoconstriction on stimulation by sarafotoxin S6c was observed. In hypertensive rats, administration of the dual ETA/ETB ERA macitentan on top of a maximal effective dose of the ETA-selective ERA ambrisentan further reduced blood pressure, indicating that ETB receptors blockade provides additional benefit. Conclusions: Taken together, these data suggest that in pathology, dual ETA/ETB receptor antagonism can provide superior vascular effects compared with ETA-selective receptor blockade. PMID:25992919

  5. Modern approaches to the design of memory and cognitive function stimulants based on AMPA receptor ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, V. V.; Proshin, A. N.; Kinzirsky, A. S.; Bachurin, Sergey O.

    2009-05-01

    Data on the structure and properties of compounds acting on AMPA receptors, the key subtype of ionotropic glutamate receptors of the mammalian central nervous system, are analyzed. Data on the role of these receptors in provision of memory and cognitive function formation and impairment processes are presented. The attention is focused on the modern views on the mechanisms of AMPA receptor desensitization and deactivation and action of substances affecting these processes. The structures of key positive modulators of AMPA receptors are given. The problems of application of these substances as therapeutic means for preventing and treating neurodegenerative and psychoneurological diseases are discussed. Bibliography — 121 references.

  6. Selective oestrogen receptor modulators differentially potentiate brain mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Irwin, R W; Yao, J; To, J; Hamilton, R T; Cadenas, E; Brinton, R D

    2012-01-01

    The mitochondrial energy-transducing capacity of the brain is important for long-term neurological health and is influenced by endocrine hormone responsiveness. The present study aimed to determine the role of oestrogen receptor (ER) subtypes in regulating mitochondrial function using selective agonists for ERα (propylpyrazoletriol; PPT) and ERβ (diarylpropionitrile; DPN). Ovariectomised female rats were treated with 17β-oestradiol (E(2) ), PPT, DPN or vehicle control. Both ER selective agonists significantly increased the mitochondrial respiratory control ratio and cytochrome oxidase (COX) activity relative to vehicle. Western blots of purified whole brain mitochondria detected ERα and, to a greater extent, ERβ localisation. Pre-treatment with DPN, an ERβ agonist, significantly increased ERβ association with mitochondria. In the hippocampus, DPN activated mitochondrial DNA-encoded COX I expression, whereas PPT was ineffective, indicating that mechanistically ERβ, and not ERα, activated mitochondrial transcriptional machinery. Both selective ER agonists increased protein expression of nuclear DNA-encoded COX IV, suggesting that activation of ERβ or ERα is sufficient. Selective ER agonists up-regulated a panel of bioenergetic enzymes and antioxidant defence proteins. Up-regulated proteins included pyruvate dehydrogenase, ATP synthase, manganese superoxide dismutase and peroxiredoxin V. In vitro, whole cell metabolism was assessed in live primary cultured hippocampal neurones and mixed glia. The results of analyses conducted in vitro were consistent with data obtained in vivo. Furthermore, lipid peroxides, accumulated as a result of hormone deprivation, were significantly reduced by E(2) , PPT and DPN. These findings suggest that the activation of both ERα and ERβ is differentially required to potentiate mitochondrial function in brain. As active components in hormone therapy, synthetically designed oestrogens as well as natural phyto-oestrogen cocktails

  7. Adrenocortical LDL receptor function negatively influences glucocorticoid output.

    PubMed

    van der Sluis, Ronald J; Van Eck, Miranda; Hoekstra, Menno

    2015-09-01

    Over 50% of the cholesterol needed by adrenocortical cells for the production of glucocorticoids is derived from lipoproteins. However, the overall contribution of the different lipoproteins and associated uptake pathways to steroidogenesis remains to be determined. Here we aimed to show the importance of LDL receptor (LDLR)-mediated cholesterol acquisition for adrenal steroidogenesis in vivo. Female total body LDLR knockout mice with a human-like lipoprotein profile were bilaterally adrenalectomized and subsequently provided with one adrenal either expressing or genetically lacking the LDLR under their renal capsule to solely modulate adrenocortical LDLR function. Plasma total cholesterol levels and basal plasma corticosterone levels were identical in the two types of adrenal transplanted mice. Strikingly, restoration of adrenal LDLR function significantly reduced the ACTH-mediated stimulation of adrenal steroidogenesis (P<0.001), with plasma corticosterone levels that were respectively 44-59% lower (P<0.01) as compared to adrenal LDLR negative controls. In addition, LDLR positive adrenal transplanted mice exhibited a significant decrease (-39%; P<0.001) in their plasma corticosterone level under fasting stress conditions. Biochemical analysis did not show changes in the expression of genes involved in cholesterol mobilization. However, LDLR expressing adrenal transplants displayed a marked 62% reduction (P<0.05) in the transcript level of the key steroidogenic enzyme HSD3B2. In conclusion, our studies in a mouse model with a human-like lipoprotein profile provide the first in vivo evidence for a novel inhibitory role of the LDLR in the control of adrenal glucocorticoid production. PMID:26136384

  8. Functional Development of the T Cell Receptor for Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Ebert, Peter J.R.; Li, Qi-Jing; Huppa, Johannes B.; Davis, Mark M.

    2016-01-01

    For over three decades now, the T cell receptor (TCR) for antigen has not ceased to challenge the imaginations of cellular and molecular immunologists alike. T cell antigen recognition transcends every aspect of adaptive immunity: it shapes the T cell repertoire in the thymus and directs T cell-mediated effector functions in the periphery, where it is also central to the induction of peripheral tolerance. Yet, despite its central position, there remain many questions unresolved: how can one TCR be specific for one particular peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) ligand while also binding other pMHC ligands with an immunologically relevant affinity? And how can a T cell’s extreme specificity (alterations of single methyl groups in their ligand can abrogate a response) and sensitivity (single agonist ligands on a cell surface are sufficient to trigger a measurable response) emerge from TCR–ligand interactions that are so low in affinity? Solving these questions is intimately tied to a fundamental understanding of molecular recognition dynamics within the many different contexts of various T cell–antigen presenting cell (APC) contacts: from the thymic APCs that shape the TCR repertoire and guide functional differentiation of developing T cells to the peripheral APCs that support homeostasis and provoke antigen responses in naïve, effector, memory, and regulatory T cells. Here, we discuss our recent findings relating to T cell antigen recognition and how this leads to the thymic development of foreign-antigen-responsive αβT cells. PMID:20800817

  9. Serotoninergic dorsal raphe neurons possess functional postsynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Galindo-Charles, Luis; Hernandez-Lopez, Salvador; Galarraga, Elvira; Tapia, Dagoberto; Bargas, José; Garduño, Julieta; Frías-Dominguez, Carmen; Drucker-Colin, René; Mihailescu, Stefan

    2008-08-01

    Very few neurons in the telencephalon have been shown to express functional postsynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), among them, the noradrenergic and dopaminergic neurons. However, there is no evidence for postsynaptic nAChRs on serotonergic neurons. In this study, we asked if functional nAChRs are present in serotonergic (5-HT) and nonserotonergic (non-5-HT) neurons of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). In rat midbrain slices, field stimulation at the tegmental pedunculopontine (PPT) nucleus evoked postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs) with different components in DRN neurons. After blocking the glutamatergic and GABAergic components, the remaining eEPSCs were blocked by mecamylamine and reduced by either the selective alpha7 nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA) or the selective alpha4beta2 nAChR antagonist dihydro-beta-eritroidine (DHbetaE). Simultaneous addition of MLA and DHbetaE blocked all eEPSCs. Integrity of the PPT-DRN pathway was assessed by both anterograde biocytin tracing and antidromic stimulation from the DRN. Inward currents evoked by the direct application of acetylcholine (ACh), in the presence of atropine and tetrodotoxin, consisted of two kinetically different currents: one was blocked by MLA and the other by DHbetaE; in both 5-HT and non-5-HT DR neurons. Analysis of spontaneous (sEPSCs) and evoked (eEPSCs) synaptic events led to the conclusion that nAChRs were located at the postsynaptic membrane. The possible implications of these newly described nAChRs in various physiological processes and behavioral events, such as the wake-sleep cycle, are discussed. PMID:18512214

  10. Control of Assembly and Function of Glutamate Receptors by the Amino-Terminal Domain

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Kasper B.; Furukawa, Hiro

    2010-01-01

    The extracellular amino-terminal domains (ATDs) of the ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits form a semiautonomous component of all glutamate receptors that resides distal to the membrane and controls a surprisingly diverse set of receptor functions. These functions include subunit assembly, receptor trafficking, channel gating, agonist potency, and allosteric modulation. The many divergent features of the different ionotropic glutamate receptor classes and different subunits within a class may stem from differential regulation by the amino-terminal domains. The emerging knowledge of the structure and function of the amino-terminal domains reviewed here may enable targeting of this region for the therapeutic modulation of glutamatergic signaling. Toward this end, NMDA receptor antagonists that interact with the GluN2B ATD show promise in animal models of ischemia, neuropathic pain, and Parkinson's disease. PMID:20660085

  11. Roles of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor β subunits in function of human α4-containing nicotinic receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jie; Liu, Qiang; Yu, Kewei; Hu, Jun; Kuo, Yen-Ping; Segerberg, Marsha; St John, Paul A; Lukas, Ronald J

    2006-01-01

    Naturally expressed nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) containing α4 subunits (α4*-nAChR) in combination with β2 subunits (α4β2-nAChR) are among the most abundant, high-affinity nicotine binding sites in the mammalian brain. β4 subunits are also richly expressed and colocalize with α4 subunits in several brain regions implicated in behavioural responses to nicotine and nicotine dependence. Thus, α4β4-nAChR also may exist and play important functional roles. In this study, properties were determined of human α4β2- and α4β4-nAChR heterologously expressed de novo in human SH-EP1 epithelial cells. Whole-cell currents mediated via human α4β4-nAChR have ∼4-fold higher amplitude than those mediated via human α4β2-nAChR and exhibit much slower acute desensitization and functional rundown. Nicotinic agonists induce peak whole-cell current responses typically with higher functional potency at α4β4-nAChR than at α4β2-nAChR. Cytisine and lobeline serve as full agonists at α4β4-nAChR but are only partial agonists at α4β2-nAChR. However, nicotinic antagonists, except hexamethonium, have comparable affinities for functional α4β2- and α4β4-nAChR. Whole-cell current responses show stronger inward rectification for α4β2-nAChR than for α4β4-nAChR at a positive holding potential. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that human nAChR β2 or β4 subunits can combine with α4 subunits to generate two forms of α4*-nAChR with distinctive physiological and pharmacological features. Diversity in α4*-nAChR is of potential relevance to nervous system function, disease, and nicotine dependence. PMID:16825297

  12. A common polymorphism in the LDL receptor gene has multiple effects on LDL receptor function.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Ihn, Hansel E; Medina, Marisa W; Krauss, Ronald M

    2013-04-01

    A common synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism in exon 12 of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene, rs688, has been associated with increased plasma total and LDL cholesterol in several populations. Using immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines from a healthy study population, we confirmed an earlier report that the minor allele of rs688 is associated with increased exon 12 alternative splicing (P < 0.05) and showed that this triggered nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) of the alternatively spliced LDLR mRNA. However, since synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms may influence structure and function of the encoded proteins by co-translational effects, we sought to test whether rs688 was also functional in the full-length mRNA. In HepG2 cells expressing LDLR cDNA constructs engineered to contain the major or minor allele of rs688, the latter was associated with a smaller amount of LDLR protein at the cell surface (-21.8 ± 0.6%, P = 0.012), a higher amount in the lysosome fraction (+25.7 ± 0.3%, P = 0.037) and reduced uptake of fluorescently labeled LDL (-24.3 ± 0.7%, P < 0.01). Moreover, in the presence of exogenous proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9), a protein that reduces cellular LDL uptake by promoting lysosomal degradation of LDLR, the minor allele resulted in reduced capacity of a PCSK9 monoclonal antibody to increase LDL uptake. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that rs688, which is located in the β-propeller region of LDLR, has effects on LDLR activity beyond its role in alternative splicing due to impairment of LDLR endosomal recycling and/or PCSK9 binding, processes in which the β-propeller is critically involved.

  13. Renal Function Assessment During Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy.

    PubMed

    Erbas, Belkis; Tuncel, Murat

    2016-09-01

    Theranostics labeled with Y-90 or Lu-177 are highly efficient therapeutic approaches for the systemic treatment of various cancers including neuroendocrine tumors and prostate cancer. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) has been used for many years for metastatic or inoperable neuroendocrine tumors. However, renal and hematopoietic toxicities are the major limitations for this therapeutic approach. Kidneys have been considered as the "critical organ" because of the predominant glomerular filtration, tubular reabsorption by the proximal tubules, and interstitial retention of the tracers. Severe nephrotoxity, which has been classified as grade 4-5 based on the "Common Terminology Criteria on Adverse Events," was reported in the range from 0%-14%. There are several risk factors for renal toxicity; patient-related risk factors include older age, preexisting renal disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, previous nephrotoxic chemotherapy, metastatic lesions close to renal parenchyma, and single kidney. There are also treatment-related issues, such as choice of radionuclide, cumulative radiation dose to kidneys, renal radiation dose per cycle, activity administered, number of cycles, and time interval between cycles. In the literature, nephrotoxicity caused by PRRT was documented using different criteria and renal function tests, from serum creatinine level to more accurate and sophisticated methods. Generally, serum creatinine level was used as a measure of kidney function. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimation based on serum creatinine was preferred by several authors. Most commonly used formulas for estimation of GFR are "Modifications of Diet in Renal Disease" (MDRD) equation and "Cockcroft-Gault" formulas. However, more precise methods than creatinine or creatinine clearance are recommended to assess renal function, such as GFR measurements using Tc-99m-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), Cr-51-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), or

  14. [Opioid receptors of the CNS: function, structure and distribution].

    PubMed

    Slamberová, R

    2004-01-01

    Even though the alkaloids of opium, such as morphine and codeine, were isolated at the beginning of 19th century, the opioid receptors were not determined until 1970's. The discovery of endogenous opioid peptides, such as endorphins, enkephalins and dynorphins, has helped to differentiate between the specific opioid receptor subtypes, mu, delta and kappa, that are used up to now. Opioid receptors are distributed in the central nervous system unevenly. Each receptor subtype has its own specific and nonspecific agonists and antagonists. Opioides, as exogenous opioid receptor agonists, are drugs that are often used in medicine for their analgesic effects, but they are also some of the most heavily abused drugs in the world. Opioides may also induce long-term changes in the numbers and binding activities of opioid receptors. Some of our studies in fact demonstrate that prenatal morphine exposure can alter opioid receptors of adult rats. This may begin to provide insight into the sources of some of the morphological and behavioral changes in the progeny of mothers that received or abused opioides during pregnancy.

  15. Orexin/hypocretin receptor signalling: a functional perspective

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, C S; Kukkonen, J P

    2014-01-01

    Multiple homeostatic systems are regulated by orexin (hypocretin) peptides and their two known GPCRs. Activation of orexin receptors promotes waking and is essential for expression of normal sleep and waking behaviour, with the sleep disorder narcolepsy resulting from the absence of orexin signalling. Orexin receptors also influence systems regulating appetite/metabolism, stress and reward, and are found in several peripheral tissues. Nevertheless, much remains unknown about the signalling pathways and targets engaged by native receptors. In this review, we integrate knowledge about the orexin receptor signalling capabilities obtained from studies in expression systems and various native cell types (as presented in Kukkonen and Leonard, this issue of British Journal of Pharmacology) with knowledge of orexin signalling in different tissues. The tissues reviewed include the CNS, the gastrointestinal tract, the pituitary gland, pancreas, adrenal gland, adipose tissue and the male reproductive system. We also summarize the findings in different native and recombinant cell lines, especially focusing on the different cascades in CHO cells, which is the most investigated cell line. This reveals that while a substantial gap exists between what is known about orexin receptor signalling and effectors in recombinant systems and native systems, mounting evidence suggests that orexin receptor signalling is more diverse than originally thought. Moreover, rather than being restricted to orexin receptor ‘overexpressing’ cells, this signalling diversity may be utilized by native receptors in a site-specific manner. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Orexin Receptors. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-2 PMID:23848055

  16. Downregulation of kinin B1 receptor function by B2 receptor heterodimerization and signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianming; Brovkovych, Viktor; Zhang, Yongkang; Tan, Fulong; Skidgel, Randal A

    2015-01-01

    Signaling through the G protein-coupled kinin receptors B1 (kB1R) and B2 (kB2R) plays a critical role in inflammatory responses mediated by activation of the kallikrein-kinin system. The kB2R is constitutively expressed and rapidly desensitized in response to agonist whereas kB1R expression is upregulated by inflammatory stimuli and it is resistant to internalization and desensitization. Here we show that the kB1R heterodimerizes with kB2Rs in co-transfected HEK293 cells and natively expressing endothelial cells, resulting in significant internalization and desensitization of the kB1R response in cells pre-treated with kB2R agonist. However, pre-treatment of cells with kB1R agonist did not affect subsequent kB2R responses. Agonists of other G protein-coupled receptors (thrombin, lysophosphatidic acid) had no effect on a subsequent kB1R response. The loss of kB1R response after pretreatment with kB2R agonist was partially reversed with kB2R mutant Y129S, which blocks kB2R signaling without affecting endocytosis, or T342A, which signals like wild type but is not endocytosed. Co-endocytosis of the kB1R with kB2R was dependent on β-arrestin and clathrin-coated pits but not caveolae. The sorting pathway of kB1R and kB2R after endocytosis differed as recycling of kB1R to the cell surface was much slower than that of kB2R. In cytokine-treated human lung microvascular endothelial cells, pre-treatment with kB2R agonist inhibited kB1R-mediated increase in transendothelial electrical resistance (TER) caused by kB1R stimulation (to generate nitric oxide) and blocked the profound drop in TER caused by kB1R activation in the presence of pyrogallol (a superoxide generator). Thus, kB1R function can be downregulated by kB2R co-endocytosis and signaling, suggesting new approaches to control kB1R signaling in pathological conditions. PMID:25289859

  17. Increased anti-tumor effects using IL2 with anti-TGFβ reveals competition between mouse NK and CD8 T cells

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Maite; Bouchlaka, Myriam N.; Sckisel, Gail D.; Sungur, Can M.; Chen, Mingyi; Murphy, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Due to increasing interest in the removal of immunosuppressive pathways in cancer, the combination of IL2 with antibodies to neutralize TGFβ, a potent immunosuppressive cytokine, was assessed. Combination immunotherapy resulted in significantly greater anti-tumor effects. These were correlated with significant increases in the numbers and functionality of NK cells, NK progenitors and activated CD8 T cells resulting in the observed anti-tumor effects. Combination immunotherapy was also accompanied with lesser toxicities than IL2 therapy alone. Additionally, we observed a dual competition between NK and activated CD8 T cells such that after immunotherapy, the depletion of either effector population resulted in the increased total expansion of the other population and compensatory anti-tumor effects. This study demonstrates the efficacy of this combination immunotherapeutic regimen as a promising cancer therapy and illustrates the existence of potent competitive regulatory pathways between NK and CD8 T cells in response to systemic activation. PMID:25000978

  18. Effect of alpha 2b interferon on inducement of mIL-2R and treatment of HCV in PBMC from patients with chronic viral hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Xiang, Gui-Ju; Liu, Bing-Xiang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the level of membrane interleukin-2 receptor (mIL-2R) on surface of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and the therapeutic efficacy of alpha 2b interferon on the treatment of HCV-RNA in PBMC of patients with chronic hepatitis C and to compare the negative rates of HCV-RNA in PBMC, HCV-RNA and anti-HCV in serum. METHODS: Before and after treatment of alpha 2b interferon, the level of mIL-2R of patients with chronic hepatitis C was detected by biotin-streptavidin (BSA). The therapeutic group (26 cases) was treated with alpha 2b interferon (3 MU/d) and control therapeutic group (22 cases) was treated with routine drugs (VitC, aspartic acid). The total course of treatment with alpha 2b interferon and routine drug was six months and per course of the treatment was three months. The levels of HCV-RNA in PBMC, HCV-RNA and anti-HCV in serum were detected before and after a course of the treatment. RESULTS: Before and after treatment of alpha 2b interferon and routine drugs, the levels of mIL-2R in silence stage were (3.44 ± 0.77)% and (2.95 ± 0.72)%, the levels of mIL-2R in inducement stage were (33.62 ± 3.95)% and (30.04 ± 3.73)%. There was a significant difference between two groups (P < 0.01-P < 0.05). After treatment of alpha 2b interferon with 3 MU/d for two courses of the treatment, the total negative rates of HCV-RNA in the PBMC and HCV-RNA, anti-HCV in serum were 42.31% (11/26), 57.69% (15/26), 65.38%(17/26) respectively. After the treatment of routine drug, the negative rates of HCV-RNA in PBMC and HCV-RNA, anti-HCV in serum were 13.64% (3/22), 22.73% (5/22), 27.27% (6/22) respectively. There was high significant difference in the group treated with alpha 2b interferon and the group treated with routine drugs (P < 0.01-P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: The mIL-2R can be induced by alpha 2b interferon during the treatment. The alpha 2b interferon has a definite effect on the treatment of HCV-RNA in PBMC. The curative effect of alpha 2b interferon is

  19. The effect of IL-2 expression by recombinant Newcastle disease virus on host immune response, viral replication and pathogenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interleukin 2 (IL-2) is a soluble cytokine that stimulates the cell-mediated immune response. Virus constructs, such as recombinant vaccinia virus, expressing chicken IL-2 have been shown to improve viral clearance by natural killer cells in mice. We have inserted the open-reading frame of the chi...

