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Sample records for functional il-2 receptor

  1. An essential role for IL-2 receptor in regulatory T cell function

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Andrew G; Fan, Xiying; Klein, Ulf; Zheng, Ye; Gasteiger, Georg; Feng, Yongqiang; Fontenot, Jason D.; Rudensky, Alexander Y.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells, expressing abundant amounts of the IL-2 receptor (IL-2R), are reliant on IL-2 produced by activated T cells. This feature implied a key role for a simple network based on IL-2 consumption by Treg cells in their suppressor function. However, congenital deficiency in IL-2R results in reduced expression of the Treg cell lineage specification factor Foxp3, confounding experimental efforts to understand the role of IL-2R expression and signaling in Treg suppressor function. Using genetic gain and loss of function approaches, we demonstrate that IL-2 capture is dispensable for control of CD4+ T cells, but is important for limiting CD8+ T cell activation, and that IL-2R dependent STAT5 transcription factor activation plays an essential role in Treg cell suppressor function separable from T cell receptor signaling. PMID:27595233

  2. Biological significance of soluble IL-2 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Candore, Giuseppina; Cigna, Diego; Colucci, Antonio Tobia; Modica, Maria Assunta

    1993-01-01

    A NUMBER of receptors for growth factors and differentiation antigens have been found to be secreted or released by cells. Following mononuclear cell (MNC) activation and interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) expression, a soluble form of the Alpha;-chain of IL-2R (sIL-2R) is released. The sIL-2R has been shown to be present in the culture supernatants of activated MNCs as well as in normal sera and, in higher amounts, in sera from subjects affected by several diseases including neoplastic, infectious and autoimmune ones, and in sera from transplanted patients suffering allograft rejection. The blood sIL-2R levels depend on the number of producing cells and the number of molecules per cell, so that sIL-2R blood values may represent an index of the number and the functional state of producing cells, both normal and neoplastic. Thus, monitoring of the immune system, mostly T-cells and haematological malignancies might be targets for the measurement of sIL-2R. Since many conditions may influence sIL-2R production, little diagnostic use may result from these measurements. However, since blood sIL-2R levels may correlate with disease progression and/or response to therapy, their measurement may be a useful index of activity and extent of disease. The precise biological role of the soluble form of the IL-2R is still a matter of debate. However, we know that increased sIL-2R levels may be observed in association with several immunological abnormalities and that sIL-2R is able to bind IL-2. It is conceivable then that in these conditions the excess sIL-2R released in vivo by activated lymphoid cells or by neoplastic cells may somehow regulate IL-2-dependent processes. On the other hand, it cannot exclude that sIL-2R is a by-product without biological significance. Finally, it is puzzling that in many conditions in which an increase of blood sIL-2R values has been observed, MNCs display a decreased in vitro capacity to produce sIL-2R. These seemingly contrasting findings are

  3. Postthymic expansion in human CD4 naive T cells defined by expression of functional high-affinity IL-2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Pekalski, Marcin L; Ferreira, Ricardo C; Coulson, Richard M R; Cutler, Antony J; Guo, Hui; Smyth, Deborah J; Downes, Kate; Dendrou, Calliope A; Castro Dopico, Xaquin; Esposito, Laura; Coleman, Gillian; Stevens, Helen E; Nutland, Sarah; Walker, Neil M; Guy, Catherine; Dunger, David B; Wallace, Chris; Tree, Timothy I M; Todd, John A; Wicker, Linda S

    2013-03-15

    As the thymus involutes with age, the maintenance of peripheral naive T cells in humans becomes strongly dependent on peripheral cell division. However, mechanisms that orchestrate homeostatic division remain unclear. In this study we present evidence that the frequency of naive CD4 T cells that express CD25 (IL-2 receptor α-chain) increases with age on subsets of both CD31(+) and CD31(-) naive CD4 T cells. Analyses of TCR excision circles from sorted subsets indicate that CD25(+) naive CD4 T cells have undergone more rounds of homeostatic proliferation than their CD25(-) counterparts in both the CD31(+) and CD31(-) subsets, indicating that CD25 is a marker of naive CD4 T cells that have preferentially responded to survival signals from self-Ags or cytokines. CD25 expression on CD25(-) naive CD4 T cells can be induced by IL-7 in vitro in the absence of TCR activation. Although CD25(+) naive T cells respond to lower concentrations of IL-2 as compared with their CD25(-) counterparts, IL-2 responsiveness is further increased in CD31(-) naive T cells by their expression of the signaling IL-2 receptor β-chain CD122, forming with common γ-chain functional high-affinity IL-2 receptors. CD25 plays a role during activation: CD25(+) naive T cells stimulated in an APC-dependent manner were shown to produce increased levels of IL-2 as compared with their CD25(-) counterparts. This study establishes CD25(+) naive CD4 T cells, which are further delineated by CD31 expression, as a major functionally distinct immune cell subset in humans that warrants further characterization in health and disease.

  4. IL-4 function can be transferred to the IL-2 receptor by tyrosine containing sequences found in the IL-4 receptor alpha chain.

    PubMed

    Wang, H Y; Paul, W E; Keegan, A D

    1996-02-01

    IL-4 binds to a cell surface receptor complex that consists of the IL-4 binding protein (IL-4R alpha) and the gamma chain of the IL-2 receptor complex (gamma c). The receptors for IL-4 and IL-2 have several features in common; both use the gamma c as a receptor component, and both activate the Janus kinases JAK-1 and JAK-3. In spite of these similarities, IL-4 evokes specific responses, including the tyrosine phosphorylation of 4PS/IRS-2 and the induction of CD23. To determine whether sequences within the cytoplasmic domain of the IL-4R alpha specify these IL-4-specific responses, we transplanted the insulin IL-4 receptor motif (I4R motif) of the huIL-4R alpha to the cytoplasmic domain of a truncated IL-2R beta. In addition, we transplanted a region that contains peptide sequences shown to block Stat6 binding to DNA. We analyzed the ability of cells expressing these IL-2R-IL-4R chimeric constructs to respond to IL-2. We found that IL-4 function could be transplanted to the IL-2 receptor by these regions and that proliferative and differentiative functions can be induced by different receptor sequences.

  5. Curcumin blocks interleukin (IL)-2 signaling in T-lymphocytes by inhibiting IL-2 synthesis, CD25 expression, and IL-2 receptor signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Forward, Nicholas A.; Conrad, David M.; Power Coombs, Melanie R.; Doucette, Carolyn D.; Furlong, Suzanne J.; Lin, Tong-Jun; Hoskin, David W.

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} Curcumin inhibits CD4{sup +} T-lymphocyte proliferation. {yields} Curcumin inhibits interleukin-2 (IL-2) synthesis and CD25 expression by CD4{sup +} T-lymphocytes. {yields} Curcumin interferes with IL-2 receptor signaling by inhibiting JAK3 and STAT5 phosphorylation. {yields} IL-2-dependent regulatory T-lymphocyte function and Foxp3 expression is downregulated by curcumin. -- Abstract: Curcumin (diferulomethane) is the principal curcuminoid in the spice tumeric and a potent inhibitor of activation-induced T-lymphocyte proliferation; however, the molecular basis of this immunosuppressive effect has not been well studied. Here we show that micromolar concentrations of curcumin inhibited DNA synthesis by mouse CD4{sup +} T-lymphocytes, as well as interleukin-2 (IL-2) and CD25 ({alpha} chain of the high affinity IL-2 receptor) expression in response to antibody-mediated cross-linking of CD3 and CD28. Curcumin acted downstream of protein kinase C activation and intracellular Ca{sup 2+} release to inhibit I{kappa}B phosphorylation, which is required for nuclear translocation of the transcription factor NF{kappa}B. In addition, IL-2-dependent DNA synthesis by mouse CTLL-2 cells, but not constitutive CD25 expression, was impaired in the presence of curcumin, which demonstrated an inhibitory effect on IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) signaling. IL-2-induced phosphorylation of STAT5A and JAK3, but not JAK1, was diminished in the presence of curcumin, indicating inhibition of critical proximal events in IL-2R signaling. In line with the inhibitory action of curcumin on IL-2R signaling, pretreatment of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +} regulatory T-cells with curcumin downregulated suppressor function, as well as forkhead box p3 (Foxp3) expression. We conclude that curcumin inhibits IL-2 signaling by reducing available IL-2 and high affinity IL-2R, as well as interfering with IL-2R signaling.

  6. Human IFN-gamma up-regulates IL-2 receptors in mitogen-activated T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, M A; De Sanctis, J B; Blasini, A M; Leon-Ponte, M; Abadi, I

    1990-01-01

    This study examined the role of human recombinant interferon-gamma (rIFN-gamma) in the expression of interleukin-2 receptors (IL-2R) by human T lymphocytes. rIFN-gamma enhanced total numbers of IL-2R in mitogen-activated but not resting T cells. Scatchard plot analysis indicated that rIFN-gamma increased both high- and low-affinity receptors, with a predominant effect on the latter. Phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-activated T cells treated with IFN-gamma showed higher IL-2 binding and greater IL-2 internalization and degradation than cells treated with PHA alone. There was a corresponding increase of mitogen-driven proliferative responses, indicating an increase of functional receptors in IFN-treated cultures. IFN-gamma may influence T-cell activation and proliferation by enhancing expression of IL-2R and promoting IL-2 uptake by mitogen-activated lymphocytes. PMID:2110548

  7. Increased number of IL-2, IL-2 receptor and IL-10 positive cells in premalignant lesions of the cervix.

    PubMed

    Mindiola, Raimy; Caulejas, Diana; Núñez-Troconis, José; Araujo, Mary; Delgado, Mariela; Mosquera, Jesús

    2008-12-01

    Previous studies have shown the involvement of the immune response in the progression of human uterine cervix cancer. The aim of this study was to determine the expression of Interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) and Interleukin 10 (IL-10) in different grades of cervical intraepithelial neoplasias of the exocervix (CIN 1, 2 and 3), and its relationship with the serum cytokine profiles and human papilomavirus (HPV) infection status. Indirect immunofluorescence was used to study the expression of IL-2, IL-2R and IL-10 in human cervical samples from 50 patients and 9 normal controls. Serum IL-2, IL-2R and IL-10 were measured by ELISA and HPV DNA and HPV types were identified by PCR. Increased number of IL-2, IL-2R and IL-10 positive cells were observed in the cervix from patients with CIN, associated with the grades of dysplasia. A significant correlation was observed between IL-2 and IL-2R (p>0.0001), IL-2 and IL-10 (p>0.0001), as well as IL-10 and IL-2R (p>0.0001). Twenty percent of patients were HPV positive and 84% of those patients were tissue cytokine positive. These results suggest that IL-2, IL-2R and IL-10 tissue expression may play a role in the development of cervical intraepithelial dysplasias.

  8. Ethanol suppresses T cell proliferation without inhibiting interleukin 2 (IL2) production and IL2 receptor (IL2R) expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, M.P.; Norman, D.C. Univ. of California, Los Angeles )

    1991-03-11

    The effect of extended ethanol consumption of young C57BL/6J mice on T cell proliferation was studied. Splenic cells of young mice, fed with one of three different liquid diets for 6-7 weeks were cultured with Con A to assess T cell proliferation and production of IL2. Then, the proliferative response of splenic cells to PMA/ionomycin was assessed. Finally, Con A-activated T blast cells were assessed for their ability to express IL2R and to respond to IL2. The results showed that both Con A-induced mitogenesis and IL2-dependent proliferation of T cells from ethanol diet-fed mice were diminished as compared to that of maltose-substitute diet or standard liquid diet. However, the ability of T cells from ethanol diet-fed mice to produce IL2 and to express IL2R was not affected. Furthermore, the magnitude of ethanol-mediated suppression of T cell proliferation induced by PMA/ionomycin was comparable to that induced by Con A. These results taken together suggest that ethanol suppresses T cell proliferation by interfering with events following the IL2-IL2R interaction.

  9. Analysis of human IL-2/IL-2 receptor beta chain interactions: monoclonal antibody H2-8 and new IL-2 mutants define the critical role of alpha helix-A of IL-2.

    PubMed

    Eckenberg, R; Xu, D; Moreau, J L; Bossus, M; Mazie, J C; Tartar, A; Liu, X Y; Alzari, P M; Bertoglio, J; Theze, J

    1997-07-01

    Interleukin 2 (IL-2) interacts with a receptor (IL-2R) composed of three subunits (IL-2R alpha, IL-2R beta and IL-2R gamma). IL-2R beta plays a critical role in signal transduction. An anti-human IL-2 mAb (H2-8) produced after immunization with peptide 1-30 of IL-2 was found to recognize the region occupied by Asp20, at the exposed interface between alpha-helices A and C. Muteins at position 17 and 20 are not recognized by mAb H2-8. mAb H2-8 specifically inhibits the IL-2 proliferation of TS1beta cells which are dependent on the expression of human IL-2R beta chain for IL-2 proliferation. Substitution at internal position Leu17 demonstrates that this position is essential for IL-2 binding and IL-2 bioactivity. New IL-2 mutants at position Asp20 have been analysed. Substitutions Asp --> Asn, Asp --> Lys, Asp --> Leu, show a correlation between diminished affinity for IL-2 receptor and reduced bioactivity measured on TS1beta cells. Mutein Asp Arg lose affinity for IL-2R and bioactivity simultaneously. Furthermore, during the course of the study we have found that mutein Asp20 --> Leu is an IL-2 antagonist. The biological effects of mAb H2-8 and the properties of new mutants at positions 17 and 20 demonstrate that this region of alpha helix-A is involved in IL-2-IL-2R beta interactions.

  10. Early immune response and regulation of IL-2 receptor subunits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, Millie; Sugano, Eiko; Schopper, Thomas; Li, Chai-Fei; Boonyaratanakornkit, J. B.; Cogoli, Augusto

    2005-01-01

    Affymetrix oligonucleotide arrays were used to monitor expression of 8796 genes and probe sets in activated T-cells; analysis revealed that 217 genes were significantly upregulated within 4 h. Induced genes included transcription factors, cytokines and their receptor genes. Analysis by semi-quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the significant induction of IL-2, IL-2R(gamma) and IL-2R(alpha). Forty-eight of the 217 induced genes are known to or predicted to be regulated by a CRE promoter/enhancer. We found that T-cell activation caused a significant increase in CREB phosphorylation furthermore, inhibition of the PKC pathway by GF109203 reduced CREB activation by 50% and inhibition of the PKA pathway caused a total block of CREB phosphorylation and significantly reduced IFN(gamma), IL-2 and IL-2R(alpha) gene expression by approximately 40% (p<0.001). PKC(theta) plays a major role in T-cell activation: inhibition of PKC significantly reduced the expression of IFN(gamma), IL-2 and IL-2R(alpha). Since PKC blocked activation of CREB, we studied potential cross-talk between the PKC and the PKA/MAPK pathways, PMA-stimulated Jurkat cells were studied with specific signal pathway inhibitors. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase-2 (ERK2) pathway was found to be significantly activated greater than seven-fold within 30 min; however, there was little activation of ERK-1 and no activation of JNK or p38 MAPK. Inhibition of the PKA pathway, but not the PKC pathway, resulted in inhibition of ERK1/2 activation at all time points, inhibition of MEK1 and 2 significantly blocked expression of IL-2 and IL-2R(alpha). Gene expression of IL-2R(alpha) and IFN(gamma) was dependent on PKA in S49 wt cells but not in kin- mutants. Using gel shift analysis, we found that forskolin activation of T-cells resulted in activation of AP1 sites; this increase in nuclear extract AP1 was significantly blocked by MEK1 inhibitor U0126. Taken together, these results suggest that the PKA in addition to PKC and

  11. Innate Response to Human Cancer Cells with or without IL-2 Receptor Common γ-Chain Function in NOD Background Mice Lacking Adaptive Immunity.

    PubMed

    Nishime, Chiyoko; Kawai, Kenji; Yamamoto, Takehiro; Katano, Ikumi; Monnai, Makoto; Goda, Nobuhito; Mizushima, Tomoko; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Masato; Murata, Mitsuru; Suematsu, Makoto; Wakui, Masatoshi

    2015-08-15

    Immunodeficient hosts exhibit high acceptance of xenogeneic or neoplastic cells mainly due to lack of adaptive immunity, although it still remains to be elucidated how innate response affects the engraftment. IL-2R common γ-chain (IL-2Rγc) signaling is required for development of NK cells and a subset of dendritic cells producing IFN-γ. To better understand innate response in the absence of adaptive immunity, we examined amounts of metastatic foci in the livers after intrasplenic transfer of human colon cancer HCT116 cells into NOD/SCID versus NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγc (null) (NOG) hosts. The intravital microscopic imaging of livers in the hosts depleted of NK cells and/or macrophages revealed that IL-2Rγc function critically contributes to elimination of cancer cells without the need for NK cells and macrophages. In the absence of IL-2Rγc, macrophages play a role in the defense against tumors despite the NOD Sirpa allele, which allows human CD47 to bind to the encoded signal regulatory protein α to inhibit macrophage phagocytosis of human cells. Analogous experiments using human pancreas cancer MIA PaCa-2 cells provided findings roughly similar to those from the experiments using HCT116 cells except for lack of suppression of metastases by macrophages in NOG hosts. Administration of mouse IFN-γ to NOG hosts appeared to partially compensate lack of IL-2Rγc-dependent elimination of transferred HCT116 cells. These results provide insights into the nature of innate response in the absence of adaptive immunity, aiding in developing tumor xenograft models in experimental oncology.

  12. The IL-2 receptor alpha-chain alters the binding of IL-2 to the beta-chain.

    PubMed

    Arima, N; Kamio, M; Okuma, M; Ju, G; Uchiyama, T

    1991-11-15

    The binding of IL-2 to its high affinity receptor results in the formation of the ternary complex consisting of IL-2, alpha-chain (p55, Tac) and beta-chain (p75). We studied the role of alpha-chain in IL-2 binding to the high affinity receptor using IL-2 analog Lys20 which was made by the substitution of Lys for Asp20 of wild-type rIL-2. Lys20 bound to MT-1 cells solely expressing alpha-chain at low affinity, but did not bind to YT-2C2 cells which solely expressed beta-chain. However, direct binding of radiolabeled Lys20 to ED515-D cells, an HTLV-I-infected and IL-2-dependent T cell line, revealed both high affinity and low affinity binding although the Kd value of high affinity binding was 50 to 100 times higher than that of the high affinity binding of wild-type rIL-2. High affinity binding of Lys20 was completely blocked by 2R-B mAb recognizing IL-2R beta-chain. Anti-Tac mAb recognizing IL-2R alpha-chain abolished all of the specific Lys20 bindings. In contrast to the replacement of cell bound 2R-B mAb with wild-type rIL-2 at 37 degrees C, the addition of an excess of Lys20 did not cause the detachment of cell-bound radiolabeled or FITC-labeled 2R-B mAb. Consistent with the results of binding studies, Lys20 induced the proliferation of ED515-D cells, but not large granular lymphocyte leukemic cells. The growth of ED-515D cells was completely suppressed by either anti-Tac mAb or 2R-B mAb. These results strongly suggest that coexpression of the IL-2R alpha- and beta-chains alters the binding affinity of Lys20 and that the interaction between IL-2 and the alpha-chain is a key event in the formation of the IL-2/IL-2R ternary complex.

  13. Interleukin 2 (IL2) PE40 is cytotoxic to cells displaying either the p55 or p70 subunit of the IL2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Lorberboum-Galski, H; Kozak, R W; Waldmann, T A; Bailon, P; FitzGerald, D J; Pastan, I

    1988-12-15

    IL2-PE40 is a chimeric protein composed of human interleukin 2 (IL2) genetically fused to the amino terminus of a modified form of pseudomonas exotoxin (PE). Internalization of IL2 via the individual p55 and p70 subunits of the IL2 receptor was studied using IL2-PE40 on several mouse and human cell lines expressing either the p55, the p70, or both IL2 receptor subunits. Internalization was assessed by measuring inhibition of protein synthesis caused by the toxin moiety of IL2-PE40. The results demonstrate that IL2 internalization is mediated by either the p55 receptor subunit or by the p70 subunit but is much more efficient when high affinity receptors composed of both subunits are present. IL2-PE40 is a powerful reagent for studying IL2 receptor interactions and for analyzing pathways of the immune response and its regulation.

  14. Interleukin 2 (IL 2) inhibitor in rheumatoid synovial fluid: Correlation with prognosis and soluble IL 2 receptor levels

    SciTech Connect

    Miossec, P.; Elhamiani, M.; Chichehian, B.; D'Angeac, A.D.; Sany, J.; Hirn, M. )

    1990-03-01

    A soluble activity inhibiting over 50% of the CTLL-2 cell line response to recombinant human interleukin 2 (IL 2) was found in 17 of 29 (59%) rheumatoid synovial fluids. To study the prognosis value of this activity, 16 rheumatoid synovial fluids were collected before a radiation synovectomy of the knee with 7 mCi of 90Y. Patients with a good clinical result after the synovectomy had a lower IL 2 inhibitory activity than those with a bad or incomplete result (P less than 0.01). Levels of inhibitory activity and of soluble IL 2 receptors were correlated with each other and with the response of the synovitis to the radiation synovectomy. These results extend the clinical usefulness of soluble IL 2 receptor measurements and indicate a correlation between the immune activation of the rheumatoid synovitis and its clinical activity.

  15. Activation of Th1 and Tc1 cell adenosine A2A receptors directly inhibits IL-2 secretion in vitro and IL-2-driven expansion in vivo.

    PubMed

    Erdmann, Andreas A; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Jung, Unsu; Foley, Jason; Borenstein, Todd; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Fowler, Daniel H

    2005-06-15

    To evaluate the direct effect of adenosine on cytokine-polarized effector T cells, murine type 1 helper T cells (Th1) and type 1 cytotoxic T lymphocytes (Tc1) and Th2/Tc2 cells were generated using an antigen-presenting cell (APC)-free method. Tc1 and Tc2 cells had similar adenosine signaling, as measured by intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) increase upon adenosine A(2A) receptor agonism by CGS21680 (CGS). CGS greatly reduced Tc1 and Tc2 cell interleukin 2 (IL-2) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) secretion, with nominal effect on interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) secretion. Tc2 cell IL-4 and IL-5 secretion was not reduced by CGS, and IL-10 secretion was moderately reduced. Agonist-mediated inhibition of IL-2 and TNF-alpha secretion occurred via A(2A) receptors, with no involvement of A(1), A(2B), or A(3) receptors. Adenosine agonist concentrations that abrogated cytokine secretion did not inhibit Tc1 or Tc2 cell cytolytic function. Adenosine modulated effector T cells in vivo, as CGS administration reduced CD4(+)Th1 and CD8(+)Tc1 cell expansion to alloantigen and, in a separate model, reduced antigen-specific CD4(+) Th1 cell numbers. Remarkably, agonist-mediated T-cell inhibition was abrogated by in vivo IL-2 therapy. Adenosine receptor activation therefore preferentially inhibits type I cytokine secretion, most notably IL-2. Modulation of adenosine receptors may thus represent a suitable target primarily for inflammatory conditions mediated by Th1 and Tc1 cells.

  16. Green tea EGCG suppresses T cell proliferation through impairment of IL-2/IL-2 receptor signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies have suggested a benefit of consuming green tea in promoting general health and reducing the risk of certain diseases. However, little is known about the effect of green tea on immune function. In this study we determined the effect of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the major active comp...

  17. Association study of schizophrenia and IL-2 receptor {beta} chain gene

    SciTech Connect

    Nimgaonkar, V.L.; Yang, Z.W.; Zhang, X.R.; Brar, J.S.

    1995-10-09

    A case-control association study was conducted in Caucasian patients with schizophrenia (DSM-III-R, n = 42) and unaffected controls (n = 47) matched for ethnicity and area of residence. Serum interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) concentrations, as well as a dinucleotide repeat polymorphism in the IL-2RP chain gene, were examined in both groups. No significant differences in IL-2R concentrations or in the distribution of the polymorphism were noted. This study does not support an association between schizophrenia and the IL-2RP gene locus, contrary to the suggestive evidence from linkage analysis in multicase families. 17 refs., 2 tabs.

  18. Structural basis of GM-CSF and IL-2 sequestration by the viral decoy receptor GIF

    PubMed Central

    Felix, Jan; Kandiah, Eaazhisai; De Munck, Steven; Bloch, Yehudi; van Zundert, Gydo C.P.; Pauwels, Kris; Dansercoer, Ann; Novanska, Katka; Read, Randy J.; Bonvin, Alexandre M.J.J.; Vergauwen, Bjorn; Verstraete, Kenneth; Gutsche, Irina; Savvides, Savvas N.

    2016-01-01

    Subversion of the host immune system by viruses is often mediated by molecular decoys that sequester host proteins pivotal to mounting effective immune responses. The widespread mammalian pathogen parapox Orf virus deploys GIF, a member of the poxvirus immune evasion superfamily, to antagonize GM-CSF (granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor) and IL-2 (interleukin-2), two pleiotropic cytokines of the mammalian immune system. However, structural and mechanistic insights into the unprecedented functional duality of GIF have remained elusive. Here we reveal that GIF employs a dimeric binding platform that sequesters two copies of its target cytokines with high affinity and slow dissociation kinetics to yield distinct complexes featuring mutually exclusive interaction footprints. We illustrate how GIF serves as a competitive decoy receptor by leveraging binding hotspots underlying the cognate receptor interactions of GM-CSF and IL-2, without sharing any structural similarity with the cytokine receptors. Our findings contribute to the tracing of novel molecular mimicry mechanisms employed by pathogenic viruses. PMID:27819269

  19. Structural basis of GM-CSF and IL-2 sequestration by the viral decoy receptor GIF.

    PubMed

    Felix, Jan; Kandiah, Eaazhisai; De Munck, Steven; Bloch, Yehudi; van Zundert, Gydo C P; Pauwels, Kris; Dansercoer, Ann; Novanska, Katka; Read, Randy J; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J; Vergauwen, Bjorn; Verstraete, Kenneth; Gutsche, Irina; Savvides, Savvas N

    2016-11-07

    Subversion of the host immune system by viruses is often mediated by molecular decoys that sequester host proteins pivotal to mounting effective immune responses. The widespread mammalian pathogen parapox Orf virus deploys GIF, a member of the poxvirus immune evasion superfamily, to antagonize GM-CSF (granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor) and IL-2 (interleukin-2), two pleiotropic cytokines of the mammalian immune system. However, structural and mechanistic insights into the unprecedented functional duality of GIF have remained elusive. Here we reveal that GIF employs a dimeric binding platform that sequesters two copies of its target cytokines with high affinity and slow dissociation kinetics to yield distinct complexes featuring mutually exclusive interaction footprints. We illustrate how GIF serves as a competitive decoy receptor by leveraging binding hotspots underlying the cognate receptor interactions of GM-CSF and IL-2, without sharing any structural similarity with the cytokine receptors. Our findings contribute to the tracing of novel molecular mimicry mechanisms employed by pathogenic viruses.

  20. The first alpha helix of interleukin (IL)-2 folds as a homotetramer, acts as an agonist of the IL-2 receptor beta chain, and induces lymphokine-activated killer cells.

    PubMed

    Eckenberg, R; Rose, T; Moreau, J L; Weil, R; Gesbert, F; Dubois, S; Tello, D; Bossus, M; Gras, H; Tartar, A; Bertoglio, J; Chouaïb, S; Goldberg, M; Jacques, Y; Alzari, P M; Thèze, J

    2000-02-07

    Interleukin (IL)-2 interacts with two types of functional receptors (IL-2Ralphabetagamma and IL-2Rbetagamma) and acts on a broad range of target cells involved in inflammatory reactions and immune responses. For the first time, we show that a chemically synthesized fragment of the IL-2 sequence can fold into a molecule mimicking the quaternary structure of a hemopoietin. Indeed, peptide p1-30 (containing amino acids 1-30, covering the entire alpha helix A of IL-2) spontaneously folds into an alpha-helical homotetramer and stimulates the growth of T cell lines expressing human IL-2Rbeta, whereas shorter versions of the peptide lack helical structure and are inactive. We also demonstrate that this neocytokine interacts with a previously undescribed dimeric form of IL-2Rbeta. In agreement with its binding to IL-2Rbeta, p1-30 activates Shc and p56(lck) but unlike IL-2, fails to activate Janus kinase (Jak)1, Jak3, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5). Unexpectedly, we also show that p1-30 activates Tyk2, thus suggesting that IL-2Rbeta may bind to different Jaks depending on its oligomerization. At the cellular level, p1-30 induces lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells and preferentially activates CD8(low) lymphocytes and natural killer cells, which constitutively express IL-2Rbeta. A significant interferon gamma production is also detected after p1-30 stimulation. A mutant form of p1-30 (Asp20-->Lys), which is likely unable to induce vascular leak syndrome, remains capable of generating LAK cells, like the original p1-30 peptide. Altogether, our data suggest that p1-30 has therapeutic potential.

  1. The First α Helix of Interleukin (Il)-2 Folds as a Homotetramer, Acts as an Agonist of the IL-2 Receptor β Chain, and Induces Lymphokine-Activated Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Eckenberg, Ralph; Rose, Thierry; Moreau, Jean-Louis; Weil, Robert; Gesbert, Franck; Dubois, Sigrid; Tello, Diana; Bossus, Marc; Gras, Hélène; Tartar, André; Bertoglio, Jacques; Chouaïb, Salem; Goldberg, Michel; Jacques, Yannick; Alzari, Pedro M.; Thèze, Jacques

    2000-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-2 interacts with two types of functional receptors (IL-2Rαβγ and IL-2Rβγ) and acts on a broad range of target cells involved in inflammatory reactions and immune responses. For the first time, we show that a chemically synthesized fragment of the IL-2 sequence can fold into a molecule mimicking the quaternary structure of a hemopoietin. Indeed, peptide p1–30 (containing amino acids 1–30, covering the entire α helix A of IL-2) spontaneously folds into an α-helical homotetramer and stimulates the growth of T cell lines expressing human IL-2Rβ, whereas shorter versions of the peptide lack helical structure and are inactive. We also demonstrate that this neocytokine interacts with a previously undescribed dimeric form of IL-2Rβ. In agreement with its binding to IL-2Rβ, p1–30 activates Shc and p56lck but unlike IL-2, fails to activate Janus kinase (Jak)1, Jak3, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5). Unexpectedly, we also show that p1–30 activates Tyk2, thus suggesting that IL-2Rβ may bind to different Jaks depending on its oligomerization. At the cellular level, p1–30 induces lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells and preferentially activates CD8low lymphocytes and natural killer cells, which constitutively express IL-2Rβ. A significant interferon γ production is also detected after p1–30 stimulation. A mutant form of p1–30 (Asp20→Lys), which is likely unable to induce vascular leak syndrome, remains capable of generating LAK cells, like the original p1–30 peptide. Altogether, our data suggest that p1–30 has therapeutic potential. PMID:10662798

  2. Mutagenic analysis of a receptor contact site on interleukin-2: preparation of an IL-2 analog with increased potency.

    PubMed

    Berndt, W G; Chang, D Z; Smith, K A; Ciardelli, T L

    1994-05-31

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a 133 amino acid alpha-helical protein secreted by activated T-cells. Combinatorial cassette mutagenesis was used to investigate the functional role of a continuous five amino acid region of IL-2 suspected to interact with the intermediate-affinity IL-2 receptor. A limited random library of IL-2 mutants was constructed in which residues 17-21 (Leu-Leu-Leu-Asp-Leu) were simultaneously mutated. The proteins were produced in an Escherichia coli expression system and screened in a biological assay for their ability to mediate the proliferation of a murine IL-2-dependent cell line. From the over 2600 clones examined, only 42 exhibited significant activity, confirming the functional importance of this region. Selected clones were purified and further characterized by biological and receptor binding assays. Viewed in the context of the recently revised 2.5-A crystal structure for IL-2, these results suggest the following conclusions: both Asp20 and Leu21, as shown by their sensitivity to mutation, are the functionally more important residues in this region, but for different reasons. Asp20 is solvent-accessible and likely plays a direct receptor contact role as previous studies have indicated. Leu21, in contrast, is completely buried in the hydrophobic core of the protein. Substitutions at this position, even a conservative Leu-->Val substitution, were found to perturb the precise hydrophobic packing arrangements that are critical for activity, resulting in a significant loss of function. In addition, one of the analogs identified in the screen was found to be 2-3 times more potent than the wild-type protein.

  3. Mechanism of action of interleukin-2 (IL-2)-Bax, an apoptosis-inducing chimaeric protein targeted against cells expressing the IL-2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Aqeilan, Rami; Kedar, Rotem; Ben-Yehudah, Ahmi; Lorberboum-Galski, Haya

    2003-02-15

    The chimaeric protein interleukin-2 (IL-2)-Bax was designed to target and kill specific cell populations expressing the IL-2 receptor. However, it is not well understood how IL-2-Bax causes target cells to die. In the present study, we investigated the pathway of apoptosis evoked by IL-2-Bax and the possible involvement of endogenous Bax in this process. We report here that, upon internalization of IL-2-Bax into target cells, it is localized first mainly in the nucleus, and only later is it translocated to the mitochondria. Similarly, endogenous Bax is also partially localized in the nucleus, and accumulates mainly in this compartment soon after physiological triggering of apoptosis. Despite the fact that Bax has no nuclear localization sequence, our data suggest that Bax has one or more physiological roles and/or substrates within the nucleus. Indeed, a dramatic repression of nuclear Tax protein expression was induced following treatment of HUT-102 cells with IL-2-Bax, similar to what occurs following serum deprivation of these cells. Unexpectedly, induction of apoptosis using IL-2-Bax was preceded by enhanced expression of newly synthesized Bax protein and suppression of Bcl-2. This imbalance between the pro- and anti-apoptotic genes was associated with p53 induction, although IL-2-Bax activity was also evident in cells lacking p53 expression. By studying the mechanism of action of IL-2-Bax, we were able to follow the intrinsic events and their cascade that culminates in cell death. We have shown that the ability of IL-2-Bax to affect the intracellular apoptotic machinery within the target cells, and to cause the cells to die, uses a mechanism similar to that induced following a normal apoptotic signal.

  4. IL2RA — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    The interleukin 2 receptor exists in three forms which differ in their ability to bind interleukin 2. The low affinity form of the receptor is a monomer of IL2RA, the alpha subunit. The alpha/beta subunit heterodimer, formed by IL2RA and IL2RB, is an intermediate affinity form. The alpha/beta/gamma heterotrimer formed by IL2RA, IL2RB, and IL2RG is the high affinity form. IL2RA is normally an integral membrane protein, although soluble IL2RA has been isolated. There are known alternately-spliced versions of IL2RA mRNAs, but their functions are unknown. Mutations in the IL2RA gene are associated with diabetes mellitus insulin-dependent type 10 (IDDM10). Complications of IDDM10 can adversely affect the eyes, kidneys, nerves, and blood vessels.

  5. Patients with T⁺/low NK⁺ IL-2 receptor γ chain deficiency have differentially-impaired cytokine signaling resulting in severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Sebastian; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Erlacher, Miriam; Vraetz, Thomas; Hartjes, Lara; Janda, Ales; Rizzi, Marta; Lorenz, Myriam R; Gilmour, Kimberly; de Saint-Basile, Geneviève; Roifman, Chaim M; Cheuk, Steven; Gennery, Andrew; Thrasher, Adrian J; Fuchs, Ilka; Schwarz, Klaus; Speckmann, Carsten; Ehl, Stephan

    2014-10-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (X-SCID) leads to a T(-) NK(-) B(+) immunophenotype and is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the IL-2 receptor γ-chain (IL2RG). IL2RG(R222C) leads to atypical SCID with a severe early onset phenotype despite largely normal NK- and T-cell numbers. To address this discrepancy, we performed a detailed analysis of T, B, and NK cells, including quantitative STAT phosphorylation and functional responses to the cytokines IL-2, IL-4, IL-15, and IL-21 in a patient with the IL2RG(R222C) mutation. Moreover, we identified nine additional unpublished patients with the same mutations, all with a full SCID phenotype, and confirmed selected immunological observations. T-cell development was variably affected, but led to borderline T-cell receptor excision circle (TREC) levels and a normal repertoire. T cells showed moderately reduced proliferation, failing enhancement by IL-2. While NK-cell development was normal, IL-2 enhancement of NK-cell degranulation and IL-15-induced cytokine production were absent. IL-2 or IL-21 failed to enhance B-cell proliferation and plasmablast differentiation. These functional alterations were reflected by a differential impact of IL2RG(R222C) on cytokine signal transduction, with a gradient IL-4<IL-2/IL-15IL2RG(R222C) causes a consistently severe clinical phenotype that is not predicted by the variable and moderate impairment of T-cell immunity or TREC analysis.

  6. Quantitative Contribution of IL2Rγ to the Dynamic Formation of IL2-IL2R Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Ponce, Luis F.; García-Martínez, Karina; León, Kalet

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL2) is a growth factor for several immune cells and its function depends on its binding to IL2Rs in the cell membrane. The most accepted model for the assembling of IL2-IL2R complexes in the cell membrane is the Affinity Conversion Model (ACM). This model postulates that IL2R receptor association is sequential and dependent on ligand binding. Most likely free IL2 binds first to IL2Rα, and then this complex binds to IL2Rβ, and finally to IL2Rγ (γc). However, in previous mathematical models representing this process, the binding of γc has not been taken into account. In this work, the quantitative contribution of the number of IL2Rγ chain to the IL2-IL2R apparent binding affinity and signaling is studied. A mathematical model of the affinity conversion process including the γ chain in the dynamic, has been formulated. The model was calibrated by fitting it to experimental data, specifically, Scatchard plots obtained using human cell lines. This paper demonstrates how the model correctly explains available experimental observations. It was estimated, for the first time, the value of the kinetic coefficients of IL2-IL2R complexes interaction in the cell membrane. Moreover, the number of IL2R components in different cell lines was also estimated. It was obtained a variable distribution in the number of IL2R components depending on the cell type and the activation state. Of most significance, the study predicts that not only the number of IL2Rα and IL2Rβ, but also the number of γc determine the capacity of the cell to capture and retain IL2 in signalling complexes. Moreover, it is also showed that different cells might use different pathways to bind IL2 as consequence of its IL2R components distribution in the membrane. PMID:27195783

  7. Study of IL-2 receptor expression after chemoimmunotherapy in patients treated for metastatic malignant melanoma.

    PubMed Central

    Mouawad, R; Ichen, M; Rixe, O; Benhammouda, A; Vuillemin, E; Weil, M; Khayat, D; Soubrane, C

    1994-01-01

    Using flow cytometry, cellular IL-2 receptors were studied before and following chemoimmunotherapy combination in 20 patients with metastatic malignant melanoma (MMM). Patients received cisplatin (100 mg/m2) at days 1 and 28, recombinant IL-2 by continuous infusion from days 3 to 6, 17 to 21, 31 to 34, and 45 to 49. Interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) was given subcutaneously three times weekly. In terms of clinical response, we observed 55% objective response (complete: 15%). When pretreatment blood samples were compared with those of healthy donors, we did not observe any change in low (alpha chain) and high affinity receptor (alpha + beta) expression. In contrast, intermediate affinity p75 (beta chain) expression was decreased significantly (P < or = 0.0001) in MMM patients. During treatment, we found a dramatic increase of beta chain as well as high affinity (alpha + beta) expression in responding patients, as soon as IL-2 therapy began. Furthermore, the increase of beta chain expression was limited to natural killer (NK) cells (CD56+). In non-responding patients, on the other hand, increase of both receptors was seen only at day 31. These data suggest the involvement of beta chain expression in the mechanism of cell activation after chemoimmunotherapy. Moreover, this early beta chain expression is correlated with the clinical response to chemoimmunotherapy. PMID:8082289

  8. Activation of the IL-2 Receptor in Podocytes: A Potential Mechanism for Podocyte Injury in Idiopathic Nephrotic Syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Zea, Arnold H.; Stewart, Tyrus; Ascani, Jeannine; Tate, David J.; Finkel-Jimenez, Beatriz; Wilk, Anna; Reiss, Krzysztof; Smoyer, William E.; Aviles, Diego H.

    2016-01-01

    The renal podocyte plays an important role in maintaining the structural integrity of the glomerular basement membrane. We have previously reported that patients with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (INS) have increased IL-2 production. We hypothesized that podocytes express an IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) and signaling through this receptor can result in podocyte injury. To confirm the presence of the IL-2R, we tested a conditionally immortalized murine podocyte cell line by flow cytometry, qPCR, and Western blot. To test for the presence of the IL-2R in vivo, immunohistochemical staining was performed on human renal biopsies in children with FSGS and control. Podocytes were stimulated with IL-2 in vitro, to study signaling events via the JAK/STAT pathway. The results showed that stimulation with IL-2 resulted in increased mRNA and protein expression of STAT 5a, phosphorylated STAT 5, JAK 3, and phosphorylated JAK 3. We then investigated for signs of cellular injury and the data showed that pro-apoptotic markers Bax and cFLIP were significantly increased following IL-2 exposure, whereas LC3 II was decreased. Furthermore, mitochondrial depolarization and apoptosis were both significantly increased following activation of the IL-2R. We used a paracellular permeability assay to monitor the structural integrity of a podocyte monolayer following IL-2 exposure. The results showed that podocytes exposed to IL-2 have increased albumin leakage across the monolayer. We conclude that murine podocytes express the IL-2R, and that activation through the IL-2R results in podocyte injury. PMID:27389192

  9. Essential biphasic role for JAK3 catalytic activity in IL-2 receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Smith, Geoffrey A; Uchida, Kenji; Weiss, Arthur; Taunton, Jack

    2016-05-01

    To drive lymphocyte proliferation and differentiation, common γ-chain (γc) cytokine receptors require hours to days of sustained stimulation. JAK1 and JAK3 kinases are found together in all γc-receptor complexes, but how their respective catalytic activities contribute to signaling over time is not known. Here we dissect the temporal requirements for JAK3 kinase activity with a selective covalent inhibitor (JAK3i). By monitoring phosphorylation of the transcription factor STAT5 over 20 h in CD4(+) T cells stimulated with interleukin 2 (IL-2), we document a second wave of signaling that is much more sensitive to JAK3i than the first wave. Selective inhibition of this second wave is sufficient to block cyclin expression and entry to S phase. An inhibitor-resistant JAK3 mutant (C905S) rescued all effects of JAK3i in isolated T cells and in mice. Our chemical genetic toolkit elucidates a biphasic requirement for JAK3 kinase activity in IL-2-driven T cell proliferation and will find broad utility in studies of γc-receptor signaling.

  10. Effect of IL-2-Bax, a novel interleukin-2-receptor-targeted chimeric protein, on bleomycin lung injury.

    PubMed

    Segel, Michael J; Aqeilan, Rami; Zilka, Keren; Lorberboum-Galski, Haya; Wallach-Dayan, Shulamit B; Conner, Michael W; Christensen, Thomas G; Breuer, Raphael

    2005-10-01

    The role of lymphocytes in the pathogenesis of lung fibrosis is not clear, but the weight of the evidence supports a pro-fibrotic effect for lymphocytes. The high-affinity interleukin-2 receptor (haIL-2R) is expressed on activated, but not quiescent, T lymphocytes. This selective expression of haIL-2R provides the basis for therapeutic strategies that target IL-2R-expressing cells. We hypothesized that elimination of activated lymphocytes by IL-2R-targeted chimeric proteins might ameliorate lung fibrosis. We investigated the effects of IL-2-Bax, a novel apoptosis-inducing IL-2R-targeted chimeric protein, on bleomycin-induced lung injury in mice. Treatment groups included (i) a single intratracheal instillation of bleomycin and twice-daily intraperitoneal injections of IL-2-Bax; (ii) intratracheal bleomycin and intraperitoneal IL-2-PE66(4Glu), an older-generation chimeric protein; (iii) intratracheal bleomycin/intraperitoneal PBS; (iv) intratracheal saline/intraperitoneal PBS. Lung injury was evaluated 14 days after intratracheal instillation by cell count in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, semi-quantitative and quantitative histomorphological measurements and by biochemical analysis of lung hydroxyproline. Bleomycin induced a BAL lymphocytosis that was significantly attenuated by IL-2-Bax and IL-2-PE66(4Glu). However, morphometric parameters and lung hydroxyproline were unaffected by the chimeric proteins. These results show that IL-2-Bax reduces the lymphocytic infiltration of the lungs in response to bleomycin, but this effect is not accompanied by a decrease in lung fibrosis.

  11. Murine Th17 cells utilize IL-2 receptor gamma chain cytokines but are resistant to cytokine withdrawal-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Neitzke, Daniel J; Bowers, Jacob S; Andrijauskaite, Kristina; O'Connell, Nathaniel S; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Wrangle, John; Li, Zihai; Paulos, Chrystal M; Cole, David J; Rubinstein, Mark P

    2017-03-09

    Adoptive cellular therapy (ACT) with the Th17 subset of CD4(+) T cells can cure established melanoma in preclinical models and holds promise for treating human cancer. However, little is known about the growth factors necessary for optimal engraftment and anti-tumor activity of Th17 cells. Due to the central role of IL-2 receptor gamma chain (IL2Rγ-chain) cytokines (IL-2, IL-7, and IL-15) in the activity and persistence of many T cell subsets after adoptive transfer, we hypothesized that these cytokines are important for Th17 cells. We found that Th17 cells proliferated in response to IL-2, IL-7, and IL-15 in vitro. However, in contrast to many other T cell subsets, including conventionally activated CD8(+) T cells, we found that Th17 cells were resistant to apoptosis in the absence of IL2Rγ-chain cytokines. To determine whether Th17 cells utilize IL2Rγ-chain cytokines in vivo, we tracked Th17 cell engraftment after adoptive transfer with or without cytokine depletion. Depletion of IL-7 and/or IL-2 decreased initial engraftment, while depletion of IL-15 did not. Supplementation of IL-2 increased initial Th17 engraftment. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we treated melanoma-bearing mice with Th17 cell adoptive transfer and concurrent cytokine depletion or supplementation. We found that simultaneous depletion of IL-2 and IL-7 decreased therapeutic efficacy, depletion of IL-15 had no effect, and IL-2 supplementation increased therapeutic efficacy. Our results show that Th17 cells are responsive to IL2Rγ-chain cytokines, and provide insight into the application of these cytokines for Th17-based therapeutic strategies.

  12. Anticancer immunotherapy by CTLA-4 blockade: obligatory contribution of IL-2 receptors and negative prognostic impact of soluble CD25

    PubMed Central

    Hannani, Dalil; Vétizou, Marie; Enot, David; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Chaput, Nathalie; Klatzmann, David; Desbois, Melanie; Jacquelot, Nicolas; Vimond, Nadège; Chouaib, Salem; Mateus, Christine; Allison, James P; Ribas, Antoni; Wolchok, Jedd D; Yuan, Jianda; Wong, Philip; Postow, Michael; Mackiewicz, Andrzej; Mackiewicz, Jacek; Schadendorff, Dirk; Jaeger, Dirk; Korman, Alan J; Bahjat, Keith; Maio, Michele; Calabro, Luana; Teng, Michele WL; Smyth, Mark J; Eggermont, Alexander; Robert, Caroline; Kroemer, Guido; Zitvogel, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    The cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4)-blocking antibody ipilimumab induces immune-mediated long-term control of metastatic melanoma in a fraction of patients. Although ipilimumab undoubtedly exerts its therapeutic effects via immunostimulation, thus far clinically useful, immunologically relevant biomarkers that predict treatment efficiency have been elusive. Here, we show that neutralization of IL-2 or blocking the α and β subunits of the IL-2 receptor (CD25 and CD122, respectively) abolished the antitumor effects and the accompanying improvement of the ratio of intratumoral T effector versus regulatory cells (Tregs), which were otherwise induced by CTLA-4 blockade in preclinical mouse models. CTLA-4 blockade led to the reduction of a suppressive CD4+ T cell subset expressing Lag3, ICOS, IL-10 and Egr2 with a concomitant rise in IL-2-producing effector cells that lost FoxP3 expression and accumulated in regressing tumors. While recombinant IL-2 improved the therapeutic efficacy of CTLA-4 blockade, the decoy IL-2 receptor α (IL-2Rα, sCD25) inhibited the anticancer effects of CTLA-4 blockade. In 262 metastatic melanoma patients receiving ipilimumab, baseline serum concentrations of sCD25 represented an independent indicator of overall survival, with high levels predicting resistance to therapy. Altogether, these results unravel a role for IL-2 and IL-2 receptors in the anticancer activity of CTLA-4 blockade. Importantly, our study provides the first immunologically relevant biomarker, namely elevated serum sCD25, that predicts resistance to CTLA-4 blockade in patients with melanoma. PMID:25582080

  13. Induction Therapy for Kidney Transplant Recipients: Do We Still Need Anti-IL2 Receptor Monoclonal Antibodies?

    PubMed

    Hellemans, R; Bosmans, J-L; Abramowicz, D

    2017-01-01

    Induction therapy with antilymphocyte biological agents is widely used after kidney transplantation, most commonly T lymphocyte-depleting rabbit-derived antithymocyte globulin (rATG) or an IL-2 receptor antagonist (IL2RA). Early randomized trials showed that rATG or IL2RA induction reduces early acute rejection, prompting recommendations by Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes that IL2RA induction be used routinely in first-line therapy after kidney transplantation, with lymphocyte-depleting induction reserved for high-risk cases. These studies, however, mainly used outdated maintenance regimens. No large randomized trial has examined the effect of IL2RA or rATG induction versus no induction in patients receiving tacrolimus, mycophenolic acid and steroids. With this triple maintenance therapy, the addition of induction may achieve an absolute risk reduction for acute rejection of only 1-4% in standard-risk patients without improving graft or patient survival. In contrast, rATG induction lowers the relative risk of acute rejection by almost 50% versus IL2RA in patients with high immunological risk. These recent data raise questions about the need for IL2RA in kidney transplantation, as it may no longer be beneficial in standard-risk transplantation and may be inferior to rATG in high-risk situations. Updated evidence-based guidelines are necessary to support clinicians deciding whether and what induction therapy is required for their transplant patients today.

  14. Mutual enhancement of IL-2 and IL-7 on DNA vaccine immunogenicity mainly involves regulations on their receptor expression and receptor-expressing lymphocyte generation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yonghong; Liang, Shuang; Li, Xiujin; Wang, Liyue; Zhang, Jianlou; Xu, Jian; Huo, Shanshan; Cao, Xuebin; Zhong, Zhenyu; Zhong, Fei

    2015-07-09

    Our previous study showed that IL-2 and IL-7 could mutually enhance the immunogenicity of canine parvovirus VP2 DNA vaccine, although the underlying mechanism remained unknown. Here, we used the OVA gene as a DNA vaccine in a mouse model to test their enhancement on DNA vaccine immunogenicity and to explore the molecular mechanism. Results showed that both IL-2 and IL-7 genes significantly increased the immunogenicity of OVA DNA vaccine in mice. Co-administration of IL-2 and IL-7 genes with OVA DNA significantly increased OVA-specific antibody titers, T cell proliferation and IFN-γ production compared with IL-2 or IL-7 alone, confirming that IL-2 and IL-7 mutually enhanced DNA vaccine immunogenicity. Mechanistically, we have shown that IL-2 significantly stimulated generation of IL-7 receptor-expressing lymphocytes, and that IL-7 significantly induced IL-2 receptor expression. These results contribute to an explanation of the mechanism of the mutual effects of IL-2 and IL-7 on enhancing DNA vaccine immunogenicity and provided a basis for further investigation on their mutual effects on adjuvant activity and immune regulation.

  15. Interleukin-21 (IL-21) synergizes with IL-2 to enhance T-cell receptor-induced human T-cell proliferation and counteracts IL-2/transforming growth factor-β-induced regulatory T-cell development

    PubMed Central

    Battaglia, Alessandra; Buzzonetti, Alexia; Baranello, Cinzia; Fanelli, Mara; Fossati, Marco; Catzola, Valentina; Scambia, Giovanni; Fattorossi, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a mainstay for current immunotherapeutic protocols but its usefulness in patients is reduced by severe toxicities and because IL-2 facilitates regulatory T (Treg) cell development. IL-21 is a type I cytokine acting as a potent T-cell co-mitogen but less efficient than IL-2 in sustaining T-cell proliferation. Using various in vitro models for T-cell receptor (TCR)-dependent human T-cell proliferation, we found that IL-21 synergized with IL-2 to make CD4+ and CD8+ T cells attain a level of expansion that was impossible to obtain with IL-2 alone. Synergy was mostly evident in naive CD4+ cells. IL-2 and tumour-released transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) are the main environmental cues that cooperate in Treg cell induction in tumour patients. Interleukin-21 hampered Treg cell expansion induced by IL-2/TGF-β combination in naive CD4+ cells by facilitating non-Treg over Treg cell proliferation from the early phases of cell activation. Conversely, IL-21 did not modulate the conversion of naive activated CD4+ cells into Treg cells in the absence of cell division. Treg cell reduction was related to persistent activation of Stat3, a negative regulator of Treg cells associated with down-modulation of IL-2/TGF-β-induced phosphorylation of Smad2/3, a positive regulator of Treg cells. In contrast to previous studies, IL-21 was completely ineffective in counteracting the suppressive activity of Treg cells on naive and memory, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Present data provide proof-of-concept for evaluating a combinatorial approach that would reduce the IL-2 needed to sustain T-cell proliferation efficiently, thereby reducing toxicity and controlling a tolerizing mechanism responsible for the contraction of the T-cell response. PMID:23278180

  16. Impaired NK-mediated regulation of T-cell activity in multiple sclerosis is reconstituted by IL-2 receptor modulation.

    PubMed

    Gross, Catharina C; Schulte-Mecklenbeck, Andreas; Rünzi, Anna; Kuhlmann, Tanja; Posevitz-Fejfár, Anita; Schwab, Nicholas; Schneider-Hohendorf, Tilman; Herich, Sebastian; Held, Kathrin; Konjević, Matea; Hartwig, Marvin; Dornmair, Klaus; Hohlfeld, Reinhard; Ziemssen, Tjalf; Klotz, Luisa; Meuth, Sven G; Wiendl, Heinz

    2016-05-24

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS) resulting from a breakdown in peripheral immune tolerance. Although a beneficial role of natural killer (NK)-cell immune-regulatory function has been proposed, it still needs to be elucidated whether NK cells are functionally impaired as part of the disease. We observed NK cells in active MS lesions in close proximity to T cells. In accordance with a higher migratory capacity across the blood-brain barrier, CD56(bright) NK cells represent the major intrathecal NK-cell subset in both MS patients and healthy individuals. Investigating the peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid of MS patients treated with natalizumab revealed that transmigration of this subset depends on the α4β1 integrin very late antigen (VLA)-4. Although no MS-related changes in the migratory capacity of NK cells were observed, NK cells derived from patients with MS exhibit a reduced cytolytic activity in response to antigen-activated CD4(+) T cells. Defective NK-mediated immune regulation in MS is mainly attributable to a CD4(+) T-cell evasion caused by an impaired DNAX accessory molecule (DNAM)-1/CD155 interaction. Both the expression of the activating NK-cell receptor DNAM-1, a genetic alteration consistently found in MS-association studies, and up-regulation of the receptor's ligand CD155 on CD4(+) T cells are reduced in MS. Therapeutic immune modulation of IL-2 receptor restores impaired immune regulation in MS by increasing the proportion of CD155-expressing CD4(+) T cells and the cytolytic activity of NK cells.

  17. Shockwaves increase T-cell proliferation and IL-2 expression through ATP release, P2X7 receptors, and FAK activation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tiecheng; Junger, Wolfgang G; Yuan, Changji; Jin, An; Zhao, Yi; Zheng, Xueqing; Zeng, Yanjun; Liu, Jianguo

    2010-03-01

    Shockwaves elicited by transient pressure disturbances are used to treat musculoskeletal disorders. Previous research has shown that shockwave treatment affects T-cell function, enhancing T-cell proliferation and IL-2 expression by activating p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Here we investigated the signaling pathway by which shockwaves mediate p38 MAPK phosphorylation. We found that shockwaves at an intensity of 0.18 mJ/mm(2) induce the release of extracellular ATP from human Jurkat T-cells at least in part by affecting cell viability. ATP released into the extracellular space stimulates P2X7-type purinergic receptors that induce the activation of p38 MAPK and of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) by phosphorylation on residues Tyr397 and Tyr576/577. Elimination of released ATP with apyrase or inhibition of P2X7 receptors with the antagonists KN-62 or suramin significantly weakens FAK phosphorylation, p38 MAPK activation, IL-2 expression, and T-cell proliferation. Conversely, addition of exogenous ATP causes phosphorylation of FAK and p38 MAPK. Silencing of FAK expression also reduces these cell responses to shockwave treatment. We conclude that shockwaves enhance p38 MAPK activation, IL-2 expression, and T-cell proliferation via the release of cellular ATP and feedback mechanisms that involve P2X7 receptor activation and FAK phosphorylation.

  18. The acquisition of cytokine responsiveness by murine B cells: a role for antigen and IL-5 in the induction of IL-2 receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Poudrier, J; Owens, T

    1994-01-01

    The mechanism whereby small resting (high buoyant density) murine B cells are induced to express interleukin-2 receptors (IL-2R) and to respond to IL-2 was addressed by staining with anti-IL-2R alpha and -IL-2R beta monoclonal antibodies (mAb), and using receptor-specific cDNA probes. Resting B cells expressed undetectable levels of both IL-2R alpha and beta chains on their surface and did not respond to IL-2, even at supra-physiological concentrations. Sepharose-coupled, but not streptavidin-cross-linked, plastic-adsorbed or soluble, anti-mu up-regulated the expression of IL-2R alpha and beta chains and mRNA to levels comparable to those seen in activated T cells. Anti-mu-stimulated B cells responded to IL-2 by incorporation of [3H]thymidine and high rate immunoglobulin (Ig) secretion. Both IL-5 (at optimal concentration) and suboptimal lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 20 ng/ml) induced surface expression of IL-2R alpha. The level of expression induced by IL-5 was equivalent to that on anti-Ig-activated B cells. Neither stimulus induced detectable expression of IL-2R beta, and neither induced B cells to respond to IL-2. IL-2R alpha expression was strongly enhanced, and low levels of IL-2R beta staining and mRNA were induced by the combination of LPS plus IL-5. LPS+IL-5-treated B cells responded to IL-2 by Ig secretion. This indicates that B cells regulate their responsiveness to IL-2 similarly to T cells, via the combined level of expression of IL-2R beta and IL-2R alpha. The synergy between IL-5 and LPS for B-cell responses shows a requirement for complementary stimuli such as would be provided by cytokines, and either cellular interaction or antigen recognition in regulation of B-cell responsiveness to IL-2. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8206511

  19. Celecoxib offsets the negative renal influences of cyclosporine via modulation of the TGF-β1/IL-2/COX-2/endothelin ET{sub B} receptor cascade

    SciTech Connect

    El-Gowelli, Hanan M.; Helmy, Maged W.; Ali, Rabab M.; El-Mas, Mahmoud M.

    2014-03-01

    Endothelin (ET) signaling provokes nephrotoxicity induced by the immunosuppressant drug cyclosporine A (CSA). We tested the hypotheses that (i): celecoxib, a selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor, counterbalances renal derangements caused by CSA in rats and (ii) the COX-2/endothelin ET{sub B} receptor signaling mediates the CSA-celecoxib interaction. Ten-day treatment with CSA (20 mg/kg/day) significantly increased biochemical indices of renal function (serum urea, creatinine), inflammation (interleukin-2, IL-2) and fibrosis (transforming growth factor-β{sub 1}, TGF-β{sub 1}). Histologically, CSA caused renal tubular atrophy along with interstitial fibrosis. These detrimental renal effects of CSA were largely reduced in rats treated concurrently with celecoxib (10 mg/kg/day). We also report that cortical glomerular and medullary tubular protein expressions of COX-2 and ET{sub B} receptors were reduced by CSA and restored to near-control values in rats treated simultaneously with celecoxib. The importance of ET{sub B} receptors in renal control and in the CSA-celecoxib interaction was further verified by the findings (i) most of the adverse biochemical, inflammatory, and histopathological profiles of CSA were replicated in rats treated with the endothelin ET{sub B} receptor antagonist BQ788 (0.1 mg/kg/day, 10 days), and (ii) the BQ788 effects, like those of CSA, were alleviated in rats treated concurrently with celecoxib. Together, the data suggest that the facilitation of the interplay between the TGF-β1/IL-2/COX-2 pathway and the endothelin ET{sub B} receptors constitutes the cellular mechanism by which celecoxib ameliorates the nephrotoxic manifestations of CSA in rats. - Highlights: • Celecoxib abolishes nephrotoxic manifestations of CSA in rats. • Blockade of ETB receptors by BQ788 mimicked the nephrotoxic effects of CSA. • CSA or BQ788 reduces renal protein expression of COX-2 and endothelin ETB receptors. • Enhanced TGFβ1/IL-2/COX2/ETB

  20. Anti-inflammatory function of Nodosin via inhibition of IL-2.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiyu; Du, Junming; Sun, Lijuan; Liu, Jianwen; Quan, Zhiwei

    2010-01-01

    In order to explore the anti-inflammatory effects of Nodosin from Isodon serra, a traditional Chinese herb medicine, mouse T lymphocytes were incubated with Nodosin. In the current study, Nodosin suppressed the overproduction of the T lymphocytes; moreover, cell mitosis cycle was modulated by interfering with DNA replication in G1 stages via inhibition of IL-2 cytokine secretion at the mRNA level by Nodosin. Interestingly, Xylene-induced mouse tumescence model results suggested Nodosin depressed the murine ear-swelling extent and the level of IL-2 in the blood serum. Finally, Nodosin possessed significant anti-inflammatory effects and is a potential candidate for further clinical trial.

  1. Celecoxib offsets the negative renal influences of cyclosporine via modulation of the TGF-β1/IL-2/COX-2/endothelin ET(B) receptor cascade.

    PubMed

    El-Gowelli, Hanan M; Helmy, Maged W; Ali, Rabab M; El-Mas, Mahmoud M

    2014-03-01

    Endothelin (ET) signaling provokes nephrotoxicity induced by the immunosuppressant drug cyclosporine A (CSA). We tested the hypotheses that (i): celecoxib, a selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor, counterbalances renal derangements caused by CSA in rats and (ii) the COX-2/endothelin ET(B) receptor signaling mediates the CSA-celecoxib interaction. Ten-day treatment with CSA (20 mg/kg/day) significantly increased biochemical indices of renal function (serum urea, creatinine), inflammation (interleukin-2, IL-2) and fibrosis (transforming growth factor-β₁, TGF-β₁). Histologically, CSA caused renal tubular atrophy along with interstitial fibrosis. These detrimental renal effects of CSA were largely reduced in rats treated concurrently with celecoxib (10 mg/kg/day). We also report that cortical glomerular and medullary tubular protein expressions of COX-2 and ET(B) receptors were reduced by CSA and restored to near-control values in rats treated simultaneously with celecoxib. The importance of ET(B) receptors in renal control and in the CSA-celecoxib interaction was further verified by the findings (i) most of the adverse biochemical, inflammatory, and histopathological profiles of CSA were replicated in rats treated with the endothelin ETB receptor antagonist BQ788 (0.1 mg/kg/day, 10 days), and (ii) the BQ788 effects, like those of CSA, were alleviated in rats treated concurrently with celecoxib. Together, the data suggest that the facilitation of the interplay between the TGF-β1/IL-2/COX-2 pathway and the endothelin ET(B) receptors constitutes the cellular mechanism by which celecoxib ameliorates the nephrotoxic manifestations of CSA in rats.

  2. A new bioassay for the immunocytokine L19-IL2 for simultaneous analysis of both functional moieties.

    PubMed

    Winter, Jonas; Barbin, Karin; Bacci, Camilla; Bunte, Thomas

    2011-01-05

    Currently, cancer directed new biological entities (NBEs) in the pharmaceutical R&D pipelines are derived from monoclonal antibodies in various formats, such as immunocytokines. Generally, immunocytokines are bi-functional molecules that consist of a specific targeting antibody-based portion and a linked cytokine. To confirm the quality of the drug product both moieties have to be characterized using appropriate techniques. Until now, the binding capacity of antibodies is usually examined by ligand binding assays whereas the biological activity of the linked cytokine is determined by cell-based potency assays. However, the simultaneous analysis of both functional moieties in a single assay format has not been described so far. In this paper we present a newly designed bioassay format for the anti-cancer immunocytokine L19-IL2, comprising of the human vascular targeting single-chain Fv L19 and human interleukin 2 (IL2). This new potency assay allows simultaneous analysis of both moieties, thus specific L19 binding capacity and the ability of IL2 to induce the proliferation of the detector cytotoxic T-cell line CTLL-2. Assay development was performed with special focus on application of different fitting models for the sigmoid dose-response curves to evaluate the influence of model optimization on the validity of assay results. For assay validation generally accepted characteristics were determined. Assay specificity was shown by testing L19-IL2 related compounds. All other validation parameters were derived from 25 batch runs using five nominal L19-IL2 concentrations, covering a range from 60% to 140% of the standard's potency. Accuracy ranged from -3.4% to -6.9% relative error (%RE). Interbatch precision ranged from 6.1% to 10.6% coefficient of variation (%CV). For assay linearity a coefficient of determination (R(2)) of 0.9992 was found. Assay robustness was shown with L19-IL2 samples after three freeze-thaw cycles and also with different cell passages of the used

  3. CD44 co-stimulation promotes FoxP3+ regulatory T-cell persistence and function via production of IL-2, IL-10 and TGF-beta

    PubMed Central

    Bollyky, Paul L.; Falk, Ben A.; Long, Alice; Preisinger, Anton; Braun, Kathy R.; Wu, Rebecca P.; Evanko, Stephen P.; Buckner, Jane H.; Wight, Thomas N.; Nepom, Gerald T.

    2011-01-01

    Work by our group and others has demonstrated a role for the extracellular matrix receptor CD44 and it's ligand hyaluronan in CD4+CD25+ regulatory T-cell (Treg) function. Herein we explore the mechanistic basis for this observation. Using mouse FoxP3/GFP+ Treg we find that CD44 co-stimulation promotes expression of FoxP3, in part through production of IL-2. This promotion of IL-2 production was also resistant to Cyclosporine A treatment, suggesting that CD44 costimulation may promote IL-2 production through bypassing FoxP3-mediated suppression of NFAT. CD44 co-stimulation increased production of IL-10 in a partially Il-2 dependant manner and also promoted cell-surface TGF-β expression. Consistent with these findings, Treg from CD44 knock-out mice demonstrated impaired regulatory function ex vivo and depressed production of IL-10 and cell-surface TGF-β. These data reveal a novel role for CD44 cross-linking in the production of regulatory cytokines. Similar salutary effects on FoxP3 expression were observed upon co-stimulation with hyaluronan, the primary natural ligand for CD44. This effect is dependent upon CD44 cross-linking; while both high molecular weight hyaluronan (HMW-HA) and plate-bound anti-CD44 Ab promoted FoxP3 expression, neither low-molecular weight HA (LMW-HA) nor soluble anti-CD44 Ab did so. The implication is that intact HMW-HA can cross-link CD44 only in those settings where it predominates over fragmentary LMW-HA, namely in un-inflamed tissue. We propose that intact but not fragmented ECM is capable of cross-linking CD44 and thereby maintains immunologic tolerance in uninjured or healing tissue. PMID:19635906

  4. The adaptor TRAF3 restrains the lineage determination of thymic regulatory T cells by modulating signaling via the receptor for IL-2.

    PubMed

    Yi, Zuoan; Lin, Wai Wai; Stunz, Laura L; Bishop, Gail A

    2014-09-01

    The number of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg cells) must be tightly controlled for efficient suppression of autoimmunity with no impairment of normal immune responses. Here we found that the adaptor TRAF3 was intrinsically required for restraining the lineage determination of thymic Treg cells. T cell-specific deficiency in TRAF3 resulted in a two- to threefold greater frequency of Treg cells, due to the more efficient transition of precursors of Treg cells into Foxp3+ Treg cells. TRAF3 dampened interleukin 2 (IL-2) signaling by facilitating recruitment of the tyrosine phosphatase TCPTP to the IL-2 receptor complex, which resulted in dephosphorylation of the signaling molecules Jak1 and Jak3 and negative regulation of signaling via Jak and the transcription factor STAT5. Our results identify a role for TRAF3 as an important negative regulator of signaling via the IL-2 receptor that affects the development of Treg cells.

  5. Two CpG mutational hot spots in the X-linked interleukin-2 receptor gamma chain gene (IL2RG) may cause 15% of all human severe combined immunodeficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Pepper, A.E.; Puck, J.M.; Liu, X.

    1994-09-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), a syndrome of profoundly impaired cellular and humoral immune function, is caused by various autosomal gene defects, including adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency, as well as mutations in the X-linked IL2RG gene encoding the gamma chain of the lymphocyte receptor for IL-2. Mutational analysis of IL2RG was performed using genomic DNA from males with SCID referred from genetics and immunology centers. Single strand conformation polymorphisms (SSCP) were sought by PCR amplification of each of the 8 IL2RG exons using labelled flanking primers. Sequence of exons with aberrant SSCP detected a majority of unique deleterious IL2RG mutations in 30 unrelated SCID patients. However, multiple mutations were seen at CpG dinucleotides, known to be C{yields}T transversion sites. cDNA 690-691 in exon 5 was mutated in 4 patients, 1 patient with each of the C{sub 690}{yields}T causing an Arg{yields}Cys substitution, and 1 with G{sub 691}{yields}A causing Arg{yields}His. Two other patients had SCID caused by a single mutation in IL2RG exon 7. This C{sub 879}{yields}T, also in a CpG, changed an Arg to STOP, resulting in loss of the SH2-related intracellular domain. In addition to our patients, 1 patient with each of the C{sub 690} and the C{sub 879} mutations have been reported by others, giving an overall incidence of 20% from our lab and 21% from all reported IL2RG SCID mutations. While ADA defects account for approximately 15% of SCID, a striking male SCID predominance suggest up to 70% of the cases are X-linked, due to IL2RG mutation. Thus, screening for mutations at the 2 CpG hot spots we have found in IL2RG can identify the genotype of as many SCID cases as are found by ADA testing.

  6. Two unique mutations in the interleukin-2 receptor gamma chain gene (IL2RG) cause X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency arising in opposite parental germ lines

    SciTech Connect

    Puck, J.M.; Pepper, A.E.

    1994-09-01

    The gene encoding the gamma chain of the lymphocyte receptor for IL-2 lies in human X13.1 and is mutated in males with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). 27 X-linked SCID mutations have been found in our laboratory. Single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of genomic DNA using primers flanking each of the 8 exons was followed by direct sequencing of abnormally migrating fragments from SCID patients and family members. A 9 bp in-frame duplication insertion was found in IL2RG exon 5 of a patient from a large X-linked SCID pedigree; the resulting duplication of 3 extracellular amino acids, including the first tryptophan of the {open_quotes}WSXWS{close_quotes} cytokine binding motif, is predicted to disrupt interaction of the cytokine receptor chain with its ligand. Genetic linkage studies demonstrated that the grandmaternal X chromosome associated with SCID was contributed to 3 daughters, 2 obligate carriers and 1 woman of unknown status. However, this grandmother`s genomic DNA did not contain the insertion mutation, nor did she have skewed X-chromosome inactivation in her lymphocytes. That both obligate carrier daughters, but not the third daughter, had the insertion proved the grandmother to be a germline mosaic. A second proband had X-linked SCID with a branch point mutation due to substitution of T for A 15 bp 5{prime} of the start of IL2RG exon 3. This mutation resulted in undetectable IL2RG mRNA by Northern blot. Linkage analysis and sequencing of IL2RG DNA in this family proved the mutation to have originated in the germline of the proband`s grandfather, an immunocompetent individual who contributed an X chromosome with normal IL2RG to one daughter and a mutated X to the another.

