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Sample records for functional intraflagellar transport

  1. Function and regulation of primary cilia and intraflagellar transport proteins in the skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xue; Serra, Rosa A.; Yang, Shuying

    2014-01-01

    Primary cilia are microtubule-based organelles that project from the cell surface to enable transduction of various developmental signaling pathways. The process of intraflagellar transport (IFT) is crucial for the building and maintenance of primary cilia. Ciliary dysfunction has been found in a range of disorders called ciliopathies, some of which display severe skeletal dysplasias. In recent years, interest has grown in uncovering the function of primary cilia/IFT proteins in bone development, mechanotransduction, and cellular regulation. We summarize recent advances in understanding the function of cilia and IFT proteins in the regulation of cell differentiation in osteoblasts, osteocytes, chondrocytes, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We also discuss the mechanosensory function of cilia and IFT proteins in bone cells, cilia orientation, and other functions of cilia in chondrocytes. PMID:24961486

  2. Function and regulation of primary cilia and intraflagellar transport proteins in the skeleton.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xue; Serra, Rosa A; Yang, Shuying

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are microtubule-based organelles that project from the cell surface to enable transduction of various developmental signaling pathways. The process of intraflagellar transport (IFT) is crucial for the building and maintenance of primary cilia. Ciliary dysfunction has been found in a range of disorders called ciliopathies, some of which display severe skeletal dysplasias. In recent years, interest has grown in uncovering the function of primary cilia/IFT proteins in bone development, mechanotransduction, and cellular regulation. We summarize recent advances in understanding the function of cilia and IFT proteins in the regulation of cell differentiation in osteoblasts, osteocytes, chondrocytes, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We also discuss the mechanosensory function of cilia and IFT proteins in bone cells, cilia orientation, and other functions of cilia in chondrocytes.

  3. Functional exploration of the IFT-A complex in intraflagellar transport and ciliogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bing; Zhu, Xin; Wang, Limei; Liang, Yinwen; Feng, Qianqian; Pan, Junmin

    2017-02-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) particles or trains are composed of IFT-A and IFT-B complexes. To assess the working mechanism of the IFT-A complex in IFT and ciliogenesis, we have analyzed ift43 mutants of Chlamydomnonas in conjunction with mutants of the other IFT-A subunits. An ift43 null mutant or a mutant with a partial deletion of the IFT43 conserved domain has no or short flagella. The mutants accumulate not only IFT-B but also IFT-Ain the short flagella, which is in contrast to an ift140 null mutant. The IFT43 conserved domain is necessary and sufficient for the function of IFT43. IFT43 directly interacts with IFT121 and loss of IFT43 results in instability of IFT-A. A construct with a partial deletion of the IFT43 conserved domain is sufficient to rescue the instability phenotype of IFT-A, but results in diminishing of IFT-A at the peri-basal body region. We have further provided evidence for the direct interactions within the IFT-A complex and shown that the integrity of IFT-A is important for its stability and cellular localization. Finally, we show that both IFT43 and IFT140 are involved in mobilizing ciliary precursors from the cytoplasmic pool during flagellar regeneration, suggesting a novel role of IFT-A in transporting ciliary components in the cytoplasm to the peri-basal body region.

  4. Functional exploration of the IFT-A complex in intraflagellar transport and ciliogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bing; Zhu, Xin; Wang, Limei; Liang, Yinwen; Feng, Qianqian

    2017-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) particles or trains are composed of IFT-A and IFT-B complexes. To assess the working mechanism of the IFT-A complex in IFT and ciliogenesis, we have analyzed ift43 mutants of Chlamydomnonas in conjunction with mutants of the other IFT-A subunits. An ift43 null mutant or a mutant with a partial deletion of the IFT43 conserved domain has no or short flagella. The mutants accumulate not only IFT-B but also IFT-Ain the short flagella, which is in contrast to an ift140 null mutant. The IFT43 conserved domain is necessary and sufficient for the function of IFT43. IFT43 directly interacts with IFT121 and loss of IFT43 results in instability of IFT-A. A construct with a partial deletion of the IFT43 conserved domain is sufficient to rescue the instability phenotype of IFT-A, but results in diminishing of IFT-A at the peri-basal body region. We have further provided evidence for the direct interactions within the IFT-A complex and shown that the integrity of IFT-A is important for its stability and cellular localization. Finally, we show that both IFT43 and IFT140 are involved in mobilizing ciliary precursors from the cytoplasmic pool during flagellar regeneration, suggesting a novel role of IFT-A in transporting ciliary components in the cytoplasm to the peri-basal body region. PMID:28207750

  5. Intraflagellar Transport and Functional Analysis of Genes Required for Flagellum Formation in Trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Absalon, Sabrina; Blisnick, Thierry; Kohl, Linda; Toutirais, Géraldine; Doré, Gwénola; Julkowska, Daria; Tavenet, Arounie

    2008-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is the bidirectional movement of protein complexes required for cilia and flagella formation. We investigated IFT by analyzing nine conventional IFT genes and five novel putative IFT genes (PIFT) in Trypanosoma brucei that maintain its existing flagellum while assembling a new flagellum. Immunostaining against IFT172 or expression of tagged IFT20 or green fluorescent protein GFP::IFT52 revealed the presence of IFT proteins along the axoneme and at the basal body and probasal body regions of both old and new flagella. IFT particles were detected by electron microscopy and exhibited a strict localization to axonemal microtubules 3–4 and 7–8, suggesting the existence of specific IFT tracks. Rapid (>3 μm/s) bidirectional intraflagellar movement of GFP::IFT52 was observed in old and new flagella. RNA interference silencing demonstrated that all individual IFT and PIFT genes are essential for new flagellum construction but the old flagellum remained present. Inhibition of IFTB proteins completely blocked axoneme construction. Absence of IFTA proteins (IFT122 and IFT140) led to formation of short flagella filled with IFT172, indicative of defects in retrograde transport. Two PIFT proteins turned out to be required for retrograde transport and three for anterograde transport. Finally, flagellum membrane elongation continues despite the absence of axonemal microtubules in all IFT/PIFT mutant. PMID:18094047

  6. Isolation of intraflagellar transport trains.

    PubMed

    Mencarelli, Caterina; Mitchell, Aaron; Leoncini, Roberto; Rosenbaum, Joel; Lupetti, Pietro

    2013-08-01

    The intraflagellar transport (IFT) system was first identified in situ by electron microscopy in thin sections of plastic-embedded flagella as linear arrays of electrondense particles, located between the B tubules of the outer doublets and the flagellar membrane. These arrays of particles are referred to as IFT trains. Upon membrane rupture, IFT trains are thought to easily dissociate to yield soluble IFT particles, which are commonly purified through sucrose gradients as ∼16-17S complexes. The latters easily dissociate into two subcomplexes, named A and B. We report here the isolation, visualization, and identification by immunolabeling of flexible strings of IFT particles, which are structurally similar to in situ IFT trains and appear to be formed by both complex A and complex B polypeptides. Moreover, the particles forming isolated IFT trains are structurally similar to the individual particles found in the ∼17S gradient peak. Our results provide the first direct evidence that ∼17S particles do indeed compose the IFT trains. The paper also represents the first isolation of the IFT trains, and opens new possibilities for higher resolution studies on their structure and how particles are attached to each other to form the particle trains.

  7. Regulation of cilium length and intraflagellar transport.

    PubMed

    Broekhuis, Joost R; Leong, Weng Y; Jansen, Gert

    2013-01-01

    Primary cilia are highly conserved sensory organelles that extend from the surface of almost all vertebrate cells. The importance of cilia is evident from their involvement in many diseases, called ciliopathies. Primary cilia contain a microtubular axoneme that is used as a railway for transport of both structural components and signaling proteins. This transport machinery is called intraflagellar transport (IFT). Cilia are dynamic organelles whose presence on the cell surface, morphology, length and function are highly regulated. It is clear that the IFT machinery plays an important role in this regulation. However, it is not clear how, for example environmental cues or cell fate decisions are relayed to modulate IFT and cilium morphology or function. This chapter presents an overview of molecules that have been shown to regulate cilium length and IFT. Several examples where signaling modulates IFT and cilium function are used to discuss the importance of these systems for the cell and for understanding of the etiology of ciliopathies.

  8. Intraflagellar transport: a new player at the immune synapse.

    PubMed

    Finetti, Francesca; Paccani, Silvia Rossi; Rosenbaum, Joel; Baldari, Cosima T

    2011-04-01

    The assembly and maintenance of primary cilia, which orchestrate signaling pathways centrally implicated in cell proliferation, differentiation and migration, are ensured by multimeric protein particles in a process known as intraflagellar transport (IFT). It has recently been demonstrated that a number of IFT components are expressed in hematopoietic cells, which have no cilia. Here, we summarize data for an unexpected role of IFT proteins in immune synapse assembly and intracellular membrane trafficking in T lymphocytes, and discuss the hypothesis that the immune synapse could represent the functional homolog of the primary cilium in these cells.

  9. Gli2 and Gli3 Localize to Cilia and Require the Intraflagellar Transport Protein Polaris for Processing and Function

    SciTech Connect

    Michaud III, Edward J; Haycraft, Courtney J; Aydin Son, Yesim; Zhang, Qihong; Yoder, Bradley

    2005-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) proteins are essential for cilia assembly and have recently been associated with a number of developmental processes, such as left-right axis specification and limb and neural tube patterning. Genetic studies indicate that IFT proteins are required for Sonic hedgehog (Shh)signaling downstream of the Smoothened and Patched membrane proteins but upstream of the Glioma (Gli) transcription factors. However, the role that IFT proteins play in transduction of Shh signaling and the importance of cilia in this process remain unknown. Here we provide insights into the mechanism by which defects in an IFT protein, Tg737/Polaris, affect Shh signaling in the murine limb bud. Our data show that loss of Tg737 results in altered Gli3 processing that abrogates Gli3-mediated repression of Gli1 transcriptional activity. In contrast to the conclusions drawn from genetic analysis, the activity of Gli1 and truncated forms of Gli3 (Gli3R) are unaffected in Tg737 mutants at the molecular level, indicating that Tg737/Polaris is differentially involved in specific activities of the Gli proteins. Most important, a negative regulator of Shh signaling, Suppressor of fused, and the three full-length Gli transcription factors localize to the distal tip of cilia in addition to the nucleus. Thus, our data support a model where cilia have a direct role in Gli processing and Shh signal transduction.

  10. Chibby functions to preserve normal ciliary morphology through the regulation of intraflagellar transport in airway ciliated cells.

    PubMed

    Siller, Saul S; Burke, Michael C; Li, Feng-Qian; Takemaru, Ken-Ichi

    2015-01-01

    Airway cilia provide the coordinated motive force for mucociliary transport, which prevents the accumulation of mucus, debris, pollutants, and bacteria in our respiratory tracts. As airway cilia are constantly exposed to the environment and, hence, are an integral component of the pathogenesis of several congenital and chronic pulmonary disorders, it is necessary to understand the molecular mechanisms that control ciliated cell differentiation and ciliogenesis. We have previously reported that loss of the basal body protein Chibby (Cby) results in chronic upper airway infection in mice due to a significant reduction in the number of airway cilia. In the present work, we demonstrate that Cby is required for normal ciliary structure and proper distribution of proteins involved in the bidirectional intraflagellar transport (IFT) system, which consists of 2 distinct sub-complexes, IFT-A and IFT-B, and is essential for ciliary biogenesis and maintenance. In fully differentiated ciliated cells, abnormal paddle-like cilia with dilated ciliary tips are observed in Cby-/- airways and primary cultures of mouse tracheal epithelial cells (MTECs). In addition, IFT88, an IFT-B sub-complex protein, robustly accumulates within the dilated tips of both multicilia in Cby-/- MTECs and primary cilia in Cby-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Furthermore, we show that only IFT-B components, including IFT20 and IFT57, but not IFT-A and Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) proteins, amass with IFT88 in these distended tips in Cby-/- ciliated cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that Cby plays a role in the proper distribution of IFT particles to preserve normal ciliary morphology in airway ciliated cells.

  11. Primary Cilia and Intraflagellar Transport Proteins in Bone and Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Yuan, X; Yang, S

    2016-11-01

    Primary cilia, present on most mammalian cells, function as a sensor to sense the environment change and transduce signaling. Loss of primary cilia causes a group of human pleiotropic syndromes called Ciliopathies. Some of the ciliopathies display skeletal dysplasias, implying the important role of primary cilia in skeletal development and homeostasis. Emerging evidence has shown that loss or malfunction of primary cilia or ciliary proteins in bone and cartilage is associated with developmental and function defects. Intraflagellar transport (IFT) proteins are essential for cilia formation and/or function. In this review, we discuss the role of primary cilia and IFT proteins in the development of bone and cartilage, as well as the differentiation and mechanotransduction of mesenchymal stem cells, osteoblasts, osteocytes, and chondrocytes. We also include the role of primary cilia in tooth development and highlight the current advance of primary cilia and IFT proteins in the pathogenesis of cartilage diseases, including osteoarthritis, osteosarcoma, and chondrosarcoma.

  12. Intraflagellar transport (IFT) role in ciliary assembly, resorption and signalling.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Lotte B; Rosenbaum, Joel L

    2008-01-01

    Cilia and flagella have attracted tremendous attention in recent years as research demonstrated crucial roles for these organelles in coordinating a number of physiologically and developmentally important signaling pathways, including the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) alpha, Sonic hedgehog, polycystin, and Wnt pathways. In addition, the realization that defective assembly or function of cilia can cause a plethora of diseases and developmental defects ("ciliopathies") has increased focus on the mechanisms by which these antenna-like, microtubular structures assemble. Ciliogenesis is a complex, multistep process that is tightly coordinated with cell cycle progression and differentiation. The ciliary axoneme is extended from a modified centriole, the basal body, which migrates to and docks onto the apical plasma membrane early in ciliogenesis as cells enter growth arrest. The ciliary axoneme is elongated via intraflagellar transport (IFT), a bidirectional transport system that tracks along the polarized microtubules of the axoneme, and which is required for assembly of almost all cilia and flagella. Here, we provide an overview of ciliogenesis with particular emphasis on the molecular mechanisms and functions of IFT. In addition to a general, up-to-date description of IFT, we discuss mechanisms by which proteins are selectively targeted to the ciliary compartment, with special focus on the ciliary transition zone. Finally, we briefly review the role of IFT in cilia-mediated signaling, including how IFT is directly involved in moving signaling moieties into and out of the ciliary compartment.

  13. Prostaglandin signaling regulates ciliogenesis by modulating intraflagellar transport

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Daqing; Ni, Terri T.; Sun, Jianjian; Wan, Haiyan; Amack, Jeffrey D.; Yu, Guangju; Fleming, Jonathan; Chiang, Chin; Li, Wenyan; Papierniak, Anna; Cheepala, Satish; Conseil, Gwenaëlle; Cole, Susan P.C.; Zhou, Bin; Drummond, Iain A.; Schuetz, John D.; Malicki, Jarema; Zhong, Tao P.

    2014-01-01

    Cilia are microtubule-based organelles that mediate signal transduction in a variety of tissues. Despite their importance, the signaling cascades that regulate cilia formation remain incompletely understood. Here we report that prostaglandin signaling affects ciliogenesis by regulating anterograde intraflagellar transport (IFT). Zebrafish leakytail (lkt) mutants display ciliogenesis defects, and lkt locus encodes an ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABCC4). We show that Lkt/ABCC4 localizes to the cell membrane and exports prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a function that is abrogated by the Lkt/ABCC4T804M mutant. PGE2 synthesis enzyme Cyclooxygenase-1 and its receptor, EP4, which localizes to the cilium and activates cAMP-mediated signaling cascade, are required for cilia formation and elongation. Importantly, PGE2 signaling increases anterograde but not retrograde velocity of IFT and promotes ciliogenesis in mammalian cells. These findings lead us to propose that Lkt/ABCC4-mediated PGE2 signaling acts through a ciliary G-protein-coupled receptor, EP4, to upregulate cAMP synthesis and increase anterograde IFT, thereby promoting ciliogenesis. PMID:25173977

  14. Prostaglandin signalling regulates ciliogenesis by modulating intraflagellar transport.

    PubMed

    Jin, Daqing; Ni, Terri T; Sun, Jianjian; Wan, Haiyan; Amack, Jeffrey D; Yu, Guangju; Fleming, Jonathan; Chiang, Chin; Li, Wenyan; Papierniak, Anna; Cheepala, Satish; Conseil, Gwenaëlle; Cole, Susan P C; Zhou, Bin; Drummond, Iain A; Schuetz, John D; Malicki, Jarema; Zhong, Tao P

    2014-09-01

    Cilia are microtubule-based organelles that mediate signal transduction in a variety of tissues. Despite their importance, the signalling cascades that regulate cilium formation remain incompletely understood. Here we report that prostaglandin signalling affects ciliogenesis by regulating anterograde intraflagellar transport (IFT). Zebrafish leakytail (lkt) mutants show ciliogenesis defects, and the lkt locus encodes an ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABCC4). We show that Lkt/ABCC4 localizes to the cell membrane and exports prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a function that is abrogated by the Lkt/ABCC4(T804M) mutant. PGE2 synthesis enzyme cyclooxygenase-1 and its receptor, EP4, which localizes to the cilium and activates the cyclic-AMP-mediated signalling cascade, are required for cilium formation and elongation. Importantly, PGE2 signalling increases anterograde but not retrograde velocity of IFT and promotes ciliogenesis in mammalian cells. These findings lead us to propose that Lkt/ABCC4-mediated PGE2 signalling acts through a ciliary G-protein-coupled receptor, EP4, to upregulate cAMP synthesis and increase anterograde IFT, thereby promoting ciliogenesis.

  15. Intraflagellar transport: mechanisms of motor action, cooperation, and cargo delivery.

    PubMed

    Prevo, Bram; Scholey, Jonathan M; Peterman, Erwin J G

    2017-03-25

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is a form of motor-dependent cargo transport that is essential for the assembly, maintenance, and length control of cilia, which play critical roles in motility, sensory reception, and signal transduction in virtually all eukaryotic cells. During IFT, anterograde kinesin-2 and retrograde IFT dynein motors drive the bidirectional transport of IFT trains that deliver cargo, for example, axoneme precursors such as tubulins as well as molecules of the signal transduction machinery, to their site of assembly within the cilium. Following its discovery in Chlamydomonas, IFT has emerged as a powerful model system for studying general principles of motor-dependent cargo transport and we now appreciate the diversity that exists in the mechanism of IFT within cilia of different cell types. The absence of heterotrimeric kinesin-2 function, for example, causes a complete loss of both IFT and cilia in Chlamydomonas, but following its loss in Caenorhabditis elegans, where its primary function is loading the IFT machinery into cilia, homodimeric kinesin-2-driven IFT persists and assembles a full-length cilium. Generally, heterotrimeric kinesin-2 and IFT dynein motors are thought to play widespread roles as core IFT motors, whereas homodimeric kinesin-2 motors are accessory motors that mediate different functions in a broad range of cilia, in some cases contributing to axoneme assembly or the delivery of signaling molecules but in many other cases their ciliary functions, if any, remain unknown. In this review, we focus on mechanisms of motor action, motor cooperation, and motor-dependent cargo delivery during IFT. © 2017 The Authors. The FEBS Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  16. Unique spatiotemporal requirements for intraflagellar transport genes during forebrain development

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching-Fang; Cionni, Megan; Brugmann, Samantha A.

    2017-01-01

    Primary cilia are organelles extended from virtually all cells and are required for the proper regulation of a number of canonical developmental pathways. The role in cortical development of proteins important for ciliary form and function is a relatively understudied area. Here we have taken a genetic approach to define the role in forebrain development of three intraflagellar transport proteins known to be important for primary cilia function. We have genetically ablated Kif3a, Ift88, and Ttc21b in a series of specific spatiotemporal domains. The resulting phenotypes allow us to draw several conclusions. First, we conclude that the Ttc21b cortical phenotype is not due to the activity of Ttc21b within the brain itself. Secondly, some of the most striking phenotypes are from ablations in the neural crest cells and the adjacent surface ectoderm indicating that cilia transduce critical tissue—tissue interactions in the developing embryonic head. Finally, we note striking differences in phenotypes from ablations only one embryonic day apart, indicating very discrete spatiotemporal requirements for these three genes in cortical development. PMID:28291836

  17. Crystal structure of the intraflagellar transport complex 25/27

    PubMed Central

    Bhogaraju, Sagar; Taschner, Michael; Morawetz, Michaela; Basquin, Claire; Lorentzen, Esben

    2011-01-01

    The cilium is an important organelle that is found on many eukaryotic cells, where it serves essential functions in motility, sensory reception and signalling. Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is a vital process for the formation and maintenance of cilia. We have determined the crystal structure of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii IFT25/27, an IFT sub-complex, at 2.6 Å resolution. IFT25 and IFT27 interact via a conserved interface that we verify biochemically using structure-guided mutagenesis. IFT27 displays the fold of Rab-like small guanosine triphosphate hydrolases (GTPases), binds GTP and GDP with micromolar affinity and has very low intrinsic GTPase activity, suggesting that it likely requires a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) for robust GTP turnover. A patch of conserved surface residues contributed by both IFT25 and IFT27 is found adjacent to the GTP-binding site and could mediate the binding to other IFT proteins as well as to a potential GAP. These results provide the first step towards a high-resolution structural understanding of the IFT complex. PMID:21505417

  18. The Role of Intraflagellar Transport in the Photoreceptor Sensory Cilium.

    PubMed

    Taub, Daniel G; Liu, Qin

    2016-01-01

    The photoreceptor is a complex specialized cell in which a major component responsible for visual transduction is the photoreceptor sensory cilium (PSC). Building and maintenance of the PSC requires the transport of large proteins along microtubules that extend from the inner segments to the outer segments. A key process, termed intraflagellar transport (IFT), has been recognized as an essential phenomenon for photoreceptor development and maintenance, and exciting new studies have highlighted its importance in retinal and cilia related diseases. This review focuses on the important roles of IFT players, including motor proteins, IFT proteins, and photoreceptor-specific cargos in photoreceptor sensory cilium. In addition, specific IFT components that are involved in inherited human diseases are discussed.

  19. Intraflagellar transport balances continuous turnover of outer doublet microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Wallace F.; Rosenbaum, Joel L.

    2001-01-01

    A central question in cell biology is how cells determine the size of their organelles. Flagellar length control is a convenient system for studying organelle size regulation. Mechanistic models proposed for flagellar length regulation have been constrained by the assumption that flagella are static structures once they are assembled. However, recent work has shown that flagella are dynamic and are constantly turning over. We have determined that this turnover occurs at the flagellar tips, and that the assembly portion of the turnover is mediated by intraflagellar transport (IFT). Blocking IFT inhibits the incorporation of tubulin at the flagellar tips and causes the flagella to resorb. These results lead to a simple steady-state model for flagellar length regulation by which a balance of assembly and disassembly can effectively regulate flagellar length. PMID:11684707

  20. The intraflagellar transport dynein complex of trypanosomes is made of a heterodimer of dynein heavy chains and of light and intermediate chains of distinct functions.

    PubMed

    Blisnick, Thierry; Buisson, Johanna; Absalon, Sabrina; Marie, Alexandra; Cayet, Nadège; Bastin, Philippe

    2014-09-01

    Cilia and flagella are assembled by intraflagellar transport (IFT) of protein complexes that bring tubulin and other precursors to the incorporation site at their distal tip. Anterograde transport is driven by kinesin, whereas retrograde transport is ensured by a specific dynein. In the protist Trypanosoma brucei, two distinct genes encode fairly different dynein heavy chains (DHCs; ∼40% identity) termed DHC2.1 and DHC2.2, which form a heterodimer and are both essential for retrograde IFT. The stability of each heavy chain relies on the presence of a dynein light intermediate chain (DLI1; also known as XBX-1/D1bLIC). The presence of both heavy chains and of DLI1 at the base of the flagellum depends on the intermediate dynein chain DIC5 (FAP133/WDR34). In the IFT140(RNAi) mutant, an IFT-A protein essential for retrograde transport, the IFT dynein components are found at high concentration at the flagellar base but fail to penetrate the flagellar compartment. We propose a model by which the IFT dynein particle is assembled in the cytoplasm, reaches the base of the flagellum, and associates with the IFT machinery in a manner dependent on the IFT-A complex.

  1. TCTEX1D2 mutations underlie Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy with impaired retrograde intraflagellar transport

    PubMed Central

    Schmidts, Miriam; Hou, Yuqing; Cortés, Claudio R.; Mans, Dorus A.; Huber, Celine; Boldt, Karsten; Patel, Mitali; van Reeuwijk, Jeroen; Plaza, Jean-Marc; van Beersum, Sylvia E. C.; Yap, Zhi Min; Letteboer, Stef J. F.; Taylor, S. Paige; Herridge, Warren; Johnson, Colin A.; Scambler, Peter J.; Ueffing, Marius; Kayserili, Hulya; Krakow, Deborah; King, Stephen M.; Beales, Philip L.; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Wicking, Carol; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Roepman, Ronald; Mitchison, Hannah M.; Witman, George B.; Al-Turki, Saeed; Anderson, Carl; Anney, Richard; Antony, Dinu; Asimit, Jennifer; Ayub, Mohammad; Barrett, Jeff; Barroso, Inês; Bentham, Jamie; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Blackwood, Douglas; Bobrow, Martin; Bochukova, Elena; Bolton, Patrick; Boustred, Chris; Breen, Gerome; Brion, Marie-Jo; Brown, Andrew; Calissano, Mattia; Carss, Keren; Chatterjee, Krishna; Chen, Lu; Cirak, Sebhattin; Clapham, Peter; Clement, Gail; Coates, Guy; Collier, David; Cosgrove, Catherine; Cox, Tony; Craddock, Nick; Crooks, Lucy; Curran, Sarah; Daly, Allan; Danecek, Petr; Smith, George Davey; Day-Williams, Aaron; Day, Ian; Durbin, Richard; Edkins, Sarah; Ellis, Peter; Evans, David; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Fitzpatrick, David; Flicek, Paul; Floyd, Jamie; Foley, A. Reghan; Franklin, Chris; Futema, Marta; Gallagher, Louise; Gaunt, Tom; Geschwind, Daniel; Greenwood, Celia; Grozeva, Detelina; Guo, Xiaosen; Gurling, Hugh; Hart, Deborah; Hendricks, Audrey; Holmans, Peter; Huang, Jie; Humphries, Steve E.; Hurles, Matt; Hysi, Pirro; Jackson, David; Jamshidi, Yalda; Jewell, David; Chris, Joyce; Kaye, Jane; Keane, Thomas; Kemp, John; Kennedy, Karen; Kent, Alastair; Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Lachance, Genevieve; Langford, Cordelia; Lee, Irene; Li, Rui; Li, Yingrui; Ryan, Liu; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Lopes, Margarida; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Massimo, Mangino; Marchini, Jonathan; Maslen, John; McCarthy, Shane; McGuffin, Peter; McIntosh, Andrew; McKechanie, Andrew; McQuillin, Andrew; Memari, Yasin; Metrustry, Sarah; Min, Josine; Moayyeri, Alireza; Morris, James; Muddyman, Dawn; Muntoni, Francesco; Northstone, Kate; O'Donovan, Michael; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Onoufriadis, Alexandros; Oualkacha, Karim; Owen, Michael; Palotie, Aarno; Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Parker, Victoria; Parr, Jeremy; Paternoster, Lavinia; Paunio, Tiina; Payne, Felicity; Perry, John; Pietilainen, Olli; Plagnol, Vincent; Quail, Michael A.; Quaye, Lydia; Raymond, Lucy; Rehnström, Karola; Brent Richards, J.; Ring, Sue; Ritchie, Graham R S; Savage, David B.; Schoenmakers, Nadia; Semple, Robert K.; Serra, Eva; Shihab, Hashem; Shin, So-Youn; Skuse, David; Small, Kerrin; Smee, Carol; Soler, Artigas María; Soranzo, Nicole; Southam, Lorraine; Spector, Tim; St Pourcain, Beate; St. Clair, David; Stalker, Jim; Surdulescu, Gabriela; Suvisaari, Jaana; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Tian, Jing; Timpson, Nic; Tobin, Martin; Valdes, Ana; van Kogelenberg, Margriet; Vijayarangakannan, Parthiban; Wain, Louise; Walter, Klaudia; Wang, Jun; Ward, Kirsten; Wheeler, Ellie; Whittall, Ros; Williams, Hywel; Williamson, Kathy; Wilson, Scott G.; Wong, Kim; Whyte, Tamieka; ChangJiang, Xu; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Zhang, Feng; Zheng, Hou-Feng

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of individuals with ciliary chondrodysplasias can shed light on sensitive mechanisms controlling ciliogenesis and cell signalling that are essential to embryonic development and survival. Here we identify TCTEX1D2 mutations causing Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy with partially penetrant inheritance. Loss of TCTEX1D2 impairs retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT) in humans and the protist Chlamydomonas, accompanied by destabilization of the retrograde IFT dynein motor. We thus define TCTEX1D2 as an integral component of the evolutionarily conserved retrograde IFT machinery. In complex with several IFT dynein light chains, it is required for correct vertebrate skeletal formation but may be functionally redundant under certain conditions. PMID:26044572

  2. Intraflagellar transport (IFT) during assembly and disassembly of Chlamydomonas flagella.

    PubMed

    Dentler, William

    2005-08-15

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) of particles along flagellar microtubules is required for the assembly and maintenance of eukaryotic flagella and cilia. In Chlamydomonas, anterograde and retrograde particles viewed by light microscopy average 0.12-microm and 0.06-microm diameter, respectively. Examination of IFT particle structure in growing flagella by electron microscopy revealed similar size aggregates composed of small particles linked to each other and to the membrane and microtubules. To determine the relationship between the number of particles and flagellar length, the rate and frequency of IFT particle movement was measured in nongrowing, growing, and shortening flagella. In all flagella, anterograde and retrograde IFT averaged 1.9 microm/s and 2.7 microm/s, respectively, but retrograde IFT was significantly slower in flagella shorter than 4 mum. The number of flagellar IFT particles was not fixed, but depended on flagellar length. Pauses in IFT particle entry into flagella suggest the presence of a periodic "gate" that permits up to 4 particles/s to enter a flagellum.

  3. A tissue-specific role for intraflagellar transport genes during craniofacial development

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Trevor J.; Snedeker, John; Brugmann, Samantha A.

    2017-01-01

    Primary cilia are nearly ubiquitous, cellular projections that function to transduce molecular signals during development. Loss of functional primary cilia has a particularly profound effect on the developing craniofacial complex, causing several anomalies including craniosynostosis, micrognathia, midfacial dysplasia, cleft lip/palate and oral/dental defects. Development of the craniofacial complex is an intricate process that requires interactions between several different tissues including neural crest cells, neuroectoderm and surface ectoderm. To understand the tissue-specific requirements for primary cilia during craniofacial development we conditionally deleted three separate intraflagellar transport genes, Kif3a, Ift88 and Ttc21b with three distinct drivers, Wnt1-Cre, Crect and AP2-Cre which drive recombination in neural crest, surface ectoderm alone, and neural crest, surface ectoderm and neuroectoderm, respectively. We found that tissue-specific conditional loss of ciliary genes with different functions produces profoundly different facial phenotypes. Furthermore, analysis of basic cellular behaviors in these mutants suggests that loss of primary cilia in a distinct tissue has unique effects on development of adjacent tissues. Together, these data suggest specific spatiotemporal roles for intraflagellar transport genes and the primary cilium during craniofacial development. PMID:28346501

  4. The ciliopathy-associated CPLANE proteins direct basal body recruitment of intraflagellar transport machinery

    PubMed Central

    Toriyama, Michinori; Lee, Chanjae; Taylor, S. Paige; Duran, Ivan; Cohn, Daniel H.; Bruel, Ange-Line; Tabler, Jacqueline M.; Drew, Kevin; Kelley, Marcus R.; Kim, Sukyoung; Park, Tae Joo; Braun, Daniella; Pierquin, Ghislaine; Biver, Armand; Wagner, Kerstin; Malfroot, Anne; Panigrahi, Inusha; Franco, Brunella; Al-lami, Hadeel Adel; Yeung, Yvonne; Choi, Yeon Ja; Duffourd, Yannis; Faivre, Laurence; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste; Chen, Jiang; Liu, Karen J.; Marcotte, Edward M.; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Krakow, Deborah; Jackson, Peter K.; Wallingford, John B.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cilia use microtubule-based intraflagellar transport (IFT) to organize intercellular signaling. The ciliopathies are a spectrum of human disease resulting from defects in cilia structure or function. Mechanisms regulating assembly of ciliary multiprotein complexes and their transport to the base of cilia remain largely unknown. Combine proteomics, in vivo imaging, and genetic analysis of proteins linked to planar cell polarity (Inturned, Fuzzy, WDPCP), we identified and characterized a new genetic module, which we term CPLANE (ciliogenesis and planar polarity effector) and an extensive associated protein network. CPLANE proteins physically and functionally interact with the poorly understood ciliopathy protein Jbts17 at basal bodies, where they act to recruit a specific subset of IFT-A proteins. In the absence of CPLANE, defective IFT-A particles enter the axoneme, and IFT-B trafficking is severely perturbed. Accordingly, mutation of CPLANE genes elicits specific ciliopathy phenotypes in mouse models and is associated with novel ciliopathies in human patients. PMID:27158779

  5. Microtubule doublets are double-track railways for intraflagellar transport trains.

    PubMed

    Stepanek, Ludek; Pigino, Gaia

    2016-05-06

    The cilium is a large macromolecular machine that is vital for motility, signaling, and sensing in most eukaryotic cells. Its conserved core structure, the axoneme, contains nine microtubule doublets, each comprising a full A-microtubule and an incomplete B-microtubule. However, thus far, the function of this doublet geometry has not been understood. We developed a time-resolved correlative fluorescence and three-dimensional electron microscopy approach to investigate the dynamics of intraflagellar transport (IFT) trains, which carry ciliary building blocks along microtubules during the assembly and disassembly of the cilium. Using this method, we showed that each microtubule doublet is used as a bidirectional double-track railway: Anterograde IFT trains move along B-microtubules, and retrograde trains move along A-microtubules. Thus, the microtubule doublet geometry provides direction-specific rails to coordinate bidirectional transport of ciliary components.

  6. Electron-tomographic analysis of intraflagellar transport particle trains in situ.

    PubMed

    Pigino, Gaia; Geimer, Stefan; Lanzavecchia, Salvatore; Paccagnini, Eugenio; Cantele, Francesca; Diener, Dennis R; Rosenbaum, Joel L; Lupetti, Pietro

    2009-10-05

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is the bidirectional movement of multipolypeptide particles between the ciliary membrane and the axonemal microtubules, and is required for the assembly, maintenance, and sensory function of cilia and flagella. In this paper, we present the first high-resolution ultrastructural analysis of trains of flagellar IFT particles, using transmission electron microscopy and electron-tomographic analysis of sections from flat-embedded Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells. Using wild-type and mutant cells with defects in IFT, we identified two different types of IFT trains: long, narrow trains responsible for anterograde transport; and short, compact trains underlying retrograde IFT. Both types of trains have characteristic repeats and patterns that vary as one sections longitudinally through the trains of particles. The individual IFT particles are highly complex, bridged to each other and to the outer doublet microtubules, and are closely apposed to the inner surface of the flagellar membrane.

  7. IFT-81 and IFT-74 are required for intraflagellar transport in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tetsuo; Gengyo-Ando, Keiko; Ishihara, Takeshi; Katsura, Isao; Mitani, Shohei

    2007-05-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is essential machinery for biogenesis and maintenance of cilia in many eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. A large number of polypeptides are known to be involved in IFT, but the physiological role of each component is not fully elucidated. Here, we identified a C. elegans orthologue of a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii IFT component, IFT-81, and found that its loss-of-function mutants show an unusual behavioral property and small body size. IFT-81 is expressed in sensory neurons, and localized at the base of cilia. The similar phenotypes with ift-81 mutants were also observed in several IFT mutants, suggesting these defects are caused by inability of IFT. We also demonstrated that IFT-81 interacts and co-localizes with IFT-74, which is another putative component of IFT. The ift-74 loss-of-function mutants showed phenocopies with ift-81 mutants, suggesting IFT-81 and IFT-74 play comparable functions. Moreover, ift-81 and ift-74 mutants similarly exhibited weak anomalies in cilia formation and obvious disruptions of transport in mature cilia. Thus, we conclude that IFT-81 and IFT-74 coordinately act in IFT in C. elegans sensory cilia.

  8. Disruption of intraflagellar protein transport in photoreceptor cilia causes Leber congenital amaurosis in humans and mice

    PubMed Central

    Boldt, Karsten; Mans, Dorus A.; Won, Jungyeon; van Reeuwijk, Jeroen; Vogt, Andreas; Kinkl, Norbert; Letteboer, Stef J.F.; Hicks, Wanda L.; Hurd, Ron E.; Naggert, Jürgen K.; Texier, Yves; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Koenekoop, Robert K.; Bennett, Jean; Cremers, Frans P.M.; Gloeckner, Christian J.; Nishina, Patsy M.; Roepman, Ronald; Ueffing, Marius

    2011-01-01

    The mutations that cause Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) lead to photoreceptor cell death at an early age, causing childhood blindness. To unravel the molecular basis of LCA, we analyzed how mutations in LCA5 affect the connectivity of the encoded protein lebercilin at the interactome level. In photoreceptors, lebercilin is uniquely localized at the cilium that bridges the inner and outer segments. Using a generally applicable affinity proteomics approach, we showed that lebercilin specifically interacted with the intraflagellar transport (IFT) machinery in HEK293T cells. This interaction disappeared when 2 human LCA-associated lebercilin mutations were introduced, implicating a specific disruption of IFT-dependent protein transport, an evolutionarily conserved basic mechanism found in all cilia. Lca5 inactivation in mice led to partial displacement of opsins and light-induced translocation of arrestin from photoreceptor outer segments. This was consistent with a defect in IFT at the connecting cilium, leading to failure of proper outer segment formation and subsequent photoreceptor degeneration. These data suggest that lebercilin functions as an integral element of selective protein transport through photoreceptor cilia and provide a molecular demonstration that disrupted IFT can lead to LCA. PMID:21606596

  9. Why motor proteins team up - Intraflagellar transport in C. elegans cilia.

    PubMed

    Mijalkovic, Jona; Prevo, Bram; Peterman, Erwin J G

    2016-01-01

    Inside the cell, vital processes such as cell division and intracellular transport are driven by the concerted action of different molecular motor proteins. In C. elegans chemosensory cilia, 2 kinesin-2 family motor proteins, kinesin-II and OSM-3, team up to drive intraflagellar transport (IFT) in the anterograde direction, from base to tip, whereas IFT dynein hitchhikes toward the tip and subsequently drives IFT in the opposite, retrograde direction, thereby recycling both kinesins. While it is evident that at least a retrograde and an anterograde motor are necessary to drive IFT, it has remained puzzling why 2 same-polarity kinesins are employed. Recently, we addressed this question by combining advanced genome-engineering tools with ultrasensitive, quantitative fluorescence microscopy to study IFT with single-molecule sensitivity.(1,2) Using this combination of approaches, we uncovered a differentiation in kinesin-2 function, in which the slower kinesin-II operates as an 'importer', loading IFT trains into the cilium before gradually handing them over to the faster OSM-3. OSM-3 subsequently acts as a long-range 'transporter', driving the IFT trains toward the tip. The two kinesin-2 motors combine their unique motility properties to achieve something neither motor can achieve on its own; that is to optimize the amount of cargo inside the cilium. In this commentary, we provide detailed insight into the rationale behind our research approach and comment on our recent findings. Moreover, we discuss the role of IFT dynein and provide an outlook on future studies.

  10. WD60/FAP163 is a dynein intermediate chain required for retrograde intraflagellar transport in cilia.

    PubMed

    Patel-King, Ramila S; Gilberti, Renée M; Hom, Erik F Y; King, Stephen M

    2013-09-01

    Retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT) is required for assembly of cilia. We identify a Chlamydomonas flagellar protein (flagellar-associated protein 163 [FAP163]) as being closely related to the D1bIC(FAP133) intermediate chain (IC) of the dynein that powers this movement. Biochemical analysis revealed that FAP163 is present in the flagellar matrix and is actively trafficked by IFT. Furthermore, FAP163 copurified with D1bIC(FAP133) and the LC8 dynein light chain, indicating that it is an integral component of the retrograde IFT dynein. To assess the functional role of FAP163, we generated an RNA interference knockdown of the orthologous protein (WD60) in planaria. The Smed-wd60(RNAi) animals had a severe ciliary assembly defect that dramatically compromised whole-organism motility. Most cilia were present as short stubs that had accumulated large quantities of IFT particle-like material between the doublet microtubules and the membrane. The few remaining approximately full-length cilia had a chaotic beat with a frequency reduced from 24 to ∼10 Hz. Thus WD60/FAP163 is a dynein IC that is absolutely required for retrograde IFT and ciliary assembly.

  11. KDM3A coordinates actin dynamics with intraflagellar transport to regulate cilia stability

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Rachel; Kawamura, Akane; Gilbert, Nick; Wills, Jimi; von Kriegsheim, Alex

    2017-01-01

    Cilia assembly and disassembly are coupled to actin dynamics, ensuring a coherent cellular response during environmental change. How these processes are integrated remains undefined. The histone lysine demethylase KDM3A plays important roles in organismal homeostasis. Loss-of-function mouse models of Kdm3a phenocopy features associated with human ciliopathies, whereas human somatic mutations correlate with poor cancer prognosis. We demonstrate that absence of KDM3A facilitates ciliogenesis, but these resulting cilia have an abnormally wide range of axonemal lengths, delaying disassembly and accumulating intraflagellar transport (IFT) proteins. KDM3A plays a dual role by regulating actin gene expression and binding to the actin cytoskeleton, creating a responsive “actin gate” that involves ARP2/3 activity and IFT. Promoting actin filament formation rescues KDM3A mutant ciliary defects. Conversely, the simultaneous depolymerization of actin networks and IFT overexpression mimics the abnormal ciliary traits of KDM3A mutants. KDM3A is thus a negative regulator of ciliogenesis required for the controlled recruitment of IFT proteins into cilia through the modulation of actin dynamics. PMID:28246120

  12. Specific recycling receptors are targeted to the immune synapse by the intraflagellar transport system.

    PubMed

    Finetti, Francesca; Patrussi, Laura; Masi, Giulia; Onnis, Anna; Galgano, Donatella; Lucherini, Orso Maria; Pazour, Gregory J; Baldari, Cosima T

    2014-05-01

    T cell activation requires sustained signaling at the immune synapse, a specialized interface with the antigen-presenting cell (APC) that assembles following T cell antigen receptor (TCR) engagement by major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-bound peptide. Central to sustained signaling is the continuous recruitment of TCRs to the immune synapse. These TCRs are partly mobilized from an endosomal pool by polarized recycling. We have identified IFT20, a component of the intraflagellar transport (IFT) system that controls ciliogenesis, as a central regulator of TCR recycling to the immune synapse. Here, we have investigated the interplay of IFT20 with the Rab GTPase network that controls recycling. We found that IFT20 forms a complex with Rab5 and the TCR on early endosomes. IFT20 knockdown (IFT20KD) resulted in a block in the recycling pathway, leading to a build-up of recycling TCRs in Rab5(+) endosomes. Recycling of the transferrin receptor (TfR), but not of CXCR4, was disrupted by IFT20 deficiency. The IFT components IFT52 and IFT57 were found to act together with IFT20 to regulate TCR and TfR recycling. The results provide novel insights into the mechanisms that control TCR recycling and immune synapse assembly, and underscore the trafficking-related function of the IFT system beyond ciliogenesis.

  13. Specific recycling receptors are targeted to the immune synapse by the intraflagellar transport system

    PubMed Central

    Finetti, Francesca; Patrussi, Laura; Masi, Giulia; Onnis, Anna; Galgano, Donatella; Lucherini, Orso Maria; Pazour, Gregory J.; Baldari, Cosima T.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT T cell activation requires sustained signaling at the immune synapse, a specialized interface with the antigen-presenting cell (APC) that assembles following T cell antigen receptor (TCR) engagement by major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-bound peptide. Central to sustained signaling is the continuous recruitment of TCRs to the immune synapse. These TCRs are partly mobilized from an endosomal pool by polarized recycling. We have identified IFT20, a component of the intraflagellar transport (IFT) system that controls ciliogenesis, as a central regulator of TCR recycling to the immune synapse. Here, we have investigated the interplay of IFT20 with the Rab GTPase network that controls recycling. We found that IFT20 forms a complex with Rab5 and the TCR on early endosomes. IFT20 knockdown (IFT20KD) resulted in a block in the recycling pathway, leading to a build-up of recycling TCRs in Rab5+ endosomes. Recycling of the transferrin receptor (TfR), but not of CXCR4, was disrupted by IFT20 deficiency. The IFT components IFT52 and IFT57 were found to act together with IFT20 to regulate TCR and TfR recycling. The results provide novel insights into the mechanisms that control TCR recycling and immune synapse assembly, and underscore the trafficking-related function of the IFT system beyond ciliogenesis. PMID:24554435

  14. Intraflagellar transport is required for the maintenance of the trypanosome flagellum composition but not its length.

    PubMed

    Fort, Cécile; Bonnefoy, Serge; Kohl, Linda; Bastin, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is required for construction of most cilia and flagella. Here, we used electron microscopy, immunofluorescence and live video microscopy to show that IFT is absent or arrested in the mature flagellum of Trypanosoma brucei upon RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown of IFT88 and IFT140, respectively. Flagella assembled prior to RNAi did not shorten, showing that IFT is not essential for the maintenance of flagella length. Although the ultrastructure of the axoneme was not visibly affected, flagellar beating was strongly reduced and the distribution of several flagellar components was drastically modified. The R subunit of the protein kinase A was no longer concentrated in the flagellum but was largely found in the cell body whereas the kinesin 9B motor was accumulating at the distal tip of the flagellum. In contrast, the distal tip protein FLAM8 was dispersed along the flagellum. This reveals that IFT also functions in maintaining the distribution of some flagellar proteins after construction of the organelle is completed. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. KDM3A coordinates actin dynamics with intraflagellar transport to regulate cilia stability.

    PubMed

    Yeyati, Patricia L; Schiller, Rachel; Mali, Girish; Kasioulis, Ioannis; Kawamura, Akane; Adams, Ian R; Playfoot, Christopher; Gilbert, Nick; van Heyningen, Veronica; Wills, Jimi; von Kriegsheim, Alex; Finch, Andrew; Sakai, Juro; Schofield, Christopher J; Jackson, Ian J; Mill, Pleasantine

    2017-02-28

    Cilia assembly and disassembly are coupled to actin dynamics, ensuring a coherent cellular response during environmental change. How these processes are integrated remains undefined. The histone lysine demethylase KDM3A plays important roles in organismal homeostasis. Loss-of-function mouse models of Kdm3a phenocopy features associated with human ciliopathies, whereas human somatic mutations correlate with poor cancer prognosis. We demonstrate that absence of KDM3A facilitates ciliogenesis, but these resulting cilia have an abnormally wide range of axonemal lengths, delaying disassembly and accumulating intraflagellar transport (IFT) proteins. KDM3A plays a dual role by regulating actin gene expression and binding to the actin cytoskeleton, creating a responsive "actin gate" that involves ARP2/3 activity and IFT. Promoting actin filament formation rescues KDM3A mutant ciliary defects. Conversely, the simultaneous depolymerization of actin networks and IFT overexpression mimics the abnormal ciliary traits of KDM3A mutants. KDM3A is thus a negative regulator of ciliogenesis required for the controlled recruitment of IFT proteins into cilia through the modulation of actin dynamics.

  16. WD60/FAP163 is a dynein intermediate chain required for retrograde intraflagellar transport in cilia

    PubMed Central

    Patel-King, Ramila S.; Gilberti, Renée M.; Hom, Erik F. Y.; King, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT) is required for assembly of cilia. We identify a Chlamydomonas flagellar protein (flagellar-associated protein 163 [FAP163]) as being closely related to the D1bIC(FAP133) intermediate chain (IC) of the dynein that powers this movement. Biochemical analysis revealed that FAP163 is present in the flagellar matrix and is actively trafficked by IFT. Furthermore, FAP163 copurified with D1bIC(FAP133) and the LC8 dynein light chain, indicating that it is an integral component of the retrograde IFT dynein. To assess the functional role of FAP163, we generated an RNA interference knockdown of the orthologous protein (WD60) in planaria. The Smed-wd60(RNAi) animals had a severe ciliary assembly defect that dramatically compromised whole-organism motility. Most cilia were present as short stubs that had accumulated large quantities of IFT particle–like material between the doublet microtubules and the membrane. The few remaining approximately full-length cilia had a chaotic beat with a frequency reduced from 24 to ∼10 Hz. Thus WD60/FAP163 is a dynein IC that is absolutely required for retrograde IFT and ciliary assembly. PMID:23864713

  17. Evidence of Intraflagellar Transport and Apical Complex Formation in a Free-Living Relative of the Apicomplexa

    PubMed Central

    Portman, Neil; Foster, Christie; Walker, Giselle

    2014-01-01

    Since its first description, Chromera velia has attracted keen interest as the closest free-living relative of parasitic Apicomplexa. The life cycle of this unicellular alga is complex and involves a motile biflagellate form. Flagella are thought to be formed in the cytoplasm, a rare phenomenon shared with Plasmodium in which the canonical mode of flagellar assembly, intraflagellar transport, is dispensed with. Here we demonstrate the expression of intraflagellar transport components in C. velia, answering the question of whether this organism has the potential to assemble flagella via the canonical route. We have developed and characterized a culturing protocol that favors the generation of flagellate forms. From this, we have determined a marked shift in the mode of daughter cell production from two to four daughter cells per division as a function of time after passage. We conduct an ultrastructural examination of the C. velia flagellate form by using serial TEM and show that flagellar biogenesis in C. velia occurs prior to cytokinesis. We demonstrate a close association of the flagellar apparatus with a complex system of apical structures, including a micropore, a conoid, and a complex endomembrane system reminiscent of the apical complex of parasitic apicomplexans. Recent work has begun to elucidate the possible flagellar origins of the apical complex, and we show that in C. velia these structures are contemporaneous within a single cell and share multiple connections. We propose that C. velia therefore represents a vital piece in the puzzle of the origins of the apical complex. PMID:24058169

  18. Evidence of intraflagellar transport and apical complex formation in a free-living relative of the apicomplexa.

    PubMed

    Portman, Neil; Foster, Christie; Walker, Giselle; Šlapeta, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Since its first description, Chromera velia has attracted keen interest as the closest free-living relative of parasitic Apicomplexa. The life cycle of this unicellular alga is complex and involves a motile biflagellate form. Flagella are thought to be formed in the cytoplasm, a rare phenomenon shared with Plasmodium in which the canonical mode of flagellar assembly, intraflagellar transport, is dispensed with. Here we demonstrate the expression of intraflagellar transport components in C. velia, answering the question of whether this organism has the potential to assemble flagella via the canonical route. We have developed and characterized a culturing protocol that favors the generation of flagellate forms. From this, we have determined a marked shift in the mode of daughter cell production from two to four daughter cells per division as a function of time after passage. We conduct an ultrastructural examination of the C. velia flagellate form by using serial TEM and show that flagellar biogenesis in C. velia occurs prior to cytokinesis. We demonstrate a close association of the flagellar apparatus with a complex system of apical structures, including a micropore, a conoid, and a complex endomembrane system reminiscent of the apical complex of parasitic apicomplexans. Recent work has begun to elucidate the possible flagellar origins of the apical complex, and we show that in C. velia these structures are contemporaneous within a single cell and share multiple connections. We propose that C. velia therefore represents a vital piece in the puzzle of the origins of the apical complex.

  19. Intraflagellar transport protein IFT20 is essential for male fertility and spermiogenesis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhengang; Li, Wei; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Ling; Teves, Maria E.; Liu, Hong; Strauss, Jerome F.; Pazour, Gregory J.; Foster, James A.; Hess, Rex A.; Zhang, Zhibing

    2016-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is a conserved mechanism believed to be essential for the assembly and maintenance of cilia and flagella. However, little is known about its role in mammalian sperm flagella formation. To fill this gap, we disrupted the Ift20 gene in male germ cells. Homozygous mutant mice were infertile, with significantly reduced sperm counts and motility. In addition, abnormally shaped, elongating spermatid heads and bulbous, round spermatids were found in the lumen of the seminiferous tubules. Electron microscopy revealed increased cytoplasmic vesicles, fiber-like structures, abnormal accumulation of mitochondria, and a decrease in mature lysosomes. The few developed sperm had disrupted axonemes, and some retained cytoplasmic lobe components on the flagella. ODF2 and SPAG16L, two sperm flagella proteins, failed to be incorporated into sperm tails of the mutant mice, and in the germ cells, both were assembled into complexes with lighter density in the absence of IFT20. Disrupting IFT20 did not significantly change expression levels of IFT88, a component of the IFT-B complex, and IFT140, a component of the IFT-A complex. Even though the expression level of an autophagy core protein that associates with IFT20, ATG16, was reduced in the testis of the Ift20 mutant mice, expression levels of other major autophagy markers, including LC3 and ubiquitin, were not changed. Our studies suggest that IFT20 is essential for male fertility and spermiogenesis in mice, and its major function is to transport cargo proteins for sperm flagella formation. It also appears to be involved in removing excess cytoplasmic components. PMID:27682589

  20. Why motor proteins team up - Intraflagellar transport in C. elegans cilia

    PubMed Central

    Mijalkovic, Jona; Prevo, Bram; Peterman, Erwin J. G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Inside the cell, vital processes such as cell division and intracellular transport are driven by the concerted action of different molecular motor proteins. In C. elegans chemosensory cilia, 2 kinesin-2 family motor proteins, kinesin-II and OSM-3, team up to drive intraflagellar transport (IFT) in the anterograde direction, from base to tip, whereas IFT dynein hitchhikes toward the tip and subsequently drives IFT in the opposite, retrograde direction, thereby recycling both kinesins. While it is evident that at least a retrograde and an anterograde motor are necessary to drive IFT, it has remained puzzling why 2 same-polarity kinesins are employed. Recently, we addressed this question by combining advanced genome-engineering tools with ultrasensitive, quantitative fluorescence microscopy to study IFT with single-molecule sensitivity.1,2 Using this combination of approaches, we uncovered a differentiation in kinesin-2 function, in which the slower kinesin-II operates as an ‘importer’, loading IFT trains into the cilium before gradually handing them over to the faster OSM-3. OSM-3 subsequently acts as a long-range ‘transporter’, driving the IFT trains toward the tip. The two kinesin-2 motors combine their unique motility properties to achieve something neither motor can achieve on its own; that is to optimize the amount of cargo inside the cilium. In this commentary, we provide detailed insight into the rationale behind our research approach and comment on our recent findings. Moreover, we discuss the role of IFT dynein and provide an outlook on future studies. PMID:27384150

  1. SQL-1, homologue of the Golgi protein GMAP210, modulates intraflagellar transport in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Broekhuis, Joost R; Rademakers, Suzanne; Burghoorn, Jan; Jansen, Gert

    2013-04-15

    Primary cilia are microtubule-based organelles that have important sensory functions. For their function, cilia rely on the delivery of specific proteins, both by intracellular trafficking and intraflagellar transport (IFT). In the cilia of Caenorhabditis elegans, anterograde IFT is mediated by kinesin-II and OSM-3. Previously, we have shown that expression of a dominant active G protein α subunit (GPA-3QL) in amphid channel neurons affects the coordination of kinesin-II and OSM-3 and also affects cilia length, suggesting that environmental signals can modulate these processes. Here, we show that loss-of-function of sql-1 (suppressor of gpa-3QL 1), which encodes the homologue of the mammalian Golgi protein GMAP210, suppresses the gpa-3QL cilia length phenotype. SQL-1 localizes to the Golgi apparatus, where it contributes to maintaining Golgi organization. Loss of sql-1 by itself does not affect cilia length, whereas overexpression of sql-1 results in longer cilia. Using live imaging of fluorescently tagged IFT proteins, we show that in sql-1 mutants OSM-3 moves faster, kinesin-II moves slower and that some complex A and B proteins move at an intermediate velocity, while others move at the same velocity as OSM-3. This indicates that mutation of sql-1 destabilizes the IFT complex. Finally, we show that simultaneous inactivation of sql-1 and activation of gpa-3QL affects the velocity of OSM-3. In summary, we show that in C. elegans the Golgin protein SQL-1 plays an important role in maintaining the stability of the IFT complex.

  2. IFT57 stabilizes the assembled intraflagellar transport complex and mediates transport of motility-related flagellar cargo.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xue; Hernandez, Daniel; Hernandez, Catherine; Ding, Zhaolan; Nan, Beiyan; Aufderheide, Karl; Qin, Hongmin

    2017-03-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is essential for the assembly and maintenance of flagella and cilia. Recent biochemical studies have shown that IFT complex B (IFT-B) is comprised of two subcomplexes, IFT-B1 and IFT-B2. The IFT-B2 subunit IFT57 lies at the interface between IFT-B1 and IFT-B2. Here, using a Chlamydomonasreinhardtii mutant for IFT57, we tested whether IFT57 is required for IFT-B complex assembly by bridging IFT-B1 and IFT-B2 together. In the ift57-1 mutant, levels of IFT57 and other IFT-B proteins were greatly reduced at the whole-cell level. However, strikingly, in the protease-free flagellar compartment, while the level of IFT57 was reduced, the levels of other IFT particle proteins were not concomitantly reduced but were present at the wild-type level. The IFT movement of the IFT57-deficient IFT particles was also unchanged. Moreover, IFT57 depletion disrupted the flagellar waveform, leading to cell swimming defects. Analysis of the mutant flagellar protein composition showed that certain axonemal proteins were altered. Taken together, these findings suggest that IFT57 does not play an essential structural role in the IFT particle complex but rather functions to prevent it from degradation. Additionally, IFT57 is involved in transporting specific motility-related proteins.

  3. Intraflagellar transport dynein is autoinhibited by trapping of its mechanical and track-binding elements.

    PubMed

    Toropova, Katerina; Mladenov, Miroslav; Roberts, Anthony J

    2017-05-01

    Cilia are multifunctional organelles that are constructed using intraflagellar transport (IFT) of cargo to and from their tip. It is widely held that the retrograde IFT motor, dynein-2, must be controlled in order to reach the ciliary tip and then unleashed to power the return journey. However, the mechanism is unknown. Here, we systematically define the mechanochemistry of human dynein-2 motors as monomers, dimers, and multimotor assemblies with kinesin-II. Combining these data with insights from single-particle EM, we discover that dynein-2 dimers are intrinsically autoinhibited. Inhibition is mediated by trapping dynein-2's mechanical 'linker' and 'stalk' domains within a novel motor-motor interface. We find that linker-mediated inhibition enables efficient transport of dynein-2 by kinesin-II in vitro. These results suggest a conserved mechanism for autoregulation among dimeric dyneins, which is exploited as a switch for dynein-2's recycling activity during IFT.

  4. TTC26/DYF13 is an intraflagellar transport protein required for transport of motility-related proteins into flagella.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Ide, Takahiro; Yagi, Toshiki; Jiang, Xue; Hirono, Masafumi; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Yanagisawa, Haruaki; Wemmer, Kimberly A; Stainier, Didier Yr; Qin, Hongmin; Kamiya, Ritsu; Marshall, Wallace F

    2014-01-01

    Cilia/flagella are assembled and maintained by the process of intraflagellar transport (IFT), a highly conserved mechanism involving more than 20 IFT proteins. However, the functions of individual IFT proteins are mostly unclear. To help address this issue, we focused on a putative IFT protein TTC26/DYF13. Using live imaging and biochemical approaches we show that TTC26/DYF13 is an IFT complex B protein in mammalian cells and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Knockdown of TTC26/DYF13 in zebrafish embryos or mutation of TTC26/DYF13 in C. reinhardtii, produced short cilia with abnormal motility. Surprisingly, IFT particle assembly and speed were normal in dyf13 mutant flagella, unlike in other IFT complex B mutants. Proteomic and biochemical analyses indicated a particular set of proteins involved in motility was specifically depleted in the dyf13 mutant. These results support the concept that different IFT proteins are responsible for different cargo subsets, providing a possible explanation for the complexity of the IFT machinery. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01566.001.

  5. The GTPase IFT27 is involved in both anterograde and retrograde intraflagellar transport.

    PubMed

    Huet, Diego; Blisnick, Thierry; Perrot, Sylvie; Bastin, Philippe

    2014-04-24

    The construction of cilia and flagella depends on intraflagellar transport (IFT), the bidirectional movement of two protein complexes (IFT-A and IFT-B) driven by specific kinesin and dynein motors. IFT-B and kinesin are associated to anterograde transport whereas IFT-A and dynein participate to retrograde transport. Surprisingly, the small GTPase IFT27, a member of the IFT-B complex, turns out to be essential for retrograde cargo transport in Trypanosoma brucei. We reveal that this is due to failure to import both the IFT-A complex and the IFT dynein into the flagellar compartment. To get further molecular insight about the role of IFT27, GDP- or GTP-locked versions were expressed in presence or absence of endogenous IFT27. The GDP-locked version is unable to enter the flagellum and to interact with other IFT-B proteins and its sole expression prevents flagellum formation. These findings demonstrate that a GTPase-competent IFT27 is required for association to the IFT complex and that IFT27 plays a role in the cargo loading of the retrograde transport machinery.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02419.001.

  6. Intraflagellar transport is required for the vectorial movement of TRPV channels in the ciliary membrane.

    PubMed

    Qin, Hongmin; Burnette, Dylan T; Bae, Young-Kyung; Forscher, Paul; Barr, Maureen M; Rosenbaum, Joel L

    2005-09-20

    The membranes of all eukaryotic motile (9 + 2) and immotile primary (9 + 0) cilia harbor channels and receptors involved in sensory transduction (reviewed by). These membrane proteins are transported from the cytoplasm onto the ciliary membrane by vesicles targeted for exocytosis at a point adjacent to the ciliary basal body. Here, we use time-lapse fluorescence microscopy to demonstrate that select GFP-tagged sensory receptors undergo rapid vectorial transport along the entire length of the cilia of Caenorhabditis elegans sensory neurons. Transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) channels OSM-9 and OCR-2 move in ciliary membranes at rates comparable to the intraflagellar transport (IFT) machinery located between the membrane and the underlying axonemal microtubules. OSM-9 motility is disrupted in certain IFT mutant backgrounds. Surprisingly, motility of transient receptor potential polycystin (TRPP) channel PKD-2 (polycystic kidney disease-2), a mechano-receptor, was not detected. Our study demonstrates that IFT, previously shown to be necessary for transport of axonemal components, is also involved in the motility of TRPV membrane protein movement along cilia of C. elegans sensory cells.

  7. Intraflagellar transport (IFT) cargo: IFT transports flagellar precursors to the tip and turnover products to the cell body.

    PubMed

    Qin, Hongmin; Diener, Dennis R; Geimer, Stefan; Cole, Douglas G; Rosenbaum, Joel L

    2004-01-19

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is the bidirectional movement of multisubunit protein particles along axonemal microtubules and is required for assembly and maintenance of eukaryotic flagella and cilia. One posited role of IFT is to transport flagellar precursors to the flagellar tip for assembly. Here, we examine radial spokes, axonemal subunits consisting of 22 polypeptides, as potential cargo for IFT. Radial spokes were found to be partially assembled in the cell body, before being transported to the flagellar tip by anterograde IFT. Fully assembled radial spokes, detached from axonemal microtubules during flagellar breakdown or turnover, are removed from flagella by retrograde IFT. Interactions between IFT particles, motors, radial spokes, and other axonemal proteins were verified by coimmunoprecipitation of these proteins from the soluble fraction of Chlamydomonas flagella. These studies indicate that one of the main roles of IFT in flagellar assembly and maintenance is to transport axonemal proteins in and out of the flagellum.

  8. Intraflagellar Transport Protein 172 is essential for primary cilia formation and plays a vital role in patterning the mammalian brain

    PubMed Central

    Gorivodsky, Marat; Mukhopadhyay, Mahua; Wilsch-Braeuninger, Michaela; Phillips, Matthew; Teufel, Andreas; Kim, Changmee; Malik, Nasir; Huttner, Wieland; Westphal, Heiner

    2008-01-01

    IFT172, also known as Selective Lim-domain Binding protein (SLB), is a component of the Intraflagellar Transport (IFT) complex. In order to evaluate the biological role of the Ift172 gene, we generated a loss-of-function mutation in the mouse. The resulting Slb mutant embryos die between E12.5–13.0, and exhibit severe cranio-facial malformations, failure to close the cranial neural tube, holoprosencephaly, heart edema and extensive hemorrhages. Cilia outgrowth in cells of the neuroepithelium is initiated but the axonemes are severely truncated and do not contain visible microtubules. Morphological and molecular analyses revealed a global brain-patterning defect along the dorsal-ventral (DV) and anterior-posterior (AP) axes. We demonstrate that Ift172 gene function is required for early regulation of Fgf8 at the midbrain-hindbrain boundary and maintenance of the isthmic organizer. In addition, Ift172 is required for proper function of the embryonic node, the early embryonic organizer and for formation of the head organizing center (the anterior mesendoderm, or AME). We propose a model suggesting that forebrain and mid-hindbrain growth and AP patterning depends on the early function of Ift172 at gastrulation. Our data suggest that the formation and function of the node and AME in the mouse embryo relies on an indispensable role of Ift172 in cilia morphogenesis and cilia-mediated signaling. PMID:18930042

  9. Intraflagellar transport is required for polarized recycling of the TCR/CD3 complex to the immune synapse.

    PubMed

    Finetti, Francesca; Paccani, Silvia Rossi; Riparbelli, Maria Giovanna; Giacomello, Emiliana; Perinetti, Giuseppe; Pazour, Gregory J; Rosenbaum, Joel L; Baldari, Cosima T

    2009-11-01

    Most eukaryotic cells have a primary cilium which functions as a sensory organelle. Cilia are assembled by intraflagellar transport (IFT), a process mediated by multimeric IFT particles and molecular motors. Here we show that lymphoid and myeloid cells, which lack primary cilia, express IFT proteins. IFT20, an IFT component essential for ciliary assembly, was found to colocalize with both the microtubule organizing centre (MTOC) and Golgi and post-Golgi compartments in T-lymphocytes. In antigen-specific conjugates, IFT20 translocated to the immune synapse. IFT20 knockdown resulted in impaired T-cell receptor/CD3 (TCR/CD3) clustering and signalling at the immune synapse, due to defective polarized recycling. Moreover, IFT20 was required for the inducible assembly of a complex with other IFT components (IFT57 and IFT88) and the TCR. The results identify IFT20 as a new regulator of immune synapse assembly in T cells and provide the first evidence to implicate IFT in membrane trafficking in cells lacking primary cilia, thereby introducing a new perspective on IFT function beyond its role in ciliogenesis.

  10. Compound heterozygous alterations in intraflagellar transport protein CLUAP1 in a child with a novel Joubert and oral–facial–digital overlap syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Jennifer J.; Lee, Chanjae; Wentzensen, Ingrid M.; Parisi, Melissa A.; Crenshaw, Molly M.; Sapp, Julie C.; Gross, Jeffrey M.; Wallingford, John B.; Biesecker, Leslie G.

    2017-01-01

    Disruption of normal ciliary function results in a range of diseases collectively referred to as ciliopathies. Here we report a child with a phenotype that overlapped with Joubert, oral–facial–digital, and Pallister–Hall syndromes including brain, limb, and craniofacial anomalies. We performed exome-sequence analysis on a proband and both parents, filtered for putative causative variants, and Sanger-verified variants of interest. Identified variants in CLUAP1 were functionally analyzed in a Xenopus system to determine their effect on ciliary function. Two variants in CLUAP1 were identified through exome-sequence analysis, Chr16:g.3558407T>G, c.338T>G, p.(Met113Arg) and Chr16:g.3570011C>T, c.688C>T, p.(Arg230Ter). These variants were rare in the Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC) data set of 65,000 individuals (one and two occurrences, respectively). Transfection of mutant CLUAP1 constructs into Xenopus embryos showed reduced protein levels p.(Arg230Ter) and reduced intraflagellar transport p.(Met113Arg). The genetic data show that these variants are present in an affected child, are rare in the population, and result in reduced, but not absent, intraflagellar transport. We conclude that biallelic mutations in CLUAP1 resulted in this novel ciliopathy syndrome in the proband. PMID:28679688

  11. Intraflagellar transport-A complex mediates ciliary entry and retrograde trafficking of ciliary G protein–coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Tomoaki; Katoh, Yohei; Nakayama, Kazuhisa

    2017-01-01

    Cilia serve as cellular antennae where proteins involved in sensory and developmental signaling, including G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs), are specifically localized. Intraflagellar transport (IFT)-A and -B complexes mediate retrograde and anterograde ciliary protein trafficking, respectively. Using a visible immunoprecipitation assay to detect protein–protein interactions, we show that the IFT-A complex is divided into a core subcomplex, composed of IFT122/IFT140/IFT144, which is associated with TULP3, and a peripheral subcomplex, composed of IFT43/IFT121/IFT139, where IFT139 is most distally located. IFT139-knockout (KO) and IFT144-KO cells demonstrated distinct phenotypes: IFT139-KO cells showed the accumulation of IFT-A, IFT-B, and GPCRs, including Smoothened and GPR161, at the bulged ciliary tips; IFT144-KO cells showed failed ciliary entry of IFT-A and GPCRs and IFT-B accumulation at the bulged tips. These observations demonstrate the distinct roles of the core and peripheral IFT-A subunits: IFT139 is dispensable for IFT-A assembly but essential for retrograde trafficking of IFT-A, IFT-B, and GPCRs; in contrast, IFT144 is essential for functional IFT-A assembly and ciliary entry of GPCRs but dispensable for anterograde IFT-B trafficking. Thus the data presented here demonstrate that the IFT-A complex mediates not only retrograde trafficking but also entry into cilia of GPCRs. PMID:27932497

  12. Intraflagellar transport is required for polarized recycling of the TCR/CD3 complex to the immune synapse

    PubMed Central

    Finetti, Francesca; Paccani, Silvia Rossi; Riparbelli, Maria Giovanna; Giacomello, Emiliana; Perinetti, Giuseppe; Pazour, Gregory J.; Rosenbaum, Joel; Baldari, Cosima T.

    2010-01-01

    Most eukaryotic cells have a primary cilium which acts as a sensory organelle1. Cilia are assembled by intraflagellar transport (IFT), a process mediated by multimeric IFT particles and molecular motors2. Here we show that lymphoid and myeloid cells, which lack primary cilia, express IFT proteins. IFT20, an IFT component essential for ciliary assembly3,4, was found to colocalize with both the MTOC and Golgi and post-Golgi compartments in T-lymphocytes. In antigen-specific conjugates, IFT20 translocated to the immune synapse (IS). IFT20 knockdown resulted in impaired TCR/CD3 clustering and signaling at the IS due to defective polarized recycling. Moreover, IFT20 was required for the inducible assembly of a complex with other IFT components (IFT57, IFT88) and the TCR. The results identify IFT20 as a novel regulator of IS assembly in T-cells and provide the first evidence that IFT is implicated in membrane trafficking in cells lacking primary cilia, thereby opening a new perspective on IFT function beyond its role in ciliogenesis. PMID:19855387

  13. Single-particle imaging reveals intraflagellar transport-independent transport and accumulation of EB1 in Chlamydomonas flagella.

    PubMed

    Harris, J Aaron; Liu, Yi; Yang, Pinfen; Kner, Peter; Lechtreck, Karl F

    2016-01-15

    The microtubule (MT) plus-end tracking protein EB1 is present at the tips of cilia and flagella; end-binding protein 1 (EB1) remains at the tip during flagellar shortening and in the absence of intraflagellar transport (IFT), the predominant protein transport system in flagella. To investigate how EB1 accumulates at the flagellar tip, we used in vivo imaging of fluorescent protein-tagged EB1 (EB1-FP) in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. After photobleaching, the EB1 signal at the flagellar tip recovered within minutes, indicating an exchange with unbleached EB1 entering the flagella from the cell body. EB1 moved independent of IFT trains, and EB1-FP recovery did not require the IFT pathway. Single-particle imaging showed that EB1-FP is highly mobile along the flagellar shaft and displays a markedly reduced mobility near the flagellar tip. Individual EB1-FP particles dwelled for several seconds near the flagellar tip, suggesting the presence of stable EB1 binding sites. In simulations, the two distinct phases of EB1 mobility are sufficient to explain its accumulation at the tip. We propose that proteins uniformly distributed throughout the cytoplasm like EB1 accumulate locally by diffusion and capture; IFT, in contrast, might be required to transport proteins against cellular concentration gradients into or out of cilia.