  20. PKCε and allopregnanolone: functional cross-talk at the GABAA receptor level

    PubMed Central

    Puia, Giulia; Ravazzini, Federica; Castelnovo, Luca Franco; Magnaghi, Valerio

    2015-01-01

    Changes in GABAergic inhibition occur during physiological processes, during response to drugs and in various pathologies. These changes can be achieved through direct allosteric modifications at the γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) type A (GABAA) receptor protein level, or by altering the synthesis, trafficking and stability of the receptor. Neurosteroids (NSs) and protein kinase C (PKC) are potent modulators of GABAA receptors and their effects are presumably intermingled, even though evidence for this hypothesis is only partially explored. However, several PKC isoforms are able to phosphorylate the GABAA receptor, producing different functional effects. We focused on the ε isoform, that has been correlated to the sensitivity of the GABAA receptor to allosteric modulators and whose expression may be regulated in peripheral sensory neurons by NSs. The cross-talk between PKC-ε and NSs, leading to changes in GABAA receptor functionality, is considered and discussed in this perspective. PMID:25852476

  1. Regulation of μ and δ opioid receptor functions: involvement of cyclin-dependent kinase 5

    PubMed Central

    Beaudry, H; Mercier-Blais, A-A; Delaygue, C; Lavoie, C; Parent, J-L; Neugebauer, W; Gendron, L

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Phosphorylation of δ opioid receptors (DOP receptors) by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) was shown to regulate the trafficking of this receptor. Therefore, we aimed to determine the role of CDK5 in regulating DOP receptors in rats treated with morphine or with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). As μ (MOP) and DOP receptors are known to be co-regulated, we also sought to determine if CDK5-mediated regulation of DOP receptors also affects MOP receptor functions. Experimental Approach The role of CDK5 in regulating opioid receptors in CFA- and morphine-treated rats was studied using roscovitine as a CDK inhibitor and a cell-penetrant peptide mimicking the second intracellular loop of DOP receptors (C11-DOPri2). Opioid receptor functions were assessed in vivo in a series of behavioural experiments and correlated by measuring ERK1/2 activity in dorsal root ganglia homogenates. Key Results Chronic roscovitine treatment reduced the antinociceptive and antihyperalgesic effects of deltorphin II (Dlt II) in morphine- and CFA-treated rats respectively. Repeated administrations of C11-DOPri2 also robustly decreased Dlt II-induced analgesia. Interestingly, DAMGO-induced analgesia was significantly increased by roscovitine and C11-DOPri2. Concomitantly, in roscovitine-treated rats the Dlt II-induced ERK1/2 activation was decreased, whereas the DAMGO-induced ERK1/2 activation was increased. An acute roscovitine treatment had no effect on Dlt II- or DAMGO-induced analgesia. Conclusions and Implications Together, our results demonstrate that CDK5 is a key player in the regulation of DOP receptors in morphine- and CFA-treated rats and that the regulation of DOP receptors by CDK5 is sufficient to modulate MOP receptor functions through an indirect process. PMID:25598508

  2. Sequence of a functional invertebrate GABAA receptor subunit which can form a chimeric receptor with a vertebrate alpha subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, R J; Vreugdenhil, E; Zaman, S H; Bhandal, N S; Usherwood, P N; Barnard, E A; Darlison, M G

    1991-01-01

    The sequence of an invertebrate GABAA receptor subunit is described. This was deduced from a cDNA which was isolated from the mollusc Lymnaea stagnalis and which corresponds to a transcript of extremely low abundance. The cDNA was isolated using short exonic sequences from part of the corresponding gene in combination with a variant of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) known as RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends). The mature polypeptide has a predicted molecular weight of 54,569 Daltons and exhibits approximately 50% identity to vertebrate GABAA receptor beta subunits. The six intron-exon boundaries determined to date in the molluscan gene occur at the same relative positions as those found in vertebrate GABAA receptor genes. Functional expression, in Xenopus oocytes, of the molluscan cDNA alone results in the formation of GABA-activated chloride ion channels that have a finite open probability even in the absence of agonist. These GABA-evoked currents can be reversibly blocked by the vertebrate GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline. Surprisingly, the molluscan beta subunit is capable of replacing vertebrate beta subunits in co-expression experiments with the bovine GABAA receptor alpha 1 subunit. These findings suggest that invertebrate GABAA receptors exist in vivo as hetero-oligomeric complexes. PMID:1655414

  3. Immunotherapy for neuroblastoma using syngeneic fibroblasts transfected with IL-2 and IL-12.

    PubMed

    Barker, S E; Grosse, S M; Siapati, E K; Kritz, A; Kinnon, C; Thrasher, A J; Hart, S L

    2007-07-16

    Cytokine-modified tumour cells have been used in clinical trials for immunotherapy of neuroblastoma, but primary tumour cells from surgical biopsies are difficult to culture. Autologous fibroblasts, however, are straightforward to manipulate in culture and easy to transfect using nonviral or viral vectors. Here we have compared the antitumour effect of fibroblasts and tumour cells transfected ex vivo to coexpress interleukin-2 (IL-2) and IL-12 in a syngeneic mouse model of neuroblastoma. Coinjection of cytokine-modified fibroblasts with Neuro-2A tumour cells abolished their in vivo tumorigenicity. Treatment of established tumours with three intratumoral doses of transfected fibroblasts showed a significant therapeutic effect with reduced growth or complete eradication of tumours in 90% of mice, associated with extensive leukocyte infiltration. Splenocytes recovered from vaccinated mice showed enhanced IL-2 production following Neuro-2A coculture, and increased cytotoxicity against Neuro-2A targets compared with controls. Furthermore, 100% of the tumour-free mice exhibited immune memory against tumour cells when rechallenged three months later. The potency of transfected fibroblasts was equivalent to that of tumour cells in all experiments. We conclude that syngeneic fibroblasts cotransfected with IL-2 and IL-12 mediate therapeutic effects against established disease, and are capable of generating immunological memory. Furthermore, as they are easier to recover and manipulate than autologous tumour cells, fibroblasts provide an attractive alternative immunotherapeutic strategy for the treatment of neuroblastoma.

  4. Cystatin F regulates proteinase activity in IL-2-activated natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Maher, Katarina; Konjar, Spela; Watts, Colin; Turk, Boris; Kopitar-Jerala, Natasa

    2014-01-01

    Cystatin F is a unique member of the cystatin family of cysteine protease inhibitors, which is synthesized as an inactive dimer and it is activated by N-terminal cleavage in the endolysosomes. It is expressed in the cells of the immune system: myeloid cells and the cells involved in target cell killing: natural killer (NK) cells and cytotoxic T cells (CTLs). Upon activation of the NK cells with interleukin 2 (IL-2), cystatin F was found upregulated and co-localized in cytotoxic granules with cathepsin C (CatC) and CatV. However, cystatin F inhibits the CatC in cells only when its N-terminal part is processed. Although cystatin F could inhibit both CatV and CatC, the IL-2 stimulation of the YT cells resulted in an increased CatV activity, while the CatC activity was unchanged. The incubation of IL-2 activated NK cells with a cysteine proteinase inhibitor E-64d increased the cystatin F dimer formation. Our results suggest that cystatin F not only inhibits CatV, but it is processed by the CatV in order to inhibit the CatC activity in cytotoxic granules. The regulation of the CatC activity in the cytotoxic granules of the NK cells by the cystatin F could be important for the processing and activation of granule-associated serine proteases - granzymes.

  5. IL2/IL21 region polymorphism influences response to rituximab in systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Ana; Dávila-Fajardo, Cristina Lucía; Robledo, Gema; Rubio, José Luis Callejas; de Ramón Garrido, Enrique; García-Hernández, Francisco J; González-León, Rocío; Ríos-Fernández, Raquel; Barrera, José Cabeza; González-Escribano, Ma Francisca; García, Ma Teresa Camps; Palma, Ma Jesús Castillo; del Mar Ayala, Ma; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Martín, Javier

    2013-08-01

    To determine whether the IL2/IL21 region, a general autoimmunity locus, contributes to the observed variation in response to rituximab in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus as well as to analyze its influence in a cohort including other autoimmune diseases. rs6822844 G/T polymorphism at the IL2-IL21 region was analyzed by TaqMan assay in 84 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and 60 different systemic autoimmune diseases Spanish patients receiving rituximab. Six months after the first infusion patients were classified, according to the EULAR criteria, as good responders, partial responders and non-responders. A statistically significant difference was observed in GG genotype frequency between responder (total and partial response) (83.56%) and non-responder (45.45%) SLE patients (p=0.010, odds ratio (OR)=6.10 [1.28-29.06]). No association with the response was evident in the group of patients with autoimmune diseases other than lupus. Furthermore, when both groups of patients were pooled in a meta-analysis, a reduced statistical significance of the association was observed (p=0.024, OR=3.53 [1.06-11.64]). Our results show for a first time that IL2-IL21 region seems to play a role in the response to rituximab in SLE patients but not in other autoimmune diseases.

  6. Single Expressed Glycine Receptor Domains Reconstitute Functional Ion Channels without Subunit-specific Desensitization Behavior*

    PubMed Central

    Meiselbach, Heike; Vogel, Nico; Langlhofer, Georg; Stangl, Sabine; Schleyer, Barbara; Bahnassawy, Lamia'a; Sticht, Heinrich; Breitinger, Hans-Georg; Becker, Cord-Michael; Villmann, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Cys loop receptors are pentameric arrangements of independent subunits that assemble into functional ion channels. Each subunit shows a domain architecture. Functional ion channels can be reconstituted even from independent, nonfunctional subunit domains, as shown previously for GlyRα1 receptors. Here, we demonstrate that this reconstitution is not restricted to α1 but can be transferred to other members of the Cys loop receptor family. A nonfunctional GlyR subunit, truncated at the intracellular TM3–4 loop by a premature stop codon, can be complemented by co-expression of the missing tail portion of the receptor. Compared with α1 subunits, rescue by domain complementation was less efficient when GlyRα3 or the GABAA/C subunit ρ1 was used. If truncation disrupted an alternative splicing cassette within the intracellular TM3–4 loop of α3 subunits, which also regulates receptor desensitization, functional rescue was not possible. When α3 receptors were restored by complementation using domains with and without the spliced insert, no difference in desensitization was found. In contrast, desensitization properties could even be transferred between α1/α3 receptor chimeras harboring or lacking the α3 splice cassette proving that functional rescue depends on the integrity of the alternative splicing cassette in α3. Thus, an intact α3 splicing cassette in the TM3–4 loop environment is indispensable for functional rescue, and the quality of receptor restoration can be assessed from desensitization properties. PMID:25143388

  7. Presynaptic TRPV1 vanilloid receptor function is age- but not CB1 cannabinoid receptor-dependent in the rodent forebrain.

    PubMed

    Köles, László; Garção, Pedro; Zádori, Zoltán S; Ferreira, Samira G; Pinheiro, Bárbara S; da Silva-Santos, Carla S; Ledent, Catherine; Köfalvi, Attila

    2013-08-01

    Neocortical and striatal TRPV1 (vanilloid or capsaicin) receptors (TRPV1Rs) are excitatory ligand-gated ion channels, and are implicated in psychiatric disorders. However, the purported presynaptic neuromodulator role of TRPV1Rs in glutamatergic, serotonergic or dopaminergic terminals of the rodent forebrain remains little understood. With the help of patch-clamp electrophysiology and neurochemical approaches, we mapped the age-dependence of presynaptic TRPV1R function, and furthermore, we aimed at exploring whether the presence of CB1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1Rs) influences the function of the TRPV1Rs, as both receptor types share endogenous ligands. We found that the major factor which affects presynaptic TRPV1R function is age: by post-natal day 13, the amplitude of capsaicin-induced release of dopamine and glutamate is halved in the rat striatum, and two weeks later, capsaicin already loses its effect. However, TRPV1R receptor function is not enhanced by chemical or genetic ablation of the CB1Rs in dopaminergic, glutamatergic and serotonergic terminals of the mouse brain. Altogether, our data indicate a possible neurodevelopmental role for presynaptic TRPV1Rs in the rodent brain, but we found no cross-talk between TRPV1Rs and CB1Rs in the same nerve terminal.

  8. Presynaptic TRPV1 vanilloid receptor function is age- but not CB1 cannabinoid receptor-dependent in the rodent forebrain.

    PubMed

    Köles, László; Garção, Pedro; Zádori, Zoltán S; Ferreira, Samira G; Pinheiro, Bárbara S; da Silva-Santos, Carla S; Ledent, Catherine; Köfalvi, Attila

    2013-08-01

    Neocortical and striatal TRPV1 (vanilloid or capsaicin) receptors (TRPV1Rs) are excitatory ligand-gated ion channels, and are implicated in psychiatric disorders. However, the purported presynaptic neuromodulator role of TRPV1Rs in glutamatergic, serotonergic or dopaminergic terminals of the rodent forebrain remains little understood. With the help of patch-clamp electrophysiology and neurochemical approaches, we mapped the age-dependence of presynaptic TRPV1R function, and furthermore, we aimed at exploring whether the presence of CB1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1Rs) influences the function of the TRPV1Rs, as both receptor types share endogenous ligands. We found that the major factor which affects presynaptic TRPV1R function is age: by post-natal day 13, the amplitude of capsaicin-induced release of dopamine and glutamate is halved in the rat striatum, and two weeks later, capsaicin already loses its effect. However, TRPV1R receptor function is not enhanced by chemical or genetic ablation of the CB1Rs in dopaminergic, glutamatergic and serotonergic terminals of the mouse brain. Altogether, our data indicate a possible neurodevelopmental role for presynaptic TRPV1Rs in the rodent brain, but we found no cross-talk between TRPV1Rs and CB1Rs in the same nerve terminal. PMID:23831917

  9. Functional Relevance of the Switch of VEGF Receptors/Co-Receptors during Peritoneal Dialysis-Induced Mesothelial to Mesenchymal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Lozano, María Luisa; Sandoval, Pilar; Rynne-Vidal, Ángela; Aguilera, Abelardo; Jiménez-Heffernan, José Antonio; Albar-Vizcaíno, Patricia; Majano, Pedro L.; Sánchez-Tomero, José Antonio; Selgas, Rafael; López-Cabrera, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is up-regulated during mesothelial to mesenchymal transition (MMT) and has been associated with peritoneal membrane dysfunction in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. It has been shown that normal and malignant mesothelial cells (MCs) express VEGF receptors (VEGFRs) and co-receptors and that VEGF is an autocrine growth factor for mesothelioma. Hence, we evaluated the expression patterns and the functional relevance of the VEGF/VEGFRs/co-receptors axis during the mesenchymal conversion of MCs induced by peritoneal dialysis. Omentum-derived MCs treated with TGF-β1 plus IL-1β (in vitro MMT) and PD effluent-derived MCs with non-epithelioid phenotype (ex vivo MMT) showed down-regulated expression of the two main receptors Flt-1/VEGFR-1 and KDR/VEGFR-2, whereas the co-receptor neuropilin-1 (Nrp-1) was up-regulated. The expression of the Nrp-1 ligand semaphorin-3A (Sema-3A), a functional VEGF competitor, was repressed throughout the MMT process. These expression pattern changes were accompanied by a reduction of the proliferation capacity and by a parallel induction of the invasive capacity of MCs that had undergone an in vitro or ex vivo MMT. Treatment with neutralizing anti-VEGF or anti-Nrp-1 antibodies showed that these molecules played a relevant role in cellular proliferation only in naïve omentum-derived MCs. Conversely, treatment with these blocking antibodies, as well as with recombinant Sema-3A, indicated that the switched VEGF/VEGFRs/co-receptors axis drove the enhanced invasion capacity of MCs undergoing MMT. In conclusion, the expression patterns of VEGFRs and co-receptors change in MCs during MMT, which in turn would determine their behaviour in terms of proliferation and invasion in response to VEGF. PMID:23585849

  10. High potency olfactory receptor agonists discovered by virtual high-throughput screening: molecular probes for receptor structure and olfactory function

    PubMed Central

    Triballeau, Nicolas; Van Name, Eric; Laslier, Guillaume; Cai, Diana; Paillard, Guillaume; Sorensen, Peter W.; Hoffmann, Rémy; Bertrand, Hugues-Olivier; Ngai, John; Acher, Francine C.

    2008-01-01

    The detection and discrimination of diverse chemical structures by the vertebrate olfactory system is accomplished by the recognition of odorous ligands by their cognate receptors. In the present study we used a computational high-throughput screening strategy to discover novel high affinity agonists of an olfactory G protein-coupled receptor tuned to recognize amino acid ligands. Functional testing of the top candidates validated several agonists with potencies higher than any of the receptor’s known natural ligands. Computational modeling revealed molecular interactions involved in ligand recognition by this receptor, and further highlighted interactions that have been conserved in evolutionarily divergent amino acid receptors. Significantly, the top compounds display robust activities as odorants in vivo, and include a natural product that may be used to signal the presence of bacteria in the aquatic environment. Our virtual screening approach should be applicable to the identification of new bioactive molecules for probing the structure of chemosensory receptors and the function of chemosensory systems in vivo. PMID:19081373

  11. Functional Characterization of Soybean Glyma04g39610 as a Brassinosteroid Receptor Gene and Evolutionary Analysis of Soybean Brassinosteroid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Suna; Tao, Ping; Xu, Feng; Wu, Aiping; Huo, Weige; Wang, Jinxiang

    2016-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BR) play important roles in plant growth and development. Although BR receptors have been intensively studied in Arabidopsis, the BR receptors in soybean remain largely unknown. Here, in addition to the known receptor gene Glyma06g15270 (GmBRI1a), we identified five putative BR receptor genes in the soybean genome: GmBRI1b, GmBRL1a, GmBRL1b, GmBRL2a, and GmBRL2b. Analysis of their expression patterns by quantitative real-time PCR showed that they are ubiquitously expressed in primary roots, lateral roots, stems, leaves, and hypocotyls. We used rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) to clone GmBRI1b (Glyma04g39160), and found that the predicted amino acid sequence of GmBRI1b showed high similarity to those of AtBRI1 and pea PsBRI1. Structural modeling of the ectodomain also demonstrated similarities between the BR receptors of soybean and Arabidopsis. GFP-fusion experiments verified that GmBRI1b localizes to the cell membrane. We also explored GmBRI1b function in Arabidopsis through complementation experiments. Ectopic over-expression of GmBRI1b in Arabidopsis BR receptor loss-of-function mutant (bri1-5 bak1-1D) restored hypocotyl growth in etiolated seedlings; increased the growth of stems, leaves, and siliques in light; and rescued the developmental defects in leaves of the bri1-6 mutant, and complemented the responses of BR biosynthesis-related genes in the bri1-5 bak1-D mutant grown in light. Bioinformatics analysis demonstrated that the six BR receptor genes in soybean resulted from three gene duplication events during evolution. Phylogenetic analysis classified the BR receptors in dicots and monocots into three subclades. Estimation of the synonymous (Ks) and the nonsynonymous substitution rate (Ka) and selection pressure (Ka/Ks) revealed that the Ka/Ks of BR receptor genes from dicots and monocots were less than 1.0, indicating that BR receptor genes in plants experienced purifying selection during evolution. PMID:27338344

  12. Functional Characterization of Soybean Glyma04g39610 as a Brassinosteroid Receptor Gene and Evolutionary Analysis of Soybean Brassinosteroid Receptors.

    PubMed

    Peng, Suna; Tao, Ping; Xu, Feng; Wu, Aiping; Huo, Weige; Wang, Jinxiang

    2016-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BR) play important roles in plant growth and development. Although BR receptors have been intensively studied in Arabidopsis, the BR receptors in soybean remain largely unknown. Here, in addition to the known receptor gene Glyma06g15270 (GmBRI1a), we identified five putative BR receptor genes in the soybean genome: GmBRI1b, GmBRL1a, GmBRL1b, GmBRL2a, and GmBRL2b. Analysis of their expression patterns by quantitative real-time PCR showed that they are ubiquitously expressed in primary roots, lateral roots, stems, leaves, and hypocotyls. We used rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) to clone GmBRI1b (Glyma04g39160), and found that the predicted amino acid sequence of GmBRI1b showed high similarity to those of AtBRI1 and pea PsBRI1. Structural modeling of the ectodomain also demonstrated similarities between the BR receptors of soybean and Arabidopsis. GFP-fusion experiments verified that GmBRI1b localizes to the cell membrane. We also explored GmBRI1b function in Arabidopsis through complementation experiments. Ectopic over-expression of GmBRI1b in Arabidopsis BR receptor loss-of-function mutant (bri1-5 bak1-1D) restored hypocotyl growth in etiolated seedlings; increased the growth of stems, leaves, and siliques in light; and rescued the developmental defects in leaves of the bri1-6 mutant, and complemented the responses of BR biosynthesis-related genes in the bri1-5 bak1-D mutant grown in light. Bioinformatics analysis demonstrated that the six BR receptor genes in soybean resulted from three gene duplication events during evolution. Phylogenetic analysis classified the BR receptors in dicots and monocots into three subclades. Estimation of the synonymous (Ks) and the nonsynonymous substitution rate (Ka) and selection pressure (Ka/Ks) revealed that the Ka/Ks of BR receptor genes from dicots and monocots were less than 1.0, indicating that BR receptor genes in plants experienced purifying selection during evolution. PMID:27338344

  13. Neuroantigen-Specific CD4 Cells Expressing Interferon-γ (IFN-γ), Interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-3 in a Mutually Exclusive Manner Prevail in Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis (EAE).