  7. Pleiotropic Effects of IL-2 on Cancer: Its Role in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Valle-Mendiola, Arturo; Gutiérrez-Hoya, Adriana; Lagunas-Cruz, María del Carmen; Weiss-Steider, Benny; Soto-Cruz, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) signalling is critical for normal lymphocyte proliferation, but its role in cervical cancer is not fully understood. The receptor is composed of three chains: IL-2α, IL-2β, and IL-2γ. Intracellular signalling is initiated by ligand-induced heterodimerization of the IL-2β and IL-2γ chains, resulting in the activation of multiple intracellular kinases. Recently, IL-2R was shown to be expressed on nonhaematopoietic cells, especially on several types of tumour cells. However, the function of this receptor on malignant cells has not been clearly defined. The expression of IL-2R and the production of IL-2 in cervical cancer cells have been documented as well as expression of molecules of the JAK-STAT pathway. In the current review we have highlighted the differences in the responses of molecules downstream from the IL-2R in normal lymphocytes and tumour cells that could explain the presence of tumour cells in an environment in which cytotoxic lymphocytes also exist and compete and also the effect of different concentrations of IL-2 that could activate effector cells of the immune system cells, which favour the elimination of tumour cells, or concentrations that may promote a regulatory microenvironment in which tumour cells can easily grow. PMID:27293315

  8. Phenotypic and Functional Dysregulated Blood NK Cells in Colorectal Cancer Patients Can Be Activated by Cetuximab Plus IL-2 or IL-15

    PubMed Central

    Rocca, Yamila Sol; Roberti, María Paula; Juliá, Estefanía Paula; Pampena, María Betina; Bruno, Luisina; Rivero, Sergio; Huertas, Eduardo; Sánchez Loria, Fernando; Pairola, Alejandro; Caignard, Anne; Mordoh, José; Levy, Estrella Mariel

    2016-01-01

    The clinical outcome of colorectal cancer (CRC) is associated with the immune response; thus, these tumors could be responsive to different immune therapy approaches. Natural killer (NK) cells are key antitumor primary effectors that can eliminate CRC cells without prior immunization. We previously determined that NK cells from the local tumor environment of CRC tumors display a profoundly altered phenotype compared with circulating NK cells from healthy donors (HD). In this study, we evaluated peripheral blood NK cells from untreated patients and their possible role in metastasis progression. We observed profound deregulation in receptor expression even in early stages of disease compared with HD. CRC-NK cells displayed underexpression of CD16, NKG2D, DNAM-1, CD161, NKp46, and NKp30 activating receptors, while inhibitory receptors CD85j and NKG2A were overexpressed. This inhibited phenotype affected cytotoxic functionality against CRC cells and interferon-γ production. We also determined that NKp30 and NKp46 are the key receptors involved in detriment of CRC-NK cells’ antitumor activity. Moreover, NKp46 expression correlated with relapse-free survival of CRC patients with a maximum follow-up of 71 months. CRC-NK cells also exhibited altered antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity function responding poorly to cetuximab. IL-2 and IL-15 in combination with cetuximab stimulated NK cell, improving cytotoxicity. These results show potential strategies to enhance CRC-NK cell activity. PMID:27777574

  9. Immunosuppression via Loss of IL2rγ Enhances Long-Term Functional Integration of hESC-Derived Photoreceptors in the Mouse Retina.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jie; Cifuentes, Helen; Reynolds, Joseph; Lamba, Deepak A

    2017-03-02

    Loss of photoreceptors is a common endpoint in degenerative retinal diseases. Human pluripotent stem cells provide a potential source for photoreceptor replacement, but, even in mouse models, the efficiency and efficacy of transplantation-based repair remains poor. In this study, we examined the degree to which immune rejection contributes to these disappointing outcomes using an immunodeficient IL2 receptor γ (IL2rγ)-null mouse model. Our results show that prevention of cell rejection in the normal and degenerating retinal environment significantly improves long-term survival and integration of hESC-derived donor retinal cells. Transplanted cells are able to differentiate into mature photoreceptors expressing various opsins and can functionally integrate into congenitally blind mice. Our work suggests that even though the retina is often considered immune-privileged, suppression of host immune-mediated cell rejection may well be a useful approach for improving long-term integration of transplanted cells with a view to successful clinical outcomes.

  10. The single nucleotide variant rs12722489 determines differential estrogen receptor binding and enhancer properties of an IL2RA intronic region

    PubMed Central

    Putlyaeva, Lidia V.; Demin, Denis E.; Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.; Vorontsov, Ilya E.; Fridman, Marina V.; Makeev, Vsevolod J.; Kuprash, Dmitry V.; Schwartz, Anton M.

    2017-01-01

    We studied functional effect of rs12722489 single nucleotide polymorphism located in the first intron of human IL2RA gene on transcriptional regulation. This polymorphism is associated with multiple autoimmune conditions (rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis). Analysis in silico suggested significant difference in the affinity of estrogen receptor (ER) binding site between alternative allelic variants, with stronger predicted affinity for the risk (G) allele. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that purified human ERα bound only G variant of a 32-bp genomic sequence containing rs12722489. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that endogenous human ERα interacted with rs12722489 genomic region in vivo and DNA pull-down assay confirmed differential allelic binding of amplified 189-bp genomic fragments containing rs12722489 with endogenous human ERα. In a luciferase reporter assay, a kilobase-long genomic segment containing G but not A allele of rs12722489 demonstrated enhancer properties in MT-2 cell line, an HTLV-1 transformed human cell line with a regulatory T cell phenotype. PMID:28234966

  11. CD8+ T Cell Fate and Function Influenced by Antigen-Specific Virus-Like Nanoparticles Co-Expressing Membrane Tethered IL-2

    PubMed Central

    Wojta-Stremayr, Daniela; Neunkirchner, Alina; Srinivasan, Bharani; Trapin, Doris; Schmetterer, Klaus G.; Pickl, Winfried F.

    2015-01-01

    A variety of adjuvants fostering humoral immunity are known as of today. However, there is a lack of adjuvants or adjuvant strategies, which directly target T cellular effector functions and memory. We here determined whether systemically toxic cytokines such as IL-2 can be restricted to the site of antigen presentation and used as ‘natural adjuvants’. Therefore, we devised antigen-presenting virus-like nanoparticles (VNP) co-expressing IL-2 attached to different membrane-anchors and assessed their potency to modulate CD8+ T cell responses in vitro and in vivo. Efficient targeting of IL-2 to lipid rafts and ultimately VNP was achieved by fusing IL-2 at its C-terminus to a minimal glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor acceptor sequence. To identify optimal membrane-anchor dimensions we inserted one (1Ig), two (2Ig) or four (4Ig) immunoglobulin(Ig)-like domains of CD16b between IL-2 and the minimal GPI-anchor acceptor sequence of CD16b (GPI). We found that the 2IgGPI version was superior to all other evaluated IL-2 variants (IL-2v) in terms of its i) degree of targeting to lipid rafts and to the VNP surface, ii) biological activity, iii) co-stimulation of cognate T cells in the absence of bystander activation and iv) potency to induce differentiation and acquisition of CD8+ T cell effector functions in vitro and in vivo. In contrast, the GPI version rather favored memory precursor cell formation. These results exemplify novel beneficial features of membrane-bound IL-2, which in addition to its mere T cell stimulatory capacity include the induction of differential effector and memory functions in CD8+ T lymphocytes. PMID:25946103

  12. Identification of contact and respiratory sensitizers according to IL-4 receptor α expression and IL-2 production

    SciTech Connect

    Goutet, Michèle Pépin, Elsa; Langonné, Isabelle; Huguet, Nelly; Ban, Masarin

    2012-04-15

    Identification of allergenic chemicals is an important occupational safety issue. While several methods exist to identify contact sensitizers, there is currently no validated model to predict the potential of chemicals to act as respiratory sensitizers. Previously, we reported that cytometry analysis of the local immune responses induced in mice dermally exposed to the respiratory sensitizer trimellitic anhydride (TMA 10%) and contact sensitizer dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB 1%) could identify divergent expression of several immune parameters. The present study confirms, first, that IgE-positive B cells, MHC class II molecules, interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4 and IL-4Rα can differentiate the allergic reactions caused by high doses of strong respiratory (TMA, phthalic anhydride and toluene diisocyanate) and contact sensitizers (DNCB, dinitrofluorobenzene and oxazolone). The second part of the study was designed to test the robustness of these markers when classing the weakly immunogenic chemicals most often encountered. Six respiratory allergens, including TMA (2.5%), five contact allergens, including DNCB (0.25%), and two irritants were compared at doses of equivalent immunogenicity. The results indicated that IL-4Rα and IL-2 can be reliably used to discriminate sensitizers. Respiratory sensitizers induced markedly higher IL-4Rα levels than contact allergens, while irritants had no effect on this parameter. Inversely, contact allergens tended to induce higher percentages of IL-2{sup +}CD8{sup +} cells than respiratory allergens. In contrast, the markers MHC-II, IgE and IL-4 were not able to classify chemicals with low immunogenic potential. In conclusion, IL-4Rα and IL-2 have the potential to be used in classifying a variety of chemical allergens. -- Highlights: ► Identification of chemical allergens is an important occupational safety issue. ► There is currently no model to predict the potential of chemicals to induce asthma. ► We analyze immune responses induced

  13. The IL-2 cytokine family in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sim, Geok Choo; Radvanyi, Laszlo

    2014-08-01

    The use of cytokines from the IL-2 family (also called the common γ chain cytokine family) such as interleukin (IL)-2, IL-7, IL-15, and IL-21 to activate the immune system of cancer patients is one of the most important areas of current cancer immunotherapy research. The infusion of IL-2 at low or high doses for multiple cycles in patients with metastatic melanoma and renal cell carcinoma was the first successful immunotherapy for cancer proving that the immune system could completely eradicate tumor cells under certain conditions. The initial clinical success observed in some IL-2-treated patients encouraged further efforts focused on developing and improving the application of other IL-2 family cytokines (IL-4, IL-7, IL-9, IL-15, and IL-21) that have unique biological effects playing important roles in the development, proliferation, and function of specific subsets of lymphocytes at different stages of differentiation with some overlapping effects with IL-2. IL-7, IL-15, and IL-21, as well as mutant forms or variants of IL-2, are now also being actively pursued in the clinic with some measured early successes. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the biology of the IL-2 cytokine family focusing on IL-2, IL-15 and IL-21. We discuss the similarities and differences between the signaling pathways mediated by these cytokines and their immunomodulatory effects on different subsets of immune cells. Current clinical application of IL-2, IL-15 and IL-21 either as single agents or in combination with other biological agents and the limitation and potential drawbacks of these cytokines for cancer immunotherapy are also described. Lastly, we discuss the future direction of research on these cytokines, such as the development of new cytokine mutants and variants for improving cytokine-based immunotherapy through differential binding to specific receptor subunits.

  14. NK cell effector functions in a Chédiak-Higashi patient undergoing cord blood transplantation: Effects of in vitro treatment with IL-2.

    PubMed

    Cifaldi, Loredana; Pinto, Rita Maria; Rana, Ippolita; Caniglia, Maurizio; Angioni, Adriano; Petrocchi, Stefano; Cancrini, Caterina; Cursi, Laura; Palumbo, Giuseppe; Zingoni, Alessandra; Gismondi, Angela; Rossi, Paolo; Santoni, Angela; Cerboni, Cristina

    2016-12-01

    NK cell cytotoxicity in Chédiak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is strongly impaired as lytic granules are not released upon NK-target cell contact, contributing to several defects typical of this severe immunodeficiency. Correction of NK cell defects in CHS should improve the outcome of hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation, proposed as therapy. We investigated NK cell functions in a CHS patient before and after cord-blood transplantation, and the ability of in vitro IL-2 treatment to restore them. Before the transplant, the strong defect in NK cell-mediated natural and antibody-dependent cytotoxicity, as well as in IFN-γ production, could be restored up to normal levels by in vitro IL-2 treatment. This cytokine also caused the appearance of smaller lysosomal granules and their orientation towards the NK-target cell contact area, thus suggesting that IL-2 had a more general capacity to restore NK cell effector functions. Moreover after the transplant, although the successful engraftment, NK cell cytotoxicity resulted still partially impaired at one year, almost normal at ten years and, anyhow, fully recovered by in vitro IL-2 treatment. Taken together, our results indicate that IL-2 had a wide capacity to restore NK cell effector functions, being able to reverse the altered cytotoxic activity, lytic granule pattern, and cytokine production observed in the CHS patient.

  15. NK026680 inhibits T-cell function in an IL-2-dependent manner and prolongs cardiac allograft survival in rats.

    PubMed

    Shibasaki, Susumu; Yamashita, Kenichiro; Goto, Ryoichi; Oura, Tetsu; Wakayama, Kenji; Hirokata, Gentaro; Shibata, Tomohiro; Igarashi, Rumi; Haga, Sanae; Ozaki, Michitaka; Todo, Satoru

    2012-01-01

    NK026680 is a triazolopyrimidine derivative that has been shown to inhibit dendritic cell maturation and activation. Here, we examined the immunosuppressive properties of NK026680 on T-cell function and assessed its immunosuppressive efficacy in an ACI (RT1(av1) haplotype) to Lewis (RT1(l)) rat heart transplantation model. The effects of NK026680 on T-cell proliferation, activation, and cytokine production were investigated in vitro. Heart transplant recipient rats were administered NK026680 daily for 14 days post-transplantation. In addition to graft survival time, alloimmune responses and graft histology at 4-10 days post-transplantation were assessed. NK026680 was found to inhibit proliferation, CD25 upregulation, IL-2 production, and cell cycle progression in αCD3/αCD28-stimulated murine T cells. These effects were likely due to suppression of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway and the subsequent inhibition of p65, c-Fos, and to a lesser extent, c-Jun. Daily NK026680 treatment suppressed alloimmune responses, prevented cellular infiltration into allografts, and prolonged graft survival. The anti-rejection effects of NK026680 were enhanced by tacrolimus. In conclusion, NK026680 inhibits the activation of T cells and prolongs cardiac allograft survival in rats. These features make it a potential candidate immunosuppressant for the treatment of organ transplant patients in the future.

  16. Characterization of an IL-2 mimetic with therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Eckenberg, R; Rose, T; Moreau, J L; Weil, R; Gesbert, F; Dubois, S; Tello, D; Bossus, M; Gras, H; Tartar, A; Bertoglio, J; Chouaïb, S; Jacques, Y; Alzari, P M; Thèze, J

    2001-06-01

    Human interleukin-2 (IL-2) interacts with two types of functional receptors (IL-2R alpha betagamma and IL-2R betagamma) and acts on a broad range of target cells involved in inflammatory reactions and immune responses. IL-2 is also used in different clinical trials aimed at improving the treatment of some cancers and the recovery of CD4 lymphocytes by HIV patients. The therapeutic index of IL-2 is limited by various side effects dominated by the vascular leak syndrome. We have shown that a chemically synthesised fragment of the IL-2 sequence can fold into a helical tetramer likely mimicking the quatemary structure of an hemopoietin. Indeed, peptide p1-30 (containing amino acids 1 to 30, including the sequence corresponding to the entire alpha helix A of IL-2) spontaneously folds into an alpha-helical homotetramer and stimulates the growth of T-cell lines expressing human IL-2R beta, whereas shorter versions of the peptide lack helical structure and are inactive. At the cellular level, p1-30 induces lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells and preferentially activates CD8 low lymphocytes and natural killer cells, which constitutively express IL-2R beta. A significant IFN-gamma production is also detected following p1-30 stimulation. A mutant form of p1-30 (Asp20-->Lys) which is likely unable to induce vascular leak syndrome remains capable to generate LAK cells like the original p1-30 peptide. Altogether our data suggest that p1-30 has therapeutic potential.

  17. RORγt, a Novel Isoform of an Orphan Receptor, Negatively Regulates Fas Ligand Expression and IL-2 Production in T Cells

    PubMed Central

    He, You-Wen; Deftos, Michael L.; Ojala, Ethan W.; Bevan, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Summary We have identified RORγt, a novel, thymus-specific isoform of the orphan nuclear receptor RORγ that is expressed predominantly in CD4+ CD8+ double-positive thymocytes. Ectopic expression of RORγt protects T cell hybridomas from activation-induced cell death by inhibiting the upregulation of Fas ligand. Following hybridoma stimulation, RORγt also inhibits IL-2 production but does not affect the induction of Nur-77 and Egr-3 nor the upregulation of CD69. Both the ligand-binding and DNA-binding domains of RORγt are required for this effect. We propose that the role of RORγt expression in immature thymocytes is to inhibit Fas ligand expression and cytokine secretion following engagement of their TCR during positive or negative selection. PMID:9881970

  18. Ectodomain Shedding of Interleukin-2 Receptor β and Generation of an Intracellular Functional Fragment*

    PubMed Central

    de Oca B., Pavel Montes; Malardé, Valerie; Proust, Richard; Dautry-Varsat, Alice; Gesbert, Franck

    2010-01-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) regulates different functions of various lymphoid cell subsets. These are mediated by its binding to the IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) composed of three subunits (IL2-Rα, -β, and -γc). IL-2Rβ is responsible for the activation of several signaling pathways. Ectodomain shedding of membrane receptors is thought to be an important mechanism for down-regulation of cell surface receptor abundance but is also emerging as a mechanism that cell membrane-associated molecules require for proper action in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that IL-2Rβ is cleaved in cell lines of different origin, including T cells, generating an intracellular 37-kDa fragment (37βic) that comprises the full intracellular C-terminal and transmembrane domains. Ectodomain shedding of IL-2Rβ decreases in a mutant deleted of the juxtamembrane region, where cleavage is predicted to occur, and is inhibited by tissue inhibitor of metalloproteases-3. 37βic is tyrosine-phosphorylated and associates with STAT-5, a canonic signal transducer of IL-2R. Finally, lymphoid cell transfection with a truncated form of IL-2Rβ mimicking 37βic increases their proliferation. These data indicate that IL-2Rβ is subject to ectodomain shedding generating an intracellular fragment biologically functional, because (i) it is phosphorylated, (ii) it associates with STAT5A, and (iii) it increases cell proliferation. PMID:20495002

  19. Depletion of IL-2 receptor β-positive cells protects from diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Brauner, Hanna; Hall, Håkan T; Flodström-Tullberg, Malin; Kärre, Klas; Höglund, Petter; Johansson, Sofia

    2016-02-01

    The destruction of β-cells in type 1 diabetes (T1D) progresses silently until only a minor fraction of the β-cells remain. A late acting therapy leading to the prevention of further β-cell killing would therefore be desirable. CD122, the β chain of the interleukin-2 receptor, is highly expressed on natural killer (NK) cells and on a subpopulation of CD8 T cells. In this study, we have treated non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice with a depleting antibody against CD122. The treatment protected from diabetes, even when initiated just before disease onset. The degree of leukocyte infiltration into islets was unaffected by the treatment, further supporting effectiveness late in the disease process. It effectively removed all NK cells from the spleen, pancreas and pancreatic lymph nodes and abolished NK cell activity. Interestingly, despite the lack of CD122 expression on CD8 T cells in the pancreas, the overall frequency of CD8 cells decreased in this organ, whereas it was unaffected in the spleen. T cells were also still capable to respond against a foreign antigen. Conclusively, targeting of CD122(+) cells could represent a novel treatment strategy against T1D.

  20. [Agonists of µ- and δ-Opioid Receptors in the Regulation of IL-2, IL-4 and IFN-γ Production by Peripheral Blood Cells in vitro].

    PubMed

    Gein, S V; Tendryakova, S P

    2015-01-01

    It was found that β-endorphin stimulates the PHA (phytohemagglutinin)-induced production of interleukin-4 and has no affect on the production of interferon-gamma in unfractionated leukocytic suspension. In the culture of purified CD4+ T cells, β-endorphin does not affect the concentration of IL-2, IL-4, and IFN-γ, but stimulates the production of IL-4 and inhibits the production of IFN-γ when adding monocytes to the culture. Selective δ-agonist DADLE enhances the PHA-induced production of IL-4 in unfractionated leukocytic suspension and in CD4+ lymphocytes+monocytes system. The synthesis of IFN-γ by purified CD4+ lymphocytes is not afected by the presence of DADLE, DAGO ad Deltorphin II; but when adding monocytes to the culture, the synthesis rate decreases. β-endorphin and selective μ-agonist DAGO enhance the production of IFN-γ by stimulated neutrophils. The production of IFN-γ in CD8+ lymphocytes is not affected by β-endorphin. Thus, opioid peptides have a predominantly Th2 polarizing effect, which is monocyte-mediated, hindering the development of cell response by inhibiting IFN-γ, and stimulating the production of I L-4 by activating δ-receptor. On the other hand, neutrophils can enhance the production of IFN-γ by stimulating μ-receptor.

  1. Natural Killer Cell Subsets and IL-2, IL-15, and IL-18 Genes Expressions in Chronic Kidney Allograft Dysfunction and Graft Function in Kidney Allograft Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Assadiasl, S.; Sepanjnia, A.; Aghili, B.; Nafar, M.; Ahmadpoor, P.; Pourrezagholi, F.; Parvin, M.; Shahlaee, A.; Nicknam, M. H.; Amirzargar, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: While acute rejection and early graft loss rates have decreased substantially over the past four decades, progressive chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD) still remains a common cause of late graft loss in kidney transplant recipients. Objective: This study was conducted to investigate the percentage of natural killer (NK) cell subsets and IL-2, 15 and 18 genes expression in two groups of CAD and well-function graft (WFG) recipients. Methods: 30 renal allograft recipients with biopsy-proven interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy (IF/TA) and impaired renal function, and 30 sex- and age-matched WFG patients were enrolled in this study. The percentage of NK cell subsets including NK CD56bright and NK CD56dim cells were determined by flowcytometry; IL-2, IL-15, and IL-18 genes expressions were assessed by real-time PCR. Results: Compared to WFG patients, there was a significant (p<0.05) increase in the percentage of NK CD56bright cells in CAD patients. However, the difference in percentage of NK CD56dim cells or CD56dim/CD56bright ratio between the studied groups was not significant. In addition, IL-2, 15 and 18 genes expressions were almost similar in CAD and WFG patients. Conclusion: We found higher percentages of NK CD56bright subset in kidney transplant recipients with CAD without considerable changes in related cytokines’ gene expression, suggesting a possible defect of NK cells maturation in these patients. PMID:28078060

  2. Prophylactic and therapeutic effects of a humanized monoclonal antibody against the IL-2 receptor (DACLIZUMAB) on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Brok, H P M; Tekoppele, J M; Hakimi, J; Kerwin, J A; Nijenhuis, E M; De Groot, C W; Bontrop, R E; ‘T Hart, B A

    2001-01-01

    CIA in the rhesus monkey is an autoimmune-based polyarthritis with inflammation and erosion of synovial joints that shares various features with human rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The close phylogenetic relationship between man and rhesus monkey makes the model very suitable for preclinical safety and efficacy testing of new therapeutics with exclusive reactivity in primates. In this study we have investigated the prophylactic and therapeutic effects of a humanized monoclonal antibody (Daclizumab) against the α-chain of the IL-2 receptor (CD25). When Daclizumab treatment was started well after immunization but before the expected onset of CIA a significant reduction of joint-inflammation and joint-erosion was observed. A therapeutic treatment, initiated as soon as the first clinical signs of CIA were observed, proved also effective since joint-degradation was abrogated. The results of this study indicate that Daclizumab has clinical potential for the treatment of RA during periods of active inflammation and suppression of the destruction of the joint tissues. PMID:11359452

  3. Immunosuppressive effect of the anti-IL-2-receptor monoclonal antibody, AMT-13, on organ-cultured fetal pancreas allograft survival

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhardt, K.; Loughnan, M.S.; Diamantstein, T.; Mandel, T.E.

    1988-11-01

    Recently, prolongation of cardiac allograft survival in mice was reported using a rat anti-IL-2R mAb (AMT-13). However, its immunosuppressive action in vivo, alone and in combination with other immunosuppressants, and its effect on other organ transplants has not been extensively studied. We grafted cultured fetal pancreas from CBA (H-2k) donors to Balb/c (H-2d) mice. Recipients were treated with 10 consecutive daily injections each of 20 micrograms AMT-13 only, or with an additional mild immunosuppression of 350 rads irradiation. Control groups received rat immunoglobulin or 350 rads irradiation. Graft survival and the phenotype of infiltrating cells were assessed histologically and immunocytochemically on days 12, 17, and 21, and soluble IL-2R levels were measured in the serum with a quantitative ELISA in all recipients. Two of five grafts in the AMT-13-treated group had islets on day 12 posttransplantation despite lymphocytic infiltration in all grafts, while at this time all grafts of rat Ig treated control mice were completely rejected with only scar tissue and a few lymphocytes remaining. Additional immunosuppression with 350 rads irradiation had a marked additive effect with AMT-13. Soluble IL-2R levels in the serum of untreated recipients were not elevated compared with normal serum levels, but recipients injected with AMT-13 had multifold increased soluble IL-2R levels. The percentage of IL-2R+ cells in the grafts of AMT-13-treated animals was either normal (less than 5%) or increased (20%) in the additionally irradiated mice, providing strong evidence that the immunosuppressive effect of AMT-13 is not due to a depletion of activated IL-2R+ lymphocytes.

  4. Inhibition of IL-2 induced IL-10 production as a principle of phase-specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bodas, Manish; Jain, Nitya; Awasthi, Amit; Martin, Sunil; Penke Loka, Raghu Kumar; Dandekar, Dineshkumar; Mitra, Debashis; Saha, Bhaskar

    2006-10-01

    Leishmania donovani, a protozoan parasite, inflicts a fatal disease, visceral leishmaniasis. The suppression of antileishmanial T cell responses that characterizes the disease was proposed to be due to deficiency of a T cell growth factor, IL-2. We demonstrate that during the first week after L. donovani infection, IL-2 induces IL-10 that suppresses the host-protective functions of T cells 14 days after infection. The observed suppression is concurrent with increased CD4+ glucocorticoid-induced TNF receptor+ T cells and Foxp3 expression in BALB/c mice, implicating IL-2-dependent regulatory T cell control of antileishmanial immune responses. Indeed, IL-2 and IL-10 neutralization at different time points after the infection demonstrates their distinct roles at the priming and effector phases, respectively, and establishes kinetic modulation of ongoing immune responses as a principle of a rational, phase-specific immunotherapy.

  5. Il2rg gene-targeted severe combined immunodeficiency pigs.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shunichi; Iwamoto, Masaki; Saito, Yoriko; Fuchimoto, Daiichiro; Sembon, Shoichiro; Suzuki, Misae; Mikawa, Satoshi; Hashimoto, Michiko; Aoki, Yuki; Najima, Yuho; Takagi, Shinsuke; Suzuki, Nahoko; Suzuki, Emi; Kubo, Masanori; Mimuro, Jun; Kashiwakura, Yuji; Madoiwa, Seiji; Sakata, Yoichi; Perry, Anthony C F; Ishikawa, Fumihiko; Onishi, Akira

    2012-06-14

    A porcine model of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) promises to facilitate human cancer studies, the humanization of tissue for xenotransplantation, and the evaluation of stem cells for clinical therapy, but SCID pigs have not been described. We report here the generation and preliminary evaluation of a porcine SCID model. Fibroblasts containing a targeted disruption of the X-linked interleukin-2 receptor gamma chain gene, Il2rg, were used as donors to generate cloned pigs by serial nuclear transfer. Germline transmission of the Il2rg deletion produced healthy Il2rg(+/-) females, while Il2rg(-/Y) males were athymic and exhibited markedly impaired immunoglobulin and T and NK cell production, robustly recapitulating human SCID. Following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, donor cells stably integrated in Il2rg(-/Y) heterozygotes and reconstituted the Il2rg(-/Y) lymphoid lineage. The SCID pigs described here represent a step toward the comprehensive evaluation of preclinical cellular regenerative strategies.

  6. Improved function and proliferation of adult human beta cells engrafted in diabetic immunodeficient NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice treated with alogliptin

    PubMed Central

    Jurczyk, Agata; diIorio, Philip; Brostowin, Dean; Leehy, Linda; Yang, Chaoxing; Urano, Fumihiko; Harlan, David M; Shultz, Leonard D; Greiner, Dale L; Bortell, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Dipeptidyl-peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are known to increase insulin secretion and beta cell proliferation in rodents. To investigate the effects on human beta cells in vivo, we utilize immunodeficient mice transplanted with human islets. The study goal was to determine the efficacy of alogliptin, a DPP-4 inhibitor, to enhance human beta cell function and proliferation in an in vivo context using diabetic immunodeficient mice engrafted with human pancreatic islets. Methods Streptozotocin-induced diabetic NOD-scid IL2rγnull (NSG) mice were transplanted with adult human islets in three separate trials. Transplanted mice were treated daily by gavage with alogliptin (30 mg/kg/day) or vehicle control. Islet graft function was compared using glucose tolerance tests and non-fasting plasma levels of human insulin and C-peptide; beta cell proliferation was determined by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation. Results Glucose tolerance tests were significantly improved by alogliptin treatment for mice transplanted with islets from two of the three human islet donors. Islet-engrafted mice treated with alogliptin also had significantly higher plasma levels of human insulin and C-peptide compared to vehicle controls. The percentage of insulin+BrdU+ cells in human islet grafts from alogliptin-treated mice was approximately 10-fold more than from vehicle control mice, consistent with a significant increase in human beta cell proliferation. Conclusion Human islet-engrafted immunodeficient mice treated with alogliptin show improved human insulin secretion and beta cell proliferation compared to control mice engrafted with the same donor islets. Immunodeficient mice transplanted with human islets provide a useful model to interrogate potential therapies to improve human islet function and survival in vivo. PMID:24376359

  7. IL-2: A Two-Faced Master Regulator of Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rahul; Fu, Shu Man; Ju, Shyr-Te

    2011-01-01

    CD4+ T-cell (Th) cytokines provide important regulatory and effector functions of T-cells. Among them, IL-2 plays a unique role. IL-2 is required for the generation and maintenance of regulatory T-cells (Treg) to provide lifelong protection from autoimmune disease. Whether IL-2 is also required for autoimmune disease development is less clear as Il2−/− mice themselves spontaneously develop multi-organ inflammation (MOI). In this communication, we discuss evidence that support the thesis that IL-2 is required for the development of autoimmune response, although some aspects of autoimmune response are not regulated by IL-2. Potential IL-2-dependent mechanisms operating at specific stages of the inflammation process are presented. The interplays among Treg, IL-2, autoimmune response and adaptive immunity are discussed. Overall, available information indicates that IL-2 is a two-faced master regulator of autoimmunity: one to prevent autoimmunity while the other promotes autoimmune response. The latter is an unfortunate consequence of IL-2 function that is used to promote the adaptive immune response against foreign antigens and pathogens. PMID:21282039

  8. Preferential expansion of human virus-specific multifunctional central memory T cells by partial targeting of the IL-2 receptor signaling pathway: the key role of CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Schmueck, Michael; Fischer, Annika M; Hammoud, Ben; Brestrich, Gordon; Fuehrer, Henrike; Luu, Si-Hong; Mueller, Karin; Babel, Nina; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Reinke, Petra

    2012-05-15

    Effector memory T cells are effective in controlling acute infections, but central memory T cells play a key role in long-lasting protection against viruses and tumors. In vivo/in vitro challenge by Ag commonly supports the generation of effector memory T cells with limited longevity. To our knowledge, this study demonstrates for the first time in the human system and under rechallenge conditions that targeting IL-2R by partial mammalian target of rapamycin inhibition or blocking IL-2Rα enriches human CD4(+)/CD8(+) central memory T cells within the virus-specific T cell product associated with enhanced functionality (i.e., multicytokine secretors, including IL-2; enhanced CD137 and CD107a expression on CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells, respectively; and killing infected target cells). Remarkably, the effects on CD8(+) T cells are mainly mediated via the enhancement of CD4(+) T cell function. The data reveal new insights into the role of CD4(+) T cell support for the quality of CD8(+) T cell memory, even under rechallenge conditions. Moreover, our method offers a new approach to improve the long-lasting efficacy of adoptive T cell therapy in patients.

  9. Functional RNAi screen targeting cytokine and growth factor receptors reveals oncorequisite role for interleukin-2 gamma receptor in JAK3-mutation-positive leukemia.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, A; MacKenzie, R J; Eide, C A; Davare, M A; Watanabe-Smith, K; Tognon, C E; Mongoue-Tchokote, S; Park, B; Braziel, R M; Tyner, J W; Druker, B J

    2015-06-04

    To understand the role of cytokine and growth factor receptor-mediated signaling in leukemia pathogenesis, we designed a functional RNA interference (RNAi) screen targeting 188 cytokine and growth factor receptors that we found highly expressed in primary leukemia specimens. Using this screen, we identified interleukin-2 gamma receptor (IL2Rγ) as a critical growth determinant for a JAK3(A572V) mutation-positive acute myeloid leukemia cell line. We observed that knockdown of IL2Rγ abrogates phosphorylation of JAK3 and downstream signaling molecules, JAK1, STAT5, MAPK and pS6 ribosomal protein. Overexpression of IL2Rγ in murine cells increased the transforming potential of activating JAK3 mutations, whereas absence of IL2Rγ completely abrogated the clonogenic potential of JAK3(A572V), as well as the transforming potential of additional JAK3-activating mutations such as JAK3(M511I). In addition, mutation at the IL2Rγ interaction site in the FERM domain of JAK3 (Y100C) completely abrogated JAK3-mediated leukemic transformation. Mechanistically, we found IL2Rγ contributes to constitutive JAK3 mutant signaling by increasing JAK3 expression and phosphorylation. Conversely, we found that mutant, but not wild-type JAK3, increased the expression of IL2Rγ, indicating IL2Rγ and JAK3 contribute to constitutive JAK/STAT signaling through their reciprocal regulation. Overall, we demonstrate a novel role for IL2Rγ in potentiating oncogenesis in the setting of JAK3-mutation-positive leukemia. In addition, our study highlights an RNAi-based functional assay that can be used to facilitate the identification of non-kinase cytokine and growth factor receptor targets for inhibiting leukemic cell growth.

  10. Engagement of SLAMF3 enhances CD4+ T-cell sensitivity to IL-2 and favors regulatory T-cell polarization in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Comte, Denis; Karampetsou, Maria P.; Kis-Toth, Katalin; Yoshida, Nobuya; Bradley, Sean J.; Mizui, Masayuki; Kono, Michihito; Solomon, Julie R.; Kyttaris, Vasileios C.; Tsokos, George C.

    2016-01-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule family 3 (SLAMF3/Ly9) is a coregulatory molecule implicated in T-cell activation and differentiation. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by aberrant T-cell activation and compromised IL-2 production, leading to abnormal regulatory T-cell (Treg) development/function. Here we show that SLAMF3 functions as a costimulator on CD4+ T cells and influences IL-2 response and T helper cell differentiation. SLAMF3 ligation promotes T-cell responses to IL-2 via up-regulation of CD25 in a small mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 3 (Smad3)-dependent mechanism. This augments the activation of the IL-2/IL-2R/STAT5 pathway and enhances cell proliferation in response to exogenous IL-2. SLAMF3 costimulation promotes Treg differentiation from naïve CD4+ T cells. Ligation of SLAMF3 receptors on SLE CD4+ T cells restores IL-2 responses to levels comparable to those seen in healthy controls and promotes functional Treg generation. Taken together, our results suggest that SLAMF3 acts as potential therapeutic target in SLE patients by augmenting sensitivity to IL-2. PMID:27482100

  11. IL-2R{gamma} gene microdeletion demonstrates that canine X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency is a homologue of the human disease

    SciTech Connect

    Henthorn, P.S.; Fimiani, V.M.; Patterson, D.F.

    1994-09-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is characterized by profound defects in cellular and humoral immunity and, in humans, is associated with mutations in the gene for the {gamma} chain of the IL-2 receptor (IL-2R{gamma}). We have examined this gene in a colony of dogs established from a single X-linked SCID carrier female. Affected dogs have a 4-bp deletion in the first exon of the IL-2R{gamma} gene, which precludes the production of a functional protein, demonstrating that the canine disease is a true homologue of human X-linked SCID. 37 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-15 have different effects on human natural killer lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Pillet, Anne-Hélène; Thèze, Jacques; Rose, Thierry

    2011-11-01

    Although interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-15 share the common signal transducing receptor chains IL-2Rβ and γ(c) and give rise to the same signaling patterns in human natural killer (NK) cells in vitro, they differ in their effects on the development, activation, and proliferation of these cells in vivo. We have previously demonstrated that the activation of NK cells induces a cellular program characterized by the sequential transcription-regulated expression of IL-15 and IL-2 high-affinity receptors. We demonstrate here that these receptors induce different responses. IL-15 sustains the expression of its high-affinity receptor, leading to long-lasting STAT5 phosphorylation and BCL2 expression. By contrast, IL-2 induces the rapid disappearance of IL-2Rα and γ(c) chains when the gene transcription is downregulated, shutting down IL-2-responses as demonstrated by the absence of STAT5 phosphorylation and BCL2 expression.

  13. Defective STAT1 activation associated with impaired IFN-γ production in NK and T lymphocytes from metastatic melanoma patients treated with IL-2.

    PubMed

    Sim, Geok Choo; Wu, Sheng; Jin, Lei; Hwu, Patrick; Radvanyi, Laszlo G

    2016-06-14

    High dose (HD) IL-2 therapy has been used for almost two decades as an immunotherapy for metastatic melanoma. IL-2 promotes the proliferation and effector function of T and NK cells through the tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription factors (STAT), especially STAT5. However, whether any defects in STAT activation exist in T and NK lymphocytes from melanoma patients are under debate. Here, we measured the extent of HD IL-2-induced phosphorylation of STAT5 and STAT1 in lymphocyte subsets from metastatic melanoma patients and healthy controls at a single cell level using flow cytometry. We found no defects in IL-2-induced STAT5 phosphorylation and induction of proliferation in T and NK cell subsets in vitro. This was confirmed by measuring ex vivo STAT5 activation in whole blood collected from patients during their first bolus HD IL-2 infusion. IL-2 also induced STAT1 phosphorylation via IFN-γ receptors in T and NK cell subsets through the release of IFN-γ by CD56hi and CD56lo NK cells. Further analysis revealed that melanoma patients had a sub-optimal STAT1 activation response linked to lower IL-2-induced IFN-γ secretion in both CD56hi and CD56low NK cell subsets. STAT1 activation in response to IL-2 also showed an age-related decline in melanoma patients not linked to tumor burden indicating a premature loss of NK cell function. Taken together, these findings indicate that, although STAT5 activation is normal in metastatic melanoma patients in response to IL-2, indirect STAT1 activation is defective owing to deficiencies in the NK cell response to IL-2.

  14. Functional Characterization of Odorant Receptors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-07

    94 IFINAL REPORT 9/1/92-11/30/93 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Functional Characterization of Odorant Receptors DAAL03-92-G-0390 6. AUTHOR(S...characterization of odorant receptors have developed in two directions. One direction is concerned with the characterization of the ligand specificity of... receptor have been replaced by the equivalent regions of odorant receptor 1-15 (Buck and Axel, 1991), thus forming a chimaeric seven transmembrane domain

  15. EBI2 augments Tfh cell fate by promoting interaction with IL2-quenching dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianhua; Lu, Erick; Yi, Tangsheng; Cyster, Jason G.

    2016-01-01

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells are a CD4 T cell subset that is important for supporting plasma cell and germinal center (GC) responses1,2. The initial induction of Tfh cell properties occurs within the first few days following activation by antigen recognition on dendritic cells (DCs), though how DCs promote this cell-fate decision is not fully understood1,2. Moreover, although Tfh cells are uniquely defined by expression of the follicle-homing receptor CXCR51,2, the guidance receptor promoting the earlier localization of activated T cells at the B cell follicle–T zone interface has been unclear3–5. Here we show that the G-protein coupled receptor EBI2 (GPR183) and its ligand 7α,25-dihydroxycholesterol (7α,25-OHC) mediate positioning of activated CD4 T cells at the follicle–T zone interface. In this location they interact with activated DCs and are exposed to Tfh cell-promoting ICOS ligand. IL2 is a cytokine that has multiple influences on T cell fate, including negative regulation of Tfh cell differentiation6–10. We demonstrate that activated DCs in the outer T zone further augment Tfh cell differentiation by producing membrane and soluble forms of CD25, the IL2 receptor α chain, and quenching T cell-derived IL2. Mice lacking EBI2 in T cells or CD25 in DCs have reduced Tfh cells and mount defective T cell-dependent plasma cell and GC responses. These findings demonstrate that distinct niches within the lymphoid organ T zone support distinct cell fate decisions, and they establish a function for DC-derived CD25 in controlling IL2 availability and T cell differentiation. PMID:27147029

  16. Allelic selection of human IL-2 gene.

    PubMed

    Matesanz, F; Delgado, C; Fresno, M; Alcina, A

    2000-12-01

    The allelic expression of mouse IL-2 cannot be definitely extrapolated to what might happen in humans. Therefore, we investigated the regulation of allelic expression of the IL-2 gene in non-genetically manipulated human T lymphocytes by following natural allelic polymorphisms. We found a phenotypically silent punctual change in the human IL-2 at position 114 after the first nucleotide of the initiation codon, which represents a dimorphic polymorphism at the first exon of the IL-2 gene. This allowed the study by single-cell PCR of the regulation of the human IL-2 allelic expression in heterozygous CD4(+) T cells, which was found to be tightly controlled monoallelically. These findings may be used as a suitable marker for monitoring the IL-2 allelic contribution to effector activities and in immune responses against different infections or in pathological situations.

  17. IL-2 coordinates IL-2–producing and regulatory T cell interplay

    PubMed Central

    Amado, Inês F.; Berges, Julien; Luther, Rita J.; Mailhé, Marie-Pierre; Garcia, Sylvie; Bandeira, Antonio; Weaver, Casey; Liston, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Many species of bacteria use quorum sensing to sense the amount of secreted metabolites and to adapt their growth according to their population density. We asked whether similar mechanisms would operate in lymphocyte homeostasis. We investigated the regulation of the size of interleukin-2 (IL-2)–producing CD4+ T cell (IL-2p) pool using different IL-2 reporter mice. We found that in the absence of either IL-2 or regulatory CD4+ T (T reg) cells, the number of IL-2p cells increases. Administration of IL-2 decreases the number of cells of the IL-2p cell subset and, pertinently, abrogates their ability to produce IL-2 upon in vivo cognate stimulation, while increasing T reg cell numbers. We propose that control of the IL-2p cell numbers occurs via a quorum sensing–like feedback loop where the produced IL-2 is sensed by both the activated CD4+ T cell pool and by T reg cells, which reciprocally regulate cells of the IL-2p cell subset. In conclusion, IL-2 acts as a self-regulatory circuit integrating the homeostasis of activated and T reg cells as CD4+ T cells restrain their growth by monitoring IL-2 levels, thereby preventing uncontrolled responses and autoimmunity. PMID:24249704

  18. Zinc signals promote IL-2-dependent proliferation of T cells.

    PubMed

    Kaltenberg, Jennifer; Plum, Laura M; Ober-Blöbaum, Julia L; Hönscheid, Andrea; Rink, Lothar; Haase, Hajo

    2010-05-01

    Zinc signals, i.e. a change of the intracellular concentration of free zinc ions in response to receptor stimulation, are involved in signal transduction in several immune cells. Here, the role of zinc signals in T-cell activation by IL-2 was investigated in the murine cytotoxic T-cell line CTLL-2 and in primary human T cells. Measurements with the fluorescent dyes FluoZin-3 and Zinquin showed that zinc is released from lysosomes into the cytosol in response to stimulation of the IL-2-receptor. Activation of the ERK-pathway was blocked by chelation of free zinc with N,N,N',N'-tetrakis-2(pyridyl-methyl)ethylenediamine, whereas zinc was not required for STAT5 phosphorylation. In addition, the key signaling molecules MEK and ERK were activated in response to elevated free intracellular zinc, induced by incubation with zinc and the ionophore pyrithione. Downstream of ERK activation, ERK-specific gene expression of c-fos and IL-2-induced proliferation was found to depend on zinc. Further experiments indicated that inhibition of MEK and ERK-dephosphorylating protein phosphatases is the molecular mechanism for the influence of zinc on this pathway. In conclusion, an increase of cytoplasmic free zinc is required for IL-2-induced ERK signaling and proliferation of T cells.

  19. A hydrophobic amino acid cluster inserted into the C-terminus of a recycling cell surface receptor functions as an endosomal sorting signal.

    PubMed

    Amano, Yuji; Yoshino, Kazuhisa; Kojima, Katsuhiko; Takeshita, Toshikazu

    2013-11-08

    Cell surface receptors ubiquitylated after ligand stimulation are internalized and delivered to the lysosomal pathway for degradation. Ubiquitylated receptors are captured by ESCRT protein complexes that sort them to the lysosomal pathway. Hepatocyte growth factor-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate (Hrs) is a component of endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT)-0 that recognizes ubiquitin attached to receptors, indicating that it functions as a key molecule for ubiquitin-dependent endosomal sorting. In a previous study on interleukin (IL)-2 receptor β (IL-2Rβ) and IL-4 receptor α (IL-4Rα), which are constitutively internalized without ligand stimulation, we revealed that Hrs bound to IL-2Rβ and IL-4Rα in a ubiquitin-independent manner, and identified a hydrophobic amino acid cluster in the cytoplasmic region of IL-2Rβ and IL-4Rα as the Hrs-interacting domain. However, a chimeric receptor containing the hydrophobic amino acid cluster inserted into the C-terminal of IL-2Rα was not delivered to late endosomes, but recycled back to the plasma membrane. In the present study, we explored the functional domain related to endosomal sorting in IL-2Rβ together with the hydrophobic amino acid cluster, and discovered the importance of an approximately 30-amino acid stretch following the C-terminus of the hydrophobic amino acid cluster in IL-2Rβ. Even though the amino acid stretch following the hydrophobic amino acid cluster was composed of arbitrary amino acids, such a stretch was also permissive for the sorting ability, suggesting that the hydrophobic amino acid cluster functions as an endosomal sorting signal. These findings clarify part of the molecular mechanism underlying the ubiquitin-independent endosomal sorting of cytokine receptors that are constitutively internalized without ligand stimulation.

  20. Suppressive effect of a standardized mistletoe extract on the expression of activatory NK receptors and function of human NK cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Jung; Son, Young-Ok; Kim, Hyunjin; Kim, Joo-Young; Park, Soon-Won; Bae, Jae-Ho; Kim, Hyung Hoi; Lee, Eun-Yup; Chung, Byung-Seon; Kim, Sun-Hee; Kang, Chi-Dug

    2007-09-01

    Despite long-term use of mistletoe extracts for cancer treatment, their mode of action remains elusive. In this study, it was studied in vitro if mistletoe extract is able to modulate the expression of natural cytotoxic receptors (NCRs) and NKG2D receptor, which stimulate natural killer cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Unexpectedly, a mistletoe extract, ABNOBA viscum Fraxini, inhibited the expression level of NKp46 and NKG2D receptors in dose- and time-dependent manners. The levels of NKp30 and NKG2D receptors were remarkably induced and NKp44 was slightly induced after 48 h treatment with IL-2 and IL-15 in both mRNA and surface expression. The activatory NK receptors were not induced significantly after treatment with IL-12, IL-18, and IL-21 for 48 h. Induction of activatory NK receptors by IL-2 and IL-15 was suppressed almost to the untreated levels by treatment with mistletoe extract, which appeared to induce apoptosis of NK cells in a dose-dependent manner. However, the treatment with IL-2 and IL-15 did not prevent the mistletoe-induced NK-cell death. Mistletoe extract inhibited significantly the cytotoxic activity of resting and IL-2- or IL-15-stimulated NK cells. These results suggest that inhibition of survival and function of NK cells by mistletoe extract may curtail in part the therapeutic effects of mistletoe.

  1. Cergutuzumab amunaleukin (CEA-IL2v), a CEA-targeted IL-2 variant-based immunocytokine for combination cancer immunotherapy: Overcoming limitations of aldesleukin and conventional IL-2-based immunocytokines

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Christian; Waldhauer, Inja; Nicolini, Valeria G.; Freimoser-Grundschober, Anne; Nayak, Tapan; Vugts, Danielle J.; Dunn, Claire; Bolijn, Marije; Benz, Jörg; Stihle, Martine; Lang, Sabine; Roemmele, Michaele; Hofer, Thomas; van Puijenbroek, Erwin; Moser, Samuel; Ast, Oliver; Brünker, Peter; Gorr, Ingo H.; Neumann, Sebastian; Hinton, Heather; Crameri, Flavio; Gerdes, Christian; Bacac, Marina; van Dongen, Guus; Moessner, Ekkehard; Umaña, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We developed cergutuzumab amunaleukin (CEA-IL2v, RG7813), a novel monomeric CEA-targeted immunocytokine, that comprises a single IL-2 variant (IL2v) moiety with abolished CD25 binding, fused to the C-terminus of a high affinity, bivalent carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-specific antibody devoid of Fc-mediated effector functions. Its molecular design aims to (i) avoid preferential activation of regulatory T-cells vs. immune effector cells by removing CD25 binding; (ii) increase the therapeutic index of IL-2 therapy by (a) preferential retention at the tumor by having a lower dissociation rate from CEA-expressing cancer cells vs. IL-2R-expressing cells, (b) avoiding any FcγR-binding and Fc effector functions and (c) reduced binding to endothelial cells expressing CD25; and (iii) improve the pharmacokinetics, and thus convenience of administration, of IL-2. The crystal structure of the IL2v-IL-2Rβγ complex was determined and CEA-IL2v activity was assessed using human immune effector cells. Tumor targeting was investigated in tumor-bearing mice using 89Zr-labeled CEA-IL2v. Efficacy studies were performed in (a) syngeneic mouse models as monotherapy and combined with anti-PD-L1, and in (b) xenograft mouse models in combination with ADCC-mediating antibodies. CEA-IL2v binds to CEA with pM avidity but not to CD25, and consequently did not preferentially activate Tregs. In vivo, CEA-IL2v demonstrated superior pharmacokinetics and tumor targeting compared with a wild-type IL-2-based CEA immunocytokine (CEA-IL2wt). CEA-IL2v strongly expanded NK and CD8+ T cells, skewing the CD8+:CD4+ ratio toward CD8+ T cells both in the periphery and in the tumor, and mediated single agent efficacy in syngeneic MC38-CEA and PancO2-CEA models. Combination with trastuzumab, cetuximab and imgatuzumab, all of human IgG1 isotype, resulted in superior efficacy compared with the monotherapies alone. Combined with anti-PD-L1, CEA-IL2v mediated superior efficacy over the respective

  2. Analysis of IL-2-like factor in lymphocyte culture supernatant of olive flounder, Paralichthys oliveaceus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Riqin; Zhang, Peijun; Li, Jun; Xu, Yongli

    2005-03-01

    To study immune mechanism of fish lymphocyte we performed a proliferation assay and ELISA using monoclonal antibody against human IL-2. The result showed that an interleukin-2 (IL-2)-like factor was detected in the supernatant of plant haemoglutinin (PHA)-stimulated lymphocyte culture from peripheral blood, spleen and head kidney of olive flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus. The quantities of IL-2-like factor in the supernatant from different lymphoid tissues were quite different. The IL-2 like factor in the supernatant from cultured head kidney lymphocytes was much higher than those of peripheral blood lymphocytes and spleen lymphocytes ( P<0.01). The IL-2 activity was found in either mouse thymocyte proliferation assay or flounder head kidney lymphocyte proliferation assay and shown to have obvious enhancing effect on proliferation of the above two types of cell. The recombinant human IL-2, (rhIL-2) was able to stimulate flounder thymocyte proliferation and used to detect the IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) on the surface of flounder lymphocyte. The cross-reaction between the lymphocytes of flounder peripheral blood and CD25(IL-2R) was detected with flow cytometry and shown that the percentage of CD25-positive cell in peripheral blood was 7.74±0.67%.

  3. Correction of interleukin-2 receptor function in X-SCID lymphoblastoid cells by retrovirally mediated transfer of the gamma-c gene.

    PubMed

    Taylor, N; Uribe, L; Smith, S; Jahn, T; Kohn, D B; Weinberg, K

    1996-04-15

    X-SCID, the most common form of human SCID, is due to mutations in the common gamma chain gene (gamma-c) that encodes an essential component of the cytokine receptors for interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4, IL-7, IL-9, and IL-15. Activation of the Janus family tyrosine kinases Jak1 and Jak3 is necessary for appropriate signalling through the IL-2 receptor (IL-2R). Neither Jak1 nor Jak3 was phosphorylated after IL-2 stimulation of an Epstein-Barr virus-transformed cell line (LCL) from an X-SCID patient with a gamma-c null mutation. However, we now show that appropriate IL-2R function can be restored in an X-SCID LCL by transduction of a wild-type gamma-c gene. A retroviral vector, G1gamma-cSvNa, was constructed and produced in the PG13 packaging line. Transduced X-SCID LCL expressed the G1gamma-cSvNa transcript. IL-2 stimulation of the transduced cell line resulted in appropriate tyrosine phosphorylation of both Jak1 and Jak3. Thus, retroviral-mediated transduction of normal gamma-c can reconstitute downstream signalling through the IL-2R in X-SCID cell lines, suggesting that gene therapy may be a treatment for this disease.

  4. Influence of In Vitro IL-2 or IL-15 Alone or in Combination with Hsp 70 Derived 14-Mer Peptide (TKD) on the Expression of NK Cell Activatory and Inhibitory Receptors on Peripheral Blood T Cells, B Cells and NKT Cells.

    PubMed

    Hromadnikova, Ilona; Li, Shuang; Kotlabova, Katerina; Dickinson, Anne M

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies from Multhoff and colleagues reported that plasma membrane Hsp70 acts as a tumour-specific recognition structure for activated NK cells, and that the incubation of NK cells with Hsp70 and/or a 14-mer peptide derived from the N-terminal sequence of Hsp70 (TKDNNLLGRFELSG, TKD, aa 450-463) plus a low dose of IL-2 triggers NK cell proliferation and migration, and their capacity to kill cancer cells expressing membrane Hsp70. Herein, we have used flow cytometry to determine the influence of in vitro stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy individuals with IL-2 or IL-15, either alone or in combination with TKD peptide on the cell surface expression of CD94, NK cell activatory receptors (CD16, NK2D, NKG2C, NKp30, NKp44, NKp46, NKp80, KIR2DL4, DNAM-1 and LAMP1) and NK cell inhibitory receptors (NKG2A, KIR2DL2/L3, LIR1/ILT-2 and NKR-P1A) by CD3+CD56+ (NKT), CD3+CD4+, CD3+CD8+ and CD19+ populations. NKG2D, DNAM-1, LAMP1 and NKR-P1A expression was upregulated after the stimulation with IL-2 or IL-15 alone or in combination with TKD in NKT, CD8+ T cells and B cells. CD94 was upregulated in NKT and CD8+ T cells. Concurrently, an increase in a number of CD8+ T cells expressing LIR1/ILT-2 and CD4+ T cells positive for NKR-P1A was observed. The proportion of CD8+ T cells that expressed NKG2D was higher after IL-2/TKD treatment, when compared with IL-2 treatment alone. In comparison with IL-15 alone, IL-15/TKD treatment increased the proportion of NKT cells that were positive for CD94, LAMP1 and NKRP-1A. The more potent effect of IL-15/TKD on cell surface expression of NKG2D, LIR1/ILT-2 and NKRP-1A was observed in B cells compared with IL-15 alone. However, this increase was not of statistical significance. IL-2/TKD induced significant upregulation of LAMP1 in CD8+ T cells compared with IL-2 alone. Besides NK cells, other immunocompetent cells present within the fraction of peripheral blood mononuclear cells were influenced by the treatment

  5. Chimeric cytotoxin IL2-PE40 delays and mitigates adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Case, J P; Lorberboum-Galski, H; Lafyatis, R; FitzGerald, D; Wilder, R L; Pastan, I

    1989-01-01

    Adjuvant arthritis in rats is a T-cell dependent "autoimmune" disease with close similarities to several forms of human arthritis. Injection of mycobacterial adjuvant leads to T-cell activation and proliferation, processes in which the de novo expression of the interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptor plays a pivotal role. The subsequent massive mononuclear cell infiltration of the joints ultimately results in complete joint destruction. Because activation of the helper/inducer subset of T lymphocytes is critical to the establishment of disease, we reasoned that IL2-PE40, a cytotoxic IL-2-Pseudomonas exotoxin fusion protein that targets the membrane-penetration and ADP-ribosylation domains of the toxin to cells bearing the IL-2 receptor, would be an effective and specific therapy. Adjuvant-injected rats were randomized to treatment with IL2-PE40, phosphate-buffered saline, or either of two control proteins related to IL2-PE40 but lacking either the receptor-binding moiety or an enzymatically active toxin domain and previously demonstrated to lack cytotoxicity in vitro. Intraperitoneal IL2-PE40 given before the establishment of overt clinical disease proved an effective and specific modifier of adjuvant arthritis by clinical, histological, and radiographic criteria. Our data suggest that IL2-PE40 may be effective in those diseases in which activated T-cells play an important role. Images PMID:2492102

  6. Cell type-specific roles of Jak3 in IL-2-induced proliferative signal transduction

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Hodaka . E-mail: hodaka@med.nyu.edu

    2007-03-16

    Binding of interleukin-2 (IL-2) to its specific receptor induces activation of two members of Jak family protein tyrosine kinases, Jak1 and Jak3. An IL-2 receptor (IL-2R)-reconstituted NIH 3T3 fibroblast cell line proliferates in response to IL-2 only when hematopoietic lineage-specific Jak3 is ectopically expressed. However, the mechanism of Jak3-dependent proliferation in the fibroblast cell line is not known. Here, I showed that Jak3 expression is dispensable for IL-2-induced activation of Jak1 and Stat proteins and expression of nuclear proto-oncogenes in the IL-2R-reconstituted fibroblast cell line. Jak3 expression markedly enhanced these IL-2-induced signaling events. In contrast, Jak3 expression was essential for induction of cyclin genes involved in the G1-S transition. These data suggest a critical role of Jak3 in IL-2 signaling in the fibroblast cell line and may provide further insight into the cell type-specific mechanism of cytokine signaling.

  7. Selective targeting of IL-2 to NKG2D bearing cells for improved immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Reza; Lazear, Eric; Wang, Xiaoli; Arefanian, Saeed; Zheleznyak, Alexander; Carreno, Beatriz M.; Higashikubo, Ryuji; Gelman, Andrew E.; Kreisel, Daniel; Fremont, Daved H.; Krupnick, Alexander Sasha

    2016-01-01

    Despite over 20 years of clinical use, IL-2 has not fulfilled expectations as a safe and effective form of tumour immunotherapy. Expression of the high affinity IL-2Rα chain on regulatory T cells mitigates the anti-tumour immune response and its expression on vascular endothelium is responsible for life threatening complications such as diffuse capillary leak and pulmonary oedema. Here we describe the development of a recombinant fusion protein comprised of a cowpox virus encoded NKG2D binding protein (OMCP) and a mutated form of IL-2 with poor affinity for IL-2Rα. This fusion protein (OMCP-mutIL-2) potently and selectively activates IL-2 signalling only on NKG2D-bearing cells, such as natural killer (NK) cells, without broadly activating IL-2Rα-bearing cells. OMCP-mutIL-2 provides superior tumour control in several mouse models of malignancy and is not limited by mouse strain-specific variability of NK function. In addition, OMCP-mutIL-2 lacks the toxicity and vascular complications associated with parental wild-type IL-2. PMID:27650575

  8. Selective targeting of IL-2 to NKG2D bearing cells for improved immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Reza; Lazear, Eric; Wang, Xiaoli; Arefanian, Saeed; Zheleznyak, Alexander; Carreno, Beatriz M; Higashikubo, Ryuji; Gelman, Andrew E; Kreisel, Daniel; Fremont, Daved H; Krupnick, Alexander Sasha

    2016-09-21

    Despite over 20 years of clinical use, IL-2 has not fulfilled expectations as a safe and effective form of tumour immunotherapy. Expression of the high affinity IL-2Rα chain on regulatory T cells mitigates the anti-tumour immune response and its expression on vascular endothelium is responsible for life threatening complications such as diffuse capillary leak and pulmonary oedema. Here we describe the development of a recombinant fusion protein comprised of a cowpox virus encoded NKG2D binding protein (OMCP) and a mutated form of IL-2 with poor affinity for IL-2Rα. This fusion protein (OMCP-mutIL-2) potently and selectively activates IL-2 signalling only on NKG2D-bearing cells, such as natural killer (NK) cells, without broadly activating IL-2Rα-bearing cells. OMCP-mutIL-2 provides superior tumour control in several mouse models of malignancy and is not limited by mouse strain-specific variability of NK function. In addition, OMCP-mutIL-2 lacks the toxicity and vascular complications associated with parental wild-type IL-2.

  9. IL-2 Suppression of IL-12p70 by a Recombinant HSV-1 Expressing IL-2 Induces T-Cell Auto-Reactivity and CNS Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Zandian, Mandana; Mott, Kevin R.; Allen, Sariah J.; Chen, Shuang; Arditi, Moshe; Ghiasi, Homayon

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the role of cellular infiltrates in CNS demyelination in immunocompetent mice, we have used a model of multiple sclerosis (MS) in which different strains of mice are infected with a recombinant HSV-1 expressing IL-2. Histologic examination of the mice infected with HSV-IL-2 demonstrates that natural killer cells, dendritic cells, B cells, and CD25 (IL-2rα) do not play any role in the HSV-IL-2-induced demyelination. T cell depletion, T cell knockout and T cell adoptive transfer experiments suggest that both CD8+ and CD4+ T cells contribute to HSV-IL-2-induced CNS demyelination with CD8+ T cells being the primary inducers. In the adoptive transfer studies, all of the transferred T cells irrespective of their CD25 status at the time of transfer were positive for expression of FoxP3 and depletion of FoxP3 blocked CNS demyelination by HSV-IL-2. The expression levels of IL-12p35 relative to IL-12p40 differed in BM-derived macrophages infected with HSV-IL-2 from those infected with wild-type HSV-1. HSV-IL-2-induced demyelination was blocked by injecting HSV-IL-2-infected mice with IL-12p70 DNA. This study demonstrates that suppression of the IL-12p70 function of macrophages by IL-2 causes T cells to become auto-aggressive. Interruption of this immunoregulatory axis results in demyelination of the optic nerve, the spinal cord and the brain by autoreactive T cells in the HSV-IL-2 mouse model of MS. PMID:21364747

  10. Interleukin-2 receptor signaling: at the interface between tolerance and immunity.

    PubMed

    Malek, Thomas R; Castro, Iris

    2010-08-27

    Interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) signaling regulates tolerance and immunity. Here, we review recent work concerning the structure, signaling, and function of the IL-2R, emphasizing the contribution of IL-2 for T cell-dependent activity in vivo. IL-2R signaling influences two discrete aspects of immune responses by CD8(+) T cells, terminal differentiation of effector cells in primary responses, and aspects of memory recall responses. IL-2 also delivers essential signals for thymic development of regulatory T (Treg) cells and later to promote their homeostasis and function. Each of these outcomes on T effector and Treg cells requires distinct amounts of IL-2R signaling, with low IL-2R signaling sufficient for many key aspects of Treg cells. Thus, tolerance is readily maintained and favored with limited IL-2.

  11. Low-dose IL-2 selectively activates subsets of CD4+ Tregs and NK cells

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Masahiro; Matos, Tiago; Liu, Hongye; Koreth, John; Kim, Haesook T.; Paul, Nicole E.; Murase, Kazuyuki; Whangbo, Jennifer; Alho, Ana C.; Nikiforow, Sarah; Cutler, Corey; Ho, Vincent T.; Armand, Philippe; Alyea, Edwin P.; Antin, Joseph H.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Lacerda, Joao F.; Soiffer, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ regulatory T cells (CD4Tregs) play a critical role in the maintenance of immune tolerance and prevention of chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. IL-2 supports the proliferation and survival of CD4Tregs and previous studies have demonstrated that IL-2 induces selective expansion of CD4Tregs and improves clinical manifestations of chronic GVHD. However, mechanisms for selective activation of CD4Tregs and the effects of low-dose IL-2 on other immune cells are not well understood. Using mass cytometry, we demonstrate that low concentrations of IL-2 selectively induce STAT5 phosphorylation in Helios+ CD4Tregs and CD56brightCD16– NK cells in vitro. Preferential activation and expansion of Helios+ CD4Tregs and CD56brightCD16– NK cells was also demonstrated in patients with chronic GVHD receiving low-dose IL-2. With prolonged IL-2 treatment for 48 weeks, phenotypic changes were also observed in Helios– CD4Tregs. The effects of low-dose IL-2 therapy on conventional CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells were limited to increased expression of PD-1 on effector memory T cells. These studies reveal the selective effects of low-dose IL-2 therapy on Helios+ CD4Tregs and CD56bright NK cells that constitutively express high-affinity IL-2 receptors as well as the indirect effects of prolonged exposure to low concentrations of IL-2 in vivo. PMID:27812545

  12. Phase I clinical trial combining imatinib mesylate and IL-2 in refractory cancer patients: IL-2 interferes with the pharmacokinetics of imatinib mesylate.

    PubMed

    Pautier, Patricia; Locher, Clara; Robert, Caroline; Deroussent, Alain; Flament, Caroline; Le Cesne, Axel; Rey, Annie; Bahleda, Ratislav; Ribrag, Vincent; Soria, Jean-Charles; Vassal, Gilles; Eggermont, Alexander; Zitvogel, Laurence; Chaput, Nathalie; Paci, Angelo

    2013-02-01

    Imatinib mesylate (IM) is a small molecule inhibitor of protein tyrosine kinases. In addition to its direct effect on malignant cells, it has been suggested IM may activate of natural killer (NK) cells, hence exerting immunomodulatory functions. In preclinical settings, improved antitumor responses have been observed when IM and interleukin-2 (IL-2), a cytokine that enhances NK cells functions, were combined. The goals of this study were to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of IL-2 combined with IM at a constant dose of 400 mg, the pharmacokinetics of IM and IL-2, as well as toxicity and clinical efficacy of this immunotherapeutic regimen in patients affected by advanced tumors. The treatment consisted in 50 mg/day cyclophosphamide from 21 d before the initiation of IM throughout the first IM cycle (from D-21 to D14), 400 mg/day IM for 14 d (D1 to D14) combined with escalating doses of IL-2 (3, 6, 9 and 12 MIU/day) from days 10 to 14. This treatment was administered at three week intervals to 17 patients. Common side effects of the combination were mild to moderate, including fever, chills, fatigue, nausea and hepatic enzyme elevation. IL-2 dose level II, 6 MIU/day, was determined as the MTD with the following dose-limiting toxicities: systemic capillary leak syndrome, fatigue and anorexia. Pharmacokinetic studies revealed that the area under the curve and the maximum concentration of IM and its main metabolite CGP74588 increased significantly when IM was concomitantly administered with IL-2. In contrast, IM did not modulate IL-2 pharmacokinetics. No objective responses were observed. The best response obtained was stable disease in 8/17 (median duration: 12 weeks). Finally, IL-2 augmented the impregnation of IM and its metabolite. The combination of IM (400 mg/day) and IL-2 (6 MIU/day) in tumors that express IM targets warrants further investigation.

  13. IL-21 restricts T follicular regulatory T cell proliferation through Bcl-6 mediated inhibition of responsiveness to IL-2.

    PubMed

    Jandl, Christoph; Liu, Sue M; Cañete, Pablo F; Warren, Joanna; Hughes, William E; Vogelzang, Alexis; Webster, Kylie; Craig, Maria E; Uzel, Gulbu; Dent, Alexander; Stepensky, Polina; Keller, Bärbel; Warnatz, Klaus; Sprent, Jonathan; King, Cecile

    2017-03-17

    T follicular regulatory (Tfr) cells control the magnitude and specificity of the germinal centre reaction, but how regulation is contained to ensure generation of high-affinity antibody is unknown. Here we show that this balance is maintained by the reciprocal influence of interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-21. The number of IL-2-dependent FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells is increased in the peripheral blood of human patients with loss-of-function mutations in the IL-21 receptor (IL-21R). In mice, IL-21:IL-21R interactions influence the phenotype of T follicular cells, reducing the expression of CXCR4 and inhibiting the expansion of Tfr cells after T-cell-dependent immunization. The negative effect of IL-21 on Tfr cells in mice is cell intrinsic and associated with decreased expression of the high affinity IL-2 receptor (CD25). Bcl-6, expressed in abundance in Tfr cells, inhibits CD25 expression and IL-21-mediated inhibition of CD25 is Bcl-6 dependent. These findings identify a mechanism by which IL-21 reinforces humoral immunity by restricting Tfr cell proliferation.

  14. IL-21 restricts T follicular regulatory T cell proliferation through Bcl-6 mediated inhibition of responsiveness to IL-2

    PubMed Central

    Jandl, Christoph; Liu, Sue M.; Cañete, Pablo F.; Warren, Joanna; Hughes, William E.; Vogelzang, Alexis; Webster, Kylie; Craig, Maria E.; Uzel, Gulbu; Dent, Alexander; Stepensky, Polina; Keller, Bärbel; Warnatz, Klaus; Sprent, Jonathan; King, Cecile

    2017-01-01

    T follicular regulatory (Tfr) cells control the magnitude and specificity of the germinal centre reaction, but how regulation is contained to ensure generation of high-affinity antibody is unknown. Here we show that this balance is maintained by the reciprocal influence of interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-21. The number of IL-2-dependent FoxP3+ regulatory T cells is increased in the peripheral blood of human patients with loss-of-function mutations in the IL-21 receptor (IL-21R). In mice, IL-21:IL-21R interactions influence the phenotype of T follicular cells, reducing the expression of CXCR4 and inhibiting the expansion of Tfr cells after T-cell-dependent immunization. The negative effect of IL-21 on Tfr cells in mice is cell intrinsic and associated with decreased expression of the high affinity IL-2 receptor (CD25). Bcl-6, expressed in abundance in Tfr cells, inhibits CD25 expression and IL-21-mediated inhibition of CD25 is Bcl-6 dependent. These findings identify a mechanism by which IL-21 reinforces humoral immunity by restricting Tfr cell proliferation. PMID:28303891

  15. GABP factors bind to a distal interleukin 2 (IL-2) enhancer and contribute to c-Raf-mediated increase in IL-2 induction.

    PubMed Central

    Avots, A; Hoffmeyer, A; Flory, E; Cimanis, A; Rapp, U R; Serfling, E

    1997-01-01

    Triggering of the T-cell receptor-CD3 complex activates two major signal cascades in T lymphocytes, (i) Ca2+-dependent signal cascades and (ii) protein kinase cascades. Both signal cascades contribute to the induction of the interleukin 2 (IL-2) gene during T-cell activation. Prominent protein kinase cascades are those that activate mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases. We show here that c-Raf, which is at the helm of the classic MAP-Erk cascade, contributes to IL-2 induction through a distal enhancer element spanning the nucleotides from positions -502 to -413 in front of the transcriptional start site of the IL-2 gene. Induction of this distal IL-2 enhancer differs from induction of the proximal IL-2 promoter-enhancer, since it is induced by phorbol esters alone and independent from Ca2+ signals. In DNA-protein binding studies, we detected the binding of transcription factors GABP alpha and -beta to a dyad symmetry element (DSE) of the distal enhancer, which is formed by palindromic binding sites of Ets-like factors. Introduction of point mutations suppressing GABP binding to the DSE interfered with the induction of the distal enhancer and the entire IL-2 promoter-enhancer, while overexpression of both GABP factors enhanced the IL-2 promoter-enhancer induction. Overexpression of BXB, a constitutive active version of c-Raf, and of further members of the Ras-Raf-Erk signal cascade exerted an increase of GABP-mediated promoter-enhancer induction. In conjunction with previously published data on c-Raf-induced phosphorylation of GABP factors (E. Flory, A. Hoffmeyer, U. Smola, U. R. Rapp, and J. T. Bruder, J. Virol. 70:2260-2268, 1996), these results indicate a contribution of GABP factors to the Raf-mediated enhancement of IL-2 induction during T-cell activation. PMID:9234696

  16. IL-2 phosphorylates STAT5 to drive IFN-γ production and activation of human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Herr, Florence; Lemoine, Roxane; Gouilleux, Fabrice; Meley, Daniel; Kazma, Ihab; Heraud, Audrey; Velge-Roussel, Florence; Baron, Christophe; Lebranchu, Yvon

    2014-06-15

    Human dendritic cells (hDCs) produce IL-2 and express IL-2R α-chain (CD25), but the role of IL-2 in DC functions is not well defined. A recent study suggested that the main function of CD25 on hDCs was to transpresent IL-2 to activate T lymphocytes. Our results demonstrate the expression of the three chains of the IL-2R on hDCs and that IL-2 induces STAT5 phosphorylation. Interestingly, use of inhibitors of p-STAT5 revealed that IL-2 increases LPS-induced IFN-γ through STAT5 phosphorylation. Finally, we report that IL-2 increases the ability of hDCs to activate helpless CD8(+) T cells, most likely because of IL-2-triggered IFN-γ synthesis, as we previously described. For the first time, to our knowledge, we disclose that IL-2 induces monocyte-derived hDC's functional maturation and activation through IL-2R binding. Interestingly, our study suggests a direct effect of anti-CD25 mAbs on hDCs that may contribute to their clinical efficacy.