  14. Loss of ift122, a Retrograde Intraflagellar Transport (IFT) Complex Component, Leads to Slow, Progressive Photoreceptor Degeneration Due to Inefficient Opsin Transport.

    PubMed

    Boubakri, Meriam; Chaya, Taro; Hirata, Hiromi; Kajimura, Naoko; Kuwahara, Ryusuke; Ueno, Akiko; Malicki, Jarema; Furukawa, Takahisa; Omori, Yoshihiro

    2016-11-18

    In the retina, aberrant opsin transport from cell bodies to outer segments leads to retinal degenerative diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa. Opsin transport is facilitated by the intraflagellar transport (IFT) system that mediates the bidirectional movement of proteins within cilia. In contrast to functions of the anterograde transport executed by IFT complex B (IFT-B), the precise functions of the retrograde transport mediated by IFT complex A (IFT-A) have not been well studied in photoreceptor cilia. Here, we analyzed developing zebrafish larvae carrying a null mutation in ift122 encoding a component of IFT-A. ift122 mutant larvae show unexpectedly mild phenotypes, compared with those of mutants defective in IFT-B. ift122 mutants exhibit a slow onset of progressive photoreceptor degeneration mainly after 7 days post-fertilization. ift122 mutant larvae also develop cystic kidney but not curly body, both of which are typically observed in various ciliary mutants. ift122 mutants display a loss of cilia in the inner ear hair cells and nasal pit epithelia. Loss of ift122 causes disorganization of outer segment discs. Ectopic accumulation of an IFT-B component, ift88, is observed in the ift122 mutant photoreceptor cilia. In addition, pulse-chase experiments using GFP-opsin fusion proteins revealed that ift122 is required for the efficient transport of opsin and the distal elongation of outer segments. These results show that IFT-A is essential for the efficient transport of outer segment proteins, including opsin, and for the survival of retinal photoreceptor cells, rendering the ift122 mutant a unique model for human retinal degenerative diseases. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Intraflagellar transport velocity is governed by the number of active KIF17 and KIF3AB motors and their motility properties under load.

    PubMed

    Milic, Bojan; Andreasson, Johan O L; Hogan, Daniel W; Block, Steven M

    2017-08-15

    Homodimeric KIF17 and heterotrimeric KIF3AB are processive, kinesin-2 family motors that act jointly to carry out anterograde intraflagellar transport (IFT), ferrying cargo along microtubules (MTs) toward the tips of cilia. How IFT trains attain speeds that exceed the unloaded rate of the slower, KIF3AB motor remains unknown. By characterizing the motility properties of kinesin-2 motors as a function of load we find that the increase in KIF3AB velocity, elicited by forward loads from KIF17 motors, cannot alone account for the speed of IFT trains in vivo. Instead, higher IFT velocities arise from an increased likelihood that KIF3AB motors dissociate from the MT, resulting in transport by KIF17 motors alone, unencumbered by opposition from KIF3AB. The rate of transport is therefore set by an equilibrium between a faster state, where only KIF17 motors move the train, and a slower state, where at least one KIF3AB motor on the train remains active in transport. The more frequently the faster state is accessed, the higher the overall velocity of the IFT train. We conclude that IFT velocity is governed by (i) the absolute numbers of each motor type on a given train, (ii) how prone KIF3AB is to dissociation from MTs relative to KIF17, and (iii) how prone both motors are to dissociation relative to binding MTs.

  16. Biochemical mapping of interactions within the intraflagellar transport (IFT) B core complex: IFT52 binds directly to four other IFT-B subunits.

    PubMed

    Taschner, Michael; Bhogaraju, Sagar; Vetter, Melanie; Morawetz, Michaela; Lorentzen, Esben

    2011-07-29

    Cilia and flagella are complex structures emanating from the surface of most eukaroytic cells and serve important functions including motility, signaling, and sensory reception. A process called intraflagellar transport (IFT) is of central importance to ciliary assembly and maintenance. The IFT complex is required for this transport and consists of two distinct multisubunit subcomplexes, IFT-A and IFT-B. Despite the importance of the IFT complex, little is known about its overall architecture. This paper presents a biochemical dissection of the molecular interactions within the IFT-B core complex. Two stable subcomplexes consisting of IFT88/70/52/46 and IFT81/74/27/25 were recombinantly co-expressed and purified. We identify a novel interaction between IFT70/52 and map the interaction domains between IFT52 and the other subunits within the IFT88/70/52/46 complex. Additionally, we show that IFT52 binds directly to the IFT81/74/27/25 complex, indicating that it could mediate the interaction between the two subcomplexes. Our data lead to an improved architectural map for the IFT-B core complex with new interactions as well as domain resolution mapping for several subunits.

  17. Pericentrin forms a complex with intraflagellar transport proteins and polycystin-2 and is required for primary cilia assembly

    PubMed Central

    Jurczyk, Agata; Gromley, Adam; Redick, Sambra; Agustin, Jovenal San; Witman, George; Pazour, Gregory J.; Peters, Dorien J.M.; Doxsey, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    Primary cilia are nonmotile microtubule structures that assemble from basal bodies by a process called intraflagellar transport (IFT) and are associated with several human diseases. Here, we show that the centrosome protein pericentrin (Pcnt) colocalizes with IFT proteins to the base of primary and motile cilia. Immunogold electron microscopy demonstrates that Pcnt is on or near basal bodies at the base of cilia. Pcnt depletion by RNA interference disrupts basal body localization of IFT proteins and the cation channel polycystin-2 (PC2), and inhibits primary cilia assembly in human epithelial cells. Conversely, silencing of IFT20 mislocalizes Pcnt from basal bodies and inhibits primary cilia assembly. Pcnt is found in spermatocyte IFT fractions, and IFT proteins are found in isolated centrosome fractions. Pcnt antibodies coimmunoprecipitate IFT proteins and PC2 from several cell lines and tissues. We conclude that Pcnt, IFTs, and PC2 form a complex in vertebrate cells that is required for assembly of primary cilia and possibly motile cilia and flagella. PMID:15337773

  18. Overall Architecture of the Intraflagellar Transport (IFT)-B Complex Containing Cluap1/IFT38 as an Essential Component of the IFT-B Peripheral Subcomplex.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Yohei; Terada, Masaya; Nishijima, Yuya; Takei, Ryota; Nozaki, Shohei; Hamada, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Kazuhisa

    2016-05-20

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is essential for assembly and maintenance of cilia and flagella as well as ciliary motility and signaling. IFT is mediated by multisubunit complexes, including IFT-A, IFT-B, and the BBSome, in concert with kinesin and dynein motors. Under high salt conditions, purified IFT-B complex dissociates into a core subcomplex composed of at least nine subunits and at least five peripherally associated proteins. Using the visible immunoprecipitation assay, which we recently developed as a convenient protein-protein interaction assay, we determined the overall architecture of the IFT-B complex, which can be divided into core and peripheral subcomplexes composed of 10 and 6 subunits, respectively. In particular, we identified TTC26/IFT56 and Cluap1/IFT38, neither of which was included with certainty in previous models of the IFT-B complex, as integral components of the core and peripheral subcomplexes, respectively. Consistent with this, a ciliogenesis defect of Cluap1-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts was rescued by exogenous expression of wild-type Cluap1 but not by mutant Cluap1 lacking the binding ability to other IFT-B components. The detailed interaction map as well as comparison of subcellular localization of IFT-B components between wild-type and Cluap1-deficient cells provides insights into the functional relevance of the architecture of the IFT-B complex. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Crystal structures of IFT70/52 and IFT52/46 provide insight into intraflagellar transport B core complex assembly

    PubMed Central

    Taschner, Michael; Kotsis, Fruzsina; Braeuer, Philipp; Kuehn, E. Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Cilia are microtubule-based organelles that assemble via intraflagellar transport (IFT) and function as signaling hubs on eukaryotic cells. IFT relies on molecular motors and IFT complexes that mediate the contacts with ciliary cargo. To elucidate the architecture of the IFT-B complex, we reconstituted and purified the nonameric IFT-B core from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and determined the crystal structures of C. reinhardtii IFT70/52 and Tetrahymena IFT52/46 subcomplexes. The 2.5-Å resolution IFT70/52 structure shows that IFT52330–370 is buried deeply within the IFT70 tetratricopeptide repeat superhelix. Furthermore, the polycystic kidney disease protein IFT88 binds IFT52281–329 in a complex that interacts directly with IFT70/IFT52330–381 in trans. The structure of IFT52C/IFT46C was solved at 2.3 Å resolution, and we show that it is essential for IFT-B core integrity by mediating interaction between IFT88/70/52/46 and IFT81/74/27/25/22 subcomplexes. Consistent with this, overexpression of mammalian IFT52C in MDCK cells is dominant-negative and causes IFT protein mislocalization and disrupted ciliogenesis. These data further rationalize several ciliogenesis phenotypes of IFT mutant strains. PMID:25349261

  20. Knockdown of the intraflagellar transport protein IFT46 stimulates selective gene expression in mouse chondrocytes and affects early development in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Gouttenoire, Jérôme; Valcourt, Ulrich; Bougault, Carole; Aubert-Foucher, Elisabeth; Arnaud, Estelle; Giraud, Lionel; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric

    2007-10-19

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) act as multifunctional regulators in morphogenesis during development. In particular they play a determinant role in the formation of cartilage molds and their replacement by bone during endochondral ossification. In cell culture, BMP-2 favors chondrogenic expression and promotes hypertrophic maturation of chondrocytes. In mouse chondrocytes we have identified a BMP-2-sensitive gene encoding a protein of 301 amino acids. This protein, named mIFT46, is the mouse ortholog of recently identified Caenorhabditis elegans and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii intraflagellar transport (IFT) proteins. After generation of a polyclonal antibody against mIFT46, we showed for the first time that the endogenous protein is located in the primary cilium of chondrocytes. We also found that mIFT46 is preferentially expressed in early hypertrophic chondrocytes located in the growth plate. Additionally, mIFT46 knockdown by small interfering RNA oligonucleotides in cultured chondrocytes specifically stimulated the expression of several genes related to skeletogenesis. Furthermore, Northern blotting analysis indicated that mIFT46 is also expressed before chondrogenesis in embryonic mouse development, suggesting that the role of mIFT46 might not be restricted to cartilage. To explore the role of IFT46 during early development, we injected antisense morpholino oligonucleotides in Danio rerio embryos to reduce zebrafish IFT46 protein (zIFT46) synthesis. Dramatic defects in embryonic development such as a dorsalization and a tail duplication were observed. Thus our results taken together indicate that the ciliary protein IFT46 has a specific function in chondrocytes and is also essential for normal development of vertebrates.

  1. Ciliary intraflagellar transport protein 80 balances canonical versus non-canonical hedgehog signaling for osteoblast differentiation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mutation of different IFT proteins cause numerous different clinical bone disorders accompanied with or without the disruption of cilia formation. Currently, there is no any effective treatment for these disorders due to lack of understanding in the function and mechanism of these proteins. IFT80 is...

  2. An essential quality control mechanism at the eukaryotic basal body prior to intraflagellar transport.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Angela; Vaughan, Sue; Shaw, Michael K; Gull, Keith; McKean, Paul G

    2007-10-01

    Constructing a eukaryotic cilium/flagellum is a demanding task requiring the transport of proteins from their cytoplasmic synthesis site into a spatially and environmentally distinct cellular compartment. The clear potential hazard is that import of aberrant proteins could seriously disable cilia/flagella assembly or turnover processes. Here, we reveal that tubulin protein destined for incorporation into axonemal microtubules interacts with a tubulin cofactor C (TBCC) domain-containing protein that is specifically located at the mature basal body transitional fibres. RNA interference-mediated ablation of this protein results in axonemal microtubule defects but no effect on other microtubule populations within the cell. Bioinformatics analysis indicates that this protein belongs to a clade of flagellum-specific TBCC-like proteins that includes the human protein, XRP2, mutations which lead to certain forms of the hereditary eye disease retinitis pigmentosa. Taken with other observations regarding the role of transitional fibres in cilium/flagellum assembly, we suggest that a localized protein processing capacity embedded at transitional fibres ensures the 'quality' of tubulin imported into the cilium/flagellum, and further, that loss of a ciliary/flagellar quality control capability may underpin a number of human genetic disorders.

  3. Whole-Organism Developmental Expression Profiling Identifies RAB-28 as a Novel Ciliary GTPase Associated with the BBSome and Intraflagellar Transport

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Anna A. W. M.; Li, Chunmei; Kennedy, Julie; Cai, Jerry; Scheidel, Noemie; Kennedy, Breandán N.; Morin, Ryan D.; Leroux, Michel R.; Blacque, Oliver E.

    2016-01-01

    Primary cilia are specialised sensory and developmental signalling devices extending from the surface of most eukaryotic cells. Defects in these organelles cause inherited human disorders (ciliopathies) such as retinitis pigmentosa and Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS), frequently affecting many physiological and developmental processes across multiple organs. Cilium formation, maintenance and function depend on intracellular transport systems such as intraflagellar transport (IFT), which is driven by kinesin-2 and IFT-dynein motors and regulated by the Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) cargo-adaptor protein complex, or BBSome. To identify new cilium-associated genes, we employed the nematode C. elegans, where ciliogenesis occurs within a short timespan during late embryogenesis when most sensory neurons differentiate. Using whole-organism RNA-Seq libraries, we discovered a signature expression profile highly enriched for transcripts of known ciliary proteins, including FAM-161 (FAM161A orthologue), CCDC-104 (CCDC104), and RPI-1 (RP1/RP1L1), which we confirm are cilium-localised in worms. From a list of 185 candidate ciliary genes, we uncover orthologues of human MAP9, YAP, CCDC149, and RAB28 as conserved cilium-associated components. Further analyses of C. elegans RAB-28, recently associated with autosomal-recessive cone-rod dystrophy, reveal that this small GTPase is exclusively expressed in ciliated neurons where it dynamically associates with IFT trains. Whereas inactive GDP-bound RAB-28 displays no IFT movement and diffuse localisation, GTP-bound (activated) RAB-28 concentrates at the periciliary membrane in a BBSome-dependent manner and undergoes bidirectional IFT. Functional analyses reveal that whilst cilium structure, sensory function and IFT are seemingly normal in a rab-28 null allele, overexpression of predicted GDP or GTP locked variants of RAB-28 perturbs cilium and sensory pore morphogenesis and function. Collectively, our findings present a new approach for

  4. Whole-Organism Developmental Expression Profiling Identifies RAB-28 as a Novel Ciliary GTPase Associated with the BBSome and Intraflagellar Transport.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Victor L; Carter, Stephen; Sanders, Anna A W M; Li, Chunmei; Kennedy, Julie; Timbers, Tiffany A; Cai, Jerry; Scheidel, Noemie; Kennedy, Breandán N; Morin, Ryan D; Leroux, Michel R; Blacque, Oliver E

    2016-12-01

    Primary cilia are specialised sensory and developmental signalling devices extending from the surface of most eukaryotic cells. Defects in these organelles cause inherited human disorders (ciliopathies) such as retinitis pigmentosa and Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS), frequently affecting many physiological and developmental processes across multiple organs. Cilium formation, maintenance and function depend on intracellular transport systems such as intraflagellar transport (IFT), which is driven by kinesin-2 and IFT-dynein motors and regulated by the Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) cargo-adaptor protein complex, or BBSome. To identify new cilium-associated genes, we employed the nematode C. elegans, where ciliogenesis occurs within a short timespan during late embryogenesis when most sensory neurons differentiate. Using whole-organism RNA-Seq libraries, we discovered a signature expression profile highly enriched for transcripts of known ciliary proteins, including FAM-161 (FAM161A orthologue), CCDC-104 (CCDC104), and RPI-1 (RP1/RP1L1), which we confirm are cilium-localised in worms. From a list of 185 candidate ciliary genes, we uncover orthologues of human MAP9, YAP, CCDC149, and RAB28 as conserved cilium-associated components. Further analyses of C. elegans RAB-28, recently associated with autosomal-recessive cone-rod dystrophy, reveal that this small GTPase is exclusively expressed in ciliated neurons where it dynamically associates with IFT trains. Whereas inactive GDP-bound RAB-28 displays no IFT movement and diffuse localisation, GTP-bound (activated) RAB-28 concentrates at the periciliary membrane in a BBSome-dependent manner and undergoes bidirectional IFT. Functional analyses reveal that whilst cilium structure, sensory function and IFT are seemingly normal in a rab-28 null allele, overexpression of predicted GDP or GTP locked variants of RAB-28 perturbs cilium and sensory pore morphogenesis and function. Collectively, our findings present a new approach for

  5. A novel bicistronic expression system composed of the intraflagellar transport protein gene ift25 and FMDV 2A sequence directs robust nuclear gene expression in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Dong, Bin; Hu, He-He; Li, Zhen-Fang; Cheng, Rong-Qiang; Meng, De-Mei; Wang, Junping; Fan, Zhen-Chuan

    2017-02-25

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii offers a great promise for large-scale production of multiple recombinant proteins of pharmaceutical and industrial interest. However, the nuclear-encoding transgenes usually are expressed at a low level, which severely hampers the use of this alga in molecular farming. In this study, the promoter of the endogenous intraflagellar transport 25 (IFT25) gene of C. reinhardtii was tested for its ability to drive the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP), which functions as a readout for target gene expression. IFT25 promoter (IFT25P) alone was not able to drive GFP expression to a detectable level. IFT25P, however, can drive robust IFT25-GFP fusion protein expression when the intron-containing IFT25 gene was inserted between IFT25P and GFP cDNA. When an extended version of foot-and-mouth virus 2A protease (2A(E)) sequence was further inserted between the intron-containing IFT25 gene and the GFP cDNA, discrete GFP protein was observed to release from the IFT25-2A(E)-GFP polyprotein via 2A self-cleaving with a cleavage efficacy of approximately 99%. The monomer GFP was accumulated to a level of as high as 0.68% of total soluble proteins. To test whether the newly developed bicistronic IFT25P-IFT25-2A(E) expression system can be used to overexpress heterologous proteins of different origins and sizes, we inserted codon-optimized cDNAs encoding a Trichoderma reesei xylanase1 (25 kDa) and a Lachnospiraceae bacterium ND2006 type V CRISPR-Cas protein LbCpf1 (147 kDa) to the vector and found that the production of xylanase1 and LbCpf1 was as high as 0.69 and 0.49% of total soluble protein. Our result showed that IFT25P-IFT25-2A(E) system is more efficient to drive nuclear gene expression in C. reinhardtii than other conventionally used promoters, thus representing a novel efficient recombinant protein expression tool and has the potential to be scaled for commercial production of nuclear-encoded recombinant proteins of different sizes and

  6. The intraflagellar transport protein IFT57 is required for cilia maintenance and regulates IFT-particle-kinesin-II dissociation in vertebrate photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Krock, Bryan L; Perkins, Brian D

    2008-06-01

    Defects in protein transport within vertebrate photoreceptors can result in photoreceptor degeneration. In developing and mature photoreceptors, proteins targeted to the outer segment are transported through the connecting cilium via the process of intraflagellar transport (IFT). In studies of vertebrate IFT, mutations in any component of the IFT particle typically abolish ciliogenesis, suggesting that IFT proteins are equally required for IFT. To determine whether photoreceptor outer segment formation depends equally on individual IFT proteins, we compared the retinal phenotypes of IFT57 and IFT88 mutant zebrafish. IFT88 mutants failed to form outer segments, whereas IFT57 mutants formed short outer segments with reduced amounts of opsin. Our phenotypic analysis revealed that IFT57 is not essential for IFT, but is required for efficient IFT. In co-immunoprecipitation experiments from whole-animal extracts, we determined that kinesin II remained associated with the IFT particle in the absence of IFT57, but IFT20 did not. Additionally, kinesin II did not exhibit ATP-dependent dissociation from the IFT particle in IFT57 mutants. We conclude that IFT20 requires IFT57 to associate with the IFT particle and that IFT57 and/or IFT20 mediate kinesin II dissociation.

  7. Intraflagellar transport proteins 172, 80, 57, 54, 38, and 20 form a stable tubulin-binding IFT-B2 complex.

    PubMed

    Taschner, Michael; Weber, Kristina; Mourão, André; Vetter, Melanie; Awasthi, Mayanka; Stiegler, Marc; Bhogaraju, Sagar; Lorentzen, Esben

    2016-04-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) relies on the IFT complex and is required for ciliogenesis. The IFT-B complex consists of 9-10 stably associated core subunits and six "peripheral" subunits that were shown to dissociate from the core structure at moderate salt concentration. We purified the six "peripheral"IFT-B subunits of Chlamydomonas reinhardtiias recombinant proteins and show that they form a stable complex independently of the IFT-B core. We suggest a nomenclature of IFT-B1 (core) and IFT-B2 (peripheral) for the two IFT-B subcomplexes. We demonstrate that IFT88, together with the N-terminal domain of IFT52, is necessary to bridge the interaction between IFT-B1 and B2. The crystal structure of IFT52N reveals highly conserved residues critical for IFT-B1/IFT-B2 complex formation. Furthermore, we show that of the three IFT-B2 subunits containing a calponin homology (CH) domain (IFT38, 54, and 57), only IFT54 binds αβ-tubulin as a potential IFT cargo, whereas the CH domains of IFT38 and IFT57 mediate the interaction with IFT80 and IFT172, respectively. Crystal structures of IFT54 CH domains reveal that tubulin binding is mediated by basic surface-exposed residues.

  8. RAB-Like 2 Has an Essential Role in Male Fertility, Sperm Intra-Flagellar Transport, and Tail Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Jennifer C. Y.; Jamsai, Duangporn; O'Connor, Anne E.; Borg, Claire; Clark, Brett J.; Whisstock, James C.; Field, Mark C.; Adams, Vicki; Ishikawa, Tomomoto; Aitken, R. John; Whittle, Belinda; Goodnow, Christopher C.; Ormandy, Christopher J.; O'Bryan, Moira K.

    2012-01-01

    A significant percentage of young men are infertile and, for the majority, the underlying cause remains unknown. Male infertility is, however, frequently associated with defective sperm motility, wherein the sperm tail is a modified flagella/cilia. Conversely, a greater understanding of essential mechanisms involved in tail formation may offer contraceptive opportunities, or more broadly, therapeutic strategies for global cilia defects. Here we have identified Rab-like 2 (RABL2) as an essential requirement for sperm tail assembly and function. RABL2 is a member of a poorly characterized clade of the RAS GTPase superfamily. RABL2 is highly enriched within developing male germ cells, where it localizes to the mid-piece of the sperm tail. Lesser amounts of Rabl2 mRNA were observed in other tissues containing motile cilia. Using a co-immunoprecipitation approach and RABL2 affinity columns followed by immunochemistry, we demonstrated that within developing haploid germ cells RABL2 interacts with intra-flagella transport (IFT) proteins and delivers a specific set of effector (cargo) proteins, including key members of the glycolytic pathway, to the sperm tail. RABL2 binding to effector proteins is regulated by GTP. Perturbed RABL2 function, as exemplified by the Mot mouse line that contains a mutation in a critical protein–protein interaction domain, results in male sterility characterized by reduced sperm output, and sperm with aberrant motility and short tails. Our data demonstrate a novel function for the RABL protein family, an essential role for RABL2 in male fertility and a previously uncharacterised mechanism for protein delivery to the flagellum. PMID:23055941

  9. Intraflagellar transport 88 (IFT88) is crucial for craniofacial development in mice and is a candidate gene for human cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hua; Feng, Jifan; Li, Jingyuan; Ho, Thach-Vu; Yuan, Yuan; Liu, Yang; Brindopke, Frederick; Figueiredo, Jane C; Magee, William; Sanchez-Lara, Pedro A; Chai, Yang

    2017-03-01

    Ciliopathies are pleiotropic human diseases resulting from defects of the primary cilium, and these patients often have cleft lip and palate. IFT88 is required for the assembly and function of the primary cilia, which mediate the activity of key developmental signaling pathways. Through whole exome sequencing of a family of three affected siblings with isolated cleft lip and palate, we discovered that they share a novel missense mutation in IFT88 (c.915G > C, p.E305D), suggesting this gene should be considered a candidate for isolated orofacial clefting. In order to evaluate the function of IFT88 in regulating craniofacial development, we generated Wnt1-Cre;Ift88fl/fl mice to eliminate Ift88 specifically in cranial neural crest (CNC) cells. Wnt1-Cre;Ift88fl/flpups died at birth due to severe craniofacial defects including bilateral cleft lip and palate and tongue agenesis, following the loss of the primary cilia in the CNC-derived palatal mesenchyme. Loss of Ift88 also resulted in a decrease in neural crest cell proliferation during early stages of palatogenesis as well as a downregulation of the Shh signaling pathway in the palatal mesenchyme. Importantly, Osr2KI-Cre;Ift88fl/flmice, in which Ift88 is lost specifically in the palatal mesenchyme, exhibit isolated cleft palate. Taken together, our results demonstrate that IFT88 has a highly conserved function within the primary cilia of the CNC-derived mesenchyme in the lip and palate region in mice and is a strong candidate as an orofacial clefting gene in humans. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Kinesin-2: a family of heterotrimeric and homodimeric motors with diverse intracellular transport functions.

    PubMed

    Scholey, Jonathan M

    2013-01-01

    Kinesin-2 was first purified as a heterotrimeric, anterograde, microtubule-based motor consisting of two distinct kinesin-related subunits and a novel associated protein (KAP) that is currently best known for its role in intraflagellar transport and ciliogenesis. Subsequent work, however, has revealed diversity in the oligomeric state of different kinesin-2 motors owing to the combinatorial heterodimerization of its subunits and the coexistence of both heterotrimeric and homodimeric kinesin-2 motors in some cells. Although the functional significance of the homo- versus heteromeric organization of kinesin-2 motor subunits and the role of KAP remain uncertain, functional studies suggest that cooperation between different types of kinesin-2 motors or between kinesin-2 and a member of a different motor family can generate diverse patterns of anterograde intracellular transport. Moreover, despite being restricted to ciliated eukaryotes, kinesin-2 motors are now known to drive diverse transport events outside cilia. Here, I review the organization, assembly, phylogeny, biological functions, and motility mechanism of this diverse family of intracellular transport motors.

  11. Transporter oligomerization: form and function

    PubMed Central

    Alguel, Yilmaz; Cameron, Alexander D.; Diallinas, George; Byrne, Bernadette

    2016-01-01

    Transporters are integral membrane proteins with central roles in the efficient movement of molecules across biological membranes. Many transporters exist as oligomers in the membrane. Depending on the individual transport protein, oligomerization can have roles in membrane trafficking, function, regulation and turnover. For example, our recent studies on UapA, a nucleobase ascorbate transporter, from Aspergillus nidulans, have revealed both that dimerization of this protein is essential for correct trafficking to the membrane and the structural basis of how one UapA protomer can affect the function of the closely associated adjacent protomer. Here, we review the roles of oligomerization in many particularly well-studied transporters and transporter families. PMID:27913684

  12. Impaired Photoreceptor Protein Transport and Synaptic Transmission in a Mouse Model of Bardet-Biedl Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Abd-El-Barr, Muhammad M.; Sykoudis, Kristen; Andrabi, Sara; Eichers, Erica R.; Pennesi, Mark E.; Tan, Perciliz L.; Wilson, John H.; Katsanis, Nicholas; Lupski, James R.; Wu, Samuel M.

    2009-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl Syndrome (BBS) is an oligogenic syndrome whose manifestations include retinal degeneration, renal abnormalities, obesity and polydactylia. Evidence suggests that the main etiopathophysiology of this syndrome is impaired Intraflagellar Transport (IFT). In this study, we study the Bbs4-null mouse and investigate photoreceptor structure and function after loss of this gene. We find that Bbs4-null mice have defects in the transport of phototransduction proteins from the inner segments to the outer segments, before signs of cell death. Additionally, we show defects in synaptic transmission from the photoreceptors to secondary neurons of the visual system, demonstrating multiple functions for BBS4 in photoreceptors. PMID:18022666

  13. Functional Analysis of Arabidopsis Sucrose Transporters

    SciTech Connect

    John M. Ward

    2009-03-31

    Sucrose is the main photosynthetic product that is transported in the vasculature of plants. The long-distance transport of carbohydrates is required to support the growth and development of net-importing (sink) tissues such as fruit, seeds and roots. This project is focused on understanding the transport mechanism sucrose transporters (SUTs). These are proton-coupled sucrose uptake transporters (membrane proteins) that are required for transport of sucrose in the vasculature and uptake into sink tissues. The accomplishments of this project included: 1) the first analysis of substrate specificity for any SUT. This was accomplished using electrophysiology to analyze AtSUC2, a sucrose transporter from companion cells in Arabidopsis. 2) the first analysis of the transport activity for a monocot SUT. The transport kinetics and substrate specificity of HvSUT1 from barley were studied. 3) the first analysis of a sucrose transporter from sugarcane. and 4) the first analysis of transport activity of a sugar alcohol transporter homolog from plants, AtPLT5. During this period four primary research papers, funded directly by the project, were published in refereed journals. The characterization of several sucrose transporters was essential for the current effort in the analysis of structure/function for this gene family. In particular, the demonstration of strong differences in substrate specificity between type I and II SUTs was important to identify targets for site-directed mutagenesis.

  14. Mapping the functional yeast ABC transporter interactome.

    PubMed

    Snider, Jamie; Hanif, Asad; Lee, Mid Eum; Jin, Ke; Yu, Analyn R; Graham, Chris; Chuk, Matthew; Damjanovic, Dunja; Wierzbicka, Marta; Tang, Priscilla; Balderes, Dina; Wong, Victoria; Jessulat, Matthew; Darowski, Katelyn D; San Luis, Bryan-Joseph; Shevelev, Igor; Sturley, Stephen L; Boone, Charles; Greenblatt, Jack F; Zhang, Zhaolei; Paumi, Christian M; Babu, Mohan; Park, Hay-Oak; Michaelis, Susan; Stagljar, Igor

    2013-09-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are a ubiquitous class of integral membrane proteins of immense clinical interest because of their strong association with human disease and pharmacology. To improve our understanding of these proteins, we used membrane yeast two-hybrid technology to map the protein interactome of all of the nonmitochondrial ABC transporters in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae and combined this data with previously reported yeast ABC transporter interactions in the BioGRID database to generate a comprehensive, integrated 'interactome'. We show that ABC transporters physically associate with proteins involved in an unexpectedly diverse range of functions. We specifically examine the importance of the physical interactions of ABC transporters in both the regulation of one another and in the modulation of proteins involved in zinc homeostasis. The interaction network presented here will be a powerful resource for increasing our fundamental understanding of the cellular role and regulation of ABC transporters.

  15. Mapping the functional yeast ABC transporter interactome

    PubMed Central

    Snider, Jamie; Hanif, Asad; Lee, Mid Eum; Jin, Ke; Yu, Analyn R.; Graham, Chris; Chuk, Matthew; Damjanovic, Dunja; Wierzbicka, Marta; Tang, Priscilla; Balderes, Dina; Wong, Victoria; Jessulat, Matthew; Darowski, Katelyn D.; Luis, Bryan-Joseph San; Shevelev, Igor; Sturley, Stephen L; Boone, Charles; Greenblatt, Jack F.; Zhang, Zhaolei; Paumi, Christian M.; Babu, Mohan; Park, Hay-Oak; Michaelis, Susan; Stagljar, Igor

    2013-01-01

    ABC transporters are a ubiquitous class of integral membrane proteins of immense clinical interest because of their strong association with human disease and pharmacology. To improve our understanding of these proteins, we used Membrane Yeast Two-Hybrid (MYTH) technology to map the protein interactome of all non-mitochondrial ABC transporters in the model organism Saccharomy cescerevisiae, and combined this data with previously reported yeast ABC transporter interactions in the BioGRID database to generate a comprehensive, integrated interactome. We show that ABC transporters physically associate with proteins involved in a surprisingly diverse range of functions. We specifically examine the importance of the physical interactions of ABC transporters in both the regulation of one another and in the modulation of proteins involved in zinc homeostasis. The interaction network presented here will be a powerful resource for increasing our fundamental understanding of the cellular role and regulation of ABC transporters. PMID:23831759

  16. Structure, function, and plasticity of GABA transporters

    PubMed Central

    Scimemi, Annalisa

    2014-01-01

    GABA transporters belong to a large family of neurotransmitter:sodium symporters. They are widely expressed throughout the brain, with different levels of expression in different brain regions. GABA transporters are present in neurons and in astrocytes and their activity is crucial to regulate the extracellular concentration of GABA under basal conditions and during ongoing synaptic events. Numerous efforts have been devoted to determine the structural and functional properties of GABA transporters. There is also evidence that the expression of GABA transporters on the cell membrane and their lateral mobility can be modulated by different intracellular signaling cascades. The strength of individual synaptic contacts and the activity of entire neuronal networks may be finely tuned by altering the density, distribution and diffusion rate of GABA transporters within the cell membrane. These findings are intriguing because they suggest the existence of complex regulatory systems that control the plasticity of GABAergic transmission in the brain. Here we review the current knowledge on the structural and functional properties of GABA transporters and highlight the molecular mechanisms that alter the expression and mobility of GABA transporters at central synapses. PMID:24987330

  17. Particulate distribution function evolution for ejecta transport

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerberg, James Edward; Plohr, Bradley J

    2010-01-01

    The time evolution of the ejecta distribution function in a gas is discussed in the context of the recent experiments of W. Buttler and M. Zellner for well characterized Sn surfaces. Evolution equations are derived for the particulate distribution function when the dominant gas-particle interaction in is particulate drag. In the approximation of separability of the distribution function in velocity and size, the solution for the time dependent distribution function is a Fredholm integral equation of the first kind whose kernel is expressible in terms of the vacuum time dependent velocity distribution function measured with piezo probes or Asay foils. The solution of this equation in principle gives the size distribution function. We discuss the solution of this equation and the results of the Buttler - Zellner experiments. These suggest that correlations in velocity and size are necessary for a complete description of the transport dala. The solutions presented also represent an analytic test problem for the calculated distribution function in ejecta transport implementations.

  18. HDL Function, Dysfunction, and Reverse Cholesterol Transport

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Edward A.; Feig, Jonathan E.; Hewing, Bernd; Hazen, Stanley L.; Smith, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Although high HDL-cholesterol levels are associated with decreased cardiovascular risk in epidemiological studies, recent genetic and pharmacological findings have raised doubts about the beneficial effects of HDL. Raising HDL levels in animal models by infusion or over expression of apolipoprotein A-I has shown clear vascular improvements, such as delayed atherosclerotic lesion progression and accelerated lesion regression, along with increased reverse cholesterol transport. Inflammation and other factors, such as myeloperoxidase mediated oxidation, can impair HDL production and HDL function, in regard to its reverse cholesterol transport, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities. Thus, tests of HDL function, which have not yet been developed as routine diagnostic assays, may prove useful and be a better predictor of cardiovascular risk than HDL-cholesterol levels. PMID:23152494

  19. IFT-Cargo Interactions and Protein Transport in Cilia.

    PubMed

    Lechtreck, Karl F

    2015-12-01

    The motile and sensory functions of cilia and flagella are indispensable for human health. Cilia assembly requires a dedicated protein shuttle, intraflagellar transport (IFT), a bidirectional motility of multi-megadalton protein arrays along ciliary microtubules. IFT functions as a protein carrier delivering hundreds of distinct proteins into growing cilia. IFT-based protein import and export continue in fully grown cilia and are required for ciliary maintenance and sensing. Large ciliary building blocks might depend on IFT to move through the transition zone, which functions as a ciliary gate. Smaller, freely diffusing proteins, such as tubulin, depend on IFT to be concentrated or removed from cilia. As I discuss here, recent work provides insights into how IFT interacts with its cargoes and how the transport is regulated.

  20. Development of intestinal transport function in mammals.

    PubMed

    Pácha, J

    2000-10-01

    Considerable progress has been made over the last decade in the understanding of mechanisms responsible for the ontogenetic changes of mammalian intestine. This review presents the current knowledge about the development of intestinal transport function in the context of intestinal mucosa ontogeny. The review predominantly focuses on signals that trigger and/or modulate the developmental changes of intestinal transport. After an overview of the proliferation and differentiation of intestinal mucosa, data about the bidirectional traffic (absorption and secretion) across the developing intestinal epithelium are presented. The largest part of the review is devoted to the description of developmental patterns concerning the absorption of nutrients, ions, water, vitamins, trace elements, and milk-borne biologically active substances. Furthermore, the review examines the development of intestinal secretion that has a variety of functions including maintenance of the fluidity of the intestinal content, lubrication of mucosal surface, and mucosal protection. The age-dependent shifts of absorption and secretion are the subject of integrated regulatory mechanisms, and hence, the input of hormonal, nervous, immune, and dietary signals is reviewed. Finally, the utilization of energy for transport processes in the developing intestine is highlighted, and the interactions between various sources of energy are discussed. The review ends with suggestions concerning possible directions of future research.

  1. Functional polymers for anhydrous proton transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikkannagari, Nagamani

    Anhydrous proton conducting polymers are highly sought after for applications in high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). N-heterocycles (eg. imidazole, triazole, and benzimidazole), owing to their amphoteric nature, have been widely studied to develop efficient anhydrous proton transporting polymers. The proton conductivity of N-heterocyclic polymers is influenced by several factors and the design and development of polymers with a delicate balance among various synergistic and competing factors to provide appreciable proton conductivities has been a challenging task. In this thesis, the proton transport (PT) characteristics of polymers functionalized with two diverse classes of functional groups--- N-heterocycles and phenols have been investigated and efforts have been made to develop the molecular design criteria for the design and development of efficient proton transporting functional groups and polymers. The proton conduction pathway in 1H-1,2,3-triazole polymers is probed by employing structurally analogous N-heterocyclic (triazole, imidazole, and pyrazole) and benz-N-heterocyclic (benzotriazole, benzimidazole, and benzopyrazole) polymers. Imidazole-like pathway was found to dominate the proton conductivity of triazole and pyrazole-like pathway makes only a negligible contribution, if any. Polymers containing benz-N-heterocycles exhibited higher proton conductivity than those with the corresponding N-heterocycles. Pyrazole-like functional groups, i.e. the molecules with two nitrogen atoms adjacent to each other, were found not to be good candidates for PT applications. A new class of proton transporting functional groups, phenols, has been introduced for anhydrous PT. One of the highlighting features of phenols over N-heterocycles is that the hydrogen bond donor/acceptor reorientation can happen on a single -OH site, allowing for facile reorientational dynamics in Grotthuss PT and enhanced proton conductivities in phenolic polymers

  2. Functionalization mediates heat transport in graphene nanoflakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Haoxue; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Nan; Samani, Majid Kabiri; Ni, Yuxiang; Mijbil, Zainelabideen Y.; Edwards, Michael; Xiong, Shiyun; Sääskilahti, Kimmo; Murugesan, Murali; Fu, Yifeng; Ye, Lilei; Sadeghi, Hatef; Bailey, Steven; Kosevich, Yuriy A.; Lambert, Colin J.; Liu, Johan; Volz, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    The high thermal conductivity of graphene and few-layer graphene undergoes severe degradations through contact with the substrate. Here we show experimentally that the thermal management of a micro heater is substantially improved by introducing alternative heat-escaping channels into a graphene-based film bonded to functionalized graphene oxide through amino-silane molecules. Using a resistance temperature probe for in situ monitoring we demonstrate that the hotspot temperature was lowered by ~28 °C for a chip operating at 1,300 W cm-2. Thermal resistance probed by pulsed photothermal reflectance measurements demonstrated an improved thermal coupling due to functionalization on the graphene-graphene oxide interface. Three functionalization molecules manifest distinct interfacial thermal transport behaviour, corroborating our atomistic calculations in unveiling the role of molecular chain length and functional groups. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the functionalization constrains the cross-plane phonon scattering, which in turn enhances in-plane heat conduction of the bonded graphene film by recovering the long flexural phonon lifetime.

  3. Functionalization mediates heat transport in graphene nanoflakes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Haoxue; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Nan; Samani, Majid Kabiri; Ni, Yuxiang; Mijbil, Zainelabideen Y.; Edwards, Michael; Xiong, Shiyun; Sääskilahti, Kimmo; Murugesan, Murali; Fu, Yifeng; Ye, Lilei; Sadeghi, Hatef; Bailey, Steven; Kosevich, Yuriy A.; Lambert, Colin J.; Liu, Johan; Volz, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    The high thermal conductivity of graphene and few-layer graphene undergoes severe degradations through contact with the substrate. Here we show experimentally that the thermal management of a micro heater is substantially improved by introducing alternative heat-escaping channels into a graphene-based film bonded to functionalized graphene oxide through amino-silane molecules. Using a resistance temperature probe for in situ monitoring we demonstrate that the hotspot temperature was lowered by ∼28 °C for a chip operating at 1,300 W cm−2. Thermal resistance probed by pulsed photothermal reflectance measurements demonstrated an improved thermal coupling due to functionalization on the graphene–graphene oxide interface. Three functionalization molecules manifest distinct interfacial thermal transport behaviour, corroborating our atomistic calculations in unveiling the role of molecular chain length and functional groups. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the functionalization constrains the cross-plane phonon scattering, which in turn enhances in-plane heat conduction of the bonded graphene film by recovering the long flexural phonon lifetime. PMID:27125636

  4. Nephrocystins and MKS proteins interact with IFT particle and facilitate transport of selected ciliary cargos.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chengtian; Malicki, Jarema

    2011-05-20

    Cilia are required for the development and function of many organs. Efficient transport of protein cargo along ciliary axoneme is necessary to sustain these processes. Despite its importance, the mode of interaction between the intraflagellar ciliary transport (IFT) mechanism and its cargo proteins remains poorly understood. Our studies demonstrate that IFT particle components, and a Meckel-Gruber syndrome 1 (MKS1)-related, B9 domain protein, B9d2, bind each other and contribute to the ciliary localization of Inversin (Nephrocystin 2). B9d2, Inversin, and Nephrocystin 5 support, in turn, the transport of a cargo protein, Opsin, but not another photoreceptor ciliary transmembrane protein, Peripherin. Interestingly, the components of this mechanism also contribute to the formation of planar cell polarity in mechanosensory epithelia. These studies reveal a molecular mechanism that mediates the transport of selected ciliary cargos and is of fundamental importance for the differentiation and survival of sensory cells.

  5. Evaluating the function of putative hormone transporters

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Burkhard; Murphy, Angus S

    2009-01-01

    Hormones typically serve as long distance signaling molecules. To reach their site of action, hormones need to be transported from the sites of synthesis. Many plant hormones are mobile, thus requiring specific transport systems for the export from their source cells as well as subsequent import into target cells. Hormone transport in general is still poorly understood. Auxin is probably the most intensively studied plant hormone concerning transport in the moment. To advance our understanding of hormone transport we need two principal data sets: information on the properties of the transport systems including substrate specificity and kinetics, and we need to identify candidate genes for the respective transporters. Physiological transport data can provide an important basis for identifying and characterizing candidate transporters and to define their in vivo role. A recent publication in Plant Physiology highlights how kinetic and specificity studies may help to identify cytokinin transporters.1 PMID:19649195

  6. Evaluating the function of putative hormone transporters.

    PubMed

    Frommer, Wolf B; Schulz, Burkhard; Murphy, Angus S

    2009-02-01

    Hormones typically serve as long distance signaling molecules. To reach their site of action, hormones need to be transported from the sites of synthesis. Many plant hormones are mobile, thus requiring specific transport systems for the export from their source cells as well as subsequent import into target cells. Hormone transport in general is still poorly understood. Auxin is probably the most intensively studied plant hormone concerning transport in the moment. To advance our understanding of hormone transport we need two principal data sets: information on the properties of the transport systems including substrate specificity and kinetics, and we need to identify candidate genes for the respective transporters. Physiological transport data can provide an important basis for identifying and characterizing candidate transporters and to define their in vivo role. A recent publication in Plant Physiology highlights how kinetic and specificity studies may help to identify cytokinin transporters.

  7. Functional characterization of a eukaryotic melibiose transporter.

    PubMed

    Lingner, Ulrike; Münch, Steffen; Sode, Björn; Deising, Holger B; Sauer, Norbert

    2011-07-01

    Pathogenic fungi drastically affect plant health and cause significant losses in crop yield and quality. In spite of their impact, little is known about the carbon sources used by these fungi in planta and about the fungal transporters importing sugars from the plant-fungus interface. Here, we report on the identification and characterization of MELIBIOSE TRANSPORTER1 (MBT1) from the hemibiotrophic fungus Colletotrichum graminicola (teleomorph Glomerella graminicola), the causal agent of leaf anthracnose and stalk rot disease in maize (Zea mays). Functional characterization of the MBT1 protein in baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) expressing the MBT1 cDNA revealed that α-D-galactopyranosyl compounds such as melibiose, galactinol, and raffinose are substrates of MBT1, with melibiose most likely being the preferred substrate. α-D-glucopyranosyl disaccharides like trehalose, isomaltose, or maltose are also accepted by MBT1, although with lower affinities. The MBT1 gene shows low and comparable expression levels in axenically grown C. graminicola and upon infection of maize leaves both during the initial biotrophic development of the fungus and during the subsequent necrotrophic phase. Despite these low levels of MBT1 expression, the MBT1 protein allows efficient growth of C. graminicola on melibiose as sole carbon source in axenic cultures. Although Δmbt1 mutants are unable to grow on melibiose, they do not show virulence defects on maize.

  8. Functions and transport of silicon in plants.

    PubMed

    Ma, J F; Yamaji, N

    2008-10-01

    Silicon exerts beneficial effects on plant growth and production by alleviating both biotic and abiotic stresses including diseases, pests, lodging, drought, and nutrient imbalance. Recently, two genes (Lsi1 and Lsi2) encoding Si transporters have been identified from rice. Lsi1 (low silicon 1) belongs to a Nod26-like major intrinsic protein subfamily in aquaporin, while Lsi2 encodes a putative anion transporter. Lsi1 is localized on the distal side of both exodermis and endodermis in rice roots, while Lsi2 is localized on the proximal side of the same cells. Lsi1 shows influx transport activity for Si, while Lsi2 shows efflux transport activity. Therefore, Lsi1 is responsible for transport of Si from the external solution to the root cells, whereas Lsi2 is an efflux transporter responsible for the transport of Si from the root cells to the apoplast. Coupling of Lsi1 with Lsi2 is required for efficient uptake of Si in rice.

  9. A Functional-Phylogenetic Classification System for Transmembrane Solute Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Saier, Milton H.

    2000-01-01

    A comprehensive classification system for transmembrane molecular transporters has been developed and recently approved by the transport panel of the nomenclature committee of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. This system is based on (i) transporter class and subclass (mode of transport and energy coupling mechanism), (ii) protein phylogenetic family and subfamily, and (iii) substrate specificity. Almost all of the more than 250 identified families of transporters include members that function exclusively in transport. Channels (115 families), secondary active transporters (uniporters, symporters, and antiporters) (78 families), primary active transporters (23 families), group translocators (6 families), and transport proteins of ill-defined function or of unknown mechanism (51 families) constitute distinct categories. Transport mode and energy coupling prove to be relatively immutable characteristics and therefore provide primary bases for classification. Phylogenetic grouping reflects structure, function, mechanism, and often substrate specificity and therefore provides a reliable secondary basis for classification. Substrate specificity and polarity of transport prove to be more readily altered during evolutionary history and therefore provide a tertiary basis for classification. With very few exceptions, a phylogenetic family of transporters includes members that function by a single transport mode and energy coupling mechanism, although a variety of substrates may be transported, sometimes with either inwardly or outwardly directed polarity. In this review, I provide cross-referencing of well-characterized constituent transporters according to (i) transport mode, (ii) energy coupling mechanism, (iii) phylogenetic grouping, and (iv) substrates transported. The structural features and distribution of recognized family members throughout the living world are also evaluated. The tabulations should facilitate familial and functional

  10. Facilitative plasma membrane transporters function during ER transit

    PubMed Central

    Takanaga, Hitomi; Frommer, Wolf B.

    2010-01-01

    Although biochemical studies suggested a high permeability of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane for small molecules, proteomics identified few specialized ER transporters. To test functionality of transporters during ER passage, we tested whether glucose transporters (GLUTs, SGLTs) destined for the plasma membrane are active during ER transit. HepG2 cells were characterized by low-affinity ER transport activity, suggesting that ER uptake is protein mediated. The much-reduced capacity of HEK293T cells to take up glucose across the plasma membrane correlated with low ER transport. Ectopic expression of GLUT1, -2, -4, or -9 induced GLUT isoform-specific ER transport activity in HEK293T cells. In contrast, the Na+-glucose cotransporter SGLT1 mediated efficient plasma membrane glucose transport but no detectable ER uptake, probably because of lack of a sufficient sodium gradient across the ER membrane. In conclusion, we demonstrate that GLUTs are sufficient for mediating ER glucose transport en route to the plasma membrane. Because of the low volume of the ER, trace amounts of these uniporters contribute to ER solute import during ER transit, while uniporters and cation-coupled transporters carry out export from the ER, together potentially explaining the low selectivity of ER transport. Expression levels and residence time of transporters in the ER, as well as their coupling mechanisms, could be key determinants of ER permeability.—Takanaga, H., Frommer, W. B. Facilitative plasma membrane transporters function during ER transit. PMID:20354141

  11. Control of machine functions or transport systems

    SciTech Connect

    Woodley, M.D.; Lee, M.J.; Jaeger, J.; King, A.S.

    1983-01-01

    A computer code, COMFORT, has been developed at SLAC for on-line calculation of the strengths of magnetic elements in an electron storage ring or transport beam line, subject to first order fitting constraints on the ring or beam line parameters. This code can also be used off-line as an interactive lattice or beam line design tool.

  12. Hedgehog Signaling Regulates the Ciliary Transport of Odorant Receptors in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Gonzalo M; Alkhori, Liza; Hatano, Eduardo; Schultz, Sebastian W; Kuzhandaivel, Anujaianthi; Jafari, Shadi; Granseth, Björn; Alenius, Mattias

    2016-01-26

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is a key regulatory pathway during development and also has a functional role in mature neurons. Here, we show that Hh signaling regulates the odor response in adult Drosophila olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). We demonstrate that this is achieved by regulating odorant receptor (OR) transport to and within the primary cilium in OSN neurons. Regulation relies on ciliary localization of the Hh signal transducer Smoothened (Smo). We further demonstrate that the Hh- and Smo-dependent regulation of the kinesin-like protein Cos2 acts in parallel to the intraflagellar transport system (IFT) to localize ORs within the cilium compartment. These findings expand our knowledge of Hh signaling to encompass chemosensory modulation and receptor trafficking.

  13. Xenobiotic, Bile Acid, and Cholesterol Transporters: Function and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Aleksunes, Lauren M.

    2010-01-01

    factors that influence transporter expression and function, including transcriptional activation and post-translational modifications as well as subcellular trafficking. Sex differences, ontogeny, and pharmacological and toxicological regulation of transporters are also addressed. Transporters are important transmembrane proteins that mediate the cellular entry and exit of a wide range of substrates throughout the body and thereby play important roles in human physiology, pharmacology, pathology, and toxicology. PMID:20103563

  14. Scallop DMT functions as a Ca2+ transporter.

    PubMed

    Toyohara, Haruhiko; Yamamoto, Sayuri; Hosoi, Masatomi; Takagi, Masaya; Hayashi, Isao; Nakao, Kenji; Kaneko, Shuji

    2005-05-09

    We identified a DMT (divalent metal transporter) homologous protein that functions as a Ca(2+) transporter. Scallop DMT cDNA encodes a 539-amino-acid protein with 12 putative membrane-spanning domains and has a consensus transport motif in the fourth extracellular loop. Since its mRNA is significantly expressed in the gill and intestine, it is assumed that scallop DMT transports Ca(2+) from seawater by the gill and from food by the intestine. Scallop DMT lacks the iron-responsive element commonly found in iron-regulatory proteins, suggesting that it is free of the post-transcriptional regulation from intracellular Fe(2+) concentration. Scallop DMT distinctly functions as a Ca(2+) transporter unlike other DMTs, however, it also transports Fe(2+) and Cd(2+) similar to them.

  15. Functional Characterization of Pneumocystis carinii Inositol Transporter 1.

    PubMed

    Cushion, Melanie T; Collins, Margaret S; Sesterhenn, Thomas; Porollo, Aleksey; Vadukoot, Anish Kizhakkekkara; Merino, Edward J

    2016-12-13

    Fungi in the genus Pneumocystis live in the lungs of mammals, where they can cause a fatal pneumonia (PCP [Pneumocystis pneumonia]) in hosts with compromised immune systems. The absence of a continuous in vitro culture system for any species of Pneumocystis has led to limited understanding of these fungi, especially for the discovery of new therapies. We recently reported that Pneumocystis carinii, Pneumocystis murina, and most significantly, Pneumocystis jirovecii lack both enzymes necessary for myo-inositol biosynthesis but contain genes with homologies to fungal myo-inositol transporters. Since myo-inositol is essential for eukaryotic viability, the primary transporter, ITR1, was functionally and structurally characterized in P. carinii The predicted structure of P. carinii ITR1 (PcITR1) contained 12 transmembrane alpha-helices with intracellular C and N termini, consistent with other inositol transporters. The apparent Km was 0.94 ± 0.08 (mean ± standard deviation), suggesting that myo-inositol transport in P. carinii is likely through a low-affinity, highly selective transport system, as no other sugars or inositol stereoisomers were significant competitive inhibitors. Glucose transport was shown to use a different transport system. The myo-inositol transport was distinct from mammalian transporters, as it was not sodium dependent and was cytochalasin B resistant. Inositol transport in these fungi offers an attractive new drug target because of the reliance of the fungi on its transport, clear differences between the mammalian and fungal transporters, and the ability of the host to both synthesize and transport this critical nutrient, predicting low toxicity of potential inhibitors to the fungal transporter. myo-Inositol is a sugarlike nutrient that is essential for life in most organisms. Humans and microbes alike can obtain it by making it, which involves only 2 enzymes, by taking it from the environment by a transport process, or by recycling it from

  16. Facilitative plasma membrane transporters function during ER transit.

    PubMed

    Takanaga, Hitomi; Frommer, Wolf B

    2010-08-01

    Although biochemical studies suggested a high permeability of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane for small molecules, proteomics identified few specialized ER transporters. To test functionality of transporters during ER passage, we tested whether glucose transporters (GLUTs, SGLTs) destined for the plasma membrane are active during ER transit. HepG2 cells were characterized by low-affinity ER transport activity, suggesting that ER uptake is protein mediated. The much-reduced capacity of HEK293T cells to take up glucose across the plasma membrane correlated with low ER transport. Ectopic expression of GLUT1, -2, -4, or -9 induced GLUT isoform-specific ER transport activity in HEK293T cells. In contrast, the Na(+)-glucose cotransporter SGLT1 mediated efficient plasma membrane glucose transport but no detectable ER uptake, probably because of lack of a sufficient sodium gradient across the ER membrane. In conclusion, we demonstrate that GLUTs are sufficient for mediating ER glucose transport en route to the plasma membrane. Because of the low volume of the ER, trace amounts of these uniporters contribute to ER solute import during ER transit, while uniporters and cation-coupled transporters carry out export from the ER, together potentially explaining the low selectivity of ER transport. Expression levels and residence time of transporters in the ER, as well as their coupling mechanisms, could be key determinants of ER permeability.

  17. Plant Intracellular Transport: Tracing Functions of the Retrograde Kinesin.

    PubMed

    Müller, Sabine

    2015-09-21

    Adding to its varied repertoire of functions in cell morphogenesis and cell division, a molecular motor protein of the kinesin-14 class has recently been implicated in rapid retrograde transport along cellular tracks in moss.

  18. Thermodynamics of Ionic Transport through Functionalized Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathee, Vikramjit; Qu, Siyi; Dilenschneider, Theodore; Phillip, William A.; Whitmer, Jonathan K.

    Through microphase separation of block copolymers, highly porous solid membranes may be assembled. Further functionalization with amine and sulfonic acid groups has demonstrated promise in exquisitely controlling the flux of charged species, and in particular multivalent ions. Using coarse-grained molecular simulations, we explore the essential thermodynamics underlying salt rejection in charge-functionalized membranes, and develop a model capable of linking the performance of these membranes to their molecular character through free energy calculations.

  19. Functional Characterization of Pneumocystis carinii Inositol Transporter 1

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Margaret S.; Sesterhenn, Thomas; Porollo, Aleksey; Vadukoot, Anish Kizhakkekkara; Merino, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fungi in the genus Pneumocystis live in the lungs of mammals, where they can cause a fatal pneumonia (PCP [Pneumocystis pneumonia]) in hosts with compromised immune systems. The absence of a continuous in vitro culture system for any species of Pneumocystis has led to limited understanding of these fungi, especially for the discovery of new therapies. We recently reported that Pneumocystis carinii, Pneumocystis murina, and most significantly, Pneumocystis jirovecii lack both enzymes necessary for myo-inositol biosynthesis but contain genes with homologies to fungal myo-inositol transporters. Since myo-inositol is essential for eukaryotic viability, the primary transporter, ITR1, was functionally and structurally characterized in P. carinii. The predicted structure of P. carinii ITR1 (PcITR1) contained 12 transmembrane alpha-helices with intracellular C and N termini, consistent with other inositol transporters. The apparent Km was 0.94 ± 0.08 (mean ± standard deviation), suggesting that myo-inositol transport in P. carinii is likely through a low-affinity, highly selective transport system, as no other sugars or inositol stereoisomers were significant competitive inhibitors. Glucose transport was shown to use a different transport system. The myo-inositol transport was distinct from mammalian transporters, as it was not sodium dependent and was cytochalasin B resistant. Inositol transport in these fungi offers an attractive new drug target because of the reliance of the fungi on its transport, clear differences between the mammalian and fungal transporters, and the ability of the host to both synthesize and transport this critical nutrient, predicting low toxicity of potential inhibitors to the fungal transporter. PMID:27965450

  20. Role of glutathione transport processes in kidney function

    SciTech Connect

    Lash, Lawrence H. . E-mail: l.h.lash@wayne.edu

    2005-05-01

    The kidneys are highly dependent on an adequate supply of glutathione (GSH) to maintain normal function. This is due, in part, to high rates of aerobic metabolism, particularly in the proximal tubules. Additionally, the kidneys are potentially exposed to high concentrations of oxidants and reactive electrophiles. Renal cellular concentrations of GSH are maintained by both intracellular synthesis and transport from outside the cell. Although function of specific carriers has not been definitively demonstrated, it is likely that multiple carriers are responsible for plasma membrane transport of GSH. Data suggest that the organic anion transporters OAT1 and OAT3 and the sodium-dicarboxylate 2 exchanger (SDCT2 or NaDC3) mediate uptake across the basolateral plasma membrane (BLM) and that the organic anion transporting polypeptide OATP1 and at least one of the multidrug resistance proteins mediate efflux across the brush-border plasma membrane (BBM). BLM transport may be used pharmacologically to provide renal proximal tubular cells with exogenous GSH to protect against oxidative stress whereas BBM transport functions physiologically in turnover of cellular GSH. The mitochondrial GSH pool is derived from cytoplasmic GSH by transport into the mitochondrial matrix and is mediated by the dicarboxylate and 2-oxoglutarate exchangers. Maintenance of the mitochondrial GSH pool is critical for cellular and mitochondrial redox homeostasis and is important in determining susceptibility to chemically induced apoptosis. Hence, membrane transport processes are critical to regulation of renal cellular and subcellular GSH pools and are determinants of susceptibility to cytotoxicity induced by oxidants and electrophiles.

  1. Peroxisomal ABC transporters: structure, function and role in disease.

    PubMed

    Morita, Masashi; Imanaka, Tsuneo

    2012-09-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters belong to one of the largest families of membrane proteins, and are present in almost all living organisms from eubacteria to mammals. They exist on plasma membranes and intracellular compartments such as the mitochondria, peroxisomes, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus and lysosomes, and mediate the active transport of a wide variety of substrates in a variety of different cellular processes. These include the transport of amino acids, polysaccharides, peptides, lipids and xenobiotics, including drugs and toxins. Three ABC transporters belonging to subfamily D have been identified in mammalian peroxisomes. The ABC transporters are half-size and assemble mostly as a homodimer after posttranslational transport to peroxisomal membranes. ABCD1/ALDP and ABCD2/ALDRP are suggested to be involved in the transport of very long chain acyl-CoA with differences in substrate specificity, and ABCD3/PMP70 is involved in the transport of long and branched chain acyl-CoA. ABCD1 is known to be responsible for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD), an inborn error of peroxisomal β-oxidation of very long chain fatty acids. Here, we summarize recent advances and important points in our advancing understanding of how these ABC transporters target and assemble to peroxisomal membranes and perform their functions in physiological and pathological processes, including the neurodegenerative disease, X-ALD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Identifying the molecular functions of electron transport proteins using radial basis function networks and biochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Le, Nguyen-Quoc-Khanh; Nguyen, Trinh-Trung-Duong; Ou, Yu-Yen

    2017-05-01

    The electron transport proteins have an important role in storing and transferring electrons in cellular respiration, which is the most proficient process through which cells gather energy from consumed food. According to the molecular functions, the electron transport chain components could be formed with five complexes with several different electron carriers and functions. Therefore, identifying the molecular functions in the electron transport chain is vital for helping biologists understand the electron transport chain process and energy production in cells. This work includes two phases for discriminating electron transport proteins from transport proteins and classifying categories of five complexes in electron transport proteins. In the first phase, the performances from PSSM with AAIndex feature set were successful in identifying electron transport proteins in transport proteins with achieved sensitivity of 73.2%, specificity of 94.1%, and accuracy of 91.3%, with MCC of 0.64 for independent data set. With the second phase, our method can approach a precise model for identifying of five complexes with different molecular functions in electron transport proteins. The PSSM with AAIndex properties in five complexes achieved MCC of 0.51, 0.47, 0.42, 0.74, and 1.00 for independent data set, respectively. We suggest that our study could be a power model for determining new proteins that belongs into which molecular function of electron transport proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Functional interaction between autophagy and ciliogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pampliega, Olatz; Orhon, Idil; Patel, Bindi; Sridhar, Sunandini; Díaz-Carretero, Antonio; Beau, Isabelle; Codogno, Patrice; Satir, Birgit; Satir, Peter; Cuervo, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    Summary Nutrient deprivation is a stimulus shared by both autophagy and the formation of primary cilia. The recently discovered role of primary cilia in nutrient sensing and signaling motivated us to explore the possible functional interactions between this signaling hub and autophagy. Here we show that part of the molecular machinery involved in ciliogenesis also participates in the early steps of the autophagic process. Signaling from the cilia, such as that from the Hedgehog pathway, induces autophagy by acting directly on essential autophagy-related proteins strategically located in the base of the cilium by ciliary trafficking proteins. While abrogation of ciliogenesis partially inhibits autophagy, blockage of autophagy enhances primary cilia growth and cilia-associated signaling during normal nutritional conditions. We propose that basal autophagy regulates ciliary growth through the degradation of proteins required for intraflagellar transport. Compromised ability to activate the autophagic response may underlie the basis of some common ciliopathies. PMID:24089209

  4. Functional interaction between autophagy and ciliogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pampliega, Olatz; Orhon, Idil; Patel, Bindi; Sridhar, Sunandini; Díaz-Carretero, Antonio; Beau, Isabelle; Codogno, Patrice; Satir, Birgit H; Satir, Peter; Cuervo, Ana Maria

    2013-10-10

    Nutrient deprivation is a stimulus shared by both autophagy and the formation of primary cilia. The recently discovered role of primary cilia in nutrient sensing and signalling motivated us to explore the possible functional interactions between this signalling hub and autophagy. Here we show that part of the molecular machinery involved in ciliogenesis also participates in the early steps of the autophagic process. Signalling from the cilia, such as that from the Hedgehog pathway, induces autophagy by acting directly on essential autophagy-related proteins strategically located in the base of the cilium by ciliary trafficking proteins. Whereas abrogation of ciliogenesis partially inhibits autophagy, blockage of autophagy enhances primary cilia growth and cilia-associated signalling during normal nutritional conditions. We propose that basal autophagy regulates ciliary growth through the degradation of proteins required for intraflagellar transport. Compromised ability to activate the autophagic response may underlie some common ciliopathies.

  5. Effects of benthos on sediment transport: difficulties with functional grouping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jumars, P. A.; Nowell, A. R. M.

    No consistent functional grouping of organisms as stabilizers vs destabilizers, respectively decreasing or enhancing erodibility, is possible. Benthic organisms can affect erodibility in particular—and sediment transport in general—via alternation (1) of fluid momentum impinging on the bed, (2) of particle exposure to the flow, (3) of adhesion between particles, and (4) of particle momentum. The net effects of a species or individual on erosion and deposition thresholds or on transport rates are not in general predictable from extant data. Furthermore, they depend upon the context of flow conditions, bed configuration, and community composition into which the organism is set. Separation of organism effects into these four categories does, however, allow their explicit incorporation into DuBoys-type and stochastic sediment dynamic models already in use and thus permits the specification of parameters whose measurement will enhance predictability of sediment transport modes and rates in natural, organism-influenced, marine settings. If the variable of prime concern is the total amount of sediment transported, rather than the frequency of transport events or the spatial pattern of erosion and eposition, and if most transport occurs in rare but intense bouts (e.g., winter storms on boreal continental shelves), then it may be possible to ignore organism effects without major sacrifices in accuracy or precision. Under high transport rates, suspended load effects override organism-produced bottom roughness, abrasion removes adhesives from transporting grains, and transport rates (normalized per unit width of the channel or bed) exceed feeding and pelletization rates. Moreover, at high rates most material transports as suspended load, effectively out of reach of the benthos. The transport rates at which organism effects are overridden, however, remain to be determined. For lower transport rates, foraging theory promises to provide insights into organism effects.

  6. Transportation functions of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System

    SciTech Connect

    Shappert, L.B.; Attaway, C.R.; Pope, R.B. ); Best, R.E.; Danese, F.L. ); Dixon, L.D. , Martinez, GA ); Jones, R.H. , Los Gatos, CA ); Klimas, M.J. ); Peterson, R.W

    1992-03-01

    Within the framework of Public Law 97.425 and provisions specified in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10 Part 961, the US Department of Energy has the responsibility to accept and transport spent fuel and high-level waste from various organizations which have entered into a contract with the federal government in a manner that protects the health and safety of the public and workers. In implementing these requirements, the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) has, among other things, supported the identification of functions that must be performed by a transportation system (TS) that will accept the waste for transport to a federal facility for storage and/or disposal. This document, through the application of system engineering principles, identifies the functions that must be performed to transport waste under this law.

  7. Functional droplets that recognize, collect, and transport debris on surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Ying; Chang, Chia-Chih; Choudhary, Umesh; Bolukbasi, Irem; Crosby, Alfred J.; Emrick, Todd

    2016-01-01

    We describe polymer-stabilized droplets capable of recognizing and picking up nanoparticles from substrates in experiments designed for transporting hydroxyapatite nanoparticles that represent the principal elemental composition of bone. Our experiments, which are inspired by cells that carry out materials transport in vivo, used oil-in-water droplets that traverse a nanoparticle-coated substrate driven by an imposed fluid flow. Nanoparticle capture is realized by interaction of the particles with chemical functionality embedded within the polymeric stabilizing layer on the droplets. Nanoparticle uptake efficiency is controlled by solution conditions and the extent of functionality available for contact with the nanoparticles. Moreover, in an elementary demonstration of nanoparticle transportation, particles retrieved initially from the substrate were later deposited “downstream,” illustrating a pickup and drop-off technique that represents a first step toward mimicking point-to-point transportation events conducted in living systems. PMID:27819054

  8. Structure and Function of SLC4 Family HCO3- Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Yang, Jichun; Chen, Li-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The solute carrier SLC4 family consists of 10 members, nine of which are HCO3- transporters, including three Na+-independent Cl−/HCO3- exchangers AE1, AE2, and AE3, five Na+-coupled HCO3- transporters NBCe1, NBCe2, NBCn1, NBCn2, and NDCBE, as well as “AE4” whose Na+-dependence remains controversial. The SLC4 HCO3- transporters play critical roles in pH regulation and transepithelial movement of electrolytes with a broad range of demonstrated physiological relevances. Dysfunctions of these transporters are associated with a series of human diseases. During the past decades, tremendous amount of effort has been undertaken to investigate the topological organization of the SLC4 transporters in the plasma membrane. Based upon the proposed topology models, mutational and functional studies have identified important structural elements likely involved in the ion translocation by the SLC4 transporters. In the present article, we review the advances during the past decades in understanding the structure and function of the SLC4 transporters. PMID:26648873

  9. Thyroid hormone transporters--functions and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Juan; Guadaño-Ferraz, Ana; Morte, Beatriz

    2015-07-01

    The cellular influx and efflux of thyroid hormones are facilitated by transmembrane protein transporters. Of these transporters, monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) is the only one specific for the transport of thyroid hormones and some of their derivatives. Mutations in SLC16A2, the gene that encodes MCT8, lead to an X-linked syndrome with severe neurological impairment and altered concentrations of thyroid hormones. Histopathological analysis of brain tissue from patients who have impaired MCT8 function indicates that brain lesions start prenatally, and are most probably the result of cerebral hypothyroidism. A Slc16a2 knockout mouse model has revealed that Mct8 is an important mediator of thyroid hormone transport, especially T3, through the blood-brain barrier. However, unlike humans with an MCT8 deficiency, these mice do not have neurological impairment. One explanation for this discrepancy could be differences in expression of the T4 transporter OATP1C1 in the blood-brain barrier; OATP1C1 is more abundant in rodents than in primates and permits the passage of T4 in the absence of T3 transport, thus preventing full cerebral hypothyroidism. In this Review, we discuss the relevance of thyroid hormone transporters in health and disease, with a particular focus on the pathophysiology of MCT8 mutations.

  10. Functional analysis of an individual IFT protein: IFT46 is required for transport of outer dynein arms into flagella.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yuqing; Qin, Hongmin; Follit, John A; Pazour, Gregory J; Rosenbaum, Joel L; Witman, George B

    2007-02-26

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT), which is the bidirectional movement of particles within flagella, is required for flagellar assembly. IFT particles are composed of approximately 16 proteins, which are organized into complexes A and B. We have cloned Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and mouse IFT46, and show that IFT46 is a highly conserved complex B protein in both organisms. A C. reinhardtii insertional mutant null for IFT46 has short, paralyzed flagella lacking dynein arms and with central pair defects. The mutant has greatly reduced levels of most complex B proteins, indicating that IFT46 is necessary for complex B stability. A partial suppressor mutation restores flagellar length to the ift46 mutant. IFT46 is still absent, but levels of the other IFT particle proteins are largely restored, indicating that complex B is stabilized in the suppressed strain. Axonemal ultrastructure is restored, except that the outer arms are still missing, although outer arm subunits are present in the cytoplasm. Thus, IFT46 is specifically required for transporting outer arms into the flagellum.

  11. Methamphetamine self-administration acutely decreases monoaminergic transporter function.

    PubMed

    McFadden, Lisa M; Stout, Kristen A; Vieira-Brock, Paula L; Allen, Scott C; Nielsen, Shannon M; Wilkins, Diana G; Hanson, Glen R; Fleckenstein, Annette E

    2012-03-01

    Numerous preclinical studies have demonstrated that noncontingent methamphetamine (METH) administration rapidly decreases both dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) and vesicular monoamine-2 transporter (VMAT-2) function. Because of the importance of transporter function to the abuse and neurotoxic liabilities of METH, and previous research indicating that the effects of noncontingent METH treatment do not necessarily predict effects of contingent exposure, the present study examined the acute impact of METH self-administration on these transporters. Results revealed that five days of METH self-administration (4 h/session; 0.06 mg/infusion) decreased DAT and VMAT-2 activity, as assessed in synaptosomes and vesicles, respectively, prepared from striatal tissue 1 h after the final self-administration session. METH self-administration increased core body temperatures as well. Brain METH and amphetamine (AMPH) levels, assessed 1 h after the final self-administration session, were approximately twice greater in high-pressing rats compared to low-pressing rats despite similar changes in DAT function. In conclusion, the present manuscript is the first to describe transporter function and METH/AMPH levels after self-administration in rodents. These data provide a foundation to investigate complex questions including how the response of dopaminergic systems to METH self-administration contributes to contingent-related processes such as dependence.