    PubMed

    Karulin, Alexey Y; Quast, Stefan; Hesse, Maike D; Lehmann, Paul V

    2012-08-24

    Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) is mediated by neuroantigen-specific pro-inflammatory T cells of the Th1 and Th17 effector class. Th-17 cells can be clearly defined by expression of IL-17, but not IFN-γ, IL-2 or IL-3. Th1 cells do not express IL-17, but it is unclear presently to what extent they co-express the cytokines canonically assigned to Th1 immunity (i.e., IFN-γ, IL-2 and IL-3) and whether CD4 cells producing these cytokines indeed belong to a single Th1 lineage. It is also unclear to what extent the Th1 response in EAE entails polyfunctional T cells that co-express IFN-γ and IL-2. Therefore, we dissected the Th1 cytokine signature of neuroantigen-specific CD4 cells studying at single cell resolution co-expression of IFN-γ, IL-2 and IL-3 using dual color cytokine ELISPOT analysis. Shortly after immunization, in the draining lymph nodes (dLN), the overall cytokine signature of the neuroantigen-specific CD4 cells was highly type 1-polarized, but IFN-γ, IL-2, and IL-3 were each secreted by different CD4 cells in a mutually exclusive manner. This single cell - single cytokine profile was stable through the course of chronic EAE-polyfunctional CD4 cells co-expressing IL-2 and IFN-γ presented less than 5% of the neuroantigen-specific T cells, even in the inflamed CNS itself. The neuroantigen-specific CD4 cells that expressed IFN-γ, IL-2 and IL-3 in a mutually exclusive manner exhibited similar functional avidities and kinetics of cytokine production, but showed different tissue distributions. These data suggest that Th1 cells do not belong to a single lineage, but different Th1 subpopulations jointly mediate Th1 immunity.

  14. 5-HT2 receptors mediate functional modulation of GABAa receptors and inhibitory synaptic transmissions in human iPS-derived neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haitao; Hu, Lingli; Liu, Chunhua; Su, Zhenghui; Wang, Lihui; Pan, Guangjin; Guo, Yiping; He, Jufang

    2016-01-01

    Neural progenitors differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) hold potentials for treating neurological diseases. Serotonin has potent effects on neuronal functions through multiple receptors, underlying a variety of neural disorders. Glutamate and GABA receptors have been proven functional in neurons differentiated from iPS, however, little is known about 5-HT receptor-mediated modulation in such neuronal networks. In the present study, human iPS were differentiated into cells possessing featured physiological properties of cortical neurons. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording was used to examine the involvement of 5-HT2 receptors in functional modulation of GABAergic synaptic transmission. We found that serotonin and DOI (a selective agonist of 5-HT2A/C receptor) reversibly reduced GABA-activated currents, and this 5-HT2A/C receptor mediated inhibition required G protein, PLC, PKC, and Ca2+ signaling. Serotonin increased the frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs), which could be mimicked by α-methylserotonin, a 5-HT2 receptor agonist. In contrast, DOI reduced both frequency and amplitude of mIPSCs. These findings suggested that in iPS-derived human neurons serotonin postsynaptically reduced GABAa receptor function through 5-HT2A/C receptors, but presynaptically other 5-HT2 receptors counteracted the action of 5-HT2A/C receptors. Functional expression of serotonin receptors in human iPS-derived neurons provides a pre-requisite for their normal behaviors after grafting. PMID:26837719

  15. The βc receptor family - Structural insights and their functional implications.

    PubMed

    Broughton, Sophie E; Nero, Tracy L; Dhagat, Urmi; Kan, Winnie L; Hercus, Timothy R; Tvorogov, Denis; Lopez, Angel F; Parker, Michael W

    2015-08-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin-3 (IL-3) and IL-5 are members of a small family of cytokines that share a beta receptor subunit (βc). These cytokines regulate the growth, differentiation, migration and effector function activities of many hematopoietic cells in bone marrow, blood and sites of inflammation. Excessive or aberrant signaling can result in chronic inflammatory conditions and myeloid leukemias. The crystal structures of the GM-CSF ternary complex, the IL-5 binary complex and the very recent IL-3 receptor alpha subunit build upon decades of structure-function studies, giving new insights into cytokine-receptor specificity and signal transduction. Selective modulation of receptor function is now a real possibility and the structures of the βc receptor family are being used to discover novel and disease-specific therapeutics. PMID:25982846

  16. Functional subtyping of muscarinic receptors on canine esophageal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Lad, R; Donoff, B; Rangachari, P K

    1991-09-01

    Serosal addition of muscarinic agonists elicited rapid changes in electrical parameters across the isolated canine esophageal epithelium set up in vitro. Both carbachol and the M1-selective agonist, McNeil A343 (McN), increased transmucosal potential differences (PDs), decreased transmucosal resistances (R), and increased short-circuit currents (Isc). Carbachol was more potent and more effective than McN. Muscarinic antagonists were used to define the muscarinic receptor involved. The pA2 values obtained with Schild plots were as follows: atropine 9.14, 4-DAMP 8.98, AFDX-116 6.71, and pirenzepine 7.12. Low concentrations of pirenzepine (10(-8) M), produced a rightward shift in the dose-response curve to McN, without inhibiting responses to carbachol. Thus the receptor subtype is clearly not an M2. As in other glandular systems, M3 receptors are present. Whether M1 receptors also exist requires better definition of receptor densities-reserves in this tissue. Carbachol induced net secretion of Na and Cl and converted a predominantly absorptive tissue to a secretory one. PMID:1716057

  17. Inhibition of leukocyte function and interleukin-2 gene expression by 2-methylarachidonyl-(2'-fluoroethyl)amide, a stable congener of the endogenous cannabinoid receptor ligand anandamide

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, Barbara L.F.; Ouyang Yanli; Herring, Amy; Yea, Sung Su; Razdan, Raj; Kaminski, Norbert E. . E-mail: kamins11@msu.edu

    2005-06-01

    Arachidonylethanolamide (anandamide, AEA) has been identified as an endogenous ligand for cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2. Characterization of the direct cannabimimetic actions of anandamide has been hampered by its short duration of action and rapid degradation in in vivo and in vitro systems to arachidonic acid, a precursor in the biosynthesis of a broad range of biologically active molecules. In the present studies, we utilized 2-methylarachidonyl-(2'-fluoroethyl)amide (F-Me-AEA), an analog of anandamide resistant to enzymatic degradation, to determine whether F-Me-AEA modulated T cell function similar to that of plant-derived cannabinoids. Indeed, F-Me-AEA at low micromolar concentrations exhibited a marked inhibition of phorbol ester plus calcium ionophore (PMA/Io)-induced IL-2 protein secretion and steady state mRNA expression. Likewise, a modest suppression of the mixed lymphocyte response was observed in the presence of F-Me-AEA indicating an alteration in T cell responsiveness to allogeneic MHC class II antigens. F-Me-AEA was also found to modestly inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in thymocytes and splenocytes, a hallmark of cannabinoid receptor agonists. Further characterization of the influence of F-Me-AEA on the cAMP signaling cascade revealed an inhibition of CREB-1/ATF-1 phosphorylation and subsequently, an inhibition of CRE DNA binding activity. Characterization of nuclear binding proteins further revealed that NF-AT and, to a lesser extent, NF-{kappa}B DNA binding activities were also suppressed. These studies demonstrate that F-Me-AEA modulates T cell function in a similar manner to plant-derived and endogenous cannabinoids and therefore can be utilized as an amidase- and hydrolysis-resistant endogenous cannabinoid.

  18. Modification of Glutamate Receptor Channels: Molecular Mechanisms and Functional Consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatt, Hanns

    Of the many possible mechanisms for modulating the efficiency of ion channels, the phosphorylation of receptor channel proteins may be the primary one. Changes in the set of molecular subunits of which the channels are composed are also important, especially for long-term regulation. In the central nervous system synaptic plasticity may be altered by modulating the ligand-activated neuronal ion channels involved in synaptic transmission; among them are channels gated directly by glutamate, the regulation of which we are only beginning to understand. This paper focuses on modulation of these channels [α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazoleprionic acid (AMPA), kainate, and N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) types] by phosphorylation and changes in subunit composition. AMPA- and kainate-activated receptors are modulated by adenosine 3, 5-monophosphate (cAMP) dependent protein kinase A (PKA) coupled via D1 dopamine receptors. An increase in the intracellular concentration of cAMP and protein kinase A potentiates kainate-activated currents in α-motoneurons of the spinal cord by increasing the affinity of the ligand (glutamate) for the phosphorylated receptor protein (GluR6 and 7). The rapid desensitization of AMPA-evoked currents normally observed in horizontal cells of the retina is completely blocked by increasing the intracellular concentration of cAMP. The effects of changes in subunit composition were examined in rat hippocampal neurons. The subunit composition of the NMDA receptor determines the kinetic properties of synaptic currents and can be regulated by the type of innervating neuron. Similar changes also occur during development. An important determinant here is the activity of the system. Dynamic regulation of excitatory receptors by both mechanisms may well be associated with some forms of learning and memory in the mammalian brain.

  19. Impact of RNA Editing on Functions of the Serotonin 2C Receptor in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Olaghere da Silva, Uade B.; Morabito, Michael V.; Canal, Clinton E.; Airey, David C.; Emeson, Ronald B.; Sanders-Bush, Elaine

    2009-01-01

    Transcripts encoding 5-HT2C receptors are modified posttranscriptionally by RNA editing, generating up to 24 protein isoforms. In recombinant cells, the fully edited isoform, 5-HT2C-VGV, exhibits blunted G-protein coupling and reduced constitutive activity. The present studies examine the signal transduction properties of 5-HT2C-VGV receptors in brain to determine the in vivo consequences of altered editing. Using mice solely expressing the 5-HT2C-VGV receptor (VGV/Y), we demonstrate reduced G-protein coupling efficiency and high-affinity agonist binding of brain 5-HT2C-VGV receptors. However, enhanced behavioral sensitivity to a 5-HT2C receptor agonist was also seen in mice expressing 5-HT2C-VGV receptors, an unexpected finding given the blunted G-protein coupling. In addition, mice expressing 5-HT2C-VGV receptors had greater sensitivity to a 5-HT2C inverse agonist/antagonist enhancement of dopamine turnover relative to wild-type mice. These behavioral and biochemical results are most likely explained by increases in 5-HT2C receptor binding sites in the brains of mice solely expressing 5-HT2C-VGV receptors. We conclude that 5-HT2C-VGV receptor signaling in brain is blunted, but this deficiency is masked by a marked increase in 5-HT2C receptor binding site density in mice solely expressing the VGV isoform. These findings suggest that RNA editing may regulate the density of 5-HT2C receptor binding sites in brain. We further caution that the pattern of 5-HT2C receptor RNA isoforms may not reflect the pattern of protein isoforms, and hence the inferred overall function of the receptor. PMID:20582266

  20. Function and Distribution of 5-HT2 Receptors in the Honeybee (Apis mellifera)

    PubMed Central

    Thamm, Markus; Rolke, Daniel; Jordan, Nadine; Balfanz, Sabine; Schiffer, Christian; Baumann, Arnd; Blenau, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Background Serotonin plays a pivotal role in regulating and modulating physiological and behavioral processes in both vertebrates and invertebrates. In the honeybee (Apis mellifera), serotonin has been implicated in division of labor, visual processing, and learning processes. Here, we present the cloning, heterologous expression, and detailed functional and pharmacological characterization of two honeybee 5-HT2 receptors. Methods Honeybee 5-HT2 receptor cDNAs were amplified from brain cDNA. Recombinant cell lines were established constitutively expressing receptor variants. Pharmacological properties of the receptors were investigated by Ca2+ imaging experiments. Quantitative PCR was applied to explore the expression patterns of receptor mRNAs. Results The honeybee 5-HT2 receptor class consists of two subtypes, Am5-HT2α and Am5-HT2β. Each receptor gene also gives rise to alternatively spliced mRNAs that possibly code for truncated receptors. Only activation of the full-length receptors with serotonin caused an increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. The effect was mimicked by the agonists 5-methoxytryptamine and 8-OH-DPAT at low micromolar concentrations. Receptor activities were blocked by established 5-HT receptor antagonists such as clozapine, methiothepin, or mianserin. High transcript numbers were detected in exocrine glands suggesting that 5-HT2 receptors participate in secretory processes in the honeybee. Conclusions This study marks the first molecular and pharmacological characterization of two 5-HT2 receptor subtypes in the same insect species. The results presented should facilitate further attempts to unravel central and peripheral effects of serotonin mediated by these receptors. PMID:24324783

  1. Functional Consequences of Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Receptor Cross-talk and Trafficking*

    PubMed Central

    Roed, Sarah Noerklit; Nøhr, Anne Cathrine; Wismann, Pernille; Iversen, Helle; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Knudsen, Sanne Moeller; Waldhoer, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The signaling capacity of seven-transmembrane/G-protein-coupled receptors (7TM/GPCRs) can be regulated through ligand-mediated receptor trafficking. Classically, the recycling of internalized receptors is associated with resensitization, whereas receptor degradation terminates signaling. We have shown previously that the incretin glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) internalizes fast and is primarily resensitized through recycling back to the cell surface. GLP-1R is expressed in pancreatic islets together with the closely related glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIPR) and glucagon (GCGR) receptors. The interaction and cross-talk between coexpressed receptors is a wide phenomenon of the 7TM/GPCR superfamily. Numerous reports show functional consequences for signaling and trafficking of the involved receptors. On the basis of the high structural similarity and tissue coexpression, we here investigated the potential cross-talk between GLP-1R and GIPR or GCGR in both trafficking and signaling pathways. Using a real-time time-resolved FRET-based internalization assay, we show that GLP-1R, GIPR, and GCGR internalize with differential properties. Remarkably, upon coexpression of the internalizing GLP-1R and the non-internalizing GIPR, GLP-1-mediated GLP-1R internalization was impaired in a GIPR concentration-dependent manner. As a functional consequence of such impaired internalization capability, GLP-1-mediated GLP-1R signaling was abrogated. A similar compromised signaling was found when GLP-1R internalization was abrogated by a dominant-negative version of dynamin (dynamin-1 K44E), which provides a mechanistic link between GLP-1R trafficking and signaling. This study highlights the importance of receptor internalization for full functionality of GLP-1R. Moreover, cross-talk between the two incretin receptors GLP-1R and GIPR is shown to alter receptor trafficking with functional consequences for GLP-1R signaling. PMID:25451942

  2. Heterogeneous accessory cell requirement for human peripheral blood T lymphocyte activation by PHA into IL-2-responsive colony-forming cells.

    PubMed

    Farcet, J P; Oudhriri, N; Gourdin, M F; Bouguet, J; Fradelizi, D; Reyes, F

    1984-08-01

    Mitogen-driven T cell proliferation in liquid culture requires accessory cells that cooperate in interleukin 2 production. We have investigated the accessory cell requirement for human lymphocyte colony formation under PHA stimulation. Semisolid medium limits cell-to-cell contact emphasizing the role of cooperating cells both in growth factor production and in triggering events. Culturing at high T cell density demonstrates that accessory cells can be substituted for colony formation by exogenous IL-2. Culturing at low T cell density in the presence of IL-2 also demonstrates that accessory cells are required for activation of a subset of progenitors into IL-2 responsive colony-forming cells. Consequently, T colony progenitors, contained in the E-rosetting cell fraction of peripheral blood, are heterogeneous in their triggering signals: a minor subset is directly inducible by PHA, and a major subset is inducible by PHA in the presence of accessory cells. We found that monocytes and some leukemic B cells support effective accessory function in both colony growth factor production and colony progenitor sensitization. PMID:6611211

  3. Functional roles of the sweet taste receptor in oral and extraoral tissues

    PubMed Central

    Laffitte, Anni; Neiers, Fabrice; Briand, Loïc

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review This review summarizes and discusses the current knowledge about the physiological roles of the sweet taste receptor in oral and extraoral tissues. Recent findings The expression of a functional sweet taste receptor has been reported in numerous extragustatory tissues, including the gut, pancreas, bladder, brain and, more recently, bone and adipose tissues. In the gut, this receptor has been suggested to be involved in luminal glucose sensing, the release of some satiety hormones, the expression of glucose transporters, and the maintenance of glucose homeostasis. More recently, the sweet taste receptor was proposed to regulate adipogenesis and bone biology. Summary The perception of sweet taste is mediated by the T1R2/T1R3 receptor, which is expressed in the oral cavity, wherein it provides input on the caloric and macronutrient contents of ingested food. This receptor recognizes all the chemically diverse compounds perceived as sweet by human beings, including natural sugars and sweeteners. Importantly, the expression of a functional sweet taste receptor has been reported in numerous extragustatory tissues, wherein it has been proposed to regulate metabolic processes. This newly recognized role of the sweet taste receptor makes this receptor a potential novel therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity and related metabolic dysfunctions, such as diabetes and hyperlipidemia. PMID:24763065

  4. The Angiotensin II Type 2 Receptor in Brain Functions: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Guimond, Marie-Odile; Gallo-Payet, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is the main active product of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), mediating its action via two major receptors, namely, the Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor and the type 2 (AT2) receptor. Recent results also implicate several other members of the renin-angiotensin system in various aspects of brain functions. The first aim of this paper is to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the properties and signaling of the AT2 receptor, its expression in the brain, and its well-established effects. Secondly, we will highlight the potential role of the AT2 receptor in cognitive function, neurological disorders and in the regulation of appetite and the possible link with development of metabolic disorders. The potential utility of novel nonpeptide selective AT2 receptor ligands in clarifying potential roles of this receptor in physiology will also be discussed. If confirmed, these new pharmacological tools should help to improve impaired cognitive performance, not only through its action on brain microcirculation and inflammation, but also through more specific effects on neurons. However, the overall physiological relevance of the AT2 receptor in the brain must also consider the Ang IV/AT4 receptor. PMID:23320146

  5. Impaired inhibitory function of presynaptic A1-adenosine receptors in SHR mesenteric arteries.

    PubMed

    Rocha-Pereira, Carolina; Arribas, Silvia Magdalena; Fresco, Paula; González, Maria Carmen; Gonçalves, Jorge; Diniz, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    In hypertension, vascular reactivity alterations have been attributed to numerous factors, including higher sympathetic innervation/adenosine. This study examined the modulation of adenosine receptors on vascular sympathetic nerves and their putative contribution to higher noradrenaline spillover in hypertension. We assessed adenosine receptors distribution in the adventitia through confocal microscopy, histomorphometry, and their regulatory function on electrically-evoked [(3)H]-noradrenaline overflow, using selective agonists/antagonists. We found that: i) A1-adenosine receptor agonist (CPA: 100 nM) inhibited tritium overflow to a lower extent in SHR (25% ± 3%, n = 14) compared to WKY (38% ± 3%, n = 14) mesenteric arteries; ii) A2A-adenosine receptor agonist (CGS 21680: 100 nM) induced a slight increase of tritium overflow that was similar in SHR (22% ± 8%, n = 8) and WKY (24% ± 5%, n = 8) mesenteric arteries; iii) A2B- and A3-adenosine receptors did not alter tritium overflow in either strain; iv) all adenosine receptors were present on mesenteric artery sympathetic nerves and/or some adventitial cells of both strains; and v) A1-adenosine receptor staining fractional area was lower in SHR than in WKY mesenteric arteries. We conclude that there is an impaired inhibitory function of vascular presynaptic A1-adenosine receptors in SHR, likely related to a reduced presence of these receptors on sympathetic innervation, which might lead to higher levels of noradrenaline in the synaptic cleft and contribute to hypertension in this strain.