  17. Comparison of the effects of FK-506, cyclosporin A and rapamycin on IL-2 production.

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, D J; Naya, I; Bundick, R V; Smith, G M; Schmidt, J A

    1991-01-01

    The immunosuppressive compounds FK-506, cyclosporin A (CsA) and rapamycin inhibit both the human and mouse mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLR) with IC50s of 2-5 x 10(-10) M for FK-506 and rapamycin and 10(-8) M for CsA. FK-506 and CsA were also potent inhibitors of A23187/PMA-stimulated IL-2 production by Jurkat and HuT-78 cells but had no effect on the response of mouse CTLL cells to IL-2. IC50 values for inhibition of IL-2 production closely matched those for inhibition of the MLR and both drugs were active only during the first 4-6 hr following stimulation. In contrast, rapamycin was a poor inhibitor of IL-2 production, although it inhibited cellular responses to IL-2. The IC50 values for these two activities indicated that neither alone accounted for rapamycin inhibition of the MLR. FK-506 and CsA affected IL-2 gene transcription in Jurkat cells by the same mechanism. Both inhibited the appearance of the transcription factor, NFAT, whereas rapamycin did not. The appearance of another transcription factor, NFK beta, was unaffected by all three drugs. The effects of FK-506 and CsA on IL-2 gene expression, therefore, are similar even though the two drugs act through distinct cytosolic receptors. Images Figure 4 PMID:1715317

  18. BCR/ABL alters the function of NK cells and the acquisition of killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs).

    PubMed

    Chiorean, Elena G; Dylla, Scott J; Olsen, Krista; Lenvik, Todd; Soignier, Yvette; Miller, Jeffrey S

    2003-05-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells decrease in function during chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) progression from chronic phase to blast crisis, and they can become BCR/ABL(+) late in the disease course. To study this altered function, NK92 cells were transduced with the BCR/ABL oncogene. In contrast to the parental cells, which died when deprived of interleukin 2 (IL-2), p210(+) NK92 cells proliferated and survived indefinitely in the absence of IL-2. BCR/ABL also decreased the natural cytotoxicity of NK92 cells against K562 targets, without affecting IL-2, interferon gamma (IFN-gamma), or tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) production. Although the ABL-specific tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib mesylate (STI-571) had no effect on parental NK92 cells, it markedly decreased the growth and survival of IL-2-independent p210(+) NK92 cells. In contrast to the parental cell line, serial analysis of p210(+) NK92 cells detected small populations that clonally expressed one or more killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs). Unlike the decreased natural cytotoxicity, the function of the activating CD158j receptor remained intact. Southern blotting and hybridization with an enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP) probe showed that KIR(-) and KIR(+) NK92 cells were all derived from the same clone, suggesting that KIR acquisition remains dynamic at the maturational stage represented by the NK92 cell line. When tested in primary CD56(+bright) NK cells, p210 induced partial IL-2-independent growth and increased KIR expression similar to findings in NK92 cells. This is the first study to show that BCR/ABL, well known for its effects on the myeloid lineage, can alter the function of lymphoid cells, which may be associated with the defect in innate immunity associated with CML progression.

  19. Endogenous IL-2 production by natural killer cells maintains cytotoxic and proliferative capacity following retroviral-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Miller, J S; Tessmer-Tuck, J; Blake, N; Lund, J; Scott, A; Blazar, B R; Orchard, P J

    1997-10-01

    Interleukin (IL)-2 therapy given at tolerable doses is insufficient to induce maximum activation of natural killer (NK) cells. We recently demonstrated that NK cells expanded in vivo can be maximally activated by short-term ex vivo incubation with 1000 U/mL IL-2. However, IL-2 withdrawal, which would occur with reinfusion, may lead to a rapid loss of cell viability and function. We hypothesized that retroviral transduction could provide an endogenous source of IL-2 to maintain NK function as measured by proliferation and cytotoxicity. Enriched NK cells were transduced with supernatants containing an MFG-based retrovirus designed to express murine IL-2 cDNA. Several supernatant transduction strategies were evaluated. NK cells were initially cultured in 1000 U/mL of huIL2 for 7-8 days, harvested, and replated prior to transduction (4 hours at 37degrees C); this proved insufficient to sustain NK proliferation or maintain cytotoxicity after exogenous human IL-2 (huIL-2) withdrawal. An alternative transduction procedure using phosphate-depleted medium, centrifugation, and transduction for 16 hours at 32degrees C was then evaluated. NK cells transduced under these conditions maintained significant NK proliferation in the absence of exogenous IL-2 compared with sham-transduced controls. Two consecutive daily transductions resulted in less proliferation, suggesting that several exposures to retroviral supernatant may inhibit subsequent NK proliferation. Cytotoxicity of the transduced NK cells against K562 and Raji was maintained under these conditions without exogenous IL-2. Sham-transduced NK cells produced 8.3+/-2.6 U/mL of murine IL-2 (muIL-2) by ELISA (background) after 7 days without exogenous IL-2. In contrast, 109+/-23 U/mL muIL-2 was produced by NK cells transduced with supernatant from the MFG/muIL-2 producer line. These experiments demonstrate that NK cells can be successfully transduced with retroviruses and induced to express sufficient IL-2 to maintain their

  20. Mutation of Asp20 of human interleukin-2 reveals a dual role of the p55 alpha chain of the interleukin-2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Flemming, C L; Russell, S J; Collins, M K

    1993-04-01

    Mutation of Asp20 in human interleukin-2 (IL-2) to Lys is known to result in an IL-2 molecule with unchanged binding to the p55 subunit of the IL-2 receptor, but with greatly decreased affinity for the p75 subunit (Collins, L., Tsien, W.-H., Seals, C. et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci USA 1988. 85: 7709). Here we demonstrate that Lys20 IL-2 competed with a reduced (10-fold) affinity for high-affinity IL-2 receptors on two murine cell lines HT2 and CTLL. In parallel with this difference in receptor interaction, Lys20 IL-2 stimulated half-maximal HT2 cell proliferation at a 10-fold higher concentration than wild-type IL-2. However, half-maximal stimulation of CTLL cells required a 100-fold higher concentration of Lys20 IL-2. A similar 100-fold reduction in bioactivity of Lys20 IL-2 was observed for primary, activated, human or murine lymphocytes. Anti-p55 antibodies increased the concentration of Lys20 IL-2 required to stimulate HT2 cells to that required for CTLL cells. These data suggest that CTLL cells, while able to bind Lys20 IL-2 with high affinity, are lacking a p55-dependent function necessary for optimal stimulation. Therefore, p55 has a dual role, being important both for high-affinity IL-2 binding and for optimal cell triggering.

  1. Muscarinic receptor family interacting proteins: role in receptor function.

    PubMed

    Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O; Correia, Patrícia A; Romero-Fernandez, Wilber; Narvaez, Manuel; Fuxe, Kjell; Ciruela, Francisco; Garriga, Pere

    2011-02-15

    G protein-coupled receptors constitute one of the most important families of membrane receptors through which cells respond to extracellular stimuli. Receptors of this superfamily likely function as signal transduction complexes. The identification and analysis of their components provide new insights into a better understanding of these receptors' function and regulation. We used tandem-affinity purification and mass spectrometry as a systematic approach to characterize multiprotein complexes in the acetylcholine muscarinic receptor subfamily. To overcome the limitations associated with membrane protein receptor solubilization with detergents, we developed a strategy in which receptors are co-expressed with a cytoplasmic minigene construct, encoding the third intracellular loop and the C-terminal tail tagged to the tandem-affinity-cassette of each receptor subtype. Numerous protein complexes were identified, including many new interactions in various signalling pathways. Systematic identification data set together with protein interactions reported in the literature revealed a high degree of connectivity. These allow the proposal, for the first time, of an outline of the muscarinic interactome as a network of protein complexes and a context for a more reasoned and informed approach to drug discovery and muscarinic receptor subtype specificities.

  2. IL-2 and IL-6 cooperate to enhance the generation of influenza-specific CD8 T cells responding to live influenza virus in aged mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin; Hopkins, Jacob W.; Wang, Chongkai; Brahmakshatriya, Vinayak; Swain, Susan L.; Kuchel, George A.; Haynes, Laura; McElhaney, Janet E.

    2016-01-01

    An age-related decline in cytolytic activity has been described in CD8+ T cells and we have previously shown that the poor CD8+ effector T cell responses to influenza A/H3N2 challenge result from a decline in the proportion and function of these cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL). Here, we describe that addition of exogenous cytokines to influenza-stimulated PBMC from both aged mice and humans, enhances the generation of influenza specific CD8 CTL by increasing their proliferation and survival. Our data show that the addition of IL-2 and IL-6 to splenocytes from mice previously infected with influenza virus restores the aged CD8+ T cell response to that observed in young mice. In humans, IL-2 plus IL-6 also reduces the proportion of apoptotic effector CD8+ T cells to levels resembling those of younger adults. In HLA-A2+ donors, MHC Class I tetramer staining showed that adding both exogenous IL-2 and IL-6 resulted in greater differentiation into influenza-specific effector CD8+ T cells. Since this effect of IL-2/IL-6 supplementation can be reproduced with the addition of Toll-like receptor agonists, it may be possible to exploit this mechanism and design new vaccines to improve the CD8 T cell response to influenza vaccination in older adults. PMID:27322555

  3. Neurosteroids and GABA-A Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingde

    2011-01-01

    Neurosteroids represent a class of endogenous steroids that are synthesized in the brain, the adrenals, and the gonads and have potent and selective effects on the GABAA-receptor. 3α-hydroxy A-ring reduced metabolites of progesterone, deoxycorticosterone, and testosterone are positive modulators of GABAA-receptor in a non-genomic manner. Allopregnanolone (3α-OH-5α-pregnan-20-one), 5α-androstane-3α, 17α-diol (Adiol), and 3α5α-tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone (3α5α-THDOC) enhance the GABA-mediated Cl- currents acting on a site (or sites) distinct from the GABA, benzodiazepine, barbiturate, and picrotoxin binding sites. 3α5α-P and 3α5α-THDOC potentiate synaptic GABAA-receptor function and activate δ-subunit containing extrasynaptic receptors that mediate tonic currents. On the contrary, 3β-OH pregnane steroids and pregnenolone sulfate (PS) are GABAA-receptor antagonists and induce activation-dependent inhibition of the receptor. The activities of neurosteroid are dependent on brain regions and types of neurons. In addition to the slow genomic action of the parent steroids, the non-genomic, and rapid actions of neurosteroids play a significant role in the GABAA-receptor function and shift in mood and memory function. This review describes molecular mechanisms underlying neurosteroid action on the GABAA-receptor, mood changes, and cognitive functions. PMID:22654809

  4. Multi-cellular natural killer (NK) cell clusters enhance NK cell activation through localizing IL-2 within the cluster

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Miju; Kim, Tae-Jin; Kim, Hye Mi; Doh, Junsang; Lee, Kyung-Mi

    2017-01-01

    Multi-cellular cluster formation of natural killer (NK) cells occurs during in vivo priming and potentiates their activation to IL-2. However, the precise mechanism underlying this synergy within NK cell clusters remains unclear. We employed lymphocyte-laden microwell technologies to modulate contact-mediated multi-cellular interactions among activating NK cells and to quantitatively assess the molecular events occurring in multi-cellular clusters of NK cells. NK cells in social microwells, which allow cell-to-cell contact, exhibited significantly higher levels of IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) signaling compared with those in lonesome microwells, which prevent intercellular contact. Further, CD25, an IL-2R α chain, and lytic granules of NK cells in social microwells were polarized toward MTOC. Live cell imaging of lytic granules revealed their dynamic and prolonged polarization toward neighboring NK cells without degranulation. These results suggest that IL-2 bound on CD25 of one NK cells triggered IL-2 signaling of neighboring NK cells. These results were further corroborated by findings that CD25-KO NK cells exhibited lower proliferation than WT NK cells, and when mixed with WT NK cells, underwent significantly higher level of proliferation. These data highlights the existence of IL-2 trans-presentation between NK cells in the local microenvironment where the availability of IL-2 is limited. PMID:28074895

  5. Multi-cellular natural killer (NK) cell clusters enhance NK cell activation through localizing IL-2 within the cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Miju; Kim, Tae-Jin; Kim, Hye Mi; Doh, Junsang; Lee, Kyung-Mi

    2017-01-01

    Multi-cellular cluster formation of natural killer (NK) cells occurs during in vivo priming and potentiates their activation to IL-2. However, the precise mechanism underlying this synergy within NK cell clusters remains unclear. We employed lymphocyte-laden microwell technologies to modulate contact-mediated multi-cellular interactions among activating NK cells and to quantitatively assess the molecular events occurring in multi-cellular clusters of NK cells. NK cells in social microwells, which allow cell-to-cell contact, exhibited significantly higher levels of IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) signaling compared with those in lonesome microwells, which prevent intercellular contact. Further, CD25, an IL-2R α chain, and lytic granules of NK cells in social microwells were polarized toward MTOC. Live cell imaging of lytic granules revealed their dynamic and prolonged polarization toward neighboring NK cells without degranulation. These results suggest that IL-2 bound on CD25 of one NK cells triggered IL-2 signaling of neighboring NK cells. These results were further corroborated by findings that CD25-KO NK cells exhibited lower proliferation than WT NK cells, and when mixed with WT NK cells, underwent significantly higher level of proliferation. These data highlights the existence of IL-2 trans-presentation between NK cells in the local microenvironment where the availability of IL-2 is limited.

  6. A fusion protein composed of IL-2 and caspase-3 ameliorates the outcome of experimental inflammatory colitis.

    PubMed

    Sagiv, Yuval; Kaminitz, Ayelet; Lorberboum-Galski, Haya; Askenasy, Nadir; Yarkoni, Shai

    2009-09-01

    Targeted depletion of immune cells expressing the interleukin-2 (IL-2) receptor can exacerbate inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) through elimination of regulatory T (Treg) cells, or ameliorate its course by depletion of cytotoxic cells. To answer this question we used a fusion protein composed of IL-2 and caspase-3 (IL2-cas) in an experimental model of DSS-induced toxic colitis. In a preventive setting, co-administration of DSS with a daily therapeutic dose of IL2-cas for seven days improved all disease parameters. Although CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells were depleted in the mesenteric lymph nodes, a fractional increase in CD4(+)FoxP3(+) T cells was observed in the spleen. Likewise, IL2-cas therapy improved the outcome of established disease in a chronic model of colitis. These data demonstrate that therapies that use IL-2 as a targeting moiety exert a protective effect over the colon under conditions of inflammation. The efficacy of IL-2-targeted therapy is attributed to reduced activity of reactive T cells, which ameliorates the secondary inflammatory infiltration. IL2-cas evolves as a potential therapeutic tool in IBD.

  7. Current Research on Opioid Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yuan; He, Xiaozhou; Yang, Yilin; Chao, Dongman; Lazarus, Lawrence H.; Xia, Ying

    2012-01-01

    The use of opioid analgesics has a long history in clinical settings, although the comprehensive action of opioid receptors is still less understood. Nonetheless, recent studies have generated fresh insights into opioid receptor-mediated functions and their underlying mechanisms. Three major opioid receptors (μ-opioid receptor, MOR; δ-opioid receptor, DOR; and κ-opioid receptor, KOR) have been cloned in many species. Each opioid receptor is functionally sub-classified into several pharmacological subtypes, although, specific gene corresponding each of these receptor subtypes is still unidentified as only a single gene has been isolated for each opioid receptor. In addition to pain modulation and addiction, opioid receptors are widely involved in various physiological and pathophysiological activities, including the regulation of membrane ionic homeostasis, cell proliferation, emotional response, epileptic seizures, immune function, feeding, obesity, respiratory and cardiovascular control as well as some neurodegenerative disorders. In some species, they play an essential role in hibernation. One of the most exciting findings of the past decade is the opioid-receptor, especially DOR, mediated neuroprotection and cardioprotection. The up-regulation of DOR expression and DOR activation increase the neuronal tolerance to hypoxic/ischemic stress. The DOR signal triggers (depending on stress duration and severity) different mechanisms at multiple levels to preserve neuronal survival, including the stabilization of homeostasis and increased pro-survival signaling (e.g., PKC-ERK-Bcl 2) and anti-oxidative capacity. In the heart, PKC and KATP channels are involved in the opioid receptor-mediated cardioprotection. The DOR-mediated neuroprotection and cardioprotection have the potential to significantly alter the clinical pharmacology in terms of prevention and treatment of life-threatening conditions like stroke and myocardial infarction. The main purpose of this article

  8. IL-2 in the tumor microenvironment is necessary for Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein deficient NK cells to respond to tumors in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kritikou, Joanna S.; Dahlberg, Carin I. M.; Baptista, Marisa A. P.; Wagner, Arnika K.; Banerjee, Pinaki P.; Gwalani, Lavesh Amar; Poli, Cecilia; Panda, Sudeepta K.; Kärre, Klas; Kaech, Susan M.; Wermeling, Fredrik; Andersson, John; Orange, Jordan S.; Brauner, Hanna; Westerberg, Lisa S.

    2016-01-01

    To kill target cells, natural killer (NK) cells organize signaling from activating and inhibitory receptors to form a lytic synapse. Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) patients have loss-of-function mutations in the actin regulator WASp and suffer from immunodeficiency with increased risk to develop lymphoreticular malignancies. NK cells from WAS patients fail to form lytic synapses, however, the functional outcome in vivo remains unknown. Here, we show that WASp KO NK cells had decreased capacity to degranulate and produce IFNγ upon NKp46 stimulation and this was associated with reduced capacity to kill MHC class I-deficient hematopoietic grafts. Pre-treatment of WASp KO NK cells with IL-2 ex vivo restored degranulation, IFNγ production, and killing of MHC class I negative hematopoietic grafts. Moreover, WASp KO mice controlled growth of A20 lymphoma cells that naturally produced IL-2. WASp KO NK cells showed increased expression of DNAM-1, LAG-3, and KLRG1, all receptors associated with cellular exhaustion and NK cell memory. NK cells isolated from WAS patient spleen cells showed increased expression of DNAM-1 and had low to negative expression of CD56, a phenotype associated with NK cells exhaustion. Finally, in a cohort of neuroblastoma patients we identified a strong correlation between WASp, IL-2, and patient survival. PMID:27477778

  9. Ets-1 facilitates nuclear entry of NFAT proteins and their recruitment to the IL-2 promoter.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Hsiao-Wei; Tai, Tzong-Shyuan; Tseng, William; Chang, Hui-Hsin; Grenningloh, Roland; Miaw, Shi-Chuen; Ho, I-Cheng

    2013-09-24

    E26 transformation-specific sequence 1 (Ets-1), the prototype of the ETS family of transcription factors, is critical for the expression of IL-2 by murine Th cells; however, its mechanism of action is still unclear. Here we show that Ets-1 is also essential for optimal production of IL-2 by primary human Th cells. Although Ets-1 negatively regulates the expression of Blimp1, a known suppressor of IL-2 expression, ablation of B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp1) does not rescue the expression of IL-2 by Ets-1-deficient Th cells. Instead, Ets-1 physically and functionally interacts with the nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) and is required for the recruitment of NFAT to the IL-2 promoter. In addition, Ets-1 is located in both the nucleus and cytoplasm of resting Th cells. Nuclear Ets-1 quickly exits the nucleus in response to calcium-dependent signals and competes with NFAT proteins for binding to protein components of noncoding RNA repressor of NFAT complex (NRON), which serves as a cytoplasmic trap for phosphorylated NFAT proteins. This nuclear exit of Ets-1 precedes rapid nuclear entry of NFAT and Ets-1 deficiency results in impaired nuclear entry, but not dephosphorylation, of NFAT proteins. Thus, Ets-1 promotes the expression of IL-2 by modulating the activity of NFAT.

  10. Cord Blood Mononuclear Cells Have a Potential to Produce NK Cells Using IL2Rg Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Khaziri, Nahid; Mohammadi, Momeneh; Aliyari, Zeinab; Soleimani Rad, Jafar; Tayefi Nasrabadi, Hamid; Nozad Charoudeh, Hojjatollah

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Although bone marrow represents the main site for NK cell development and also distinct thymic-dependentNK cell pathway was identified, the cytokines effect on the NK cell generation from cord blood is unclear. Studies were identified the role of cytokines in the regulation of bone marrow and thymic NK cells. Previous studies reported that IL15 are critical for bone marrow dependent and IL7 is important for thymic NK cells. It is remain unclear the cytokines influence on the expantion of NK cells in cord blood mononuclear cells. Methods: We evaluated cultured cord blood mononuclear cells suplememnted with combinations of cytokines using FACS in distinct time points. In this study, we presented the role of IL2, IL7 and IL15 as members of the common gamma receptor -chain (Il2rg) on the expansion NK cells from cord blood cells. Results: By investigating cord blood mononuclear cells in vitro , we demonstrated that IL2 and IL15 are important for expansion of NK cells. IL2 in comparision with IL15 has more influences in NK cell expansion. In contrast IL-7 is dispensable for NK cell generation in cord blood. Conclusion: Thus,IL-2Rg cytokines play complementary roles and are indispensable for homeostasis of NK cell development in cord blood. Probably these cytokines could help to use NK beneficials in engrafment of transplanted cells and Anti tumor activity of NK cells. PMID:27123412

  11. Autophagy is required for IL-2-mediated fibroblast growth

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Rui; Tang, Daolin; Lotze, Michael T.; Zeh III, Herbert J.

    2013-02-15

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved pathway responsible for delivery of cytoplasmic material into the lysosomal degradation pathway to enable vesicular exocytosis. Interleukin (IL)-2 is produced by T-cells and its activity is important for immunoregulation. Fibroblasts are an immune competent cell type, playing a critical role in wound healing, chronic inflammation, and tumor development. Although autophagy plays an important role in each of these processes, whether it regulates IL-2 activity in fibroblasts is unknown. Here, we show that autophagy is required for IL-2-induced cell growth in fibroblasts. IL-2 significantly induced autophagy in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and primary lung fibroblasts. Autophagy inhibitors (e.g., 3-methylamphetamine and bafilomycin A1) or knockdown of ATG5 and beclin 1 blocked clinical grade IL-2-induced autophagy. Moreover, IL-2 induced HMGB1 cytoplasmic translocation in MEFs and promoted interaction between HMGB1 and beclin1, which is required for autophagy induction. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of autophagy inhibited IL-2-induced cell proliferation and enhanced IL-2-induced apoptosis. These findings suggest that autophagy is an important pro-survival regulator for IL-2-induced cell growth in fibroblasts.

  12. New technologies for elucidating opioid receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Bruchas, Michael R.; Roth, Bryan L.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in technology, including high resolution crystal structures of opioid receptors, novel chemical tools, and new genetic approaches have provided an unparalleled pallette of tools for deconstructing opioid receptor actions in vitro and in vivo. Here we provide a brief description of our understanding of opioid receptor function from both molecular and atomic perspectives, as well as their role in neural circuits in vivo. We then show how insights into the molecular details of opioid actions can facilitate the creation of functionally-selective (biased) and photoswitchable opioid ligands. Finally, we describe how newly engineered opioid receptor-based chemo- and optogenetic tools, and new mouse lines are expanding and transforming our understanding of opioid function and, perhaps, paving the way for new therapeutics. PMID:26833118

  13. Mammalian odorant receptors: functional evolution and variation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yue; Matsunami, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, the perception of smell starts with the activation of odorant receptors (ORs) by volatile molecules in the environment. The mammalian OR repertoire has been subject to rapid evolution, and is highly diverse within the human population. Recent advances in the functional expression and ligand identification of ORs allow for functional analysis of OR evolution, and reveal that changes in OR protein sequences translate into high degrees of functional variations. Moreover, in several cases the functional variation of a single OR affects the perception of its cognate odor ligand, providing clues as to how an odor is coded at the receptor level. PMID:25660959

  14. Presence of HIV-1 Gag-specific IFN-gamma+IL-2+ and CD28+IL-2+ CD4 T cell responses is associated with nonprogression in HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Boaz, Mark J; Waters, Anele; Murad, Shahed; Easterbrook, Philippa J; Vyakarnam, Annapurna

    2002-12-01

    HIV immunity is likely CD4 T cell dependent. HIV-specific CD4 T cell proliferative responses are reported to correlate inversely with virus load and directly with specific CD8 responses. However, the phenotype and cytokine profile of specific CD4 T cells that correlate with disease is unknown. We compared the number/function of Gag p24-specific CD4 T cells in 17 HIV-infected long-term nonprogressors (LTNPs) infected for a median of 14.6 years with those of 16 slow progressors (SPs), also HIV infected for a median of 14 years but whose CD4 count had declined to <500 cells/ micro l. Compared with SPs, LTNPs had higher numbers of specific CD4s that were double positive for IFN-gamma and IL-2 as well as CD28 and IL-2. However, CD4 T cells that produced IL-2 alone (IL-2(+)IFN-gamma(-)) or IFN-gamma alone (IFN-gamma(+)IL-2(-)) did not differ between LTNPs and SPs. The decrease in p24-specific CD28(+)IL-2(+) cells with a concomitant increase of p24-specific CD28(-)IL-2(+) cells occurred before those specific for a non-HIV Ag, CMV. p24-specific CD28(-)IL-2(+) cells were evident in LTNPs and SPs, whereas the CMV-specific CD28(-)IL-2(+) response was confined to SPs. The difference between LTNPs and SPs in the Gag p24 IFN-gamma(+)IL-2(+) response was maintained when responses to total Gag (p17 plus p24) were measured. The percentage and absolute number of Gag-specific IFN-gamma(+)IL-2(+) but not of IFN-gamma(+)IL-2(-) CD4s correlated inversely with virus load. The Gag-specific IFN-gamma(+)IL-2(+) CD4 response also correlated positively with the percentage of Gag-specific IFN-gamma(+) CD8 T cells in these subjects. Accumulation of specific CD28(-)IL-2(+) helpers and loss of IFN-gamma(+)IL-2(+) CD4 T cells may compromise specific CD8 responses and, in turn, immunity to HIV.

  15. Correction of murine SCID-X1 by lentiviral gene therapy using a codon-optimized IL2RG gene and minimal pretransplant conditioning.

    PubMed

    Huston, Marshall W; van Til, Niek P; Visser, Trudi P; Arshad, Shazia; Brugman, Martijn H; Cattoglio, Claudia; Nowrouzi, Ali; Li, Yuedan; Schambach, Axel; Schmidt, Manfred; Baum, Christopher; von Kalle, Christof; Mavilio, Fulvio; Zhang, Fang; Blundell, Mike P; Thrasher, Adrian J; Verstegen, Monique M A; Wagemaker, Gerard

    2011-10-01

    Clinical trials have demonstrated the potential of ex vivo hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy to treat X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) using γ-retroviral vectors, leading to immune system functionality in the majority of treated patients without pretransplant conditioning. The success was tempered by insertional oncogenesis in a proportion of the patients. To reduce the genotoxicity risk, a self-inactivating (SIN) lentiviral vector (LV) with improved expression of a codon optimized human interleukin-2 receptor γ gene (IL2RG) cDNA (coγc), regulated by its 1.1 kb promoter region (γcPr), was compared in efficacy to the viral spleen focus forming virus (SF) and the cellular phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) promoters. Pretransplant conditioning of Il2rg(-/-) mice resulted in long-term reconstitution of T and B lymphocytes, normalized natural antibody titers, humoral immune responses, ConA/IL-2 stimulated spleen cell proliferation, and polyclonal T-cell receptor gene rearrangements with a clear integration preference of the SF vector for proto-oncogenes, contrary to the PGK and γcPr vectors. We conclude that SIN lentiviral gene therapy using coγc driven by the γcPr or PGK promoter corrects the SCID phenotype, potentially with an improved safety profile, and that low-dose conditioning proved essential for immune competence, allowing for a reduced threshold of cell numbers required.

  16. Function of Estrogen Receptor Tryosine Phosphorylation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-07-01

    6219 TITLE: Function of Estrogen Receptor Tryosine Phosphorylation PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Matthew R. Yudt CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of...Estrogen Receptor Tryosine Phosphorylation ~DAMD17-96-1-6219 6. AUTHOR(S) Matthew R. Yudt 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME11S) AND AODRESS(ES...this model, tyrosine 537 (Y537) phosphorylation of one monomer interacts with another tyrosine phosphorylated monomer to constitute an hER dimer

  17. Reduced interleukin-2 responsiveness impairs the ability of Treg cells to compete for IL-2 in nonobese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    James, Cini R; Buckle, Irina; Muscate, Franziska; Otsuka, Masayuki; Nakao, Mari; Oon, Jack Sh; Steptoe, Raymond J; Thomas, Ranjeny; Hamilton-Williams, Emma E

    2016-05-01

    Enhancement of regulatory T cell (Treg cell) frequency and function is the goal of many therapeutic strategies aimed at treating type 1 diabetes (T1D). The interleukin-2 (IL-2) pathway, which has been strongly implicated in T1D susceptibility in both humans and mice, is a master regulator of Treg cell homeostasis and function. We investigated how IL-2 pathway defects impact Treg cells in T1D-susceptible nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice in comparison with protected C57BL/6 and NOD congenic mice. NOD Treg cells were reduced in frequency specifically in the lymph nodes and expressed lower levels of CD25 and CD39/CD73 immunosuppressive molecules. In the spleen and blood, Treg cell frequency was preserved through expansion of CD25(low), effector phenotype Treg cells. Reduced CD25 expression led to decreased IL-2 signaling in NOD Treg cells. In vivo, treatment with IL-2-anti-IL-2 antibody complexes led to effective upregulation of suppressive molecules on NOD Treg cells in the spleen and blood, but had reduced efficacy on lymph node Treg cells. In contrast, NOD CD8(+) and CD4(+) effector T cells were not impaired in their response to IL-2 therapy. We conclude that NOD Treg cells have an impaired responsiveness to IL-2 that reduces their ability to compete for a limited supply of IL-2.

  18. Soluble interleukin 2 receptors are released from activated human lymphoid cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, L.A.; Kurman, C.C.; Fritz, M.E.; Biddison, W.E.; Boutin, B.; Yarchoan, R.; Nelson, D.L.

    1985-11-01

    With the use of an enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay to measure soluble human interleukin 2 receptors (IL 2R), certain human T cell leukemia virus I (HTLV I)-positive T cell lines were found to spontaneously release large quantities of IL 2R into culture supernatants. This was not found with HTLV I-negative and IL 2 independent T cell lines, and only one of seven B cell-derived lines examined produced small amounts of IL 2R. In addition to this constitutive production of soluble IL 2R by certain cell lines, normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) could be induced to release soluble IL 2R by plant lectins, the murine monoclonal antibody OKT3, tetanus toxoid, and allogeneic cells. Such activated cells also expressed cellular IL 2R measurable in detergent solubilized cell extracts. The generation of cellular and supernatant IL 2R was: dependent on cellular activation, rapid, radioresistant (3000 rad), and inhibited by cycloheximide treatment. NaDodSO4-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of soluble IL 2R demonstrated molecules of apparent Mr = 35,000 to 40,000, and 45,000 to 50,000, respectively, somewhat smaller than the mature surface receptor on these cells. The release of soluble IL 2R appears to be a characteristic marker of T lymphocyte activation and might serve an immunoregulatory function during both normal and abnormal cell growth and differentiation.

  19. Involvement of IL-2 in homeostasis of regulatory T cells: the IL-2 cycle.

    PubMed

    Yarkoni, Shai; Kaminitz, Ayelet; Sagiv, Yuval; Yaniv, Isaac; Askenasy, Nadir

    2008-09-01

    A large body of evidence on the activity of regulatory T (Treg) cells was gathered during the last decade, and a similar number of reviews and opinion papers attempted to integrate the experimental findings. The abundant literature clearly delineates an exciting area of research but also underlines some major controversies. A linear cause-result interpretation of experimental maneuvers often ignores the fact that the activity of Treg cells is orchestrated with the effector T (Teff) cells within an intricate network of physiological immune homeostasis. Every modulation of the activity of the effector (cytotoxic) immune system revolves to affect the activity of regulatory (suppressive) cells through elaborate feedback loops of negative and positive regulation. The lack of IL-2 production by innate Treg cells makes this cytokine a prime coupler of the effector and suppressive mechanisms. Here we attempt to integrate evidence that delineates the involvement of IL-2 in primary and secondary feedback loops that regulate the activity of suppressive cells within the elaborate network of physiological immune homeostasis.

  20. Production of an active anti-CD20-hIL-2 immunocytokine in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Marusic, Carla; Novelli, Flavia; Salzano, Anna M; Scaloni, Andrea; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Pioli, Claudio; Donini, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    Anti-CD20 murine or chimeric antibodies (Abs) have been used to treat non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) and other diseases characterized by overactive or dysfunctional B cells. Anti-CD20 Abs demonstrated to be effective in inducing regression of B-cell lymphomas, although in many cases patients relapse following treatment. A promising approach to improve the outcome of mAb therapy is the use of anti-CD20 antibodies to deliver cytokines to the tumour microenvironment. In particular, IL-2-based immunocytokines have shown enhanced antitumour activity in several preclinical studies. Here, we report on the engineering of an anti-CD20-human interleukin-2 (hIL-2) immunocytokine (2B8-Fc-hIL2) based on the C2B8 mAb (Rituximab) and the resulting ectopic expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. The scFv-Fc-engineered immunocytokine is fully assembled in plants with minor degradation products as assessed by SDS-PAGE and gel filtration. Purification yields using protein-A affinity chromatography were in the range of 15-20 mg/kg of fresh leaf weight (FW). Glycopeptide analysis confirmed the presence of a highly homogeneous plant-type glycosylation. 2B8-Fc-hIL2 and the cognate 2B8-Fc antibody, devoid of hIL-2, were assayed by flow cytometry on Daudi cells revealing a CD20 binding activity comparable to that of Rituximab and were effective in eliciting antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity of human PBMC versus Daudi cells, demonstrating their functional integrity. In 2B8-Fc-hIL2, IL-2 accessibility and biological activity were verified by flow cytometry and cell proliferation assay. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a recombinant immunocytokine based on the therapeutic Rituximab antibody scaffold, whose expression in plants may be a valuable tool for NHLs treatment.

  1. IL2 — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    From NCBI Gene: The protein encoded by this gene is a secreted cytokine that is important for the proliferation of T and B lymphocytes. The receptor of this cytokine is a heterotrimeric protein complex whose gamma chain is also shared by interleukin 4 (IL4) and interleukin 7 (IL7). The expression of this gene in mature thymocytes is monoallelic, which represents an unusual regulatory mode for controlling the precise expression of a single gene. The targeted disruption of a similar gene in mice leads to ulcerative colitis-like disease, which suggests an essential role of this gene in the immune response to antigenic stimuli. [provided by RefSeq, Jul 2008

  2. Targeted therapy to the IL-2R using diphtheria toxin and caspase-3 fusion proteins modulates Treg and ameliorates inflammatory colitis.

    PubMed

    Yarkoni, Shai; Sagiv, Yuval; Kaminitz, Ayelet; Farkas, Daniel L; Askenasy, Nadir

    2009-10-01

    Pathogenic lymphocytes in the enteric wall of inflammatory bowel disease patients display various abnormalities, including reduced sensitivity to apoptosis. We evaluated a therapeutic approach to elimination of cytotoxic cells, using two IL-2 fusion proteins, a diphtheria toxin (IL2-DT) and a caspase-3 (IL2-cas) conjugate. In models of acute (dextran sodium sulfate and trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid) and chronic (dextran sodium sulfate) toxic colitis, therapeutic doses of the fusion proteins improved survival and prevented colon shortening. While both chimeric proteins eradicated CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T cells in mesenteric LN, IL2-DT caused severe lymphopenia. In contrast, IL2-cas was equally protective and increased fractional expression of Foxp3. Similar effects of the fusion proteins were observed in healthy mice: IL2-DT caused lymphopenia and IL2-cas increased fractional expression of FoxP3. The fusion proteins induced apoptosis in CD25(+) T cells in vitro, with lower toxicity of IL2-cas to Foxp3(+) T cells. These data infer that targeted depletion of cells expressing the IL-2 receptor has therapeutic potential in models of inflammatory colitis, despite depletion of CD25(+) Treg. The IL2-cas fusion protein is particularly relevant to inflammatory bowel disease, as direct internalization of toxic moieties overcomes multiple pathways of resistance to apoptosis of colitogenic T cells.

  3. Characterization of interleukin-15 (IL-15) and the IL-15 receptor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, M.K.; Park, L.S.

    1996-05-01

    IL-15 interacts with a heterotrimeric receptor that consists of the {beta} and {gamma} subunits of the IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) as well as a specific, high-affinity IL-15-binding subunit, which is designated IL-15R{alpha}. Since both the {beta} and the {gamma} subunits of the IL-2R are required for signaling by either IL-2 or IL-15, it is not surprising that these cytokines share many activities in vitro. However, the differential expression of these cytokines and the {alpha} chains of their receptors within various tissues and cell types suggests that IL-2 and IL-15 may perform at least partially distinct physiological functions. The production of IL-15 by macrophages, and possibly other cell types, in response to environmental stimuli and infectious agents suggests that IL-15 may play a role in protective immune responses, allograft rejection, and the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. 56 refs.

  4. IL2 treatment for cancer: from biology to gene therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Foa, R.; Guarini, A.; Gansbacher, B.

    1992-01-01

    In this review we shall discuss the biological rationale and the clinical findings obtained using Interleukin 2 (IL2)-based immunotherapy in the management of cancer patients. Objective and long-lived clinical responses have been documented in a proportion of cases, particularly renal cell carcinoma, melanoma and acute myeloid leukaemia. Though encouraging, the clinical use of IL2 has so far been limited by toxicity, as well as by the heterogeneous and unpredictable responses and by the lack of specific anti-tumour effect. These considerations have led to the belief that more sophisticated technologies aimed at introducing the IL2 gene into the neoplastic cells may potentially overcome some of the limitations coupled to the in vivo infusion of high doses of IL2. The data accumulated in animal models and, more recently, also with human tumour cells indicate that the IL2 gene may be successfully inserted into neoplastic cells. The constitutive secretion of IL2 by the tumour cells leads to a reduced or abrogated tumorigenicity in several different tumour models. The evidence that in some experimental tumours the transduction of the IL2 gene into the neoplastic cells may elicit a specific cytotoxic response and confer anti-tumour memory, suggests that vaccination protocols based on this innovative strategy may represent a potential new tool in the management of cancer patients. PMID:1457368

  5. Pharmacology and function of melatonin receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Dubocovich, M.L.

    1988-09-01

    The hormone melatonin is secreted primarily from the pineal gland, with highest levels occurring during the dark period of a circadian cycle. This hormone, through an action in the brain, appears to be involved in the regulation of various neural and endocrine processes that are cued by the daily change in photoperiod. This article reviews the pharmacological characteristics and function of melatonin receptors in the central nervous system, and the role of melatonin in mediating physiological functions in mammals. Melatonin and melatonin agonists, at picomolar concentrations, inhibit the release of dopamine from retina through activation of a site that is pharmacologically different from a serotonin receptor. These inhibitory effects are antagonized by the novel melatonin receptor antagonist luzindole (N-0774), which suggests that melatonin activates a presynaptic melatonin receptor. In chicken and rabbit retina, the pharmacological characteristics of the presynaptic melatonin receptor and the site labeled by 2-(125I)iodomelatonin are identical. It is proposed that 2-(125I)iodomelatonin binding sites (e.g., chicken brain) that possess the pharmacological characteristics of the retinal melatonin receptor site (order of affinities: 2-iodomelatonin greater than 6-chloromelatonin greater than or equal to melatonin greater than or equal to 6,7-di-chloro-2-methylmelatonin greater than 6-hydroxymelatonin greater than or equal to 6-methoxymelatonin greater than N-acetyltryptamine greater than or equal to luzindole greater than N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine greater than 5-methoxytryptamine much greater than 5-hydroxytryptamine) be classified as ML-1 (melatonin 1). The 2-(125I)iodomelatonin binding site of hamster brain membranes possesses different binding and pharmacological characteristics from the retinal melatonin receptor site and should be classified as ML-2. 64 references.

  6. Heterogeneous effects of exogenous IL-2 on HIV-specific cell-mediated immunity (CMI).

    PubMed Central

    Bell, S J; Cooper, D A; Kemp, B E; Doherty, R R; Penny, R

    1992-01-01

    A characteristic feature associated with HIV-1 infection of the human host is a chronic decline in circulating CD4+ T helper/inducer cell numbers. Impaired cell-mediated immune functions usually occur in parallel with the decline in CD4+ T cells. Activated CD4+ T helper cells are a major source of endogenous IL-2 which is required for the immunoregulation of both antigen-specific B cells and CD8+ T cells. HIV-specific T cell proliferative responses are said to be weak and inconsistent, even during the asymptomatic phase of disease. We thus wished to determine how exogenous IL-2 affected HIV-specific T cell proliferation at different stages of the disease. Our cohort of 81 included both asymptomatic and symptomatic HIV-infected patients as well as uninfected normal donors. Proliferative responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) that were elicited during culture with an immunodominant gp41-derived synthetic peptide, gp41[8], and which were known to be CD8+ cell-associated in asymptomatics only, were used to analyse the effects of exogenous IL-2. IL-2 had three main effects on HIV-specific proliferation, namely (i) an additive effect, (ii) a synergistic effect, and (iii) an induced effect. More specifically, low dose exogenous IL-2 frequently augmented lymphoproliferation in both asymptomatic and symptomatic gp41[8] responders. In most symptomatics, however, who were predominantly gp41[8] non-responders, exogenous IL-2 induced lymphoproliferation. Flow cytometric analyses using dual immunofluorescence were used to analyse the T cell subset distribution of proliferating PBMC cultures. During culture with gp41[8], both CD4+ and CD8+ T cell numbers increased. However, after the addition of exogenous IL-2 to gp41[8]-containing cultures, CD8+ cell-associated lymphoproliferative responses were preferentially augmented. These results suggest that in symptomatics there is an inadequate supply of endogenous IL-2 to help maintain the strong and effective CD8+ cell

  7. NKG2D functions as an activating receptor on natural killer cells in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masamichi; Kudo, Yohei; Kawano, Mitsuko; Nakayama, Masafumi; Nakamura, Kyohei; Kameda, Mai; Ebara, Masamune; Sato, Takeki; Nakamura, Marina; Omine, Kaito; Kametani, Yoshie; Suzuki, Ryuji; Ogasawara, Kouetsu

    2014-11-01

    The natural killer group 2 membrane D (NKG2D) receptor is an NK-activating receptor that plays an important role in host defense against tumors and viral infections. Although the marmoset is an important and reliable animal model, especially for the study of human-specific viral infections, functional characterization of NKG2D on marmoset NK cells has not previously been conducted. In the present study, we investigated a subpopulation of marmoset NK cells that express NKG2D and exhibit cytolytic potential. On the basis of their CD16 and CD56 expression patterns, marmoset NK cells can be classified into three subpopulations: CD16(+) CD56(-), CD16(-) CD56(+) and CD16(-) CD56(-) cells. NKG2D expression on marmoset CD16(+) CD56(-) and CD16(-) CD56(+) splenocytes was confirmed using an NKG2D ligand composed of an MHC class I chain-related molecule A (MICA)-Fc fusion protein. When marmoset splenocytes were cultured with IL-2 for 4 days, NKG2D expression was retained on CD16(+) CD56(-) and CD16(-) CD56(+). In addition, CD16(+) CD56(+) cells within the marmoset NK population appeared which expressed NKG2D after IL-2 stimulation. IL-2-activated marmoset NK cells showed strong cytolytic activity against K562 target cells and target cells stably expressing MICA. Further, the cytolytic activity of marmoset splenocytes was significantly reduced after addition of MICA-Fc fusion protein. Thus, NKG2D functions as an activating receptor on marmoset NK cells that possesses cytotoxic potential, and phenotypic profiles of marmoset NK cell subpopulations are similar to those seen in humans.

  8. Destabilization of peptide: MHC interaction induces IL-2 resistant anergy in diabetogenic T cells

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Lindsay J.; Evavold, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    Autoreactive T cells are responsible for inducing several autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes. We have developed a strategy to induce unresponsiveness in these cells by destabilizing the peptide:MHC ligand recognized by the T cell receptor. By introducing amino acid substitutions into the immunogenic peptide at residues that bind to the MHC, the half life of the peptide:MHC complex is severely reduced, thereby resulting in abortive T cell activation and anergy. By treating a monoclonal diabetogenic T cell population with an MHC variant peptide, the cells are rendered unresponsive to the wild type ligand, as measured by both proliferation and IL-2 production. Stimulation of T cells with MHC variant peptides results in minimal Erk1/2 phosphorylation or cell division. Variant peptide stimulation effectively initiates a signaling program dominated by sustained tyrosine phosphatase activity, including elevated SHP-1 activity. These negative signaling events result in an anergic phenotype in which the T cells are not competent to signal through the IL-2 receptor, as evidenced by a lack of phospho-Stat5 upregulation and proliferation, despite high expression of the IL-2 receptor. This unique negative signaling profile provides a novel means to shut down the anti-self response. PMID:23895744

  9. Modulating DNA methylation in activated CD8+ T cells inhibits regulatory T cell-induced binding of Foxp3 to the CD8+ T Cell IL-2 promoter.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michelle M; Akaronu, Nnenna; Thompson, Elizabeth M; Hood, Sylvia F; Fogle, Jonathan E

    2015-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated that CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) activated during the course of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection suppress CD8(+) CTL function in a TGF-β-dependent fashion, inhibiting IFN-γ and IL-2 production and inducing G1 cell-cycle arrest. In this article, we describe the molecular events occurring at the IL-2 promoter leading to suppression of IL-2 production. These experiments demonstrate that Foxp3 induced by lentivirus-activated Tregs in the CD8(+) target cells binds to the IL-2 promoter, actively repressing IL-2 transcription. We further demonstrate that the chronic activation of CD8(+) T cells during FIV infection results in chromatin remodeling at the IL-2 promoter, specifically, demethylation of CpG residues. These DNA modifications occur during active transcription and translation of IL-2; however, these changes render the IL-2 promoter permissive to Foxp3-induced transcriptional repression. These data help explain, in part, the seemingly paradoxical observations that CD8(+) T cells displaying an activation phenotype exhibit altered antiviral function. Further, we demonstrate that blocking demethylation of CpG residues at the IL-2 promoter inhibits Foxp3 binding, suggesting a potential mechanism for rescue and/or reactivation of CD8(+) T cells. Using the FIV model for lentiviral persistence, these studies provide a framework for understanding how immune activation combined with Treg-mediated suppression may affect CD8(+) T cell IL-2 transcription, maturation, and antiviral function.

  10. IL2Rβ-dependent signals drive terminal exhaustion and suppress memory development during chronic viral infection.

    PubMed

    Beltra, Jean-Christophe; Bourbonnais, Sara; Bédard, Nathalie; Charpentier, Tania; Boulangé, Moana; Michaud, Eva; Boufaied, Ines; Bruneau, Julie; Shoukry, Naglaa H; Lamarre, Alain; Decaluwe, Hélène

    2016-09-13

    Exhaustion of CD8(+) T cells severely impedes the adaptive immune response to chronic viral infections. Despite major advances in our understanding of the molecular regulation of exhaustion, the cytokines that directly control this process during chronicity remain unknown. We demonstrate a direct impact of IL-2 and IL-15, two common gamma-chain-dependent cytokines, on CD8(+) T-cell exhaustion. Common to both cytokine receptors, the IL-2 receptor β (IL2Rβ) chain is selectively maintained on CD8(+) T cells during chronic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus and hepatitis C virus infections. Its expression correlates with exhaustion severity and identifies terminally exhausted CD8(+) T cells both in mice and humans. Genetic ablation of the IL2Rβ chain on CD8(+) T cells restrains inhibitory receptor induction, in particular 2B4 and Tim-3; precludes terminal differentiation of highly defective PD-1(hi) effectors; and rescues memory T-cell development and responsiveness to IL-7-dependent signals. Together, we ascribe a previously unexpected role to IL-2 and IL-15 as instigators of CD8(+) T-cell exhaustion during chronic viral infection.

  11. MEMBRANE ESTROGEN RECEPTOR REGULATION OF HYPOTHALAMIC FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Micevych, Paul E.; Kelly, Martin J.

    2012-01-01

    Over the decades, our understanding of estrogen receptor (ER) function has evolved. Today we are confronted by at least two nuclear ERs: ERα and ERβ; and a number of putative membrane ERs, including ERα, ERβ, ER-X, GPR30 and Gq-mER. These receptors all bind estrogens or at least estrogenic compounds and activate intracellular signaling pathways. In some cases, a well-defined pharmacology, and physiology has been discovered. In other cases, the identity or the function remains to be elucidated. This mini-review attempts to synthesize our understanding of 17β-estradiol membrane signaling within hypothalamic circuits involved in homeostatic functions focusing on reproduction and energy balance. PMID:22538318

  12. [Structure and Function of the Nuclear Receptor Constitutive Androstane Receptor].

    PubMed

    Inouye, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Animal defense mechanisms against both endogenous and exogenous toxic compounds function mainly through receptor-type transcription factors, including the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). Following xenobiotic stimulation, CAR translocates into the nucleus and transactivates its target genes including oxygenic and conjugative enzymes and transporters in hepatocytes. We identified subcellular localization signals in the rat CAR: two nuclear localization signals (NLS1 and 2); two nuclear export signals (NES1 and 2); and a cytoplasmic retention region. The nuclear import of CAR is regulated by the importin-Ran system and microtubule network. Five splice variants (SV1-5) were identified in rat liver in addition to wild-type CAR. When expressed in immortalized cells, their artificial transcripts were inactive as transcription factors. A CAR mutant with three consecutive alanine residues inserted into the ligand-binding domain of CAR showed ligand-dependent activation of target genes in immortalized cells, which is in marked contrast to the constitutive transactivating nature of wild-type CAR. Using this assay system, androstenol and clotrimazole, both of which are inverse agonists of CAR, were classified as an antagonist and weak agonist, respectively. A member of the DEAD box DNA/RNA helicase family (DP97) and protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) were found to be gene (or promotor)-specific coactivators of CAR. The expression of the CAR gene might be under the control of clock genes mediated by the nuclear receptor Rev-erb-α.

  13. Engraftment of human HSCs in nonirradiated newborn NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice is enhanced by transgenic expression of membrane-bound human SCF

    PubMed Central

    Racki, Waldemar J.; Leif, Jean; Burzenski, Lisa; Hosur, Vishnu; Wetmore, Amber; Gott, Bruce; Herlihy, Mary; Ignotz, Ronald; Dunn, Raymond; Shultz, Leonard D.; Greiner, Dale L.

    2012-01-01

    Immunodeficient mice engrafted with human HSCs support multidisciplinary translational experimentation, including the study of human hematopoiesis. Heightened levels of human HSC engraftment are observed in immunodeficient mice expressing mutations in the IL2-receptor common γ chain (IL2rg) gene, including NOD-scid IL2rγnull (NSG) mice. Engraftment of human HSC requires preconditioning of immunodeficient recipients, usually with irradiation. Such preconditioning increases the expression of stem cell factor (SCF), which is critical for HSC engraftment, proliferation, and survival. We hypothesized that transgenic expression of human membrane-bound stem cell factor Tg(hu-mSCF)] would increase levels of human HSC engraftment in nonirradiated NSG mice and eliminate complications associated with irradiation. Surprisingly, detectable levels of human CD45+ cell chimerism were observed after transplantation of cord blood–derived human HSCs into nonirradiated adult as well as newborn NSG mice. However, transgenic expression of human mSCF enabled heightened levels of human hematopoietic cell chimerism in the absence of irradiation. Moreover, nonirradiated NSG-Tg(hu-mSCF) mice engrafted as newborns with human HSCs rejected human skin grafts from a histoincompatible donor, indicating the development of a functional human immune system. These data provide a new immunodeficient mouse model that does not require irradiation preconditioning for human HSC engraftment and immune system development. PMID:22246028

  14. [Functional selectivity of opioid receptors ligands].

    PubMed

    Audet, Nicolas; Archer-Lahlou, Elodie; Richard-Lalonde, Mélissa; Piñeyro-Filpo, Graciela

    2010-01-01

    Opiates are the most effective analgesics available for the treatment of severe pain. However, their clinical use is restricted by unwanted side effects such as tolerance, physical dependence and respiratory depression. The strategy to develop new opiates with reduced side effects has mainly focused on the study and production of ligands that specifically bind to different opiate receptors subtypes. However, this strategy has not allowed the production of novel therapeutic ligands with a better side effects profile. Thus, other research strategies need to be explored. One which is receiving increasing attention is the possibility of exploiting ligand ability to stabilize different receptor conformations with distinct signalling profiles. This newly described property, termed functional selectivity, provides a potential means of directing the stimulus generated by an activated receptor towards a specific cellular response. Here we summarize evidence supporting the existence of ligand-specific active conformations for two opioid receptors subtypes (delta and mu), and analyze how functional selectivity may contribute in the production of longer lasting, better tolerated opiate analgesics. double dagger.

  15. Brain immune interactions and air pollution: macrophage inhibitory factor (MIF), prion cellular protein (PrPC), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), and interleukin-2 (IL-2) in cerebrospinal fluid and MIF in serum differentiate urban children exposed to severe vs. low air pollution

    PubMed Central

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Cross, Janet V.; Franco-Lira, Maricela; Aragón-Flores, Mariana; Kavanaugh, Michael; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Chao, Chih-kai; Thompson, Charles; Chang, Jing; Zhu, Hongtu; D'Angiulli, Amedeo

    2013-01-01

    Mexico City Metropolitan Area children chronically exposed to high concentrations of air pollutants exhibit an early brain imbalance in genes involved in oxidative stress, inflammation, innate and adaptive immune responses along with accumulation of misfolded proteins observed in the early stages of Alzheimer and Parkinson's diseases. A complex modulation of serum cytokines and chemokines influences children's brain structural and gray/white matter volumetric responses to air pollution. The search for biomarkers associating systemic and CNS inflammation to brain growth and cognitive deficits in the short term and neurodegeneration in the long-term is our principal aim. We explored and compared a profile of cytokines, chemokines (Multiplexing LASER Bead Technology) and Cellular prion protein (PrPC) in normal cerebro-spinal-fluid (CSF) of urban children with high vs. low air pollution exposures. PrPC and macrophage inhibitory factor (MIF) were also measured in serum. Samples from 139 children ages 11.91 ± 4.2 years were measured. Highly exposed children exhibited significant increases in CSF MIF (p = 0.002), IL6 (p = 0.006), IL1ra (p = 0.014), IL-2 (p = 0.04), and PrPC (p = 0.039) vs. controls. MIF serum concentrations were higher in exposed children (p = 0.009). Our results suggest CSF as a MIF, IL6, IL1Ra, IL-2, and PrPC compartment that can possibly differentiate air pollution exposures in children. MIF, a key neuro-immune mediator, is a potential biomarker bridge to identify children with CNS inflammation. Fine tuning of immune-to-brain communication is crucial to neural networks appropriate functioning, thus the short and long term effects of systemic inflammation and dysregulated neural immune responses are of deep concern for millions of exposed children. Defining the linkage and the health consequences of the brain / immune system interactions in the developing brain chronically exposed to air pollutants ought to be of pressing importance for public health

  16. Brain immune interactions and air pollution: macrophage inhibitory factor (MIF), prion cellular protein (PrP(C)), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), and interleukin-2 (IL-2) in cerebrospinal fluid and MIF in serum differentiate urban children exposed to severe vs. low air pollution.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Cross, Janet V; Franco-Lira, Maricela; Aragón-Flores, Mariana; Kavanaugh, Michael; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Chao, Chih-Kai; Thompson, Charles; Chang, Jing; Zhu, Hongtu; D'Angiulli, Amedeo

    2013-01-01

    Mexico City Metropolitan Area children chronically exposed to high concentrations of air pollutants exhibit an early brain imbalance in genes involved in oxidative stress, inflammation, innate and adaptive immune responses along with accumulation of misfolded proteins observed in the early stages of Alzheimer and Parkinson's diseases. A complex modulation of serum cytokines and chemokines influences children's brain structural and gray/white matter volumetric responses to air pollution. The search for biomarkers associating systemic and CNS inflammation to brain growth and cognitive deficits in the short term and neurodegeneration in the long-term is our principal aim. We explored and compared a profile of cytokines, chemokines (Multiplexing LASER Bead Technology) and Cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) in normal cerebro-spinal-fluid (CSF) of urban children with high vs. low air pollution exposures. PrP(C) and macrophage inhibitory factor (MIF) were also measured in serum. Samples from 139 children ages 11.91 ± 4.2 years were measured. Highly exposed children exhibited significant increases in CSF MIF (p = 0.002), IL6 (p = 0.006), IL1ra (p = 0.014), IL-2 (p = 0.04), and PrP(C) (p = 0.039) vs. controls. MIF serum concentrations were higher in exposed children (p = 0.009). Our results suggest CSF as a MIF, IL6, IL1Ra, IL-2, and PrP(C) compartment that can possibly differentiate air pollution exposures in children. MIF, a key neuro-immune mediator, is a potential biomarker bridge to identify children with CNS inflammation. Fine tuning of immune-to-brain communication is crucial to neural networks appropriate functioning, thus the short and long term effects of systemic inflammation and dysregulated neural immune responses are of deep concern for millions of exposed children. Defining the linkage and the health consequences of the brain / immune system interactions in the developing brain chronically exposed to air pollutants ought to be of pressing importance for public

  17. Functional responses of human neonatal B lymphocytes to antigen receptor cross-linking and CpG DNA

    PubMed Central

    TASKER, L; MARSHALL-CLARKE, S

    2003-01-01

    Human neonates are immunologically immature and consequently are highly susceptible to infection. The cellular basis for the dysfunctional immune responses of neonates is not clear, but is likely to reflect the immaturity of both B and T cell populations. Here we have examined the ability of human cord blood B cells to respond to antigen receptor cross-linking and also to CpG containing oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN), and compared their responses with those of adult peripheral blood B cells. Antigen receptor cross-linking with soluble F(ab′)2 anti-IgM antibodies, induced HLA-DR and CD86 up-regulation and proliferation to a similar extent in adult and cord blood B cells. Both interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-4 co-stimulated anti-IgM-induced proliferation, but cord blood B cells were less sensitive than adult B cells to the co-stimulatory effects of IL-2. Antigen receptor cross-linking induced secretion of the chemokines macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α) and MIP-1β in adult and cord blood B cells, and secretion was enhanced by IL-2 or IL-4. CpG-ODN induced up-regulation of HLA-DR and CD86 expression and proliferation of adult and cord blood B cells, and anti-IgM and CPG-ODN synergized in the induction of proliferation. CpG-ODN also induced MIP-1α and MIP-1α secretion in adult and cord blood B cells. In addition to functional studies we examined the expression of CD62L (l-selectin), CCR7 and CXCR5. Our data show that surface expression of CD62L and CCR7 is lower on cord blood B cells than on adult B cells, suggesting that human cord blood B cells may exhibit homing defects. PMID:14632745

  18. Transcription Factor Ets-2 Acts as a Preinduction Repressor of Interleukin-2 (IL-2) Transcription in Naive T Helper Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Panagoulias, Ioannis; Georgakopoulos, Tassos; Aggeletopoulou, Ioanna; Agelopoulos, Marios; Thanos, Dimitris; Mouzaki, Athanasia

    2016-12-23

    IL-2 is the first cytokine produced when naive T helper (Th) cells are activated and differentiate into dividing pre-Th0 proliferating precursors. IL-2 expression is blocked in naive, but not activated or memory, Th cells by the transcription factor Ets-2 that binds to the antigen receptor response element (ARRE)-2 of the proximal IL-2 promoter. Ets-2 acts as an independent preinduction repressor in naive Th cells and does not interact physically with the transcription factor NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T-cells) that binds to the ARRE-2 in activated Th cells. In naive Th cells, Ets-2 mRNA expression, Ets-2 protein levels, and Ets-2 binding to ARRE-2 decrease upon cell activation followed by the concomitant expression of IL-2. Cyclosporine A stabilizes Ets-2 mRNA and protein when the cells are activated. Ets-2 silences directly constitutive or induced IL-2 expression through the ARRE-2. Conversely, Ets-2 silencing allows for constitutive IL-2 expression in unstimulated cells. Ets-2 binding to ARRE-2 in chromatin is stronger in naive compared with activated or memory Th cells; in the latter, Ets-2 participates in a change of the IL-2 promoter architecture, possibly to facilitate a quick response when the cells re-encounter antigen. We propose that Ets-2 expression and protein binding to the ARRE-2 of the IL-2 promoter are part of a strictly regulated process that results in a physiological transition of naive Th cells to Th0 cells upon antigenic stimulation. Malfunction of such a repression mechanism at the molecular level could lead to a disturbance of later events in Th cell plasticity, leading to autoimmune diseases or other pathological conditions.

  19. Expression of HLA Class II Molecules in Humanized NOD.Rag1KO.IL2RgcKO Mice is Critical for Development and Function of Human T and B Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-17

    reconstituted mice were able to elicit HLA-A2-restricted CD8 T cell responses upon infection with Epstein Barr or dengue virus [27–29]. However, the function...and eliminate viruses , bacteria, and parasites as well as to control the homeostatic growth of commensal bacteria in the intestinal tract [24]. In...High levels of human peripheral blood mononuclear cell engraftment and enhanced susceptibility to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection in NOD

  20. Only high-affinity receptors for interleukin 2 mediate internalization of ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Weissman, A.M.; Harford, J.B.; Svetlik, P.B.; Leonard, W.L.; Depper, J.M.; Waldmann, T.A.; Greene, W.C.; Klausner, R.D.

    1986-03-01

    Interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptors are expressed on activated T cells and in select T-cell leukemias. Recently, it has been demonstrated that at least two classes of receptor for IL-2 exist with markedly different affinities for ligand. All known biological actions of IL-2 have been correlated with occupancy of high-affinity sites; the function of the low-affinity sites remains unknown. Receptor-mediated endocytosis is the primary means of internalization of cell-surface receptors and their ligands. The internalization of IL-2 bound to high- and low-affinity receptor sites was studied in a human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-infected human T-cell leukemia cell line and in a cloned murine cytotoxic T-cell line (CTLL). Internalization of IL-2 occurred only when bound to high-affinity sites. In addition, an anti-receptor antibody (anti-Tac), which binds equally well to high- and low-affinity sites, demonstrated no detectable internalization. The implications of these findings as they relate to IL-2 receptor structure and function are discussed.

  1. Partial loss of interleukin 2 receptor gamma function in pigs provides mechanistic insights for the study of human immunodeficiency syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Woo-Jin; Kwon, Deug-Nam; Park, Chankyu; Do, Jeong Tae; Song, Hyuk; Cho, Seong-Keun; Park, Kwang-Wook; Brown, Alana N.; Samuel, Melissa S.; Murphy, Clifton N.; Prather, Randall S.; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we described the phenotype of monoallelic interleukin 2 receptor gamma knockout (mIL2RG+/Δ69-368 KO) pigs. Approximately 80% of mIL2RG+/Δ69-368 KO pigs (8/10) were athymic, whereas 20% (2/10) presented a rudimentary thymus. The body weight of IL2RG+/Δ69-368KO pigs developed normally. Immunological analysis showed that mIL2RG+/Δ69-368 KO pigs possessed CD25+CD44- or CD25-CD44+ cells, whereas single (CD4 or CD8) or double (CD4/8) positive cells were lacking in mIL2RG+/Δ69-368 KO pigs. CD3+ cells in the thymus of mIL2RG+/Δ69-368 KO pigs contained mainly CD44+ cells and/or CD25+ cells, which included FOXP3+ cells. These observations demonstrated that T cells from mIL2RG+/Δ69-368 KO pigs were able to develop to the DN3 stage, but failed to transition toward the DN4 stage. Whole-transcriptome analysis of thymus and spleen, and subsequent pathway analysis revealed that a subset of genes differentially expressed following the loss of IL2RG might be responsible for both impaired T-cell receptor and cytokine-mediated signalling. However, comparative analysis of two mIL2RG+/Δ69-368 KO pigs revealed little variability in the down- and up-regulated gene sets. In conclusion, mIL2RG+/Δ69-368 KO pigs presented a T-B+NK- SCID phenotype, suggesting that pigs can be used as a valuable and suitable biomedical model for human SCID research. PMID:27463006

  2. PGC-1α-Dependent Mitochondrial Adaptation Is Necessary to Sustain IL-2-Induced Activities in Human NK Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jara, Claudia; Ibañez, Jorge; Ahumada, Viviana; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Martin, Adrian; Córdova, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Human Natural Killer (NK) cells are a specialized heterogeneous subpopulation of lymphocytes involved in antitumor defense reactions. NK cell effector functions are critically dependent on cytokines and metabolic activity. Among various cytokines modulating NK cell function, interleukin-2 (IL-2) can induce a more potent cytotoxic activity defined as lymphokine activated killer activity (LAK). Our aim was to determine if IL-2 induces changes at the mitochondrial level in NK cells to support the bioenergetic demand for performing this enhanced cytotoxic activity more efficiently. Purified human NK cells were cultured with high IL-2 concentrations to develop LAK activity, which was assessed by the ability of NK cells to lyse NK-resistant Daudi cells. Here we show that, after 72 h of culture of purified human NK cells with enough IL-2 to induce LAK activity, both the mitochondrial mass and the mitochondrial membrane potential increased in a PGC-1α-dependent manner. In addition, oligomycin, an inhibitor of ATP synthase, inhibited IL-2-induced LAK activity at 48 and 72 h of culture. Moreover, the secretion of IFN-γ from NK cells with LAK activity was also partially dependent on PGC-1α expression. These results indicate that PGC-1α plays a crucial role in regulating mitochondrial function involved in the maintenance of LAK activity in human NK cells stimulated with IL-2. PMID:27413259

  3. Functional evolution of the pregnane X receptor

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Manisha; Reschly, Erica J.; Krasowski, Matthew D.

    2008-01-01

    The pregnane X receptor (PXR; NR1I2) is a nuclear hormone receptor (NR) that transcriptionally regulates genes encoding transporters and drug-metabolizing enzymes in the liver and intestine. PXR activation leads to enhanced metabolism and elimination of xenobiotics and endogenous compounds such as hormones and bile salts. Relative to other vertebrate NRs, PXR has the broadest specificity for ligand activators by virtue of a large, flexible ligand-binding cavity. In addition, PXR has the most extensive sequence diversity across vertebrate species in the ligand-binding domain of any NR, with significant pharmacologic differences between humans and rodent PXRs and especially marked divergence between mammalian and non-mammalian PXRs. The unusual properties of PXR complicate the use of in silico and animal models to predict in vivo human PXR pharmacology. Research into the evolutionary history of the PXR gene has also provided insight into the function of PXR in humans and other animals. PMID:16863441

  4. Implication of IL-2/IL-21 region in systemic sclerosis genetic susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Gallo, Lina-Marcela; Simeon, Carmen P; Broen, Jasper C; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Beretta, Lorenzo; Vonk, Madelon C; Carreira, Patricia E; Vargas, Sofia; Román-Ivorra, José Andrés; González-Gay, Miguel A; Tolosa, Carlos; López-Longo, Francisco Javier; Espinosa, Gerard; Vicente, Esther F; Hesselstrand, Roger; Riemekasten, Gabriela; Witte, Torsten; Distler, Jörg H W; Voskuyl, Alexandre E; Schuerwegh, Annemie J; Shiels, Paul G; Nordin, Annika; Padyukov, Leonid; Hoffmann-Vold, Anna-Maria; Scorza, Raffaella; Lunardi, Claudio; Airo, Paolo; van Laar, Jacob M; Hunzelmann, Nicolas; Gathof, Birgit S; Kreuter, Alexander; Herrick, Ariane; Worthington, Jane; Denton, Christopher P; Zhou, Xiaodong; Arnett, Frank C; Fonseca, Carmen; Koeleman, Bobby PC; Assasi, Shervin; Radstake, Timothy R D J; Mayes, Maureen D; Martín, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Objective The interleukin 2 (IL-2) and interleukin 21 (IL-21) locus at chromosome 4q27 has been associated with several autoimmune diseases, and both genes are related to immune system functions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of the IL-2/IL-21 locus in systemic sclerosis (SSc). Patients and methods The case control study included 4493 SSc Caucasian patients and 5856 healthy controls from eight Caucasian populations (Spain, Germany, The Netherlands, USA, Italy, Sweden, UK and Norway). Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs2069762, rs6822844, rs6835457 and rs907715) were genotyped using TaqMan allelic discrimination assays. Results We observed evidence of association of the rs6822844 and rs907715 variants with global SSc (pc=6.6E-4 and pc=7.2E-3, respectively). Similar statistically significant associations were observed for the limited cutaneous form of the disease. The conditional regression analysis suggested that the most likely genetic variation responsible for the association was the rs6822844 polymorphism. Consistently, the rs2069762A-rs6822844T-rs6835457G-rs907715T allelic combination showed evidence of association with SSc and limited cutaneous SSc subtype (pc=1.7E-03 and pc=8E-4, respectively). Conclusions These results suggested that the IL-2/IL-21 locus influences the genetic susceptibility to SSc. Moreover, this study provided further support for the IL-2/IL-21 locus as a common genetic factor in autoimmune diseases. PMID:23172754

  5. Functional Evolution of Mammalian Odorant Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Adipietro, Kaylin A.; Mainland, Joel D.; Matsunami, Hiroaki

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian odorant receptor (OR) repertoire is an attractive model to study evolution, because ORs have been subjected to rapid evolution between species, presumably caused by changes of the olfactory system to adapt to the environment. However, functional assessment of ORs in related species remains largely untested. Here we investigated the functional properties of primate and rodent ORs to determine how well evolutionary distance predicts functional characteristics. Using human and mouse ORs with previously identified ligands, we cloned 18 OR orthologs from chimpanzee and rhesus macaque and 17 mouse-rat orthologous pairs that are broadly representative of the OR repertoire. We functionally characterized the in vitro responses of ORs to a wide panel of odors and found similar ligand selectivity but dramatic differences in response magnitude. 87% of human-primate orthologs and 94% of mouse-rat orthologs showed differences in receptor potency (EC50) and/or efficacy (dynamic range) to an individual ligand. Notably dN/dS ratio, an indication of selective pressure during evolution, does not predict functional similarities between orthologs. Additionally, we found that orthologs responded to a common ligand 82% of the time, while human OR paralogs of the same subfamily responded to the common ligand only 33% of the time. Our results suggest that, while OR orthologs tend to show conserved ligand selectivity, their potency and/or efficacy dynamically change during evolution, even in closely related species. These functional changes in orthologs provide a platform for examining how the evolution of ORs can meet species-specific demands. PMID:22807691

  6. Melanocortin 1 Receptor: Structure, Function, and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Wolf Horrell, Erin M.; Boulanger, Mary C.; D’Orazio, John A.

    2016-01-01

    The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) is a melanocytic Gs protein coupled receptor that regulates skin pigmentation, UV responses, and melanoma risk. It is a highly polymorphic gene, and loss of function correlates with a fair, UV-sensitive, and melanoma-prone phenotype due to defective epidermal melanization and sub-optimal DNA repair. MC1R signaling, achieved through adenylyl cyclase activation and generation of the second messenger cAMP, is hormonally controlled by the positive agonist melanocortin, the negative agonist agouti signaling protein, and the neutral antagonist β-defensin 3. Activation of cAMP signaling up-regulates melanin production and deposition in the epidermis which functions to limit UV penetration into the skin and enhances nucleotide excision repair (NER), the genomic stability pathway responsible for clearing UV photolesions from DNA to avoid mutagenesis. Herein we review MC1R structure and function and summarize our laboratory’s findings on the molecular mechanisms by which MC1R signaling impacts NER. PMID:27303435

  7. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and endothelial function

    PubMed Central

    Maron, Bradley A.; Leopold, Jane A.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperaldosteronism has been associated with endothelial dysfunction and impaired vascular reactivity in patients with hypertension or congestive heart failure. The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists spironolactone and eplerenone have been shown to reduce morbidity and mortality, in part, by ameliorating the adverse effects of aldosterone on vascular function. Although spironolactone and eplerenone are increasingly utilized in patients with cardiovascular disease, widespread clinical use is limited by the development of gynecomastia with spironolactone and hyperkalemia with both agents. This suggests that the development of newer agents with favorable side effect profiles is warranted. PMID:18729003

  8. In vivo expansion of regulatory T cells with IL-2/IL-2 mAb complexes prevents anti-factor VIII immune responses in hemophilia A mice treated with factor VIII plasmid-mediated gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao-Lien; Ye, Peiqing; Yen, Benjamin C; Miao, Carol H

    2011-08-01

    Generation of transgene-specific immune responses can constitute a major complication following gene therapy treatment. An in vivo approach to inducing selective expansion of Regulatory T (Treg) cells by injecting interleukin-2 (IL-2) mixed with a specific IL-2 monoclonal antibody (JES6-1) was adopted to modulate anti-factor VIII (anti-FVIII) immune responses. Three consecutive IL-2 complexes treatments combined with FVIII plasmid injection prevented anti-FVIII formation and achieved persistent, therapeutic-level of FVIII expression in hemophilia A (HemA) mice. The IL-2 complexes treatment expanded CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cells five- to sevenfold on peak day, and they gradually returned to normal levels within 7-14 days without changing other lymphocyte populations. The transiently expanded Treg cells are highly activated and display suppressive function in vitro. Adoptive transfer of the expanded Treg cells protected recipient mice from generation of high-titer antibodies following FVIII plasmid challenge. Repeated plasmid transfer is applicable in tolerized mice without eliciting immune responses. Mice treated with IL-2 complexes mounted immune responses against both T-dependent and T-independent neoantigens, indicating that IL-2 complexes did not hamper the immune system for long. These results demonstrate the important role of Treg cells in suppressing anti-FVIII immune responses and the potential of developing Treg cell expansion therapies that induce long-term tolerance to FVIII.