  12. Methamphetamine Self-Administration Acutely Decreases Monoaminergic Transporter Function

    PubMed Central

    McFadden, Lisa M.; Stout, Kristen A.; Vieira-Brock, Paula L.; Allen, Scott C.; Nielsen, Shannon M.; Wilkins, Diana G.; Hanson, Glen R.; Fleckenstein, Annette E.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous pre-clinical studies have demonstrated that non-contingent methamphetamine (METH) administration rapidly decreases both dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) and vesicular monoamine-2 transporter (VMAT-2) function. Because of the importance of transporter function to the abuse and neurotoxic liabilities of METH, and previous research indicating that the effects of non-contingent METH treatment do not necessarily predict effects of contingent exposure, the present study examined the acute impact of METH self-administration on these transporters. Results revealed that five days of METH self-administration (4 h/session; 0.06 mg/infusion) decreased DAT and VMAT-2 activity, as assessed in synaptosomes and vesicles, respectively, prepared from striatal tissue 1 h after the final self-administration session. METH self-administration increased core body temperatures as well. Brain METH and amphetamine (AMPH) levels, assessed 1 h after the final self-administration session, were approximately twice greater in high-pressing rats compared to low-pressing rats despite similar changes in DAT function. In conclusion, the present manuscript is the first to describe transporter function and METH/AMPH levels after self-administration in rodents. These data provide a foundation to investigate complex questions including how the response of dopaminergic systems to METH self-administration contributes to contingent-related processes such as dependence. PMID:22120988

  13. Co-existence of Functionally Different Vesicular Neurotransmitter Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Münster-Wandowski, Agnieszka; Zander, Johannes-Friedrich; Richter, Karin; Ahnert-Hilger, Gudrun

    2016-01-01

    The vesicular transmitter transporters VGLUT, VGAT, VMAT2 and VAChT, define phenotype and physiological properties of neuronal subtypes. VGLUTs concentrate the excitatory amino acid glutamate, VGAT the inhibitory amino acid GABA, VMAT2 monoamines, and VAChT acetylcholine (ACh) into synaptic vesicle (SV). Following membrane depolarization SV release their content into the synaptic cleft. A strict segregation of vesicular transporters is mandatory for the precise functioning of synaptic communication and of neuronal circuits. In the last years, evidence accumulates that subsets of neurons express more than one of these transporters leading to synaptic co-release of different and functionally opposing transmitters and modulation of synaptic plasticity. Synaptic co-existence of transporters may change during pathological scenarios in order to ameliorate misbalances in neuronal activity. In addition, evidence increases that transporters also co-exist on the same vesicle providing another layer of regulation. Generally, vesicular transmitter loading relies on an electrochemical gradient ΔμH+ driven by the proton ATPase rendering the lumen of the vesicle with respect to the cytosol positive (Δψ) and acidic (ΔpH). While the activity of VGLUT mainly depends on the Δψ component, VMAT, VGAT and VAChT work best at a high ΔpH. Thus, a vesicular synergy of transporters depending on the combination may increase or decrease the filling of SV with the principal transmitter. We provide an overview on synaptic co-existence of vesicular transmitter transporters including changes in the excitatory/inhibitory balance under pathological conditions. Additionally, we discuss functional aspects of vesicular synergy of transmitter transporters. PMID:26909036

  14. Co-existence of Functionally Different Vesicular Neurotransmitter Transporters.

    PubMed

    Münster-Wandowski, Agnieszka; Zander, Johannes-Friedrich; Richter, Karin; Ahnert-Hilger, Gudrun

    2016-01-01

    The vesicular transmitter transporters VGLUT, VGAT, VMAT2 and VAChT, define phenotype and physiological properties of neuronal subtypes. VGLUTs concentrate the excitatory amino acid glutamate, VGAT the inhibitory amino acid GABA, VMAT2 monoamines, and VAChT acetylcholine (ACh) into synaptic vesicle (SV). Following membrane depolarization SV release their content into the synaptic cleft. A strict segregation of vesicular transporters is mandatory for the precise functioning of synaptic communication and of neuronal circuits. In the last years, evidence accumulates that subsets of neurons express more than one of these transporters leading to synaptic co-release of different and functionally opposing transmitters and modulation of synaptic plasticity. Synaptic co-existence of transporters may change during pathological scenarios in order to ameliorate misbalances in neuronal activity. In addition, evidence increases that transporters also co-exist on the same vesicle providing another layer of regulation. Generally, vesicular transmitter loading relies on an electrochemical gradient ΔμH(+) driven by the proton ATPase rendering the lumen of the vesicle with respect to the cytosol positive (Δψ) and acidic (ΔpH). While the activity of VGLUT mainly depends on the Δψ component, VMAT, VGAT and VAChT work best at a high ΔpH. Thus, a vesicular synergy of transporters depending on the combination may increase or decrease the filling of SV with the principal transmitter. We provide an overview on synaptic co-existence of vesicular transmitter transporters including changes in the excitatory/inhibitory balance under pathological conditions. Additionally, we discuss functional aspects of vesicular synergy of transmitter transporters.

  15. Structure and Function of Thyroid Hormone Plasma Membrane Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Ulrich; Johannes, Jörg; Bayer, Dorothea; Braun, Doreen

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) cross the plasma membrane with the help of transporter proteins. As charged amino acid derivatives, TH cannot simply diffuse across a lipid bilayer membrane, despite their notorious hydrophobicity. The identification of monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8, SLC16A2) as a specific and very active TH transporter paved the way to the finding that mutations in the MCT8 gene cause a syndrome of psychomotor retardation in humans. The purpose of this review is to introduce the current model of transmembrane transport and highlight the diversity of TH transmembrane transporters. The interactions of TH with plasma transfer proteins, T3 receptors, and deiodinase are summarized. It is shown that proteins may bind TH owing to their hydrophobic character in hydrophobic cavities and/or by specific polar interaction with the phenolic hydroxyl, the aminopropionic acid moiety, and by weak polar interactions with the iodine atoms. These findings are compared with our understanding of how TH transporters interact with substrate. The presumed effects of mutations in MCT8 on protein folding and transport function are explained in light of the available homology model. PMID:25538896

  16. Structure and function of thyroid hormone plasma membrane transporters.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Ulrich; Johannes, Jörg; Bayer, Dorothea; Braun, Doreen

    2014-09-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) cross the plasma membrane with the help of transporter proteins. As charged amino acid derivatives, TH cannot simply diffuse across a lipid bilayer membrane, despite their notorious hydrophobicity. The identification of monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8, SLC16A2) as a specific and very active TH transporter paved the way to the finding that mutations in the MCT8 gene cause a syndrome of psychomotor retardation in humans. The purpose of this review is to introduce the current model of transmembrane transport and highlight the diversity of TH transmembrane transporters. The interactions of TH with plasma transfer proteins, T3 receptors, and deiodinase are summarized. It is shown that proteins may bind TH owing to their hydrophobic character in hydrophobic cavities and/or by specific polar interaction with the phenolic hydroxyl, the aminopropionic acid moiety, and by weak polar interactions with the iodine atoms. These findings are compared with our understanding of how TH transporters interact with substrate. The presumed effects of mutations in MCT8 on protein folding and transport function are explained in light of the available homology model.

  17. Functional genomics of membrane transporters in human populations.

    PubMed

    Urban, Thomas J; Sebro, Ronnie; Hurowitz, Evan H; Leabman, Maya K; Badagnani, Ilaria; Lagpacan, Leah L; Risch, Neil; Giacomini, Kathleen M

    2006-02-01

    Although considerable progress has been made toward characterizing human DNA sequence variation, there remains a deficiency in information on human phenotypic variation at the single-gene level. We systematically analyzed the function of all protein-altering variants of eleven membrane transporters in heterologous expression systems. Coding-region variants were identified by screening DNA from a large sample (n = 247-276) of ethnically diverse subjects. In total, we functionally analyzed 88 protein-altering variants. Fourteen percent of the polymorphic variants (defined as variants with allele frequencies > or =1% in at least one major ethnic group) had no activity or significantly reduced function. Decreased function variants had significantly lower allele frequencies and were more likely to alter evolutionarily conserved amino acid residues. However, variants at evolutionarily conserved positions with approximately normal activity in cellular assays were also at significantly lower allele frequencies, suggesting that some variants with apparently normal activity in biochemical assays may influence occult functions or quantitative degrees of function that are important in human fitness but not measured in these assays. For example, eight (14%) of the 58 variants for which we had measured the transport of at least two substrates showed substrate-specific defects in transport. These variants and the reduced function variants provide plausible candidates for disease susceptibility or variation in clinical drug response.

  18. Ion transport controlled by nanoparticle-functionalized membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, Edward; McBride, Sean P.; Jaeger, Heinrich M.; Lin, Xiao-Min

    2014-12-01

    From proton exchange membranes in fuel cells to ion channels in biological membranes, the well-specified control of ionic interactions in confined geometries profoundly influences the transport and selectivity of porous materials. Here we outline a versatile new approach to control a membrane’s electrostatic interactions with ions by depositing ligand-coated nanoparticles around the pore entrances. Leveraging the flexibility and control by which ligated nanoparticles can be synthesized, we demonstrate how ligand terminal groups such as methyl, carboxyl and amine can be used to tune the membrane charge density and control ion transport. Further functionality, exploiting the ligands as binding sites, is demonstrated for sulfonate groups resulting in an enhancement of the membrane charge density. We then extend these results to smaller dimensions by systematically varying the underlying pore diameter. As a whole, these results outline a previously unexplored method for the nanoparticle functionalization of membranes using ligated nanoparticles to control ion transport.

  19. Ion transport controlled by nanoparticle-functionalized membranes.

    PubMed

    Barry, Edward; McBride, Sean P; Jaeger, Heinrich M; Lin, Xiao-Min

    2014-12-17

    From proton exchange membranes in fuel cells to ion channels in biological membranes, the well-specified control of ionic interactions in confined geometries profoundly influences the transport and selectivity of porous materials. Here we outline a versatile new approach to control a membrane's electrostatic interactions with ions by depositing ligand-coated nanoparticles around the pore entrances. Leveraging the flexibility and control by which ligated nanoparticles can be synthesized, we demonstrate how ligand terminal groups such as methyl, carboxyl and amine can be used to tune the membrane charge density and control ion transport. Further functionality, exploiting the ligands as binding sites, is demonstrated for sulfonate groups resulting in an enhancement of the membrane charge density. We then extend these results to smaller dimensions by systematically varying the underlying pore diameter. As a whole, these results outline a previously unexplored method for the nanoparticle functionalization of membranes using ligated nanoparticles to control ion transport.

  20. Discovery of CLC transport proteins: cloning, structure, function and pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Jentsch, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Abstract After providing a personal description of the convoluted path leading 25 years ago to the molecular identification of the Torpedo Cl− channel ClC-0 and the discovery of the CLC gene family, I succinctly describe the general structural and functional features of these ion transporters before giving a short overview of mammalian CLCs. These can be categorized into plasma membrane Cl− channels and vesicular Cl−/H+-exchangers. They are involved in the regulation of membrane excitability, transepithelial transport, extracellular ion homeostasis, endocytosis and lysosomal function. Diseases caused by CLC dysfunction include myotonia, neurodegeneration, deafness, blindness, leukodystrophy, male infertility, renal salt loss, kidney stones and osteopetrosis, revealing a surprisingly broad spectrum of biological roles for chloride transport that was unsuspected when I set out to clone the first voltage-gated chloride channel. PMID:25590607

  1. Ion transport in roots: measurement of fluxes using ion-selective microelectrodes to characterize transporter function.

    PubMed

    Newman, I A

    2001-01-01

    The transport of mineral ions into and out of tissues and cells is central to the life of plants. Ion transport and the plasma membrane transporters themselves have been studied using a variety of techniques. In the last 15 years, measurement of specific ion fluxes has contributed to the characterization of transport systems. Progress in molecular genetics is allowing gene identification and controlled expression of transporter molecules. However the molecular expression of transporter gene products must be characterized at the functional level. The ion-selective microelectrode technique to measure specific ion fluxes non-invasively is ideally suited to this purpose. This technique, its theory, its links with others and its application and prospects in plant science, are discussed. Ions studied include hydrogen, potassium, sodium, ammonium, calcium, chloride and nitrate. Applications discussed include: solute ion uptake by roots; gravitropism and other processes in the root cap, meristematic and elongation zones; Nod factor effect on root hairs; osmotic and salt stresses; oscillations; the effects of light and temperature. Studies have included intact roots, leaf mesophyll and other tissues, protoplasts and bacterial biofilms. A multi-ion capability of the technique will greatly assist functional genomics, particularly when coupled with imaging techniques, patch clamping and the use of suitable mutants.

  2. Functional characterization of Caenorhabditis elegans heteromeric amino acid transporters.

    PubMed

    Veljkovic, Emilija; Stasiuk, Susan; Skelly, Patrick J; Shoemaker, Charles B; Verrey, François

    2004-02-27

    Mammalian heteromeric amino acid transporters (HATs) are composed of a multi-transmembrane spanning catalytic protein covalently associated with a type II glycoprotein (e.g. 4F2hc, rBAT) through a disulfide bond. Caenorhabditis elegans has nine genes encoding close homologues of the HAT catalytic proteins. Three of these genes (designated AAT-1 to AAT-3) have a much higher degree of similarity to the mammalian homologues than the other six, including the presence of a cysteine residue at the position known to form a disulfide bridge to the glycoprotein partner in mammalian HATs. C. elegans also has two genes encoding homologues of the heteromeric amino acid transporter type II glycoprotein subunits (designated ATG-1 and ATG-2). Both ATG, and/or AAT-1, -2, -3 proteins were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and tested for amino acid transport function. This screen revealed that AAT-1 and AAT-3 facilitate amino acid transport when expressed together with ATG-2 but not with ATG-1 or the mammalian type II glycoproteins 4F2hc and rBAT. AAT-1 and AAT-3 covalently bind to both C. elegans ATG glycoproteins, but only the pairs with ATG-2 traffic to the oocyte surface. Both of these functional, surface-expressed C. elegans HATs transport most neutral amino acids and display the highest transport rate for l-Ala and l-Ser (apparent K(m) 100 microm range). Similar to their mammalian counterparts, the C. elegans HATs function as (near) obligatory amino acid exchangers. Taken together, this study demonstrates that the heteromeric structure and the amino acid exchange function of HATs have been conserved throughout the evolution of nematodes to mammals.

  3. Effect of Liver Disease on Hepatic Transporter Expression and Function.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Nilay; Slizgi, Jason R; Brouwer, Kim L R

    2017-09-01

    Liver disease can alter the disposition of xenobiotics and endogenous substances. Regulatory agencies such as the Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Evaluation Agency recommend, if possible, studying the effect of liver disease on drugs under development to guide specific dose recommendations in these patients. Although extensive research has been conducted to characterize the effect of liver disease on drug-metabolizing enzymes, emerging data have implicated that the expression and function of hepatobiliary transport proteins also are altered in liver disease. This review summarizes recent developments in the field, which may have implications for understanding altered disposition, safety, and efficacy of new and existing drugs. A brief review of liver physiology and hepatic transporter localization/function is provided. Then, the expression and function of hepatic transporters in cholestasis, hepatitis C infection, hepatocellular carcinoma, human immunodeficiency virus infection, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, and primary biliary cirrhosis are reviewed. In the absence of clinical data, nonclinical information in animal models is presented. This review aims to advance the understanding of altered expression and function of hepatic transporters in liver disease and the implications of such changes on drug disposition. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Density Functional Theory with Dissipation: Transport through Single Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kieron Burke

    2012-04-30

    A huge amount of fundamental research was performed on this grant. Most of it focussed on fundamental issues of electronic structure calculations of transport through single molecules, using density functional theory. Achievements were: (1) First density functional theory with dissipation; (2) Pseudopotential plane wave calculations with master equation; (3) Weak bias limit; (4) Long-chain conductance; and (5) Self-interaction effects in tunneling.

  5. Beyond genotype: serotonin transporter epigenetic modification predicts human brain function.

    PubMed

    Nikolova, Yuliya S; Koenen, Karestan C; Galea, Sandro; Wang, Chiou-Miin; Seney, Marianne L; Sibille, Etienne; Williamson, Douglas E; Hariri, Ahmad R

    2014-09-01

    We examined epigenetic regulation in regards to behaviorally and clinically relevant human brain function. Specifically, we found that increased promoter methylation of the serotonin transporter gene predicted increased threat-related amygdala reactivity and decreased mRNA expression in postmortem amygdala tissue. These patterns were independent of functional genetic variation in the same region. Furthermore, the association with amygdala reactivity was replicated in a second cohort and was robust to both sampling methods and age.

  6. Capacitance-Voltage Measurement of Transporting Function at Cell Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Toshiya; Miyahara, Yuji

    In this paper, we report the detection of transporting function at cell membrane using capacitance-voltage (CV) measurement. The detection principle of our devices is based on the field-effect of electrostatic interaction between charged species at cell membrane in solution and surface electrons in silicon crystal through the gate insulator of Si3N4/SiO2 thin double-layer. We designed an oocyte-based field-effect capacitor, on which a Xenopus laevis oocyte was fixed. The transporter of human organic anion transporting peptide C (hOATP-C) was expressed at oocyte membrane by induction of cRNA. The electrical phenomena such as ion or molecular charge flux at the interface between cell membrane and gate surface could be detected as the change of flat band voltage in CV characteristics. The flat band voltage shift decreased with incubation time after introduction of substrate into the oocyte-based field-effect capacitor. The electrical signal is due to the change of charge flux from the oocyte at the gate surface inspired by transporter-substrate binding. The platform based on the oocyte-based field-effect capacitor is suitable for a simple and non-invasive detection system in order to analyze function of transporters related to drug efficacy.

  7. Function and structure of heterodimeric amino acid transporters.

    PubMed

    Wagner, C A; Lang, F; Bröer, S

    2001-10-01

    Heterodimeric amino acid transporters are comprised of two subunits, a polytopic membrane protein (light chain) and an associated type II membrane protein (heavy chain). The heavy chain rbAT (related to b(0,+) amino acid transporter) associates with the light chain b(0,+)AT (b(0,+) amino acid transporter) to form the amino acid transport system b(0,+), whereas the homologous heavy chain 4F2hc interacts with several light chains to form system L (with LAT1 and LAT2), system y(+)L (with y(+)LAT1 and y(+)LAT2), system x (with xAT), or system asc (with asc1). The association of light chains with the two heavy chains is not unambiguous. rbAT may interact with LAT2 and y(+)LAT1 and vice versa; 4F2hc may interact with b(0,+)AT when overexpressed. 4F2hc is necessary for trafficking of the light chain to the plasma membrane, whereas the light chains are thought to determine the transport characteristics of the respective heterodimer. In contrast to 4F2hc, mutations in rbAT suggest that rbAT itself takes part in the transport besides serving for the trafficking of the light chain to the cell surface. Heavy and light subunits are linked together by a disulfide bridge. The disulfide bridge, however, is not necessary for the trafficking of rbAT or 4F2 heterodimers to the membrane or for the functioning of the transporter. However, there is experimental evidence that the disulfide bridge in the 4F2hc/LAT1 heterodimer plays a role in the regulation of a cation channel. These results highlight complex interactions between the different subunits of heterodimeric amino acid transporters and suggest that despite high grades of homology, the interactions between rbAT and 4F2hc and their respective partners may be different.

  8. Design Function and Structure of a Monomeric CLC Transporter

    SciTech Connect

    L Robertson; L Kolmakova-Partensky; C Miller

    2011-12-31

    Channels and transporters of the ClC family cause the transmembrane movement of inorganic anions in service of a variety of biological tasks, from the unusual - the generation of the kilowatt pulses with which electric fish stun their prey - to the quotidian - the acidification of endosomes, vacuoles and lysosomes. The homodimeric architecture of ClC proteins, initially inferred from single-molecule studies of an elasmobranch Cl{sup -} channel and later confirmed by crystal structures of bacterial Cl{sup -}/H{sup +} antiporters, is apparently universal. Moreover, the basic machinery that enables ion movement through these proteins - the aqueous pores for anion diffusion in the channels and the ion-coupling chambers that coordinate Cl{sup -} and H{sup +} antiport in the transporters - are contained wholly within each subunit of the homodimer. The near-normal function of a bacterial ClC transporter straitjacketed by covalent crosslinks across the dimer interface and the behaviour of a concatemeric human homologue argue that the transport cycle resides within each subunit and does not require rigid-body rearrangements between subunits. However, this evidence is only inferential, and because examples are known in which quaternary rearrangements of extramembrane ClC domains that contribute to dimerization modulate transport activity, we cannot declare as definitive a 'parallel-pathways picture in which the homodimer consists of two single-subunit transporters operating independently. A strong prediction of such a view is that it should in principle be possible to obtain a monomeric ClC. Here we exploit the known structure of a ClC Cl{sup -}/H{sup +} exchanger, ClC-ec1 from Escherichia coli, to design mutants that destabilize the dimer interface while preserving both the structure and the transport function of individual subunits. The results demonstrate that the ClC subunit alone is the basic functional unit for transport and that cross-subunit interaction is not

  9. Universal probability distribution function for bursty transport in plasma turbulence.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, I; Benkadda, S; Garbet, X; Ropokis, G; Hizanidis, K; del-Castillo-Negrete, D

    2009-10-16

    Bursty transport phenomena associated with convective motion present universal statistical characteristics among different physical systems. In this Letter, a stochastic univariate model and the associated probability distribution function for the description of bursty transport in plasma turbulence is presented. The proposed stochastic process recovers the universal distribution of density fluctuations observed in plasma edge of several magnetic confinement devices and the remarkable scaling between their skewness S and kurtosis K. Similar statistical characteristics of variabilities have been also observed in other physical systems that are characterized by convection such as the x-ray fluctuations emitted by the Cygnus X-1 accretion disc plasmas and the sea surface temperature fluctuations.

  10. Structure and function of nucleotide sugar transporters: Current progress

    PubMed Central

    Hadley, Barbara; Maggioni, Andrea; Ashikov, Angel; Day, Christopher J.; Haselhorst, Thomas; Tiralongo, Joe

    2014-01-01

    The proteomes of eukaryotes, bacteria and archaea are highly diverse due, in part, to the complex post-translational modification of protein glycosylation. The diversity of glycosylation in eukaryotes is reliant on nucleotide sugar transporters to translocate specific nucleotide sugars that are synthesised in the cytosol and nucleus, into the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus where glycosylation reactions occur. Thirty years of research utilising multidisciplinary approaches has contributed to our current understanding of NST function and structure. In this review, the structure and function, with reference to various disease states, of several NSTs including the UDP-galactose, UDP-N-acetylglucosamine, UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine, GDP-fucose, UDP-N-acetylglucosamine/UDP-glucose/GDP-mannose and CMP-sialic acid transporters will be described. Little is known regarding the exact structure of NSTs due to difficulties associated with crystallising membrane proteins. To date, no three-dimensional structure of any NST has been elucidated. What is known is based on computer predictions, mutagenesis experiments, epitope-tagging studies, in-vitro assays and phylogenetic analysis. In this regard the best-characterised NST to date is the CMP-sialic acid transporter (CST). Therefore in this review we will provide the current state-of-play with respect to the structure–function relationship of the (CST). In particular we have summarised work performed by a number groups detailing the affect of various mutations on CST transport activity, efficiency, and substrate specificity. PMID:25210595

  11. Monocarboxylate transporter 10 functions as a thyroid hormone transporter in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Abe, Sanae; Namba, Noriyuki; Abe, Makoto; Fujiwara, Makoto; Aikawa, Tomonao; Kogo, Mikihiko; Ozono, Keiichi

    2012-08-01

    Thyroid hormone is essential for normal proliferation and differentiation of chondrocytes. Thus, untreated congenital hypothyroidism is marked by severe short stature. The monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) is a highly specific transporter for thyroid hormone. The hallmarks of Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome, caused by MCT8 mutations, are severe psychomotor retardation and elevated T(3) levels. However, growth is mostly normal. We therefore hypothesized that growth plate chondrocytes use transporters other than MCT8 for thyroid hormone uptake. Extensive analysis of thyroid hormone transporter mRNA expression in mouse chondrogenic ATDC5 cells revealed that monocarboxylate transporter 10 (Mct10) was most abundantly expressed among the transporters known to be highly specific for thyroid hormone, namely Mct8, Mct10, and organic anion transporter 1c1. Expression levels of Mct10 mRNA diminished with chondrocyte differentiation in these cells. Accordingly, Mct10 mRNA was expressed most abundantly in the growth plate resting zone chondrocytes in vivo. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of Mct10 mRNA in ATDC5 cells decreased [(125)I]T(3) uptake up to 44% compared with negative control (P < 0.05). Moreover, silencing Mct10 mRNA expression abolished the known effects of T(3), i.e. suppression of proliferation and enhancement of differentiation, in ATDC5 cells. These results suggest that Mct10 functions as a thyroid hormone transporter in chondrocytes and can explain at least in part why Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome patients do not exhibit significant growth impairment.

  12. Structural and functional heterogeneity in phloem loading and transport

    PubMed Central

    Slewinski, Thomas L.; Zhang, Cankui; Turgeon, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The phloem is often regarded as a relatively straightforward transport system composed of loading (collection), long-distance (transport), and unloading (release) zones. While this simple view is necessary and useful in many contexts, it belies the reality, which is that the phloem is inherently complex. At least three types of sieve element–companion cell complexes are found in minor veins of leaves. Individual species may have more than one type, indicating that they employ multiple loading strategies, even in the same vein. Gene expression data in particular point to heterogeneity in sieve element–companion cell complexes of minor veins, perhaps in all flowering plants. Phloem heterogeneity in the transport phloem is also evident in many species based on anatomical, biochemical and gene expression data. In this regard, members of the Cucurbitaceae are especially complex and interesting. We conclude that a hidden world of specialized phloem function awaits discovery. PMID:23847646

  13. Functional characterization of a xylose transporter in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The production of bioethanol from lignocellulosic feedstocks will only become economically feasible when the majority of cellulosic and hemicellulosic biopolymers can be efficiently converted into bioethanol. The main component of cellulose is glucose, whereas hemicelluloses mainly consist of pentose sugars such as D-xylose and L-arabinose. The genomes of filamentous fungi such as A. nidulans encode a multiplicity of sugar transporters with broad affinities for hexose and pentose sugars. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which has a long history of use in industrial fermentation processes, is not able to efficiently transport or metabolize pentose sugars (e.g. xylose). Subsequently, the aim of this study was to identify xylose-transporters from A. nidulans, as potential candidates for introduction into S. cerevisiae in order to improve xylose utilization. Results In this study, we identified the A. nidulans xtrD (xylose transporter) gene, which encodes a Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) transporter, and which was specifically induced at the transcriptional level by xylose in a XlnR-dependent manner, while being partially repressed by glucose in a CreA-dependent manner. We evaluated the ability of xtrD to functionally complement the S. cerevisiae EBY.VW4000 strain which is unable to grow on glucose, fructose, mannose or galactose as single carbon source. In S. cerevisiae, XtrD was targeted to the plasma membrane and its expression was able to restore growth on xylose, glucose, galactose, and mannose as single carbon sources, indicating that this transporter accepts multiple sugars as a substrate. XtrD has a high affinity for xylose, and may be a high affinity xylose transporter. We were able to select a S. cerevisiae mutant strain that had increased xylose transport when expressing the xtrD gene. Conclusions This study characterized the regulation and substrate specificity of an A. nidulans transporter that represents a good candidate for further directed

  14. Transceptors as a functional link of transporters and receptors

    PubMed Central

    Diallinas, George

    2017-01-01

    Cells need to communicate with their environment in order to obtain nutrients, grow, divide and respond to signals related to adaptation in changing physiological conditions or stress. A very basic question in biology is how cells, especially of those organisms living in rapidly changing habitats, sense their environment. Apparently, this question is of particular importance to all free-living microorganisms. The critical role of receptors, transporters and channels, transmembrane proteins located in the plasma membrane of all types of cells, in signaling environmental changes is well established. A relative newcomer in environment sensing are the so called transceptors, membrane proteins that possess both solute transport and receptor-like signaling activities. Now, the transceptor concept is further enlarged to include micronutrient sensing via the iron and zinc high-affinity transporters of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Interestingly, what seems to underline the transport and/or sensing function of receptors, transporters and transceptors is ligand-induced conformational alterations recognized by downstream intracellular effectors. PMID:28357392

  15. A functional calcium-transporting ATPase encoded by chlorella viruses

    PubMed Central

    Bonza, Maria Cristina; Martin, Holger; Kang, Ming; Lewis, Gentry; Greiner, Timo; Giacometti, Sonia; Van Etten, James L.; De Michelis, Maria Ida; Thiel, Gerhard; Moroni, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Calcium-transporting ATPases (Ca2+ pumps) are major players in maintaining calcium homeostasis in the cell and have been detected in all cellular organisms. Here, we report the identification of two putative Ca2+ pumps, M535L and C785L, encoded by chlorella viruses MT325 and AR158, respectively, and the functional characterization of M535L. Phylogenetic and sequence analyses place the viral proteins in group IIB of P-type ATPases even though they lack a typical feature of this class, a calmodulin-binding domain. A Ca2+ pump gene is present in 45 of 47 viruses tested and is transcribed during virus infection. Complementation analysis of the triple yeast mutant K616 confirmed that M535L transports calcium ions and, unusually for group IIB pumps, also manganese ions. In vitro assays show basal ATPase activity. This activity is inhibited by vanadate, but, unlike that of other Ca2+ pumps, is not significantly stimulated by either calcium or manganese. The enzyme forms a 32P-phosphorylated intermediate, which is inhibited by vanadate and not stimulated by the transported substrate Ca2+, thus confirming the peculiar properties of this viral pump. To our knowledge this is the first report of a functional P-type Ca2+-transporting ATPase encoded by a virus. PMID:20573858

  16. A functional calcium-transporting ATPase encoded by chlorella viruses.

    PubMed

    Bonza, Maria Cristina; Martin, Holger; Kang, Ming; Lewis, Gentry; Greiner, Timo; Giacometti, Sonia; Van Etten, James L; De Michelis, Maria Ida; Thiel, Gerhard; Moroni, Anna

    2010-10-01

    Calcium-transporting ATPases (Ca(2+) pumps) are major players in maintaining calcium homeostasis in the cell and have been detected in all cellular organisms. Here, we report the identification of two putative Ca(2+) pumps, M535L and C785L, encoded by chlorella viruses MT325 and AR158, respectively, and the functional characterization of M535L. Phylogenetic and sequence analyses place the viral proteins in group IIB of P-type ATPases even though they lack a typical feature of this class, a calmodulin-binding domain. A Ca(2+) pump gene is present in 45 of 47 viruses tested and is transcribed during virus infection. Complementation analysis of the triple yeast mutant K616 confirmed that M535L transports calcium ions and, unusually for group IIB pumps, also manganese ions. In vitro assays show basal ATPase activity. This activity is inhibited by vanadate, but, unlike that of other Ca(2+) pumps, is not significantly stimulated by either calcium or manganese. The enzyme forms a (32)P-phosphorylated intermediate, which is inhibited by vanadate and not stimulated by the transported substrate Ca(2+), thus confirming the peculiar properties of this viral pump. To our knowledge this is the first report of a functional P-type Ca(2+)-transporting ATPase encoded by a virus.

  17. Acrolein impairs the cholesterol transport functions of high density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Alexandra C; Holme, Rebecca L; Chen, Yiliang; Thomas, Michael J; Sorci-Thomas, Mary G; Silverstein, Roy L; Pritchard, Kirkwood A; Sahoo, Daisy

    2015-01-01

    High density lipoproteins (HDL) are considered athero-protective, primarily due to their role in reverse cholesterol transport, where they transport cholesterol from peripheral tissues to the liver for excretion. The current study was designed to determine the impact of HDL modification by acrolein, a highly reactive aldehyde found in high abundance in cigarette smoke, on the cholesterol transport functions of HDL. HDL was chemically-modified with acrolein and immunoblot and mass spectrometry analyses confirmed apolipoprotein crosslinking, as well as acrolein adducts on apolipoproteins A-I and A-II. The ability of acrolein-modified HDL (acro-HDL) to serve as an acceptor of free cholesterol (FC) from COS-7 cells transiently expressing SR-BI was significantly decreased. Further, in contrast to native HDL, acro-HDL promotes higher neutral lipid accumulation in murine macrophages as judged by Oil Red O staining. The ability of acro-HDL to mediate efficient selective uptake of HDL-cholesteryl esters (CE) into SR-BI-expressing cells was reduced compared to native HDL. Together, the findings from our studies suggest that acrolein modification of HDL produces a dysfunctional particle that may ultimately promote atherogenesis by impairing functions that are critical in the reverse cholesterol transport pathway.

  18. Placental sulphate transport: a review of functional and molecular studies.

    PubMed

    Shennan, D B

    2012-08-01

    Sulphate is required by the feto-placental unit for a number of important conjugation and biosynthetic pathways. Functional studies performed several decades ago established that sulphate transport in human placental microvillus and basal membrane vesicles was mainly via a DIDS-sensitive anion-exchange mechanism. In contrast, no evidence was found for Na⁺-dependent transport. Studies performed using isolated human placental tissue confirmed anion-exchange as the main mechanism. More recently, molecular studies have established the presence of anion-exchange proteins which could play a role in transplacental sulphate movement. However, the presence of transcripts for NaS2 has been reported and has prompted the suggestion that Na⁺-sulphate cotransport may play an important role in maternal-fetal sulphate transport. This article reviews our present knowledge of placental sulphate transport, both functional and molecular, and attempts to form a model based on the available evidence. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Approximate Green's function methods for HZE transport in multilayered materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Badavi, Francis F.; Shinn, Judy L.; Costen, Robert C.

    1993-01-01

    A nonperturbative analytic solution of the high charge and energy (HZE) Green's function is used to implement a computer code for laboratory ion beam transport in multilayered materials. The code is established to operate on the Langley nuclear fragmentation model used in engineering applications. Computational procedures are established to generate linear energy transfer (LET) distributions for a specified ion beam and target for comparison with experimental measurements. The code was found to be highly efficient and compared well with the perturbation approximation.

  20. Sucrose transporter1 functions in phloem loading in maize leaves

    PubMed Central

    Slewinski, Thomas L.; Meeley, Robert; Braun, David M.

    2009-01-01

    In most plants, sucrose is exported from source leaves to carbon-importing sink tissues to sustain their growth and metabolism. Apoplastic phloem-loading species require sucrose transporters (SUTs) to transport sucrose into the phloem. In many dicot plants, genetic and biochemical evidence has established that SUT1-type proteins function in phloem loading. However, the role of SUT1 in phloem loading in monocot plants is not clear since the rice (Oryza sativa) and sugarcane (Saccharum hybrid) SUT1 orthologues do not appear to function in phloem loading of sucrose. A SUT1 gene was previously cloned from maize (Zea mays) and shown to have expression and biochemical activity consistent with a hypothesized role in phloem loading. To determine the biological function of SUT1 in maize, a sut1 mutant was isolated and characterized. sut1 mutant plants hyperaccumulate carbohydrates in mature leaves and display leaf chlorosis with premature senescence. In addition, sut1 mutants have greatly reduced stature, altered biomass partitioning, delayed flowering, and stunted tassel development. Cold-girdling wild-type leaves to block phloem transport phenocopied the sut1 mutants, supporting a role for maize SUT1 in sucrose export. Furthermore, application of 14C-sucrose to abraded sut1 mutant and wild-type leaves showed that sucrose export was greatly diminished in sut1 mutants compared with wild type. Collectively, these data demonstrate that SUT1 is crucial for efficient phloem loading of sucrose in maize leaves. PMID:19181865

  1. Functional characterization of a novel disaccharide transporter in lobster hepatopancreas.

    PubMed

    Scheffler, Olivia; Ahearn, Gregory A

    2017-02-08

    In animals, the accepted model of carbohydrate digestion and absorption involves reduction of disaccharides into the monosaccharides glucose, fructose, and galactose followed by their individual transmembrane transport into cells. In 2011, a gene for a distinct disaccharide sucrose transporter (SCRT) was found in Drosophila melanogaster and characterized in a yeast expression system. The purpose of the present investigation was to functionally identify and characterize a putative disaccharide transporter analog in the hepatopancreas of the American lobster, Homarus americanus. Purified hepatopancreatic brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV) were used in transport experiments using (14)C-sucrose and a Millipore filter isolation technique. In the absence of sodium, an external pH of 4 significantly stimulated the uptake of (14)C-sucrose compared to that occurring at pH 5, 6, or 7. At pH 7, increasing external concentrations of sodium increased (14)C-sucrose uptake by BBMV in a hyperbolic fashion and this stimulation was significantly reduced when the pH was changed to 4, suggesting that both protons and sodium ions were each capable of driving the uptake of the sugar. In experiments with a variety of monosaccharides, disaccharides, and trisaccharides, used as potential inhibitors of (14)C-sucrose uptake, only maltose and trehalose inhibited carrier-mediated (14)C-sucrose transport. An additional experiment showed that 20 mM maltose was a competitive inhibitor of (14)C-sucrose uptake. The use of a putative lobster SCRT by both maltose and trehalose is nutritionally appropriate for lobsters as they commonly digest glycogen and chitin, polymers of maltose and trehalose, respectively. These findings suggest there is a brush-border proton- or sodium-dependent, hepatopancreatic carrier process, shared by sucrose, maltose, and trehalose, that may function to absorb disaccharides that are produced from digestion of naturally occurring dietary constituents.

  2. Supramolecular functional assemblies: dynamic membrane transporters and peptide nanotubular composites.

    PubMed

    Fuertes, Alberto; Juanes, Marisa; Granja, Juan R; Montenegro, Javier

    2017-07-11

    The fabrication of functional molecular devices constitutes one of the most important current challenges for chemical sciences. The complex processes accomplished by living systems continuously demand the assistance of non-covalent interactions between molecular building blocks. Additionally, these building blocks (proteins, membranes, nucleotides) are also constituted by self-assembled structures. Therefore, supramolecular chemistry is the discipline required to understand the properties of the minimal self-assembled building blocks of living systems and to develop new functional smart materials. In the first part of this feature article, we highlight selected examples of the preparation of supramolecular membrane transporters with special emphasis on the application of dynamic covalent bonds. In the second section of the paper we review recent breakthroughs in the preparation of peptide nanotube hybrids with functional applications. The development of these devices constitutes an exciting process from where we can learn how to understand and manipulate supramolecular functional assemblies.

  3. Stepwise Functional Evolution in a Fungal Sugar Transporter Family.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Carla; Coelho, Marco A; Salema-Oom, Madalena; Gonçalves, Paula

    2016-02-01

    Sugar transport is of the utmost importance for most cells and is central to a wide range of applied fields. However, despite the straightforward in silico assignment of many novel transporters, including sugar porters, to existing families, their exact biological role and evolutionary trajectory often remain unclear, mainly because biochemical characterization of membrane proteins is inherently challenging, but also owing to their uncommonly turbulent evolutionary histories. In addition, many important shifts in membrane carrier function are apparently ancient, which further limits our ability to reconstruct evolutionary trajectories in a reliable manner. Here, we circumvented some of these obstacles by examining the relatively recent emergence of a unique family of fungal sugar facilitators, related to drug antiporters. The former transporters, named Ffz, were previously shown to be required for fructophilic metabolism in yeasts. We first exploited the wealth of fungal genomic data available to define a comprehensive but well-delimited family of Ffz-like transporters, showing that they are only present in Dikarya. Subsequently, a combination of phylogenetic analyses and in vivo functional characterization was used to retrace important changes in function, while highlighting the evolutionary events that are most likely to have determined extant distribution of the gene, such as horizontal gene transfers (HGTs). One such HGT event is proposed to have set the stage for the onset of fructophilic metabolism in yeasts, a trait that according to our results may be the metabolic hallmark of close to 100 yeast species that thrive in sugar rich environments. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Modeling transport in the kidney: investigating function and dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Mathematical models of water and solute transport in the kidney have significantly expanded our understanding of renal function in both health and disease. This review describes recent theoretical developments and emphasizes the relevance of model findings to major unresolved questions and controversies. These include the fundamental processes by which urine is concentrated in the inner medulla, the ultrastructural basis of proteinuria, irregular flow oscillation patterns in spontaneously hypertensive rats, and the mechanisms underlying the hypotensive effects of thiazides. Macroscopic models of water, NaCl, and urea transport in populations of nephrons have served to test, confirm, or refute a number of hypotheses related to the urine concentrating mechanism. Other macroscopic models focus on the mechanisms, role, and irregularities of renal hemodynamic control and on the regulation of renal oxygenation. At the mesoscale, models of glomerular filtration have yielded significant insight into the ultrastructural basis underlying a number of disorders. At the cellular scale, models of epithelial solute transport and pericyte Ca2+ signaling are being used to elucidate transport pathways and the effects of hormones and drugs. Areas where further theoretical progress is conditional on experimental advances are also identified. PMID:19889951

  5. TonB-dependent transporters: regulation, structure, and function

    PubMed Central

    Noinaj, Nicholas; Guillier, Maude; Barnard, Travis J.; Buchanan, Susan K.

    2011-01-01

    TonB-dependent transporters (TBDTs) are bacterial outer membrane proteins that bind and transport ferric chelates called siderophores, as well as vitamin B12, nickel complexes, and carbohydrates. The transport process requires energy in the form of protonmotive force and a complex of three inner membrane proteins, TonB-ExbB-ExbD, to transduce this energy to the outer membrane. The siderophore substrates range in complexity from simple small molecules such as citrate to large proteins like serum transferrin and haemoglobin. Because iron uptake is vital for almost all bacteria, expression of TBDTs is regulated in a number of ways that include metal-dependent regulators, σ/anti-σ factor systems, small RNAs, and even a riboswitch. In recent years many new structures of TBDTs have been solved in various states, resulting in a more complete picture of siderophore selectivity and binding, signal transduction across the outer membrane, and interaction with TonB-ExbB-ExbD. However, the transport mechanism is still unclear. In this review, we summarize recent progress in understanding regulation, structure and function in TBDTs and questions remaining to be answered. PMID:20420522

  6. TonB-dependent transporters: regulation, structure, and function.

    PubMed

    Noinaj, Nicholas; Guillier, Maude; Barnard, Travis J; Buchanan, Susan K

    2010-01-01

    TonB-dependent transporters (TBDTs) are bacterial outer membrane proteins that bind and transport ferric chelates, called siderophores, as well as vitamin B(12), nickel complexes, and carbohydrates. The transport process requires energy in the form of proton motive force and a complex of three inner membrane proteins, TonB-ExbB-ExbD, to transduce this energy to the outer membrane. The siderophore substrates range in complexity from simple small molecules such as citrate to large proteins such as serum transferrin and hemoglobin. Because iron uptake is vital for almost all bacteria, expression of TBDTs is regulated in a number of ways that include metal-dependent regulators, σ/anti-σ factor systems, small RNAs, and even a riboswitch. In recent years, many new structures of TBDTs have been solved in various states, resulting in a more complete understanding of siderophore selectivity and binding, signal transduction across the outer membrane, and interaction with the TonB-ExbB-ExbD complex. However, the transport mechanism is still unclear. In this review, we summarize recent progress in understanding regulation, structure, and function in TBDTs and questions remaining to be answered.

  7. Evidence for the transport function of uricase, an oxidative enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Pordy, W.T.; Lipkowitz, M.S.; Abramson, R.G. )

    1987-10-01

    (2-{sup 14}C)urate uptake was examined in proteoliposomes prepared with phosphatidylcholine and either pig liver uricase or albumin, and in protein-free liposomes. Urate uptake was only evident in proteoliposomes that contained active uricase. Uptakes were indistinguishable in the presence and absence of inwardly directed gradients of sodium, potassium, or choline chloride or outwardly directed hydroxyl gradients. Both urate and allantoin accumulated within proteoliposomes during urate uptake; however, (2-{sup 14}C)allantoin was not taken up by proteoliposomes. Urate uptake was accelerated in the presence of unlabeled urate in the trans position, saturable, and competitively inhibited by oxonate, findings consistent with carrier-mediated transport. Finally, the kinetics of urate uptake and oxidation were virtually identical, implying that the transporter is uricase. Thus, these studies provide evidence that uricase can function as a transport protein for urate when inserted in a lipid bilayer: transport via uricase is neither cation dependent (not a cotransporter) nor dependent on an exchangeable anion (not a urate/anion exchanger). Additionally, these studies demonstrate that neither urate nor allantoin cross lipid bilayers by simple or nonionic diffusion.

  8. A Green's function method for heavy ion beam transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinn, J. L.; Wilson, J. W.; Schimmerling, W.; Shavers, M. R.; Miller, J.; Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.; Badavi, F. F.

    1995-01-01

    The use of Green's function has played a fundamental role in transport calculations for high-charge high-energy (HZE) ions. Two recent developments have greatly advanced the practical aspects of implementation of these methods. The first was the formulation of a closed-form solution as a multiple fragmentation perturbation series. The second was the effective summation of the closed-form solution through nonperturbative techniques. The nonperturbative methods have been recently extended to an inhomogeneous, two-layer transport media to simulate the lead scattering foil present in the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories (LBL) biomedical beam line used for cancer therapy. Such inhomogeneous codes are necessary for astronaut shielding in space. The transport codes utilize the Langley Research Center atomic and nuclear database. Transport code and database evaluation are performed by comparison with experiments performed at the LBL Bevalac facility using 670 A MeV 20Ne and 600 A MeV 56Fe ion beams. The comparison with a time-of-flight and delta E detector measurement for the 20Ne beam and the plastic nuclear track detectors for 56Fe show agreement up to 35%-40% in water and aluminium targets, respectively.

  9. Function and evolution of channels and transporters in photosynthetic membranes.

    PubMed

    Pfeil, Bernard E; Schoefs, Benoît; Spetea, Cornelia

    2014-03-01

    Chloroplasts from land plants and algae originated from an endosymbiotic event, most likely involving an ancestral photoautotrophic prokaryote related to cyanobacteria. Both chloroplasts and cyanobacteria have thylakoid membranes, harboring pigment-protein complexes that perform the light-dependent reactions of oxygenic photosynthesis. The composition, function and regulation of these complexes have thus far been the major topics in thylakoid membrane research. For many decades, we have also accumulated biochemical and electrophysiological evidence for the existence of solute transthylakoid transport activities that affect photosynthesis. However, research dedicated to molecular identification of the responsible proteins has only recently emerged with the explosion of genomic information. Here we review the current knowledge about channels and transporters from the thylakoid membrane of Arabidopsis thaliana and of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. No homologues of these proteins have been characterized in algae, although similar sequences could be recognized in many of the available sequenced genomes. Based on phylogenetic analyses, we hypothesize a host origin for most of the so far identified Arabidopsis thylakoid channels and transporters. Additionally, the shift from a non-thylakoid to a thylakoid location appears to have occurred at different times for different transport proteins. We propose that closer control of and provision for the thylakoid by products of the host genome has been an ongoing process, rather than a one-step event. Some of the proteins recruited to serve in the thylakoid may have been the result of the increased specialization of its pigment-protein composition and organization in green plants.

  10. A Green's function method for heavy ion beam transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinn, J. L.; Wilson, J. W.; Schimmerling, W.; Shavers, M. R.; Miller, J.; Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.; Badavi, F. F.

    1995-01-01

    The use of Green's function has played a fundamental role in transport calculations for high-charge high-energy (HZE) ions. Two recent developments have greatly advanced the practical aspects of implementation of these methods. The first was the formulation of a closed-form solution as a multiple fragmentation perturbation series. The second was the effective summation of the closed-form solution through nonperturbative techniques. The nonperturbative methods have been recently extended to an inhomogeneous, two-layer transport media to simulate the lead scattering foil present in the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories (LBL) biomedical beam line used for cancer therapy. Such inhomogeneous codes are necessary for astronaut shielding in space. The transport codes utilize the Langley Research Center atomic and nuclear database. Transport code and database evaluation are performed by comparison with experiments performed at the LBL Bevalac facility using 670 A MeV 20Ne and 600 A MeV 56Fe ion beams. The comparison with a time-of-flight and delta E detector measurement for the 20Ne beam and the plastic nuclear track detectors for 56Fe show agreement up to 35%-40% in water and aluminium targets, respectively.

  11. Karyopherins regulate nuclear pore complex barrier and transport function.

    PubMed

    Kapinos, Larisa E; Huang, Binlu; Rencurel, Chantal; Lim, Roderick Y H

    2017-09-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic transport is sustained by karyopherins (Kaps) and a Ran guanosine triphosphate (RanGTP) gradient that imports nuclear localization signal (NLS)-specific cargoes (NLS-cargoes) into the nucleus. However, how nuclear pore complex (NPC) barrier selectivity, Kap traffic, and NLS-cargo release are systematically linked and simultaneously regulated remains incoherent. In this study, we show that Kapα facilitates Kapβ1 turnover and occupancy at the NPC in a RanGTP-dependent manner that is directly coupled to NLS-cargo release and NPC barrier function. This is underpinned by the binding affinity of Kapβ1 to phenylalanine-glycine nucleoporins (FG Nups), which is comparable with RanGTP·Kapβ1, but stronger for Kapα·Kapβ1. On this basis, RanGTP is ineffective at releasing standalone Kapβ1 from NPCs. Depleting Kapα·Kapβ1 by RanGTP further abrogates NPC barrier function, whereas adding back Kapβ1 rescues it while Kapβ1 turnover softens it. Therefore, the FG Nups are necessary but insufficient for NPC barrier function. We conclude that Kaps constitute integral constituents of the NPC whose barrier, transport, and cargo release functionalities establish a continuum under a mechanism of Kap-centric control. © 2017 Kapinos et al.

  12. Sucrose transporters in plants: update on function and structure.

    PubMed

    Lemoine, R

    2000-05-01

    In plants, sucrose is the major transport form for photoassimilated carbon and is both a source of carbon skeletons and energy for plant organs unable to perform photosynthesis (sink organs). As a molecule translocated over distance, sucrose has to pass through a number of membranes. Membrane transport of sucrose has therefore been considered for a long time as a major determinant of plant productivity. After several decades of physiological and biochemical experiments measuring the activity of sucrose carriers, unequivocal evidence came from the first identification of a cDNA coding a sucrose carrier (SoSUT1, Riesmeier et al. (1992) EMBO J. 11, 4705-4713). At present 20 different cDNAs encoding sucrose carriers have been identified in different plant species, in both dicots and monocots (one case). The total number is increasing rapidly and most importantly, it can be guessed from the results obtained for Arabidopsis, that in each species, sucrose transporters represent a gene family. The sequences are highly conserved and those carriers display the typical 12 transmembrane alpha-helices of members of the Major Facilitator superfamily. Yeast expression of those carriers indicate that they are all influx carriers, all cotransport sucrose and proton and that their affinity for sucrose is surprisingly similar (0.2-2 mM). All their characteristics are in agreement with those demonstrated at the physiological level in plants. These characteristics are discussed in relation to the function in plants and the few data available on the structure of those transporters in relation to their function are presented.

  13. Role for the IFT-A Complex in Selective Transport to the Primary Cilium.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wenxiang; Wang, Lei; Kim, Sehyun; Li, Ji; Dynlacht, Brian David

    2016-11-01

    Intraflagellar transport sub-complex A (IFT-A) is known to regulate retrograde IFT in the cilium. To rigorously assess its other possible roles, we knocked out an IFT-A subunit, IFT121/WDR35, in mammalian cells and screened the localization of more than 50 proteins. We found that Wdr35 regulates cilium assembly by selectively regulating transport of distinct cargoes. Beyond its role in retrograde transport, we show that Wdr35 functions in fusion of Rab8 vesicles at the nascent cilium, protein exit from the cilium, and centriolar satellite organization. Furthermore, we show that Wdr35 is essential for entry of many membrane proteins into the cilium through robust interactions with cargoes and other IFT-A subunits, but the actin network functions to dampen this transport. Wdr35 is mutated in several ciliopathies, and we find that certain disease mutations impair interactions with cargo and other IFT-A subunits. Together, our data link defects in IFT-A mediated cargo transport with disease.

  14. Diverse functional roles of monosaccharide transporters and their homologs in vascular plants: a physiological perspective.

    PubMed

    Slewinski, Thomas L

    2011-07-01

    Vascular plants contain two gene families that encode monosaccharide transporter proteins. The classical monosaccharide transporter(-like) gene superfamily is large and functionally diverse, while the recently identified SWEET transporter family is smaller and, thus far, only found to transport glucose. These transporters play essential roles at many levels, ranging from organelles to the whole plant. Many family members are essential for cellular homeostasis and reproductive success. Although most transporters do not directly participate in long-distance transport, their indirect roles greatly impact carbon allocation and transport flux to the heterotrophic tissues of the plant. Functional characterization of some members from both gene families has revealed their diverse roles in carbohydrate partitioning, phloem function, resource allocation, plant defense, and sugar signaling. This review highlights the broad impacts and implications of monosaccharide transport by describing some of the functional roles of the monosaccharide transporter(-like) superfamily and the SWEET transporter family.

  15. Transportation management center functions. A synthesis of highway practice

    SciTech Connect

    Kraft, W.H.

    1998-12-31

    Transportation management centers (TMCs), or traffic management centers, have become a vital part of the transportation fabric in many urban areas. This synthesis presents information on the current operational and technical practices used by highway, transit, and multimodal TMCs in several urbanized areas. It also provides information to developers and suppliers of hardware and software for traffic control technology and communications systems. This report of the Transportation Research Board describes the various types of TMCs, their functions, and details of design, operations, and staffing. It describes the practice of agencies in the United States and Canada, based on survey responses from 147 TMCs. These agencies are responsible for highways, surface streets, bridges and tunnels, transit, including bus and rail, and several integrated TMCs that include more than one mode. Design criteria describe in detail the physical facility design of TMCs, as well as the software configurations and the interrelationships among TMCs of various types. The required staffing and the personnel roles are highlighted. To the extent that data are available, ranges of costs and benefits for TMCs are included in this report.

  16. Functional expression of sodium-glucose transporters in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Scafoglio, Claudio; Hirayama, Bruce A.; Kepe, Vladimir; Liu, Jie; Ghezzi, Chiara; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Moatamed, Neda A.; Huang, Jiaoti; Koepsell, Hermann; Barrio, Jorge R.; Wright, Ernest M.

    2015-01-01

    Glucose is a major metabolic substrate required for cancer cell survival and growth. It is mainly imported into cells by facilitated glucose transporters (GLUTs). Here we demonstrate the importance of another glucose import system, the sodium-dependent glucose transporters (SGLTs), in pancreatic and prostate adenocarcinomas, and investigate their role in cancer cell survival. Three experimental approaches were used: (i) immunohistochemical mapping of SGLT1 and SGLT2 distribution in tumors; (ii) measurement of glucose uptake in fresh isolated tumors using an SGLT-specific radioactive glucose analog, α-methyl-4-deoxy-4-[18F]fluoro-d-glucopyranoside (Me4FDG), which is not transported by GLUTs; and (iii) measurement of in vivo SGLT activity in mouse models of pancreatic and prostate cancer using Me4FDG-PET imaging. We found that SGLT2 is functionally expressed in pancreatic and prostate adenocarcinomas, and provide evidence that SGLT2 inhibitors block glucose uptake and reduce tumor growth and survival in a xenograft model of pancreatic cancer. We suggest that Me4FDG-PET imaging may be used to diagnose and stage pancreatic and prostate cancers, and that SGLT2 inhibitors, currently in use for treating diabetes, may be useful for cancer therapy. PMID:26170283

  17. Chloride transport in functionally active phagosomes isolated from Human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Aiken, Martha L.; Painter, Richard G.; Zhou, Yun; Wang, Guoshun

    2012-01-01

    Chloride anion is critical for hypochlorous acid (HOCl) production and microbial killing in neutrophil phagosomes. However, the molecular mechanism by which this anion is transported to the organelle is poorly understood. In this report, membrane-enclosed and functionally active phagosomes were isolated from human neutrophils by using opsonized paramagnetic latex microspheres and a rapid magnetic separation method. The phagosomes recovered were highly enriched for specific protein markers associated with this organelle such as lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1, myeloperoxidase (MPO), lactoferrin, and NADPH oxidase. When FITC–dextran was included in the phagocytosis medium, the majority of the isolated phagosomes retained the fluorescent label after isolation, indicative of intact membrane structure. Flow cytometric measurement of acridine orange, a fluorescent pH indicator, in the purified phagosomes demonstrated that the organelle in its isolated state was capable of transporting protons to the phagosomal lumen via the vacuolar-type ATPase proton pump (V-ATPase). When NADPH was supplied, the isolated phagosomes constitutively oxidized dihydrorhodamine 123, indicating their ability to produce hydrogen peroxide. The preparations also showed a robust production of HOCl within the phagosomal lumen when assayed with the HOCl-specific fluorescent probe R19-S by flow cytometry. MPO-mediated iodination of the proteins covalently conjugated to the phagocytosed beads was quantitatively measured. Phagosomal uptake of iodide and protein iodination were significantly blocked by chloride channel inhibitors, including CFTRinh-172 and NPPB. Further experiments determined that the V-ATPase-driving proton flux into the isolated phagosomes required chloride cotransport, and the cAMP-activated CFTR chloride channel was a major contributor to the chloride transport. Taken together, the data suggest that the phagosomal preparation described herein retains ion transport

  18. Structural and Functional Recovery of Sensory Cilia in C. elegans IFT Mutants upon Aging

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Julie; Brear, Andrea G.; Prahlad, Veena; Blacque, Oliver E.; Sengupta, Piali

    2016-01-01

    The majority of cilia are formed and maintained by the highly conserved process of intraflagellar transport (IFT). Mutations in IFT genes lead to ciliary structural defects and systemic disorders termed ciliopathies. Here we show that the severely truncated sensory cilia of hypomorphic IFT mutants in C. elegans transiently elongate during a discrete period of adult aging leading to markedly improved sensory behaviors. Age-dependent restoration of cilia morphology occurs in structurally diverse cilia types and requires IFT. We demonstrate that while DAF-16/FOXO is dispensable, the age-dependent suppression of cilia phenotypes in IFT mutants requires cell-autonomous functions of the HSF1 heat shock factor and the Hsp90 chaperone. Our results describe an unexpected role of early aging and protein quality control mechanisms in suppressing ciliary phenotypes of IFT mutants, and suggest possible strategies for targeting subsets of ciliopathies. PMID:27906968

  19. Structural and Functional Recovery of Sensory Cilia in C. elegans IFT Mutants upon Aging.

    PubMed

    Cornils, Astrid; Maurya, Ashish K; Tereshko, Lauren; Kennedy, Julie; Brear, Andrea G; Prahlad, Veena; Blacque, Oliver E; Sengupta, Piali

    2016-12-01

    The majority of cilia are formed and maintained by the highly conserved process of intraflagellar transport (IFT). Mutations in IFT genes lead to ciliary structural defects and systemic disorders termed ciliopathies. Here we show that the severely truncated sensory cilia of hypomorphic IFT mutants in C. elegans transiently elongate during a discrete period of adult aging leading to markedly improved sensory behaviors. Age-dependent restoration of cilia morphology occurs in structurally diverse cilia types and requires IFT. We demonstrate that while DAF-16/FOXO is dispensable, the age-dependent suppression of cilia phenotypes in IFT mutants requires cell-autonomous functions of the HSF1 heat shock factor and the Hsp90 chaperone. Our results describe an unexpected role of early aging and protein quality control mechanisms in suppressing ciliary phenotypes of IFT mutants, and suggest possible strategies for targeting subsets of ciliopathies.

  20. Controlling transport and chemical functionality of magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Latham, Andrew H; Williams, Mary Elizabeth

    2008-03-01

    A wide range of metal, magnetic, semiconductor, and polymer nanoparticles with tunable sizes and properties can be synthesized by wet-chemical techniques. Magnetic nanoparticles are particularly attractive because their inherent superparamagnetic properties make them desirable for medical imaging, magnetic field assisted transport, and separations and analyses. With such applications on the horizon, synthetic routes for quickly and reliably rendering magnetic nanoparticle surfaces chemically functional have become an increasingly important focus. This Account describes common synthetic routes for making and functionalizing magnetic nanoparticles and discusses initial applications in magnetic field induced separations. The most widely studied magnetic nanoparticles are iron oxide (Fe2O3 and Fe3O4), cobalt ferrite (CoFe 2O4), iron platinum (FePt), and manganese ferrite (MnFe 2O4), although others have been investigated. Magnetic nanoparticles are typically prepared under either high-temperature organic phase or aqueous conditions, producing particles with surfaces that are stabilized by attached surfactants or associated ions. Although it requires more specialized glassware, high-temperature routes are generally preferred when a high degree of stability and low particle size dispersity is desired. Particles can be further modified with a secondary metal or polymer to create core-shell structures. The outer shells function as protective layers for the inner metal cores and alter the surface chemistry to enable postsynthetic modification of the surfactant chemistry. Efforts by our group as well as others have centered on pathways to yield nanoparticles with surfaces that are both easily functionalized and tunable in terms of the number and variety of attached species. Ligand place-exchange reactions have been shown quite successful for exchanging silanes, acids, thiols, and dopamine ligands onto the surfaces of some magnetic particles. Poly(ethylene oxide

  1. Meteorological Conditions for Functioning Automobile Transport in Moscow Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiryaeva, Alexandra

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate weather and climate conditions of functioning automobile transport in Moscow region. For this, statistics on the daily number of accidents in the City of Moscow in 2013-2014 were studied and compared with the weather conditions. Various weather phenomena and meteorological parameters that affect the increase and decrease in the number of accidents in warm and cold seasons were identified; the extent of this influence was assessed. Moreover, an analysis of the distribution and change of the frequency of occurrence of these phenomena and meteorological parameters in 1961-2010 in Moscow region was conducted. In the cold season, there are much more weather events influencing the growth in the number of accidents than in the warm season. Fallout of more than 2 cm of snow per date, the reduction in meteorological visibility, drizzle and snow storms lead to an increase of accident rate by 5-15%. In the warm season, when thunderstorms and heavy rainfall there is a decrease in accidents; increase in the number of accidents happens in hot weather (maximum air temperatures over +30 °C). In the period 1991-2010 compared to 1961-1990 in the Moscow oblast the sustained cold period and amount of precipitation under negative air temperature has reduced; a decrease in the number of days with reduced visibility range and the offset of the date of the fallout of the first snow aside winter months is observed, which is favorable for automobile transport. At the same time, there is an increase in the number of days with transitions of air temperature through 0 °C, and the number of hot days, which negatively affects the functioning automobile transport.

  2. Characteristics and Possible Functions of Mitochondrial Ca2+ Transport Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Gunter, Thomas E.; Sheu, Shey-Shing

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondria produce around 92% of the ATP used in the typical animal cell by oxidative phosphorylation using energy from their electrochemical proton gradient. Intramitochondrial free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]m) has been found to be an important component of control of the rate of this ATP production. In addition, [Ca2+]m also controls the opening of a large pore in the inner mitochondrial membrane, the permeability transition pore (PTP), which plays a role in mitochondrial control of programmed cell death or apoptosis. Therefore, [Ca2+]m can control whether the cell has sufficient ATP to fulfill its functions and survive or is condemned to death. Ca2+ is also one of the most important second messengers within the cytosol, signaling changes in cellular response through Ca2+ pulses or transients. Mitochondria can also sequester Ca2+ from these transients so as to modify the shape of Ca2+ signaling transients or control their location within the cell. All of this is controlled by the action of four or five mitochondrial Ca2+ transport mechanisms and the PTP. The characteristics of these mechanisms of Ca2+ transport and a discussion of how they might function are described in this paper. PMID:19161975

  3. Platelet Serotonin Transporter Function Predicts Default-Mode Network Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kasess, Christian H.; Meyer, Bernhard M.; Hofmaier, Tina; Diers, Kersten; Bartova, Lucie; Pail, Gerald; Huf, Wolfgang; Uzelac, Zeljko; Hartinger, Beate; Kalcher, Klaudius; Perkmann, Thomas; Haslacher, Helmuth; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Kasper, Siegfried; Freissmuth, Michael; Windischberger, Christian; Willeit, Matthäus; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Esterbauer, Harald; Brocke, Burkhard; Moser, Ewald; Sitte, Harald H.; Pezawas, Lukas

    2014-01-01

    Background The serotonin transporter (5-HTT) is abundantly expressed in humans by the serotonin transporter gene SLC6A4 and removes serotonin (5-HT) from extracellular space. A blood-brain relationship between platelet and synaptosomal 5-HT reuptake has been suggested, but it is unknown today, if platelet 5-HT uptake can predict neural activation of human brain networks that are known to be under serotonergic influence. Methods A functional magnetic resonance study was performed in 48 healthy subjects and maximal 5-HT uptake velocity (Vmax) was assessed in blood platelets. We used a mixed-effects multilevel analysis technique (MEMA) to test for linear relationships between whole-brain, blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) activity and platelet Vmax. Results The present study demonstrates that increases in platelet Vmax significantly predict default-mode network (DMN) suppression in healthy subjects independent of genetic variation within SLC6A4. Furthermore, functional connectivity analyses indicate that platelet Vmax is related to global DMN activation and not intrinsic DMN connectivity. Conclusion This study provides evidence that platelet Vmax predicts global DMN activation changes in healthy subjects. Given previous reports on platelet-synaptosomal Vmax coupling, results further suggest an important role of neuronal 5-HT reuptake in DMN regulation. PMID:24667541

  4. Filtered density function approach for reactive transport in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suciu, Nicolae; Schüler, Lennart; Attinger, Sabine; Knabner, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Spatial filtering may be used in coarse-grained simulations (CGS) of reactive transport in groundwater, similar to the large eddy simulations (LES) in turbulence. The filtered density function (FDF), stochastically equivalent to a probability density function (PDF), provides a statistical description of the sub-grid, unresolved, variability of the concentration field. Besides closing the chemical source terms in the transport equation for the mean concentration, like in LES-FDF methods, the CGS-FDF approach aims at quantifying the uncertainty over the whole hierarchy of heterogeneity scales exhibited by natural porous media. Practically, that means estimating concentration PDFs on coarse grids, at affordable computational costs. To cope with the high dimensionality of the problem in case of multi-component reactive transport and to reduce the numerical diffusion, FDF equations are solved by particle methods. But, while trajectories of computational particles are modeled as stochastic processes indexed by time, the concentration's heterogeneity is modeled as a random field, with multi-dimensional, spatio-temporal sets of indices. To overcome this conceptual inconsistency, we consider FDFs/PDFs of random species concentrations weighted by conserved scalars and we show that their evolution equations can be formulated as Fokker-Planck equations describing stochastically equivalent processes in concentration-position spaces. Numerical solutions can then be approximated by the density in the concentration-position space of an ensemble of computational particles governed by the associated Itô equations. Instead of sequential particle methods we use a global random walk (GRW) algorithm, which is stable, free of numerical diffusion, and practically insensitive to the increase of the number of particles. We illustrate the general FDF approach and the GRW numerical solution for a reduced complexity problem consisting of the transport of a single scalar in groundwater

  5. Density Functional Theory Calculations of Mass Transport in UO2

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Anders D.; Dorado, Boris; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Stanek, Christopher R.

    2012-06-26

    In this talk we present results of density functional theory (DFT) calculations of U, O and fission gas diffusion in UO{sub 2}. These processes all impact nuclear fuel performance. For example, the formation and retention of fission gas bubbles induce fuel swelling, which leads to mechanical interaction with the clad thereby increasing the probability for clad breach. Alternatively, fission gas can be released from the fuel to the plenum, which increases the pressure on the clad walls and decreases the gap thermal conductivity. The evolution of fuel microstructure features is strongly coupled to diffusion of U vacancies. Since both U and fission gas transport rates vary strongly with the O stoichiometry, it is also important to understand O diffusion. In order to better understand bulk Xe behavior in UO{sub 2{+-}x} we first calculate the relevant activation energies using DFT techniques. By analyzing a combination of Xe solution thermodynamics, migration barriers and the interaction of dissolved Xe atoms with U, we demonstrate that Xe diffusion predominantly occurs via a vacancy-mediated mechanism. Since Xe transport is closely related to diffusion of U vacancies, we have also studied the activation energy for this process. In order to explain the low value of 2.4 eV found for U migration from independent damage experiments (not thermal equilibrium) the presence of vacancy clusters must be included in the analysis. Next we investigate species transport on the (111) UO{sub 2} surface, which is motivated by the formation of small voids partially filled with fission gas atoms (bubbles) in UO{sub 2} under irradiation. Surface diffusion could be the rate-limiting step for diffusion of such bubbles, which is an alternative mechanism for mass transport in these materials. As expected, the activation energy for surface diffusion is significantly lower than for bulk transport. These results are further discussed in terms of engineering-scale fission gas release models

  6. Kin5 knockdown in Tetrahymena thermophila using RNAi blocks cargo transport of Gef1.

    PubMed

    Awan, Aashir; Bell, Aaron J; Satir, Peter

    2009-01-01

    A critical process that builds and maintains the eukaryotic cilium is intraflagellar transport (IFT). This process utilizes members of the kinesin-2 superfamily to transport cargo into the cilium (anterograde transport) and a dynein motor for the retrograde traffic. Using a novel RNAi knockdown method, we have analyzed the function of the homodimeric IFT kinesin-2, Kin5, in Tetrahymena ciliary transport. In RNAi transformants, Kin5 was severely downregulated and disappeared from the cilia, but cilia did not resorb, although tip structure was affected. After deciliation of the knockdown cell, cilia regrew and cells swam, which suggested that Kin5 is not responsible for the trafficking of axonemal precursors to build the cilium, but could be transporting molecules that act in ciliary signal transduction, such as guanine nucleotide exchange proteins (GEFs). Gef1 is a Tetrahymena ciliary protein, and current coimmunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence studies showed that it is absent in regrowing cilia of the knockdown cells lacking ciliary Kin5. We suggest that one important cargo of Kin5 is Gef1 and knockdown of Kin5 results in cell lethality.

  7. Kin5 Knockdown in Tetrahymena thermophila Using RNAi Blocks Cargo Transport of Gef1

    PubMed Central

    Awan, Aashir; Bell, Aaron J.; Satir, Peter

    2009-01-01

    A critical process that builds and maintains the eukaryotic cilium is intraflagellar transport (IFT). This process utilizes members of the kinesin-2 superfamily to transport cargo into the cilium (anterograde transport) and a dynein motor for the retrograde traffic. Using a novel RNAi knockdown method, we have analyzed the function of the homodimeric IFT kinesin-2, Kin5, in Tetrahymena ciliary transport. In RNAi transformants, Kin5 was severely downregulated and disappeared from the cilia, but cilia did not resorb, although tip structure was affected. After deciliation of the knockdown cell, cilia regrew and cells swam, which suggested that Kin5 is not responsible for the trafficking of axonemal precursors to build the cilium, but could be transporting molecules that act in ciliary signal transduction, such as guanine nucleotide exchange proteins (GEFs). Gef1 is a Tetrahymena ciliary protein, and current coimmunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence studies showed that it is absent in regrowing cilia of the knockdown cells lacking ciliary Kin5. We suggest that one important cargo of Kin5 is Gef1 and knockdown of Kin5 results in cell lethality. PMID:19290045

  8. Is Density Functional Theory adequate for quantum transport?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Kieron

    2007-03-01

    Density functional calculations for the electronic conductance of single molecules attached to leads are now common. I'll examine the methodology from a rigorous point of view, discussing where it can be expected to work, and where it should fail. When molecules are weakly coupled to leads, local and gradient-corrected approximations fail, as the Kohn-Sham levels are misaligned. In the weak bias regime, XC corrections to the current are missed by the standard methodology. Finally, I will compare and contrast several new methodologies that go beyond the present standard approach of applying the Landauer formula to ground-state DFT. Self-interaction errors in density functional calculations of electronictransport, C. Toher, A. Filippetti, S. Sanvito, and K. Burke, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 146402 (2005) The Dramatic Role of the Exchange-Correlation Potential in ab initio Electron Transport Calculations, S-H. Ke, H.U. Baranger, and W. Yang, cond-mat/0609367. Zero-bias molecular electronics: Exchange-correlation corrections to Landauer's formula, M. Koentopp, K. Burke, and F. Evers, Phys. Rev. B Rapid Comm., 73, 121403 (2006). Density Functional Theory of the Electrical Conductivity of Molecular Devices, K. Burke, Roberto Car, and Ralph Gebauer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 146803 (2005). Density functional calculations of nanoscale conductance, Connie Chang, Max Koentopp, Kieron Burke, and Roberto Car, in prep.

  9. Transport through correlated systems with density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Kurth, S; Stefanucci, G

    2017-10-18

    We present recent advances in density functional theory (DFT) for applications in the field of quantum transport, with particular emphasis on transport through strongly correlated systems. We review the foundations of the popular Landauer-Büttiker(LB)  +  DFT approach. This formalism, when using approximations to the exchange-correlation (xc) potential with steps at integer occupation, correctly captures the Kondo plateau in the zero bias conductance at zero temperature but completely fails to capture the transition to the Coulomb blockade (CB) regime as the temperature increases. To overcome the limitations of LB  +  DFT, the quantum transport problem is treated from a time-dependent (TD) perspective using TDDFT, an exact framework to deal with nonequilibrium situations. The steady-state limit of TDDFT shows that in addition to an xc potential in the junction, there also exists an xc correction to the applied bias. Open shell molecules in the CB regime provide the most striking examples of the importance of the xc bias correction. Using the Anderson model as guidance we estimate these corrections in the limit of zero bias. For the general case we put forward a steady-state DFT which is based on one-to-one correspondence between the pair of basic variables, steady density on and steady current across the junction and the pair local potential on and bias across the junction. Like TDDFT, this framework also leads to both an xc potential in the junction and an xc correction to the bias. Unlike TDDFT, these potentials are independent of history. We highlight the universal features of both xc potential and xc bias corrections for junctions in the CB regime and provide an accurate parametrization for the Anderson model at arbitrary temperatures and interaction strengths, thus providing a unified DFT description for both Kondo and CB regimes and the transition between them.