  6. Functional rescue of a constitutively desensitized beta2AR through receptor dimerization.

    PubMed Central

    Hebert, T E; Loisel, T P; Adam, L; Ethier, N; Onge, S S; Bouvier, M

    1998-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that wild-type beta2-adrenergic receptors (beta2AR) form homodimers and that disruption of receptor dimerization inhibits signalling via Gs [Hebert, Moffett, Morello, Loisel, Bichet, Barret and Bouvier (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 16384-16392]. Here taking advantage of the altered functional properties of a non-palmitoylated, constitutively desensitized mutant beta2AR (C341Gbeta2AR), we sought to study whether physical interactions between mutant and wild-type beta2AR expressed in Sf9 cells could occur and have functional consequences. Using metabolic labelling with [3H]palmitate and co-immunoprecipitation we demonstrated the existence of heterodimerization between wild-type and C341Gbeta2AR. Furthermore, we show that, in co-expression experiments, wild-type receptors have a dominant positive effect resulting in the functional complementation of C341Gbeta2AR. Indeed, when expressed alone, the mutant C341G receptor displays altered functional characteristics in that (1) the response of the receptor to agonist is reduced as compared to the wild-type receptor and (2) the desensitization of the receptor in response to prolonged exposure to agonist is minimal. In contrast, when C341G and the wild-type beta2AR were expressed together, both the response to agonist and subsequent desensitization (at a constant level of total receptor) were equivalent to the wild-type beta2AR expressed alone. This dominant positive effect was also seen when C341G was co-expressed with a second receptor mutant in which the two protein kinase A phosphorylation sites (S261, 262, 345, 346A beta2AR) were mutated. Taken together these data suggest that intermolecular interactions between receptors may have both functional and structural implications for G-protein-mediated signalling. PMID:9461522

  7. Structure-function analysis identifies highly sensitive strigolactone receptors in Striga.

    PubMed

    Toh, Shigeo; Holbrook-Smith, Duncan; Stogios, Peter J; Onopriyenko, Olena; Lumba, Shelley; Tsuchiya, Yuichiro; Savchenko, Alexei; McCourt, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Strigolactones are naturally occurring signaling molecules that affect plant development, fungi-plant interactions, and parasitic plant infestations. We characterized the function of 11 strigolactone receptors from the parasitic plant Striga hermonthica using chemical and structural biology. We found a clade of polyspecific receptors, including one that is sensitive to picomolar concentrations of strigolactone. A crystal structure of a highly sensitive strigolactone receptor from Striga revealed a larger binding pocket than that of the Arabidopsis receptor, which could explain the increased range of strigolactone sensitivity. Thus, the sensitivity of Striga to strigolactones from host plants is driven by receptor sensitivity. By expressing strigolactone receptors in Arabidopsis, we developed a bioassay that can be used to identify chemicals and crops with altered strigolactone levels. PMID:26450211

  8. Small molecule modulation of nuclear receptor conformational dynamics: implications for function and drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Kojetin, Douglas J; Burris, Thomas P

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are targets for a wide range of ligands, both natural and synthetic, that regulate their activity and provide a means to pharmacologically modulate the receptor. Recent emphasis in the nuclear receptor field has focused on selective nuclear receptor modulators, which can display graded transcriptional responses and tissue selective pharmacological responses that deviate from the prototypical agonist or antagonist. Understanding the molecular mechanism of action of these selective modulators will provide significant insight toward the development of the next generation of modulators. Although most nuclear receptor structural studies have primarily focused on obtaining ligand-receptor cocrystal structures, recent studies implicate an important role for protein dynamics in the mechanism of action of nuclear receptor ligands. Here we review nuclear receptor studies reporting how ligands modulate the conformational dynamics of the nuclear receptor ligand-binding domain (LBD). A particular emphasis is placed on protein NMR and hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) techniques and how they provide complementary information that, when combined with crystallography, provide detailed insight into the function of nuclear receptors.

  9. Recombinant immunocytokines targeting the mouse transferrin receptor: construction and biological activities.

    PubMed

    Dreier, T; Lode, H N; Xiang, R; Dolman, C S; Reisfeld, R A; Kang, A S

    1998-01-01

    Localized cytokine therapies with recombinant monoclonal antibody-cytokine fusion proteins, designated immunocytokines, have become of increasing interest for tumor immunotherapy, since they direct immunomodulatory cytokines into the tumor microenvironment. To investigate their mechanisms of action in a variety of syngeneic tumor models, recombinant mouse cytokines IL2 and GM-CSF were engineered as fusion proteins to the carboxyl terminus of a chimeric rat/mouse antitransferrin receptor antibody, ch17217 and expressed in stable-transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells. The recombinant immunocytokines were readily purified by affinity chromatography and their binding characteristics were identical to those shown for the ch17217 antibody. The IL2 immunocytokine had an activity similar to recombinant mouse IL2, whereas the GM-CSF immunocytokine had enhanced cytokine activity relative to recombinant mouse GM-CSF. The clearance rates of ch17217 and the GM-CSF and IL2 immunocytokines were relatively similar with elimination phases (t1/2alpha) of 1.8 h and distribution phases (t1/2beta) of 83, 88, and 91 h, respectively. Both immunocytokines demonstrated effective antitumor activity by suppressing the growth of hepatic metastases of mouse neuroblastoma and pulmonary metastases of mouse colon carcinoma in syngeneic A/J and BALB/c mice, respectively. These results indicate that biologically effective IL2 and GM-CSF immunocytokines combine the targeting ability of an antitransferrin receptor monoclonal antibody with the immunomodulatory functions of each cytokine. Because of the universal expression of the transferrin receptor on mouse tumor cell lines, these constructs should prove useful to determine their efficacy in a wide variety of syngeneic mouse tumor models and to perform detailed studies of their modes of action.

  10. RNA editing of the GABA(A) receptor alpha3 subunit alters the functional properties of recombinant receptors.

    PubMed

    Nimmich, Mitchell L; Heidelberg, Laura S; Fisher, Janet L

    2009-04-01

    RNA editing provides a post-transcriptional mechanism to increase structural heterogeneity of gene products. Recently, the alpha3 subunit of the GABAA receptors has been shown to undergo RNA editing. As a result, a highly conserved isoleucine residue in the third transmembrane domain is replaced with a methionine. To determine the effect of this structural change on receptor function, we compared the GABA sensitivity, pharmacological properties and macroscopic kinetics of recombinant receptors containing either the edited or unedited forms of the alpha3 subunit along with beta3 and gamma2L. Editing substantially altered the GABA sensitivity and deactivation rate of the receptors, with the unedited form showing a lower GABA EC50 and slower decay. Comparable effects were observed with a mutation at the homologous location in the alpha1 subunit, suggesting a common role for this site in regulation of channel gating. Except for the response to GABA, the pharmacological properties of the receptor were unaffected by editing, with similar enhancement by a variety of modulators. Since RNA editing of the alpha3 subunit increases through development, our findings suggest that GABAergic neurotransmission may be more effective early in development, with greater GABA sensitivity and slower decay rates conferred by the unedited alpha3 subunit.

  11. Functional characterization of bursicon receptor and genome-wide analysis for identification of genes affected by bursicon receptor RNAi.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hua; Palli, Subba R

    2010-08-01

    Bursicon is an insect neuropeptide hormone that is secreted from the central nervous system into the hemolymph and initiates cuticle tanning. The receptor for bursicon is encoded by the rickets (rk) gene and belongs to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily. The bursicon and its receptor regulate cuticle tanning as well as wing expansion after adult eclosion. However, the molecular action of bursicon signaling remains unclear. We utilized RNA interference (RNAi) and microarray to study the function of the bursicon receptor (Tcrk) in the model insect, Tribolium castaneum. The data included here showed that in addition to cuticle tanning and wing expansion reported previously, Tcrk is also required for development and expansion of integumentary structures and adult eclosion. Using custom microarrays, we identified 24 genes that are differentially expressed between Tcrk RNAi and control insects. Knockdown in the expression of one of these genes, TC004091, resulted in the arrest of adult eclosion. Identification of genes that are involved in bursicon receptor mediated biological processes will provide tools for future studies on mechanisms of bursicon action.

  12. EphB3 receptors function as dependence receptors to mediate oligodendrocyte cell death following contusive spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Tsenkina, Y; Ricard, J; Runko, E; Quiala- Acosta, M M; Mier, J; Liebl, D J

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that EphB3 receptors mediate oligodendrocyte (OL) cell death in the injured spinal cord through dependence receptor mechanism. OLs in the adult spinal cord express EphB3 as well as other members of the Eph receptor family. Spinal cord injury (SCI) is associated with tissue damage, cellular loss and disturbances in EphB3-ephrinB3 protein balance acutely (days) after the initial impact creating an environment for a dependence receptor-mediated cell death to occur. Genetic ablation of EphB3 promotes OL survival associated with increased expression of myelin basic protein and improved locomotor function in mice after SCI. Moreover, administration of its ephrinB3 ligand to the spinal cord after injury also promotes OL survival. Our in vivo findings are supported by in vitro studies showing that ephrinB3 administration promotes the survival of both oligodendroglial progenitor cells and mature OLs cultured under pro-apoptotic conditions. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates a novel dependence receptor role of EphB3 in OL cell death after SCI, and supports further development of ephrinB3-based therapies to promote recovery. PMID:26469970

  13. Functional atrial natriuretic peptide receptor in human adrenal tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Shionoiri, H.; Hirawa, N.; Takasaki, I.; Ishikawa, Y.; Oda, H.; Minamisawa, K.; Sugimoto, K.; Matsukawa, T.; Ueda, S.; Miyajima, E.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of synthetic human atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on the release of catecholamines, aldosterone, or cortisol were observed in human adrenal tumors obtained surgically from patients with pheochromocytoma, primary aldosteronism, or Cushing's syndrome, respectively. Each tumor tissue or adjacent normal cortical tissue was sectioned into slices, which were incubated in medium-199 in the presence or absence of adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH) and ANP. The amounts of epinephrine, norepinephrine, aldosterone, or cortisol released into the medium were measured. Existence of ANP receptors on the adrenal tissues was examined by binding assays, affinity labeling, and immunohistochemistry. Release of catecholamines from pheochromocytoma tissues was inhibited by ANP, and the presence of the ANP receptor on pheochromocytoma was further demonstrated by both binding assays and affinity labeling; Scatchard analysis revealed a single class of binding sites for ANP with a Kd of 1.0 nM and a Bmax of 0.4 pmol/mg of protein and the molecular size was estimated as 140 and a 70 kDa under nonreducing and reducing conditions, respectively. The presence of ANP receptors in pheochromocytoma was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. ANP inhibited both basal and ACTH-stimulated aldosterone secretion in the slices of normal cortex, and localization of ANP receptors in zona glomerulosa cells was also demonstrated. However, ANP did not inhibit basal and ACTH-stimulated aldosterone and cortisol secretion in both tissue slices from aldosteronoma and Cushing's adenoma. Consistent with these observations, the absence of ANP receptors in adenoma tissues was determined by binding assays, affinity labeling, and immunohistochemistry.

  14. Dependence of AT1 angiotensin receptor function on adjacent asparagine residues in the seventh transmembrane helix.

    PubMed

    Hunyady, L; Ji, H; Jagadeesh, G; Zhang, M; Gáborik, Z; Mihalik, B; Catt, K J

    1998-08-01

    For several G protein-coupled receptors, amino acids in the seventh transmembrane helix have been implicated in ligand binding and receptor activation. The function of this region in the AT1 angiotensin receptor was further investigated by mutation of two conserved polar residues (Asn294 and Asn295) and the adjacent Phe293 residue. Analysis of the properties of the mutant receptors expressed in COS-7 cells revealed that alanine replacement of Phe293 had no major effect on AT1 receptor function. Substitution of the adjacent Asn294 residue with alanine (N294A) reduced receptor binding affinities for angiotensin II, two nonpeptide agonists (L-162,313 and L-163,491), and the AT1-selective nonpeptide antagonist losartan but not that for the peptide antagonist [Sar1, Ile8]angiotensin II. The N294A receptor also showed impaired G protein coupling and severely attenuated inositol phosphate generation. In contrast, alanine replacement of Asn295 decreased receptor binding affinities for all angiotensin II ligands but did not impair signal transduction. Additional substitutions of Asn295 with a variety of amino acids did not identify specific structural elements for ligand binding. These findings indicate that Asn295 is required for the integrity of the intramembrane binding pocket of the AT1a receptor but is not essential for signal generation. They also demonstrate the importance of transmembrane helices in the formation of the binding site for nonpeptide AT1 receptor agonists. We conclude that the Asn294 residue of the AT1 receptor is an essential determinant of receptor activation and that the adjacent Asn295 residue is required for normal ligand binding.

  15. Role of the Extracellular and Intracellular Loops of Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Receptor in Its Function

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Antara A.; Mahale, Smita D.

    2015-01-01

    Follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) is a leucine-rich repeat containing class A G-protein coupled receptor belonging to the subfamily of glycoprotein hormone receptors (GPHRs), which includes luteinizing hormone/choriogonadotropin receptor (LH/CGR) and thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor. Its cognate ligand, follicle-stimulating hormone binds to, and activates FSHR expressed on the surface of granulosa cells of the ovary, in females, and Sertoli cells of the testis, in males, to bring about folliculogenesis and spermatogenesis, respectively. FSHR contains a large extracellular domain (ECD) consisting of leucine-rich repeats at the N-terminal end and a hinge region at the C-terminus that connects the ECD to the membrane spanning transmembrane domain (TMD). The TMD consists of seven α-helices that are connected to each other by means of three extracellular loops (ELs) and three intracellular loops (ILs) and ends in a short-cytoplasmic tail. It is well established that the ECD is the primary hormone binding domain, whereas the TMD is the signal transducing domain. However, several studies on the ELs and ILs employing site directed mutagenesis, generation of chimeric receptors and in vitro characterization of naturally occurring mutations have proven their indispensable role in FSHR function. Their role in every phase of the life cycle of the receptor like post translational modifications, cell surface trafficking, hormone binding, activation of downstream signaling, receptor phosphorylation, hormone–receptor internalization, and recycling of hormone–receptor complex have been documented. Mutations in the loops causing dysregulation of these processes lead to pathophysiological conditions. In other GPHRs as well, the loops have been convincingly shown to contribute to various aspects of receptor function. This review article attempts to summarize the extensive contributions of FSHR loops and C-terminal tail to its function. PMID:26236283

  16. Role of the Extracellular and Intracellular Loops of Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Receptor in Its Function.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Antara A; Mahale, Smita D

    2015-01-01

    Follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) is a leucine-rich repeat containing class A G-protein coupled receptor belonging to the subfamily of glycoprotein hormone receptors (GPHRs), which includes luteinizing hormone/choriogonadotropin receptor (LH/CGR) and thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor. Its cognate ligand, follicle-stimulating hormone binds to, and activates FSHR expressed on the surface of granulosa cells of the ovary, in females, and Sertoli cells of the testis, in males, to bring about folliculogenesis and spermatogenesis, respectively. FSHR contains a large extracellular domain (ECD) consisting of leucine-rich repeats at the N-terminal end and a hinge region at the C-terminus that connects the ECD to the membrane spanning transmembrane domain (TMD). The TMD consists of seven α-helices that are connected to each other by means of three extracellular loops (ELs) and three intracellular loops (ILs) and ends in a short-cytoplasmic tail. It is well established that the ECD is the primary hormone binding domain, whereas the TMD is the signal transducing domain. However, several studies on the ELs and ILs employing site directed mutagenesis, generation of chimeric receptors and in vitro characterization of naturally occurring mutations have proven their indispensable role in FSHR function. Their role in every phase of the life cycle of the receptor like post translational modifications, cell surface trafficking, hormone binding, activation of downstream signaling, receptor phosphorylation, hormone-receptor internalization, and recycling of hormone-receptor complex have been documented. Mutations in the loops causing dysregulation of these processes lead to pathophysiological conditions. In other GPHRs as well, the loops have been convincingly shown to contribute to various aspects of receptor function. This review article attempts to summarize the extensive contributions of FSHR loops and C-terminal tail to its function. PMID:26236283

  17. Specific in vitro interferon-gamma and IL-2 production as biomarkers during treatment of chronic Q fever

    PubMed Central

    Schoffelen, Teske; Wegdam-Blans, Marjolijn C.; Ammerdorffer, Anne; Pronk, Marjolijn J. H.; Soethoudt, Yvonne E. P.; Netea, Mihai G.; van der Meer, Jos W. M.; Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P.; van Deuren, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Background: Antibiotic treatment of chronic Q fever is cumbersome and of long duration. To monitor treatment, there is a need for alternative biomarkers. Coxiella burnetii-specific interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-2 production reflect the type of effector and memory T-cell response. In chronic Q fever, C. burnetii-specific IFN-γ production is higher and IL-2 production is lower than in individuals with past Q fever. Here we explore whether C. burnetii-specific IFN-γ and IL-2 production correlate to treatment response. Methods: We studied the longitudinal C. burnetii-specific IFN-γ/IL-2 ratio in fifteen proven chronic Q fever patients. All patients were followed for at least 18 months during antibiotic treatment. Treatment was considered successful when clinical recovery was observed, a positive PCR for C. burnetii DNA in blood became persistently negative, anti-phase I IgG showed a fourfold decrease or more, and imaging techniques showed disappearance of infectious foci. Results: Overall, the IFN-γ/IL-2 ratio declined when patients experienced a successful treatment outcome. When treatment failed, IFN-γ/IL-2 ratios did not significantly decrease. The median (±IQR) slope of the longitudinal IFN-γ/IL-2 ratio with successful treatment was -2.10 (-7.02 to -0.06), and -0.15 (-1.13 to 0.25) with unsuccessful treatment (P = 0.19). Q fever endocarditis patients had higher IFN-γ/IL-2 ratios than patients with endovascular infections. Conclusion: We propose that the IFN-γ/IL-2 ratio can be used as an additional biomarker for monitoring chronic Q fever treatment, with declining ratios being indicative of successful treatment. PMID:25729380

  18. Recombinant Collagen Engineered to Bind to Discoidin Domain Receptor Functions as a Receptor Inhibitor*

    PubMed Central

    An, Bo; Abbonante, Vittorio; Xu, Huifang; Gavriilidou, Despoina; Yoshizumi, Ayumi; Bihan, Dominique; Farndale, Richard W.; Kaplan, David L.; Balduini, Alessandra; Leitinger, Birgit; Brodsky, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    A bacterial collagen-like protein Scl2 has been developed as a recombinant collagen model system to host human collagen ligand-binding sequences, with the goal of generating biomaterials with selective collagen bioactivities. Defined binding sites in human collagen for integrins, fibronectin, heparin, and MMP-1 have been introduced into the triple-helical domain of the bacterial collagen and led to the expected biological activities. The modular insertion of activities is extended here to the discoidin domain receptors (DDRs), which are collagen-activated receptor tyrosine kinases. Insertion of the DDR-binding sequence from human collagen III into bacterial collagen led to specific receptor binding. However, even at the highest testable concentrations, the construct was unable to stimulate DDR autophosphorylation. The recombinant collagen expressed in Escherichia coli does not contain hydroxyproline (Hyp), and complementary synthetic peptide studies showed that replacement of Hyp by Pro at the critical Gly-Val-Met-Gly-Phe-Hyp position decreased the DDR-binding affinity and consequently required a higher concentration for the induction of receptor activation. The ability of the recombinant bacterial collagen to bind the DDRs without inducing kinase activation suggested it could interfere with the interactions between animal collagen and the DDRs, and such an inhibitory role was confirmed in vitro and with a cell migration assay. This study illustrates that recombinant collagen can complement synthetic peptides in investigating structure-activity relationships, and this system has the potential for the introduction or inhibition of specific biological activities. PMID:26702058

  19. Recombinant Collagen Engineered to Bind to Discoidin Domain Receptor Functions as a Receptor Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    An, Bo; Abbonante, Vittorio; Xu, Huifang; Gavriilidou, Despoina; Yoshizumi, Ayumi; Bihan, Dominique; Farndale, Richard W; Kaplan, David L; Balduini, Alessandra; Leitinger, Birgit; Brodsky, Barbara

    2016-02-26

    A bacterial collagen-like protein Scl2 has been developed as a recombinant collagen model system to host human collagen ligand-binding sequences, with the goal of generating biomaterials with selective collagen bioactivities. Defined binding sites in human collagen for integrins, fibronectin, heparin, and MMP-1 have been introduced into the triple-helical domain of the bacterial collagen and led to the expected biological activities. The modular insertion of activities is extended here to the discoidin domain receptors (DDRs), which are collagen-activated receptor tyrosine kinases. Insertion of the DDR-binding sequence from human collagen III into bacterial collagen led to specific receptor binding. However, even at the highest testable concentrations, the construct was unable to stimulate DDR autophosphorylation. The recombinant collagen expressed in Escherichia coli does not contain hydroxyproline (Hyp), and complementary synthetic peptide studies showed that replacement of Hyp by Pro at the critical Gly-Val-Met-Gly-Phe-Hyp position decreased the DDR-binding affinity and consequently required a higher concentration for the induction of receptor activation. The ability of the recombinant bacterial collagen to bind the DDRs without inducing kinase activation suggested it could interfere with the interactions between animal collagen and the DDRs, and such an inhibitory role was confirmed in vitro and with a cell migration assay. This study illustrates that recombinant collagen can complement synthetic peptides in investigating structure-activity relationships, and this system has the potential for the introduction or inhibition of specific biological activities.