  9. Molecular modeling of the inhibition of protein-protein interactions with small molecules: The IL2-IL2Rα case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieraccini, Stefano; De Gonda, Riccardo; Sironi, Maurizio

    2011-12-01

    Developing drug like molecules targeting protein-protein interactions is one of the main goals of current medicinal chemistry. To drive the design process it is fundamental to locate those sites on the protein-protein contact surface that are more critical for protein binding, which are the most eligible targets to affect the protein complex formation. In this work we show how computational alanine scanning can be used to identify such critical sites and evaluate their interactions with small molecules designed to inhibit the complex formation. Complex of protein IL2 with IL2Rα and with some small molecule inhibitors are used as an example.

  10. TIM-3 Suppresses Anti-CD3/CD28-Induced TCR Activation and IL-2 Expression through the NFAT Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Tomkowicz, Brian; Walsh, Eileen; Cotty, Adam; Verona, Raluca; Sabins, Nina; Kaplan, Fred; Santulli-Marotto, Sandy; Chin, Chen-Ni; Mooney, Jill; Lingham, Russell B; Naso, Michael; McCabe, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    TIM-3 (T cell immunoglobulin and mucin-domain containing protein 3) is a member of the TIM family of proteins that is preferentially expressed on Th1 polarized CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Recent studies indicate that TIM-3 serves as a negative regulator of T cell function (i.e. T cell dependent immune responses, proliferation, tolerance, and exhaustion). Despite having no recognizable inhibitory signaling motifs, the intracellular tail of TIM-3 is apparently indispensable for function. Specifically, the conserved residues Y265/Y272 and surrounding amino acids appear to be critical for function. Mechanistically, several studies suggest that TIM-3 can associate with interleukin inducible T cell kinase (ITK), the Src kinases Fyn and Lck, and the p85 phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) adaptor protein to positively or negatively regulate IL-2 production via NF-κB/NFAT signaling pathways. To begin to address this discrepancy, we examined the effect of TIM-3 in two model systems. First, we generated several Jurkat T cell lines stably expressing human TIM-3 or murine CD28-ECD/human TIM-3 intracellular tail chimeras and examined the effects that TIM-3 exerts on T cell Receptor (TCR)-mediated activation, cytokine secretion, promoter activity, and protein kinase association. In this model, our results demonstrate that TIM-3 inhibits several TCR-mediated phenotypes: i) NF-kB/NFAT activation, ii) CD69 expression, and iii) suppression of IL-2 secretion. To confirm our Jurkat cell observations we developed a primary human CD8+ cell system that expresses endogenous levels of TIM-3. Upon TCR ligation, we observed the loss of NFAT reporter activity and IL-2 secretion, and identified the association of Src kinase Lck, and PLC-γ with TIM-3. Taken together, our results support the conclusion that TIM-3 is a negative regulator of TCR-function by attenuating activation signals mediated by CD3/CD28 co-stimulation.

  11. Antigen-Specific Regulatory T Cells and Low Dose of IL-2 in Treatment of Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pham, Minh N; von Herrath, Matthias G; Vela, Jose Luis

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an important role in preventing effector T-cell (Teff) targeting of self-antigens that can lead to tissue destruction in autoimmune settings, including type 1 diabetes (T1D). Autoimmunity is caused in part by an imbalance between Teff and Tregs. Early attempts to treat with immunosuppressive agents have led to serious side effects, thus requiring a more targeted approach. Low-dose IL-2 (LD IL-2) can provide immunoregulation with few side effects by preferentially acting on Tregs to drive tolerance. The concept of LD IL-2 as a therapeutic approach is supported by data in mouse models where autoimmunity is cured and further strengthened by success in human clinical studies in hepatitis C virus-induced vasculitis, chronic graft-versus-host disease, and Alopecia areata. Treatment will require identification of a safe therapeutic window, which is a difficult task given that patients are reported to have deficient or defective IL-2 production or signaling and have experienced mild activation of NK cells and eosinophils with LD IL-2 therapy. In T1D, an LD IL-2 clinical trial concluded that Tregs can be safely expanded in humans; however, the study was not designed to address efficacy. Antigen-specific therapies have also aimed at regulation of the autoimmune response but have been filled with disappointment despite an extensive list of diverse islet antigens tested in humans. This approach could be enhanced through the addition of LD IL-2 to the antigenic treatment regimen to improve the frequency and function of antigen-specific Tregs, without global immunosuppression. Here, we will discuss the use of LD IL-2 and islet antigen to enhance antigen-specific Tregs in T1D and focus on what is known about their immunological impact, their safety, and potential efficacy, and need for better methods to identify therapeutic effectiveness.

  12. The human IL-2 gene promoter can assemble a positioned nucleosome that becomes remodeled upon T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Attema, Joanne L; Reeves, Raymond; Murray, Vincent; Levichkin, Ilya; Temple, Mark D; Tremethick, David J; Shannon, M Frances

    2002-09-01

    Controlled production of the cytokine IL-2 plays a key role in the mammalian immune system. Expression from the gene is tightly regulated with no detectable expression in resting T cells and a strong induction following T cell activation. The IL-2 proximal promoter (+1 to -300) contains many well-defined transcriptional activation elements that respond to T cell stimulation. To determine the role of chromatin structure in the regulation of interleukin-2 gene transcription, nucleosome assembly across the IL-2 promoter region was examined using in vitro chromatin reconstitution assays. The IL-2 promoter assembles a nucleosome that is both translationally and rotationally positioned, spanning some of the major functional control elements. The binding of transcription factors to these elements, with the exception of the architectural protein HMGA1, was occluded by the presence of the nucleosome. Analysis of the chromatin architecture of the IL-2 gene in Jurkat T cells provided evidence for the presence of a similarly positioned nucleosome in vivo. The region encompassed by this nucleosome becomes remodeled following activation of Jurkat T cells. These observations suggest that the presence of a positioned nucleosome across the IL-2 proximal promoter may play an important role in maintaining an inactive gene in resting T cells and that remodeling of this nucleosome is important for gene activation.

  13. In vitro assessment of choline dihydrogen phosphate (CDHP) as a vehicle for recombinant human interleukin-2 (rhIL-2).

    PubMed

    Foureau, David M; Vrikkis, Regina M; Jones, Chase P; Weaver, Katherine D; Macfarlane, Douglas R; Salo, Jonathan C; McKillop, Iain H; Elliott, Gloria D

    2012-12-01

    Choline dihydrogen phosphate (CDHP) is an ionic liquid reported to increase thermal stability of model proteins. The current work investigated CDHP effect on structural integrity and biological activity of recombinant human interleukin-2 (rhIL-2), a therapeutic protein used for treating advanced melanoma. In vitro CDHP biocompatibility was also evaluated using primary cell cultures, or B16-F10 cell line, chronically exposed to the ionic liquid. Formulation of rhIL-2 in an aqueous 680mM CDHP pH 7.4 solution resulted in a 12.5°C increase in the Tm of rhIL-2 compared to a basic buffer formulation, and provided conformational rhIL-2 stabilization when the solution was heated to 23.3°C above the Tm. CDHP solutions (≤80mM), exhibited no cytotoxic activity toward primary splenocytes or B16-F10 cells in culture. However, a 10-fold loss in biological activity was observed when rhIL-2 was used in a 30mM CDHP aqueous solution with NaHCO3 (pH≥7.2) compared to controls without CDHP. While increased Tm is associated with a diminished rhIL-2 biological activity, the therapeutic protein remains structurally intact and functional.

  14. In vitro assessment of choline dihydrogen phosphate (CDHP) as a vehicle for recombinant human interleukin-2 (rhIL-2)

    PubMed Central

    Foureau, David M.; Vrikkis, Regina M.; Jones, Chase P.; Weaver, Katherine D.; MacFarlane, Douglas R.; Salo, Jonathan C.; McKillop, Iain H.; Elliott, Gloria D.

    2013-01-01

    Choline dihydrogen phosphate (CDHP) is an ionic liquid reported to increase thermal stability of model proteins. The current work investigated CDHP effect on structural integrity and biological activity of recombinant human interleukin-2 (rhIL-2), a therapeutic protein used for treating advanced melanoma. In vitro CDHP biocompatibility was also evaluated using primary cell cultures, or B16-F10 cell line, chronically exposed to the ionic liquid. Formulation of rhIL-2 in an aqueous 680mM CDHP pH 7.4 solution resulted in a 12.5°C increase in the Tm of rhIL-2 compared to a basic buffer formulation, and provided conformational rhIL-2 stabilization when the solution was heated to 23.3°C above the Tm. CDHP solutions (≤80mM), exhibited no cytotoxic activity toward primary splenocytes or B16-F10 cells in culture. However, a 10-fold loss in biological activity was observed when rhIL-2 was used in a 30mM CDHP aqueous solution with NaHCO3 (pH≥7.2) compared to controls without CDHP. While increased Tm is associated with a diminished rhIL-2 biological activity, the therapeutic protein remains structurally intact and functional. PMID:24504148

  15. Melanocortin MC₄ receptor expression sites and local function.

    PubMed

    Siljee-Wong, Jacqueline E

    2011-06-11

    The melanocortin MC(4) receptor plays an important role in energy metabolism, but also affects blood pressure, heart rate and erectile function. Localization of the receptors that fulfill these distinct roles is only partially known. Mapping of the melanocortin MC(4) receptor has been stymied by the absence of a functional antibody. Several groups have examined mRNA expression of the melanocortin MC(4) receptor in the rodent brain and transgenic approaches have also been utilized to visualize melanocortin MC(4) receptor expression sites within the brain. Ligand expression and binding studies have provided additional information on the areas of the brain where this elusive receptor is functionally expressed. Finally, microinjection of melanocortin MC(4) receptor ligands in specific nuclei has further served to elucidate the function of melanocortin MC(4) receptors in these nuclei. These combined approaches have helped link the anatomy and function of this receptor, such as the role of paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus melanocortin MC(4) receptor in the regulation of food intake. Intriguingly, however, numerous expression-sites have been identified that have not been linked to a specific receptor function such as those along the optic tract and olfactory tubercle. Further research is needed to clarify the function of the melanocortin MC(4) receptor at these sites.

  16. A New IL-2RG Gene Mutation in an X-linked SCID Identified through TREC/KREC Screening: a Case Report.

    PubMed

    Nourizadeh, Maryam; Borte, Stephan; Fazlollahi, Mohammad Reza; Hammarström, Lennart; Pourpak, Zahra

    2015-08-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) represents a rare group of primary immunodeficiency disorders (PIDs), with known or unknown genetic alterations. Here, we report a new interleukin 2 receptor, gamma chain (IL-2RG) mutation in an Iranian SCID newborn. The patient was a 6-day old boy with a family history of PID. The child was screened using a molecular-based analysis for the assessment of T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) and kappa-deleting recombination excision circles (KRECs). Moreover, a complete immunological evaluation and gene sequencing was performed. Results showed undetectable TREC but a high level of KREC copy numbers. Flow cytometric data indicated low numbers of T and NK cells, but elevated number of B cells. A novel substitution in IL2RG: c.675 C>A, leading to p.225 Ser>Arg was found. Based on the functional analysis, the mutation is predicted to be damaging. The patient was diagnosed as a T B+ NK X-linked SCID.

  17. TARP redundancy is critical for maintaining AMPA receptor function.

    PubMed

    Menuz, Karen; O'Brien, Jessica L; Karmizadegan, Siavash; Bredt, David S; Nicoll, Roger A

    2008-08-27

    Transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) are AMPA receptor auxiliary subunits that influence diverse aspects of receptor function. However, the full complement of physiological roles for TARPs in vivo remains poorly understood. Here we find that double knock-out mice lacking TARPs gamma-2 and gamma-3 are profoundly ataxic and fail to thrive. We demonstrate that these TARPs are critical for the synaptic targeting and kinetics of AMPA receptors in cerebellar Golgi cells, but that either alone is sufficient to fully preserve function. By analyzing the few remaining synaptic AMPA receptors in the gamma-2, gamma-3 double knock-out mice, we unexpectedly find that these TARPs specify AMPA receptor subunit composition. This study establishes a new role for TARPs in regulating AMPA receptor assembly and suggests that TARPs are necessary for proper AMPA receptor localization and function in most, if not all, neurons of the CNS.

  18. Antioxidant Functions of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a transcription factor belonging to the basic helix-loop-helix/PER-ARNT-SIM family. It is activated by a variety of ligands, such as environmental contaminants like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or dioxins, but also by naturally occurring compounds and endogenous ligands. Binding of the ligand leads to dimerization of the AhR with aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) and transcriptional activation of several xenobiotic phase I and phase II metabolizing enzymes. It is generally accepted that the toxic responses of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, dioxins, and structurally related compounds are mediated by activation of the AhR. A multitude of studies indicate that the AhR operates beyond xenobiotic metabolism and exerts pleiotropic functions. Increasing evidence points to a protective role of the AhR against carcinogenesis and oxidative stress. Herein, I will highlight data demonstrating a causal role of the AhR in the antioxidant response and present novel findings on potential AhR-mediated antioxidative mechanisms. PMID:27829840

  19. Receptor expression is essential for proliferation induced by dimerized Jak kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Hodaka

    2008-06-13

    Two members of Jak kinases, Jak1 and Jak3, are associated with the cytoplasmic domains of the interleukin-2 (IL-2) receptor (IL-2R) {beta} chain (IL-2R{beta}) and the common cytokine receptor {gamma} chain ({gamma}c), respectively, and accumulating evidence indicates their functional importance in IL-2 signaling. Here, I showed that coumermycin-induced chemical heterodimerization of Jak1 and Jak3 but not homodimerization of Jak1 or Jak3 induces cell proliferation of an IL-2R-reconstituted cell line. In this regard, expression of IL-2R{beta} was essential for cell proliferation by chemical heterodimerization of Jak1 and Jak3, indicating that dimerized Jak1 and Jak3 induce heterodimerization of IL-2R{beta} and {gamma}c, which may activate receptor-bound signaling molecules. Previous reports using chemical dimerization suggest that dimerization of Jak kinases is sufficient to induce cell proliferation. The present study indicates that re-evaluation of this conclusion is necessary and that interpretation of functional analysis of signaling molecules using chemical dimerizers needs more careful assessment.

  20. Novel lysophosphoplipid receptors: their structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Makide, Kumiko; Uwamizu, Akiharu; Shinjo, Yuji; Ishiguro, Jun; Okutani, Michiyo; Inoue, Asuka; Aoki, Junken

    2014-01-01

    It is now accepted that lysophospholipids (LysoGPs) have a wide variety of functions as lipid mediators that are exerted through G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) specific to each lysophospholipid. While the roles of some LysoGPs, such as lysophosphatidic acid and sphingosine 1-phosphate, have been thoroughly examined, little is known about the roles of several other LysoGPs, such as lysophosphatidylserine (LysoPS), lysophosphatidylthreonine, lysophosphatidylethanolamine, lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI), and lysophosphatidylglycerol. Recently, a GPCR was found for LPI (GPR55) and three GPCRs (GPR34/LPS1, P2Y10/LPS2, and GPR174/LPS3) were found for LysoPS. In this review, we focus on these newly identified GPCRs and summarize the actions of LysoPS and LPI as lipid mediators. PMID:24891334

  1. 3'-functionalized adamantyl cannabinoid receptor probes.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Go; Tius, Marcus A; Zhou, Han; Nikas, Spyros P; Halikhedkar, Aneetha; Mallipeddi, Srikrishnan; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2015-04-09

    The aliphatic side chain plays a pivotal role in determining the cannabinergic potency of tricyclic classical cannabinoids, and we have previously shown that this chain could be substituted successfully by adamantyl or other polycyclic groups. In an effort to explore the pharmacophoric features of these conformationally fixed groups, we have synthesized a series of analogues in which the C3 position is substituted directly with an adamantyl group bearing functionality at one of the tertiary carbon atoms. These substituents included the electrophilic isothiocyanate and photoactivatable azido groups, both of which are capable of covalent attachment with the target protein. Our results show that substitution at the 3'-adamantyl position can lead to ligands with improved affinities and CB1/CB2 selectivities. Our work has also led to the development of two successful covalent probes with high affinities for both cannabinoid receptors, namely, the electrophilic isothiocyanate AM994 and the photoactivatable aliphatic azido AM993 analogues.

  2. Monocyte surface-bound IL-15 can function as an activating receptor and participate in reverse signaling.

    PubMed

    Neely, Graham G; Epelman, Slava; Ma, Ling Ling; Colarusso, Pina; Howlett, Christopher J; Amankwah, Ernest K; McIntyre, Amanda C; Robbins, Stephen M; Mody, Christopher H

    2004-04-01

    IL-15 is a short chain, four-alpha helix cytokine that shares some biological function with IL-2. One striking difference between IL-2 and IL-15 is the ability of monocytes to express IL-15 on their cell surface after activation. In the current study we have investigated the ability of human monocyte cell surface IL-15 to participate in reverse signaling. Cross-linking anti-IL-15 Abs were used as a surrogate ligand for surface IL-15 engagement. Ligation of cell surface-expressed IL-15 induced monocyte adhesion that required the activity of small m.w. GTPases. Reverse signals through surface IL-15 activated the Rho-GTPase Rac3. In addition, engagement of cell surface IL-15 was found to activate a number of signaling pathways, including both extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38, and resulted in the secretion of IL-8. IL-8 production required mitogen-activated protein kinase activity. Thus, the current study has established that cell surface IL-15 is more than just a ligand; it can function as a receptor and participate in reverse signaling that results in cellular adhesion and production of inflammatory cytokines.

  3. Function of Estrogen Receptor Tryosine Phosphorylation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-07-01

    localization of the receptors, ligand binding, DNA binding, transcriptional activation, and receptor turnover ( LeGoff et al. 1994; Lahooti et al. 1994...1040-1049 (1995). LeGoff P., M.M. Montano, D.J. Schodin, and B. Katzenellenbogen. Phosphorylation of the Human Estrogen Receptor. J. Biol. Chem

  4. Evaluation of an Albumin-Binding Domain Protein Fused to Recombinant Human IL-2 and Its Effects on the Bioactivity and Serum Half-Life of the Cytokine

    PubMed Central

    Adabi, Elham; Saebi, Fateme; Hasan-Abad, Amin Moradi; Teimoori-Toolabi, Ladan; Kardar, Gholam Ali

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cancer immunotherapy is a promising strategy for cancer treatment. In this strategy, the immune system is triggered to destroy cancer cells. IL-2 is an important factor in passive cancer immunotherapy that helps modulating some important immune functions. One of the IL-2 limitations is low serum half-life; therefore, repetitive high doses of the injections are required to maintain effective concentrations. High-dose IL-2 therapy results in severe side effects; thus, improvement of its serum half-life would provide therapeutic benefits. Methods: We have investigated a strategy that is able to utilize an albumin-binding domain (ABD) from streptococcal protein G. In this strategy, the fusion protein ABD-rIL-2 binds to serum albumin, which results in improvement of the IL-2 serum half-life. PET26b+ plasmid was used as an expression vector, which encoded rIL-2 and ABD-rIL-2, both fused to pelB secretion signal under the control of the strong bacteriophage T7 promoter. The constructs were expressed in E. coli Rosetta (DE3), and the recombinant proteins were purified from periplasmic fractions. Results: The analysis of in vitro bioactivity proved that the fusion of ABD to rIL-2 does not interfere with its bioactivity. ABD-rIL-2 fusion protein indicated higher serum half-life compared to rIL-2, when it was tested in the BALB/c mice. Conclusion: The current study provides an alternative strategy to extend the half-life and improve pharmacokinetic properties of rIL-2 without reducing its bioactivity in vitro. PMID:27805072

  5. GABAB receptor modulation of synaptic function

    PubMed Central

    Chalifoux, Jason R.; Carter, Adam G.

    2011-01-01

    Neuromodulators have complex effects on both the presynaptic release and postsynaptic detection of neurotransmitters. Here we describe recent advances in our understanding of synaptic modulation by metabotropic GABAB receptors. By inhibiting multivesicular release from the presynaptic terminal, these receptors decrease the synaptic glutamate signal. GABAB receptors also inhibit the Ca2+ permeability of NMDA receptors to decrease Ca2+ signals in postsynaptic spines. These new findings highlight the importance of GABAB receptors in regulating many aspects of synaptic transmission. They also point to novel questions about the spatiotemporal dynamics and sources of synaptic modulation in the brain. PMID:21376567

  6. Functional selectivity of dopamine D1 receptor agonists in regulating the fate of internalized receptors *

    PubMed Central

    Ryman-Rasmussen, Jessica P.; Griffith, Adam; Oloff, Scott; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Brown, Justin T.; Goddard, William A.; Mailman, Richard B.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that D1 agonists can cause functionally selective effects when the endpoints of receptor internalization and adenylate cyclase activation are compared. The present study was designed to probe the phenomenon of functional selectivity at the D1 receptor further by testing the hypothesis that structurally dissimilar agonists with efficacies at these endpoints that equal or exceed those of dopamine would differ in ability to influence receptor fate after internalization, a functional endpoint largely unexplored for the D1 receptor. We selected two novel agonists of therapeutic interest that meet these criteria (the isochroman A-77636, and the isoquinoline dinapsoline), and compared the fates of the D1 receptor after internalization in response to these two compounds with that of dopamine. We found that dopamine caused the receptor to be rapidly recycled to the cell surface within 1 h of removal. Conversely, A-77636 caused the receptor to be retained intracellularly up to 48 h after agonist removal. Most surprisingly, the D1 receptor recovered to the cell surface 48 h after removal of dinapsoline. Taken together, these data indicate that these agonists target the D1 receptor to different intracellular trafficking pathways, demonstrating that the phenomenon of functional selectivity at the D1 receptor is operative for cellular events that are temporally downstream of immediate receptor activation. We hypothesize that these differential effects result from interactions of the synthetic ligands with aspects of the D1 receptor that are distal from the ligand binding domain. PMID:17067639

  7. Group I Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Interacting Proteins: Fine-Tuning Receptor Functions in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kalinowska, Magdalena; Francesconi, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors mediate slow excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system and are critical to activity-dependent synaptic plasticity, a cellular substrate of learning and memory. Dysregulated receptor signaling is implicated in neuropsychiatric conditions ranging from neurodevelopmental to neurodegenerative disorders. Importantly, group I metabotropic glutamate receptor signaling functions can be modulated by interacting proteins that mediate receptor trafficking, expression and coupling efficiency to signaling effectors. These interactions afford cell- or pathway-specific modulation to fine-tune receptor function, thus representing a potential target for pharmacological interventions in pathological conditions. PMID:27296642

  8. A second trigeminal CGRP receptor: function and expression of the AMY1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Christopher S; Eftekhari, Sajedeh; Bower, Rebekah L; Wilderman, Andrea; Insel, Paul A; Edvinsson, Lars; Waldvogel, Henry J; Jamaluddin, Muhammad A; Russo, Andrew F; Hay, Debbie L

    2015-01-01

    Objective The trigeminovascular system plays a central role in migraine, a condition in need of new treatments. The neuropeptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), is proposed as causative in migraine and is the subject of intensive drug discovery efforts. This study explores the expression and functionality of two CGRP receptor candidates in the sensory trigeminal system. Methods Receptor expression was determined using Taqman G protein-coupled receptor arrays and immunohistochemistry in trigeminal ganglia (TG) and the spinal trigeminal complex of the brainstem in rat and human. Receptor pharmacology was quantified using sensitive signaling assays in primary rat TG neurons. Results mRNA and histological expression analysis in rat and human samples revealed the presence of two CGRP-responsive receptors (AMY1: calcitonin receptor/receptor activity-modifying protein 1 [RAMP1]) and the CGRP receptor (calcitonin receptor-like receptor/RAMP1). In support of this finding, quantification of agonist and antagonist potencies revealed a dual population of functional CGRP-responsive receptors in primary rat TG neurons. Interpretation The unexpected presence of a functional non-canonical CGRP receptor (AMY1) at neural sites important for craniofacial pain has important implications for targeting the CGRP axis in migraine. PMID:26125036

  9. Angiotensin Receptors: Structure, Function, Signaling and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Khuraijam Dhanachandra; Karnik, Sadashiva S

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensinogen – a serpin family protein predominantly produced by the liver is systematically processed by proteases of the Renin Angiotensin system (RAS) generating hormone peptides. Specific cell surface receptors for at least three distinct angiotensin peptides produce distinct cellular signals that regulate system-wide physiological response to RAS. Two well characterized receptors are angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1 receptor) and type 2 receptor (AT2 receptor). They respond to the octapeptide hormone angiotensin II. The oncogene product MAS is a putative receptor for Ang (1–7). While these are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), the in vivo angiotensin IV binding sites may be type 2 transmembrane proteins. These four receptors together regulate cardiovascular, hemodynamic, neurological, renal, and endothelial functions; as well as cell proliferation, survival, matrix-cell interactions and inflammation. Angiotensin receptors are important therapeutic targets for several diseases. Thus, researchers and pharmaceutical companies are focusing on drugs targeting AT1 receptor than AT2 receptor, MAS and AngIV binding sites. AT1 receptor blockers are the cornerstone of current treatment for hypertension, heart failure, renal failure and many types of vascular diseases including atherosclerosis, aortic aneurism and Marfan syndrome. PMID:27512731

  10. Functional reconstitution of Drosophila melanogaster NMJ glutamate receptors

    DOE PAGES

    Han, Tae Hee; Dharkar, Poorva; Mayer, Mark L.; ...

    2015-04-27

    The Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ), at which glutamate acts as the excitatory neurotransmitter, is a widely used model for genetic analysis of synapse function and development. Despite decades of study, the inability to reconstitute NMJ glutamate receptor function using heterologous expression systems has complicated the analysis of receptor function, such that it is difficult to resolve the molecular basis for compound phenotypes observed in mutant flies. In this paper, we find that Drosophila Neto functions as an essential component required for the function of NMJ glutamate receptors, permitting analysis of glutamate receptor responses in Xenopus oocytes. Finally, in combinationmore » with a crystallographic analysis of the GluRIIB ligand binding domain, we use this system to characterize the subunit dependence of assembly, channel block, and ligand selectivity for Drosophila NMJ glutamate receptors.« less

  11. Sigma-1 receptors modulate functional activity of rat splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Whitlock, B B; Pultz, J A; Wolfe, S A

    1995-06-01

    Neuroleptics, opiates, and cocaine are commonly prescribed for or abused by humans. Although primarily used for their actions at other receptors in brain, these compounds also act at sigma receptors. We have previously identified sigma-1 receptors on human peripheral blood leukocytes and rat spleen, and in the present study we demonstrate a correlation between the pharmacology of these receptors and the ability of drugs to suppress concanavalin A-induced splenocyte proliferation. These results support the hypothesis that sigma-1 receptors regulate functional activities of immune cells, and suggest that sigma agonists may cause changes in immune competence in vivo.

  12. NMDA Receptor Function During Senescence: Implication on Cognitive Performance

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, a family of L-glutamate receptors, play an important role in learning and memory, and are critical for spatial memory. These receptors are tetrameric ion channels composed of a family of related subunits. One of the hallmarks of the aging human population is a decline in cognitive function; studies in the past couple of years have demonstrated deterioration in NMDA receptor subunit expression and function with advancing age. However, a direct relationship between impaired memory function and a decline in NMDA receptors is still ambiguous. Recent studies indicate a link between an age-associated NMDA receptor hypofunction and memory impairment and provide evidence that age-associated enhanced oxidative stress might be contributing to the alterations associated with senescence. However, clear evidence is still deficient in demonstrating the underlying mechanisms and a relationship between age-associated impaired cognitive faculties and NMDA receptor hypofunction. The current review intends to present an overview of the research findings regarding changes in expression of various NMDA receptor subunits and deficits in NMDA receptor function during senescence and its implication in age-associated impaired hippocampal-dependent memory function. PMID:26732087

  13. Polymorphic variants of the IL2RA gene and susceptibility to type 1 diabetes in the Polish population.

    PubMed

    Fichna, M; Zurawek, M; Fichna, P; Januszkiewicz, D; Nowak, J

    2012-03-01

    Polymorphic variants of the IL2RA gene, which encodes high-affinity alpha subunit (CD25) of the interleukin-2 receptor, were recently found to affect the risk of several autoimmune disorders. This study was aimed to investigate the association of selected IL2RA polymorphisms (rs11594656, rs3118470, rs2104286 and rs7093069) with type 1 diabetes (T1D) in a Polish cohort comprising 445 patients and 671 healthy control subjects. The minor A allele at rs11594656 was found significantly less frequently among T1D subjects, compared with the control group [P = 0.011; odds ratio (OR) = 0.77; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.629-0.942]. In contrast, the minor C allele at rs3118470 appeared to be significantly associated with the occurrence of T1D (P = 0.003; OR = 1.30; 95% CI = 1.094-1.550). Two other IL2RA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) did not show significant differences among investigated groups. In conclusion, the study confirms the association of the IL2RA locus with T1D in the Polish population.

  14. Transferrin receptor function in hereditary hemochromatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, J.H.; Kushner, J.P.; Ray, F.A.; Kaplan, J.

    1984-02-01

    The binding of /sup 125/I-diferric transferrin to cultured skin fibroblasts and phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes was studied in cells derived from individuals homozygous for hereditary hemochromatosis and from normal individuals. Receptors with a high affinity for diferric transferrin were present on all cells. Transferrin receptor number decreased by more than 50% when fibroblasts from both normal and hemochromatotic subjects were maintained in iron-supplemented medium. The number of transferrin receptors expressed by normal and hemochromatotic lymphocytes after mitogen stimulation in iron-supplemented media was less than 50% that of lymphocytes which were mitogen stimulated in standard medium. No change in the affinity of the receptors of diferric transferrin was seen in cells maintained in iron-supplemented medium. Competition experiments in the presence of deferoxamine suggested that the transferrin receptors of fibroblasts and mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes have a 70- to 100-fold higher affinity for diferric transferrin than for apotransferrin. No differences in the properties of transferrin receptors were found between patients with hereditary hemochromatosis and normal individuals. Although transferrin binding decreases when cells are exposed to high levels of iron in the medium, the failure to totally abolish transferrin binding to the receptor suggests that the concentration of diferric transferrin to which cells are exposed may be a major determinant of cellular iron loading in hereditary hemochromatosis.

  15. Herbal Compound “Jiedu Huayu” Reduces Liver Injury in Rats via Regulation of IL-2, TLR4, and PCNA Expression Levels

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Qinglan; Zhang, Rongzhen; Qiu, Hua

    2017-01-01

    Aim of the Study. To investigate the preventative effects of Jiedu Huayu (JDHY) on D-galactosamine (D-GalN) and lipopolysaccharide-induced acute liver failure (ALF) and to evaluate the possible mechanisms of action. Materials and Methods. ALF was induced in Wistar rats by administrating D-GalN (900 mg/kg) and lipopolysaccharide (10 μg/kg). After treatment with JDHY granules, the levels of blood alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, total bilirubin, and prothrombin time were determined. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen was detected by immunohistochemistry staining. The expression of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) was examined by fluorescence quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blot. Results. JDHY treatment dramatically improved liver function and increased survival rates in an ALF model in rats. We observed a decrease in IL-2 and TLR4 expression following treatment with JDHY in liver cells from ALF rats using qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Conclusion. We hypothesize that the therapeutic potential of JDHY for treating ALF is due to its modulatory effect on the suppression of inflammation and by promoting hepatocyte regeneration. Our results contribute towards validation of the traditional use of JDHY in the treatment of liver disease. PMID:28197212

  16. Emerging structural insights into the function of ionotropic glutamate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Karakas, Erkan; Regan, Michael C.; Furukawa, Hiro

    2015-01-01

    Summary Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) are ligand-gated ion channels that mediate excitatory neurotransmission crucial for brain development and function including learning and memory formation. Recently a wealth of structural studies on iGluRs, including AMPA receptors (AMPARs), kainate receptors, and NMDA receptors (NMDARs) became available.. These studies showed structures of non-NMDARs including AMPAR and kainate receptor in various functional states, thereby providing the first visual sense of how non-NMDAR iGluRs may function in the context of homotetramers. Furthermore, they provided the first view of heterotetrameric NMDAR ion channels, which illuminated the similarities with and differences from non-NMDARs, thus raising a mechanistic distinction between the two groups of iGluRs. Here we review mechanistic insights into iGluR functions gained through structural studies of multiple groups. PMID:25941168

  17. Functional properties of five Dictyostelium discoideum P2X receptors.

    PubMed

    Baines, Abigail; Parkinson, Katie; Sim, Joan A; Bragg, Laricia; Thompson, Christopher R L; North, R Alan

    2013-07-19

    The Dictyostelium discoideum genome encodes five proteins that share weak sequence similarity with vertebrate P2X receptors. Unlike vertebrate P2X receptors, these proteins are not expressed on the surface of cells, but populate the tubules and bladders of the contractile vacuole. In this study, we expressed humanized cDNAs of P2XA, P2XB, P2XC, P2XD, and P2XE in human embryonic kidney cells and altered the ionic and proton environment in an attempt to reflect the situation in amoeba. Recording of whole-cell membrane currents showed that four receptors operated as ATP-gated channels (P2XA, P2XB, P2XD, and P2XE). At P2XA receptors, ATP was the only effective agonist of 17 structurally related putative ligands that were tested. Extracellular sodium, compared with potassium, strongly inhibited ATP responses in P2XB, P2XD, and P2XE receptors. Increasing the proton concentration (pH 6.2) accelerated desensitization at P2XA receptors and decreased currents at P2XD receptors, but increased the currents at P2XB and P2XE receptors. Dictyostelium lacking P2XA receptors showed impaired regulatory volume decrease in hypotonic solution. This phenotype was readily rescued by overexpression of P2XA and P2XD receptors, partially rescued by P2XB and P2XE receptors, and not rescued by P2XC receptors. The failure of the nonfunctional receptor P2XC to restore the regulatory volume decrease highlights the importance of ATP activation of P2X receptors for a normal response to hypo-osmotic shock, and the weak rescue by P2XB and P2XE receptors indicates that there is limited functional redundancy among Dictyostelium P2X receptors.

  18. IL-2 enhances cervical cancer cells proliferation and JAK3/STAT5 phosphorylation at low doses, while at high doses IL-2 has opposite effects.

    PubMed

    Valle-Mendiola, Arturo; Weiss-Steider, Benny; Rocha-Zavaleta, Leticia; Soto-Cruz, Isabel

    2014-05-01

    The IL-2R signaling is critical for normal lymphocyte proliferation. However, the role of the IL-2 signaling in cervical cancer is not yet fully understood. We show that in IL-2R-expressing cervical cancer cells, JAK1 molecules are not phosphorylated. At low doses of IL-2, the constitutive phosphorylation of JAK3 and STAT5 increases in the tumor cells and decreases in lymphocytes, whereas the opposite occurs at high doses of IL-2. Using AG-490, the activation of JAK3 and the proliferation of cervical cancer cells were inhibited. We describe differences in the response of molecules downstream the IL-2R in lymphocytes and tumor cells.

  19. Adenosine A1 receptor: Functional receptor-receptor interactions in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Sichardt, Kathrin

    2007-01-01

    Over the past decade, many lines of investigation have shown that receptor-mediated signaling exhibits greater diversity than previously appreciated. Signal diversity arises from numerous factors, which include the formation of receptor dimers and interplay between different receptors. Using adenosine A1 receptors as a paradigm of G protein-coupled receptors, this review focuses on how receptor-receptor interactions may contribute to regulation of the synaptic transmission within the central nervous system. The interactions with metabotropic dopamine, adenosine A2A, A3, neuropeptide Y, and purinergic P2Y1 receptors will be described in the first part. The second part deals with interactions between A1Rs and ionotropic receptors, especially GABAA, NMDA, and P2X receptors as well as ATP-sensitive K+ channels. Finally, the review will discuss new approaches towards treating neurological disorders. PMID:18404442

  20. Modulation of lipoprotein receptor functions by intracellular adaptor proteins.

    PubMed

    Stolt, Peggy C; Bock, Hans H

    2006-10-01

    Members of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene family are critically involved in a wide range of physiological processes including lipid and vitamin homeostasis, cellular migration, neurodevelopment, and synaptic plasticity, to name a few. Lipoprotein receptors exert these diverse biological functions by acting as cellular uptake receptors or by inducing intracellular signaling cascades. It was discovered that a short sequence in the intracellular region of all lipoprotein receptors, Asn-Pro-X-Tyr (NPXY) is important for mediating either endocytosis or signal transduction events, and that this motif serves as a binding site for phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain containing scaffold proteins. These molecular adaptors connect the transmembrane receptors with the endocytosis machinery and regulate cellular trafficking, or function as assembly sites for dynamic multi-protein signaling complexes. Whereas the LDL receptor represents the archetype of an endocytic lipoprotein receptor, the structurally closely related apolipoprotein E receptor 2 (apoER2) and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) receptor activate a kinase-dependent intracellular signaling cascade after binding to the neuronal signaling molecule Reelin. This review focuses on two related PTB domain containing adaptor proteins that mediate these divergent lipoprotein receptor responses, ARH (autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia protein) and Dab1 (disabled-1), and discusses the structural and molecular basis of this different behaviour.

  1. Human T lymphocytes express N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors functionally active in controlling T cell activation

    SciTech Connect

    Miglio, Gianluca; Varsaldi, Federica; Lombardi, Grazia . E-mail: lombardi@pharm.unipmn.it

    2005-12-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate the expression and the functional role of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in human T cells. RT-PCR analysis showed that human resting peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and Jurkat T cells express genes encoding for both NR1 and NR2B subunits: phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-activated PBL also expresses both these genes and the NR2A and NR2D genes. Cytofluorimetric analysis showed that NR1 expression increases as a consequence of PHA (10 {mu}g/ml) treatment. D-(-)-2-Amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (D-AP5), and (+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine [(+)-MK 801], competitive and non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonists, respectively, inhibited PHA-induced T cell proliferation, whereas they did not affect IL-2 (10 U/ml)-induced proliferation of PHA blasts. These effects were due to the prevention of T cell activation (inhibition of cell aggregate formation and CD25 expression), but not to cell cycle arrest or death. These results demonstrate that human T lymphocytes express NMDA receptors, which are functionally active in controlling cell activation.

  2. Discoidin domain receptor functions in physiological and pathological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Leitinger, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    The discoidin domain receptors, DDR1 and DDR2, are non-integrin collagen receptors that are members of the receptor tyrosine kinase family. Both DDRs bind a number of different collagen types and play important roles in embryo development. Dysregulated DDR function is associated with progression of various human diseases, including fibrosis, arthritis and cancer. By interacting with key components of the extracellular matrix and displaying distinct activation kinetics, the DDRs form a unique subfamily of receptor tyrosine kinases. DDR-facilitated cellular functions include cell migration, cell survival, proliferation and differentiation, as well as remodelling of extracellular matrices. This review summarises the current knowledge of DDR-ligand interactions, DDR-initiated signal pathways and the molecular mechanisms that regulate receptor function. Also discussed are the roles of DDRs in development and disease progression. PMID:24725424

  3. Transduction of human dendritic cells with a recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara virus encoding MUC1 and IL-2.

    PubMed

    Trevor, K T; Hersh, E M; Brailey, J; Balloul, J M; Acres, B

    2001-10-01

    The epithelial mucin MUC1 is considered an opportune target antigen for cancer immunotherapy, as it is over-expressed and exhibits aberrant glycosylation in malignant cells. Because dendritic cells (DC) are powerful initiators of immune responses, efforts have focused on tumor antigen-bearing DC as potent cancer vaccines. In this study we have characterized the transduction of monocyte-derived DC with a highly attenuated vaccinia virus vector [modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA)] encoding human MUC1 and the immunostimulatory cytokine IL-2. Analysis of transduced DC cultures generated from a number of donors revealed MUC1 expression in the range of 27-54% of the cells and a co-regulated secretion of bioactive IL-2. As shown by FACS analysis with MUCI-specific antibodies, the MVA-MUC1/IL-2-transduced DC predominantly expressed the fully processed glycoform of MUC1, typical of that displayed by normal epithelia. Over a 3-day period after transduction, transgene expression declined concurrent with an increase in MVA-induced cytopathic effects. The transduced DC stimulated allogeneic lymphocyte proliferation, indicating that DC immunostimulatory function is not impaired by vector transduction. In the presence of IL-2, MVA-transduced DC were able to enhance autologous lymphocyte proliferation. Also, vector expression was analyzed in DC cultures treated with TNF-alpha, a known DC maturation factor. As indicated by the up-regulation of several DC maturation markers, neither virus infection nor transgene expression influenced the maturation capacity of the cells. The MVA-MUC1/IL-2 vector effectively transduced both immature and TNF-alpha-matured DC. Overall, our results are encouraging for the clinical application of MVA-MUC1/IL-2-transduced DC.

  4. PET neuroimaging of extrastriatal dopamine receptors and prefrontal cortex functions.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hidehiko

    2013-12-01

    The role of prefrontal dopamine D1 receptors in prefrontal cortex (PFC) functions, including working memory, is widely investigated. However, human (healthy volunteers and schizophrenia patients) positron emission tomography (PET) studies about the relationship between prefrontal D1 receptors and PFC functions are somewhat inconsistent. We argued that several factors including an inverted U-shaped relationship between prefrontal D1 receptors and PFC functions might be responsible for these inconsistencies. In contrast to D1 receptors, relatively less attention has been paid to the role of D2 receptors in PFC functions. Several animal and human pharmacological studies have reported that the systemic administration of D2 receptor agonist/antagonist modulates PFC functions, although those studies do not tell us which region(s) is responsible for the effect. Furthermore, while prefrontal D1 receptors are primarily involved in working memory, other PFC functions such as set-shifting seem to be differentially modulated by dopamine. PET studies of extrastriatal D2 receptors including ours suggested that orchestration of prefrontal dopamine transmission and hippocampal dopamine transmission might be necessary for a broad range of normal PFC functions. In order to understand the complex effects of dopamine signaling on PFC functions, measuring a single index related to basic dopamine tone is not sufficient. For a better understanding of the meanings of PET indices related to neurotransmitters, comprehensive information (presynaptic, postsynaptic, and beyond receptor signaling) will be required. Still, an interdisciplinary approach combining molecular imaging techniques with cognitive neuroscience and clinical psychiatry will provide new perspectives for understanding the neurobiology of neuropsychiatric disorders and their innovative drug developments.

  5. Limitations of IL-2 and rapamycin in immunotherapy of type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Baeyens, Audrey; Pérol, Louis; Fourcade, Gwladys; Cagnard, Nicolas; Carpentier, Wassila; Woytschak, Janine; Boyman, Onur; Hartemann, Agnès; Piaggio, Eliane

    2013-09-01

    Administration of low-dose interleukin-2 (IL-2) alone or combined with rapamycin (RAPA) prevents hyperglycemia in NOD mice. Also, low-dose IL-2 cures recent-onset type 1 diabetes (T1D) in NOD mice, partially by boosting pancreatic regulatory T cells (Treg cells). These approaches are currently being evaluated in humans. Our objective was to study the effect of higher IL-2 doses (250,000-500,000 IU daily) as well as low-dose IL-2 (25,000 IU daily) and RAPA (1 mg/kg daily) (RAPA/IL-2) combination. We show that, despite further boosting of Treg cells, high doses of IL-2 rapidly precipitated T1D in prediabetic female and male mice and increased myeloid cells in the pancreas. Also, we observed that RAPA counteracted IL-2 effects on Treg cells, failed to control IL-2-boosted NK cells, and broke IL-2-induced tolerance in a reversible way. Notably, the RAPA/IL-2 combination failure to cure T1D was associated with an unexpected deleterious effect on glucose homeostasis at multiple levels, including β-cell division, glucose tolerance, and liver glucose metabolism. Our data help to understand the therapeutic limitations of IL-2 alone or RAPA/IL-2 combination and could lead to the design of improved therapies for T1D.

  6. Increased serum IL-2R levels in coeliac disease are related to CD4 but not CD8 antigens.

    PubMed

    Blanco, A; Garrote, J A; Arranz, E; Alonso, M; Clavo, C

    1992-11-01

    Forty-three coeliac children, ranging from 1 year and 3 months to 14 years and 9 months, were studied. Twenty-eight patients were in an active phase of the disease, and 15 were in remission. The criteria of coeliac disease (CD) activity were established according to the results of IgA anti-endomysial antibodies (IgA-AEm). Interleukin 2 receptor (IL-2R) and CD4 and CD8 antigens were measured in serum samples by an ELISA technique using two noncompetitive monoclonal antibodies. Antigliadin antibodies of IgG (IgG-AGA) and IgA (IgA-AGA) classes were also measured. The AEm-positive coeliac patient group showed values of 1,860 +/- 948 U/ml for IL-2R, 430 +/- 228 U/ml for CD8, and 36.8 +/- 25.1 U/ml for CD4. AEm-negative patients showed values of 980 +/- 436 U/ml, 350 +/- 243 U/ml, and 24.1 +/- 20 U/ml, respectively. IL-2R levels were the only ones significantly elevated (p < 0.005) in the active coeliac group. On the other hand, IgG-AGA and IgA-AGA were both clearly increased (p < 0.001). IL-2R levels in active coeliac patients correlated with CD4 levels (p < 0.05), but not with CD8, IgG-AGA, and IgA-AGA levels. We also found a surprising negative correlation between AEm antibodies of IgA2 class with both IL-2R (r = 0.471; p < 0.05) and CD8 (r = 0.616; p < 0.05). The results show that in CD there is a lymphocyte activation affecting mainly CD4+ cells and not correlated with serum AGA levels, suggesting an independence of both immunological phenomena and probably with different locations of origin.

  7. IL2RA/CD25 Gene Polymorphisms: Uneven Association with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and Type 1 Diabetes (T1D)

    PubMed Central

    Alcina, Antonio; Fedetz, María; Ndagire, Dorothy; Fernández, Oscar; Leyva, Laura; Guerrero, Miguel; Abad-Grau, María M.; Arnal, Carmen; Delgado, Concepción; Lucas, Miguel; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Matesanz, Fuencisla

    2009-01-01

    Background IL-2 receptor (IL2R) alpha is the specific component of the high affinity IL2R system involved in the immune response and in the control of autoimmunity. Methods and Results Here we perform a replication and fine mapping of the IL2RA gene region analyzing 3 SNPs previously associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) and 5 SNPs associated with type 1 diabetes (T1D) in a collection of 798 MS patients and 927 matched Caucasian controls from the south of Spain. We observed association with MS in 6 of 8 SNPs. The rs1570538, at the 3′- UTR extreme of the gene, previously reported to have a weak association with MS, is replicated here (P = 0.032). The most associated T1D SNP (rs41295061) was not associated with MS in the present study. However, the rs35285258, belonging to another independent group of SNPs associated with T1D, showed the maximal association in this study but different risk allele. We replicated the association of only one (rs2104286) of the two IL2RA SNPs identified in the recently performed genome-wide association study of MS. Conclusions These findings confirm and extend the association of this gene with MS and reveal a genetic heterogeneity of the associated polymorphisms and risk alleles between MS and T1D suggesting different immunopathological roles of IL2RA in these two diseases. PMID:19125193

  8. IL-2 production in developing Th1 cells is regulated by heterodimerization of RelA and T-bet and requires T-bet serine residue 508.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Eun Sook; Hong, Jeong-Ho; Glimcher, Laurie H

    2005-11-07

    Interleukin (IL)-2 is the predominant cytokine that is produced by naive Th cells in a primary response. It is required for proliferation and differentiation of Th precursor cells into effector cells. Initial high-level IL-2 production is followed by its decline, and the concomitant induction of cytokines that are typical of the differentiated state. Although the factors that are responsible for the early induction of IL-2 are well defined, the mechanisms that are responsible for its down-regulation in later stages of Th development have not been studied as much. Previous work from our laboratory revealed a repressor function for the T-box transcription factor, T-bet, in IL-2 gene transcription. Here, we report that T-bet(S508) is required for the optimal repression of IL-2 production in developing Th1 cells. Phosphorylation of T-bet(S508) by casein kinase I and glycogen synthase kinase-3 kinases accompanies T-bet's interaction with the RelA nuclear factor-kappaB transcription factor. Heterodimerization of T-bet and RelA interferes with the binding of RelA to the IL-2 promoter, and hence, transcriptional activation of the IL-2 gene by RelA.

  9. Complexing receptor pharmacology: modulation of family B G protein-coupled receptor function by RAMPs.

    PubMed

    Sexton, Patrick M; Morfis, Maria; Tilakaratne, Nanda; Hay, Debbie L; Udawela, Madhara; Christopoulos, George; Christopoulos, Arthur

    2006-07-01

    The most well-characterized subgroup of family B G protein-coupledreceptors (GPCRs) comprises receptors for peptide hormones, such as secretin, calcitonin (CT), glucagon, and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). Recent data suggest that many of these receptors can interact with a novel family of GPCR accessory proteins termed receptor activity modifying proteins (RAMPs). RAMP interaction with receptors can lead to a variety of actions that include chaperoning of the receptor protein to the cell surface as is the case for the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) and the generation of novel receptor phenotypes. RAMP heterodimerization with the CLR and related CT receptor is required for the formation of specific CT gene-related peptide, adrenomedullin (AM) or amylin receptors. More recent work has revealed that the specific RAMP present in a heterodimer may modulate other functions such as receptor internalization and recycling and also the strength of activation of downstream signaling pathways. In this article we review our current state of knowledge of the consequence of RAMP interaction with family B GPCRs.

  10. Presynaptic glutamate receptors: physiological functions and mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Paulo S; Mulle, Christophe

    2008-06-01

    Glutamate acts on postsynaptic glutamate receptors to mediate excitatory communication between neurons. The discovery that additional presynaptic glutamate receptors can modulate neurotransmitter release has added complexity to the way we view glutamatergic synaptic transmission. Here we review evidence of a physiological role for presynaptic glutamate receptors in neurotransmitter release. We compare the physiological roles of ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors in short- and long-term regulation of synaptic transmission. Furthermore, we discuss the physiological conditions that are necessary for their activation, the source of the glutamate that activates them, their mechanisms of action and their involvement in higher brain function.

  11. Function of Estrogen Receptor Tryosine Phosphorylation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-07-01

    phosphotyrosyl peptide that blocks dimerization of the human estrogen receptor. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America... Vivat , V., Chambon, P., Moras, D., and Gronemeyer, H. (1996) Nat. Struct. Biol. 3, 87-94 8. Shiau, A. K., Barstad, D., Loria, P. M., Cheng, L

  12. Functional domains of the poliovirus receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, Satoshi; Ise, Iku; Nomoto, Akio )

    1991-05-15

    A number of mutant cDNAs of the human poliovirus receptor were constructed to identify essential regions of the molecule as the receptor. All mutant cDNAs carrying the sequence coding for the entire N-terminal immunoglobulin-like domain (domain I) confer permissiveness for poliovirus to mouse L cells, but a mutant cDNA lacking the sequence for domain I does not. The transformants permissive for poliovirus were able to bind the virus and were also recognized by monoclonal antibody D171, which competes with poliovirus for the cellular receptor. These results strongly suggest that the poliovirus binding site resides in domain I of the receptor. Mutant cDNAs for the sequence encoding the intracellular peptide were also constructed and expressed in mouse L cells. Susceptibility of these cells to poliovirus revealed that the entire putative cytoplasmic domain is not essential for virus infection. Thus, the cytoplasmic domain of the molecule appears not to play a role in the penetration of poliovirus.

  13. Progesterone Receptor Scaffolding Function in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-28

    Corporation. T47D-Y and HeLa cells were maintained at 37°C in 5% CO2 in 11 Minimum Essential Media (MEM; CellGro) supplemented with 5% FBS, 1% 12 Penicillin ...growth factor signaling: 2 phosphorylation of progesterone receptors mediates transcriptional 3 hypersensitivity and increased ligand-independent

  14. Steroid receptors and their ligands: Effects on male gamete functions

    SciTech Connect

    Aquila, Saveria; De Amicis, Francesca

    2014-11-01

    In recent years a new picture of human sperm biology is emerging. It is now widely recognized that sperm contain nuclear encoded mRNA, mitochondrial encoded RNA and different transcription factors including steroid receptors, while in the past sperm were considered incapable of transcription and translation. One of the main targets of steroid hormones and their receptors is reproductive function. Expression studies on Progesterone Receptor, estrogen receptor, androgen receptor and their specific ligands, demonstrate the presence of these systems in mature spermatozoa as surface but also as nuclear conventional receptors, suggesting that both systemic and local steroid hormones, through sperm receptors, may influence male reproduction. However, the relationship between the signaling events modulated by steroid hormones and sperm fertilization potential as well as the possible involvement of the specific receptors are still controversial issues. The main line of this review highlights the current research in human sperm biology examining new molecular systems of response to the hormones as well as specific regulatory pathways controlling sperm cell fate and biological functions. Most significant studies regarding the identification of steroid receptors are reported and the mechanistic insights relative to signaling pathways, together with the change in sperm metabolism energy influenced by steroid hormones are discussed.The reviewed evidences suggest important effects of Progesterone, Estrogen and Testosterone and their receptors on spermatozoa and implicate the involvement of both systemic and local steroid action in the regulation of male fertility potential. - Highlights: • One of the main targets of steroid hormones and their receptors is reproductive function. • Pg/PR co-work to stimulate enzymatic activities to sustain a capacitation process. • E2/ERs regulate sperm motility, capacitation and acrosome reaction and act as survival factors. • Androgens

  15. mGlu5 Receptor Functional Interactions and Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Robyn M.; Mustafa, Sanam; Ayoub, Mohammed Akli; Dodd, Peter R.; Pfleger, Kevin D. G.; Lawrence, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    The idea of “receptor mosaics” is that proteins may form complex and dynamic networks with respect to time and composition. These have the potential to markedly expand the diversity and specificity of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) signaling, particularly in neural cells, where a few key receptors have been implicated in many neurological and psychiatric disorders, including addiction. Metabotropic glutamate type 5 receptors (mGlu5) can form complexes with other GPCRs, including adenosine A2A and dopamine D2 receptors. mGlu5-containing complexes have been reported in the striatum, a brain region critical for mediating the rewarding and incentive motivational properties of drugs of abuse. mGlu5-containing complexes and/or downstream interactions between divergent receptors may play roles in addiction–relevant behaviors. Interactions between mGlu5 receptors and other GPCRs can regulate the rewarding and conditioned effects of drugs as well as drug-seeking behaviors. mGlu5 complexes may influence striatal function, including GABAergic output of striatopallidal neurons and glutamatergic input from corticostriatal afferents. Given their discrete localization, mGlu5-[non-mGlu5] receptor interactions and/or mGlu5-containing complexes may minimize off-target effects and thus provide a novel avenue for drug discovery. The therapeutic targeting of receptor–receptor functional interactions and/or receptor mosaics in a tissue specific or temporal manner (for example, a sub-population of receptors in a “pathological state”) might reduce detrimental side effects that may otherwise impair vital brain functions. PMID:22586398

  16. Role of CD4 molecule in the induction of interleukin 2 and interleukin 2 receptor in class II major histocompatibility complex-restricted antigen-specific T helper clones. T cell receptor/CD3 complex transmits CD4-dependent and CD4-independent signals.

    PubMed Central

    Oyaizu, N; Chirmule, N; Pahwa, S

    1992-01-01

    The CD4 molecule plays an essential role in antigen-induced activation of T helper (Th) cells, but its contribution to signal transduction events resulting in physiologic T cell function is ill defined. By utilizing anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that recognize distinct epitopes of CD4, we have investigated the role of CD4 molecule in antigen-induced interleukin 2 (IL-2) and IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) alpha chain expression in class II major histocompatibility complex-restricted antigen-specific human Th clones. Pretreatment of the Th clones with Leu3a resulted in a dose-dependent suppression of antigen-induced proliferative responses, inositol phosphate accumulation, increase in free cytoplasmic calcium ions ([Ca2+]i), IL-2 mRNA accumulation, IL-2 secretion, and membrane IL-2R expression. IL-2R mRNA accumulation, however, was unaffected even at highest Leu3a concentrations. Leu3a treatment did not affect bypass activation of T cells with PMA plus ionomycin or activation via CD2 molecule. The MAb OKT4, which binds another domain of CD4, was not inhibitory. These results suggest that after T cell antigen receptor-CD3 activation, IL-2 gene induction, IL-2 secretion, and membrane IL-2R expression are absolutely dependent upon participation of CD4 molecules, phosphatidylinositol (PI) hydrolysis, and increase in [Ca2+]i. The requirement for IL-2R gene induction, however, occurs independently of CD4 molecule participation and PI hydrolysis. Images PMID:1534818

  17. Functional analysis of retinoid Z receptor beta, a brain-specific nuclear orphan receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Greiner, E F; Kirfel, J; Greschik, H; Dörflinger, U; Becker, P; Mercep, A; Schüle, R

    1996-01-01

    The retinoid Z receptor beta (RZR beta), an orphan receptor, is a member of the retinoic acid receptor (RAR)/thyroid hormone receptor (TR) subfamily of nuclear receptors. RZR beta exhibits a highly restricted brain-specific expression pattern. So far, no natural RZR beta target gene has been identified and the physiological role of the receptor in transcriptional regulation remains to be elucidated. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays reveal binding of RZR beta to monomeric response elements containing the sequence AnnTAGGTCA, but RZR beta-mediated transactivation of reporter genes is only achieved with two property spaced binding sites. We present evidence that RZR beta can function as a cell-type-specific transactivator. In neuronal cells, GaI-RZR beta fusion proteins function as potent transcriptional activators, whereas no transactivation can be observed in nonneuronal cells. Mutational analyses demonstrate that the activation domain (AF-2) of RZR beta and RAR alpha are functionally interchangeable. However, in contrast to RAR and TR, the RZR beta AF-2 cannot function autonomously as a transactivation domain. Furthermore, our data define a novel repressor function for the C-terminal part of the putative ligand binding domain. We propose that the transcriptional activity of RZR beta is regulated by an interplay of different receptor domains with coactivators and corepressors. Images Fig. 5 PMID:8816759

  18. Progesterone Receptor Scaffolding Function in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    HeLa cells were maintained at 37°C in 5% CO2 in minimum essential media (MEM) (CellGro) supplemented with 5% fetal bovine serum (FBS), 1% penicillin ...phosphorylation of progesterone receptors mediates transcrip- tional hypersensitivity and increased ligand-independent breast cancer cell growth. Steroids 72:188...set of promoters (Qiu and Lange, 2003); the mechanism of growth factor-induced PR hypersensitivity maps to phospho-Ser294 antagonism of Lys388

  19. Enhancement of glycine receptor function by ethanol: role of phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Paola Mascia, Maria; Wick, Marilee J; Martinez, Larry D; Harris, R Adron

    1998-01-01

    The effects of several kinase inhibitors (staurosporine, GF 109203X, H89, KN62, genistein) and of the phosphatase inhibitor calyculin A were studied on the ethanol potentiation and on the function of homomeric α1 glycine receptor expressed in Xenopus oocytes using a two electrode voltage clamp recording technique.The function of the homomeric α1 glycine receptor was not modified in Xenopus oocytes pretreated with kinase inhibitors or with the phosphatase inhibitor calyculin A.The potentiation of the glycine receptor function induced by ethanol (10–200 mM) was significantly reduced in Xenopus oocytes pretreated with the PKC inhibitors staurosporine or GF 109203X.No differences in propofol (2.5 μM) or halothane (250 μM) actions were found after exposure of Xenopus oocytes to staurosporine.No differences in ethanol sensitivity were found after exposure of Xenopus oocytes expressing glycine α1 receptors to H89, KN62, genistein or to the phosphatase inhibitor calyculin A.The mutant α1 (S391A), in which the PKC phosphorylation site at serine 391 was mutated to alanine, was less sensitive to the effects of ethanol than was the α1 wild type receptor. Moreover, the ethanol potentiation of the glycine receptor function was not affected by treatment with staurosporine in oocytes expressing α1 (S391A).The splice variant of the α1 glycine receptor subunit, α1ins, containing eight additional amino acids and a potential phosphorylation site for PKA, did not differ from wild type for sensitivity to ethanol.These results indicate that phosphorylation by PKC of the homomeric α1 glycine receptor subunit modulates ethanol potentiation, but not the function of the glycine receptor. PMID:9786497

  20. An analysis of early-stage IL-2 capture times in populations of T cells diffusively interacting in a confined environment.

    PubMed

    Labowsky, M

    2016-12-21

    This numerical analysis examines early-stage Interlukin-2 (IL-2) capture in large populations of secreting T helper (Th) and absorbing T regulatory (Treg) cells in an attempt to provide rational guidelines for when diffusive interactions can affect the Th autocrine cycle, as reflected in capture times. Autocrine and paracrine capture is calculated over a wide range of conditions: the mix of cells in a population; cell size and spacing; antigen activated IL-2 secretion and Th receptor expression rates; receptor dissociation constant; and number of resting Treg receptors. Correlations for quickly estimating IL-2 capture over these conditions are provided. This study suggests that a typical Treg can scavenge a significant amount of IL-2 without affecting autocrine capture by the Th. As a result, Treg influence on autocrine capture is shorter-ranged than previously reported. It is conjectured that high early-stage paracrine relative to autocrine capture leads to faster receptor enhancement for a Treg than a Th. The resulting enhancement time gap is considerably longer and, thus, diffusive suppression more likely, for a weakly- as opposed to strongly-activated Th. The methodology can be extended to later-stage capture to confirm this conjecture and to diffusive interactions in other cell-type populations.

  1. NK cells and CD1d-restricted NKT cells respond in different ways with divergent kinetics to IL-2 treatment in primary HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Kuylenstierna, C; Snyder-Cappione, J E; Loo, C P; Long, B R; Gonzalez, V D; Michaëlsson, J; Moll, M; Spotts, G; Hecht, F M; Nixon, D F; Sandberg, J K

    2011-02-01

    Cytokine immunotherapy is being evaluated as adjunct treatment in infectious diseases. The effects on innate and adaptive immunity in vivo are insufficiently known. Here, we investigate whether combination treatment with antiretroviral therapy (ART) and Interleukin-2 (IL-2) of patients with primary HIV-1 infection induces sustained increases in circulating NKT cell and NK cell numbers and effector functions and investigate how changes are coordinated in the two compartments. Patients with primary HIV-1 infection starting ART were analyzed for numbers, phenotype and function of NKT cells, NK cells and dendritic cells (DC) in peripheral blood before, during and after IL-2 treatment. NKT cells expanded during IL-2 treatment as expected from previous studies. However, their response to α-galactosyl ceramide antigen were retained but not boosted. Myeloid DC did not change their numbers or CD1d-expression during treatment. In contrast, the NK cell compartment responded with rapid expansion of the CD56(dim) effector subset and enhanced IFNγ production. Expansions of NKT cells and NK cells retracted back towards baseline values at 12 months after IL-2 treatment ended. In summary, NKT cells and NK cells respond to IL-2 treatment with different kinetics. Effects on cellular function are distinct between the cell types and the effects appear not to be sustained after IL-2 treatment ends. These results improve our understanding of the effects of cytokine immunotherapy on innate cellular immunity in early HIV-1 infection.

  2. NOD/Shi-scid IL2rgamma(null) (NOG) mice more appropriate for humanized mouse models.

    PubMed

    Ito, M; Kobayashi, K; Nakahata, T

    2008-01-01

    "Humanized mice," in which various kinds of human cells and tissues can be engrafted and retain the same functions as in humans, are extremely useful because human diseases can be studied directly. Using the newly combined immunodeficient NOD-scid IL2rgamma(null) mice and Rag2(null) IL2rgamma(null) humanized mice, it has became possible to expand applications because various hematopoietic cells can be differentiated by human hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and the human immune system can be reconstituted to some degree. This work has attracted attention worldwide, but the development and use of immunodeficient mice in Japan are not very well known or understood. This review describes the history and characteristics of the NOD/Shi-scid IL2rgamma(null) (NOG) and BALB/cA-Rag2(null) IL2rgamma(null) mice that were established in Japan, including our unpublished data from researchers who are currently using these mice. In addition, we also describe the potential development of new immunodeficient mice that can be used as humanized mice in the future.

  3. IL-1, IL-2 and IFN-gamma production by Theiler's virus-induced encephalomyelitic SJL/J mice.

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, N; Torres, C

    1991-01-01

    Interleukins have been postulated to exert an important modulatory and recruiting role in the Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV)-induced demyelination of the central nervous system (CNS) in SJL/J mice. Using bio- and radioimmunoassays, we have detected and quantified some of the interleukins suspected to play a role in this immune-mediated process. The interleukins 1 and 2 (IL-1, IL-2) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) have been measured in homogenates from the CNS and sera from infected animals, as well as in supernatants from antigen-specific in vitro-stimulated spleen and meningeal cells. IL-1 was detected both in CNS tissue homogenates (approximately 20-40 fmol/ml) and in splenic cultures (200 U/ml). IL-2 was detected only after TMEV-specific antigenic stimulation in spleen cultures (approximately 120 U/ml). In vitro, IL-2 and IL-1 synthesis appear in a dose- and time-dependent manner. IFN-gamma could not be found in any case. The precise nature of IL-1 and IL-2 activity was further assessed by HPLC. The above results strongly indicate the presence of functionally active macrophages in the CNS infiltrates of cells triggering this autoaggressive immune process. In addition, we propose a central role for IL-1 in augmenting the intracerebral immune response leading to the inflammatory demyelination induced by TMEV. PMID:1748475

  4. Hairless is a nuclear receptor corepressor essential for skin function

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Catherine C.

    2009-01-01

    The activity of nuclear receptors is modulated by numerous coregulatory factors. Corepressors can either mediate the ability of nuclear receptors to repress transcription, or can inhibit transactivation by nuclear receptors. As we learn more about the mechanisms of transcriptional repression, the importance of repression by nuclear receptors in development and disease has become clear. The protein encoded by the mammalian Hairless (Hr) gene was shown to be a corepressor by virtue of its functional similarity to the well-established corepressors N-CoR and SMRT. Mutation of the Hr gene results in congenital hair loss in both mice and men. Investigation of Hairless function both in vitro and in mouse models in vivo has revealed a critical role in maintaining skin and hair by regulating the differentiation of epithelial stem cells, as well as a putative role in regulating gene expression via chromatin remodeling. PMID:20087431

  5. Regulation of Vascular and Renal Function by Metabolite Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Peti-Peterdi, János; Kishore, Bellamkonda K.; Pluznick, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    To maintain metabolic homeostasis, the body must be able to monitor the concentration of a large number of substances, including metabolites, in real time and to use that information to regulate the activities of different metabolic pathways. Such regulation is achieved by the presence of sensors, termed metabolite receptors, in various tissues and cells of the body, which in turn convey the information to appropriate regulatory or positive or negative feedback systems. In this review, we cover the unique roles of metabolite receptors in renal and vascular function. These receptors play a wide variety of important roles in maintaining various aspects of homeostasis—from salt and water balance to metabolism—by sensing metabolites from a wide variety of sources. We discuss the role of metabolite sensors in sensing metabolites generated locally, metabolites generated at distant tissues or organs, or even metabolites generated by resident microbes. Metabolite receptors are also involved in various pathophysiological conditions and are being recognized as potential targets for new drugs. By highlighting three receptor families—(a) citric acid cycle intermediate receptors, (b) purinergic receptors, and (c) short-chain fatty acid receptors—we emphasize the unique and important roles that these receptors play in renal and vascular physiology and pathophysiology. PMID:26667077

  6. Functional somatostatin receptors on a rat pancreatic acinar cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Viguerie, N.; Tahiri-Jouti, N.; Esteve, J.P.; Clerc, P.; Logsdon, C.; Svoboda, M.; Susini, C.; Vaysse, N.; Ribet, A. Mount Zion Hospital and Medical Center, San Francisco, CA Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels )

    1988-07-01

    Somatostatin receptors from a rat pancreatic acinar cell line, AR4-2J, were characterized biochemically, structurally, and functionally. Binding of {sup 125}I-(Tyr{sup 11})Somatostatin to AR4-2J cells was saturable, exhibiting a single class of high-affinity binding sites with a maximal binding capacity of 258 {plus minus} 20 fmol/10{sup 6} cells. Somatostatin receptor structure was analyzed by covalently cross-linking {sup 125}I-(Tyr{sup 11})somatostatin to its plasma membrane receptors. Gel electrophoresis and autoradiography of cross-linked proteins revealed a peptide containing the somatostatin receptor. Somatostatin inhibited vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-stimulated adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) formation in a dose-dependent manner. The concentration of somatostatin that caused half-maximal inhibition of cAMP formation was close to the receptor affinity for somatostatin. Pertussis toxin pretreatment of AR4-2J cells prevented somatostatin inhibition of VIP-stimulated cAMP formation as well as somatostatin binding. The authors conclude that AR4-2J cells exhibit functional somatostatin receptors that retain both specificity and affinity of the pancreatic acinar cell somatostatin receptors and act via the pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide-binding protein N{sub i} to inhibit adenylate cyclase.

  7. Nuclear receptors CAR and PXR: Molecular, functional, and biomedical aspects.

    PubMed

    di Masi, Alessandra; De Marinis, Elisabetta; Ascenzi, Paolo; Marino, Maria

    2009-10-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand-activated transcription factors sharing a common evolutionary history and having similar sequence features at the protein level. Selective ligand(s) for some NRs is not known, therefore these NRs have been named "orphan receptors". Whenever ligands have been recognized for any of the orphan receptor, it has been categorized and grouped as "adopted" orphan receptor. This group includes the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and the pregnane X receptor (PXR). They function as sensors of toxic byproducts derived from endogenous metabolites and of exogenous chemicals, in order to enhance their elimination. This unique function of CAR and PXR sets them apart from the steroid hormone receptors. The broad response profile has established that CAR and PXR are xenobiotic sensors that coordinately regulate xenobiotic clearance in the liver and intestine via induction of genes involved in drug and xenobiotic metabolism. In the past few years, research has revealed new and mostly unsuspected roles for CAR and PXR in modulating hormone, lipid, and energy homeostasis as well as cancer and liver steatosis. The purpose of this review is to highlight the structural and molecular bases of CAR and PXR impact on human health, providing information on mechanisms through which diet, chemical exposure, and environment ultimately impact health and disease.

  8. Functional properties of extracellular domains of transducer receptor gp130.

    PubMed

    Kostjukova, M N; Tupitsyn, N N

    2011-04-01

    Cytokine receptor molecules have been shown to have extracellular domains of complex structure and a multi-step activation system. Glycoprotein gp130 is a typical transducer of cytokine signal; it functions by forming multicomponent receptor complexes and transferring signals of tens of cytokines from the IL-6 family. Structural organization and basic functioning principles of gp130 are well known, as well as related signal pathways, which function during normal differentiation and are involved in pathogenesis of many tumors. The role of gp130 in IL-6-dependent tumors is best studied. In this review, based on extensive accumulated data, we examine the functional significance of certain parts of gp130 extracellular domains. Potentials of a recently developed method for estimation of receptor activation at the level of epitope structure are discussed.

  9. Insights from the Study of Animals Lacking Functional Estrogen Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korach, Kenneth S.

    1994-12-01

    Estrogen hormones produce physiological actions within a variety of target sites in the body and during development by activating a specific receptor protein. Hormone responsiveness for the estrogen receptor protein was investigated at different stages of development with the use of gene knockout techniques because no natural genetic mutants have been described. A mutant mouse line without a functional estrogen receptor was created and is being used to assess estrogen responsiveness. Both sexes of these mutant animals are infertile and show a variety of phenotypic changes, some of which are associated with the gonads, mammary glands, reproductive tracts, and skeletal tissues.

