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Sample records for functional mitral regurgitation

  1. Functional Mitral Regurgitation: Appraising the Evidence Behind Recommended Treatment Strategies.

    PubMed

    Samad, Zainab; Velazquez, Eric J

    2016-12-01

    Functional mitral regurgitation (MR) is the most common type of MR encountered in clinical practice. Because the disease arises from the ventricular aspect of the mitral valve apparatus, treatment therapies are less defined and outcomes are poor. In this review, the state of evidence for medical and surgical therapy in functional MR is appraised. Future directions for research in this area are also defined.

  2. [Atrial functional mitral regurgitation. Three-dimensional echocardiographic study].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Ramírez, José Miguel; Ortega-Trujillo, José Ramón

    2017-07-24

    Atrial fibrillation can lead to a left atrium remodeling and induce functional mitral regurgitation. The aim of this study is to establish what features of the mitral annulus are related to atrial functional mitral regurgitation. Retrospectively 29 patients with persistent atrial fibrillation and 36 controls in sinus rhythm were enrolled. The characteristics of the mitral annulus were analyzed by three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography in both groups. 2D and 3D echocardiographic parameters were correlated with the effective regurgitant orifice. Patients with atrial fibrillation had larger left atrium volume, anteroposterior diameter at end-diastole and lower percentage of change in this diameter (P: 0.015, 0.019 and <0.001, respectively). In the multiple regression analysis the ellipticity index (β: -0.756, P: 0.004) and height-anterolateral-posteriomedial diameter ratio (β: -0704, P: 0.003) were independent parameters correlated with the effective regurgitant orifice (R(2): 0.699, P: 0.019) in patients with atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation leads to atrial dilatation and alterations in the size and dynamic of the anteroposterior diameter, producing a circular mitral annulus. The independents determinants of atrial functional mitral regurgitation in the atrial fibrillation group were the ellipticity index and height-anterolateral-posteromedial diameter ratio. Copyright © 2017 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of Mitral Annulus Remodeling Following MitraClip Procedure on Reduction of Functional Mitral Regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Francisco; Mesa, Dolores; Ruiz, Martín; Delgado, Mónica; Rodríguez, Sara; Pardo, Laura; Pan, Manuel; López, Amador; Romero, Miguel A; Suárez de Lezo, José

    2016-11-01

    The percutaneous mitral valve repair procedure (MitraClip) appears to reduce mitral annulus diameter in patients with functional mitral regurgitation, but the relationship between this and regurgitation severity has not been demonstrated. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of mitral annulus remodeling on the reduction of mitral regurgitation in patients with functional etiology. The study included all patients with functional mitral regurgitation treated with MitraClip at our hospital until January 2015. Echocardiogram (iE33 model, Philips) was performed in all patients immediately after device positioning. Changes in the mitral annulus correlated with mitral regurgitation severity, as assessed using the effective regurgitant orifice area. The study included 23 patients (age, 65±14 years; 74% men; left ventricular ejection fraction, 31%±13%; systolic pulmonary artery pressure, 47±10 mmHg). After the procedure, the regurgitant orifice area decreased by 0.30 cm(2)±0.04 cm(2) (P<.0005), from a baseline of 0.49 cm(2)±0.09 cm(2). Anteroposterior diameter decreased by 3.14 mm±1.01 mm (P<.0005) from a baseline of 28.27 mm±4.9 mm, with no changes in the intercommissural diameter (0.50 mm±0.91 mm vs 40.68 mm±4.7 mm; P=.26). A significant association was seen between anteroposterior diameter reduction and regurgitant orifice area reduction (r=.49; P=.020). In patients with functional mitral regurgitation, the MitraClip device produces an immediate reduction in the anteroposterior diameter. This remodeling may be related to the reduction in mitral regurgitation. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Determinants of regurgitant volume in mitral regurgitation: contrasting effect of similar effective regurgitant orifice area in functional and organic mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Chiampan, Andrea; Nahum, Julien; Leye, Mohamed; Oziel, Johanna; Cueff, Caroline; Brochet, Eric; Iung, Bernard; Rossi, Andrea; Vahanian, Alec; Messika-Zeitoun, David

    2012-04-01

    Quantitative assessment of the severity of mitral regurgitation (MR) is based on the calculation of the effective regurgitant orifice (ERO), a measure of lesion severity, and of the regurgitant volume (RVol), a measure of left ventricular volume overload. We aimed at evaluating the determinants of RVol in both organic (OMR) and functional mitral regurgitation (FMR). MR severity was quantitatively assessed using the proximal isovelocity surface area (PISA) method in 240 patients, 142 with OMR and 98 patients with FMR. By definition, ERO and RVol were strongly correlated both in patients with OMR and FMR (both R = 0.90, P < 0.0001) but the slopes of the regression lines were significantly different (P < 0.0001). This difference remained significant in patients with elevated systolic pulmonary artery pressure (SPAP > 40 mmHg, P < 0.0001) but not in patients with normal SPAP (≤40 mmHg, P = 0.09). In multivariate analysis, independent determinants of RVol were ERO (P < 0.0001), MR mechanism (FMR/OMR) (P = 0.0003) and SPAP (P = 0.03). In patients with elevated SPAP, ERO (P < 0.0001), left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) (P = 0.03), and MR mechanism (P = 0.03) were independently associated with RVol, whereas in patients with normal SPAP, ERO (P < 0.0001) was the only independent determinant of RVol. In the present study, we evaluated the contrasting effect of similar lesion severity in OMR and FMR and showed that similar ERO were associated with lower RVol in FMR compared with OMR. The regurgitant volume is the result of complex interactions of anatomic lesions, LVEF, and SPAP and our results highlight the importance of taking into account these parameters when interpreting RVol values in clinical practice, especially in FMR.

  5. [Functional mitral regurgitation. Physiopathology and impact of medical therapy and surgical techniques for left ventricle reduction].

    PubMed

    Comín, J; Manito, N; Roca, J; Castells, E; Esplugas, E

    1999-07-01

    Functional mitral regurgitation is frequently observed in the setting of left ventricular dyfunction. This finding is a marker of poor outcome in patients with either ischemic or dilated cardiomyopathy. The mechanism accounting for this phenomenon is an altered balance of tethering versus coapting forces acting on the mitral valves in the failing heart. Tethering forces represent an anomalous tension on the mitral valves due to displacement of mitral valve attachments secondary to increased left ventricular chamber sphericity associated with systolic ventricular dysfunction. On the other hand, coapting forces are weak and unable to counteract the abnormal tension acting on the mitral valve, which restricts closure and leads to regurgitation. Vasodilators and inotropic drugs are effective in the management of functional mitral regurgitation. Although partial left ventriculectomy or Batista's procedure is still investigational, this new technique seems to provide an optimal control of functional mitral regurgitation and improve functional capacity and survival of some patients with heart failure.

  6. [Ventricular and myocardial function in mitral regurgitation (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Dübbers, H W; Neuhaus, K L; Spiller, P; Tebbe, U

    1979-07-01

    Left ventricular and myocardial performance were analyzed in 9 patients with chronic volume overload by mitral regurgitation from biplane cineventriculograms, simultaneous pressure recordings and cardiac output (thermodilution method) determinations. In spite of a considerable regurgitant fraction (49 +/- 17% of total stroke volume) cardiac index on the average is normal (CI = 3.3 +/- 0.7 l . min-1). The main compensatory mechanism to maintain cardiac ouput in hypertorphy (WED = 1.1 +/- 0.2 cm; LVMI = 216 +/- 62 g . m-2; LVMI/EDVI = 1.3 +/- 0.3 g . ml-1) and dilatation (EDVI = 163 +/- 37 ml . m-2). An increase of preload is of minor importance (PLVED = 15 +/- 7 mmHg; sigma ED = (40 +/- 19) x 10(3) dyn . cm-2). Left ventricular enlargement and wall mass are related to the degree of clinical heart failure (NYHA). Enddiastolic volume on the average is more increased than total stroke volume (89 +/- 31 ml . m-2). Ejection fraction (EF = 54 +/- 7%) was depressed despite a normal afterload (sigma tej = (171 +/- 37 x 10(3) dyn. cm-2; sigma max = (247 +/- 48 x 10(3) dyn . cm-2). The reduced ejection fraction and diminished myocardial power are related to an impairment of myocardial function (VMW . sigma tej = (83 +/- 39) x 10(3) dyn . cm-2 . s-1; VMW . sigma tej/ln sigma ED = 7.9 +/- 3.6 x 10(3) dyn . cm-2 . s-1). In comparable degrees of heart failure myocardial function is more compromised in patients with mitral than with aortic regurgitation.

  7. Percutaneous mitral valve repair with MitraClip for severe functional mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Khung Keong; Ding, Zee Pin; Chua, Yeow Leng; Lim, Soo Teik; Sin, Kenny Yoong Kong; Tan, Jack Wei Chieh; Chiam, Paul Toon Lim; Hwang, Nian Chih; Koh, Tian Hai

    2013-01-01

    A 67-year-old Chinese woman with comorbidities of chronic obstructive lung disease, hypertension and prior coronary artery bypass surgery presented with severe functional mitral regurgitation (MR) and severely depressed left ventricular function. She was in New York Heart Association (NYHA) Class II-III. Due to high surgical risk, she was referred for percutaneous treatment with the MitraClip valve repair system. This procedure is typically performed via the femoral venous system and involves a transseptal puncture. A clip is delivered to grasp the regurgitant mitral valve leaflets and reduce MR. This was performed uneventfully in our patient, with reduction of MR from 4+ to 1+. She was discharged on post-procedure Day 2 and her NYHA class improved to Class I. This was the first successful MitraClip procedure performed in Asia and represents a valuable treatment option in patients with severe MR, especially those with functional MR or those at high surgical risk.

  8. Functional tricuspid regurgitation in mitral valve disease: epidemiology and prognostic implications.

    PubMed

    Anyanwu, Ani C; Adams, David H

    2010-01-01

    In this review we summarize the data on epidemiology and natural history of functional tricuspid valve regurgitation as it applies to surgery for mitral valve disease. Tricuspid regurgitation in the context of mitral valve disease is frequent and is associated with substantial reduction in survival and quality of life. In many patients, the correction of left-sided cardiac lesions does not lead to resolution of tricuspid regurgitation. Significant tricuspid regurgitation after mitral valve surgery portends a poor prognosis, a course that is often not altered by subsequent surgical therapy. Although a liberal approach to tricuspid annuloplasty is widely practiced, the evidence that this approach alters the natural history of functional tricuspid regurgitation is not yet available, so it is not certain how much of the negative impact of tricuspid regurgitation is causative, rather than confounding, and to what degree we will improve long-term outcomes of mitral valve surgery by liberal tricuspid annuloplasty.

  9. Quantitation of mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Topilsky, Yan; Grigioni, Francesco; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice

    2011-01-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) is the most frequent valve disease. Nevertheless, evaluation of MR severity is difficult because standard color flow imaging is plagued by considerable pitfalls. Modern surgical indications in asymptomatic patients require precise assessment of MR severity. MR severity assessment is always comprehensive, utilizing all views and methods. Determining trivial/mild MR is usually easy, based on small jet and flow convergence. Specific signs of severe MR (pulmonary venous flow systolic reversal or severe mitral lesion) are useful but insensitive. Quantitative methods, quantitative Doppler (measuring stroke volumes) and flow convergence (aka PISA method), measure the lesion severity as effective regurgitant orifice (ERO) and volume overload as regurgitant volume (RVol). Interpretation of these numbers should be performed in context of specific MR type. In organic MR (intrinsic valve lesions) ERO ≥ 0.40 cm(2) and RVol ≥ 60 mL are associated with poor outcome, while in functional MR ERO ≥ 0.20 cm(2) and RVol ≥ 30 mL mark reduced survival. While MR assessment should always be comprehensive, quantitative assessment of MR provides measures that are strongly predictive of outcome and should be the preferred approach. The ERO and RVol measured by these methods require interpretation in causal context to best predict outcome and determine MR management. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Problem: Mitral Valve Regurgitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stroke Vascular Health Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Problem: Mitral Valve Regurgitation Updated:Sep 21,2016 What is mitral valve ... blood flows from the ventricle through the aortic valve — as it should — and some blood flows ...

  11. Depressed contractile function due to canine mitral regurgitation improves after correction of the volume overload.

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, K; Swindle, M M; Spinale, F; Ishihara, K; Kanazawa, S; Smith, A; Biederman, R W; Clamp, L; Hamada, Y; Zile, M R

    1991-01-01

    It is known that long-standing volume overload on the left ventricle due to mitral regurgitation eventually leads to contractile dysfunction. However, it is unknown whether or not correction of the volume overload can lead to recovery of contractility. In this study we tested the hypothesis that depressed contractile function due to volume overload in mitral regurgitation could return toward normal after mitral valve replacement. Using a canine model of mitral regurgitation which is known to produce contractile dysfunction, we examined contractile function longitudinally in seven dogs at baseline, after 3 mo of mitral regurgitation, 1 mo after mitral valve replacement, and 3 mo after mitral valve replacement. After 3 mo of mitral regurgitation (regurgitant fraction 0.62 +/- 0.04), end-diastolic volume had nearly doubled from 68 +/- 6.8 to 123 +/- 12.1 ml (P less than 0.05). All five indices of contractile function which we examined were depressed. For instance, maximum fiber elastance (EmaxF) obtained by assessment of time-varying elastance decreased from 5.95 +/- 0.71 to 2.25 +/- 0.18 (P less than 0.05). The end-systolic stiffness constant (k) was also depressed from 4.2 +/- 0.4 to 2.1 +/- 0.3. 3 mo after mitral valve replacement all indexes of contractile function had returned to or toward normal (e.g., EmaxF 3.65 +/- 0.21 and k 4.2 +/- 0.3). We conclude that previously depressed contractile function due to volume overload can improve after correction of the overload. PMID:1828252

  12. Prevalence of Late Functional Tricuspid Regurgitation in Degenerative Mitral Regurgitation Surgery.

    PubMed

    Vaturi, Mordehay; Kotler, Tali; Shapira, Yaron; Weisenberg, Daniel; Monakier, Daniel; Sagie, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Although significant late tricuspid regurgitation (TR) may develop after surgery for degenerative mitral regurgitation (MR), the use of routine tricuspid annuloplasty is debatable. The study aim was to determine the prevalence and predictors of significant late TR after surgery for degenerative MR. A total of 112 patients who had undergone surgery for degenerative MR without concomitant tricuspid valve repair (average follow up 7.7 ± 4.0 years) was studied retrospectively. The prevalence of post-surgical TR and predictors of progression were determined. The majority of patients (97%) had non-significant TR (less than moderate) prior to surgery, although an overall trend of progression towards significant TR (grades 2 or 3) was noted in 17 patients (p = 0.0006). Of the 18 patients (16%) with late postoperative significant TR, only nine (8%) had severe TR with only a single referral to surgery. New-onset post-surgical atrial fibrillation was more common in patients who developed late significant TR (p = 0.002). Multivariate analysis of the pre-surgery variables, age >65 years and left ventricular dysfunction were shown to be independent predictors of late functional TR. Significant progression in TR after surgery for degenerative MR was rare in this patient cohort. The impact of older age and left ventricular dysfunction at the time of surgery showed a strong association with post-surgical atrial fibrillation.

  13. Assessing functional mitral regurgitation with exercise echocardiography: rationale and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Secondary or functional mitral regurgitation (FMR) represents an increasing feature of mitral valve disease characterized by abnormal function of anatomically normal leaflets in the context of the impaired function of remodelled left ventricles. The anatomic and pathophysiological basis of FMR are briefly analyzed; in addition, the role of exercise echocardiography for the assessment of FMR is discussed in view of its relevance to clinical practice. PMID:20003417

  14. Mitral valve repair for traumatic mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Taro; Kogure, Shuhei; Muro, Takashi; Okada, Yukikatsu

    2016-06-01

    Mitral valve injury after blunt chest trauma is a rare clinical condition. We describe a case of mitral valve repair for severe mitral regurgitation due to blunt chest trauma 5 years previously. A 22-year-old man was referred to our hospital for surgical correction of severe mitral regurgitation. Echocardiography demonstrated a partial tear of the anterolateral papillary muscle which lacerated to the apex. The entire anterolateral part of the mitral valve including the anterior commissure and posterior leaflets had prolapsed. Reimplantation of the papillary muscle to the posterior left ventricular wall and ring annuloplasty were successfully performed without residual regurgitation.

  15. MitraClip Therapy for Mitral Regurgitation: Secondary Mitral Regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Ted; Mehta, Arjun; Guerrero, Mayra; Levisay, Justin P; Salinger, Michael H

    2016-01-01

    Therapy for mitral regurgitation (MR) has been synonymous with mitral valve surgery. Operative approaches for degenerative MR repair have been associated with excellent results, with durable long term outcomes. Surgery for functional MR has been less successful. MitraClip has shown promise for functional MR, especiall in patinets who are high risk for surgery. The aggregate of nonrandomized global experience with MitraClip in functional MR has been consistent in showing improvements in symptoms and left ventricular remodeling. It remains to be seen how MitraClip therapy will compare with best medical therapy. The COAPT trial will clarify this question.

  16. Percutaneous Mitral Valve Repair in Mitral Regurgitation Reduces Cell-Free Hemoglobin and Improves Endothelial Function

    PubMed Central

    Rammos, Christos; Zeus, Tobias; Balzer, Jan; Kubatz, Laura; Hendgen-Cotta, Ulrike B.; Veulemans, Verena; Hellhammer, Katharina; Totzeck, Matthias; Luedike, Peter; Kelm, Malte; Rassaf, Tienush

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Endothelial dysfunction is predictive for cardiovascular events and may be caused by decreased bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO). NO is scavenged by cell-free hemoglobin with reduction of bioavailable NO up to 70% subsequently deteriorating vascular function. While patients with mitral regurgitation (MR) suffer from an impaired prognosis, mechanisms relating to coexistent vascular dysfunctions have not been described yet. Therapy of MR using a percutaneous mitral valve repair (PMVR) approach has been shown to lead to significant clinical benefits. We here sought to investigate the role of endothelial function in MR and the potential impact of PMVR. Methods and Results Twenty-seven patients with moderate-to-severe MR treated with the MitraClip® device were enrolled in an open-label single-center observational study. Patients underwent clinical assessment, conventional echocardiography, and determination of endothelial function by measuring flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery using high-resolution ultrasound at baseline and at 3-month follow-up. Patients with MR demonstrated decompartmentalized hemoglobin and reduced endothelial function (cell-free plasma hemoglobin in heme 28.9±3.8 μM, FMD 3.9±0.9%). Three months post-procedure, PMVR improved ejection fraction (from 41±3% to 46±3%, p = 0.03) and NYHA functional class (from 3.0±0.1 to 1.9±1.7, p<0.001). PMVR was associated with a decrease in cell free plasma hemoglobin (22.3±2.4 μM, p = 0.02) and improved endothelial functions (FMD 4.8±1.0%, p<0.0001). Conclusion We demonstrate here that plasma from patients with MR contains significant amounts of cell-free hemoglobin, which is accompanied by endothelial dysfunction. PMVR therapy is associated with an improved hemoglobin decompartmentalization and vascular function. PMID:26986059

  17. Left atrial function and deformation in chronic primary mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Borg, Alexander N; Pearce, Keith A; Williams, Simon G; Ray, Simon G

    2009-10-01

    To study global and regional left atrial (LA) mechanics in chronic primary mitral regurgitation (MR) with echocardiography. LA volumes during reservoir, conduit, and contractile phases were measured in 27 MR patients and 25 controls. LA ejection fraction (EF) and ejection force were calculated. Reservoir (SR-R), conduit (SR-C), and contractile phase (SR-A) strain rates, and reservoir phase strain were obtained. LA volumes were higher in MR in all phases. In MR, ejection force was increased (21.5 vs. 12.3 kdynes, P = 0.001); reservoir phase strain (32.91 +/- 14.26%), SR-R (2.65 +/- 0.87), SR-C (-2.02 +/- 0.58), and SR-A (-2.55 +/- 1.31 s(-1)) were increased (23.14 +/- 7.96%, 1.62 +/- 0.53, -1.29 +/- 0.59, -1.98 +/- 0.65 s(-1), in controls, respectively, P < or = 0.004). Regional deformation correlated with corresponding volumetric parameters. Despite enhanced SR-A in MR, LA EF was unchanged (31.34 vs. 29.23%, P = ns), and LA contractile tissue velocity (A') was reduced (-5.39 +/- 1.95 vs. -6.91 +/- 1.80 cm/s, P = 0.006). The LA contractile contribution to left ventricular filling was significantly reduced in MR. LA deformation is increased in all phases in MR. Unchanged LA EF and reduced A' may reflect the reduced contractile contribution to left ventricular filling.

  18. Functional mitral regurgitation: predictor for atrial substrate remodeling and poor ablation outcome in paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Yu; Wu, Lingmin; Hou, Bingbo; Sun, Wei; Zheng, Lihui; Ding, Ligang; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Shu; Yao, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Functional mitral regurgitation (FMR) is not uncommon in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. We sought to investigate the association between FMR and atrial substrate remodeling as well as the ablation outcome in paroxysmal AF (PAF) patients. We retrospectively analyzed a prospectively enrolled cohort of 132 patients (age 55.1 ± 9.6 years, 75.8% male) with symptomatic PAF who underwent initial ablation in our institute. Functional mitral regurgitation was defined as regurgitation jet area to left atrium (LA) area ratio ≥ 0.1 without any primary valvular disease. Voltage mapping of LA was performed under sinus rhythm. Low voltage zones (LVZs) were semi-quantitatively estimated and presented as low voltage index. Follow-up for AF recurrence ≥ 12 months was performed. In total, 40 patients (29.6%) were detected with FMR, who were older than the non-FMR patients (P = 0.007) and had larger LA diameters (P = 0.02). Left atrium LVZs were observed in 64.9% of patients with FMR versus 22.1% patients without FMR (P < 0.001). Functional mitral regurgitation independently predicted the presence of LVZs (OR 7.286; 95% CI 3.023–17.562; P < 0.001). During a mean follow-up of 22.9 ± 6.5 months, 38 patients (28.8%) experienced AF recurrence. The recurrence rate was 60.0% and 19.5% in FMR and non-FMR cohort, respectively (log rank P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that FMR was an independent predictor for AF recurrence (HR 2.291; 95% CI 1.062–4.942; P = 0.03). Functional mitral regurgitation was strongly associated with atrial substrate remodeling. Furthermore, patients with FMR have substantial risk for AF recurrence post ablation. PMID:27472715

  19. Misconceptions and Facts About Mitral Regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Argulian, Edgar; Borer, Jeffrey S; Messerli, Franz H

    2016-09-01

    Mitral regurgitation is a common heart valve disease. It is defined to be primary when it results from the pathology of the mitral valve apparatus itself and secondary when it is caused by distortion of the architecture or function of the left ventricle. Although the diagnosis and management of mitral regurgitation rely heavily on echocardiography, one should bear in mind the caveats and shortcomings of such an approach. Clinical decision making commonly focuses on the indications for surgery, but it is complex and mandates precise assessment of the mitral pathology, symptom status of the patient, and ventricular performance (right and left) among other descriptors. It is important for healthcare providers at all levels to be familiar with the clinical picture, diagnosis, disease course, and management of mitral regurgitation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Mitral valve repair is not always needed in patients with functional mitral regurgitation undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting and/or aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Lindeboom, J.E.; Jaarsma, W.; Kelder, J.C.; Morshuis, W.J.; Visser, C.A.

    2005-01-01

    Background and aim Functional mitral regurgitation (FMR) is defined as mitral regurgitation in the absence of intrinsic valvular abnormalities. We prospectively evaluated the effect of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and/or aortic valve replacement (AVR), without additional mitral valve repair, on the degree of moderate or severe FMR. Study design and methods From a cohort of 2829 patients undergoing CABG and/or AVR in the St. Antonius Hospital, 67 patients were identified with moderate or severe FMR by transthoracic and transoesophageal Doppler echocardiography. Results Two out of the 67 patients (3%) died perioperatively. During follow-up (3-18 months) mitral regurgitation decreased by one grade in 29 patients, by two grades in 28, by three grades in five patients and remained unchanged in one patient (p=0.0001). Of all patients, 85% had grade I mitral regurgitation or less. Grade II mitral regurgitation remained in nine patients with a previous large myocardial infarction and/or annular calcifications. NYHA class improved from 3.1+0.5 to 1.4+0.4 (p=0.0001). Ejection fraction increased from 46 to 55% (p=0.0001). Overall, left atrial and left ventricular end-diastolic dimensions decreased significantly. In contrast, no decrease in dimensions was seen in patients with postoperative grade II mitral regurgitation. Conclusion FMR may improve significantly following CABG and/or AVR, although a previous large myocardial infarction and/or annular calcifications may affect outcome. PMID:25696484

  1. Mitral valve repair for ischemic mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Mohebali, Jahan; Chen, Frederick Y

    2015-05-01

    Mitral valve repair for ischemic mitral valve regurgitation remains controversial. In moderate mitral regurgitation (MR), controversy exists whether revascularization alone will be adequate to restore native valve geometry or whether intervention on the valve (repair) should be performed concomitantly. When MR is severe, the need for valve intervention is not disputed. Rather, the controversy is whether repair versus replacement should be undertaken. In contrast to degenerative or myxomatous disease that directly affects leaflet integrity and morphology, ischemic FMR results from a distortion and dilation of native ventricular geometry that normally supports normal leaflet coaptation. To address this, the first and most crucial step in successful valve repair is placement of an undersized, complete remodeling annuloplasty ring to restore the annulus to its native geometry. The following article outlines the steps for repair of ischemic mitral regurgitation.

  2. Long-term outcomes of tricuspid annuloplasty for functional tricuspid regurgitation associated with degenerative mitral regurgitation: suture annuloplasty versus ring annuloplasty using a flexible band.

    PubMed

    Murashita, Takashi; Okada, Yukikatsu; Kanemitsu, Hideo; Fukunaga, Naoto; Konishi, Yasunobu; Nakamura, Ken; Koyama, Tadaaki

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the long-term outcomes of suture/ring tricuspid valve annuloplasty for functional tricuspid regurgitation associated with degenerative mitral regurgitation. We retrospectively reviewed patients who underwent flexible ring tricuspid valve annuloplasty (n = 120) or suture tricuspid valve annuloplasty (n = 42) for functional tricuspid regurgitation concomitant with surgery for degenerative mitral regurgitation (mean follow-up duration, 5.3 ± 5.1 years). The mean age of patients was 62.5 ± 13.1 years. Thirty-day mortality was zero in the suture group, and 0.8% in the ring group. Tricuspid regurgitation grade at discharge was lower in the ring group ( p = 0.002). No difference was observed between survival and freedom from major cardiac/cerebrovascular adverse events between the groups. However, freedom from ≥moderate tricuspid regurgitation was higher in the ring group (Log-rank p = 0.003). From univariate analysis, the risk factors for ≥moderate TR were suture annuloplasty and preoperative tricuspid regurgitation grade. No reoperation for recurrent tricuspid regurgitation occurred in either group because symptoms experienced by patients with recurrent tricuspid regurgitation were relatively insignificant. Concomitant tricuspid annuloplasty using flexible bands offered improved durability than suture annuloplasty for preventing postoperative tricuspid regurgitation progression.

  3. Treatment of functional mitral valve regurgitation with the permanent percutaneous transvenous mitral annuloplasty system: results of the multicenter international Percutaneous Transvenous Mitral Annuloplasty System to Reduce Mitral Valve Regurgitation in Patients with Heart Failure trial.

    PubMed

    Machaalany, Jimmy; Bilodeau, Luc; Hoffmann, Rainer; Sack, Stefan; Sievert, Horst; Kautzner, Josef; Hehrlein, Christoph; Serruys, Patrick; Sénéchal, Mario; Douglas, Pamela; Bertrand, Olivier F

    2013-05-01

    PTOLEMY-2 was a prospective multicenter phase I single-arm feasibility trial to evaluate the second-generation permanent percutaneous transvenous mitral annuloplasty (PTMA) device in reducing functional mitral regurgitation (MR). Percutaneous MR reduction has been performed through a direct method of clipping and securing the mitral leaflets together or an indirect approach of reducing mitral annular dimension via the coronary sinus. The PTMA device is the only coronary sinus mitral repair device without a static fixation element. Patients with at least moderate functional MR, New York Heart Association functional class II to IV, and left ventricular ejection fraction of 20% to 50% were enrolled at 14 centers in 5 countries. Device effects on patients were assessed by serial echocardiography, quality of life (QOL), and exercise capacity metrics. A total of 43 patients were recruited, and 30 patients (70%) were implanted with a permanent PTMA device with a mean follow-up of 5.8 ± 3.8 months. The primary safety end point (freedom from death, myocardial infarction, stroke, or emergency surgery) at 30 days was met in 28 patients, whereas 2 patients died of device-related complications. The primary efficacy end point (MR reduction of at least 1.0 grade or reduction of regurgitant orifice area by 0.1 cm(2) or regurgitant volume by 15 mL or regurgitant fraction by 10% compared with baseline) was obtained in 13 patients. No significant changes were noted in MR parameters, ventricular volumes, or QOL. Distance walked on 6 minutes testing at 6-month follow-up increased from 331 ± 167 m to 417 ± 132 m (P = .65). Compared with nonresponders, responders had a higher baseline regurgitant orifice area >0.2 cm(2) (P = .001) and less prior history of myocardial infarction (P = .02), coronary artery bypass surgery (P = .03), and ischemic MR (P = .04). Overall, PTMA had mild impact on MR reduction, left ventricular remodeling, QOL, and exercise capacity. During follow-up, the risk

  4. Percutaneous mitral valve repair for mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Block, Peter C

    2003-02-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) associated with, ischemic, and degenerative (prolapse) disease, contributes to left ventricular (LV) dysfunction due to remodeling, and LV dilation, resulting in worsening of MR. Mitral valve (MV) surgical repair has provided improvement in survival, LV function and symptoms, especially when performed early. Surgical repair is complex, due to diverse etiologies and has significant complications. The Society for Thoracic Surgery database shows that operative mortality for a 1st repair is 2% and for re-do repair is 4 times that. Cardiopulmonary bypass and cardiac arrest are required. The attendant morbidity prolongs hospitalization and recovery. Alfieri simplified mitral repair using an edge-to-edge technique which subsequently has been shown to be effective for multiple etiologies of MR. The MV leaflers are typically brought together by a central suture producing a double orifice MV without stenosis. Umana reported that MR decreased from grade 3.6 +/- 0.5 to 0.8 +/- 0.4 (P < 0.0001) and LV ejection fraction increased from 33 +/- 13% to 45 +/- 11% (P = 0.0156). In 121 patients, Maisano reported freedom from re-operation of 95 +/- 4.8% with up to 6 year follow-up. Oz developed a MV "grasper" that is directly placed via a left ventriculotomy and coapts both leaflets which are then fastened by a graduated spiral screw. An in-vitro model using explanted human valves showed significant reduction in MR and in canine studies, animals followed by serial echo had persistent MV coaptation. At 12 weeks the device was endothelialized. These promising results have paved the way for a percutaneous or minimally invasive-off pump mitral repair. Evalve has developed catheter-based technology, which, by apposing the edges of a regurgitant MV, results in edge-to-edge repair. Release of the device is done after echo and fluoroscopic evaluation under normal loading conditions. If the desired effect is not produced the device can be repositioned or retrieved

  5. Surgical treatment of moderate ischemic mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Peter K; Puskas, John D; Ascheim, Deborah D; Voisine, Pierre; Gelijns, Annetine C; Moskowitz, Alan J; Hung, Judy W; Parides, Michael K; Ailawadi, Gorav; Perrault, Louis P; Acker, Michael A; Argenziano, Michael; Thourani, Vinod; Gammie, James S; Miller, Marissa A; Pagé, Pierre; Overbey, Jessica R; Bagiella, Emilia; Dagenais, François; Blackstone, Eugene H; Kron, Irving L; Goldstein, Daniel J; Rose, Eric A; Moquete, Ellen G; Jeffries, Neal; Gardner, Timothy J; O'Gara, Patrick T; Alexander, John H; Michler, Robert E

    2014-12-04

    Ischemic mitral regurgitation is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. For surgical patients with moderate regurgitation, the benefits of adding mitral-valve repair to coronary-artery bypass grafting (CABG) are uncertain. We randomly assigned 301 patients with moderate ischemic mitral regurgitation to CABG alone or CABG plus mitral-valve repair (combined procedure). The primary end point was the left ventricular end-systolic volume index (LVESVI), a measure of left ventricular remodeling, at 1 year. This end point was assessed with the use of a Wilcoxon rank-sum test in which deaths were categorized as the lowest LVESVI rank. At 1 year, the mean LVESVI among surviving patients was 46.1±22.4 ml per square meter of body-surface area in the CABG-alone group and 49.6±31.5 ml per square meter in the combined-procedure group (mean change from baseline, -9.4 and -9.3 ml per square meter, respectively). The rate of death was 6.7% in the combined-procedure group and 7.3% in the CABG-alone group (hazard ratio with mitral-valve repair, 0.90; 95% confidence interval, 0.38 to 2.12; P=0.81). The rank-based assessment of LVESVI at 1 year (incorporating deaths) showed no significant between-group difference (z score, 0.50; P=0.61). The addition of mitral-valve repair was associated with a longer bypass time (P<0.001), a longer hospital stay after surgery (P=0.002), and more neurologic events (P=0.03). Moderate or severe mitral regurgitation was less common in the combined-procedure group than in the CABG-alone group (11.2% vs. 31.0%, P<0.001). There were no significant between-group differences in major adverse cardiac or cerebrovascular events, deaths, readmissions, functional status, or quality of life at 1 year. In patients with moderate ischemic mitral regurgitation, the addition of mitral-valve repair to CABG did not result in a higher degree of left ventricular reverse remodeling. Mitral-valve repair was associated with a reduced prevalence of moderate or

  6. Mechanical dyssynchrony and deformation imaging in patients with functional mitral regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Isabella; Marini, Claudia; Stella, Stefano; Ancona, Francesco; Spartera, Marco; Margonato, Alberto; Agricola, Eustachio

    2016-01-01

    Chronic functional mitral regurgitation (FMR) is a frequent finding of ischemic heart disease and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), associated with unfavourable prognosis. Several pathophysiologic mechanisms are involved in FMR, such as annular dilatation and dysfunction, left ventricle (LV) remodeling, dysfunction and dyssynchrony, papillary muscles displacement and dyssynchrony. The best therapeutic choice for FMR is still debated. When optimal medical treatment has already been set, a further option for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) and/or surgical correction should be considered. CRT is able to contrast most of the pathophysiologic determinants of FMR by minimizing LV dyssynchrony through different mechanisms: Increasing closing forces, reducing tethering forces, reshaping annular geometry and function, correcting diastolic MR. Deformation imaging in terms of two-dimensional speckle tracking has been validated for LV dyssynchrony assessment. Radial speckle tracking and three-dimensional strain analysis appear to be the best methods to quantify intraventricular delay and to predict CRT-responders. Speckle-tracking echocardiography in patients with mitral valve regurgitation has been usually proposed for the assessment of LV and left atrial function. However it has also revealed a fundamental role of intraventricular dyssynchrony in determining FMR especially in DCM, rather than in ischemic cardiomyopathy in which MR severity seems to be more related to mitral valve deformation indexes. Furthermore speckle tracking allows the assessment of papillary muscle dyssynchrony. Therefore this technique can help to identify optimal candidates to CRT that will probably demonstrate a reduction in FMR degree and thus will experience a better outcome. PMID:26981211

  7. Mechanical dyssynchrony and deformation imaging in patients with functional mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Isabella; Marini, Claudia; Stella, Stefano; Ancona, Francesco; Spartera, Marco; Margonato, Alberto; Agricola, Eustachio

    2016-02-26

    Chronic functional mitral regurgitation (FMR) is a frequent finding of ischemic heart disease and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), associated with unfavourable prognosis. Several pathophysiologic mechanisms are involved in FMR, such as annular dilatation and dysfunction, left ventricle (LV) remodeling, dysfunction and dyssynchrony, papillary muscles displacement and dyssynchrony. The best therapeutic choice for FMR is still debated. When optimal medical treatment has already been set, a further option for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) and/or surgical correction should be considered. CRT is able to contrast most of the pathophysiologic determinants of FMR by minimizing LV dyssynchrony through different mechanisms: Increasing closing forces, reducing tethering forces, reshaping annular geometry and function, correcting diastolic MR. Deformation imaging in terms of two-dimensional speckle tracking has been validated for LV dyssynchrony assessment. Radial speckle tracking and three-dimensional strain analysis appear to be the best methods to quantify intraventricular delay and to predict CRT-responders. Speckle-tracking echocardiography in patients with mitral valve regurgitation has been usually proposed for the assessment of LV and left atrial function. However it has also revealed a fundamental role of intraventricular dyssynchrony in determining FMR especially in DCM, rather than in ischemic cardiomyopathy in which MR severity seems to be more related to mitral valve deformation indexes. Furthermore speckle tracking allows the assessment of papillary muscle dyssynchrony. Therefore this technique can help to identify optimal candidates to CRT that will probably demonstrate a reduction in FMR degree and thus will experience a better outcome.

  8. Papillary Muscle Free Strain in Patients with Severe Degenerative and Functional Mitral Regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Kılıcgedik, Alev; Kahveci, Gokhan; Gurbuz, Ahmet Seyfeddin; Karabay, Can Yucel; Guler, Ahmet; Efe, Suleyman Cagan; Aung, Soe Moe; Arslantas, Ugur; Demir, Serdar; Izgi, Ibrahim Akin; Kirma, Cevat

    2017-04-01

    The role of papillary muscle function in severe mitral regurgitation with preserved and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction and the method of choice to evaluate PM have still been the subjects of controversy. To evaluate and compare papillary muscle function in and between patients with severe degenerative and functional mitral regurgitation by using the free strain method. 64 patients with severe mitral regurgitation - 39 patients with degenerative mitral regurgitation (DMR group) and 25 patients with severe functional mitral regurgitation (FMR group) - and 30 control subjects (control group) were included in the study. Papillary muscle function was evaluated through the free strain method from apical four chamber images of the anterolateral papillary muscle (APM) and from apical three chamber images of the posteromedial papillary muscle (PPM). Global left ventricular longitudinal and circumferential strains were evaluated by applying 2D speckle tracking imaging. Global left ventricular longitudinal strain (DMR group, -17 [-14.2/-20]; FMR group, -9 [-7/-10.7]; control group, -20 [-18/-21] p < 0.001), global left ventricular circumferential strain (DMR group, -20 [-14.5/-22.7]; FMR group, -10 [-7/-12]; control group, -23 [-21/-27.5] p < 0.001) and papillary musle strains (PPMS; DMR group, -30.5 [-24/-46.7]; FMR group, -18 [-12/-30]; control group; -43 [-34.5/-39.5] p < 0.001; APMS; DMR group, (-35 [-23.5/-43]; FMR group, -20 [-13.5/-26]; control group, -40 [-32.5/-48] p < 0.001) were significantly different among all groups. APMS and PPMS were highly correlated with LVEF (p < 0.001, p < 0.001; respectively), GLS (p < 0.001, p < 0.001; respectively) and GCS (p < 0.001, p < 0.00; respectively) of LV among all groups. No correlation was found between papillary muscle strains and effective orifice area (EOA) in both groups of severe mitral regurgitation. Measuring papillary muscle longitudinal strain by the free strain method is practical and applicable

  9. Percutaneous repair or surgery for mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Ted; Foster, Elyse; Glower, Donald D; Glower, Donald G; Kar, Saibal; Rinaldi, Michael J; Fail, Peter S; Smalling, Richard W; Siegel, Robert; Rose, Geoffrey A; Engeron, Eric; Loghin, Catalin; Trento, Alfredo; Skipper, Eric R; Fudge, Tommy; Letsou, George V; Massaro, Joseph M; Mauri, Laura

    2011-04-14

    Mitral-valve repair can be accomplished with an investigational procedure that involves the percutaneous implantation of a clip that grasps and approximates the edges of the mitral leaflets at the origin of the regurgitant jet. We randomly assigned 279 patients with moderately severe or severe (grade 3+ or 4+) mitral regurgitation in a 2:1 ratio to undergo either percutaneous repair or conventional surgery for repair or replacement of the mitral valve. The primary composite end point for efficacy was freedom from death, from surgery for mitral-valve dysfunction, and from grade 3+ or 4+ mitral regurgitation at 12 months. The primary safety end point was a composite of major adverse events within 30 days. At 12 months, the rates of the primary end point for efficacy were 55% in the percutaneous-repair group and 73% in the surgery group (P=0.007). The respective rates of the components of the primary end point were as follows: death, 6% in each group; surgery for mitral-valve dysfunction, 20% versus 2%; and grade 3+ or 4+ mitral regurgitation, 21% versus 20%. Major adverse events occurred in 15% of patients in the percutaneous-repair group and 48% of patients in the surgery group at 30 days (P<0.001). At 12 months, both groups had improved left ventricular size, New York Heart Association functional class, and quality-of-life measures, as compared with baseline. Although percutaneous repair was less effective at reducing mitral regurgitation than conventional surgery, the procedure was associated with superior safety and similar improvements in clinical outcomes. (Funded by Abbott Vascular; EVEREST II ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00209274.).

  10. An Intriguing Case Report of Functional Mitral Regurgitation Treated With MitraClip

    PubMed Central

    Duino, Vincenzo; Fiocca, Luigi; Musumeci, Giuseppe; D’Elia, Emilia; Gori, Mauro; Cerchierini, Elisa; Valsecchi, Orazio; Senni, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Functional mitral regurgitation (FMR) is frequent in patients with heart failure (HF). It develops as a consequence of left ventricle (LV) geometry alterations, causing imbalance between increased tethering forces and decreased closing forces exerted on the mitral valve apparatus during systole. FMR is known to change at rest and during effort, due to preload–afterload changes, myocardial ischemia, and/or LV dysfunction. Despite optimized medical therapy, an FMR can be responsible of shortness of breath limiting quality of life and decompensation. In this report, we present a case of dynamic FMR treated with MitraClip. MitraClip implantation is a successful and innovative opportunity for HF patients with FMR. PMID:25997036

  11. Percutaneous mitral valve annuloplasty for functional mitral regurgitation: acute results of the first patient treated with the Viacor permanent device and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Olivier F; Philippon, François; St Pierre, André; Nguyen, Can M; Larose, Eric; Bilodeau, Sylvie; Dagenais, François; Charbonneau, Eric; Rodés-Cabau, Josep; Sénéchal, Mario

    2010-01-01

    There is a need to develop less invasive techniques to manage moderate or severe functional mitral regurgitation in patients at high surgical risk. We report the acute results of the first patient treated with the permanent Viacor percutaneous transvenous mitral annuloplasty (PTMA) device in North America, introduce the PTOLEMY-2 protocol, and briefly discuss the current status of transvenous mitral valve techniques. After several episodes of pulmonary edema, an 87-year-old woman was referred for hemodynamic evaluation. Angiography revealed normal coronary arteries and severe mitral regurgitation. Baseline echocardiography showed severe (4+) functional mitral regurgitation. The coronary sinus was cannulated with a 9.5-Fr introducer from a left subclavian approach. After distal positioning of a coronary wire, the 7-Fr PTMA Viacor catheter was advanced to the anterior interventricular vein. Two 130 g/cm rods were then inserted resulting in an acute and dramatic reduction in mitral regurgitation as assessed by continuous transoesophageal echocardiography and which was associated with a sudden rise in arterial blood pressure. The next day, transthoracic echocardiogram showed a significant reduction in effective regurgitant orifice area (EROA) from 41 to 10 mm(2). The patient was discharged home the day following the procedure without complication. In accordance with the PTOLEMY-2 protocol, she will undergo 3-D transthoracic echocardiograms, quality of life assessments, and 6-min walk tests at regular intervals for the next 5 years. PTMA is a promising technique for the treatment of severe mitral regurgitation in selected patients. Further ongoing research will determine the predictors of success and long-term safety and performance of this technique. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Transaortic edge-to-edge mitral valve repair for moderate secondary/functional mitral regurgitation in patients undergoing aortic root/valve intervention.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Shiv Kumar; Abraham, Atul; Bhoje, Amol; Gharde, Parag; Sahu, Manoj; Talwar, Sachin; Airan, Balram

    2017-06-13

    The present study evaluates the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of edge-to-edge repair for moderate secondary/functional mitral regurgitation in patients undergoing aortic valve/root interventions. Sixteen patients underwent transaortic edge-to-edge mitral valve repair. Mitral regurgitation was 2+ in 8 patients and 3+ in 6 patients. Two patients in whom cardiac arrest developed preoperatively had severe (4+) mitral regurgitation. Patients underwent operation for severe aortic regurgitation ± aortic root lesions. The mean left ventricular systolic and diastolic diameters were 51.5 ± 12.8 mm and 70.7 ± 10.7 mm, respectively. Left ventricular ejection fraction ranged from 20% to 60%. Primary surgical procedure included Bentall's ± hemiarch replacement in 10 patients, aortic valve replacement in 5 patients, and noncoronary sinus replacement with aortic valve repair in 1 patient. Severity of mitral regurgitation decreased to trivial or zero in 13 patients, 1+ in 2 patients, and 2+ in 1 patient. There were no gradients across the mitral valve in 9 patients, less than 5 mm Hg in 6 patients, and 9 mm Hg in 1 patient. There was no operative mortality. Follow-up ranged from 2 weeks to 54 months. Echocardiography showed trivial or no mitral regurgitation in 12 patients, 1+ in 2 patients, and 2+ in 2 patients. None of the patients had significant mitral stenosis. The mean left ventricular systolic and diastolic diameters decreased to 40.5 ± 10.3 mm and 58.7 ± 11.6 mm, respectively. Ejection fraction also improved slightly (22%-65%). Transaortic edge-to-edge mitral valve repair is a safe and effective technique to abolish secondary/functional mitral regurgitation. However, its impact on overall survival needs to be studied. Copyright © 2017 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Determinants of functional mitral regurgitation severity in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy versus nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Konstantinou, Dimitrios M; Papadopoulou, Klio; Giannakoulas, George; Kamperidis, Vasilis; Dalamanga, Emmanouela G; Damvopoulou, Efthalia; Parcharidou, Despina G; Karamitsos, Theodoros D; Karvounis, Haralambos I

    2014-01-01

    Functional mitral regurgitation (MR) is prevalent among patients with left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and is associated with a poorer prognosis. Our aim was to assess the primary determinants of MR severity in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM) and nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Patients with functional MR secondary to ICM (n = 55) and DCM (n = 48) were prospectively enrolled. Effective regurgitant orifice (ERO) area, global LV remodeling, regional wall-motion abnormalities, and mitral apparatus deformity indices were assessed utilizing conventional and tissue Doppler echocardiography. ICM patients had more severe MR compared with DCM patients despite similar ejection fraction and functional status (ERO = 0.16 ± 0.08 cm(2) vs. ERO = 0.12 ± 0.70 cm(2) , respectively, P = 0.002). Regional myocardial systolic velocities in mid-inferior and mid-lateral wall were negatively correlated with ERO in ICM and DCM patients, respectively. Multivariate analysis identified coaptation height as the only independent determinant of ERO in both groups. In a subset of ICM patients (n = 9) with relatively high ERO despite low coaptation height, a higher prevalence of left bundle branch block was detected (88.9% vs. 46.7%, P = 0.02). Functional MR severity was chiefly determined by the extent of mitral apparatus deformity, and coaptation height can provide a rapid estimation of MR severity in heart failure patients. Additional contributory mechanisms in ICM patients include depressed myocardial systolic velocities in posteromedial papillary muscle attaching site and evidence of global LV dyssynchrony. © 2013, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Percutaenous mitral valve: A non-stented coronary sinus device for the treatment of functional mitral regurgitation in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Sack, Stefan; Kahlert, Philipp; Erbel, Raimund

    2009-01-01

    Functional mitral regurgitation in heart failure limits survival in a severity-graded fashion. Even mild mitral regurgitation doubles mortality risk. We report the use of a non-stented coronary sinus device to reduce mitral annulus dimension in order to re-establish mitral valve competence. The device (PTMA, Viacor, Inc., Wilmington, MA, USA) consists of a multi-lumen PTFE (Teflon) PTMA catheter in which Nitinol (nickel-titanium alloy) treatment rods are advanced. For individual use up to three rods of different length and stiffness can be used. Therefore dimension reduction can be performed in an incremental fashion. Fluoroscopy and 3 D echocardiography are performed throughout the procedure to visiualize the positioning and confirm maximum treatment effect. The case describes the use and the effect of PTMA treatment. Safety and efficacy of the PTMA device will be investigated in the upcoming PTOLEMY 2 trial.

  15. Predicting recurrent mitral regurgitation after mitral valve repair for severe ischemic mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Kron, Irving L; Hung, Judy; Overbey, Jessica R; Bouchard, Denis; Gelijns, Annetine C; Moskowitz, Alan J; Voisine, Pierre; O'Gara, Patrick T; Argenziano, Michael; Michler, Robert E; Gillinov, Marc; Puskas, John D; Gammie, James S; Mack, Michael J; Smith, Peter K; Sai-Sudhakar, Chittoor; Gardner, Timothy J; Ailawadi, Gorav; Zeng, Xin; O'Sullivan, Karen; Parides, Michael K; Swayze, Roger; Thourani, Vinod; Rose, Eric A; Perrault, Louis P; Acker, Michael A

    2015-03-01

    The Cardiothoracic Surgical Trials Network recently reported no difference in the primary end point of left ventricular end-systolic volume index at 1 year postsurgery in patients randomized to repair (n = 126) or replacement (n = 125) for severe ischemic mitral regurgitation. However, patients undergoing repair experienced significantly more recurrent mitral regurgitation than patients undergoing replacement (32.6% vs 2.3%). We examined whether baseline echocardiographic and clinical characteristics could identify those who will develop moderate/severe recurrent mitral regurgitation or die. Our analysis includes 116 patients who were randomized to and received mitral valve repair. Logistic regression was used to estimate a model-based probability of recurrence or death from baseline factors. Receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed from these estimated probabilities to determine classification cut-points maximizing accuracy of prediction based on sensitivity and specificity. Of the 116 patients, 6 received a replacement before leaving the operating room; all other patients had mild or less mitral regurgitation on intraoperative echocardiogram after repair. During the 2-year follow-up period, 76 patients developed moderate/severe mitral regurgitation or died (53 mitral regurgitation recurrences, 13 mitral regurgitation recurrences and death, and 10 deaths). The mechanism for recurrent mitral regurgitation was largely mitral valve leaflet tethering. Our model (including age, body mass index, sex, race, effective regurgitant orifice area, basal aneurysm/dyskinesis, New York Heart Association class, history of coronary artery bypass grafting, percutaneous coronary intervention, or ventricular arrhythmias) yielded an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.82. The model demonstrated good discrimination in identifying patients who will survive 2 years without recurrent mitral regurgitation after mitral valve repair. Although our

  16. Transcatheter mitral valve repair in osteogenesis imperfecta associated mitral valve regurgitation.

    PubMed

    van der Kley, Frank; Delgado, Victoria; Ajmone Marsan, Nina; Schalij, Martin J

    2014-08-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is associated with increased prevalence of significant mitral valve regurgitation. Surgical mitral valve repair and replacement are feasible but are associated with increased risk of bleeding and dehiscence of implanted valves may occur more frequently. The present case report describes the outcomes of transcatheter mitral valve repair in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta. A 60 year-old patient with osteogenesis imperfecta and associated symptomatic moderate to severe mitral regurgitation underwent transthoracic echocardiography which showed a nondilated left ventricle with preserved systolic function and moderate to severe mitral regurgitation. On transoesophageal echocardiography the regurgitant jet originated between the anterolateral scallops of the anterior and posterior leaflets (A1-P1). Considering the comorbidities associated with osteogenesis imperfecta the patient was accepted for transcatheter mitral valve repair using the Mitraclip device (Abbott vascular, Menlo, CA). Under fluoroscopy and 3D transoesophageal echocardiography guidance, a Mitraclip device was implanted between the anterolateral and central scallops with significant reduction of mitral regurgitation. The postoperative evolution was uneventful. At one month follow-up, transthoracic echocardiography showed a stable position of the Mitraclip device with no mitral regurgitation. Transcatheter mitral valve repair is feasible and safe in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta and associated symptomatic significant mitral regurgitation. Copyright © 2014 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Pivotal role of bedside Doppler echocardiography in the assessment of patients with acute heart failure and mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Ennezat, Pierre Vladimir; Bellouin, Annaïk; Maréchaux, Sylvestre; Juthier, Francis; Fayad, Georges; Vincentelli, André; Berrébi, Alain; Auffray, Jean Luc; Bauchart, Jean Jacques; Mouquet, Frédéric; Montaigne, David; Asseman, Philippe; Le Jemtel, Thierry H; Pibarot, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Patients presenting with mitral regurgitation and acute heart failure remain a challenge for the clinicians. Bedside echocardiography ascertains the functional or primary nature of mitral regurgitation, thereby allowing to focus therapy on the left ventricle and mitral valve apparatus in patients with functional mitral regurgitation and to hasten mitral valve repair or replacement when acute heart failure results from primary mitral regurgitation. This short article reviews the evaluation by bedside echocardiography to guide management of these patients. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Cardiac magnetic resonance determinants of functional mitral regurgitation in ischemic and non ischemic left ventricular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Golfín, Covadonga; De Agustin, Alberto; Manzano, M Carmen; Bustos, Ana; Sánchez, Tibisay; Pérez de Isla, Leopoldo; Fuentes, Manuel; Macaya, Carlos; Zamorano, José

    2011-04-01

    Functional mitral regurgitation (FMR) is frequent in left ventricular (LV) dilatation/dysfunction. Echocardiographic predictors of FMR are known. However, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) predictors of FMR have not been fully addressed. The aim of the study was to evaluate CMR mitral valve (MV) parameters associated with FMR in ischemic and non ischemic LV dysfunction. 80 patients with LV ejection fraction below 45% and/or left ventricular dilatation of ischemic and non ischemic etiology were included. Cine-MR images (steady state free-precession) were acquired in a short-axis and 4 chambers views where MV evaluation was performed. Delayed enhancement was performed as well. Significant FMR was established as more than mild MR according to the echocardiographic report. Mean age was 59 years, males 79%. FMR was detected in 20 patients (25%) Significant differences were noted in LV functional parameters and in most MV parameters according to the presence of significant FMR. However, differences were noted between ischemic and non ischemic groups. In the first, differences in most MV parameters remained significant while in the non ischemic, only systolic and diastolic interpapillary muscle distance (1.60 vs. 2.19 cm, P = 0.001; 2. 51 vs. 3.04, P = 0.008) were predictors of FMR. FMR is associated with a more severe LV dilatation/dysfunction in the overall population. CMR MV parameters are associated with the presence of significant FMR and are different between ischemic and non ischemic patients. CMR evaluation of these patients may help in risk stratification as well as in surgical candidate selection.

  19. Determination of regurgitant orifice area with the use of a new three-dimensional flow convergence geometric assumption in functional mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Yoshiki; Saracino, Giuseppe; Sugioka, Kenichi; Tran, Hung; Greenberg, Neil L; Wada, Nozomi; Toyono, Manatomo; Fukuda, Shota; Hozumi, Takeshi; Thomas, James D; Yoshikawa, Junichi; Yoshiyama, Minoru; Shiota, Takahiro

    2008-11-01

    Geometry of the proximal isovelocity surface area (PISA) in functional mitral regurgitation (MR) is elongated, leading to underestimation of the effective regurgitant orifice (ERO) area. This underestimation could be corrected by a new hemiellipsoidal method. Thirty patients with functional MR were examined by real-time 3-dimensional (D) echocardiography. Two ERO areas were calculated from 3D measurements: ERO area by the hemispheric method and that by the new hemiellipsoidal method with our customized program. Each ERO area was compared with that by the 2D quantitative Doppler method. Color 3D images showed an elongated PISA geometry including 2 geometric types ("mountain" or "valley") in all patients with functional MR. Our hemiellipsoidal method could be adapted for all geometric types of PISA and underestimated ERO area by only 26%, whereas the underestimation by the hemispheric PISA method was 49%. The underestimation by the hemispheric PISA method can be significantly corrected by our hemiellipsoidal method.

  20. Outcomes of Mild to Moderate Functional Tricuspid Regurgitation in Patients Undergoing Mitral Valve Operations: A Meta-Analysis of 2,488 Patients.

    PubMed

    Kara, Ibrahim; Koksal, Cengiz; Erkin, Alper; Sacli, Hakan; Demirtas, Mucahit; Percin, Bilal; Diler, Mevriye Serpil; Kirali, Kaan

    2015-12-01

    This meta-analysis examined the prognosis of patients who were found to have mild to moderate functional tricuspid regurgitation during mitral valve operations. Overall, this meta-analysis included 2,488 patients in 10 studies. Compared with the group without tricuspid valve annuloplasty, the probability of not progressing to moderate to severe functional tricuspid regurgitation was significantly higher in the tricuspid valve annuloplasty group. A more aggressive surgical approach involving concomitant tricuspid repair with mitral valve operations may be considered to avoid the development of moderate to severe functional tricuspid regurgitation in the follow-up.

  1. Impact of preserved myocardial contractile function in the segments attached to the papillary muscles on reduction in functional mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Kataoka, Toshiya; Norisada, Kazuko; Onishi, Tetsuari; Kawai, Hiroya; Hirata, Ken-ichi

    2013-02-01

    Effectiveness of functional mitral regurgitation (FMR) in heart failure patients is of growing importance for patient prognosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether regional myocardial contractile function as assessed by tissue Doppler strain rate imaging can predict reduction in FMR caused by dobutamine. Fifty-one patients with depressed left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (32 ± 9%) secondary to dilated cardiomyopathy and FMR underwent evaluation of effective regurgitant orifice (ERO) of FMR, mitral valve deformation, global LV remodeling, and regional myocardial contractile function assessed by longitudinal peak systolic strain rate (Ssr) in 6 mid-LV segments from standard apical views. We also determined the average Ssr of segments attached to the papillary muscles, that is, the inferior, inferolateral, and anterolateral segments (PM segments Ssr). Low-dose (10 μg/kg per minute) dobutamine-induced reduction in ERO was compared with baseline variables. Baseline valve tenting was associated with dobutamine-induced reduction in ERO (r = -0.30, P < 0.05). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that baseline valve tenting, LV sphericity index, inferior Ssr, inferolateral Ssr, and PM segments Ssr were predictors of dobutamine-induced ≥30% reduction in ERO. Importantly, only PM segments Ssr predicted dobutamine-induced ≥20% reduction in valve tenting with area under the curve of 0.67 (P < 0.05). Preserved myocardial contractile function in the segments attached to the PMs was associated with dobutamine-induced reduction in mitral valve tenting and FMR, suggesting that our findings are important for improvement in cardiac function and FMR with medical treatment. © 2012, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Role of Imaging Techniques in Percutaneous Treatment of Mitral Regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Li, Chi-Hion; Arzamendi, Dabit; Carreras, Francesc

    2016-04-01

    Mitral regurgitation is the most prevalent valvular heart disease in the United States and the second most prevalent in Europe. Patients with severe mitral regurgitation have a poor prognosis with medical therapy once they become symptomatic or develop signs of significant cardiac dysfunction. However, as many as half of these patients are inoperable because of advanced age, ventricular dysfunction, or other comorbidities. Studies have shown that surgery increases survival in patients with organic mitral regurgitation due to valve prolapse but has no clinical benefit in those with functional mitral regurgitation. In this scenario, percutaneous repair for mitral regurgitation in native valves provides alternative management of valvular heart disease in patients at high surgical risk. Percutaneous repair for mitral regurgitation is a growing field that relies heavily on imaging techniques to diagnose functional anatomy and guide repair procedures. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Durability of mitral valve repair for mitral regurgitation due to degenerative mitral valve disease.

    PubMed

    David, Tirone E

    2015-09-01

    Degenerative diseases of the mitral valve (MV) are the most common cause of mitral regurgitation in the Western world and the most suitable pathology for MV repair. Several studies have shown excellent long-term durability of MV repair for degenerative diseases. The best follow-up results are obtained with isolated prolapse of the posterior leaflet, however even with isolated prolapse of the anterior leaflet or prolapse of both leaflets the results are gratifying, particularly in young patients. The freedom from reoperation on the MV at 15 years exceeds 90% for isolated prolapse of the posterior leaflet and it is around 70-85% for prolapse of the anterior leaflet or both leaflets. The degree of degenerative change in the MV also plays a role in durability of MV repair. Most studies have used freedom from reoperation to assess durability of the repair but some studies that examined valve function late after surgery suggest that recurrent mitral regurgitation is higher than estimated by freedom from reoperation. We can conclude that MV repair for degenerative mitral regurgitation is associated with low probability of reoperation for up to two decades after surgery. However, almost one-third of the patients develop recurrent moderate or severe mitral regurgitation suggesting that surgery does not arrest the degenerative process.

  4. Durability of mitral valve repair for mitral regurgitation due to degenerative mitral valve disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative diseases of the mitral valve (MV) are the most common cause of mitral regurgitation in the Western world and the most suitable pathology for MV repair. Several studies have shown excellent long-term durability of MV repair for degenerative diseases. The best follow-up results are obtained with isolated prolapse of the posterior leaflet, however even with isolated prolapse of the anterior leaflet or prolapse of both leaflets the results are gratifying, particularly in young patients. The freedom from reoperation on the MV at 15 years exceeds 90% for isolated prolapse of the posterior leaflet and it is around 70-85% for prolapse of the anterior leaflet or both leaflets. The degree of degenerative change in the MV also plays a role in durability of MV repair. Most studies have used freedom from reoperation to assess durability of the repair but some studies that examined valve function late after surgery suggest that recurrent mitral regurgitation is higher than estimated by freedom from reoperation. We can conclude that MV repair for degenerative mitral regurgitation is associated with low probability of reoperation for up to two decades after surgery. However, almost one-third of the patients develop recurrent moderate or severe mitral regurgitation suggesting that surgery does not arrest the degenerative process. PMID:26539345

  5. [Valvular surgery for an exercise-induced functional mitral regurgitation in heart failure and preserved ejection fraction: a case study].

    PubMed

    Attari, M; Legrand, M; Philippe, C; Rosak, P

    2013-08-01

    We here report the case of a 67-year-old woman with moderate mitral regurgitation without significant structural abnormalities that get worse during severe recurrent heart failures and preserved ejection fraction with concomitant paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation became permanent and despite a well-controlled cardiac frequency, new heart failure episodes occurred. Exercise doppler echocardiography showed that the mechanism of this mitral regurgitation was a two leaflet mitral tenting. We discuss here the different mechanisms that could induce these kinds of mitral regurgitation with excessive tenting. We emphasize the interest of early detection by exercise doppler echocardiography even when a triggering factor like atrial fibrillation seems to be involved. We also discuss the interest of mitral valve replacement for these patients.

  6. Degenerative mitral valve regurgitation: best practice revolution

    PubMed Central

    Adams, David H.; Rosenhek, Raphael; Falk, Volkmar

    2010-01-01

    Degenerative mitral valve disease often leads to leaflet prolapse due to chordal elongation or rupture, and resulting in mitral valve regurgitation. Guideline referral for surgical intervention centres primarily on symptoms and ventricular dysfunction. The recommended treatment for degenerative mitral valve disease is mitral valve reconstruction, as opposed to valve replacement with a bioprosthetic or mechanical valve, because valve repair is associated with improved event free survival. Recent studies have documented a significant number of patients are not referred in a timely fashion according to established guidelines, and when they are subjected to surgery, an alarming number of patients continue to undergo mitral valve replacement. The debate around appropriate timing of intervention for asymptomatic severe mitral valve regurgitation has put additional emphasis on targeted surgeon referral and the need to ensure a very high rate of mitral valve repair, particularly in the non-elderly population. Current clinical practice remains suboptimal for many patients, and this review explores the need for a ‘best practice revolution’ in the field of degenerative mitral valve regurgitation. PMID:20624767

  7. Role of regional mechanical dyssynchrony as a determinant of functional mitral regurgitation in patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Agricola, E; Oppizzi, M; Galderisi, M; Pisani, M; Meris, A; Pappone, C; Margonato, A

    2006-10-01

    To assess regional mechanical dyssynchrony as a determinant of the degree of functional mitral regurgitation (FMR). Tertiary cardiology clinic. 74 consecutive patients with left ventricular (LV) dysfunction (ejection fraction < 40%, mean 32.2 (SD 7.3)%) were evaluated. Effective regurgitant orifice (ERO) area, indices of mitral deformation (systolic valvular tenting, mitral annular contraction) and of global LV function and remodelling (ejection fraction, end systolic volume, sphericity index) and local remodelling (papillary-fibrosa distance, regional wall motion score index), and tissue Doppler-derived dyssynchrony index (DI) (regional DI, defined as the standard deviation of time to peak myocardial systolic contraction of eight LV segments supporting the papillary muscles attachment) were measured. All the assessed variables correlated significantly with ERO. By multivariate analysis, systolic valvular tenting was the strongest independent predictor of ERO (R(2) = 0.77, p = 0.0001), with a minor influence of papillary-fibrosa distance (R(2) = 0.77, p = 0.01) and regional DI (R(2) = 0.77, p = 0.03). Local LV remodelling (regional wall motion score index: R(2) = 0.58, p = 0.001; papillary-fibrosa distance: R(2) = 0.58, p = 0.002) and global remodelling indices (sphericity index: R(2) = 0.58, p = 0.003) were the main determinants of systolic valvular tenting, whereas regional DI did not enter into the model. Regional DI was an independent predictor of ERO (R(2) = 0.56, p = 0.005) in patients with non-ischaemic LV dysfunction but not in patients with ischaemic LV dysfunction when these groups were analysed separately. The degree of FMR is associated mainly with mitral deformation indices. The regional dyssynchrony also has an independent association with ERO but with a minor influence; however, it is not a determinant of FMR in patients with ischaemic LV dysfunction.

  8. Role of Dyssynchrony on Functional Mitral Regurgitation in Patients with Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy: A Comparison Study with Geometric Parameters of Mitral Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Woong Gil; Kim, Soo Hyun; Park, Sang Don; Baek, Young Soo; Shin, Sung Hee; Woo, Sung Ill; Kim, Dae Hyeok; Park, Keum Soo; Lee, Woo Hyung

    2011-01-01

    Background Functional mitral regurgitation (FMR) occurs commonly in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). This study was conducted to explore the role of left ventricular (LV) dyssynchrony in developing FMR in patients with DCM in comparison with geometric parameters of the mitral apparatus. Methods Twenty patients without FMR and 33 patients with FMR [effective regurgitant orifice area (ERO) = 0.17 ± 0.10 cm2] were enrolled. MR severity was estimated with ERO area. Dyssynchrony indices (DI) were measured using the standard deviations of time to peak myocardial systolic velocity between eight segments. Using real time 3D echocardiography, mitral valve tenting area (MVTa), anterior (APMD) and posterior papillary muscle distances (PPMD), LV sphericity, and tethering angle of anterior (Aα) and posterior leaflets (Pα) were estimated. All geometrical measurements were corrected (c) by the height of each patient. Results The patient with FMR had significantly higher cDI, cMVTa, cAPMD and cPPMD, LV sphericity, Aα, and Pα than the patients without FMR (all p < 0.05). With multiple logistic regression analysis, cMVTa (p = 0.017) found to be strongest predictor of FMR development. In patients with FMR, cMVTa (r = 0.868), cAPMD (r = 0.801), cPPMD (r = 0.742), Aα (r = 0.454), LV sphericity (r = 0.452), and DI (r = 0.410) showed significant correlation with ERO. On multivariate regression analysis, cMVTa and cAPMD (p < 0.001, p = 0.022, respectively) remained the strongest determinants of the degree of ERO and cAPMD (p < 0.001) remained the strongest determinant of the degree of cMVTa. Conclusion Displacement of anterior papillary muscle and consequent mitral valve tenting seem to play a major role in developing FMR in DCM, while LV dyssynchrony seems to have no significant role. PMID:21860720

  9. Role of dyssynchrony on functional mitral regurgitation in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy: a comparison study with geometric parameters of mitral apparatus.

    PubMed

    Choi, Woong Gil; Kim, Soo Hyun; Park, Sang Don; Baek, Young Soo; Shin, Sung Hee; Woo, Sung Ill; Kim, Dae Hyeok; Park, Keum Soo; Lee, Woo Hyung; Kwan, Jun

    2011-06-01

    Functional mitral regurgitation (FMR) occurs commonly in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). This study was conducted to explore the role of left ventricular (LV) dyssynchrony in developing FMR in patients with DCM in comparison with geometric parameters of the mitral apparatus. Twenty patients without FMR and 33 patients with FMR [effective regurgitant orifice area (ERO) = 0.17 ± 0.10 cm(2)] were enrolled. MR severity was estimated with ERO area. Dyssynchrony indices (DI) were measured using the standard deviations of time to peak myocardial systolic velocity between eight segments. Using real time 3D echocardiography, mitral valve tenting area (MVTa), anterior (APMD) and posterior papillary muscle distances (PPMD), LV sphericity, and tethering angle of anterior (Aα) and posterior leaflets (Pα) were estimated. All geometrical measurements were corrected (c) by the height of each patient. The patient with FMR had significantly higher cDI, cMVTa, cAPMD and cPPMD, LV sphericity, Aα, and Pα than the patients without FMR (all p < 0.05). With multiple logistic regression analysis, cMVTa (p = 0.017) found to be strongest predictor of FMR development. In patients with FMR, cMVTa (r = 0.868), cAPMD (r = 0.801), cPPMD (r = 0.742), Aα (r = 0.454), LV sphericity (r = 0.452), and DI (r = 0.410) showed significant correlation with ERO. On multivariate regression analysis, cMVTa and cAPMD (p < 0.001, p = 0.022, respectively) remained the strongest determinants of the degree of ERO and cAPMD (p < 0.001) remained the strongest determinant of the degree of cMVTa. Displacement of anterior papillary muscle and consequent mitral valve tenting seem to play a major role in developing FMR in DCM, while LV dyssynchrony seems to have no significant role.

  10. Transaortic Edge-to-Edge Repair for Functional Mitral Regurgitation During Aortic Valve Replacement: A 13-Year Experience.

    PubMed

    Mihos, Christos G; Larrauri-Reyes, Maiteder; Hung, Judy; Santana, Orlando

    The study evaluated the feasibility of a transaortic edge-to-edge mitral valve repair (Alfieri stitch) for moderate or greater (≥2+) functional mitral regurgitation (MR) in high-risk patients undergoing aortic valve replacement. We retrospectively evaluated 40 consecutive patients who underwent aortic valve replacement combined with a transaortic edge-to-edge mitral valve repair for 2+ or greater functional MR, between February 2002 and April 2015. The MR was graded semiquantitatively as 0 (trace/none), mild (1+), moderate (2+), or moderate to severe (3-4+). Thirty-two patients had aortic stenosis, and eight had aortic regurgitation. The mean ± standard deviation (SD) age was 77.5 ± 5 years, 34 (85%) were male, and the mean ± SD EuroSCORE II was 14.3% ± 12.9. At a median follow-up of 1 month (interquartile range, 0.75-10), there were significant improvements in preoperative versus postoperative median MR grade (3+ vs 1+, P < 0.001), mean left ventricular ejection fraction (34% vs 41%, P = 0.018), left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (54 vs 49 mm, P = 0.005), and pulmonary artery systolic pressure (49 vs 35 mm Hg, P < 0.001). Persistent 3 to 4+ MR occurred in two patients (5%). In 12 patients with at least 6-month follow-up (mean ± SD, 18 ± 11 months), a sustained improvement in all echocardiographic parameters was observed, with persistent 3 to 4+ MR occurring in one patient (8.3%). Actuarial survival at 1, 3, and 4.5 years was 82% ± 6, 71% ± 8, and 65% ± 10, respectively. A transaortic edge-to-edge repair for 2+ or greater functional MR can be safely performed during aortic valve replacement and is associated with improvements in MR grade, left ventricular remodeling, and pulmonary hemodynamics.

  11. Transcatheter mitral valve repair therapies for primary and secondary mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Al Amri, Ibtihal; van der Kley, Frank; Schalij, Martin J; Ajmone Marsan, Nina; Delgado, Victoria

    2015-03-01

    Mitral regurgitation is one of the most prevalent valvular heart diseases and its prevalence is related to population aging. Elderly patients with age-associated co-morbidities have an increased risk for conventional mitral valve surgery. Transcatheter mitral valve repair has emerged as a feasible and safe alternative in patients with contraindications for surgery or high operative risk. Several transcatheter mitral repair technologies have been developed during the last decade. While the development of some devices was abandoned due to suboptimal results, others demonstrated to be safe and effective and have been included in current practice guidelines. Not all technologies are suitable for all mitral anatomies and regurgitation mechanisms. Therefore, accurate evaluation of mitral valve anatomy and function are pivotal to the success of these therapies. Cardiac imaging plays a central role in selecting patients, guiding the procedure and evaluating the durability of the repair at follow-up.

  12. Real‐Time 3‐Dimensional Dynamics of Functional Mitral Regurgitation: A Prospective Quantitative and Mechanistic Study

    PubMed Central

    Topilsky, Yan; Vaturi, Ori; Watanabe, Nozomi; Bichara, Valentina; Nkomo, Vuyisile T.; Michelena, Hector; Le Tourneau, Thierry; Mankad, Sunil V.; Park, Soon; Capps, Mary Ann; Suri, Rakesh; Pislaru, Sorin V.; Maalouf, Joseph; Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Enriquez‐Sarano, Maurice

    2013-01-01

    Background Three‐dimensional transthoracic echocardiography (3D‐TTE) with dedicated software permits quantification of mitral annulus dynamics and papillary muscle motion throughout the cardiac cycle. Methods and Results Mitral apparatus 3D‐TTE was acquired in controls (n=42), patients with left ventricle dysfunction and functional mitral regurgitation (LVD‐FMR; n=43) or without FMR (LVD‐noMR, n=35). Annulus in both normal and LVD‐noMR subjects displayed saddle shape accentuation in early‐systole (ratio of height to intercommissural diameter, 10.6±3.7 to 13.5±4.0 in normal and 9.1±4.3 to 12.6±3.6 in LVD‐noMR; P<0.001 for diastole to early‐systole motion, P=NS between those groups). In contrast, saddle shape was unchanged from diastole in FMR patients (10.0±6.4 to 8.0±5.2; P=NS, P<0.05 compared to both other groups). Papillary tips moved symmetrically towards to the midanterior annulus in control and LVD‐noMR subjects, maintaining constant ratio of the distances between both tips to midannulus (PtAR) throughout systole. In LVD‐FMR patients midsystolic posterior papillary tip to anterior annulus distance was increased, resulting in higher PtAR (P=0.05 compared to both other groups). Mechanisms of early‐ and midsystolic FMR differed between different etiologies of LV dysfunction. In patients with anterior MI and global dysfunction annular function and dilatation were the dominant parameters, while papillary muscle motion was the predominant determinant of FMR in patients with inferior MI. Conclusions Inadequate early‐systolic annular contraction and saddle‐shape accentuation in patients with impaired LV contribute to early–mitral incompetency. Asymmetric papillary tip movement towards the midanterior annulus is a major determinant of mid‐ and late‐systolic functional mitral regurgitation. PMID:23727698

  13. Severe mitral regurgitation unmasked after bilateral lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Udoji, Timothy N; Force, Seth D; Pelaez, Andres

    2013-09-01

    Abstract A 33-year-old female patient with advanced idiopathic pulmonary artery hypertension underwent bilateral lung transplantation. The postsurgical course was complicated by prolonged mechanical ventilation and acute hypoxemia with recurrent episodes of pulmonary edema. An echocardiogram revealed improved right-sided pressures along with a dilated left atrium, a structurally normal mitral valve, and a new posterior-oriented severe mitral regurgitation. The patient's condition improved after treatment with arterial vasodilators and diuretics, and she has remained in World Health Organization functional class I after almost 36 months of follow-up. We hypothesize that cardiac ventricle remodeling and a geometric change in mitral valve apparatus after transplantation led to the hemodynamic changes and recurrent pulmonary edema seen in our patient. Our case is, to our knowledge, the second report of severe valvular regurgitation in a structurally normal mitral valve apparatus in the postoperative period and the first of a patient to be treated without valve replacement.

  14. Tricuspid regurgitation after successful mitral valve surgery

    PubMed Central

    Katsi, Vasiliki; Raftopoulos, Leonidas; Aggeli, Constantina; Vlasseros, Ioannis; Felekos, Ioannis; Tousoulis, Dimitrios; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Kallikazaros, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    The tricuspid valve (TV) is inseparably connected with the mitral valve (MV) in terms of function. Any pathophysiological condition concerning the MV is potentially a threat for the normal function of the TV as well. One of the most challenging cases is functional tricuspid regurgitation (TR) after surgical MV correction. In the past, TR was considered to progressively revert with time after left-sided valve restoration. Nevertheless, more recent studies showed that TR could develop and evolve postoperatively over time, as well as being closely associated with a poorer prognosis in terms of morbidity and mortality. Pressure and volume overload are usually the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms; structural alterations, like tricuspid annulus dilatation, increased leaflet tethering and right ventricular remodelling are almost always present when regurgitation develops. The most important risk factors associated with a higher probability of late TR development involve the elderly, female gender, larger left atrial size, atrial fibrillation, right chamber dilatation, higher pulmonary artery systolic pressures, longer times from the onset of MV disease to surgery, history of rheumatic heart disease, ischaemic heart disease and prosthetic valve malfunction. The time of TR manifestation can be up to 10 years or more after an MV surgery. Echocardiography, including the novel 3D Echo techniques, is crucial in the early diagnosis and prognosis of future TV disease development. Appropriate surgical technique and timing still need to be clarified. PMID:22457188

  15. Tricuspid regurgitation after successful mitral valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Katsi, Vasiliki; Raftopoulos, Leonidas; Aggeli, Constantina; Vlasseros, Ioannis; Felekos, Ioannis; Tousoulis, Dimitrios; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Kallikazaros, Ioannis

    2012-07-01

    The tricuspid valve (TV) is inseparably connected with the mitral valve (MV) in terms of function. Any pathophysiological condition concerning the MV is potentially a threat for the normal function of the TV as well. One of the most challenging cases is functional tricuspid regurgitation (TR) after surgical MV correction. In the past, TR was considered to progressively revert with time after left-sided valve restoration. Nevertheless, more recent studies showed that TR could develop and evolve postoperatively over time, as well as being closely associated with a poorer prognosis in terms of morbidity and mortality. Pressure and volume overload are usually the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms; structural alterations, like tricuspid annulus dilatation, increased leaflet tethering and right ventricular remodelling are almost always present when regurgitation develops. The most important risk factors associated with a higher probability of late TR development involve the elderly, female gender, larger left atrial size, atrial fibrillation, right chamber dilatation, higher pulmonary artery systolic pressures, longer times from the onset of MV disease to surgery, history of rheumatic heart disease, ischaemic heart disease and prosthetic valve malfunction. The time of TR manifestation can be up to 10 years or more after an MV surgery. Echocardiography, including the novel 3D Echo techniques, is crucial in the early diagnosis and prognosis of future TV disease development. Appropriate surgical technique and timing still need to be clarified.