  10. Transport through correlated systems with density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurth, S.; Stefanucci, G.

    2017-10-01

    We present recent advances in density functional theory (DFT) for applications in the field of quantum transport, with particular emphasis on transport through strongly correlated systems. We review the foundations of the popular Landauer–Büttiker(LB)  +  DFT approach. This formalism, when using approximations to the exchange-correlation (xc) potential with steps at integer occupation, correctly captures the Kondo plateau in the zero bias conductance at zero temperature but completely fails to capture the transition to the Coulomb blockade (CB) regime as the temperature increases. To overcome the limitations of LB  +  DFT, the quantum transport problem is treated from a time-dependent (TD) perspective using TDDFT, an exact framework to deal with nonequilibrium situations. The steady-state limit of TDDFT shows that in addition to an xc potential in the junction, there also exists an xc correction to the applied bias. Open shell molecules in the CB regime provide the most striking examples of the importance of the xc bias correction. Using the Anderson model as guidance we estimate these corrections in the limit of zero bias. For the general case we put forward a steady-state DFT which is based on one-to-one correspondence between the pair of basic variables, steady density on and steady current across the junction and the pair local potential on and bias across the junction. Like TDDFT, this framework also leads to both an xc potential in the junction and an xc correction to the bias. Unlike TDDFT, these potentials are independent of history. We highlight the universal features of both xc potential and xc bias corrections for junctions in the CB regime and provide an accurate parametrization for the Anderson model at arbitrary temperatures and interaction strengths, thus providing a unified DFT description for both Kondo and CB regimes and the transition between them.

  11. Functional Characterization of Candida albicans ABC Transporter Cdr1p

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Suneet; Saini, Preeti; Smriti; Jha, Sudhakar; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Prasad, Rajendra

    2003-01-01

    In view of the importance of Candida drug resistance protein (Cdr1p) in azole resistance, we have characterized it by overexpressing it as a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged fusion protein (Cdr1p-GFP). The overexpressed Cdr1p-GFP in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is shown to be specifically labeled with the photoaffinity analogs iodoarylazidoprazosin (IAAP) and azidopine, which have been used to characterize the drug-binding sites on mammalian drug-transporting P-glycoproteins. While nystatin could compete for the binding of IAAP, miconazole specifically competed for azidopine binding, suggesting that IAAP and azidopine bind to separate sites on Cdr1p. Cdr1p was subjected to site-directed mutational analysis. Among many mutant variants of Cdr1p, the phenotypes of F774A and ΔF774 were particularly interesting. The analysis of GFP-tagged mutant variants of Cdr1p revealed that a conserved F774, in predicted transmembrane segment 6, when changed to alanine showed increased binding of both photoaffinity analogues, while its deletion (ΔF774), as revealed by confocal microscopic analyses, led to mislocalization of the protein. The mislocalized ΔF774 mutant Cdr1p could be rescued to the plasma membrane as a functional transporter by growth in the presence of a Cdr1p substrate, cycloheximide. Our data for the first time show that the drug substrate-binding sites of Cdr1p exhibit striking similarities with those of mammalian drug-transporting P-glycoproteins and despite differences in topological organization, the transmembrane segment 6 in Cdr1p is also a major contributor to drug substrate-binding site(s). PMID:14665469

  12. KCl stimulation increases norepinephrine transporter function in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Mandela, Prashant; Ordway, Gregory A

    2006-09-01

    The norepinephrine transporter (NET) plays a pivotal role in terminating noradrenergic signaling and conserving norepinephrine (NE) through the process of re-uptake. Recent evidence suggests a close association between NE release and regulation of NET function. The present study evaluated the relationship between release and uptake, and the cellular mechanisms that govern these processes. KCl stimulation of PC12 cells robustly increased [3H]NE uptake via the NET and simultaneously increased [3H]NE release. KCl-stimulated increases in uptake and release were dependent on Ca2+. Treatment of cells with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) or okadaic acid decreased [3H]NE uptake but did not block KCl-stimulated increases in [3H]NE uptake. In contrast, PMA increased [3H]NE release and augmented KCl-stimulated release, while okadaic acid had no effects on release. Inhibition of Ca2+-activated signaling cascades with KN93 (a Ca2+ calmodulin-dependent kinase inhibitor), or ML7 and ML9 (myosin light chain kinase inhibitors), reduced [3H]NE uptake and blocked KCl-stimulated increases in uptake. In contrast, KN93, ML7 and ML9 had no effect on KCl-stimulated [3H]NE release. KCl-stimulated increases in [3H]NE uptake were independent of transporter trafficking to the plasma membrane. While increases in both NE release and uptake mediated by KCl stimulation require Ca2+, different intracellular mechanisms mediate these two events.

  13. Magnetic Alignment and Charge Transport Improvement in Functional Soft Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majewski, Pawel W.

    The realization of nanostructured functional materials by self-assembly in polymers and polymer nanocomposites is adversely affected by persisting structural defects which greatly diminish the performance of the material. The use of magnetic fields to impose long-range order is investigated in three distinct systems - ion-conducting block copolymers, semiconducting nanowire-polymer composites and lyotropic surfactant mesophases. The alignment process is quantitatively studied with X-ray scattering and microscopic methods. Time and temperature resolved data collected in situ during the magnetic experiments provide an insight into the thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of the process. These data together with simultaneous electrical conductivity measurements allow relating fundamental structural properties (e.g., morphology and long-range order) to transport properties (i.e., conductivity). In particular, it is demonstrated that magnetic fields offer a viable route for improvement of electric conductivity in these systems. More than an order of magnitude increase in conductivity is recorded in magnetically-annealed materials. The resulting aligned nanostructured systems are attractive for ordered solid polymer electrolyte membranes, heterojunction photovoltaic devices and generally help to understand charge transport mechanisms in anisotropic heterogeneous systems.

  14. Multicellularity and the Functional Interdependence of Motility and Molecular Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solari, C.; Ganguly, S.; Kessler, J. O.; Michod, R.; Goldstein, R. E.

    2006-03-01

    Benefits, costs and requirements accompany the transition from motile totipotent unicellular organisms to multicellular organisms having cells specialized into reproductive (germ) and vegetative (sterile soma) functions such as motility. In flagellated colonial organisms such as the volvocalean green algae, organized beating by the somatic cells' flagella yields propulsion important in phototaxis and chemotaxis. It has not been generally appreciated that for the larger colonies, flagellar stirring of boundary layers and remote transport are fundamental for maintaining a sufficient rate of metabolite turnover, one not attainable by diffusive transport alone. We describe experiments that quantify the role of advective dynamics in enhancing productivity in germ-soma differentiated colonies. First, experiments with suspended deflagellated colonies of Volvox carteri show that forced advection improves productivity. Second, Particle Imaging Velocimetry of fluid motion around colonies reveals flow fields with very large characteristic velocities U extending to length scales comparable to the colony radius R. For a typical metabolite diffusion constant D, the Peclet number Pe=2UR/D 1, indicative of the dominance of advection over diffusion, with striking augmentation at the cell division stage.

  15. An improved Green's function for ion beam transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweed, J.; Wilson, J. W.; Tripathi, R. K.

    2004-01-01

    Ion beam transport theory allows testing of material transmission properties in the laboratory environment generated by particle accelerators. This is a necessary step in materials development and evaluation for space use. The approximations used in solving the Boltzmann transport equation for the space setting are often not sufficient for laboratory work and those issues are the main emphasis of the present work. In consequence, an analytic solution of the linear Boltzmann equation is pursued in the form of a Green's function allowing flexibility in application to a broad range of boundary value problems. It has been established that simple solutions can be found for high charge and energy (HZE) ions by ignoring nuclear energy downshifts and dispersion. Such solutions were found to be supported by experimental evidence with HZE ion beams when multiple scattering was added. Lacking from the prior solutions were range and energy straggling and energy downshift with dispersion associated with nuclear events. Recently, we have found global solutions including these effects providing a broader class of HZE ion solutions. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Functional Characterization of a Eukaryotic Melibiose Transporter1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Lingner, Ulrike; Münch, Steffen; Sode, Björn; Deising, Holger B.; Sauer, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    Pathogenic fungi drastically affect plant health and cause significant losses in crop yield and quality. In spite of their impact, little is known about the carbon sources used by these fungi in planta and about the fungal transporters importing sugars from the plant-fungus interface. Here, we report on the identification and characterization of MELIBIOSE TRANSPORTER1 (MBT1) from the hemibiotrophic fungus Colletotrichum graminicola (teleomorph Glomerella graminicola), the causal agent of leaf anthracnose and stalk rot disease in maize (Zea mays). Functional characterization of the MBT1 protein in baker’s yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) expressing the MBT1 cDNA revealed that α-d-galactopyranosyl compounds such as melibiose, galactinol, and raffinose are substrates of MBT1, with melibiose most likely being the preferred substrate. α-d-Glucopyranosyl disaccharides like trehalose, isomaltose, or maltose are also accepted by MBT1, although with lower affinities. The MBT1 gene shows low and comparable expression levels in axenically grown C. graminicola and upon infection of maize leaves both during the initial biotrophic development of the fungus and during the subsequent necrotrophic phase. Despite these low levels of MBT1 expression, the MBT1 protein allows efficient growth of C. graminicola on melibiose as sole carbon source in axenic cultures. Although Δmbt1 mutants are unable to grow on melibiose, they do not show virulence defects on maize. PMID:21593216

  17. An improved Green's function for ion beam transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweed, J.; Wilson, J. W.; Tripathi, R. K.

    2004-01-01

    Ion beam transport theory allows testing of material transmission properties in the laboratory environment generated by particle accelerators. This is a necessary step in materials development and evaluation for space use. The approximations used in solving the Boltzmann transport equation for the space setting are often not sufficient for laboratory work and those issues are the main emphasis of the present work. In consequence, an analytic solution of the linear Boltzmann equation is pursued in the form of a Green's function allowing flexibility in application to a broad range of boundary value problems. It has been established that simple solutions can be found for high charge and energy (HZE) ions by ignoring nuclear energy downshifts and dispersion. Such solutions were found to be supported by experimental evidence with HZE ion beams when multiple scattering was added. Lacking from the prior solutions were range and energy straggling and energy downshift with dispersion associated with nuclear events. Recently, we have found global solutions including these effects providing a broader class of HZE ion solutions. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. An Improved Green's Function for Ion Beam Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweed, J.; Wilson, J. W.; Tripathi, R. K.

    2003-01-01

    Ion beam transport theory allows testing of material transmission properties in the laboratory environment generated by particle accelerators. This is a necessary step in materials development and evaluation for space use. The approximations used in solving the Boltzmann transport equation for the space setting are often not sufficient for laboratory work and those issues are the main emphasis of the present work. In consequence, an analytic solution of the linear Boltzmann equation is pursued in the form of a Green's function allowing flexibility in application to a broad range of boundary value problems. It has been established that simple solutions can be found for the high charge and energy (HZE) by ignoring nuclear energy downshifts and dispersion. Such solutions were found to be supported by experimental evidence with HZE ion beams when multiple scattering was added. Lacking from the prior solutions were range and energy straggling and energy downshift with dispersion associated with nuclear events. Recently, we have found global solutions including these effects providing a broader class of HZE ion solutions.

  19. Human Erythrocyte Glucose Transporter: Normal Asymmetric Orientation and Function in Liposomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chia-Chen; Kurokawa, Tomonori; Shaw, Shyh-Yu; Tillotson, Loyal G.; Kalled, Susan; Isselbacher, Kurt J.

    1986-04-01

    The transport function and orientation of the reconstituted human erythrocyte glucose transporter was studied with liposomes made with bovine brain lipid or Escherichia coli lipid. Reconstitution was achieved by a simple octyl glucoside dilution method. The reconstituted transporters with either lipid showed identical counterflow transport activity, the same response to various inhibitors, and characteristic cytochalasin B (CB) labeling. Functional location and purification of the glucose transporter was performed by using gel-permeation high-performance liquid chromatography with octyl glucoside-containing buffer. The reconstituted transport activity was associated only with band 4.5 protein (preactin) and not with band 3 protein. Both CB binding and transport function of the reconstituted transporters were resistant to trypsin but susceptible to chymotrypsin digestion. However, both trypsin and chymotrypsin treatment of unsealed ghosts completely eliminated the CB labeling and transport function of the glucose transporter. In our reconstitution system the glucose transporters maintained a normal asymmetrical (rightside-out) orientation and good transport function. A specific monoclonal antibody against the glucose transporter inhibited CB labeling of the transporters on unsealed ghosts. This was not found with the reconstituted system; however, after freeze-thawing there was a significant inhibition of CB binding by the antibody. These findings suggest that the CB-binding site of the reconstituted transporter is on the inner side of the proteoliposomes.

  20. Time-dependent density functional theory for quantum transport.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiao; Chen, GuanHua; Mo, Yan; Koo, SiuKong; Tian, Heng; Yam, ChiYung; Yan, YiJing

    2010-09-21

    Based on our earlier works [X. Zheng et al., Phys. Rev. B 75, 195127 (2007); J. S. Jin et al., J. Chem. Phys. 128, 234703 (2008)], we propose a rigorous and numerically convenient approach to simulate time-dependent quantum transport from first-principles. The proposed approach combines time-dependent density functional theory with quantum dissipation theory, and results in a useful tool for studying transient dynamics of electronic systems. Within the proposed exact theoretical framework, we construct a number of practical schemes for simulating realistic systems such as nanoscopic electronic devices. Computational cost of each scheme is analyzed, with the expected level of accuracy discussed. As a demonstration, a simulation based on the adiabatic wide-band limit approximation scheme is carried out to characterize the transient current response of a carbon nanotube based electronic device under time-dependent external voltages.

  1. Hydrodynamic transport functions from quantum kinetic field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzetta, E. A.; Hu, B. L.; Ramsey, S. A.

    2000-06-01

    Starting from the quantum kinetic field theory [E. Calzetta and B. L. Hu, Phys. Rev. D 37, 2878 (1988)] constructed from the closed-time-path (CTP), two-particle-irreducible (2PI) effective action we show how to compute from first principles the shear and bulk viscosity functions in the hydrodynamic-thermodynamic regime. For a real scalar field with λΦ4 self-interaction we need to include four-loop graphs in the equation of motion. This work provides a microscopic field-theoretical basis to the ``effective kinetic theory'' proposed by Jeon and Yaffe [S. Jeon and L. G. Yaffe, Phys. Rev. D 53, 5799 (1996)], while our result for the bulk viscosity reproduces their expression derived from linear-response theory and the imaginary-time formalism of thermal field theory. Though unavoidably involved in calculations of this sort, we feel that the approach using fundamental quantum kinetic field theory is conceptually clearer and methodically simpler than the effective kinetic theory approach, as the success of the latter requires a clever rendition of diagrammatic resummations which is neither straightforward nor fail-safe. Moreover, the method based on the CTP-2PI effective action illustrated here for a scalar field can be formulated entirely in terms of functional integral quantization, which makes it an appealing method for a first-principles calculation of transport functions of a thermal non-Abelian gauge theory, e.g., QCD quark-gluon plasma produced from heavy ion collisions.

  2. Artificial muscles to restore transport function of diseased atria.

    PubMed

    Tozzi, Piergiorgio; Hayoz, Daniel; Thévenaz, Pierrick; Roulet, Jean-Yves; Salchli, Francois; von Segesser, Ludwig K

    2008-01-01

    Surgical treatment of persistent atrial fibrillation often fails to restore the transport function of the atrium. This study first introduces the concept of an atrial assist device to restore the pump function of the atrium. A micro motorless pump based on artificial muscle technology, is positioned on the external surface of the atrium to compress it and restore its muscular activity. A bench model reproduces the function of fibrillating atrium to assess the circulatory support that this pump can provide. The Atripump is a dome shape silicone coated nitinol actuator mounted on a plastic ring. A pacemaker-like control unit drives the actuator, which compresses the atrium, providing the mechanical support to the blood circulation. The bench model consists of an open circuit made of latex bladder 60 mm in diameter filled with water. The Atripump is placed on the outer surface of the bladder. Pressure, volume, and temperature changes were recorded. The contraction rate was 1 Hz with power supply of 12 V, 400 mA for 200 milliseconds. Preload ranged from 15 to 21 cm H20. The pump produced a maximal work of 16 x 10(-3) J. Maximal volume pumped was 492 ml/min. This artificial muscle pump is compact, and reproduces the hemodynamic performances of normal atrium.

  3. Diet-induced obesity: dopamine transporter function, impulsivity and motivation

    PubMed Central

    Narayanaswami, V; Thompson, AC; Cassis, LA; Bardo, MT; Dwoskin, LP

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE A rat model of diet-induced obesity (DIO) was used to determine dopamine transporter (DAT) function, impulsivity and motivation as neurobehavioral outcomes and predictors of obesity. DESIGN To evaluate neurobehavioral alterations following the development of DIO induced by an 8-week high-fat diet (HF) exposure, striatal D2-receptor density, DAT function and expression, extracellular dopamine concentrations, impulsivity, and motivation for high- and low-fat reinforcers were determined. To determine predictors of DIO, neurobehavioral antecedents including impulsivity, motivation for high-fat reinforcers, DAT function and extracellular dopamine were evaluated before the 8-week HF exposure. METHODS Striatal D2-receptor density was determined by in vitro kinetic analysis of [3H]raclopride binding. DAT function was determined using in vitro kinetic analysis of [3H]dopamine uptake, methamphetamine-evoked [3H]dopamine overflow and no-net flux in vivo microdialysis. DAT cell-surface expression was determined using biotinylation and western blotting. Impulsivity and food-motivated behavior were determined using a delay discounting task and progressive ratio schedule, respectively. RESULTS Relative to obesity-resistant (OR) rats, obesity-prone (OP) rats exhibited 18% greater body weight following an 8-week HF-diet exposure, 42% lower striatal D2-receptor density, 30% lower total DAT expression, 40% lower in vitro and in vivo DAT function, 45% greater extracellular dopamine and twofold greater methamphetamine-evoked [3H]dopamine overflow. OP rats exhibited higher motivation for food, and surprisingly, were less impulsive relative to OR rats. Impulsivity, in vivo DAT function and extracellular dopamine concentration did not predict DIO. Importantly, motivation for high-fat reinforcers predicted the development of DIO. CONCLUSION Human studies are limited by their ability to determine if impulsivity, motivation and DAT function are causes or consequences of DIO. The

  4. Diet-induced obesity: dopamine transporter function, impulsivity and motivation.

    PubMed

    Narayanaswami, V; Thompson, A C; Cassis, L A; Bardo, M T; Dwoskin, L P

    2013-08-01

    A rat model of diet-induced obesity (DIO) was used to determine dopamine transporter (DAT) function, impulsivity and motivation as neurobehavioral outcomes and predictors of obesity. To evaluate neurobehavioral alterations following the development of DIO induced by an 8-week high-fat diet (HF) exposure, striatal D2-receptor density, DAT function and expression, extracellular dopamine concentrations, impulsivity, and motivation for high- and low-fat reinforcers were determined. To determine predictors of DIO, neurobehavioral antecedents including impulsivity, motivation for high-fat reinforcers, DAT function and extracellular dopamine were evaluated before the 8-week HF exposure. Striatal D2-receptor density was determined by in vitro kinetic analysis of [(3)H]raclopride binding. DAT function was determined using in vitro kinetic analysis of [(3)H]dopamine uptake, methamphetamine-evoked [(3)H]dopamine overflow and no-net flux in vivo microdialysis. DAT cell-surface expression was determined using biotinylation and western blotting. Impulsivity and food-motivated behavior were determined using a delay discounting task and progressive ratio schedule, respectively. Relative to obesity-resistant (OR) rats, obesity-prone (OP) rats exhibited 18% greater body weight following an 8-week HF-diet exposure, 42% lower striatal D2-receptor density, 30% lower total DAT expression, 40% lower in vitro and in vivo DAT function, 45% greater extracellular dopamine and twofold greater methamphetamine-evoked [(3)H]dopamine overflow. OP rats exhibited higher motivation for food, and surprisingly, were less impulsive relative to OR rats. Impulsivity, in vivo DAT function and extracellular dopamine concentration did not predict DIO. Importantly, motivation for high-fat reinforcers predicted the development of DIO. Human studies are limited by their ability to determine if impulsivity, motivation and DAT function are causes or consequences of DIO. The current animal model shows that

  5. Visualizing Functional Motions of Membrane Transporters with Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Computational modeling and molecular simulation techniques have become an integral part of modern molecular research. Various areas of molecular sciences continue to benefit from, indeed rely on, the unparalleled spatial and temporal resolutions offered by these technologies, to provide a more complete picture of the molecular problems at hand. Because of the continuous development of more efficient algorithms harvesting ever-expanding computational resources, and the emergence of more advanced and novel theories and methodologies, the scope of computational studies has expanded significantly over the past decade, now including much larger molecular systems and far more complex molecular phenomena. Among the various computer modeling techniques, the application of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and related techniques has particularly drawn attention in biomolecular research, because of the ability of the method to describe the dynamical nature of the molecular systems and thereby to provide a more realistic representation, which is often needed for understanding fundamental molecular properties. The method has proven to be remarkably successful in capturing molecular events and structural transitions highly relevant to the function and/or physicochemical properties of biomolecular systems. Herein, after a brief introduction to the method of MD, we use a number of membrane transport proteins studied in our laboratory as examples to showcase the scope and applicability of the method and its power in characterizing molecular motions of various magnitudes and time scales that are involved in the function of this important class of membrane proteins. PMID:23298176

  6. Methylene blue inhibits function of the 5-HT transporter

    PubMed Central

    Oz, Murat; Isaev, Dmytro; Lorke, Dietrich E; Hasan, Muhammed; Petroianu, Georg; Shippenberg, Toni S

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Methylene blue (MB) is commonly employed as a treatment for methaemoglobinaemia, malaria and vasoplegic shock. An increasing number of studies indicate that MB can cause 5-HT toxicity when administered with a 5-HT reuptake inhibitor. MB is a potent inhibitor of monoamine oxidases, but other targets that may contribute to MB toxicity have not been identified. Given the role of the 5-HT transporter (SERT) in the regulation of extracellular 5-HT concentrations, the present study aimed to characterize the effect of MB on SERT. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Live cell imaging, in conjunction with the fluorescent SERT substrate 4-(4-(dimethylamino)-styryl)-N-methylpyridinium (ASP+), [3H]5-HT uptake and whole-cell patch-clamp techniques were employed to examine the effects of MB on SERT function. KEY RESULTS In EM4 cells expressing GFP-tagged human SERT (hSERT), MB concentration-dependently inhibited ASP+ accumulation (IC50: 1.4 ± 0.3 µM). A similar effect was observed in N2A cells. Uptake of [3H]5-HT was decreased by MB pretreatment. Furthermore, patch-clamp studies in hSERT expressing cells indicated that MB significantly inhibited 5-HT-evoked ion currents. Pretreatment with 8-Br-cGMP did not alter the inhibitory effect of MB on hSERT activity, and intracellular Ca2+ levels remained unchanged during MB application. Further experiments revealed that ASP+ binding to cell surface hSERT was reduced after MB treatment. In whole-cell radioligand experiments, exposure to MB (10 µM; 10 min) did not alter surface binding of the SERT ligand [125I]RTI-55. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS MB modulated SERT function and suggested that SERT may be an additional target upon which MB acts to produce 5-HT toxicity. PMID:21542830

  7. Amphetamine and methamphetamine reduce striatal dopamine transporter function without concurrent dopamine transporter relocalization.

    PubMed

    German, Christopher L; Hanson, Glen R; Fleckenstein, Annette E

    2012-10-01

    Amphetamine (AMPH) and methamphetamine (METH) alter dopamine transporter (DAT) function. In vitro heterologous cell line and synaptosome studies demonstrate AMPH-induced DAT internalization, implicating relocalization in reduced DAT uptake following drug exposure. However, few studies have evaluated DAT localization following in vivo AMPH/METH administration. To determine DAT subcellular localization following drug administration, a centrifugation technique was developed to isolate striatal synaptosomal membrane and vesicle fractions. DAT was distributed between the synaptosomal membrane (60%) and endosomal vesicles (40%), and in vitro application of the protein kinase C activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate to striatal synaptosomes caused DAT internalization into the vesicle fractions. In contrast, neither single nor repeated in vivo AMPH and/or METH administrations altered DAT localization 5, 15, 30, or 60 min post-treatment, despite reduced DAT uptake. Importantly, repeated METH injections uniformly decreased total DAT immunoreactivity within all fractions 7 days post-treatment. These findings suggest that factors other than internalization can contribute to the observed acute and persistent DAT dysfunction and dopaminergic deficits following in vivo AMPH or METH administration. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Neurochemistry © 2012 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  8. Amphetamine and Methamphetamine Reduce Striatal Dopamine Transporter Function Without Concurrent Dopamine Transporter Relocalization

    PubMed Central

    German, Christopher L.; Hanson, Glen R.; Fleckenstein, Annette E.

    2014-01-01

    Amphetamine (AMPH) and methamphetamine (METH) alter dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) function. In vitro heterologous cell line and synaptosome studies demonstrate AMPH-induced DAT internalization, implicating relocalization in reduced DAT uptake following drug exposure. However, few studies have evaluated DAT localization following in vivo AMPH/METH administration. To determine DAT subcellular localization following drug administration, a centrifugation technique was developed to isolate striatal synaptosomal membrane and vesicle fractions. DAT was distributed between the synaptosomal membrane (60%) and endosomal vesicles (40%), and in vitro application of the protein kinase C activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) to striatal synaptosomes caused DAT internalization into the vesicle fractions. In contrast, neither single nor repeated in vivo AMPH and/or METH administrations altered DAT localization 5, 15, 30 or 60 min post-treatment, despite reduced DAT uptake. Importantly, repeated METH injections uniformly decreased total DAT immunoreactivity within all fractions 7 d post-treatment. These findings suggest factors other than internalization can contribute to the observed acute and persistent DAT dysfunction and dopaminergic deficits following in vivo AMPH or METH administration. PMID:22804716

  9. Membrane Transporters: Structure, Function and Targets for Drug Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravna, Aina W.; Sager, Georg; Dahl, Svein G.; Sylte, Ingebrigt

    Current therapeutic drugs act on four main types of molecular targets: enzymes, receptors, ion channels and transporters, among which a major part (60-70%) are membrane proteins. This review discusses the molecular structures and potential impact of membrane transporter proteins on new drug discovery. The three-dimensional (3D) molecular structure of a protein contains information about the active site and possible ligand binding, and about evolutionary relationships within the protein family. Transporters have a recognition site for a particular substrate, which may be used as a target for drugs inhibiting the transporter or acting as a false substrate. Three groups of transporters have particular interest as drug targets: the major facilitator superfamily, which includes almost 4000 different proteins transporting sugars, polyols, drugs, neurotransmitters, metabolites, amino acids, peptides, organic and inorganic anions and many other substrates; the ATP-binding cassette superfamily, which plays an important role in multidrug resistance in cancer chemotherapy; and the neurotransmitter:sodium symporter family, which includes the molecular targets for some of the most widely used psychotropic drugs. Recent technical advances have increased the number of known 3D structures of membrane transporters, and demonstrated that they form a divergent group of proteins with large conformational flexibility which facilitates transport of the substrate.

  10. Functional studies of acid transporter in cultured rat epididymal cell.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Wu-Lin; Huang, Jie-Hong; Shan, Jia-Jie; Li, Sheng; Wong, Patrick Y D; Zhou, Wen-Liang

    2010-05-15

    To explore the functional role of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase in the pH regulation of epididymal fluid and its effect on sperm motility. Experimental study. Physiology laboratory in a university. Immature male Sprague-Dawley rats. The H(+)-ATPase inhibitor was applied to the primary culture of epididymal cells. The intracellular luminal fluid pH and sperm percent motility were recorded. Double immunofluorescence of H(+)-ATPase and carbonic anhydrase II in primary culture of cauda epididymal epithelial cells showed that the system was a suitable model for investigation of acid secretion by clear cells. Clear cells were pharmacologically distinct from principal cells in acid/base transportation. The intracellular pH recovery from cellular acidification was suppressed by the H(+)-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1(100 nM) and the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger inhibitor amiloride (1 mM) by 85% and 54%, respectively. These results suggest that, in addition to Na(+)/H(+) exchanger, clear cells actively pump proton from cytoplasm into extracellular space through H(+)-ATPase. In addition, inhibition of H(+)-ATPase by bafilomycin A1 blocked the acidification of luminal fluid with IC(50) values of 12 nM, which supports that H(+)-ATPase acidifies the luminal fluid. We also confirm that the acid fluid regulates rat cauda sperm motility. The present work shows that clear cells, the minority cell type of epididymal cell population, play an important role in the pH regulation of epididymal fluid by H(+)-ATPase. Copyright 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. An assay for functional xylose transporters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chengqiang; Shen, Yu; Hou, Jin; Suo, Fan; Bao, Xiaoming

    2013-11-15

    It has been considered that more efficient uptake of xylose could promote increased xylose metabolic capacity of several microorganisms. In this study, an assay to screen xylose transporters was established in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, which expresses the xylosidase gene of Bacillus pumilus intracellularly. The absorbed xylose analog p-nitrophenyl-β-d-xylopyranoside (pNPX) rapidly hydrolyzed to p-nitrophenol (pNP), which displayed a yellow tint when exposed to xylosidase in vivo. The xylose transporter activities of the strain were computed using the pNP production rate, which was detected extracellularly. This method could be used for both high-throughput screening and smaller scale investigations. AraEp, which is a pentose transporter of Corynebacterium glutamicum, was expressed in S. cerevisiae and exhibited better transport capacity than the endogenous transporters Hxt7p and Gal2p. Moreover, a mutant of AraEp with 103% greater transport capacity was screened out, and the computer simulation suggested that transmembrane domain 5 was an important factor for the transport capacity of AraEp in S. cerevisiae.

  12. Functional Expression and Characterization of Plant ABC Transporters in Xenopus laevis Oocytes for Transport Engineering Purposes.

    PubMed

    Xu, D; Veres, D; Belew, Z M; Olsen, C E; Nour-Eldin, H H; Halkier, B A

    2016-01-01

    Transport engineering in bioengineering is aimed at efficient export of the final product to reduce toxicity and feedback inhibition and to increase yield. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters with their highly diverse substrate specificity and role in cellular efflux are potentially suitable in transport engineering approaches, although their size and high number of introns make them notoriously difficult to clone. Here, we report a novel in planta "exon engineering" strategy for cloning of full-length coding sequence of ABC transporters followed by methods for biochemical characterization of ABC exporters in Xenopus oocytes. Although the Xenopus oocyte expression system is particularly suitable for expression of membrane proteins and powerful in screening for novel transporter activity, only few examples of successful expression of ABC transporter has been reported. This raises the question whether the oocytes system is suitable to express and characterize ABC transporters. Thus we have selected AtABCG25, previously characterized in insect cells as the exporter of commercially valuable abscisic acid-as case study for optimizing of characterization in Xenopus oocytes. The tools provided will hopefully contribute to more successful transport engineering in synthetic biology. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Sediment transport-storage functions for alluvial reservoirs

    Treesearch

    Thomas E. Lisle; Michael Church

    2000-01-01

    In a drainage network, sediment is routed through a linked series of channel/valley segments (alluvial reservoirs) that are distinguished from their neighbors by their capacity to store and transport sediment.

  14. Sensory ciliogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans: assignment of IFT components into distinct modules based on transport and phenotypic profiles.

    PubMed

    Ou, Guangshuo; Koga, Makato; Blacque, Oliver E; Murayama, Takashi; Ohshima, Yasumi; Schafer, Jenny C; Li, Chunmei; Yoder, Bradley K; Leroux, Michel R; Scholey, Jonathan M

    2007-05-01

    Sensory cilium biogenesis within Caenorhabditis elegans neurons depends on the kinesin-2-dependent intraflagellar transport (IFT) of ciliary precursors associated with IFT particles to the axoneme tip. Here we analyzed the molecular organization of the IFT machinery by comparing the in vivo transport and phenotypic profiles of multiple proteins involved in IFT and ciliogenesis. Based on their motility in wild-type and bbs (Bardet-Biedl syndrome) mutants, IFT proteins were classified into groups with similar transport profiles that we refer to as "modules." We also analyzed the distribution and transport of fluorescent IFT particles in multiple known ciliary mutants and 49 new ciliary mutants. Most of the latter mutants were snip-SNP mapped and one, namely dyf-14(ks69), was cloned and found to encode a conserved protein essential for ciliogenesis. The products of these ciliogenesis genes could also be assigned to the aforementioned set of modules or to specific aspects of ciliogenesis, based on IFT particle dynamics and ciliary mutant phenotypes. Although binding assays would be required to confirm direct physical interactions, the results are consistent with the hypothesis that the C. elegans IFT machinery has a modular design, consisting of modules IFT-subcomplex A, IFT-subcomplex B, and a BBS protein complex, in addition to motor and cargo modules, with each module contributing to distinct functional aspects of IFT or ciliogenesis.

  15. Sensory Ciliogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans: Assignment of IFT Components into Distinct Modules Based on Transport and Phenotypic Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Guangshuo; Koga, Makato; Blacque, Oliver E.; Murayama, Takashi; Ohshima, Yasumi; Schafer, Jenny C.; Li, Chunmei; Yoder, Bradley K.

    2007-01-01

    Sensory cilium biogenesis within Caenorhabditis elegans neurons depends on the kinesin-2–dependent intraflagellar transport (IFT) of ciliary precursors associated with IFT particles to the axoneme tip. Here we analyzed the molecular organization of the IFT machinery by comparing the in vivo transport and phenotypic profiles of multiple proteins involved in IFT and ciliogenesis. Based on their motility in wild-type and bbs (Bardet-Biedl syndrome) mutants, IFT proteins were classified into groups with similar transport profiles that we refer to as “modules.” We also analyzed the distribution and transport of fluorescent IFT particles in multiple known ciliary mutants and 49 new ciliary mutants. Most of the latter mutants were snip-SNP mapped and one, namely dyf-14(ks69), was cloned and found to encode a conserved protein essential for ciliogenesis. The products of these ciliogenesis genes could also be assigned to the aforementioned set of modules or to specific aspects of ciliogenesis, based on IFT particle dynamics and ciliary mutant phenotypes. Although binding assays would be required to confirm direct physical interactions, the results are consistent with the hypothesis that the C. elegans IFT machinery has a modular design, consisting of modules IFT-subcomplex A, IFT-subcomplex B, and a BBS protein complex, in addition to motor and cargo modules, with each module contributing to distinct functional aspects of IFT or ciliogenesis. PMID:17314406

  16. Enhanced serotonin transporter function during depression in seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Willeit, Matthäus; Sitte, Harald H; Thierry, Nikolaus; Michalek, Klaus; Praschak-Rieder, Nicole; Zill, Peter; Winkler, Dietmar; Brannath, Werner; Fischer, Michael B; Bondy, Brigitta; Kasper, Siegfried; Singer, Ernst A

    2008-06-01

    Decreased synaptic serotonin during depressive episodes is a central element of the monoamine hypothesis of depression. The serotonin transporter (5-HTT, SERT) is a key molecule for the control of synaptic serotonin levels. Here we aimed to detect state-related alterations in the efficiency of 5-HTT-mediated inward and outward transport in platelets of drug-free depressed patients suffering from seasonal affective disorder (SAD). 5-HTT turnover rate, a measure for the number of inward transport events per minute, and tyramine-induced, 5-HTT-mediated outward transport were assessed at baseline, after 4 weeks of bright light therapy, and in summer using a case-control design in a consecutive sample of 73 drug-free depressed patients with SAD and 70 nonseasonal healthy controls. Patients were drug-naive or medication-free for at least 6 months prior to study inclusion, females patients were studied in the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. All participants were genotyped for a 5-HTT-promoter polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) to assess the influence of this polymorphism on 5-HTT parameters. Efficiency of 5-HTT-mediated inward (p=0.014) and outward (p=0.003) transport was enhanced in depressed patients. Both measures normalized toward control levels after therapy and in natural summer remission. Changes in outward transport showed a clear correlation with treatment response (rho=0.421, p=0.001). Changes in inward transport were mediated by changes in 5-HTT transport efficiency rather than affinity or density. 5-HTTLPR was not associated with any of the 5-HTT parameters. In sum, we conclude that the 5-HTT is in a hyperfunctional state during depression in SAD and normalizes after light therapy and in natural summer remission.

  17. Calculation of eigenvalues for neutron transport equation using Henyey-Greenstein phase function in slab geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bülbül, Ahmet

    2016-11-01

    Eigenvalues are obtained for one-dimensional steady-state neutron transport equation in slab geometry using Henyey-Greenstein (HG) phase function. Firstly, HG phase function is inserted into neutron transport equation then eigenvalues are calculated for different values of collision parameters c and t parameters. All results are calculated for P9 and U9 approximation and these results compared each other.

  18. PET and SPECT Radiotracers to Assess Function and Expression of ABC Transporters in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mairinger, Severin; Erker, Thomas; Müller, Markus; Langer, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, such as P-glycoprotein (Pgp, ABCB1), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCG2) and multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) are expressed in high concentrations at various physiological barriers (e.g. blood-brain barrier, blood-testis barrier, blood-tumor barrier), where they impede the tissue accumulation of various drugs by active efflux transport. Changes in ABC transporter expression and function are thought to be implicated in various diseases, such as cancer, epilepsy, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. The availability of a non-invasive imaging method which allows for measuring ABC transporter function or expression in vivo would be of great clinical use in that it could facilitate the identification of those patients that would benefit from treatment with ABC transporter modulating drugs. To date three different kinds of imaging probes have been described to measure ABC transporters in vivo: i) radiolabelled transporter substrates ii) radiolabelled transporter inhibitors and iii) radiolabelled prodrugs which are enzymatically converted into transporter substrates in the organ of interest (e.g. brain). The design of new imaging probes to visualize efflux transporters is inter alia complicated by the overlapping substrate recognition pattern of different ABC transporter types. The present article will describe currently available ABC transporter radiotracers for positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and critically discuss strengths and limitations of individual probes and their potential clinical applications. PMID:21434859

  19. SLC6 transporters: structure, function, regulation, disease association and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Pramod, Akula Bala; Foster, James; Carvelli, Lucia; Henry, L Keith

    2013-01-01

    The SLC6 family of secondary active transporters are integral membrane solute carrier proteins characterized by the Na(+)-dependent translocation of small amino acid or amino acid-like substrates. SLC6 transporters, which include the serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, GABA, taurine, creatine, as well as amino acid transporters, are associated with a number of human diseases and disorders making this family a critical target for therapeutic development. In addition, several members of this family are directly involved in the action of drugs of abuse such as cocaine, amphetamines, and ecstasy. Recent advances providing structural insight into this family have vastly accelerated our ability to study these proteins and their involvement in complex biological processes.

  20. SLC6 Transporters: Structure, Function, Regulation, Disease Association and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Bala, Pramod Akula; Foster, James; Carvelli, Lucia; Henry, L. Keith

    2012-01-01

    The SLC6 family of secondary active transporters are integral membrane solute carrier proteins characterized by the Na+-dependent translocation of small amino acid or amino acid-like substrates. SLC6 transporters, which include the serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, GABA, taurine, creatine, as well as amino acid transporters, are associated with a number of human diseases and disorders making this family a critical target for therapeutic development. In addition, several members of this family are directly involved in the action of drugs of abuse such as cocaine, amphetamines, and ecstasy. Recent advances providing structural insight into this family have vastly accelerated our ability to study these proteins and their involvement in complex biological processes. PMID:23506866

  1. Functional transformations of bile acid transporters induced by high-affinity macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hilal, Taslim A.; Chung, Seung Woo; Alam, Farzana; Park, Jooho; Lee, Kyung Eun; Jeon, Hyesung; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kwon, Ick Chan; Kim, In-San; Kim, Sang Yoon; Byun, Youngro

    2014-01-01

    Apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporters (ASBT) are the intestinal transporters that form intermediate complexes with substrates and its conformational change drives the movement of substrates across the cell membrane. However, membrane-based intestinal transporters are confined to the transport of only small molecular substrates. Here, we propose a new strategy that uses high-affinity binding macromolecular substrates to functionally transform the membrane transporters so that they behave like receptors, ultimately allowing the apical-basal transport of bound macromolecules. Bile acid based macromolecular substrates were synthesized and allowed to interact with ASBT. ASBT/macromolecular substrate complexes were rapidly internalized in vesicles, localized in early endosomes, dissociated and escaped the vesicular transport while binding of cytoplasmic ileal bile acid binding proteins cause exocytosis of macromolecules and prevented entry into lysosomes. This newly found transformation process of ASBT suggests a new transport mechanism that could aid in further utilization of ASBT to mediate oral macromolecular drug delivery. PMID:24566561

  2. Functional transformations of bile acid transporters induced by high-affinity macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Al-Hilal, Taslim A; Chung, Seung Woo; Alam, Farzana; Park, Jooho; Lee, Kyung Eun; Jeon, Hyesung; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kwon, Ick Chan; Kim, In-San; Kim, Sang Yoon; Byun, Youngro

    2014-02-25

    Apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporters (ASBT) are the intestinal transporters that form intermediate complexes with substrates and its conformational change drives the movement of substrates across the cell membrane. However, membrane-based intestinal transporters are confined to the transport of only small molecular substrates. Here, we propose a new strategy that uses high-affinity binding macromolecular substrates to functionally transform the membrane transporters so that they behave like receptors, ultimately allowing the apical-basal transport of bound macromolecules. Bile acid based macromolecular substrates were synthesized and allowed to interact with ASBT. ASBT/macromolecular substrate complexes were rapidly internalized in vesicles, localized in early endosomes, dissociated and escaped the vesicular transport while binding of cytoplasmic ileal bile acid binding proteins cause exocytosis of macromolecules and prevented entry into lysosomes. This newly found transformation process of ASBT suggests a new transport mechanism that could aid in further utilization of ASBT to mediate oral macromolecular drug delivery.

  3. Optimizing the patient transport function at Mayo Clinic.

    PubMed

    Kuchera, Dustin; Rohleder, Thomas R

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we report on the implementation of a computerized scheduling tool to optimize staffing for patient transport at the Mayo Clinic. The tool was developed and implemented in Microsoft Excel and Visual Basic for Applications and includes an easy-to-use interface. The tool allows transport management to consider the trade-offs between patient waiting time and staffing levels. While improved staffing efficiency was a desire of the project, it was important that patient service quality was also maintained. The results show that staffing could be reduced while maintaining historical patient service levels.

  4. Functions of Ion Transport Peptide and Ion Transport Peptide-Like in the Red Flour Beetle Tribolium castaneum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ion transport peptide (ITP) and ITP-like (ITPL) are highly conserved neuropeptides in insects and crustaceans. We investigated the alternatively spliced variants of ITP/ITPL in Tribolium castaneum to understand their functions. We identified three alternatively spliced transcripts named itp, itpl-...

  5. Structure-function relationships in sapwood water transport and storage.

    Treesearch

    Barbara L. Gartner; Frederick C. Meinzer

    2005-01-01

    Primary production by plants requires the loss of substantial quantities of water when the stomata are open for carbon assimilation. The delivery of that water to the leaves occurs through the xylem. The structure, condition, and quantity of the xylem control not only the transport efficiency but also the release of water from storage. For example, if there is high...

  6. Effect of temperament and prolonged transportation on endocrine and functional variables in young beef bulls.

    PubMed

    Fazio, E; Medica, P; Cravana, C; Cavaleri, S; Ferlazzo, A

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of prolonged transportation on adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol, total and free triiodothyronine (T(3), fT(3)) and thyroxine (T(4), fT(4)) concentrations, and functional variables (heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR) and rectal temperature (RT)) in calm and temperamental Limousin young beef bulls. Exit velocity measurement was used to classify bulls' temperament as calm (group I: consisted of eight slowest bulls) and temperamental (group II: consisted of five fastest bulls). Calm subjects showed an increase of ACTH (P<0.05) and T(4) (P<0.01) concentrations after transportation compared with before transportation values. Temperamental subjects showed higher ACTH (P<0.01) concentrations before transportation, and lower T(4) (P<0.05) and fT(4) (P<0.001) concentrations after transportation than calm subjects. Related to functional variables, temperamental young beef bulls showed a decrease of RT (P<0.05) after transportation compared with before values, higher RT (P<0.001) before transportation, and higher HR (P<0.001) and RR (P<0.01) after transportation than calm subjects. Data obtained suggest that longer periods of transportation could minimise the magnitude and duration of the endocrine and functional responses to stress of young beef bulls; such responses probably decrease or disappear during transport, in accordance with animal temperament.

  7. Effect of transportation on lower respiratory tract contamination and peripheral blood neutrophil function.

    PubMed

    Raidal, S L; Bailey, G D; Love, D N

    1997-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of transportation on lower respiratory tract contamination and peripheral blood neutrophil function in horses and to compare results from transported horses with those obtained in earlier experiments from horses confined with heads elevated. A prospective study. Six horses were transported by road for 12 h. Clinical and haematological examination, transtracheal aspiration and cell function studies were conducted before and after transportation. Results obtained after transportation were compared to pre-transportation values. After transportation, peripheral blood leucocyte and neutrophil numbers were increased and rectal temperatures were evaluated. Transtracheal aspirates showed an accumulation of purulent respiratory tract secretions with increased numbers of bacteria, particularly beta-haemolytic Streptococcus spp and members of the Pasteurellaceae family. Three horses also had increased numbers of bacteria from the Enterobacteriaceae family relative to corresponding samples from earlier studies. Phagocytosis by peripheral blood neutrophils was significantly reduced, while the oxidative burst activity of peripheral blood leucocytes was either unchanged or enhanced. Bacterial contamination of the lower respiratory tract occurs as a routine consequence of transportation of horses and is likely to be an important determinant in the development of transport-associated respiratory disease. Inflammatory airway secretions and increased numbers of bacteria were rapidly cleared, without clinical evidence of significant pulmonary disease and without additional treatment, in normal horses that were allowed to lower their heads after transportation. Peripheral blood neutrophilia and a reduction in neutrophil phagocytic function were evident for at least 36 h after transportation, suggesting that horses may require a number of days to recover from the stress of transportation. As the potential role of bacteria from the Enterobacteriaceae family in the

  8. Viability and functional assessment of murine pancreatic islets after transportation between Korea and Japan.

    PubMed

    Lee, S; Takahashi, Y; Lee, K M; Mizuno, M; Nemeno, J G; Takebe, T; Lee, J I

    2015-04-01

    Organ donor scarcity remains a restricting factor for pancreatic islet transplantation. To date, limited information is available on the impact of long-distance transportation on transplantable pancreatic islets. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of transportation on the viability and function of murine pancreatic islet cells. The isolated murine pancreatic islets were transported from Japan to Korea with the use of commercial modes of transportation: subway and commercial airplane. After transportation, the islets were assessed by performing a viability assay and by evaluating the islets' insulin secretion in response to glucose stimulation. A comparative study was performed for evaluating the insulin secretory responses of transported and control islets (not transported). There was no evidence of contamination in the transported pancreatic islets. No significant differences were observed in the viability and functionality of the transported and control islet cells. These findings show the feasibility of pancreatic islet transportation from Japan to Korea. Our data could be used not only for the inter-Asian but also for global advancement of animal and human islet transportation methods and transplantation research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Functional hot spots in human ATP-binding cassette transporter nucleotide binding domains

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Libusha; Fukushima, Hisayo; Karchin, Rachel; Gow, Jason M; Chinn, Leslie W; Pieper, Ursula; Segal, Mark R; Kroetz, Deanna L; Sali, Andrej

    2010-01-01

    The human ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily consists of 48 integral membrane proteins that couple the action of ATP binding and hydrolysis to the transport of diverse substrates across cellular membranes. Defects in 18 transporters have been implicated in human disease. In hundreds of cases, disease phenotypes and defects in function can be traced to nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs). The functional impact of the majority of ABC transporter nsSNPs has yet to be experimentally characterized. Here, we combine experimental mutational studies with sequence and structural analysis to describe the impact of nsSNPs in human ABC transporters. First, the disease associations of 39 nsSNPs in 10 transporters were rationalized by identifying two conserved loops and a small α-helical region that may be involved in interdomain communication necessary for transport of substrates. Second, an approach to discriminate between disease-associated and neutral nsSNPs was developed and tailored to this superfamily. Finally, the functional impact of 40 unannotated nsSNPs in seven ABC transporters identified in 247 ethnically diverse individuals studied by the Pharmacogenetics of Membrane Transporters consortium was predicted. Three predictions were experimentally tested using human embryonic kidney epithelial (HEK) 293 cells stably transfected with the reference multidrug resistance transporter 4 and its variants to examine functional differences in transport of the antiviral drug, tenofovir. The experimental results confirmed two predictions. Our analysis provides a structural and evolutionary framework for rationalizing and predicting the functional effects of nsSNPs in this clinically important membrane transporter superfamily. PMID:20799350

  10. Expression and Function of Intestinal Hexose Transporters after Small Intestinal Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Corey W.; Fatima, Javairiah; Duenes, Judith; Houghton, Scott G.; Kasparek, Michael S.; Sarr, Michael G.

    2009-01-01

    Background The role of neural regulation in expression and function of intestinal hexose transporters is unknown. Aim To determine the role of intestinal innervation in gene expression and function of the membrane hexose transporters, SGLT1, GLUT2, and GLUT5 in the enterocyte. Hypothesis Denervation of the small intestine decreases expression of hexose transporters leading to decreased glucose absorption. Methods Six groups of Lewis rats were studied (n=6 each): control, 1 wk after sham laparotomy, 1 and 8 wk after syngeneic (no immune rejection) orthotopic small bowel transplantation (SBT) (SBT1, SBT8) to induce complete extrinsic denervation, and 1 and 8 wk after selective disruption of intrinsic neural continuity to jejunoileum by gut transection and reanastomosis (T/A1, T/A8). All tissue was harvested between 8AM and 10AM. In duodenum, jejunum, and ileum, mucosal mRNA levels were quantitated by real time PCR, protein by Western blotting, and transporter-mediated glucose absorption using the everted sleeve technique. Results Across the six groups, relative gene expression of hexose transporter mRNA and protein levels were unchanged and no difference in transporter-mediated glucose uptake was evident in any region. Glucose transporter affinity (Km) and functional transporter levels (Vmax) calculated for duodenum and jejunum showed no difference between the six groups. Conclusion Baseline regulation of hexose transporter function is not mediated tonically by intrinsic or extrinsic neural continuity to the jejunoileum. PMID:19541015

  11. Creatine transporter deficiency: Novel mutations and functional studies.

    PubMed

    Ardon, O; Procter, M; Mao, R; Longo, N; Landau, Y E; Shilon-Hadass, A; Gabis, L V; Hoffmann, C; Tzadok, M; Heimer, G; Sada, S; Ben-Zeev, B; Anikster, Y

    2016-09-01

    X-linked cerebral creatine deficiency (MIM 300036) is caused by deficiency of the creatine transporter encoded by the SLC6A8 gene. Here we report three patients with this condition from Israel. These unrelated patients were evaluated for global developmental delays and language apraxia. Borderline microcephaly was noted in one of them. Diagnosis was prompted by brain magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy which revealed normal white matter distribution, but absence of the creatine peak in all three patients. Biochemical testing indicated normal plasma levels of creatine and guanidinoacetate, but an increased urine creatine/creatinine ratio. The diagnosis was confirmed by demonstrating absent ([14])C-creatine transport in fibroblasts. Molecular studies indicated that the first patient is hemizygous for a single nucleotide change substituting a single amino acid (c.619 C > T, p.R207W). Expression studies in HeLa cells confirmed the causative role of the R207W substitution. The second patient had a three base pair deletion in the SLC6A8 gene (c.1222_1224delTTC, p.F408del) as well as a single base change (c.1254 + 1G > A) at a splicing site in the intron-exon junction of exon 8, the latter occurring de novo. The third patient, had a three base pair deletion (c.1006_1008delAAC, p.N336del) previously reported in other patients with creatine transporter deficiency. These three patients are the first reported cases of creatine transporter deficiency in Israel.

  12. Membranes with functionalized carbon nanotube pores for selective transport

    DOEpatents

    Bakajin, Olgica; Noy, Aleksandr; Fornasiero, Francesco; Park, Hyung Gyu; Holt, Jason K; Kim, Sangil

    2015-01-27

    Provided herein composition and methods for nanoporous membranes comprising single walled, double walled, or multi-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in a matrix material. Average pore size of the carbon nanotube can be 6 nm or less. These membranes are a robust platform for the study of confined molecular transport, with applications in liquid and gas separations and chemical sensing including desalination, dialysis, and fabric formation.

  13. Osmoregulation in zebrafish: ion transport mechanisms and functional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Guh, Ying-Jey; Lin, Chia-Hao; Hwang, Pung-Pung

    2015-01-01

    Fish, like mammals, have to maintain their body fluid ionic and osmotic homeostasis through sophisticated iono-/osmoregulation mechanisms, which are conducted mainly by ionocytes of the gill (the skin in embryonic stages), instead of the renal tubular cells in mammals. Given the advantages in terms of genetic database availability and manipulation, zebrafish is an emerging model for research into regulatory and integrative physiology. At least five types of ionocytes, HR, NaR, NCC, SLC26, and KS cells, have been identified to carry out Na+ uptake/H+ secretion/NH4+ excretion, Ca2+ uptake, Na+/Cl- uptake, K+ secretion, and Cl- uptake/HCO3- secretion, respectively, through distinct sets of transporters. Several hormones, namely isotocin, prolactin, cortisol, stanniocalcin-1, calcitonin, endothelin-1, vitamin D, parathyorid hormone 1, catecholamines, and the renin-angiotensin-system, have been demonstrated to positively or negatively regulate ion transport through specific receptors at different ionocytes stages, at either the transcriptional/translational or posttranslational level. The knowledge obtained using zebrafish answered many long-term contentious or unknown issues in the field of fish iono-/osmoregulation. The homology of ion transport pathways and hormone systems also means that the zebrafish model informs studies on mammals or other animal species, thereby providing insights into related fields. PMID:26600749

  14. Human organic anion transporter 2 is distinct from organic anion transporters 1 and 3 with respect to transport function.

    PubMed

    Henjakovic, Maja; Hagos, Yohannes; Krick, Wolfgang; Burckhardt, Gerhard; Burckhardt, Birgitta C

    2015-11-15

    Phylogentically, organic anion transporter (OAT)1 and OAT3 are closely related, whereas OAT2 is more distant. Experiments with human embryonic kidney-293 cells stably transfected with human OAT1, OAT2, or OAT3 were performed to compare selected transport properties. Common to OAT1, OAT2, and OAT3 is their ability to transport cGMP. OAT2 interacted with prostaglandins, and cGMP uptake was inhibited by PGE2 and PGF2α with IC50 values of 40.8 and 12.7 μM, respectively. OAT1 (IC50: 23.7 μM), OAT2 (IC50: 9.5 μM), and OAT3 (IC50: 1.6 μM) were potently inhibited by MK571, an established multidrug resistance protein inhibitor. OAT2-mediated cGMP uptake was not inhibited by short-chain monocarboxylates and, as opposed to OAT1 and OAT3, not by dicarboxylates. Consequently, OAT2 showed no cGMP/glutarate exchange. OAT1 and OAT3 exhibited a pH and a Cl- dependence with higher substrate uptake at acidic pH and lower substrate uptake in the absence of Cl-, respectively. Such pH and Cl- dependencies were not observed with OAT2. Depolarization of membrane potential by high K+ concentrations in the presence of the K+ ionophore valinomycin left cGMP uptake unaffected. In addition to cGMP, OAT2 transported urate and glutamate, but cGMP/glutamate exchange could not be demonstrated. These experiments suggest that OAT2-mediated cGMP uptake does not occur via exchange with monocarboxylates, dicarboxylates, and hydroxyl ions. The counter anion for electroneutral cGMP uptake remains to be identified.

  15. Physiological Functions of Cyclic Electron Transport Around Photosystem I in Sustaining Photosynthesis and Plant Growth.

    PubMed

    Yamori, Wataru; Shikanai, Toshiharu

    2016-04-29

    The light reactions in photosynthesis drive both linear and cyclic electron transport around photosystem I (PSI). Linear electron transport generates both ATP and NADPH, whereas PSI cyclic electron transport produces ATP without producing NADPH. PSI cyclic electron transport is thought to be essential for balancing the ATP/NADPH production ratio and for protecting both photosystems from damage caused by stromal overreduction. Two distinct pathways of cyclic electron transport have been proposed in angiosperms: a major pathway that depends on the PROTON GRADIENT REGULATION 5 (PGR5) and PGR5-LIKE PHOTOSYNTHETIC PHENOTYPE 1 (PGRL1) proteins, which are the target site of antimycin A, and a minor pathway mediated by the chloroplast NADH dehydrogenase-like (NDH) complex. Recently, the regulation of PSI cyclic electron transport has been recognized as essential for photosynthesis and plant growth. In this review, we summarize the possible functions and importance of the two pathways of PSI cyclic electron transport.

  16. Effects of various pharmacological agents on the function of norepinephrine transporter.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Noriaki; Toyohira, Yumiko; Takahashi, Keita; Yanagihara, Nobuyuki

    2015-03-01

    The norepinephrine transporter is selectively expressed in noradrenergic nerve terminals, where it can exert spatial and temporal control over the action of norepinephrine. The norepinephrine transporter mediates the termination of neurotransmission via the reuptake of norepinephrine released into the extracellular milieu. In the present brief review, we report our recent studies about the effects of various pharmacological agents such as fasudil, nicotine, pentazocine, ketamine and genistein on norepinephrine transporter function.

  17. Functional characterization of a Na+-dependent dicarboxylate transporter from Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Mulligan, Christopher; Fitzgerald, Gabriel A.; Wang, Da-Neng

    2014-01-01

    The SLC13 transporter family, whose members play key physiological roles in the regulation of fatty acid synthesis, adiposity, insulin resistance, and other processes, catalyzes the transport of Krebs cycle intermediates and sulfate across the plasma membrane of mammalian cells. SLC13 transporters are part of the divalent anion:Na+ symporter (DASS) family that includes several well-characterized bacterial members. Despite sharing significant sequence similarity, the functional characteristics of DASS family members differ with regard to their substrate and coupling ion dependence. The publication of a high resolution structure of dimer VcINDY, a bacterial DASS family member, provides crucial structural insight into this transporter family. However, marrying this structural insight to the current functional understanding of this family also demands a comprehensive analysis of the transporter’s functional properties. To this end, we purified VcINDY, reconstituted it into liposomes, and determined its basic functional characteristics. Our data demonstrate that VcINDY is a high affinity, Na+-dependent transporter with a preference for C4- and C5-dicarboxylates. Transport of the model substrate, succinate, is highly pH dependent, consistent with VcINDY strongly preferring the substrate’s dianionic form. VcINDY transport is electrogenic with succinate coupled to the transport of three or more Na+ ions. In contrast to succinate, citrate, bound in the VcINDY crystal structure (in an inward-facing conformation), seems to interact only weakly with the transporter in vitro. These transport properties together provide a functional framework for future experimental and computational examinations of the VcINDY transport mechanism. PMID:24821967

  18. Functional Survey for Heterologous Sugar Transport Proteins, Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a Host▿

    PubMed Central

    Young, Eric; Poucher, Ashley; Comer, Austin; Bailey, Alexandra; Alper, Hal

    2011-01-01

    Molecular transport is a key process in cellular metabolism. This step is often limiting when using a nonnative carbon source, as exemplified by xylose catabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. As a step toward addressing this limitation, this study seeks to characterize monosaccharide transport preference and efficiency. A group of 26 known and putative monosaccharide transport proteins was expressed in a recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae host unable to transport several monosaccharides. A growth-based assay was used to detect transport capacity across six different carbon sources (glucose, xylose, galactose, fructose, mannose, and ribose). A mixed glucose-and-xylose cofermentation was performed to determine substrate preference. These experiments identified 10 transporter proteins that function as transporters of one or more of these sugars. Most of these proteins exhibited broad substrate ranges, and glucose was preferred in all cases. The broadest transporters confer the highest growth rates and strongly prefer glucose. This study reports the first molecular characterization of the annotated XUT genes of Scheffersomyces stipitis and open reading frames from the yeasts Yarrowia lipolytica and Debaryomyces hansenii. Finally, a phylogenetic analysis demonstrates that transporter function clusters into three distinct groups. One particular group comprised of D. hansenii XylHP and S. stipitis XUT1 and XUT3 demonstrated moderate transport efficiency and higher xylose preferences. PMID:21421781

  19. SLC transporters as a novel class of tumour suppressors: identity, function and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Bhutia, Yangzom D; Babu, Ellappan; Ramachandran, Sabarish; Yang, Shengping; Thangaraju, Muthusamy; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2016-05-01

    The role of plasma membrane transporters in cancer is receiving increasing attention in recent years. Several transporters for essential nutrients are up-regulated in cancer and serve as tumour promoters. Transporters could also function as tumour suppressors. To date, four transporters belonging to the SLC gene family have been identified as tumour suppressors. SLC5A8 is a Na(+)-coupled transporter for monocarboxylates. Among its substrates are the bacterial fermentation products butyrate and propionate and the ubiquitous metabolite pyruvate. The tumour-suppressive function of this transporter relates to the ability of butyrate, propionate and pyruvate to inhibit histone deacetylases (HDAC). SLC5A8 functions as a tumour suppressor in most tissues studied thus far, and provides a molecular link to Warburg effect, a characteristic feature in most cancers. It also links colonic bacteria and dietary fibre to the host. SLC26A3 as a tumour suppressor is restricted to colon; it is a Cl(-)/HCO(-) 3 exchanger, facilitating the efflux of HCO(-) 3 The likely mechanism for the tumour-suppressive function of SLC26A3 is related to intracellular pH regulation. SLC39A1 is a Zn(2+) transporter and its role in tumour suppression has been shown in prostate. Zn(2+) is present at high concentrations in normal prostate where it elicits its tumour-suppressive function. SLC22A18 is possibly an organic cation transporter, but the identity of its physiological substrates is unknown. As such, there is no information on molecular pathways responsible for the tumour-suppressive function of this transporter. It is likely that additional SLC transporters will be discovered as tumour suppressors in the future. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  20. Genome-wide annotation and functional identification of aphid GLUT-like sugar transporters.

    PubMed

    Price, Daniel R G; Gatehouse, John A

    2014-08-04

    Phloem feeding insects, such as aphids, feed almost continuously on plant phloem sap, a liquid diet that contains high concentrations of sucrose (a disaccharide comprising of glucose and fructose). To access the available carbon, aphids hydrolyze sucrose in the gut lumen and transport its constituent monosaccharides, glucose and fructose. Although sugar transport plays a critical role in aphid nutrition, the molecular basis of sugar transport in aphids, and more generally across all insects, remains poorly characterized. Here, using the latest release of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, genome we provide an updated gene annotation and expression profile of putative sugar transporters. Finally, gut expressed sugar transporters are functionally expressed in yeast and screened for glucose and fructose transport activity. In this study, using a de novo approach, we identified 19 sugar porter (SP) family transporters in the A. pisum genome. Gene expression analysis, based on 214, 834 A. pisum expressed sequence tags, supports 17 sugar porter family transporters being actively expressed in adult female aphids. Further analysis, using quantitative PCR identifies 4 transporters, A. pisum sugar transporter 1, 3, 4 and 9 (ApST1, ApST3, ApST4 and ApST9) as highly expressed and/or enriched in gut tissue. When expressed in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae hexose transporter deletion mutant (strain EBY.VW4000), only ApST3 (previously characterized) and ApST4 (reported here) transport glucose and fructose resulting in functional rescue of the yeast mutant. Here we characterize ApST4, a 491 amino acid protein, with 12 predicted transmembrane regions, as a facilitative glucose/fructose transporter. Finally, phylogenetic reconstruction reveals that ApST4, and related, as yet uncharacterized insect transporters are phylogenetically closely related to human GLUT (SLC2A) class I facilitative glucose/fructose transporters. The gut enhanced expression of ApST4, and the transport specificity

  1. [Vesicular intracellular transport in the digestive organs. Membrane vesicle--the universal mechanism of the functional transport].

    PubMed

    Morozov, I A

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of long-term research of the morpho-functional characteristics of the cells of the stomach, small intestine and gallbladder the mechanism and function of membrane vesicles in the implementation of the main functions of these organs sets out in this article: the secretion of hydrochloric acid by parietal cells, the absorption of nutrients in the small intestine and the fluid at a concentration of bile epitheliocytes of gallbladder. Proofs of the intracellular formation of hydrochloric acid in tubulovesicles of the parietal cells and turnover of its secretory membranes in the process of secretory cycle, that has ensured the re-use and explained the extraordinary life of these unique cells are presented. The credible mechanism of HCl output oppression by H(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity blockers has set out on this basis. The article provides detailed endocytosis mechanism of the ions and nutrients absorption by enterocytes. The mechanism of participation of the apical contractile complex of brush border of epithelial cells in the initiation of endocytosis and cytoplasmic microtubules in transport of membrane vesicles in the cytoplasm was analyzed. Based on our research and numerous of the world scientific proceedings the conclusion was done about the existence of two energy dependent types of transport in the absorptive epithelium of the digestive--transmembrane (ionic and nutritive) homeostatic type which is realized by the ATP-system of the basal plasmalemma, and vesicular (endocytosis) type which is impltmented by apical contractile complex of brush border and cytoplasmic microtubules. Both types of transport are interrelated and are under constant cellular control. This observation is relevant to the majority of cells, including those involved in the secretion of various substances: hydrochloric acid by parietal cells, enzymes by main cells of the gastric glands and exocrinocytes of the pancreas, hormone by endocrine cells of the APUD system and, finally

  2. TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation outline: transport principles, effective solubility; gasoline composition; and field examples (plume diving).
    Presentation conclusions: MTBE transport follows from - phyiscal and chemical properties and hydrology. Field examples show: MTBE plumes > benzene plu...

  3. Expression analysis and functional characterization of the monosaccharide transporters, OsTMTs, involving vacuolar sugar transport in rice (Oryza sativa).

    PubMed

    Cho, Jung-Il; Burla, Bo; Lee, Dae-Woo; Ryoo, Nayeon; Hong, Soon-Kwan; Kim, Hyun-Bi; Eom, Joon-Seob; Choi, Sang-Bong; Cho, Man-Ho; Bhoo, Seong Hee; Hahn, Tae-Ryong; Neuhaus, H Ekkehard; Martinoia, Enrico; Jeon, Jong-Seong

    2010-05-01

    In Arabidopsis, the compartmentation of sugars into vacuoles is known to be facilitated by sugar transporters. However, vacuolar sugar transporters have not been studied in detail in other plant species. To characterize the rice (Oryza sativa) tonoplast monosaccharide transporters, OsTMT1 and OsTMT2, we analysed their subcellular localization using green fluorescent protein (GFP) and expression patterns using reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), performed histochemical beta-glucuronidase (GUS) assay and in situ hybridization analysis, and assessed sugar transport ability using isolated vacuoles. Expression of OsTMT-GFP fusion protein in rice and Arabidopsis revealed that the OsTMTs localize at the tonoplast. Analyses of OsTMT promoter-GUS transgenic rice indicated that OsTMT1 and OsTMT2 are highly expressed in bundle sheath cells, and in vascular parenchyma and companion cells in leaves, respectively. Both genes were found to be preferentially expressed in the vascular tissues of roots, the palea/lemma of spikelets, and in the main vascular tissues and nucellar projections on the dorsal side of the seed coats. Glucose uptake studies using vacuoles isolated from transgenic mutant Arabidopsis (tmt1-2-3) expressing OsTMT1 demonstrated that OsTMTs are capable of transporting glucose into vacuoles. Based on expression analysis and functional characterization, our present findings suggest that the OsTMTs play a role in vacuolar glucose storage in rice.

  4. A novel fungal family of oligopeptide transporters identified by functional metatranscriptomics of soil eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Damon, Coralie; Vallon, Laurent; Zimmermann, Sabine; Haider, Muhammad Z; Galeote, Virginie; Dequin, Sylvie; Luis, Patricia; Fraissinet-Tachet, Laurence; Marmeisse, Roland

    2011-12-01

    Functional environmental genomics has the potential to identify novel biological functions that the systematic sequencing of microbial genomes or environmental DNA may fail to uncover. We targeted the functions expressed by soil eukaryotes using a metatranscriptomic approach based on the use of soil-extracted polyadenylated messenger RNA to construct environmental complementary DNA expression libraries. Functional complementation of a yeast mutant defective in di/tripeptide uptake identified a novel family of oligopeptide transporters expressed by fungi. This family has a patchy distribution in the Basidiomycota and Ascomycota and is present in the genome of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strain. High throughput phenotyping of yeast mutants expressing two environmental transporters showed that they both displayed broad substrate specificity and could transport more than 60-80 dipeptides. When expressed in Xenopus oocytes one environmental transporter induced currents upon dipeptide addition, suggesting proton-coupled co-transport of dipeptides. This transporter was also able to transport specifically cysteine. Deletion of the two copies of the corresponding gene family members in the genome of the wine yeast strain severely reduced the number of dipeptides that it could assimilate. These results demonstrate that these genes are functional and can be used by fungi to efficiently scavenge the numerous, low concentration, oligopeptides continuously generated in soils by proteolysis.

  5. Empirical sediment transport function predicting seepage erosion undercutting for cohesive bank failure prediction

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Seepage erosion is an important factor in hillslope instability and failure. However, predicting erosion by subsurface flow or seepage and incorporating its effects into stability models remains a challenge. Limitations exist with all existing seepage erosion sediment transport functions, including ...

  6. Transport functions of nitrogen up to 26,000 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermann, W.; Schade, E.

    1980-01-01

    The current field strength characteristic, E(1), and a large number of radial temperature distributions, T(r,I), measured in a 5 mm N2 cascade arc at normal pressure are used to evaluate the transport properties of nitrogen up to 26,000 K. The electrical conductivity sigma (T) and the Coulomb cross section are determined directly from the E(I) and several T(r,I) curves. Between 10,000 and 15,000 K the radiative energy flux for different arc current, the thermal conductivity, and from this the charge exchange cross section are determined in a good approximation utilizing the large number of measured temperature distributions. It turns out, that at the highest measured arc current, i.e., 570 A, in the axial region of the arc about 95% of the supplied energy is carried off by radiation.

  7. Thermal transport across metal silicide-silicon interfaces: First-principles calculations and Green's function transport simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadasivam, Sridhar; Ye, Ning; Feser, Joseph P.; Charles, James; Miao, Kai; Kubis, Tillmann; Fisher, Timothy S.