  10. IL-2 Modulates the TCR Signaling Threshold for CD8 but Not CD4 T Cell Proliferation on a Single-Cell Level.

    PubMed

    Au-Yeung, Byron B; Smith, Geoffrey Alexander; Mueller, James L; Heyn, Cheryl S; Jaszczak, Rebecca Garrett; Weiss, Arthur; Zikherman, Julie

    2017-03-15

    Lymphocytes integrate Ag and cytokine receptor signals to make cell fate decisions. Using a specific reporter of TCR signaling that is insensitive to cytokine signaling, Nur77-eGFP, we identify a sharp, minimal threshold of cumulative TCR signaling required for proliferation in CD4 and CD8 T cells that is independent of both Ag concentration and affinity. Unexpectedly, IL-2 reduces this threshold in CD8 but not CD4 T cells, suggesting that integration of multiple mitogenic inputs may alter the minimal requirement for TCR signaling in CD8 T cells. Neither naive CD4 nor naive CD8 T cells are responsive to low doses of IL-2. We show that activated CD8 T cells become responsive to low doses of IL-2 more quickly than CD4 T cells, and propose that this relative delay in turn accounts for the differential effects of IL-2 on the minimal TCR signaling threshold for proliferation in these populations. In contrast to Nur77-eGFP, c-Myc protein expression integrates mitogenic signals downstream of both IL-2 and the TCR, yet marks an invariant minimal threshold of cumulative mitogenic stimulation required for cell division. Our work provides a conceptual framework for understanding the regulation of clonal expansion of CD8 T cells by subthreshold TCR signaling in the context of mitogenic IL-2 signals, thereby rendering CD8 T cells exquisitely dependent upon environmental cues. Conversely, CD4 T cell proliferation requires an invariant minimal intensity of TCR signaling that is not modulated by IL-2, thereby restricting responses to low-affinity or low-abundance self-antigens even in the context of an inflammatory milieu.

  11. Mutation analyses and prenatal diagnosis in families of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency caused by IL2Rγ gene novel mutation.

    PubMed

    Bai, Q L; Liu, N; Kong, X D; Xu, X J; Zhao, Z H

    2015-06-11

    We investigated the feasibility of interleukin-2 receptor gamma (IL2Rγ) gene based on gene mutation analysis and pre-natal diagnosis of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (X-SCID). Blood samples of patients and their parents of X-SCID (family 1) and X-SCID (family 2) were collected. IL2Rγ gene sequences of the 2 families were analyzed using bi-directional direct sequencing by polymerase chain reaction. DNA sequence changes in the IL2Rγ gene exon region and shear zone were also analyzed. We also sequenced the IL2Rγ gene in 100 healthy individuals. Prenatal genetic diagnoses for a high-risk fetus in family 1 were performed by chorionic villus sampling after determining each family's genotypes. The suspect fe-male in family 1 underwent carrier detection. Two novel mutations of IL2Rγ gene were identified, including c.361-363delGAG (p.E121del) in the patient and his mother in family 1, and c.510-511insGAACT (p.W173X) heterozygous mutation in the proband's mother in family 2. These mutations were absent in the 100 controls. Prenatal diagnosis of early pregnancy in the female fetus of family 1 was performed; the fetus was heterozygous, which was confirmed at postnatal follow-up. The suspect female in family 1 showed no mutation in carrier detection. The novel p.E121del and p.W173X mutations in IL2Rγ may have been the primary causes of disease in 2 families with X-SCID. In couples with an X-SCID reproductive history, prenatal gene mutation analysis of IL2Rγ can effectively prevent the birth of children with X-SCID and carrier detection for suspected females.

  12. CNTF variants with increased biological potency and receptor selectivity define a functional site of receptor interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Saggio, I; Gloaguen, I; Poiana, G; Laufer, R

    1995-01-01

    Human CNTF is a neurocytokine that elicits potent neurotrophic effects by activating a receptor complex composed of the ligand-specific alpha-receptor subunit (CNTFR alpha) and two signal transducing proteins, which together constitute a receptor for leukemia inhibitory factor (LIFR). At high concentrations, CNTF can also activate the LIFR and possibly other cross-reactive cytokine receptors in the absence of CNTFR alpha. To gain a better understanding of its structure-function relationships and to develop analogs with increased receptor specificity, the cytokine was submitted to affinity maturation using phage display technology. Variants with greatly increased CNTFR alpha affinity were selected from a phage-displayed library of CNTF variants carrying random amino acid substitutions in the putative D helix. Selected variants contained substitutions of the wild-type Gln167 residue, either alone or in combination with neighboring mutations. These results provide evidence for an important functional role of the mutagenized region in CNTFR alpha binding. Affinity enhancing mutations conferred to CNTF increased potency to trigger biological effects mediated by CNTFR alpha and enhanced neurotrophic activity on chicken ciliary neurons. In contrast, the same mutations did not potentiate the CNTFR alpha-independent receptor actions of CNTF. These CNTF analogs thus represent receptor-specific superagonists, which should help to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the pleiotropic actions of the neurocytokine. PMID:7621819

  13. Challenges and developing solutions for increasing the benefits of IL-2 treatment in tumor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Skrombolas, Denise; Frelinger, John G.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a cytokine with pleiotropic effects on the immune system. Systemic IL-2 treatment has produced durable responses in melanoma and renal cancer patients, but unfortunately this is effective only in a fraction of patients. Moreover, IL-2 treatment also engenders serious side effects, which limit its clinical utility. It is now appreciated that IL-2 not only stimulates NK and effector T cells but also has a critical role in the generation and maintenance of regulatory T cells, which act to dampen immune responses. Thus, successful immunotherapy of cancers using IL-2 has to address two fundamentally important issues: (1) how to limit side effects yet be active where it is needed, and (2) how to preferentially activate effector T cells while limiting the stimulation of Tregs. Strategies are now being developed to address these critical obstacles that may lead to a renaissance of IL-2 therapy. PMID:24410537

  14. β-Adrenergic receptor mediated increases in activation and function of natural killer cells following repeated social disruption.

    PubMed

    Tarr, Andrew J; Powell, Nicole D; Reader, Brenda F; Bhave, Neela S; Roloson, Amanda L; Carson, William E; Sheridan, John F

    2012-11-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are specialized innate lymphocytes important in the early defense against tumor and virus bearing cells. Many factors influence the immune system's effectiveness against pathogens, including stress. Social disruption (SDR) "primes" macrophages/monocytes and dendritic cells thereby enhancing their anti-microbial function. What remains unclear is whether similar responses are evident in NK cells. Current studies investigated the cellular distribution and activation/inhibitory phenotypes of NK cells in the spleen, lung, and blood of C57BL/6 male mice following SDR. Furthermore, cytolytic activity and anti-viral cytokine production of splenic NK cells were determined. Lastly, β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) signaling was investigated to determine possible mechanisms behind the SDR-induced NK cell alterations. Results indicated NK cells from SDR mice have increased expression of CD16 and CD69 and reduced NKG2a and Ly49a expression on splenic CD3-/DX5+ NK cells indicative of an activated phenotype, both immediately and 14h post-SDR. Administration of propranolol (10mg/kg; non-selective β-adrenergic receptor antagonist) was shown to block these "priming" effects at the 14h time-point. In the lung, SDR had similar effects on activation and inhibitory receptors 14h post-SDR, however no alterations were evident in the blood besides increased NK cells directly after SDR. Additionally, splenic NK cells from SDR mice had increased CD107a surface expression, cytolytic activity, and IFN-γ production was increased upon costimulation with IgG and IL-2 ex vivo. Collectively, these data suggest that social stress "primes" NK cells in the spleen and lung to be more proficient in their cytolytic and anti-viral/tumor effecter functions through β-adrenergic receptor dependent signaling.

  15. Cell cycle regulation of glucocorticoid receptor function.

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, S C; Qi, M; DeFranco, D B

    1992-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) nuclear translocation, transactivation and phosphorylation were examined during the cell cycle in mouse L cell fibroblasts. Glucocorticoid-dependent transactivation of the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter was observed in G0 and S phase synchronized L cells, but not in G2 synchronized cells. G2 effects were selective on the glucocorticoid hormone signal transduction pathway, since glucocorticoid but not heavy metal induction of the endogenous Metallothionein-1 gene was also impaired in G2 synchronized cells. GRs that translocate to the nucleus of G2 synchronized cells in response to dexamethasone treatment were not efficiently retained there and redistributed to the cytoplasmic compartment. In contrast, GRs bound by the glucocorticoid antagonist RU486 were efficiently retained within nuclei of G2 synchronized cells. Inefficient nuclear retention was observed for both dexamethasone- and RU486-bound GRs in L cells that actively progress through G2 following release from an S phase arrest. Finally, site-specific alterations in GR phosphorylation were observed in G2 synchronized cells suggesting that cell cycle regulation of specific protein kinases and phosphatases could influence nuclear retention, recycling and transactivation activity of the GR. Images PMID:1505524

  16. Molecular determinants of odorant receptor function in insects.

    PubMed

    Ray, Anandasankar; van Naters, Wynand Goes; Carlson, John R

    2014-09-01

    The olfactory system of Drosophila melanogaster provides a powerful model to study molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying function of a sensory system. In the 1970s Siddiqi and colleagues pioneered the application of genetics to olfactory research and isolated several mutant Drosophila with odorant-specific defects in olfactory behaviour, suggesting that odorants are detected differentially by the olfactory system. Since then basic principles of olfactory system function and development have emerged using Drosophila as a model. Nearly four decades later we can add computational methods to further our understanding of how specific odorants are detected by receptors. Using a comparative approach we identify two categories of short amino acid sequence motifs: ones that are conserved family-wide predominantly in the C-terminal half of most receptors, and ones that are present in receptors that detect a specific odorant, 4-methylphenol, found predominantly in the N-terminal half. The odorant-specific sequence motifs are predictors of phenol detection in Anopheles gambiae and other insects, suggesting they are likely to participate in odorant binding. Conversely, the family-wide motifs are expected to participate in shared functions across all receptors and a mutation in the most conserved motif leads to a reduction in odor response. These findings lay a foundation for investigating functional domains within odorant receptors that can lead to a molecular understanding of odor detection.

  17. Targeting of IL-2 to cytotoxic lymphocytes as an improved method of cytokine-driven immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Reza; Hein, Sarah M.; Westwick, John; Watkins, Dan; Fremont, Daved H.; Krupnick, Alexander Sasha

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The use of high-dose interleukin-2 (IL-2) has fallen out of favor due to severe life-threatening side effects. We have recently described a unique way of directly targeting IL-2 to cytotoxic lymphocytes using a virally encoded immune evasion protein and an IL-2 mutant that avoids off-target side effects such as activation of regulatory T cells and vascular endothelium. PMID:28344875

  18. Glutamate Receptor Ion Channels: Structure, Regulation, and Function

    PubMed Central

    Wollmuth, Lonnie P.; McBain, Chris J.; Menniti, Frank S.; Vance, Katie M.; Ogden, Kevin K.; Hansen, Kasper B.; Yuan, Hongjie; Myers, Scott J.; Dingledine, Ray

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian ionotropic glutamate receptor family encodes 18 gene products that coassemble to form ligand-gated ion channels containing an agonist recognition site, a transmembrane ion permeation pathway, and gating elements that couple agonist-induced conformational changes to the opening or closing of the permeation pore. Glutamate receptors mediate fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system and are localized on neuronal and non-neuronal cells. These receptors regulate a broad spectrum of processes in the brain, spinal cord, retina, and peripheral nervous system. Glutamate receptors are postulated to play important roles in numerous neurological diseases and have attracted intense scrutiny. The description of glutamate receptor structure, including its transmembrane elements, reveals a complex assembly of multiple semiautonomous extracellular domains linked to a pore-forming element with striking resemblance to an inverted potassium channel. In this review we discuss International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology glutamate receptor nomenclature, structure, assembly, accessory subunits, interacting proteins, gene expression and translation, post-translational modifications, agonist and antagonist pharmacology, allosteric modulation, mechanisms of gating and permeation, roles in normal physiological function, as well as the potential therapeutic use of pharmacological agents acting at glutamate receptors. PMID:20716669

  19. Novel Functional Properties of Drosophila CNS Glutamate Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yan; Dharkar, Poorva; Han, Tae-Hee; Serpe, Mihaela; Lee, Chi-Hon; Mayer, Mark L.

    2016-12-01

    Phylogenetic analysis reveals AMPA, kainate, and NMDA receptor families in insect genomes, suggesting conserved functional properties corresponding to their vertebrate counterparts. However, heterologous expression of the Drosophila kainate receptor DKaiR1D and the AMPA receptor DGluR1A revealed novel ligand selectivity at odds with the classification used for vertebrate glutamate receptor ion channels (iGluRs). DKaiR1D forms a rapidly activating and desensitizing receptor that is inhibited by both NMDA and the NMDA receptor antagonist AP5; crystallization of the KaiR1D ligand-binding domain reveals that these ligands stabilize open cleft conformations, explaining their action as antagonists. Surprisingly, the AMPA receptor DGluR1A shows weak activation by its namesake agonist AMPA and also by quisqualate. Crystallization of the DGluR1A ligand-binding domain reveals amino acid exchanges that interfere with binding of these ligands. The unexpected ligand-binding profiles of insect iGluRs allows classical tools to be used in novel approaches for the study of synaptic regulation.

  20. Regulation of Vascular and Renal Function by Metabolite Receptors.

    PubMed

    Peti-Peterdi, János; Kishore, Bellamkonda K; Pluznick, Jennifer L

    2016-01-01

    To maintain metabolic homeostasis, the body must be able to monitor the concentration of a large number of substances, including metabolites, in real time and to use that information to regulate the activities of different metabolic pathways. Such regulation is achieved by the presence of sensors, termed metabolite receptors, in various tissues and cells of the body, which in turn convey the information to appropriate regulatory or positive or negative feedback systems. In this review, we cover the unique roles of metabolite receptors in renal and vascular function. These receptors play a wide variety of important roles in maintaining various aspects of homeostasis-from salt and water balance to metabolism-by sensing metabolites from a wide variety of sources. We discuss the role of metabolite sensors in sensing metabolites generated locally, metabolites generated at distant tissues or organs, or even metabolites generated by resident microbes. Metabolite receptors are also involved in various pathophysiological conditions and are being recognized as potential targets for new drugs. By highlighting three receptor families-(a) citric acid cycle intermediate receptors, (b) purinergic receptors, and

  1. Functional CB1 cannabinoid receptors in human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, J; Gao, B; Mirshahi, F; Sanyal, A J; Khanolkar, A D; Makriyannis, A; Kunos, G

    2000-01-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor mRNA was detected using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in endothelial cells from human aorta and hepatic artery and in the ECV304 cell line derived from human umbilical vein endothelial cells. CB1 receptor-binding sites were detected by the high-affinity antagonist radioligand [(125)I]AM-251. In ECV304 cells, both the highly potent synthetic cannabinoid agonist HU-210 and the endogenous ligand anandamide induce activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, and the effect of HU-210 was completely blocked, whereas the effect of anandamide was partially inhibited by SR141716A, a selective CB1 receptor antagonist. Transfection of ECV304 cells with CB1 receptor antisense, but not sense, oligonucleotides caused the same pattern of inhibition as SR141716A. This provides more definitive evidence for the involvement of CB1 receptors in MAP kinase activation and suggests that anandamide may also activate MAP kinase via an additional, CB1 receptor-independent, SR141716A-resistant mechanism. The MAP kinase activation by anandamide in ECV304 cells requires genistein-sensitive tyrosine kinases and protein kinase C (PKC), and anandamide also activates p38 kinase and c-Jun kinase. These findings indicate that CB1 receptors located in human vascular endothelium are functionally coupled to the MAP kinase cascade. Activation of protein kinase cascades by anandamide may be involved in the modulation of endothelial cell growth and proliferation. PMID:10698714

  2. Effect of local anesthetics on serotonin1A receptor function.

    PubMed

    Rao, Bhagyashree D; Shrivastava, Sandeep; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2016-12-01

    The fundamental mechanism behind the action of local anesthetics is still not clearly understood. Phenylethanol (PEtOH) is a constituent of essential oils with a pleasant odor and can act as a local anesthetic. In this work, we have explored the effect of PEtOH on the function of the hippocampal serotonin1A receptor, a representative neurotransmitter receptor belonging to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family. Our results show that PEtOH induces reduction in ligand binding to the serotonin1A receptor due to lowering of binding affinity, along with a concomitant decrease in the degree of G-protein coupling. Analysis of membrane order using the environment-sensitive fluorescent probe DPH revealed decrease in membrane order with increasing PEtOH concentration, as evident from reduction in rotational correlation time of the probe. Analysis of results obtained shows that the action of local anesthetics could be attributed to the combined effects of specific interaction of the receptor with anesthetics and alteration of membrane properties (such as membrane order). These results assume relevance in the perspective of anesthetic action and could be helpful to achieve a better understanding of the possible role of anesthetics in the function of membrane receptors.

  3. Virus infection drives IL-2 antibody complexes into pro-inflammatory agonists in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wendy W. L.; Teo, Teck-Hui; Lum, Fok-Moon; Andiappan, Anand K.; Amrun, Siti Naqiah; Rénia, Laurent; Rötzschke, Olaf; Ng, Lisa F. P.

    2016-01-01

    The use of IL-2/JES6-1 Ab complex (IL-2 Ab Cx) has been considered as a potential therapeutic for inflammatory diseases due to its selective expansion of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in mice. Here, IL-2 Ab Cx was explored as a therapeutic agent to reduce joint inflammation induced by chikungunya virus, an alphavirus causing debilitating joint disease globally. Virus-infected mice treated with IL-2 Ab Cx exhibited exacerbated joint inflammation due to infiltration of highly activated CD4+ effector T cells (Teffs). Virus infection led to upregulation of CD25 on the Teffs, rendering them sensitive towards IL2 Ab Cx. Ready responsiveness of Teffs to IL-2 was further demonstrated in healthy human donors, suggesting that the use of IL-2 Ab Cx in humans is not suitable. Changes in IL-2 sensitivity during active virus infection could change the responsive pattern towards the IL-2 Ab Cx, resulting in the expansion of pro-inflammatory rather than anti-inflammatory responses. PMID:27886209

  4. Dynamic Regulation of the GABAA Receptor Function by Redox Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Daniel J; Beltrán González, Andrea N

    2016-09-01

    Oxidizing and reducing agents, which are currently involved in cell metabolism and signaling pathways, can regulate fast inhibitory neurotransmission mediated by GABA receptors in the nervous system. A number of in vitro studies have shown that diverse redox compounds, including redox metabolites and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, modulate phasic and tonic responses mediated by neuronal GABAA receptors through both presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms. We review experimental data showing that many redox agents, which are normally present in neurons and glia or are endogenously generated in these cells under physiologic states or during oxidative stress (e.g., hydrogen peroxide, superoxide and hydroxyl radicals, nitric oxide, ascorbic acid, and glutathione), induce potentiating or inhibiting actions on different native and recombinant GABAA receptor subtypes. Based on these results, it is thought that redox signaling might represent a homeostatic mechanism that regulates the function of synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAA receptors in physiologic and pathologic conditions.

  5. Emerging functional roles of nuclear receptors in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Doan, Tram B; Graham, J Dinny; Clarke, Christine L

    2017-04-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) have been targets of intensive drug development for decades due to their roles as key regulators of multiple developmental, physiological and disease processes. In breast cancer, expression of the estrogen and progesterone receptor remains clinically important in predicting prognosis and determining therapeutic strategies. More recently, there is growing evidence supporting the involvement of multiple nuclear receptors other than the estrogen and progesterone receptors, in the regulation of various processes important to the initiation and progression of breast cancer. We review new insights into the mechanisms of action of NRs made possible by recent advances in genomic technologies and focus on the emerging functional roles of NRs in breast cancer biology, including their involvement in circadian regulation, metabolic reprogramming and breast cancer migration and metastasis.

  6. Estimation by limiting dilution analysis of human IL 2-secreting T cells: detection of IL 2 produced by single lymphokine-secreting T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Vie, H.; Miller, R.A.

    1986-05-01

    We present here a culture method for the estimation, in human blood, of the number of lymphocytes that can respond to mitogen by producing interleukin 2 (IL 2). T cells are cultured at limiting dilutions with PHA or Con A in the presence of Epstein Barr virus-transformed human lymphoblastoid cells (EB-LCL), and supernatants are tested 3 days later for IL 2 content by a cell proliferation assay. The distribution of negative wells follows the expected Poisson single-hit relationship, suggesting that the assay is sensitive to single cells of a single limiting cell type. On average, 16.3% of peripheral blood mononuclear cells can produce IL 2 in such clonal cultures (mean of 12 determinations; SD = 5.6%). Surprisingly, irradiation (up to 2000 rad) of the titrated responder cell population diminishes the estimated frequencies by less than 50%. The ability to detect IL 2 levels in cultures containing only a single, nonproliferating T lymphocyte allows us to estimate the amount of IL 2 generated by an individual effector cell during a 3-day culture interval after mitogen stimulation. The average responding, irradiated T cell generates 0.92 pg of IL 2 (median) within 3 days. The method presented provides a straightforward way to provide independent estimates of responding cell number and of lymphokine production per cell in a variety of clinical situations.

  7. Human articular chondrocytes express functional leukotriene B4 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Ann Kristin; Indrevik, Jill-Tove; Figenschau, Yngve; Martinez-Zubiaurre, Inigo; Sveinbjörnsson, Baldur

    2015-01-01

    Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) is a potent chemoattractant associated with the development of osteoarthritis (OA), while its receptors BLT1 and BLT2 have been found in synovium and subchondral bone. In this study, we have investigated whether these receptors are also expressed by human cartilage cells and their potential effects on cartilage cells. The expression of LTB4 receptors in native tissue and cultured cells was assessed by immunohistochemistry, immunocytochemistry, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and electron microscopy. The functional significance of the LTB4 receptor expression was studied by Western blotting, using phospho-specific antibodies in the presence or absence of receptor antagonists. In further studies, the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, growth factors and metalloproteinases by LTB4-stimulated chondrocytes was measured by multiplex protein assays. The effects of LTB4 in cartilage signature gene expression in cultured cells were assessed by quantitative PCR, whereas the LTB4-promoted matrix synthesis was determined using 3D pellet cultures. Both receptors were present in cultured chondrocytes, as was confirmed by immunolabelling and PCR. The relative quantification by PCR demonstrated a higher expression of the receptors in cells from healthy joints compared with OA cases. The stimulation of cultured chondrocytes with LTB4 resulted in a phosphorylation of downstream transcription factor Erk 1/2, which was reduced after blocking BLT1 signalling. No alteration in the secretion of cytokine and metalloproteinases was recorded after challenging cultured cells with LTB4; likewise, cartilage matrix gene expression and 3D tissue synthesis were unaffected. Chondrocytes express BLT1 and BLT2 receptors, and LTB4 activates the downstream Erk 1/2 pathway by engaging the high-affinity receptor BLT1. However, any putative role in cartilage biology could not be revealed, and remains to be clarified. PMID:25677035

  8. Delta opioid receptors in brain function and diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Paul Chu Sin; Kieffer, Brigitte L.

    2013-01-01

    Evidence that the delta opioid receptor (DOR) is an attractive target for the treatment of brain disorders has strengthened in recent years. This receptor is broadly expressed in the brain, binds endogenous opioid peptides, and shows as functional profile highly distinct from those of mu and kappa opioid receptors. Our knowledge of DOR function has enormously progressed from in vivo studies using pharmacological tools and genetic approaches. The important role of this receptor in reducing chronic pain has been extensively overviewed; therefore this review focuses on facets of delta receptor activity relevant to psychiatric and other neurological disorders. Beneficial effects of DOR agonists are now well established in the context of emotional responses and mood disorders. DOR activation also regulates drug reward, inhibitory controls and learning processes, but whether delta compounds may represent useful drugs in the treatment of drug abuse remains open. Epileptogenic and locomotor-stimulating effects of delta agonists appear drug-dependent, and the possibility of biased agonism at DOR for these effects is worthwhile further investigations to increase benefit/risk ratio of delta therapies. Neuroprotective effects of DOR activity represent a forthcoming research area. Future developments in DOR research will benefit from in-depth investigations of DOR function at cellular and circuit levels. PMID:23764370

  9. Linking Functional Domains of the Human Insulin Receptor with the Bacterial Aspartate Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Leland; Morgan, David O.; Koshland, Daniel E.; Clauser, Eric; Moe, Gregory R.; Bollag, Gideon; Roth, Richard A.; Rutter, William J.

    1986-11-01

    A hybrid receptor has been constructed that is composed of the extracellular domain of the human insulin receptor fused to the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of the bacterial aspartate chemoreceptor. This hybrid protein can be expressed in rodent (CHO) cells and displays several functional features comparable to wild-type insulin receptor. It is localized to the cell surface, binds insulin with high affinity, forms oligomers, and is recognized by conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies. Although most of the expressed protein accumulates as a 180-kDa proreceptor, some processed 135-kDa receptor can be detected on the cell surface by covalent cross-linking. Expression of the hybrid receptor inhibits the insulin-activated uptake of 2-deoxyglucose by CHO cells. Thus, this hybrid is partially functional and can be processed; however, it is incapable of native transmembrane signaling. The results indicate that the intact domains of different types of receptors can retain some of the native features in a hybrid molecule but specific requirements will need to be satisfied for transmembrane signaling.

  10. Organization, control and function of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Papouin, Thomas; Oliet, Stéphane H. R.

    2014-01-01

    N-methyl d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) exist in different forms owing to multiple combinations of subunits that can assemble into a functional receptor. In addition, they are located not only at synapses but also at extrasynaptic sites. There has been intense speculation over the past decade about whether specific NMDAR subtypes and/or locations are responsible for inducing synaptic plasticity and excitotoxicity. Here, we review the latest findings on the organization, subunit composition and endogenous control of NMDARs at extrasynaptic sites and consider their putative functions. Because astrocytes are capable of controlling NMDARs through the release of gliotransmitters, we also discuss the role of the glial environment in regulating the activity of these receptors. PMID:25225095

  11. IL-2 Immunotherapy Reveals Potential for Innate Beta Cell Regeneration in the Non-Obese Diabetic Mouse Model of Autoimmune Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Knee, Deborah; Filippi, Christophe; Londei, Marco; McNamara, Peter; Nasoff, Marc; DiDonato, Michael; Glynne, Richard; Herman, Ann E.

    2013-01-01

    Type-1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease targeting insulin-producing beta cells, resulting in dependence on exogenous insulin. To date, significant efforts have been invested to develop immune-modulatory therapies for T1D treatment. Previously, IL-2 immunotherapy was demonstrated to prevent and reverse T1D at onset in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model, revealing potential as a therapy in early disease stage in humans. In the NOD model, IL-2 deficiency contributes to a loss of regulatory T cell function. This deficiency can be augmented with IL-2 or antibody bound to IL-2 (Ab/IL-2) therapy, resulting in regulatory T cell expansion and potentiation. However, an understanding of the mechanism by which reconstituted regulatory T cell function allows for reversal of diabetes after onset is not clearly understood. Here, we describe that Ab/IL-2 immunotherapy treatment, given at the time of diabetes onset in NOD mice, not only correlated with reversal of diabetes and expansion of Treg cells, but also demonstrated the ability to significantly increase beta cell proliferation. Proliferation appeared specific to Ab/IL-2 immunotherapy, as anti-CD3 therapy did not have a similar effect. Furthermore, to assess the effect of Ab/IL-2 immunotherapy well after the development of diabetes, we tested the effect of delaying treatment for 4 weeks after diabetes onset, when beta cells were virtually absent. At this late stage after diabetes onset, Ab/IL-2 treatment was not sufficient to reverse hyperglycemia. However, it did promote survival in the absence of exogenous insulin. Proliferation of beta cells could not account for this improvement as few beta cells remained. Rather, abnormal insulin and glucagon dual-expressing cells were the only insulin-expressing cells observed in islets from mice with established disease. Thus, these data suggest that in diabetic NOD mice, beta cells have an innate capacity for regeneration both early and late in disease, which is revealed

  12. Functional efficacy of adenosine A2A receptor agonists is positively correlated to their receptor residence time

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dong; Mulder-Krieger, Thea; IJzerman, Adriaan P; Heitman, Laura H

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The adenosine A2A receptor belongs to the superfamily of GPCRs and is a promising therapeutic target. Traditionally, the discovery of novel agents for the A2A receptor has been guided by their affinity for the receptor. This parameter is determined under equilibrium conditions, largely ignoring the kinetic aspects of the ligand-receptor interaction. The aim of this study was to assess the binding kinetics of A2A receptor agonists and explore a possible relationship with their functional efficacy. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We set up, validated and optimized a kinetic radioligand binding assay (a so-called competition association assay) at the A2A receptor from which the binding kinetics of unlabelled ligands were determined. Subsequently, functional efficacies of A2A receptor agonists were determined in two different assays: a novel label-free impedance-based assay and a more traditional cAMP determination. KEY RESULTS A simplified competition association assay yielded an accurate determination of the association and dissociation rates of unlabelled A2A receptor ligands at their receptor. A correlation was observed between the receptor residence time of A2A receptor agonists and their intrinsic efficacies in both functional assays. The affinity of A2A receptor agonists was not correlated to their functional efficacy. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS This study indicates that the molecular basis of different agonist efficacies at the A2A receptor lies within their different residence times at this receptor. PMID:22324512

  13. TAAR1 Modulates Cortical Glutamate NMDA Receptor Function.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Stefano; Lignani, Gabriele; Caffino, Lucia; Maggi, Silvia; Sukhanov, Ilya; Leo, Damiana; Mus, Liudmila; Emanuele, Marco; Ronzitti, Giuseppe; Harmeier, Anja; Medrihan, Lucian; Sotnikova, Tatyana D; Chieregatti, Evelina; Hoener, Marius C; Benfenati, Fabio; Tucci, Valter; Fumagalli, Fabio; Gainetdinov, Raul R

    2015-08-01

    Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1 (TAAR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor expressed in the mammalian brain and known to influence subcortical monoaminergic transmission. Monoamines, such as dopamine, also play an important role within the prefrontal cortex (PFC) circuitry, which is critically involved in high-o5rder cognitive processes. TAAR1-selective ligands have shown potential antipsychotic, antidepressant, and pro-cognitive effects in experimental animal models; however, it remains unclear whether TAAR1 can affect PFC-related processes and functions. In this study, we document a distinct pattern of expression of TAAR1 in the PFC, as well as altered subunit composition and deficient functionality of the glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the pyramidal neurons of layer V of PFC in mice lacking TAAR1. The dysregulated cortical glutamate transmission in TAAR1-KO mice was associated with aberrant behaviors in several tests, indicating a perseverative and impulsive phenotype of mutants. Conversely, pharmacological activation of TAAR1 with selective agonists reduced premature impulsive responses observed in the fixed-interval conditioning schedule in normal mice. Our study indicates that TAAR1 plays an important role in the modulation of NMDA receptor-mediated glutamate transmission in the PFC and related functions. Furthermore, these data suggest that the development of TAAR1-based drugs could provide a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of disorders related to aberrant cortical functions.

  14. TAAR1 Modulates Cortical Glutamate NMDA Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, Stefano; Lignani, Gabriele; Caffino, Lucia; Maggi, Silvia; Sukhanov, Ilya; Leo, Damiana; Mus, Liudmila; Emanuele, Marco; Ronzitti, Giuseppe; Harmeier, Anja; Medrihan, Lucian; Sotnikova, Tatyana D; Chieregatti, Evelina; Hoener, Marius C; Benfenati, Fabio; Tucci, Valter; Fumagalli, Fabio; Gainetdinov, Raul R

    2015-01-01

    Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1 (TAAR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor expressed in the mammalian brain and known to influence subcortical monoaminergic transmission. Monoamines, such as dopamine, also play an important role within the prefrontal cortex (PFC) circuitry, which is critically involved in high-o5rder cognitive processes. TAAR1-selective ligands have shown potential antipsychotic, antidepressant, and pro-cognitive effects in experimental animal models; however, it remains unclear whether TAAR1 can affect PFC-related processes and functions. In this study, we document a distinct pattern of expression of TAAR1 in the PFC, as well as altered subunit composition and deficient functionality of the glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the pyramidal neurons of layer V of PFC in mice lacking TAAR1. The dysregulated cortical glutamate transmission in TAAR1-KO mice was associated with aberrant behaviors in several tests, indicating a perseverative and impulsive phenotype of mutants. Conversely, pharmacological activation of TAAR1 with selective agonists reduced premature impulsive responses observed in the fixed-interval conditioning schedule in normal mice. Our study indicates that TAAR1 plays an important role in the modulation of NMDA receptor-mediated glutamate transmission in the PFC and related functions. Furthermore, these data suggest that the development of TAAR1-based drugs could provide a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of disorders related to aberrant cortical functions. PMID:25749299

  15. Functional characterization of muscarinic receptors in murine airways.

    PubMed Central

    Garssen, J.; Van Loveren, H.; Gierveld, C. M.; Van der Vliet, H.; Nijkamp, F. P.

    1993-01-01

    1. The effects of muscarinic receptor antagonists considered to be selective for M1 receptors (pirenzepine; PZ), M2 receptors (AFDX-116), and for M3 receptors (4-diphenyl acetoxy N-methyl-piperidine (4-DAMP)) were used to investigate the existence of muscarinic receptors subtypes in murine airways. Atropine was used as a nonselective antagonist. The effects of these antagonists were studied upon tracheal contractions induced either by EFS (electric field stimulation) or by application of an exogenous cholinoceptor agonist (arecoline). 2. The muscarinic receptor antagonists tested inhibited arecoline-induced tracheal contractions with the following rank order of potency: 4-DAMP = atropine > pirenzepine = AFDX-116. The rank order of potency of the muscarinic antagonists used in inhibiting EFS-induced tracheal contractions was: 4-DAMP = atropine > PZ > AFDX-116. The pA2 values for these antagonists were similar when compared to the pA2 values determined in guinea-pig and bovine airway smooth muscle. 3. In addition to in vitro studies, the effects of inhalation of the different muscarinic antagonists on lung function parameters in vivo were investigated. Inhalation of 4-DAMP induced a decrease in airway resistance and an increase in lung compliance. In contrast, inhalation of AFDX-116 induced an increase in airway resistance and almost no change in lung compliance. Apart from some minor effects of atropine on airway resistance, atropine, PZ, and pilocarpine failed to induce changes in lung mechanics as determined by in vivo lung function measurements. 4. The results provide evidence for the existence of M3 receptors on murine tracheae that are involved in the contraction of tracheal smooth muscle.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8495246

  16. Inhibition of oxytocin receptor function by direct binding of progesterone.

    PubMed

    Grazzini, E; Guillon, G; Mouillac, B; Zingg, H H

    1998-04-02

    The steroid hormone progesterone (P4) is essential for establishing and maintaining pregnancy in mammals. One of its functions includes maintenance of uterine quiescence by decreasing uterine sensitivity to the uterotonic peptide hormone oxytocin. Although it is generally held that steroid hormones such as P4 act at a genomic level by binding to nuclear receptors and modulating the expression of specific target genes, we show here that the effect of P4 on uterine sensitivity to oxytocin involves direct, non-genomic action of P4 on the uterine oxytocin receptor (OTR), a member of the G-protein-coupled receptor family. P4 inhibits oxytocin binding to OTR-containing membranes in vitro, binds with high affinity to recombinant rat OTR expressed in CHO cells, and suppresses oxytocin-induced inositol phosphate production and calcium mobilization. These effects are highly steroid- and receptor-specific, because binding and signalling functions of the closely related human OTR are not affected by P4 itself but by the P4 metabolite 5beta-dihydroprogesterone. Our findings provide the first evidence for a direct interaction between a steroid hormone and a G-protein-coupled receptor and define a new level of crosstalk between the peptide- and steroid-hormone signalling pathways.

  17. Structure and Function of Serotonin G protein Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    McCorvy, John D.; Roth, Bryan L.

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin receptors are prevalent throughout the nervous system and the periphery, and remain one of the most lucrative and promising drug discovery targets for disorders ranging from migraine headaches to neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression. There are 14 distinct serotonin receptors, of which 13 are G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are targets for approximately 40% of the approved medicines. Recent crystallographic and biochemical evidence has provided a converging understanding of the basic structure and functional mechanics of GPCR activation. Currently, two GPCR crystal structures exist for the serotonin family, the 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B receptor, with the antimigraine and valvulopathic drug ergotamine bound. The first serotonin crystal structures not only provide the first evidence of serotonin receptor topography but also provide mechanistic explanations into functional selectivity or biased agonism. This review will detail the findings of these crystal structures from a molecular and mutagenesis perspective for driving rational drug design for novel therapeutics incorporating biased signaling. PMID:25601315

  18. Morphine upregulates functional expression of neurokinin-1 receptor in neurons.

    PubMed

    Wan, Qi; Douglas, Steven D; Wang, Xu; Kolson, Dennis L; O'Donnell, Lauren A; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2006-11-15

    Neuronkinin-1 receptor (NK-1R), the neuropeptide substance P (SP) preferring receptor, is highly expressed in areas of the central nervous system (CNS) that are especially implicated in depression, anxiety, and stress. Repeated exposure to opioids may sensitize neuronal systems involved in stress response. We examined the effects of morphine, the principal metabolite of heroin, on the functional expression of NK-1R in the cortical neurons. NK-1R and mu-opioid receptor (MOR) are co-expressed in the cortical neurons. Morphine enhanced NK-1R expression in the cortical neurons at both the mRNA and protein levels. The upregulated NK-1R by morphine had functional activity, because morphine-treated cortical neurons had greater SP-induced Ca(2+) mobilization than untreated neurons. Blocking opioid receptors on the cortical neurons by naltrexone or CTAP (a mu-opioid receptor antagonist) abolished the morphine action. Investigation of the mechanism(s) responsible for the morphine action showed that morphine activated NK-1R promoter and induced the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK protein in the cortical neurons. These in vitro data provide a plausible cellular mechanism for opioid-mediated neurological disorders.

  19. Mathematical Models of the Impact of IL2 Modulation Therapies on T Cell Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    León, Kalet; García-Martínez, Karina; Carmenate, Tania

    2013-01-01

    Several reports in the literature have drawn a complex picture of the effect of treatments aiming to modulate IL2 activity in vivo. They seem to promote either immunity or tolerance, probably depending on the specific context, dose, and timing of their application. Such complexity might derive from the pleiotropic role of IL2 in T cell dynamics. To theoretically address the latter possibility, our group has developed several mathematical models for Helper, Regulatory, and Memory T cell population dynamics, which account for most well-known facts concerning their relationship with IL2. We have simulated the effect of several types of therapies, including the injection of: IL2; antibodies anti-IL2; IL2/anti-IL2 immune-complexes; and mutant variants of IL2. We studied the qualitative and quantitative conditions of dose and timing for these treatments which allow them to potentiate either immunity or tolerance. Our results provide reasonable explanations for the existent pre-clinical and clinical data, predict some novel treatments, and further provide interesting practical guidelines to optimize the future application of these types of treatments. PMID:24376444

  20. Structured Treatment Interruptions and Low Doses of IL-2 in Patients with Primary HIV Infection. Inflammatory, Virological and Immunological Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Nicolás, David; Manzardo, Christian; Agüero, Fernando; Claramonte, Xavier; Plana, Montserrat; Tuset, Montserrat; Pumarola, Tomás; Gallart, Teresa; Gatell, José María; Miró, José María

    2015-01-01

    Background Interventions during primary HIV infection (PHI) can modify the clinical course during the chronic phase. The long-term effect of structured treatment interruptions (STI) followed by low doses of interleukin-2 (IL-2) in treated PHI patients is unknown. Methods Twelve PHI patients with viral load (VL) <20 copies/mL, CD4 cells >500 cells/mm3, and CD4/CD8 ratio >1, on antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiated within the first 90 days of infection and continued for at least 12 months were included. They underwent four STI and were then allocated (week 0 of the study) to ART alone or ART plus low doses of IL-2. ART was stopped once VL <20 copies/mL ('final stop'). Primary endpoints were VL<3000 copies/mL and CD4 cells >500 cells/mm3 at 48 weeks; secondary endpoints were immune activation, inflammatory markers until 48 weeks and the time before resuming ART (CD4 <350 cells/mm3 or AIDS) after ‘final stop’, compared between groups. Results Ten out of 12 patients were males, median age was 35 years and the main risk was men-who-have-sex-with-men. Only one out of 12 patients (in the STI group) maintained VL<3000 copies/mL and CD4 cells >500 cells/mm3 without ART at 48 weeks. All other virological and immunological parameters were comparable between groups at week 0, 'final stop' and week 48. However, the proportion of CD8-CD38+ cells, tumor necrosis factor and srIL-2 were higher in the IL-2 group at 'final stop' and week 24. All these differences vanished during follow-up. At 5 years after the final stop 3 out of 6 patients in the IL-2 group and 6 out of 6 patients in the STI group have resumed ART (P = 0.19). Conclusions STI and IL-2 failed to achieve virological control after ART interruption. STI were not deleterious in long-term follow-up, an important issue for eradication and functional cure trials. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02300623 PMID:26186440

  1. Functionalized Congeners of P2Y1 Receptor Antagonists:

    SciTech Connect

    de Castro, Sonia; Maruoka, Hiroshi; Hong, Kunlun; Kilbey, II, S Michael; Costanzi, Stefano; Hechler, Béatrice; Gachet, Christian; Harden, T. Kendall; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2010-01-01

    The P2Y{sub 1} receptor is a prothrombotic G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activated by ADP. Preference for the North (N) ring conformation of the ribose moiety of adenine nucleotide 3',5'-bisphosphate antagonists of the P2Y{sub 1} receptor was established by using a ring-constrained methanocarba (a bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane) ring as a ribose substitute. A series of covalently linkable N{sup 6}-methyl-(N)-methanocarba-2'-deoxyadenosine-3',5'-bisphosphates containing extended 2-alkynyl chains was designed, and binding affinity at the human (h) P2Y{sub 1} receptor determined. The chain of these functionalized congeners contained hydrophilic moieties, a reactive substituent, or biotin, linked via an amide. Variation of the chain length and position of an intermediate amide group revealed high affinity of carboxylic congener 8 (K{sub i} 23 nM) and extended amine congener 15 (K{sub i} 132 nM), both having a 2-(1-pentynoyl) group. A biotin conjugate 18 containing an extended {epsilon}-aminocaproyl spacer chain exhibited higher affinity than a shorter biotinylated analogue. Alternatively, click coupling of terminal alkynes of homologous 2-dialkynyl nucleotide derivatives to alkyl azido groups produced triazole derivatives that bound to the P2Y{sub 1} receptor following deprotection of the bisphosphate groups. The preservation of receptor affinity of the functionalized congeners was consistent with new P2Y{sub 1} receptor modeling and ligand docking. Attempted P2Y{sub 1} antagonist conjugation to PAMAM dendrimer carriers by amide formation or palladium-catalyzed reaction between an alkyne on the dendrimer and a 2-iodopurine-derivatized nucleotide was unsuccessful. A dialkynyl intermediate containing the chain length favored in receptor binding was conjugated to an azide-derivatized dendrimer, and the conjugate inhibited ADP-promoted human platelet aggregation. This is the first example of attaching a strategically functionalized P2Y receptor antagonist to a PAMAM dendrimer to

  2. Molecular neuroimaging in rodents: assessing receptor expression and function.

    PubMed

    Mueggler, Thomas; Baltes, Christof; Rudin, Markus

    2009-11-01

    Multimodal non-invasive neuroimaging in rodents constitutes an attractive tool for studying neurobiological processes in vivo. At present, imaging studies of brain anatomy and function as well as the investigation of structure-function relationships belong to the standard repertoire of neuroscientists. Molecular imaging adds a new perspective. The mapping of the receptor distribution and receptor occupancy can nowadays be complemented by specific readouts of receptor function either by visualizing the activity of signaling pathways or mapping the physiological consequences of receptor stimulation. Molecular information is obtained through the use of imaging probes that combine a target-specific ligand with a reporter moiety that generates a signal that can be detected from outside the body. For imaging probes targeting the central nervous system, penetration of the intact blood-brain barrier constitutes a major hurdle. Molecular imaging generates specific information and therefore has a large potential for disease phenotyping (diagnostics), therapy development and monitoring of treatment response. Molecular imaging is still in its infancy and major developments in imaging technology, probe design and data analysis are required in order to make an impact. Rodent molecular neuroimaging will play an important role in the development of these tools.

  3. Solution assembly of cytokine receptor ectodomain complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zining; Ciardelli, T.L.; Johnson, K.W.

    1995-09-01

    For the majority of single transmembrane-spanning cell surface receptors, signal transmission across the lipid bilayer barrier involves several discrete components of molecular recognition. The interaction between ligand and the extracellular segment of its cognate receptor (ectodomain) initiates either homomeric or heteromeric association of receptor subunits. Specific recognition among these subunits may then occur between ectodomain regions, within the membrane by interhelical contact or inside the cell between cytoplasmic domains. Any or all of these interactions may contribute to the stability of the signaling complex. It is the characteristics of ligand binding by the ectodomains of these receptors that controls the heteromeric or homomeric nature and the stoichiometry of the complex. Cytokines and their receptors belong to a growing family of macromolecular systems that exhibit these functional features and share many structural similarities as well. Interleukin-2 is a multifunctional cytokine that represents, perhaps, the most complex example to date of ligand recognition among the hematopoietin receptor family. It is the cooperative binding of IL-2 by all three proteins on the surface of activated T-lymphocytes, however, that ultimately results in crosslinking of the {beta}- and {gamma}-subunits and signaling via association of their cytoplasmic domains. Although the high-affinity IL-2R functions as a heterotrimer, heterodimers of the receptor subunits are also physiologically important. The {alpha}/{beta} heterodimer or {open_quotes}pseudo-high affinity{close_quotes} receptor captures IL-2 as a preformed cell surface complex while the {beta}/{gamma} intermediate affinity site exists, in the absence of the {alpha} subunit, on the majority of natural killer cells. We have begun to study stable complexes of cytokine receptor ectodomains of defined composition and that mimic the ligand binding characteristics of the equivalent cell surface receptor sites.

  4. The Human Glucocorticoid Receptor: Molecular Basis of Biologic Function

    PubMed Central

    Nicolaides, Nicolas C.; Galata, Zoi; Kino, Tomoshige; Chrousos, George P.; Charmandari, Evangelia

    2009-01-01

    The characterization of the subfamily of steroid hormone receptors has enhanced our understanding of how a set of hormonally derived lipophilic ligands controls cellular and molecular functions to influence development and help achieve homeostasis. The glucocorticopid receptor (GR), the first member of this subfamily, is a ubiquitously expressed intracellular protein, which functions as a ligand-dependent transcription factor that regulates the expression of glucocorticoid-responsive genes. The effector domains of the GR mediate transcriptional activation by recruiting coregulatory multi-subunit complexes that remodel chromatin, target initiation sites, and stabilize the RNA polymerase II machinery for repeated rounds of transcription of target genes. This review summarizes the basic aspects of the structure and of the human (h) GR, and the molecular basis of its biologic function. PMID:19818358

  5. The human glucocorticoid receptor: molecular basis of biologic function.

    PubMed

    Nicolaides, Nicolas C; Galata, Zoi; Kino, Tomoshige; Chrousos, George P; Charmandari, Evangelia

    2010-01-01

    The characterization of the subfamily of steroid hormone receptors has enhanced our understanding of how a set of hormonally derived lipophilic ligands controls cellular and molecular functions to influence development and help achieve homeostasis. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR), the first member of this subfamily, is a ubiquitously expressed intracellular protein, which functions as a ligand-dependent transcription factor that regulates the expression of glucocorticoid-responsive genes. The effector domains of the GR mediate transcriptional activation by recruiting coregulatory multi-subunit complexes that remodel chromatin, target initiation sites, and stabilize the RNA-polymerase II machinery for repeated rounds of transcription of target genes. This review summarizes the basic aspects of the structure and actions of the human (h) GR, and the molecular basis of its biologic functions.

  6. Cardiac nuclear receptors: architects of mitochondrial structure and function.

    PubMed

    Vega, Rick B; Kelly, Daniel P

    2017-04-03

    The adult heart is uniquely designed and equipped to provide a continuous supply of energy in the form of ATP to support persistent contractile function. This high-capacity energy transduction system is the result of a remarkable surge in mitochondrial biogenesis and maturation during the fetal-to-adult transition in cardiac development. Substantial evidence indicates that nuclear receptor signaling is integral to dynamic changes in the cardiac mitochondrial phenotype in response to developmental cues, in response to diverse postnatal physiologic conditions, and in disease states such as heart failure. A subset of cardiac-enriched nuclear receptors serve to match mitochondrial fuel preferences and capacity for ATP production with changing energy demands of the heart. In this Review, we describe the role of specific nuclear receptors and their coregulators in the dynamic control of mitochondrial biogenesis and energy metabolism in the normal and diseased heart.

  7. Structural and functional analysis of domains of the progesterone receptor.

    PubMed

    Hill, Krista K; Roemer, Sarah C; Churchill, Mair E A; Edwards, Dean P

    2012-01-30

    Steroid hormone receptors are multi-domain proteins composed of conserved well-structured regions, such as ligand (LBD) and DNA binding domains (DBD), plus other naturally unstructured regions including the amino-terminal domain (NTD) and the hinge region between the LBD and DBD. The hinge is more than just a flexible region between the DBD and LBD and is capable of binding co-regulatory proteins and the minor groove of DNA flanking hormone response elements. Because the hinge can directly participate in DNA binding it has also been termed the carboxyl terminal extension (CTE) of the DNA binding domain. The CTE and NTD are dynamic regions of the receptor that can adopt multiple conformations depending on the environment of interacting proteins and DNA. Both regions have important regulatory roles for multiple receptor functions that are related to the ability of the CTE and NTD to form multiple active conformations. This review focuses on studies of the CTE and NTD of progesterone receptor (PR), as well as related work with other steroid/nuclear receptors.

  8. Elevated copper impairs hepatic nuclear receptor function in Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wooton-Kee, Clavia Ruth; Jain, Ajay K; Wagner, Martin; Grusak, Michael A; Finegold, Milton J; Lutsenko, Svetlana; Moore, David D

    2015-09-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive disorder that results in accumulation of copper in the liver as a consequence of mutations in the gene encoding the copper-transporting P-type ATPase (ATP7B). WD is a chronic liver disorder, and individuals with the disease present with a variety of complications, including steatosis, cholestasis, cirrhosis, and liver failure. Similar to patients with WD, Atp7b⁻/⁻ mice have markedly elevated levels of hepatic copper and liver pathology. Previous studies have demonstrated that replacement of zinc in the DNA-binding domain of the estrogen receptor (ER) with copper disrupts specific binding to DNA response elements. Here, we found decreased binding of the nuclear receptors FXR, RXR, HNF4α, and LRH-1 to promoter response elements and decreased mRNA expression of nuclear receptor target genes in Atp7b⁻/⁻ mice, as well as in adult and pediatric WD patients. Excessive hepatic copper has been described in progressive familial cholestasis (PFIC), and we found that similar to individuals with WD, patients with PFIC2 or PFIC3 who have clinically elevated hepatic copper levels exhibit impaired nuclear receptor activity. Together, these data demonstrate that copper-mediated nuclear receptor dysfunction disrupts liver function in WD and potentially in other disorders associated with increased hepatic copper levels.

  9. Thyroid hormone receptors in brain development and function.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Juan

    2007-03-01

    Thyroid hormones are important during development of the mammalian brain, acting on migration and differentiation of neural cells, synaptogenesis, and myelination. The actions of thyroid hormones are mediated through nuclear thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) and regulation of gene expression. The purpose of this article is to review the role of TRs in brain maturation. In developing humans maternal and fetal thyroid glands provide thyroid hormones to the fetal brain, but the timing of receptor ontogeny agrees with clinical data on the importance of the maternal thyroid gland before midgestation. Several TR isoforms, which are encoded by the THRA and THRB genes, are expressed in the brain, with the most common being TRalpha1. Deletion of TRalpha1 in rodents is not, however, equivalent to hormone deprivation and, paradoxically, even prevents the effects of hypothyroidism. Unliganded receptor activity is, therefore, probably an important factor in causing the harmful effects of hypothyroidism. Accordingly, expression of a mutant receptor with impaired triiodothyronine (T(3)) binding and dominant negative activity affected cerebellar development and motor performance. TRs are also involved in adult brain function. TRalpha1 deletion, or expression of a dominant negative mutant receptor, induces consistent behavioral changes in adult mice, leading to severe anxiety and morphological changes in the hippocampus.

  10. Functional role of cannabinoid receptors in urinary bladder

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Pradeep; Tyagi, Vikas; Yoshimura, Naoki; Chancellor, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Cannabinoids, the active components of Cannabis sativa (maijuana), and their derivatives produce a wide spectrum of central and peripheral effects, some of which may have clinical applications. The discovery of specific cannabinoid receptors and a family of endogenous ligands of those receptors has attracted much attention to the general cannabinoid pharmacology. In recent years, studies on the functional role of cannabinoid receptors in bladder have been motivated by the therapeutic effects of cannabinoids on voiding dysfunction in multiple sclerosis patients. In this review, we shall summarize the literature on the expression of cannabinoid receptors in urinary bladder and the peripheral influence of locally and systemically administered cannabinoids in the bladder. The ongoing search for cannabinoid-based therapeutic strategies devoid of psychotropic effects can be complemented with local delivery into bladder by the intravesical route. A greater understanding of the role of the peripheral CB1 and CB2 receptor system in lower urinary tract is necessary to allow the development of new treatment for pelvic disorders. PMID:20535281

  11. Understanding Nuclear Receptor Form and Function Using Structural Biology

    PubMed Central

    Rastinejad, Fraydoon; Huang, Pengxiang; Chandra, Vikas; Khorasanizadeh, Sepideh

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NR) are a major transcription factor family whose members selectively bind small molecule lipophilic ligands and transduce those signals into specific changes in gene programs. For over two decades, structural biology efforts were directed exclusively on the individual ligand binding domains (LBDs) or DNA binding domains (DBDs) of NRs. These analyses revealed the basis for both ligand and DNA binding, and also revealed receptor conformations representing both the activated and repressed states. Additionally, crystallographic studies explained how NR LBD surfaces recognize discrete portions of transcriptional coregulators. The many structural snapshots of LBDs have also guided the development of synthetic ligands with therapeutic potential. Yet, the exclusive structural focus on isolated NR domains has made it difficult to conceptualize how all the NR polypeptide segments are coordinated physically and functionally in the context of receptor quaternary architectures. Newly emerged crystal structures of the PPARγ-RXRα heterodimer and HNF-4α homodimer have recently revealed the higher order organizations of these receptor complexes on DNA, as well as the complexity and uniqueness of their domain-domain interfaces. These emerging structural advances promise to better explain how signals in one domain can be allosterically transmitted to distal receptor domains, also providing much better frameworks for guiding future drug discovery efforts. PMID:24103914

  12. Memory regulatory T cells require IL-7 and not IL-2 for their maintenance in peripheral tissues1

    PubMed Central

    Gratz, Iris K.; Truong, Hong-An; Yang, Sara Hsin-Yi; Maurano, Megan M.; Lee, Karim; Abbas, Abul K.; Rosenblum, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Thymic Foxp3-expressing regulatory T cells are activated by peripheral self antigen to increase their suppressive function, and a fraction of these cells survive as memory Tregs (mTregs). Memory Tregs persist in non-lymphoid tissue after cessation of antigen expression and have enhanced capacity to suppress tissue-specific autoimmunity. Here, we show that murine mTregs express specific effector memory T cell markers and localize preferentially to hair follicles in skin. Memory Tregs express high levels of both IL-2Rα and IL-7Rα. Using a genetic deletion approach, we show that IL-2 is required to generate mTregs from naive CD4+ T cell precursors in vivo. However, IL-2 is not required to maintain these cells in the skin and skin-draining lymph nodes. Conversely, IL-7 is essential for maintaining mTregs in skin in the steady state. These results elucidate the fundamental biology of mTregs and show that IL-7 plays an important role in their survival in skin. PMID:23543753

  13. Peripherally induced tolerance depends on pTreg cells that require Hopx to inhibit intrinsic IL-2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Andrew; Opejin, Adeleye; Henderson, Jacob G.; Gross, Cindy; Jain, Rajan; Epstein, Jonathan A.; Flavell, Richard A.; Hawiger, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic Cells (DCs) can induce peripheral immune tolerance that prevents autoimmune responses. Antigen presentation by peripheral DCs under steady state conditions leads to a conversion of some peripheral CD4+ T cells into Treg cells that require Homeodomain Only Protein (Hopx) to mediate T cell unresponsiveness. However, the roles of these peripheral (p)Treg cells in averting autoimmune responses as well as immunological mechanisms of Hopx remain unknown. Here we report that Hopx+ pTreg cells converted by DCs from Hopxneg T cells are indispensible to sustain tolerance that prevents autoimmune responses directed at self-antigens during experimental acute encephalomyelitis (EAE). Our studies further reveal that Hopx inhibits intrinsic IL-2 expression in pTreg cells after antigenic re-challenge. In the absence of Hopx, increased levels of IL-2 lead to death and decreased numbers of pTreg cells. Therefore formation of Hopx+ pTreg cells represents a crucial pathway of sustained tolerance induced by peripheral DCs and the maintenance of such pTreg cells and tolerance requires functions of Hopx to block intrinsic IL-2 production in pTreg cells. PMID:26170384

  14. Glycine Potentiates AMPA Receptor Function through Metabotropic Activation of GluN2A-Containing NMDA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li-Jun; Hu, Rong; Lujan, Brendan; Chen, Juan; Zhang, Jian-Jian; Nakano, Yasuko; Cui, Tian-Yuan; Liao, Ming-Xia; Chen, Jin-Cao; Man, Heng-Ye; Feng, Hua; Wan, Qi

    2016-01-01

    NMDA receptors are Ca2+-permeable ion channels. The activation of NMDA receptors requires agonist glutamate and co-agonist glycine. Recent evidence indicates that NMDA receptor also has metabotropic function. Here we report that in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons, glycine increases AMPA receptor-mediated currents independent of the channel activity of NMDA receptors and the activation of glycine receptors. The potentiation of AMPA receptor function by glycine is antagonized by the inhibition of ERK1/2. In the hippocampal neurons and in the HEK293 cells transfected with different combinations of NMDA receptors, glycine preferentially acts on GluN2A-containing NMDA receptors (GluN2ARs), but not GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors (GluN2BRs), to enhance ERK1/2 phosphorylation independent of the channel activity of GluN2ARs. Without requiring the channel activity of GluN2ARs, glycine increases AMPA receptor-mediated currents through GluN2ARs. Thus, these results reveal a metabotropic function of GluN2ARs in mediating glycine-induced potentiation of AMPA receptor function via ERK1/2 activation. PMID:27807405

  15. Proteolytic cleavage, trafficking, and functions of nuclear receptor tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei-Kuang; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2015-10-01

    Intracellular localization has been reported for over three-quarters of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) families in response to environmental stimuli. Internalized RTK may bind to non-canonical substrates and affect various cellular processes. Many of the intracellular RTKs exist as fragmented forms that are generated by γ-secretase cleavage of the full-length receptor, shedding, alternative splicing, or alternative translation initiation. Soluble RTK fragments are stabilized and intracellularly transported into subcellular compartments, such as the nucleus, by binding to chaperone or transcription factors, while membrane-bound RTKs (full-length or truncated) are transported from the plasma membrane to the ER through the well-established Rab- or clathrin adaptor protein-coated vesicle retrograde trafficking pathways. Subsequent nuclear transport of membrane-bound RTK may occur via two pathways, INFS or INTERNET, with the former characterized by release of receptors from the ER into the cytosol and the latter characterized by release of membrane-bound receptor from the ER into the nucleoplasm through the inner nuclear membrane. Although most non-canonical intracellular RTK signaling is related to transcriptional regulation, there may be other functions that have yet to be discovered. In this review, we summarize the proteolytic processing, intracellular trafficking and nuclear functions of RTKs, and discuss how they promote cancer progression, and their clinical implications.

  16. Histamine homologues discriminating between two functional H3 receptor assays. Evidence for H3 receptor heterogeneity?.

    PubMed

    Leurs, R; Kathmann, M; Vollinga, R C; Menge, W M; Schlicker, E; Timmerman, H

    1996-03-01

    We studied several histamine homologues as potential ligands for the histamine H3 receptor in two binding assays ([125l]iodophenpropit and N alpha-[3H]methylhistamine binding to rat brain cortex membranes) and two functional H3 receptor models (inhibition of the neurogenic contraction in the guinea pig jejunum and of [3H]noradrenaline release in mouse brain cortex slices). The histamine homologues acted all as competitive H3 antagonists at the guinea pig jejunum. The potency in this model and/or the affinity for N alpha-[3H]methylhistamine binding was higher for the butylene (pA2 = 7.7; pKi = 9.4) and pentylene homologue (impentamine, pA2 = 8.4; pKi = 9.1) than for the propylene, hexylene and octylene homologues (pA2 = 5.9-7.8; pKi = 6.1-7.6). In the mouse brain cortex the propylene, butylene and pentylene homologues acted as partial agonists (alpha = 0.3-0.6) and the hexylene and octylene homologues acted as antagonists. [125I]Iodophenpropit binding was displaced monophasically by the propylene, hexylene and octylene homologues and biphasically by the butylene and pentylene homologues. Biphasic displacement curves were converted to monophasic ones by 10 microM guanosine-5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate. In conclusion, the homologue of histamine with five methylene groups is a more potent H3 receptor antagonist in the guinea pig jejunum than the other homologues tested. Furthermore, the propylene, butylene and pentylene homologues can discriminate between the two functional H3 receptor models in the guinea pig jejunum and mouse brain. These data are discussed in relation to the efficiency of receptor coupling and receptor heterogeneity.

  17. Adenosine receptor expression and function in rat striatal cholinergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Preston, Z; Lee, K; Widdowson, L; Freeman, T C; Dixon, A K; Richardson, P J

    2000-06-01

    Cholinergic neurons were identified in rat striatal slices by their size, membrane properties, sensitivity to the NK(1) receptor agonist (Sar(9), Met(O(2))(11)) Substance P, and expression of choline acetyltransferase mRNA. A(1) receptor mRNA was detected in 60% of the neurons analysed, and A(2A) receptor mRNA in 67% (n=15). The A(1) receptor agonist R-N(6)-(2-phenylisopropyl)adenosine (R-PIA) hyperpolarized cholinergic neurons in a concentration dependent manner sensitive to the A(1) antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1, 3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX, 100 nM). In dual stimulus experiments, the A(2A) receptor antagonist 8-(3-chlorostyryl)caffeine (CSC, 500 nM) decreased release of [(3)H]-acetylcholine from striatal slices (S2/S1 0.78+/-0.07 versus 0.95+/-0.05 in control), as did adenosine deaminase (S2/S1 ratio 0.69+/-0.05), whereas the A(1) receptor antagonist DPCPX (100 nM) had no effect (S2/S1 1.05+/-0.14). In the presence of adenosine deaminase the adenosine A(2A) receptor agonist 2-p-((carboxyethyl)phenylethylamino)-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadeno sin e (CGS21680, 10 nM) increased release (S2/S1 ratio 1.03+/-0.05 versus 0.88+/-0.05 in control), an effect blocked by the antagonist CSC (500 nM, S2/S1 0.68+/-0.05, versus 0.73+/-0.08 with CSC alone). The combined superfusion of bicuculline (10 microM), saclofen (1 microM) and naloxone (10 microM) had no effect on the stimulation by CGS21680 (S2/S1 ratio 0.99+/-0.04). The A(1) receptor agonist R-PIA (100 nM) inhibited the release of [(3)H]-acetylcholine (S2/S1 ratio 0.70+/-0.03), an effect blocked by DPCPX (S2/S1 ratio 1.06+/-0.07). It is concluded that both A(1) and A(2A) receptors are expressed on striatal cholinergic neurons where they are functionally active.

  18. Nitric oxide synthesis contributes to IL-2-induced antitumor responses against intraperitoneal Meth A tumor.

    PubMed

    Yim, C Y; McGregor, J R; Kwon, O D; Bastian, N R; Rees, M; Mori, M; Hibbs, J B; Samlowski, W E

    1995-11-01

    IL-2 therapy is a potent inductive stimulus for nitric oxide (NO.) synthesis in mice and humans. It is not yet clear whether NO. can contribute to IL-2-induced therapeutic responses. The murine skin cancer Meth A is relatively resistant to lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cell killing, allowing evaluation of the role of IL-2-induced NO. synthesis in vivo, without contribution by LAK cells. Subcutaneous IL-2 treatment of mice bearing i.p. Meth A tumor increased nitrite production by cells derived from ascites (63 +/- 14 microM vs 3.2 +/- 1.5 microM in untreated controls). N omega-monomethyl-L-arginine (MLA), NO. synthase inhibitor, prevented this increase. NO. production correlated in an inverse fashion with tumor cell proliferation in vitro. Evidence for IL-2-induced heme nitrosylation was demonstrated in tumor cells by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. By immunomagnetic depletion experiments, macrophages were implicated as a major source of NO. synthesis. Cytologic and flow-cytometric evaluation revealed that IL-2 treatment resulted in enhanced lymphocyte and macrophage recruitment into malignant ascites, and decreases in tumor cell recovery. MLA administration further increased host cell recovery. Subcutaneous IL-2 therapy increased urinary nitrate excretion up to eightfold in mice, and appeared to produce a significant survival advantage that was prevented by MLA administration.

  19. Bisphenol A affects androgen receptor function via multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Teng, Christina; Goodwin, Bonnie; Shockley, Keith; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Norris, John; Merrick, B Alex; Jetten, Anton M; Austin, Christopher P; Tice, Raymond R

    2013-05-25

    Bisphenol A (BPA), is a well-known endocrine disruptor compound (EDC) that affects the normal development and function of the female and male reproductive system, however the mechanisms of action remain unclear. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of how BPA may affect ten different nuclear receptors, stable cell lines containing individual nuclear receptor ligand binding domain (LBD)-linked to the β-Gal reporter were examined by a quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) format in the Tox21 Screening Program of the NIH. The results showed that two receptors, estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and androgen receptor (AR), are affected by BPA in opposite direction. To confirm the observed effects of BPA on ERα and AR, we performed transient transfection experiments with full-length receptors and their corresponding response elements linked to luciferase reporters. We also included in this study two BPA analogs, bisphenol AF (BPAF) and bisphenol S (BPS). As seen in African green monkey kidney CV1 cells, the present study confirmed that BPA and BPAF act as ERα agonists (half maximal effective concentration EC50 of 10-100 nM) and as AR antagonists (half maximal inhibitory concentration IC50 of 1-2 μM). Both BPA and BPAF antagonized AR function via competitive inhibition of the action of synthetic androgen R1881. BPS with lower estrogenic activity (EC50 of 2.2 μM), did not compete with R1881 for AR binding, when tested at 30 μM. Finally, the effects of BPA were also evaluated in a nuclear translocation assays using EGPF-tagged receptors. Similar to 17β-estradiol (E2) which was used as control, BPA was able to enhance ERα nuclear foci formation but at a 100-fold higher concentration. Although BPA was able to bind AR, the nuclear translocation was reduced. Furthermore, BPA was unable to induce functional foci in the nuclei and is consistent with the transient transfection study that BPA is unable to activate AR.

  20. Inducible adeno-associated virus-mediated IL-2 gene therapy prevents autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Goudy, Kevin S; Johnson, Mark C; Garland, Alaina; Li, Chengwen; Samulski, R Jude; Wang, Bo; Tisch, Roland

    2011-03-15

    IL-2 and TGF-β1 play key roles in the immunobiology of Foxp3-expressing CD25(+)CD4(+) T cells (Foxp3(+)Treg). Administration of these cytokines offers an appealing approach to manipulate the Foxp3(+)Treg pool and treat T cell-mediated autoimmunity such as type 1 diabetes. However, efficacy of cytokine treatment is dependent on the mode of application, and the potent pleiotropic effects of cytokines like IL-2 may lead to severe side effects. In the current study, we used a gene therapy-based approach to assess the efficacy of recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors expressing inducible IL-2 or TGF-β1 transgenes to suppress ongoing β cell autoimmunity in NOD mice. Intramuscular vaccination of recombinant adeno-associated virus to 10-wk-old NOD female mice and a subsequent 3 wk induction of IL-2 was sufficient to prevent diabetes and block the progression of insulitis. Protection correlated with an increased frequency of Foxp3(+)Treg in the periphery as well as in the draining pancreatic lymph nodes and islets. IL-2 induced a shift in the ratio favoring Foxp3(+)Treg versus IFN-γ-expressing T cells infiltrating the islets. Induction of IL-2 had no systemic effect on the frequency or activational status of T cells and NK cells. Induction of TGF-β1 had no effect on the Foxp3(+)Treg pool or the progression of β cell autoimmunity despite induced systemic levels of activated TGF-β1 that were comparable to IL-2. These results demonstrate that inducible IL-2 gene therapy is an effective and safe approach to manipulate Foxp3(+)Treg and suppress T cell-mediated autoimmunity and that under the conditions employed, IL-2 is more potent than TGF-β1.

  1. Enhancing NMDA Receptor Function: Recent Progress on Allosteric Modulators

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are subtype glutamate receptors that play important roles in excitatory neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity. Their hypo- or hyperactivation are proposed to contribute to the genesis or progression of various brain diseases, including stroke, schizophrenia, depression, and Alzheimer's disease. Past efforts in targeting NMDARs for therapeutic intervention have largely been on inhibitors of NMDARs. In light of the discovery of NMDAR hypofunction in psychiatric disorders and perhaps Alzheimer's disease, efforts in boosting NMDAR activity/functions have surged in recent years. In this review, we will focus on enhancing NMDAR functions, especially on the recent progress in the generation of subunit-selective, allosteric positive modulators (PAMs) of NMDARs. We shall also discuss the usefulness of these newly developed NMDAR-PAMs. PMID:28163934

  2. The Emergence of NMDA Receptor Metabotropic Function: Insights from Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dore, Kim; Aow, Jonathan; Malinow, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The NMDA receptor (R) participates in many important physiological and pathological processes. For example, its activation is required for both long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) of synaptic transmission, cellular models of learning and memory. Furthermore, it may play a role in the actions of amyloid-beta on synapses as well as in the signaling leading to cell death following stroke. Until recently, these processes were thought to be mediated by ion-flux through the receptor. Using a combination of imaging and electrophysiological approaches, ion-flux independent functions of the NMDAR were recently examined. In this review, we will discuss the role of metabotropic NMDAR function in LTD and synaptic dysfunction. PMID:27516738

  3. The role of Fas in the immune system biology of IL-2R alpha knockout mice: interplay among regulatory T cells, inflammation, hemopoiesis, and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rahul; Bagavant, Harini; Jarjour, Wael N; Sung, Sun-Sang J; Ju, Shyr-Te

    2005-08-01

    Introducing lpr mutation prevents early mortality associated with IL-2Ralpha knockout (KO) mice, prompting us to determine the role of Fas in the immune system biology of IL-2Ralpha KO mice. Consistent with a defect in CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cell expression, spontaneous lymphocyte activation in lymphoid organs was observed in 6-wk-old mice. In 16- to 22-wk-old mice, infiltration of leukocytes was observed in bone marrow, colon, lung, pancreas, lacrimal gland, and salivary gland, but not in heart, thyroid, liver, stomach, small intestine, ovary, and kidney. In the lymphocytes-infiltrated bone marrow, B cell lymphopoiesis was blocked at pro-B to pre-B/immature B stage, culminating in an age-dependent B cell loss in the periphery. These phenotypes were also observed in IL-2Ralpha KO mice bearing the lpr mutation (DM mice), indicating Treg cell function and the phenotypes attributed directly to Treg cell abnormality are largely Fas-independent. However, anemia and body weight loss were partially prevented, tissue cell apoptosis was inhibited, and lifespan was improved in the DM mice, demonstrating Fas-dependent elements in these processes. Our age-dependent, lifelong analysis of IL-2Ralpha KO and DM mice supports a CD4+CD25+ Treg cell-based mechanism for the abnormal immune system biology observed in IL-2Ralpha KO mice and provides a global view of the interplays among Treg cells, multiorgan inflammation, hemopoiesis, and apoptosis.