  16. Exercise pulmonary hypertension in asymptomatic degenerative mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Magne, Julien; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Piérard, Luc A

    2010-07-06

    Current guidelines recommend mitral valve surgery for asymptomatic patients with severe degenerative mitral regurgitation and preserved left ventricular systolic function when exercise pulmonary hypertension (PHT) is present. However, the determinants of exercise PHT have not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to identify the echocardiographic predictors of exercise PHT and the impact on symptoms. Comprehensive resting and exercise transthoracic echocardiography was performed in 78 consecutive patients (age, 61+/-13 years; 56% men) with at least moderate degenerative mitral regurgitation (effective regurgitant orifice area =43+/-20 mm(2); regurgitant volume =71+/-27 mL). Exercise PHT was defined as a systolic pulmonary arterial pressure (SPAP) >60 mm Hg. Exercise PHT was present in 46% patients. In multivariable analysis, exercise effective regurgitant orifice was an independent determinant of exercise SPAP (P<0.0001) and exercise PHT (P=0.002). Resting PHT and exercise PHT were associated with markedly reduced 2-year symptom-free survival (36+/-14% versus 59+/-7%, P=0.04; 35+/-8% versus 75+/-7%, P<0.0001). After adjustment, although the impact of resting PHT was no longer significant, exercise PHT was identified as an independent predictor of the occurrence of symptoms (hazard ratio=3.4; P=0.002). Receiver-operating characteristics curves revealed that exercise PHT (SPAP >56 mm Hg) was more accurate than resting PHT (SPAP >36 mm Hg) in predicting the occurrence of symptoms during follow-up (P=0.032). Exercise PHT is frequent in patients with asymptomatic degenerative mitral regurgitation. Exercise mitral regurgitation severity is a strong independent predictor of both exercise SPAP and exercise PHT. Exercise PHT is associated with markedly low 2-year symptom-free survival, emphasizing the use of exercise echocardiography. An exercise SPAP >56 mm Hg accurately predicts the occurrence of symptoms.

  17. Mitral Valve Clip for Treatment of Mitral Regurgitation: An Evidence-Based Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Mohammed T.; Ahmadzai, Nadera; Coyle, Kathryn; Coyle, Doug; Moher, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Many of the 500,000 North American patients with chronic mitral regurgitation may be poor candidates for mitral valve surgery. Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the comparative effectiveness, harms, and cost-effectiveness of percutaneous mitral valve repair using mitral valve clips in candidates at prohibitive risk for surgery. Data Sources We searched articles in MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane Library published from 1994 to February 2014 for evidence of effectiveness and harms; for economic literature we also searched NHS EED and Tufts CEA registry. Grey literature was also searched. Review Methods Primary studies were sought from existing systematic reviews that had employed reliable search and screening methods. Newer studies were sought by searching the period subsequent to the last search date of the review. Two reviewers screened records and assessed study validity. We used the Cochrane risk of bias tool for randomized, generic assessment for non-randomized studies, and the Phillips checklist for economic studies. Results Ten studies including 1 randomized trial were included. The majority of the direct comparative evidence compared the mitral valve clip repair with surgery in patients not particularly at prohibitive surgical risk. Irrespective of degenerative or functional chronic mitral regurgitation etiology, evidence of effectiveness and harms is inconclusive and of very low quality. Very-low-quality evidence indicates that percutaneous mitral valve clip repair may provide a survival advantage, at least during the first 1 to 2 years, particularly in medically managed chronic functional mitral regurgitation. Because of limitations in the design of studies, the cost-effectiveness of mitral valve clips in patients at prohibitive risk for surgery also could not be established. Limitations Because of serious concerns of risk of bias, indirectness, and imprecision, evidence is of very low quality. Conclusions No meaningful

  18. Acute mitral regurgitation in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Bouabdallaoui, Nadia; Wang, Zhen; Lecomte, Milena; Ennezat, Pierre V; Blanchard, Didier

    2015-04-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) is a well-recognised entity that commonly manifests with chest pain, ST segment abnormalities and transient left ventricular apical ballooning without coronary artery obstructive disease. This syndrome usually portends a favourable outcome. In the rare haemodynamically unstable TTC patients, acute mitral regurgitation (MR) related to systolic anterior motion (SAM) of the mitral valve and left ventricular outflow tract obstruction (LVOTO) is to be considered. Bedside echocardiography is key in recognition of this latter condition as vasodilators, inotropic agents or intra-aortic balloon counter-pulsation worsen the patient's clinical status. We discuss here a case of TTC where nitrate-induced subaortic obstruction and mitral regurgitation led to haemodynamic instability.

  19. Functional mitral regurgitation in patients with aortic stenosis: prevalence, clinical correlates and pathophysiological determinants: a quantitative prospective study.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Andrea; Dandale, Rajesh; Nistri, Stefano; Faggiano, Pompilio; Cicoira, Mariantonietta; Benfari, Giovanni; Onorati, Francesco; Santini, Francesco; Messika-Zeitoun, David; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice; Vassanelli, Corrado

    2014-06-01

    In patients with aortic stenosis (AS) functional mitral regurgitation (FMR) is frequent and is attributed to left ventricular (LV) remodelling and to aortic gradient. However, the association of these variables with mitral effective regurgitant orifice (ERO) is still unknown. We prospectively enrolled patients with aortic valve thickness and aortic velocities >2.5 m/s. We measured the LV diastolic (LVD) and systolic volumes (Simpson's method) and ejection fraction (EF) and longitudinal shortening (S-DTI), early, and late (A-DTI) lengthening velocities. The aortic valve area (AVA) and mean gradient (MG) were measured. FMR was considered in the absence of any alteration of mitral leaflet. ERO and regurgitant volume were measured by means of a proximal velocity surface area method method. One hundred and seventy-two patients formed the study population (mean age 76 ± 8 years; 50% female, EF 57 ± 14%, AVA 1.00 ± 0.4 cm(2)). Sixty-three per cent of patients had FMR (ERO range: 0.02 0.32 cm(2)). ERO was significantly associated with LVD (rho = 0.34; P = 0.0001), EF (r(s) = -0.35: P = 0.0001), and S-DTI (r = -0.57; P = 0.0001), A-DTI (rho = -0.47; P = 0.0001). In the subgroup of patients with a preserved EF (LVD <75 mL/m(2) and EF >55%), S-DTI, and A-DTI were the variables with the more powerful association with ERO (r(s) = -0.49 P = 0.0001 and r(s) = -0.40 P = 0.0001, respectively). In the overall population there was a non-significant negative association between the degree of AS and ERO (MG: r(s) = -0.08 P = 0.2 and AVA: r(s) = -0.08 P = 0.2). In AS patients, the LV function is a main determinant of FMR even if EF is preserved. The association between ERO and valvular gradient is complex but tended to be negative. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2013. For permissions please email: journals. permissions@ oup. com.

  20. Relationship between native papillary muscle T1 time and severity of functional mitral regurgitation in patients with non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shingo; Nakamori, Shiro; Roujol, Sébastien; Delling, Francesca N; Akhtari, Shadi; Jang, Jihye; Basha, Tamer; Berg, Sophie; Kissinger, Kraig V; Goddu, Beth; Manning, Warren J; Nezafat, Reza

    2016-11-16

    Functional mitral regurgitation is one of the severe complications of non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Non-contrast native T1 mapping has emerged as a non-invasive method to evaluate myocardial fibrosis. We sought to evaluate the potential relationship between papillary muscle T1 time and mitral regurgitation in DCM patients. Forty DCM patients (55 ± 13 years) and 20 healthy adult control subjects (54 ± 13 years) were studied. Native T1 mapping was performed using a slice interleaved T1 mapping sequence (STONE) which enables acquisition of 5 slices in the short-axis plane within a 90 s free-breathing scan. We measured papillary muscle diameter, length and shortening. DCM patients were allocated into 2 groups based on the presence or absence of functional mitral regurgitation. Papillary muscle T1 time was significantly elevated in DCM patients with mitral regurgitation (n = 22) in comparison to those without mitral regurgitation (n = 18) (anterior papillary muscle: 1127 ± 36 msec vs 1063 ± 16 msec, p < 0.05; posterior papillary muscle: 1124 ± 30 msec vs 1062 ± 19 msec, p < 0.05), but LV T1 time was similar (1129 ± 38 msec vs 1134 ± 58 msec, p = 0.93). Multivariate linear regression analysis showed that papillary muscle native T1 time (β = 0.10, 95 % CI: 0.05-0.17, p < 0.05) is significantly correlated with mitral regurgitant fraction. Elevated papillary muscle T1 time was associated with larger diameter, longer length and decreased papillary muscle shortening (all p values <0.05). In DCM, papillary muscle native T1 time is significantly elevated and related to mitral regurgitant fraction.

  1. Non-rheumatic `subvalvar' mitral regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Caves, P. K.; Paneth, M.

    1973-01-01

    Thirty-seven patients with non-rheumatic subvalvar mitral regurgitation are reported, representing 16% of all patients with mitral regurgitation submitted to open operation over a five-and-a-half-year period. In 22 older patients with `idiopathic' chordal lesions, the commonest finding was rupture of chordae to the posterior leaflet. The aortic leaflet chordae were most frequently involved following myocardial infarction (7 patients) or bacterial endocarditis (3 patients). Three other younger patients had ruptured chordae and two patients had rupture of the posteromedial papillary muscle following acute myocardial infarction. The mitral valve was repaired in 16 patients with ruptured chordae, of whom only eight obtained a satisfactory late result. In the other 21 patients the valve was replaced with a mounted aortic homograft or a Starr-Edwards prosthesis. It is concluded that mitral valve repair should be reserved for patients with symmetrical rupture of the chordae controlling the centre of the posterior leaflet, as regurgitation may reappear after other forms of repair due to progressive rupture of other abnormal chordae or breakdown of the repair. The early and late mortality in the patients with a definite antecedent myocardial infarction was much higher than in the other groups, and emergency valve replacement soon after rupture of the papillary muscle was unsuccessful in both patients. Images PMID:4731107

  2. Determinants of Atrial Electromechanical Delay in Patients with Functional Mitral Regurgitation and Non-ischemic Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Bengi Bakal, Ruken; Hatipoglu, Suzan; Sahin, Muslum; Emiroglu, Mehmet Yunus; Bulut, Mustafa; Ozdemir, Nihal

    2014-01-01

    Atrial conduction time has important hemodynamic effects on ventricular filling and is accepted as a predictor of atrial fibrillation. In this study we assessed atrial conduction time in patients with non ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (NIDCMP) and functional mitral regurgitation (MR) and aimed to determine factors predicting atrial conduction time prolongation. Sixty five patients with non ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy who have moderate to severe MR and 60 control subjects were included in the study. In addition to conventional echocardiographic measures used to asses left ventricle and MR, atrial electromechanical coupling (time interval from the onset of P wave on surface electrocardiogram [ECG] to the beginning of A wave interval with tissue Doppler echocardiography [PA]), intra- and interatrial electromechanical delay (intra and inter AEMD) were measured. The correlations between inter AEMD and left atrial (LA) size, MR volume, isovolumetric relaxation time (IVRT), deceleration time (DT), systolic pulmonary artery pressure (PAPs), E/A ratio and E/e' were very poor. Similarly, intra AEMD was not correlated to LA size , MR volume, IVRT, DT, PAPs, E/A ratio and E/e'. However, both inter AEMD and intra AEMD had good correlation with left ventricular mass index, tenting area (TA), tenting distance (TD), coaptation septal distance (CSD), sphericity index (SI). Prolongation of inter and intra AEMDs were found to be well correlated with parameters reflecting left ventricular and mitral annular remodeling.

  3. Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage due to Acute Mitral Valve Regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Marak, Creticus P.; Joy, Parijat S.; Gupta, Pragya; Guddati, Achuta K.

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) can be caused by several etiologies including vasculitis, drug exposure, anticoagulants, infections, mitral valve stenosis, and regurgitation. Chronic mitral valve regurgitation (MR) has been well documented as an etiological factor for DAH, but there have been only a few cases which have reported acute mitral valve regurgitation as an etiology of DAH. Acute mitral valve regurgitation can be a life-threatening condition and often requires urgent intervention. In rare cases, acute mitral regurgitation may result in a regurgitant jet which is directed towards the right upper pulmonary vein and may specifically cause right-sided pulmonary edema and right-sided DAH. Surgical repair of the mitral valve results in rapid resolution of DAH. Acute MR should be considered as a possible etiology in patients presenting with unilateral pulmonary edema, hemoptysis, and DAH. PMID:24383034

  4. Pre- and afterload reduction in chronic mitral regurgitation: a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial of the acute and 2 weeks' effect of nifedipine or isosorbide dinitrate treatment on left ventricular function and the severity of mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Kelbaek, H; Aldershvile, J; Skagen, K; Hildebrandt, P; Nielsen, S L

    1996-06-01

    1. The acute effect and effect of 14 days' treatment with isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN) and nifedipine (NIF) was evaluated by radionuclide cardiography in patients with chronic mitral regurgitation and sinus rhythm. 2. In 23 patients with clinically stable disease blood pressure was lowered by 15% and left ventricular volume was reduced by 16-20% after 20 mg sublingual ISDN causing combined pre- and afterload reduction. Afterload reduction alone induced by 10 mg NIF resulted in an acute 9% decrease in left ventricular endsystolic volume, whereas forward stroke volume increased by 30%, and regurgitation fraction tended to decrease. No haemodynamic effects could be detected after 14 days' treatment with 20 mg ISDN orally twice daily (preload reduction), whereas 20 mg NIF twice daily (afterload reduction) caused an increase in forward stroke volume (18%) and a decrease in both regurgitant volume (20%) and regurgitation fraction (22%) without affecting blood pressure or heart rate. 3. ISDN and NIF have beneficial acute haemodynamic effects in patients with chronic mitral regurgitation probably due to their pre- and afterload reducing properties. The reduction in regurgitation induced by NIF appears to be sustained after 14 days therapy.

  5. Acute severe mitral regurgitation. Pathophysiology, clinical recognition, and management.

    PubMed

    DePace, N L; Nestico, P F; Morganroth, J

    1985-02-01

    Acute severe mitral regurgitation often goes unrecognized as an emergency requiring prompt, lifesaving treatment. Its causes, physical signs, natural history, echocardiographic features, and findings on chest roentgenography, electrocardiography, and nuclear scintigraphic scanning are reviewed. Acute severe mitral insufficiency can be differentiated from chronic severe mitral insufficiency by noninvasive two-dimensional echocardiography. M-mode echocardiography is a valuable tool in evaluating mitral prosthetic paravalvular regurgitation.

  6. Outcome after percutaneous edge-to-edge mitral repair for functional and degenerative mitral regurgitation: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chiarito, Mauro; Pagnesi, Matteo; Martino, Enrico Antonio; Pighi, Michele; Scotti, Andrea; Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe; Latib, Azeem; Landoni, Giovanni; Mario, Carlo Di; Margonato, Alberto; Maisano, Francesco; Feldman, Ted; Alfieri, Ottavio; Colombo, Antonio; Godino, Cosmo

    2017-06-29

    Differences in terms of safety and efficacy of percutaneous edge-to-edge mitral repair between patients with functional and degenerative mitral regurgitation (MR) are not well established. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to clarify these differences. PubMed, EMBASE, Google scholar database and international meeting abstracts were searched for all studies about MitraClip. Studies with <25 patients or where 1-year results were not delineated between MR aetiology were excluded. This study is registered with PROSPERO. A total of nine studies investigating the mid-term outcome of percutaneous edge-to-edge repair in patients with functional versus degenerative MR were included in the meta-analysis (n=2615). At 1 year, there were not significant differences among groups in terms of patients with MR grade≤2 (719/1304 vs 295/504; 58% vs 54%; risk ratio (RR) 1.12; 95% CI: 0.86 to 1.47; p=0.40), while there was a significantly lower rate of mitral valve re-intervention in patients with functional MR compared with those with degenerative MR (77/1770 vs 80/818; 4% vs 10%; RR 0.60; 95% CI: 0.38 to 0.97; p=0.04). One-year mortality rate was 16% (408/2498) and similar among groups (RR 1.26; 95% CI: 0.90 to 1.77; p=0.18). Functional MR group showed significantly higher percentage of patients in New York Heart Association class III/IV (234/1480 vs 49/583; 16% vs 8%; p<0.01) and re-hospitalisation for heart failure (137/605 vs 31/220; 23% vs 14%; p=0.03). No differences were found in terms of single leaflet device attachment (25/969 vs 20/464; 3% vs 4%; p=0.81) and device embolisation (no events reported in both groups) at 1 year. This meta-analysis suggests that percutaneous edge-to-edge repair is likely to be an efficacious and safe option in patients with both functional and degenerative MR. Large, randomised studies are ongoing and awaited to fully assess the clinical impact of the procedure in these two different MR aetiologies. © Article author

  7. Invasive Hemodynamic Assessment of Cardiac Output State after MitraClip Therapy in Nonanaesthetized Patients with Functional Mitral Regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Budesinsky, Tomas; Linkova, Hana

    2016-01-01

    Background. Surgical correction of mitral regurgitation (MR) can lead to postoperative low cardiac output state. We aimed to assess the acute hemodynamic changes after percutaneous MitraClip therapy (a unique model without influence of factors linked to surgical procedure) in patients with functional MR without the influence of general anaesthesia. Methods. We studied invasive hemodynamic parameters in 23 patients before procedure (conscious, nonsedated patients), during procedure (intubated patients), and the first day after MitraClip implantation (conscious, extubated patients). Results. Mitral valve clipping significantly increased cardiac index (CI) (from 2.0 ± 0.5 to 3.3 ± 0.6 L/min/m2; p < 0.01). Conversely, there was significant reduction in the mean pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) (from 18.6 ± 5.7 to 10.5 ± 3.8 mmHg; p < 0.01), mean pulmonary artery pressure (from 29.8 ± 10.9 to 25.2 ± 10.3 mmHg; p = 0.03), and pulmonary vascular resistance index (from 531 ± 359 to 365 ± 193 dyn·s·cm−5/m2; p = 0.03). Conclusions. The functional MR therapy with percutaneous MitraClip device results in significant increase in CI (+66%) and concomitant decrease in PCWP (−42%). None of our patients developed low cardiac output state. Our results support the idea that significant part of low cardiac output state after cardiac surgery is due to surgery related factors rather than due to increase in afterload after MR elimination. PMID:28058260

  8. Chronic mitral regurgitation: a pilot study to assess preoperative left ventricular contractile function using speckle-tracking echocardiography.

    PubMed

    de Isla, Leopoldo Perez; de Agustin, Alberto; Rodrigo, Jose Luis; Almeria, Carlos; del Carmen Manzano, Maria; Rodríguez, Enrique; García, Ana; Macaya, Carlos; Zamorano, José

    2009-07-01

    The development of postoperative left ventricular (LV) dysfunction is a frequent complication in patients with chronic severe mitral regurgitation (MR) and implies a poor prognosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive value of preoperative regional LV contractile function assessment using two-dimensional echocardiography-based speckle-tracking analysis in patients with chronic severe MR. Thirty-eight consecutive patients with chronic severe MR scheduled for mitral valve replacement were prospectively enrolled. Preoperative two-dimensional echocardiography-based speckle-tracking analysis at the level of the interventricular septum (IVS) was carried out, and strain and strain rate values were obtained. LV dP/dt and Doppler tissue imaging-derived strain and strain rate measurements were also obtained. LV volumes and LV ejection fraction (LVEF) were defined using three-dimensional echocardiography. Preoperative speckle tracking-derived longitudinal strain and strain rate values at the level of the IVS strongly predicted a postoperative LVEF decrease of >10%. Their predictive values were greater than those obtained for preoperative LV volumes and LVEF, LV dP/dt, and Doppler tissue imaging-derived strain and strain rate. The best discriminant parameter to detect a postoperative LVEF reduction of >10% with speckle tracking was a longitudinal strain rate at the level of the mid IVS < -0.80 s(-1) (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.88; sensitivity, 60%; specificity, 96.5%; positive predictive value, 90%; negative predictive value, 82.35%). IVS longitudinal speckle tracking-derived strain rate allows the accurate detection of early abnormalities in LV contractile function. It is a powerful predictor of early postoperative LVEF decreases in patients with chronic severe MR. Furthermore, speckle-tracking technology is more accurate than other methods. This new tool might assist clinicians in the optimal timing of surgery in patients with

  9. [Immediate Results of Mitral Valve Surgery in Asymptomatic Patients With Severe Mitral Regurgitation Due to Degenerative Mitral VaIve Disease].

    PubMed

    Nazarov, V M; Afanasyev, A V; Zheleznev, S I; Bogachev-Prokophiev, A V; Demin, I I; Karaskov, A M

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative mitral valve disease nowadays is the most common cause of mitral insufficiency in developed countries and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. In the last decades repairing the mitral valve has become the operation of choice for treatment of the mitral valve prolapse, enabling to improve the geometry and function of the left ventricle and long-term survival. Nevertheless, the problem of choice of method of management of severe mitral regurgitation in asymptomatic patients with degenerative mitral valve disease remains unsolved. In this article we present immediate results of a prospective comparative study of mitral valve surgery in asymptomatic and symptomatic patients in dependence on NYHA class of heart failure.

  10. Forward ejection fraction: a new index of left ventricular function in mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Clancy, K F; Hakki, A H; Iskandrian, A S; Hadjimiltiades, S; Mundth, E D; Hakki, A H; Bemis, C E; Nestico, P F; DePace, N L; Segal, B L

    1985-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that a normal LVEF is not a reliable index of LV function in MR. We hypothesized that the forward EF, which is the forward stroke volume (measured by Fick or thermodilution) divided by end-diastolic volume (measured by contrast ventriculography) may be a useful index of LV function, since it represents LV emptying into the aorta. This index was examined in 54 patients with chronic MR who had normal EF (greater than or equal to 50%). There were significant correlations between the forward EF and the end-diastolic volume index (r = -0.69, p less than 0.001), end-systolic volume index (r = -0.64, p less than 0.001), cardiac index (r = 0.43, p less than 0.01), and the ratio of systolic pressure-to-end-systolic volume (r = 0.65, p less than 0.001). Patients were divided into two groups according to the forward EF: group I (n = 34) had forward EF less than or equal to 35%; and group II (n = 20) had forward EF greater than 35%. Of the 32 patients who subsequently underwent mitral valve replacement, 24 patients were in group I and eight patients were in group II. At a mean follow-up of 35 months, four patients died; all of them were in group I. Improvement in functional class occurred in 75% of surgical survivors (80% in group I and 63% in group II, p = NS). These preliminary data suggest that forward EF may be a useful index of LV performance in patients with MR who have normal EF.

  11. A pathoanatomic approach to the management of mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Badhwar, Vinay; Smith, Anson J C; Cavalcante, João L

    2016-02-01

    Mitral regurgitation remains the most common global valvular heart disease. From otherwise unsuspecting healthy patients without overt symptoms to those with recalcitrant heart failure, mitral valve (MV) disease touches millions of patients per year. While MV prolapse without regurgitation remains benign, once regurgitation begins, quantification of severity is related to prognosis. Understanding the mechanism of regurgitation guides appropriate treatment. Current management guidelines emphasize early therapy after careful assessment of both anatomy and severity of mitral regurgitation. The objective of this review is to provide an update on the treatment of MV disease and to offer additional granularity on pathoanatomic decision making that may aid a more precise application of optimal guideline-directed therapy of primary and secondary mitral regurgitation.

  12. Management and outcomes in patients with moderate or severe functional mitral regurgitation and severe left ventricular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Samad, Zainab; Shaw, Linda K; Phelan, Matthew; Ersboll, Mads; Risum, Niels; Al-Khalidi, Hussein R; Glower, Donald D; Milano, Carmelo A; Alexander, John H; O'Connor, Christopher M; Wang, Andrew; Velazquez, Eric J

    2015-10-21

    The management and outcomes of patients with functional moderate/severe mitral regurgitation and severe left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction are not well defined. We sought to determine the characteristics, management strategies, and outcomes of patients with moderate or severe mitral regurgitation (MR) and LV systolic dysfunction. For the period 1995-2010, the Duke Echocardiography Laboratory and Duke Databank for Cardiovascular Diseases databases were merged to identify patients with moderate or severe functional MR and severe LV dysfunction (defined as LV ejection fraction ≤ 30% or LV end-systolic diameter > 55 mm). We examined treatment effects in two ways. (i) A multivariable Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess the independent relationship of different treatment strategies and long-term event (death, LV assist device, or transplant)-free survival among those with and without coronary artery disease (CAD). (ii) To examine the association of mitral valve (MV) surgery with outcomes, we divided the entire cohort into two groups, those who underwent MV surgery and those who did not; we used inverse probability weighted (IPW) propensity adjustment to account for non-random treatment assignment. Among 1441 patients with moderate (70%) or severe (30%) MR, a significant history of hypertension (59%), diabetes (28%), symptomatic heart failure (83%), and CAD (52%) was observed. Past revascularization in 26% was noted. At 1 year, 1094 (75%) patients were treated medically. Percutaneous coronary intervention was performed in 114 patients, coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery in 82, CABG and MV surgery in 96, and MV surgery alone in 55 patients. Among patients with CAD, compared with medical therapy alone, the treatment strategies of CABG surgery [hazard ratio (HR) 0.56, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.42-0.76] and CABG with MV surgery (HR 0.58, 95% CI 0.44-0.78) were associated with long-term, event-free survival benefit. Percutaneous

  13. Cardiogenic unilateral pulmonary oedema in an infant with severe residual mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Joong, Anna; Lai, Wyman W; Ferris, Anne

    2017-01-01

    An infant with residual severe mitral regurgitation following mitral commissurotomy developed cardiogenic unilateral pulmonary oedema and subsegmental atelectasis that resolved with mechanical mitral valve replacement.

  14. Mitral valve plasty for mitral regurgitation after blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, H; Hamanaka, Y; Hirai, S; Mitsui, N; Kobayashi, T

    2001-06-01

    A 21 year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of chest and back pain after blunt chest trauma. On admission, consciousness was clear and a physical examination showed labored breathing. Her vital signs were stable, but her breathing gradually worsened, and artificial respiration was started. The chest roentgenogram and a subsequent chest computed tomographic scans revealed contusions, hemothorax of the left lung and multiple rib fractures. A transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) revealed normal left ventricular wall motion and mild mitral regurgitation (MR). TTE was carried out repeatedly, and revealed gradually progressive MR and prolapse of the posterior medial leaflet, although there was no congestive heart failure. After her general condition had recovered, surgery was performed. Intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) revealed torn chordae at the posterior medial leaflet. The leaflet where the chorda was torn was cut and plicated, and posterior mitral annuloplasty was performed using a prosthetic ring. One month later following discharge, the MR had disappeared on TTE.

  15. Severe mitral regurgitation due to an extraordinary heart defect.

    PubMed

    García-Ropero, Álvaro; Cortés García, Marcelino; Aldamiz Echevarría, Gonzalo; Farré Muncharaz, Jerónimo

    2016-09-01

    A previously non-described cause of mitral regurgitation is presented. An asymptomatic 50-year old male who was casually diagnosed of mitral valve Barlow's disease underwent cardiac surgery due to severe mitral regurgitation. In the operating theatre, a longitudinal fissure of 1.5-2.0 cm length, along the posterior mitral leaflet, was found responsible for the insufficiency. This defect had features of a potential congenital origin and it was successfully repaired with direct suture. Whether it is an atypical mitral cleft, a variation of Barlow's morphology spectrum or a new congenital heart defect remains unclear.

  16. Floppy Mitral Valve (FMV) - Mitral Valve Prolapse (MVP) - Mitral Valvular Regurgitation and FMV/MVP Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Boudoulas, Konstantinos Dean; Pitsis, Antonios A; Boudoulas, Harisios

    2016-01-01

    Mitral valve prolapse (MVP) results from the systolic movement of a portion(s) or segment(s) of the mitral valve leaflet(s) into the left atrium during left ventricular (LV) systole. It should be emphasised that MVP alone, as defined by imaging techniques, may comprise a non-specific finding because it also depends on the LV volume, myocardial contractility and other LV hemodynamics. Thus, a floppy mitral valve (FMV) should be the basis for the diagnosis of MVP. Two types of symptoms may be defined in these patients. In one group, symptoms are directly related to progressive mitral regurgitation and its complications. In the other group, symptoms cannot be explained only by the degree of mitral regurgitation alone; neuroendocrine dysfunction has been implicated for the explanation of symptoms in this group of patients that today is referred as the FMV/MVP syndrome. When significant mitral regurgitation is present in a patient with FMV/MVP, surgical intervention is recommended. In patients with a prohibitive risk for surgery, transcatheter mitral valve repair using a mitraclip device may be considered. Furthermore, transcatheter mitral valve replacement may represent an option in the near future as clinical trials are underway. In this brief review, the current concepts related to FMV/MVP and FMV/MVP syndrome will be discussed.

  17. Strain Echocardiography and Functional Capacity in Asymptomatic Primary Mitral Regurgitation With Preserved Ejection Fraction.

    PubMed

    Mentias, Amgad; Naji, Peyman; Gillinov, A Marc; Rodriguez, L Leonardo; Reed, Grant; Mihaljevic, Tomislav; Suri, Rakesh M; Sabik, Joseph F; Svensson, Lars G; Grimm, Richard A; Griffin, Brian P; Desai, Milind Y

    2016-11-01

    The potential additive utility of baseline resting left ventricular global longitudinal strain (LV-GLS) and exercise stress testing in risk stratification of patients with significant mitral regurgitation (MR) has not been studied. The goal of this study was to determine whether resting LV-GLS and exercise testing provide incremental prognostic utility in asymptomatic patients with ≥3+ primary MR and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. Between 2000 and 2011, resting and exercise echocardiography data, Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) scores, and death were recorded in 737 patients (mean age 58 ± 13 years; 68% men). Coronary artery disease and flail leaflet were seen in 10% and 28% of patients, respectively. STS score, resting left ventricular ejection fraction, mitral effective regurgitant orifice, resting right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP), exercise metabolic equivalents (METs), and percentage of age-/sex-predicted METs were 1.5 ± 1%, 62 ± 2%, 0.45 ± 0.2 cm(2), 31 ± 12 mm Hg, 9.8 ± 3, and 115 ± 27, respectively. Median LV-GLS was -21.7%. Within 3 months (interquartile range: 1 to 15 months), 65% underwent mitral valve surgery. At 8.3 ± 3 years, 64 (9%) patients died (0% 30-day post-operative deaths). On multivariable Cox survival analysis, higher STS score (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.14), more abnormal resting LV-GLS (HR: 1.60), higher baseline RVSP (HR: 1.35), and lower percentage of age-/sex-predicted METs (HR: 1.13) were associated with higher mortality, whereas mitral valve surgery (HR: 0.82) was associated with improved survival (all p < 0.01). Addition of predicted METs and resting LV-GLS to STS, resting RVSP, left ventricular end-systolic dimension, and mitral effective regurgitant orifice increased the C-statistic for longer-term mortality from 0.61 to 0.69 and 0.78, respectively (all p < 0.01). On quadratic spline analysis, the risk of death progressively increased as resting LV-GLS worsened below -21%. Reduced exercise

  18. Left atrial mechanical functions in chronic primary mitral regurgitation patients: a velocity vector imaging-based study

    PubMed Central

    Yurdakul, Selen; Yıldirimtürk, Özlem

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Assessment of the left atrium (LA) mechanical function provides further information on the level of cardiac compensation. We aimed to evaluate LA function using a strain imaging method: velocity vector imaging (VVI) in chronic primary mitral regurgitation (MR). Material and methods We recruited 48 patients with chronic, isolated, moderate to severe MR (54.70 ±15.35 years and 56% male) and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (56.52 ±15.95 years and 56% male). The LA volumes during reservoir (RV), conduit (CV) and contractile phases (AV) were measured. Global strain (S), systolic strain rate (SRs), early diastolic (ESRd) and late diastolic strain rate (LSRd) were calculated. Results LA RV (50 ±18.7 to 37.9 ±5.9; p = 0.0001), CV (43.1 ±29 to 21 ±2.56; p = 0.0001), and AV (17.9 ±13.5 to 10.9 ±1.9; p = 0.006) were increased in MR patients. The LA reservoir phase strain was 16.2 ±8.1% in the MR group and 51.1 ±5.7% in the control group (p = 0.0001). The LA SRs (1.01 ±0.52 s–1 for MR and 2.1 ±0.22 s–1 for controls; p = 0.0001), LA ESRd (0.83 ±0.34 s–1 for MR and 2.26 ±0.17 s–1 for controls; p = 0.0001) and LA LSRd (0.76 ±0.24 s–1 for MR and 2.2 ±0.26 s–1 for controls; p = 0.0001) were impaired in MR patients. Conclusions The LA deformation indices may be used as adjunctive parameters to determine LA dysfunction in chronic primary MR. PMID:25097574

  19. CMR predictors of mitral regurgitation in mitral valve prolapse.

    PubMed

    Delling, Francesca N; Kang, Lih Lisa; Yeon, Susan B; Kissinger, Kraig V; Goddu, Beth; Manning, Warren J; Han, Yuchi

    2010-10-01

    We sought to assess the correlation between mitral valve characteristics and severity of mitral regurgitation (MR) in subjects with mitral valve prolapse (MVP) undergoing cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging. Compared with extensive echocardiographic studies, CMR predictors of MVP-related MR are unknown. The severity of MR at the time of diagnosis has prognostic implication for patients; therefore, the identification of determinants of MR and its progression may be important for risk stratification, follow-up recommendations, and surgical decision making. Seventy-one MVP patients (age 54 ± 11 years, 58% males, left ventricular [LV] ejection fraction 65 ± 5%) underwent cine CMR to assess annular dimensions, maximum systolic anterior and posterior leaflet displacement, papillary muscle (PM) distance to coaptation point and prolapsed leaflets, as well as diastolic anterior and posterior leaflet thickness and length, and LV volumes and mass. Velocity-encoded CMR was used to obtain aortic outflow and to quantify MR volume. Using multiple linear regression analysis including all variables, LV mass (p < 0.001), anterior leaflet length (p = 0.006), and posterior displacement (p = 0.01) were the best determinants of MR volume with a model-adjusted R(2) = 0.6. When the analysis was restricted to valvular characteristics, MR volume correlated with anterior mitral leaflet length (p < 0.001), posterior mitral leaflet displacement (p = 0.003), posterior leaflet thickness (p = 0.008), and the presence of flail (p = 0.005) with a model-adjusted R(2) = 0.5. We also demonstrated acceptable intraobserver and interobserver variability in these measurements. Anterior leaflet length, posterior leaflet displacement, posterior leaflet thickness, and the presence of flail are the best CMR valvular determinants of MVP-related MR. The acceptable intraobserver and interobserver variability of our measurements confirms the role of CMR as an imaging modality for assessment of MVP patients

  20. Mitral Valve Replacement After Failed Mitral Ring Insertion With or Without Leaflet/Chordal Repair for Pure Mitral Regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Roberts, William C; Moore, Meagan; Ko, Jong Mi; Hamman, Baron L

    2016-06-01

    Mitral repair operations for correction of pure mitral regurgitation (MR) are generally quite successful. Occasionally, however, the reparative procedure incompletely corrects the MR or the MR recurs. From March 1993 to January 2016, twenty nine patients had mitral valve replacement after the initial mitral repair operation, and observations in them were analyzed. All 29 patients at the repair operation had an annular ring inserted and later (<1 year in 6 and >1 year in 21) mitral valve replacement. The cause of the MR before the repair operation appears to have been prolapse in 16 patients (55%), secondary (functional) in 12 (41%) (ischemic in 5), and infective endocarditis which healed in 1 (3%). At the replacement operation the excised anterior mitral leaflet was thickened in all 29 patients. Some degree of stenosis appeared to have been present in 16 of the 29 patients before the replacement operation, although only 10 had an echocardiographic or hemodynamic recording of a transvalvular gradient; at least 11 patients had restricted motion of the posterior mitral leaflet; 10, ring dehiscence; 2, severe hemolysis; and 2, left ventricular outflow obstruction. In conclusion, there are multiple reasons for valve replacement after earlier mitral repair. Uniformly, at the time of the replacement, the mitral leaflets were thickened by fibrous tissue. Measurement of the area enclosed by the 360° rings and study of the excised leaflet suggest that the ring itself may have contributed to the leaflet scarring and development of some transmitral stenosis.

  1. Mechanisms of Functional Mitral Regurgitation in Ischemic Cardiomyopathy Determined by Transesophageal Echocardiography (From the Surgical Treatment for Ischemic Heart Failure [STICH] Trial)

    PubMed Central

    Golba, Krzysztof; Mokrzycki, Krzysztof; Drozdz, Jaroslaw; Cherniavsky, Alexander; Wrobel, Krzysztof; Roberts, Bradley J.; Haddad, Haissam; Maurer, Gerald; Yii, Michael; Asch, Federico M.; Handschumacher, Mark D.; Holly, Thomas A.; Przybylski, Roman; Kron, Irving; Schaff, Hartzell; Aston, Susan; Horton, John; Lee, Kerry L.; Velazquez, Eric J.; Grayburn, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying functional mitral regurgitation (MR), and the relation between mechanism and severity of MR have not been evaluated in a large multicenter randomized controlled trial. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) was performed in 215 patients at 17 centers in the Surgical Treatment of Ischemic Heart Failure (STICH) trial. Both two-dimensional (2D, n=215) and three-dimensional (3D, n=81) TEE were used to assess multiple quantitative measures of the mechanism and severity of MR. By 2D TEE, leaflet tenting area, anterior and posterior leaflet angles, mitral annulus diameter, left ventricular (LV) end-systolic volume index, LV ejection fraction (LVEF), and sphericity index (p<0.05 for all) were significantly different across MR grades. By 3D TEE, mitral annulus area, leaflet tenting area, LV end-systolic volume index, LVEF, and sphericity index (p<0.05 for all) were significantly different across MR grades. A multivariable analysis showed a trend for annulus area (p=0.069) and LV end-systolic volume index (p=0.071) to predict effective regurgitant orifice area (EROA) and for annulus area (p=0.018) and LV end-systolic volume index (p=0.073) to predict vena contracta area. In the STICH trial, multiple quantitative parameters of the mechanism of functional MR are related to MR severity. The mechanism of functional MR in ischemic cardiomyopathy is heterogeneous but no single variable stands out as a strong predictor of quantitative severity of MR. PMID:24035166

  2. Impact and evolution of right ventricular dysfunction after successful MitraClip implantation in patients with functional mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Godino, Cosmo; Salerno, Anna; Cera, Michela; Agricola, Eustachio; Fragasso, Gabriele; Rosa, Isabella; Oppizzi, Michele; Monello, Alberto; Scotti, Andrea; Magni, Valeria; Montorfano, Matteo; Cappelletti, Alberto; Margonato, Alberto; Colombo, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    Right ventricular dysfunction (RVdysf) is a predictor of poor outcome in patients with heart failure and valvular disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the evolution and the impact of RVdysf in patients with moderate-severe functional mitral regurgitation (FMR) successfully treated with MitraClip. From October 2008 to July 2014, 60 consecutive high surgical risk FMR patients were evaluated and stratified into two groups: RVdysf group (TAPSE < 16 mm and/or S'TDI < 10 cm/s, 21 patients) and No-RVdysf group (38 patients). The overall mean age of patients was 73 ± 8 (83% male). Ischemic FMR etiology was present in 67%. Mean LVEF was 30 ± 10%. Overall mean time follow-up was 565 ± 310 days. The only significant difference between the two groups was a greater prevalence of stroke, ICD and use of aldosterone antagonist in RVdysf group. Acute procedural success was achieved in 90% of patients. At 6-month echo-matched analysis significant RV function improvement was observed in patients with baseline RVdysf (TAPSE 15 ± 3.0 vs. 19 ± 4.5, p = 0.007; S'TDI 7 ± 1.2 vs. 11 ± 2.8, p < 0.0001; baseline vs. 6-month, respectively). The mean improvement in the 6-min walking test was significant in both groups (120 and 143 m, RVdysf and No-RVdysf groups, respectively). At Kaplan-Meier analysis, the presence of RVdysf did not affect the outcome in terms of freedom from composite efficacy endpoint. This study shows that successful MitraClip implantation in patients with FMR and concomitant right ventricular dysfunction yields significant improvement of RV function at mid-term follow-up. Further data on larger population will be required to confirm our observations.

  3. The MitraClip Asia-Pacific registry: Differences in outcomes between functional and degenerative mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Tay, Edgar; Muda, Nasir; Yap, Jonathan; Muller, David W M; Santoso, Teguh; Walters, Darren L; Liu, Xianbao; Yamen, Eric; Jansz, Paul; Yip, James; Zambahari, Robaayah; Passage, Jurgen; Ding, Zee Pin; Wang, Jian'an; Scalia, Gregory; Soesanto, Amiliana M; Yeo, Khung Keong

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study is to describe and compare the use of the MitraClip therapy in mitral regurgitation (MR) patients with degenerative MR (DMR) and functional MR (FMR). Percutaneous edge-to-edge repair of severe MR using the MitraClip device is approved for use in the USA for high risk DMR while European guidelines include its use in FMR patients as well. The MitraClip in the Asia-Pacific Registry (MARS) is a multicenter retrospective registry, involving eight sites in five Asia-Pacific countries. Clinical and echocardiographic characteristics, procedural outcomes and 1-month outcomes [death and major adverse events (MAE)] were compared between FMR and DMR patients treated with the MitraClip. A total of 163 patients were included from 2011 to 2014. The acute procedural success rates for FMR (95.5%, n = 84) and DMR (92%, n = 69) were similar (P = 0.515). 45% of FMR had ≥2 clips inserted compared to 60% of those with DMR (P = 0.064).The 30-day mortality rate for FMR and DMR was similar at 4.5% and 6.7% respectively (P = 0.555). The 30-day MAE rate was 9.2% for FMR and 14.7% for DMR (P = 0.281). Both FMR and DMR patients had significant improvements in the severity of MR and NYHA class after 30 days. There was a significantly greater reduction in left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (P = 0.002) and end systolic diameter (P = 0.017) in DMR than in FMR. The MitraClip therapy is a safe and efficacious treatment option for both FMR and DMR. Although, there is a significantly greater reduction in LV volumes in DMR, patients in both groups report clinical benefit with improvement in functional class. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Automated assessment of mitral regurgitant volume and regurgitant fraction by a newly developed digital color Doppler velocity profile integration method.

    PubMed

    Hozumi, T; Yoshida, K; Akasaka, T; Takagi, T; Yamamuro, A; Yagi, T; Yoshikawa, J

    1997-11-15

    Recent development of the automated cardiac flow measurement (ACFM) method has provided automated measurement of stroke volume and cardiac output by spatial and temporal integration of digital Doppler velocity profile data. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of the ACFM method using digital color Doppler velocity profile integration in the assessment of mitral regurgitant volume and regurgitant fraction from measurements of both aortic outflow and mitral inflow volumes. We calculated both aortic outflow and mitral inflow volumes from the apical approach with the ACFM and pulsed Doppler (PD) methods in 20 patients with isolated mitral regurgitation. Mitral regurgitant volume and regurgitant fraction were calculated by the following equation: mitral regurgitant volume = (mitral inflow volume) - (aortic outflow volume), % regurgitant fraction = (mitral regurgitant volume)/(mitral inflow volume) x 100. Mitral regurgitant volume and regurgitant fraction were compared with that determined by the PD method. Mitral regurgitant volume measurement by the ACFM method showed a good correlation with that measured by the PD method (r = 0.90, y = 0.77x + 11.6, SEE = 9.0 ml); the mean differences between PD and ACFM measurements was -1.7 +/- 12.5 ml. Regurgitant fraction estimated by the ACFM method correlated well with that of the PD method (r = 0.92, y = 0.98x + 2.1, SEE = 8.8%). The mean difference for the measurement of regurgitant fraction between the PD and ACFM methods was 0.8 +/- 6.6%. Total time required for mitral regurgitant volume calculation in 1 cardiac cycle by the ACFM method was significantly shorter than that of the PD method (126 +/- 15 seconds vs 228 +/- 36 seconds, p <0.01). In conclusion, the newly developed ACFM method is simple, quick, and accurate in the automated assessment of mitral regurgitant volume and regurgitant fraction.

  5. Acute aortic and mitral valve regurgitation following blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Bernabeu, Eduardo; Mestres, Carlos A; Loma-Osorio, Pablo; Josa, Miguel

    2004-03-01

    Traumatic rupture of intracardiac structures is an uncommon phenomenon although there are a number of reports with regards to rupture of the tricuspid, mitral and aortic valves. We report the case of a 25-year-old patient who presented with acute aortic and mitral valve regurgitation of traumatic origin. Both lesions were seen separated by 2 weeks. Pathophysiology is reviewed. The combination of both aortic and mitral lesions following blunt chest trauma is almost exceptional.

  6. Mitral-valve repair versus replacement for severe ischemic mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Acker, Michael A; Parides, Michael K; Perrault, Louis P; Moskowitz, Alan J; Gelijns, Annetine C; Voisine, Pierre; Smith, Peter K; Hung, Judy W; Blackstone, Eugene H; Puskas, John D; Argenziano, Michael; Gammie, James S; Mack, Michael; Ascheim, Deborah D; Bagiella, Emilia; Moquete, Ellen G; Ferguson, T Bruce; Horvath, Keith A; Geller, Nancy L; Miller, Marissa A; Woo, Y Joseph; D'Alessandro, David A; Ailawadi, Gorav; Dagenais, Francois; Gardner, Timothy J; O'Gara, Patrick T; Michler, Robert E; Kron, Irving L

    2014-01-02

    Ischemic mitral regurgitation is associated with a substantial risk of death. Practice guidelines recommend surgery for patients with a severe form of this condition but acknowledge that the supporting evidence for repair or replacement is limited. We randomly assigned 251 patients with severe ischemic mitral regurgitation to undergo either mitral-valve repair or chordal-sparing replacement in order to evaluate efficacy and safety. The primary end point was the left ventricular end-systolic volume index (LVESVI) at 12 months, as assessed with the use of a Wilcoxon rank-sum test in which deaths were categorized below the lowest LVESVI rank. At 12 months, the mean LVESVI among surviving patients was 54.6±25.0 ml per square meter of body-surface area in the repair group and 60.7±31.5 ml per square meter in the replacement group (mean change from baseline, -6.6 and -6.8 ml per square meter, respectively). The rate of death was 14.3% in the repair group and 17.6% in the replacement group (hazard ratio with repair, 0.79; 95% confidence interval, 0.42 to 1.47; P=0.45 by the log-rank test). There was no significant between-group difference in LVESVI after adjustment for death (z score, 1.33; P=0.18). The rate of moderate or severe recurrence of mitral regurgitation at 12 months was higher in the repair group than in the replacement group (32.6% vs. 2.3%, P<0.001). There were no significant between-group differences in the rate of a composite of major adverse cardiac or cerebrovascular events, in functional status, or in quality of life at 12 months. We observed no significant difference in left ventricular reverse remodeling or survival at 12 months between patients who underwent mitral-valve repair and those who underwent mitral-valve replacement. Replacement provided a more durable correction of mitral regurgitation, but there was no significant between-group difference in clinical outcomes. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Canadian Institutes of

  7. Regurgitation Hemodynamics Alone Cause Mitral Valve Remodeling Characteristic of Clinical Disease States In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Connell, Patrick S; Azimuddin, Anam F; Kim, Seulgi E; Ramirez, Fernando; Jackson, Matthew S; Little, Stephen H; Grande-Allen, K Jane

    2016-04-01

    Mitral valve regurgitation is a challenging clinical condition that is frequent, highly varied, and poorly understood. While the causes of mitral regurgitation are multifactorial, how the hemodynamics of regurgitation impact valve tissue remodeling is an understudied phenomenon. We employed a pseudo-physiological flow loop capable of long-term organ culture to investigate the early progression of remodeling in living mitral valves placed in conditions resembling mitral valve prolapse (MVP) and functional mitral regurgitation (FMR). Valve geometry was altered to mimic the hemodynamics of controls (no changes from native geometry), MVP (5 mm displacement of papillary muscles towards the annulus), and FMR (5 mm apical, 5 mm lateral papillary muscle displacement, 65% larger annular area). Flow measurements ensured moderate regurgitant fraction for regurgitation groups. After 1-week culture, valve tissues underwent mechanical and compositional analysis. MVP conditioned tissues were less stiff, weaker, and had elevated collagen III and glycosaminoglycans. FMR conditioned tissues were stiffer, more brittle, less extensible, and had more collagen synthesis, remodeling, and crosslinking related enzymes and proteoglycans, including decorin, matrix metalloproteinase-1, and lysyl oxidase. These models replicate clinical findings of MVP (myxomatous remodeling) and FMR (fibrotic remodeling), indicating that valve cells remodel extracellular matrix in response to altered mechanical homeostasis resulting from disease hemodynamics.

  8. [Chronic aortic and mitral valve regurgitation. Effects of isosorbide dinitrate on systolic function and passive elastic properties of the left ventricle (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Herreman, F; Cosma, H; Degeorges, M

    1982-06-10

    A haemodynamic and cineangiographic study was conducted in 20 patients with chronic aortic regurgitation alone or associated with mitral regurgitation before and during i.v. administration of isosorbide dinitrate 5 mg/hour. Freedom from coronary disease had been ascertained. The heart rate and aortic pressure (initially normal), cardiac index (initially low), pulmonary pressures and pulmonary and systemic resistances (slightly raised initially) remained unchanged. On the other hand, the left ventricular (LV) filling pressure, distinctly raised before treatment, was reduced by 17% (p less than 0.05). There was also a 10% reduction in LV end-diastolic volume (from 204 +/- 60- cm3.m2 to 184 +/- 56 cm3,m2; p less than 0.001) and a 14% reduction in LV end-systolic volume (from 104 +/- 39 cm3.m2 to 89 +/- 40 cm3.m3; p less than 0.001). LV geometry, stroke volume and regurgitation volume were unmodified. There was a significant improvement in ventricular function indices, globally reduced before treatment: + 8% for the fiber shortening amplitude (p less than 0.025), + 6% for the ejection fraction (p fiber shortening (p less than 0.01), and + 15% for the ESP: ESV ratio (p less than 0.05). The passive elasticity indices, all increased before treatment, also improved. It is concluded that isosorbide dinitrate improves LV systolic and diastolic functions in patients with chronic valve disease.

  9. Accuracy of real-time 3D echocardiography in the evaluation of functional anatomy of mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Agricola, Eustachio; Oppizzi, Michele; Pisani, Matteo; Maisano, Francesco; Margonato, Alberto

    2008-07-21

    To evaluate the feasibility of mitral valve (MV) reconstruction protocol by real-time 3D echocardiography (RT3DE) in the assessment mitral regurgitant (MR) lesions, and to determine the accuracy of RT3DE compared with transthoracic (TTE) and transesophageal (TEE) echocardiographies using surgical findings as gold standard. Sixty-three consecutive patients (mean age 61.7+/-12.5 years, 35 men and 28 women) with severe organic MR were enrolled. Data were acquired in zoom and in full-volume modes from apical and/or parasternal windows. A volume rendered en-face view of MV and five serial longitudinal cut planes were reconstructed to visualize all segments of both leaflets. The feasibility of RT3D reconstruction was 94%. Compared with surgical diagnosis, the accuracy of RT3D was 91% for aetiology, 92% for mechanisms, 94% for prolapse, 88% for flail and 94% for defect location. Diagnostic accuracy was significant higher for RT3D than TTE for all end points except for flail lesion and similar to TEE but inferior to this for flail lesion. The accuracy, sensitivity and specificity were higher in patients with good-excellent than those with poor image quality regarding aetiology, mechanisms and defect location (all p=0.0001). RT3D imaging of MV is feasible and accurate in defining aetiology, mechanism and defect location in patients with MR and has incremental diagnostic value if TTE is inconclusive and similar diagnostic value of TEE except for flail lesion. RT3D, at least in patients with good acoustic window, may obviate the need for subsequent TEE and/or can be considered a complementary technique to study MV in patients with MR.

  10. Transapical Mitral Valve Replacement for Mixed Native Mitral Stenosis and Regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Bedzra, Edo; Don, Creighton W; Reisman, Mark; Aldea, Gabriel S

    2016-08-01

    A 71-year-old man presented with New York Heart Association (NYHA) class IV heart failure. He had undergone transapical mitral valve replacement for mixed mitral stenosis and mitral regurgitation. At the 1 month follow-up, the patient reported symptom resolution. An echocardiogram revealed a low gradient and no regurgitation. Our case shows that with careful multidisciplinary evaluation, preoperative planning, and patient selection, percutaneous mitral intervention can become an alternative therapy for high-risk patients who cannot undergo conventional surgical therapy.

  11. [Severe mitral regurgitation following resection of a giant atrial myxoma: Case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    Orozco Vinasco, D M; Abello Sánchez, M; Osorio Esquivel, J E

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of the competence of a mitral valve can often be impossible in the clinical setting of a giant atrial myxoma. A 50-year-old woman with severe mitral regurgitation in the post-bypass period following a myxoma resection was managed with a mitral valve replacement. The absence of mitral insufficiency in the preoperative examination should not be taken as a reliable predictor of normal valve function. So herein, we discuss the role of the intraoperative echocardiographic examination, the underlying mechanisms, and the proposed management of severe mitral regurgitation following the resection of an atrial myxoma. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  12. Relationship between systolic and diastolic function with improvements in forward stroke volume following reduction in mitral regurgitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firstenberg, M. S.; Greenberg, N. L.; Smedira, N. G.; McCarthy, P. M.; Garcia, M. J.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Efforts to improve mitral regurgitation (MR) are often performed in conjunction with coronary revascularization. However, the independent effects of a reduced MR area (MRa) are difficult to quantify. Using a previously developed cardiovascular model, ventricular contractility (elastance 1-8 mmHg/ml) and relaxation (tau: 40-150 msec) were independently adjusted for four grades of MR orifice areas (0.0 to 0.8 cm2). Improvements in forward stroke volume (fSV) were determined for the permutations of reduced MRa. For all conditions, LV end-diastolic pressure and volumes ranged from 7.3-24.2 mmHg and 64.8-174.3 ml, respectively. Overall, fSV ranged from 36.0-89.4 (mean: 64.2 +/- 12.8) ml, improved between 6.4 and 35.3% (mean: 15.6 +/- 8.1%), and was best predicted by (r=0.97, p<0.01) %delta(fSV)[correction of fVS]=34[MRa initial] - 46[MRa final] -0.5[elastance]. Reduced MRa, independent of relaxation and minimally influence by contractility, yield improved fSVs.

  13. Relationship between systolic and diastolic function with improvements in forward stroke volume following reduction in mitral regurgitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firstenberg, M. S.; Greenberg, N. L.; Smedira, N. G.; McCarthy, P. M.; Garcia, M. J.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Efforts to improve mitral regurgitation (MR) are often performed in conjunction with coronary revascularization. However, the independent effects of a reduced MR area (MRa) are difficult to quantify. Using a previously developed cardiovascular model, ventricular contractility (elastance 1-8 mmHg/ml) and relaxation (tau: 40-150 msec) were independently adjusted for four grades of MR orifice areas (0.0 to 0.8 cm2). Improvements in forward stroke volume (fSV) were determined for the permutations of reduced MRa. For all conditions, LV end-diastolic pressure and volumes ranged from 7.3-24.2 mmHg and 64.8-174.3 ml, respectively. Overall, fSV ranged from 36.0-89.4 (mean: 64.2 +/- 12.8) ml, improved between 6.4 and 35.3% (mean: 15.6 +/- 8.1%), and was best predicted by (r=0.97, p<0.01) %delta(fSV)[correction of fVS]=34[MRa initial] - 46[MRa final] -0.5[elastance]. Reduced MRa, independent of relaxation and minimally influence by contractility, yield improved fSVs.

  14. [Impact of mitral annuloplasty combined with surgical revascularization in ischemic mitral regurgitation].

    PubMed

    Tribak, M; Konaté, M; Ould Hbib, B; Konan, P; Mahfoudi, L; Hassani, A El; Daouda, A; Lachhab, F; Bendagha, N; Soufiani, A; Fila, J; Maghraoui, S; Bensouda, A; Marmade, L; Moughil, S

    2017-08-08

    Ischemic Mitral Regurgitation (IMR) is a serious complication of coronary artery disease and is associated with a poor prognosis. The optimal surgical treatment of IMR involves controversies in its indications and modalities. To determine whether mitral annuloplasty associated with surgical revascularization improved short and mid terms outcomes compared with revascularization alone in patients with IMR. Between January 2007 and January 2011, 81 patients operated on Department of Cardiovascular Surgery "B" were included in this study divided into 3 groups. Group 1: 28 patients with IMR had mitral valve surgery associated with surgical revascularization. Group 2: 26 patients with IMR had surgical revascularization without mitral valve surgery. Group 3: 27 patients without IMR had isolated revascularization. Clinical end-points were operative mortality, late mortality, postoperative functional status (NYHA), and the Effective Regurgitant Orifice (ERO) at last follow-up. The mean follow-up was 5 years for groups 1 and 2 and 4 years for group 3. There was no difference between the 3 groups regarding age, sex, cardiovascular risk factors, and extension of coronary artery disease. The Left Ventricle End Diastolic Diameter (LVEDD) and the Left Ventricle Ejection Fraction (LVEF) were slightly different. Late and operative mortality were higher in group 2 compared to groups 1 and 3. Postoperative functional status (NYHA) improved both in groups 1 and 2. In group 1, there was a decrease in ERO. Mitral annuloplasty combined to revascularization improves symptoms, postoperative ERO and short- and mid-term survival compared with revascularization alone. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Repair or replace for severe ischemic mitral regurgitation: prospective randomized multicenter data.

    PubMed

    LaPar, Damien J; Acker, Michael A; Gelijns, Annetine C; Kron, Irving L

    2015-09-01

    Ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR) is a subset of functional mitral regurgitation (MR) that has the potential to impact an increasing number of patients in the future. This is in the context of a worldwide population, which continues to live longer with improved survival after myocardial infarction. Substantial data have accumulated over the past few decades demonstrating the negative effects of IMR. Further, significant research has been done to define the optimal surgical approach and several studies have compared mitral repair versus replacement for patients with severe mitral regurgitation (SMR). Studies supporting performance of mitral repair cite superior operative morbidity and mortality rates, while proponents of mitral replacement cite improved long-term durability and correction of MR. Lack of clinically robust Level I randomized controlled trial data have curtailed attempts to better define appropriate surgical treatment allocation over the past few decades. Recently, however, the Cardiothoracic Surgical Trials Network (CTSN) conducted the first randomized controlled trial, funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, the National Institute for Neurological Diseases and Stroke and the Canadian Institute for Health Research, to compare the performance of mitral repair versus replacement for SMR. Herein, the present review describes the design, results and implications of the CTSN SMR trial and its efforts to identify the most efficacious surgical approach to SMR. This review also describes CTSN investigation to predict the recurrence of MR after mitral repair.

  16. Non-invasive measurement of the regurgitant fraction by pulsed Doppler echocardiography in isolated pure mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Tribouilloy, C; Shen, W F; Slama, M A; Dufossé, H; Choquet, D; Marek, A; Lesbre, J P

    1991-10-01

    To assess the usefulness of pulsed Doppler echocardiography as a method of measuring the regurgitant fraction in patients with mitral regurgitation. Twenty controls and 27 patients with isolated mitral regurgitation underwent Doppler studies. In the patients the study was performed within 48 hours of cardiac catheterisation. Aortic outflow was measured in the centre of the aortic annulus, and mitral inflow was derived from the flow velocity at the tip of the leaflets and the area of the elliptical mitral opening. The regurgitant fraction was calculated as the difference between the two flows divided by the mtiral inflow. In the 20 controls the two flows were almost identical (mitral inflow, 4.44 (SD 0.88) l/min; aortic outflow, 4.58 (SD 0.84) l/min), with a mean regurgitant fraction of 4.2 (SD 8.4)%. In patients with mitral regurgitation, the mitral inflow was significantly higher than the aortic outflow (8.8 (3.6) v 4.3 (1.1) l/min). In most patients the Doppler-derived regurgitant fraction (45.8 (19.2)%) accorded closely with the regurgitant fraction (41.3 (SD 17.8)%) determined by the haemodynamic technique. Pulsed Doppler echocardiography, with an instantaneous velocity-valve area method for calculating mitral inflow, reliably measured the severity of regurgitation in patients with mitral regurgitation.

  17. Non-invasive measurement of the regurgitant fraction by pulsed Doppler echocardiography in isolated pure mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed Central

    Tribouilloy, C; Shen, W F; Slama, M A; Dufossé, H; Choquet, D; Marek, A; Lesbre, J P

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the usefulness of pulsed Doppler echocardiography as a method of measuring the regurgitant fraction in patients with mitral regurgitation. PATIENTS AND METHODS--Twenty controls and 27 patients with isolated mitral regurgitation underwent Doppler studies. In the patients the study was performed within 48 hours of cardiac catheterisation. Aortic outflow was measured in the centre of the aortic annulus, and mitral inflow was derived from the flow velocity at the tip of the leaflets and the area of the elliptical mitral opening. The regurgitant fraction was calculated as the difference between the two flows divided by the mtiral inflow. RESULTS--In the 20 controls the two flows were almost identical (mitral inflow, 4.44 (SD 0.88) l/min; aortic outflow, 4.58 (SD 0.84) l/min), with a mean regurgitant fraction of 4.2 (SD 8.4)%. In patients with mitral regurgitation, the mitral inflow was significantly higher than the aortic outflow (8.8 (3.6) v 4.3 (1.1) l/min). In most patients the Doppler-derived regurgitant fraction (45.8 (19.2)%) accorded closely with the regurgitant fraction (41.3 (SD 17.8)%) determined by the haemodynamic technique. CONCLUSION--Pulsed Doppler echocardiography, with an instantaneous velocity-valve area method for calculating mitral inflow, reliably measured the severity of regurgitation in patients with mitral regurgitation. Images PMID:1747280

  18. Preoperative and postoperative study of left ventricular function, hemodynamics and plasma catecholamine concentrations during dynamic exercise in patients with chronic mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Haque, E U; Suyama, A; Mori, T

    1994-01-01

    We studied 7 patients before and after mitral valve replacement (MVR) for chronic mitral regurgitation (MR) and 5 control subjects by echocardiography and right heart catheterization to assess left ventricular function, hemodynamics and plasma catecholamine concentrations during supine bicycle exercise. Left ventricular (LV) end-systolic dimension decreased and LV systolic function increased significantly during exercise in patients and control subjects. LV systolic function (fractional shortening and mean velocity of circumferential fiber shortening) was significantly lower in patients after MVR than before MVR (p < 0.05). Cardiac index at peak exercise was significantly higher in patients after MVR than before MVR (p < 0.05). Significantly greater augmentation in plasma norepinephrine (NE) levels were observed during exercise in patients both before and after MVR than in control subjects (p < 0.05). No significant differences in mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) were observed between the patients before and after MVR. Thus, it is concluded that LV systolic and pump function (CI) during exercise were augmented by a compensatory activation of sympathetic nervous system in patients both before and after MVR for chronic MR.

  19. Initial experience of percutaneous treatment of mitral regurgitation with MitraClip® therapy in Spain.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Chinchilla, Fernando; Arzamendi, Dabit; Romero, Miguel; Gimeno de Carlos, Federico; Alonso-Briales, Juan Horacio; Li, Chi-Hion; Mesa, Maria Dolores; Arnold, Roman; Serrador Frutos, Ana María; Pan, Manuel; Roig, Eulalia; Rodríguez-Bailón, Isabel; de la Fuente Galán, Luis; Hernández, José María; Serra, Antonio; Suárez de Lezo, José

    2014-12-01

    Symptomatic mitral regurgitation has an unfavorable prognosis unless treated by surgery. However, the European registry of valvular heart disease reports that 49% of patients with this condition do not undergo surgery. Percutaneous treatment of mitral regurgitation with MitraClip® has been proved a safe, efficient adjunct to medical treatment in patients with this profile. The objective of the present study is to describe initial experience of MitraClip® therapy in Spain. Retrospective observational study including all patients treated between November 2011 and July 2013 at the 4 Spanish hospitals recording the highest numbers of implantations. A total of 62 patients (77.4% men) were treated, mainly for restrictive functional mitral regurgitation (85.4%) of grade III (37%) or grade IV (63%), mean (standard deviation) ejection fraction 36% (14%), and New York Heart Association functional class III (37%) or IV (63%). Device implantation was successful in 98% of the patients. At 1 year, 81.2% had mitral regurgitation ≤ 2 and 90.9% were in New York Heart Association functional class ≤ II. One periprocedural death occurred (sepsis at 20 days post-implantation) and another 3 patients died during follow-up (mean, 9.1 months). Two patients needed a second implantation due to partial dehiscence of the first device and 2 others underwent heart transplantation. In Spain, MitraClip® therapy has principally been aimed at patients with functional mitral regurgitation, significant systolic ventricular dysfunction, and high surgical risk. It is considered a safe alternative treatment, which can reduce mitral regurgitation and improve functional capacity. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Non-invasive diagnosis of mitral regurgitation by Doppler echocardiography.

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, D; Diebold, B; Peronneau, P; Foult, J M; Nee, M; Guermonprez, J L; Maurice, P

    1981-01-01

    The value of Doppler echocardiography for the non-invasive diagnosis of mitral regurgitation was studied blindly in 161 consecutive invasively investigated adult patients. Regurgitation was graded from 0 to 3 at selective left ventricular angiography. The Doppler echocardiographic examination was considered to be positive when a disturbed systolic flow was found within the left atrium behind the aorta or the anterior leaflet of the mitral valve. The test was considered to be negative in the absence of a regurgitant jet. The level of the signal to noise ratio was checked by the recording of the ventricular filling flow. The study was performed in 131 cases from the left side of the sternum and in 101 cases from the apex. There were no false positives and thus the specificity was 100 per cent. The 20 false negatives were all in patients with grade 1 regurgitation. Thus only some (33%) instances of mild regurgitation were misdiagnosed, and the sensitivity for moderate to severe mitral regurgitation was 100 per cent. PMID:7236465

  1. A complex transcatheter mitral valve replacement and repair for the treatmemt of refractory severe mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Condado, Jose F; Babaliaros, Vasilis C; Thourani, Vinod H; Jensen, Hanna K; Kim, Dennis W; Kaebnick, Brian W; Block, Peter C; Lerakis, Stamatios

    2017-01-23

    Hybrid transcatheter Mitral Valve-in-Ring and Mitral Valve-in-Valve procedures can be an alternative to traditional surgical valve replacement in patients with high surgical risk. We present a case of a 65-year-old male with recurrent severe mitral regurgitation (MR) that failed two traditional surgical attempts due to severe chest fibrosis. We performed a mitral valve-in ring replacement with a Sapien valve followed by a mitral valve-in-valve replacement with a Melody valve. Patient had a residual paravalvular leak that was closed with a vascular plug. Our case proves that is feasible to treat selected patients with MR using a hybrid transcatheter approach.

  2. Direct assessment of size and shape of noncircular vena contracta area in functional versus organic mitral regurgitation using real-time three-dimensional echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Kahlert, Philipp; Plicht, Björn; Schenk, Ingmar M; Janosi, Rolf-Alexander; Erbel, Raimund; Buck, Thomas

    2008-08-01

    Vena contracta width (VCW) as an estimate of effective regurgitant orifice area (EROA) is an accepted parameter of mitral regurgitation (MR) severity. However, uncertainty exists in cases in which VCW at the same time appears narrow in 4-chamber (4CH) view and broad in 2-chamber (2CH) view as common in functional MR with noncircular or slit-like regurgitant orifices. We therefore hypothesized that new real-time 3-dimensional color Doppler echocardiography (RT3DE) can be used for direct assessment of the size and shape of vena contracta area (VCA) in an en face view and to determine the potential error of conventional VCW measurement on estimation of EROA. RT3DE was performed in 57 patients with relevant MR of different etiologies. Manual tracing of VCA in a cross-sectional plane through the vena contracta was compared with VCW in 4CH and 2CH views. As a comparative approach to VCA-3D, EROA was calculated using the hemispheric and hemielliptic proximal isovelocity surface (PISA) area method. Direct measurement of VCA-3D was feasible in all patients within 2.6 +/- 0.7 minutes. RT3DE revealed significant asymmetry of VCA in functional compared with organic MR (P < .001). Among all patients, VCW-4CH and VCW-2CH correlated only moderately to VCA-3D (r =.77; r =.80). Mean VCW correlated and agreed best with VCA-3D (r =.90). VCA-3D correlated and agreed well with EROA by hemielliptic PISA (r = .96, mean error: -0.09 +/- 0.14 cm(2)) compared with significant underestimation of hemispheric PISA in noncircular lesions. Direct assessment of VCA using RT3DE revealed significant asymmetry of VCA in functional MR compared with organic MR, resulting in poor estimation of EROA by single VCW measurements.

  3. Surgery for ischemic mitral regurgitation: should the valve be repaired?

    PubMed

    Silberman, Shuli; Eldar, Orly; Oren, Avraham; Tauber, Rachel; Fink, Daniel; Klutstein, Marc W; Bitran, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    Patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) often have concomitant mitral regurgitation (MR). Repairing the valve at the time of surgery is not universally accepted. The results of CABG with or without mitral valve annuloplasty (MVA) were compared in patients with reduced left ventricular (LV) function and ischemic MR. Among a total of 195 patients, 108 underwent isolated CABG, and 87 underwent CABG with MVA. The study end-points included survival, degree of MR, and NYHA functional class. Patients in the MVA group were younger (mean age 63 +/- 10 versus 68 +/- 9 years; p <0.001), but had a more severe cardiac pathology, with severe LV dysfunction in 45% versus 26% (p = 0.006) and severe MR in 82% versus 14% (p < 0.001). The operative mortality was 9%, and similar in both groups. The follow up was complete, with a mean survival period of 87 +/- 50 months. Although, overall, no improvement was seen in LV function, symptomatic improvement was more pronounced in the MVA group (p = 0.006). At follow up, residual MR was present in 2% of the MVA group and in 47% of the CABG-only group (p < 0.0001). For the MVA and CABG-only groups, respectively, survival at five and 10 years was 68% and 46% versus 77% and 52% (p = NS). By multivariate analysis, neither degree of MR nor LV function at follow up had any impact on survival. In patients with a reduced LV function undergoing CABG, the addition of a mitral annuloplasty does not increase the operative risk. Although patients in the MVA group were more ill, there was a better symptomatic improvement in this group, and they attained a similar survival. It is recommended that MVA be performed at the time of CABG in patients having moderate or greater MR associated with a reduced LV function.

  4. Percutaneous coronary intervention for acute myocardial infarction with mitral regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Yan; Zeng, Qing-Chun; Huang, Ying; Li, Jian-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR) is a common complication of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Current evidences suggest that revascularization of the culprit vessels with percutaneous coronary artery intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass grafting can be beneficial for relieving IMR. A 2.5-year follow-up data of a 61-year-old male patient with ST-segment elevation AMI complicated with IMR showed that mitral regurgitation area increased five days after PCI, and decreased to lower steady level three months after PCI. This finding suggest that three months after PCI might be a suitable time point for evaluating the possibility of IMR recovery and the necessity of surgical intervention of the mitral valve for AMI patient. PMID:27582769

  5. Assessment of severity of mitral regurgitation by measuring regurgitant jet width at its origin with transesophageal Doppler color flow imaging.

    PubMed

    Tribouilloy, C; Shen, W F; Quéré, J P; Rey, J L; Choquet, D; Dufossé, H; Lesbre, J P

    1992-04-01

    The ability of transesophageal color Doppler echocardiography to provide high-resolution images of both cardiac structure and blood flow in real time is advantageous for many clinical purposes. This study was performed to determine the utility of the regurgitant jet width at its origin measured by transesophageal Doppler color flow imaging in the assessment of severity of mitral regurgitation. Sixty-three consecutive patients with mitral regurgitation underwent transesophageal color Doppler examination, and the diameter of regurgitant jet at its origin was measured. Both right and left cardiac catheterizations were performed within 24 hours of Doppler studies, and angiographic grading of mitral regurgitation and regurgitant stroke volume were evaluated. There was a close relation between the jet diameter at its origin measured by transesophageal Doppler color flow imaging and the angiographic grade of mitral regurgitation (r = 0.86, p less than 0.001). A jet diameter of 5.5 mm or more identified severe mitral regurgitation (grade III or IV) with a sensitivity of 92%, specificity of 92%, and positive and negative predictive values of 88% and 95%, respectively. In 31 patients with isolated mitral regurgitation, the jet diameter correlated well with the regurgitant stroke volume determined by a combined hemodynamic-angiographic method (r = 0.85, p less than 0.001). A jet diameter of 5.5 mm or more identified a regurgitant stroke volume of 60 ml or more with a sensitivity of 88%, specificity of 93%, and positive and negative predictive values of 94% and 87%, respectively. The regurgitant jet width at its origin measured by transesophageal Doppler color flow imaging provides a simple and useful method of measuring the severity of mitral regurgitation, and it may allow differentiation between mild and severe mitral regurgitation.

  6. The value of assessing pulmonary venous flow velocity for predicting severity of mitral regurgitation: A quantitative assessment integrating left ventricular function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pu, M.; Griffin, B. P.; Vandervoort, P. M.; Stewart, W. J.; Fan, X.; Cosgrove, D. M.; Thomas, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    Although alteration in pulmonary venous flow has been reported to relate to mitral regurgitant severity, it is also known to vary with left ventricular (LV) systolic and diastolic dysfunction. There are few data relating pulmonary venous flow to quantitative indexes of mitral regurgitation (MR). The object of this study was to assess quantitatively the accuracy of pulmonary venous flow for predicting MR severity by using transesophageal echocardiographic measurement in patients with variable LV dysfunction. This study consisted of 73 patients undergoing heart surgery with mild to severe MR. Regurgitant orifice area (ROA), regurgitant stroke volume (RSV), and regurgitant fraction (RF) were obtained by quantitative transesophageal echocardiography and proximal isovelocity surface area. Both left and right upper pulmonary venous flow velocities were recorded and their patterns classified by the ratio of systolic to diastolic velocity: normal (>/=1), blunted (<1), and systolic reversal (<0). Twenty-three percent of patients had discordant patterns between the left and right veins. When the most abnormal patterns either in the left or right vein were used for analysis, the ratio of peak systolic to diastolic flow velocity was negatively correlated with ROA (r = -0.74, P <.001), RSV (r = -0.70, P <.001), and RF (r = -0.66, P <.001) calculated by the Doppler thermodilution method; values were r = -0.70, r = -0.67, and r = -0.57, respectively (all P <.001), for indexes calculated by the proximal isovelocity surface area method. The sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of the reversed pulmonary venous flow pattern for detecting a large ROA (>0.3 cm(2)) were 69%, 98%, and 97%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of the normal pulmonary venous flow pattern for detecting a small ROA (<0.3 cm(2)) were 60%, 96%, and 94%, respectively. However, the blunted pattern had low sensitivity (22%), specificity (61%), and predictive values (30

  7. The value of assessing pulmonary venous flow velocity for predicting severity of mitral regurgitation: A quantitative assessment integrating left ventricular function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pu, M.; Griffin, B. P.; Vandervoort, P. M.; Stewart, W. J.; Fan, X.; Cosgrove, D. M.; Thomas, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    Although alteration in pulmonary venous flow has been reported to relate to mitral regurgitant severity, it is also known to vary with left ventricular (LV) systolic and diastolic dysfunction. There are few data relating pulmonary venous flow to quantitative indexes of mitral regurgitation (MR). The object of this study was to assess quantitatively the accuracy of pulmonary venous flow for predicting MR severity by using transesophageal echocardiographic measurement in patients with variable LV dysfunction. This study consisted of 73 patients undergoing heart surgery with mild to severe MR. Regurgitant orifice area (ROA), regurgitant stroke volume (RSV), and regurgitant fraction (RF) were obtained by quantitative transesophageal echocardiography and proximal isovelocity surface area. Both left and right upper pulmonary venous flow velocities were recorded and their patterns classified by the ratio of systolic to diastolic velocity: normal (>/=1), blunted (<1), and systolic reversal (<0). Twenty-three percent of patients had discordant patterns between the left and right veins. When the most abnormal patterns either in the left or right vein were used for analysis, the ratio of peak systolic to diastolic flow velocity was negatively correlated with ROA (r = -0.74, P <.001), RSV (r = -0.70, P <.001), and RF (r = -0.66, P <.001) calculated by the Doppler thermodilution method; values were r = -0.70, r = -0.67, and r = -0.57, respectively (all P <.001), for indexes calculated by the proximal isovelocity surface area method. The sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of the reversed pulmonary venous flow pattern for detecting a large ROA (>0.3 cm(2)) were 69%, 98%, and 97%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of the normal pulmonary venous flow pattern for detecting a small ROA (<0.3 cm(2)) were 60%, 96%, and 94%, respectively. However, the blunted pattern had low sensitivity (22%), specificity (61%), and predictive values (30

  8. The prevalence of moderate mitral regurgitation in patients undergoing CABG.

    PubMed

    Wierup, Per; Nielsen, Sten Lyager; Egeblad, Henrik; Scherstén, Henrik; Kimblad, Per-Ola; Bech-Hansen, Odd; Roijer, Anders; Nilsson, Folke; Nielsen, Per Hostrup; Poulsen, Steen Hvitfeldt; Mølgaard, Henning

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of moderate ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR) in the contemporary CABG population. We also aimed to correlate the effective regurgitant orifice area (ERO) of any regurgitant mitral valve in patients with coronary artery disease with the semiquantitative integrated scale of IMR. From March 15 through June 15, 2006, 510 consecutive CABG patients in three tertiary centres were included in the study. All patients showing any sign of mitral regurgitation (MR) at the referring hospital underwent a preoperative transthoracic echocardiographic estimation of the degree of MR using the integrated scale (1-4) and ERO. IMR was found in 141 patients (28%). The prevalence of moderate 2+ or worse IMR was 4% (95% CI; 2.5-6.1%) and the ERO corresponding to 2+ IMR or more ranged from 5 to 30 mm(2). Fourteen patients had an ERO between 15-30 mm(2). According to our study, patients with moderate IMR, defined as an ERO between 15-30 mm(2), account for only 2.7% (95% CI; 1.5-4.7%) of a non-emergency CABG population.