  20. Binding kinetics differentiates functional antagonism of orexin-2 receptor ligands

    PubMed Central

    Mould, R; Brown, J; Marshall, FH; Langmead, CJ

    2014-01-01

    Orexin receptor antagonism represents a novel approach for the treatment of insomnia that directly targets sleep/wake regulation. Several such compounds have entered into clinical development, including the dual orexin receptor antagonists, suvorexant and almorexant. In this study, we have used equilibrium and kinetic binding studies with the orexin-2 (OX2) selective antagonist radioligand, [3H]-EMPA, to profile several orexin receptor antagonists. Furthermore, selected compounds were studied in cell-based assays of inositol phosphate accumulation and ERK-1/2 phosphorylation in CHO cells stably expressing the OX2 receptor that employ different agonist incubation times (30 and 5 min, respectively). EMPA, suvorexant, almorexant and TCS-OX-29 all bind to the OX2 receptor with moderate to high affinity (pKI values ≥ 7.5), whereas the primarily OX1 selective antagonists SB-334867 and SB-408124 displayed low affinity (pKI values ca. 6). Competition kinetic analysis showed that the compounds displayed a range of dissociation rates from very fast (TCS-OX2-29, koff = 0.22 min−1) to very slow (almorexant, koff = 0.005 min−1). Notably, there was a clear correlation between association rate and affinity. In the cell-based assays, fast-offset antagonists EMPA and TCS-OX2-29 displayed surmountable antagonism of orexin-A agonist activity. However, both suvorexant and particularly almorexant cause concentration-dependent depression in the maximal orexin-A response, a profile that is more evident with a shorter agonist incubation time. Analysis according to a hemi-equilibrium model suggests that antagonist dissociation is slower in a cellular system than in membrane binding; under these conditions, almorexant effectively acts as a pseudo-irreversible antagonist. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Orexin Receptors. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-2 PMID:23692283

  1. Antibodies from combinatorial libraries use functional receptor pleiotropism to regulate cell fates.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Richard A; Grover, Rajesh K; Zhang, Hongkai; Xie, Jia; Han, Kyung Ho; Peng, Yingjie; Yea, Kyungmoo

    2015-11-01

    To date, most antibodies from combinatorial libraries have been selected purely on the basis of binding. However, new methods now allow selection on the basis of function in animal cells. These selected agonist antibodies have given new insights into the important problem of signal transduction. Remarkably, when some antibodies bind to a given receptor they induce a cell fate that is different than that induced by the natural agonist to the same receptor. The fact that receptors can be functionally pleiotropic may yield new insights into the important problem of signal transduction.

  2. More Than Cholesterol Transporters: Lipoprotein Receptors in CNS Function and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lane-Donovan, Courtney E.; Philips, Gary T.; Herz, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Members of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene family have a diverse set of biological functions that transcend lipid metabolism. Lipoprotein receptors have broad effects in both the developing and adult brain and participate in synapse development, cargo trafficking, and signal transduction. In addition, several family members play key roles in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis and neurodegeneration. This review summarizes our current understanding of the role lipoprotein receptors play in CNS function and AD pathology, with a special emphasis on amyloid-independent roles in endocytosis and synaptic dysfunction. PMID:25144875

  3. The orphan nuclear receptor DAX-1 functions as a potent corepressor of the constitutive androstane receptor (NR1I3).

    PubMed

    Laurenzana, Elizabeth M; Chen, Tao; Kannuswamy, Malavika; Sell, Brian E; Strom, Stephen C; Li, Yong; Omiecinski, Curtis J

    2012-11-01

    Regulation of gene transcription is controlled in part by nuclear receptors that function coordinately with coregulator proteins. The human constitutive androstane receptor (CAR; NR1I3) is expressed primarily in liver and regulates the expression of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism as well as hormone, energy, and lipid homeostasis. In this report, DAX-1, a nuclear receptor family member with corepressor properties, was identified as a potent CAR regulator. Results of transaction and mutational studies demonstrated that both DAX-1's downstream LXXLL and its PCFQVLP motifs were critical contributors to DAX-1's corepression activities, although two other LXXM/LL motifs located nearer the N terminus had no impact on the CAR functional interaction. Deletion of DAX-1's C-terminal transcription silencing domain restored CAR1 transactivation activity in reporter assays to approximately 90% of control, demonstrating its critical function in mediating the CAR repression activities. Furthermore, results obtained from mammalian two-hybrid experiments assessing various domain configurations of the respective receptors showed that full-length DAX-1 inhibited the CAR-SRC1 interaction by approximately 50%, whereas the same interaction was restored to 90% of control when the DAX-1 transcription silencing domain was deleted. Direct interaction between CAR and DAX-1 was demonstrated with both alpha-screen and coimmunoprecipitation experiments, and this interaction was enhanced in the presence of the CAR activator 6-(4-chlorophenyl)imidazo[2,1-b]thiazole-5-carbaldehyde O-(3,4-dichlorobenzyl)oxime (CITCO). Results obtained in primary human hepatocytes further demonstrated DAX-1 inhibition of CAR-mediated CITCO induction of the CYP2B6 target gene. The results of this investigation identify DAX-1 as a novel and potent CAR corepressor and suggest that DAX-1 functions as a coordinate hepatic regulator of CAR's biological function. PMID:22896671

  4. Attenuated Purinergic Receptor Function in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Thaning, Pia; Bune, Laurids T.; Hellsten, Ylva; Pilegaard, Henriette; Saltin, Bengt; Rosenmeier, Jaya B.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Extracellular nucleotides and nucleosides are involved in regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow. Diabetes induces cardiovascular dysregulation, but the extent to which the vasodilatatory capacity of nucleotides and nucleosides is affected in type 2 diabetes is unknown. The present study investigated 1) the vasodilatatory effect of ATP, uridine-triphosphate (UTP), and adenosine (ADO) and 2) the expression and distribution of P2Y2 and P2X1 receptors in skeletal muscles of diabetic subjects. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In 10 diabetic patients and 10 age-matched control subjects, leg blood flow (LBF) was measured during intrafemoral artery infusion of ATP, UTP, and ADO, eliciting a blood flow equal to knee-extensor exercise at 12 W (∼2.6 l/min). RESULTS The vasodilatatory effect of the purinergic system was 50% lower in the diabetic group as exemplified by an LBF increase of 274 ± 37 vs. 143 ± 26 ml/μmol ATP × kg, 494 ± 80 vs. 234 ± 39 ml/μmol UTP × kg, and 14.9 ± 2.7 vs. 7.5 ± 0.6 ml/μmol ADO × kg in control and diabetic subjects, respectively, thus making the vasodilator potency as follows: UTP control subjects (100) > ATP control subjects (55) > UTP diabetic subjects (47) > ATP diabetic subjects (29) > ADO control subjects (3) > ADO diabetic subjects (1.5). The distribution and mRNA expression of receptors were similar in the two groups. CONCLUSIONS The vasodilatatory effect of the purinergic system is severely reduced in type 2 diabetic patients. The potency of nucleotides varies with the following rank order: UTP > ATP > ADO. This is not due to alterations in receptor distribution and mRNA expression, but may be due to differences in receptor sensitivity. PMID:19808895

  5. Chronic Alcohol Disrupts Dopamine Receptor Activity and the Cognitive Function of the Medial Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, Elizabeth J.; Gass, Justin T.; Lopez, Marcelo F.; Mulholland, Patrick J.; Centanni, Samuel W.; Floresco, Stan B.; Chandler, L. Judson

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) receptors in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) exert powerful effects on cognition by modulating the balance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission. The present study examined the impact of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure on cognitive function and DA receptor-mediated neurotransmission in the rat mPFC. Consistent with alterations in executive function in alcoholics, CIE-exposed rats exhibited deficits in behavioral flexibility in an operant set-shifting task. Since alterations in dopaminergic neurotransmission in the mPFC have been implicated in a number of behavioral disorders including addiction, studies were then performed in the adult acute slice preparation to examine changes in DA receptor function in the mPFC following CIE exposure. In slices obtained from control rats, DA receptor stimulation was observed to exert complex actions on neuronal firing and synaptic neurotransmission that were not only dependent upon the particular receptor subtype but also whether it was a pyramidal cell or a fast-spiking interneuron. In contrast to slices from control rats, there was a near complete loss of the modulatory actions of D2/D4 receptors on cell firing and neurotransmission in slices obtained immediately, 1 and 4 weeks after the last day of CIE exposure. This loss did not appear to be associated with changes in receptor expression. In contrast, CIE exposure did not alter D1 receptor function or mGluR1 modulation of firing. These studies are consistent with the suggestion that chronic alcohol exposure disrupts cognitive function at least in part through disruption of D2 and D4 receptor signaling in mPFC. PMID:24599469

  6. Chronic alcohol disrupts dopamine receptor activity and the cognitive function of the medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Trantham-Davidson, Heather; Burnett, Elizabeth J; Gass, Justin T; Lopez, Marcelo F; Mulholland, Patrick J; Centanni, Samuel W; Floresco, Stan B; Chandler, L Judson

    2014-03-01

    Dopamine (DA) receptors in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) exert powerful effects on cognition by modulating the balance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission. The present study examined the impact of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure on cognitive function and DA receptor-mediated neurotransmission in the rat mPFC. Consistent with alterations in executive function in alcoholics, CIE-exposed rats exhibited deficits in behavioral flexibility in an operant set-shifting task. Since alterations in dopaminergic neurotransmission in the mPFC have been implicated in a number of behavioral disorders including addiction, studies were then performed in the adult acute slice preparation to examine changes in DA receptor function in the mPFC following CIE exposure. In slices obtained from control rats, DA receptor stimulation was observed to exert complex actions on neuronal firing and synaptic neurotransmission that were not only dependent upon the particular receptor subtype but also whether it was a pyramidal cell or a fast-spiking interneuron. In contrast to slices from control rats, there was a near complete loss of the modulatory actions of D2/D4 receptors on cell firing and neurotransmission in slices obtained immediately, 1 and 4 weeks after the last day of CIE exposure. This loss did not appear to be associated with changes in receptor expression. In contrast, CIE exposure did not alter D1 receptor function or mGluR1 modulation of firing. These studies are consistent with the suggestion that chronic alcohol exposure disrupts cognitive function at least in part through disruption of D2 and D4 receptor signaling in mPFC.

  7. EP4 receptor stimulation down-regulates human eosinophil function.

    PubMed

    Luschnig-Schratl, Petra; Sturm, Eva M; Konya, Viktoria; Philipose, Sonia; Marsche, Gunther; Fröhlich, Eleonore; Samberger, Claudia; Lang-Loidolt, Doris; Gattenlöhner, Stefan; Lippe, Irmgard Th; Peskar, Bernhard A; Schuligoi, Rufina; Heinemann, Akos

    2011-11-01

    Accumulation of eosinophils in tissue is a hallmark of allergic inflammation. Here we observed that a selective agonist of the PGE(2) receptor EP4, ONO AE1-329, potently attenuated the chemotaxis of human peripheral blood eosinophils, upregulation of the adhesion molecule CD11b and the production of reactive oxygen species. These effects were accompanied by the inhibition of cytoskeletal rearrangement and Ca(2+) mobilization. The involvement of the EP4 receptor was substantiated by a selective EP4 antagonist, which reversed the inhibitory effects of PGE(2) and the EP4 agonist. Selective kinase inhibitors revealed that the inhibitory effect of EP4 stimulation on eosinophil migration depended upon activation of PI 3-kinase and PKC, but not cAMP. Finally, we found that EP4 receptors are expressed by human eosinophils, and are also present on infiltrating leukocytes in inflamed human nasal mucosa. These data indicate that EP4 agonists might be a novel therapeutic option in eosinophilic diseases.

  8. Bacterial expression of functional, biotinylated peripheral cannabinoid receptor CB2.

    PubMed

    Krepkiy, Dmitriy; Wong, Karen; Gawrisch, Klaus; Yeliseev, Alexei

    2006-09-01

    A biotin-protein ligase recognition site (BRS) was inserted into a polypeptide comprised of the maltose-binding protein, the peripheral cannabinoid receptor (CB2), thioredoxin A, and a polyhistidine tag at the carboxy terminus. Expression levels of the recombinant receptor in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) cells were approximately 1mg per liter of bacterial culture. The biotinylated CB2-fusion fully retained its ligand-binding capacity. Introduction of the BRS at the C-terminus of the CB2 fusion protein (construct CB2-109) resulted in its complete in vivo biotinylation; the biotinylated protein was streptavidin-binding competent. Positioning of the BRS near the N-terminus of CB2 (CB2-112) resulted in a very low level of biotinylation in vivo. However, the detergent solubilized and purified CB2-112 fusion protein were successfully biotinylated in vitro by action of a BirA biotin-protein ligase. The biotinylated CB2-112 fusion protein was cleaved by the tobacco etch virus protease at specifically inserted sites, and deposited onto monomeric avidin agarose beads. Biotinylation of the recombinant CB2 receptor enabled not only purification but also immobilization of the GPCR on a solid support in homogeneous orientation which is beneficial for subsequent structural characterization.

  9. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate inhibits expression of receptors for T cell regulatory cytokines and their downstream signaling in mouse CD4+ T cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We previously showed a suppressive effect of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on T cell cycling and expansion as well as a paradoxical effect on IL-2 levels (up-regulating) and IL-2 receptor (IL-2R)alpha expression (down-regulating). Thus, in the current study we tested the hypothesis that EGCG aff...

  10. Multiple loss-of-function variants of taste receptors in modern humans.

    PubMed

    Fujikura, Kohei

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the knowledge of interindividual taste differences, the underlying genetic backgrounds have remained to be fully elucidated. Much of the taste variation among different mammalian species can be explained by pseudogenization of taste receptors. Here I investigated whether the most recent disruptions of taste receptor genes segregate with their intact forms in modern humans by analyzing 14 ethnically diverse populations. The results revealed an unprecedented prevalence of 25 segregating loss-of-function (LoF) taste receptor variants, identifying one of the most pronounced cases of functional population diversity in the human genome. LoF variant frequency in taste receptors (2.10%) was considerably higher than the overall LoF frequency in human genome (0.16%). In particular, molecular evolutionary rates of candidate sour (14.7%) and bitter (1.8%) receptors were far higher in humans than those of sweet (0.02%), salty (0.05%), and umami (0.17%) receptors compared with other carnivorous mammals, although not all of the taste receptors were identified. Many LoF variants are population-specific, some of which arose even after population differentiation, not before divergence of the modern and archaic human. I conclude that modern humans might have been losing some sour and bitter receptor genes because of high-frequency LoF variants. PMID:26307445

  11. Multiple loss-of-function variants of taste receptors in modern humans

    PubMed Central

    Fujikura, K.

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the knowledge of interindividual taste differences, the underlying genetic backgrounds have remained to be fully elucidated. Much of the taste variation among different mammalian species can be explained by pseudogenization of taste receptors. Here I investigated whether the most recent disruptions of taste receptor genes segregate with their intact forms in modern humans by analyzing 14 ethnically diverse populations. The results revealed an unprecedented prevalence of 25 segregating loss-of-function (LoF) taste receptor variants, identifying one of the most pronounced cases of functional population diversity in the human genome. LoF variant frequency in taste receptors (2.10%) was considerably higher than the overall LoF frequency in human genome (0.16%). In particular, molecular evolutionary rates of candidate sour (14.7%) and bitter (1.8%) receptors were far higher in humans than those of sweet (0.02%), salty (0.05%), and umami (0.17%) receptors compared with other carnivorous mammals, although not all of the taste receptors were identified. Many LoF variants are population-specific, some of which arose even after population differentiation, not before divergence of the modern and archaic human. I conclude that modern humans might have been losing some sour and bitter receptor genes because of high-frequency LoF variants. PMID:26307445

  12. Expression and Purification of Functional Ligand-binding Domains of T1R3 Taste Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Nie,Y.; Hobbs, J.; Vigues, S.; Olson, W.; Conn, G.; Munger, S.

    2006-01-01

    Chemosensory receptors, including odor, taste, and vomeronasal receptors, comprise the largest group of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the mammalian genome. However, little is known about the molecular determinants that are critical for the detection and discrimination of ligands by most of these receptors. This dearth of understanding is due in part to difficulties in preparing functional receptors suitable for biochemical and biophysical analyses. Here we describe in detail two strategies for the expression and purification of the ligand-binding domain of T1R taste receptors, which are constituents of the sweet and umami taste receptors. These class C GPCRs contain a large extracellular N-terminal domain (NTD) that is the site of interaction with most ligands and that is amenable to expression as a separate polypeptide in heterologous cells. The NTD of mouse T1R3 was expressed as two distinct fusion proteins in Escherichia coli and purified by column chromatography. Spectroscopic analysis of the purified NTD proteins shows them to be properly folded and capable of binding ligands. This methodology should not only facilitate the characterization of T1R ligand interactions but may also be useful for dissecting the function of other class C GPCRs such as the large family of orphan V2R vomeronasal receptors.

  13. Fc gamma receptor IIIb enhances Fc gamma receptor IIa function in an oxidant-dependent and allele-sensitive manner.

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, J E; Millard, S S; Brogle, N L; Kimberly, R P

    1995-01-01

    Two classes of receptors for IgG, Fc gamma RIIa and Fc gamma RIIIb, both of which exist in two allelic forms, are expressed on human neutrophils. Neutrophils from normal donors, homozygous for the different allelic phenotypes of Fc gamma RIIIb, have significantly different levels of Fc gamma receptor-mediated phagocytosis of IgG-opsonized erythrocytes (EA). However, the observation that Fc gamma RIIIb mediates phagocytosis of specific mAb-targeted erythrocytes poorly suggests that this receptor may influence EA internalization by Fc gamma RIIa in an allele-sensitive fashion. Donors homozygous for the NA1 allele of Fc gamma RIIIb showed greater activation of Fc gamma RIIa after Fc gamma RIIIb cross-linking than donors homozygous for the NA2 allele of Fc gamma RIIIb. This increase in receptor-specific internalization reflects both an increase in ligand binding by Fc gamma RIIa and an increase in internalization efficiency of targets bound. Activation of Fc gamma RIIa by Fc gamma RIIIb is transferable by supernatants from activated cells and is blocked by inhibitors of reactive oxygen species and the H2O2-myeloperoxidase-chloride system and by serine protease inhibitors. Thus, cross-linking of Fc gamma RIIIb, which leads to neutrophil degranulation and the generation of reactive oxygen intermediates, in turn alters Fc gamma RIIa avidity and efficiency. These oxidant-mediated changes in Fc gamma RIIa function provide a novel mechanism for receptors to collaborate in both an autocrine and paracrine fashion. The allele sensitivity of these effects suggests that Fc gamma receptor polymorphisms may be inherited disease susceptibility factors in host defense against infection and in the development of autoimmunity. Images PMID:7769129

  14. Recognition of a Functional Peroxisome Type 1 Target by the Dynamic Import Receptor Pex5p

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Will A.; Filipp, Fabian V.; Kursula, Petri; Schüller, Nicole; Erdmann, Ralf; Schliebs, Wolfgang; Sattler, Michael; Wilmanns, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Summary Peroxisomes require the translocation of folded and functional target proteins of various sizes across the peroxisomal membrane. We have investigated the structure and function of the principal import receptor Pex5p, which recognizes targets bearing a C-terminal peroxisomal targeting signal type 1. Crystal structures of the receptor in the presence and absence of a peroxisomal target, sterol carrier protein 2, reveal major structural changes from an open, snail-like conformation into a closed, circular conformation. These changes are caused by a long loop C terminal to the 7-fold tetratricopeptide repeat segments. Mutations in residues of this loop lead to defects in peroxisomal import in human fibroblasts. The structure of the receptor/cargo complex demonstrates that the primary receptor-binding site of the cargo is structurally and topologically autonomous, enabling the cargo to retain its native structure and function. PMID:17157249

  15. From The Cover: Microtransplantation of functional receptors and channels from the Alzheimer's brain to frog oocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miledi, R.; Dueñas, Z.; Martinez-Torres, A.; Kawas, C. H.; Eusebi, F.