    2017-02-01

    Heat transfer across metal-semiconductor interfaces involves multiple fundamental transport mechanisms such as elastic and inelastic phonon scattering, and electron-phonon coupling within the metal and across the interface. The relative contributions of these different transport mechanisms to the interface conductance remains unclear in the current literature. In this work, we use a combination of first-principles calculations under the density functional theory framework and heat transport simulations using the atomistic Green's function (AGF) method to quantitatively predict the contribution of the different scattering mechanisms to the thermal interface conductance of epitaxial CoSi2-Si interfaces. An important development in the present work is the direct computation of interfacial bonding from density functional perturbation theory (DFPT) and hence the avoidance of commonly used "mixing rules" to obtain the cross-interface force constants from bulk material force constants. Another important algorithmic development is the integration of the recursive Green's function (RGF) method with Büttiker probe scattering that enables computationally efficient simulations of inelastic phonon scattering and its contribution to the thermal interface conductance. First-principles calculations of electron-phonon coupling reveal that cross-interface energy transfer between metal electrons and atomic vibrations in the semiconductor is mediated by delocalized acoustic phonon modes that extend on both sides of the interface, and phonon modes that are localized inside the semiconductor region of the interface exhibit negligible coupling with electrons in the metal. We also provide a direct comparison between simulation predictions and experimental measurements of thermal interface conductance of epitaxial CoSi2-Si interfaces using the time-domain thermoreflectance technique. Importantly, the experimental results, performed across a wide temperature range, only agree well with

  8. Fast axonal transport of the proteasome complex depends on membrane interaction and molecular motor function.

    PubMed

    Otero, Maria G; Alloatti, Matías; Cromberg, Lucas E; Almenar-Queralt, Angels; Encalada, Sandra E; Pozo Devoto, Victorio M; Bruno, Luciana; Goldstein, Lawrence S B; Falzone, Tomás L

    2014-04-01

    Protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system in neurons depends on the correct delivery of the proteasome complex. In neurodegenerative diseases, aggregation and accumulation of proteins in axons link transport defects with degradation impairments; however, the transport properties of proteasomes remain unknown. Here, using in vivo experiments, we reveal the fast anterograde transport of assembled and functional 26S proteasome complexes. A high-resolution tracking system to follow fluorescent proteasomes revealed three types of motion: actively driven proteasome axonal transport, diffusive behavior in a viscoelastic axonema and proteasome-confined motion. We show that active proteasome transport depends on motor function because knockdown of the KIF5B motor subunit resulted in impairment of the anterograde proteasome flux and the density of segmental velocities. Finally, we reveal that neuronal proteasomes interact with intracellular membranes and identify the coordinated transport of fluorescent proteasomes with synaptic precursor vesicles, Golgi-derived vesicles, lysosomes and mitochondria. Taken together, our results reveal fast axonal transport as a new mechanism of proteasome delivery that depends on membrane cargo 'hitch-hiking' and the function of molecular motors. We further hypothesize that defects in proteasome transport could promote abnormal protein clearance in neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. Functional Characterization of a Hexose Transporter from Root Endophyte Piriformospora indica

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Mamta; Raj, Sumit; Dayaman, Vikram; Kumar, Manoj; Dua, Meenakshi; Johri, Atul K.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism of photosynthate transfer at symbiotic interface by fungal monosaccharide transporter is of substantial importance. The carbohydrate uptake at the apoplast by the fungus is facilitated by PiHXT5 hexose transporter in root endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica. The putative PiHXT5 belongs to MFS superfamily with 12 predicted transmembrane helices. It possess sugar transporter PFAM motif (PF0083) and MFS superfamily domain (PS50850). It contains the signature tags related to glucose transporter GLUT1 of human erythrocyte. PiHXT5 is regulated in response to mutualism as well as glucose concentration. We have functionally characterized PiHXT5 by complementation of hxt-null mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae EBY.VW4000. It is involved in transport of multiple sugars ranging from D-glucose, D-fructose, D-xylose, D-mannose, D-galactose with decreasing affinity. The uncoupling experiments indicate that it functions as H+/glucose co-transporter. Further, pH dependence analysis suggests that it functions maximum between pH 5 and 6. The expression of PiHXT5 is dependent on glucose concentration and was found to be expressed at low glucose levels (1 mM) which indicate its role as a high affinity glucose transporter. Our study on this sugar transporter will help in better understanding of carbon metabolism and flow in this agro-friendly fungus. PMID:27499747

  10. Functional analysis of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene family of Tribolium castaneum.

    PubMed

    Broehan, Gunnar; Kroeger, Tobias; Lorenzen, Marcé; Merzendorfer, Hans

    2013-01-16

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters belong to a large superfamily of proteins that have important physiological functions in all living organisms. Most are integral membrane proteins that transport a broad spectrum of substrates across lipid membranes. In insects, ABC transporters are of special interest because of their role in insecticide resistance. We have identified 73 ABC transporter genes in the genome of T. castaneum, which group into eight subfamilies (ABCA-H). This coleopteran ABC family is significantly larger than those reported for insects in other taxonomic groups. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that this increase is due to gene expansion within a single clade of subfamily ABCC. We performed an RNA interference (RNAi) screen to study the function of ABC transporters during development. In ten cases, injection of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into larvae caused developmental phenotypes, which included growth arrest and localized melanization, eye pigmentation defects, abnormal cuticle formation, egg-laying and egg-hatching defects, and mortality due to abortive molting and desiccation. Some of the ABC transporters we studied in closer detail to examine their role in lipid, ecdysteroid and eye pigment transport. The results from our study provide new insights into the physiological function of ABC transporters in T. castaneum, and may help to establish new target sites for insect control.

  11. Functional analysis of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene family of Tribolium castaneum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters belong to a large superfamily of proteins that have important physiological functions in all living organisms. Most are integral membrane proteins that transport a broad spectrum of substrates across lipid membranes. In insects, ABC transporters are of special interest because of their role in insecticide resistance. Results We have identified 73 ABC transporter genes in the genome of T. castaneum, which group into eight subfamilies (ABCA-H). This coleopteran ABC family is significantly larger than those reported for insects in other taxonomic groups. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that this increase is due to gene expansion within a single clade of subfamily ABCC. We performed an RNA interference (RNAi) screen to study the function of ABC transporters during development. In ten cases, injection of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into larvae caused developmental phenotypes, which included growth arrest and localized melanization, eye pigmentation defects, abnormal cuticle formation, egg-laying and egg-hatching defects, and mortality due to abortive molting and desiccation. Some of the ABC transporters we studied in closer detail to examine their role in lipid, ecdysteroid and eye pigment transport. Conclusions The results from our study provide new insights into the physiological function of ABC transporters in T. castaneum, and may help to establish new target sites for insect control. PMID:23324493

  12. Plant KT/KUP/HAK Potassium Transporters: Single Family – Multiple Functions

    PubMed Central

    Grabov, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Potassium transporters belonging to the KT/KUP/HAK family are important for various aspects of plant life including mineral nutrition and the regulation of development. Genes encoding these transporters are present in the genomes of all plants, but have not been found in the genomes of Protista or Animalia. The aim of this Botanical Briefing is to analyse the function of KT/KUP/HAK transporters from evolutionary, molecular and physiological perspectives. Scope This Briefing covers the phylogeny and evolution of KT/KUP/HAK transporters, the role of transporters in plant mineral nutrition and potassium homeostasis, and the role of KT/KUP/HAK transporters in plant development. PMID:17495982

  13. Pathogenic mutations causing glucose transport defects in GLUT1 transporter: The role of intermolecular forces in protein structure-function.

    PubMed

    Raja, Mobeen; Kinne, Rolf K H

    2015-01-01

    Two families of glucose transporter - the Na(+)-dependent glucose cotransporter-1 (SGLT family) and the facilitated diffusion glucose transporter family (GLUT family) - play a crucial role in the translocation of glucose across the epithelial cell membrane. How genetic mutations cause life-threatening diseases like GLUT1-deficiency syndrome (GLUT1-DS) is not well understood. In this review, we have combined previous functional data with our in silico analyses of the bacterial homologue of GLUT members, XylE (an outward-facing, partly occluded conformation) and previously proposed GLUT1 homology model (an inward-facing conformation). A variety of native and mutant side chain interactions were modeled to highlight the potential roles of mutations in destabilizing protein-protein interaction hence triggering structural and functional defects. This study sets the stage for future studies of the structural properties that mediate GLUT1 dysfunction and further suggests that both SGLT and GLUT families share conserved domains that stabilize the transporter structure/function via a similar mechanism.

  14. Purification of IFT particle proteins and preparation of recombinant proteins for structural and functional analysis.

    PubMed

    Behal, Robert H; Betleja, Ewelina; Cole, Douglas G

    2009-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is characterized by a robust bidirectional movement of large proteinaceous particles along the length of eukaryotic cilia and flagella. Essential for the assembly and function of the organelle, IFT is believed to transport a large array of ciliary components in and out of the organelle. Biochemical analysis of the proteins involved with this transport has been largely dependent on the ability to isolate suitable quantities of intact cilia or flagella. One model organism, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, has proven to be especially well-suited for such endeavors. Indeed, many of the IFT particle proteins were initially identified through biochemical analysis of green algae. This chapter describes some of the most effective methods for the purification of IFT particle proteins from Chlamydomonas flagella. This chapter also describes complementary approaches where recombinant IFT proteins are generated with affinity tags that allow rapid and specific purification. The recombinant proteins can be used to analyze protein-protein interactions and can be directly delivered to mutant cells to analyze functional domains. Although the techniques described here are focused entirely on Chlamydomonas IFT proteins, the approaches, especially regarding recombinant proteins, should be applicable to the study of IFT machinery in other model organisms.

  15. Diversity in Expression Patterns and Functional Properties in the Rice HKT Transporter Family1[W

    PubMed Central

    Jabnoune, Mehdi; Espeout, Sandra; Mieulet, Delphine; Fizames, Cécile; Verdeil, Jean-Luc; Conéjéro, Geneviève; Rodríguez-Navarro, Alonso; Sentenac, Hervé; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel; Abdelly, Chedly; Véry, Anne-Aliénor

    2009-01-01

    Plant growth under low K+ availability or salt stress requires tight control of K+ and Na+ uptake, long-distance transport, and accumulation. The family of membrane transporters named HKT (for High-Affinity K+ Transporters), permeable either to K+ and Na+ or to Na+ only, is thought to play major roles in these functions. Whereas Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) possesses a single HKT transporter, involved in Na+ transport in vascular tissues, a larger number of HKT transporters are present in rice (Oryza sativa) as well as in other monocots. Here, we report on the expression patterns and functional properties of three rice HKT transporters, OsHKT1;1, OsHKT1;3, and OsHKT2;1. In situ hybridization experiments revealed overlapping but distinctive and complex expression patterns, wider than expected for such a transporter type, including vascular tissues and root periphery but also new locations, such as osmocontractile leaf bulliform cells (involved in leaf folding). Functional analyses in Xenopus laevis oocytes revealed striking diversity. OsHKT1;1 and OsHKT1;3, shown to be permeable to Na+ only, are strongly different in terms of affinity for this cation and direction of transport (inward only or reversible). OsHKT2;1 displays diverse permeation modes, Na+-K+ symport, Na+ uniport, or inhibited states, depending on external Na+ and K+ concentrations within the physiological concentration range. The whole set of data indicates that HKT transporters fulfill distinctive roles at the whole plant level in rice, each system playing diverse roles in different cell types. Such a large diversity within the HKT transporter family might be central to the regulation of K+ and Na+ accumulation in monocots. PMID:19482918

  16. Monitoring the function of membrane transport proteins in detergent-solubilized form

    PubMed Central

    Quick, Matthias; Javitch, Jonathan A.

    2007-01-01

    Transport proteins constitute ≈10% of most proteomes and play vital roles in the translocation of solutes across membranes of all organisms. Their (dys)function is implicated in many disorders, making them frequent targets for pharmacotherapy. The identification of substrates for members of this large protein family, still replete with many orphans of unknown function, has proven difficult, in part because high-throughput screening is greatly complicated by endogenous transporters present in many expression systems. In addition, direct structural studies require that transporters be extracted from the membrane with detergent, thereby precluding transport measurements because of the lack of a vectorial environment and necessitating reconstitution into proteoliposomes for activity measurements. Here, we describe a direct scintillation proximity-based radioligand-binding assay for determining transport protein function in crude cell extracts and in purified form. This rapid and universally applicable assay with advantages over cell-based platforms will greatly facilitate the identification of substrates for many orphan transporters and allows monitoring the function of transport proteins in a nonmembranous environment. PMID:17360689

  17. Functional characterization of dipeptide transport system in human jejunum.

    PubMed

    Adibi, S A; Soleimanpour, M R

    1974-05-01

    The present studies were performed to determine whether dipeptide absorption in human jejunum exhibits the characteristics of carrier-mediated transport. 15-cm jejunal segments from human volunteers were perfused with test solutions containing varying amounts of either glycylglycine, glycylleucine, glycine, leucine, glycylglycine with leucine or glycine, glycylglycine with glycylleucine, or glycylleucine with an equimolar mixture of free glycine and leucine. Jejunal absorption rates of both glycylglycine and glycylleucine followed the kinetics of a saturable process. The K(m) value in millimoles/liter of glycylglycine was significantly greater than the K(m) value of glycylleucine (43.3+/-2.6 vs. 26.8+/-5.9, P < 0.05); and the K(m) value of glycine was also significantly greater than the K(m) value of leucine (42.7+/-7.5 vs. 20.4+/-5.4, P < 0.05). While overlapping occurred among the K(m) values of free amino acids and dipeptides, the transport kinetics of dipeptides were characterized by higher V(max) values (in micromoles per minute per 15 centimeters) than those of free amino acids. For example, the V(max) values for glycylglycine and glycine were 837+/-62 and 590+/-56, respectively (P < 0.02). While jejunal absorption rates of glycylglycine were not significantly affected by free leucine or free glycine, they were competitively inhibited by glycylleucine. The jejunal absorption rate of glycylleucine was not significantly altered by an equimolar mixture of free glycine and leucine. The selective absorption of dipeptides was investigated by infusing three equimolar mixtures, each containing two different dipeptides. Among the three dipeptides examined, glycylglycine was the least absorbed. There was no significant difference between the absorption of glycylleucine and leucylglycine. The above studies suggest that absorption of both glycylglycine and glycylleucine is mediated by a carrier which is not shared with free neutral amino acids; and that both COOH- and NH

  18. Transferring functional annotations of membrane transporters on the basis of sequence similarity and sequence motifs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Membrane transporters catalyze the transport of small solute molecules across biological barriers such as lipid bilayer membranes. Experimental identification of the transported substrates is very tedious. Once a particular transport mechanism has been identified in one organism, it is thus highly desirable to transfer this information to related transporter sequences in different organisms based on bioinformatics evidence. Results We present a thorough benchmark at which level of sequence identity membrane transporters from Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Arabidopsis thaliana belong to the same families of the Transporter Classification (TC) system, and at what level these membrane transporters mediate the transport of the same substrate. We found that two membrane transporter sequences from different organisms that are aligned with normalized BLAST expectation value better than E-value 1e-8 are highly likely to belong to the same TC family (F-measure around 90%). Enriched sequence motifs identified by MEME at thresholds below 1e-12 support accurate classification into TC families for about two thirds of the sequences (F-measure 80% and higher). For the comparison of transported substrates, we focused on the four largest substrate classes of amino acids, sugars, metal ions, and phosphate. At similar identity thresholds, the nature of the transported substrates was more divergent (F-measure 40 - 75% at the same thresholds) than the TC family membership. Conclusions We suggest an acceptable threshold of 1e-8 for BLAST and HMMER where at least three quarters of the sequences are classified according to the TC system with a reasonably high accuracy. Researchers who wish to apply these thresholds in their studies should multiply these thresholds by the size of the database they search against. Our findings should be useful to those who wish to transfer transporter functional annotations across species. PMID:24283849

  19. Modeling of nanoscale liquid mixture transport by density functional hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinariev, Oleg Yu.; Evseev, Nikolay V.

    2017-06-01

    Modeling of multiphase compositional hydrodynamics at nanoscale is performed by means of density functional hydrodynamics (DFH). DFH is the method based on density functional theory and continuum mechanics. This method has been developed by the authors over 20 years and used for modeling in various multiphase hydrodynamic applications. In this paper, DFH was further extended to encompass phenomena inherent in liquids at nanoscale. The new DFH extension is based on the introduction of external potentials for chemical components. These potentials are localized in the vicinity of solid surfaces and take account of the van der Waals forces. A set of numerical examples, including disjoining pressure, film precursors, anomalous rheology, liquid in contact with heterogeneous surface, capillary condensation, and forward and reverse osmosis, is presented to demonstrate modeling capabilities.

  20. Facile Anhydrous Proton Transport on Hydroxyl Functionalized Graphane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagusetty, Abhishek; Choudhury, Pabitra; Saidi, Wisssam A.; Derksen, Bridget; Gatto, Elizabeth; Johnson, J. Karl

    2017-05-01

    Graphane functionalized with hydroxyl groups is shown to rapidly conduct protons under anhydrous conditions through a contiguous network of hydrogen bonds. Density functional theory calculations predict remarkably low barriers to diffusion of protons along a 1D chain of surface hydroxyls. Diffusion is controlled by the local rotation of hydroxyl groups, a mechanism that is very different from that found in 1D water wires in confined nanopores or in bulk water. The proton mean square displacement in the 1D chain was observed to follow Fickian diffusion rather than the expected single-file mobility. A charge analysis reveals that the charge on the proton is essentially equally shared by all hydrogens bound to oxygens, effectively delocalizing the proton.

  1. Facile Anhydrous Proton Transport on Hydroxyl Functionalized Graphane.

    PubMed

    Bagusetty, Abhishek; Choudhury, Pabitra; Saidi, Wisssam A; Derksen, Bridget; Gatto, Elizabeth; Johnson, J Karl

    2017-05-05

    Graphane functionalized with hydroxyl groups is shown to rapidly conduct protons under anhydrous conditions through a contiguous network of hydrogen bonds. Density functional theory calculations predict remarkably low barriers to diffusion of protons along a 1D chain of surface hydroxyls. Diffusion is controlled by the local rotation of hydroxyl groups, a mechanism that is very different from that found in 1D water wires in confined nanopores or in bulk water. The proton mean square displacement in the 1D chain was observed to follow Fickian diffusion rather than the expected single-file mobility. A charge analysis reveals that the charge on the proton is essentially equally shared by all hydrogens bound to oxygens, effectively delocalizing the proton.

  2. Proteoliposomes as Tool for Assaying Membrane Transporter Functions and Interactions with Xenobiotics

    PubMed Central

    Scalise, Mariafrancesca; Pochini, Lorena; Giangregorio, Nicola; Tonazzi, Annamaria; Indiveri, Cesare

    2013-01-01

    Proteoliposomes represent a suitable and up to date tool for studying membrane transporters which physiologically mediate absorption, excretion, trafficking and reabsorption of nutrients and metabolites. Using recently developed reconstitution strategies, transporters can be inserted in artificial bilayers with the same orientation as in the cell membranes and in the absence of other interfering molecular systems. These methodologies are very suitable for studying kinetic parameters and molecular mechanisms. After the first applications on mitochondrial transporters, in the last decade, proteoliposomes obtained with optimized methodologies have been used for studying plasma membrane transporters and defining their functional and kinetic properties and structure/function relationships. A lot of information has been obtained which has clarified and completed the knowledge on several transporters among which the OCTN sub-family members, transporters for neutral amino acid, B0AT1 and ASCT2, and others. Transporters can mediate absorption of substrate-like derivatives or drugs, improving their bioavailability or can interact with these compounds or other xenobiotics, leading to side/toxic effects. Therefore, proteoliposomes have recently been used for studying the interaction of some plasma membrane and mitochondrial transporters with toxic compounds, such as mercurials, H2O2 and some drugs. Several mechanisms have been defined and in some cases the amino acid residues responsible for the interaction have been identified. The data obtained indicate proteoliposomes as a novel and potentially important tool in drug discovery. PMID:24300519

  3. A functional genomics approach to establish the complement of carbohydrate transporters in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Bidossi, Alessandro; Mulas, Laura; Decorosi, Francesca; Colomba, Leonarda; Ricci, Susanna; Pozzi, Gianni; Deutscher, Josef; Viti, Carlo; Oggioni, Marco Rinaldo

    2012-01-01

    The aerotolerant anaerobe Streptococcus pneumoniae is part of the normal nasopharyngeal microbiota of humans and one of the most important invasive pathogens. A genomic survey allowed establishing the occurrence of twenty-one phosphotransferase systems, seven carbohydrate uptake ABC transporters, one sodium:solute symporter and a permease, underlining an exceptionally high capacity for uptake of carbohydrate substrates. Despite high genomic variability, combined phenotypic and genomic analysis of twenty sequenced strains did assign the substrate specificity only to two uptake systems. Systematic analysis of mutants for most carbohydrate transporters enabled us to assign a phenotype and substrate specificity to twenty-three transport systems. For five putative transporters for galactose, pentoses, ribonucleosides and sulphated glycans activity was inferred, but not experimentally confirmed and only one transport system remains with an unknown substrate and lack of any functional annotation. Using a metabolic approach, 80% of the thirty-two fermentable carbon substrates were assigned to the corresponding transporter. The complexity and robustness of sugar uptake is underlined by the finding that many transporters have multiple substrates, and many sugars are transported by more than one system. The present work permits to draw a functional map of the complete arsenal of carbohydrate utilisation proteins of pneumococci, allows re-annotation of genomic data and might serve as a reference for related species. These data provide tools for specific investigation of the roles of the different carbon substrates on pneumococcal physiology in the host during carriage and invasive infection.

  4. The human synaptic vesicle protein, SV2A, functions as a galactose transporter in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Madeo, Marianna; Kovács, Attila D; Pearce, David A

    2014-11-28

    SV2A is a synaptic vesicle membrane protein expressed in neurons and endocrine cells and involved in the regulation of neurotransmitter release. Although the exact function of SV2A still remains elusive, it was identified as the specific binding site for levetiracetam, a second generation antiepileptic drug. Our sequence analysis demonstrates that SV2A has significant homology with several yeast transport proteins belonging to the major facilitator superfamily (MFS). Many of these transporters are involved in sugar transport into yeast cells. Here we present evidence showing, for the first time, that SV2A is a galactose transporter. We expressed human SV2A in hexose transport-deficient EBY.VW4000 yeast cells and demonstrated that these cells are able to grow on galactose-containing medium but not on other fermentable carbon sources. Furthermore, the addition of the SV2A-binding antiepileptic drug levetiracetam to the medium inhibited the galactose-dependent growth of hexose transport-deficient EBY.VW4000 yeast cells expressing human SV2A. Most importantly, direct measurement of galactose uptake in the same strain verified that SV2A is able to transport extracellular galactose inside the cells. The newly identified galactose transport capability of SV2A may have an important role in regulating/modulating synaptic function. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Water transport through functionalized nanotubes with tunable hydrophobicity

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, Ian; Snyder, Mark A.; Mittal, Jeetain

    2014-11-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the occupancy and flow of water through nanotubes comprised of hydrophobic and hydrophilic atoms, which are arranged on a honeycomb lattice to mimic functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs). We consider single-file motion of TIP3P water through narrow channels of (6,6) CNTs with varying fractions (f) of hydrophilic atoms. Various arrangements of hydrophilic atoms are used to create heterogeneous nanotubes with separate hydrophobic/hydrophilic domains along the tube as well as random mixtures of the two types of atoms. The water occupancy inside the nanotube channel is found to vary nonlinearly as a function of f, and a small fraction of hydrophilic atoms (f ≈ 0.4) are sufficient to induce spontaneous and continuous filling of the nanotube. Interestingly, the average number of water molecules inside the channel and water flux through the nanotube are less sensitive to the specific arrangement of hydrophilic atoms than to the fraction, f. Two different regimes are observed for the water flux dependence on f – an approximately linear increase in flux as a function of f for f < 0.4, and almost no change in flux for higher f values, similar to the change in water occupancy. We are able to define an effective interaction strength between nanotube atoms and water's oxygen, based on a linear combination of interaction strengths between hydrophobic and hydrophilic nanotube atoms and water, that can quantitatively capture the observed behavior.

  6. Pyrethroid pesticide-induced alterations in dopamine transporter function

    SciTech Connect

    Elwan, Mohamed A.; Richardson, Jason R.; Guillot, Thomas S.; Caudle, W. Michael; Miller, Gary W. . E-mail: gary.miller@emory.edu

    2006-03-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway. Several epidemiological studies have demonstrated an association between pesticide exposure and the incidence of PD. Studies from our laboratory and others have demonstrated that certain pesticides increase levels of the dopamine transporter (DAT), an integral component of dopaminergic neurotransmission and a gateway for dopaminergic neurotoxins. Here, we report that repeated exposure (3 injections over 2 weeks) of mice to two commonly used pyrethroid pesticides, deltamethrin (3 mg/kg) and permethrin (0.8 mg/kg), increases DAT-mediated dopamine uptake by 31 and 28%, respectively. Using cells stably expressing DAT, we determined that exposure (10 min) to deltamethrin and permethrin (1 nM-100 {mu}M) had no effect on DAT-mediated dopamine uptake. Extending exposures to both pesticides for 30 min (10 {mu}M) or 24 h (1, 5, and 10 {mu}M) resulted in significant decrease in dopamine uptake. This reduction was not the result of competitive inhibition, loss of DAT protein, or cytotoxicity. However, there was an increase in DNA fragmentation, an index of apoptosis, in cells exhibiting reduced uptake at 30 min and 24 h. These data suggest that up-regulation of DAT by in vivo pyrethroid exposure is an indirect effect and that longer-term exposure of cells results in apoptosis. Since DAT can greatly affect the vulnerability of dopamine neurons to neurotoxicants, up-regulation of DAT by deltamethrin and permethrin may increase the susceptibility of dopamine neurons to toxic insult, which may provide insight into the association between pesticide exposure and PD.

  7. Glucose Transporters at the Blood-Brain Barrier: Function, Regulation and Gateways for Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Patching, Simon G

    2017-03-01

    Glucose transporters (GLUTs) at the blood-brain barrier maintain the continuous high glucose and energy demands of the brain. They also act as therapeutic targets and provide routes of entry for drug delivery to the brain and central nervous system for treatment of neurological and neurovascular conditions and brain tumours. This article first describes the distribution, function and regulation of glucose transporters at the blood-brain barrier, the major ones being the sodium-independent facilitative transporters GLUT1 and GLUT3. Other GLUTs and sodium-dependent transporters (SGLTs) have also been identified at lower levels and under various physiological conditions. It then considers the effects on glucose transporter expression and distribution of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia associated with diabetes and oxygen/glucose deprivation associated with cerebral ischemia. A reduction in glucose transporters at the blood-brain barrier that occurs before the onset of the main pathophysiological changes and symptoms of Alzheimer's disease is a potential causative effect in the vascular hypothesis of the disease. Mutations in glucose transporters, notably those identified in GLUT1 deficiency syndrome, and some recreational drug compounds also alter the expression and/or activity of glucose transporters at the blood-brain barrier. Approaches for drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier include the pro-drug strategy whereby drug molecules are conjugated to glucose transporter substrates or encapsulated in nano-enabled delivery systems (e.g. liposomes, micelles, nanoparticles) that are functionalised to target glucose transporters. Finally, the continuous development of blood-brain barrier in vitro models is important for studying glucose transporter function, effects of disease conditions and interactions with drugs and xenobiotics.

  8. Functional and physiological evidence for a rhesus-type ammonia transporter in Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Weidinger, Kerstin; Neuhäuser, Benjamin; Gilch, Stefan; Ludewig, Uwe; Meyer, Ortwin; Schmidt, Ingo

    2007-08-01

    Ammonium transporters form a conserved family of transport proteins and are widely distributed among all domains of life. The genome of Nitrosomonas europaea codes for a single gene (rh1) that belongs to the family of the AMT/Rh ammonium transporters. For the first time, this study provides functional and physiological evidence for a rhesus-type ammonia transporter in bacteria (N. europaea). The methylammonium (MA) transport activity of N. europaea correlated with the Rh1 expression. The K(m) value for the MA uptake of N. europaea was 1.8+/-0.2 mM (pH 7.25), and the uptake was competitively inhibited by ammonium [K(i)(NH(4) (+)) 0.3+/-0.1 mM at pH 7.25]. The MA uptake rate was pH dependent, indicating that the uncharged form of MA is transported by Rh1. An effect of the glutamine synthetase on the MA uptake was not observed. When expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the function of Rh1 from N. europaea as an ammonia/MA transporter was confirmed. The results suggest that Rh1 equilibrates the uncharged substrate species. A low pH value in the periplasmic space during ammonia oxidation seems to be responsible for the ammonium accumulation functioning as an acid NH(4) (+) trap.

  9. The functional and physical relationship between the DRA bicarbonate transporter and carbonic anhydrase II.

    PubMed

    Sterling, Deborah; Brown, Nathan J D; Supuran, Claudiu T; Casey, Joseph R

    2002-11-01

    COOH-terminal cytoplasmic tails of chloride/bicarbonate anion exchangers (AE) bind cytosolic carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) to form a bicarbonate transport metabolon, a membrane protein complex that accelerates transmembrane bicarbonate flux. To determine whether interaction with CAII affects the downregulated in adenoma (DRA) chloride/bicarbonate exchanger, anion exchange activity of DRA-transfected HEK-293 cells was monitored by following changes in intracellular pH associated with bicarbonate transport. DRA-mediated bicarbonate transport activity of 18 +/- 1 mM H+ equivalents/min was inhibited 53 +/- 2% by 100 mM of the CAII inhibitor, acetazolamide, but was unaffected by the membrane-impermeant carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, 1-[5-sulfamoyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl-(aminosulfonyl-4-phenyl)]-2,6-dimethyl-4-phenyl-pyridinium perchlorate. Compared with AE1, the COOH-terminal tail of DRA interacted weakly with CAII. Overexpression of a functionally inactive CAII mutant, V143Y, reduced AE1 transport activity by 61 +/- 4% without effect on DRA transport activity (105 +/- 7% transport activity relative to DRA alone). We conclude that cytosolic CAII is required for full DRA-mediated bicarbonate transport. However, DRA differs from other bicarbonate transport proteins because its transport activity is not stimulated by direct interaction with CAII.

  10. Functional role of oligomerization for bacterial and plant SWEET sugar transporter family.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Yuan Hu; Hu, Yi Bing; Chen, Li-Qing; Sosso, Davide; Ducat, Daniel C; Hou, Bi-Huei; Frommer, Wolf B

    2013-09-24

    Eukaryotic sugar transporters of the MFS and SWEET superfamilies consist of 12 and 7 α-helical transmembrane domains (TMs), respectively. Structural analyses indicate that MFS transporters evolved from a series of tandem duplications of an ancestral 3-TM unit. SWEETs are heptahelical proteins carrying a tandem repeat of 3-TM separated by a single TM. Here, we show that prokaryotes have ancestral SWEET homologs with only 3-TM and that the Bradyrhizobium japonicum SemiSWEET1, like Arabidopsis SWEET11, mediates sucrose transport. Eukaryotic SWEETs most likely evolved by internal duplication of the 3-TM, suggesting that SemiSWEETs form oligomers to create a functional pore. However, it remains elusive whether the 7-TM SWEETs are the functional unit or require oligomerization to form a pore sufficiently large to allow for sucrose passage. Split ubiquitin yeast two-hybrid and split GFP assays indicate that Arabidopsis SWEETs homo- and heterooligomerize. We examined mutant SWEET variants for negative dominance to test if oligomerization is necessary for function. Mutation of the conserved Y57 or G58 in SWEET1 led to loss of activity. Coexpression of the defective mutants with functional A. thaliana SWEET1 inhibited glucose transport, indicating that homooligomerization is necessary for function. Collectively, these data imply that the basic unit of SWEETs, similar to MFS sugar transporters, is a 3-TM unit and that a functional transporter contains at least four such domains. We hypothesize that the functional unit of the SWEET family of transporters possesses a structure resembling the 12-TM MFS structure, however, with a parallel orientation of the 3-TM unit.

  11. Functional role of oligomerization for bacterial and plant SWEET sugar transporter family

    PubMed Central

    Xuan, Yuan Hu; Hu, Yi Bing; Chen, Li-Qing; Sosso, Davide; Ducat, Daniel C.; Hou, Bi-Huei; Frommer, Wolf B.

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic sugar transporters of the MFS and SWEET superfamilies consist of 12 and 7 α-helical transmembrane domains (TMs), respectively. Structural analyses indicate that MFS transporters evolved from a series of tandem duplications of an ancestral 3-TM unit. SWEETs are heptahelical proteins carrying a tandem repeat of 3-TM separated by a single TM. Here, we show that prokaryotes have ancestral SWEET homologs with only 3-TM and that the Bradyrhizobium japonicum SemiSWEET1, like Arabidopsis SWEET11, mediates sucrose transport. Eukaryotic SWEETs most likely evolved by internal duplication of the 3-TM, suggesting that SemiSWEETs form oligomers to create a functional pore. However, it remains elusive whether the 7-TM SWEETs are the functional unit or require oligomerization to form a pore sufficiently large to allow for sucrose passage. Split ubiquitin yeast two-hybrid and split GFP assays indicate that Arabidopsis SWEETs homo- and heterooligomerize. We examined mutant SWEET variants for negative dominance to test if oligomerization is necessary for function. Mutation of the conserved Y57 or G58 in SWEET1 led to loss of activity. Coexpression of the defective mutants with functional A. thaliana SWEET1 inhibited glucose transport, indicating that homooligomerization is necessary for function. Collectively, these data imply that the basic unit of SWEETs, similar to MFS sugar transporters, is a 3-TM unit and that a functional transporter contains at least four such domains. We hypothesize that the functional unit of the SWEET family of transporters possesses a structure resembling the 12-TM MFS structure, however, with a parallel orientation of the 3-TM unit. PMID:24027245

  12. K+ and Cl− Channels and Transporters in Sperm Function

    PubMed Central

    Santi, C.M.; Orta, G.; Salkoff, L.

    2013-01-01

    To succeed in fertilization, spermatozoa must decode environmental cues which require a set of ion channels. Recent findings have revealed that K+ and Cl− channels participate in some of the main sperm functions. This work reviews the evidence indicating the involvement of K+ and Cl− channels in motility, maturation, and the acrosome reaction, and the advancement in identifying their molecular identity and modes of regulation. Improving our insight on how these channels operate will strengthen our ability to surmount some infertility problems, improve animal breeding, preserve biodiversity, and develop selective and secure male contraceptives. PMID:23287041

  13. Architecture and function of IFT complex proteins in ciliogenesis.

    PubMed

    Taschner, Michael; Bhogaraju, Sagar; Lorentzen, Esben

    2012-02-01

    Cilia and flagella (interchangeable terms) are evolutionarily conserved organelles found on many different types of eukaryotic cells where they fulfill important functions in motility, sensory reception and signaling. The process of Intraflagellar Transport (IFT) is of central importance for both the assembly and maintenance of cilia, as it delivers building blocks from their site of synthesis in the cell body to the ciliary assembly site at the tip of the cilium. A key player in this process is the multi-subunit IFT-complex, which acts as an adapter between the motor proteins required for movement and the ciliary cargo proteins. Since the discovery of IFT more than 15 years ago, considerable effort has gone into the purification and characterization of the IFT complex proteins. Even though this has led to very interesting findings and has greatly improved our knowledge of the IFT process, we still know very little about the overall architecture of the IFT complex and the specific functions of the various subunits. In this review we will give an update on the knowledge of the structure and function of individual IFT proteins, and the way these proteins interact to form the complex that facilitates IFT.

  14. Nasal airway ion transport and lung function in young people with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Helen L; Barker, Pierre M; Southern, Kevin W

    2003-09-01

    There is strong evidence that abnormal airway ion transport is the primary defect that initiates the pathophysiology of lung disease in cystic fibrosis (CF). To examine the relationship between airway ion transport abnormality and severity of lung disease, we measured nasal potential difference in 51 young people with CF using a validated modified technique. There was no correlation between any component of the ion transport measurement and clinical condition (respiratory function, chest radiograph score, or Shwachman clinical score). Thirty subjects, homozygous for the DeltaF508 mutation, were divided into those above and those below average respiratory function for their age. There was no significant difference in any of the ion transport parameters between those with above and below average pulmonary function. Of the 51 subjects, 10 had significant hyperpolarization after perfusion with a zero Cl- solution (> 5 mV). This Cl- secretory capacity did not correlate with above average lung function. These data do not support the assertion that the extent of lung disease in CF reflects the degree of ion transport abnormality. We suggest that although an ion transport abnormality initiates lung disease, other factors (e.g., environmental and genetic modifiers) are more influential in determining disease severity.

  15. Decreased vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) and dopamine transporter (DAT) function in knockout mice affects aging of dopaminergic systems

    PubMed Central

    Hall, F. S.; Itokawa, K.; Schmitt, A.; Moessner, R.; Sora, I.; Lesch, K. P.; Uhl, G. R.

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) is accumulated and compartmentalized by the dopamine transporter (DAT; SLC3A6) and the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2; SLC18A2). These transporters work at the plasma and vesicular membranes of dopaminergic neurons, respectively, and thus regulate levels of DA in neuronal compartments that include the extravesicular cytoplasmic compartment. DA in this compartment has been hypothesized to contribute to oxidative damage that can reduce the function of dopaminergic neurons in aging brains and may contribute to reductions in dopaminergic neurochemical markers, locomotor behavior and responses to dopaminergic drugs that are found in aged animals. The studies reported here examined aged mice with heterozygous deletions of VMAT2 or of DAT, which each reduce transporter expression to about 50% of levels found in wild-type (WT) mice. Aged mice displayed reduced locomotor responses under a variety of circumstances, including in response to locomotor stimulants, as well as changes in monoamine levels and metabolites in a regionally dependent manner. Several effects of aging were more pronounced in heterozygous VMAT2 knockout (KO) mice, including aging induced reductions in locomotion and reduced locomotor responses to cocaine. By contrast, some effects of aging were reduced or not observed in heterozygous DAT KO mice. These findings support the idea that altered DAT and VMAT2 expression affect age-related changes in dopaminergic function. These effects are most likely mediated by alterations in DA compartmentalization, and might be hypothesized to be more exacerbated by other factors that affect the metabolism of cytosolic DA. PMID:23978383

  16. Fuzzy Multi-Objective Transportation Planning with Modified S-Curve Membership Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peidro, D.; Vasant, P.

    2009-08-01

    In this paper, the S-Curve membership function methodology is used in a transportation planning decision (TPD) problem. An interactive method for solving multi-objective TPD problems with fuzzy goals, available supply and forecast demand is developed. The proposed method attempts simultaneously to minimize the total production and transportation costs and the total delivery time with reference to budget constraints and available supply, machine capacities at each source, as well as forecast demand and warehouse space constraints at each destination. We compare in an industrial case the performance of S-curve membership functions, representing uncertainty goals and constraints in TPD problems, with linear membership functions.

  17. An Active Learning Exercise to Facilitate Understanding of Nephron Function: Anatomy and Physiology of Renal Transporters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dirks-Naylor, Amie J.

    2016-01-01

    Renal transport is a central mechanism underlying electrolyte homeostasis, acid base balance and other essential functions of the kidneys in human physiology. Thus, knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the nephron is essential for the understanding of kidney function in health and disease. However, students find this content difficult to…

  18. An Active Learning Exercise to Facilitate Understanding of Nephron Function: Anatomy and Physiology of Renal Transporters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dirks-Naylor, Amie J.

    2016-01-01

    Renal transport is a central mechanism underlying electrolyte homeostasis, acid base balance and other essential functions of the kidneys in human physiology. Thus, knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the nephron is essential for the understanding of kidney function in health and disease. However, students find this content difficult to…

  19. Functional modulation of IFT kinesins extends the sensory repertoire of ciliated neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Evans, James E; Snow, Joshua J; Gunnarson, Amy L; Ou, Guangshuo; Stahlberg, Henning; McDonald, Kent L; Scholey, Jonathan M

    2006-02-27

    The diversity of sensory cilia on Caenorhabditis elegans neurons allows the animal to detect a variety of sensory stimuli. Sensory cilia are assembled by intraflagellar transport (IFT) kinesins, which transport ciliary precursors, bound to IFT particles, along the ciliary axoneme for incorporation into ciliary structures. Using fluorescence microscopy of living animals and serial section electron microscopy of high pressure-frozen, freeze-substituted IFT motor mutants, we found that two IFT kinesins, homodimeric OSM-3 kinesin and heterotrimeric kinesin II, function in a partially redundant manner to build full-length amphid channel cilia but are completely redundant for building full-length amphid wing (AWC) cilia. This difference reflects cilia-specific differences in OSM-3 activity, which serves to extend distal singlets in channel cilia but not in AWC cilia, which lack such singlets. Moreover, AWC-specific chemotaxis assays reveal novel sensory functions for kinesin II in these wing cilia. We propose that kinesin II is a "canonical" IFT motor, whereas OSM-3 is an "accessory" IFT motor, and that subtle changes in the deployment or actions of these IFT kinesins can contribute to differences in cilia morphology, cilia function, and sensory perception.

  20. The cytoplasmic domain is essential for transport function of the integral membrane transport protein SLC4A11.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Sampath K; Lukowski, Chris M; Casey, Joseph R

    2016-01-15

    Large cytoplasmic domains (CD) are a common feature among integral membrane proteins. In virtually all cases, these CD have a function (e.g., binding cytoskeleton or regulatory factors) separate from that of the membrane domain (MD). Strong associations between CD and MD are rare. Here we studied SLC4A11, a membrane transport protein of corneal endothelial cells, the mutations of which cause genetic corneal blindness. SLC4A11 has a 41-kDa CD and a 57-kDa integral MD. One disease-causing mutation in the CD, R125H, manifests a catalytic defect, suggesting a role of the CD in transport function. Expressed in HEK-293 cells without the CD, MD-SLC4A11 is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, indicating a folding defect. Replacement of CD-SLC4A11 with green fluorescent protein did not rescue MD-SLC4A11, suggesting some specific role of CD-SLC4A11. Homology modeling revealed that the structure of CD-SLC4A11 is similar to that of the Cl(-)/HCO3(-) exchange protein AE1 (SLC4A1) CD. Fusion to CD-AE1 partially rescued MD-SLC4A11 to the cell surface, suggesting that the structure of CD-AE1 is similar to that of CD-SLC4A11. The CD-AE1-MD-SLC4a11 chimera, however, had no functional activity. We conclude that CD-SLC4A11 has an indispensable role in the transport function of SLC4A11. CD-SLC4A11 forms insoluble precipitates when expressed in bacteria, suggesting that the domain cannot fold properly when expressed alone. Consistent with a strong association between CD-SLC4A11 and MD-SLC4A11, these domains specifically associate when coexpressed in HEK-293 cells. We conclude that SLC4A11 is a rare integral membrane protein in which the CD has strong associations with the integral MD, which contributes to membrane transport function. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  1. The cytoplasmic domain is essential for transport function of the integral membrane transport protein SLC4A11

    PubMed Central

    Loganathan, Sampath K.; Lukowski, Chris M.

    2015-01-01

    Large cytoplasmic domains (CD) are a common feature among integral membrane proteins. In virtually all cases, these CD have a function (e.g., binding cytoskeleton or regulatory factors) separate from that of the membrane domain (MD). Strong associations between CD and MD are rare. Here we studied SLC4A11, a membrane transport protein of corneal endothelial cells, the mutations of which cause genetic corneal blindness. SLC4A11 has a 41-kDa CD and a 57-kDa integral MD. One disease-causing mutation in the CD, R125H, manifests a catalytic defect, suggesting a role of the CD in transport function. Expressed in HEK-293 cells without the CD, MD-SLC4A11 is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, indicating a folding defect. Replacement of CD-SLC4A11 with green fluorescent protein did not rescue MD-SLC4A11, suggesting some specific role of CD-SLC4A11. Homology modeling revealed that the structure of CD-SLC4A11 is similar to that of the Cl−/HCO3− exchange protein AE1 (SLC4A1) CD. Fusion to CD-AE1 partially rescued MD-SLC4A11 to the cell surface, suggesting that the structure of CD-AE1 is similar to that of CD-SLC4A11. The CD-AE1-MD-SLC4a11 chimera, however, had no functional activity. We conclude that CD-SLC4A11 has an indispensable role in the transport function of SLC4A11. CD-SLC4A11 forms insoluble precipitates when expressed in bacteria, suggesting that the domain cannot fold properly when expressed alone. Consistent with a strong association between CD-SLC4A11 and MD-SLC4A11, these domains specifically associate when coexpressed in HEK-293 cells. We conclude that SLC4A11 is a rare integral membrane protein in which the CD has strong associations with the integral MD, which contributes to membrane transport function. PMID:26582474

  2. Phloem Transport of the Receptor DWARF14 Protein Is Required for Full Function of Strigolactones.

    PubMed

    Kameoka, Hiromu; Dun, Elizabeth A; Lopez-Obando, Mauricio; Brewer, Philip B; de Saint Germain, Alexandre; Rameau, Catherine; Beveridge, Christine A; Kyozuka, Junko

    2016-11-01

    The cell-to-cell transport of signaling molecules is essential for multicellular organisms to coordinate the action of their cells. Recent studies identified DWARF14 (D14) as a receptor of strigolactones (SLs), molecules that act as plant hormones and inhibit shoot branching. Here, we demonstrate that RAMOSUS3, a pea ortholog of D14, works as a graft-transmissible signal to suppress shoot branching. In addition, we show that D14 protein is contained in phloem sap and transported through the phloem to axillary buds in rice. SLs are not required for the transport of D14 protein. Disruption of D14 transport weakens the suppression of axillary bud outgrowth of rice. Taken together, we conclude that the D14 protein works as an intercellular signaling molecule to fine-tune SL function. Our findings provide evidence that the intercellular transport of a receptor can regulate the action of plant hormones.

  3. Characterization and functional analysis of the nucleotide binding fold in human peroxisomal ATP binding cassette transporters.

    PubMed

    Roerig, P; Mayerhofer, P; Holzinger, A; Gärtner, J

    2001-03-09

    The 70-kDa peroxisomal membrane protein (PMP70) and the adrenoleukodystrophy protein (ALDP) are half ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters in the peroxisome membrane. Mutations in the ALD gene encoding ALDP result in the X-linked neurodegenerative disorder adrenoleukodystrophy. Plausible models exist to show a role for ATP hydrolysis in peroxisomal ABC transporter functions. Here, we describe the first measurements of the rate of ATP binding and hydrolysis by purified nucleotide binding fold (NBF) fusion proteins of PMP70 and ALDP. Both proteins act as an ATP specific binding subunit releasing ADP after ATP hydrolysis; they did not exhibit GTPase activity. Mutations in conserved residues of the nucleotidases (PMP70: G478R, S572I; ALDP: G512S, S606L) altered ATPase activity. Furthermore, our results indicate that these mutations do not influence homodimerization or heterodimerization of ALDP or PMP70. The study provides evidence that peroxisomal ABC transporters utilize ATP to become a functional transporter.

  4. mRNA transport in yeast: time to reinvestigate the functions of the nucleolus.

    PubMed Central

    Schneiter, R; Kadowaki, T; Tartakoff, A M

    1995-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic transport of mRNA is vital to gene expression and may prove to be key to its regulation. Genetic approaches in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have led to the identification of conditional mutants defective in mRNA transport. Mutations in approximately two dozen genes result in accumulation of transcripts, trapped at various sites in the nucleus, as detected by in situ hybridization. Phenotypic and molecular analyses of many of these mRNA transport mutants suggest that, in yeast, the function of the nucleus is not limited to the biogenesis of pre-ribosomes but may also be important for transport of poly(A)+ RNA. A similar function of the animal cell nucleolus is suggested by several observations. Images PMID:7626803

  5. Functional profiles of orphan membrane transporters in the life cycle of the malaria parasite

    PubMed Central

    Kenthirapalan, Sanketha; Waters, Andrew P.; Matuschewski, Kai; Kooij, Taco W. A.

    2016-01-01

    Assigning function to orphan membrane transport proteins and prioritizing candidates for detailed biochemical characterization remain fundamental challenges and are particularly important for medically relevant pathogens, such as malaria parasites. Here we present a comprehensive genetic analysis of 35 orphan transport proteins of Plasmodium berghei during its life cycle in mice and Anopheles mosquitoes. Six genes, including four candidate aminophospholipid transporters, are refractory to gene deletion, indicative of essential functions. We generate and phenotypically characterize 29 mutant strains with deletions of individual transporter genes. Whereas seven genes appear to be dispensable under the experimental conditions tested, deletion of any of the 22 other genes leads to specific defects in life cycle progression in vivo and/or host transition. Our study provides growing support for a potential link between heavy metal homeostasis and host switching and reveals potential targets for rational design of new intervention strategies against malaria. PMID:26796412

  6. The Structure and Function of OxlT, the Oxalate Transporter of Oxalobacter formigenes.

    PubMed

    Iyalomhe, Osigbemhe; Khantwal, Chandra M; Kang, Di Cody

    2015-08-01

    OxlT, the oxalate transporter of Oxalobacter formigenes, is a member of the Major Facilitator Superfamily of transporters (MFS), one of the largest groups of membrane proteins with substantial relevance to solute transport physiology, pharmacology, and possible drug development. MFS proteins transport a wide range of substrates such as organic and inorganic anions, sugars, drugs, and neurotransmitters. This review succinctly summarizes experimental work on a model MFS protein, OxlT, beginning with its identification as an electrogenic oxalate/formate exchanger, its three-dimensional structure, and discussion of biochemical and biophysical data that have shed further light on its structure and function. We also discuss the structure and function of OxlT in relation to notable MFS carriers such as LacY and GlpT.

  7. Functional analysis of the rice vacuolar zinc transporter OsMTP1

    PubMed Central

    Menguer, Paloma K.; Farthing, Emily; Peaston, Kerry A.; Ricachenevsky, Felipe Klein; Fett, Janette Palma; Williams, Lorraine E.

    2013-01-01

    Heavy metal homeostasis is maintained in plant cells by specialized transporters which compartmentalize or efflux metal ions, maintaining cytosolic concentrations within a narrow range. OsMTP1 is a member of the cation diffusion facilitator (CDF)/metal tolerance protein (MTP) family of metal cation transporters in Oryza sativa, which is closely related to Arabidopsis thaliana MTP1. Functional complementation of the Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutant mtp1-1 demonstrates that OsMTP1 transports Zn in planta and localizes at the tonoplast. When heterologously expressed in the yeast mutant zrc1 cot1, OsMTP1 complemented its Zn hypersensitivity and was also localized to the vacuole. OsMTP1 alleviated, to some extent, the Co sensitivity of this mutant, rescued the Fe hypersensitivity of the ccc1 mutant at low Fe concentrations, and restored growth of the Cd-hypersensitive mutant ycf1 at low Cd concentrations. These results suggest that OsMTP1 transports Zn but also Co, Fe, and Cd, possibly with lower affinity. Site-directed mutagenesis studies revealed two substitutions in OsMTP1 that alter the transport function of this protein. OsMTP1 harbouring a substitution of Leu82 to a phenylalanine can still transport low levels of Zn, with an enhanced affinity for Fe and Co, and a gain of function for Mn. A substitution of His90 with an aspartic acid completely abolishes Zn transport but improves Fe transport in OsMTP1. These amino acid residues are important in determining substrate specificity and may be a starting point for refining transporter activity in possible biotechnological applications, such as biofortification and phytoremediation. PMID:23761487

  8. Caco-2 cells - expression, regulation and function of drug transporters compared with human jejunal tissue.

    PubMed

    Brück, S; Strohmeier, J; Busch, D; Drozdzik, M; Oswald, S

    2017-03-01

    Induction or inhibition of drug transporting proteins by concomitantly administered drugs can cause serious drug-drug interactions (DDIs). However, in vitro assays currently available are mostly for studying the inhibitory potential of drugs on intestinal transporter proteins, rather than induction. Therefore, this study investigated the suitability of the frequently used intestinal Caco-2 cell line to predict transporter-mediated DDIs as caused by induction via activation of nuclear receptors. TaqMan® low density arrays and LC-MS/MS based targeted proteomics were used to evaluate transporter expression in Caco-2 cells in comparison with jejunal tissue, in culture-time dependence studies and after incubation with different known inducers of drug metabolism and transport. Additionally, studies on ABCB1 function were performed using Transwell® assays with [(3) H]-digoxin and [(3) H]-talinolol as substrates after incubation with the prototypical inducers rifampicin, St John's wort, carbamazepine and efavirenz. The gene and protein expression pattern of drug transporters in Caco-2 cells and jejunal tissue differed considerably. For some transporters culture-time dependent differences in mRNA expression and/or protein abundance could be determined. Finally, none of the studied prototypical inducers showed an effect either on mRNA expression and protein abundance or on the function of ABCB1. Differences in transporter expression in Caco-2 cells compared with jejunal tissue, as well as expression dependence on culture time must be considered in in vitro studies to avoid under- or overestimation of certain transporters. The Caco-2 cell model is not suitable for the evaluation of DDIs caused by transporter induction. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Deposition and transport of functionalized carbon nanotubes in water-saturated sand columns.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuan; Gao, Bin; Wang, Yu; Morales, Verónica L; Carpena, Rafael Muñoz; Huang, Qingguo; Yang, Liuyan

    2012-04-30

    Knowledge of the fate and transport of functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in porous media is crucial to understand their environmental impacts. In this study, laboratory column and modeling experiments were conducted to mechanistically compare the retention and transport of two types of functionalized CNTs (i.e., single-walled nanotubes and multi-walled nanotubes) in acid-cleaned, baked, and natural sand under unfavorable conditions. The CNTs were highly mobile in the acid-cleaned sand columns but showed little transport in the both natural and baked sand columns. In addition, the retention of the CNTs in the both baked and natural sand was strong and almost irreversible even after reverse, high-velocity, or surfactant flow flushing. Both experimental and modeling results showed that pH is one of the factors dominating CNT retention and transport in natural and baked sand. Retention of the functionalized CNTs in the natural and baked sand columns reduced dramatically when the system pH increased. Our results suggest that the retention and transport of the functionalized CNTs in natural sand porous media were mainly controlled by strong surface deposition through the electrostatic and/or hydrogen-bonding attractions between surface function groups of the CNTs and metal oxyhydroxide impurities on the sand surfaces. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Liver and Kidney on Chips: Microphysiological Models to Understand Transporter Function.

    PubMed

    Chang, S Y; Weber, E J; Ness, Kp Van; Eaton, D L; Kelly, E J

    2016-11-01

    Because of complex cellular microenvironments of both the liver and kidneys, accurate modeling of transport function has remained a challenge, leaving a dire need for models that can faithfully recapitulate both the architecture and cell-cell interactions observed in vivo. The study of hepatic and renal transport function is a fundamental component of understanding the metabolic fate of drugs and xenobiotics; however, there are few in vitro systems conducive for these types of studies. For both the hepatic and renal systems, we provide an overview of the location and function of the most significant phase I/II/III (transporter) of enzymes, and then review current in vitro systems for the suitability of a transporter function study and provide details on microphysiological systems that lead the field in these investigations. Microphysiological modeling of the liver and kidneys using "organ-on-a-chip" technologies is rapidly advancing in transport function assessment and has emerged as a promising method to evaluate drug and xenobiotic metabolism. Future directions for the field are also discussed along with technical challenges encountered in complex multiple-organs-on-chips development. © 2016 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  11. Electron-phonon scattering from Green's function transport combined with molecular dynamics: Applications to mobility predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markussen, Troels; Palsgaard, Mattias; Stradi, Daniele; Gunst, Tue; Brandbyge, Mads; Stokbro, Kurt

    2017-06-01

    We present a conceptually simple method for treating electron-phonon scattering and phonon limited mobilities. By combining Green's function based transport calculations and molecular dynamics, we obtain a temperature dependent transmission from which we evaluate the mobility. We validate our approach by comparing to mobilities and conductivities obtained by the Boltzmann transport equation for different bulk and one-dimensional systems. For bulk silicon and gold we compare against experimental values. We discuss limitations and advantages of each of the computational approaches.

  12. Expression and function of renal and hepatic organic anion transporters in extrahepatic cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Brandoni, Anabel; Hazelhoff, María Herminia; Bulacio, Romina Paula; Torres, Adriana Mónica

    2012-01-01

    Obstructive jaundice occurs in patients suffering from cholelithiasis and from neoplasms affecting the pancreas and the common bile duct. The absorption, distribution and elimination of drugs are impaired during this pathology. Prolonged cholestasis may alter both liver and kidney function. Lactam antibiotics, diuretics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, several antiviral drugs as well as endogenous compounds are classified as organic anions. The hepatic and renal organic anion transport pathways play a key role in the pharmacokinetics of these compounds. It has been demonstrated that acute extrahepatic cholestasis is associated with increased renal elimination of organic anions. The present work describes the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of the expression and function of the renal and hepatic organic anion transporters in extrahepatic cholestasis, such as multidrug resistance-associated protein 2, organic anion transporting polypeptide 1, organic anion transporter 3, bilitranslocase, bromosulfophthalein/bilirubin binding protein, organic anion transporter 1 and sodium dependent bile salt transporter. The modulation in the expression of renal organic anion transporters constitutes a compensatory mechanism to overcome the hepatic dysfunction in the elimination of organic anions. PMID:23197884

  13. Rice nitrate transporter OsNPF2.4 functions in low-affinity acquisition and long-distance transport.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xiudong; Fan, Xiaorong; Wei, Jia; Feng, Huimin; Qu, Hongye; Xie, Dan; Miller, Anthony J; Xu, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    Plant proteins belonging to the NPF (formerly NRT1/PTR) family are well represented in every genome and function in transporting a wide variety of substrates. In this study, we showed that rice OsNPF2.4 is located in the plasma membrane and is expressed mainly in the epidermis, xylem parenchyma, and phloem companion cells. Functional analysis in oocytes showed that OsNPF2.4 is a pH-dependent, low-affinity NO₃⁻ transporter. Short-term (¹⁵NO₃⁻) influx rate, long-term NO₃⁻ acquisition by root, and upward transfer from root to shoot were decreased by disruption of OsNPF2.4 and increased by OsNPF2.4 overexpression under high NO₃⁻ supply. Moreover, the redistribution of NO₃⁻ in the mutants in comparison with the wild type from the oldest leaf to other organs, particularly to N-starved roots, was dramatically changed. Knockout of OsNPF2.4 decreased rice growth and potassium (K) concentration in xylem sap, root, culm, and sheath, but increased the shoot:root ratio of tissue K under higher NO₃⁻. We conclude that OsNPF2.4 functions in acquisition and long-distance transport of NO₃⁻ , and that altering its expression has an indirect effect on K recycling between the root and shoot. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Ins and outs of the ABCG2 multidrug transporter: an update on in vitro functional assays.

    PubMed

    Hegedus, Csilla; Szakács, Gergely; Homolya, László; Orbán, Tamás I; Telbisz, Agnes; Jani, Márton; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2009-01-31

    The major aim of this chapter is to provide a critical overview of the in vitro methods available for studying the function of the ABCG2 multidrug transporter protein. When describing the most applicable assay systems, in each case we present a short overview relevant to ABC multidrug transporters in general, and then we concentrate on the tools applicable to analysis of substrate-drug interactions, the effects of potential activators and inhibitors, and the role of polymorphisms of the ABCG2 transporter. Throughout this chapter we focus on recently developed assay systems, which may provide new possibilities for analyzing the pharmacological aspects of this medically important protein.

  15. Presenilin controls kinesin-1 and dynein function during APP-vesicle transport in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gunawardena, Shermali; Yang, Ge; Goldstein, Lawrence S.B.

    2013-01-01

    Neurons and other cells require intracellular transport of essential components for viability and function. Previous work has shown that while net amyloid precursor protein (APP) transport is generally anterograde, individual vesicles containing APP move bi-directionally. This discrepancy highlights our poor understanding of the in vivo regulation of APP-vesicle transport. Here, we show that reduction of presenilin (PS) or suppression of gamma-secretase activity substantially increases anterograde and retrograde velocities for APP vesicles. Strikingly, PS deficiency has no effect on an unrelated cargo vesicle class containing synaptotagmin, which is powered by a different kinesin motor. Increased velocities caused by PS or gamma-secretase reduction require functional kinesin-1 and dynein motors. Together, our findings suggest that a normal function of PS is to repress kinesin-1 and dynein motor activity during axonal transport of APP vesicles. Furthermore, our data suggest that axonal transport defects induced by loss of PS-mediated regulatory effects on APP-vesicle motility could be a major cause of neuronal and synaptic defects observed in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) pathogenesis. Thus, perturbations of APP/PS transport could contribute to early neuropathology observed in AD, and highlight a potential novel therapeutic pathway for early intervention, prior to neuronal loss and clinical manifestation of disease. PMID:23710041

  16. Molecular alterations of canalicular transport systems in experimental models of cholestasis: possible functional correlations.

    PubMed Central

    Trauner, M.

    1997-01-01

    The discovery of unidirectional, ATP-dependent canalicular transport systems (also termed "export pumps") for bile salts, amphiphilic anionic conjugates, lipophilic cations, and phospholipids has opened new opportunities for understanding biliary physiology and the pathophysiology of cholestasis. In addition, ATP-independent canalicular transport systems for glutathione and bicarbonate contribute to (bile acid-independent) bile formation. Canalicular excretion of bile salts and several non-bile acid organic anions is impaired in various experimental models of cholestasis. Recent cloning of several canalicular transport systems now facilitates studies on their molecular regulation in cholestasis. Although the picture is far from complete, experimental evidence now exists that decreased or even absent expression of canalicular transport proteins may explain impaired transport function resulting in hyperbilirubinemia and cholestasis. With the increasing availability of molecular probes for these transport systems in humans, new information on the molecular regulation of canalicular transport proteins in human cholestatic liver diseases is beginning to emerge and should bring new insights into their pathophysiology and treatment. This article gives an overview on molecular alterations of canalicular transport systems in experimental models of cholestasis and discusses the potential implications of these changes for the pathophysiology of cholestasis. PMID:9626757

  17. Kinesin-2 motors transport IFT-particles, dyneins and tubulin subunits to the tips of Caenorhabditis elegans sensory cilia: relevance to vision research?

    PubMed

    Scholey, Jonathan M

    2012-12-15

    The sensory outer segments (OS) of vertebrate retinal photoreceptors, which detect photons of light, resemble the distal segments of Caenorhabditis elegans sensory cilia, which detect chemical ligands that influence the chemotactic movements of the animal. Based on fluorescence microscopy assays performed in sensory cilia of living, transgenic "wild type" and mutant C. elegans, combined with in vitro motility assays using purified motors, we have proposed that two types of kinesin-2 motor, heterotrimeric kinesin-II and homodimeric OSM-3, cooperate to build amphid and phasmid sensory cilia on chemosensory neurons. Specifically, we propose that these motors function together in a redundant manner to build the axoneme core (aka middle segments (MS)), whereas OSM-3 alone serves to build the distal segments (DS). Furthermore, our data suggest that these motors accomplish this by driving two sequential steps of anterograde transport of cargoes consisting of IFT-particles, retrograde dynein motors, and ciliary tubulin subunits, from the transition zone to the tips of the axonemal microtubules (MTs). Homologs of kinesin-II (KIF3) and OSM-3 (KIF17) are also proposed to contribute to the assembly of vertebrate photoreceptors, although how they do so is currently unclear. Here I review our work on kinesin-2 motors, intraflagellar transport (IFT) and cilium biogenesis in C. elegans sensory cilia, and comment on its possible relevance to current research on vertebrate photoreceptor cilia assembly and function. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Mechanism of transport of IFT particles in C. elegans cilia by the concerted action of kinesin-II and OSM-3 motors.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaoyu; Ou, Guangshuo; Civelekoglu-Scholey, Gul; Blacque, Oliver E; Endres, Nicholas F; Tao, Li; Mogilner, Alex; Leroux, Michel R; Vale, Ronald D; Scholey, Jonathan M

    2006-09-25

    The assembly and function of cilia on Caenorhabditis elegans neurons depends on the action of two kinesin-2 motors, heterotrimeric kinesin-II and homodimeric OSM-3-kinesin, which cooperate to move the same intraflagellar transport (IFT) particles along microtubule (MT) doublets. Using competitive in vitro MT gliding assays, we show that purified kinesin-II and OSM-3 cooperate to generate movement similar to that seen along the cilium in the absence of any additional regulatory factors. Quantitative modeling suggests that this could reflect an alternating action mechanism, in which the motors take turns to move along MTs, or a mechanical competition, in which the motors function in a concerted fashion to move along MTs with the slow motor exerting drag on the fast motor and vice versa. In vivo transport assays performed in Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) protein and IFT motor mutants favor a mechanical competition model for motor coordination in which the IFT motors exert a BBS protein-dependent tension on IFT particles, which controls the IFT pathway that builds the cilium foundation.

  19. Modeling of glycerol-3-phosphate transporter suggests a potential 'tilt' mechanism involved in its function.

    PubMed

    Tsigelny, Igor F; Greenberg, Jerry; Kouznetsova, Valentina; Nigam, Sanjay K

    2008-10-01

    "rocker switch" may apply to certain MFS transporters, intermediate "tilted" states may exist under certain circumstances or as transitional structures. Although wet lab experimental confirmation is required, our results suggest that transport mechanisms in this transporter family should probably not be assumed to be conserved simply based on standard structural homology considerations. Furthermore, steered molecular dynamics elucidating energetic interactions of ligands with amino acid residues in an appropriately modeled transporter may have predictive value in understanding the impact of mutations and/or polymorphisms on transporter function.

  20. Phosphorylation is required for the pathogen defense function of the Arabidopsis PEN3 ABC transporter.

    PubMed

    Underwood, William; Somerville, Shauna C

    2017-09-14

    The Arabidopsis PEN3 ABC transporter accumulates at sites of pathogen detection, where it is involved in defense against a number of pathogens. Perception of PAMPs by pattern recognition receptors initiates recruitment of PEN3 and also leads to PEN3 phosphorylation at multiple amino acid residues. Whether PAMP-induced phosphorylation of PEN3 is important for its defense function or focal recruitment has not been addressed. In this study, we evaluated the role of PEN3 phosphorylation in modulating the localization and defense function of the transporter. We report that PEN3 phosphorylation is critical for its function in defense, but dispensable for recruitment to powdery mildew penetration sites. These results indicate that PAMP-induced phosphorylation is likely to regulate the transport activity of PEN3.

  1. Effect of surface functionalization on the electronic transport properties of Ti3C2 MXene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdiyorov, G. R.

    2015-09-01

    The effects of surface functionalization on the electronic transport properties of the MXene compound Ti3C2 are studied using density-functional theory in combination with the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism. Fluorinated, oxidized and hydroxylated surfaces are considered and the obtained results are compared with the ones for the pristine MXene. It is found that the surface termination has a considerable impact on the electronic transport in MXene. For example, the fluorinated sample shows the largest transmission, whereas surface oxidation results in a considerable reduction of the electronic transmission. The current in the former sample can be up to 4 times larger for a given bias voltage as compared to the case of bare MXene. The increased transmission originates from the extended electronic states and smaller variations of the electrostatic potential profile. Our findings can be useful in designing MXene-based anode materials for energy storage applications, where enhanced electronic transport will be an asset.

  2. Molecular biology of nucleoside transporters and their distributions and functions in the brain.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Fiona E; Damaraju, Vijaya L; Graham, Kathryn; Yao, Sylvia Y M; Baldwin, Stephen A; Cass, Carol E; Young, James D

    2011-01-01

    Pyrimidine and purine nucleosides and their derivatives have critical functions and pharmacological applications in the brain. Nucleosides and nucleobases are precursors of nucleotides, which serve as the energy-rich currency of intermediary metabolism and as precursors of nucleic acids. Nucleosides (e.g., adenosine) and nucleotides are key signaling molecules that modulate brain function through interaction with cell surface receptors. Brain pathologies involving nucleosides and their metabolites range from epilepsy to neurodegenerative disorders and psychiatric conditions to cerebrovascular ischemia. Nucleoside analogs are used clinically in the treatment of brain cancer and viral infections. Nucleosides are hydrophilic molecules, and transportability across cell membranes via specialized nucleoside transporter (NT) proteins is a critical determinant of their metabolism and, for nucleoside drugs, their pharmacologic actions. In mammals, there are two types of nucleoside transport process: bidirectional equilibrative processes driven by chemical gradients, and unidirectional concentrative processes driven by sodium (and proton) electrochemical gradients. In mammals, these processes, both of which are present in brain, are mediated by members of two structurally unrelated membrane protein families (ENT and CNT, respectively). In this Chapter, we review current knowledge of cellular, physiological, pathophysiological and therapeutic aspects of ENT and CNT distribution and function in the mammalian brain, including studies with NT inhibitors and new research involving NT knockout and transgenic mice. We also describe recent progress in functional and molecular studies of ENT and CNT proteins, and summarize emerging evidence of other transporter families with demonstrated or potential roles in the transport of nucleosides and their derivatives in the brain.

  3. A rapid and efficient method to study the function of crop plant transporters in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiangfeng; Zhong, Fudi; Woo, Cheuk Hang; Miao, Yansong; Grusak, Michael A; Zhang, Xiaobo; Tu, Jumin; Wong, Yum Shing; Jiang, Liwen

    2017-03-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential micronutrient for humans. Fe deficiency disease is widespread and has led to extensive studies on the mechanisms of Fe uptake and storage, especially in staple food crops such as rice. However, studies of functionally related genes in rice and other crops are often time and space demanding. Here, we demonstrate that transgenic Arabidopsis suspension culture cells and Arabidopsis plants can be used as an efficient expression system for gain-of-function study of selected transporters, using Fe transporters as a proof-of-principle. The vacuolar membrane transporters OsVIT1 and OsVIT2 have been described to be important for iron sequestration, and disruption of these two genes leads to Fe accumulation in rice seeds. In this study, we have taken advantage of the fluorescent-tagged protein GFP-OsVIT1, which functionally complements the Fe hypersensitivity of ccc1 yeast mutant, to generate transgenic Arabidopsis suspension cell lines and plants. GFP-OsVIT1 was shown to localize on the vacuolar membrane using confocal microscopy and immunogold EM. More importantly, the Fe concentration, as well as the concentration of Zn, in the transgenic cell lines and plants were significantly increased compared to that in the WT. Taken together, our study shows that the heterologous expression of rice vacuolar membrane transporter OsVIT1 in Arabidopsis system is functional and effectively enhances iron accumulation, indicating an useful approach for studying other putative transporters of crop plants in this system.

  4. Structural and functional studies of conserved nucleotide-binding protein LptB in lipopolysaccharide transport

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhongshan; Xiang, Quanju; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Dong, Haohao; He, Chuan; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Yizheng; Wang, Wenjian; Dong, Changjiang

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Determination of the structure of the wild-type LptB in complex with ATP and Mg{sup 2+}. • Demonstrated that ATP binding residues are essential for LptB’s ATPase activity and LPS transport. • Dimerization is required for the LptB’s function and LPS transport. • Revealed relationship between activity of the LptB and the vitality of E. coli cells. - Abstract: Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the main component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, which plays an essential role in protecting the bacteria from harsh conditions and antibiotics. LPS molecules are transported from the inner membrane to the outer membrane by seven LPS transport proteins. LptB is vital in hydrolyzing ATP to provide energy for LPS transport, however this mechanism is not very clear. Here we report wild-type LptB crystal structure in complex with ATP and Mg{sup 2+}, which reveals that its structure is conserved with other nucleotide-binding proteins (NBD). Structural, functional and electron microscopic studies demonstrated that the ATP binding residues, including K42 and T43, are crucial for LptB’s ATPase activity, LPS transport and the vitality of Escherichia coli cells with the exceptions of H195A and Q85A; the H195A mutation does not lower its ATPase activity but impairs LPS transport, and Q85A does not alter ATPase activity but causes cell death. Our data also suggest that two protomers of LptB have to work together for ATP hydrolysis and LPS transport. These results have significant impacts in understanding the LPS transport mechanism and developing new antibiotics.

  5. PAA1, a P-Type ATPase of Arabidopsis, Functions in Copper Transport in Chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Shikanai, Toshiharu; Müller-Moulé, Patricia; Munekage, Yuri; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Pilon, Marinus

    2003-01-01

    Copper (Cu) is an essential trace element with important roles as a cofactor in many plant functions, including photosynthesis. However, free Cu ions can cause toxicity, necessitating precise Cu delivery systems. Relatively little is known about Cu transport in plant cells, and no components of the Cu transport machinery in chloroplasts have been identified previously. Cu transport into chloroplasts provides the cofactor for the stromal enzyme copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/ZnSOD) and for the thylakoid lumen protein plastocyanin, which functions in photosynthetic electron transport from the cytochrome b6f complex to photosystem I. Here, we characterized six Arabidopsis mutants that are defective in the PAA1 gene, which encodes a member of the metal-transporting P-type ATPase family with a functional N-terminal chloroplast transit peptide. paa1 mutants exhibited a high-chlorophyll-fluorescence phenotype as a result of an impairment of photosynthetic electron transport that could be ascribed to decreased levels of holoplastocyanin. The paa1-1 mutant had a lower chloroplast Cu content, despite having wild-type levels in leaves. The electron transport defect of paa1 mutants was evident on medium containing <1 μM Cu, but it was suppressed by the addition of 10 μM Cu. Chloroplastic Cu/ZnSOD activity also was reduced in paa1 mutants, suggesting that PAA1 mediates Cu transfer across the plastid envelope. Thus, PAA1 is a critical component of a Cu transport system in chloroplasts responsible for cofactor delivery to plastocyanin and Cu/ZnSOD. PMID:12782727

  6. Functional characterization of LIT1, the Leishmania amazonensis ferrous iron transporter

    PubMed Central

    Jacques, Ismaele; Andrews, Norma W.; Huynh, Chau

    2010-01-01

    Leishmania amazonensis LIT1 was identified based on homology with IRT1, a ferrous iron transporter from Arabidopsis thaliana. Δlit1 Leishmania amazonensis are defective in intracellular replication and lesion formation in vivo, a virulence phenotype attributed to defective intracellular iron acquisition. Here we functionally characterize LIT1, directly demonstrating that it functions as a ferrous iron membrane transporter from the ZIP family. Conserved residues in the predicted transmembrane domains II, IV, V and VII of LIT1 are essential for iron transport in yeast, including histidines that were proposed to function as metal ligands in ZIP transporters. LIT1 also contains two regions within the predicted intracellular loop that are not found in Arabidopsis IRT1. Deletion of region I inhibited LIT1 expression on the surface of Leishmania promastigotes. Deletion of region II did not interfere with LIT1 trafficking to the surface, but abolished its iron transport capacity when expressed in yeast. Mutagenesis revealed two motifs within region II, HGHQH and TPPRDM, that are independently required for iron transport by LIT1. D263 was identified as a key residue required for iron transport within the TPPRDM motif, while P260 and P261 were dispensable. Deletion of proline-rich regions within region I and between regions I and II did not affect iron transport in yeast, but in Leishmania amazonensis were not able to rescue the intracellular growth of Δlit1 parasites, or their ability to form lesions in mice. These results are consistent with a potential role of the unique intracellular loop of LIT1 in intracellular regulation by Leishmania-specific factors. PMID:20025906

  7. Functional characterization of LIT1, the Leishmania amazonensis ferrous iron transporter.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Ismaele; Andrews, Norma W; Huynh, Chau

    2010-03-01

    Leishmania amazonensis LIT1 was identified based on homology with IRT1, a ferrous iron transporter from Arabidopsis thaliana. Deltalit1L. amazonensis are defective in intracellular replication and lesion formation in vivo, a virulence phenotype attributed to defective intracellular iron acquisition. Here we functionally characterize LIT1, directly demonstrating that it functions as a ferrous iron membrane transporter from the ZIP family. Conserved residues in the predicted transmembrane domains II, IV, V and VII of LIT1 are essential for iron transport in yeast, including histidines that were proposed to function as metal ligands in ZIP transporters. LIT1 also contains two regions within the predicted intracellular loop that are not found in Arabidopsis IRT1. Deletion of region I inhibited LIT1 expression on the surface of Leishmania promastigotes. Deletion of region II did not interfere with LIT1 trafficking to the surface, but abolished its iron transport capacity when expressed in yeast. Mutagenesis revealed two motifs within region II, HGHQH and TPPRDM, that are independently required for iron transport by LIT1. D263 was identified as a key residue required for iron transport within the TPPRDM motif, while P260 and P261 were dispensable. Deletion of proline-rich regions within region I and between regions I and II did not affect iron transport in yeast, but in L. amazonensis were not able to rescue the intracellular growth of Deltalit1 parasites, or their ability to form lesions in mice. These results are consistent with a potential role of the unique intracellular loop of LIT1 in intracellular regulation by Leishmania-specific factors.