  9. Mitral valve aneurysm associated with aortic valve endocarditis and regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Raval, Amish N; Menkis, Alan H; Boughner, Derek R

    2002-01-01

    Mitral valve aneurysms are rare complications occurring most commonly in association with aortic valve infective endocarditis. [Decroly 1989, Chua 1990, Northridge 1991, Karalis 1992, Roguin 1996, Mollod 1997, Vilacosta 1997, Cai 1999, Vilacosta 1999, Teskey 1999, Chan 2000, Goh 2000, Marcos- Alberca 2000] While the mechanism of the development of this lesion is unclear, complications such as perforation can occur and lead to significant mitral regurgitation. [Decroly 1989, Karalis 1992, Teskey 1999, Vilacosta 1999]; The case of a 69-year-old male with Streptococcus Sanguis aortic valve endocarditis and associated anterior mitral leaflet aneurysm is presented. Following surgery, tissue pathology of the excised lesion revealed myxomatous degeneration and no active endocarditis or inflammatory cells. This may add support to the hypothesis that physical stress due to severe aortic insufficiency and structural weakening, without infection of the anterior mitral leaflet, can lead to the development of this lesion.

  10. Right ventricular evaluation to improve survival outcome in patients with severe functional mitral regurgitation and advanced heart failure undergoing MitraClip therapy.

    PubMed

    Giannini, Cristina; Fiorelli, Francesca; Colombo, Antonio; De Carlo, Marco; Weisz, Sara Hana; Agricola, Eustachio; Godino, Cosmo; Castriota, Fausto; Golino, Paolo; Petronio, Anna Sonia

    2016-11-15

    Percutaneous mitral valve repair (PMVR) is a new option for high risk patients with functional mitral regurgitation (FMR) and severely depressed left ventricular (LV) function who are not responding to optimal medical therapy. However patients with end stage heart failure have a high mortality rate despite MitraClip implantation. We sought to identify right ventricular (RV) echocardiographic predictors of outcome in a large cohort of patients with severe FMR and advanced heart failure in order to select the most appropriate candidate who could benefit from this treatment. 169 consecutive high surgical risk patients affected by severe FMR underwent PMVR with the MitraClip System. The primary end-point was cardiovascular mortality at the longest available follow-up. The survival free from cardiac death was 97.6% at 30days, 86.7% at 1year, 71.5% at 2years and 61.6% at 3years. Patients who died were significantly older and had more severe comorbidities and signs of more advance heart failure. Independent predictors of cardiovascular mortality were severely impaired renal function [glomerular filtration rate (GFR)<30ml/min; OR=5.46, 95%CI=1.43-20.84, (p=0.01)] and RV systolic dysfunction [peak systolic velocity tissue Doppler imaging (PSVtdi)<9.5cm/s; OR=0.57, 95%CI=0.39-0.82, (p=0.003)]. Our study shows the importance of RV systolic function evaluation for the risk stratification of patients with FMR and advanced heart failure undergoing PMVR. Severe right ventricular failure identifies patients with an increased risk for cardiovascular mortality despite MitraClip treatment. RV PSVtdi is the best independent predictor of outcome in these end-stage patients for a threshold value of 9.5cm/s. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Mitral valve prolapse with mid-late systolic mitral regurgitation: pitfalls of evaluation and clinical outcome compared with holosystolic regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Topilsky, Yan; Michelena, Hector; Bichara, Valentina; Maalouf, Joseph; Mahoney, Douglas W; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice

    2012-04-03

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) of mitral valve prolapse predominates in late systole but may be holosystolic or purely mid-late systolic, but the impact of MR timing on MR left ventricular and left atrial consequences and outcome is unknown. Whether effective regurgitant orifice (ERO) by the flow convergence method is similarly linked to outcome in mid-late systolic MR and holosystolic MR is uncertain. We comprehensively and prospectively quantified MR in 111 patients with mitral valve prolapse and mid-late systolic MR and matched them to 90 patients with mitral valve prolapse and holosystolic MR for age, gender, atrial fibrillation, ejection fraction, and ERO (flow convergence). Mid-late systolic MR versus holosystolic MR groups were well matched, including for comorbidity, blood pressure, and heart rate (all P>0.10). Mid-late systolic MR versus holosystolic MR caused similar color jet area, midsystolic regurgitant flow, and peak velocity (P>0.40). Despite identical ERO (0.25±0.15 versus 0.25±0.15 cm(2); P=0.53), the shorter duration of mid-late systolic MR (233±56 versus 426±50 ms; P<0.0001) yielded lower regurgitant volume (24.8±13.4 versus 48.6±25.6 mL; P<0.0001). MR consequences, systolic pulmonary pressure, and left ventricular and left atrial volume index (all P<0.001) were more benign in mid-late systolic MR versus holosystolic MR. Under medical management, fewer cardiac events (5 years: 15.8±4.6% versus 40.4±6.1%; P<0.0001) occurred in mid-late systolic MR versus holosystolic MR, requiring less mitral surgery. Multivariable analysis confirmed the independent association of mid-late systolic MR with benign consequences and outcomes (all P<0.01). Absolute ERO was not linked to outcome, in contrast to regurgitant volume. MR of mitral valve prolapse that is purely mid-late systolic causes more benign consequences and outcomes than holosystolic MR. Assessment may be misleading because jet area and ERO by flow convergence appear similar to those of

  12. Color flow imaging of the vena contracta in mitral regurgitation: technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Brad J; Grayburn, Paul A

    2003-09-01

    Qualitative grading of mitral regurgitation severity has significant pitfalls secondary to hemodynamic variables, sonographic technique, blood pool entrainment, and the Coanda effect. Volumetric and proximal isovelocity surface area methods can be used to quantitate regurgitant orifice area, regurgitant volume, and regurgitant fraction, but have several limitations and can pose technical challenges. The vena contracta width method provides a rapid and accurate quantitative assessment of mitral regurgitation severity, but is clinically underused. This article is intended to generate an understanding of the flow mechanics of the vena contracta and the sonographic technique required to provide consistent and accurate measurements of vena contracta width in patients with mitral regurgitation.

  13. Comparison of outcomes of tricuspid annuloplasty with 3D-rigid versus flexible prosthetic ring for functional tricuspid regurgitation secondary to rheumatic mitral valve disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haiping; Wang, Xin; Lv, Zhenqian; Liu, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Background Annuloplasty bands and rings are widely used for repairing functional tricuspid regurgitation (FTR). However, the question regarding which is the ideal annuloplasty device remains unclear. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and mid-term durability of tricuspid ring annuloplasty for FTR secondary to rheumatic mitral valve disease using flexible Cosgrove-Edwards band and the rigid Edwards MC3 ring (Edwards Lifesciences, LLC, Irvine, CA, USA). Methods We retrospectively collected the clinical data of those who underwent mitral valve replacement (MVR) in concomitant with tricuspid ring annuloplasty from 2009 to 2013. The flexible band was used in 46 patients (flexible group), and the 3D rigid ring was used in 60 patients (rigid group). Echocardiographic evaluation of tricuspid function was performed preoperatively and postoperatively. Results The grade of TR was significantly improved compared to preoperative values in two groups. There was no significant difference regarding postoperative TR grade between the two groups at 1 week and 2–3 months but there was statistical significant difference at postoperative 6–12 months, and 2–3 years. During the follow up period, 25 of 46 patients (54.3%) in flexible group and 22 of 60 patients (30.3%) in rigid group developed recurrent TR. Freedom from recurrent TR in flexible group is significant lower than rigid group in each postoperative follow up period. Conclusions These findings suggest that 3D rigid ring annuloplasty might be more effective for tricuspid ring annuloplasty in FTR in mid-term postoperative periods when compared to flexible band. PMID:28066587

  14. Ischemic or Nonischemic Functional Mitral Regurgitation and Outcomes in Patients With Acute Decompensated Heart Failure With Preserved or Reduced Ejection Fraction.

    PubMed

    Kajimoto, Katsuya; Minami, Yuichiro; Otsubo, Shigeru; Sato, Naoki

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of functional mitral regurgitation (FMR), preserved or reduced ejection fraction (EF), and ischemic or nonischemic origin with outcomes in patients discharged alive after hospitalization for acute decompensated heart failure (HF). Of the 4,842 patients enrolled in the Acute Decompensated Heart Failure Syndromes (ATTEND) registry, 3,357 patients were evaluated to assess the association of FMR, preserved or reduced EF, and ischemic or nonischemic origin with the primary end point (all-cause death and readmission for HF after discharge). At the time of discharge, FMR was assessed semiquantitatively (classified as none, mild, or moderate to severe) by color Doppler analysis of the regurgitant jet area. According to multivariable analysis, in the ischemic group, either mild or moderate to severe FMR in patients with a preserved EF had a significantly higher risk of the primary end point than patients without FMR (hazard ratio [HR] 1.60; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.12 to 2.29; p = 0.010 and HR 1.98; 95% CI 1.30 to 3.01; p = 0.001, respectively). In patients with reduced EF with an ischemic origin, only moderate to severe FMR was associated with a significantly higher risk of the primary end point (HR 1.67; 95% CI 1.11 to 2.50; p = 0.014). In the nonischemic group, there was no significant association between FMR and the primary end point in patients with either a preserved or reduced EF. In conclusion, among patients with acute decompensated HF with a preserved or reduced EF, the association of FMR with adverse outcomes may differ between patients who had an ischemic or nonischemic origin of HF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Successful surgical repair of the parachute mitral valve with mitral valve regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Manabu; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Adachi, Hideo

    2012-01-01

    A 65-year-old woman with exercise-related dyspnea was admitted to our hospital. Transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated a large anomalous papillary muscle that originated from the posterior wall of the left ventricle and severe mitral valve regurgitation in systole. Cleft suture, 5-0 polytetrafluoroethylene sutures from a single papillary muscle to the anterior commissure leaflet (AC), 5-0 polypropylene sutures between AC and A1, and between A1 and A2, the double-orifice technique, and ring plasty with 32-mm semi-rigid ring was performed. Postoperative echocardiography showed an improvement in severe mitral valve regurgitation. At the 2-month follow-up, the patient was in good health. In the present case, the elderly patient with an isolated parachute mitral valve but without any other cardiac anomaly and presenting with mitral valve regurgitation is extremely rare. This case of mitral valvuloplasty for a parachute mitral valve with a single papillary muscle in an elderly woman has not been reported before.

  16. Fully automated software for mitral annulus evaluation in chronic mitral regurgitation by 3-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Aquila, Iolanda; Fernández-Golfín, Covadonga; Rincon, Luis Miguel; González, Ariana; García Martín, Ana; Hinojar, Rocio; Jimenez Nacher, Jose Julio; Indolfi, Ciro; Zamorano, Jose Luis

    2016-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is the gold standard for mitral valve (MV) anatomic and functional evaluation. Currently, dedicated MV analysis software has limitations for its use in clinical practice. Thus, we tested here a complete and reproducible evaluation of a new fully automatic software to characterize MV anatomy in different forms of mitral regurgitation (MR) by 3D TEE.Sixty patients were included: 45 with more than moderate MR (28 organic MR [OMR] and 17 functional MR [FMR]) and 15 controls. All patients underwent TEE. 3D MV images obtained using 3D zoom were imported into the new software for automatic analysis. Different MV parameters were obtained and compared. Anatomic and dynamic differences between FMR and OMR were detected. A significant increase in systolic (859.75 vs 801.83 vs 607.78 mm; P = 0.002) and diastolic (1040.60 vs. 1217.83 and 859.74 mm; P < 0.001) annular sizes was observed in both OMR and FMR compared to that in controls. FMR had a reduced mitral annular contraction compared to degenerative cases of OMR and to controls (17.14% vs 32.78% and 29.89%; P = 0.007). Good reproducibility was demonstrated along with a short analysis time (mean 4.30 minutes).Annular characteristics and dynamics are abnormal in both FMR and OMR. Full 3D software analysis automatically calculates several significant parameters that provide a correct and complete assessment of anatomy and dynamic mitral annulus geometry and displacement in the 3D space. This analysis allows a better characterization of MR pathophysiology and could be useful in designing new devices for MR repair or replacement.

  17. Fully automated software for mitral annulus evaluation in chronic mitral regurgitation by 3-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Aquila, Iolanda; Fernández-Golfín, Covadonga; Rincon, Luis Miguel; González, Ariana; García Martín, Ana; Hinojar, Rocio; Jimenez Nacher, Jose Julio; Indolfi, Ciro; Zamorano, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Three-dimensional (3D) transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is the gold standard for mitral valve (MV) anatomic and functional evaluation. Currently, dedicated MV analysis software has limitations for its use in clinical practice. Thus, we tested here a complete and reproducible evaluation of a new fully automatic software to characterize MV anatomy in different forms of mitral regurgitation (MR) by 3D TEE. Sixty patients were included: 45 with more than moderate MR (28 organic MR [OMR] and 17 functional MR [FMR]) and 15 controls. All patients underwent TEE. 3D MV images obtained using 3D zoom were imported into the new software for automatic analysis. Different MV parameters were obtained and compared. Anatomic and dynamic differences between FMR and OMR were detected. A significant increase in systolic (859.75 vs 801.83 vs 607.78 mm2; P = 0.002) and diastolic (1040.60 vs. 1217.83 and 859.74 mm2; P < 0.001) annular sizes was observed in both OMR and FMR compared to that in controls. FMR had a reduced mitral annular contraction compared to degenerative cases of OMR and to controls (17.14% vs 32.78% and 29.89%; P = 0.007). Good reproducibility was demonstrated along with a short analysis time (mean 4.30 minutes). Annular characteristics and dynamics are abnormal in both FMR and OMR. Full 3D software analysis automatically calculates several significant parameters that provide a correct and complete assessment of anatomy and dynamic mitral annulus geometry and displacement in the 3D space. This analysis allows a better characterization of MR pathophysiology and could be useful in designing new devices for MR repair or replacement. PMID:27930514

  18. Acute massive mitral regurgitation from prosthetic valve dysfunction.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, D K; Sturridge, M F

    1976-01-01

    Two cases of prosthetic valve dysfunction resulting in acute massive mitral regurgitation are reported; emergency operation was successful in both cases. Survival following complete dislodgement of the occluder of a disc valve, as occurred in one case, does not appear to have been reported before. The diffculty in diagnosis of sudden cardiac decompensation in patients with prosthetic valves is stressed, as is the need for urgent operation. Images PMID:973894

  19. Papillary muscle approximation to septum for functional tricuspid regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Lohchab, Shamsher Singh; Chahal, Ashok Kumar; Agrawal, Nilesh

    2015-07-01

    Current techniques for repair of functional tricuspid regurgitation are associated with a significant degree of residual or recurrent regurgitation. We describe a technique of anterior papillary muscle attachment to the septum to correct residual tricuspid regurgitation persisting after annuloplasty. In our early experience in 15 patients (6 men and 9 women) with a mean age of 32 ± 11 years, who underwent annuloplasty for severe functional tricuspid regurgitation secondary to rheumatic mitral valve disease, this technique effectively eliminated residual tricuspid regurgitation.

  20. The Mitral Valve Prolapsus : Quantification of the Regurgitation Flow Rate by Experimental Time-Dependant PIV

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    The Mitral Valve Prolapsus : Quantification of the Regurgitation Flow Rate by Experimental Time-Dependant PIV. F. Billy1, D. Coisne1,2, L. Sanchez1... mitral valve insufficiency), assumes that the velocity field in the convergent region have hemispheric shapes and introduce miscalculation specially...upstream a prolaps model of regurgitant orifice based on 2D time dependent PIV reconstruction. Keywords- Mitral Valve , Prolapsus, Regurgitation Flow

  1. Reversible mitral and aortic regurgitation due to pioglitazone.

    PubMed

    Kota, Sunil K; Tripathy, Prabhas R; Kota, Siva K; Jammula, Sruti; Panda, Sandip; Modi, Kirtikumar D

    2012-01-01

    To report the occurrence of pioglitazone-induced reversible valvular regurgitant lesions. Clinical, laboratory, and imaging data are reported on a patient with known type 2 diabetes mellitus, who was prescribed pioglitazone to achieve better glycemic control. We present a case report of a 50-year-old woman, in whom diabetes had been diagnosed 5 years previously, who developed severe mitral and aortic regurgitation during 5 months of treatment with pioglitazone along with clinical and laboratory indications of fluid retention. Echocardiography 5 months after discontinued use of pioglitazone showed regression of regurgitant lesions and normalization of pertinent laboratory variables. Five months of treatment with pioglitazone could potentially induce major cardiac valvular dysfunction, which was reversible in our patient. This report emphasizes the importance of carefully monitoring patients during treatment with thiazolidinediones.

  2. Novel pathogenetic mechanisms and structural adaptations in ischemic mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Silbiger, Jeffrey J

    2013-10-01

    Ischemic mitral regurgitation (MR) is a common complication of myocardial infarction thought to result from leaflet tethering caused by displacement of the papillary muscles that occurs as the left ventricle remodels. The author explores the possibility that left atrial remodeling may also play a role in the pathogenesis of ischemic MR, through a novel mechanism: atriogenic leaflet tethering. When ischemic MR is hemodynamically significant, the left ventricle compensates by dilating to preserve forward output using the Starling mechanism. Left ventricular dilatation, however, worsens MR by increasing the mitral valve regurgitant orifice, leading to a vicious cycle in which MR begets more MR. The author proposes that several structural adaptations play a role in reducing ischemic MR. In contrast to the compensatory effects of left ventricular enlargement, these may reduce, rather than increase, its severity. The suggested adaptations involve the mitral valve leaflets, the papillary muscles, the mitral annulus, and the left ventricular false tendons. This review describes the potential role each may play in reducing ischemic MR. Therapies that exploit these adaptations are also discussed.

  3. Mitral Apparatus Assessment by Delayed Enhancement CMR – Relative Impact of Infarct Distribution on Mitral Regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Chinitz, Jason S.; Chen, Debbie; Goyal, Parag; Wilson, Sean; Islam, Fahmida; Nguyen, Thanh; Wang, Yi; Hurtado-Rua, Sandra; Simprini, Lauren; Cham, Matthew; Levine, Robert A.; Devereux, Richard B.; Weinsaft, Jonathan W.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess patterns and functional consequences of mitral apparatus infarction after acute MI (AMI). Background The mitral apparatus contains two myocardial components – papillary muscles and the adjacent LV wall. Delayed-enhancement CMR (DE-CMR) enables in-vivo study of inter-relationships and potential contributions of LV wall and papillary muscle infarction (PMI) to mitral regurgitation (MR). Methods Multimodality imaging was performed: CMR was used to assess mitral geometry and infarct pattern, including 3D DE-CMR for PMI. Echocardiography (echo) was used to measure MR. Imaging occurred 27±8 days post-AMI (CMR, echo within 1 day). Results 153 patients with first AMI were studied. PMI was present in 30% (n=46; 72% posteromedial, 39% anterolateral). When stratified by angiographic culprit vessel, PMI occurred in 65% of patients with left circumflex, 48% with right coronary, and only 14% of patients with left anterior descending infarctions (p<0.001). Patients with PMI had more advanced remodeling as measured by LV size and mitral annular diameter (p<0.05). Increased extent of PMI was accompanied by a stepwise increase in mean infarct transmurality within regional LV segments underlying each papillary muscle (p<0.001). Prevalence of lateral wall infarction was 3.0 fold higher among patients with, compared to those without, PMI (65% vs. 22%, p<0.001). Infarct distribution also impacted MR, with greater MR among patients with lateral wall infarction (p=0.002). Conversely, MR severity did not differ based on presence (p=0.19) or extent (p=0.12) of PMI, or by angiographic culprit vessel. In multivariable analysis, lateral wall infarct size (OR=1.20[CI=1.05–1.39], p=0.01) was independently associated with substantial (≥moderate) MR even after controlling for mitral annular (OR=1.22[1.04–1.43], p=0.01) and LV end-diastolic diameter (OR=1.11 [0.99–1.23], p=0.056). Conclusions PMI is common post-AMI, affecting nearly one-third of patients. PMI extent

  4. Is an adjunctive subvalvular repair during mitral annuloplasty for secondary mitral regurgitation effective in preventing recurrent regurgitation?

    PubMed

    Mihos, Christos G; Santana, Orlando

    2016-02-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: Is an adjunctive subvalvular repair during mitral annuloplasty for secondary mitral regurgitation effective in preventing recurrent regurgitation? Altogether, 353 studies were found using the reported search, of which 9 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers were tabulated. The best evidence regarding adjunctive subvalvular repair during mitral annuloplasty for secondary mitral regurgitation was from retrospective analyses. The studies reported outcomes of mitral valve repair (MVr) with annuloplasty alone (ring MVr) versus adjunctive papillary muscle approximation (PMA; n = 3), papillary muscle relocation (PMR; n = 3), secondary chordal cutting (n = 2) and PMA + PMR (n = 1). All but one study included concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting, whereas additional ventriculoplasty was performed in three studies. Follow-up ranged from 1 month to 5 years. The performance of PMA was associated with a lower mitral regurgitation (MR) grade when combined with ventriculoplasty in one study, whereas a greater improvement in left ventricular end-diastolic diameter and left ventricular ejection fraction at follow-up was observed with PMA alone in a separate study. Three studies of ring + PMR reported a reduction in ≥ 2+ recurrent MR, whereas two studies also observed a greater reduction in left ventricular end-diastolic diameter. The two studies on secondary chordal cutting reported a lower MR grade, lower recurrence of ≥ 2+ MR and a greater left ventricular ejection fraction at follow-up. Combining PMA + PMR + ventriculoplasty significantly reduced left ventricular end-systolic volume index at short-term follow-up in one study. Finally, none of the studies reported a significant difference in

  5. Assessment of mitral regurgitation in dogs: comparison of results of echocardiography with magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Sargent, J; Connolly, D J; Watts, V; Mõtsküla, P; Volk, H A; Lamb, C R; Fuentes, V Luis

    2015-11-01

    Echocardiography is used routinely to assess mitral regurgitation severity, but echocardiographic measures of mitral regurgitation in dogs have not been compared with other quantitative methods. The study aim was to compare echocardiographic measures of mitral regurgitation with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging-derived mitral regurgitant fraction in small-breed dogs. Dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease scheduled for magnetic resonance imaging assessment of neurological disease were recruited. Correlations were tested between cardiac magnetic resonance imaging-derived mitral regurgitant fraction and the following echocardiographic measures: vena contracta/aortic diameter, transmitral E-wave velocity, amplitude of mitral prolapse/aortic diameter, diastolic left ventricular diameter:aortic diameter, left atrium:aortic diameter, mitral regurgitation jet area ratio and regurgitant fraction calculated using the proximal isovelocity surface area method. Measurement of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging-derived mitral regurgitant fraction was attempted in 21 dogs. Twelve consecutive, complete studies were obtained and 10 dogs were included in the final analysis: vena contracta/aortic diameter (r = 0 · 89, p = 0 · 001) and E-wave velocity (r = 0 · 86, p = 0 · 001) had the strongest correlations with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging-derived mitral regurgitant fraction. E velocity had superior repeatability and could be measured in all dogs. The presence of multiple jets precluded vena contracta/aortic diameter measurement in one dog. Measurement of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging-derived mitral regurgitant fraction is feasible but technically demanding. The echocardiographic measures that correlated most closely with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging-derived mitral regurgitant fraction were vena contracta/aortic diameter and E-wave velocity. © 2015 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  6. Impact of mitral valve geometry on hemodynamic efficacy of surgical repair in secondary mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Padala, Muralidhar; Gyoneva, Lazarina I; Thourani, Vinod H; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2014-01-01

    Mitral valve geometry is significantly altered secondary to left ventricular remodeling in non-ischemic and ischemic dilated cardiomyopathies. Since the extent of remodeling and asymmetry of dilatation of the ventricle differ significantly between individual patients, the valve geometry and tethering also differ. The study aim was to determine if mitral valve geometry has an impact on the efficacy of surgical repairs to eliminate regurgitation and restore valve closure in a validated experimental model. Porcine mitral valves (n = 8) were studied in a pulsatile heart simulator, in which the mitral valve geometry can be precisely altered and controlled throughout the experiment. Baseline hemodynamics for each valve were measured (Control), and the valves were tethered in two distinct ways: annular dilatation with 7 mm apical papillary muscle (PM) displacement (Tether 1, symmetric), and annular dilatation with 7 mm apical, 7 mm posterior and 7 mm lateral PM displacement (Tether 2, asymmetric). Mitral annuloplasty was performed on each valve (Annular Repair), succeeded by anterior leaflet secondary chordal cutting (Sub-annular Repair). The efficacy of each repair in the setting of a given valve geometry was quantified by measuring the changes in mitral regurgitation (MR), leaflet coaptation length, tethering height and area. At baseline, none of the valves was regurgitant. Significant leaflet tethering was measured in Tether 2 over Tether 1, but both groups were significantly higher compared to baseline (60.9 +/- 31 mm2 for Control versus 129.7 +/- 28.4 mm2 for Tether 1 versus 186.4 +/- 36.3 mm2 for Tether 2). Consequently, the MR fraction was higher in Tether 2 group (23.0 +/- 5.7%) than in Tether 1 (10.5 +/- 5.5%). Mitral annuloplasty reduced MR in both groups, but remnant regurgitation after the repair was higher in Tether 2. After chordal cutting a similar trend was observed with trace regurgitation in Tether 1 group at 3.6 +/- 2.8%, in comparison to 18.6 +/- 4

  7. Functional Mitral Regurgitation Predicts Short-Term Adverse Events in Patients With Acute Heart Failure and Reduced Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction.

    PubMed

    De la Espriella, Rafael; Santas, Enrique; Miñana, Gema; Bodí, Vicent; Valero, Ernesto; Payá, Rafael; Núñez, Eduardo; Payá, Ana; Chorro, Francisco J; Bayés-Genis, Antoni; Sanchis, Juan; Núñez, Julio

    2017-10-15

    Functional mitral regurgitation (FMR) is a common finding in patients with acute heart failure (AHF) and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (heart failure and reduced ejection fraction [HFrEF]). However, its clinical impact remains unclear. We aimed to evaluate the association between the severity of FMR after clinical stabilization and short-term adverse outcomes after a hospitalization for AHF. We prospectively included 938 consecutive patients with HFrEF discharged after a hospitalization for AHF, after excluding those with organic valve disease, congenital heart disease, or aortic valve disease. FMR was assessed semiquantitatively by color Doppler analysis of the regurgitant jet area, and its severity was categorized as none or mild (grade 0 or 1), moderate (grade 2), or severe (grade 3 or 4). FMR was assessed at 120 ± 24 hours after admission. The primary end point was the composite of all-cause mortality and rehospitalization at 90 days. At discharge, 533 (56.8%), 253 (26.9%), and 152 (16.2%) patients showed none-mild, moderate, and severe FMR. At the 90-day follow-up, 161 patients (17.2%) either died (n = 49) or were readmitted (n = 112). Compared with patients with none or mild FMR, rates of the composite end point were higher for patients with moderate and severe FMRs (p <0.001). After the multivariable adjustment, those with moderate and severe FMRs had a significantly higher risk of reaching the end point (hazard ratio = 1.50, 95% confidence interval 1.04 to 2.17, p = 0.027; and hazard ratio = 1.63, 95% confidence interval 1.07 to 2.48, p = 0.023, respectively). In conclusion, FMR is a common finding in patients with HFrEF, and its presence, when moderate or severe, identifies a subgroup at higher risk of adverse clinical outcomes at short term. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [A case of death due to mitral regurgitation caused by traumatic mitral valve injury].

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Y; Kojima, T; Yasui, W; Nagasawa, N; Yashiki, M

    1996-06-01

    A 51-year-old male, who had been driving a motor bicycle, was involved in a traffic accident with a trailer, and he died immediately after the accident. According to the external examination of the victim, no fatal injuries were found. The medico-legal autopsy revealed a rupture of the left side of the pericardium, and a tear of the posterior leaflet of the mitral valve. There were no injuries of the papillary muscles and chordae. The cause of death was due to traumatic mitral regurgitation.

  9. Left atrial myxoma, ruptured chordae tendinae causing mitral regurgitation and coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Bhupesh; Raj, Ravi; Jayant, Aveek; Kuthe, Sachin

    2014-01-01

    Mitral regurgitation is uncommon with left atrial myxoma. The echocardiographic assessment of presence of mitral regurgitation and its severity are impaired by the presence of left atrial myxoma. We describe an uncommon association of left atrial myxoma with coronary artery disease and mitral regurgitation. MR was reported as mild on pre-operative transthoracic echocardiography but found to be severe due to ruptured chordae tendinae during intra-operative transesophageal echocardiography, which lead to change in the surgical plan to mitral valve replacement in addition to excision of myxoma.

  10. Mitral Regurgitation after Percutaneous Balloon Mitral Valvotomy in Patients with Rheumatic Mitral Stenosis: A Single-Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Aslanabadi, Naser; Toufan, Mehrnoush; Salehi, Rezvaneyeh; Alizadehasl, Azin; Ghaffari, Samad; Sohrabi, Bahram; Separham, Ahmad; Manafi, Ataolaah; Mehdizadeh, Mohammad Bagher; Habibzadeh, Afshin

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Percutaneous balloon mitral valvotomy (BMV) is the gold standard treatment for rheumatic mitral stenosis (MS) in that it causes significant changes in mitral valve area (MVA) and improves leaflet mobility. Development of or increase in mitral regurgitation (MR) is common after BMV. This study evaluated MR severity and its changes after BMV in Iranian patients. Methods: We prospectively evaluated consecutive patients with severe rheumatic MS undergoing BMV using the Inoue balloon technique between February 2010 and January 2013 in Madani Heart Center, Tabriz, Iran. New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class and echocardiographic and catheterization data, including MVA, mitral valve mean and peak gradient (MVPG and MVMG), left atrial (LA) pressure, pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PAPs), and MR severity before and after BMV, were evaluated. Results: Totally, 105 patients (80% female) at a mean age of 45.81 ± 13.37 years were enrolled. NYHA class was significantly improved after BMV: 55.2% of the patients were in NYHA functional class III before BMV compared to 36.2% after the procedure (p value < 0.001). MVA significantly increased (mean area = 0.64 ± 0.29 cm2 before BMV vs. 1.90 ± 0.22 cm2 after BMV; p value < 0.001) and PAPs, LA pressure, MVPG, and MVMG significantly decreased. MR severity did not change in 82 (78.1%) patients, but it increased in 18 (17.1%) and decreased in 5 (4.8%) patients. Patients with increased MR had a significantly higher calcification score (2.03 ± 0.53 vs.1.50 ± 0.51; p value < 0.001) and lower MVA before BMV (0.81 ± 0.23 vs.0.94 ± 0.18; p value = 0.010). There were no major complications. Conclusion: In our study, BMV had excellent immediate hemodynamic and clinical results inasmuch as MR severity increased only in some patients and, interestingly, decreased in a few. Our results, underscore BMV efficacy in severe MS. The echocardiographic calcification score was useful for identifying patients

  11. Mitral regurgitation after percutaneous balloon mitral valvotomy in patients with rheumatic mitral stenosis: a single-center study.

    PubMed

    Aslanabadi, Naser; Toufan, Mehrnoush; Salehi, Rezvaneyeh; Alizadehasl, Azin; Ghaffari, Samad; Sohrabi, Bahram; Separham, Ahmad; Manafi, Ataolaah; Mehdizadeh, Mohammad Bagher; Habibzadeh, Afshin

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous balloon mitral valvotomy (BMV) is the gold standard treatment for rheumatic mitral stenosis (MS) in that it causes significant changes in mitral valve area (MVA) and improves leaflet mobility. Development of or increase in mitral regurgitation (MR) is common after BMV. This study evaluated MR severity and its changes after BMV in Iranian patients. We prospectively evaluated consecutive patients with severe rheumatic MS undergoing BMV using the Inoue balloon technique between February 2010 and January 2013 in Madani Heart Center, Tabriz, Iran. New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class and echocardiographic and catheterization data, including MVA, mitral valve mean and peak gradient (MVPG and MVMG), left atrial (LA) pressure, pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PAPs), and MR severity before and after BMV, were evaluated. Totally, 105 patients (80% female) at a mean age of 45.81 ± 13.37 years were enrolled. NYHA class was significantly improved after BMV: 55.2% of the patients were in NYHA functional class III before BMV compared to 36.2% after the procedure (p value < 0.001). MVA significantly increased (mean area = 0.64 ± 0.29 cm(2) before BMV vs. 1.90 ± 0.22 cm(2) after BMV; p value < 0.001) and PAPs, LA pressure, MVPG, and MVMG significantly decreased. MR severity did not change in 82 (78.1%) patients, but it increased in 18 (17.1%) and decreased in 5 (4.8%) patients. Patients with increased MR had a significantly higher calcification score (2.03 ± 0.53 vs.1.50 ± 0.51; p value < 0.001) and lower MVA before BMV (0.81 ± 0.23 vs.0.94 ± 0.18; p value = 0.010). There were no major complications. In our study, BMV had excellent immediate hemodynamic and clinical results inasmuch as MR severity increased only in some patients and, interestingly, decreased in a few. Our results, underscore BMV efficacy in severe MS. The echocardiographic calcification score was useful for identifying patients likely to have MR development or MR increase after

  12. Compassionate use of the PASCAL transcatheter mitral valve repair system for patients with severe mitral regurgitation: a multicentre, prospective, observational, first-in-man study.

    PubMed

    Praz, Fabien; Spargias, Konstantinos; Chrissoheris, Michael; Büllesfeld, Lutz; Nickenig, Georg; Deuschl, Florian; Schueler, Robert; Fam, Neil P; Moss, Robert; Makar, Moody; Boone, Robert; Edwards, Jeremy; Moschovitis, Aris; Kar, Saibal; Webb, John; Schäfer, Ulrich; Feldman, Ted; Windecker, Stephan

    2017-08-19

    Severe mitral regurgitation is associated with impaired prognosis if left untreated. Using the devices currently available, transcatheter mitral valve repair (TMVr) remains challenging in complex anatomical situations. We report the procedural and 30-day results of the first-in-man study of the Edwards PASCAL TMVr system. In this multicentre, prospective, observational, first-in-man study, we collected data from seven tertiary care hospitals in five countries that had a compassionate use programme in which patients underwent transcatheter mitral valve repair using the Edwards PASCAL TMVr system. Eligible patients were those with symptomatic, severe functional, degenerative, or mixed mitral regurgitation deemed at high risk or inoperable. Safety and efficacy of the procedure were prospectively assessed at device implantation, discharge, and 30 days after device implantation. The key study endpoints were technical success assessed at the end of the procedure and device success 30 days after implantation using the Mitral Valve Academic Research Consortium definitions. Between Sept 1, 2016, and March 31, 2017, 23 patients (median age 75 years [IQR 61-82]) had treatment for moderate-to-severe (grade 3+) or severe (grade 4+) mitral regurgitation using the Edwards PASCAL TMVr system. At baseline, the median EuroScore II score was 7·1% (IQR 3·6-12·8) and the median Society of Thoracic Surgeons predicted risk of mortality for mitral valve repair was 4·8% (2·1-9·0) and 6·8% (2·9-10·1) for mitral valve replacement. 22 (96%) of 23 patients were New York Heart Association (NYHA) class III or IV at baseline. The implantation of at least one device was successful in all patients, resulting in procedural residual mitral regurgitation of grade 2+ or less in 22 (96%) patients. Six (26%) of 23 patients had two implants. Periprocedural complications occurred in two (9%) of 23 patients (one minor bleeding event and one transient ischaemic attack). Despite the anatomical

  13. The role of papillary muscle approximation in mitral valve repair for the treatment of secondary mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Mihos, Christos G; Yucel, Evin; Santana, Orlando

    2016-12-30

    SummarySecondary mitral regurgitation (MR) is present in up to half of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, and is associated with a poor prognosis. It primarily results from progressive left ventricular remodelling, papillary muscle displacement and tethering of the mitral valve leaflets. Mitral valve repair with an undersized ring annuloplasty is the reparative procedure of choice in the treatment of secondary MR. However, this technique is associated with a 30-60% incidence of recurrent moderate or greater MR at mid-term follow-up, which results in progressive deterioration of left ventricular function and increased morbidity. Combined mitral valve repair and papillary muscle approximation has been applied in order to address both the annular and subvalvular dysfunction that coexist in secondary MR, which include graft and suture-based techniques. Herein, we provide a systematic review of the published literature regarding the technical aspects, clinical application, and outcomes of mitral valve repair with combined ring annuloplasty and papillary muscle approximation for the treatment of secondary MR.

  14. [Does mitral valve annuloplasty improve long-term survival in patients having moderate ischemic mitral regurgitation undergoing CABG?].

    PubMed

    Silberman, Shuli; Merin, Ofer; Fink, Daniel; Alshousha, Atia; Shachar, Sigal; Tauber, Rachel; Butnaro, Adi; Bitran, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    The best surgical approach for patients with moderate ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR) is still undetermined. We examined long term outcomes in patients with moderate IMR undergoing coronary bypass (CABG), and compared outcomes between those undergoing isolated CABG to those undergoing concomitant restrictive annuloplasty. Between the years 1993-2011, 231 patients with moderate IMR underwent CABG: group 1 (n = 186) underwent isolated CABG, group 2 (n = 15) underwent CABG with concomitant mitral valve annuloplasty. Univariate analysis was used to compare baseline parameters. Kaplan-Meier estimates were used to compare survival. Cox multivariate regression was used to determine predictors for late survival. Survival data up to 20 years is 97% complete. The groups were similar with respect to age, prior MI, LV function, and incidence of atrial fibrillation. Patients undergoing mitral repair had a higher incidence of congestive heart failure (CHF) (p < 0.0001). After surgery more repair patients required use of inotropes (p = 0.0005). Overall operative mortality was 7% and similar between groups. Ten year survival was 55% and 52% for groups 1 and 2 respectively (p = 0.2). Predictors of late mortality included age, CHF, LV dimensions and LV dysfunction. Neither the addition of a mitral procedure and type of ring implanted nor residual MR after surgery, emerged as predictors of survival. In patients with moderate ischemic MR, neither operative mortality nor long term survival are affected by the performance of a restrictive annuloplasty. For patients with CHF, mitral repair may be beneficial in terms of survival.

  15. Management of mitral regurgitation in Marfan syndrome: Outcomes of valve repair versus replacement and comparison with myxomatous mitral valve disease.

    PubMed

    Helder, Meghana R K; Schaff, Hartzell V; Dearani, Joseph A; Li, Zhuo; Stulak, John M; Suri, Rakesh M; Connolly, Heidi M

    2014-09-01

    The study objective was to evaluate patients with Marfan syndrome and mitral valve regurgitation undergoing valve repair or replacement and to compare them with patients undergoing repair for myxomatous mitral valve disease. We reviewed the medical records of consecutive patients with Marfan syndrome treated surgically between March 17, 1960, and September 12, 2011, for mitral regurgitation and performed a subanalysis of those with repairs compared with case-matched patients with myxomatous mitral valve disease who had repairs (March 14, 1995, to July 5, 2013). Of 61 consecutive patients, 40 underwent mitral repair and 21 underwent mitral replacement (mean [standard deviation] age, 40 [18] vs 31 [19] years; P = .09). Concomitant aortic surgery was performed to a similar extent (repair, 45% [18/40] vs replacement, 43% [9/21]; P = .87). Ten-year survival was significantly better in patients with Marfan syndrome with mitral repair than in those with replacement (80% vs 41%; P = .01). Mitral reintervention did not differ between mitral repair and replacement (cumulative risk of reoperation, 27% vs 15%; P = .64). In the matched cohort, 10-year survival after repair was similar for patients with Marfan syndrome and myxomatous mitral disease (84% vs 78%; P = .63), as was cumulative risk of reoperation (17% vs 12%; P = .61). Patients with Marfan syndrome and mitral regurgitation have better survival with repair than with replacement. Survival and risk of reoperation for patients with Marfan syndrome were similar to those for patients with myxomatous mitral disease. These results support the use of mitral valve repair in patients with Marfan syndrome and moderate or more mitral regurgitation, including those having composite replacement of the aortic root. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Mitral Valve Stenosis after Open Repair Surgery for Non-rheumatic Mitral Valve Regurgitation: A Review.

    PubMed

    Shabsigh, Muhammad; Lawrence, Cassidy; Rosero-Britton, Byron R; Kumar, Nicolas; Kimura, Satoshi; Durda, Michael Andrew; Essandoh, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Mitral stenosis (MS) after mitral valve (MV) repair is a slowly progressive condition, usually detected many years after the index MV surgery. It is defined as a mean transmitral pressure gradient (TMPG) >5 mmHg or a mitral valve area (MVA) <1.5 cm(2). Pannus formation around the mitral annulus or extending to the mitral leaflets is suggested as the main mechanism for developing delayed MS after MV repair. On the other hand, early stenosis is thought to be a direct result of an undersized annuloplasty ring. Furthermore, in MS following ischemic mitral regurgitation (MR) repair, subvalvular tethering is the hypothesized pathophysiology. MS after MV repair has an incidence of 9-54%. Several factors have been associated with a higher risk for developing MS after MV repair, including the use of flexible Duran annuloplasty rings versus rigid Carpentier-Edwards rings, complete annuloplasty rings versus partial bands, small versus large anterior leaflet opening angle, and anterior leaflet tip opening length. Intraoperative echocardiography can measure the anterior leaflet opening angle, the anterior leaflet tip opening dimension, the MVA and the mean TMPG, and may help identify patients at risk for developing MS after MV repair.

  17. Mitral Valve Stenosis after Open Repair Surgery for Non-rheumatic Mitral Valve Regurgitation: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Shabsigh, Muhammad; Lawrence, Cassidy; Rosero-Britton, Byron R.; Kumar, Nicolas; Kimura, Satoshi; Durda, Michael Andrew; Essandoh, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Mitral stenosis (MS) after mitral valve (MV) repair is a slowly progressive condition, usually detected many years after the index MV surgery. It is defined as a mean transmitral pressure gradient (TMPG) >5 mmHg or a mitral valve area (MVA) <1.5 cm2. Pannus formation around the mitral annulus or extending to the mitral leaflets is suggested as the main mechanism for developing delayed MS after MV repair. On the other hand, early stenosis is thought to be a direct result of an undersized annuloplasty ring. Furthermore, in MS following ischemic mitral regurgitation (MR) repair, subvalvular tethering is the hypothesized pathophysiology. MS after MV repair has an incidence of 9–54%. Several factors have been associated with a higher risk for developing MS after MV repair, including the use of flexible Duran annuloplasty rings versus rigid Carpentier–Edwards rings, complete annuloplasty rings versus partial bands, small versus large anterior leaflet opening angle, and anterior leaflet tip opening length. Intraoperative echocardiography can measure the anterior leaflet opening angle, the anterior leaflet tip opening dimension, the MVA and the mean TMPG, and may help identify patients at risk for developing MS after MV repair. PMID:27148540

  18. A pig model of ischemic mitral regurgitation induced by mitral chordae tendinae rupture and implantation of an ameroid constrictor.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yong-Chun; Li, Kai; Tian, Yi; Yuan, Wei-Min; Peng, Peng; Yang, Jian-Zhong; Zhang, Bao-Jie; Zhang, Hui-Dong; Wu, Ai-Li; Tang, Yue

    2014-01-01

    A miniature pig model of ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR) was developed by posterior mitral chordae tendinae rupture and implantation of an ameroid constrictor. A 2.5-mm ameroid constrictor was placed around the left circumflex coronary artery (LCX) of male Tibetan miniature pigs to induce ischemia, while the posterior mitral chordae tendinae was also ruptured. X-ray coronary angiography, ECG analysis, echocardiography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used to evaluate heart structure and function in pigs at baseline and one, two, four and eight weeks after the operation. Blood velocity of the mitral regurgitation was found to be between medium and high levels. Angiographic analyses revealed that the LCX closure was 10-20% at one week, 30-40% at two weeks and 90-100% at four weeks subsequent ameroid constrictor implantation. ECG analysis highlighted an increase in the diameter of the left atria (LA) at two weeks post-operation as well as ischemic changes in the left ventricle (LV) and LA wall at four weeks post-operation. Echocardiography and MRI further detected a gradual increase in LA and LV volumes from two weeks post-operation. LV end diastolic and systolic volumes as well as LA end diastolic and systolic volume were also significantly higher in pig hearts post-operation when compared to baseline. Pathological changes were observed in the heart, which included scar tissue in the ischemic central area of the LV. Transmission electron microscopy highlighted the presence of contraction bands and edema surrounding the ischemia area, including inflammatory cell infiltration within the ischemic area. We have developed a pig model of IMR using the posterior mitral chordae tendineae rupture technique and implantation of an ameroid constrictor. The pathological features of this pig IMR model were found to mimic the natural history and progression of IMR in patients.

  19. Optimal Surgical Management of Severe Ischemic Mitral Regurgitation: To Repair or to Replace?

    PubMed Central

    Perrault, Louis P.; Moskowitz, Alan J.; Kron, Irving L.; Acker, Michael A.; Miller, Marissa A.; Horvath, Keith A.; Thourani, Vinod H.; Argenziano, Michael; D'Alessandro, David A.; Blackstone, Eugene H.; Moy, Claudia S.; Mathew, Joseph P.; Hung, Judy; Gardner, Timothy J.; Parides, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Ischemic mitral regurgitation (MR), a complication of myocardial infarction and coronary artery disease more generally, is associated with a high mortality rate and estimated to affect 2.8 million Americans. With 1-year mortality rates as high as 40%, recent practice guidelines of professional societies recommend repair or replacement, but there remains a lack of conclusive evidence supporting either intervention. The choice between therapeutic options is characterized by the trade-off between reduced operative morbidity and mortality with repair versus a better long-term correction of mitral insufficiency with replacement. The long-term benefits of repair versus replacement remain unknown, which has led to significant variation in surgical practice. Methods and Results This paper describes the design of a prospective randomized clinical trial to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of mitral valve repair and replacement in patients with severe ischemic mitral regurgitation. This trial is being conducted as part of the Cardiothoracic (CT) Surgical Trials Network. This paper addresses challenges in selecting a feasible primary endpoint, characterizing the target population (including the degree of MR), and analytical challenges in this high mortality disease. Conclusions The paper concludes by discussing the importance of information on functional status, survival, neurocognition, quality of life and cardiac physiology in therapeutic decision-making. PMID:22054660

  20. Diastolic Mitral Regurgitation in a Patient With Complex Native Mitral and Aortic Valve Endocarditis: A Rare Phenomenon With Potential Catastrophic Consequences.

    PubMed

    Pulido, Juan N; Lynch, James J; Mauermann, William J; Michelena, Hector I; Rehfeldt, Kent H

    2016-03-01

    Diastolic mitral valve regurgitation is a rare phenomenon described in patients with atrioventricular conduction abnormalities, severe left ventricular systolic or diastolic dysfunction with regional wall motion dyssynchrony, or severe acute aortic valve regurgitation. The presence of diastolic mitral valve regurgitation in acute aortic regurgitation due to endocarditis suggests critical severity requiring urgent surgical valve replacement. We describe a case of diastolic mitral regurgitation in the setting of complex native mitral-aortic valve endocarditis in a patient in normal sinus rhythm and review the etiologic mechanisms of this phenomenon, echocardiographic assessment, and therapeutic implications for hemodynamic management.

  1. Examination of mitral regurgitation with a goat heart model for the development of intelligent artificial papillary muscle.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Y; Yambe, T; Yoshizawa, M; Hashimoto, H; Yamada, A; Miura, H; Hashem, M; Kitano, T; Shiga, T; Homma, D

    2012-01-01

    Annuloplasty for functional mitral or tricuspid regurgitation has been made for surgical restoration of valvular diseases. However, these major techniques may sometimes be ineffective because of chamber dilation and valve tethering. We have been developing a sophisticated intelligent artificial papillary muscle (PM) by using an anisotropic shape memory alloy fiber for an alternative surgical reconstruction of the continuity of the mitral structural apparatus and the left ventricular myocardium. This study exhibited the mitral regurgitation with regard to the reduction in the PM tension quantitatively with an originally developed ventricular simulator using isolated goat hearts for the sophisticated artificial PM. Aortic and mitral valves with left ventricular free wall portions of isolated goat hearts (n=9) were secured on the elastic plastic membrane and statically pressurized, which led to valvular leaflet-papillary muscle positional change and central mitral regurgitation. PMs were connected to the load cell, and the relationship between the tension of regurgitation and PM tension were measured. Then we connected the left ventricular specimen model to our hydraulic ventricular simulator and achieved hemodynamic simulation with the controlled tension of PMs.

  2. Impact of mitral geometry and global afterload on improvement of mitral regurgitation after trans-catheter aortic valve implantation

    PubMed Central

    Dworakowski, R; Kogoj, P; Reiken, J; Kenny, C; MacCarthy, P; Wendler, O; Monaghan, M J

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the impact of mitral geometry, left ventricular (LV) remodelling and global LV afterload on mitral regurgitation (MR) after trans-catheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Methods In this study, 60 patients who underwent TAVI were evaluated by 3D echocardiography at baseline, 1 month and 6 months after procedure. The proportional change in MR following TAVI was determined by examining the percentage change in vena contracta (VC) at 6 months. Patients having a significant reduction of at least 30% in VC were defined as good responders (GR) and the remaining patients were defined as poor responders (PR). Results After 6 months of TAVI, 27 (45%) patients were GR and 33 (55%) were PR. There was a significant decrease in 3DE-derived mitral annular diameter and area (P = 0.001), mitral valve tenting area (TA) (P = 0.05), and mitral papillary muscle dyssynchrony index (DSI) (P = 0.05) in the GR group. 3DE-derived LVESV (P = 0.016), LV mass (P = 0.001) and LV DSI, (P = 0.001) were also improved 6 months after TAVI. In addition, valvulo-arterial impedance (ZVA) was significantly higher at baseline in patients with PR (P = 0.028). 3DE-derived mitral annular area (β: 0.47, P = 0.04), mitral papillary DSI (β: −0.65, P = 0.012) and ZVA (β: 0.45, P = 0.028) were the strongest independent parameters that could predict the reduction of functional MR after TAVI. Conclusion GR patients demonstrate more regression in mitral annulus area and diameter after significant decrease in high LVEDP and trans-aortic gradients with TAVI. PR patients appear to have increased baseline ZVA, mitral valve tenting and restriction in mitral valve coaptation. These factors are important for predicting the impact of TAVI on pre-existing MR. PMID:27457965

  3. Mitral valve repair for ischemic mitral regurgitation: lessons from the Cardiothoracic Surgical Trials Network randomized study.

    PubMed

    Mihos, Christos G; Santana, Orlando

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 30% to 50% of patients will develop ischemic mitral regurgitation (MR) after a myocardial infarction, which is a result of progressive left ventricular remodeling and dysfunction of the subvalvular apparatus, and portends a poor long-term prognosis. Surgical treatment is centered on mitral valve repair utilizing a restrictive annuloplasty, or valve replacement with preservation of the subvalvular apparatus. In the recent Cardiothoracic Surgical Trials Network (CSTN) study, patients with severe ischemic MR were randomized to mitral valve repair with a restrictive annuloplasty versus chordal-sparing valve replacement, and concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting, if indicated. At 2-year follow-up, mitral valve repair was associated with a significantly higher incidence of moderate or greater recurrent MR and heart failure, with no difference in the indices of left ventricular reverse remodeling, as compared with valve replacement. The current appraisal aims to provide insight into the CSTN trial results, and discusses the evidence supporting a pathophysiologic-guided repair strategy incorporating combined annuloplasty and subvalvular repair techniques to optimize the outcomes of mitral valve repair in ischemic MR.

  4. Quantification of mitral regurgitation: comparison between transthoracic and transesophageal color Doppler flow mapping.

    PubMed

    Mimo, R; Sparacino, L; Nicolosi, G; D'Angelo, G; Dall'Aglio, V; Lestuzzi, C; Pavan, D; Cervesato, E; Zanuttini, D

    1991-11-01

    We reviewed transthoracic (TTE) and transesophageal (TEE) echocardiograms of 100 consecutive patients: 63 male, 37 female, mean age 50 years (range 16-83 years), 32 with neoplastic disease, 18 aortic disease, 28 mitral valve disease, and 22 with other diseases. Absence or presence of mitral regurgitation (defined as mild, moderate, or severe) was assessed. TEE showed mild mitral regurgitation in 26 patients where TTE was negative. The overall estimate of regurgitant lesion severity was concordant at TEE and TTE in 64% of cases. The overall estimate of regurgitant lesion severity was also greater by one grade in 1% of cases at TTE, and in 35% of cases at TEE. Maximal digitized jet areas were 3.60 +/- 6.35 cm 2 at TTE and 3.04 +/- 3.79 cm 2 at TEE (P = NS). Correlation was r = 0.69 (TEE = 0.41 TTE + 1.55; P less than 0.001). TEE yielded a higher prevalence of mitral regurgitation than TTE with a trend toward greater overall estimate of mitral regurgitation at the semi-quantitative analysis. TTE and TEE showed similar mean results at the quantitative assessment of maximal jet areas. However, a highly significant random variability was observed in quantifying mitral regurgitation at TEE.

  5. Quantitation of mitral regurgitation with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Eric V; Lee, James; Branch, Kelley R; Hamilton-Craig, Christian

    2016-12-01

    In this review discuss the application of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) to the evaluation and quantification of mitral regurgitation and provide a systematic literature review for comparisons with echocardiography. Using the 2015 Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses methodology, we searched Medline and PubMed for original research articles published since 2000 that provided data on the quantification of mitral regurgitation by CMR. We identified 220 articles of which 33 were included. Four main techniques of mitral regurgitation quantification were identified. Reproducibility varied substantially between papers but was high overall for all techniques. However, quantification differed between the techniques studied. When compared with two-dimensional echocardiography, mitral regurgitation fraction and regurgitant volume measured by CMR were comparable but typically lower. CMR has high reproducibility for the quantification of mitral regurgitation in experienced centres, but further technological refinement is needed. An integrated and standardised approach that combines multiple techniques is recommended for optimal reproducibility and precise mitral regurgitation quantification. Definitive outcome studies using CMR as a basis for treatment are lacking but needed. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. [Pulsed echo-Doppler evaluation of regurgitant fraction in mitral valve insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Tribouilloy, C; Slama, M A; Kugener, H; Dufossé, H; Rey, J L; Lesbre, J P

    1991-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the validity of Doppler echocardiographic evaluation of the regurgitant fraction in pure mitral insufficiency. The Doppler echocardiographic measurement of systemic flow was made at the level of the aortic ring, and the mitral flow by the method of integration of instantaneous flow proposed by Touche. In a preliminary study, we demonstrated a close correlation between forward aortic and mitral flow in 20 normal subjects (r = 0.94; SD = 0.31 l/mn; y = 0.98 x -0.004). We then studied a group of 38 patients with pure isolated mitral regurgitation. Five patients were excluded because of the poor quality of the echocardiographic documents. The hemodynamic regurgitant fraction was determined by measuring pulmonary flow by thermodilution and the left ventricular outflow by digitised angiography. The average Doppler and hemodynamic regurgitant fractions were 46.6 +/- 18% and 42 +/- 17% respectively. There was a close correlation between the Doppler and hemodynamic values (r = 0.91; SD = 7.8%; y = 0.97 x + 5.7). The correlations were also good between Doppler regurgitant fraction and the four angiographic grades of regurgitation (r = 0.88). A statistically significant difference was observed between the Doppler regurgitant fractions of Grades I and II and of Grades III and IV (p less than 0.001). In addition, the ratio of mitral VTI/aortic VTI gave a useful index of regurgitation in pure mitral insufficiency. When the ratio was greater than 1.3 the regurgitant fraction was over 40% with a sensitivity of 79% and a specificity of 86%. Finally, this study shows that pure, isolated mitral regurgitation can be evaluated by Doppler echocardiography.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. CTS Trials Network: A paradigm shift in the surgical treatment of moderate ischemic mitral regurgitation?

    PubMed

    Afifi, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    The Cardiothoracic Surgery Trials Network has reported results of the one-year follow up of their randomized trial "Surgical Treatment of Moderate Ischemic Mitral Regurgitation". They studied 301 patients with moderate ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR) undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) with or without mitral repair with the primary end-point of change in left ventricular end-diastolic volume index (LVEDVI) at one year and multiple clinical and echocardiographic secondary endpoints. Although their results were against repairing the mitral valve, the debate on surgical management of moderate IMR remains unsettled.

  8. Percutaneous approaches to valve repair for mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Ted; Young, Amelia

    2014-05-27

    Percutaneous therapy has emerged as an option for treatment of mitral regurgitation for selected, predominantly high-risk patients. Most of the percutaneous approaches are modifications of existing surgical approaches. Catheter-based devices mimic these surgical approaches with less procedural risk, due to their less-invasive nature. Percutaneous annuloplasty can be achieved indirectly via the coronary sinus or directly from retrograde left ventricular access. Catheter-based leaflet repair with the MitraClip (Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, Illinois) is accomplished with an implantable clip to mimic the surgical edge-to-edge leaflet repair technique. A large experience with MitraClip has been reported, and several other percutaneous approaches have been successfully used in smaller numbers of patients to demonstrate proof of concept, whereas others have failed and are no longer under development. There is increasing experience in both trials and practice to begin to define the clinical utility of percutaneous leaflet repair, and annuloplasty approaches are undergoing significant development. Transcatheter mitral valve replacement is still in early development.

  9. Dumb-bell in the heart: rare case of biatrial myxoma with mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Ananthanarayanan, Chandrasekaran; Bishnoi, Arvind Kumar; Ramani, Jayadip; Gandhi, Hemang

    2016-10-01

    Cardiac myxomas are rare intracardiac tumors, and the majority are benign myxomas involving the left atrium. We report a case of the very rare occurrence of biatrial myxoma associated with mitral regurgitation, which was successfully treated.

  10. Pulsed Doppler echocardiographic analysis of mitral regurgitation after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Loperfido, F; Biasucci, L M; Pennestri, F; Laurenzi, F; Gimigliano, F; Vigna, C; Rossi, E; Favuzzi, A; Santarelli, P; Manzoli, U

    1986-10-01

    In 72 patients with previous myocardial infarction (MI), mitral regurgitation (MR) was assessed by pulsed-wave Doppler echocardiography and compared with physical and 2-dimensional echocardiographic findings. MR was found by Doppler in 29 of 42 patients (62%) with anterior MI, 11 of 30 (37%) with inferior MI (p less than 0.01) and in none of 20 normal control subjects. MR was more frequent in patients who underwent Doppler study 3 months after MI than in those who underwent Doppler at discharge (anterior MI = 83% vs 50%, p less than 0.01; inferior MI = 47% vs 27%, p = not significant). Of 15 patients who underwent Doppler studies both times, 3 (all with anterior MI) had MR only on the second study. Of the patients with Doppler MR, 12 of 27 (44%) with a left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) greater than 30% and 1 of 13 (8%) with an EF of 30% or less (p less than 0.01) had an MR systolic murmur. Mitral prolapse or eversion and papillary muscle fibrosis were infrequent in MI patients, whether or not Doppler MR was present. The degree of Doppler MR correlated with EF (r = -0.61), LV systolic volume (r = 0.47), and systolic and diastolic mitral anulus circumference (r = 0.52 and 0.51, respectively). Doppler MR was present in 24 of 28 patients (86%) with an EF of 40% or less and in 16 of 44 (36%) with EF more than 40% (p less than 0.001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Quantitation of the mitral tetrahedron in patients with ischemic heart disease using real-time three-dimensional echocardiography to evaluate the geometric determinants of ischemic mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Hsuan, Chin-Feng; Yu, Hsi-Yu; Tseng, Wei-Kung; Lin, Lung-Chun; Hsu, Kwan-Lih; Wu, Chau-Chung

    2013-05-01

    Ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR) is common in ischemic heart disease and results in poor prognosis. However, the exact mechanism of IMR has not been fully elucidated. Quantitation of the mitral tetrahedron using three-dimentianl (3D) echocardiography is capable of evaluating the geometric determinants and mechanisms of IMR. Forty patients with a history of ST-elevation myocardial infarction at least 6 months earlier were studied. Parameters of mitral deformation and global left ventricular (LV) function and shape were evaluated by 2-dimensional echocardiography. The effective regurgitant orifice (ERO) of IMR was obtained by the quantitative continuous-wave Doppler technique. Three-dimensional (3D) echocardiography was applied to assess the mitral tetrahedron. Mitral valvular tenting area (P < 0.001), mitral annular area (P = 0.032), dilation of the LV in diastole, impairment of the LV ejection fraction, and volume of the spherically shaped LV in systole were greater in patients with an ERO ≥20 mm(2) than in those with an ERO <20 mm(2). In the mitral tetrahedron, only the interpapillary muscle roots distance showed a significant difference (P = 0.004). Multivariate analysis with the logistic regression model showed the systolic mitral tenting area (odds ratio [OR]: 280.49, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.59-1.72 × 10(4), P = 0.007) and interpapillary muscle distance (OR: 1.50, 95% CI: 1.03-2.19, P = 0.036) to be independent factors in predicting significant IMR (ERO ≥20 mm(2)). 3D echocardiography can be effectively applied in measuring the mitral tetrahedron and evaluating the mechanism of IMR. Mitral valvular tenting and interpapillary muscle distance are 2 independent factors of significant IMR. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Proximal isovelocity surface area should be routinely measured in evaluating mitral regurgitation: a core review.

    PubMed

    Lambert, A Stephane

    2007-10-01

    The proximal isovelocity surface area (PISA) measurement, also known as the "flow convergence" method, can be used in echocardiography to estimate the area of an orifice through which blood flows. It has many applications, but this review focuses only on its use in the intraoperative evaluation of mitral regurgitation. In that setting, PISA provides a quantitative assessment of the severity of mitral regurgitation and it is useful in clinical decision-making in the operating room. In this review, I discuss the physical principles behind the PISA method, along with the various mathematical formulas used to calculate the effective mitral regurgitant orifice area, the regurgitant volume, and the regurgitant fraction. A step-by-step approach is presented and illustrated with graphic and video demonstrations. Finally, I will discuss the various limitations and technical considerations of PISA measurement in the operating room.

  13. Nonresectional Single-Suture Leaflet Remodeling for Degenerative Mitral Regurgitation Facilitates Minimally Invasive Mitral Valve Repair

    PubMed Central

    MacArthur, John W.; Cohen, Jeffrey E.; Goldstone, Andrew B.; Fairman, Alexander S.; Edwards, Bryan B.; Hornick, Matthew A.; Atluri, Pavan; Woo, Y. Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Background Both leaflet resection and neochordal construction are effective mitral repair techniques, but they may become incrementally time-consuming when using minimally invasive approaches. We have used a single-suture leaflet-remodeling technique of inverting the prolapsed or flail segment tissue into the left ventricle. This repair is straightforward, expeditious, and facilitates a minimally invasive approach. Methods Ninety-nine patients with degenerative mitral regurgitation (MR) underwent a minimally invasive single-suture repair of the mitral valve from May 2007 through December 2012. Preoperative and perioperative echocardiograms as well as patient outcomes were analyzed and compared with those obtained from patients undergoing minimally invasive mitral valve repair using quadrangular resection at the same institution during the same period. Results All 99 patients had a successful mitral repair through a sternal-sparing minimally invasive approach. Ninety-one of the 99 patients had zero MR on postoperative echocardiogram, and 8 of 99 had trace to mild MR. Patients in the nonresectional group had significantly shorter cardiopulmonary bypass and cross-clamp times compared with the quadrangular resection group (115.8 ± 41.7 minutes versus 144.9 ± 38.2 minutes; p < 0.001; 76.2 ± 28.1 minutes versus 112.6 ± 33.5 minutes; p < 0.001, respectively). The mean length of stay was 7.5 ± 3 days. All patients were discharged alive and free from clinical symptoms of MR. There have been no reoperations for recurrent MR on subsequent average follow-up of 1 year. Conclusions An effective, highly efficient, and thus far durable single-suture mitral leaflet-remodeling technique facilitates minimally invasive repair of degenerative MR. PMID:23932318

  14. One-year outcome of percutaneous mitral valve repair in patients with severe symptomatic mitral valve regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Gotzmann, Michael; Sprenger, Isabell; Ewers, Aydan; Mügge, Andreas; Bösche, Leif

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate one-year outcomes after percutaneous mitral valve repair with MitraClip® in patients with severe mitral regurgitation (MR). METHODS Our study investigated consecutive patients with symptomatic severe MR who underwent MitraClip® implantation at the University Hospital Bergmannsheil from 2012 to 2014. The primary study end-point was all-cause mortality. Secondary end-points were degree of MR and functional status after percutaneous mitral valve repair. RESULTS The study population consisted of 46 consecutive patients (mean logistic EuroSCORE 32% ± 21%). The degree of MR decreased significantly (severe MR before MitraClip® 100% vs after MitraClip® 13%; P < 0.001), and the NYHA functional classes improved (NYHA III/IV before MitraClip® 98% vs after MitraClip® 35%; P < 0.001). The mortality rates 30 d and one year after percutaneous mitral valve repair were 4.3% and 19.5%, respectively. During the follow-up of 473 ± 274 d, 11 patients died (90% due to cardiovascular death). A pre-procedural plasma B-type natriuretic peptide level > 817 pg/mL was associated with all-cause mortality (hazard ratio, 6.074; 95%CI: 1.257-29.239; P = 0.012). CONCLUSION Percutaneous mitral valve repair with MitraClip® has positive effects on hemodynamics and symptoms. Despite the study patients’ multiple comorbidities and extremely high operative risk, one-year outcomes after MitraClip® are favorable. Elevated B-type natriuretic peptide levels indicate poorer mid-term survival. PMID:28163835

  15. Critical evaluation of the MitraClip system in the management of mitral regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Deuschl, Florian; Schofer, Niklas; Lubos, Edith; Blankenberg, Stefan; Schäfer, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The MitraClip (MC) system is a device for percutaneous, transseptal edge-to-edge reconstruction of the mitral valve (MV) in patients with severe mitral regurgitation (MR) not eligible for surgery. Recently, a number of studies have underlined the therapeutic benefit of the MC system for patients with extreme and high risk for MV surgery suffering from either degenerative or functional MR. The MC procedure shows negligible intraprocedural mortality, low periprocedural complication rates, and a significant reduction in MR, as well as an improvement in functional capacity and most importantly quality of life. Presently, the MC system has become an additional interventional tool in the concert of surgical methods. It hereby enlarges the spectrum of MV repair for the Heart Team. Lately, many reviews focused on the MC system. The current review describes the developments in the treatment of MR with the MC system. PMID:26811687

  16. [Postoperative acute mitral regurgitation. Unexpected finding after minor non-cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Wagner, K J; Unterbuchner, C; Bogdanski, R; Martin, J; Kochs, E F; Tassani-Prell, P

    2008-10-01

    This report describes the case of a 59-year-old man who was scheduled for general anesthesia with propofol, sufentanil and sevoflurane for removal of a metal implant. The patient was classified as American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) II status because of an asymptomatic mitral valve prolapse and medically treated arterial hypertension. During induction of narcosis a pulsoxymetrically measured inadequate increase in oxygen saturation after preoxygenation was noticed and a moderate respiratory obstruction occurred intraoperatively, but anesthesia was uneventfully completed and the patient was extubated. However, 3 h later the patient developed severe dyspnea, hypoxia, tachycardia and arterial hypotension. Physical examination revealed a new grade 4/6 systolic murmur radiating to the axilla and X-ray showed bilateral pulmonary edema. Neither electrocardiographic nor biochemical manifestations of acute myocardial infarction were identified but transthoracic echocardiography revealed fluttering of the posterior leaflet of the mitral valve with grade III regurgitation and dilation of the left atrium. Coronary angiography was normal and left ventriculography confirmed severe mitral regurgitation. Mitral valve repair was successfully performed 22 h after presentation of symptoms. Mitral regurgitation is a common finding on echocardiography, seen to some degree in over 75% of the population. The etiology of mitral valve insufficiency which can be caused by pathologic changes of one or more of the components of the mitral valve, including the leaflets, annulus, chordae tendineae, papillary muscles, or by abnormalities of the surrounding left ventricle and/or atrium are discussed. Rupture of mitral chordae tendineae is infrequent and causes acute hemodynamic deterioration and needs corrective surgery. Valve replacement should be performed only if mitral valve repair is not possible. Echocardiography is an invaluable tool in determining the severity of regurgitation

  17. Emergency mitral valve replacement for acute severe mitral regurgitation following balloon mitral valvotomy: pathophysiology of hemodynamic collapse and peri-operative management issues.

    PubMed

    Bayya, Praveen Reddy; Varma, Praveen Kerala; Raman, Suneel Puthuvassery; Neema, Praveen Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Severe mitral regurgitation (MR) following balloon mitral valvotomy (BMV) needing emergent mitral valve replacement is a rare complication. The unrelieved mitral stenosis is compounded by severe MR leading to acute rise in pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular afterload, decreased coronary perfusion, ischemia and right ventricular failure. Associated septal shift and falling left ventricular preload leads to a vicious cycle of myocardial ischemia and hemodynamic collapse and needs to be addressed emergently before the onset of end organ damage. In this report, we describe the pathophysiology of hemodynamic collapse and peri-operative management issues in a case of mitral valve replacement for acute severe MR following BMV.

  18. Mitral regurgitation in patients with coronary artery disease and low left ventricular ejection fractions. How should it be treated?

    PubMed Central

    Christenson, J T; Simonet, F; Maurice, J; Bloch, A; Velebit, V; Schmuziger, M

    1995-01-01

    In recent years, coronary artery bypass grafting has been extended to include patients with very low left ventricular ejection fractions. Should concomitant mitral valve regurgitation be corrected simultaneously? Between January 1990 and July 1994, 43 patients with preoperative left ventricular ejection fractions < or = 25% and echocardiographic evidence of concomitant mitral valve regurgitation (grade I, 18 patients; II, 19 patients; and III, 6 patients) underwent primary coronary artery bypass grafting. None of these patients underwent simultaneous mitral valve surgery. Twenty-four patients (56%) had pulmonary artery pressures > or = 40 mmHg (pulmonary hypertension). The mean preoperative left ventricular ejection fraction was 18.7% +/- 4.4% (range, 10% to 25%), and the mean pulmonary artery pressure was 45.6 +/- 15.8 mmHg. The average of number of grafts per patient was 4.5 +/- 1.5. Five patients underwent simultaneous repair of a left ventricular aneurysm. The hospital mortality rate was 4.7% (2/43). Transient low cardiac output occurred postoperatively in 13 patients (30%). Sixteen patients (37%) had no postoperative complications. The average follow-up of the 41 hospital survivors was 6 months (range, 1 to 32 months). One patient died 8 months after surgery for an overall mortality rate of 7%. Another 2 patients had graft occlusions that did not require reoperation. In the 40 surviving patients, follow-up echocardiography revealed that 37 patients (93%) had either no mitral valve regurgitation or only very mild mitral valve regurgitation (grade I). Three patients had grade II mitral valve regurgitation, but none required mitral valve surgery. The New York Heart Association functional class improved significantly in all hospital survivors (from 3.4 +/- 0.6 to 1.7 +/- 0.7; p > 0.001), and left ventricular ejection fractions rose from 19.0% +/- 4.6% to 42.0% +/- 8.3%. Coronary artery bypass grafting is possible in patients with very low left ventricular ejection

  19. Reversal of severe mitral regurgitation by device closure of a large patent ductus arteriosus in a premature infant.

    PubMed

    Kheiwa, Ahmed; Ross, Robert D; Kobayashi, Daisuke

    2017-01-01

    We report a critically ill premature infant with severe mitral valve regurgitation associated with pulmonary hypertension and a severely dilated left atrium from a large patent ductus arteriosus. The mitral valve regurgitation improved significantly with normalisation of left atrial size 4 weeks after percutaneous closure of the patent ductus arteriosus. This case highlights the potential reversibility of severe mitral valve regurgitation with treatment of an underlying cardiac shunt.

  20. Mitral and aortic regurgitation following transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Szymański, Piotr; Hryniewiecki, Tomasz; Dąbrowski, Maciej; Sorysz, Danuta; Kochman, Janusz; Jastrzębski, Jan; Kukulski, Tomasz; Zembala, Marian

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyse the impact of postprocedural mitral regurgitation (MR), in an interaction with aortic regurgitation (AR), on mortality following transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Methods To assess the interaction between MR and AR, we compared the survival rate of patients (i) without both significant MR and AR versus (ii) those with either significant MR or significant AR versus (iii) with significant MR and AR, all postprocedure. 381 participants of the Polish Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation Registry (166 males (43.6%) and 215 females (56.4%), age 78.8±7.4 years) were analysed. Follow-up was 94.1±96.5 days. Results Inhospital and midterm mortality were 6.6% and 10.2%, respectively. Significant MR and AR were present in 16% and 8.1% patients, including 3.1% patients with both significant MR and AR. Patients with significant versus insignificant AR differed with respect to mortality (log rank p=0.009). This difference was not apparent in a subgroup of patients without significant MR (log rank p=0.80). In a subgroup of patients without significant AR, there were no significant differences in mortality between individuals with versus without significant MR (log rank p=0.44). Significant MR and AR had a significant impact on mortality only when associated with each other (log rank p<0.0001). At multivariate Cox regression modelling concomitant significant MR and AR were independently associated with mortality (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.54 to 5.71, p=0.002). Conclusions Significant MR or AR postprocedure, when isolated, had no impact on survival. Combined MR and AR had a significant impact on a patient's prognosis. PMID:26908096

  1. RT 3D TEE: Characteristics of Mitral Valve in Ischemic Mitral Regurgitation Evaluated by MVQ Program

    PubMed Central

    Kovalova, Sylva; Necas, Josef

    2011-01-01

    Aim To assess the changes of mitral valve (MV) in ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR) using Mitral Valve Quantification (MVQ) program. Methods We examined 46 patients (18 women) with IMR aged 45-86 and a control group of 33 healthy individuals (14 women) aged 18-88. Following parameters were assessed: Area of minimal surface spanning annulus (A3), annulus height (h), tenting height (Th), exposed area of anterior (AL), posterior (PL) and both leaflets (BL), ejection fraction of the left ventricle (LV EF), regurgitation volume (RV) and BL/A3, AL/A3, PL/A3 ratios. The normal range of BL/A3 ratio was defined as the average ± 2SD of control group. The study group was separated into subgroup 1 with BL/A3 ratio within normal values and subgroup 2 with pathological BL/A3 ratio. Corresponding parameters of IMR group were compared to the controls and both subgroups were compared to each other using Student t-test. Results In IMR group, as compared to the controls, A3, AL, PL, BL as well as BL/A3, AL/A3, PL/A3 ratios and Th were significantly increased, conversely, h and LV EF was significantly decreased. In the subgroup 2 as compared to the subgroup 1 there was significant increase of Th, BL, AL and PL, while EF LV was significantly decreased. There was no significant difference between these subgroups in A3, h and RV. Conclusion In ischemic MV remodeling two stages were identified without relation to the severity of IMR. The first stage was mainly influenced by the LV dilatation while LV remodeling was more important in the second stage.

  2. Revascularization alone or combined with suture annuloplasty for ischemic mitral regurgitation. Evaluation by color Doppler echocardiography.

    PubMed Central

    Czer, L S; Maurer, G; Bolger, A F; DeRobertis, M; Chaux, A; Matloff, J M

    1996-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of revascularization alone or combined with mitral valve repair for ischemic mitral regurgitation, we performed color Doppler echocardiography intraoperatively before and after cardiopulmonary bypass in 49 patients (mean age, 70 +/- 9 years) with concomitant mitral regurgitation and coronary artery disease (triple vessel or left main in 88%; prior infarction in 90%). After revascularization alone (n = 25), the mitral annulus diameter (2.88 +/- 0.44 cm vs 2.88 +/- 0.44 cm), leaflet-to-annulus ratio (1.44 +/- 0.30 vs 1.44 +/- 0.29), and mitral regurgitation grade (1.7 +/- 0.9 vs 1.8 +/- 0.7) remained unchanged (p = NS, postpump vs prepump); mitral regurgitation decreased by 2 grades in only 1 patient (4%). After combined revascularization and mitral valve suture annuloplasty (Kay-Zubiate; n = 24), the annulus diameter decreased (to 2.57 +/- 0.45 cm from 3.11 +/- 0.43 cm), the leaflet-to-annulus ratio increased (to 1.46 +/- 0.25 from 1.20 +/- 0.21), and the mitral regurgitation grade decreased significantly (to 0.9 +/- 0.9 from 2.8 +/- 1.0) (p < 0.01); mitral regurgitation decreased by 2 grades or more (successful repair) in 75%. The origin of the jet correlated with the site of prior infarction (p < 0.05), being inferior in cases of posterior or inferior infarction (67%), and central or broad in cases of combined anterior and inferior infarction (70%). Despite a slightly higher 30-day mortality in the repair group (p = 0.10), there was no significant difference in survival between the 2 surgical groups at 5 years or 8 years. Therefore, in this study of patients with mitral regurgitation and coronary artery disease, reduction in regurgitation grade with revascularization alone was infrequent. Concomitant suture annuloplasty significantly reduced regurgitation by reestablishing a more normal relationship between the leaflet and annulus sizes. The failure rate after suture annuloplasty was 25%; alternative repair techniques such as ring

  3. Progression to moderate or severe mitral regurgitation after percutaneous transvenous mitral commissurotomy using stepwise inflation technique.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, T; Yamazoe, M; Tamura, Y; Tanabe, Y; Hori, T; Konno, T; Higuchi, K; Ida, T; Takemoto, M; Aizawa, Y

    1998-05-01

    Progression to moderate or severe mitral regurgitation (MR) was studied after Inoue balloon percutaneous transvenous mitral commissurotomy (PTMC) using the stepwise inflation technique, performed at increments of 1 mm of balloon diameter, in 49 consecutive patients with rheumatic mitral stenosis (aged from 32-73 years; 8 males, 41 females). The patients were classified on the basis of the degree of MR after PTMC, compared with that before PTMC, into either Group A, development of moderate or more severe (> or = grade 2) MR (n = 8) or Group B, no increase in MR or development of mild (grade 1) MR (n = 41). Progression to moderate or severe MR was significantly associated only with advanced age (60 +/- 8 vs 52 +/- 10 years, p < 0.05) and narrower mitral valve area (0.87 +/- 0.35 vs 1.11 +/- 0.29 cm2, p < 0.05), but other characteristics before PTMC were similar in both groups. There was no difference between the two groups in the total number and degree of balloon inflation. Immediately before the final inflation, the left atrial mean pressure and v wave pressure were decreased in smaller degrees in Group A compared with Group B (-2 +/- 2 vs -5 +/- 4 mmHg, p < 0.05; -2 +/- 2 vs -6 +/- 6 mmHg, p < 0.05, respectively). Thus, the stepwise inflations require careful monitoring of changes in the left atrial pressure and waveform to recognize the aggravation of MR, especially in older patients with severe stenosis. Patients who do not have a significant drop in left atrial mean pressure and v wave pressure during stepwise inflations of the balloon might be at risk of development of moderate or severe MR after further dilations.