    2004-02-01

    About a decade ago, cell membranes from the electric organ of Torpedo and from the rat brain were transplanted to frog oocytes, which thus acquired functional Torpedo and rat neurotransmitter receptors. Nevertheless, the great potential that this method has for studying human diseases has remained virtually untapped. Here, we show that cell membranes from the postmortem brains of humans that suffered Alzheimer's disease can be microtransplanted to the plasma membrane of Xenopus oocytes. We show also that these postmortem membranes carry neurotransmitter receptors and voltage-operated channels that are still functional, even after they have been kept frozen for many years. This method provides a new and powerful approach to study directly the functional characteristics and structure of receptors, channels, and other membrane proteins of the Alzheimer's brain. This knowledge may help in understanding the basis of Alzheimer's disease and also help in developing new treatments. -aminobutyric acid receptors | sodium channels | calcium channels | postmortem brain

  16. Estrogen-related Receptor β Reduces the Subnuclear Mobility of Estrogen Receptor α and Suppresses Estrogen-dependent Cellular Function*

    PubMed Central

    Tanida, Takashi; Matsuda, Ken Ichi; Yamada, Shunji; Hashimoto, Takashi; Kawata, Mitsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen-related receptor (ERR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that has strong homology with estrogen receptor (ER) α. ERR has three subtypes (α, β, and γ) expressed in estrogen-sensitive organs, including ovary, breast, and brain. No endogenous ligands of ERRs have been identified, but these receptors share a common DNA element with ERα and control estrogen-mediated gene transcription. Recent evidence suggests a role of ERRs in estrogen-related pathophysiology, but the detailed mechanisms of ERR functions in estrogen-related tissues are unclear. Using live-cell imaging with fluorescent protein labeling, we found that only ERRβ among the ERRs exhibits a punctate intranuclear pattern overlapping with ERα following 17β-estradiol (E2)-stimulation. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching showed significant reduction of the mobility of ligand-activated ERα with co-expression of ERRβ. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer revealed that ERRβ directly interacts with ERα. The N-terminal domain of ERRβ was identified as the region that interacts with ERα. We also found a correlation between punctate cluster formation of ERα and interaction between the receptors. Expression of ERRβ significantly repressed ERα-mediated transactivity, whereas that of other ERR subtypes had no effect on the transactivity of ERα. Consistent with this finding, E2-stimulated proliferation of MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells and bcl-2 expression was significantly inhibited by expression of ERRβ. These results provide strong evidence for a suppressive effect of ERRβ on estrogen signaling through reduction of the intranuclear mobility of ERα. The findings further suggest a unique inhibitory role for ERRβ in estrogen-dependent cellular function such as cancer cell proliferation. PMID:25805499

  17. Functional Interaction Between Na/K-ATPase and NMDA Receptor in Cerebellar Neurons.

    PubMed

    Akkuratov, Evgeny E; Lopacheva, Olga M; Kruusmägi, Markus; Lopachev, Alexandr V; Shah, Zahoor A; Boldyrev, Alexander A; Liu, Lijun

    2015-12-01

    NMDA receptors play a crucial role in regulating synaptic plasticity and memory. Activation of NMDA receptors changes intracellular concentrations of Na(+) and K(+), which are subsequently restored by Na/K-ATPase. We used immunochemical and biochemical methods to elucidate the potential mechanisms of interaction between these two proteins. We observed that NMDA receptor and Na/K-ATPase interact with each other and this interaction was shown for both isoforms of α subunit (α1 and α3) of Na/K-ATPase expressed in neurons. Using Western blotting, we showed that long-term exposure of the primary culture of cerebellar neurons to nanomolar concentrations of ouabain (a cardiotonic steroid, a specific ligand of Na/K-ATPase) leads to a decrease in the levels of NMDA receptors which is likely mediated by the α3 subunit of Na/K-ATPase. We also observed a decrease in enzymatic activity of the α1 subunit of Na/K-ATPase caused by NMDA receptor activation. This effect is mediated by an increase in intracellular Ca(2+). Thus, Na/K-ATPase and NMDA receptor can interact functionally by forming a macromolecular complex which can be important for restoring ionic balance after neuronal excitation. Furthermore, this interaction suggests that NMDA receptor function can be regulated by endogenous cardiotonic steroids which recently have been found in cerebrospinal fluid or by pharmacological drugs affecting Na/K-ATPase function.

  18. Evolution and function of chemokine receptors in the immune system of lower vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Bajoghli, Baubak

    2013-07-01

    Chemokine receptors and their counterpart ligands are one of the evolutionary innovations of vertebrates. They play a guiding role in the coordination of cell trafficking in many biological processes. Comparative syntenic and phylogenetic analyses provide insight into the evolution of chemokine receptors and suggest that the repertoire of chemokine receptors varies in each species, regardless of the evolutionary position of the species. Despite the rapid evolution of chemokine receptors, the expression and function of orthologous chemokine receptors in lower and higher vertebrates are very similar. This is also true for the chemokine ligands that have been examined so far, such as CXCL8, CXCL12, and CCL25. As examples, this review will discuss how the evolution of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 is coincident with the emergence of lymphocytes in jawless vertebrates (lamprey); and that, in jawed vertebrates, CXCR4 and CCR9 are involved in thymus colonization. In myeloid cells, the function of CXCR1 in neutrophils and the expression of CXCR3 in macrophages and DCs are evolutionarily conserved between fish and mammals. In this context, medaka and zebrafish are outstanding models for studying the function of chemokines and their receptors. PMID:23719857

  19. Conditional gene deletion reveals functional redundancy of GABAB receptors in peripheral nociceptors in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an important inhibitory neurotransmitter which mainly mediates its effects on neurons via ionotropic (GABAA) and metabotropic (GABAB) receptors. GABAB receptors are widely expressed in the central and the peripheral nervous system. Although there is evidence for a key function of GABAB receptors in the modulation of pain, the relative contribution of peripherally- versus centrally-expressed GABAB receptors is unclear. Results In order to elucidate the functional relevance of GABAB receptors expressed in peripheral nociceptive neurons in pain modulation we generated and analyzed conditional mouse mutants lacking functional GABAB(1) subunit specifically in nociceptors, preserving expression in the spinal cord and brain (SNS-GABAB(1)-/- mice). Lack of the GABAB(1) subunit precludes the assembly of functional GABAB receptor. We analyzed SNS-GABAB(1)-/- mice and their control littermates in several models of acute and neuropathic pain. Electrophysiological studies on peripheral afferents revealed higher firing frequencies in SNS-GABAB(1)-/- mice compared to corresponding control littermates. However no differences were seen in basal nociceptive sensitivity between these groups. The development of neuropathic and chronic inflammatory pain was similar across the two genotypes. The duration of nocifensive responses evoked by intraplantar formalin injection was prolonged in the SNS-GABAB(1)-/- animals as compared to their control littermates. Pharmacological experiments revealed that systemic baclofen-induced inhibition of formalin-induced nociceptive behaviors was not dependent upon GABAB(1) expression in nociceptors. Conclusion This study addressed contribution of GABAB receptors expressed on primary afferent nociceptive fibers to the modulation of pain. We observed that neither the development of acute and chronic pain nor the analgesic effects of a systematically-delivered GABAB agonist was significantly changed upon a specific

  20. Dexamethasone inhibits human interleukin 2 but not interleukin 2 receptor gene expression in vitro at the level of nuclear transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Boumpas, D T; Anastassiou, E D; Older, S A; Tsokos, G C; Nelson, D L; Balow, J E

    1991-01-01

    Glucocorticosteroids have an inhibitory effect on the expression of interleukin 2 (IL-2) and interleukin 2 receptor (IL-2R) genes. To determine the mechanisms of this inhibition, human T lymphocytes were stimulated with mitogens in the presence of dexamethasone. Nuclear transcription run-off assays showed that high doses of dexamethasone inhibited the transcription of the IL-2 gene but not that of the IL-2R gene. Post-transcriptionally, high doses of dexamethasone (10(-4) M) were required to inhibit IL-2R mRNA levels by 50%, whereas lower doses (10(-6) M) inhibited by greater than 70% the accumulation of IL-2 mRNA. IL-2 mRNA half-life decreased in the presence of dexamethasone (10(-6) M) by approximately 50%. At the protein product level, dexamethasone inhibited both IL-2 production, as well as cell surface and soluble forms of IL-2R. IL-2R gene expression was inhibited for at least 72 h after exposure of cells to dexamethasone. In the presence of exogenous IL-2, dexamethasone failed to exert a significant effect on the production of IL-2R protein. These data indicate that dexamethasone has a greater effect on the expression of the IL-2 gene than on the IL-2R gene. Dexamethasone both inhibits transcription of the IL-2 gene and decreases the stability of IL-2 mRNA. The effect of dexamethasone on the IL-2R gene is post-transcriptional and may result indirectly from decreased IL-2 production. Images PMID:2022743

  1. IL-6, IL-18, sIL-2R, and TNFα proinflammatory markers in depression and schizophrenia patients who are free of overt inflammation.

    PubMed

    Al-Hakeim, Hussein Kadhem; Al-Rammahi, Duaa Abdulzahraa; Al-Dujaili, Arafat Hussein

    2015-08-15

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) and schizophrenia are associated with inflammatory processes. Studies have shown that these disorders exhibit increase in the level of one or more proinflammatory markers. However, these studies did not exclude patients with obvious inflammation (i.e., CRP>6mg/L). Therefore, a comprehensive study should include those inflammatory disorders. In the present study, the inflammatory natures of MDD and schizophrenia were investigated. To achieve this goal, serum levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-18 (IL-18), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), and soluble interleukin 2 receptor (sIL-2R) in depressed and schizophrenic patients were obtained and compared with those of the control group. Results showed a significant increase (p<0.05) in serum levels of IL-6, IL-18, TNFα, and sIL-2R in MDD and schizophrenic patients compared with the control group. Also patients with schizophrenia group showed higher levels of the inflammatory markers than MDD and control groups. The current study concluded that the immunological response in the MDD and schizophrenic patients groups was significantly stimulated. These disorders may be considered an inflammatory disorder because of elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines in spite of lacking an overt inflammation. Furthermore results of this study suggested the possibility of the use of anti-inflammatory drugs as adjuvant therapy in schizophrenic and depressive disorders. PMID:25985379

  2. Heteromerization Between the Bradykinin B2 Receptor and the Angiotensin-(1-7) Mas Receptor: Functional Consequences.

    PubMed

    Cerrato, Bruno D; Carretero, Oscar A; Janic, Brana; Grecco, Hernán E; Gironacci, Mariela M

    2016-10-01

    Bradykinin B2 receptor (B2R) and angiotensin-(1-7) Mas receptor (MasR)-mediated effects are physiologically interconnected. The molecular basis for such cross talk is unknown. It is hypothesized that the cross talk occurs at the receptor level. We investigated B2R-MasR heteromerization and the functional consequences of such interaction. B2R fused to the cyan fluorescent protein and MasR fused to the yellow fluorescent protein were transiently coexpressed in human embryonic kidney293T cells. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis showed that B2R and MasR formed a constitutive heteromer, which was not modified by their agonists. B2R or MasR antagonists decreased fluorescence resonance energy transfer efficiency, suggesting that the antagonist promoted heteromer dissociation. B2R-MasR heteromerization induced an 8-fold increase in the MasR ligand-binding affinity. On agonist stimulation, the heteromer was internalized into early endosomes with a slower sequestration rate from the plasma membrane, compared with single receptors. B2R-MasR heteromerization induced a greater increase in arachidonic acid release and extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation after angiotensin-(1-7) stimulation, and this effect was blocked by the B2R antagonist. Concerning serine/threonine kinase Akt activity, a significant bradykinin-promoted activation was detected in B2R-MasR but not in B2R-expressing cells. Angiotensin-(1-7) and bradykinin elicited antiproliferative effects only in cells expressing B2R-MasR heteromers, but not in cells expressing each receptor alone. Proximity ligation assay confirmed B2R-MasR interaction in human glomerular endothelial cells supporting the interaction between both receptors in vivo. Our findings provide an explanation for the cross talk between bradykinin B2R and angiotensin-(1-7) MasR-mediated effects. B2R-MasR heteromerization induces functional changes in the receptor that may lead to long-lasting protective properties. PMID

  3. Nestin Modulates Glucocorticoid Receptor Function by Cytoplasmic Anchoring

    PubMed Central

    Szalay, Beata; Hagel, Christian; Hohenberg, Heinrich; Deppert, Wolfgang; Bohn, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Nestin is the characteristic intermediate filament (IF) protein of rapidly proliferating progenitor cells and regenerating tissue. Nestin copolymerizes with class III IF-proteins, mostly vimentin, into heteromeric filaments. Its expression is downregulated with differentiation. Here we show that a strong nestin expression in mouse embryo tissue coincides with a strong accumulation of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), a key regulator of growth and differentiation in embryonic development. Microscopic studies on cultured cells show an association of GR with IFs composed of vimentin and nestin. Cells lacking nestin, but expressing vimentin, or cells expressing vimentin, but lacking nestin accumulate GR in the nucleus. Completing these networks with an exogenous nestin, respectively an exogenous vimentin restores cytoplasmic anchoring of GR to the IF system. Thus, heteromeric filaments provide the basis for anchoring of GR. The reaction pattern with phospho-GR specific antibodies and the presence of the chaperone HSC70 suggest that specifically the unliganded receptor is anchored to the IF system. Ligand addition releases GR from IFs and shifts the receptor into the nucleus. Suppression of nestin by specific shRNA abolishes anchoring of GR, induces its accumulation in the nucleus and provokes an irreversible G1/S cell cycle arrest. Suppression of GR prior to that of nestin prevents entry into the arrest. The data give evidence that nestin/vimentin specific anchoring modulates growth suppression by GR. We hypothesize that expression of nestin is a major determinant in suppression of anti-proliferative activity of GR in undifferentiated tissue and facilitates activation of this growth control in a precise tissue and differentiation dependent manner. PMID:19562035

  4. GRK2 protein-mediated transphosphorylation contributes to loss of function of μ-opioid receptors induced by neuropeptide FF (NPFF2) receptors.

    PubMed

    Moulédous, Lionel; Froment, Carine; Dauvillier, Stéphanie; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Zajac, Jean-Marie; Mollereau, Catherine

    2012-04-13

    Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) interacts with specific receptors to modulate opioid functions in the central nervous system. On dissociated neurons and neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) transfected with NPFF receptors, NPFF acts as a functional antagonist of μ-opioid (MOP) receptors by attenuating the opioid-induced inhibition of calcium conductance. In the SH-SY5Y model, MOP and NPFF(2) receptors have been shown to heteromerize. To understand the molecular mechanism involved in the anti-opioid activity of NPFF, we have investigated the phosphorylation status of the MOP receptor using phospho-specific antibody and mass spectrometry. Similarly to direct opioid receptor stimulation, activation of the NPFF(2) receptor by [D-Tyr-1-(NMe)Phe-3]NPFF (1DMe), an analog of NPFF, induced the phosphorylation of Ser-377 of the human MOP receptor. This heterologous phosphorylation was unaffected by inhibition of second messenger-dependent kinases and, contrarily to homologous phosphorylation, was prevented by inactivation of G(i/o) proteins by pertussis toxin. Using siRNA knockdown we could demonstrate that 1DMe-induced Ser-377 cross-phosphorylation and MOP receptor loss of function were mediated by the G protein receptor kinase GRK2. In addition, mass spectrometric analysis revealed that the phosphorylation pattern of MOP receptors was qualitatively similar after treatment with the MOP agonist Tyr-D-Ala-Gly (NMe)-Phe-Gly-ol (DAMGO) or after treatment with the NPFF agonist 1DMe, but the level of multiple phosphorylation was more intense after DAMGO. Finally, NPFF(2) receptor activation was sufficient to recruit β-arrestin2 to the MOP receptor but not to induce its internalization. These data show that NPFF-induced heterologous desensitization of MOP receptor signaling is mediated by GRK2 and could involve transphosphorylation within the heteromeric receptor complex. PMID:22375000

  5. GRK2 protein-mediated transphosphorylation contributes to loss of function of μ-opioid receptors induced by neuropeptide FF (NPFF2) receptors.

    PubMed

    Moulédous, Lionel; Froment, Carine; Dauvillier, Stéphanie; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Zajac, Jean-Marie; Mollereau, Catherine

    2012-04-13

    Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) interacts with specific receptors to modulate opioid functions in the central nervous system. On dissociated neurons and neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) transfected with NPFF receptors, NPFF acts as a functional antagonist of μ-opioid (MOP) receptors by attenuating the opioid-induced inhibition of calcium conductance. In the SH-SY5Y model, MOP and NPFF(2) receptors have been shown to heteromerize. To understand the molecular mechanism involved in the anti-opioid activity of NPFF, we have investigated the phosphorylation status of the MOP receptor using phospho-specific antibody and mass spectrometry. Similarly to direct opioid receptor stimulation, activation of the NPFF(2) receptor by [D-Tyr-1-(NMe)Phe-3]NPFF (1DMe), an analog of NPFF, induced the phosphorylation of Ser-377 of the human MOP receptor. This heterologous phosphorylation was unaffected by inhibition of second messenger-dependent kinases and, contrarily to homologous phosphorylation, was prevented by inactivation of G(i/o) proteins by pertussis toxin. Using siRNA knockdown we could demonstrate that 1DMe-induced Ser-377 cross-phosphorylation and MOP receptor loss of function were mediated by the G protein receptor kinase GRK2. In addition, mass spectrometric analysis revealed that the phosphorylation pattern of MOP receptors was qualitatively similar after treatment with the MOP agonist Tyr-D-Ala-Gly (NMe)-Phe-Gly-ol (DAMGO) or after treatment with the NPFF agonist 1DMe, but the level of multiple phosphorylation was more intense after DAMGO. Finally, NPFF(2) receptor activation was sufficient to recruit β-arrestin2 to the MOP receptor but not to induce its internalization. These data show that NPFF-induced heterologous desensitization of MOP receptor signaling is mediated by GRK2 and could involve transphosphorylation within the heteromeric receptor complex.

  6. The acute anorexic effect of liraglutide, a GLP-1 receptor agonist, does not require functional leptin receptor, serotonin, and hypothalamic POMC and CART activities in mice.

    PubMed

    Nonogaki, Katsunori; Kaji, Takao

    2016-10-01

    The acute anorexic effect of liraglutide, a GLP-1 receptor agonist, did not require functional leptin receptor, serotonin, and hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin and cocaine amphetamine regulated transcript activities in mice, although decrease in functional hypothalamic orexin activity might be involved in the acute anorexic effect of liraglutide. PMID:27585115

  7. Nuclear receptor function in skin health and disease: therapeutic opportunities in the orphan and adopted receptor classes.

    PubMed

    Yin, Kelvin; Smith, Aaron G

    2016-10-01

    The skin forms a vital barrier between an organism's external environment, providing protection from pathogens and numerous physical and chemical threats. Moreover, the intact barrier is essential to prevent water and electrolyte loss without which terrestrial life could not be maintained. Accordingly, acute disruption of the skin through physical or chemical trauma needs to be repaired timely and efficiently as sustained skin pathologies ranging from mild irritations and inflammation through to malignancy impact considerably on morbidity and mortality. The Nuclear Hormone Receptor Family of transcriptional regulators has proven to be highly valuable targets for addressing a range of pathologies, including metabolic syndrome and cancer. Indeed members of the classic endocrine sub-group, such as the glucocorticoid, retinoid, and Vitamin D receptors, represent mainstay treatment strategies for numerous inflammatory skin disorders, though side effects from prolonged use are common. Emerging evidence has now highlighted important functional roles for nuclear receptors belonging to the adopted and orphan subgroups in skin physiology and patho-physiology. This review will focus on these subgroups and explore the current evidence that suggests these nuclear receptor hold great promise as future stand-alone or complementary drug targets in treating common skin diseases and maintaining skin homeostasis. PMID:27544210

  8. Nuclear receptor function in skin health and disease: therapeutic opportunities in the orphan and adopted receptor classes.

    PubMed

    Yin, Kelvin; Smith, Aaron G

    2016-10-01

    The skin forms a vital barrier between an organism's external environment, providing protection from pathogens and numerous physical and chemical threats. Moreover, the intact barrier is essential to prevent water and electrolyte loss without which terrestrial life could not be maintained. Accordingly, acute disruption of the skin through physical or chemical trauma needs to be repaired timely and efficiently as sustained skin pathologies ranging from mild irritations and inflammation through to malignancy impact considerably on morbidity and mortality. The Nuclear Hormone Receptor Family of transcriptional regulators has proven to be highly valuable targets for addressing a range of pathologies, including metabolic syndrome and cancer. Indeed members of the classic endocrine sub-group, such as the glucocorticoid, retinoid, and Vitamin D receptors, represent mainstay treatment strategies for numerous inflammatory skin disorders, though side effects from prolonged use are common. Emerging evidence has now highlighted important functional roles for nuclear receptors belonging to the adopted and orphan subgroups in skin physiology and patho-physiology. This review will focus on these subgroups and explore the current evidence that suggests these nuclear receptor hold great promise as future stand-alone or complementary drug targets in treating common skin diseases and maintaining skin homeostasis.

  9. Possible mechanisms and function of nuclear trafficking of the colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Rovida, Elisabetta; Dello Sbarba, Persio

    2014-10-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) have long being studied with respect to the "canonical" signaling. This includes ligand-induced activation of a receptor tyrosine kinase at the cell surface that leads to receptor dimerization, followed by its phosphorylation in the intracellular domain and activation. The activated receptor then recruits cytoplasmic signaling molecules including other kinases. Activation of the downstream signaling cascade frequently leads to changes in gene expression following nuclear translocation of downstream targets. However, RTK themselves may localize within the nucleus, as either full-length molecules or cleaved fragments, with or without their ligands. Significant differences in this mechanism have been reported depending on the individual RTK, cellular context or disease. Accumulating evidences indicate that the colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R) may localize within the nucleus. To date, however, little is known about the mechanism of CSF-1R nuclear shuttling, as well as the functional role of nuclear CSF-1R.