  8. Functional domains of the fatty acid transport proteins: studies using protein chimeras.

    PubMed

    DiRusso, Concetta C; Darwis, Dina; Obermeyer, Thomas; Black, Paul N

    2008-03-01

    Fatty acid transport proteins (FATP) function in fatty acid trafficking pathways, several of which have been shown to participate in the transport of exogenous fatty acids into the cell. Members of this protein family also function as acyl CoA synthetases with specificity towards very long chain fatty acids or bile acids. These proteins have two identifying sequence motifs: The ATP/AMP motif, an approximately 100 amino acid segment required for ATP binding and common to members of the adenylate-forming super family of proteins, and the FATP/VLACS motif that consists of approximately 50 amino acid residues and is restricted to members of the FATP family. This latter motif has been implicated in fatty acid transport in the yeast FATP orthologue Fat1p. In the present studies using a yeast strain containing deletions in FAT1 (encoding Fat1p) and FAA1 (encoding the major acyl CoA synthetase (Acsl) Faa1p) as an experimental platform, the phenotypic and functional properties of specific murine FATP1-FATP4 and FATP6-FATP4 protein chimeras were evaluated in order to define elements within these proteins that further distinguish the fatty acid transport and activation functions. As expected from previous work FATP1 and FATP4 were functional in the fatty acid transport pathway, while and FATP6 was not. All three isoforms were able to activate the very long chain fatty acids arachidonate (C(20:4)) and lignocerate (C(24:0)), but with distinguishing activities between saturated and highly unsaturated ligands. A 73 amino acid segment common to FATP1 and FATP4 and between the ATP/AMP and FATP/VLACS motifs was identified by studying the chimeras, which is hypothesized to contribute to the transport function.

  9. Gene therapy rescues cilia defects and restores olfactory function in a mammalian ciliopathy model.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Jeremy C; Davis, Erica E; Joiner, Ariell; Williams, Corey L; Tsai, I-Chun; Jenkins, Paul M; McEwen, Dyke P; Zhang, Lian; Escobado, John; Thomas, Sophie; Szymanska, Katarzyna; Johnson, Colin A; Beales, Philip L; Green, Eric D; Mullikin, James C; Sabo, Aniko; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Attié-Bitach, Tania; Yoder, Bradley K; Reed, Randall R; Katsanis, Nicholas; Martens, Jeffrey R

    2012-09-01

    Cilia are evolutionarily conserved microtubule-based organelles that are crucial for diverse biological functions, including motility, cell signaling and sensory perception. In humans, alterations in the formation and function of cilia manifest clinically as ciliopathies, a growing class of pleiotropic genetic disorders. Despite the substantial progress that has been made in identifying genes that cause ciliopathies, therapies for these disorders are not yet available to patients. Although mice with a hypomorphic mutation in the intraflagellar transport protein IFT88 (Ift88Tg737Rpw mice, also known as ORPK mice)5 have been well studied, the relevance of IFT88 mutations to human pathology is unknown. We show that a mutation in IFT88 causes a hitherto unknown human ciliopathy. In vivo complementation assays in zebrafish and mIMCD3 cells show the pathogenicity of this newly discovered allele. We further show that ORPK mice are functionally anosmic as a result of the loss of cilia on their olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). Notably, adenoviral-mediated expression of IFT88 in mature, fully differentiated OSNs of ORPK mice is sufficient to restore ciliary structures and rescue olfactory function. These studies are the first to use in vivo therapeutic treatment to reestablish cilia in a mammalian ciliopathy. More broadly, our studies indicate that gene therapy is a viable option for cellular and functional rescue of the complex ciliary organelle in established differentiated cells.

  10. Membrane transporters as machines: degenerate singularities as a requirement for function.

    PubMed

    Daniel, R W; Boyd, C A R

    2005-01-21

    It is suggested that Membrane Transporter functionality is based on low energy paths between proteins of different conformations. A simple extension of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation is used to reduce the protein structure problem to one of the kinematics of engineering mechanisms. Such low energy paths between conformations with the same handedness imply the existence of degenerate singularities in the engineering mechanism. The requirement for degeneracy leads to a number of conjectures. These include the structure and function of chaperones for constructing such proteins and the thermodynamic properties of membrane transporters.

  11. Functional analysis and molecular modeling of a cloned urate transporter/channel.

    PubMed

    Leal-Pinto, E; Cohen, B E; Abramson, R G

    1999-05-01

    Recombinant protein, designated UAT, prepared from a cloned rat renal cDNA library functions as a selective voltage-sensitive urate transporter/channel when fused with lipid bilayers. Since we previously suggested that UAT may represent the mammalian electrogenic urate transporter, UAT has been functionally characterized in the presence and absence of potential channel blockers, several of which are known to block mammalian electrogenic urate transport. Two substrates, oxonate (a competitive uricase inhibitor) and pyrazinoate, that inhibit renal electrogenic urate transport also block UAT activity. Of note, oxonate selectively blocks from the cytoplasmic side of the channel while pyrazinoate only blocks from the channel's extracellular face. Like oxonate, anti-uricase (an electrogenic transport inhibitor) also selectively blocks channel activity from the cytoplasmic side. Adenosine blocks from the extracellular side exclusively while xanthine blocks from both sides. These effects are consistent with newly identified regions of homology to uricase and the adenosine A1/A3 receptor in UAT and localize these homologous regions to the cytoplasmic and extracellular faces of UAT, respectively. Additionally, computer analyses identified four putative alpha-helical transmembrane domains, two beta sheets, and blocks of homology to the E and B loops of aquaporin-1 within UAT. The experimental observations substantiate our proposal that UAT is the molecular representation of the renal electrogenic urate transporter and, in conjunction with computer algorithms, suggest a possible molecular structure for this unique channel.

  12. Functional expression of pig renal organic anion transporter 3 (pOAT3).

    PubMed

    Hagos, Yohannes; Braun, Isabella M; Krick, Wolfgang; Burckhardt, Gerhard; Bahn, Andrew

    2005-05-01

    With the cloning of pig renal organic anion transporter 1 (pOAT1) (Biochimie 84 (2002) 1219) we set up a model system for comparative studies of cloned and natively isolated membrane located transport proteins. Meanwhile, another transport protein involved in p-aminohippurate (PAH) uptake on the basolateral side of the proximal tubule cells was identified, designated organic anion transporter 3 (OAT3). To explore the contribution of pOAT1 to the PAH clearance in comparison to OAT3, it was the aim of this study to extend our model by cloning of the pig ortholog of OAT3. Sequence comparisons of human organic anion transporter 3 (hOAT3) with the expressed sequence tag (EST) database revealed a clone and partial sequence of the pig renal organic anion transporter 3 (pOAT3) ortholog. Sequencing of the entire open reading frame resulted in a protein of 543 amino acid residues encoded by 1632 base pairs (EMBL Acc. No. AJ587003). It showed high homologies of 81%, 80%, 76%, and 77% to the human, rabbit, rat, and mouse OAT3, respectively. A functional characterization of pOAT3 in Xenopus laevis oocytes yielded an apparent Km (Kt) for [3H]estrone sulfate of 7.8 +/- 1.3 microM. Moreover, pOAT3 mediated [3H]estrone sulfate uptake was almost abolished by 0.5 mM of glutarate, dehydroepiandosterone sulfate, or probenecid consistent with the hallmarks of OAT3 function.

  13. Cloning and functional characterization of the pig (Sus scrofa) organic anion transporting polypeptide 1a2.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yejin; Liu, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Zheren; Xiao, Yunpeng; Hong, Mei

    2013-08-01

    1. Organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs) are a family of transporter proteins that have been extensively recognized as key determinants of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of various drugs. Human OATP1A2 has been demonstrated to transport wide spectrum of endogenous and exogenous compounds. Study on OATP1A2 orthologues of other species, however, is still limited. 2. Here, we described the cloning and functional characterization of a member of the OATP/Oatp family member obtained from pig (Sus scrofa) liver. Sequence analysis suggested that it has a high homology with human OATP1A2 and bovine Oatp1a2. Prototypic substrates estrone-3-sulfate (E-3-S) and taurocholic acid were transported by the protein. The transport of these two substrates is pH-dependent, with lower pH showing higher uptake function. Kinetic study showed the transport of these two substrates have a Km of 42.5 ± 12.1 and 33.1 ± 8.7 µM, respectively. Pig Slco1a2 has the highest expression level in the liver, and to a less extend in the brain and small intestine. 3. In conclusion, an OATP member was cloned from pig liver. Sequence analysis and phylogenic study revealed it as an orthologue of human OATP1A2. Its kinetic characteristic for prototypic substrates and organ distribution are similar with that of OATP1A2.

  14. Functional and cytometric examination of different human lung epithelial cell types as drug transport barriers

    PubMed Central

    Min, Kyoung Ah; Rosania, Gus R.; Kim, Chong-Kook; Shin, Meong Cheol

    2016-01-01

    To develop inhaled medications, various cell culture models have been used to examine the transcellular transport or cellular uptake properties of small molecules. For the reproducible high throughput screening of the inhaled drug candidates, a further verification of cell architectures as drug transport barriers can contribute to establishing appropriate in vitro cell models. In the present study, side-by-side experiments were performed to compare the structure and transport function of three lung epithelial cells (Calu-3, normal human bronchial primary cells (NHBE), and NL-20). The cells were cultured on the nucleopore membranes in the air-liquid interface (ALI) culture conditions, with cell culture medium in the basolateral side only, starting from day 1. In transport assays, paracellular transport across all three types of cells appeared to be markedly different with the NHBE or Calu-3 cells, showing low paracellular permeability and high TEER values, while the NL-20 cells showed high paracellular permeability and low TEER. Quantitative image analysis of the confocal microscope sections further confirmed that the Calu-3 cells formed intact cell monolayers in contrast to the NHBE and NL-20 cells with multilayers. Among three lung epithelial cell types, the Calu-3 cell cultures under the ALI condition showed optimal cytometric features for mimicking the biophysical characteristics of in vivo airway epithelium. Therefore, the Calu-3 cell monolayers could be used as functional cell barriers for the lung-targeted drug transport studies. PMID:26746641

  15. Functional Characterization of 5-Oxoproline Transport via SLC16A1/MCT1*

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Shotaro; Futagi, Yuya; Kobayashi, Masaki; Ogura, Jiro; Iseki, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone is a tripeptide that consists of 5-oxoproline, histidine, and proline. The peptide is rapidly metabolized by various enzymes. 5-Oxoproline is produced by enzymatic hydrolysis in a variety of peptides. Previous studies showed that 5-oxoproline could become a possible biomarker for autism spectrum disorders. Here we demonstrate the involvement of SLC16A1 in the transport of 5-oxoproline. An SLC16A1 polymorphism (rs1049434) was recently identified. However, there is no information about the effect of the polymorphism on SLC16A1 function. In this study, the polymorphism caused an observable change in 5-oxoproline and lactate transport via SLC16A1. The Michaelis constant (Km) was increased in an SLC16A1 mutant compared with that in the wild type. In addition, the proton concentration required to produce half-maximal activation of transport activity (K0.5, H+) was increased in the SLC16A1 mutant compared with that in the wild type. Furthermore, we examined the transport of 5-oxoproline in T98G cells as an astrocyte cell model. Despite the fact that 5-oxoproline is an amino acid derivative, Na+-dependent and amino acid transport systems scarcely contributed to 5-oxoproline transport. Based on our findings, we conclude that H+-coupled 5-oxoproline transport is mediated solely by SLC16A1 in the cells. PMID:25371203

  16. Cloning and functional expression of a human pancreatic islet glucose-transporter cDNA

    SciTech Connect

    Permutt, M.A.; Koranyi, L.; Keller, K.; Lacy, P.E.; Scharp, D.W.; Mueckler, M. )

    1989-11-01

    Previous studies have suggested that pancreatic islet glucose transport is mediated by a high-K{sub m}, low-affinity facilitated transporter similar to that expressed in liver. To determine the relationship between islet and liver glucose transporters, liver-type glucose-transporter cDNA clones were isolated from a human liver cDNA library. The liver-type glucose-transporter cDNA clone hybridized to mRNA transcripts of the same size in human liver and pancreatic islet RNA. A cDNA library was prepared from purified human pancreatic islet tissue and screened with human liver-type glucose-transporter cDNA. The authors isolated two overlapping cDNA clones encompassing 2600 base pairs, which encode a pancreatic islet protein identical in sequence to that of the putative liver-type glucose-transporter protein. Xenopus oocytes injected with synthetic mRNA transcribed from a full-length cDNA construct exhibited increased uptake of 2-deoxyglucose, confirming the functional identity of the clone. These cDNA clones can now be used to study regulation of expression of the gene and to assess the role of inherited defects in this gene as a candidate for inherited susceptibility to non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

  17. Effect of sulfhydryl modification on rat kidney basolateral plasma membrane transport function.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Rais A; Rizvi, Syed A A; Husain, Kazim; Lymperopoulos, Anastasios; Berndt, William O

    2012-10-01

    Transport processes are the hallmark of functioning kidney. Various nephrotoxicants disrupt the transport processes to manifest nephrotoxicity. Of several nephrotoxicants, mercuric chloride (HgCl(2)) depletes the reduced glutathione (GSH) in kidney and has been observed to affect the in vitro p-aminohippurate (PAH) transport by basolateral (BL) membrane vesicles. The role of renal nonprotein sulfhydryls such as, reduced GSH has been demonstrated to affect the PAH transport by BL membrane vesicles. The role of protein sulfhydryls in transport process of PAH by BL membrane is not known. Due to mercury mediated effects on sulfhydryls, the effects of protein-sulfhydryls (-SH) modifying reagents in the current study were investigated on PAH transport by BL membrane. It was observed that modification of -SH by p-chloromercuribenzoate sulphate (pCMBS), and mercuric chloride (HgCl(2)) decreased while recovering the protein -SH with dithiothreitol treatment provided protection against the effects of pCMBS, and HgCl(2) on PAH transport by BL membrane vesicles.

  18. Gravel threshold of motion: a state function of sediment transport disequilibrium?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Joel P. L.

    2016-08-01

    In most sediment transport models, a threshold variable dictates the shear stress at which non-negligible bedload transport begins. Previous work has demonstrated that nondimensional transport thresholds (τc*) vary with many factors related not only to grain size and shape, but also with characteristics of the local bed surface and sediment transport rate (qs). I propose a new model in which qs-dependent τc*, notated as τc(qs)*, evolves as a power-law function of net erosion or deposition. In the model, net entrainment is assumed to progressively remove more mobile particles while leaving behind more stable grains, gradually increasing τc(qs)* and reducing transport rates. Net deposition tends to fill in topographic lows, progressively leading to less stable distributions of surface grains, decreasing τc(qs)* and increasing transport rates. Model parameters are calibrated based on laboratory flume experiments that explore transport disequilibrium. The τc(qs)* equation is then incorporated into a simple morphodynamic model. The evolution of τc(qs)* is a negative feedback on morphologic change, while also allowing reaches to equilibrate to sediment supply at different slopes. Finally, τc(qs)* is interpreted to be an important but nonunique state variable for morphodynamics, in a manner consistent with state variables such as temperature in thermodynamics.

  19. Linking phloem function to structure: analysis with a coupled xylem-phloem transport model.

    PubMed

    Hölttä, T; Mencuccini, M; Nikinmaa, E

    2009-07-21

    We carried out a theoretical analysis of phloem transport based on Münch hypothesis by developing a coupled xylem-phloem transport model. Results showed that the maximum sugar transport rate of the phloem was limited by solution viscosity and that transport requirements were strongly affected by prevailing xylem water potential. The minimum number of xylem and phloem conduits required to sustain transpiration and assimilation, respectively, were calculated. At its maximum sugar transport rate, the phloem functioned with a high turgor pressure difference between the sugar sources and sinks but the turgor pressure difference was reduced if additional parallel conduits were added or solute relays were introduced. Solute relays were shown to decrease the number of parallel sieve tubes needed for phloem transport, leading to a more uniform turgor pressure and allowing faster information transmission within the phloem. Because xylem water potential affected both xylem and phloem transport, the conductance of the two systems was found to be coupled such that large structural investments in the xylem reduced the need for investment in the phloem and vice versa.

  20. Functional characterization of 5-oxoproline transport via SLC16A1/MCT1.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Shotaro; Futagi, Yuya; Kobayashi, Masaki; Ogura, Jiro; Iseki, Ken

    2015-01-23

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone is a tripeptide that consists of 5-oxoproline, histidine, and proline. The peptide is rapidly metabolized by various enzymes. 5-Oxoproline is produced by enzymatic hydrolysis in a variety of peptides. Previous studies showed that 5-oxoproline could become a possible biomarker for autism spectrum disorders. Here we demonstrate the involvement of SLC16A1 in the transport of 5-oxoproline. An SLC16A1 polymorphism (rs1049434) was recently identified. However, there is no information about the effect of the polymorphism on SLC16A1 function. In this study, the polymorphism caused an observable change in 5-oxoproline and lactate transport via SLC16A1. The Michaelis constant (Km) was increased in an SLC16A1 mutant compared with that in the wild type. In addition, the proton concentration required to produce half-maximal activation of transport activity (K0.5, H (+)) was increased in the SLC16A1 mutant compared with that in the wild type. Furthermore, we examined the transport of 5-oxoproline in T98G cells as an astrocyte cell model. Despite the fact that 5-oxoproline is an amino acid derivative, Na(+)-dependent and amino acid transport systems scarcely contributed to 5-oxoproline transport. Based on our findings, we conclude that H(+)-coupled 5-oxoproline transport is mediated solely by SLC16A1 in the cells. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. The CLC-5 2Cl(-)/H(+) exchange transporter in endosomal function and Dent's disease.

    PubMed

    Lippiat, Jonathan D; Smith, Andrew J

    2012-01-01

    CLC-5 plays a critical role in the process of endocytosis in the proximal tubule of the kidney and mutations that alter protein function are the cause of Dent's I disease. In this X-linked disorder impaired reabsorption results in the wasting of calcium and low molecular weight protein to the urine, kidney stones, and progressive renal failure. Several different ion-transporting and protein clustering roles have been proposed as the physiological function of CLC-5 in endosomal membranes. At the time of its discovery, nearly 20 years ago, it was understandably assumed to be a chloride channel similar to known members of the CLC family, such as CLC-1, suggesting that chloride transport by CLC-5 was critical for endosomal function. Since then CLC-5 was found instead to be a 2Cl(-)/H(+) exchange transporter with voltage-dependent activity. Recent studies have determined that it is this coupled exchange of protons for chloride, and not just chloride transport, which is critical for endosomal and kidney function. This review discusses the recent ideas that describe how CLC-5 might function in endosomal membranes, the aspects that we still do not understand, and where controversies remain.

  2. Structure and function of SemiSWEET and SWEET sugar transporters.

    PubMed

    Feng, Liang; Frommer, Wolf B

    2015-08-01

    SemiSWEETs and SWEETs have emerged as unique sugar transporters. First discovered in plants with the help of fluorescent biosensors, homologs exist in all kingdoms of life. Bacterial and plant homologs transport hexoses and sucrose, whereas animal SWEETs transport glucose. Prokaryotic SemiSWEETs are small and comprise a parallel homodimer of an approximately 100 amino acid-long triple helix bundle (THB). Duplicated THBs are fused to create eukaryotic SWEETs in a parallel orientation via an inversion linker helix, producing a similar configuration to that of SemiSWEET dimers. Structures of four SemiSWEETs have been resolved in three states: open outside, occluded, and open inside, indicating alternating access. As we discuss here, these atomic structures provide a basis for exploring the evolution of structure-function relations in this new class of transporters. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Insect glycerol transporters evolved by functional co-option and gene replacement.

    PubMed

    Finn, Roderick Nigel; Chauvigné, François; Stavang, Jon Anders; Belles, Xavier; Cerdà, Joan

    2015-07-17

    Transmembrane glycerol transport is typically facilitated by aquaglyceroporins in Prokaryota and Eukaryota. In holometabolan insects however, aquaglyceroporins are absent, yet several species possess polyol permeable aquaporins. It thus remains unknown how glycerol transport evolved in the Holometabola. By combining phylogenetic and functional studies, here we show that a more efficient form of glycerol transporter related to the water-selective channel AQP4 specifically evolved and multiplied in the insect lineage, resulting in the replacement of the ancestral branch of aquaglyceroporins in holometabolan insects. To recapitulate this evolutionary process, we generate specific mutants in distantly related insect aquaporins and human AQP4 and show that a single mutation in the selectivity filter converted a water-selective channel into a glycerol transporter at the root of the crown clade of hexapod insects. Integration of phanerozoic climate models suggests that these events were associated with the emergence of complete metamorphosis and the unparalleled radiation of insects.

  4. Insect glycerol transporters evolved by functional co-option and gene replacement

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Roderick Nigel; Chauvigné, François; Stavang, Jon Anders; Belles, Xavier; Cerdà, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Transmembrane glycerol transport is typically facilitated by aquaglyceroporins in Prokaryota and Eukaryota. In holometabolan insects however, aquaglyceroporins are absent, yet several species possess polyol permeable aquaporins. It thus remains unknown how glycerol transport evolved in the Holometabola. By combining phylogenetic and functional studies, here we show that a more efficient form of glycerol transporter related to the water-selective channel AQP4 specifically evolved and multiplied in the insect lineage, resulting in the replacement of the ancestral branch of aquaglyceroporins in holometabolan insects. To recapitulate this evolutionary process, we generate specific mutants in distantly related insect aquaporins and human AQP4 and show that a single mutation in the selectivity filter converted a water-selective channel into a glycerol transporter at the root of the crown clade of hexapod insects. Integration of phanerozoic climate models suggests that these events were associated with the emergence of complete metamorphosis and the unparalleled radiation of insects. PMID:26183829

  5. Functional mutations in mouse norepinephrine transporter reduce sensitivity to cocaine inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hua; Hill, Erik R; Gu, Howard H.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The transporters of dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin are molecular targets of cocaine, amphetamine, and therapeutic antidepressants. The residues involved in binding these drugs are unknown. We have performed several rounds of random and site-directed mutagenesis in the mouse norepinephrine transporter and screened for mutants with altered sensitivity to cocaine inhibition of substrate uptake. We have identified a triple mutation that retains close to wild-type transport function but displays a 37-fold decrease in cocaine sensitivity and 24-fold decrease in desipramine sensitivity. In contrast, the mutant’s sensitivities to amphetamine, methamphetamine, and methylphenidate are only slightly changed. Our data reveal critical residues contributing to the potent uptake inhibitions by these important drugs. Furthermore, this drug-resistant triple mutant can be used to generate a unique knock-in mouse line to study the role of norepinephrine transporter in the addictive effects of cocaine and the therapeutic effects of desipramine. PMID:18824182

  6. Optimal transportation network with concave cost functions: loop analysis and algorithms.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhen; Zhou, Haijun

    2007-06-01

    Transportation networks play a vital role in modern societies. Structural optimization of a transportation system under a given set of constraints is an issue of great practical importance. For a general transportation system whose total cost C is determined by C = Sigma(ifunctions of the flow I(ij). To further understand the qualitative difference between systems with concave and convex cost functions, a loop analysis of transportation cost is performed in the present paper, and an alternative mathematical proof of the optimality of tree-formed networks is given. The simple intuitive picture of this proof then leads to an efficient global algorithm for the searching of optimal structures for a given transportation system with concave cost functions.

  7. High level functional expression of the ABCG2 multidrug transporter in undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Apáti, Agota; Orbán, Tamás I; Varga, Nóra; Németh, Andrea; Schamberger, Anita; Krizsik, Virág; Erdélyi-Belle, Boglárka; Homolya, László; Várady, György; Padányi, Rita; Karászi, Eva; Kemna, Evelien W M; Német, Katalin; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2008-12-01

    Expression of multidrug resistance ABC transporters has been suggested as a functional marker and chemoprotective element in early human progenitor cell types. In this study we examined the expression and function of the key multidrug-ABC transporters, ABCB1, ABCC1 and ABCG2 in two human embryonic stem (HuES) cell lines. We detected a high level ABCG2 expression in the undifferentiated HuES cells, while the expression of this protein significantly decreased during early cell differentiation. ABCG2 in HuES cells provided protection against mitoxantrone toxicity, with a drug-stimulated overexpression of the transporter. No significant expression of ABCB1/ABCC1 was found either in the undifferentiated or partially differentiated HuES cells. Examination of the ABCG2 mRNA in HuES cells indicated the use of selected promoter sites and a truncated 3' untranslated region, suggesting a functionally distinct regulation of this transporter in undifferentiated stem cells. The selective expression of the ABCG2 multidrug transporter indicates that ABCG2 can be applied as a marker for undifferentiated HuES cells. Moreover, protection of embryonic stem cells against xenobiotics and endobiotics may depend on ABCG2 expression and regulation.

  8. Spatiotemporal Coupling of cAMP Transporter to CFTR Chloride Channel Function in the Gut Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunying; Krishnamurthy, Partha C.; Penmatsa, Himabindu; Marrs, Kevin L.; Wang, Xue Qing; Zaccolo, Manuela; Jalink, Kees; Li, Min; Nelson, Deborah J.; Schuetz, John D.; Naren, Anjaparavanda P.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a cAMP-regulated chloride channel localized at apical cell membranes and exists in macromolecular complexes with a variety of signaling and transporter molecules. Here we report that the multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4), a cAMP transporter, is functionally and physically associates with CFTR. Adenosine-stimulated CFTR-mediated chloride currents are potentiated by MRP4 inhibition, and this potentiation is directly coupled to attenuated cAMP efflux through the apical cAMP transporter. CFTR single-channel recordings and FRET-based intracellular cAMP dynamics suggest that a compartmentalized coupling of cAMP transporter and CFTR occurs via the PDZ scaffolding protein, PDZK1, forming a macromolecular complex at apical surfaces of gut epithelia. Disrupting this complex abrogates the functional coupling of cAMP transporter activity to CFTR function. MRP4 knockout mice are more prone to CFTR-mediated secretory diarrhea. Our findings have important implications for disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease and secretory diarrhea. PMID:18045536

  9. Quantum dots for tracking cellular transport of lectin-functionalized nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Xiaoling; Wang Tao; Wu Bingxian; Chen Jun; Chen Jiyao; Yue Yang; Dai Ning; Chen Hongzhuan Jiang Xinguo

    2008-12-05

    Successful drug delivery by functionalized nanocarriers largely depends on their efficient intracellular transport which has not yet been fully understood. We developed a new tracking technique by encapsulating quantum dots into the core of wheat germ agglutinin-conjugated nanoparticles (WGA-NP) to track cellular transport of functionalized nanocarriers. The resulting nanoparticles showed no changes in particle size, zeta potential or biobinding activity, and the loaded probe presented excellent photostability and tracking ability. Taking advantage of these properties, cellular transport profiles of WGA-NP in Caco-2 cells was demonstrated. The cellular uptake begins with binding of WGA to its receptor at the cell surface. The subsequent endocytosis happened in a cytoskeleton-dependent manner and by means of clathrin and caveolae-mediated mechanisms. After endosome creating, transport occurs to both trans-Golgi and lysosome. Our study provides new evidences for quantum dots as a cellular tracking probe of nanocarriers and helps understand intracellular transport profile of lectin-functionalized nanoparticles.

  10. Computer-aided analyses of transport protein sequences: gleaning evidence concerning function, structure, biogenesis, and evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Saier, M H

    1994-01-01

    Three-dimensional structures have been elucidated for very few integral membrane proteins. Computer methods can be used as guides for estimation of solute transport protein structure, function, biogenesis, and evolution. In this paper the application of currently available computer programs to over a dozen distinct families of transport proteins is reviewed. The reliability of sequence-based topological and localization analyses and the importance of sequence and residue conservation to structure and function are evaluated. Evidence concerning the nature and frequency of occurrence of domain shuffling, splicing, fusion, deletion, and duplication during evolution of specific transport protein families is also evaluated. Channel proteins are proposed to be functionally related to carriers. It is argued that energy coupling to transport was a late occurrence, superimposed on preexisting mechanisms of solute facilitation. It is shown that several transport protein families have evolved independently of each other, employing different routes, at different times in evolutionary history, to give topologically similar transmembrane protein complexes. The possible significance of this apparent topological convergence is discussed. PMID:8177172

  11. Spatiotemporal coupling of cAMP transporter to CFTR chloride channel function in the gut epithelia.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunying; Krishnamurthy, Partha C; Penmatsa, Himabindu; Marrs, Kevin L; Wang, Xue Qing; Zaccolo, Manuela; Jalink, Kees; Li, Min; Nelson, Deborah J; Schuetz, John D; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2007-11-30

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a cAMP-regulated chloride channel localized at apical cell membranes and exists in macromolecular complexes with a variety of signaling and transporter molecules. Here, we report that the multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4), a cAMP transporter, functionally and physically associates with CFTR. Adenosine-stimulated CFTR-mediated chloride currents are potentiated by MRP4 inhibition, and this potentiation is directly coupled to attenuated cAMP efflux through the apical cAMP transporter. CFTR single-channel recordings and FRET-based intracellular cAMP dynamics suggest that a compartmentalized coupling of cAMP transporter and CFTR occurs via the PDZ scaffolding protein, PDZK1, forming a macromolecular complex at apical surfaces of gut epithelia. Disrupting this complex abrogates the functional coupling of cAMP transporter activity to CFTR function. Mrp4 knockout mice are more prone to CFTR-mediated secretory diarrhea. Our findings have important implications for disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease and secretory diarrhea.

  12. OsABCB14 functions in auxin transport and iron homeostasis in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanxia; Zhang, Saina; Guo, Haipeng; Wang, Suikang; Xu, Ligen; Li, Chuanyou; Qian, Qian; Chen, Fan; Geisler, Markus; Qi, Yanhua; Jiang, De An

    2014-07-01

    Members of the ATP Binding Cassette B/Multidrug-Resistance/P-glyco-protein (ABCB/MDR/PGP) subfamily were shown to function primarily in Oryza sativa (rice) auxin transport; however, none of the rice ABCB transporters have been functionally characterized. Here, we describe that a knock-down of OsABCB14 confers decreased auxin concentrations and polar auxin transport rates, conferring insensitivity to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). OsABCB14 displays enhanced specific auxin influx activity in yeast and protoplasts prepared from rice knock-down alleles. OsABCB14 is localized at the plasma membrane, pointing to an important directionality under physiological conditions. osabcb14 mutants were surprisingly found to be insensitive to iron deficiency treatment (-Fe). Their Fe concentration is higher and upregulation of Fe deficiency-responsive genes is lower in osabcb14 mutants than in wild-type rice (Nipponbare, NIP). Taken together, our results strongly support the role of OsABCB14 as an auxin influx transporter involved in Fe homeostasis. The functional characterization of OsABCB14 provides insights in monocot auxin transport and its relationship to Fe nutrition. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Integrating Membrane Transport with Male Gametophyte Development and Function through Transcriptomics.

    SciTech Connect

    Bock KW; D Honys; JM. Ward; S Padmanaban; EP Nawrocki; KD Hirschi; D Twell; H Sze

    2006-01-01

    Male fertility depends on the proper development of the male gametophyte, successful pollen germination, tube growth and delivery of the sperm cells to the ovule. Previous studies have shown that nutrients like boron, and ion gradients or currents of Ca2+, H+, and K+ are critical for pollen tube growth. However, the molecular identities of transporters mediating these fluxes are mostly unknown. As a first step to integrate transport with pollen development and function, a genome-wide analysis of transporter genes expressed in the male gametophyte at four developmental stages was conducted. About 1269 genes encoding classified transporters were collected from the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. Of 757 transporter genes expressed in pollen, 16% or 124 genes, including AHA6, CNGC18, TIP1.3 and CHX08, are specifically or preferentially expressed relative to sporophytic tissues. Some genes are highly expressed in microspores and bicellular pollen (COPT3, STP2, OPT9); while others are activated only in tricellular or mature pollen (STP11, LHT7). Analyses of entire gene families showed that a subset of genes, including those expressed in sporophytic tissues, were developmentally-regulated during pollen maturation. Early and late expression patterns revealed by transcriptome analysis are supported by promoter::GUS analyses of CHX genes and by other methods. Recent genetic studies based on a few transporters, including plasma membrane H+ pump AHA3, Ca2+ pump ACA9, and K+ channel SPIK, further support the expression patterns and the inferred functions revealed by our analyses. Thus, revealing the distinct expression patterns of specific transporters and unknown polytopic proteins during microgametogenesis provides new insights for strategic mutant analyses necessary to integrate the roles of transporters and potential receptors with male gametophyte development.

  14. Copper homeostasis in grapevine: functional characterization of the Vitis vinifera copper transporter 1.

    PubMed

    Martins, Viviana; Bassil, Elias; Hanana, Mohsen; Blumwald, Eduardo; Gerós, Hernâni

    2014-07-01

    The Vitis vinifera copper transporter 1 is capable of self-interaction and mediates intracellular copper transport. An understanding of copper homeostasis in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) is particularly relevant to viticulture in which copper-based fungicides are intensively used. In the present study, the Vitis vinifera copper transporter 1 (VvCTr1), belonging to the Ctr family of copper transporters, was cloned and functionally characterized. Amino acid sequence analysis showed that VvCTr1 monomers are small peptides composed of 148 amino acids with 3 transmembrane domains and several amino acid residues typical of Ctr transporters. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) demonstrated that Ctr monomers are self-interacting and subcellular localization studies revealed that VvCTr1 is mobilized via the trans-Golgi network, through the pre-vacuolar compartment and located to the vacuolar membrane. The heterologous expression of VvCTr1 in a yeast strain lacking all Ctr transporters fully rescued the phenotype, while a deficient complementation was observed in a strain lacking only plasma membrane-bound Ctrs. Given the common subcellular localization of VvCTr1 and AtCOPT5 and the highest amino acid sequence similarity in comparison to the remaining AtCOPT proteins, Arabidopsis copt5 plants were stably transformed with VvCTr1. The impairment in root growth observed in copt5 seedlings in copper-deficient conditions was fully rescued by VvCTr1, further supporting its involvement in intracellular copper transport. Expression studies in V. vinifera showed that VvCTr1 is mostly expressed in the root system, but transcripts were also present in leaves and stems. The functional characterization of VvCTr-mediated copper transport provides the first step towards understanding the physiological and molecular responses of grapevines to copper-based fungicides.

  15. Identification and Functional Characterization of the Caenorhabditis elegans Riboflavin Transporters rft-1 and rft-2

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Arundhati; Elmatari, Daniel; Rothman, Jason; LaMunyon, Craig W.; Said, Hamid M.

    2013-01-01

    Two potential orthologs of the human riboflavin transporter 3 (hRFVT3) were identified in the C. elegans genome, Y47D7A.16 and Y47D7A.14, which share 33.7 and 30.5% identity, respectively, with hRFVT3. The genes are tandemly arranged, and we assign them the names rft-1 (for Y47D7A.16) and rft-2 (for Y47D7A.14). Functional characterization of the coding sequences in a heterologous expression system demonstrated that both were specific riboflavin transporters, although the rft-1 encoded protein had greater transport activity. A more detailed examination of rft-1 showed its transport of riboflavin to have an acidic pH dependence, saturability (apparent Km = 1.4±0.5 µM), inhibition by riboflavin analogues, and Na+ independence. The expression of rft-1 mRNA was relatively higher in young larvae than in adults, and mRNA expression dropped in response to RF supplementation. Knocking down the two transporters individually via RNA interference resulted in a severe loss of fertility that was compounded in a double knockdown. Transcriptional fusions constructed with two fluorophores (rft-1::GFP, and rft-2::mCherry) indicated that rft-1 is expressed in the intestine and a small subset of neuronal support cells along the entire length of the animal. Expression of rft-2 is localized mainly to the intestine and pharynx. We also observed a drop in the expression of the two reporters in animals that were maintained in high riboflavin levels. These results report for the first time the identification of two riboflavin transporters in C. elegans and demonstrate their expression and importance to metabolic function in worms. Absence of transporter function renders worms sterile, making them useful in understanding human disease associated with mutations in hRFVT3. PMID:23483992

  16. [Structure and function of heavy metal transporter P(1B)-ATPase in plant: a review].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuxiu; Zhang, Yuanya; Sun, Tao; Chai, Tuanyao

    2010-06-01

    The regulation of the heavy-metal accumulation in vivo for plant survival is very complex. The metal cation transporter plays key roles in the metabolic process. P(1B)-ATPases are the only subgroup of P-ATPases that contribute to heavy metal homeostasis presented in most organisms. Arabidopsis thaliana contains eight genes encoding P(1B)-ATPases. The current reports show that the functions of P(1B)-ATPases are involved in maintaining metal homeostasis, transporting and detoxification in plants. P(1B)-ATPases not only mediated metal ion mobilization and uptake in roots, but also contribute to the metal transport, storage and tolerance in shoots, especially in heavy metal hyperaccumulators. In this paper, we reviewed and discussed the evolution, classification, structure and function of P(1B)-ATPases in plants. HMAs-transgenic manipulation could be a feasible approach for phytoremediation and mineral nutrition fortification.

  17. Functional genetic variants in the vesicular monoamine transporter 1 (VMAT1) modulate emotion processing

    PubMed Central

    Lohoff, Falk W.; Hodge, Rachel; Narasimhan, Sneha; Nall, Aleksandra; Ferraro, Thomas N.; Mickey, Brian J.; Heitzeg, Mary M.; Langenecker, Scott A.; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; Bogdan, Ryan; Nikolova, Yuliya S.; Drabant, Emily; Hariri, Ahmad R.; Bevilacqua, Laura; Goldman, David; Doyle, Glenn A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Emotional behavior is in part heritable and often disrupted in psychopathology. Identification of specific genetic variants that drive this heritability may provide important new insight into molecular and neurobiological mechanisms involved in emotionality. Our results demonstrate that the presynaptic vesicular monoamine transporter 1 (VMAT1) Thr136Ile (rs1390938) polymorphism is functional in vitro, with the Ile allele leading to increased monoamine transport into presynaptic vesicles. Moreover, we show that the Thr136Ile variant predicts differential responses in emotional brain circuits consistent with its effects in vitro. Lastly, deep sequencing of bipolar disorder (BPD) patients and controls identified several rare novel VMAT1 variants. The variant Phe84Ser was only present in individuals with BPD and leads to marked increase monoamine transport in vitro. Taken together, our data show that VMAT1 polymorphisms influence monoamine signaling, the functional response of emotional brain circuits, and risk for psychopathology. PMID:23337945

  18. Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vontiesenhausen, G.

    1986-01-01

    A summary of tether transportation is given. Four steps were used over a period of time. First, theoretical engineering feasibility and technology requirements were determined. Then the survivors of that effort went into step two in the analysis of promising candidates. Those survivors went into the third phase which is engineering design and cost benefits. Survivors entered into the demonstration mission definition phase. Transportation studies have covered two kinds of deployments. First, steady state deployment was studied. Like the TSS, it's nearly vertical. It takes a long time to deploy and involves relatively high tether tension. Secondly, dynamic deployment was studied. Deployment started in an almost horizontal direction under a very shallow angle which allows a high deployment rate under very low tension. Momentum transfer here occurs by libration. Specific payloads were used to study tethered transportation benefits. Four transportation concepts were studied with regard to cost benefits. A tethered orbiter deboost from the space station, an OTV boost up from the Space Station, a science platform on a tether with a possible micro-g lab moving in between platform and station, and a tethered boost of payloads fromthe orbiter are the four concepts. These benefits are examined in detail.

  19. The Debaryomyces hansenii carboxylate transporters Jen1 homologues are functional in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Soares-Silva, Isabel; Ribas, David; Foskolou, Iosifina P; Barata, Beatriz; Bessa, Daniela; Paiva, Sandra; Queirós, Odília; Casal, Margarida

    2015-12-01

    We have functionally characterized the four Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc) Jen1 homologues of Debaryomyces hansenii (Dh) by heterologous expression in S. cerevisiae. Debaryomyces hansenii cells display mediated transport for the uptake of lactate, acetate, succinate and malate. DHJEN genes expression was detected by RT-PCR in all carbon sources assayed, namely lactate, succinate, citrate, glycerol and glucose. The heterologous expression in the S. cerevisiae W303-1A jen1Δ ady2Δ strain demonstrated that the D. hansenii JEN genes encode four carboxylate transporters. DH27 gene encodes an acetate transporter (Km 0.94 ± 0.17 mM; Vmax 0.43 ± 0.03 nmol s(-1) mg(-1)), DH17 encodes a malate transporter (Km 0.27 ± 0.04 mM; Vmax 0.11 ± 0.01 nmol s(-1) mg(-1)) and both DH18 and DH24 encode succinate transporters with the following kinetic parameters, respectively, Km 0.31 ± 0.06 mM; Vmax 0.83 ± 0.04 nmol s(-1) mg(-1)and Km 0.16 ± 0.02 mM; Vmax 0.19 ± 0.02 nmol s(-1) mg(-1). Surprisingly, no lactate transporter was found, although D. hansenii presents a mediated transport for this acid. This work advanced the current knowledge on yeast carboxylate transporters by characterizing four new plasma membrane transporters in D. hansenii. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Functional characterization in Xenopus oocytes of Na+ transport systems from durum wheat reveals diversity among two HKT1;4 transporters.

    PubMed

    Ben Amar, Siwar; Brini, Faiçal; Sentenac, Hervé; Masmoudi, Khaled; Véry, Anne-Aliénor

    2014-01-01

    Plant tolerance to salinity constraint involves complex and integrated functions including control of Na(+) uptake, translocation, and compartmentalization. Several members of the high-affinity K(+) transporter (HKT) family, which comprises plasma-membrane transporters permeable to K(+) and Na(+) or to Na(+) only, have been shown to play major roles in plant Na(+) and K(+) homeostasis. Among them, HKT1;4 has been identified as corresponding to a quantitative trait locus (QTL) of salt tolerance in wheat but was not functionally characterized. Here, we isolated two HKT1;4-type cDNAs from a salt-tolerant durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L. subsp. durum) cultivar, Om Rabia3, and investigated the functional properties of the encoded transporters using a two-electrode voltage-clamp technique, after expression in Xenopus oocytes. Both transporters displayed high selectivity for Na(+), their permeability to other monovalent cations (K(+), Li(+), Cs(+), and Rb(+)) being ten times lower than that to Na(+). Both TdHKT1;4-1 and TdHKT1;4-2 transported Na(+) with low affinity, although the half-saturation of the conductance was observed at a Na(+) concentration four times lower in TdHKT1;4-1 than in TdHKT1;4-2. External K(+) did not inhibit Na(+) transport through these transporters. Quinine slightly inhibited TdHKT1;4-2 but not TdHKT1;4-1. Overall, these data identified TdHKT1;4 transporters as new Na(+)-selective transporters within the HKT family, displaying their own functional features. Furthermore, they showed that important differences in affinity exist among durum wheat HKT1;4 transporters. This suggests that the salt tolerance QTL involving HKT1;4 may be at least in part explained by functional variability among wheat HKT1;4-type transporters.

  1. Functional characterization in Xenopus oocytes of Na+ transport systems from durum wheat reveals diversity among two HKT1;4 transporters

    PubMed Central

    Masmoudi, Khaled; Véry, Anne-Aliénor

    2014-01-01

    Plant tolerance to salinity constraint involves complex and integrated functions including control of Na+ uptake, translocation, and compartmentalization. Several members of the high-affinity K+ transporter (HKT) family, which comprises plasma-membrane transporters permeable to K+ and Na+ or to Na+ only, have been shown to play major roles in plant Na+ and K+ homeostasis. Among them, HKT1;4 has been identified as corresponding to a quantitative trait locus (QTL) of salt tolerance in wheat but was not functionally characterized. Here, we isolated two HKT1;4-type cDNAs from a salt-tolerant durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L. subsp. durum) cultivar, Om Rabia3, and investigated the functional properties of the encoded transporters using a two-electrode voltage-clamp technique, after expression in Xenopus oocytes. Both transporters displayed high selectivity for Na+, their permeability to other monovalent cations (K+, Li+, Cs+, and Rb+) being ten times lower than that to Na+. Both TdHKT1;4-1 and TdHKT1;4-2 transported Na+ with low affinity, although the half-saturation of the conductance was observed at a Na+ concentration four times lower in TdHKT1;4-1 than in TdHKT1;4-2. External K+ did not inhibit Na+ transport through these transporters. Quinine slightly inhibited TdHKT1;4-2 but not TdHKT1;4-1. Overall, these data identified TdHKT1;4 transporters as new Na+-selective transporters within the HKT family, displaying their own functional features. Furthermore, they showed that important differences in affinity exist among durum wheat HKT1;4 transporters. This suggests that the salt tolerance QTL involving HKT1;4 may be at least in part explained by functional variability among wheat HKT1;4-type transporters. PMID:24192995

  2. Specific α- and β-Tubulin Isotypes Optimize the Functions of Sensory Cilia in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Hurd, Daryl D.; Miller, Renee M.; Núñez, Lizbeth; Portman, Douglas S.

    2010-01-01

    Primary cilia have essential roles in transducing signals in eukaryotes. At their core is the ciliary axoneme, a microtubule-based structure that defines cilium morphology and provides a substrate for intraflagellar transport. However, the extent to which axonemal microtubules are specialized for sensory cilium function is unknown. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, primary cilia are present at the dendritic ends of most sensory neurons, where they provide a specialized environment for the transduction of particular stimuli. Here, we find that three tubulin isotypes—the α-tubulins TBA-6 and TBA-9 and the β-tubulin TBB-4—are specifically expressed in overlapping sets of C. elegans sensory neurons and localize to the sensory cilia of these cells. Although cilia still form in mutants lacking tba-6, tba-9, and tbb-4, ciliary function is often compromised: these mutants exhibit a variety of sensory deficits as well as the mislocalization of signaling components. In at least one case, that of the CEM cephalic sensory neurons, cilium architecture is disrupted in mutants lacking specific ciliary tubulins. While there is likely to be some functional redundancy among C. elegans tubulin genes, our results indicate that specific tubulins optimize the functional properties of C. elegans sensory cilia. PMID:20421600

  3. A seepage erosion sediment transport function and geometric headcut relationships for predicting seepage erosion undercutting

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Seepage erosion is an important factor in hillslope instability and failure. However, predicting erosion by subsurface flow or seepage and incorporating its effects into stability models remain a challenge. Limitations exist with all existing seepage erosion sediment transport functions, including n...

  4. IFPA meeting 2015 workshop report I: placental mitochondrial function, transport systems and epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Bianco-Miotto, T; Blundell, C; Buckberry, S; Chamley, L; Chong, S; Cottrell, E; Dawson, P; Hanna, C; Holland, O; Lewis, R M; Moritz, K; Myatt, L; Perkins, A V; Powell, T; Saffery, R; Sferruzzi-Perri, A; Sibley, C; Simmons, D; O'Tierney-Ginn, P F

    2016-12-01

    Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting as they allow for discussion of specialized topics. At IFPA meeting 2015 there were twelve themed workshops, three of which are summarized in this report. These workshops covered areas of placental regulation and nutrient handling: 1) placental epigenetics; 2) placental mitochondrial function; 3) placental transport systems.

  5. Interplay between group function of kinesin based transport and lipid bilayer mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Joseph; Hirst, Linda; Xu, Jing

    2015-03-01

    Motor proteins, discovered in recent decades, are important building blocks to life. These molecular machines transport cargo and although indispensable to cell function, are not well understood at present. Single kinesin transport properties have been documented, but their group function remains unknown. In this project, the properties of kinesin-based transport by multiple motors are investigated in-vitro to establish a link between travel distance and lipid diffusion in the vesicle membrane. In the experiments, silica beads coated in a supported lipid membrane and giant lipid vesicles are transported along a microtubule by embedded kinesin motors. In an alternate geometry, this system can be inverted, whereby motors are bound to a surface of a lipid bilayer and microtubules are deposited. We have characterized motor function with respect to the fluidity of the membrane. To measure the diffusion properties of different membranes, planar lipid bilayers are prepared on silica slides and supported by bovine serum albumin protein. To establish a diffusion constant at room temperature for the lipid membrane we use the FRAP technique (fluorescence recovery after photobleaching). Using this method we can investigate if there is any interplay between group travel function and membrane fluidity.

  6. Limited transport of functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes in two natural soils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Column experiments were conducted in undisturbed and in repacked soil columns at water contents close to saturation (85–96%) to investigate the transport and retention of functionalized 14C-labeled multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) in two natural soils. Additionally, a field lysimeter experiment...

  7. Identification of Functional Amino Acid Residues Involved in Polyamine and Agmatine Transport by Human Organic Cation Transporter 2

    PubMed Central

    Higashi, Kyohei; Imamura, Masataka; Fudo, Satoshi; Uemura, Takeshi; Saiki, Ryotaro; Hoshino, Tyuji; Toida, Toshihiko; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Igarashi, Kazuei

    2014-01-01

    Polyamine (putrescine, spermidine and spermine) and agmatine uptake by the human organic cation transporter 2 (hOCT2) was studied using HEK293 cells transfected with pCMV6-XL4/hOCT2. The Km values for putrescine and spermidine were 7.50 and 6.76 mM, and the Vmax values were 4.71 and 2.34 nmol/min/mg protein, respectively. Spermine uptake by hOCT2 was not observed at pH 7.4, although it inhibited both putrescine and spermidine uptake. Agmatine was also taken up by hOCT2, with Km value: 3.27 mM and a Vmax value of 3.14 nmol/min/mg protein. Amino acid residues involved in putrescine, agmatine and spermidine uptake by hOCT2 were Asp427, Glu448, Glu456, Asp475, and Glu516. In addition, Glu524 and Glu530 were involved in putrescine and spermidine uptake activity, and Glu528 and Glu540 were weakly involved in putrescine uptake activity. Furthermore, Asp551 was also involved in the recognition of spermidine. These results indicate that the recognition sites for putrescine, agmatine and spermidine on hOCT2 strongly overlap, consistent with the observation that the three amines are transported with similar affinity and velocity. A model of spermidine binding to hOCT2 was constructed based on the functional amino acid residues. PMID:25019617

  8. N-Glycosylation is required for Na{sup +}-dependent vitamin C transporter functionality

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, Veedamali S. Marchant, Jonathan S.; Reidling, Jack C.; Said, Hamid M.

    2008-09-12

    The human sodium-dependent vitamin C transporters (hSVCT1 and hSVCT2) mediate cellular uptake of ascorbic acid. Both these transporters contain potential sites for N-glycosylation in their extracellular domains (Asn-138, Asn-144 [hSVCT1]; Asn-188, Asn-196 [hSVCT2]), however the role of N-glycosylation in transporter function is unexplored. On the basis of the result that tunicamycin decreased {sup 14}C-ascorbic acid uptake in HepG2 cells, we systematically ablated all consensus N-glycosylation sites in hSVCT1 and hSVCT2 to resolve any effects on ascorbic acid uptake, transporter expression and targeting. We show that removal of individual N-glycosylation sites significantly impairs protein expression and consequently ascorbic acid uptake for hSVCT1 mutants (N138Q is retained intracellularly) and for hSVCT2 mutants (all of which reach the cell surface). N-Glycosylation is therefore essential for vitamin C transporter functionality.

  9. Functional expression of a human GDP-L-fucose transporter in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Förster-Fromme, Karin; Schneider, Sarah; Sprenger, Georg A; Albermann, Christoph

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the translocation of nucleotide-activated sugars from the cytosol across a membrane into the endoplasmatic reticulum or the Golgi apparatus which is an important step in the synthesis of glycoproteins and glycolipids in eukaryotes. The heterologous expression of the recombinant and codon-adapted human GDP-L-fucose antiporter gene SLC35C1 (encoding an N-terminal OmpA-signal sequence) led to a functional transporter protein located in the cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli. The in vitro transport was investigated using inverted membrane vesicles. SLC35C1 is an antiporter specific for GDP-L-fucose and depending on the concomitant reverse transport of GMP. The recombinant transporter FucT1 exhibited an activity for the transport of (3)H-GDP-L-fucose with a Vmax of 8 pmol/min mg with a Km of 4 µM. The functional expression of SLC35C1 in GDP-L-fucose overproducing E. coli led to the export of GDP-L-fucose to the culture supernatant. The export of GDP-L-fucose by E. coli provides the opportunity for the engineering of a periplasmatic fucosylation reaction in recombinant bacterial cells.

  10. Large collective motions regulate the functional properties of glutamate transporter trimers

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jie; Shrivastava, Indira H.; Watts, Spencer D.; Bahar, Ivet; Amara, Susan G.

    2011-01-01

    Glutamate transporters clear synaptically released glutamate to maintain precise communication between neurons and limit glutamate neurotoxicity. Although much progress has been made on the topology, structure, and function of these carriers, few studies have addressed large-scale structural motions collectively associated with substrate transport. Here we show that a series of single cysteine substitutions in the helical hairpin HP2 of excitatory amino acid transporter 1 form intersubunit disulfide cross-links within the trimer. After cross-linking, substrate uptake, but not substrate-activated anion conductance, is completely inhibited in these mutants. These disulfide bridges link residue pairs > 40 Å apart in the outward-facing crystal structure, and can be explained by concerted subunit movements predicted by the anisotropic network model (ANM). The existence of these global motions is further supported by the observation that single cysteine substitutions at the extracellular part of the transmembrane domain 8 can also be cross-linked by copper phenanthroline as predicted by the ANM. Interestingly, the transport domain in the un-cross-linked subunit of the trimer assumes an inward-facing orientation, suggesting that individual subunits potentially undergo separate transitions between outward- and inward-facing forms, rather than an all-or-none transition of the three subunits, a mechanism also supported by ANM-predicted intrinsic dynamics. These results shed light on how large collective motions contribute to the functional dynamics of glutamate transporters. PMID:21876140

  11. Electronic transport properties of one dimensional lithium nanowire using density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Thakur, Anil; Kumar, Arun; Chandel, Surjeet; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2015-05-15

    Single nanowire electrode devices are a unique platform for studying as energy storage devices. Lithium nanowire is of much importance in lithium ion batteries and therefore has received a great deal of attention in past few years. In this paper we investigated structural and electronic transport properties of Li nanowire using density functional theory (DFT) with SIESTA code. Electronic transport properties of Li nanowire are investigated theoretically. The calculations are performed in two steps: first an optimized geometry for Li nanowire is obtained using DFT calculations, and then the transport relations are obtained using NEGF approach. SIESTA and TranSIESTA simulation codes are used in the calculations correspondingly. The electrodes are chosen to be the same as the central region where transport is studied, eliminating current quantization effects due to contacts and focusing the electronic transport study to the intrinsic structure of the material. By varying chemical potential in the electrode regions, an I-V curve is traced which is in agreement with the predicted behavior. Agreement of bulk properties of Li with experimental values make the study of electronic and transport properties in lithium nanowires interesting because they are promising candidates as bridging pieces in nanoelectronics. Transmission coefficient and V-I characteristic of Li nano wire indicates that Li nanowire can be used as an electrode device.

  12. Molecular Cloning and Functional Analysis of a Na(+)-Insensitive K(+) Transporter of Capsicum chinense Jacq.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Lau, Nancy; Bojórquez-Quintal, Emanuel; Benito, Begoña; Echevarría-Machado, Ileana; Sánchez-Cach, Lucila A; Medina-Lara, María de Fátima; Martínez-Estévez, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    High-affinity K(+) (HAK) transporters are encoded by a large family of genes and are ubiquitous in the plant kingdom. These HAK-type transporters participate in low- and high-affinity potassium (K(+)) uptake and are crucial for the maintenance of K(+) homeostasis under hostile conditions. In this study, the full-length cDNA of CcHAK1 gene was isolated from roots of the habanero pepper (Capsicum chinense). CcHAK1 expression was positively regulated by K(+) starvation in roots and was not inhibited in the presence of NaCl. Phylogenetic analysis placed the CcHAK1 transporter in group I of the HAK K(+) transporters, showing that it is closely related to Capsicum annuum CaHAK1 and Solanum lycopersicum LeHAK5. Characterization of the protein in a yeast mutant deficient in high-affinity K(+) uptake (WΔ3) suggested that CcHAK1 function is associated with high-affinity K(+) uptake, with Km and Vmax for Rb of 50 μM and 0.52 nmol mg(-1) min(-1), respectively. K(+) uptake in yeast expressing the CcHAK1 transporter was inhibited by millimolar concentrations of the cations ammonium ([Formula: see text]) and cesium (Cs(+)) but not by sodium (Na(+)). The results presented in this study suggest that the CcHAK1 transporter may contribute to the maintenance of K(+) homeostasis in root cells in C. chinense plants undergoing K(+)-deficiency and salt stress.

  13. Structural basis of transport function in major facilitator superfamily protein from Trichoderma harzianum.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Nitika; Sandhu, Padmani; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Akhter, Yusuf

    2017-02-01

    Trichothecenes are the sesquiterpenes secreted by Trichoderma spp. residing in the rhizosphere. These compounds have been reported to act as plant growth promoters and bio-control agents. The structural knowledge for the transporter proteins of their efflux remained limited. In this study, three-dimensional structure of Thmfs1 protein, a trichothecene transporter from Trichoderma harzianum, was homology modelled and further Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations were used to decipher its mechanism. Fourteen transmembrane helices of Thmfs1 protein are observed contributing to an inward-open conformation. The transport channel and ligand binding sites in Thmfs1 are identified based on heuristic, iterative algorithm and structural alignment with homologous proteins. MD simulations were performed to reveal the differential structural behaviour occurring in the ligand free and ligand bound forms. We found that two discrete trichothecene binding sites are located on either side of the central transport tunnel running from the cytoplasmic side to the extracellular side across the Thmfs1 protein. Detailed analysis of the MD trajectories showed an alternative access mechanism between N and C-terminal domains contributing to its function. These results also demonstrate that the transport of trichodermin occurs via hopping mechanism in which the substrate molecule jumps from one binding site to another lining the transport tunnel.

  14. Ion transport versus gas conduction: function of AMT/Rh-type proteins.

    PubMed

    Ludewig, U

    2006-01-01

    Although lipid membranes exhibit some permeability to the weak base NH3, organisms have developed specialized proteins that increase and regulate the NH3 fluxes across cellular membranes. In humans, the Rh glycoproteins, such as the erythrocyte-specific RhAG and the liver and kidney homologs RhBG and RhCG, are involved in the passage of NH3. Rh glycoproteins have distant relatives, called ammonium transporters (AMTs), in archae and bacteria. The crystal structures of AMTs show that the proteins are homo-trimers and that the center of each monomer forms a pore. AMT/Rh proteins have also been identified in plants. In contrast to the human Rh glycoproteins, these AMTs specifically transport NH4+ or co-transport NH3/H+. Hence, they can transport against NH3 gradients. The molecular determinants for the different transport mechanisms within proteins of the same family are currently unclear. The functional differences between AMT/Rh transporters are likely to be an evolutionary adaptation to different ammonium and nitrogen requirements in bacteria, plants and animals.

  15. Molecular Cloning and Functional Analysis of a Na+-Insensitive K+ Transporter of Capsicum chinense Jacq

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Lau, Nancy; Bojórquez-Quintal, Emanuel; Benito, Begoña; Echevarría-Machado, Ileana; Sánchez-Cach, Lucila A.; Medina-Lara, María de Fátima; Martínez-Estévez, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    High-affinity K+ (HAK) transporters are encoded by a large family of genes and are ubiquitous in the plant kingdom. These HAK-type transporters participate in low- and high-affinity potassium (K+) uptake and are crucial for the maintenance of K+ homeostasis under hostile conditions. In this study, the full-length cDNA of CcHAK1 gene was isolated from roots of the habanero pepper (Capsicum chinense). CcHAK1 expression was positively regulated by K+ starvation in roots and was not inhibited in the presence of NaCl. Phylogenetic analysis placed the CcHAK1 transporter in group I of the HAK K+ transporters, showing that it is closely related to Capsicum annuum CaHAK1 and Solanum lycopersicum LeHAK5. Characterization of the protein in a yeast mutant deficient in high-affinity K+ uptake (WΔ3) suggested that CcHAK1 function is associated with high-affinity K+ uptake, with Km and Vmax for Rb of 50 μM and 0.52 nmol mg−1 min−1, respectively. K+ uptake in yeast expressing the CcHAK1 transporter was inhibited by millimolar concentrations of the cations ammonium (NH4+) and cesium (Cs+) but not by sodium (Na+). The results presented in this study suggest that the CcHAK1 transporter may contribute to the maintenance of K+ homeostasis in root cells in C. chinense plants undergoing K+-deficiency and salt stress. PMID:28083010

  16. Electronic transport properties of one dimensional lithium nanowire using density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Anil; Kumar, Arun; Chandel, Surjeet; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2015-05-01

    Single nanowire electrode devices are a unique platform for studying as energy storage devices. Lithium nanowire is of much importance in lithium ion batteries and therefore has received a great deal of attention in past few years. In this paper we investigated structural and electronic transport properties of Li nanowire using density functional theory (DFT) with SIESTA code. Electronic transport properties of Li nanowire are investigated theoretically. The calculations are performed in two steps: first an optimized geometry for Li nanowire is obtained using DFT calculations, and then the transport relations are obtained using NEGF approach. SIESTA and TranSIESTA simulation codes are used in the calculations correspondingly. The electrodes are chosen to be the same as the central region where transport is studied, eliminating current quantization effects due to contacts and focusing the electronic transport study to the intrinsic structure of the material. By varying chemical potential in the electrode regions, an I-V curve is traced which is in agreement with the predicted behavior. Agreement of bulk properties of Li with experimental values make the study of electronic and transport properties in lithium nanowires interesting because they are promising candidates as bridging pieces in nanoelectronics. Transmission coefficient and V-I characteristic of Li nano wire indicates that Li nanowire can be used as an electrode device.

  17. Transportability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-25

    psi). (g) Maximum axle load (pneumatic tires) - 2,268 kg (5,000 lb). (h) Maximum wheel load (pneumatic tires) - 1,134 kg (2,500 lb). (i...survivability following the shock or vibration environment induced. Vehicles not typically transported with payload such as wreckers, truck tractors ...combination weight rating (GCWR) means the value specified by the manufacturer as the loaded weight of the combination vehicle. (d) Gross axle weight

  18. Transportation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    International (cont.) European Commission – Directorate General for Energy and Transport, Brussels, Belgium Headquarters Netherlands Customs ...100,000 by 2014. As a result of these challenges and due to the increase in intermodal freight traffic, a customer /client relationship has...increase by 50% domestically and 110% internationally by 2016 (CRS, 2007). United Parcel Service (UPS), FedEx, and DHL currently control the package

  19. Relationships between rhodamine 123 transport, cell volume, and ion-channel function of P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Altenberg, G A; Vanoye, C G; Han, E S; Deitmer, J W; Reuss, L

    1994-03-11

    The P-glycoprotein (Pgp), a plasma membrane protein overexpressed in multidrug-resistant tumor cells, is thought to be both an ATPase that actively exports cytotoxic drugs and a Cl- channel activated by cell swelling. The partial reversal of multidrug resistance by Cl- transport blockers suggests a possible role for Cl- in Pgp-mediated drug transport. We used multidrug-resistant Chinese hamster fibroblasts and human breast cancer cells expressing Pgp to study the roles of Cl- (and also Na+ and HCO3-/CO2) on Pgp-mediated efflux of the fluorescent dye rhodamine 123 (R123). In Pgp-expressing Chinese hamster fibroblasts, exposed to isosmotic solutions, the unidirectional efflux of R123 was not measurably changed by a approximately 60-min removal of Cl- (or by exposure to Na(+)-free, or nominally HCO3-/CO2-free medium); short term (2-3 min) ion substitutions were also ineffective. In human breast cancer cells transfected with human mdr1 cDNA, hyposmotic solutions activated a Cl- current but had no effect on the Pgp-mediated unidirectional efflux of R123. Additionally, in human breast cancer cells, the intracellular presence of R123 did not prevent activation of the Cl- current by hyposmotic solution. The lack of detectable effect of removal of Cl-, Na+, or HCO3- on Pgp-mediated R123 transport rules out direct coupling between substrate transport and transport of either of these ions by Pgp. The persistence of Pgp-mediated R123 efflux in osmotically swollen cells indicates that activation of the Pgp-associated Cl- current does not hinder the Pgp pump function. The lack of effect of R123 on swelling-activated Cl- current denotes that Pgp-mediated transport of organic substrates and Pgp-associated Cl- currents can occur at the same time in a single cell. These results underscore the dissociation between Pgp-mediated active drug transport and electrodiffusive Cl- transport.

  20. Density Functional Study of the Transport and Electronic Properties of Waved Graphene Nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammouri, Mahmoud; Vasiliev, Igor

    2015-03-01

    First principles ab initio calculations are employed to study the electronic and transport properties of waved graphene nanoribbons. Our calculations are performed using the SIESTA and TRANSIESTA density functional electronic structure codes. We find that the band gaps of graphene nanoribbons with symmetrical edges change very slightly with the increasing compression, whereas the band gaps of nanoribbons with asymmetrical edges change significantly. The computed IV-characteristics of the waved graphene nanoribbons with different compression ratios reveal the effect of compression on the transport properties of graphene nanoribbons. Supported by NMSU GREG Award and by NSF CHE-1112388.

  1. A Green's function method for high charge and energy ion transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chun, S. Y.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Wilson, J. W.

    1996-01-01

    A heavy-ion transport code using Green's function methods is developed. The low-order perturbation terms exhibiting the greatest energy variation are used as dominant energy-dependent terms, and the higher order collision terms are evaluated using nonperturbative methods. The recently revised NUCFRG database is used to evaluate the solution for comparison with experimental data for 625A MeV 20Ne and 517A MeV 40Ar ion beams. Improved agreements with the attenuation characteristics for neon ions are found, and reasonable agreement is obtained for the transport of argon ions in water.

  2. Isolation of liver nuclei that retain functional trans-membrane transport.

    PubMed

    Ho, Y F; Guenthner, T M

    1997-11-01

    We have developed a method for the rapid isolation of hepatocyte nuclei, which employs gentle homogenization and centrifugation conditions, and involves minimal processing time. The purified nuclei were morphologically unaltered when observed by light and electron microscopy. No significant contamination from cytoplasm or mitochondria was detected when assessed by marker enzymes. Membrane transport function, measured as ATP-dependent calcium uptake, was intact. This isolation method was devised to be applicable to studies that involve measurement of uptake and active transport of a variety of substances by the cell nucleus.

  3. Boundary conditions for probability density function transport equations in fluid mechanics.

    PubMed

    Valiño, Luis; Hierro, Juan

    2003-04-01

    The behavior of the probability density function (PDF) transport equation at the limits of the probability space is studied from the point of view of fluid mechanics. Different boundary conditions are considered depending on the nature of the variable considered (velocity, scalar, and position). A study of the implications of entrance and exit conditions is performed, showing that a new term should be added to the PDF transport equation to preserve normalization in some nonstationary processes. In practice, this term is taken into account naturally in particle methods. Finally, the existence of discontinuities at the limits is also investigated.

  4. Recent Developments in Three Dimensional Radiation Transport Using the Green's Function Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rockell, Candice; Tweed, John; Blattnig, Steve R.; Mertens, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    In the future, astronauts will be sent into space for longer durations of time compared to previous missions. The increased risk of exposure to dangerous radiation, such as Galactic Cosmic Rays and Solar Particle Events, is of great concern. Consequently, steps must be taken to ensure astronaut safety by providing adequate shielding. In order to better determine and verify shielding requirements, an accurate and efficient radiation transport code based on a fully three dimensional radiation transport model using the Green's function technique is being developed

  5. Long-distance movement factor: a transport function of the potyvirus helper component proteinase.

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, S; Verchot, J; Haldeman-Cahill, R; Schaad, M C; Carrington, J C

    1995-01-01

    Transport of viruses from cell to cell in plants typically involves one or more viral proteins that supply dedicated movement functions. Transport from leaf to leaf through phloem, or long-distance transport, is a poorly understood process with requirements differing from those of cell-to-cell movement. Through genetic analysis of tobacco etch virus (TEV; potyvirus group), a novel long-distance movement factor was identified that facilitates vascular-associated movement in tobacco. A mutation in the central region of the helper component proteinase (HC-Pro), a TEV-encoded protein with previously described activities in aphid-mediated transmission and polyprotein processing, inactivated long-distance movement. This mutant virus exhibited only minor defects in genome amplification and cell-to-cell movement functions. In situ histochemical analysis revealed that the mutant was capable of infecting mesophyll, bundle sheath, and phloem cells within inoculated leaves, suggesting that the long-distance movement block was associated with entry into or exit from sieve elements. The long-distance movement defect was specifically complemented by HC-Pro supplied in trans by a transgenic host. The data indicate that HC-Pro functions in one or more steps unique to long-distance transport. PMID:7780307

  6. Distinct functions of the Drosophila Nup153 and Nup214 FG domains in nuclear protein transport.

    PubMed

    Sabri, Nafiseh; Roth, Peggy; Xylourgidis, Nikos; Sadeghifar, Fatemeh; Adler, Jeremy; Samakovlis, Christos

    2007-08-13

    The phenylanine-glycine (FG)-rich regions of several nucleoporins both bind to nuclear transport receptors and collectively provide a diffusion barrier to the nuclear pores. However, the in vivo roles of FG nucleoporins in transport remain unclear. We have inactivated 30 putative nucleoporins in cultured Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells by RNA interference and analyzed the phenotypes on importin alpha/beta-mediated import and CRM1-dependent protein export. The fly homologues of FG nucleoporins Nup358, Nup153, and Nup54 are selectively required for import. The FG repeats of Nup153 are necessary for its function in transport, whereas the remainder of the protein maintains pore integrity. Inactivation of the CRM1 cofactor RanBP3 decreased the nuclear accumulation of CRM1 and protein export. We report a surprisingly antagonistic relationship between RanBP3 and the Nup214 FG region in determining CRM1 localization and its function in protein export. Our data suggest that peripheral metazoan FG nucleoporins have distinct functions in nuclear protein transport events.

  7. A DATABASE OF >20 keV ELECTRON GREEN'S FUNCTIONS OF INTERPLANETARY TRANSPORT AT 1 AU

    SciTech Connect

    Agueda, N.; Sanahuja, B.; Vainio, R.

    2012-10-15

    We use interplanetary transport simulations to compute a database of electron Green's functions, i.e., differential intensities resulting at the spacecraft position from an impulsive injection of energetic (>20 keV) electrons close to the Sun, for a large number of values of two standard interplanetary transport parameters: the scattering mean free path and the solar wind speed. The nominal energy channels of the ACE, STEREO, and Wind spacecraft have been used in the interplanetary transport simulations to conceive a unique tool for the study of near-relativistic electron events observed at 1 AU. In this paper, we quantify the characteristic times of the Green's functions (onset and peak time, rise and decay phase duration) as a function of the interplanetary transport conditions. We use the database to calculate the FWHM of the pitch-angle distributions at different times of the event and under different scattering conditions. This allows us to provide a first quantitative result that can be compared with observations, and to assess the validity of the frequently used term beam-like pitch-angle distribution.