  4. Quantitative Evaluation of Mitral Regurgitation Secondary to Mitral Valve Prolapse by Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Le Goffic, Caroline; Toledano, Manuel; Ennezat, Pierre-Vladimir; Binda, Camille; Castel, Anne-Laure; Delelis, François; Graux, Pierre; Tribouilloy, Christophe; Maréchaux, Sylvestre

    2015-11-01

    The present prospective study was designed to evaluate the accuracy of quantitative assessment of mitral regurgitant fraction (MRF) by echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI) in the modern era using as reference method the blinded multiparametric integrative assessment of mitral regurgitation (MR) severity. 2-Dimensional (2D) and 3-dimensional (3D) MRF by echocardiography (2D echo MRF and 3D echo MRF) were obtained by measuring the difference in left ventricular (LV) total stroke volume (obtained from either 2D or 3D acquisition) and aortic forward stroke volume normalized to LV total stroke volume. MRF was calculated by cMRI using either (1) (LV stroke volume - systolic aortic outflow volume by phase contrast)/LV stroke volume (cMRI MRF [volumetric]) or (2) (mitral inflow volume - systolic aortic outflow volume)/mitral inflow volume (cMRI MRF [phase contrast]). Six patients had 1 + MR, 6 patients had 2 + MR, 12 patients had 3 + MR, and 10 had 4 + MR. A significant correlation was observed between MR grading and 2D echo MRF (r = 0.60, p <0.0001) and 3D echo MRF (r = 0.79, p <0.0001), cMRI MRF (volumetric) (r = 0.87, p <0.0001), and cMRI MRF (phase contrast r = 0.72, p <0.001). The accuracy of MRF for the diagnosis of MR ≥3+ or 4+ was the highest with cMRI MRF (volumetric) (area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve [AUC] = 0.98), followed by 3D echo MRF (AUC = 0.96), 2D echo MRF (AUC = 0.90), and cMRI MRF (phase contrast; AUC = 0.83). In conclusion, MRF by cMRI (volumetric method) and 3D echo MRF had the highest diagnostic value to detect significant MR, whereas the diagnostic value of 2D echo MRF and cMRI MRF (phase contrast) was lower. Hence, the present study suggests that both cMRI (volumetric method) and 3D echo represent best approaches for calculating MRF.

  5. CTS Trials Network: A paradigm shift in the surgical treatment of moderate ischemic mitral regurgitation?

    PubMed Central

    Afifi, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    The Cardiothoracic Surgery Trials Network has reported results of the one-year follow up of their randomized trial “Surgical Treatment of Moderate Ischemic Mitral Regurgitation”. They studied 301 patients with moderate ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR) undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) with or without mitral repair with the primary end-point of change in left ventricular end-diastolic volume index (LVEDVI) at one year and multiple clinical and echocardiographic secondary endpoints. Although their results were against repairing the mitral valve, the debate on surgical management of moderate IMR remains unsettled. PMID:26779511

  6. Timing surgery in mitral regurgitation: defining risk and optimising intervention using stress echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Nicola C; Ray, Simon; Steeds, Richard P

    2016-01-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) is the second most common form of valvular disease requiring surgery. Correct identification of surgical candidates and optimising the timing of surgery are key in management. For primary MR, this relies upon a balance between the peri-operative risks and rates of successful repair in patients undergoing early surgery when asymptomatic with the potential risk of irreversible left ventricular dysfunction if intervention is performed too late. For secondary MR, recognition that this is a highly dynamic condition where MR severity may change is key, although data on outcomes in determining whether concomitant valve intervention is performed with revascularisation has raised questions regarding timing of surgery. There has been substantial interest in the use of stress echocardiography to risk stratify patients in mitral regurgitation. This article reviews the role of stress echocardiography in both primary and secondary mitral regurgitation and discusses how this can help clinicians tackle the challenges of this prevalent condition. PMID:27737905

  7. Determinants of exercise-induced changes in mitral regurgitation in patients with coronary artery disease and left ventricular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lancellotti, Patrizio; Lebrun, Frédéric; Piérard, Luc A

    2003-12-03

    We sought to examine the determinants of exercise-induced changes in ischemic mitral regurgitation (MR) in patients with left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. In the post-myocardial infarction (MI) phase, ischemic MR contributes to worsening of symptoms and of LV dysfunction. In this study, 70 patients in the chronic, post-MI phase, with LV ejection fraction <45% and at least mild MR, underwent semi-supine exercise Doppler echocardiography. The effective regurgitant orifice (ERO) of MR was quantified at rest and during exercise. Exercise-induced changes in ERO were compared with changes in mitral deformation and in local and global LV remodeling. The wide range of exercise-induced ERO changes that were observed was unrelated to the degree of MR at rest (r = 0.20). Effective regurgitant orifice changes correlated best with changes in mitral deformation (i.e., differences in systolic mitral tenting area, systolic annular area, and coaptation height) (p < 0.0001). Posterior displacement of the papillary muscles was associated with larger changes in the ERO in both infarct groups. In patients with inferior MI, a decrease in the ERO was related to improvement in wall motion (r = 0.68). The independent predictors of ERO changes during exercise were changes in systolic annular area for all infarct categories, in tenting area and wall motion score in the global population and those with inferior infarction, and in apical displacement of mitral leaflets for patients with anterior MI. The degree of MR at rest is unrelated to exercise-induced changes in EROs, which are related to those in local LV remodeling and in mitral deformation but not those in global LV function.

  8. Surgical Strategies for Management of Mitral Regurgitation: Recent Evidence from Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Tolis, George; Sundt, Thoralf M

    2015-12-01

    In contrast to mitral regurgitation (MR) caused by structural abnormality of the valve ("primary" MR), about which there is increasing consensus regarding treatment, there is increasing controversy around the management of functional or "secondary" MR, of which "ischemic mitral regurgitation" (IMR) is a common cause. While the trend in the management of primary MR is increasingly aggressive, with wide agreement on the preference for repair over replacement such that debate centers on earlier and earlier repair even among asymptomatic patients, the situation is reversed in the setting of secondary MR with uncertainly beyond the mode of management (repair or replacement) to the value of intervening at all. This is, in part, because the term IMR has been somewhat loosely applied by the medical and surgical communities to include regurgitation secondary to active myocardial ischemia, as well as that resulting from a completed myocardial infarct. As a result, there is considerable variability in reported outcomes of surgical interventions for IMR. In addition, the natural history of IMR is quite adverse-more so than that of many solid organ malignancies-and its surgical treatment has traditionally carried a higher operative mortality than many cardiac surgical procedures, including similar operations for primary MR and incidental coronary artery disease. Added to this, with recent advances in both the medical and surgical treatment of heart failure improving nonoperative outcomes and simultaneously reducing operative risk compared to reports from previous decades, the landscape has been quite dynamic. Here, we review the issues surrounding surgical treatment for IMR, along with available evidence supporting different approaches, to lend an informed perspective on the divergent opinions among experts in this field and guide the appropriate management of the individual patient.

  9. Evolut R Implantation to Treat Severe Pure Aortic Regurgitation in a Patient With Mitral Bioprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Bruschi, Giuseppe; Colombo, Paola; Nava, Stefano; Musca, Francesco; Merlanti, Bruno; Belli, Oriana; Soriano, Francesco; Botta, Luca; De Caria, Danile; Giannattasio, Cristina; Russo, Claudio F

    2016-12-01

    Transcatheter aortic valves have been designed to treat high-risk surgical candidates affected by severe aortic stenosis, but little is known about the use of transcatheter valves in patients with severe pure aortic regurgitation. We describe the implantation of Medtronic CoreValve Evolut R (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) to treat an 82-year-old patient affected by severe pure aortic regurgitation who underwent prior mitral valve replacement with a biological valve protruding into the left ventricular outflow tract.

  10. Three-dimensional echocardiographic planimetry of maximal regurgitant orifice area in myxomatous mitral regurgitation: intraoperative comparison with proximal flow convergence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breburda, C. S.; Griffin, B. P.; Pu, M.; Rodriguez, L.; Cosgrove, D. M. 3rd; Thomas, J. D.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We sought to validate direct planimetry of mitral regurgitant orifice area from three-dimensional echocardiographic reconstructions. BACKGROUND: Regurgitant orifice area (ROA) is an important measure of the severity of mitral regurgitation (MR) that up to now has been calculated from hemodynamic data rather than measured directly. We hypothesized that improved spatial resolution of the mitral valve (MV) with three-dimensional (3D) echo might allow accurate planimetry of ROA. METHODS: We reconstructed the MV using 3D echo with 3 degrees rotational acquisitions (TomTec) using a transesophageal (TEE) multiplane probe in 15 patients undergoing MV repair (age 59 +/- 11 years). One observer reconstructed the prolapsing mitral leaflet in a left atrial plane parallel to the ROA and planimetered the two-dimensional (2D) projection of the maximal ROA. A second observer, blinded to the results of the first, calculated maximal ROA using the proximal convergence method defined as maximal flow rate (2pi(r2)va, where r is the radius of a color alias contour with velocity va) divided by regurgitant peak velocity (obtained by continuous wave [CW] Doppler) and corrected as necessary for proximal flow constraint. RESULTS: Maximal ROA was 0.79 +/- 0.39 (mean +/- SD) cm2 by 3D and 0.86 +/- 0.42 cm2 by proximal convergence (p = NS). Maximal ROA by 3D echo (y) was highly correlated with the corresponding flow measurement (x) (y = 0.87x + 0.03, r = 0.95, p < 0.001) with close agreement seen (AROA (y - x) = 0.07 +/- 0.12 cm2). CONCLUSIONS: 3D echo imaging of the MV allows direct visualization and planimetry of the ROA in patients with severe MR with good agreement to flow-based proximal convergence measurements.

  11. Three-dimensional echocardiographic planimetry of maximal regurgitant orifice area in myxomatous mitral regurgitation: intraoperative comparison with proximal flow convergence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breburda, C. S.; Griffin, B. P.; Pu, M.; Rodriguez, L.; Cosgrove, D. M. 3rd; Thomas, J. D.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We sought to validate direct planimetry of mitral regurgitant orifice area from three-dimensional echocardiographic reconstructions. BACKGROUND: Regurgitant orifice area (ROA) is an important measure of the severity of mitral regurgitation (MR) that up to now has been calculated from hemodynamic data rather than measured directly. We hypothesized that improved spatial resolution of the mitral valve (MV) with three-dimensional (3D) echo might allow accurate planimetry of ROA. METHODS: We reconstructed the MV using 3D echo with 3 degrees rotational acquisitions (TomTec) using a transesophageal (TEE) multiplane probe in 15 patients undergoing MV repair (age 59 +/- 11 years). One observer reconstructed the prolapsing mitral leaflet in a left atrial plane parallel to the ROA and planimetered the two-dimensional (2D) projection of the maximal ROA. A second observer, blinded to the results of the first, calculated maximal ROA using the proximal convergence method defined as maximal flow rate (2pi(r2)va, where r is the radius of a color alias contour with velocity va) divided by regurgitant peak velocity (obtained by continuous wave [CW] Doppler) and corrected as necessary for proximal flow constraint. RESULTS: Maximal ROA was 0.79 +/- 0.39 (mean +/- SD) cm2 by 3D and 0.86 +/- 0.42 cm2 by proximal convergence (p = NS). Maximal ROA by 3D echo (y) was highly correlated with the corresponding flow measurement (x) (y = 0.87x + 0.03, r = 0.95, p < 0.001) with close agreement seen (AROA (y - x) = 0.07 +/- 0.12 cm2). CONCLUSIONS: 3D echo imaging of the MV allows direct visualization and planimetry of the ROA in patients with severe MR with good agreement to flow-based proximal convergence measurements.

  12. Systemic Artery to Pulmonary Artery Fistula Associated with Mitral Regurgitation: Successful Treatment with Endovascular Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Iwazawa, Jin; Nakamura, Kenji; Hamuro, Masao; Nango, Mineyoshi; Sakai, Yukimasa; Nishida, Norifumi

    2008-07-15

    We present the case of a 60-year-old woman with symptomatic mitral regurgitation caused by a left-to-right shunt via anastomoses consisting of microfistulae, most likely of inflammatory origin, between the right subclavian artery and the right pulmonary artery. The three arteries responsible for fistulous formation, including the internal mammary, thyrocervical, and lateral thoracic arteries, were successfully occluded by transcatheter embolization using superabsorbent polymer microsphere (SAP-MS) particles combined with metallic coils. No complications have been identified following treatment with SAP-MS particles. This approach significantly reduced the patient's mitral regurgitation and she has remained asymptomatic for more than 4 years.

  13. DISC VARIANCE OF THE HARKEN MITRAL PROSTHESIS: THE CONTRIBUTION OF ASSOCIATED AORTIC REGURGITATION

    PubMed Central

    Yarnoz, Michael D.; Hueter, David; McCormick, John R.; Black, Harrison; Berger, Robert L.

    1977-01-01

    Four cases of severe mitral regurgitation due to disc variance of the Harken disc prosthesis in the mitral position are described. The valve occluder actually escaped into the left atrium in two patients, and neither survived despite emergency valve replacement. In the other two, disc malfunction was identified by flouroscopy, the prosthesis was replaced, and both patients survived. All four patients had associated aortic regurgitation, which most likely contributed to erosion of the disc edges. It is suggested that patients with the Harken disc prosthesis undergo periodic evaluation to detect abnormal disc motion. Images PMID:15216088

  14. Contrasting effect of similar effective regurgitant orifice area in mitral and tricuspid regurgitation: a quantitative Doppler echocardiographic study.

    PubMed

    Tribouilloy, Christophe M; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice; Capps, Mary Ann; Bailey, Kent R; Tajik, A Jamil

    2002-09-01

    We compared the effect of similar effective regurgitant orifice (ERO) areas in tricuspid regurgitation (TR) and mitral regurgitation (MR) on hemodynamics and volume overload, and examined the impact on grading of TR and MR severity. In a prospective study, 95 patients with TR in sinus rhythm were compared with 95 patients with MR in sinus rhythm matched for ERO area, age, and body surface area. We found that similar ERO area was associated with decreased volume overload in TR compared with MR. There were more women with TR than with MR, but comparison stratified by sex confirmed that regurgitant volume (RVol) was smaller in TR than in MR for similar ERO area. However, patients with systolic venous flow reversal (hepatic for TR and pulmonary for MR) had lower RVol but similar ERO area in TR compared with MR. Therefore, optimal diagnostic thresholds for severe regurgitation (maximum sum of sensitivity and specificity) in TR and MR were different for RVol (45 and 60 mL/beat, respectively) but similar for ERO area (40 mm(2)). We conclude that similar ERO areas induce less RVol in TR than in MR because of the decreased driving force in TR, but have similar consequences with regard to venous flow reversal. Therefore, a similar ERO area grading scheme can be used, and an ERO area of 40 mm(2) or greater is consistent with severe regurgitation in both TR and MR.

  15. Fast measurements of flow through mitral regurgitant orifices with magnetic resonance phase velocity mapping.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haosen; Halliburton, Sandra S; White, Richard D; Chatzimavroudis, George P

    2004-12-01

    Magnetic-resonance (MR) phase velocity mapping (PVM) shows promise in measuring the mitral regurgitant volume. However, in its conventional nonsegmented form, MR-PVM is slow and impractical for clinical use. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of rapid, segmented k-space MR-PVM in quantifying the mitral regurgitant flow through a control volume (CV) method. Two segmented MR-PVM schemes, one with seven (seg-7) and one with nine (seg-9) lines per segment, were evaluated in acrylic regurgitant mitral valve models under steady and pulsatile flow. A nonsegmented (nonseg) MR-PVM acquisition was also performed for reference. The segmented acquisitions were considerably faster (<10 min) than the nonsegmented (>45 min). The regurgitant flow rates and volumes measured with segmented MR-PVM agreed closely with those measured with nonsegmented MR-PVM (differences <5%, p > 0.05), when the CV was large enough to exclude the region of flow acceleration and aliasing from its boundaries. The regurgitant orifice shape (circular vs. slit-like) and the presence of aortic outflow did not significantly affect the accuracy of the results under both steady and pulsatile flow (p > 0.05). This study shows that segmented k-space MR-PVM can accurately quantify the flow through regurgitant orifices using the CV method and demonstrates great clinical potential.

  16. Transcatheter Mitral Valve Replacement for Patients With Symptomatic Mitral Regurgitation: A Global Feasibility Trial.

    PubMed

    Muller, David W M; Farivar, Robert Saeid; Jansz, Paul; Bae, Richard; Walters, Darren; Clarke, Andrew; Grayburn, Paul A; Stoler, Robert C; Dahle, Gry; Rein, Kjell A; Shaw, Marty; Scalia, Gregory M; Guerrero, Mayra; Pearson, Paul; Kapadia, Samir; Gillinov, Marc; Pichard, Augusto; Corso, Paul; Popma, Jeffrey; Chuang, Michael; Blanke, Philipp; Leipsic, Jonathon; Sorajja, Paul

    2017-01-31

    Symptomatic mitral regurgitation (MR) is associated with high morbidity and mortality that can be ameliorated by surgical valve repair or replacement. Despite this, many patients with MR do not undergo surgery. Transcatheter mitral valve replacement (TMVR) may be an option for selected patients with severe MR. This study aimed to examine the effectiveness and safety of TMVR in a cohort of patients with native valve MR who were at high risk for cardiac surgery. Patients underwent transcatheter, transapical delivery of a self-expanding mitral valve prosthesis and were examined in a prospective registry for short-term and 30-day outcomes. Thirty patients (age 75.6 ± 9.2 years; 25 men) with grade 3 or 4 MR underwent TMVR. The MR etiology was secondary (n = 23), primary (n = 3), or mixed pathology (n = 4). The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Predicted Risk of Mortality was 7.3 ± 5.7%. Successful device implantation was achieved in 28 patients (93.3%). There were no acute deaths, strokes, or myocardial infarctions. One patient died 13 days after TMVR from hospital-acquired pneumonia. Prosthetic leaflet thrombosis was detected in 1 patient at follow-up and resolved after increased oral anticoagulation with warfarin. At 30 days, transthoracic echocardiography showed mild (1+) central MR in 1 patient, and no residual MR in the remaining 26 patients with valves in situ. The left ventricular end-diastolic volume index decreased (90.1 ± 28.2 ml/m(2) at baseline vs. 72.1 ± 19.3 ml/m(2) at follow-up; p = 0.0012), as did the left ventricular end-systolic volume index (48.4 ± 19.7 ml/m(2) vs. 43.1 ± 16.2 ml/m(2); p = 0.18). Seventy-five percent of the patients reported mild or no symptoms at follow-up (New York Heart Association functional class I or II). Successful device implantation free of cardiovascular mortality, stroke, and device malfunction at 30 days was 86.6%. TMVR is an effective and safe therapy for selected patients with symptomatic native MR. Further

  17. Two-Year Outcomes of Surgical Treatment of Severe Ischemic Mitral Regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Daniel; Moskowitz, Alan J; Gelijns, Annetine C; Ailawadi, Gorav; Parides, Michael K; Perrault, Louis P; Hung, Judy W; Voisine, Pierre; Dagenais, Francois; Gillinov, A Marc; Thourani, Vinod; Argenziano, Michael; Gammie, James S; Mack, Michael; Demers, Philippe; Atluri, Pavan; Rose, Eric A; O'Sullivan, Karen; Williams, Deborah L; Bagiella, Emilia; Michler, Robert E; Weisel, Richard D; Miller, Marissa A; Geller, Nancy L; Taddei-Peters, Wendy C; Smith, Peter K; Moquete, Ellen; Overbey, Jessica R; Kron, Irving L; O'Gara, Patrick T; Acker, Michael A

    2016-01-28

    In a randomized trial comparing mitral-valve repair with mitral-valve replacement in patients with severe ischemic mitral regurgitation, we found no significant difference in the left ventricular end-systolic volume index (LVESVI), survival, or adverse events at 1 year after surgery. However, patients in the repair group had significantly more recurrences of moderate or severe mitral regurgitation. We now report the 2-year outcomes of this trial. We randomly assigned 251 patients to mitral-valve repair or replacement. Patients were followed for 2 years, and clinical and echocardiographic outcomes were assessed. Among surviving patients, the mean (±SD) 2-year LVESVI was 52.6±27.7 ml per square meter of body-surface area with mitral-valve repair and 60.6±39.0 ml per square meter with mitral-valve replacement (mean changes from baseline, -9.0 ml per square meter and -6.5 ml per square meter, respectively). Two-year mortality was 19.0% in the repair group and 23.2% in the replacement group (hazard ratio in the repair group, 0.79; 95% confidence interval, 0.46 to 1.35; P=0.39). The rank-based assessment of LVESVI at 2 years (incorporating deaths) showed no significant between-group difference (z score=-1.32, P=0.19). The rate of recurrence of moderate or severe mitral regurgitation over 2 years was higher in the repair group than in the replacement group (58.8% vs. 3.8%, P<0.001). There were no significant between-group differences in rates of serious adverse events and overall readmissions, but patients in the repair group had more serious adverse events related to heart failure (P=0.05) and cardiovascular readmissions (P=0.01). On the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure questionnaire, there was a trend toward greater improvement in the replacement group (P=0.07). In patients undergoing mitral-valve repair or replacement for severe ischemic mitral regurgitation, we observed no significant between-group difference in left ventricular reverse remodeling or survival at

  18. Two-Year Outcomes of Surgical Treatment of Severe Ischemic Mitral Regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, D.; Moskowitz, A.J.; Gelijns, A.C.; Ailawadi, G.; Parides, M.K.; Perrault, L.P.; Hung, J.W.; Voisine, P.; Dagenais, F.; Gillinov, A.M.; Thourani, V.; Argenziano, M.; Gammie, J.S.; Mack, M.; Demers, P.; Atluri, P.; Rose, E.A.; O’Sullivan, K.; Williams, D.L.; Bagiella, E.; Michler, R.E.; Weisel, R.D.; Miller, M.A.; Geller, N.L.; Taddei-Peters, W.C.; Smith, P.K.; Moquete, E.; Overbey, J.R.; Kron, I.L.; O’Gara, P.T.; Acker, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND In a randomized trial comparing mitral-valve repair with mitral-valve replacement in patients with severe ischemic mitral regurgitation, we found no significant difference in the left ventricular end-systolic volume index (LVESVI), survival, or adverse events at 1 year after surgery. However, patients in the repair group had significantly more recurrences of moderate or severe mitral regurgitation. We now report the 2-year out-comes of this trial. METHODS We randomly assigned 251 patients to mitral-valve repair or replacement. Patients were followed for 2 years, and clinical and echocardiographic outcomes were assessed. RESULTS Among surviving patients, the mean (±SD) 2-year LVESVI was 52.6±27.7 ml per square meter of body-surface area with mitral-valve repair and 60.6±39.0 ml per square meter with mitral-valve replacement (mean changes from baseline, −9.0 ml per square meter and −6.5 ml per square meter, respectively). Two-year mortality was 19.0% in the repair group and 23.2% in the replacement group (hazard ratio in the repair group, 0.79; 95% confidence interval, 0.46 to 1.35; P = 0.39). The rank-based assessment of LVESVI at 2 years (incorporating deaths) showed no significant between-group difference (z score = −1.32, P = 0.19). The rate of recurrence of moderate or severe mitral regurgitation over 2 years was higher in the repair group than in the replacement group (58.8% vs. 3.8%, P<0.001). There were no significant between-group differences in rates of serious adverse events and overall readmissions, but patients in the repair group had more serious adverse events related to heart failure (P = 0.05) and cardiovascular readmissions (P = 0.01). On the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure questionnaire, there was a trend toward greater improvement in the replacement group (P=0.07). CONCLUSIONS In patients undergoing mitral-valve repair or replacement for severe ischemic mitral regurgitation, we observed no significant between

  19. The Mitral Valve Prolapsus: Quantification of the Regurgitation Flow Rate by Experimental Time-Dependant PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billy, F.; Coisne, D.; Sanchez, L.; Perrault, R.

    2001-10-01

    Color Doppler is routinely used for visualisation of intra cardiac flows and quantification of valvular heart disease, Nevertheless the 2D visualization of a complex 3D phenomenon is the major limitation of this technique, In particular, in clinical setting, the flow rate calculation upstream a regurgitant orifice (i,e, mitral valve insufficiency), assumes that the velocity field in the convergent region have hemispheric shapes and introduce miscalculation specially in case of prolaps regurgitant orifices, The main objective of this study was to characterize the dynamic 3D velocity field of the convergent region upstream a prolaps model of regurgitant orifice based on 2D time dependent PIV reconstruction.

  20. Effects of acute ischemic mitral regurgitation on three-dimensional mitral leaflet edge geometry.

    PubMed

    Bothe, Wolfgang; Nguyen, Tom C; Ennis, Daniel B; Itoh, Akinobu; Carlhäll, Carl Johan; Lai, David T; Ingels, Neil B; Miller, D Craig

    2008-02-01

    Improved quantitative understanding of in vivo leaflet geometry in ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR) is needed to improve reparative techniques, yet few data are available due to current imaging limitations. Using marker technology we tested the hypotheses that IMR (1) occurs chiefly during early systole; (2) affects primarily the valve region contiguous with the myocardial ischemic insult; and (3) results in systolic leaflet edge restriction. Eleven sheep had radiopaque markers sutured as five opposing pairs along the anterior (A(1)-E(1)) and posterior (A(2)-E(2)) mitral leaflet free edges from the anterior commissure (A(1)-A(2)) to the posterior commissure (E(1)-E(2)). Immediately postoperatively, biplane videofluoroscopy was used to obtain 4D marker coordinates before and during acute proximal left circumflex artery occlusion. Regional mitral orifice area (MOA) was calculated in the anterior (Ant-MOA), middle (Mid-MOA), and posterior (Post-MOA) mitral orifice segments during early systole (EarlyS), mid systole (MidS), and end systole (EndS). MOA was normalized to zero (minimum orifice opening) at baseline EndS. Tenting height was the distance of the midpoint of paired markers to the mitral annular plane at EndS. Acute ischemia increased echocardiographic MR grade (0.5+/-0.3 vs 2.3+/-0.7, p<0.01) and MOA in all regions at EarlyS, MidS, and EndS: Ant-MOA (7+/-10 vs 22+/-19 mm(2), 1+/-2 vs 18+/-16 mm(2), 0 vs 17+/-15 mm(2)); Mid-MOA (9+/-13 vs 25+/-17 mm(2), 3+/-6 vs 21+/-19 mm(2), 0 vs 25+/-17 mm(2)); and Post-MOA (8+/-10 vs 25+/-16, 2+/-4 vs 22+/-13 mm(2), 0 vs 23+/-13 mm(2)), all p<0.05. There was no change in MOA throughout systole (EarlyS vs MidS vs EndS) during baseline conditions or ischemia. Tenting height increased with ischemia near the central and the anterior commissure leaflet edges (B(1)-B(2): 7.1+/-1.8mm vs 7.9+/-1.7 mm, C(1)-C(2): 6.9+/-1.3mm vs 8.0+/-1.5mm, both p<0.05). MOA during ischemia was larger throughout systole, indicating that acute IMR

  1. EFFECTS OF ACUTE ISCHEMIC MITRAL REGURGITATION ON THREE DIMENSIONAL MITRAL LEAFLET EDGE GEOMETRY

    PubMed Central

    Bothe, Wolfgang; Nguyen, Tom C.; Ennis, Daniel B.; Itoh, Akinobu; Carlhäll, Carl Johan; Lai, David T.; Ingels, Neil B.; Miller, D. Craig

    2008-01-01

    Background: Improved quantitative understanding of in-vivo leaflet geometry in ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR) is needed to improve reparative techniques, yet few data are available due to current imaging limitations. Using marker technology we tested the hypotheses that IMR: (1) Occurs chiefly during early-systole; (2) Affects primarily the valve region contiguous with the myocardial ischemic insult; and, (3) Results in systolic leaflet edge restriction. Methods: Eleven sheep had radiopaque markers sutured as five opposing pairs along the anterior (A1-E1) and posterior (A2-E2) mitral leaflet free-edges from the anterior commissure (A1-A2) to the posterior commissure (E1-E2). Immediately postoperatively, biplane videofluoroscopy was used to obtain 4-D marker coordinates before and during acute proximal left circumflex artery occlusion. Regional mitral orifice area (MOA) was calculated in the anterior (Ant-MOA), middle (Mid-MOA) and posterior (Post-MOA) mitral orifice segments during early-systole (EarlyS), mid-systole (MidS), and end-systole (EndS). MOA was normalized to zero (minimum orifice opening) at baseline EndS. Tenting height was the distance of the midpoint of paired markers to the mitral annular plane at EndS. . Results: Acute ischemia increased echocardiographic MR grade (0.5±0.3 vs. 2.3±0.7, p<0.01) and MOA in all regions at EarlyS, MidS and EndS: Ant-MOA (7±10 vs. 22±19mm2, 1±2 vs. 18±16mm2, 0 vs. 17±15mm2); Mid-MOA (9±13 vs. 25±17mm2, 3±6 vs. 21±19mm2, 0 vs. 25±17mm2); and Post-MOA (8±10 vs. 25±16, 2±4 vs. 22±13mm2, 0 vs. 23±13mm2), all p<0.05. There was no change in MOA throughout systole (EarlyS vs. MidS vs. EndS) during baseline conditions or ischemia. Tenting height increased with ischemia near the central and the anterior commissure leaflet edges (B1-B2: 7.1±1.8mm vs. 7.9±1.7mm, C1-C2: 6.9±1.3mm vs. 8.0±1.5mm, both p<0.05). Conclusions: (1) MOA during ischemia was larger throughout systole, indicating that acute IMR in

  2. Impact of chronic lisinopril therapy on left atrial volume versus dimension in chronic organic mitral regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Graham C; Marcotte, Francois; Rudski, Lawrence G

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Chronic mitral regurgitation imparts a volume load on the left atrium (LA). Because this chamber may dilate asymmetrically, changes in left atrial size may be underestimated using standard two-dimensional or M-mode techniques. METHODS The effect of lisinopril therapy in the setting of chronic organic mitral regurgitation on LA dimension was studied using standard M-mode techniques and LA volumes using the biplane Simpson’s method. RESULTS Mitral regurgitant fraction was reduced at one year in the lisinopril group versus the placebo group (−6.7%±3.5% versus 3.5%±3.2%, respectively; P<0.05). Significant reductions in both maximum and minimum LA volumes were seen in the lisinopril group (88±33 mL to 75±23 mL and 46±20 mL to 38±16 mL, respectively; P<0.01). This change in LA size was not appreciated when measurements were performed using standard M-mode techniques (from 44.3±6.9 mm to 44.1±7.4 mm; P=not significant). There was no significant relationship between change in LA volume and change in regurgitant fraction or systolic blood pressure. Change in LA volume was moderately correlated with change in left ventricular mass. CONCLUSIONS Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor therapy reduces LA volume in the setting of chronic mitral regurgitation. This change in LA size is not apparent when standard M-mode techniques are used. Therefore, a volumetric assessment of atrial size in the setting of chronic mitral regurgitation proved to be superior to standard two-dimensional techniques. PMID:16485047

  3. Tissue Doppler-Derived Myocardial Acceleration during Isovolumetric Contraction Predicts Pulmonary Capillary Wedge Pressure in Patients with Significant Mitral Regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Omar, Alaa Mabrouk Salem; Abdel-Rahman, Mohamed Ahmed; Khorshid, Hazem; Helmy, Mostafa; Raslan, Hala; Rifaie, Osama

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether isovolumic contraction velocity (IVV) and acceleration (IVA) predict pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) in mitral regurgitation. Forty-four patients with mitral regurgitation were studied. PCWP was invasively measured. IVV, IVA and the ratio IVRT/Te'-E (where IVRT = isovolumic relaxation time, and Te'-E = time difference between the onset of mitral annular e' and mitral flow E waves) were measured. Mean age was 59.2 ± 13.3 y. Twenty-six patients had an ejection fraction ≥55%, and 18 patients had an ejection fraction <55%. IVRT/Te'-E was impossible in 11 patients because Te'-E = zero. PCWP correlated with IVV, IVA and IVRT/Te'-E; overall (r = -0.714, -0.892 and, -0.752, all p < 0.001), ejection fraction ≥55 (r = -0.467, -0.749, -0.639, p = 0.016, <0.001, 0.003) and ejection fraction <55% (r = -0.761, -0.911 and -0.833, all p < 0.001). Similar correlations were found for sinus and atrial fibrillation. Our study suggests that IVV and IVA correlate with PCWP in patients with mitral regurgitation irrespective of systolic function or rhythms and, thus, can be alternatives to the tedious IVRT/Te'-E, especially when impossible because Te'-E = 0. Copyright © 2015 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Mitral Valve Regurgitation in the LVAD-Assisted Heart Studied in a Mock Circulatory Loop.

    PubMed

    May-Newman, K; Fisher, B; Hara, M; Dembitsky, W; Adamson, R

    2016-06-01

    Permanent closure of the aortic valve (AVC) is sometimes performed In LVAD patients, usually when a mechanical valve prosthesis or significant aortic insufficiency is present. Mitral valve regurgitation (MVR) present at the time of LVAD implantation can remain unresolved, representing a limitation for exercise tolerance and a potential predictor of mortality. To investigate the effect of MVR on hemodynamics of the LVAD-supported heart following AVC, studies were performed using a mock circulatory loop. Pressure and flow measured for a range of cardiac function, LVAD speed, and MVR show that cardiac contraction augments aortic pressure by 10-27% over nonpulsatile conditions when the mitral valve functions normally, but decreases with MVR until it reaches the nonpulsatile level. Aortic flow displays a similar trend, demonstrating a 25% decrease from fully functioning to open at 7 krpm, a 5% decrease at 9 krpm, and no observable effect at 11 krpm. Pulsatility decreases with increased LVAD speed and MVR. The data indicate that a modest level of cardiac output (1.5-2 L/min) can be maintained by the native heart through the LVAD when the LVAD is off. These results demonstrate that MVR decreases the augmentation of forward flow by improved cardiac function at lower LVAD speeds. While some level of MVR can be tolerated in LVAD recipients, this condition represents a risk, particularly in those patients that undergo AVC closure, and may warrant repair at the time of surgery.

  5. Severe mitral regurgitation and hepatopulmonary hydatid cysts: what should be treated first?

    PubMed

    Vasquez, Julio C; DeLaRosa, Jacob; Montesinos, Efrain; Rojas, Luis; Peralta, Julio; Leon, Juan J

    2008-12-01

    Hydatid cyst can simultaneously affect the liver and lung. Some patients might have additional comorbidities that can make management more challenging. Here, we present a 10-year-old boy with hepatopulmonary hydatid cysts and severe mitral regurgitation, who was successfully managed with a staged surgical approach treating the lung first, followed by the liver and finally, the heart.

  6. Mitral valve regurgitation due to annular dilatation caused by a huge and floating left atrial myxoma

    PubMed Central

    Ersoy, Burak; Yeniterzi, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of mitral valve annular dilatation caused by a huge left atrial myxoma obstructing the mitral valve orifice. A 50-year-old man presenting with palpitation was found to have a huge left atrial myxoma protruding into the left ventricle during diastole, causing severe mitral regurgitation. The diagnosis was made with echocardiogram. Transoesophageal echocardiography revealed a solid mass of 75 × 55 mm. During operation, the myxoma was completely removed from its attachment in the atrium. We preferred to place a mechanical heart valve after an annuloplasty ring because of severely dilated mitral annulus and chordae elongation. The patient had an uneventful recovery. Our case suggests that immediate surgery, careful evaluation of mitral valve annulus preoperatively is recommended. PMID:26702283

  7. Mitral valve regurgitation due to annular dilatation caused by a huge and floating left atrial myxoma.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Mehmet; Ersoy, Burak; Yeniterzi, Mehmet

    2015-09-01

    We describe a case of mitral valve annular dilatation caused by a huge left atrial myxoma obstructing the mitral valve orifice. A 50-year-old man presenting with palpitation was found to have a huge left atrial myxoma protruding into the left ventricle during diastole, causing severe mitral regurgitation. The diagnosis was made with echocardiogram. Transoesophageal echocardiography revealed a solid mass of 75 × 55 mm. During operation, the myxoma was completely removed from its attachment in the atrium. We preferred to place a mechanical heart valve after an annuloplasty ring because of severely dilated mitral annulus and chordae elongation. The patient had an uneventful recovery. Our case suggests that immediate surgery, careful evaluation of mitral valve annulus preoperatively is recommended.

  8. Single-Suture Neochorda-Folding Plasty for Mitral Regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Myung; Je, Hyung Gon; Lee, Sang Kwon

    2016-01-01

    The single-suture neochorda-folding plasty technique is a modification of existing mitral valve repair techniques. In the authors’ experience, its simplicity, reliability, and versatility make it a useful technique for mitral valve repair, especially when a minimally invasive approach is used. PMID:26889453

  9. Percutaneous mitral valve repair for mitral regurgitation in high-risk patients: results of the EVEREST II study.

    PubMed

    Glower, Donald D; Kar, Saibal; Trento, Alfredo; Lim, D Scott; Bajwa, Tanvir; Quesada, Ramon; Whitlow, Patrick L; Rinaldi, Michael J; Grayburn, Paul; Mack, Michael J; Mauri, Laura; McCarthy, Patrick M; Feldman, Ted

    2014-07-15

    The EVEREST II (Endovascular Valve Edge-to-Edge REpair STudy) High-Risk registry and REALISM Continued Access Study High-Risk Arm are prospective registries of patients who received the MitraClip device (Abbott Vascular, Santa Clara, California) for mitral regurgitation (MR) in the United States. The purpose of this study was to report 12-month outcomes in high-risk patients treated with the percutaneous mitral valve edge-to-edge repair. Patients with grades 3 to 4+ MR and a surgical mortality risk of ≥12%, based on the Society of Thoracic Surgeons risk calculator or the estimate of a surgeon coinvestigator following pre-specified protocol criteria, were enrolled. In the studies, 327 of 351 patients completed 12 months of follow-up. Patients were elderly (76 ± 11 years of age), with 70% having functional MR and 60% having prior cardiac surgery. The mitral valve device reduced MR to ≤2+ in 86% of patients at discharge (n = 325; p < 0.0001). Major adverse events at 30 days included death in 4.8%, myocardial infarction in 1.1%, and stroke in 2.6%. At 12 months, MR was ≤2+ in 84% of patients (n = 225; p < 0.0001). From baseline to 12 months, left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic volume improved from 161 ± 56 ml to 143 ± 53 ml (n = 203; p < 0.0001) and LV end-systolic volume improved from 87 ± 47 ml to 79 ± 44 ml (n = 202; p < 0.0001). New York Heart Association functional class improved from 82% in class III/IV at baseline to 83% in class I/II at 12 months (n = 234; p < 0.0001). The 36-item Short Form Health Survey physical and mental quality-of-life scores improved from baseline to 12 months (n = 191; p < 0.0001). Annual hospitalization rate for heart failure fell from 0.79% pre-procedure to 0.41% post-procedure (n = 338; p < 0.0001). Kaplan-Meier survival estimate at 12 months was 77.2%. The percutaneous mitral valve device significantly reduced MR, improved clinical symptoms, and decreased LV dimensions at 12 months in this high-surgical-risk cohort

  10. Practice gaps in the care of mitral valve regurgitation: Insights from the American College of Cardiology mitral regurgitation gap analysis and advisory panel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Andrew; Grayburn, Paul; Foster, Jill A; McCulloch, Marti L; Badhwar, Vinay; Gammie, James S; Costa, Salvatore P; Benitez, Robert Michael; Rinaldi, Michael J; Thourani, Vinod H; Martin, Randolph P

    2016-02-01

    The revised 2014 American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Heart Association valvular heart disease guidelines provide evidenced-based recommendations for the management of mitral regurgitation (MR). However, knowledge gaps related to our evolving understanding of critical MR concepts may impede their implementation. The ACC conducted a multifaceted needs assessment to characterize gaps, practice patterns, and perceptions related to the diagnosis and treatment of MR. A key project element was a set of surveys distributed to primary care and cardiovascular physicians (cardiologists and cardiothoracic surgeons). Survey and other gap analysis findings were presented to a panel of 10 expert advisors from specialties of general cardiology, cardiac imaging, interventional cardiology, and cardiac surgeons with expertise in valvular heart disease, especially MR, and cardiovascular education. The panel was charged with assessing the relative importance and potential means of remedying identified gaps to improve care for patients with MR. The survey results identified several knowledge and practice gaps that may limit implementation of evidence-based recommendations for MR care. Specifically, half of primary care physicians reported uncertainty regarding timing of intervention for patients with severe primary or functional MR. Physicians in all groups reported that quantitative indices of MR severity were frequently not reported in clinical echocardiographic interpretations, and that these measurements were not consistently reviewed when provided in reports. In the treatment of MR, nearly 30% of primary care physician and general cardiologists did not know the volume of mitral valve repair surgeries by their reference cardiac surgeons and did not have a standard source to obtain this information. After review of the survey results, the expert panel summarized practice gaps into 4 thematic areas and offered proposals to address deficiencies and promote better alignment

  11. Two-Year Outcomes of Surgical Treatment of Moderate Ischemic Mitral Regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Michler, Robert E; Smith, Peter K; Parides, Michael K; Ailawadi, Gorav; Thourani, Vinod; Moskowitz, Alan J; Acker, Michael A; Hung, Judy W; Chang, Helena L; Perrault, Louis P; Gillinov, A Marc; Argenziano, Michael; Bagiella, Emilia; Overbey, Jessica R; Moquete, Ellen G; Gupta, Lopa N; Miller, Marissa A; Taddei-Peters, Wendy C; Jeffries, Neal; Weisel, Richard D; Rose, Eric A; Gammie, James S; DeRose, Joseph J; Puskas, John D; Dagenais, François; Burks, Sandra G; El-Hamamsy, Ismail; Milano, Carmelo A; Atluri, Pavan; Voisine, Pierre; O'Gara, Patrick T; Gelijns, Annetine C

    2016-05-19

    In a trial comparing coronary-artery bypass grafting (CABG) alone with CABG plus mitral-valve repair in patients with moderate ischemic mitral regurgitation, we found no significant difference in the left ventricular end-systolic volume index (LVESVI) or survival after 1 year. Concomitant mitral-valve repair was associated with a reduced prevalence of moderate or severe mitral regurgitation, but patients had more adverse events. We now report 2-year outcomes. We randomly assigned 301 patients to undergo either CABG alone or the combined procedure. Patients were followed for 2 years for clinical and echocardiographic outcomes. At 2 years, the mean (±SD) LVESVI was 41.2±20.0 ml per square meter of body-surface area in the CABG-alone group and 43.2±20.6 ml per square meter in the combined-procedure group (mean improvement over baseline, -14.1 ml per square meter and -14.6 ml per square meter, respectively). The rate of death was 10.6% in the CABG-alone group and 10.0% in the combined-procedure group (hazard ratio in the combined-procedure group, 0.90; 95% confidence interval, 0.45 to 1.83; P=0.78). There was no significant between-group difference in the rank-based assessment of the LVESVI (including death) at 2 years (z score, 0.38; P=0.71). The 2-year rate of moderate or severe residual mitral regurgitation was higher in the CABG-alone group than in the combined-procedure group (32.3% vs. 11.2%, P<0.001). Overall rates of hospital readmission and serious adverse events were similar in the two groups, but neurologic events and supraventricular arrhythmias remained more frequent in the combined-procedure group. In patients with moderate ischemic mitral regurgitation undergoing CABG, the addition of mitral-valve repair did not lead to significant differences in left ventricular reverse remodeling at 2 years. Mitral-valve repair provided a more durable correction of mitral regurgitation but did not significantly improve survival or reduce overall adverse events or

  12. Anatomic regurgitant orifice area obtained using 3D-echocardiography as an indicator of severity of mitral regurgitation in dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease.

    PubMed

    Müller, S; Menciotti, G; Borgarelli, M

    2017-09-27

    To determine feasibility and repeatability of measuring the anatomic regurgitant orifice area (AROA) using real-time three-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography (RT3DE) in dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD), and to investigate differences in the AROA of dogs with different disease severity and in different American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM) stages. Sixty privately-owned dogs diagnosed with MMVD. The echocardiographic database of our institution was retrospectively searched for dogs diagnosed with MMVD and RT3DE data set acquisition. Dogs were classified into mild, moderate, or severe MMVD according to a Mitral Regurgitation Severity Score (MRSS), and into stage B1, B2 or C according to ACVIM staging. The RT3DE data sets were imported into dedicated software and a short axis plane crossing the regurgitant orifice was used to measure the AROA. Feasibility, inter- and intra-observer variability of measuring the AROA was calculated. Differences in the AROA between dogs in different MRSS and ACVIM stages were investigated. The AROA was measurable in 60 data sets of 81 selected to be included in the study (74%). The inter- and intra-observer coefficients of variation were 26% and 21%, respectively. The AROA was significantly greater in dogs with a severe MRSS compared with dogs with mild MRSS (p=0.045). There was no difference between the AROA of dogs in different ACVIM clinical stages. Obtaining the AROA using RT3DE is feasible and might provide additional information to stratify mitral regurgitation severity in dogs with MMVD. Diagnostic and prognostic utility of the AROA deserves further investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Quantification of left ventricular interstitial fibrosis in asymptomatic chronic primary degenerative mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Nicola C; Moody, William E; Yuan, Mengshi; Weale, Peter; Neal, Desley; Townend, Jonathan N; Steeds, Richard P

    2014-11-01

    The optimum timing of surgery in asymptomatic patients with chronic severe primary degenerative mitral regurgitation (MR) remains controversial, and further markers are needed to improve decision-making. There are limited data that wall stress is increased in MR and may result in ventricular fibrosis. We investigated the hypothesis that chronic volume overload in MR is a stimulus for myocardial fibrosis using T1-mapping cardiac MRI. A cross-sectional study of 35 patients (age 60 ± 14 years) with asymptomatic moderate and severe primary degenerative MR (mean effective regurgitant orifice area, 0.45 ± 0.25 cm)(2) with no class I indication for surgery were compared with age and sex controls. Subjects were studied with cardiopulmonary exercise testing, echocardiography, and cardiac MRI. Longitudinal and circumferential myocardial deformation was reduced with MR when left ventricular ejection fraction (67% ± 10%) and N-terminal pro B Natriuretic peptide (126 [76-428] ng/L) were within the normal range. Myocardial extracellular volume was increased (0.32 ± 0.07 versus 0.25 ± 0.02, P<0.01) and was associated with increased left ventricular end-systolic volume index (r=0.62, P<0.01), left atrial volume index (r=0.41, P<0.05) but lower left ventricular ejection fraction (r=-0.60, P<0.01), longitudinal function (mitral annular plane systolic excursion, r=-0.46, P<0.01), and peak VO2 max (r=-0.51, P<0.05). In a multivariable regression model, left ventricular end-systolic volume index and left atrial volume index were independent predictors of extracellular volume (r(2)=0.42, P<0.01). Patients with asymptomatic MR demonstrate a spectrum of myocardial fibrosis associated with reduced myocardial deformation and reduced exercise capacity. Future work is warranted to investigate whether left ventricle fibrosis affects clinical outcomes. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Early Stabilization of Traumatic Aortic Transection and Mitral Valve Regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Lambrechts, David L.; Wellens, Francis; Vercoutere, Rik A.; De Geest, Raf

    2003-01-01

    We report a case of life-threatening aortic transection with concomitant mitral papillary muscle rupture and severe lung contusion caused by a failed parachute jump. This blunt thoracic injury was treated by early stabilization with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation followed by successful delayed graft repair of the descending aorta and mitral valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis. (Tex Heart Inst J 2003;30:65–7) PMID:12638675

  15. Geometric differences of the mitral apparatus between ischemic and dilated cardiomyopathy with significant mitral regurgitation: real-time three-dimensional echocardiography study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwan, Jun; Shiota, Takahiro; Agler, Deborah A.; Popovic, Zoran B.; Qin, Jian Xin; Gillinov, Marc A.; Stewart, William J.; Cosgrove, Delos M.; McCarthy, Patrick M.; Thomas, James D.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study was conducted to elucidate the geometric differences of the mitral apparatus in patients with significant mitral regurgitation caused by ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM-MR) and by idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM-MR) by use of real-time 3D echocardiography (RT3DE). METHODS AND RESULTS: Twenty-six patients with ICM-MR caused by posterior infarction, 18 patients with DCM-MR, and 8 control subjects were studied. With the 3D software, commissure-commissure plane and 3 perpendicular anteroposterior (AP) planes were generated for imaging the medial, central, and lateral sides of the mitral valve (MV) during mid systole. In 3 AP planes, the angles between the annular plane and each leaflet (anterior, Aalpha; posterior, Palpha) were measured. In ICM-MR, Aalpha measured in the medial and central planes was significantly larger than that in the lateral plane (39+/-5 degrees, 34+/-6 degrees, and 27+/-5 degrees, respectively; P<0.01), whereas Palpha showed no significant difference in any of the 3 AP planes (61+/-7 degrees, 57+/-7 degrees, and 56+/-7 degrees, P>0.05). In DCM-MR, both Aalpha (38+/-8 degrees, 37+/-9 degrees, and 36+/-7 degrees, P>0.05) and Palpha (59+/-6 degrees, 58+/-5 degrees, and 57+/-6 degrees, P>0.05) revealed no significant differences in the 3 planes. CONCLUSIONS: The pattern of MV deformation from the medial to the lateral side was asymmetrical in ICM-MR, whereas it was symmetrical in DCM-MR. RT3DE is a helpful tool for differentiating the geometry of the mitral apparatus between these 2 different types of functional mitral regurgitation.

  16. Geometric differences of the mitral apparatus between ischemic and dilated cardiomyopathy with significant mitral regurgitation: real-time three-dimensional echocardiography study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwan, Jun; Shiota, Takahiro; Agler, Deborah A.; Popovic, Zoran B.; Qin, Jian Xin; Gillinov, Marc A.; Stewart, William J.; Cosgrove, Delos M.; McCarthy, Patrick M.; Thomas, James D.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study was conducted to elucidate the geometric differences of the mitral apparatus in patients with significant mitral regurgitation caused by ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM-MR) and by idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM-MR) by use of real-time 3D echocardiography (RT3DE). METHODS AND RESULTS: Twenty-six patients with ICM-MR caused by posterior infarction, 18 patients with DCM-MR, and 8 control subjects were studied. With the 3D software, commissure-commissure plane and 3 perpendicular anteroposterior (AP) planes were generated for imaging the medial, central, and lateral sides of the mitral valve (MV) during mid systole. In 3 AP planes, the angles between the annular plane and each leaflet (anterior, Aalpha; posterior, Palpha) were measured. In ICM-MR, Aalpha measured in the medial and central planes was significantly larger than that in the lateral plane (39+/-5 degrees, 34+/-6 degrees, and 27+/-5 degrees, respectively; P<0.01), whereas Palpha showed no significant difference in any of the 3 AP planes (61+/-7 degrees, 57+/-7 degrees, and 56+/-7 degrees, P>0.05). In DCM-MR, both Aalpha (38+/-8 degrees, 37+/-9 degrees, and 36+/-7 degrees, P>0.05) and Palpha (59+/-6 degrees, 58+/-5 degrees, and 57+/-6 degrees, P>0.05) revealed no significant differences in the 3 planes. CONCLUSIONS: The pattern of MV deformation from the medial to the lateral side was asymmetrical in ICM-MR, whereas it was symmetrical in DCM-MR. RT3DE is a helpful tool for differentiating the geometry of the mitral apparatus between these 2 different types of functional mitral regurgitation.

  17. Preoperative Three-Dimensional Valve Analysis Predicts Recurrent Ischemic Mitral Regurgitation after Mitral Annuloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bouma, Wobbe; Lai, Eric K.; Levack, Melissa M.; Shang, Eric K.; Pouch, Alison M.; Eperjesi, Thomas J.; Plappert, Theodore J.; Yushkevich, Paul A.; Mariani, Massimo A.; Khabbaz, Kamal R.; Gleason, Thomas G.; Mahmood, Feroze; Acker, Michael A.; Woo, Y. Joseph; Cheung, Albert T.; Jackson, Benjamin M.; Gorman, Joseph H.; Gorman, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Valve repair for ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR) with undersized annuloplasty rings is characterized by high IMR recurrence rates. Patient-specific preoperative imaging-based risk stratification for recurrent IMR would optimize results. We sought to determine if pre-repair three-dimensional (3D) echocardiography combined with a novel valve modeling algorithm would be predictive of IMR recurrence 6 months after repair. Methods Intraoperative transesophageal real-time 3D echocardiography was performed in 50 patients undergoing undersized ring annuloplasty for IMR (and in 21 patients with normal mitral valves). A customized image analysis protocol was used to assess 3D annular geometry and regional leaflet tethering. IMR recurrence (≥grade 2) was assessed with two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography 6 months after repair. Results Preoperative annular geometry was similar in all IMR patients; and preoperative leaflet tethering was significantly higher in patients with recurrent IMR (n=13) as compared with patients in whom IMR did not recur IMR (n=37) (tethering index 3.91±1.01 vs. 2.90±1.17, P=0.008; tethering angles of A3 (23.5±8.9° vs. 14.4± 11.4°, P=0.012), P2 (44.4±8.8° vs. 28.2±17.0°, P=0.002), and P3 (35.2±6.0° vs. 18.6±12.7°, P<0.001)). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed preoperative P3 tethering angle as an independent predictor of IMR recurrence with an optimal cut-off value of 29.9° (AUC 0.92, 95%CI 0.84–1.00, P<0.001). Conclusions 3D echocardiography combined with valve modeling is predictive of recurrent IMR. Preoperative regional leaflet tethering of segment P3 is a strong independent predictor of IMR recurrence after undersized ring annuloplasty. In patients with a preoperative P3 tethering angle ≥29.9° chordal-sparing valve replacement rather than valve repair should be strongly considered. PMID:26688087

  18. [Evaluation of mitral regurgitation severity using a simplified method based on proximal flow convergence].

    PubMed

    Moya, José L; Darriba-Pollán, Julia; García-Lledó, Alberto; Taboada, Dolores; Catalán-Sanz, Paz; Megías-Saez, Alicia; Guzmán-Martínez, Gabriela; Campuzano-Ruiz, Raquel; Asín-Cardiel, Enrique

    2006-10-01

    Calculation of the effective regurgitant orifice (ERO) is regarded as the most accurate way of assessing the severity of mitral regurgitation (MR), but the technique's complexity limits its use. Our objective was to modify and validate a previously published semiquantitative method of assessment based on measurement of the proximal isovelocity surface area (PISA) in order to adapt it to recent recommendations from American and European cardiology societies. In the PISA method, maximum regurgitant flow (MRF) is a function of the radius and aliasing velocity (AV). Using this relationship, it is possible to construct a nomogram formed by lines of different MRF value, which can be easily derived by looking for radius values on the graph and observing where they cross with AV values. The MR severity limits on the nomogram were set to reflect the different severity grades and limits recommended for use with ERO measurements by American and European cardiology societies. We studied 76 patients with MR using Doppler echocardiography. There was an excellent correlation between MRF and ERO (r=0.98, P< .001). Estimates of MR severity made using the new nomogram were in good agreement with those derived from the ERO: for a scale with three severity grades, kappa was 0.951 and the standard error was 0.11; for four grades, kappa was 0.969 and the standard error, 0.11. Estimates of MR severity derived semiquantitatively from MRF using the nomogram proposed here were in excellent agreement with quantitative estimates obtained using the ERO, and the method was faster and easier to use.

  19. Hospital-based health technology assessment on the use of mitral clips in the treatment of mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Miniati, Roberto; Cecconi, Giulio; Dori, Fabrizio; Marchetti, Matteo; Gentili, Guido Biffi; Porchia, Barbara; Presicce, Giorgio; Franchi, Sara; Gusinu, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    This study, carried out at the Florence Teaching Hospital Careggi (AOUC), reports the technological evaluation, through the use of Health Technology Assessment (HTA), on the application of mitral clips in the treatment of mitral insufficiency. The assessment, carried out by analyzing the clinical, technological, social, procedural, safety and economic elements, sought to answer the following research questions: Evaluation of the general technological status of the mitral clips in the treatment process of mitral regurgitation, with particular reference to traditional methods; and contextualisation of the analyses within the hospital structure, by identifying criticality issues and improvements. The methodology was based on the following steps: technological description; areas of evaluation and the selection of Key Performance Indicators; research of scientific facts and the collection of expert opinions; evaluation and reporting of findings. The results are based on an analysis which included a total of 50 indicators, effectively evaluating 86.5% of them, from the least from the clinical sector (80%) to the most in the areas of procedure, safety and social (100%). Traditional surgery (repair or valve replacement) still represents the gold standard for the treatment of mitral regurgitation due to its maturity both on a technological and clinical level. The minimally invasive procedures which use the mitral clips present interesting opportunities both on a social level (minimum stay in hospital and no post-operative rehabilitation) and clinical level, especially as an alternative to medication, even if they are still at an emergent level (the long-term results are unknown) and complex to use. From the clinical point of view they show some interesting findings related to immediate and post-operative mortality (none during the operation and a minor and equal amount 30 days and 12 months later in comparison to traditional methods) whilst economically, despite the fact

  20. Usefulness of latent left ventricular dysfunction assessed by Bowditch Treppe to predict stress-induced pulmonary hypertension in minimally symptomatic severe mitral regurgitation secondary to mitral valve prolapse.

    PubMed

    Agricola, Eustachio; Bombardini, Tonino; Oppizzi, Michele; Margonato, Alberto; Pisani, Matteo; Melisurgo, Giulio; Picano, Eugenio

    2005-02-01

    We assessed whether the presence of latent myocardial dysfunction, evaluated by echocardiographic derived force-frequency relationship (FFR) during exercise, predicts the appearance of stress-induced pulmonary hypertension in minimally symptomatic patients with severe mitral regurgitation (MR). Two groups of patients were identified: group I with normal (40 mm Hg) peak stress systemic pulmonary artery pressure. Group I had normal and upsloping FFR and group II had abnormal flat or biphasic FFR. Therefore, in patients with severe MR and apparently normal left ventricular function, the stress-induced pulmonary hypertension seems to be related to the presence of latent left ventricular dysfunction.

  1. Dynamic quantitative echocardiographic evaluation of mitral regurgitation in the operating department.

    PubMed

    Gisbert, Alejandro; Soulière, Vicky; Denault, André Y; Bouchard, Denis; Couture, Pierre; Pellerin, Michel; Carrier, Michel; Levesque, Sylvie; Ducharme, Anique; Basmadjian, Arsène J

    2006-02-01

    Hemodynamic modifications induced by general anesthesia could lead to underestimation of mitral regurgitation (MR) severity in the operating department and potentially serious consequences. The intraoperative severity of MR was prospectively compared with the preoperative baseline evaluation using dynamic quantitative transesophageal echocardiography in 25 patients who were stable with MR 2/4 or greater undergoing coronary bypass, mitral valve operation, or both. Significant changes in the severity of MR using transesophageal echocardiographic criteria occurred after the induction of general anesthesia and with phenylephrine. Quantitative transesophageal echocardiographic evaluation of MR using effective orifice area and vena contracta, and the use of phenylephrine challenge, were useful to avoid underestimating MR severity in the operating department.

  2. Cardiac surgery for annuloaortic ectasia and mitral regurgitation in an adult patient with dextrocardia.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Yuichiro; Satoh, Harumitsu; Abe, Mitsunori; Nagashima, Mitsugi; Kurata, Akira; Higashino, Hiroshi

    2011-05-01

    We report a surgical case of dextrocardia complicated with annuloaortic ectasia (AAE) and mitral regurgitation, which induced congestive heart failure. Preoperative electrocardiography-gated multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) showed the following complex cardiovascular abnormalities without motion artifacts: dextrocardia, situs inversus, polysplenia, AAE, absence of the inferior vena cava, azygos vein continuation, drainage of the hepatic vein into the right atrium, and bilateral superior venae cavae. On the basis of the MDCT data, we established a cardiopulmonary bypass; and a modified Bentall procedure (Piehler method) and mitral valve replacement were performed without complications.

  3. Management of mitral regurgitation during left ventricular reconstruction for ischemic heart failure†

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Patrick; Braun, Jerry; Holman, Eduard R.; Versteegh, Michel I.M.; Verwey, Harriette F.; Dion, Robert A.E.; Bax, Jeroen J.; Klautz, Robert J.M.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Remodeling of the left ventricle (LV) in ischemic cardiomyopathy frequently leads to functional mitral regurgitation (MR). The indication for correcting MR in patients undergoing LV reconstruction (LVR) is unclear. In this study, we evaluated our strategy of correcting MR ≥ grade 2+ by restrictive mitral annuloplasty (RMA) during LVR. METHODS We studied 92 consecutive patients (76 men, mean age 61 ± 10 years) who underwent LVR for ischemic heart failure (IHF). RMA was performed in all patients with MR ≥ grade 2+ on preoperative echocardiography and in patients who showed increased MR to ≥grade 2+ immediately after LVR. Patients were attributed to a RMA and no-RMA group, depending on whether or not concomitant RMA had been performed. Mean clinical and structured echocardiographic follow-up was 47 ± 20 months and was 100% complete. RESULTS In 38 out of 40 patients (95%) with preoperative MR ≥ grade 2+, concomitant RMA was planned and performed. In 17 out of 52 patients (33%) with MR < grade 2+ preoperatively, MR increased after LVR to ≥grade 2+ leading to additional RMA during a second period of aortic cross-clamping. Early mortality in the RMA group (n = 55) was 12.7% and survival at 36 months 78.2 ± 11.2%. Early mortality in the no-RMA group (n = 37) was 5.4% and survival at 36 months 81.1 ± 12.8%. Patients in the RMA group had significantly more reduced LV function with greater LV dimensions and volumes preoperatively. Echocardiography demonstrated sustained improvement in LVEF with reduction of LV volumes in both patient groups. Recurrence of MR at late follow-up was observed in 2 patients (1 patient per group). CONCLUSIONS Patients with IHF eligible for LV reconstruction have MR ≥ grade 2+ in 44% of cases. In one-third of IHF patients with MR < grade 2+ preoperatively, MR increases to ≥grade 2+ after LVR. Concomitant mitral valve repair for MR ≥ grade 2+, on either preoperative echocardiography or

  4. Radiation-induced mitral and tricuspid regurgitation with severe ostial coronary artery disease: a case report with successful surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Raviprasad, G S; Salem, B I; Gowda, S; Leidenfrost, R

    1995-06-01

    A 71-year-old woman presented with congestive heart failure due to severe mitral and tricuspid regurgitations. In addition, she had significant ostial right coronary stenosis. She received radiation therapy following left radical mastectomy for carcinoma of breast in the past. She underwent successful combined mitral valve replacement, tricuspid annuloplasty, and coronary artery bypass graft for radiation-induced heart disease.

  5. Importance of anterior leaflet tethering in predicting recurrence of ischemic mitral regurgitation after restrictive annuloplasty.

    PubMed

    van Garsse, Leen; Gelsomino, Sandro; Lucà, Fabiana; Lorusso, Roberto; Rao, Carmelo Massimiliano; Stefàno, Pieluigi; Maessen, Jos

    2012-04-01

    We investigated the relationship between anterior mitral leaflet (AML) tethering and recurrent ischemic mitral regurgitation (MR) after restrictive annuloplasty. We also explored whether the effect of AML tethering was secondary to modifications in left ventricular size and geometry. The study population consisted of 435 consecutive patients with chronic ischemic MR who survived combined coronary artery bypass grafting and undersized mitral ring annuloplasty performed at 3 institutions (University Hospital, Maastricht, The Netherlands; Careggi Hospital, Florence, Italy; and Civic Hospital, Brescia, Italy) from 2001 to 2008. The median follow-up was 44.7 months (interquartile range 25.9-66.4). The patients were divided by the baseline measurements into quintiles of AML tethering angle α' as follows: group 1, normal/slight AML tethering; group 2, mild AML tethering; group 3, moderate AML tethering; group 4, moderate-to-severe AML tethering; and group 5, severe AML tethering. Recurrence of MR was significantly greater in patients with moderate-to-severe (28.3%) and severe (39.4%) AML tethering (P < .001). A strong correlation was found between α' (r = 0.83, P < .001) and recurrent MR but a weak correlation with the posterior mitral angle β' (r = 0.12, P = .05). On logistic regression analysis corrected for other echocardiographic risk factors, moderate-severe AML tethering or worse (adjusted odds ratio, 3.6; 95% confidence interval, 3.0-4.1; P < .001) was a strong predictor of MR recurrence. Compared with patients with β' of 45 or greater, those with severe and moderate-severe AML tethering had more than 3.7 and 1.7 times greater odds of MR recurrence, respectively. No significant interactions were found between α' and the indexes of left ventricular function and geometry. Preoperative moderate-severe AML tethering or worse was strongly associated with MR recurrence. Thus, assessment of leaflet tethering should be incorporated into clinical risk assessment and

  6. Transcatheter implantation of the MONARC coronary sinus device for mitral regurgitation: 1-year results from the EVOLUTION phase I study (Clinical Evaluation of the Edwards Lifesciences Percutaneous Mitral Annuloplasty System for the Treatment of Mitral Regurgitation).

    PubMed

    Harnek, Jan; Webb, John G; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Tschope, Carsten; Vahanian, Alec; Buller, Christopher E; James, Stefan K; Tiefenbacher, Christiane P; Stone, Gregg W

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to assess the safety and efficacy of transcatheter valve annuloplasty in patients with mitral regurgitation (MR). Mitral regurgitation is associated with a worsened prognosis in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. Surgical mitral annuloplasty reduces the septal-lateral dimension of the mitral annulus resulting in improved leaflet coaptation with a reduction in regurgitation. Percutaneous annuloplasty with the MONARC device (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, California) implanted within the coronary sinus is designed to reduce mitral regurgitation through a similar mechanism. A total of 72 patients with MR grade ≥ 2 were enrolled at 8 participating centers in 4 countries. Clinical evaluation and transthoracic echocardiography were performed at baseline and at 3, 6, and 12 months. Multislice cardiac computed tomography and coronary angiography were performed at baseline and 3 months. The MONARC device was implanted in 59 of 72 patients (82%). The primary safety end point (freedom from death, tamponade, or myocardial infarction at 30 days) was met in 91% of patients at 30 days and in 82% at 1 year. Computed tomography imaging documented passage of the great cardiac vein over an obtuse marginal artery in 55% of patients and was associated with angiographic coronary artery compression in 15 patients and myocardial infarction in 2 patients (3.4%). At 12 months, a reduction in MR by ≥ 1 grade was observed in 50.0% of 22 implanted patients with matched echocardiograms and in 85.7% of 7 patients with baseline MR grade ≥ 3. Implantation of the MONARC device in the coronary sinus is feasible and may reduce MR. However, coronary artery compression may occur in patients in whom the great cardiac vein passes over a coronary artery, necessitating strategies in future studies to avoid this occurrence. Copyright © 2011 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The value of preoperative 3-dimensional over 2-dimensional valve analysis in predicting recurrent ischemic mitral regurgitation after mitral annuloplasty.

    PubMed

    Wijdh-den Hamer, Inez J; Bouma, Wobbe; Lai, Eric K; Levack, Melissa M; Shang, Eric K; Pouch, Alison M; Eperjesi, Thomas J; Plappert, Theodore J; Yushkevich, Paul A; Hung, Judy; Mariani, Massimo A; Khabbaz, Kamal R; Gleason, Thomas G; Mahmood, Feroze; Acker, Michael A; Woo, Y Joseph; Cheung, Albert T; Gillespie, Matthew J; Jackson, Benjamin M; Gorman, Joseph H; Gorman, Robert C

    2016-09-01

    Repair for ischemic mitral regurgitation with undersized annuloplasty is characterized by high recurrence rates. We sought to determine the value of pre-repair 3-dimensional echocardiography over 2-dimensional echocardiography in predicting recurrence at 6 months. Intraoperative transesophageal 2-dimensional echocardiography and 3-dimensional echocardiography were performed in 50 patients undergoing undersized annuloplasty for ischemic mitral regurgitation. Two-dimensional echocardiography annular diameter and tethering parameters were measured in the apical 2- and 4-chamber views. A customized protocol was used to assess 3-dimensional annular geometry and regional leaflet tethering. Recurrence (grade ≥2) was assessed with 2-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography at 6 months. Preoperative 2- and 3-dimensional annular geometry were similar in all patients with ischemic mitral regurgitation. Preoperative 2- and 3-dimensional leaflet tethering were significantly higher in patients with recurrence (n = 13) when compared with patients without recurrence (n = 37). Multivariate logistic regression revealed preoperative 2-dimensional echocardiography posterior tethering angle as an independent predictor of recurrence with an optimal cutoff value of 32.0° (area under the curve, 0.81; 95% confidence interval, 0.68-0.95; P = .002) and preoperative 3-dimensional echocardiography P3 tethering angle as an independent predictor of recurrence with an optimal cutoff value of 29.9° (area under the curve, 0.92; 95% confidence interval, 0.84-1.00; P < .001). The predictive value of the 3-dimensional geometric multivariate model can be augmented by adding basal aneurysm/dyskinesis (area under the curve, 0.94; 95% confidence interval, 0.87-1.00; P < .001). Preoperative 3-dimensional echocardiography P3 tethering angle is a stronger predictor of ischemic mitral regurgitation recurrence after annuloplasty than preoperative 2-dimensional echocardiography posterior

  8. Rheumatic mitral regurgitation. The case for annuloplasty in the pediatric age group.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, J G; Kawabori, I; Morgan, B C; Dillard, D H; Merendino, K A; Guntheroth, W G

    1975-08-01

    Eight youngsters (five female, three male, ages 10 to 19 years, mean 15 years) with isolated severe rheumatic mitral regurgitation have been subjected to mitral annuloplasty because of limiting symptoms and prominent ECG and X-ray changes. They have been followed for up to 11 years (mean 3.7 years), and 7 have had excellent results. An early (1961) patient had a small annulus and was not a favorable candidate; he had only transient improvement. Seven are greatly improved, have decreased cardiac size (often dramatic), and have improved ECG's. One has undergone successful pregnancy, and none has been limited in activities. The extent and duration of improvement, lack of mortality, and resumption of normal activities by these youngsters indicate surgical success. The essence of childhood and youth is activity and the future life span hopefully long; hence, annuloplasty would appear to be the procedure of choice for severe rheumatic mitral regurgitation in the pediatric age group, avoiding the usual need for anticoagulation and uncertain long-term results associated with mitral valve replacement.

  9. Mechanical haemolytic anaemia after valve repair operations for non-rheumatic mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed Central

    Warnes, C; Honey, M; Brooks, N; Davies, J; Gorman, A; Parker, N

    1980-01-01

    Two cases are described in which severe mechanical haemolytic anaemia developed shortly after operation for repair of non-rheumatic mitral regurgitation. One patient had a "floppy" valve and the other cleft mitral leaflets, and both had chordal rupture. In both there was residual regurgitation after repair though in one this was initially only trivial. Clinically manifest haemolysis ceased after replacement of the valve by a frame-mounted xenograft. There are two previously reported cases in which haemolytic anaemia followed an unsuccessful mitral valve repair operation. Subclinical haemolysis or mild haemolytic anaemia may occur with unoperated valve lesions, but hitherto frank haemolytic anaemia has been observed only when turbulent blood flow is associated with the presence of a prosthetic valve or patch of prosthetic fabric. In these four cases, however, polyester or Teflon sutures were the only foreign material, and it is suggested that when these are used for the repair of leaflets, particularly in non-rheumatic mitral valve disease, they may increase the damaging effect of turbulence on circulating red blood cells. PMID:7426198

  10. Chronic mitral regurgitation and Doppler estimation of left ventricular filling pressures in patients with heart failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temporelli, P. L.; Scapellato, F.; Corra, U.; Eleuteri, E.; Firstenberg, M. S.; Thomas, J. D.; Giannuzzi, P.

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies relating Doppler parameters and pulmonary capillary wedge pressures (PCWP) typically exclude patients with severe mitral regurgitation (MR). We evaluated the effects of varying degrees of chronic MR on the Doppler estimation of PCWP. PCWP and mitral Doppler profiles were obtained in 88 patients (mean age 55 +/- 8 years) with severe left ventricular (LV) dysfunction (mean ejection fraction 23% +/- 5%). Patients were classified by severity of MR. Patients with severe MR had greater left atrial areas, LV end-diastolic volumes, and mean PCWPs and lower ejection fractions (each P <.01). In patients with mild MR, multiple echocardiographic parameters correlated with PCWP; however, with worsening MR, only deceleration time strongly related to PCWP. From stepwise multivariate analysis, deceleration time was the best independent predictor of PCWP overall, and it was the only predictor in patients with moderate or severe MR. Doppler-derived early mitral deceleration time reliably predicts PCWP in patients with severe LV dysfunction irrespective of degree of MR.

  11. Chronic mitral regurgitation and Doppler estimation of left ventricular filling pressures in patients with heart failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temporelli, P. L.; Scapellato, F.; Corra, U.; Eleuteri, E.; Firstenberg, M. S.; Thomas, J. D.; Giannuzzi, P.

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies relating Doppler parameters and pulmonary capillary wedge pressures (PCWP) typically exclude patients with severe mitral regurgitation (MR). We evaluated the effects of varying degrees of chronic MR on the Doppler estimation of PCWP. PCWP and mitral Doppler profiles were obtained in 88 patients (mean age 55 +/- 8 years) with severe left ventricular (LV) dysfunction (mean ejection fraction 23% +/- 5%). Patients were classified by severity of MR. Patients with severe MR had greater left atrial areas, LV end-diastolic volumes, and mean PCWPs and lower ejection fractions (each P <.01). In patients with mild MR, multiple echocardiographic parameters correlated with PCWP; however, with worsening MR, only deceleration time strongly related to PCWP. From stepwise multivariate analysis, deceleration time was the best independent predictor of PCWP overall, and it was the only predictor in patients with moderate or severe MR. Doppler-derived early mitral deceleration time reliably predicts PCWP in patients with severe LV dysfunction irrespective of degree of MR.

  12. Two-dimensional echocardiographic determination of left atrial emptying volume: a noninvasive index in quantifying the degree of nonrheumatic mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Ren, J F; Kotler, M N; DePace, N L; Mintz, G S; Kimbiris, D; Kalman, P; Ross, J

    1983-10-01

    Several noninvasive techniques, including radionuclide angiography and Doppler echocardiography, have attempted to measure the regurgitant volume in patients with mitral regurgitation; however, none of these techniques are entirely satisfactory. Utilizing a computerized light pen method for tracing the left atrial endocardial border during systole and diastole in two orthogonal planes (apical four and two chamber views), biplane volume determinations were calculated in 12 normal subjects and 30 patients with nonrheumatic mitral regurgitation. Left atrial emptying volume determinations were performed by subtracting the left atrial end-diastolic volume from the left atrial end-systolic volume. The degree of mitral regurgitation was visually assessed as normal (0, trivial, Group I, 12 patients), mild (1+, Group II, 4 patients), moderate (2+, Group III, 8 patients), moderately severe (3+, Group IV, 12 patients) and severe (4+, Group V, 6 patients) by contrast left ventricular angiography and also quantitatively by regurgitant fraction at cardiac catheterization. All 18 patients with moderately severe (Group IV) and severe (Group V) mitral regurgitation had a left atrial emptying volume greater than 40 ml compared with none of the normal subjects and patients with mild (Group II) or moderate (Group III) mitral regurgitation. There was good correlation between left atrial emptying volume and mitral regurgitant fraction (r = 0.85, p less than 0.01). Thus, in patients with nonrheumatic mitral regurgitation, left atrial emptying volume is useful in separating mild from severe mitral regurgitation.

  13. Functional and Biomechanical Effects of the Edge-to-Edge Repair in the Setting of Mitral Regurgitation: Consolidated Knowledge and Novel Tools to Gain Insight into Its Percutaneous Implementation.