  4. Silencing and trans-activation of the mouse IL-2 gene in Xenopus oocytes by proteins from resting and mitogen-induced primary T-lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Mouzaki, A; Weil, R; Muster, L; Rungger, D

    1991-01-01

    The Xenopus oocyte system was used to test functionally, putative trans-active elements involved in the transcriptional control of the mouse interleukin-2 (IL-2) gene in resting and mitogen-induced primary T-lymphocytes. The IL-2 gene injected into the oocyte is active over a wide range of DNA concentrations. This basal activity is silenced by the addition of protein extracts from G0-arrested spleen cells. Extracts from 8 h-stimulated spleen cells do not silence but moderately increase transcription over basal level. When IL-2 transcription is silenced first by an injection of extract from resting spleen cells, the addition of proteins from stimulated cells results in a strong increase in transcription (derepression). Use of proteins from purified splenic T-lymphocytes shows that both silencer(s) and activator(s) are contributed by these cells. Extracts from control tissues have neither a silencing nor stimulatory effect. None of the proteins tested affects the activities of co-injected control genes. Injections with IL-2 promoter mutants indicate that the main target sequence of the silencing and activating factors is a purine region (Pu-box) lying between positions -261 and -292 upstream of the IL-2 gene. Bandshift assays show differential binding of the Pu-box with proteins from resting or activated T-cells. Images PMID:2026141

  5. Loss of functional GABAA receptors in the Alzheimer diseased brain

    PubMed Central

    Limon, Agenor; Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge Mauricio; Miledi, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    The cholinergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission systems are known to be severely disrupted in Alzheimer's disease (AD). GABAergic neurotransmission, in contrast, is generally thought to be well preserved. Evidence from animal models and human postmortem tissue suggest GABAergic remodeling in the AD brain. Nevertheless, there is no information on changes, if any, in the electrophysiological properties of human native GABA receptors as a consequence of AD. To gain such information, we have microtransplanted cell membranes, isolated from temporal cortices of control and AD brains, into Xenopus oocytes, and recorded the electrophysiological activity of the transplanted GABA receptors. We found an age-dependent reduction of GABA currents in the AD brain. This reduction was larger when the AD membranes were obtained from younger subjects. We also found that GABA currents from AD brains have a faster rate of desensitization than those from non-AD brains. Furthermore, GABA receptors from AD brains were slightly, but significantly, less sensitive to GABA than receptors from non-AD brains. The reduction of GABA currents in AD was associated with reductions of mRNA and protein of the principal GABA receptor subunits normally present in the temporal cortex. Pairwise analysis of the transcripts within control and AD groups and analyses of the proportion of GABA receptor subunits revealed down-regulation of α1 and γ2 subunits in AD. In contrast, the proportions of α2, β1, and γ1 transcripts were up-regulated in the AD brains. Our data support a functional remodeling of GABAergic neurotransmission in the human AD brain. PMID:22691495

  6. Structural and Functional Similarity of Amphibian Constitutive Androstane Receptor with Mammalian Pregnane X Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Mathäs, Marianne; Burk, Oliver; Gödtel-Armbrust, Ute; Herlyn, Holger; Wojnowski, Leszek; Windshügel, Björn

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear receptors and xenosensors constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) and pregnane X receptor (PXR, NR1I2) induce the expression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and transporters, which also affects various endobiotics. While human and mouse CAR feature a high basal activity and low induction upon ligand exposure, we recently identified two constitutive androstane receptors in Xenopus laevis (xlCARα and β) that possess PXR-like characteristics such as low basal activity and activation in response to structurally diverse compounds. Using a set of complementary computational and biochemical approaches we provide evidence for xlCARα being the structural and functional counterpart of mammalian PXR. A three-dimensional model of the xlCARα ligand-binding domain (LBD) reveals a human PXR-like L-shaped ligand binding pocket with a larger volume than the binding pockets in human and murine CAR. The shape and amino acid composition of the ligand-binding pocket of xlCAR suggests PXR-like binding of chemically diverse ligands which was confirmed by biochemical methods. Similarly to PXR, xlCARα possesses a flexible helix 11’. Modest increase in the recruitment of coactivator PGC-1α may contribute to the enhanced basal activity of three gain-of-function xlCARα mutants humanizing key LBD amino acid residues. xlCARα and PXR appear to constitute an example of convergent evolution. PMID:24797902

  7. Up-regulated MHC-class II expression and gamma-IFN and soluble IL-2R in lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, H; Takabatake, T; Takaeda, M; Wada, T; Naito, T; Ikeda, K; Goshima, S; Takasawa, K; Tomosugi, N; Kobayashi, K

    1992-09-01

    Expression of MHC-class II molecules (HLA-DR and -DQ), serum gamma-interferon (gamma-IFN) and soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sIL-2R) levels were studied in 35 Japanese patients with lupus nephritis (LN) to clarify intraglomerular cellular activation and cytokine involvement in human LN. In 11 normal kidney specimens, HLA-DR(Ia1) was noted in glomerular tufts, but HLA-DQ was either not or was faintly detected in glomeruli by the indirect immunofluorescence technique. HLA-DR and -DQ were observed mainly on the surface of glomerular endothelial cells in 100% and 50% of 28 lupus kidney specimens except for necrotic or sclerotic lesions. HLA-DQ was expressed in a high incidence of 67%, 86% in patients with proliferative LN (WHO Class III-IV) and active lesions, respectively. Serum gamma-IFN and sIL-2R levels were 1.2 +/- 0.2 U/ml and 190 +/- 24 U/ml (mean +/- SEM; N = 30) in normal controls, and elevated in patients with proliferative LN (4.1 +/- 1.0 U/ml, 383 +/- 81 U/ml, N = 25), especially with active lesions (6.2 +/- 1.5 U/ml, 500 +/- 110 U/ml, N = 14). Overall, glomerular lesions such as HLA-DQ expression, the activity index and leukocyte infiltration correlated positively with serum gamma-IFN levels (r = 0.55; P less than 0.01 for HLA-DQ, r = 0.68; P less than 0.001 for activity index, r = 0.38; P less than 0.05 for leukocyte infiltration), but not with serum sIL-2R levels, anti-DNA antibody titers and CH50 titers.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Integrating TRPV1 Receptor Function with Capsaicin Psychophysics

    PubMed Central

    Smutzer, Gregory; Devassy, Roni K.

    2016-01-01

    Capsaicin is a naturally occurring vanilloid that causes a hot, pungent sensation in the human oral cavity. This trigeminal stimulus activates TRPV1 receptors and stimulates an influx of cations into sensory cells. TRPV1 receptors function as homotetramers that also respond to heat, proinflammatory substances, lipoxygenase products, resiniferatoxin, endocannabinoids, protons, and peptide toxins. Kinase-mediated phosphorylation of TRPV1 leads to increased sensitivity to both chemical and thermal stimuli. In contrast, desensitization occurs via a calcium-dependent mechanism that results in receptor dephosphorylation. Human psychophysical studies have shown that capsaicin is detected at nanomole amounts and causes desensitization in the oral cavity. Psychophysical studies further indicate that desensitization can be temporarily reversed in the oral cavity if stimulation with capsaicin is resumed at short interstimulus intervals. Pretreatment of lingual epithelium with capsaicin modulates the perception of several primary taste qualities. Also, sweet taste stimuli may decrease the intensity of capsaicin perception in the oral cavity. In addition, capsaicin perception and hedonic responses may be modified by diet. Psychophysical studies with capsaicin are consistent with recent findings that have identified TRPV1 channel modulation by phosphorylation and interactions with membrane inositol phospholipids. Future studies will further clarify the importance of capsaicin and its receptor in human health and nutrition. PMID:26884754

  9. Integrating TRPV1 Receptor Function with Capsaicin Psychophysics.

    PubMed

    Smutzer, Gregory; Devassy, Roni K

    2016-01-01

    Capsaicin is a naturally occurring vanilloid that causes a hot, pungent sensation in the human oral cavity. This trigeminal stimulus activates TRPV1 receptors and stimulates an influx of cations into sensory cells. TRPV1 receptors function as homotetramers that also respond to heat, proinflammatory substances, lipoxygenase products, resiniferatoxin, endocannabinoids, protons, and peptide toxins. Kinase-mediated phosphorylation of TRPV1 leads to increased sensitivity to both chemical and thermal stimuli. In contrast, desensitization occurs via a calcium-dependent mechanism that results in receptor dephosphorylation. Human psychophysical studies have shown that capsaicin is detected at nanomole amounts and causes desensitization in the oral cavity. Psychophysical studies further indicate that desensitization can be temporarily reversed in the oral cavity if stimulation with capsaicin is resumed at short interstimulus intervals. Pretreatment of lingual epithelium with capsaicin modulates the perception of several primary taste qualities. Also, sweet taste stimuli may decrease the intensity of capsaicin perception in the oral cavity. In addition, capsaicin perception and hedonic responses may be modified by diet. Psychophysical studies with capsaicin are consistent with recent findings that have identified TRPV1 channel modulation by phosphorylation and interactions with membrane inositol phospholipids. Future studies will further clarify the importance of capsaicin and its receptor in human health and nutrition.

  10. Central nicotinic receptors: structure, function, ligands, and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Romanelli, M Novella; Gratteri, Paola; Guandalini, Luca; Martini, Elisabetta; Bonaccini, Claudia; Gualtieri, Fulvio

    2007-06-01

    The growing interest in nicotinic receptors, because of their wide expression in neuronal and non-neuronal tissues and their involvement in several important CNS pathologies, has stimulated the synthesis of a high number of ligands able to modulate their function. These membrane proteins appear to be highly heterogeneous, and still only incomplete information is available on their structure, subunit composition, and stoichiometry. This is due to the lack of selective ligands to study the role of nAChR under physiological or pathological conditions; so far, only compounds showing selectivity between alpha4beta2 and alpha7 receptors have been obtained. The nicotinic receptor ligands have been designed starting from lead compounds from natural sources such as nicotine, cytisine, or epibatidine, and, more recently, through the high-throughput screening of chemical libraries. This review focuses on the structure of the new agonists, antagonists, and allosteric ligands of nicotinic receptors, it highlights the current knowledge on the binding site models as a molecular modeling approach to design new compounds, and it discusses the nAChR modulators which have entered clinical trials.

  11. Characterization of interleukin 2 (IL-2)-dependent cytotoxic T-cell clones. V. Transfer of resistance to allografts and tumor grafts requires exogenous IL-2.

    PubMed

    Palladino, M A; Welte, K; Carroll, A M; Oettgen, H F

    1984-07-01

    The adoptive transfer of resistance to tumor grafts with cloned interleukin 2 (IL-2)-dependent cytotoxic T-cell lines was examined. Two clones were used: clone CTLL-A2 which recognizes H-2Dd determinants and clone CTLL-R5 which recognizes a unique cell surface antigen of BALB/c leukemia RL male 1. Systemic transfer of resistance with these clones was accomplished only when exogenous (rat or human) IL-2 was administered at the same time. Intraperitoneal injection of CTLL-A2 cells accelerated rejection of sarcoma Meth A (H-2Dd), but not ascites sarcoma BP8 (H-2k) or leukemia EL4 (H-2b) inoculated subcutaneously into C57BL/6 mice. CTLL-R5 cells were examined in local (Winn tests) as well as systemic transfer experiments. When mixed with leukemia cells before subcutaneous injection, they suppressed the growth of leukemia RL male 1 without exogenous IL-2. When injected intraperitoneally, CTLL-R5 cells inhibited the growth of subcutaneous grafts of leukemia RL male 1 only when exogenous IL-2 was administered at the same time. CTLL-R5 did not inhibit the growth of other radiation-induced BALB/c leukemias.

  12. Effects of pharmacological and genetic disruption of CXCR4 chemokine receptor function in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, Shubhchintan; Cho, Byung S; Ghosh, Dipanjan; Sivina, Mariela; Koehrer, Stefan; Müschen, Markus; Peled, Amnon; Davis, Richard E; Konopleva, Marina; Burger, Jan A

    2016-08-01

    B cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (B-ALL) cells express high levels of CXCR4 chemokine receptors for homing and retention within the marrow microenvironment. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) secrete CXCL12, the ligand for CXCR4, and protect B-ALL cells from cytotoxic drugs. Therefore, the therapeutic use of CXCR4 antagonists has been proposed to disrupt cross talk between B-ALL cells and the protective stroma. Because CXCR4 antagonists can have activating agonistic function, we compared the genetic and pharmacological deletion of CXCR4 in B-ALL cells, using CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing and CXCR4 antagonists that are in clinical use (plerixafor, BKT140). Both genetic and pharmacological CXCR4 inhibition significantly reduced B-ALL cell migration to CXCL12 gradients and beneath BMSC, and restored drug sensitivity to dexamethasone, vincristine and cyclophosphamide. NOD/SCID/IL-2rγnull mice injected with CXCR4 gene-deleted B-ALL cells had significant delay in disease progression and superior survival when compared to control mice injected with CXCR4 wild-type B-ALL cells. These findings indicate that anti-leukaemia activity of CXCR4 antagonists is primarily due to CXCR4 inhibition, rather than agonistic activity, and corroborate that CXCR4 is an important target to overcome stroma-mediated drug resistance in B-ALL.

  13. Functional CB2 type cannabinoid receptors at CNS synapses.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Nicola H; Stanford, Ian M; Woodhall, Gavin L

    2009-09-01

    To date, it has been thought that cannabinoid receptors in CNS are primarily of the CB1R subtype, with CB2R expressed only in glia and peripheral tissues. However, evidence for the expression of CB2 type cannabinoid receptors at neuronal sites in the CNS is building through anatomical localization of receptors and mRNA in neurons and behavioural studies of central effects of CB2R agonists. In the medial entorhinal area of the rat, we found that blockade of CB1R did not occlude suppression of GABAergic inhibition by the non-specific endogenous cannabinoid 2-AG, suggesting that CB1R could not account fully for the effects of 2-AG. Suppression could be mimicked using the CB2R agonist JWH-133 and reversed by the CB2R inverse agonist AM-630, indicating the presence of functional CB2R. When we reversed the order of drug application AM-630 blocked the effects of the CB2R agonist JWH-133, but not the CB1R inverse agonist LY320135. JTE-907, a CB2R inverse agonist structurally unrelated to AM-630 elicited increased GABAergic neurotransmission at picomolar concentrations. Analysis of mIPSCs revealed that CB2R effects were restricted to action potential dependent, but not action potential independent GABA release. These data provide pharmacological evidence for functional CB2R at CNS synapses.

  14. Computational design of receptor and sensor proteins with novel functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Looger, Loren L.; Dwyer, Mary A.; Smith, James J.; Hellinga, Homme W.

    2003-05-01

    The formation of complexes between proteins and ligands is fundamental to biological processes at the molecular level. Manipulation of molecular recognition between ligands and proteins is therefore important for basic biological studies and has many biotechnological applications, including the construction of enzymes, biosensors, genetic circuits, signal transduction pathways and chiral separations. The systematic manipulation of binding sites remains a major challenge. Computational design offers enormous generality for engineering protein structure and function. Here we present a structure-based computational method that can drastically redesign protein ligand-binding specificities. This method was used to construct soluble receptors that bind trinitrotoluene, L-lactate or serotonin with high selectivity and affinity. These engineered receptors can function as biosensors for their new ligands; we also incorporated them into synthetic bacterial signal transduction pathways, regulating gene expression in response to extracellular trinitrotoluene or L-lactate. The use of various ligands and proteins shows that a high degree of control over biomolecular recognition has been established computationally. The biological and biosensing activities of the designed receptors illustrate potential applications of computational design.

  15. Functional interaction of nuclear receptor coactivator 4 with aryl hydrocarbon receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kollara, Alexandra; Brown, Theodore J. . E-mail: brown@mshri.on.ca

    2006-07-28

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) transcriptional activity is enhanced by interaction with p160 coactivators. We demonstrate here that NcoA4, a nuclear receptor coactivator, interacts with and amplifies AhR action. NcoA4-AhR and NcoA4-ARNT interactions were demonstrated by immunoprecipitation in T47D breast cancer and COS cells and was independent of ligand. Overexpression of NcoA4 enhanced AhR transcriptional activity 3.2-fold in the presence of dioxin, whereas overexpression of a splice variant, NcoA4{beta}, as well as a variant lacking the C-terminal region enhanced AhR transcriptional activity by only 1.6-fold. Enhanced AhR signaling by NcoA4 was independent of the LXXLL and FXXLF motifs or of the activation domain. NcoA4 protein localized to cytoplasm in the absence of dioxin and in both the cytoplasm and nucleus following dioxin treatment. NcoA4-facilitation of AhR activity was abolished by overexpression of androgen receptor, suggesting a potential competition of AhR and androgen receptor for NcoA4. These findings thus demonstrate a functional interaction between NcoA4 and AhR that may alter AhR activity to affect disease development and progression.

  16. The gamma-chain cytokine/receptor system in fish: more ligands and receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tiehui; Huang, Wenshu; Costa, Maria M; Secombes, Christopher J

    2011-11-01

    The mammalian gamma-chain (γC) cytokine family consists of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-7, IL-9, IL-15 and IL-21. They signal through a receptor complex containing the common γC and a private alpha chain, and in the case of IL-2 and IL-15 an additional common IL-2/15Rβ chain. Deficiency of γC signalling in mammals prevents CD4+ T cells from developing effector functions and CD8+ T cells from developing immunological memory. Thus γC cytokines are critical for the generation and peripheral homeostasis of naïve and memory T cells. This review will give an update on the γC ligands and receptor subunits in fish, and also present some new data on the cloning and expression of a second γC and two IL-2Rβ chains in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. In recent years, aided by the availability of sequenced fish genomes and expressed sequence tag databases, five of the six mammalian γC cytokines and their cognate receptors have been discovered in fish, with only the IL-9/IL-9R homologues apparently absent. Paralogues have been discovered in diploid fish and all the receptors described in the tetraploid rainbow trout, including γC itself, IL-2Rβ, IL-4Rα, IL-13Rα1, IL-13Rα2 and IL-2/15Rα, have duplicates. As a consequence of the teleost and salmonid whole genome duplications, even more paralogues may yet be discovered. Some of the paralogues have changes in domain structures and show differential expression and modulation, suggesting the potential for a change in function. Functional characterisation of fish γC cytokines is beginning but made more difficult by the co-existence of so many paralogues of the ligands and their receptors. Initial functional studies have shown that fish γC cytokines can modulate the expression of key cytokines (e.g. interferon-γ, IL-10 and IL-22) of the adaptive immune response, and may thus have promise as adjuvants to improve vaccination efficiency in fish.

  17. Chronic hypoxia in pregnancy affects thymus development in Balb/c mouse offspring via IL2 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaopeng; Zhou, Xiuwen; Li, Lingjun; Sun, Miao; Gao, Qingqing; Zhang, Pengjie; Tang, Jiaqi; He, Yu; Zhu, Di; Xu, Zhice

    2016-04-01

    Hypoxia during pregnancy can adversely affect development. This study, addressed the impact of prenatal hypoxia on thymus development in the rodent offspring. Pregnant Balb/c mice were exposed to hypoxia or normoxia during pregnancy, and the thymuses of their offspring were tested. Chronic hypoxia during pregnancy resulted in significantly decreased fetal body weight, with an increased thymus-to-body weight ratio. Histological analysis revealed a smaller cortical zone in the thymus of the offspring exposed to hypoxia. A reduction in the cortical T lymphocyte population corresponded to increased mRNA abundance of caspase 3 (Casp3) and decreased expression of the proliferation marker Ki-67 (Mki67). Differences in T lymphocyte sub-populations in the thymus further indicate that thymus development in offspring was retarded or stagnated by prenatal hypoxia. The abundance of IL2 and its receptor was reduced in the thymus following prenatal hypoxia. This was accompanied by an increase in thymus HIF1A and IKKβ and a decrease in phosphorylated NFKB, MAP2K1, and MAPK1/3 compared to control pregnancies. Together, these results implicate deficiencies in IL2-mediated signaling as one source of prenatal-hypoxia-impaired thymus development.

  18. MMP-7 cleaves the NR1 NMDA receptor subunit and modifies NMDA receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Szklarczyk, Arek; Ewaleifoh, Osefame; Beique, Jean-Claude; Wang, Yue; Knorr, David; Haughey, Norman; Malpica, Tanya; Mattson, Mark P.; Huganir, Richard; Conant, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are zinc-dependent enzymes that play a role in the inflammatory response. These enzymes have been well studied in the context of cancer biology and inflammation. Recent studies, however, suggest that these enzymes also play roles in brain development and neurodegenerative disease. Select MMPs can target proteins critical to synaptic structure and neuronal survival, including integrins and cadherins. Here, we show that one member of the MMP family, MMP-7, which may be released from cells, including microglia, can target a protein critical to synaptic function. Through analysis of extracts from murine cortical slice preparations, we show that MMP-7 cleaves the NR1 subunit of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor to generate an N-terminal fragment of ∼65 kDa. Moreover, studies with recombinant protein show that MMP-7-mediated cleavage of NR1 occurs at amino acid 517, which is extracellular and just distal to the first transmembrane domain. Data suggest that NR2A, which shares sequence homology with NR1, is also cleaved following treatment of slices with MMP-7, while select AMPA receptor subunits are not. Consistent with a potential effect of MMP-7 on ligand binding, additional experiments demonstrate that NMDA-mediated calcium flux is significantly diminished by MMP-7 pretreatment of cultures. In addition, the AMPA/NMDA ratio is increased by MMP-7 pretreatment. These data suggest that synaptic function may be altered in neurological conditions associated with increased levels of MMP-7.—Szklarczyk, A., Ewaleifoh, O., Beique, J.-C., Wang, Y., Knorr, D., Haughey, N., Malpica, T., Mattson, M. P., Huganir, R., Conant, K. MMP-7 cleaves the NR1 NMDA receptor subunit and modifies NMDA receptor function. PMID:18644839

  19. Functional analysis of an olfactory receptor in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Störtkuhl, Klemens F.; Kettler, Raffael

    2001-01-01

    Fifty nine candidate olfactory receptor (Or) genes have recently been identified in Drosophila melanogaster, one of which is Or43a. In wild-type flies, Or43a is expressed at the distal edge of the third antennal segment in about 15 Or neurons. To identify ligands for the receptor we used the Gal4/UAS system to misexpress Or43a in the third antennal segment. Or43a mRNA expression in the antenna of transformed and wild-type flies was visualized by in situ hybridization with a digoxigenin-labeled probe. Electroantennogram recordings from transformed and wild-type flies were used to identify cyclohexanol, cyclohexanone, benzaldehyde, and benzyl alcohol as ligands for the Or43a. This in vivo analysis reveals functional properties of one member of the recently isolated Or family in Drosophila and will provide further insight into our understanding of olfactory coding. PMID:11481495

  20. The Effect of Continuous Versus Pericycle Antiretroviral Therapy on IL-2 Responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Healey, Letha M.; Hahn, Barbara K.; Rehm, Catherine A.; Adelsberger, Joseph; Qin, Jing; Follmann, Dean A.; Tavel, Jorge; Kovacs, Joseph A.; Sereti, Irini

    2008-01-01

    Background Intermittent administration of interleukin-2 (IL-2) to human immunodeficiency virus (HlV)-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) is capable of inducing significant increases in CD4 T cell counts as a result of increased T cell survival and decreased cell turnover. However, its role in the setting of ART interruptions (STI) is less well characterized. We sought to compare the effect of continuous (C) versus intermittent (P) ART on CD4 responses in patients undergoing IL-2 therapy. Methods CD4 cell responses were compared in 25 patients who underwent IL-2 therapy during periods of continuous ART (n = 90 cycles) as well as during STI (n = 45 cycles). During STI, patients resumed ART for only 10 days surrounding each IL-2 cycle. Results C cycles resulted in a significantly greater CD4 gain than P cycles (Δ156 cells/μL, 95% CI = 68–243). In multivariate analyses, baseline CD4/CD25 expression and treatment arm remained strong predictors of CD4 gain while CD8/CD38+, CD8/DR+, and CD4 Ki67+ phenotype were not predictive. Conclusions Continuous ART was associated with a statistically significantly greater CD4 cell response to IL-2 therapy than was intermittent ART. These observations may have important implications for the appropriate integration of IL-2 therapy into STI strategies. PMID:18597618

  1. Loss of immune tolerance to IL-2 in type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Pérol, Louis; Lindner, John M.; Caudana, Pamela; Nunez, Nicolas Gonzalo; Baeyens, Audrey; Valle, Andrea; Sedlik, Christine; Loirat, Delphine; Boyer, Olivier; Créange, Alain; Cohen, José Laurent; Rogner, Ute Christine; Yamanouchi, Jun; Marchant, Martine; Leber, Xavier Charles; Scharenberg, Meike; Gagnerault, Marie-Claude; Mallone, Roberto; Battaglia, Manuela; Santamaria, Pere; Hartemann, Agnès; Traggiai, Elisabetta; Piaggio, Eliane

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is characterized by a chronic, progressive autoimmune attack against pancreas-specific antigens, effecting the destruction of insulin-producing β-cells. Here we show interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a non-pancreatic autoimmune target in T1D. Anti-IL-2 autoantibodies, as well as T cells specific for a single orthologous epitope of IL-2, are present in the peripheral blood of non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice and patients with T1D. In NOD mice, the generation of anti-IL-2 autoantibodies is genetically determined and their titre increases with age and disease onset. In T1D patients, circulating IgG memory B cells specific for IL-2 or insulin are present at similar frequencies. Anti-IL-2 autoantibodies cloned from T1D patients demonstrate clonality, a high degree of somatic hypermutation and nanomolar affinities, indicating a germinal centre origin and underscoring the synergy between cognate autoreactive T and B cells leading to defective immune tolerance. PMID:27708334

  2. Phosphorylation and function of alpha4beta2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Bermudez, Isabel; Moroni, Mirko

    2006-01-01

    The neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) alpha4 and beta2 subunits expressed in heterologous expression systems assemble into high- and low-affinity receptors (Zwart and Vijverberg, 1998; Buisson and Bertrand, 2001; Houlihan et al., 2001; Nelson et al., 2003), which reflects the assembly of two distinct subunit stoichiometries of alpha4beta2 receptor (Nelson et al., 2003). The high-affinity receptor ([alpha4]2[beta2]3) is about 100-fold more sensitive to ACh than the low-affinity receptor ([alpha4]3[beta2]2) (Zwart and Vijverberg, 1998; Buisson and Bertrand, 2001; Houlihan et al., 2001; Nelson et al., 2003). Recent evidence implicated 14-3-3 proteins as modulators of the relative abundance of nAChR subunits in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where ligand-gated ion channels assemble. The 14-3-3 proteins influence ER-to-plasma membrane trafficking of multimeric cell-surface proteins (O'Kelly et al., 2002). 14-3-3 proteins bind components of these multimeric proteins, and this interaction overrides dibasic COP1 retention signal to permit forward transport of the protein (O'Kelly et al., 2002). In the case of alpha4beta2 nAChRs, 14-3-3 binds the alpha4 subunit, and this association is dependent on phosphorylation of a serine residue within a protein kinase A(PKA) consensus sequence in the large cytoplasmic domain of the alpha4 subunit, which is also a binding motif recognized by 14-3-3 (Jeancloss et al., 2001; O'Kelly et al., 2002). The interplay among PKA, alpha4 subunits, and 14-3-3 proteins increases cell-surface expression of alpha4beta2 nAChRs by increasing steady-state levels of the alpha4 subunit available for assembly with beta2 subunits (Jeancloss et al., 2001). Because it is not known how 14-3-3-dependent changes in the steady-state levels of the alpha4 subunit might affect the functional type of alpha4beta2 receptors, we have investigated the effects of mutations of the 14-3-3 binding motif in the alpha4 subunit on alpha4beta2 nAChR function.

  3. Fcγ Receptor Heterogeneity in Leukocyte Functional Responses

    PubMed Central

    Rosales, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Antibodies participate in defense of the organism from all types of pathogens, including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and protozoa. IgG antibodies recognize their associated antigen via their two Fab portions and are in turn recognized though their Fc portion by specific Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) on the membrane of immune cells. Multiple types and polymorphic variants of FcγR exist. These receptors are expressed in many cells types and are also redundant in inducing cell responses. Crosslinking of FcγR on the surface of leukocytes activates several effector functions aimed toward the destruction of pathogens and the induction of an inflammatory response. In the past few years, new evidence on how the particular IgG subclass and the glycosylation pattern of the antibody modulate the IgG–FcγR interaction has been presented. Despite these advances, our knowledge of what particular effector function is activated in a certain cell and in response to a specific type of FcγR remains very limited today. On one hand, each immune cell could be programmed to perform a particular cell function after FcγR crosslinking. On the other, each FcγR could activate a particular signaling pathway leading to a unique cell response. In this review, I describe the main types of FcγRs and our current view of how particular FcγRs activate various signaling pathways to promote unique leukocyte functions. PMID:28373871

  4. Chemokine receptor CXCR7 is a functional receptor for CXCL12 in brain endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Carson-Walter, Eleanor; Walter, Kevin A

    2014-01-01

    The chemokine CXCL12 regulates multiple cell functions through its receptor, CXCR4. However, recent studies have shown that CXCL12 also binds a second receptor, CXCR7, to potentiate signal transduction and cell activity. In contrast to CXCL12/CXCR4, few studies have focused on the role of CXCR7 in vascular biology and its role in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) remains unclear. In this report, we used complementary methods, including immunocytofluorescence, Western blot, and flow cytometry analyses, to demonstrate that CXCR7 was expressed on HBMECs. We then employed short hairpin RNA (shRNA) technology to knockdown CXCR7 in HBMECs. Knockdown of CXCR7 in HBMECs resulted in significantly reduced HBMEC proliferation, tube formation, and migration, as well as adhesion to matrigel and tumor cells. Blocking CXCR7 with a specific antibody or small molecule antagonist similarly disrupted HBMEC binding to matrigel or tumor cells. We found that tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α induced CXCR7 in a time and dose-response manner and that this increase preceded an increase in vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Knockdown of CXCR7 resulted in suppression of VCAM-1, suggesting that the reduced binding of CXCR7-knockdown HBMECs may result from suppression of VCAM-1. Collectively, CXCR7 acted as a functional receptor for CXCL12 in brain endothelial cells. Targeting CXCR7 in tumor vasculature may provide novel opportunities for improving brain tumor therapy.

  5. Yeast-based reporter assays for the functional characterization of cochaperone interactions with steroid hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Balsiger, Heather A; Cox, Marc B

    2009-01-01

    Steroid hormone receptor-mediated reporter assays in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been an invaluable tool for the identification and functional characterization of steroid hormone receptor-associated chaperones and cochaperones. This chapter describes a hormone-inducible androgen receptor-mediated beta-galactosidase reporter assay in yeast. In addition, the immunophilin FKBP52 is used as a specific example of a receptor-associated cochaperone that acts as a positive regulator of receptor function. With the right combination of receptor and cochaperone expression plasmids, reporter plasmid, and ligand, the assay protocol described here could be used to functionally characterize a wide variety of nuclear receptor-cochaperone interactions. In addition to the functional characterization of receptor regulatory proteins, a modified version of this assay is currently being used to screen compound libraries for selective FKBP52 inhibitors that represent attractive therapeutic candidates for the treatment of steroid hormone receptor-associated diseases.

  6. The weak, fine-tuned binding of ubiquitous transcription factors to the Il-2 enhancer contributes to its T cell-restricted activity.

    PubMed Central

    Hentsch, B; Mouzaki, A; Pfeuffer, I; Rungger, D; Serfling, E

    1992-01-01

    The T lymphocyte-specific enhancers of the murine and human Interleukin 2 (Il-2) genes harbour several binding sites for ubiquitous transcription factors. All these sites for the binding of AP-1, NF-kB or Oct-1 are non-canonical sites, i.e. they differ in one or a few base pairs from consensus sequences for the optimal binding of these factors. Although the factors bind weakly to these sites, the latter are functionally important because their mutation to non-binding sites results in a decrease of inducible activity of the Il-2 enhancer. Conversion of three sites to canonical binding sites of Octamer factors, AP-1 and NF-kB results in a drastic increase in enhancer activity and the induction of the Il-2 enhancer in non-T cells, such as B cell lines, murine L cells and human HeLa cells. The introduction of two or three canonical sites into the enhancer leads to a further increase of its activity. Il-2 enhancer induction is also observed in B cells when the concentration of AP-1 and Oct factors increases as a result of cotransfections with FosB and Octamer expression plasmids. When Il-2 enhancer constructs carrying canonical factor binding sites were injected into Xenopus oocytes the strong binding of ubiquitous factors substantially overcomes the silencing effect of negatively acting factors present in resting primary T lymphocytes. These results suggest a fine-tuned interplay between ubiquitous and lymphoid-specific factors binding to and transactivating the Il-2 enhancer and show that the binding affinity of ubiquitous factors to the enhancer contributes to its cell-type specific activity. Moreover, we believe that a dramatic increase of transcriptional activity brought about by single point mutations at strategic important factor binding sites may also have relevance to the activation of nuclear oncogenes. Images PMID:1614851

  7. Ischemic insult to cerebellar Purkinje cells causes diminished GABAA receptor function and Allopregnanolone neuroprotection is associated with GABAA receptor stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, MH; Taguchi, N; Ardeshiri, A; Kuroiwa, M; Hurn, PD; Traystman, RJ; Herson, PS

    2009-01-01

    Cerebellar Purkinje cells are particularly vulnerable to ischemic injury and excitotoxicity, although the molecular basis of this sensitivity remains unclear. We tested the hypothesis that ischemia causes rapid down-regulation of GABAA receptors in cerebellar Purkinje cells, thereby increasing susceptibility to excitotoxicity. Oxygen-glucose deprivation caused a decline in functional GABAA receptors, within the first hour of re-oxygenation. Decreased amplitude of miniature inhibitory post-synaptic potentials confirmed that oxygen-glucose deprivation caused a significant decrease in functional synaptic GABAA receptors and quantitative Western blot analysis demonstrated the loss of GABAA receptor current was associated with a decline in total receptor protein. Interestingly, the potent neuroprotectant allopregnanolone prevented the decline in GABAA receptor current and protein. Consistent with our in vitro data, global ischemia in mice caused a significant decline in total cerebellar GABAA receptor protein and Purkinje cell specific immunoreactivity. Moreover, allopregnanolone provided strong protection of Purkinje cells and prevented ischemia-induced decline in GABAA receptor protein. Our findings indicate that ischemia causes a rapid and sustained loss of GABAA receptors in Purkinje cells, whereas allopregnanolone prevents the decline in GABAA receptors and protects against ischemia-induced damage. Thus, interventions which prevent ischemia-induced decline in GABAA receptors may represent a novel neuroprotective strategy. PMID:18699862

  8. Extrasynaptic glutamate NMDA receptors: key players in striatal function.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Munoz, Marianela; Lopez-Huerta, Violeta G; Carrillo-Reid, Luis; Arbuthnott, Gordon W

    2015-02-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) are crucial for the function of excitatory neurotransmission and are present at the synapse and on the extrasynaptic membrane. The major nucleus of the basal ganglia, striatum, receives a large glutamatergic excitatory input carrying information about movements and associated sensory stimulation for its proper function. Such bombardment of glutamate synaptic release results in a large extracellular concentration of glutamate that can overcome the neuronal and glial uptake homeostatic systems therefore allowing the stimulation of extrasynaptic glutamate receptors. Here we have studied the participation of their extrasynaptic type in cortically evoked responses or in the presence of NMDARs stimulation. We report that extrasynaptic NMDAR blocker memantine, reduced in a dose-dependent manner cortically induced NMDA excitatory currents in striatal neurons (recorded in zero-Mg(++) plus DNQX 10 μM). Moreover, memantine (2-4 μM) significantly reduced the NMDAR-dependent membrane potential oscillations called up and down states. Recordings of neuronal striatal networks with a fluorescent calcium indicator or with multielectrode arrays (MEA) also showed that memantine reduced in a dose-dependent manner, NMDA-induced excitatory currents and network behavior. We used multielectrode arrays (MEA) to grow segregated cortical and striatal neurons. Once synaptic contacts were developed (>21DIV) recordings of extracellular activity confirmed the cortical drive of spontaneous synchronous discharges in both compartments. After severing connections between compartments, active striatal neurons in the presence of memantine (1 μM) and CNQX (10 μM) were predominantly fast spiking interneurons (FSI). The significance of extrasynaptic receptors in the regulation of striatal function and neuronal network activity is evident.

  9. Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 7: From Synaptic Function to Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Palazzo, Enza; Marabese, Ida; de Novellis, Vito; Rossi, Francesco; Maione, Sabatino

    2016-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 7 (mGluR7) is localized presynaptically at the active zone of neurotransmitter release. Unlike mGluR4 and mGluR8, which share mGluR7’s presynaptic location, mGluR7 shows low affinity for glutamate and is activated only by high glutamate concentrations. Its wide distribution in the central nervous system (CNS) and evolutionary conservation across species suggest that mGluR7 plays a primary role in controlling excitatory synapse function. High mGluR7 expression has been observed in several brain regions that are critical for CNS functioning and are involved in neurological and psychiatric disorder development. Until the recent discovery of selective ligands for mGluR7, techniques to elucidate its role in neural function were limited to the use of knockout mice and gene silencing. Studies using these two techniques have revealed that mGluR7 modulates emotionality, stress and fear responses. N,N'-dibenzhydrylethane-1,2-diamine dihydrochloride (AMN082) was reported as the first selective mGluR7 allosteric agonist. Pharmacological effects of AMN082 have not completely confirmed the mGluR7-knockout mouse phenotype; this has been attributed to rapid receptor internalization after drug treatment and to the drug’s apparent lack of in vivo selectivity. Therefore, the more recently developed mGluR7 negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) are crucial for understanding mGluR7 function and for exploiting its potential as a target for therapeutic interventions. This review presents the main findings regarding mGluR7’s effect on modulation of synaptic function and its role in normal CNS function and in models of neurologic and psychiatric disorders. PMID:27306064

  10. Brain cannabinoid receptor 2: expression, function and modulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, De-Jie; Gao, Ming; Gao, Fen-Fei; Su, Quan-Xi; Wu, Jie

    2017-03-01

    Cannabis sativa (marijuana) is a fibrous flowering plant that produces an abundant variety of molecules, some with psychoactive effects. At least 4% of the world's adult population uses cannabis annually, making it one of the most frequently used illicit drugs in the world. The psychoactive effects of cannabis are mediated primarily through cannabinoid receptor (CBR) subtypes. The prevailing view is that CB1Rs are mainly expressed in the central neurons, whereas CB2Rs are predominantly expressed in peripheral immune cells. However, this traditional view has been challenged by emerging strong evidence that shows CB2Rs are moderately expressed and function in specific brain areas. New evidence has demonstrated that brain CB2Rs modulate animal drug-seeking behaviors, suggesting that these receptors may exist in brain regions that regulate drug addiction. Recently, we further confirmed that functional CB2Rs are expressed in mouse ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons and that the activation of VTA CB2Rs reduces neuronal excitability and cocaine-seeking behavior. In addition, CB2R-mediated modulation of hippocampal CA3 neuronal excitability and network synchronization has been reported. Here, we briefly summarize recent lines of evidence showing how CB2Rs modulate function and pathophysiology in the CNS.

  11. Brain cannabinoid receptor 2: expression, function and modulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, De-jie; Gao, Ming; Gao, Fen-fei; Su, Quan-xi; Wu, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Cannabis sativa (marijuana) is a fibrous flowering plant that produces an abundant variety of molecules, some with psychoactive effects. At least 4% of the world's adult population uses cannabis annually, making it one of the most frequently used illicit drugs in the world. The psychoactive effects of cannabis are mediated primarily through cannabinoid receptor (CBR) subtypes. The prevailing view is that CB1Rs are mainly expressed in the central neurons, whereas CB2Rs are predominantly expressed in peripheral immune cells. However, this traditional view has been challenged by emerging strong evidence that shows CB2Rs are moderately expressed and function in specific brain areas. New evidence has demonstrated that brain CB2Rs modulate animal drug-seeking behaviors, suggesting that these receptors may exist in brain regions that regulate drug addiction. Recently, we further confirmed that functional CB2Rs are expressed in mouse ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons and that the activation of VTA CB2Rs reduces neuronal excitability and cocaine-seeking behavior. In addition, CB2R-mediated modulation of hippocampal CA3 neuronal excitability and network synchronization has been reported. Here, we briefly summarize recent lines of evidence showing how CB2Rs modulate function and pathophysiology in the CNS. PMID:28065934

  12. Transceptors as a functional link of transporters and receptors

    PubMed Central

    Diallinas, George

    2017-01-01

    Cells need to communicate with their environment in order to obtain nutrients, grow, divide and respond to signals related to adaptation in changing physiological conditions or stress. A very basic question in biology is how cells, especially of those organisms living in rapidly changing habitats, sense their environment. Apparently, this question is of particular importance to all free-living microorganisms. The critical role of receptors, transporters and channels, transmembrane proteins located in the plasma membrane of all types of cells, in signaling environmental changes is well established. A relative newcomer in environment sensing are the so called transceptors, membrane proteins that possess both solute transport and receptor-like signaling activities. Now, the transceptor concept is further enlarged to include micronutrient sensing via the iron and zinc high-affinity transporters of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Interestingly, what seems to underline the transport and/or sensing function of receptors, transporters and transceptors is ligand-induced conformational alterations recognized by downstream intracellular effectors. PMID:28357392

  13. Functional Roles of the Interaction of APP and Lipoprotein Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Pohlkamp, Theresa; Wasser, Catherine R.; Herz, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    The biological fates of the key initiator of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the amyloid precursor protein (APP), and a family of lipoprotein receptors, the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related proteins (LRPs) and their molecular roles in the neurodegenerative disease process are inseparably interwoven. Not only does APP bind tightly to the extracellular domains (ECDs) of several members of the LRP group, their intracellular portions are also connected through scaffolds like the one established by FE65 proteins and through interactions with adaptor proteins such as X11/Mint and Dab1. Moreover, the ECDs of APP and LRPs share common ligands, most notably Reelin, a regulator of neuronal migration during embryonic development and modulator of synaptic transmission in the adult brain, and Agrin, another signaling protein which is essential for the formation and maintenance of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) and which likely also has critical, though at this time less well defined, roles for the regulation of central synapses. Furthermore, the major independent risk factors for AD, Apolipoprotein (Apo) E and ApoJ/Clusterin, are lipoprotein ligands for LRPs. Receptors and ligands mutually influence their intracellular trafficking and thereby the functions and abilities of neurons and the blood-brain-barrier to turn over and remove the pathological product of APP, the amyloid-β peptide. This article will review and summarize the molecular mechanisms that are shared by APP and LRPs and discuss their relative contributions to AD. PMID:28298885

  14. The Histamine H3 Receptor: Structure, Pharmacology, and Function.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Alamilla, Gustavo; Márquez-Gómez, Ricardo; García-Gálvez, Ana-Maricela; Morales-Figueroa, Guadalupe-Elide; Arias-Montaño, José-Antonio

    2016-11-01

    Among the four G protein-coupled receptors (H1-H4) identified as mediators of the biologic effects of histamine, the H3 receptor (H3R) is distinguished for its almost exclusive expression in the nervous system and the large variety of isoforms generated by alternative splicing of the corresponding mRNA. Additionally, it exhibits dual functionality as autoreceptor and heteroreceptor, and this enables H3Rs to modulate the histaminergic and other neurotransmitter systems. The cloning of the H3R cDNA in 1999 by Lovenberg et al. allowed for detailed studies of its molecular aspects. In this work, we review the characteristics of the H3R, namely, its structure, constitutive activity, isoforms, signal transduction pathways, regional differences in expression and localization, selective agonists, antagonists and inverse agonists, dimerization with other neurotransmitter receptors, and the main presynaptic and postsynaptic effects resulting from its activation. The H3R has attracted interest as a potential drug target for the treatment of several important neurologic and psychiatric disorders, such as Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases, Gilles de la Tourette syndrome, and addiction.

  15. The Memory Function of the B Cell Antigen Receptor.

    PubMed

    Wienands, Jürgen; Engels, Niklas

    2016-01-01

    Activated B lymphocytes preserve their antigen experience by differentiating into long-lived pools of antibody-secreting plasma cells or various types of memory B cells (MBCs). The former population constantly produces serum immunoglobulins with sufficient specificity and affinity to thwart infections with recurrent pathogens. By contrast, memory B cell populations retain their antigen receptors on the cell surface and hence need pathogen-induced differentiation steps before they can actively contribute to host defense. The terminal differentiation of MBCs into antibody-secreting plasma cells is hallmarked by the absence of the lag phase characteristic for primary antibody responses. Moreover, secondary antibody responses are predominantly driven by MBCs that bear an antigen receptor of the IgG class on their surface although IgM-positive memory populations exist as well. These fundamental principles of B cell memory were enigmatic for decades. Only recently, we have begun to understand the underlying mechanisms. This review summarizes our current understanding of how different subpopulations of MBCs are generated during primary immune responses and how their functional heterogeneity on antigen recall is controlled by different signaling capabilities of B cell antigen receptor (BCR) isotypes and by the nature of the antigen.

  16. In situ functionalized fluorescent nanoparticles for efficient receptor coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, Abbas Abdulameer; Heidelberg, Thorsten

    2014-05-01

    An oligoethylene glycol-based propargyl phosphonate was applied to functionalize the surface of LaPO4:Ce,Tb nanoparticles in situ during the particle synthesis. The application of the surface modification reagent did not alter either size (5-7 nm in diameter) or morphology of the nanocrystalline core, but provided efficient anchor groups for subsequent coupling of a carbohydrate model receptor under mild reaction conditions. The biofunctionalization efficiency was quantified by thermogravimetric analysis and confirmed by a photometric assay. A calculation-based estimation suggested an average number of about 20 biomarkers per nanoparticles and a surface density of about 1 marker per 6 nm-2.

  17. Kappa-opioid receptor signaling and brain reward function

    PubMed Central

    Bruijnzeel, Adrie W.

    2009-01-01

    The dynorphin-like peptides have profound effects on the state of the brain reward system and human and animal behavior. The dynorphin-like peptides affect locomotor activity, food intake, sexual behavior, anxiety-like behavior, and drug intake. Stimulation of kappa-opioid receptors, the endogenous receptor for the dynorphin-like peptides, inhibits dopamine release in the striatum (nucleus accumbens and caudate putamen) and induces a negative mood state in humans and animals. The administration of drugs of abuse increases the release of dopamine in the striatum and mediates the concomitant release of dynorphin-like peptides in this brain region. The reviewed studies suggest that chronic drug intake leads to an upregulation of the brain dynorphin system in the striatum and in particular in the dorsal part of the striatum/caudate putamen. This might inhibit drug-induced dopamine release and provide protection against the neurotoxic effects of high dopamine levels. After the discontinuation of chronic drug intake these neuroadaptations remain unopposed which has been suggested to contribute to the negative emotional state associated with drug withdrawal and increased drug intake. Kappa-opioid receptor agonists have also been shown to inhibit calcium channels. Calcium channel inhibitors have antidepressant-like effects and inhibit the release of norepinephrine. This might explain that in some studies kappa-opioid receptor agonists attenuate nicotine and opioid withdrawal symptomatology. A better understanding of the role of dynorphins in the regulation of brain reward function might contribute to the development of novel treatments for mood disorders and other disorders that stem from a dysregulation of the brain reward system. PMID:19804796

  18. Monitoring of TNFR1, IL-2Rα, HGF, CCL8, IL-8 and IL-12p70 following HSCT and their role as GVHD biomarkers in paediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Berger, M; Signorino, E; Muraro, M; Quarello, P; Biasin, E; Nesi, F; Vassallo, E; Fagioli, F

    2013-09-01

    No predictive factors are currently available to establish patient-specific GVHD risk. A panel of six serum cytokines (TNF receptor 1, IL-2 receptor alfa (IL-2Rα), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), monocyte chemo-attractant protein-2, IL-8, IL-12p70) were monitored at established time points (days -1, +1, +7, +14, +21, +28 and +60) in 170 paediatric hematopoietic SCT (HSCT) recipients. We found that higher concentrations of IL-2Rα on days +14 and +21 together with HGF on days +14 and +21 were significantly associated at a higher probability of both grade II-IV GVHD (on day +14 it was: 60% vs 28%, P=0.007) and grade III-IV (on day +14 it was: 40% vs 15%, P=0.001). The higher IL-8 serum concentration on day +28 was associated with a lower probability of chronic GVHD being 4% vs 29% (P=0.01) for patients with higher vs lower IL-8 serum concentration. These findings were confirmed when the analysis was restricted to the the matched unrelated donor group. In conclusion, even if the serum cytokine levels were related to several variables associated with HSCT, we identified two cytokines as predictors of GVHD II-IV and III-IV, translating into a higher TRM risk (17% vs 3%, P=0.004).

  19. Combination of temozolomide with immunocytokine F16–IL2 for the treatment of glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Pedretti, M; Verpelli, C; Mårlind, J; Bertani, G; Sala, C; Neri, D; Bello, L

    2010-01-01

    Background: Glioblastoma patients are still not cured by the treatments available at the moment. We investigated the therapeutic properties of temozolomide in combination with F16–IL2, a clinical-stage immunocytokine consisting of human interleukin (IL)-2 fused to the human antibody F16, specific to the A1 domain of tenascin-C. Methods: We conducted three preclinical therapy studies, using subcutaneous and intracranial U87MG glioblastoma tumours xenografted in BALB/c nude mice. The same therapeutic schedule was used, consisting of five total administrations every third day, of 0.525 mg temozolomide, 20 μg F16–IL2, the combination, or the control solution. Results: Immunohistochemical analysis of U87MG xenografts and of human glioblastoma specimens showed selective tumour staining of F16. A quantitative biodistribution confirmed the preferential tumour accumulation of radiolabelled F16–IL2. In the study with subcutaneous xenografts, the combination of F16–IL2 with temozolomide induced complete remission of the animals, which remained tumour free for over 160 days. The same treatment led to a consistent size reduction of intracranial xenografts and to a longer survival of animals. The immunocytokine promoted the recruitment of leukocytes into tumours of both models. Conclusion: The combined use of temozolomide with F16–IL2 deserves clinical investigations, which will be facilitated by the excellent safety profile in cynomolgus monkeys, and by the fact that F16–IL2 is in clinical trials in patients with cancer. PMID:20736949

  20. Lysis of pig endothelium by IL-2 activated human natural killer cells is inhibited by swine and human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I gene products.

    PubMed

    Itescu, S; Artrip, J H; Kwiatkowski, P A; Wang, S F; Minanov, O P; Morgenthau, A S; Michler, R E

    1997-01-01

    We have previously described a form of xenograft rejection, mediated by natural killer (NK) cells, occurring in pig-to-primate organ transplants beyond the period of antibody-mediated hyperacute rejection. In this study, two distinct NK activation pathways were identified as mechanisms of pig aortic endotheliual cell (PAEC) lysis by human NK cells. Using an antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) assay, a progressive increase in human NK lysis of PAEC was observed following incubation with human IgG at increasing serum titer. In the absence of IgG, a second mechanism of PAEC lysis by human NK cells was observed following activation with IL-2. IL-2 activation of human NK cells increased lysis of PAEC by over 3-fold compared with ADCC. These results indicate that IL-2 activation of human NK cells induces significantly higher levels of lytic activity than does conventional ADCC involving IgG and FcRIII. We next investigated the role of MHC class I molecules in the regulation of NK lysis following IL-2 activation. PAEC expression of SLA class I molecules was increased by up to 75% by treatment with human TNFa. Following treatment with TNFa at 1 u/ml, IL-2 activated human NK lysis of PAEC was inhibited at every effector:target (E:T) ratio tested. Maximal effect occurred at an E:T ratio of 10:1, with TNFa inhibiting specific lysis by 59% (p < 0.01). Incubation with an anti-SLA class I Mab, but not IgG isotype control, abrogated the protective effects of TNFa on NK lysis of PAEC, suggesting direct inhibitory effects of SLA class I molecules on human NK function. To investigate whether human MHC class I molecules might have similar effects on human NK lysis of PAEC, further experiments were performed using a soluble peptide derived from the alpha-helical region of HLA-B7. Incubation with the HLA-B7 derived peptide significantly reduced the IL-2 activated NK lytic activity against PAEC in a dose-dependent fashion. Maximal effect occurred at a concentration of 10 mg

  1. Mammalian Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors: From Structure to Function

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque, Edson X.; Pereira, Edna F. R.; Alkondon, Manickavasagom; Rogers, Scott W.

    2009-01-01

    The classical studies of nicotine by Langley at the turn of the 20th century introduced the concept of a “receptive substance,” from which the idea of a “receptor” came to light. Subsequent studies aided by the Torpedo electric organ, a rich source of muscle-type nicotinic receptors (nAChRs), and the discovery of α-bungarotoxin, a snake toxin that binds pseudo-irreversibly to the muscle nAChR, resulted in the muscle nAChR being the best characterized ligand-gated ion channel hitherto. With the advancement of functional and genetic studies in the late 1980s, the existence of nAChRs in the mammalian brain was confirmed and the realization that the numerous nAChR subtypes contribute to the psychoactive properties of nicotine and other drugs of abuse and to the neuropathology of various diseases, including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and schizophrenia, has since emerged. This review provides a comprehensive overview of these findings and the more recent revelations of the impact that the rich diversity in function and expression of this receptor family has on neuronal and nonneuronal cells throughout the body. Despite these numerous developments, our understanding of the contributions of specific neuronal nAChR subtypes to the many facets of physiology throughout the body remains in its infancy. PMID:19126755

  2. The nephron (pro)renin receptor: function and significance.

    PubMed

    Ramkumar, Nirupama; Kohan, Donald E

    2016-12-01

    The (pro)renin receptor (PRR) is a multifunctional protein that is part of the renin-angiotensin system and is an important accessory molecule for the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase. The PRR is widely expressed in the kidney with relatively high abundance in the distal nephron. Determining the physiological relevance of the PRR has been challenging due to early lethality in whole animal and cell-specific PRR knockout models. Recently, viable renal cell-specific PRR knockout mice have been developed; these studies suggest that PRR in the nephron can modulate renal function via angiotensin II (ANG II)-dependent and -independent cell signaling pathways. In this mini-review, we highlight new developments in nephron PRR function in health and in pathophysiological conditions.

  3. The CCK(-like) receptor in the animal kingdom: functions, evolution and structures.

    PubMed

    Staljanssens, Dorien; Azari, Elnaz Karimian; Christiaens, Olivier; Beaufays, Jérôme; Lins, Laurence; Van Camp, John; Smagghe, Guy

    2011-03-01

    In this review, the cholecystokinin (CCK)(-like) receptors throughout the animal kingdom are compared on the level of physiological functions, evolutionary basis and molecular structure. In vertebrates, the CCK receptor is an important member of the G-protein coupled receptors as it is involved in the regulation of many physiological functions like satiety, gastrointestinal motility, gastric acid secretion, gall bladder contraction, pancreatic secretion, panic, anxiety and memory and learning processes. A homolog for this receptor is also found in nematodes and arthropods, called CK receptor and sulfakinin (SK) receptor, respectively. These receptors seem to have evolved from a common ancestor which is probably still closely related to the nematode CK receptor. The SK receptor is more closely related to the CCK receptor and seems to have similar functions. A molecular 3D-model for the CCK receptor type 1 has been built together with the docking of the natural ligands for the CCK and SK receptors in the CCK receptor type 1. These molecular models can help to study ligand-receptor interactions, that can in turn be useful in the development of new CCK(-like) receptor agonists and antagonists with beneficial health effects in humans or potential for pest control.

  4. Suppression of IL-2 production and proliferation of CD4(+) T cells by tuberostemonine O.

    PubMed

    Jung Jang, Eun; Kil, Yun-Seo; Ryeon Park, Hye; Oh, Sera; Kyeong Kim, Hyo; Gyeong Jeong, Mi; Kyoung Seo, Eun; Sook Hwang, Eun

    2014-12-01

    Tuberostemonine stereoisomers are natural alkaloids found in Stemona tuberosa, that are known to have anti-inflammatory and anti-infective properties. Tuberostemonine alkaloids inhibit inflammation by suppressing the expression of inflammatory mediators such as cyclooxygenase and nitric oxide synthase. However, the direct immunomodulatory properties of tuberostemonine alkaloids in T cells have not been elucidated so far. In this study, the activities in T cells of tuberostemonine N (TbN) and a novel alkaloid, tuberostemonine O (TbO), isolated from S. tuberosa, were investigated. Although TbN did not have a significant effect on cytokine production in splenic T cells, TbO selectively suppressed interleukin (IL)-2 production. Moreover, TbO, but not TbN, significantly inhibited IL-2 production by primary CD4(+) T cells and delayed the T-cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of excess recombinant IL-2 restored the decreased cell-division rates in TbO-treated CD4(+) T cells to control levels. Collectively, these findings suggest that the immunomodulatory effects of TbO occurred by the suppression of IL-2 expression and IL-2-induced T-cell proliferation, suggesting a potential beneficial role of tuberostemonine alkaloids for the control of chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases caused by hyperactivated T cells.

  5. A dominant negative mutation suppresses the function of normal epidermal growth factor receptors by heterodimerization.

    PubMed Central

    Kashles, O; Yarden, Y; Fischer, R; Ullrich, A; Schlessinger, J

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies provide evidence that defective receptors can function as a dominant negative mutation suppressing the action of wild-type receptors. This causes various diminished responses in cell culture and developmental disorders in murine embryogenesis. Here, we describe a model system and a potential mechanism underlying the dominant suppressing response caused by defective epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors. We used cultured 3T3 cells coexpressing human wild-type receptors and an inactive deletion mutant lacking most of the cytoplasmic domain. When expressed alone, EGF was able to stimulate the dimerization of either wild-type or mutant receptors in living cells as revealed by chemical covalent cross-linking experiments. In response to EGF, heterodimers and homodimers of wild-type and mutant receptors were observed in cells coexpressing both receptor species. However, only homodimers of wild-type EGF receptors underwent EGF-induced tyrosine autophosphorylation in living cells. These results indicate that the integrity of both receptor moieties within receptor dimers is essential for kinase activation and autophosphorylation. Moreover, the presence of mutant receptors in cells expressing wild-type receptors diminished the number of high-affinity binding sites for EGF, reduced the rate of receptor endocytosis and degradation, and diminished biological signalling via EGF receptors. We propose that heterodimerization with defective EGF receptors functions as a dominant negative mutation suppressing the activation and response of normal receptors by formation of unproductive heterodimers. Images PMID:1705006

  6. Long-term outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for IL2RG/JAK3 SCID-: a cohort report.

    PubMed

    Abd Hamid, Intan Juliana; Slatter, Mary A; McKendrick, Fiona; Pearce, Mark S; Gennery, Andrew R

    2017-02-16

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) cures the T-lymphocyte, B-lymphocyte and Natural Killer (NK) cell differentiation defect in IL2RG/JAK3 SCID. We evaluated long-term clinical features, longitudinal immunoreconstitution, donor chimerism and quality of life (QoL) of IL2RG/JAK3 SCID patients >2 years post-HSCT at our center. Clinical data were collated and patients/families answered PedsQL Generic Core Scale v4.0 questionnaires. We performed longitudinal analyses of CD3+, CD4+ naïve T-lymphocyte, CD19+ and NK cell numbers from pre-transplant until 15 years post-transplant. 31/43 (72%) patients survived. Median age at last follow-up was 10 years (range, 2-25). 21 (68%) had persistent medical issues, mainly on-going immunoglobulin replacement (14, 45%), cutaneous viral warts (7, 24%), short stature (4, 14%), limb lymphoedema (3, 10%) and bronchiectasis (2, 7%). Lung function was available and normal for 6 patients. Longitudinal analysis demonstrated sustained CD3+, CD19+ and NK cell output 15 years post-HSCT. CD4+ naïve lymphocyte numbers were better in conditioned versus unconditioned recipients (p 0.06). B-lymphocyte and myeloid chimerism were highly correlated, (rho 0.98, p < 0.001). Low toxicity MAC recipients have better B-lymphocyte/myeloid chimerism and are free from immunoglobulin replacement therapy. IL2RG/JAK3 SCID survivors free from immunoglobulin replacement have normal QoL.

  7. Flow cytometric analysis of expression of interleukin-2 receptor beta chain (p70-75) on various leukemic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshino, S.; Oshimi, K.; Tsudo, M.; Miyasaka, M.; Teramura, M.; Masuda, M.; Motoji, T.; Mizoguchi, H. )

    1990-08-15

    We analyzed the expression of the interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) beta chain (p70-75) on various leukemic cells from 44 patients by flow cytometric analysis using the IL-2R beta chain-specific monoclonal antibody, designated Mik-beta 1. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated the expression of the IL-2R beta chain on granular lymphocytes (GLs) from all eight patients with granular lymphocyte proliferative disorders (GLPDs), on adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) cells from all three patients with ATL, and on T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells from one of three patients with T-ALL. Although GLs from all the GLPD patients expressed the IL-2R beta chain alone and not the IL-2R alpha chain (Tac-antigen: p55), ATL and T-ALL cells expressing the beta chain coexpressed the alpha chain. In two of seven patients with common ALL (cALL) and in both patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, the leukemic cells expressed the alpha chain alone. Neither the alpha chain nor the beta chain was expressed on leukemic cells from the remaining 28 patients, including all 18 patients with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, five of seven patients with cALL, all three patients with multiple myeloma, and two of three patients with T-ALL. These results indicate that three different forms of IL-2R chain expression exist on leukemic cells: the alpha chain alone; the beta chain alone; and both the alpha and beta chains. To examine whether the results obtained by flow cytometric analysis actually reflect functional aspects of the expressed IL-2Rs, we studied the specific binding of 125I-labeled IL-2 (125I-IL-2) to leukemic cells in 18 of the 44 patients. In addition, we performed 125I-IL-2 crosslinking studies in seven patients. The results of IL-2R expression of both 125I-IL-2 binding assay and crosslinking studies were in agreement with those obtained by flow cytometric analysis.

  8. Mutational analysis of extracellular cysteine residues of rat secretin receptor shows that disulfide bridges are essential for receptor function.

    PubMed

    Vilardaga, J P; Di Paolo, E; Bialek, C; De Neef, P; Waelbroeck, M; Bollen, A; Robberecht, P

    1997-05-15

    We attempted to express point-mutant secretin receptors where each of the 10 extracellular Cys residues was replaced by a Ser residue, in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Six of the point-mutant receptors (C24-->S, C44-->S, C53-->S, C67-->S, C85-->S and C101-->S) could not be detected by binding or functional studies: the mutations resulted in functional inactivation of the receptor. In contrast, the four other point-mutant receptors (C11-->S, C186-->S, C193-->S and C263-->S) were able to bind poorly 125I-secretin, and to activate adenylate cyclase with high secretin EC50 values. These results suggest that cysteine residues 24, 44, 53, 67, 85 and 101 are necessary for receptor function, and that the two putative disulfide bridges formed by cysteine residues 11, 186, 193 and 263 are functionally relevant, but not essential for receptor expression. Secretin activated the adenylate cyclase through the quadruple mutant (C11,186,193,263-->S), the four triple mutants, and through double mutants C186,193-->S and C186,263-->S with a very high (microM) EC50 value, suggesting that, in the wild-type receptor, disulfide bridges are formed between C11-C186, and between C193-C263. Prior treatment with dithiothreitol resulted in a marked EC50 increase of the wild-type receptor and of those receptors with at least the two cysteine residues in positions 11 and 186, suggesting that the C11-C186 (but not the C193-C263) disulfide bridge was accessible to this reducing agent. Several results nevertheless indicated that, in mutant receptors, alternative disulfide bridges can be formed between cysteine 186 and cysteine 193 or 263, suggesting that these three residues are in close spatial proximity in the wild-type receptor.

  9. Intact Microtubules Preserve Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) Functionality through Receptor Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Storti, Barbara; Bizzarri, Ranieri; Cardarelli, Francesco; Beltram, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    The transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) is a protein currently under scrutiny as a pharmacological target for pain management therapies. Recently, the role of TRPV1-microtubule interaction in transducing nociception stimuli to cells by cytoskeletal rearrangement was proposed. In this work, we investigate TRPV1-microtubule interaction in living cells under the resting or activated state of TRPV1, as well as in presence of structurally intact or depolymerized cytoskeletal microtubules. We combined a toolbox of high resolution/high sensitivity fluorescence imaging techniques (such as FRET, correlation spectroscopy, and fluorescence anisotropy) to monitor TRPV1 aggregation status, membrane mobility, and interaction with microtubules. We found that TRPV1 is a dimeric membrane protein characterized by two populations with different diffusion properties in basal condition. After stimulation with resiniferatoxin, TRPV1 dimers tetramerize. The tetramers and the slower population of TRPV1 dimers bind dynamically to intact microtubules but not to tubulin dimers. Upon microtubule disassembly, the interaction with TRPV1 is lost thereby inducing receptor self-aggregation with partial loss of functionality. Intact microtubules play an essential role in maintaining TRPV1 functionality toward activation stimuli. This previously undisclosed property mirrors the recently reported role of TRPV1 in modulating microtubule assembly/disassembly and suggests the participation of these two players in a feedback cycle linking nociception and cytoskeletal remodeling. PMID:22262838

  10. Anticancer agent xanthohumol inhibits IL-2 induced signaling pathways involved in T cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yongbo; Gao, Xiaohua; Deeb, Dorrah; Arbab, Ali S.; Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Gautam, Subhash C.

    2013-01-01

    Xanthohumol (XN), a prenylated chalcone present in hops exhibits anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anticancer activity. In the present study we show that XN inhibits the proliferation of mouse lymphoma cells and IL-2 induced proliferation and cell cycle progression in mouse splenic T cells. The suppression of T cell proliferation by XN was due to the inhibition of IL-2 induced Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (Jak/STAT) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (Erk1/2) signaling pathways. XN also inhibited proliferation-related cellular proteins such as c-Myc, c-Fos and NF-κB and cyclin D1. Thus, understanding of IL-2 induced cell signaling pathways in normal T cells, which are constitutively turned on in T cell lymphomas may facilitate development of XN for the treatment of hematologic cancers. PMID:22946339

  11. Third generation antipsychotic drugs: partial agonism or receptor functional selectivity?

    PubMed Central

    Mailman, Richard B.; Murthy, Vishakantha

    2010-01-01

    Functional selectivity is the term that describes drugs that cause markedly different signaling through a single receptor (e.g., full agonist at one pathway and antagonist at a second). It has been widely recognized recently that this phenomenon impacts the understanding of mechanism of action of some drugs, and has relevance to drug discovery. One of the clinical areas where this mechanism has particular importance is in the treatment of schizophrenia. Antipsychotic drugs have been grouped according to both pattern of clinical action and mechanism of action. The original antipsychotic drugs such as chlorpromazine and haloperidol have been called typical or first generation. They cause both antipsychotic actions and many side effects (extrapyramidal and endocrine) that are ascribed to their high affinity dopamine D2 receptor antagonism. Drugs such as clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone and others were then developed that avoided the neurological side effects (atypical or second generation antipsychotics). These compounds are divided mechanistically into those that are high affinity D2 and 5-HT2A antagonists, and those that also bind with modest affinity to D2, 5-HT2A, and many other neuroreceptors. There is one approved third generation drug, aripiprazole, whose actions have been ascribed alternately to either D2 partial agonism or D2 functional selectivity. Although partial agonism has been the more widely accepted mechanism, the available data are inconsistent with this mechanism. Conversely, the D2 functional selectivity hypothesis can accommodate all current data for aripiprazole, and also impacts on discovery compounds that are not pure D2 antagonists. PMID:19909227

  12. Interspecies variations in Bordetella catecholamine receptor gene regulation and function.

    PubMed

    Brickman, Timothy J; Suhadolc, Ryan J; Armstrong, Sandra K

    2015-12-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica can use catecholamines to obtain iron from transferrin and lactoferrin via uptake pathways involving the BfrA, BfrD, and BfrE outer membrane receptor proteins, and although Bordetella pertussis has the bfrD and bfrE genes, the role of these genes in iron uptake has not been demonstrated. In this study, the bfrD and bfrE genes of B. pertussis were shown to be functional in B. bronchiseptica, but neither B. bronchiseptica bfrD nor bfrE imparted catecholamine utilization to B. pertussis. Gene fusion analyses found that expression of B. bronchiseptica bfrA was increased during iron starvation, as is common for iron receptor genes, but that expression of the bfrD and bfrE genes of both species was decreased during iron limitation. As shown previously for B. pertussis, bfrD expression in B. bronchiseptica was also dependent on the BvgAS virulence regulatory system; however, in contrast to the case in B. pertussis, the known modulators nicotinic acid and sulfate, which silence Bvg-activated genes, did not silence expression of bfrD in B. bronchiseptica. Further studies using a B. bronchiseptica bvgAS mutant expressing the B. pertussis bvgAS genes revealed that the interspecies differences in bfrD modulation are partly due to BvgAS differences. Mouse respiratory infection experiments determined that catecholamine utilization contributes to the in vivo fitness of B. bronchiseptica and B. pertussis. Additional evidence of the in vivo importance of the B. pertussis receptors was obtained from serologic studies demonstrating pertussis patient serum reactivity with the B. pertussis BfrD and BfrE proteins.

  13. Interspecies Variations in Bordetella Catecholamine Receptor Gene Regulation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Brickman, Timothy J.; Suhadolc, Ryan J.

    2015-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica can use catecholamines to obtain iron from transferrin and lactoferrin via uptake pathways involving the BfrA, BfrD, and BfrE outer membrane receptor proteins, and although Bordetella pertussis has the bfrD and bfrE genes, the role of these genes in iron uptake has not been demonstrated. In this study, the bfrD and bfrE genes of B. pertussis were shown to be functional in B. bronchiseptica, but neither B. bronchiseptica bfrD nor bfrE imparted catecholamine utilization to B. pertussis. Gene fusion analyses found that expression of B. bronchiseptica bfrA was increased during iron starvation, as is common for iron receptor genes, but that expression of the bfrD and bfrE genes of both species was decreased during iron limitation. As shown previously for B. pertussis, bfrD expression in B. bronchiseptica was also dependent on the BvgAS virulence regulatory system; however, in contrast to the case in B. pertussis, the known modulators nicotinic acid and sulfate, which silence Bvg-activated genes, did not silence expression of bfrD in B. bronchiseptica. Further studies using a B. bronchiseptica bvgAS mutant expressing the B. pertussis bvgAS genes revealed that the interspecies differences in bfrD modulation are partly due to BvgAS differences. Mouse respiratory infection experiments determined that catecholamine utilization contributes to the in vivo fitness of B. bronchiseptica and B. pertussis. Additional evidence of the in vivo importance of the B. pertussis receptors was obtained from serologic studies demonstrating pertussis patient serum reactivity with the B. pertussis BfrD and BfrE proteins. PMID:26371128

  14. Distinct second extracellular loop structures of the brain cannabinoid CB(1) receptor: implication in ligand binding and receptor function.

    PubMed

    Shim, Joong-Youn; Rudd, James; Ding, Tomas T

    2011-02-01

    The G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) second extracellular loop (E2) is known to play an important role in receptor structure and function. The brain cannabinoid (CB(1)) receptor is unique in that it lacks the interloop E2 disulfide linkage to the transmembrane (TM) helical bundle, a characteristic of many GPCRs. Recent mutation studies of the CB(1) receptor, however, suggest the presence of an alternative intraloop disulfide bond between two E2 Cys residues. Considering the oxidation state of these Cys residues, we determine the molecular structures of the 17-residue E2 in the dithiol form (E2(dithiol)) and in the disulfide form (E2(disulfide)) of the CB(1) receptor in a fully hydrated 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayer, using a combination of simulated annealing and molecular dynamics simulation approaches. We characterize the CB(1) receptor models with these two E2 forms, CB(1)(E2(dithiol)) and CB(1)(E2(disulfide)), by analyzing interaction energy, contact number, core crevice, and cross correlation. The results show that the distinct E2 structures interact differently with the TM helical bundle and uniquely modify the TM helical topology, suggesting that E2 of the CB(1) receptor plays a critical role in stabilizing receptor structure, regulating ligand binding, and ultimately modulating receptor activation. Further studies on the role of E2 of the CB(1) receptor are warranted, particularly comparisons of the ligand-bound form with the present ligand-free form.