  8. Structure-function analysis of a novel member of the LIV-1 subfamily of zinc transporters, ZIP14.

    PubMed

    Taylor, K M; Morgan, H E; Johnson, A; Nicholson, R I

    2005-01-17

    Here, we report the first investigation of a novel member of the LZT (LIV-1 subfamily of ZIP zinc Transporters) subfamily of zinc influx transporters. LZT subfamily sequences all contain a unique and highly conserved metalloprotease motif (HEXPHEXGD) in transmembrane domain V with both histidine residues essential for zinc transport by ZIP (Zrt-, Irt-like Proteins) transporters. We investigate here whether ZIP14 (SLC39A14), lacking the initial histidine in this motif, is still able to transport zinc. We demonstrate that this plasma membrane located glycosylated protein functions as a zinc influx transporter in a temperature-dependant manner.

  9. The role of the dynein light intermediate chain in retrograde IFT and flagellar function in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Reck, Jaimee; Schauer, Alexandria M; VanderWaal Mills, Kristyn; Bower, Raqual; Tritschler, Douglas; Perrone, Catherine A; Porter, Mary E

    2016-08-01

    The assembly of cilia and flagella depends on the activity of two microtubule motor complexes, kinesin-2 and dynein-2/1b, but the specific functions of the different subunits are poorly defined. Here we analyze Chlamydomonas strains expressing different amounts of the dynein 1b light intermediate chain (D1bLIC). Disruption of D1bLIC alters the stability of the dynein 1b complex and reduces both the frequency and velocity of retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT), but it does not eliminate retrograde IFT. Flagellar assembly, motility, gliding, and mating are altered in a dose-dependent manner. iTRAQ-based proteomics identifies a small subset of proteins that are significantly reduced or elevated in d1blic flagella. Transformation with D1bLIC-GFP rescues the mutant phenotypes, and D1bLIC-GFP assembles into the dynein 1b complex at wild-type levels. D1bLIC-GFP is transported with anterograde IFT particles to the flagellar tip, dissociates into smaller particles, and begins processive retrograde IFT in <2 s. These studies demonstrate the role of D1bLIC in facilitating the recycling of IFT subunits and other proteins, identify new components potentially involved in the regulation of IFT, flagellar assembly, and flagellar signaling, and provide insight into the role of D1bLIC and retrograde IFT in other organisms.

  10. The role of the dynein light intermediate chain in retrograde IFT and flagellar function in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Reck, Jaimee; Schauer, Alexandria M.; VanderWaal Mills, Kristyn; Bower, Raqual; Tritschler, Douglas; Perrone, Catherine A.; Porter, Mary E.

    2016-01-01

    The assembly of cilia and flagella depends on the activity of two microtubule motor complexes, kinesin-2 and dynein-2/1b, but the specific functions of the different subunits are poorly defined. Here we analyze Chlamydomonas strains expressing different amounts of the dynein 1b light intermediate chain (D1bLIC). Disruption of D1bLIC alters the stability of the dynein 1b complex and reduces both the frequency and velocity of retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT), but it does not eliminate retrograde IFT. Flagellar assembly, motility, gliding, and mating are altered in a dose-dependent manner. iTRAQ-based proteomics identifies a small subset of proteins that are significantly reduced or elevated in d1blic flagella. Transformation with D1bLIC-GFP rescues the mutant phenotypes, and D1bLIC-GFP assembles into the dynein 1b complex at wild-type levels. D1bLIC-GFP is transported with anterograde IFT particles to the flagellar tip, dissociates into smaller particles, and begins processive retrograde IFT in <2 s. These studies demonstrate the role of D1bLIC in facilitating the recycling of IFT subunits and other proteins, identify new components potentially involved in the regulation of IFT, flagellar assembly, and flagellar signaling, and provide insight into the role of D1bLIC and retrograde IFT in other organisms. PMID:27251063

  11. A theoretical study for electronic and transport properties of covalent functionalized MoS2 monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lijuan; Yang, Zhao-Di; Zhang, Guiling

    2017-06-01

    The geometries, electronic and electron transport properties of a series of functionalized MoS2 monolayers were investigated using density-functional theory (DFT) and the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) methods. n-Propyl, n-trisilicyl, phenyl, p-nitrophenyl and p-methoxyphenyl are chosen as electron-donating groups. The results show covalent functionalization with electron-donating groups could make a transformation from typical semiconducting to metallic properties for appearance of midgap level across the Fermi level (Ef). The calculations of transport properties for two-probe devices indicate that conductivities of functionalized systems are obviously enhanced relative to pristine MoS2 monolayer. Grafted groups contribute to the major transport path and play an important role in enhancing conductivity. The NDR effect is found. The influence of grafted density is also studied. Larger grafted density leads to wider bandwidth of midgap level, larger current response of I-V curves and larger current difference between peak and valley.

  12. Fabrication of self-supporting porous silicon membranes and tuning transport properties by surface functionalization.

    PubMed

    Velleman, Leonora; Shearer, Cameron James; Ellis, Amanda Vera; Losic, Dusan; Voelcker, Nicolas Hans; Shapter, Joseph George

    2010-09-01

    This study presents a simple approach to perform selective mass transport through freestanding porous silicon (pSi) membranes. pSi membranes were fabricated by the electrochemical etching of silicon to produce membranes with controlled structure and pore sizes close to molecular dimensions (approximately 12 nm in diameter). While these membranes are capable of size-exclusion based separations, chemically specific filtration remains a great challenge especially in the biomedical field. Herein, we investigate the transport properties of chemically functionalized pSi membranes. The membranes were functionalized using silanes (heptadecafluoro-1,1,2,2-tetrahydrodecyl)dimethylchlorosilane (PFDS) and N-(triethoxysilylpropyl)-o-polyethylene oxide urethane (PEGS) to give membranes hydrophobic (PFDS) and hydrophilic (PEGS) properties. The transport of probe dyes tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)dichlororuthenium(ii) hexahydrate (Rubpy) and Rose Bengal (RB) through these functionalized membranes was examined to determine the effect surface functionalization has on the selectivity and separation ability of pSi membranes. This study provides the basis for further investigation into more sophisticated surface functionalization and coupled with the biocompatibility of pSi will lead to new advances in membrane based bio-separations.

  13. Time-dependent density functional theory quantum transport simulation in non-orthogonal basis.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Yan Ho; Xie, Hang; Yam, Chi Yung; Zheng, Xiao; Chen, Guan Hua

    2013-12-14

    Basing on the earlier works on the hierarchical equations of motion for quantum transport, we present in this paper a first principles scheme for time-dependent quantum transport by combining time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and Keldysh's non-equilibrium Green's function formalism. This scheme is beyond the wide band limit approximation and is directly applicable to the case of non-orthogonal basis without the need of basis transformation. The overlap between the basis in the lead and the device region is treated properly by including it in the self-energy and it can be shown that this approach is equivalent to a lead-device orthogonalization. This scheme has been implemented at both TDDFT and density functional tight-binding level. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate our method and comparison with wide band limit approximation is made. Finally, the sparsity of the matrices and computational complexity of this method are analyzed.

  14. Functional characterization of a ClC transporter by solid-supported membrane electrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Celma, Juan; Szydelko, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    EcClC, a prokaryotic member of the ClC family of chloride channels and transporters, works as coupled H+/Cl− exchanger. With a known structure and the possibility of investigating its behavior with different biochemical and biophysical techniques, the protein has become an important model system for the family. Although many aspects of its function have been previously characterized, it was difficult to measure transport on the same sample under different environmental conditions. To overcome this experimental limitation, we have studied EcClC by solid-supported membrane electrophysiology. The large transport-related transient currents and a simple way of relating transport rates to the measured signal have allowed a thorough investigation of ion selectivity, inhibition, and the dependence of transport on changes in ion concentration and pH. Our results confirm that the protein transports larger anions with about similar rates, whereas the smaller fluoride is not a substrate. We also show that 4,4′-diisothiocyano-2,2’-stilbenedisulfonic acid (DIDS), a known inhibitor of other anion transport protein, irreversibly inhibits EcClC from the intracellular side. The chloride dependence shows an apparent saturation at millimolar concentrations that resembles a similar behavior in eukaryotic ClC channels. Our experiments have also allowed us to quantify the pH dependence of transport. EcClC shows a strong activation at low pH with an apparent pKa of 4.6. The pronounced pH dependence is lost by the mutation of a conserved glutamate facing the extracellular solution that was previously shown to be an acceptor for transported protons, whereas it is largely retained by the mutation of an equivalent residue at the intracellular side. Our results have provided a quantitative basis for the transport behavior of EcClC, and they will serve as a reference for future investigations of novel electrogenic transporters with still-uncharacterized properties. PMID:23478993

  15. Identification of Residues in the Lipopolysaccharide ABC Transporter That Coordinate ATPase Activity with Extractor Function

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Brent W.; Owens, Tristan W.; Orabella, Matthew J.; Davis, Rebecca M.; May, Janine M.; Trauger, Sunia A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The surface of most Gram-negative bacteria is covered with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), creating a permeability barrier against toxic molecules, including many antimicrobials. To assemble LPS on their surface, Gram-negative bacteria must extract newly synthesized LPS from the inner membrane, transport it across the aqueous periplasm, and translocate it across the outer membrane. The LptA to -G proteins assemble into a transenvelope complex that transports LPS from the inner membrane to the cell surface. The Lpt system powers LPS transport from the inner membrane by using a poorly characterized ATP-binding cassette system composed of the ATPase LptB and the transmembrane domains LptFG. Here, we characterize a cluster of residues in the groove region of LptB that is important for controlling LPS transport. We also provide the first functional characterization of LptFG and identify their coupling helices that interact with the LptB groove. Substitutions at conserved residues in these coupling helices compromise both the assembly and function of the LptB2FG complex. Defects in LPS transport conferred by alterations in the LptFG coupling helices can be rescued by changing a residue in LptB that is adjacent to functionally important residues in the groove region. This suppression is achieved by increasing the ATPase activity of the LptB2FG complex. Taken together, these data identify a specific binding site in LptB for the coupling helices of LptFG that is responsible for coupling of ATP hydrolysis by LptB with LptFG function to achieve LPS extraction. PMID:27795402

  16. Dampened Amphetamine-Stimulated Behavior and Altered Dopamine Transporter Function in the Absence of Brain GDNF.

    PubMed

    Kopra, Jaakko J; Panhelainen, Anne; Af Bjerkén, Sara; Porokuokka, Lauriina L; Varendi, Kärt; Olfat, Soophie; Montonen, Heidi; Piepponen, T Petteri; Saarma, Mart; Andressoo, Jaan-Olle

    2017-02-08

    Midbrain dopamine neuron dysfunction contributes to various psychiatric and neurological diseases, including drug addiction and Parkinson's disease. Because of its well established dopaminotrophic effects, the therapeutic potential of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has been studied extensively in various disorders with disturbed dopamine homeostasis. However, the outcomes from preclinical and clinical studies vary, highlighting a need for a better understanding of the physiological role of GDNF on striatal dopaminergic function. Nevertheless, the current lack of appropriate animal models has limited this understanding. Therefore, we have generated novel mouse models to study conditional Gdnf deletion in the CNS during embryonic development and reduction of striatal GDNF levels in adult mice via AAV-Cre delivery. We found that both of these mice have reduced amphetamine-induced locomotor response and striatal dopamine efflux. Embryonic GDNF deletion in the CNS did not affect striatal dopamine levels or dopamine release, but dopamine reuptake was increased due to increased levels of both total and synaptic membrane-associated dopamine transporters. Collectively, these results suggest that endogenous GDNF plays an important role in regulating the function of dopamine transporters in the striatum.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Delivery of ectopic glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) promotes the function, plasticity, and survival of midbrain dopaminergic neurons, the dysfunction of which contributes to various neurological and psychiatric diseases. However, how the deletion or reduction of GDNF in the CNS affects the function of dopaminergic neurons has remained unknown. Using conditional Gdnf knock-out mice, we found that endogenous GDNF affects striatal dopamine homeostasis and regulates amphetamine-induced behaviors by regulating the level and function of dopamine transporters. These data regarding the physiological role of GDNF are

  17. Motile and non-motile cilia in human pathology: from function to phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Mitchison, Hannah M; Valente, Enza Maria

    2017-01-01

    Ciliopathies are inherited human disorders caused by both motile and non-motile cilia dysfunction that form an important and rapidly expanding disease category. Ciliopathies are complex conditions to diagnose, being multisystem disorders characterized by extensive genetic heterogeneity and clinical variability with high levels of lethality. There is marked phenotypic overlap among distinct ciliopathy syndromes that presents a major challenge for their recognition, diagnosis, and clinical management, in addition to posing an on-going task to develop the most appropriate family counselling. The impact of next-generation sequencing and high-throughput technologies in the last decade has significantly improved our understanding of the biological basis of ciliopathy disorders, enhancing our ability to determine the possible reasons for the extensive overlap in their symptoms and genetic aetiologies. Here, we review the diverse functions of cilia in human health and disease and discuss a growing shift away from the classical clinical definitions of ciliopathy syndromes to a more functional categorization. This approach arises from our improved understanding of this unique organelle, revealed through new genetic and cell biological insights into the discrete functioning of subcompartments of the cilium (basal body, transition zone, intraflagellar transport, motility). Mutations affecting these distinct ciliary protein modules can confer different genetic diseases and new clinical classifications are possible to define, according to the nature and extent of organ involvement. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. The importance of thyroid hormone transporters for brain development and function.

    PubMed

    Heuer, Heike

    2007-06-01

    Thyroid hormone is essential for proper brain development and function. As a prerequisite for its action, transporters must exist to mediate its cellular entry. As impaired uptake of thyroid hormone into the CNS causes severe neurological symptoms, it is of utmost importance to identify these carriers. The monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) was recently characterized as a very specific thyroid hormone transporter. Inactivating mutations in the MCT8 gene are associated with a severe syndrome of psychomotor retardation and abnormal thyroid hormone parameters. To elucidate the underlying pathogenic mechanisms, MCT8-deficient mice that replicate the human thyroid phenotype, despite the absence of overt neurological symptoms, have been generated. Here, we summarize recent findings obtained by analyzing these animals and discuss their potential impact for the treatment of affected patients.

  19. Development of a non-equilibrium quantum transport calculation method based on constrained density functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Han Seul; Kim, Yong-Hoon

    2015-03-01

    We report on the development of a novel first-principles method for the calculation of non-equilibrium quantum transport process. Within the scheme, non-equilibrium situation and quantum transport within the open-boundary condition are described by the region-dependent Δ self-consistent field method and matrix Green's function theory, respectively. We will discuss our solutions to the technical difficulties in describing bias-dependent electron transport at complicated nanointerfaces and present several application examples. Global Frontier Program (2013M3A6B1078881), Basic Science Research Grant (2012R1A1A2044793), EDISON Program (No. 2012M3C1A6035684), and 2013 Global Ph.D fellowship program of the National Research Foundation. KISTI Supercomputing Center (KSC-2014-C3-021).

  20. Charge transport in nanostructured materials: Implementation and verification of constrained density functional theory

    DOE PAGES

    Goldey, Matthew B.; Brawand, Nicholas P.; Voros, Marton; ...

    2017-04-20

    The in silico design of novel complex materials for energy conversion requires accurate, ab initio simulation of charge transport. In this work, we present an implementation of constrained density functional theory (CDFT) for the calculation of parameters for charge transport in the hopping regime. We verify our implementation against literature results for molecular systems, and we discuss the dependence of results on numerical parameters and the choice of localization potentials. In addition, we compare CDFT results with those of other commonly used methods for simulating charge transport between nanoscale building blocks. As a result, we show that some of thesemore » methods give unphysical results for thermally disordered configurations, while CDFT proves to be a viable and robust approach.« less

  1. The Expression and Function of Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptides in Normal Tissues and in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Obaidat, Amanda; Roth, Megan; Hagenbuch, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs) are members of the SLCO gene superfamily of proteins. The 11 human OATPs are classified in 6 families and subfamilies on the basis of their amino acid sequence similarities. OATPs are expressed in several epithelial tissues throughout the body and transport mainly amphipathic molecules with molecular weights of more than 300 kDa. Members of the OATP1 and OATP2 families are functionally the best-characterized OATPs. Among these are the multispecific OATP1A2, OATP1B1, OATP1B3, and OATP2B1. They transport various endo- and xenobiotics, including hormones and their conjugates as well as numerous drugs such as several anticancer agents. Recent reports demonstrate that some OATPs are up- or downregulated in several cancers and that OATP expression might affect cancer development. On the basis of the findings summarized in this review, we propose that OATPs could be valuable targets for anticancer therapy. PMID:21854228

  2. The expression and function of organic anion transporting polypeptides in normal tissues and in cancer.

    PubMed

    Obaidat, Amanda; Roth, Megan; Hagenbuch, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs) are members of the SLCO gene superfamily of proteins. The 11 human OATPs are classified into 6 families and subfamilies on the basis of their amino acid sequence similarities. OATPs are expressed in several epithelial tissues throughout the body and transport mainly amphipathic molecules with molecular weights of more than 300 kDa. Members of the OATP1 and OATP2 families are functionally the best-characterized OATPs. Among these are the multispecific OATP1A2, OATP1B1, OATP1B3, and OATP2B1. They transport various endo- and xenobiotics, including hormones and their conjugates as well as numerous drugs such as several anticancer agents. Recent reports demonstrate that some OATPs are up- or downregulated in several cancers and that OATP expression might affect cancer development. On the basis of the findings summarized in this review, we propose that OATPs could be valuable targets for anticancer therapy.

  3. A novel iron-regulated metal transporter from plants identified by functional expression in yeast.

    PubMed

    Eide, D; Broderius, M; Fett, J; Guerinot, M L

    1996-05-28

    Iron is an essential nutrient for virtually all organisms. The IRT1 (iron-regulated transporter) gene of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana, encoding a probable Fe(II) transporter, was cloned by functional expression in a yeast strain defective for iron uptake. Yeast expressing IRT1 possess a novel Fe(II) uptake activity that is strongly inhibited by Cd. IRT1 is predicted to be an integral membrane protein with a metal-binding domain. Data base comparisons and Southern blot analysis indicated that IRT1 is a member of a gene family in Arabidopsis. Related sequences were also found in the genomes of rice, yeast, nematodes, and humans. In Arabidopsis, IRT1 is expressed in roots, is induced by iron deficiency, and has altered regulation in plant lines bearing mutations that affect the iron uptake system. These results provide the first molecular insight into iron transport by plants.

  4. Aquatic models for the study of renal transport function and pollutant toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.S.

    1987-04-01

    Studies of renal cell transport mechanisms and their impairment by xenobiotics are often limited by technical difficulties related to renal tubule complexity. Problems include the juxtaposition of multiple tubule segments with different transport functions and severely limited access to the tubular lumen. Some limitations can be overcome by the careful selection of an appropriate aquatic experimental system. Two aquatic models for the vertebrate proximal segment are discussed here. The first is the kidney from certain marine flounder, which offers the following advantages: long-term viability, little tissue of nonproximal origin, and easy tubule isolation. Data are presented to demonstrate how studies with flounder kidney can be used to elucidate cellular mechanisms whereby different classes of toxic pollutants may interact. Results from these experiments indicate that the excretion of certain anionic xenobiotics can be delayed (1) by other anionic xenobiotics that compete for secretory transport sites and (2) by compounds that disrupt cellular ion gradients and energy metabolism needed to drive transport. The second system is the crustacean urinary bladder, a simple, flatsheet epithelium. Bladder morphology and transport physiology closely resemble those of vertebrate proximal segment. Electron micrographs show a brush border membrane at the luminal surface, numerous mitochondria, and an infolded serosal membrane, while in vivo and in vitro transport studies show reabsorption of NaCl, nutrients and water and secretion of organic cations; organic anions are secreted in bladders from some species and reabsorbed in others. Moreover, since bladders can be mounted as flat sheets in flux chambers, studies with this tissue avoid the problems of complex renal tubule geometry and tissue heterogeneity and tissue heterogeneity that limit transport studies in proximal tubule.

  5. Purinergic P2Y receptors in airway epithelia: from ion transport to immune functions.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yuan; Ko, Wing-hung

    2014-02-25

    The regulated transport of salt and water is essential to the integrated function of many organ systems, including the respiratory, reproductive, and digestive tracts. Airway epithelial fluid secretion is a passive process that is driven by osmotic forces, which are generated by ion transport. The main determinant of a luminally-directed osmotic gradient is the mucosal transport of chloride ions (Cl(-)) into the lumen. As with many epithelial cells, a number of classic signal transduction cascades are involved in the regulation of ion transport. There are two well-known intracellular signaling systems: an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) and an increase in the rate of synthesis of cyclic nucleotides, such as cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Therefore, Cl(-) secretion is primarily activated via the opening of apical Ca(2+)- or cAMP-dependent Cl(-) channels at the apical membrane. The opening of basolateral Ca(2+)- or cAMP-activated K(+) channels, which hyperpolarizes the cell to maintain the driving force for Cl(-) exit through apical Cl(-) channels that are constitutively open, is also important in regulating transepithelial ion transport. P2Y receptors are expressed in the apical and/or basolateral membranes of virtually all polarized epithelia to control the transport of fluid and electrolytes. Human airway epithelial cells express multiple nucleotide receptors. Extracellular nucleotides, such as UTP and ATP, are calcium-mobilizing secretagogues. They are released into the extracellular space from airway epithelial cells and act on the same cell in an autocrine fashion to stimulate transepithelial ion transport. In addition, recent data support the role of P2Y receptors in releasing inflammatory cytokines in the bronchial epithelium and other immune cells.

  6. Glycans in the intestinal peptide transporter PEPT1 contribute to function and protect from proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Stelzl, Tamara; Geillinger-Kästle, Kerstin Elisabeth; Stolz, Jürgen; Daniel, Hannelore

    2017-03-23

    Despite the fact that many membrane proteins carry extracellular glycans, little is known about whether the glycan chains also affect protein function. We recently demonstrated that the proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter 1 (PEPT1) in the intestine is glycosylated at six asparagine residues (N50, N406, N439, N510, N515, N532). Mutagenesis-induced disruption of the individual N-glycosylation site N50, which is highly conserved among mammals, was detected to significantly enhance the PEPT1 mediated inward transport of peptides. Here, we show for the murine protein, that the inhibition of glycosylation at sequon N50 by substituting N50 with glutamine, lysine or cysteine, or by replacing S52 with alanine, equally altered PEPT1 transport kinetics in oocytes. Further, we provide evidence that the uptake of [(14)C]-glycyl-sarcosine in immortalized murine small intestinal (Mode-K) or colonic epithelial (PTK-6) cells stably expressing the PEPT1 transporter N50Q is also significantly increased relative to the wild type protein. By using electrophysiological recordings and tracer flux studies, we further demonstrate that the rise in transport velocity observed for PEPT1 N50Q is bidirectional. In line with these findings, we show that attachment of biotin derivatives, comparable in weight to 2-4 monosaccharides, to the PEPT1 N50C transporter slows down the transport velocity. In addition, our experiments provide strong evidence that glycosylation of PEPT1 confers resistance against proteolytic cleavage by proteinase K, while a remarkable intrinsic stability against trypsin, even in absence of N-linked glycans, was detected.

  7. Effects of functional group mass variance on vibrational properties and thermal transport in graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Lindsay, L.; Kuang, Y.

    2017-03-13

    Intrinsic thermal resistivity critically depends on features of phonon dispersions dictated by harmonic interatomic forces and masses. We present the effects of functional group mass variance on vibrational properties and thermal conductivity (κ ) of functionalized graphene from first principles calculations. We also use graphane, a buckled graphene backbone with covalently bonded Hydrogen atoms on both sides, as the base material and vary the mass of the Hydrogen atoms to simulate the effect of mass variance from other functional groups. We find non-monotonic behavior of κ with increasing mass of the functional group and an unusual cross-over from acoustic-dominated tomore » optic-dominated thermal transport behavior. We connect this cross-over to changes in the phonon dispersion with varying mass which suppress acoustic phonon velocities, but also give unusually high velocity optic modes. Further, we show that out-of-plane acoustic vibrations contribute significantly more to thermal transport than in-plane acoustic modes despite breaking of a reflection symmetry based scattering selection rule responsible for their large contributions in graphene. Our work demonstrates the potential for manipulation and engineering of thermal transport properties in two dimensional materials toward targeted applications.« less

  8. Performance verification of network function virtualization in software defined optical transport networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongli; Hu, Liyazhou; Wang, Wei; Li, Yajie; Zhang, Jie

    2017-01-01

    With the continuous opening of resource acquisition and application, there are a large variety of network hardware appliances deployed as the communication infrastructure. To lunch a new network application always implies to replace the obsolete devices and needs the related space and power to accommodate it, which will increase the energy and capital investment. Network function virtualization1 (NFV) aims to address these problems by consolidating many network equipment onto industry standard elements such as servers, switches and storage. Many types of IT resources have been deployed to run Virtual Network Functions (vNFs), such as virtual switches and routers. Then how to deploy NFV in optical transport networks is a of great importance problem. This paper focuses on this problem, and gives an implementation architecture of NFV-enabled optical transport networks based on Software Defined Optical Networking (SDON) with the procedure of vNFs call and return. Especially, an implementation solution of NFV-enabled optical transport node is designed, and a parallel processing method for NFV-enabled OTN nodes is proposed. To verify the performance of NFV-enabled SDON, the protocol interaction procedures of control function virtualization and node function virtualization are demonstrated on SDON testbed. Finally, the benefits and challenges of the parallel processing method for NFV-enabled OTN nodes are simulated and analyzed.

  9. Effects of functional group mass variance on vibrational properties and thermal transport in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, L.; Kuang, Y.

    2017-03-01

    Intrinsic thermal resistivity critically depends on features of phonon dispersions dictated by harmonic interatomic forces and masses. Here we present the effects of functional group mass variance on vibrational properties and thermal conductivity (κ ) of functionalized graphene from first-principles calculations. We use graphane, a buckled graphene backbone with covalently bonded hydrogen atoms on both sides, as the base material and vary the mass of the hydrogen atoms to simulate the effect of mass variance from other functional groups. We find nonmonotonic behavior of κ with increasing mass of the functional group and an unusual crossover from acoustic-dominated to optic-dominated thermal transport behavior. We connect this crossover to changes in the phonon dispersion with varying mass which suppress acoustic phonon velocities, but also give unusually high velocity optic modes. Further, we show that out-of-plane acoustic vibrations contribute significantly more to thermal transport than in-plane acoustic modes despite breaking of a reflection-symmetry-based scattering selection rule responsible for their large contributions in graphene. This work demonstrates the potential for manipulation and engineering of thermal transport properties in two-dimensional materials toward targeted applications.

  10. Functional xenobiotic metabolism and efflux transporters in trout hepatocyte spheroid cultures

    PubMed Central

    Uchea, Chibuzor; Chipman, J. Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Prediction of xenobiotic fate in fish is important for the regulatory assessment of chemicals under current legislation. Trout hepatocyte spheroids are a promising in vitro model for this assessment. In this investigation, the gene expression and function for xenobiotic metabolism and cellular efflux were characterised. Using fluorescence, transport and real time PCR analysis, the expression and functionality of a variety of genes related to xenobiotic metabolism and drug efflux were assessed in a range of trout hepatocyte culture preparations. Significantly greater levels of expression of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism and efflux were measured in spheroids (which have been shown to remain viable in excess of 30 days), compared to hepatocytes cultured using conventional suspension and monolayer culture techniques. A transient decline in the expression of genes related to both xenobiotic metabolism and transport was determined during spheroid development, with a subsequent recovery in older spheroids. The most mature spheroids also exhibited an expression profile most comparable to that reported in vivo. Functionality of efflux transporters in spheroids was also demonstrated using fluorescent markers and specific inhibitors. In conclusion, the more physiologically relevant architecture in spheroid cultures provides a high functional integrity in relation to xenobiotic metabolism and efflux. Together with the enhanced gene expression and longevity of the model, hepatocytes in spheroid culture may prove to be an accurate alternative model to study the mechanisms of these processes in fish liver and provide an assay to determine the bioaccumulation potential of environmental contaminants. PMID:25893091

  11. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) disrupts particle transport, cilia function and sperm motility in an ex vivo oviduct model

    PubMed Central

    O’Doherty, A. M.; Di Fenza, M.; Kölle, S.

    2016-01-01

    The oviduct functions in the transportation of gametes to the site of fertilization (the ampulla) and is the site of early embryonic development. Alterations of this early developmental environment, such as the presence of sexually transmitted pathogens, may affect oviduct function leading to reduced fertilization rates and contribute to compromised embryonic development. In this study, sperm interactions, particle transport speed (PTS) and cilia beat frequency (CBF) in the ampulla following exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a constituent of the sexually transmitted pathogens Chlamydia trachomatis and Chlamydia abortus, was investigated. Three complementary experiments were performed to analyse; (1) bound sperm motility and cilia function (2) transport velocity in the oviduct and (3) the expression of genes related to immune function and inflammatory response (CASP3, CD14, MYD88, TLR4 and TRAF6). The motility of bound sperm was significantly lower in ampullae that were exposed to LPS. CBF and PTS significantly increased after treatment with LPS for 2 hours. Finally, gene expression analysis revealed that CASP3 and CD14 were significantly upregulated and TLR4 trended towards increased expression following treatment with LPS. These findings provide an insight on the impact of LPS on the oviduct sperm interaction, and have implications for both male and female fertility. PMID:27079521

  12. Surface-localized glycine transporters 1 and 2 function as monomeric proteins in Xenopus oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Horiuchi, Masahisa; Nicke, Annette; Gomeza, Jesus; Aschrafi, Armaz; Schmalzing, Günther; Betz, Heinrich

    2001-01-01

    Na+/Cl−-dependent neurotransmitter transporters form a superfamily of transmembrane proteins that share 12 membrane-spanning regions. To gain information about the quaternary structure of these transporter proteins, we heterologously expressed the glial glycine transporter GlyT1 and its neuronal homolog GlyT2 in Xenopus oocytes. By using metabolic labeling with [35S]methionine or surface labeling with a plasma membrane impermeable reagent followed by affinity purification, we separately analyzed the total cellular pools of newly synthesized GlyTs and its functional plasma membrane-bound fractions. Upon blue native gel electrophoresis, the surface-localized transporter proteins were found to exist exclusively in complex-glycosylated monomeric form, whereas a significant fraction of the intracellular GlyT1 and GlyT2 was core-glycosylated and oligomeric. In contrast, even after treatment with the crosslinker glutaraldehyde, surface GlyTs failed to migrate as oligomeric proteins. These results indicate that plasma membrane-bound GlyT1 and GlyT2 are monomeric proteins. Thus, Na+/Cl−-dependent neurotransmitter transporters do not require oligomerization for substrate translocation. PMID:11171971

  13. Sugar transporters in the black truffle Tuber melanosporum: from gene prediction to functional characterization.

    PubMed

    Ceccaroli, Paola; Saltarelli, Roberta; Polidori, Emanuela; Barbieri, Elena; Guescini, Michele; Ciacci, Caterina; Stocchi, Vilberto

    2015-08-01

    In a natural forest ecosystem, ectomycorrhiza formation is a way for soil fungi to obtain carbohydrates from their host plants. However, our knowledge of sugar transporters in ectomycorrhizal ascomycetous fungi is limited. To bridge this gap we used data obtained from the sequenced genome of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Tuber melanosporum Vittad. to search for sugar transporters. Twenty-three potential hexose transporters were found, and three of them (Tmelhxt1, Tmel2281 and Tmel131), differentially expressed during the fungus life cycle, were investigated. The heterologous expression of Tmelhxt1 and Tmel2281 in an hxt-null Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain restores the growth in glucose and fructose. The functional characterization and expression profiles of Tmelhxt1 and Tmel2281 in the symbiotic phase suggest that they are high affinity hexose transporters at the plant-fungus interface. On the contrary, Tmel131 is preferentially expressed in the fruiting body and its inability to restore the S. cerevisiae mutant strain growth led us to hypothesize that it could be involved in the transport of alternative carbon sources important for a hypothetical saprophytic strategy for the complete maturation of the carpophore.

  14. Functional characterization of Citrus macrophylla BOR1 as a boron transporter.

    PubMed

    Cañon, Paola; Aquea, Felipe; Rodríguez-Hoces de la Guardia, Amparo; Arce-Johnson, Patricio

    2013-11-01

    Plants have evolved to develop an efficient system of boron uptake and transport using a range of efflux carriers named BOR proteins. In this work we isolated and characterized a boron transporter of citrus (Citrus macrophylla), which was named CmBOR1 for its high homology to AtBOR1. CmBOR1 has 4403 bp and 12 exons. Its coding region has 2145 bp and encodes for a protein of 714 amino acids. CmBOR1 possesses the molecular features of BORs such as an anion exchanger domain and the presence of 10 transmembrane domains. Functional analysis in yeast indicated that CmBOR1 has an efflux boron transporter activity, and transformants have increased tolerance to excess boron. CmBOR1 is expressed in leaves, stem and flowers and shows the greatest accumulation in roots. The transcript accumulation was significantly increased under boron deficiency conditions in shoots. In contrast, the accumulation of the transcript did not change in boron toxicity conditions. Finally, we observed that constitutive expression of CmBOR1 was able to increase tolerance to boron deficiency conditions in Arabidopsis thaliana, suggesting that CmBOR1 is a xylem loading boron transporter. Based on these results, it was determined that CmBOR1 encodes a boric acid/borate transporter involved in tolerance to boron deficiency in plants.

  15. Water transport and functional dynamics of aquaporins in osmoregulatory organs of fishes.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Steffen S; Engelund, Morten B; Cutler, Christopher P

    2015-08-01

    Aquaporins play distinct roles for water transport in fishes as they do in mammals-both at the cellular, organ, and organismal levels. However, with over 32,000 known species of fishes inhabiting almost every aquatic environment, from tidal pools, small mountain streams, to the oceans and extreme salty desert lakes, the challenge to obtain consensus as well as specific knowledge about aquaporin physiology in these vertebrate clades is overwhelming. Because the integumental surfaces of these animals are in intimate contact with the surrounding milieu, passive water loss and uptake represent two of the major osmoregulatory challenges that need compensation. However, neither obligatory nor regulatory water transport nor their mechanisms have been elucidated to the same degree as, for example, ion transport in fishes. Currently fewer than 60 papers address fish aquaporins. Most of these papers identify "what is present" and describe tissue expression patterns in various teleosts. The agnathans, chondrichthyans, and functionality of fish aquaporins generally have received little attention. This review emphasizes the functional physiology of aquaporins in fishes, focusing on transepithelial water transport in osmoregulatory organs in euryhaline species - primarily teleosts, but covering other taxonomic groups as well. Most current knowledge comes from teleosts, and there is a strong need for related information on older fish clades. Our survey aims to stimulate new, original research in this area and to bring together new collaborations across disciplines.

  16. Identification and functional characterization of uric acid transporter Urat1 (Slc22a12) in rats.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masanobu; Wakayama, Tomohiko; Mamada, Hideaki; Shirasaka, Yoshiyuki; Nakanishi, Takeo; Tamai, Ikumi

    2011-06-01

    Uric acid transporter URAT1 contributes significantly to reabsorption of uric acid in humans to maintain a constant serum uric acid (SUA) level. Since alteration of SUA level is associated with various diseases, it is important to clarify the mechanism of change in SUA. However, although expression of mRNA of an ortholog of URAT1 (rUrat1) in rats has been reported, functional analysis and localization have not been done. Therefore, rat rUrat1 was functionally analyzed using gene expression systems and isolated brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMVs) prepared from rat kidney, and its localization in kidney was examined immunohistochemically. Uric acid transport by rUrat1 was chloride (Cl-) susceptible with a Km of 1773μM. It was inhibited by benzbromarone and trans-stimulated by lactate and pyrazinecarboxylic acid (PZA). Cl- gradient-susceptible uric acid transport by BBMVs showed similar characteristics to those of uric acid transport by rUrat1. Moreover, rUrat1 was localized at the apical membrane in proximal tubular epithelial cells in rat kidney. Accordingly, rUrat1 is considered to be involved in uric acid reabsorption in rats in the same manner as URAT1 in humans. Therefore, rUrat1 may be a useful model to study issues related to the role of human URAT1.

  17. Sympathetic nervous function and erythrocyte cation transport systems in normotensive individuals with family history of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Saito, T; Koshibu, Y; Kai, N; Yamamoto, K; Iwata, J; Sakaguchi, A; Tonooka, M; Inagaki, Y

    1989-01-01

    To investigate the influence of heredity to the sympathetic nervous function and the cell membrane cation transport systems, we studied the blood pressure and plasma catecholamine response to supine exercise testings by bicycle ergometer, the pressure response to noradrenaline infusion tests and the heart rate response to isoproterenol infusion tests in 88 healthy Japanese sedentary normotensive men with and without a family history of essential hypertension [FHH(+) and FHH(-)]. Several erythrocyte monovalent cation transport parameters were also measured in 74 of these individuals. In the results, (1) the systolic blood pressure response to exercise testings and noradrenaline infusion tests were larger in FHH(+) than FHH(-): (2) there was no difference between FHH(+) and FHH(-) in the heart rate response to isoproterenol infusion tests: (3) there was no significant difference between FHH(+) and FHH(-) in the increased plasma catecholamine levels to exercise testings: (4) the intraerythrocytic sodium content was significantly higher in FHH(+) than in FHH(-): and (5) several erythrocyte monovalent cation transport systems (Li-Na countertransport, Na-K cotransport and Na-K pump activity) were clearly accelerated in FHH(+). We concluded that in spite of normotension there were abnormalities of sympathetic nervous function, intracellular sodium content and several cell membrane cation transport systems in individuals with a family history of essential hypertension.

  18. The role of SNARE proteins in trafficking and function of neurotransmitter transporters.

    PubMed

    Quick, M W

    2006-01-01

    The SNARE hypothesis of vesicle fusion proposes that a series of protein-protein interactions governs the delivery of vesicles to various membrane targets such as the Golgi network and the plasma membrane. Key players in this process include members of the syntaxin family of membrane proteins. The first member identified in this family, syntaxin 1A, plays an essential role in the docking and fusion of neurotransmitter-containing vesicles to the presynaptic membrane of neurons. Syntaxin 1A and other syntaxin family members have also been shown to interact with, and directly regulate, a variety of ion channels. More recently, the family of plasma membrane neurotransmitter transporters, proteins that function in part to control transmitter levels in brain, have been shown to be direct targets of syntaxin 1A regulation. This regulation involves both the trafficking of transporters as well as the control of ion and transmitter flux through transporters. In this chapter, the functional effects of syntaxin-transporter interactions are reviewed, and how such interactions may regulate neuronal signaling are considered.

  19. Pharmacogenomics of the human ABC transporter ABCG2: from functional evaluation to drug molecular design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Toshihisa; Tamura, Ai; Saito, Hikaru; Wakabayashi, Kanako; Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    2005-10-01

    In the post-genome-sequencing era, emerging genomic technologies are shifting the paradigm for drug discovery and development. Nevertheless, drug discovery and development still remain high-risk and high-stakes ventures with long and costly timelines. Indeed, the attrition of drug candidates in preclinical and development stages is a major problem in drug design. For at least 30% of the candidates, this attrition is due to poor pharmacokinetics and toxicity. Thus, pharmaceutical companies have begun to seriously re-evaluate their current strategies of drug discovery and development. In that light, we propose that a transport mechanism-based design might help to create new, pharmacokinetically advantageous drugs, and as such should be considered an important component of drug design strategy. Performing enzyme- and/or cell-based drug transporter, interaction tests may greatly facilitate drug development and allow the prediction of drug-drug interactions. We recently developed methods for high-speed functional screening and quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis to study the substrate specificity of ABC transporters and to evaluate the effect of genetic polymorphisms on their function. These methods would provide a practical tool to screen synthetic and natural compounds, and these data can be applied to the molecular design of new drugs. In this review article, we present an overview on the genetic polymorphisms of human ABC transporter ABCG2 and new camptothecin analogues that can circumvent AGCG2-associated multidrug resistance of cancer.

  20. MKS and NPHP modules cooperate to establish basal body/transition zone membrane associations and ciliary gate function during ciliogenesis.

    PubMed

    Williams, Corey L; Li, Chunmei; Kida, Katarzyna; Inglis, Peter N; Mohan, Swetha; Semenec, Lucie; Bialas, Nathan J; Stupay, Rachel M; Chen, Nansheng; Blacque, Oliver E; Yoder, Bradley K; Leroux, Michel R

    2011-03-21

    Meckel-Gruber syndrome (MKS), nephronophthisis (NPHP), and related ciliopathies present with overlapping phenotypes and display considerable allelism between at least twelve different genes of largely unexplained function. We demonstrate that the conserved C. elegans B9 domain (MKS-1, MKSR-1, and MKSR-2), MKS-3/TMEM67, MKS-5/RPGRIP1L, MKS-6/CC2D2A, NPHP-1, and NPHP-4 proteins exhibit essential, collective functions at the transition zone (TZ), an underappreciated region at the base of all cilia characterized by Y-shaped assemblages that link axoneme microtubules to surrounding membrane. These TZ proteins functionally interact as members of two distinct modules, which together contribute to an early ciliogenic event. Specifically, MKS/MKSR/NPHP proteins establish basal body/TZ membrane attachments before or coinciding with intraflagellar transport-dependent axoneme extension and subsequently restrict accumulation of nonciliary components within the ciliary compartment. Together, our findings uncover a unified role for eight TZ-localized proteins in basal body anchoring and establishing a ciliary gate during ciliogenesis, and suggest that disrupting ciliary gate function contributes to phenotypic features of the MKS/NPHP disease spectrum.

  1. The structure and function of the dopamine transporter and its role in CNS diseases.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Patrick C; Buckley, David A

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, we explore the basic science of the dopamine transporter (DAT), an integral component of a system that regulates dopamine homeostasis. Dopamine is a key neurotransmitter for several brain functions including locomotor control and reward systems. The transporter structure, function, mechanism of action, localization, and distribution, in addition to gene regulation, are discussed. Over many years, a wealth of information concerning the DAT has been accrued and has led to increased interest in the role of the DAT in a plethora of central nervous system diseases. These DAT characteristics are explored in relation to a range of neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases, with a particular focus on the genetics of the DAT. In addition, we discuss the pharmacology of the DAT and how this relates to disease and addiction. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A structure-function analysis of ion transport in crustacean gills and excretory organs.

    PubMed

    Freire, Carolina A; Onken, Horst; McNamara, John C

    2008-11-01

    Osmotic and ionic regulation in the Crustacea is mostly accomplished by the multifunctional gills, together with the excretory organs. In addition to their role in gas exchange, the gills constitute organs of active, transepithelial, ion transport, an activity of major importance that underlies many essential physiological functions like osmoregulation, calcium homeostasis, ammonium excretion and extracellular pH regulation. This review focuses on structure-function relationships in crustacean gills and excretory effectors, from the organ to molecular levels of organization. We address the diversity of structural architectures encountered in different crustacean gill types, and in constituent cell types, before examining the physiological mechanisms of Na(+), Cl(-), Ca(2+) and NH(4)(+) transport, and of acid-base equivalents, based on findings obtained over the last two decades employing advanced techniques. The antennal and maxillary glands constitute the principal crustacean excretory organs, which have received less attention in functional studies. We examine the diversity present in antennal and maxillary gland architecture, highlighting the structural similarities between both organ types, and we analyze the functions ascribed to each glandular segment. Emphasis is given to volume and osmoregulatory functions, capacity to produce dilute urine in freshwater crustaceans, and the effect of acclimation salinity on urine volume and composition. The microanatomy and diversity of function ascribed to gills and excretory organs are appraised from an evolutionary perspective, and suggestions made as to future avenues of investigation that may elucidate evolutionary and adaptive trends underpinning the invasion and exploitation of novel habitats.

  3. Semi-solid Gels Function as Physical Barriers to Human Immunodeficiency Virus Transport In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Bonnie E.; Geonnotti, Anthony R.; DeSoto, Michael G.; Montefiori, David C.; Katz, David F.

    2010-01-01

    Vaginal gels may act as physical barriers to HIV following semen deposition. However, the extent and significance of this effect are not well understood. During male-to-female sexual transmission of HIV, semen containing infectious HIV is present within the lower female reproductive tract. In cases where a topical gel has previously been applied to the vaginal epithelium, virions must move through gel layers before reaching vulnerable tissue. This additional barrier could affect the functioning of anti-HIV microbicide gels and placebos. To better understand HIV transport in gels, we: (1) quantified diffusion coefficients of HIV virions within semi-solid delivery vehicles; and (2) tested the barrier functioning of thin gel layers in a Transwell system. Two gels used as placebos in microbicides clinical trials, hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC) and methylcellulose (MC), were found to hinder HIV transport in vitro. The diffusion coefficients for HIV virions in undiluted HEC and MC were 4 ± 2 × 10−12 cm2/s and 7 ± 1 × 10−12 cm2/s respectively. These are almost 10,000 times lower than the diffusion coefficient for HIV in water. Substantial gel dilution (80%: diluent/gel, v/v) was required before diffusion coefficients rose to even two orders of magnitude lower than those in water. In the Transwell system, gel layers of approximately 150-μm thickness reduced HIV transport. There was a log reduction in the amount of HIV that had breached the Transwell membrane after 0-, 4-, and 8- hour incubations. The ability of a gel to function as a physical barrier to HIV transport from semen to tissue will also depend on its distribution over the epithelium and effects of dilution by vaginal fluids or semen. Results here can serve as a baseline for future design of products that act as barriers to HIV transmission. The potential barrier function of placebo gels should be considered in the design and interpretation of microbicides clinical trials. PMID:20709109

  4. Stanniocalcin-1 Controls Ion Regulation Functions of Ion-transporting Epithelium Other than Calcium Balance

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Ming-Yi; Lin, Chia-Hao; Chao, Pei-Lin; Hung, Jo-Chi; Cruz, Shelly A.; Hwang, Pung-Pung

    2015-01-01

    Stanniocalcin-1 (STC-1) was first identified to involve in Ca2+ homeostasis in teleosts, and was thought to act as a hypocalcemic hormone in vertebrate. Recent studies suggested that STC-1 exhibits broad effects on ion balance, not confines to Ca2+, but the mechanism of this regulation process remains largely unknown. Here, we used zebrafish embryos as an alternative in vivo model to investigate how STC-1 regulates transepithelial ion transport function in ion-transporting epithelium. Expression of stc-1 mRNA in zebrafish embryos was increased in high-Ca2+ environments but decreased by acidic and ion-deficient treatments while overexpression of stc-1 impaired the hypotonic acclimation by decreasing whole body Ca2+, Na+, and Cl- contents and H+ secretion ability. Injection of STC-1 mRNA also down-regulated mRNA expressions of epithelial Ca2+ channel, H+-ATPase, and Na+-Cl- cotransporter, suggesting the roles of STC-1 in regulation of ions other than Ca2+. Knockdown of STC-1 caused an increase in ionocyte progenitors (foxi3a as the marker) and mature ionocytes (ion transporters as the markers), but did not affect epithelium stem cells (p63 as the marker) in the embryonic skin. Overexpression of STC-1 had the corresponding opposite effect on ionocyte progenitors, mature ionocytes in the embryonic skin. Taken together, STC-1 negatively regulates the number of ionocytes to reduce ionocyte functions. This process is important for body fluid ionic homeostasis, which is achieved by the regulation of ion transport functions in ionocytes. The present findings provide new insights into the broader functions of STC-1, a hypocalcemic hormone. PMID:25561895

  5. The ceramide transporter and the Goodpasture antigen binding protein: one protein--one function?

    PubMed

    Mencarelli, Chiara; Losen, Mario; Hammels, Caroline; De Vry, Jochen; Hesselink, Matthijs K C; Steinbusch, Harry W M; De Baets, Marc H; Martínez-Martínez, Pilar

    2010-06-01

    The Goodpasture antigen-binding protein (GPBP) and its splice variant the ceramide transporter (CERT) are multifunctional proteins that have been found to play important roles in brain development and biology. However, the function of GPBP and CERT is controversial because of their involvement in two apparently unrelated research fields: GPBP was initially isolated as a protein associated with collagen IV in patients with the autoimmune disease Goodpasture syndrome. Subsequently, a splice variant lacking a serine-rich domain of 26 amino acids (GPBPDelta26) was found to mediate the cytosolic transport of ceramide and was therefore (re)named CERT. The two splice forms likely carry out different functions in specific sub-cellular localizations. Selective GPBP knockdown induces extensive apoptosis and tissue loss in the brain of zebrafish. GPBP/GPBPDelta26 knock-out mice die as a result of structural and functional defects in endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Because both mitochondria and ceramide play an important role in many biological events that regulate neuronal differentiation, cellular senescence, proliferation and cell death, we propose that GPBP and CERT are pivotal in neurodegenerative processes. In this review, we discuss the current state of knowledge on GPBP and CERT, including the molecular and biochemical characterization of GPBP in the field of autoimmunity as well as the fundamental research on CERT in ceramide transport, biosynthesis, localization, metabolism and cell homeostasis.

  6. AtMRP2, an Arabidopsis ATP binding cassette transporter able to transport glutathione S-conjugates and chlorophyll catabolites: functional comparisons with Atmrp1.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Y P; Li, Z S; Drozdowicz, Y M; Hortensteiner, S; Martinoia, E; Rea, P A

    1998-01-01

    Three ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter-like activities directed toward large amphipathic organic anions have recently been identified on the vacuolar membrane of plant cells. These are the Mg-ATP-energized, vanadate-inhibitable vacuolar accumulation of glutathione S-conjugates (GS conjugates), chlorophyll catabolites, and bile acids, respectively. Although each of these activities previously had been assigned to distinct pumps in native plant membranes, we describe here the molecular cloning, physical mapping, and heterologous expression of a gene, AtMRP2, from Arabidopsis thaliana that encodes a multispecific ABC transporter competent in the transport of both GS conjugates and chlorophyll catabolites. Unlike its isoform, AtMRP1, which transports the model Brassica napus chlorophyll catabolite transporter substrate Bn-NCC-1 at low efficiency, heterologously expressed AtMRP2 has the facility for simultaneous high-efficiency parallel transport of GS conjugates and Bn-NCC-1. The properties of AtMRP2 therefore establish a basis for the manipulation of two previously identified plant ABC transporter activities and provide an explanation for how the comparable transporter in native plant membranes would be systematically mistaken for two distinct transporters. These findings are discussed with respect to the functional organization of AtMRP2, the inability of AtMRP2 and AtMRP1 to transport the model bile acid transporter substrate taurocholate (despite the pronounced sensitivity of both to direct inhibition by this agent), the differential patterns of expression of their genes in the intact plant, and the high capacity of AtMRP2 for the transport of glutathionated herbicides and anthocyanins. PMID:9490749

  7. Altered effect of dopamine transporter 3'UTR VNTR genotype on prefrontal and striatal function in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Prata, Diana P; Mechelli, Andrea; Picchioni, Marco M; Fu, Cynthia H Y; Toulopoulou, Timothea; Bramon, Elvira; Walshe, Muriel; Murray, Robin M; Collier, David A; McGuire, Philip

    2009-11-01

    The dopamine transporter plays a key role in the regulation of central dopaminergic transmission, which modulates cognitive processing. Disrupted dopamine function and impaired executive processing are robust features of schizophrenia. To examine the effect of a polymorphism in the dopamine transporter gene (the variable number of tandem repeats in the 3' untranslated region) on brain function during executive processing in healthy volunteers and patients with schizophrenia. We hypothesized that this variation would have a different effect on prefrontal and striatal activation in schizophrenia, reflecting altered dopamine function. Case-control study. Psychiatric research center. Eighty-five subjects, comprising 44 healthy volunteers (18 who were 9-repeat carriers and 26 who were 10-repeat homozygotes) and 41 patients with DSM-IV schizophrenia (18 who were 9-repeat carriers and 23 who were 10-repeat homozygotes). Regional brain activation during word generation relative to repetition in an overt verbal fluency task measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging. Main effects of genotype and diagnosis on activation and their interaction were estimated with analysis of variance in SPM5. Irrespective of diagnosis, the 10-repeat allele was associated with greater activation than the 9-repeat allele in the left anterior insula and right caudate nucleus. Trends for the same effect in the right insula and for greater deactivation in the rostral anterior cingulate cortex were also detected. There were diagnosis x genotype interactions in the left middle frontal gyrus and left nucleus accumbens, where the 9-repeat allele was associated with greater activation than the 10-repeat allele in patients but not controls. Insular, cingulate, and striatal function during an executive task is normally modulated by variation in the dopamine transporter gene. Its effect on activation in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and ventral striatum is altered in patients with schizophrenia

  8. Workshop on Functional Requirements for the Modeling of Fate and Transport of Waterborne CBRN Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Giles, GE

    2005-02-03

    The purpose of this Workshop on ''Functional Requirements for the Modeling of Fate and Transport of Waterborne CBRN Materials'' was to solicit functional requirements for tools that help Incident Managers plan for and deal with the consequences of industrial or terrorist releases of materials into the nation's waterways and public water utilities. Twenty representatives attended and several made presentations. Several hours of discussions elicited a set of requirements. These requirements were summarized in a form for the attendees to vote on their highest priority requirements. These votes were used to determine the prioritized requirements that are reported in this paper and can be used to direct future developments.

  9. Numerical Methods for a Kohn-Sham Density Functional Model Based on Optimal Transport.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huajie; Friesecke, Gero; Mendl, Christian B

    2014-10-14

    In this paper, we study numerical discretizations to solve density functional models in the "strictly correlated electrons" (SCE) framework. Unlike previous studies, our work is not restricted to radially symmetric densities. In the SCE framework, the exchange-correlation functional encodes the effects of the strong correlation regime by minimizing the pairwise Coulomb repulsion, resulting in an optimal transport problem. We give a mathematical derivation of the self-consistent Kohn-Sham-SCE equations, construct an efficient numerical discretization for this type of problem for N = 2 electrons, and apply it to the H2 molecule in its dissociating limit.

  10. Peptides actively transported across the tympanic membrane: Functional and structural properties

    PubMed Central

    Kurabi, Arwa; Beasley, Kerry A.; Chang, Lisa; McCann, James; Pak, Kwang; Ryan, Allen F.

    2017-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) is the most common infectious disease of children under six, causing more antibiotic prescriptions and surgical procedures than any other pediatric condition. By screening a bacteriophage (phage) library genetically engineered to express random peptides on their surfaces, we discovered unique peptides that actively transport phage particles across the intact tympanic membrane (TM) and into the middle ear (ME). Herein our goals were to characterize the physiochemical peptide features that may underlie trans-TM phage transport; assess morphological and functional effects of phage peptides on the ME and inner ear (IE); and determine whether peptide-bearing phage transmigrate from the ME into the IE. Incubation of five peptide-bearing phage on the TM for over 4hrs resulted in demonstrably superior transport of one peptide, in level and in exponential increase over time. This suggests a preferred peptide motif for TM active transport. Functional and structural comparisons revealed unique features of this peptide: These include a central lysine residue, isoelectric point of 0.0 at physiological pH and a hydrophobic C-terminus. When the optimal peptide was applied to the TM independent of phage, similar transport was observed, indicating that integration into phage is not required. When 109 particles of the four different trans-TM phage were applied directly into the ME, no morphological effects were detected in the ME or IE when compared to saline or wild-type (WT) phage controls. Comparable, reversible hearing loss was observed for saline controls, WT phage and trans-TM peptide phage, suggesting a mild conductive hearing loss due to ME fluid. Perilymph titers after ME incubation established that few copies of trans-TM peptide phage crossed into the IE. The results suggest that, within the parameters tested, trans-TM peptides are safe and could be used as potential agents for noninvasive delivery of drugs, particles and gene therapy vectors to the ME

  11. Functional Impact of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Exposure on Tau Phosphorylation and Axon Transport.

    PubMed

    Le, Michelle H; Weissmiller, April M; Monte, Louise; Lin, Po Han; Hexom, Tia C; Natera, Orlangie; Wu, Chengbiao; Rissman, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    Stress exposure or increased levels of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) induce hippocampal tau phosphorylation (tau-P) in rodent models, a process that is dependent on the type-1 CRF receptor (CRFR1). Although these preclinical studies on stress-induced tau-P provide mechanistic insight for epidemiological work that identifies stress as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), the actual impact of stress-induced tau-P on neuronal function remains unclear. To determine the functional consequences of stress-induced tau-P, we developed a novel mouse neuronal cell culture system to explore the impact of acute (0.5hr) and chronic (2hr) CRF treatment on tau-P and integral cell processes such as axon transport. Consistent with in vivo reports, we found that chronic CRF treatment increased tau-P levels and caused globular accumulations of phosphorylated tau in dendritic and axonal processes. Furthermore, while both acute and chronic CRF treatment led to significant reduction in CREB activation and axon transport of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), this was not the case with mitochondrial transport. Acute CRF treatment caused increased mitochondrial velocity and distance traveled in neurons, while chronic CRF treatment modestly decreased mitochondrial velocity and greatly increased distance traveled. These results suggest that transport of cellular energetics may take priority over growth factors during stress. Tau-P was required for these changes, as co-treatment of CRF with a GSK kinase inhibitor prevented CRF-induced tau-P and all axon transport changes. Collectively, our results provide mechanistic insight into the consequences of stress peptide-induced tau-P and provide an explanation for how chronic stress via CRF may lead to neuronal vulnerability in AD.

  12. Function and Regulation of the C4-Dicarboxylate Transporters in Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Wösten, Marc M. S. M.; van de Lest, Chris H. A.; van Dijk, Linda; van Putten, Jos P. M.

    2017-01-01

    C4-dicarboxylates are important molecules for the human pathogen C.jejuni, as they are used as carbon and electron acceptor molecules, as sugars cannot be utilized by this microaerophilic organism. Based on the genome analysis, C. jejuni may possess five different C4–dicarboxylate transporters: DctA, DcuA, DcuB, and two homologs of DcuC. Here, we investigated the regulation and function of various C4–dicarboxylate transporters in C. jejuni. Transcription of the dctA and dcuC homologs is constitutive, while dcuA and dcuB are both directly regulated by the two-component RacR/RacS system in response to limited oxygen availability and the presence of nitrate. The DctA transporter is the only C4-dicarboxylate transporter to allow C. jejuni to grow on C4-carbon sources such as aspartate, fumarate, and succinate at high oxygen levels (10% O2) and is indispensable for the uptake of succinate from the medium under these conditions. Both DcuA and DcuB can sequester aspartate from the medium under low-oxygen conditions (0.3% O2). However, under these conditions, DcuB is the only transporter to secrete succinate to the environment. Under low-oxygen conditions, nitrate prevents the secretion of succinate to the environment and was able to overrule the phenotype of the C4-transporter mutants, indicating that the activity of the aspartate–fumarate–succinate pathway in C. jejuni is strongly reduced by the addition of nitrate in the medium. PMID:28223978

  13. Host and Pathogen Copper-Transporting P-Type ATPases Function Antagonistically during Salmonella Infection.

    PubMed

    Ladomersky, Erik; Khan, Aslam; Shanbhag, Vinit; Cavet, Jennifer S; Chan, Jefferson; Weisman, Gary A; Petris, Michael J

    2017-09-01

    Copper is an essential yet potentially toxic trace element that is required by all aerobic organisms. A key regulator of copper homeostasis in mammalian cells is the copper-transporting P-type ATPase ATP7A, which mediates copper transport from the cytoplasm into the secretory pathway, as well as copper export across the plasma membrane. Previous studies have shown that ATP7A-dependent copper transport is required for killing phagocytosed Escherichia coli in a cultured macrophage cell line. In this investigation, we expanded on these studies by generating Atp7a(LysMcre) mice, in which the Atp7a gene was specifically deleted in cells of the myeloid lineage, including macrophages. Primary macrophages isolated from Atp7a(LysMcre) mice exhibit decreased copper transport into phagosomal compartments and a reduced ability to kill Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium compared to that of macrophages isolated from wild-type mice. The Atp7a(LysMcre) mice were also more susceptible to systemic infection by S Typhimurium than wild-type mice. Deletion of the S Typhimurium copper exporters, CopA and GolT, was found to decrease infection in wild-type mice but not in the Atp7a(LysMcre) mice. These studies suggest that ATP7A-dependent copper transport into the phagosome mediates host defense against S Typhimurium, which is counteracted by copper export from the bacteria via CopA and GolT. These findings reveal unique and opposing functions for copper transporters of the host and pathogen during infection. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  14. Molecular and functional characterization of riboflavin specific transport system in rat brain capillary endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mitesh; Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2012-01-01

    Riboflavin is an important water soluble vitamin (B2) required for metabolic reactions, normal cellular growth, differentiation and function. Mammalian brain cells cannot synthesize riboflavin and must import from systemic circulation. However, the uptake mechanism, cellular translocation and intracellular trafficking of riboflavin in brain capillary endothelial cells are poorly understood. The primary objective of this study is to investigate the existence of riboflavin-specific transport system and delineate the uptake and intracellular regulation of riboflavin in immortalized rat brain capillary endothelial cells (RBE4). The uptake of [3H]-Riboflavin is sodium, temperature and energy dependent but pH independent. [3H]-Riboflavin uptake is saturable with Km and Vmax values of 19 ± 3 µM and 0.235 ± 0.012 picomoles/min/mg protein, respectively. The uptake process is inhibited by unlabelled structural analogs (lumiflavin, lumichrome) but not by structurally unrelated vitamins. Ca++/calmodulin and protein kinase A (PKA) pathways are found to play an important role in the intracellular regulation of [3H]-Riboflavin. Apical and baso-lateral uptake of [3H]-Riboflavin clearly indicate that riboflavin specific transport system is predominantly localized on the apical side of RBE4 cells. A 628 bp band corresponding to riboflavin transporter is revealed in RT-PCR analysis. These findings, for the first time report the existence of a specialized and high affinity transport system for riboflavin in RBE4 cells. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a major obstacle limiting drug transport inside the brain as it regulates drug permeation from systemic circulation. This transporter can be utilized for targeted delivery in enhancing brain permeation of highly potent drugs on systemic administration. PMID:22683359

  15. Functional Validation of ABCA3 as a Miltefosine Transporter in Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Dohmen, Luuk C. T.; Navas, Adriana; Vargas, Deninson Alejandro; Gregory, David J.; Kip, Anke; Dorlo, Thomas P. C.; Gomez, Maria Adelaida

    2016-01-01

    Within its mammalian host, Leishmania resides and replicates as an intracellular parasite. The direct activity of antileishmanials must therefore depend on intracellular drug transport, metabolism, and accumulation within the host cell. In this study, we explored the role of human macrophage transporters in the intracellular accumulation and antileishmanial activity of miltefosine (MLF), the only oral drug available for the treatment of visceral and cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL). Membrane transporter gene expression in primary human macrophages infected in vitro with Leishmania Viannia panamensis and exposed to MLF showed modulation of ABC and solute liquid carrier transporters gene transcripts. Among these, ABCA3, a lipid transporter, was significantly induced after exposure to MLF, and this induction was confirmed in primary macrophages from CL patients. Functional validation of MLF as a substrate for ABCA3 was performed by shRNA gene knockdown (KD) in THP-1 monocytes. Intracellular accumulation of radiolabeled MLF was significantly higher in ABCA3KD macrophages. ABCA3KD resulted in increased cytotoxicity induced by MLF exposure. ABCA3 gene expression inversely correlated with intracellular MLF content in primary macrophages from CL patients. ABCA3KD reduced parasite survival during macrophage infection with an L. V. panamensis strain exhibiting low in vitro susceptibility to MLF. Confocal microscopy showed ABCA3 to be located in the cell membrane of resting macrophages and in intracellular compartments in L. V. panamensis-infected cells. These results provide evidence of ABCA3 as an MLF efflux transporter in human macrophages and support its role in the direct antileishmanial effect of this alkylphosphocholine drug. PMID:26903515

  16. Insights into the Structure and Function of Ciliary and Flagellar Doublet Microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Linck, Richard; Fu, Xiaofeng; Lin, Jianfeng; Ouch, Christna; Schefter, Alexandra; Steffen, Walter; Warren, Peter; Nicastro, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Cilia and flagella are conserved, motile, and sensory cell organelles involved in signal transduction and human disease. Their scaffold consists of a 9-fold array of remarkably stable doublet microtubules (DMTs), along which motor proteins transmit force for ciliary motility and intraflagellar transport. DMTs possess Ribbons of three to four hyper-stable protofilaments whose location, organization, and specialized functions have been elusive. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the distribution and structural arrangements of Ribbon proteins from sea urchin sperm flagella, using quantitative immunobiochemistry, proteomics, immuno-cryo-electron microscopy, and tomography. Isolated Ribbons contain acetylated α-tubulin, β-tubulin, conserved protein Rib45, >95% of the axonemal tektins, and >95% of the calcium-binding proteins, Rib74 and Rib85.5, whose human homologues are related to the cause of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. DMTs contain only one type of Ribbon, corresponding to protofilaments A11-12-13-1 of the A-tubule. Rib74 and Rib85.5 are associated with the Ribbon in the lumen of the A-tubule. Ribbons contain a single ∼5-nm wide filament, composed of equimolar tektins A, B, and C, which interact with the nexin-dynein regulatory complex. A summary of findings is presented, and the functions of Ribbon proteins are discussed in terms of the assembly and stability of DMTs, ciliary motility, and other microtubule systems. PMID:24794867

  17. Noradrenaline transporter blockade increases fronto-parietal functional connectivity relevant for working memory.

    PubMed

    Hernaus, Dennis; Casales Santa, Marta Ma; Offermann, Jan Stefan; Van Amelsvoort, Thérèse

    2017-03-10

    Experimental animal work has demonstrated that dopamine and noradrenaline play an essential role in modulating prefrontal cortex-mediated networks underlying working memory performance. Studies of functional connectivity have been instrumental in extending such notions to humans but, so far, have almost exclusively focussed on pharmacological agents with a predominant dopaminergic mechanism of action. Here, we investigate the effect of a single dose of atomoxetine 60mg, a noradrenaline transporter inhibitor, on working memory performance and associated functional connectivity during an n-back task in 19 healthy male volunteers. Atomoxetine increased functional connectivity between right anterior insula and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, precentral gyrus, posterior parietal cortex and precuneus during the high-working memory load condition of the n-back task. Increased atomoxetine-induced insula-dorsolateral prefrontal cortex functional connectivity during this condition correlated with decreased reaction time variability and was furthermore predicted by working memory capacity. These results show for the first time that noradrenaline transporter blockade-induced increases in cortical catecholamines accentuate fronto-parietal working memory-related network integrity. The observation of significant inter-subject variability in response to atomoxetine has implications for inverted-U frameworks of dopamine and noradrenaline function, which could be useful to predict drug effects in clinical disorders with variable treatment response.

  18. Molecular changes in hepatic metabolism and transport in cirrhosis and their functional importance

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Christoph G; Götze, Oliver; Geier, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is the common endpoint of many hepatic diseases and represents a relevant risk for liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma. The progress of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis is accompanied by deteriorating liver function. This review summarizes the regulatory and functional changes in phase I and phase II metabolic enzymes as well as transport proteins and provides an overview regarding lipid and glucose metabolism in cirrhotic patients. Interestingly, phase I enzymes are generally downregulated transcriptionally, while phase II enzymes are mostly preserved transcriptionally but are reduced in their function. Transport proteins are regulated in a specific way that resembles the molecular changes observed in obstructive cholestasis. Lipid and glucose metabolism are characterized by insulin resistance and catabolism, leading to the disturbance of energy expenditure and wasting. Possible non-invasive tests, especially breath tests, for components of liver metabolism are discussed. The heterogeneity and complexity of changes in hepatic metabolism complicate the assessment of liver function in individual patients. Additionally, studies in humans are rare, and species differences preclude the transferability of data from rodents to humans. In clinical practice, some established global scores or criteria form the basis for the functional evaluation of patients with liver cirrhosis, but difficult treatment decisions such as selection for transplantation or resection require further research regarding the application of existing non-invasive tests and the development of more specific tests. PMID:26755861

  19. Charge transport calculations by a wave-packet dynamical approach using maximally localized Wannier functions based on density functional theory: Application to high-mobility organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko; Hirose, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    We present a wave-packet dynamical approach to charge transport using maximally localized Wannier functions based on density functional theory including van der Waals interactions. We apply it to the transport properties of pentacene and rubrene single crystals and show the temperature-dependent natures from bandlike to thermally activated behaviors as a function of the magnitude of external static disorder. We compare the results with those obtained by the conventional band and hopping models and experiments.

  20. Molecular and functional characterization of choline transporter in human colon carcinoma HT-29 cells.

    PubMed

    Kouji, Hironobu; Inazu, Masato; Yamada, Tomoko; Tajima, Hirohisa; Aoki, Tatsuya; Matsumiya, Teruhiko

    2009-03-01

    We examined the molecular and functional characterization of choline uptake in human colon carcinomas using the cell line HT-29. Furthermore, we explored the possible correlation between choline uptake and cell proliferation. Choline uptake was saturable and mediated by a single transport system. Interestingly, removal of Na(+) from the uptake buffer strongly enhanced choline uptake. This increase in component of choline uptake under Na(+)-free conditions was inhibited by a Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1 (NHE1) inhibitor. Collapse of the plasma-membrane H(+) electrochemical gradient by a protonophore inhibited choline uptake. Choline uptake was inhibited by the choline analogue hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) and various organic cations, and was significantly decreased by acidification of the extracellular medium and by intracellular alkalinization. Real-time PCR revealed that choline transporter-like protein 1 (CTL1), CTL2, CTL4 and NHE1 mRNA are mainly expressed in HT-29 cells. Western blot and immunocytochemical analysis indicated that CTL1 protein was expressed in plasma membrane. The biochemical and pharmacological data indicated that CTL1 is functionally expressed in HT-29 cells and is responsible for choline uptake in these cells. We conclude that choline transporters, especially CTL1, use a directed H(+) gradient as a driving force, and its transport functions in co-operation with NHE1. Finally, cell proliferation was inhibited by HC-3 and tetrahexylammonium chloride (THA), which strongly inhibits choline uptake. Identification of this novel CTL1-mediated choline uptake system provides a potential new target for therapeutic intervention.

  1. Analysis of cargo transport by IFT and GFP imaging of IFT in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Diener, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is the organism in which intraflagellar transport (IFT) was first visualized and in which the composition of IFT particles was originally elucidated. As the universality of IFT among ciliated/flagellated cells was uncovered, the diversity of organisms used to study IFT has grown. Still, because of the ease of isolation of flagella from Chlamydomonas and the battery of temperature-sensitive mutants affecting IFT proteins and motors, this unicellular alga remains the principal model for biochemical studies of IFT motors and cargo; furthermore, the long, exposed flagella of this cell are ideally suited for observing IFT in real time with GFP-tagged components of IFT.

  2. Molecular Basis of Tubulin Transport Within the Cilium by IFT74 and IFT81

    PubMed Central

    Bhogaraju, Sagar; Cajanek, Lukas; Fort, Cécile; Blisnick, Thierry; Weber, Kristina; Taschner, Michael; Mizuno, Naoko; Lamla, Stefan; Bastin, Philippe; Nigg, Erich A.; Lorentzen, Esben

    2015-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) of ciliary precursors such as tubulin from the cytoplasm to the ciliary tip is involved in the construction of the cilium, a hairlike organelle found on most eukaryotic cells. However, the molecular mechanisms of IFT are poorly understood. Here, we found that the two core IFT proteins IFT74 and IFT81 form a tubulin-binding module and mapped the interaction to a calponin homology domain of IFT81 and a highly basic domain in IFT74. Knockdown of IFT81 and rescue experiments with point mutants showed that tubulin binding by IFT81 was required for ciliogenesis in human cells. PMID:23990561

  3. Tryptophan 415 Is Critical for the Cholesterol Transport Functions of Scavenger Receptor BI.

    PubMed

    Holme, Rebecca L; Miller, James J; Nicholson, Kay; Sahoo, Daisy

    2016-01-12

    High density lipoproteins (HDL) are anti-atherogenic particles, primarily due to their role in the reverse cholesterol transport pathway whereby HDL delivers cholesteryl esters (CE) to the liver for excretion upon interaction with its receptor, scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI). We designed experiments to test the hypothesis that one or more of the eight highly conserved tryptophan (Trp; W) residues in SR-BI are critical for mediating function. We created a series of Trp-to-phenylalanine (Phe, F) mutant receptors, as well as Trp-less SR-BI (ΔW-SR-BI), and assessed their ability to mediate cholesterol transport. Wild-type (WT) or mutant SR-BI receptors were transiently expressed in COS-7 cells, and cell surface expression was confirmed. Next, we showed that Trp-less- and W415F-SR-BI had significantly decreased abilities to bind HDL and promote selective uptake of HDL-CE, albeit with higher selective uptake efficiency as compared to WT-SR-BI. Interestingly, only Trp-less-, but not W415F-SR-BI, showed an impaired ability to mediate efflux of free cholesterol (FC). Furthermore, both W415F- and Trp-less-SR-BI were unable to reorganize plasma membrane pools of FC based on lack of sensitivity to exogenous cholesterol oxidase. Restoration of Trp 415 into the Trp-less-SR-BI background was unable to rescue Trp-less-SR-BI's impaired functions, suggesting that Trp 415 is critical, but not sufficient for full receptor function. Furthermore, with the exception of Trp 262, restoration of individual extracellular Trp residues, in combination with Trp 415, into the Trp-less-SR-BI background partially rescued SR-BI function, indicating that Trp 415 must be present in combination with other Trp residues for proper cholesterol transport functions.