    PubMed

    Sturla, Francesco; Redaelli, Alberto; Puppini, Giovanni; Onorati, Francesco; Faggian, Giuseppe; Votta, Emiliano

    2015-06-01

    Mitral regurgitation is the most prevalent heart valve disease in the western population. When severe, it requires surgical treatment, repair being the preferred option. The edge-to-edge repair technique treats mitral regurgitation by suturing the leaflets together and creating a double-orifice valve. Due to its relative simplicity and versatility, it has become progressively more widespread. Recently, its percutaneous version has become feasible, and has raised interest thanks to the positive results of the Mitraclip(®) device. Edge-to-edge features and evolution have stimulated debate and multidisciplinary research by both clinicians and engineers. After providing an overview of representative studies in the field, here we propose a novel computational approach to the most recent percutaneous evolution of the edge-to-edge technique. Image-based structural finite element models of three mitral valves affected by posterior prolapse were derived from cine-cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. The models accounted for the patient-specific 3D geometry of the valve, including leaflet compound curvature pattern, patient-specific motion of annulus and papillary muscles, and hyperelastic and anisotropic mechanical properties of tissues. The biomechanics of the three valves throughout the entire cardiac cycle was simulated before and after Mitraclip(®) implantation, assessing the biomechanical impact of the procedure. For all three simulated MVs, Mitraclip(®) implantation significantly improved systolic leaflets coaptation, without inducing major alterations in systolic peak stresses. Diastolic orifice area was decreased, by up to 58.9%, and leaflets diastolic stresses became comparable, although lower, to systolic ones. Despite established knowledge on the edge-to-edge surgical repair, latest technological advances make its percutanoues implementation a challenging field of research. The modeling approach herein proposed may be expanded to analyze clinical scenarios that

  14. Anti-Ro/SSA antibodies are associated with severe mitral valve regurgitation in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Higuera-Ortiz, Violeta; Mora-Arias, Tania; Castillo-Martinez, Diana; Amezcua-Guerra, Luis M

    2017-05-01

    To assess whether anti-Ro/SSA antibodies are associated with cardiac valve disease in lupus. A single-center, medical chart review was performed. Lupus patients were divided according to its anti-Ro/SSA status and subgroups were compared for valvular abnormalities and other characteristics. Dependence of anti-Ro/SSA reactivity to anti-Ro52/TRIM21 antibodies was also evaluated. Eighty-nine lupus patients were analyzed. The most common valvular abnormalities were tricuspid (60%), mitral (41%) and pulmonary (14%) regurgitation. Thirty-six patients were positive and 53 negative for anti-Ro/SSA antibodies. In patients positive to anti-Ro/SSA, a difference was noted for anti-dsDNA (67 versus 45%; p = 0.04) and anti-La/SSB (19 versus 2%; p = 0.004) antibodies. An association between anti-Ro/SSA antibodies and severe mitral regurgitation was observed; indeed, 4/15 patients with anti-Ro/SSA and mitral regurgitation had severe forms of valvulopathy as compared to only 1/22 patients with mitral regurgitation but negative to such antibody (27 versus 5%; p = 0.02). Anti-Ro/SSA antibodies significantly elevated the risk of severe mitral regurgitation (OR = 5). Anti-Ro52/TRIM21 levels (103 ± 29 versus 42 ± 43 U/mL; p = 0.03) and anti-Ro52/TRIM21: anti-Ro/SSA ratios (0.88 ± 0.02 versus 0.35 ± 0.37; p = 0.03) were higher in patients with mitral valve regurgitation than in those with no valvulopathy. Anti-Ro/SSA antibodies, mainly against Ro52/TRIM21 antigens, may be pathologically involved in lupus-associated mitral valve regurgitation.

  15. Mitochondrial apoptotic pathway activation in the atria of heart failure patients due to mitral and tricuspid regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jen-Ping; Chen, Mien-Cheng; Liu, Wen-Hao; Lin, Yu-Sheng; Huang, Yao-Kuang; Pan, Kuo-Li; Ho, Wan-Chun; Fang, Chih-Yuan; Chen, Chien-Jen; Chen, Huang-Chung

    2015-08-01

    Apoptosis occurs in atrial cardiomyocytes in mitral and tricuspid valve disease. The purpose of this study was to examine the respective roles of the mitochondrial and tumor necrosis factor-α receptor associated death domain (TRADD)-mediated death receptor pathways for apoptosis in the atrial cardiomyocytes of heart failure patients due to severe mitral and moderate-to-severe tricuspid regurgitation. This study comprised eighteen patients (7 patients with persistent atrial fibrillation and 11 in sinus rhythm). Atrial appendage tissues were obtained during surgery. Three purchased normal human left atrial tissues served as normal controls. Moderately-to-severely myolytic cardiomyocytes comprised 59.7±22.1% of the cardiomyocytes in the right atria and 52.4±12.9% of the cardiomyocytes in the left atria of mitral and tricuspid regurgitation patients with atrial fibrillation group and comprised 58.4±24.8% of the cardiomyocytes in the right atria of mitral and tricuspid regurgitation patients with sinus rhythm. In contrast, no myolysis was observed in the normal human adult left atrial tissue samples. Immunohistochemical analysis showed expression of cleaved caspase-9, an effector of the mitochondrial pathways, in the majority of right atrial cardiomyocytes (87.3±10.0%) of mitral and tricuspid regurgitation patients with sinus rhythm, and right atrial cardiomyocytes (90.6±31.4%) and left atrial cardiomyocytes (70.7±22.0%) of mitral and tricuspid regurgitation patients with atrial fibrillation. In contrast, only 5.7% of cardiomyocytes of the normal left atrial tissues showed strongly positive expression of cleaved caspase-9. Of note, none of the atrial cardiomyocytes in right atrial tissue in sinus rhythm and in the fibrillating right and left atria of mitral and tricuspid regurgitation patients, and in the normal human adult left atrial tissue samples showed cleaved caspase-8 expression, which is a downstream effector of TRADD of the death receptor pathway

  16. Surgical revascularization is associated with maximal survival in patients with ischemic mitral regurgitation: a 20-year experience.

    PubMed

    Castleberry, Anthony W; Williams, Judson B; Daneshmand, Mani A; Honeycutt, Emily; Shaw, Linda K; Samad, Zainab; Lopes, Renato D; Alexander, John H; Mathew, Joseph P; Velazquez, Eric J; Milano, Carmelo A; Smith, Peter K

    2014-06-17

    The optimal treatment for ischemic mitral regurgitation remains actively debated. Our objective was to evaluate the relationship between ischemic mitral regurgitation treatment strategy and survival. We retrospectively reviewed patients at our institution diagnosed with significant coronary artery disease and moderate or severe ischemic mitral regurgitation from 1990 to 2009, categorized by medical treatment alone, percutaneous coronary intervention, coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), or CABG plus mitral valve repair or replacement. Kaplan-Meier methods and multivariable Cox proportional hazards analyses were performed to assess the relationship between treatment strategy and survival, with the use of propensity scores to account for nonrandom treatment assignment. A total of 4989 patients were included: medical treatment alone=36%, percutaneous coronary intervention=26%, CABG=33%, and CABG plus mitral valve repair or replacement=5%. Median follow-up was 5.37 years. Compared with medical treatment alone, significantly lower mortality was observed in patients treated with percutaneous coronary intervention (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.83; 95% confidence interval, 0.76-0.92; P=0.0002), CABG (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.56; 95% confidence interval, 0.51-0.62; P<0.0001), and CABG plus mitral valve repair or replacement (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.69; 95% confidence interval, 0.57-0.82; P<0.0001). There was no significant difference in these results based on mitral regurgitation severity. Patients with significant coronary artery disease and moderate or severe ischemic mitral regurgitation undergoing CABG alone demonstrated the lowest risk of death. CABG with or without mitral valve surgery was associated with lower mortality than either percutaneous coronary intervention or medical treatment alone. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Design, Rationale, and Initiation of the Surgical Interventions for Moderate Ischemic Mitral Regurgitation Trial: A Report from the Cardiothoracic Surgical Trials Network

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Peter K.; Michler, Robert E.; Woo, Y. Joseph; Alexander, John H.; Puskas, John D.; D’Alessandro, David A.; Hahn, Rebecca T.; Williams, Judson B.; Dent, John M.; Ferguson, T. Bruce; Moquete, Ellen; Pagé, Pierre; Jeffries, Neal O.; O’Gara, Patrick T.; Ascheim, Deborah D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients with moderate ischemic mitral regurgitation have demonstrably poorer outcome compared to coronary artery disease patients without mitral regurgitation. The optimal treatment of this condition has become increasingly controversial and a randomized trial evaluating current practices is warranted. Methods and Results We describe the design and initial execution of the Cardiothoracic Surgical Trials Network moderate ischemic mitral regurgitation trial. This is an ongoing prospective, multi-center, randomized, controlled clinical trial designed to test the safety and efficacy of mitral repair in addition to coronary artery bypass grafting in the treatment of moderate ischemic mitral regurgitation. Conclusion The results of the Cardiothoracic Surgical Trials Network ischemic mitral regurgitation trials will provide long-awaited information on controversial therapies for a morbid disease process. PMID:21788032

  18. Mitral regurgitation as a phenotypic manifestation of nonphotosensitive trichothiodystrophy due to a splice variant in MPLKIP.

    PubMed

    Shah, Khadim; Ali, Raja Hussain; Ansar, Muhammad; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Chishti, Muhammad Salman; Abbe, Izoduwa; Li, Biao; Smith, Joshua D; Nickerson, Deborah A; Shendure, Jay; Coucke, Paul J; Steyaert, Wouter; Bamshad, Michael J; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Leal, Suzanne M; Ahmad, Wasim

    2016-02-16

    Nonphotosensitive trichothiodystrophy (TTDN) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder of neuroectodermal origin. The condition is marked by hair abnormalities, intellectual impairment, nail dystrophies and susceptibility to infections but with no UV sensitivity. We identified three consanguineous Pakistani families with varied TTDN features and used homozygosity mapping, linkage analysis, and Sanger and exome sequencing in order to identify pathogenic variants. Haplotype analysis was performed and haplotype age estimated. A splicing assay was used to validate the effect of the MPLKIP splice variant on expression. Affected individuals from all families exhibit several TTDN features along with a heart-specific feature, i.e. mitral regurgitation. Exome sequencing in the probands from families ED168 and ED241 identified a homozygous splice mutation c.339 + 1G > A within MPLKIP. The same splice variant co-segregates with TTDN in a third family ED210. The MPLKIP splice variant was not found in public databases, e.g. the Exome Aggregation Consortium, and in unrelated Pakistani controls. Functional analysis of the splice variant confirmed intron retention, which leads to protein truncation and loss of a phosphorylation site. Haplotype analysis identified a 585.1-kb haplotype which includes the MPLKIP variant, supporting the existence of a founder haplotype that is estimated to be 25,900 years old. This study extends the allelic and phenotypic spectra of MPLKIP-related TTDN, to include a splice variant that causes cardiomyopathy as part of the TTDN phenotype.

  19. Quantification of mitral regurgitation on cardiac computed tomography: comparison with qualitative and quantitative echocardiographic parameters.

    PubMed

    Arnous, Samer; Killeen, Ronan P; Martos, Ramon; Quinn, Martin; McDonald, Kenneth; Dodd, Jonathan Dermot

    2011-01-01

    To assess whether cardiac computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) can quantify the severity of chronic mitral regurgitation (MR) compared to qualitative and quantitative echocardiographic parameters. Cardiac computed tomographic angiography was performed in 23 patients (mean ± SD age, 63 ± 16 years; range, 24-86 years) with MR and 20 patients without MR (controls) as determined by transthoracic echocardiography. Multiphasic reconstructions (20 data sets reconstructed at 5% increments of the electrocardiographic gated R-R interval) were used to analyze the mitral valve. Using CCTA planimetry, 2 readers measured the regurgitant mitral orifice area (CCTA ROA) during systole. A qualitative echocardiographic assessment of severity of MR was made by visual assessment of the length of the regurgitant jet. Quantitative echocardiographic measurements included the vena contracta, proximal isovelocity surface area, regurgitant volume, and estimated regurgitant orifice (ERO). Comparisons were performed using the independent t test, and correlations were assessed using the Spearman rank test. All controls and the patients with MR were correctly identified by CCTA. For patients with mild, moderate, or severe MR, mean ± SD EROs were 0.16 ± 0.03, 0.31 ± 0.08, and 0.52 ± 0.03 cm² (P < 0.0001) compared with mean ± SD CCTA ROAs 0.09 ± 0.05, 0.30 ± 0.04, and 0.97 ± 0.26 cm² (P < 0.0001), respectively. When echocardiographic measurements were graded qualitatively as mild, moderate, or severe, strong correlations were seen with CCTA ROA (R = 0.89; P < 0.001). When echocardiographic measurements were graded quantitatively, the vena contracta and the ERO showed modest correlations with CCTA ROA (0.48 and 0.50; P < 0.05 for both). Neither the proximal isovelocity surface area nor the regurgitant volume demonstrated significant correlations with CCTA ROA. Single-source 64-slice CCTA provides a strong agreement with qualitative echocardiographic parameters but only a moderate

  20. Percutaneous closure of perivalvular mitral regurgitation: how should the interventionalists and the echocardiographers communicate?

    PubMed

    Quader, Nishath; Davidson, Charles J; Rigolin, Vera H

    2015-05-01

    There is considerable interest in percutaneous closure of perivalvular leaks without the need for repeat surgery. Successful percutaneous closure of these defects requires extensive planning and coordination before and during the procedure. However, there is no standardized description of valve pathology in the presence of a prosthetic valve, which adds to the challenge of communication. Transesophageal echocardiography is ideally suited to guide percutaneous mitral valve procedures, because of the proximity of the mitral valve to the esophagus. Successful percutaneous procedures of the mitral valve require teamwork. Both the interventionalist and the echocardiographer must have great familiarity with mitral valve anatomy, structure, and function, and they must know how to effectively communicate with each other. The authors review the relevant periprocedural mapping of the mitral valve and provide guidance to echocardiographers and interventionalists on effective ways to communicate during percutaneous perivalvular mitral leak closures to accomplish a successful outcome. Copyright © 2015 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Identification of Patients Affected by Mitral Valve Prolapse with Severe Regurgitation: A Multivariable Regression Model

    PubMed Central

    Songia, Paola; Chiesa, Mattia; Alamanni, Francesco; Tremoli, Elena

    2017-01-01

    Background. Mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is the most common cause of severe mitral regurgitation. Besides echocardiography, up to now there are no reliable biomarkers available for the identification of this pathology. We aim to generate a predictive model, based on circulating biomarkers, able to identify MVP patients with the highest accuracy. Methods. We analysed 43 patients who underwent mitral valve repair due to MVP and compared to 29 matched controls. We assessed the oxidative stress status measuring the oxidized and the reduced form of glutathione by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. Osteoprotegerin (OPG) plasma levels were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The combination of these biochemical variables was used to implement several logistic regression models. Results. Oxidative stress levels and OPG concentrations were significantly higher in patients compared to control subjects (0.116 ± 0.007 versus 0.053 ± 0.013 and 1748 ± 100.2 versus 1109 ± 45.3 pg/mL, respectively; p < 0.0001). The best regression model was able to correctly classify 62 samples out of 72 with accuracy in terms of area under the curve of 0.92. Conclusions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to show a strong association between OPG and oxidative stress status in patients affected by MVP with severe regurgitation. PMID:28261377

  2. Repair or observe moderate ischemic mitral regurgitation during coronary artery bypass grafting? Prospective randomized multicenter data

    PubMed Central

    Gulack, Brian C.; Englum, Brian R.; Castleberry, Anthony W.; Daneshmand, Mani A.; Perrault, Louis P.

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic mitral regurgitation (MR) is a common occurrence following myocardial infarction and its presence is associated with poor outcomes. The optimal treatment of ischemic MR is a matter of debate, especially for patients with moderate MR severity. Some authors advocate for isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) for patients with moderate MR, maintaining that reverse ventricular remodeling will reduce MR grade and its associated mortality risk, while others argue that a concomitant mitral valve repair (MVR) or replacement is superior. The Cardiothoracic Surgical Trials Network (CTSN) recently published the 1-year results of the Surgical Treatment of Moderate Ischemic Mitral Regurgitation study, a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial investigating the impact of MVR in addition to CABG compared to CABG alone in the treatment of moderate ischemic MR. Here, we have reviewed previous observational and prospective studies investigating moderate ischemic MR treatment as well as the results of the current CTSN randomized trial. Furthermore, we have summarized the current state of the available evidence and preview potential new information that will become available with planned subgroup analyses and further follow-up of enrolled patients in the recently completed CTSN trial. PMID:26309829

  3. Functional mitral regurgitation after a first non-ST segment elevation acute coronary syndrome: very-long-term follow-up, prognosis and contribution to left ventricular enlargement and atrial fibrillation development.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Gil, Iván J; Estrada, Irene; Pérez de Isla, Leopoldo; Feltes, Gisela; De Agustín, José Alberto; Vivas, David; Viana-Tejedor, Ana; Escaned, Javier; Alfonso, Fernando; Jiménez-Quevedo, Pilar; García-Fernández, Miguel A; Macaya, Carlos; Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio

    2013-10-01

    To assess the relationship between functional mitral regurgitation (MR) after a non-ST segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTSEACS) and long-term prognosis, ventricular remodelling and further development of atrial fibrillation (AF), since functional MR is common after myocardial infarction. Prospective cohort study conducted in a tertiary referral centre. We prospectively studied 237 patients consecutively discharged in New York Heart Association class I-II (74% men; mean age 66.1 years) after a first NSTSEACS. All underwent an ECG the first week after admission and were echocardiographically and clinically followed-up (median 6.95 years). MR was detected in 95 cases (40.1%) and became an independent risk factor for the development of heart failure (HF) and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) (per MR degree, HRHF 1.71, 95% CI 1.138 to 2.588, p=0.01; HRMACE 1.49, 95% CI 1.158 to 1.921, p=0.002). Left ventricular diastolic (grade I 12.7±40.7; grade II 26.8±12.4; grade III 46.3±50.9 mL, p=0.01) and systolic (grade I 10.4±37.3; grade II 10.12±12.7; grade III 36.8±46.0 mL, p=0.02) mean volumes were higher after follow-up in patients with MR, in proportion to the initial degree of MR. In the rhythm analysis (126 patients; previously excluding those with any history of AF) during follow-up, 11.4% of patients with degree I MR, 14.3% with degree II MR and 75% with degree III MR developed AF, while only 5.1% of those with degree 0 developed AF, p<0.001. MR is common after an NSTSEACS. The presence and greater degree of MR confers a worse long-term prognosis after a first NSTSEACS. This can in part be explained by increased negative ventricular remodelling and increased occurrence of AF.

  4. Challenges in Echocardiographic Assessment of Mitral Regurgitation in Children After Repair of Atrioventricular Septal Defect

    PubMed Central

    Lacro, Ronald V.; Sleeper, Lynn A.; Minich, L. LuAnn; Colan, Steven D.; McCrindle, Brian; Covitz, Wesley; Golding, Fraser; Hlavacek, Anthony M.; Levine, Jami C.; Cohen, Meryl S.

    2011-01-01

    The validity and reproducibility of echocardiographic methods used to quantify mitral regurgitation (MR) in children with congenital heart disease are unknown. We evaluated the usefulness of methods used to quantify MR in children enrolled in a multicenter trial of enalapril 6 months after surgical repair of an atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD). MR severity in this trial was assessed using body surface area (BSA)-adjusted vena contracta lateral (i-VCWlat) and anterior-posterior (i-VCWap) dimensions and cross-sectional area (i-VCA), regurgitant volume/BSA, regurgitant fraction, and qualitative MR grade. For each method, association with left ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDVz) and end-diastolic dimension (LVEDDz) z-scores and interobserver agreement were assessed. In 149 children (median age 1 year), i-VCWlat, i-VCWap, and i-VCA were best associated with LVEDVz (r2 = 0.54, r2 = 0.24, and r2 = 0.46, respectively; p < 0.001 for all) and showed the highest interobserver agreement (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.62, 0.73, and 0.68, respectively). Qualitative MR grade was also associated with LVEDVz (r2 = 0.31, p < 0.001) and showed modest interobserver agreement (kappa 0.56). Regurgitant volume/BSA and regurgitant fraction were associated with LVEDVz (r2 = 0.45 and r2 = 0.45, p < 0.001 for both) but showed poor interobserver agreement [ICC = 0.28 (n = 91) and ICC = 0.17 (n = 76), respectively], and their values were negative in 75% of subjects. In conclusion, echocardiographic assessment of MR severity after AVSD remains challenging. Among the quantitative methods used in this trial, i-VCW and i-VCA performed the best but offered little advantage compared with qualitative MR grade. The utility of regurgitant volume and fraction was severely limited by poor interobserver agreement and frequently negative values. PMID:21909774

  5. Challenges in echocardiographic assessment of mitral regurgitation in children after repair of atrioventricular septal defect.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Ashwin; Lacro, Ronald V; Sleeper, Lynn A; Minich, L Luann; Colan, Steven D; McCrindle, Brian; Covitz, Wesley; Golding, Fraser; Hlavacek, Anthony M; Levine, Jami C; Cohen, Meryl S

    2012-02-01

    The validity and reproducibility of echocardiographic methods used to quantify mitral regurgitation (MR) in children with congenital heart disease are unknown. We evaluated the usefulness of methods used to quantify MR in children enrolled in a multicenter trial of enalapril 6 months after surgical repair of an atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD). MR severity in this trial was assessed using body surface area (BSA)-adjusted vena contracta lateral (i-VCW(lat)) and anterior-posterior (i-VCW(ap)) dimensions and cross-sectional area (i-VCA), regurgitant volume/BSA, regurgitant fraction, and qualitative MR grade. For each method, association with left ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDVz) and end-diastolic dimension (LVEDDz) z-scores and interobserver agreement were assessed. In 149 children (median age 1 year), i-VCW(lat), i-VCW(ap), and i-VCA were best associated with LVEDVz (r (2) = 0.54, r (2) = 0.24, and r (2) = 0.46, respectively; p < 0.001 for all) and showed the highest interobserver agreement (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.62, 0.73, and 0.68, respectively). Qualitative MR grade was also associated with LVEDVz (r (2) = 0.31, p < 0.001) and showed modest interobserver agreement (kappa 0.56). Regurgitant volume/BSA and regurgitant fraction were associated with LVEDVz (r (2) = 0.45 and r (2) = 0.45, p < 0.001 for both) but showed poor interobserver agreement [ICC = 0.28 (n = 91) and ICC = 0.17 (n = 76), respectively], and their values were negative in 75% of subjects. In conclusion, echocardiographic assessment of MR severity after AVSD remains challenging. Among the quantitative methods used in this trial, i-VCW and i-VCA performed the best but offered little advantage compared with qualitative MR grade. The utility of regurgitant volume and fraction was severely limited by poor interobserver agreement and frequently negative values.

  6. Midterm outcomes of chordal cutting in combination with downsized ring annuloplasty for ischemic mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Murashita, Takashi; Okada, Yukikatsu; Kanemitsu, Hideo; Fukunaga, Naoto; Konishi, Yasunobu; Nakamura, Ken; Koyama, Tadaaki

    2014-01-01

    We describe midterm outcomes after division of secondary chords (chordal cutting) combined with downsized ring annuloplasty for ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR). We compared the clinical outcomes in patients who underwent chordal cutting with downsized ring annuloplasty (CC-group, n = 15) and those who underwent conventional ring annuloplasty only (Conventional-group, n = 35) for IMR. Follow-up was complete in all patients. The median follow-up time was 4.1 years. Thirty-day mortality was 0% in CC-group and 20% in Conventional-group. The overall survival rate at 5-year was 80.8% ± 12.6% in CC-group and 61.7% ± 8.4% in Conventional-group (Log-rank, p = 0.145). The freedom rate from valve-related events at 5 year was 84.6% ± 10.0% in CC-group and 65.3% ± 10.1% in Conventional-group (Log-rank, p = 0.213). Recurrence of severe mitral regurgitation was revealed in 3 patients of CC-group. Preoperative tenting height was the significant predictor of mitral regurgitation recurrence. In CC-group, the mean left ventricular ejection fraction was 38.0% ± 14.0%, which was similar to the preoperative value of 40.0% ± 13.2% (p = 0.349). Chordal cutting with downsized ring annuloplasty for IMR is a simple method and provides satisfactory early outcomes. However, it carries with high recurrence of MR especially for patients with high tenting height.

  7. Mitral regurgitation in heart failure: insights from CPET combined with exercise echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Bandera, Francesco; Generati, Greta; Pellegrino, Marta; Garatti, Andrea; Labate, Valentina; Alfonzetti, Eleonora; Gaeta, Maddalena; Castelvecchio, Serenella; Menicanti, Lorenzo; Guazzi, Marco

    2017-03-01

    In heart failure patients with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), exercise-induced functional mitral regurgitation (MR) may affect functional capacity and outcome. We sought to study functional and cardiac phenotypes of HFrEF patients according to the MR degree. We performed rest and exercise echocardiography (Ex-Echo), simultaneously combined with cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET), in 102 HFrEF patients, identifying 3 groups: non-severe (ERO <20 mm2) MR (group A), exercise-induced severe (ERO ≥20 mm2) MR (group B), and rest severe MR (group C). Patients were tracked for the composite end point of death and heart failure hospitalization. Group B (ERO: rest= 14 ± 5 mm2, Ex= 28 ± 6 mm2; P = < 0.001) had a functional impairment (workload = 56 ± 21 vs. 50 ± 17 watts, P = 0.42; peak VO2 = 11.8 ± 3.2 vs. 11.5 ± 3.0 mL/Kg/min, P = 0.70) similar to Group C (ERO: rest = 29 ± 7 mm2, Ex = 42 ± 7 mm2, P = < 0.001), associated with comparable advanced left ventricle remodelling (end diastolic indexed volume = 107 ± 34 vs. 115 ± 30 mL/m2, P = 0.27), characterized by exercise-induced pulmonary hypertension (PH) (Ex systolic pulmonary pressures = 63 ± 16 mmHg). Group C showed the worse cardiac phenotype (right ventricle dilatation, dysfunction, and rest PH) with severe ventilatory impairment (VE/VCO2 = 41.2 ± 11) compared with Groups A and B. Moreover, Group C had the higher rate of death and HF hospitalization. In HFrEF patients, severe dynamic MR produces functional limitation similar to rest severe MR, characterized by dynamic PH. Rest severe MR reflects the most advanced bi-ventricular remodelling associated with rest PH, the most unfavourable ventilatory profile, and the worst mid-term outcome.

  8. Coexistence of dynamic mitral regurgitation and dynamic left ventricular dyssynchrony in a patient with repeated episodes of acute pulmonary edema: improvement with cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Maria Salomé; Andrade, Maria João; Reis, Carla; Brito, João; Trabulo, Marisa; Mendes, Miguel

    2013-12-01

    A 69-year-old woman with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and chronic heart failure experienced repeated hospital admissions for acute pulmonary edema with no recognizable precipitating factor. Worsening mitral regurgitation was triggered by exercise echocardiography and significant intraventricular dyssynchrony was elicited by low-dose dobutamine stress echocardiography. After cardiac resynchronization therapy she remained free of hospitalizations for 12 months. This case highlights the dynamic nature of both functional mitral regurgitation and left ventricular dyssynchrony and illustrates how in some patients stress echocardiography can help to clarify clinical scenarios and help with the challenging task of selecting patients who will benefit from cardiac resynchronization therapy. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  9. Mitral valve surgery for mitral regurgitation caused by Libman-Sacks endocarditis: a report of four cases and a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bouma, Wobbe; Klinkenberg, Theo J; van der Horst, Iwan C C; Wijdh-den Hamer, Inez J; Erasmus, Michiel E; Bijl, Marc; Suurmeijer, Albert J H; Zijlstra, Felix; Mariani, Massimo A

    2010-03-23

    Libman-Sacks endocarditis of the mitral valve was first described by Libman and Sacks in 1924. Currently, the sterile verrucous vegetative lesions seen in Libman-Sacks endocarditis are regarded as a cardiac manifestation of both systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Although typically mild and asymptomatic, complications of Libman-Sacks endocarditis may include superimposed bacterial endocarditis, thromboembolic events, and severe valvular regurgitation and/or stenosis requiring surgery. In this study we report two cases of mitral valve repair and two cases of mitral valve replacement for mitral regurgitation (MR) caused by Libman-Sacks endocarditis. In addition, we provide a systematic review of the English literature on mitral valve surgery for MR caused by Libman-Sacks endocarditis. This report shows that mitral valve repair is feasible and effective in young patients with relatively stable SLE and/or APS and only localized mitral valve abnormalities caused by Libman-Sacks endocarditis. Both clinical and echocardiographic follow-up after repair show excellent mid- and long-term results.

  10. Paradoxical Heart Failure Precipitated by Profound Dehydration: Intraventricular Dynamic Obstruction and Significant Mitral Regurgitation in a Volume-Depleted Heart

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dongmin; Mun, Jeong-Beom; Kim, Eun Young

    2013-01-01

    Occurrence of dynamic left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction is not infrequent in critically ill patients, and it is associated with potential danger. Here, we report a case of transient heart failure with hemodynamic deterioration paradoxically induced by extreme dehydration. This article describes clinical features of the patient and echocardiographic findings of dynamic LVOT obstruction and significant mitral regurgitation caused by systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve in a volume-depleted heart. PMID:23709446

  11. Untreated Mitral Regurgitation Does Not Affect Survival of Elderly Patients Undergoing TAVI.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Shuli; Fink, Daniel; Butnaru, Adi; Balkin, Jonathan; Almagor, Yaron; Tauber, Rachel; Merin, Ofer

    2016-01-01

    The study aim was to examine the impact of concomitant significant mitral regurgitation (MR) in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). TAVI has become an acceptable mode of treatment for high-surgical risk patients with aortic stenosis (AS) requiring valve replacement. A significant number of patients have concomitant MR which cannot be addressed by TAVI alone, and therefore may not be considered candidates for this procedure. A comparison was conducted of results obtained from patients undergoing TAVI with or without MR. Between 2008 and 2013, a total of 164 patients (mean age 81 ± 8 years) underwent TAVI at the authors' institution. Of these patients, 87 (53%) had MR of moderate or greater degree. The groups were similar with respect to age, gender, presence of congestive heart failure, left ventricular function and co-morbid conditions. The logistic EuroSCORE was higher in the MR group (p = 0.02). Procedural (30-day) mortality was 12% (n = 19) and similar between groups. Kaplan-Meier estimates showed the overall survival at three years to be 68% and 76% for the MR and non-MR groups, respectively (p = 0.6). By Cox regression, age (p = 0.007) and peripheral vascular disease (p = 0.03) were the only predictors of late survival. Regression of MR was seen in patients with functional MR. Neither the presence of MR nor residual MR emerged as predictors of late mortality. In elderly patients undergoing TAVI the presence of MR does not impact survival. TAVI should not be withheld from this group of patients because of concomitant MR.

  12. Quantification of mitral regurgitation by automated cardiac output measurement: experimental and clinical validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, J. P.; Yang, X. S.; Qin, J. X.; Greenberg, N. L.; Zhou, J.; Vazquez, C. J.; Griffin, B. P.; Stewart, W. J.; Thomas, J. D.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop and validate an automated noninvasive method to quantify mitral regurgitation. BACKGROUND: Automated cardiac output measurement (ACM), which integrates digital color Doppler velocities in space and in time, has been validated for the left ventricular (LV) outflow tract but has not been tested for the LV inflow tract or to assess mitral regurgitation (MR). METHODS: First, to validate ACM against a gold standard (ultrasonic flow meter), 8 dogs were studied at 40 different stages of cardiac output (CO). Second, to compare ACM to the LV outflow (ACMa) and inflow (ACMm) tracts, 50 normal volunteers without MR or aortic regurgitation (44+/-5 years, 31 male) were studied. Third, to compare ACM with the standard pulsed Doppler-two-dimensional echocardiographic (PD-2D) method for quantification of MR, 51 patients (61+/-14 years, 30 male) with MR were studied. RESULTS: In the canine studies, CO by ACM (1.32+/-0.3 liter/min, y) and flow meter (1.35+/-0.3 liter/min, x) showed good correlation (r=0.95, y=0.89x+0.11) and agreement (deltaCO(y-x)=0.03+/-0.08 [mean+/-SD] liter/min). In the normal subjects, CO measured by ACMm agreed with CO by ACMa (r=0.90, p < 0.0001, deltaCO=-0.09+/-0.42 liter/min), PD (r=0.87, p < 0.0001, deltaCO=0.12+/-0.49 liter/min) and 2D (r=0.84, p < 0.0001, deltaCO=-0.16+/-0.48 liter/min). In the patients, mitral regurgitant volume (MRV) by ACMm-ACMa agreed with PD-2D (r= 0.88, y=0.88x+6.6, p < 0.0001, deltaMRV=2.68+/-9.7 ml). CONCLUSIONS: We determined that ACM is a feasible new method for quantifying LV outflow and inflow volume to measure MRV and that ACM automatically performs calculations that are equivalent to more time-consuming Doppler and 2D measurements. Additionally, ACM should improve MR quantification in routine clinical practice.

  13. Quantification of mitral regurgitation by automated cardiac output measurement: experimental and clinical validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, J. P.; Yang, X. S.; Qin, J. X.; Greenberg, N. L.; Zhou, J.; Vazquez, C. J.; Griffin, B. P.; Stewart, W. J.; Thomas, J. D.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop and validate an automated noninvasive method to quantify mitral regurgitation. BACKGROUND: Automated cardiac output measurement (ACM), which integrates digital color Doppler velocities in space and in time, has been validated for the left ventricular (LV) outflow tract but has not been tested for the LV inflow tract or to assess mitral regurgitation (MR). METHODS: First, to validate ACM against a gold standard (ultrasonic flow meter), 8 dogs were studied at 40 different stages of cardiac output (CO). Second, to compare ACM to the LV outflow (ACMa) and inflow (ACMm) tracts, 50 normal volunteers without MR or aortic regurgitation (44+/-5 years, 31 male) were studied. Third, to compare ACM with the standard pulsed Doppler-two-dimensional echocardiographic (PD-2D) method for quantification of MR, 51 patients (61+/-14 years, 30 male) with MR were studied. RESULTS: In the canine studies, CO by ACM (1.32+/-0.3 liter/min, y) and flow meter (1.35+/-0.3 liter/min, x) showed good correlation (r=0.95, y=0.89x+0.11) and agreement (deltaCO(y-x)=0.03+/-0.08 [mean+/-SD] liter/min). In the normal subjects, CO measured by ACMm agreed with CO by ACMa (r=0.90, p < 0.0001, deltaCO=-0.09+/-0.42 liter/min), PD (r=0.87, p < 0.0001, deltaCO=0.12+/-0.49 liter/min) and 2D (r=0.84, p < 0.0001, deltaCO=-0.16+/-0.48 liter/min). In the patients, mitral regurgitant volume (MRV) by ACMm-ACMa agreed with PD-2D (r= 0.88, y=0.88x+6.6, p < 0.0001, deltaMRV=2.68+/-9.7 ml). CONCLUSIONS: We determined that ACM is a feasible new method for quantifying LV outflow and inflow volume to measure MRV and that ACM automatically performs calculations that are equivalent to more time-consuming Doppler and 2D measurements. Additionally, ACM should improve MR quantification in routine clinical practice.

  14. Heritability of Mitral Regurgitation: Observations From the Framingham Heart Study and Swedish Population.

    PubMed

    Delling, Francesca N; Li, Xinjun; Li, Shuo; Yang, Qiong; Xanthakis, Vanessa; Martinsson, Andreas; Andell, Pontus; Lehman, Birgitta T; Osypiuk, Ewa W; Stantchev, Plamen; Zöller, Bengt; Benjamin, Emelia J; Sundquist, Kristina; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Smith, J Gustav

    2017-10-01

    Familial aggregation has been described for primary mitral regurgitation (MR) caused by mitral valve prolapse. We hypothesized that heritability of MR exists across different MR subtypes including nonprimary MR. Study participants were FHS (Framingham Heart Study) Generation 3 (Gen 3) and Gen 2 cohort participants and all adult Swedish siblings born after 1932 identified in 1997 and followed through 2010. MR was defined as ≥ mild regurgitation on color Doppler in FHS and from International Classification of Diseases codes in Sweden. We estimated the association of sibling MR with MR in Gen 2/Gen 3/Swedish siblings. We also estimated heritability of MR in 539 FHS pedigrees (7580 individuals). Among 5132 FHS Gen 2/Gen 3 participants with sibling information, 1062 had MR. Of siblings with sibling MR, 28% (500/1797) had MR compared with 17% (562/3335) without sibling MR (multivariable-adjusted odds ratio, 1.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.43; P=0.04). When we combined parental and sibling data in FHS pedigrees, heritability of MR was estimated at 0.15 (95% CI, 0.07-0.23), 0.12 (95% CI, 0.04-0.20) excluding mitral valve prolapse, and 0.44 (95% CI, 0.15-0.73) for ≥ moderate MR only (all P<0.05). In Sweden, sibling MR was associated with a hazard ratio of 3.57 (95% CI, 2.21-5.76; P<0.001) for development of MR. Familial clustering of MR exists in the community, supporting a genetic susceptibility common to primary and nonprimary MR. Further studies are needed to elucidate the common regulatory pathways that may lead to MR irrespective of its cause. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Immediate and 12-Month Outcomes of Ischemic Versus Nonischemic Functional Mitral Regurgitation in Patients Treated With MitraClip (from the 2011 to 2012 Pilot Sentinel Registry of Percutaneous Edge-To-Edge Mitral Valve Repair of the European Society of Cardiology).

    PubMed

    Pighi, Michele; Estevez-Loureiro, Rodrigo; Maisano, Francesco; Ussia, Gian P; Dall'Ara, Gianni; Franzen, Olaf; Laroche, Cécile; Settergren, Magnus; Winter, Reidar; Nickenig, Georg; Gilard, Martine; Di Mario, Carlo

    2017-02-15

    In literature, there are limited data comparing ischemic mitral regurgitation (I-MR) versus nonischemic MR regarding outcomes after percutaneous "edge-to-edge" repair. We aimed to describe the early and 12-month results after MitraClip device implantation regarding the 2 etiologies. From January 2011 to December 2012, the Transcatheter Valve Treatment Sentinel Pilot Registry included 452 patients with MR who underwent MitraClip procedure in 25 centers across Europe. The prevalent etiology was I-MR (235 patients, 52.0%). I-MR group had a significantly higher proportion of men (74.9 vs 59.9%, p <0.001) and surgical risk (logistic EuroSCORE 24.8 ± 18.2 vs 18.8 ± 16.3, p <0.001). Acute procedural success was high (96%) and similar between groups (p = 0.48). Patients with I-MR required a higher, albeit not significant, number of clips to reduce MR (p = 0.08). Inhospital mortality was low (2.0%) without significant differences between etiologies. The estimated 1-year mortality and rehospitalization rates were 15.0% and 25.8%, respectively, without significant differences between groups. Paired echocardiographic data showed a persistent improvement of MR at 1 year in both etiologies. Despite a significant overall reverse atrial remodeling after clip, there were no significant changes in left ventricular volumes. In conclusion, this large independent cohort showed that percutaneous "edge-to-edge" therapy was associated with early- and long-term improvement of MR severity and functional condition both in patients with I-MR and nonischemic MR. There were no significant differences between the 2 etiologies regarding survival and freedom from rehospitalization due to heart failure at the 1-year follow-up.

  16. Mitral annular calcification is not associated with decreased procedural success, durability of repair, or left ventricular remodelling in percutaneous edge-to-edge repair of mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Richard; Tat, Emily; Siegel, Robert J; Arsanjani, Reza; Hussaini, Asma; Makar, Moody; Mizutani, Yukiko; Trento, Alfredo; Kar, Saibal

    2016-10-20

    Mitral annular calcification (MAC) negatively influences outcomes in surgical mitral valve (MV) repair for mitral regurgitation (MR). However, there are no data on whether MAC impacts on outcomes of MitraClip percutaneous MV edge-to-edge repair. This study sought to investigate whether the presence of MAC impacts on the procedural success and durability of percutaneous transcatheter repair of MR using the MitraClip. One hundred and seventy-three patients undergoing MitraClip repair for significant MR were studied. Patients with moderate-or-severe MAC (n=28) were compared to those with no-or-mild MAC. Post-procedural MR severity was not different (p=0.642) and MR reduction to moderate-or-less was equally high in patients with moderate-or-severe MAC (100%) and those without (96.7%), p=1.000. At one year, MR severity was not different (p=0.831), and there was no difference in the repair durability when comparing patients with moderate-or-severe MAC (93.8%) to those without (90.6%), p=1.000. All patients with moderate-or-severe MAC assessed at one year were in NYHA functional Class I-II and had haemodynamic improvements with a decrease in pulmonary artery systolic pressure (-6.5±13.1 mmHg), p=0.021, and end-diastolic left ventricular internal diameter (-3.9±6.5 mm), p=0.034, not different to those achieved by patients without MAC (both p>0.100). Moderate-or-severe MAC scored by echocardiography and confirmed on fluoroscopy was not associated with decreased procedural success or durability of repair. Patients with moderate-or-severe MAC had improvements in clinical symptoms and haemodynamics, as well as decreased left ventricular dimensions.

  17. Measurements of the pulmonary vasculature on thoracic radiographs in healthy dogs compared to dogs with mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Oui, Heejin; Oh, Juyeon; Keh, Seoyeon; Lee, Gahyun; Jeon, Sunghoon; Kim, Hyunwook; Yoon, Junghee; Choi, Jihye

    2015-01-01

    This study reassessed the previously reported radiographic method of comparing pulmonary vessels versus rib diameter for differentiating healthy dogs and dogs with mitral regurgitation. The width of the right cranial pulmonary artery and vein at the fourth rib level, right caudal pulmonary artery and vein at the ninth rib level, and the diameters of the fourth rib and ninth rib were measured in prospectively recruited healthy dogs (n = 40) and retrospectively recruited dogs with mitral regurgitation (n = 58). In healthy dogs, the pulmonary arteries and accompanying veins were similar in size. The cranial lobar vessels were smaller than the fourth rib. However, 67.5% of right caudal pulmonary artery diameters and 65% of vein diameters were larger than the ninth rib in healthy dogs. The right caudal pulmonary vein diameter in dogs with mitral regurgitation, particularly those within moderate and severe grades, was significantly larger than that in healthy dogs (P < 0.001). The comparative method used to detect enlargement of the right caudal pulmonary vein relative to the accompanying pulmonary artery had the highest sensitivity (80.2%) and specificity (82.5%) for predicting mitral regurgitation. A cut-off of 1.22 when applying the ninth rib criterion had better specificity (73%) than the most used value ≤ 1 (89.7% sensitivity and 63.8% specificity), although it has less sensitivity (73%). We recommend using the accompanying pulmonary artery and 1.22 × the diameter of the ninth rib as a radiographic criterion for assessing the size of the right caudal pulmonary vein and differentiating healthy dogs from those with mitral regurgitation. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  18. Contribution of ischemic mitral regurgitation to congestive heart failure after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Grigioni, Francesco; Detaint, Delphine; Avierinos, Jean-François; Scott, Christopher; Tajik, Jamil; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice

    2005-01-18

    The purpose of this study was to define the contribution of ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR) to the occurrence of congestive heart failure (CHF) after myocardial infarction (MI). After MI, CHF is a frequent and serious complication, but its determinants and, particularly, the role of IMR are poorly defined. We analyzed 173 asymptomatic patients with previous Q-wave MI (>16 days) with echocardiographic quantitation of IMR (measuring effective regurgitant orifice [ERO] and regurgitant volume). The 102 patients with IMR were matched to 71 patients without IMR for age (71 +/- 11 years vs. 68 +/- 9 years; p = 0.11), gender (76% vs. 82% males; p = 0.41), and left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) (37 +/- 14% vs. 36 +/- 11%; p = 0.92). Five-year rates of CHF and of CHF or cardiac death (CD) were 36 +/- 5% and 52 +/- 5%, respectively. Independent determinants of CHF were EF, sodium plasma level, and presence and degree of IMR (p < 0.0001). Five-year CHF rates were 18 +/- 5% without mitral regurgitation (MR), 53 +/- 7% with IMR, 46 +/- 9% with ERO 1 to 19 mm(2) and 68 +/- 12% with ERO > or =20 mm(2) (all p < 0.0001). The adjusted relative risk of CHF was 3.65 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.86 to 7.75) for IMR presence and 4.42 (95% CI 1.9 to 10.5) for ERO > or =20 mm(2). The adjusted relative risk of CHF/CD was 2.97 (95% CI 1.77 to 5.16) for IMR presence and 4.4 (95% CI 2.4 to 8.2) for ERO > or =20 mm(2). After MI, incidence of CHF and of CHF/CD are high even in patients with no or minimal symptoms at baseline and are higher in patients with IMR. Congestive heart failure is independently determined by larger ERO of IMR. These data suggest that detecting and quantifying IMR is essential for risk stratification after MI. Value of IMR treatment in improving post-MI outcome should be investigated.

  19. R-R interval variations influence the degree of mitral regurgitation in dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease.

    PubMed

    Reimann, M J; Møller, J E; Häggström, J; Markussen, B; Holen, A E W; Falk, T; Olsen, L H

    2014-03-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) due to myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD) is a frequent finding in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels (CKCSs). Sinus arrhythmia and atrial premature complexes leading to R-R interval variations occur in dogs. The aim of the study was to evaluate whether the duration of the R-R interval immediately influences the degree of MR assessed by echocardiography in dogs. Clinical examination including echocardiography was performed in 103 privately-owned dogs: 16 control Beagles, 70 CKCSs with different degree of MR and 17 dogs of different breeds with clinical signs of congestive heart failure due to MMVD. The severity of MR was evaluated in apical four-chamber view using colour Doppler flow mapping (maximum % of the left atrium area) and colour Doppler M-mode (duration in ms). The influence of the ratio between present and preceding R-R interval on MR severity was evaluated in 10 consecutive R-R intervals using a linear mixed model for repeated measurements. MR severity was increased when a short R-R interval was followed by a long R-R interval in CKCSs with different degrees of MR (P<0.005 when adjusted for multiple testing). The relationship was not significant in control dogs with minimal MR and in dogs with severe MR and clinical signs of heart failure. In conclusion, MR severity increases in long R-R intervals when these follow a short R-R interval in CKCSs with different degrees of MR due to asymptomatic MMVD. Thus, R-R interval variations may affect the echocardiographic grading of MR in CKCSs.

  20. 3D Experimental and Computational Analysis of Eccentric Mitral Regurgitant Jets in a Mock Imaging Heart Chamber.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yifan; Quaini, Annalisa; Čanić, Sunčica; Vukicevic, Marija; Little, Stephen H

    2017-07-10

    Mitral valve regurgitation (MR) is a disorder of the heart in which the mitral valve does not close properly. This causes an abnormal leaking of blood backwards from the left ventricle into the left atrium during the systolic contractions of the left ventricle. Noninvasive assessment of MR using echocardiography is an ongoing challenge. In particular, a major problem are eccentric or Coanda regurgitant jets which hug the walls of the left atrium and appear smaller in the color Doppler image of regurgitant flow. This manuscript presents a comprehensive investigation of Coanda regurgitant jets and the associated intracardiac flows by using a combination of experimental and computational approaches. An anatomically correct mock heart chamber connected to a pulsatile flow loop is used to generate the physiologically relevant flow conditions, and the influence of two clinically relevant parameters (orifice aspect ratio and regurgitant volume) on the onset of Coanda effect is studied. A two parameter bifurcation diagram showing transition to Coanda jets is obtained, indicating that: (1) strong wall hugging jets occur in long and narrow orifices with moderate to large regurgitant volumes, and (2) short orifices with moderate to large regurgitant volumes produce strong 3D flow features such as vortex rolls, giving rise to the velocities that are orthogonal to the 2D plane associated with the apical color Doppler views, making them "invisible" to the single plane color Doppler assessment of MR. This is the first work in which the presence of vortex rolls in the left atrium during regurgitation is reported and identified as one of the reasons for under-estimation of regurgitant volume. The results of this work can be used for better design of imaging strategies in noninvasive assessment of MR, and for better understanding of LA remodeling that may be associated with the presence of maladapted vortex dynamics. This introduces a new concept in clinical imaging, which

  1. Use of a MitraClip for severe mitral regurgitation in a cardiac transplant patient

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Fayez S.; Grayburn, Paul A.

    2017-01-01

    Severe mitral regurgitation (MR) in patients after cardiac transplant has not been well studied. Traditionally, patients have undergone corrective surgery. We report a 64-year-old man who presented with new heart failure symptoms 6 months after cardiac transplantation. He was found to have severe MR and underwent successful implantation of a MitraClip® with reduction of his MR to mild as well as improvement in his symptoms. Six months later he was still doing well, and a repeat echocardiogram showed good results. We found two previously reported cases using the MitraClip to treat severe MR in adult cardiac transplant patients. The MitraClip is a viable treatment option for MR in cardiac transplant patients despite their distorted anatomy. PMID:28405092

  2. Effect of Pulmonary Vascular Pressures on Long-Term Outcome in Patients With Primary Mitral Regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Mentias, Amgad; Patel, Krishna; Patel, Harsh; Gillinov, A Marc; Sabik, Joseph F; Mihaljevic, Tomislav; Suri, Rakesh M; Rodriguez, L Leonardo; Svensson, Lars G; Griffin, Brian P; Desai, Milind Y

    2016-06-28

    Primary mitral regurgitation (MR) is a growing health problem due to the aging population. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of baseline pulmonary hypertension on long-term outcomes in patients with significant primary MR and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). We studied 1,318 patients with ≥3+ primary MR and LVEF ≥60% using echocardiography at rest; they were evaluated at our center from 2005 to 2008. Baseline clinical and echocardiography data were recorded, and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) score was calculated. The primary outcome was death. Mean STS score was 3.98 ± 1%; 54% of patients were in New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class I and 31% were in NYHA functional class II; and 18% had atrial fibrillation (AF). Mean LVEF, mitral effective regurgitant orifice, indexed LV end-systolic diameter (LVESD), and right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) were 62 ± 2%, 0.56 ± 0.30 cm(2), 1.6 ± 0.3 cm/m(2), and 37 ± 14 mm Hg, respectively. At 7.1 ± 2.0 years, 86% had mitral valve (MV) surgery. Death occurred in 130 (10%) patients. On Cox multivariable analysis, baseline RVSP, together with age, baseline NYHA functional class, pre-operative AF, coronary artery disease, and indexed LVESD were associated with a higher rate of longer term mortality (all p < 0.01), whereas MV surgery (as a time-dependent covariate) was associated with improved survival (p < 0.001). Addition of RVSP to the STS score significantly reclassified the risk for longer term mortality (integrated discrimination index: 0.07; p < 0.001); 77% patients who died had RVSP ≥35 mm Hg. In patients with significant primary MR and preserved LVEF, baseline RVSP is independently associated with long-term survival. Impact of RVSP is progressive and not confined to those with the highest baseline values. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Feasibility of Doppler hemodynamic evaluation of primary and secondary mitral regurgitation during exercise echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Coisne, Augustin; Levy, Franck; Malaquin, Dorothée; Richardson, Marjorie; Quéré, Jean Paul; Montaigne, David; Tribouilloy, Christophe

    2015-02-01

    Exercise transthoracic echocardiography (ExE) was recently proposed to evaluate tolerance and help risk stratification of mitral regurgitation (MR). Few data are available on the feasibility of Doppler echocardiographic recordings at exercise in daily practice in both secondary and primary MR. Comprehensive resting and ExE were performed in 72 unselected patients (age 59 ± 15 years, 62 % men), with no or minimal symptoms, with at least moderate (mean effective regurgitant orifice area (ERO) = 36 ± 14 mm(2)) primary or secondary MR in two French university hospitals. At rest, quantification of ERO was more challenging in semi-supine position than in classic left lateral decubitus position (55/72; 76 % vs 66/72; 92 %; p = 0.012), particularly in mitral valve (MV) prolapse (35/47; 74 %). During exercise, ERO was only obtained in 30/55 (55 %) patients and was more difficult to assess in MV prolapse than in rheumatic or ischemic MR (respectively in 43, 67 and 88 %, p = 0.046). At peak exercise, ERO was more frequently obtained in symptomatic than asymptomatic patients (77 vs 37 %, p = 0.046) because peak heart rate was lower (113 ± 20 vs 133 ± 23 bpm, p = 0.026). Systolic pulmonary artery pressure (SPAP) was obtained in 69 patients (96 %) at rest and in 60 patients (83 %) at peak exercise (Pex). LV contractile reserve (CR), monitored in all patients (100 %), was found in 51/72 patients (71 %). In daily ExE, monitoring of the CR and SPAP appeared less challenging than MR quantification by the PISA method. Monitoring of ERO was more feasible in ischemic MR than in MV prolapse.

  4. Outcomes of ischaemic mitral regurgitation in anterior versus inferior ST elevation myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Mentias, Amgad; Raza, Mohammad Q; Barakat, Amr F; Hill, Elizabeth; Youssef, Dalia; Krishnaswamy, Amar; Desai, Milind Y; Griffin, Brian; Ellis, Stephen; Menon, Venu; Tuzcu, E Murat; Kapadia, Samir R

    2016-01-01

    Background Ischaemic mitral regurgitation (IMR) is a detrimental complication of ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Objective We sought to determine patient characteristics and outcomes of patients with IMR with focus on anterior or inferior location of STEMI. Methods All patients presenting with STEMI complicated by IMR to our centre who underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention within the first 12 hours of presentation from 1995 to 2014 were included. IMR was graded from 1+ to 4+ within 3 days of index myocardial infarction by echocardiography, divided into 2 groups based on infarct location and outcomes were compared. Results Overall, 805 patients were included. There were 302 (17.8%) patients with mitral regurgitation (MR) out of the 1700 patients with anterior STEMI while 503 (21.8%) had MR out of the 2305 patients with inferior STEMI. There was no significant difference between both groups in comorbidities, clinical presentation or door-to-balloon time (DBT; median 104 vs 106 min, p=0.5). 30-day and 1-year mortality were higher in anterior STEMI compared with inferior STEMI (14.9% vs 6.8% and 26.4% vs 14.3%, respectively, p<0.001 both), as well as 5-year mortality (39.7% vs 24.8%, p<0.01). When analysis was performed for each grade of IMR, anterior was associated with worse outcomes in every grade. On multivariate cox survival analysis, after adjustment for age, gender, comorbidities, grade of IMR, ejection fraction and DBT, anterior STEMI was still associated with worse outcomes (HR 1.62 (95% CI 1.23 to 2.12), p<0.001). Conclusions Although IMR occurs more frequently with inferior infarction, outcomes are worse following anterior infarction. PMID:27933193

  5. Usefulness of atrial deformation analysis to predict left atrial fibrosis and endocardial thickness in patients undergoing mitral valve operations for severe mitral regurgitation secondary to mitral valve prolapse.

    PubMed

    Cameli, Matteo; Lisi, Matteo; Righini, Francesca Maria; Massoni, Alberto; Natali, Benedetta Maria; Focardi, Marta; Tacchini, Damiana; Geyer, Alessia; Curci, Valeria; Di Tommaso, Cristina; Lisi, Gianfranco; Maccherini, Massimo; Chiavarelli, Mario; Massetti, Massimo; Tanganelli, Piero; Mondillo, Sergio

    2013-02-15

    In patients with severe mitral regurgitation (MR) referred for cardiac surgery, left atrial (LA) remodeling and enlargement are accompanied by mechanical stress, mediated cellular hypertrophy, and interstitial fibrosis that finally lead to LA failure. Speckle tracking echocardiography is a novel non-Doppler-based method that allows an objective quantification of LA myocardial deformation, becoming useful for LA functional analysis. We conducted a study to evaluate the relation between the traditional and novel atrial indexes and the extent of ultrastructural alterations, obtained from patients with severe MR who were undergoing surgical correction of the valvular disease. The study population included 46 patients with severe MR, referred to our echocardiographic laboratory for a diagnostic examination before cardiac surgery. The global peak atrial longitudinal strain (PALS) was measured in all subjects by averaging all atrial segments. LA tissue samples were obtained from all patients. Masson's trichrome staining was performed to assess the extent of the fibrosis. The LA endocardial thickness was measured. A close negative correlation between the global PALS and grade of LA myocardial fibrosis was found (r = -0.82, p <0.0001), with poorer correlations for the LA indexed volume (r = 0.51, p = 0.01), LA ejection fraction (r = 0.61, p = 0.005), and E/E' ratio (0.14, p = NS). Of these indexes, global PALS showed the best diagnostic accuracy to detect LA fibrosis (area under the curve 0.89), and it appears to be a strong and independent predictor of LA fibrosis. Furthermore, we also demonstrated an inverse correlation between the global PALS and LA endocardial thickness (r = -0.66, p = 0.0001). In conclusion, in patients with severe MR referred for cardiac surgery, impairment of LA longitudinal deformation, as assessed by the global PALS, correlated strongly with the extent of LA fibrosis and remodeling. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Posterior ventricular anchoring neochordal repair of degenerative mitral regurgitation efficiently remodels and repositions posterior leaflet prolapse†

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Y. Joseph; MacArthur, John W.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Mitral valve repair techniques for degenerative disease typically entail leaflet resection or neochordal construction, which may require extensive resection, leaflet detachment/reattachment, reliance on diseased native chords or precise neochordal measuring. Occasionally, impaired leaflet mobility, reduced coaptation surface and systolic anterior motion (SAM) may result. We describe a novel technique for addressing posterior leaflet prolapse/flail, which both simplifies repair and addresses these issues. METHODS Fifty-four patients (age 62 ± 11 years) with degenerative MR underwent this new repair, 36 of whom minimally-invasively. A CV5 Gore-Tex suture was placed into the posterior left ventricular myocardium underneath the prolapsing segment as an anchor. This suture was then used to imbricate a portion of the prolapsed segment into the ventricle, creating a smooth, broad, non-prolapsed coapting surface on a leaflet with preserved mobility, additional neochordal support and posteriorly positioned enough to preclude SAM. RESULTS Repair was successful in all patients. The mean MR grade was reduced from +3.8 to +0.1 with 50 of 54 patients having zero MR and 4 of the 54 having trace or mild MR. All patients had proper antero-posterior location of the coaptation line of a mean length of 10.2 mm, and preserved posterior leaflet mobility. No patients had SAM or mitral stenosis. All patients were discharged and are currently doing well. CONCLUSION This new technique facilitated efficient single-suture repair of the prolapsed posterior leaflet mitral regurgitation without the need for resection or sliding annuloplasty. It precluded the need for precise neochordal measurement and preserved the leaflet coaptation surface. PMID:23449863

  7. Recent developments in percutaneous mitral valve treatment.

    PubMed

    La Canna, Giovanni; Denti, Paolo; Buzzatti, Nicola; Alfieri, Ottavio

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, various percutaneous techniques have been introduced for the treatment of mitral regurgitation (MR), including direct leaflet repair, annuloplasty and left ventricular remodeling. Percutaneous mitral repair targets both primary degenerative and secondary mitral valve regurgitation and may be considered in selected high-surgical-risk patients. The assessment of mitral functional anatomy by echocardiography and computed tomography is crucial when selecting the appropriate repair strategy, according to the regurgitant valve lesion and the surrounding anatomy. The ongoing clinical use of new devices in annuloplasty and percutaneous mitral valve replacement is a promising new scenario in the treatment of MR that goes beyond the conventional surgical approach.

  8. Application of Percutaneous Balloon Mitral Valvuloplasty in Patients of Rheumatic Heart Disease Mitral Stenosis Combined with Tricuspid Regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhang-Qiang; Hong, Lang; Wang, Hong; Lu, Lin-Xiang; Yin, Qiu-Lin; Lai, Heng-Li; Li, Hua-Tai; Wang, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tricuspid regurgitation (TR) is frequently associated with severe mitral stenosis (MS), the importance of significant TR was often neglected. However, TR influences the outcome of patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of percutaneous balloon mitral valvuloplasty (PBMV) procedure in rheumatic heart disease patients with mitral valve (MV) stenosis and tricuspid valve regurgitation. Methods: Two hundred and twenty patients were enrolled in this study due to rheumatic heart disease with MS combined with TR. Mitral balloon catheter made in China was used to expand MV. The following parameters were measured before and after PBMV: MV area (MVA), TR area (TRA), atrial pressure and diameter, and pulmonary artery pressure (PAP). The patients were followed for 6 months to 9 years. Results: After PBMV, the MVAs increased significantly (1.7 ± 0.3 cm2 vs. 0.9 ± 0.3 cm2, P < 0.01); TRA significantly decreased (6.3 ± 1.7 cm2 vs. 14.2 ± 6.5 cm2, P < 0.01), right atrial area (RAA) decreased significantly (21.5 ± 4.5 cm2 vs. 25.4 ± 4.3 cm2, P < 0.05), TRA/RAA (%) decreased significantly (29.3 ± 3.2% vs. 44.2 ± 3.6%, P < 0.01). TR velocity (TRV) and TR continue time (TRT) as well as TRV × TRT decreased significantly (183.4 ± 9.4 cm/s vs. 254.5 ± 10.7 cm/s, P < 0.01; 185.7 ± 13.6 ms vs. 238.6 ± 11.3 ms, P < 0.01; 34.2 ± 5.6 cm vs. 60.7 ± 8.5 cm, P < 0.01, respectively). The postoperative left atrial diameter (LAD) significantly reduced (41.3 ± 6.2 mm vs. 49.8 ± 6.8 mm, P < 0.01) and the postoperative right atrial diameter (RAD) significantly reduced (28.7 ± 5.6 mm vs. 46.5 ± 6.3 mm, P < 0.01); the postoperative left atrium pressure significantly reduced (15.6 ± 6.1 mmHg vs. 26.5 ± 6.6 mmHg, P < 0.01), the postoperative right atrial pressure decreased significantly (13.2 ± 2.4 mmHg vs. 18.5 ± 4.3 mmHg, P < 0.01). The pulmonary arterial pressure decreased significantly after PBMV (48.2 ± 10.3 mmHg vs. 60.6 ± 15

  9. Ventricular Reconstruction Results in Improved Left Ventricular Function and Amelioration of Mitral Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kaza, Aditya K.; Patel, Mayank R.; Fiser, Steven M.; Long, Stewart M.; Kern, John A.; Tribble, Curtis G.; Kron, Irving L.

    2002-01-01

    Introduction Surgical restoration of the left ventricular wall (Dor procedure) has been advocated as a therapy for left ventricular dysfunction due to ischemic cardiomyopathy. This procedure involves placement of an endoventricular patch through a ventriculotomy. Methods We reviewed our series of patients that underwent the Dor procedure within the past 4 years and examined their pre and postoperative ventricular function and mitral valve function. Pre and postoperative ejection fraction and degree of mitral regurgitation were analyzed using the paired Student t-test. We hypothesized that this procedure would result in improved ventricular function and that it would also help improve mitral valve function. Results Thirty-four patients underwent this procedure, with one death. Of these, 30 patients underwent concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting and 8 patients had mitral intervention (seven had an Alfieri repair of the mitral valve, and one had mitral valve annuloplasty). The average preoperative ejection fraction among these patients was 26.8% (range 10–45%). The postoperative ejection fraction was significantly higher at 35.4% (range 25–52%) (P < .001). We noted an improvement in ejection fraction in 27 patients (82%). We also noted that 21 of 33 patients (64%) had improvement in the degree of mitral regurgitation based on echocardiography data (P < .001). Conclusions We conclude that the Dor procedure results in improvement in the left ventricular function. Furthermore, we also note that this procedure ameliorates mitral regurgitation in a majority of these patients even in the absence of associated mitral valve procedures, probably due to reduction in the size of the ventricle and improved orientation of the papillary muscles. PMID:12035039

  10. Direct and indirect quantification of mitral regurgitation with cardiovascular magnetic resonance, and the effect of heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Myerson, Saul G; Francis, Jane M; Neubauer, Stefan

    2010-09-01

    Quantifying mitral regurgitation with cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) involves indirect calculation, which increases the potential for error. We examined a direct quantification method using velocity mapping across the mitral valve, which may be less susceptible to error, and also examined the effect of heart rate variability on both techniques. Fifty-five patients underwent mitral regurgitation quantification with CMR by the direct method and two indirect methods-the standard method subtracting aortic flow (assessed by velocity mapping) from left ventricular stroke volume (assessed by cine imaging) and the 'volumetric' method using the difference between left and right ventricular stroke volumes. The methods were compared using Bland-Altman analyses. Patients with low heart rate variability (beat-to-beat variability <30 bpm; n = 44) showed good agreement between direct and indirect methods (95% confidence limits for the difference between measurements +/-16.7 ml/11.8% regurgitant fraction for the standard method; +/-21.7 ml/15.4% for the volumetric method), with no significant offset (mean difference +2.8 ml/+1.9% for standard and +3.1 ml/+2.3% for volumetric methods). Patients with high heart rate variability (>30 bpm; n = 11) showed poor agreement between techniques (95% limits +/-80.3 ml/56.0%) and significant offset (mean difference +31.7 ml/+19.5%). Direct quantification of mitral regurgitation with CMR compares well with indirect methods for patients with low heart rate variability, involves fewer calculations and is quick. All CMR measurements that use velocity mapping may be inaccurate, however, in patients with highly irregular rhythms and should be avoided in these patients.

  11. Changes in mitral regurgitation and left ventricular geometry during exercise affect exercise capacity in patients with systolic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Izumo, Masaki; Suzuki, Kengo; Moonen, Marie; Kou, Seisyou; Shimozato, Takashi; Hayashi, Akio; Akashi, Yoshihiro J; Osada, Naohiko; Omiya, Kazuto; Miyake, Fumihiko; Ohtaki, Eiji; Lancellotti, Patrizio

    2011-01-01

    exercise may dramatically change the extent of functional mitral regurgitation (MR) and left ventricular (LV) geometry in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). We hypothesized that dynamic changes in MR and LV geometry would affect exercise capacity. this study included 30 CHF patients with functional MR who underwent symptom-limited bicycle exercise stress echocardiography and cardiopulmonary exercise testing for quantitative assessment of MR (effective regurgitant orifice; ERO), and pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP). LV sphericity index was obtained from real-time three-dimensional echocardiograms. The patients were stratified into exercised-induced MR (EMR; n = 10, an increase in ERO by ≥13 mm(2)) or non-EMR (NEMR; n = 20, an increase in ERO by <13 mm(2)) group. At rest, no differences in LV volume and function, ERO, and PASP were found between the two groups. At peak exercise, PASP and sphericity index were significantly greater (all P < 0.01) in the EMR group. The EMR group revealed lower peak oxygen uptake (peak VO(2); P = 0.018) and greater minute ventilation/carbon dioxide production slope (VE/VCO(2) slope; P = 0.042) than the NEMR group. Peak VO(2) negatively correlated with changes in ERO (r = -0.628) and LV sphericity index (r = -0.437); meanwhile, VE/VCO(2) slope was well correlated with these changes (r = 0.414 and 0.364, respectively). A multivariate analysis identified that the change in ERO was the strongest predictor of peak VO(2) (P = 0.001). dynamic changes in MR and LV geometry contributed to the limitation of exercise capacity in patients with CHF.

  12. Usefulness of 3D-PISA as compared to guideline endorsed parameters for mitral regurgitation quantification.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Frank P; Gniewosz, Theresa; Jabs, Alexander; Münzel, Thomas; Hink, Ulrich; Lancellotti, Patrizio; von Bardeleben, Ralph-Stephan

    2014-12-01

    This study was intended to evaluate the diagnostic value of three dimensional proximal isovelocity surface area (3D PISA) derived effective regurgitant orifice area (EROA) and the accuracy of automatic 3D PISA detection in a population resembling clinical practice. Quantification of mitral regurgitation (MR) remains challenging and 3D PISA EROA is a novel diagnostic tool with promising results. However its' usefulness compared to guideline endorsed parameters has not been shown. In 93 consecutive patients examined in routine practice conventional parameters and 3D-datasets for offline 3D PISA evaluation were recorded. EROA was determined from the largest (peak) PISA and also averaged over systole for meanEROA. Results of 3D PISA calculation were compared with a combination of expert grading by two examiners and two scores for MR grading. In receiver operator characteristic-analysis the meanEROA as determined by 3D PISA had the best diagnostic value (AUC = 0.907 CI 0.832-0.983) as compared to peakEROA (AUC 0.840 CI 0.739-0.941), vena contracta width (AUC 0.831 CI 0.745-0.918) and 2D PISA (AUC 0.747 CI 0.644-0.850). A meanEROA of 0.15 cm(2) had a sensitivity of 88.2 % and a specificity of 81.4 % for distinguishing severe from non-severe MR. Semiautomatic 3D PISA detection correlated very well with manually corrected values (r = 0.955). Semiautomatic 3D PISA measurement is feasible in a clinical population and has better diagnostic value compared to 2D PISA. Calculation of mean EROA throughout systole further improves diagnostic value compared to conventional parameters.

  13. Routine Cine-CMR for Prosthesis Associated Mitral Regurgitation – A Multicenter Comparison to Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Simprini, Lauren A.; Afroz, Anika; Cooper, Mitchell A.; Klem, Igor; Jensen, Christoph; Kim, Raymond J.; Srichai, Monvadi B.; Heitner, John F.; Sood, Michael; Chandy, Elizabeth; Shah, Dipan J.; Lopez-Mattei, Juan; Biederman, Robert W.; Grizzard, John D.; Fuisz, Anthon; Ghafourian, Kambiz; Farzaneh-Far, Afshin; Weinsaft, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim MR is an important complication after PMV. Transthoracic echocardiography is widely used to screen for native MR, but can be limited with PMV. Cine-CMR holds potential to non-invasively assess regurgitant severity based on MR-induced inter-voxel dephasing. This study evaluated routine cine-CMR for visual assessment of prosthetic mitral valve (PMV) associated mitral regurgitation (MR). Methods Routine cine-CMR was performed at 9 sites. A uniform protocol was used to grade MR based on jet size in relation to the left atrium (mild <1/3, moderate 1/3–2/3, severe >2/3): MR was graded in each long axis orientation, with overall severity based on cumulative grade. Cine-CMR was also scored for MR density and pulmonary vein systolic flow reversal (PSFR). Visual interpretation was compared to quantitative analysis in a single center (derivation) cohort, and to transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) in a multicenter (validation) cohort. Results The population comprised 85 PMV patients (59% mechanical, 41% bioprosthetic). Among the derivation cohort (n=25), quantitative indices paralleled visual scores, with stepwise increases in jet size and density in relation to visually graded MR severity (both p=0.001): Patients with severe MR had nearly a 3-fold increase in quantitative jet area (p=0.002), and 2-fold increase in density (p=0.04) than did others. Among the multicenter cohort, cine-CMR and TEE (Δ=2±3 days) demonstrated moderate agreement (κ=0.44); 64% of discordances differed by ≤ 1 grade (Δ=1.2±0.5). Using a TEE reference, cine-CMR yielded excellent diagnostic performance for severe MR (sensitivity, negative predictive value=100%). Patients with visually graded severe MR also had more frequent PVSFR (p<0.001), denser jets (p<0.001), and larger left atria (p=0.01) on cine-CMR. Conclusions Cine-CMR is useful for assessment of PMV-associated MR, which manifests concordant quantitative and qualitative changes in size and density of inter

  14. Routine cine-CMR for prosthesis-associated mitral regurgitation: a multicenter comparison to echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Simprini, Lauren A; Afroz, Anika; Cooper, Mitchell A; Klem, Igor; Jensen, Christoph; Kim, Raymond J; Srichai, Monvadi B; Heitner, John F; Sood, Michael; Chandy, Elizabeth; Shah, Dipan J; Lopez-Mattei, Juan; Biederman, Robert W; Grizzard, John D; Fuisz, Anthon; Ghafourian, Kambiz; Farzaneh-Far, Afshin; Weinsaft, Jonathan

    2014-09-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) is an important complication after prosthetic mitral valve (PMV) implantation. Transthoracic echocardiography is widely used to screen for native MR, but can be limited with PMV. Cine-cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) holds the potential for the non-invasive assessment of regurgitant severity based on MR-induced inter-voxel dephasing. The study aim was to evaluate routine cine-CMR for the visual assessment of PMV-associated MR. Routine cine-CMR was performed at nine sites. A uniform protocol was used to grade MR based on jet size in relation to the left atrium (mild < 1/3, moderate 1/3-2/3, severe > 2/3). MR was graded in each long-axis orientation, with overall severity based on cumulative grade. Cine-CMR was also scored for MR density and pulmonary vein systolic flow reversal (PVSFR). Visual interpretation was compared to quantitative analysis in a single-center (derivation) cohort, and to transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) in a multicenter (validation) cohort. The population comprised 85 PMV patients (59% mechanical valves, 41% bioprostheses). Among the derivation cohort (n = 25), quantitative indices paralleled visual scores, with stepwise increases in jet size and density in relation to visually graded MR severity (both p = 0.001). Patients with severe MR had an almost three-fold increase in quantitative jet area (p = 0.002), and a two-fold increase in density (p = 0.04) than did other patients. Among the multicenter cohort, cine-CMR and TEE (Δ =. 2 ± 3 days) demonstrated moderate agreement (κ = 0.44); 64% of discordances differed by ≤ 1 grade (Δ = 1.2 ± 0.5). Using a TEE reference, cine-CMR yielded excellent diagnostic performance for severe MR (sensitivity, negative predictive value = 100%). Patients with visually graded severe MR also had more frequent PVSFR (p < 0.001), denser jets (p < 0.001), and larger left atria (p = 0.01) on cine-CMR. Cine-CMR is useful for the assessment of PMV-associated MR, which manifests

  15. Aortic or Mitral Valve Replacement With the Biocor and Biocor Supra

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-09

    Aortic Valve Insufficiency; Aortic Valve Regurgitation; Aortic Valve Stenosis; Aortic Valve Incompetence; Mitral Valve Insufficiency; Mitral Valve Regurgitation; Mitral Valve Stenosis; Mitral Valve Incompetence

  16. Randomized Comparison of Percutaneous Repair and Surgery for Mitral Regurgitation: 5-Year Results of EVEREST II.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Ted; Kar, Saibal; Elmariah, Sammy; Smart, Steven C; Trento, Alfredo; Siegel, Robert J; Apruzzese, Patricia; Fail, Peter; Rinaldi, Michael J; Smalling, Richard W; Hermiller, James B; Heimansohn, David; Gray, William A; Grayburn, Paul A; Mack, Michael J; Lim, D Scott; Ailawadi, Gorav; Herrmann, Howard C; Acker, Michael A; Silvestry, Frank E; Foster, Elyse; Wang, Andrew; Glower, Donald D; Mauri, Laura

    2015-12-29

    In EVEREST II (Endovascular Valve Edge-to-Edge Repair Study), treatment of mitral regurgitation (MR) with a novel percutaneous device showed superior safety compared with surgery, but less effective reduction in MR at 1 year. This study sought to evaluate the final 5-year clinical outcomes and durability of percutaneous mitral valve (MV) repair with the MitraClip device compared with conventional MV surgery. Patients with grade 3+ or 4+ MR were randomly assigned to percutaneous repair with the device or conventional MV surgery in a 2:1 ratio (178:80). Patients prospectively consented to 5 years of follow-up. At 5 years, the rate of the composite endpoint of freedom from death, surgery, or 3+ or 4+ MR in the as-treated population was 44.2% versus 64.3% in the percutaneous repair and surgical groups, respectively (p = 0.01). The difference was driven by increased rates of 3+ to 4+ MR (12.3% vs. 1.8%; p = 0.02) and surgery (27.9% vs. 8.9%; p = 0.003) with percutaneous repair. After percutaneous repair, 78% of surgeries occurred within the first 6 months. Beyond 6 months, rates of surgery and moderate-to-severe MR were comparable between groups. Five-year mortality rates were 20.8% and 26.8% (p = 0.4) for percutaneous repair and surgery, respectively. In multivariable analysis, treatment strategy was not associated with survival. Patients treated with percutaneous repair more commonly required surgery for residual MR during the first year after treatment, but between 1- and 5-year follow-up, comparably low rates of surgery for MV dysfunction with either percutaneous or surgical therapy endorse the durability of MR reduction with both repair techniques. (EVEREST II Pivotal Study High Risk Registry; NCT00209274). Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Downsizing annuloplasty in ischemic mitral regurgitation: double row overlapping suture to avoid ring disinsertion in valve repair.

    PubMed

    Nappi, Francesco; Spadaccio, Cristiano; Al-Attar, Nawwar; Chello, Massimo; Lusini, Mario; Barbato, Raffaele; Acar, Christophe

    2014-11-01

    The long-term outcomes of undersizing annuloplasty for the treatment of ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR) is affected by the progressive dilation of the annulus, which carries increased risk for ring disinsertion. Reasons underlying this phenomenon might be found in the excess of physical stress on the annuloplasty sutures during the ventricular remodeling process. We report a technique based on the placement of a double row of overlapping sutures aiming at reducing the potential for ring disinsertion. Eleven patients with IMR undergoing mitral valve repair associated with coronary bypass grafting were treated with this technique and echocardiographically followed up at 6 and 12 months. The overall annular dimension decreased significantly with a significant reduction of the tenting area and no recurrence of mitral regurgitation at 1 year. A double row of overlapping sutures allowed firm attachment of the prosthetic ring while downsizing the annulus in IMR, limiting the consequences of changes in subannular ventricular geometry. This technique might therefore be considered a useful aid during mitral valve repair.

  18. Comparison of Transesophageal and Transthoracic Echocardiographic Measurements of Mechanism and Severity of Mitral Regurgitation in Ischemic Cardiomyopathy (From the STICH trial)

    PubMed Central

    Grayburn, Paul A.; She, Lilin; Roberts, Brad J.; Golba, Krzysztof S.; Mokrzycki, Krzysztof; Drozdz, Jaroslaw; Cherniavsky, Alexander; Przybylski, Roman; Wrobel, Krzysztof; Asch, Federico M.; Holly, Thomas A.; Haddad, Haissam; Yii, Michael; Maurer, Gerald; Kron, Irving; Schaff, Hartzell; Velazquez, Eric J.; Oh, Jae K.