  15. Notch ligand delta-like 4 regulates development and pathogenesis of allergic airway responses by modulating IL-2 production and Th2 immunity.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sihyug; Schaller, Matthew; Berlin, Aaron A; Lukacs, Nicholas W

    2010-11-15

    Activation of the canonical Notch pathways has been implicated in Th cell differentiation, but the role of specific Notch ligands in Th2-mediated allergic airway responses has not been completely elucidated. In this study, we show that delta-like ligand 4 (Dll4) was upregulated on dendritic cells in response to cockroach allergen. Blocking Dll4 in vivo during either the primary or secondary response enhanced allergen-induced pathogenic consequences including airway hyperresponsiveness and mucus production via increased Th2 cytokines. In vitro assays demonstrated that Dll4 regulates IL-2 in T cells from established Th2 responses as well as during primary stimulation. Notably, Dll4 blockade during the primary, but not the secondary, response increased IL-2 levels in lung and lymph node of allergic mice. The in vivo neutralization of Dll4 was associated with increased expansion and decreased apoptosis during the primary allergen sensitization. Moreover, Dll4-mediated Notch activation of T cells during primary stimulation in vitro increased apoptosis during the contraction/resting phase of the response, which could be rescued by exogenous IL-2. Consistent with the role for Dll4-mediated IL-2 regulation in overall T cell function, the frequency of IL-4-producing cells was also significantly altered by Dll4 both in vivo and in vitro. These data demonstrate a regulatory role of Dll4 both in initial Th2 differentiation and in Th2 cytokine production in established allergic responses.

  16. Interleukin 9 and its receptor: an overview of structure and function.

    PubMed

    Demoulin, J B; Renauld, J C

    1998-01-01

    Interleukin-9 (IL-9) is a multifunctional cytokine produced by activated TH2 clones in vitro and during TH2-like T cell responses in vivo. Although IL-9 was initially described as a T cell growth factor, its role in T cell responses is still unclear. While freshly isolated normal T cells do not respond to IL-9, this cytokine induces the proliferation of murine T cell lymphomas in vitro, and in vivo overexpression of IL-9 results in the development of thymic lymphomas. In the human, the existence of an IL-9 mediated autocrine loop has been suggested for some malignancies such as Hodgkin's disease. Various observations indicate that IL-9 is actively involved in mast cells responses by inducing the proliferation and differentiation of these cells. Other potential biological targets for IL-9 include B lymphocytes, and hematopoietic progenitors, for which higher responses were observed with foetal or transformed cells as compared to normal adult progenitors. The IL-9 receptor is a member of the hemopoietin receptor superfamily and interacts with the gamma chain of the IL-2 receptor for signaling. Signal transduction studies have stressed the role of the Jak-STAT pathway in various IL-9 bioactivities, whereas the 4PS/IRS2 adaptor protein might also play a significant role in IL-9 signaling.

  17. Transient CD86 expression on hepatitis C virus-specific CD8+ T cells in acute infection is linked to sufficient IL-2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Radziewicz, Henry; Ibegbu, Chris C; Hon, Huiming; Bédard, Nathalie; Bruneau, Julie; Workowski, Kimberly A; Knechtle, Stuart J; Kirk, Allan D; Larsen, Christian P; Shoukry, Naglaa H; Grakoui, Arash

    2010-03-01

    Costimulatory signals via B7/CD28 family molecules (signal 2) are critical for effective adaptive CD8(+) T cell immune responses. In addition to costimulatory signals, B7/CD28 family coinhibitory receptor/ligands that modulate immune responses have been identified. In acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, programmed death receptor 1, an inhibitory receptor in the CD28 family, is highly expressed on virus-specific CD8(+) T cells, yet vigorous immune responses often develop. We hypothesized that other costimulatory signals present during the acute phase of HCV infection would be important to counter this negative signaling. In this study, we found that CD86 was highly expressed on HCV-specific CD8(+) T cells early in acute HCV infection and was lost on transition to chronic HCV infection; the expression of CD86 was different from other activation markers, because expression was delayed after in vitro TCR stimulation and required sufficient IL-2 signaling; and HCV-specific CD8(+) T cells in the liver of patients with chronic HCV infection were highly activated (CD69, CD38, and HLA-DR expression), but only a minority expressed CD86 or showed evidence of recent IL-2 signaling (low basal phosphorylated STAT5), despite persistent viremia. Our study identified B7 ligand expression on HCV-specific CD8(+) T cells as a distinct marker of effective T cell stimulation with IL-2 signaling in acute HCV infection. Expression of costimulatory molecules, such as CD86, early in HCV infection may be essential in overcoming inhibitory signals from the high level of programmed death receptor 1 expression also seen at this phase of infection.

  18. Functional Analyses of Bitter Taste Receptors in Domestic Cats (Felis catus)

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Weiwei; Ravoninjohary, Aurore; Li, Xia; Margolskee, Robert F.; Reed, Danielle R.; Beauchamp, Gary K.; Jiang, Peihua

    2015-01-01

    Cats are obligate carnivores and under most circumstances eat only animal products. Owing to the pseudogenization of one of two subunits of the sweet receptor gene, they are indifferent to sweeteners, presumably having no need to detect plant-based sugars in their diet. Following this reasoning and a recent report of a positive correlation between the proportion of dietary plants and the number of Tas2r (bitter receptor) genes in vertebrate species, we tested the hypothesis that if bitter perception exists primarily to protect animals from poisonous plant compounds, the genome of the domestic cat (Felis catus) should have lost functional bitter receptors and they should also have reduced bitter receptor function. To test functionality of cat bitter receptors, we expressed cat Tas2R receptors in cell-based assays. We found that they have at least 7 functional receptors with distinct receptive ranges, showing many similarities, along with some differences, with human bitter receptors. To provide a comparative perspective, we compared the cat repertoire of intact receptors with those of a restricted number of members of the order Carnivora, with a range of dietary habits as reported in the literature. The numbers of functional bitter receptors in the terrestrial Carnivora we examined, including omnivorous and herbivorous species, were roughly comparable to that of cats thereby providing no strong support for the hypothesis that a strict meat diet influences bitter receptor number or function. Maintenance of bitter receptor function in terrestrial obligate carnivores may be due to the presence of bitter compounds in vertebrate and invertebrate prey, to the necessary role these receptors play in non-oral perception, or to other unknown factors. We also found that the two aquatic Carnivora species examined had fewer intact bitter receptors. Further comparative studies of factors driving numbers and functions of bitter taste receptors will aid in understanding the forces

  19. Melanocortin 1 receptor variants: functional role and pigmentary associations.

    PubMed

    Dessinioti, Clio; Antoniou, Christina; Katsambas, Andreas; Stratigos, Alexander J

    2011-01-01

    The significance of human cutaneous pigmentation lies in its protective role against sun-induced DNA damage and photocarcinogenesis. Fair skin and red hair are characterized by a low eumelanin to pheomelanin ratio, and have been associated with increased risk of skin cancer. Cutaneous pigmentation is a complex genetic trait, with more than 120 genes involved in its regulation, among which the melanocortin 1 receptor gene (MC1R) plays a key role. Although a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been identified in pigmentation genes, very few SNPs have been examined in relation to human pigmentary phenotypes and skin cancer risk. Recent GWAS have identified new candidate determinants of pigmentation traits, but MC1R remains the best characterized genetic determinant of human skin and hair pigmentation as well as the more firmly validated low-penetrance skin cancer susceptibility gene. In this review, we will address how the melanocortin system regulates pigmentation, the effect of MC1R variants on the physiologic function of the MC1 receptor, and how specific MC1R variants are associated with distinct human pigmentation phenotypes.

  20. Androgen Receptor Structure, Function and Biology: From Bench to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Rachel A; Grossmann, Mathis

    2016-01-01

    The actions of androgens such as testosterone and dihydrotestosterone are mediated via the androgen receptor (AR), a ligand-dependent nuclear transcription factor and member of the steroid hormone nuclear receptor family. Given its widespread expression in many cells and tissues, the AR has a diverse range of biological actions including important roles in the development and maintenance of the reproductive, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, immune, neural and haemopoietic systems. AR signalling may also be involved in the development of tumours in the prostate, bladder, liver, kidney and lung. Androgens can exert their actions via the AR in a DNA binding-dependent manner to regulate target gene transcription, or in a non-DNA binding-dependent manner to initiate rapid, cellular events such as the phosphorylation of 2nd messenger signalling cascades. More recently, ligand-independent actions of the AR have also been identified. Given the large volume of studies relating to androgens and the AR, this review is not intended as an extensive review of all studies investigating the AR, but rather as an overview of the structure, function, signalling pathways and biology of the AR as well as its important role in clinical medicine, with emphasis on recent developments in this field. PMID:27057074

  1. 3′-Functionalized Adamantyl Cannabinoid Receptor Probes

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Go; Tius, Marcus A.; Zhou, Han; Nikas, Spyros P.; Halikhedkar, Aneetha; Mallipeddi, Srikrishnan; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2015-01-01

    The aliphatic side chain plays a pivotal role in determining the cannabinergic potency of tricyclic classical cannabinoids, and we have previously shown that this chain could be substituted successfully by adamantyl or other polycyclic groups. In an effort to explore the pharmacophoric features of these conformationally fixed groups, we have synthesized a series of analogues in which the C3 position is substituted directly with an adamantyl group bearing functionality at one of the tertiary carbon atoms. These substituents included the electrophilic isothiocyanate and photoactivatable azido groups, both of which are capable of covalent attachment with the target protein. Our results show that substitution at the 3′-adamantyl position can lead to ligands with improved affinities and CB1/CB2 selectivities. Our work has also led to the development of two successful covalent probes with high affinities for both cannabinoid receptors, namely, the electrophilic isothiocyanate AM994 and the photoactivatable aliphatic azido AM993 analogues. PMID:25760146

  2. Cultured rat microglia express functional beta-chemokine receptors.

    PubMed

    Boddeke, E W; Meigel, I; Frentzel, S; Gourmala, N G; Harrison, J K; Buttini, M; Spleiss, O; Gebicke-Härter, P

    1999-08-03

    We have investigated the functional expression of the beta-chemokine receptors CCR1 to 5 in cultured rat microglia. RT-PCR analysis revealed constitutive expression of CCR1, CCR2 and CCR5 mRNA. The beta-chemokines MCP-1 (1-30 nM) as well as RANTES and MIP-1alpha (100-1000 nM) evoked calcium transients in control and LPS-treated microglia. Whereas, the response to MCP-1 was dependent on extracellular calcium the response to RANTES was not. The effect of MCP-1 but not that of RANTES was inhibited by the calcium-induced calcium release inhibitor ryanodine. Calcium responses to MCP-1- and RANTES were observed in distinct populations of microglia.

  3. Functional characterization of ecdysone receptor gene switches in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Panguluri, Siva K; Kumar, Prasanna; Palli, Subba R

    2006-12-01

    Regulated expression of transgene is essential in basic research as well as for many therapeutic applications. The main purpose of the present study is to understand the functioning of the ecdysone receptor (EcR)-based gene switch in mammalian cells and to develop improved versions of EcR gene switches. We utilized EcR mutants to develop new EcR gene switches that showed higher ligand sensitivity and higher magnitude of induction of reporter gene expression in the presence of ligand. We also developed monopartite versions of EcR gene switches with reduced size of the components that are accommodated into viral vectors. Ligand binding assays revealed that EcR alone could not bind to the nonsteroidal ligand, RH-2485. The EcR's heterodimeric partner, ultraspiracle, is required for efficient binding of EcR to the ligand. The essential role of retinoid X receptor (RXR) or its insect homolog, ultraspiracle, in EcR function is shown by RXR knockdown experiments using RNAi. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that VP16 (activation domain, AD):GAL4(DNA binding domain, DBD):EcR(ligand binding domain, LBD) or GAL4(DBD):EcR(LBD) fusion proteins can bind to GAL4 response elements in the absence of ligand. The VP16(AD) fusion protein of a chimera between human and locust RXR could heterodimerize with GAL4(DBD):EcR(LBD) in the absence of ligand but the VP16(AD) fusion protein of Homo sapiens RXR requires ligand for its heterodimerization with GAL4(DBD):EcR(LBD).

  4. Roles for oestrogen receptor β in adult brain function.

    PubMed

    Handa, R J; Ogawa, S; Wang, J M; Herbison, A E

    2012-01-01

    Oestradiol exerts a profound influence upon multiple brain circuits. For the most part, these effects are mediated by oestrogen receptor (ER)α. We review here the roles of ERβ, the other ER isoform, in mediating rodent oestradiol-regulated anxiety, aggressive and sexual behaviours, the control of gonadotrophin secretion, and adult neurogenesis. Evidence exists for: (i) ERβ located in the paraventricular nucleus underpinning the suppressive influence of oestradiol on the stress axis and anxiety-like behaviour; (ii) ERβ expressed in gonadotrophin-releasing hormone neurones contributing to oestrogen negative-feedback control of gonadotrophin secretion; (iii) ERβ controlling the offset of lordosis behaviour; (iv) ERβ suppressing aggressive behaviour in males; (v) ERβ modulating responses to social stimuli; and (vi) ERβ in controlling adult neurogenesis. This review highlights two major themes; first, ERβ and ERα are usually tightly inter-related in the oestradiol-dependent control of a particular brain function. For example, even though oestradiol feedback to control reproduction occurs principally through ERα-dependent mechanisms, modulatory roles for ERβ also exist. Second, the roles of ERα and ERβ within a particular neural network may be synergistic or antagonistic. Examples of the latter include the role of ERα to enhance, and ERβ to suppress, anxiety-like and aggressive behaviours. Splice variants such as ERβ2, acting as dominant negative receptors, are of further particular interest because their expression levels may reflect preceeding oestradiol exposure of relevance to oestradiol replacement therapy. Together, this review highlights the predominant modulatory, but nonetheless important, roles of ERβ in mediating the many effects of oestradiol upon adult brain function.

  5. Functional evolution of the vitamin D and pregnane X receptors

    PubMed Central

    Reschly, Erica J; Bainy, Afonso Celso Dias; Mattos, Jaco Joaquim; Hagey, Lee R; Bahary, Nathan; Mada, Sripal R; Ou, Junhai; Venkataramanan, Raman; Krasowski, Matthew D

    2007-01-01

    Background The vitamin D receptor (VDR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) are nuclear hormone receptors of the NR1I subfamily that show contrasting patterns of cross-species variation. VDR and PXR are thought to have arisen from duplication of an ancestral gene, evident now as a single gene in the genome of the chordate invertebrate Ciona intestinalis (sea squirt). VDR genes have been detected in a wide range of vertebrates including jawless fish. To date, PXR genes have not been found in cartilaginous fish. In this study, the ligand selectivities of VDRs were compared in detail across a range of vertebrate species and compared with those of the Ciona VDR/PXR. In addition, several assays were used to search for evidence of PXR-mediated hepatic effects in three model non-mammalian species: sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), zebrafish (Danio rerio), and African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis). Results Human, mouse, frog, zebrafish, and lamprey VDRs were found to have similar ligand selectivities for vitamin D derivatives. In contrast, using cultured primary hepatocytes, only zebrafish showed evidence of PXR-mediated induction of enzyme expression, with increases in testosterone 6β-hydroxylation activity (a measure of cytochrome P450 3A activity in other species) and flurbiprofen 4-hydroxylation activity (measure of cytochrome P450 2C activity) following exposure to known PXR activators. A separate assay in vivo using zebrafish demonstrated increased hepatic transcription of another PXR target, multidrug resistance gene (ABCB5), following injection of the major zebrafish bile salt, 5α-cyprinol 27-sulfate. The PXR target function, testosterone hydroxylation, was detected in frog and sea lamprey primary hepatocytes, but was not inducible in these two species by a wide range of PXR activators in other animals. Analysis of the sea lamprey draft genome also did not show evidence of a PXR gene. Conclusion Our results show tight conservation of ligand selectivity of VDRs across

  6. Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators (SARMs) as Function Promoting Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Bhasin, Shalender; Jasuja, Ravi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review The last decade has witnessed unprecedented discovery effort to develop selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) that improve physical function and bone health without adversely affecting the prostate and cardiovascular outcomes. This review describes the historical evolution, the rationale for SARM development, and the mechanisms of testosterone action and SARM selectivity. Recent Findings While steroidal SARMs have been around since the 1940s, a number of nonsteroidal SARMs that do not serve as substrates for CYP19 aromatase or 5α-reductase, act as full agonists in muscle and bone and as partial agonists in prostate are in development. The differing interactions of steroidal and nonsteroidal compounds with AR contribute to their unique pharmacologic actions. Ligand binding induces specific conformational changes in the ligand binding domain, which could modulate surface topology and protein-protein interactions between AR and coregulators, resulting in tissue-specific gene regulation. Preclinical studies have demonstrated the ability of SARMs to increase muscle and bone mass in preclinical rodent models with varying degree of prostate sparing. Phase I trials of SARMs in humans have reported modest increments in fat-free mass. Summary SARMs hold promise as a new class of function promoting anabolic therapies for a number of clinical indications, including functional limitations associated with aging and chronic disease, frailty, cancer cachexia, and osteoporosis. PMID:19357508

  7. Cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2 form functional heteromers in brain.

    PubMed

    Callén, Lucía; Moreno, Estefanía; Barroso-Chinea, Pedro; Moreno-Delgado, David; Cortés, Antoni; Mallol, Josefa; Casadó, Vicent; Lanciego, José Luis; Franco, Rafael; Lluis, Carmen; Canela, Enric I; McCormick, Peter J

    2012-06-15

    Exploring the role of cannabinoid CB(2) receptors in the brain, we present evidence of CB(2) receptor molecular and functional interaction with cannabinoid CB(1) receptors. Using biophysical and biochemical approaches, we discovered that CB(2) receptors can form heteromers with CB(1) receptors in transfected neuronal cells and in rat brain pineal gland, nucleus accumbens, and globus pallidus. Within CB(1)-CB(2) receptor heteromers expressed in a neuronal cell model, agonist co-activation of CB(1) and CB(2) receptors resulted in a negative cross-talk in Akt phosphorylation and neurite outgrowth. Moreover, one specific characteristic of CB(1)-CB(2) receptor heteromers consists of both the ability of CB(1) receptor antagonists to block the effect of CB(2) receptor agonists and, conversely, the ability of CB(2) receptor antagonists to block the effect of CB(1) receptor agonists, showing a bidirectional cross-antagonism phenomenon. Taken together, these data illuminate the mechanism by which CB(2) receptors can negatively modulate CB(1) receptor function.

  8. Clinical response to cyclosporin in chronic severe asthma is associated with reduction in serum soluble interleukin-2 receptor concentrations.

    PubMed

    Alexander, A G; Barnes, N C; Kay, A B; Corrigan, C J

    1995-04-01

    Activated T-lymphocytes play an important role in asthma pathogenesis and release soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sIL-2R), which can be detected in the serum. In a recent randomized, cross-over trial we showed that cyclosporin, an inhibitor of T-lymphocyte activation, improved lung function in patients with chronic severe asthma. To investigate whether changes in serum sIL-2R concentration could be related to clinical response we prospectively compared serum sIL-2R concentrations in patients during cyclosporin and placebo treatment. Peripheral venous blood was obtained from 22 patients during the last 4 weeks of both the cyclosporin and placebo treatment periods and serum stored at -80 degrees C pending measurement of sIL-2R concentration by enzyme immunoassay. Soluble IL-2R was detected in all samples at a concentration range of 191-2,297 U.ml-1. Mean serum concentrations of sIL-2R were significantly lower on cyclosporin therapy (560 U.ml-1) as compared with placebo (676 U.ml-1). The decreases in serum sIL-2R concentrations associated with cyclosporin therapy in these patients correlated with the percentage increases in their morning peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) measurements on cyclosporin as compared with placebo. These data demonstrate that in patients with chronic severe asthma, cyclosporin therapy which results in clinical improvement is associated with a decrease in serum concentrations of sIL-2R. This is compatible with the hypothesis that cyclosporin ameliorates asthma, at least partly, by inhibition of T-lymphocyte activation.

  9. Time-Dependent Regulation of IL-2R α-Chain (CD25) Expression by TCR Signal Strength and IL-2-Induced STAT5 Signaling in Activated Human Blood T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shatrova, Alla N.; Mityushova, Elena V.; Vassilieva, Irina O.; Aksenov, Nikolay D.; Zenin, Valery V.; Nikolsky, Nikolay N.; Marakhova, Irina I.

    2016-01-01

    The expression of the IL-2R α-chain (IL-2Rα) is regulated at the transcriptional level via TCR- and IL-2R-signaling. The question is how to precede in time the activation signals to induce the IL-2Rα expression in native primary T cells. By comparing the effects of selective drugs on the dynamics of CD25 expression during the mitogen stimulation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes, we identified distinct Src- and JAK-dependent stages of IL-2Rα upregulation. PP2, a selective inhibitor of TCR-associated Src kinase, prevents CD25 expression at initial stages of T cell activation, prior to the cell growth. This early IL-2Rα upregulation underlies the T cell competence and the IL-2 responsiveness. We found that the activated with “weak” mitogen, the population of blood lymphocytes has some pool of competent CD25+ cells bearing a high affinity IL-2R. A distinct pattern of IL-2R signaling in resting and competent T lymphocytes has been shown. Based on the inhibitory effect of WHI-P131, a selective drug of JAK3 kinase activity, we concluded that in quiescent primary T lymphocytes, the constitutive STAT3 and the IL-2-induced prolonged STAT5 activity (assayed by tyrosine phosphorylation) is mostly JAK3-independent. In competent T cells, in the presence of IL-2 JAK3/STAT5 pathway is switched to maintain the higher and sustained IL-2Rα expression as well as cell growth and proliferation. We believe that understanding the temporal coordination of antigen- and cytokine-evoked signals in primary T cells may be useful for improving immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:27936140

  10. Human native kappa opioid receptor functions not predicted by recombinant receptors: Implications for drug design

    PubMed Central

    Broad, John; Maurel, Damien; Kung, Victor W. S.; Hicks, Gareth A.; Schemann, Michael; Barnes, Michael R.; Kenakin, Terrence P.; Granier, Sébastien; Sanger, Gareth J.

    2016-01-01

    If activation of recombinant G protein-coupled receptors in host cells (by drugs or other ligands) has predictive value, similar data must be obtained with native receptors naturally expressed in tissues. Using mouse and human recombinant κ opioid receptors transfected into a host cell, two selectively-acting compounds (ICI204448, asimadoline) equi-effectively activated both receptors, assessed by measuring two different cell signalling pathways which were equally affected without evidence of bias. In mouse intestine, naturally expressing κ receptors within its nervous system, both compounds also equi-effectively activated the receptor, inhibiting nerve-mediated muscle contraction. However, whereas ICI204448 acted similarly in human intestine, where κ receptors are again expressed within its nervous system, asimadoline was inhibitory only at very high concentrations; instead, low concentrations of asimadoline reduced the activity of ICI204448. This demonstration of species-dependence in activation of native, not recombinant κ receptors may be explained by different mouse/human receptor structures affecting receptor expression and/or interactions with intracellular signalling pathways in native environments, to reveal differences in intrinsic efficacy between receptor agonists. These results have profound implications in drug design for κ and perhaps other receptors, in terms of recombinant-to-native receptor translation, species-dependency and possibly, a need to use human, therapeutically-relevant, not surrogate tissues. PMID:27492592

  11. Molecular insights on the peripheral and intra-tumoral effects of systemic high dose rIL-2 (Aldesleukin) administration for the treatment of metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Geoffrey R.; Grosh, William W.; Chianese-Bullock, Kimberly A.; Zhao, Yingdong; Liu, Hui; Slingluff, Craig L.; Marincola, Francesco M; Wang, Ena

    2011-01-01

    Purpose We have previously shown that within tumors, recombinant interleukin-2 (rIL-2, Aldesleukin) consistently activates tumor-associated macrophages and up-regulates interferon stimulated genes (ISGs) while inducing minimal migration, activation or proliferation of T-cells. These effects are independent of tumor response to treatment. Here, we prospectively evaluated transcriptional alterations induced by rIL-2 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and within melanoma metastases. Experimental Design We evaluated gene expression changes by serially comparing pre- to post-treatment samples in 14 patients and also compared transcriptional differences among lesions displaying different responsiveness to therapy, focusing on 2 lesions decreasing in size and 2 remaining stable (responding lesions) compared to non-responding ones. Results As previously described, the effects of rIL-2 were dramatic within PBMC, while effects within the tumor microenvironment were lesion-specific and limited. However, distinct signatures specific to response could be observed in responding lesions pre-treatment that were amplified following rIL-2 administration. These signatures match the functional profile observed in other human or experimental models in which immune-mediated tissue-specific destruction (TSD) occurs underlying a common pathways leading to rejection. Moreover, the signatures observed in pre-treatment lesions were qualitatively similar to those associated with TSD underlining a determinism to immune responsiveness that depends upon the genetic background of the host or the intrinsic genetic makeup of individual tumors. Conclusions This is the first prospectively collected insight on global transcriptional events occurring during high-dose rIL-2 therapy in melanoma metastases responding to treatment. PMID:21976537

  12. Drug-induced expansion and differentiation of V gamma 9V delta 2 T cells in vivo: the role of exogenous IL-2.

    PubMed

    Casetti, Rita; Perretta, Gemma; Taglioni, Alessandra; Mattei, Maurizio; Colizzi, Vittorio; Dieli, Francesco; D'Offizi, Gianpiero; Malkovsky, Miroslav; Poccia, Fabrizio

    2005-08-01

    Human Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells recognize nonpeptidic Ags generated by the 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate (many eubacteria, algae, plants, and Apicomplexa) and mevalonate (eukaryotes, archaebacteria, and certain eubacteria) pathways of isoprenoid synthesis. The potent Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cell reactivity 1) against certain cancer cells or 2) induced by infectious agents indicates that therapeutic augmentations of Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cell activities may be clinically beneficial. The functional characteristics of Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells from Macaca fascicularis (cynomolgus monkey) are very similar to those from Homo sapiens. We have found that the i.v. administration of nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate or pyrophosphomonoester drugs into cynomolgus monkeys combined with s.c. low-dose (6 x 10(5) U/animal) IL-2 induces a large pool of CD27+ and CD27- effector/memory T cells in the peripheral blood of treated animals. The administration of these drugs in the absence of IL-2 is substantially less effective, indicating the importance of additional exogenous costimuli. Shortly after the costimulatory IL-2 treatment, only gammadelta (but not alphabeta) T cells expressed the CD69 activation marker, indicating that Vgamma9Vdelta2 T lymphocytes are more responsive to low-dose IL-2 than alphabeta T cells. Up to 100-fold increases in the numbers of peripheral blood Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells were observed in animals receiving the gammadelta stimulatory drug plus IL-2. Moreover, the expanded Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells were potent Th1 effectors capable of releasing large amounts of IFN-gamma. These results may be relevant for designing novel (or modifying current) immunotherapeutic trials with nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate or pyrophosphomonoester drugs.

  13. Attenuation of IL-2 Induced Multi-System Organ Edema by Phalloidin and Antamanide.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    on the cytoskeleton in vivo is not known. Page 6 A381-0 6/22/90 METHODS Animal Preparation Seventy-eight adult male Sprague-Dawley rats ( Charles River ...to a final concentration of 106 U/ml. Depending on the batch of IL-2, endotoxin content was 3 to 6 pg/ml final dilution, assayed with the Limulus

  14. Altered glucocorticoid receptor expression and function during mouse skin carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Budunova, I V; Carbajal, S; Kang, H; Viaje, A; Slaga, T J

    1997-03-01

    Glucocorticoids are the most potent inhibitors of tumor promotion in mouse skin, when applied with a promoting agent at the early stages of promotion. However, established skin papillomas become resistant to growth inhibition by glucocorticoids. Glucocorticoid control of cellular functions is mediated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), a well-known transcription factor. Here we present data on GR expression and function in mouse papillomas and squamous cell carcinomas. Tumors were produced in SENCAR mice by a 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate two-stage protocol. In early papillomas (after 15-20 wk of promotion), northern blotting revealed a decrease in the GR mRNA level that was confirmed by a binding assay. However, in late papillomas (after 30-40 wk of promotion), and especially in squamous cell carcinomas, the level of GR in both assays was similar to or higher than the GR level in normal epidermis. To test the functional capability of GR in tumors, we compared the effect of the synthetic glucocorticoid fluocinolone acetonide (FA) on keratinocyte proliferation and on expression of glucocorticoid-responsive genes in normal epidermis, hyperplastic skin surrounding tumors, and mouse skin papillomas. FA strongly inhibited DNA synthesis in keratinocytes in normal skin and tumor-surrounding skin but had no effect on DNA synthesis in papillomas. In addition, FA strongly induced metallothionein 1 expression and inhibited connexin 26 expression in skin but did not affect expression of these genes in tumors. These data suggest that alteration of both the expression and function of GR may be an important mechanism of tumor promotion in skin.

  15. Intratumoral hu14.18-IL-2 (IC) induces local and systemic antitumor effects that involve both activated T and NK cells as well as enhanced IC retention.

    PubMed

    Yang, Richard K; Kalogriopoulos, Nicholas A; Rakhmilevich, Alexander L; Ranheim, Erik A; Seo, Songwon; Kim, Kyungmann; Alderson, Kory L; Gan, Jacek; Reisfeld, Ralph A; Gillies, Stephen D; Hank, Jacquelyn A; Sondel, Paul M

    2012-09-01

    hu14.18-IL-2 (IC) is an immunocytokine consisting of human IL-2 linked to hu14.18 mAb, which recognizes the GD2 disialoganglioside. Phase 2 clinical trials of i.v. hu14.18-IL-2 (i.v.-IC) in neuroblastoma and melanoma are underway and have already demonstrated activity in neuroblastoma. We showed previously that intratumoral hu14.18-IL-2 (IT-IC) results in enhanced antitumor activity in mouse models compared with i.v.-IC. The studies presented in this article were designed to determine the mechanisms involved in this enhanced activity and to support the future clinical testing of intratumoral administration of immunocytokines. Improved survival and inhibition of growth of both local and distant tumors were observed in A/J mice bearing s.c. NXS2 neuroblastomas treated with IT-IC compared with those treated with i.v.-IC or control mice. The local and systemic antitumor effects of IT-IC were inhibited by depletion of NK cells or T cells. IT-IC resulted in increased NKG2D receptors on intratumoral NKG2A/C/E⁺ NKp46⁺ NK cells and NKG2A/C/E⁺ CD8⁺ T cells compared with control mice or mice treated with i.v.-IC. NKG2D levels were augmented more in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes compared with splenocytes, supporting the localized nature of the intratumoral changes induced by IT-IC treatment. Prolonged retention of IC at the tumor site was seen with IT-IC compared with i.v.-IC. Overall, IT-IC resulted in increased numbers of activated T and NK cells within tumors, better IC retention in the tumor, enhanced inhibition of tumor growth, and improved survival compared with i.v.-IC.

  16. A reversion of an IL2RG mutation in combined immunodeficiency providing competitive advantage to the majority of CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Kuijpers, Taco W; van Leeuwen, Ester M M; Barendregt, Barbara H; Klarenbeek, Paul; aan de Kerk, Daan J; Baars, Paul A; Jansen, Machiel H; de Vries, Niek; van Lier, René A W; van der Burg, Mirjam

    2013-07-01

    Mutations in the common gamma chain (γc, CD132, encoded by the IL2RG gene) can lead to B(+)T(-)NK(-) X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency, as a consequence of unresponsiveness to γc-cytokines such as interleukins-2, -7 and -15. Hypomorphic mutations in CD132 may cause combined immunodeficiencies with a variety of clinical presentations. We analyzed peripheral blood mononuclear cells of a 6-year-old boy with normal lymphocyte counts, who suffered from recurrent pneumonia and disseminated mollusca contagiosa. Since proliferative responses of T cells and NK cells to γc -cytokines were severely impaired, we performed IL2RG gene analysis, showing a heterozygous mutation in the presence of a single X-chromosome. Interestingly, an IL2RG reversion to normal predominated in both naïve and antigen-primed CD8(+) T cells and increased over time. Only the revertant CD8(+) T cells showed normal expression of CD132 and the various CD8(+) T cell populations had a different T-cell receptor repertoire. Finally, a fraction of γδ(+) T cells and differentiated CD4(+)CD27(-) effector-memory T cells carried the reversion, whereas NK or B cells were repeatedly negative. In conclusion, in a patient with a novel IL2RG mutation, gene-reverted CD8(+) T cells accumulated over time. Our data indicate that selective outgrowth of particular T-cell subsets may occur following reversion at the level of committed T progenitor cells.

  17. Association study of IL2RA and CTLA4 Gene Variants with Type I Diabetes Mellitus in children in the northwest of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ranjouri, Mohammad Reza; Aob, Parisa; Mansoori Derakhshan, Sima; Shekari Khaniani, Mahmoud; Chiti, Hossein; Ramazani, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: A variety of genetic predisposing factors and environmental factors are known to influence the pathogenesis of type-1 diabetes (T1D). This study intended to investigate the association of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte associated protein 4 (CTLA4) and interleukin 2 receptor subunit alpha (IL2RA) gene polymorphisms with type 1 diabetes in children of northwest of Iran. Methods: Genomic DNA was extracted by salting-out method. PCR amplification and direct sequencing methods were used for genotyping of CTLA4 (exon 1) and IL2RA (intron 1) genes in all patients and controls. SNPStats was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs), 95% confidence intervals (CIs), and p values. Results: In this study, the frequency of G allele and GG genotype of CTLA-4 (+49A/G) polymorphism in T1D patients were significantly different from those in the controls (26% vs. 11%, p = 0.006). Moreover, a significant difference was observed between patients and control group in the allele frequencies of the new SNP (chr2:203868145) that was identified in exon one of CTLA4 (14% vs. 3%, p = 0.006). The results showed that the GG homozygous genotype of +49 A>G was associated with increased glycemic level in T1D patients in the study population (95% CI = 10.47, p = 0.0067). However, no significant association was found between IL2RA (ss52580101C>A) polymorphism and T1D patients (2% vs. 4%, p = 0.41). Conclusion: The results further support the association of T1D with +49A>G SNP in the CTLA4 gene in the population of northwest of Iran. However, no significant relationship was observed between ss52580101C>A polymorphism of IL2RA gene and T1D in this study. PMID:28265534

  18. Local tumor irradiation augments the response to IL-2 therapy in a murine renal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Younes, E; Haas, G P; Dezso, B; Ali, E; Maughan, R L; Kukuruga, M A; Montecillo, E; Pontes, J E; Hillman, G G

    1995-10-15

    We have previously demonstrated that local tumor irradiation effectively enhanced the therapeutic effect of IL-2 therapy on pulmonary metastases from a murine renal adenocarcinoma, Renca. Irradiation with 300 rad to the left lung only, followed by systemic IL-2 therapy, results in increased tumor reduction in both lungs, suggesting that radiation enhances the systemic effect of immunotherapy. In this study, we show that irradiation of the tumor-bearing organ is essential for the combined effect of both modalities. This effect is radiation dose-dependent as increases in the radiation dosage result in greater tumor reduction in the irradiated field as well as systemically in nonirradiated fields when combined with immunotherapy. We find that irradiation has a direct inhibitory effect on Renca cell growth in vitro. Irradiation of Renca cells also causes an upregulation in H-2Kd class I MHC antigen detectable at 300 rad and more pronounced with 800 rad. By in vivo selective depletion of lymphocyte subsets, we demonstrate the involvement of Lyt-2+ and L3T4+ T cell subsets and AsGM1+ cells, including NK cells, in the antitumor effect mediated by tumor irradiation and IL-2 therapy. Immunohistochemistry studies, performed on lung sections, showed a significant infiltration of CD3+ T cells and macrophages in the tumor nodules following treatment with tumor irradiation and IL-2 therapy. Our studies indicate that the mechanism of interaction between tumor irradiation and immunotherapy may include radiation-induced alterations in the tumor growth and antigenicity which may enhance or trigger an anti-tumor response elicited by IL-2 and mediated by T cells, AsGM1+ cells, and macrophages.

  19. Growth hormone receptor/binding protein: Physiology and function

    SciTech Connect

    Herington, A.C.; Ymer, S.I.; Stevenson, J.L.; Roupas, P.

    1994-12-31

    Soluble truncated forms of the growth hormone receptor (GHR) are present in the circulation of many species and are also produced by many tissues/cell types. The major high-affinity forms of these GH-binding proteins (GHBP) are derived by alternative splicing of GHR mRNA in rodents, but probably by proteolytic cleavage in other species. Questions still remain with respect to the origins, native molecular forms(s), physiology, and function of the GHBPs, however. The observation that GH induces dimerization of the soluble GHBP and a membrane GHR, and that dimerization of GHR appears to be critical for GH bioactivity suggests that the presentation of GH to target cells, in an unbound form or as a monomeric or dimeric complex with GHBP, may have significant implications for the ability of GH to activate specific postreceptor signaling pathways (tyrosine kinase, protein kinase C, G-protein pathways) known to be utilized by GH for its diverse biological effects. This minireview addresses some of these aspects and highlights several new questions which have arisen as a result of recent advances in our understanding of the structure, function, and signaling mechanisms of the membrane bound GHR. 43 refs.

  20. Functional regions of the mouse interleukin-10 receptor cytoplasmic domain.

    PubMed Central

    Ho, A S; Wei, S H; Mui, A L; Miyajima, A; Moore, K W

    1995-01-01

    The functions of wild-type and mutant mouse interleukin-10 receptors (mIL-10R) expressed in murine Ba/F3 cells were studied. As observed previously, IL-10 stimulates proliferation of IL-10R-expressing Ba/F3 cells. Accumulation of viable cells in the proliferation assay is to a significant extent balanced by concomitant cell death. Moreover, growth in IL-10 also induces a previously unrecognized response, differentiation of the cells, as evidenced both by formation of large clusters of cells in cultures with IL-10 and by induction or enhancement of expression of several cell surface antigens, including CD32/16, CD2, LECAM-1 (v-selectin), and heat-stable antigen. Two distinct functional regions near the C terminus of the mIL-10R cytoplasmic domain which mediate proliferation were identified; one of these regions also mediates the differentiation response. A third region proximal to the transmembrane domain was identified; removal of this region renders the cell 10- to 100-fold more sensitive to IL-10 in the proliferation assay. In cells expressing both wild-type and mutant IL-10R, stimulation with IL-10 leads to tyrosine phosphorylation of the kinases JAK1 and TYK2 but not JAK2 or JAK3 under the conditions tested. PMID:7544437

  1. Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibits Glucocorticoid Receptor Function in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Van Bogaert, Tom; Vandevyver, Sofie; Dejager, Lien; Van Hauwermeiren, Filip; Pinheiro, Iris; Petta, Ioanna; Engblom, David; Kleyman, Anna; Schütz, Günther; Tuckermann, Jan; Libert, Claude

    2011-01-01

    As glucocorticoid resistance (GCR) and the concomitant burden pose a worldwide problem, there is an urgent need for a more effective glucocorticoid therapy, for which insights into the molecular mechanisms of GCR are essential. In this study, we addressed the hypothesis that TNFα, a strong pro-inflammatory mediator in numerous inflammatory diseases, compromises the protective function of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) against TNFα-induced lethal inflammation. Indeed, protection of mice by dexamethasone against TNFα lethality was completely abolished when it was administered after TNFα stimulation, indicating compromised GR function upon TNFα challenge. TNFα-induced GCR was further demonstrated by impaired GR-dependent gene expression in the liver. Furthermore, TNFα down-regulates the levels of both GR mRNA and protein. However, this down-regulation seems to occur independently of GC production, as TNFα also resulted in down-regulation of GR levels in adrenalectomized mice. These findings suggest that the decreased amount of GR determines the GR response and outcome of TNFα-induced shock, as supported by our studies with GR heterozygous mice. We propose that by inducing GCR, TNFα inhibits a major brake on inflammation and thereby amplifies the pro-inflammatory response. Our findings might prove helpful in understanding GCR in inflammatory diseases in which TNFα is intimately involved. PMID:21646349

  2. Functional asymmetries in cockroach ON and OFF olfactory receptor neurons.

    PubMed

    Burgstaller, Maria; Tichy, Harald

    2011-02-01

    The ON and OFF olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) on the antenna of the American cockroach respond to the same changes in the concentration of the odor of lemon oil, but in the opposite direction. The same jump in concentration raises impulse frequency in the ON and lowers it in the OFF ORN and, conversely, the same concentration drop raises impulse frequency in the OFF and lowers it in the ON ORN. When the new concentration level is maintained, it becomes a background concentration and affects the responses of the ON and OFF ORNs to superimposed changes. Raising the background concentration decreases both the ON-ORN's response to concentration jumps and the OFF-ORN's response to concentration drops. In addition, the slopes of the functions approximating the relationship of impulse frequency to concentration changes become flatter for both types of ORNs as the background concentration rises. The progressively compressed scaling optimizes the detection of concentration changes in the low concentration range. The loss of information caused by the lower differential sensitivity in the high concentration range is partially compensated by the higher discharge rates of the OFF ORNs. The functional asymmetry of the ON and OFF ORNs, which reflects nonlinearity in the detection of changes in the concentration of the lemon oil odor, improves information transfer for decrements in the high concentration range.

  3. p150/Glued Modifies Nuclear Estrogen Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soo Jung; Chae, Christina; Wang, Michael M.

    2009-01-01

    Estrogen modulates gene expression through interactions with estrogen receptors (ERs) that bind chromosomal target genes. Recent studies have suggested an interaction between the cytoskeletal system and estrogen signaling; these have implicated a role of cytoplasmic microtubules in scaffolding ERα and enhancing nongenomic function; in addition, other experiments demonstrate that dynein light chain 1 may chaperone ERα to the nucleus, indirectly increasing transcriptional potency. Actin/myosin and dynein light chain 1 are also required for estrogen-mediated chromosomal movement that is required for transcriptional up-regulation of ERα targets. We present evidence that the dynactin component, p150/glued, directly influences the potency of nuclear ER function. Increasing the stoichiometric ratio of p150/glued and ERα by overexpression enhances estrogen responses. ERα enhancement by p150/glued does not appear to be influenced by shifts in subcellular localization because microtubule disruption fails to increase nuclear ERα. Rather, we find that modest amounts of p150/glued reside in the nucleus of cells, suggesting that it plays a direct role in nuclear transcription. Notably, p150/glued is recruited to the pS2 promoter in the presence of hormone, and, in MCF-7 cells, knockdown of p150/glued levels reduces estrogen-dependent transcription. Our results suggest that p150/glued modulates estrogen sensitivity in cells through nuclear mechanisms. PMID:19228793

  4. The heat shock protein 70 cochaperone hip enhances functional maturation of glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Gregory M; Prapapanich, Viravan; Carrigan, Patricia E; Roberts, Patricia J; Riggs, Daniel L; Smith, David F

    2004-07-01

    Multiple molecular chaperones interact with steroid receptors to promote functional maturation and stability of receptor complexes. The heat shock protein (Hsp)70 cochaperone Hip has been identified in conjunction with Hsp70, Hsp90, and the Hsp70/Hsp90 cochaperone Hop/Sti1p in receptor complexes during an intermediate stage of receptor assembly, but a functional requirement for Hip in the receptor assembly process has not been established. Because the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains orthologs for most of the receptor-associated chaperones yet lacks an orthologous Hip gene, we exploited the well-established yeast model for steroid receptor function to ask whether Hip can alter steroid receptor function in vivo. Introducing human Hip into yeast enhances hormone-dependent activation of a reporter gene by glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Because Hip does not similarly enhance signaling by mineralocorticoid, progesterone, or estrogen receptors, a general effect on transcription can be excluded. Instead, Hip promotes functional maturation of GR without increasing steady-state levels of GR protein. Unexpectedly, Hip binding to Hsp70 is not critical for boosting GR responsiveness to hormone. In conclusion, Hip functions by a previously unrecognized mechanism to promote the efficiency of GR maturation in cells.

  5. The Neuroendocrine Functions of the Parathyroid Hormone 2 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Dobolyi, Arpád; Dimitrov, Eugene; Palkovits, Miklós; Usdin, Ted B.

    2012-01-01

    The G-protein coupled parathyroid hormone 2 receptor (PTH2R) is concentrated in endocrine and limbic regions in the forebrain. Its endogenous ligand, tuberoinfundibular peptide of 39 residues (TIP39), is synthesized in only two brain regions, within the posterior thalamus and the lateral pons. TIP39-expressing neurons have a widespread projection pattern, which matches the PTH2R distribution in the brain. Neuroendocrine centers including the preoptic area, the periventricular, paraventricular, and arcuate nuclei contain the highest density of PTH2R-positive networks. The administration of TIP39 and an antagonist of the PTH2R as well as the investigation of mice that lack functional TIP39 and PTH2R revealed the involvement of the PTH2R in a variety of neural and neuroendocrine functions. TIP39 acting via the PTH2R modulates several aspects of the stress response. It evokes corticosterone release by activating corticotropin-releasing hormone-containing neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. Block of TIP39 signaling elevates the anxiety state of animals and their fear response, and increases stress-induced analgesia. TIP39 has also been suggested to affect the release of additional pituitary hormones including arginine-vasopressin and growth hormone. A role of the TIP39-PTH2R system in thermoregulation was also identified. TIP39 may play a role in maintaining body temperature in a cold environment via descending excitatory pathways from the preoptic area. Anatomical and functional studies also implicated the TIP39-PTH2R system in nociceptive information processing. Finally, TIP39 induced in postpartum dams may play a role in the release of prolactin during lactation. Potential mechanisms leading to the activation of TIP39 neurons and how they influence the neuroendocrine system are also described. The unique TIP39-PTH2R neuromodulator system provides the possibility for developing drugs with a novel mechanism of action to control neuroendocrine disorders

  6. Human rhabdomyosarcoma cells express functional erythropoietin receptor: Potential therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    PONIEWIERSKA-BARAN, AGATA; SUSZYNSKA, MALWINA; SUN, WENYUE; ABDELBASET-ISMAIL, AHMED; SCHNEIDER, GABRIELA; BARR, FREDERIC G.; RATAJCZAK, MARIUSZ Z.

    2015-01-01

    The erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) is expressed by cells from the erythroid lineage; however, evidence has accumulated that it is also expressed by some solid tumors. This is an important observation, because recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) is employed in cancer patients to treat anemia related to chemo/radiotherapy. In our studies we employed eight rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cell lines (three alveolar-type RMS cell lines and five embrional-type RMS cell lines), and mRNA samples obtained from positive, PAX7-FOXO1-positive, and fusion-negative RMS patient samples. Expression of EpoR was evaluated by RT-PCR, gene array and FACS. The functionality of EpoR in RMS cell lines was evaluated by chemotaxis, adhesion, and direct cell proliferation assays. In some of the experiments, RMS cells were exposed to vincristine (VCR) in the presence or absence of EPO to test whether EPO may impair the therapeutic effect of VCR. We report for a first time that functional EpoR is expressed in human RMS cell lines as well as by primary tumors from RMS patients. Furthermore, EpoR is detectably expressed in both embryonal and alveolar RMS subtypes. At the functional level, several human RMS cell lines responded to EPO stimulation by enhanced proliferation, chemotaxis, cell adhesion, and phosphorylation of MAPKp42/44 and AKT. Moreover, RMS cells became more resistant to VCR treatment in the presence of EPO. Our findings have important potential clinical implications, indicating that EPO supplementation in RMS patients may have the unwanted side effect of tumor progression. PMID:26412593

  7. Impaired non-specific suppressor-inducer T-cell activity in aged murine Peyer's patches, which can be corrected largely by IL-2 in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Kawanishi, H; Kiely, J

    1989-01-01

    To shed further light on the mechanism of age-associated T-cell-mediated immunoregulatory alterations in gut non-specific mucosal immune responses, we studied in vitro the function of a variety of concanavalin A (Con A)-activated immunoregulatory T-cell subsets derived from aged murine Peyer's patches (PP) (BALB/c > 24 months old) in the production of class-specific immunoglobulins (Ig) by young (5-8 months old) lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated PP B cells. The in vitro induction of Con A-activated PP helper (Th) [L3T4+ Lyt-2- Vicia villosa non-adherent (VV-)], suppressor (Ts) L3T4- Lyt-2+ (VV-), and contrasuppresor (Tcs) (L3T4+ Lyt-2- VV+) T cells were compared for the two age groups. The activities of aged PP-derived Ts and Tcs cells were greatly impaired, in contrast to minor defects in activity of the aged Th cells. The induction of effector Tcs cells, however, depended on the presence of functionally effective Ts cells. Recombinant IL-2 (rIL-2) could largely correct this impaired generation of aged Ts and Tcs cells. Next, we determined the activities of Ts inducer (Tsi) (L3T4+ Lyt-2- VV-) T cells in aged PP in vitro. The cell activity was considerably diminished in aged mice. Then, we tested in vitro whether rIL-2 could reconstitute the impaired generation of the aged non-specific Tsi cell. The function of the latter cell was largely restored by rIL-2. Thus, the major functional (intrinsic) defect present in immunocompetent T lymphocytes of murine aged PP was confined to the Tsi cell. PMID:15493264

  8. Inactivation of erythropoietin receptor function by point mutations in a region having homology with other cytokine receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Miura, O; Cleveland, J L; Ihle, J N

    1993-01-01

    The cytoplasmic domain of the erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) contains a region, proximal to the transmembrane domain, that is essential for function and has homology with other members of the cytokine receptor family. To explore the functional significance of this region and to identify critical residues, we introduced several amino acid substitutions and examined their effects on erythropoietin-induced mitogenesis, tyrosine phosphorylation, and expression of immediate-early (c-fos, c-myc, and egr-1) and early (ornithine decarboxylase and T-cell receptor gamma) genes in interleukin-3-dependent cell lines. Amino acid substitution of W-282, which is strictly conserved at the middle portion of the homology region, completely abolished all the functions of the EpoR. Point mutation at L-306 or E-307, both of which are in a conserved LEVL motif, drastically impaired the function of the receptor in all assays. Other point mutations, introduced into less conserved amino acid residues, did not significantly impair the function of the receptor. These results demonstrate that conserved amino acid residues in this domain of the EpoR are required for mitogenesis, stimulation of tyrosine phosphorylation, and induction of immediate-early and early genes. Images PMID:8382775

  9. Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ Receptor Structure, Signaling, Ligands, Functions, and Interactions with Opioid Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bruchas, Michael R.; Calo', Girolamo; Cox, Brian M.; Zaveri, Nurulain T.

    2016-01-01

    The NOP receptor (nociceptin/orphanin FQ opioid peptide receptor) is the most recently discovered member of the opioid receptor family and, together with its endogenous ligand, N/OFQ, make up the fourth members of the opioid receptor and opioid peptide family. Because of its more recent discovery, an understanding of the cellular and behavioral actions induced by NOP receptor activation are less well developed than for the other members of the opioid receptor family. All of these factors are important because NOP receptor activation has a clear modulatory role on mu opioid receptor-mediated actions and thereby affects opioid analgesia, tolerance development, and reward. In addition to opioid modulatory actions, NOP receptor activation has important effects on motor function and other physiologic processes. This review discusses how NOP pharmacology intersects, contrasts, and interacts with the mu opioid receptor in terms of tertiary structure and mechanism of receptor activation; location of receptors in the central nervous system; mechanisms of desensitization and downregulation; cellular actions; intracellular signal transduction pathways; and behavioral actions with respect to analgesia, tolerance, dependence, and reward. This is followed by a discussion of the agonists and antagonists that have most contributed to our current knowledge. Because NOP receptors are highly expressed in brain and spinal cord and NOP receptor activation sometimes synergizes with mu receptor-mediated actions and sometimes opposes them, an understanding of NOP receptor pharmacology in the context of these interactions with the opioid receptors will be crucial to the development of novel therapeutics that engage the NOP receptor. PMID:26956246

  10. Profound regulation of neonatal CA1 rat hippocampal GABAergic transmission by functionally distinct kainate receptor populations

    PubMed Central

    Maingret, François; Lauri, Sari E; Taira, Tomi; Isaac, John TR

    2005-01-01

    Neonatal hippocampus exhibits distinct patterns of network activity that are dependent on the interaction between inhibitory and excitatory transmission. Kainate receptors are ideally positioned to regulate this activity by virtue of their ability to regulate presynaptic function in GABAergic interneurones. Indeed, kainate receptors are highly expressed in neonatal hippocampal interneurones, yet the role and mechanisms by which they might regulate neonatal circuitry are unexplored. To address this we investigated the kainate receptor-dependent regulation of GABAergic transmission onto neonatal CA1 pyramidal neurones. Kainate receptor activation produced two distinct opposing effects, a very large increase in the frequency of spontaneous IPSCs, and a robust depression of evoked GABAergic transmission. The up-regulation of spontaneous transmission was due to activation of somatodendritic and axonal receptors while the depression of evoked transmission could be fully accounted for by a direct regulation of GABA release by kainate receptors located at the terminals. None of the effects of kainate receptor agonists were sensitive to GABAB receptor antagonists, nor was there any postsynaptic kainate receptor-dependent effects observed in CA1 pyramidal cells that could account for our findings. Our data demonstrate that kainate receptors profoundly regulate neonatal CA1 GABAergic circuitry by two distinct opposing mechanisms, and indicate that these two effects are mediated by functionally distinct populations of receptors. Thus kainate receptors are strategically located to play a critical role in shaping early hippocampal network activity and by virtue of this have a key role in hippocampal development. PMID:15946969

  11. Bivalent Ligands Targeting Chemokine Receptor Dimerization: Molecular Design and Functional Studies

    PubMed Central

    Arnatt, Christopher Kent; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence has shown that chemokine receptors may form functional dimers with unique pharmacological profiles. A common practice to characterize such G protein-coupled receptor dimerization processes is to apply bivalent ligands as chemical probes which can interact with both receptors simultaneously. Currently, two chemokine receptor dimers have been studied by applying bivalent compounds: the CXCR4-CXCR4 homodimer and the CCR5-MOR heterodimer. These bivalent compounds have revealed how dimerization influences receptor function and may lead to novel therapeutics. Future design of bivalent ligands for chemokine receptor dimers may be aided with the recently available CXCR4 homodimer, and CCR5 monomer crystal structures by more accurately simulating chemokine receptors and their dimers. PMID:25159160

  12. The chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 induces functional responses through dimerization of its receptor CCR2

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Frade, José Miguel; Vila-Coro, Antonio J.; Martín de Ana, Ana; Albar, Juan Pablo; Martínez-A., Carlos; Mellado, Mario

    1999-01-01

    Cytokines interact with hematopoietin superfamily receptors and stimulate receptor dimerization. We demonstrate that chemoattractant cytokines (chemokines) also trigger biological responses through receptor dimerization. Functional responses are induced after pairwise crosslinking of chemokine receptors by bivalent agonistic antichemokine receptor mAb, but not by their Fab fragments. Monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1-triggered receptor dimerization was studied in human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cells cotransfected with genes coding for the CCR2b receptor tagged with YSK or Myc sequences. After MCP-1 stimulation, immunoprecipitation with Myc-specific antibodies revealed YSK-tagged receptors in immunoblotting. Receptor dimerization also was validated by chemical crosslinking in both HEK-293 cells and the human monocytic cell line Mono Mac 1. Finally, we constructed a loss-of-function CCR2bY139F mutant that acted as a dominant negative, blocking signaling through the CCR2 wild-type receptor. This study provides functional support for a model in which the MCP-1 receptor is activated by ligand-induced homodimerization, allowing discussion of the similarities between bacterial and leukocyte chemotaxis. PMID:10097088

  13. Structure-function study of the fourth transmembrane segment of the GABAρ1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Estrada-Mondragón, Argel; Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge Mauricio; Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo; Miledi, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    The Cys-loop family of receptors mediates synaptic neurotransmission in the central nervous system of vertebrates. These receptors share several structural characteristics and assemble in the plasma membrane as multimers with fivefold symmetry. Of these, the ionotropic GABA receptors are key players in the pathogenesis of diseases like epilepsy, anxiety, and schizophrenia. Different experimental approaches have shed some light on the mechanisms behind the function of these receptors; but little is known about their structure at high resolution. Sequence homology with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor predicts that ionotropic GABA receptors possess four transmembrane segments (TM1–4) and that TM2 forms the wall of the ion channel. However, the role of the other three segments is unclear. The GABAρ1 receptor plays a fundamental role in the regulation of neurotransmission along the visual pathway, is highly sensitive to GABA, and exhibits little desensitization. In our recent investigations of the role of TM4 in receptor function, a key residue in this domain (W475) was found to be involved in activation of the receptor. Here we have generated a structural model of the GABAρ1 receptor in silico and assessed its validity by electrophysiologically testing nine amino acid substitutions of W475 and deletions of the neighboring residues (Y474 and S476). The results identify a critical linkage between the ligand-binding domain and the TM4 domain and provide a framework for more detailed structure-function analyses of ionotropic GABA receptors. PMID:20876117

  14. Rising stars: modulation of brain functions by astroglial type-1 cannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Metna-Laurent, Mathilde; Marsicano, Giovanni

    2015-03-01

    The type-1-cannabinoid (CB1 ) receptor is amongst the most widely expressed G protein-coupled receptors in the brain. In few decades, CB1 receptors have been shown to regulate a large array of functions from brain cell development and survival to complex cognitive processes. Understanding the cellular mechanisms underlying these functions of CB1 is complex due to the heterogeneity of the brain cell types on which the receptor is expressed. Although the large majority of CB1 receptors act on neurons, early studies pointed to a direct control of CB1 receptors over astroglial functions including brain energy supply and neuroprotection. In line with the growing concept of the tripartite synapse highlighting astrocytes as direct players in synaptic plasticity, astroglial CB1 receptor signaling recently emerged as the mediator of several forms of synaptic plasticity associated to important cognitive functions. Here, we shortly review the current knowledge on CB1 receptor-mediated astroglial functions. This functional spectrum is large and most of the mechanisms by which CB1 receptors control astrocytes, as well as their consequences in vivo, are still unknown, requiring innovative approaches to improve this new cannabinoid research field.

  15. Minoxidil may suppress androgen receptor-related functions

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Liu, Jai-Shin; Lin, An-Chi; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Chung, Wen-Hung; Wu, Wen-Guey

    2014-01-01

    Although minoxidil has been used for more than two decades to treat androgenetic alopecia (AGA), an androgen-androgen receptor (AR) pathway-dominant disease, its precise mechanism of action remains elusive. We hypothesized that minoxidil may influence the AR or its downstream signaling. These tests revealed that minoxidil suppressed AR-related functions, decreasing AR transcriptional activity in reporter assays, reducing expression of AR targets at the protein level, and suppressing AR-positive LNCaP cell growth. Dissecting the underlying mechanisms, we found that minoxidil interfered with AR-peptide, AR-coregulator, and AR N/C-terminal interactions, as well as AR protein stability. Furthermore, a crystallographic analysis using the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD) revealed direct binding of minoxidil to the AR in a minoxidil-AR-LBD co-crystal model, and surface plasmon resonance assays demonstrated that minoxidil directly bound the AR with a Kd value of 2.6 μM. Minoxidil also suppressed AR-responsive reporter activity and decreased AR protein stability in human hair dermal papilla cells. The current findings provide evidence that minoxidil could be used to treat both cancer and age-related disease, and open a new avenue for applications of minoxidil in treating androgen-AR pathway-related diseases. PMID:24742982

  16. Metabolic functions of glucocorticoid receptor in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Taiyi; Harris, Charles A; Wang, Jen-Chywan

    2013-11-05

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) exert key metabolic influences on skeletal muscle. GCs increase protein degradation and decrease protein synthesis. The released amino acids are mobilized from skeletal muscle to liver, where they serve as substrates for hepatic gluconeogenesis. This metabolic response is critical for mammals' survival under stressful conditions, such as fasting and starvation. GCs suppress insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and utilization and glycogen synthesis, and play a permissive role for catecholamine-induced glycogenolysis, thus preserving the level of circulating glucose, the major energy source for the brain. However, chronic or excess exposure of GCs can induce muscle atrophy and insulin resistance. GCs convey their signal mainly through the intracellular glucocorticoid receptor (GR). While GR can act through different mechanisms, one of its major actions is to regulate the transcription of its primary target genes through genomic glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) by directly binding to DNA or tethering onto other DNA-binding transcription factors. These GR primary targets trigger physiological and pathological responses of GCs. Much progress has been made to understand how GCs regulate protein and glucose metabolism. In this review, we will discuss how GR primary target genes confer metabolic functions of GCs, and the mechanisms governing the transcriptional regulation of these targets. Comprehending these processes not only contributes to the fundamental understanding of mammalian physiology, but also will provide invaluable insight for improved GC therapeutics.

  17. Prefrontal dopaminergic receptor abnormalities and executive functions in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ko, Ji Hyun; Antonelli, Francesca; Monchi, Oury; Ray, Nicola; Rusjan, Pablo; Houle, Sylvain; Lang, Anthony E; Christopher, Leigh; Strafella, Antonio P

    2013-07-01

    The main pattern of cognitive impairments seen in early to moderate stages of Parkinson's disease (PD) includes deficits of executive functions. These nonmotor complications have a significant impact on the quality of life and day-to-day activities of PD patients and are not effectively managed by current therapies, a problem which is almost certainly due to the fact that the disease extends beyond the nigrostriatal system. To investigate the role of extrastriatal dopamine in executive function in PD, PD patients and a control group were studied with positron-emission-tomography using a high-affinity dopamine D2/D3 receptor tracer, [(11) C]FLB-457. All participants were scanned twice while performing an executive task and a control task. Patients were off medication for at least 12 h. The imaging analysis revealed that parkinsonian patients had lower [(11) C]FLB-457 binding than control group independently of task conditions across different brain regions. Cognitive assessment measures were positively correlated with [(11) C]FLB-457 binding in the bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex only in control group, but not in PD patients. Within the control group, during the executive task (as compared to control task), there was evidence of reduced [(11) C]FLB-457 binding (indicative of increased dopamine release) in the right orbitofrontal cortex. In contrast, PD patients did not show any reduction in binding during the executive task (as compared with control task). These findings suggest that PD patients present significant abnormalities in extrastriatal dopamine associated with executive processing. These observations provide important insights on the pathophysiology of cognitive dysfunction in PD.

  18. Functional reconstitution of Drosophila melanogaster NMJ glutamate receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Tae Hee; Dharkar, Poorva; Mayer, Mark L.; Serpe, Mihaela

    2015-04-27

    The Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ), at which glutamate acts as the excitatory neurotransmitter, is a widely used model for genetic analysis of synapse function and development. Despite decades of study, the inability to reconstitute NMJ glutamate receptor function using heterologous expression systems has complicated the analysis of receptor function, such that it is difficult to resolve the molecular basis for compound phenotypes observed in mutant flies. In this paper, we find that Drosophila Neto functions as an essential component required for the function of NMJ glutamate receptors, permitting analysis of glutamate receptor responses in Xenopus oocytes. Finally, in combination with a crystallographic analysis of the GluRIIB ligand binding domain, we use this system to characterize the subunit dependence of assembly, channel block, and ligand selectivity for Drosophila NMJ glutamate receptors.

  19. The Missense of Smell: Functional Variability in the Human Odorant Receptor Repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Andreas; Li, Yun R.; Zhou, Ting; Trimmer, Casey; Snyder, Lindsey L.; Moberly, Andrew H.; Adipietro, Kaylin A.; Liu, Wen Ling L.; Zhuang, Hanyi; Zhan, Senmiao; Lee, Somin S.; Lin, Abigail; Matsunami, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    Humans have approximately 400 intact odorant receptors, but each individual has a unique set of genetic variations that lead to variation in olfactory perception. We used a heterologous assay to determine how often genetic polymorphisms in odorant receptors alter receptor function. We identified agonists for 18 odorant receptors and found that 63% of the odorant receptors we examined had polymorphisms that altered in vitro function. On average, two individuals differ functionally at over 30% of their odorant receptor alleles. To show that these in vitro results are relevant to olfactory perception, we verified that variations in OR10G4 genotype explain over 15% of the observed variation in perceived intensity and over 10% of the observed variation in perceived valence for the high affinity in vitro agonist guaiacol, but do not explain phenotypic variation for the lower affinity agonists vanillin and ethyl vanillin. PMID:24316890

  20. Functional characterisation of the Anopheles leucokinins and their cognate G-protein coupled receptor.

    PubMed

    Radford, Jonathan C; Terhzaz, Selim; Cabrero, Pablo; Davies, Shireen-A; Dow, Julian A T

    2004-12-01

    Identification of the Anopheles gambiae leucokinin gene from the completed A. gambiae genome revealed that this insect species contains three leucokinin peptides, named Anopheles leucokinin I-III. These peptides are similar to those identified in two other mosquito species, Aedes aegypti and Culex salinarius. Additionally, Anopheles leucokinin I displays sequence similarity to Drosophila melanogaster leucokinin. Using a combination of computational and molecular approaches, a full-length cDNA for a candidate leucokinin-like receptor was isolated from A. stephensi, a close relative of A. gambiae. Alignment of the known leucokinin receptors--all G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs)--with this receptor, identified some key conserved regions within the receptors, notably transmembrane (TM) domains I, II, III, VI and VII. The Anopheles leucokinins and receptor were shown to be a functional receptor-ligand pair. All three Anopheles leucokinins caused a dose-dependent rise in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) when applied to S2 cells co-expressing the receptor and an aequorin transgene, with a potency order of I>II>III. Drosophila leucokinin was also found to activate the Anopheles receptor with a similar EC50 value to Anopheles leucokinin I. However, when the Anopheles peptides were applied to the Drosophila receptor, only Anopheles leucokinin I and II elicited a rise in [Ca2+]i. This suggests that the Anopheles receptor has a broader specificity for leucokinin ligands than the Drosophila receptor. Antisera raised against the Anopheles receptor identified a doublet of approx. 65 and 72 kDa on western blots, consistent with the presence of four N-glycosylation sites within the receptor sequence, and the known glycosylation of the receptor in Drosophila. In Anopheles tubules, as in Drosophila, the receptor was localised to the stellate cells. Thus we provide the first identification of Anopheles mosquito leucokinins (Anopheles leucokinins) and a cognate leucokinin receptor

  1. Structural and functional evolution of the P2Y12-like receptor group

    PubMed Central

    Hermsdorf, Thomas; Engemaier, Eva; Engel, Kathrin; Liebscher, Ines; Thor, Doreen; Zierau, Klaas; Römpler, Holger; Schulz, Angela

    2007-01-01

    Metabotropic pyrimidine and purine nucleotide receptors (P2Y receptors) belong to the superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). They are distinguishable from adenosine receptors (P1) as they bind adenine and/or uracil nucleotide triphosphates or diphosphates depending on the subtype. Over the past decade, P2Y receptors have been cloned from a variety of tissues and species, and as many as eight functional subtypes have been characterized. Most recently, several members of the P2Y12-like receptor group, which includes the clopidogrel-sensitive ADP receptor P2Y12, have been deorphanized. The P2Y12-like receptor group comprises several structurally related GPCR which, however, display heterogeneous agonist specificity including nucleotides, their derivatives, and lipids. Besides the established function of P2Y12 in platelet activation, expression in macrophages, neuronal and glial cells as well as recent results from functional studies implicate that several members of this group may have specific functions in neurotransmission, inflammation, chemotaxis, and response to tissue injury. This review focuses specifically on the structure-function relation and shortly summarizes some aspects of the physiological relevance of P2Y12-like receptor members. PMID:18404440

  2. Inhibition of transforming growth factor-β signalling attenuates interleukin (IL)-18 plus IL-2-induced interstitial lung disease in mice

    PubMed Central

    Segawa, S; Goto, D; Yoshiga, Y; Sugihara, M; Hayashi, T; Chino, Y; Matsumoto, I; Ito, S; Sumida, T

    2010-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is an intractable disease induced by various factors in humans. However, there is no universally effective treatment for ILD. In this study, we investigated the role of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signalling in the pathogenesis of ILD by using model mice. Injection of interleukin (IL)-18 plus IL-2 in C57BL6 (B6) mice resulted in acute ILD by infiltration of natural killer (NK) cells and a significant increase of TGF-β mRNA in the lung. To examine the pathogenetic role of TGF-β in ILD mice, we used SB-431542 (4-[4-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-5-(2-pyridinyl)-1H-imidazol-2-yl]-benzamide), which is a potent and selective inhibitor of TGF-β receptor I (TβRI), also known as activin receptor-like kinase 5 (ALK5). Treatment of B6-ILD mice with SB-431542 resulted in improvement of ILD, delay in mortality, reduction of the expression of interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-6 in the lungs. The same treatment also decreased significantly the percentage of natural killer (NK) cells in the lungs (P < 0·05) and mRNA expression levels of certain chemokines such as CCL2, CCL3, CCL4, CCL5 and CXCL10 in B6-ILD. These findings were confirmed by IL-18 plus IL-2 treatment of Smad3-deficient (Smad3–/–) mice (P < 0·05). Our results showed that inhibition of TGF-β signalling reduced the percentage of NK cells and the expression of certain chemokines in the lungs, resulting in improvement of ILD. The findings suggest that TGF-β signalling may play an important role in the pathogenesis of IL-18 plus IL-2-induced ILD in mice. PMID:20089076

  3. Fever and the use of paracetamol during IL-2-based immunotherapy in metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Køstner, Anne Helene; Ellegaard, Mai-Britt Bjørklund; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Bastholt, Lars; Schmidt, Henrik

    2015-03-01

    Fever is frequently observed in conjunction with interleukin-2 (IL-2)-based immunotherapy. Traditionally, fever has been regarded as an undesirable side effect and treated with fever-lowering drugs. However, new insights in tumor immunology suggest that elevated temperature may facilitate a more effective antitumor immune response. The purpose of this retrospective study was to examine the potential role of the IL-2-induced fever in melanoma patients treated with or without paracetamol in two consecutive cohorts. One hundred and seventy-nine patients with metastatic melanoma treated with a modified decrescendo regimen of IL-2 and Interferon (IFN) between 2004 and 2010 were retrospectively studied. 87 patients treated before 2007 received paracetamol as part of the treatment schedule, and 92 patients treated after 2007 did not receive paracetamol routinely. Body temperature was analyzed as dichotomized and continuous variables and correlated to objective tumor response and overall survival using logistic regression and Cox proportional hazard analysis. Patients experiencing peak temperature of ≥ 39.5 °C had a median OS of 15.2 months compared to 8.7 months among patients with lower temperatures (P = 0.01). In the multivariate analysis, peak temperature of ≥ 39.5 °C (HR 0.53; P = 0.026) and high mean temperature (HR 0.56; P = 0.004) were independent prognostic factors for improved survival. We suggest high fever as a biomarker for improved survival in melanoma patients treated with IL-2/IFN. The routine use of fever-reducing drugs during immunotherapy can therefore be questioned. More studies are needed to evaluate the role of fever and the use of antipyretics during cytokine-based immunotherapy.

  4. [Experience with rIL2 in the treatment of metastatic renal carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Cardellini, P; Vicini, D; Ruggieri, M; Franceschetti, G P; Nicrosini, S

    1993-04-01

    Eight patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma, all nephrectomized, were treated with rIL2 continuous i.v. infusion or subcutaneous administering (+/- INF). Six patients alive. Continuous infusion is possible event out of Intensive Care Unity. Adverse effects, sometimes serious, rapidly decrease with suspension. Subcutaneous infusion is more easy and with lower adverse effects. We don't know methodic of which can give more security.

  5. The effect of IL-2 expression by recombinant Newcastle disease virus on host immune response, viral replication and pathogenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interleukin 2 (IL-2) is a soluble cytokine that stimulates the cell-mediated immune response. Virus constructs, such as recombinant vaccinia virus, expressing chicken IL-2 have been shown to improve viral clearance by natural killer cells in mice. We have inserted the open-reading frame of the chi...

  6. [Opioid receptors of the CNS: function, structure and distribution].

    PubMed

    Slamberová, R

    2004-01-01

    Even though the alkaloids of opium, such as morphine and codeine, were isolated at the beginning of 19th century, the opioid receptors were not determined until 1970's. The discovery of endogenous opioid peptides, such as endorphins, enkephalins and dynorphins, has helped to differentiate between the specific opioid receptor subtypes, mu, delta and kappa, that are used up to now. Opioid receptors are distributed in the central nervous system unevenly. Each receptor subtype has its own specific and nonspecific agonists and antagonists. Opioides, as exogenous opioid receptor agonists, are drugs that are often used in medicine for their analgesic effects, but they are also some of the most heavily abused drugs in the world. Opioides may also induce long-term changes in the numbers and binding activities of opioid receptors. Some of our studies in fact demonstrate that prenatal morphine exposure can alter opioid receptors of adult rats. This may begin to provide insight into the sources of some of the morphological and behavioral changes in the progeny of mothers that received or abused opioides during pregnancy.