  4. Discontinuous membrane helices in transport proteins and their correlation with function.

    PubMed

    Screpanti, Emanuela; Hunte, Carola

    2007-08-01

    Alpha-helical bundles and beta-barrel proteins represent the two basic types of architecture known for integral membrane proteins. Irregular structural motifs have been revealed with the growing number of structures determined. "Discontinuous" helices are present in membrane proteins that actively transport ions. In the Ca(2+)-ATPase, a primary active transporter, and in the secondary transporters NhaA, LeuT(Aa), ClC H(+)/Cl(-) exchanger and Glt(Ph), the helical structure of two membrane segments is interrupted and the interjacent polypeptide chain forms an extended peptide. The discontinuous helices are integrated in the membrane either as transmembrane-spanning or hairpin-type segments. In addition, the secondary transporters have inverted internal duplication domains, which are only weakly correlated with their amino acid sequence. The symmetry comprises either parts of or the complete molecule, but always includes the discontinuous helices. The helix-peptide-helix motif is correlated with the ion translocation function. The extended peptides with their backbone atoms, the helix termini and the polar/charged amino acid residues in close vicinity provide the basis for ion recognition, binding and translocation.

  5. Loss of GSNOR1 Function Leads to Compromised Auxin Signaling and Polar Auxin Transport.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ya-Fei; Wang, Da-Li; Wang, Chao; Culler, Angela Hendrickson; Kreiser, Molly A; Suresh, Jayanti; Cohen, Jerry D; Pan, Jianwei; Baker, Barbara; Liu, Jian-Zhong

    2015-09-01

    Cross talk between phytohormones, nitric oxide (NO), and auxin has been implicated in the control of plant growth and development. Two recent reports indicate that NO promoted auxin signaling but inhibited auxin transport probably through S-nitrosylation. However, genetic evidence for the effect of S-nitrosylation on auxin physiology has been lacking. In this study, we used a genetic approach to understand the broader role of S-nitrosylation in auxin physiology in Arabidopsis. We compared auxin signaling and transport in Col-0 and gsnor1-3, a loss-of-function GSNOR1 mutant defective in protein de-nitrosylation. Our results showed that auxin signaling was impaired in the gsnor1-3 mutant as revealed by significantly reduced DR5-GUS/DR5-GFP accumulation and compromised degradation of AXR3NT-GUS, a useful reporter in interrogating auxin-mediated degradation of Aux/IAA by auxin receptors. In addition, polar auxin transport was compromised in gsnor1-3, which was correlated with universally reduced levels of PIN or GFP-PIN proteins in the roots of the mutant in a manner independent of transcription and 26S proteasome degradation. Our results suggest that S-nitrosylation and GSNOR1-mediated de-nitrosylation contribute to auxin physiology, and impaired auxin signaling and compromised auxin transport are responsible for the auxin-related morphological phenotypes displayed by the gsnor1-3 mutant.

  6. Molecular regulation of sucrose catabolism and sugar transport for development, defence and phloem function.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Wu, Limin; Foster, Ryan; Ruan, Yong-Ling

    2017-05-01

    Sucrose (Suc) is the major end product of photosynthesis in mesophyll cells of most vascular plants. It is loaded into phloem of mature leaves for long-distance translocation to non-photosynthetic organs where it is unloaded for diverse uses. Clearly, Suc transport and metabolism is central to plant growth and development and the functionality of the entire vascular system. Despite vast information in the literature about the physiological roles of individual sugar metabolic enzymes and transporters, there is a lack of systematic evaluation about their molecular regulation from transcriptional to post-translational levels. Knowledge on this topic is essential for understanding and improving plant development, optimizing resource distribution and increasing crop productivity. We therefore focused our analyses on molecular control of key players in Suc metabolism and transport, including: (i) the identification of promoter elements responsive to sugars and hormones or targeted by transcription factors and microRNAs degrading transcripts of target genes; and (ii) modulation of enzyme and transporter activities through protein-protein interactions and other post-translational modifications. We have highlighted major remaining questions and discussed opportunities to exploit current understanding to gain new insights into molecular control of carbon partitioning for improving plant performance. © 2017 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  7. Brain barriers and functional interfaces with sequential appearance of ABC efflux transporters during human development.

    PubMed

    Møllgård, Kjeld; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M; Holst, Camilla B; Habgood, Mark D; Saunders, Norman R

    2017-09-14

    Adult brain is protected from entry of drugs and toxins by specific mechanisms such as ABC (ATP-binding Cassette) efflux transporters. Little is known when these appear in human brain during development. Cellular distribution of three main ABC transporters (ABCC1, ABCG2, ABCB1) was determined at blood-brain barriers and interfaces in human embryos and fetuses in first half of gestation. Antibodies against claudin-5 and -11 and antibodies to α-fetoprotein were used to describe morphological and functional aspects of brain barriers. First exchange interfaces to be established, probably at 4-5 weeks post conception, are between brain and embryonic cerebrospinal fluid (eCSF) and between outer surface of brain anlage and primary meninx. They already exclude α-fetoprotein and are immunopositive for both claudins, ABCC1 and ABCG2. ABCB1 is detectable within a week of blood vessels first penetrating into brain parenchyma (6-7 weeks post conception). ABCC1, ABCB1 and ABCG2 are present at blood-CSF barrier in all choroid plexuses from first appearance (7 weeks post conception). Outer CSF-brain interfaces are established between 9-11 weeks post conception exhibiting immunoreactivity for all three transporters. Results provide evidence for sequential establishment of brain exchange interfaces and spatial and temporal timetable for three main ABC transporters in early human brain.

  8. Vitamin C function in the brain: vital role of the ascorbate transporter SVCT2.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Fiona E; May, James M

    2009-03-15

    Ascorbate (vitamin C) is a vital antioxidant molecule in the brain. However, it also has a number of other important functions, participating as a cofactor in several enzyme reactions, including catecholamine synthesis, collagen production, and regulation of HIF-1 alpha. Ascorbate is transported into the brain and neurons via the sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter 2 (SVCT2), which causes accumulation of ascorbate within cells against a concentration gradient. Dehydroascorbic acid, the oxidized form of ascorbate, is transported via glucose transporters of the GLUT family. Once in cells, it is rapidly reduced to ascorbate. The highest concentrations of ascorbate in the body are found in the brain and in neuroendocrine tissues such as adrenal, although the brain is the most difficult organ to deplete of ascorbate. Combined with regional asymmetry in ascorbate distribution within different brain areas, these facts suggest an important role for ascorbate in the brain. Ascorbate is proposed as a neuromodulator of glutamatergic, dopaminergic, cholinergic, and GABAergic transmission and related behaviors. Neurodegenerative diseases typically involve high levels of oxidative stress and thus ascorbate has been posited to have potential therapeutic roles against ischemic stroke, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's disease.

  9. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of the apple sucrose transporter gene MdSUT2.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qi-Jun; Sun, Mei-Hong; Liu, Ya-Jing; Lu, Jing; Hu, Da-Gang; Hao, Yu-Jin

    2016-12-01

    Sucrose is not only the primary photosynthetic product but also the major component translocated in the phloem of economically important plant species. Sucrose transporters or carriers (SUTs or SUCs), function as sucrose/H(+) symporters and play a crucial role in determining the cell-to-cell distribution of sucrose throughout the entire plant. However, whether such genes are involved in responses to abiotic stress and other biological processes is largely unknown. Here, we report that MdSUT2 in apple is a homolog of the Arabidopsis vacuolar sucrose transporter AtSUT2. Ectopic expression of MdSUT2 in Arabidopsis decreased sucrose sensitivity in germination and seeding stage and increased sucrose transport activity. In addition, our results showed that MdSUT2 impacted on plant growth by accelerating vegetative growth and promoting early flowering in Arabidopsis. Overexpression of MdSUT2 significantly improved abiotic stress tolerance including NaCl, ABA, and mannitol in apple calli and Arabidopsis. Together, these findings provide evidence that the apple sucrose transporter MdSUT2 is involved in abiotic stress resistance and the regulation of plant growth and development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Vitamin C Function in the Brain: Vital Role of the Ascorbate Transporter (SVCT2)

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Fiona E.; May, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Ascorbate (vitamin C) is a vital antioxidant molecule in the brain. However, it also has a number of other important functions, participating as a co-factor in several enzyme reactions including catecholamine synthesis, collagen production and regulation of HIF-1α. Ascorbate is transported into the brain and neurons via the Sodium-dependent Vitamin C Transporter-2 (SVCT2), which causes accumulation of ascorbate within cells against a concentration gradient. Dehydroascorbic acid, the oxidized form of ascorbate, is transported via glucose transporters of the GLUT family. Once in cells, it is rapidly reduced to ascorbate. The highest concentrations of ascorbate in the body are found in the brain and neuroendocrine tissues such as adrenal, although the brain is the most difficult organ to deplete of ascorbate. Combined with regional asymmetry in ascorbate distribution within different brain areas, these facts suggest an important role for ascorbate in the brain. Ascorbate is proposed as a neuromodulator of glutamatergic, dopaminergic, cholinergic and GABAergic transmission and related behaviors. Neurodegenerative diseases typically involve high levels of oxidative stress and thus ascorbate has been posited to have potential therapeutic roles against ischemic stroke, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and Huntingdon's disease. PMID:19162177

  11. Functional characterization of amphipathic α-helix in the osmoregulatory ABC transporter OpuA.

    PubMed

    Gul, Nadia; Schuurman-Wolters, Gea; Karasawa, Akira; Poolman, Bert

    2012-06-26

    The ATP-binding-cassette transporter OpuA from Lactococcus lactis is composed of two ATPase subunits (OpuAA) and two subunits (OpuABC) with the transmembrane domain fused to an extracellular substrate-binding protein. Of the almost 1900 homologues of OpuA known to date, a subset has an amino-terminal amphipathic helix (plus extra transmembrane segment) fused to the core of the transmembrane domain of the OpuABC subunit. FRET measurements indicate that the amphipathic α-helix is located close to the membrane surface, where its hydrophobic face interacts with the transport protein rather than the membrane lipids. Next, we determined the functional role of this accessory region by engineering the amphipathic α-helix. We analyzed the consequence of the mutations in intact cells by monitoring growth and transport of glycine betaine under normal and osmotic stress conditions. More detailed studies were performed in hybrid membrane vesicles, proteoliposomes, and bilayer nanodisks. We show that the amphipathic α-helix of OpuA is necessary for high activity of OpuA but is not critical for the biogenesis of the protein or the ionic regulation of transport.

  12. Mathematical models of functioning and allocation indicators of road-transport complex resources in the fuel and raw materials region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyvis, V. A.; Novichikhin, A. V.; Temlyantsev, M. V.

    2017-09-01

    A number of features of coal industry functioning was determined for the conditions of Kemerovo region, and the specifics of planning and organization of coal transportation were revealed. The analysis of indicators of motor and railway types of transport in the process of coal transportation was executed. The necessity of improving the tools of coal products transportation in the modern conditions is substantiated. Specific features of functioning of a road-transport complex in the fuel and raw material region (on the example of Kemerovo region) are determined. The modern scientific and applied problems of functioning and allocation of the road-transport complex resources are identified. To justify the management decisions on the development and improvement of road-transport complex a set of indicators are proposed: infrastructural, transportation performance, operating, social and economic. Mathematical models of indicators are recommended for formulation and justification of decisions made during operational and strategic planning of development, evaluation and development of algorithms of functioning and allocation of road-transport sector in Kemerovo region in the future.

  13. Lesion-Induced Alterations in Astrocyte Glutamate Transporter Expression and Function in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Schreiner, Alexandra E.; Langer, Julia; Kafitz, Karl W.; Rose, Christine R.

    2013-01-01

    Astrocytes express the sodium-dependent glutamate transporters GLAST and GLT-1, which are critical to maintain low extracellular glutamate concentrations. Here, we analyzed changes in their expression and function following a mechanical lesion in the CA1 area of organotypic hippocampal slices. 6-7 days after lesion, a glial scar had formed along the injury site, containing strongly activated astrocytes with increased GFAP and S100β immunoreactivity, enlarged somata, and reduced capability for uptake of SR101. Astrocytes in the scar's periphery were swollen as well, but showed only moderate upregulation of GFAP and S100β and efficiently took up SR101. In the scar, clusters of GLT-1 and GLAST immunoreactivity colocalized with GFAP-positive fibers. Apart from these, GLT-1 immunoreactivity declined with increasing distance from the scar, whereas GLAST expression appeared largely uniform. Sodium imaging in reactive astrocytes indicated that glutamate uptake was strongly reduced in the scar but maintained in the periphery. Our results thus show that moderately reactive astrocytes in the lesion periphery maintain overall glutamate transporter expression and function. Strongly reactive astrocytes in the scar, however, display clusters of GLAST and GLT-1 immunoreactivity together with reduced glutamate transport activity. This reduction might contribute to increased extracellular glutamate concentrations and promote excitotoxic cell damage at the lesion site. PMID:24078881

  14. A biochemical and functional protein complex involving dopamine synthesis and transport into synaptic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Cartier, Etienne A; Parra, Leonardo A; Baust, Tracy B; Quiroz, Marisol; Salazar, Gloria; Faundez, Victor; Egaña, Loreto; Torres, Gonzalo E

    2010-01-15

    Synaptic transmission depends on neurotransmitter pools stored within vesicles that undergo regulated exocytosis. In the brain, the vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT(2)) is responsible for the loading of dopamine (DA) and other monoamines into synaptic vesicles. Prior to storage within vesicles, DA synthesis occurs at the synaptic terminal in a two-step enzymatic process. First, the rate-limiting enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) converts tyrosine to di-OH-phenylalanine. Aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) then converts di-OH-phenylalanine into DA. Here, we provide evidence that VMAT(2) physically and functionally interacts with the enzymes responsible for DA synthesis. In rat striata, TH and AADC co-immunoprecipitate with VMAT(2), whereas in PC 12 cells, TH co-immunoprecipitates with the closely related VMAT(1) and with overexpressed VMAT(2). GST pull-down assays further identified three cytosolic domains of VMAT(2) involved in the interaction with TH and AADC. Furthermore, in vitro binding assays demonstrated that TH directly interacts with VMAT(2). Additionally, using fractionation and immunoisolation approaches, we demonstrate that TH and AADC associate with VMAT(2)-containing synaptic vesicles from rat brain. These vesicles exhibited specific TH activity. Finally, the coupling between synthesis and transport of DA into vesicles was impaired in the presence of fragments involved in the VMAT(2)/TH/AADC interaction. Taken together, our results indicate that DA synthesis can occur at the synaptic vesicle membrane, where it is physically and functionally coupled to VMAT(2)-mediated transport into vesicles.

  15. Expression and functional studies of genes involved in transport and metabolism of glycerol in Pachysolen tannophilus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pachysolen tannophilus is a non-conventional yeast, which can metabolize many of the carbon sources found in low cost feedstocks including glycerol and xylose. The xylose utilisation pathways have been extensively studied in this organism. However, the mechanism behind glycerol metabolism is poorly understood. Using the recently published genome sequence of P. tannophilus CBS4044, we searched for genes with functions in glycerol transport and metabolism by performing a BLAST search using the sequences of the relevant genes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae as queries. Results Quantitative real-time PCR was performed to unveil the expression patterns of these genes during growth of P. tannophilus on glycerol and glucose as sole carbon sources. The genes predicted to be involved in glycerol transport in P. tannophilus were expressed in S. cerevisiae to validate their function. The S. cerevisiae strains transformed with heterologous genes showed improved growth and glycerol consumption rates with glycerol as the sole carbon source. Conclusions P. tannophilus has characteristics relevant for a microbial cell factory to be applied in a biorefinery setting, i.e. its ability to utilise the carbon sources such as xylose and glycerol. However, the strain is not currently amenable to genetic modification and transformation. Heterologous expression of the glycerol transporters from P. tannophilus, which has a relatively high growth rate on glycerol, could be used as an approach for improving the efficiency of glycerol assimilation in other well characterized and applied cell factories such as S. cerevisiae. PMID:23514356

  16. Lactate Transport and Receptor Actions in Retina: Potential Roles in Retinal Function and Disease.

    PubMed

    Kolko, Miriam; Vosborg, Fia; Henriksen, Ulrik L; Hasan-Olive, Md Mahdi; Diget, Elisabeth Holm; Vohra, Rupali; Gurubaran, Iswariya Raja Sridevi; Gjedde, Albert; Mariga, Shelton Tendai; Skytt, Dorte M; Utheim, Tor Paaske; Storm-Mathisen, Jon; Bergersen, Linda H

    2016-06-01

    In retina, like in brain, lactate equilibrates across cell membranes via monocarboxylate transporters and in the extracellular space by diffusion, forming a basis for the action of lactate as a transmitter of metabolic signals. In the present paper, we argue that the lactate receptor GPR81, also known as HCAR1, may contribute importantly to the control of retinal cell functions in health and disease. GPR81, a G-protein coupled receptor, is known to downregulate cAMP both in adipose and nervous tissue. The receptor also acts through other down-stream mechanisms to control functions, such as excitability, metabolism and inflammation. Recent publications predict effects of the lactate receptor on neurodegeneration. Neurodegenerative diseases in retina, where the retinal ganglion cells die, notably glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy, may be linked to disturbed lactate homeostasis. Pilot studies reveal high GPR81 mRNA in retina and indicate GPR81 localization in Müller cells and retinal ganglion cells. Moreover, monocarboxylate transporters are expressed in retinal cells. We envision that lactate receptors and transporters could be useful future targets of novel therapeutic strategies to protect neurons and prevent or counteract glaucoma as well as other retinal diseases.

  17. Structure-Functional Basis of Ion Transport in Sodium–Calcium Exchanger (NCX) Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Giladi, Moshe; Shor, Reut; Lisnyansky, Michal; Khananshvili, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The membrane-bound sodium–calcium exchanger (NCX) proteins shape Ca2+ homeostasis in many cell types, thus participating in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes. Determination of the crystal structure of an archaeal NCX (NCX_Mj) paved the way for a thorough and systematic investigation of ion transport mechanisms in NCX proteins. Here, we review the data gathered from the X-ray crystallography, molecular dynamics simulations, hydrogen–deuterium exchange mass-spectrometry (HDX-MS), and ion-flux analyses of mutants. Strikingly, the apo NCX_Mj protein exhibits characteristic patterns in the local backbone dynamics at particular helix segments, thereby possessing characteristic HDX profiles, suggesting structure-dynamic preorganization (geometric arrangements of catalytic residues before the transition state) of conserved α1 and α2 repeats at ion-coordinating residues involved in transport activities. Moreover, dynamic preorganization of local structural entities in the apo protein predefines the status of ion-occlusion and transition states, even though Na+ or Ca2+ binding modifies the preceding backbone dynamics nearby functionally important residues. Future challenges include resolving the structural-dynamic determinants governing the ion selectivity, functional asymmetry and ion-induced alternating access. Taking into account the structural similarities of NCX_Mj with the other proteins belonging to the Ca2+/cation exchanger superfamily, the recent findings can significantly improve our understanding of ion transport mechanisms in NCX and similar proteins. PMID:27879668

  18. Structure-Functional Basis of Ion Transport in Sodium-Calcium Exchanger (NCX) Proteins.

    PubMed

    Giladi, Moshe; Shor, Reut; Lisnyansky, Michal; Khananshvili, Daniel

    2016-11-22

    The membrane-bound sodium-calcium exchanger (NCX) proteins shape Ca(2+) homeostasis in many cell types, thus participating in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes. Determination of the crystal structure of an archaeal NCX (NCX_Mj) paved the way for a thorough and systematic investigation of ion transport mechanisms in NCX proteins. Here, we review the data gathered from the X-ray crystallography, molecular dynamics simulations, hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass-spectrometry (HDX-MS), and ion-flux analyses of mutants. Strikingly, the apo NCX_Mj protein exhibits characteristic patterns in the local backbone dynamics at particular helix segments, thereby possessing characteristic HDX profiles, suggesting structure-dynamic preorganization (geometric arrangements of catalytic residues before the transition state) of conserved α₁ and α₂ repeats at ion-coordinating residues involved in transport activities. Moreover, dynamic preorganization of local structural entities in the apo protein predefines the status of ion-occlusion and transition states, even though Na⁺ or Ca(2+) binding modifies the preceding backbone dynamics nearby functionally important residues. Future challenges include resolving the structural-dynamic determinants governing the ion selectivity, functional asymmetry and ion-induced alternating access. Taking into account the structural similarities of NCX_Mj with the other proteins belonging to the Ca(2+)/cation exchanger superfamily, the recent findings can significantly improve our understanding of ion transport mechanisms in NCX and similar proteins.

  19. Synthesis and transport of creatine in the CNS: importance for cerebral functions.

    PubMed

    Béard, Elidie; Braissant, Olivier

    2010-10-01

    Apart of its well known function of 'energetic buffer' through the creatine/phosphocreatine/creatine kinase system allowing the regeneration of ATP, creatine has been recently suggested as a potential neuromodulator of even true neurotransmitter. Moreover, the recent discovery of primary creatine deficiency syndromes, due to deficiencies in L-arginine : glycine amidinotransferase or guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (the two enzymes allowing creatine synthesis) or in the creatine transporter, has shed new light on creatine synthesis, metabolism and transport, in particular in CNS which appears as the main tissue affected by these creatine deficiencies. Recent data suggest that creatine can cross blood-brain barrier but only with a poor efficiency, and that the brain must ensure parts of its needs in creatine by its own endogenous synthesis. Finally, the recent years have demonstrated the interest to use creatine as a neuroprotective agent in a growing number of neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. This article aims at reviewing the latest data on creatine metabolism and transport in the brain, in relation to creatine deficiencies and to the potential use of creatine as neuroprotective molecule. Emphasis is also given to the importance of creatine for cerebral function. © 2010 The Authors. Journal Compilation © 2010 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  20. Localization and Function of GABA Transporters GAT-1 and GAT-3 in the Basal Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiao-Tao; Galvan, Adriana; Wichmann, Thomas; Smith, Yoland

    2011-01-01

    GABA transporter type 1 and 3 (GAT-1 and GAT-3, respectively) are the two main subtypes of GATs responsible for the regulation of extracellular GABA levels in the central nervous system. These transporters are widely expressed in neuronal (mainly GAT-1) and glial (mainly GAT-3) elements throughout the brain, but most data obtained so far relate to their role in the regulation of GABAA receptor-mediated postsynaptic tonic and phasic inhibition in the hippocampus, cerebral cortex and cerebellum. Taking into consideration the key role of GABAergic transmission within basal ganglia networks, and the importance for these systems to be properly balanced to mediate normal basal ganglia function, we analyzed in detail the localization and function of GAT-1 and GAT-3 in the globus pallidus of normal and Parkinsonian animals, in order to further understand the substrate and possible mechanisms by which GABA transporters may regulate basal ganglia outflow, and may become relevant targets for new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of basal ganglia-related disorders. In this review, we describe the general features of GATs in the basal ganglia, and give a detailed account of recent evidence that GAT-1 and GAT-3 regulation can have a major impact on the firing rate and pattern of basal ganglia neurons through pre- and post-synaptic GABAA- and GABAB-receptor-mediated effects. PMID:21847373

  1. Nuclear transportation of diacylglycerol kinase gamma and its possible function in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Takehiro; Shirai, Yasuhito; Miyasaka, Kei; Murakami, Takuya; Yamaguchi, Yasuto; Ueyama, Takehiko; Kai, Masahiro; Sakane, Fumio; Kanoh, Hideo; Hashimoto, Toshiaki; Kamada, Shinji; Kikkawa, Ushio; Saito, Naoaki

    2006-03-10

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs) convert diacylglycerol (DG) to phosphatidic acid, and both lipids are known to play important roles in lipid signal transduction. Thereby, DGKs are considered to be a one of the key players in lipid signaling, but its physiological function remains to be solved. In an effort to investigate one of nine subtypes, we found that DGKgamma came to be localized in the nucleus with time in all cell lines tested while seen only in the cytoplasm at the early stage of culture, indicating that DGKgamma is transported from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. The nuclear transportation of DGKgamma didn't necessarily need DGK activity, but its C1 domain was indispensable, suggesting that the C1 domain of DGKgamma acts as a nuclear transport signal. Furthermore, to address the function of DGKgamma in the nucleus, we produced stable cell lines of wild-type DGKgamma and mutants, including kinase negative, and investigated their cell size, growth rate, and cell cycle. The cells expressing the kinase-negative mutant of DGKgamma were larger in size and showed slower growth rate, and the S phase of the cells was extended. These findings implicate that nuclear DGKgamma regulates cell cycle.

  2. Arabidopsis TT19 functions as a carrier to transport anthocyanin from the cytosol to tonoplasts.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Li, Hong; Huang, Ji-Rong

    2012-03-01

    Anthocyanins are synthesized in the cytosolic surface of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) but dominantly accumulate in the vacuole. Little is known about how anthocyanins are transported from the ER to the vacuole. Here, we provide evidence supporting that Transparent Testa 19 (TT19), a glutathione S-transferase (GST), functions as a carrier to transport cyanidin and/or anthocyanins to the tonoplast. We identified a novel tt19 mutant (tt19-7), which barely accumulates anthocyanins but produces a 36% higher level of flavonol than the wild-type (WT), from ethyl methanesulfonate mutagenized seeds. Expressing TT19-fused green fluorescence protein (GFP) in tt19-7 rescues the mutant phenotype in defective anthocyanin biosynthesis, indicating that TT19-GFP is functional. We further showed that TT19-GFP is localized not only in the cytoplasm and nuclei, but also on the tonoplast. The membrane localization of TT19-GFP was further ascertained by immunoblot analysis. In vitro assay showed that the purified recombinant TT19 increases water solubility of cyanidin (Cya) and cyanidin-3-O-glycoside (C3G). Compared with C3G, Cya can dramatically quench the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of TT19 to much lower levels, indicating a higher affinity of TT19 to Cya than to C3G. Isothermal titration calorimetry analysis also confirmed physical interaction between TT19 and C3G. Taken together, our data reveal molecular mechanism underlying TT19-mediated anthocyanin transportation.

  3. Linking suspended sediment transport metrics with fish functional traits in the Northwestern Great Plains (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, J. S.; Simon, A.; Klimetz, L.

    2009-12-01

    Loss of ecological integrity due to excessive suspended sediment in rivers and streams is a major cause of water quality impairment in the United States. Although 32 states have developed numeric criteria for turbidity or suspended solids, or both according to the USEPA (2006), criteria is typically written as a percent exceedance above background and what constitutes background is not well defined. Defining a background level is problematic considering suspended sediments and related turbidity levels change with flow stage and season, and limited scientific data exists on relationships between sediment exposure and biotic response. Current assessment protocols for development of sediment total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) lack a means to link temporally-variable sediment transport rates with specific losses of ecological functions as loads increase. This study, within the in Northwestern Great Plains Ecoregion, co-located 58 USGS gauging stations with existing flow and suspended sediment data, and fish data from federal and state agencies. Suspended sediment concentration (SSC) transport metrics were quantified into exceedance frequencies of a given magnitude, duration as the number of consecutive days a given concentration was equaled or exceeded, dosage as concentration x duration, and mean annual suspended sediment yields. A functional traits-based approach was used to correlate SSC transport metrics with site occurrences of 20 fish traits organized into four main groups: preferred rearing mesohabitat, trophic structure, feeding habits, and spawning behavior. Negative correlations between SSC metrics and trait occurrences were assumed to represent potential conditions for impairment, specifically identifying an ecological loss by functional trait. Potential impairment conditions were linked with presence of the following traits: habitat preferences for stream pool and river shallow waters; feeding generalists, omnivores, piscivores; and several spawning

  4. A parametric transfer function methodology for analyzing reactive transport in nonuniform flow.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jian; Cirpka, Olaf A; Fienen, Michael N; Wu, Wei-min; Mehlhorn, Tonia L; Carley, Jack; Jardine, Philip M; Criddle, Craig S; Kitanidis, Peter K

    2006-02-01

    We analyze reactive transport during in-situ bioremediation in a nonuniform flow field, involving multiple extraction and injection wells, by the method of transfer functions. Gamma distributions are used as parametric models of the transfer functions. Apparent parameters of classical transport models may be estimated from those of the gamma distributions by matching temporal moments. We demonstrate the method by application to measured data taken at a field experiment on bioremediation conducted in a multiple-well system in Oak Ridge, TN. Breakthrough curves (BTCs) of a conservative tracer (bromide) and a reactive compound (ethanol) are measured at multi-level sampling (MLS) wells and in extraction wells. The BTCs of both compounds are jointly analyzed to estimate the first-order degradation rate of ethanol. To quantify the tracer loss, we compare the approaches of using a scaling factor and a first-order decay term. Results show that by including a scaling factor both gamma distributions and inverse-Gaussian distributions (transfer functions according to the advection-dispersion equation) are suitable to approximate the transfer functions and estimate the reactive rate coefficients for both MLS and extraction wells. However, using a first-order decay term for tracer loss fails to describe the BTCs at the extraction well, which is affected by the nonuniform distribution of travel paths.

  5. A parametric transfer function methodology for analyzing reactive transport in nonuniform flow

    SciTech Connect

    Jardine, Philip M; Cirpka, Olaf; Fienen, Michael; Wu, Weimin; Mehlhorn, Tonia L; Carley, Jack M; Criddle, Craig; Kitanidis, Peter K

    2005-12-01

    We analyze reactive transport during in-situ bioremediation in a nonuniform flow field, involving multiple extraction and injection wells, by the method of transfer functions. Gamma distributions are used as parametric models of the transfer functions. Apparent parameters of classical transport models may be estimated from those of the gamma distributions by matching temporal moments. We demonstrate the method by application to measured data taken at a field experiment on bioremediation conducted in a multiple-well system in Oak Ridge, TN. Breakthrough curves (BTCs) of a conservative tracer (bromide) and a reactive compound (ethanol) are measured at multi-level sampling (MLS) wells and in extraction wells. The BTCs of both compounds are jointly analyzed to estimate the first-order degradation rate of ethanol. To quantify the tracer loss, we compare the approaches of using a scaling factor and a first-order decay term. Results show that by including a scaling factor both gamma distributions and inverse-Gaussian distributions (transfer functions according to the advection-dispersion equation) are suitable to approximate the transfer functions and estimate the reactive rate coefficients for both MLS and extraction wells. However, using a first-order decay term for tracer loss fails to describe the BTCs at the extraction well, which is affected by the nonuniform distribution of travel paths.

  6. Light source distribution and scattering phase function influence light transport in diffuse multi-layered media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaudelle, Fabrice; L'Huillier, Jean-Pierre; Askoura, Mohamed Lamine

    2017-06-01

    Red and near-Infrared light is often used as a useful diagnostic and imaging probe for highly scattering media such as biological tissues, fruits and vegetables. Part of diffusively reflected light gives interesting information related to the tissue subsurface, whereas light recorded at further distances may probe deeper into the interrogated turbid tissues. However, modelling diffusive events occurring at short source-detector distances requires to consider both the distribution of the light sources and the scattering phase functions. In this report, a modified Monte Carlo model is used to compute light transport in curved and multi-layered tissue samples which are covered with a thin and highly diffusing tissue layer. Different light source distributions (ballistic, diffuse or Lambertian) are tested with specific scattering phase functions (modified or not modified Henyey-Greenstein, Gegenbauer and Mie) to compute the amount of backscattered and transmitted light in apple and human skin structures. Comparisons between simulation results and experiments carried out with a multispectral imaging setup confirm the soundness of the theoretical strategy and may explain the role of the skin on light transport in whole and half-cut apples. Other computational results show that a Lambertian source distribution combined with a Henyey-Greenstein phase function provides a higher photon density in the stratum corneum than in the upper dermis layer. Furthermore, it is also shown that the scattering phase function may affect the shape and the magnitude of the Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution (BRDF) exhibited at the skin surface.

  7. Be together, not the same: Spatiotemporal organization of different cilia types generates distinct transport functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawroth, Janna; Guo, Hanliang; Ruby, Edward; Dabiri, John; McFall-Ngai, Margaret; Kanso, Eva

    2016-11-01

    Motile cilia are microscopic, hair-like structures on the cell surface that can sense and propel the extracellular fluid environment. Cilia are often thought to be limited to stereotypic morphologies, beat kinematics and non-discriminatory clearance functions, but we find that the spatiotemporal organization of different cilia types and beat behaviors can generate complex flow patterns and transport functions. Here, we present a case study in the Hawaiian bobtail squid where collective ciliary activity and resulting flow fields help recruit symbiont bacteria to the animal host. In particular, we demonstrate empirically and computationally how the squid's internal cilia act like a microfluidic device that actively filters the water for potential bacterial candidates and also provides a sheltered zone allowing for accumulation of mucus and bacteria into a biofilm. Moreover, in this sheltered zone, different cilia-driven flows enhance diffusion of biochemical signals, which could accelerate specific bacteria-host recognition. These results suggest that studying cilia activity on the population level might reveal a diverse range of biological transport and sensing functions. Moreover, understanding cilia as functional building blocks could inspire the design of ciliated robots and devices.

  8. High work-function hole transport layers by self-assembly using a fluorinated additive

    DOE PAGES

    Mauger, Scott A.; Li, Jun; Özmen, Özge Tüzün; ...

    2013-10-30

    The hole transport polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(4-styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) derives many of its favorable properties from a PSS-rich interfacial layer that forms spontaneously during coating. Since PEDOT:PSS is only usable as a blend it is not possible to study PEDOT:PSS without this interfacial layer. Through the use of the self-doped polymer sulfonated poly(thiophene-3-[2-(2-methoxyethoxy) ethoxy]-2,5-diyl) (S-P3MEET) and a polyfluorinated ionomer (PFI) it is possible to compare transparent conducting organic films with and without interfacial layers and to understand their function. Using neutron reflectometry, we show that PFI preferentially segregates at the top surface of the film during coating and forms a thermally stable surfacemore » layer. Because of this distribution we find that even small amounts of PFI increase the electron work function of the HTL. We also find that annealing at 150°C and above reduces the work function compared to samples heated at lower temperatures. Using near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and gas chromatography we show that this reduction in work function is due to S-P3MEET being doped by PFI. Organic photovoltaic devices with S-P3MEET/PFI hole transport layers yield higher power conversion efficiency than devices with pure S-P3MEET or PEDOT:PSS hole transport layers. Additionally, devices with a doped interface layer of S-P3MEET/PFI show superior performance to those with un-doped S-P3MEET.« less

  9. Overview of Nucleotide Sugar Transporter Gene Family Functions Across Multiple Species.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Ariel; Moraga, Carol; Araya, Macarena; Moreno, Adrian

    2016-08-14

    Glycoproteins and glycolipids are crucial in a number of cellular processes, such as growth, development, and responses to external cues, among others. Polysaccharides, another class of sugar-containing molecules, also play important structural and signaling roles in the extracellular matrix. The additions of glycans to proteins and lipids, as well as polysaccharide synthesis, are processes that primarily occur in the Golgi apparatus, and the substrates used in this biosynthetic process are nucleotide sugars. These proteins, lipids, and polysaccharides are also modified by the addition of sulfate groups in the Golgi apparatus in a series of reactions where nucleotide sulfate is needed. The required nucleotide sugar substrates are mainly synthesized in the cytosol and transported into the Golgi apparatus by nucleotide sugar transporters (NSTs), which can additionally transport nucleotide sulfate. Due to the critical role of NSTs in eukaryotic organisms, any malfunction of these could change glycan and polysaccharide structures, thus affecting function and altering organism physiology. For example, mutations or deletion on NST genes lead to pathological conditions in humans or alter cell walls in plants. In recent years, many NSTs have been identified and functionally characterized, but several remain unanalyzed. This study examined existing information on functionally characterized NSTs and conducted a phylogenetic analysis of 257 NSTs predicted from nine animal and plant model species, as well as from protists and fungi. From this analysis, relationships between substrate specificity and the primary NST structure can be inferred, thereby advancing understandings of nucleotide sugar gene family functions across multiple species. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. High work-function hole transport layers by self-assembly using a fluorinated additive

    SciTech Connect

    Mauger, Scott A.; Li, Jun; Özmen, Özge Tüzün; Yang, Andy Y.; Friedrich, Stephan; Rail, M. Diego; Berben, Louise A.; Moulé, Adam J.

    2013-10-30

    The hole transport polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(4-styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) derives many of its favorable properties from a PSS-rich interfacial layer that forms spontaneously during coating. Since PEDOT:PSS is only usable as a blend it is not possible to study PEDOT:PSS without this interfacial layer. Through the use of the self-doped polymer sulfonated poly(thiophene-3-[2-(2-methoxyethoxy) ethoxy]-2,5-diyl) (S-P3MEET) and a polyfluorinated ionomer (PFI) it is possible to compare transparent conducting organic films with and without interfacial layers and to understand their function. Using neutron reflectometry, we show that PFI preferentially segregates at the top surface of the film during coating and forms a thermally stable surface layer. Because of this distribution we find that even small amounts of PFI increase the electron work function of the HTL. We also find that annealing at 150°C and above reduces the work function compared to samples heated at lower temperatures. Using near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and gas chromatography we show that this reduction in work function is due to S-P3MEET being doped by PFI. Organic photovoltaic devices with S-P3MEET/PFI hole transport layers yield higher power conversion efficiency than devices with pure S-P3MEET or PEDOT:PSS hole transport layers. Additionally, devices with a doped interface layer of S-P3MEET/PFI show superior performance to those with un-doped S-P3MEET.

  11. Neuronal ClC-3 Splice Variants Differ in Subcellular Localizations, but Mediate Identical Transport Functions*

    PubMed Central

    Guzman, Raul E.; Miranda-Laferte, Erick; Franzen, Arne; Fahlke, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    ClC-3 is a member of the CLC family of anion channels and transporters, for which multiple functional properties and subcellular localizations have been reported. Since alternative splicing often results in proteins with diverse properties, we investigated to what extent alternative splicing might influence subcellular targeting and function of ClC-3. We identified three alternatively spliced ClC-3 isoforms, ClC-3a, ClC-3b, and ClC-3c, in mouse brain, with ClC-3c being the predominant splice variant. Whereas ClC-3a and ClC-3b are present in late endosomes/lysosomes, ClC-3c is targeted to recycling endosomes via a novel N-terminal isoleucine-proline (IP) motif. Surface membrane insertion of a fraction of ClC-3c transporters permitted electrophysiological characterization of this splice variant through whole-cell patch clamping on transfected mammalian cells. In contrast, neutralization of the N-terminal dileucine-like motifs was required for functional analysis of ClC-3a and ClC-3b. Heterologous expression of ClC-3a or ClC-3b carrying mutations in N-terminal dileucine motifs as well as WTClC-3c in HEK293T cells resulted in outwardly rectifying Cl− currents with significant capacitive current components. We conclude that alternative splicing of Clcn3 results in proteins with different subcellular localizations, but leaves the transport function of the proteins unaffected. PMID:26342074

  12. Neuronal ClC-3 Splice Variants Differ in Subcellular Localizations, but Mediate Identical Transport Functions.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Raul E; Miranda-Laferte, Erick; Franzen, Arne; Fahlke, Christoph

    2015-10-23

    ClC-3 is a member of the CLC family of anion channels and transporters, for which multiple functional properties and subcellular localizations have been reported. Since alternative splicing often results in proteins with diverse properties, we investigated to what extent alternative splicing might influence subcellular targeting and function of ClC-3. We identified three alternatively spliced ClC-3 isoforms, ClC-3a, ClC-3b, and ClC-3c, in mouse brain, with ClC-3c being the predominant splice variant. Whereas ClC-3a and ClC-3b are present in late endosomes/lysosomes, ClC-3c is targeted to recycling endosomes via a novel N-terminal isoleucine-proline (IP) motif. Surface membrane insertion of a fraction of ClC-3c transporters permitted electrophysiological characterization of this splice variant through whole-cell patch clamping on transfected mammalian cells. In contrast, neutralization of the N-terminal dileucine-like motifs was required for functional analysis of ClC-3a and ClC-3b. Heterologous expression of ClC-3a or ClC-3b carrying mutations in N-terminal dileucine motifs as well as WTClC-3c in HEK293T cells resulted in outwardly rectifying Cl(-) currents with significant capacitive current components. We conclude that alternative splicing of Clcn3 results in proteins with different subcellular localizations, but leaves the transport function of the proteins unaffected.

  13. Identification and functional expression of the Arabidopsis thaliana vacuolar glucose transporter 1 and its role in seed germination and flowering.

    PubMed

    Aluri, Sirisha; Büttner, Michael

    2007-02-13

    Sugar compartmentation into vacuoles of higher plants is a very important physiological process, providing extra space for transient and long-term sugar storage and contributing to the osmoregulation of cell turgor and shape. Despite the long-standing knowledge of this subcellular sugar partitioning, the proteins responsible for these transport steps have remained unknown. We have identified a gene family in Arabidopsis consisting of three members homologous to known sugar transporters. One member of this family, Arabidopsis thaliana vacuolar glucose transporter 1 (AtVGT1), was localized to the vacuolar membrane. Moreover, we provide evidence for transport activity of a tonoplast sugar transporter based on its functional expression in bakers' yeast and uptake studies in isolated yeast vacuoles. Analyses of Atvgt1 mutant lines indicate an important function of this vacuolar glucose transporter during developmental processes like seed germination and flowering.

  14. Molecular motor function in axonal transport in vivo probed by genetic and computational analysis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Gerald F.; Yang, Ge; Szpankowski, Lukasz; Weaver, Carole; Shah, Sameer B.; Robinson, John T.; Hays, Thomas S.; Danuser, Gaudenz; Goldstein, Lawrence S. B.

    2012-01-01

    Bidirectional axonal transport driven by kinesin and dynein along microtubules is critical to neuronal viability and function. To evaluate axonal transport mechanisms, we developed a high-resolution imaging system to track the movement of amyloid precursor protein (APP) vesicles in Drosophila segmental nerve axons. Computational analyses of a large number of moving vesicles in defined genetic backgrounds with partial reduction or overexpression of motor proteins enabled us to test with high precision existing and new models of motor activity and coordination in vivo. We discovered several previously unknown features of vesicle movement, including a surprising dependence of anterograde APP vesicle movement velocity on the amount of kinesin-1. This finding is largely incompatible with the biophysical properties of kinesin-1 derived from in vitro analyses. Our data also suggest kinesin-1 and cytoplasmic dynein motors assemble in stable mixtures on APP vesicles and their direction and velocity are controlled at least in part by dynein intermediate chain. PMID:22398725

  15. Flexible gates: dynamic topologies and functions for FG nucleoporins in nucleocytoplasmic transport.

    PubMed

    Terry, Laura J; Wente, Susan R

    2009-12-01

    The nuclear envelope is a physical barrier between the nucleus and cytoplasm and, as such, separates the mechanisms of transcription from translation. This compartmentalization of eukaryotic cells allows spatial regulation of gene expression; however, it also necessitates a mechanism for transport between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Macromolecular trafficking of protein and RNA occurs exclusively through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), specialized channels spanning the nuclear envelope. A novel family of NPC proteins, the FG-nucleoporins (FG-Nups), coordinates and potentially regulates NPC translocation. The extensive repeats of phenylalanine-glycine (FG) in each FG-Nup directly bind to shuttling transport receptors moving through the NPC. In addition, FG-Nups are essential components of the nuclear permeability barrier. In this review, we discuss the structural features, cellular functions, and evolutionary conservation of the FG-Nups.

  16. Structural correlates of the creatine transporter function regulation: the undiscovered country.

    PubMed

    Santacruz, Lucia; Jacobs, Danny O

    2016-08-01

    Creatine (Cr) and phosphocreatine constitute an energy shuttle that links ATP production in mitochondria to subcellular locations of ATP consumption. Cells in tissues that are reliant on this energy shuttle, such as myocytes and neurons, appear to have very limited ability to synthesize creatine. Therefore, these cells depend on Cr uptake across the cell membrane by a specialized creatine transporter (CrT solute carrier SLC6A8) in order to maintain intracellular creatine levels. Cr supplementation has been shown to have a beneficial effect in numerous in vitro and in vivo models, particularly in cases of oxidative stress, and is also widely used by athletes as a performance enhancement nutraceutical. Intracellular creatine content is maintained within narrow limits. However, the physiological and cellular mechanisms that mediate Cr transport during health and disease (such as cardiac failure) are not understood. In this narrative mini-review, we summarize the last three decades of research on CrT structure, function and regulation.

  17. Functional characterization of multidrug and toxin extrusion protein 1 as a facilitative transporter for fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Kin-ya; Imamura, Yuichiro; Okudaira, Noriko; Atsumi, Ryou; Inoue, Katsuhisa; Yuasa, Hiroaki

    2009-02-01

    Many fluoroquinolones are mainly eliminated by urinary excretion, in which tubular secretion by carrier-mediated transport systems has been suggested to be involved. In the present study, we examined the possibility that multidrug and toxin extrusion protein (MATE) 1, which is abundantly expressed in the kidney, might be involved in that, using rat MATE (rMATE) 1 expressed in MDCKII cells. It was found that rMATE1 can transport fluoroquinolones such as ciprofloxacin, enoxacin, gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, norfloxacin (NFX), pazufloxacin, and tosufloxacin. Although rMATE1 has been known as an apical organic cation/H(+) antiporter, detailed investigation of rMATE1-mediated uptake of NFX has revealed that it is not sensitive to intracellular acidification by treatments using NH(4)Cl or nigericin, suggesting that the transmembrane proton gradient is not involved in its transport as a driving force. However, it was dependent on extracellular pH, being greatest at pH 7.0 and smaller at both acidic and basic pH in agreement with the profile of zwitterionization of NFX. The basal-to-apical transcellular transport of NFX in rMATE1-expressing MDCKII cells was greater than that in mock cells and insensitive to acidification of the apical medium, demonstrating proton gradient-independent functionality of rMATE1 in NFX efflux. Finally, rMATE1-mediated NFX uptake at pH 7.4 was saturable with the Michaelis constant of 55.3 microM and inhibited by cationic compounds, such as TEA and cimetidine. These results suggest that rMATE1 mediates the transport of NFX by a facilitative manner. MATE1 may play a key role in the renal tubular secretion of fluoroquinolones.

  18. Chloroplast Iron Transport Proteins – Function and Impact on Plant Physiology

    PubMed Central

    López-Millán, Ana F.; Duy, Daniela; Philippar, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplasts originated about three billion years ago by endosymbiosis of an ancestor of today’s cyanobacteria with a mitochondria-containing host cell. During evolution chloroplasts of higher plants established as the site for photosynthesis and thus became the basis for all life dependent on oxygen and carbohydrate supply. To fulfill this task, plastid organelles are loaded with the transition metals iron, copper, and manganese, which due to their redox properties are essential for photosynthetic electron transport. In consequence, chloroplasts for example represent the iron-richest system in plant cells. However, improvement of oxygenic photosynthesis in turn required adaptation of metal transport and homeostasis since metal-catalyzed generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) causes oxidative damage. This is most acute in chloroplasts, where radicals and transition metals are side by side and ROS-production is a usual feature of photosynthetic electron transport. Thus, on the one hand when bound by proteins, chloroplast-intrinsic metals are a prerequisite for photoautotrophic life, but on the other hand become toxic when present in their highly reactive, radical generating, free ionic forms. In consequence, transport, storage and cofactor-assembly of metal ions in plastids have to be tightly controlled and are crucial throughout plant growth and development. In the recent years, proteins for iron transport have been isolated from chloroplast envelope membranes. Here, we discuss their putative functions and impact on cellular metal homeostasis as well as photosynthetic performance and plant metabolism. We further consider the potential of proteomic analyses to identify new players in the field. PMID:27014281

  19. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae high affinity phosphate transporter encoded by PHO84 also functions in manganese homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Laran T; Ajua-Alemanji, Mispa; Culotta, Valeria Cizewski

    2003-10-24

    In the bakers' yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, high affinity manganese uptake and intracellular distribution involve two members of the Nramp family of genes, SMF1 and SMF2. In a search for other genes involved in manganese homeostasis, PHO84 was identified. The PHO84 gene encodes a high affinity inorganic phosphate transporter, and we find that its disruption results in a manganese-resistant phenotype. Resistance to zinc, cobalt, and copper ions was also demonstrated for pho84Delta yeast. When challenged with high concentrations of metals, pho84Delta yeast have reduced metal ion accumulation, suggesting that resistance is due to reduced uptake of metal ions. Pho84p accounted for virtually all the manganese accumulated under metal surplus conditions, demonstrating that this transporter is the major source of excess manganese accumulation. The manganese taken in via Pho84p is indeed biologically active and can not only cause toxicity but can also be incorporated into manganese-requiring enzymes. Pho84p is essential for activating manganese enzymes in smf2Delta mutants that rely on low affinity manganese transport systems. A role for Pho84p in manganese accumulation was also identified in a standard laboratory growth medium when high affinity manganese uptake is active. Under these conditions, cells lacking both Pho84p and the high affinity Smf1p transporter accumulated low levels of manganese, although there was no major effect on activity of manganese-requiring enzymes. We conclude that Pho84p plays a role in manganese homeostasis predominantly under manganese surplus conditions and appears to be functioning as a low affinity metal transporter.

  20. Sucrose Transporter Localization and Function in Phloem Unloading in Developing Stems.

    PubMed

    Milne, Ricky J; Perroux, Jai M; Rae, Anne L; Reinders, Anke; Ward, John M; Offler, Christina E; Patrick, John W; Grof, Christopher P L

    2017-02-01

    How sucrose transporters (SUTs) regulate phloem unloading in monocot stems is poorly understood and particularly so for species storing high Suc concentrations. To this end, Sorghum bicolor SUTs SbSUT1 and SbSUT5 were characterized by determining their transport properties heterologously expressed in yeast or Xenopus laevis oocytes, and their in planta cellular and subcellular localization. The plasma membrane-localized SbSUT1 and SbSUT5 exhibited a strong selectivity for Suc and high Suc affinities in X. laevis oocytes at pH 5-SbSUT1, 6.3 ± 0.7 mm, and SbSUT5, 2.4 ± 0.5 mm Suc. The Suc affinity of SbSUT1 was dependent on membrane potential and pH. In contrast, SbSUT5 Suc affinity was independent of membrane potential and pH but supported high transport rates at neutral pH. Suc transport by the tonoplast localized SbSUT4 could not be detected using yeast or X. laevis oocytes. Across internode development, SUTs, other than SbSUT4, were immunolocalized to sieve elements, while for elongating and recently elongated internodes, SUTs also were detected in storage parenchyma cells. We conclude that apoplasmic Suc unloading from de-energized protophloem sieve elements in meristematic zones may be mediated by reversal of SbSUT1 and/or by uniporting SWEETs. Storage parenchyma localized SbSUT1 and SbSUT5 may accumulate Suc from the stem apoplasms of elongating and recently elongated internodes, whereas SbSUT4 may function to release Suc from vacuoles. Transiting from an apoplasmic to symplasmic unloading pathway as the stem matures, SbSUT1 and SbSUT5 increasingly function in Suc retrieval into metaphloem sieve elements to maintain a high turgor to drive symplasmic unloading by bulk flow. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Function and repair of dental enamel - Potential role of epithelial transport processes of ameloblasts.

    PubMed

    Varga, Gábor; Kerémi, Beáta; Bori, Erzsébet; Földes, Anna

    2015-07-01

    The hardest mammalian tissue, dental enamel is produced by ameloblasts, which are electrolyte-transporting epithelial cells. Although the end product is very different, they show many similarities to transporting epithelia of the pancreas, salivary glands and kidney. Enamel is produced in a multi-step epithelial secretory process that features biomineralization which is an interplay of secreted ameloblast specific proteins and the time-specific transport of minerals, protons and bicarbonate. First, "secretory" ameloblasts form the entire thickness of the enamel layer, but with low mineral content. Then they differentiate into "maturation" ameloblasts, which remove organic matrix from the enamel and in turn further build up hydroxyapatite crystals. The protons generated by hydroxyapatite formation need to be buffered, otherwise enamel will not attain full mineralization. Buffering requires a tight pH regulation and secretion of bicarbonate by ameloblasts. The whole process has been the focus of many immunohistochemical and gene knock-out studies, but, perhaps surprisingly, no functional data existed for mineral ion transport by ameloblasts. However, recent studies including ours provided a better insight for molecular mechanism of mineral formation. The secretory regulation is not completely known as yet, but its significance is crucial. Impairing regulation retards or prevents completion of enamel mineralization and results in the development of hypomineralized enamel that easily erodes after dental eruption. Factors that impair this function are fluoride and disruption of pH regulators. Revealing these factors may eventually lead to the treatment of enamel hypomineralization related to genetic or environmentally induced malformation. Copyright © 2015 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Sucrose Transporter Localization and Function in Phloem Unloading in Developing Stems1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Rae, Anne L.; Reinders, Anke

    2017-01-01

    How sucrose transporters (SUTs) regulate phloem unloading in monocot stems is poorly understood and particularly so for species storing high Suc concentrations. To this end, Sorghum bicolor SUTs SbSUT1 and SbSUT5 were characterized by determining their transport properties heterologously expressed in yeast or Xenopus laevis oocytes, and their in planta cellular and subcellular localization. The plasma membrane-localized SbSUT1 and SbSUT5 exhibited a strong selectivity for Suc and high Suc affinities in X. laevis oocytes at pH 5—SbSUT1, 6.3 ± 0.7 mm, and SbSUT5, 2.4 ± 0.5 mm Suc. The Suc affinity of SbSUT1 was dependent on membrane potential and pH. In contrast, SbSUT5 Suc affinity was independent of membrane potential and pH but supported high transport rates at neutral pH. Suc transport by the tonoplast localized SbSUT4 could not be detected using yeast or X. laevis oocytes. Across internode development, SUTs, other than SbSUT4, were immunolocalized to sieve elements, while for elongating and recently elongated internodes, SUTs also were detected in storage parenchyma cells. We conclude that apoplasmic Suc unloading from de-energized protophloem sieve elements in meristematic zones may be mediated by reversal of SbSUT1 and/or by uniporting SWEETs. Storage parenchyma localized SbSUT1 and SbSUT5 may accumulate Suc from the stem apoplasms of elongating and recently elongated internodes, whereas SbSUT4 may function to release Suc from vacuoles. Transiting from an apoplasmic to symplasmic unloading pathway as the stem matures, SbSUT1 and SbSUT5 increasingly function in Suc retrieval into metaphloem sieve elements to maintain a high turgor to drive symplasmic unloading by bulk flow. PMID:27986867

  3. Functional properties and differential mode of regulation of the nitrate transporter from a plant symbiotic ascomycete

    PubMed Central

    Montanini, Barbara; Viscomi, Arturo R.; Bolchi, Angelo; Martin, Yusé; Siverio, José M.; Balestrini, Raffaella; Bonfante, Paola; Ottonello, Simone

    2005-01-01

    Nitrogen assimilation by plant symbiotic fungi plays a central role in the mutualistic interaction established by these organisms, as well as in nitrogen flux in a variety of soils. In the present study, we report on the functional properties, structural organization and distinctive mode of regulation of TbNrt2 (Tuber borchii NRT2 family transporter), the nitrate transporter of the mycorrhizal ascomycete T. borchii. As revealed by experiments conducted in a nitrate-uptake-defective mutant of the yeast Hansenula polymorpha, TbNrt2 is a high-affinity transporter (Km=4.7 μM nitrate) that is bispecific for nitrate and nitrite. It is expressed in free-living mycelia and in mycorrhizae, where it preferentially accumulates in the plasma membrane of root-contacting hyphae. The TbNrt2 mRNA, which is transcribed from a single-copy gene clustered with the nitrate reductase gene in the T. borchii genome, was specifically up-regulated following transfer of mycelia to nitrate- (or nitrite)-containing medium. However, at variance with the strict nitrate-dependent induction commonly observed in other organisms, TbNrt2 was also up-regulated (at both the mRNA and the protein level) following transfer to a nitrogen-free medium. This unusual mode of regulation differs from that of the adjacent nitrate reductase gene, which was expressed at basal levels under nitrogen deprivation conditions and required nitrate for induction. The functional and expression properties, described in the present study, delineate TbNrt2 as a versatile transporter that may be especially suited to cope with the fluctuating (and often low) mineral nitrogen concentrations found in most natural, especially forest, soils. PMID:16201972

  4. Insulin modulates cocaine-sensitive monoamine transporter function and impulsive behavior.

    PubMed

    Schoffelmeer, Anton N M; Drukarch, Benjamin; De Vries, Taco J; Hogenboom, François; Schetters, Dustin; Pattij, Tommy

    2011-01-26

    Because insulin acutely enhances the function of dopamine transporters, the tyrosine kinase receptors activated by this hormone may modulate transporter-dependent neurochemical and behavioral effects of psychoactive drugs. In this respect, we examined the effects of insulin on exocytotic monoamine release and the efficacy of the monoamine transporter blocker cocaine in rat nucleus accumbens. Whereas insulin reduced electrically evoked exocytotic [(3)H]dopamine release in nucleus accumbens slices, the hormone potentiated the release-enhancing effect of cocaine thereon. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 abolished these effects, indicating the involvement of insulin receptors. Similar insulin effects were observed on the release of [(3)H]norepinephrine in nucleus accumbens slices, but not on that of [(3)H]serotonin, and were also apparent in medial prefrontal cortex slices. As might then be expected, insulin also potentiated the dopamine and norepinephrine release-enhancing effects of the selective monoamine uptake inhibitors GBR12909 and desmethylimipramine, respectively. In subsequent behavioral experiments, we investigated the role of insulin in motor impulsivity that depends on monoamine neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens. Intracranial administration of insulin in the nucleus accumbens alone reduced premature responses in the five-choice serial reaction time task and enhanced the stimulatory effect of peripheral cocaine administration on impulsivity, resembling the observed neurochemical effects of the hormone. In contrast, cocaine-induced locomotor activity remained unchanged by intra-accumbal insulin application. These data reveal that insulin presynaptically regulates cocaine-sensitive monoamine transporter function in the nucleus accumbens and, as a consequence, impulsivity. Therefore, insulin signaling proteins may represent targets for the treatment of inhibitory control deficits such as addictive behaviors.

  5. Functional characterization of the Arabidopsis thaliana nitrate transporter CHL1 in the yeast Hansenula polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Martín, Yusé; Navarro, Francisco J; Siverio, José M

    2008-10-01

    CHL1 (AtNRT1.1) is a dual-affinity nitrate transporter of Arabidopsis thaliana, in which phosphorylation at Thr 101 switches CHL1 from low to high nitrate affinity. CHL1 expressed in a Hansenula polymorpha high-affinity nitrate-transporter deficient mutant (Deltaynt1) restores nitrate uptake and growth. These events take place at nitrate concentrations as low as 500 microM, suggesting that CHL1 has a high-affinity for nitrate in yeast. Accordingly, CHL1 expressed in H. polymorpha presents a K(m) for nitrate of about 125 microM. The absence of nitrate, the CHL1 gene inducer, showed the high turnover rate of CHL1 expressed in yeast, which is counteracted by nitrate CHL1 induction. Furthermore, H. polymorpha strains expressing CHL1 become sensitive to 250 microM chlorate, as expected for CHL1 high-affinity behaviour. Given that CHL1 presented high affinity by nitrate, we study the role of CHL1 Thr101 in yeast. Strains producing CHL1Thr101Ala, unable to undergo phosphorylation, and CHL1Thr101Asp, where CHL1 phosphorylation is constitutively mimicked, were used. Yeast strains expressing CHL1Thr101Ala, CHL1Thr101Asp and CHL1 at the same rate showed that Deltaynt1CHL1Thr101Ala is strikingly unable to transport nitrate and contains a very low amount of CHL1 protein; however, Deltaynt1CHL1Thr101Asp restores nitrate uptake and growth, although no significant changes in nitrate affinity were observed. Our results show that CHL1-Thr101 is involved in regulating the levels of CHL1 expressed in yeast and suggest that the phosphorylation of this residue could be involved in targeting this nitrate transporter to the plasma membrane. The functional expression of CHL1 in H. polymorpha reveals that this yeast is a suitable tool for evaluating the real nitrate transport capacity of plant putative nitrate transporters belonging to different families and study their regulation and structure function relationship.

  6. Revealing the Molecular Structure and the Transport Mechanism at the Base of Primary Cilia Using Superresolution STED Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tung-Lin

    The primary cilium is an organelle that serves as a signaling center of the cell and is involved in the hedgehog signaling, cAMP pathway, Wnt pathways, etc. Ciliary function relies on the transportation of molecules between the primary cilium and the cell, which is facilitated by intraflagellar transport (IFT). IFT88, one of the important IFT proteins in complex B, is known to play a role in the formation and maintenance of cilia in various types of organisms. The ciliary transition zone (TZ), which is part of the gating apparatus at the ciliary base, is home to a large number of ciliopathy molecules. Recent studies have identified important regulating elements for TZ gating in cilia. However, the architecture of the TZ region and its arrangement relative to intraflagellar transport (IFT) proteins remain largely unknown, hindering the mechanistic understanding of the regulation processes. One of the major challenges comes from the tiny volume at the ciliary base packed with numerous proteins, with the diameter of the TZ close to the diffraction limit of conventional microscopes. Using a series of stimulated emission depletion (STED) superresolution images mapped to electron microscopy images, we analyzed the structural organization of the ciliary base. Subdiffraction imaging of TZ components defines novel geometric distributions of RPGRIP1L, MKS1, CEP290, TCTN2 and TMEM67, shedding light on their roles in TZ structure, assembly, and function. We found TCTN2 at the outmost periphery of the TZ close to the ciliary membrane, with a 227+/-18 nm diameter. TMEM67 was adjacent to TCTN2, with a 205+/-20 nm diameter. RPGRIP1L was localized toward the axoneme at the same axial level as TCTN2 and TMEM67, with a 165+/-8 nm diameter. MKS1 was situated between TMEM67 and RPGRIP1L, with an 186+/-21 nm diameter. Surprisingly, CEP290 was localized at the proximal side of the TZ close to the distal end of the centrin-labeled basal body. The lateral width was unexpectedly close to

  7. Quantum transport: A unified approach via a multivariate hypergeometric generating function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macedo-Junior, A. F.; Macêdo, A. M. S.

    2014-07-01

    We introduce a characteristic function method to describe charge-counting statistics (CCS) in phase coherent systems that directly connects the three most successful approaches to quantum transport: random-matrix theory (RMT), the nonlinear σ-model and the trajectory-based semiclassical method. The central idea is the construction of a generating function based on a multivariate hypergeometric function, which can be naturally represented in terms of quantities that are well-defined in each approach. We illustrate the power of our scheme by obtaining exact analytical results for the first four cumulants of CCS in a chaotic quantum dot coupled ideally to electron reservoirs via perfectly conducting leads with arbitrary number of open scattering channels.

  8. Tamoxifen and its active metabolites inhibit dopamine transporter function independently of the estrogen receptors.

    PubMed

    Mikelman, Sarah R; Guptaroy, Bipasha; Gnegy, Margaret E

    2017-04-01

    As one of the primary mechanisms by which dopamine signaling is regulated, the dopamine transporter (DAT) is an attractive pharmacological target for the treatment of diseases based in dopaminergic dysfunction. In this work we demonstrate for the first time that the commonly prescribed breast cancer therapeutic tamoxifen and its major metabolites, 4-hydroxytamoxifen and endoxifen, inhibit DAT function. Tamoxifen inhibits [(3) H]dopamine uptake into human DAT (hDAT)-N2A cells via an uncompetitive or mixed mechanism. Endoxifen, an active metabolite of tamoxifen, asymmetrically inhibits DAT function in hDAT-N2A cells, showing a preference for the inhibition of amphetamine-stimulated dopamine efflux as compared to dopamine uptake. Importantly, we demonstrate that the effects of tamoxifen and its metabolites on the DAT occur independently of its activity as selective estrogen receptor modulators. This work suggests that tamoxifen is inhibiting DAT function through a previously unidentified mechanism. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  9. Effects of Dietary Flavonoids on Reverse Cholesterol Transport, HDL Metabolism, and HDL Function.

    PubMed

    Millar, Courtney L; Duclos, Quinn; Blesso, Christopher N

    2017-03-01

    Strong experimental evidence confirms that HDL directly alleviates atherosclerosis. HDL particles display diverse atheroprotective functions in reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiapoptotic processes. In certain inflammatory disease states, however, HDL particles may become dysfunctional and proatherogenic. Flavonoids show the potential to improve HDL function through their well-documented effects on cellular antioxidant status and inflammation. The aim of this review is to summarize the basic science and clinical research examining the effects of dietary flavonoids on RCT and HDL function. Based on preclinical studies that used cell culture and rodent models, it appears that many flavonoids (e.g., anthocyanidins, flavonols, and flavone subclasses) influence RCT and HDL function beyond simple HDL cholesterol concentration by regulating cellular cholesterol efflux from macrophages and hepatic paraoxonase 1 expression and activity. In clinical studies, dietary anthocyanin intake is associated with beneficial changes in serum biomarkers related to HDL function in a variety of human populations (e.g., in those who are hyperlipidemic, hypertensive, or diabetic), including increased HDL cholesterol concentration, as well as HDL antioxidant and cholesterol efflux capacities. However, clinical research on HDL functionality is lacking for some flavonoid subclasses (e.g., flavanols, flavones, flavanones, and isoflavones). Although there has been a tremendous effort to develop HDL-targeted drug therapies, more research is warranted on how the intake of foods or specific nutrients affects HDL function.

  10. Membrane transporters for the special amino acid glutamine: Structure/function relationships and relevance to human health.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pochini, Lorena; Scalise, Mariafrancesca; Galluccio, Michele; Indiveri, Cesare

    2014-08-01

    Glutamine together with glucose is essential for body’s homeostasis. It is the most abundant amino acid and is involved in many biosynthetic, regulatory and energy production processes. Several membrane transporters which differ in transport modes, ensure glutamine homeostasis by coordinating its absorption, reabsorption and delivery to tissues. These transporters belong to different protein families, are redundant and ubiquitous. Their classification, originally based on functional properties, has recently been associated with the SLC nomenclature. Function of glutamine transporters is studied in cells over-expressing the transporters or, more recently in proteoliposomes harboring the proteins extracted from animal tissues or over-expressed in microorganisms. The role of the glutamine transporters is linked to their transport modes and coupling with Na+ and H+. Most transporters share specificity for other neutral or cationic amino acids. Na+-dependent co-transporters efficiently accumulate glutamine while antiporters regulate the pools of glutamine and other amino acids. The most acknowledged glutamine transporters belong to the SLC1, 6, 7 and 38 families. The members involved in the homeostasis are the co-transporters B0AT1 and the SNAT members 1, 2, 3, 5 and 7; the antiporters ASCT2, LAT1 and 2. The last two are associated to the ancillary CD98 protein. Some information on regulation of the glutamine transporters exist, which, however, need to be deepened. No information at all is available on structures, besides some homology models obtained using similar bacterial transporters as templates. Some models of rat and human glutamine transporters highlight very similar structures between the orthologues. Moreover the presence of glycosylation and/or phosphorylation sites located at the extracellular or intracellular faces has been predicted. ASCT2 and LAT1 are over-expressed in several cancers, thus representing potential targets for pharmacological intervention.

  11. Membrane transporters for the special amino acid glutamine: structure/function relationships and relevance to human health

    PubMed Central

    Pochini, Lorena; Scalise, Mariafrancesca; Galluccio, Michele; Indiveri, Cesare

    2014-01-01

    Glutamine together with glucose is essential for body's homeostasis. It is the most abundant amino acid and is involved in many biosynthetic, regulatory and energy production processes. Several membrane transporters which differ in transport modes, ensure glutamine homeostasis by coordinating its absorption, reabsorption and delivery to tissues. These transporters belong to different protein families, are redundant and ubiquitous. Their classification, originally based on functional properties, has recently been associated with the SLC nomenclature. Function of glutamine transporters is studied in cells over-expressing the transporters or, more recently in proteoliposomes harboring the proteins extracted from animal tissues or over-expressed in microorganisms. The role of the glutamine transporters is linked to their transport modes and coupling with Na+ and H+. Most transporters share specificity for other neutral or cationic amino acids. Na+-dependent co-transporters efficiently accumulate glutamine while antiporters regulate the pools of glutamine and other amino acids. The most acknowledged glutamine transporters belong to the SLC1, 6, 7, and 38 families. The members involved in the homeostasis are the co-transporters B0AT1 and the SNAT members 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7; the antiporters ASCT2, LAT1 and 2. The last two are associated to the ancillary CD98 protein. Some information on regulation of the glutamine transporters exist, which, however, need to be deepened. No information at all is available on structures, besides some homology models obtained using similar bacterial transporters as templates. Some models of rat and human glutamine transporters highlight very similar structures between the orthologs. Moreover the presence of glycosylation and/or phosphorylation sites located at the extracellular or intracellular faces has been predicted. ASCT2 and LAT1 are over-expressed in several cancers, thus representing potential targets for pharmacological intervention

  12. Enhanced functional preservation of cold-stored rat heart by a nucleoside transport inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Yang, X; Zhu, Q; Claydon, M A; Hicks, G L; Wang, T

    1994-07-15

    This study investigates the hypothesis that inhibition of nucleoside transport during hypothermic storage elevates tissue adenosine (ADO) content and improves the function of the isolated rat heart. The hearts, flushed with a cardioplegic solution containing varying concentrations (0-100 nM) of a nucleoside transport inhibitor, S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine (NBTI), were immersion-stored at 0 degrees C for 9 hr. Function was assessed after 30 min of working reperfusion. Function of unstored fresh hearts served as controls and poststorage recovery is reported as percentage of control function. Poststorage heart rate in all groups returned to control level after reperfusion. Recovery of other functional parameters in the no-NBTI group was as follows: aortic flow (AF), 56.2 +/- 4.6%; coronary flow (CF), 53.9 +/- 3.2%; cardiac output (CO), 55.5 +/- 4.0%; systolic pressure, 81.6 +/- 2.5%; work, 47.0 +/- 4.2%; and coronary vascular resistance (CVR), 157.1 +/- 7.8% of control. NBTI improved functional recovery in a dose-dependent fashion; the maximal improvement was seen at a dose of 5 nM, in which the recovery was: AF, 78.1 +/- 3.4%; CF, 73.5 +/- 4.4%; CO, 76.7 +/- 3.6%; work, 70.7 +/- 5.0%; and CVR, 127.5 +/- 4.5% of control (P < 0.05 vs. no-NBTI). The ADO A1-receptor antagonist, 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (0.1 microM) blocked the effects of 5 nM NBTI; the recovery of AF, CF, CO, work, and CVR decreased to 62.8 +/- 8.0%, 58.3 +/- 5.0%, 61.5 +/- 3.9%, 54.4 +/- 4.5%, and 163.8 +/- 12.7% of control, respectively (P < 0.05 vs. 5 nM NBTI). Tissue ADO content in 5 nM NBTI hearts at the end of storage was 0.075 +/- 0.025 mumol/g dry wt, which was significantly elevated from 0.016 +/- 0.004 mumol/g dry wt in no-NBTI hearts. Purine release during initial reperfusion was delayed in 5 nM NBTI hearts, indicating the inhibition of nucleoside transport by NBTI. But NBTI treatment did not improve end-storage or end-reperfusion myocardial ATP. In conclusion, the addition of

  13. Modulation of serotonin transporter function by kappa-opioid receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Sundaramurthy, Santhanalakshmi; Annamalai, Balasubramaniam; Samuvel, Devadoss J; Shippenberg, Toni S; Jayanthi, Lankupalle D; Ramamoorthy, Sammanda

    2017-02-01

    Kappa opioid receptor (KOR) agonists produce dysphoria and psychotomimesis. While KOR agonists produce pro-depressant-like effects, KOR antagonists produce anti-depressant-like effects in rodent models. The cellular mechanisms and downstream effector(s) by which KOR ligands produce these effects are not clear. KOR agonists mod