    2015-01-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) is common in ischemic heart disease and contributes to symptoms and mortality. This report compares the results of baseline transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) imaging of the mechanism and severity of functional MR in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy in the Surgical Treatment for Ischemic Heart Failure (STICH) trial. Independent core labs measured both TTE and TEE images on 196 STICH patients. Common measurements to both modalities included MR grade, mitral valve tenting height and tenting area, and mitral annular diameter. For each parameter, correlations were assessed using Spearman rank correlation coefficients. A modest correlation (figure) was present between TEE and TTE for overall MR grade (n=176, r=0.52). For mechanism of MR, modest correlations were present for long-axis tenting height (n=152, r=0.35), tenting area (n=128, r=0.27), and long-axis mitral annulus diameter (n=123, r=0.41). For each measurement, there was significant scatter. Potential explanations for the scatter include different orientation of the imaging planes between TEE and TTE, a mean temporal delay of 6 days between TEE and TTE, and statistically significant differences in heart rate and blood pressure and weight between studies. In conclusion, TEE and TTE measurements of MR mechanism and severity correlate only modestly with enough scatter in the data that they are not interchangeable. PMID:26170249

  19. The influence of saddle-shaped annuloplasty on leaflet curvature in patients with ischaemic mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Vergnat, Mathieu; Levack, Melissa M; Jassar, Arminder S; Jackson, Benjamin M; Acker, Michael A; Woo, Y Joseph; Gorman, Robert C; Gorman, Joseph H

    2012-09-01

    Reports indicate that repair procedures for ischaemic mitral regurgitation (IMR) are less durable than previously thought. Repair failure has been shown to be stress related. Leaflet curvature is the major determinant of valve stress. Theoretical and animal experiments have shown that saddle-shaped annuloplasty optimizes leaflet curvature when compared with standard flat ring annuloplasty. Despite this, the influence of the ring shape on leaflet curvature has not been described in patients with IMR. This study uses real-time three-dimensional echocardiography (rt-3DE) to assess the influence of the ring shape on leaflet curvature. Rt-3DE was performed in 21 patients with IMR after placement of either a flat (n = 10, CE-Physio, Edwards) or saddle-shaped (n = 11, Profile 3D, Medtronic) annuloplasty ring. A combination of commercially available and customized software was used to measure multiple leaflet curvature parameters across all regions of the mitral valve. Independently of the shape of the annuloplasty ring, all patients were subject to the same degree of annular undersizing. Patients who received saddle-shaped annuloplasty rings had greater leaflet curvature in all six mitral valve leaflet regions (A1 = 0.36 ± 0.10, A2 = 0.53 ± 0.13, A3 = 0.47 ± 0.13, P1 = 0.35 ± 0.23, P2 = 0.53 ± 0.34, P3 = 0.42 ± 0.20 cm(-2)) compared with patients who received flat annuloplasty rings (A1 = 0.16 ± 0.11, A2 = 0.18 ± 0.09, A3 = 0.16 ± 0.11, P1 = 0.20 ± 0.17, P2 = 0.21 ± 0.11, P3 = 0.18 ± 0.13 cm(-2)). These differences were statistically significant in all regions except the P1 region. Saddle-shaped annuloplasty rings increase leaflet curvature compared with flat rings in patients with IMR. As a result, saddle-shaped annuloplasty may decrease leaflet stress and potentially increases the durability of the repair in patients with IMR.

  20. Age-related changes in cardiovascular performance in mitral regurgitation: analysis of 61 patients.

    PubMed

    Clancy, K F; Iskandrian, A S; Hakki, A H; Nestico, P; DePace, N L

    1985-03-01

    This study examines the cardiovascular performance in relation to age in 61 patients with moderate or severe chronic mitral regurgitation (MR). Coronary artery disease (CAD) (50% or more diameter narrowing of one or more major coronary arteries) was present in 20 patients (33%). Patients less than 60 years (n = 33) had lower pulmonary artery pressure, systolic arterial pressure, left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic pressure, and pulmonary artery wedge pressure than the patients greater than or equal to 60 years (n = 28) (p less than 0.05). In the 41 patients without associated CAD, the LV end-diastolic pressure and systemic arterial pressure were higher in patients greater than or equal to 60 years (n = 14) than patients less than 60 years (n = 27) (p less than 0.05). The LV end-diastolic pressure showed an age-related increase in the presence or absence of CAD. Thus, older patients with MR have higher LV end-diastolic pressure, probably because of an increase in myocardial stiffness.

  1. Impact of duration of mitral regurgitation on outcomes in asymptomatic patients with myxomatous mitral valve undergoing exercise stress echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Naji, Peyman; Asfahan, Fadi; Barr, Tyler; Rodriguez, L Leonardo; Grimm, Richard A; Agarwal, Shikhar; Thomas, James D; Gillinov, A Marc; Mihaljevic, Tomislav; Griffin, Brian P; Desai, Milind Y

    2015-02-11

    Significant mitral regurgitation (MR) typically occurs as holosystolic (HS) or mid-late systolic (MLS), with differences in volumetric impact on the left ventricle (LV). We sought to assess outcomes of degenerative MR patients undergoing exercise echocardiography, separated based on MR duration (MLS versus HS). We included 609 consecutive patients with ≥III+myxomatous MR undergoing exercise echocardiography: HS (n=487) and MLS (n=122). MLS MR was defined as delayed appearance of MR signal during mid-late systole on continuous-wave Doppler while HS MR occurred throughout systole. Composite events of death and congestive heart failure were recorded. Compared to MLS MR, HS MR patients were older (60±14 versus 53±14 years), more were males (72% versus 53%), and had greater prevalence of atrial fibrillation (16% versus 7%; all P<0.01). HS MR patients had higher right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) at rest (33±11 versus 27±9 mm Hg), more flail leaflets (36% versus 6%), and a lower number of metabolic equivalents (METs) achieved (9.5±3 versus 10.5±3), compared to the MLS MR group (all P<0.05). There were 54 events during 7.1±3 years of follow-up. On step-wise multivariable analysis, HS versus MLS MR (HR 4.99 [1.21 to 20.14]), higher LV ejection fraction (hazard ratio [HR], 0.94 [0.89 to 0.98]), atrial fibrillation (HR, 2.59 [1.33 to 5.11]), higher RVSP (HR, 1.05 [1.03 to 1.09]), and higher percentage of age- and gender-predicted METs (HR, 0.98 [0.97 to 0.99]) were independently associated with adverse outcomes (all P<0.05). In patients with ≥III+myxomatous MR undergoing exercise echocardiography, holosystolic MR is associated with adverse outcomes, independent of other predictors. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  2. Impact of Duration of Mitral Regurgitation on Outcomes in Asymptomatic Patients With Myxomatous Mitral Valve Undergoing Exercise Stress Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Naji, Peyman; Asfahan, Fadi; Barr, Tyler; Rodriguez, L. Leonardo; Grimm, Richard A.; Agarwal, Shikhar; Thomas, James D.; Gillinov, A. Marc; Mihaljevic, Tomislav; Griffin, Brian P.; Desai, Milind Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background Significant mitral regurgitation (MR) typically occurs as holosystolic (HS) or mid‐late systolic (MLS), with differences in volumetric impact on the left ventricle (LV). We sought to assess outcomes of degenerative MR patients undergoing exercise echocardiography, separated based on MR duration (MLS versus HS). Methods and Results We included 609 consecutive patients with ≥III+myxomatous MR undergoing exercise echocardiography: HS (n=487) and MLS (n=122). MLS MR was defined as delayed appearance of MR signal during mid‐late systole on continuous‐wave Doppler while HS MR occurred throughout systole. Composite events of death and congestive heart failure were recorded. Compared to MLS MR, HS MR patients were older (60±14 versus 53±14 years), more were males (72% versus 53%), and had greater prevalence of atrial fibrillation (16% versus 7%; all P<0.01). HS MR patients had higher right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) at rest (33±11 versus 27±9 mm Hg), more flail leaflets (36% versus 6%), and a lower number of metabolic equivalents (METs) achieved (9.5±3 versus 10.5±3), compared to the MLS MR group (all P<0.05). There were 54 events during 7.1±3 years of follow‐up. On step‐wise multivariable analysis, HS versus MLS MR (HR 4.99 [1.21 to 20.14]), higher LV ejection fraction (hazard ratio [HR], 0.94 [0.89 to 0.98]), atrial fibrillation (HR, 2.59 [1.33 to 5.11]), higher RVSP (HR, 1.05 [1.03 to 1.09]), and higher percentage of age‐ and gender‐predicted METs (HR, 0.98 [0.97 to 0.99]) were independently associated with adverse outcomes (all P<0.05). Conclusion In patients with ≥III+myxomatous MR undergoing exercise echocardiography, holosystolic MR is associated with adverse outcomes, independent of other predictors. PMID:25672368

  3. Assessment of myocardial deformation: Predicting medium-term left ventricular dysfunction after surgery in patients with chronic mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    de Agustín, José A; Pérez de Isla, Leopoldo; Núñez-Gil, Iván J; Vivas, David; Manzano, María del C; Marcos-Alberca, Pedro; Fernández-Golfín, Covadonga; Corros, Cecilia; Almería, Carlos; Rodrigo, José L; Aubele, Adalia; Herrera, Dionisio; Rodríguez, Enrique; Macaya, Carlos; Zamorano, José

    2010-05-01

    The development of left ventricular dysfunction after mitral valve replacement is a common problem in patients with chronic severe mitral regurgitation. Assessment of myocardial deformation enables myocardial contractility to be accurately estimated. Our aim was to compare the value of the preoperative strain and strain rate derived by either speckle-tracking echocardiography or tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) for predicting the medium-term decrease in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) following surgery. This prospective study involved 38 consecutive patients with chronic severe mitral regurgitation who were scheduled for mitral valve replacement. The longitudinal strain and strain rate in the interventricular septum were measured preoperatively using speckle-tracking echocardiography and TDI. The LVEF was determined preoperatively and postoperatively using 3-dimensional echocardiography. Echocardiographic assessments were performed in the 48 hours prior to surgery and 6 months postoperatively. The patients' mean age was 59.9+/-11.3 years and 10 (29.4%) were male. Both speckle-tracking echocardiography and TDI were found to be predictors of a >10% decrease in LVEF at 6 months. However, the predictive value of speckle-tracking echocardiography was greater than that of TDI. The longitudinal strain at baseline in the interventricular septum as measured by speckle-tracking echocardiography was the most powerful predictor; the area under the curve was 0.85 and the optimal cut-off value was -0.11. Speckle-tracking echocardiography can be used to predict a decrease in LVEF over the medium term after mitral valve replacement. Moreover, the predictive accuracy of speckle-tracking echocardiography was greater than that of TDI.

  4. Direct measurement of proximal isovelocity surface area by single-beat three-dimensional color Doppler echocardiography in mitral regurgitation: a validation study.

    PubMed

    de Agustín, Jose Alberto; Marcos-Alberca, Pedro; Fernandez-Golfin, Covadonga; Gonçalves, Alexandra; Feltes, Gisela; Nuñez-Gil, Ivan Javier; Almeria, Carlos; Rodrigo, Jose Luis; Perez de Isla, Leopoldo; Macaya, Carlos; Zamorano, Jose

    2012-08-01

    The two-dimensional (2D) proximal isovelocity surface area (PISA) method has some technical limitations, mainly the geometric assumptions of PISA shape required to calculate effective regurgitant orifice area (EROA). Recently developed single-beat, real-time three-dimensional (3D) color Doppler imaging allows direct measurement of PISA without geometric assumptions. The aim of this study was to validate this novel method in patients with chronic mitral regurgitation (MR). Thirty-three patients were included, 25 (75.7%) with degenerative MR and eight (24.2%) with functional MR. EROA and regurgitant volume were assessed using transthoracic 2D and 3D PISA methods. The quantitative Doppler method and 3D transesophageal echocardiographic planimetry of EROA were used as reference methods. Both EROA and regurgitant volume assessed using the 3D PISA method had better correlations with the reference methods than conventional 2D PISA. A consistent significant underestimation of EROA and regurgitant volume using 2D PISA was observed, particularly in the assessment of eccentric jets. On the basis of 3D transesophageal echocardiographic planimetry of EROA, 14 patients had severe MR (EROA ≥ 0.4 cm(2)). Of these 14 patients, 42.8% (6 of 14) were underestimated as having nonsevere MR (EROA ≤ 0.4 cm(2)) by the 2D PISA method. In contrast, the 3D PISA method had 92.9% (13 of 14) agreement with 3D transesophageal planimetry in classifying severe MR. Good intraobserver and interobserver agreement for 3D PISA measurements was observed, with intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.96 and 0.92, respectively. Direct measurement of PISA without geometric assumptions using single-beat, real-time 3D color Doppler echocardiography is feasible in the clinical setting. MR quantification using this methodology is more accurate than the conventional 2D PISA method. Copyright © 2012 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Minimally invasive approach provides at least equivalent results for surgical correction of mitral regurgitation: A propensity-matched comparison

    PubMed Central

    Goldstone, Andrew B.; Atluri, Pavan; Szeto, Wilson Y.; Trubelja, Alen; Howard, Jessica L.; MacArthur, John W.; Newcomb, Craig; Donnelly, Joseph P.; Kobrin, Dale M.; Sheridan, Mary A.; Powers, Christiana; Gorman, Robert C.; Gorman, Joseph H.; Pochettino, Alberto; Bavaria, Joseph E.; Acker, Michael A.; Hargrove, W. Clark; Woo, Y. Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Objective Minimally invasive approaches to mitral valve surgery are increasingly used, but the surgical approach must not compromise the clinical outcome for improved cosmesis. We examined the outcomes of mitral repair performed through right minithoracotomy or median sternotomy. Methods Between January 2002 and October 2011, 1011 isolated mitral valve repairs were performed in the University of Pennsylvania health system (455 sternotomies, 556 right minithoracotomies). To account for key differences in preoperative risk profiles, propensity scores identified 201 well-matched patient pairs with mitral regurgitation of any cause and 153 pairs with myxomatous disease. Results In-hospital mortality was similar between propensity-matched groups (0% vs 0% for the degenerative cohort; 0% vs 0.5%, P = .5 for the overall cohort; in minimally invasive and sternotomy groups, respectively). Incidence of stroke, infection, myocardial infarction, exploration for postoperative hemorrhage, renal failure, and atrial fibrillation also were comparable. Transfusion was less frequent in the minimally invasive groups (11.8% vs 20.3%, P = .04 for the degenerative cohort; 14.0% vs 22.9%, P .03 for the overall cohort), but time to extubation and discharge was similar. A 99% repair rate was achieved=in patients with myxomatous disease, and a minimally invasive approach did not significantly increase the likelihood of a failed repair resulting in mitral valve replacement. Patients undergoing minimally invasive mitral repair were more likely to have no residual post-repair mitral regurgitation (97.4% vs 92.1%, P = .04 for the degenerative cohort; 95.5% vs 89.6%, P = .02 for the overall cohort). In the overall matched cohort, early readmission rates were higher in patients undergoing sternotomies (12.6% vs 4.4%, P = .01). Over 9 years of follow-up, there was no significant difference in long-term survival between groups (P = .8). Conclusions In appropriate patients with isolated mitral valve

  6. Is valve repair preferable to valve replacement in ischaemic mitral regurgitation? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Salmasi, Mohammad Yousuf; Acharya, Metesh; Humayun, Nada; Baskaran, Dinnish; Hubbard, Stephanie; Vohra, Hunaid

    2016-07-01

    Ischaemic mitral regurgitation (MR) is associated with poor survival. The favoured surgical option remains debatable. Our aim was to perform a meta-analysis to compare the outcomes of mitral valve repair (MVRp) with replacement (MVR). A literature search was conducted in PubMed, Medline and Ovid using the terms 'ischaemic mitral regurgitation', 'repair' and 'replacement'. The primary outcome measure was 30-day survival. The secondary outcome measures were MR recurrence and reoperation. Out of 310 articles, 18 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. A total of 3978 patients were included: 2563 (64%) MVRp cases and 1415 (36%) MVR cases. Operative techniques included annuloplasty for MVRp and subvalvular apparatus-sparing MVR techniques. Thirty-day mortality was lower after MVRp compared with MVR [OR 0.42; (95% CI 0.33-0.54; P = 0.0001)]. There was no difference in long-term survival ranging 1-5 years (HR 0.85, 95% CI 0.65-1.12). Recurrence of MR was significantly higher in the MVRp group (OR 4.26, 95% CI 2.52-7.22), as was the rate of reoperation (OR 2.03, 95% CI 1.49-2.77). Although MVR for ischaemic MR has a higher 30-day mortality rate compared with MVRp, MVRp is associated with the higher rate of MR recurrence and the need for reoperation. MVR remains an attractive option for ischaemic MR.

  7. Predictors of Exercise-Induced Pulmonary Hypertension in Patients with Asymptomatic Degenerative Mitral Regurgitation: Mechanistic Insights from 2D Speckle-Tracking Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Kamijima, Ryo; Suzuki, Kengo; Izumo, Masaki; Kuwata, Shingo; Mizukoshi, Kei; Takai, Manabu; Kou, Seisyou; Hayashi, Akio; Kida, Keisuke; Harada, Tomoo; Akashi, Yoshihiro J.

    2017-01-01

    Presence of exercise-induced pulmonary hypertension (EIPH) in asymptomatic degenerative mitral regurgitation (DMR) determines prognosis. This study aimed to elucidate the mechanism and predictors of EIPH in asymptomatic DMR. Ninety-one consecutive asymptomatic patients with DMR who underwent exercise stress echocardiography were prospectively included. We obtained various conventional echocardiographic parameters at rest and during peak exercise, as well as left atrial (LA) function at rest using 2-dimensional speckle-tracking analysis. The 25 patients (33.3%) with EIPH were significantly older and had a greater ratio of mitral peak velocity of early filling to early diastolic mitral annular velocity during peak exercise than those without EIPH. LA strain (LAS)-s and LAS-e, indices of LA reservoir and conduit function, respectively, were significantly lower in those with EIPH than in those without EIPH. Multivariate analysis indicated that LAS-s was the only resting echocardiographic parameter that independently predicted EIPH, with a cut-off value of 26.9%. Furthermore, Kaplan-Meier curve analysis showed that symptom-free survival was markedly lower among those with reduced LAS-s. In conclusion, decreased LA reservoir function contributes to EIPH, and LAS-s at rest is a useful indicator for predicting EIPH in asymptomatic patients with DMR. PMID:28071674

  8. Determinants of Late Tricuspid Regurgitation After Aortic-Mitral Double Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Dong Seop; Park, Pyo Won; Sung, Kiick; Kim, Wook Sung; Lee, Young Tak

    2017-05-15

    The aims of this study are to evaluate the long-term outcomes of double valve replacement (aortic and mitral valves) and to investigate the determinants of late tricuspid regurgitation (TR). A total of 239 consecutive patients who underwent double valve replacement were enrolled. Valve pathology was rheumatic in 86.6% (207/239) and degenerative in 13.4% (32/239) of patients. Among these patients, 116 patients underwent concomitant tricuspid annuloplasty, and follow-up was completed for all 239 patients (mean = 7.3 ± 4.1, maximum = 15.9 years). We used propensity score matching to match 67 patients without tricuspid annuloplasty to the 114 patients who underwent annuloplasty. There was 1 in-hospital death and 9.7% (23/238) of patients experienced late cardiac-related mortality. Analysis of aortic valves indicated that the transprosthetic mean pressure gradient increased with time (13.4 ± 5.2 vs 15.4 ± 9.0 mm Hg, p = 0.002). Aortic transprosthetic mean pressure gradient increased more notably in woman and was associated with late TR (odds ratio 1.1, p = 0.010). In patients with mild TR, those who underwent tricuspid valve repair were less likely to experience a cardiac-related death within 10 years of surgery (hazards ratio 6.1, p = 0.036). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Meta-analysis of concomitant mitral valve repair and coronary artery bypass surgery versus isolated coronary artery bypass surgery in patients with moderate ischaemic mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Kopjar, Tomislav; Gasparovic, Hrvoje; Mestres, Carlos A; Milicic, Davor; Biocina, Bojan

    2016-08-01

    Ischaemic mitral regurgitation (IMR) is a complication of coronary artery disease with normal chordal and leaflet morphology. Controversy surrounds the issue of appropriate surgical management of moderate IMR. With the present meta-analysis, we aimed to determine whether the addition of mitral valve (MV) repair to coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) improved clinical outcome over CABG alone in patients with moderate IMR. Databases were searched for studies reporting on clinical outcomes after CABG and MV repair or CABG alone for moderate IMR. Clinical end-points were operative mortality, survival, New York Heart Association (NYHA) class ≥2 and MR grade ≥2 at last follow-up. A total of five observational and four randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were identified. The mean follow-up was 2.7 years. An analysis of all studies revealed increased operative risk in the concomitant CABG and MV repair group {risk ratio [RR] 2.02 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.15, 3.56], P = 0.01, I(2) = 0%}. However, an analysis of RCTs only showed that the operative risk was equivalent [RR 1.05 (95% CI 0.34, 3.30), P = 0.93, I(2) = 0%]. Pooled hazard ratio (HR) on survival did not favour either procedure [all studies: HR 1.08 (95% CI 0.77, 1.50), P = 0.66, I(2) = 0%; RCTs only: HR 0.89 (95% CI 0.47, 1.70), P = 0.73, I(2) = 0%]. The incidence of exercise intolerance quantified as NYHA class ≥2 was similar between groups (all studies: RR 0.72 (95% CI 0.42, 1.24), P = 0.24, I(2) = 77%; RCTs only: RR 0.61 (95% CI 0.24, 1.55), P = 0.30, I(2) = 83%]. Risk of residual MR grade ≥2 was higher in the CABG only group [all studies: RR 0.30 (95% CI 0.16, 0.60), P < 0.001, I(2) = 83%; RCTs only: RR 0.20 (95% CI 0.04, 0.90), P = 0.04, I(2) = 72%]. There is neither increased operative mortality nor survival benefit associated with concomitant CABG and MV repair for IMR of moderate degree over CABG alone. Further studies with long-term follow-up data and sub-group analyses of current data are

  10. Swine (Sus scrofa) as a Model of Postinfarction Mitral Regurgitation and Techniques to Accommodate Its Effects during Surgical Repair

    PubMed Central

    Sarin, Eric L; Shi, Weiwei; Duara, Rajnish; Melone, Todd A; Kalra, Kanika; Strong, Ashley; Girish, Apoorva; McIver, Bryant V; Thourani, Vinod H; Guyton, Robert A; Padala, Muralidhar

    2016-01-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) is a common heart-valve lesion after myocardial infarction in humans. Because it is considered a risk factor for accelerated heart failure and death, various surgical approaches and catheter-based devices to correct it are in development. Lack of a reproducible animal model of MR after myocardial infarction and reliable techniques to perform open-heart surgery in these diseased models led to the use of healthy animals to test new devices. Thus, most devices that are deemed safe in healthy animals have shown poor results in human efficacy studies, hampering progress in this area of research. Here we report our experience with a swine model of postinfarction MR, describe techniques to induce regurgitation and perform open-heart surgery in these diseased animals, and discuss our outcomes, complications, and solutions. PMID:27538860

  11. Swine (Sus scrofa) as a Model of Postinfarction Mitral Regurgitation and Techniques to Accommodate Its Effects during Surgical Repair.

    PubMed

    Sarin, Eric L; Shi, Weiwei; Duara, Rajnish; Melone, Todd A; Kalra, Kanika; Strong, Ashley; Girish, Apoorva; McIver, Bryant V; Thourani, Vinod H; Guyton, Robert A; Padala, Muralidhar

    2016-01-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) is a common heart-valve lesion after myocardial infarction in humans. Because it is considered a risk factor for accelerated heart failure and death, various surgical approaches and catheter-based devices to correct it are in development. Lack of a reproducible animal model of MR after myocardial infarction and reliable techniques to perform open-heart surgery in these diseased models led to the use of healthy animals to test new devices. Thus, most devices that are deemed safe in healthy animals have shown poor results in human efficacy studies, hampering progress in this area of research. Here we report our experience with a swine model of postinfarction MR, describe techniques to induce regurgitation and perform open-heart surgery in these diseased animals, and discuss our outcomes, complications, and solutions.

  12. Real-Time 3-Dimensional Echocardiographic Assessment of Effective Regurgitant Orifice Area in Dogs With Myxomatous Mitral Valve Disease.

    PubMed

    Tidholm, A; Bodegård-Westling, A; Höglund, K; Häggström, J; Ljungvall, I

    2017-03-01

    Effective regurgitant orifice area (EROA), calculated from the vena contracta width (VCW) as the narrowest portion of the proximal regurgitant jet, might be used to estimate severity of mitral regurgitation. However, this simplified assumption only holds when the EROA is circular, which might not be true in dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD). Effective regurgitant orifice area in dogs with MMVD is noncircular, and using color Doppler real-time 3-dimensional (RT3D) echocardiography, measured EROA in the en face view will be significantly different from calculated EROA. Hundred and fifty-eight privately owned dogs with naturally occurring MMVD. Prospective observational study comparing en face view of EROA with calculated EROA using VCW in 4-chamber (4Ch) and 2-chamber (2Ch) view only or combined 4Ch and 2Ch views using RT3D echocardiography. The calculated EROA using the 2Ch view showed a systematic underestimation of 17% compared with the measured en face EROA corrected for body surface area. The calculated EROA using 4Ch and 4Ch + 2Ch views showed less agreement with the en face EROA, and the difference between methods increased with increasing EROA. The difference between calculated and measured EROA showed a systematic underestimation of the calculated EROA by 36% (4Ch) and 33% (4Ch + 2Ch), respectively, compared to measured en face EROA. When replacing measured EROA with calculated EROA using VCW measurements, the 2Ch view is preferred in dogs with MMVD. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  13. [Progressive moderate mitral regurgitation in a children with Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome. The importance of cardiologic follow up].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Ferrer, Francisco; Grima Murcia, María D

    2016-12-01

    Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome is a congenital disease with an estimated prevalence of one in 200,000 individuals. This is an ophthalmic disorder related to anterior segment dysgenesis, which may be present from the neonatal period. It is associated with extraocular affectations such as cranial dimorphism, maxillofacial or dental anomalies. Cardiological or pituitary manifestations are less common. The congenital heart disease in Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome has been described in very few cases in the literature. We report a 7-year-old patient with Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome and mild mitral insufficiency since the age of 3 years, which is progressing to moderate mitral regurgitation at the present time. The cardiologic follow up may be indicated in patients with Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome.

  14. Importance of Exercise Capacity in Predicting Outcomes and Determining Optimal Timing of Surgery in Significant Primary Mitral Regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Naji, Peyman; Griffin, Brian P.; Barr, Tyler; Asfahan, Fadi; Gillinov, A. Marc; Grimm, Richard A.; Rodriguez, L. Leonardo; Mihaljevic, Tomislav; Stewart, William J.; Desai, Milind Y.

    2014-01-01

    Background In primary mitral regurgitation (MR), exercise echocardiography aids in symptom evaluation and timing of mitral valve (MV) surgery. In patients with grade ≥3 primary MR undergoing exercise echocardiography followed by MV surgery, we sought to assess predictors of outcomes and whether delaying MV surgery adversely affects outcomes. Methods and Results We studied 576 consecutive such patients (aged 57±13 years, 70% men, excluding prior valve surgery and functional MR). Clinical, echocardiographic (MR, LVEF, indexed LV dimensions, RV systolic pressure) and exercise data (metabolic equivalents) were recorded. Composite events of death, MI, stroke, and congestive heart failure were recorded. Mean LVEF was 58±5%, indexed LV end‐systolic dimension was 1.7±0.5 mm/m2, rest RV systolic pressure was 32±13 mm Hg, peak‐stress RV systolic pressure was 47±17 mm Hg, and percentage of age‐ and gender‐predicted metabolic equivalents was 113±27. Median time between exercise and MV surgery was 3 months (MV surgery delayed ≥1 year in 28%). At 6.6±4 years, there were 53 events (no deaths at 30 days). On stepwise multivariable survival analysis, increasing age (hazard ratio of 1.07 [95% confidence interval, 1.03 to 1.12], P<0.01), lower percentage of age‐ and gender‐predicted metabolic equivalents (hazard ratio of 0.82 [95% confidence interval, 0.71 to 0.94], P=0.007), and lower LVEF (0.94 [0.89 to 0.99], P=0.04) independently predicted outcomes. In patients achieving >100% predicted metabolic equivalents (n=399), delaying surgery by ≥1 year (median of 28 months) did not adversely affect outcomes (P=0.8). Conclusion In patients with primary MR that underwent exercise echocardiography followed by MV surgery, lower achieved metabolic equivalents were associated with worse long‐term outcomes. In those with preserved exercise capacity, delaying MV surgery by ≥1 year did not adversely affect outcomes. PMID:25213567

  15. Survival and Cardiovascular Outcomes of Patients With Secondary Mitral Regurgitation: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sannino, Anna; Smith, Robert L; Schiattarella, Gabriele G; Trimarco, Bruno; Esposito, Giovanni; Grayburn, Paul A

    2017-09-06

    The outcomes of patients with left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and secondary mitral regurgitation (SMR) are still controversial. To clarify the role of SMR in the outcomes of patients with ischemic or idiopathic cardiomyopathies. MEDLINE, ISI Web of Science, and Scopus databases were searched for studies published up to March 2017. Studies reporting data on outcomes in patients with SMR were included. Duplicate publication data, studies lacking data on SMR grade and its correlation with outcomes, mixed data on SMR and primary mitral regurgitation, studies not clearly reporting the outcome of interest, and studies with fewer than 100 patients were excluded. Of the initial 3820 articles identified, 1.4% were finally included. The study met PRISMA requirements. Two of us independently screened articles for fulfillment of inclusion criteria. The primary outcome, set after data collection, was the incidence of all-cause mortality in patients with and without SMR. Secondary outcomes included hospitalization for heart failure (HF), cardiac mortality, and a composite end point of death, HF hospitalization, and cardiac transplant. Fifty-three studies and 45 900 patients were included in the meta-analysis. The mean (SD) length of follow-up was 40.8 (22.2) months. In 26 of 36 studies reporting LV function by SMR grade, increasing SMR severity was associated with worse LV function. When SMR was categorized as present or absent, all-cause mortality was significantly higher in the patients with SMR (17 studies, 26 359 patients; risk ratio [RR],1.79; 95% CI, 1.47-2.18; P < .001, I2 = 85%); when SMR was qualitatively graded, the incidence of all-cause mortality was significantly increased in patients having any degree of SMR compared with patients not having SMR (21 studies, 21 081 patients; RR, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.67-2.31; P < .001, I2 = 74%). Finally, when SMR was quantitatively graded, it remained associated with an increased all-cause mortality rate (9

  16. Enhanced expression of ROCK in left atrial myocytes of mitral regurgitation: a potential mechanism of myolysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huang-Chung; Chang, Jen-Ping; Chang, Tzu-Hao; Lin, Yu-Sheng; Huang, Yao-Kuang; Pan, Kuo-Li; Fang, Chih-Yuan; Chen, Chien-Jen; Ho, Wan-Chun; Chen, Mien-Cheng

    2015-05-09

    Severe mitral regurgitation (MR) may cause myolysis in the left atrial myocytes. Myolysis may contribute to atrial enlargement. However, the relationship between Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) and myolysis in the left atrial myocytes of MR patients remain unclear. This study comprised 22 patients with severe MR [12 with atrial fibrillation (AF) and ten in sinus rhythm]. Left atrial appendage tissues were obtained during surgery. Normal left atrial tissues were purchased. Immunofluorescence histochemical and immunoblotting studies were performed. The expression of ROCK2 in the myolytic left atrial myocytes of MR AF patients (p = 0.009) and MR sinus patients (p = 0.011) were significantly higher than that of the normal subjects. Similarly, the expression of ROCK1 in the myolytic left atrial myocytes of MR AF patients was significantly higher than that of the normal subjects (p = 0.010), and the expression of ROCK1 in the myolytic left atrial myocytes of MR sinus patients was higher than that of the normal subjects (p = 0.091). Immunofluorescence study revealed significant co-localization and juxtaposition of ROCK2 and cleaved caspase-3 in the left atrial myocytes both in the MR AF group (Pearson's coefficient = 0.74 ± 0.03) and the MR sinus group (Pearson's coefficient = 0.73 ± 0.02). Similarly, immunofluorescence study revealed significant co-localization and juxtaposition of ROCK1 and cleaved caspase-3 in the left atrial myocytes both in the MR AF group (Pearson's coefficient = 0.65 ± 0.03) and the MR sinus group (Pearson's coefficient = 0.65 ± 0.03). Correlation analysis demonstrated that there was a significant direct relationship between the expression of ROCK2 in the myolytic left atrial myocytes and left atrial diameter in the MR patients (p = 0.041; r = 0.440). Moreover, the ratio of phosphorylated myosin-binding subunit of myosin light chain phosphatase (pMBS)/total MBS of left atrial tissues was significantly higher in the MR AF group (p < 0.04) and the

  17. Pulmonary venous flow determinants of left atrial pressure under different loading conditions in a chronic animal model with mitral regurgitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Hua; Jones, Michael; Shiota, Takahiro; Qin, Jian Xin; Kim, Yong Jin; Popovic, Zoran B.; Pu, Min; Greenberg, Neil L.; Cardon, Lisa A.; Eto, Yoko; Sitges, Marta; Zetts, Arthur D.; Thomas, James D.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of our study was to quantitatively compare the changes and correlations between pulmonary venous flow variables and mean left atrial pressure (mLAP) under different loading conditions in animals with chronic mitral regurgitation (MR) and without MR. METHODS: A total of 85 hemodynamic conditions were studied in 22 sheep, 12 without MR as control (NO-MR group) and 10 with MR (MR group). We obtained pulmonary venous flow systolic velocity (Sv) and diastolic velocity (Dv), Sv and Dv time integrals, their ratios (Sv/Dv and Sv/Dv time integral), mLAP, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, and MR stroke volume. We also measured left atrial a, x, v, and y pressures and calculated the difference between v and y pressures. RESULTS: Average MR stroke volume was 10.6 +/- 4.3 mL/beat. There were good correlations between Sv (r = -0.64 and r = -0.59, P <.01), Sv/Dv (r = -0.62 and r = -0.74, P <.01), and mLAP in the MR and NO-MR groups, respectively. Correlations were also observed between Dv time integral (r = 0.61 and r = 0.57, P <.01) and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure in the MR and NO-MR groups. In velocity variables, Sv (r = -0.79, P <.001) was the best predictor of mLAP in both groups. The sensitivity and specificity of Sv = 0 in predicting mLAP 15 mm Hg or greater were 86% and 85%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Pulmonary venous flow variables correlated well with mLAP under altered loading conditions in the MR and NO-MR groups. They may be applied clinically as substitutes for invasively acquired indexes of mLAP to assess left atrial and left ventricular functional status.

  18. Pulmonary venous flow determinants of left atrial pressure under different loading conditions in a chronic animal model with mitral regurgitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Hua; Jones, Michael; Shiota, Takahiro; Qin, Jian Xin; Kim, Yong Jin; Popovic, Zoran B.; Pu, Min; Greenberg, Neil L.; Cardon, Lisa A.; Eto, Yoko; hide

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of our study was to quantitatively compare the changes and correlations between pulmonary venous flow variables and mean left atrial pressure (mLAP) under different loading conditions in animals with chronic mitral regurgitation (MR) and without MR. METHODS: A total of 85 hemodynamic conditions were studied in 22 sheep, 12 without MR as control (NO-MR group) and 10 with MR (MR group). We obtained pulmonary venous flow systolic velocity (Sv) and diastolic velocity (Dv), Sv and Dv time integrals, their ratios (Sv/Dv and Sv/Dv time integral), mLAP, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, and MR stroke volume. We also measured left atrial a, x, v, and y pressures and calculated the difference between v and y pressures. RESULTS: Average MR stroke volume was 10.6 +/- 4.3 mL/beat. There were good correlations between Sv (r = -0.64 and r = -0.59, P <.01), Sv/Dv (r = -0.62 and r = -0.74, P <.01), and mLAP in the MR and NO-MR groups, respectively. Correlations were also observed between Dv time integral (r = 0.61 and r = 0.57, P <.01) and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure in the MR and NO-MR groups. In velocity variables, Sv (r = -0.79, P <.001) was the best predictor of mLAP in both groups. The sensitivity and specificity of Sv = 0 in predicting mLAP 15 mm Hg or greater were 86% and 85%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Pulmonary venous flow variables correlated well with mLAP under altered loading conditions in the MR and NO-MR groups. They may be applied clinically as substitutes for invasively acquired indexes of mLAP to assess left atrial and left ventricular functional status.

  19. Severity of mitral regurgitation predicts risk of death or cardiac transplantation in children with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Patange, Amit; Thomas, Ronald; Ross, Robert D

    2014-02-01

    Clinical outcomes among children with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDC) are diverse, which makes the decision as to when a patient should be listed for a cardiac transplantation challenging. This study aimed to determine echocardiographic and clinical variables that can help clinicians identify those at highest risk for death or cardiac transplantation. The study was a single-center, retrospective chart review of children with IDC. Patients younger than 18 years with a diagnosis of IDC, as defined by a left ventricular end-diastolic dimension (LVEDD) z-score higher than 2, and fractional shortening of less than 28 % on the initial echocardiogram, were included in the study. Echocardiographic parameters including mitral regurgitation (MR) grade and certain clinical parameters at the time of presentation were assessed. A follow-up echocardiogram was similarly studied. The study included 49 children with IDC. Those who died or underwent cardiac transplantation were grouped as "nonsurvivors" (n = 26). The remaining children who either completely recovered or experienced chronic dilated cardiomyopathy were grouped as "survivors" (n = 23). The median age overall was 1.25 years (range 0.1-17 years). The follow-up echocardiograms of the survivors showed significant improvement in left ventricle size, systolic function, left atrial volume, and MR grade, whereas these parameters did not change in the nonsurvivor group. The use of inotropic medications at initial presentation was an independent predictor of death or cardiac transplantation (p < 0.05). The presence of moderate to severe MR at diagnosis also was predictive of a worse outcome.

  20. In vitro validation of real-time three-dimensional color Doppler echocardiography for direct measurement of proximal isovelocity surface area in mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Little, Stephen H; Igo, Stephen R; Pirat, Bahar; McCulloch, Marti; Hartley, Craig J; Nosé, Yukihiko; Zoghbi, William A

    2007-05-15

    The 2-dimensional (2D) color Doppler (2D-CD) proximal isovelocity surface area (PISA) method assumes a hemispheric flow convergence zone to estimate transvalvular flow. Recently developed 3-dimensional (3D)-CD can directly visualize PISA shape and surface area without geometric assumptions. To validate a novel method to directly measure PISA using real-time 3D-CD echocardiography, a circulatory loop with an ultrasound imaging chamber was created to model mitral regurgitation (MR). Thirty-two different regurgitant flow conditions were tested using symmetric and asymmetric flow orifices. Three-dimensional-PISA was reconstructed from a hand-held real-time 3D-CD data set. Regurgitant volume was derived using both 2D-CD and 3D-CD PISA methods, and each was compared against a flow-meter standard. The circulatory loop achieved regurgitant volume within the clinical range of MR (11 to 84 ml). Three-dimensional-PISA geometry reflected the 2D geometry of the regurgitant orifice. Correlation between the 2D-PISA method regurgitant volume and actual regurgitant volume was significant (r(2) = 0.47, p <0.001). Mean 2D-PISA regurgitant volume underestimate was 19.1 +/- 25 ml (2 SDs). For the 3D-PISA method, correlation with actual regurgitant volume was significant (r(2) = 0.92, p <0.001), with a mean regurgitant volume underestimate of 2.7 +/- 10 ml (2 SDs). The 3D-PISA method showed less regurgitant volume underestimation for all orifice shapes and regurgitant volumes tested. In conclusion, in an in vitro model of MR, 3D-CD was used to directly measure PISA without geometric assumption. Compared with conventional 2D-PISA, regurgitant volume was more accurate when derived from 3D-PISA across symmetric and asymmetric orifices within a broad range of hemodynamic flow conditions.

  1. Mitral valve prolapse with a late-systolic regurgitant murmur may be associated with significant hemodynamic consequences.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mustafa I; Sanagala, Thriveni; Denney, Thomas; Inusah, Seidu; McGiffin, David; Knowlan, Donald; O'Rourke, Robert A; Dell'Italia, Louis J

    2009-08-01

    The late-systolic murmur of mitral regurgitation (MR) in degenerative mitral valve disease is widely believed to represent regurgitation of a degree that is not associated with hemodynamic significance. However, the extent of left ventricular (LV) remodeling associated with the late-systolic murmur has not been systematically assessed. Accordingly, we studied 82 patients sent for evaluation of at least moderate isolated MR by echocardiography/Doppler examination. All patients had a physical examination and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging to measure LV volumes by summation of serial short-axis slices. Forty-five patients had a pan-systolic murmur and 37 had a late-systolic murmur on auscultation that was verified by timing of onset of regurgitant turbulence by cine magnetic resonance imaging. Systolic blood pressures (124 +/- 3 versus 124 +/- 3 mm Hg) and LV ejection fraction (61 +/- 1% versus 61 +/- 1%) did not differ significantly between pan-systolic and late-systolic murmur groups. Although LV end-diastolic volume index was greater in the pan-systolic versus late-systolic murmur (108 +/- 4 versus 95 +/- 4 mL/m2, P = 0.007), both groups were significantly greater than normals (68 +/- 2 mL/m2, P < 0.0001). However, LV end-systolic volume index (42 +/- 2 versus 38 +/- 2 mL/m2) and LV end-systolic dimension (38 +/- 1 versus 37 +/- 1 mm), critical markers of adverse LV remodeling in isolated MR, did not differ significantly between pan-systolic and late-systolic murmur groups. In conclusion, the late systolic isolated MR murmur may be associated with significant adverse LV remodeling, and should not be considered evidence of hemodynamically unimportant MR.

  2. Surgical Revascularization is Associated with Maximal Survival in Patients with Ischemic Mitral Regurgitation: A 20-Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Castleberry, Anthony W.; Williams, Judson B.; Daneshmand, Mani A.; Honeycutt, Emily; Shaw, Linda K.; Samad, Zainab; Lopes, Renato D.; Alexander, John H.; Mathew, Joseph P.; Velazquez, Eric J.; Milano, Carmelo A.; Smith, Peter K.

    2014-01-01

    Background The optimal treatment for ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR) remains actively debated. Our objective was to evaluate the relationship between IMR treatment strategy and survival. Methods and Results We retrospectively reviewed patients at our institution diagnosed with significant coronary artery disease and moderate or severe IMR from 1990–2009, categorized by medical treatment alone (MED), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), or CABG + mitral valve repair or replacement (MVRR). Kaplan-Meier methods and multivariable Cox proportional hazard analyses were performed to assess the relationship between treatment strategy and survival, using propensity scores to account for nonrandom treatment assignment. A total of 4,989 patients were included: MED = 36%, PCI = 26%, CABG = 33%, and CABG+MVRR = 5%. Median follow-up was 5.37 years. Compared to MED, significantly lower mortality was observed in patients treated with PCI [adjusted hazard ratio (AHR): 0.83, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.76 – 0.92, p=0.0002], CABG (AHR: 0.56, CI: 0.51 – 0.62, p<0.0001), and CABG+MVRR (AHR: 0.69, CI: 0.57 – 0.82, p<0.0001). There was no significant difference in these results based on MR severity. Conclusions Patients with significant coronary artery disease and moderate or severe IMR undergoing CABG alone demonstrated the lowest risk of death. CABG with or without mitral valve surgery was associated with lower mortality than either PCI or MED. PMID:24744275

  3. Early stabilization of traumatic aortic transection and mitral valve regurgitation with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Lambrechts, David L; Wellens, Francis; Vercoutere, Rik A; De Geest, Raf

    2003-01-01

    We report a case of life-threatening aortic transection with concomitant mitral papillary muscle rupture and severe lung contusion caused by a failed parachute jump. This blunt thoracic injury was treated by early stabilization with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation followed by successful delayed graft repair of the descending aorta and mitral valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis.

  4. Flexible band versus rigid ring annuloplasty for functional tricuspid regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Izutani, Hironori; Nakamura, Teruya; Kawachi, Kanji

    2010-12-31

    We review and compare our experience with tricuspid ring annuloplasty between usage of the Cosgrove-Edwards flexible band and the MC(3) rigid ring for repair of functional tricuspid regurgitation to determine the efficacy and mid-term durability of tricuspid annuloplasty. 117 patients with functional tricuspid regurgitation undergoing open heart surgery and tricuspid valve repair from May 2005 to December 2007 were reviewed. The flexible bands were used in thirty five patients before October 2006. Since then, the rigid rings were used in the next consecutive eighty two cases. Echocardiographic evaluation of tricuspid regurgitation was performed preoperatively and postoperatively in follow-up schedule. The degree of tricuspid regurgitation was reduced from 2.80±0.67 to 0.71±1.0 (regurgitation severity grade: 0 to 4) in the patients with flexible bands at discharge. It was from 2.68±0.70 to 0.22±0.60 in the patients with rigid rings. At thirty six months postoperative period, tricuspid regurgitation grades in patients with flexible bands and rigid rings were 0.80±0.95 and 0.36±0.77, respectively. Freedom from recurrent tricuspid regurgitation (grade 2 or 3) in patients with flexible bands and rigid rings were 68.6% and 87.8%, respectively. Recurrent tricuspid regurgitation was significantly lower in the patients with rigid rings. Although both flexible band and rigid ring annuloplasty provide low rate of recurrent tricuspid regurgitation, rigid ring annuloplasty might be more effective than flexible band annuloplasty for decreasing functional tricuspid regurgitation in immediate and mid-term postoperative periods.

  5. Comparison of the Outcomes of Modified Artificial Chordae Technique for Mitral Regurgitation through Right Minithoracotomy or Median Sternotomy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhao-Lei; Feng, Xiao-Yuan; Ma, Nan; Zhu, Jia-Quan; Zhang, Li; Ding, Fang-Bao; Bao, Chun-Rong; Mei, Ju

    2016-01-01

    Background: Right minithoracotomy (RM) has been proven to be a safe and effective approach for mitral valve surgery, but the differences of artificial chordae technique between RM and median sternotomy (MS) were seldom reported. Here, we compared the outcomes of modified artificial chordae technique for mitral regurgitation (MR) through RM or MS approaches. Methods: One hundred and eighteen consecutive adult patients who received mitral valve repair with artificial chordae and annuloplasty for MR through RM (n = 58) or MS (n = 60) from January 2006 to January 2015 were analyzed. Results: All of the selected patients underwent mitral valve repair successfully without any complication during the surgery. There was no significant difference between RM group and MS group in cardiopulmonary bypass time, aortic cross-clamp time, and early postoperative complications. However, compared with the MS group, the RM group had shorter hospital stay and faster surgical recovery. At a mean follow-up of 44.8 ± 25.0 months, the freedom from more than moderate MR was 93.9% ± 3.5% in RM group and 94.8% ± 2.9% in MS group at 3 years postoperatively. Log-rank test showed that there was no significant difference in the freedom from recurrent significant MR between the two groups (χ2 = 0.247, P = 0.619). Multivariate analysis revealed that the presence of mild MR at discharge was the independent risk factor for the recurrent significant MR. Conclusion: Right minithoracotomy can achieve the similar therapeutic effects with MS for the patients who received modified artificial chordae technique for treating MR. PMID:27625084

  6. Automated quantification of mitral valve regurgitation based on normalized centerline velocity distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deserranno, D.; Greenberg, N. L.; Thomas, J. D.; Garcia, M. J.

    2001-01-01

    Previous echocardiographic techniques for quantifying valvular regurgitation are limited by factors including uncertainties for orifice location and a hemispheric convergence assumption that often results in over- and underestimation of flow rate and regurgitant orifice area. Using computational fluid dynamics simulations, these factors were eliminated, allowing a more accurate assessment of regurgitation. A model was developed to allow automated quantification of regurgitant orifice diameter based on the centerline velocity data available from color M-mode echocardiography. The model, validated using in vitro unsteady flow data, demonstrated improved accuracy for orifice diameter (y=0.95x + 0.38, r=0.96) and volume (y=1.18x - 4.72, r=0.93).

  7. Automated quantification of mitral valve regurgitation based on normalized centerline velocity distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deserranno, D.; Greenberg, N. L.; Thomas, J. D.; Garcia, M. J.

    2001-01-01

    Previous echocardiographic techniques for quantifying valvular regurgitation are limited by factors including uncertainties for orifice location and a hemispheric convergence assumption that often results in over- and underestimation of flow rate and regurgitant orifice area. Using computational fluid dynamics simulations, these factors were eliminated, allowing a more accurate assessment of regurgitation. A model was developed to allow automated quantification of regurgitant orifice diameter based on the centerline velocity data available from color M-mode echocardiography. The model, validated using in vitro unsteady flow data, demonstrated improved accuracy for orifice diameter (y=0.95x + 0.38, r=0.96) and volume (y=1.18x - 4.72, r=0.93).

  8. Relief of mitral incompetence by selective intracoronary thrombolysis in hyperacute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Keltai, M; Palik, I; Rozsa, Z; Szente, A

    1985-01-01

    Left ventriculography and coronary arteriography were performed in 47 patients with hyperacute myocardial infarction prior to recanalization of the infarct-related vessel. Mitral regurgitation was found in ten patients. After successful recanalization, left ventriculography was repeated in eight of the ten patients with mitral incompetence, and the mitral regurgitation had disappeared in seven. Selective intracoronary thrombolysis resulted in improved left ventricular function and disappearance of mitral incompetence.

  9. Role of vasodilators in regurgitant valve disease.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, Artur; Tornos, Pilar; Sambola, Antonia; Permayer-Miralda, Gaieta

    2006-12-01

    Vasodilator therapy is designed to reduce regurgitant volume and improve left ventricular function. Acute administration reduces vascular resistance and decreases regurgitant volume and left ventricular filling pressure. These effects may be clinically useful in acute regurgitations, but less consistent results have been reported in long-term therapy. In chronic mitral functional regurgitation, vasodilator therapy has proved to have clinical or prognostic benefit only when heart failure or poor ventricular function is present. The indication of vasodilator treatment in aortic regurgitation has raised significant controversy. Several studies with small series have shown beneficial effects on regurgitant volume, ejection fraction, and mass of the left ventricle. Nevertheless, in the only two randomized long-term follow-up studies, results differed completely. In our experience, both nifedipine and enalapril failed to reduce the need for valvular surgery or show benefits in echocardiographic parameters. Vasodilator therapy would be indicated only in patients with severe aortic regurgitation and systemic hypertension, or when surgery is contraindicated.

  10. Survival implication of left ventricular end-systolic diameter in mitral regurgitation due to flail leaflets a long-term follow-up multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Tribouilloy, Christophe; Grigioni, Francesco; Avierinos, Jean François; Barbieri, Andrea; Rusinaru, Dan; Szymanski, Catherine; Ferlito, Marinella; Tafanelli, Laurence; Bursi, Francesca; Trojette, Faouzi; Branzi, Angelo; Habib, Gilbert; Modena, Maria G; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice

    2009-11-17

    This study analyzed the association of left ventricular end-systolic diameter (LVESD) with survival after diagnosis in organic mitral regurgitation (MR) due to flail leaflets. LVESD is a marker of left ventricular function in patients with organic MR but its association to survival after diagnosis is unknown. The MIDA (Mitral Regurgitation International Database) registry is a multicenter registry of echocardiographically diagnosed organic MR due to flail leaflets. We enrolled 739 patients with MR due to flail leaflets (age 65 +/- 12 years; ejection fraction: 65 +/- 10%) in whom LVESD was measured (36 +/- 7 mm). Under conservative management, 10-year survival and survival free of cardiac death were higher with LVESD <40 mm versus > or =40 mm (64 +/- 5% vs. 48 +/- 10%; p < 0.001, and 73 +/- 5% vs. 63 +/- 10%; p = 0.001). LVESD > or =40 mm independently predicted overall mortality (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.95, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01 to 3.83) and cardiac mortality (HR: 3.09, 95% CI: 1.35 to 7.09) under conservative management. Mortality risk increased linearly with LVESD >40 mm (HR: 1.15, 95% CI: 1.04 to 1.27 per 1-mm increment). During the entire follow-up (including post-surgical), LVESD > or =40 mm independently predicted overall mortality (HR: 1.86, 95% CI: 1.24 to 2.80) and cardiac mortality (HR: 2.14, 95% CI: 1.29 to 3.56), due to persistence of excess mortality in patients with LVESD > or =40 mm after surgery (HR: 1.86, 95% CI: 1.11 to 3.15 for overall death, and HR: 1.81, 95% CI: 1.05 to 3.54 for cardiac death). In MR due to flail leaflets, LVESD > or =40 mm is independently associated with increased mortality under medical management but also after mitral surgery. These findings support prompt surgical rescue in patients with LVESD > or =40 mm but also suggest that best preservation of survival is achieved in patients operated before LVESD reaches 40 mm.

  11. Transient mitral regurgitation: An adjunctive sign of myocardial ischemia during dipyridamole-thallium imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lette, J.; Gagnon, A.; Lapointe, J.; Cerino, M.

    1989-07-01

    A patient developed transient exacerbation of a mitral insufficiency murmur and a reversible posterior wall perfusion defect during dipyridamole-thallium imaging. Coronary angiography showed significant stenoses of both the right and the circumflex coronary arteries that supply the posterior papillary muscle. Cardiac auscultation for transient mitral incompetence, a sign of reversible papillary muscle dysfunction, is a simple and practical adjunctive test for myocardial ischemia during dipyridamole-thallium imaging. It may confirm that an isolated reversible posterior wall myocardial perfusion defect is truly ischemic in nature as opposed to an artifact resulting from attenuation by the diaphragm.

  12. [Color Doppler identification of early diastolic turbulence in the left atrium in patients with mitral valve insufficiency: persistence of regurgitation or inertia phenomenon?].

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, G; Moro, E; Nicolosi, G L; Dall'Aglio, V; Mimo, R; Mangano, S; Zanuttini, D

    1990-08-01

    Color Doppler flow mapping represents the most recent non invasive diagnostic tool for the visualization of intracardiac blood flow. By using the color Doppler flow mapping technique, two independent observers identified the persistence of turbulence in early diastole inside the left atrium in a selected group of 8 patients (3 F and 5 M) with mitral insufficiency. All the patients had moderate or severe mitral insufficiency, due to dilated cardiomyopathy and/or ischemic cardiomyopathy and/or valvular disease. The persistence of early diastolic turbulence inside the left atrium was documented and confirmed by using 30 degrees color sector images, which show the highest possible frame rate. The frame by frame analysis facilitated the identification of two simultaneous flow velocities during early diastole, after the mitral valve was open. The first flow was anterograde and was coded as a red signal; it flowed from the mitral valve into the left ventricle and represented early diastolic left ventricular filling. The second flow was retrograde, and was coded as a blue mosaic signal, due to turbulent aliased jet, extending from the mitral valve into the left atrium, away from the transducer. The interpretation of these two dimensional color Doppler findings is uncertain. We believe, however, that these turbulent velocity signals which persist in early diastole and flow from the mitral valve into the left atrium are probably caused by inertial blood flow due to the impact of regurgitant mitral jets during the previous systole.

  13. Ideal site for ventricular anchoring of artificial chordae in mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Weber, Alberto; Hurni, Samuel; Vandenberghe, Stijn; Wahl, Andreas; Aymard, Thierry; Vogel, Rolf; Carrel, Thierry

    2012-04-01

    Surgical treatment of mitral leaflet prolapse using artificial neochordae shows excellent outcomes. Upcoming devices attempt the same treatment in a minimally invasive way but target the left ventricular apex as an anchoring point, rather than the tip of the corresponding papillary muscle. In this study, cine cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was used to compare these 2 different anchoring positions and their dynamic relationship with the mitral leaflets. Eleven healthy volunteers (mean age, 31 years; 6 female; mean ejection fraction, 62%) were examined by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (3 Tesla, cine steady free precession technique with retrospective gating), whereby dedicated software enabled assessment of the physiologic distances among 3 anchoring sites (anterior papillary muscle, posterior papillary muscle, and apex) and the plane of the mitral annulus at the level of leaflet coaptation. These distances were measured in systole and diastole, and the performance of virtual neochordae was analyzed for the 3 potential anchoring sites. Length difference between systole and diastole for the 3 measured distances were 0.19 ± 0.11 cm (5.9% ± 3.4%) for the anterior papillary muscle, 0.19 ± 0.09 cm (6.7% ± 3.6%) for the posterior papillary muscle, and 1.52 ± 0.18 cm (17.8% ± 2.8%) for the left ventricular apex (P = .001). Virtual neochordae between the leaflet and the left ventricular apex were first adjusted in systole to achieve leaflet coaptation. Leaflet tear in diastole can only be avoided if the width of the attached leaflet is larger than the systole-diastole length difference. On the other hand, if virtual neochordae are adjusted in diastole to avoid leaflet tear, residual leaflet prolapse during systole can result. Because the systole-diastole length difference for papillary muscle anchored chordae is smaller than for apical chordae by a factor 10, there is a strongly reduced risk of prolapse or tearing and the leaflet width is unimportant

  14. Cardiogenic Shock, Acute Severe Mitral Regurgitation and Complete Heart Block After Cavo-Tricuspid Isthmus Atrial Flutter Ablation.

    PubMed

    Aung, Thein Tun; Roberto, Edward Samuel; Kravitz, Kevin D

    2017-04-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation is the first-line management of cavo-tricuspid isthmus dependent atrial flutter. It has been performed with 95% success rate. Adverse events are very rare. We report the first case of acute severe mitral regurgitation (MR) and complete heart block developed after successful atrial flutter ablation. A 62-year-old female with mild MR presented with palpitations. Surface electrocardiogram was suggestive of isthmus dependent atrial flutter. A duodecapolar mapping catheter showed an atrial flutter with cycle length of 280 ms. An 8 mm tipped Thermistor RF ablation catheter was placed at the cavo-tricuspid isthmus. RF energy was delivered as the catheter was dragged to the inferior vena cava. Temperature limit was 60 °C; the power output limit was 60 W. The patient converted to sinus rhythm with the first ablation line. Bi-directional block was recorded. Two additional ablation lines lasting 60 - 120 s were delivered. The patient started having chest pain and developed complete heart block with no escape rhythm. She became hypotensive and was immediately paced from the right ventricle. There were no signs of pericardial tamponade. Emergent bedside echo demonstrated severe MR with a retracted posteromedial mitral valve leaflet. She was 100% paced and EKG changes could not be assessed. Based on the sudden onset chest pain, hypotension, complete heart block and acute severe MR after ablation, the right coronary artery occlusion was suspected. She was immediately transferred to the catheterization laboratory. Coronary angiography revealed a total occlusion of the posterolateral branch from the right coronary artery. Balloon angioplasty and coronary artery stenting was performed. Complete heart block subsequently resolved. Subsequent bedside echocardiogram showed marked improvement of the MR. Patients with smaller body size have smaller hearts and more likely to have injury from RF current. Higher energy penetrates deeper and causes more tissue

  15. Alterations in Atrial Electrophysiology and Tissue Structure in a Canine Model of Chronic Atrial Dilatation Due to Mitral Regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Verheule, Sander; Wilson, Emily; Everett, Thomas; Shanbhag, Sujata; Golden, Catherine; Olgin, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    Background Clinically, chronic atrial dilatation is associated with an increased incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF), but the underlying mechanism is not clear. We have investigated atrial electrophysiology and tissue structure in a canine model of chronic atrial dilatation due to mitral regurgitation (MR). Methods and Results Thirteen control and 19 MR dogs (1 month after partial mitral valve avulsion) were studied. Dogs in the MR group were monitored using echocardiography and Holter recording. In open-chest follow-up experiments, electrode arrays were placed on the atria to investigate conduction patterns, effective refractory periods, and inducibility of AF. Alterations in tissue structure and ultrastructure were assessed in atrial tissue samples. At follow-up, left atrial length in MR dogs was 4.09±0.45 cm, compared with 3.25±0.28 at baseline (P<0.01), corresponding to a volume of 205±61% of baseline. At follow-up, no differences in atrial conduction pattern and conduction velocities were noted between control and MR dogs. Effective refractory periods were increased homogeneously throughout the left and right atrium. Sustained AF (>1 hour) was inducible in 10 of 19 MR dogs and none of 13 control dogs (P<0.01). In the dilated MR left atrium, areas of increased interstitial fibrosis and chronic inflammation were accompanied by increased glycogen ultrastructurally. Conclusions Chronic atrial dilatation in the absence of overt heart failure leads to an increased vulnerability to AF that is not based on a decrease in wavelength. PMID:12732604

  16. Aortic coarctation associated with aortic valve stenosis and mitral regurgitation in an adult patient: a two-stage approach using a large-diameter stent graft.

    PubMed

    Novosel, Luka; Perkov, Dražen; Dobrota, Savko; Ćorić, Vedran; Štern Padovan, Ranka

    2014-02-01

    We report a case of a staged surgical and endovascular management in a 62-year-old woman with aortic coarctation associated with aortic valve stenosis and mitral regurgitation. The patient was admitted for severe aortic valve stenosis and mitral valve incompetence. During hospitalization and preoperative imaging, a previously undiagnosed aortic coarctation was discovered. The patient underwent a 2-stage approach that combined a Bentall procedure and mitral valve replacement in the first stage, followed by correction of the aortic coarctation by percutaneous placement of an Advanta V12 large-diameter stent graft (Atrium, Mijdrecht, The Netherlands) which to our knowledge has not been used in an adult patient with this combination of additional cardiac comorbidities. A staged approach combining surgical treatment first and endovascular placement of an Advanta V12 stent graft in the second stage can be effective and safe in adult patients with coarctation of the aorta and additional cardiac comorbidities.

  17. Survival, Exercise Capacity, and Left Ventricular Remodeling in a Rat Model of Chronic Mitral Regurgitation: Serial Echocardiography and Pressure-Volume Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung-Hee; Lee, Seung-Pyo; Kim, Hyung-Kwan; Seo, Jeong-Wook; Sohn, Dae-Won; Oh, Byung-Hee; Park, Young-Bae

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives The aims of this study were to establish a reliable model of chronic mitral regurgitation (MR) in rats and verify the pathophysiological features of this model by evaluating cardiac function using serial echocardiography and a pressure-volume analysis. Materials and Methods MR was created in 37 Sprague-Dawley rats by making a hole with a 23 gauge needle on the mitral leaflet through the left ventricular (LV) apex under the guidance of transesophageal echocardiography. Results Serial echocardiograms revealed that the LV began to dilate immediately after the MR operation and showed progressive dilation until the 14th week (LV end-systolic dimension at 14 weeks, 4.71±0.25 mm vs. 6.81±0.50 mm for sham vs. MR, p<0.01; LV end-diastolic dimension, 8.32±0.42 mm vs. 11.01±0.47 mm, p<0.01). The LV ejection fraction tended to increase immediately after the MR operation but started to decrease thereafter and showed a significant difference with the sham group from the 14th week (70.0±2.2% vs. 62.1±3.1% for sham vs. MR). In a pressure-volume analysis performed at the 14th week, the LV end-systolic pressure-volume relationship and +dp/dt decreased significantly in the MR group. A serial treadmill test revealed that exercise capacity remained in the normal range until the 14th week when it began to decrease (exercise duration, 406±45 seconds vs. 330±27 seconds, p<0.01). A pathological analysis showed no significance difference in interstitial fibrosis between the two groups. Conclusion We established a small animal model of chronic MR and verified its pathophysiological features. This model may provide a useful tool for future research on MR and volume overload heart failure. PMID:22125560

  18. Short communication: Distribution of Porphyromonas gulae fimA genotypes in oral specimens from dogs with mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Mitsuyuki; Nomura, Ryota; Kato, Yukio; Murakami, Masaru; Kondo, Chihiro; Takahashi, Soraaki; Yamasaki, Yoshie; Matsumoto-Nakano, Michiyo; Arai, Nobuaki; Yasuda, Hidemi; Nakano, Kazuhiko; Asai, Fumitoshi

    2015-10-01

    Porphyromonas gulae, a suspected pathogen for periodontal disease in dogs, possesses approximately 41-kDa fimbriae (FimA) that are encoded by the fimA gene. In the present study, the association of fimA genotypes with mitral regurgitation (MR) was investigated. Twenty-five dogs diagnosed with MR (age range 6-13 years old, average 10.8 years) and 32 healthy dogs (8-15 years old, average 10.8 years) were selected at the participating clinics in a consecutive manner during the same time period. Oral swab specimens were collected from the dogs and bacterial DNA was extracted, then polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed using primers specific for each fimA genotype, with the dominant genotype determined. The rate for genotype C dominant specimens was 48.0% in the MR group, which was significantly higher than that in the control group (18.8%) (P <0.05). These results suggest that P. gulae fimA genotype C is associated with MR.

  19. [Clinico-functional features of mitral valve prolapse in young military men].

    PubMed

    Gorbachenko, A V; Shalimov, P M

    2008-01-01

    One hundred and sixty-six young military man with mitral valve prolapse (MVP) aged 19.2+/-0.8 years were examined. Complex system approach to health status was applied to study clinico-functional features of this condition in young military men. The study found that clinico-functional manifestations of MVP in young military men reflected a multifocal character of dysadaptation during the first stages of military service. Conditions of professional military activity potentiate permanent progress of crisp prolapse as well as the severity of mitral regurgitation, structural and functional myocardial alterations, and myocardial electric instability increasing in the presence of abnormal cardiac chords under the influence of a prominent vegetative dysfunction. The reserve of the cardiorespiratory system and the entire organism in military men with MVP was lowered. The study registered inadequate hemodynamic responses to functional orthostatic test and physical load test, typical for hyperventilation syndrome.

  20. Finite Element Modeling of Mitral Valve Repair

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Ashley E.; Pantoja, Joe Luis; Weinsaft, Jonathan; Grossi, Eugene; Guccione, Julius M.; Ge, Liang; Ratcliffe, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The mitral valve is a complex structure regulating forward flow of blood between the left atrium and left ventricle (LV). Multiple disease processes can affect its proper function, and when these diseases cause severe mitral regurgitation (MR), optimal treatment is repair of the native valve. The mitral valve (MV) is a dynamic structure with multiple components that have complex interactions. Computational modeling through finite element (FE) analysis is a valuable tool to delineate the biomechanical properties of the mitral valve and understand its diseases and their repairs. In this review, we present an overview of relevant mitral valve diseases, and describe the evolution of FE models of surgical valve repair techniques. PMID:26632260

  1. Dynamic heart phantom with functional mitral and aortic valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannelli, Claire; Moore, John; McLeod, Jonathan; Ceh, Dennis; Peters, Terry

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac valvular stenosis, prolapse and regurgitation are increasingly common conditions, particularly in an elderly population with limited potential for on-pump cardiac surgery. NeoChord©, MitraClipand numerous stent-based transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) devices provide an alternative to intrusive cardiac operations; performed while the heart is beating, these procedures require surgeons and cardiologists to learn new image-guidance based techniques. Developing these visual aids and protocols is a challenging task that benefits from sophisticated simulators. Existing models lack features needed to simulate off-pump valvular procedures: functional, dynamic valves, apical and vascular access, and user flexibility for different activation patterns such as variable heart rates and rapid pacing. We present a left ventricle phantom with these characteristics. The phantom can be used to simulate valvular repair and replacement procedures with magnetic tracking, augmented reality, fluoroscopy and ultrasound guidance. This tool serves as a platform to develop image-guidance and image processing techniques required for a range of minimally invasive cardiac interventions. The phantom mimics in vivo mitral and aortic valve motion, permitting realistic ultrasound images of these components to be acquired. It also has a physiological realistic left ventricular ejection fraction of 50%. Given its realistic imaging properties and non-biodegradable composition—silicone for tissue, water for blood—the system promises to reduce the number of animal trials required to develop image guidance applications for valvular repair and replacement. The phantom has been used in validation studies for both TAVI image-guidance techniques1, and image-based mitral valve tracking algorithms2.

  2. Timing in resolution of left heart dilation according to the degree of mitral regurgitation in children with ventricular septal defect after surgical closure.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hwa Jin; Ma, Jae Sook; Cho, Young Kuk; Ahn, Byoung Hee; Na, Kook Joo; Jeong, In Seok

    2014-01-01

    Children with ventricular septal defects (VSD) can have chronic volume overload, which can result in changes of left heart echocardiographic parameters. To evaluate the changes before and after surgical closure, the children were divided into three groups according to the degree of mitral regurgitation (MR), and their echocardiographic characteristics were reviewed at serial follow-up after surgical closure. The preoperative, and one-, three-, and 12-month postoperative echocardiographic data of 40 children who underwent surgical closure of VSD were retrospectively reviewed. Left ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDV), left ventricular end-diastolic dimension (LVEDD), left ventricular end-systolic dimension (LVESD), mitral valvular characteristics, including degree of MR and mitral valve annulus, and left atrial (LA) characteristics, including volume and dimensions, were observed. Preoperative LVEDV, LVEDD, LVESD, mitral valvular annulus, LA volume, and LA dimensions were significantly larger in children with MR. Additionally, there were significant decreases in LVEDV, LVEDD, LA volume, and LA dimensions at one, three, and 12 months postoperatively. The degree of MR also improved to a lower grade after surgical closure of the VSD without additional mitral valve repair. The echocardiographic parameters of left heart dilation and MR in children with VSD improved within the first year after surgical closure without additional mitral valve repair. Furthermore, in all of the patients with VSD, regardless of MR, LA dilation was reduced within three months after surgical closure of the VSD; however, LV and mitral valve annular dilatation decreased within 12 months. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of three-dimensional proximal isovelocity surface area to cardiac magnetic resonance imaging for quantifying mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Brugger, Nicolas; Wustmann, Kerstin; Hürzeler, Michael; Wahl, Andreas; de Marchi, Stefano F; Steck, Hélène; Zürcher, Fabian; Seiler, Christian

    2015-04-15

    The aim of our study was to evaluate 3-dimensional (3D) color Doppler proximal isovelocity surface area (PISA) as a tool for quantitative assessment of mitral regurgitation (MR) against in vitro and in vivo reference methods. A customized 3D PISA software was validated in vitro against a flowmeter MR phantom. Sixty consecutive patients, with ≥mild MR of any cause, were recruited and the regurgitant volume (RVol) was measured by 2D PISA, 3D peak PISA, and 3D integrated PISA, using transthoracic (TTE) and transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) was used as reference method. Flowmeter RVol was associated with 3D integrated PISA as follows: y = 0.64x + 4.7, r(2) = 0.97, p <0.0001 for TEE and y = 0.88x + 4.07, r(2) = 0.96, p <0.0001 for TTE. The bias and limit of agreement in the Bland-Altman analysis were 6.8 ml [-3.5 to 17.1] for TEE and -0.059 ml [-6.2 to 6.1] for TTE. In vivo, TEE-derived 3D integrated PISA was the most accurate method for MR quantification compared to CMR: r(2) = 0.76, y = 0.95x - 3.95, p <0.0001; 5.1 ml (-14.7 to 26.5). It was superior to TEE 3D peak PISA (r(2) = 0.67, y = 1.00x + 6.20, p <0.0001; -6.3 ml [-33.4 to 21.0]), TEE 2D PISA (r(2) = 0.54, y = 0.76x + 0.18, p <0.0001; 8.4 ml [-20.4 to 37.2]), and TTE-derived measurements. It was also most accurate by receiver operating characteristic analysis (area under the curve 0.99) for the detection of severe MR, RVol cutoff = 48 ml, sensibility 100%, and specificity 96%. RVol and the cutoff to define severe MR were underestimated using the most accurate method. In conclusion, quantitative 3D color Doppler echocardiography of the PISA permits a more accurate MR assessment than conventional techniques and, consequently, should enable an optimized management of patients suffering from MR.

  4. High levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and uric acid can predict disease severity in patients with mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Turker, Yasin; Ekinozu, Ismail; Turker, Yasemin; Akkaya, Mehmet

    2014-11-01

    Both high-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) and uric acid (UA) levels are known to be increased in heart failure patients and are associated with poorer functional capacity and adverse outcome. The role of these markers in patients with mitral regurgitation (MR) is less clear. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between hs-CRP, UA and organic MR. We also assessed whether hs-CRP and UA levels are correlated with symptoms of MR, severity of MR, LV remodeling and outcome during follow-up. A total of 200 consecutive patients (87 men [43.5%]; mean age 61.6±12.5 years) with moderate or severe isolated and organic MR were included in the study. All the patients were assessed clinically and were managed and treated with standard medical therapy according to evidence-based practice guidelines. Patients were categorized according to New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class. We assessed and graded the severity of MR using a multiparametric approach. hs-CRP was measured with chemiluminescent immunometric assay using an IMMULITE® 1000 autoanalyzer (Siemens, Germany). Serum UA levels were analyzed using a Cobas® 6000 autoanalyzer (Roche Diagnostics, Mannheim, Germany). Mean UA levels increased significantly with NYHA class: 4.46±1.58 mg/dl for patients in NYHA class I, 5.91±1.69 mg/dl for class II, 6.31±2.16 mg/dl for class III and 8.86±3.17 mg/dl for class IV (p<0.001). Mean UA levels also increased significantly with increased severity of MR (moderate 5.62±1.9 mg/dl, moderate to severe 5.56±1.2 mg/dl, severe 7.38±3.4 mg/dl, p<0.001). There was a significant correlation between UA level and left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (r=0.40; p<0.001), left ventricular end-systolic diameter (r=0.297; p=0.001) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) (r=0.195, p=0.036), whereas hs-CRP was not correlated with these parameters. In multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis LVEF, NYHA class and UA levels were the only independent predictors of death

  5. Evaluation of left ventricular systolic function in young adults with mitral valve prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Malev, Eduard; Zemtsovsky, Eduard; Pshepiy, Asiyet; Timofeev, Eugeny; Reeva, Svetlana; Prokudina, Maria

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate left ventricular function in young adults with mitral valve prolapse (MVP) without significant mitral regurgitation using two-dimensional strain imaging. METHODS AND RESULTS: A total of 58 asymptomatic young subjects (mean [± SD] age 19.7±1.6 years; 72% male) with MVP were compared with 60 sex- and age-matched healthy subjects. MVP was diagnosed by billowing one or both mitral leaflets >2 mm above the mitral annulus in the long-axis parasternal view. Longitudinal, radial and circumferential strain and strain rate were determined using speckle tracking with a grey-scale frame rate of 50 fps to 85 fps. There were no significant differences in the global systolic left ventricular function of the subjects with MVP compared with the control group. In the MVP group, most of the global myocardial systolic deformation indexes were not reduced. Only the global circumferential strain showed a decrease in the prolapse subjects. Regional, longitudinal, circumferential and radial strain and strain rate were decreased only in septal segments. A decrease in the rotation of the same septal segments at the basal level was also observed. CONCLUSION: Regional septal myocardial deformation indexes decrease in subjects with MVP. These changes may be the first sign indicating the deterioration of left ventricular systolic function as well as the existence of primary cardiomyopathy in asymptomatic young subjects with MVP. PMID:23592928

  6. Role of concomitant tricuspid surgery in moderate functional tricuspid regurgitation in patients undergoing left heart valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Mahesh, Balakrishnan; Wells, Francis; Nashef, Samer; Nair, Sukumaran

    2013-01-01

    Functional tricuspid regurgitation (FTR) is frequently present in patients undergoing aortic, and particularly mitral valve, surgery. Untreated FTR may lead to right heart failure. Reoperative cardiac surgery for late FTR is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Therefore, severe FTR has emerged as a Class I indication for concomitant tricuspid valve surgery in patients undergoing left valve surgery. Concomitant tricuspid valve surgery during left heart valve surgery to address moderate and mild FTR is controversial. This review addresses this issue and proposes an algorithm for the treatment of FTR in patients undergoing left heart valve surgery.

  7. Safety and feasibility of a novel adjustable mitral annuloplasty ring: a multicentre European experience†

    PubMed Central

    Andreas, Martin; Doll, Nicolas; Livesey, Steve; Castella, Manuel; Kocher, Alfred; Casselman, Filip; Voth, Vladimir; Bannister, Christina; Encalada Palacios, Juan F.; Pereda, Daniel; Laufer, Guenther; Czesla, Markus

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Recurrent mitral regurgitation is a significant problem after mitral valve repair in patients with functional valve disease. We report the safety and feasibility of a novel adjustable mitral annuloplasty device that permits downsizing of the anterior–posterior diameter late after initial surgery. METHODS In this multicentre, non-randomized, observational register, patients with moderate or severe mitral regurgitation undergoing surgical mitral valve repair with the MiCardia EnCorSQ™ Mitral Valve Repair system were evaluated. Patient characteristics, operative specifications and results as well as postoperative follow-up were collected for all five centres. RESULTS Ninety-four patients with a median age of 71 (64–75) years (EuroSCORE II 6.7 ± 6.3; 66% male, 48% ischaemic MR, 37% dilated cardiomyopathy and 15% degenerative disease) were included. Operative mortality was 1% and the 1-year survival was 93%. Ring adjustment was attempted in 12 patients at a mean interval of 9 ± 6 months after surgery. In three of these attempts, a technical failure occurred. In 1 patient, mitral regurgitation was reduced two grades, in 2 patients mitral regurgitation was reduced one grade and in 6 patients, mitral regurgitation did not change significantly. The mean grade of mitral regurgitation changed from 2.9 ± 0.9 to 2.1 ± 0.7 (P = 0.02). Five patients were reoperated after 11 ± 9 months (Ring dehiscence: 2; failed adjustment: 3). CONCLUSION We conclude that this device may provide an additional treatment option in patients with functional mitral regurgitation, who are at risk for reoperation due to recurrent mitral regurgitation. Clinical results in this complex disease were ambiguous and patient selection seems to be a crucial step for this device. Further trials are required to estimate the clinical value of this therapeutic concept. PMID:25694471

  8. Transventricular mitral valve operations.

    PubMed

    Joseph Woo, Y; McCormick, Ryan C

    2011-10-01

    We report transventricular mitral valve operations in 2 patients with severe mitral regurgitation and postinfarction left ventricular rupture and pseudoaneurysm. The first patient had direct papillary muscle involvement necessitating replacement of the mitral valve. The second patient had indirect mitral involvement allowing for placement of an atrial mitral annuloplasty ring via the left ventricle. Both patients showed no mitral valve regurgitation after replacement or repair and had uneventful postoperative recoveries. These cases demonstrate a feasible, alternative, transventricular approach to mitral valve replacement and repair.