  10. Functional Synergy between Cholecystokinin Receptors CCKAR and CCKBR in Mammalian Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Sayoko; Bilgüvar, Kaya; Ishigame, Keiko; Sestan, Nenad; Günel, Murat; Louvi, Angeliki

    2015-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK), a peptide hormone and one of the most abundant neuropeptides in vertebrate brain, mediates its actions via two G-protein coupled receptors, CCKAR and CCKBR, respectively active in peripheral organs and the central nervous system. Here, we demonstrate that the CCK receptors have a dynamic and largely reciprocal expression in embryonic and postnatal brain. Using compound homozygous mutant mice lacking the activity of both CCK receptors, we uncover their additive, functionally synergistic effects in brain development and demonstrate that CCK receptor loss leads to abnormalities of cortical development, including defects in the formation of the midline and corpus callosum, and cortical interneuron migration. Using comparative transcriptome analysis of embryonic neocortex, we define the molecular mechanisms underlying these defects. Thus we demonstrate a developmental, hitherto unappreciated, role of the two CCK receptors in mammalian neocortical development. PMID:25875176

  11. Functional dissociation in sweet taste receptor neurons between and within taste organs of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Thoma, Vladimiros; Knapek, Stephan; Arai, Shogo; Hartl, Marion; Kohsaka, Hiroshi; Sirigrivatanawong, Pudith; Abe, Ayako; Hashimoto, Koichi; Tanimoto, Hiromu

    2016-02-19

    Finding food sources is essential for survival. Insects detect nutrients with external taste receptor neurons. Drosophila possesses multiple taste organs that are distributed throughout its body. However, the role of different taste organs in feeding remains poorly understood. By blocking subsets of sweet taste receptor neurons, we show that receptor neurons in the legs are required for immediate sugar choice. Furthermore, we identify two anatomically distinct classes of sweet taste receptor neurons in the leg. The axonal projections of one class terminate in the thoracic ganglia, whereas the other projects directly to the brain. These two classes are functionally distinct: the brain-projecting neurons are involved in feeding initiation, whereas the thoracic ganglia-projecting neurons play a role in sugar-dependent suppression of locomotion. Distinct receptor neurons for the same taste quality may coordinate early appetitive responses, taking advantage of the legs as the first appendages to contact food.

  12. Functional study of endothelin B receptors in satellite glial cells in trigeminal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Feldman-Goriachnik, Rachel; Hanani, Menachem

    2011-07-13

    There is immunohistochemical evidence for endothelin (ET) receptors in satellite glial cells in sensory ganglia, but there is no information on the function of these receptors. We used calcium imaging to study this question in isolated mouse trigeminal ganglia and found that satellite glial cells are highly sensitive to ET-1, with threshold at 0.05 nM. Responses displayed strong desensitization at ET-1 concentrations of more than 1 nM. A large component of the response persisted when Ca was deleted from the external medium, consistent with Ca release from internal stores. The use of receptor selective agents showed that the responses were mediated by ETB receptors. We conclude that satellite glial cells display endothelin receptors, which may participate in neuron-glia communications in the trigeminal ganglia.

  13. Functional dissociation in sweet taste receptor neurons between and within taste organs of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Thoma, Vladimiros; Knapek, Stephan; Arai, Shogo; Hartl, Marion; Kohsaka, Hiroshi; Sirigrivatanawong, Pudith; Abe, Ayako; Hashimoto, Koichi; Tanimoto, Hiromu

    2016-01-01

    Finding food sources is essential for survival. Insects detect nutrients with external taste receptor neurons. Drosophila possesses multiple taste organs that are distributed throughout its body. However, the role of different taste organs in feeding remains poorly understood. By blocking subsets of sweet taste receptor neurons, we show that receptor neurons in the legs are required for immediate sugar choice. Furthermore, we identify two anatomically distinct classes of sweet taste receptor neurons in the leg. The axonal projections of one class terminate in the thoracic ganglia, whereas the other projects directly to the brain. These two classes are functionally distinct: the brain-projecting neurons are involved in feeding initiation, whereas the thoracic ganglia-projecting neurons play a role in sugar-dependent suppression of locomotion. Distinct receptor neurons for the same taste quality may coordinate early appetitive responses, taking advantage of the legs as the first appendages to contact food. PMID:26893070

  14. The insulin and IGF1 receptor kinase domains are functional dimers in the activated state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabail, M. Zulema; Li, Shiqing; Lemmon, Eric; Bowen, Mark E.; Hubbard, Stevan R.; Miller, W. Todd

    2015-03-01

    The insulin receptor (IR) and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) are highly related receptor tyrosine kinases with a disulfide-linked homodimeric architecture. Ligand binding to the receptor ectodomain triggers tyrosine autophosphorylation of the cytoplasmic domains, which stimulates catalytic activity and creates recruitment sites for downstream signalling proteins. Whether the two phosphorylated tyrosine kinase domains within the receptor dimer function independently or cooperatively to phosphorylate protein substrates is not known. Here we provide crystallographic, biophysical and biochemical evidence demonstrating that the phosphorylated kinase domains of IR and IGF1R form a specific dimeric arrangement involving an exchange of the juxtamembrane region proximal to the kinase domain. In this dimer, the active position of α-helix C in the kinase N lobe is stabilized, which promotes downstream substrate phosphorylation. These studies afford a novel strategy for the design of small-molecule IR agonists as potential therapeutic agents for type 2 diabetes.

  15. Functional dissociation in sweet taste receptor neurons between and within taste organs of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Thoma, Vladimiros; Knapek, Stephan; Arai, Shogo; Hartl, Marion; Kohsaka, Hiroshi; Sirigrivatanawong, Pudith; Abe, Ayako; Hashimoto, Koichi; Tanimoto, Hiromu

    2016-01-01

    Finding food sources is essential for survival. Insects detect nutrients with external taste receptor neurons. Drosophila possesses multiple taste organs that are distributed throughout its body. However, the role of different taste organs in feeding remains poorly understood. By blocking subsets of sweet taste receptor neurons, we show that receptor neurons in the legs are required for immediate sugar choice. Furthermore, we identify two anatomically distinct classes of sweet taste receptor neurons in the leg. The axonal projections of one class terminate in the thoracic ganglia, whereas the other projects directly to the brain. These two classes are functionally distinct: the brain-projecting neurons are involved in feeding initiation, whereas the thoracic ganglia-projecting neurons play a role in sugar-dependent suppression of locomotion. Distinct receptor neurons for the same taste quality may coordinate early appetitive responses, taking advantage of the legs as the first appendages to contact food. PMID:26893070

  16. β2-Adrenergic Receptors Chaperone Trapped Bitter Taste Receptor 14 to the Cell Surface as a Heterodimer and Exert Unidirectional Desensitization of Taste Receptor Function.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donghwa; Pauer, Susan H; Yong, Hwan M; An, Steven S; Liggett, Stephen B

    2016-08-19

    Bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs) are G-protein-coupled receptors now recognized to be expressed on extraoral cells, including airway smooth muscle (ASM) where they evoke relaxation. TAS2Rs are difficult to express in heterologous systems, with most receptors being trapped intracellularly. We find, however, that co-expression of β2-adrenergic receptors (β2AR) in HEK-293T routes TAS2R14 to the cell surface by forming receptor heterodimers. Cell surface TAS2R14 expression was increased by ∼5-fold when β2AR was co-expressed. Heterodimer formation was shown by co-immunoprecipitation with tagged receptors, biomolecular fluorescence complementation, and merged confocal images. The dynamic nature of this interaction was shown by: a gene-dose relationship between transfected β2AR and TAS2R14 expression, enhanced (up to 3-fold) TAS2R14 agonist stimulation of [Ca(2+)]i with β2AR co-transfection, ∼53% decrease in [Ca(2+)]i signaling with shRNA knockdown of β2AR in H292 cells, and ∼60% loss of [Ca(2+)]i responsiveness in βAR knock-out mouse ASM. Once expressed on the surface, we detected unidirectional, conformation-dependent, interaction within the heterodimer, with β2AR activation rapidly uncoupling TAS2R14 function (∼65% desensitization). Cross-talk was independent of β2AR internalization and cAMP/PKA, and not accompanied by TAS2R14 internalization. With prolonged β-agonist exposure, TAS2R14 internalized, consistent with slow recycling of naked TAS2R14 in the absence of the heterodimeric milieu. In studies of ASM mechanics, rapid cross-talk was confirmed at the physiologic level, where relaxation from TAS2R14 agonist was decreased by ∼50% with β-agonist co-treatment. Thus the β2AR acts as a double-edged sword: increasing TAS2R14 cell surface expression, but when activated by β-agonist, partially offsetting the expression phenotype by direct receptor:receptor desensitization of TAS2R14 function. PMID:27342779

  17. β2-Adrenergic Receptors Chaperone Trapped Bitter Taste Receptor 14 to the Cell Surface as a Heterodimer and Exert Unidirectional Desensitization of Taste Receptor Function*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Donghwa; Pauer, Susan H.; Yong, Hwan M.; An, Steven S.; Liggett, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs) are G-protein-coupled receptors now recognized to be expressed on extraoral cells, including airway smooth muscle (ASM) where they evoke relaxation. TAS2Rs are difficult to express in heterologous systems, with most receptors being trapped intracellularly. We find, however, that co-expression of β2-adrenergic receptors (β2AR) in HEK-293T routes TAS2R14 to the cell surface by forming receptor heterodimers. Cell surface TAS2R14 expression was increased by ∼5-fold when β2AR was co-expressed. Heterodimer formation was shown by co-immunoprecipitation with tagged receptors, biomolecular fluorescence complementation, and merged confocal images. The dynamic nature of this interaction was shown by: a gene-dose relationship between transfected β2AR and TAS2R14 expression, enhanced (up to 3-fold) TAS2R14 agonist stimulation of [Ca2+]i with β2AR co-transfection, ∼53% decrease in [Ca2+]i signaling with shRNA knockdown of β2AR in H292 cells, and ∼60% loss of [Ca2+]i responsiveness in βAR knock-out mouse ASM. Once expressed on the surface, we detected unidirectional, conformation-dependent, interaction within the heterodimer, with β2AR activation rapidly uncoupling TAS2R14 function (∼65% desensitization). Cross-talk was independent of β2AR internalization and cAMP/PKA, and not accompanied by TAS2R14 internalization. With prolonged β-agonist exposure, TAS2R14 internalized, consistent with slow recycling of naked TAS2R14 in the absence of the heterodimeric milieu. In studies of ASM mechanics, rapid cross-talk was confirmed at the physiologic level, where relaxation from TAS2R14 agonist was decreased by ∼50% with β-agonist co-treatment. Thus the β2AR acts as a double-edged sword: increasing TAS2R14 cell surface expression, but when activated by β-agonist, partially offsetting the expression phenotype by direct receptor:receptor desensitization of TAS2R14 function. PMID:27342779

  18. Loss of renal medullary endothelin B receptor function during salt deprivation is regulated by angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Kittikulsuth, Wararat; Pollock, Jennifer S; Pollock, David M

    2012-09-01

    We have recently demonstrated that chronic infusion of exogenous ANG II, which induces blood pressure elevation, attenuates renal medullary endothelin B (ET(B)) receptor function in rats. Moreover, this was associated with a reduction of ET(B) receptor expression in the renal inner medulla. The aim of this present work was to investigate the effect of a physiological increase in endogenous ANG II (low-salt diet) on the renal ET system, including ET(B) receptor function. We hypothesized that endogenous ANG II reduces renal medullary ET(B) receptor function during low-salt intake. Rats were placed on a low-salt diet (0.01-0.02% NaCl) for 2 wk to allow an increase in endogenous ANG II. In rats on normal-salt chow, the stimulation of renal medullary ET(B) receptor by ET(B) receptor agonist sarafotoxin 6c (S6c) causes an increase in water (3.6 ± 0.4 from baseline vs. 10.5 ± 1.3 μl/min following S6c infusion; P < 0.05) and sodium excretion (0.38 ± 0.06 vs. 1.23 ± 0.17 μmol/min; P < 0.05). The low-salt diet reduced the ET(B)-dependent diuresis (4.5 ± 0.5 vs. 6.1 ± 0.9 μl/min) and natriuresis (0.40 ± 0.11 vs. 0.46 ± 0.12 μmol/min) in response to acute intramedullary infusion of S6c. Chronic treatment with candesartan restored renal medullary ET(B) receptor function; urine flow was 7.1 ± 0.9 vs. 15.9 ± 1.7 μl/min (P < 0.05), and sodium excretion was 0.4 ± 0.1 vs. 1.1 ± 0.1 μmol/min (P < 0.05) before and after intramedullary S6c infusion, respectively. Receptor binding assays determined that the sodium-depleted diet resulted in a similar level of ET(B) receptor binding in renal inner medulla compared with rats on a normal-salt diet. Candesartan reduced renal inner medullary ET(B) receptor binding (1,414 ± 95 vs. 862 ± 50 fmol/mg; P < 0.05). We conclude that endogenous ANG II attenuates renal medullary ET(B) receptor function to conserve sodium during salt deprivation independently of receptor expression.

  19. Mutations and polymorphisms in FSH receptor: functional implications in human reproduction.

    PubMed

    Desai, Swapna S; Roy, Binita Sur; Mahale, Smita D

    2013-12-01

    FSH brings about its physiological actions by activating a specific receptor located on target cells. Normal functioning of the FSH receptor (FSHR) is crucial for follicular development and estradiol production in females and for the regulation of Sertoli cell function and spermatogenesis in males. In the last two decades, the number of inactivating and activating mutations, single nucleotide polymorphisms, and spliced variants of FSHR gene has been identified in selected infertile cases. Information on genotype-phenotype correlation and in vitro functional characterization of the mutants has helped in understanding the possible genetic cause for female infertility in affected individuals. The information is also being used to dissect various extracellular and intracellular events involved in hormone-receptor interaction by studying the differences in the properties of the mutant receptor when compared with WT receptor. Studies on polymorphisms in the FSHR gene have shown variability in clinical outcome among women treated with FSH. These observations are being explored to develop molecular markers to predict the optimum dose of FSH required for controlled ovarian hyperstimulation. Pharmacogenetics is an emerging field in this area that aims at designing individual treatment protocols for reproductive abnormalities based on FSHR gene polymorphisms. The present review discusses the current knowledge of various genetic alterations in FSHR and their impact on receptor function in the female reproductive system.

  20. Plasticity of GABAA Receptors during Pregnancy and Postpartum Period: From Gene to Function

    PubMed Central

    Licheri, Valentina; Talani, Giuseppe; Gorule, Ashish A.; Mostallino, Maria Cristina; Biggio, Giovanni; Sanna, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy needs complex pathways that together play a role in proper growth and protection of the fetus preventing its premature loss. Changes during pregnancy and postpartum period include the manifold machinery of neuroactive steroids that plays a crucial role in neuronal excitability by local modulation of specific inhibitory receptors: the GABAA receptors. Marked fluctuations in both blood and brain concentration of neuroactive steroids strongly contribute to GABAA receptor function and plasticity. In this review, we listed several interesting results regarding the regulation and plasticity of GABAA receptor function during pregnancy and postpartum period in rats. The increase in brain levels of neuroactive steroids during pregnancy and their sudden decrease immediately before delivery are causally related to changes in the expression/function of specific GABAA receptor subunits in the hippocampus. These data suggest that alterations in GABAA receptor expression and function may be related to neurological and psychiatric disorders associated with crucial periods in women. These findings could help to provide potential new treatments for these women's disabling syndromes. PMID:26413323

  1. Nuclear Receptor Expression and Function in Human Lung Cancer Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jihye; Sato, Mitsuo; Choi, Jong-Whan; Kim, Hyun-Won; Yeh, Byung-Il; Larsen, Jill E.; Minna, John D.; Cha, Jeong-Heon; Jeong, Yangsik

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is caused by combinations of diverse genetic mutations. Here, to understand the relevance of nuclear receptors (NRs) in the oncogene-associated lung cancer pathogenesis, we investigated the expression profile of the entire 48 NR members by using QPCR analysis in a panel of human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) that included precancerous and tumorigenic HBECs harboring oncogenic K-rasV12 and/or p53 alterations. The analysis of the profile revealed that oncogenic alterations accompanied transcriptional changes in the expression of 19 NRs in precancerous HBECs and 15 NRs according to the malignant progression of HBECs. Amongst these, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), a NR chosen as a proof-of-principle study, showed increased expression in precancerous HBECs, which was surprisingly reversed when these HBECs acquired full in vivo tumorigenicity. Notably, PPARγ activation by thiazolidinedione (TZD) treatment reversed the increased expression of pro-inflammatory cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) in precancerous HBECs. In fully tumorigenic HBECs with inducible expression of PPARγ, TZD treatments inhibited tumor cell growth, clonogenecity, and cell migration in a PPARγ-sumoylation dependent manner. Mechanistically, the sumoylation of liganded-PPARγ decreased COX2 expression and increased 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase expression. This suggests that ligand-mediated sumoylation of PPARγ plays an important role in lung cancer pathogenesis by modulating prostaglandin metabolism. PMID:26244663

  2. Zolpidem modulates GABA(A) receptor function in subthalamic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Xie, Jun-Xia; Fung, Kam-Shuen; Yung, Wing-Ho

    2007-05-01

    The subthalamic nucleus occupies a position in the indirect pathway of basal ganglia circuit, which plays an important role in the movement regulation. Zolpidem is an imidazopyridine agonist with a high affinity on the benzodiazepine site of GABA(A) receptors containing alpha 1 subunit. Recently, zolpidem has been reported to be useful in treating subgroups of parkinsonian patients. A high density of zolpidem binding sites has been shown in rat subthalamic nucleus. To further investigate the modulation of zolpidem on GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibitory synaptic current in subthalamic nucleus, whole-cell patch clamp recordings were used in the present study. Zolpidem at 100nM significantly prolonged the decay time and rise time of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents, with no effect on the amplitude and frequency. The benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil could completely block the potentiation induced by zolpidem, confirming the specificity on the benzodiazepine site. At a high concentration of 1 microM, zolpidem significantly increased the decay time, rise time, amplitude and frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents. In the behaving rats, unilateral microinjection of zolpidem into subthalamic nucleus induced a significant contralateral rotation. The present findings on the effect of zolpidem in subthalamic nucleus provide a rationale for further investigations into its potential in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. PMID:17337310

  3. Fucosylation and protein glycosylation create functional receptors for cholera toxin

    PubMed Central

    Wands, Amberlyn M; Fujita, Akiko; McCombs, Janet E; Cervin, Jakob; Dedic, Benjamin; Rodriguez, Andrea C; Nischan, Nicole; Bond, Michelle R; Mettlen, Marcel; Trudgian, David C; Lemoff, Andrew; Quiding-Järbrink, Marianne; Gustavsson, Bengt; Steentoft, Catharina; Clausen, Henrik; Mirzaei, Hamid; Teneberg, Susann; Yrlid, Ulf; Kohler, Jennifer J

    2015-01-01

    Cholera toxin (CT) enters and intoxicates host cells after binding cell surface receptors using its B subunit (CTB). The ganglioside (glycolipid) GM1 is thought to be the sole CT receptor; however, the mechanism by which CTB binding to GM1 mediates internalization of CT remains enigmatic. Here we report that CTB binds cell surface glycoproteins. Relative contributions of gangliosides and glycoproteins to CTB binding depend on cell type, and CTB binds primarily to glycoproteins in colonic epithelial cell lines. Using a metabolically incorporated photocrosslinking sugar, we identified one CTB-binding glycoprotein and demonstrated that the glycan portion of the molecule, not the protein, provides the CTB interaction motif. We further show that fucosylated structures promote CTB entry into a colonic epithelial cell line and subsequent host cell intoxication. CTB-binding fucosylated glycoproteins are present in normal human intestinal epithelia and could play a role in cholera. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09545.001 PMID:26512888

  4. Differential transcription factor use by the KIR2DL4 promoter under constitutive and IL-2/15-treated conditions.

    PubMed

    Presnell, Steven R; Zhang, Lei; Chlebowy, Corrin N; Al-Attar, Ahmad; Lutz, Charles T

    2012-05-01

    KIR2DL4 is unique among human KIR genes in expression, cellular localization, structure, and function, yet the transcription factors required for its expression have not been identified. Using mutagenesis, EMSA, and cotransfection assays, we identified two redundant Runx binding sites in the 2DL4 promoter as essential for constitutive 2DL4 transcription, with contributions by a cyclic AMP response element (CRE) and initiator elements. IL-2- and IL-15-stimulated human NK cell lines increased 2DL4 promoter activity, which required functional Runx, CRE, and Ets sites. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments show that Runx3 and Ets1 bind the 2DL4 promoter in situ. 2DL4 promoter activity had similar transcription factor requirements in T cells. Runx, CRE, and Ets binding motifs are present in 2DL4 promoters from across primate species, but other postulated transcription factor binding sites are not preserved. Differences between 2DL4 and clonally restricted KIR promoters suggest a model that explains the unique 2DL4 expression pattern in human NK cells.

  5. Nuclear receptors: potential biomarkers for assessing physiological functions of soy proteins and phytoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Chao Wu; Wood, Carla; Gilani, G Sarwar

    2006-01-01

    Soy consumption is associated with decreased incidence of chronic diseases, including cardiovascular diseases, atherosclerosis, diabetes, osteoporosis, and certain types of cancers. However, consumption of high amounts of soy isoflavones may adversely influence endocrine functions, such as thyroid function and reproductive performance, because of their structural similarity to endogenous estrogens. Nuclear receptors are a group of transcription factors that play critical roles in the regulation of gene expression and physiological functions through direct interaction with target genes. Modulation of the abundance of these receptors, such as changing their gene expression, alters the sensitivity of the target cells or tissues to the stimulation of ligands, and eventually affects the relevant physiological functions, such as growth, development, osteogenesis, immune response, lipogenesis, reproductive process, and anticarcinogenesis. A number of studies have shown that the bioactive components in soy can modify the expression of these receptors in various tissues and cancer cells, which is believed to be a key intracellular mechanism by which soy components affect physiological functions. This review summarizes the current understanding of the modulation of nuclear receptors by soy proteins and isoflavones, and focuses especially on the receptors for estrogens, progesterone, androgen, vitamin D, retinoic acid, and thyroid hormones as well as the potential impact on physiological functions.