  7. A common polymorphism in the LDL receptor gene has multiple effects on LDL receptor function.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Ihn, Hansel E; Medina, Marisa W; Krauss, Ronald M

    2013-04-01

    A common synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism in exon 12 of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene, rs688, has been associated with increased plasma total and LDL cholesterol in several populations. Using immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines from a healthy study population, we confirmed an earlier report that the minor allele of rs688 is associated with increased exon 12 alternative splicing (P < 0.05) and showed that this triggered nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) of the alternatively spliced LDLR mRNA. However, since synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms may influence structure and function of the encoded proteins by co-translational effects, we sought to test whether rs688 was also functional in the full-length mRNA. In HepG2 cells expressing LDLR cDNA constructs engineered to contain the major or minor allele of rs688, the latter was associated with a smaller amount of LDLR protein at the cell surface (-21.8 ± 0.6%, P = 0.012), a higher amount in the lysosome fraction (+25.7 ± 0.3%, P = 0.037) and reduced uptake of fluorescently labeled LDL (-24.3 ± 0.7%, P < 0.01). Moreover, in the presence of exogenous proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9), a protein that reduces cellular LDL uptake by promoting lysosomal degradation of LDLR, the minor allele resulted in reduced capacity of a PCSK9 monoclonal antibody to increase LDL uptake. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that rs688, which is located in the β-propeller region of LDLR, has effects on LDLR activity beyond its role in alternative splicing due to impairment of LDLR endosomal recycling and/or PCSK9 binding, processes in which the β-propeller is critically involved.

  8. Molecular cloning of natriuretic peptide receptor A from bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) brain and its functional expression.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, T; Miyamoto, K; Mizutani, T; Yamada, K; Yazawa, T; Yoshino, M; Minegishi, T; Takei, Y; Kangawa, K; Minamino, N; Saito, Y; Kojima, M

    2001-08-08

    A comparative study of natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR) was performed by cloning the NPR-A receptor subtype from the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) brain and analyzing its functional expression. Like other mammalian NPR-A receptors, the bullfrog NPR-A receptor consists of an extracellular ligand binding domain, a hydrophobic transmembrane domain, a kinase-like domain and a guanylate cyclase domain. Sequence comparison among the bullfrog and mammalian receptors revealed a relatively low ( approximately 45%) similarity in the extracellular domain compared to a very high similarity ( approximately 92%) in the cytoplasmic regulatory and catalytic domains. Expression of NPR-A mRNA was detected in various bullfrog tissues including the brain, heart, lung, kidney and liver; highest levels were observed in lung. Functional expression of the receptor in COS-7 cells revealed that frog atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) elicited cyclic guanosine 3'5'-monophosphate production by stimulating the receptor in a dose-dependent manner from 10(-10) M concentrations. Rat ANP was also effective in stimulating the frog receptor whereas rat BNP and porcine BNP were less responsive to the receptor. On the other hand, frog C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) as well as porcine CNP stimulated the receptor only at high concentrations (10(-7) M). This clearly indicates that the bullfrog receptor is a counterpart of mammalian NPR-A, and is specific for ANP or BNP but not for CNP.

  9. Modulation of Chemokine Receptor Function by Cholesterol: New Prospects for Pharmacological Intervention.

    PubMed

    Legler, Daniel F; Matti, Christoph; Laufer, Julia M; Jakobs, Barbara D; Purvanov, Vladimir; Uetz-von Allmen, Edith; Thelen, Marcus

    2017-04-01

    Chemokine receptors are seven transmembrane-domain receptors belonging to class A of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The receptors together with their chemokine ligands constitute the chemokine system, which is essential for directing cell migration and plays a crucial role in a variety of physiologic and pathologic processes. Given the importance of orchestrating cell migration, it is vital that chemokine receptor signaling is tightly regulated to ensure appropriate responses. Recent studies highlight a key role for cholesterol in modulating chemokine receptor activities. The steroid influences the spatial organization of GPCRs within the membrane bilayer, and consequently can tune chemokine receptor signaling. The effects of cholesterol on the organization and function of chemokine receptors and GPCRs in general include direct and indirect effects (Fig. 1). Here, we review how cholesterol and some key metabolites modulate functions of the chemokine system in multiple ways. We emphasize the role of cholesterol in chemokine receptor oligomerization, thereby promoting the formation of a signaling hub enabling integration of distinct signaling pathways at the receptor-membrane interface. Moreover, we discuss the role of cholesterol in stabilizing particular receptor conformations and its consequence for chemokine binding. Finally, we highlight how cholesterol accumulation, its deprivation, or cholesterol metabolites contribute to modulating cell orchestration during inflammation, induction of an adaptive immune response, as well as to dampening an anti-tumor immune response.

  10. Effect of ambient extracellular glutamate on Drosophila glutamate receptor trafficking and function.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kaiyun; Augustin, Hrvoje; Featherstone, David E

    2009-01-01

    Measurements suggest that the hemolymph glutamate concentrations in Drosophila are relatively high. This raises the possibility that extracellular glutamate could be an important regulator of glutamatergic transmission in vivo. Using voltage clamp electrophysiology, we found that synaptic currents in D. melanogaster larval neuromuscular junctions are reduced by extracellular glutamate (EC50: approximately 0.4 mM), such that only 10-30% of receptors were functionally available in 1 mM extracellular glutamate. The kinetics of synaptic currents were also slowed in a dose-dependent fashion (EC50: approximately 1 mM), consistent with the idea that extracellular glutamate preferentially removes the fastest-desensitizing receptors from the functional pool. Prolonged exposure (several hours) to extracellular glutamate also triggers loss of glutamate receptor immunoreactivity from neuromuscular junctions. To determine whether this receptor loss requires that glutamate bind directly to the lost receptors, we examined glutamate-dependent loss of receptor immunoreactivity in larvae with glutamate receptor ligand binding mutations. Our results suggest that glutamate-dependent receptor loss requires binding of glutamate directly to the lost receptors. To determine whether lost receptor protein is degraded or merely redistributed, we used immunoblots. Results suggest that glutamate receptor protein is redistributed, but not degraded, after prolonged exposure to high extracellular glutamate.

  11. Silent IL2RG Gene Editing in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Li B; Ma, Chao; Awong, Geneve; Kennedy, Marion; Gornalusse, German; Keller, Gordon; Kaufman, Dan S; Russell, David W

    2016-03-01

    Many applications of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) require efficient editing of silent chromosomal genes. Here, we show that a major limitation in isolating edited clones is silencing of the selectable marker cassette after homologous recombination and that this can be overcome by using a ubiquitous chromatin opening element (UCOE) promoter-driven transgene. We use this strategy to edit the silent IL2RG locus in human PSCs with a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-targeting vector in the absence of potentially genotoxic, site-specific nucleases and show that IL2RG is required for natural killer and T-cell differentiation of human PSCs. Insertion of an active UCOE promoter into a silent locus altered the histone modification and cytosine methylation pattern of surrounding chromatin, but these changes resolved when the UCOE promoter was removed. This same approach could be used to correct IL2RG mutations in X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency patient-derived induced PSCs (iPSCs), to prevent graft versus host disease in regenerative medicine applications, or to edit other silent genes.

  12. IL2/IL21 region polymorphism influences response to rituximab in systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Ana; Dávila-Fajardo, Cristina Lucía; Robledo, Gema; Rubio, José Luis Callejas; de Ramón Garrido, Enrique; García-Hernández, Francisco J; González-León, Rocío; Ríos-Fernández, Raquel; Barrera, José Cabeza; González-Escribano, Ma Francisca; García, Ma Teresa Camps; Palma, Ma Jesús Castillo; del Mar Ayala, Ma; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Martín, Javier

    2013-08-01

    To determine whether the IL2/IL21 region, a general autoimmunity locus, contributes to the observed variation in response to rituximab in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus as well as to analyze its influence in a cohort including other autoimmune diseases. rs6822844 G/T polymorphism at the IL2-IL21 region was analyzed by TaqMan assay in 84 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and 60 different systemic autoimmune diseases Spanish patients receiving rituximab. Six months after the first infusion patients were classified, according to the EULAR criteria, as good responders, partial responders and non-responders. A statistically significant difference was observed in GG genotype frequency between responder (total and partial response) (83.56%) and non-responder (45.45%) SLE patients (p=0.010, odds ratio (OR)=6.10 [1.28-29.06]). No association with the response was evident in the group of patients with autoimmune diseases other than lupus. Furthermore, when both groups of patients were pooled in a meta-analysis, a reduced statistical significance of the association was observed (p=0.024, OR=3.53 [1.06-11.64]). Our results show for a first time that IL2-IL21 region seems to play a role in the response to rituximab in SLE patients but not in other autoimmune diseases.

  13. Pavlovian conditioning of LPS-induced responses: effects on corticosterone, splenic NE, and IL-2 production.

    PubMed

    Janz, L J; Green-Johnson, J; Murray, L; Vriend, C Y; Nance, D M; Greenberg, A H; Dyck, D G

    1996-06-01

    The present study used a taste aversion paradigm to condition lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced suppression of splenic lymphocyte interleukin-2 (IL-2) production, with concurrent measurement of corticosterone production and splenic norepinephrine (NE) content). In training, two groups of rats received saccharin and IP LPS in a paired (P) manner and a third group in a specifically unpaired (U) manner. In the test, the unpaired group (group U) and one of the paired (group P) groups were re-exposed (R) to the cue and the other not (NR). An additional group controlled for the effects of cues (conditional stimulus) and fluid deprivation (negative control; NC). A robust taste aversion in the P-R group was accompanied by suppression of IL-2 production, reduced splenic NE content, and elevated corticosterone production, relative to combined controls (i.e., groups U-R, P-NR, and NC). The conditioned modulation of IL-2 secretion, along with the concomitant alteration of adrenocortical and sympathetic mediators, supports the involvement of bidirectional central nervous-immune system pathways in this paradigm.

  14. Local immunotherapy of spontaneous feline fibrosarcomas using recombinant poxviruses expressing interleukin 2 (IL2).

    PubMed

    Jourdier, T-M; Moste, C; Bonnet, M-C; Delisle, F; Tafani, J-P; Devauchelle, P; Tartaglia, J; Moingeon, P

    2003-12-01

    We tested the canarypox virus vector ALVAC and the genetically attenuated vaccinia virus vector NYVAC as vehicles for achieving local immunomodulation in domestic animals bearing spontaneous tumours. Following intratumoral administration of ALVAC-, or NYVAC-luciferase in dogs with melanoma, it was demonstrated that viral recombinants remained localized along the needle track, with no virus detectable in the periphery of the tumour. Given these distribution characteristics and their well-documented safety profile, ALVAC- or NYVAC-based recombinants expressing feline or human IL2, respectively, were administered to domestic cats, in order to prevent the recurrence of spontaneous fibrosarcomas. In the absence of immunotherapy, tumour recurrence was observed in 61% of animals within a 12-month follow-up period after treatment with surgery and iridium-based radiotherapy. In contrast, only 39 and 28% of cats receiving either NYVAC-human IL2 or ALVAC-feline IL2, respectively, exhibited tumour recurrences. Based on such results, and in the context of ongoing clinical studies conducted in humans, we discuss the utilization of ALVAC- or NYVAC-based recombinants as viable therapeutic modalities for local immunotherapy or therapeutic vaccination against cancer, both in humans and companion animals.

  15. Conformational transitions and interactions underlying the function of membrane embedded receptor protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Bocharov, Eduard V; Sharonov, Georgy V; Bocharova, Olga V; Pavlov, Konstantin V

    2017-01-25

    Among membrane receptors, the single-span receptor protein kinases occupy a broad but specific functional niche determined by distinctive features of the underlying transmembrane signaling mechanisms that are briefly overviewed on the basis of some of the most representative examples, followed by a more detailed discussion of several hierarchical levels of organization and interactions involved. All these levels, including single-molecule interactions (e.g., dimerization, liganding, chemical modifications), local processes (e.g. lipid membrane perturbations, cytoskeletal interactions), and larger scale phenomena (e.g., effects of membrane surface shape or electrochemical potential gradients) appear to be closely integrated to achieve the observed diversity of the receptor functioning. Different species of receptor protein kinases meet their specific functional demands through different structural features defining their responses to stimulation, but certain common patterns exist. Signaling by receptor protein kinases is typically associated with the receptor dimerization and clustering, ligand-induced rearrangements of receptor domains through allosteric conformational transitions with involvement of lipids, release of the sequestered lipids, restriction of receptor diffusion, cytoskeleton and membrane shape remodeling. Understanding of complexity and continuity of the signaling processes can help identifying currently neglected opportunities for influencing the receptor signaling with potential therapeutic implications. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Interactions between membrane receptors in cellular membranes edited by Kalina Hristova.

  16. Downregulation of kinin B1 receptor function by B2 receptor heterodimerization and signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianming; Brovkovych, Viktor; Zhang, Yongkang; Tan, Fulong; Skidgel, Randal A

    2015-01-01

    Signaling through the G protein-coupled kinin receptors B1 (kB1R) and B2 (kB2R) plays a critical role in inflammatory responses mediated by activation of the kallikrein-kinin system. The kB2R is constitutively expressed and rapidly desensitized in response to agonist whereas kB1R expression is upregulated by inflammatory stimuli and it is resistant to internalization and desensitization. Here we show that the kB1R heterodimerizes with kB2Rs in co-transfected HEK293 cells and natively expressing endothelial cells, resulting in significant internalization and desensitization of the kB1R response in cells pre-treated with kB2R agonist. However, pre-treatment of cells with kB1R agonist did not affect subsequent kB2R responses. Agonists of other G protein-coupled receptors (thrombin, lysophosphatidic acid) had no effect on a subsequent kB1R response. The loss of kB1R response after pretreatment with kB2R agonist was partially reversed with kB2R mutant Y129S, which blocks kB2R signaling without affecting endocytosis, or T342A, which signals like wild type but is not endocytosed. Co-endocytosis of the kB1R with kB2R was dependent on β-arrestin and clathrin-coated pits but not caveolae. The sorting pathway of kB1R and kB2R after endocytosis differed as recycling of kB1R to the cell surface was much slower than that of kB2R. In cytokine-treated human lung microvascular endothelial cells, pre-treatment with kB2R agonist inhibited kB1R-mediated increase in transendothelial electrical resistance (TER) caused by kB1R stimulation (to generate nitric oxide) and blocked the profound drop in TER caused by kB1R activation in the presence of pyrogallol (a superoxide generator). Thus, kB1R function can be downregulated by kB2R co-endocytosis and signaling, suggesting new approaches to control kB1R signaling in pathological conditions.

  17. Distinct Second Extracellular Loop Structures of the Brain Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor: Implication in Ligand Binding and Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Joong-Youn; Rudd, James; Ding, Tomas T.

    2010-01-01

    The G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) second extracellular loop (E2) is known to play an important role in receptor structure and function. The brain cannabinoid (CB1) receptor is unique in that it lacks the inter-loop E2 disulfide linkage to the transmembrane (TM) helical bundle, a characteristic of many GPCRs. Recent mutation studies of the CB1 receptor, however, suggest the presence of an alternative intra-loop disulfide bond between two E2 Cys residues. Considering the oxidation state of these Cys residues, we determine the molecular structures of the 17-residue E2 in the dithiol form (E2dithiol) and in the disulfide form (E2disulfide) of the CB1 receptor in a fully hydrated 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) bilayer, employing a combination of simulated annealing (SA) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation approaches. We characterize the CB1 receptor models with these two E2 forms, CB1(E2dithiol) and CB1(E2disulfide), by analyzing interaction energy, contact number, core crevice and cross-correlation. The results show that the distinct E2 structures interact differently with the TM helical bundle and uniquely modify the TM helical topology, suggesting that E2 plays a critical role in stabilizing receptor structure, regulating ligand binding, and ultimately modulating receptor activation. Further studies on the role of E2 of the CB1 receptor are warranted; particularly comparisons of the ligand-bound form with the present ligand-free form. PMID:21120862

  18. Importance of extracellular loop one of the Neuropeptide S receptor for biogenesis and function

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Stewart D.; Tran, Ha T.; Zeng, Joanne; Reinscheid, Rainer K.

    2009-01-01

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) is the endogenous ligand of a formerly orphan G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). The NPS receptor (NPSR) belongs to the subfamily of peptide GPCRs and is widely expressed in the brain. NPS promotes arousal and induces anxiolytic-like effects after central administration in rodents. Previously, we have reported that the N107I polymorphism in the human NPS receptor results in a gain-of-function characterized by an increase in agonist potency without changing agonist binding affinity. We have extended our findings by investigating pharmacological and biochemical consequences of mutations in the vicinity of position 107. Alanine substitutions were made for D105 and N101, and stable clones were analyzed for agonist-induced changes of intracellular Ca2+. Receptor protein expression was monitored by Western blot and flow cytometry. The mutation D105A produced receptors that have a ∼200-fold higher EC50 despite elevated total receptor protein and surface expression compared to cell lines expressing the parental receptor NPSR-N107. The mutation N101A resulted in slightly reduced agonist potency without affecting the ability of the protein to form functional receptors. Stable NPSR-A101 clones show little expression of the fully glycosylated form. However, NPSR-A101 receptors are expressed on the cell surface and are functional, suggesting that full glycosylation is not required for receptor function. Our studies suggest that N-linked glycosylation is not important for receptor biogenesis or function, and that residue D105 might be critical for receptor binding. PMID:19874863

  19. Cytokine receptor expression in human lymphoid tissue: analysis by fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zola, H; Ridings, J; Weedon, H; Fusco, M; Byard, R W; Macardle, P J

    1995-08-01

    A highly-sensitive flourescence method, capable of detecting cytokine receptors present at low concentrations (around 100 molecules per cell) by flow cytometry, was adapted for use on tissue sections. This method was used to examine the expression of several cytokine receptors in lymphoid tissues. IL-2 receptors were distributed broadly, with higher concentrations in T cell areas. IL-1 receptor Type 1 was detected in T cell areas and in the follicular mantle, and was strongly expressed on vascular endothelium. IL-6 receptor was found at very low concentration, both within and outside germinal centres. The gp 130 molecule, which is involved in the functional receptor complex for IL-6 and several other cytokines, was present at higher concentrations, particularly in the germinal centre. Analysis of receptor expression in secondary lymphoid tissue provides evidence bearing on the physiological roles of cytokines, as these tissues contain cells at various stages of physiological activation located in well-defined functional zones.

  20. Glutamate receptor functions in sensory relay in the thalamus.

    PubMed Central

    Salt, T E

    2002-01-01

    It is known that glutamate is a major excitatory transmitter of sensory and cortical afferents to the thalamus. These actions are mediated via several distinct receptors with postsynaptic excitatory effects predominantly mediated by ionotropic receptors of the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) and N-methyl-D-aspartate varieties (NMDA). However, there are also other kinds of glutamate receptor present in the thalamus, notably the metabotropic and kainate types, and these may have more complex or subtle roles in sensory transmission. This paper describes recent electrophysiological experiments done in vitro and in vivo which aim to determine how the metabotropic and kainate receptor types can influence transmission through the sensory thalamic relay. A particular focus will be how such mechanisms might operate under physiological conditions. PMID:12626010

  1. Pathogen recognition or homeostasis? APC receptor functions in innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Siamon

    2004-06-01

    Myeloid cells (macrophages, neutrophils, dendritic cells) express a repertoire of plasma membrane receptors able to recognize all classes of macromolecules. The concept of pattern recognition has emphasized microbial ligands and host defence. However, these receptors play a broader role in tissue homeostasis within multicellular hosts, clearing the extracellular environment of potential undesirable ligands arising endogenously as well as from without. This article will evaluate one of the paradigms that underlie innate immunity.

  2. Non-Neuronal Functions of the M2 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ockenga, Wymke; Kühne, Sina; Bocksberger, Simone; Banning, Antje; Tikkanen, Ritva

    2013-01-01

    Acetylcholine is an important neurotransmitter whose effects are mediated by two classes of receptors. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are ion channels, whereas the muscarinic receptors belong to the large family of G protein coupled seven transmembrane helix receptors. Beyond its function in neuronal systems, it has become evident that acetylcholine also plays an important role in non-neuronal cells such as epithelial and immune cells. Furthermore, many cell types in the periphery are capable of synthesizing acetylcholine and express at least some of the receptors. In this review, we summarize the non-neuronal functions of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, especially those of the M2 muscarinic receptor in epithelial cells. We will review the mechanisms of signaling by the M2 receptor but also the cellular trafficking and ARF6 mediated endocytosis of this receptor, which play an important role in the regulation of signaling events. In addition, we provide an overview of the M2 receptor in human pathological conditions such as autoimmune diseases and cancer. PMID:24705159

  3. Presynaptic TRPV1 vanilloid receptor function is age- but not CB1 cannabinoid receptor-dependent in the rodent forebrain.

    PubMed

    Köles, László; Garção, Pedro; Zádori, Zoltán S; Ferreira, Samira G; Pinheiro, Bárbara S; da Silva-Santos, Carla S; Ledent, Catherine; Köfalvi, Attila

    2013-08-01

    Neocortical and striatal TRPV1 (vanilloid or capsaicin) receptors (TRPV1Rs) are excitatory ligand-gated ion channels, and are implicated in psychiatric disorders. However, the purported presynaptic neuromodulator role of TRPV1Rs in glutamatergic, serotonergic or dopaminergic terminals of the rodent forebrain remains little understood. With the help of patch-clamp electrophysiology and neurochemical approaches, we mapped the age-dependence of presynaptic TRPV1R function, and furthermore, we aimed at exploring whether the presence of CB1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1Rs) influences the function of the TRPV1Rs, as both receptor types share endogenous ligands. We found that the major factor which affects presynaptic TRPV1R function is age: by post-natal day 13, the amplitude of capsaicin-induced release of dopamine and glutamate is halved in the rat striatum, and two weeks later, capsaicin already loses its effect. However, TRPV1R receptor function is not enhanced by chemical or genetic ablation of the CB1Rs in dopaminergic, glutamatergic and serotonergic terminals of the mouse brain. Altogether, our data indicate a possible neurodevelopmental role for presynaptic TRPV1Rs in the rodent brain, but we found no cross-talk between TRPV1Rs and CB1Rs in the same nerve terminal.

  4. Activation and inhibition of erythropoietin receptor function: role of receptor dimerization.

    PubMed Central

    Watowich, S S; Hilton, D J; Lodish, H F

    1994-01-01

    Members of the cytokine receptor superfamily have structurally similar extracellular ligand-binding domains yet diverse cytoplasmic regions lacking any obvious catalytic domains. Many of these receptors form ligand-induced oligomers which are likely to participate in transmembrane signaling. A constitutively active (factor-independent) mutant of the erythropoietin receptor (EPO-R), R129C in the exoplasmic domain, forms disulfide-linked homodimers, suggesting that the wild-type EPO-R is activated by ligand-induced homodimerization. Here, we have taken two approaches to probe the role EPO-R dimerization plays in signal transduction. First, on the basis of the crystal structure of the ligand-bound, homodimeric growth hormone receptor (GH-R) and sequence alignment between the GH-R and EPO-R, we identified residues of the EPO-R which may be involved in intersubunit contacts in an EPO-R homodimer. Residue 129 of the EPO-R corresponds to a residue localized to the GH-R dimer interface region. Alanine or cysteine substitutions were introduced at four other residues of the EPO-R predicted to be in the dimer interface region. Substitution of residue E-132 or E-133 with cysteine renders the EPO-R constitutively active. Like the arginine-to-cysteine mutation at position 129 in the exoplasmic domain (R129C), E132C and E133C form disulfide-linked homodimers, suggesting that constitutive activity is due to covalent dimerization. In the second approach, we have coexpressed the wild-type EPO-R with inactive mutants of the receptor missing all or part of the cytosolic domain. These truncated receptors have a dominant inhibitory effect on the proliferative action of the wild-type receptor. Taken together, these results strengthen the hypothesis that an initial step in EPO- and EPO-R-mediated signal transduction is ligand-induced receptor dimerization. Images PMID:8196600

  5. Expression of functional receptors by the human gamma-aminobutyric acid A gamma 2 subunit.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo; Miledi, Ricardo

    2004-03-02

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid A (GABA(A)) receptors are heteromeric membrane proteins formed mainly by various combinations of alpha, beta, and gamma subunits; and it is commonly thought that the gamma 2 subunit alone does not form functional receptors. In contrast, we found that cDNA encoding the gamma 2L subunit of the human GABA(A) receptor, injected alone into Xenopus oocytes, expressed functional GABA receptors whose properties were investigated by using the two-microelectrode voltage-clamp technique. GABA elicited desensitizing membrane currents that recovered after a few minutes' wash. Repetitive applications of GABA induced a "run-up" of GABA currents that nearly doubled the amplitude of the first response. The GABA currents inverted direction at about -30 mV, indicating that they are carried mainly by Cl(-) ions. The homomeric gamma 2L receptors were also activated by beta-alanine > taurine > glycine, and, like some types of heteromeric GABA(A) receptors, the gamma 2L receptors were blocked by bicuculline and were potentiated by pentobarbital and flunitrazepam. These results indicate that the human gamma 2L subunit is capable of forming fully functional GABA receptors by itself in Xenopus oocytes and suggest that the roles proposed for the various subunits that make up the heteromeric GABA(A) receptors in situ require further clarification.

  6. Expression of functional receptors by the human γ-aminobutyric acid A γ2 subunit

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo; Miledi, Ricardo

    2004-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptors are heteromeric membrane proteins formed mainly by various combinations of α, β, and γ subunits; and it is commonly thought that the γ2 subunit alone does not form functional receptors. In contrast, we found that cDNA encoding the γ2L subunit of the human GABAA receptor, injected alone into Xenopus oocytes, expressed functional GABA receptors whose properties were investigated by using the two-microelectrode voltage-clamp technique. GABA elicited desensitizing membrane currents that recovered after a few minutes' wash. Repetitive applications of GABA induced a “run-up” of GABA currents that nearly doubled the amplitude of the first response. The GABA currents inverted direction at about -30 mV, indicating that they are carried mainly by Cl- ions. The homomeric γ2L receptors were also activated by β-alanine > taurine > glycine, and, like some types of heteromeric GABAA receptors, the γ2L receptors were blocked by bicuculline and were potentiated by pentobarbital and flunitrazepam. These results indicate that the human γ2L subunit is capable of forming fully functional GABA receptors by itself in Xenopus oocytes and suggest that the roles proposed for the various subunits that make up the heteromeric GABAA receptors in situ require further clarification. PMID:14981251

  7. Polymorphic variant at the IL2 region is associated with type 1 diabetes and may affect serum levels of interleukin-2.

    PubMed

    Fichna, Marta; Zurawek, Magdalena; Fichna, Piotr; Ziółkowska-Suchanek, Iwona; Januszkiewicz, Danuta; Nowak, Jerzy

    2013-12-01

    Polymorphic variants at the interleukin-2 (IL2) locus affect the risk of several autoimmune disorders. Our aim was to evaluate the association of the four IL2 polymorphisms (rs6822844, rs6534349, rs2069762 and rs3136534) with type 1 diabetes (T1D) in the Polish population, and to correlate them with the serum interleukin-2 levels. 543 unrelated T1D patients and 706 healthy control subjects were enrolled. The minor T allele at rs6822844 was significantly less frequent in T1D compared to controls (p = 0.002; OR 0.71; 95 % CI 0.571-0.880). Likewise, the frequency of the TT genotype was decreased among the affected individuals (p = 0.007). In healthy subjects, stratification according to the rs6822844 genotype revealed significant differences in circulating interleukin-2 (p = 0.037) with the highest levels in TT protective genotypes. Three other IL2 polymorphisms did not display significant differences in allele and genotype distribution. In conclusion, the rs6822844 variant is associated with T1D and may play a functional role, or reflect the influence of another causative genetic variant in linkage disequilibrium.

  8. Functional characterization of insulin receptor gene mutations contributing to Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome - phenotypic heterogeneity of insulin receptor gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shan; Fang, Qichen; Zhang, Feng; Wan, Hui; Zhang, Rong; Wang, Congrong; Bao, Yuqian; Zhang, Lei; Ma, Xiaojing; Lu, Junxi; Gao, Fei; Xiang, Kunsan; Jia, Weiping

    2011-01-01

    Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome (RMS) is a rare disorder that presents as severe insulin resistance as a result of mutations present in the insulin receptor (INSR). A Chinese girl with RMS presented with profound diabetes, hyperinsulinemia, acanthosis nigricans, hirsutism, and abnormalities of teeth and nails. Direct sequencing of the patient's INSR detected heterozygote mutations at Arg83Gln (R83Q) and Ala1028Val (A1028V), with the former representing a novel mutation. Functional studies of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells transfected with wild-type (WT) and mutant forms of INSR were performed to evaluate the effects of these mutations on receptor expression and activation. Receptor expression, insulin binding activity, and phosphorylation of the R83Q variant were comparable to WT. In contrast, expression of the A1028V receptor was much lower than that of WT INSR, and impairment of insulin binding and autophosphorylation were nearly commensurate with the decrease in expression detected. Reductions in the phosphorylation of IRS-1, Akt, and Erk1/2 (60%, 40%, and 50% of WT, respectively) indicate that the A1028V receptor contributes to impaired signal transduction. In conclusion, INSR mutations associated with RMS were identified. Moreover, the A1028V mutation associated with a decrease in expression of INSR potentially accounts for loss of function of the INSR.

  9. Functional probes of drug-receptor interactions implicated by structural studies: Cys-loop receptors provide a fertile testing ground.

    PubMed

    Van Arnam, Ethan B; Dougherty, Dennis A

    2014-08-14

    Structures of integral membrane receptors provide valuable models for drug-receptor interactions across many important classes of drug targets and have become much more widely available in recent years. However, it remains to be determined to what extent these images are relevant to human receptors in their biological context and how subtle issues such as subtype selectivity can be informed by them. The high precision structural modifications enabled by unnatural amino acid mutagenesis on mammalian receptors expressed in vertebrate cells allow detailed tests of predictions from structural studies. Using the Cys-loop superfamily of ligand-gated ion channels, we show that functional studies lead to detailed binding models that, at times, are significantly at odds with the structural studies on related invertebrate proteins. Importantly, broad variations in binding interactions are seen for very closely related receptor subtypes and for varying drugs at a given binding site. These studies highlight the essential interplay between structural studies and functional studies that can guide efforts to develop new pharmaceuticals.

  10. Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors IR64a and IR8a Form a Functional Odorant Receptor Complex In Vivo in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Blais, Steven; Park, Jin-Yong; Min, Soohong; Neubert, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila olfactory sensory neurons express either odorant receptors or ionotropic glutamate receptors (IRs). The sensory neurons that express IR64a, a member of the IR family, send axonal projections to either the DC4 or DP1m glomeruli in the antennal lobe. DC4 neurons respond specifically to acids/protons, whereas DP1m neurons respond to a broad spectrum of odorants. The molecular composition of IR64a-containing receptor complexes in either DC4 or DP1m neurons is not known, however. Here, we immunoprecipitated the IR64a protein from lysates of fly antennal tissue and identified IR8a as a receptor subunit physically associated with IR64a by mass spectrometry. IR8a mutants and flies in which IR8a was knocked down by RNAi in IR64a+ neurons exhibited defects in acid-evoked physiological and behavioral responses. Furthermore, we found that the loss of IR8a caused a significant reduction in IR64a protein levels. When expressed in Xenopus oocytes, IR64a and IR8a formed a functional ion channel that allowed ligand-evoked cation currents. These findings provide direct evidence that IR8a is a subunit that forms a functional olfactory receptor with IR64a in vivo to mediate odor detection. PMID:23804096

  11. Ionotropic glutamate receptors IR64a and IR8a form a functional odorant receptor complex in vivo in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ai, Minrong; Blais, Steven; Park, Jin-Yong; Min, Soohong; Neubert, Thomas A; Suh, Greg S B

    2013-06-26

    Drosophila olfactory sensory neurons express either odorant receptors or ionotropic glutamate receptors (IRs). The sensory neurons that express IR64a, a member of the IR family, send axonal projections to either the DC4 or DP1m glomeruli in the antennal lobe. DC4 neurons respond specifically to acids/protons, whereas DP1m neurons respond to a broad spectrum of odorants. The molecular composition of IR64a-containing receptor complexes in either DC4 or DP1m neurons is not known, however. Here, we immunoprecipitated the IR64a protein from lysates of fly antennal tissue and identified IR8a as a receptor subunit physically associated with IR64a by mass spectrometry. IR8a mutants and flies in which IR8a was knocked down by RNAi in IR64a+ neurons exhibited defects in acid-evoked physiological and behavioral responses. Furthermore, we found that the loss of IR8a caused a significant reduction in IR64a protein levels. When expressed in Xenopus oocytes, IR64a and IR8a formed a functional ion channel that allowed ligand-evoked cation currents. These findings provide direct evidence that IR8a is a subunit that forms a functional olfactory receptor with IR64a in vivo to mediate odor detection.

  12. Functional Characterization of Soybean Glyma04g39610 as a Brassinosteroid Receptor Gene and Evolutionary Analysis of Soybean Brassinosteroid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Suna; Tao, Ping; Xu, Feng; Wu, Aiping; Huo, Weige; Wang, Jinxiang

    2016-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BR) play important roles in plant growth and development. Although BR receptors have been intensively studied in Arabidopsis, the BR receptors in soybean remain largely unknown. Here, in addition to the known receptor gene Glyma06g15270 (GmBRI1a), we identified five putative BR receptor genes in the soybean genome: GmBRI1b, GmBRL1a, GmBRL1b, GmBRL2a, and GmBRL2b. Analysis of their expression patterns by quantitative real-time PCR showed that they are ubiquitously expressed in primary roots, lateral roots, stems, leaves, and hypocotyls. We used rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) to clone GmBRI1b (Glyma04g39160), and found that the predicted amino acid sequence of GmBRI1b showed high similarity to those of AtBRI1 and pea PsBRI1. Structural modeling of the ectodomain also demonstrated similarities between the BR receptors of soybean and Arabidopsis. GFP-fusion experiments verified that GmBRI1b localizes to the cell membrane. We also explored GmBRI1b function in Arabidopsis through complementation experiments. Ectopic over-expression of GmBRI1b in Arabidopsis BR receptor loss-of-function mutant (bri1-5 bak1-1D) restored hypocotyl growth in etiolated seedlings; increased the growth of stems, leaves, and siliques in light; and rescued the developmental defects in leaves of the bri1-6 mutant, and complemented the responses of BR biosynthesis-related genes in the bri1-5 bak1-D mutant grown in light. Bioinformatics analysis demonstrated that the six BR receptor genes in soybean resulted from three gene duplication events during evolution. Phylogenetic analysis classified the BR receptors in dicots and monocots into three subclades. Estimation of the synonymous (Ks) and the nonsynonymous substitution rate (Ka) and selection pressure (Ka/Ks) revealed that the Ka/Ks of BR receptor genes from dicots and monocots were less than 1.0, indicating that BR receptor genes in plants experienced purifying selection during evolution. PMID:27338344

  13. Interleukin-2 receptor-directed therapies for cutaneous lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Foss, Francine M; Waldmann, Thomas A

    2003-12-01

    Our emerging understanding of the IL-2/IL-2R system opens the possibility for more specific immunotherapy of CTCL. This understanding, taken in conjunction with the ability to produce humanized antibodies to the IL-2R subunit by genetic engineering; to arm these antibodies, as well as IL-2 itself with toxins or with alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides; and to modulate IL-2R subunits to optimize targeting of these agents provides a rational therapeutic strategy for the treatment of IL-2R-expressing CTCL. Although most of these studies were conducted in HTLV-1-associated T-cell lymphomas or CTCL, it is likely that these agents may be applicable to other T-cell lymphomas, including the anaplastic large cell lymphomas, peripheral T-cell lymphomas, and the natural killer lymphomas, because these cells express the IL-2 receptor.

  14. 5-HT2 receptors mediate functional modulation of GABAa receptors and inhibitory synaptic transmissions in human iPS-derived neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haitao; Hu, Lingli; Liu, Chunhua; Su, Zhenghui; Wang, Lihui; Pan, Guangjin; Guo, Yiping; He, Jufang

    2016-01-01

    Neural progenitors differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) hold potentials for treating neurological diseases. Serotonin has potent effects on neuronal functions through multiple receptors, underlying a variety of neural disorders. Glutamate and GABA receptors have been proven functional in neurons differentiated from iPS, however, little is known about 5-HT receptor-mediated modulation in such neuronal networks. In the present study, human iPS were differentiated into cells possessing featured physiological properties of cortical neurons. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording was used to examine the involvement of 5-HT2 receptors in functional modulation of GABAergic synaptic transmission. We found that serotonin and DOI (a selective agonist of 5-HT2A/C receptor) reversibly reduced GABA-activated currents, and this 5-HT2A/C receptor mediated inhibition required G protein, PLC, PKC, and Ca2+ signaling. Serotonin increased the frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs), which could be mimicked by α-methylserotonin, a 5-HT2 receptor agonist. In contrast, DOI reduced both frequency and amplitude of mIPSCs. These findings suggested that in iPS-derived human neurons serotonin postsynaptically reduced GABAa receptor function through 5-HT2A/C receptors, but presynaptically other 5-HT2 receptors counteracted the action of 5-HT2A/C receptors. Functional expression of serotonin receptors in human iPS-derived neurons provides a pre-requisite for their normal behaviors after grafting. PMID:26837719

  15. The muscle-specific laminin receptor alpha7 beta1 integrin negatively regulates alpha5 beta1 fibronectin receptor function.

    PubMed

    Tomatis, D; Echtermayer, F; Schöber, S; Balzac, F; Retta, S F; Silengo, L; Tarone, G

    1999-02-01

    alpha7 beta1 is the major integrin complex expressed in differentiated muscle cells where it functions as a laminin receptor. In this work we have expressed the alpha7 integrin subunit in CHO cells to investigate the functional properties of this receptor. After transfection with alpha7 CHO cells acquired the ability to adhere and spread on laminin 1 consistent with the laminin receptor activity of the alpha7 beta1. alpha7 transfectants, however, showed a 70% reduction in the ability to adhere to fibronectin and were unable to assemble a fibronectin matrix. The degree of reduction was inversely related to the level of alpha7 expression. To define the mechanisms underlying this adhesive defect we analyzed surface expression and functional properties of the alpha5 beta1 fibronectin receptor. Although cell surface expression of alpha5 beta1 was reduced by a factor of 20-25% in alpha7 transfectants compared to control untransfected cells, this slight reduction was not sufficient to explain the dramatic reduction in cell adhesion (70%) and matrix assembly (close to 100%). Binding studies showed that the affinity of 125I-fibronectin for its surface receptor was decreased by 50% in alpha7 transfectants, indicating that the alpha5 beta1 integrin is partially inactivated in these cells. Inactivation can be reversed by Mn2+, a cation known to increase integrin affinity for their ligands. In fact, incubation of cells with Mn2+ restored fibronectin binding affinity, adhesion to fibronectin, and assembly of fibronectin matrix in alpha7 transfectants. These data indicate that alpha7 expression leads to the functional down regulation of alpha5beta1 integrin by decreasing ligand binding affinity and surface expression. In conclusion, the data reported establish the existence of a negative cooperativity between alpha7 and alpha5 integrins that may be important in determining functional regulation of integrins during myogenic differentiation.

  16. Adequate immune response ensured by binary IL-2 and graded CD25 expression in a murine transfer model

    PubMed Central

    Fuhrmann, Franziska; Lischke, Timo; Gross, Fridolin; Scheel, Tobias; Bauer, Laura; Kalim, Khalid Wasim; Radbruch, Andreas; Herzel, Hanspeter; Hutloff, Andreas; Baumgrass, Ria

    2016-01-01

    The IL-2/IL-2Ralpha (CD25) axis is of central importance for the interplay of effector and regulatory T cells. Nevertheless, the question how different antigen loads are translated into appropriate IL-2 production to ensure adequate responses against pathogens remains largely unexplored. Here we find that at single cell level, IL-2 is binary (digital) and CD25 is graded expressed whereas at population level both parameters show graded expression correlating with the antigen amount. Combining in vivo data with a mathematical model we demonstrate that only this binary IL-2 expression ensures a wide linear antigen response range for Teff and Treg cells under real spatiotemporal conditions. Furthermore, at low antigen concentrations binary IL-2 expression safeguards by its spatial distribution selective STAT5 activation only of closely adjacent Treg cells regardless of their antigen specificity. These data show that the mode of IL-2 secretion is critical to tailor the adaptive immune response to the antigen amount. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20616.001 PMID:28035902

  17. Inflammation compromises renal dopamine D1 receptor function in rats

    PubMed Central

    Chugh, Gaurav; Lokhandwala, Mustafa F.

    2009-01-01

    We tested the effects of inflammation on renal dopamine D1 receptor signaling cascade, a key pathway that maintains sodium homeostasis and blood pressure during increased salt intake. Inflammation was produced by administering lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 4 mg/kg ip) to rats provided without (normal salt) and with 1% NaCl in drinking water for 2 wk (high salt). Control rats had saline injection and received tap water. We found that LPS increased the levels of inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α in the rats given either normal- or high-salt intake. Also, these rats had higher levels of oxidative stress markers, malondialdehyde and nitrotyrosine, and lower levels of antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase in the renal proximal tubules (RPTs). The nuclear levels of transcription factors NF-κB increased and Nrf2 decreased in the RPTs in response to LPS in rats given normal and high salt. Furthermore, D1 receptor numbers, D1 receptor proteins, and D1 receptor agonist (SKF38393)-mediated 35S-GTPγS binding decreased in the RPTs in these rats. The basal activities of Na-K-ATPase in the RPTs were similar in control and LPS-treated rats given normal and high salt. SKF38393 caused inhibition of Na-K-ATPase activity in the primary cultures of RPTs treated with vehicle but not in the cultures treated with LPS. Furthermore, LPS caused an increase in blood pressure in the rats given high salt but not in the rats given normal salt. These results suggest that LPS differentially regulates NF-κB and Nrf2, produces inflammation, decreases antioxidant enzyme, increases oxidative stress, and causes D1 receptor dysfunction in the RPTs. The LPS-induced dysfunction of renal D1 receptors alters salt handling and causes hypertension in rats during salt overload. PMID:19794106

  18. Two Distinct Central Serotonin Receptors with Different Physiological Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peroutka, Stephen J.; Lebovitz, Richard M.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    1981-05-01

    Two distinct serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) receptors designated serotonin 1 and serotonin 2 bind tritium-labeled serotonin and tritium-labeled spiroperidol, respectively. Drug potencies at serotonin 2 sites, but not at serotonin 1 sites, predict their effects on the ``serotonin behavioral syndrome,'' indicating that serotonin 2 sites mediate these behaviors. The limited correlation of drug effects with regulation by guanine nucleotides suggests that serotonin 1 sites might be linked to adenylate cyclase. Drug specificities of serotonin-elicited synaptic inhibition and excitation may reflect serotonin 1 and serotonin 2 receptor interactions, respectively.

  19. Inhibition of leukocyte function and interleukin-2 gene expression by 2-methylarachidonyl-(2'-fluoroethyl)amide, a stable congener of the endogenous cannabinoid receptor ligand anandamide

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, Barbara L.F.; Ouyang Yanli; Herring, Amy; Yea, Sung Su; Razdan, Raj; Kaminski, Norbert E. . E-mail: kamins11@msu.edu

    2005-06-01

    Arachidonylethanolamide (anandamide, AEA) has been identified as an endogenous ligand for cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2. Characterization of the direct cannabimimetic actions of anandamide has been hampered by its short duration of action and rapid degradation in in vivo and in vitro systems to arachidonic acid, a precursor in the biosynthesis of a broad range of biologically active molecules. In the present studies, we utilized 2-methylarachidonyl-(2'-fluoroethyl)amide (F-Me-AEA), an analog of anandamide resistant to enzymatic degradation, to determine whether F-Me-AEA modulated T cell function similar to that of plant-derived cannabinoids. Indeed, F-Me-AEA at low micromolar concentrations exhibited a marked inhibition of phorbol ester plus calcium ionophore (PMA/Io)-induced IL-2 protein secretion and steady state mRNA expression. Likewise, a modest suppression of the mixed lymphocyte response was observed in the presence of F-Me-AEA indicating an alteration in T cell responsiveness to allogeneic MHC class II antigens. F-Me-AEA was also found to modestly inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in thymocytes and splenocytes, a hallmark of cannabinoid receptor agonists. Further characterization of the influence of F-Me-AEA on the cAMP signaling cascade revealed an inhibition of CREB-1/ATF-1 phosphorylation and subsequently, an inhibition of CRE DNA binding activity. Characterization of nuclear binding proteins further revealed that NF-AT and, to a lesser extent, NF-{kappa}B DNA binding activities were also suppressed. These studies demonstrate that F-Me-AEA modulates T cell function in a similar manner to plant-derived and endogenous cannabinoids and therefore can be utilized as an amidase- and hydrolysis-resistant endogenous cannabinoid.

  20. The Impact of Escitalopram on IL-2-Induced Neuroendocrine, Immune, and Behavioral Changes in Patients with Malignant Melanoma: Preliminary Findings

    PubMed Central

    Musselman, Dominique; Royster, Erica B; Wang, Ming; Long, Qi; Trimble, Lisa M; Mann, Tara K; Graciaa, Daniel S; McNutt, Marcia D; Auyeung, N S Freda; Oliver, Lindsay; Lawson, David H; Miller, Andrew H

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-2, a T-cell cytokine used to treat malignant melanoma, can induce profound depression. To determine whether pretreatment with the antidepressant escitalopram could reduce IL-2-induced neuroendocrine, immune, and neurobehavioral changes, 20 patients with Stage IV melanoma were randomized to either placebo or the serotonin reuptake inhibitor, escitalopram (ESC) 10–20 mg/day, 2 weeks before, and during IL-2 treatment (720 000 units/kg Q8 h × 5 days (1 cycle) every 3 weeks × 4 cycles). Generalized estimation equations were used to examine HPA axis activity (plasma ACTH and cortisol), immune activation (plasma IL-6), and depressive symptoms (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) score). Tolerance of IL-2 treatment (concomitant medications required) and adherence (number of IL-2 doses received) were also assessed. Both the groups (ESC (n=9), placebo (n=11)) exhibited significant IL-2-induced increases in plasma cortisol, IL-6, and depressive symptoms (p<0.05), as well as a temporal trend for increases in plasma ACTH (p=0.054); the effects of age and treatment were not significant. Higher plasma ACTH concentrations were associated with higher depressive symptoms during cycles 1–3 of IL-2 therapy (p<0.01). Although ESC had no significant effects on ACTH, cortisol, IL-6, tolerance of, or adherence to IL-2, ESC treatment was associated with lower depressive symptoms, ie, a maximal difference of ∼3 points on the HDRS, which, though not statistically significant (in part, due to small sample size), represents a clinically significant difference according to the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidelines. A larger sample size will establish whether antidepressant pretreatment can prevent IL-2-induced neurobehavioral changes. PMID:23575741

  1. The impact of escitalopram on IL-2-induced neuroendocrine, immune, and behavioral changes in patients with malignant melanoma: preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    Musselman, Dominique; Royster, Erica B; Wang, Ming; Long, Qi; Trimble, Lisa M; Mann, Tara K; Graciaa, Daniel S; McNutt, Marcia D; Auyeung, N S Freda; Oliver, Lindsay; Lawson, David H; Miller, Andrew H

    2013-09-01

    Interleukin (IL)-2, a T-cell cytokine used to treat malignant melanoma, can induce profound depression. To determine whether pretreatment with the antidepressant escitalopram could reduce IL-2-induced neuroendocrine, immune, and neurobehavioral changes, 20 patients with Stage IV melanoma were randomized to either placebo or the serotonin reuptake inhibitor, escitalopram (ESC) 10-20 mg/day, 2 weeks before, and during IL-2 treatment (720 000 units/kg Q8 h × 5 days (1 cycle) every 3 weeks × 4 cycles). Generalized estimation equations were used to examine HPA axis activity (plasma ACTH and cortisol), immune activation (plasma IL-6), and depressive symptoms (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) score). Tolerance of IL-2 treatment (concomitant medications required) and adherence (number of IL-2 doses received) were also assessed. Both the groups (ESC (n=9), placebo (n=11)) exhibited significant IL-2-induced increases in plasma cortisol, IL-6, and depressive symptoms (p<0.05), as well as a temporal trend for increases in plasma ACTH (p=0.054); the effects of age and treatment were not significant. Higher plasma ACTH concentrations were associated with higher depressive symptoms during cycles 1-3 of IL-2 therapy (p<0.01). Although ESC had no significant effects on ACTH, cortisol, IL-6, tolerance of, or adherence to IL-2, ESC treatment was associated with lower depressive symptoms, ie, a maximal difference of ∼3 points on the HDRS, which, though not statistically significant (in part, due to small sample size), represents a clinically significant difference according to the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidelines. A larger sample size will establish whether antidepressant pretreatment can prevent IL-2-induced neurobehavioral changes.

  2. Function and Distribution of 5-HT2 Receptors in the Honeybee (Apis mellifera)

    PubMed Central

    Thamm, Markus; Rolke, Daniel; Jordan, Nadine; Balfanz, Sabine; Schiffer, Christian; Baumann, Arnd; Blenau, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Background Serotonin plays a pivotal role in regulating and modulating physiological and behavioral processes in both vertebrates and invertebrates. In the honeybee (Apis mellifera), serotonin has been implicated in division of labor, visual processing, and learning processes. Here, we present the cloning, heterologous expression, and detailed functional and pharmacological characterization of two honeybee 5-HT2 receptors. Methods Honeybee 5-HT2 receptor cDNAs were amplified from brain cDNA. Recombinant cell lines were established constitutively expressing receptor variants. Pharmacological properties of the receptors were investigated by Ca2+ imaging experiments. Quantitative PCR was applied to explore the expression patterns of receptor mRNAs. Results The honeybee 5-HT2 receptor class consists of two subtypes, Am5-HT2α and Am5-HT2β. Each receptor gene also gives rise to alternatively spliced mRNAs that possibly code for truncated receptors. Only activation of the full-length receptors with serotonin caused an increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. The effect was mimicked by the agonists 5-methoxytryptamine and 8-OH-DPAT at low micromolar concentrations. Receptor activities were blocked by established 5-HT receptor antagonists such as clozapine, methiothepin, or mianserin. High transcript numbers were detected in exocrine glands suggesting that 5-HT2 receptors participate in secretory processes in the honeybee. Conclusions This study marks the first molecular and pharmacological characterization of two 5-HT2 receptor subtypes in the same insect species. The results presented should facilitate further attempts to unravel central and peripheral effects of serotonin mediated by these receptors. PMID:24324783

  3. An immunosuppressive murine leukaemia virus induces a Th1-->Th2 switch and abrogates the IgM antibody response to sheep erythrocytes by suppressing the production of IL-2.

    PubMed Central

    Faxvaag, A; Espevik, T; Dalen, A

    1995-01-01

    Many retroviruses have tropism for cells in the immune system and have a propensity to induce immunosuppression in the host. Some of the effects of retroviruses on immune cell function are thought to be mediated through cytokines. Friend ImmunoSuppressive virus-2 (FIS-2) is a low oncogenic murine leukaemia virus (MuLV) that induces lymphadenopathy and immunosuppression in NMRI mice. The role of T cell cytokines during the generation of a primary antibody response in healthy and FIS-2-infected mice was studied following the antibody response to sheep erythrocytes by an in vitro immunization (IVI) technique. In cultures from FIS-2-infected mice, the antibody response was reduced compared with cultures from uninfected mice and the production of the Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-6 was elevated, whereas the Th1 cytokines IL-2, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) were reduced. The suppressed anti-sheep erythrocyte antibody response in cultures from mice infected with FIS-2 seemed to be caused by an insufficient production of IL-2, since addition of recombinant IL-2 stimulated the antibody response. This effect was also observed in cultures depleted of T cells, indicating a direct effect of IL-2 on B cells. A switch to a Th2 cell response and suppression of IL-2 production might play a central role in the immune cell dysfunction induced by FIS-2. PMID:8536362

  4. MOOD STATES, SYMPATHETIC ACTIVITY, AND IN VIVO β-ADRENERGIC RECEPTOR FUNCTION IN A NORMAL POPULATION

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bum-Hee; Kang, Eun-Ho; Ziegler, Michael G.; Mills, Paul J.; Dimsdale, Joel E.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between mood states and β-adrenergic receptor function in a normal population. We also examined if sympathetic nervous system activity is related to mood states or β-adrenergic receptor function. Sixty-two participants aged 25–50 years were enrolled in this study. Mood states were assessed using the Profile of Mood States (POMS). β-adrenergic receptor function was determined using the chronotropic 25 dose isoproterenol infusion test. Level of sympathetic nervous system activity was estimated from 24-hr urine norepinephrine excretion. Higher tension-anxiety, depression-dejection, and anger-hostility were related to decreased β-adrenergic receptor sensitivity (i.e., higher chronotropic 25 dose values), but tension-anxiety was the only remaining independent predictor of β-adrenergic receptor function after controlling for age, gender, ethnicity, and body mass index (BMI). Urinary norepinephrine excretion was unrelated to either mood states or β-adrenergic receptor function. These findings replicate previous reports that anxiety is related to decreased (i.e., desensitized) β-adrenergic receptor sensitivity, even after controlling for age, gender, ethnicity, and body mass index. PMID:17583588

  5. Muscarinic receptor subtypes in neuronal and non-neuronal cholinergic function.

    PubMed

    Eglen, R M

    2006-07-01

    1 Muscarinic M1-M5 receptors mediate the metabotropic actions of acetylcholine in the nervous system. A growing body of data indicate they also mediate autocrine functions of the molecule. The availability of novel and selective muscarinic agonists and antagonists, as well as in vivo gene disruption techniques, has clarified the roles of muscarinic receptors in mediating both functions of acetylcholine. 2 Selective M1 agonists or mixed M1 agonists/M2 antagonists may provide an approach to the treatment of cognitive disorders, while M3 antagonism, or mixed M2/M3 antagonists, are approved for the treatment of contractility disorders including overactive bladder and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Preclinical data suggest that selective agonism of the M4 receptor will provide novel anti-nociceptive agents, while therapeutics-based upon agonism or antagonism of the muscarinic M5 receptor have yet to be reported. 3 The autocrine functions of muscarinic receptors broadly fall into two areas - control of cell growth or proliferation and mediation of the release of chemical mediators from epithelial cells, ultimately causing muscle relaxation. The former particularly are involved in embryological development, oncogenesis, keratinocyte function and immune responsiveness. The latter regulate contractility of smooth muscle in the vasculature, airways and urinary bladder. 4 Most attention has focused on muscarinic M1 or M3 receptors which mediate lymphocyte immunoresponsiveness, cell migration and release of smooth muscle relaxant factors. Muscarinic M4 receptors are implicated in the regulation of keratinocyte adhesion and M2 receptors in stem cell proliferation and development. Little data are available concerning the M5 receptor, partly due to the difficulties in defining the subtype pharmacologically. 5 The autocrine functions of acetylcholine, like those in the nervous system, involve activation of several muscarinic receptor subtypes. Consequently, the role of

  6. Evolutionary and Functional Diversification of the Vitamin D Receptor-Lithocholic Acid Partnership.

    PubMed

    Kollitz, Erin M; Zhang, Guozhu; Hawkins, Mary Beth; Whitfield, G Kerr; Reif, David M; Kullman, Seth W

    2016-01-01

    The evolution, molecular behavior, and physiological function of nuclear receptors are of particular interest given their diverse roles in regulating essential biological processes. The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is well known for its canonical roles in calcium homeostasis and skeletal maintenance. Additionally, VDR has received an increased amount of attention due to the discovery of numerous non-calcemic functions, including the detoxification of lithocholic acid. Lithocholic acid is a toxic metabolite of chenodeoxycholic acid, a primary bile acid. The partnership between the VDR and lithocholic acid has been hypothesized to be a recent adaptation that evolved to mediate the detoxification and elimination of lithocholic acid from the gut. This partnership is speculated to be limited to higher vertebrates (birds and mammals), as lower vertebrates do not synthesize the parent compound of lithocholic acid. However, the molecular functions associated with the observed insensitivity of basal VDRs to lithocholic acid have not been explored. Here we characterize canonical nuclear receptor functions of VDRs from select species representing key nodes in vertebrate evolution and span a range of bile salt phenotypes. Competitive ligand binding assays revealed that the receptor's affinity for lithocholic acid is highly conserved across species, suggesting that lithocholic acid affinity is an ancient and non-adaptive trait. However, transient transactivation assays revealed that lithocholic acid-mediated VDR activation might have evolved more recently, as the non-mammalian receptors did not respond to lithocholic acid unless exogenous coactivator proteins were co-expressed. Subsequent functional assays indicated that differential lithocholic acid-mediated receptor activation is potentially driven by differential protein-protein interactions between VDR and nuclear receptor coregulator proteins. We hypothesize that the vitamin D receptor-lithocholic acid partnership evolved as a

  7. Functional roles of the sweet taste receptor in oral and extraoral tissues

    PubMed Central

    Laffitte, Anni; Neiers, Fabrice; Briand, Loïc

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review This review summarizes and discusses the current knowledge about the physiological roles of the sweet taste receptor in oral and extraoral tissues. Recent findings The expression of a functional sweet taste receptor has been reported in numerous extragustatory tissues, including the gut, pancreas, bladder, brain and, more recently, bone and adipose tissues. In the gut, this receptor has been suggested to be involved in luminal glucose sensing, the release of some satiety hormones, the expression of glucose transporters, and the maintenance of glucose homeostasis. More recently, the sweet taste receptor was proposed to regulate adipogenesis and bone biology. Summary The perception of sweet taste is mediated by the T1R2/T1R3 receptor, which is expressed in the oral cavity, wherein it provides input on the caloric and macronutrient contents of ingested food. This receptor recognizes all the chemically diverse compounds perceived as sweet by human beings, including natural sugars and sweeteners. Importantly, the expression of a functional sweet taste receptor has been reported in numerous extragustatory tissues, wherein it has been proposed to regulate metabolic processes. This newly recognized role of the sweet taste receptor makes this receptor a potential novel therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity and related metabolic dysfunctions, such as diabetes and hyperlipidemia. PMID:24763065

  8. The Angiotensin II Type 2 Receptor in Brain Functions: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Guimond, Marie-Odile; Gallo-Payet, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is the main active product of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), mediating its action via two major receptors, namely, the Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor and the type 2 (AT2) receptor. Recent results also implicate several other members of the renin-angiotensin system in various aspects of brain functions. The first aim of this paper is to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the properties and signaling of the AT2 receptor, its expression in the brain, and its well-established effects. Secondly, we will highlight the potential role of the AT2 receptor in cognitive function, neurological disorders and in the regulation of appetite and the possible link with development of metabolic disorders. The potential utility of novel nonpeptide selective AT2 receptor ligands in clarifying potential roles of this receptor in physiology will also be discussed. If confirmed, these new pharmacological tools should help to improve impaired cognitive performance, not only through its action on brain microcirculation and inflammation, but also through more specific effects on neurons. However, the overall physiological relevance of the AT2 receptor in the brain must also consider the Ang IV/AT4 receptor. PMID:23320146

  9. The CXC Chemokine Receptor 4 Ligands Ubiquitin and Stromal Cell-derived Factor-1α Function through Distinct Receptor Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Vikas; Staren, Daniel M.; Ziarek, Joshua J.; Nashaat, Zayd N.; Campbell, Edward M.; Volkman, Brian F.; Marchese, Adriano; Majetschak, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Recently, we identified extracellular ubiquitin as an endogenous CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR) 4 agonist. However, the receptor selectivity and molecular basis of the CXCR4 agonist activity of ubiquitin are unknown, and functional consequences of CXCR4 activation with ubiquitin are poorly defined. Here, we provide evidence that ubiquitin and the cognate CXCR4 ligand stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1α do not share CXCR7 as a receptor. We further demonstrate that ubiquitin does not utilize the typical two-site binding mechanism of chemokine-receptor interactions, in which the receptor N terminus is important for ligand binding. CXCR4 activation with ubiquitin and SDF-1α lead to similar Gαi-responses and to a comparable magnitude of phosphorylation of ERK-1/2, p90 ribosomal S6 kinase-l and Akt, although phosphorylations occur more transiently after activation with ubiquitin. Despite the similarity of signal transduction events after activation of CXCR4 with both ligands, ubiquitin possesses weaker chemotactic activity than SDF-lα in cell migration assays and does not interfere with productive entry of HIV-1 into P4.R5 multinuclear activation of galactosidase indicator cells. Unlike SDF-1α, ubiquitin lacks interactions with an N-terminal CXCR4 peptide in NMR spectroscopy experiments. Binding and signaling studies in the presence of antibodies against the N terminus and extracellular loops 2/3 of CXCR4 confirm that the ubiquitin CXCR4 interaction is independent of the N-terminal receptor domain, whereas blockade of extracellular loops 2/3 prevents receptor binding and activation. Our findings define ubiquitin as a CXCR4 agonist, which does not interfere with productive cellular entry of HIV-1, and provide new mechanistic insights into interactions between CXCR4 and its natural ligands. PMID:21757744

  10. Functional atrial natriuretic peptide receptor in human adrenal tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Shionoiri, H.; Hirawa, N.; Takasaki, I.; Ishikawa, Y.; Oda, H.; Minamisawa, K.; Sugimoto, K.; Matsukawa, T.; Ueda, S.; Miyajima, E.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of synthetic human atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on the release of catecholamines, aldosterone, or cortisol were observed in human adrenal tumors obtained surgically from patients with pheochromocytoma, primary aldosteronism, or Cushing's syndrome, respectively. Each tumor tissue or adjacent normal cortical tissue was sectioned into slices, which were incubated in medium-199 in the presence or absence of adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH) and ANP. The amounts of epinephrine, norepinephrine, aldosterone, or cortisol released into the medium were measured. Existence of ANP receptors on the adrenal tissues was examined by binding assays, affinity labeling, and immunohistochemistry. Release of catecholamines from pheochromocytoma tissues was inhibited by ANP, and the presence of the ANP receptor on pheochromocytoma was further demonstrated by both binding assays and affinity labeling; Scatchard analysis revealed a single class of binding sites for ANP with a Kd of 1.0 nM and a Bmax of 0.4 pmol/mg of protein and the molecular size was estimated as 140 and a 70 kDa under nonreducing and reducing conditions, respectively. The presence of ANP receptors in pheochromocytoma was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. ANP inhibited both basal and ACTH-stimulated aldosterone secretion in the slices of normal cortex, and localization of ANP receptors in zona glomerulosa cells was also demonstrated. However, ANP did not inhibit basal and ACTH-stimulated aldosterone and cortisol secretion in both tissue slices from aldosteronoma and Cushing's adenoma. Consistent with these observations, the absence of ANP receptors in adenoma tissues was determined by binding assays, affinity labeling, and immunohistochemistry.

  11. Functional expression in frog oocytes of human ρ1 receptors produced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Martínez, Alejandro; Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge Mauricio; Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo; Miledi, Ricardo

    2004-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was engineered to express the ρ1 subunit of the human γ-aminobutyric acid ρ1 (GABAρ1) receptor. RNA that was isolated from several transformed yeast strains produced fully functional GABA receptors in Xenopus oocytes. The GABA currents elicited in the oocytes were fast, nondesensitizing chloride currents; and the order of agonist potency was GABA > β-alanine > glycine. Moreover, the receptors were resistant to bicuculline, strongly antagonized by (1,2,5,6 tetrahydropyridine-4-yl)methylphosphinic acid, and modulated by zinc and lanthanum. Thus, the GABA receptors expressed by the yeast mRNA retained all of the principal characteristics of receptors expressed by cRNA or native retina mRNAs. Western blot assays showed immunoreactivity in yeast plasma membrane preparations, and a ρ1-GFP fusion gene showed mostly intracellular distribution with a faint fluorescence toward the plasma membrane. In situ immunodetection of ρ1 in yeast demonstrated that some receptors reach the plasma membrane. Furthermore, microtransplantation of yeast plasma membranes to frog oocytes resulted in the incorporation of a small number of functional yeast ρ1 receptors into the oocyte plasma membrane. These results show that yeast may be useful to produce complete functional ionotropic receptors suitable for structural analysis. PMID:14704273

  12. Function of the cytoplasmic tail of human calcitonin receptor-like receptor in complex with receptor activity-modifying protein 2

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwasako, Kenji; Kitamura, Kazuo; Nagata, Sayaka; Hikosaka, Tomomi; Kato, Johji

    2010-02-12

    Receptor activity-modifying protein 2 (RAMP2) enables calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) to form an adrenomedullin (AM)-specific receptor. Here we investigated the function of the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail (C-tail) of human (h)CRLR by co-transfecting its C-terminal mutants into HEK-293 cells stably expressing hRAMP2. Deleting the C-tail from CRLR disrupted AM-evoked cAMP production or receptor internalization, but did not affect [{sup 125}I]AM binding. We found that CRLR residues 428-439 are required for AM-evoked cAMP production, though deleting this region had little effect on receptor internalization. Moreover, pretreatment with pertussis toxin (100 ng/mL) led to significant increases in AM-induced cAMP production via wild-type CRLR/RAMP2 complexes. This effect was canceled by deleting CRLR residues 454-457, suggesting Gi couples to this region. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that CRLR truncation mutants lacking residues in the Ser/Thr-rich region extending from Ser{sup 449} to Ser{sup 467} were unable to undergo AM-induced receptor internalization and, in contrast to the effect on wild-type CRLR, overexpression of GPCR kinases-2, -3 and -4 failed to promote internalization of CRLR mutants lacking residues 449-467. Thus, the hCRLR C-tail is crucial for AM-evoked cAMP production and internalization of the CRLR/RAMP2, while the receptor internalization is dependent on the aforementioned GPCR kinases, but not Gs coupling.

  13. Role of the Extracellular and Intracellular Loops of Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Receptor in Its Function

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Antara A.; Mahale, Smita D.

    2015-01-01

    Follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) is a leucine-rich repeat containing class A G-protein coupled receptor belonging to the subfamily of glycoprotein hormone receptors (GPHRs), which includes luteinizing hormone/choriogonadotropin receptor (LH/CGR) and thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor. Its cognate ligand, follicle-stimulating hormone binds to, and activates FSHR expressed on the surface of granulosa cells of the ovary, in females, and Sertoli cells of the testis, in males, to bring about folliculogenesis and spermatogenesis, respectively. FSHR contains a large extracellular domain (ECD) consisting of leucine-rich repeats at the N-terminal end and a hinge region at the C-terminus that connects the ECD to the membrane spanning transmembrane domain (TMD). The TMD consists of seven α-helices that are connected to each other by means of three extracellular loops (ELs) and three intracellular loops (ILs) and ends in a short-cytoplasmic tail. It is well established that the ECD is the primary hormone binding domain, whereas the TMD is the signal transducing domain. However, several studies on the ELs and ILs employing site directed mutagenesis, generation of chimeric receptors and in vitro characterization of naturally occurring mutations have proven their indispensable role in FSHR function. Their role in every phase of the life cycle of the receptor like post translational modifications, cell surface trafficking, hormone binding, activation of downstream signaling, receptor phosphorylation, hormone–receptor internalization, and recycling of hormone–receptor complex have been documented. Mutations in the loops causing dysregulation of these processes lead to pathophysiological conditions. In other GPHRs as well, the loops have been convincingly shown to contribute to various aspects of receptor function. This review article attempts to summarize the extensive contributions of FSHR loops and C-terminal tail to its function. PMID:26236283

  14. Molecular and functional characterization of human P2X(2) receptors.

    PubMed

    Lynch, K J; Touma, E; Niforatos, W; Kage, K L; Burgard, E C; van Biesen, T; Kowaluk, E A; Jarvis, M F

    1999-12-01

    P2X receptors are a family of ATP-gated ion channels. Four cDNAs with a high degree of homology to the rat P2X(2) receptor were isolated from human pituitary and pancreas RNA. Genomic sequence indicated that these cDNAs represent alternatively spliced messages. Northern analysis revealed high levels of human P2X(2) (hP2X(2)) message in the pancreas, and splice variants could be detected in a variety of tissues. Two cDNAs encoded functional ion channels when expressed in Xenopus oocytes, a receptor structurally homologous to the prototype rat P2X(2) receptor (called hP2X(2a)) and a variant containing a deletion within its cytoplasmic C terminus (called hP2X(2b)). Pharmacologically, these functional human P2X(2) receptors were virtually indistinguishable, with the P2X receptor agonists ATP, 2-methylthio-ATP, 2' and 3'-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyl)-ATP, and ATP5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) being approximately equipotent (EC(50) = 1 microM) in eliciting extracellular Ca(2+) influx. The P2 receptor agonists alpha,beta-methylene ATP, adenosine, adenosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate), and UTP were inactive at concentrations up to 100 microM. Both hP2X(2a) and hP2X(2b) receptors were sensitive to the P2 receptor antagonist pyridoxal-5-phosphate-6-azophenyl-2', 4'-disulfonic acid (IC(50) = 3 microM). In contrast to the analogous rat P2X(2) and P2X(2b) receptors, the desensitization rates of the hP2X(2a) and hP2X(2b) receptors were equivalent. Both functional forms of the human P2X(2) receptors formed heteromeric channels with the human P2X(3) receptor. These data demonstrate that the gene structure and mRNA heterogeneity of the P2X(2) receptor subtype are evolutionarily conserved between rat and human, but also suggest that alternative splicing serves a function other than regulating the desensitization rate of the human receptor.

  15. Divergence of allosteric effects of rapacuronium on binding and function of muscarinic receptors

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Many neuromuscular blockers act as negative allosteric modulators of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors by decreasing affinity and potency of acetylcholine. The neuromuscular blocker rapacuronium has been shown to have facilitatory effects at muscarinic receptors leading to bronchospasm. We examined the influence of rapacuronium on acetylcholine (ACh) binding to and activation of individual subtypes of muscarinic receptors expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells to determine its receptor selectivity. Results At equilibrium rapacuronium bound to all subtypes of muscarinic receptors with micromolar affinity (2.7-17 μM) and displayed negative cooperativity with both high- and low-affinity ACh binding states. Rapacuronium accelerated [3H]ACh association with and dissociation from odd-numbered receptor subtypes. With respect to [35S]GTPγS binding rapacuronium alone behaved as an inverse agonist at all subtypes. Rapacuronium concentration-dependently decreased the potency of ACh-induced [35S]GTPγS binding at M2 and M4 receptors. In contrast, 0.1 μM rapacuronium significantly increased ACh potency at M1, M3, and M5 receptors. Kinetic measurements at M3 receptors showed acceleration of the rate of ACh-induced [35S]GTPγS binding by rapacuronium. Conclusions Our data demonstrate a novel dichotomy in rapacuronium effects at odd-numbered muscarinic receptors. Rapacuronium accelerates the rate of ACh binding but decreases its affinity under equilibrium conditions. This results in potentiation of receptor activation at low concentrations of rapacuronium (1 μM) but not at high concentrations (10 μM). These observations highlight the relevance and necessity of performing physiological tests under non-equilibrium conditions in evaluating the functional effects of allosteric modulators at muscarinic receptors. They also provide molecular basis for potentiating M3 receptor-mediated bronchoconstriction. PMID:20038295

  16. Recombinant Collagen Engineered to Bind to Discoidin Domain Receptor Functions as a Receptor Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    An, Bo; Abbonante, Vittorio; Xu, Huifang; Gavriilidou, Despoina; Yoshizumi, Ayumi; Bihan, Dominique; Farndale, Richard W; Kaplan, David L; Balduini, Alessandra; Leitinger, Birgit; Brodsky, Barbara

    2016-02-26

    A bacterial collagen-like protein Scl2 has been developed as a recombinant collagen model system to host human collagen ligand-binding sequences, with the goal of generating biomaterials with selective collagen bioactivities. Defined binding sites in human collagen for integrins, fibronectin, heparin, and MMP-1 have been introduced into the triple-helical domain of the bacterial collagen and led to the expected biological activities. The modular insertion of activities is extended here to the discoidin domain receptors (DDRs), which are collagen-activated receptor tyrosine kinases. Insertion of the DDR-binding sequence from human collagen III into bacterial collagen led to specific receptor binding. However, even at the highest testable concentrations, the construct was unable to stimulate DDR autophosphorylation. The recombinant collagen expressed in Escherichia coli does not contain hydroxyproline (Hyp), and complementary synthetic peptide studies showed that replacement of Hyp by Pro at the critical Gly-Val-Met-Gly-Phe-Hyp position decreased the DDR-binding affinity and consequently required a higher concentration for the induction of receptor activation. The ability of the recombinant bacterial collagen to bind the DDRs without inducing kinase activation suggested it could interfere with the interactions between animal collagen and the DDRs, and such an inhibitory role was confirmed in vitro and with a cell migration assay. This study illustrates that recombinant collagen can complement synthetic peptides in investigating structure-activity relationships, and this system has the potential for the introduction or inhibition of specific biological activities.