  9. Comparison of direct planimetry of mitral valve regurgitation orifice area by three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography to effective regurgitant orifice area obtained by proximal flow convergence method and vena contracta area determined by color Doppler echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Altiok, Ertunc; Hamada, Sandra; van Hall, Silke; Hanenberg, Mehtap; Dohmen, Guido; Almalla, Mohammed; Grabskaya, Eva; Becker, Michael; Marx, Nikolaus; Hoffmann, Rainer

    2011-02-01

    Direct measurement of anatomic regurgitant orifice area (AROA) by 3-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography was evaluated for analysis of mitral regurgitation (MR) severity. In 72 patients (age 70.6 ± 13.3 years, 37 men) with mild to severe MR, 3-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography and transthoracic color Doppler echocardiography were performed to determine AROA by direct planimetry, effective regurgitant orifice area (EROA) by proximal convergence method, and vena contracta area (VCA) by 2-dimensional color Doppler echocardiography. AROA was measured with commercially available software (QLAB, Philips Medical Systems, Andover, Massachusetts) after adjusting the first and second planes to reveal the smallest orifice in the third plane where planimetry could take place. AROA was classified as circular or noncircular by calculating the ratio of the medial-lateral distance above the anterior-posterior distance (≤1.5 compared to >1.5). AROA determined by direct planimetry was 0.30 ± 0.20 cm², EROA determined by proximal convergence method was 0.30 ± 0.20 cm², and VCA was 0.33 ± 0.23 cm². Correlation between AROA and EROA (r = 0.96, SEE 0.058 cm²) and between AROA and VCA (r = 0.89, SEE 0.105 cm²) was high considering all patients. In patients with a circular regurgitation orifice area (n = 14) the correlation between AROA and EROA was better (r = 0.99, SEE 0.036 cm²) compared to patients with noncircular regurgitation orifice area (n = 58, r = 0.94, SEE 0.061 cm²). Correlation between AROA and EROA was higher in an EROA ≥0.2 cm² (r = 0.95) than in an EROA <0.2 cm² (r = 0.60). In conclusion, direct measurement of MR AROA correlates well with EROA by proximal convergence method and VCA. Agreement between methods is better for patients with a circular regurgitation orifice area than in patients with a noncircular regurgitation orifice area. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Transcatheter Mitral Valve Repair Therapies: Evolution, Status and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Espiritu, Daniella; Onohara, Daisuke; Kalra, Kanika; Sarin, Eric L; Padala, Muralidhar

    2017-02-01

    Mitral regurgitation is a common cardiac valve lesion, developing from primary lesions of the mitral valve or secondary to cardiomyopathies. Moderate or higher severity of mitral regurgitation imposes significant volume overload on the left ventricle, causing permanent structural and functional deterioration of the myocardium and heart failure. Timely correction of regurgitation is essential to preserve cardiac function, but surgical mitral valve repair is often delayed due to the risks of open heart surgery. Since correction of mitral regurgitation can provide symptomatic relief and halt progressive cardiac dysfunction, transcatheter mitral valve repair technologies are emerging as alternative therapies. In this approach, the mitral valve is repaired either with sutures or implants that are delivered to the native valve on catheters introduced into the cardiovascular system under image guidance, through small vascular or ventricular ports. Several transcatheter mitral valve technologies are in development, but limited clinical success has been achieved. In this review, we present a historical perspective of mitral valve repair, review the transcatheter technologies emerging from surgical concepts, the challenges they face in achieving successful clinical application, and the increasing rigor of safety and durability standards for new transcatheter valve technologies.

  11. Mitral effective regurgitant orifice area versus left ventricular ejection fraction as prognostic indicators in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Venturi, Flavio; Gianfaldoni, Maria Luisa; Melina, Giovanni; Cecchi, Andrea; Petix, Nunzia Rosa; Monopoli, Anna; Taiti, Andrea; Mazzoni, Vincenzo; Fantini, Fabio

    2004-10-01

    This study aimed at investigating the relative powers of the quantitative evaluation of functional mitral regurgitation (FMR) and ejection fraction (EF) in predicting the clinical changes and prognosis of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) with severe systolic dysfunction. A total of 81 patients with DCM, EF < 0.40 and at least mild FMR were prospectively evaluated during a mean follow-up of 24 +/- 7 months. Twenty cardiac deaths were recorded. At the time of enrolment all patients underwent echocardiographic evaluation of the effective regurgitant orifice area (ERO), EF, left atrial area, and tenting area. In 42/81 patients, the data obtained at enrolment were compared to those measured at a mean follow-up of 10 +/- 2 months. A multivariate analysis was performed to determine the best predictor of NYHA class and mortality. There was a correlation between the NYHA class and the ERO (chi2 = 26.1, p = 0.0001) but not with EF (chi2 = 4.3, p = 0.22) and at multivariate analysis, the ERO was found to be the main determinant of the NYHA class (r = 0.64, standard error 0.6, p = 0.0001). The NYHA class remained unchanged or improved in 28/42 (67%) and deteriorated in 14/42 (33%) patients. In the first group, the ERO increased from 22.3 +/- 10 to 30.2 +/- 16.4 mm2 (p = 0.05) and the tenting area from 5.8 +/- 1.8 to 6.8 +/- 1.8 cm2 (p = 0.001); in the second group, the ERO increased from 25.1 +/- 5.6 to 39.0 +/- 14.5 mm2 (p = 0.04) and the tenting area from 5.9 +/- 2.1 to 7.6 +/- 1.8 cm2 (p = 0.0001), in both groups without significant changes in EF. The mortality was 8.1% in patients with an ERO < 21 mm2, 30.3% in patients with an ERO of 21-30 mm2, and 50% in those with an ERO > 30 mm2. The EF was similar in the three subgroups. At Cox multivariate analysis the best predictors of mortality were the ERO (chi2 = 13.83, p = 0.0001), EF (chi2 = 5.48, p = 0.019), and left atrial area (chi2 = 4.52, p = 0.04). FMR in DCM well correlated with the clinical status of the patients and its

  12. Chronic ischemic mitral regurgitation and papillary muscle infarction detected by late gadolinium-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Bouma, Wobbe; Willemsen, Hendrik M; Lexis, Chris P H; Prakken, Niek H; Lipsic, Erik; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Mariani, Massimo A; van der Harst, Pim; van der Horst, Iwan C C

    2016-12-01

    Both papillary muscle infarction (PMI) and chronic ischemic mitral regurgitation (CIMR) are associated with reduced survival after myocardial infarction. The influence of PMI on CIMR and factors influencing both entities are incompletely understood. We sought to determine the influence of PMI on CIMR after primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and to define independent predictors of PMI and CIMR. Between January 2011 and May 2013, 263 patients (mean age 57.8 ± 11.5 years) underwent late gadolinium-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and transthoracic echocardiography 4 months after PCI for STEMI. Infarct size, PMI, and mitral valve and left ventricular geometric and functional parameters were assessed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictors of PMI and CIMR (≥grade 2+). PMI was present in 61 patients (23 %) and CIMR was present in 86 patients (33 %). In patients with PMI, 52 % had CIMR, and in patients without PMI, 27 % had CIMR (P < 0.001). In multivariate analyses, infarct size [odds ratio (OR) 1.09 (95 % confidence interval 1.04-1.13), P < 0.001], inferior MI [OR 4.64 (1.04-20.62), P = 0.044], and circumflex infarct-related artery [OR 8.21 (3.80-17.74), P < 0.001] were independent predictors of PMI. Age [OR 1.08 (1.04-1.11), P < 0.001], infarct size [OR 1.09 (1.03-1.16), P = 0.003], tethering height [OR 19.30 (3.28-113.61), P = 0.001], and interpapillary muscle distance [OR 3.32 (1.31-8.42), P = 0.011] were independent predictors of CIMR. The risk of PMI is mainly associated with inferior infarction and infarction in the circumflex coronary artery. Although the prevalence of CIMR is almost doubled in the presence of PMI, PMI is not an independent predictor of CIMR. Tethering height and interpapillary muscle distance are the strongest independent predictors of CIMR.

  13. Primary Mitral Valve Regurgitation Outcome in Patients With Severe Aortic Stenosis 1 Year After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation: Echocardiographic Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Florentino, Thiago Marinho; Bihan, David Le; Abizaid, Alexandre Antonio Cunha; Cedro, Alexandre Vianna; Corrêa, Amably Pessoa; Santos, Alexandre Roginski Mendes Dos; Souza, Alexandre Costa; Bignoto, Tiago Costa; Sousa, José Eduardo Moraes Rego; Sousa, Amanda Guerra de Moraes Rego

    2017-07-10

    Mitral valve regurgitation (MR), present in up to 74% of the patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS), can be a negative prognostic factor when moderate or severe. The outcome of MR after percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and predictors associated with that outcome have not been well established in the literature. To assess the outcome of primary MR in patients submitted to TAVI and to identify associated factors. Observational study of patients with symptomatic severe AS submitted to TAVI from January 2009 to April 2015 at two specialized centers. Echocardiographic outcome was assessed with data collected before and 1 year after TAVI. Of the 91 patients with MR submitted to TAVI and followed up for at least 12 months, 67 (73.6%) had minimum/mild MR before the procedure and 24 (26.4%) had moderate/severe MR. Of those with minimum/mild MR, 62 (92.5%) had no change in the MR grade (p < 0.001), while 5 (7.5%) showed worsening. Of those with moderate/severe MR, 8 (33.3%) maintained the same grade and 16 (66.7%) improved it (p = 0.076). Patients with moderate/severe MR who improved MR grade had lower EuroSCORE II (p = 0.023) and STS morbidity (p = 0.027) scores, as compared to those who maintained the MR grade. MR grades change after TAVI. This study suggests a trend towards improvement in moderate/severe MR after TAVI, which was associated with lower preoperative risk scores. A insuficiência valvar mitral (IM), presente em até 74% dos pacientes com estenose aórtica (EA) grave, pode representar um fator prognóstico negativo quando moderada ou importante. A evolução da IM após implante percutâneo de valva aórtica transcateter (TAVI) e preditores associados a essa evolução não estão bem estabelecidos na literatura. Avaliar a evolução da IM primária em pacientes submetidos ao TAVI e identificar fatores associados a essa evolução. Realizou-se um estudo observacional em pacientes com EA grave sintomática, submetidos ao TAVI no

  14. Multiplanar strain quantification for assessment of right ventricular dysfunction and non-ischemic fibrosis among patients with ischemic mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Di Franco, Antonino; Kim, Jiwon; Rodriguez-Diego, Sara; Khalique, Omar; Siden, Jonathan Y; Goldburg, Samantha R; Mehta, Neil K; Srinivasan, Aparna; Ratcliffe, Mark B; Levine, Robert A; Crea, Filippo; Devereux, Richard B; Weinsaft, Jonathan W

    2017-01-01

    Ischemic mitral regurgitation (iMR) predisposes to right ventricular (RV) pressure and volume overload, providing a nidus for RV dysfunction (RVDYS) and non-ischemic fibrosis (NIF). Echocardiography (echo) is widely used to assess iMR, but performance of different indices as markers of RVDYS and NIF is unknown. iMR patients prospectively underwent echo and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) within 72 hours. Echo quantified iMR, assessed conventional RV indices (TAPSE, RV-S', fractional area change [FAC]), and strain via speckle tracking in apical 4-chamber (global longitudinal strain [RV-GLS]) and parasternal long axis orientation (transverse strain). CMR volumetrically quantified RVEF, and assessed ischemic pattern myocardial infarction (MI) and septal NIF. 73 iMR patients were studied; 36% had RVDYS (EF<50%) on CMR among whom LVEF was lower, PA systolic pressure higher, and MI size larger (all p<0.05). CMR RVEF was paralleled by echo results; correlations were highest for RV-GLS (r = 0.73) and lowest for RV-S' (r = 0.43; all p<0.001). RVDYS patients more often had CMR-evidenced NIF (54% vs. 7%; p<0.001). Whereas all RV indices were lower among NIF-affected patients (all p≤0.006), percent change was largest for transverse strain (48.3%). CMR RVEF was independently associated with RV-GLS (partial r = 0.57, p<0.001) and transverse strain (r = 0.38, p = 0.002) (R = 0.78, p<0.001). Overall diagnostic performance of RV-GLS and transverse strain were similar (AUC = 0.93[0.87-0.99]|0.91[0.84-0.99], both p<0.001), and yielded near equivalent sensitivity and specificity (85%|83% and 80%|79% respectively). Compared to conventional echo indices, RV strain parameters yield stronger correlation with CMR-defined RVEF and potentially constitute better markers of CMR-evidenced NIF in iMR.

  15. Differential effect of 3-dimensional color Doppler echocardiography for the quantification of mitral regurgitation according to the severity and characteristics.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaehuk; Heo, Ran; Hong, Geu-Ru; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Sung, Ji Min; Shin, Sang Hoon; Cho, In Jeong; Shim, Chi-Young; Chung, Namsik

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the differential effect of 3-dimensional color Doppler echocardiography for the quantification of mitral regurgitation (MR). Two-dimensional color Doppler echocardiography-based MR quantification has well-documented limitations. We consecutively enrolled 221 patients with MR. Adequate image quality was obtained by 2D- and 3D-color Doppler echocardiography in 211 (95.5%) patients. The quantitative differences between the MR volumes obtained by 2D- and 3D-proximal isovelocity surface area (PISA) were analyzed in various MR subgroups. In the validation cohort (n=52), MR volume obtained by 3D-PISA showed a better agreement with phase-contrast cardiac MRI than 2D-PISA (r=0.97 versus 0.84). In all 211 patients, 2D-PISA underestimated the MR volume when compared with 3D-PISA (52.4±19.6 versus 59.5±25.6 mL; P=0.005). A total of 33.3% with severe MR based on 3D-PISA were incorrectly assessed by 2D-PISA as having nonsevere MR. In the subgroup analysis, the MR severity (odds ratio, 6.96; 95% confidence interval, 3.04-15.94; P<0.001) and having an asymmetrical orifice (odds ratio, 11.48; 95% confidence interval, 3.72-35.4; P<0.001), and an eccentric jet (odds ratio, 3.82; 95% confidence interval, 1.27-11.48; P=0.017) were predictors of significant difference in MR volume (>15 mL) between 2D- and 3D-PISA methods. Quantification of MR by 3D-PISA method is clinically feasible and more accurate than the current 2D-PISA method. MR quantification by 2D-PISA significantly underestimated MR volume with severe, eccentric MR with an asymmetrical orifice. This article demonstrates that 3D-color Doppler echocardiography could be used as a valuable tool to confirm treatment strategy in patients with significant MR. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Exploring Regulatory Mechanisms of Atrial Myocyte Hypertrophy of Mitral Regurgitation through Gene Expression Profiling Analysis: Role of NFAT in Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tzu-Hao; Chen, Mien-Cheng; Chang, Jen-Ping; Huang, Hsien-Da; Ho, Wan-Chun; Lin, Yu-Sheng; Pan, Kuo-Li; Huang, Yao-Kuang; Liu, Wen-Hao; Wu, Chia-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Background Left atrial enlargement in mitral regurgitation (MR) predicts a poor prognosis. The regulatory mechanisms of atrial myocyte hypertrophy of MR patients remain unknown. Methods and Results This study comprised 14 patients with MR, 7 patients with aortic valve disease (AVD), and 6 purchased samples from normal subjects (NC). We used microarrays, enrichment analysis and quantitative RT-PCR to study the gene expression profiles in the left atria. Microarray results showed that 112 genes were differentially up-regulated and 132 genes were differentially down-regulated in the left atria between MR patients and NC. Enrichment analysis of differentially expressed genes demonstrated that “NFAT in cardiac hypertrophy” pathway was not only one of the significant associated canonical pathways, but also the only one predicted with a non-zero score of 1.34 (i.e. activated) through Ingenuity Pathway Analysis molecule activity predictor. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis Global Molecular Network analysis exhibited that the highest score network also showed high association with cardiac related pathways and functions. Therefore, 5 NFAT associated genes (PPP3R1, PPP3CB, CAMK1, MEF2C, PLCE1) were studies for validation. The mRNA expressions of PPP3CB and MEF2C were significantly up-regulated, and CAMK1 and PPP3R1 were significantly down-regulated in MR patients compared to NC. Moreover, MR patients had significantly increased mRNA levels of PPP3CB, MEF2C and PLCE1 compared to AVD patients. The atrial myocyte size of MR patients significantly exceeded that of the AVD patients and NC. Conclusions Differentially expressed genes in the “NFAT in cardiac hypertrophy” pathway may play a critical role in the atrial myocyte hypertrophy of MR patients. PMID:27907007

  17. The Prognostic Value of the Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction Is Dependent upon the Severity of Mitral Regurgitation in Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jung Sun; Youn, Ho-Joong; Her, Sung-Ho; Park, Maen Won; Kim, Chan Joon; Park, Gyung-Min; Jeong, Myung Ho; Cho, Jae Yeong; Ahn, Youngkeun; Kim, Kye Hun; Park, Jong Chun; Seung, Ki Bae; Cho, Myeong Chan; Kim, Chong Jin; Kim, Young Jo; Han, Kyoo Rok; Kim, Hyo Soo

    2015-07-01

    The prognostic value of the left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has been questioned even though it is an accurate marker of left ventricle (LV) systolic dysfunction. This study aimed to examine the prognostic impact of LVEF in patients with AMI with or without high-grade mitral regurgitation (MR). A total of 15,097 patients with AMI who received echocardiography were registered in the Korean Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry (KAMIR) between January 2005 and July 2011. Patients with low-grade MR (grades 0-2) and high-grade MR (grades 3-4) were divided into the following two sub-groups according to LVEF: LVEF ≤ 40% (n = 2,422 and 197, respectively) and LVEF > 40% (n = 12,252 and 226, respectively). The primary endpoints were major adverse cardiac events (MACE), cardiac death, and all-cause death during the first year after registration. Independent predictors of mortality in the multivariate analysis in AMI patients with low-grade MR were age ≥ 75 yr, Killip class ≥ III, N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide > 4,000 pg/mL, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein ≥ 2.59 mg/L, LVEF ≤ 40%, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). However, PCI was an independent predictor in AMI patients with high-grade MR. No differences in primary endpoints between AMI patients with high-grade MR (grades 3-4) and EF ≤ 40% or EF > 40% were noted. MR is a predictor of a poor outcome regardless of ejection fraction. LVEF is an inadequate method to evaluate contractile function of the ischemic heart in the face of significant MR.

  18. [Intraoperative evaluation of mitral valve reconstruction using two-dimensional contrast echocardiography].

    PubMed

    Viossat, J; Chauvaud, S; Mihaileanu, S; Pillière, R; Sicre, P; Schnebert, B; Abbou, B; Lafont, A; Julien, J; Marino, J P

    1986-09-01

    20 patients who underwent reconstructive surgery for mitral regurgitation were peroperatively investigated by contrasted bidimensional echocardiography using intraventricular injection of 20 ml of physiologic saline. Before the valvuloplasty, the peroperative quantitation of mitral leakage was in all cases closely correlated with the data obtained preoperatively. After the mitral reparation, three groups of patients could be observed: group I (12 cases): absent or minimal regurgitation (0-+); group II (5 cases): moderate mitral regurgitation (++); group III (3 cases): marked regurgitation ( - +) necessitating an immediate ECC. In two cases it was possible to improve successfully the valvular function, in the third case valvular replacement was necessary. The correlation between the data of peroperative contrasted echography at one hand and the clinical examination and the postoperative paraclinical investigations on the other hand was excellent in all cases. Thus the contrasted bidimensional peroperative echocardiography represents a reliable method for predicting the immediate results of mitral reconstructive surgery.

  19. Mitral valve regurgitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... your provider and dentist if you have a history of heart valve disease or congenital heart disease before treatment. Some people ... In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap ...

  20. Relation between early mitral regurgitation and left ventricular thrombus formation after acute myocardial infarction: results of the GISSI-3 echo substudy

    PubMed Central

    Ascione, L; Antonini-Canterin, F; Macor, F; Cervesato, E; Chiarella, F; Giannuzzi, P; Temporelli, P L; Gentile, F; Lucci, D; Maggioni, A P; Tavazzi, L; Badano, L; Stoian, I; Piazza, R; Bosimini, E; Pavan, D; Nicolosi, G L

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the prevalence and correlates of left ventricular thrombosis in patients with acute myocardial infarction, and whether the occurrence of early mitral regurgitation has a protective effect against the formation of left ventricular thrombus. Design and setting: Multicentre clinical trial carried out in 47 Italian coronary care units. Patients and methods: 757 patients from the GISSI-3 echo substudy population with their first acute myocardial infarct were studied by echocardiography at 24–48 hours from symptom onset (S1), at discharge (S2), at six weeks (S3), and at six months (S4). The diagnosis of left ventricular thrombosis was based on the detection of an echo dense mass with defined margins visible throughout the cardiac cycle in at least two orthogonal views. Results: In 64 patients (8%), left ventricular thrombosis was detected in one or more examinations. Compared with the remaining 693 patients, subjects with left ventricular thrombosis were older (mean (SD) age: 64.6 (13.0) v 59.8 (11.7) years, p < 0.005), and had larger infarcts (extent of wall motion asynergy: 40.9 (11.5)% v 24.9 (14)%, p < 0.001), greater depression of left ventricular ejection fraction at S1 (43.3 (6.9)% v 48.1 (6.8)%, p < 0.001), and greater left ventricular volumes at S1 (end diastolic volume: 87 (22) v 78 (18) ml/m2, p < 0.001; end systolic volume: 50 (17) v 41 (14) ml/m2, p < 0.001). The prevalence of moderate to severe mitral regurgitation on colour Doppler at S1 was greater in patients who had left ventricular thrombosis at any time (10.2% v 4.2%, p < 0.05). On stepwise multiple logistic regression analysis the only independent variables related to the presence of left ventricular thrombosis were the extent of wall motion asynergy and anterior site of infarction. Conclusions: Left ventricular thrombosis is not reduced, and may even be increased, by early moderate to severe mitral regurgitation after acute myocardial infarction. The only independent

  1. Unusual vanishing interstitial lymphatic "pearls" in a patient presenting with extensive interstitial and mediastinal MDCT features of acute cardiogenic failure related to bradycardia and mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Coulier, Bruno; El Khoury, Elie; Deprez, Fabrice C; Ghaye, Benoît; Van den Broeck, Stephane; Tourmous, Hussein

    2014-12-01

    Thoracic multidetector computed tomography-MDCT-was simultaneously performed during emergency abdominal CT in a patient presenting with abdominal pain and acute cardiogenic edema related to sick sinus syndrome and mitral prolapse with regurgitation. A constellation of severe but completely reversible interstitial and mediastinal features was found comprising pleural effusions, diffuse alveolar ground glass, thickening of the bronchial walls and septal lines, hazy infiltration of the mediastinal fat, and enlarged lymphatic nodes. Multiple atypical hypodense nodular "pearls" were also found. These oval shape or fusiform pearls were distributed along the thickened septal lines and disappeared completely after treatment. The hypothesis of transient lymphatic ectasia or lakes is proposed for these never previously described abnormalities.

  2. Late outcome of tricuspid annuloplasty using a flexible band/ring for functional tricuspid regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Naoto; Okada, Yukikatsu; Konishi, Yasunobu; Murashita, Takashi; Koyama, Tadaaki

    2015-01-01

    We assessed late outcome after tricuspid annuloplasty (TAP) using a flexible band or ring for functional tricuspid regurgitation (FTR). We reviewed 220 consecutive patients (mean age, 65.4±11.4 years) who underwent TAP for FTR during mitral valve surgery between January 2000 and December 2010. Indications for TAP included the following: (1) TR grade greater than mild; (2) history of right heart failure; (3) atrial fibrillation; and (4) systolic pulmonary artery pressure (SPAP) ≥50 mmHg. The mean follow-up period was 4.4±2.6 years. Overall hospital mortality was 5.5% (12/220). The 5- and 10-year survival rates were 90.2±2.1% and 82.4±5.6%, respectively. Freedom from recurrent TR at 8 years was 78.0±6.6%. Twenty patients had a greater than mild TR grade at final follow-up. Elevated SPAP was a predictor of recurrent TR (hazard ratio, 1.091; P=0.0003), which was associated with advanced age, atrial fibrillation, rheumatic etiology and preoperative TR grade. There was a significant difference in freedom from valve-related events between residual TR greater than mild and less than moderate (log-rank test, P=0.0464). Factors affecting residual TR were preoperative TR grade (OR, 7.368; P=0.0267) and mitral valve replacement (OR, 4.369; P=0.0402). Late outcome of TAP in the present series was acceptable. Late outcome can be improved by performing TAP before deterioration of TR.

  3. Moderate ischemic mitral regurgitation after postero-lateral myocardial infarction in sheep alters left ventricular shear but not normal strain in the infarct and infarct borderzone

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Liang; Wu, Yife; Soleimani, Mehrdad; Khazalpour, Michael; Takaba, Kiyoaki; Tartibi, Mehrzad; Zhang, Zhihong; Acevedo-Bolton, Gabriel; Saloner, David A.; Wallace, Arthur W.; Mishra, Rakesh; Grossi, Eugene A.; Guccione, Julius M.; Ratcliffe, Mark B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic ischemic mitral regurgitation (CIMR: MR) is associated with poor outcome. Left ventricular (LV) strain after postero-lateral myocardial infarction (MI) may drive LV remodeling. Although moderate CIMR has been previously shown to effect LV remodeling, the effect of CIMR on LV strain after postero-lateral MI remains unknown. We tested the hypothesis that moderate CIMR alters LV strain after postero-lateral MI. Methods/Results Postero-lateral MI was created in 10 sheep. Cardiac MRI with tags was performed 2 weeks before and 2, 8 and 16 weeks after MI. LV and right ventricular (RV) volumes were measured and regurgitant volume indexed to body surface area (BSA; RegurgVolume Index) calculated as the difference between LV and RV stroke volumes / BSA. Three-dimensional strain was calculated. Circumferential (Ecc)and longitudinal (Ell) strains were reduced in the infarct proper, MI borderzone (BZ) and remote myocardium 16 weeks after MI. In addition, radial circumferential (Erc) and radial longitudinal (Erl) shear strains were reduced in remote myocardium but increased in the infarct and BZ 16 weeks after MI. Of all strain components, however, only Erc was effected by RegurgVolume Index (p=0.0005). There was no statistically significant effect of RegurgVolume Index on Ecc, Ell, Erl, or circumferential longitudinal shear strain (Ecl). Conclusions Moderate CIMR alters radial circumferential shear strain after postero-lateral MI in the sheep. Further studies are needed to determine the effect of shear strain on myocyte hypertrophy and the effect of mitral repair on myocardial strain. PMID:26857634

  4. Mitral annulus morphologic and functional analysis using real time tridimensional echocardiography in patients submitted to unsupported mitral valve repair

    PubMed Central

    Guedes, Marco Antônio Vieira; Pomerantzeff, Pablo Maria Alberto; Brandão, Carlos Manuel de Almeida; Vieira, Marcelo Luiz Campos; Tarasoutchi, Flávio; Spinola, Pablo da Cunha; Jatene, Fábio Biscegli

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Mitral valve repair is the treatment of choice to correct mitral insufficiency, although the literature related to mitral valve annulus behavior after mitral repair without use of prosthetic rings is scarce. Objective To analyze mitral annulus morphology and function using real time tridimensional echocardiography in individuals submitted to mitral valve repair with Double Teflon technique. Methods Fourteen patients with mitral valve insufficiency secondary to mixomatous degeneration that were submitted to mitral valve repair with the Double Teflon technique were included. Thirteen patients were in FC III/IV. Patients were evaluated in preoperative period, immediate postoperative period, 6 months and 1 year after mitral repair. Statistical analysis was made by repeated measures ANOVA test and was considered statistically significant P<0.05. Results There were no deaths, reoperation due to valve dysfunction, thromboembolism or endocarditis during the study. Posterior mitral annulus demonstrated a significant reduction in immediate postoperative period (P<0.001), remaining stable during the study, and presents a mean of reduction of 25.8% comparing with preoperative period. There was a significant reduction in anteroposterior and mediolateral diameters in the immediate postoperative period (P<0.001), although there was a significant increase in mediolateral diameter between immediate postoperative period and 1 year. There was no difference in mitral internal area variation over the cardiac cycle during the study. Conclusion Segmentar annuloplasty reduced the posterior component of mitral annulus, which remained stable in a 1-year-period. The variation in mitral annulus area during cardiac cycle remained stable during the study. PMID:26313723

  5. Peri-procedural imaging for transcatheter mitral valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Navin; Patel, Parag; Bartel, Thomas; Kapadia, Samir; Navia, Jose; Stewart, William; Tuzcu, E. Murat

    2016-01-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) has a high prevalence in older patient populations of industrialized nations. Common etiologies are structural, degenerative MR and functional MR secondary to myocardial remodeling. Because of co-morbidities and associated high surgical risk, open surgical mitral repair/replacement is deferred in a significant percentage of patients. For these patients transcatheter repair/replacement are emerging as treatment options. Because of the lack of direct visualization, pre- and intra-procedural imaging is critical for these procedures. In this review, we summarize mitral valve anatomy, trans-catheter mitral valve replacement (TMVR) options, and imaging in the context of TMVR. PMID:27054104

  6. Biological versus prosthetic ring in mitral-valve repair: enhancement of mitral annulus dynamics and left-ventricular function with pericardial annuloplasty at long term.

    PubMed

    Borghetti, V; Campana, M; Scotti, C; Domenighini, D; Totaro, P; Coletti, G; Pagani, M; Lorusso, R

    2000-04-01

    The effects of different annuloplasty rings on mitral annulus dynamics and left-ventricular (LV) function after mitral-valve repair (MVR) are still controversial. This study sought to compare biological versus prosthetic rigid rings for annular remodelling in MVR at long term. Forty-four consecutive patients were retrospectively enrolled. All patients had isolated posterior-leaflet prolapse and underwent identical surgical mitral-valve reconstruction (quadrangular resection of the posterior leaflet associated with annuloplasty). Twenty-three patients underwent mitral annuloplasty with an autologous pericardial ring (group I), whereas 21 patients had MVR with a Carpentier-Edwards rigid ring (group II). No differences existed between the groups in terms of pre-operative patient profile. Post-operative LV systolic indices have been assessed by two-dimensional echocardiography at rest and during supine bicycle exercise. Mitral annular motion has been examined by means of the extent of mitral annulus systolic excursion (MASE), as measured in four longitudinal LV segments (anterior, inferior, septal and lateral). Mean and peak trans-mitral flow velocities (TMFV) have been also evaluated by continuous-wave Doppler. The mean follow-up did not differ between the groups, those being 41+/-12 months in group I (range17-65 months) and 46+/-15 months in group II (range 23-83 months), respectively. Post-operative echocardiographic study did not show significant mitral regurgitation at rest or at peak exercise in any patient. ANOVA analysis for repeated measures showed a significant interaction in peak TMFV (F((1,42))=5.23; P=0.03), and in left-ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF; F((1,42))=7.61, P=0.01). The analysis of contrasts showed a significant increase in TMFV in both groups (group I from 1.22+/-0.22 to 1.79+/-0.32 m/s, t=-8.8, P<0.0001; and group II from 1.19+/-0.17 to 1.96+/-0.33 m/s, t=-12.8, P<0.0001). Recruitment of LVEF reserve during exercise was observed only in

  7. Functional Tricuspid Regurgitation Model in a Beating Heart Platform.

    PubMed

    Jaworek, Michal; Piola, Marco; Lucherini, Federico; Gelpi, Guido; Castagna, Marco; Lentini, Giuliana; Antona, Carlo; Fiore, Gianfranco B; Vismara, Riccardo

    2017-01-03

    Currently, clinicians are seeking new, minimally invasive treatment options for functional tricuspid regurgitation (FTR). Challenging tricuspid complexity requires the evaluation of the treatment techniques in adequate and realistic preclinical scenario. The purpose of this paper is to describe the design and functional assessment of a novel passive beating heart model of the pulmonary circulation with the possibility to tightly control FTR.The model housed porcine hearts actuated by a volumetric pump that cyclically pressurized the right ventricle. The in-vitro FTR model exploited the tendency of the ventricle to dilate under pressure. The dilation entailed papillary muscles displacement and valve annulus enlargement, thus inducing tricuspid valve insufficiency. Employment of constraint bands allowed to restore valve competency.The system provided consistent replication of the main determinants of the pulmonary hemodynamics in a wide range of working conditions. The experimental model of FTR was reliable, easily controllable and showed good stability over time. Echocardiography and fiberscope imaging provided a unique opportunity to investigate valve dynamics. These features make the platform suitable for realistic training purposes and testing of the upcoming FTR therapies.

  8. Surgical indication for functional tricuspid regurgitation at initial operation: judging from long term outcomes.

    PubMed

    Pozzoli, Alberto; Elisabetta, Lapenna; Vicentini, Luca; Alfieri, Ottavio; De Bonis, Michele

    2016-09-01

    The assessment and management of tricuspid valve disease have evolved substantially during the past several years. Whereas tricuspid stenosis is uncommon, tricuspid regurgitation is frequently encountered and it is most often secondary due to annular dilatation and leaflet tethering from right ventricular remodelling. The indications for tricuspid valve surgery to treat tricuspid regurgitation are several and mainly related to the underlying disease, to the severity of insufficiency and to the right ventricular function. Surgical tricuspid repair has been avoided for years, because of the misleading concept that tricuspid regurgitation should disappear once the primary left-sided problem has been eliminated. Instead, during the last decade, many investigators have reported evidence in favor of a more aggressive surgical approach to functional tricuspid regurgitation, recognising the risk of progressive tricuspid insufficiency in patients with moderate or lesser degrees of tricuspid regurgitation and tricuspid annular dilatation. This concept, along with the long-term outcomes of principal surgical repair techniques are reported and discussed. Last, novel transcatheter therapies have begun to emerge for the treatment of severe tricuspid regurgitation in high-risk patients. Hence, very preliminary pre-clinical and clinical experiences are illustrated. The scope of this review is to explore the anatomic basis, the pathophysiology, the outcomes and the new insights in the management of functional tricuspid regurgitation.

  9. Real-time three-dimensional color doppler evaluation of the flow convergence zone for quantification of mitral regurgitation: Validation experimental animal study and initial clinical experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitges, Marta; Jones, Michael; Shiota, Takahiro; Qin, Jian Xin; Tsujino, Hiroyuki; Bauer, Fabrice; Kim, Yong Jin; Agler, Deborah A.; Cardon, Lisa A.; Zetts, Arthur D.; hide

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pitfalls of the flow convergence (FC) method, including 2-dimensional imaging of the 3-dimensional (3D) geometry of the FC surface, can lead to erroneous quantification of mitral regurgitation (MR). This limitation may be mitigated by the use of real-time 3D color Doppler echocardiography (CE). Our objective was to validate a real-time 3D navigation method for MR quantification. METHODS: In 12 sheep with surgically induced chronic MR, 37 different hemodynamic conditions were studied with real-time 3DCE. Using real-time 3D navigation, the radius of the largest hemispherical FC zone was located and measured. MR volume was quantified according to the FC method after observing the shape of FC in 3D space. Aortic and mitral electromagnetic flow probes and meters were balanced against each other to determine reference MR volume. As an initial clinical application study, 22 patients with chronic MR were also studied with this real-time 3DCE-FC method. Left ventricular (LV) outflow tract automated cardiac flow measurement (Toshiba Corp, Tokyo, Japan) and real-time 3D LV stroke volume were used to quantify the reference MR volume (MR volume = 3DLV stroke volume - automated cardiac flow measurement). RESULTS: In the sheep model, a good correlation and agreement was seen between MR volume by real-time 3DCE and electromagnetic (y = 0.77x + 1.48, r = 0.87, P <.001, delta = -0.91 +/- 2.65 mL). In patients, real-time 3DCE-derived MR volume also showed a good correlation and agreement with the reference method (y = 0.89x - 0.38, r = 0.93, P <.001, delta = -4.8 +/- 7.6 mL). CONCLUSIONS: real-time 3DCE can capture the entire FC image, permitting geometrical recognition of the FC zone geometry and reliable MR quantification.

  10. [Study of left ventricular function in valvular cardiopathies (mitral insufficiency and aortic insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Herreman, F; Brun, P; Cannet, G; Savin, E; Vannier, D

    1974-10-01

    A study of the left ventricular function based on the haemodynamic data combined with those provided by biplane cineangiography was performed in 35 cases with left ventricular volume overload (20 cases of mitral incompetence and 15 of aortic insufficiency). The importance of the haemodynamic changes and of the adaptation mechanisms set up were described. The more intense dilatation-hypertrophy of aortic incompetence than of mitral incompetence plays an essential part. The role of Starling's mechanism is underlined. Estimation of the contractile value of the myocardium, taken into account the mechanical overload and the conditions of late-diastolic lengthening of the fibre and of impedance to left ventricular ejection was determined. An obvious myocardial failure, demonstrated in approximately one third of the cases, by determination of some contractility indices estimated in the ejection phase, Vf sigma max in particular, the only one valid in the presence of valvular regurgitation. In the other cases, the moderate decrease of myocardial contractility was masked by compensatory mechanisms.

  11. Diastolic murmurs in the presence of Starr-Edwards mitral prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, R A; McAnulty, J H; Starr, A; Rahimtoola, S H

    1975-03-01

    Diastolic murmurs associated with the Starr-Edwards mitral prosthesis have not been described previously. In this report, five patients with mitral prostheses are described in whom apical mid-diastolic and presystolic murmurs resulted from two different causes. Three patients had clots obstructing the prosthetic orifice. The other two had normally functioning protheses and moderately severe aortic insufficiency. The occurrence of mid-diastolic and presystolic murmurs in the presence of a normally functioning prosthetic mitral valve demonstrates that 1) the mid-diastolic Austin Flint murmur can occur in the absence of incomplete mitral valve opening, premature mitral valve closure, vibrating mitral leaflets, or relative mitral stenosis and 2) the presystolic Austin Flint murmur can occur in the absence of incomplete valve opening or presystolic mitral regurgitation. However, the presystolic murmur was associated with early closure movement of the presthetic poppet.

  12. Effect of varying ventricular function by extrasystolic potentiation on closure of the mitral valve.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenberg, R. A.; Williams, J. C. P.; Sturm, R. E.; Wood , E. H.

    1971-01-01

    Mitral regurgitant indexes were measured by roentgen videodensitometry in anesthetized dogs without thoracotomy before, during and after extrasystolic potentiation of ventricular contraction while the atria and ventricles were driven in normal temporal sequence simultaneously or in such a way as to induce atrial fibrillation. Small amounts of mitral reflux were observed with simultaneous atrial and ventricular driving and with atrial fibrillation in the control measurements before initiation of extrasystolic potentiation. Reflux became negligible during extrasystolic potentiation and increased beyond control levels after termination of extrasystolic potentiation.

  13. Effect of varying ventricular function by extrasystolic potentiation on closure of the mitral valve.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenberg, R. A.; Williams, J. C. P.; Sturm, R. E.; Wood , E. H.

    1971-01-01

    Mitral regurgitant indexes were measured by roentgen videodensitometry in anesthetized dogs without thoracotomy before, during and after extrasystolic potentiation of ventricular contraction while the atria and ventricles were driven in normal temporal sequence simultaneously or in such a way as to induce atrial fibrillation. Small amounts of mitral reflux were observed with simultaneous atrial and ventricular driving and with atrial fibrillation in the control measurements before initiation of extrasystolic potentiation. Reflux became negligible during extrasystolic potentiation and increased beyond control levels after termination of extrasystolic potentiation.

  14. [Mitral valve repair with the MitraClip following surgical mitral annuloplasty failure].

    PubMed

    Picard, F; Tadros, V-X; Millán, X; Asgar, A W

    2016-10-28

    Mitral repair using the MitraClip device is on ongoing expansion and has been evaluated in different patterns of mitral regurgitation. Nevertheless, surgical approaches to mitral regurgitation remain the standard of care, at least in absence of contraindication. We report the first Canadian experience of mitral valve repair with the MitraClip following surgical mitral annuloplasty failure. Therapeutic considerations and potential challenges are discussed.

  15. Fluid-Structure Interaction Analysis of Ruptured Mitral Chordae Tendineae.

    PubMed

    Toma, Milan; Bloodworth, Charles H; Pierce, Eric L; Einstein, Daniel R; Cochran, Richard P; Yoganathan, Ajit P; Kunzelman, Karyn S

    2017-03-01

    The chordal structure is a part of mitral valve geometry that has been commonly neglected or simplified in computational modeling due to its complexity. However, these simplifications cannot be used when investigating the roles of individual chordae tendineae in mitral valve closure. For the first time, advancements in imaging, computational techniques, and hardware technology make it possible to create models of the mitral valve without simplifications to its complex geometry, and to quickly run validated computer simulations that more realistically capture its function. Such simulations can then be used for a detailed analysis of chordae-related diseases. In this work, a comprehensive model of a subject-specific mitral valve with detailed chordal structure is used to analyze the distinct role played by individual chordae in closure of the mitral valve leaflets. Mitral closure was simulated for 51 possible chordal rupture points. Resultant regurgitant orifice area and strain change in the chordae at the papillary muscle tips were then calculated to examine the role of each ruptured chorda in the mitral valve closure. For certain subclassifications of chordae, regurgitant orifice area was found to trend positively with ruptured chordal diameter, and strain changes correlated negatively with regurgitant orifice area. Further advancements in clinical imaging modalities, coupled with the next generation of computational techniques will enable more physiologically realistic simulations.

  16. Off-pump transapical implantation of artificial neo-chordae to correct mitral regurgitation: the TACT Trial (Transapical Artificial Chordae Tendinae) proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Seeburger, Joerg; Rinaldi, Mauro; Nielsen, Sten Lyager; Salizzoni, Stefano; Lange, Ruediger; Schoenburg, Markus; Alfieri, Ottavio; Borger, Michael Andrew; Mohr, Friedrich Wilhelm; Aidietis, Audrius

    2014-03-11

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the safety and performance of the NeoChord DS1000 system (NeoChord, Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota). There is an increasing interest in transcatheter mitral valve (MV) treatment. The NeoChord DS 1000 system enables off-pump beating heart transapical MV repair with implantation of artificial neo-chordae. Patients with severe mitral regurgitation (MR) due to isolated posterior prolapse were included in this TACT (Transapical Artificial Chordae Tendinae) trial. All patients were scheduled for off-pump transapical implantation of neo-chordae. Thirty patients at 7 centers were enrolled. Major adverse events included 1 death due to post-cardiotomy syndrome and concomitant sepsis and 1 minor stroke with the patient fully recovered at the 30-day follow-up visit. Additional patients experienced procedural major adverse events related to a reoperation or conversion to standard of care. Acute procedural success (placement of at least 1 neo-chord and reduction of MR from 3+ or 4+ to ≤2+) was achieved in 26 patients (86.7%). In 4 patients neo-chordae were not placed for technical and/or patient-specific reasons. These patients underwent intraoperative (3 patients) or post-operative (1 patient) standard MV repair. At 30 days, 17 patients maintained an MR grade ≤2+. Four patients who developed recurrent MR were successfully treated with open MV repair during 30-day follow-up. Results improved with experience: durable reduction in MR to ≤2+ at 30 days was achieved in 5 (33.3%) of the first 15 patients and 12 (85.7%) of the last 14 patients. Off-pump transapical implantation of artificial chordae to correct MR is technically safe and feasible; however, it yields further potential for improvement of efficacy and durability. (Safety and Performance Study of the NeoChord Device [TACT]; NCT01777815). Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Deciphering the gene expression profile of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor signaling pathway in the left atria of patients with mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mien-Cheng; Chang, Jen-Ping; Lin, Yu-Sheng; Pan, Kuo-Li; Ho, Wan-Chun; Liu, Wen-Hao; Chang, Tzu-Hao; Huang, Yao-Kuang; Fang, Chih-Yuan; Chen, Chien-Jen

    2016-06-02

    Differentially expressed genes in the left atria of mitral regurgitation (MR) pigs have been linked to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) signaling pathway in the KEGG pathway. However, specific genes of the PPAR signaling pathway in the left atria of MR patients have never been explored. This study enrolled 15 MR patients with heart failure, 7 patients with aortic valve disease and heart failure, and 6 normal controls. We used PCR assay (84 genes) for PPAR pathway and quantitative RT-PCR to study specific genes of the PPAR pathway in the left atria. Gene expression profiling analysis through PCR assay identified 23 genes to be differentially expressed in the left atria of MR patients compared to normal controls. The expressions of APOA1, ACADM, FABP3, ETFDH, ECH1, CPT1B, CPT2, SLC27A6, ACAA2, SMARCD3, SORBS1, EHHADH, SLC27A1, PPARGC1B, PPARA and CPT1A were significantly up-regulated, whereas the expression of PLTP was significantly down-regulated in the MR patients compared to normal controls. The expressions of HMGCS2, ACADM, FABP3, MLYCD, ECH1, ACAA2, EHHADH, CPT1A and PLTP were significantly up-regulated in the MR patients compared to patients with aortic valve disease. Notably, only ACADM, FABP3, ECH1, ACAA2, EHHADH, CPT1A and PLTP of the PPAR pathway were significantly differentially expressed in the MR patients compared to patients with aortic valve disease and normal controls. Differentially expressed genes of the PPAR pathway have been identified in the left atria of MR patients compared with patients with aortic valve disease and normal controls.

  18. The MitraClip and survival in patients with mitral regurgitation at high risk for surgery: A propensity-matched comparison.

    PubMed

    Velazquez, Eric J; Samad, Zainab; Al-Khalidi, Hussein R; Sangli, Chithra; Grayburn, Paul A; Massaro, Joseph M; Stevens, Susanna R; Feldman, Ted E; Krucoff, Mitchell W

    2015-11-01

    We compared 30-day and 1-year survival among high-risk mitral regurgitation (MR) patients treated with the MitraClip (Abbott Vascular, Abbott Park, IL) with matched non-surgically treated patients from the Duke Echocardiography Laboratory Database (DELD). High-risk patients with 3+/4+ MR managed non-surgically between years 2000 and 2010 in the longitudinal DELD were matched to high-risk MitraClip patients. Patient matching was performed using the method of nearest available Mahalanobis distance metric within calipers defined by the propensity score. Kaplan-Meier estimates and stratified Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare survival at 30 days and 1 year. Among 953 high-risk DELD patients available for matching, 30-day and 1-year mortality were 6.5% and 26.2%. Close matches were obtained for 239 of the 351 MitraClip patients. The 30-day mortality in MitraClip patients was lower (4.2%) when compared with matched DELD patients (7.2%). The 1-year relative risk of mortality of the MitraClip compared with non-surgical treatment was 0.64 (95% CI 0.45-0.91; log-rank P = .013). These results in favor of the MitraClip remained significant upon further adjustment for baseline differences between groups (P = .043). This matched comparison of severe MR patients at high surgical risk supports the safety of the MitraClip relative to medical therapy at 30 days and a survival benefit at 1 year. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Assessment of proximal isovelocity surface area (PISA) shape using three-dimensional echocardiography in a paediatric population with mitral regurgitation or ventricular shunt.

    PubMed

    Ziani, Abdelkader Boutaleb; Latcu, Decebal Gabriel; Abadir, Sylvia; Paranon, Soizic; Dulac, Yves; Guerrero, Felipe; Acar, Philippe

    2009-03-01

    The proximal isovelocity surface area (PISA) method is validated to quantify mitral regurgitation (MR) and ventricular shunt (VS). However, the two-dimensional echocardiography (2DE) PISA method assumes a hemispherical distribution of velocity factors proximal to the MR or VS orifice. To assess the PISA shape by three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE) in a paediatric population with MR or VS. According to the true PISA shape, we suggest different models to calculate the MR or VS volume by the 3DE PISA method. Thirty-one paediatric patients (aged 1month to 20years, median 69months) were included: 17 had MR and 14 had VS. The orifice area and volume of MR and VS were evaluated by 2DE. 3DE acquired the entire PISA volume at orifice level. The PISA shape was estimated according to three diameters as being hemispherical, prolate hemispheroid, oblate hemispheroid and hemiellipsoid. Data from 28patients were analysed. The PISA shape was variable: hemispherical, 11%; prolate hemispheroid, 43%; oblate hemispheroid, 32%; hemiellipsoid, 14%. Oblate hemispheroids occurred more frequently in the MR group (47%), whereas prolate hemispheroids occurred more frequently in the VS group (62%); hemispheres were scarce in both groups (10%). The mean MR or VS orifices and volumes measured by 2DE and 3DE were significantly different (0.123cm(2) versus 0.094cm(2) and 13.2mL versus 10.1mL, respectively; p=0.019). 3DE describes the true surface of the PISA shape. In a paediatric population with MR or VS, the PISA is rarely hemispherical but is more often prolate or oblate hemispheroid.

  20. Ischemic mitral valve prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Cristiano, Spadaccio; Nenna, Antonio; Chello, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic mitral prolapse (IMP) is a pathologic entity encountered in about one-third among the patients undergoing surgery for ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR). IMP is generally the result of a papillary muscle injury consequent to myocardial, but the recent literature is progressively unveiling a more complex pathogenesis. The mechanisms underlying its development regards the impairment of one or more components of the mitral apparatus, which comprises the annulus, the chordae tendineae, the papillary muscle and the left ventricular wall. IMP is not only a disorder of valvular function, but also entails coexistent aspects of a geometric disturbance of the mitral valve configuration and of the left ventricular function and dimension and a correct understanding of all these aspects is crucial to guide and tailor the correct therapeutic strategy to be adopted. Localization of prolapse, anatomic features of the prolapsed leaflets and the subvalvular apparatus should be carefully evaluated as also constituting the major determinants defining patient’s outcomes. This review will summarize our current understanding of the pathophysiology and clinical evidence on IMP with a particular focus on the surgical treatment. PMID:28149574

  1. Late results of mitral valve repair with glutaraldehyde-treated autologous pericardium.

    PubMed

    Shomura, Yu; Okada, Yukikatsu; Nasu, Michihiro; Koyama, Tadaaki; Yuzaki, Mitsuru; Murashita, Takashi; Fukunaga, Naoto; Konishi, Yasunobu

    2013-06-01

    Mitral valve repair is an established surgical procedure for treating severe organic mitral regurgitation. The mechanisms of mitral regurgitation due to infective endocarditis include rheumatic disease and congenital diseases such as a lack of leaflet tissue, and thus additional material is required to create a functional coaptation surface. We review our experience with 139 patients who underwent mitral valve repair with glutaraldehyde-treated autologous pericardium to treat organic mitral regurgitation between March 1992 and November 2011. Mitral valve disease mainly consisted of infective endocarditis in 51 patients (active, n = 32; healed, n = 19) and rheumatic disease in 47. This procedure was also applied to 12 patients who required reoperation after mitral valve repair for degenerative, congenital, or rheumatic mitral regurgitation. The mean follow-up was 4.5 ± 4.3 years (maximum 19.1). Actuarial survival at 10 years was 84% ± 5%. Eleven reoperations proceeded at a mean of 68 months after surgery. The causes of reoperation were rheumatic disease progression (n = 4), infection (n = 3), patch dehiscence (n = 2), progressive fibrosis of the remaining mitral valve tissue after infective endocarditis (n = 1), and patch tear (n = 1). Mitral valves were replaced in 8 patients and re-repaired in 3 patients. The autologous pericardium was not calcified at the time of reoperation. The rate of freedom from reoperation was 82% ± 7% at 10 years. Mitral valves that might otherwise require replacement can be durably and predictably repaired using glutaraldehyde-treated autologous pericardium. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Intrinsic Wave Propagation of Myocardial Stretch, A New Tool to Evaluate Myocardial Stiffness: A Pilot Study in Patients with Aortic Stenosis and Mitral Regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Pislaru, Cristina; Alashry, Mahmoud M; Thaden, Jeremy J; Pellikka, Patricia A; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice; Pislaru, Sorin V

    2017-08-16

    Left ventricular (LV) filling following atrial contraction generates LV myocardial stretch that propagates from base to apex with a speed proportional to myocardial elasticity. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that intrinsic velocity propagation of myocardial stretch (iVP) would be altered in patients with valvular disease and chronic LV pressure overload or volume overload, which may adversely affect mechanical properties of the LV tissue. A second aim was to compare iVP with flow propagation velocity in the chamber. Sixty subjects were prospectively recruited: 20 with severe aortic stenosis (AS), 20 with severe degenerative mitral regurgitation (MR), and 20 normal control subjects. LV iVP was measured using ultrahigh-frame rate tissue Doppler (350-460 frames/sec) and flow propagation velocity by color flow M-mode imaging. Follow-up data (up to 2 years) were retrieved from medical records. iVP was highest in patients with AS (2.2 ± 0.7 m/sec), intermediate in those with MR (1.6 ± 0.5 m/sec), and lowest in control subjects (1.4 ± 0.2 m/sec; P < .0001). Fourteen patients with AS and eight with MR had iVP > 1.8 m/sec. Overall, iVP correlated with age, LV morphology, severity of aortic valve obstruction, and measures of LV preload and afterload. At follow-up, patients with high iVP had lower survival free of major adverse cardiac events (P = .002). Flow propagation velocity was similar between groups and correlated poorly with iVP (r = 0.26, P = .10). A significant number of patients with severe AS and severe MR had rapid transmission of myocardial stretch, indicating increased myocardial stiffness. This information was not conveyed by measurement of flow propagation. Larger studies are needed to investigate the clinical utility of this novel measurement. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Direct quantification of mitral regurgitant flow volume by real-time three-dimensional echocardiography using dealiasing of color Doppler flow at the vena contracta.

    PubMed

    Plicht, Björn; Kahlert, Philipp; Goldwasser, Ranny; Janosi, Rolf-Alexander; Hunold, Peter; Erbel, Raimund; Buck, Thomas

    2008-12-01

    Real-time 3-dimensional color Doppler echocardiographic (RT3DE) imaging has recently been demonstrated to provide accurate direct measurement of vena contracta area (VCA). The quantification of mitral regurgitant (MR) flow directly at the lesion using color Doppler echocardiography, however, has been prevented because of multiple aliasing from high flow velocities. Recent studies, however, have demonstrated that flow at the vena contracta is laminar, with a narrow velocity spectrum that should allow the dealiasing of color Doppler flow velocities for the accurate measurement of MR flow. This hypothesis was tested in an in vitro flow model and initial patient application, with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) used as a reference. In an in vitro flow model, MR jets of flow rates from 5 to 60 mL/s were produced through asymmetric orifices of 0.2 to 0.6 cm(2). From RT3DE data sets, MR flow was calculated by the automated integration of the nonaliased color Doppler velocities over the VCA, with aliasing avoided by maximum baseline shift. Aliased flow was calculated as VCA times the Nyquist velocity times the number of aliasing transitions derived from the maximum continuous-wave Doppler velocity. Total MR flow was calculated as the sum of nonaliased and aliased flow. This approach was also clinically evaluated in 23 patients for the measurement of MR stroke volume against MRI and the hemispheric and hemielliptic proximal isovelocity surface area methods. In vitro RT3DE imaging of VCA was feasible in all flow stages without color Doppler aliasing. Flow rates calculated from RT3DE data sets showed excellent correlation with actual flow rates (r = 0.99), with a mean difference of -0.05 +/- 0.5 mL/s (not significant by t test). In vivo, good correlation and agreement were found between MR stroke volume by dealiasing and MRI (r = 0.91, -1.8 +/- 7.1 mL; not significant by t test), with better correlation and agreement compared with hemispheric proximal isovelocity surface

  4. Circulating miR-148b-3p and miR-409-3p as biomarkers for heart failure in patients with mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mien-Cheng; Chang, Tzu-Hao; Chang, Jen-Ping; Huang, Hsien-Da; Ho, Wan-Chun; Lin, Yu-Sheng; Pan, Kuo-Li; Liu, Wen-Hao; Huang, Yao-Kuang

    2016-11-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) regulate gene expression in heart failure. Circulating miRs as biomarkers for heart failure in mitral regurgitation patients (MR) remain unexplored. This case-control study enrolled 32 MR patients with heart failure, 16 asymptomatic MR patients, and 12 control subjects without heart failure. We used next generation sequencing to study the gene expression profiles in the sera, and quantitative RT-PCR to study serum and tissue miRs in the left atria. Next generation sequencing analysis and enrichment analysis showed that 25 miRs were differentially expressed in the sera of MR patients with heart failure compared to control subjects. The circulating miR-148b-3p (p=0.002) and miR-409-3p (p=0.010) were significantly down-regulated in the MR patients with heart failure compared to control subjects. However, only circulation miR-148b-3p was significantly down-regulated in the MR patients without heart failure compared to control subjects (p=0.009). The tissue miR-409-3p was significantly down-regulated in the MR patients with heart failure compared to 3 purchased normal controls (p=0.041). Notably, the tissue RASGRP3 mRNA, target gene of miR-409-3p, was significantly up-regulated in the MR patients with heart failure compared to normal controls (p=0.010). The tissue FRY (p=0.010) and GADD45A (p=0.010) mRNAs, target genes of miR-148b-3p, were significantly up-regulated in the MR patients with heart failure compared to normal controls. Circulating miR-148b-3p might serve as biomarker for future development of heart failure and miR-409-3p might serve as biomarker for incident heart failure in MR patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Mechanics of mitral valve edge-to-edge-repair and MitraClip procedure.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Shamik; He, Zhaoming

    2015-01-01

    The edge-to-edge repair (ETER) technique has been used as a stand-alone procedure, or as a secondary procedure with ring annuloplasty for degenerative, functional mitral regurgitation, or for mitral regurgitation of other kinds of valvular etiologies. The percutaneous MitraClip technique based on ETER has been used in patients who are inoperable or at high surgical risk. However, adverse events such as residual mitral regurgitation, and clip detachment or fracture indicate that the mechanics underlying these procedures is not well understood. Therefore, current studies on mitral valve functionality and mechanics related to the ETER and MitraClip procedures are reviewed to improve the efficacy and safety of both procedures. Extensive in vivo, in vitro, and in silico studies related to ETER and MitraClip procedures along with MitraClip clinical trial results are presented and discussed herein. The ETER suture force and the mitral valve tissue mechanics and hemodynamics of each procedure are discussed. A quantitative understanding of the interplay of mitral valve components and as to biological response to the procedures remains challenging. Based on mitral valve mechanics, ETER or MitraClip therapy can be optimized to enhance repair efficacy and durability.

  6. Ecocardiografía tridimensional. Nuevas perspectivas sobre la caracterización de la válvula mitral

    PubMed Central

    Solis, Jorge; Sitges, Marta; Levine, Robert A.; Hung, Judy

    2010-01-01

    Recent developments in three-dimensional echocardiography have made it possible to obtain images in real time, without the need for off-line reconstruction. These developments have enabled the technique to become an important tool for both research and daily clinical practice. A substantial proportion of the studies carried out using three-dimensional echocardiography have focused on the mitral valve, the pathophysiology of mitral valve disease and, in particular, functional mitral regurgitation. The aims of this article were to review the contribution of three-dimensional echocardiography to understanding of the functional anatomy of the mitral valve and to summarize the resulting clinical applications and therapeutic implications. PMID:19232192

  7. Exuberant accessory mitral valve tissue with possible true parachute mitral valve: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, Aleksandra; Joksimovic, Zoran; Jovovic, Ljiljana

    2012-09-11

    A parachute mitral valve is defined as a unifocal attachment of mitral valve chordae tendineae independent of the number of papillary muscles. Data from the literature suggests that the valve can be distinguished on the basis of morphological features as either a parachute-like asymmetrical mitral valve or a true parachute mitral valve. A parachute-like asymmetrical mitral valve has two papillary muscles; one is elongated and located higher in the left ventricle. A true parachute mitral valve has a single papillary muscle that receives all chordae, as was present in our patient. Patients with parachute mitral valves during childhood have multilevel left-side heart obstructions, with poor outcomes without operative treatment. The finding of a parachute mitral valve in an adult patient is extremely rare, especially as an isolated lesion. In adults, the unifocal attachment of the chordae results in a slightly restricted valve opening and, more frequently, valvular regurgitation. A 40-year-old Caucasian female patient was admitted to a primary care physician due to her recent symptoms of heart palpitation and chest discomfort on effort. Transthoracic echocardiography showed chordae tendineae which were elongated and formed an unusual net shape penetrating into left ventricle cavity. The parasternal short axis view of her left ventricle showed a single papillary muscle positioned on one side in the posteromedial commissure receiving all chordae. Her mitral valve orifice was slightly eccentric and the chordae were converting into a single papillary muscle. Mitral regurgitation was present and it was graded as moderate to severe. Her left atrium was enlarged. There were no signs of mitral stenosis or a subvalvular ring. She did not have a bicuspid aortic valve or coarctation of the ascending aorta. The dimensions and systolic function of her left ventricle were normal. Our patient had a normal body habitus, without signs of heart failure. Her functional status was graded

  8. Exuberant accessory mitral valve tissue with possible true parachute mitral valve: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction A parachute mitral valve is defined as a unifocal attachment of mitral valve chordae tendineae independent of the number of papillary muscles. Data from the literature suggests that the valve can be distinguished on the basis of morphological features as either a parachute-like asymmetrical mitral valve or a true parachute mitral valve. A parachute-like asymmetrical mitral valve has two papillary muscles; one is elongated and located higher in the left ventricle. A true parachute mitral valve has a single papillary muscle that receives all chordae, as was present in our patient. Patients with parachute mitral valves during childhood have multilevel left-side heart obstructions, with poor outcomes without operative treatment. The finding of a parachute mitral valve in an adult patient is extremely rare, especially as an isolated lesion. In adults, the unifocal attachment of the chordae results in a slightly restricted valve opening and, more frequently, valvular regurgitation. Case presentation A 40-year-old Caucasian female patient was admitted to a primary care physician due to her recent symptoms of heart palpitation and chest discomfort on effort. Transthoracic echocardiography showed chordae tendineae which were elongated and formed an unusual net shape penetrating into left ventricle cavity. The parasternal short axis view of her left ventricle showed a single papillary muscle positioned on one side in the posteromedial commissure receiving all chordae. Her mitral valve orifice was slightly eccentric and the chordae were converting into a single papillary muscle. Mitral regurgitation was present and it was graded as moderate to severe. Her left atrium was enlarged. There were no signs of mitral stenosis or a subvalvular ring. She did not have a bicuspid aortic valve or coarctation of the ascending aorta. The dimensions and systolic function of her left ventricle were normal. Our patient had a normal body habitus, without signs of heart failure

  9. [Modern mitral valve surgery].

    PubMed

    Bothe, W; Beyersdorf, F

    2016-04-01

    At the beginning of the 20th century, Cutler and Levine performed the first successful surgical treatment of a stenotic mitral valve, which was the only treatable heart valve defect at that time. Mitral valve surgery has evolved significantly since then. The introduction of the heart-lung machine in 1954 not only reduced the surgical risk, but also allowed the treatment of different mitral valve pathologies. Nowadays, mitral valve insufficiency has become the most common underlying pathomechanism of mitral valve disease and can be classified into primary and secondary mitral insufficiency. Primary mitral valve insufficiency is mainly caused by alterations of the valve (leaflets and primary order chords) itself, whereas left ventricular dilatation leading to papillary muscle displacement and leaflet tethering via second order chords is the main underlying pathomechanism for secondary mitral valve regurgitation. Valve reconstruction using the "loop technique" plus annuloplasty is the surgical strategy of choice and normalizes life expectancy in patients with primary mitral regurgitation. In patients with secondary mitral regurgitation, implanting an annuloplasty is not superior to valve replacement and results in high rates of valve re-insufficiency (up to 30 % after 3 months) due to ongoing ventricular dilatation. In order to improve repair results in these patients, we add a novel subvalvular technique (ring-noose-string) to the annuloplasty that aims to prevent ongoing ventricular remodeling and re-insufficiency. In modern mitral surgery, a right lateral thoracotomy is the approach of choice with excellent repair and cosmetic results.

  10. Management of moderate functional tricuspid valve regurgitation at the time of pulmonary valve replacement: is concomitant tricuspid valve repair necessary?

    PubMed

    Kogon, Brian; Patel, Manisha; Leong, Traci; McConnell, Michael; Book, Wendy

    2010-08-01

    Congenital heart defects with a component of pulmonary stenosis are often palliated in childhood by disrupting the pulmonary valve. Patients often undergo subsequent pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) to protect the heart from the consequences of pulmonary regurgitation. In the presence of associated moderate functional tricuspid valve (TV) regurgitation, it is unclear what factors contribute to persistent TV regurgitation following PVR. In particular, it is unknown whether PVR alone will reduce the right ventricular (RV) size and restore TV function or whether concomitant TV annuloplasty is required as well. Thirty-five patients were analyzed. Each patient underwent initial palliation of congenital pulmonary stenosis or tetralogy of Fallot, underwent subsequent PVR between 2002 and 2008, and had at least moderate TV regurgitation at the time of valve replacement. Serial echocardiograms were analyzed. Pulmonary and TV regurgitation, along with RV dilation and dysfunction, were scored (0, none; 1, mild; 2, moderate; 3, severe). RV volume and area were also calculated. Potential risk factors for persistent postoperative TV regurgitation were evaluated. One month following PVR, there was a significant reduction in pulmonary valve regurgitation (mean, 3 vs. 0.39; P < 0.0001) and TV regurgitation (mean, 2.33 vs. 1.3; P < 0.0001). There were also significant reductions in RV dilation, volume, and area. There were no significant further improvements in any of the parameters at 1 and 3 years. There was no difference in the degree of TV regurgitation postoperatively between those patients who underwent PVR alone and those who underwent concomitant tricuspid annuloplasty (mean, 1.29 vs. 1.31; P = 0.81). We conclude that following PVR, improvement in TV regurgitation and RV size occurs primarily in the first postoperative month. TV function improved to a similar degree with or without annuloplasty.

  11. Genetic association analyses highlight biological pathways underlying mitral valve prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Dina, Christian; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Tucker, Nathan; Delling, Francesca N.; Toomer, Katelynn; Durst, Ronen; Perrocheau, Maelle; Fernandez-Friera, Leticia; Solis, Jorge; Le Tourneau, Thierry; Chen, Ming-Huei; Probst, Vincent; Bosse, Yohan; Pibarot, Philippe; Zelenika, Diana; Lathrop, Mark; Hercberg, Serge; Roussel, Ronan; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Bonnet, Fabrice; Su Hao, LO; Dolmatova, Elena; Simonet, Floriane; Lecointe, Simon; Kyndt, Florence; Redon, Richard; Le Marec, Hervé; Froguel, Philippe; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Bruneval, Patrick; Norris, Russell A.; Milan, David J.; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A.; Levine, Robert A.; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Hagege, Albert A.; Jeunemaitre, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Non-syndromic mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is a common degenerative cardiac valvulopathy of unknown aetiology that predisposes to mitral regurgitation, heart failure and sudden death1. Previous family and pathophysiological studies suggest a complex pattern of inheritance2–5. We performed a meta-analysis of two genome-wide association studies in 1,442 cases and 2,439 controls. We identified and replicated in 1,422 cases and 6,779 controls six loci and provide functional evidence for candidate genes. We highlight LMCD1 encoding a transcription factor6, for which morpholino knockdown in zebrafish results in atrioventricular (AV) valve regurgitation. A similar zebrafish phenotype was obtained for tensin1 (TNS1), a focal adhesion protein involved in cytoskeleton organization. We also show the expression of tensin1 during valve morphogenesis and describe enlarged posterior mitral leaflets in Tns1−/− mice. This study identifies the first risk loci for MVP and suggests new mechanisms involved in mitral valve regurgitation, the most common indication for mitral valve repair7. PMID:26301497

  12. Genetic association analyses highlight biological pathways underlying mitral valve prolapse.

    PubMed

    Dina, Christian; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Tucker, Nathan; Delling, Francesca N; Toomer, Katelynn; Durst, Ronen; Perrocheau, Maelle; Fernandez-Friera, Leticia; Solis, Jorge; Le Tourneau, Thierry; Chen, Ming-Huei; Probst, Vincent; Bosse, Yohan; Pibarot, Philippe; Zelenika, Diana; Lathrop, Mark; Hercberg, Serge; Roussel, Ronan; Benjamin, Emelia J; Bonnet, Fabrice; Lo, Su Hao; Dolmatova, Elena; Simonet, Floriane; Lecointe, Simon; Kyndt, Florence; Redon, Richard; Le Marec, Hervé; Froguel, Philippe; Ellinor, Patrick T; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Bruneval, Patrick; Markwald, Roger R; Norris, Russell A; Milan, David J; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A; Levine, Robert A; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Hagege, Albert A; Jeunemaitre, Xavier

    2015-10-01

    Nonsyndromic mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is a common degenerative cardiac valvulopathy of unknown etiology that predisposes to mitral regurgitation, heart failure and sudden death. Previous family and pathophysiological studies suggest a complex pattern of inheritance. We performed a meta-analysis of 2 genome-wide association studies in 1,412 MVP cases and 2,439 controls. We identified 6 loci, which we replicated in 1,422 cases and 6,779 controls, and provide functional evidence for candidate genes. We highlight LMCD1 (LIM and cysteine-rich domains 1), which encodes a transcription factor and for which morpholino knockdown of the ortholog in zebrafish resulted in atrioventricular valve regurgitation. A similar zebrafish phenotype was obtained with knockdown of the ortholog of TNS1, which encodes tensin 1, a focal adhesion protein involved in cytoskeleton organization. We also showed expression of tensin 1 during valve morphogenesis and describe enlarged posterior mitral leaflets in Tns1(-/-) mice. This study identifies the first risk loci for MVP and suggests new mechanisms involved in mitral valve regurgitation, the most common indication for mitral valve repair.

  13. Morphologic and functional abnormalities in patients with Ebstein's anomaly with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: Correlation with tricuspid regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xi; Zhang, Qin; Yang, Zhi-Gang; Guo, Ying-Kun; Shi, Ke; Xu, Hua-Yan; Wen, Ling-Yi; Li, Rui; Chen, Jing

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the correlations of functional and dimensional parameters with the severity of tricuspid regurgitation in patients with Ebstein's anomaly (EA) by using cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging. Thirty-three patients with EA without previous cardiac surgery and 25 normal individuals were recruited and underwent both cardiac MR imaging and preoperative transthoracic echocardiography. The left ventricular (LV) functional parameters and dimensions of the right ventricle (RV) and LV were measured using 3.0-T cardiac MR imaging. Tricuspid regurgitation severity grading was estimated by echocardiography. The functional and dimensional parameters were compared between EA patients and controls using independent sample t-tests. Spearman's rank correlation was used to determine the correlations between the functional and dimensional parameters and tricuspid regurgitation. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to predict tricuspid regurgitation severity using individual functional and dimensional parameters. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences in the functional and dimensional parameters between EA patients and controls. Within the EA group, tricuspid valve regurgitation negatively correlated well with the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) (r=-0.558, p=0.001). The ratio of the right ventricular (functional right ventricle) end-diastolic dimension to the left ventricle end-diastolic dimension (RVEDD/LVEDD) in EA patients also correlated well with the severity of tricuspid valve regurgitation (r=0.492, p=0.004). Moreover, ROC analysis revealed that high sensitivity and specificity were obtained for predicting the severity of tricuspid valve regurgitation with LVEF (78.3%, 90.0%) and RVEDD/LVEDD (78.3%, 94.3%). In EA patients, the left and right ventricular functional and dimensional parameters from MRI correlated well with tricuspid regurgitation, which helped predict the severity of EA. Copyright

  14. [A simplified method of continuous-wave Doppler noninvasive assessment of ventricular relaxation in mitral insufficiency].

    PubMed

    García Lledó, J A; Moya Mur, J L; Balaguer Recena, J; Novo García, E; Correa Gorospe, C; Jorge, P; Barea Navarro, R; Boquete, L

    1998-08-01

    The minimum value of dP/dT is a parameter of diastolic function that can be estimated noninvasively by analyzing the profile of velocity of the mitral regurgitant jet, recorded by continuous-wave Doppler. This estimation requires a complex analysis of the curves that impedes its practical use. Our objective was to validate a simplified method to estimate noninvasively the value of dP/dTmin when mitral regurgitation exists. We calculated the pendient of the profile of velocity of the curve of mitral regurgitation during its deceleration, between 3 and 1.5 m/s, an interval that defines a difference in pressure using the formula delta p = (4v2(1) - 4v2(2)). We divided this interval by the time needed by the jet to decelerate from 3 to 1.5 m/s, obtaining the rate of pressure decay, in mmHg/s. We provoked mitral regurgitation in five pigs and registered dP/dT and the curve velocity of mitral regurgitation simultaneously, by micromanometer-tipped catheter and continuous-wave Doppler, respectively. The rate of pressure decay was calculated on the mitral regurgitation curve. We obtained 29 simultaneous registers. The coefficient for the correlationship between dP/dT and the rate of pressure decay was with an r value of 0.62 (p < 0.0001). The rate of pressure decay underestimated systematically the value of dP/dT. Intra and interobserver variability of TDP was 9 and 11%, respectively. This study validates a simplified method to estimate dP/dT noninvasively, with acceptable correlation with invasive measurements and adequate reproducibility.

  15. A retrospective analysis of mitral valve pathology in the setting of bicuspid aortic valves

    PubMed Central

    van Rensburg, Annari; Doubell, Anton

    2017-01-01

    The therapeutic implications of bicuspid aortic valve associations have come under scrutiny in the transcatheter aortic valve implantation era. We evaluate the spectrum of mitral valve disease in patients with bicuspid aortic valves to determine the need for closer echocardiographic scrutiny/follow-up of the mitral valve. A retrospective analysis of echocardiograms done at a referral hospital over five years was conducted in patients with bicuspid aortic valves with special attention to congenital abnormalities of the mitral valve. One hundred and forty patients with a bicuspid aortic valve were included. A congenital mitral valve abnormality was present in eight (5.7%, P = 0.01) with a parachute mitral valve in four (2.8%), an accessory mitral valve leaflet in one (0.7%), mitral valve prolapse in one, a cleft in one and the novel finding of a trileaflet mitral valve in one. Minor abnormalities included an elongated anterior mitral valve leaflet (P < 0.001), the increased incidence of physiological mitral regurgitation (P < 0.001), abnormal papillary muscles (P = 0.002) and an additional chord or tendon in the left ventricle cavity (P = 0.007). Mitral valve abnormalities occur more commonly in patients with bicuspid aortic valves than matched healthy individuals. The study confirms that abnormalities in these patients extend beyond the aorta. These abnormalities did not have a significant functional effect. PMID:28515127

  16. Can the proximal isovelocity surface area method calculate stenotic mitral valve area in patients with associated moderate to severe aortic regurgitation? Analysis using low aliasing velocity of 10% of the peak transmitral velocity.

    PubMed

    Ikawa, H; Enya, E; Hirano, Y; Uehara, H; Ozasa, Y; Yamada, S; Ishikawa, K

    2001-02-01

    To assess the ability of the proximal isovelocity surface area (PISA) method to accurately measure the stenotic mitral valve area (MVA), and to assess whether aortic regurgitation (AR) affects the calculation, we compared the accuracy of the PISA method and the pressure half-time (PHT) method for determining MVA in patients with and without associated AR by using two-dimensional echocardiographic planimetry as a standard. The study population consisted of 45 patients with mitral stenosis. Seventeen of the 45 patients had associated moderate-to-severe AR. The PISA method was performed using low aliasing velocity (AV) of 10% of the peak transmitral velocity, which provided the most accurate estimation of MVA when compared with planimetry. The maximal radius r of the PISA was measured from the orifice to blue-red aliasing interface. Using the PISA method, MVA was calculated as (2pir(2)) x theta / 180 x AV/Vmax, where theta was the inflow angle formed by mitral leaflets, AV was the aliasing velocity (cm/sec), and Vmax was the peak transmitral velocity (cm/sec). MVA by the PISA method correlated well with planimetry both in patients with AR (r = 0.90, P < 0.001, SEE = 0.17 cm(2)) and without AR (r = 0.92, P < 0.001, SEE = 0.16 cm(2)). However, MVA by the PHT method did not correlate as well with planimetry (r = 0.57, P < 0.05, SEE = 0.37 cm(2)) in patients with associated AR, and the PHT method produced a significant overestimation (24%) of MVA obtained by planimetry in these patients. We conclude that the PISA method allows accurate estimation of MVA and is not influenced by AR.

  17. FLUID-STRUCTURE INTERACTION MODELS OF THE MITRAL VALVE: FUNCTION IN NORMAL AND PATHOLOGIC STATES

    SciTech Connect

    Kunzelman, K. S.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Cochran, R. P.