  6. Trace amines inhibit insect odorant receptor function through antagonism of the co-receptor subunit

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sisi; Luetje, Charles W.

    2014-01-01

    Many insect behaviors are driven by olfaction, making insect olfactory receptors (ORs) appealing targets for insect control.  Insect ORs are odorant-gated ion channels, with each receptor thought to be composed of a representative from a large, variable family of odorant binding subunits and a highly conserved co-receptor subunit (Orco), assembled in an unknown stoichiometry.  Synthetic Orco directed agonists and antagonists have recently been identified.  Several Orco antagonists have been shown to act via an allosteric mechanism to inhibit OR activation by odorants.  The high degree of conservation of Orco across insect species results in Orco antagonists having broad activity at ORs from a variety of insect species and suggests that the binding site for Orco ligands may serve as a modulatory site for compounds endogenous to insects or may be a target of exogenous compounds, such as those produced by plants.  To test this idea, we screened a series of biogenic and trace amines, identifying several as Orco antagonists.  Of particular interest were tryptamine, a plant-produced amine, and tyramine, an amine endogenous to the insect nervous system.  Tryptamine was found to be a potent antagonist of Orco, able to block Orco activation by an Orco agonist and to allosterically inhibit activation of ORs by odorants.  Tyramine had effects similar to those of tryptamine, but was less potent.  Importantly, both tryptamine and tyramine displayed broad activity, inhibiting odorant activation of ORs of species from three different insect orders (Diptera, Lepidoptera and Coleoptera), as well as odorant activation of six diverse ORs from a single species (the human malaria vector mosquito, Anopheles gambiae).  Our results suggest that endogenous and exogenous natural compounds serve as Orco ligands modulating insect olfaction and that Orco can be an important target for the development of novel insect repellants. PMID:25075297

  7. Functional Overexpression of Vomeronasal Receptors Using a Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1)-Derived Amplicon

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Benjamin; Alonso, María Teresa; Zufall, Frank; Leinders-Zufall, Trese; Chamero, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    In mice, social behaviors such as mating and aggression are mediated by pheromones and related chemosignals. The vomeronasal organ (VNO) detects olfactory information from other individuals by sensory neurons tuned to respond to specific chemical cues. Receptors expressed by vomeronasal neurons are implicated in selective detection of these cues. Nearly 400 receptor genes have been identified in the mouse VNO, but the tuning properties of individual receptors remain poorly understood, in part due to the lack of a robust heterologous expression system. Here we develop a herpes virus-based amplicon delivery system to overexpress three types of vomeronasal receptor genes and to characterize cell responses to their proposed ligands. Through Ca2+ imaging in native VNO cells we show that virus-induced overexpression of V1rj2, V2r1b or Fpr3 caused a pronounced increase of responsivity to sulfated steroids, MHC-binding peptide or the synthetic hexapeptide W-peptide, respectively. Other related ligands were not recognized by infected individual neurons, indicating a high degree of selectivity by the overexpressed receptor. Removal of G-protein signaling eliminates Ca2+ responses, indicating that the endogenous second messenger system is essential for observing receptor activation. Our results provide a novel expression system for vomeronasal receptors that should be useful for understanding the molecular logic of VNO ligand detection. Functional expression of vomeronasal receptors and their deorphanization provides an essential requirement for deciphering the neural mechanisms controlling behavior. PMID:27195771

  8. Density functional theory and conductivity studies of boron-based anion receptors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Leung, Kevin; Chaudhari, Mangesh I.; Rempe, Susan B.; Fenton, Kyle R.; Pratt, III, Harry D.; Staiger, Chad L.; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan

    2015-07-10

    Anion receptors that bind strongly to fluoride anions in organic solvents can help dissolve the lithium fluoride discharge products of primary carbon monofluoride (CFx) batteries, thereby preventing the clogging of cathode surfaces and improving ion conductivity. The receptors are also potentially beneficial to rechargeable lithium ion and lithium air batteries. We apply Density Functional Theory (DFT) to show that an oxalate-based pentafluorophenyl-boron anion receptor binds as strongly, or more strongly, to fluoride anions than many phenyl-boron anion receptors proposed in the literature. Experimental data shows marked improvement in electrolyte conductivity when this oxalate anion receptor is present. The receptor ismore » sufficiently electrophilic that organic solvent molecules compete with F– for boron-site binding, and specific solvent effects must be considered when predicting its F– affinity. To further illustrate the last point, we also perform computational studies on a geometrically constrained boron ester that exhibits much stronger gas-phase affinity for both F– and organic solvent molecules. After accounting for specific solvent effects, however, its net F– affinity is about the same as the simple oxalate-based anion receptor. Lastly, we propose that LiF dissolution in cyclic carbonate organic solvents, in the absence of anion receptors, is due mostly to the formation of ionic aggregates, not isolated F– ions.« less

  9. Density functional theory and conductivity studies of boron-based anion receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Kevin; Chaudhari, Mangesh I.; Rempe, Susan B.; Fenton, Kyle R.; Pratt, III, Harry D.; Staiger, Chad L.; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan

    2015-07-10

    Anion receptors that bind strongly to fluoride anions in organic solvents can help dissolve the lithium fluoride discharge products of primary carbon monofluoride (CFx) batteries, thereby preventing the clogging of cathode surfaces and improving ion conductivity. The receptors are also potentially beneficial to rechargeable lithium ion and lithium air batteries. We apply Density Functional Theory (DFT) to show that an oxalate-based pentafluorophenyl-boron anion receptor binds as strongly, or more strongly, to fluoride anions than many phenyl-boron anion receptors proposed in the literature. Experimental data shows marked improvement in electrolyte conductivity when this oxalate anion receptor is present. The receptor is sufficiently electrophilic that organic solvent molecules compete with F for boron-site binding, and specific solvent effects must be considered when predicting its F affinity. To further illustrate the last point, we also perform computational studies on a geometrically constrained boron ester that exhibits much stronger gas-phase affinity for both F and organic solvent molecules. After accounting for specific solvent effects, however, its net F affinity is about the same as the simple oxalate-based anion receptor. Lastly, we propose that LiF dissolution in cyclic carbonate organic solvents, in the absence of anion receptors, is due mostly to the formation of ionic aggregates, not isolated F ions.

  10. Functional characteristics of alpha adrenergic and endothelinergic receptors in pressurized rat mesenteric veins.

    PubMed

    Enouri, Saad; Monteith, Gabrielle; Johnson, Ron

    2013-07-01

    Increasing transmural pressure can alter the functional role of post-junctional receptor subtypes. Under conditions of changing transmural pressure, we investigated the relative contributions of alpha adrenergic (α-ARs) and endothelinergic receptors to norepinephrine (NE) and endothelin (ET-1) contractile responses, respectively, in third-order rat mesenteric small veins (MSV) and arteries (MSA). NE, phenylephrine (PE), clonidine, and ET-1 concentration-response curves were constructed in the absence and presence of α-adrenergic and ET-1 receptor antagonists, respectively. MSV were more sensitive to NE, PE, and ET-1 compared with MSA. The sensitivity of MSV to NE was higher than that to PE. Phentolamine (α1-AR/α2-AR antagonist) and prazosin (α1-AR antagonist) completely abolished NE responses. Yohimbine (α2-AR antagonist) reduced NE and clonidine contractile responses in MSV. Clonidine contractile responses were reduced by prazosin in MSA. In MSA and MSV, BQ-610 (ET(A) receptor antagonist) but not BQ-788 (ET(B) receptor antagonist) reduced ET-1 contractile responses. Combined application of BQ-610 and BQ-788 caused further reduction in ET-1 concentration-response curves obtained in MSV. These results suggest that in addition to α1-ARs and ET(A) receptors, α2-ARs and ET(B) receptors also mediate NE and ET-1 contractile responses in MSV, respectively, with no change in the participation of these receptors as transmural pressure is increased.

  11. Functional Selectivity and Antidepressant Activity of Serotonin 1A Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Chilmonczyk, Zdzisław; Bojarski, Andrzej Jacek; Pilc, Andrzej; Sylte, Ingebrigt

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a monoamine neurotransmitter that plays an important role in physiological functions. 5-HT has been implicated in sleep, feeding, sexual behavior, temperature regulation, pain, and cognition as well as in pathological states including disorders connected to mood, anxiety, psychosis and pain. 5-HT1A receptors have for a long time been considered as an interesting target for the action of antidepressant drugs. It was postulated that postsynaptic 5-HT1A agonists could form a new class of antidepressant drugs, and mixed 5-HT1A receptor ligands/serotonin transporter (SERT) inhibitors seem to possess an interesting pharmacological profile. It should, however, be noted that 5-HT1A receptors can activate several different biochemical pathways and signal through both G protein-dependent and G protein-independent pathways. The variables that affect the multiplicity of 5-HT1A receptor signaling pathways would thus result from the summation of effects specific to the host cell milieu. Moreover, receptor trafficking appears different at pre- and postsynaptic sites. It should also be noted that the 5-HT1A receptor cooperates with other signal transduction systems (like the 5-HT1B or 5-HT2A/2B/2C receptors, the GABAergic and the glutaminergic systems), which also contribute to its antidepressant and/or anxiolytic activity. Thus identifying brain specific molecular targets for 5-HT1A receptor ligands may result in a better targeting, raising a hope for more effective medicines for various pathologies. PMID:26262615

  12. Detection and functional portrayal of a novel class of dihydrotestosterone derived selective progesterone receptor modulators (SPRM).

    PubMed

    Andrieu, Thomas; Mani, Orlando; Goepfert, Christine; Bertolini, Reto; Guettinger, Andreas; Setoud, Raschid; Uh, Kayla Y; Baker, Michael E; Frey, Felix J; Frey, Brigitte M

    2015-03-01

    In early pregnancy, abortion can be induced by blocking the actions of progesterone receptors (PR). However, the PR antagonist, mifepristone (RU38486), is rather unselective in clinical use because it also cross-reacts with other nuclear receptors. Since the ligand-binding domain of human progesterone receptor (hPR) and androgen receptor (hAR) share 54% identity, we hypothesized that derivatives of dihydrotestosterone (DHT), the cognate ligand for hAR, might also regulate the hPR. Compounds designed and synthesized in our laboratory were investigated for their affinities for hPRB, hAR, glucocorticoid receptor (hGRα) and mineralocorticoid receptor (hMR), using whole cell receptor competitive binding assays. Agonistic and antagonistic activities were characterized by reporter assays. Nuclear translocation was monitored using cherry-hPRB and GFP-hAR chimeric receptors. Cytostatic properties and apoptosis were tested on breast cancer cells (MCF7, T-47D). One compound presented a favorable profile with an apparent neutral hPRB antagonistic function, a selective cherry-hPRB nuclear translocation and a cytostatic effect. 3D models of human PR and AR with this ligand were constructed to investigate the molecular basis of selectivity. Our data suggest that these novel DHT-derivatives provide suitable templates for the development of new selective steroidal hPR antagonists.

  13. Functional Overexpression of Vomeronasal Receptors Using a Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1)-Derived Amplicon.

    PubMed

    Stein, Benjamin; Alonso, María Teresa; Zufall, Frank; Leinders-Zufall, Trese; Chamero, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    In mice, social behaviors such as mating and aggression are mediated by pheromones and related chemosignals. The vomeronasal organ (VNO) detects olfactory information from other individuals by sensory neurons tuned to respond to specific chemical cues. Receptors expressed by vomeronasal neurons are implicated in selective detection of these cues. Nearly 400 receptor genes have been identified in the mouse VNO, but the tuning properties of individual receptors remain poorly understood, in part due to the lack of a robust heterologous expression system. Here we develop a herpes virus-based amplicon delivery system to overexpress three types of vomeronasal receptor genes and to characterize cell responses to their proposed ligands. Through Ca2+ imaging in native VNO cells we show that virus-induced overexpression of V1rj2, V2r1b or Fpr3 caused a pronounced increase of responsivity to sulfated steroids, MHC-binding peptide or the synthetic hexapeptide W-peptide, respectively. Other related ligands were not recognized by infected individual neurons, indicating a high degree of selectivity by the overexpressed receptor. Removal of G-protein signaling eliminates Ca2+ responses, indicating that the endogenous second messenger system is essential for observing receptor activation. Our results provide a novel expression system for vomeronasal receptors that should be useful for understanding the molecular logic of VNO ligand detection. Functional expression of vomeronasal receptors and their deorphanization provides an essential requirement for deciphering the neural mechanisms controlling behavior. PMID:27195771

  14. Extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptors in the brainstem and spinal cord: structure and function.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Lezama, Rodolfo; Loeza-Alcocer, Emanuel; Andrés, Carmen; Aguilar, Justo; Guertin, Pierre A; Felix, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) plays many of its key roles in embryonic development and functioning of the central nervous system (CNS) by acting on ligand gated chloride-permeable channels known as GABAA receptors (GABAAR). Classically, GABAARmediated synaptic communication is tailored to allow rapid and precise transmission of information to synchronize the activity of large populations of cells to generate and maintain neuronal networks oscillations. An alternative type of inhibition mediated by GABAA receptors, initially described about 25 years ago, is characterized by a tonic activation of receptors that react to ambient extracellular GABA. The receptors that mediate this action are wide-spread throughout the nerve cells but are located distant from the sites of GABA release, and therefore they have been called extrasynaptic GABAA receptors. The molecular nature of the extrasynaptic GABAA receptors and the tonic inhibitory current they generate have been characterized in many brain structures, and due to its relevance in controlling neuron excitability they have become attractive pharmacological targets for a variety of neurological disorders such as schizophrenia, epilepsy and Parkinson disease. In the spinal cord, early studies have implicated these receptors in anesthesia, chronic pain, motor control, and locomotion. This review highlights past and present developments in the field of extrasynaptic GABAA receptors and emphasizes their subunit containing distribution and physiological role in the spinal cord. PMID:23360278

  15. Primary structure and functional expression of a guinea pig kappa opioid (dynorphin) receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Xie, G X; Meng, F; Mansour, A; Thompson, R C; Hoversten, M T; Goldstein, A; Watson, S J; Akil, H

    1994-01-01

    A full-length cDNA encoding the guinea pig kappa opioid (dynorphin) receptor has been isolated. The deduced protein contains 380 aa and seven hydrophobic alpha-helices characteristic of the G protein-coupled receptors. This receptor is 90% identical to the mouse and rat kappa receptors, with the greatest level of divergence in the N-terminal region. When expressed in COS-7 cells, the receptor displays high affinity and stereospecificity toward dynorphin peptides and other kappa-selective opioid ligands such as U50, 488. It does not bind the mu- and delta-selective opioid ligands. The expressed receptor is functionally coupled to G protein(s) to inhibit adenylyl cyclase and Ca2+ channels. The guinea pig kappa receptor mRNA is expressed in many brain areas, including the cerebellum, a pattern that agrees well with autoradiographic maps of classical guinea pig kappa binding sites. Species differences in the pharmacology and mRNA distribution between the cloned guinea pig and rat kappa receptors may be worthy of further examination. Images PMID:8170987

  16. Functional Selectivity and Antidepressant Activity of Serotonin 1A Receptor Ligands.

    PubMed

    Chilmonczyk, Zdzisław; Bojarski, Andrzej Jacek; Pilc, Andrzej; Sylte, Ingebrigt

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a monoamine neurotransmitter that plays an important role in physiological functions. 5-HT has been implicated in sleep, feeding, sexual behavior, temperature regulation, pain, and cognition as well as in pathological states including disorders connected to mood, anxiety, psychosis and pain. 5-HT1A receptors have for a long time been considered as an interesting target for the action of antidepressant drugs. It was postulated that postsynaptic 5-HT1A agonists could form a new class of antidepressant drugs, and mixed 5-HT1A receptor ligands/serotonin transporter (SERT) inhibitors seem to possess an interesting pharmacological profile. It should, however, be noted that 5-HT1A receptors can activate several different biochemical pathways and signal through both G protein-dependent and G protein-independent pathways. The variables that affect the multiplicity of 5-HT1A receptor signaling pathways would thus result from the summation of effects specific to the host cell milieu. Moreover, receptor trafficking appears different at pre- and postsynaptic sites. It should also be noted that the 5-HT1A receptor cooperates with other signal transduction systems (like the 5-HT1B or 5-HT2A/2B/2C receptors, the GABAergic and the glutaminergic systems), which also contribute to its antidepressant and/or anxiolytic activity. Thus identifying brain specific molecular targets for 5-HT1A receptor ligands may result in a better targeting, raising a hope for more effective medicines for various pathologies. PMID:26262615

  17. GABAA receptor beta subunit heterogeneity: functional expression of cloned cDNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Ymer, S; Schofield, P R; Draguhn, A; Werner, P; Köhler, M; Seeburg, P H

    1989-01-01

    Cloned cDNAs encoding two new beta subunits of the rat and bovine GABAA receptor have been isolated using a degenerate oligonucleotide probe based on a highly conserved peptide sequence in the second transmembrane domain of GABAA receptor subunits. The beta 2 and beta 3 subunits share approximately 72% sequence identity with the previously characterized beta 1 polypeptide. Northern analysis showed that both beta 2 and beta 3 mRNAs are more abundant in the brain than beta 1 mRNA. All three beta subunit encoding cDNAs were also identified in a library constructed from adrenal medulla RNA. Each beta subunit, when co-expressed in Xenopus oocytes with an alpha subunit, forms functional GABAA receptors. These results, together with the known alpha subunit heterogeneity, suggest that a variety of related but functionally distinct GABAA receptor subtypes are generated by different subunit combinations. Images PMID:2548852

  18. Amino acid coevolution reveals three-dimensional structure and functional domains of insect odorant receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hopf, Thomas A.; Morinaga, Satoshi; Ihara, Sayoko; Touhara, Kazushige; Marks, Debora S.; Benton, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Insect Odorant Receptors (ORs) comprise an enormous protein family that translates environmental chemical signals into neuronal electrical activity. These heptahelical receptors are proposed to function as ligand-gated ion channels and/or to act metabotropically as G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Resolving their signalling mechanism has been hampered by the lack of tertiary structural information and primary sequence similarity to other proteins. We use amino acid evolutionary covariation across these ORs to define restraints on structural proximity of residue pairs, which permit de novo generation of three-dimensional models. The validity of our analysis is supported by the location of functionally important residues in highly constrained regions of the protein. Importantly, insect OR models exhibit a distinct transmembrane domain packing arrangement to that of canonical GPCRs, establishing the structural unrelatedness of these receptor families. The evolutionary couplings and models predict odour binding and ion conduction domains, and provide a template for rationale structure-activity dissection. PMID:25584517

  19. Signaling, physiological functions and clinical relevance of the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor GPER

    PubMed Central

    Prossnitz, Eric R.; Barton, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    GPR30, now named GPER1 (G protein-coupled estrogen receptor1) or GPER here, was first identified as an orphan 7- transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor by multiple laboratories using either homology cloning or differential expression and subsequently shown to be required for estrogen-mediated signaling in certain cancer cells. The actions of estrogen are extensive in the body and are thought to be mediated predominantly by classical nuclear estrogen receptors that act as transcription factors/regulators. Nevertheless, certain aspects of estrogen function remain incompatible with the generally accepted mechanisms of classical estrogen receptor action. Many recent studies have revealed that GPER contributes to some of the actions of estrogen, including rapid signaling events and rapid transcriptional activation. With the introduction of GPER-selective ligands and GPER knockout mice, the functions of GPER are becoming more clearly defined. In many cases, there appears to be a complex interplay between the two receptor systems, suggesting that estrogen-mediated physiological responses may be mediated by either receptor or a combination of both receptor types, with important medical implications. PMID:19442754

  20. Neurodegeneration in mice resulting from loss of functional selenoprotein P or its receptor apolipoprotein E receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Valentine, William M; Abel, Ty W; Hill, Kristina E; Austin, Lori M; Burk, Raymond F

    2008-01-01

    Selenoprotein P (Sepp1) is involved in selenium homeostasis. Mice with a deletion of Sepp1, replacement of it by the shortened form Sepp1(Delta240-361), or deletion of its receptor apolipoprotein E receptor 2 develop severe neurologic dysfunction when fed low-selenium diet. Because the brainstems of Sepp1(-/-) mice had been observed to contain degenerated axons, a study of these 3 strains was made under selenium-deficient and high-selenium (control) conditions. Selenium-deficient wild-type mice were additional controls. Serial sections of the brain were evaluated with amino cupric silver degeneration and anti-glial fibrillary acidic protein stains. All 3 strains with altered Sepp1 metabolism developed severe axonal injury when fed selenium deficient diet. This injury was mitigated by high-selenium diet and was absent from selenium-deficient wild-type mice. Injury was most severe in Sepp1(-/-) mice, with staining in at least 6 brain regions. Injury in Sepp1(Delta240-361) and apolipoprotein E receptor 2 mice was less severe and occurred only in areas injured in Sepp1(-/-) mice, suggesting a common selenium-related etiology. Affected brain regions were primarily associated with auditory and motor functions, consistent with the clinical signs. Those areas have high metabolic rates. We conclude that interference with Sepp1 function damages auditory and motor areas, at least in part by restricting selenium supply to the brain regions. PMID:18172410