    2007-08-29

    Successful mitral valve repair is dependent upon a full understanding of normal and abnormal mitral valve anatomy and function. Computational analysis is one such method that can be applied to simulate mitral valve function in order to analyze the roles of individual components, and evaluate proposed surgical repair. We developed the first three-dimensional, finite element (FE) computer model of the mitral valve including leaflets and chordae tendineae, however, one critical aspect that has been missing until the last few years was the evaluation of fluid flow, as coupled to the function of the mitral valve structure. We present here our latest results for normal function and specific pathologic changes using a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model. Normal valve function was first assessed, followed by pathologic material changes in collagen fiber volume fraction, fiber stiffness, fiber splay, and isotropic stiffness. Leaflet and chordal stress and strain, and papillary muscle force was determined. In addition, transmitral flow, time to leaflet closure, and heart valve sound were assessed. Model predictions in the normal state agreed well with a wide range of available in-vivo and in-vitro data. Further, pathologic material changes that preserved the anisotropy of the valve leaflets were found to preserve valve function. By contrast, material changes that altered the anisotropy of the valve were found to profoundly alter valve function. The addition of blood flow and an experimentally driven microstructural description of mitral tissue represent significant advances in computational studies of the mitral valve, which allow further insight to be gained. This work is another building block in the foundation of a computational framework to aid in the refinement and development of a truly noninvasive diagnostic evaluation of the mitral valve. Ultimately, it represents the basis for simulation of surgical repair of pathologic valves in a clinical and educational

  18. Differentiation of left ventricular diastolic function by mid-diastolic mitral annular motion patterns.

    PubMed

    Su, Ho-Ming; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Lee, Chee-Siong; Yen, Hsueh-Wei; Huang, Chih-Hsin; Cheng, Kai-Hung; Lee, Hsiang-Chun; Lai, Wen-Ter; Sheu, Sheng-Hsiung; Voon, Wen-Chol

    2008-05-01

    Mid-diastolic mitral annular motion may be driven by strain energy, an energy for myocardial recoil, stored during the previous systole. Hence, various patterns of mid-diastolic mitral annular motion may imply different left ventricular (LV) diastolic function. The purpose of this study is to compare LV diastolic properties among different types of mid-diastolic mitral annular motion. Two-hundred and three consecutive subjects underwent an echocardiographic examination at our outpatient clinic. Study subjects were classified into three groups according to mid-diastolic mitral annular motion patterns. Upward and downward La waves were defined, respectively, as a clear apically and atrially directed mid-diastolic annular motion on at least three consecutive beats with the average peak velocity > or =2 cm/s. Subjects with upward La wave, with downward but without upward La wave and without La wave were categorized as groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Early diastolic mitral annular velocity (Ea) was higher and the ratio of transmitral E wave velocity to Ea was lower in group 1 than in groups 2 and 3 (all p < 0.001). The diagnostic accuracy of upward La wave in prediction of normal diastolic function fell between 75% and 88%. In conclusion, patients with upward La wave had better LV diastolic function and lower LV filling pressure than patients without it. Upward La wave is useful in prediction of normal diastolic function. Therefore, analysis of mid-diastolic mitral annular motion may be complementary to other measures of LV diastolic function. (

  19. Parabolic resection for mitral valve repair.

    PubMed

    Drake, Daniel H; Drake, Charles G; Recchia, Dino

    2010-02-01

    Parabolic resection, named for the shape of the cut edges of the excised tissue, expands on a common 'trick' used by experienced mitral surgeons to preserve tissue and increase the probability of successful repair. Our objective was to describe and clinically analyze this simple modification of conventional resection. Thirty-six patients with mitral regurgitation underwent valve repair using parabolic resection in combination with other techniques. Institution specific mitral data, Society of Thoracic Surgeons data and preoperative, post-cardiopulmonary bypass (PCPB) and postoperative echocardiography data were collected and analyzed. Preoperative echocardiography demonstrated mitral regurgitation ranging from moderate to severe. PCPB transesophageal echocardiography demonstrated no regurgitation or mild regurgitation in all patients. Thirty-day surgical mortality was 2.8%. Serial echocardiograms demonstrated excellent repair stability. One patient (2.9%) with rheumatic disease progressed to moderate regurgitation 33 months following surgery. Echocardiography on all others demonstrated no or mild regurgitation at a mean follow-up of 22.8+/-12.8 months. No patient required mitral reintervention. Longitudinal analysis demonstrated 80% freedom from cardiac death, reintervention and greater than moderate regurgitation at four years following repair. Parabolic resection is a simple technique that can be very useful during complex mitral reconstruction. Early and intermediate echocardiographic studies demonstrate excellent results.

  20. Revisit of Functional Tricuspid Regurgitation; Current Trends in the Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Muraru, Denisa; Surkova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Current knowledge of functional tricuspid regurgitation (FTR) as a progressive entity, worsening the prognosis of patients irrespective of its aetiology, has led to renewed interest in the pathophysiology and assessment of FTR. For the proper management of FTR, not only its severity, but also the mechanisms, the mode of leaflet coaptation, the degree of tricuspid annulus enlargement and leaflet tenting, and the haemodynamic consequences for right atrial and right ventricular morphology and function have to be taken into account. A better assessment of the anatomy and function of tricuspid apparatus and tricuspid regurgitation severity should help with the appropriate selection of patients who will benefit from either surgical tricuspid valve repair/replacement or a percutaneous procedure, especially among patients who are to undergo or have undergone primary left-sided valvular surgery. In this article, we review the anatomy, pathophysiology and the use of imaging techniques to assess patients with FTR, as well as the various treatment options for FTR, including emerging transcatheter procedures. The limitations affecting the current approach to FTR patients and the unmet clinical needs for their management have also been discussed. PMID:27482252

  1. Tricuspid surgery for tricuspid regurgitation: review.

    PubMed

    Isomura, Tadashi; Fukada, Yasuhisa; Miyazaki, Takuya; Endo, Masahiro

    2016-10-01

    The tricuspid regurgitation (TR) is so-called 'functional' rather than organic. And therefore, it was originally thought that in most patients with secondary TR, surgical treatment of the left side heart valve would correct the problems of the TR. However, in recent study, the residual or recurrent TR showed poor prognosis after the surgery and the tricuspid valve is called 'forgotten' valve. The anatomy and pathophysiology of the tricuspid valve are shown as three-dimensional structure which is different from the "saddle-shaped" mitral annulus, and the finding suggests that an annuloplasty for TR is different from that for mitral regurgitation. The indication of tricuspid annuloplasty (TAP) for TR is not only the degree of TR but also annular dilatation without TR at the time of surgery. Tricuspid annuloplasty shows better long-term results after surgery than replacement and additional procedure may be required to prevent recurrence of TR after TAP. In this review, indication, the therapeutic procedures and prognosis depend on surgical procedure with or without ring or additional procedures are reviewed.

  2. Doppler-derived left ventricular negative dP/dt as a predictor of atrial fibrillation or ischemic stroke in patients with degenerative mitral regurgitation and normal ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jeong-Eun; Lee, Dong-Hyeon; Cho, Eun Joo; Jeon, Hui-Kyung; Jung, Hae-Ok; Youn, Ho-Joong

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Doppler-derived left ventricular (LV) -dP/dt in predicting atrial fibrillation (AF) or ischemic stroke in patients with moderate to severe degenerative mitral regurgitation (MR). Doppler-derived LV -dP/dt was determined from the continuous-wave Doppler spectrum of the MR jet (-dP/dt = 32/time between 3 and 1 m/sec) in 80 patients (mean age 59 ± 16 years, 41% men) with moderate to severe degenerative MR, normal LV ejection fraction (LVEF ≥ 60%), and sinus rhythm at diagnosis. Events were defined as new AF or ischemic stroke. During a mean follow-up of 18 ± 13 months, there were 9 events (6 new AF, 3 ischemic strokes). Univariate analysis showed that older age, decreased LV -dP/dt, increased LV mass index, and left atrial volume index (LAVI), shortened deceleration time (DT), reduced A' velocity, and elevated E/E' ratio, prolongation of pulmonary venous (PV) atrial reversal (AR) flow duration relative to mitral inflow A-wave duration (AR-Adur) were associated with events. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, Doppler-derived LV -dP/dt (for each 100 mmHg/sec increase, hazard ratio: 0.165, 95% confidence interval: 0.036-0.761, P = 0.021) and E/E' (hazard ratio: 0.820, 95% confidence interval: 0.682-0.987, P = 0.036) were significant independent predictors of AF or ischemic stroke. Doppler-derived LV -dP/dt is independently associated with the occurrence of AF or ischemic stroke in patients with moderate to severe degenerative MR and provides additional prognostic information. © 2013, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Acute changes of mitral valve geometry during interventional edge-to-edge repair with the MitraClip system are associated with midterm outcomes in patients with functional valve disease: preliminary results from a prospective single-center study.

    PubMed

    Schueler, Robert; Momcilovic, Diana; Weber, Marcel; Welz, Armin; Werner, Nikos; Mueller, Cornelius; Ghanem, Alexander; Nickenig, Georg; Hammerstingl, Christoph

    2014-06-01

    Transcatheter mitral valve repair (TMVR) is a treatment option in patients with symptomatic functional or degenerative mitral regurgitation (DMR) at high surgical risk. The acute effect of MitraClip procedure on mitral valve (MV) annular geometry and its relation to functional outcomes is unclear. We sought to assess immediate effect of TMVR on MV annular geometry with 3-dimensional (3D) transesophageal echocardiography and the association of MV diameter reduction with functional response after 6 months. Consecutive patients (n = 111; age, 78.3 ± 8.1 years) at high surgical risk (logistic EuroSCORE [European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation], 29.8±21.5%) underwent TMVR. The procedure was completed successfully in 107 (96%) patients with 3D reconstruction of MV annular geometry immediately before and after clip implantation. Only patients with functional mitral regurgitation (n = 71) experienced an acute reduction of anterior-posterior MV diameters (4.0 ± 0.6 and 3.6 ± 0.6 cm; P < 0.0001), MV annulus areas (2D annulus area, 13.9 ± 3.8 and 12.8 ± 3.4 cm(2); P < 0.0001 and 3D annulus area, 14.4 ± 3.9 and 12.9 ± 3.4 cm(2); P < 0.0001), and MV annular geometry (MV sphericity index, 0.9 ± 0.1 and 0.8 ± 0.1; P < 0.0001); the lateral medial MV diameters remained unchanged (4.3 ± 0.7 and 4.4 ± 0.6 cm; P = 0.13). In subjects with DMR, all MV annular geometry-defining values were not significantly altered after TMVR (n = 36; P > 0.05). Acute anterior-posterior diameter reduction was associated with clinical response to TMVR after 6 months of follow-up (cutoff value, ≥ 6.4%; area under the curve, 0.81; P = 0.002; sensitivity, 81.6%; specificity, 81.8%), which was confirmed by additional regression analysis (P = 0.007). Three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography enables assessment of acute changes of MV geometry in patients undergoing the MitraClip procedure. Only patients with functional mitral regurgitation experienced significant reduction

  4. Results of tricuspid valve surgery for functional tricuspid regurgitation: acute and long-term outcomes and predictors of failure.

    PubMed

    Pozzoli, Alberto; Buzzatti, Nicola; Vicentini, Luca; De Bonis, Michele; Alfieri, Ottavio

    2017-02-15

    The assessment and management of tricuspid valve disease evolved significantly in the last decade. Tricuspid regurgitation is a frequent heart valve disease and it is most often secondary, due to annular dilatation and leaflet tethering from right ventricular remodelling. The indications for tricuspid valve surgery are several and mainly related to the underlying disease, to the severity of the regurgitation and to the right ventricular function. Moreover, surgical tricuspid repair has been avoided for years, because of the erroneous concept that tricuspid regurgitation should disappear once the primary pathology on the left heart has been resolved. Instead, during the last few years, many investigators have reported evidence in favour of a more aggressive surgical approach to functional tricuspid regurgitation, recognising the risk of progressive tricuspid insufficiency in patients with annular dilatation and only moderate regurgitation (or less) at the time of surgery. This concept, along with the acute and long-term outcomes of tricuspid surgical repair techniques and tricuspid replacement are discussed in this review.

  5. Mitral Valve Surgery: Current Minimally Invasive and Transcatheter Options.

    PubMed

    Ramlawi, Basel; Gammie, James S

    2016-01-01

    The mitral valve is a highly complex structure, the competency and function of which relies on the harmonious action of its component parts. Minimally invasive cardiac surgery (MICS) for mitral valve repair or replacement (MVR/r) has been performed successfully with incremental improvements in techniques over the past decade. These minimally invasive procedures, while attractive to patients and referring physicians, should meet the same high bar for optimal clinical outcomes and long-term durability of valve repair as traditional sternotomy procedures. The majority of MICS MVR/r procedures are performed via a right minithoracotomy approach with direct or camera-assisted visualization, with a minority of centers performing robotic MVR/r. Outcomes with MICS MVR/r have been shown to have similar morbidity and mortality rates as traditional sternotomy MV procedures but with the advantage of reduced transfusions, postoperative atrial fibrillation, and time to recovery. More recently, transcatheter mitral valve repair and replacement (TMVR/r) has become a reality. Percutaneous MV repair technology is currently FDA approved for patients with nonsurgical high-risk degenerative mitral regurgitation. Other TMVR/r technology is at various levels of preclinical and clinical investigation, although these devices are proving to be more challenging compared to transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) due to the significantly more complex mitral anatomy and the greater heterogeneity of mitral disease requiring treatment. In this article, we review current techniques for MICS MVR/r and upcoming catheter-based therapies for the mitral valve.

  6. Mitral Valve Surgery: Current Minimally Invasive and Transcatheter Options

    PubMed Central

    Ramlawi, Basel; Gammie, James S.

    2016-01-01

    The mitral valve is a highly complex structure, the competency and function of which relies on the harmonious action of its component parts. Minimally invasive cardiac surgery (MICS) for mitral valve repair or replacement (MVR/r) has been performed successfully with incremental improvements in techniques over the past decade. These minimally invasive procedures, while attractive to patients and referring physicians, should meet the same high bar for optimal clinical outcomes and long-term durability of valve repair as traditional sternotomy procedures. The majority of MICS MVR/r procedures are performed via a right minithoracotomy approach with direct or camera-assisted visualization, with a minority of centers performing robotic MVR/r. Outcomes with MICS MVR/r have been shown to have similar morbidity and mortality rates as traditional sternotomy MV procedures but with the advantage of reduced transfusions, postoperative atrial fibrillation, and time to recovery. More recently, transcatheter mitral valve repair and replacement (TMVR/r) has become a reality. Percutaneous MV repair technology is currently FDA approved for patients with nonsurgical high-risk degenerative mitral regurgitation. Other TMVR/r technology is at various levels of preclinical and clinical investigation, although these devices are proving to be more challenging compared to transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) due to the significantly more complex mitral anatomy and the greater heterogeneity of mitral disease requiring treatment. In this article, we review current techniques for MICS MVR/r and upcoming catheter-based therapies for the mitral valve. PMID:27127558

  7. Immediate Outcome of Balloon Mitral Valvuloplasty with JOMIVA Balloon during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, Ramona; Kaliappan, Tamilarasu; Gopalan, Rajendiran; Palanimuthu, Ramasmy; Anandhan, Premkrishna

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Rheumatic mitral stenosis is the most common Valvular Heart Disease encountered during pregnancy. Balloon Mitral Valvuloplasty (BMV) is one of the treatment option available if the symptoms are refractory to the medical management and the valve anatomy is suitable for balloon dilatation. BMV with Inoue balloon is the most common technique being followed worldwide. Over the wire BMV is a modified technique using Joseph Mitral Valvuloplasty (JOMIVA) balloon catheter which is being followed in certain centres. Aim To assess the immediate post procedure outcome of over the wire BMV with JOMIVA balloon. Materials and Methods Clinical and echocardiographic parameters of pregnant women with significant mitral stenosis who underwent elective BMV with JOMIVA balloon in our institute from 2005 to 2015 were analysed retrospectively. Severity of breathlessness (New York Heart Association Functional Class), and duration of pregnancy was included in the analysis. Pre procedural echocardiographic parameters which included severity of mitral stenosis and Wilkin’s scoring were analysed. Clinical, haemodynamic and echocardiographic outcomes immediately after the procedure were analysed. Results Among the patients who underwent BMV in our Institute 38 were pregnant women. Twenty four patients (63%) were in New York Heart Association (NYHA) Class III. All of them were in sinus rhythm except two (5%) who had atrial fibrillation. Thirty four patients (89.5%) were in second trimester of pregnancy at the time of presentation and four (10.5%) were in third trimester. Echocardiographic analysis of the mitral valve showed that the mean Wilkin’s score was 7.3. Mean mitral valve area pre procedure was 0.8 cm2. Mean gradient across the valve was 18 mmHg. Ten patients (26.5%) had mild mitral regurgitation and none had more than mild mitral regurgitation. Thirty six patients had pulmonary hypertension as assessed by tricuspid regurgitation jet velocity. All of them underwent BMV

  8. [Ischaemic mitral insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Messas, E

    2004-06-01

    Ischaemic mitral insufficiency (IMI) due to regurgitation of an anatomically normal valve, due to dysfunction directly related to myocardial ischaemia, is observed in over 20% of post-infarction patients and is associated with a doubling of the risk of death. The responsibility of ventricular remodelling with displacement of the papillary muscles in the genesis of IMI has been demonstrated experimentally. 3-D echocardiography has improved our understanding of the central role of geometrical changes of the subvalvular apparatus. The inconsistent results of surgery using an undersized mitral annulus have led to the search for alternative techniques. The correction of mitral insufficiency at coronary bypass surgery is a current topic of research. The application of new techniques of mitral valvuloplasty seems more effective and should provide an answer to this problem.

  9. Acute Effect of Treatment of Mitral Stenosis on Left Atrium Function

    PubMed Central

    Rohani, Atooshe; Kargar, Shahram; Fazlinejad, Afsoon; Ghaderi, Fereshte; Vakili, Vida; Falsoleiman, Homa; Bagheri, Ramin Khamene

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Peak atrial longitudinal strain (PALS) is used to evaluate left atrium (LA) function in patients with mitral stenosis (MS), before and after percutaneous transmitral commissurotomy (PTMC) and mitral valve replacement (MVR). Methods: Patients with severe symptomatic MS, who were referred to our echocardiographic laboratory for a diagnostic examination before cardiac surgery or PTMC from October of 2014 to October of 2015, were included in the study. Result: The peak systolic global LA strain improved post-PTMC (P < 0.001) and post-MVR (P = 0.012). This difference was statistically highly significant. Conclusion: PALS is impaired in patients with severe symptomatic MS and improved acutely after treatment and may be a good indicator of LA function and may predict the right time for intervention on mitral valve. PMID:28074794

  10. Population diversity and function of hyperpolarization-activated current in olfactory bulb mitral cells

    PubMed Central

    Angelo, Kamilla; Margrie, Troy W.

    2011-01-01

    Although neurons are known to exhibit a broad array of intrinsic properties that impact critically on the computations they perform, very few studies have quantified such biophysical diversity and its functional consequences. Using in vivo and in vitro whole-cell recordings here we show that mitral cells are extremely heterogeneous in their expression of a rebound depolarization (sag) at hyperpolarized potentials that is mediated by a ZD7288-sensitive current with properties typical of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide gated (HCN) channels. The variability in sag expression reflects a functionally diverse population of mitral cells. For example, those cells with large amplitude sag exhibit more membrane noise, a lower rheobase and fire action potentials more regularly than cells where sag is absent. Thus, cell-to-cell variability in sag potential amplitude reflects diversity in the integrative properties of mitral cells that ensures a broad dynamic range for odor representation across these principal neurons. PMID:22355569

  11. The Effects of Pulmonary Valve Replacement for Severe Pulmonary Regurgitation on Exercise Capacity and Cardiac Function.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jason G; Schamberger, Marcus S; Hurwitz, Roger A; Johnson, Tiffanie R; Sterrett, Lauren E; Ebenroth, Eric S

    2015-08-01

    Patients may develop hemodynamic abnormalities after right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) repair. Re-intervention timing remains a dilemma. This study evaluates exercise capacity and RV function before and after intervention using age-related comparisons. Twenty-six patients with severe pulmonary regurgitation (PR) after initial repair scheduled for pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) were enrolled. Metabolic treadmill testing (EST) and MRI were obtained before and after surgery. EST results were compared with matched controls. Preoperative exercise time and peak oxygen consumption (VO2 max) were significantly diminished compared with controls but were not significantly different postoperatively. The patients were then split into age-related cohorts. When comparing pre-PVR and post-PVR exercise time and VO2 max among themselves, neither cohort showed significant differences. However, patients younger than 25 years had better postoperative results, an age-related difference not seen in the controls. Preoperative MRI showed significantly dilated RV, PR, and low normal function. After PVR, the right to left ventricular end-diastolic volume ratio (RVEDV:LVEDV) and pulmonary artery regurgitant fraction (RF) significantly decreased. There was no change in ventricular ejection fractions (EF). Severe PR, decreased RVEF, and RV dilation can significantly diminish exercise capacity. PVR improves RVEDV:LVEDV and RF, but not EF. Younger patients had better exercise capacity that was maintained postoperatively. This age-related difference was not seen in the controls, indicating that earlier intervention may preserve exercise capacity. Serial ESTs in patients with severe PR following RVOT repair may identify deteriorating exercise capacity as an early indicator for the need for PVR.

  12. Early Clinical Outcome of Mitral Valve Replacement Using a Newly Designed Stentless Mitral Valve for Failure of Initial Mitral Valve Repair.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Hidefumi; Kasegawa, Hitoshi; Kin, Hajime; Takanashi, Shuichiro

    2016-12-21

    Here we report the early outcome of mitral valve replacement using a newly designed stentless mitral valve for failure of initial mitral valve repair. Mitral valve plasty (MVP) for mitral regurgitation is currently a standard technique performed worldwide. However, whether mitral valve repair should be performed for patients with advanced leaflet damage or complicated pathology remains controversial. Mitral valve replacement might be feasible for patients who have undergone failed initial MVP; however, it is not an optimal treatment because of poor valve durability and the need for anticoagulative therapy. We report two cases of successful mitral valve replacement using a newly designed stentless mitral valve made of fresh autologous pericardium, which may have a potential benefit over mitral valve repair or mitral valve replacement with a mechanical or bioprosthetic valve.

  13. Recurrent stuck mitral valve: eosinophilia an unusual pathology.

    PubMed

    Awasthy, Neeraj; Bhat, Yasser; Radhakrishnan, S; Sharma, Rajesh

    2015-03-01

    Eosinophilia is a very unusual and rare cause of thrombosis of prosthetic mitral valve. We report a 10-year-old male child of recurrent stuck prosthetic mitral valve. The child underwent mitral valve replacement for severe mitral regurgitation secondary to Rheumatic heart disease. He had recurrent prosthetic mitral valve thrombosis, despite desired INR levels. There was associated eosinophilia. The child was treated on the lines of tropical eosinophilia with oral prednisolone and diethylcarbamazine, the eosinophil count dropped significantly with no subsequent episode of stuck mitral valve. We discuss the management of recurrent stuck mitral valve and also eosinophilia as a causative factor for the same.

  14. Use of three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography to evaluate mitral valve morphology for risk stratification prior to mitral valvuloplasty.

    PubMed

    Francis, Loren; Finley, Alan; Hessami, Walead

    2017-02-01

    Mitral stenosis is often managed percutaneously with an interventional procedure such as balloon commissurotomy. Although this often results in an increased mitral valve area and improved clinical symptoms, this procedure is not benign and may have serious complications including the development of hemodynamically significant mitral valve regurgitation. Multiple scoring systems have been developed to attempt to risk stratify these patients prior to their procedure.

  15. Trans Apical Mitral Implantation (TAMI) of the Tiara ™ Bio-prosthesis: Pre-Clinical Results

    PubMed Central

    Banai, Shmuel; Verheye, Stefan; Cheung, Anson; Schwartz, Marc; Marko, Alexei; Lane, Randy; Jolicoeur, E. Marc; Garceau, Patrick; Biner, Simon; Tanguay, Jean-Francois; Edelman, Elazer R.; White, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To describe the pre-clinical evaluation of Trans-Apical Mitral Implantation (TAMI) of the Tiara in preparation for first-in-man implantation. Background The Tiara™ is a trans-catheter self-expanding mitral bio-prosthesis, specifically designed for the complex anatomical configuration of the mitral apparatus. Methods Tiara valves were implanted in an acute porcine model, in a chronic ovine model, and in human cadavers. Results Acute and chronic evaluation demonstrated excellent function and alignment of the valves, with no left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction, coronary artery obstruction, or transvalvular gradients. Chronic evaluation of 7 sheep demonstrated clinically stable animals. A mild degree of prosthetic valve regurgitation was seen in 2 of the 7 sheep. Mild to moderate degree of paravalvular leak, which was attributed to this animal model, was observed in 6 of these animals. Cardioscopy and macroscopic evaluation demonstrated stable and secure positioning of the Tiara with no evidence of injury to the ventricular or atrial walls. Pericardial leaflets were free and mobile without calcifications. Implantation of the Tiara valves in human cadaver hearts demonstrated, upon visual inspection, proper anatomic alignment and seating of the valve both at the atrial and at the ventricular aspects of the native mitral apparatus. Conclusions In preparation for the first-in-man trans-catheter mitral valve implantation we report the successful pre-clinical evaluation of the Tiara trans-catheter self-expanding mitral bioprosthetic valve. In porcine and ovine models without mitral regurgitation, trans-apical mitral implantation of the Tiara valve is technically feasible, safe, and results in a stable and well-functioning mitral bioprosthesis. PMID:24556094

  16. Role of Right Ventricular Dysfunction and Diabetes Mellitus in N-terminal pro-B-type Natriuretic Peptide Response of Patients With Severe Mitral Regurgitation and Heart Failure After MitraClip.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Hidehiro; Neuss, Michael; Weissenborn, Jens; Butter, Christian

    2017-04-06

    MitraClip (MC) is an alternative therapeutic option for patients with severe mitral regurgitation (MR) who are at high surgical risk. Most candidates for MC have severe heart failure (HF) with increased N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro BNP) levels. We sought to clarify the response of NT-pro BNP after MC and to identify the determinants of NT-pro BNP nonresponders. Among 136 consecutive patients successfully treated with MC, we excluded 20 patients due to low baseline NT-pro BNP levels and therefore examined 116 patients. NT-pro BNP responders were defined as patients whose NT-pro BNP levels decreased by > 30% at 6 months after MC. Mean NT-pro BNP levels significantly decreased from 6,117 pg/mL at baseline to 4,143 pg/mL at 6 months after MC (P < 0.001); 61 patients (53%) were responders. Diabetes mellitus (DM) (51% versus 25%; P = 0.003) and atrial fibrillation (67% versus 49%; P = 0.049) were more common in nonresponders. Baseline New York Heart Association (NYHA) class and NT-proBNP levels were higher in responders. Right ventricular systolic dysfunction (RVSD) defined as tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) < 15 mm was more common in nonresponders (41% versus 18%; P = 0.008). Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that DM (odds ratio [OR], 2.966; P = 0.014), RVSD (OR, 3.948; P = 0.006), and baseline NT-proBNP > 5,000 pg/mL (OR, 0.204; P = 0.001) were independent determinants of nonresponders. All-cause death tended to be less common in responders to NT-pro BNP (20% versus 31%; P = 0.163). In conclusion, NT-pro BNP levels significantly decreased after MC. DM and RVSD were determinants of NT-pro BNP nonresponse after the MC procedure.

  17. Longer Left Ventricular Electric Delay Reduces Mitral Regurgitation After Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy: Mechanistic Insights From the SMART-AV Study (SmartDelay Determined AV Optimization: A Comparison to Other AV Delay Methods Used in Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy).

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Neal A; Gold, Michael R; Waggoner, Alan D; Picard, Michael H; Stein, Kenneth M; Yu, Yinghong; Meyer, Timothy E; Wold, Nicholas; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A; Singh, Jagmeet P

    2016-11-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) is associated with worse survival in those undergoing cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Left ventricular (LV) lead position in CRT may ameliorate mechanisms of MR. We examine the association between a longer LV electric delay (QLV) at the LV stimulation site and MR reduction after CRT. QLV was assessed retrospectively in 426 patients enrolled in the SMART-AV study (SmartDelay Determined AV Optimization: A Comparison to Other AV Delay Methods Used in CRT). QLV was defined as the time from QRS onset to the first large peak of the LV electrogram. Linear regression and logistic regression were used to assess the association between baseline QLV and MR reduction at 6 months (absolute change in vena contracta width and odds of ≥1 grade reduction in MR). At baseline, there was no difference in MR grade, LV dyssynchrony, or LV volumes in those with QLV above versus below the median (95 ms). After multivariable adjustment, increasing QLV was an independent predictor of MR reduction at 6 months as reflected by an increased odds of MR response (odds ratio: 1.13 [1.03-1.25]/10 ms increase QLV; P=0.02) and a decrease in vena contracta width (P<0.001). At 3 months, longer QLV (≥median) was associated with significant decrease in LV end-systolic volume (ΔLV end-systolic volume -28.2±38.9 versus -4.9±33.8 mL, P<0.001). Adjustment for 3-month ΔLV end-systolic volume attenuated the association between QLV and 6-month MR reduction. In patients undergoing CRT, longer QLV was an independent predictor of MR reduction at 6 months and associated with interval 3-month LV reverse remodeling. These findings provide a mechanistic basis for using an electric-targeting LV lead strategy at the time of CRT implant. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Large animal model of functional tricuspid regurgitation in pacing induced end-stage heart failure.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, Marcin; Proudfoot, Alistair G; Langholz, David; Eberhart, Lenora; Brown, Michael; Schubert, Hans; Wodarek, Jeremy; Timek, Tomasz A

    2017-06-01

    Functional tricuspid regurgitation (FTR) is common in patients with advanced heart failure and frequently complicates left ventricular assist device implantation yet remains poorly understood. We set out to establish large animal model of FTR that could serve as a research platform to investigate the pathogenesis of FTR associated with end-stage heart failure. : Through right thoracotomy, ten adult sheep underwent implantation of pacemaker with epicardial LV lead, five sonomicrometry crystals on the right ventricle, and left and right ventricular telemetry pressure sensors during a beating heart off-pump procedure. After 5 ± 1 days of recovery, baseline haemodynamic, echocardiographic and sonomicrometry data were collected. Animals were paced thereafter at a rate of 220-240 beats/min until the development of heart failure and concomitant tricuspid regurgitation. : Three animals died during early recovery period and one during the pacing phase. Six surviving animals were paced for a mean of 14 ± 5 days. Cardiac function was significantly depressed compared to baseline, with LV ejection fraction falling from 69 ± 2% to 22 ± 4% ( P  < 0.001) and RV fractional area change from 52 ± 11% to 25 ± 9% ( P  = 0.005). All animals developed significant enlargement of tricuspid annulus (from 29.5 ± 1.6 to 36.5 ± 4.5 mm; P  = 0.01) and right ventricle (from 21.9 ± 0.2 to 30.3 ± 0.6 mm; P  = 0.03). Sonomicrometry derived contractility of RV free wall was depressed and at least moderate tricuspid insufficiency developed in all animals. : Biventricular dysfunction, tricuspid annular dilatation and significant FTR were observed in our model of ovine tachycardia induced cardiomyopathy. This animal model reflects the clinical situation of end-stage heart failure patients presenting for mechanical support.

  19. Isolated parachute mitral valve in a 29 years old female; a case report.

    PubMed

    Toufan, Mehrnoush; Mahmoudi, Seyed Sajjad

    2016-01-01

    A 29-year old female patient was referred to our hospital for evaluation of dyspnea NYHA class I which begun from several months ago. The only abnormal sign found on physical examination was a grade 2/6 systolic murmur at the apex position without radiation. Echocardiography revealed normal left and right ventricular sizes and systolic function, and only one papillary muscle in left ventricular (LV) cavity which all chordae tendineae inserted into that muscle. The mitral valve orifice was eccentrically located at the lateral side with mild to moderate mitral regurgitation but without significant mitral stenosis. No other congenital heart anomalies were identified. Thus, the final diagnosis was isolated parachute mitral valve (IPMV). She was one of the very rare IPMV cases have ever been reported in adults.

  20. Isolated parachute mitral valve in a 29 years old female; a case report

    PubMed Central

    Toufan, Mehrnoush; Mahmoudi, Seyed Sajjad

    2016-01-01

    A 29-year old female patient was referred to our hospital for evaluation of dyspnea NYHA class I which begun from several months ago. The only abnormal sign found on physical examination was a grade 2/6 systolic murmur at the apex position without radiation. Echocardiography revealed normal left and right ventricular sizes and systolic function, and only one papillary muscle in left ventricular (LV) cavity which all chordae tendineae inserted into that muscle. The mitral valve orifice was eccentrically located at the lateral side with mild to moderate mitral regurgitation but without significant mitral stenosis. No other congenital heart anomalies were identified. Thus, the final diagnosis was isolated parachute mitral valve (IPMV). She was one of the very rare IPMV cases have ever been reported in adults PMID:27069567

  1. Transapical Transcatheter Valve-in-Valve Implantation for Failed Mitral Bioprostheses: Gradient, Symptoms, and Functional Status in 18 High-Risk Patients Up to 5 Years.

    PubMed

    Cerillo, Alfredo Giuseppe; Gasbarri, Tommaso; Celi, Simona; Murzi, Michele; Trianni, Giuseppe; Ravani, Marcello; Solinas, Marco; Berti, Sergio

    2016-10-01

    The recourse to mitral valve-in-valve implantation is expected to rise consistently owing to the increasing use of bioprostheses and to the risks related to redo valve replacement. However, there is concern that the excellent early results of mitral valve-in-valve could be nullified by the development of significant gradients. We report our experience with mitral valve-in-valve implantation, with particular emphasis on the midterm follow-up. Eighteen patients underwent mitral valve-in-valve implantation at our institution. The mean Society of Thoracic Surgeons score was 10.3. All patients were heavily symptomatic. The mechanisms of bioprosthesis failure were stenosis (3 patients), regurgitation (4 patients) or mixed (11 patients). The mean transprosthetic gradient was 12.8 ± 5.7 mm Hg. All the procedures were transapical. Balloon predilation was never used. In the first patient, the transcatheter valve embolized in the ventricle. The patient died 2 days later of multiorgan failure. There were no other hospital deaths. Four patients died of pneumonia, endocarditis, lung cancer, and stroke at 1, 8, 18, and 46 months, postoperatively. The mean gradient at discharge was 5.1 ± 2.3 mm Hg. At follow-up (median 27 months), all surviving patients were in New York Heart Association functional class II or less. The mean transprosthetic gradient was 7 ± 1.8 mm Hg, and 1 patient had a gradient more than 10 mm Hg. Mitral valve-in-valve implantation allows good clinical and hemodynamic results. In our series, the appearance of a significant gradient at follow-up was not associated with echocardiographic signs of structural deterioration, and was possibly related to the size of the transcatheter and recipient valve. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Unusual redo mitral valve replacement for bleeding in Glanzmann thrombasthenia.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Villarreal, Ovidio A; Fernández-Ceseña, Ernesto; Solano-Ricardi, Mercedes; Aguilar-García, Alma L; Vega-Hernández, Raquel; Del Angel-Soto, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of 23-year-old man with mitral valve regurgitation and Glanzmann thrombasthenia, who underwent mechanical mitral valve replacement. Warfarin therapy was devastating, causing bilateral hemothorax, pericardial effusion, gastrointestinal bleeding, and hematuria. Redo mitral valve replacement with a biological prosthesis was required to resolve this critical situation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of mitral valve replacement in Glanzmann thrombasthenia, highlighting the danger of oral anticoagulation in this pathology.

  3. A Remnant Mitral Subvalvular Apparatus Mimicking Aortic Valve Vegetation after Mitral Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Jin; Kim, Kyung-Hee; Choi, Jae-Sung; Kim, Jun-Sung; Kim, Myung-A

    2012-01-01

    Preservation of the subvalvular apparatus has the merits of postoperative outcomes during mitral valve replacement for mitral regurgitation. We performed mitral valve replacement with anterior and posterior leaflet chordal preservation in a 65-year-old woman. On the 2nd postoperative day, routine postoperative trans-thoracic echocardiography showed an unknown aortic subvalvular mobile mass. We report a case of a remnant mitral subvalvular apparatus detected by echocardiography after chordal preserving mitral valve replacement which was confused with postoperative aortic valve vegetation. PMID:22509443

  4. [Serial assessment of left ventricular function after valve replacement for isolated aortic regurgitation].

    PubMed

    Misawa, Y; Hasegawa, T; Kato, M; Horimi, H; Yamaguchi, T

    1991-04-01

    Between 1978 and 1990, serial echocardiographic studies were performed on consecutive twenty-five patients of isolated aortic regurgitation (AR) before and after aortic valve replacement (AVR). The mean follow up period was 55 +/- 30 months. The serial changes in left ventricular end-diastolic dimension (LVDd), left ventricular end-systolic dimension (LVDs), fractional shortening (FS), and ejection fraction (EF) were assessed. According to preoperative echocardiographic studies, 25 patients were divided into two groups: Group I with LVDs greater than 50 mm and FS less than 25%, Group II with LVDs less than or equal to 50 mm and/or FS greater than or equal to 25%. One year after AVR, echocardiographic studies revealed normalization of LVDd and LVDs in Group II, and persistent left ventricular enlargement with lower FS and EF levels in Group I. However three years after AVR, LVDd, LVDs, and FS and EF of Group I returned to normal levels. It was concluded that in order to normalize the left ventricular function in isolated AR patients, those who had LVDs greater than 50 mm and FS less than 25% required three years after AVR, those patients who had LVDs less than or equal to 50 mm and/or FS greater than or equal to 25%, required only one year after AVR.

  5. Automated quantification of mitral valve anatomy using anatomical intelligence in three-dimensional echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Jin, Chun-Na; Salgo, Ivan S; Schneider, Robert J; Feng, Wei; Meng, Fan-Xia; Kam, Kevin Ka-Ho; Chi, Wai-Kin; So, Chak-Yu; Chan, Chris; Sun, Jing-Ping; Tsui, Gary; Wong, Kwan-Yee Kenneth; Yu, Cheuk-Man; Wan, Song; Wong, Randolph; Underwood, Malcolm; Au, Sylvia; Ng, Siu-Keung; Lee, Alex Pui-Wai

    2015-11-15

    Quantitative analysis of mitral valve morphology with three-dimensional (3D) transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) provides anatomic information that can assist clinical decision-making. However, routine use of mitral valve quantification has been hindered by tedious workflow and high operator-dependence. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the feasibility, accuracy and efficiency of a novel computer-learning algorithm using anatomical intelligence in ultrasound (AIUS) to automatically detect and quantitatively assess the mitral valve anatomy. A novice operator used AIUS to quantitatively assess mitral valve anatomy on the 3D TEE images of 55 patients (33 with mitral valve prolapse, 11 with functional mitral regurgitation, and 11 normal valves). The results were compared to that of manual mitral valve quantification by an experienced 3D echocardiographer and, in the 24 patients who underwent mitral valve repair, the surgical findings. Time consumption and reproducibility of AIUS were compared to the manual method. AIUS mitral valve quantification was feasible in 52 patients (95%). There were excellent agreements between AIUS and expert manual quantification for all mitral valve anatomic parameters (r=0.85-0.99, p<0.05). AIUS accurately classified surgically defined location of prolapse in 139 of 144 segments analyzed (97%). AIUS improved the intra- [intraclass-correlation coefficient (ICC)=0.91-0.99] and inter-observer (ICC=0.86-0.98) variability of novice users, surpassing the manual approach (intra-observer ICC=0.32-0.95; inter-observer ICC=0.45-0.93), yet requiring significantly less time (144±24s vs. 770±89s, p<0.0001). Anatomic intelligence in 3D TEE image can provide accurate, reproducible, and rapid quantification of the mitral valve anatomy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Measurement of aortic regurgitation by Doppler echocardiography.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y; Nitter-Hauge, S; Ihlen, H; Rootwelt, K; Myhre, E

    1986-01-01

    In an attempt to develop a new approach to the non-invasive measurement of aortic regurgitation, transmitral volumetric flow (MF) and left ventricular total stroke volume (SV) were measured by Doppler and cross sectional echocardiography in 23 patients without aortic valve disease (group A) and in 26 patients with aortic regurgitation (group B). The transmitral volumetric flow was obtained by multiplying the corrected mitral orifice area by the diastolic velocity integral, and the left ventricular total stroke volume was derived by subtracting the left ventricular end systolic volume from the end diastolic volume. The aortic regurgitant fraction (RF) was calculated as: RF = 1 - MF/SV. In group A there was a close agreement between the transmitral volumetric flow and the left ventricular total stroke volume, and the difference between the two measurements did not differ significantly from zero. In group B the left ventricular total stroke volume was significantly larger than the transmitral volumetric flow, and there was good agreement between the regurgitant fractions determined by Doppler echocardiography and radionuclide ventriculography. Discrepancies between the two techniques were found in patients with combined aortic and mitral regurgitation or a low angiographic left ventricular ejection fraction (less than 35%). The effective cardiac output measured by Doppler echocardiography accorded well with that measured by the Fick method. Doppler echocardiography provides a new and promising approach to the non-invasive measurement of aortic regurgitation. PMID:3947478

  7. Delayed recovery of right ventricular systolic function after repair of long-standing tricuspid regurgitation associated with severe right ventricular failure.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Kyung Hwa; Choi, Jong Bum; Kuh, Ja Hong

    2016-03-01

    After tricuspid valve surgery for long-standing tricuspid regurgitation associated with right ventricular failure, reverse remodelling of the enlarged right ventricle, including recovery of right ventricular systolic function, is unpredictable. We present the case of a 31-year old man with early reduction of dilated right ventricular dimensions and delayed recovery of impaired right ventricular systolic function after valve repair for traumatic tricuspid regurgitation lasting 16 years.

  8. Transcatheter Edge-to-Edge Treatment of Functional Tricuspid Regurgitation in an Ex Vivo Pulsatile Heart Model.

    PubMed

    Vismara, Riccardo; Gelpi, Guido; Prabhu, Santosh; Romitelli, Paolo; Troxler, Lauren G; Mangini, Andrea; Romagnoni, Claudia; Contino, Monica; Van Hoven, Dylan T; Lucherini, Federico; Jaworek, Michal; Redaelli, Alberto; Fiore, Gianfranco B; Antona, Carlo

    2016-09-06

    Although associated with left heart pathologies, functional tricuspid regurgitation (FTR) is often left untreated during left heart surgery. Hence, owing to its degenerative character, reoperation is often needed, encompassing an impressive (25% to 35%) mortality rate. Thus transcatheter approaches to FTR are raising great interest. The authors evaluated the post-treatment effectiveness of the edge-to-edge technique using the percutaneous mitral valve repair device in an ex vivo pulsatile model of FTR. The devices were implanted in 11 porcine hearts simulating FTR. In each heart, single-clip treatments involved grasping leaflet pairs in the medial or commissural position (6 combinations). Two-clip treatments were then performed considering all possible 15 combinations of leaflet pairs and medial/commissural grasping. Cardiac output, mean pulmonary pressure, and mean diastolic valve pressure gradient were evaluated in physiological and simulated pathological conditions (FTR), and post-treatments. Grasping the septal and anterior leaflets allowed for the best post-procedural outcome, ensuring a complete re-establishment of physiological-like hemodynamics. Septal and posterior grasping induced a significant recovery from FTR, although less marked. Conversely, grasping the anterior and posterior leaflets did not reduce FTR, and was detrimental in some specific cases. This experimental work demonstrated that the transcatheter edge-to-edge repair technique is a feasible approach for FTR. The study investigated this approach to develop a selective, specific structural intervention methodology for treating FTR, considering the several biomechanical factors that alter proper functionality of valvular substructures. These results can be used to guide the development of edge-to-edge repair techniques in treatment of FTR. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Double-orifice mitral valve treated by percutaneous balloon valvuloplasty.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Thomas George; Revankar, Vinod Raghunath; Papanna, Monica; Srinivasan, Harshini

    2016-07-01

    Double-orifice mitral valve is an rare anomaly characterized by a mitral valve with a single fibrous annulus and 2 orifices that open into the left ventricle. It is often associated with other congenital anomalies, most commonly atrioventricular canal defects, and rarely associated with a stenotic or regurgitant mitral valve. A patient who was diagnosed with congenital double-orifice mitral valve with severe mitral stenosis was treated successfully by percutaneous balloon mitral valvotomy rather than the conventional open surgical approach, demonstrating the utility of percutaneous correction of this anomaly.

  10. Rare Case of Unileaflet Mitral Valve.

    PubMed

    Shah, Jainil; Jain, Tarun; Shah, Sunay; Mawri, Sagger; Ananthasubramaniam, Karthikeyan

    2016-06-01

    Unileaflet mitral valve is the rarest of the congenital mitral valve anomalies and is usually life threatening in infancy due to severe mitral regurgitation (MR). In most asymptomatic individuals, it is mostly due to hypoplastic posterior mitral leaflet. We present a 22-year-old male with palpitations, who was found to have an echocardiogram revealing an elongated anterior mitral valve leaflet with severely hypoplastic posterior mitral valve leaflet appearing as a unileaflet mitral valve without MR. Our case is one of the 11 reported cases in the literature so far. We hereby review those cases and conclude that these patients are likely to be at risk of developing worsening MR later in their lives.

  11. Mitral and tricuspid valve surgery for Coffin-Lowry syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takeshi; Ohashi, Takeki; Furui, Masato; Kageyama, Souichirou; Kodani, Noriko; Kobayashi, Yutaka; Hirai, Yasutaka; Sakakura, Reo

    2015-05-01

    Coffin-Lowry syndrome is a rare X-linked disorder characterized by craniofacial and skeletal abnormalities, mental retardation, short stature, and hypotonia. An 18-year-old man with morphologic features characteristic of Coffin-Lowry syndrome was referred to our institution for valve disease surgery for worsening cardiac failure. Echocardiography showed severe mitral valve regurgitation associated with tricuspid valve regurgitation. Mitral valve implantation with a biological valve and tricuspid annular plication with a ring was performed. The ascending aorta was hypoplastic. Both the mitral papillary muscle originating near the mitral annulus and the chordae were shortened. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful and his cardiac failure improved.

  12. [A Case of Mitral Valvular Re-repair in a Patient with Hemolytic Anemia after Mitral Valvular Repair].

    PubMed

    Tomino, Mikiko; Miyata, Kazuto; Takeshita, Yuji; Kaneko, Koki; Kanazawa, Hiroko; Uchino, Hiroyuki

    2015-07-01

    A 54-year-old woman was admitted for mitral valvular repair. After folding plasty to A3, a 30 mm Cosgrove-Edwards ring was placed. There was no mitral regurgitation jet observed by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) during the operation. However, high blood pressure was monitored and treated in the intensive care unit, hemolytic anemia developed, and the serum lactate dehydrogenase level was elevated. Two weeks after the operation, serum lactate dehydrogenase was again elevated. TEE showed mild mitral regurgitation and the regurgitation jet colliding with the annuloplasty ring. Multiple transfusions of red blood cells were required. Repeat surgery was therefore undertaken. Lam and associates previously studying patients on hemolysis after mitral valvular repair noted high grade mitral regurgitation jets fragmented or accelerated. In the present case, mitral regurgitation was mild, but the high velocity and manner of regurgitation (collision with the annuloplasty ring) could cause hemolytic anemia. In the present case, high blood pressure might have caused chordae rupture. Furthermore, a flexible ring, such as the Cosgrove-Edwards ring, is likely to cause hemolytic anemia. As contributing factors to hemolysis after mitral valvular repair, perioperative blood pressure management and type of ring are significant.

  13. Modified semicircular constricting annuloplasty (Sagban's annuloplasty) in severe functional tricuspid regurgitation: alternative surgical technique and its mid-term results.

    PubMed

    Goksin, Ibrahim; Yilmaz, Arif; Baltalarli, Ahmet; Goktogan, Tayfun; Karahan, Nagihan; Turk, Ufuk Ali; Kara, Hakan; Sagban, Mansur

    2006-01-01

    De Vega annuloplasty is one of the most effective methods used in surgical correction of functional tricuspid regurgitation (FTR). Physiologic annular motions are protected by De Vega annuloplasty. However, recurrent tricuspid regurgitation secondary to Bowstring (Guitar string) phenomenon may be seen after De Vega annuloplasty as a result of gliding (jiggle) effect. The aim of this new annuloplasty was to prevent Bowstring phenomenon seen in De Vega annuloplasty. Twenty-five patients with severe FTR secondary to the left-sided valvular heart disease were included in this study. Modified semicircular constricting annuloplasty (Sagban's annuloplasty): The procedure is performed utilizing 0 and 2-0 polypropylene sutures. At first, 0 and 2-0 polypropylene sutures are fixed and knotted at anteroseptal and posteroseptal comissural regions (named as anchoring points). 2-0 Polypropylene sutures which come from anchoring points in clockwise and counterclockwise direction are used to encircle the free wall annulus as well as 0 polypropylene sutures in spiral fashion (spiral annulary suture technique). When both sutures get to the anteroposterior comissural region (tying point), they are passed through plastic snares. After the annuloplasty is completed, with the heart beating and the pulmonary artery clamped, competency of the valve is tested by injecting saline into the right ventricular chamber before the adjusting suture is tied. In this annuloplasty, 0 polypropylene sutures are used for reduction and constriction, 2-0 polypropylene sutures are used for the fixation of 0 polypropylene sutures in annular level. FTR improved totally in 16 patients (66.7%), 4 patients (16.7%) had first degree, 3 patients (12.5%) had second degree, and only 1 patient (4.2%) had third degree residual tricuspid regurgitation in an average follow-up period of 17.8 months. One patient died from low cardiac output in early postoperative period. There is no risk of recurrent regurgitation

  14. Surgical Repair of Congenital Left Atrial Aneurysm and Mitral Valve Insufficiency in a Four-Year-Old Child.

    PubMed

    Sarioglu, C Tayyar; Turkekul, Yasemin; Arnaz, Ahmet; Sisli, Emrah; Yalcinbas, Yusuf Kenan; Sarioglu, Ayse

    2016-12-12

    Left atrial aneurysm is an extremely rare anomaly, which can be associated with supraventricular arrhythmia, compression of coronary arteries, intracardiac thrombus, life-threatening systemic embolization, pulmonary venous obstruction, mitral valve insufficiency, and congestive heart failure. Herein, we report a four-year-old boy who had a giant aneurysm of the left atrium and severe mitral regurgitation. The aneurysm and mitral valve cleft causing severe mitral regurgitation were successfully repaired. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Mitral Repair Is Superior to Replacement When Associated With Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Reece, T Brett; Tribble, Curtis G.; Ellman, Peter I.; Maxey, Thomas S.; Woodford, Randall L.; Dimeling, George M.; Wellons, Harry A.; Crosby, Ivan K.; Kern, John A.; Kron, Irving L.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To compare the outcomes of mitral repair and replacement in revascularized patients with ischemic mitral regurgitation. Summary Background Data: Combined coronary bypass (CABG) and mitral procedures have been associated with the highest mortality (>10%) in cardiac surgery. Recent studies have suggested that mitral valve replacement (MVR) with sparing of the subvalvular apparatus had comparable results to mitral repair when associated with CABG. Methods: Over the past 7 years, 54 patients had CABG/mitral repair versus 56 who had CABG/MVR with preservation of the subvalvular apparatus. The groups were similar in age at 69.2 years in the replacement group versus 67.0 in the repair group. We compared these 2 groups based on hospital mortality, incidence of complications including nosocomial infection, neurologic decompensation (stroke), pulmonary complication (pneumonia, atelectasis, and prolonged ventilation), and renal complications (acute renal failure or insufficiency). Results: The mitral repair group had a hospital mortality of 1.9% versus 10.7% in the replacement group (P = 0.05). Infection occurred in 9% of repairs compared with 13% of replacements (P = 0.59). The incidence of stroke was no different between groups (2 of 54 repairs vs. 2 of 56 replacements, P = 1.00). Pulmonary complication rate was 39% in repairs versus 32% in replacements (P = 0.59). Worsening renal function occurred in 15% of repairs versus 18% of replacements (P = 0.67). Conclusions: Mitral repair is superior to mitral replacement when associated with coronary artery disease in terms of perioperative morbidity and hospital mortality. Although preservation of the subvalvular apparatus with MVR has a theoretical advantage in terms of ventricular function, mitral repair clearly adds a survival benefit in patients with concomitant ischemic cardiac disease. PMID:15082971

  16. Diastolic Function Evaluations by Tissue Doppler Imaging in Patients With Mitral Valve Prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Rezvaneh; Javanshir, Elnaz; Enamzadeh, Elgar

    2013-01-01

    Background Tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) is a new echocardiographic imaging technique that is believed to be superior to older conventional techniques in assessing abnormalities of cardiac function in many conditions affecting the heart. There are very limited data regarding the role of TDI in evaluating patients with mitral valve prolapse (MVP). Current study evaluates diastolic function in patients with MVP by this method. Methods From November 2009 to April 2011, one hundred and ten adults matched for age and sex and without structural heart disease were studied in two groups, with and without MVP, at Madani Heart Center, Tabriz, Iran. TDI was performed at the basal-lateral wall and S, E, E’, A, and A’ velocities, as well as the E/A and E’/A’ ratios were measured. Mitral annular systolic velocity and early diastolic (E’) velocities were measured lateral corner of mitral valve in apical 4-chamber view. Results Patients with MVP had higher left atrium volume (42.31 ± 10.47 vs. 35.19 ± 9.15 cm3; P < 0.001) and deceleration time (186.70 ± 26.00 vs. 176.89 ± 20.36 ms; P = 0.03). Diastolic dysfunction, although seemed more prevalent in MVP group (14.54%) than normal subjects (5.45%), the difference was not statistically significant between groups (P = 0.11). Conclusion Left atrial volume and deceleration time of mitral valve inflow was significantly higher in MVP which could be indicative of early stages of diastolic dysfunction in patients with MVP. However, larger follow-up studies are required to evaluate clinical significance of our findings in these patients.

  17. Assessment of mitral Björk-Shiley prosthetic dysfunction using digitised M mode echocardiography.

    PubMed Central

    Dawkins, K D; Cotter, L; Gibson, D G

    1984-01-01

    Digitised M mode echocardiograms were analysed in 22 patients with possible Björk-Shiley mitral prosthetic dysfunction. Patients with paraprosthetic mitral regurgitation had a significantly greater shortening fraction, an increased peak rate of dimension change during systole, and an increased peak velocity of circumferential fibre shortening than those with poor left ventricular function. Patients with a clotted prosthesis had lower values for shortening fraction and peak rate of dimension change during systole than patients with paraprosthetic regurgitation. In this latter group, the peak rate of dimension change during diastole and peak lengthening rate were greater than in either those patients with poor left ventricular function or those with a clotted prosthesis. In addition, the peak lengthening rate was greater in those with a clotted prosthesis than in those with poor left ventricular function. Thus M mode echocardiography is a useful method of assessing mitral prosthetic dysfunction and allows patients with paraprosthetic regurgitation to be distinguished from those with either poor left ventricular function or a clotted prosthesis. PMID:6691866

  18. Is minimally invasive thoracoscopic surgery the new benchmark for treating mitral valve disease?

    PubMed Central

    Goldstone, Andrew B.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of mitral valve disease remains dynamic; surgeons and patients must now choose between many different surgical options when addressing mitral regurgitation and mitral stenosis. Notably, advances in imaging and surgical instrumentation allow surgeons to perform less invasive mitral valve surgery that spares the sternum. With favorable long-term data now emerging, we compare the benefits and risks of thoracoscopic mitral valve surgery with that through conventional sternotomy or surgery that is robot-assisted. PMID:27942489

  19. The Diagnosis of Mitral Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Munroe, D. S.; Rally, C. R.

    1963-01-01

    The diagnosis of classical mitral stenosis is easy, but many pitfalls lead to over-diagnosis or under-diagnosis. These have been considered in detail and variations in symptoms and signs have been illustrated by case histories. Such variations include: (1) Embolism producing the Leriche syndrome; (2) mitral stenosis with insignificant hemodynamic effect; (3) myxoma masquerading as mitral stenosis; (4) mitral stenosis without apical murmurs, and (5) mitral stenosis with a systolic murmur predominant or alone. In cases of combined mitral and aortic stenosis, the history, radiographic configuration, and incidence of hemoptysis, edema, bronchitis, embolism and atrial fibrillation resemble such findings in cases of isolated mitral stenosis, but the auscultatory signs of the latter may be obscured. The degree of aortic stenosis is difficult to determine in cases of combined stenosis. In the diagnosis of re-stenosis the condition of the valve at the first commissurotomy, the precise procedure performed and the degree of regurgitation produced are of prime importance. Congenital mitral stenosis is rare and is associated with a high incidence of other defects. PMID:13936649

  20. [Diagnosis and differential therapy of mitral stenosis].

    PubMed

    Fassbender, D; Schmidt, H K; Seggewiss, H; Mannebach, H; Bogunovic, N

    1998-11-01

    Clinical symptoms and diagnostic findings in patients with mitral stenosis are usually determined by the extent of the stenosis. Compared to a normal mitral valve area (MVA) of > 4 cm2, MVA in patients with severe mitral stenosis is usually reduced to < 1.5 cm2. In older patients symptoms are frequently influenced by concomitant diseases (e.g. atrial fibrillation, arterial hypertension or lung disease). An important diagnostic element besides anamnesis, auscultation, ECG and chest X-ray is echocardiography, which is required in order to measure non-invasively and reliably the mitral valve gradient (MVG), the MVA and morphologic changes to the valves, as well as concomitant valvular disease, ventricular functions and, where appropriate, left-atrial thrombi. In addition to the surgical treatment of patients with severe mitral stenosis, which has been an established procedure for 50 years, percutaneous balloon mitral valvuloplasty (MVP) has recently established itself as an alternative option. At the current time, the Inoue technique seems to display the most advantages. Following transseptal puncture, the Inoue balloon is guided transvenously into the left atrium and then into the left ventricle using a special support wire. The balloon is short and soft. Its special unfolding character enables it to be placed securely in the mitral valve without any risk of ventricular perforation (Figure 1). As with surgical commissurotomy, balloon valvuloplasty leads to a separation of fused commissures. This results in a significant reduction of MVG, accompanied by an increase in the MVA (Figure 2). The results and success of MVP are influenced by the morphology of the valves and the changes to the subvalvular apparatus. In randomized studies, the results of surgical commissurotomy were comparable with those of balloon mitral valvulotomy. In our hospital, an increase in MVA from 1.0 to 1.8 cm2 could be achieved in 899 patients (mean age 56 +/- 3 years). In younger patients with

  1. Morphofunctional Abnormalities of Mitral Annulus and Arrhythmic Mitral Valve Prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Basso, Cristina; De Lazzari, Manuel; Rizzo, Stefania; Cipriani, Alberto; Giorgi, Benedetta; Lacognata, Carmelo; Rigato, Ilaria; Migliore, Federico; Pilichou, Kalliopi; Cacciavillani, Luisa; Bertaglia, Emanuele; Frigo, Anna Chiara; Bauce, Barbara; Corrado, Domenico; Thiene, Gaetano; Iliceto, Sabino

    2016-01-01

    Background— Arrhythmic mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is characterized by myxomatous leaflets and left ventricular (LV) fibrosis of papillary muscles and inferobasal wall. We searched for morphofunctional abnormalities of the mitral valve that could explain a regional mechanical myocardial stretch. Methods and Results— Thirty-six (27 female patients; median age: 44 years) arrhythmic MVP patients with LV late gadolinium enhancement on cardiac magnetic resonance and no or trivial mitral regurgitation, and 16 (6 female patients; median age: 40 years) MVP patients without LV late gadolinium enhancement were investigated by morphofunctional cardiac magnetic resonance. Mitral annulus disjunction (median: 4.8 versus 1.8 mm; P<0.001), end-systolic mitral annular diameters (median: 41.2 versus 31.5; P=0.004) and end-diastolic mitral annular diameters (median: 35.5 versus 31.5; P=0.042), prevalence of posterior systolic curling (34 [94%] versus 3 [19%]; P<0.001), and basal to mid LV wall thickness ratio >1.5 (22 [61%] versus 4 [25%]; P=0.016) were higher in MVP patients with late gadolinium enhancement than in those without. A linear correlation was found between mitral annulus disjunction and curling (R=0.85). A higher prevalence of auscultatory midsystolic click (26 [72%] versus 6 [38%]; P=0.018) was also noted. Histology of the mitral annulus showed a longer mitral annulus disjunction in 50 sudden death patients with MVP and LV fibrosis than in 20 patients without MVP (median: 3 versus 1.5 mm; P<0.001). Conclusions— Mitral annulus disjunction is a constant feature of arrhythmic MVP with LV fibrosis. The excessive mobility of the leaflets caused by posterior systolic curling accounts for a mechanical stretch of the inferobasal wall and papillary muscles, eventually leading to myocardial hypertrophy and scarring. These mitral annulus abnormalities, together with auscultatory midsystolic click, may identify MVP patients who would need arrhythmic risk stratification. PMID

  2. Morphofunctional Abnormalities of Mitral Annulus and Arrhythmic Mitral Valve Prolapse.

    PubMed

    Perazzolo Marra, Martina; Basso, Cristina; De Lazzari, Manuel; Rizzo, Stefania; Cipriani, Alberto; Giorgi, Benedetta; Lacognata, Carmelo; Rigato, Ilaria; Migliore, Federico; Pilichou, Kalliopi; Cacciavillani, Luisa; Bertaglia, Emanuele; Frigo, Anna Chiara; Bauce, Barbara; Corrado, Domenico; Thiene, Gaetano; Iliceto, Sabino

    2016-08-01

    Arrhythmic mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is characterized by myxomatous leaflets and left ventricular (LV) fibrosis of papillary muscles and inferobasal wall. We searched for morphofunctional abnormalities of the mitral valve that could explain a regional mechanical myocardial stretch. Thirty-six (27 female patients; median age: 44 years) arrhythmic MVP patients with LV late gadolinium enhancement on cardiac magnetic resonance and no or trivial mitral regurgitation, and 16 (6 female patients; median age: 40 years) MVP patients without LV late gadolinium enhancement were investigated by morphofunctional cardiac magnetic resonance. Mitral annulus disjunction (median: 4.8 versus 1.8 mm; P<0.001), end-systolic mitral annular diameters (median: 41.2 versus 31.5; P=0.004) and end-diastolic mitral annular diameters (median: 35.5 versus 31.5; P=0.042), prevalence of posterior systolic curling (34 [94%] versus 3 [19%]; P<0.001), and basal to mid LV wall thickness ratio >1.5 (22 [61%] versus 4 [25%]; P=0.016) were higher in MVP patients with late gadolinium enhancement than in those without. A linear correlation was found between mitral annulus disjunction and curling (R=0.85). A higher prevalence of auscultatory midsystolic click (26 [72%] versus 6 [38%]; P=0.018) was also noted. Histology of the mitral annulus showed a longer mitral annulus disjunction in 50 sudden death patients with MVP and LV fibrosis than in 20 patients without MVP (median: 3 versus 1.5 mm; P<0.001). Mitral annulus disjunction is a constant feature of arrhythmic MVP with LV fibrosis. The excessive mobility of the leaflets caused by posterior systolic curling accounts for a mechanical stretch of the inferobasal wall and papillary muscles, eventually leading to myocardial hypertrophy and scarring. These mitral annulus abnormalities, together with auscultatory midsystolic click, may identify MVP patients who would need arrhythmic risk stratification. © 2016 The Authors.

  3. Fluid-Structure Interactions of the Mitral Valve and Left Heart: Comprehensive Strategies, Past, Present and Future

    PubMed Central

    Einstein, Daniel R.; Del Pin, Facundo; Jiao, Xiangmin; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Carson, James P.; Kunzelman, Karyn S.; Cochran, Richard P.; Guccione, Julius M.; Ratcliffe, Mark B.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY The remodeling that occurs after a posterolateral myocardial infarction can alter mitral valve function by creating conformational abnormalities in the mitral annulus and in the posteromedial papillary muscle, leading to mitral regurgitation (MR). It is generally assumed that this remodeling is caused by a volume load and is mediated by an increase in diastolic wall stress. Thus, mitral regurgitation can be both the cause and effect of an abnormal cardiac stress environment. Computational modeling of ischemic MR and its surgical correction is attractive because it enables an examination of whether a given intervention addresses the correction of regurgitation (fluid-flow) at the cost of abnormal tissue stress. This is significant because the negative effects of an increased wall stress due to the intervention will only be evident over time. However, a meaningful fluid-structure interaction model of the left heart is not trivial; it requires a careful characterization of the in-vivo cardiac geometry, tissue parameterization though inverse analysis, a robust coupled solver that handles collapsing Lagrangian interfaces, automatic grid-generation algorithms that are capable of accurately discretizing the cardiac geometry, innovations in image analysis, competent and efficient constitutive models and an understanding of the spatial organization of tissue microstructure. In this manuscript, we profile our work toward a comprehensive fluid-structure interaction model of the left heart by reviewing our early work, presenting our current work and laying out our future work in four broad categories: data collection, geometry, fluid-structure interaction and validation. PMID:20454531

  4. Isolated Mitral Cleft in Trisomy 21: An Initially 'Silent' Lesion.

    PubMed

    Thankavel, Poonam P; Ramaciotti, Claudio

    2016-02-01

    Congenital cardiac anomalies are common in trisomy 21, and transthoracic echocardiogram within the first month of life is recommended. While a cleft mitral valve associated with atrioventricular septal defect has been well defined in this population, the prevalence of isolated mitral valve cleft has not been previously reported. The aim of our study was to define the occurrence of isolated mitral cleft in the first echocardiogram of patients with trisomy 21. This retrospective chart review examined echocardiographic data on all Trisomy 21 patients <1 year of age obtained during January 1, 2010, to May 1, 2014, at our institution. Images were reviewed by one of the authors with no knowledge of the official diagnosis. In addition to evaluation for isolated mitral valve cleft, data obtained included presence of additional congenital heart defects and need for surgical intervention. A total of 184 patients (median age 5 days) were identified. Isolated mitral cleft was identified in 12 patients (6.5 %). Four were diagnosed retrospectively (33 %). Only one had mitral regurgitation on initial echocardiogram. Seven required surgery for closure of ventricular septal defects. Isolated mitral cleft is present in an important number of neonates with Trisomy 21. Mitral regurgitation is often absent in the neonatal period and should not be used as a reliable indicator of absence of valve abnormality. Careful attention should be directed toward the mitral valve during the first echocardiogram to exclude an isolated cleft, which can lead to progressive mitral regurgitation.

  5. Challenging mitral valve repair for double-orifice mitral valve with noncompaction of left ventricular myocardium.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Manabu; Misumi, Hiroyasu; Abe, Kohei; Kawazoe, Kohei

    2017-02-25

    Double-orifice mitral valve (DOMV) is a relatively rare cardiac anomaly. Although usually associated with various cardiac anomalies, co-presence of DOMV and noncompaction of left ventricular myocardium (NCLVM) is extremely rare. Here, we present a 24-year-old male who underwent mitral valve repair using artificial chordae and annuloplasty at the posterior commissure for severe mitral regurgitation (MR), resulting from flail anterior leaflet of the larger postero-medial orifice and dilatation of left ventricle with NCLVM. One year later, he underwent second mitral valve repair for recurrence of MR. Further endoscopic evaluation of the left ventricle, and reinforcement via artificial ring, enabled us to achieve repair.

  6. Long-term importance of right ventricular outflow tract patch function in patients with pulmonary regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Puranik, Rajesh; Tsang, Victor; Lurz, Philip; Muthurangu, Vivek; Offen, Sophie; Frigiola, Alessandra; Norman, Wendy; Walker, Fiona; Bonhoeffer, Philip; Taylor, Andrew M

    2012-05-01

    Chronic pulmonary regurgitation (PR) has deleterious effects on right ventricular (RV) function in repaired tetralogy of Fallot (ToF). However, there are little data regarding right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) contractile dysfunction in response to chronic PR and on both RV and LV volumes and function. We retrospectively identified consecutive patients with PR who were referred for magnetic resonance imaging quantification of "free PR" detected on echocardiography between 2003 and 2008. Patients had ToF and a transannular patch procedure (n = 30, 25.1 ± 1.2 years) or PR resulting from valvar pulmonary stenosis treated with surgical or percutaneous valvotomy (n = 30, 26.6 ± 1.8 years). The ToF and the PS groups were well matched for age at scan, age at repair surgery in ToF or initial valvotomy in PS, duration of exposure to PR, body surface area, heart rate, PR fraction, net forward pulmonary artery flow, and main and branch pulmonary artery dimensions. Severe PR fractions were identified in both groups (ToF: 40% ± 1% vs PS: 37% ± 2%, P = .2). Indexed RV and LV end-diastolic volumes were similar for both ToF and PS groups (RV end-diastolic volume index: 137 ± 6 mL/m(2) vs 128 ± 5 mL/m(2), P = .2, and LV end-diastolic volume index: 72 ± 2 mL/m(2) vs 67 ± 2 mL/m(2), P = .1, respectively). RV mass was also similar between groups (95 ± 5 g vs 81 ± 6 g, respectively, P = .08). However, indexed RV and LV end-systolic volumes were consistently higher in ToF when compared with PS (RV end-systolic volume index: 70 ± 5 mL/m(2) vs 54 ± 3 mL/m(2), P < .01, and LV end-systolic volume index: 29 ± 1 mL/m(2) vs 22 ± 1 mL/m(2), P < .01, respectively). These changes were reflected in lower biventricular systolic function in patients with ToF when compared with PS (RV ejection fraction: 52% ± 1.5% vs 59% ± 1%, P < .001, and LV ejection fraction: 61% ± 1% vs 67 ± 1%, P < .001, respectively). Although RV transannular plane systolic excursion was not significantly

  7. Anatomical features of acute mitral valve repair dysfunction: Additional value of three-dimensional echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Derkx, Salomé; Nguyen, Virginia; Cimadevilla, Claire; Verdonk, Constance; Lepage, Laurent; Raffoul, Richard; Nataf, Patrick; Vahanian, Alec; Messika-Zeitoun, David

    2017-03-01

    Recurrence of mitral regurgitation after mitral valve repair is correlated with unfavourable left ventricular remodelling and poor outcome. This pictorial review describes the echocardiographic features of three types of acute mitral valve repair dysfunction, and the additional value of three-dimensional echocardiography.

  8. In Vitro System for Measuring Chordal Force Changes Following Mitral Valve Patch Repair

    PubMed Central

    Ostli, B; Vester-Petersen, J; Askov, JB; Honge, JL; Levine, RA; Hagège, A; Nielsen, SL; Hasenkam, JM; Nygaard, H; Jensen, MO

    2013-01-01

    Background Attention towards optimization of mitral valve repair methods is increasing. Patch augmentation is one strategy utilized to correct functional mitral regurgitation or systolic anterior motion in complex mitral valve repairs. This article describes a system for investigating the redistribution of chordae tendineae tension as a reflection of altered stress distribution of the valve leaflet following patch augmentation. Methods and materials An in vitro test setup was constructed to hold native porcine mitral valves containing an annulus and papillary muscle positioning system. The alterations caused by patch augmentation should be visual from both the atrial and ventricular views. Ventricular pressure was regulated stepwise in a range of 0-150 mmHg. To test the system, the anterior mitral leaflet was extended by a pericardial patch sutured to the mid/basal part of the leaflet, and the chordae tendineae force was measured as the ventricular pressure was applied. Results The system demonstrated the capacity to hold native porcine mitral valves and introducing patch repairs according to clinical practice. The porcine mitral valve test setup indicated strong correlation between the forces in the mitral valve secondary chordae tendineae and the applied transvalvular pressure (R2 = 0.95). Conclusion This test setup proved the ability to obtain normal mid-systolic mitral valve function, secondary chordae force measurements, and important preservation of the visual access: Hence, obtaining the pressure-force relationship as well as identifying any shift of the secondary chordae insertion point on the anterior leaflet relative to the coaptation zone was made possible. PMID:26273417

  9. Three-dimensional echocardiographic assessment of the repaired mitral valve.

    PubMed

    Maslow, Andrew; Mahmood, Feroze; Poppas, Athena; Singh, Arun

    2014-02-01

    This study examined the geometric changes of the mitral valve (MV) after repair using conventional and three-dimensional echocardiography. Prospective evaluation of consecutive patients undergoing mitral valve repair. Tertiary care university hospital. Fifty consecutive patients scheduled for elective repair of the mitral valve for regurgitant disease. Intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography. Assessments of valve area (MVA) were performed using two-dimensional planimetry (2D-Plan), pressure half-time (PHT), and three-dimensional planimetry (3D-Plan). In addition, the direction of ventricular inflow was assessed from the three-dimensional imaging. Good correlations (r = 0.83) and agreement (-0.08 +/- 0.43 cm(2)) were seen between the MVA measured with 3D-Plan and PHT, and were better than either compared to 2D-Plan. MVAs were smaller after repair of functional disease repaired with an annuloplasty ring. After repair, ventricular inflow was directed toward the lateral ventricular wall. Subgroup analysis showed that the change in inflow angle was not different after repair of functional disease (168 to 171 degrees) as compared to those presenting with degenerative disease (168 to 148 degrees; p<0.0001). Three-dimensional imaging provides caregivers with a unique ability to assess changes in valve function after mitral valve repair. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Mitral valve surgery in a patient with dextrocardia and 180° counter-clockwise rotated heart due to congenital agenesis of the right lung.

    PubMed

    Atsumi, Yosuke; Tokunaga, Shigehiko; Yasuda, Shota; Fushimi, Kenichi; Masuda, Munetaka

    2013-11-01

    We report a case of severe mitral regurgitation (MR) with dextrocardia and 180° counterclockwise rotated situs solitus heart. We describe the technique for mitral valve surgery in a patient with dextrocardia and agenesis of the right lung.

  11. Normal human mitral valve proteome: A preliminary investigation by gel-based and gel-free proteomic approaches.

    PubMed

    Brioschi, Maura; Baetta, Roberta; Ghilardi, Stefania; Gianazza, Erica; Guarino, Anna; Parolari, Alessandro; Polvani, Gianluca; Tremoli, Elena; Banfi, Cristina

    2016-10-01

    The mitral valve is a highly complex structure which regulates blood flow from the left atrium to the left ventricle (LV) avoiding a significant forward gradient during diastole or regurgitation during systole. The integrity of the mitral valve is also essential for the maintenance of normal LV size, geometry, and function. Significant advances in the comprehension of the biological, functional, and mechanical behavior of the mitral valve have recently been made. However, current knowledge of protein components in the normal human mitral valve is still limited and complicated by the low cellularity of this tissue and the presence of high abundant proteins from the extracellular matrix. We employed here an integrated proteomic approach to analyse the protein composition of the normal human mitral valve and reported confident identification of 422 proteins, some of which have not been previously described in this tissue. In particular, we described the ability of pre-MS separation technique based on liquid-phase IEF and SDS-PAGE to identify the largest number of proteins. We also demonstrated that some of these proteins, e.g. αB-Crystallin, septin-11, four-and-a-half LIM domains protein 1, and dermatopontin, are synthesised by interstitial cells isolated from human mitral valves. These initial results provide a valuable basis for future studies aimed at analysing in depth the mitral valve protein composition and at investigating potential pathogenetic molecular mechanisms. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD004397.

  12. Transcatheter mitral valve replacement with a novel self-expandable prosthesis: single institutional experience procedural outcomes and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Ussia, Gian Paolo; Cammalleri, Valeria; Mehta, Jawahar L; Sarkar, Kunal; Muscoli, Saverio; de Vico, Pasquale; Ruvolo, Giovanni; Romeo, Francesco

    2017-06-01

    We report our experience with the CardiAQ prosthetic valve using both transapical and transseptal access. Aim of our study was proving the feasibility, safety and effectiveness of a novel transcatheter mitral valve bioprosthesis. Four patients with severe mitral regurgitation, not eligible for mitral valve surgery, were treated with the CardiAQ valve. The procedures were performed under general anaesthesia, fluoroscopic and transesophageal echocardiographic guidance. We used a transapical approach in two patients and transseptal access in the others. Procedural success was obtained in all patients without extracorporeal circulation support. Mean procedure time was 128 min (range 90-180) and mean hospitalization duration was 12 days (range 4-24). The transseptal approach resulted in significantly shorter in-hospital stay with quick recovery. One patient died on day 35 from septicaemia and another one died after 5 months from major bleeding. The survival patients are presently in New York Heart Association I-II with improved left ventricular ejection fraction and normal quality of life. CardiAQ valve placement is safe using a transapical or transseptal approach. Following valve replacement, there was a marked functional improvement in survivors. Transcatheter mitral valve replacement is a promising therapy for mitral regurgitation in a selected patient population.

  13. [Experience of Mitral Valve Replacement Using a Pulmonary Autograft (Ross II Operation) in an Infant;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Kawahito, Tomohisa; Egawa, Yoshiyasu; Yoshida, Homare; Shimoe, Yasushi; Onishi, Tatsuya; Miyagi, Yuhichi; Terada, Kazuya; Ohta, Akira

    2015-07-01

    A 24-day-old boy suddenly developed progressive heart failure and was transported to our hospital. Echocardiography showed massive mitral regurgitation due to chordal rupture. Mitral valve repair was performed at 28 days of life, but postoperative valvular function was not satisfactory. A mechanical valve was implanted in the supra-annular position at 37 days of life. Two months after valve replacement, the mechanical valve was suddenly stuck. Emergent redo valve replacement was performed, but the prosthetic valve became stuck again 2 months after the 3rd operation, despite sufficient anti-coagulation therapy. At the 4th operation (6 months after birth), we implanted a pulmonary autograft in the mitral position instead of another mechanical valve in an emergent operation. The right ventricular outflow tract was reconstructed with a valved conduit. A postoperative catheter examination, which was performed 1 year after the Ross II operation, showed mild mitral stenosis with no regurgitation. Previous reports of Ross II operations in infants are rare and long-term results are unknown. However, we advocate that this procedure should be a rescue operation for mitral valve dysfunction in the early period of infants.

  14. De Vega annuloplasty for functional tricupsid regurgitation: concept of tricuspid valve orifice index to optimize tricuspid valve annular reduction.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ho Young; Chang, Hyoung Woo; Jeong, Dong Seop; Ahn, Hyuk

    2013-12-01

    We evaluated long-term results of De Vega annuloplasty measured by cylindrical sizers for functional tricuspid regurgitation (FTR) and analyzed the impact of measured annular size on the late recurrence of tricuspid valve regurgitation. Between 2001 and 2011, 177 patients (57.9±10.5 yr) underwent De Vega annuloplasty for FTR. Three cylindrical sizers (actual diameters of 29.5, 31.5, and 33.5 mm) were used to reproducibly reduce the tricuspid annulus. Long-term outcomes were evaluated and risk factor analyses for the recurrence of FTR ≥3+ were performed. Measured annular diameter indexed by patient's body surface area was included in the analyses as a possible risk factor. Operative mortality occurred in 8 patients (4.5%). Ten-year overall and cardiac death-free survivals were 80.5% and 90.8%, respectively. Five and 10-yr freedom rates from recurrent FTR were 96.5% and 93.1%, respectively. Cox proportional hazard model revealed that higher indexed annular size was the only risk factor for the recurrence of FTR (P=0.006). A minimal P value approach demonstrated that indexed annular diameter of 22.5 mm/m(2) was a cut-off value predicting the recurrence of FTR. De Vega annuloplasty for FTR results in low rates of recurrent FTR in the long-term. Tricuspid annulus should be reduced appropriately considering patients' body size to prevent recurrent FTR.

  15. An uncommon case of isolated parachute-like asymmetric mitral valve in an adult.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Yasuhide; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Fukuda, Yuko; Hirata, Ken-Ichi

    2014-09-01

    A 31-year-old asymptomatic male was referred to hospital for an examination of right bundle brunch block. Both, transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography revealed normal left ventricular function, and two different-sized papillary muscles; the anterolateral muscle was more pronounced, with almost major chordae tendineae inserted into this dominant muscle, whereas the immature, flat posteromedial papillary muscle had very short chordae tendineae and was located higher in the left ventricle, inserted directly into the mitral annulus. The mitral valve orifice was eccentrically located at the lateral side, but no significant mitral stenosis or regurgitation was observed. No other congenital heart anomalies were identified. Thus, the final diagnosis was isolated parachute-like asymmetric <